WorldWideScience

Sample records for botswana

  1. African Journals Online: Botswana

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Botswana Journal of Economics. The Botswana Journal of Economics is a professional journal established for the dissemination of contemporary economic issues–theoretical, methodological, and policy relevant–in the context of both the immediate environment and the wider international community. View Journal | Current ...

  2. Botswana Journal of Economics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Botswana Journal of Economics is a professional journal established for the dissemination of contemporary economic issues–theoretical, methodological, and policy relevant–in the context of both the immediate environment and the wider international community.

  3. Botswana country study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Peter [EECG Consultants, Gaborone (Botswana)

    1998-10-01

    The project analysed the baseline economic, energy development and greenhouse gas (GHG) scenarios, and abatement costing of plausible greenhouse gas mitigation options in the energy sector of Botswana. The analysis period for both the baseline and mitigation scenarios is up to 2030 with the short term stretching from 1994 to 2005 and the long term up to 2030. There is a relatively significant potential to reduce GHG emissions in the energy system of Botswana by applying a number of mitigation options. The potential in by applying a set of 21 mitigation options analysed in this study was found to be about 28.7% in 2005 and 26.1% in 2030. (EG)

  4. Botswana Journal of Technology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Botswana Journal of Technology describes original developments or research in the field of Engineering and Technology. It is published twice a year. Vol 22, No 1 (2013). DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Subscription or Fee Access. Table of Contents. Articles. Urbanisation, infrastructure ...

  5. IDRC in Botswana

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    the traditional method of dehulling grains by manually pounding them in a wooden mortar and pestle. They adapted a machine for dehulling sorghum that caught the imagination of villagers. Ultimately, 21 small-scale milling systems were established throughout the country, incorporating 36 built-in-. Botswana dehullers.

  6. The Determinants of Inflation in Botswana and Bank of Botswana's ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The main conclusions of the study are: (a) price inertia, real GDP, money supply and South African prices play a dominant role in determining inflation in Botswana; and (b) unless international deflationary environment prevails, the probability that the Bank of Botswana will achieve its medium-term objective range of 3 to 6 ...

  7. Short Communication The Botswana Collection : An Evaluative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted to investigate the awareness and usage of the Botswana Collection by the students of the University of Botswana. A questionnaire survey was utilised for data collection from the students in all the five faculties of the University of Botswana. The study showed that the awareness of the Botswana ...

  8. Tinea capitis in Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thakur R

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Rameshwari ThakurDepartment of Microbiology, Muzaffarnagar Medical College, Muzaffarnagar, IndiaBackground: Tinea capitis (TC is a common dermatophyte infection of the scalp that can also involve the eyebrows and eyelashes.Aim: This study aimed to find the causative fungus responsible for TC in Botswana and determine its association with the clinical types of TC.Methods: Samples for potassium hydroxide 10% mounts and fungal cultures were collected in a microbiology laboratory at the National Health Laboratory, Gaborone, Botswana. Dermasel agar and Sabouraud dextrose agar were inoculated with the samples. Lactophenol cotton blue mounts were prepared from the culture-positive samples to study the morphological characteristics.Results: Trichophyton violaceum was found to be the predominant causative organism of TC. Trichophyton tonsurans was isolated from one patient. Both are anthropophilic species.Conclusion: TC was found to be most common in those aged 1–15 years (81%. Of 17 patients in this age group, 16 were younger than 10 years old and one was 14 years old. T. violaceum was the most common dermatophyte species isolated.Keywords: Trichophyton violaceum, Trichophyton violaceum white variant, Trichophyton tonsurans, dermatophyte

  9. Urban agriculture in Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aloysius Clemence Mosha

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Botswana, a middle-income country, is experiencing a sluggish economic growth and a rapid urbanisation which has brought in its wake high unemployment, poverty and food insecurity. This has led some people to engage in subsistence and commercial urban and peri-urban agriculture (UPA to address these problems. However, in spite of its known advantages, uptake of UPA has been low for a number of reasons including: high GDP before the economic meltdown of recent years; a harsh climate; lack of water; poor access to land; and over-reliance on generous government handouts. Nevertheless, the extent of its practice and its contribution to food security – albeit modest – shows that it is a sector that needs to be encouraged and supported. Both central and local government can play a big role by providing land and infrastructure, and also by implementing an enabling policy and regulatory environment which promotes small- and medium-scale urban food production.

  10. Botswana country study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1999-09-01

    This study was carried out in Botswana, Tanzania and Zambia as part of the project `Climate Change Mitigation in Southern Africa` funded by the Danish International Development Agency (Danida). The project was conducted parallel to the UNEP/GEF project `Economics of Greenhouse Gas Limitations` which involved 8 other developing countries and 2 regional projects in Latin America and the SADC region. The limitation of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions is a complex issue, intimately connected with economic development at local, national, regional and global levels. Key economic sectors such as energy, agriculture, industry and forestry all produce GHGs, and are likely to be affected directly and indirectly by any mitigation policy. The UNEP Greenhouse Gas Abatement Costing Studies, initiated in 1991, attempted to address these complex issues, developing a methodological framework and testing it through practical application in ten countries. (EHS) 28 refs.

  11. MISR Images Northeastern Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    MISR images of the Ntwetwe and Sua Pans in northeastern Botswana, acquired on August 18, 2000 (Terra orbit 3553). The left image is a color view from the vertical-viewing (nadir) camera. On the right is a composite of red band imagery in which the 45-degree aft camera data are displayed in blue, 45-degree forward as green, and vertical as red. This combination causes wet areas to appear blue because of the glint-like reflection from water and damp surfaces. Clouds are visible in the upper left corner and right center of each image. The clouds look peculiar in the multi-angle view because geometric parallax resulting from their elevation above the surface causes a misregistration of the individual images making up the composite. This stereoscopic effect provides a way of distinguishing clouds from bright surfaces.The images are approximately 250 kilometers across. Ntwetwe and Sua pans are closed interior basins that catch rainwater and surface runoff during the wet season. Seasonal lakes form that may reach several meters in depth. During the dry season the collected waters rapidly evaporate leaving behind dissolved salts that coat the surface and turn it bright ('sua' means salt). The mining town of Sowa is located where the Sua Spit (a finger of grassland extending into the pan) attaches to the shore. Sowa represents headquarters for a JPL contingent carrying out MISR field experiments using the evaporite surface and the grasslands as targets and for Botswana scientists studying migration of groundwaters beneath the pans and surrounding areas. These efforts support the Southern Africa Regional Science Initiative (SAFARI-2000), which is now underway.MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.For more information: http://www-misr.jpl.nasa.gov

  12. The sheep industry in Botswana: promoting the

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Technical Notes. The sheep industry in Botswana: promoting the. Karakul sheep industry. S.J. Nsoso' and M.J. Madimabe. Botswana College of Agriculture, Private Bag 0027, Gaborone, Botswana. Received revised 25 October 1999; accepted 25 October I999. *To whom correspondence should be addressed at: Tel: 00267 ...

  13. Newspaper preservation at Botswana's legal repositories ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This has unfortunately limited our understanding of how records managers and archivists preserve newspapers in transitioning country contexts. The study reported here investigated the preservation of newspapers in Botswana's three national repositories: Botswana National Archives and Records Services, Botswana ...

  14. Makgadikgadi Salt Pan, Botswana, Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The Makgadikgadi Salt Pan of Botswana, an ancient lake bed, (19.0S, 26.0E) is one of the largest features in Botswana visible from orbit. Any water that spills out of the Okavango Swamplands flows into the Makagadikgadi where it evaporates. An ancient beach line can be seen as a smooth line around the west side of the pan and to the south, the Orapa diamond mine is seen as a small rectangle. Far to the east, can be seen the Great Dike of Zimbabwe.

  15. Poverty reduction through alternative livelihoods in Botswana\\'s ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    According to the study, there are several livelihood options available in the desert margins of Botswana, but communities fail to exploit these due to a number of constraints such as poor access to financial credit, lack of awareness of potential income earners such as eco-tourism, insufficient knowledge and technical ...

  16. Botswana: A Note on Economic Diversification | Sekwati | Botswana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Despite a series of supportive policies over the years, economic diversification remains an obscurity for Botswana. The economy remains heavily dependent on diamond mining, while the private sector, considered pivotal in the strategy for diversification, continues to be shallow and narrow, with weak inter sectoral diversity ...

  17. Self hardening property of Botswana fly ash | Sahu | Botswana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the present investigation, an effort has been made to study the self hardening property of Botswana fly ash by testing penetration resistance of fly ash flowable fills and unconfined compressive strength of 3 soils mixed with fly ash and compacted to their optimum unit weight. It has been found that the strength of both ...

  18. 210PO concentration in soil samples of Botswana | Murty | Botswana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Botswana's economy mainly depends on diamonds, which involves huge mining activity which in turn involves excavating huge amounts of soil. It is well known that soils do possess radioactivity. Due to this, it is important to assess the activity levels of radionuclides. This paper deals with the distribution and enrichment of ...

  19. Energy overview of Botswana: generation and consumption

    OpenAIRE

    Ofetotse, E. L.; Essah, Emmanuel A.

    2012-01-01

    Botswana has a basic need to explore its energy concept, this being its energy sources, generation and percentage of the population with access to electricity. At present, Botswana generates electricity from coal, which supplies about 29% (on average) of the country’s demand. The other 71% is imported mainly from South Africa (Eskom). Consequently, the dependence of Botswana on imports posses threats to the security of its energy supply. As a result, there is the need to understand the bases ...

  20. Air quality management in Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Modupe O. Akinola

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines air pollution situation and the history of air quality management in Botswana. The current air quality management in Botswana is still largely underpinned by the Atmospheric Pollution Prevention Act of 1971, supplemented by the more recently enacted legislations such as the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA Act of 2010 and the Ambient Air Quality - Limits for Common Pollutants of 2012 published by the Botswana Bureau of Standards. Though commendable efforts have been made toward legislating against air and other forms of pollution, these have not yielded expected results in view of the prevailing levels of air pollutants like sulphur dioxide and fine particulate matters in the country’s atmospheric environment. Legislation as a sole measure may not be effective in tackling this challenge. Rather, government should also address some root-causes of the problem by making policies and programmes that will reduce unemployment and increase the earning capacity of citizenry. This will, among other things, effectively check poverty-induced biomass burning in the country. The paper looks at some other challenges of air pollution management and suggestions are made to tackle the identified problems.

  1. Botswana: A Note on Economic Diversification

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the decline in real value added by the mining industry (Republic of Botswana 2010). ... strategy, provided the initial impetus for industrial development in Botswana. ..... 4.0. Renewed Impetus towards Economic Diversification. In recent times, there seems to be renewed excitement and vigour on the part of government with.

  2. Decentralization in Botswana: the reluctant process | Dipholo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Botswana\\'s decentralization process has always been justified in terms of democracy and development. Consequently, the government has always argued that it is fully committed to decentralization in order to promote popular participation as well as facilitating sustainable rural development. Yet the government does not ...

  3. Participatory development planning in Botswana: Exploring the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The article examines the utilisation of spaces for participation in the development planning processes in Botswana. It has often been argued that, contrary to the widespread espousal to participatory planning, Botswana's planning system remains non-participatory. What is perceived as a highly centralised planning system ...

  4. CREDIT RATIONING AND SME DEVELOPMENT IN BOTSWANA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    None

    including financial record keeping) if they are to be ... In Botswana small enterprises are defined as those entities employing less than 25 employees and .... and high interest rates which is not conducive for long-term enterprise development (Okurut.

  5. Botswana Journal of Technology - Vol 18, No 2 (2009)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Botswana Journal of Technology. ... Framework for readiness assessment of 3G Mobile Telecommunication Network in Botswana · EMAIL ... Application of data mining techniques in healthcare database · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT

  6. Reproductive Health and the Question of Abortion in Botswana: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    The complications of unsafe, illegal abortions are a significant cause of ... of abortion in urban Botswana in order to understand the social and cultural obstacles ... This article constitutes a review of the abortion issue in Botswana based on my.

  7. Modeling the international competitiveness of Botswana's coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichani, Khaulani

    Botswana has vast proven deposits of steam coal, which for a long time it has wanted to develop but without much success. The main objectives of this study are: (1) to analyze the time schedule of coal exports likely to be forthcoming from Botswana and the land routes for these exports; (2) to determine the competitiveness of Botswana's coal in the world steam coal markets and (3) to make recommendations on the appropriate policy for the exploitation of this coal. To accomplish these objectives, we construct a model of the seaborne steam coal trade consisting of exporters and importers with a substantial share in this trade. We econometrically estimate the long run marginal cost functions for net exporters and employ these to construct a spatial and dynamic model of the world steam coal trade with elastic supply and inelastic demand. This model is applied to simulate Botswana's competitiveness in this trade over the period 1995 to 2010 from a 1990 base year with a decision criterion that minimizes the sum of discounted capital costs of mine development, variable supply costs, rail and maritime transportation costs. Finally, we employ the model to forecast the likely optimal size of mine, timing of production capacity and choice of export port for Botswana's coal for the years 2005 and 2010. The base year for the forecast is 2000. The simulation results indicate that Botswana's coal would have been competitive in the steam coal markets of Western Europe and Asia. The forecast results indicate that Botswana's coal would also be competitive in these markets in the future. These results are least sensitive to changes in rail transportation and variable supply costs but are sensitive to capital costs for mine development.

  8. Hospital social work practice in Botswana: Yesterday, today and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... work practice in hospital settings in Botswana, and suggests ways of improving the practice environment to enhance the quality of service. KEYWORDS: Social work practice, Botswana, secondary setting, hospital, teamwork, challenges Social work practice, Botswana, secondary setting, hospital, teamwork, challenges ...

  9. Diamonds are not forever : Botswana medium-term fiscal sustainability

    OpenAIRE

    Kojo, Naoko C.

    2010-01-01

    This paper analyzes Botswana's medium-term fiscal sustainability in view of the expected depletion of diamonds in the future. The analysis shows that in the absence of policy adjustments, Botswana's current fiscal policy strategy is unsustainable over the longer term, which could endanger macroeconomic stability and Botswana's reputation as Africa's success story. Ensuring medium-term sust...

  10. The Role of Remittances from Migration in Botswana

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sulaiman.adebowale

    This study examines internal labour migration of Botswana citizens and their remittance behaviour. Though ... of poverty and remittances within the framework of international migration. In Botswana, where emigration ..... policy that was designed to improve the state of wellness of the population. (Botswana 1991). Electricity ...

  11. Republic of Botswana. Country profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarver, J

    1985-08-01

    A summary of Botswana's population characteristics, population distribution, labor force characteristics, health situation, and transportation and communication facilities is provided. 87% of the country's 941,027 inhabitants live in the catchment area of the Limpopo River in the eastern region of the country. Much of the remaining area is covered by the Kalahari Desert. The population is growing at an annual rate of 3.6%, the birth rate is 50 and the total fertility rate is 6.6. The government has no official population policy. Major ethnic groups are the cattle raising Tswanas, which make up 50% of the population, the Herero, and the Basarwa, or Bushmen, of the Kalahri Desert. Urban areas are officially defined as population centers which contain 5000 or more residents and in which at least 75% of the inhabitants are engaged in nonagricultural work. According to this classification, 84% of the population is rural; however, most rural inhabitants live in agrotowns and temporarily move to outlying cattle and land posts during part of the year. Some of the agrotowns have almost 25,000 inhabitants. Major urban centers include 1) Gaborone, the capital and major administrative center, with a popualtion of 59,657; 2) Francistown, a large commercial center, with a population of 31,065; 3) Selebi-Phikwe, a mining center, populated by 29,469; and 4) Lobatse, a livestock marketing and processing center, with 19,034 residents. The urban population increased from 54,416 to 150,021 between 1971-81. The population has a young age structure. A large number of working aged males migrate temporarily to the Republic of South Africa to work in the gold mines. 37% of the economically active population is engaged in government services, 26% in mining, manufacturing, and construction, 21% in trade and finance, 6% in transportation, utilities, and communication, and 4.5% in agriculture. Only 1.3% of the land is cultivatable. The working age population is expected to double by the end of

  12. Botswana: A Note on Economic Diversification

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Despite a series of supportive policies over the years, economic diversification remains an obscurity for Botswana. The economy remains heavily dependent on diamond mining, while the private sector, considered pivotal in the strategy for diversification, continues to be shallow and narrow, with weak inter sectoral ...

  13. Harnessing research to protect Botswana's wildlife | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Wildlife of all kinds freely cross the borders of Angola, Botswana, Namibia, Zambia, and Zimbabwe, but is the research data needed to protect them as mobile? Monica Morrison, a PhD candidate at Stellenbosch University and a 2014 Research Award recipient, sought to find out if the extensive research on this vital ...

  14. Language Identity and Multicultural Diversity in Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boikhutso, Keene; Jotia, Agreement Lathi

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the common wisdom that sees Botswana as inherently ethnically homogenous. It used the existing Afrobarometer survey data drawn from Round 1 (1999), Round 2 (2003), Round 3 (2005) and Round 4 (2008). The findings of this study revealed that when using language spoken mostly at home, common wisdom is confirmed. However, it is…

  15. Critiquing Botswana's National Ecotourism Strategy through a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Using a gender lens,1 this article textually critiques Botswana's national ecotourism strategy and finds that, while the document mentions matters of gender, this is done superficially and as such is in need of revision. This type of oversight is symptomatic of how broader ecotourism policies and academia on tourism tend to ...

  16. Communicative Language Teaching (CLT) in Botswana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper reports on the first phase of a research project that focused on understanding the perceptions of teachers regarding the implementation of CLT in the English Second Language (ESL) classrooms in Botswana's Junior Secondary Schools (JSSs). CLT has been the dominant English language teaching paradigm in ...

  17. Marketing Sports Facilities: Perspectives from Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohutsana, Basuti; Akpata, Dele

    2013-01-01

    The provision of sports facilities contributes immensely to the growth of sports and leisure activities in the countries where they are provided. In some countries, as was the case in Botswana, the government had to spend millions of dollars to provide new Integrated Sports Facilities (ISF's) as a panacea for the continued poor performance of its…

  18. Supervisors' and subordinates' perception of the Impact of Botswana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was a descriptive survey, which ascertained supervisors and subordinates perception of the impact of Botswana College of Agriculture training programme on graduates' job behaviour. The study was carried out in the Ministry of Agriculture, Gaborone, Botswana, which is composed of six departments. All BCA ...

  19. Reproductive Health and the Question of Abortion in Botswana: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    Smith. Abortion in Botswana. African Journal of Reproductive Health December 2013; 17(4):26. REVIEW ARTICLE. Reproductive Health and the Question of Abortion in ..... 2009;35:114-121. 31. UN. Botswana: Abortion Policy. [2011 Nov 19] Available from www.un.org/. 32. Benson J. Evaluating abortion-care programs: Old.

  20. Determinants of Commercial banks' interest rate spreads in Botswana

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The significance of GDP, inflation and bank concentration variables show the importance of maintaining stable macroeconomic factors. Keywords: Botswana; Banks; Interest rate Spreads. JEL code: G21; E43. * Corresponding author, ntsosamm@mopipi.ub.bw . Department of Economics, University of Botswana, Private Bag.

  1. Reproductive Health and the Question of Abortion in Botswana: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reproductive Health and the Question of Abortion in Botswana: A Review. Stephanie S Smith. Abstract. The complications of unsafe, illegal abortions are a significant cause of maternal mortality in Botswana. The stigma attached to abortion leads some women to seek clandestine procedures, or alternatively, to carry the ...

  2. Constructions of Traditional Womanhood in Botswana Myths and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article sets up a genealogy of the image that begins with oral narratives and continues through portrayals of actual women. It examines misogynistic and stereotypical depictions of women in the Botswana collective cultural imaginary and in transnational forms of representation. Key terms: Botswana popular culture, ...

  3. Assessing Botswana's Textiles Export Trade Potential Using the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Through the application of the gravity trade model technique, the study investigates countries for which Botswana has unrealized export trade potential in textile products. The estimated results indicate that Canada, Denmark, Finland, Ghana, Mozambique and Switzerland are the export destinations to which Botswana ...

  4. The level of recycling operations in Botswana | Ketlogetswe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper describes a case study that evaluated the level of recycling operations in Botswana. Recycling operations are now recommended as effective waste management strategies for reducing the amount of municipal solid waste disposed at landfill sites. In assessing the level of recycling operations in Botswana, two ...

  5. Teacher appraisal in Botswana secondary schools: a critical analysis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Teacher appraisal in Botswana secondary schools: a critical analysis. ... It emerged that many teachers viewed the current teacher appraisal system in Botswana as demoralising, even threatening. Our study confirmed the thesis that ... There is hardly a country in the world where teacher appraisal is not a contentious issue.

  6. An Analysis of the Stability of Monetary Aggragates in Botswana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... the fact that M3 is made up of Bank of Botswana Certificates among others.It seems reasonable to assume that M3 would be a better target than M2. A potential area for further research may be to assess whether using either of these monetary aggregates to anchor policy would actually work for Botswana, given also the ...

  7. within the Selebi Phikwe Ni-Cu mine area, Botswana

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RESEARCH ARTICLES. The occurrences of chest pains and frequent coughing among residents living within the Selebi Phikwe Ni-Cu mine area, Botswana. Georges Ekosse', Linda de Jager2 and Dawid J. van den I—Ieever3. 1. X~Ray Diffraction Unit, Faculty of Science, University of Botswana, P/Bag 0022 Gaborone,.

  8. Library and information science research in Botswana: An analysis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper analysed library and information science research in Botswana that has been published since 1979, when the library school at the University of Botswana was established. The period considered is from 1980 to 2006, a period of 27 years. The paper linked research and publication trends with the historical, social ...

  9. Botswana: An Example of Prudent Economic Policy and Growth

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2000-01-01

    Botswana is one of a small group of countries in the contemporary era, virtually the only African country that has sustained rapid economic growth over an extended period. Over the past three decades, Botswana's real per capita income grew by more than 7 percent per annum, which is comparable to rates of growth achieved by countries like Korea and Thailand. Remarkably, this growth, facilit...

  10. Economic Growth and Poverty Reduction in Botswana - Lessons for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article critically examines various dimensions of poverty reduction in. Botswana relative to SADC members. It has been argued that macro-economic, fi nancial and political stability; peace and security; accountable democratic governance and judicious use of mining resources have contributed positively to Botswana's ...

  11. Determinants of Condom use in Botswana: An empirical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SIPHAMBE, H.K. (PROF.)

    The increase in infection rates amongst women, is also prevalent in Botswana in which more women ... Gender inequality is considered a major factor in the spread of HIV in Botswana. For every boy under 14 .... promiscuity is associated with men, in Mozambique, the migration of husbands to mines particularly in South ...

  12. Monitoring and Evaluating Government Performance in Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. K. Botlhale

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In an era characterised by fiscal stress in the post-global recession era, clichés such as ‘bang for the buck’ are commonplace. Governments are under increasing pressure to spend limited public resources in efficient and  effective ways. Efficient and  effective governments are a necessary, though not sufficient, condition for economic development. Hence, governments have adopted performance-improving interventions such as New Public Management. Botswana jumped into the bandwagon of public sector reforms in the 1990s through interventions such as Performance-based Management Systems. The focus was almost entirely on performance enhancement to the neglect of performance measurement through a result-based Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E framework. However, in 2009, the government decided to mainstream M&E into the development planning regime. Since the M&E tool is still in draft form, Botswana is very favourably circumstanced to learn from others. Meanwhile essentials to do are: attitudinal change, shared vision on M&E, stakeholder management and demand and use of M&E information by policy-makers such as Members of Parliament.

  13. SAFARI 2000 PAR Measurements, Kalahari Transect, Botswana, Wet Season 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: Ceptometer data from a Decagon AccuPAR (Model PAR-80) were collected at four sites in Botswana during the SAFARI 2000 Kalahari Transect Wet Season Campaign...

  14. SAFARI 2000 PAR Measurements, Kalahari Transect, Botswana, Wet Season 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Ceptometer data from a Decagon AccuPAR (Model PAR-80) were collected at four sites in Botswana during the SAFARI 2000 Kalahari Transect Wet Season Campaign (March,...

  15. Mentor development in higher education in Botswana: How ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    VET) in Botswana is explored in this article. Changes in education policy require mentors to engage in individual as well as organisational change and transformation. Most studies focus on mentee development and the resulting organisational ...

  16. Localisation, Ghanaian Pentecostalism and the stranger's beauty in Botswana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, van R.A.

    2003-01-01

    This contribution considers the current position of the Ghanaian migrant community in Botswana's capital, Gaborone, at a time of rising xenophobic sentiments and increasing ethnic tensions among the general public. The article examines anthropological understandings of such sentiments by placing

  17. Everyday burden of musculoskeletal conditions among villagers in rural Botswana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hondras, Maria; Hartvigsen, Jan; Myburgh, Corrie

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the perspectives of villagers in rural Botswana about the everyday life burden and impact of their musculoskeletal disorders. METHODS: Ethnographic fieldwork for 8 months included 55 in-depth interviews with 34 villagers. Interviews were typically conducted in Setswana with ...... country settings. Community-engaged partnerships are needed to develop rehabilitation programmes to ease the burden of musculoskeletal disorders in rural Botswana....

  18. Core economic issues in the horticulture sector of Botswana

    OpenAIRE

    Moepeng, Pelotshweu

    2013-01-01

    Poverty and unemployment in Botswana are the major problems that the government is focusing its effort and attention on. The overall government aim is to eradicate poverty and diversify the economy away from diamond mining to create sustainable jobs. Agriculture is traditionally thought to be a primary sector that can help the country’s disadvantaged community to escape from poverty and problems of unemployment. However, Botswana has experienced falling agricultural productivity and a fall in...

  19. Economic accounting of water: The Botswana experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setlhogile, T.; Arntzen, J.; Pule, O. B.

    2017-08-01

    Water accounts aim to capture the value of water resources and their use within the economy. The accounts complement the National Accounts as the latter's main indicator (GDP) does not reflect changes in natural capital. Botswana developed water accounts for the period 2010/11-2014/15 using the UN's standard System of Environmental Economic Accounting for water (SEEA-water). The article focuses both on the construction of physical flow accounts as well as on the policy implications for development planning and water resource management through the use of policy indicators. It also shows long-term trends in water abstraction and water use efficiency linking the SEEA water accounts with results of earlier (non-SEEA) water accounting projects in Botswana. The water accounts results show that water abstraction and consumption have been largely stable since 2010/11 despite population (1.9% p.a.) and economic growth (around 5% p.a.) likely due to a combination of water sector reforms and drought conditions in south eastern Botswana; the latter led to the drying up of several dams and the imposition of severe water restrictions. While public attention focuses mostly on water service providers, self-providers (mines and the agricultural sector) account for more than 50% of total water abstracted from the environment of water, demonstrating the need to pay more attention to self-providers in IWRM implementation. Water consumption is highest for the agricultural sector (70.2 Mm3) followed by households and mines at 41.2 and 39 Mm3 respectively in 2014/15. In terms of water use efficiency, value added per m3 has increased in time, showing (some) decoupling of water consumption and economic growth. This positive trend needs to be enhanced in the pursuit of economic diversification, which should focus on growth of water-efficient economic sectors. Finally, per capita water consumption has decreased over time; while this may indicate that people conserve water, it may also point

  20. Record management practices in labour organisations in Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trywell Kalusopa

    2012-06-01

    Objective: The main objective of the study was to examine records management practices in labour organisations in Botswana. Methods: A quantitative paradigm largely guided this study. The researchers used a survey research strategy. Methodological triangulation of both quantitative and qualitative data collection methods complemented the strategy. The researchers surveyed all of the 50 registered labour organisations in Botswana. Of these, 45 responded. This is a response rate of 90%. The researchers obtained their data through structured questionnaires, semi-structured interviews, document reviews and observations. Results: The study showed that labour organisations in Botswana had some form of records management function. However, the management of both paper-based and electronic records was not satisfactory and fell short of the best-recognised records management standards and practices. Conclusion: Although the researchers limited the study to labour organisations, it sheds light on the challenges of managing records that most organisations in Botswana face. Its results provide useful strategic recommendations to promote effective records management in labour organisations in Botswana and elsewhere in Africa.

  1. Strategies for knowledge management in law firms in Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.C. Fombad

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available This article formulates a route map on how law firms in Botswana may utilise knowledge management to enhance their competitive edge amidst the changing legal environment. It draws from the multiple definitions and perspectives of knowledge management, several frameworks and models together with the empirical findings to recommend a strategy for knowledge management in law firms in Botswana. It underscores the fact that knowledge management is becoming an imperative for the survival of law firms as knowledge intensive organisations. Law firms in Botswana can no longer afford to rely on the traditional methods of managing knowledge because there is a need for the 'best minds' and the best knowledge in their area of practice. It is recommended that lawyers should be proactive, adaptive, innovative, effective and competitive in the provision of outstanding, cost-efficient and effective services to clients. Most previous studies in this area have been carried out in developed countries with large law firms.

  2. A Survey of Knowledge Management in Law Firms in Botswana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article provides an empirical assessment of knowledge management in law firms in Botswana. It employs survey research methodology and triangulation of qualitative and quantitative methods of data collection. Data were collected mainly through a questionnaire administered to the 217 lawyers in all the law firms ...

  3. Micro Language Planning and Cultural Renaissance in Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimi, Modupe M.

    2016-01-01

    Many African countries exhibit complex patterns of language use because of linguistic pluralism. The situation is often compounded by the presence of at least one foreign language that is either the official or second language. The language situation in Botswana depicts this complex pattern. Out of the 26 languages spoken in the country, including…

  4. Financing poverty programmes in Botswana under fiscal uncertainty ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Botswana has achieved an impressive developmental record since independence in 1966 and it belongs to a category of medium human development countries. Despite this achievement, it is faced with development challenges such as poverty. The state provides a policy response in the form of poverty programmes and ...

  5. Strategies for Naming Tourist Sites in Botswana | Kari | Marang ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper aims at establishing and discussing the strategies for naming tourist sites in the languages of Botswana using a descriptive approach. In addition, the paper attempts a classification of these tourist sites in respect of personalities or objects after which these sites are named. The data for this paper are largely ...

  6. Reducing HIV Risk in Botswana: A National Cluster Randomized ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Building on results This project builds on previous research in Botswana which showed how interventions focused on the structural causes of HIV, such as ... Sub-Saharan Africa continues to deal with high morbidity and mortality rates related to health inequalities and diseases such as malaria, tuberculosis, and HIV/AIDS.

  7. Internalising the Externalities of Public Transport in Botswana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, the externalities generated by public transport and the economics of road pricing are analysed. A case study of Botswana shows the imbalance between the supply and demand for road space as the underlying cause of traffic congestion. Empirically, the determinants of private motor vehicle ownership in ...

  8. Internalising the Externalities of Public Transport in Botswana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-10-07

    Oct 7, 2008 ... Abstract. In this paper, the externalities generated by public transport and the economics of road pricing are analysed. A case study of Botswana shows the imbalance between the supply and demand for road space as the underlying cause of traffic congestion. Empirically, the determinants of private motor ...

  9. Democracy and the eductation system of Botswana: Towards ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The importance of languages in education and in the other important sectors of human interaction and development does not seem to have been an issue in the definition and practice of democracy in Botswana. Although the country claims to be democratic and hosts over twenty five ethnic languages, it does not see the ...

  10. Nurses' perceptions about Botswana patients' anti-retroviral therapy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anti-retroviral drugs(ARVs) are supplied free of charge in Botswana. Lifelong adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is vital to improve the patient's state of well-being ... weerstand bied teen anti-retrovirale behandeling (ARB). Persone met ARB-weerstandbiedende MIV stamme kan dit versprei na ander mense toe, wat ...

  11. Eradicating Poverty and Promoting Dignity in Botswana through ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Poverty in post-Independence Botswana remains a significant problem for many people today as it inhibits human dignity. Eradicating it is equally a serious challenge. The difficulty with fighting poverty is that oppressive issues such as landlessness, gender/ethnic disparity and HIV and AIDS continue to make its eradication ...

  12. Promoting Industrialisation in Mauritius, South Africa and Botswana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    selected not because they have achieved the ultimate goal of industrialisation, but rather because they have taken ... Moyo: Promoting Industrialisation in Mauritius, South Africa and Botswana primary commodity .... relevant and useful knowledge and technologies was an important factor for success. This example aptly ...

  13. Some insights into statutory lawmaking in Botswana | Fombad ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines the law-making process in Botswana, one of Africa's best examples of vibrant parliamentary democracy. Although the whole process is modelled on the British Westminster system, it has, however, been shaped and influenced by some local realities. An example of this is the existence of a House of ...

  14. The Challenges Procuring of Safe Abortion Care in Botswana

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    Botswana's national healthcare system has experienced substantial investment as a result of a growing economy and stable government, and improvements in quality and access are notable. Despite these advances, women's reproductive health continues to suffer as a result of unsafe abortion. The personal, financial, and ...

  15. The Challenges Procuring of Safe Abortion Care in Botswana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Botswana's national healthcare system has experienced substantial investment as a result of a growing economy and stable government, and improvements in quality and access are notable. Despite these advances, women's reproductive health continues to suffer as a result of unsafe abortion. The personal, financial, and ...

  16. Problems Faced by Court Interpreters in Botswana | Miyanda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Court interpreting is a rather complex task. Inaccuracies in legal interpreting or translation can have serious consequences. Using oral interviews and a written questionnaire, this study set out to establish the problems faced by court interpreters in Botswana in the course of their duties, the kind of training offered to court ...

  17. Preservation Risk Assessment Survey of the University of Botswana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of Botswana Library Conservator was tasked with the responsibility to conduct a preservation risk assessment in order to address deterioration issues of collections in the university library. This article sought to report the findings on the preservation risk assessment and recommendations on the strategy for improvement.

  18. Agriculture–Tourism Linkages in Botswana: Evidence from the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article examines the linkages between the tourism and agriculture sectors in Botswana using evidence gathered from the country's growing safari lodge accommodation sector. The findings reveal limited local linkages between agriculture and tourism, and instead the existence of high levels of food imports from ...

  19. Barriers to Clinical Supervision Practices in Botswana Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moswela, Bernard; Mphale, Luke Moloko

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate possible barriers to the effective implementation of clinical supervision in Botswana primary schools, junior and senior secondary schools. Since the study sought views, experiences and observations of respondents, it adopted a qualitative approach to data collection. Teacher practitioners on study leave at…

  20. The Timeliness of the Botswana Parastatal Annual Reports: 1994 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It also embarked on establishing the quality of the accounts, as indicated by the auditor's opinion report. The results suggest that on average, the Botswana parastatal required 5.35 months to avail the report. This compares unfavourably to other developed countries. However, compared to some other developed countries, ...

  1. Sport and recreation participation preferences in the Botswana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sport and recreation are used as vehicles to create military readiness. Botswana Defence Force (BDF) soldiers are constantly deployed to border posts and other areas where their missions involve anti-poaching activities, disaster management and foreign peace-keeping. When not deployed, they reside with their families ...

  2. Preservation and Management of Audiovisual Archives in Botswana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper reviews the state of the audio-visual collections held by different government institutions in Botswana. The rationale of such review rests on the observation that although audiovisual materials constitute a vital information resource in such institutions, they are often not adequately managed after they are created.

  3. An Analysis of the Stability of Monetary Aggragates in Botswana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-10-07

    Oct 7, 2008 ... authorities choose a quantity they wish to control in order to achieve their inflation objectives. These quantities can be any of money supply, monetary base, credit expansion, etc. The Bank of Botswana, in the conduct of monetary policy focuses on domestic credit expansion, that is, the rate of growth of ...

  4. Albinism in Botswana Junior Secondary Schools: A Double Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dart, Gareth; Nkanotsang, Tiroyaone; Chizwe, Ose; Kowa, Lily

    2010-01-01

    Pupils with albinism potentially face a number of challenges in accessing quality education in schools in Botswana. Physical issues such as poor eyesight related to the condition and the problems of sensitive skin in such a dry and warm climate are both contributing factors to making learning problematic for some pupils. This study by Gareth Dart…

  5. Deltamethrin in sediment samples of the Okavango Delta, Botswana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Deltamethrin concentrations were determined in 35 sediment samples collected from three different habitats: channel, lagoon and pool sites from Xakanaxa in the Okavango Delta, NW Botswana. The samples were Soxhlet-extracted in acetone to extract deltamethrin residues and subsequently cleaned-up with silica gel 60.

  6. Botswana Journal of Technology - Vol 17, No 2 (2008)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Self hardening property of Botswana fly ash · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL ... Learning approaches used by the art and design and technology students at Molepolole college of education: a case study · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT ...

  7. Developing a campus slang dictionary for the university of Botswana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper focuses on the study of slang on a university campus for a lexicographic project. The research was conducted at the University of Botswana, a campus comprising circa 16,000 students, most of whom are bilingual in Setswana and English, and a small population of foreign students. Very few studies and ...

  8. Information literacy and law students at the University of Botswana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article is based on a study which investigated the ability of law students to search the electronic databases of the University of Botswana (UB) Library and their perceptions of the Information Literacy course offered by the Library. The study population consisted of 362 undergraduate law students. Data was collected by ...

  9. Lifelong Learning for Social Inclusion of Ethnic Minorities in Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruatona, Tonic

    2015-01-01

    In spite of its overall economic success, most citizens living in the remote areas of Botswana face poverty and are unemployed. The article argues that minority communities in remote areas are excluded because education programs use unfamiliar languages and de-contextualized curricula, there is no national qualifications framework to sufficiently…

  10. The teaching of reading in Botswana Government Primary Shcools ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated how reading is taught in Botswana Government schools. The findings indicate that inadequate reading instruction by teachers, their inability to model and provide students with research-based proven strategies, lack of reading specialists/coaches in the primary schools, the use of only basal series as ...

  11. Managing urbanising rural settlements in Botswana: A case study of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Urbanising rural settlements form a significant proportion of urban settlements in Botswana. About 59 ... challenges that range from problematic alignment of the plans, inadequate definition of responsibilities over plan implementation and management and absence of budget commitment for most of the planning documents.

  12. The Botswana Brigades: Education for Employment 1965-89.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Q. N.

    1989-01-01

    The Brigades movement in Botswana is a test case of a scheme of education for employment in a Southern African country. It shows that the development of a plan is determined more by the changing politics of a country than by internal dynamics and personalities. (JOW)

  13. Digitising the oral history collection at Botswana National Archives ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mpho ngoepe

    the preservation, custody and control of public archives of Botswana. The mandate of the. Department was expanded in 1992 by Circular No 4 of 1992, issued by the Permanent. Secretary to the President to cover the management of records for the entire life cycle and the consequent amendment of the National archives ...

  14. female participation in the labour market of botswana

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Labour market outcomes in Botswana, like elsewhere, have a great impact on the well-being of females and most ... productive work outside home while the domestic labour is undervalued and in most cases unpaid. .... being the employer of last resort because of the working conditions that prevailed in the sector, but today.

  15. Perceptions of physician leadership in Botswana | Sokol-Hessner ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Physician leadership is essential for the strengthening of health systems, especially in underserved settings such as sub-Saharan Africa. To be effective, leaders must be perceived as such by their community. It is unknown how perceptions of physician leadership in Botswana compare with those of the ...

  16. Radio Broadcasting for Adult Nonformal Environmental Education in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyirenda, Juma E.

    1995-01-01

    Radio broadcasting is used in Botswana to inform, teach, and persuade adults about issues in agriculture, health, wildlife, conservation, and other areas. However, open broadcasting is not an effective nonformal education tool. Active and guided group listening to radio enables discussion and feedback. (SK)

  17. The views of Botswana adults towards support during childbirth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The positive effect of support during labour is well documented in the literature. It is not known whether the Botswana males are interested in supporting their partners during labour, or whether the women really want them there, especially in the African culture where it may be taboo for a man to witness a delivery.

  18. Botswana English: Implications for English Language Teaching and Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimi, Modupe

    2011-01-01

    Concerted efforts to characterise Botswana English (BE), though still referred to as "a variety in development", have validated its existence. However, the teaching and assessment of English in the high schools do not seem to have responded to the development of this variety. This paper discusses the viability of using Standard British…

  19. Learning with a Website for the Textile Industry in Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbambo, Buhle; Cronje, Johannes C.

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on a locally initiated investigation into the suitability of the Internet in helping to meet the information needs of women in small, medium, and micro enterprises (SMMEs) in the textile industry in Botswana. The background is the stated government policy to encourage the development of SMMEs and the Internet infrastructure. The…

  20. Prevalence of asthma among school children in Gaborone, Botswana

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Asthma prevalence is high (>10%) in developed countries and although data is still missing for most of Africa, rates are increasing in developing regions as they become more westernized. We investigated the prevalence of asthma in school children in Gaborone, Botswana. Methods: This was a cross sectional ...

  1. Rainfall reliability, drought and flood vulnerability in Botswana

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DRINIE

    2003-10-04

    Oct 4, 2003 ... Rainfall data from 14 stations (cities, towns and major villages) spanning 26 years (1970 to 1995) were used to calculate reliability and vulnerability of rainfall in Botswana. Time series data for 72 years were generated from the long-term rainfall gauging stations and the number of wet and dry years ...

  2. The Botswana medical eligibility criteria wheel: adapting a tool to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In efforts to strive for family planning repositioning in Botswana, the Ministry of Health convened a meeting to undertake an adaptation of the Medical eligibility criteria for contraceptive use (MEC) wheel. The main objectives of this process were to present technical updates of the various contraceptive methods, to update the ...

  3. A parametric daily precipitation model application in Botswana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A parametric precipitation model is developed for generation of daily rainfall time series based on historic data. The precipitation model is a composite model of Markov-chain (MC) and probability distribution (PD). Thirty nine rain gauge stations in Botswana that have daily rainfall record length in the range of 11 to 83 years ...

  4. Change Project-Based Learning in Teacher Education in Botswana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Change Project-Based Learning in Teacher Education in Botswana. ... Southern African Journal of Environmental Education ... Environmental education (EE) and education for sustainable development (ESD) pedagogies are intricate, and to enhance learning, teacher education has to be innovative in teaching approach.

  5. Humidity dependent aerosol size growth | Verma | Botswana Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Botswana Journal of Technology. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 19, No 1 (2010) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT ...

  6. Stock Market Returns and Exchange Rates in Botswana | Lesotho ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper investigates the effect of bilateral exchange rates on stock market returns in the Botswana Stock Exchange (BSE) measured by the domestic company index (DCI). To examine whether this effect exists or not, Johansen cointegration test, Vector Error Correction model (VECM), Granger causality test, Impulse ...

  7. The Impact of Microfinance on Household Welfare in Botswana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigated the impact of microfinance on household welfare in Botswana using a nationally representative sample of 503 households and an econometric model adapted from Coleman (1999). The results suggested that microfinance had no significant effect on household welfare, which is consistent with Okurut ...

  8. A Critique of Botswana's Language Policy from a Translanguaging Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagwasi, Mompoloki Mmangaka

    2017-01-01

    This paper critiques the language practices and language-in-education policy of Botswana from a translanguaging perspective. By so doing, it revisits our commonly held perceptions about multilingualism, bilingualism and language and its boundary. We commonly perceive languages as autonomous and as having boundaries and we perceive bilingualism or…

  9. Reducing HIV Risk in Botswana: A National Cluster Randomized ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Botswana has the second highest prevalence of HIV in the world after Swaziland. The country has made great strides in stopping the spread of HIV/AIDS. It was the first country in sub-Saharan Africa to implement a prevention of mother-to-child transmission program in 1999. It has since added other HIV/AIDS prevention ...

  10. Determinants of Commercial banks' interest rate spreads in Botswana

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper investigated the determinants of commercial banks' interest rate spreads in Botswana using time series cross-sectional analysis for the period of 2004Q1 to 2014Q4. Factors empirically tested are bank-specific, industry-specific and macroeconomic data. Results indicate that bank intermediation, GDP, inflation ...

  11. Botswana team sport players' perception of cohesion and imagery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Perception of cohesion and imagery use among 45 elite team sport players in Botswana were assessed with the Group Environment Questionnaire (Carron et al., 1985) and the Sport Imagery Questionnaire (Hall et al., 1998) to determine whether a relationship exists between the variables, and whether imagery use will ...

  12. Effects of external debt on national savings in Botswana | Oageng ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The main objective of the study was to investigate the effects of external debt on national savings in Botswana using time series economic tools for the period 1980-2014. Annual data for Savings as percentage of GDP, GDP per capita, Exports as percentage of GDP, Exchange rates, Gross Fixed Capital Formation as ...

  13. Distance Learning and Teacher Education in Botswana: Opportunities and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikwibele, Anne L.; Mungoo, Judith K.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on a study at Molepolole College of Education (MCE) involving teachers and tutors in the Diploma in Primary Education (DPE) program by distance mode, an in-service program aimed at upgrading academic and professional qualifications of primary school teachers in Botswana. The study sought to understand the level of access and the…

  14. Design of automatic power factor control system | Yanev | Botswana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Maintenance of the proper power factor is a very important matter for the industry and for the economy of any country. A study of the power factor values for a number of industrial plants in Botswana shows that they operate at power-factors lower than the optimal values. If a plant power factor is different from its optimal value, ...

  15. Reviewing published information on reading in Botswana secondary schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lone E. Ketsitlile

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this review on published information on reading in Botswana schools is to seek ways of providing instruction and assessment that result in children becoming proficient readers. Botswana has made impressive progress in literacy growth since independence. However, a lot still needs to be done if literacy is to become all that it needs to be in the lives of the youth. One conclusion from this review is that there is an urgent need in Botswana to teach reading in ways that meet the needs of all students, especially those from Khoesan-speaking backgrounds. There is also a clear mismatch between policy and practice in the teaching of reading and this greatly disadvantages the students. Two important recommendations emanating from this review are, firstly, the teaching of reading should be linked more explicitly to that of writing; secondly, the Ministry of Education and concerned stakeholders need to encourage a marriage of policy and practice in the teaching of reading in Botswana.

  16. Patient-initiated sexual partner notification in Botswana and time ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patient-initiated sexual partner notification in Botswana and time taken for sexual contacts to report for treatment. ... Records showed that 47.3% (752/1 590) of the index patients were treated for vaginal discharge syndrome. Conclusion. A high proportion of sexual contacts were treated within 7 days of treating the index ...

  17. An Analysis of Anaphora Resolution in Common Botswana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Using articles from popular Botswana newspapers, the study demonstrates that writers have available to them a whole array of anaphora resolution strategies which include morphologically marked number, gender, and animacy; semantic roles; grammatical relations; number of intervening referents between anaphors and ...

  18. Rainfall reliability, drought and flood vulnerability in Botswana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rainfall data from 14 stations (cities, towns and major villages) spanning 26 years (1970 to 1995) were used to calculate reliability and vulnerability of rainfall in Botswana. Time series data for 72 years were generated from the long-term rainfall gauging stations and the number of wet and dry years determined. Apart from ...

  19. The Textile and Clothing Sector in Botswana: Challenges and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper considers the performance of the Textile and Clothing (TC) sector in Botswana and reviews various .... developing countries such as Pakistan, India and the world's clothing manufacturing powerhouse .... to harness the potential of improved trade, investment and employment opportunities offered by AGOA.

  20. Determinants of Child Labour and Schooling in Botswana: Evidence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BOJE: Botswana Journal of Economics. 16 the child's employment skills encourage parents to take their children out of schools and put them into employment. However, despite almost universal agreement that child labour is undesirable, there is wide disagreement on how to tackle the problem. Therefore, the formulation.

  1. Botswana's Beef Global Commodity Chain: Explaining the Resistance to Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransom, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    In an era of increasing global agricultural trade, many firms and farms seek to upgrade their agricultural commodity chains to become better integrated into global markets. Utilizing a global commodity chain (GCC) approach, this analysis unravels the challenges to and the potential consequences of upgrading Botswana's beef commodity chain.…

  2. Botswana vahetas presidenti taas valimisteta ja rahumeelselt / Allan Espenberg

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Espenberg, Allan

    2008-01-01

    Botswana demokraatia eripäraks on, et ametisolev president astub vabatahtlikult ja ennetähtaegselt ametist tagasi ning loovutab koha määratud järeltulijale. Aprilli alguses pani 69-aastane president Festus Mogae ameti maha ja uueks riigipeaks vannutati senine asepresident Ian Khama

  3. Transformational Learning in Botswana: How Culture Shapes the Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merriam, Sharan B.; Ntseane, Gabo

    2008-01-01

    Transformational learning as presented by Jack Mezirow has been critiqued for its Western, rational, and cognitive orientation. This qualitative study was conducted in the African nation of Botswana and examines how that culture shaped the process. In-depth interviews were held with 12 adults who acknowledged having an experience that had…

  4. Credit rationing and SME development in Botswana: Implications for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This constrained access to credit is argued in the literature to be due to the credit rationing behaviour of banks emanating from asymmetric information in credit ... economic diversification, employment creation opportunities, increase household incomes, and contributing to poverty reduction in line with Botswana's Vision ...

  5. Tracer Study of the Botswana Library School Graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aina, L. O.; Moahi, K.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the results of a survey of graduates of the Department of Library and Information Studies, University of Botswana that was conducted to determine their characteristics, the relevance of their training to their present jobs, and their perceptions of the curriculum. A copy of the questionnaire used is appended. (Author/LRW)

  6. Misconceptions about HIV prevention and transmission in Botswana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Misconceptions about how HIV can be transmitted or prevented often prevent individuals from making informed choices and taking appropriate action. The purpose of the research was to explore the socio-demographic and behavioural factors in Botswana that are associated with misconceptions about HIV prevention and ...

  7. Minerals objectives, policies and strategies in Botswana - analysis and lessons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, C.J. (East-West Center, Honolulu, Hawaii (USA). Resource Systems Institute)

    1981-10-01

    This article examines the present status of the minerals industry in Botswana and the effectiveness of that country's policies on minerals development and the achievement of national development goals. Botswana's mineral production increased (in constant 1979 dollars) from less than 1 million dollars per year in the late 1960s to 300 million dollars in 1979 and is expected to more than double by the mid-1980s. The author analyses the country's regime of mineral rights, the role of the private sector, negotiation of mining agreements and the implementation of national mineral exploration strategies. Diamonds are most important find. But uranium finds are expected to increase.

  8. Behavioral Response to Plastic Bag Legislation in Botswana

    OpenAIRE

    Dikgang, Johane; Visser, Martine

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates the use of charges and standards in dealing with a common externality, plastic litter from shopping bags in Botswana. The country passed a plastic bag tax (effective 2007) to curb the plastic bag demand. Interestingly, the legislation did not force retailers to charge for plastic bags, which they did voluntarily at different prices. We assessed the environmental effectiveness and efficiency of the plastic bag legislation by analyzing consumers’ sensitivity to the impro...

  9. Rabies virus typing--preliminary survey in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremlett, J G; Wibberley, G; King, A A

    1994-08-01

    A survey was made of the subtypes of rabies isolates made in Botswana using monoclonal antibodies. Two subtypes were detected, termed canine and mongoose. The canine subtype predominated in the north and west and appeared to be related to the distribution of both the domestic dog and wild jackal. The mongoose subtype was found in the south-east and was associated with feline and viverrid wildlife. The geographical distribution also matched reports of isolates examined in the neighbouring countries.

  10. Foreign Direct Investment – The Case of Botswana

    OpenAIRE

    Patricia Lindelwa Makoni

    2015-01-01

    This article sets out to analyse the occurrence of foreign direct investment (FDI) in Botswana. Diamonds contribute more than 50% of Botswana’s gross domestic product (GDP), hence economic growth and development focus has been on the mining sector. The country’s other sectors of tourism, agriculture, financial services and manufacturing have not received as much support from the Government, private sector and even international investors. This article briefly examines FDI inflow ...

  11. Botswana; Staff Report for the 2002 Article IV Consultation

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2002-01-01

    This 2002 Article IV Consultation highlights that real GDP growth of Botswana slipped to an estimated 1¼ percent in 2001/02 (July–June), largely reflecting a downturn in the global diamond market and a drop in Botswana’s diamond production. The non-mining sectors performed better, especially the service industries. Their success is in part a product of Botswana’s market-friendly environment, sound macroeconomic policies, and investments in education and physical infrastructure. The overall fi...

  12. Botswana Development Policy Review : An Agenda for Competitiveness and Diversification

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2012-01-01

    Botswana has been one of the most successful countries in the developing world over the last 40 years by many measures. Incomes have grown at a sustained pace, poverty has fallen, and the citizenry has become more educated. To be sure, poverty and income inequalities remain a problem, but rising standards of living have meant a better life for this generation of Batswana than any before it...

  13. Fertility Decline in Botswana 1980-2006 : A Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2010-01-01

    Botswana has had a stable democratic government and good governance since independence in 1966. With a sustained high average economic growth (about 9 percent) fueled by the diamond mining industry, it is the only country in Africa listed among the 13 'economic miracles' of the world for 1960-2005. The total fertility rate remains high in Sub-Saharan Africa, with 25 countries showing a rat...

  14. How headmasters perceive their role: A case study in Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, David W.; Burchfield, Shirley A.

    1994-11-01

    This study investigates the extent to which junior secondary school headmasters in Botswana differ in their beliefs about the impact of their activities in instructional supervision, school management, and communications between the school and the community about student achievement. The study reveals that groups of headmasters who differ in these beliefs also differ in the way they view the dynamics of their school. Implications for headmaster selection, headmaster training, and decentralization of educational management are discussed.

  15. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation knowledge and skills of registered nurses in Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmi Rajeswaran

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: In Botswana nurses provide most health care in the primary, secondary and tertiary level clinics and hospitals. Trauma and medical emergencies are on the increase, and nurses should have cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR knowledge and skills in order to be able to implement effective interventions in cardiac arrest situations.Objective: The objective of this descriptive study was to assess registered nurses’ CPR knowledge and skills.Method: A pre-test, intervention and re-test time-series research design was adopted, and data were collected from 102 nurses from the 2 referral hospitals in Botswana. A multiple choice questionnaire and checklist were used to collect data.Results: All nurses failed the pre-test. Their knowledge and skills improved after training, but deteriorated over the three months until the post-test was conducted.Conclusion: The significantly low levels of registered nurses’ CPR skills in Botswana should be addressed by instituting country-wide CPR training and regular refresher courses.

  16. Understanding human resource management practices in Botswana's public health sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitio-Kgokgwe, Onalenna Stannie; Gauld, Robin; Hill, Philip C; Barnett, Pauline

    2016-11-21

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to assess the management of the public sector health workforce in Botswana. Using institutional frameworks it aims to document and analyse human resource management (HRM) practices, and make recommendations to improve employee and health system outcomes. Design/methodology/approach The paper draws from a large study that used a mixed methods approach to assess performance of Botswana's Ministry of Health (MOH). It uses data collected through document analysis and in-depth interviews of 54 key informants comprising policy makers, senior staff of the MOH and its stakeholder organizations. Findings Public health sector HRM in Botswana has experienced inadequate planning, poor deployment and underutilization of staff. Lack of comprehensive retention strategies and poor working conditions contributed to the failure to attract and retain skilled personnel. Relationships with both formal and informal environments affected HRM performance. Research limitations/implications While document review was a major source of data for this paper, the weaknesses in the human resource information system limited availability of data. Practical implications This paper presents an argument for the need for consideration of formal and informal environments in developing effective HRM strategies. Originality/value This research provides a rare system-wide approach to health HRM in a Sub-Saharan African country. It contributes to the literature and evidence needed to guide HRM policy decisions and practices.

  17. Predicting Intentions to Seek Psychological Help Among Botswana University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mpho M. Pheko

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The current study had two main objectives. The first was to investigate Botswana’s university students’ intentions to seek psychological help. The second was to investigate whether (a Attitude Toward Seeking Professional Psychological Help (ATSPPH, (b Self-Stigma of Seeking Help (SSOSH, and (c Social Stigma of Receiving Psychological Help (SSRPH predicted the students’ intentions to seek psychological help. A total of N = 519 (283 females and 236 males students from the University of Botswana completed the survey. Results indicated that generally, the students had moderate intentions of seeking psychological help. Multiple regression analysis revealed that of the three predictors, only ATSPPH and SSRPH significantly predicted intentions to seek psychological help. The current study is important because while it has been established that university students are a high-risk population for mental health problems, there is close to nothing documented on university students in Botswana. Findings of the current study will undoubtedly increase knowledge relating to psychological help-seeking and its predictors in Botswana and may inform interventions that aim to encourage young people to seek psychological or counseling help.

  18. Risk Factors for Cerebral Palsy in Children in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monokwane, Baphaleng; Johnson, Allison; Gambrah-Sampaney, Claudia; Khurana, Esha; Baier, James; Baranov, Esther; Westmoreland, Kate D; Mazhani, Loeto; Steenhoff, Andrew P; Bearden, David R

    2017-12-01

    Although cerebral palsy is reported to have a higher prevalence in low-resource settings, there are few studies describing risk factors for cerebral palsy in these settings. A better understanding of the unique risk factors affecting children with cerebral palsy in low-resource settings could optimize both resource allocation and preventative strategies. A case-control study comparing children with cerebral palsy at ages two to 18 years with age-matched healthy control subjects was conducted between 2013 and 2014 at a referral center in Gaborone, Botswana. Study participants were enrolled from inpatient and outpatient settings, and data were collected through caregiver interviews, review of medical records, and physical examination of subjects. Risk factors were evaluated using conditional logistic regression models. We studied 56 subjects with cerebral palsy and 56 age-matched control subjects. Significant risk factors for cerebral palsy included a history of serious neonatal infection (odds ratio 15.0, P = 0.009), complications during delivery (odds ratio 13.5, P cerebral palsy in Botswana differ from those described in high-resource settings. Modifiable risk factors such as maternal HIV infection should be targeted as a potential strategy to reduce the incidence of cerebral palsy in Botswana. Further studies are necessary to determine optimal preventative and treatment strategies in this population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Foreign Direct Investment – The Case of Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Lindelwa Makoni

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This article sets out to analyse the occurrence of foreign direct investment (FDI in Botswana. Diamonds contribute more than 50% of Botswana’s gross domestic product (GDP, hence economic growth and development focus has been on the mining sector. The country’s other sectors of tourism, agriculture, financial services and manufacturing have not received as much support from the Government, private sector and even international investors. This article briefly examines FDI inflow trends and the country’s national economic-building policies which the Government has put in place to diversify its economy from the current export-oriented, diamond mining economy. A country-specific case study approach was adopted. The results yielded show that Botswana is overly dependent on export earnings from diamonds. This leaves the country vulnerable to external global economic shocks. Given that diamonds are a natural resource with a limited lifespan, the Government of Botswana needs to draw up investor-friendly policies to attract FDI inflows to expand its economic base. International capital inflows would complement domestic savings and further boost employment and trade opportunities in the country.

  20. Welfare Effects of Higher Energy and Food Prices in Botswana: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Using a social accounting matrix (SAM) multiplier framework, the paper examines the welfare effects of higher prices of internationally traded energy and food commodities on economic sectors in Botswana. These are adverse supply–side shocks to Botswana since the country is a net importer of energy and food ...

  1. Welfare Effects of Higher Energy and Food Prices in Botswana: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... domestic energy production and to ensure that efficiency gains in food and energy supply chains are achieved. In addition, there is a need to review the adequacy and targeting of existing social safety nets. Keywords: Social Accounting Matrix; Multiplier analysis; Welfare; Botswana BOJE: Botswana Journal of Economics, ...

  2. Pathways toward Peace: Negotiating National Unity and Ethnic Diversity through Education in Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dryden-Peterson, Sarah; Mulimbi, Bethany

    2017-01-01

    This study examines how education can disrupt threats of conflict, specifically in the presence of ethnic diversity. We present a historical analysis of Botswana, using methods of process tracing drawing on documents, in-depth interviews, and Afrobarometer survey data. Postindependence Botswana engaged in redistribution of educational access…

  3. Testing the Export-Led Growth Hypothesis for Botswana: A Causality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    André C. Jordaan & Joel Hinaunye Eita. 3. Botswana is a mineral-dependent economy and the export-led growth strategy has been based on primary or mineral products (Wright, 1997). According to Beaulier (2003), Botswana was the fastest growing country in the world during the period 1965 to 1995 with average growth ...

  4. Parental Involvement and Expectations of Children's Academic Achievement Goals in Botswana: Parent's Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kgosidialwa, Keinyatse T.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the school related activities that parents in Botswana engage in with their children. The study also examined how parents in Botswana perceive their involvement and expectations of their children's academic achievement goals. Sixteen parents (15 females and 1 male) who had children in standards five, six, or seven participated…

  5. Live by the gun, die by the gun: Botswana's 'shoot-to-kill' policy as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It argues that anti-poaching is comparable to the war on terror. It reviews Botswana's shoot-to-kill policy and its justification in international law, specifically with regard to war and armed combat. It adopts an exploratory methodology to reflect on the effectiveness of Botswana's policy, and considers whether it can be adopted ...

  6. The Perceptions of Senior Management Teams' (SMTs) Dominant Leadership Styles in Selected Botswana Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhozya, C. M.

    2010-01-01

    This study, which was funded by the office of research and development (ORD) in the University of Botswana, surveyed 65 primary schools in South Central region in Botswana, which aimed at establishing the perceptions of senior management teams dominant leadership style. The study was done in three phases; the first phase started in June 2008 to…

  7. Aids Eestis nagu Botswanas / Mikk Jürisson ; interv. Svea Talving

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Jürisson, Mikk, 1963-

    2004-01-01

    Kui Eesti ei taha jõuda olukorda, mis tekkis Botswanas, kus aidsiepideemia ravi ja tõkestamine haaras lõviosa riigi tuludest ning keskmine eluiga lühenes drastiliselt, tuleks haiguse levik võtta range tähelepanu alla ja uurida, mida tasuks õppida Botswana kogemusest

  8. What Citizenship Responsibility Means to Botswana's Young Adults: Implications for Adult Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preece, Julia; Mosweunyane, Dama

    2006-01-01

    Politicians and other leaders in Botswana have recently expressed concerns that the country's "youth" is not taking its citizenship responsibilities seriously. This is in a context of rapid change and development in the last thirty years since Botswana's independence in 1966. The study described here explored the learned perceptions of…

  9. Status of waste tyres and management practice in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mmereki, Daniel; Machola, Bontle; Mokokwe, Kentlafetse

    2017-02-22

    Waste tyres (WTs) are becoming a significant environmental, economical and technological challenge due to their high contents of combustible composition and potential for valuable materials and energy resources. Fewer studies in developing and even developed countries have been carried out to assess the challenges regarding waste tyres management, and suggested the best alternative solutions for managing this waste stream. While developed countries made progress in waste tyres management needs by implementing more efficient innovative recovery and recycling methods, and restrictive regulations regarding the management of used tyres, in many developing countries the management of waste tyres has not received adequate interest, and the processing, treatment and disposal of waste tyre is still nascent. In recent years, worldwide, several methods for managing used tyres, including other principal alternatives for managing end-of-life tyres defined in the 4Rs, reduction, re-use, recovery and recycling have been adopted and applied to minimize serious threats to both the natural environment environment and human. The paper attempted to establish stakeholders' action that has the responsibility in waste tyre management in Botswana. This study also analyzed important aspects on waste tyres management in Botswana. A synthesis of approaches was employed in the present investigation to determine the factors influencing effective performance of waste tyres management practice in Botswana. Data for the present study was obtained using relevant published literature, scientific journals, other third sector sources, academic sources, and research derived from governments and other agencies and field observations. Group discussions with the participants and semi-structured interviews with professionals were carried out. The outcomes of this investigation are a wide-range outline concerning the participants that are important in waste tyres management, and a set of aspects affecting

  10. Conservation implications of brown hyaena (Parahyaena brunnea population densities and distribution across landscapes in Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiaan W. Winterbach

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The brown hyaena (Parahyaena brunnea is endemic to southern Africa. The largest population of this near-threatened species occurs in Botswana, but limited data were available to assess distribution and density. Our objectives were to use a stratified approach to collate available data and to collect more data to assess brown hyaena distribution and density across land uses in Botswana. We conducted surveys using track counts, camera traps and questionnaires and collated our results and available data to estimate the brown hyaena population based on the stratification of Botswana for large carnivores. Brown hyaenas occur over 533 050 km² (92% of Botswana. Our density estimates ranged from 0 brown hyaenas/100 km² in strata of northern Botswana to 2.94 (2.16–3.71 brown hyaenas/100 km² in the southern stratum of the Central Kalahari Game Reserve. We made assumptions regarding densities in strata that lacked data, using the best references available. We estimated the brown hyaena population in Botswana as 4642 (3133–5993 animals, with 6.8% of the population in the Northern Conservation Zone, 73.1% in the Southern Conservation Zone, 2.0% in the smaller conservation zones and 18.1% in the agricultural zones. The similar densities of brown hyaenas in the Central Kalahari Game Reserve and the Ghanzi farms highlight the potential of agricultural areas in Botswana to conserve this species. The conservation of brown hyaenas in the agricultural landscape of Botswana is critical for the long-term conservation of the species; these areas provide important links between populations in South Africa, Namibia and Zimbabwe.Conservation implications: Botswana contains the core of the brown hyaena population in southern Africa, and conflict mitigation on agricultural land is crucial to maintaining connectivity among the range countries.

  11. Movement patterns of cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus in farmlands in Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. K. Van der Weyde

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Botswana has the second highest population of cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus with most living outside protected areas. As a result, many cheetahs are found in farming areas which occasionally results in human-wildlife conflict. This study aimed to look at movement patterns of cheetahs in farming environments to determine whether cheetahs have adapted their movements in these human-dominated landscapes. We fitted high-time resolution GPS collars to cheetahs in the Ghanzi farmlands of Botswana. GPS locations were used to calculate home range sizes as well as number and duration of visits to landscape features using a time-based local convex hull method. Cheetahs had medium-sized home ranges compared to previously studied cheetah in similar farming environments. Results showed that cheetahs actively visited scent marking trees and avoided visiting homesteads. A slight preference for visiting game farms over cattle farms was found, but there was no difference in duration of visits between farm types. We conclude that cheetahs selected for areas that are important for their dietary and social needs and prefer to avoid human-occupied areas. Improved knowledge of how cheetahs use farmlands can allow farmers to make informed decisions when developing management practices and can be an important tool for reducing human-wildlife conflict.

  12. Documentation of ethnoveterinary practices used in family poultry in Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Cassius Moreki

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To document the use of indigenous plants used by family poultry rearers to treat and control diseases and parasites in 15 villages of Botswana. Materials and Methods: A total of 1000 family poultry rearers in 15 villages were interviewed using a structured questionnaire. Data were also collected through direct observation, village walks, interview of passers-by, group interviews, and meetings with key informants (i.e., traditional leaders, extension agents and chairpersons of village development committees. Results: The ethnoveterinary practices in 15 villages of Botswana were identified and documented. Nineteen plant species representing 15 families were used by family poultry rearers to treat and control poultry diseases and parasites. Most frequently used plants were from Fabaceae, Asteraceae and Liliaceae. Both human and veterinary medications (e.g., vicks, disprin and Compral tablets, blue stones, potassium permanganate, veterinary drugs and vaccines were used in health management. Sixty-six percent of the respondents said they used traditional remedies to control and treat diseases, 19% did not use vaccines or remedies, 2% used vaccines while 13% used drugs to control and treat diseases. Conclusions: Ethnoveterinary medicine predominates in family poultry healthcare. Scientific investigations should be carried out to ascertain the effectiveness of identified plant species used in health management of family poultry. [Vet World 2013; 6(1.000: 18-21

  13. Biomedicine, public health, and citizenship in the advent of antiretrovirals in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabrol, Fanny

    2014-08-01

    Often celebrated as a model of development in Africa, Botswana nonetheless endured a severe HIV epidemic. This article describes the singularity of the Botswana experience in facing AIDS and creating the widest possible access to antiretroviral medications for its citizens. Through exploration of different sets of actors and the construction of their ethics of treatment, it is possible to examine how free and universal access was created within the national antiretroviral program. This article underscores the importance of the site and the local dynamics in the advent of an ethics of access to treatment for Botswana citizens. At the intersection of national citizenship, pharmaceutical philanthropy, and biomedical collaborations, Botswana is an exemplary case (one of the first and unique in its kind) of global health programs for access to drugs in which patients' rights are tied to science and pharmaceutical development. As such it also bears some limitations and concerns over its sustainability. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. SAFARI 2000 LAI and FPAR Measurements at Sua Pan, Botswana, Dry Season 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) Validation team was deployed to the Sua Pan salt playa in the Magkadigkadi region of Botswana during the...

  15. SAFARI 2000 Surface Spectral Reflectance at Sua Pan, Botswana, Dry Season 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) Validation team was deployed to Sua Pan, a salt playa in the Magkadigkadi region of Botswana, from August 18 to...

  16. SAFARI 2000 LAI and FPAR Measurements at Sua Pan, Botswana, Dry Season 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) Validation team was deployed to the Sua Pan salt playa in the Magkadigkadi region of Botswana during the SAFARI 2000...

  17. SAFARI 2000 Surface Spectral Reflectance at Sua Pan, Botswana, Dry Season 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) Validation team was deployed to Sua Pan, a salt playa in the Magkadigkadi region of Botswana, from August...

  18. Determinants of educational systems of Bophuthatswana and Botswana / Jacob Herman Kgosi Malao

    OpenAIRE

    Malao, Jacob Herman Kgosi

    1985-01-01

    In the opening chapter the following matters are looked into: * PROBLEM OF RESEARCH The problem of research is: - to determine whether the influences of the Republic of South Africa on the Bophuthatswana system of education and that of England on Botswana are responsible for differences of the educational systems of Bophuthatswana and Botswana; - to determine whether there are other determinants of the systems in question; and - a comparison of the determinants of the education...

  19. Factors Influencing Students’ Choice of Accounting as a Major: The Case of Botswana Accounting Students

    OpenAIRE

    Lillian B Wally-Dima

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the factors that have influenced students at the University of Botswana to select accounting as a major and to establish at what stage the decision was made. There is need for renewed research to examine how students perceive accounting as a major especially given the challenges that the accountancy profession has been faced with over the past decade. Data was collected from final year accounting students at the University of Botswana who were majoring in accounting using ...

  20. Buffalo, Bush Meat, and the Zoonotic Threat of Brucellosis in Botswana

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander, Kathleen Anne; Blackburn, Jason Kenna; Vandewalle, Mark Eric; Pesapane, Risa; Baipoledi, Eddie Kekgonne; Elzer, Phil H.

    2012-01-01

    Background Brucellosis is a zoonotic disease of global importance infecting humans, domestic animals, and wildlife. Little is known about the epidemiology and persistence of brucellosis in wildlife in Southern Africa, particularly in Botswana. Methods Archived wildlife samples from Botswana (1995–2000) were screened with the Rose Bengal Test (RBT) and fluorescence polarization assay (FPA) and included the African buffalo (247), bushbuck (1), eland (5), elephant (25), gemsbok (1), giraffe (9),...

  1. The development of a strategic framework for the promotion of local cuisine in Botswana / Delly Chatibura

    OpenAIRE

    Chatibura, Delly

    2015-01-01

    The main goal of this study is the development a strategic framework for the promotion of local cuisine in Botswana. This goal was achieved in five key objectives. Firstly the study set to review extant literature on tourists‟ cuisine experiences in general and in Botswana. An understanding of tourists‟ cuisine experiences is significant in paving the way for increased promotion in cuisine tourism, an alternative form of tourism that has remained relatively neglected in the country‟s tourism ...

  2. New law on HIV testing in Botswana: The implications for healthcare professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rofiah O. Sarumi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Botswana is one of the countries with the highest HIV prevalence rates in the world. Innovative HIV testing strategies are required to ensure that those infected or at risk of infection become aware of their HIV status and are able to access treatment, care and support. Despite this public health imperative, HIV testing strategies in Botswana will in future be based around the principles in the new Public Health Act (2013. The present article describes the HIV testing norms in the Act, and sets out the strengths and weaknesses of this approach and its implications for healthcare professionals in Botswana.Objectives: To compare international norms on HIV testing with the provisions governing such testing in the new Botswana Public Health Act and to assess the extent to which the new Act meets international human rights norms on HIV testing.Method: A ‘desktop’ review of international human rights norms and those in the Botswana Public Health Act.Conclusion: HIV testing norms in the new Public Health Act in Botswana violate individual rights and will place healthcare workers in a position where they will have to elect between acting lawfully or ethically. Law reform is required in order to ensure that HIV testing achieves the joint goals of public health and human rights.

  3. Mitochondrial DNA and karyotypic data confirm the presence of Mus indutus and Mus minutoides (Mammalia, Rodentia, Muridae, Nannomys in Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molly McDonough

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We use a combination of cytochrome b sequence data and karyological evidence to confirm the presence of Mus indutus and Mus minutoides in Botswana. Our data include sampling from five localities from across the country, including one site in northwestern Botswana where both species were captured in syntopy. Additionally, we find evidence for two mitochondrial lineages of M. minutoides in northwestern Botswana that differ by 5% in sequence variation. Also, we report that M. minutoides in Botswana have the 2n=34 karyotype with the presence of a (X.1 sex-autosome translocation.

  4. Beef cattle productivity under traditional and improved management in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennie, T; Light, D; Rutherford, A; Miller, M; Fisher, I; Pratchett, D; Capper, B; Buck, N; Trail, J

    1977-02-01

    A comparison of productivity over a 4-year period from indigenous type beef cattle under two production systems in Botswana is reported. The two systems are: the traditional system on unenclosed communal grazing (cattle post) and ranching within fenced paddocks. Calving percentages, 7-month old calf weight, calf mortality and post-weaning growth to 18 months of age under cattle post conditions were 46.4 per cent, 122.5 kg, 10.2 percent and 88.5 kg respectively. Corresponding figures for cattle on the fenced ranches were 74.0 per cent, 177.4 kg, 8.5 per cent and 105.8 kg. These results indicate overall productivity estimates of 51 and 120 kg of weaner calf per cow per year and 86 and 188 kg of 18-month old calf per cow per year for the cattle post and fenced ranch respectively.

  5. Pteridophytes of the Okavango Delta, Botswana (Southern Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vega Hernández, Efrén

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available The Okavango Delta in Botswana constitutes one of the larger inland deltas in the world. Fifteen species of fern were found in this ecological system integrated into 10 genera and 9 families. Included in this report are descriptions of each family, genus and species. Also given are artificial keys to the genera, as well as keys for genera and species within the family when necessary. A documented distribution and ecological notes for each species also appears.Se estudian los pterid6fitos del delta del Okavango, uno de los deltas interiores ma's grandes del mundo. Se citan 15 especies, incluidas en 10 generos y 9 familias. Se aportan descripciones, claves de identification, datos sobre la distribucitin y ecologia. y mapas de distribuci6n detallada de cada una de las especies.

  6. Diseases of indigenous chickens in Bokaa village, Kgatleng district, Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.Z. Mushi

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available his study examined flock size and management, level of internal and external parasite burden and seroprevalence of antibodies to poultry pathogens in indigenous chickens in Bokaa village, Kgatleng district, Botswana. The mean flock size was 22.6±6.85 with a range of 11-34. The mean body weights of cocks and hens were 2.28±0.56 kg and 1.70 ±0.38 kg, respectively. Housing and commercial poultry feed were not provided. Ascaridia galli, Heterakis gallinarum and Syngamus trachea were found in some birds. Although the chickens were not vaccinated against any poultry diseases, serum antibodies to Newcastle disease, infectious bursal disease and infectious bronchitis were detected.

  7. Distance Learning and Teacher Education in Botswana: Opportunities and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne L Sikwibele

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on a study at Molepolole College of Education (MCE involving teachers and tutors in the Diploma in Primary Education (DPE program by distance mode, an in-service program aimed at upgrading academic and professional qualifications of primary school teachers in Botswana. The study sought to understand the level of access and the challenges faced by teachers and tutors. Data was collected through in-depth interviews, survey, and document analysis. Findings showed that teachers should be enrolled in the program at a younger age, and issues that lead to delays in completion must be addressed. The paper recommends that the Ministry of Education (MOE hire full-time tutors to support teachers at their bases, provide resources for practical subjects, organize workshops to familiarize tutors with appropriate strategies for adult learners, increase the duration of residential sessions, explore the use of alternative instructional technologies, and institute regular customer evaluations.

  8. Everyday burden of musculoskeletal conditions among villagers in rural Botswana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hondras, Maria; Hartvigsen, Jan; Myburgh, Corrie

    2016-01-01

    of independence and social identity to fulfil traditional roles held meaning as significance. Outmigration for wage labour and other shifts in family structure compounded everyday musculoskeletal burden. CONCLUSION: Uncovering burden is an important first step to address musculoskeletal care needs in developing......OBJECTIVE: To examine the perspectives of villagers in rural Botswana about the everyday life burden and impact of their musculoskeletal disorders. METHODS: Ethnographic fieldwork for 8 months included 55 in-depth interviews with 34 villagers. Interviews were typically conducted in Setswana...... for the consequences and significance of musculoskeletal burden related to 3 themes: (i) hard work for traditional lives; (ii) bearing the load of a rugged landscape; and, (iii) caring for others with disrupted lives. Physical labour with musculoskeletal symptoms had economic and subsistence consequences. The loss...

  9. Nurses' perceptions about Botswana patients' anti-retroviral therapy adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie J. Ehlers

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Anti-retroviral drugs (ARVs are supplied free of charge in Botswana. Lifelong adherence to anti-retroviral therapy (ART is vital to improve the patient’s state of well-being and to prevent the development of strains of the human immunodef ciency virus (HIV that are resistant to ART. Persons with ART-resistant strains of HIV can spread these to other people, requiring more expensive ART with more severe side-effects and poorer health outcomes. The purpose of this exploratory, descriptive, qualitative study was to determine nurses’ perspectives on Botswana patients’ anti-retroviral therapy (ART adherence, and to identify factors which could promote or hinder ART adherence. Four ART sites were randomly selected and all 16 nurses providing ART services at these sites participated in semi-structured interviews. These nurses indicated that patients’ ART adherence was inf uenced by service-related and patient-related factors. Service-related factors included the inaccessibility of ART clinics, limited clinic hours, health workers’ inability to communicate in patients’ local languages, long waiting times at clinics and delays in being informed about their CD4 and viral load results. Nurses could not trace defaulters nor contact them by phone, and also had to work night shifts, disrupting nurse-patient relationships. Patient-related factors included patients’ lack of education, inability to understand the significance of CD4 and viral load results, financial hardships, non-disclosure and non-acceptance of their HIV positive status, alcohol abuse, the utilisation of traditional medicines and side effects of ART. The challenges of lifelong ART adherence are multifaceted involving both patient-related and service-related factors. Supplying free ARVs does not ensure high levels of ART adherence.

    Opsomming

    Anti-retrovirale middels (ARMs word gratis verskaf in Botswana. Lewenslange getroue nakoming van ARM voorskrifte is

  10. From Perception and Knowledge to Classroom Practice: Teaching Listening Comprehension to Setswana Speakers of English in Junior Schools in Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebina, Boikanyego; Arua, Arua E.

    2017-01-01

    The study investigated whether teachers' knowledge and positive perception of listening contribute to its teaching in junior secondary schools in Botswana. Using an observation schedule, data were collected from four schools in the Gaborone, Botswana, area. The main finding of the study is that knowledge of listening does not translate into good…

  11. Information Literacy and Digital Divide: The Case of the University of Botswana Students Studying Part-Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kgosiemang, Rose T.

    2016-01-01

    In Botswana, the costs and requirements to study full-time are very high. Not everyone can afford to study full-time without forfeiting their current roles, for example, in 1999 the Center for Continuing Education (CCE) in Botswana launched a Diploma in Primary Education distance education programme, to upgrade academic and professional…

  12. The Rise and Attenuation of the Basic Education Programme (BEP) in Botswana: A Global-Local Dialectic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabulawa, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Using a global-local dialectic approach, this paper traces the rise of the basic education programme in the 1980s and 1990s in Botswana and its subsequent attenuation in the 2000s. Amongst the local forces that led to the rise of BEP were Botswana's political project of nation-building; the country's dire human resources situation in the decades…

  13. Wealth Sharing for Conflict Prevention and Economic Growth : Botswana Case Study of Natural Resource Utilization for Peace and Development

    OpenAIRE

    Sebudubudu, David

    2011-01-01

    There are countries in Asia, Europe, the Middle East and even a few such countries in Africa that are using non-renewable resources to drive development and have not experienced conflict. South Africa, Namibia, Botswana, and Zambia are such typical cases in Africa. Instead, the presence of significant minerals in Botswana is associated with economic development and democracy as well as peace. ...

  14. Hairy Stalagmites, a new biogenic root speleothem from Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard C. Du Preez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ngamiland in northwestern Botswana hosts the Gcwihaba Caves which present unique subterranean environments and host speleothems never before recorded. Cave atmospheric conditions can be extreme with temperatures as high as 28°C and relative humidity nearing 99.9%. Within Dimapo and Diviner’s Caves peculiar root speleothems that we named ‘Hairy Stalagmites’ were found. These stalagmites are closely associated with the roots of Namaqua fig (Ficus cordata trees that enter the cave environment in search of water. Pieces of broken stalagmites were sampled from Dimapo Cave for further investigations. Stereo and electron microscopy revealed that the Hairy Stalagmites consist of multiple intertwined tubes created when thin films of CaCO3 are deposited around fine lateral roots. The importance of the roots is substantiated with evidence of calcified epidermal cells, apical meristems and epidermal imprints. The development of these stalagmites starts when roots accumulate on the cave floor in the vicinity of a water drip and a root nest is created to capture the water. From this point the roots grow upwards (positive hydrotropism allowing the development of the calcite structure, and as CO2 diffusion and evaporation occurs, CaCO3 is deposited. The environmental conditions necessary for the growth of Hairy Stalagmites, as well their developmental mechanism, are discussed and illustrated.

  15. Financing Development Through Public Private Partnerships (PPPs in Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. K. Botlhale

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Largely due to chronic fiscal stress since the recent global economic crisis, there are calls for alternative ways of financing economic development. Public Private Partnerships (PPPs have been identified as such alternatives. There is an increasing awareness that the private sector is not a competitor but a strategic partner in the drive for economic development. Therefore, governments are leveraging on the benefits of PPPs. Using the case study of Botswana, which is experiencing revenue challenges as diamonds have not been selling well since 2008, this theoretical paper explores the possibility of using more PPPs to finance economic development. Grounded in interpretivist research methodology, using the survey research strategy and using secondary data sources in the form of a desk survey, it concluded that there is a case for the increased use PPPs to finance economic development. It further concluded that while there is demonstrated appetite for PPPs, to date, only a few projects have been procured through PPPs. Hence, moving forward, and given the deteriorating revenue situation, there is a need to use more PPPs to deliver economic development. Finally, the paper argues that there is a need to reform the current PPP legal-institutional architecture and bench-mark and peer-learn from best PPP practices in Africa such as South Africa and Nigeria and beyond.

  16. Presence of Bacillus cereus in street foods in Gaborone, Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murindamombe, Gervas Y; Collison, Ernest K; Mpuchane, Sisai F; Gashe, Berhanu A

    2005-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the microbiological safety and quality of street foods sold in Gaborone, Botswana. A total of 148 point-of-sale composite street food samples were bought and analyzed between June 2001 and May 2002. The analysis focused on the level of contamination of various street foods with Bacillus cereus. The B. cereus (vegetative and spores), total spore, and total viable counts were determined on all the samples. Also B. cereus isolates from 444 individual point-of-sale food samples were characterized with respect to their biochemical profiles and enterotoxigenic properties. The B. cereus contamination rate for point-of-sale foods was 65%. The B. cereus counts ranged from not detectable to levels as high as 9.1 log CFU/g. Despite the high rate of contamination of some samples, generally, most samples had B. cereus counts of less than 4 log CFU/g; hence, they were of acceptable microbiological quality. Bacillus diarrheal enterotoxin was detected from 52 isolates from individual portions of meals using the B. cereus enterotoxin reversed passive latex agglutination kit. Results of the assay revealed that 59.6% of the B. cereus isolates were enterotoxigenic. Most of the enterotoxigenic isolates were obtained from vegetable samples.

  17. Coal prospects in Botswana, Mozambique, Zambia, Zimbabwe and Namibia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-12-01

    Increasing demand for coal in Asia is stimulating interest in the potentially large coal resources in Southern African countries such as Botswana, Mozambique, Zambia, Zimbabwe and Namibia. These countries have been slow to utilise their coal as local demand has been limited and the means to export coal has been inadequate. The governments in these regions are now recognising coal as a strategically important commodity, capable of earning foreign revenue but also adding value to the economy by generating much needed electricity. This report looks in turn at the role of coal in the energy economies of each of these countries. As in most emerging economies, the provision of a reliable and cost-effective supply of electricity to industries and people is essential for economic growth and the welfare of communities. Demand for Africa's mineral commodities such as diamonds and copper is driving a massive need for electricity and coal will play a major role. Not only does the mining industry need power, but with these growing industries come communities and commerce which are also in need of energy.

  18. Magnetic Investigations On The Okavango Giant Dyke Swarm (n Botswana)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tshoso, G.; Dyment, J.; Aubourg, C.; Le Gall, B.; Tiercelin, J. J.; Féraud, G.; Bertrand, H.; Jourdan, F.; Kampunzu, H.

    The Okavango Giant Dyke Swarm is one of the largest mafic dyke complex world- wide. It extends as a 1500 x 100 km intrusive system across the Karoo igneous province of E. Namibia, N. Botswana and W. Zimbabwe. It is marked by prominent magnetic anomalies on the many aeromagnetic surveys acquired by mining compa- nies. Beyond the analysis of these data, ground truth evidence has been collected along a 100 km continuous section nearly perpendicular to the dyke swarm on the Shashe River, which present excellent exposures of dykes and basement host-rocks. Samples have been cored on 15 dykes for paleomagnetic and rock magnetic analy- ses. The paleomagnetic poles determined from most of the dykes is consistent with a Karoo age on the Apparent Polar Wander path for Africa and confirm the radio- metric results obtained by Ar-Ar dating technique. A very different pole is obtained for one basement dyke dated at 880 Ma. Magnetic susceptibility and natural rema- nent magnetization have been compiled and used to constrain forward modeling of the aeromagnetic anomalies. The direction of magmatic flow within individual dykes is investigated through the analysis of magnetic susceptibility anisotropy.

  19. The well-being of gays, lesbians and bisexuals in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, V J; Zuyderduin, A; Oosthuizen, M J

    2001-09-01

    To investigate the level of well-being of gays, lesbians and bisexuals (GLBs) in Botswana, how this level of well-being could be promoted and whether their health care needs were met by health care professionals. It is illegal to engage in same-sex activities in Botswana, punishable by imprisonment. Although Botswana's citizens have one of Africa's best health care systems, little is known about the health status, health care needs and general well-being of Botswana's GLBs. This survey attempted to uncover some of these potential health care needs, impacting on the GLBs' well-being. The research framework adopted was the health and human rights approach, placing dignity before rights. A survey design, with structured questionnaires, was used. Snow-ball sampling techniques were used. Results indicated that varying degrees of distress were experienced by 64% of the GLBs in this study. The GLBs identified a need for human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) education and had concerns about their general health, discrimination against them and vulnerability to violence including sexual assaults. The well-being of the GLBs in Botswana was influenced by both positive internal acceptance of their sexual orientation and negative external acceptance by society. Health care professionals played insignificant roles in the promotion of GLBs' well-being, and could make greater inputs into health education efforts, and more significant contributions towards enhancing the GLBs' levels of well-being. Enhanced collaboration between health professionals and human rights activists are recommended to reduce violations of Botswana's GLBs' dignity and to improve their quality of life, including enhanced access to and utilization of health care services.

  20. The characteristics and economic importance of Pterocarpus angolensis in D.C. Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumbile, A U; Kwerepe, B C; Kelatlhilwe, M

    2007-02-15

    Pterocarpus angolensis grows throughout northern Botswana and may be found in all woodland types as well as in evergreen and deciduous forests. It is among the few indigenous trees that thrive in the deep Kalahari sands. P. angolensis produces a hard wood timber of attractive appearance. Due to its flexibility, resistance and lightweight, the communities in Botswana use the species for making door frames, window frames, canoes, canoe peddles, spear handles for use in game hunting, fishing and general construction. The community also use it as a carving and sculpting medium. Traditionally, all parts of the tree are used for medicinal purposes.

  1. HIV in the workplace in Botswana: incidence, prevalence, and disease severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riviello, Elisabeth D; Sterling, Timothy R; Shepherd, Bryan; Fantan, Tsetsele; Makhema, Joseph

    2007-12-01

    Few detailed epidemiologic data exist regarding the impact of HIV infection on the workplace in the developing world. In addition, most HIV surveys examine only prevalence, without data on incidence or disease severity. In June 2003, we conducted a voluntary anonymous HIV serosurvey among employees of the Debswana Mining Company, the largest nongovernmental employer in Botswana. Among the 3558 participants, annual HIV incidence was estimated to be 3.4%, and HIV prevalence was 23.8%. HIV-infected participants had a median CD4(+) lymphocyte count of 427 cells/mm(3) (interquartile range 269-642), with 13.3% of samples Botswana.

  2. Validation of AIDS-related mortality in Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taffa Negussie

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mortality data are used to conduct disease surveillance, describe health status and inform planning processes for health service provision and resource allocation. In many countries, HIV- and AIDS-related deaths are believed to be under-reported in government statistics. Methods To estimate the extent of under-reporting of HIV- and AIDS-related deaths in Botswana, we conducted a retrospective study of a sample of deaths reported in the government vital registration database from eight hospitals, where more than 40% of deaths in the country in 2005 occurred. We used the consensus of three physicians conducting independent reviews of medical records as the gold standard comparison. We examined the sensitivity, specificity and other validity statistics. Results Of the 5276 deaths registered in the eight hospitals, 29% were HIV- and AIDS-related. The percentage of HIV- and AIDS-related deaths confirmed by physician consensus (positive predictive value was 95.4%; however, the percentage of non-HIV- and non-AIDS-related deaths confirmed (negative predictive value was only 69.1%. The sensitivity and specificity of the vital registration system was 55.7% and 97.3%, respectively. After correcting for misclassification, the percentage of HIV- and AIDS--related deaths was estimated to be in the range of 48.8% to 54.4%, depending on the definition. Conclusion Improvements in hospitals and within government offices are necessary to strengthen the vital registration system. These should include such strategies as training physicians and coders in accurate reporting and recording of death statistics, implementing continuous quality assurance methods, and working with the government to underscore the importance of using mortality statistics in future evidence-based planning.

  3. BAQMAP. Air Quality Monitoring and Surveillance Program for Botswana. Mission 1 Report 4-22 November 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bekkestad, T.; Dreiem, R.; Hermansen, O.; Knudsen, S.

    1996-12-31

    This report is concerned with the start of a joint project between the authorities in Botswana and Norway on the development of an air pollution monitoring and surveillance program for Botswana. NILU will provide assistance in the fields of (1) Siting and establishment of an air pollution monitoring network, (2) Laboratory techniques, methods and routines, (3) Quality control and quality assurance procedures, (4) Emission data bases, (5) Statistical data analysis and reporting, (6) Atmospheric dispersion model estimates for air quality planning and assessment analysis. This is the report of the Norwegian team after their first visit to Botswana. 1 ref., 13 figs., 35 tabs.

  4. Botswana and Swaziland: report links violations of women's rights to HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, Kate

    2007-12-01

    In May 2007, Physicians for Human Rights (PHR) released a report investigating the links between discriminatory views against women in Botswana and Swaziland and sexual risk-taking and, in turn, extremely high HIV prevalence in those countries. The report also examines the role of women's lack of political and economic power in those countries, and the connection to HIV infection.

  5. Eddy flux and leaf level measurements of biogeni VOC emissions from Mopane woodland of Botswana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greenberg, J.P.; Guenter, A.; Harley, P.; Otter, L.; Veenendaal, E.M.; Hewwit, C.N.; James, A.E.; Owen, S.M.

    2003-01-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions were measured in a mopane woodland near Maun, Botswana in January–February 2001 as part of SAFARI 2000. This landscape is comprised of more than 95% of one woody plant species, Colophospermum mopane (Caesalpinaceae). Mopane woodlands extend over a

  6. Proposed criteria for the evaluation of an address assignment scheme in Botswana

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ditsela, J

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available propose criteria for an address assignment scheme in Botswana: a single set of place or area names; different addresses types for urban, rural and farm areas; principles for address numbering assignment; integration of different referencing systems; and a...

  7. Policy-maker attitudes to the ageing of the HIV cohort in Botswana

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-09-19

    Sep 19, 2017 ... (Report, 2010; Republic of Botswana Ministry of Heath et al.,. 2013; United Nations Development Programme, 2012). The quality of life of adults aging with HIV, however, is in question due to medical complications, poorer mental health, social isolation and stigmatization from health care providers and.

  8. Training Needs Assessment in the Botswana Public Service: A Case Study of Five State Sector Ministries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balisi, Shadreck

    2014-01-01

    Using qualitative methods, this study analysed the process of training needs assessment in the Botswana public service, with special focus on five state sector ministries. It is evident from the research findings that there is little and an unsystematic approach to the needs assessment prior to training. The research further revealed that the…

  9. Social Work Counselling for the Children of Botswana: Contemporary Issues and Corresponding Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntshwarang, Poloko N.; Malinga-Musamba, Tumani

    2016-01-01

    Economic development and globalisation have had both positive and negative consequences for many people in Botswana. The changing economic situation has affected their social, economic, spiritual, health, and psychological status. The population most at risk is children. Children face several challenges such as malnutrition, sexual and other forms…

  10. A Review of the Literature on Reading in Botswana Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commeyras, M.; Ketsitlile, L. E.

    2013-01-01

    In this review the authors considered all the documents pertaining to the teaching of reading in Botswana primary schools from independence to the present. The purpose was to get the big picture with regard to the status of reading education. The results are reported in four categories: (1) Reading in the Classroom; (2) Reading and Policy; (3)…

  11. Botswana School Child Parents: Their Personal and Community Relationships Contexts for Counselling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntinda, Kayi; Mpofu, Elias; Bender, Benza; Moagi, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    The study determined personal-socio-contextual influences that predicted the perceived quality of relationships with Batswana early teenage mothers. The participants were 86 Botswana high school students (mean age 18.97, SD = 1.76) with motherhood. They completed a numerical measure of adjustment to teenage motherhood in the context of family,…

  12. The Nature, Extent and Causes of Abuse of Children with Disabilities in Schools in Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumba, Almon; Abosi, Okey C.

    2011-01-01

    Studies show that the exact number of children with disabilities in Botswana is unknown. A study on child abuse sought to determine: the forms of child abuse perpetrated on children with disabilities; the extent of child abuse; and the causes of child abuse of children with disabilities. A questionnaire on child abuse was adapted and used to…

  13. Effective Utilization of ICT in English Language Learning--The Case of University of Botswana Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umunnakwe, Ngozi; Sello, Queen

    2016-01-01

    The study investigates the effective utilization of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) by first year undergraduates of the University of Botswana (UB) in their reading and writing skills. The first year students are not first language (L1) learners of English. They have not utilized computers for learning reading and writing in their…

  14. Public servants' right to strike in Lesotho, Botswana and South Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Restrictions on the rights of public officers to strike are permitted by the Constitutions of Lesotho, Botswana and South Africa, where such limitations are reasonable, necessary and justifiable in a democratic society. The limitation of this right in the context of public servants is endorsed by the ILO in the Freedom of ...

  15. Communication Strategies in Primary Schools in Botswana: Interventions Using Cooks, Teacher Aides and Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokibelo, Eureka B.

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the micro planning activities that schools engage in to address learners' needs to make education work in rural primary schools of Botswana. The national language plan prescribes the use of English and Setswana only as languages of instruction at the primary school level. However, this plan is not practical in some regions…

  16. Perceptions of door-to-door HIV counselling and testing in Botswana

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Karen Kroeger a knk2@cdc.gov, Allan W Taylor MD MPH a , Heather M Marlow b , Dr Douglas T Fleming c , Vanessa Beyleveld d , Mary Grace Alwano e e , Mabel Tebogo Kejelepula f , Kentsenao Busang Chilume g , Dr Dawn K Smith a , Dr Thierry Roels h & Dr Peter Kilmarx i

    technical assistance in the development and implementation of PEPFAR supported HIV Testing and Counselling programmes in Botswana. Mabel Tebogo ... Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention at the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Previously ... He is responsible for 9 countries in west and central. Africa and ...

  17. Children Home Alone Unsupervised: Modeling Parental Decisions and Associated Factors in Botswana, Mexico, and Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Casares, Monica; Heymann, Jody

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This paper examines different child care arrangements utilized by working families in countries undergoing major socio-economic transitions, with a focus on modeling parental decisions to leave children home alone. Method: The study interviewed 537 working caregivers attending government health clinics in Botswana, Mexico, and Vietnam.…

  18. Portfolio Assessment of Teaching Practice: Views From Business Education In-Service Student Teachers in Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sithole, Burman Musa

    2011-01-01

    Portfolio assessment of teaching practice was first introduced into the University of Botswana's Faculty of Education in May 2010. This study sought to investigate the impact of this innovative new professional development/assessment system on the professional growth and development of in-service teachers. The findings of the study suggest that…

  19. An Assessment of Academic Stress among Undergraduate Students: The Case of University of Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agolla, Joseph E.; Ongori, Henry

    2009-01-01

    This research finding is based on the responses obtained from the undergraduate students at a higher learning institution (University) in Botswana. This paper investigated the stressors, symptoms and effects that are likely to be experienced by the undergraduate students in higher institutions (Universities). Stressors related to time, academic…

  20. The Relationship between Followership Style and Job Performance in Botswana Private Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyetunji, Christianah O.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the followership style and job performance in Botswana private universities. Attempt was made to determine if there is a significant relationship between followership styles in relation to job performance. A total of 102 randomly selected lecturers from the two private universities completed followership and job performance…

  1. Epidemic transmission of intestinal schistosomiasis in the seasonal part of the Okavango Delta, Botswana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appleton, C.C.; Ellery, W.N.; Byskov, Jens

    2008-01-01

    A well documented epidemic of human intestinal schistosomiasis caused by Schistosoma mansoni occurred at Maun in the seasonal part of the Okavango Delta, Botswana, building from very few cases in the 1950s and early 1960s to a peak prevalence of >80% in the 1980s. A retrospective analysis...

  2. Enhancing Botswana Children's Environmental Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices through the School Civic Clubs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajiboye, Josiah O.; Silo, Nthalivi

    2008-01-01

    An intervention study was set up through the School Civic Clubs to improve Botswana children's environmental knowledge, attitudes and practices. The underlying assumption in using this informal approach was based on the premise that the school time table is already overcrowded and that the infusion approach currently adopted in the country has not…

  3. The Theory into Practice Dilemma: Lesson Planning Challenges Facing Botswana Student-Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boikhutso, Keene

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the problems facing University of Botswana's Post-Graduate Diploma in Education (PGDE) student-teachers with respect to their pedagogical practices during school placements. The study attempts to locate the issue of lesson plans and use of behavioural objectives within the general discourse on school…

  4. Benchmarking the Intended Technology Curricula of Botswana and South Africa: What Can We Learn?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du Toit, Adri; Gaotlhobogwe, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Following a transformation of experience-based handicraft education, Technology education was introduced in Botswana and South Africa in 1990 and 1998, respectively, with the intention of developing technologically literate societies, as well as to develop learners' skills for the world of work. Despite these optimistic intentions, limited…

  5. Sign Language as Medium of Instruction in Botswana Primary Schools: Voices from the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mpuang, Kerileng D.; Mukhopadhyay, Sourav; Malatsi, Nelly

    2015-01-01

    This descriptive phenomenological study investigates teachers' experiences of using sign language for learners who are deaf in the primary schools in Botswana. Eight in-service teachers who have had more than ten years of teaching deaf or hard of hearing (DHH) learners were purposively selected for this study. Data were collected using multiple…

  6. In-School HIV & AIDS Counselling Services in Botswana: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefhedi, Sheila; Montsi, Mercy; Mpofu, Elias

    2008-01-01

    This exploratory study describes the provision of HIV & AIDS counselling services in Botswana junior secondary schools as perceived by teachers. A total of 45 teachers (age range = 20-55; teaching experience range = 0-21 years) from three schools participated. The participants completed a questionnaire on the types of HIV & AIDS-related…

  7. Agriculture on the Brink: Climate Change, Labor and Smallholder Farming in Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William G. Moseley

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Botswana is a semi-arid, middle-income African country that imports 90 percent of its food. Despite its relative prosperity, Botswana also suffers from one of the highest measures of income inequality in the world, persistent poverty, and relatively high levels of food insecurity. The objective of this paper is to explore how political economy, climate change and livelihood dynamics are synergistically impacting household food security. The major finding is that the marginalization of smallholder farming in Botswana has as much or more to do with domestic, regional and international political economy as it does with climate change. As such, international efforts to support climate change adaptation in Botswana will have a limited effect on smallholder farming livelihoods and rural food security unless such efforts take account of political economic constraints. Effective support must be based on a grounded understanding of the real drivers of marginalization and food insecurity. One initiative that merits further exploration is the government’s backyard gardening initiative, which could be viewed as a pro-poor climate adaptation strategy. The findings of this paper are based on semi-structured interviews with policymakers and surveys with urban, peri-urban and rural households undertaken in 2012 and 2015.

  8. Secondary Education for San Students in Botswana: A New Xade Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekere, Bihela

    2011-01-01

    Much research in Botswana has shown that, although other ethnic groups have benefited from the state-funded education systems since independence in 1966, San children have been "left behind." This case study is based on an investigation of the root causes of secondary school dropout among Rural Area Development Program students in New…

  9. Library Automation in Sub Saharan Africa: Case Study of the University of Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutula, Stephen Mudogo

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This article aims to present experiences and the lessons learned from the University of Botswana (UB) library automation project. The implications of the project for similar libraries planning automation in sub Saharan Africa and beyond are adduced. Design/methodology/approach: The article is a case study of library automation at the…

  10. Alcohol abuse, gender-based violence and HIV/AIDS in Botswana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The existence of gender-based violence has been a source of concern within the public and private sectors as well as civil society organisations in Botswana. The present study investigated the link between alcohol abuse, gender-based violence and HIV/AIDS. Further, it attempted to unravel the often unquestioned ...

  11. Development of the National Health Information Systems in Botswana: Pitfalls, prospects and lessons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitio-Kgokgwe, Onalenna; Gauld, Robin D C; Hill, Philip C; Barnett, Pauline

    2015-01-01

    Studies evaluating development of health information systems in developing countries are limited. Most of the available studies are based on pilot projects or cross-sectional studies. We took a longitudinal approach to analysing the development of Botswana's health information systems. We aimed to: (i) trace the development of the national health information systems in Botswana (ii) identify pitfalls during development and prospects that could be maximized to strengthen the system; and (iii) draw lessons for Botswana and other countries working on establishing or improving their health information systems. This article is based on data collected through document analysis and key informant interviews with policy makers, senior managers and staff of the Ministry of Health and senior officers from various stakeholder organizations. Lack of central coordination, weak leadership, weak policy and regulatory frameworks, and inadequate resources limited development of the national health information systems in Botswana. Lack of attention to issues of organizational structure is one of the major pitfalls. The ongoing reorganization of the Ministry of Health provides opportunity to reposition the health information system function. The current efforts including development of the health information management policy and plan could enhance the health information management system.

  12. Molecular, Spatial, and Field Epidemiology Suggesting TB Transmission in Community, Not Hospital, Gaborone, Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surie, Diya; Fane, Othusitse; Finlay, Alyssa; Ogopotse, Matsiri; Tobias, James L; Click, Eleanor S; Modongo, Chawangwa; Zetola, Nicola M; Moonan, Patrick K; Oeltmann, John E

    2017-03-01

    During 2012-2015, 10 of 24 patients infected with matching genotypes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis received care at the same hospital in Gaborone, Botswana. Nosocomial transmission was initially suspected, but we discovered plausible sites of community transmission for 20 (95%) of 21 interviewed patients. Active case-finding at these sites could halt ongoing transmission.

  13. Basic Extension Skills Training (BEST): A Responsive Approach to Integrated Extension for Rural Development in Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gboku, Matthew L. S.; Modise, Oitshepile M.

    2008-01-01

    In a rapidly changing society like Botswana, the competition for employment, training and progression on the job has become very high. The development of skills is therefore a crucial and integral part of nation building, which needs a direct link to a training programme to continuously help staff to cope with the different needs they meet in the…

  14. Teaching of Cultural Concepts in Botswana Junior Secondary Schools Design and Technology Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moalosi, Richie

    2011-01-01

    This research explored the extent to which cultural concepts stipulated in Botswana Design and Technology curriculum are taught by teachers at junior secondary schools, a topic on which there is little previous research. The pinnacle of good product innovation is when it is grounded on sensitive cultural analysis of the society's culture. However,…

  15. Indicators of desiccation-driven change in the distal Okavango Delta, Botswana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ringrose, S.; Vanderpost, C.; Matheson, W.; Wolski, P.; Huntsman-Mapila, P.; Murray-Hudson, M.; Jellema, A.

    2007-01-01

    This work seeks to determine whether riparian woody plant variables respond to drying and salinity regimes in the semi-arid distal Okavango Delta, northern Botswana. Structural and compositional variables were obtained from 47 field sites. Mapping using satellite imagery illustrated differences in

  16. Conductive sapwood area prediction from stem and canopy areas - allometric equations of Kalahari trees, Botswana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubczynski, M.W.; Chavarro-Rincon, D.C.; Rossiter, David

    2017-01-01

    Conductive sapwood (xylem) area (Ax) of all trees in a given forested area is the main factor contributing to spatial tree transpiration. One hundred ninety-five trees of 9 species in the Kalahari region of Botswana were felled, stained, cut into discs, and measured to develop allometric equations

  17. HIV/AIDS in Botswana: President Festus G. Mogae's narrative of secular conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Robin E; Williams, Elizabeth A; Holyoak, Isaac C; Shorter, Shavonne

    2012-01-01

    Over the last decade, Botswana has been identified as a model for countries fighting against annihilation from HIV/AIDS. The country had the highest rate of HIV infections in the world in 2000, but by the end of Festus G. Mogae's presidential term in 2008 Botswana's situation had improved significantly, as residents were increasingly likely to get tested, obtain treatment, and discontinue practices of discrimination against the infected. This study seeks to contribute to a growing body of literature focusing on the communicative elements that played a role in Botswana's successes. More specifically, the purpose of this study is to explore Mogae's national speeches about HIV/AIDS to consider how his rhetoric may have encouraged Botswana's residents to alter their health-related beliefs and behaviors. We find that Mogae used a narrative of secular conversion (i.e., discourse with a pseudoreligious structure that positions problems as rooted in existing values and offers a new guiding principle as an antidote), and we identify such narratives as persuasive health communication tools. The analysis offers public health advocates, scholars, and opinion leaders a framework for persuasively communicating about diseases such as HIV/AIDS without drawing exclusively from a biomedical framework.

  18. The effect of praziquantel against Schistosoma mansoni-infections in Botswana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, H; Byskov, Jens

    1989-01-01

    Chemotherapy of all infected individuals, using praziquantel 40 mg/kg in a single dose, was the initial component of the recently introduced control programme against Schistosoma mansoni-infections in Ngamiland, Botswana. To evaluate the effect of praziquantel in Ngamiland, 81 children were selec...

  19. Mary's room : a case study on becoming a consumer in Francistown, Botswana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Binsbergen, van W.M.J.; Fardon, R.; Binsbergen, van W.M.J.; Dijk, van R.A.

    1999-01-01

    This chapter presents an extended case study of the personal experiences of a young Kalanga woman in Francistown, Botswana, as she moves from village girlhood to incipient urban consumerism. After describing the urban setting of Francistown and the expansion of the town's residential space under the

  20. Classroom Assessment Practices: A Survey of Botswana Primary and Secondary School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koloi-Keaikitse, Setlhomo

    2012-01-01

    The Classroom Assessment Practices and Skills (CAPS) questionnaire was administered to a sample of 691 primary and secondary school teachers in Botswana, Southern Africa to survey their thoughts about classroom assessment and identify classroom assessment practices teachers perceive to be skilled and those that they used most. The study examined…

  1. Exploring the Culture of Reading among Primary School Teachers in Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commeyras, Michelle; Mazile, Bontshetse Mosadimotho

    2011-01-01

    In Botswana, it is common to hear the lament that there is no culture of reading. We aim to contribute to the development of more specific understanding of a culture of reading by reporting on information gathered from teachers who attended workshops we offered titled "Teachers as Readers AND Readers as Teachers: Creating Young Readers and…

  2. Developmentally Appropriate Technology in Early Childhood (DATEC) in Botswana: In-Service Teachers' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Kabita

    2009-01-01

    Developmentally Appropriate Technology in Early Childhood (DATEC) aims to identify the most appropriate applications of Information and Communication Technology to support the development of children under eight years of age. Botswana has a unique spread of population density and deep-rooted socio-cultural values. There is a need to address the…

  3. Changing Livelihoods, Language Use and Language Shift amongst Basarwa of Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mafela, Lily

    2009-01-01

    This study explores the historical relationship between the languages of Basarwa of Botswana and Setswana, in order to understand the dynamics underpinning their appropriation of the Setswana language, as they adjust to their changing livelihoods. The study contributes towards the promotion of a better understanding and awareness of the issues of…

  4. Policy-maker attitudes to the ageing of the HIV cohort in Botswana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The roll out of antiretroviral therapy in Botswana, as in many countries with near universal access to treatment, has transformed HIV into a complex yet manageable chronic condition and has led to the emergence of a population aging with HIV. Although there has been some realization of this development at ...

  5. El Negro, el Niño, witchcraft and the absence of rain in Botswana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gewald, J.B.

    2001-01-01

    In October 2000, the remains of 'El Negro', a Tswana man who had died 170 years before and who, as a stuffed specimen, had been on display in Europe for over 160 years, were flown from Spain to Botswana and given a State funeral in the capital Gaborone. In early 2001, as it became clear that the

  6. Teacher Labour Markets in South Africa and Botswana: A Comparative Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irving, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    This article compares key features of the labour markets for teachers across Botswana and South Africa in order to seek possible explanations for the apparently larger teacher shortages in South Africa. It is argued that South African teachers earn relatively lower wages when compared to professionals with comparable qualifications; they have also…

  7. Testing the Export-Led Growth Hypothesis for Botswana: A Causality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper investigates the causal relationship between export and economic growth for Botswana, using quarterly data for the period 1996 to 2007. The results show that there is bi-directional causality between export and economic growth. The two variables complement each other. This indicates that there is evidence in ...

  8. Advancing Grassroots Climate Change Awareness in Botswana: BCA Campus Greenhouse Gas Baseline Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batisani, Nnyaladzi; Ndiane, Abijah

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to report on the results of a case study in Botswana, aimed at raising awareness on climate issues. Higher-education institutions play a leading role in sustainability efforts, as their research role often lays the groundwork for social transformation. Design/methodology/approach: The Clean Air-Cool Planet (CACP) campus…

  9. A Tracer Study of Home Economics Graduates in Botswana: A Case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this descriptive cross-sectional study was to explore career paths of graduates from the Department of Home Economics Education (DHEE) at University of Botswana (UB). This tracer study involved a survey of market demands, perceived training needs and job satisfaction of participants. A purposive sample ...

  10. Conquering the digital divide: Botswana and South Korea digital divide status and interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nonofo C. Sedimo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Botswana is putting in place initiatives towards establishing itself as a knowledgebased economy. Transformation from a resource-based to a knowledge-based economy is partly hinged on innovation, research and development capability, knowledge channels, and the funding of research and development activities.Objectives: Bridging the digital divide and narrowing the intra-national divide brings about global information and communication technology (ICT usage that translates into changing work patterns and eventually transformed economies. This article outlines the different interventions implemented in Botswana to bridge the divide. The South Korean experience in bridging the divide is discussed so as to serve as lessons on how to effectively bridge the divide to Botswana’s initiatives.Method: Using a mix of exploratory and empirical study, this article presents the findings on the status of ICT uptake in Botswana and investigates the level of the digital divide in the country.Results: The results of the study show that the digital divide is much more evident in Botswana than in South Korea. South Korea has put in place robust strategic initiatives towards reducing the digital divide and this has largely transcended into its transformation into a full-fledged knowledge society.Conclusion: This article is timely as it unearths the different pointers that may be utilised in policy formation and what interventions need to be taken at both the individual and national level to bridge the digital divide.

  11. Information needs of Botswana health care workers and perceptions of wikipedia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Elizabeth; Masupe, Tiny; Joseph, Joseph; Ho-Foster, Ari; Chavez, Afton; Jammalamadugu, Swetha; Marek, Andrew; Arumala, Ruth; Ketshogileng, Dineo; Littman-Quinn, Ryan; Kovarik, Carrie

    2016-11-01

    Since the UN Human Rights Council's recognition on the subject in 2011, the right to access the Internet and information is now considered one of the most basic human rights of global citizens [1,2]. Despite this, an information gap between developed and resource-limited countries remains, and there is scant research on actual information needs of workers themselves. The Republic of Botswana represents a fertile ground to address existing gaps in research, policy, and practice, due to its demonstrated gap in access to information and specialists among rural health care workers (HCWs), burgeoning mHealth capacity, and a timely offer from Orange Telecommunications to access Wikipedia for free on mobile platforms for Botswana subscribers. In this study, we sought to identify clinical information needs of HCWs of Botswana and their perception of Wikipedia as a clinical tool. Twenty-eight facilitated focus groups, consisting of 113 HCWs of various cadres based at district hospitals, clinics, and health posts around Botswana, were employed. Transcription and thematic analysis were performed for those groups. Access to the Internet is limited at most facilities. Most HCWs placed high importance upon using Botswana Ministry of Health (MoH) resources for obtaining credible clinical information. However, the clinical applicability of these materials was limited due to discrepancies amongst sources, potentially outdated information, and poor optimization for time-sensitive circumstances. As a result, HCWs faced challenges, such as loss of patient trust and compromises in patient care. Potential solutions posed by HCWs to address these issues included: multifaceted improvements in Internet infrastructure, access to up-to-date information, transfer of knowledge from MoH to HCW, and improving content and applicability of currently available information. Topics of clinical information needs were broad and encompassed: HIV, TB (Tuberculosis), OB/GYN (Obstetrics and Gynecology

  12. Corporate entrepreneurship orientation and the pursuit of innovating opportunities in Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melodi Botha

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose and objectives: A causal relationship between the independent variable (introduction of innovation and the dependent variable (Corporate Entrepreneurship orientation is explored by addressing the question: Do companies in Botswana have a corporate entrepreneurship (CE orientation that leads them to pursue innovating opportunities? The primary objective is to investigate how CE orientation in companies in Botswana is linked to individual employees' pursuit of innovation within corporate boundaries. Secondary objectives are to identify the prerequisites and factors of CE orientation, individual employees' perceptions and the importance of innovation factors in established companies. Problem investigated: To determine whether existing firms in Botswana represent the concept of an entrepreneurial company within the sphere of corporate entrepreneurship by pursuing innovating opportunities. The intention is to identify the knowledge, attitudes and beliefs of individuals as potential corporate entrepreneurs, their ability to be innovative and how such innovation is brought to fruition. Design and methodology: To obtain quantifiable measures of the link between CE orientation and innovation, a quantitative approach is used: a formalised, cross-sectional research design. The sample consists of 100 individuals at supervisory levels and above in large corporate companies, from eight different provinces in Botswana. A research instrument is used and convenience sampling employed. Factor analysis is performed on the questionnaire to determine its validity and reliability. A Pearson correlation coefficient test is conducted on the three factors identified in factor analysis. The chi-square test and T-test (Mann-Whitney U test are used to illustrate the statistically significant differences between the different variables and factors. Findings and implications: This paper proves the inextricable link between CE orientation and the pursuit of innovation

  13. SCALING UP A MOBILE TELEMEDICINE SOLUTION IN BOTSWANA: KEYS TO SUSTAINABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kagiso eNdlovu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Effective health care delivery is significantly compromised in an environment where resources, both human and technical, are limited. Botswana’s health care system is one of the many in the African continent with few specialised medical doctors, thereby posing a barrier to patients’ access to health care services. In addition, the traditional landline and non-robust Information Technology (IT network infrastructure characterised by slow bandwidth still dominates the health care system in Botswana. Upgrading of the landline IT infrastructure to meet today’s health care demands is a tedious, long and expensive process. Despite these challenges, there still lies hope in health care delivery utilising wireless telecommunication services. Botswana has recently experienced a tremendous growth in the mobile telecommunication industry coupled with an increase in the number of individually owned mobile devices. This growth inspired the Botswana-UPenn Partnership (BUP to collaborate with local partners to explore using mobile devices as tools to improve access to specialised health care delivery. Pilot studies were conducted across four medical specialties, including radiology, oral medicine, dermatology and cervical cancer screening. Findings from the studies became vital evidence in support of the first scale-up project of a mobile telemedicine solution in Botswana, also known as Kgonafalo. Some technical and social challenges were encountered during the initial studies, such as malfunctioning of mobile devices, accidental damage of devices and cultural misalignment between IT and healthcare providers. These challenges brought about lessons learnt, including a strong need for unwavering senior management support, establishment of solid local public-private partnerships, and efficient project sustainability plans. Sustainability milestones included the development and signing of a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU between the Botswana government and

  14. Improving the quality of health information: a qualitative assessment of data management and reporting systems in Botswana

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ledikwe, Jenny H; Grignon, Jessica; Lebelonyane, Refeletswe; Ludick, Steven; Matshediso, Ellah; Sento, Baraedi W; Sharma, Anjali; Semo, Bazghina-werq

    2014-01-01

    .... An assessment was conducted to identify strengths and weaknesses of the health data management and reporting systems that capture and transfer routine monitoring and evaluation (M&E) data in Botswana...

  15. Application of PRECEDE-PROCEED model to tackle problems identified with diarrhoea burden among under-5s in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popoola, Tosin; Mchunu, Gugu

    2015-05-01

    Diarrhoea has been identified as the second leading cause of mortality among under-5s and also claims more life than HIV, measles and malaria combined together in the same category of population. This article is a combination of literature review and personal experience of lessons learnt from past diarrhoea outbreaks in Botswana that caused significant rate of mortality among under-5s. The paper used literature review to identify contributory factors to diarrhoea burden among under-5s in Botswana and applied a community health nursing framework (PRECEDE-PROCEED) to tackle the problems identified. The study revealed that Botswana mothers are lacking in knowledge related to exclusive breastfeeding, prevention and treatment of diarrhoea disease. The paper recommends that health-care workers in Botswana be sensitized on current diarrhoea management to tailor their health education methods appropriately. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  16. Profile of acute poisoning in three health districts of Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Kasule

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study sought to characterise acute poisoning cases seen in three health districts of Botswana.Method: A retrospective review of patients’ records was conducted and included patients treated from January 2004 to December 2005. Data on the demographic status of the patients, information about the poisonous agent(s involved, and the circumstances and outcomes of the poisoning incidents were recorded on a pre-tested data collection form.Results: A total of 590 cases of acute poisoning were included in the analysis. The most affected age category was that of children aged less than six years, who constituted 33.4% of the cases. Most incidents were recorded in the urban district of Gaborone. Seventy-eight percent (78% of the incidents were accidental, with the remainder being intentional. The poisonous agents involved were pharmaceuticals (26.6%, natural toxins (25.6%, household products (14.6%, foods (14.4%, alcohol (6.9%, traditional medicines (4.7%, unspecified agents (3.2%, and agrochemicals (2.7%. The most common route of poison exposure was by oral (82.2%, followed by dermal contact (16.5%, while the inhalation of gases occurred in 1.2% of cases. An incidence rate of 4.7/1000, a case fatality rate of 3.8/100, and 1.5% of deaths were recorded over the two-year period.Conclusion: In conclusion, it can be stated that acute poisoning involved mainly young children and resulted in an incidence rate of 4.7/1000, a case fatality rate of 3.8/100, and 1.5% of deaths over the two-year period. There were differences based on age category, gender and residence of the victims, the types of toxic agents involved, as well as the circumstances and the outcomes of the poisoning incidents. Given the fact that pharmaceuticals, natural toxins, household products and foods were the agents most commonly involved, targeted interventions should take these differences into account in addressing the problem of acute poisoning.

  17. Addressing the Growing Cancer Burden in the Wake of the AIDS Epidemic in Botswana: The BOTSOGO Collaborative Partnership

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Efstathiou, Jason A., E-mail: jefstathiou@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Bvochora-Nsingo, Memory [Gaborone Private Hospital, Gaborone (Botswana); Gierga, David P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Alphonse Kayembe, Mukendi K. [Department of Anatomical Pathology, National Health Laboratory, Gaborone (Botswana); Department of Pathology, University of Botswana School of Medicine, Gaborone (Botswana); Mmalane, Mompati [Botswana Harvard AIDS Institute, Gaborone (Botswana); Russell, Anthony H.; Paly, Jonathan J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Brown, Carolyn [Botswana Harvard AIDS Institute, Gaborone (Botswana); Musimar, Zola [Princess Marina Hospital, Gaborone (Botswana); Abramson, Jeremy S. [Department of Medical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Bruce, Kathy A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Karumekayi, Talkmore [Gaborone Private Hospital, Gaborone (Botswana); Clayman, Rebecca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Hodgeman, Ryan [Botswana Harvard AIDS Institute, Gaborone (Botswana); Kasese, Joseph [Bokamoso Private Hospital, Gaborone (Botswana); Makufa, Remigio [Gaborone Private Hospital, Gaborone (Botswana); Bigger, Elizabeth [Princess Marina Hospital, Gaborone (Botswana); Department of Medical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Suneja, Gita [Department of Radiation Oncology and Leonard David Institute of Health Economics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Busse, Paul M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); and others

    2014-07-01

    Botswana has experienced a dramatic increase in HIV-related malignancies over the past decade. The BOTSOGO collaboration sought to establish a sustainable partnership with the Botswana oncology community to improve cancer care. This collaboration is anchored by regular tumor boards and on-site visits that have resulted in the introduction of new approaches to treatment and perceived improvements in care, providing a model for partnership between academic oncology centers and high-burden countries with limited resources.

  18. Associations of demographic variables and the Health Belief Model constructs with Pap smear screening among urban women in Botswana

    OpenAIRE

    McFarland, Ditsapelo

    2013-01-01

    Ditsapelo M McFarland College of Nursing and Public Health, Adelphi University, Garden City, NY, USA Purpose: Papanicolaou (Pap) smear services are available in most urban areas in Botswana. Yet most women in such areas do not screen regularly for cancer of the cervix. The purpose of this article is to present findings on the associations of demographic variables and Health Belief Model constructs with Pap smear screening among urban women in Botswana. Sample and methods: The study included ...

  19. Building research capacity in Botswana: a randomized trial comparing training methodologies in the Botswana ethics training initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Little empirical data are available on the extent to which capacity-building programs in research ethics prepare trainees to apply ethical reasoning skills to the design, conduct, or review of research. A randomized controlled trial was conducted in Botswana in 2010 to assess the effectiveness of a case-based intervention using email to augment in-person seminars. Methods University faculty and current and prospective IRB/REC members took part in a semester-long training program in research ethics. Participants attended two 2-day seminars and were assigned at random to one of two on-line arms of the trial. Participants in both arms completed on-line international modules from the Collaborative Institutional Training Initiative. Between seminars, intervention-arm participants were also emailed a weekly case to analyze in response to set questions; responses and individualized faculty feedback were exchanged via email. Tests assessing ethics knowledge were administered at the start of each seminar. The post-test included an additional section in which participants were asked to identify the ethical issues highlighted in five case studies from a list of multiple-choice responses. Results were analyzed using regression and ANOVA. Results Of the 71 participants (36 control, 35 intervention) enrolled at the first seminar, 41 (57.7%) attended the second seminar (19 control, 22 intervention). In the intervention arm, 19 (54.3%) participants fully completed and 8 (22.9%) partially completed all six weekly cases. The mean score was higher on the post-test (30.3/40) than on the pre-test (28.0/40), and individual post- and pre-test scores were highly correlated (r = 0.65, p  0.84), but intervention-arm subjects who completed all assigned cases answered an average of 3.2 more questions correctly on the post-test than others, controlling for pre-test scores (p = 0.003). Conclusions Completion of the case-based intervention improved respondents’ test

  20. Scaling up a Mobile Telemedicine Solution in Botswana: Keys to Sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndlovu, Kagiso; Littman-Quinn, Ryan; Park, Elizabeth; Dikai, Zambo; Kovarik, Carrie L

    2014-01-01

    Effective health care delivery is significantly compromised in an environment where resources, both human and technical, are limited. Botswana's health care system is one of the many in the African continent with few specialized medical doctors, thereby posing a barrier to patients' access to health care services. In addition, the traditional landline and non-robust Information Technology (IT) network infrastructure characterized by slow bandwidth still dominates the health care system in Botswana. Upgrading of the landline IT infrastructure to meet today's health care demands is a tedious, long, and expensive process. Despite these challenges, there still lies hope in health care delivery utilizing wireless telecommunication services. Botswana has recently experienced tremendous growth in the mobile telecommunication industry coupled with an increase in the number of individually owned mobile devices. This growth inspired the Botswana-UPenn Partnership (BUP) to collaborate with local partners to explore using mobile devices as tools to improve access to specialized health care delivery. Pilot studies were conducted across four medical specialties, including radiology, oral medicine, dermatology, and cervical cancer screening. Findings from the studies became vital evidence in support of the first scale-up project of a mobile telemedicine solution in Botswana, also known as "Kgonafalo." Some technical and social challenges were encountered during the initial studies, such as malfunctioning of mobile devices, accidental damage of devices, and cultural misalignment between IT and healthcare providers. These challenges brought about lessons learnt, including a strong need for unwavering senior management support, establishment of solid local public-private partnerships, and efficient project sustainability plans. Sustainability milestones included the development and signing of a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the Botswana government and a private

  1. An innovative educational approach to professional development of medical laboratory scientists in Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magowe MK

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Mabel KM Magowe,1 Jenny H Ledikwe,2,3 Ishmael Kasvosve,1 Robert Martin,2 Kabo Thankane,3 Bazghina-werq Semo2,31Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Botswana, Gaborone, Botswana; 2Department of Global Health, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA; 3Botswana International Training and Education Center for Health, Gaborone, BotswanaPurpose: To address the shortage of laboratory scientists in Botswana, an innovative, one-year academic bridging program was initiated at the University of Botswana, to advance diploma-holding laboratory technicians towards becoming laboratory scientists holding Bachelor’s degrees. An evaluation was conducted, which described the outcomes of the program and the lessons learned from this novel approach to meeting human resource needs.Methods: This was a cross-sectional, mixed-methods evaluation. Qualitative interviews were conducted with graduates of the Bachelor of Science (BSc Medical Laboratory Sciences (MLS bridging program, along with the graduates’ current supervisors, and key informants who were involved in program development or implementation. The quantitative data collected included a written questionnaire, completed by program graduates, with a retrospective pre-test/post-test survey of graduates’ confidence, in terms of key laboratory competencies.Results: The BSc MLS bridging program produced thirty-three laboratory scientists over 3 years. There was a significant increase in confidence among graduates, for specified competencies, after the program (P<0.05. Graduates reported acquiring new skills and, often, accepting new responsibilities at their former workplace, particularly in relationship to leadership and management. Five graduates enrolled in advanced degree programs. Most graduates assumed increased responsibility. However, only two graduates were promoted after completing the training program. The lessons learned include: the importance of stakeholder involvement, the need for

  2. Macroeconomic and household-level impacts of HIV/AIDS in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferis, Keith; Kinghorn, Anthony; Siphambe, Happy; Thurlow, James

    2008-07-01

    To measure the impact of HIV/AIDS on economic growth and poverty in Botswana and estimate how providing treatment can mitigate its effects. Demographic and financial projections were combined with economic simulation models, including a macroeconomic growth model and a macro-microeconomic computable general equilibrium and microsimulation model. HIV/AIDS significantly reduces economic growth and increases household poverty. The impact is now severe enough to be affecting the economy as a whole, and threatens to pull some of the uninfected population into poverty. Providing antiretroviral therapy can partly offset this negative effect. Treatment increases health's share of government expenditure only marginally, because it increases economic growth and because withholding treatment raises the cost of other health services. Botswana's treatment programme is appropriate from a macroeconomic perspective. Conducting macroeconomic impact assessments is important in countries where prevalence rates are particularly high.

  3. Electricity Consumption and Economic Growth: Trivariate investigation in Botswana with Capital Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakiru Adebola Solarin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the relationship between electricity consumption and real gross domestic product in Botswana (the world’s largest producer of diamonds. The study includes capital formation in a trivariate system for the period covering 1980-2008. Zivot and Andrews (1992 unit roots test; bound test for cointegration, and Granger causality test are employed. Unidirectional causality is found from electricity consumption to real gross domestic product is in line with study of Altinay and Karagol (2005 among others. The long run estimate reinforce the Granger causality tests by indicating that electricity consumption is positively associated with real gross domestic product in the long run. Further findings suggest unidirectional causality from capital formation to real gross domestic product. The implication is that Botswana- being a highly energy dependent country- will have the performance of its capital formation on the economy partly determined by adequate electricity.

  4. Is Wagner’s theory relevant in explaining health expenditure dynamics in Botswana?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunofiwa Tsaurai

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This study tests the relevance of the Wagner’s theory in explaining the health expenditure in Botswana. There is no consensus yet when it comes to the causality relationship between health expenditure and economy. At the moment, there are four dominant schools of thought explaining the causality relationship between health expenditure and economy. The first school of thought is that health expenditure spurs the economy whilst the second school of thought says that the economy drives health expenditure. The third school of thought maintains that there is a feedback effect between health expenditure and the economy whilst the fourth mentions that there is no causality at all between the two variables. However, this study found out that there is no causality relationship between health expenditure and GDP in Botswana thereby dismissing the relevance of the Wagner’s theory.

  5. Continuing Discontinuities: Local and State Perspectives on Cattle Production and Water Management in Botswana

    OpenAIRE

    Emmanuel Manzungu; Tiego J. Mpho; Africa Mpale-Mudanga

    2009-01-01

    From 1885 when the modern state of Botswana was founded until the discovery of significant mineral deposits in 1967, one year after independence, the livestock industry, particularly cattle production, played a significant role in the country’s economy. Today there are concerns about how the livestock industry, because of its importance to many rural households, and its potential to diversify the mineral-dominated economy, can be revived. In recognition of the country’s semi-arid climate, the...

  6. Clinical use of blood and blood components in post-abortion care in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsima, B M; Melese, T; Mogobe, K D; Chabaesele, K; Rankgoane, G; Nassali, M; Habte, D

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the pattern and gaps in blood product utilisation in post-abortion care is crucial for evidence-based planning and priority setting. To describe the current use of blood and blood components in post-abortion care in Botswana. We conducted a retrospective cross-sectional study across four hospitals in Botswana using routine patients' records. We included all patients admitted for an abortion between January and August 2014. Descriptive statistics are used to report the results. Whole blood and red cell concentrates were used in 59/619 (9·5%) of patients. Plasma and platelet use was 1·3 and 0·7%, respectively. The mean admission haemoglobin level was 10·07 g dL(-1) (SD 2·69) and differed significantly between referral and district hospitals. The mean number of blood units transfused per patient was 2·23 (standard deviation (SD) 1·23), with 15/55 (27·3%) receiving a single unit. A total of 43/288 (14·9%) of the patients had haemoglobin levels below 7 g dL(-1) but did not receive any transfusion. There was a moderate positive correlation between admission haemoglobin level and time to transfusion (Spearman's rho = 0·37, P = 0·01). The number of blood units given increased with decreasing admission haemoglobin level. The strength of this association was moderate (Spearman's rho = -0·48, P blood and blood components in post-abortion care in Botswana despite an apparent clinical need in some instances. The reason for this shortfall, as well as its impact on morbidity and mortality, needs to be explored and be a focus of health systems research in Botswana. © 2016 The Authors. Transfusion Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Blood Transfusion Society.

  7. Tax Payers Attitude and Compliance Behavior among Small Medium Enterprises (SMEs) in Botswana

    OpenAIRE

    Nugi Nkwe

    2013-01-01

    In the framework of this study, an attempt to identify the level of taxpayers attitudes and tax compliance behaviour towards tax systems, to identify factors which influence taxpayers¡¯ attitudes, to establish relationship between attitudes and tax compliance behaviour and to recommend ways that may contribute to development of enhanced taxpayers¡¯ attitudes and compliance behaviour among Small Medium Enterprises in Botswana. This research was a survey whose data is collected from two hundred...

  8. Réduction du risque d'infection par le VIH au Botswana - essais ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Au Botswana, ce sont les jeunes femmes qui sont le plus touchées par les nouvelles infections par le VIH. Le présent projet a pour but de réduire le nombre de nouveaux cas d'infection par le VIH, en particulier chez les femmes de 15 à 29 ans. Bien que l'on recense des cas de VIH/sida dans la plupart des régions du ...

  9. DISSEMINATION OF AND USE OF HIV/AIDS INFORMATION BY STUDENTS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF BOTSWANA

    OpenAIRE

    Lauretta Wamunza; Benzies Boadi; Stephen Mutula

    2007-01-01

    Presents part of the findings of a study that was carried out at the University of Botswana to determine in general how HIV/AIDS information is disseminated to and used by undergraduate students. Both qualitative and quantitative approaches were used. A survey design was used to study a population of 9000 plus undergraduate students. Questionnaires and interviews were used to collect data. SPSS was used to analyse quantitative data while qualitative data was analysed using thematic categoriza...

  10. Development of the National Health Information Systems in Botswana: Pitfalls, prospects and lessons

    OpenAIRE

    Seitio-Kgokgwe, Onalenna; Gauld, Robin D. C.; Hill, Philip C.; Barnett, Pauline

    2015-01-01

    Background: Studies evaluating development of health information systems in developing countries are limited. Most of the available studies are based on pilot projects or cross-sectional studies. We took a longitudinal approach to analysing the development of Botswana’s health information systems. Objectives: We aimed to: (i) trace the development of the national health information systems in Botswana (ii) identify pitfalls during development and prospects that could be maximized to strengthe...

  11. A day in my life as a peer-educator. Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, S

    1995-01-01

    The experiences of a peer educator who joined the YWCA's Peer Approach Counselling by Teenagers (PACT) program in 1993 are related. She learned youth-to-youth counseling skills pertaining to contraceptives, relationships, decision-making, problem solving, leadership, and AIDS education. In 1994 she started working for Population Services International (PSI), a social marketing program for condoms whose main target groups are youth and young women. In Botswana almost 1/5 of 13-15 year-old youth have already had sex. Early sexual activity contributes to the high rate of teenage pregnancy (approximately 10-15% of 13-18 year olds are parents); and the alarming HIV infection rate (15-20% of the sexually active population). Choices and responsibilities are the themes that provide youth with the education to make informed decisions by which they can be better parents. Sometimes work involves other non-governmental associations (NGOs) such as the Botswana Welfare Association, the YWCA, or the Red Cross, but most of the work takes place at events such as fashion shows, radio programs, concerts, and festivals. A demonstration team travels across Botswana to stage serious condom demonstrations, which are followed by games and competitions, and a few questions about AIDS awareness. Youth are much more likely to participate in this informal setting. The existing institutions that teach youth about reproductive health, such as schools or clinics, are not being used efficiently. Research has shown that teenagers actually do think about using condoms but lack the negotiating skills, therefore responsible sexual behavior should be the basis of education in all schools. Unfortunately, many adults find correct condom usage and teenage sexuality sensitive topics. Although PSI and other NGOs have been successful in Botswana, much education is still needed. More support from parents and teachers could contribute to reaching more youth.

  12. Buffalo, bush meat, and the zoonotic threat of brucellosis in Botswana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Anne Alexander

    Full Text Available Brucellosis is a zoonotic disease of global importance infecting humans, domestic animals, and wildlife. Little is known about the epidemiology and persistence of brucellosis in wildlife in Southern Africa, particularly in Botswana.Archived wildlife samples from Botswana (1995-2000 were screened with the Rose Bengal Test (RBT and fluorescence polarization assay (FPA and included the African buffalo (247, bushbuck (1, eland (5, elephant (25, gemsbok (1, giraffe (9, hartebeest (12, impala (171, kudu (27, red lechwe (10, reedbuck (1, rhino (2, springbok (5, steenbok (2, warthog (24, waterbuck (1, wildebeest (33, honey badger (1, lion (43, and zebra (21. Human case data were extracted from government annual health reports (1974-2006.Only buffalo (6%, 95% CI 3.04%-8.96% and giraffe (11%, 95% CI 0-38.43% were confirmed seropositive on both tests. Seropositive buffalo were widely distributed across the buffalo range where cattle density was low. Human infections were reported in low numbers with most infections (46% occurring in children (<14 years old and no cases were reported among people working in the agricultural sector.Low seroprevalence of brucellosis in Botswana buffalo in a previous study in 1974 and again in this survey suggests an endemic status of the disease in this species. Buffalo, a preferred source of bush meat, is utilized both legally and illegally in Botswana. Household meat processing practices can provide widespread pathogen exposure risk to family members and the community, identifying an important source of zoonotic pathogen transmission potential. Although brucellosis may be controlled in livestock populations, public health officials need to be alert to the possibility of human infections arising from the use of bush meat. This study illustrates the need for a unified approach in infectious disease research that includes consideration of both domestic and wildlife sources of infection in determining public health risks from

  13. La chambre de Mary : ou comment devenir consommatrice à Francistown, Botswana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Binsbergen, van W.M.J.; Zabus, C.; Lame, D de

    1999-01-01

    Cet article est fondé sur un travail de terrain ethnographique réalisé sur une durée de cinq années d'observation participante entrecoupée de pauses dans la ville de Francistown au Botswana à partir de 1988. Il s'agit d'une étude de cas longitudinale, où est suivie une jeune femme qui a migré d'un

  14. Low back pain among school teachers in Botswana, prevalence and risk factors

    OpenAIRE

    ERICK, Patience N.; Derek R Smith

    2014-01-01

    Background Although low back pain (LBP) represents a common occupational problem, few epidemiological studies have investigated the prevalence and risk factors for LBP among school teachers, particularly in Africa. School teachers are known to represent an occupational group among which there appears to be a high prevalence of LBP. The objective of this study was, therefore, to conduct one of the first epidemiological investigations of LBP among teachers in Botswana. Methods A cross-sectional...

  15. Is HIV/AIDS undermining Botswana's ‘success story'? implications for development strategy:

    OpenAIRE

    Thurlow, James

    2007-01-01

    "Despite its strong growth record, Botswana faces two prominent development challenges: the onslaught of HIV/AIDS and the slowdown in diamond mining. This study estimates the growth and distributional impact of the HIV/AIDS pandemic and considers its implications for the country's development prospects, using a dynamic computable general equilibrium and microsimulation model that accounts for the cost of treatment. The results of this analysis indicate that HIV/AIDS reduces GDP growth by 1.6 ...

  16. WP 81 - An overview of women’s work and employment in Botswana

    OpenAIRE

    Maarten Klaveren; Kea Tijdens; Melanie Hughie Williams; Nuria Ramos Martin

    2009-01-01

    *Management Summary* This report provides information on Botswana on behalf of the implementation of the DECISIONS FOR LIFE project in that country. The DECISIONS FOR LIFE project aims to raise awareness amongst young female workers about their employment opportunities and career possibilities, family building and the work-family balance. This report is part of the Inventories, to be made by the University of Amsterdam, for all 14 countries involved. It focuses on a gender analysis of work an...

  17. Small Business Critical Success/Failure Factors In Developing Economies: Some Evidences From Botswana

    OpenAIRE

    Zelealem T. Temtime; J. Pansiri

    2004-01-01

    Although the discovery of diamond has propelled Botswana from one of the poorest countries in 1966 to its current economic status as a middle-income country, the country still faces the problems of economic diversification, employment creation, income generation and distribution and poverty alleviation. Governmental and non- Governmental organizations have put many efforts on the development of small and medium Enterprises (SMEs) to diversify the economy away from mining, to create jobs, gene...

  18. A survey analysis of indigenous goat production in communal farming systems of Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monau, P I; Visser, C; Nsoso, S J; Van Marle-Köster, E

    2017-08-01

    A total of 153 communal farmers in four agro-ecological regions of Botswana were interviewed using a structured questionnaire. The aims of the survey were to characterise existing communal goat production systems, evaluate the importance of goats to farmers and identify breeding practices and constraints encountered in goat production in Botswana. Data was collected on socio-economic parameters, general and breeding management practices and major constraints limiting goat production in Botswana. All respondents were small-scale communal farmers with 63% respondents practising mixed crop-livestock farming and 37% keeping livestock as their primary activity. The majority (33%) of respondents were older than 60 years. Over 80% of the farmers kept goats for cash required for tuition, school uniforms and household commodities as well as re-stocking of animals. Most farmers (62%) kept indigenous crossed genotypes. Generally, uncontrolled mating was practised with the majority of farmers (41%) using on-farm reared bucks for more than two years of breeding and communal bucks (36%) as an alternative. The major constraints limiting goat productivity in communal areas included uncontrolled breeding, predators, theft and diseases. Issues raised by farmers should be considered in designing and implementing effective breeding programs for goats to improve their overall productivity and contribution to poverty alleviation in these communities.

  19. The Madikwe Forum: a comprehensive partnership for supporting governance of Botswana's HIV and AIDS response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Gavin; Reardon, Candice; Gunthorp, Jonathan; Moeti, Themba; Chingombe, Innocent; Busang, Lesego; Musuka, Godfrey

    2012-03-01

    There is a need for actors within the philanthropic sector to pursue collaborative partnerships with developing nations which could result in sustainable country-led responses to HIV and AIDS. There is also a need to evaluate the structures governing these partnerships in order to determine their effectiveness in strengthening national responses to HIV and AIDS. This article presents findings from a qualitative study of a governance structure of the African Comprehensive HIV/AIDS Partnerships (ACHAP), namely the Madikwe Forum. The investigation sought to critically reflect on the role and effectiveness of the Madikwe Forum in Botswana's response to HIV and AIDS and to consider the value of such a forum for other developing nations and partnership arrangements. The findings indicate that the Madikwe Forum has enabled considerable progress in the implementation of ACHAP-supported initiatives in Botswana. The constructive working relationship and close alignment between ACHAP and the Botswana government's objectives and priority areas were viewed as critical to this success. However, problems exist regarding the operation of the forum as well as a lack of focus on monitoring and evaluation, which requires the forum's urgent attention.

  20. Development of Family Medicine training in Botswana: Views of key stakeholders in Ngamiland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mash, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Background Family Medicine training commenced in Botswana in 2011, and Maun was one of the two sites chosen as a training complex. If it is to be successful there has to be investment in the training programme by all stakeholders in healthcare delivery in the district. Aim The aim of the study was to explore the attitudes of stakeholders to initiation of Family Medicine training and their perspectives on the future roles of family physicians in Ngami district, Botswana. Setting Maun and the surrounding Ngami subdistrict of Botswana. Methods Thirteen in-depth interviews were conducted with purposively selected key stakeholders in the district health services. Data were recorded, transcribed and analysed using the framework method. Results Participants welcomed the development of Family Medicine training in Maun and expect that this will result in improved quality of primary care. Participants expect the registrars and family physicians to provide holistic health care that is of higher quality and expertise than currently experienced, relevant research into the health needs of the community, and reduced need for referrals. Inadequate personal welfare facilities, erratic ancillary support services and an inadequate complement of mentors and supervisors for the programme were some of the gaps and challenges highlighted by participants. Conclusion Family Medicine training is welcomed by stakeholders in Ngamiland. With proper planning introduction of the family physician in the district is expected to result in improvement of primary care. PMID:28235328

  1. Stress, social relationships and health outcomes in low-income Francistown, Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modie-Moroka, Tirelo

    2014-08-01

    Studies assessing the impact of stress on health outcomes are lacking in developing countries such as Botswana, in Southern Africa. This study examines the relationships between individual life stressors (stressful life events and chronic life stressors), social relationships and quality of life (QoL), for low-income urban residents in Francistown, Botswana. Although there are many studies of social support and quality of life, no studies have so far explored the relationship among the three variables. Selected concepts from stress theory are used as a conceptual framework. Using a cross-sectional quantitative design (both descriptive and explanatory), this study examined the associations among life stress (stressful life events and chronic life stressors), social relationships, and four indicators of health and QoL among a sample of 388 low-income urban dwellers in Francistown, Botswana. Using multiple regression models, the results of this study show that the availability of social relationships was associated with better physical and psychological health and level of independence. Controlling for the physical domain of QoL, social relationships buffered the effects of chronic life stressors on QoL and level of independence. Social relationships buffer the effects of stressful life events on quality, not on psychological well-being. Social relationships had no moderating effect on physical health, level of independence and on quality of life.

  2. Beliefs about the causes of cervical cancer in Botswana: implications for nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, D M

    2009-12-01

    Cervical cancer is the most common cause of cancer mortality and morbidity for women in Botswana. Yet, little is known about what women believe to be the causes of the disease. This paper presents data on factors women in Botswana believe are responsible for the high incidence of cervical cancer in their country. Data were part of a larger study that explored knowledge and perceptions about cervical cancer and Pap smear screening from the perspectives of the clients and the healthcare providers. The study that generated the data included 30 women of all socio-economic levels, recruited by network sampling. The women's ages ranged from 31 to 54 years. Demographic data were analysed descriptively. Individualized interview data were content-analysed. The identified causes of cervical cancer were classified as cervical irritants and non-irritants. The most commonly cited cervical irritants were vaginally inserted chemical agents and traditional medicine. Participants identified vaginally inserted chemical substances and traditional medicines as possible explanations for the high incidence of cervical cancer in Botswana. They reported that women used these substances for sexual and hygienic purposes. Although these factors are believed to be the causes of cervical cancer and have not yet been medically acknowledged, verbal reports suggest that their use is problematic. There is a need for health education and for further research to affirm women's beliefs about the harmful effects of intravaginal agents.

  3. Implementation of the Integrated Management of Childhood Illnesses strategy: challenges and recommendations in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mupara, Lucia U; Lubbe, Johanna C

    2016-01-01

    Under-five mortality has been a major public health challenge from time immemorial. In response to this challenge, the World Health Organization and the United Nations Children's Fund developed the Integrated Management of Childhood Illnesses (IMCI) strategy and presented it to the whole world as a key approach to reduce child morbidity and mortality. Botswana started to implement the IMCI strategy in 1998. Reductions in the under-five mortality rate (U5MR) have been documented, although the reduction is not on par with the expected Millennium Development Goal 4 predictions. A quantitative study was done to identify the problems IMCI implementers face when tending children under 5 years in the Gaborone Health District of Botswana. The study population was made up of all the IMCI-trained and registered nurses, and systematic sampling was used to randomly select study participants. Questionnaires were used to collect data. The study findings indicated challenges related to low training coverage, health systems, and the unique features of the IMCI strategy. The comprehensive implementation of the IMCI strategy has the potential to significantly influence the U5MR in Botswana.

  4. Assessing the impact of airborne outreach to build clinical capacity in rural Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brianna L. Kirk

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available There is a paucity of research demonstrating how best to address inequalities in health and access to specialist care faced by rural disadvantaged populations in high HIV-prevalent settings in Sub Saharan Africa. Delivering equitable and cost-effective specialist clinical services in many parts of Africa is challenging, given human resource shortages, poor transport infrastructure and competing health priorities. In this report we describe how an airborne outreach program to provide HIV services to high HIV burden health facilities in rural Botswana has been an important catalyst for improving specialist service delivery across the spectrum of clinical care. The success of Botswana’s airborne program is a consequence of many country-specific determinants as well as external funding support. We argue that lessons learned from the experience in Botswana are normative for other African settings. Specialist medical airborne outreach to rural hospitals can improve access to and quality of care, when part of a multifaceted, multidisciplinary intervention. Furthermore, we demonstrate how an HIV funded program can be a vehicle for enhanced access to essential sub-specialist clinicians in rural Botswana.

  5. Interaction between HIV awareness, knowledge, safe sex practice and HIV prevalence: evidence from Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Ranjan; Sinha, Kompal

    2012-05-01

    This paper makes methodological and empirical contributions to the study of HIV in the context of Botswana, a country with high HIV prevalence. Comparable evidence is presented from India to put the Botswana results in perspective. The results point to the strong role played by affluence and education in increasing HIV knowledge, promoting safe sex and reducing HIV prevalence. The study presents African evidence on the role played by the empowerment of women in promoting safe sex practices such as condom use. The lack of significant association between HIV prevalence and safe sex practice points to the danger of HIV-infected individuals spreading the disease through multiple sex partners and unprotected sex. This danger is underlined by the finding that females with multiple sex partners are at higher risk of being infected with HIV. These results take on special policy significance in the context of Botswana, where the issue of multiple sex partners has not been adequately addressed in the programme to contain the spread of HIV.

  6. Conquering the digital divide: Botswana and South Korea digital divide status and interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nonofo C. Sedimo

    2011-11-01

    Objectives: Bridging the digital divide and narrowing the intra-national divide brings about global information and communication technology (ICT usage that translates into changing work patterns and eventually transformed economies. This article outlines the different interventions implemented in Botswana to bridge the divide. The South Korean experience in bridging the divide is discussed so as to serve as lessons on how to effectively bridge the divide to Botswana’s initiatives. Method: Using a mix of exploratory and empirical study, this article presents the findings on the status of ICT uptake in Botswana and investigates the level of the digital divide in the country. Results: The results of the study show that the digital divide is much more evident in Botswana than in South Korea. South Korea has put in place robust strategic initiatives towards reducing the digital divide and this has largely transcended into its transformation into a full-fledged knowledge society. Conclusion: This article is timely as it unearths the different pointers that may be utilised in policy formation and what interventions need to be taken at both the individual and national level to bridge the digital divide.

  7. Botswana water and surface energy balance research program. Part 1: Integrated approach and field campaign results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandegriend, A. A.; Owe, M.; Vugts, H. F.; Ramothwa, G. K.

    1992-01-01

    The Botswana water and surface energy balance research program was developed to study and evaluate the integrated use of multispectral satellite remote sensing for monitoring the hydrological status of the Earth's surface. Results of the first part of the program (Botswana 1) which ran from 1 Jan. 1988 - 31 Dec. 1990 are summarized. Botswana 1 consisted of two major, mutually related components: a surface energy balance modeling component, built around an extensive field campaign; and a passive microwave research component which consisted of a retrospective study of large scale moisture conditions and Nimbus scanning multichannel microwave radiometer microwave signatures. The integrated approach of both components in general are described and activities performed during the surface energy modeling component including the extensive field campaign are summarized. The results of the passive microwave component are summarized. The key of the field campaign was a multilevel approach, whereby measurements by various similar sensors were made at several altitudes and resolution. Data collection was performed at two adjacent sites of contrasting surface character. The following measurements were made: micrometeorological measurements, surface temperatures, soil temperatures, soil moisture, vegetation (leaf area index and biomass), satellite data, aircraft data, atmospheric soundings, stomatal resistance, and surface emissivity.

  8. Safe male circumcision in Botswana: tension between traditional practices and biomedical marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katisi, Masego; Daniel, Marguerite

    2015-01-01

    Botswana has been running Safe Male Circumcision (SMC) since 2009 and has not yet met its target. Donors like the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Africa Comprehensive HIV/AIDS Partnership (funded by the Gates Foundation) in collaboration with Botswana's Ministry of Health have invested much to encourage HIV-negative men to circumcise. Demand creation strategies make use of media and celebrities. The objective of this paper is to explore responses to SMC in relation to circumcision as part of traditional initiation practices. More specifically, we present the views of two communities in Botswana on SMC consultation processes, implementation procedures and campaign strategies. The methods used include participant observation, in-depth interviews with key stakeholders (donors, implementers and Ministry officials), community leaders and men in the community. We observe that consultation with traditional leaders was done in a seemingly superficial, non-participatory manner. While SMC implementers reported pressure to deliver numbers to the World Health Organization, traditional leaders promoted circumcision through their routine traditional initiation ceremonies at breaks of two-year intervals. There were conflicting views on public SMC demand creation campaigns in relation to the traditional secrecy of circumcision. In conclusion, initial cooperation of local chiefs and elders turned into resistance.

  9. Poverty Alleviation through Pro-Poor Tourism: The Role of Botswana Forest Reserves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haretsebe Manwa

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Both government and international donor agencies now promote the use of tourism to alleviate poverty. The Botswana government has embraced tourism as a meaningful and sustainable economic activity and diversification opportunity, which now ranks second after mining in its contribution to the country’s gross domestic product. The study reported in this paper investigates perceptions of stakeholders on the opportunities that would be created for the poor by opening up Botswana’s forest reserves for ecotourism. Data was collected through mixed methods involving in-depth interviews with government departments, traditional leaders, quasi-government organisations and the Hospitality and Tourism Association of Botswana. Focus group discussions were also held with village development committees, Chobe Enclave Conservation Trust (CECT and Kasane, Lesoma and Pandematenga Trust (KALEPA members, and a consultative national workshop of stakeholders was also held. The findings indicate that opening up forest reserves for ecotourism has the potential to alleviate poverty among the disadvantaged groups living adjacent to forest reserves through direct (employment, small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs, secondary (linkages/partnerships and dynamic effects (sustainable livelihoods. The study concludes by cautioning that whilst pro-poor tourism may yield short- and medium-term benefits, in keeping with sustainability objectives, participants in the programme need to be mindful of forestry encroachment and come up with strategies to ensure the sustainability of the Botswana forest reserves.

  10. Landscape suitability in Botswana for the conservation of its six large African carnivores.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanlie E K Winterbach

    Full Text Available Wide-ranging large carnivores often range beyond the boundaries of protected areas into human-dominated areas. Mapping out potentially suitable habitats on a country-wide scale and identifying areas with potentially high levels of threats to large carnivore survival is necessary to develop national conservation action plans. We used a novel approach to map and identify these areas in Botswana for its large carnivore guild consisting of lion (Panthera leo, leopard (Panthera pardus, spotted hyaena (Crocuta crocuta, brown hyaena (Hyaena brunnea, cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus and African wild dog (Lycaon pictus. The habitat suitability for large carnivores depends primarily on prey availability, interspecific competition, and conflict with humans. Prey availability is most likely the strongest natural determinant. We used the distribution of biomass of typical wild ungulate species occurring in Botswana which is preyed upon by the six large carnivores to evaluate the potential suitability of the different management zones in the country to sustain large carnivore populations. In areas where a high biomass of large prey species occurred, we assumed interspecific competition between dominant and subordinated competitors to be high. This reduced the suitability of these areas for conservation of subordinate competitors, and vice versa. We used the percentage of prey biomass of the total prey and livestock biomass to identify areas with potentially high levels of conflict in agricultural areas. High to medium biomass of large prey was mostly confined to conservation zones, while small prey biomass was more evenly spread across large parts of the country. This necessitates different conservation strategies for carnivores with a preference for large prey, and those that can persist in the agricultural areas. To ensure connectivity between populations inside Botswana and also with its neighbours, a number of critical areas for priority management actions exist

  11. Landscape suitability in Botswana for the conservation of its six large African carnivores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterbach, Hanlie E K; Winterbach, Christiaan W; Somers, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Wide-ranging large carnivores often range beyond the boundaries of protected areas into human-dominated areas. Mapping out potentially suitable habitats on a country-wide scale and identifying areas with potentially high levels of threats to large carnivore survival is necessary to develop national conservation action plans. We used a novel approach to map and identify these areas in Botswana for its large carnivore guild consisting of lion (Panthera leo), leopard (Panthera pardus), spotted hyaena (Crocuta crocuta), brown hyaena (Hyaena brunnea), cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) and African wild dog (Lycaon pictus). The habitat suitability for large carnivores depends primarily on prey availability, interspecific competition, and conflict with humans. Prey availability is most likely the strongest natural determinant. We used the distribution of biomass of typical wild ungulate species occurring in Botswana which is preyed upon by the six large carnivores to evaluate the potential suitability of the different management zones in the country to sustain large carnivore populations. In areas where a high biomass of large prey species occurred, we assumed interspecific competition between dominant and subordinated competitors to be high. This reduced the suitability of these areas for conservation of subordinate competitors, and vice versa. We used the percentage of prey biomass of the total prey and livestock biomass to identify areas with potentially high levels of conflict in agricultural areas. High to medium biomass of large prey was mostly confined to conservation zones, while small prey biomass was more evenly spread across large parts of the country. This necessitates different conservation strategies for carnivores with a preference for large prey, and those that can persist in the agricultural areas. To ensure connectivity between populations inside Botswana and also with its neighbours, a number of critical areas for priority management actions exist in the

  12. Achieving public and global health competencies: A teaching case study of Botswana's cervical cancer screening program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okatch, Harriet; Sowicz, Timothy Joseph; Teng, Helen; Ramogola-Masire, Doreen; Buttenheim, Alison M

    2018-02-09

    To design and implement a case study on the cervical cancer screening program in Botswana to teach public and global health competencies to undergraduate nursing students. The case study was developed following a review of the literature on the epidemiology and health policies of cervical cancer in Botswana, and an interview with an obstetrician/gynecologist engaged in both clinical practice and research in Botswana. The case study has been implemented over seven semesters to students enrolled in the Nursing in the Community course at the University of Pennsylvania. Approximately 75-100 students are enrolled each semester. Student's perceptions of epidemiologic skills gained and group functioning. Students responded to an open-ended question about lessons learned and offered suggestions to improve the learning experience. Faculty assessment of student deliverables demonstrated that students achieved the learning objectives and mastered necessary competencies. More than 70% (n = 69) of the students indicated that they acquired relevant skills at greater than a satisfactory level. Generally, students had great experiences working in groups measured across five dimensions: engagement/contribution, creativity/resilience, on task/works independently, social interaction/communication, and preparedness. However, isolated cases of poor group functioning were reported for engagement/contribution, and creativity/resilience. The case study, which has been revised with respect to length, content and group processes, has been valuable in educating undergraduate nursing students in a more engaging way that mimics real life public health nursing scenarios. Students achieved both public and global health competencies through participation in the case study. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Registrar wellness in Botswana: Measuring burnout and identifying ways to improve wellness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K D Westmoreland

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. Burnout during registrar training is high, especially in resource-limited settings where stressors are intensified. Burnout leads to decreased quality of life for doctors, poor job and patient satisfaction, and difficulty retaining doctors. Objectives. Primary: to measure burnout among registrars working at Princess Marina Hospital in Gaborone, Botswana. Secondary: to determine factors contributing to burnout and identify potential wellness interventions. Methods. The validated Maslach Burnout Inventory was used to measure the degree of emotional exhaustion, depersonalisation and personal accomplishment. Work-related difficulties and potential wellness interventions were explored through multiple-choice and open-ended questions. Results. Of 40 eligible registrars, 20 (50% completed the survey. High levels of burnout were reported for emotional exhaustion in 65% (13/20, depersonalisation in 45% (9/20, and personal accomplishment in 35% (7/20 of registrars. A high degree of burnout was reported by 75% (15/20 of registrars in one or more domains. In the previous 7 days, registrars worked an average of 77 hours, took 1.5 overnight calls, slept 5.7 hours per night, and 53% (10/19 had ≥1 of their patients die. Five (25% registrars considered leaving Botswana to work in another country, which correlated with those with the highest degree of burnout. The most common frustrations included insufficient salary and limited medical resources. Suggested interventions included improved mentorship and wellness lectures. Conclusions. There is a high degree of burnout, especially emotional exhaustion, among registrars. Encouragingly, most registrars have a desire to work in Botswana after training. Future research on improving registrar wellness in low-resource settings is urgently needed.

  14. Factors associated with acceptability of child circumcision in Botswana -- a cross sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mpho Keetile

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Safe male child circumcision has been recently adopted as a potential strategy to prevent HIV/AIDS transmission in later life in Botswana. Methods Data used was derived from a cross-sectional survey, the Botswana AIDS Impact Survey (BAIS IV, conducted in 2013. A total sample of 7984 respondents in ages 15–64 years who had successfully completed the individual questionnaire during the survey were selected and included for analysis. Both descriptive and multivariable analyses were used to explore factors associated with acceptability of child circumcision. Data was analysed using SPSS version 22 program. Results Results indicate that about 84 % of participants said they would circumcise their male children aged 18 years and below, while 93 % were aware of the safe male circumcision program. Bivariate analyses results show that acceptability of child circumcision was significantly associated with sex, age, education, religion, residence, HIV status of the parent, fathers circumcision status, father's intention to circumcise and parent's knowledge about the safe male circumcision program. Multivariable analyses results indicate positive association between respondent's HIV positive status (OR, 3.5, Men's circumcision status (OR, 3.7, men's intention to circumcise (OR, 9.3 and acceptability of child circumcision. Conclusion Results of this study indicate some relatively high acceptability levels for child circumcision. Some individual behavioural factors influencing acceptability of child circumcision were also identified. This study provides a proper understanding of factors associated with acceptability of child circumcision which will ultimately enhance the successful roll-out of the school going children circumcision program in Botswana.

  15. Buffalo, bush meat, and the zoonotic threat of brucellosis in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Kathleen Anne; Blackburn, Jason Kenna; Vandewalle, Mark Eric; Pesapane, Risa; Baipoledi, Eddie Kekgonne; Elzer, Phil H

    2012-01-01

    Brucellosis is a zoonotic disease of global importance infecting humans, domestic animals, and wildlife. Little is known about the epidemiology and persistence of brucellosis in wildlife in Southern Africa, particularly in Botswana. Archived wildlife samples from Botswana (1995-2000) were screened with the Rose Bengal Test (RBT) and fluorescence polarization assay (FPA) and included the African buffalo (247), bushbuck (1), eland (5), elephant (25), gemsbok (1), giraffe (9), hartebeest (12), impala (171), kudu (27), red lechwe (10), reedbuck (1), rhino (2), springbok (5), steenbok (2), warthog (24), waterbuck (1), wildebeest (33), honey badger (1), lion (43), and zebra (21). Human case data were extracted from government annual health reports (1974-2006). Only buffalo (6%, 95% CI 3.04%-8.96%) and giraffe (11%, 95% CI 0-38.43%) were confirmed seropositive on both tests. Seropositive buffalo were widely distributed across the buffalo range where cattle density was low. Human infections were reported in low numbers with most infections (46%) occurring in children (bush meat, is utilized both legally and illegally in Botswana. Household meat processing practices can provide widespread pathogen exposure risk to family members and the community, identifying an important source of zoonotic pathogen transmission potential. Although brucellosis may be controlled in livestock populations, public health officials need to be alert to the possibility of human infections arising from the use of bush meat. This study illustrates the need for a unified approach in infectious disease research that includes consideration of both domestic and wildlife sources of infection in determining public health risks from zoonotic disease invasions.

  16. Climate Change is Likely to Worsen the Public Health Threat of Diarrheal Disease in Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Vance

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Diarrheal disease is an important health challenge, accounting for the majority of childhood deaths globally. Climate change is expected to increase the global burden of diarrheal disease but little is known regarding climate drivers, particularly in Africa. Using health data from Botswana spanning a 30-year period (1974–2003, we evaluated monthly reports of diarrheal disease among patients presenting to Botswana health facilities and compared this to climatic variables. Diarrheal case incidence presents with a bimodal cyclical pattern with peaks in March (ANOVA p < 0.001 and October (ANOVA p < 0.001 in the wet and dry season, respectively. There is a strong positive autocorrelation (p < 0.001 in the number of reported diarrhea cases at the one-month lag level. Climatic variables (rainfall, minimum temperature, and vapor pressure predicted seasonal diarrheal with a one-month lag in variables (p < 0.001. Diarrheal case incidence was highest in the dry season after accounting for other variables, exhibiting on average a 20% increase over the yearly mean (p < 0.001. Our analysis suggests that forecasted climate change increases in temperature and decreases in precipitation may increase dry season diarrheal disease incidence with hot, dry conditions starting earlier and lasting longer. Diarrheal disease incidence in the wet season is likely to decline. Our results identify significant health-climate interactions, highlighting the need for an escalated public health focus on controlling diarrheal disease in Botswana. Study findings have application to other arid countries in Africa where diarrheal disease is a persistent public health problem.

  17. The peasantariat and politics: migration, wage labor, and agriculture in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parson, J

    1984-01-01

    This article examines Botswana's wage labor migration in terms of 2 reigning theories: 1) as a dichotomy between traditional and modern society, with workers viewing agriculture as an alternative to more desirable wage employment; or 2) as a subordination of colonial society to capitalist society, with workers drawn from the resulting underdeveloped and impoverished areas and divorced from their agricultural potential. Approximately 90% of Botswanan households have a wage worker; less than 1/4 of households rely on the agricultural economy alone. 80% of the population works in agriculture in some way, but agriculture contributes only 35% of total rural income. Over 50% of households are below the poverty level, and most must rely on a variety of income sources for subsistence. 68% of rural households (Botswana is 84% rural) have absent wage earners while 45% have 1 or more wage earners present. Absent wage earners work mainly in unskilled and semi-skilled jobs in Botswanan towns (44%) and villages (22%), and lands and cattlepost locations (5%) in South African mines (19%), and other jobs in South Africa (8%). Individuals with low socioeconomic status tend to migrate to South Africa; those with higher status move to Botswanan towns. Working for wages has become customary for most Botswanans. This article undermines conventional development theories by showing the close interweaving of the modern and traditional societies, and arguing that traditional retention of communal land rights and cattle ownership served the capitalistic system by becoming the basis for wage earning; previous income source (agriculture) did not disappear, but their use was altered. South African mining returns to the Botswanan government since 1965 largely benefited a growing petty-bourgeois class and marginally improved the life styles of the peasant labor class. Botswana's development depends on the relationship between the peripherial laboring class and the dominating petty-bourgeois and

  18. Prevalence of HIV testing and counseling and associated factors among secondary school students in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodika, Stephane M; Lekone, Phenyo E; Loeto, Peter; Alwano, Mary G; Zulu, Thekiso C; Kim, Evelyn; Machao, Gape; Voetsch, Andrew C

    2016-05-01

    The World Health Organization recommends HIV testing and counseling (HTC) for all adolescents living in countries with generalized HIV epidemics. In Botswana, HIV prevalence among adolescents 15-19 years is 3.7% and among pregnant adolescents is 10%. We describe the proportion and characteristics of secondary school students who have accessed HTC. A multistage sample survey was conducted among students in Botswana's public secondary schools in 2010. The survey was self-administered using a personal digital assistant device. The HTC rate was estimated using self-reported history of HIV testing. Of 1,632 participants, 52% were girls, 43% aged below 16 years, and 27% had ever had sexual intercourse. Most (81%) students knew where to get tested for HIV. Overall, 2.2% of students were HIV positive by self-report. The HTC rate was 23% overall, 34% among students who had ever had sexual intercourse, and 45% among students who had sexual intercourse in the past 12 months. Being pregnant or having made someone pregnant and having had sexual intercourse in the past 12 months were associated with having been tested for HIV among students who had ever had sexual intercourse. Overall, the HTC rate was low, and the self- reported HIV prevalence was high among secondary students in Botswana. Most sexually active students have never been tested for HIV. Health communications efforts for adolescents that increase demand for HTC, routine opt-out HIV testing in healthcare facilities, and school-based HIV testing are needed as part of a national HIV prevention strategy.

  19. Gastric nematodes of Nile crocodiles, Crocodylus niloticus Laurenti, 1768, in the Okavango River, Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Junker

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The ascaridoid nematodes Dujardinascaris madagascariensis Chabaud & Caballero, 1966, Dujardinascaris dujardini (Travassos, 1920, Gedoelstascaris vandenbrandeni (Baylis, 1929 Sprent, 1978 and Multicaecum agile (Wedl, 1861 Baylis, 1923 were recovered from the stomach contents of Crocodylus niloticus Laurenti, 1768 from the Okavango River, Botswana, together with Eustrongylides sp., a dioctophymatoid nematode usually parasitizing piscivorous birds. Dujardinascaris madagascariensis was present in most of the infected hosts, while the remaining species were mostly represented in single collections in one to three hosts. All four ascaridoid nematodes represent new geographic records.

  20. Farmer–African wild dog (Lycaon pictus relations in the eastern Kalahari region of Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valli-Laurente Fraser-Celin

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available African wild dogs (Lycaon pictus are the most endangered large carnivores in southern Africa. Direct and indirect persecution by farmers causes significant conservation challenges. Farmer– wild dog conflict in Botswana commonly occurs as a result of cattle and stocked game depredation by wild dogs, affecting farmer livelihood and causing economic and emotional distress. Although wild dogs predate livestock at lower levels than other carnivores, they continue to be killed both indiscriminately and in retaliation for incidents of depredation. Investigating farmer–wild dog conflict is a necessary step towards establishing appropriate conflict mitigation strategies. Eighty livestock and game farmers were interviewed in order to examine farmers’ value of, perceptions of and experiences with wild dogs as well as their insights on wild dog impacts and conservation in the eastern Kalahari region of Botswana. Interviews were semi-structured and used open-ended questions to capture complexities surrounding farmer–wild dog relations. This research contributes baseline data on wild dogs in understudied tribal land and commercial livestock and game farms in eastern Kalahari. It confirms the presence of wild dogs, livestock and stocked game depredation by wild dogs and negative perspectives amongst farmers towards wild dogs and their conservation. Mean losses were 0.85 livestock per subsistence farmer, 1.25 livestock per commercial livestock farmer, while game farmers lost 95.88 game animals per farmer during January 2012 through June 2013. Proportionally, more subsistence farmers than commercial livestock farmers and game farmers held negative perspectives of wild dogs (χ ² = 9.63, df = 2, p < 0.05. Farmer type, education level, socioeconomic status and land tenure, as well as positive wild dog characteristics should be considered when planning and operationalising conflict mitigation strategies. As such, conservation approaches should focus on

  1. Music Teaching in Botswana Secondary Teacher Training Colleges: A Case of Molepolole College of Education.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otukile Sindiso Phibion

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to find out facts on music teaching in Botswana Secondary Teacher Training Colleges. The authors conducted a formal study with regard to the Diploma in Secondary Education with a component of Music Education Training in Botswana. The study was conducted in Botswana at Molepolole College of Education (MCE which is the only government Secondary Teacher Training College, offering music in the whole country. Data were collected over a period of time by the three authors through meetings with staff and students surveys. The process was informed by involving all three authors. The leading author consecutively moderated this college for twelve years whilst the other two have been lecturers at the research college. This experience facilitated a further exploration of the competence frameworks in music education that they believed offered a narrow and technical view that neglected personal attributes and qualities. Apart from observations, research information was obtained through external examination/moderation reports review compiled consecutively over a number of years. Some of the information was obtained through consultation of government documents such as: The National Development Plan 10 (NDP 10, Vision 2016, Revised National Policy on Education (RNPE and Education for Kagisano with regard to prospects of music teaching in Botswana. In addition, Colleges of Education documents such as syllabuses, regulations, and prospectus were also consulted. It became evident through this research that music is accorded low status hence termed a minor subject as compared to other subjects called major. This research revealed that the admission process is also biased towards “Major” subjects. Initially there used to be interviews for “minor” opting students selection which have been since abandoned. The review found that lecturers at MCE were committed to serving for excellence yet strong criticism was made of perceived

  2. Walking sticks for muscle, bone and joint health in rural Botswana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hondras, Maria; Salsbury, Stacie A; Nissen, Nina

    participants (35 villagers and 13 healthcare providers). Analysis included constant comparative methods followed by a structured approach to identify and assemble walking stick text for interpretation. Results: Observations and discussions revealed that many walking sticks were handcrafted from natural...... providers, villagers claimed little or no instruction for use; no educational notes were identified in villager health cards. Conclusions: Many walking sticks are homemade and most are used without professional instruction. To promote MuBoJo health amongst villagers in Botswana, it is essential...

  3. Walking sticks for muscle, bone and joint health in rural Botswana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hondras, Maria; Salsbury, Stacie A; Nissen, Nina

    2015-01-01

    participants (35 villagers and 13 healthcare providers). Analysis included constant comparative methods followed by a structured approach to identify and assemble walking stick text for interpretation. Results: Observations and discussions revealed that many walking sticks were handcrafted from natural...... providers, villagers claimed little or no instruction for use; no educational notes were identified in villager health cards. Conclusions: Many walking sticks are homemade and most are used without professional instruction. To promote MuBoJo health amongst villagers in Botswana, it is essential...

  4. Terrestrial Water Storage from GRACE and Satellite Altimetry in the Okavango Delta (Botswana)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Krogh, Pernille Engelbredt; Bauer-Gottwein, Peter

    2010-01-01

    New technology can for the first time enable the accurate retrieval of the global and regional water budgets from space-borne and ground-based gravity surveys. Water is mankind’s most critical natural resource, but it is being heavily used throughout the globe. The aim of this paper is to outline...... the HYDROGRAV project dealing with improving large scale hydrological model with time variable gravity observations. Also preliminary HYDROGRAV investigationsa of terrestrial water storage variations in the Okavango delta in Botswana are presented. Data from 4 years of satellite altimetry, GRACE derived TWS...

  5. Social policy development and global financial crisis in the open developing economies of Botswana and Mauritius

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulriksen, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    The manner in which open economies in a globalized world shape social policy development is highly disputed, as is the impact of the current financial crisis on social policy. One argument is that globalization and economic austerity force social policy dismantling. Alternatively, it is proposed...... that open economies – facing greater volatility, especially during crisis – push for greater social protection. Using the examples of Botswana and Mauritius, two open middle-income countries, this article suggests that, in fact, both arguments may be correct. The impact of globalization and economic crisis...

  6. The Bolivian, Botswana, and Bilybara Highs and Southern Hemisphere drought/floods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reason, C. J. C.

    2016-02-01

    Semipermanent anticyclones in the midlevel troposphere over the subtropical landmasses are a prominent component of Southern Hemisphere climate. Typically, they occur over Bolivia, Botswana/Namibia, and northwestern Australia from austral spring to about April and are strongest in late summer. Here a mode of variability is studied that modulates the strength of these midlevel anticyclones and which is not strongly tied to El Niño-Southern Oscillation. This mode leads to variations in January-March rainfall over large parts of South America, southern Africa, and Australia on both interannual and near-decadal scales.

  7. Molecular characterisation of hepatitis B virus in HIV-1 subtype C infected patients in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Motswedi; Gaseitsiwe, Simani; Moyo, Sikhulile; Wessels, Matthijs J C; Mohammed, Terence; Sebunya, Theresa K; Powell, Eleanor A; Makhema, Joseph; Blackard, Jason T; Marlink, Richard; Essex, Max; Musonda, Rosemary M

    2015-08-13

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a major global health problem especially in sub-Saharan Africa and in East Asia. Ten hepatitis B virus genotypes have been described that differ by geographic distribution, disease progression, and response to treatment. Escape mutations within the surface open reading frame (ORF) affect HBV antigenicity leading to failures in diagnosis, vaccine and hepatitis B immunoglobulin therapy. However, the molecular characteristics of HBV in Botswana, a highly endemic country, are unknown. We describe the molecular characteristics of HBV and prevalence of escape mutants among HIV/HBV coinfected individuals Botswana. DNA was extracted from archived plasma samples from 81 HIV/HBV co-infected participants from various clinical studies at the Botswana Harvard AIDS Institute Partnership. A 415 base pair (bp) fragment of the polymerase gene was amplified by semi-nested PCR. In a subset of samples, a 2100 bp fragment was amplified. The PCR product was genotyped using Big Dye sequencing chemistry and the sequences were analysed for genotypes and mutations. Of the 81 samples included, 70 (86 %) samples were successfully genotyped. Genotype A was found in 56 (80 %) participants, D in 13 (18.6 %), and 1 (1.4 %) was genotype E. Escape mutations previously linked with failure of diagnosis or escaping active vaccination and passive immunoglobulin therapy were detected in 12 (17.1 %) participants at positions 100, 119, 122, 123, 124, 126, 129, 130, 133, 134 and 140 of the S ORF. Genotypes and escape mutations were not significantly associated with aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and AST platelet ratio index (APRI). Genotypes A, D and E were found in this cohort of HIV coinfected patients in Botswana, consistent with the findings from the sub-Saharan Africa region. Some escape mutations which have previously been associated with diagnosis failure, escaping vaccine and immunoglobulin therapy were also observed and are important in

  8. Policy-maker attitudes to the ageing of the HIV cohort in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matlho, Kabo; Lebelonyane, Refelwetswe; Driscoll, Tim; Negin, Joel

    2017-12-01

    The roll out of antiretroviral therapy in Botswana, as in many countries with near universal access to treatment, has transformed HIV into a complex yet manageable chronic condition and has led to the emergence of a population aging with HIV. Although there has been some realization of this development at international level, no clear defined intervention strategy has been established in many highly affected countries. Therefore we explored attitudes of policy-makers and service providers towards HIV among older adults (50 years or older) in Botswana. We conducted qualitative face-to-face interviews with 15 consenting personnel from the Ministry of Health, medical practitioners and non-governmental organizations involved in the administration of medical services, planning, strategies and policies that govern social, physical and medical intervention aimed at people living with HIV and health in general. The Shiffman and Smith Framework of how health issues become a priority was used as a guide for our analysis. Amidst an HIV prevalence of 25% among those aged 50-64 years, the respondents passively recognized the predicament posed by a population aging with HIV but exhibited a lack of comprehension and acknowledgement of the extent of the issue. An underlying persistent ageist stigma regarding sexual behaviour existed among a number of interviewees. Respondents also noted the lack of defined geriatric care within the provision of the national health care system. There seemed, however, to be a debate among the policy strategists and care providers as to whether the appropriate response should be specifically towards older adults living with HIV or rather to improve health services for older adults more generally. Respondents acknowledged that health systems in Botswana are still configured for individual diseases rather than coexisting chronic diseases even though it has become increasingly common for patients, particularly the aged, to have two or more medical

  9. ¿La maldición de los recursos como mito? El caso de Botswana

    OpenAIRE

    Varela, Hilda

    2011-01-01

    Cuando obtuvo la independencia, en 1966, Botswana era uno de los diez países más pobres del mundo y era prácticamente desconocido. En los primeros años de vida independiente, con el descubrimiento por parte de la compañía De Beers de un depósito de diamantes, empezó a gestarse una experiencia exitosa y singular en África subsahariana, caracterizada por el surgimiento de un Estado desarrollista con un enfoque pragmático vis-à-vis las inversiones extranjeras y que ha dado como resultado ingreso...

  10. Low back pain among school teachers in Botswana, prevalence and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erick, Patience N; Smith, Derek R

    2014-10-30

    Although low back pain (LBP) represents a common occupational problem, few epidemiological studies have investigated the prevalence and risk factors for LBP among school teachers, particularly in Africa. School teachers are known to represent an occupational group among which there appears to be a high prevalence of LBP. The objective of this study was, therefore, to conduct one of the first epidemiological investigations of LBP among teachers in Botswana. A cross-sectional study was conducted among teachers in Botswana using self-administered questionnaires which were distributed to 3100 randomly selected school teachers and collected over a five-month period between July and November 2012. The questionnaire included low back pain information, demographic data, lifestyle, work-related characteristics and psychosocial factors. Data were analysed using Chi-squared and logistic regression models. The 12 month prevalence and LBP disability and associated risk factors were also analysed. A total of 1747 teachers returned completed questionnaires, yielding a response rate of 56.3%. The 12-month prevalence of LBP was 55.7%, with 67.1% of them reporting minimal disability. The results of logistic regression analysis revealed that female gender [OR: 1.51, 95% CI: 1.14-2.00] and previous back injury [OR: 9.67, 95% CI: 4.94-18.93] were positively correlated to LBP. Awkward arm position [OR: 1.81, 95% CI: 1.24-2.62] and high psychological job demands [OR: 1.40, 95% CI: 1.02-1.93] were also significantly associated with LBP. Regular physical exercise was negatively associated with LBP [OR: 0.63, 95% CI: 0.43-0.93]. Female gender [OR: 2.67, 95% CI: 1.52-3.99] and previous back injury [OR: 3.01, 95% CI: 1.92-4.74] were also positively associated with LBP disability. The prevalence of LBP appears to be high among school teachers in Botswana. A wide variety of LBP risk factors were identified in this study. Female gender and previous injury were both associated with LBP presence

  11. Procamallanus (Procamallanus) spp. (Nematoda: Camallanidae) in fishes of the Okavango River, Botswana, including the description of P. (P.) pseudolaeviconchus n. sp. parasitic in Clarias spp. (Clariidae) from Botswana and Egypt

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Moravec, František; Van As, L. L.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 90, č. 2 (2015), s. 137-149 ISSN 0165-5752 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP505/12/G112 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : parasitic nematode * Camallanidae * Botswana * Egypt Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 1.316, year: 2015

  12. Exploration of Experiences and Perceptions of Three Botswana Basic Education Stakeholders on Employment and Unemployment of Graduates of Basic Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tidimane, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    This study used a phenomenological approach to explore the lived experiences of three groups of stakeholders of the Botswana basic education program related to the employment and unemployment of graduates of basic education. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 21 participants from three groups of stakeholders, graduates of basic…

  13. Aggressive and Antisocial Behaviours among Secondary School Students in Botswana. The Influence of Family and School Based Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malete, Leapetswe

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between family factors and secondary school students' aggressive and antisocial behaviours. Participants were 1,478 junior and senior secondary school students from four major urban centres in Botswana, aged 12-20. Results showed significant prevalence of self-reported aggressive tendencies and antisocial…

  14. Growth form and seasonal variation in leaf gas exchange of Colophospermum mopane savanna trees in northwest Botswana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenendaal, E.M.; Mantlana, K.B.; Pammenter, N.W.; Weber, P.; Huntsman-Mapila, P.; Lloyd, J.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated differences in physiological and morphological traits between the tall and short forms of mopane (Colophospermum mopane (Kirk ex Benth.) Kirk ex J. Leonard) trees growing near Maun, Botswana on a Kalahari sandveld overlying an impermeable calcrete duricrust. We sought to determine if

  15. Seen But Not Heard? Focusing on the Needs of Children of Divorced Parents in Gaborone and Surrounding Areas, Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maundeni, Tapologo

    2002-01-01

    Examined extent to which children's expressed needs for information were met by their mothers in study of parental separation and divorce in Botswana. Found that most children were dissatisfied with informational support received from their mothers. Mothers' ability to meet children's communication needs were influenced by their perceptions of…

  16. Exploring Responses to Transformative Group Therapy for Orphaned Children in the Context of Mass Orphaning in Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thamuku, Masego; Daniel, Marguerite

    2013-01-01

    In the context of AIDS, the Botswana Government has adopted a group therapy program to help large numbers of orphaned children cope with bereavement. This study explores the effectiveness of the therapy and examines how it interacts with cultural attitudes and practices concerning death. Ten orphaned children were involved in five rounds of data…

  17. A Comparative Study of Entrepreneurship Curriculum Development and Review at the University of Zimbabwe and Botho University, Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munyanyiwa, Takaruza; Svotwa, Douglas; Rudhumbu, Norman; Mutsau, Morgen

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to make comparative study of the development and review process of the entrepreneurship curriculum at the University of Zimbabwe (UZ) Faculty of Commerce and Botho University, (BU) Faculty of Business and Accounting in Gaborone, Botswana. The study focused on the processes and influences of curriculum development…

  18. Claims and Counterclaims: Institutional Arrangements and Farmers' Response to the Delivery and Adoption of Innovations in the Okavango Delta, Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noga, Sekondeko Ronnie; Kolawole, Oluwatoyin Dare; Thakadu, Olekae Tsompi; Masunga, Gaseitsiwe Smollie

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This article examined how institutional factors influencing the promotion of two elephant crop-raiding deterrent innovations (ECDIs) introduced to farmers through a ministry-based extension system in the Okavango Delta, Botswana, have impacted farmers' adoption behaviour. Methodology: A standardised interview schedule was used to elicit…

  19. General Education Courses at the University of Botswana: Application of the Theory of Reasoned Action in Measuring Course Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Deepti; Garg, Ajay K.

    2007-01-01

    This study applied the Theory of Reasoned Action and the Technology Acceptance Model to measure outcomes of general education courses (GECs) under the University of Botswana Computer and Information Skills (CIS) program. An exploratory model was validated for responses from 298 students. The results suggest that resources currently committed to…

  20. The Influence of Cultural Bias on Motivation to Learn English: The Case of Khoe Primary School Students in Eastern Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magogwe, Joel Mokuedi

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of cultural bias in the teaching of English and in the books used to teach English in primary schools attended by Khoe students in eastern Botswana. The study also explored the link between cultural bias and the attitudes and motivation of Khoe students learning English. One hundred and thirty-seven students…

  1. Assessment of coalbed gas resources of the Kalahari Basin Province of Botswana, Zimbabwe, and Zambia, Africa, 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownfield, Michael E.; Schenk, Christopher J.; Klett, Timothy R.; Tennyson, Marilyn E.; Mercier, Tracey J.; Gaswirth, Stephanie B.; Marra, Kristen R.; Hawkins, Sarah J.; Finn, Thomas M.; Le, Phuong A.; Leathers-Miller, Heidi M.

    2017-02-24

    Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated undiscovered, technically recoverable mean resources of 4.5 trillion cubic feet of coalbed gas in the Kalahari Basin Province of Botswana, Zambia, and Zimbabwe, Africa.

  2. Perceived Influencers of the Decline on Performance of Students in Botswana General Certificate of Secondary Education's Agriculture Examination Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibanda, Clyde; Hulela, Keba; Tselaesele, Nelson

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate factors perceived to contribute to the decline of students' performance in the Botswana's General Certificate of Secondary Education (BGCSE) agriculture results. Ninety-one agriculture examiners were randomly sampled out of 100 teachers who were invited to mark the 2012 end of year examination scripts. A…

  3. Integrating Information and Communication Technology in English Language Teaching: A Case Study of Selected Junior Secondary Schools in Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mafuraga, Mbizo; Moremi, Mbiganyi

    2017-01-01

    The paper discusses how Information and Communication Technology (ICT) could be integrated in the teaching of English Language in Botswana Junior Secondary Schools. It does so by exploring opportunities and challenges faced by teachers of English Language and the students they teach. Fifty five (55) teachers in eleven (11) Junior Secondary Schools…

  4. Relative Effects of Visualized and Verbal Presentation Methods in Communicating Environmental Information among Stakeholders: Okavango Delta, Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakadu, Olekae T.; Irani, Tracy; Telg, Ricky

    2011-01-01

    The present study examined the relative effectiveness of 2 public instructional communication methods in improving selected predictors of knowledge-sharing behaviors among communities in the Okavango Delta, Botswana. A total of 120 subjects took part in a quasiexperimental study, with 2 experimental treatments: (a) visualized PowerPoint…

  5. Constraints to Senior Management's Capacity to Implement the Performance Management System in Senior Secondary Schools in Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulawa, Philip

    2013-01-01

    The performance management system in different forms has been in existence in many countries for some years. In 1999 Botswana like other countries decided to implement a performance management system (PMS) across the entire public service including schools. At its introduction, the government explained the purpose for which this reform was being…

  6. Training of Evaluators in the Third World: Implementation of the Action Training Model (ATM) in Kenya and Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhola, H. S.

    The Action Training Model (ATM) was developed for the delivery of evaluation training to development workers in Kenya and Botswana and implemented under the aegis of the German Foundation for International Development. Training of evaluators is a challenge in any context, but in the Third World environment, evaluation training offers special…

  7. Challenges of Introducing E-Learning at Botswana University of Agriculture and Natural Resources: Lecturers' Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moakofhi, Moakofhi; Leteane, Oratile; Phiri, Tawona; Pholele, Thato; Sebalatlheng, Perncy

    2017-01-01

    The integration of technology in the education process has immensely improved the acquisition and retention of knowledge. Although e-learning initiatives bring many advantages to the education system, these rewards have not been fully realised in developing countries like Botswana. Therefore, in the current study, authors set out to identify…

  8. Associations of demographic variables and the Health Belief Model constructs with Pap smear screening among urban women in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Ditsapelo M

    2013-01-01

    Papanicolaou (Pap) smear services are available in most urban areas in Botswana. Yet most women in such areas do not screen regularly for cancer of the cervix. The purpose of this article is to present findings on the associations of demographic variables and Health Belief Model constructs with Pap smear screening among urban women in Botswana. The study included a convenience sample of 353 asymptomatic women aged 30 years and older who were living in Gaborone, Botswana. Data were collected using a demographic questionnaire and items of the Health Belief Model. Data analysis included descriptive statistics for demographic variables and bivariate and ordinal (logit) regression to determine the associations of demographic variables. Having health insurance and having a regular health care provider were significant predictors of whether or not women had a Pap smear. Women with health insurance were more likely to have had a Pap smear test than women without health insurance (91% vs 36%). Similarly, women who had a regular health care provider were more likely to have had a Pap smear test than women without a regular health care provider (94% vs 42%). Major barriers to screening included what was described as "laziness" for women who had ever had a Pap smear (57%) and limited information about Pap smear screening for women who had never had a Pap smear (44%). There is a need for more information about the importance of the Pap smear test and for increased access to screening services in Botswana.

  9. Metacognitive awareness of reading strategies of University of Botswana English as Second Language students of different academic reading proficiencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel M. Magogwe

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This study explored metacognitive awareness level of University of Botswana students in the Faculty of Social Sciences. It also considered the more recent research focusing on the role of metacognitive awareness in reading and how it relates to proficiency. The following questions are addressed: (1 What are the self-reported reading proficiencies of the University of Botswana students? (2 Are the University of Botswana students aware of their metacognitive reading strategies? (3 What kind of metacognitive reading strategies are frequently used? (4 Is there a difference in metacognitive awareness of reading strategies used by high- and low-proficiency students respectively? The Survey of Reading Strategies Questionnaire (SORS developed by Mokhtari and Sheorey (2002, and the semi-structured interview technique were used to collect data for this study. The findings indicate that University of Botswana English as Second Language (ESL students reported high reading proficiency and high use of metacognitive strategies, but there was no vast difference in terms of proficiency. Students who reported their proficiency as high had an edge over low-proficiency ones mainly because their management and monitoring of reading was guided more by the goals they have set themselves than by the tests and assignments they were supposed to write.

  10. The Impact of Lack of Resources on Declining Students' Enrolments in Design and Technology in Botswana Junior Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaotlhobogwe, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Lack of resources has resulted in declining students' enrolment in design and technology in Botswana junior secondary schools by up to 6% per year over 10 years, despite positive encouragement by the government. Based on the PATT (pupils' attitude towards technology) theoretical framework this study indicated how a lack of resources in Botswana…

  11. "They Are the Government's Children." School and Community Relations in a Remote Area Dweller (Basarwa) Settlement in Kweneng District, Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tshireletso, Lucky

    1996-01-01

    Examines school-community relations in a Botswana settlement of Basarwa, remote rural nomads with a minority language and culture. Surveys of parents and students in grades 5-7 indicate that all held positive educational attitudes and believed schooling would help children to find future employment, but that schools were authoritarian and operated…

  12. Implementation of m-health applications in Botswana: telemedicine and education on mobile devices in a low resource setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littman-Quinn, Ryan; Mibenge, Chikoti; Antwi, Cynthia; Chandra, Amit; Kovarik, Carrie L

    2013-02-01

    Although Botswana has recently been categorised as an upper middle income country, it is burdened by a scarcity of resources, both human and technological. There are barriers to patients' access to specialized care and healthcare providers' access to medical knowledge. Over the past three years, the Botswana-University of Pennsylvania Partnership (BUP) has piloted four mobile telemedicine projects in the specialties of women's health (cervical cancer screening utilizing visual inspection with acetic acid), radiology, oral medicine and dermatology. Mobile telemedicine has been used in 11 locations in Botswana, training a total of 24 clinicians and successfully contributing to the management of 643 cases. In addition to mobile telemedicine, BUP has initiated an m-learning programme with the University of Botswana School of Medicine. While successfully providing patients and providers with improved access to healthcare resources, the m-health projects have faced numerous technical and social challenges. These include malfunctioning mobile devices, unreliable IT infrastructure, accidental damage to mobile devices, and cultural misalignment between IT and healthcare providers. BUP has worked with its local partners to develop solutions to these problems. To ensure sustainability, m-health programmes must have strategic goals that are aligned with those of the national health and education system, and the initiatives must be owned and led by local stakeholders. Whenever possible, open source technology and local IT expertise and infrastructure should be employed.

  13. Understanding Language in Education and Grade 4 Reading Performance Using a "Natural Experiment" of Botswana and South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Debra Lynne

    2018-01-01

    The regional and cultural closeness of Botswana and South Africa, as well as differences in their political histories and language policy stances, offers a unique opportunity to evaluate the role of language in reading outcomes. This study aims to empirically test the effect of exposure to mother tongue and English instruction on the reading…

  14. Instructional Leadership for Quality Learning: An Assessment of the Impact of the Primary School Management Development Project in Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pansiri, Nkobi Owen

    2008-01-01

    A descriptive study using questionnaires was conducted in 2004 to assess the effectiveness of instructional leadership displayed by primary school management teams following the implementation of the Primary School Management Project in Botswana. Leadership skills, Coordination of instructional activities, management of curriculum and quality of…

  15. Molecular epidemiology of rabies in Botswana: a comparison between antibody typing and nucleotide sequence phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, N; Letshwenyo, M; Baipoledi, E K; Thobokwe, G; Fooks, A R

    2004-06-10

    A panel of rabies virus isolates (RABV) endemic within Botswana between 1988 and 1992 have been typed by anti-nucleocapsid monoclonal antibodies (MAb) into two dominant groups. The first associated with the domestic dog (Canis familiaris) and the second associated with a range of wildlife species. Using nucleoprotein coding sequence data, we have applied molecular phylogenetic techniques to the same panel of 35 well-characterised rabies virus isolates from throughout Botswana in an attempt to compare both techniques and to further investigate the virus/host species relationships within this African country. The results confirm that there are indeed two major groups and that these are related primarily to biotype. The wildlife-associated biotype appeared more phylogenetically diverse and was more commonly isolated in the southeast of the country, with the canine-associated group dominating the north of the country. In addition, molecular phylogeny identified further groupings within both biotypes and a small number of isolates, which were not classified by MAb typing, could be assigned to a group. During the study period (4 years) there appeared to be little sequence variation within groups suggesting that distinct lineages persisted throughout the study and that there appears to be little evolutionary pressure on the nucleoprotein coding region of the viral genome. Copyright 2004 Elsiever B.V.

  16. Risk Factors for Malnutrition Among Children With Cerebral Palsy in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Allison; Gambrah-Sampaney, Claudia; Khurana, Esha; Baier, James; Baranov, Esther; Monokwane, Baphaleng; Bearden, David R

    2017-05-01

    Children with cerebral palsy in low-resource settings are at high risk of malnutrition, which further increases their risk of poor health outcomes. However, there are few available data on specific risk factors for malnutrition among children with cerebral palsy in the developing world. We performed a case-control study among children with cerebral palsy receiving care at a tertiary care hospital in Gaborone, Botswana. Children with cerebral palsy and malnutrition were identified according to World Health Organization growth curves and compared with subjects with cerebral palsy without malnutrition. Risk factors for malnutrition were identified using multivariable logistic regression models. These risk factors were then used to generate a Malnutrition Risk Score, and Receiver Operating Characteristic curves were used to identify optimal cutoffs to identify subjects at high risk of malnutrition. We identified 61 children with cerebral palsy, 26 of whom (43%) met criteria for malnutrition. Nonambulatory status (odds ratio 13.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.8-50.1, P children with cerebral palsy in Botswana, and a simple risk score may help identify children with the highest risk. Further studies are needed to validate this screening tool and to determine optimal nutritional interventions in this population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Family medicine in Denmark: Are there lessons for Botswana and Africa?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Setlhare

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Family medicine is a new specialty in Botswana and many African countries and its definitionand scope are still evolving. In this region, healthcare is constrained by resource limitation andinefficiencies in resource utilisation. Experiences in countries with good health indicators canhelp inform discussions on the future of family medicine in Africa. Observations made duringa visit to family physicians (FPs in Denmark showed that the training of FPs, the practice offamily medicine and the role of support staff in a family practice were often different andsometimes unimaginable by African standards. Danish family practices were friendly andenmeshed in an egalitarian and efficient health system, which is supported by an effectiveinformation technology network. There was a lot of task shifting and nurses and clerical staffattended to simple or uncomplicated aspects of patient care whilst FPs attended to morecomplicated patient problems. Higher taxation and higher health expenditure seemed toundergird the effective health system. An egalitarian relationship amongst patients andhealthcare workers (HCW may help improve patient care in Botswana. Task shifting shouldbe formalised, and all sectors of primary healthcare should have fast and effective informationtechnology systems. HCW training and roles should be revised. Higher health expenditure isnecessary to achieve good health indicators.Keywords: task shifting, Family Medicine, Family Physician, Denmark, health expenditure, egalitarian

  18. Improving the quality of care for patients with hypertension in Moshupa District, Botswana: Quality improvement cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathy Kande

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although there are no prevalence studies on hypertension in Botswana, this condition is thought to be common and the quality of care to be poor.Aim: The aim of this project was to assess and improve the quality of primary care forhypertension.Setting: Moshupa clinic and catchment area, Botswana.Methods: Quality improvement cycle.Results: Two hundred participants were included in the audit. Sixty-eight per cent were women with a mean age of 55 years. In the baseline audit none of the target standards were met. During the re-audit six months later, six out of nine structural target standards, five out of 11 process target standards and one out of two outcome target standards were achieved. Statistically-significant improvement in performance (p < 0.05 was shown in 10 criteria although the target standard was not always met. In the re-audit, the target of achieving blood pressure control (< 140/90 in 70% of patients was achieved.Conclusion: The quality of care for hypertension was suboptimal in our setting. Simple interventions were designed and implemented to improve the quality of care. These interventions led to significant improvement in structural and process criteria. A corresponding significant improvement in the control of blood pressure was also seen.

  19. Wildlife Abundance and Diversity as Indicators of Tourism Potential in Northern Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterbach, Christiaan W.; Whitesell, Carolyn; Somers, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Wildlife tourism can provide economic incentives for conservation. Due to the abundance of wildlife and the presence of charismatic species some areas are better suited to wildlife tourism. Our first objective was to develop criteria based on wildlife abundance and diversity to evaluate tourism potential in the Northern Conservation Zone of Botswana. Secondly we wanted to quantify and compare tourism experiences in areas with high and low tourism potential. We used aerial survey data to estimate wildlife biomass and diversity to determine tourism potential, while data from ground surveys quantified the tourist experience. Areas used for High Paying Low Volume tourism had significantly higher mean wildlife biomass and wildlife diversity than the areas avoided for this type of tourism. Only 22% of the Northern Conservation Zone has intermediate to high tourism potential. The areas with high tourism potential, as determined from the aerial survey data, provided tourists with significantly better wildlife sightings (ground surveys) than the low tourism potential areas. Even Low Paying tourism may not be economically viable in concessions that lack areas with intermediate to high tourism potential. The largest part of the Northern Conservation Zone has low tourism potential, but low tourism potential is not equal to low conservation value. Alternative conservation strategies should be developed to complement the economic incentive provided by wildlife-based tourism in Botswana. PMID:26308859

  20. Genre analysis of essays in the Social Sciences: The case of Botswana students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel M. Magogwe

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Writing is a challenging but requisite skill at university and other life situations. At university, essay writing is generally challenging to first-year students across disciplines or faculties. This study therefore describes the writing challenges of the Faculty of Social Sciences students at the University of Botswana. To that end, this study asks the following research questions: (1 What writing tasks are first-year students in the Faculty of Social Sciences given? (2 What problems do the students encounter when writing essays in the Faculty of Social Sciences? (3 What kind of assistance do students receive on writing essays? This article is underpinned by the English for Academic Purposes genre analysis framework. All in all, the findings of this study point to the need for a more intensive writing programme for first-year students at the University of Botswana in which both faculties and the Communication and Study Skills Unit will cooperatively assist students with writing. Students’ responses clearly indicated the need for such collaboration.

  1. Continuing Discontinuities: Local and State Perspectives on Cattle Production and Water Management in Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Manzungu

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available From 1885 when the modern state of Botswana was founded until the discovery of significant mineral deposits in 1967, one year after independence, the livestock industry, particularly cattle production, played a significant role in the country’s economy. Today there are concerns about how the livestock industry, because of its importance to many rural households, and its potential to diversify the mineral-dominated economy, can be revived. In recognition of the country’s semi-arid climate, the government has promoted a policy of developing water sources for livestock watering. The state has acknowledged the policy has largely been ineffective, but continues to implement it. This paper attempts to explain this paradox by examining state and local perspectives in the management of water and related resources in the Botswana part of the Limpopo river basin. The discontinuities between the local inhabitants and state practitioners are analyzed within the wider physical social, political, and economic landscape. We ascribe the continued implementation of an ineffective policy to modernisation claims.

  2. Ergonomics issues among sewing machine operators in the textile manufacturing industry in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sealetsa, O J; Thatcher, A

    2011-01-01

    Universally musculoskeletal disorders are among the leading causes of low productivity in today's work environment. The situation is reportedly even worse in developing countries with appalling working conditions in many industries. In addition, there is often an acute lack of awareness of ergonomics issues, education and training programmes, and certification within developing countries. Numerous studies internationally have highlighted musculoskeletal risk factors associated with the textile industry and garment-making jobs because of highly repetitive work in awkward work postures. The objective of this study was to identify and describe possible ergonomics deficiencies in the workstation of sewing machine operators in a textile industry in Botswana as well as their perception of workload and bodily discomfort. This study focused on one textile manufacturing factory in Botswana where 157 female sewing machine operators were recruited as participants. A modified Corlett and Bishop body map questionnaire and the NASA TLX were administered and relevant anthropometric and workplace layout measurements were collected. The results of the study revealed a high prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders. Back, neck and shoulder discomfort are highly prevalent among these sewing machine operators. This study proposes intervention strategies including the re-design of the workstations and seating and the provision of training in basic ergonomics principles for improving the work-life of these operators and provides a base for further research on the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders among sewing machine operators in developing countries.

  3. An advocacy project for multicultural education: The case of the Shiyeyi language in Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyati-Saleshando, Lydia

    2011-12-01

    Multicultural education respects cultural differences and affirms pluralism which students, their communities and teachers bring to the learning process. It is founded on the belief that a school curriculum which promotes the ideals of freedom, justice, equality, equity and human dignity is most likely to result in high academic achievement and quality education. In Botswana, English is the official language and medium of instruction and Setswana is the national lingua franca which is used for formal occasions in the villages and other informal settings. Any other languages spoken by unrecognised tribes are banned from use in schools or the media, including minority languages taught before independence in 1966, This paper describes the Shiyeyi Language Project, initiated by the Wayeyi tribe, which advocates for a multicultural model of education where children learn in their mother tongue and about their local culture at an early stage, then add the national language, and eventually an international language as medium of instruction. The project operates within an unfriendly political and legal context, but has achieved some results. Continued efforts, especially as supported by similar language projects, have the potential to change the situation in Botswana.

  4. Gender-specific patterns of multiple concurrent sexual partnerships: a national cross sectional survey in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho-Foster, Ari; Laetsang, Ditiro; Masisi, Mokgweetsi; Anderson, Marina; Tlhoiwe, Derrick; Cockcroft, Anne; Andersson, Neil

    2010-08-01

    A priority of AIDS prevention in Botswana is to reduce multiple concurrent sexual partnerships. We analysed data from interviews with people aged 16-60 years in a 2007 national stratified random cluster sample of communities across Botswana. Among 768 male and 1784 female respondents, 10% reported multiple sexual partners in the month prior to the survey (MP1); 19% of men and 6% of women. In a multivariate analysis, men were more likely to report MP1 if they had not completed primary education (adjusted Odds Ratio (ORa) 2.13, 95% confidence intervals with adjustment for clustering (CIca) 1.19-3.85), if they were single (ORa 2.29, 95% CIca 1.28-4.11), if they had experienced intimate partner violence in the last year (ORa 2.59, 95% CIca 1.51-4.45) and if they reported acquiescence to high risk sex (ORa 8.32, 95% CIca 3.38-20.46). Women who said they earned more or the same as their partner were also more likely to report MP1 (ORa 1.76, 95% CIca 1.21-2.56). The higher rate of MP1 among men with different forms of choice-disability shows an important potential multiplication of male risk factors. Women with higher income were more likely to have more partners, questioning the idea that multiple concurrent partners is mainly a question of male disposable income.

  5. Indoor and outdoor radon levels and its diurnal variations in Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murty, V. R. K.; King, J. G.; Karunakara, N.; Raju, V. C. C.

    2010-07-01

    Studies on radon monitoring are essential for countries actively involved in mining activities. Since large-scale mining activities have the potential to enhance the background radiation levels, a detailed study on indoor and outdoor radon levels, its diurnal variation with temperature, pressure and humidity for Botswana is initiated. The study is important because such studies for Botswana are non-existent and the database on indoor and outdoor 222Rn concentration and the resulting inhalation dose to the population of the region is not available. Measurements were carried out using the AlphaGuard (Genitron,Germany) Professional Radon Monitor. The concentration of 226Ra in soil was also measured by gamma spectrometry using a 41% relative efficiency n-type HPGe detector (Canberra, USA). Initial results show that the indoor 222Rn concentration vary in the range 3.0-93.0 Bq m -3 with a mean of 24.5 Bq m -3. Diurnal variation studies show that the concentration is higher in the early morning hours and lower in the early afternoon hours. All the results are presented and discussed in detail in this paper.

  6. Indoor and outdoor radon levels and its diurnal variations in Botswana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murty, V.R.K., E-mail: murtyvrk@mopipi.ub.b [Radiation Physics Laboratories, Department of Physics, University of Botswana, Private Bag 0022, Gaborone (Botswana); King, J.G. [Radiation Physics Laboratories, Department of Physics, University of Botswana, Private Bag 0022, Gaborone (Botswana); Karunakara, N. [University Science Instrumentation Centre, Mangalore University, Mangalagangotri 574 199 (India); Raju, V.C.C. [Department of Mathematics, University of Botswana, Private Bag 0022, Gaborone (Botswana)

    2010-07-21

    Studies on radon monitoring are essential for countries actively involved in mining activities. Since large-scale mining activities have the potential to enhance the background radiation levels, a detailed study on indoor and outdoor radon levels, its diurnal variation with temperature, pressure and humidity for Botswana is initiated. The study is important because such studies for Botswana are non-existent and the database on indoor and outdoor {sup 222}Rn concentration and the resulting inhalation dose to the population of the region is not available. Measurements were carried out using the AlphaGuard (Genitron,Germany) Professional Radon Monitor. The concentration of {sup 226}Ra in soil was also measured by gamma spectrometry using a 41% relative efficiency n-type HPGe detector (Canberra, USA). Initial results show that the indoor {sup 222}Rn concentration vary in the range 3.0-93.0 Bq m{sup -3} with a mean of 24.5 Bq m{sup -3}. Diurnal variation studies show that the concentration is higher in the early morning hours and lower in the early afternoon hours. All the results are presented and discussed in detail in this paper.

  7. Appropriating social citizenship: women's labour, poverty, and entrepreneurship in the manual workers union of Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werbner, Pnina

    2010-01-01

    Interrogating critiques of the 'African labour aristocracy' thesis, the article proposes that public service industrial-class manual workers in Botswana form, if not a labour 'aristocracy' in the sense first defined by Saul and Arrighi, then a marginal worker 'elite'. They are privileged in having a regular salary above minimum pay, augmented by periodic lump-sum gratuity payments. This sets them apart from the other low-paid workers in the private sector, casual workers in the informal economy and a vast army of unemployed job seekers. In the absence of a national unemployment benefit scheme in Botswana, the article explores some of the strategies deployed by women members of the Manual Workers Union in their attempts to contend with the spectre of future unemployment and impoverishment. In gender terms, the article highlights the independence, autonomy and decision-making capacity of women trade unionist leaders, who straddle the worlds of workers' rights and citizens' rights, and manoeuvre their way through the maze of rules and regulations they encounter in both.

  8. Wildlife Abundance and Diversity as Indicators of Tourism Potential in Northern Botswana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiaan W Winterbach

    Full Text Available Wildlife tourism can provide economic incentives for conservation. Due to the abundance of wildlife and the presence of charismatic species some areas are better suited to wildlife tourism. Our first objective was to develop criteria based on wildlife abundance and diversity to evaluate tourism potential in the Northern Conservation Zone of Botswana. Secondly we wanted to quantify and compare tourism experiences in areas with high and low tourism potential. We used aerial survey data to estimate wildlife biomass and diversity to determine tourism potential, while data from ground surveys quantified the tourist experience. Areas used for High Paying Low Volume tourism had significantly higher mean wildlife biomass and wildlife diversity than the areas avoided for this type of tourism. Only 22% of the Northern Conservation Zone has intermediate to high tourism potential. The areas with high tourism potential, as determined from the aerial survey data, provided tourists with significantly better wildlife sightings (ground surveys than the low tourism potential areas. Even Low Paying tourism may not be economically viable in concessions that lack areas with intermediate to high tourism potential. The largest part of the Northern Conservation Zone has low tourism potential, but low tourism potential is not equal to low conservation value. Alternative conservation strategies should be developed to complement the economic incentive provided by wildlife-based tourism in Botswana.

  9. Assessing performance of Botswana's public hospital system: the use of the World Health Organization Health System Performance Assessment Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitio-Kgokgwe, Onalenna; Gauld, Robin Dc; Hill, Philip C; Barnett, Pauline

    2014-09-01

    Very few studies have assessed performance of Botswana public hospitals. We draw from a large research study assessing performance of the Botswana Ministry of Health (MoH) to evaluate the performance of public hospital system using the World Health Organization Health Systems Performance Assessment Framework (WHO HSPAF). We aimed to evaluate performance of Botswana public hospital system; relate findings of the assessment to the potential for improvements in hospital performance; and determine the usefulness of the WHO HSPAF in assessing performance of hospital systems in a developing country. This article is based on data collected from document analysis, 54 key informants comprising senior managers and staff of the MoH (N= 40) and senior officers from stakeholder organizations (N= 14), and surveys of 42 hospital managers and 389 health workers. Data from documents and transcripts were analyzed using content and thematic analysis while data analysis for surveys was descriptive determining proportions and percentages. The organizational structure of the Botswana's public hospital system, authority and decision-making are highly centralized. Overall physical access to health services is high. However, challenges in the distribution of facilities and inpatient beds create inequities and inefficiencies. Capacity of the hospitals to deliver services is limited by inadequate resources. There are significant challenges with the quality of care. While Botswana invested considerably in building hospitals around the country resulting in high physical access to services, the organization and governance of the hospital system, and inadequate resources limit service delivery. The ongoing efforts to decentralize management of hospitals to district level entities should be expedited. The WHO HSPAF enabled us to conduct a comprehensive assessment of the public hospital system. Though relatively new, this approach proved useful in this study.

  10. An epidemiologic review of enteropathogens in Gaborone, Botswana: shifting patterns of resistance in an HIV endemic region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack S Rowe

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The epidemiology of diarrheal disease in Botswana, an HIV endemic region, is largely unknown. Our primary objective was to characterize the prevalent bacterial and parasitic enteropathogens in Gaborone, Botswana. Secondary objectives included determining corresponding antimicrobial resistance patterns and the value of stool white and red blood cells for predicting bacterial and parasitic enteropathogens.A retrospective cross-sectional study examined laboratory records of stool specimens analyzed by the Botswana National Health Laboratory in Gaborone, Botswana from February 2003 through July 2008. In 4485 specimens the median subject age was 23 [interquartile range 1.6-34] years. Overall, 14.4% (644 of 4485 of samples yielded a pathogen. Bacteria alone were isolated in 8.2% (367 of 4485, parasites alone in 5.6% (253 of 4485 and both in 0.5% (24 of 4485 of samples. The most common bacterial pathogens were Shigella spp. and Salmonella spp., isolated from 4.0% (180 of 4485 and 3.9% (175 of 4485 of specimens, respectively. Escherichia coli (22 of 4485 and Campylobacter spp. (22 of 4485 each accounted for 0.5% of pathogens. Comparing antimicrobial resistance among Shigella spp. and Salmonella spp. between two periods, February 2003 to February 2004 and July 2006 to July 2008, revealed an increase in ampicillin resistance among Shigella spp. from 43% to 83% (p<0.001. Among Salmonella spp., resistance to chloramphenicol decreased from 56% to 6% (p<0.001. The absence of stool white and red blood cells correlated with a high specificity and negative predictive value.Most gastroenteritis stools were culture and microscopy negative suggesting that viral pathogens were the majority etiologic agents in this Botswana cohort. Shigella spp. and Salmonella spp. were the most common bacteria; Isospora spp. and Cryptosporidium spp. were the most common parasites. Resistance to commonly used antimicrobials is high and should be closely monitored.

  11. The use of interactional metadiscourse features to present a textual voice: A case study of undergraduate writing in two departments at the University of Botswana

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Boitumelo T. Ramoroka

    2017-01-01

    .... Using a multiple-methods approach to genre analysis, this article compares students’ use of interactional metadiscourse features in two undergraduate courses, Media Studies and Primary Education at the University of Botswana...

  12. HIV prevalence, risks for HIV infection, and human rights among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Malawi, Namibia, and Botswana

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baral, Stefan; Trapence, Gift; Motimedi, Felistus; Umar, Eric; Iipinge, Scholastika; Dausab, Friedel; Beyrer, Chris

    2009-01-01

    .... A cross-sectional anonymous probe of 537 men recruited with non-probability sampling among men who reported ever having had sex with another man in Malawi, Namibia, and Botswana using a structured...

  13. Recommendations for Making Anti-Poaching Programs More Effective in the Southern African Region through the Analysis of Key Variables Impacting Upon the Poaching of Elephants in Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-08

    establish an effective defense force within 11 years after independence. Ecotourism also 5 increased due to the abundance of flora and fauna. All these... Ecotourism 3. Botswana Tourism Master Plan 1. Funds from National budget 2. Contributions from Private Sector 3. NGOs/IGOs funding Wildlife...1992 • Tourism Regulations of 1996 • Botswana Tourism Act of 2004 • National Ecotourism Act Provides for the development of tourism in

  14. Developing the Botswana Primary Care Guideline: an integrated, symptom-based primary care guideline for the adult patient in a resource-limited setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsima BM

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Billy M Tsima,1 Vincent Setlhare,1 Oathokwa Nkomazana2 1Department of Family Medicine and Public Health, 2Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Botswana, Gaborone, Botswana Background: Botswana’s health care system is based on a primary care model. Various national guidelines exist for specific diseases. However, most of the guidelines address management at a tertiary level and often appear nonapplicable for the limited resources in primary care facilities. An integrated symptom-based guideline was developed so as to translate the Botswana national guidelines to those applicable in primary care. The Botswana Primary Care Guideline (BPCG integrates the care of communicable diseases, including HIV/AIDS and noncommunicable diseases, by frontline primary health care workers.Methods: The Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Botswana, together with guideline developers from the Knowledge Translation Unit (University of Cape Town collaborated with the Ministry of Health to develop the guideline. Stakeholder groups were set up to review specific content of the guideline to ensure compliance with Botswana government policy and the essential drug list.Results: Participants included clinicians, academics, patient advocacy groups, and policymakers from different disciplines, both private and public. Drug-related issues were identified as necessary for implementing recommendations of the guideline. There was consensus by working groups for updating the essential drug list for primary care and expansion of prescribing rights of trained nurse prescribers in primary care within their scope of practice. An integrated guideline incorporating common symptoms of diseases seen in the Botswana primary care setting was developed.Conclusion: The development of the BPCG took a broad consultative approach with buy in from relevant stakeholders. It is anticipated that implementation of the BPCG will translate into better

  15. Indigenous or citizen? : discourses of indigenousness, nationhood and development in the conflict over relocation of the San / Basarwa from the Central Kalahari Game Reserve, Botswana

    OpenAIRE

    Haram, Åse

    2005-01-01

    The theme of this is indigenous advocacy and the potential of the indigenous rights concept to challenge the homogenising citizenship of the post-colonial developmental state for the benefit of Botswana San / Basarwa hunter-gatherer minority. I base the analysis on the current conflict between members of the San / Basarwa minority and the Botswana government, over the policy to relocate the residents of Central Kalahari Game Reserve (CKGR) to government resettlements outside the reserve. From...

  16. The effect of micronutrient supplementation on active TB incidence early in HIV infection in Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campa A

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Adriana Campa,1 Marianna K Baum,1 Hermann Bussmann,2 Sabrina Sales Martinez,1 Mansour Farahani,3 Erik van Widenfelt,2 Sikhulile Moyo,2,3 Joseph Makhema,2 Max Essex,2,3 Richard Marlink3 1Department of Dietetics and Nutrition, Robert Stempel College of Public Health and Social Work, Florida International University, Miami, FL, USA; 2Botswana Harvard AIDS Institute Partnership, Gaborone, Botswana; 3The Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA Background: Coinfection with active tuberculosis (TB is one of the leading causes of death in people living with HIV (PLWH in Africa. This investigation explores the role of micronutrient supplementation in preventing active TB in PLWH. Methods: A randomized trial of nutritional supplementation was conducted among antiretroviral-naïve (without previous antiretroviral treatment [ART] HIV-infected people in Botswana between 2004 and 2009. The study had a factorial design with four arms: the selenium (Se alone arm, the multivitamins (MVT alone arm that contained vitamin B complex and vitamins C and E, the combined Se+MVT group and the placebo group. Those participants with prior or current active TB were excluded, as were participants with advanced HIV disease (CD4 <250 cells/µL or who had already qualified for ART. HIV-positive adults (N=878 were followed monthly for study pill dispensation, every 3 months for CD4 cell count and every 6 months for viral load during 24 months or until they were started on ART. Results: The participants’ characteristics were not significantly different among the four groups at baseline. Supplementation with Se alone (hazard ratio =0.20, 95% confidence interval: 0.04, 0.95, P=0.043 and the two combined SE groups (Se and Se+MVT had significantly lower risk of developing incident TB disease compared with placebo in multivariate adjusted models (hazard ratio=0.32, 95% confidence interval: 0.11, 0.93, P=0.036. Multivitamins alone did not affect the incidence of TB

  17. Tick-borne haemoparasites in African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) from two wildlife areas in Northern Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eygelaar, Dewald; Jori, Ferran; Mokopasetso, Mokganedi; Sibeko, Kgomotso P; Collins, Nicola E; Vorster, Ilse; Troskie, Milana; Oosthuizen, Marinda C

    2015-01-15

    The African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) is a host for many pathogens known to cause economically important diseases and is often considered an important reservoir for livestock diseases. Theileriosis, heartwater, babesiosis and anaplasmosis are considered the most important tick-borne diseases of livestock in sub-Saharan Africa, resulting in extensive economic losses to livestock farmers in endemic areas. Information on the distribution of tick-borne diseases and ticks is scarce in Northern Botswana. Nevertheless, this data is necessary for targeting surveillance and control measures in livestock production at national level. In order to address this gap, we analyzed 120 blood samples from buffalo herds for the presence of common tick-borne haemoparasites causing disease in livestock, collected in two of the main wildlife areas of Northern Botswana: the Chobe National Park (CNP, n=64) and the Okavango Delta (OD, n=56). Analysis of the reverse line blot (RLB) hybridization assay results revealed the presence of Theileria, Babesia, Anaplasma and Ehrlichia species, either as single or mixed infections. Among the Theileria spp. present, T. parva (60%) and T. mutans (37%) were the most prevalent. Other species of interest were Anaplasma marginale subsp. centrale (30%), A. marginale (20%), Babesia occultans (23%) and Ehrlichia ruminantium (6%). The indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT) indicated 74% of samples to be positive for the presence of T. parva antibodies. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) detected the highest level of animals infected with T. parva (81% of the samples). The level of agreement between the tests for detection of T. parva positive animals was higher between qPCR and IFAT (kappa=0.56), than between qPCR and RLB (kappa=0.26) or the latter and IFAT (kappa=0.15). This is the first report of tick-borne haemoparasites in African buffalo from northern Botswana, where animals from the CNP showed higher levels of infection than those from OD. Considering

  18. Evaluating institutional capacity for research ethics in Africa: a case study from Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyder, Adnan A; Zafar, Waleed; Ali, Joseph; Ssekubugu, Robert; Ndebele, Paul; Kass, Nancy

    2013-07-30

    The increase in the volume of research conducted in Low and Middle Income Countries (LMIC), has brought a renewed international focus on processes for ethical conduct of research. Several programs have been initiated to strengthen the capacity for research ethics in LMIC. However, most such programs focus on individual training or development of ethics review committees. The objective of this paper is to present an approach to institutional capacity assessment in research ethics and application of this approach in the form of a case study from an institution in Africa. We adapted the Octagon model originally used by the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency to assess an organization along eight domains in research ethics: basic values and identity; structure and organization; ability to carry out activities; relevance of activities to stated goals; capacity of staff and management; administrative, financing and accounting systems; its relations with target groups; and the national context. We used a mixed methods approach to collect empirical data at the University of Botswana from March to December 2010. The overall shape of the external evaluation Octagon suggests that strengths of the University of Botswana are in the areas of structure, relevance, production and identity; while the university still needs more work in the areas of systems of finance, target groups, and environment. The Octagons also show the similarities and discrepancies between the 'external' and 'internal' evaluations and provide an opportunity for exploration of these different assessments. For example, the discrepant score for 'identity' between internal and external evaluations allows for an exploration of what constitutes a strong identity for research ethics at the University of Botswana and how it can be strengthened. There is a general lack of frameworks for evaluating research ethics capacity in LMICs. We presented an approach that stresses evaluation from both internal

  19. A population-based study on alcohol and high-risk sexual behaviors in Botswana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheri D Weiser

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available In Botswana, an estimated 24% of adults ages 15-49 years are infected with HIV. While alcohol use is strongly associated with HIV infection in Africa, few population-based studies have characterized the association of alcohol use with specific high-risk sexual behaviors.We conducted a cross-sectional, population-based study of 1,268 adults from five districts in Botswana using a stratified two-stage probability sample design. Multivariate logistic regression was used to assess correlates of heavy alcohol consumption (>14 drinks/week for women, and >21 drinks/week for men as a dependent variable. We also assessed gender-specific associations between alcohol use as a primary independent variable (categorized as none, moderate, problem and heavy drinking and several risky sex outcomes including: (a having unprotected sex with a nonmonogamous partner; (b having multiple sexual partners; and (c paying for or selling sex in exchange for money or other resources. Criteria for heavy drinking were met by 31% of men and 17% of women. Adjusted correlates of heavy alcohol use included male gender, intergenerational relationships (age gap > or =10 y, higher education, and living with a sexual partner. Among men, heavy alcohol use was associated with higher odds of all risky sex outcomes examined, including unprotected sex (AOR = 3.48; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.65 to 7.32, multiple partners (AOR = 3.08; 95% CI, 1.95 to 4.87, and paying for sex (AOR = 3.65; 95% CI, 2.58 to 12.37. Similarly, among women, heavy alcohol consumption was associated with higher odds of unprotected sex (AOR = 3.28; 95% CI, 1.71 to 6.28, multiple partners (AOR = 3.05; 95% CI, 1.83 to 5.07, and selling sex (AOR = 8.50; 95% CI, 3.41 to 21.18. A dose-response relationship was seen between alcohol use and risky sexual behaviors, with moderate drinkers at lower risk than both problem and heavy drinkers.Alcohol use is associated with multiple risks for HIV transmission among both men

  20. SU-F-P-09: A Global Medical Physics Collaboration for Implementation of Modern Radiotherapy in Botswana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makufa, R; Bvochora-Nsingo, M; Karumekayi, T [Gaborone Private Hospital, Gaborone (Botswana); Schneider, RJ [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Efstathiou, JA; Gierga, DP [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Dryden-Peterson, S [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Odom, A [Associates in Medical Physics, Louisville, KY (United States); Shulman, A [Hamad Medical Corporation, Shelbyville, TN (United States); Pipman, Y [Forest Hills, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The global burden of cancer is considerable, particularly in low and middle-income countries. Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and Botswana-Harvard AIDS Institute have partnered with the oncology community and government of Botswana to form BOTSOGO (BOTSwana Oncology Global Outreach) to address the rising burden of cancer in Botswana. Currently, radiation therapy (RT) is only available at a single linear accelerator (LINAC) in Gaborone Private Hospital (GPH). BOTSOGO worked to limit the absence of RT during a LINAC upgrade and ensure a safe transition to modern radiotherapy techniques. Methods: The existing Elekta Precise LINAC was decommissioned in November 2015 and replaced with a new Elekta VERSA-HD with IMRT/VMAT/CBCT capability. Upgraded treatment planning and record-and-verify systems were also installed. Physicists from GPH and MGH collaborated during an intensive on-site visit in Botswana during the commissioning process. Measurements were performed using newly purchased Sun Nuclear equipment. Photon beams were matched with an existing model to minimize the time needed for beam modeling and machine down time. Additional remote peer review was also employed. Independent dosimetry was performed by irradiating OSLDs, which were subsequently analyzed at MGH. Results: Photon beam quality agreed with reference data within 0.2%. Electron beam data agreed with example clinical data within 3%. Absolute dose calibration was performed using both IAEA and AAPM protocols. Absolute dose measurements with OSLDs agreed within 5%. Quentry cloud-based software was installed to facilitate remote review of treatment plans. Patient treatments resumed in February 2016. The time without RT was reduced, therefore likely resulting in reduced patient morbidity/mortality. Conclusion: A global physics collaboration was utilized to commission a modern LINAC in a resource-constrained setting. This can be a useful model in other areas with limited resources. Further use of

  1. The leadership characteristics of the preceptor in selected clinical practice settings in Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Dube

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available A non-experimental, explorative, descriptive, quantitative study was undertaken. The purpose was to explore and describe the views of preceptors and preceptees regarding the fulfilment of the role of the preceptor in selected clinical nursing practice settings in the Botswana context. The study included 72 preceptors and 200 nursing students/preceptees who voluntary agreed voluntarily to participate in the study. A questionnaire was used to collect data, which was analyzed by using descriptive and inferential statistics. The findings of this study indicated that the preceptor lacked leadership characteristics in the accompaniment of the preceptee. These constraints included the lack of desirable characteristics such as intellectual, emotional, physical and other traits that are common to all good leaders. Recommendations were stated for improvements in selecting preceptors with certain leadership skills for the clinical practice settings. The limitations of this study were highlighted.

  2. The role of nursing education in preventing medication errors in Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wananani B. Tshiamo

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the authors take stock of the extent to which nursing curricula address the prevention of medication errors, highlighting strengths and pinpointing weaknesses yet to be addressed. The exercise involved review of curricula at various levels of nursing education as well as nursing regulatory documents. Findings from the review were corroborated with published work on the subject. Recommendations for strengthening basic nursing curricula at both diploma and undergraduate levels’ coverage of medications errors are proposed. Also recommended are measures to improve the system in the practice arena as well as research to establish the magnitude of medication errors and their related risk factors in Botswana. The exercise is envisaged to improve patients’ safety and reduce the risk of litigation for nurses.

  3. How can we assess the burden of muscle, bone and joint conditions in rural Botswana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hondras, Maria; Myburgh, Corrie; Hartvigsen, Jan

    2015-01-01

    - and middle-income countries in Africa. Since 2011, World Spine Care, a nongovernmental organisation, has collaborated with the Botswana Ministry of Health to open spine care centres and to conduct research. The broad aim of the Muscle, Bone and Joint (MuBoJo) research project is to examine the sociocultural......-participant and participant observations, and informal and in-depth interviews with villagers and healthcare providers. Villager interviews were typically conducted in Setswana with an interpreter. Audio recordings were transcribed verbatim in the language spoken with Setswana contextually translated into English. Computer...... software supported qualitative data management. Analysis is ongoing using constant comparison and a template organising style to facilitate pattern-finding and reveal insights for the burden and care of musculoskeletal conditions. DISCUSSION: Findings from the MuBoJo Project will document the context...

  4. The Creation of Students' Academic Slang Expressions in the University of Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arua, Arua E.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the creation of students' academic slang expressions at the University of Botswana with data obtained from 32 items in a questionnaire consisting of 89 items. The semantic process of extension is the most widespread creative process, producing 101 (66% out of 153 selected slang expressions. Five morphological processes, compounding, derivation, conversion, acronymy and reduplication, together produce the remaining 52 (34% expressions. Also the process of semantic extension features in all aspects of the students' academic life in contrast with the other five morphological processes which are restricted. These findings show that the students draw extensively on and exploit the language resources at their disposal to create new meanings for describing their academic life. The findings also show that all the word formation processes highlighted relate to certain areas of the students' academic life, notably, the students' relationships with their lecturers, difficult courses and those who teach them, performances and grades.

  5. Interaction of density flow and geochemical processes on islands in the Okavanga Delta, Botswana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauer-Gottwein, Peter; Langer, T.; Prommer, H.

    2006-01-01

    This paper analyses the interactions of density driven flow and geochemical reactions under evapo-concentration. A multi-species hydrodynamic flow and transport simulation model (SEAWAT) is coupled to a batch reaction model (PHREEQC) to analyze densitydriven flow on islands in the Okavango Delta......, Botswana. Evapo-concentration on the islands leads to steadily increasing concentrations until the onset of density-driven flow against the evaporation-induced upward gradient. Lag times to the onset of density-driven flow are strongly influenced by geochemical reactions. Mineral precipitation and carbon...... dioxide offgassing increase the lag time. Carbon dioxide off-gassing is enhanced in the presence of significant amounts of humic substances. Simulation results further depend sensitively on the assumed dispersivity....

  6. Devil's claw (Harpagophytum procumbens in a Brahman's preputial sheath : a case report from Botswana : case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.F.W. Isa

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Failure of penile protrusion during attempted service of a cow on heat was investigated in a 3-year-old Brahman bull at Kwakwadi cattle-post in the Kgalahadi sandveld, Kweneng District, Botswana. The investigation revealed that penile protrusion was obstructed by a devil's claw (grapple thorn, a dry fruit of the plant Harpagophytum procumbens, which had lodged in the cavum preputiale. The thorn, which was removed almost completely manually with minimal tissue dissection, had also caused minor lacerations and puncture wounds on the lamina interna pars parietalis. The wounds healed well following treatment with antiseptics and antibiotics and subsequently the bull regained full penile protrusion and served the cows well. This report describes the first case of lodgement of a devil's claw fruit in, and its extraction from, the cavum preputiale of a Brahman.

  7. Formative Work and Community Engagement Approaches for Implementing an HIV Intervention in Botswana Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kim S; Cham, Haddi J; Taylor, Eboni M; Berrier, Faith L; Duffy, Meghan; Vig, Jessica; Chipazi, Lily; Chakalisa, Chawada; Sidibe, Sekou; Swart, Kenau; Tau, Nontobeko Sylvia; Clark, Leslie F

    2016-08-01

    Providing adolescents with evidence-based sexual risk reduction interventions is critical to addressing the HIV/AIDS epidemic among adolescents in sub-Saharan Africa. Project AIM (Adult Identity Mentoring) is an innovative, evidence-based, youth development intervention that is being evaluated for the first time in Botswana through a 3-year (2015-2017), 50-school cluster randomized controlled trial, including testing for herpes simplex virus type 2 as a sexual activity biomarker. Conducting a trial of this magnitude requires the support and collaboration of government and community stakeholders. All school staff, including teachers, must be well informed about the study; dedicated staff placed at each school can help to improve school and community familiarity with the study, improve the information flow, and relieve some of the burden study activities places on schools.

  8. Botswana water and surface energy balance research program. Part 2: Large scale moisture and passive microwaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandegriend, A. A.; Owe, M.; Chang, A. T. C.

    1992-01-01

    The Botswana water and surface energy balance research program was developed to study and evaluate the integrated use of multispectral satellite remote sensing for monitoring the hydrological status of the Earth's surface. The research program consisted of two major, mutually related components: a surface energy balance modeling component, built around an extensive field campaign; and a passive microwave research component which consisted of a retrospective study of large scale moisture conditions and Nimbus scanning multichannel microwave radiometer microwave signatures. The integrated approach of both components are explained in general and activities performed within the passive microwave research component are summarized. The microwave theory is discussed taking into account: soil dielectric constant, emissivity, soil roughness effects, vegetation effects, optical depth, single scattering albedo, and wavelength effects. The study site is described. The soil moisture data and its processing are considered. The relation between observed large scale soil moisture and normalized brightness temperatures is discussed. Vegetation characteristics and inverse modeling of soil emissivity is considered.

  9. ODL and the Impact of Digital Divide on Information Access in Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olugbade Oladokun

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Open and distance learning (ODL has created room for the emergence of virtual education. Not only are students found everywhere and anywhere undertaking their studies and earning their degrees, but geographical boundaries between nations no longer appear to have much relevance. As the new education paradigm irretrievably alters the way teaching and learning is conducted, the application of modern educational ICTs has a major role to play.With students of transnational or cross-border education dispersed into various nooks and crannies of Botswana, many others enlist for the “home-baked” distance learning programmes from their diverse locations. Like the face-to-face conventional students, distance learners also have information needs which have to be met. But blocking the distance learners’ realization of their information needs is the digital divide, which further marginalizes the underclass of “info-poor.”The survey method was used, and a questionnaire administered to 519 students of four tertiary level distance teaching institutions that met the criteria set for the study yielded a 70.1% response rate. The results showed that while the Government of Botswana has made considerable effort to ensure country-wide access to ICT, which now constitutes an effective instrument for meeting information needs, a number of problems still exist. The factors impeding easy access are unearthed. The findings of an empirical study portraying some learners as information-rich and others as information-poor, and the consequence of distance learners studying on both sides of the digital divide, are discussed. Suggestions on bridging the digital divide are offered.

  10. Botlhoko, botlhoko! How people talk about their musculoskeletal complaints in rural Botswana: a focused ethnography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Hondras

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Conflicting interpretations about the structure and function of the body contribute to discordance in communication between healthcare professionals and lay people. Understanding musculoskeletal (MSK complaints presents additional complexities when discussed in more than one language or in cross-cultural settings. In low- and middle-income countries (LMICs, few healthcare professionals have specialist MSK training and not all practitioners speak the primary language of patients. Objective: Our goal was to understand how people in rural Botswana perceive and express MSK complaints. Design: Ethnographic fieldwork for 8 months in the Botswana Central District included participant observations and interviews with 34 community members with MSK complaints. Audio-recorded interviews were typically conducted in Setswana with an interpreter, transcribed verbatim, and contextually translated into English. Abductive qualitative analysis was used as the interpretive methodology. Results: Whereas initial responses about MSK troubles yielded the exclamation botlhoko, botlhoko! combined with animated non-verbal gestures and facial expressions indicating widespread body pains, in-depth interviews revealed the complexities of pain expression among respondents. MSK pains were described as ‘bursting, exploding, aching, numbness, hot, pricking, stabbing, swollen, and pain in the heart’. Language subtleties manifested during interviews, where ‘meat’ or ‘flesh’ implied soft tissue pains; waist pains were voiced yet portrayed as low back or sacroiliac pain; and ‘veins’ variously referred to structural and functional types of pain. Psychological and social stressors accompanied many accounts of MSK troubles. Conclusions: Respondents offered diverse MSK symptom descriptions consistent with biopsychosocial illness models, yet few communicated complaints using the biomedical language of healthcare providers. Although research interview and

  11. People living with AIDS/HIV in Botswana: a needs assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Zuyderduin

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available A deficit in information and knowledge regarding people living with AIDS in Botswana, hampering health care planning and satisfactory health care delivery to these people, necessitated the needs assessment reported on in this paper. Not only did self-imposed alienation and societal levels of stigma surrounding HIV and AIDS force many people living with AIDS/HIV (PLWAH into silence and denial of their HIV+ve diagnosis, thereby creating knowledge and information deficits. These same factors also pose challenges for conducting a needs assessment among these persons. Consequently, a 73 item questionnaire was administered to a convenience sample of 39 male and 77 female PLWAH in Botswana. Maslow’s Hierarchy of Human Needs served as a general theoretical point of departure for the needs analysis and the 73 items represented needs at all levels of this hierarchy. Analysis of the data indicates that 65% of the respondents lived in urban areas. The majority of individuals (42% were tested for HIV because they became ill, while 28% did so voluntarily. Other reasons for testing were: child becoming ill, partner becoming ill, being pregnant and having been raped. Only 7% indicated that their HIV status had been disclosed to other persons. With regards to love and belongingness 70% of the respondents indicated that they were not in an intimate relationship, nearly one third experienced multiple deaths within their families due to AIDS, 61% had access to a support group, and 48% had not informed their parents about their HIV+ve status. Stigmatisation weighed down self-esteem. Despite the deficiencies in the fulfilment of safety, belonging

  12. Food insufficiency is associated with high-risk sexual behavior among women in Botswana and Swaziland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheri D Weiser

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Both food insufficiency and HIV infection are major public health problems in sub-Saharan Africa, yet the impact of food insufficiency on HIV risk behavior has not been systematically investigated. We tested the hypothesis that food insufficiency is associated with HIV transmission behavior.We studied the association between food insufficiency (not having enough food to eat over the previous 12 months and inconsistent condom use, sex exchange, and other measures of risky sex in a cross-sectional population-based study of 1,255 adults in Botswana and 796 adults in Swaziland using a stratified two-stage probability design. Associations were examined using multivariable logistic regression analyses, clustered by country and stratified by gender. Food insufficiency was reported by 32% of women and 22% of men over the previous 12 months. Among 1,050 women in both countries, after controlling for respondent characteristics including income and education, HIV knowledge, and alcohol use, food insufficiency was associated with inconsistent condom use with a nonprimary partner (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 1.73, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.27-2.36, sex exchange (AOR 1.84, 95% CI 1.74-1.93, intergenerational sexual relationships (AOR 1.46, 95% CI 1.03-2.08, and lack of control in sexual relationships (AOR 1.68, 95% CI 1.24-2.28. Associations between food insufficiency and risky sex were much attenuated among men.Food insufficiency is an important risk factor for increased sexual risk-taking among women in Botswana and Swaziland. Targeted food assistance and income generation programs in conjunction with efforts to enhance women's legal and social rights may play an important role in decreasing HIV transmission risk for women.

  13. A retrospective longitudinal study of animal and human rabies in Botswana 1989-2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.T. Moagabo

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available A longitudinal study of animal and human rabies covering 18 years from 1989 to 2006 was retrospectively conducted in order to highlight the epidemiological features and trends of the disease in Botswana. Over the 18-year period, a total of 4 306 brain specimens collected from various species of animals including human beings with clinical signs consistent with rabies were submitted to the National Veterinary Laboratory in Gaborone for confirmatory diagnosis. Of the samples submitted, 2 419 cases were found to be positive for lyssavirus antigen; this presents an overall prevalence rate of 56.18 ± 1.48 %. About 85.7 % (2 074/2 419 of the cases were from domestic animals, 14.2 % (343/2 419 cases were from wild animals and two cases (0.1 % were from human beings. During the first half of the study (1989-1997 the prevalence rate of the disease was estimated at 62.79 ± 1.85 % (1 645/2 620 positive whereas during the second half (1998-2006 it was estimated at 45.91 ± 2.38 % (774/1 686 positive and the difference between the two estimates was statistically, highly significant (Δ % = 16.88, SE 95 diff % = 3.015, SD = 5.599; P < 0.001. Ruminant rabies accounted for 79.99 % (50.92 % bovine, 28.40 % caprine and 0.67 % ovine whereas canine (domestic dog and feline (domestic cat accounted for 16.01 and 0.87 %, respectively. Equine rabies accounted for 3.13 % with 1.35 and 1.78 %, respectively, for horses and donkeys. Jackal rabies accounted for more than 60 % of the total cases in wild animals. These findings are discussed in relation to the previous epidemiological situation of the disease (1979-1988, its socio-economic impact, monitoring and control in Botswana.

  14. The role of the law in reducing tuberculosis transmission in Botswana, South Africa and Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verani, Andre R; Emerson, Courtney N; Lederer, Philip; Lipke, Ginny; Kapata, Nathan; Lanje, Samson; Peters, Annatjie C; Zulu, Isaac; Marston, Barbara J; Miller, Bess

    2016-06-01

    To determine whether laws and regulations in Botswana, South Africa and Zambia - three countries with a high tuberculosis and HIV infection burden - address elements of the World Health Organization (WHO) policy on tuberculosis infection control. An online desk review of laws and regulations that address six selected elements of the WHO policy on tuberculosis infection control in the three countries was conducted in November 2015 using publicly available domestic legal databases. The six elements covered: (i) national policy and legal framework; (ii) health facility design, construction and use; (iii) tuberculosis disease surveillance among health workers; (iv) patients' and health workers' rights; (v) monitoring of infection control measures; and (vi) relevant research. The six elements were found to be adequately addressed in the three countries' laws and regulations. In all three, tuberculosis case-reporting is required, as is tuberculosis surveillance among health workers. Each country's legal and regulatory framework also addresses the need to respect individuals' rights and privacy while safeguarding public health. These laws and regulations create a strong foundation for tuberculosis infection control. Although the legal and regulatory frameworks thoroughly address tuberculosis infection control, their dissemination, implementation and enforcement were not assessed, nor was their impact on public health. Laws and regulations in Botswana, South Africa and Zambia address all six selected elements of the WHO policy on tuberculosis infection control. However, the lack of data on their implementation is a limitation. Future research should assess the implementation and public health impact of laws and regulations.

  15. Health-related quality of life of antiretroviral treatment defaulters in Botswana

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    Nnamdi O. Ndubuka

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Antiretroviral therapy (ART improves patients’ health-related quality of life (HRQoL. Defaulting from ART has detrimental consequences, including the development of viral resistance, treatment failure and increased risks of disease progression. Little is known about the quality of life of ART defaulters and reasons for discontinuing their ART. Objectives: This study sought to measure the HRQoL of ART patients in Botswana who were on ART for up to 5 years but had discontinued treatment for at least 3 months, and to identify factors associated with ART defaulting. Method: We conducted a cross-sectional study with 104 eligible respondents in four ART clinics in south eastern Botswana. We assessed respondents’ HRQoL using the World Health Organization Quality of Life Questionnaire for HIV short form. Clinical information was obtained from respondents’ medical records. Data were analysed using SAS version 9.2. Results: Reasons for discontinuing ART were inaccessible clinics (22.4%, feeling better (21.4%, running out of pills (11.2%, depression (8.2%, lack of care and/or support (8.2%, failure to understand instructions (7.7%, medications’ side effects (6.1% and alcohol abuse (3.1%. In multivariate analyses, respondents aged 36–45 years had a 0.03 lower independence HRQoL score compared to those aged 35 and younger (β = -0.03; 95% confidence interval: -1.72, -1.66. Despite defaulting from their ART, respondents’ calculated HRQoL scores were Conclusion: This study highlights the need to enhance ART adherence in order to improve the HRQoL of people living with HIV and/or AIDS.

  16. Reported intimate partner violence amongst women attending a public hospital in Botswana

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    Lindiwe I. Zungu

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Intimate partner violence (IPV is common worldwide and occurs across social, economic, religious and cultural groups. This makes it an important public health issue for health care providers. In South Africa, the problem of violence against women is complex and it has social and public health consequences. The paucity of data on IPV is related to underreporting and a lack of screening of this form of violence in health care settings.Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of IPV and explore the risk factors associated with this type of violence against women who visited a public hospital in Botswana.Method: A descriptive, cross-sectional survey was conducted among randomly sampled adult women aged 21 years and older, during their hospital visits in 2007. Data were obtained by means of structured interviews, after obtaining written and signed, informed consent from each participant.Results: A total of 320 women participated in this study. Almost half (49.7% reported having had an experience of IPV in one form or another at some point in their lifetime, while 68 (21.2% reported a recent incident of abuse by their partners in the past year. Experiences of IPV were predominantly reported by women aged 21 – 30 years (122; 38%. Most of the allegedly abused participants were single (173; 54% and unemployed (140; 44%. Significant associations were found between alcohol use by participants’ male intimate partners (χ2 = 17.318; p = 0.001 and IPV, as well as cigarette smoking (χ2 = 17.318; p = 0.001 and IPV.Conclusion: The prevalence of alleged IPV in Botswana is relatively high (49.7%, especially among young adult women, but the prevalence of reported IPV is low (13.2%. It is essential that women are screened regularly in the country’s public and private health care settings for IPV.

  17. Perceptions and attitudes towards food choice in adolescents in Gaborone, Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Corbett; Shaibu, Sheila; Maruapula, Segametsi; Malete, Leapetswe; Compher, Charlene

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to describe the factors that influence adolescent and adult perceptions and attitudes related to adolescent diet in Botswana. A series of 15 focus groups [12 adolescent focus groups (6 male and 6 female) & 3 parent focus groups] of approximately six to eleven members each were conducted in Gaborone, the capital city of Botswana in 2009-2010. Adolescents and parents of adolescents suggest that the main drivers of adolescent food choices have much to do with where the adolescent is in terms of time of day as well as with whom the adolescent is with. Outside of the home adolescents suggest that the real or perceived influence of companions place social standing on the ability to purchase and consume non-traditional foods, and that traditional foods leave adolescents open to ridicule. Additionally parents of adolescents suggest that while they prefer for their children to consume healthy foods, they frequently purchase unhealthy food items for their children based on the child's taste preferences as well as social influence to prove you can buy "nice things" for one's family. Adolescents and parents of adolescents suggest that increasing the availability and decreasing the costs of healthy food options are preferred possible interventions to increase healthful eating among adolescents. However, the adolescents also suggest that these healthy food options should not crowd out or completely replace unhealthy options, thus preserving the adolescents' freedom to choose. This could pose a major challenge in any school-based adolescent obesity prevention program. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Mineralogical and particulate morphological characterization of geophagic clayey soils from Botswana

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    Georges-Ivo Ekosse

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study focused on determining the minerals composition and particle morphology of geophagic clayey soils from Botswana in order to infer on how they could influence human health. Six representative geophagic clayey soils from Botswana were mineralogically characterized using X-ray powder diffractometry (XRPD, optical microscopy, and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM. Results of identified mineral phases revealed quartz (SiO2 as the most dominant in all samples constituting close to 70 wt %; followed by goethite (FeO.OH having a mean concentration of 9 wt%, and kaolinite (Al2Si2O5(OH4 with a mean concentration of 8 wt%. Other minerals present were smectite ((Na,Ca(Al,Mg6(Si4O103(OH6-n(H2O, mica (AB2-3(Al,SiSi3O10(F,OH2, feldspar (Na/K(AlSi3O8 and hematite (Fe2O3. The quartz particles were generally coarse; and angular to very angular in morphology. Due to ions present in goethite, kaolinite, and smectite, these minerals impact positively on properties of geophagic clayey soils and could possibly influence human health when consumed. The quartz particles could negatively affect dental enamel as a result of mastication; and cause abrasion of the walls of the gastro-intestinal tract which may lead to rupturing. Although the studied clayey soils could have potential to provide medicinal benefits to the consumer, there is need for beneficiation exercise to be conducted to reduce the coarse angular particles contained in them. It is therefore necessary for constructive efforts to be directed at beneficiating geophagic materials which will render them safe for human consumption.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/bcse.v26i3.6

  19. Prevention of mother-to-child transmission in HIV audit in Xhosa clinic, Mahalapye, Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephane Tshitenge

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Mahalapye district health management team (DHMT conducts regular audits to evaluate the standard of services delivered to patients, one of which is the prevention of mother-to-child-transmission (PMTCT programme. Xhosa clinic is one of the facilities in Mahalapye which provides a PMTCT programme.Aim: This audit aimed to identify gaps between the current PMTCT clinical practice in Xhosa clinic and the Botswana PMTCT national guidelines.Setting: This audit took place in Xhosa clinic in the urban village of Mahalapye, in the Central District of Botswana.Methods: This was a retrospective audit using PMTCT Xhosa clinic records of pregnant mothers and HIV-exposed babies seen from January 2013 to June 2013.Results: One hundred and thirty-three pregnant women registered for antenatal care. Twenty-five (19% knew their HIV-positive status as they had been tested before their pregnancy or had tested HIV positive at their first antenatal clinic visit. More than two-thirds of the 115 pregnant women (69% were seen at a gestational age of between 14 and 28 weeks. About two-thirds of the pregnant women (67% took antiretroviral drugs. Of the 44 HIV-exposed infants, 39 (89% were HIV DNA PCR negative at 6 weeks. Thirty-two (73% children were given cotrimoxazole prophylaxis between 6 and 8 weeks.Conclusion: The PMTCT programme service delivery was still suboptimal and could potentially increase the mother-to-child transmission of HIV. Daily monitoring mechanism to track those eligible could help to close the gap.

  20. Botlhoko, botlhoko! How people talk about their musculoskeletal complaints in rural Botswana: a focused ethnography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hondras, Maria; Myburgh, Corrie; Hartvigsen, Jan; Johannessen, Helle

    2015-01-01

    Conflicting interpretations about the structure and function of the body contribute to discordance in communication between healthcare professionals and lay people. Understanding musculoskeletal (MSK) complaints presents additional complexities when discussed in more than one language or in cross-cultural settings. In low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), few healthcare professionals have specialist MSK training and not all practitioners speak the primary language of patients. Our goal was to understand how people in rural Botswana perceive and express MSK complaints. Ethnographic fieldwork for 8 months in the Botswana Central District included participant observations and interviews with 34 community members with MSK complaints. Audio-recorded interviews were typically conducted in Setswana with an interpreter, transcribed verbatim, and contextually translated into English. Abductive qualitative analysis was used as the interpretive methodology. Whereas initial responses about MSK troubles yielded the exclamation botlhoko, botlhoko! combined with animated non-verbal gestures and facial expressions indicating widespread body pains, in-depth interviews revealed the complexities of pain expression among respondents. MSK pains were described as 'bursting, exploding, aching, numbness, hot, pricking, stabbing, swollen, and pain in the heart'. Language subtleties manifested during interviews, where 'meat' or 'flesh' implied soft tissue pains; waist pains were voiced yet portrayed as low back or sacroiliac pain; and 'veins' variously referred to structural and functional types of pain. Psychological and social stressors accompanied many accounts of MSK troubles. Respondents offered diverse MSK symptom descriptions consistent with biopsychosocial illness models, yet few communicated complaints using the biomedical language of healthcare providers. Although research interview and transcription processes may not be practical for clinicians, working with interpreters who

  1. Immune activation markers in peripartum women in Botswana: association with feeding strategy and maternal morbidity.

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    Elizabeth S Russell

    Full Text Available Hormone levels shift the immune state in HIV-uninfected pregnant and breastfeeding women away from Th1 responses and toward regulation to permit fetal tolerance. Limited data exist on inflammation during pregnancy or postpartum in HIV-infected women, though certain inflammatory markers are associated with adverse health outcomes among HIV-infected persons. We measured hsCRP, D-dimer, IFN-γ, IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α at 34 weeks gestation and six months postpartum in HIV-infected women from the Botswana Mashi PMTCT trial who were randomized to breastfeeding or formula-feeding. Differences in inflammatory markers between gestation and postpartum periods, and by randomized feeding method, were estimated using generalized estimating equations, adjusting for baseline plasma HIV-1 viral load, CD4 count, calendar time, and antiretroviral treatment status. Additionally, we studied the association between marker concentrations at six months postpartum and major adverse clinical events over the following 4.5 years, using case-cohort sampling and adjusted Cox proportional hazards models. In 86 breastfeeding and 75 formula-feeding women, hsCRP and D-dimer decreased significantly between 34 weeks gestation and six months postpartum, while IFN-γ increased. There was no significant association between inflammatory marker change and randomized feeding method after adjusting for multiple comparisons and removing outliers. In univariate analysis, TNF-α, D-dimer, and IFN-γ concentrations at six months postpartum were significant predictors of subsequent clinical events, and TNF-α remained significant in multivariate analysis (HR = 4.16, p = 0.001. In young HIV-infected women in Botswana inflammatory marker concentrations did not differ significantly between women who breast- vs. formula-fed. However, postpartum TNF-α level was predictive of subsequent adverse clinical event.

  2. Sterility and stigma in an era of HIV/AIDS: narratives of risk assessment among men and women in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upton, Rebecca L; Dolan, Edward Myers

    2011-03-01

    This paper examines the experience and interpretations of infertility and sterility in northern Botswana. Specifically it highlights the role of stigma and impression management among Tswana men and women through their narratives and discourse about childbearing and personhood in an era of HIV/AIDS. The paper demonstrates that in a country with one of the highest HIV/AIDS infection rates in the world, risky sexual practices are weighed against cultural norms that suggest being a full person and productive adult is to be a reproductive man or woman. Through longitudinal qualitative research the narratives and life histories of several individuals offer ethnographic evidence on the power of stigma. The research finds that even with ubiquitous HIV/AIDS education and prevention programmes throughout Botswana, Tswana engage in various kinds of risk taking behaviours as means through which impressions and identities as full persons of value may be managed successfully.

  3. BAQMAP Air Quality Monitoring and Surveillance Program for Botswana. Mission 2 Report 27 January - 18 February 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bekkestad, T.

    1997-12-31

    This report is concerned with Mission 2 of a joint project between the authorities in Botswana and Norway on the development of an air pollution monitoring and surveillance program for Botswana. Mission 2 was undertaken as part of the annual meeting on 4 February 1997. Discussions and decision on the air quality program was performed after the annual meeting. Passive samplers for SO{sub 2} and NO{sub 2} were installed in Selebi-Phikwe and Francistown. The samplers measured air pollution from the BCL smelter and traffic, respectively, during the first two weeks of February 1997. The samplers have been analysed and the results are given in this report, which also includes a status report. 13 tabs.

  4. Assessing intervention measures for anti-social behaviour : A case study of secondary school in Lobatse, Botswana. / Heather Modiane Sechele

    OpenAIRE

    Sechele, Heather Modiane

    2012-01-01

    Intervention for students' antisocial behaviour is a challenging issue for teachers in secondary schools. Even though Government has implemented intervention measures in secondary schools to assist teachers in interveni.ng in curbing antisocial behaviour by students, the problems of student misconduct still prevail. The purpose of this study was to investigate intervention measures employed to curb antisocial bebaviour by students in a secondary school in Lobatse Botswana. The researcher w...

  5. Farmer–African wild dog (Lycaon pictus) relations in the eastern Kalahari region of Botswana

    OpenAIRE

    Valli-Laurente Fraser-Celin; Alice J Hovorka; Mark Hovork; Glyn Maude

    2017-01-01

    African wild dogs (Lycaon pictus) are the most endangered large carnivores in southern Africa. Direct and indirect persecution by farmers causes significant conservation challenges. Farmer– wild dog conflict in Botswana commonly occurs as a result of cattle and stocked game depredation by wild dogs, affecting farmer livelihood and causing economic and emotional distress. Although wild dogs predate livestock at lower levels than other carnivores, they continue to be killed both indiscriminatel...

  6. Is the Botswana Defence Force Poised to Attain the Level of Military Effectiveness Espoused by Its Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-13

    has been an active member of the Botswana Defence Force for 26 years. These years were spent predominantly at Air Arm Command ( AAC ) as a Licensed...He has held the following appointments during his tenure at AAC ; Squadron Engineering Officer, Chief Maintenance Planning Officer, Base Engineer...and Plans Division is responsible for developing defense policy within the guidelines set out by the cabinet, and then translating approved policy

  7. GPS-corrected and GIS-based remapping of the Kalahari Gemsbok National Park and the adjacent area in Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. du P. Bothma

    1993-09-01

    Full Text Available GPS-equipment was used to map the interior roads, major pans and the location of all windmills and solar-equipped boreholes in the Kalahari Gemsbok National Park and the adjacent areas of Botswana. The final map was generated with GIS-equipment, and supplies managers and planners with the first error-free map of the area. The major errors of previous maps are indicated.

  8. Male circumcision, attitudes to HIV prevention and HIV status: a cross-sectional study in Botswana, Namibia and Swaziland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Neil; Cockcroft, Anne

    2012-01-01

    In efficacy trials male circumcision (MC) protected men against HIV infection. Planners need information relevant to MC programmes in practice. In 2008, we interviewed 2915 men and 4549 women aged 15-29 years in representative cluster samples in Botswana, Namibia and Swaziland, asking about socio-economic characteristics, knowledge and attitudes about HIV and MC and MC history. We tested finger prick blood samples for HIV. We calculated weighted frequencies of MC knowledge and attitudes, and MC history and HIV status. Multivariate analysis examined associations between MC and other variables and HIV status. In Botswana, 11% of young men reported MC, 28% in Namibia and 8% in Swaziland; mostly (75% in Botswana, 94% - mostly Herero - in Namibia and 68% in Swaziland) as infants or children. Overall, 6.5% were HIV positive (8.3% Botswana, 2.6% Namibia and 9.1% Swaziland). Taking other variables into account, circumcised men were as likely as uncircumcised men to be HIV positive. Nearly half of the uncircumcised young men planned to be circumcised; two-thirds of young men and women planned to have their sons circumcised. Some respondents had inaccurate beliefs and unhelpful views about MC and HIV, with variation between countries. Between 9 and 15% believed a circumcised man is fully protected against HIV; 20-26% believed men need not be tested for HIV before MC; 14-26% believed HIV-positive men who are circumcised cannot transmit the virus; and 8-34% thought it was "okay for a circumcised man to expect sex without a condom". Inaccurate perceptions about protection from MC could lead to risk compensation and reduce women's ability to negotiate safer sex. More efforts are needed to raise awareness about the limitations of MC protection, especially for women, and to study the interactions between MC roll out programmes and primary HIV prevention programmes.

  9. 11 Botswana

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    this system has not led to electoral violence or political instability. The system is not without its limitations, .... Ghanzi were designated sub-chiefs and periodically elected from these areas. The question then is, .... organ on the land, and comprises 57 elected l\\/fembers of Parliament (MP), four members specially elected by ...

  10. Evaluation of a TB infection control implementation initiative in out-patient HIV clinics in Zambia and Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, C; Lipke, V; Kapata, N; Mwananyambe, N; Mwinga, A; Garekwe, M; Lanje, S; Moshe, Y; Pals, S L; Nakashima, A K; Miller, B

    2016-07-01

    Out-patient human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) care and treatment clinics in Zambia and Botswana, countries with a high burden of HIV and TB infection. To develop a tuberculosis infection control (TB IC) training and implementation package and evaluate the implementation of TB IC activities in facilities implementing the package. Prospective program evaluation of a TB IC training and implementation package using a standardized facility risk assessment tool, qualitative interviews with facility health care workers and measures of pre- and post-test performance. A composite measure of facility performance in TB IC improved from 32% at baseline to 50% at 1 year among eight facilities in Zambia, and from 27% to 80% at 6 months among 10 facilities in Botswana. Although there was marked improvement in indicators of managerial, administrative and environmental controls, key ongoing challenges remained in ensuring access to personal protective equipment and implementing TB screening in health care workers. TB IC activities at out-patient HIV clinics in Zambia and Botswana improved after training using the implementation package. Continued infrastructure support, as well as monitoring and evaluation, are needed to support the scale-up and sustainability of TB IC programs in facilities in low-resource countries.

  11. Cardio-pulmonary resuscitation challenges in selected Botswana hospitals: Nurse managers’ views

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmi Rajeswaran

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Road traffic accident victims, as well as persons experiencing cardiac and other medical emergencies, might lose their lives due to the non-availability of trained personnel to provide effective cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR with functional equipment and adequate resources. The objectives of the study were to identify unit managers’ perceptions about challenges encountered when performing CPR interventions in the two referral public hospitals in Botswana. These results could be used to recommend more effective CPR strategies for Botswana’s hospitals. Interviews, comprising two quantitative sections with closed ended questions and one qualitative section with semi-structured questions, were conducted with 22 unit managers. The quantitative data indicated that all unit managers had at least eight years’ nursing experience, and could identify CPR shortcomings in their hospitals. Only one interviewee had never performed CPR. The qualitative data analysis revealed that the hospital units sometimes had too few staff members and did not have fully equipped emergency trolleys and/or equipment. No CPR teams and no CPR policies and guidelines existed. Nurses and doctors reportedly lacked CPR knowledge and skills. No debriefing services were provided after CPR encounters. The participating hospitals should address the following challenges that might affect CPR outcomes: shortages of staff, overpopulation of hospital units, shortcomings of the emergency trolleys and CPR equipment, absence of CPR policies and guidelines, absence of CPR teams, limited CPR competencies of doctors and nurses and the lack of debriefing sessions after CPR attempts. Die slagoffers van padongelukke, asook persone wat hart- en ander mediese noodtoestande ervaar, kan hulle lewens verloor omdat daar nie opgeleide personeel met funksionele toerusting en voldoende hulpbronne beskikbaar is om effektiewe kardiopulmonale resussitasie (KPR te doen nie. Die studie het ten doel

  12. Continuing professional development training needs of medical laboratory personnel in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasvosve, Ishmael; Ledikwe, Jenny H; Phumaphi, Othilia; Mpofu, Mulamuli; Nyangah, Robert; Motswaledi, Modisa S; Martin, Robert; Semo, Bazghina-Werq

    2014-08-18

    Laboratory professionals are expected to maintain their knowledge on the most recent advances in laboratory testing and continuing professional development (CPD) programs can address this expectation. In developing countries, accessing CPD programs is a major challenge for laboratory personnel, partly due to their limited availability. An assessment was conducted among clinical laboratory workforce in Botswana to identify and prioritize CPD training needs as well as preferred modes of CPD delivery. A self-administered questionnaire was disseminated to medical laboratory scientists and technicians registered with the Botswana Health Professions Council. Questions were organized into domains of competency related to (i) quality management systems, (ii) technical competence, (iii) laboratory management, leadership, and coaching, and (iv) pathophysiology, data interpretation, and research. Participants were asked to rank their self-perceived training needs using a 3-point scale in order of importance (most, moderate, and least). Furthermore, participants were asked to select any three preferences for delivery formats for the CPD. Out of 350 questionnaires that were distributed, 275 were completed and returned giving an overall response rate of 79%. The most frequently selected topics for training in rank order according to key themes were (mean, range) (i) quality management systems, most important (79%, 74-84%); (ii) pathophysiology, data interpretation, and research (68%, 52-78%); (iii) technical competence (65%, 44-73%); and (iv) laboratory management, leadership, and coaching (60%, 37-77%). The top three topics selected by the participants were (i) quality systems essentials for medical laboratory, (ii) implementing a quality management system, and (iii) techniques to identify and control sources of error in laboratory procedures. The top three preferred CPD delivery modes, in rank order, were training workshops, hands-on workshops, and internet-based learning

  13. Waste electrical and electronic equipment management in Botswana: Prospects and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mmereki, Daniel; Li, Baizhan; Li'ao, Wang

    2015-01-01

    The management of waste electronic and electrical equipment (WEEE) is a major challenge in developing and transition countries. The paper investigates recent strategies to manage this waste stream in an environmentally sound way. Obsolete electrical and electronic equipment (EEE) are a complex waste category containing both hazardous and valuable substances. Many countries and regions in the world are undertaking extensive scientific research to plan and develop effective collection and treatment systems for end-of-life EEE. In developing countries such as Botswana, effective strategies that cover all stages throughout the lifecycle of products, particularly at the end-of-life, still lag behind. Infrastructure, pre-processing, and end-processing facilities and innovative technologies for end-of-life management of e-waste are noticeably absent due to lack of investment and high costs of its management. The objective of the paper is to present the e-waste situation in Botswana, highlighting (a) measures taken in the form of legislative and policy regulations; (b) existing practices to manage e-waste; and (c) effective solutions for e-waste management in emerging economies. Studies from other countries on e-waste management issues provided insights on the "best" technical and logistical pre-processing and end-processing strategies to treat hazardous waste. The paper also highlights key societal factors that affect successful implementation of cost-effective collection and value recovery of end-of-life EEE. These include unavailability of national "e-waste policy," absence of formal take-back system, absence of financing and subsidies, inadequate source separation programmes, absence of technical and logistical integration of pre-processing and end-processing facilities, and limited infrastructure and access to technologies and investment. Effective strategies such as an "integrated approach" (mixed options), access to technologies, establishment of pre-processing and

  14. Association of respiratory viruses with outcomes of severe childhood pneumonia in Botswana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew S Kelly

    Full Text Available The highest incidence of childhood acute lower respiratory tract infection (ALRI is in low- and middle-income countries. Few studies examined whether detection of respiratory viruses predicts ALRI outcomes in these settings.We conducted prospective cohort and case-control studies of children 1-23 months of age in Botswana. Cases met clinical criteria for pneumonia and were recruited within six hours of presentation to a referral hospital. Controls were children without pneumonia matched to cases by primary care clinic and date of enrollment. Nasopharyngeal specimens were tested for respiratory viruses using polymerase chain reaction. We compared detection rates of specific viruses in matched case-control pairs. We examined the effect of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV and other respiratory viruses on pneumonia outcomes.Between April 2012 and August 2014, we enrolled 310 cases, of which 133 had matched controls. Median ages of cases and controls were 6.1 and 6.4 months, respectively. One or more viruses were detected from 75% of cases and 34% of controls. RSV and human metapneumovirus were more frequent among cases than controls, but only enterovirus/rhinovirus was detected from asymptomatic controls. Compared with non-RSV viruses, RSV was associated with an increased risk of treatment failure at 48 hours [risk ratio (RR: 1.85; 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.20, 2.84], more days of respiratory support [mean difference (MD: 1.26 days; 95% CI: 0.30, 2.22 days], and longer duration of hospitalization [MD: 1.35 days; 95% CI: 0.20, 2.50 days], but lower in-hospital mortality [RR: 0.09; 95% CI: 0.01, 0.80] in children with pneumonia.Respiratory viruses were detected from most children hospitalized with ALRI in Botswana, but only RSV and human metapneumovirus were more frequent than among children without ALRI. Detection of RSV from children with ALRI predicted a protracted illness course but lower mortality compared with non-RSV viruses.

  15. Evaluation of satellite and simulated rainfall products for hydrological applications in the Notwane catchment, Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenabatho, P. K.; Parida, B. P.; Moalafhi, D. B.

    2017-08-01

    In semi-arid catchments, hydrological modeling, water resources planning and management are hampered by insufficient spatial rainfall data which is usually derived from limited rain gauge networks. Satellite products are potential candidates to augment the limited spatial rainfall data in these areas. In this paper, the utility of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) product (3B42 v7) is evaluated using data from the Notwane catchment in Botswana. In addition, rainfall simulations obtained from a multi-site stochastic rainfall model based on the generalised linear models (GLMs) were used as additional spatial rainfall estimates. These rainfall products were compared to the observed rainfall data obtained from six (6) rainfall stations available in the catchment for the period 1998-2012. The results show that in general the two approaches produce reasonable spatial rainfall estimates. However, the TRMM products provided better spatial rainfall estimates compared to the GLM rainfall outputs on an average, as more than 90% of the monthly rainfall variations were explained by the TRMM compared to 80% from the GLMs. However, there is still uncertainty associated mainly with limited rainfall stations, and the inability of the two products to capture unusually high rainfall values in the data sets. Despite this observation, rainfall indices computed to further assess the daily rainfall products (i.e. rainfall occurrence and amounts, length of dry spells) were adequately represented by the TRMM data compared to the GLMs. Performance from the GLMs is expected to improve with addition of further rainfall predictors. A combination of these rainfall products allows for reasonable spatial rainfall estimates and temporal (short term future) rainfall simulations from the TRMM and GLMs, respectively. The results have significant implications on water resources planning and management in the catchment which has, for the past three years, been experiencing prolonged

  16. Cardio-pulmonary resuscitation challenges in selected Botswana hospitals: Nurse managers’ views

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    Lakshmi Rajeswaran

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Road traffic accident victims, as well as persons experiencing cardiac and other medical emergencies, might lose their lives due to the non-availability of trained personnel to provide effective cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR with functional equipment and adequate resources.The objectives of the study were to identify unit managers’ perceptions about challenges encountered when performing CPR interventions in the two referral public hospitals in Botswana. These results could be used to recommend more effective CPR strategies for Botswana’s hospitals. Interviews, comprising two quantitative sections with closed ended questions and one qualitative section with semi-structured questions, were conducted with 22 unit managers. The quantitative data indicated that all unit managers had at least eight years’ nursing experience, and could identify CPR shortcomings in their hospitals. Only one interviewee had never performed CPR. The qualitative data analysis revealed that the hospital units sometimes had too few staff members and did not have fully equipped emergency trolleys and/or equipment. No CPR teams and no CPR policies and guidelines existed. Nurses and doctors reportedly lacked CPR knowledge and skills. No debriefing services were provided after CPR encounters. The participating hospitals should address the following challenges that might affect CPR outcomes: shortages of staff, overpopulation of hospital units, shortcomings of the emergency trolleys and CPR equipment, absence of CPR policies and guidelines, absence of CPR teams, limited CPR competencies of doctors and nurses and the lack of debriefing sessions after CPR attempts.

  17. Body image dissatisfaction is increased in male and overweight/obese adolescents in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malete, L; Motlhoiwa, K; Shaibu, S; Wrotniak, B H; Maruapula, S D; Jackson, J; Compher, C W

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine linkages between obesity, physical activity, and body image dissatisfaction, with consideration of socioeconomic status (SES) and urbanization in adolescents in Botswana. A nationally representative, cross-sectional survey in 707 secondary school students included measured height and weight to determine overweight (OW) or obesity (OB) using World Health Organization standards; physical activity (PA) using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire; and body image satisfaction using the Body Ideals Questionnaire. SES was described by private school versus public school attendance. OW/OB students felt farther from ideal and greater dissatisfaction with their weight and body proportions than optimal weight students. Boys felt greater difference from ideal and more dissatisfaction with muscle tone, chest size, and strength than girls. Lower SES students and those from rural villages had more minutes of PA than higher SES or urban students. In this rapidly developing African country, these trends reflect the nutrition transition and offer opportunity to motivate OW/OB students and boys for PA as a health promotion obesity prevention behavior. As urbanization and improved SES are desirable and likely to continue, the public health system will be challenged to prevent obesity while preserving a healthy body image.

  18. Reading competency of first-year undergraduate students at University of Botswana: A case study

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    Beauty B. Ntereke

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The ability to read and interpret textbooks and other assigned material is a critical component of success at university level. Therefore, the aims of this study are twofold: to evaluate the reading levels of first-year students when they first enter the university to determine how adequately prepared they are for university reading. It is also to find out if there will be any significant improvement after going through the academic literacy course offered to first-year students. The participants were 51 first-year undergraduate humanities students enrolled in the Communication and Academic Literacy course at the University of Botswana. The data were collected through a reading test adopted from Zulu which was administered at the beginning of the first semester. The same test was administered at the end of the semester after the students had gone through the academic literacy course to see if there was any difference in performance. The findings of this study indicate that there is a mixed and wide variation of students reading competency levels when students first enter the university and that a significant number of first-year entrants are inadequately prepared for university reading.

  19. The effect of exposure to wood smoke on outcomes of childhood pneumonia in Botswana.

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    Kelly, M S; Wirth, K E; Madrigano, J; Feemster, K A; Cunningham, C K; Arscott-Mills, T; Boiditswe, S; Shah, S S; Finalle, R; Steenhoff, A P

    2015-03-01

    Tertiary hospital in Gaborone, Botswana. To examine whether exposure to wood smoke worsens outcomes of childhood pneumonia. Prospective cohort study of children aged 1-23 months meeting clinical criteria for pneumonia. Household use of wood as a cooking fuel was assessed during a face-to-face questionnaire with care givers. We estimated crude and adjusted risk ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for treatment failure at 48 h by household use of wood as a cooking fuel. We assessed for effect modification by age (1-5 vs. 6-23 months) and malnutrition (none vs. moderate vs. severe). The median age of the 284 enrolled children was 5.9 months; 17% had moderate or severe malnutrition. Ninety-nine (35%) children failed treatment at 48 h and 17 (6%) died. In multivariable analyses, household use of wood as a cooking fuel increased the risk of treatment failure at 48 h (RR 1.44, 95%CI 1.09-1.92, P = 0.01). This association differed by child nutritional status (P = 0.02), with a detrimental effect observed only among children with no or moderate malnutrition. Exposure to wood smoke worsens outcomes for childhood pneumonia. Efforts to prevent exposure to smoke from unprocessed fuels may improve pneumonia outcomes among children.

  20. Understanding the organisational culture of district health services: Mahalapye and Ngamiland health districts of Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkomazana, Oathokwa; Mash, Robert; Phaladze, Nthabiseng

    2015-11-30

    Botswana has a shortage of health care workers, especially in primary healthcare. Retention and high performance of employees are closely linked to job satisfaction and motivation, which are both highest where employees' personal values and goals are realised. The aim of the study was to evaluate employees' personal values, and the current and desired organisational culture of the district health services as experienced by the primary health care workers. The study was conducted in the Ngamiland and Mahalapye health districts. This was a cross sectional survey. The participants were asked to select 10 values that best described their personal, current organisational and desired organisational values from a predetermined list. Sixty and 67 health care workers completed the survey in Mahalapye and Ngamiland districts, respectively. The top 10 prevalent organisational values experienced in both districts were: teamwork, patient satisfaction, blame, confusion, job insecurity, not sharing information and manipulation. When all the current values were assessed, 32% (Mahalapye) and 36% (Ngamiland) selected by health care workers were potentially limiting organisational effectiveness. The organisational values desired by health care workers in both districts were: transparency, professional growth, staff recognition, shared decision-making, accountability, productivity, leadership development and teamwork. The experience of the primary health care workers in the two health districts were overwhelmingly negative, which is likely to contribute to low levels of motivation, job satisfaction, productivity and high attrition rates. There is therefore urgent need for organisational transformation with a focus on staff experience and leadership development.

  1. Participation of Females in Physics Programs at the University of Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maabong, Kelebogile

    2005-10-01

    The number of females enrolling in medical and health-related fields is substantially higher than in engineering and technology. Females tend to express a preference for careers with a strong element of social services. The level of interest and achievement in science and technology between females and males is quite different. Much of the research argues that stereotyping influences the attitudes and beliefs of young children, and these attitudes and beliefs are reinforced at home and school to create a marked effect on participation of females and their subject choices in science and technology education. These attitudes affect the level of self-confidence and enjoyment that females develop about science, especially physics. Girls tend to view physics in a negative way, claiming that it is difficult, time consuming, and masculine. They may believe that they can only understand a concept if they can put it into a broader world view, whereas males are pleased if there is internal coherence within the concept learned, and appear to enjoy physics more than biology and chemistry, viewing it as valuable in itself. The University of Botswana is facing this low participation and lower performance of females in physics programs compared with males.

  2. Redesigning a Ministry of Health's organizational structure: exploring implementation challenges through Botswana's experiences.

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    Seitio-Kgokgwe, Onalenna; Gauld, Robin D C; Hill, Philip C; Barnett, Pauline

    2016-04-01

    The Botswana's Ministry of Health redesigned and adopted a new organizational structure in 2005, which was poorly implemented. This article explores factors that influenced the implementation of this organizational structure. This article draws from data collected through in-depth interviews with 54 purposively selected key informants comprising policy makers, senior managers and staff of the Ministry of Health (N = 40) and senior officers from various stakeholder organizations (N = 14). Participants generally felt that the review of the Ministry of Health organizational structure was important. The previous structure was considered obsolete with fragmented functions that limited the overall performance of the health system. The new organizational structure was viewed to be aligned to current national priorities with potential to positively influence performance. Some key weaknesses identified included lack of consultation and information sharing with workers during the restructuring process, which affected the understanding of their new roles, failure to mobilize key resources to support implementation of the new structure and inadequate monitoring of the implementation process. Redesigning an organizational structure is a major change. There is a need for effective and sustained leadership to plan, direct, coordinate, monitor and evaluate the implementation phase of the reform. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Relative availability of natural prey versus livestock predicts landscape suitability for cheetahs Acinonyx jubatus in Botswana

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    Hanlie E.K. Winterbach

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Prey availability and human-carnivore conflict are strong determinants that govern the spatial distribution and abundance of large carnivore species and determine the suitability of areas for their conservation. For wide-ranging large carnivores such as cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus, additional conservation areas beyond protected area boundaries are crucial to effectively conserve them both inside and outside protected areas. Although cheetahs prefer preying on wild prey, they also cause conflict with people by predating on especially small livestock. We investigated whether the distribution of cheetahs’ preferred prey and small livestock biomass could be used to explore the potential suitability of agricultural areas in Botswana for the long-term persistence of its cheetah population. We found it gave a good point of departure for identifying priority areas for land management, the threat to connectivity between cheetah populations, and areas where the reduction and mitigation of human-cheetah conflict is critical. Our analysis showed the existence of a wide prey base for cheetahs across large parts of Botswana’s agricultural areas, which provide additional large areas with high conservation potential. Twenty percent of wild prey biomass appears to be the critical point to distinguish between high and low probable levels of human-cheetah conflict. We identified focal areas in the agricultural zones where restoring wild prey numbers in concurrence with effective human-cheetah conflict mitigation efforts are the most immediate conservation strategies needed to maintain Botswana’s still large and contiguous cheetah population.

  4. Development and application of modern agricultural biotechnology in Botswana: the potentials, opportunities and challenges.

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    Batlang, Utlwang; Tsurupe, Gorata; Segwagwe, Amogelang; Obopile, Motshwari

    2014-07-03

    In Botswana, approximately 40% of the population live in rural areas and derive most of their livelihood from agriculture by keeping livestock and practising arable farming. Due to the nature of their farming practises livestock and crops are exposed to diseases and environmental stresses. These challenges offer opportunities for application of biotechnology to develop adaptable materials to the country's environment. On the other hand, the perceived risk of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) has dimmed the promise of the technology for its application in agriculture. This calls for a holistic approach to the application of biotechnology to address issues of biosafety of GMOs. We have therefore assessed the potentials, challenges and opportunities to apply biotechnology with specific emphasis on agriculture, taking cognisance of requirement for its research, development and application in research and teaching institutions. In order to achieve this, resource availability, infrastructure, human and laboratory requirements were analyzed. The analysis revealed that the country has the capacity to carry out research in biotechnology in the development and production of genetically modified crops for food and fodder crops. These will include gene discovery, genetic transformation and development of systems to comply with the world regulatory framework on biosafety. In view of the challenges facing the country in agriculture, first generation biotech crops could be released for production. Novel GM products for development may include disease diagnosis kits, animal disease vaccines, and nutrient use efficiency, drought, and pest and disease resistant food and fodder crops.

  5. Radiological and genetic analysis of a Late Iron Age mummy from the Tuli Block, Botswana

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    Frank J. Rühli

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Mummified human remains are valuable sources of information on past populations. Here we report on the radiological and molecular findings of a partially mummified individual found in northern Botswana. This desiccated mummy from the Tuli region is the first to have been reported from this region. The remains were those of an older male adult of African origin. He was interred in a tightly flexed position and wrapped in an animal skin. Computerised tomography (CT scanning revealed that none of the internal organs was preserved. Multiple post-mortem alterations are seen, but apart from some degenerative changes of the lower vertebral column, the axial skeleton has remained intact. The advanced osteophytosis suggests an older age than what was previously estimated. The aDNA analysis confirms Sotho-Tswana and possibly Khoesan genetic relatedness, as could be expected from individuals from that region. These results represent one of the first CT scans of a mummified individual from southern Africa, and also the first successful aDNA extraction from such remains.

  6. Body Image Dissatisfaction Is Increased in Male and Overweight/Obese Adolescents in Botswana

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    L. Malete

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The purpose of this study was to examine linkages between obesity, physical activity, and body image dissatisfaction, with consideration of socioeconomic status (SES and urbanization in adolescents in Botswana. Materials and Methods. A nationally representative, cross-sectional survey in 707 secondary school students included measured height and weight to determine overweight (OW or obesity (OB using World Health Organization standards; physical activity (PA using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire; and body image satisfaction using the Body Ideals Questionnaire. SES was described by private school versus public school attendance. Results and Discussion. OW/OB students felt farther from ideal and greater dissatisfaction with their weight and body proportions than optimal weight students. Boys felt greater difference from ideal and more dissatisfaction with muscle tone, chest size, and strength than girls. Lower SES students and those from rural villages had more minutes of PA than higher SES or urban students. In this rapidly developing African country, these trends reflect the nutrition transition and offer opportunity to motivate OW/OB students and boys for PA as a health promotion obesity prevention behavior. Conclusions. As urbanization and improved SES are desirable and likely to continue, the public health system will be challenged to prevent obesity while preserving a healthy body image.

  7. Mapping and Modelling Land Susceptibility to Water Erosion in Eastern Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olufunmilayo Akinyemi, Felicia; Mashame, Gofamodimo

    2017-04-01

    Soil loss by water erosion is a major environmental challenge globally and semi-arid environments are not exempted. This study employs a spatial modelling technique that applies the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) to estimate annual soil loss in the Palapye area of the Lotsane sub-basin in Eastern Botswana. Soil loss estimation within a GIS environment allows for the integration of datasets from various sources and enables the mapping of the spatial distribution of soil loss. With the high sensitivity of semi-arid areas to climate change, this study further investigates how rates of soil loss would vary using both historical (1990-2012) and near range 21st Century (2015-2028) under two IPCC Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs): RCP4.5 and RCP8.5. Topography and vegetation cover seems to play a prominent role in soil loss as it occurs mostly along tracks and/or footpaths, bare land, river banks and on the steep hilly slopes in the south eastern part. For RCP 4.5, the highest projected average annual soil loss due to water erosion is 307 Mg ha-1 year-1, whereas, for RCP 8.5, the highest is 330 Mg ha-1 year-1. In general, projected soil losses are higher for RCP8.5 than for RCP4.5. This study aids the validation of empirical models and contributes to the understanding of soil erosion rates under present conditions and future climate.

  8. Use of oxytocin during Caesarean section at Princess Marina Hospital, Botswana: An audit of clinical practice

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    Billy M. Tsima

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oxytocin is widely used for the prevention of postpartum haemorrhage. In the setting of Caesarean section (CS, the dosage and mode of administrating oxytocin differs according to different guidelines. Inappropriate oxytocin doses have been identified as contributory to some cases of maternal deaths. The main aim of this study was to audit the current standard of clinical practice with regard to the use of oxytocin during CS at a referral hospital in Botswana.Methods: A clinical audit of pregnant women having CS and given oxytocin at the time of the operation was conducted over a period of three months. Data included indications for CS, oxytocin dose regimen, prescribing clinician’s designation, type of anaesthesia for the CS and estimated blood loss.Results: A total of 139 case records were included. The commonest dose was 20 IU infusion (31.7%. The potentially dangerous regimen of 10 IU intravenous bolus of oxytocin was used in 12.9% of CS. Further doses were utilized in 57 patients (41%. The top three indications for CS were fetal distress (36 patients, 24.5%, dystocia (32 patients, 21.8% and a previous CS (25 patients, 17.0%. Estimated blood loss ranged from 50 mL – 2000 mL.Conclusion: The use of oxytocin during CS in the local setting does not follow recommended practice. This has potentially harmful consequences. Education and guidance through evidence based national guidelines could help alleviate the problem.

  9. Predictors of early breastfeeding cessation among HIV-infected women in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogwu, Anthony; Moyo, Sikhulile; Powis, Kathleen; Asmelash, Aida; Lockman, Shahin; Moffat, Claire; Leidner, Jean; Makhema, Joseph; Essex, Max; Shapiro, Roger

    2016-08-01

    Infants born to HIV-infected women receiving antiretroviral treatment (ART) can be breastfed through at least 6 months with very low risk of HIV acquisition. We aimed to identify demographic and cultural factors that may influence mothers' willingness to breastfeed for the recommended duration. We evaluated factors associated with early cessation of breastfeeding (i.e. before 5 months post-partum) in a randomized clinical trial evaluating different ART regimens used for prevention of mother-to-child transmission during breastfeeding in Botswana. Univariate and multivariable Cox regressions were used to describe predictors of early exclusive BF cessation. Among 677 women who started breastfeeding, the median time to breastfeeding cessation was 178 days (IQR 150-181) and 25.1% weaned early. In multivariable analysis, urban location (aHR = 1.86 95%CI 1.27-2.73; P = 0.002), salaried employment or being a student (aHR = 2.78 95% CI 1.63-4.75; P women who are receiving ART prophylaxis to breastfeed longer. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Life in institutional care: the voices of children in a residential facility in Botswana.

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    Morantz, Gillian; Heymann, Jody

    2010-01-01

    As a result of the HIV/AIDS pandemic, there are now more than 12 million orphans in sub-Saharan Africa. The majority of these children have been absorbed into their extended families. A minority of AIDS orphans and other vulnerable children are living in residential care facilities. Although concerns have been raised regarding the care received in such facilities, very little is known about children's perspectives on their own experiences residing in these institutions. As part of an ongoing initiative to better understand the impact of HIV/AIDS in Southern Africa and what can be done to address needs, one-on-one interviews were conducted with the children and youth residents, and graduates of a residential care facility in Botswana. The children report on the importance of having uninterrupted access to food, shelter and schooling and a sense of belonging. However, they also reveal a profound ambivalence towards their paid caregivers, and the other children residents. They describe being separated from siblings, missing their families and feeling disconnected from the community at large. Their narratives offer insight into ways in which we can better meet their complex needs. Policy implications are discussed.

  11. Early resumption of sexual activity following voluntary medical male circumcision in Botswana: A qualitative study.

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    Jenny H Ledikwe

    Full Text Available Unprotected sexual intercourse after undergoing voluntary medical male circumcision but prior to complete wound healing can lead to major adverse events including HIV acquisition. To better understand perceptions related to early resumption of sex prior to wound healing, 27 focus group discussions were conducted among 238 adult men, women, and community leaders in Botswana. Median age among all participants was 31 years of whom 60% were male and 51% were either employed and receiving salary or self-employed. Only 12% reported being currently married. Pain, not risk of HIV acquisition, was perceived as the main adverse consequence of early resumption of sex. In fact, no participant mentioned that early resumption of sex could lead to an increase in HIV risk. Demonstrating masculinity and virility, fear of losing female partners, and misperception about post-operative wound healing also played key roles in the decision to resume sex prior to complete wound healing. Findings from this study highlight a potentially widespread lack of awareness of the increased risk of HIV acquisition during the wound healing period. Strengthening post-operative counseling and identifying strategies to discourage the early resumption of sex will be increasingly important as older men and HIV-positive men seek voluntary medical male circumcision services.

  12. General health status of residents of the Selebi Phikwe Ni-Cu mine area, Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekosse, Georges

    2005-10-01

    Residents of the Selebi Phikwe area, Botswana where nickel-copper (Ni-Cu) is being exploited often exhibit symptoms of varied degrees of ailments, sicknesses and diseases. A need to investigate their general health status was therefore eminent. Primary data was obtained by means of a questionnaire and structured interviews conducted with individuals, health service providers, business enterprises and educational Institutions. The generated data revealed common ailments, sicknesses and diseases in the area with the four most frequent health complaints being frequent coughing headaches, influenza/common colds and rampant chest pains. Research findings indicated that residents had respiratory tract-related problems, suspected to be linked to the effects of air pollution caused by the emission of sulphur dioxide (SO2) from mining and smelting activities. Residents were frequently in contact with SO2 and related gases and fumes, mineral and silica dust generated from the mining processes. No clearly demarcating differences were noticed in the health status of residents living in the control site from those in the main study area. However, sites most affected were those close to where Ni-Cu is exploited. Environmental factors resulting from mining and smelting activities, among others, could be contributory to the negative health effects occurring at Selebi Phikwe.

  13. Pyroclastic flow deposits from a kimberlite eruption: The Orapa South Crater, Botswana

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    Gernon, T. M.; Fontana, G.; Field, M.; Sparks, R. S. J.; Brown, R. J.; Mac Niocaill, C.

    2009-11-01

    The Orapa Diamond Mine (Republic of Botswana) exposes a bi-lobate kimberlite pipe that erupted during the Late-Cretaceous epoch (~ 93 Ma) through Archaean basement and volcano-sedimentary rocks of the Karoo Supergroup. Geological mapping of the crater zone of the South Pipe has revealed a 15-25 m thick in-situ kimberlite pyroclastic flow deposit. The pyroclastic deposit fills in the crater and completely drapes lower units, indicating that the parent flow originated from an adjacent kimberlite pipe. The unit comprises a basal coarse lithic concentration layer exhibiting imbricated clasts, which grades upwards into massive poorly sorted lapilli tuff. The tuff contains abundant sub-vertical degassing structures defined by lithic enrichment and depletion in fine-grained material. Degassing structures commonly emanate from blocks in the basal layer. The presence of degassing structures and a coarse basal layer distinguishes this deposit from pipe-filling massive volcaniclastic kimberlite, which is typically homogeneous in terms of texture and clast size over distances on the order of 100s of metres. Studies of the thermal remanent magnetism in basalt clasts from the deposit, together with serpentine-diopside assemblages, indicate that it was emplaced at elevated temperatures on the order of 200-440 °C, consistent with deposition from a pyroclastic flow. The lithofacies characteristics can be explained by the interaction of the pyroclastic flow with the complex topography of a pre-existing crater.

  14. Identification of sources of aerosol particles in three locations in eastern Botswana

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    Chimidza, S.; Moloi, K.

    2000-07-01

    Airborne particles have been collected using a dichotomous virtual impactor at three different locations in the eastern part of Botswana: Serowe, Selibe-Phikwe, and Francistown. The particles were separated into two fractions (fine and coarse). Sampling at the three locations was done consecutively during the months of July and August, which are usually dry and stable. The sampling time for each sample was 12 hours during the day. For elemental composition, energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence technique was used. Correlations and principal component analysis with varimax rotation were used to identify major sources of aerosol particles. In all the three places, soil was found to be the main source of aerosol particles. A copper-nickel mine and smelter at Selibe-Phikwe was found to be not only a source of copper and nickel particles in Selibe-Phikwe but also a source of these particles in far places like Serowe. In Selibe-Phikwe and Francistown, car exhaust was found to be the major source of fine particles of lead and bromine.

  15. Developing the Botswana Primary Care Guideline: an integrated, symptom-based primary care guideline for the adult patient in a resource-limited setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsima, Billy M; Setlhare, Vincent; Nkomazana, Oathokwa

    2016-01-01

    Botswana's health care system is based on a primary care model. Various national guidelines exist for specific diseases. However, most of the guidelines address management at a tertiary level and often appear nonapplicable for the limited resources in primary care facilities. An integrated symptom-based guideline was developed so as to translate the Botswana national guidelines to those applicable in primary care. The Botswana Primary Care Guideline (BPCG) integrates the care of communicable diseases, including HIV/AIDS and noncommunicable diseases, by frontline primary health care workers. The Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Botswana, together with guideline developers from the Knowledge Translation Unit (University of Cape Town) collaborated with the Ministry of Health to develop the guideline. Stakeholder groups were set up to review specific content of the guideline to ensure compliance with Botswana government policy and the essential drug list. Participants included clinicians, academics, patient advocacy groups, and policymakers from different disciplines, both private and public. Drug-related issues were identified as necessary for implementing recommendations of the guideline. There was consensus by working groups for updating the essential drug list for primary care and expansion of prescribing rights of trained nurse prescribers in primary care within their scope of practice. An integrated guideline incorporating common symptoms of diseases seen in the Botswana primary care setting was developed. The development of the BPCG took a broad consultative approach with buy in from relevant stakeholders. It is anticipated that implementation of the BPCG will translate into better patient outcomes as similar projects elsewhere have done.

  16. Tobacco advertising, promotion, and sponsorship (TAPS) exposure, anti-TAPS policies, and students' smoking behavior in Botswana and South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Lorna McLeod; Hsia, Jason; Malarcher, Ann

    2016-10-01

    We examined the change over time in tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship exposure and the concurrent changes in cigarette smoking behavior among students age 13 to 15years in two African countries with different anti-tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship policies. In South Africa, anti-tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship policies became more comprehensive over time and were more strictly enforced, whereas the partial anti-tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship policies adopted in Botswana were weakly enforced. We analyzed two rounds of Global Youth Tobacco Survey data from South Africa (1999, n=2342; 2011, n=3713) and in Botswana (2001, n=1073; 2008, n=1605). We assessed several indicators of tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship exposure along with prevalence of current cigarette smoking and smoking susceptibility for each data round. Logistic regression was used to examine changes over time in tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship exposure and smoking behavior in both countries. Between 1999 and 2011, South African students' exposure to tobacco advertising and sponsorship decreased significantly by 16% (p value, smoking decreased over time (OR, 0.68) as did susceptibility to smoking (OR, 0.75), but declines did not remain significant after adjusting for parents' and friends' smoking. In Botswana, students' prevalence of cigarette smoking increased significantly over time (OR, 1.84), as did susceptibility to smoking (OR, 2.71). Enforcement of strong anti-tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship policies is a vital component of effective tobacco control programs in Africa. Such regulations, if effectively implemented, can reduce tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship exposure among adolescents and may influence cigarette smoking behavior. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Prediction of onset and cessation of austral summer rainfall and dry spell frequency analysis in semiarid Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byakatonda, Jimmy; Parida, B. P.; Kenabatho, Piet K.; Moalafhi, D. B.

    2018-01-01

    Uncertainties in rainfall have increased in the recent past exacerbating climate risks which are projected to be higher in semiarid environments. This study investigates the associated features of rainfall such as rain onset, cessation, length of the rain season (LRS), and dry spell frequency (DSF) as part of climate risk management in Botswana. Their trends were analysed using Mann-Kendall test statistic and Sen's Slope estimator. The rainfall-evapotranspiration relationships were used in formulating the rain onset and cessation criteria. To understand some of the complexities arising from such uncertainties, artificial neural network (ANN) is used to predict onset and cessation of rain. Results reveal higher coefficients of variation in onset dates as compared to cessation of rain. Pandamatenga experiences the earliest onset on 28th of November while Tsabong the latest on 14th of January. Likewise, earliest cessation is observed at Tshane on 22nd of February and the latest on 30th of March at Shakawe. The shortest LRS of 45 days is registered at Tsabong whereas the northern locations show LRS greater than 100 days. Stations across the country experience strong negative correlation between onset and LRS of - 0.9. DSF shows increasing trends in 50% of the stations but only significant at Mahalapye, Pandamatenga, and Shakawe. Combining the LRS criteria and DSF, Kasane, Pandamatenga, and Shakawe were identified to be suitable for rainfed agriculture in Botswana especially for short to medium maturing cereal varieties. Predictions of onset and cessation indicate the possibility of delayed onset by 2-5 weeks in the next 5 years. Information generated from this study could help Botswana in climate risk management in the context of rainfed farming.

  18. High-risk behaviors among adult men and women in Botswana: implications for HIV/AIDS prevention efforts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keetile, Mpho

    2014-01-01

    The government of Botswana has been spending a lot of money in the prevention, treatment, care and support for HIV/AIDS patient for decades. This paper uses data from the third Botswana AIDS Impact Survey (BAIS III) to explore high-risk behaviors of adults and how they affect government efforts to stop the spread of HIV/AIDS. The objective of this paper is to fill in the gap on the assessment of high-risk behaviors associated with HIV/AIDS and their implications on HIV/AIDS prevention efforts. A nationally representative sample of 10,159 men and women aged 20-64 years who had successfully completed the BAIS III individual questionnaire were used in the study. Both descriptive and binary logistic regression analyses were used for analysis. Crude odds ratios were obtained from gross effects model while adjusted odds ratios (AOR) were obtained from the net effects model. Statistically significant association was observed between multiple current partners and alcohol consumption (AOR = 1.5), drug abuse (AOR = 1.7), transactional sex (AOR = 2.6) and intergenerational sex (AOR = 1.07). Furthermore, statistically significant association was seen for inconsistent condom use and having tested for HIV (AOR = 1.5). These results show a worrying tendency that despite government's efforts to stop the spread of HIV/AIDS, adults in Botswana continue to indulge in high-risk behaviors. Therefore, any programs and policies on HIV/AIDS should first target these high-risk behaviors.

  19. Issues, Dilemmas and Prospects on the State Provision of Education to Traditional Hunter-Gatherer Societies of Botswana

    OpenAIRE

    TSHIRELETSO, Lucky

    2001-01-01

    Botswana has embraced the idea of universal provision of basic education to all of its young citizens on the basis of right. This has put a tremendous pressure on the education sector to improve access to schooling. As a result, over one hundred and fifty additional schools built during the period between 1985 and 1995 as part of this effort. However, studies conducted in the latter part of the 1980's and the National Commission on Education point out the fact that about 17% of school going c...

  20. The constraints of antiretroviral uptake in rural areas: the case of Thamaga and surrounding villages, Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bene, Matlhogonolo; Darkoh, Michael B K

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the constraints of antiretroviral (ARV) uptake in the villages of Thamaga, Kumakwane, Mankgodi and Gakgatla which are in the Kweneng District of Botswana. The social interactionist approach and theories of health behaviour provided the theoretical basis of the study. Data were obtained by using interviewer-administered questionnaires which were applied to a sample of 145 respondents and 61 people living with HIV/AIDS in the four villages. The results of the study showed that people aged 30-39 years represented the highest proportion of the persons on ARV treatment in the villages. Some of the people living with HIV believed that ARV therapy could better their lives during the initial stages of introduction, but with time, they lost hope and gave up the treatment. Culturally, parents and children in the villages do not discuss sexual matters at home and it was found in the study that there was little communication between parents and children on AIDS and ARV issues. Some churches in the area discouraged the use of ARV. There were also traditional doctors who made their patients mix traditional herbs treatment with ARV treatment. Distance, travel costs, cultural beliefs, stigma and discrimination among others were found to be important socio-economic factors inhibiting ARV uptake. Even though there were constraints on ARV uptake in the villages, efforts were being made by Government and non-governmental organizations to overcome them. The Ministry of Health provided information and education to the public using its strategy known as Information, Education and Communication. Nurses, doctors and chiefs taught people at kgotlas (traditional courts) in the villages about the dangers of the epidemic. Free HIV testing, ARVs and condoms were provided to the villagers. The outlook for ARV uptake looks generally promising for the future. However, if HIV/AIDS is to be contained, sexual behaviour of people in the villages needs to change.

  1. Planners’ roles and techniques in developing sustainable "eco-City": The case of gaborone, Botswana

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    Cavrić Branko I.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Efforts to incorporate sustainability principles into city planning demands new relationships between traditional and contemporary culture of key players involved in urban development arena. Many stakeholders involved in urban projects, management and governance are tailoring the destiny of urban world. Unfortunately, their contribution to sustainable practices show the lack of awareness and negative attitude towards protection of basic environmental, economic and social elements for the benefits of future generations of urban dwellers. By changing the way in which they think it is important to spell out clearly the role of planning professionals which should be more active and persistent in educating and advising decision-makers and other stakeholders helping them not to think and act only sectorally supporting individual and forgetting common interests. With carrying capacities and sustainability in mind these "key players" should be trained and guided by planners and diverse community entrepreneurs to have a look well beyond current planning horizons of socio-economic and physical plans, because sound sustainable solutions need wider and more ecologically friendly temporal frameworks. This paper explores contemporary physical planning concepts for sustainable development of Gaborone city, the capital of Botswana. sensitive development solutions, lamenting more on behavioural organisational and technological improvements in city planner’s "toolkit" and planner’s roles of technocrats and advocates of sustainable change. The purpose of this exploration will also be to suggest how to create enough manoeuvring space beyond the exclusive political power and how to apply different planning concepts which can help to create a sustainable eco-city.

  2. University of Botswana Undergraduates Uses of the Internet: Implications on Academic Performance

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    Adeyinka Tella

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The recognized potential of technology to improve education has led to several initiatives to foster effective use and integration in the curriculum. The Internet as a new invented technology holds the greatest promise humanity has known for learning and universal access to quality education. It allows students to broaden their academic experience, access important information and communicate to others within academic community. In the light of these therefore, this study examined undergraduate’s uses of the Internet and its implications on their academic performance at the University of Botswana, Gaborone. Three hundred and six undergraduate students from thirteen systematically selected departments formed the study sample. A modified Internet Use scale was used to gather data for the study. The data collected was analysed using descriptive statistics, chi-square and Friedman test. The results indicate that: majority of the respondents (66% access the Internet 1-5 hours per week, 33.3% of respondents access the Internet 6-20 hours per week and 0.7% of respondents access the Internet between 21-25 hours per week. Moreover, most respondents use the Internet for the purpose of obtaining course related information. The results also reveal that Internet contributes significantly to academic performance of the respondents. To enhance and optimise the use of the Internet so that learning can take place at any time and anywhere, providing more access to computers and the Internet on campus constitutes the major recommendations. Future areas of research could include determining variations in Internet use by students from different disciplines, determining the nature and relationships between Internet use and academic performance.

  3. Assessment of the household availability of oral rehydration salt in rural Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jammalamadugu, Swetha Bindu; Mosime, Botsang; Masupe, Tiny; Habte, Dereje

    2013-01-01

    Diarrhea contributed for 17.6% of under-five deaths in Botswana. Oral rehydration salt (ORS) therapy has been the cornerstone in the control of morbidity and mortality secondary to diarrheal diseases. The study was aimed at assessing the household availability of ORS following the nationwide campaign of availing ORS at household level. A cross sectional community based study was conducted in August 2012. EPI random walk method was used to identify households. Data was collected using interviewers' administered structured questionnaire. SPSS software was used in data entry and analysis. Oral Rehydration Salt (ORS) was available in 50.8% of the households with under-five children. Information on ORS is well disseminated whereas only three-fourth of informed participants had adequate knowledge of ORS preparation. The sources of information were predominantly the Child Welfare Clinic (88.8%). Being grandmother as a care taker was a negative predictor of household availability of ORS (AOR 0.25, 95% CI 0.09-0.69) while respondents who are knowledgeable about ORS preparation were more likely to have ORS available at home (AOR 1.92, 95% CI 1.10-3.34). The campaign has brought a significant coverage in terms of availability of ORS. The health education and community sensitization efforts need to go beyond health facilities via other means like the media and community based approaches. Approaches aimed at improving the knowledge of care takers on the importance of ORS, its preparation, correct use and restocking are of paramount importance. Availing community based outlet for ORS is an alternative to enhance accessibility.

  4. Understanding the organisational culture of district health services: Mahalapye and Ngamiland health districts of Botswana

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    Oathokwa Nkomazana

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Botswana has a shortage of health care workers, especially in primary healthcare. Retention and high performance of employees are closely linked to job satisfaction and motivation, which are both highest where employees’ personal values and goals are realised.Aim: The aim of the study was to evaluate employees’ personal values, and the current and desired organisational culture of the district health services as experienced by the primary health care workers.Setting: The study was conducted in the Ngamiland and Mahalapye health districts.Method: This was a cross sectional survey. The participants were asked to select 10 values that best described their personal, current organisational and desired organisational values from a predetermined list.Results: Sixty and 67 health care workers completed the survey in Mahalapye and Ngamiland districts, respectively. The top 10 prevalent organisational values experienced in both districts were: teamwork, patient satisfaction, blame, confusion, job insecurity, not sharing information and manipulation. When all the current values were assessed, 32% (Mahalapye and 36% (Ngamiland selected by health care workers were potentially limiting organisational effectiveness. The organisational values desired by health care workers in both districts were: transparency, professional growth, staff recognition, shared decision-making, accountability, productivity, leadership development and teamwork.Conclusions: The experience of the primary health care workers in the two health districts were overwhelmingly negative, which is likely to contribute to low levels of motivation, job satisfaction, productivity and high attrition rates. There is therefore urgent need for organisational transformation with a focus on staff experience and leadership development.

  5. Comparative profitability of onions harvested as green and dry (mature in Botswana

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    S.P. Baliyan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was an attempt to calculate and compare the profitability of onions harvested as green and dry (mature in Botswana. Half of the planted onions were harvested and sold as green and half were harvested and sold as dry onions. The cost of production of green onions was 32.78% higher than the cost of production of dry onions. The irrigation and marketing expenses contributed the highest difference in the cost of production of green and dry onions. The major cost item contributing to the cost of green onions production was marketing cost (32.86% followed by irrigation cost (23.77% and harvesting cost (18.53% whereas the highest cost of production for dry onions was contributed by irrigation (38.58% followed by marketing (19.45% and planting (11.96%. The marketing cost for green onions was almost double (35.6% as compare to the dry onions (18.2%. The total return from green onions was 50.90% higher than the returns from dry onions. Gross margin of onions harvested as green was 63% higher than the gross margin from dry onions, which indicated that the production of green onions is more profitable as compare to production of dry onions. The farmers preferred onion harvested as green because it generates regular and higher returns than onions harvested as mature. Government should support farmers through some policies such as Minimum Support Price (MSP for dry onions, distribution of Mini Ferti–Seed Kit (Seeds of improved varieties and fertilizer package, construction of storages and formation of cooperatives.

  6. Community views of inter-generational sex: findings from focus groups in Botswana, Namibia and Swaziland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockcroft, Anne; Kunda, John Lengwe; Kgakole, Leagajang; Masisi, Mokgweetsi; Laetsang, Ditiro; Ho-Foster, Ari; Marokoane, Nobantu; Andersson, Neil

    2010-10-01

    Inter-generational sex is an important driver of the AIDS epidemic in Southern Africa, contributing to the high incidence of HIV among young women. We conducted 12 focus group discussions with women aged 15-24 years and 11 with men aged 40-55 years in urban and rural locations in Botswana, Namibia and Swaziland. There was consensus that inter-generational sex is commonplace. The young women were clear they had sex with older men to get money and material goods. In urban sites, they spoke about requirements for a "modern" lifestyle and to keep up with their friends, but in rural sites they also said they needed money for school fees, food and household goods. Young women used disparaging names for the older men and they were well aware of the risk of HIV from inter-generational sex. They believed older men were more risky than younger men: They were more likely to be infected and it was harder to negotiate use of a condom with them. They were willing to take the risk to get what they wanted; some also had a fatalistic attitude. Older men described sexual motivation and blamed young women for seducing them. They believed there was a higher risk of HIV from younger women, because they have more partners and do not insist on using a condom. But this did not deter them from taking the risk. Older men and young women discount the risks of inter-generational sex against short-term benefits. Isolated efforts to increase risk awareness are unlikely to be effective. Making older men aware they are ridiculed by young women may be a promising approach, combined with interventions that give alternatives to young women and increase their self-worth.

  7. Worlds apart 3: Botswana and Zambia. Zambian women's needs not being met.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermans, T

    1994-01-01

    Zambia has not been as successful as neighboring Botswana in reducing fertility. Zambian fertility only declined from 7.1 to 6.5 between 1972 and 1992. Only 15% use modern contraception, even though 87% have knowledge of modern contraception and a source of supply. A major obstacle to fertility decline is the lack of government endorsement of family planning (FP), even though the Planned Parenthood Association of Zambia has promoted FP since 1972. Contraception was feared and perceived as the persecution of Black Africans by White colonists. State hospitals did not begin accepting FP until the late 1970s, and foreign aid was directed to maternal and child health services. In 1989, a national population policy was adopted, and goals were set to attain 30% contraceptive prevalence by the year 2000. Health services lacked trained personnel to provide FP services. Teenagers were particularly unaware of contraception in a country where, in 1992, 66% of women were either mothers or pregnant by the age of 19 years. Unmet need was estimated at 33% of women who desired a delay in childbearing or no more children. Service accessibility was an obstacle, since many remote areas were 20-25 km from a health center. Other obstacles to good health were contaminated water supplies, lack of hygienic practices, and air pollution. 71% of the population lived in absolute poverty in 1990. Overcrowding in urban areas and lack of educational facilities contributed to the lack of social development. The tropical climate and shortages of arable land coupled with high fertility resulted in a difficult existence. Cultural support for a large family was still strong. Donor and government support is currently directed to contraceptive logistics, communications, contraceptive social marketing, community- and employment-based distribution, operations research, and safe abortions, which are legal but cumbersome because of bureaucratic procedures and the lack of an informed population.

  8. Fifth-year medical students’ perspectives on rural training in Botswana: A qualitative approach

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    P Kebaabetswe

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. The curriculum of the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Botswana includes rural community exposure for students throughout their 5 years of training. In addition to community exposure during the first 2 years, students complete 16 weeks of family medicine and 8 weeks of public health medicine. However, as a new faculty, students’ experiences and perceptions regarding rural clinical training are not yet known. Objective. To describe the experiences and perceptions of the 5th-year medical students during their rural training and solicit their recommendations for improvement. Methods. This qualitative study used face-to-face interviews with 5th-year undergraduate medical students (N=36 at the end of their family medicine rotation in Mahalapye and Maun villages. We used a phenomenological paradigm to underpin the study. Voice-recorded interviews were transcribed and analysed using Atlas TI version 7 software (USA. Results. Three main themes were identified: (i experiences and perceptions of the rural training environment; (ii perceptions of the staff at rural sites; and (iii perceptions of clinical benefits and relevance during rural training. While the majority of students perceived rural training as beneficial and valuable, a few felt that learning was compromised by limited resources and processes, such as medical equipment, internet connectivity and inadequate supervision. Conclusion. While the majority of students perceived rural training as beneficial, students identified limitations in both resources and supervision that need to be improved. Understanding students’ rural training experiences and perceptions can help the Faculty of Medicine, stakeholders and site facilitators to guide future rural training implementation.

  9. Partner notification and treatment for sexually transmitted infections among pregnant women in Gaborone, Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offorjebe, Ogechukwu A; Wynn, Adriane; Moshashane, Neo; Joseph Davey, Dvora; Arena, Kaitlin; Ramogola-Masire, Doreen; Gaolebale, Ponatshego; Morroni, Chelsea; Klausner, Jeffrey D

    2017-10-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis (CT), Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG), and Trichomonas vaginalis (TV) are sexually transmitted infections (STIs) associated with adverse birth outcomes. Untreated partners contribute to high rates of STI reinfection; thus, partner notification and treatment remain important components of STI care and control. A prospective cohort study was conducted among 300 pregnant women presenting to the antenatal clinic at Princess Marina Hospital in Gaborone, Botswana who enrolled in an STI screening study. Following informed consent and sample collection for CT/NG/TV testing, participants were asked if they were willing to disclose their STI result and to deliver medications to their partner(s). Those who tested positive were asked at a follow-up appointment if they notified their partners. Among the 300 participants, 294 (98%) said they would be willing to tell their partner(s) about their test results if they tested positive, and 284 (95%) said they would be willing to give their partner(s) medication if the option was available. Of those who tested positive and returned for a test of cure, 27 of 32 (84%) reported that they told their partner about the results, and 20 of 32 (63%) reported that their partner received treatment. Almost all pregnant women reported willingness to tell their partner the STI test result and give their partner medications. At test of cure, most women reported informing their partner, although actual treatment receipt was lower. Our findings suggest that pregnant women are willing to utilize patient-based partner notification, but actual partner treatment might be lower than intended.

  10. The inorganic chemistry of peat from the Maunachira channel-swamp system, Okavango Delta, Botswana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarthy, T.S.; McIver, J.R.; Cairncross, B.; Ellery, W.N.; Ellery, K.

    1989-05-01

    The Okavango Delta is a large (18000 km/sup 2/), low gradient (1:3600), alluvial fan situated in the semi-arid Kalahari basin of northern Botswana. Seasonal floodwaters from tropical Angola disperse on the fan creating both perennial (6000 km/sup 2/) and seasonal (7000 to 12000 km/sup 2/) swamps. Ninety-five percent of this water is lost annually by evapotranspiration. Organic rich sediment (peat) is a major sediment of the perennial swamps. Peat formation commences during senescence of the plants, when certain nutrients are recycled while others are lost by rainwater leaching. Further changes in chemistry occur during subaqueous decay of the plants which involve both gains and losses of constituents. Decaying plants trap detrital mineral matter which becomes an integral part of the peat. The main sources and forms of inorganic matter in the peat are: allochthonous kaolinite (40%) and quartz (20%) and both allochthonous and autochthonous phytolithic silica (30%). several inorganic components (Fe, K, P, Na, Ca and Mg) which make up the remaining 10% are associated with the organic fraction. Ion exchange plays only a minor part in their uptake and it seems that these metals are taken up during bacterial activity in the peat. The weight proportion of inorganic matter (ash) decreases downstream, mainly due to a decrease in allochthonous mineral matter. Volume percentage also decreases but is low throughout, generally less than five percent. This study has revealed that the low-quantity allochthonous mineral matter is the main reason for the long-term survival of this ecosystem. Uptake of soluble ions by the peat is important in off-setting evaporative concentration of metals. 36 refs., 13 figs., 7 tabs.

  11. Analysis of temperature data over semi-arid Botswana: trends and break points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mphale, Kgakgamatso; Adedoyin, Akintayo; Nkoni, Godiraone; Ramaphane, Galebonwe; Wiston, Modise; Chimidza, Oyapo

    2017-06-01

    Climate change is a global challenge which impacts negatively on sustainable rural livelihoods, public health and economic development, more especially for communities in Southern Africa. Assessment of indices that signify climate change can inform formulation of relevant adaptation strategies and policies for the communities. Diurnal temperature range (DTR) is acknowledged as an expedient measure of the scourge as it is sensitive to variations in radiative energy balance. In this study, a long-term (1961-2010) daily temperature data obtained from nine (9) synoptic stations in Botswana were analyzed for monotonic trends and epochal changes in annual maximum (T max), minimum (T min) temperatures and DTR time series. Most of the considered stations were along the Kalahari Transect, a region which is at high risk of extensive environmental change due to climate change. Mann-Kendall trend and Lepage tests were applied for trend and change point analysis, respectively. The statistical analysis shows that stations in the southern part of the country experienced significant negative trends in annual DTR at the rate of -0.09 to -0.30 °C per decade due to steeper warming rates in annual T min than annual T max trends. On the contrary, stations in the northern part of the country experienced positive trends in annual DTR brought about by either a decreasing annual T min trend which outstripped annual T max or annual T max which outpaced annual T min. The increasing trends in DTR varied from 0.25 to 0.67 °C per decade. For most of the stations, the most significant annual DTR trends change point was in 1982 which coincided with the reversal of atmospheric circulation patterns.

  12. Prevalence of occupational lung disease among Botswana men formerly employed in the South African mining industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, T W; Gyi, K M; White, N W; Gabosianelwe, T; Ludick, S; Mazonde, G N; Mabongo, N; Ncube, M; Monare, N; Ehrlich, R; Schierhout, G

    1997-01-01

    To determine whether previous health experiences affect the prevalence of occupational lung disease in a semirural Botswanan community where there is a long history of labour recruitment to South African mines. A cross sectional prevalence study of 304 former miners examined according to a protocol including a questionnaire, chest radiograph, spirometry, and medical examination. Overall mean age was 56.7 (range 28-93) years, mean duration of service 15.5 (range 2-42) years. 26.6% had a history of tuberculosis. 23.3% had experienced a disabling occupational injury. Overall prevalence of pnemoconiosis (> 1/0 profusion, by the International Labour Organisation classification) was 26.6%-31.0%, and 6.8% had progressive massive fibrosis (PMF). Many were entitled to compensation under South African law. Both radiograph readers detected time response relations between pneumoconiosis and PMF among the 234 underground gold miners. PMF could result from Botswana have a high prevalence of previously unrecognised pneumoconiosis, indicative of high previous exposures to fibrogenic respirable dust. Their pneumoconiosis went unrecognised because they had no access to surveillance after employment. Inadequate radiographic surveillance or failure to act on results when employed or when leaving employment at the mines could have contributed to under recognition. Community based studies of former miners are essential to fully evaluate the effects of mining exposures. Our findings indicate a failure of established measures to prevent or identify pneumoconiosis while these miners were in employment and show that few of the social costs of occupational lung diseases are borne by mining companies through the compensation system.

  13. Innovative corporate social responsibility in Botswana. The Debswana mining company study case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ramón Torres Solís

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se presentan una serie de consideraciones sobre la forma en que una importante compañía africana hace frente a su responsabilidad social, en lo que podría ser una innovación en la industria minera dedicada a la explotación del diamante. De esta manera se realiza un caso de estudio referido a la compañía Debswana que opera en Botswana, uno de los países africanos más destacados en la producción diamantífera mundial. Se discuten y critican algunas acciones implementadas por esa compañía en materia de responsabilidad social y se concluye con algunos señalamientos y opiniones al respecto. Podemos señalar que los resultados del estudio de este caso muestran como altamente positivas las interacciones de esta compañía minera con la sociedad en la que se desenvuelve sin que deje de puntualizarse la existencia de algunos inconvenientes serios que deben ser superados en conjunción con las políticas públicas del gobierno de ese país. Es importante señalar que lo que se intenta hacer en este trabajo es mostrar algunos hechos que consideramos importantes en la responsabilidad social de una organización en particular, buscando construir un caso de estudio que pudiera ser relevante para las disciplinas administrativas en cuya literatura han sido escasamente tratados.

  14. Ground survey of red lechwe in the Linyanti swamps and Chobe floodplains, northern Botswana

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    Phemelo Gadimang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A ground survey of red lechwe was carried out in the Linyanti swamps and the Chobe floodplains of northern Botswana in the dry and wet seasons of 2012 and 2013, respectively. We documented numbers, sex ratio and age structure of red lechwe within the linear strips of 25 km × 300 m along the Linyanti swamps and the Chobe floodplains. Results indicated a significant difference in the numbers of red lechwe between sites and seasons. About 66 and 755 red lechwe were estimated for Chobe in the dry and wet season, respectively, with 343 and 261 of them estimated for Linyanti in the dry and wet season, respectively. In Chobe, the red lechwe densities varied widely between seasons (9 red lechwe/km2 – 101 red lechwe/km2 compared with Linyanti, where the densities did not vary much between seasons (35 red lechwe/km2 – 46 red lechwe/km2 . The lower densities of red lechwe in Chobe in the dry season when compared with the wet season suggest a possible seasonal shift in the distribution of red lechwe to the nearby Zambezi floodplains in Namibia.Conservation implications: The higher number of red lechwe in the Chobe floodplains in the wet season indicates the potential of the floodplains as a habitat for this species in that season. The dry season shift in the distribution of red lechwe in Chobe presents an opportunity for local communities in Namibia to engage in tourism, whereas the return of the red lechwe to the floodplains in the wet season ensures protection of the animals as well as boosts the tourism potential of the Chobe National Park.

  15. A regional coupled surface water/groundwater model of the Okavango Delta, Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Peter; Gumbricht, Thomas; Kinzelbach, Wolfgang

    2006-04-01

    In the endorheic Okavango River system in southern Africa a balance between human and environmental water demands has to be achieved. The runoff generated in the humid tropical highlands of Angola flows through arid Namibia and Botswana before forming a large inland delta and eventually being consumed by evapotranspiration. With an approximate size of about 30,000 km2, the Okavango Delta is the world's largest site protected under the convention on wetlands of international importance, signed in 1971 in Ramsar, Iran. The extended wetlands of the Okavango Delta, which sustain a rich ecology, spectacular wildlife, and a first-class tourism infrastructure, depend on the combined effect of the highly seasonal runoff in the Okavango River and variable local climate. The annual fluctuations in the inflow are transformed into vast areas of seasonally inundated floodplains. Water abstraction and reservoir building in the upstream countries are expected to reduce and/or redistribute the available flows for the Okavango Delta ecosystem. To study the impacts of upstream and local interventions, a large-scale (1 km2 grid), coupled surface water/groundwater model has been developed. It is composed of a surface water flow component based on the diffusive wave approximation of the Saint-Venant equations, a groundwater component, and a relatively simple vadose zone component for calculating the net water exchange between land and atmosphere. The numerical scheme is based on the groundwater simulation software MODFLOW-96. Since the primary model output is the spatiotemporal distribution of flooded areas and since hydrologic data on the large and inaccessible floodplains and tributaries are sparse and unreliable, the model was not calibrated with point hydrographs but with a time series of flooding patterns derived from satellite imagery (NOAA advanced very high resolution radiometer). Scenarios were designed to study major upstream and local interventions and their expected impacts

  16. An evaluation of the integrated poverty alleviation and housing scheme in Botswana, case of Ramotswa village

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    Ikgopoleng Horatio Gaogakwe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This article evaluates the effectiveness of the Integrated Poverty Alleviation and Housing Scheme (IPAHS in Ramotswa; an urban village located 32 km south-east of the capital city of Botswana, Gaborone. This study emanates from the fact that low income urban and rural residents with no formal employment were left out of the Self Help Housing Scheme (SHHA. The SHHA was mandated to facilitate the acquisition of subsidised land and loan to purchase building materials. One of the major conditions to qualify for SHHA is that applicants should have formal employment.; the IPAHS was specifically introduced to facilitate economic empowerment to poor households who do not qualify under the SHHA scheme. The IPAHS scheme is a twothronged approach mandated to equip the residents with skills to build/improve houses for themselves and create employment for themselves through molding of bricks for sale in an effort to alleviate poverty. This paper is based on documentary and field research. The field research has a participatory component involving discussion and open ended interviews with relevant government departments. It also involves the administration of structured questionnaire survey to 30 beneficiaries of the scheme. Results show that despite high uptake of the scheme within the country, there are several challenges such as insufficient income to build or improve their houses, signs of poverty in living environments of beneficiaries, uncoordinated roles of various institutions which are major stakeholders in the implementation of the scheme. The scheme requires pragmatic policies geared to meet the needs and aspirations of the poor. There is a need for policy interventions through Government commitment to principles such as the right to housing by every citizen, coordination of roles played by different stakeholders to support the sustainability of the scheme.

  17. Seasonal and inter-annual variations of leaf-level photosynthesis and soil respiration in the representative ecosystems of the Okavango Delta, Botswana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mantlana, K.B.

    2008-01-01

    Seasonal and inter-annual leaf-level photosynthesis and soil respiration measurements were conducted in representative ecosystems of the Okavango Delta, Botswana, that differ in their long-term soil water content: the permanent swamp, the seasonal floodplain, the rain-fed grassland and the mopane

  18. A Comparative Analysis of SMTs (School Management Teams) and Teachers Perceived Preferred Leadership Style: A Case of Selected Primary Schools in Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsayang, Gabatshwane

    2011-01-01

    The study compared the SMTs (School Management Teams) and teachers' perceptions of preferred leadership styles in some selected schools in Botswana. SMTs and teachers completed a questionnaire adopted from the leadership styles questionnaires. The findings of the study pointed to an overwhelming view that the preferred style of leadership is the…

  19. The Challenges of Change: A Tracer Study of San Preschool Children in Botswana. Early Childhood Development: Practice and Reflections. Following Footsteps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    le Roux, Willemien

    This report details findings of a study undertaken during 1993-1995 in the Ghanzi District of Botswana to ascertain the progress of the San children in primary school, comparing children who attended preschool to those who did not. The report also describes the Bokamoso Preschool Programme, started in 1986. Data for the study were collected…

  20. A Self-Assessment of the Propensity to Obtain Future Employment: A Case of Final-Year Engineering Students at the University of Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ssegawa, Joseph K.; Kasule, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    The article provides a self-assessment by final-year engineering students at the University of Botswana regarding the propensity to get employment. Students rated which employability attributes are important, the level of attainment and the sources that have facilitated the development of the attributes. Results indicated that students identified…

  1. Implementation of the Performance Management System (PMS) in Senior Secondary Schools in Botswana: An Investigation of Senior Management Team's Expected Benefits of the PMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulawa, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Different forms of the performance management system have been implemented in many countries for some years. As in other countries, in 1999 the government of Botswana took a decision to implement a performance management system (PMS) across the entire public service including schools. The government explained the purpose for which this reform was…

  2. Self-reported infection control practices and perceptions of HIV/AIDS risk amongst emergency department nurses in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelenyane, Mothusi; Endacott, Ruth

    2006-07-01

    This descriptive exploratory study investigated the reported practices and perceptions of emergency nurses related to infection control in the context of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS) pandemic in Botswana. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected using a self-administered questionnaire. Forty questionnaires were distributed to nurses with emergency department experience in Botswana, with a response rate of 55% (n = 22). Quantitative data were analysed using descriptive statistics while qualitative data were subjected to thematic and content analysis. The majority of respondents reported compliance with universal precautions at the hospital emergency department. However, qualitative data highlighted resource constraints that may hinder compliance with universal precautions such as a lack of appropriate facilities, a shortage of equipment and materials, inadequate staffing and absence of sustainable in-service education programs. Further, the reported compliance with Universal Precautions had not removed the fear of exposure to HIV/AIDS and perceived risk of transmission to family. The authors recommend in-service education and practice initiatives to promote sustainable compliance with universal precautions and realistic risk perception among nurses. Further research is required to evaluate nurses' compliance with universal precautions in developing countries using observational methods or in-depth interviews. This would enable exploration of nurses' actions regarding compliance with universal precautions.

  3. Maximizing the benefit of health workforce secondment in Botswana: an approach for strengthening health systems in resource-limited settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grignon JS

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Jessica S Grignon,1,2 Jenny H Ledikwe,1,2 Ditsapelo Makati,2 Robert Nyangah,2 Baraedi W Sento,2 Bazghina-werq Semo1,2 1Department of Global Health, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA; 2International Training and Education Center for Health, Gaborone, Botswana Abstract: To address health systems challenges in limited-resource settings, global health initiatives, particularly the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief, have seconded health workers to the public sector. Implementation considerations for secondment as a health workforce development strategy are not well documented. The purpose of this article is to present outcomes, best practices, and lessons learned from a President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief-funded secondment program in Botswana. Outcomes are documented across four World Health Organization health systems' building blocks. Best practices include documentation of joint stakeholder expectations, collaborative recruitment, and early identification of counterparts. Lessons learned include inadequate ownership, a two-tier employment system, and ill-defined position duration. These findings can inform program and policy development to maximize the benefit of health workforce secondment. Secondment requires substantial investment, and emphasis should be placed on high-level technical positions responsible for building systems, developing health workers, and strengthening government to translate policy into programs. Keywords: human resources, health policy, health worker, HIV/AIDS, PEPFAR

  4. Symptom Burden and Functional Dependencies Among Cancer Patients in Botswana Suggest a Need for Palliative Care Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazenby, Mark; Sebego, Miriam; Swart, Norman Carl; Lopez, Lidia; Peterson, Katie

    2016-01-01

    Palliative care and cancer nursing in sub-Saharan Africa is hampered by inadequate clinical resources and evidence base but is central to symptom management amid the growing cancer burden. The aim of this study is to describe symptom burden and functional dependencies of cancer patients in Botswana using the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale-Short Form (MSAS-SF) and Enforced Social Dependency Scale (ESDS). A cross-sectional multisite study was conducted in Gaborone, Botswana, from June to August 2013 using MSAS-SF, ESDS, and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status at 1 time point. Descriptive statistics, tests of association, correlation, and scale validity were used. Among the 100 cancer patients, 65 were women, 21 were inpatients, 48 were human immunodeficiency virus-positive, 23 had gynecological malignancies, 34 had stage 4 disease, and 54 received chemotherapy only. Sixty-four reported pain; 54, neuropathies; 51, weight loss; and 51, hunger. Most distressing symptoms were weight loss, body image, skin changes, and pain. Recreational/social role was most affected by cancer. Cronbach's α for both the MSAS-SF and ESDS was .91. Variations in means for MSAS-SF and ESDS were associated with ECOG grade 2 (P Nurses trained in palliative care are needed to meet cancer patients' pain and symptom management care needs.

  5. Choice-disability and HIV infection: a cross sectional study of HIV status in Botswana, Namibia and Swaziland.

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    Andersson, Neil; Cockcroft, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Interpersonal power gradients may prevent people implementing HIV prevention decisions. Among 7,464 youth aged 15-29 years in Botswana, Namibia and Swaziland we documented indicators of choice-disability (low education, educational disparity with partner, experience of sexual violence, experience of intimate partner violence (IPV), poverty, partner income disparity, willingness to have sex without a condom despite believing partner at risk of HIV), and risk behaviours like inconsistent use of condoms and multiple partners. In Botswana, Namibia and Swaziland, 22.9, 9.1, and 26.1% women, and 8.3, 2.8, and 9.3% men, were HIV positive. Among both women and men, experience of IPV, IPV interacted with age, and partner income disparity interacted with age were associated with HIV positivity in multivariate analysis. Additional factors were low education (for women) and poverty (for men). Choice disability may be an important driver of the AIDS epidemic. New strategies are needed that favour the choice-disabled.

  6. Huntington's disease-like 2 with an expansion mutation of the Junctophilin-3 gene; first reported case from Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocampo, C; Daimari, R; Oyekunle, A A

    2017-10-21

    Huntington's disease-like 2 (HDL2) is a rare autosomal dominant progressive neurodegenerative disorder commonly seen in adults. It was first described in a large African-American family in the United States. HDL2 clinically resembles Huntington's disease (HD) and causes adult-onset relentlessly progressive movement, emotional and cognitive dysfunction. Onset is usually in the fourth decade with slow progression to death. We present a 47-year-old male Botswana native, with a four-year-history of chorea, slurred speech, mood instability, cognitive impairment and weight loss. Genetic testing reveals normal HTT gene but a heterozygous expansion mutation at the JPH3 locus, confirmatory of HDL2. Though some cases of HDL2 have been reported from neighboring South Africa, this is the first instance from Botswana. This report draws attention to the fact that HDL2 exists among native Batswana, and even though clinically indistinguishable from HD, molecular testing can result in positive case identification. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Tswanarising global gayness: the 'unAfrican' argument, Western gay media imagery, local responses and gay culture in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, John

    2013-01-01

    This paper is a strategic intervention in the debate over the value of globalised gay identity for emerging sexual minority communities in the South. Focusing on self-identifying gay men in Botswana using semi-structured interviews, it explores their views of what characterises 'modern gay culture' and relates these to international media clichés of a glamorous, stylish, hedonistic gayness. I argue that identifying with what is so visibly a Western image of gayness exposes sexual minority communities to the most dangerous of the justifications for homophobia in Africa, the argument that sexual dissidence is a neo-colonial conspiracy to subvert 'African values'. The 'unAfrican' argument has to be taken very seriously, not only because it taps into the intense, conflicted emotions at the heart of the post-colonial condition, but also because it contains an undeniable germ of truth. This poses a dilemma, since global gay discourses, including the media clichés, are an important source of inspiration for African sexual minorities. A communication activism strategy is proposed to undermine the unAfrican argument by cultivating and asserting the 'tswanarisation' of gay culture in Botswana that is already taking place. A similar strategy may also be effective in other African societies.

  8. The use of culturally themed HIV messages and their implications for future behaviour change communication campaigns: the case of Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntshebe, O; Pitso, J M N; Segobye, A K

    2006-08-01

    The 'ABC' approach promoted at the beginning of the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Botswana has failed to yield significant behaviour change. Formative research was conducted in urban, semi-urban and rural areas to explore how the use of sociocultural messages depicted in posters elicited people's response to HIV/AIDS-related behaviours. The research interrogated values and practices underpinning Tswana philosophy in relation to parent-child communication, voluntary counselling and testing, condom use and faithfulness. A total of 206 individuals aged 15 - 49 years were purposively interviewed. The results showed that this campaign was perceived as an activation of positive Batswana culture to modify harmful norms, values and social practices, drawing upon those cultural aspects favouring more positive behaviour. We conclude that behaviour change communication should promote links to cultural values and principles. This can be achieved by: communication in other languages in order to reach all groups in Botswana; providing opportunities for venturing into other ways of communicating HIV/AIDS messages to Batswana in light of literacy skills; and using communication media that is developed on the basis of cultural approaches and focuses on segmented population groups.

  9. The vegetation and wildlife habitats of the Savuti-Mababe-Linyanti ecosystem, northern Botswana

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    Keoikantse Sianga

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This study classified the vegetation of the Savuti-Mababe-Linyanti ecosystem (SMLE, northern Botswana and developed a detailed map that provides a reliable habitat template of the SMLE for future wildlife habitat use studies. The major vegetation units of the SMLE were determined from satellite imagery and field visits and then mapped using Landsat 8 and RapidEye imagery and maximum likelihood classifier. These units were sampled using 40 m x 20 m (800 m² plots in which the coverage of all plant species was estimated. Non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMS demonstrated that plant communities were determined by gradients in soil texture or fertility and wetness. NMS 1 represented a gradient of soil texture with seven woodland communities on sandy soils (sandveld communities and Baikiaea forest dominated by Baikiaea plurijuga in Baikiaea forest and Terminalia sericea and Philenoptera nelsii in sandveld, with various indicator species differentiating the various sandveld community types. Mopane woodland further from and riparian woodland adjacent to permanent water was common on less sandy alluvial soils. Mineral-rich, heavy clay soils in the sump of a large paleolake system support open grassland and mixed Senegalia/Vachellia (Acacia savanna, with the mineral-rich soils supporting grasses high in minerals such as phosphorus, calcium, sodium and potassium, and thus this region is a critical wet season range for migratory zebra. Taller, high-quality grasses in the mosaic of sandveld and mopane woodland communities provide critical grazing for taller grass grazers such as buffalo, roan and sable antelope, whereas wetland communities provide reliable green forage during the dry season for a variety of herbivores, including elephant. This study has demonstrated how large-scale environmental gradients determine functional habitat heterogeneity for wildlife.Conservation implications: Our study demonstrated that the functionality of protected areas is

  10. Economic valuation of selected direct and indirect use values of the Makgadikgadi wetland system, Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setlhogile, Tshepo; Arntzen, Jaap; Mabiza, Collin; Mano, Reneth

    Economic valuation of wetlands aims to investigate public preferences for changes in the state of the wetland and the natural resources it constitutes in monetary terms. It provides a means of quantifying the direct and indirect benefits that people derive from wetlands. In addition, it informs management planning and practice about resource options, optimal allocation and also provides information for conservation of the resource. The Makgadikgadi wetland is a unique system that mostly consists of dry pans during most of the year. This study aimed at estimating the value of groundwater recharge and community-based natural resource management (CBNRM) activities within the Makgadikgadi wetland and how these goods and services contribute to the local and national economy. The study used the Total Economic Valuation approach, which considers both the direct and indirect use values of the resource. In essence, the study concentrated on one direct use value (use of resources through CBNRM) and one indirect use value (groundwater recharge). With regard to CBNRM, three community-based organisations (CBOs) were selected for the study and static and dynamic cost-benefit models for these CBOs were developed. The groundwater recharge value was largely determined through desktop review and interviews with stakeholders. The results indicate a small positive contribution of CBOs towards the economy of Botswana and a high potential for communities to derive substantial benefits from the projects because currently benefits realised by communities are limited. CBOs involved in joint venture partnerships with tourism and hunting enterprises benefit more from utilising the wetland’s resources. Groundwater recharge often occurs in areas away from the physical location of the wetland and may not be easily attributable to the wetland. However, the study assessed the value taking into consideration the various sectors which rely on the groundwater resource. The groundwater recharge

  11. HIV/AIDS, artisanal fishing and food security in the Okavango Delta, Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngwenya, B. N.; Mosepele, K.

    Generally, rural households pursue all year round natural and non-natural resource-based livelihood systems to diversify these options in order to cope with risks emanating from a range of shocks and stressors. Artisanal fishing in the Delta is not only a major livelihood option but also a source of food security. This paper is based on analysis of primary data collected from a survey of 248 subsistence fishers’ households through simple random sampling in 22 villages in the Delta. The overall objectives of the survey were to assess the general prevalence of HIV/AIDS in the Ngamiland district of Botswana, to investigate potential effects of AIDS-related stressors, particularly chronic illness on artisanal fishing activities, and to assess implications towards food security. Results from this study indicate that HIV prevalence rates for pregnant women attending antenatal clinics in the Delta are approximately 30% and are related to factors such as marriage, education, and employment. Despite this relatively high prevalence percentage, most of the affected households do not have adequate access to HIV/AIDS support facilities. Support services are provided on the basis of population size and/or status of the settlement (i.e. urban, urban village, rural or remote). Therefore, since about 50% of the Delta’s population lives in settlements of less than 500 people, they receive health services indirectly through major population centres whose capacity to deliver timely HIV/AIDS services is limited. This disproportionate access to HIV/AIDS services disadvantages the majority of fishing communities in the Delta, and may affect their ability to fish. Moreover, about 53% of sampled households had cared for a continuously ill person/s (CIP’s) in the last 5 years, out of which approximately 29% felt that this seriously impacted fishing activities. These serious impacts included sale of family assets, depletion of savings, and switching or abandoning fishing activities

  12. Hydrochemical models of the sulphidic tailings dumps at Matchless (Namibia) and Selebi-Phikwe (Botswana)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, M. O.; Schippers, A.; Hahn, L.

    2006-02-01

    The sulphidic tailings dumps at Matchless (Namibia) and Selebi-Phikwe (Botswana) are located in a similar semiarid environment but have a contrasting mineralogical composition. The Matchless tailings are pyrite-rich, whereas the Selebi-Phikwe tailings are dominated by pyrrhotite. Hydrochemical models are established with computer codes for water-balance, sulphide oxidation rate and hydrochemical equilibrium calculations. The data input is based on detailed mineralogical, chemical and kinetic investigations carried out on the core of boreholes drilled in 2000 and 2003. The oxidation of pyrrhotite proceeds at a much faster rate than the oxidation of pyrite. The PYROX code, which is used for kinetic calculations, can take these differences into account by applying different oxide-coating diffusion coefficients (D2) for pyrrhotite and pyrite. Humidity-cell testing is widely used to predict the post-mining composition of drainage water in humid climates. However, the semiarid conditions at Matchless and Selebi-Phikwe only allow a minimal water flux within the dump. Under such conditions, humidity-cell testing is likely to overestimate the seepage-water pH. This is suggested by the hydrochemical equilibrium calculations for the post-mining period at Selebi-Phikwe, which predict a seepage-water pH about one unit lower than the pH at the end of the 26-weeks humidity-cell testing period. The acidity of the seepage water can be reduced by about half a pH unit, if an oxygen barrier below the evaporation zone is installed. A clay layer 0.5 m thick covered by >1.5 m tailings represents the optimal design for a wet barrier. All three computer codes used for water-balance calculations (HELP3, UNSAT-H and HYDRUS-1D), predict >85% average water saturation for such a layer, which diminishes the diffusion of oxygen into the pile and production of SO{4/-2} and H+. The alternative design for a dry barrier consists of a vegetated silt layer 1 m thick on top of the tailings. This barrier

  13. Routine HIV testing in Botswana: a population-based study on attitudes, practices, and human rights concerns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheri D Weiser

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The Botswana government recently implemented a policy of routine or "opt-out" HIV testing in response to the high prevalence of HIV infection, estimated at 37% of adults.We conducted a cross-sectional, population-based study of 1,268 adults from five districts in Botswana to assess knowledge of and attitudes toward routine testing, correlates of HIV testing, and barriers and facilitators to testing, 11 months after the introduction of this policy. Most participants (81% reported being extremely or very much in favor of routine testing. The majority believed that this policy would decrease barriers to testing (89%, HIV-related stigma (60%, and violence toward women (55%, and would increase access to antiretroviral treatment (93%. At the same time, 43% of participants believed that routine testing would lead people to avoid going to the doctor for fear of testing, and 14% believed that this policy could increase gender-based violence related to testing. The prevalence of self-reported HIV testing was 48%. Adjusted correlates of testing included female gender (AOR = 1.5, 95% CI = 1.1-1.9, higher education (AOR = 2.0, 95% CI = 1.5-2.7, more frequent healthcare visits (AOR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.3-2.7, perceived access to HIV testing (AOR = 1.6, 95% CI = 1.1-2.5, and inconsistent condom use (AOR = 1.6, 95% CI = 1.2-2.1. Individuals with stigmatizing attitudes toward people living with HIV and AIDS were less likely to have been tested for HIV/AIDS (AOR = 0.7, 95% CI = 0.5-0.9 or to have heard of routine testing (AOR = 0.59, 95% CI = 0.45-0.76. While experiences with voluntary and routine testing overall were positive, 68% felt that they could not refuse the HIV test. Key barriers to testing included fear of learning one's status (49%, lack of perceived HIV risk (43%, and fear of having to change sexual practices with a positive HIV test (33%.Routine testing appears to be widely supported and may reduce barriers to testing in Botswana. As routine testing is

  14. Leptospira interrogans at the human-wildlife interface in northern Botswana: a newly identified public health threat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobbins, S E; Sanderson, C E; Alexander, K A

    2014-03-01

    Leptospirosis is the most widespread zoonosis in the world. In northern Botswana, humans live in close proximity to a diversity of wildlife and peridomestic rodents and may be exposed to a variety of zoonotic pathogens. Little is known regarding the occurrence and epidemiology of L. interrogans in Africa despite the recognized global importance of this zoonotic disease and the threat it poses to public health. In Botswana, banded mongooses (Mungos mungo) live in close proximity to humans across protected and unprotected landscapes and may be a useful sentinel species for assessing the occurrence of zoonotic organisms, such as L. interrogans. We utilized PCR to screen banded mongoose kidneys for leptospiral DNA and identified 41.5% prevalence of renal carriage of L. interrogans (exact binomial 95% CI 27.7-56.7%, n = 41). Renal carriage was also detected in one Selous' mongoose (Paracynictis selousi). This is the first published confirmation of carriage of L. interrogans in either species. This is also the first report of L. interrogans occurrence in northern Botswana and the only report of this organism in a wildlife host in the country. Pathogenic Leptospira are usually transmitted indirectly to humans through soil or water contaminated with infected urine. Other avenues, such as direct contact between humans and wildlife, as well as consumption of mongooses and other wildlife as bushmeat, may pose additional exposure risk and must be considered in public health management of this newly identified zoonotic disease threat. There is a critical need to characterize host species involvement and pathogen transmission dynamics, including human-wildlife interactions that may increase human exposure potential and infection risk. We recommend that public health strategy be modified to include sensitization of medical practitioners to the presence of L. interrogans in the region, the potential for human infection, and implementation of clinical screening. This study

  15. This is Literacy! Reading of photographs in research on San students’ literacy in a Remote Dweller School in Botswana

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    Lone E. Ketsitlile

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available I discuss here part of my larger study which investigated what San students and their non-San friends in a Remote Area Dweller (RAD Junior Secondary School in Botswana understand as literacy in school and at home. A narrative case study approach was used to gain an in-depth understanding of what students’ value and understand by literacy. Findings across participants’ stories revealed that they saw literacy as those things that had value to them and these influenced how they read ‘the word’ and ‘the world’. Storytelling, games, singing, knowledge of different plants, basket weaving and sculpting were variously identified as literacy by the six San and Tswana participants.

  16. Crossing the Chasm – Introducing Flexible Learning into the Botswana Technical Education Programme: From Policy to Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison Mead Richardson

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on a longitudinal, ethnomethodological case study of the development towards flexible delivery of the Botswana Technical Education Programme (BTEP, offered by Francistown College of Technical & Vocational Education (FCTVE. Data collection methods included documentary analysis, naturalistic participant observation, and semi-structured interviews. The author identifies and analyses the technical, staffing, and cultural barriers to change when introducing technology-enhanced, flexible delivery methods. The study recommends that strategies to advance flexible learning should focus on the following goals: establish flexible policy and administration systems, change how staff utilization is calculated when flexible learning methodologies are used, embed flexible delivery in individual performance development and department/college strategic plans, ensure managerial leadership, hire and support permanent specialists, identify champions and share success stories, and address issues of inflexible organisational culture. This study may be of value in developing countries where mass-based models are sought to expand access to vocational education and training.

  17. Cross-cultural adaptation of an adolescent HIV prevention program: social validation of social contexts and behavior among Botswana adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Lawrence, Janet S; Seloilwe, Esther; Magowe, Mabel; Dithole, Kefalotse; Kgosikwena, Billy; Kokoro, Elija; Lesaane, Dipuo

    2013-08-01

    An evidence-based HIV prevention intervention was adapted for Botswana youth with qualitative interviews, input from an adolescent panel, and social validation. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 40 boys and girls ages 13-19. An adolescent panel then drafted scenarios reflecting social situations described in the interviews that posed risk for HIV. A social validation sample (N = 65) then indicated the prevalence and difficulty of each situation. Youth described informational needs, pressures to use alcohol and drugs, peer pressure for unprotected sex, and intergenerational sex initiations as risk-priming situations. From 17% to 57% of the social validation sample had personally experienced the situations drafted by the adolescent panel. There were no differences in the ratings of boys versus girls, but youth over age 16 more often reported that they had experienced these risky situations. The results were embedded into the intervention. Major changes to the intervention resulted from this three-phase process.

  18. Addressing the challenge of the emerging NCD epidemic: lessons learned from Botswana's response to the HIV epidemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, M J A; Mosepele, M; Tsima, B M; Gross, R

    2012-09-21

    Botswana has the second highest prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune-deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) in the world, and yet it has built one of Africa's most progressive and comprehensive HIV programs. While public health infrastructure has responded remarkably to the HIV epidemic, the prevalence of non-communicable diseases (NCDs), particularly diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease, in both HIV-infected and non-infected individuals, is increasing rapidly. Applying lessons learned from the scale-up of HIV/AIDS services may help with the implementation of an effective response to the challenges of the emerging NCD epidemic. We suggest that a successful response should include integrated service delivery, capacity building to provide disease-specific care, and strong partnerships to mobilize communities.

  19. POTENTIAL BENEFITS AND COMPLEXITIES OF BLENDED LEARNING IN HIGHER EDUCATION: The case of the University of Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina K. MASALELA

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Blended/hybrid learning is dominating news in higher education as a training and educational delivery method of choice. It is seen as a link between instructors, learners and classrooms located in different places to enhance learning. Based on the interviews with 15 faculty members and one administrator that had direct experience with this form of delivery at the University of Botswana (UB the findings suggested two major themes that dominated faculty members ’accounts: potential benefits and challenges of blended learning. The study was guided by the Diffusion of Innovation theory. The potential benefits of blended learning included improved pedagogy; engagement in learning; and added flexibility in the teaching and learning to mention a few. Faculty members perceived complexities such as lack of students’ readiness to use the course management system, slow network and breakdowns; lack of computers for students and lack of time. The article concludes by suggesting future directions for blended learning (BL at the UB.

  20. Christian theology of life, death and healing in an era of antiretroviraltherapy: reflections on the responses of some Botswana churches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togarasei, Lovemore

    2010-12-01

    This article discusses Christian understandings of life, death and healing in the context of antiretroviral (ARV) therapy. The discussion is a response to the reactions of some Botswana Pentecostal and African Independent Churches to the availability of ARV therapy, as reflected in several media reports of churches discouraging church members' use of ARV drugs. The article argues that this negative attitude to ARVs is a result of the Christian churches' understandings of life, death and healing through traditional Bible-based interpretations. Based on this, some churches view the ability of ARVs to prolong life as challenging God who is the source of life and healing. The article argues that this attitude grows from an initial Christian understanding of HIV and AIDS as a form of God's punishment on humanity for its sins. The article thus argues for the development of 'a Christian theology of ARVs' that sees ARVs as a manifestation and not a contradiction of God's healing powers.

  1. Evaluation of Resources Necessary for Provision of Trauma Care in Botswana: An Initiative for a Local System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwandri, Michael B; Hardcastle, Timothy C

    2017-11-28

    Developing countries face the highest incidence of trauma, and on the other hand, they do not have resources for mitigating the scourge of these injuries. The World Health Organization through the Essential Trauma Care (ETC) project provides recommendations for improving management of the injured and building up of systems that are effective in low-middle-income countries (LMICs). This study uses ETC project recommendations and other trauma-care guidelines to evaluate the current status of the resources and organizational structures necessary for optimal trauma care in Botswana; an African country with relatively good health facilities network, subsidized public hospital care and a functioning Motor Vehicle Accident fund covering road traffic collision victims. A cross-sectional descriptive design employed convenience sampling for recruiting high-volume trauma hospitals and selecting candidates. A questionnaire, checklist, and physical verification of resources were utilized to evaluate resources, staff knowledge, and organization-of-care and hospital capabilities. Results are provided in plain descriptive language to demonstrate the findings. Necessary consumables, good infrastructure, adequate numbers of personnel and rehabilitation services were identified all meeting or exceeding ETC recommendations. Deficiencies were noted in staff knowledge of initial trauma care, district hospital capability to provide essential surgery, and the organization of trauma care. The good level of resources available in Botswana may be used to improve trauma care: To further this process, more empowering of high-volume trauma hospitals by adopting trauma-care recommendations and inclusive trauma-system approaches are desirable. The use of successful examples on enhanced surgical skills and capabilities, effective trauma-care resource management, and leadership should be encouraged.

  2. Effectiveness of Monovalent Rotavirus Vaccine After Programmatic Implementation in Botswana: A Multisite Prospective Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastañaduy, Paul A; Steenhoff, Andrew P; Mokomane, Margaret; Esona, Mathew D; Bowen, Michael D; Jibril, Haruna; Pernica, Jeffrey M; Mazhani, Loeto; Smieja, Marek; Tate, Jacqueline E; Parashar, Umesh D; Goldfarb, David M

    2016-05-01

    Botswana introduced monovalent G1P rotavirus vaccine (RV1) in July 2012, providing one of the first opportunities to assess the effectiveness of routine RV1 vaccination in a high-burden setting in Africa. We sought to determine the effectiveness of RV1 against rotavirus diarrhea hospitalization using a case-control evaluation. Vaccine age-eligible children vaccine history was compared between case patients (children with laboratory-confirmed rotavirus diarrhea) and nonrotavirus "test-negative" diarrhea controls. Vaccine effectiveness (VE) was computed using unconditional logistic regression models adjusting for age, birth month/year, and hospital. Sequence-based genotyping was performed on antigen-positive samples. Among 242 case patients and 368 controls, 82% (199/242) and 92% (339/368), respectively, had received ≥1 doses of RV1. Effectiveness of a full series (2 doses) of RV1 against rotavirus diarrhea requiring hospitalization was 54% (95% confidence interval [CI], 23%-73%); 1 dose of RV1 was 48% (95% CI, 1%-72%) effective. Effectiveness was 59% (95% CI, 4%-83%) against rotavirus caused by G2P, the most common (37%) circulating genotype. However, the effectiveness of 2 RV1 doses was significantly higher in children with no undernutrition (VE, 75% [95% CI, 41%-89%]), compared to those with moderate or severe undernutrition (VE, -28% [95% CI, -309% to 60%]) (P= .02). Routine RV1 vaccination in Botswana showed effectiveness similar to that in clinical trials in Africa, including against a serotype fully heterotypic to the vaccine. Undernutrition may in part explain the lower rotavirus VE in low-income settings. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Knowledge of HIV/AIDS, attitudes towards sexual risk behaviour and perceived behavioural control among college students in Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Faimau

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the knowledge of HIV/AIDS, attitudes towards risky sexual behaviour and perceived behavioural control among students in Botswana. Data were collected from 445 students randomly selected from the University of Botswana and Boitekanelo College. Hundred and seventy three males and 272 females participated in the study. The study established that although more than 90% of students correctly identified routes of HIV transmission, misconceptions regarding HIV/AIDS still exist. This includes the belief that people can be infected with HIV because of witchcraft and that only people who have sex with gay or homosexual partners can be infected with HIV. Majority of students were aware of various sexual risks. However, the percentage of students who indicated that “it is difficult to ask my partner to use a condom” was still relatively high (13.5% based on the assumption that students are supposed to know the consequences of sexual risky behaviour. It was also found that male students were 3.48 times more likely to negotiate sex than their female counterparts (OR = 3.48, 95% CI: 1.09 − 11.13 and students who were 18 years and below were more likely to negotiate sex than students above 18 years of age (OR = 2.78, 95% CI: 1.42 − 18.32. Christians are four times less likely to negotiate sex compared to non-Christians (OR = 0.219, 95% CI: 0.095 − 0.506. More than 80% of students were comfortable discussing HIV or sex and sexuality with their friends, boyfriends/girlfriends or partners but uncomfortable discussing the same issues with their parents.

  4. Depression and HIV in Botswana: a population-based study on gender-specific socioeconomic and behavioral correlates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reshma Gupta

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Depression is a leading contributor to the burden of disease worldwide, a critical barrier to HIV prevention and a common serious HIV co-morbidity. However, depression screening and treatment are limited in sub-Saharan Africa, and there are few population-level studies examining the prevalence and gender-specific factors associated with depression.We conducted a cross-sectional population-based study of 18-49 year-old adults from five districts in Botswana with the highest prevalence of HIV-infection. We examined the prevalence of depressive symptoms, using a Hopkins Symptom Checklist for Depression (HSCL-D score of ≥ 1.75 to define depression, and correlates of depression using multivariate logistic regression stratified by sex.Of 1,268 participants surveyed, 25.3% of women and 31.4% of men had depression. Among women, lower education (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 2.07, 95% confidence interval [1.30-3.32], higher income (1.77 [1.09-2.86], and lack of control in sexual decision-making (2.35 [1.46-3.81] were positively associated with depression. Among men, being single (1.95 [1.02-3.74], living in a rural area (1.63 [1.02-2.65], having frequent visits to a health provider (3.29 [1.88-5.74], anticipated HIV stigma (fearing discrimination if HIV status was revealed (2.04 [1.27-3.29], and intergenerational sex (2.28 [1.17-4.41] were independently associated with depression.Depression is highly prevalent in Botswana, and its correlates are gender-specific. Our findings suggest multiple targets for screening and prevention of depression and highlight the need to integrate mental health counseling and treatment into primary health care to decrease morbidity and improve HIV management efforts.

  5. Variable-source flood pulsing in a semi-arid transboundary watershed: the Chobe River, Botswana and Namibia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pricope, Narcisa G

    2013-02-01

    The Chobe River, characterized by an unusual flood pulsing regime and shared between Botswana and Namibia, lies at the heart of the world's largest transfrontier conservation area (the Kavango-Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area). Significant ecological changes and vegetation conversions are occurring along its floodplains. Various scenarios for agricultural and urban water use are currently being proposed by the government of Botswana. However, the understanding of the river's annual flow regime and timing of the relative contributions of water from three different sources is relatively poor. In light of past and future climate change and variability, this means that allocating water between ecological flows and economic and domestic uses will become increasingly challenging. We reconstruct the inundation history in this basin to help ease this challenge. This paper presents a spatiotemporal approach to estimate the contribution of water from various sources and the magnitude of changes in the flooding extent in the basin between 1985 and 2010. We used time series analysis of bimonthly NOAA AVHRR and NASA MODIS data and climatologic and hydrologic records to determine the flooding timing and extent. The results indicate that between 12 and 62 % of the basin is flooded on an annual basis and that the spatial extent of the flooding varies throughout the year as a function of the timing of peak discharge in two larger basins. A 30-year trend analysis indicates a consistent decline in the average monthly flooded area in the basin. The results may prove useful in future water utilization feasibility studies, in determining measures for protecting ecological flows and levels, and in ecosystem dynamics studies in the context of current and future climate change and variability.

  6. Understanding Household Connectivity and Resilience in Marginal Rural Communities through Social Network Analysis in the Village of Habu, Botswana

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    Lin Cassidy

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Adaptability is emerging as a key issue not only in the climate change debate but in the general area of sustainable development. In this context, we examine the link between household resilience and connectivity in a rural community in Botswana. We see resilience and vulnerability as the positive and negative dimensions of adaptability. Poor, marginal rural communities confronted with the vagaries of climate change, will need to become more resilient if they are to survive and thrive. We define resilience as the capacity of a social-ecological system to cope with shocks such as droughts or economic crises without changing its fundamental identity. We make use of three different indices of household resilience: livelihood diversity, wealth, and a comprehensive resilience index based on a combination of human, financial, physical, social, and natural capital. Then, we measure the social connectivity of households through a whole network approach in social network analysis, using two measures of network centrality (degree centrality and betweenness. We hypothesize that households with greater social connectivity have greater resilience, and analyze a community in rural Botswana to uncover how different households make use of social networks to deal with shocks such as human illness and death, crop damage, and livestock disease. We surveyed the entire community of Habu using a structured questionnaire that focused on livelihood strategies and social networks. We found that gender, age of household head, and household size were positively correlated with social connectivity. Our analysis indicates that those households that are more socially networked are likely to have a wider range of livelihood strategies, greater levels of other forms of social capital, and greater overall capital. Therefore, they are more resilient.

  7. Groundwater investigations in the Okavango Delta, Botswana, using electric and electromagnetic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, P.; Podgorski, J. E.; Green, A.; Kalscheuer, T.; Greenhalgh, S.; Rabenstein, L.; Tshoso, G.; Jaba, B. C.; Kinzelbach, W.; Foged, N.

    2012-04-01

    The Okavango Delta, one of the world's largest inland deltas, lies in the semi-arid Kalahari Desert of northwestern Botswana. Most of the surface water inflow and local rain is evaporated, with only a small percentage being discharged downstream. About 1/3 of the evaporation is due to transpiration of groundwater by trees on islands. This leads to salt accumulation in the shallow groundwater. Eventually, the denser water sinks to the deeper saline aquifer by fingering. Mapping the subsurface salinity distribution is important to understand the fate of dissolved salts imported into the delta. This can be effectively done using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and electromagnetic (EM) measurements. Airborne transient EM (TEM) surveys have delineated a resistive fresh water layer overlying a broad conductive salt water and/or clay layer, which sits on another resistive layer. The basal resistive layer was interpreted as bedrock or a fresh water aquifer, covered by clay which prevents the salt water from further downward movement. To improve model resolution, 2-D ERT and TEM surveys were conducted at two selected locations: HR2 on the western border and Jedibe Island in the heart of the delta. ERT was performed using 96 electrodes at 5 m spacing, with additional current electrodes at either end of the line for increased depth penetration. The TEM soundings used square transmitter loops of size 40 m or 100 m, responses were recorded on two in-loop receiver channels. At HR2, two TEM lines and one ERT line were recorded. Inversions of the TEM data were performed individually (single site 1-D models) and laterally constrained (LCI) to form quasi 2-D models. The layering sequence is resistive (>50 Ωm) - conductive (20 Ωm). Depth to the conductive and the bottom resistive layer is ~20 m and ~140 m, respectively. ERT smooth inversion yields greater lateral heterogeneity in the shallow subsurface. The same layering pattern as for the TEM is observed, but with better

  8. Hydrological and sedimentological modeling of the Okavango Delta, Botswana, using remotely sensed input and calibration data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milzow, C.; Kgotlhang, L.; Kinzelbach, W.; Bauer-Gottwein, P.

    2006-12-01

    The Okavango Delta is a vast wetland situated in the mostly arid southern Africa. It is protected by the Ramsar convention but economic growth of the tributary countries (Angola, Namibia and Botswana) will make the waters of its feeding river, the Okavango, more and more attractive for agricultural water abstraction and production of electrical energy. An integrated hydrological model of the delta is build to study consequences of water abstraction and sediment retention in the river. The model is based on Modflow 2000 but several changes are made to the code. Flows in the delta are of three types: Groundwater flow, slow overland flow and fast flow through channels. These three components are reflected in the model by a standard aquifer layer, a wettable surface layer which also obeys the Darcy law, and stream flow routing using the SFR2 package. The stream-flow routing component of the model simulates realistic flow velocities which allow to incorporate sediment transport in the model. For this purpose a basic sediment transport package for Modflow 2000 has been written. We assume that the position of the channels stays approximately constant over few decades but that channel elevations may change due to aggradation and erosion. Changing slopes induce changes in the distribution of the water to the different arms and flood plains of the deltaic system. Flooding patterns of the delta differ each year. They are a function of inflow, meteorological data and to some extend of the wetting state in previous years in the short term (1-3 years). Vegetation growth, peat fires and sediment deposition lead to variations in the medium term (10 to 50 years). Topography changes with major changes of channel network geometry will only occur in the long term (100 to 1000 years). Tectonic events may, however, lead to sudden discontinuities in the flooding behavior. When analyzing management options and the sustainable use of the Delta's resources the interesting time scale is the

  9. Evaluating the impact of a mobile oral telemedicine system on medical management and clinical outcomes of patients with complicated oral lesions in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesfalul, Martha; Littman-Quinn, Ryan; Antwi, Cynthia; Ndlovu, Siphiwo; Motsepe, Didintle; Phuthego, Motsholathebe; Tau, Boitumelo; Mohutsiwa-Dibe, Neo; Kovarik, Carrie

    2013-01-01

    Mobile telemedicine, which involves the use of cellular phone telecommunications to facilitate exchange of information between parties in different locations to assist in the management of patients, has become increasingly popular, particularly in resource-limited settings. In Botswana, small studies of mobile telemedicine programs suggest access to these services positively affect patients, but these programs' impact is difficult to capture given limitations of baseline and comparative data. Our observational study uses each patient receiving mobile oral telemedicine services in Botswana as his/her own control to assess the impact of these services on his/her diagnosis and management plan. At month 5 of 12 total, preliminary analysis of eligible cases (n = 27) reveals management plan discordance between clinicians submitting cases and the specialist was 68.0% (17/25), suggesting that telemedicine can result in significant changes in management of patients.

  10. The perfidious experiences of men as palliative caregivers of people living with HIV/AIDS and other terminal illnesses in Botswana. Eclectic data sources

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    Simon Kangethe

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim and objective of this scientific research article is to explore the literature with intent to raise attention to the perfidiousness of the experiences of men as palliative caregivers of people living with HIV/AIDS and other terminal illnesses. The article has utilized eclectic data sources in Botswana and elsewhere. The findings indicate that care giving position of men has been found beset by: retrogressive gender unfriendly cultures; patriarchy; weaker gender empowerment campaigns; and inadequate male involvement in care. The article recommends: (1 a paradigm shift of structural gender dynamics; (2 making AIDS care programmes both gender sensitive and gender neutral; (3 Strengthening gender mainstreaming; (4 diluting cultures and patriarchy; (5 and signing and domesticating SADC gender protocol and other gender friendly international agreements by Botswana government.

  11. The influence of sex education on sexual behaviour of junior secondary school learners in Maokane-Jwaneng school in Botswana / L.G. Tumedi

    OpenAIRE

    Tumedi, L G

    2011-01-01

    Education is an ongoing process and it is never 'complete' in anyone's life. Sex education is relevant in Junior Secondary Schools (JSS) in Botswana. The study was under taken to investigate the influence of sex education on the sexual behaviour of JSS learners. Adolescents today are faced with challenges and they need support to face these challenges. The study was guided by the following research objectives: What constitutes the nature and characteristics of sex education? Wh...

  12. Towards a Theory-based framework for assessing the mainstreaming of education for sustainable development : A case study of teacher education institutions in Botswana

    OpenAIRE

    Schrage, Jesse; Lenglet, Frans

    2016-01-01

    This article presents the development of a theory-based framework for exploring the ways in which different teacher education institutions in Botswana have worked towards the infusion of education for sustainable development (ESD) in the curriculum and the practice of pre-service teacher education.The framework combines theory of change, a theory of education for sustainable human development and a theory of transformative learning.The objective of this paper is to understand how this theoret...

  13. A project to develop an adult basic vocational education and training programme as a contribution towards the development of human and social capital in Botswana

    OpenAIRE

    Cook, Kathryn E

    2008-01-01

    In 1992, the Government of Botswana appointed a National Commission to review the education system and advise how it could promote human resource development to address the country’s socio-economic challenges. The Commission identified the need to diversify the labour market and shift towards occupational groupings based on skills, attitudes and competence. However, fifteen years on, Botswana’s dependence on diamond mining, coupled with immigration from neighbouring countries and a mismatch o...

  14. Saugestad, Sidsel. – The Inconvenient Indigenous. Remote Area Development in Botswana, Donor Assistance, and the First People of the Kalahari

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell, John R.

    2007-01-01

    This is a carefully considered and well-written anthropological analysis of an evolving relationship between the government of Botswana, the Norwegian Agency for International Development (norad)–the principal donor–, and a diverse group of peoples (and aid recipients) referred to as Bushman/Basarwa/San (by outsiders, including the dominant Tswana ethnic group) or as the “First People of the Kalahari” (by indigenous political spokesmen). The book examines assistance to the San provided under ...

  15. Strengthening medical training programmes by focusing on professional transitions: a national bridging programme to prepare medical school graduates for their role as medical interns in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peluso, Michael J; Luckett, Rebecca; Mantzor, Savara; Bedada, Alemayhu G; Saleeb, Paul; Haverkamp, Miriam; Mosepele, Mosepele; Haverkamp, Cecil; Maoto, Rosa; Prozesky, Detlef; Tapela, Neo; Nkomazana, Oathokwa; Barak, Tomer

    2017-12-21

    The improvement of existing medical training programmes in resource-constrained settings is seen as key to addressing the challenge of retaining medical graduates trained at considerable cost both in-country and abroad. In Botswana, the establishment of the national Medical Internship Training Programme (MIT) in 2014 was a first step in efforts to promote retention through the expansion and standardization of internship training, but MIT faces a major challenge related to variability between incoming trainees due to factors such as their completion of undergraduate medical training in different settings. To address this challenge, in August 2016 we piloted a bridging programme for foreign and locally trained medical graduates that aimed to facilitate their transition into internship training. This study aimed to describe the programme and evaluate its impact on the participants' self-rated perceptions of their knowledge, experience, clinical skills, and familiarity with Botswana's healthcare system. We conducted a national, intensive, two-week programme designed to facilitate the transition from medical student to intern and to prepare all incoming interns for their work in Botswana's health system. Participants included all interns entering in August 2016. Formats included lectures, workshops, simulations, discussions, and reflection-oriented activities. The Kellogg Foundation Outcomes Logic Model was used to evaluate the programme, and participants self-rated their knowledge, skills, and attitudes across each of the programme objectives on paired questionnaires before and after participation. 48/54 participants (89%) provided paired data. Participants reported a high degree of satisfaction with the programme (mean 4.2/5). Self-rated preparedness improved after participation (mean 3.2 versus 3.7, p programme prepared them for their internship training. Exploratory analysis revealed that 20/25 participants (80%) reporting either no effect or a negative effect

  16. Problems experienced with the teaching of Arabic to learners in Muslim private schools in South Africa and Botswana

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    Mall, MA

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses a number of problems that are unique to the teaching of Arabic in private schools in South Africa and Botswana. Specific attention is given to aspects of teaching that mean that learners are unable to reach a level of communicative competence in Arabic or to understand the Koran (despite the fact that this is an important goal in teaching Arabic. An investigation conducted with the aid of questionnaires revealed that Arabic teachers do not have confidence in their own language proficiency or their ability to speak Arabiefluently. It seems that teaching is largely based on the Grammar-Translation method: learning of new vocabulary and grammar rules. It also appears that most teachers believe that learners study Arabic for religious purposes (to be able to read the Koran so they are not so much interested in developing communicative skills as in extending their vocabulary and knowledge of grammar so they will be able to understand the formal language of the Koran. In hierdie artikel word 'n aantal probleme wat eie is aan die onderrig van Arabies in Moslem privaatskole in Suid-Afrika en Botswana bespreek. Daar word spesifiek aandag gegee aan onderrigaspekte wat instrumentee! is tot die leerders se onvermoe om 'n mate van kommunikatiewe bevoegdheid in Arabies te bereik en om die Koran met begrip te lees (ten spyte daarvan dat dU 'n belangrike doelstelling met die onderrig van Arabies is. Vit 'n ondersoek wat met behulp van vraelyste gedoen is, blyk dit dat die meerderheid Arabiese onderwysers nie vertroue het in hul eie taalvaardigheid en hul vermoe om vlot in Arabies te kommunikeer nie. Daar word ook aangedui dat onderrig hooftaaklik gebaseer is op die grammatika-vertaalmetode, die aanleer van nuwe woordeskat en die leer van grammatikareels. Dit blyk ook dat die meerderheid onderwysers van mening is dat leerders Arabies bestudeer vir religieuse doeleindes (om die Koran te kan lees en daarom nie soseer ingestel is op die

  17. Prevalence and treatment outcomes of routine Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Trichomonas vaginalis testing during antenatal care, Gaborone, Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, Adriane; Ramogola-Masire, Doreen; Gaolebale, Ponatshego; Moshashane, Neo; Sickboy, Ontiretse; Duque, Sofia; Williams, Elizabeth; Doherty, Klara; Klausner, Jeffrey D; Morroni, Chelsea

    2017-11-02

    Chlamydia trachomatis (CT), Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG) and Trichomonas vaginalis (TV) are curable, mostly asymptomatic, STIs that cause adverse maternal and perinatal outcomes. Most countries do not test for those infections during antenatal care. We implemented a CT, NG and TV testing and treatment programme in an antenatal clinic in Gaborone, Botswana. We conducted a prospective study in the antenatal clinic at Princess Marina Hospital in Gaborone, Botswana. We offered pregnant women who were 18 years or older and less than 35 weeks of gestation, CT, NG and TV testing using self-collected vaginal swabs. Testing was conducted using a GeneXpert® CT/NG and TV system. Those who tested positive were given directly observed antibiotic therapy and asked to return for a test of cure. We determined the prevalence of infections, uptake of treatment and proportion cured. The relationships between positive STI test and participant characteristics were assessed. We enrolled 400 pregnant women. Fifty-four (13.5%) tested positive for CT, NG and/or TV: 31 (8%) for CT, 5 (1.3%) for NG and 21 (5%) for TV. Among those who tested positive, 74% (40) received same-day, in person results and treatment. Among those who received delayed results (6), 67% (4) were treated. Statistical comparisons showed that being unmarried and HIV infected were positively association CT, NG and/or TV infection. Self-reported STI symptoms were not associated with CT, NG and/or TV infection. The prevalence of CT, NG and/or TV was high, particularly among women with HIV infection. Among women with CT, NG and/or TV infection, those who received same-day results were more likely to be treated than those who received delayed results. More research is needed on the costs and benefits of integrating highly sensitive and specific STI testing into antenatal care in Southern Africa. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No

  18. Improving the quality of health information: a qualitative assessment of data management and reporting systems in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledikwe, Jenny H; Grignon, Jessica; Lebelonyane, Refeletswe; Ludick, Steven; Matshediso, Ellah; Sento, Baraedi W; Sharma, Anjali; Semo, Bazghina-werq

    2014-01-30

    Ensuring that data collected through national health information systems are of sufficient quality for meaningful interpretation is a challenge in many resource-limited countries. An assessment was conducted to identify strengths and weaknesses of the health data management and reporting systems that capture and transfer routine monitoring and evaluation (M&E) data in Botswana. This was a descriptive, qualitative assessment. In-depth interviews were conducted at the national (n = 27), district (n = 31), and facility/community (n = 71) levels to assess i) M&E structures, functions, and capabilities; ii) indicator definitions and reporting guidelines; iii) data collection forms and tools; iv) data management processes; and v) links with the national reporting system. A framework analysis was conducted using ATLAS.ti v6.1. Health programs generally had standardized data collection and reporting tools and defined personnel for M&E responsibilities at the national and district levels. Best practices unique to individual health programs were identified and included a variety of relatively low-resource initiatives such as attention to staffing patterns, making health data more accessible for evidence-based decision-making, developing a single source of information related to indicator definitions, data collection tools, and management processes, and utilization of supportive supervision visits to districts and facilities. Weakness included limited ownership of M&E-related duties within facilities, a lack of tertiary training programs to build M&E skills, few standard practices related to confidentiality and document storage, limited dissemination of indicator definitions, and limited functionality of electronic data management systems. Addressing fundamental M&E system issues, further standardization of M&E practices, and increasing health services management responsiveness to time-sensitive information are critical to sustain progress related to health

  19. Seasonal habitat selection by African buffalo Syncerus caffer in the Savuti–Mababe–Linyanti ecosystem of northern Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keoikantse Sianga

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to establish seasonal movement and habitat selection patterns of African buffalo Syncerus caffer in relation to a detailed habitat map and according to seasonal changes in forage quality and quantity in the Savuti–Mababe–Linyanti ecosystem (Botswana. Two buffalo were collared in November 2011 and another in October 2012. All three buffalo had greater activities in the mopane–sandveld woodland mosaic during the wet season, which provided high-quality leafy grasses and ephemeral water for drinking, but moved to permanent water and reliable forage of various wetlands (swamps and floodplains and riverine woodlands during the dry season. Wetlands had higher grass greenness, height and biomass than woodlands during the dry season. Buffalo had similar wet season concentration areas in the 2011–2012 and 2012–2013 wet seasons and similar dry season concentration areas over the 2012 and 2013 dry seasons. However, their dry season location of collaring in 2011 differed dramatically from their 2012 and 2013 dry season concentration areas, possibly because of the exceptionally high flood levels in 2011, which reduced accessibility to their usual dry season concentration areas. The study demonstrates that extremely large and heterogeneous landscapes are needed to conserve buffalo in sandy, dystrophic ecosystems with variable rainfall.Conservation implications: This study emphasises the importance of large spatial scale available for movement, which enables adaptation to changing conditions between years and seasons.

  20. PEPFAR support of alcohol-HIV prevention activities in Namibia and Botswana: a framework for investigation, implementation and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenshaw, M; Deluca, N; Adams, R; Parry, C; Fritz, K; Du Preez, V; Voetsch, K; Lekone, P; Seth, P; Bachanas, P; Grillo, M; Kresina, T F; Pick, B; Ryan, C; Bock, N

    2016-01-01

    The association between harmful use of alcohol and HIV infection is well documented. To address this dual epidemic, the US President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) developed and implemented a multi-pronged approach primarily in Namibia and Botswana. We present the approach and preliminary results of the public health investigative and programmatic activities designed, initiated and supported by PEPFAR to combat the harmful use of alcohol and its association as a driver of HIV morbidity and mortality from 2008 to 2013. PEPFAR supported comprehensive alcohol programming using a matrix model approach that combined the socio-ecological framework and the Alcohol Misuse Prevention and Intervention Continuum. This structure enabled seven component objectives: (1) to quantify harmful use of alcohol through rapid assessments; (2) to develop and evaluate alcohol-based interventions; (3) to promote screening programs and alcohol abuse resource services; (4) to support stakeholder networks; (5) to support policy interventions and (6) structural interventions; and (7) to institutionalize universal prevention messages. Targeted PEPFAR support for alcohol activities resulted in several projects to address harmful alcohol use and HIV. Components are graphically conceptualized within the matrix model, demonstrating the intersections between primary, secondary and tertiary prevention activities and individual, interpersonal, community, and societal factors. Key initiative successes included leveraging alcohol harm prevention activities that enabled projects to be piloted in healthcare settings, schools, communities, and alcohol outlets. Primary challenges included the complexity of multi-sectorial programming, varying degrees of political will, and difficulties monitoring outcomes over the short duration of the program.

  1. Improvement of physical, chemical, and biological properties of aridisol from Botswana by the incorporation of torrefied biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura, Tatsuki; Date, Yasuhiro; Masukujane, Masego; Coetzee, Tidimalo; Akashi, Kinya; Kikuchi, Jun

    2016-06-01

    Effective use of agricultural residual biomass may be beneficial for both local and global ecosystems. Recently, biochar has received attention as a soil enhancer, and its effects on plant growth and soil microbiota have been investigated. However, there is little information on how the physical, chemical, and biological properties of soil amended with biochar are affected. In this study, we evaluated the effects of the incorporation of torrefied plant biomass on physical and structural properties, elemental profiles, initial plant growth, and metabolic and microbial dynamics in aridisol from Botswana. Hemicellulose in the biomass was degraded while cellulose and lignin were not, owing to the relatively low-temperature treatment in the torrefaction preparation. Water retentivity and mineral availability for plants were improved in soils with torrefied biomass. Furthermore, fertilization with 3% and 5% of torrefied biomass enhanced initial plant growth and elemental uptake. Although the metabolic and microbial dynamics of the control soil were dominantly associated with a C1 metabolism, those of the 3% and 5% torrefied biomass soils were dominantly associated with an organic acid metabolism. Torrefied biomass was shown to be an effective soil amendment by enhancing water retentivity, structural stability, and plant growth and controlling soil metabolites and microbiota.

  2. Comparative Characterization of Atmospheric particles at an urban site and a roadside site in the City of Gaborone, Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mmereki, B. T.; Khumoetsile, T.

    2016-12-01

    Characterization of individual atmospheric particles in the urban atmosphere is key to addressing a number of air quality issues ranging from pollution source apportionment, understanding their global biogeochemical cycling and environmental fate to the correlation of the particle morphology and chemical make-up to health related issues. Airborne particles were collected in the city of Gaborone Botswana using a High Volume air-sampler. Samples were collected in the summer and winter months at a location bordering a busy highway and a low income high-human population density locality where un-controlled fossil fuel burning provides for the requisite energy requirements of the population in this locality. Morphologies and elemental compositions of particles were obtained using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy-dispersive (X-ray) spectrometry (EDS). Preliminary results suggest a complex mix of aggregates of carbonaceous-diesel particles, complex carbonaceous matter, and inorganic nano-crystals. Ambient air morphology and concentrations of particles (PM10), carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NOx), and ozone (O3) will be discussed. There is a notable influence of high traffic volumes to particle chemistry.

  3. Stationary tailgating in Gaborone, Botswana: the influence of gender, time of day, type of vehicle and presence of traffic officer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole M. Monteiro

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated stationary tailgating in Gaborone, Botswana. We observed and measured the distance between 722 vehicles (541 male drivers, 181 female drivers stopped at three traffic intersections in Gaborone during rush-hour and non-rush hour. Gender of driver, type of vehicle (private, commercial, government or company, whether it was rush-hour or not, whether or not a traffic officer was present and distance from the car in front, were recorded. Based on a benchmark of 350 centimetres, derived from the recommendation that cars maintain the distance of the length of a car from the vehicle in front of them when stopped, it was found that 76% of drivers tailgated. In general, men tailgated more than women and tailgating occurred more during rush-hour and when there was a traffic officer present. In addition, a series of four-way analysis of variance tests yielded a main effect for presence of officer, such that the average distance kept from the car in front was significantly less when a traffic officer was present than when a traffic officer was not present. The main effects of gender, time of day and vehicle type were not significant. Findings are discussed in relation to the impact on pedestrians as well as drivers and implications for traffic regulation procedures.

  4. Using helicopter TEM to delineate fresh water and salt water zones in the aquifer beneath the Okavango Delta, Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podgorski, Joel E.; Kinzelbach, Wolfgang K. H.; Kgotlhang, Lesego

    2017-09-01

    The Okavango Delta is a vast wetland wilderness in the middle of the Kalahari Desert of Botswana. It is a largely closed hydrological system with most water leaving the delta by evapotranspiration. In spite of this, the channels and swamps of the delta remain surprisingly low in salinity. To help understand the hydrological processes at work, we reanalyzed a previous inversion of data collected from a helicopter transient electromagnetic (HTEM) survey of the entire delta and performed an inversion of a high resolution dataset recorded during the same survey. Our results show widespread infiltration of fresh water to as much as ∼200 m depth into the regional saline aquifer. Beneath the western delta, freshwater infiltration extends to only about 80 m depth. Hydrological modeling with SEAWAT confirms that this may be due to rebound of the regional saltwater-freshwater interface following the cessation of surface flooding over this part of the delta in the 1880s. Our resistivity models also provide evidence for active and inactive saltwater fingers to as much as ∼100 m beneath islands. These results demonstrate the great extent of freshwater infiltration across the delta and also show that all vegetated areas along the delta's channels and swamps are potential locations for transferring solutes from surface water to an aquifer at depth.

  5. Assessing the role of local institutions in participatory development: The case of Khwee and Sehunong settlements in Botswana

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    Keneilwe Molosi- France

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Many governments in Africa give priority to rural development mainly because a significant proportion of their populations live in the rural areas where poverty is severe. Thus, one of the goals of rural development is to address the problem of poverty in the rural areas with an emphasis on promoting participation of people in decisions that affect them. The Village Development Committee (VDC is a village-level institution that is responsible for ensuring that the community actively participates in the development process in order to promote grassroot development. Essentially, VDCs have been established to offer a forum for community engagement in the processes that concern their development with a view to promote a sense of responsibility, commitment and ownership by the community. This discussion is informed by a qualitative study that used semi-structured interviews to gather data. Two findings pertaining to the weak role of the VDC and unequal power relations are seen to be hindering community participation. As such, this paper argues that VDCs in Khwee and Sehunong settlements do not serve their intended purpose of engaging the community as other stakeholders pay lip service to community participation, hence not fully involving the VDC. The paper recommends that the Government of Botswana as the main stakeholder in national development, including the development of San communities, should commit to genuine community participation, while on the other hand the San should be empowered so that they can embrace and demand to be involved in their own development.

  6. Ramifications of ostracism as a consequence of revelation of HIV positive status: its effect o individuals and families in Botswana

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    Tabitha T. Langeni

    2003-12-01

    the structure and composition of the family in Botswana. The study showed that the highest proportion of respondents who would abandon an HIV positive partner (58.4% occurs among young people aged 15 to 19 years; and that the propensity to abandon an HIV positive partner diminishes with advancement in age. In-depth inquiries on why HIV positive partners would be abandoned produced responses that revolved around fear of exposure, vulnerability and association with an HIV positive individual. The study showed that the highest proportion of respondents who would not reveal their HIV positive status occurs among those who have lost a relative or a friend to AIDS. Fear of being isolated, rejected, stigmatized and unwanted featured among the top reasons why respondents would not reveal their HIV positive status. Society’s reaction towards HIV positive individuals and families with HIV/AIDS patients appeared strong enough to drive individuals to hide their positive status and to go ahead and take the risk of onward transmission of the virus.

  7. Seasonal fluctuation of parasitic infestation in donkeys (Equus asinus in Oodi village, Kgatleng District, Botswana : short communication

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    E.Z. Mushi

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available During the period March to September 2000, a study was conducted in Oodi village, Kgatleng District, Botswana, to investigate the seasonal fluctuation of internal, external and blood parasites of donkeys. Twelve adult donkeys were randomly selected from a farmer with a herd of 15 donkeys. Monthly visits were made to the farmer when the donkeys were examined for parasites. The only ectoparasites recovered from the donkeys were instars of various tick species. The most prevalent tick was Rhipicephalus evertsi evertsi (98.4 %, followed by Amblyomma hebraeum and Hyalomma species. The only haemoparasite seen on microscopy was Babesia equi at low parasitaemia in 26.8% of the donkeys. However, no clinical babesiosis was evident. Coprological examination showed the presence of strongyle eggs in moderate numbers. Very low numbers of coccidia oocysts were found in the faecal samples. High tick numbers and worm egg counts coincided with the warm, wet months in contrast to the low numbers recovered during the cold, dry months. An interview conducted by the authors indicated that donkeys were nutritionally marginalised by owners. Supplementary feeding was therefore recommended, especially during the winter months when grazing is poor.

  8. Household access to traditional and indigenous foods positively associated with food security and dietary diversity in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasimba, Salome Nduku; Motswagole, Boitumelo Stokie; Covic, Namukolo Margaret; Claasen, Nicole

    2017-12-26

    To determine access to traditional and indigenous foods (TIF) and the association with household food security, dietary diversity and women's BMI in low socio-economic households. Sequential explanatory mixed-methods design, including a random household cross-sectional survey on household food insecurity access (HFIA), household dietary diversity (HDD) and women's BMI, followed by focus group discussions. Two rural and two urban areas of Botswana. Persons responsible for food preparation or an adult in a household (n 400); for BMI, non-pregnant women aged 18-49 years (n 253). Almost two-thirds of households experienced moderate or severe food insecurity (28·8 and 37·3 %, respectively), but more than half of women were overweight or obese (26·9 and 26·9 %, respectively). Median HDD score was 6 (interquartile range 5-7) out of a total of 12. A positive correlation was found between number of TIF accessed and HDD score (r=0·457; Pfoods. TIF may potentially have an important role in household food security and dietary diversity. There is need to explore potential benefits that may be associated with their optimal use on food security and nutrition outcomes.

  9. Causes and possible solutions to water resource conflicts in the Okavango River Basin: The case of Angola, Namibia and Botswana

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    Mbaiwa, Joseph E.

    This paper reviews available literature concerning water resources use in the Okavango River Basin (ORB). It describes a number of common arguments regarding possibilities for the emergence of violent conflict in and among Basin states, particularly those states party to the Okavango River Basin Commission (Okacom)-Angola, Botswana and Namibia. The paper presents data concerning present and future water demands and examines a number of formal, institutional steps taken by global and regional actors to facilitate sustainable development, natural resources management and peaceful cooperation in the Basin. Contrary to trends in much of the literature, the paper suggests that there is great scope for enhanced inter-state cooperation in the Basin. It argues that to achieve sustainable utilisation of water resources and avoid violent conflict in the ORB, an integrated management plan for the entire basin needs to be developed. In addition, each basin member-state should observe international and regional conventions and treaties governing the use of water resources when designing national water development projects that require the use of water from the ORB.

  10. A preliminary disease survey in the wild Nile crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus) population in the Okavango Delta, Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, A J; Lovely, C J; Pittman, J M

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this study was to conduct a preliminary survey of diseases that might be present in the wild Nile crocodile population in the Okavango Delta, Botswana. Blood samples were collected from crocodiles ranging in size from 34.0 cm to 463.0 cm total length. Samples were examined for blood parasites and underwent a haematological analysis. Before release the crocodiles were examined for various clinical abnormalities. Of the 144 crocodiles examined, none were visibly sick or displayed any signs of disease. No antibodies to Mycoplasma crocodyli were detected. Hepatozoon pettiti was present in 55.3% of blood smears examined, but there was no significant difference in any of the haematological values between the infected and uninfected crocodiles, and a high prevalence of Hepatozoon infection is not uncommon in other species. Only 7.6% of the examined crocodiles were infested with leeches. Further research is required for several of the crocodilian diseases, in particular to elucidate the role of wild crocodilians as reservoirs of infection.

  11. A preliminary disease survey in the wild Nile crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus population in the Okavango Delta, Botswana

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    A. J. Leslie

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to conduct a preliminary survey of diseases that might be present in the wild Nile crocodile population in the Okavango Delta, Botswana. Blood samples were collected from crocodiles ranging in size from 34.0cmto 463.0cmtotal length. Samples were examined for blood parasites and underwent a haematological analysis. Before release the crocodiles were examined for various clinical abnormalities. Of the 144 crocodiles examined, none were visibly sick or displayed any signs of disease. No antibodies to Mycoplasma crocodyli were detected. Hepatozoon pettiti was present in 55.3 % of blood smears examined, but there was no significant difference in any of the haematological values between the infected and uninfected crocodiles, and a high prevalence of Hepatozoon infection is not uncommon in other species. Only 7.6 % of the examined crocodiles were infested with leeches. Further research is required for several of the crocodilian diseases, in particular to elucidate the role of wild crocodilians as reservoirs of infection.

  12. Adopting an ethical approach to global health training: the evolution of the Botswana - University of Pennsylvania partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacso, Matthew; Chandra, Amit; Friedman, Harvey

    2013-11-01

    Global health training opportunities for medical students and residents have proliferated in recent years. These short-term elective rotations allow trainees to learn about global health issues by participating in various aspects of education and health care in resource-limited settings. Recently published consensus-based ethical guidelines have suggested considerations for the design of international electives that address the activities of host and sending sites, visiting students and residents, and sponsors.The authors analyze the value of global health training opportunities for medical students, residents, faculty, host and sending institutions, and other stakeholders from the perspective of the Botswana-University of Pennsylvania Partnership, a program that has provided global health experiences for health care trainees for more than 10 years. Drawing from the Working Group on Ethics Guidelines for Global Health Training framework, they illustrate the ethical and logistical challenges faced by the program's organizers and the solutions that they implemented alongside their host site partners. They conclude with a summary of recommendations to guide implementation of ethically sound international health electives in resource-limited settings.

  13. Protocol for a population-based molecular epidemiology study of tuberculosis transmission in a high HIV-burden setting: the Botswana Kopanyo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zetola, N M; Modongo, C; Moonan, P K; Click, E; Oeltmann, J E; Shepherd, J; Finlay, A

    2016-05-09

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is transmitted from person to person via airborne droplet nuclei. At the community level, Mtb transmission depends on the exposure venue, infectiousness of the tuberculosis (TB) index case and the susceptibility of the index case's social network. People living with HIV infection are at high risk of TB, yet the factors associated with TB transmission within communities with high rates of TB and HIV are largely undocumented. The primary aim of the Kopanyo study is to better understand the demographic, clinical, social and geospatial factors associated with TB and multidrug-resistant TB transmission in 2 communities in Botswana, a country where 60% of all patients with TB are also infected with HIV. This manuscript describes the methods used in the Kopanyo study. The study will be conducted in greater Gaborone, which has high rates of HIV and a mobile population; and in Ghanzi, a rural community with lower prevalence of HIV infection and home to the native San population. Kopanyo aims to enrol all persons diagnosed with TB during a 4-year study period. From each participant, sputum will be cultured, and for all Mtb isolates, molecular genotyping (24-locus mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of tandem repeats) will be performed. Patients with matching genotype results will be considered members of a genotype cluster, a proxy for recent transmission. Demographic, behavioural, clinical and social information will be collected by interview. Participant residence, work place, healthcare facilities visited and social gathering venues will be geocoded. We will assess relationships between these factors and cluster involvement to better plan interventions for reducing TB transmission. Ethical approval from the Independent Review Boards at the University of Pennsylvania, US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Botswana Ministry of Health and University of Botswana has been obtained. Published by the BMJ

  14. Mixed methods evaluation of targeted selective anthelmintic treatment by resource-poor smallholder goat farmers in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Josephine G; Ofithile, Mphoeng; Tavolaro, F Marina; van Wyk, Jan A; Evans, Kate; Morgan, Eric R

    2015-11-30

    Due to the threat of anthelmintic resistance, livestock farmers worldwide are encouraged to selectively apply treatments against gastrointestinal nematodes (GINs). Targeted selective treatment (TST) of individual animals would be especially useful for smallholder farmers in low-income economies, where cost-effective and sustainable intervention strategies will improve livestock productivity and food security. Supporting research has focused mainly on refining technical indicators for treatment, and much less on factors influencing uptake and effectiveness. We used a mixed method approach, whereby qualitative and quantitative approaches are combined, to develop, implement and validate a TST system for GINs in small ruminants, most commonly goats, among smallholder farmers in the Makgadikgadi Pans region of Botswana, and to seek better understanding of system performance within a cultural context. After the first six months of the study, 42 out of 47 enrolled farmers were followed up; 52% had monitored their animals using the taught inspection criteria and 26% applied TST during this phase. Uptake level showed little correlation with farmer characteristics, such as literacy and size of farm. Herd health significantly improved in those herds where anthelmintic treatment was applied: anaemia, as assessed using the five-point FAMACHA(©) scale, was 0.44-0.69 points better (95% confidence interval) and body condition score was 0.18-0.36 points better (95% C.I., five-point scale) in treated compared with untreated herds. Only targeting individuals in greatest need led to similar health improvements compared to treating the entire herd, leading to dose savings ranging from 36% to 97%. This study demonstrates that TST against nematodes can be implemented effectively by resource-poor farmers using a community-led approach. The use of mixed methods provides a promising system to integrate technical and social aspects of TST programmes for maximum uptake and effect. Copyright

  15. The effectiveness of the South African Triage Toll use in Mahalapye District Hospital – Emergency Department, Botswana

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    Stephane T. Tshitenge

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The study aimed to determine the proportion of each priority level of patients, time of performance in each priority level, and the reliability of the South African Triage Scale (SATS tool at the Mahalapye District Hospital - Emergency Department (MDH-ED, a setting where the majority of the nurses were not formally trained on the use of the SATS.Methods: This was a cross-sectional study using case records in MDH-ED from 1 January 2014 to 31 December 2014. A panel of experts from the Mahalapye site of the Family Medicine Department, University of Botswana, reviewed and scored each selected case record that was compared with the scores previously attributed to the nurse triage.Results: From the 315 case records, both the nurse triage and the panel of expert triage assigned the majority of cases in the routine category (green, 146 (46% and 125 (40%, respectively, or in the urgent category (yellow, they assigned 140 (44% and 111 (35% cases, respectively.Overall, there was an adequate agreement between the nurse triage and the panel of expert triage (k = 0.4, 95% confidence interval: 0.3–0.5, although the level of agreement was satisfactory.Conclusion: Findings of the study reported that the profile of the priority-level categories in MDH-ED was made in the majority of routine and urgent patients, only the routine and the emergency patients were seen within the targeted time and they had a satisfactory level of reliability (between 0.4 and 0.6.

  16. Prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility of Salmonella isolated from a variety of raw meat sausages in Gaborone (Botswana) retail stores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaxa, Ronald Gaelekolwe; Matsheka, Maitshwarelo Ignatius; Mpoloka, Sununguko Wata; Gashe, Berhanu Abegaz

    2012-04-01

    The objective of the study was to provide baseline data on the prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility of Salmonella in different types of raw meat sausages directly accessible to the consumers in Gaborone, Botswana. A total of 300 raw sausages comprising 79 beef, 78 pork, 72 chicken, and 71 mutton samples were concurrently analyzed for the presence of Salmonella using a conventional culture method and a validated PCR method. The PCR assay results were in full concordance with those of the conventional culture method for the detection of Salmonella. Sixty-five (21.7%) of 300 samples were positive for Salmonella by both the conventional culture method and PCR assay. Even though more chicken samples contained Salmonella than did any other sausage type, the difference in the presence of Salmonella among the four sausages types was not significant. Eleven serotypes were identified, and Salmonella enterica subsp. salamae II was most prevalent in all the sausage types. Beef sausages generally had higher mesophilic bacterial counts than did the other three sausage types. However, higher microbial counts were not reflective of the presence of salmonellae. Susceptibility of the Salmonella enterica serotypes to 20 antimicrobial agents was determined, and Salmonella Muenchen was resistant to the widest array of agents and was mostly isolated from chicken sausages. Regardless of the meat of origin, all 65 Salmonella isolates were resistant to at least four antimicrobial agents: amikacin, gentamicin, cefuroxime, and tombramycin. This resistance profile group was the most common in all four sausage types, comprising 90% of all Salmonella isolates from beef, 71% from pork, 63% from mutton, and 35% from chicken. These results suggest that raw sausages pose a risk of transmitting multidrug-resistant Salmonella isolates to consumers.

  17. Palaeochannels (stone-rolls) in coal seams: Modern analogues from fluvial deposits of the Okavango Delta, Botswana, southern Africa

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    Cairncross, B.; Stanistreet, I. G.; McCarthy, T. S.; Ellery, W. N.; Ellery, K.; Grobicki, T. S. A.

    1988-05-01

    Two varieties of fluvial sandstones are associated with coal seams in the Permian Witbank Coalfield of South Africa. The first comprises lenticular channel-fill sandstone, minor conglomerate and siltstone encased entirely within the coal seam. Medium- to coarse-grained arkosic sandstones are structured by planar cross-bedding and fine upwards into carbonaceous siltstone and overlying coal. These palaeochannel-fill deposits are 5 km wide in proximal basin areas and narrow down palaeoslope to less than 1 km in width. The second variety of channel fill consists of medium- to coarse-grained sandstone which occurs below the floor of the coal seam. These deposits form undulating ridges that occur either in sub-parallel groups or as isolated shoe-string type bodies at the coal-floor rock contact. Both features are referred to as stone-rolls in colliery terminology. These ancient deposits are compared with active and abandoned fluvial systems from the Okavango Delta in Botswana, southern Africa. Active channels are flanked by extensive peat swamps which effectively confine and stabilize the channel margins. Clastic sedimentation is therefore completely confined to the channels by the vegetation and deposition occurs by vertical aggradation. Recently abandoned channels in the Okavango Delta display a variety of well preserved bed-forms which alternate with scoured depressions along the thalweg producing an undulating topography to the channel floor. These features provide a modern analogue for the stone-rolls in the coalfield deposits. The subsequent channel abandonment, vegetation encroachment and peat formation over the sand bodies would form a coal seam superimposed on the irregular surface, provided channel abandonment was followed by subsidence, overlying sediment deposition, compaction and coalification of the peat. Although the Okavango rivers are narrower and transport finer-grained sand than their Permian counterparts, the mechanism of formation and style of

  18. Examining student understanding of the science of a societal issue in Botswana: Effects of ultraviolet radiation on the human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suping, Shanah Mompoloki

    Science has had such an impact on our way of life that it has been at the centre of discussion for all issues of health, education, development, and the safe stewardship of the Earth's resources. Science has advanced so quickly in the last 50 years that the amount of knowledge generated by scientists is overwhelming. Science teachers who have persistently introduced children to science from a very young age, have been charged with a daunting task of presenting science knowledge to students in ways that not only make it easy to understand, but also make it relevant to them. The methods of how best they should go about this task have been debated from time immemorial. Due to the many concerns and demands placed on science teachers and science education programs in general, there have been a number of efforts to reform and redefine the science curriculum. Science education reform efforts in the US and elsewhere have examined all possible nucleotides in the building up of the reform DNA molecule. Many studies have measured people's level of understanding on given issues that affect their communities, but little attention has been given to conceptions and level of scientific literacy among students in developing countries. This study assessed Botswana school children's knowledge about ultraviolet radiation (UVR) and its effects on human health using a scientific literacy lens. Results show that students do not know as much as one would expect them to know, from public school through the first year in college. Exploratory factor analysis identified four indicators of knowledge about UVR. These are: (a) diseases related to UVR, (b) items that can be used for protections against UVR, (c) misconceptions held about UVR, and (d) general issues surrounding UVR. MANOVA analysis showed that whereas there are no differences in general based on school location, certain groups of students performed differently depending on the school type, type of science pursued at school and or

  19. Structural analysis and implicit 3D modelling of Jwaneng Mine: Insights into deformation of the Transvaal Supergroup in SE Botswana

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    Creus, P. K.; Basson, I. J.; Stoch, B.; Mogorosi, O.; Gabanakgosi, K.; Ramsden, F.; Gaegopolwe, P.

    2018-01-01

    Country rock at Jwaneng Diamond Mine provides a rare insight into the deformational history of the Transvaal Supergroup in southern Botswana. The ca. 235 Ma kimberlite diatremes intruded into late Archaean to Early Proterozoic, mixed, siliciclastic-carbonate sediments, that were subjected to at least three deformational events. The first deformational event (D1), caused by NW-SE directed compression, is responsible for NE-trending, open folds (F1) with associated diverging, fanning, axial planar cleavage. The second deformational event (D2) is probably progressive, involving a clockwise rotation of the principal stress to NE-SW trends. Early D2, which was N-S directed, involved left-lateral, oblique shearing along cleavage planes that developed around F1 folds, along with the development of antithetic structures. Progressive clockwise rotation of far-field forces saw the development of NW-trending folds (F2) and its associated, weak, axial planar cleavage. D3 is an extensional event in which normal faulting, along pre-existing cleavage planes, created a series of rhomboid-shaped, fault-bounded blocks. Normal faults, which bound these blocks, are the dominant structures at Jwaneng Mine. Combined with block rotation and NW-dipping bedding, a horst-like structure on the northwestern limb of a broad, gentle, NE-trending anticline is indicated. The early compressional and subsequent extensional events are consistent throughout the Jwaneng-Ramotswa-Lobatse-Thabazimbi area, suggesting that a large area records the same fault geometry and, consequently, deformational history. It is proposed that Jwaneng Mine is at or near the northernmost limit of the initial, northwards-directed compressional event.

  20. The effect of purified condensed tannins of forage plants from Botswana on the free-living stages of gastrointestinal nematode parasites of livestock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibe, O; Sutherland, I A; Lesperance, L; Harding, D R K

    2013-10-18

    The effect of condensed tannins (CT) extracted from forage plants from Botswana on the free-living stages of a number of species of gastrointestinal nematode parasites derived from infected sheep were investigated using in vitro assays. Fresh samples of five different plants (Viscum rotundifolium, Viscum verrucosum, Tapinanthus oleifolius, Grewia flava and Ipomoea sinensis) were collected over two summers (February 2009 and 2010). Fractionation of each crude extract on a Sephadex LH-20 column yielded low molecular weight phenolics and CT-containing fractions. The effect of each purified CT fraction on parasites was evaluated using either egg hatch, larval development or larval migration inhibition assays. Three gastrointestinal nematode species (Haemonchus contortus, Trichostrongylus colubriformis and Teladorsagia circumcincta) derived from infected sheep were evaluated in the study. CT from V. rotundifolium and I. sinensis fractions from samples collected in 2009 and 2010 did not inhibit larval development. However, CT isolated from V. verrucosum, T. oleifolius and G. flava collected in 2009 completely inhibited the development of all parasite species. These CT fractions were more potent in inhibiting larval development of H. contortus than fractions from the same plant species collected in 2010. However, a slight effect on larval migration was observed with some CT extracts. The results suggest that CT extracts of some forage plants from Botswana have anti-parasitic properties in vitro, and that further research is required to determine any in vivo efficacy from feeding the plants to goats in a field situation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Integration of sources in academic writing: A corpus-based study of citation practices in essay writing in two departments at the University of Botswana

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    Boitumelo T. Ramoroka

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The ability to cite sources appropriately is an important feature of academic writing. Academic writers are expected to integrate ideas of others into their texts and take a stance towards the reported material as they develop their arguments. Despite this importance, research has shown that citation presents considerable difficulties for students, particularly non-native English speakers. Such difficulties include using citations effectively in writing and understanding them in reading, expressing one’s voice and signalling citations in writing so that there is a clear distinction between one’s ideas and those derived from source materials. This study investigates the types of reporting verbs used by students to refer to the work of others and the extent to which they evaluate the work of others in their writing. It draws from a corpus of approximately 80 000 words from essays written by students in two departments at the University of Botswana (Botswana. The findings show that students used more informing verbs, associated with the neutral passing of information from the source to the reader, without interpreting the information cited, compared with argumentative verbs (which signify an evaluative role. The results of the study underscore the importance of teaching reporting verbs in the English for academic purposes classroom and making students aware of their evaluative potential.

  2. People living with HIV and AIDS on the brink: stigma--a complex sociocultural impediment in the fight against HIV and AIDS in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nthomang, Keitseope; Phaladze, Nthabiseng; Oagile, Noma; Ngwenya, Barbara; Seboni, Naomi; Gobotswang, Kesitegile; Kubanji, Rebecca

    2009-03-01

    HIV-related stigma is a life-altering phenomenon. The consequence of the stigmatization process sets apart stigmatized person(s) as a distinct category, leading to various forms of disapproval, rejection, exclusion, labeling, stereotyping, and discrimination. Stigma of HIV-positive people in Botswana is a complex social phenomenon associated with the disease itself and the behaviors that lead to infection. This is a synthesis paper based on the literature review on HIV- and AIDS-related stigmatization of HIV-positive people in Botswana and in-depth interviews with people living with HIV and AIDS (PLWHAs). I examine the literature on HIV- and AIDS-related stigmatization and subsequent discrimination and the implications for intervention programs for people living with HIV and AIDS. The findings from the literature and in-depth interviews show that HIV-AIDS-related stigma is deeply embedded in societal structures and culture which promote nonacceptance of those branded HIV positive. This often is reinforced at a practical level by pervasive negative attitudes toward PLWHAs. Recommendations argue for the adoption of Healthy Relationship. This intervention seeks to promote and strengthen decision-making skills among PLWHAs and programs that promote destigmatization of, and tolerant attitudes toward, PLWHAs.

  3. Predictors of risky sexual behaviour among young people in the era of HIV/AIDS: evidence from the 2008 Botswana AIDS Impact Survey III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letamo, Gobopamang; Mokgatlhe, Lucky L

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this study is to fill in that research gap by investigating factors that are likely to predict Botswana's young people's practicing risky sexual behaviour in the era of HIV/AIDS. Data used in this study were obtained from a nationally representative sample of 5,810 young people aged 15 to 29 who had completed an individual questionnaire of the 2008 Botswana AIDS Impact Survey III. Both descriptive and multiple regression analyses were used for analysis. Elevated odds ratio (OR) values were obtained from a linear model analysis, showing statistically significant predictors of risky sexual behaviour among young people who have experienced coerced sex (OR=2.2), substance use (OR=1.8), having had sex before the age of 15 (OR=1.9), being older (OR=1.1) and lack of sexual self-efficacy (OR=1.6). Therefore risk reduction strategies aimed at addressing these potential problems should target young people before they enter adolescence and should develop gender-specific strategies.

  4. Heavy metal distribution in soils near Palapye, Botswana: An evaluation of the environmental impact of coal mining and combustion on soils in a semi-arid region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, M.; Totolo, O.; Modisi, M.P.; Finkelman, R.B.; Kelesitse, S.M.; Menyatso, M.

    2009-01-01

    Morupule Colliery near Palapye in eastern Botswana is the only coalmine in production in Botswana at present. Its coal is mainly used in the nearby coal-fired Morupule Power Station, which generates approximately 1,000 GWh of electricity per annum. After more than 30 years mining and more than 20 years of combustion, the sedimentation of outlet fly ash from the Morupule Power Station has increased concentrations of Cr, Ni, Zn and As by 13, 2.5, 16 and 5 ppm, respectively, in the fine portion (<53 ??m) of surface soils for approximately 9 km downwind. Elements that have higher concentrations in coal have stronger small-particle association during coal combustion and are less mobile in surface soils, thus showing stronger contaminations in surface soils around the coal-fired plant. Although the degree of contamination of Cr, Ni, Zn and As from coal combustion in the Palapye area at present is low, it is necessary to monitor concentrations of these elements in surface soils routinely in the future. This study also reveals moderate Pb and Zn contaminations in the Palapye area. The former is due to the use of leaded petroleum in motor vehicle traffic and the latter is mainly due to the use of galvanized iron sheets in construction. ?? 2009 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  5. Heavy metal distribution in soils near Palapye, Botswana: an evaluation of the environmental impact of coal mining and combustion on soils in a semi-arid region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Mingzhe; Totolo, Otlogetswe; Modisi, Motsoptse P; Finkelman, Robert B; Kelesitse, Sebueng M; Menyatso, Mooketsi

    2009-12-01

    Morupule Colliery near Palapye in eastern Botswana is the only coalmine in production in Botswana at present. Its coal is mainly used in the nearby coal-fired Morupule Power Station, which generates approximately 1,000 GWh of electricity per annum. After more than 30 years mining and more than 20 years of combustion, the sedimentation of outlet fly ash from the Morupule Power Station has increased concentrations of Cr, Ni, Zn and As by 13, 2.5, 16 and 5 ppm, respectively, in the fine portion (<53 μm) of surface soils for approximately 9 km downwind. Elements that have higher concentrations in coal have stronger small-particle association during coal combustion and are less mobile in surface soils, thus showing stronger contaminations in surface soils around the coal-fired plant. Although the degree of contamination of Cr, Ni, Zn and As from coal combustion in the Palapye area at present is low, it is necessary to monitor concentrations of these elements in surface soils routinely in the future. This study also reveals moderate Pb and Zn contaminations in the Palapye area. The former is due to the use of leaded petroleum in motor vehicle traffic and the latter is mainly due to the use of galvanized iron sheets in construction.

  6. Ethno-meteorology and scientific weather forecasting: Small farmers and scientists’ perspectives on climate variability in the Okavango Delta, Botswana

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    Oluwatoyin Dare Kolawole

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent trends in abrupt weather changes continue to pose a challenge to agricultural production most especially in sub-Saharan Africa. The paper specifically addresses the questions on how local farmers read and predict the weather; and how they can collaborate with weather scientists in devising adaptation strategies for climate variability (CV in the Okavango Delta of Botswana. Recent trends in agriculture-related weather variables available from country’s climate services, as well as in freely available satellite rainfall products were analysed. The utility of a seasonal hydrological forecasting system for the study area in the context of supporting farmer’s information needs were assessed. Through a multi-stage sampling procedure, a total of 592 households heads in 8 rural communities in the Okavango Delta were selected and interviewed using open and close-ended interview schedules. Also, 19 scientists were purposively selected and interviewed using questionnaires. Key informant interviews, focus group and knowledge validation workshops were used to generate qualitative information from both farmers and scientists. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used in summarising the data. Analysis of satellite rainfall products indicated that there was a consistent increase in total annual rainfall throughout the region in the last 10 years, accompanied by an increase in number of rain days, and reduction of duration of dry spells. However, there is a progressive increase in the region’s temperatures leading to increase in potential evaporation. Findings from social surveys show that farmers’ age, education level, number of years engaged in farming, sources of weather information, knowledge of weather forecasting and decision on farming practices either had a significant relationship or correlation with their perceptions about the nature of both local [ethno-meteorological] and scientific weather knowledge. Nonetheless, there was a

  7. Provenance and tectonic setting of the Neoproterozoic clastic rocks hosting the Banana Zone Cu-Ag mineralisation, northwest Botswana

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    Kelepile, Tebogo; Bineli Betsi, Thierry; Franchi, Fulvio; Shemang, Elisha; Suh, Cheo Emmanuel

    2017-05-01

    Petrographic and geochemical data were combined in order to decipher the petrogenesis of the Neoproterozoic sedimentary succession associated with the Banana Zone Cu-Ag mineralisation (northwest Botswana), in the Kalahari Copperbelt. The investigated Neoproterozoic sedimentary succession is composed of two formations including the Ngwako Pan and the D'kar Formations. The Ngwako Pan Formation is made up of continental siliciclastic sediments, mainly sandstones interbedded with siltstones and mudstones, whereas the D'kar Formation is comprised of shallow marine laminated siltstones, sandstones and mudstones, with subordinate limestone. Copper-Ag mineralisation is essentially confined at the base of the D'kar Formation, which bears reduced organic components, likely to have controlled Cu-Ag precipitation. Sandstones of both the Ngwako Pan and the D'kar Formations are arkoses and subarkoses, composed of quartz (Q), feldspars (F) and lithic fragments (L). Moreover, geochemically the sandstones are considered as potassic and classified as arkoses. On the other hand, mudrocks of the D'kar Formation are finely laminated and are dominated by muscovite, sericite, chlorite and quartz. The modified chemical index of weathering (CIW‧) values indicated an intense chemical weathering of the source rock. The dominance of detrital quartz and feldspar grains coupled with Al2O3/TiO2 ratios (average 29.67 and 24.52 for Ngwako Pan and D'kar Formations, respectively) and Ni and Cr depletion in the sandstones, suggest a dominant felsic source. However, high concentrations of Ni and Cr and a low Al2O3/TiO2 ratio (<20) in the mudrocks of the D'kar Formation indicate a mixed source. Provenance of the investigated sandstones and mudrocks samples is further supported by the REE patterns, the size of Eu anomaly as well as La/Co, Th/Co, Th/Cr and Cr/Th ratios, which show a felsic source for the sandstones of both the Ngwako Pan and D'kar Formations and an intermediate source for the mudrocks

  8. Looking for very low tectonic deformation in GNSS time series impacted by strong hydrological signal in the Okavango Delta, Botswana

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    Pastier, Anne-Morwenn; Dauteuil, Olivier; Murray-Hudson, Michael; Makati, Kaelo; Moreau, Frédérique; Crave, Alain; Longuevergne, Laurent; Walpersdorf, Andrea

    2017-04-01

    Located in northern Botswana, the Okavango Delta is a vast wetland, fed from the Angolan highlands and constrained by a half-graben in the Kalahari depression. Since the 70's, the Okavango graben is usually considered as the terminus of the East African Rift System. But a recent geodetic study showed there has been no extension on the tectonic structure over the past 5 years, and recent geophysical studies began to call this hypothesis into question. The deformation in the area could instead be related to far-field deformation accommodation due to the motion of the Kalahari craton relative to the rest of the Nubian plate and to the opening of the Rift Valley. Getting to the vertical deformation isn't trivial. The GNSS time series show a strong annual deformation of the ground surface (3 cm of amplitude). On the vertical component, this periodic signal is so strong that it hides the tectonic long-term deformation, while this information would give a crucial insight on the geodynamic process at play. This periodic signal is related to the seasonal loading of water due to the rainy season. This hypothesis is corroborated by the modeling of the surface deformation based on the GRACE satellites data, interpreted as the variation of groundwater amount. In the Okavango Delta, the peak of water level isn't paced with the local precipitations, but is driven by a flood pulse coming from the Angolan Highlands. The migration of this massive water body isn't visible at first order in GRACE data. Yet, local precipitations are supposed to undergo too much evapotranspiration to be significant in the hydrological balance. Thus this later water body isn't supposed to produce a mass anomaly in GRACE time series. This paradox could highlight a relationship not yet defined between groundwater and local rainfall. The wide spatial resolution of GRACE data (about 300 km) doesn't allow a modeling accurate enough to give access to the slow tectonic deformation, nor to determine the

  9. Provenance studies from 40Ar/ 39Ar dating of mineral inclusions in diamonds: Methodological tests on the Orapa kimberlite, Botswana

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    Phillips, D.; Harris, J. W.

    2008-09-01

    Previous studies indicate that clinopyroxene inclusions extracted from their host diamonds give 40Ar/ 39Ar ages approaching the time of source kimberlite eruption. This behaviour is attributed to diffusion of argon to the diamond/inclusion interface region during mantle residence, with subsequent loss of this component on cleaving of the diamond to release the inclusion(s). In this study, we investigate the potential of the 40Ar/ 39Ar inclusion dating method as a niche provenance tool. As diamondiferous kimberlites are uncommon igneous rocks, largely restricted to Archaean cratons and have limited age ranges, provenance studies of detrital diamond occurrences should provide unique information on craton erosional histories, palaeo-drainage evolution and related basin development. As a methodological test, 40Ar/ 39Ar step-heating and in vacuo crushing experiments were conducted on 50 eclogitic clinopyroxene inclusions extracted from diamonds from the ˜ 93 Ma Orapa kimberlite in Botswana. Low temperature steps and crushing experiments produced anomalously old ages (up to 2.98 ± 0.10 Ga), consistent with partial retention of pre-eruption (inherited) argon in sub-micron(?) defect sites. High temperature (fusion) steps yielded significantly younger ages, although only 35% are within error of the time of Orapa kimberlite eruption. However, 77% of results are within 50 Ma, and 92% within 100 Ma, of the Orapa eruption age. These results mandate that individual fusion ages be treated as maximum estimates of source kimberlite eruption ages, with analyses of several (> 6) inclusions required to date single-age detrital populations. For multi-source diamond deposits, only the youngest detrital population, or populations separated by > 100 Ma, will be resolvable. Despite these limitations, we conclude that the 40Ar/ 39Ar inclusion dating method is still capable of resolving key provenance questions, such as the source of detrital diamond deposits in southern Africa, where

  10. HIV/AIDS and access to water: A case study of home-based care in Ngamiland, Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngwenya, B. N.; Kgathi, D. L.

    This case study investigates access to potable water in HIV/AIDS related home-based care households in five rural communities in Ngamiland, Botswana. Primary data collected from five villages consisted of two parts. The first survey collected household data on demographic and rural livelihood features and impacts of HIV/AIDS. A total of 129 households were selected using a two-stage stratified random sampling method. In the second survey, a total of 39 family primary and community care givers of continuously ill, bed-ridden or non-bed-ridden HIV/AIDS patients were interviewed. A detailed questionnaire, with closed and open-ended questions, was used to collect household data. In addition to using the questionnaire, data were also collected through participant observation, informal interviews and secondary sources. The study revealed that there are several sources of water for communities in Ngamiland such as off-plot, outdoor (communal) and on-plot outdoor and/or indoor (private) water connections, as well as other sources such as bowsed water, well-points, boreholes and open perennial/ephemeral water from river channels and pans. There was a serious problem of unreliable water supply caused by, among other things, the breakdown of diesel-powered water pumps, high frequency of HIV/AIDS related absenteeism, and the failure of timely delivery of diesel fuel. Some villages experienced chronic supply disruptions while others experienced seasonal or occasional water shortages. Strategies for coping with unreliability of water supply included economizing on water, reserve storage, buying water, and collection from river/dug wells or other alternative sources such as rain harvesting tanks in government institutions. The unreliability of water supply resulted in an increase in the use of water of poor quality and other practices of poor hygiene as well as a high opportunity cost of water collection. In such instances, bathing of patients was cut from twice daily to once or

  11. Spatial Distribution of Iron in Soils and Vegetation Cover Close to an Abandoned Manganese Oxide Ore Mine, Botswana

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    Ekosse, Georges Ivo E.

    This study aimed at establishing the spatial distribution of iron (Fe) in soils and vegetation cover within the periphery of the Kgwakgwe Manganese (Mn) oxides ore abandoned mine in Botswana. Four hundred soil samples and two hundred vegetation samples were obtained from a 4 km2 area close to the mine. Determination of Fe concentrations after acid digestion of samples was performed using an atomic absorption spectrometer equipped with a deuterium background correction. Tests for soil pH and soil colour were complementary to soil chemical analysis. Results were processed using Geographical Information Systems (GIS) and Remote Sensing (RS) techniques with integrated Land and Water Information System (ILWIS), Geosoft Oasis Montaj, ArcGIS and Microsoft Excel software packages. Concentrations of Fe in soils was from 1116.59 to 870766.00 μg g-1 with a mean of 17593.52 μg g-1 and for leaves, levels were from 101.2 to 3758.09 μg g-1 with a mean of 637.07 μg g-1. Soil pH values ranged from 2.92 to 7.26 and soil colour shades ranged from yellowish red to very dark grey. Gridded soils and vegetation maps show Fe anomalies in different parts of the study area. Values were low in areas located at the mine workings and in the Northwestern part of the study area and high in the north and southern part. Where concentrations of Fe were high in soils, correspondingly high figures were obtained for vegetation cover. Similar trends were obtained for soil pH distribution in the study area. Bedrock geology, topography, Mn mineralization, soil acidity and prevailing oxidizing conditions were governing factors that influenced the concentration and spatial distribution of Fe in the soils and vegetation. The findings further confirm that Fe distribution and its chemistry in the soils and environment around the Kgwakgwe abandoned Mn oxides ore mine have affected the vegetation cover.

  12. Repeated assessments of informed consent comprehension among HIV-infected participants of a three-year clinical trial in Botswana.

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    Lelia H Chaisson

    Full Text Available Informed consent (IC has been an international standard for decades for the ethical conduct of clinical trials. Yet frequently study participants have incomplete understanding of key issues, a problem exacerbated by language barriers or lack of familiarity with research concepts. Few investigators measure participant comprehension of IC, while even fewer conduct interim assessments once a trial is underway.We assessed comprehension of IC using a 20-question true/false quiz administered in 6-month intervals in the context of a placebo-controlled, randomized trial for the prevention of tuberculosis among HIV-infected adults in Botswana (2004-2009. Quizzes were offered in both Setswana and English. To enroll in the TB trial, participants were required to have ≥ 16/20 correct responses. We examined concepts understood and the degree to which understanding changed over three-years. We analyzed 5,555 quizzes from 1,835 participants. The participants' highest education levels were: 28% primary, 59% secondary, 9% tertiary and 7% no formal education. Eighty percent of participants passed the enrollment quiz (Quiz1 on their first attempt and the remainder passed on their second attempt. Those having higher than primary education and those who took the quiz in English were more likely to receive a passing score on their first attempt (adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals, 3.1 (2.4-4.0 and 1.5 (1.2, 1.9, respectively. The trial's purpose or procedures were understood by 90-100% of participants, while 44-77% understood randomization, placebos, or risks. Participants who failed Quiz1 on their initial attempt were more likely to fail quizzes later in the trial. Pass rates improved with quiz re-administration in subsequent years.Administration of a comprehension quiz at enrollment and during follow-up was feasible in a large, international collaboration and efficiently determined IC comprehension by trial participants. Strategies to improve

  13. Pre-clinical carotid atherosclerosis and sCD163 among virally suppressed HIV patients in Botswana compared with uninfected controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosepele, Mosepele; Hemphill, Linda C; Moloi, Walter; Moyo, Sikhulile; Nkele, Isaac; Makhema, Joseph; Bennett, Kara; Triant, Virginia A; Lockman, Shahin

    2017-01-01

    Human immune deficiency virus (HIV) is associated with increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, yet the relationship between HIV and carotid atherosclerosis / monocyte activation among virally suppressed HIV-infected patients in sub-Saharan Africa is not well understood. We measured traditional CVD risk factors, bilateral distal common carotid intima media thickness (cIMT), presence of carotid plaque and plasma sCD163 levels among virally suppressed HIV-infected adults and HIV-uninfected controls, in a cross-sectional study in Gaborone, Botswana. The associations between HIV status, traditional CVD risk factors, sCD163 and outcome of cIMT were assessed in univariate and multivariate linear regression models. We enrolled 208 HIV-infected adults (55% Female, mean age 39 years) who had undetectable HIV-1 RNA on antiretroviral therapy and 224 HIV-uninfected controls (47% Female, mean age 37 years). There was no difference in cIMT between study groups, with mean cIMT 0.607mm and 0.599mm in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected, respectively (p = 0.37). Plasma sCD163 was significantly higher in HIV-infected versus HIV-uninfected persons (1917ng/ml vs 1593ng/ml, p = 0.003), but was not associated with cIMT (p = 0.43 among all, p = 0.72 for HIV-infected only). In the final multivariate model, increased cIMT was associated with older age, being treated for hypertension, and higher non-HDL cholesterol among all (polder age and waist-hip ratio in HIV-infected participants (p = 0.02 & p = 0.02 respectively). Carotid plaque was present in a significantly higher proportion of HIV-infected adults (RR 2.15, 95% CI 1.22, 3.81). HIV-infected participants aged 30-50 years who have achieved viral suppression did not have increased cIMT when compared to HIV-uninfected controls in Botswana. However, well-controlled HIV was associated with excess monocyte activation. Future work should explore the impact of subclinical atherosclerosis on CVD events among HIV-infected and -uninfected adults

  14. Pre-clinical carotid atherosclerosis and sCD163 among virally suppressed HIV patients in Botswana compared with uninfected controls.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosepele Mosepele

    Full Text Available Human immune deficiency virus (HIV is associated with increased cardiovascular disease (CVD risk, yet the relationship between HIV and carotid atherosclerosis / monocyte activation among virally suppressed HIV-infected patients in sub-Saharan Africa is not well understood.We measured traditional CVD risk factors, bilateral distal common carotid intima media thickness (cIMT, presence of carotid plaque and plasma sCD163 levels among virally suppressed HIV-infected adults and HIV-uninfected controls, in a cross-sectional study in Gaborone, Botswana. The associations between HIV status, traditional CVD risk factors, sCD163 and outcome of cIMT were assessed in univariate and multivariate linear regression models.We enrolled 208 HIV-infected adults (55% Female, mean age 39 years who had undetectable HIV-1 RNA on antiretroviral therapy and 224 HIV-uninfected controls (47% Female, mean age 37 years. There was no difference in cIMT between study groups, with mean cIMT 0.607mm and 0.599mm in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected, respectively (p = 0.37. Plasma sCD163 was significantly higher in HIV-infected versus HIV-uninfected persons (1917ng/ml vs 1593ng/ml, p = 0.003, but was not associated with cIMT (p = 0.43 among all, p = 0.72 for HIV-infected only. In the final multivariate model, increased cIMT was associated with older age, being treated for hypertension, and higher non-HDL cholesterol among all (p<0.001, p = 0.03, p<0.001 respectively, and with older age and waist-hip ratio in HIV-infected participants (p = 0.02 & p = 0.02 respectively. Carotid plaque was present in a significantly higher proportion of HIV-infected adults (RR 2.15, 95% CI 1.22, 3.81.HIV-infected participants aged 30-50 years who have achieved viral suppression did not have increased cIMT when compared to HIV-uninfected controls in Botswana. However, well-controlled HIV was associated with excess monocyte activation. Future work should explore the impact of subclinical atherosclerosis

  15. Estimated age and gender profile of individuals missed by a home-based HIV testing and counselling campaign in a Botswana community

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    Vlad Novitsky

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: It would be useful to understand which populations are not reached by home-based HIV-1 testing and counselling (HTC to improve strategies aimed at linking these individuals to care and reducing rates of onward HIV transmission. Methods: We present the results of a baseline home-based HTC (HBHTC campaign aimed at counselling and testing residents aged 16 to 64 for HIV in the north-eastern sector of Mochudi, a community in Botswana with about 44,000 inhabitants. Collected data were compared with population references for Botswana, the United Nations (UN estimates based on the National Census data and the Botswana AIDS Impact Survey IV (BAIS-IV. Analyzed data and references were stratified by age and gender. Results: A total of 6238 age-eligible residents were tested for HIV-1; 1247 (20.0%; 95% CI 19.0 to 21.0% were found to be HIV positive (23.7% of women vs. 13.4% of men. HIV-1 prevalence peaked at 44% in 35- to 39-year-old women and 32% in 40- to 44-year-old men. A lower HIV prevalence rate, 10.9% (95% CI 9.5 to 12.5%, was found among individuals tested for the first time. A significant gender gap was evident in all analyzed subsets. The existing HIV transmission network was analyzed by combining phylogenetic mapping and household structure. Between 62.4 and 71.8% of all HIV-positive individuals had detectable virus. When compared with the UN and BAIS-IV estimates, the proportion of men missed by the testing campaign (48.5%; 95% CI 47.0 to 50.0% was significantly higher than the proportion of missed women (14.2%; 95% CI 13.2 to 15.3%; p<0.0001. The estimated proportion of missed men peaked at about 60% in the age group 30 to 39 years old. The proportions of missed women were substantially smaller, at approximately 28% within the age groups 30 to 34 and 45 to 49 years old. Conclusions: The HBHTC campaign seems to be an efficient tool for reaching individuals who have never been tested previously in southern African communities

  16. Risk factors for suboptimal antiretroviral therapy adherence in HIV-infected adolescents in Gaborone, Botswana: a pilot cross-sectional study

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    Ndiaye M

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Maimouna Ndiaye,1,2 Peter Nyasulu,1 Hoang Nguyen,6,7 Elizabeth D Lowenthal,8,9 Robert Gross,10 Edward J Mills,3 Jean B Nachega4–6 1School of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa; 2Central Medical Stores, Ministry of Health, Gaborone, Botswana; 3Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada; 4Department of Medicine and Centre for Infectious Diseases, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town, South Africa; 5Department of Epidemiology, Infectious Disease Epidemiology Research Program, Pittsburgh University Graduate School of Public Health, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; 6Departments of Epidemiology and International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USA; 7Tay Ho Clinics, Department of Medicine, Hanoi Health Services, Hanoi, Vietnam; 8Departments of Pediatrics and Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 9Center for Pediatric Clinical Effectiveness, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 10Departments of Medicine and Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA Objective: Little is known about factors associated with suboptimal antiretroviral treatment (ART adherence among adolescents in Sub-Saharan Africa. Our objective was to determine the level of ART adherence and predictors of non-adherence among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-infected adolescents at the Botswana-Baylor Children's Clinical Centre of Excellence in Gaborone, Botswana. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, 82 HIV-infected adolescents receiving ART and their caregivers were administered a structured questionnaire. The patient's clinical information was retrieved from medical records. Outcome measures included excellent pill count ART adherence (>95% and virologic suppression

  17. Advanced Immune Suppression is Associated With Increased Prevalence of Mixed-Strain Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infections Among Persons at High Risk for Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis in Botswana

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    Shin, Sanghyuk S.; Modongo, Chawangwa; Ncube, Ronald; Sepako, Enoch; Klausner, Jeffrey D.; Zetola, Nicola M.

    2015-01-01

    We examined factors associated with mixed-strain Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections among patients at high risk for drug-resistant tuberculosis in Botswana. Thirty-seven (10.0%) of 370 patients with tuberculosis had mixed M. tuberculosis infections, based on 24-locus mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit–variable number of tandem repeats genotyping. In log-binomial regression analysis, age prevalence ratio [PR], 1.92; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01–3.57) and prior tuberculosis treatment (adjusted PR, 2.31; 95% CI, 1.09–4.89) were associated with mixed M. tuberculosis infections. Among human immunodeficiency virus–infected patients, prior tuberculosis treatment (adjusted PR, 2.11; 95% CI, 1.04–4.31) and CD4+ T-cell count of tuberculosis infections. Clinical suspicion of mixed M. tuberculosis infections should be high for patients with advanced immunosuppression and a prior history of tuberculosis treatment. PMID:25070941

  18. Lessons Learned From Transitioning PEPFAR Track 1.0 Care and Treatment Programs: Case Studies in Financial Management Capacity Building in Zambia and Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehn, Chuck; Tidwell, George; Vhugen, Jann; Sharma, Anjali

    2015-01-01

    In 2008, the United States government mandated transition of internationally managed HIV care and treatment programs to local country ownership. Three case studies illustrate the US Health Resources Services Administration's fiscal assessment and technical assistance (TA) processes to strengthen local organizations' capabilities to absorb and manage United States government funding. Review of initial, TA and follow-up reports reveal that the 1 Botswanan and 2 Zambian organizations closed 10 of 17 financial capacity gaps, with Health Resources Services Administration assisting on 2. Zambian organizations requested and absorbed targeted TA on the basis of the consultant's desk review, their finance staff revised fiscal policies and procedures, and accordingly trained other staff. In Botswana, delays in integrating recommendations necessitated on-site TA for knowledge building and role modeling. Organizational maturity may explain differences in responsiveness, ownership, and required TA approaches. Clarifying expectations of capacity building, funding agreement, and nonmonetary donor involvement can help new organizations determine and act on intervening actions.

  19. Quantitative geospatial dataset on the near-surface heavy metal concentrations in semi-arid soils from Maibele Airstrip North, Central Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eze, Peter N; Mosokomani, Valiant S; Udeigwe, Theophilus K; Oyedele, Opeoluwa F

    2016-09-01

    This article contains a statistically analyzed dataset of the heavy metals including Cr, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn and Pb contents of near-surface (~30 cm depth) soils in a Cu-Ni prospecting field at Airstrip North, Central Botswana. The soils developed on paragneisses and amphibolites parent materials in a semi-arid environment with hardveld vegetation, "The geology of the Topisi area" (Key et al., 1994) [1]. Grid sampling was adopted in the field data collection. Heavy metals were determined using the relatively new portable x-ray fluorescence spectrometer (Delta Premium, 510,890, USA) technology in a "soil" mode. The data presented was obtained from the average reading of two soil samples collected from same point but passed through sieves.

  20. Radio role models for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV and HIV testing among pregnant women in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebert Kuhlmann, Anne K; Kraft, Joan Marie; Galavotti, Christine; Creek, Tracy L; Mooki, Maungo; Ntumy, Raphael

    2008-09-01

    Although Botswana supports a program for the prevention of mother-to-child-transmission of HIV (PMTCT), many women initially did not take advantage of the program. Using data from a 2003 survey of 504 pregnant and post-partum women, we assessed associations between exposure to a long-running radio serial drama that encourages use of the PMTCT program and HIV testing during pregnancy. Controlling for demographic, pregnancy and other variables, women who spontaneously named a PMTCT character in the serial drama as their favorite character were nearly twice as likely to test for HIV during pregnancy as those who did not. Additionally, multiparity, knowing a pregnant woman taking AZT, having a partner who tested, higher education and PMTCT knowledge were associated with HIV testing during pregnancy. Identification with characters in the radio serial drama is associated with testing during pregnancy. Coupled with other supporting elements, serial dramas could contribute to HIV prevention, treatment and care initiatives.