WorldWideScience

Sample records for botany

  1. Supermarket Botany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Geoff E.; Harper, John D. I.

    2009-01-01

    Supermarket Botany is a frequently-used teaching resource or strategy. It draws on a student's existing familiarity with plant-based foods to explore plant structure and life cycles. One of its strongest points is that it is adaptable to many age levels--from lower primary school to university and general interest groups. We have designed a unique…

  2. Elderberry: Botany, Horticulture, Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horticultural Review allows extensive reviews of the state of the knowledge on certain topics or crops. Elderberry: Botany, Horticulture, Potential, is outlined with an Introduction, Botany, Horticulture, Propagation, Uses and Conclusion sections. This review compiles literature from around the w...

  3. The Visual in Botany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flannery, Maura C., Ed.

    1995-01-01

    Presents a variety of writers who have published books that demonstrate the art of botany. The following sections are included: (1) Herbal; (2) Printed Books; (3) Flowers; (4) British Botany; (5) Printing Advances; and (6) Art and Science. Contains 23 references. (ZWH)

  4. Locke and botany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anstey, Peter R; Harris, Stephen A

    2006-06-01

    This paper argues that the English philosopher John Locke, who has normally been thought to have had only an amateurish interest in botany, was far more involved in the botanical science of his day than has previously been known. Through the presentation of new evidence deriving from Locke's own herbarium, his manuscript notes, journal and correspondence, it is established that Locke made a modest contribution to early modern botany. It is shown that Locke had close and ongoing relations with the Bobarts, keepers of the Oxford Botanic Garden, and that Locke distributed seeds and plant parts to other botanists, seeds of which the progeny almost certainly ended up in the most important herbaria of the period. Furthermore, it is claimed that the depth of Locke's interest in and practice of botany has a direct bearing on our understanding of his views on the correct method of natural philosophy and on the interpretation of his well known discussion of the nature of species in Book III of his Essay concerning human understanding.

  5. South African Journal of Botany

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The South African Journal of Botany, the official journal of the South African Association of Botanists publishes papers which make an original contribution to any field of Botany. Papers are accepted on the understanding that their contents have not been published, or submitted for publication, elsewhere. All submitted ...

  6. [Lysenkoism in Polish botany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Piotr

    2008-01-01

    Lysenkoism by PAN came with the Sixth General Assembly of its members on June 11-12, 1956. The second tier of propagating Lysenkoism consisted in activities aimed at the general public, including the teaching of creative Darwinism (obligatory for pupils of various levels of education), in the school years 1949/50-1956/57. There were few botanists who published studies in Lysenkoism: only 55 persons did so. Among them, there were only a few botanists who could boast of significant previous scientific achievements--they included Stefan Białobok (1909-1992), Władysław Kunicki-Goldfinger (1916-1995), Edmund Malinowski (1885-1979), Konstanty Moldenhawer (1889-1962), Józef Motyka (1900-1984), Szczepan Pieniazek. A majority of the authors of publication in Lysenkoism were young scientists or people who did publish anything later on. Basing on the available bibliographies, it is possible to ascertain that there were ca. 140 Lysenkoist botanical publications (out of the total of 3410), i.e. 4.1% (fig. 1) of all the botanist publications in Poland in that period. Their number in the years 1949-1953 was higher than in the next period, and oscillated between 15 and 24 publications annually (fig. 2). The percentage of Lysenkoist studies among all publications in botany published each year was highest in 1949 (11.5%), and decreased systematically in the following years (fig. 3). Lysenkoism was a marginal phenomenon in Polish botany. Among the Lysenkoist publications, most summarized papers delivered at successive conferences, or consisted in reprints of Soviet studies. A significant group was made up of publications popularizing the principles and achievements of Lysenkoism (on the basis of Soviet publications). There were relatively studies presenting the results of research conducted in Poland on the basis of Lysenko's theory. Botanists who remember those times recollect that topics connected with Michurinian-Lysenkoist biology were avoided. It is symptomatic that not a single

  7. Botany in Edinburgh's Medical Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Hazel

    2012-01-01

    In the early 18th century, at the founding of Edinburgh University Medical School, the study of botany was regarded as an essential component of medical training. Botanical teaching began as basic instruction in the recognition of medical plants, considered a vital aspect of a physician's Materia Medica studies. Over the next hundred years growing importance was given to the study of botany as a science, its popularity peaking under John Hutton Balfour's tenure as Professor (1845-1879). The relevance of botanical study later declined in the undergraduate medical curriculum until its cessation in 1961 .This paper considers the history of botanical studies in Edinburgh, including the reasons for its introduction and its changing importance over time.

  8. Lysenko affair and Polish botany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Piotr

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the slight impact of Lysenkoism upon Polish botany. I begin with an account of the development of plant genetics in Poland, as well as the attitude of scientists and the Polish intelligentsia toward Marxist philosophy prior to the World War II. Next I provide a short history of the introduction and demise of Lysenkoism in Polish science, with a focus on events in botany, in context with key events in Polish science from 1939 to 1958. The article outlines the little effects of Lysenkoism upon botanists and their research, as well as how botanists for the most part rejected what was often termed the "new biology." My paper shows that though Lysenko's theories received political support, and were actively promoted by a small circle of scientists and Communist party activists, they were never accepted by most botanists. Once the political climate in Poland altered after the events of 1956, Lysenko's theories were immediately abandoned.

  9. Gastronomic botany and molecular gastronomy

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez-Urria Carril, Elena; Gómez Garay, Aranzazu; Ávalos García, Adolfo; Martín Calvarro, Luisa; Pintos López, Beatriz; Saco Sierra, M. Dolores; Martín Gómez, M. Soledad; Pérez Alonso, M. José; Puelles Gallo, María; Palá Paúl, Jesús; Cifuentes Cuencas, Blanca; Llamas Ramos, José Eugenio

    2011-01-01

    Complutense University of Madrid through the "Vicerrectorado de Calidad" develops projects to innovate and improve teaching quality. Among these projects is "Gastronomic Botany and Molecular Gastronomy" which aims to develop new materials and tools for the Virtual Campus and consequently offer new possibilities for teaching and training. Also this project organize and structure a new teaching matter for post-graduate education that will be an example of approach, relationship and cooper...

  10. Archives: South African Journal of Botany

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Archives: South African Journal of Botany. Journal Home > Archives: South African Journal of Botany. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives. This journal has not ...

  11. A Historical Perspective on Problems in Botany Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershey, David R.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses how the many problems in botany teaching are interrelated and most have existed since at least the early 1900s. Considers botany teaching at both the precollege and introductory college levels. Discusses botany neglect in biology teaching, botanical illiteracy, uninteresting or irrelevant botany teaching, zoochauvinism, research…

  12. South African Journal of Botany: Contact

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mailing Address. South African Journal of Botany Research Centre for Plant Growth and Development University of Natal Pietermaritzburg Private Bag X01 Scottsville 3209, South Africa Street address: Carbis Road, Scottsville, Pietermaritzburg 3201 ...

  13. Experimental Garden Plots for Botany Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorodnicheva, V. V.; Vasil'eva, E. I.

    1976-01-01

    Discussion of the botany lessons used at two schools points out the need for fifth and sixth grade students to be taught the principles of plant life through observations made at an experimental garden plot at the school. (ND)

  14. South African Journal of Botany: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The South African Association of Botanists. The association is open to all scientists interested in Plant Biology. Information on the Association, its membership directory, membership applications and meetings are available on its website: http://botany.ru.ac.za/saab/SAAB.htm ...

  15. [Application of DNA labeling technology in forensic botany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Znang, Xian; Li, Jing-Lin; Zhang, Xiang-Yu

    2008-12-01

    Forensic botany is a study of judicial plant evidence. Recently, researches on DNA labeling technology have been a mainstream of forensic botany. The article systematically reviews various types of DNA labeling techniques in forensic botany with enumerated practical cases, as well as the potential forensic application of each individual technique. The advantages of the DNA labeling technology over traditional morphological taxonomic methods are also summarized.

  16. A Comparative Study of Students' Achievement in Botany and Zoology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamir, P.

    1974-01-01

    A comparative study of student achievement in botany and zoology based on data of 10 studies conducted in 20 countries. Up to age 14, students achieve better in zoology; after age 14, students achieve better in botany. Based on the findings, recommendations are suggested regarding curriculum planning, laboratory work and the need for specific…

  17. Montessori Botany Studies: Why It Is Time for a Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coe, Elisabeth; Spears, Priscilla

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the need to change the Montessori botany nomenclature cards to reflect the progress of the field over the past 55 years. Maintains that the materials used should reflect the goals of botany study for children. Provides a sample outline of lessons and nomenclature for the flowering plants. Discusses the need to use available reference…

  18. The End of the Botany Degree in the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drea, Sinead

    2011-01-01

    The last student enrolled in a pure "Botany" degree in the UK began in the University of Bristol this year, 2010. In recent years only the University of Reading also offered the Botany degree, before it was dropped there 3 years ago. This short article is written to draw attention to this fact and to a more general relative decline in…

  19. Elements of plant physiology in theophrastus' botany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennazio, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    For thousands of years the plants were considered only as a source of food and medicine, and as ornamental objects. Only from the fifth century BC, some philosophers of Ancient Greece realized that the plants were living organisms but, unfortunately, their works have come to us as fragments that we often know from the biological works of Aristotle. This eminent philosopher and man of science, however, did not give us a complete work on the plants, which he often promised to write. From scattered fragments of his conspicuous biological work, it emerges a concept of nutritive soul that, in the presence of heat and moisture, allows plants to grow and reproduce. The task of writing a comprehensive botanical work was delegated to his first pupil, Theophrastus, who left us two treatises over time translated into the various languages up to the current versions (Enquiry into plants, On the causes of plants). The plant life is described and interpreted on the basis of highly accurate observations. The physiological part of his botany is essentially the nutrition: According to Theophrastus, plants get matter and moisture from the soil through root uptake and process the absorbed substances transforming them into food, thanks to the heat. The processing (pepsis, coction) of matter into the food represents an extraordinary physiological intuition because individual organs of a plant appear to perform its specific transformation. Despite that Theophrastus did not do scientific experiments or use special methods other than the sharpness of his observations, he can be considered the forerunner of a plant physiology that would take rebirth only after two millennia.

  20. Potential, Distribution, Ethno-Botany and Tapping Procedures of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Potential, Distribution, Ethno-Botany and Tapping Procedures of Gum Producing Acacia Species in the Somali Region, Southeastern Ethiopia. ... Therefore, promotion of gum extraction in the Somali Region both for economic benefit of the community and sustainable management of the fragile ecosystem is recommended.

  1. [Half century of botany publishing in Revista de Biologia Tropical].

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, Jorge

    2002-01-01

    Over its first half century the Revista de Biología Tropical published many papers and supplements dealing with the botany. However, the Revista is not a primary botanical journal. A wide variety of topics and geographic sources have been included, taking into consideration species from the Neotropics, but also from India and Nigeria. A complete index of botanical papers is presented.

  2. Improving Student Engagement in a Lower-Division Botany Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Nisse A.; Ingram, Kathleen W.

    2011-01-01

    Active-learning techniques have been advocated as a means to promote student engagement in lower-division biology courses. In this case study, mini-lectures in combination with active-learning activities were evaluated as strategies to promote a culture of learning and participation in a required botany course. These activities were designed to…

  3. Illustrated Plant Identification Keys: An Interactive Tool to Learn Botany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Helena; Pinho, Rosa; Lopes, Lisia; Nogueira, Antonio J. A.; Silveira, Paulo

    2011-01-01

    An Interactive Dichotomous Key (IDK) for 390 "taxa" of vascular plants from the Ria de Aveiro, available on a website, was developed to help teach botany to school and universitary students. This multimedia tool includes several links to Descriptive and Illustrated Glossaries. Questionnaires answered by high-school and undergraduate students about…

  4. Plants & Perpetrators: Forensic Investigation in the Botany Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Amy E.

    2006-01-01

    Applying botanical knowledge to a simulated forensic investigation provides inquiry-based and problem-based learning in the botany classroom. This paper details one such forensic investigation in which students use what they have learned about plant morphology and anatomy to analyze evidence and solve a murder mystery. (Contains 1 table.)

  5. Art Instruction in the Botany Lab: A Collaborative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Lyn; Crawford, Ila

    2010-01-01

    Good observations are often fundamental to good science, and drawing has long been recognized as a tool to develop students' observation skills. Yet when drawing in illustrated journals was introduced into botany laboratories in an undergraduate, teaching-focused university, students reported feeling uncomfortable and intimidated by the required…

  6. Research in the Botany Department. University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NN,

    1969-01-01

    Dr. B.C. Stone, the present Head of the Botany Unit, is continuing his investigations on Pandanaceae, which form the major research work; and on Rutaceae and Araliaceae, two other families which are his favorites. The genus Freycinetia is the nearest to completion; it is expected to have about

  7. Botany facility, phase A study. Part 1: Executive summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doll, B.; Frey, A.; Schiller, P.

    1983-10-01

    A facility for spaceborne botany experiments to be flown on the European Retrievable Carrier (EURECA) is proposed. Configuration and design, thermal control, electronics, subsystem design, add-on concepts and ground support equipment are described. The facility has 16 sample-containers at microgravity and 8 on the centrifuge. Containers are 50 x 50 x 150 mm and are observed by video and optical cine cameras. A controlled environment can be assured during 6 month operation.

  8. Botany meets archaeology: people and plants in the past.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Jo

    2013-12-01

    This paper explores the close links between botany and archaeology, using case studies from the ancient Mediterranean. It explains the kinds of palaeobotanical remains that archaeologists can recover and the methods used to analyse them. The importance of iconographic and textual evidence is also underlined. Examples of key research areas that focus on ancient plants are discussed: diet and palaeoeconomy; medicines, poisons, and psychotropics; perfumes, cosmetics, and dyes; and prestige.

  9. Acanthopanax senticosus: review of botany, chemistry and pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Linzhang; Zhao, Hongfang; Huang, Baokang; Zheng, Chengjian; Peng, Wei; Qin, Luping

    2011-02-01

    Acanthopanax senticosus (Rupr. et Maxim) Harms (Araliaceae), also called Siberian Ginseng, Eleutherococcus senticosus, and Ciwujia in Chinese, is a widely used traditional Chinese herb that could invigorate qi, strengthen the spleen, and nourish kidney in the theory of Traditional Chinese Medicine. With high medicinal value, Acanthopanax senticosus (AS, thereafter) is popularly used as an "adaptogen" like Panax ginseng. In recent decades, a great number of chemical, pharmacological, and clinical studies on AS have been carried out worldwide. Several kinds of chemical compounds have been reported, including triterpenoid saponins, lignans, coumarins, and flavones, among which, phenolic compounds such as syringin and eleutheroside E, were considered to be the most active components. Considerable pharmacological experiments both in vitro and in vivo have persuasively demonstrated that AS possessed anti-stress, antiulcer, anti-irradiation, anticancer, anti-inflammatory and hepatoprotective activities, etc. The present review is an up-to-date and comprehensive analysis of the botany, chemistry, pharmacology, toxicity and clinical trials of AS.

  10. The voice of American botanists: the founding and establishment of the American Journal of Botany, "American botany," and the Great War (1906-1935).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smocovitis, Vassiliki Betty

    2014-03-01

    This paper examines the crucial early history of the American Journal of Botany from the years following the founding of the Botanical Society of America in 1906 to the termination of the agreement for publication with the Brooklyn Botanic Garden in 1935. It examines the efforts of individuals like F. C. Newcombe, who did the most to raise support for the journal and became the first Editor-in-Chief, in the context of the growing numbers of professional botanists and plant scientists who were actively engaged in research requiring appropriate publication venues and in the process of forming an independent identity as "American botanists." It also examines the launching of the journal in the context of the Great War in Europe and the transition from German botany to American botany in the second decade of the 20th century.

  11. Ethno – Medico – Botany of Chenchus of Mahaboobnagar District, Andhra Pradesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, T. Dharmachandra; Pullaiah, T.

    1999-01-01

    The present paper deals with the ethno-medico-botany of Chenchus of Mahaboobnagar district, Andhra Pradesh. About fourty four plants are enumerated with knowledge of the tribals for their medicinal uses in curing different diseases and ailments. PMID:22556915

  12. Higher education biology students’ conceptions on botany teaching : a Brazil – Portugal case study

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, João Rodrigo Santos da; Guimarães, Fernando; Sano, Paulo Takeo

    2012-01-01

    Generally, the teaching of botany is seen as mainly based on the transmission of knowledge and on empirical-logical thinking, in a context of scientific knowledge and with the purpose of affirming truth about the world. From this perspective, both in Brazil and in Portugal botany is usually seen as a list of scientific names remote from the daily life of students, which might make classes demotivating. This project was designed with the aim of understanding the prior conceptions of higher ...

  13. Teaching of Botany in higher education: representations and discussions of undergraduate students

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, João Rodrigo Santos da; Guimarães, Fernando; Sano, Paulo Takeo

    2016-01-01

    The teaching of botany is characterised as being taught in a technical and uninteresting way for students. The objective of this work is to find out what students think of the way Botany is taught and their views on this as students and in the future as teachers. To achieve this objective an open questionnaire was given to first year undergraduate students studying Biological Sciences. Two hundred and twenty one students from four different Universities filled in the questionnaire. From the r...

  14. The plant microbiome explored: implications for experimental botany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, Gabriele; Rybakova, Daria; Grube, Martin; Köberl, Martina

    2015-11-07

    The importance of microbial root inhabitants for plant growth and health was recognized as early as 100 years ago. Recent insights reveal a close symbiotic relationship between plants and their associated microorganisms, and high structural and functional diversity within plant microbiomes. Plants provide microbial communities with specific habitats, which can be broadly categorized as the rhizosphere, phyllosphere, and endosphere. Plant-associated microbes interact with their host in essential functional contexts. They can stimulate germination and growth, help plants fend off disease, promote stress resistance, and influence plant fitness. Therefore, plants have to be considered as metaorganisms within which the associated microbes usually outnumber the cells belonging to the plant host. The structure of the plant microbiome is determined by biotic and abiotic factors but follows ecological rules. Metaorganisms are coevolved species assemblages. The metabolism and morphology of plants and their microbiota are intensively connected with each other, and the interplay of both maintains the functioning and fitness of the holobiont. Our study of the current literature shows that analysis of plant microbiome data has brought about a paradigm shift in our understanding of the diverse structure and functioning of the plant microbiome with respect to the following: (i) the high interplay of bacteria, archaea, fungi, and protists; (ii) the high specificity even at cultivar level; (iii) the vertical transmission of core microbiomes; (iv) the extraordinary function of endophytes; and (v) several unexpected functions and metabolic interactions. The plant microbiome should be recognized as an additional factor in experimental botany and breeding strategies.

  15. KEBUN RAYA BOTANI DENGAN SISTEM WTP (WATER TREATMENT PLAN DI MAKASSAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Innayah Wahid

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak—Pariwisata merupakan salah satu sumber devisa yang sangat potensial dan mempunyai andil besar dalam membangun perekonomian yang memiliki nilai jual menjadi objek yang menguntungkan bagi kemajuan Makassar. Tujuan wisata yang hanya ada di Makassar menciptakan rasa ingin tahu pengunjung untuk berkunjung.Pengunjung yang datang menginvestasikan akomodasi seluruh kegiatan wisata dengan pengusaha lokal setempat.Pengunjung domestik maupun asing juga menjadi sumber pendapatan bagi masyarakat yang tinggal di sekitar objek wisata. Laporan ini bertujuan untuk menata elemen-elemen fisik kawasan seperti tata guna lahan, bentuk dan massa bangunan, jalur pejalan kaki, sirkulasi dan parker signage atau penanda, serta fasilitas pendukung kedalam suatu kawasan kebun raya botani yang dibutuhkan untuk mencapai kenyamanan bagi para pengguna lahan dan menerapkan sistem WTP dalam bentuk desain yang bersifat berkelanjutan (sustainable.dan tujuan non arsitektural yang lain untuk merumuskan kegiatan rekayasa tumbuhan secara alami sehingga kebun raya botani dapat menjadi alternatif pusat pendidikan, mengelompokkan tanaman yang sesuai dengan iklim dan kondisi tapak kebun raya botani, untuk menentukan sistem kerja WTP dalam kebun raya botani yang dapat memenuhi kebutuhan tanaman. Hasil laporan ini berupa desain penataan kebun raya botani dengan sistem WTP (water Treatment Plan di Makassar Kata Kunci :kebun raya botani, WTP Abstract- Tourism is one potential source of foreign exchange and have a larger share in building an economy that has a sale value into an object that is beneficial to the progress of Makassar. Tourist destinations that exist only in Makassar creates curiosity of visitors to visit. Visitors who come to invest accommodation all over the local tourism activities with local entrepreneurs. Domestic and foreign visitors are also a source of income for the people who live around the attraction. This report aims to restructure the physical elements

  16. Activation Analysis in Botany and Agriculture. Survey Paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowen, H. J.M. [University of Reading, Reading, Berks. (United Kingdom)

    1967-10-15

    The applications of activation analysis to the plant sciences are reviewed. In soil science the technique has only been used by a few workers but its potentialities are good. In particular, it offers a practical method of measuring the concentrations of trace elements such as Co, Cu, Mn, Mo, Se and Zn in the soil solution, which has rarely if ever been carried out by other techniques. It can also be used to determine phosphorus in the soil solution from phosphate-deficient soils, which cannot be done by current methods. In pure botany there have been many applications, mostly concerned with the behaviour of essential trace elements. The sensitivity of the method is adequate for the analysis not only of minute seeds but of embryos, endosperm and seed coats dissected from those seeds. Important developments include the use of the (n, {alpha}) reaction to determine boron, the (p, n) reaction to determine oxygen-18 in products of photosynthesis, and the detection of minute traces of organic phosphates on chromatograms. Most papers refer to seed plants, but there has been some work on fungi and about 20 elements have been determined in algae. Some of the latter elements could not have been determined by any other technique. There have been numerous applications in agriculture, though here the sensitivity of the method for essential trace elements has not been taken advantage of as much as might have been expected. There has, however, been particular interest in the determination of selenium, mainly because of the difficulty of using conventional analysis for the levels normally found in herbage and fertilizers. The determination of toxic residues, containing such elements as As, Br, CI, Hg or Ni is another application of great potential interest. In a recent intercomparison programme involving the analysis of standard kale, activation analysis has been shown to give results agreeing with those obtained by other techniques in all but one instance. The exception is the

  17. On New Spain and Mexican medicinal botany in cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Micheli-Serra, Alfredo Alessandro; Izaguirre-Ávila, Raúl

    2014-01-01

    Towards the middle of the XVI century, the empirical physician Martín de la Cruz, in New Spain, compiled a catalogue of the local medicinal herbs and plants, which was translated into Latin by Juan Badiano, professor at the Franciscan college of Tlatelolco. On his side, Dr. Francisco Hernández, the royal physician (protomédico) from 1571 until 1577, performed a systematic study of the flora and fauna in this period. His notes and designs were not published at that time, but two epitomes of Hernández' works appeared, respectively, in 1615 in Mexico and in 1651 in Rome. During the XVIII century, two Spanish scientific expeditions arrived to these lands. They were led, respectively, by the Spanish naturalist Martín Sessé and the Italian seaman, Alessandro Malaspina di Mulazzo, dependent from the Spanish Government. These expeditions collected and carried rich scientific material to Spain. At the end of that century, the Franciscan friar Juan Navarro depicted and described several Mexican medicinal plants in the fifth volume of his botanic work. In the last years of the colonial period, the fundamental works of Humboldt and Bonpland on the geographic distribution of the American plants were published. In the modern age, the first research about the Mexican medicinal botany was performed in the laboratory of the Instituto Médico Nacional [National Medical Institute] under the leadership of Dr. Fernando Altamirano, who started pharmacological studies in this country. Later, trials of cardiovascular pharmacology were performed in the small laboratories of the cardiological unit at the General Hospital of Mexico City, on Dr. Ignacio Chávez' initiative. The Mexican botanical-pharmacological tradition persists alive and vigorous at the Instituto Nacional de Cardiología and other scientific institutions of the country.

  18. The plant microbiome explored: implications for experimental botany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Gabriele; Rybakova, Daria; Grube, Martin; Köberl, Martina

    2016-02-01

    The importance of microbial root inhabitants for plant growth and health was recognized as early as 100 years ago. Recent insights reveal a close symbiotic relationship between plants and their associated microorganisms, and high structural and functional diversity within plant microbiomes. Plants provide microbial communities with specific habitats, which can be broadly categorized as the rhizosphere, phyllosphere, and endosphere. Plant-associated microbes interact with their host in essential functional contexts. They can stimulate germination and growth, help plants fend off disease, promote stress resistance, and influence plant fitness. Therefore, plants have to be considered as metaorganisms within which the associated microbes usually outnumber the cells belonging to the plant host. The structure of the plant microbiome is determined by biotic and abiotic factors but follows ecological rules. Metaorganisms are co-evolved species assemblages. The metabolism and morphology of plants and their microbiota are intensively connected with each other, and the interplay of both maintains the functioning and fitness of the holobiont. Our study of the current literature shows that analysis of plant microbiome data has brought about a paradigm shift in our understanding of the diverse structure and functioning of the plant microbiome with respect to the following: (i) the high interplay of bacteria, archaea, fungi, and protists; (ii) the high specificity even at cultivar level; (iii) the vertical transmission of core microbiomes; (iv) the extraordinary function of endophytes; and (v) several unexpected functions and metabolic interactions. The plant microbiome should be recognized as an additional factor in experimental botany and breeding strategies. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Little Botany: A Mobile Game Utilizing Data Integration to Enhance Plant Science Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suphanut Jamonnak

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobile devices are rapidly becoming the new medium of educational and social life for young people, and hence mobile educational games have become an important mechanism for learning. To help school-aged children learn about the fascinating world of plants, we present a mobile educational game called Little Botany, where players can create their own virtual gardens in any location on earth. One unique feature of Little Botany is that the game is built upon real-world data by leveraging data integration mechanism. The gardens created in Little Botany are augmented with real-world location data and real-time weather data. More specifically, Little Botany is using real-time weather data for the garden location to simulate how the weather affects plants growth. Little Botany players can learn to select what crops to plant, maintain their own garden, watch crops to grow, tend the crops on a daily basis, and harvest them. With this game, users can also learn plant structure and three chemical reactions.

  20. Historical Contribution of Pharmaceutics to Botany and Pharmacognosy Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zunic, Lejla; Skrbo, Armin; Dobraca, Amra

    2017-12-01

    Pharmacy and medicine belong to the oldest human activities, so the development of these sciences is closely related to the socio-economic, cultural and religious opportunities of the nations within which they have been developing. To present the historical influence of pharmacy on the development of the human being from its very beginning; To present the historical link between pharmaceutical and medical activity, as well as early development of independent pharmaceutical activity; To present the historical influence of pharmacists on the development of botany and pharmacognosy and to present the historical influence of the first written herbarium and incunabula on the development of pharmacognosy. The article has a descriptive character, and represents a systematic review of the literature dealing with this topic. The roots of pharmacy started to the very beginning of human civilization, when people collected various medicinal herbs and try to alleviate their health problems, pain and suffering. The scientific foundations of the pharmacy were set up in the antique period by the books of Dioskurides and Galen, and its further development continued in the mid-century, at the beginning by rewriting famous parts of ancient literature, and later by writing new discoveries (the base of this development was represented by South Italy) so that in 1240, for the first time in history, came the separation of doctors and pharmacists, and at the beginning of the 13th century the opening of the first pharmacy. The effort to maintain knowledge of medicinal herbs and its practical application has led to the writing of a large number of recipes books, the forerunners of today's pharmacopeia, while the aspiration to classify medicinal herbs, and the desire to present medicinal herbs to ordinary people, has led to a large number of herbaria, making the knowledge and descriptions of plants available to many, not just the nobility. Descriptions of plants in herbaria and later in

  1. The History of Women in Botany and Science at the Herbarium Library: Evaluation for Historical Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicker, Sandra J.

    Evaluating library collections by comparing them to bibliographies has a long history in research libraries. This evaluative study examined all 107 titles within the "Women in Botany" section of the Herbarium Library at The Ohio State University (OSU). The Herbarium is not part of the OSU Library system, but functions as a satellite to…

  2. Effects of the Teacher's Background on Teaching and Students' Achievement in Botany and Zoology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamir, P.

    1976-01-01

    The relationship of certain teacher background variables to their attitudes priorities, expectations, and instructional practices regarding botany and zoology was investigated. Teachers were grouped into three categories: botanists, zoologists, and neutrals; the academic achievement of the students of the teachers in the three categories was…

  3. Supporting Upper-Level Undergraduate Students in Building a Systems Perspective in a Botany Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zangori, Laura; Koontz, Jason A.

    2017-01-01

    Undergraduate biology majors require biological literacy about the critical and dynamic relationships between plants and ecosystems and the effect human-made processes have on these systems. To support students in understanding systems relationships, we redesigned an undergraduate botany course using an ecological framework and embedded systems…

  4. Basic Botany On-Line: A Training Tool for the Master Gardener Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDerZanden, Ann Marie; Rost, Bob; Eckel, Rick

    2002-01-01

    A noncredit, online training module on botany was offered to participants in the Oregon Master Gardener program. The 48 participants felt the module was a useful training tool. They also noted that the convenience of completing the material at their own pace and during a time that fit into their schedule. (SK)

  5. [Herbalism, botany and components analysis study on original plants of frankincense].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lei; Xu, Jimin; Jin, Hongyu; Tian, Jingai; Lin, Ruichao

    2011-01-01

    In order to clarify original plants of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) frankincense, a GC method for determination essential oils and a HPLC method for determination boswellic acids were carried out together with analysis of herbalism, botany, components and pharmacology papers of frankincense. It was concluded that original plants of TCM frankincense include at least Boswellia sacra, B. papyrifera and B. serrata.

  6. Field Botanist for a Day: A Group Exercise for the Introductory Botany Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbatt, Natalie M.

    2004-01-01

    A group exercise, suggested to be most effective when used near the semester-end, enables entry-level students to appreciate the application of plant biology and makes botany labs experimental. It is believed that this series of labs helps students to appreciate their own learning when they teach and explain things to others.

  7. Afrikaans in Botany after 75 years of “Akademie” activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. P. van der Schijff

    1985-03-01

    Full Text Available Just like the Afrikaans language itself, the use of Afrikaans as a technical language in Botany made meaningful progress during the last 75 years. It cannot, however, be divorced from the general use of Afrikaans by the Afrikaner in his daily contact with his non-Afrikaans speaking compatriots in all other spheres of activities, such as business, sports or politics. Unless Afrikaans as a spoken language can hold its own in a growing English-speaking community and world, it will not survive as a technical scientific language in Botany. As a technical language only, no language can hold its own. The publishing of scientific papers in international journals by Afrikaans-speaking scientists cannot be attributed to selfishness or a lack of appreciation for their mother tongue. It must also be seen as a means of enhancing the scientific image of his country and of the Afrikaner.

  8. The role of forensic botany in crime scene investigation: case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquila, Isabella; Ausania, Francesco; Di Nunzio, Ciro; Serra, Arianna; Boca, Silvia; Capelli, Arnaldo; Magni, Paola; Ricci, Pietrantonio

    2014-05-01

    Management of a crime is the process of ensuring accurate and effective collection and preservation of physical evidence. Forensic botany can provide significant supporting evidences during criminal investigations. The aim of this study is to demonstrate the importance of forensic botany in the crime scene. We reported a case of a woman affected by dementia who had disappeared from nursing care and was found dead near the banks of a river that flowed under a railroad. Two possible ways of access to crime scene were identified and denominated "Path A" and "Path B." Both types of soil and plants were identified. Botanical survey was performed. Some samples of Xanthium Orientalis subsp. Italicum were identified. The fall of woman resulted in external injuries and vertebral fracture at autopsy. The botanical evidence is important when crime scene and autopsy findings are not sufficient to define the dynamics and the modality of death. © 2014 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  9. Botany teaching in Portugal and Brazil : analysis of school textbooks and their application in elementary school classes (2001- 2010)

    OpenAIRE

    Guimarães, Fernando; Santos, Fernando S.

    2009-01-01

    We have privileged the study of Botany contents in our research. Such contents derive from reorganizational approaches within the teaching of Natural Sciences at the elementary level in Portugal and Brazil. Along with the development of scientific knowledge on biological classifications and attempts to solve existing weaknesses in both countries, various governments introduced, throughout the last century, new programmatic Botany contents within the teaching of Natural Sciences at...

  10. One hundred and twenty-five years of the Annals of Botany. Part 2: the years 1937 to 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Michael B

    2016-12-01

    Annals of Botany is a peer-reviewed plant biology journal. It was started in 1887, making it the oldest continuously published plant science title. A previous article [Jackson MB. 2015. One hundred and twenty-five years of the Annals of Botany Part 1: the first 50 years (1887-1936). Annals of Botany 115: : 1-18] summarized events leading to its founding, highlighted the individuals involved and examined the Journal's achievements and management practices over the first 50 years to 1937. This second article covers the next 75 years. The account draws principally on the Journal's own records, minute books, financial accounts, original letters and notes held by the Annals of Botany Company, the Journal's owners and managers. In 1937, its 51st year, the Journal was re-launched as Annals of Botany New Series and its volume numbers were reset to No. I. The present article evaluates the evolution of the New Series up to 2012, Annals of Botany's 125th anniversary year. The period includes a 2-year run-up to World War II, six war years and their immediate aftermath, and then on through increasingly competitive times. The ebb and flow of the Journal's fortunes are set against a roll-call of the often highly distinguished scientists who managed and edited the Journal. The article also examines an internal crisis in the 1980s that radically altered the Journal's organization in ways that were, ultimately, to its benefit. The narrative is set against changes to economic conditions in Great Britain over the period, to the evolving nature and geographical distribution of much experimental plant science and to the digital revolution that, from the late 20th century, transformed the workings of Annals of Botany and of scientific publishing more generally. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. [Recent advances of amplified fragment length polymorphism and its applications in forensic botany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng-Tao; Li, Li

    2008-10-01

    Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) is a new molecular marker to detect genomic polymorphism. This new technology has advantages of high resolution, good stability, and reproducibility. Great achievements have been derived in recent years in AFLP related technologies with several AFLP expanded methodologies available. AFLP technology has been widely used in the fields of plant, animal, and microbes. It has become one of the hotspots in Forensic Botany. This review focuses on the recent advances of AFLP and its applications in forensic biology.

  12. Comparative study of the introduction of modern botany in Japan and China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Métailié, Georges

    2002-03-01

    Prior to the eighteenth-century, a similar approach towards the vegetable kingdom, mainly influenced by the tradition of the Chinese pharmacopoeias, could be observed in China and Japan. During the eighteenth-century, the interest for "Dutch learning" led some Japanese physicians and interpreters to be more and more interested in Western knowledge about medicinal plants. At the beginning of the nineteenth-century, a few scholars, through direct contact with foreigners or with foreign books, realised that there was a specific scientific field called "botany" and began to introduce the Japanese scholarly community to this new science which became one of the subjects taught at the "University of Tokyo" in 1877. In China, up to the middle of the nineteenth-century, no trace of modern botany can be found in any published document. In the second half of the century, a few botanical treatises were published, all being adaptations or translations of Western books, done by foreign-Chinese teams of translators. This situation began to change when Chinese students had the opportunity to go and study abroad, mainly to Japan, at the beginning of the twentieth-century, and, actually, it is between 20 and 30 years later that botany became a real scientific practice in China. We will analyse these two processes, their specificities and their interactions.

  13. Root (Botany)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert R. Ziemer

    1981-01-01

    Plant roots can contribute significantly to the stability of steep slopes. They can anchor through the soil mass into fractures in bedrock, can cross zones of weakness to more stable soil, and can provide interlocking long fibrous binders within a weak soil mass. In deep soil, anchoring to bedrock becomes negligible, and lateral reinforcement predominates

  14. Synthetic Botany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Christian R; Pollak, Bernardo; Purswani, Nuri; Patron, Nicola; Haseloff, Jim

    2017-07-05

    Plants are attractive platforms for synthetic biology and metabolic engineering. Plants' modular and plastic body plans, capacity for photosynthesis, extensive secondary metabolism, and agronomic systems for large-scale production make them ideal targets for genetic reprogramming. However, efforts in this area have been constrained by slow growth, long life cycles, the requirement for specialized facilities, a paucity of efficient tools for genetic manipulation, and the complexity of multicellularity. There is a need for better experimental and theoretical frameworks to understand the way genetic networks, cellular populations, and tissue-wide physical processes interact at different scales. We highlight new approaches to the DNA-based manipulation of plants and the use of advanced quantitative imaging techniques in simple plant models such as Marchantia polymorpha. These offer the prospects of improved understanding of plant dynamics and new approaches to rational engineering of plant traits. Copyright © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  15. One hundred and twenty-five years of the Annals of Botany. Part 2: the years 1937 to 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Annals of Botany is a peer-reviewed plant biology journal. It was started in 1887, making it the oldest continuously published plant science title. A previous article [Jackson MB. 2015. One hundred and twenty-five years of the Annals of Botany. Part 1: the first 50 years (1887–1936). Annals of Botany 115: 1–18] summarized events leading to its founding, highlighted the individuals involved and examined the Journal’s achievements and management practices over the first 50 years to 1937. This second article covers the next 75 years. Sources of information The account draws principally on the Journal’s own records, minute books, financial accounts, original letters and notes held by the Annals of Botany Company, the Journal’s owners and managers. Content In 1937, its 51st year, the Journal was re-launched as Annals of Botany New Series and its volume numbers were reset to No. I. The present article evaluates the evolution of the New Series up to 2012, Annals of Botany’s 125th anniversary year. The period includes a 2-year run-up to World War II, six war years and their immediate aftermath, and then on through increasingly competitive times. The ebb and flow of the Journal’s fortunes are set against a roll-call of the often highly distinguished scientists who managed and edited the Journal. The article also examines an internal crisis in the 1980s that radically altered the Journal’s organization in ways that were, ultimately, to its benefit. The narrative is set against changes to economic conditions in Great Britain over the period, to the evolving nature and geographical distribution of much experimental plant science and to the digital revolution that, from the late 20th century, transformed the workings of Annals of Botany and of scientific publishing more generally. PMID:27974325

  16. The correspondence of Thomas Dale (1700-1750): Botany in the transatlantic Republic of Letters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, William J

    2012-03-01

    This paper seeks to provide a full account of the life and career of Dr. Thomas Dale (1700-1750), with particular reference to his botanical works and correspondence. Born in Hoxton, London, Dale studied medicine at Leiden and engaged fully in the social, literary and epistolary network in which botany was practised in eighteenth-century England. In 1730, however, Dale relocated to the British colonial port of Charles Town, South Carolina. Here he continued to engage in a transatlantic network of botanical exchange and discussion, corresponding on equal and reciprocal terms with his former colleagues in England. Where Dale differs from naturalists in South Carolina before him is that his motives for pursuing botany and for corresponding with English naturalists were located firmly in the New World. Such a conclusion forms a valuable, albeit small contribution to models for the development of national scientific cultures in the imperial world. Similarly, Dale's pursuit of botanical information in South Carolina provides a small amount of material with which to illustrate currently fashionable models for the mediated exchange and circulation of scientific knowledge. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A Review of Botany and Pharmacological Effect and Chemical Composition of Echinophora Species Growing in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Zohreh; Lorigooini, Zahra; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud; Shirmardi, Hamzeh Ali; Solati, Kamal

    2017-01-01

    This review was conducted to investigate the botany, phytochemistry, and pharmacological properties of Echinophora species. The information of this review was obtained by searching for keywords Apiaceae , Echinophora , pharmacological effects, and traditional and modern medicine in scientific articles and books published in search engines Scopus, Google Scholar, Science Direct, PubMed, and Web of Science. The traditional uses of Echinophora and the existence of valuable phytochemicals in the plant have led to isolation and drug discovery of natural medicines such as antibiotic, analgesics, and anticancer drugs, and the beneficial effects of these plants can widely be used in healthcare. Echinophora species are medicinal and aromatic plants that are belong to Apiaceae family. This genus have four species in Iran. The botany, geographical distribution, traditional and pharmacological effects of Echinophora genus were described. Also, the major chemical constituents of the essential oil and extract of different species of Echinophora that have been reported. Overall, the existence of valuable phytochemicals purpose Echinophora species as novel candidate to isolation and drug discovery of natural medicines such as antibiotic, analgesics, and anticancer drugs.

  18. Platycladus orientalis leaves: a systemic review on botany, phytochemistry and pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Ming-Qiu; Shang, Jing; Ding, An-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Platycladus orientalis leaves (Cebaiye) have been used for thousands of years as traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). According to the theory of TCM, they are categorized as a blood-cooling and hematostatic herb. In clinical practice, they were usually prescribed with heat-clearing herbs to reinforce the efficacy of hemostasis. The review provides the up-to-date information from 1980 to present that is available on the botany, processing research, phytochemistry, pharmacology and toxicology of the leaves. The information is collected from scientific journals, books, theses and reports via library and electronic search (Google Scholar, Pubmed and CNKI). Through literature reports, we can find that the leaves show a wide spectrum of pharmacological activities, such as anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antimicrobial, disinsection, anticancer, diuretic, hair growth-promoting, neuroprotective and antifibrotic activities. Diterpene and flavonoids would be active constituents in P. orientalis leaves. Many studies have provided evidence for various traditional uses. However, there is a great need for additional studies to elucidate the mechanism of blood-cooling and hematostatic activity of the leaves. Therefore, the present review on the botany, traditional uses, phytochemistry and toxicity has provided preliminary information for further studies of this herb.

  19. Arabic plant names and botany in Arabic civilisation. The contribution of Peter Forsskål (1732-1763) and others

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Provencal, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    A presentation of the state of Botany in the Classical Arabic Civilisation and of some of the main contributors to our knowledge in this field, especially Peter Forsskål.......A presentation of the state of Botany in the Classical Arabic Civilisation and of some of the main contributors to our knowledge in this field, especially Peter Forsskål....

  20. Radix Bupleuri: A Review of Traditional Uses, Botany, Phytochemistry, Pharmacology, and Toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fude; Dong, Xiaoxv; Yin, Xingbin; Wang, Wenping; You, Longtai; Ni, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Radix Bupleuri (Chaihu) has been used as a traditional medicine for more than 2000 years in China, Japan, Korea, and other Asian countries. Phytochemical studies demonstrated that this plant contains essential oils, triterpenoid saponins, polyacetylenes, flavonoids, lignans, fatty acids, and sterols. Crude extracts and pure compounds isolated from Radix Bupleuri exhibited various biological activities, such as anti-inflammatory, anticancer, antipyretic, antimicrobial, antiviral, hepatoprotective, neuroprotective, and immunomodulatory effects. However, Radix Bupleuri could also lead to hepatotoxicity, particularly in high doses and with long-term use. Pharmacokinetic studies have demonstrated that the major bioactive compounds (saikosaponins a, b 2 , c, and d) were absorbed rapidly in rats after oral administration of the extract of Radix Bupleuri . This review aims to comprehensively summarize the traditional uses, botany, phytochemistry, pharmacology, toxicology, and pharmacokinetics of Radix Bupleuri reported to date with an emphasis on its biological properties and mechanisms of action.

  1. Real Time Analysis of Bioanalytes in Healthcare, Food, Zoology and Botany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tianqi; Ramnarayanan, Ashwin; Cheng, Huanyu

    2017-12-21

    The growing demand for real time analysis of bioanalytes has spurred development in the field of wearable technology to offer non-invasive data collection at a low cost. The manufacturing processes for creating these sensing systems vary significantly by the material used, the type of sensors needed and the subject of study as well. The methods predominantly involve stretchable electronic sensors to monitor targets and transmit data mainly through flexible wires or short-range wireless communication devices. Capable of conformal contact, the application of wearable technology goes beyond the healthcare to fields of food, zoology and botany. With a brief review of wearable technology and its applications to various fields, we believe this mini review would be of interest to the reader in broad fields of materials, sensor development and areas where wearable sensors can provide data that are not available elsewhere.

  2. Forensic botany: using plant evidence to aid in forensic death investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller Coyle, Heather; Lee, Cheng-Lung; Lin, Wen-Yu; Lee, Henry C; Palmbach, Timothy M

    2005-08-01

    Forensic botany is still an under-utilized resource in forensic casework, although it has been used on occasion. It is an area of specialty science that could include traditional botanical classification of species, DNA, or materials evidence (trace and transfer evidence), crime mapping or geo-sourcing, all dependent on the specific case application under consideration. Critical to the evaluation of plant evidence is careful collection, documentation, and preservation for later scientific analysis. This article reviews proper procedures and recent cases where botanical evidence played a role in establishing either manner or time of death. Plant evidence can be useful for determining if a death was due to an accident, suicide, or homicide, or what time of year burial may have taken place. In addition, plant evidence can be used to determine if a crime scene is a primary or secondary scene and to locate missing bodies.

  3. New categories for traditional medicine in the Economic Botany Data Collection Standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruca, Marta; Cámara-Leret, Rodrigo; Macía, Manuel J; Balslev, Henrik

    2014-09-11

    The Economic Botany Data Collection Standard (EBDCS) has been successfully followed by ethnobotanists investigating plant uses in many parts of the world. However, we have encountered some cases in our study of traditional medicine where the standard seems incomplete and inaccurate when it is applied to plant uses of rural or indigenous societies in developing countries. We propose two categories to be added to the EBDCS: Cultural Diseases and Disorders, and Ritual/Magical Uses. Adding these categories, we believe will give a more accurate insight into traditional medicine and will contribute to developing an integrative ethnomedicinal data collection protocol, which will make ethnomedicinal studies more comparable. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Rheum australe D. Don: a review of its botany, ethnobotany, phytochemistry and pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokaya, Maan Bahadur; Münzbergová, Zuzana; Timsina, Binu; Bhattarai, Krishna Ram

    2012-06-14

    Rheum australe D. Don (Polygonaceae) has been commonly used in traditional medicine for a wide range of ailments related to the circulatory, digestive, endocrine, respiratory and skeletal systems as well as to infectious diseases. To provide the up-to-date information that is available on the botany, traditional uses, phytochemistry, pharmacology and toxicology of Rheum australe. Additionally, to highlight the possible uses of this species to treat different diseases and to provide a basis for future research. The present review covers the literature available from 1980 to 2011. The information was collected from scientific journals, books, theses and reports via a library and electronic search (Google Scholar, Web of Science and ScienceDirect). Ethnomedical uses of Rheum australe have been recorded from China, India, Nepal and Pakistan for 57 different types of ailments. The phytochemical studies have shown the presence of many secondary metabolites belonging to anthraquinones, stilbenes, anthrones, oxantrone ethers and esters, chromones, flavonoids, carbohydrate, lignans, phenols and sterols. Crude extracts and isolated compounds from Rheum australe show a wide spectrum of pharmacological activities, such as antidiabetic, anti-inflammatory, antifungal, antimicrobial, antioxidant, anticancer, hepatoprotective and immune-enhancing activities, as well as a usefulness for improving renal function. Rheum australe has been widely used source of medicine for years without any adverse effects. Many studies have provided evidence for various traditional uses. However, there is a need for additional studies of the isolated compounds to validate the traditional uses in human models. The present review on the botany, traditional uses, phytochemistry and toxicity has provided preliminary information for further studies and commercial exploitations of the plant. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The Botanical Expedition to New Spain, 1786-1803: Mexico City's Botanical Garden and Pro­fessorship in Botany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Luis Maldonado Polo

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Thís work is about a  scientific enterprise carried out by  the Spanish Crown during the illustrated period, as a part of the ex­peditionary project to the overseas  territories. It describes the details and circumstances in which the Botanical Expedition be­gan, considering the prevailing intellectual environment at the time and the people who took a Ieading role in the cultural life of  the  incipient but  vigorous New Spain scientific community. After describing this background, the  author considers one of the Expedition's main results: the creation of  Mexico City's Botanical Garden and  Professorship in Botany,  which was the first of its kind in the American continent and contributed toes­ establish the study of Botany and related sciences in New Spain.

  6. Changing techniques in crop plant classification: molecularization at the National Institute of Agricultural Botany during the 1980s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Matthew

    2017-04-01

    Modern methods of analysing biological materials, including protein and DNA sequencing, are increasingly the objects of historical study. Yet twentieth-century taxonomic techniques have been overlooked in one of their most important contexts: agricultural botany. This paper addresses this omission by harnessing unexamined archival material from the National Institute of Agricultural Botany (NIAB), a British plant science organization. During the 1980s the NIAB carried out three overlapping research programmes in crop identification and analysis: electrophoresis, near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and machine vision systems. For each of these three programmes, contemporary economic, statutory and scientific factors behind their uptake by the NIAB are discussed. This approach reveals significant links between taxonomic practice at the NIAB and historical questions around agricultural research, intellectual property and scientific values. Such links are of further importance given that the techniques developed by researchers at the NIAB during the 1980s remain part of crop classification guidelines issued by international bodies today.

  7. Importance of the Hungarian phytosociological school established at the University of Debrecen in development of current field botany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borhidi, A; Salamon-Albert, Eva

    2010-01-01

    The paper gives a short panoramic historical survey about the main activities of the Hungarian phytosociology, their chief protagonists, the fundamental role of professor Rezső Soó in the creation and development of the phytosociological school of Debrecen established by him in the Botanical Department of the University of Debrecen, which is celebrating the 80 anniversary of its existence and has played a determinant role in the Hungarian botany.

  8. Diospyros lycioides Desf.: Review of its botany, medicinal uses, pharmacological activities and phytochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred Maroyi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Diospyros lycioides Desf. (D. lycioides is traditionally used as herbal medicine against various human and animal ailments in tropical Africa. The present paper reviewed information on botany, medicinal uses, phytochemistry and pharmacological activities of D. lycioides. This review was compiled using scientific literature from electronic search engine such as PubMed, Scopus, ScienceDirect, Springerlink, BioMed Central, Scielo, Medline and Science domain. Additional literatures were obtained from book chapters, books, dissertations, websites and other scientific publications. D. lycioides is used as traditional medicine in 50% of the countries where the species is native in tropical Africa. This study recorded 22 medicinal uses of D. lycioides which included abdominal pains, infertility in women, sexually transmitted infections, and used as chewing sticks (or mouthwash, toothbrushes and ethnoveterinary medicine. D. lycioides extracts demonstrated anti-adhesive, anti-inflammatory, antimetastatic, antioxidant, antifungal, antiproliferative, mutagenicity and antibacterial activities. Future research should focus on the pharmacological properties, phytochemistry, clinical trials and pharmacokinetics of D. lycioides which will enhance the therapeutic potential of the species.

  9. A Review of the Botany, Phytochemistry, Pharmacology and Toxicology of Rubiae Radix et Rhizoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingqiu Shan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Rubia cordifolia Linn (Rubiaceae is a climbing perennial herbal plant, which is widely distributed in China and India. Its root and rhizome, Rubiae Radix et Rhizoma (called Qiancao in China and Indian madder in India, is a well known phytomedicine used for hematemesis, epistaxis, flooding, spotting, traumatic bleeding, amenorrhea caused by obstruction, joint impediment pain, swelling and pain caused by injuries from falls. In addition, it is a kind of pigment utilized as a food additive and a dye for wool or fiber. This review mainly concentrates on studies of the botany, phytochemistry, pharmacology and toxicology of this Traditional Chinese Medicine. The phytochemical evidences indicated that over a hundred chemical components have been found and isolated from the medicine, such as anthraquinones, naphthoquinones, triterpenoids, cyclic hexapeptides and others. These components are considered responsible for the various bioactivities of the herbal drug, including anti-oxidation, anti-inflammation, immunomodulation, antitumor, effects on coagulation-fibrinolysis system, neuroprotection and other effects. Additionally, based on these existing results, we also propose some interesting future research directions. Consequently, this review should help us to more comprehensively understand and to more fully utilize the herbal medicine Rubiae Radix et Rhizoma.

  10. A Review of the Botany, Phytochemistry, Pharmacology and Toxicology of Rubiae Radix et Rhizoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Mingqiu; Yu, Sheng; Yan, Hui; Chen, Peidong; Zhang, Li; Ding, Anwei

    2016-12-20

    Rubia cordifolia Linn (Rubiaceae) is a climbing perennial herbal plant, which is widely distributed in China and India. Its root and rhizome, Rubiae Radix et Rhizoma (called Qiancao in China and Indian madder in India), is a well known phytomedicine used for hematemesis, epistaxis, flooding, spotting, traumatic bleeding, amenorrhea caused by obstruction, joint impediment pain, swelling and pain caused by injuries from falls. In addition, it is a kind of pigment utilized as a food additive and a dye for wool or fiber. This review mainly concentrates on studies of the botany, phytochemistry, pharmacology and toxicology of this Traditional Chinese Medicine. The phytochemical evidences indicated that over a hundred chemical components have been found and isolated from the medicine, such as anthraquinones, naphthoquinones, triterpenoids, cyclic hexapeptides and others. These components are considered responsible for the various bioactivities of the herbal drug, including anti-oxidation, anti-inflammation, immunomodulation, antitumor, effects on coagulation-fibrinolysis system, neuroprotection and other effects. Additionally, based on these existing results, we also propose some interesting future research directions. Consequently, this review should help us to more comprehensively understand and to more fully utilize the herbal medicine Rubiae Radix et Rhizoma.

  11. Forensic botany: species identification of botanical trace evidence using a multigene barcoding approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Gianmarco; Alù, Milena; Corradini, Beatrice; Beduschi, Giovanni

    2009-09-01

    Forensic botany can provide significant supporting evidence during criminal investigations. However, it is still an underutilized field of investigation with its most common application limited to identifying specific as well as suspected illegal plants. The ubiquitous presence of plant species can be useful in forensics, but the absence of an accurate identification system remains the major obstacle to the present inability to routinely and correctly identify trace botanical evidence. Many plant materials cannot be identified and differentiated to the species level by traditional morphological characteristics when botanical specimens are degraded and lack physical features. By taking advantage of a universal barcode system, DNA sequencing, and other biomolecular techniques used routinely in forensic investigations, two chloroplast DNA regions were evaluated for their use as "barcoding" markers for plant identification in the field of forensics. We therefore investigated the forensic use of two non-coding plastid regions, psbA-trnH and trnL-trnF, to create a multimarker system for species identification that could be useful throughout the plant kingdom. The sequences from 63 plants belonging to our local flora were submitted and registered on the GenBank database. Sequence comparison to set up the level of identification (species, genus, or family) through Blast algorithms allowed us to assess the suitability of this method. The results confirmed the effectiveness of our botanic universal multimarker assay in forensic investigations.

  12. Botany, Phytochemistry, Pharmacology and Toxicity of Strychnos nux-vomica L.: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Rixin; Wang, Ting; Zhou, Guohong; Xu, Mengying; Yu, Xiankuo; Zhang, Xiao; Sui, Feng; Li, Chun; Tang, Liying; Wang, Zhuju

    2018-01-01

    Strychnos nux-vomica L. belongs to the genus Strychnos of the family Loganiaceae and grows in Sri Lanka, India and Australia. The traditional medicinal component is its seed, called Nux vomica. This study provides a relevant and comprehensive review of S. nux-vomica L., including its botany, ethnopharmacology, phytochemistry, pharmacology and toxicology, thus providing a foundation for future studies. Up to the present day, over 84 compounds, including alkaloids, iridoid glycosides, flavonoid glycosides, triterpenoids, steroids and organic acids, among others, have been isolated and identified from S. nux-vomica. These compounds possess an array of biological activities, including effects on the nervous system, analgesic and anti-inflammatory actions, antitumor effects, inhibition of the growth of pathogenic microorganisms and regulation of immune function. Furthermore, toxicity and detoxification methods are preliminarily discussed toward the end of this review. In further research on S. nux-vomica, bioactivity-guided isolation strategies should be emphasized. Its antitumor effects should be investigated further and in vivo animal experiments should be performed alongside in vitro testing. The pharmacological activity and toxicology of strychnine [Formula: see text]-oxide and brucine [Formula: see text]-oxide should be studied to explore the detoxification mechanism associated with processing more deeply.

  13. Euclea undulata Thunb.: Review of its botany, ethnomedicinal uses, phytochemistry and biological activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroyi, Alfred

    2017-11-01

    Euclea undulata (E. undulata) is traditionally used for the treatment of body pains, chest complaints, cough, diabetes, diarrhoea, headaches, heart diseases and toothaches in southern Africa. This study was aimed at reviewing the botany, ethnopharmacology and biological activities of E. undulata in southern Africa. Results presented in this study are based on review of literature using search engines such as Science Direct, Springerlink, Scopus, PubMed, Web of Science, BioMed Central and Google Scholar. Herbal medicine is prepared from the decoctions of the roots, bark and leaves, and extracts of these plant parts have demonstrated anticholinesterase, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antimycobacterial, antiplasmodial, antioxidant and hypoglycaemic activities. Multiple classes of phytochemical compounds such alkaloids, diterpenes, fatty acids, flavonoids, glycosides, naphthoquinones, phenolics, phytosterols, reducing sugars, saponins and tannins have been isolated from the species. E. undulata has a lot of potential as herbal medicine in tropical Africa, and advanced research is required aimed at correlating its medicinal uses with the phytochemistry and pharmacological properties. Copyright © 2017 Hainan Medical University. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Illicium verum: a review on its botany, traditional use, chemistry and pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guo-Wei; Hu, Wen-Ting; Huang, Bao-Kang; Qin, Lu-Ping

    2011-06-14

    The fruit of Illicium verum Hook. f. (Chinese star anise) has long been used in traditional Chinese medicine and food industry with the actions of dispelling cold, regulating the flow of Qi and relieving pain. A bibliographic investigation was carried out by analyzing recognized books including Chinese herbal classic, and worldwide accepted scientific databases (Pubmed, SciFinder, Scopus and Web of Science) were searched for the available information on I. verum. I. verum is an aromatic evergreen tree of the family Illiciaceae. It is sometimes contaminated with highly toxic Japanese star anise (I. anisatum L.) and poisonous star anise (I. lanceolatum A. C. Smith), which contain several neurotoxic sesquiterpenes. Traditional uses of I. verum are recorded throughout Asia and Northern America, where it has been used for more than 10 types of disorders. Numerous compounds including volatiles, seco-prezizaane-type sesquiterpenes, phenylpropanoids, lignans, flavonoids and other constituents have been identified from I. verum. Modern pharmacology studies demonstrated that its crude extracts and active compounds possess wide pharmacological actions, especially in antimicrobial, antioxidant, insecticidal, analgesic, sedative and convulsive activities. In addition, it is the major source of shikimic acid, a primary ingredient in the antiflu drug (Tamiflu). This review summarizes the up-to-date and comprehensive information concerning the botany, traditional use, phytochemistry and pharmacology of I. verum together with the toxicology, and discusses the possible trend and scope for future research of I. verum. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Euphorbia neriifolia L.: Review on botany, ethnomedicinal uses, phytochemistry and biological activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mali, Prashant Y; Panchal, Shital S

    2017-05-01

    The present review is intended to provide information on botany, ethnomedicinal uses, phytochemistry and biological activities of various parts of Euphorbia neriifolia (E. neriifolia). E. neriifolia has several ethnomedicinal uses. The latex of E. neriifolia is used as laxative, purgative, rubefacient, carminative and expectorant as well as in treatment of whooping cough, gonorrhoea, leprosy, asthma, dyspepsia, jaundice, enlargement of the spleen, tumours, stone in the bladder, abdominal troubles and leucoderma. Leaves are brittle, heating, carminative, and good for improving the appetite and treatment of tumours, pains, inflammations, abdominal swellings and bronchial infections. Roots are used as symptomatic treatment of snake bite, scorpion sting and antispasmodic. Various plant parts or whole E. neriifolia extract and its isolates have been reported scientifically using various in-vivo and in-vitro experimental methods for anaesthetic, analgesic, anti-anxiety, anti-convulsant, anti-psychotic, anti-arthritis, anti-carcinogenic, antidiabetic, anti-diarrhoeal, anti-inflammatory, anti-thrombotic, antimicrobial, antioxidant, antiulcer, cytotoxic, death-receptor expression enhancing, dermal irritation, diuretic, haemolytic, immunomodulatory, radioprotective, scorpion venom and wound healing properties. It is reported to have chemical constituents like, neriifolin-S, neriifolin, neriifoliene, euphol, neriifolione, cycloartenol, nerifoliol, lectin, euphonerins A-G, 3-O-acetyl-8-O-tigloylingol, taraxerol, antiquorin, etc. Identified chemical constituents are still required to be explored for their advanced isolation techniques and biological activities. Copyright © 2017 Hainan Medical University. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The plant breeding industry after pure line theory: Lessons from the National Institute of Agricultural Botany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Dominic

    2014-06-01

    In the early twentieth century, Wilhelm Johannsen proposed his pure line theory and the genotype/phenotype distinction, work that is prized as one of the most important founding contributions to genetics and Mendelian plant breeding. Most historians have already concluded that pure line theory did not change breeding practices directly. Instead, breeding became more orderly as a consequence of pure line theory, which structured breeding programmes and eliminated external heritable influences. This incremental change then explains how and why the large multi-national seed companies that we know today were created; pure lines invited standardisation and economies of scale that the latter were designed to exploit. Rather than focus on breeding practice, this paper examines the plant varietal market itself. It focusses upon work conducted by the National Institute of Agricultural Botany (NIAB) during the interwar years, and in doing so demonstrates that, on the contrary, the pure line was actually only partially accepted by the industry. Moreover, claims that contradicted the logic of the pure line were not merely tolerated by the agricultural geneticists affiliated with NIAB, but were acknowledged and legitimised by them. The history of how and why the plant breeding industry was transformed remains to be written. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Forensic botany as a useful tool in the crime scene: Report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margiotta, Gabriele; Bacaro, Giovanni; Carnevali, Eugenia; Severini, Simona; Bacci, Mauro; Gabbrielli, Mario

    2015-08-01

    The ubiquitous presence of plant species makes forensic botany useful for many criminal cases. Particularly, bryophytes are useful for forensic investigations because many of them are clonal and largely distributed. Bryophyte shoots can easily become attached to shoes and clothes and it is possible to be found on footwear, providing links between crime scene and individuals. We report a case of suicide of a young girl happened in Siena, Tuscany, Italia. The cause of traumatic injuries could be ascribed to suicide, to homicide, or to accident. In absence of eyewitnesses who could testify the dynamics of the event, the crime scene investigation was fundamental to clarify the accident. During the scene analysis, some fragments of Tortula muralis Hedw. and Bryum capillare Hedw were found. The fragments were analyzed by a bryologists in order to compare them with the moss present on the stairs that the victim used immediately before the death. The analysis of these bryophytes found at the crime scene allowed to reconstruct the accident. Even if this evidence, of course, is circumstantial, it can be useful in forensic cases, together with the other evidences, to reconstruct the dynamics of events. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  18. A molecular identification system for grasses: a novel technology for forensic botany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, J; Peakall, R; Gilmore, S R; Robertson, J

    2005-09-10

    Our present inability to rapidly, accurately and cost-effectively identify trace botanical evidence remains the major impediment to the routine application of forensic botany. Grasses are amongst the most likely plant species encountered as forensic trace evidence and have the potential to provide links between crime scenes and individuals or other vital crime scene information. We are designing a molecular DNA-based identification system for grasses consisting of several PCR assays that, like a traditional morphological taxonomic key, provide criteria that progressively identify an unknown grass sample to a given taxonomic rank. In a prior study of DNA sequences across 20 phylogenetically representative grass species, we identified a series of potentially informative indels in the grass mitochondrial genome. In this study we designed and tested five PCR assays spanning these indels and assessed the feasibility of these assays to aid identification of unknown grass samples. We confirmed that for our control set of 20 samples, on which the design of the PCR assays was based, the five primer combinations produced the expected results. Using these PCR assays in a 'blind test', we were able to identify 25 unknown grass samples with some restrictions. Species belonging to genera represented in our control set were all correctly identified to genus with one exception. Similarly, genera belonging to tribes in the control set were correctly identified to the tribal level. Finally, for those samples for which neither the tribal or genus specific PCR assays were designed, we could confidently exclude these samples from belonging to certain tribes and genera. The results confirmed the utility of the PCR assays and the feasibility of developing a robust full-scale usable grass identification system for forensic purposes.

  19. Botany, traditional uses, phytochemistry and pharmacology of Apocynum venetum L. (Luobuma): A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wenyan; Zhang, Xiaoying; Wang, Tian; Hu, Jianjun

    2012-05-07

    Apocynum venetum L. (Apocynaceae, Luobuma ) has a long history as a Chinese traditional medicine with uses to calm the liver, soothe the nerves, dissipate heat, and promote diuresis. Recently, Luobuma tea has been commercialized as a sedative and anti-aging supplement that has become increasingly popular in North American and East Asian health food markets. The aim of this review is to provide an up-to-date and comprehensive overview of the botany, chemical constituents, traditional uses, pharmacological activities and safety aspects of Apocynum venetum in order to assess its ethnopharmacological use and to explore its therapeutic potentials and future opportunities for research. The accessible literature on Apocynum venetum written in English, Chinese and Japanese were collected and analyzed. The literatures included ancient Chinese herbal classics, pharmacopoeias and articles that included in Pubmed, Web of Science, Google Scholar and Wanfang. Modern pharmacological studies demonstrated that Apocynum venetum possess wide pharmacological activities that include antihypertensive, cardiotonic, hepatoprotective, antioxidant, lipid-lowering, antidepressant and anxiolytic effects, which can be explained by the presence of various flavonoid compounds in this plant. The traditional (Lop Nor region) use of Apocynum venetum with tobacco as an agent to detoxify nicotine may receive interest as a possible therapeutic option to detoxify the body from smoking. Based on animal studies and clinical trials, Apocynum venetum causes no severe side effects, even in a stable daily dosage (50mg/person/day) for more than three years. Apocynum venetum potentially has therapeutic potential in the prevention and treatment for the cardiovascular and neurological diseases, especially for high blood pressure, high cholesterol, neurasthenia, depression and anxiety. Further investigations are needed to explore individual bioactive compounds responsible for these in vitro and in vivo

  20. CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE HISTORY OF BOTANY AND EXPLORATION IN MALAYSIA—7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. C. D. DE WIT

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Barchewitz reached the islet of Leti, in the southwestern Moluccas, on September 2, 1714; he returned to Europe in September 1720, having represented the East India Company on Leti for six years. Like so many of his contemporaries he wrote a book on his life's adventures. This work appeared in 1730 and proved a success. A second, slightly enlarged, edition followed in 1751, entitled "Neu-vermehrte Ost-Indianische Reise- Beschreibung." Barchewitz is the earliest author on the natural history of Leti and -he paid attention to a number of plants. The present note is mainly a survey of the botany contained in his book. Ernst Christoph Barchewitz was born at the close of the 17th century at Grosz-Sommerda near Erfurt. He was bound apprentice to a tawer at Erfurt but soon preferred to travel ("Wanderschaft" with his brother to Holland. He visited the larger towns, learned at the Hague the art of dressing and the barber's craft, and became the valet de chambre of the Imperial Ambassador, Baron von Heems, whom he accompanied to Austria and the southern Netherlands. He ended his service at Delft Where he enlisted with the East India Company. As a soldier he embarked at Hellevoetsluis on the "Voorburg," sailing April 1, 1711. The treatment on board he judged to be fair; his only objection was that he had to drink water whereas wine would have seemed very suitable. After a stay at Batavia (December 20, 1711 till January 29, 1712, he was garrisoned on Banda, where he remained till August 15, 1714. He left when he was appointed Corporal of Leti. The following pertains to the second edition of Barchewitz's book, the pages referred to are cited between brackets. All quotations have been translated.

  1. One hundred and twenty-five years of the Annals of Botany. Part 1: the first 50 years (1887-1936).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Michael B

    2015-01-01

    The Annals of Botany is a peer-reviewed scientific journal publishing papers on a wide range of topics in plant biology. It first appeared in 1887, making it the oldest continuously published botanical title. The present article gives a historical account of events leading to the founding of the Journal and of its development over the first 50 years. Much of the content is drawn from the Journal's own records and from extensive Minutes, financial accounts, personal letters and notes relating to the Annals of Botany that were repatriated from University College, University of London in 1999. Documents held at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew and at the Oxford University Press Museum were also consulted. Emphasis is placed on the individuals who instigated, edited and managed the Annals of Botany up to 1937, especially the nine founding members of the Journal and the background that brought them together and motivated them to start the Annals of Botany. A falling out between two of the founders in 1899 is highlighted since not only did this threaten the Journal's future but also gives much insight into the personalities of those most closely involved in the Journal during its formative years. The article also examines the way the Journal was funded and how it dealt with its publisher (the University of Oxford's Clarendon Press), turned itself into a registered company (the Annals of Botany Company) and coped with the travails of the First World War, currency inflation and the Great Depression. Plans to re-start the Journal as a New Series, beginning in 1937, are discussed in the context of the competition the Annals of Botany then faced from younger journals. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Forensic botany II, DNA barcode for land plants: Which markers after the international agreement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, G; Corradini, B; Ferrari, F; Santunione, A L; Palazzoli, F; Alu', M

    2015-03-01

    forensic botany. Based on obtained results, we recommend the adoption of a two-locus combination with rbcL+trnH-psbA plastid markers, which currently best satisfies forensic needs for botanical species identification. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Citri Reticulatae Pericarpium (Chenpi): Botany, ethnopharmacology, phytochemistry, and pharmacology of a frequently used traditional Chinese medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xin; Sun, Shuang; Guo, Yuyan; Liu, Yan; Yang, Dayu; Li, Guoyu; Lü, Shaowa

    2018-06-28

    Citri Reticulatae Pericarpium (Rutaceae, CRP), commonly called as Chenpi () in Chinese, is most frequently used as a qi-regulating drug in thousands of Chinese medicine prescriptions. CRP is found mainly in major citrus-producing areas such as the Guangdong, Guangxi, Sichuan, Fujian, and Zhejiang Provinces of China. Since thousands of years in China, CRP has been used widely in clinical practice to treat nausea, vomiting, indigestion, anepithymia, diarrhea, cough, expectoration, and so on. Currently, CRP is listed in the Pharmacopoeia of the People's Republic of China. The present paper reviews the botany, ethnopharmacology, phytochemistry, pharmacology, quality control, and toxicology of CRP. Information on CRP was gathered from various sources including the books on traditional Chinese herbal medicine; scientific databases including Elsevier, PubMed, and ScienceDirect; Baidu Scholar; CNKI; and others and from different professional websites. Approximately 140 chemical compounds have been isolated and identified from CRP. Among them, volatile oils and flavonoids are generally considered as the main bioactive and characteristic ingredients. CRP possesses wide pharmacological effects such as having a beneficial effect on the cardiovascular, digestive, and respiratory systems, antitumor, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory properties; and a protective effect on the liver and nerve. Moreover, hesperidin is chosen as an indicator in the quantitative determination of CRP, and the quantity of aflatoxin in CRP must not exceed the standard limit mentioned in the pharmacopoeia. In brief, CRP has a warming nature, and hence, it can be used in harmony with a lot of medicines. CRP not only exhibits its effects individually but also aids other medicines exhibit a better effect. CRP can be consumed with tea, food, alcohol, and medicine. Irrespective of the form it is being consumed, CRP not only shows a synergistic effect but also has strengths on its own. Modern pharmacological

  4. Traditional usages, botany, phytochemistry, pharmacology and toxicology of Polygonum multiflorum Thunb.: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Longfei; Ni, Boran; Lin, Hongmei; Zhang, Miao; Li, Xuechun; Yin, Xingbin; Qu, Changhai; Ni, Jian

    2015-01-15

    Polygonum multiflorum Thunb., which is known as Heshouwu ( in Chinese) in China. It is traditionally valued and reported for hair-blacking, liver and kidney-tonifying and anti-aging effects as well as low toxicity. The aim of this review is to provide comprehensive information on the botany, traditional uses, phytochemistry, pharmacological research and toxicology of Polygonum multiflorum, based on the scientific literature. Moreover, trends and perspectives for future investigation of this plant are discussed. It will build up a new foundation for further study on Polygonum multiflorum. A systematic review of the literature on Polygonum multiflorum was performed using several resources, including classic books on Chinese herbal medicine and various scientific databases, such as PubMed, SciFinder, the Web of Science, Science Direct, China Knowledge Resource Integrated (CNKI). Polygonum multiflorum is widely distributed throughout the world and has been used as a traditional medicine for centuries in China. The ethnomedical uses of Polygonum multiflorum have been recorded in many provinces of China and Japan for nine species of adulterants in six families. More than 100 chemical compounds have been isolated from this plant, and the major components have been determined to be stilbenes, quinones, flavonoids and others. Crude extracts and pure compounds of this plant are used as effective agents in pre-clinical and clinical practice due to their anti-aging, anti-hyperlipidaemia, anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory effects and to promote immunomodulation, neuroprotection, and the curing of other diseases. However, these extracts can also lead to hepatotoxicity, nephrotoxicity and embryonic toxicity. Pharmacokinetic studies have demonstrated that the main components of Polygonum multiflorum, such as 2,3,5,4'-tetrahydroxystilbene-2-O-β-d-glucopyranoside and emodin are distributed among many organs and tissues. Therapeutic potential of Polygonum multiflorum has been

  5. Economic botany collections: A source of material evidence for exploring historical changes in Chinese medicinal materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Eric; Leon, Christine; Nesbitt, Mark; Guo, Ping; Huang, Ran; Chen, Hubiao; Liang, Li; Zhao, Zhongzhen

    2017-03-22

    Many Chinese medicinal materials (CMMs) have changed over centuries of use, particularly in terms of their botanical identity and processing methods. In some cases, these changes have important implications for safety and efficacy in modern clinical practice. As most previous research has focused on clarifying the evolution of CMMs by analyzing traditional Chinese materia medica ("bencao") literature, assessments of historical collections are needed to validate these conclusions with material evidence. Historical collections of Chinese medicines reveal the market materials in circulation at a given moment in time, and represent an underexploited resource for analyzing the evolution of Chinese herbal medicines. This study compares specimens from a rare collection of CMMs from the 1920s with contemporary market materials; by highlighting examples of changes in botanical identity and processing that remain relevant for safe clinical practice in the modern era, this work aims to stimulate further research into previously unexplored historical collections of Chinese medicines. 620 specimens of CMMs that were collected from Chinese pharmacies in the Malay peninsula in the 1920s were examined macroscopically and compared with current pharmacopoeia specifications and authentic contemporary samples. These historical specimens, which are stored in the UK in the Economic Botany Collections (EBC) of Royal Botanic Gardens Kew, were morphologically examined, photographed, and compared to authentic CMMs stored at the Bank of China (Hong Kong) Chinese Medicines Center at Hong Kong Baptist University, as well as authentic herbarium-vouchered specimens from the Leon Collection (LC) at the Kew EBC. Case studies were selected to illustrate examples of historical changes in botanical identity, used plant parts, and processing methods. This investigation confirmed that confusion due to shared common names and regional variations in the botanical identity of certain CMMs has been a

  6. Areca catechu L. (Arecaceae): a review of its traditional uses, botany, phytochemistry, pharmacology and toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Wei; Liu, Yu-Jie; Wu, Na; Sun, Tao; He, Xiao-Yan; Gao, Yong-Xiang; Wu, Chun-Jie

    2015-04-22

    Areca catechu L. (Arecaceae), widely distributed in South and Southeast Asia, is a popular traditional herbal medicine that can be chewed for the purpose of dispersing accumulated fluid in the abdominal cavity and killing worms. The present paper aims to provide an up-to-date review on the traditional uses and advances in the botany, phytochemistry, pharmacology and toxicology of this plant. Furthermore, the possible trends and a perspective for future research of this plant are also discussed. A literature search was performed on A. catechu based on classic books of herbal medicine, PhD. and MSc. dissertations, government reports, the state and local drug standards, scientific databases including Pubmed, SciFinder, Scopus, the Web of Science, Google Scholar, and others. Various types of information regarding this plant are discussed in corresponding parts of this paper. In addition, perspectives for possible future studies of A. catechu are discussed. The seeds of A. catechu (areca nut) have been widely used in clinical practice in China, India and other South and Southeast Asian Countries. Currently, over 59 compounds have been isolated and identified from A. catechu, including alkaloids, tannins, flavones, triterpenes, steroids, and fatty acids. The extracts and compounds isolated from A. catechu have many pharmacological activities. These include antiparasitic effects, anti-depressive effects, anti-fatigue effects, antioxidant effects, antibacterial and antifungal effects, antihypertensive effects, anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects, anti-allergic effects, the promotion of digestive functions, suppression of platelet aggregation, regulatory effects on blood glucose and lipids, etc. Although arecoline is the primary active constituent of A. catechu, it is also the primary toxic compound. The main toxicities of arecoline are the promotion of oral submucosal fibrosis (OSF) and cytotoxic effects on normal human cells, which involve inducing apoptosis. As an

  7. Botany, phytochemistry, pharmacology, and potential application of Polygonum cuspidatum Sieb.et Zucc.: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Wei; Qin, Rongxin; Li, Xiaoli; Zhou, Hong

    2013-07-30

    Polygonum cuspidatum Sieb. et Zucc. (Polygonum cuspidatum), also known as Reynoutria japonica Houtt and Huzhang in China, is a traditional and popular Chinese medicinal herb. Polygonum cuspidatum with a wide spectrum of pharmacological effects has been used for treatment of inflammation, favus, jaundice, scald, and hyperlipemia, etc. The present paper reviews the traditional applications as well as advances in botany, phytochemistry, pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics and toxicology of this plant. Finally, the tendency and perspective for future investigation of this plant are discussed, too. A systematic review of literature about Polygonum cuspidatum is carried out using resources including classic books about Chinese herbal medicine, and scientific databases including Pubmed, SciFinder, Scopus, the Web of Science and others. Polygonum cuspidatum is widely distributed in the world and has been used as a traditional medicine for a long history in China. Over 67 compounds including quinones, stilbenes, flavonoids, counmarins and ligans have been isolated and identified from this plant. The root of this plant is used as the effective agent in pre-clinical and clinical practice for regulating lipids, anti-endotoxic shock, anti-infection and anti-inflammation, anti-cancer and other diseases in China and Japan. As an important traditional Chinese medicine, Polygonum cuspidatum has been used for treatment of hyperlipemia, inflammation, infection and cancer, etc. Because there is no enough systemic data about the chemical constituents and their pharmacological effects or toxicities, it is important to investigate the pharmacological effects and molecular mechanisms of this plant based on modern realization of diseases' pathophysiology. Drug target-guided and bioactivity-guided isolation and purification of the chemical constituents from this plant and subsequent evaluation of their pharmacologic effects will promote the development of new drug and make sure which

  8. One hundred and twenty-five years of the Annals of Botany. Part 1: the first 50 years (1887–1936)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    Background The Annals of Botany is a peer-reviewed scientific journal publishing papers on a wide range of topics in plant biology. It first appeared in 1887, making it the oldest continuously published botanical title. The present article gives a historical account of events leading to the founding of the Journal and of its development over the first 50 years. Sources of Information Much of the content is drawn from the Journal’s own records and from extensive Minutes, financial accounts, personal letters and notes relating to the Annals of Botany that were repatriated from University College, University of London in 1999. Documents held at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew and at the Oxford University Press Museum were also consulted. Content Emphasis is placed on the individuals who instigated, edited and managed the Annals of Botany up to 1937, especially the nine founding members of the Journal and the background that brought them together and motivated them to start the Annals of Botany. A falling out between two of the founders in 1899 is highlighted since not only did this threaten the Journal’s future but also gives much insight into the personalities of those most closely involved in the Journal during its formative years. The article also examines the way the Journal was funded and how it dealt with its publisher (the University of Oxford’s Clarendon Press), turned itself into a registered company (the Annals of Botany Company) and coped with the travails of the First World War, currency inflation and the Great Depression. Plans to re-start the Journal as a New Series, beginning in 1937, are discussed in the context of the competition the Annals of Botany then faced from younger journals. PMID:25561090

  9. Differences between epiphytic assemblages on introduced Caulerpa taxifolia and coexisting eelgrass (Zostera capricorni in Botany Bay (NSW, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Prado

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A preliminary study was conducted to assess the potential effects of introduced Caulerpa taxifolia (Caulerpales, Chlorophyta on the biodiversity and trophic functioning of seagrass systems in New South Wales, Australia. Epiphytic assemblages growing on fronds of C. taxifolia were compared to those on eelgrass Zostera capricorni (Aschers. leaves in zones where both species were coexisting. The study was conducted at three shallow sites (ca. 1 m depth in Botany Bay during austral spring. Assemblages on both C. taxifolia and Z. capricorni were dominated by epiphytic algae (ca. 65% of the total taxa but results showed significantly greater numbers on C. taxifolia compared to Z. capricorni as well as important differences among study sites. n-MDS ordinations and PERMANOVA analyses confirmed the existence of significant differences in the assemblage compositions of C. taxifolia and Z. capricorni as well as differences between times and sites. SIMPER analysis showed that animal composition made a higher contribution to dissimilarities between habitats compared to epiphytic algae (36% vs. 23% respectively. In particular, filter-feeding organisms, associated with surfaces such as ascidians (5 taxa and bryozoans (2 taxa emerged as important contributing taxa. Hence, our results suggest that introduced C. taxifolia from Botany Bay is a suitable substratum for settlement of epiphytes, at least during the study period, and that observed patterns are due to differences in habitat structure. Further research is necessary to determine the influence of seasonal processes, such as production of toxic secondary metabolites, in other invaded locations of New South Wales.

  10. Malthus and the Philanthropists, 1764–1859: The Cultural Circulation of Political Economy, Botany, and Natural Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Marc MacDonald

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Modernity does not possess a monopoly on mass incarceration, population fears, forced migration, famine, or climatic change. Indeed, contemporary and early modern concerns over these matters have extended interests in Thomas Malthus. Yet, despite extensive research on population issues, little work explicates the genesis of population knowledge production or how the process of intellectual transfer occurred during the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. This paper examines the Delessert network’s instrumental role in cultivating, curating, and circulating knowledge that popularized Malthusian population theory, including the theory’s constitutive elements of political economy, philanthropy, industry, agriculture, and botany. I show how deviant, nonconformist groups suffered forced migration for their political philosophy, particularly during the revolutionary 1790s, resulting in their imprisonment and migration to America. A consequence of these social shifts was the diffusion and dissemination of population theory—as a pursuit of scientific knowledge and exploration—across both sides of the Atlantic. By focusing on the Delesserts and their social network, I find that a byproduct of inter and intra continental migration among European elites was a knowledge exchange that stimulated Malthus’s thesis on population and Genevan Augustin Pyramus Candolle’s research on botany, ultimately culminating in Charles Darwin’s theory of natural selection and human evolution.

  11. Saussurea involucrata: A review of the botany, phytochemistry and ethnopharmacology of a rare traditional herbal medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chik, Wai-I; Zhu, Lin; Fan, Lan-Lan; Yi, Tao; Zhu, Guo-Yuan; Gou, Xiao-Jun; Tang, Yi-Na; Xu, Jun; Yeung, Wing-Ping; Zhao, Zhong-Zhen; Yu, Zhi-Ling; Chen, Hu-Biao

    2015-08-22

    Saussurea involucrata Matsum. & Koidz. is an endangered species of the Asteraceae family, growing in the high mountains of central Asia. It has been, and is, widely used in traditional Uyghur, Mongolian and Kazakhstan medicine as well as in Traditional Chinese Medicine as Tianshan Snow Lotus (Chinese: ). In traditional medical theory, S. involucrata can promote blood circulation, thereby alleviating all symptoms associated with poor circulation. It also reputedly eliminates cold and dampness from the body, diminishes inflammation, invigorates, and strengthens Yin and Yang. It has long been used to treat rheumatoid arthritis, cough with cold, stomach ache, dysmenorrhea, and altitude sickness in Uyghur and Chinese medicine. To comprehensively summarize the miscellaneous research that has been done regarding the botany, ethnopharmacology, phytochemistry, biological activity, and toxicology of S. involucrata. An extensive review of the literature was carried out. Apart from different electronic databases including SciFinder, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), ScienceDirect that were sourced for information, abstracts, full-text articles and books written in English and Chinese, including those traditional records tracing back to the Qing Dynasty. Pharmacopoeia of China and other local herbal records in Uighur, Mongolian and Kazakhstan ethnomedicines were investigated and compared for pertinent information. The phytochemistry of S. involucrata has been comprehensively investigated. More than 70 compounds have been isolated and identified; they include phenylpropanoids, flavonoids, coumarins, lignans, sesquiterpenes, steroids, ceramides, polysaccharides. Scientific studies on the biological activity of S. involucrata are equally numerous. The herb has been shown to have anti-neoplastic, anti-inflammatory, analgesic, anti-oxidative, anti-fatigue, anti-aging, anti-hypoxic, neuroprotective and immunomodulating effects. Many have shown correlations to the

  12. Botany on a plate. Pleasure and the power of pictures in promoting early nineteenth-century scientific knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secord, Anne

    2002-03-01

    In early nineteenth-century Britain the use of pictures in introducing novices to the study of science was contentious, leading to debates over the ways in which words and images constituted knowledge and over the role of pleasure in intellectual pursuits. While recent studies have stressed visual representation as a critical element of science and considered its relation to the written word in conveying information, this essay explores the nineteenth-century preoccupation with the mind and mental faculties in relation to corporeal responses to explain concerns over the role of images and the process of recognition. By considering illustration in this way, it argues that popular botany was defined by many expert naturalists as the means by which private individuals could best be encouraged to extend their aesthetic appreciation and love of plants to an active and participatory pursuit of science.

  13. The Role of Forensic Botany in Solving a Case: Scientific Evidence on the Falsification of a Crime Scene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquila, Isabella; Gratteri, Santo; Sacco, Matteo A; Ricci, Pietrantonio

    2018-05-01

    Forensic botany can provide useful information for pathologists, particularly on crime scene investigation. We report the case of a man who arrived at the hospital and died shortly afterward. The body showed widespread electrical lesions. The statements of his brother and wife about the incident aroused a large amount of suspicion in the investigators. A crime scene investigation was carried out, along with a botanical morphological survey on small vegetations found on the corpse. An autopsy was also performed. Botanical analysis showed some samples of Xanthium spinosum, thus leading to the discovery of the falsification of the crime scene although the location of the true crime scene remained a mystery. The botanical analysis, along with circumstantial data and autopsy findings, led to the discovery of the real crime scene and became crucial as part of the legal evidence regarding the falsity of the statements made to investigators. © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  14. A question of merit: John Hutton Balfour, Joseph Hooker and the 'concussion' over the Edinburgh chair of botany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellon, Richard

    2005-03-01

    In 1845, Robert Graham's death created a vacancy for the traditionally dual appointment to the University of Edinburgh's chair of botany and the Regius Keepership of the Edinburgh Royal Botanic Garden. John Hutton Balfour and Joseph Hooker emerged as the leading candidates. The contest quickly became embroiled in long running controversies over the nature and control of Scottish university education at a time of particular social and political tension after a recent schism in Church of Scotland. The politics of the appointment were complicated by the fact that the Edinburgh Town Council (which preferred Balfour) chose the chair while the keepership was under the patronage of the Westminster government (which preferred Hooker). Balfour eventually emerged triumphant after a bitter campaign marked on all sides by intense politicking. The struggle to replace Graham provides a case study in how Victorian men of science adapted their aspirations to the practical realities of life in industrial, reforming, imperial, multinational Britain.

  15. Traditional uses, botany, phytochemistry, pharmacology and toxicology of Panax notoginseng (Burk.) F.H. Chen: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting; Guo, Rixin; Zhou, Guohong; Zhou, Xidan; Kou, Zhenzhen; Sui, Feng; Li, Chun; Tang, Liying; Wang, Zhuju

    2016-07-21

    Panax notoginseng (Burk.) F.H. Chen is a widely used traditional Chinese medicine known as Sanqi or Tianqi in China. This plant, which is distributed primarily in the southwest of China, has wide-ranging pharmacological effects and can be used to treat cardiovascular diseases, pain, inflammation and trauma as well as internal and external bleeding due to injury. This paper provides up-to-date information on investigations of this plant, including its botany, ethnopharmacology, phytochemistry, pharmacology and toxicology. The possible uses and perspectives for future investigation of this plant are also discussed. The relevant information on Panax notoginseng (Burk.) F.H. Chen was collected from numerous resources, including classic books about Chinese herbal medicine, and scientific databases, including Pubmed, SciFinder, ACS, Ebsco, Elsevier, Taylor, Wiley and CNKI. More than 200 chemical compounds have been isolated from Panax notoginseng (Burk.) F.H. Chen, including saponins, flavonoids and cyclopeptides. The plant has pharmacological effects on the cardiovascular system, immune system as well as anti-inflammatory, anti-atherosclerotic, haemostatic and anti-tumour activities, etc. Panax notoginseng is a valuable traditional Chinese medical herb with multiple pharmacological effects. This review summarizes the botany, ethnopharmacology, phytochemistry, pharmacology and toxicology of P. notoginseng, and presents the constituents and their corresponding chemical structures found in P. notoginseng comprehensively for the first time. Future research into its phytochemistry of bio-active components should be performed by using bioactivity-guided isolation strategies. Further work on elucidation of the structure-function relationship among saponins, understanding of multi-target network pharmacology of P. notoginseng, as well as developing its new clinical usage and comprehensive utilize will enhance the therapeutic potentials of P. notoginseng. Copyright © 2016

  16. Filadelfia y la botánica en Norteamérica Philadelphia and the Botany in North America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Freire-Fierro

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available El establecimiento y el desarrollo de la investigación botánica en Norteamérica se inician con la fundación de tres instituciones de Filadelfia, la American Philosophical Society en 1743, el Departamento de Botánica de la Universidad de Pennsylvania en 1768 y la Academia de Ciencias Naturales (PH en 1812. Algunos de los botánicos más influyentes durante los últimos cuatro siglos y en particular durante los siglos XVIII y XIX, vivieron en Filadelfia, entre ellos William Bartram (1699-1777, fundador del primer jardín botánico de Norteamérica, Benjamin Smith Barton (1766-1815, escritor del primer libro de texto de botánica en Estados Unidos y posiblemente en toda América, Federico Pursh (1774-1820, autor de una de las floras norteamericanas más completas del siglo XIX, Thomas Nuttall (1786-1859, autor de la primera flora norteamericana a nivel continental y Lewis David von Schweinitz (1780-1834, ampliamente reconocido como el padre de la micología norteamericana. Aunque la botánica alcanzó su cenit en Filadelfia durante el siglo XIX, continúa hoy contribuyendo al desarrollo de la botánica, gracias al aporte de muchas instituciones. El Herbario PH con sus más de 1,4 millones de especímenes y con la proporción más alta de tipos/totalidad de especímenes de todos los herbarios en los Estados Unidos, continúa siendo una fuente importante para estudios sistemáticos, no solo de taxones norteamericanos, sino también de otras regiones del mundo.The establishment and development of botanical research in North America began with the foundation of three Philadelphian institutions: The American Philosophical Society in 1743, the Botany Department at University of Pennsylvania in 1768 and the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia in 1812. Some of the most influential botanists of the last four centuries, and in particular, the 18th and 19th centuries lived in Philadelphia, including William Bartram (1699-1777, founder of the

  17. Temperature profile and other data collected from XBT casts in South Pacific Ocean from BOTANY BAY and other platforms from 24 January 1991 to 20 November 1991 (NODC Accession 9400208)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and other data were collected using XBT casts from BOTANY BAY and other platforms in South Pacific Ocean. Data were collected from 24 January...

  18. Bryophytes as Teaching Materials on the Textbook of Botany (The Latter Term of Meiji to the Beginning of Showa) and Suggestions for Development of New Teaching Material

    OpenAIRE

    Sato, Takayuki; Muko, Heiwa; Ohshika, Kiyoyuki

    2007-01-01

    Bryophytes have some characteristics as teaching material, but it is very difficult to use them in secondary education. Nevertheless, from the latter term of Meiji to the beginning of Showa, there are many teaching materials for natural history.Therefore, we analyzed teaching materials on the textbook of botany that was published at the period, take suggestions for newly development of teaching material. We analyzed composition of textbooks and species of Bryophytes, and compared them to a ma...

  19. Zanthoxylum bungeanum Maxim. (Rutaceae: A Systematic Review of Its Traditional Uses, Botany, Phytochemistry, Pharmacology, Pharmacokinetics, and Toxicology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengmeng Zhang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Zanthoxylum bungeanum Maxim. (Rutaceae is a popular food additive and traditional Chinese herbal medicine commonly named HuaJiao in China. This plant is widely distributed in Asian countries. The aim of this paper is to provide a systematic review on the traditional usages, botany, phytochemistry, pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, and toxicology of this plant. Furthermore, the possible development and perspectives for future research on this plant are also discussed. To date, over 140 compounds have been isolated and identified from Z. bungeanum, including alkaloids, terpenoids, flavonoids, and free fatty acids. The extracts and compounds have been shown to possess wide-ranging biological activity, such as anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects, antioxidant and anti-tumor effects, antibacterial and antifungal effects, as well as regulatory effects on the gastrointestinal system and nervous system, and other effects. As a traditional herbal medicine, Z. bungeanum has been widely used to treat many diseases, especially digestive disorders, toothache, stomach ache, and diarrhea. Many traditional usages of this plant have been validated by present investigations. However, further research elucidating the structure-function relationship among chemical compounds, understanding the mechanism of unique sensation, as well as exploring new clinical effects and establishing criteria for quality control for Z. bungeanum should be further studied.

  20. Zanthoxylum bungeanum Maxim. (Rutaceae): A Systematic Review of Its Traditional Uses, Botany, Phytochemistry, Pharmacology, Pharmacokinetics, and Toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mengmeng; Wang, Jiaolong; Zhu, Lei; Li, Tao; Jiang, Weidong; Zhou, Juan; Peng, Wei; Wu, Chunjie

    2017-10-18

    Zanthoxylum bungeanum Maxim. (Rutaceae) is a popular food additive and traditional Chinese herbal medicine commonly named HuaJiao in China. This plant is widely distributed in Asian countries. The aim of this paper is to provide a systematic review on the traditional usages, botany, phytochemistry, pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, and toxicology of this plant. Furthermore, the possible development and perspectives for future research on this plant are also discussed. To date, over 140 compounds have been isolated and identified from Z. bungeanum , including alkaloids, terpenoids, flavonoids, and free fatty acids. The extracts and compounds have been shown to possess wide-ranging biological activity, such as anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects, antioxidant and anti-tumor effects, antibacterial and antifungal effects, as well as regulatory effects on the gastrointestinal system and nervous system, and other effects. As a traditional herbal medicine, Z. bungeanum has been widely used to treat many diseases, especially digestive disorders, toothache, stomach ache, and diarrhea. Many traditional usages of this plant have been validated by present investigations. However, further research elucidating the structure-function relationship among chemical compounds, understanding the mechanism of unique sensation, as well as exploring new clinical effects and establishing criteria for quality control for Z. bungeanum should be further studied.

  1. Dinoflagellate cyst abundance is positively correlated to sediment organic carbon in Sydney Harbour and Botany Bay, NSW, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Chang; Doblin, Martina A; Dafforn, Katherine A; Johnston, Emma L; Pei, Haiyan; Hu, Wenrong

    2018-02-01

    There is growing public concern about the global expansion of harmful algal bloom species (HABs), with dinoflagellate microalgae comprising the major portion of the harmful taxa. These motile, unicellular organisms have a lifecycle involving sexual reproduction and resting cyst formation whereby cysts can germinate from sediments and 'seed' planktonic populations. Thus, investigation of dinoflagellate cyst (dinocyst) distribution in sediments can provide significant insights into HAB dynamics and contribute to indices of habitat quality. Species composition and abundance of dinocysts in relation to sediment characteristics were studied at 18 stations in two densely populated temperate Australian estuaries, Sydney Harbour (Parramatta River/Port Jackson; PS) and Botany Bay (including Georges River; GB). Eighteen dinocyst taxa were identified, dominated by Protoceratium reticulatum and Gonyaulax sp.1 in the PS estuary, together with Archaeperidinium minutum and Gonyaulax sp.1 in the GB estuary. Cysts of Alexandrium catenella, which is one of the causative species of paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP), were also detected in both estuaries. Out of the measured sediment characteristics (TOC, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Pb, Mn, Ni, Zn and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons), TOC was the parameter explaining most of the variation in dinocyst assemblages and was positively correlated to most of the heavy metals. Given the significant relationship between sediment TOC and dinocyst abundance and heavy metal concentrations, this study suggests that sediment TOC could be broadly used in risk management for potential development of algal blooms and sediment contamination in these estuaries.

  2. Botany in children's literature: A content analysis of plant-centered children's picture books that have a plot and characters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goins, Sheila Lewis

    This content analysis study examined 36 plant-centered children's science picture books that have a plot and characters published from 1950 to present. Botanical subject matter and learning opportunities offered by these books were analyzed, along with the range and frequency of the National Science Education Standards-consistent and age-appropriate plant science concepts and principles. The science graphics, artistic innovations, and story plot of these books were also examined. Rubrics and research-based recommendations were developed to offer parents, teachers, and librarians assistance in identifying, evaluating, and using such books to help children of ages 4--8 learn about plants and enjoy plant science. This genre of children's literature was identified and selected primarily through extensive research at four major, nationally recognized children's literature collections: The Kerlan Collection, The de Grummond Collection, The Center for Children's Books, and The Central Children's Room at the Donnell Library. This study determined that there was a substantial increase in the number of books written in this genre of children's literature from 1990 to 2000. Botanical subject-matter knowledge and learning opportunities offered by these books include biodiversity of plants; characteristics of plants; life cycles of plants; economic botany, ecology, and ethnobotany. The range and frequency of National Standards-consistent and age-appropriate plant science concepts and principles identified within these books, in part, though not exclusively, included the emergent categories of the process of photosynthesis; basic needs of plants; plant structures; external signals affecting plant growth; environmental stress to plants; biodiversity of plants; plants as animal habitats; and common uses of plants. With regard to plant science graphics, 13 books were identified as presenting some type of science graphic, beyond simple illustrations. The most frequently used

  3. Solomon Islands Botany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenis, van C.G.G.J.

    1969-01-01

    A discussion of the Results of the Royal Society Expedition to the British Solomon Islands Protectorate, 1965. Organized by E.J.H. Corner. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B 255 (1969) 185-631, 196 fig. University Printing House, Shaftesbury Road, Cambridge. Obtainable through booksellers or direct to the Royal

  4. Progress in Malesian botany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NN,

    1969-01-01

    Annonaceae. Mr. J. Sinclair had begun collecting details for tackling Malesian Annonaceae. He left several notebooks of notes made in various herbaria of examined specimens, several envelopes containing slips bearing identifications, and a thick file with manuscript. It is not possible to say

  5. Progress in Malesian botany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NN,

    2002-01-01

    Dr. Si He (MO) has put an annotated list of Thai mosses on the web. Especially many Peninsular species are Malesian as well. The introductory chapters are of general botanical interest. http://www.mobot.org/MOBOT/moss/Thailand/thailand.htm Dr. A. Touw (L) has started a survey of all 19th century

  6. Progress in Malesian botany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NN,

    1985-01-01

    The research on the Clavariaceae of the Philippines aims to establish a taxonomic account and the distribution, seasonality and economic importance of the indigenous species. A total of 85 specimens belonging to 7 genera have so far been collected by Mr. L.T. EVANGELISTA. Among his interesting

  7. Marine botany. Second edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawes, C.J.

    1998-01-01

    Marine plants are a diverse group that include unicellular algae, seaweeds, seagrasses, salt marshes, and mangrove forests. They carry out a variety of ecological functions and serve as the primary producers in coastal wetlands and oceanic waters. The theme that connects such a wide variety of plants is their ecology, which was also emphasized in the 1981 edition. The goal of this revision is to present taxonomic, physiological, chemical, and ecological aspects of marine plants, their adaptations, and how abiotic and biotic factors interact in their communities. The data are presented in a concise, comparative manner in order to identify similarities and differences between communities such as salt marsh and mangroves or subtidal seaweeds and seagrasses. To accomplish this, the text is organized into five chapters that introduce the marine habitats, consider abiotic and biotic factors, and anthropogenic influences on the communities followed by seven chapters that deal with microalgae, seaweeds, salt marshes, mangroves, seagrasses, and coral reefs. Two appendixes are included; one presents simple field techniques and the other is a summary of seaweed uses

  8. Progress in Malesian botany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NN,

    1995-01-01

    Anacardiaceae — Mr. K.M. Kochummen (KEP) is revising the family for the Tree Flora of Sabah and Sarawak. Araliaceae — The family has been revised by Dr. P.P. Lowry (MO) for the Flore de la Nouvelle-Calédonie.

  9. Progress in Malesian botany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NN,

    1967-01-01

    At Singapore, Mr. H. M. Burkill began a study of the marine genus Avrainvillea, and of the aerophilous genus Trentepohlia, on which he had made observations for a long time. Many anatomical drawings were prepared of both genera.

  10. Progress in Malesian botany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NN,

    1982-01-01

    Acanthaceae. At C, Dr. Bertel Hansen took an interest in the family, and began by going through the many papers by C.E.B. Bremekamp. Annonaceae. Mr. Paul Kessler, Botanik, Universität, Box 3049, Kaiserslautern, W. Germany, has undertaken work on Orophea.

  11. Progress in Malesian botany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NN,

    1966-01-01

    Dr. R. Grolle, Jena, started a revision of the hitherto published records and determination of unstudied collections of Hepaticae from New Guinea (and neighbouring regions). The results will be successively published in the Journal of the Hattori Botanical Laboratory under the title ”Lebermoose aus

  12. Progress in Malesian botany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NN,

    1977-01-01

    Apocynaceae. Professor F. Markgraf at Zürich, after having sent his Alyxia revision, 57 species, for publication in Blumea, is continuing his FM work with the genera Dyera and Amblyocalyx. He then means to take up Rauvolfia. His large MS. for the Flore de Madagascar, prepared years ago, has just

  13. Progress in Malesian botany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NN,

    1986-01-01

    Check Lists of Indonesian Trees under editorship of Dr. T.C. WHITMORE (OXF) and Dr. I.G.M. TANTRA (Forest Dept., Bali). In April 1986 the list for Sumatra was ready to be printed. The lists for Celebes and Nusa Tenggara were in the typing stage. Manuscripts for the Moluccas, Borneo and New Guinea

  14. Progress in Malesian botany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NN,

    1987-01-01

    Tree Flora of Indonesia checklists under editorship of Dr. T.C. WHITMORE and Dr. I.G.M. TANTRA (Forest Dept., Bali). Sumatra has now been distributed at least to at least a few key Institutes outside Indonesia. Others can write to either Ir. Rubardi, or Ir. K. Sumarno, Forest Research & Development

  15. Towering tribute to botany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Nigel

    2003-08-05

    One of the world's greatest plant collections has won a top heritage award at a time when it is highlighting with a tree-top walkway the need to study the forest canopy which is one of the most crucial but least understood habitats.

  16. Botany and culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    The cucurbits (family Cucurbitaceae) form a diverse group of species grown around the world under many different conditions and for many different purposes. The major cultivated types include cucumber, melon (cantaloupe or muskmelon, honeydew, etc.), watermelon, squash, and pumpkin. Minor cultivated...

  17. Food-System Botany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rop, Charles J.

    2011-01-01

    This set of inquiry lessons is adaptable for middle school through high school life science or biology classrooms and will help meet the NSTA scientific inquiry position statement (2004) and the AAAS benchmarks (1993) and NRC standards (1996; 2000) related to health and food literacy. The standards require adolescents to examine their own diet and…

  18. Next Generation Botany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybczynski, Stephen; Li, Zheng; Hickey, R. James

    2014-01-01

    Civilization simply would not exist without plants, yet their importance is often overlooked. As the nation's ability to respond to the botanical challenges associated with food production, climate change, invasive species, and biodiversity loss continues to decrease (Kramer, Zorn- Arnold, and Havens 2010), educators must discourage this…

  19. Botany and topography: the problem of the levelling of plants in the scientific historiography on Francisco José de Caldas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Alejandra Puerta Olaya,

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The levelling of plants is usually recognized as one of the main concepts in the works and the thought of Francisco José de Caldas. There are different interpretations about this concept, but in general, the treatment is not very careful and does not really go into the details concerning its theoretical assumptions and consequences. In this article, we identify the diverse interpretations that historians have offered regarding the origin, the function and the definition of this concept. Our interest is to show the difficulties that the scientific historiography on Caldas faces when it deals with this concept, and how these difficulties generate uncertainty concerning the coherence that may exist between those different interpretations. In particular, we defend the thesis that the approach to the term “levelling of plants” has been focused more on the plants part than on the levelling part, that is, more on botany than on topography. This historiographic assumption has led to the construction of historical narratives that, despite the explicit topographic dimension of the term, place it in the history of botany and not in the history of topography.

  20. Contributions of the Meaningful Learning Theory to the learning of botany concepts - doi: 10.4025/actascieduc.v33i2.14355

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Airton José Vinholi Júnior

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted in a school of the black community of Furnas do Dionísio (Jaraguari, Mato Grosso do Sul State. For its realization, initially, a test with questions of botany was applied to the students to identify the absence or presence of subsumers classified into adequate or partially adequate. This analysis was used for the planning and production of instructional strategies in order to facilitate interaction between new information and background on the student's cognitive structure in order to promote learning. After, educational interventions have been proposed based on dialogue between traditional knowledge and science in the classroom. Based on the results of these strategies and concept maps based on the Theory of Meaningful Learning of David Ausubel, built by students on the proposed content, we concluded that learning was satisfactory. Taking into account the methodology used to investigate the local knowledge about medicinal plants, it is concluded that this contribution was significant to the learning of botany

  1. Description of concept and first feasibility test results of a life support subsystem of the Botany Facility based on water reclamation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeser, H. R.

    1986-01-01

    The Botany Facility allows the growth of higher plants and fungi over a period of 6 months maximum. It is a payload planned for the second flight of the Eureca platform around 1990. Major tasks of the Life Support Subsystem (LSS) of the Botany Facility include the control of the pressure and composition of the atmosphere within the plant/fungi growth chambers, control of the temperature and humidity of the air and the regulation of the soil water content within specified limits. Previous studies have shown that various LSS concepts are feasible ranging from heavy, simple and cheap to light, complex and expensive solutions. A summary of those concepts is given. A new approach to accomplish control of the temperature and humidity of the air within the growth chambers based on water reclamation is discussed. This reclamation is achieved by condensation with a heat pump and capillary transport of the condensate back into the soil of the individual growth chamber. Some analytical estimates are given in order to obtain guidelines for circulation flow rates and to determine the specific power consumption.

  2. Heritage of the romantic philosophy in post-Linnaean botany Reichenbach's reception of Goethe's metamorphosis of plants as a methodological and philosophical framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the importance of the reception and development of Goethe's metamorphosis of plants as a methodological and philosophical framework in the history of botanical theories. It proposes a focus on the textbooks written by the German botanist Ludwig Reichenbach and his first attempt to use Goethe's idea of metamorphosis of plants as fundamental to his natural system of plants published under the title 'Botany for Women', in German Botanik für Damen (1828). In this book, Reichenbach paid particular attention to Goethe's sensitive views on the essence of nature; he regarded Goethe's idea of metamorphosis in the plant kingdom as an ideal model to interpret connections of natural phenomena, in particular as a conceptual frame for a natural system. Furthermore, he aimed to develop the philosophical statement of the metamorphosis, in which he called for nature-philosophical conceptions in order to materialize his representation of plant "affinities," and of a kind of "ontogeny" of the whole plant kingdom. This paper demonstrates that, between speculative views and empirical attempts, the extent to which Reichenbach actually belonged to a new "school" of thought, which left its mark on the history and philosophy of botany.

  3. Mostly Plants. Individualized Biology Activities on: I. Investigating Bread Mold; II. Transpiration; III. Botany Project; IV. Collecting/Preserving/Identifying Leaves; [and] V. Student Science Laboratory Write-Ups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Paul R.

    Individualized biology activities for secondary students are presented in this teaching guide. The guide is divided into five sections: (1) investigating bread mold; (2) investigating transpiration; (3) completing a botany project; (4) collecting, preserving, and identifying leaves; and (5) writing up science laboratory investigations. The…

  4. Virulence of BotaniGard® to Second Instar Brown Marmorated Stink Bug, Halyomorpha halys (Stål (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce L. Parker

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The brown marmorated stink bug, Halyomorpha halys (Stål (BMSB is an exotic invasive insect originating in East Asia, currently causing significant damage to fruits, vegetables and other crops throughout most of the Mid-Atlantic states of the U.S. It also is a nuisance pest, entering homes in the fall in search of suitable overwintering sites. Two formulations of BotaniGard® with a strain of Beauveria bassiana (GHA as the active ingredient were tested against second instar BMSB. Both the wettable powder and the emulsifiable suspension formulations were efficacious at 1 × 107 conidia mL−1, causing 67%–80% mortality 9 days post treatment and 95%–100% after 12 days. The wettable powder formulation was slightly more efficacious.

  5. The role of botany in the development of the Republic of South Africa with special emphasis on the contributions of the Botanical Research Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. J. B. Killick

    1979-11-01

    Full Text Available Five papers cover different aspects of the contributions to and role of botany in the development of the Republic of South Africa. Two papers sum up the contributions for the non-agricultural and agricultural sectors. The introductory paper by D. J. B. Killick provides a short historical account of the Botanical Research Institute, followed by a discussion of the contributions of the Institute to botany in South Africa through its National Herbarium and identification service as well as researches in taxonomy, plant anatomy, cyto-genetics, ecology, economic botany and data processing. B. de Winter emphasizes the fundamental role of taxonomy and bio-systematics for planning and the optimal use of the natural plant resources. The current support for taxonomy and biosystematics is examined and proposals made for improving progress in the Flora of Southern Africa series. For plant physiology, N. Grobbelaar discusses, firstly, the ways whereby the productivity of a plant species with its characteristic genetic constitution can be raised by determining and modifying for optimal response the effects of environmental factors such as spacing, mineral nutrition, water provision, etc.; and, secondly, usually when the first means has been achieved, of improving plant productivity by altering the genetic constitution of the plant so that it can perform better than its ancestors under the prevailing conditions. After discussing and illustrating the applications and roles of plant ecology, D. Edwards concludes that basic plant ecological research is required, firstly, at the regional level through regional plant ecological studies to supply the essential local knowledge needed by researchers, planners and users of the land; and, secondly, at the more detailed level where knowledge is needed of the processes and factors that govern the behaviour of vegetation so that it can be properly used, managed and manipulated. M. J. Wells discusses the role of economic

  6. Changes in the Use of the Passive Voice over Time: A Historical Look at the "American Journal of Botany" and the Changes in the Use of the Passive Voice from 1914-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumin, Laura Marie

    2010-01-01

    Scope and Method of Study. This study looks at 15 articles from the "American Journal of Botany"--5 articles from 1914-1918, 5 articles from 1962-1966, and 5 articles from 2004-2008--to determine if and how the use of the passive voice has changed over time. Findings and Conclusions. The ways in which the passive voice was used, and the…

  7. First systematic plant proteomics workshop in Botany Department, University of Delhi: transferring proteomics knowledge to next-generation researchers and students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deswal, Renu; Abat, Jasmeet Kaur; Sehrawat, Ankita; Gupta, Ravi; Kashyap, Prakriti; Sharma, Shruti; Sharma, Bhavana; Chaurasia, Satya Prakash; Chanu, Sougrakpam Yaiphabi; Masi, Antonio; Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar; Sarkar, Abhijit; Agrawal, Raj; Dunn, Michael J; Renaut, Jenny; Rakwal, Randeep

    2014-07-01

    International Plant Proteomics Organization (INPPO) outlined ten initiatives to promote plant proteomics in each and every country. With greater emphasis in developing countries, one of those was to "organize workshops at national and international levels to train manpower and exchange information". This third INPPO highlights covers the workshop organized for the very first time in a developing country, India, at the Department of Botany in University of Delhi on December 26-30, 2013 titled - "1(st) Plant Proteomics Workshop / Training Program" under the umbrella of INPPO India-Nepal chapter. Selected 20 participants received on-hand training mainly on gel-based proteomics approach along with manual booklet and parallel lectures on this and associated topics. In house, as well as invited experts drawn from other Universities and Institutes (national and international), delivered talks on different aspects of gel-based and gel-free proteomics. Importance of gel-free proteomics approach, translational proteomics, and INPPO roles were presented and interactively discussed by a group of three invited speakers Drs. Ganesh Kumar Agrawal (Nepal), Randeep Rakwal (Japan), and Antonio Masi (Italy). Given the output of this systematic workshop, it was proposed and thereafter decided to be organized every alternate year; the next workshop will be held in 2015. Furthermore, possibilities on providing advanced training to those students / researchers / teachers with basic knowledge in proteomics theory and experiments at national and international levels were discussed. INPPO is committed to generating next-generation trained manpower in proteomics, and it would only happen by the firm determination of scientists to come forward and do it. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Sunflower disease compendium: Sunflower botany

    Science.gov (United States)

    The number one challenge for global sunflower production is diseases. Sunflower is the fifth largest oilseed crop grown in temperate and subtropical areas in 72 countries and on every continent, except Antarctica. This has facilitated the spread of diseases globally. Disease control can be by chemic...

  9. Bitter Gourd: Botany, Horticulture, Breeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitter gourd fruits are a good source of carbohydrates, proteins, vitamins, and minerals and have the highest nutritive value among cucurbits. Moreover, the crude protein content (11.4-20.9 g.kg-1) of bitter gourd fruits is higher than that of tomato and cucumber. This book chapter focuses on the ...

  10. Contribuições da Teoria da Aprendizagem Significativa para a aprendizagem de conceitos em Botânica = Contributions of the Meaningful Learning Theory to the learning of botany concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Airton José Vinholi Júnior

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available O trabalho foi realizado em uma escola da comunidade quilombola Furnas do Dionísio (Jaraguari, Estado do Mato Grosso do Sul. Para sua realização, inicialmente, um teste com questões de Botânica foi aplicado aos alunos para identificar ausência ou presença de subsunçores, classificados em adequados ou parcialmente adequados. Esta análise foi utilizada para o planejamento e confecção de estratégias instrucionais, visando a facilitar a interação entre as novas informações e as preexistentes na estrutura cognitiva do aluno, com o intuito de promover aprendizagem. Posteriormente, foram propostas intervenções pedagógicas baseadas no diálogo entre conhecimento tradicional e científico em sala de aula. Baseando-se nos resultados dessas estratégias e em Mapas Conceituais fundamentados na Teoria da Aprendizagem Significativa, de David Ausubel, construídos pelos alunos sobre os conteúdos propostos, concluiu-se que a aprendizagem foi satisfatória. Quanto à metodologia utilizada, verificou-se que essa contribuição foi significativa para a aprendizagem de Botânica.The study was conducted in a school of the black community of Furnas do Dionísio (Jaraguari, Mato Grosso do Sul State. For its realization, initially, a test with questions of botany was applied to the students to identify the absence or presence of subsumers classified into adequate or partially adequate. This analysis was used for the planning and production of instructional strategies in order to facilitate interaction between new information and background on the student's cognitive structure in order to promote learning. After, educational interventions have been proposed based on dialogue between traditional knowledge and science in the classroom. Based on the results of these strategies and concept maps based on the Theory of Meaningful Learning of David Ausubel, built by students on the proposed content, we concluded that learning was satisfactory. Taking into

  11. South African Journal of Botany: Advanced Search

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Search tips: Search terms are case-insensitive; Common words are ignored; By default only articles containing all terms in the query are returned (i.e., AND is implied); Combine multiple words with OR to find articles containing either term; e.g., education OR research; Use parentheses to create more complex queries; e.g., ...

  12. DNA fingerprinting in botany: past, present, future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nybom, Hilde; Weising, Kurt; Rotter, Björn

    2014-01-03

    Almost three decades ago Alec Jeffreys published his seminal Nature papers on the use of minisatellite probes for DNA fingerprinting of humans (Jeffreys and colleagues Nature 1985, 314:67-73 and Nature 1985, 316:76-79). The new technology was soon adopted for many other organisms including plants, and when Hilde Nybom, Kurt Weising and Alec Jeffreys first met at the very First International Conference on DNA Fingerprinting in Berne, Switzerland, in 1990, everybody was enthusiastic about the novel method that allowed us for the first time to discriminate between humans, animals, plants and fungi on the individual level using DNA markers. A newsletter coined "Fingerprint News" was launched, T-shirts were sold, and the proceedings of the Berne conference filled a first book on "DNA fingerprinting: approaches and applications". Four more conferences were about to follow, one on each continent, and Alec Jeffreys of course was invited to all of them. Since these early days, methodologies have undergone a rapid evolution and diversification. A multitude of techniques have been developed, optimized, and eventually abandoned when novel and more efficient and/or more reliable methods appeared. Despite some overlap between the lifetimes of the different technologies, three phases can be defined that coincide with major technological advances. Whereas the first phase of DNA fingerprinting ("the past") was dominated by restriction fragment analysis in conjunction with Southern blot hybridization, the advent of the PCR in the late 1980s gave way to the development of PCR-based single- or multi-locus profiling techniques in the second phase. Given that many routine applications of plant DNA fingerprinting still rely on PCR-based markers, we here refer to these methods as "DNA fingerprinting in the present", and include numerous examples in the present review. The beginning of the third phase actually dates back to 2005, when several novel, highly parallel DNA sequencing strategies were developed that increased the throughput over current Sanger sequencing technology 1000-fold and more. High-speed DNA sequencing was soon also exploited for DNA fingerprinting in plants, either in terms of facilitated marker development, or directly in the sense of "genotyping-by-sequencing". Whereas these novel approaches are applied at an ever increasing rate also in non-model species, they are still far from routine, and we therefore treat them here as "DNA fingerprinting in the future".

  13. DNA fingerprinting in botany: past, present, future

    OpenAIRE

    Nybom, Hilde; Weising, Kurt; Rotter, Björn

    2014-01-01

    Almost three decades ago Alec Jeffreys published his seminal Nature papers on the use of minisatellite probes for DNA fingerprinting of humans (Jeffreys and colleagues Nature 1985, 314:67–73 and Nature 1985, 316:76–79). The new technology was soon adopted for many other organisms including plants, and when Hilde Nybom, Kurt Weising and Alec Jeffreys first met at the very First International Conference on DNA Fingerprinting in Berne, Switzerland, in 1990, everybody was enthusiastic about the n...

  14. Computational botany methods for automated species identification

    CERN Document Server

    Remagnino, Paolo; Wilkin, Paul; Cope, James; Kirkup, Don

    2017-01-01

    This book discusses innovative methods for mining information from images of plants, especially leaves, and highlights the diagnostic features that can be implemented in fully automatic systems for identifying plant species. Adopting a multidisciplinary approach, it explores the problem of plant species identification, covering both the concepts of taxonomy and morphology. It then provides an overview of morphometrics, including the historical background and the main steps in the morphometric analysis of leaves together with a number of applications. The core of the book focuses on novel diagnostic methods for plant species identification developed from a computer scientist’s perspective. It then concludes with a chapter on the characterization of botanists' visions, which highlights important cognitive aspects that can be implemented in a computer system to more accurately replicate the human expert’s fixation process. The book not only represents an authoritative guide to advanced computational tools fo...

  15. South African Journal of Botany: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    com/products/acrobat/acrrsystemreqs.html#70win. If you do not wish to use the PDF annotations function, you may list the corrections (including replies to the Query Form) and return to Elsevier in an e-mail. Please list your corrections quoting line ...

  16. Women and botany in Risorgimento Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Gabriella Berti

    2004-01-01

    The first Italian women described as botanists by their male peers were active during the Risorgimento. They were few in numbers and only one of them, Elisabetta Fiorini, was recognized for her extensive contributions to the field of cryptogams in Italy by being nominated to important Italian scientific academies. No such recognition was ever alloted to the other female botanists who acted as collectors, correspondents and/or patrons to male botanists, had their own garden of exotic plants, or discovered a new species of phanerogams, and occasionally published on the subject. This study will show that a woman could still belong to Italian scientific academies in the nineteenth century, if like Fiorini, she chose to practice science in a way that was considered at par with that of male scientists.

  17. Rhubarb botany, horticulture, and genetic resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhubarb (Rheum spp.) is native to areas around the Tibetan Plateau and has been cultivated for medicinal purposes for approximately 4,000 years. The roots (rhizomes) of species in this genus are rich in anthraquinones and other biochemicals that may show promise in treating or preventing cancer, dia...

  18. Collection and collation: theory and practice of Linnaean botany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Wille, Staffan

    2007-09-01

    Historians and philosophers of science have interpreted the taxonomic theory of Carl Linnaeus (1707-1778) as an 'essentialist', 'Aristotelian', or even 'scholastic' one. This interpretation is flatly contradicted by what Linnaeus himself had to say about taxonomy in Systema naturae (1735), Fundamenta botanica (1736) and Genera plantarum (1737). This paper straightens out some of the more basic misinterpretations by showing that: (1) Linnaeus's species concept took account of reproductive relations among organisms and was therefore not metaphysical, but biological; (2) Linnaeus did not favour classification by logical division, but criticized it for necessarily failing to represent what he called 'natural' genera; (3) Linnaeus's definitions of 'natural' genera and species were not essentialist, but descriptive and polytypic; (4) Linnaeus's method in establishing 'natural' definitions was not deductive, but consisted in an inductive, bottom-up procedure of comparing concrete specimens. The conclusion will discuss the fragmentary and provisional nature of Linnaeus's 'natural method'. I will argue in particular that Linnaeus opted for inductive strategies not on abstract epistemological grounds, but in order to confer stability and continuity to the explorative practices of contemporary natural history.

  19. Using Haworthia Cultured Cells as an Aid in Teaching Botany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Shyamal K.; Castellano, John M.

    1977-01-01

    Callus induction from species of Haworthia can be done quickly in the laboratory with minimal equipment to study tissue dedifferentiation and cellular redifferentiation. It is shown that the cultured cell can also be used to study and evaluate the effects of various mutagens, carcinogens, and pesticides in controlled environments. (Author/MA)

  20. On the agronomy and botany of salak (Salacca zalacca)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ashari, S.

    2002-01-01

    Keywords: Salak, Salacca zalacca, Palmae, dioecious, haustorium, simple leaf, compound leaf, sucker, phyllotaxis, seedling, inflorescence, fruit, hand pollination, farm yard manure, fertilizer, shading, walking palm.


    Salak is a dioecious, suckering

  1. Simaroubaceae family: botany, chemical composition and biological activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iasmine A.B.S. Alves

    Full Text Available The Simaroubaceae family includes 32 genera and more than 170 species of trees and brushes of pantropical distribution. The main distribution hot spots are located at tropical areas of America, extending to Africa, Madagascar and regions of Australia bathed by the Pacific. This family is characterized by the presence of quassinoids, secondary metabolites responsible of a wide spectrum of biological activities such as antitumor, antimalarial, antiviral, insecticide, feeding deterrent, amebicide, antiparasitic and herbicidal. Although the chemical and pharmacological potential of Simaroubaceae family as well as its participation in official compendia; such as British, German, French and Brazilian pharmacopoeias, and patent registration, many of its species have not been studied yet. In order to direct further investigation to approach detailed botanical, chemical and pharmacological aspects of the Simaroubaceae, the present work reviews the information regarding the main genera of the family up to 2013.

  2. Forensic botany: usability of bryophyte material in forensic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, Viivi; Korpelainen, Helena; Kostamo, Kirsi

    2007-10-25

    Two experiments were performed to test the relevance of bryophyte (Plantae, Bryophyta) material for forensic studies. The first experiment was conducted to reveal if, and how well, plant fragments attach to footwear in general. In the test, 16 persons walked outdoors wearing rubber boots or hiking boots. After 24h of use outdoors the boots were carefully cleaned, and all plant fragments were collected. Afterwards, all plant material was examined to identify the species. In the second experiment, fresh material of nine bryophyte species was kept in a shed in adverse conditions for 18 months, after which DNA was extracted and subjected to genotyping to test the quality of the material. Both experiments give support for the usability of bryophyte material in forensic studies. The bryophyte fragments become attached to shoes, where they remain even after the wearer walks on a dry road for several hours. Bryophyte DNA stays intact, allowing DNA profiling after lengthy periods following detachment from the original plant source. Based on these experiments, and considering the fact that many bryophytes are clonal plants, we propose that bryophytes are among the most usable plants to provide botanical evidence for forensic investigations.

  3. Rehmannia glutinosa: review of botany, chemistry and pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ru-Xue; Li, Mao-Xing; Jia, Zheng-Ping

    2008-05-08

    Rehmannia glutinosa, a widely used traditional Chinese herb, belongs to the family of Scrophulariaceae, and is taken to nourish Yin and invigorate the kidney in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and has a very high medicinal value. In recent decades, a great number of chemical and pharmacological studies have been done on Rehmannia glutinosa. More than 70 compounds including iridoids, saccharides, amino acid, inorganic ions, as well as other trace elements have been found in the herb. Studies show that Rehmannia glutinosa and its active principles possess wide pharmacological actions on the blood system, immune system, endocrine system, cardiovascular system and the nervous system. Currently, the effective monomeric compounds or active parts have been screened for the pharmacological activity of Rehmannia glutinosa and the highest quality scientific data is delivered to support the further application and exploitation for new drug development.

  4. Backyard Botany: Using GPS Technology in the Science Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    March, Kathryn A.

    2012-01-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) technology can be used to connect students to the natural world and improve their skills in observation, identification, and classification. Using GPS devices in the classroom increases student interest in science, encourages team-building skills, and improves biology content knowledge. Additionally, it helps…

  5. The geology, botany and chemistry of selected peat-forming environments from temperate and tropical latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, C.C.; Esterle, J.S.; Palmer, C.A.

    1989-01-01

    Peat has been studied in several geologic settings: (1) glaciated terrain in cold temperate Maine and Minnesota, U.S.A.; (2) an island in the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of Maine, where sea level is rising; (3) the warm temperate U.S. Atlantic and Gulf Coastal Plains, where sea level has changed often; and (4) the tropical coast of Sarawak, Malaysia, and the tropical delta of the Batang Hari River, Sumatra, Indonesia. Most of these deposits are domed (ombrotrophic or partly ombrotrophic) bogs in which peat accumulation continued above the surface of the surrounding soil. However, the bogs of the U.S. Atlantic and Gulf Coastal Plains are comparatively not as domed, and many have almost level surfaces. In some bogs, aquatic or semi-aquatic plant materials accumulated, replaced water in the depressions, and formed a surface on which marsh or swamp vegetation could subsequently live, die, and accumulate. In others, the plant materials accumulated initially on level silt or sand surfaces supporting marshes or swamps. As the peat dome formed, plants growing on it changed from luxuriant ones near the base of the dome, where nutrients were brought into the bog by surface and ground water, to stunted ones at the top of the dome, where the raised bogs are fed by nutrient-poor precipitation. The physical and chemical changes that take place in the sequence of environments from the pond stage of deposit development, through the grassy marsh stage, through the forested swamp stage, and finally through the heath dome stage can be measured in terms of acidity and ash, volatile matter, carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, sulfur and oxygen contents, as well as in the kind and distribution of trace elements. The organic and inorganic contents of the deposits relate to geomorphology, and geomorphology relates to their settings. As models of coal formation, some domed peat deposits may help in solving problems of distribution and character of ancient coal beds. But clearly not all peat deposits are precursors of coal. Most Holocene peat deposits are subject to destruction by erosion, fire and decomposition through microbial and chemical oxidation before burial. The best environments for coal precursors have biomass accumulation, a continuously rising water table within the mass, and minimum influx of clay and silt until preservation by burial. The most suitable settings for future economic coal deposits are domed bogs that accumulate thick, widespread peat having low ash and low sulfur contents. The ombrotrophic peat deposits of tropical Sarawak and Sumatra are thick and extensive, contain low-ash and low-sulfur peat, and have high heating values. They are considered to be the best tropical coal analogs because of their extent and chances of preservation; the base of the peat is below adjacent river levels, and chemical and structural conditions are favorable for accumulation. ?? 1989.

  6. Foeniculum vulgare Mill: A Review of Its Botany, Phytochemistry, Pharmacology, Contemporary Application, and Toxicology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamkant B. Badgujar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Foeniculum vulgare Mill commonly called fennel has been used in traditional medicine for a wide range of ailments related to digestive, endocrine, reproductive, and respiratory systems. Additionally, it is also used as a galactagogue agent for lactating mothers. The review aims to gather the fragmented information available in the literature regarding morphology, ethnomedicinal applications, phytochemistry, pharmacology, and toxicology of Foeniculum vulgare. It also compiles available scientific evidence for the ethnobotanical claims and to identify gaps required to be filled by future research. Findings based on their traditional uses and scientific evaluation indicates that Foeniculum vulgare remains to be the most widely used herbal plant. It has been used for more than forty types of disorders. Phytochemical studies have shown the presence of numerous valuable compounds, such as volatile compounds, flavonoids, phenolic compounds, fatty acids, and amino acids. Compiled data indicate their efficacy in several in vitro and in vivo pharmacological properties such as antimicrobial, antiviral, anti-inflammatory, antimutagenic, antinociceptive, antipyretic, antispasmodic, antithrombotic, apoptotic, cardiovascular, chemomodulatory, antitumor, hepatoprotective, hypoglycemic, hypolipidemic, and memory enhancing property. Foeniculum vulgare has emerged as a good source of traditional medicine and it provides a noteworthy basis in pharmaceutical biology for the development/formulation of new drugs and future clinical uses.

  7. Rheum australe D. Don: A review of its botany, ethnobotany, phytochemistry and pharmacology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rokaya, Maan Bahadur; Münzbergová, Zuzana; Tumsina, B.; Bhattarai, K. R.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 141, č. 3 (2012), s. 761-774 ISSN 0378-8741 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA526/09/0549 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : Rheum australe * traditional uses * phytochemistry Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 2.755, year: 2012

  8. Dendropedagogy: Teaching Botany, Ecology and Statistical Principles through Tree-Ring Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubino, Darrin L.; McCarthy, Brian C.

    2002-01-01

    Develops a simple tree-ring laboratory to demonstrate the basics of dendrochronology. Provides two upper-level laboratory exercises primarily intended to demonstrate the specific dendrochronology subdisciplines of dendroclimatology and dendroecology. Suggests using the exercises separately or in unison as part of a multidisciplinary capstone…

  9. Field Botany and Creative Writing: Where the Science of Writing Meets the Writing of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killingbeck, Keith

    2006-01-01

    Merging science and writing to enhance both subjects was the objective of a venture known as "Plant Notes." At first, teacher-written notes served as the inspiration for this writing assignment. Later, eclectic student-written novellas, poems, song lyrics, mnemonic devices, and field trip recollections made their way into "Plant Notes" and stole…

  10. Dyes, Fibers, and Paper: A Botany Lab Exercise for Non-Biology Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Todd P.; Meekins, J. Forrest; Maluso, Diane

    2004-01-01

    This laboratory exercise affords students a hands-on experience learning about traditional dyes, fiber strength, and paper making. It is economical, simple to prepare, provides satisfactory results, and is student friendly. Dyes were extracted from plant leaves, stems, roots, and fruits. Hard-boiled eggs were place in the dyes for 15 minutes to…

  11. Lessons for Teaching Botany: What Middle School Students Know about Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Chitra; Chunawala, Sugra; Apte, Swapna; Ramadas, Jayashree

    Students' alternative conceptions arise out of an interconnected system of beliefs: about the nature of science, of learning, of the natural and social world. Cross-cultural perspectives on these world views are therefore essential. This study probed middle school students' conceptions about plants. Tribal students were found to have a richer and…

  12. Native plant naming by high-school students of different socioeconomic status: implications for botany education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermudez, Gonzalo M. A.; Díaz, Sandra; De Longhi, Ana L.

    2018-01-01

    People's diminished awareness of plants, affected by anthropogenic environmental deterioration, has challenged science education to overcome the obstacles impeding a better understanding of their meaning and value. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the socioeconomic status of high-school students, as indicated by their attendance at private or state schools, on their knowledge of native plants. In total, 321 students aged 15-18 were asked to write down 10 plants native to Córdoba, Argentina, in a freelist questionnaire. Students listed a mean of 6.8 species of a total of 165 different categories of plant names. The majority of the species named were exotic to Córdoba (63%) or Argentina (50.6%, of which 33.8% were adventitious), indicating an 'adventitious-to-native' effect by which all spontaneously reproducing plants were presumed to be native species. However, the 20 most frequently named plants were mainly native, with 'Algarrobo' (Prosopis spp.) and 'Espinillo' (Vachellia caven) being the most mentioned. Students' socioeconomic status had a significant effect on the number of species named, with the students of state schools (where the less well-off sectors of the society attend) mentioning more species and, among these, more native ones than the students from private schools. Furthermore, we defined size, colour and scent as being conspicuous traits of plant flowers that are relevant for human perception, and found that the most frequently named adventitious species, unlike the native ones, were those exhibiting big brightly-coloured flowers which ranged from being inodorous to having medium intensity scents.

  13. The influence of new world species on the botany of the 16th century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ubrizsy Savoia, Andrea

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is about how some New World species, not as widespread as tomato, tobacco, etc. were introduced in the botanical European knowledge, with special reference to Ulisse Aldrovandi (1522-1605. His herbal, his inconographic collections and manuscripts containing lists of seeds, woods and other matrials, are conserved in his Museum and grown in the Botanical Garden of Bologna.

    El presente trabajo analiza cómo algunas especies botánicas del Nuevo mundo, no tan difundidas como el tomate, el tabaco, etc., formaron parte del conocimiento botánico europeo, haciendo especial referencia a la de obra de Ulisse Aldrovandi (1522-1605. Su herbario, sus colecciones iconográficas y manuscritos que contienen listas de semillas, maderas y otros materiales, se conservan en su Museo y algunas de las especies crecen en el Jardín Botánico de Bolonia.

  14. Native Plant Naming by High-School Students of Different Socioeconomic Status: Implications for Botany Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermudez, Gonzalo M. A.; Díaz, Sandra; De Longhi, Ana L.

    2018-01-01

    People's diminished awareness of plants, affected by anthropogenic environmental deterioration, has challenged science education to overcome the obstacles impeding a better understanding of their meaning and value. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the socioeconomic status of high-school students, as indicated by their…

  15. Integrating Botany with Chemistry & Art to Improve Elementary School Children's Awareness of Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çil, Emine

    2015-01-01

    Students need to be aware of plants in order to learn about, appreciate, care for, and protect them. However, research has found that many children are not aware of the plants in their environment. A way to address this issue might be integration of plants with various disciplines. I investigated the effectiveness of an instructional approach…

  16. Effect of 7 botany species of plants on Zabrotes subfasciatus (Bohemann

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Valdés Herrera

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of several plant in the control of weevil Zabrotes subfasciatus (Boh. (Coleoptera; Bruchidae was evaluated. The plant were caisimón of anisette, apasote, bitter broom, sage, sassafras, garlic leek and nim were used. In the experiment they were carried out 2 variants, one to see the effect on a female of the insect and another to observe the behavior in group of Z. subfasciatus. The effects of the same ones were evaluated in the ovoposición and in the time of permanency of the insect on each plant residual. the death to Z. subfasciatus. The residuals of the molinaje of bitter broom, I age leek, caisimón of anisette and sage those that bigger repelencia effect had were, as much in the permanency as in the number of eggs ovopositados for the female of Z. subfasciatus. Correlation didn’t exist among the time of permanency of the insect in the different treatments and the number of on eggs. The biggest quantity in eggs was ovopositados it has more than enough sassafras.

  17. Pengendalian Kutu Putih pada Buah Manggis (Garcinia mangostana L.) dengan Insektisida Botani

    OpenAIRE

    Bangun, Susana

    2012-01-01

    Susana Bangun “Controlling of Mealybugs on Mangosteen Fruits (Garcinia mangostana L.) Using Botanical Insecticides“ supervised by Maryani Cyccu Tobing and Darma Bakti. The objectives of the research were to find out an effective and eco-friendly method controlling on mealybug, and technique on keeping mangosteen fruits freshness lasts longer taking the advantages of using botanical insecticides that can be used for the need of certificating mealybug-free mangosteen for export destination. The...

  18. Botany, Genetics and Ethnobotany: A Crossed Investigation on the Elusive Tapir's Diet in French Guiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibert, Fabrice; Sabatier, Daniel; Andrivot, Judith; Scotti-Saintagne, Caroline; Gonzalez, Sophie; Prévost, Marie-Françoise; Grenand, Pierre; Chave, Jérome; Caron, Henri; Richard-Hansen, Cécile

    2011-01-01

    While the populations of large herbivores are being depleted in many tropical rainforests, the importance of their trophic role in the ecological functioning and biodiversity of these ecosystems is still not well evaluated. This is due to the outstanding plant diversity that they feed upon and the inherent difficulties involved in observing their elusive behaviour. Classically, the diet of elusive tropical herbivores is studied through the observation of browsing signs and macroscopic analysis of faeces or stomach contents. In this study, we illustrate that the original coupling of classic methods with genetic and ethnobotanical approaches yields information both about the diet diversity, the foraging modalities and the potential impact on vegetation of the largest terrestrial mammal of Amazonia, the lowland tapir. The study was conducted in the Guianan shield, where the ecology of tapirs has been less investigated. We identified 92 new species, 51 new genera and 13 new families of plants eaten by tapirs. We discuss the relative contribution of our different approaches, notably the contribution of genetic barcoding, used for the first time to investigate the diet of a large tropical mammal, and how local traditional ecological knowledge is accredited and valuable for research on the ecology of elusive animals. PMID:21991372

  19. Botany, genetics and ethnobotany: a crossed investigation on the elusive tapir's diet in French Guiana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrice Hibert

    Full Text Available While the populations of large herbivores are being depleted in many tropical rainforests, the importance of their trophic role in the ecological functioning and biodiversity of these ecosystems is still not well evaluated. This is due to the outstanding plant diversity that they feed upon and the inherent difficulties involved in observing their elusive behaviour. Classically, the diet of elusive tropical herbivores is studied through the observation of browsing signs and macroscopic analysis of faeces or stomach contents. In this study, we illustrate that the original coupling of classic methods with genetic and ethnobotanical approaches yields information both about the diet diversity, the foraging modalities and the potential impact on vegetation of the largest terrestrial mammal of Amazonia, the lowland tapir. The study was conducted in the Guianan shield, where the ecology of tapirs has been less investigated. We identified 92 new species, 51 new genera and 13 new families of plants eaten by tapirs. We discuss the relative contribution of our different approaches, notably the contribution of genetic barcoding, used for the first time to investigate the diet of a large tropical mammal, and how local traditional ecological knowledge is accredited and valuable for research on the ecology of elusive animals.

  20. Nature in Botany and Zoology in the Spanish Literature: La Celestina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pardo de Santayana, Manuel

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The botanical and zoological references that appear in La Celestina are analysed and cuantified to provide an insight of the knowledge about plants and animals included in a literary work of the Rennaisance, in this case one of the most important of the Spanish literature. The plants and animals products were used by the healer for the care, health and beauty of the body. Many other plants, animals and some mineral products were used for love remedies. Moreover, references to plant and animal names and their products are also commented as linguistic sources, i.e. metaphoric references to plants, set phrases, and other literary figures of speech. All the 86 plant species and 70 animals and the complete textual passages are included in two apendixes.

    En este trabajo se analizan y cuantifican las referencias botánicas y zoológicas que aparecen en La Celestina como ejemplo de los conocimientos sobre plantas y animales que incorpora una obra de la literatura renacentista española. Dado el oficio de la protagonista, el interés del uso de muchas plantas y animales se centra en el cuidado, cura y aseo del cuerpo, que entonces se hacía sobre todo a base de productos vegetales y animales. Éstos también aparecen empleados en la magia de amor. Se comentan asimismo la utilización de nombres de plantas y animales, así como de productos derivados de éstos, como recursos lingüisticos o literarios; es decir, cuando se emplean como metáforas, en dichos, frases hechas y otras figuras literarias. Se incluyen en 2 anexos las 86 especies vegetales y las 70 animales, así como las citas encontradas.

  1. Application of radiotracers in an exotic field of botany. How to feed carnivorous plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhauser, G.; Musilek, A.; Sterba, J.H.; Bichler, M.; Adlassnig, W.; Peroutka, M.; Lichtscheidl, I.K.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, methods for the application of radiotracers in the Cobra Lily (Darlingtonia californica), a carnivorous pitcher plant, are described. The uptake of radiotracers such as 42 K and 54 Mn into the pitcher trap in aqueous solution could be proven, whereas uptake of 59 Fe ions could not be observed. No-carrier-added 54 Mn was taken up by the plants, regardless of extremely low concentrations. In contrast to earlier experiments using 14 C and 15 N-based tracers, the methodology presented allows quick, simple and reliable quantification of the nutrient uptake. The results of our experiments lead to a deeper biological understanding concerning the trace element household of this carnivorous plant and the absorption of micro- and macronutrients from trapped prey. (author)

  2. Contributions to the history of botany and exploration in Malaysia. 8—9

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenis-Kruseman, van M.J.

    1962-01-01

    When Dr. F. G. Meyer, in a letter to Dr. Ding Hou, inquired after biographical particulars of “Heinrich Bürger”, the name of this naturalist meant nothing to me. This is not astonishing, as nearly all of his activities took place in Japan, a country outside our range of study. It took Dr. van

  3. Guidelines for collecting vouchers and tissues intended for genomic work (Smithsonian Institution: Botany Best Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicki Funk

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of Next Generation Sequencing into the disciplines of plant systematics, ecology, and metagenomics, among others, has resulted in a phenomenal increase in the collecting and storing of tissue samples and their respective vouchers. This manual suggests standard practices that will insure the quality and preservation of the tissue and vouchers and their respective data. Although written for use by the Smithsonian Institution botanists it suggests a framework for collecting tissues and vouchers that other research programs can adapt to their own needs. It includes information on collecting voucher specimens, collecting plant tissue intended for genomic analysis, how to manage these collections, and how to incorporate the data into a database management system. It also includes many useful references for collecting and processing collections. We hope it will be useful for a variety of botanists but especially those who know how to collect plants and want to collect tissue samples that will be useful for genomic research, and those who are skilled in lab work and want to know how to properly voucher and record their tissue collections.

  4. The Ethno-Botany and utility evaluation of some Species of cucurbits ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is the need to develop accurate data, and to put in place more effort toward the cultivation, improvement and conservation of various cucurbits germplasm. An inventory was canned out to track down and document the ethnobotanical uses of the various species of cucurbits found in the Niger Delta areas of Nigeria.

  5. APPLIED BOTANY, I. PROTECTION OF TREES AND BUSHES IN THE INVESTMENT PROCESS IN URBAN AREAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariola Garczyńska

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Ecosystem services are the benefits resulting from resources and processes in nature. Trees and stand densities constitute a significant element of the landscape (both in urban and rural areas and serve a number of ecosystem functions, forming an inherent part of each group of benefits singled out on the basis of the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment. In the thesis, selected ecosystem services of trees and stand densities were detailed - provisioning, regulatory, supporting and cultural functions. Diagnosis of services performed by trees and their valuation may contribute to taking increased care of them and protection during performing various investments, it is therefore appropriate to launch multifaceted ecological education to each person, particularly to those directly responsible for trees and bushes in towns and rural areas. In order to restrict construction stress to trees and bushes, environmental impact assessment has to be made as soon as the construction planning is being made (natural, cultural and landscape conditions should be provided additionally, it is advisable to conduct a dendrological inventory for planning purposes. Appropriate protection of trees and standing densities is also legally regulated by the Nature Conservation Act and the Construction Law. During the investment process, the trees and their settlement conditions should be adequately secured , so that it will not affect their viability. After completed investment, the condition of the tree stand should be monitored.

  6. Linnaeus' restless system: translation as textual engineering in eighteenth-century botany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, Bettina

    2016-04-01

    In this essay, translations of Linnaeus' Systema naturae into various European languages will be placed into the context of successively expanded editions of Linnaeus' writings. The ambition and intention of most translators was not only to make the Systema naturae accessible for practical botanical use by a wider readership, but also to supplement and correct it, and thus to shape it. By recruiting more users, translations made a significant contribution to keeping the Systema up to date and thus maintaining its practical value for decades. The need to incorporate countless additions and corrections into an existing text, to document their provenance, to identify inconsistencies, and to refer to relevant observations, descriptions, and illustrations in the botanical literature all helped to develop and refine techniques of textual montage. This form of textual engineering, becoming increasingly complex with each translation cycle, shaped the external appearance of new editions of the Systema, and reflected the modular architecture of a botanical system designed for expansion.

  7. The use of forensic botany and geology in war crimes investigations in NE Bosnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, A G

    2006-11-22

    From 1997 to 2002 the United Nations International Criminal Tribune for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) undertook the exhumation of mass graves in NE Bosnia as part of the war crimes investigations aimed at providing evidence for the prosecution of war criminals in The Hague. This involved the location and exhumation of seven former mass graves (primary sites) dug following the fall of Srebrenica in July 1995. These primary mass graves were secretly and hurriedly exhumed three months later and most of the bodies or body parts transported and reburied in a large number of secondary sites many of which were subsequently exhumed by ICTY. The aim of the pollen and soil/sediment studies was to provide an 'environmental profile' of the original site of the samples and use this to match the relocated bodies to the original mass graves. This was part of completing the chain of evidence, providing evidence of the scale and organization of the original atrocities and the subsequent attempts to conceal the evidence related to them. All the primary sites were located in areas of contrasting geology, soils and vegetation, and this allowed matching of the sediment transported in intimate contact with the bodies to the original burial sites, which in some cases were also the execution sites. In all, over 24 sites were investigated, over 240 samples collected and analyzed under low power microscopy and 65 pollen sub-samples fully analyzed. The pollen and sediment descriptions were used in conjunction with the mineralogy (using XRD) of primary and secondary sites in order to provide matches. These matches were then compared with matching evidence from ballistic studies and clothing. The evidence has been used in court and is now in the public domain. It is believed this is the first time 'environmental profiling' techniques have been used in a systematic manner in a war crimes investigation.

  8. Safed musli (Chlorophytum borivilianum): a review of its botany, ethnopharmacology and phytochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanam, Zakia; Singh, Ompal; Singh, Rampal; Bhat, Irshad Ul Haq

    2013-11-25

    Safed musli (Chlorophytum borivilianum) is an eminent medicinal plant of India and considered as a 'white gold' or 'divya aushad' in Indian systems of medicine. In Ayurveda, Chlorophytum borivilianum belongs to the group of "Vajikaran Rasayana" corroborated to its rejuvenating, aphrodisiac, natural sex tonic properties and effective in alleviating sexual disorders. It is largely used as ethnic medicine by local healers of indigenous communities of India. A thorough bibliographic investigation was carried out by analyzing worldwide accepted scientific data base (Pub Med, SciFinder, Scopus and Web of Science), thesis, recognized books, non impact and non indexed journals. Traditionally, Chlorophytum borivilianum is well known for treating male impotency in India. The multi therapeutic and nutritional importance of Chlorophytum borivilianum is attributed to the rich source of phytochemicals particularly saponins. Recently, Chlorophytum borivilianum has gained a well established domestic (Indian) and international market for being the herbal alternative of "Viagra" without any side effects. Under the trade name 'Nai Chetna', the state government of Gujarat, India, has launched a novel potency drug from Chlorophytum borivilianum. Modern pharmacological studies of Chlorophytum borivilianum have demonstrated a wide range of pharmacological activities, most importantly aphrodisiac, immunomodulatory and anticancer activities. The increased commercial exploitation of Chlorophytum borivilianum and low productivity of this endangered plant has raised the concern over its conservation. It has been envisaged that efforts should be made to standardize, encourage and popularize the cultivation of Chlorophytum borivilianum as a commercial crop. The analysis of previous pharmacological investigations suggested lack of substantial scientific evidences in various studies and do not stand the test of critical assessment. Due to high economic value, Chlorophytum borivilianum has also encountered a problem of adulteration with closely resembling medicinally inferior species. The studies available on toxicity, safety and quality of Chlorophytum borivilianum are inadequate for providing information on commercial utilization. Thus, the present review summarizes comprehensive information on Chlorophytum borivilianum and possible scope for future research to fill the existing lacunae on its different aspects of the study. © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Botany, genetics and ethnobotany: a crossed investigation on the elusive tapir's diet in French Guiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibert, Fabrice; Sabatier, Daniel; Andrivot, Judith; Scotti-Saintagne, Caroline; Gonzalez, Sophie; Prévost, Marie-Françoise; Grenand, Pierre; Chave, Jérome; Caron, Henri; Richard-Hansen, Cécile

    2011-01-01

    While the populations of large herbivores are being depleted in many tropical rainforests, the importance of their trophic role in the ecological functioning and biodiversity of these ecosystems is still not well evaluated. This is due to the outstanding plant diversity that they feed upon and the inherent difficulties involved in observing their elusive behaviour. Classically, the diet of elusive tropical herbivores is studied through the observation of browsing signs and macroscopic analysis of faeces or stomach contents. In this study, we illustrate that the original coupling of classic methods with genetic and ethnobotanical approaches yields information both about the diet diversity, the foraging modalities and the potential impact on vegetation of the largest terrestrial mammal of Amazonia, the lowland tapir. The study was conducted in the Guianan shield, where the ecology of tapirs has been less investigated. We identified 92 new species, 51 new genera and 13 new families of plants eaten by tapirs. We discuss the relative contribution of our different approaches, notably the contribution of genetic barcoding, used for the first time to investigate the diet of a large tropical mammal, and how local traditional ecological knowledge is accredited and valuable for research on the ecology of elusive animals.

  10. Botanical smuts and hermaphrodites: Lydia Becker, Darwin's botany, and education reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianquitto, Tina

    2013-06-01

    In 1868, Lydia Becker (1827-1890), the renowned Manchester suffragist, announced in a talk before the British Association for the Advancement of Science that the mind had no sex. A year later, she presented original botanical research at the BAAS, contending that a parasitic fungus forced normally single-sex female flowers of Lychnis diurna to develop stamens and become hermaphroditic. This essay uncovers the complex relationship between Lydia Becker's botanical research and her stance on women's rights by investigating how her interest in evolutionary theory, as well as her correspondence with Charles Darwin, critically informed her reform agendas by providing her with a new vocabulary for advocating for equality. One of the facts that Becker took away from her work on Lychnis was that even supposedly fixed, dichotomous categories such as biological sex became unfocused under the evolutionary lens. The details of evolutionary theory, from specific arguments on structural adaptations to more encompassing theories on heredity (i.e., pangenesis), informed Becker's understanding of human physiology. At the same time, Becker's belief in the fundamental equality of the sexes enabled her to perceive the distinction between inherent, biological differences and culturally contingent ones. She applied biological principles to social constructs as she asked: Do analogous evolutionary forces act on humans?

  11. A grass molecular identification system for forensic botany: a critical evaluation of the strengths and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Jodie; Gilmore, Simon R; Robertson, James; Peakall, Rod

    2009-11-01

    Plant material is frequently encountered in criminal investigations but often overlooked as potential evidence. We designed a DNA-based molecular identification system for 100 Australian grasses that consisted of a series of polymerase chain reaction assays that enabled the progressive identification of grasses to different taxonomic levels. The identification system was based on DNA sequence variation at four chloroplast and two mitochondrial loci. Seventeen informative indels and 68 single-nucleotide polymorphisms were utilized as molecular markers for subfamily to species-level identification. To identify an unknown sample to subfamily level required a minimum of four markers or nine markers for species identification. The accuracy of the system was confirmed by blind tests. We have demonstrated "proof of concept" of a molecular identification system for trace botanical samples. Our evaluation suggests that the adoption of a system that combines this approach with DNA sequencing could assist the morphological identification of grasses found as forensic evidence.

  12. Botany, ethnomedicines, phytochemistry and pharmacology of Himalayan paeony (Paeonia emodi Royle.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Mushtaq; Malik, Khafsa; Tariq, Akash; Zhang, Guolin; Yaseen, Ghulam; Rashid, Neelam; Sultana, Shazia; Zafar, Muhammad; Ullah, Kifayat; Khan, Muhammad Pukhtoon Zada

    2018-06-28

    Himalayan paeony (Paeonia emodi Royle.) is an important species used to treat various diseases. This study aimed to compile the detailed traditional medicinal uses, phytochemistry, pharmacology and toxicological investigations on P. emodi. This study also highlights taxonomic validity, quality of experimental designs and shortcomings in previously reported information on Himalayan paeony. The data was extracted from unpublished theses (Pakistan, China, India and Nepal), and different published research articles confined to pharmacology, phytochemistry and antimicrobial activities using different databases through specific keywords. The relevant information regarding medicinal uses, taxonomic/common names, part used, collection and identification source, authentication, voucher specimen number, plant extracts and their characterization, isolation and identification of phytochemicals, methods of study in silico, in vivo or in vitro, model organism used, dose and duration, minimal active concentration, zone of inhibition (antimicrobial study), bioactive compound(s), mechanism of action on single or multiple targets, and toxicological information. P. emodi is reported for diverse medicinal uses with pharmacological properties like antioxidant, nephroprotective, lipoxygenase inhibitory, cognition and oxidative stress release, cytotoxic, anti-inflammatory, antiepileptic, anticonvulsant, haemaglutination, alpha-chymotrypsin inhibitory, hepatoprotective, hepatic chromes and pharmacokinetics of carbamazepine expression, β-glucuronidase inhibitory, spasmolytic and spasmogenic, and airway relaxant. Data confined to its taxonomic validity, shows 10% studies with correct taxonomic name while 90% studies with incorrect taxonomic, pharmacopeial and common names. The literature reviewed, shows lack of collection source (11 reports), without proper source of identification (15 reports), 33 studies without voucher specimen number, 26 reports lack information on authentic herbarium submission and most of the studies (90%) without validation of taxonomic names using recognized databases. In reported methods, 67% studies without characterization of extracts, 25% lack proper dose, 40% without duration and 31% reports lack information on proper controls. Similarly, only 18% studies reports active compound(s) responsible for pharmacological activities, 14% studies show minimal active concentration, only 2.5% studies report mechanism of action on target while none of the reports mentioned in silico approach. P. emodi is endemic to Himalayan region (Pakistan, China, India and Nepal) with diverse traditional therapeutic uses. Majority of reviewed studies showed confusion in its taxonomic validity, incomplete methodologies and ambiguous findings. Keeping in view the immense uses of P. emodi in various traditional medicinal systems, holistic pharmacological approaches in combination with reverse pharmacology, system biology, and "omics" technologies are recommended to improve the quality of research which leads to natural drug discovery development at global perspectives. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Botany and the Taming of Female Passion: Rousseau and Contemporary Educational Concepts of Young Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinau, Elke

    2012-01-01

    Central in the analyses of women's and gender studies within the history of education has been Rousseau's (Emil oder Uber die Erziehung, 12th edn. Ferdinand Schoningh, Paderborn 1762) educational novel Emile, especially Book 5, which deals with the education of Sophie, Emilie's future spouse. Given the lasting interest in the person of Rousseau…

  14. Warburgia: a comprehensive review of the botany, traditional uses and phytochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Carmen M; Viljoen, Alvaro M

    2015-05-13

    The genus Warburgia (Canellaceae) is represented by several medicinal trees found exclusively on the African continent. Traditionally, extracts and products produced from Warburgia species are regarded as important natural African antibiotics and have been used extensively as part of traditional healing practices for the treatment of fungal, bacterial and protozoal infections in both humans and animals. We here aim to collate and review the fragmented information on the ethnobotany, phytochemistry and biological activities of ethnomedicinally important Warburgia species and present recommendations for future research. Peer-reviewed articles using "Warburgia" as search term ("all fields") were retrieved from Scopus, ScienceDirect, SciFinder and Google Scholar with no specific time frame set for the search. In addition, various books were consulted that contained botanical and ethnopharmacological information. The ethnopharmacology, phytochemistry and biological activity of Warburgia are reviewed. Most of the biological activities are attributed to the drimane sesquiterpenoids, including polygodial, warburganal, muzigadial, mukaadial and ugandensial, flavonoids and miscellaneous compounds present in the various species. In addition to anti-infective properties, Warburgia extracts are also used to treat a wide range of ailments, including stomach aches, fever and headaches, which may also be a manifestation of infections. The need to record anecdotal evidence is emphasised and conservation efforts are highlighted to contribute to the protection and preservation of one of Africa's most coveted botanical resources. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A comprehensive analysis on Symplocos racemosa Roxb.: Traditional uses, botany, phytochemistry and pharmacological activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Niyati; Acharya, Sanjeev; Shah, Unnati; Shah, Ripal; Hingorani, Lal

    2016-04-02

    Symplocos racemosa Roxb. belongs to a unigeneric family Symplocaceae, known as lodhra in Sanskrit; is a small evergreen tree, found throughout the tropical and sub-tropical countries. Ethnobotanical literature indicates use of S. racemosa in treatment of eye disease, skin diseases, ear diseases, liver and bowel complaints, tumors, uterine disorders, spongy and bleeding gums, asthma, fever, snake-bite, gonorrhea and arthritis. The main aim of this review is to provide detailed phytopharmacological profile on S. racemosa in support with the traditional practices and ethnomedicinal uses. All relevant worldwide accepted databases have been searched for the name "S. racemosa" along with other literature from Indian Classical texts and Pharmacopoeias. The accessible literatures available on S. racemosa, were collected through electronic search on Pub med, Scopus, Science direct and traditional reports. S. racemosa is important Indian traditional drug used in many Ayurvedic and herbal formulations for treatment of liver as well as uterine disorders and leucorrhea. Majority of phytopharmacological reports are on stem bark of the plant which include anti-cancer, hepatoprotective, anti-oxidant, anti-androgenic effect, anti-inflammatory, wound healing activity and anti-diabetic effects. Phytochemical studies indicated presence of many phenolic glycosides like symplocoside, triterpenoids like betulinic acid, acetyloleanolic acid and oleanolic acid and flavonoids like quercetin which might have contributed to the observed protective effects. Many ethnobotanical claims have been confirmed through systematic in-vitro and in-vivo pharmacological studies on different extracts of stem bark and isolated constituents. However, systematic studies on the bio-markers are desirable to establish mode of action and to validate the traditional claim in clinical practice after proper safety assessment. The conservation data of genus Symplocos showed risk of extinction due to restricted distribution in the wild hence systematic techniques should be developed for the maintenance of this plant. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Beyond botany to genetic resource preservation: the S. P. Vander Kloet Vaccinium L. collections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dr. S. P. Vander Kloet, botanist, traveled the world examining and obtaining specimens to redefine infrageneric taxonomic units within Vaccinium L., family Ericaceae. Besides his botanical treatises, his legacy includes herbarium voucher specimens and ex situ genetic resource collections including a...

  17. Seeing Coloured Fruits: Utilisation of the Theory of Adaptive Memory in Teaching Botany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokop, Pavol; Fancovicová, Jana

    2014-01-01

    Plants are characterised by a great diversity of easily observed features such as colours or shape, but children show low interest in learning about them. Here, we integrated modern theory of adaptive memory and evolutionary views of the function of fruit colouration on children's retention of information. Survival-relevant (fruit toxicity) and…

  18. Preliminary results of sequential monitoring of simulated clandestine graves in Colombia, South America, using ground penetrating radar and botany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Carlos Martin; Pringle, Jamie K; Saumett, Miguel; Hernández, Orlando

    2015-03-01

    In most Latin American countries there are significant numbers of missing people and forced disappearances, 68,000 alone currently in Colombia. Successful detection of shallow buried human remains by forensic search teams is difficult in varying terrain and climates. This research has created three simulated clandestine burial styles at two different depths commonly encountered in Latin America to gain knowledge of optimum forensic geophysics detection techniques. Repeated monitoring of the graves post-burial was undertaken by ground penetrating radar. Radar survey 2D profile results show reasonable detection of ½ clothed pig cadavers up to 19 weeks of burial, with decreasing confidence after this time. Simulated burials using skeletonized human remains were not able to be imaged after 19 weeks of burial, with beheaded and burnt human remains not being able to be detected throughout the survey period. Horizontal radar time slices showed good early results up to 19 weeks of burial as more area was covered and bi-directional surveys were collected, but these decreased in amplitude over time. Deeper burials were all harder to image than shallower ones. Analysis of excavated soil found soil moisture content almost double compared to those reported from temperate climate studies. Vegetation variations over the simulated graves were also noted which would provide promising indicators for grave detection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The Teaching of Botany in Last Century in Portugal: analysis of school textbooks of primary school education 1

    OpenAIRE

    Guimarães, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    O presente estudo assume como objetivo principal analisar qual a importância que tem sido conferida, em Portugal, à área de Botânica nos livros didáticos de Ciências da Natureza do Ensino Fundamental 1. Na tentativa de perceber de que forma ocorreu uma evolução na abordagem de conteúdos de Botânica, apreciamos livros didáticos baseados em onze princípios. Esta apreciação, apoiada numa abordagem metodológica assente na análise de conteúdo, pelo estabelecimento de categorias a posteriori, e na ...

  20. Conceptions of Landscape-Ecological Relevance Emerged in the Czech Botany during the Second Half of Twentieth Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovář Pavel

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes those substantial theoretical concepts or methods for applications within interdisciplinary or practical uses published by Czech autors (geobotanists = ecological botanists, plant ecologists and ecophysiologists during the second half of the 20th century, that were internationally cited. All selected thematical clusters are of landscape-ecological relevance through various contexts. Examples include the concepts of (potential reconstructed vegetation in maps (R. Neuhäusl, Z. Neuhäuslová, linear vegetation features (corridors in landscape and deductive classification of vegetation (K. Kopecký, analysis of soil seed bank (Z. Kropáč, dependency of macrophyte plant stands on ecodynamics (S. Hejný, dynamic periodicity in segetal vegetation (Z. Kropáč, E. Hadač, S. Hejný, anemo-orographic system explaining species richness in mountain regions (J. Jeník, productivity in grassland ecosystems (M. Rychnovská, J. Květ, elementary landscape units based on homogenity and potential vegetation (E. Hadač, landscape dispensation phenomena (V. Ložek, afforestation of coastal sandy dunes – the Netherlands, and polluted areas - the Czech Republic (J. Fanta, invasive plants and invasions into landscapes (M. Rejmánek.

  1. Society for College Science Teachers: Putting Inquiry Teaching to the Test--Enhancing Learning in College Botany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, Thomas; Shelly, Chad; Zimmerman, Rachel

    2007-01-01

    Can you imagine a class where students cover the content with each other rather than simply listening to the professor's lecture? Can you envision students developing their own laboratory investigations and quizzing each other weekly to check for understanding? Well, that's pretty much how the major science organizations across the nation are…

  2. Textbooks in the teaching of Botany in primary school education in Portugal : promoting critical reflection on environmental issues?

    OpenAIRE

    Guimarães, Fernando

    2009-01-01

    Textbooks are of great importance to school and teaching especially in the conformation of forms and contents of pedagogical knowledge. In what natural sciences are concerned, textbooks are aimed at promoting scientific literacy, environment education, the understanding of social and ecological reality. Textbooks develop also important pedagogical functions due to sequence and rhythm of the transmission of knowledge through, for instance, activities by which it is promoted and eva...

  3. Different dimensions in teaching of botany in Portugal : analysis of texttbooks of primary school Education (1900-2000)

    OpenAIRE

    Guimarães, Fernando

    2011-01-01

    Textbooks are of great importance to school and teaching especially in the conformation of forms and contents of pedagogical knowledge. In what natural sciences are concerned, textbooks are aimed at promoting scientific literacy, environment education, the understanding of social and ecological reality. Textbooks develop also important pedagogical functions due to sequence and rhythm of the transmission of knowledge through, for instance, activities by which it is promoted and evalua...

  4. Me'en ritual, medicinal and other plants : a contribution to South-West Ethiopian ethno-botany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbink, J.

    1993-01-01

    The present article offers a descriptive survey of the most important plants used by the Southeast Surmic-speaking Me'en in southwestern Käfa, Ethiopia, based on information gathered over a period of 14-months field research (1989-1991). Data covering the Me'en name of each plant, the scientific

  5. Application of plant DNA markers in forensic botany: genetic comparison of Quercus evidence leaves to crime scene trees using microsatellites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craft, Kathleen J; Owens, Jeffrey D; Ashley, Mary V

    2007-01-05

    As highly polymorphic DNA markers become increasingly available for a wide range of plant and animal species, there will be increasing opportunities for applications to forensic investigations. To date, however, relatively few studies have reported using DNA profiles of non-human species to place suspects at or near crime scenes. Here we describe an investigation of a double homicide of a female and her near-term fetus. Leaf material taken from a suspect's vehicle was identified to be that of sand live oak, Quercus geminata, the same tree species that occurred near a shallow grave where the victims were found. Quercus-specific DNA microsatellites were used to genotype both dried and fresh material from trees located near the burial site and from the material taken from the suspect's car. Samples from the local population of Q. geminata were also collected and genotyped in order to demonstrate that genetic variation at four microsatellite loci was sufficient to assign leaves to an individual tree with high statistical certainty. The cumulative average probability of identity for these four loci was 2.06x10(-6). DNA was successfully obtained from the dried leaf material although PCR amplification was more difficult than amplification of DNA from fresh leaves. The DNA profiles of the dried leaves from the suspect's car did not match those of the trees near the crime scene. Although this investigation did not provide evidence that could be used against the suspect, it does demonstrate the potential for plant microsatellite markers providing physical evidence that links plant materials to live plants at or near crime scenes.

  6. The natural history of Caroline Atoll, Southern Line Islands. Part I. History, physiography, botany, and isle descriptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepler, A.K.; Kepler, C.B.

    1994-01-01

    conclusion: Lushly wooded Caroline Atoll, with the majority of its 39 islets (399 ha of land) either in near-pristine condition or having recovered remarkably from past disturbance, is one of the least spoiled atolls in the Pacific. Uninhabited, it harbors plant ecosystems and breeding seabirds (Pt. II) of national and international importance. Its marine and terrestrial ecosystems are prime outdoor ecological laboratories for research on geological processes including ground water, sea level changes, the dynamics of motu formation, fish poisoning, and numerous facets of ecology including plant succession and Pisonia growth rates. Caroline boasts prime coral reefs thickly studded with Tridacna clams, substantial numbers of coconut crabs, breeding sites for green turtles, wintering grounds for shorebirds including the rare Bristle-thighed Curlew, ancient Tuamotuan marae, and a crystalline, unpolluted lagoon. The variety, abundance, and quality of its flora and fauna qualify it for status as an officially recognized international preserve (Pt. II, Sect. G). Efforts toward its conservation have thus far been unsuccessful: in 1992 it was leased to a private French businessman who is currently fishing the reefs for commercial profit, as well as disturbing seabird, turtle and coconut crab populations.

  7. Antiquity, botany, origin and domestication of Jatropha curcas (Euphorbiaceae), a plant species with potential for biodiesel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, L A S; Missio, R F; Dias, D C F S

    2012-08-16

    Jatropha curcas is a multi-purpose plant species, with many advantages for biodiesel production. Its potential oil productivity is 1.9 t/ha, beginning the fourth year after planting. Nevertheless, limitations such as high harvest cost, lack of scientific konowledge and low profitability have prevented it from being utilized commercially. In order to provide information that could be useful to improve the status of this species as a bioenergy plant, we elucidated the center of origin and the center of domestication of J. curcas (Mexico). Evidence of the antiquity of knowledge of J. curcas by Olmeca people, who lived 3500-5000 years ago, reinforces its Mexican origin. The existence of non-toxic types, which only exist in that country, along with DNA studies, also strongly suggest that Mexico is the domestication center of this species. In Brazil, the Northern region of Minas Gerais State presents types with the highest oil content. Here we propose this region as a secondary center of diversity of J. curcas.

  8. Inspiration in the harness of daily labor. Darwin, botany, and the triumph of evolution, 1859-1868.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellon, Richard

    2011-09-01

    Charles Darwin hoped that a large body of working naturalists would embrace evolution after the Origin of Species appeared in late 1859. He was disappointed. His evolutionary ideas at first made painfully little progress in the scientific community. But by 1863 the tide had turned dramatically, and within five years evolution became scientific orthodoxy in Britain. The Origin's reception followed this peculiar trajectory because Darwin had not initially tied its theory to productive original scientific investigation, which left him vulnerable to charges of reckless speculation. The debate changed with his successful application of evolution to original problems, most notably orchid fertilization, the subject of a well-received book in 1862. Most of Darwin's colleagues found the argument of the Origin convincing when they realized that it functioned productively in the day-to-day work of science-and not before. The conceptual force of the Origin, however outwardly persuasive, acquired full scientific legitimacy only when placed "in the harness of daily labour".

  9. Botany and zoology in the late seventeenth-century Philippines: the work of Georg Josef Camel SJ (1661-1706).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Raquel A G

    2009-10-01

    Georg Josef Camel (1661-1706) went to the Spanish colony of the Philippine Islands as a Jesuit lay brother in 1687, and he remained there until his death. Throughout his time in the Philippines, Camel collected examples of the flora and fauna, which he drew and described in detail. This paper offers an overview of his life, his publications and the Camel manuscripts, drawings and specimens that are preserved among the Sloane Manuscripts in the British Library and in the Sloane Herbarium at the Natural History Museum, London. It also discusses Camel's links and exchanges with scientifically minded plant collectors and botanists in London, Madras and Batavia. Among those with whom Camel corresponded were John Ray, James Petiver, and the Dutch physician Willem Ten Rhijne.

  10. Enhancing Hispanic Minority Undergraduates' Botany Laboratory Experiences: Implementation of an Inquiry-Based Plant Tissue Culture Module Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siritunga, Dimuth; Navas, Vivian; Diffoot, Nanette

    2012-01-01

    Early involvement of students in hands-on research experiences are known to demystify research and promote the pursuit of careers in science. But in large enrollment departments such opportunities for undergraduates to participate in research are rare. To counteract such lack of opportunities, inquiry-based laboratory module in plant tissue…

  11. Six Units for Primary (K-2) Gifted/Talented Students. Self (Psychology), Plants (Botany), Animals (Zoology), Measurement (Mathematics), Space (Astronomy), Computers (Technology).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCallister, Corliss

    This curriculum for gifted/talented students in kindergarten through grade 2 focuses on the cognitive, affective, and psychomotor domains in the areas of language arts, mathematics, music, physical education (dance), science, social studies, theatre, and visual arts. The curriculum is student centered, experientially based, exploratory,…

  12. Student Peer Review as a Tool for Efficiently Achieving Subject-Specific and Generic Learning Outcomes: Examples in Botany at the Faculty of Agriculture, University of Belgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarrie, Sofija Pekic

    2007-01-01

    Several teachers at the Faculty of Agriculture at the University of Belgrade recognised the need to improve teaching methods in order to actively involve students in the teaching process, help them learn more effectively, and reduce the low exam pass rate. This led to a purpose-designed course on improving academic skills, after which the author…

  13. Uncovering patterns of interest in useful plants. Frequency analysis of individual students’ interest types as a tool for planning botany teaching units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Pany

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presented examines how useful plants can help counteracting “plant blindness” – a phenomenon leading people to overlook plants in everyday-life. Recent research indicates that people are most likely interested in useful plants, hence this group of plants could be used to trigger interest in botanical content in general. This study has investigated the structure of interest in five subgroups of useful plants (medicinal plants, stimulant herbal drugs, spice plants, edible plants, and ornamental plants. For this purpose, the FEIN-questionnaire (Fragebogen zur Erhebung des Interesses an Nutzpflanzen = Questionnaire acquiring interest in useful plants was filled in by N = 1299 pupils from grade 5 to 12. Data analysis shows (for all age groups and both genders that medicinal plants and stimulant herbal drugs trigger high interest while spice plants, edible plants and ornamental plants raise only lower interest. However, mean values do not allow conclusions on individual level (e.g. in a school class. In order to gain information about the interest structure in a specific target group teachers deal with in practice, we have analysed the interests on individual level using frequency analysis of different interest types. Results show that stimulant herbal drugs seem to strongly polarize students, whereas medicinal plants are interesting for almost the whole sample. Eventually, medicinal plants turned out to be well suited to introduce botanical content by means of plants catching the interest of as many students as possible. Therefore, medicinal plants should be established as flagships counteracting plant blindness.

  14. Jasmonates: biosynthesis, perception, signal transduction and action in plant stress response, growth and development. An update to the 2007 review in Annals of Botany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasternack, C; Hause, B

    2013-06-01

    Jasmonates are important regulators in plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses as well as in development. Synthesized from lipid-constituents, the initially formed jasmonic acid is converted to different metabolites including the conjugate with isoleucine. Important new components of jasmonate signalling including its receptor were identified, providing deeper insight into the role of jasmonate signalling pathways in stress responses and development. The present review is an update of the review on jasmonates published in this journal in 2007. New data of the last five years are described with emphasis on metabolites of jasmonates, on jasmonate perception and signalling, on cross-talk to other plant hormones and on jasmonate signalling in response to herbivores and pathogens, in symbiotic interactions, in flower development, in root growth and in light perception. The last few years have seen breakthroughs in the identification of JASMONATE ZIM DOMAIN (JAZ) proteins and their interactors such as transcription factors and co-repressors, and the crystallization of the jasmonate receptor as well as of the enzyme conjugating jasmonate to amino acids. Now, the complex nature of networks of jasmonate signalling in stress responses and development including hormone cross-talk can be addressed.

  15. Visions of the past and dreams of the future in the Orient: the Irano-Turanian region from classical botany to evolutionary studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manafzadeh, Sara; Staedler, Yannick M; Conti, Elena

    2017-08-01

    Ever since the 19th century, the immense arid lands of the Orient, now called the Irano-Turanian (IT) floristic region, attracted the interest of European naturalists with their tremendous plant biodiversity. Covering approximately 30% of the surface of Eurasia (16000000 km 2 ), the IT region is one of the largest floristic regions of the world. The IT region represents one of the hotspots of evolutionary and biological diversity in the Old World, and serves as a source of xerophytic taxa for neighbouring regions. Moreover, it is the cradle of the numerous species domesticated in the Fertile Crescent. Over the last 200 years, naturalists outlined different borders for the IT region. Yet, the delimitation and evolutionary history of this area remain one of the least well-understood fields of global biogeography, even though it is crucial to explaining the distribution of life in Eurasia. No comprehensive review of the biogeographical delimitations nor of the role of geological and climatic changes in the evolution of the IT region is currently available. After considering the key role of floristic regions in biogeography, we review the history of evolving concepts about the borders and composition of the IT region over the past 200 years and outline a tentative circumscription for it. We also summarise current knowledge on the geological and climatic history of the IT region. We then use this knowledge to generate specific evolutionary hypotheses to explain how different geological, palaeoclimatic, and ecological factors contributed to range expansion and contraction, thus shaping patterns of speciation in the IT region over time and space. Both historical and ecological biogeography should be applied to understand better the floristic diversification of the region. This will ultimately require evolutionary comparative analyses based on integrative phylogenetic, geological, climatic, ecological, and species distribution studies on the region. Furthermore, an understanding of evolutionary and ecological processes will play a major role in regional planning for protecting biodiversity of the IT region in facing climatic change. With this review, we aim to introduce the IT floristic region to a broader audience of evolutionary, ecological and systematic biologists, thus promoting cutting-edge research on this area and raising awareness of this vast and diverse, yet understudied, part of the world. © 2016 Cambridge Philosophical Society.

  16. [The journal "Broteria," Jesuit botanists and Gonçalo Sampaio. Exchange of plants and ideas, and the development of botany in Portugal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, João Paulo

    2010-01-01

    The journal Broteria has covered a long path, since its foundation in 1902 until the mid 20's, when it stands as one of the best journals of natural history and a voice of the renewal of the natural sciences in Portugal. Broteria's success was due, mainly, to the remarkable qualities of its founders and main editors: their working capacity, intellectual standards and perseverance as well as the ability to establish a network of naturalists who sent them biological collections from remote regions and the ability to adapt to exile, while continuing to work and focusing their studies on the natural history of the exile country. The maintenance, in regular functioning, of their schools, and the opening to the collaboration of non Jesuit naturalists, such as the botanists from Oporto, also contributed to the success of Broteria.

  17. Report on the Willi Hennig Society workshop "Phylogenetic analysis: theory and practice" at the Institute of Botany Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Drábková, Lenka; Pačes, Václav

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 1 (2008), s. 108-109 ISSN 0748-3007 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516; CEZ:AV0Z50520701; CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : phylogeny workshop * phylogenetic programmes * theory and practise Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 3.515, year: 2008

  18. [The alphabet of nature and the alphabet of culture in the eighteenth century. botany, diplomatics, and ethno-linguistics according to Carl von Linné, Johann Christoph Gatterer, and Christian Wilhelm Büttner : Botany, Diplomatics, and ethno-linguistics according to Carl von Linné, Johann Christoph Gatterer, and Christian Wilhelm Büttner].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gierl, Martin

    2010-01-01

    In the middle of the eighteenth century, Carl von Linné, Johann Christoph Gatterer, and Christian Wilhelm Büttner attempted to realize the old idea of deciphering the alphabet of the world, which Francis Bacon had raised as a general postulate of science. This article describes these attempts and their interrelations. Linné used the model of the alphabet to classify plants according to the characters of this fruiting body. Gatterer, one of the leading German historians during the Enlightenment, adopted the botanical method of classification by genus and species to classify the history of scripts. He used the forms of the alphabetic characters to measure the age of manuscripts and to map the process of history as a genealogy of culture. Gatterer collaborated closely with Büttner, the first Göttingen professor of natural history. Büttner constructed a general alphabet of languages which connected the phonetics of language with the historically known alphabets. Early on, diplomatics and ethnography combined the natural order of natural history and the cultural order of the alphabet with the attempt to register development and to document development by the evolution of forms. Based on the shared model of the alphabet and on the common necessity to classify their empirical material, natural history and the description of culture were related attempts in the middle of the eighteenth century to comprehend the alphabetically organized nature and a naturally ordered culture.

  19. A narrative of the expedition to Botany Bay : with an account of New South Wales, its productions, inhabitants, &c. to which is subjoined, a list of the civil and military establishments at Port Jackson / by Watkin Tench

    Trove (Australia)

    Tench, Watkin, 1759?-1833

    2008-01-01

    ... Convicts to the Departure of the Ships from England From the Departure to the Arrival of the Fleet at Teneriffe From the Fleet s Arrival at Teneriffe to its Departure for Rio de Janeiro in the Brazils ...

  20. Linguistic differences and similarities in the abstracts of botany and literature = Diferenças e similaridades linguísticas entre os resumos da botânica e da literatura

    OpenAIRE

    Paz, Juliana Ferreira

    2012-01-01

    O estudo de linguagens específicas, que estão ligadas a certas áreas de pesquisa, tem se tornado cada vez mais comum e essencial para a compreensão da língua como um todo. Portanto, este artigo tem por objetivo estudar, analisar e comparar a linguagem existente em abstracts a partir de duas diferentes áreas de estudo: a Botânica e a Literatura. A pesquisa relatada neste artigo tem a intenção de identificar as semelhanças e as diferenças linguísticas entre essas duas áreas e classificá-las de ...

  1. An English-Spanish Glossary of Terminology Used in Forestry, Range, Wildlife, Fishery, Soils, and Botany = Glosario en Ingles-Espanol de Terminologia Usada en Forestales, Pastizales, Fauna, Silvestre, Pesqueria, Suelos, y Botanica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Alvin Leroy

    This document presents English-Spanish/Spanish-English equivalent translations of scientific and management terms commonly used in the field of natural resource management. The glossary is composed of two sections. Section 1 contains the English to Spanish translations, while Section 2 provides the Spanish to English translations. Each section is…

  2. Linguistic differences and similarities in the abstracts of botany and literature = Diferenças e similaridades linguísticas entre os resumos da botânica e da literatura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paz, Juliana Ferreira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available O estudo de linguagens específicas, que estão ligadas a certas áreas de pesquisa, tem se tornado cada vez mais comum e essencial para a compreensão da língua como um todo. Portanto, este artigo tem por objetivo estudar, analisar e comparar a linguagem existente em abstracts a partir de duas diferentes áreas de estudo: a Botânica e a Literatura. A pesquisa relatada neste artigo tem a intenção de identificar as semelhanças e as diferenças linguísticas entre essas duas áreas e classificá-las de acordo com a gramática. A análise dos resultados mostrou que, na linguagem utilizada nos abstracts de Literatura, há um frequente uso de adjetivos, enquanto que, na linguagem dos abstracts da Botânica, há um uso frequente de substantivos

  3. An English-Spanish glossary of terminology used in forestry, range, wildlife, fishery, soils, and botany (Glosario en Ingles-Espanol de terminologia usada en forestales, pastizales, fauna, silvestre, pesqueria, suelos, y botanica)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvin Leroy Medina

    1988-01-01

    The English-Spanish/Spanish-English equivalent translations of scientific and management terms (jargon) commonly used in the field of natural resource management are presented. The glossary is useful in improving communications and fostering understanding between Spanish- and English-speaking persons.

  4. Nomenclatural and taxonomic problems related to the electronic publication of new nomina and nomenclatural acts in zoology, with brief comments on optical discs and on the situation in botany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Alain; Crochet, Pierre-André; Dickinson, Edward C; Nemésio, André; Aescht, Erna; Bauer, Aaron M; Blagoderov, Vladimir; Bour, Roger; De Carvalho, Marcelo R; Desutter-Grandcolas, Laure; Frétey, Thierry; Jäger, Peter; Koyamba, Victoire; Lavilla, Esteban O; Löbl, Ivan; Louchart, Antoine; Malécot, Valéry; Schatz, Heinrich; Ohler, Annemarie

    2013-11-11

    In zoological nomenclature, to be potentially valid, nomenclatural novelties (i.e., new nomina and nomenclatural acts) need first to be made available, that is, published in works qualifying as publications as defined by the International Code of zoological Nomenclature ("the Code"). In September 2012, the Code was amended in order to allow the recognition of works electronically published online after 2011 as publications available for the purpose of zoological nomenclature, provided they meet several conditions, notably a preregistration of the work in ZooBank. Despite these new Rules, several of the long-discussed problems concerning the electronic publication of new nomina and nomenclatural acts have not been resolved. The publication of this amendment provides an opportunity to discuss some of these in detail. It is important to note that: (1) all works published only online before 2012 are nomenclaturally unavailable; (2) printed copies of the PDFs of works which do not have their own ISSN or ISBN, and which are not obtainable free of charge or by purchase, do not qualify as publications but must be seen as facsimiles of unavailable works and are unable to provide nomenclatural availability to any nomenclatural novelties they may contain; (3) prepublications online of later released online publications are unavailable, i.e., they do not advance the date of publication; (4) the publication dates of works for which online prepublications had been released are not those of these prepublications and it is critical that the real release date of such works appear on the actual final electronic publication, but this is not currently the case in electronic periodicals that distribute such online prepublications and which still indicate on their websites and PDFs the date of release of prepublication as that of publication of the work; (5) supplementary online materials and subsequent formal corrections of either paper or electronic publications distributed only online are nomenclaturally unavailable; (6) nomenclatural information provided on online websites that do not have a fixed content and format, with ISSN or ISBN, is unavailable. We give precise examples of many of these nomenclatural problems. Several of them, when they arise, are due to the fact that the availability of nomenclatural novelties now depends on information that will have to be sought not from the work itself but from extrinsic evidence. As shown by several examples discussed here, an electronic document can be modified while keeping the same DOI and publication date, which is not compatible with the requirements of zoological nomenclature. Therefore, another system of registration of electronic documents as permanent and inalterable will have to be devised. ZooBank also clearly needs to be improved in several respects. Mention in a work of its registration number (LSID) in ZooBank would seem to be possible only if this registration has occurred previously, but some works that have purportedly been registered in ZooBank are in fact missing on this web application. In conclusion, we offer recommendations to authors, referees, editors, publishers, libraries and the International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature, in the hope that such problems can be limited along with the potential chaos in zoological nomenclature that could result, if careful attention is not paid to the problems we highlight here, from a somewhat misplaced, and perhaps now widespread, understanding that electronic publication of nomenclatural novelties is now allowed and straightforward. We suggest that, as long as the problematic points linked to the new amendment and to electronic publication as a whole are not resolved, nomenclatural novelties continue to be published in paper-printed journals that have so far shown editorial competence regarding taxonomy and nomenclature, which is not the case of several recent electronic-only published journals.

  5. A Catskill Flora and Economic Botany, III: Apetalae. Including the Poplars, Willows, Hickories, Birches, Beeches, Oaks, Elms, Nettles, Sorrels, Docks, and Smartweeds. Bulletin No. 443, New York State Museum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Karl L.

    This compendium deals with the ecology and economic importance of the poplars, willows, hickories, birches, beeches, oaks, elms, nettles, sorrels, docks, and smartweeds growing in New York's Catskills. Provided are keys for identifying each plant to species by flowers, foliage, or winter buds. A line drawing accompanies a summary of basic data…

  6. Engaging Students by Emphasising Botanical Concepts over Techniques: Innovative Practical Exercises Using Virtual Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonser, Stephen P.; de Permentier, Patrick; Green, Jacinta; Velan, Gary M.; Adam, Paul; Kumar, Rakesh K.

    2013-01-01

    Student interest in botany and enrolment in plant sciences courses tends to be low compared to that in other biological disciplines. One potential way of increasing student interest in botany is to focus on course material designed to raise student enthusiasm and satisfaction. Here, we introduce and evaluate virtual microscopy in botany teaching.…

  7. 75 FR 51477 - Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, Monument Advisory Committee: Call for Nominations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-20

    ... financial disclosure requirements in the Ethics in Government Act and 5 CFR 2634. Travel reimbursement is... expertise: Archaeology; Botany; Geology; Paleontology; Social science; Systems ecology; and Wildlife biology...

  8. Early modern natural history: Contributions from the Americas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Early modern natural history: Contributions from the Americas and India. Rajesh Kochhar. Perspectives Volume 37 Issue ... Keywords. India; medical botany; natural history; scientific botany; the Americas. Author Affiliations. Rajesh Kochhar1. Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Mohali 140 306 Punjab, India ...

  9. Isolation of Antidiabetic Principle from Bougainvillea spectabilis Willd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Department of Botany, Multanimal Modi (PG). College, Modinagar, Ghaziabad, India, and a voucher specimen (no. MMCM/02/013) deposited in the herbarium of Department of. Botany, Multanimal Modi (PG) College,. Modinagar, for future reference. Extraction and isolation. Stem bark of B. spectabilis was air-dried under a.

  10. Interdisciplinary Workshop on the Physical-Chemical-Biological Processes Affecting Archeological Sites Held in College Station, Texas on May 27-29, 1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    8217The Nature and Status of Ethnobotany," Chronica Botanica , Vol 6, pp 219-221. Jones, Volney H. 1957. "Botany," The Identification of Non- artifactual...Chronica Botanica , Vol. 6, pp. 219-221. CULTURAL Ethnobotany, general JONES, VOLNEY H., 1957, Botany. In Taylor, W., (editor), The Identification of Non

  11. Nature of ergastic substances in some Poaceae seeds

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-08-29

    Aug 29, 2011 ... 1Department of Botany, University of Benin, PMB 1154, Benin City, Edo State, Nigeria. 2Department of Botany, Ambrose Alli University, PMB. 14, Ekpoma, Edo State, Nigeria. Accepted 6 May, 2011 ... grasses) contribute more food seeds than any other plant family; it contributes about 50% per capita energy ...

  12. Original Research Original Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2013-06-23

    Jun 23, 2013 ... 1Department of Botany, DRM Science College, Da. 2Gulbarga University,. 3Department of Biotechnology, G.M. Institute. 4Department of Zoology, Sahyadri Scien. 5Department of Botany, Sahyadri Science Colleg. Abstract. This study was ... They form bulk of food for zooplankton, fishes an other aquatic ...

  13. Xylem Hydraulics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dilip Amritphale1 Santosh K Sharma2. Professor of Botany, School of Studies in Botany, Vikram University, Ujjain 456 010, MP, India; BKS Naveen PG College, Shajapur. Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Current Issue : Vol. 23, Issue 3 · Current Issue Volume 23 | Issue 3. March 2018. Home · Volumes & Issues ...

  14. Effectiveness of a Mobile Plant Learning System in a Science Curriculum in Taiwanese Elementary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yueh-Min; Lin, Yen-Ting; Cheng, Shu-Chen

    2010-01-01

    This study developed a Mobile Plant Learning System (MPLS) that provides instructors with the ways and means to facilitate student learning in an elementary-school-level botany course. The MPLS represented in this study was implemented to address problems that arise with the use of a didactic approach to teaching and learning botany, as is…

  15. Výsledky floristického kurzu v Domažlicích 4.-10. července 2010

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chvojková, E.; Sladký, J.; Bureš, J.; Pivoňková, L.; Danihelka, Jiří; Sova, P.; Nesvadbová, J.; Sofron, J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 47, Příl.1 (2012), s. 1-94 ISSN 1211-5258 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC06073 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : vascular plants * field botany * Czech Republic Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany

  16. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tawfik, Kawther M. Vol 3, No 1 (2001): (Botany) - Articles Water relations, transpiration rate, stomatal behaviour and leaf sap pH of Aloe vera and Aloe eru. Abstract · Vol 3, No 1 (2001): (Botany) - Articles Growth and aloin production of Aloe vera and Aloe eru under different ecological conditions. Abstract. ISSN: 1110-6859.

  17. Ma-rc-h

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    maheshwarii, a new rubiaceous tax.onare some examples. The broad spectrum of botany which. Maheshwari portrayed made him welcome in labo- ratories of .... spicuous because of his perennial service to botany and sustained contributions to plant em- bryology, Maheshwari was elected Fellow of the. Royal Society of ...

  18. Our Human-Plant Connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clary, Renee; Wandersee, James

    2011-01-01

    It is relatively easy to incorporate plants into a curriculum and extend their use beyond the botany unit into other scientific arenas. There are numerous web-based resources for teachers, including the Human Flower Project (HFP) website, which offers numerous vignettes on all aspects of flowering plants. In addition to botany and invasive plant…

  19. JANAKI AMMAL, Edavaleth Kakkat*

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    User

    Collected plants of medicinal and economic value and carried out valuable studies on the cytology of several plant taxa. Studies in ethnobotany particularly in use of plants by tribals in. Kerala are of great value. Last Address: Centre for Advanced Studies in Botany, University Botany Laboratory,. Triplicane, Madras 600 005.

  20. Is the scaling relationship between carbohydrate storage and leaf biomass in meadow plants affected by the disturbance regime?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klimešová, Jitka; Janeček, Štěpán; Bartušková, Alena; Bartoš, Michael; Altman, Jan; Doležal, Jiří; Lanta, Vojtěch; Latzel, Vít

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 120, č. 6 (2017), s. 979-985 ISSN 0305-7364 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 ; RVO:61388971 Keywords : abandonment * below-ground organs * TNC Subject RIV: EF - Botanics; EF - Botanics (MBU-M) OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany ; Plant sciences, botany (MBU-M) Impact factor: 4.041, year: 2016

  1. Prof. T. S. Sadasivan | History | About IASc | Indian Academy of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Career: Univ. of Lucknow, Dept. of Botany: Demonstrator 40-41; Fruit and Vegetable Preservation Lab., Lyaupur: Microbiologist 41-44; Univ. of Madras, Centre for Ad-vanced Studies in Botany: Director/Prof. 44-73; CSIR, Plant-based Lab.: Consultant 73-76; Birbal Sahni Professor, Lucknow 77-80; Vidyashram, Kodaikanal: ...

  2. [Jacques Clarion (1776-1844), professor of l'Ecole de pharmacie de Paris].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trépardoux, Francis

    2006-11-01

    Engaged in military campaigns from 1793 to 1797, he then studied medicine in Paris, as well as pharmacy, specialised in chemistry and botany. Supported by Deyeux and Corvisart, he was nominated as pharmacist of the emperor. From 1819 to 1844, he taught botany at the School of pharmacy of Paris. In 1823, the authority gave him a second chair for the medical botany at the Faculty of medicine, but after the 1830 revolution, he was dismissed. He mainly worked in taxonomy, contributing to several publications with Palisot and de Candolle for Graminaceae. He was a member of the academy of medicine.

  3. In vitro clonal propagation of the neem tree (Azadirachta indica A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-02-19

    2202, Bangladesh. 2Department of Crop Botany, Bangladesh Agricultural University, ... However, comer- cialization of neem products (oil and azadirachtin) is greatly hindered by the limitation of natural resources. (Isman ...

  4. Nenápadní obyvatelé kůry stromů. Pralesovité porosty Česka - ráj epifytických lišejníků

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malíček, Jiří

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 2017, č. 3 (2017), s. 16-17 ISSN 1805-5591 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : primeval forests * beech and spruce forests * scree forests * biodiversity Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany

  5. Zajímavé nálezy vzácných mechorostů ve starých sedimentech 2

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hájková, Petra; Potůčková, Anna; Hájek, M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 1 (2017), s. 67-71 ISSN 0862-8904 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : glacial relict * macrofossil analysis * palaeoecology Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany

  6. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 38; Issue 4 ... Department of Plant Physiology, UPSC, Umeå University, S-90187 Umea, Sweden; Ecologie ... Lyon, France; Faculty of Applied Sciences, Department of Botany, University of Sri ...

  7. Variation in leaf anatomy within the Elytrigia intermedia – E. ×mucronata – E. repens (Poaceae) hybrid complex

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Paštová, Ladislava

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 2 (2017), s. 187-198 ISSN 1310-7771 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : hybrid * leaf blade selection * micromorphology Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany

  8. Nucleotide diversity and phylogenetic relationships among ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-03-03

    Mar 3, 2017 ... 2Department of Botany, D. S. B. Campus, Kumaun University, Nainital 263 001, India ... Rana T. S. 2017 Nucleotide diversity and phylogenetic relationships ... Anderson and Park 1989). ..... Edgewood Press, Edgewood, USA.

  9. Download this PDF file

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Department of Botany and Plant Biotechnology, University of Johannesburg, P.O. Box 524, Auckland Park 2006,. Johannesburg, South ... 14, Oct. 2016. Published Online: 01, Oct. 2017 ...... Murray CJL (eds). Oxford University Press, New York.

  10. Desmodium: A low-cost pasture for the eastern Cape coastal region ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Animal production; Beef production; botany; Desmodium intortum; dryland; east london; Eastern Cape; economic evaluation; fertilizer; grasses; gross margin; Growth requirements; livestock; Management; maximum production; pasture; Pastures; Production costs; south africa; star grass; stocking rate; stocking ...

  11. Phytochemical screening and antimicrobial activity of the ethanolic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-05-02

    1973). Phytochemical Methods. Chapman and Hall limited, London. pp. 49-188. Makut et al. 1219. Hill AF (1952). Economic Botany: A Textbook of useful plants and plant products. McGraw-Hill Book Company, New York, p. 127.

  12. Biological control of Aspergillus flavus growth and subsequent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ONOS

    2010-07-05

    Jul 5, 2010 ... 1School of Biological Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 USM, Penang, Malaysia,. 2Department of Botany, Osmania University, Hyderabad, India. ... the biocontrol agents tested, culture filtrate of Rhodococcus ...

  13. Effect of plant growth regulators, explants type and efficient plantlet ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-12-05

    Dec 5, 2011 ... Plant Pathology, Tissue Culture and Biotechnology Laboratory, Department of Botany,. University of ... variability in response to growth regulators. In vitro rooting ..... an adult tree Wrightia tomentosa through enhanced axillary.

  14. Ecohealth Field-building Leadership Initiative in Southeast Asia ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Ecohealth Field-building Leadership Initiative in Southeast Asia ... This grant will allow a consortium of research centres in China, Indonesia, Thailand ... Kunming Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences as represented by Sun Hang.

  15. Building Effective Water Governance in the Asian Highlands | CRDI ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Building Effective Water Governance in the Asian Highlands ... This project is funded through IDRC's Adaptation Research Initiative in Asia (ARI-Asia) ... Kunming Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences as represented by Sun Hang.

  16. Initiative de renforcement du leadership en recherche en écosanté ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Institution. Kunming Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences as represented by Sun Hang ... Ecohealth research in Southeast Asia : past, present and the way forward ... Ecohealth Field-building Leadership Initiative in Southeast Asia.

  17. Zajímavé nálezy lišejníků z čeledi Parmeliaceae v České republice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šoun, J.; Bouda, F.; Kocourková, J.; Malíček, Jiří; Palice, Zdeněk; Peksa, O.; Svoboda, D.; Vondrák, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 1 (2017), s. 46-64 ISSN 0862-8904 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : air pollution * biodiversity and lichen diversity * climate change * rare makrolichens * recolonization Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany

  18. Science Academies' Refresher Course on Innovations in Genetics ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and Abiotic Stress” will be held at PG and Research Department of Botany, ... Arts and Sciences for Women (Autonomous), Elayampalayam, Tiruchengode, Tamil ... November 2017 for the benefit of faculty involved in teaching undergraduate.

  19. Antioxidant, hypoglycemic and anti-diabetic activities of Ziziphus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2610 ... 1Department of Botany, Environment Program, Faculty of Biological Science, King ... International Pharmaceutical Abstract, Chemical Abstracts, Embase, Index Copernicus, EBSCO, African .... The extracts, fractions and drugs were orally.

  20. Herbáře včera, dnes a zítra

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Danihelka, Jiří

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 4 (2012), s. 85-87 kulér ISSN 0044-4812 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : large Czech herbaria * history of botany * university nad museum collections Subject RIV: EF - Botanics

  1. 22_126 - 133_Nura S., et al.,_Bajopas

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user pc

    2017-12-02

    Purseglove, ... leucine in fonio are slightly higher than those de for the Food and Agriculture Organization refer ... Department of Botany, Ahmadu Bello University Zaria, Nigeria. ment of Plant Science, Ahmadu Bello University ...

  2. Nutrition supply affects the activity of pathogenesis-related β-1,3-glucanases and chitinases in wheat

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Maglovski, M.; Gregorová, Z.; Rybanský, L.; Mészáros, P.; Moravčíková, J.; Hauptvogel, P.; Adamec, Lubomír; Matušíková, I.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 81, č. 3 (2017), s. 443-453 ISSN 0167-6903 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : glucanhydrolases * chitinases * nitrogen Subject RIV: ED - Physiology OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 2.646, year: 2016

  3. Co je společné a zásadní pro masožravé rostliny?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adamec, Lubomír

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 65, č. 3 (2017), "LXXX"-"LXXXI" ISSN 0044-4812 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : carnivorous syndrome * nutrition ecology * evolution Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany

  4. Transfer of the Ecuadorian species Oncidium hernandezii to the genus Caucaea (Orchidaceae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolanowska, Marta; Hirtz, A.; Tobar Suarez, D. F.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 309, č. 3 (2017), s. 299-299 ISSN 1179-3155 Institutional support: RVO:86652079 Keywords : Caucaea * new combination * Monocots Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 1.240, year: 2016

  5. Book review: T. J. Stohlgren: Measuring plant diversity: lessons from the field; Oxford University Press, Oxford, 390 pp.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Petřík, Petr

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 4 (2007), s. 438-439 ISSN 1211-9520 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : biodiversity * methodology * ecology Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 1.133, year: 2007

  6. Zaniklými vesnicemi v krajině Českého Švýcarska

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Petřík, Petr; Hederová, Lucia

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 2 (2017), s. 16-17 ISSN 2336-2243 EU Projects: European Commission INTERREG - 100281957 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : vegetation * flora * memory of landscape Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany

  7. Modularization: An Attempt at Collegiate Level in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, J.; Pillai, J. K.

    1981-01-01

    The effectiveness of a modular approach to learning in a botany unit as compared to the traditional teaching approach in terms of learning efficiency, learning time, and mastery level is reported. Three references are cited. (Author/CHC)

  8. Testování modelu rozšíření Ledum palustre L. pomocí paleoekologických dat

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Radoměřský, T.; Kuneš, P.; Bobek, Přemysl

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 1 (2017), s. 65-71 ISSN 0514-8057 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : species distribution modelling * Holocene * pollen analysis Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany

  9. Two new species of the genus Xanthoxerampellia (Orchidaceae, Maxillariinae) from Antioquia, Colombia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Szlachetko, D. L.; Kolanowska, Marta

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 24, - (2017), s. 199-204 ISSN 1561-882X Institutional support: RVO:86652079 Keywords : biodiversity * Maxillariinae * Neotropics * orchids * taxonomy Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 1.219, year: 2016

  10. On the mechanics of thin films and growing surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Holland, M. A.; Kosmata, T.; Goriely, A.; Kuhl, E.

    2013-01-01

    these classical model problems in botany: it can be easily extended to model and predict surface growth in asthma, gastritis, obstructive sleep apnoea, brain development, and tumor invasion. Beyond biology and medicine, surface growth models are valuable tools

  11. Synthetic polyploids in Vicia cracca: methodology, effects on plant performance and aneuploidy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pavlíková, Z.; Paštová, Ladislava; Münzbergová, Zuzana

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 303, č. 7 (2017), s. 827-839 ISSN 0378-2697 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : chromosome number * colchicine * neopolyploid Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 1.239, year: 2016

  12. Programmed Multi-Image Lectures for College Biology Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, William A.; Knauft, Robert L.

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the use of a programed multi-image lecture approach for teaching a botany course to nonmajor students at the University of California, Berkeley. Also considers the advantages, production, method of presentation, and design of the multimedia lectures. (HM)

  13. A Quantitative Technique for Beginning Microscopists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundberg, Marshall D.

    1984-01-01

    Stereology is the study of three-dimensional objects through the interpretation of two-dimensional images. Stereological techniques used in introductory botany to quantitatively examine changes in leaf anatomy in response to different environments are discussed. (JN)

  14. Tombstones as Textbooks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Karen L.

    1989-01-01

    Cemeteries can provide valuable teaching tools for studying art, genealogy, botany, math, geology, and local history. Several activities are suggested that will make a field trip to a local cemetery a learning experience. (IAH)

  15. Field Ecology Studies in the Rocky Mountains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Philip A.

    1978-01-01

    Describes a six-week field plant ecology course in Montana which is offered by the Botany Department at Southern Illinois University. The goals of the course, how it is taught, and student evaluation are also presented. (HM)

  16. Demonstrating the Effects of Light Quality on Plant Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitesell, J. H.; Garcia, Maria

    1977-01-01

    Describes a lab demonstration that illustrates the effect of different colors or wavelengths of visible light on plant growth and development. This demonstration is appropriate for use in college biology, botany, or plant physiology courses. (HM)

  17. Linnaeus in Uppsala, Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Paul; Cohen, Brenda

    1997-01-01

    Presents a brief life history of Carl Linnaeus, a professor of medicine and botany in Uppsala, Sweden. Highlights his work in developing a classification system for plants and animals, and his botanical lectures and demonstrations. (JRH)

  18. In vitro regenerative potentials of the medicinal plant Abutilon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nissar Reshi

    2016-03-23

    Mar 23, 2016 ... ... Hodiyala Vasanaika. Plant Tissue Culture Laboratory, Department of Studies in Botany, University of Mysore, Manasagangotri, ... explants like shoot tip, axillary buds, stem cuttings and .... strand at the base of the embryoid.

  19. The checklist of photosynthetic euglenoids (order Euglenales) of the Czech Republic: ecology, taxonomy, distribution

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Juráň, Josef

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 317, č. 1 (2017), s. 1-16 ISSN 1179-3155 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : algae * Euglenophytes * floristics Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 1.240, year: 2016

  20. Quantification of growth benefit of carnivorous plants from prey

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adamec, Lubomír

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 3 (2017), s. 1-7 ISSN 0190-9215 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : mineral cost and benefit * stimulation of roots * growth stimulation Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany

  1. Storage fungi and mycotoxins associated with stored smoked ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF HORSFALL

    Department of Marine Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Lagos, Department of Botany, Faculty of Science, University of Lagos ... such as bacteria, yeasts and moulds (Okafor and ... and produce their toxic secondary metabolites, which.

  2. BAYERO JOURNAL OF PURE AND APPLIED SCIENCES (BAJOPAS)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    sciences, namely: Agricultural Sciences, Botany, Biochemistry, Chemistry, Computer Science,. Engineering, Environmental Sciences and Geography. Also, areas of Laboratory Science, Technology,. Mathematical Sciences, Microbiology, Physics, Medical Sciences and Zoology form part of the contents of the Journal.

  3. 2018-05-06T17:17:01Z https://www.ajol.info/index.php/all/oai oai:ojs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    article/11784 2018-05-06T17:17:01Z njnpm:ART ANTIBACTERIAL ACTIVITY OF THE ESSENTIAL OILS FROM FOUR SELECTED VARIETIES OF CAPASIUM ANNUUM Odoemena, SC; Department of Botany and Microbiology, University of Uyo, ...

  4. Associateship | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship; Associateship. Associate Profile. Period: 1993–1998. Raghubanshi, Dr A S . Date of birth: 12 July 1963. Specialization: Tropical Ecology Address during Associateship: Lecturer, Department of Botany, Banaras Hindu University, ...

  5. Fellowship | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Calcutta), FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 16 February 1932. Date of death: 14 January 2008. Specialization: Plant & Human Cytogenetics and Environmental Mutagenesis Last known address: National Environmental Fellow, Department of Botany, ...

  6. Fellowship | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Specialization: Seed Biology, Seed Pathology & Technology, Molecular Plant Pathology and Biotechnological Approach to Plant Disease Management Address: Life-time Honorary Distinguished Professor, Department of Studies in Applied Botany and Biotechnology, University of Mysore, Manasagangotri, Mysore 570 006, ...

  7. Response of Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and Rhizobium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    2Department of Botany, A.V.C. College (Autonomous), Mannampandal-609 305,. Mayiladuthurai, Tamil ... moisture zone for continuous water absorption and translocating ... sampling on 15th, 30th, and 45th day after sowing and estimation of ...

  8. Genetic analysis to identify good combiners for ToLCV resistance ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-11-10

    Nov 10, 2014 ... 2Department of Botany, Udai Pratap Autonomous College, Varanasi 221 002, India. 3AIP-USAID ... there is a possibility of getting hybrid seeds in some com- binations. .... plant growth and resistance to ToLCV disease.

  9. Studies on cytotoxicity and antitumor screening of red and white ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-11-19

    Nov 19, 2008 ... 2Department of Botany, Government Arts College (Autonomous), Salem – 636 007, Tamilnadu, India. ... namely red and black coloured seeds (red form) and the ... development induced by Dalton's Lymphoma Ascites.

  10. Nature of ergastic substances in some Poaceae seeds

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-08-29

    Aug 29, 2011 ... 1Department of Botany, University of Benin, PMB 1154, Benin City, Edo State, Nigeria. ... Since seed is the storage organs of ergastic materials such as .... Ultrastructure and Development of Silica Bodies in Monocotyledons.

  11. Regeneration of okra (Abelmoschus esculentus L.) via apical shoot ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2012-10-25

    Oct 25, 2012 ... esculentus L. Monech) N-550 line evolved at R&D, Nirmal Seeds Pvt. Ltd., was used as basic material ... Therefore, development of tissue culture protocols to induce .... Department of Botany, Rajshahi University, Bangladesh.

  12. Download this PDF file

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    s

    2017-03-01

    Mar 1, 2017 ... Department of Botany, Faculty of Life Science, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria. ... sesame mutants had the best number of seeds per plant (4.60) and thousand seed ... induced variability can be exploited to develop.

  13. 59 - 62 lawan paid

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMIN

    development rather than seed germination. Key words: Allelochemicals, Eucalyptus species, Root length, Germination, Arachis hypogea. INTRODUCTION. Plants that ..... Bangladesh Journal of Botany, 33(2): 79-84. Ahmed, R., Uddin, M. B. ...

  14. Laboratory study on influence of plant growth promoting ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aghomotsegin

    2015-03-06

    Mar 6, 2015 ... promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) on growth response and tolerance of Zea ... inoculating maize seeds with plant growth promoting rhizobacterial strains in a crude oil impacted medium. ..... Botany and Environmental Health.

  15. Seed germination of Hippophae salicifolia D

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Deepak Dhyani

    2012-11-08

    Nov 8, 2012 ... lead towards the development of a simple cost-effective propagation technique for large scale cultivation and ... Propagation of the species by seed is time consuming technique ..... In: Singh, V. (Eds.), Botany,. Harvesting and ...

  16. 8 Sources of Pod Yield Losses

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2Department of Agronomy, University for Development Studies (UDS), P. O. Box 1350,. Tamale, Ghana ..... Effects of delay in harvesting of groundnut on 100 seed weight (g) in 2007 and 2008. Harvesting date ..... economic botany. Macmillan ...

  17. In vitro clonal propagation of Mucuna pruriens var. utilis and its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-04-17

    Apr 17, 2008 ... there is a need to develop in vitro germplasm of the wild and cultivated species of ... was used as basal medium excepting seed germination medium, which completely lacked ..... Department of Botany. Bharathiar University.

  18. Molecular systematics of Indian Alysicarpus (Fabaceae) based on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    AKRAM GHOLAMI

    Department of Botany, University of Delhi, Delhi 110 007, India. Abstract ...... easy separation of seeds from the pod whereas Alysicarpus species having ... Research and Development grant support to Arun K. Pandey from University of Delhi is ...

  19. Molecular cytogenetic identification of a wheat–Thinopyrum ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    FANG HE

    ... have supported the development of several wheat germplasms that are in use ... Li, formerly of the Northwest Institute of Botany, Chinese. Academy of Sciences ... Cytogenetic analysis. Seeds were germinated in Petri dishes maintained at 4.

  20. In vivo and in vitro investigations on rotenoids from Indigofera ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    Laboratory of Plant Physiology and Biochemistry Department of Botany, University of ... different growth stages and analysed for their rotenoid content. ... The static cultures of Indigofera tinctoria were established from seeds on RT medium,.

  1. The analysis of proteome changes in sunflower seeds induced by N ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu

    Key Laboratory of Photosynthesis and Environmental Molecular Physiology, Institute of Botany, Chinese ... ion, a proteomic analysis of N+ ion implantation seeds was developed. ... implantation were validated in course of plant development,.

  2. The phenological development of Themeda triandra, Elyonurus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The phenological development of Themeda triandra, Elyonurus argenteus and ... fire or drought may have a detrimental effect on leaf, shoot and seed production. ... Keywords: afrikaans; botany; carbohydrate; crude protein content; cutting; ...

  3. COMPOSITIONAL CHANGES OF MAJOR CHEMICAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    3Ege University, Department of Botany, Bornova, Izmir, Turkey ... received from seed germ [6], which is used as alternative protein source for the industry. The ... and sugars of carob pods during fruit development were studied as well.

  4. Online Resources Microsatellites development, cross-amplification ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    unknown

    1Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Applied Botany, South China ... In south China, urban development is another threat to A. sinensis. ..... Chen G., Liu C. and Sun W. 2016 Pollination and seed dispersal of Aquilaria sinensis (Lour.) ...

  5. Genetic variability of tissue cultured Sorghum bicolor (L) Moench as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    john

    1Department of Botany, Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, P. O. Box 6000, Nairobi, Kenya. 2Department of ... and transformation of embryonic callus for wheat has ..... Grenier C, Bramel-Cox PJ, Hamon CP (2001).

  6. African Trachelomonas saccasii found in a European mesotrophic pond (Czech Republic). implication for euglenoid biogeography and recommendations for euglenoid flagship species

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Juráň, Josef; Couté, A.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 334, č. 3 (2018), s. 201-204 ISSN 1179-3155 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : Euglenophytes * Trachelomonas * Biogeographical distribution Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 1.240, year: 2016

  7. Rod Porina (Porinaceae, lichenes) vo flore Kavkaza

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Urbanavichus, G.; Vondrák, Jan; Urbanavichene, I.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 102, č. 4 (2017), s. 563-576 ISSN 0006-8136 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : lichens * distribution * Northern Caucasus Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany

  8. Patchiness in semi-arid dwarf shrublands: evidence from satellite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... Plants; Remote sensing; Rhigozum obovatum Burch; Satellite-derived vegetation indices; Woody species; patchiness; semi-arid; dwarf shrubland; shrublands; co2; assimilation; karoo; south africa; ndvi; satellite imagery; geochemical mound; rhigozum obovatum; eriocephalus ericoides; pentzia incana; vegetation; botany

  9. Grenz rays. An illustrated guide to the theory and practical application of soft x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, D.; Thomson, J.

    1980-01-01

    The uses of soft x-rays (Grenz rays) as investigative tools in the fields of medical diagnosis, botany, art, entomology and forensic science, are discussed and the practical applications of the techniques illustrated by numerous photographs. (U.K.)

  10. Lichens recorded during the Bryological and Lichenological meeting in Mohelno (Třebíč region, southwestern Moravia) in spring 2016

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malíček, Jiří; Berger, F.; Bouda, F.; Cezanne, R.; Eichler, M.; Šoun, J.; Uhlík, P.; Vondrák, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 1 (2017), s. 24-45 ISSN 0862-8904 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : species diversity * lichen ofloristics * classical localities Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany

  11. How apomictic taxa are treated in current taxonomy: A review

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Majeský, L.; Krahulec, František; Vašut, R.J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 66, č. 5 (2017), s. 1017-1040 ISSN 0040-0262 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : apomixis * hybridization * species concept Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 2.447, year: 2016

  12. PHYLOGENETIC DIVERSITY OF CASSAVA GREEN MITE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    All rights reserved. ©2016, African Crop ... A comparative search from the NCBI Gene bank resulted into identical ... Previous studies have reported success in biological control of ..... Australian Systematic Botany 19: 479-559. Murega, T.N. ...

  13. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Pramana – Journal of Physics · Proceedings – Mathematical Sciences · Resonance – Journal of Science Education · Sadhana · Current Science ... Specialization: Embryology, Plant Anatomy,Economic Botany ... Summer Research Fellowship Programme 2018 ... Advanced Instructional School In Stochastic Processes.

  14. correlation studies of mineral nutrients' concentrations in soils

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. BARTH EKWEME

    Samples were labeled and processed for soil and plant laboratory analyses. The parameters analyzed .... crushed with pestle, and mortar into finer particles before subjected to the ..... Economic Botany in the Tropics. Macmillan India. p. 203.

  15. In vitro regenerative potentials of the medicinal plant Abutilon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nissar Reshi

    2016-03-23

    Mar 23, 2016 ... Plant Tissue Culture Laboratory, Department of Studies in Botany, University of ... Since the plant has a lot of medicinal importance, it was subjected to culture in vitro. ..... (3%) as compared to the cultures of tomato (van den.

  16. In memoriam - RNDr. Josef Nečas CSc.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Komárek, Jiří

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 1 (2017), III-IV ISSN 1802-5439 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : genetics * unilateral algal mutilation * death Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 1.350, year: 2016

  17. Carex fritschii Waisb

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grulich, V.; Prančl, Jan; Vydrová, A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 1 (2017), s. 62-65 ISSN 1211-5258 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : Carex fritschii * distribution * Czech Republic Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany

  18. Centunculus minimus L

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Prančl, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 1 (2017), s. 70-71 ISSN 1211-5258 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : Centunculus minimus * distribution * Czech republic Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany

  19. Ecological genetics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ford, E. B

    1975-01-01

    ... years and is attracting an increasing number of scientists. The author has developed principles, illustrated by examples drawn from both zoology and botany, rather than produced a compendium of available information...

  20. Effects of crude polysaccharides from Purslane on fatigue induced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2012-01-12

    Jan 12, 2012 ... supplementation on fatigue induced by forced swimming in mice. 96 mice were divided .... city and authenticated by Dr. D. M. Li (Shanghai Botany Institute,. China). A voucher ..... Bull (Tokyo), 58: 507-510. Gandevia SC (2001) ...

  1. Mokřinka a Čenkov-Komorsko. Srovnání výsledků systematického mezioborového studia pozůstatků pálení dřevěného uhlí na Křivoklátsku a v Brdech

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matoušek, V.; Bobek, Přemysl

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 1 (2017), s. 425-435 ISSN 1214-3553 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : charcoal kiln * charcoal-making * forest history Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany

  2. New journals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NN,

    1974-01-01

    Asher’s Guide to botanical periodicals is a 3-weekly printed announcement of articles published in more than five thousand selected periodicals, in the field of: anatomy bibliography botanical history cytology dendrology ecology economic botany evolution floristics horticulture hydrobiology

  3. Středoevropské pralesy a lišejníky I. Příklady nejcennějších lokalit a ekologie lesních lišejníků

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malíček, Jiří

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 65, č. 4 (2017), s. 152-155 ISSN 0044-4812 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : beech forests * biodiversity * bioindication Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany

  4. Lišejníky NPP Kaňk u Kutné Hory

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malíček, Jiří

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 1 (2017), s. 30-36 ISSN 0862-8904 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : Acarospora rehmii * biodiversity * calcareous conglomerates Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany

  5. Fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH

    11% due to surface water velocity (SWV) in the river Cauvery and 11% due to temperature in the river Kapila. ...... 2000) and in sediments of Botany Bay in Sydney, Australia, ... APHA 1992 Standard methods for examination of water and waste.

  6. Don't Just Pet Your Chia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershey, David R.

    1995-01-01

    Presents ways to use ChiaPets to link biology-related topics such as taxonomy, morphology, ethnobotany, economic botany, hydroponics, salinity, photomorphogenesis, and phototropism with food and fertilizer chemistry, mathematics, art, and history. (MKR)

  7. Application Format The last date for receiving the application is 30th ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    shobha rav

    break in career, through support for S&T based R&D projects addressing the ... Research, development and adaptation of technology to improve the quality of life .... Architecture/ Biology/ Biotechnology/ Botany/ Chemistry/ Computer/ Science/ ...

  8. Molecular analyses uncover the phylogenetic placement of the lichenized hyphomycetous genus Cheiromycina

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Muggia, L.; Mancinelli, R.; Tønsberg, T.; Jabłońska, A.; Kukwa, M.; Palice, Zdeněk

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 109, č. 4 (2017), s. 588-600 ISSN 0027-5514 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : sterile lichens * phylogeny * Malmideaceae Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 2.550, year: 2016

  9. Patterns, causes and consequences of genome size variation in Restionaceae of the Cape flora

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Linder, H. P.; Suda, Jan; Weiss-Schneeweiss, H.; Trávníček, Pavel; Bouchenak-Khelladi, Y.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 183, č. 4 (2017), s. 515-531 ISSN 0024-4074 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : chromosome numbers * dispersal * ecology Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 2.277, year: 2016

  10. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Author Affiliations. Shalini Srivastava1 H N Verma1 2 Aparana Srivastava1 Vivek Prasad1. Molecular Plant Virology Lab, Department of Botany, Lucknow University, Lucknow 226 007, India; Jaipur National University, Jagatpura, Jaipur 302 017, India ...

  11. Associateship | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship; Associateship. Associate Profile. Period: 1983–1988. Ramanuja Rao, Dr I V . Date of birth: 23 May 1954. Specialization: Plant Physiology Address during Associateship: Department of Botany, University of Delhi, Delhi 110 007.

  12. Lišejníky zaznamenané během 22. jarního setkání bryologicko-lichenologické sekce ČBS v Moravském krasu v dubnu 2015

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Halda, J. P.; Kocourková, J.; Lenzová, V.; Malíček, Jiří; Müller, A.; Palice, Zdeněk; Uhlík, P.; Vondrák, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 1 (2017), s. 1-23 ISSN 0862-8904 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : lichens diversity * Thelidium dionanthense * limestone Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany

  13. Výsledky floristického kurzu České botanické společnosti v Prachaticích (8. 7. - 13. 7. 2012)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lepší, P.; Paulič, R.; Boublík, K.; Čech, L.; Grulich, V.; Hoffmann, A.; Chrtek, Jindřich; Janáková, J.; Jírová, A.; Karlík, P.; Lepší, M.; Lippl, L.; Prach, K.; Půbal, D.; Štech, M.; Štěpánek, Jan; Těšitel, J.; Velebil, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 52, Supplement 1 (2017), s. 1-68 ISSN 1211-5266 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : floristic records * South Bohemia * plant distribution and diversity Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany

  14. Antennaria dioica na Pálavě?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Danihelka, Jiří

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 1 (2017), s. 134-134 ISSN 1211-5258 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : Antennaria dioica * Asteraceae * phytogeography Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany

  15. Phylogeny of the 'orchid-like' bladderworts (gen. Utricularia sect. Orchidioides and Iperua: Lentibulariaceae) with remarks on the stolon-tuber system

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rodrigues, F. G.; Marulanda, N. F.; Silva, S. R.; Płachno, B.J.; Adamec, Lubomír; Miranda, V.F.O.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 120, č. 5 (2017), s. 709-723 ISSN 0305-7364 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : molecular phylogeny * anatomy * tubers Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 4.041, year: 2016

  16. Associateship | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Associate Profile. Period: 1985–1988. Arora, Dr D K . Date of birth: 29 June 1952. Specialization: Mycology and Microbiology Address during Associateship: Department of Botany, Institute of Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221 005.

  17. An experience beyond continuous assessment activities: virtual tour to the medieval medicinal plant garden of the Pedralbes monastery

    OpenAIRE

    Rovira López, Ana Ma.; Benedí, Carles; Blanché i Vergés, Cèsar; Bosch i Daniel, Maria; Castellano, A.; Simon Pallisé, Joan

    2010-01-01

    [eng] The group of teaching innovation in the area of Botany (GIBAF), University of Barcelona (UB), is raised each year to design new accreditation activities under continuous evaluation framework. We present the experience carried out during the academic year 2008-09 in the course of Pharmaceutical Botany. The aim has been to involve students for a semester in the authorship of a tutored project immediately useful and of easy permanence, beyond its assessment proving usefulness. The Medicina...

  18. Multiple horizontal transfers of nuclear ribosomal genes between phylogenetically distinct grass lineages

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mahelka, Václav; Krak, Karol; Kopecký, David; Fehrer, Judith; Šafář, Jan; Bartoš, Jan; Hobza, Roman; Blavet, Nicolas; Blattner, F.R.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 114, č. 7 (2017), s. 1726-1731 ISSN 0027-8424 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204; GA ČR GA13-04454S Institutional support: RVO:67985939 ; RVO:61389030 Keywords : Triticeae * Panicoideae * horizantal genen transfer Subject RIV: EF - Botanics; EF - Botanics (UEB-Q) OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany; Plant sciences, botany (UEB-Q) Impact factor: 9.661, year: 2016

  19. Taxonomic evaluation of cyanobacterial microflora from alkaline marshes of Northern Belize. 3. diversity of heterocytous genera

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Komárek, Jiří; Komárková, Jaroslava; Ventura, S.; Kozlíková-Zapomělová, Eliška; Rejmánková, E.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 105, 3-4 (2017), s. 445-486 ISSN 0029-5035 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-00113S Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 ; RVO:60077344 Keywords : alkaline marshes * Caribbean region * cyanobacteria Subject RIV: EF - Botanics; EF - Botanics (BC-A) OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany; Plant sciences, botany (BC-A) Impact factor: 0.941, year: 2016

  20. Inoculation effects on root-colonizing arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities spread beyond directly inoculated plants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janoušková, Martina; Krak, Karol; Vosátka, Miroslav; Püschel, David; Štorchová, Helena

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 7 (2017), s. 1-21, č. článku e0181525. E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH14285 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 ; RVO:61389030 Keywords : inoculation * arbuscular mycorrhiza * community Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour; EH - Ecology, Behaviour (UEB-Q) OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany; Plant sciences, botany (UEB-Q) Impact factor: 2.806, year: 2016

  1. The slowdown of Y chromosome expansion in dioecious Silene latifolia due to DNA loss and male-specific silencing of retrotransposons

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Puterova, Janka; Kubát, Zdeněk; Kejnovský, Eduard; Jesionek, Wojciech; Čížková, Jana; Vyskot, Boris; Hobza, Roman

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 19, FEB2018 (2018) ISSN 1471-2164 R&D Projects: GA ČR GJ15-21523Y Institutional support: RVO:68081707 ; RVO:61389030 Keywords : sex-linked genes * plant silene * transposable elements Subject RIV: EF - Botanics; EF - Botanics (UEB-Q) OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany; Plant sciences, botany (UEB-Q) Impact factor: 3.729, year: 2016

  2. Tissue-specific expression of telomerase reverse transcriptase gene variants in Nicotiana tabacum

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jurečková, J.; Sýkorová, Eva; Hafidh, Said; Honys, David; Fajkus, Jiří; Fojtová, M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 245, č. 3 (2017), s. 549-561 ISSN 0032-0935 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-06943S; GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1601 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 ; RVO:61389030 Keywords : male gametophyte development * tobacco male gametophyte * allotetraploid nicotiana Subject RIV: EF - Botanics; EF - Botanics (UEB-Q) OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany; Plant sciences, botany (UEB-Q) Impact factor: 3.361, year: 2016

  3. Carl Linnaeus, Erasmus Darwin and Anna Seward: Botanical Poetry and Female Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Sam

    2014-03-01

    This article will explore the intersection between `literature' and `science' in one key area, the botanical poem with scientific notes. It reveals significant aspects of the way knowledge was gendered in the Enlightenment, which is relevant to the present-day education of girls in science. It aims to illustrate how members of the Lichfield Botanical Society (headed by Erasmus Darwin) became implicated in debates around the education of women in Linnaean botany. The Society's translations from Linnaeus inspired a new genre of women's educational writing, the botanical poem with scientific notes, which emerged at this time. It focuses in particular on a poem by Anna Seward and argues that significant problems regarding the representation of the Linnaean sexual system of botany are found in such works and that women in the culture of botany struggled to give voice to a subject which was judged improper for female education. The story of this unique poem and the surrounding controversies can teach us much about how gender impacted upon women's scientific writing in eighteenth century Britain, and how it shaped the language and terminology of botany in works for female education. In particular, it demonstrates how the sexuality of plants uncovered by Linnaeus is a paradigmatic illustration of how societal forces can simultaneously both constrict and stimulate women's involvement in science. Despite the vast changes to women's access in scientific knowledge of the present day, this `fair sexing' of botany illustrates the struggle that women have undergone to give voice to their botanical knowledge.

  4. Gardens, knowledge and the sciences in the early modern period

    CERN Document Server

    Remmert, Volker; Wolschke-Bulmahn, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    This volume focuses on the outstanding contributions made by botany and the mathematical sciences to the genesis and development of early modern garden art and garden culture. The many facets of the mathematical sciences and botany point to the increasingly “scientific” approach that was being adopted in and applied to garden art and garden culture in the early modern period. This development was deeply embedded in the philosophical, religious, political, cultural and social contexts, running parallel to the beginning of processes of scientization so characteristic for modern European history. This volume strikingly shows how these various developments are intertwined in gardens for various purposes.

  5. REBRANDING EKALOKASARI PLAZA “Pattern of Communication In Rebrandring Process Ekalokasari Plaza"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arien Afriesta

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakPerkembangan pusat perbelanjaan yang semakin meningkat di Kota Bogormendorong Ekalokasari Plaza (sekarang menjadi LIPPO Plaza Bogor untukmelakukan perubahan agar dapat bersaing dengan berbagai pusat perbelanjaanmodern lainnya, khususnya yang berada di Kota Bogor.Ekalokasari Plaza yang sekarang sudah berubah menjadi LIPPO Plaza Bogormerupakan salah satu pusat perbelanjaan tertua di Kota Bogor, bahkan lebih tuadibandingkan Botani Square yang menjadi pesaing utama pusat perbelanjaan moderndi Kota Bogor. Berdasarkan sebuah situs blog yang bernama “Hello Bogor” terdapatinformasi tiga besar pusat perbelanjaan modern terbesar di Kota Bogor pada tahun2012, yaitu Botani Square, Ekalokasari Plaza (LIPPO Plaza Bogor, dan CibinongCity Mall.

  6. Micro-morphological Characterization of In-Vivo Diatoms Using ESEM

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tihlaříková, Eva; Neděla, Vilém; Fránková, Markéta

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 23, S1 (2017), s. 1346-1347 ISSN 1431-9276 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01; GA MŠk(CZ) LD14045 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 ; RVO:67985939 Keywords : ESEM * in-vivo diatoms * micro-morphologia Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering; EH - Ecology, Behaviour (BU-J) OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany; Plant sciences, botany (BU-J) Impact factor: 1.891, year: 2016

  7. Learning Science in Virtual Reality Multimedia Environments: Role of Methods and Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Roxana; Mayer, Richard E.

    2002-01-01

    College students learned about botany through an agent-based multimedia game. Students received either spoken or identical on-screen text explanations. Results reveal that students scored higher on retention, transfer, and program ratings in narration conditions than in text conditions. The media--desktop displays or headmounted displays--did not…

  8. Testing the spectral resolutions of the new multispectral sensors for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    S.R.GCAYI

    1School of Agriculture, Earth and Environmental Sciences, Pietermaritzburg .... sunny and cloud-free conditions between 10h00 am and 14h00 pm local ..... and crop models: the case of nitrogen management', Journal of Experimental Botany, vol. .... using a satellite-based Climate-Variability Impact Index' Agricultural and ...

  9. [USJ Herbarium of Costa Rica: history and contributions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Carlos O

    2012-12-01

    In 2011 the Herbarium USJ of the University of Costa Rica became 80 years old and came up with 100 000 specimens of all the taxa that traditional botany studies. Data and figures on the history, the founders, and contributions of USJ to the knowledge of Costa Rican flora are summarized.

  10. Kruhatka Matthiolova (Cortusa matthioli) v Sudetech aneb anti-Hendrych

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Danihelka, Jiří

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 2 (2012), s. 251-263 ISSN 1211-5258 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC06073 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : Central Europe * C. Schwenckfelt * history of botany Subject RIV: EF - Botanics

  11. Two new polyploid species closely related to Alnus glutinosa in Europe and North Africa - An analysis based on morphometry, karyology, flow cytometry and microsatellites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vít, Petr; Douda, Jan; Krak, Karol; Havrdová, Alena; Mandák, Bohumil

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 66, č. 3 (2017), s. 567-583 ISSN 0040-0262 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP504/11/0402 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : Alnus glutinosa * flow cytometry * Balkan Peninsula Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 2.447, year: 2016

  12. Stability of Genome Composition and Recombination between Homoeologous Chromosomes in Festulolium (Festuca × Lolium) Cultivars

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kopecký, David; Šimoníková, Denisa; Ghesquière, M.; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 151, č. 2 (2017), s. 106-114 ISSN 1424-8581 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Festulolium * Genome composition * Genomic in situ hybridization * Grass hybrids * Homoeologous recombination * Lolium × Festuca Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 1.354, year: 2016

  13. Vascular tissue in traps of Australian carnivorous bladderworts (Utricularia) of the subgenus Polypompholyx

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Płachno, B.J.; Kamińska, I.; Adamec, Lubomír; Świątek, P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 142, Sep 2017 (2017), s. 25-31 ISSN 0304-3770 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : vascular bundles * traps * Lentibulariaceae Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 1.714, year: 2016

  14. Antibacterial properties studies of trunk barks of terminalia ivorensis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Laboratory of Botany, Unity of Formation and Research Biosciences; University Félix Houphouët Boigny of Cocody-. Abidjan (Côte ... Laboratory of chemistry Organic Structural, Unity of Formation and Research of Sciences of the Structure of the mate- rial and of the .... coat the use of this plant in the traditional treatment of.

  15. A Computer-Based Simulation for Teaching Heat Transfer across a Woody Stem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maixner, Michael R.; Noyd, Robert K.; Krueger, Jerome A.

    2010-01-01

    To assist student understanding of heat transfer through woody stems, we developed an instructional package that included an Excel-based, one-dimensional simulation model and a companion instructional worksheet. Guiding undergraduate botany students to applying principles of thermodynamics to plants in nature is fraught with two main obstacles:…

  16. SERS internship Spring 1995 abstracts and research papers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, B.

    1995-11-01

    Presented topics varied over many fields in science and engineering. Botany on grasses in California, real time face recognition technology, thermogravimetric studies on corrosion and finite element modeling of the human pelvis are examples of discussed subjects. Further fields of study are carcinogenics, waste management, radar imaging, automobile accessories, document searching on the internet, and shooting stars. Individual papers are indexed separately on EDB.

  17. Canadian Reference Sources 1980--A Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, Dorothy E.

    1981-01-01

    Provides a bibliography of 52 reference sources and 24 new editions and supplements, excluding annuals. Topics include science and technology, art, history, university courses, regional information, native languages, museums, law, geography, Canadian culture, dissertations, sports, antiques, botany, and a variety of directories. (CHC)

  18. Carbohydrates and gibberellins relationship in potato tuberization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ševčíková, H.; Mašková, P.; Tarkowská, Danuše; Mašek, T.; Lipavská, H.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 214, JUL (2017), s. 53-63 ISSN 0176-1617 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-34792S Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Carbohydrate distribution * Gibberellin * Photoautotrophic cultivation * Potato * Tuberization Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 3.121, year: 2016

  19. Download this PDF file

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    species to the adjacent Somalia, Somalia wa included in ... flora areas (i.e., Ethiopia, Eritrea, East Africa and .... red sandy soil. HA. N1-2C1-2 S1. C. hornbyi B.D. Burtt. 380-1220. 450-750 ..... Commiphora, belong to deciduous woodland and/or ..... The fruit of Commiphora. ... Botany with practical references to tropical plants.

  20. Sweet vernal grasses (Anthoxanthum) colonized African mountains along two fronts in the Late Pliocene, followed by secondary contact, polyploidization and local extinction in the Pleistocene

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tusiime, F. M.; Gizaw, A.; Wondimu, T.; Masao, C. A.; Abdi, A. A.; Muwanika, V.; Trávníček, Pavel; Nemomissa, S.; Popp, M.; Eilu, G.; Brochmann, C.; Pimentel, M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 13 (2017), s. 3513-3532 ISSN 0962-1083 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : Africa - tropical alpine * colonization * hybridization Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 6.086, year: 2016

  1. Phylogeny and infrageneric delimitation in Spiraea (Rosaceae) inferred from AFLP markers and a comparison with morphology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Záveská Drábková, Lenka; Pospíšková, M.; Businský, R.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 185, č. 4 (2017), s. 525-541 ISSN 0024-4074 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-14649S Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : classification * spiraeoideae * networks * aflp * Bayesian analysis * maximum parsimony * neighbour network * taxonomy Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 2.277, year: 2016

  2. Academic performance and pass rates: Comparison of three first ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    First year students' academic performance in three Life Science courses (Botany, Zoology and Bioscience) was compared. Pass rates, as well as the means and distributions of final marks were analysed. Of the three components (coursework, practical and theory examinations) contributing to the final mark of each course, ...

  3. Ecohealth Field-building Leadership Initiative in Southeast Asia ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Institution. Kunming Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences as represented by Sun Hang. Institution Country. China. Project Leader. Dr Fang Jing. Institution. Kunming Medical University as represented by Jiang Runsheng. Institution Country. China. Institution Website. http://www.kmmu.edu.cn. Project Leader.

  4. Backgrounder

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC CRDI

    Center for Mountain Ecosystem Studies, Kunming Institute of Botany of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, China: $1,526,000 to inform effective water governance in the Asian highlands of China, Nepal, and Pakistan. • Ashoka Trust for Research in Ecology and the Environment (ATREE), India: $1,499,300 for research on ...

  5. Seed bank of Littorella uniflora (L.) Asch. in the Czech Republic, Central Europe: does burial depth and sediment type influence seed germination?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolář, J.; Kučerová, Andrea; Jakubec, J.; Vymazal, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 794, č. 1 (2017), s. 347-358 ISSN 0018-8158 Grant - others:EHP, MF ČR, MŽP ČR(CZ) MGSII-11 Program:CZ02 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : Isoetids * Fishpond eutrophication * Summer drainage Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 2.056, year: 2016

  6. Density and Specific Gravity Metrics in Biomass Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micheal C. Wiemann; G. Bruce Williamson

    2012-01-01

    Following the 2010 publication of Measuring Wood Specific Gravity… Correctly in the American Journal of Botany, readers contacted us to inquire about application of wood density and specific gravity to biomass research. Here we recommend methods for sample collection, volume measurement, and determination of wood density and specific gravity for...

  7. Ecological plant epigenetics: Evidence from model and non-model species, and the way forward

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Richards, C. L.; Alonso, C.; Becker, C.; Bossdorf, O.; Bucher, E.; Colomé-Tatché, M.; Durka, W.; Engelhardt, J.; Gaspar, B.; Gogol-Döring, A.; Grosse, I.; van Gurp, T. P.; Heer, K.; Kronholm, I.; Lampei, C.; Latzel, Vít; Mirouze, M.; Opgenoorth, L.; Paun, O.; Prohaska, S. A.; Rensing, S. A.; Stadler, P. f.; Trucchi, E.; Ullrich, K.; Verhoeven, K. J. F.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 12 (2017), s. 1576-1590 ISSN 1461-023X Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : bioinformatics * ecological epigenetic s * genomics Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 9.449, year: 2016

  8. Transgenerational plasticity as an important mechanism affecting response of clonal species to changing climate

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Münzbergová, Zuzana; Hadincová, Věroslava

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 14 (2017), s. 5236-5247 ISSN 2045-7758 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-07795S Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : climatic extrems * common garden experiment * epigenetic memory * Festuca rubra Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 2.440, year: 2016

  9. Epigenetic regulation – contribution to herbicide resistance in weeds?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Markus, C.; Pečinka, Aleš; Karan, R.; Barney, J. N.; Merotto, A.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 74, č. 2 (2018), s. 275-281 ISSN 1526-498X Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : DNA methylation * epigenetic s * gene expression * gene regulation * herbicide detoxification * plant stress response Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 3.253, year: 2016

  10. Rare occurrence of nine Microcystis species (Chroococcales, Cyanobacteria) in a single lake (Lake Dojran, fYR Macedonia)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krstić, S.; Aleksovski, B.; Komárek, Jiří

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 1 (2017), s. 4-21 ISSN 1947-573X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : Lake Dojran * Microcystis * microcystins Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany

  11. Vacuole Integrity Maintained by DUF300 Proteins Is Required for Brassinosteroid Signaling Regulation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Liu, Q.; Vain, T.; Viotti, C.; Doyle, S. M.; Tarkowská, Danuše; Novák, Ondřej; Zipfel, C.; Sitbon, F.; Robert, S.; Hofius, D.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 4 (2018), s. 553-567 ISSN 1674-2052 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Arabidopsis * brassinosteroid signaling * DUF300 proteins * tonoplast * vacuole integrity Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 8.827, year: 2016

  12. Molecular phylogeny of bladderworts: A wide approach of Utricularia (Lentibulariaceae) species relationships based on six plastidial and nuclear DNA sequences.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Silva, S. R.; Gibson, R.; Adamec, Lubomír; Domínguez, Y.; Miranda, V.F.O.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 118, Jan2018 (2018), s. 244-264 ISSN 1055-7903 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : bladderworts * DNA sequencing * carnivorous plants Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 4.419, year: 2016

  13. Phylogeny and infrageneric delimitation in the genus Spiraea (Rosaceae) inferred from AFLP markers and compared with morphology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Záveská Drábková, Lenka; Pospíšková, M.; Businský, R.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 185, č. 4 (2017), s. 525-541 ISSN 0024-4074 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-14649S Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : morphological analysis * Spiraea * AFLP Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 2.277, year: 2016

  14. New Workflows for Born-Digital Assets: Managing Charles E. Bracker's Orchid Photographs Collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurford, Amanda A.; Runyon, Carolyn F.

    2011-01-01

    Charles E. Bracker was a professor of botany and plant pathology at Purdue University from 1964 to 1999. His late wife, Anri, was an orchid enthusiast who began collecting and housing orchids in the 1980s. In 2009, Bracker's 30,000 digital orchid photographs were donated to Ball State University Libraries, where both of this article's authors…

  15. Journal of Genetics | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Department of Agricultural Botany,Post Graduate Institute, Dr Panjabrao Deshmukh Krishi Vidyapeeth, Akola 444 104, India; Department of Plant Pathology, Post Graduate Institute, Dr Panjabrao Deshmukh Krishi Vidyapeeth, Akola 444 104, India; Nuclear Agriculture and Biotechnology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research ...

  16. Plant growth regulator interactions in physiological processes for controlling plant regeneration and in vitro development of Tulbaghia simmleri

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kumari, A.; Baskaran, P.; Plačková, Lenka; Omámiková, Hana; Nisler, Jaroslav; Doležal, Karel; Van Staden, J.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 223, APR (2018), s. 65-71 ISSN 0176-1617 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Endogenous hormone * Exogenous hormone application * In vitro regeneration * Ornamental and medicinal plant * Physiological process * Tulbaghia simmleri Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 3.121, year: 2016

  17. Editorial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NN,

    1966-01-01

    Since the last Bulletin was published we have to regret the loss of four persons who were supporters of Flora Malesiana or collaborated with it in some way or other. Mr. P. Groenhart started his career in Java as a botany teacher in the Agriculture School at Malang. He was keenly interested in

  18. Divergent adaptations in different parts of introduced range in tetraploid Vicia cracca

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Líblová, Z.; Eliášová, A.; Münzbergová, Zuzana

    Roč. 234, SEP 2017 (2017), s. 245-255 ISSN 0367-2530 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : common garden experiments * autoploid * cytotype * biological invasions * evolutionary plasticity Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 1.125, year: 2016

  19. Modification of soil nutrients and micro-climate by tree crowns in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The findings on soil nutrient status are consistent with results from disturbed systems, and challenge the dogma, at least for soil nutrient status, that conservative stocking rates are beneficial. Keywords: botany; crown interception; Matopos Research Station; micro-climate; nutrients; semi-arid; shade-adapted; shading; soil ...

  20. Phellinus artemisiae sp. nov. (Basidiomycota, Hymenochaetaceae), from western USA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vlasák, Josef; Vlasák, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 303, č. 1 (2017), s. 93-96 ISSN 1179-3155 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : chaparral Fungi * Phellinus artemisiae sp. nov. * molecular taxonomy * Fungi Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 1.240, year: 2016

  1. Mohan Ram, Prof. Holenarasipur Yoganarasimham

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mohan Ram, Prof. Holenarasipur Yoganarasimham Ph.D. (Delhi), FNA, FNASc, FNAAS Council Service: 1983-88; Vice-President: 1986-88. Date of birth: 24 September 1930. Specialization: Plant Growth & Development and Economic Botany Address: No. 174, SFS DDA Flats, Mukherjee Nagar, Delhi 110 009, U.T.

  2. An Ethnobotanical Survey on Fuel Wood and Timber plant Species ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2011-12-19

    Dec 19, 2011 ... 3Department of Botany, Post Graduate College Abbottabad, Pakistan. Accepted 17 March, 2011. A survey was conducted to explore the fuel wood species and timber producing species of Kaghan valleys, Pakistan. Consumption pattern and impact on the forest resources were also taken into consideration.

  3. Selection of culture medium and conditions for the production of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    oyaide

    2013-05-15

    May 15, 2013 ... Root and Soil Biology Laboratory, Department of Botany, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore- 641 046, Tamil Nadu, India. Accepted 10 May, 2013. Selenium (Se) yeast is a recognized source of organic food-form of Se and it plays a vital role in animal and human nutrition. The organic Se supplementation in ...

  4. Estimation of genetic diversity of the Kenyan yam (Dioscorea spp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MUTHAMIA

    2013-10-02

    Oct 2, 2013 ... The botany, ethnobotany, use and possible future of yams in West Africa. Econ. Bot. 26:301-318. Beebe S, Sckroch PW, Tohme J, Duque MC, Pedraza F, Nienhuis J. (2000). Structure of genetic diversity among common bean landraces of Middle American origin based on correspondence analysis of. RAPD ...

  5. Editorial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NN,

    1969-01-01

    In 1969 Indonesian botany suffered a severe loss by the untimely death of Dr. B. Prijanto, at the end of April. He was the head of the Forest Exploration Division, Forest Research Institute, Bogor. He belonged to that still very small, but admirable circle of young able Indonesian botanists built up

  6. Fire behaviour - A preliminary study. | W.S.W. | African Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These results demonstrate the value of knowledgte about fire behaviour in veld management; it is recommended that fire behaviour and its effect on vegetation always be taken cognisance of in any future research on fire in relation to vegetation. Keywords: behaviour; botany; environmental conditions; fire; fire behaviour; ...

  7. Cytotoxicity of Sambucus ebulus on cancer cell lines and protective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Regarding the traditional utilization of Sambucus ebulus, Iranian native botany and its active ingredients (e.g. ebulitin and ebulin 1), cytotoxicity of ethyl acetate ... cytotoxic agent on liver and colon cancer cells and suggest that vitamins C and E may protect normal cells, when SEE were used in cancer therapy in future.

  8. Download this PDF file

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cadewumi

    review is to provide a comprehensive overview of the botany, phytochemistry, pharmacology and toxicology of Arctotis arctotoides. Additionally, evidence of traditional uses of this important medicinal plant has been examined and recommendations pertaining to future research areas for the plant highlighted. Methodology.

  9. Untitled

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Department of Plant Systematics, National Research Centre, El-Dokki,. Cairo, Egypt; PDepartment of Botany, Faculty of Science,. Assiut University, Assiut, Egypt ... be noted that chemical characters might prove most helpful in future infrageneric classificatory schemes". As part of a chemosystematic survey of members of the ...

  10. Research and publications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NN,

    1994-01-01

    Botany 2000-Asia — From the Newsletter 3/2 (June 1994) the following: — Workshop on Piperaceae to be held in 1995. For more information write to Mr. M. van Alphen, UNESCO/ROSTEA, 8 Poorvi Marg, Vasant Vihar, New Delhi-11057, India. — The second Symposium on the Zingiberaceae will be held between 9

  11. Root patterning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheres, Ben; Laskowski, Marta

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms that pattern lateral root primordial are essential for the elaboration of root system architecture, a trait of key importance for future crop breeding. But which are most important: periodic or local cues? In this issue of Journal of Experimental Botany (pages 1411-1420), Kircher

  12. Factors determining the use of botanical insect pest control methods ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2009-05-16

    May 16, 2009 ... 3Department of Agricultural Economics, Egerton University, P.O. Box 536 20115 Egerton, Kenya. 4Department of Botany, Makerere University, P.O. Box 7062, Kampala, Uganda. 5Department of Chemistry, The Open. University of Tanzania, P.O. Box 31608, DAR ES SALAM, Tanzania. Accepted 16 May ...

  13. Importance socioculturelle de Artocarpus altilis (Parkinson) Fosberg ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    31 mars 2014 ... conducted to evaluate the economic value of the species and to clarify the parental relationship between the two local forms of ..... arecaceae, an understory palm used for roof thatching in the Peruvian Amazon. Economic. Botany 54 (3), 267–277. Goussanou AC, Tente B, Djègo J, Agbani P, Sinsin B,. 2011.

  14. An economic study of the need for turfgrass research. | G. | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... yield the unharvested turfgrass crop can only be valued by the amount of money the nation is prepared to spend on the industry. On financial considerations alone the facts justify the priority that must now be given to turfgrass research. Keywords: botany; grass; grassland; production; research; south africa; turfgrass; yield.

  15. 110 intra- and inter- correlative responses among fruits physical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OLUWOLE AKINNAGBE

    Sapotaceae, foremost economic species seem to be. Vitellaria paradoxa, Baillonella toxisperma and. Madhuca longifolia ... correlates with two or more traits of economic significance. In Vitellaria paradoxa, seedling growth is ..... Hill, A.F. (1952) Economic Botany: A. Textbook of Useful Plants and Plant. Products, 2nd Edition.

  16. Wintola et al., Afr J Tradit Complement Altern Med. (2015) 12(4):112 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Proff.Adewunmi

    Medicinal Plants and Economic Development Research Centre, Department of Botany, University of Fort Hare, Alice. 5700, South Africa. *Corresponding author: E-mail: Aafolayan@ufh.ac.za. Abstract. Background: Intestinal parasitic infections are among the most common chronic human infections in developing countries; ...

  17. Efficient micropropagation of Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sunny t

    2016-08-24

    Aug 24, 2016 ... 2Plant Tissue Culture Laboratory, Department of Botany, D.S.B. Campus, Kumaun University, ... 2007 data, India is the largest producer of lemons .... Values represent mean±SE, values within each column followed by the same letters are not significantly ..... ICALTD Asian Citrus rehabilitation conference.

  18. Expeditions and other fieldwork

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seidenschwarz, F.

    1997-01-01

    Flora and vegetation study of Suluan Island, Eastern Samar, Philippines — A group of botanists from the University of San Carlos Botany Research Group (USCBRG) and CEBU (Ms. E. Elumbaring, Dr. B. Heeger, Dr. F. Seidenschwarz, and Ms. S. Semblante) is studying the flora and vegetation of Suluan

  19. Plant transcriptomics and responses to environmental stress

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Atta-ur-Rehman School of Applied Biosciences, National University of Sciences and Technology, H-12 Campus, Islamabad 25000, Pakistan; Stress Physiology Lab Department of Botany, Jiwaji University, Gwalior 474 011, India; Centre for Environmental Research, Near East University, 33010, Lefkosha, Turkish Republic ...

  20. 50 Years of JBE: The Evolution of Biology as a School Subject

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Edgar

    2016-01-01

    When the "Journal of Biological Education" was first published in 1967, biology was still very much the Cinderella of the three school sciences in many countries. Most selective secondary school biology courses readily betrayed their origins as an unconvincing coalition of botany and zoology. In the non-selective secondary modern…

  1. Academic Performance and Pass Rates: Comparison of Three First-Year Life Science Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, C. T.

    2009-01-01

    First year students' academic performance in three Life Science courses (Botany, Zoology and Bioscience) was compared. Pass rates, as well as the means and distributions of final marks were analysed. Of the three components (coursework, practical and theory examinations) contributing to the final mark of each course, students performed best in the…

  2. Publication List - New York State Museum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Museum, Albany.

    Presented is a list of publications in six areas: (1) Anthropology and Archeology, (2) Botany, (3) Entomology, (4) Zoology, (5) Geology and Paleontology, and (6) Miscellaneous. This list was produced by the New York State Department of Education in cooperation with the New York State Museum. The list includes the publication number, author(s),…

  3. Life Sciences and Allied Fields: Indexes and Abstracts, Book Review Indexes, Serials Bibliographies, Translations. Bibliographic Series No. 32.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colpitts, D. Corinne

    The information sources for the life sciences and allied fields listed were selected from the holdings of the Arkansas University library. Citations include indexes and abstracts dealing with national and international literature in medicine, the biological sciences, environmental science, veterinary medicine, agriculture, botany, and zoology, as…

  4. Stomatal function, density and pattern, and CO2 assimilation in Arabidopsis thaliana tmm1 and sdd1-1 mutants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vráblová, M.; Vrábl, D.; Hronková, Marie; Kubásek, J.; Šantrůček, Jiří

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 5 (2017), s. 689-701 ISSN 1435-8603 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : carbon-isotope discrimination * leaf gas-exchange * abscisic-acid * photosynthetic capacity Subject RIV: ED - Physiology OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 2.106, year: 2016

  5. 977-IJBCS-Article-Dr Madjelia Some

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrateur

    biology. In the Sudano-Sahelian forest of Burkina Faso, fruit and seed production of a common dioecious ... areas of West Africa. Its pods are ... tropical dry forests, a dioecious plant with different ..... American Journal of Botany, 71: 736–. 751.

  6. Lichens of the family Teloschistaceae in Dagestan, an eastern part of the Caucasian biodiversity hot-spot

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vondrák, Jan; Ismailov, A.; Urbanavichus, G.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 104, č. 4 (2017), s. 483-498 ISSN 0029-5035 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : diversity potential * Russia * Variospora * Xanthocarpia * Caloplaca Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 0.941, year: 2016

  7. Short Training Course in Oceanography. Red Sea & Gulf of Aden Programme (PERSGA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arab Organization for Education and Science, Cairo (Egypt).

    This document presents a training course in oceanography intended for Junior Bachelor of Science (B.S.) graduates in physics, mathematics, chemistry, zoology, botany or geology to give them the minimum qualifications required to work in any of the marine science stations. This 14-week course, organized by the Arab League Educational, Cultural and…

  8. Carl Linnaeus: pictures and propaganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fara, Patricia

    2003-03-01

    How do scientists become famous? Carl Linnaeus was an expert at self-promotion who used portraits to gain patronage and consolidate his reputation. His sexualized classification system was hugely controversial, yet his successors celebrated him as a great hero of botany.

  9. Biomonitoring of Urban Pollution Using Silicon-Accumulating Species, Phyllostachys aureosulcata 'Aureocaulis'

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Morina, Filis; Vidovic, M.; Streckovic, T.; Radovic, V.; Veljovic-Jovanovic, S.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 99, č. 6 (2017), s. 706-712 ISSN 0007-4861 R&D Projects: GA MŠk EF15_003/0000336 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : bamboo * phytoliths * carbon * stress * rice Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 1.412, year: 2016

  10. Transcriptomic response of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. roots to ibuprofen

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Landa, Přemysl; Přerostová, Sylva; Langhansová, Lenka; Maršík, Petr; Vaněk, Tomáš

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 8 (2017), s. 695-700 ISSN 1522-6514 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-22593S Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : detoxification * gene expression * metabolism of xenobiotics * microarrays * phytoremediation Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 1.770, year: 2016

  11. Diploids of the Valeriana officinalis group (Valerianaceae) in Central Europe, and an attempt to unravel the nomenclatural chaos

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kirschner, Jan; Zeisek, Vojtěch

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 3 (2017), s. 189-201 ISSN 0511-9618 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36079G Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : Valeriana officinalis * taxonomy * nomenclature Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 0.680, year: 2016

  12. Ecological hybrid speciation in central-European species of Bolboschoenus: genetic and morphological evaluation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Píšová, Soňa; Hroudová, Zdenka; Chumová, Zuzana; Fér, T.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 89, č. 1 (2017), s. 17-39 ISSN 0032-7786 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36079G Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : AFLP * Bolboschoenus * central Europe * speciation * model-based clustering * morfometrics Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 3.000, year: 2016

  13. Prevalence and intensity of Nematodirus sp. and Eimeria sp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There was a significant correlation between OPG and host size. We conclude that differences in parasite loads are determined by both environmental and biological factors. KEY WORDS: goats, Nematodirus, Eimeria, season, site, food, sex, age. Egyptian Journal of Botany Vol.5 2003: 78-85. AJOL African Journals Online.

  14. Studies on storage rot of cocoyam

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    uc network

    42(3): 2059-2068. Eze, C.S (1984). Studies on storage rot of cocoyam (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott) at Nsukka. MSc. Dissertation, Dept of Botany, Univ of Nigeria, Nsukka. 73pp. Loyonga, S. N and Nzietchueng S. (1987). Cocoyam and African food crisi. In: Tropical Root Crops: Root crops and the African food crisis Terry ...

  15. Resonance – Journal of Science Education | Indian Academy of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Search for Future Viands - Algae and Fungi as Food. Dipanjan Ghosh. General Article Volume 9 Issue 5 ... Keywords. Alternative food; algae; fungi; mushrooms; seaweeds. Author Affiliations. Dipanjan Ghosh1. Teacher in Botany Biology Division Kirnahar Shib Chandra High School, Kirnahar Birbhum 731302, WB, India.

  16. L-Glutamic acid production by Bacillus spp. isolated from vegetable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-06-15

    Jun 15, 2011 ... 2Department of Botany and Microbiology, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Oyo state, Nigeria. ... monosodium salt as a flavor enhancer in foods (Kikunae, ...... Madhavan KN, Ashok P (1996). Solid state fermentation for L – glutamic acid production using Brevibacterium sp. DSM 20411. J. Food. Sci. Technol.

  17. callus induction from epicotyl and hypocotyl explants of

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AMO0+ and B.E. AYISIRE. Department of Botany, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife. Nigeria. (Submitted: 31 May 2004; Accepted: 31 October 2004). Abstract ..... of Nigeria: Implications for food security. pp. 265-. 283. University of Agriculture, Abeokuta, Conference. Proceedings Series No. 3. Ayisire, B.E., Obembe, 0.0.

  18. Nutritional analyses of Rumex hastatus D. Don, Rumex dentatus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-09-01

    Sep 1, 2009 ... Pharmacognosy Laboratory, Department of Botany, University of Peshawar, Pakistan. Accepted 5 July, 2007. The study shows the ... drates, proteins, fats) that are utilized as foods by man and animals, but also for multitude of ... The deficiency of protein in human food and animal feed is well recognized.

  19. Phytochemical studies on herbal plants commonly used for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    2014-01-31

    Jan 31, 2014 ... 2Department of Food Science and Technology of Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, P. O. Box. 62000-00200 Nairobi Kenya: 3Department of Botany Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology;. 4School of Human Resource Development Jomo Kenyatta University of ...

  20. Antibacterial potential of extracts of leaves of Parrotia persica

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-11-19

    Nov 19, 2007 ... 1Microbiology laboratory, Department of studies in Botany and Microbiology, University of Mysore, Manasagangotri,. Mysore 570 006, India. 2Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Mazandaran Medical ... It is also used for food coloring and food flavoring (Rechinger, 1999). There are no scientific reports on the ...

  1. Antioxidant properties of some medicinal Aristolochiaceae species

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-02-19

    Feb 19, 2008 ... Department of Botany, Plant Tissue Culture Division, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore, Tamil nadu, India. Accepted 15 August, 2007. Antioxidant properties of ... raising interest among scientists and food manufacturers as consumers move toward functional foods with specific health effects (Lo liger, 1991).

  2. Status and distribution patterns of selected medicinal and food tree ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tree species of ethno-botany and food relevance were identified and enumerated in the course of field survey in the study communities. The spatial distributions of six most-frequently utilized tree species were mapped using Geographical Information System (GIS). Data were statistically analyzed using descriptive statistics ...

  3. 2018-02-21T16:33:41Z https://www.ajol.info/index.php/all/oai oai:ojs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    article/829 2018-02-21T16:33:41Z ajrfs:ART A review of plant-based methods for estimating food consumption, percentage utilisation, species preferences and feeding patterns of grazing and browsing animals. D.L., Barnes Keywords: botany; ...

  4. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    El-Zawahry, YA. Vol 3, No 1 (2001): (Botany) - Articles How do carbon dioxide and ozone affect the basal respiration and soil microbial population in the rhizosphere of Glycine max ? Abstract. ISSN: 1110-6859. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More ...

  5. Fun with Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLure, John W.

    1993-01-01

    Describes hands-on activities with fungi that may provoke the curiosity of early adolescents and increase their enjoyment and understanding of a vast, important portion of botany. Some of the activities may be conducted during the winter months when most fieldwork ceases. (PR)

  6. Hybridization success is largely limited to homoploid Prunus hybrids: a multidisciplinary approach

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Macková, L.; Vít, Petr; Ďurišová, Ľ.; Eliáš, P. Jr.; Urfus, T.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 303, č. 4 (2017), s. 481-495 ISSN 0378-2697 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : absolute genome size * interspecific hybridization * embryology Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 1.239, year: 2016

  7. 47th ANZAAS Congress (abstracts) Vol. I, Sections 1-18

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-01-01

    Abstracts are included for approximately 250 papers. The subject areas covered by the papers include the following: (1) physics, (2) chemistry, (3) geology, (4) architecture and town planning, (5) pharmaceutical sciences, (6) optometry, (7) zoology, (8) botany, (9) agriculture and forestry, (10) physiology, and (11) food science and nutrition. An author index is included. (MOW)

  8. Combining soil and tree-stem flux measurements and soil gas profiles to understand CH4 pathways in Fagus sylvatica forests

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Maier, M.; Macháčová, Kateřina; Lang, F.; Svobodová, Kateřina; Urban, Otmar

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 181, č. 1 (2018), s. 31-35 ISSN 1436-8730 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415 Institutional support: RVO:86652079 Keywords : ch4 * soil gas profile * gas flux * co2 * methanogenesis Subject RIV: ED - Physiology OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 2.102, year: 2016

  9. Ethiopian Journal of Environmental Studies and Management

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... Ethiopian Journal of Environmental Studies and Management (EJESM) is based in the Department of Geography and Environmental Studies, Bahir Dar University, Ethiopia. Its aim is to publish original research output in the area of Geography, Ecology, Botany, Conservation studies, Food and Nutrition, Water Resources, ...

  10. The pangenome of hexaploid bread wheat

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Montenegro, J. D.; Golicz, A. A.; Bayer, P.E.; Hurgobin, B.; Lee, H. T.; Chan, C. K. K.; Visendi, P.; Lai, K.; Doležel, Jaroslav; Batley, J.; Edwards, D.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 90, č. 5 (2017), s. 1007-1013 ISSN 0960-7412 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : database * diversity * genome * pangenome * single nucleotide polymorphisms * Triticum aestivum * wheat Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 5.901, year: 2016

  11. Isolation, purification and characterization of phytase from Bacillus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eltoukhy

    2013-05-15

    May 15, 2013 ... 2Faculty of Science, Botany and Microbiology Department, ... additive to enhance the nutritional quality of plant material ..... 3 ml of sterile distilled water was added to a 24 h old slant of B. subtilis. ..... line protease productivity compared to the other matrices .... Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press, NY, Vol.

  12. Is biomass a reliable estimate of plant fitness?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Younginger, B.S.; Sirová, Dagmara; Cruzan, M.B.; Ballhorn, D.J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 2 (2017), č. článku 1600094. ISSN 2168-0450 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : biomass * fecundity * fitness * plant performance * selection Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 1.492, year: 2016

  13. Dny otevřených dveří se Sbírce vodních a mokřadních rostlin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Navrátilová, Jana

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 5 (2017), s. 23-24 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) StrategieAV21/9 Program:StrategieAV Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : open day * collection * plants Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany

  14. Novinky ve Sbírce vodních a mokřadních rostlin v Třeboni v roce 2016

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Navrátilová, Jana

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 1 (2017), s. 14-17 ISSN 2336-2243 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) StrategieAV21/9 Program:StrategieAV Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : Botanical garden * wetland plant * news Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany

  15. one step method of plantlet regeneration in trichosanthes dioica roxb

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2011-01-03

    Jan 3, 2011 ... Tissue Culture Laboratory, Department of Botany, Patna University, Patna, India. E-mail: rashmi0911@gmail.com. Accepted 23 December, 2010. In order to reduce the cost and time of in vitro raised plants of Trichosanthes dioica Roxb., a minimal .... 1951), tomato juice (Nitsch, 1951; Straus and La Rue,.

  16. High gellan gum concentration and secondary somatic embryogenesis: two key factors to improve somatic embryo development in Pseudotsuga menziesii [Mirb.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lelu-Walter, M.A.; Gautier, J.; Eliášová, Kateřina; Sanchez, L.; Teyssier, C.; Lomenech, A. M.; Le Metté, C.; Hargreaves, R.; Trontin, J.F.; Reeves, G.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 132, č. 1 (2018), s. 137-155 ISSN 0167-6857 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Cell density * Cleavage polyembryony * Douglas-fir * Embryogenic potential * Protein pattern * Vegetative propagation Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 2.002, year: 2016

  17. Interplay between cytochrome c and gibberellins during Arabidopsis vegetative development

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Racca, S.; Welchen, E.; Gras, D. E.; Tarkowská, Danuše; Turečková, Veronika; Maurino, V. G.; Gonzalez, D. H.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 94, č. 1 (2018), s. 105-121 ISSN 0960-7412 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Arabidopsis thaliana * cytochrome c * DELLA protein * gibberellin * mitochondrion Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 5.901, year: 2016

  18. 2297-IJBCS-Article-Dansi Alexandre

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hp

    Ethno-botany and morphological characterisation of the yam pona complex in Ghana. African. Crop Science, 9: 407-414. Peroni N, Kageyama PY, Begossi A. 2007. Molecular differentiation, diversity and folk classification of sweet and bitter cassava (Manihot esculenta) in Caicara and Caboclo management systems in ...

  19. The ins and outs of Ca2+ in plant endomembrane trafficking

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Himschoot, E.; Pleskot, Roman; Van Damme, D.; Vanneste, S.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 40, DEC (2017), s. 131-137 ISSN 1369-5266 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA17-27477S Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : CLATHRIN-MEDIATED ENDOCYTOSIS * GOLGI NETWORK/EARLY ENDOSOME * VACUOLAR SORTING RECEPTOR Subject RIV: ED - Physiology OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 7.357, year: 2016

  20. Book review: H. Haeupler & T. Muer: Bildatlas der Farn- und Blütenpflanzen Deutschlands; Eugen Ulmer Verlag, Stuttgart, 2007, 789 pp

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Petřík, Petr

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 3 (2007), s. 237-239 ISSN 1211-9520 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : distribution atlas * vascular plants * Germany Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant science s, botany Impact factor: 1.133, year: 2007

  1. From schedonorus and micropyropsis to lolium (Poaceae: Loliinae): New combinations and typifications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Banfi, E.; Galasso, G.; Foggi, B.; Kopecký, David; Ardenghi, N.M.G.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 66, č. 3 (2017), s. 708-717 ISSN 0040-0262 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Epitypification * Fescues * Grasses * Lectotypification * Nomenclature * Nothospecies * Taxonomy Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 2.447, year: 2016

  2. medicinal utilization of roots of forest plants in lere local government

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OLANIPEKUN

    Department of Forestry and Wildlife Management,. University of Port ... Health care and botany have evolved as inseparable domains of human activity: ... importance in traditional health care systems of developing countries. ... are also skilled botanists and have a great talent for locating the requisite plant from the green.

  3. Miscellaneous information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NN,

    1983-01-01

    Tropical Botany in Aberdeen University. This was started by Professor J.W.H. Trail, who held the chair from 1877 to 1919, and travelled in the Amazon Valley (1873-75) mainly collecting cryptogams and studying palms. He was succeeded by Prof. W.G. Craib (1920-33) who was never in the tropics but

  4. Identity, ecology and ecophysiology of planktic green algae dominating in ice-covered lakes on James Ross Island (northeastern Antarctic Peninsula)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nedbalová, Linda; Mihál, M.; Kvíderová, Jana; Procházková, L.; Řezanka, Tomáš; Elster, Josef

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 1 (2017), s. 187-200 ISSN 1433-4909 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-00227S Institutional support: RVO:67985939 ; RVO:61388971 Keywords : Monoraphidium * lakes * Antarktica Subject RIV: EF - Botanics; EE - Microbiology, Virology (MBU-M) OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany; Microbiology (MBU-M)

  5. Book review: Chytrý M., Kučera T., Kočí M., Grulich V. & Lustyk P. (eds.): Katalog biotopů České republiky - Habitat Catalogue of the Czech Republic. Ed. 2. - Agentura ochrany přírody a krajiny ČR, Praha 2010, 445 pp

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Petřík, Petr

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 84, č. 4 (2012), s. 937-938 ISSN 0032-7786 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : habitat mapping * Natura 2000 * Czech Republic Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 2.833, year: 2012

  6. Seaweeds - a field manual

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Dhargalkar, V.K.; Kavlekar, D.P.

    ) Seashore plants of California. University of California pres, Berkley Los Angeles London Srivasan, K.S. (1969) Phycologia Indica, Icons of Indian Marinine Algae. Botani- cal Survey of India, Calcutta. pp 52. Oza, R.M. & S.H. Zaidi (2001) A revised checklist...

  7. Rare and new Laboulbeniales from Poland. X

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Majewski

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In a consecutive paper in the series concerning Polish Laboulbeniales, several species new for Poland are reported. Similarly as in the earlier papers of this series, all specimens were found by the author (if not otherwise indicated. The specimens are kept in the author's collection at the Mycology Laboratory of the Institute of Botany, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw.

  8. Repetitive DNA: A Versatile Tool for Karyotyping in Festuca pratensis Huds

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Křivánková, Anna; Kopecký, David; Stočes, Štěpán; Doležel, Jaroslav; Hřibová, Eva

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 151, č. 2 (2017), s. 96-105 ISSN 1424-8581 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Fluorescence in situ hybridization * Karyotyping * Meadow fescue * Repetitive DNA * Tandem organized repeats Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 1.354, year: 2016

  9. Flower palate structure of the aquatic bladderworts Utricularia bremii Heer and U. minor L. from section Utricularia (Lentibulariaceae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Płachno, B.J.; Stpiczyńska, M.; Krajewski, Ł.; Świątek, P.; Adamec, Lubomír; Miranda, V.F.O.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 254, č. 5 (2017), s. 2007-2015 ISSN 0033-183X Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : aquatic bladderworts * pollination * ultrastructure Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 2.870, year: 2016

  10. Herbs as a food and medicine source in Palestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Rabia, Aref

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the broad ethno-botany and folk medicine in Palestine. It presents examples of different edible plants and their use by Palestinians in a host of manners, fresh, cooked and dried, both as foodstuffs and treatment of diseases and medical disorders. Their potential application as cancer chemopreventive agents needs to be a focus of research attention.

  11. The correct author citation of the recently published name Pluteus fenzlii

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Borovička, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 1 (2008), s. 123-124 ISSN 1211-0981 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516; CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : Pluteus fenzlii * botany Subject RIV: EF - Botanics http://prfdec.natur.cuni.cz/cvsm/CM60110F.pdf

  12. The Institute of Biological Sciences Herbarium (PBDH), University of the Philippines Los Baños

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buot, I.E.; Hernaez, B.F.; Tandang, D.N.

    2002-01-01

    With the founding of the Museum of Natural History (MNH) at the University of the Philippines Los Baños (UPLB) the former Department of Botany Herbarium (CAHUP) has been transferred to this. This required the establishment of another herbarium to cater to the increasing need by courses in

  13. Gain-of-function mutants of the cytokinin receptors AHK2 and AHK3 regulate plant organ size, flowering time and plant longevity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bartrina, I.; Jensen, H.; Novák, Ondřej; Strnad, Miroslav; Werner, T.; Schmülling, T.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 173, č. 3 (2017), s. 1783-1797 ISSN 0032-0889 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-22322S Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : SHOOT APICAL MERISTEM * ARABIDOPSIS-THALIANA * HISTIDINE KINASE Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 6.456, year: 2016

  14. Plant Parts Snack--A Way to Family Involvement, Science Learning, and Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matt, Megan Mason

    2008-01-01

    As a teacher who loves to bring botany into her preschool classroom of 4- and 5-year-olds, the author makes edible plants a regular, popular feature of her students' environment. The author is fascinated when her students become increasingly adventurous in their tastes for vegetables the more they handle and understand plants. The author decided…

  15. Short Communication ISSN 0189-6016©2007

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Adewunmi

    authenticated at the Botany department, Faculty of Science, Aden University, Yemen; Voucher specimens of the plant material were deposited in Pharmacognosy Unit, Aden University. Air-dried and ground plant material (10 g) was extracted at room temperature successively with chloroform (100 ml x 4), MeOH (100 ml x 4) ...

  16. Palaeovegetation in the Pavlovské vrchy hills region (South Moravia, Czech Republic) around 25,000 BP: Bulhary core

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rybníčková, Eliška; Rybníček, Kamil

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 6 (2014), s. 719-728 ISSN 0939-6314 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : polen analyses * Gravettian-Pavlovian * interstadial WII/WIII * palaeovegetation * palaeoenvironment Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 2.648, year: 2014

  17. Biowaste-derived hydrolysates as plant disease suppressants for oilseed rape

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jindřichová, Barbora; Burketová, Lenka; Montoneri, E.; Francavilla, M.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 183, MAY 10 (2018), s. 335-342 ISSN 0959-6526 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD14056 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Biogas digestate * Compost * Induced resistance * Leptosphaeria maculans * Oilseed rape Subject RIV: GF - Plant Pathology, Vermin, Weed, Plant Protection OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 5.715, year: 2016

  18. Effect of Piper betle on Giardia intestinalis infection in vivo

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pecková, R.; Doležal, Karel; Sak, Bohumil; Květoňová, Dana; Kváč, Martin; Nurcahyo, W.; Foitová, I.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 184, JAN (2018), s. 39-45 ISSN 0014-4894 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP505/11/1163 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 ; RVO:60077344 Keywords : Antigiardial activity * Drug of choice * Giardia intestinalis * Natural antiparasitics * Parasites * Piper betle Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 1.724, year: 2016

  19. Phenolic compounds and antioxidant capacity in different-colored and non-pigmented berries of bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus L.)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Colak, N.; Primetta, A. K.; Riihinen, K. R.; Jaakola, L.; Grúz, Jiří; Strnad, Miroslav; Torun, H.; Ayaz, F. A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 20, DEC (2017), s. 67-78 ISSN 2212-4292 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Anthocyanin * Antioxidant * Bilberry * Phenolic acid * Vaccinium myrtillus Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 1.964, year: 2016

  20. Assessment of rosehips based on the content of their biologically active compounds

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bhave, A.; Schulzová, V.; Chmelařová, H.; Mrnka, Libor; Hajslová, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 2 (2017), s. 681-690 ISSN 1021-9498 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TE01020080 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : rosehips * bioactive compounds * antioxidative activity Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 3.048, year: 2016

  1. Microbial control of Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) with Beauveria bassiana strain GHA: field applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houping Liu; Leah S. Bauer

    2008-01-01

    The effects of Beauveria bassiana strain GHA, applied as BotaniGard ES, on newly colonised and well-established populations of emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) were evaluated in the field using foliar and trunk sprays in Michigan in 2004-2005. Results from field trials at a newly colonised white ash...

  2. Cytokinin biosynthesis promotes cortical cell responses during nodule development

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Reid, D.E.; Nadzieja, M.; Novák, Ondřej; Heckmann, A.B.; Sandal, N.; Stougaard, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 175, č. 1 (2017), s. 361-375 ISSN 0032-0889 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : MEDICAGO-TRUNCATULA ROOT * ERN1 TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR * DEPENDENT PROTEIN-KINASE Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 6.456, year: 2016

  3. Diversity, ecology and community structure of the freshwater littoral diatom flora from Petuniabukta (Spitsbergen)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pinseel, E.; Van de Vijver, B.; Kavan, J.; Verleyen, E.; Kopalová, Kateřina

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 3 (2017), s. 533-551 ISSN 0722-4060 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : Arctic region * Community analysis * Diatoms Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 1.949, year: 2016

  4. Development and Experiment in College Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Committee on Institutional Cooperation.

    These reports comprise sample collections of experimental instructional projects seeking new and better arrangements for teaching. The entries in section one, describe department-based projects in accounting, art history, biology, botany, business administration, communication, counseling, dairy science, design, education, engineering, language,…

  5. S.A.P. Students Adopt Plants: A Curriculum Guide for Independent Research Projects in High School Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Gayle A.

    This curriculum guide begins with classroom and text study of plants and develops into an individual research project that continues throughout the school year outside the regular biology or botany teaching plan and text. The project uses about one class period every 2 weeks for group discussions, evaluations, and suggestions for the individual…

  6. Editorial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NN,

    1960-01-01

    The frontispiece selected for this number is a photograph made during a visit by Leyden botanists to the nestor of Malaysian botany, Dr C.A. Backer, at Heemstede, who celebrated his 85th birthday, September 18, 1959. Though now almost confined to his room and his eyesight unfortunately no longer

  7. Let Peter Rabbit Play in the Garden: Using Beatrix Potter's Work to Integrate Ecological Literacy into Montessori Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kelly

    2015-01-01

    Kelly Johnson introduces a series of lessons that incorporate literacy, observation, botany, history, place studies, writing, and art, with a long-term eco-literacy goal of connectedness and a conservation ethic. Johnson's initial idea to use Beatrix Potter as a model in the Lower Elementary classroom came after extensively researching…

  8. Demonstrating Inquiry-Based Teaching Competencies in the Life Sciences--Part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    This set of botany demonstrations is a continuation of the inquiry-based lecture activities that provide realistic connections to the history and nature of science and employ technology in data collection. The demonstrations also provide examples of inquiry-based teaching practices in the life sciences. (Contains 5 figures.) [For Part 1, see…

  9. The Natural Area: Teaching Tool and Community Catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Roger M.; Grimm, Floyd M., III

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the properties desirable in a natural area to be used as a teaching tool in college courses such as general biology, botany, zoology, entomology, and ecology. Describes the use of a natural area at Harford Community College, Maryland, and outlines the community involvement in planning and utilizing the area. (JR)

  10. Doctor Ward's Accidental Terrarium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershey, David R.

    1996-01-01

    Presents the story of the accidental invention of the Wardian case, or terrarium, by Nathaniel Bagshaw Ward. Advocates the use of this story in teaching precollege biology as an illustration of how a chance event can lead to a major scientific advancement and as an example of the common occurrence of multiple discovery in botany. Contains 34…

  11. Lydia Shattuck: "A Streak of the Modern."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shmurak, Carole B.; Handler, Bonnie S.

    1991-01-01

    Lydia Shattuck was responsible for the excellence in science instruction at Mount Holyoke Seminary. Shattuck graduated in 1851 and remained there as a faculty member, specializing in chemistry and botany. One of the first women to join scientific societies, she helped enlarge the sphere of women engaged in scientific research. (SM)

  12. Assessing and Analyzing Behavior Strategies of Instructors in College Science Laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyle, William C., Jr.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Analyzed are university instructor behaviors in introductory and advanced level laboratories of botany, chemistry, geology, physics and zoology. Science Laboratory Interaction Categories--Teacher (SLIC) was used to assess 15 individual categories of teacher behaviors in the areas of questioning, giving directions, transmitting information,…

  13. What Is a Leaf? An Online Tutorial and Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Geoffrey

    2008-01-01

    A leaf is a fundamental unit in botany and understanding what constitutes a leaf is fundamental to many plant science activities. My observations and subsequent testing indicated that many students could not confidently and consistently recognise a leaf from a leaflet, or recognise basic leaf arrangements and the various types of compound or…

  14. Improvement of Science Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postlethwait, S. N.

    1980-01-01

    Supports implementation of instructional procedures that permit students to engage in good learning practices as commonly defined by educational psychologists and teachers. Presents the scientific strategy used by students in botany at Purdue, which involves students in the practice of scientific procedures. (CS)

  15. Landscaping Habitat for Humanity Homes: A Community Outreach Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsay, Jodie L.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to incorporate a community service component into a Biology course at Northern State University (NSU) in Aberdeen, SD. Students in an upper-level botany course (Plant Structure and Function) provide landscaping services to homeowners who have purchased homes through Habitat for Humanity. Homeowner satisfaction with…

  16. INTEGRATED EXPERIENCE APPROACH TO LEARNING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    POSTLETHWAIT, S.N.; AND OTHERS

    THE USE OF AUDIOTUTORIAL TECHNIQUES FOR TEACHING INTRODUCTORY COLLEGE BOTANY IS DESCRIBED. SPECIFIC PRACTICES USED AT PURDUE UNIVERSITY TO ILLUSTRATE DIFFERENT FACETS OF THE APPROACH ARE ANALYZED. INCLUDED ARE INDEPENDENT STUDY SESSIONS, SMALL ASSEMBLY SESSIONS, GENERAL ASSEMBLY SESSIONS, AND HOME STUDY SESSIONS. ILLUSTRATIONS AND SPECIFICATIONS…

  17. Deepening Cosmic Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Gerard

    2013-01-01

    This article is a special blend of research, theory, and practice, with clear insight into the origins of Cosmic Education and cosmic task, while recalling memories of student explorations in botany, in particular, episodes from Mr. Leonard's teaching. Mr. Leonard speaks of a storytelling curriculum that eloquently puts perspective into dimensions…

  18. Why Are Things Shaped the Way They Are?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiten, David J.; Whiten, Phyllis

    2009-01-01

    This article examines important geometric concepts embedded in the shape and design of natural and manufactured objects. The Whitins first describe fourth graders exploring why manhole covers are circles. Then the authors offer a range of activities to demonstrate how inquiring about shape in botany, geology, biology, and industry can effectively…

  19. Audio-Tutorial Instruction: A Strategy For Teaching Introductory College Geology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenner, Peter; Andrews, Ted F.

    The rationale of audio-tutorial instruction is discussed, and the history and development of the audio-tutorial botany program at Purdue University is described. Audio-tutorial programs in geology at eleven colleges and one school are described, illustrating several ways in which programs have been developed and integrated into courses. Programs…

  20. A Strategy for Reorientation of Post-Graduate Courses in Life Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaraman, J.

    1975-01-01

    The Binational Conference on Life Sciences in Bangalore in 1971 made recommendations for reorganization of teaching and research in life sciences (e.g. integration of botany and zoology departments). The author notes administrative reasons why changes have not been implemented and outlines notes administrative reasons why changes have not been…

  1. Teaching Botanical Identification to Adults: Experiences of the UK Participatory Science Project "Open Air Laboratories"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagg, Bethan C.; Donkin, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Taxonomic education and botany are increasingly neglected in schools and universities, leading to a "missed generation" of adults that cannot identify organisms, especially plants. This study pilots three methods for teaching identification of native plant species to forty-three adults engaged in the participatory science project…

  2. The Audio-Tutorial Approach to Learning Through Independent Study and Integrated Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postlethwait, S. N.; And Others

    The rationale of the integrated experience approach to teaching botany at Purdue University is given and the history of the audio-tutorial course at Purdue and its present organization are described. A sample week's unit of study is given, including transcription of the tape, reproduction of printed materials and photographs of other materials…

  3. How I Spent My Summer Vacation: Amazing Opportunities for Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curwood, Jen Scott

    2008-01-01

    From summer programs in archaeology or Russian to teaching abroad for a year or more, there are many opportunities available for teachers. This article describes unique programs in archeology, geology, astronomy, botany, and oceanography that are available as summer programs; master's programs in languages, administration, writing, and Teaching…

  4. Addition to chapter VI b (p. 2011)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NN,

    1972-01-01

    Botanic Garden at the University of Malaya. A plan was submitted by Professor W.R. Stanton, head of the Botany Division, University of Malaya, K.L., to establish a new botanic garden of some 100 acres as a teaching facility and for the benefit of biological education institutes and the general

  5. Assessing and Analyzing the Performance of Students in College Science Laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyle, William C., Jr.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    The study investigated specific student behavior in introductory and advanced college laboratories in botany, chemistry, geology, physics, and zoology. Behaviors were observed, described, and classified with no effort made to induce change, detail underlying conditions, or identify correlates. (Author/RE)

  6. Promoting Student Learning through the Integration of Lab and Lecture: The Seamless Biology Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrowes, Patricia; Nazario, Gladys

    2008-01-01

    The authors engaged in an education experiment to determine if the integration of lab and lecture activities in zoology and botany proved beneficial to student learning and motivation toward biology. Their results revealed that this strategy positively influenced students' academic achievement, conceptual understanding, and ability to apply…

  7. Lessons from Ganderbill Holler. Essay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liftig, Inez Fugate

    2001-01-01

    An award-winning science teacher recalls her youth in Appalachian Kentucky and how she learned the fundamental concepts of biology, botany, hydrology, and geology playing and working in the family's "holler." The holler also gave her a philosophy of teaching--she has her students experience the wonders of the natural world before…

  8. Teaching Flower Structure & Floral Formulae--A Mix of the Real & Virtual Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Geoff

    2010-01-01

    The study of flower structure is essential in plant identification and in understanding sexual reproduction in plants, pollination syndromes, plant breeding, and fruit structure. Thus, study of flower structure and construction of floral formulae are standard parts of first-year university botany and biology courses. These activities involve…

  9. Four-Year Turfgrass Management Programs in the United States: II. Organization and Content of Introductory Turfgrass Management Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnok, Keith J.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A survey of 32 land-grant institutions was conducted to determine format, topical content, and teaching methods of introductory turfgrass management courses of 4-year turfgrass management programs in the United States. Required courses included a basic soils class and a course in biology or botany, usually transmitted by the lecture method. (MDH)

  10. More Misconceptions to Avoid When Teaching about Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershey, David R.

    2005-01-01

    As follow-up to a previous article "Avoid Misconceptions When Teaching about Plants," the author identifies fifty additional misconceptions. Undergeneralizations are added to the list of oversimplifications, obsolete concepts, terms, misidentifications, and flawed research. A glossary at the end of the article compares words used in botany with…

  11. Personal news

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NN,

    1966-01-01

    Dr. P. S. Ashton has taken up an appointment as a lecturer in botany at the University of Aberdeen, Scotland, after the completion of his work in Sarawak in September 1966. A programme of cooperation has come into existence between the universities of Aberdeen and Kuala Lumpur, Malaya. Dr. Ashton’s

  12. soybeans yoghurt production using starter culture from

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BSN

    On kilogram (lkg) of soybeans used produced soy-milk ... production and the vegetable oil industry can not be overemphasised .... cost. Four genera ut microorgamsms were isolated from the fennented cow milk ... The bacteria involved might have enzyme systems capable of metabolizing .... A Textbook of Economic Botany.

  13. Determination of Ploidy Level and Nuclear DNA Content in the Droseraceae by Flow Cytometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hoshi, Y.; Azumatani, M.; Suyama, T.; Adamec, Lubomír

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 3 (2017), s. 321-327 ISSN 0011-4545 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : nuclear DNA content * genome size * Droseraceae Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 0.913, year: 2016

  14. Cytogenetic relationships within the Maghrebian clade of Festuca subgen. Schedonorus (Poaceae), using flow cytometry and FISH

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ezquerro-López, D.; Kopecký, David; Inda, L. A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 74, č. 1 (2017), č. článku e052. ISSN 0211-1322 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Broad-leaved fescues * Festuca subgen. Schedonorus * fish * Genome size * rdna Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 0.385, year: 2016

  15. Effects of Zinc and nitrogen application on agronomic traits and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aria

    2012-05-03

    May 3, 2012 ... Nitrogen fertilizer application improved seed number per silique and 1000-seed weight over .... mobile phase of acetonitrile and water at a flow rate of 1.0 ml/min ..... Ph.D. Thesis Faculty of Science, Botany Department, Cairo.

  16. Overexpression of a flower-specific aerolysin-like protein from the dioecious plant Rumex acetosa alters flower development and induces male sterility in transgenic tobacco

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Manzano, S.; Megias, Z.; Martinez, C.; Garcia, A.; Aguado, E.; Chileh, T.; Lopez-Alonso, D.; Garcia-Maroto, F.; Kejnovský, Eduard; Široký, Jiří; Kubát, Zdeněk; Králová, Tereza; Vyskot, Boris; Jamilena, M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 89, č. 1 (2017), s. 58-72 ISSN 0960-7412 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : sex determination * Rumex acetosa * aerolysin-like protein Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 5.901, year: 2016

  17. Heterodera schachtii Tyrosinase-like protein a novel nematode effector modulating plant hormone homeostasis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Habash, S.; Radakovic, Z.S.; Vaňková, Radomíra; Siddique, S.; Dobrev, Petre; Gleason, C.; Grundler, F.M.W.; Elashry, A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, JUL 31 (2017), č. článku 6874. ISSN 2045-2322 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : arabidopsis-thaliana * cyst-nematode * parasitic nematode * transient expression * host plants * sequence * identification * infection * model * transformation Subject RIV: ED - Physiology OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016

  18. Taraxacum sect. Orientalia (Compositae-Crepidinae) and the West Himalayan dandelions: A new interpretation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kirschner, Jan; Štěpánek, Jan; Zeisek, Vojtěch

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 312, č. 1 (2017), s. 1-27 ISSN 1179-3155 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-13368S Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : taxonomy * new sections and species * nrDNA ITS Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 1.240, year: 2016

  19. Checklist of root-sprouters in the Czech flora: mapping the gaps in our knowledge

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bartušková, Alena; Malíková, Lenka; Klimešová, Jitka

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 52, 3-4 (2017), s. 337-343 ISSN 1211-9520 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36079G Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : adventitious bud * root * hypocotyl Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 1.017, year: 2016

  20. Deciphering the growth pattern and phytohormonal content in Saskatoon berry (Amelanchier alnifolia) in response to in vitro cytokinin application

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Moyo, M.; Aremu, A.O.; Plačková, Lenka; Plíhalová, Lucie; Pěnčík, Aleš; Novák, Ondřej; Holub, J.; Doležal, Karel; Van Staden, J.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 42, MAY 25 (2018), s. 85-94 ISSN 1871-6784 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Auxins * Endogenous cytokinins * Micropropagation * Organogenesis * Saskatoon berry * Topolins Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 3.813, year: 2016

  1. Hard work and perseverance lead to success

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lawrence

    enrolled for MSc to do research in botany under the guidance of. Prof. Ella Gonzalves. ... such as metabolic products of algae, drainage water algae, nitro- gen-fixing algae in ... can be used as food, manure, and as a source of oil, as we had.

  2. Hvězdnice sivá (Aster canus), Christian Ferdinand Hochstetter a dva málo známé prameny ke květeně Moravy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Danihelka, Jiří

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 1 (2008), s. 1-16 ISSN 1211-5258 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06073 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : history of botany * halophytes * exsiccate series Subject RIV: EF - Botanics

  3. The Coast Artillery Journal. Volume 85, Number 6, November-December 1942

    Science.gov (United States)

    1942-12-01

    1.00 War and Peace. By Leon Tolstoy , .. , 3.00 Flamingo Road. By Robert lr’ilder . , 2.50 The Sun Is My Undoing. By Marguerite Steen , 3.00 Botany...car, mainte- nance and lubrication. The epidemic of inhuman warfare from which the world is now suffering is destined to be of long dura - tion

  4. Trait variation and genetic diversity in a banana genomic selection training population

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nyine, Moses; Uwimana, B.; Swennen, R.; Batte, M.; Brown, A.; Christelová, Pavla; Hřibová, Eva; Lorenzen, J.; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 6 (2017), č. článku e0178734. E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : PLANTAIN MUSA * AAB GROUP * IMPROVEMENT Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 2.806, year: 2016

  5. Chřest přeslenitý (Asparagus verticillatus) lokálně zdomácnělý na jižní Moravě

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Danihelka, Jiří; Chytrý, K.; Prokešová, H.; Sedláček, V.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 2 (2017), s. 155-162 ISSN 1211-5258 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36079G Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : Asparagaceae * distribution * garden escape * introduced species * neophyte * phytogeography Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany

  6. Obituaries and biographical notes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NN,

    1977-01-01

    Portraits of botanists who worked on the Ryukyu Islands, 80 in number, most Japanese, a few Americans, were published in the book by S. Hatusima, Flora of the Ryukyus, p. 56-75 (1971). Baas Becking, L. G. M. A meticulous bibliography, of the former Professor of Experimental Botany at Leiden and

  7. Crash course Can a seventeen-mile-long collider unlock the universe?

    CERN Document Server

    Kolbert, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    If you think of the sciences as a tower, with one field resting on another until you reach, say, botany or physiology, then particle physics represents the bottommost floor....A full of mysterious particles - "sparticles" - that have yet to be detected; that is is not a universe at all, but a multiverse. (7,5 pages)

  8. Distributions of vascular plants in the Czech Republic. Part 4

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaplan, Zdeněk; Danihelka, Jiří; Koutecký, P.; Šumberová, Kateřina; Ekrt, L.; Grulich, V.; Řepka, R.; Hroudová, Zdenka; Štěpánková, Jitka; Dvořák, V.; Dančák, M.; Dřevojan, P.; Wild, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 89, č. 2 (2017), s. 115-201 ISSN 0032-7786 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36079G Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : distribution * maps * phytogeography Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 3.000, year: 2016

  9. Impact of repetitive elements on the Y chromosome formation in plants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hobza, Roman; Čegan, R.; Jesionek, W.; Kejnovský, E.; Vyskot, B.; Kubát, Z.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 11 (2017), č. článku 302. ISSN 2073-4425 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA16-08698S Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Satellites * Sex chromosomes * Transposable elements * Y chromosome Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 3.600, year: 2016

  10. Elleanthus albiflorus (Orchidaceae) a new, white-flowered species from Peru

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dudek, M.; Baranow, P.; Kolanowska, Marta; Rykaczewski, M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 312, č. 2 (2017), s. 256-262 ISSN 1179-3155 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36098G Institutional support: RVO:86652079 Keywords : biodiversity * Epidendroideae * morphology * Pasco Region * taxonomy Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 1.240, year: 2016

  11. flea beetle populations and economic yield of okra as influenced

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Adipala Ekwamu

    Aussi, il n'yavait pas eu de difference significative en terme d'interaction .... The study was carried out at the Teaching and ..... metabolic pathways especially when applied .... Journal of Plant Nutrition ... Annals of Botany 105 (2):333-339.

  12. Vnitrodruhová variabilita a křížení zevaru vzpřímeného

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Píšová, Soňa; Fér, T.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 65, č. 3 (2017), s. 108-111 ISSN 0044-4812 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36079G Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : Sparganium * hybridization * variation Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany

  13. In Memoriam Cornelis (Kees) Kalkman (1928—1998)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baas, Pieter

    1998-01-01

    With the sudden and untimely death of Kees Kalkman on 19 January 1998, systematic botany in general and the Rijksherbarium/Hortus Botanicus in particular lost a great servant. The word servant is appropriate, because in a totally unselfish and very conscientious way Kalkman carried out all the

  14. Coordinated nitrogen and carbon remobilization for nitrate assimilation in leaf, sheath and root and associated cytokinin signals during early regrowth of Lolium perenne

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Roche, J.; Turnbull, M. H.; Guo, Q.; Novák, Ondřej; Späth, J.; Gieseg, S. P.; Jameson, P. E.; Love, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 119, č. 8 (2017), s. 1353-1364 ISSN 0305-7364 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : assimilation * cytokinin * defoliation * Lolium perenne * nitrate * Nitrogen * regrowth * water-soluble carbohydrates Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 4.041, year: 2016

  15. High Throughput Screening Method for Identifying Potential Agonists and Antagonists of Arabidopsis thaliana Cytokinin Receptor CRE1/AHK4

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klimeš, P.; Turek, D.; Mazura, P.; Gallová, L.; Spíchal, L.; Brzobohatý, Břetislav

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, JUN 2017 (2017), č. článku 947. ISSN 1664-462X Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : signaling pathway * histidine kinases * plant-growth Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 4.298, year: 2016

  16. Download this PDF file

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1 Department of Botany, SRNMN College of Applied Sciences, Balraj Urs Road, Shivamogga-577201,. Karnataka, India. 2 Department of Microbiology, SRNMN College of Applied Sciences, Balraj Urs Road, Shivamogga-. 577201, Karnataka, India. Abstract. Article Information. The present study was designed to study the ...

  17. Associateship | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Public Lectures · Lecture Workshops · Refresher Courses · Symposia. Home; Fellowship; Associateship. Associate Profile. Period: 1990–1994. Saluja, Dr Daman. Date of birth: 1 February 1959. Specialization: Plant Molecular Biology Address during Associateship: Department of Botany, University of Delhi, Delhi 110 007.

  18. Shahat et al., Afr J Tradit Complement Altern Med. (2017) 14(2):161 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sayed

    The obtained dry extract was weighed and the percentage yield was expressed in terms of air dried weight of plant materials. Material for Antimicrobials. The bacterial, fungal and yeast strains were personally obtained from the microbiology Lab, Botany Dept.,. Fac. of Sci. (Al- Azhar Univ. Assiut, Assiut Univ. and Minia Univ.).

  19. Fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Our featured scientist this month is one of those rare personalities in our country who succeeded in establishing a school of thought, rather than simply building institutions, or chairing noble committees and commissions. Panchanan Maheshwari was instrumental in taking the study of botany in our country to a new height.

  20. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Odoemena, SC, Department of Botany and Microbiology, University of Uyo, P.M.B. 1017, Uyo. Vol 2 (1998) - Articles ANTIBACTERIAL ACTIVITY OF THE ESSENTIAL OILS FROM FOUR SELECTED VARIETIES OF CAPASIUM ANNUUM Abstract. ISSN: 1118-6267. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL.