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Sample records for bosr regulatory protein

  1. Regulatory protein modification: techniques and protocols

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hemmings, Hugh C

    1997-01-01

    ... important roles in cellular regulation. The techniques used to analyze various forms of posttranslational protein modification are described, along with current protocols, discussion of the methodological limitations, and relevant examples from recent publications. This collection should be of use to investigators of protein modification who work i...

  2. Functional Classification of Immune Regulatory Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubinstein, Rotem [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Ramagopal, Udupi A. [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Nathenson, Stanley G. [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Almo, Steven C. [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Fiser, Andras [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Members of the immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) control innate and adaptive immunity and are prime targets for the treatment of autoimmune diseases, infectious diseases, and malignancies. We describe a computational method, termed the Brotherhood algorithm, which utilizes intermediate sequence information to classify proteins into functionally related families. This approach identifies functional relationships within the IgSF and predicts additional receptor-ligand interactions. As a specific example, we examine the nectin/nectin-like family of cell adhesion and signaling proteins and propose receptor-ligand interactions within this family. We were guided by the Brotherhood approach and present the high-resolution structural characterization of a homophilic interaction involving the class-I MHC-restricted T-cell-associated molecule, which we now classify as a nectin-like family member. The Brotherhood algorithm is likely to have a significant impact on structural immunology by identifying those proteins and complexes for which structural characterization will be particularly informative.

  3. Protein kinase A regulatory subunit distribution in medulloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mucignat-Caretta, Carla; Denaro, Luca; Redaelli, Marco; D'Avella, Domenico; Caretta, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies showed a differential distribution of the four regulatory subunits of cAMP-dependent protein kinases inside the brain, that changed in rodent gliomas: therefore, the distribution of these proteins inside the brain can give information on the functional state of the cells. Our goal was to examine human brain tumors to provide evidence for a differential distribution of protein kinase A in different tumors. The distribution of detergent insoluble regulatory (R1 and R2) and catalytic subunits of cAMP dependent kinases was examined in pediatric brain tumors by immunohistochemistry and fluorescent cAMP analogues binding. R2 is organized in large single dots in medulloblastomas, while it has a different appearance in other tumors. Fluorescent cAMP labelling was observed only in medulloblastoma. A different distribution of cAMP dependent protein kinases has been observed in medulloblastoma

  4. Co-suppression of sterol-regulatory element binding protein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-06-22

    Jun 22, 2011 ... In Arabidopsis,. At5g35220 gene being sterol regulatory element-binding protein site 2, protease and metalloendopeptidase activity were required for chloroplast development and play a role in regulation of endodermal plastid size and number that are involved in ethylene-dependent gravitropism of light-.

  5. CONSTRUCTION AND ANALYSIS OF IPBR/XYLS HYBRID REGULATORY PROTEINS

    Science.gov (United States)

    IpbR and XylS are related regulatory proteins (having 56% identity). IpbR responds to isopropylbenzene as well as to a variety of hydrophobic chemicals to activate expression of the isopropylbenzene catabolic pathway operon of pRE4 from ipbOP. XylS responds to substituted benzoic...

  6. Hijacking Complement Regulatory Proteins for Bacterial Immune Evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovingh, Elise S; van den Broek, Bryan; Jongerius, Ilse

    2016-01-01

    The human complement system plays an important role in the defense against invading pathogens, inflammation and homeostasis. Invading microbes, such as bacteria, directly activate the complement system resulting in the formation of chemoattractants and in effective labeling of the bacteria for phagocytosis. In addition, formation of the membrane attack complex is responsible for direct killing of Gram-negative bacteria. In turn, bacteria have evolved several ways to evade complement activation on their surface in order to be able to colonize and invade the human host. One important mechanism of bacterial escape is attraction of complement regulatory proteins to the microbial surface. These molecules are present in the human body for tight regulation of the complement system to prevent damage to host self-surfaces. Therefore, recruitment of complement regulatory proteins to the bacterial surface results in decreased complement activation on the microbial surface which favors bacterial survival. This review will discuss recent advances in understanding the binding of complement regulatory proteins to the bacterial surface at the molecular level. This includes, new insights that have become available concerning specific conserved motives on complement regulatory proteins that are favorable for microbial binding. Finally, complement evasion molecules are of high importance for vaccine development due to their dominant role in bacterial survival, high immunogenicity and homology as well as their presence on the bacterial surface. Here, the use of complement evasion molecules for vaccine development will be discussed.

  7. Automated protein-DNA interaction screening of Drosophila regulatory elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hens, Korneel; Feuz, Jean-Daniel; Isakova, Alina; Iagovitina, Antonina; Massouras, Andreas; Bryois, Julien; Callaerts, Patrick; Celniker, Susan E; Deplancke, Bart

    2011-10-30

    Drosophila melanogaster has one of the best characterized metazoan genomes in terms of functionally annotated regulatory elements. To explore how these elements contribute to gene regulation, we need convenient tools to identify the proteins that bind to them. Here we describe the development and validation of a high-throughput yeast one-hybrid platform, which enables screening of DNA elements versus an array of full-length, sequence-verified clones containing over 85% of predicted Drosophila transcription factors. Using six well-characterized regulatory elements, we identified 33 transcription factor-DNA interactions of which 27 were previously unidentified. To simultaneously validate these interactions and locate the binding sites of involved transcription factors, we implemented a powerful microfluidics-based approach that enabled us to retrieve DNA-occupancy data for each transcription factor throughout the respective target DNA elements. Finally, we biologically validated several interactions and identified two new regulators of sine oculis gene expression and hence eye development.

  8. Signal regulatory proteins (SIRPS) are secreted presynaptic organizing molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umemori, Hisashi; Sanes, Joshua R

    2008-12-05

    Formation of chemical synapses requires exchange of organizing signals between the synaptic partners. Using synaptic vesicle aggregation in cultured neurons as a marker of presynaptic differentiation, we purified candidate presynaptic organizers from mouse brain. A major bioactive species was the extracellular domain of signal regulatory protein alpha (SIRP-alpha), a transmembrane immunoglobulin superfamily member concentrated at synapses. The extracellular domain of SIRP-alpha is cleaved and shed in a developmentally regulated manner. The presynaptic organizing activity of SIRP-alpha is mediated in part by CD47. SIRP-alpha homologues, SIRP-beta and -gamma also have synaptic vesicle clustering activity. The effects of SIRP-alpha are distinct from those of another presynaptic organizer, FGF22: the two proteins induced vesicle clusters of different sizes, differed in their ability to promote neurite branching, and acted through different receptors and signaling pathways. SIRP family proteins may act together with other organizing molecules to pattern synapses.

  9. Exploitation of complement regulatory proteins by Borrelia and Francisella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madar, Marian; Bencurova, Elena; Mlynarcik, Patrik; Almeida, André M; Soares, Renata; Bhide, Katarina; Pulzova, Lucia; Kovac, Andrej; Coelho, Ana V; Bhide, Mangesh

    2015-06-01

    Pathogens have developed sophisticated mechanisms of complement evasion such as binding to the host complement regulatory proteins (CRPs) on their surface or expression of CRP mimicking molecules. The ability of pathogens to evade the complement system has been correlated with pathogenesis and host selectivity. Hitherto, little work has been undertaken to determine whether Borrelia and Francisella exploit various CRPs to block complement attack. Seventeen Borrelia (twelve species) and six Francisella (three subspecies) strains were used to assess their ability to bind human, sheep and cattle CRPs or mimic membrane associated complement regulators. A series of experiments including affinity ligand binding experiments, pull-down assays and mass spectrometry based protein identification, revealed an array of CRP binding proteins of Borrelia and Francisella. Unlike Francisella, Borrelia strains were able to bind multiple human CRPs. Three strains of Borrelia (SKT-4, SKT-2 and HO14) showed the presence of a human CD46-homologous motif, indicating their ability to possess putative human CD46 mimicking molecules. Similarly, five strains of Borrelia and two strains of Francisella may have surface proteins with human CD59-homologous motifs. Among ovine and bovine CRPs, the only CRP bound by Francisella (LVS, Tul4 strain) was vitronectin, while ovine C4BP, ovine factor H and bovine factor H were bound to Borrelia strains SKT-2, DN127 and Co53. This study presents an array of proteins of Borrelia and Francisella that bind CRPs or may mimic membrane-CRPs, thus enabling multiphasic complement evasion strategies of these pathogens.

  10. Enzymatic Mercury Detoxification: The Regulatory Protein MerR

    CERN Multimedia

    Ctortecka, B; Walsh, C T; Comess, K M

    2002-01-01

    Mercury ions and organomercurial reagents are extremely toxic due to their affinity for thiol groups. Many bacteria contain an elaborate detoxification system for a metabolic conversion of toxic Hg$^{2+}$ or organomercurials to less toxic elemental Hg$^0$. The main components of the enzymatic mercury detoxification (see Fig. 1) are the regulatory protein MerR (mercury responsive genetic switch), the organomercurial lyase MerB (cleavage of carbon mercury bonds), and the mercuric ion reductase MerA (reduction of mercuric ions). In these proteins Hg$^{2+}$ is usually coordinated by the thiol groups of cysteines. We utilize the nuclear quadrupole interaction (NQI) of ${\\rm^{199m}}$Hg detected by time differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) to identify the Hg metal site geometries in these proteins in order to elucidate the molecular origin of the ultrasensitivity, selectivity and reaction mechanism of this detoxification system. The short lived TDPAC probe ${\\rm^{199m}}$Hg ($\\tau_{1/2} =$ 43 min) is su...

  11. A conserved regulatory mechanism in bifunctional biotin protein ligases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingheng; Beckett, Dorothy

    2017-08-01

    Class II bifunctional biotin protein ligases (BirA), which catalyze post-translational biotinylation and repress transcription initiation, are broadly distributed in eubacteria and archaea. However, it is unclear if these proteins all share the same molecular mechanism of transcription regulation. In Escherichia coli the corepressor biotinoyl-5'-AMP (bio-5'-AMP), which is also the intermediate in biotin transfer, promotes operator binding and resulting transcription repression by enhancing BirA dimerization. Like E. coli BirA (EcBirA), Staphylococcus aureus, and Bacillus subtilis BirA (Sa and BsBirA) repress transcription in vivo in a biotin-dependent manner. In this work, sedimentation equilibrium measurements were performed to investigate the molecular basis of this biotin-responsive transcription regulation. The results reveal that, as observed for EcBirA, Sa, and BsBirA dimerization reactions are significantly enhanced by bio-5'-AMP binding. Thus, the molecular mechanism of the Biotin Regulatory System is conserved in the biotin repressors from these three organisms. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  12. Pleiotropy constrains the evolution of protein but not regulatory sequences in a transcription regulatory network influencing complex social behaviours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria eMolodtsova

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available It is increasingly apparent that genes and networks that influence complex behaviour are evolutionary conserved, which is paradoxical considering that behaviour is labile over evolutionary timescales. How does adaptive change in behaviour arise if behaviour is controlled by conserved, pleiotropic, and likely evolutionary constrained genes? Pleiotropy and connectedness are known to constrain the general rate of protein evolution, prompting some to suggest that the evolution of complex traits, including behaviour, is fuelled by regulatory sequence evolution. However, we seldom have data on the strength of selection on mutations in coding and regulatory sequences, and this hinders our ability to study how pleiotropy influences coding and regulatory sequence evolution. Here we use population genomics to estimate the strength of selection on coding and regulatory mutations for a transcriptional regulatory network that influences complex behaviour of honey bees. We found that replacement mutations in highly connected transcription factors and target genes experience significantly stronger negative selection relative to weakly connected transcription factors and targets. Adaptively evolving proteins were significantly more likely to reside at the periphery of the regulatory network, while proteins with signs of negative selection were near the core of the network. Interestingly, connectedness and network structure had minimal influence on the strength of selection on putative regulatory sequences for both transcription factors and their targets. Our study indicates that adaptive evolution of complex behaviour can arise because of positive selection on protein-coding mutations in peripheral genes, and on regulatory sequence mutations in both transcription factors and their targets throughout the network.

  13. Critical protein GAPDH and its regulatory mechanisms in cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jin-Ying; Zhang, Fan; Hong, Chao-Qun; Giuliano, Armando E.; Cui, Xiao-Jiang; Zhou, Guang-Ji; Zhang, Guo-Jun; Cui, Yu-Kun

    2015-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), initially identified as a glycolytic enzyme and considered as a housekeeping gene, is widely used as an internal control in experiments on proteins, mRNA, and DNA. However, emerging evidence indicates that GAPDH is implicated in diverse functions independent of its role in energy metabolism; the expression status of GAPDH is also deregulated in various cancer cells. One of the most common effects of GAPDH is its inconsistent role in the determination of cancer cell fate. Furthermore, studies have described GAPDH as a regulator of cell death; other studies have suggested that GAPDH participates in tumor progression and serves as a new therapeutic target. However, related regulatory mechanisms of its numerous cellular functions and deregulated expression levels remain unclear. GAPDH is tightly regulated at transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels, which are involved in the regulation of diverse GAPDH functions. Several cancer-related factors, such as insulin, hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), p53, nitric oxide (NO), and acetylated histone, not only modulate GAPDH gene expression but also affect protein functions via common pathways. Moreover, posttranslational modifications (PTMs) occurring in GAPDH in cancer cells result in new activities unrelated to the original glycolytic function of GAPDH. In this review, recent findings related to GAPDH transcriptional regulation and PTMs are summarized. Mechanisms and pathways involved in GAPDH regulation and its different roles in cancer cells are also described

  14. [The intracellular localization of the regulatory proteins of the densovirus of German cockroach, Blattella germanica].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martynova, E U; Kapelinskaia, T V; Schal, C; Mukha, D V

    2014-01-01

    The intracellular localization of the regulatory proteins encoded by the genome of the densovirus of German cockroach was analyzed using western-blotting of nuclear and cytoplasmic extracts of the densovirus-infected passaging cells tissue culture BGE-2. Two of the three regulatory proteins, NS1 and NS3, were shown to possess mainly nuclear localization, while NS2 protein was distributed between the nucleus and cytoplasm. Data obtained provide new information necessary for prediction of the functions of densovirus regulatory proteins. Intracellular localization of NS3 protein was described for the densoviruses for the first time.

  15. The interaction between anticoagulant protein S and complement regulatory C4b-binding protein (C4BP)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Poel, R. H.; Meijers, J. C.; Bouma, B. N.

    2000-01-01

    An important mechanism of regulation of blood coagulation is the anticoagulant protein C pathway. In this pathway, the anticoagulant activity of activated protein C is increased by its cofactor protein S. The cofactor activity of protein S can be regulated by binding to complement regulatory

  16. Antidiabetic effects of glucokinase regulatory protein small-molecule disruptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, David J.; St Jean, David J.; Kurzeja, Robert J. M.; Wahl, Robert C.; Michelsen, Klaus; Cupples, Rod; Chen, Michelle; Wu, John; Sivits, Glenn; Helmering, Joan; Komorowski, Renée; Ashton, Kate S.; Pennington, Lewis D.; Fotsch, Christopher; Vazir, Mukta; Chen, Kui; Chmait, Samer; Zhang, Jiandong; Liu, Longbin; Norman, Mark H.; Andrews, Kristin L.; Bartberger, Michael D.; van, Gwyneth; Galbreath, Elizabeth J.; Vonderfecht, Steven L.; Wang, Minghan; Jordan, Steven R.; Véniant, Murielle M.; Hale, Clarence

    2013-12-01

    Glucose homeostasis is a vital and complex process, and its disruption can cause hyperglycaemia and type II diabetes mellitus. Glucokinase (GK), a key enzyme that regulates glucose homeostasis, converts glucose to glucose-6-phosphate in pancreatic β-cells, liver hepatocytes, specific hypothalamic neurons, and gut enterocytes. In hepatocytes, GK regulates glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis, suppresses glucose production, and is subject to the endogenous inhibitor GK regulatory protein (GKRP). During fasting, GKRP binds, inactivates and sequesters GK in the nucleus, which removes GK from the gluconeogenic process and prevents a futile cycle of glucose phosphorylation. Compounds that directly hyperactivate GK (GK activators) lower blood glucose levels and are being evaluated clinically as potential therapeutics for the treatment of type II diabetes mellitus. However, initial reports indicate that an increased risk of hypoglycaemia is associated with some GK activators. To mitigate the risk of hypoglycaemia, we sought to increase GK activity by blocking GKRP. Here we describe the identification of two potent small-molecule GK-GKRP disruptors (AMG-1694 and AMG-3969) that normalized blood glucose levels in several rodent models of diabetes. These compounds potently reversed the inhibitory effect of GKRP on GK activity and promoted GK translocation both in vitro (isolated hepatocytes) and in vivo (liver). A co-crystal structure of full-length human GKRP in complex with AMG-1694 revealed a previously unknown binding pocket in GKRP distinct from that of the phosphofructose-binding site. Furthermore, with AMG-1694 and AMG-3969 (but not GK activators), blood glucose lowering was restricted to diabetic and not normoglycaemic animals. These findings exploit a new cellular mechanism for lowering blood glucose levels with reduced potential for hypoglycaemic risk in patients with type II diabetes mellitus.

  17. Regulatory elements of Caenorhabditis elegans ribosomal protein genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sleumer Monica C

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ribosomal protein genes (RPGs are essential, tightly regulated, and highly expressed during embryonic development and cell growth. Even though their protein sequences are strongly conserved, their mechanism of regulation is not conserved across yeast, Drosophila, and vertebrates. A recent investigation of genomic sequences conserved across both nematode species and associated with different gene groups indicated the existence of several elements in the upstream regions of C. elegans RPGs, providing a new insight regarding the regulation of these genes in C. elegans. Results In this study, we performed an in-depth examination of C. elegans RPG regulation and found nine highly conserved motifs in the upstream regions of C. elegans RPGs using the motif discovery algorithm DME. Four motifs were partially similar to transcription factor binding sites from C. elegans, Drosophila, yeast, and human. One pair of these motifs was found to co-occur in the upstream regions of 250 transcripts including 22 RPGs. The distance between the two motifs displayed a complex frequency pattern that was related to their relative orientation. We tested the impact of three of these motifs on the expression of rpl-2 using a series of reporter gene constructs and showed that all three motifs are necessary to maintain the high natural expression level of this gene. One of the motifs was similar to the binding site of an orthologue of POP-1, and we showed that RNAi knockdown of pop-1 impacts the expression of rpl-2. We further determined the transcription start site of rpl-2 by 5’ RACE and found that the motifs lie 40–90 bases upstream of the start site. We also found evidence that a noncoding RNA, contained within the outron of rpl-2, is co-transcribed with rpl-2 and cleaved during trans-splicing. Conclusions Our results indicate that C. elegans RPGs are regulated by a complex novel series of regulatory elements that is evolutionarily distinct from

  18. An Appetite for Modernizing the Regulatory Framework for Protein Content Claims in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinangeli, Christopher P F; Foisy, Samara; Shoveller, Anna K; Porter, Cara; Musa-Veloso, Kathy; Sievenpiper, John L; Jenkins, David J A

    2017-08-23

    The need for protein-rich plant-based foods continues as dietary guidelines emphasize their contribution to healthy dietary patterns that prevent chronic disease and promote environmental sustainability. However, the Canadian Food and Drug Regulations provide a regulatory framework that can prevent Canadian consumers from identifying protein-rich plant-based foods. In Canada, protein nutrient content claims are based on the protein efficiency ratio (PER) and protein rating method, which is based on a rat growth bioassay. PERs are not additive, and the protein rating of a food is underpinned by its Reasonable Daily Intake. The restrictive nature of Canada's requirements for supporting protein claims therefore presents challenges for Canadian consumers to adapt to a rapidly changing food environment. This commentary will present two options for modernizing the regulatory framework for protein content claims in Canada. The first and preferred option advocates that protein quality not be considered in the determination of the eligibility of a food for protein content claims. The second and less preferred option, an interim solution, is a framework for adopting the protein digestibility corrected amino acid score as the official method for supporting protein content and quality claims and harmonizes Canada's regulatory framework with that of the USA.

  19. Intracellular localization of ornithine decarboxylase and its regulatory protein, antizyme-1.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schipper, R.G.; Cuijpers, V.M.J.I.; Groot, L.H. de; Thio, M.; Verhofstad, A.A.J.

    2004-01-01

    The enzyme ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and its regulatory protein antizyme-1 (AZ1) are key regulators in the homeostasis of polyamines. To gain more insight into the exact intracellular distribution of ODC and AZ1, we performed immunocytochemical and Green Fluorescent Protein-fluorocytochemical

  20. Dynamic SPR monitoring of yeast nuclear protein binding to a cis-regulatory element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao, Grace; Brody, James P.

    2007-01-01

    Gene expression is controlled by protein complexes binding to short specific sequences of DNA, called cis-regulatory elements. Expression of most eukaryotic genes is controlled by dozens of these elements. Comprehensive identification and monitoring of these elements is a major goal of genomics. In pursuit of this goal, we are developing a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) based assay to identify and monitor cis-regulatory elements. To test whether we could reliably monitor protein binding to a regulatory element, we immobilized a 16 bp region of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome 5 onto a gold surface. This 16 bp region of DNA is known to bind several proteins and thought to control expression of the gene RNR1, which varies through the cell cycle. We synchronized yeast cell cultures, and then sampled these cultures at a regular interval. These samples were processed to purify nuclear lysate, which was then exposed to the sensor. We found that nuclear protein binds this particular element of DNA at a significantly higher rate (as compared to unsynchronized cells) during G1 phase. Other time points show levels of DNA-nuclear protein binding similar to the unsynchronized control. We also measured the apparent association complex of the binding to be 0.014 s -1 . We conclude that (1) SPR-based assays can monitor DNA-nuclear protein binding and that (2) for this particular cis-regulatory element, maximum DNA-nuclear protein binding occurs during G1 phase

  1. RNA-Binding Proteins in Trichomonas vaginalis: Atypical Multifunctional Proteins Involved in a Posttranscriptional Iron Regulatory Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa-Angulo, Elisa E.; Calla-Choque, Jaeson S.; Mancilla-Olea, Maria Inocente; Arroyo, Rossana

    2015-01-01

    Iron homeostasis is highly regulated in vertebrates through a regulatory system mediated by RNA-protein interactions between the iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) that interact with an iron responsive element (IRE) located in certain mRNAs, dubbed the IRE-IRP regulatory system. Trichomonas vaginalis, the causal agent of trichomoniasis, presents high iron dependency to regulate its growth, metabolism, and virulence properties. Although T. vaginalis lacks IRPs or proteins with aconitase activity, possesses gene expression mechanisms of iron regulation at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. However, only one gene with iron regulation at the transcriptional level has been described. Recently, our research group described an iron posttranscriptional regulatory mechanism in the T. vaginalis tvcp4 and tvcp12 cysteine proteinase mRNAs. The tvcp4 and tvcp12 mRNAs have a stem-loop structure in the 5'-coding region or in the 3'-UTR, respectively that interacts with T. vaginalis multifunctional proteins HSP70, α-Actinin, and Actin under iron starvation condition, causing translation inhibition or mRNA stabilization similar to the previously characterized IRE-IRP system in eukaryotes. Herein, we summarize recent progress and shed some light on atypical RNA-binding proteins that may participate in the iron posttranscriptional regulation in T. vaginalis. PMID:26703754

  2. Cell-cycle regulatory proteins in human wound healing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartkova, Jirina; Grøn, Birgitte; Dabelsteen, Erik

    2003-01-01

    ) and A, and reduced expression of cyclins D(3) and E, the cyclin D-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4), the MCM7 component of DNA replication origin complexes and the retinoblastoma protein pRb. Among the CDK inhibitors (CKIs), p16ink4a and p21Cip1 were moderately increased and decreased, respectively, whereas...

  3. The regulatory effect of nucleoside diphosphate kinase on G-protein and G-protein mediated phospholipase C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, D; Chang, K

    1995-03-01

    The effect of nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDPK) on the activity of guanine nucleotide regulatory protein (G-protein) mediated phospholipase C (PLC) and on the [35S] GTPT tau S binding of G-protein was investigated in this work in order to demonstrate the mechanism behind the regulation of G-protein and its effector PLC by NDPK. The stimulation of PLC in turkey erythrocyte membrane by both GTP and GTP tau S indicated that the PLC stimulation was mediated by G-protein. NDPK alone stimulated PLC activity, as well as the stimulation in the presence of GTP and GDP, in a dose-dependent manner. However, NDPK inhibited GTP tau S-stimulated PLC. Furthermore, NDPK inhibited [35S]GTP tau S binding of purified Gi-protein in a non-competitive manner. A hypothesis implying an important role of direct interaction of G-protein and NDPK in the regulation of their functions is suggested and discussed.

  4. The impact of RGS and other G-protein regulatory proteins on Gαi-mediated signaling in immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehrl, John H

    2016-08-15

    Leukocyte chemoattractant receptors are members of the G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) family. Signaling downstream of these receptors directs the localization, positioning and homeostatic trafficking of leukocytes; as well as their recruitment to, and their retention at, inflammatory sites. Ligand induced changes in the molecular conformation of chemoattractant receptors results in the engagement of heterotrimeric G-proteins, which promotes α subunits to undergo GTP/GDP exchange. This results in the functional release of βγ subunits from the heterotrimers, thereby activating downstream effector molecules, which initiate leukocyte polarization, gradient sensing, and directional migration. Pertussis toxin ADP ribosylates Gαi subunits and prevents chemoattractant receptors from triggering Gαi nucleotide exchange. The use of pertussis toxin revealed the essential importance of Gαi subunit nucleotide exchange for chemoattractant receptor signaling. More recent studies have identified a range of regulatory mechanisms that target these receptors and their associated heterotrimeric G-proteins, thereby helping to control the magnitude, kinetics, and duration of signaling. A failure in these regulatory pathways can lead to impaired receptor signaling and immunopathology. The analysis of mice with targeted deletions of Gαi isoforms as well as some of these G-protein regulatory proteins is providing insights into their roles in chemoattractant receptor signaling. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Plant Kinesin-Like Calmodulin Binding Protein Employs Its Regulatory Domain for Dimerization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maia V Vinogradova

    Full Text Available Kinesin-like calmodulin binding protein (KCBP, a Kinesin-14 family motor protein, is involved in the structural organization of microtubules during mitosis and trichome morphogenesis in plants. The molecular mechanism of microtubule bundling by KCBP remains unknown. KCBP binding to microtubules is regulated by Ca(2+-binding proteins that recognize its C-terminal regulatory domain. In this work, we have discovered a new function of the regulatory domain. We present a crystal structure of an Arabidopsis KCBP fragment showing that the C-terminal regulatory domain forms a dimerization interface for KCBP. This dimerization site is distinct from the dimerization interface within the N-terminal domain. Side chains of hydrophobic residues of the calmodulin binding helix of the regulatory domain form the C-terminal dimerization interface. Biochemical experiments show that another segment of the regulatory domain located beyond the dimerization interface, its negatively charged coil, is unexpectedly and absolutely required to stabilize the dimers. The strong microtubule bundling properties of KCBP are unaffected by deletion of the C-terminal regulatory domain. The slow minus-end directed motility of KCBP is also unchanged in vitro. Although the C-terminal domain is not essential for microtubule bundling, we suggest that KCBP may use its two independent dimerization interfaces to support different types of bundled microtubule structures in cells. Two distinct dimerization sites may provide a mechanism for microtubule rearrangement in response to Ca(2+ signaling since Ca(2+- binding proteins can disengage KCBP dimers dependent on its C-terminal dimerization interface.

  6. Making Sense of Multifunctional Proteins: Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Accessory and Regulatory Proteins and Connections to Transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faust, Tyler B; Binning, Jennifer M; Gross, John D; Frankel, Alan D

    2017-09-29

    Viruses are completely dependent upon cellular machinery to support replication and have therefore developed strategies to co-opt cellular processes to optimize infection and counter host immune defenses. Many viruses, including human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), encode a relatively small number of genes. Viruses with limited genetic content often encode multifunctional proteins that function at multiple stages of the viral replication cycle. In this review, we discuss the functions of HIV-1 regulatory (Tat and Rev) and accessory (Vif, Vpr, Vpu, and Nef) proteins. Each of these proteins has a highly conserved primary activity; however, numerous additional activities have been attributed to these viral proteins. We explore the possibility that HIV-1 proteins leverage their multifunctional nature to alter host transcriptional networks to elicit a diverse set of cellular responses. Although these transcriptional effects appear to benefit the virus, it is not yet clear whether they are strongly selected for during viral evolution or are a ripple effect from the primary function. As our detailed knowledge of these viral proteins improves, we will undoubtedly uncover how the multifunctional nature of these HIV-1 regulatory and accessory proteins, and in particular their transcriptional functions, work to drive viral pathogenesis.

  7. Cell-cycle regulatory proteins in human wound healing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartkova, Jirina; Grøn, Birgitte; Dabelsteen, Erik

    2003-01-01

    the abundance of most of the CKIs, including p27Kip1, p57Kip2, p15ink4b and p18ink4c, was relatively maintained in the migrating epithelial tongue. These data indicate that downmodulation of several G(1)/S-phase cyclins and a relative excess of CKIs may cooperate to ensure the quiescent state of migrating......-cycle regulators critical for G(1)-phase progression and S-phase entry was here analysed immunohistochemically. Compared to normal human mucosa, epithelia migrating to cover 2- or 3-day-old wounds made either in vivo or in an organotypic cell culture all showed loss of the proliferation marker Ki67 and cyclins D(1......) and A, and reduced expression of cyclins D(3) and E, the cyclin D-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4), the MCM7 component of DNA replication origin complexes and the retinoblastoma protein pRb. Among the CDK inhibitors (CKIs), p16ink4a and p21Cip1 were moderately increased and decreased, respectively, whereas...

  8. Functional modification of the guanine nucleotide regulatory protein after desensitization of turkey erythrocytes by catecholamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, M M; Stadel, J M; Iyengar, R; Lefkowitz, R J

    1983-07-01

    Densensitization of turkey erythrocytes by exposure to the beta-adrenergic agonist (-)isoproterenol leads to decreased activation of adenylate cyclase by agonist, NaF, and guanyl-5'-yl imido diphosphate, with no reduction in the number of beta-adrenergic receptors. Interactions between the receptor and the guanine nucleotide regulatory protein (N protein) also seem to be impaired. These observations suggest that a component distal to the beta-adrenergic receptor may be a locus of modification. Accordingly we examined the N protein to determine whether it was altered by desensitization. The rate at which (-)isoproterenol stimulated the release of [3H]GDP from the N protein was substantially lower in membranes prepared from desensitized cells, providing further evidence for uncoupling of the receptor and the N protein. The amount of N protein in membranes from control and desensitized cells was compared by labeling the 42,000 Mr component of the N protein with [32P]NAD+ and cholera toxin; no significant difference was found. However, significantly more N protein (p less than .001) was solubilized by cholate extraction of desensitized membranes, suggesting an altered association of the N protein with the membrane after desensitization. The functional activity of the N protein was measured by reconstitution of cholate extracts of turkey erythrocyte membranes into S49 lymphoma cyc- membranes. Reconstitution of (-)isoproterenol stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity was reduced significantly (p less than .05) after desensitization. These observations suggest that desensitization of the turkey erythrocyte by (-)isoproterenol results in functional modifications of the guanine nucleotide regulatory protein, leading to impaired interactions with the beta-adrenergic receptor and reduced activation of adenylate cyclase.

  9. Structural studies of bacterial transcriptional regulatory proteins by multidimensional heteronuclear NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkman, Brian Finley [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-02-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to elucidate detailed structural information for peptide and protein molecules. A small peptide was designed and synthesized, and its three-dimensional structure was calculated using distance information derived from two-dimensional NMR measurements. The peptide was used to induce antibodies in mice, and the cross-reactivity of the antibodies with a related protein was analyzed with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Two proteins which are involved in regulation of transcription in bacteria were also studied. The ferric uptake regulation (Fur) protein is a metal-dependent repressor which controls iron uptake in bacteria. Two- and three-dimensional NMR techniques, coupled with uniform and selective isotope labeling allowed the nearly complete assignment of the resonances of the metal-binding domain of the Fur protein. NTRC is a transcriptional enhancer binding protein whose N-terminal domain is a "receiver domain" in the family of "two-component" regulatory systems. Phosphorylation of the N-terminal domain of NTRC activates the initiation of transcription of aeries encoding proteins involved in nitrogen regulation. Three- and four-dimensional NMR spectroscopy methods have been used to complete the resonance assignments and determine the solution structure of the N-terminal receiver domain of the NTRC protein. Comparison of the solution structure of the NTRC receiver domain with the crystal structures of the homologous protein CheY reveals a very similar fold, with the only significant difference being the position of helix 4 relative to the rest of the protein. The determination of the structure of the NTRC receiver domain is the first step toward understanding a mechanism of signal transduction which is common to many bacterial regulatory systems.

  10. Overexpression of KH-type splicing regulatory protein regulates proliferation, migration, and implantation ability of osteosarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruksakorn, Dumnoensun; Teeyakasem, Pimpisa; Klangjorhor, Jeerawan; Chaiyawat, Parunya; Settakorn, Jongkolnee; Diskul-Na-Ayudthaya, Penchatr; Chokchaichamnankit, Daranee; Pothacharoen, Peraphan; Srisomsap, Chantragan

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is a common malignant bone tumor in children and adolescents. The current 5-year survival rate is ~60% and that seems to be reaching a plateau. In order to improve treatment outcomes of osteosarcoma, a better understanding of tumorigenesis and underlying molecular mechanisms is required for searching out possible new treatment targets. This study aimed to identify the potential proteins involving the pathogenesis of osteosarcoma using a proteomics approach. Proteins extracted from primary cell culture of osteosarcoma (n=7) and osteoblasts of cancellous bone (n=7) were studied. Using 2-DE based proteomics and LC-MS/MS analysis, we successfully determined seven differentially expressed protein spots. Four upregulated proteins and three downregulated proteins were observed in this study in which KH-type splicing regulatory protein (KSRP) was selected for further exploration. KSRP was significantly upregulated in osteosarcoma cells compared to osteoblasts using western blot assay. In addition, immunohistochemistry demonstrated that KSRP was also highly expressed in osteosarcoma tissue of independent cases from the experimental group. More importantly, KSRP silencing of osteosarcoma cell lines significantly decreased cell proliferation, migration ability, as well as implantation and growth ability in chick chorioallantoic membrane assay. Taken together, these findings demonstrate, that KSRP plays important roles in regulatory controls of osteosarcoma pathogenesis and serves as a potentially therapeutic target of osteosarcoma. PMID:27573585

  11. Green fluorescent protein transgene driven by Kit regulatory sequences is expressed in hematopoietic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Cerisoli, Francesco; Cassinelli, Letizia; Lamorte, Giuseppe; Citterio, Stefania; Bertolotti, Francesca; Magli, Maria Cristina; Ottolenghi, Sergio

    2009-01-01

    The expression of Kit in multiple types of stem cells suggests that common transcriptional programs might regulate this gene in different stem cells. In this work, the authors used mouse lines expressing transgenic green fluorescent protein under the control of Kit promoter/first intron regulatory elements. This study provides the basis for the elucidation of DNA sequences regulating a stem cell gene in multiple types of stem cells.

  12. The Contribution of Serine 194 Phosphorylation to Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory Protein Function

    OpenAIRE

    Sasaki, Goro; Zubair, Mohamad; Ishii, Tomohiro; Mitsui, Toshikatsu; Hasegawa, Tomonobu; Auchus, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    The steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) facilitates the delivery of cholesterol to the inner mitochondrial membrane, where the cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme catalyzes the initial step of steroid hormone biosynthesis. StAR was initially identified in adrenocortical cells as a phosphoprotein, the expression and phosphorylation of which were stimulated by corticotropin. A number of in vitro studies have implicated cAMP-dependent phosphorylation at serine 194 (S194, S195 in hum...

  13. Lanosterol metabolism and sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP) expression in male germ cell maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fon Tacer, Klementina; Kalanj-Bognar, Svjetlana; Waterman, Michael R; Rozman, Damjana

    2003-06-01

    Expression of genes involved in cholesterol biosynthesis in male germ cells is insensitive to the negative cholesterol feedback regulation, in contrast to cholesterol level-sensitive/sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)-dependent gene regulation in somatic cells. The role of sterol regulatory element binding proteins in spermatogenic cells was an enigma until recently, when a soluble, 55kDa cholesterol-insensitive form of SREBP2 (SREBP2gc) was discovered [Mol. Cell. Endocrinol. 22 (2002) 8478], being translated from a germ cell-specific SREBP2 mRNA. Our RT-PCR results also show that SREBP2 as well as SREBP1c mRNAs are detectable in prepubertal and postpubertal male germ cells while SREBP1a is not detected. Surprisingly, three SREBP2 immunoreactive proteins (72, 63 and 55kDa), that are not present in mouse liver nuclei, reside in testis nuclei of prepubertal and adult mice. The 55kDa protein is likely SREBP2gc, the other two isoforms are novel. HPLC measurements in liver and testes of fasted prepubertal and postpubertal mice showed no significant difference in cholesterol level. However, FF-MAS and lanosterol/testis-meiosis activating sterol (T-MAS) intermediates that are detectable mainly in testes, increase in fasted postpubertal mice which coincides well with the elevated level of 68kDa SREBP2. Similar to SREBP2gc, the two novel SREBP2 immunoreactive proteins seem to be insensitive to the level of cholesterol.

  14. Regulatory pathways for ATP-binding cassette transport proteins in kidney proximal tubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masereeuw, Rosalinde; Russel, Frans G M

    2012-12-01

    The ATP-binding cassette transport proteins (ABC transporters) represent important determinants of drug excretion. Protective or excretory tissues where these transporters mediate substrate efflux include the kidney proximal tubule. Regulation of the transport proteins in this tissue requires elaborate signaling pathways, including genetic, epigenetic, nuclear receptor mediated, posttranscriptional gene regulation involving microRNAs, and non-genomic (kinases) pathways triggered by hormones and/or growth factors. This review discusses current knowledge on regulatory pathways for ABC transporters in kidney proximal tubules, with a main focus on P-glycoprotein, multidrug resistance proteins 2 and 4, and breast cancer resistance protein. Insight in these processes is of importance because variations in transporter activity due to certain (disease) conditions could lead to significant changes in drug efficacy or toxicity.

  15. Regulatory Activities of Four ArsR Proteins in Agrobacterium tumefaciens 5A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yoon-Suk; Brame, Keenan; Jetter, Jonathan; Bothner, Brian B; Wang, Gejiao; Thiyagarajan, Saravanamuthu; McDermott, Timothy R

    2016-06-15

    ArsR is a well-studied transcriptional repressor that regulates microbe-arsenic interactions. Most microorganisms have an arsR gene, but in cases where multiple copies exist, the respective roles or potential functional overlap have not been explored. We examined the repressors encoded by arsR1 and arsR2 (ars1 operon) and by arsR3 and arsR4 (ars2 operon) in Agrobacterium tumefaciens 5A. ArsR1 and ArsR4 are very similar in their primary sequences and diverge phylogenetically from ArsR2 and ArsR3, which are also quite similar to one another. Reporter constructs (lacZ) for arsR1, arsR2, and arsR4 were all inducible by As(III), but expression of arsR3 (monitored by reverse transcriptase PCR) was not influenced by As(III) and appeared to be linked transcriptionally to an upstream lysR-type gene. Experiments using a combination of deletion mutations and additional reporter assays illustrated that the encoded repressors (i) are not all autoregulatory as is typically known for ArsR proteins, (ii) exhibit variable control of each other's encoding genes, and (iii) exert variable control of other genes previously shown to be under the control of ArsR1. Furthermore, ArsR2, ArsR3, and ArsR4 appear to have an activator-like function for some genes otherwise repressed by ArsR1, which deviates from the well-studied repressor role of ArsR proteins. The differential regulatory activities suggest a complex regulatory network not previously observed in ArsR studies. The results indicate that fine-scale ArsR sequence deviations of the reiterated regulatory proteins apparently translate to different regulatory roles. Given the significance of the ArsR repressor in regulating various aspects of microbe-arsenic interactions, it is important to assess potential regulatory overlap and/or interference when a microorganism carries multiple copies of arsR This study explores this issue and shows that the four arsR genes in A. tumefaciens 5A, associated with two separate ars operons, encode

  16. Ca2+-regulatory proteins in cardiomyocytes from the right ventricle in children with congenital heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Yihe

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hypoxia and hypertrophy are the most frequent pathophysiological consequence of congenital heart disease (CHD which can induce the alteration of Ca2+-regulatory proteins and inhibit cardiac contractility. Few studies have been performed to examine Ca2+-regulatory proteins in human cardiomyocytes from the hypertrophic right ventricle with or without hypoxia. Methods Right ventricle tissues were collected from children with tetralogy of Fallot [n = 25, hypoxia and hypertrophy group (HH group], pulmonary stenosis [n = 25, hypertrophy group (H group], or small isolated ventricular septal defect [n = 25, control group (C group] during open-heart surgery. Paraffin sections of tissues were stained with 3,3′-dioctadecyloxacarbocyanine perchlorate to measure cardiomyocyte size. Expression levels of Ca2+-regulatory proteins [sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA2a, ryanodine receptor (RyR2, sodiumcalcium exchanger (NCX, sarcolipin (SLN and phospholamban (PLN] were analysed by means of real-time PCR, western blot, or immunofluorescence. Additionally, phosphorylation level of RyR and PLN and activity of protein phosphatase (PP1 were evaluated using western blot. Results Mild cardiomyocyte hypertrophy of the right ventricle in H and HH groups was confirmed by comparing cardiomyocyte size. A significant reduction of SERCA2a in mRNA (P16-phosphorylated PLN was down-regulated (PP Conclusions The decreased SERCA2a mRNA may be a biomarker of the pathological process in the early stage of cyanotic CHD with the hypertrophic right ventricle. A combination of hypoxia and hypertrophy can induce the adverse effect of PLN-Ser16 dephosphorylation. Increased PP1 could result in the decreased PLN-Ser16 and inhibition of PP1 is a potential therapeutic target for heart dysfunction in pediatrics.

  17. Differential recruitment of co-regulatory proteins to the human estrogen receptor 1 in response to xenoestrogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L Cody; Clark, Jessica C; Bisesi, Joseph H; Ferguson, P Lee; Sabo-Attwood, Tara

    2016-09-01

    The diverse biological effects of xenoestrogens may be explained by their ability to differentially recruit co-regulatory proteins to the estrogen receptor (ER). We employed high-throughput receptor affinity binding and co-regulatory protein recruitment screening assays based on fluorescence polarization and time resolved florescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET), respectively, to assess xenoestrogen-specific binding and co-regulatory protein recruitment to the ER. Then we used a functional proteomic assay based on co-immunoprecipitation of ER-bound proteins to isolate and identify intact co-regulatory proteins recruited to a ligand-activated ER. Through these approaches, we revealed differential binding affinity of bisphenol-A (BPA) and genistein (GEN) to the human ERα (ESR1) and ligand-dependent recruitment of SRC-1 and SRC-3 peptides. Recruitment profiles were variable for each ligand and in some cases were distinct compared to 17β-estradiol (E2). For example, E2 and GEN recruited both SRC-1 and -3 peptides whereas BPA recruited only SRC-1 peptides. Results of the functional proteomic assay showed differential recruitment between ligands where E2 recruited the greatest number of proteins followed by BPA then GEN. A number of proteins share previously identified relationships with ESR1 as determined by STRING analysis. Although there was limited overlap in proteins identified between treatments, all ligands recruited proteins involved in cell growth as determined by subnetwork enrichment analysis (p<0.05). A comparative, in silico analysis revealed that fewer interactions exist between zebrafish (Danio rerio) esr1 and zebrafish orthologs of proteins identified in our functional proteomic analysis. Taken together these results identify recruitment of known and previously unknown co-regulatory proteins to ESR1 and highlight new methods to assay recruitment of low abundant and intact, endogenous co-regulatory proteins to ESR1 or other nuclear receptors, in

  18. Differential recruitment of co-regulatory proteins to the human estrogen receptor 1 in response to xenoestrogens☆,☆☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The diverse biological effects of xenoestrogens may be explained by their ability to differentially recruit co-regulatory proteins to the estrogen receptor (ER). We employed high-throughput receptor affinity binding and co-regulatory protein recruitment screening assays based on fluorescence polarization and time resolved florescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET), respectively, to assess xenoestrogen-specific binding and co-regulatory protein recruitment to the ER. Then we used a functional proteomic assay based on co-immunoprecipitation of ER-bound proteins to isolate and identify intact co-regulatory proteins recruited to a ligand-activated ER. Through these approaches, we revealed differential binding affinity of bisphenol-A (BPA) and genistein (GEN) to the human ERα (ESR1) and ligand-dependent recruitment of SRC-1 and SRC-3 peptides. Recruitment profiles were variable for each ligand and in some cases were distinct compared to 17β-estradiol (E2). For example, E2 and GEN recruited both SRC-1 and -3 peptides whereas BPA recruited only SRC-1 peptides. Results of the functional proteomic assay showed differential recruitment between ligands where E2 recruited the greatest number of proteins followed by BPA then GEN. A number of proteins share previously identified relationships with ESR1 as determined by STRING analysis. Although there was limited overlap in proteins identified between treatments, all ligands recruited proteins involved in cell growth as determined by subnetwork enrichment analysis (p < 0.05). A comparative, in silico analysis revealed that fewer interactions exist between zebrafish (Danio rerio) esr1 and zebrafish orthologs of proteins identified in our functional proteomic analysis. Taken together these results identify recruitment of known and previously unknown co-regulatory proteins to ESR1 and highlight new methods to assay recruitment of low abundant and intact, endogenous co-regulatory proteins to ESR1 or other nuclear receptors, in

  19. Fluorescence polarization assays to measure interactions between Gα subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins and regulatory motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maziarz, Marcin; Garcia-Marcos, Mikel

    2017-01-01

    Fluorescence polarization (FP) is a simple and sensitive method allowing for the quantification of interactions between proteins and fluorescently tagged small molecules like peptides. Heterotrimeric G proteins are critical signal transducing molecules and their activity is controlled by a complex network of regulatory proteins. Some of these regulators have defined short motifs (G proteins and subsequently modulate their activity. For these cases, FP represents a robust and quantitative method to characterize the G protein regulator interaction. Here we describe FP assays in a 384-well plate format to quantify interactions between Gα subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins and peptides corresponding to the Gα binding and activating (GBA) or GoLoco motifs, which are present in some proteins with guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) (e.g., GIV/Girdin) or guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor (GDI) (e.g., RGS12) activity, respectively. This assay can be used to determine equilibrium dissociation constants, characterize the impact of single amino acid point mutations on the Gα-peptide interaction, and is suitable for high-throughput screening. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. EWS and FUS bind a subset of transcribed genes encoding proteins enriched in RNA regulatory functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Yonglun; Friis, Jenny Blechingberg; Fernandes, Ana Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Background FUS (TLS) and EWS (EWSR1) belong to the FET-protein family of RNA and DNA binding proteins. FUS and EWS are structurally and functionally related and participate in transcriptional regulation and RNA processing. FUS and EWS are identified in translocation generated cancer fusion proteins...... and involved in the human neurological diseases amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and fronto-temporal lobar degeneration. Results To determine the gene regulatory functions of FUS and EWS at the level of chromatin, we have performed chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by next generation sequencing (Ch......IP-seq). Our results show that FUS and EWS bind to a subset of actively transcribed genes, that binding often is downstream the poly(A)-signal, and that binding overlaps with RNA polymerase II. Functional examinations of selected target genes identified that FUS and EWS can regulate gene expression...

  1. Alteration of contractile and regulatory proteins in estrogen-induced hypertrophy of female rabbit bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Alpha Dian-Yu; Levin, Robert M; Kogan, Barry A; Whitbeck, Catherine; Leggett, Robert E; Kearns, Christine; Mannikarottu, Anita

    2006-11-01

    Estrogen is essential to mediate physiologic functions in female bladders. Deficiency of estrogen has been speculated to be an etiologic factor for bladder dysfunction in postmenopausal women. Our previous studies have demonstrated that estrogen supplementation in female rabbits induces a "functional hypertrophy" of the urinary bladder smooth muscle. The present study investigated the alterations in the contractile and regulatory proteins in this model. Twenty New Zealand white female rabbits were separated into five groups of 4 rabbits each. Group 1 served as the control, groups 2 to 6 underwent ovariectomy (Ovx), and group 2 served as the Ovx without estradiol treatment group. Two weeks after Ovx, groups 3 to 5 were given 17-beta estradiol (1 mg/kg/day) by subcutaneous implant for 1, 3, and 7 days, respectively. The expression of the contractile and regulatory proteins, such as myosin light chain kinase, rho-kinase, and caldesmon, was analyzed by Western blotting. The expression of myosin light chain kinase was enhanced by estradiol supplementation. The expression of rho-kinase-alpha was increased significantly (20-fold) after Ovx, which was downregulated after estrogen supplementation. No significant change was seen in rho-kinase-beta after Ovx or estradiol supplementation. The expression of caldesmon isoforms was enhanced by 1-day estradiol supplementation but decreased to lower levels than those of the control group by 3 and 7 days of estrogen treatment. The results of the present study have provided more understanding about the role of the contractile and regulatory proteins in detrusor muscle, in both dysfunctional atrophy induced by Ovx and functional hypertrophy induced by estrogen supplementation.

  2. Pro-protein convertases control the maturation and processing of the iron-regulatory protein, RGMc/hemojuvelin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rotwein Peter

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Repulsive guidance molecule c (RGMc or hemojuvelin, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-linked glycoprotein expressed in liver and striated muscle, plays a central role in systemic iron balance. Inactivating mutations in the RGMc gene cause juvenile hemochromatosis (JH, a rapidly progressing iron storage disorder with severe systemic manifestations. RGMc undergoes complex biosynthetic steps leading to membrane-bound and soluble forms of the protein, including both 50 and 40 kDa single-chain species. Results We now show that pro-protein convertases (PC are responsible for conversion of 50 kDa RGMc to a 40 kDa protein with a truncated COOH-terminus. Unlike related molecules RGMa and RGMb, RGMc encodes a conserved PC recognition and cleavage site, and JH-associated RGMc frame-shift mutants undergo COOH-terminal cleavage only if this site is present. A cell-impermeable peptide PC inhibitor blocks the appearance of 40 kDa RGMc in extra-cellular fluid, as does an engineered mutation in the conserved PC recognition sequence, while the PC furin cleaves 50 kDa RGMc in vitro into a 40 kDa molecule with an intact NH2-terminus. Iron loading reduces release of RGMc from the cell membrane, and diminishes accumulation of the 40 kDa species in cell culture medium. Conclusion Our results define a role for PCs in the maturation of RGMc that may have implications for the physiological actions of this critical iron-regulatory protein.

  3. iTRAQ-Based Quantitative Proteomics Identifies Potential Regulatory Proteins Involved in Chicken Eggshell Brownness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangqi Li

    Full Text Available Brown eggs are popular in many countries and consumers regard eggshell brownness as an important indicator of egg quality. However, the potential regulatory proteins and detailed molecular mechanisms regulating eggshell brownness have yet to be clearly defined. In the present study, we performed quantitative proteomics analysis with iTRAQ technology in the shell gland epithelium of hens laying dark and light brown eggs to investigate the candidate proteins and molecular mechanisms underlying variation in chicken eggshell brownness. The results indicated 147 differentially expressed proteins between these two groups, among which 65 and 82 proteins were significantly up-regulated in the light and dark groups, respectively. Functional analysis indicated that in the light group, the down-regulated iron-sulfur cluster assembly protein (Iba57 would decrease the synthesis of protoporphyrin IX; furthermore, the up-regulated protein solute carrier family 25 (mitochondrial carrier; adenine nucleotide translocator, member 5 (SLC25A5 and down-regulated translocator protein (TSPO would lead to increased amounts of protoporphyrin IX transported into the mitochondria matrix to form heme with iron, which is supplied by ovotransferrin protein (TF. In other words, chickens from the light group produce less protoporphyrin IX, which is mainly used for heme synthesis. Therefore, the exported protoporphyrin IX available for eggshell deposition and brownness is reduced in the light group. The current study provides valuable information to elucidate variation of chicken eggshell brownness, and demonstrates the feasibility and sensitivity of iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics analysis in providing useful insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying brown eggshell pigmentation.

  4. Guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins in retinal pigment epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Meisheng; Tran, V.T.; Fong, H.K.W. (Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles (United States)); Pandey, S. (Doheny Eye Inst., Los Angeles, CA (United States))

    1991-05-01

    The expression of GTP-binding regulatory proteins (G proteins) in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells was analyzed by RNA blot hybridization and cDNA amplification. Both adult and fetal human RPE cells contain mRNA for multiple G protein {alpha} subunits (G{alpha}) including G{sub s}{alpha}, G{sub i-1}{alpha}, G{sub i-2}{alpha}, G{sub i-3}{alpha}, and G{sub z}{alpha} (or G{sub x}{alpha}), where G{sub s} and G{sub i} are proteins that stimulate or inhibit adenylyl cyclase, respectively, and G{sub z} is a protein that may mediate pertussis toxin-insensitive events. Other G{alpha}-related mRNA transcripts were detected in fetal RPE cells by low-stringency hybridization to G{sub i-2}{alpha} and G{sub s}{alpha} protein-coding cDNA probes. The diversity of G proteins in RPE cells was further studied by cDNA amplification with reverse transcriptase and the polymerase chain reaction. This approach revealed that, besides the above mentioned members of the G{alpha} gene family, at least two other G{alpha} subunits are expressed in RPE cells. Human retinal cDNA clones that encode one of the additional G{alpha} subunits were isolated and characterized. The results indicate that this G{alpha} subunit belongs to a separate subfamily of G proteins that may be insensitive to inhibition by pertussis toxin.

  5. Anomalous DNA binding by E2 regulatory protein driven by spacer sequence TATA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Zhiqun; Zhang, Yongli; Hegde, Rashmi S; Shakked, Zippora; Crothers, Donald M

    2010-06-01

    We have investigated the anomalously weak binding of human papillomavirus (HPV) regulatory protein E2 to a DNA target containing the spacer sequence TATA. Experiments in magnesium (Mg(2+)) and calcium (Ca(2+)) ion buffers revealed a marked reduction in cutting by DNase I at the CpG sequence in the protein-binding site 3' to the TATA spacer sequence, Studies of the cation dependence of DNA-E2 affinities showed that upon E2 binding the TATA sequence releases approximately twice as many Mg(2+) ions as the average of the other spacer sequences. Binding experiments for TATA spacer relative to ATAT showed that in potassium ion (K(+)) the E2 affinity of the two sequences is nearly equal, but the relative dissociation constant (K(d)) for TATA increases in the order K(+ )TATA relative to ATAT is independent of ion concentration, whereas for Mg(2+) the affinity for TATA drops sharply as ion concentration increases. Thus, ions of increasing positive charge density increasingly distort the E2 binding site, weakening the affinity for protein. In the case of Mg(2+), additional ions are bound to TATA that require displacement for protein binding. We suggest that the TATA sequence may bias the DNA structure towards a conformation that binds the protein relatively weakly.

  6. The Positive Regulatory Roles of the TIFY10 Proteins in Plant Responses to Alkaline Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dan; Li, Rongtian; Liu, Xin; Sun, Mingzhe; Wu, Jing; Zhang, Ning; Zhu, Yanming

    2014-01-01

    The TIFY family is a novel plant-specific protein family, and is characterized by a conserved TIFY motif (TIFF/YXG). Our previous studies indicated the potential roles of TIFY10/11 proteins in plant responses to alkaline stress. In the current study, we focused on the regulatory roles and possible physiological and molecular basis of the TIFY10 proteins in plant responses to alkaline stress. We demonstrated the positive function of TIFY10s in alkaline responses by using the AtTIFY10a and AtTIFY10b knockout Arabidopsis, as evidenced by the relatively lower germination rates of attify10a and attify10b mutant seeds under alkaline stress. We also revealed that ectopic expression of GsTIFY10a in Medicago sativa promoted plant growth, and increased the NADP-ME activity, citric acid content and free proline content but decreased the MDA content of transgenic plants under alkaline stress. Furthermore, expression levels of the stress responsive genes including NADP-ME, CS, H+-ppase and P5CS were also up-regulated in GsTIFY10a transgenic plants under alkaline stress. Interestingly, GsTIFY10a overexpression increased the jasmonate content of the transgenic alfalfa. In addition, we showed that neither GsTIFY10a nor GsTIFY10e exhibited transcriptional activity in yeast cells. However, through Y2H and BiFc assays, we demonstrated that GsTIFY10a, not GsTIFY10e, could form homodimers in yeast cells and in living plant cells. As expected, we also demonstrated that GsTIFY10a and GsTIFY10e could heterodimerize with each other in both yeast and plant cells. Taken together, our results provided direct evidence supporting the positive regulatory roles of the TIFY10 proteins in plant responses to alkaline stress. PMID:25375909

  7. Development of neurodevelopmental disorders: a regulatory mechanism involving bromodomain-containing proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Junlin

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Neurodevelopmental disorders are classified as diseases that cause abnormal functions of the brain or central nervous system. Children with neurodevelopmental disorders show impaired language and speech abilities, learning and memory damage, and poor motor skills. However, we still know very little about the molecular etiology of these disorders. Recent evidence implicates the bromodomain-containing proteins (BCPs in the initiation and development of neurodevelopmental disorders. BCPs have a particular domain, the bromodomain (Brd, which was originally identified as specifically binding acetyl-lysine residues at the N-terminus of histone proteins in vitro and in vivo. Other domains of BCPs are responsible for binding partner proteins to form regulatory complexes. Once these complexes are assembled, BCPs alter chromosomal states and regulate gene expression. Some BCP complexes bind nucleosomes, are involved in basal transcription regulation, and influence the transcription of many genes. However, most BCPs are involved in targeting. For example, some BCPs function as a recruitment platform or scaffold through their Brds-binding targeting sites. Others are recruited to form a complex to bind the targeting sites of their partners. The regulation mediated by these proteins is especially critical during normal and abnormal development. Mutant BCPs or dysfunctional BCP-containing complexes are implicated in the initiation and development of neurodevelopmental disorders. However, the pathogenic molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. In this review, we focus on the roles of regulatory BCPs associated with neurodevelopmental disorders, including mental retardation, Fragile X syndrome (FRX, Williams syndrome (WS, Rett syndrome and Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RTS. A better understanding of the molecular pathogenesis, based upon the roles of BCPs, will lead to screening of targets for the treatment of neurodevelopmental disorders.

  8. Handshakes and Fights: The Regulatory Interplay of RNA-Binding Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Dassi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available What drives the flow of signals controlling the outcome of post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression? This regulatory layer, presiding to processes ranging from splicing to mRNA stability and localization, is a key determinant of protein levels and thus cell phenotypes. RNA-binding proteins (RBPs form a remarkable army of post-transcriptional regulators, strong of more than 1,500 genes implementing this expression fine-tuning plan and implicated in both cell physiology and pathology. RBPs can bind and control a wide array of RNA targets. This sheer amount of interactions form complex regulatory networks (PTRNs where the action of individual RBPs cannot be easily untangled from each other. While past studies have mostly focused on the action of individual RBPs on their targets, we are now observing an increasing amount of evidence describing the occurrence of interactions between RBPs, defining how common target RNAs are regulated. This suggests that the flow of signals in PTRNs is driven by the intertwined contribution of multiple RBPs, concurrently acting on each of their targets. Understanding how RBPs cooperate and compete is thus of paramount importance to chart the wiring of PTRNs and their impact on cell phenotypes. Here we review the current knowledge about patterns of RBP interaction and attempt at describing their general principles. We also discuss future directions which should be taken to reach a comprehensive understanding of this fundamental aspect of gene expression regulation.

  9. Malignant mixed Mullerian tumors of the uterus: histopathological evaluation of cell cycle and apoptotic regulatory proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senger Jenna-Lynn B

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aim The aim of our study was to evaluate survival outcomes in malignant mixed Mullerian tumors (MMMT of the uterus with respect to the role of cell cycle and apoptotic regulatory proteins in the carcinomatous and sarcomatous components. Methods 23 cases of uterine MMMT identified from the Saskatchewan Cancer Agency (1970-1999 were evaluated. Immunohistochemical expression of Bad, Mcl-1, bcl-x, bak, mdm2, bax, p16, p21, p53, p27, EMA, Bcl-2, Ki67 and PCNA was correlated with clinico-pathological data including survival outcomes. Results Histopathological examination confirmed malignant epithelial component with homologous (12 cases and heterologous (11 cases sarcomatous elements. P53 was strongly expressed (70-95% in 15 cases and negative in 5 cases. The average survival in the p53+ve cases was 3.56 years as opposed to 8.94 years in p53-ve cases. Overexpression of p16 and Mcl-1 were observed in patients with longer survival outcomes (> 2 years. P16 and p21 were overexpressed in the carcinomatous and sarcomatous elements respectively. Cyclin-D1 was focally expressed only in the carcinomatous elements. Conclusions Our study supports that a cell cycle and apoptotic regulatory protein dysregulation is an important pathway for tumorigenesis and b p53 is an important immunoprognostic marker in MMMT of the uterus.

  10. Naturally-occurring, dually-functional fusions between restriction endonucleases and regulatory proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jixiao; Blumenthal, Robert M

    2013-10-02

    Restriction-modification (RM) systems appear to play key roles in modulating gene flow among bacteria and archaea. Because the restriction endonuclease (REase) is potentially lethal to unmethylated new host cells, regulation to ensure pre-expression of the protective DNA methyltransferase (MTase) is essential to the spread of RM genes. This is particularly true for Type IIP RM systems, in which the REase and MTase are separate, independently-active proteins. A substantial subset of Type IIP RM systems are controlled by an activator-repressor called C protein. In these systems, C controls the promoter for its own gene, and for the downstream REase gene that lacks its own promoter. Thus MTase is expressed immediately after the RM genes enter a new cell, while expression of REase is delayed until sufficient C protein accumulates. To study the variation in and evolution of this regulatory mechanism, we searched for RM systems closely related to the well-studied C protein-dependent PvuII RM system. Unexpectedly, among those found were several in which the C protein and REase genes were fused. The gene for CR.NsoJS138I fusion protein (nsoJS138ICR, from the bacterium Niabella soli) was cloned, and the fusion protein produced and partially purified. Western blots provided no evidence that, under the conditions tested, anything other than full-length fusion protein is produced. This protein had REase activity in vitro and, as expected from the sequence similarity, its specificity was indistinguishable from that for PvuII REase, though the optimal reaction conditions were different. Furthermore, the fusion was active as a C protein, as revealed by in vivo activation of a lacZ reporter fusion to the promoter region for the nsoJS138ICR gene. Fusions between C proteins and REases have not previously been characterized, though other fusions have (such as between REases and MTases). These results reinforce the evidence for impressive modularity among RM system proteins, and raise

  11. Expression and purification of functional, recombinant Trypanosoma cruzi complement regulatory protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beucher, Margaret; Meira, Wendell S F; Zegarra, Vasthy; Galvão, Lúcia M C; Chiari, Egler; Norris, Karen A

    2003-01-01

    The complement regulatory protein (CRP) of Trypanosoma cruzi is a developmentally regulated glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored membrane protein that protects the parasite from complement-mediated killing, and is an important virulence determinant of the microorganism. CRP binds human complement components C3b and C4b to restrict activation of the complement cascade. Here, we report production of functional, recombinant T. cruzi CRP in mammalian cells and a one-step purification of the recombinant protein. Exchange of the crp DNA sequence encoding the carboxy-terminal GPI signal sequence with the corresponding sequence of decay accelerating factor (DAF) was necessary for recognition, cleavage, and addition of GPI in mammalian cells. CRP production was assessed in two mammalian cell lines with crp-daf gene expression driven by three different transcription control regions: Rous sarcoma virus long terminal repeat, cytomegalovirus (CMV) immediate early gene, and chicken beta-actin promoter/CMV enhancer. We present evidence that CRP produced in transfected Chinese hamster Ovary (CHO) cells was functional and protected the cells from complement-mediated lysis. To facilitate purification of the recombinant protein, a hexahistidyl tag was incorporated at 3(') end of the cDNA upstream of the GPI anchor addition sequence. An additional histidine fusion construct was made that allowed for secretion and recovery of recombinant protein from culture supernatant fluid. Both membrane and secreted forms of the protein were purified in one step by nickel nitrilotriacetic acid. The production and purification of functionally active CRP in a non-infectious expression system will allow for structure and function studies aimed at identifying the active site(s) of this protein.

  12. The life cycle of the steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein: from transcription through proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granot, Zvi; Silverman, Eran; Friedlander, Ruth; Melamed-Book, Naomi; Eimerl, Sarah; Timberg, Rina; Hales, Karen H; Hales, Dale B; Stocco, Douglas M; Orly, Joseph

    2002-11-01

    The Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory (StAR) protein is a mitochondrial protein required for the transport of cholesterol substrate to the P450scc enzyme located in the inner mitochondrial membranes of steroid producing cells. This study suggests that the acute regulation of the rodent StAR gene in the ovary is mediated by two factors, C/EBPbeta and GATA-4. Once translated, the StAR precursor protein is either imported into the mitochondria, or it is rapidly degraded in the cytosol. We predicted that in order to perpetuate StAR activity cycles, imported StAR should turn over rapidly to avoid a potentially harmful accumulation of the protein in sub-mitochondrial compartments. Pulse-chase experiments in metabolically labeled cells showed that: (a) the turnover rate of mature mitochondrial StAR protein (30 kDa) is much faster (t(1/2) = 4-5 h) than that of other mitochondrial proteins; (b) dissipation of the inner membrane potential (-delta psi) by carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (mCCCP) accelerates the mitochondrial degradation of StAR; (c) unexpectedly, the mitochondrial degradation of StAR is inhibited by MG132 and lactacystin, but not by epoxomicin. Furthermore, StAR degradation becomes inhibitor-resistant two hours after import. Therefore, these studies suggest a bi-phasic route of StAR turnover in the mitochondria. Shortly after import, StAR is degraded by inhibitor-sensitive protease(s) (phase I), whereas at later times, StAR turnover proceeds to completion through an MG132-resistant proteolytic activity (phase II). Collectively, this study defines StAR as a unique protein that can authentically be used to probe multiple proteolytic activities in mammalian mitochondria.

  13. The Yersinia pseudotuberculosis outer membrane protein Ail recruits the human complement regulatory protein factor H.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Derek K; Riva, Rauna; Skurnik, Mikael; Meri, Seppo

    2012-10-01

    Previous investigations characterizing the mechanism(s) of complement resistance in Yersinia pseudotuberculosis showed that the outer membrane protein Ail can functionally recruit the regulator of the classical and lectin pathways of complement, C4b-binding protein. In this study, we extend these observations and show that Ail can also recruit the regulator of the alternative pathway (AP), factor H (fH). Binding to fH was dependent on Ail expression and observed in the context of full-length LPS. Inactivation of ail resulted in loss of fH binding. Ail expression conferred resistance to AP-mediated killing. Bound fH was functional as a cofactor for factor I-mediated cleavage and inactivation of C3b. Ail alone is sufficient to mediate fH binding and resistance to AP-mediated killing, because Ail expression in a laboratory Escherichia coli strain conferred both of these phenotypes. Binding was specific and inhibited by increasing heparin and NaCl concentrations. Using a panel of fH recombinant fragments, we observed that both short consensus repeats 5-7 and 19-20 regions are responsible for mediating the interaction with Ail. Collectively, these results suggest that fH recruitment is an additional mechanism of complement resistance of Ail. Recruitment of both fH and C4BP by Ail may confer Y. pseudotuberculosis with the ability to resist all pathways of complement activation.

  14. Structural model of the Rev regulatory protein from equine infectious anemia virus.

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    Yungok Ihm

    Full Text Available Rev is an essential regulatory protein in the equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV and other lentiviruses, including HIV-1. It binds incompletely spliced viral mRNAs and shuttles them from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, a critical prerequisite for the production of viral structural proteins and genomic RNA. Despite its important role in production of infectious virus, the development of antiviral therapies directed against Rev has been hampered by the lack of an experimentally-determined structure of the full length protein. We have used a combined computational and biochemical approach to generate and evaluate a structural model of the Rev protein. The modeled EIAV Rev (ERev structure includes a total of 6 helices, four of which form an anti-parallel four-helix bundle. The first helix contains the leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES. An arginine-rich RNA binding motif, RRDRW, is located in a solvent-exposed loop region. An ERLE motif required for Rev activity is predicted to be buried in the core of modeled structure where it plays an essential role in stabilization of the Rev fold. This structural model is supported by existing genetic and functional data as well as by targeted mutagenesis of residues predicted to be essential for overall structural integrity. Our predicted structure should increase understanding of structure-function relationships in Rev and may provide a basis for the design of new therapies for lentiviral diseases.

  15. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance structural studies of peptides and proteins from the vaso-regulatory System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sizun, Philippe

    1991-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to show how Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) allows to determine the 3D structure of peptides and proteins in solution. A comparative study of peptides involved in the vaso-regulatory System (form small hormonal peptide to the 65 amido-acid protein hirudin) has allowed to design most efficient NMR 1D and 2D strategies. It rapidly appeared that the size of the peptide plays a key role in the structuration of the molecule, smallest peptides being weakly structured owing to the lack of cooperative effects. As the molecular size increases or if conformational locks are present (disulfide bridges) the probability of stable secondary structure increases. For the protein hirudin, a combination of ail available NMR parameters deduced form dedicated experiments (chemical shifts, coupling constants, overhauser effects, accessibility of amide protons) and molecular modelling under constraints allows a clear 3D structure to be proposed for this protein in solution. Finally, a comparative study of the experimental structures and of those deduced form prediction rules has shed light on the concept of structural predisposition, the latter being of high value for a better understanding of structure-activity relationships. (author) [fr

  16. Spectroscopic studies on peptides and proteins with cysteine-containing heme regulatory motifs (HRM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Erik; Florin, Nicole; Duthie, Fraser; Henning Brewitz, H; Kühl, Toni; Imhof, Diana; Hagelueken, Gregor; Schiemann, Olav

    2015-07-01

    The role of heme as a cofactor in enzymatic reactions has been studied for a long time and in great detail. Recently it was discovered that heme can also serve as a signalling molecule in cells but so far only few examples of this regulation have been studied. In order to discover new potentially heme-regulated proteins, we screened protein sequence databases for bacterial proteins that contain sequence features like a Cysteine-Proline (CP) motif, which is known for its heme-binding propensity. Based on this search we synthesized a series of these potential heme regulatory motifs (HRMs). We used cw EPR spectroscopy to investigate whether these sequences do indeed bind to heme and if the spin state of heme is changed upon interaction with the peptides. The corresponding proteins of two potential HRMs, FeoB and GlpF, were expressed and purified and their interaction with heme was studied by cw EPR and UV-Visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Mutations in complement regulatory proteins predispose to preeclampsia: a genetic analysis of the PROMISSE cohort.

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    Jane E Salmon

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy in women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE or antiphospholipid antibodies (APL Ab--autoimmune conditions characterized by complement-mediated injury--is associated with increased risk of preeclampsia and miscarriage. Our previous studies in mice indicate that complement activation targeted to the placenta drives angiogenic imbalance and placental insufficiency.We use PROMISSE, a prospective study of 250 pregnant patients with SLE and/or APL Ab, to test the hypothesis in humans that impaired capacity to limit complement activation predisposes to preeclampsia. We sequenced genes encoding three complement regulatory proteins--membrane cofactor protein (MCP, complement factor I (CFI, and complement factor H (CFH--in 40 patients who had preeclampsia and found heterozygous mutations in seven (18%. Five of these patients had risk variants in MCP or CFI that were previously identified in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, a disease characterized by endothelial damage. One had a novel mutation in MCP that impairs regulation of C4b. These findings constitute, to our knowledge, the first genetic defects associated with preeclampsia in SLE and/or APL Ab. We confirmed the association of hypomorphic variants of MCP and CFI in a cohort of non-autoimmune preeclampsia patients in which five of 59 were heterozygous for mutations.The presence of risk variants in complement regulatory proteins in patients with SLE and/or APL Ab who develop preeclampsia, as well as in preeclampsia patients lacking autoimmune disease, links complement activation to disease pathogenesis and suggests new targets for treatment of this important public health problem.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00198068.

  18. Contributions of protein-coding and regulatory change to adaptive molecular evolution in murid rodents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel L Halligan

    Full Text Available The contribution of regulatory versus protein change to adaptive evolution has long been controversial. In principle, the rate and strength of adaptation within functional genetic elements can be quantified on the basis of an excess of nucleotide substitutions between species compared to the neutral expectation or from effects of recent substitutions on nucleotide diversity at linked sites. Here, we infer the nature of selective forces acting in proteins, their UTRs and conserved noncoding elements (CNEs using genome-wide patterns of diversity in wild house mice and divergence to related species. By applying an extension of the McDonald-Kreitman test, we infer that adaptive substitutions are widespread in protein-coding genes, UTRs and CNEs, and we estimate that there are at least four times as many adaptive substitutions in CNEs and UTRs as in proteins. We observe pronounced reductions in mean diversity around nonsynonymous sites (whether or not they have experienced a recent substitution. This can be explained by selection on multiple, linked CNEs and exons. We also observe substantial dips in mean diversity (after controlling for divergence around protein-coding exons and CNEs, which can also be explained by the combined effects of many linked exons and CNEs. A model of background selection (BGS can adequately explain the reduction in mean diversity observed around CNEs. However, BGS fails to explain the wide reductions in mean diversity surrounding exons (encompassing ~100 Kb, on average, implying that there is a substantial role for adaptation within exons or closely linked sites. The wide dips in diversity around exons, which are hard to explain by BGS, suggest that the fitness effects of adaptive amino acid substitutions could be substantially larger than substitutions in CNEs. We conclude that although there appear to be many more adaptive noncoding changes, substitutions in proteins may dominate phenotypic evolution.

  19. Crystal structures of the apo and ATP bound Mycobacterium tuberculosis nitrogen regulatory PII protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shetty, Nishant D.; Reddy, Manchi C.M.; Palaninathan, Satheesh K.; Owen, Joshua L.; Sacchettini, James C. (TAM)

    2010-10-11

    PII constitutes a family of signal transduction proteins that act as nitrogen sensors in microorganisms and plants. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) has a single homologue of PII whose precise role has as yet not been explored. We have solved the crystal structures of the Mtb PII protein in its apo and ATP bound forms to 1.4 and 2.4 {angstrom} resolutions, respectively. The protein forms a trimeric assembly in the crystal lattice and folds similarly to the other PII family proteins. The Mtb PII:ATP binary complex structure reveals three ATP molecules per trimer, each bound between the base of the T-loop of one subunit and the C-loop of the neighboring subunit. In contrast to the apo structure, at least one subunit of the binary complex structure contains a completely ordered T-loop indicating that ATP binding plays a role in orienting this loop region towards target proteins like the ammonium transporter, AmtB. Arg38 of the T-loop makes direct contact with the {gamma}-phosphate of the ATP molecule replacing the Mg{sup 2+} position seen in the Methanococcus jannaschii GlnK1 structure. The C-loop of a neighboring subunit encloses the other side of the ATP molecule, placing the GlnK specific C-terminal 3{sub 10} helix in the vicinity. Homology modeling studies with the E. coli GlnK:AmtB complex reveal that Mtb PII could form a complex similar to the complex in E. coli. The structural conservation and operon organization suggests that the Mtb PII gene encodes for a GlnK protein and might play a key role in the nitrogen regulatory pathway.

  20. Signal regulatory protein alpha (SIRPalpha cells in the adaptive response to ESAT-6/CFP-10 protein of tuberculous mycobacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Ray Waters

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Early secretory antigenic target-6 (ESAT-6 and culture filtrate protein-10 (CFP-10 are co-secreted proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex mycobacteria (includes M. bovis, the zoonotic agent of bovine tuberculosis involved in phagolysosome escape of the bacillus and, potentially, in the efficient induction of granulomas. Upon tuberculosis infection, multi-nucleate giant cells are elicited, likely as a response aimed at containing mycobacteria. In tissue culture models, signal regulatory protein (SIRPalpha (also referred to as macrophage fusion receptor or CD172a is essential for multi-nucleate giant cell formation.In the present study, ESAT-6/CFP-10 complex and SIRPalpha interactions were evaluated with samples obtained from calves experimentally infected with M. bovis. Peripheral blood CD172a(+ (SIRPalpha-expressing cells from M. bovis-infected calves proliferated upon in vitro stimulation with ESAT-6/CFP-10 (either as a fusion protein or a peptide cocktail, but not with cells from animals receiving M. bovis strains lacking ESAT-6/CFP-10 (i.e, M. bovis BCG or M. bovis DeltaRD1. Sorted CD172a(+ cells from these cultures had a dendritic cell/macrophage morphology, bound fluorescently-tagged rESAT-6:CFP-10, bound and phagocytosed live M. bovis BCG, and co-expressed CD11c, DEC-205, CD44, MHC II, CD80/86 (a subset also co-expressed CD11b or CD8alpha. Intradermal administration of rESAT-6:CFP-10 into tuberculous calves elicited a delayed type hypersensitive response consisting of CD11c(+, CD172a(+, and CD3(+ cells, including CD172a-expressing multi-nucleated giant cells.These findings demonstrate the ability of ESAT-6/CFP-10 to specifically expand CD172a(+ cells, bind to CD172a(+ cells, and induce multi-nucleated giant cells expressing CD172a.

  1. Antagonistic regulation of flowering time through distinct regulatory subunits of protein phosphatase 2A.

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    Behzad Heidari

    Full Text Available Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A consists of three types of subunits: a catalytic (C, a scaffolding (A, and a regulatory (B subunit. In Arabidopsis thaliana and other organisms the regulatory B subunits are divided into at least three non-related groups, B55, B' and B″. Flowering time in plants mutated in B55 or B' genes were investigated in this work. The PP2A-b55α and PP2A-b55β (knockout lines showed earlier flowering than WT, whereas a PP2A-b'γ (knockdown line showed late flowering. Average advancements of flowering in PP2A-b55 mutants were 3.4 days in continuous light, 6.6 days in 12 h days, and 8.2 days in 8 h days. Average delays in the PP2A-b'γ mutant line were 7.1 days in 16 h days and 4.7 days in 8 h days. Expression of marker genes of genetically distinct flowering pathways (CO, FLC, MYB33, SPL3, and the floral integrator (FT, SOC1 were tested in WT, pp2a mutants, and two known flowering time mutants elf6 and edm2. The results are compatible with B55 acting at and/or downstream of the floral integrator, in a non-identified pathway. B' γ was involved in repression of FLC, the main flowering repressor gene. For B'γ the results are consistent with the subunit being a component in the major autonomous flowering pathway. In conclusion PP2A is both a positive and negative regulator of flowering time, depending on the type of regulatory subunit involved.

  2. Transcriptional control by two leucine-responsive regulatory proteins in Halobacterium salinarum R1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarasov Valery

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Archaea combine bacterial-as well as eukaryotic-like features to regulate cellular processes. Halobacterium salinarum R1 encodes eight leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp-homologues. The function of two of them, Irp (OE3923F and lrpA1 (OE2621R, were analyzed by gene deletion and overexpression, including genome scale impacts using microarrays. Results It was shown that Lrp affects the transcription of multiple target genes, including those encoding enzymes involved in amino acid synthesis, central metabolism, transport processes and other regulators of transcription. In contrast, LrpA1 regulates transcription in a more specific manner. The aspB3 gene, coding for an aspartate transaminase, was repressed by LrpA1 in the presence of L-aspartate. Analytical DNA-affinity chromatography was adapted to high salt, and demonstrated binding of LrpA1 to its own promoter, as well as L-aspartate dependent binding to the aspB3 promoter. Conclusion The gene expression profiles of two archaeal Lrp-homologues report in detail their role in H. salinarum R1. LrpA1 and Lrp show similar functions to those already described in bacteria, but in addition they play a key role in regulatory networks, such as controlling the transcription of other regulators. In a more detailed analysis ligand dependent binding of LrpA1 was demonstrated to its target gene aspB3.

  3. Molecular cloning and expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein from bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung-Chang; Oh, Sung-Dug; Ahn, Ryun-Sup; Soh, Jaemog; Kwon, Hyuk-Bang

    2009-06-01

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) transfers cholesterol from the outer mitochondrial membrane to the inner membrane where the cytochrome P450 side chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc) resides. This process is the rate-limiting step in steroidogenesis. StAR cDNAs have been cloned and characterized from a range of different species. To investigate the role of StAR in the amphibian system, we cloned a full-length StAR cDNA from bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in conjunction with rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The putative full-length bullfrog StAR (bfStAR) cDNA was 1862 base pairs (bp) in length, and the longest open reading frame (ORF) encoded a protein of 284 amino acids. Amino acid sequence comparison showed that amphibian StAR has a high degree of sequence identity, ranging from 62% to 98%, with StAR proteins of other species. Similar to other species, bfStAR contained two conserved domains, the mitochondrial targeting domain and cholesterol-binding domain, in the N-terminus and C-terminus of the protein, respectively. Northern blot analysis and RT-PCR indicated that StAR mRNA is expressed in the gonads and adrenal gland. Transfection of green monkey kidney (COS-1) cells with an expression construct for bfStAR revealed that it encoded 34 and 27kDa proteins that were recognized by antiserum raised against the human StAR-related lipid transfer (START) domain.

  4. Properties of Sequence Conservation in Upstream Regulatory and Protein Coding Sequences among Paralogs in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Dale N.; Wiehe, Thomas

    Whole genome duplication (WGD) has catalyzed the formation of new species, genes with novel functions, altered expression patterns, complexified signaling pathways and has provided organisms a level of genetic robustness. We studied the long-term evolution and interrelationships of 5’ upstream regulatory sequences (URSs), protein coding sequences (CDSs) and expression correlations (EC) of duplicated gene pairs in Arabidopsis. Three distinct methods revealed significant evolutionary conservation between paralogous URSs and were highly correlated with microarray-based expression correlation of the respective gene pairs. Positional information on exact matches between sequences unveiled the contribution of micro-chromosomal rearrangements on expression divergence. A three-way rank analysis of URS similarity, CDS divergence and EC uncovered specific gene functional biases. Transcription factor activity was associated with gene pairs exhibiting conserved URSs and divergent CDSs, whereas a broad array of metabolic enzymes was found to be associated with gene pairs showing diverged URSs but conserved CDSs.

  5. Structural and regulatory diversity shape HLA-C protein expression levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaur, Gurman; Gras, Stephanie; Mobbs, Jesse I

    2017-01-01

    Expression of HLA-C varies widely across individuals in an allele-specific manner. This variation in expression can influence efficacy of the immune response, as shown for infectious and autoimmune diseases. MicroRNA binding partially influences differential HLA-C expression, but the additional...... contributing factors have remained undetermined. Here we use functional and structural analyses to demonstrate that HLA-C expression is modulated not just at the RNA level, but also at the protein level. Specifically, we show that variation in exons 2 and 3, which encode the α1/α2 domains, drives differential...... expression of HLA-C allomorphs at the cell surface by influencing the structure of the peptide-binding cleft and the diversity of peptides bound by the HLA-C molecules. Together with a phylogenetic analysis, these results highlight the diversity and long-term balancing selection of regulatory factors...

  6. Regulatory effect of porcine plasma protein hydrolysates on pasting and gelatinization action of corn starch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Baohua; Niu, Haili; Sun, Fangda; Han, Jianchun; Liu, Qian

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the regulatory effect of porcine plasma protein hydrolysates (PPPH) on the physicochemical, pasting, and gelatinization properties of corn starch (CS). The results showed that the solubility of CS markedly increased, whereas swelling power and gel penetration force decreased with increased PPPH concentration (Pstarch granules at room temperature (25°C) and then formed a network with swollen starch granules during gelatinization. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) images indicated that the blocklet sizes of gelatinized CS-PPPH mixtures were smaller and more uniform than native CS. The results proved that pasting and gelatinization abilities of CS can be effectively influenced by adding PPPH. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The cellular prion protein is preferentially expressed by CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+ regulatory T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacs, Jeremy D; Garden, Oliver A; Kaur, Gurman; Collinge, John; Jackson, Graham S; Altmann, Daniel M

    2008-01-01

    Post-translational modification of the cellular prion protein (PrPC) is intimately associated with the pathogenesis of prion disease, yet the normal function of the protein remains unclear. PrPC is expressed in lymphoid cells and is known to be a T-cell activation antigen. Further, transcription profiling studies of regulatory T cells have shown preferential overexpression of PrPC, suggesting a possible role in regulatory function. We report that both the expression of PrP message and cell surface PrPC levels are increased in murine CD4+ CD25+ regulatory T cells compared with CD4+ CD25− cells. However, PrP0/0 mice do not show altered regulatory T-cell numbers or forkhead box P3 (Foxp3) expression levels, or impaired regulatory T-cell function in vitro. Nevertheless, the preferential expression of surface PrPC by regulatory T cells raises the possibility that therapeutic ligation of PrPC might alter immune regulation. PMID:18462346

  8. The multifaceted activity of the VirF regulatory protein in the Shigella lifestyle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Letizia Di Martino

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Shigella is a highly adapted human pathogen, mainly found in the developing world and causing a severe enteric syndrome. The highly sophisticated infectious strategy of Shigella banks on the capacity to invade the intestinal epithelial barrier and cause its inflammatory destruction. The cellular pathogenesis and clinical presentation of shigellosis are the sum of the complex action of a large number of bacterial virulence factors mainly located on a large virulence plasmid (pINV. The expression of pINV genes is controlled by multiple environmental stimuli through a regulatory cascade involving proteins and sRNAs encoded by both the pINV and the chromosome. The primary regulator of the virulence phenotype is VirF, a DNA-binding protein belonging to the AraC family of transcriptional regulators. The virF gene, located on the pINV, is expressed only within the host, mainly in response to the temperature transition occurring when the bacterium transits from the outer environment to the intestinal milieu. VirF then acts as anti-H-NS protein and directly activates the icsA and virB genes, triggering the full expression of the invasion program of Shigella. In this review we will focus on the structure of VirF, on its sophisticated regulation, and on its role as major player in the path leading from the non invasive to the invasive phenotype of Shigella. We will address also the involvement of VirF in mechanisms aimed at withstanding adverse conditions inside the host, indicating that this protein is emerging as a global regulator whose action is not limited to virulence systems. Finally, we will discuss recent observations conferring VirF the potential of a novel antibacterial target for shigellosis.

  9. Phage phi 29 regulatory protein p4 stabilizes the binding of the RNA polymerase to the late promoter in a process involving direct protein-protein contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuez, B; Rojo, F; Salas, M

    1992-12-01

    Transcription from the late promoter, PA3, of Bacillus subtilis phage phi 29 is activated by the viral regulatory protein p4. A kinetic analysis of the activation process has revealed that the role of protein p4 is to stabilize the binding of RNA polymerase to the promoter as a closed complex without significantly affecting further steps of the initiation process. Electrophoretic band-shift assays performed with a DNA fragment spanning only the protein p4 binding site showed that RNA polymerase could efficiently retard the complex formed by protein p4 bound to the DNA. Similarly, when a DNA fragment containing only the RNA polymerase-binding region of PA3 was used, p4 greatly stimulated the binding of RNA polymerase to the DNA. These results strongly suggest that p4 and RNA polymerase contact each other at the PA3 promoter. In the light of current knowledge of the p4 activation mechanism, we propose that direct contacts between the two proteins participate in the activation process.

  10. The Protein Phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit Twins stabilizes Plk4 to induce centriole amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownlee, Christopher W; Klebba, Joey E; Buster, Daniel W; Rogers, Gregory C

    2011-10-17

    Centriole duplication is a tightly regulated process that must occur only once per cell cycle; otherwise, supernumerary centrioles can induce aneuploidy and tumorigenesis. Plk4 (Polo-like kinase 4) activity initiates centriole duplication and is regulated by ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis. Throughout interphase, Plk4 autophosphorylation triggers its degradation, thus preventing centriole amplification. However, Plk4 activity is required during mitosis for proper centriole duplication, but the mechanism stabilizing mitotic Plk4 is unknown. In this paper, we show that PP2A (Protein Phosphatase 2A(Twins)) counteracts Plk4 autophosphorylation, thus stabilizing Plk4 and promoting centriole duplication. Like Plk4, the protein level of PP2A's regulatory subunit, Twins (Tws), peaks during mitosis and is required for centriole duplication. However, untimely Tws expression stabilizes Plk4 inappropriately, inducing centriole amplification. Paradoxically, expression of tumor-promoting simian virus 40 small tumor antigen (ST), a reported PP2A inhibitor, promotes centrosome amplification by an unknown mechanism. We demonstrate that ST actually mimics Tws function in stabilizing Plk4 and inducing centriole amplification.

  11. A mutation in protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit A affects auxin transport in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbers, C.; DeLong, A.; Deruere, J.; Bernasconi, P.; Soll, D.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The phytohormone auxin controls processes such as cell elongation, root hair development and root branching. Tropisms, growth curvatures triggered by gravity, light and touch, are also auxin-mediated responses. Auxin is synthesized in the shoot apex and transported through the stem, but the molecular mechanism of auxin transport is not well understood. Naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) and other inhibitors of auxin transport block tropic curvature responses and inhibit root and shoot elongation. We have isolated a novel Arabidopsis thaliana mutant designated roots curl in NPA (rcn1). Mutant seedlings exhibit altered responses to NPA in root curling and hypocotyl elongation. Auxin efflux in mutant seedlings displays increased sensitivity to NPA. The rcn1 mutation was transferred-DNA (T-DNA) tagged and sequences flanking the T-DNA insert were cloned. Analysis of the RCN1 cDNA reveals that the T-DNA insertion disrupts a gene for the regulatory A subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A-A). The RCN1 gene rescues the rcn1 mutant phenotype and also complements the temperature-sensitive phenotype of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae PP2A-A mutation, tpd3-1. These data implicate protein phosphatase 2A in the regulation of auxin transport in Arabidopsis.

  12. Unperturbed posttranscriptional regulatory Rev protein function and HIV-1 replication in astrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Chauhan

    Full Text Available Astrocytes protect neurons, but also evoke proinflammatory responses to injury and viral infections, including HIV. There is a prevailing notion that HIV-1 Rev protein function in astrocytes is perturbed, leading to restricted viral replication. In earlier studies, our finding of restricted viral entry into astrocytes led us to investigate whether there are any intracellular restrictions, including crippled Rev function, in astrocytes. Despite barely detectable levels of DDX3 (Rev-supporting RNA helicase and TRBP (anti-PKR in primary astrocytes compared to astrocytic cells, Rev function was unperturbed in wild-type, but not DDX3-ablated astrocytes. As in permissive cells, after HIV-1 entry bypass in astrocytes, viral-encoded Tat and Rev proteins had robust regulatory activities, leading to efficient viral replication. Productive HIV-1 infection in astrocytes persisted for several weeks. Our findings on HIV-1 entry bypass in astrocytes demonstrated that the intracellular environment is conducive to viral replication and that Tat and Rev functions are unperturbed.

  13. Epitopes of human immunodeficiency virus regulatory proteins tat, nef, and rev are expressed in normal human tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parmentier, H. K.; van Wichen, D. F.; Meyling, F. H.; Goudsmit, J.; Schuurman, H. J.

    1992-01-01

    The expression of regulatory proteins tat, rev, and nef of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) and tat of HIV-2 was studied in frozen sections of lymph nodes from HIV-1-infected individuals, and various tissues from uninfected persons. In HIV-1-positive lymph nodes, monoclonal antibodies to

  14. Adaptation of Tri-molecular fluorescence complementation allows assaying of regulatory Csr RNA-protein interactions in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelderman, Grant; Sivakumar, Anusha; Lipp, Sarah; Contreras, Lydia

    2015-02-01

    sRNAs play a significant role in controlling and regulating cellular metabolism. One of the more interesting aspects of certain sRNAs is their ability to make global changes in the cell by interacting with regulatory proteins. In this work, we demonstrate the use of an in vivo Tri-molecular Fluorescence Complementation assay to detect and visualize the central regulatory sRNA-protein interaction of the Carbon Storage Regulatory system in E. coli. The Carbon Storage Regulator consists primarily of an RNA binding protein, CsrA, that alters the activity of mRNA targets and of an sRNA, CsrB, that modulates the activity of CsrA. We describe the construction of a fluorescence complementation system that detects the interactions between CsrB and CsrA. Additionally, we demonstrate that the intensity of the fluorescence of this system is able to detect changes in the affinity of the CsrB-CsrA interaction, as caused by mutations in the protein sequence of CsrA. While previous methods have adopted this technique to study mRNA or RNA localization, this is the first attempt to use this technique to study the sRNA-protein interaction directly in bacteria. This method presents a potentially powerful tool to study complex bacterial RNA protein interactions in vivo. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Characterization of the regulatory subunit of Yarrowia lipolytica cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Evidences of a monomeric protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronberg, Florencia; Giacometti, Romina; Ruiz-Herrera, José; Passeron, Susana

    2011-05-01

    cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) catalytic (C) and regulatory (R) subunits from Yarrowia lipolytica are encoded by single genes, TPK1 and RKA1, respectively. Here we performed the heterologous expression, purification and characterization of the R subunit from Y. lipolytica yeast cells, and explored the main biochemical features of the PKA. The purified recombinant R, active and capable to interact with C subunit was used to prepare highly specific polyclonal antiserum. Sucrose-gradient centrifugation and gel filtration analysis of both recombinant and native R revealed the monomeric nature of this subunit. Hydrodynamic parameters of the holoenzyme indicated that Y. lipolytica PKA is a dimer of 90 kDa composed of an R subunit of 42 kDa and a C subunit of 39 kDa. The identification of the N-terminal sequence was carried out by mass spectrometry analysis of the purified native R subunit. The differences between N-terminal sequences of R subunits from Y. lipolytica and other organisms, particularly a short linker that spans the inhibitory site, were discussed as the possible cause of the lack of dimerization. R was identified as a type II subunit since our results indicated that it was phosphorylated in vivo by C at S124 identified by anti-phospho-PKA substrate (RRXS/T) antibody. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Global gene expression profiling in Escherichia coli K12. The effects of leucine-responsive regulatory protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, She-pin; Baldi, Pierre; Hatfield, G Wesley

    2002-10-25

    Leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp) is a global regulatory protein that affects the expression of multiple genes and operons in bacteria. Although the physiological purpose of Lrp-mediated gene regulation remains unclear, it has been suggested that it functions to coordinate cellular metabolism with the nutritional state of the environment. The results of gene expression profiles between otherwise isogenic lrp(+) and lrp(-) strains of Escherichia coli support this suggestion. The newly discovered Lrp-regulated genes reported here are involved either in small molecule or macromolecule synthesis or degradation, or in small molecule transport and environmental stress responses. Although many of these regulatory effects are direct, others are indirect consequences of Lrp-mediated changes in the expression levels of other global regulatory proteins. Because computational methods to analyze and interpret high dimensional DNA microarray data are still an early stage, much of the emphasis of this work is directed toward the development of methods to identify differentially expressed genes with a high level of confidence. In particular, we describe a Bayesian statistical framework for a posterior estimate of the standard deviation of gene measurements based on a limited number of replications. We also describe an algorithm to compute a posterior estimate of differential expression for each gene based on the experiment-wide global false positive and false negative level for a DNA microarray data set. This allows the experimenter to compute posterior probabilities of differential expression for each individual differential gene expression measurement.

  17. Human sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1a contributes significantly to hepatic lipogenic gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitter, Andreas; Nüssler, Andreas K; Thasler, Wolfgang E; Klein, Kathrin; Zanger, Ulrich M; Schwab, Matthias; Burk, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) 1, the master regulator of lipogenesis, was shown to be associated with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, which is attributed to its major isoform SREBP1c. Based on studies in mice, the minor isoform SREBP1a is regarded as negligible for hepatic lipogenesis. This study aims to elucidate the expression and functional role of SREBP1a in human liver. mRNA expression of both isoforms was quantified in cohorts of human livers and primary human hepatocytes. Hepatocytes were treated with PF-429242 to inhibit the proteolytic activation of SREBP precursor protein. SREBP1a-specifc and pan-SREBP1 knock-down were performed by transfection of respective siRNAs. Lipogenic SREBP-target gene expression was analyzed by real-time RT-PCR. In human liver, SREBP1a accounts for up to half of the total SREBP1 pool. Treatment with PF-429242 indicated SREBP-dependent auto-regulation of SREBP1a, which however was much weaker than of SREBP1c. SREBP1a-specifc knock-down also reduced significantly the expression of SREBP1c and of SREBP-target genes. Regarding most SREBP-target genes, simultaneous knock-down of both isoforms resulted in effects of only similar extent as SREBP1a-specific knock-down. We here showed that SREBP1a is significantly contributing to the human hepatic SREBP1 pool and has a share in human hepatic lipogenic gene expression. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Human Sterol Regulatory Element-Binding Protein 1a Contributes Significantly to Hepatic Lipogenic Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Bitter

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP 1, the master regulator of lipogenesis, was shown to be associated with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, which is attributed to its major isoform SREBP1c. Based on studies in mice, the minor isoform SREBP1a is regarded as negligible for hepatic lipogenesis. This study aims to elucidate the expression and functional role of SREBP1a in human liver. Methods: mRNA expression of both isoforms was quantified in cohorts of human livers and primary human hepatocytes. Hepatocytes were treated with PF-429242 to inhibit the proteolytic activation of SREBP precursor protein. SREBP1a-specifc and pan-SREBP1 knock-down were performed by transfection of respective siRNAs. Lipogenic SREBP-target gene expression was analyzed by real-time RT-PCR. Results: In human liver, SREBP1a accounts for up to half of the total SREBP1 pool. Treatment with PF-429242 indicated SREBP-dependent auto-regulation of SREBP1a, which however was much weaker than of SREBP1c. SREBP1a-specifc knock-down also reduced significantly the expression of SREBP1c and of SREBP-target genes. Regarding most SREBP-target genes, simultaneous knock-down of both isoforms resulted in effects of only similar extent as SREBP1a-specific knock-down. Conclusion: We here showed that SREBP1a is significantly contributing to the human hepatic SREBP1 pool and has a share in human hepatic lipogenic gene expression.

  19. Regulatory roles of microtubule-associated proteins in neuronal morphogenesis. Involvement of the extracellular matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramírez G.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available As a result of recent investigations, the cytoskeleton can be viewed as a cytoplasmic system of interconnected filaments with three major integrative levels: self-assembling macromolecules, filamentous polymers, e.g., microtubules, intermediate filaments and actin filaments, and supramolecular structures formed by bundles of these filaments or networks resulting from cross-bridges between these major cytoskeletal polymers. The organization of this biological structure appears to be sensitive to fine spatially and temporally dependent regulatory signals. In differentiating neurons, regulation of cytoskeleton organization is particularly relevant, and the microtubule-associated protein (MAP tau appears to play roles in the extension of large neuritic processes and axons as well as in the stabilization of microtubular polymers along these processes. Within this context, tau is directly involved in defining neuronal polarity as well as in the generation of neuronal growth cones. There is increasing evidence that elements of the extracellular matrix contribute to the control of cytoskeleton organization in differentiating neurons, and that these regulations could be mediated by changes in MAP activity. In this brief review, we discuss the possible roles of tau in mediating the effects of extracellular matrix components on the internal cytoskeletal arrays and its organization in growing neurons.

  20. Cross-phosphorylation of bacterial serine/threonine and tyrosine protein kinases on key regulatory residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei eShi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria possess protein serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases which resemble eukaryal kinases in their capacity to phosphorylate multiple substrates. We hypothesized that the analogy might extend further, and bacterial kinases may also undergo mutual phosphorylation and activation, which is currently considered as a hallmark of eukaryal kinase networks. In order to test this hypothesis, we explored the capacity of all members of four different classes of serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases present in the firmicute model organism Bacillus subtilis to phosphorylate each other in vitro and interact with each other in vivo. The interactomics data suggested a high degree of connectivity among all types of kinases, while phosphorylation assays revealed equally wide-spread cross-phosphorylation events. Our findings suggest that the Hanks-type kinases PrkC, PrkD and YabT exhibit the highest capacity to phosphorylate other B. subtilis kinases, while the BY-kinase PtkA and the two-component-like kinases RsbW and SpoIIAB show the highest propensity to be phosphorylated by other kinases. Analysis of phosphorylated residues on several selected recipient kinases suggests that most cross-phosphorylation events concern key regulatory residues. Therefore, cross-phosphorylation events are very likely to influence the capacity of recipient kinases to phosphorylate substrates downstream in the signal transduction cascade. We therefore conclude that bacterial serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases probably engage in a network-type behavior previously described only in eukaryal cells.

  1. Sequence-selective DNA binding to the regulatory subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J C; Wang, J H

    1989-06-15

    The fluorescence of Trp-226 in the regulatory subunit of bovine type II cAMP-dependent protein kinase is unaffected by the binding of cAMP, but is quenched by the binding of 2'-dansyl-cAMP (DNS-cAMP). Up to 67% of the fluorescence of Trp-226 can be quenched by resonant energy transfer to the DNS-cAMP bound to the first site, and 96% of the fluorescence can be quenched by saturating both sites with DNS-cAMP. The observed efficiencies of energy transfer gave a distance of 16 A between Trp-226 and the DNS-cAMP bound at the first site and a distance of 12.7 A between Trp-226 and the DNS-cAMP bound at second site. The fluorescence of Trp-226 was suppressed by incubation of RII with the self-complementary octanucleotide TGACGTCA (CRE) due to binding of the oligonucleotide to RII. A detailed study of the binding equilibrium showed that each RII(cAMP)2 molecule binds 1 molecule of CRE with Kd = 80 nM. The corresponding Kd value for cAMP-depleted RII was found to be 25-fold higher. RII was also found to bind randomly selected DNA fragments with an average Kd value much higher than that of CRE. These observations show for the first time that the binding of oligonucleotide to RII is cAMP-enhanced and sequence-selective.

  2. Nickel decreases cellular iron level and converts cytosolic aconitase to iron-regulatory protein 1 in A549 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Haobin; Davidson, Todd; Singleton, Steven; Garrick, Michael D.; Costa, Max

    2005-01-01

    Nickel (Ni) compounds are well-established carcinogens and are known to initiate a hypoxic response in cells via the stabilization and transactivation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α). This change may be the consequence of nickel's interference with the function of several Fe(II)-dependent enzymes. In this study, the effects of soluble nickel exposure on cellular iron homeostasis were investigated. Nickel treatment decreased both mitochondrial and cytosolic aconitase (c-aconitase) activity in A549 cells. Cytosolic aconitase was converted to iron-regulatory protein 1, a form critical for the regulation of cellular iron homeostasis. The increased activity of iron-regulatory protein 1 after nickel exposure stabilized and increased transferrin receptor (Tfr) mRNA and antagonized the iron-induced ferritin light chain protein synthesis. The decrease of aconitase activity after nickel treatment reflected neither direct interference with aconitase function nor obstruction of [4Fe-4S] cluster reconstitution by nickel. Exposure of A549 cells to soluble nickel decreased total cellular iron by about 40%, a decrease that likely caused the observed decrease in aconitase activity and the increase of iron-regulatory protein 1 activity. Iron treatment reversed the effect of nickel on cytosolic aconitase and iron-regulatory protein 1. To assess the mechanism for the observed effects, human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells over expressing divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1) were compared to A549 cells expressing only endogenous transporters for inhibition of iron uptake by nickel. The inhibition data suggest that nickel can enter via DMT1 and compete with iron for entry into the cell. This disturbance of cellular iron homeostasis by nickel may have a great impact on the ability of the cell to regulate a variety of cell functions, as well as create a state of hypoxia in cells under normal oxygen tension. These effects may be very important in how nickel exerts phenotypic

  3. The Prognostic Impact of Some Cell Cycle Regulatory Proteins in Egyptian Breast Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KAMEL, A.; Mokhtar, N.; Elshaknkiry, N.; Yassin, D.; Elnahass, Y.; Zakarya, O.; Elbasmy, A.; Elmetenawy, W.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The particular goal of this work is to study some cell cycle regulatory proteins and their potential impact on prognosis of breast cancer; p53, cyclin D 1 and p27 are potential effectors being the major contributors to the control of the restriction (R) check point of the cell cycle. We also aimed to evaluate different techniques used to detect these cell cycle proteins. Material and Methods: Forty five breast cancer patients as well as 10 controls with non malignant pathology were assessed for cell cycle regulators each by 2 different techniques; p53 was assessed by enzyme immunoassay (EJA) and immunohistochemistry (lHC), cyclin D1 by Western Blotting (WB) and IHC and p27 by WB and me. The cut-off was calculated as the mean of the normal controls +2 SD. Patients were followed up for 4 years and their laboratory data were correlated with different clinical parameters and with other studied regulators. Results: Eighty seven percent of cases (39/45) were positive for p53 by EIA with a range from 20 to 4300, and a mean of 464±97 I pg/mg protein. By mc, 80% (24/30) of the cases showed varying degrees of positivity. Using WB, cyclin D 1 showed high expression levels above cut off values in 69% of patients (31/45) and in 67% (20/30) by me. The corresponding positive figures for p27 were 82% (37/45) and 73% (22/30) using the two techniques, respectively. No significant association was found between p53, cyclin 01 and p27 on one side and different clinical parameters as lymph node status, tumor size or presence of distant metastases on the other side. Survival was poor in patients with high p53 expression. Cyclin D1 positive cases showed comparable survival with negative cases, whereas high p27 levels favored a longer disease free survival. Conclusions: Techniques more suitable for assessment of each of these markers in our consideration were EIA for p53, WB for cyclin D1 and IHC for p27. Moreover, this study demonstrated that these markers were relevant to the

  4. Successful immunotherapy of autoimmune cholangitis by adoptive transfer of forkhead box protein 3+ regulatory T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, H; Zhang, W; Yang, G-X; Ando, Y; Tomiyama, T; Tsuneyama, K; Leung, P; Coppel, R L; Ansari, A A; Lian, Z X; Ridgway, W M; Joh, T; Gershwin, M E

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) has lagged behind that of other autoimmune diseases. In this study we have addressed the potential utility of immunotherapy using regulatory T cells (Treg) to treat murine autoimmune cholangitis. In particular, we have taken advantage of our ability to produce portal inflammation and bile duct cell loss by transfer of CD8+ T cells from the dominant negative form of transforming growth factor beta receptor type II (dnTGF-βRII) mice to recombination-activating gene (Rag)1–/– recipients. We then used this robust established adoptive transfer system and co-transferred CD8+ T cells from dnTGF-βRII mice with either C57BL/6 or dnTGF-βRII forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3+) T cells. Recipient mice were monitored for histology, including portal inflammation and intralobular biliary cell damage, and also included a study of the phenotypical changes in recipient lymphoid populations and local and systemic cytokine production. Importantly, we report herein that adoptive transfer of Treg from C57BL/6 but not dnTGF-βRII mice significantly reduced the pathology of autoimmune cholangitis, including decreased portal inflammation and bile duct damage as well as down-regulation of the secondary inflammatory response. Further, to define the mechanism of action that explains the differential ability of C57BL/6 Treg versus dnTGF-βRII Treg on the ability to down-regulate autoimmune cholangitis, we noted significant differential expression of glycoprotein A repetitions predominant (GARP), CD73, CD101 and CD103 and a functionally significant increase in interleukin (IL)-10 in Treg from C57BL/6 compared to dnTGF-βRII mice. Our data reflect the therapeutic potential of wild-type CD4+ FoxP3+ Treg in reducing the excessive T cell responses of autoimmune cholangitis, which has significance for the potential immunotherapy of PBC. PMID:25041369

  5. Successful immunotherapy of autoimmune cholangitis by adoptive transfer of forkhead box protein 3(+) regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, H; Zhang, W; Yang, G-X; Ando, Y; Tomiyama, T; Tsuneyama, K; Leung, P; Coppel, R L; Ansari, A A; Lian, Z X; Ridgway, W M; Joh, T; Gershwin, M E

    2014-11-01

    Treatment of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) has lagged behind that of other autoimmune diseases. In this study we have addressed the potential utility of immunotherapy using regulatory T cells (Treg ) to treat murine autoimmune cholangitis. In particular, we have taken advantage of our ability to produce portal inflammation and bile duct cell loss by transfer of CD8(+) T cells from the dominant negative form of transforming growth factor beta receptor type II (dnTGF-βRII) mice to recombination-activating gene (Rag)1(-/-) recipients. We then used this robust established adoptive transfer system and co-transferred CD8(+) T cells from dnTGF-βRII mice with either C57BL/6 or dnTGF-βRII forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3(+) ) T cells. Recipient mice were monitored for histology, including portal inflammation and intralobular biliary cell damage, and also included a study of the phenotypical changes in recipient lymphoid populations and local and systemic cytokine production. Importantly, we report herein that adoptive transfer of Treg from C57BL/6 but not dnTGF-βRII mice significantly reduced the pathology of autoimmune cholangitis, including decreased portal inflammation and bile duct damage as well as down-regulation of the secondary inflammatory response. Further, to define the mechanism of action that explains the differential ability of C57BL/6 Treg versus dnTGF-βRII Treg on the ability to down-regulate autoimmune cholangitis, we noted significant differential expression of glycoprotein A repetitions predominant (GARP), CD73, CD101 and CD103 and a functionally significant increase in interleukin (IL)-10 in Treg from C57BL/6 compared to dnTGF-βRII mice. Our data reflect the therapeutic potential of wild-type CD4(+) FoxP3(+) Treg in reducing the excessive T cell responses of autoimmune cholangitis, which has significance for the potential immunotherapy of PBC. © 2014 British Society for Immunology.

  6. Iron-regulatory proteins secure iron availability in cardiomyocytes to prevent heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Saba; Wang, Yong; Galy, Bruno; Korf-Klingebiel, Mortimer; Hirsch, Valentin; Baru, Abdul M; Rostami, Fatemeh; Reboll, Marc R; Heineke, Jörg; Flögel, Ulrich; Groos, Stephanie; Renner, André; Toischer, Karl; Zimmermann, Fabian; Engeli, Stefan; Jordan, Jens; Bauersachs, Johann; Hentze, Matthias W; Wollert, Kai C; Kempf, Tibor

    2017-02-01

    Iron deficiency (ID) is associated with adverse outcomes in heart failure (HF) but the underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood. Intracellular iron availability is secured by two mRNA-binding iron-regulatory proteins (IRPs), IRP1 and IRP2. We generated mice with a cardiomyocyte-targeted deletion of Irp1 and Irp2 to explore the functional implications of ID in the heart independent of systemic ID and anaemia. Iron content in cardiomyocytes was reduced in Irp-targeted mice. The animals were not anaemic and did not show a phenotype under baseline conditions. Irp-targeted mice, however, were unable to increase left ventricular (LV) systolic function in response to an acute dobutamine challenge. After myocardial infarction, Irp-targeted mice developed more severe LV dysfunction with increased HF mortality. Mechanistically, the activity of the iron-sulphur cluster-containing complex I of the mitochondrial electron transport chain was reduced in left ventricles from Irp-targeted mice. As demonstrated by extracellular flux analysis in vitro, mitochondrial respiration was preserved at baseline but failed to increase in response to dobutamine in Irp-targeted cardiomyocytes. As shown by 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy in vivo, LV phosphocreatine/ATP ratio declined during dobutamine stress in Irp-targeted mice but remained stable in control mice. Intravenous injection of ferric carboxymaltose replenished cardiac iron stores, restored mitochondrial respiratory capacity and inotropic reserve, and attenuated adverse remodelling after myocardial infarction in Irp-targeted mice but not in control mice. As shown by electrophoretic mobility shift assays, IRP activity was significantly reduced in LV tissue samples from patients with advanced HF and reduced LV tissue iron content. ID in cardiomyocytes impairs mitochondrial respiration and adaptation to acute and chronic increases in workload. Iron supplementation restores cardiac energy reserve and function in iron

  7. Involvement of the iron regulatory protein from Eisenia andrei earthworms in the regulation of cellular iron homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Procházková

    Full Text Available Iron homeostasis in cells is regulated by iron regulatory proteins (IRPs that exist in different organisms. IRPs are cytosolic proteins that bind to iron-responsive elements (IREs of the 5'- or 3'-untranslated regions (UTR of mRNAs that encode many proteins involved in iron metabolism. In this study, we have cloned and described a new regulatory protein belonging to the family of IRPs from the earthworm Eisenia andrei (EaIRP. The earthworm IRE site in 5'-UTR of ferritin mRNA most likely folds into a secondary structure that differs from the conventional IRE structures of ferritin due to the absence of a typically unpaired cytosine that participates in protein binding. Prepared recombinant EaIRP and proteins from mammalian liver extracts are able to bind both mammalian and Eisenia IRE structures of ferritin mRNA, although the affinity of the rEaIRP/Eisenia IRE structure is rather low. This result suggests the possible contribution of a conventional IRE structure. When IRP is supplemented with a Fe-S cluster, it can function as a cytosolic aconitase. Cellular cytosolic and mitochondrial fractions, as well as recombinant EaIRP, exhibit aconitase activity that can be abolished by the action of oxygen radicals. The highest expression of EaIRP was detected in parts of the digestive tract. We can assume that earthworms may possess an IRE/IRP regulatory network as a potential mechanism for maintaining cellular iron homeostasis, although the aconitase function of EaIRP is most likely more relevant.

  8. Involvement of the Iron Regulatory Protein from Eisenia andrei Earthworms in the Regulation of Cellular Iron Homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procházková, Petra; Škanta, František; Roubalová, Radka; Šilerová, Marcela; Dvořák, Jiří; Bilej, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Iron homeostasis in cells is regulated by iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) that exist in different organisms. IRPs are cytosolic proteins that bind to iron-responsive elements (IREs) of the 5′- or 3′-untranslated regions (UTR) of mRNAs that encode many proteins involved in iron metabolism. In this study, we have cloned and described a new regulatory protein belonging to the family of IRPs from the earthworm Eisenia andrei (EaIRP). The earthworm IRE site in 5′-UTR of ferritin mRNA most likely folds into a secondary structure that differs from the conventional IRE structures of ferritin due to the absence of a typically unpaired cytosine that participates in protein binding. Prepared recombinant EaIRP and proteins from mammalian liver extracts are able to bind both mammalian and Eisenia IRE structures of ferritin mRNA, although the affinity of the rEaIRP/Eisenia IRE structure is rather low. This result suggests the possible contribution of a conventional IRE structure. When IRP is supplemented with a Fe-S cluster, it can function as a cytosolic aconitase. Cellular cytosolic and mitochondrial fractions, as well as recombinant EaIRP, exhibit aconitase activity that can be abolished by the action of oxygen radicals. The highest expression of EaIRP was detected in parts of the digestive tract. We can assume that earthworms may possess an IRE/IRP regulatory network as a potential mechanism for maintaining cellular iron homeostasis, although the aconitase function of EaIRP is most likely more relevant. PMID:25279857

  9. Inhibitors Alter the Stochasticity of Regulatory Proteins to Force Cells to Switch to the Other State in the Bistable System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhang, Wun-Sin; Lo, Shih-Chiang; Yeh, Chen-Chao; Shu, Che-Chi

    2017-06-30

    The cellular behaviors under the control of genetic circuits are subject to stochastic fluctuations, or noise. The stochasticity in gene regulation, far from a nuisance, has been gradually appreciated for its unusual function in cellular activities. In this work, with Chemical Master Equation (CME), we discovered that the addition of inhibitors altered the stochasticity of regulatory proteins. For a bistable system of a mutually inhibitory network, such a change of noise led to the migration of cells in the bimodal distribution. We proposed that the consumption of regulatory protein caused by the addition of inhibitor is not the only reason for pushing cells to the specific state; the change of the intracellular stochasticity is also the main cause for the redistribution. For the level of the inhibitor capable of driving 99% of cells, if there is no consumption of regulatory protein, 88% of cells were guided to the specific state. It implied that cells were pushed, by the inhibitor, to the specific state due to the change of stochasticity.

  10. Cross regulation between Candida albicans catalytic and regulatory subunits of protein kinase A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacometti, Romina; Kronberg, Florencia; Biondi, Ricardo M; Hernández, Alejandra I; Passeron, Susana

    2012-01-01

    In the pathogen Candida albicans protein kinase A (PKA) catalytic subunit is encoded by two genes TPK1 and TPK2 and the regulatory subunit by one gene, BCY1. PKA mediates several cellular processes such as cell cycle regulation and the yeast to hyphae transition, a key factor for C. albicans virulence. The catalytic isoforms Tpk1p and Tpk2p share redundant functions in vegetative growth and hyphal development, though they differentially regulate glycogen metabolism, the stress response pathway and pseudohyphal formation. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae it was earlier reported that BCY1 overexpression not only increased the amount of TPK3 mRNA but also its catalytic activity. In C. albicans a significant decrease in Bcy1p expression levels was already observed in tpk2Δ null strains. In this work we showed that the upregulation in Bcy1p expression was observed in a set of strains having a TPK1 or TPK2 allele reintegrated in its own locus, as well as in strains expressing the TPKs under the control of the constitutive ACT1 promoter. To confirm the cross regulation event between Bcy1p and Tpkp expression we generated a mutant strain with the lowest PKA activity carrying one TPK1 and a unique BCY1 allele with the aim to obtain two derived strains in which BCY1 or TPK1 were placed under their own promoters inserted in the RPS10 neutral locus. We found that placing one copy of BCY1 upregulated the levels of Tpk1p and its catalytic activity; while TPK1 insertion led to an increase in BCY1 mRNA, Bcy1p and in a high cAMP binding activity. Our results suggest that C. albicans cells were able to compensate for the increased levels of either Tpk1p or Tpk2p subunits with a corresponding elevation of Bcy1 protein levels and vice versa, implying a tightly regulated mechanism to balance holoenzyme formation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Iron-regulatory proteins DmdR1 and DmdR2 of Streptomyces coelicolor form two different DNA-protein complexes with iron boxes.

    OpenAIRE

    Flores, Francisco J; Martín, Juan F

    2004-01-01

    In high G+C Gram-positive bacteria, the control of expression of genes involved in iron metabolism is exerted by a DmdR [divalent (bivalent) metal-dependent regulatory protein] in the presence of Fe2+ or other bivalent ions. The dmdR1 and dmdR2 genes of Streptomyces coelicolor were overexpressed in Escherichia coli and the DmdR1 and DmdR2 proteins were purified to homogeneity. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assays showed that both DmdR1 and DmdR2 bind to the 19-nt tox and desA iron boxes form...

  12. Regulation of Src trafficking and activation by the endocytic regulatory proteins MICAL-L1 and EHD1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinecke, James B.; Katafiasz, Dawn; Naslavsky, Naava; Caplan, Steve

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Localization of the non-receptor tyrosine kinase Src to the cell periphery is required for its activation and to mediate focal adhesion turnover, cell spreading and migration. Inactive Src localizes to a perinuclear compartment and the movement of Src to the plasma membrane is mediated by endocytic transport. However, the precise pathways and regulatory proteins that are responsible for SRC transport are incompletely understood. Here, we demonstrate that Src partially colocalizes with the endocytic regulatory protein MICAL-L1 (molecule interacting with CasL-like protein 1) in mammalian cells. Furthermore, MICAL-L1 is required for growth-factor- and integrin-induced Src activation and transport to the cell periphery in HeLa cells and human fibroblasts. Accordingly, MICAL-L1 depletion impairs focal adhesion turnover, cell spreading and cell migration. Interestingly, we find that the MICAL-L1 interaction partner EHD1 (EH domain-containing protein 1) is also required for Src activation and transport. Moreover, the MICAL-L1-mediated recruitment of EHD1 to Src-containing recycling endosomes is required for the release of Src from the perinuclear endocytic recycling compartment in response to growth factor stimulation. Our study sheds new light on the mechanism by which Src is transported to the plasma membrane and activated, and provides a new function for MICAL-L1 and EHD1 in the regulation of intracellular non-receptor tyrosine kinases. PMID:24481818

  13. Partitioning of genetic variation between regulatory and coding gene segments: the predominance of software variation in genes encoding introvert proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchison, A

    1997-01-01

    In considering genetic variation in eukaryotes, a fundamental distinction can be made between variation in regulatory (software) and coding (hardware) gene segments. For quantitative traits the bulk of variation, particularly that near the population mean, appears to reside in regulatory segments. The main exceptions to this rule concern proteins which handle extrinsic substances, here termed extrovert proteins. The immune system includes an unusually large proportion of this exceptional category, but even so its chief source of variation may well be polymorphism in regulatory gene segments. The main evidence for this view emerges from genome scanning for quantitative trait loci (QTL), which in the case of the immune system points to a major contribution of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes. Further support comes from sequencing of major histocompatibility complex (Mhc) class II promoters, where a high level of polymorphism has been detected. These Mhc promoters appear to act, in part at least, by gating the back-signal from T cells into antigen-presenting cells. Both these forms of polymorphism are likely to be sustained by the need for flexibility in the immune response. Future work on promoter polymorphism is likely to benefit from the input from genome informatics.

  14. Lrp, a major regulatory protein in Escherichia coli, bends DNA and can organize the assembly of a higher-order nucleoprotein structure.

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Q; Calvo, J M

    1993-01-01

    Lrp (Leucine-responsive regulatory protein) is a global regulatory protein that controls the expression of many operons in Escherichia coli. One of those operons, ilvIH, contains six Lrp binding sites located within a several hundred base pair region upstream of the promoter region. Analysis of the binding of Lrp to a set of circularly permuted DNA fragments from this region indicates that Lrp induces DNA bending. The results of DNase I footprinting experiments suggest that Lrp binding to thi...

  15. Regulatory pathways for ATP-binding cassette transport proteins in kidney proximal tubules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Masereeuw, R.; Russel, F.G.M.

    2012-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette transport proteins (ABC transporters) represent important determinants of drug excretion. Protective or excretory tissues where these transporters mediate substrate efflux include the kidney proximal tubule. Regulation of the transport proteins in this tissue requires

  16. Cell Cycle and Apoptosis Regulatory Protein (CARP)-1 is Expressed inOsteoblasts and Regulated by PTH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Sonali; Mahalingam, Chandrika D.; Das, Varsha; Jamal, Shazia; Levi, Edi; Rishi, Arun K.; Datta, Nabanita S.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •CARP-1 is identified for the first time in bone cells. •PTH downregulates CARP-1 expression in differentiated osteoblasts. •PTH displaces CARP-1 from nucleus to the cytoplasm in differentiated osteoblasts. •Downregulation of CARP-1 by PTH involves PKA, PKC and P-p38 MAPK pathways. -- Abstract: Bone mass is dependent on osteoblast proliferation, differentiation and life-span of osteoblasts. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) controls osteoblast cell cycle regulatory proteins and suppresses mature osteoblasts apoptosis. Intermittent administration of PTH increases bone mass but the mechanism of action are complex and incompletely understood. Cell Cycle and Apoptosis Regulatory Protein (CARP)-1 (aka CCAR1) is a novel transducer of signaling by diverse agents including cell growth and differentiation factors. To gain further insight into the molecular mechanism, we investigated involvement of CARP-1 in PTH signaling in osteoblasts. Immunostaining studies revealed presence of CARP-1 in osteoblasts and osteocytes, while a minimal to absent levels were noted in the chondrocytes of femora from 10 to 12-week old mice. Treatment of 7-day differentiated MC3T3-E1 clone-4 (MC-4) mouse osteoblastic cells and primary calvarial osteoblasts with PTH for 30 min to 5 h followed by Western blot analysis showed 2- to 3-fold down-regulation of CARP-1 protein expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner compared to the respective vehicle treated control cells. H-89, a Protein Kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, suppressed PTH action on CARP-1 protein expression indicating PKA-dependent mechanism. PMA, a Protein Kinase C (PKC) agonist, mimicked PTH action, and the PKC inhibitor, GF109203X, partially blocked PTH-dependent downregulation of CARP-1, implying involvement of PKC. U0126, a Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) Kinase (MEK) inhibitor, failed to interfere with CARP-1 suppression by PTH. In contrast, SB203580, p38 inhibitor, attenuated PTH down-regulation of CARP-1

  17. Cell Cycle and Apoptosis Regulatory Protein (CARP)-1 is Expressed inOsteoblasts and Regulated by PTH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Sonali; Mahalingam, Chandrika D.; Das, Varsha [Department of Internal Medicine/Endocrinology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Jamal, Shazia [Department of Oncology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Levi, Edi [Department of Oncology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Department of Pathology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Rishi, Arun K. [Department of Oncology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); VA Medical Center, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Datta, Nabanita S., E-mail: ndatta@med.wayne.edu [Department of Internal Medicine/Endocrinology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Cardiovascular Research Institute, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States)

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •CARP-1 is identified for the first time in bone cells. •PTH downregulates CARP-1 expression in differentiated osteoblasts. •PTH displaces CARP-1 from nucleus to the cytoplasm in differentiated osteoblasts. •Downregulation of CARP-1 by PTH involves PKA, PKC and P-p38 MAPK pathways. -- Abstract: Bone mass is dependent on osteoblast proliferation, differentiation and life-span of osteoblasts. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) controls osteoblast cell cycle regulatory proteins and suppresses mature osteoblasts apoptosis. Intermittent administration of PTH increases bone mass but the mechanism of action are complex and incompletely understood. Cell Cycle and Apoptosis Regulatory Protein (CARP)-1 (aka CCAR1) is a novel transducer of signaling by diverse agents including cell growth and differentiation factors. To gain further insight into the molecular mechanism, we investigated involvement of CARP-1 in PTH signaling in osteoblasts. Immunostaining studies revealed presence of CARP-1 in osteoblasts and osteocytes, while a minimal to absent levels were noted in the chondrocytes of femora from 10 to 12-week old mice. Treatment of 7-day differentiated MC3T3-E1 clone-4 (MC-4) mouse osteoblastic cells and primary calvarial osteoblasts with PTH for 30 min to 5 h followed by Western blot analysis showed 2- to 3-fold down-regulation of CARP-1 protein expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner compared to the respective vehicle treated control cells. H-89, a Protein Kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, suppressed PTH action on CARP-1 protein expression indicating PKA-dependent mechanism. PMA, a Protein Kinase C (PKC) agonist, mimicked PTH action, and the PKC inhibitor, GF109203X, partially blocked PTH-dependent downregulation of CARP-1, implying involvement of PKC. U0126, a Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) Kinase (MEK) inhibitor, failed to interfere with CARP-1 suppression by PTH. In contrast, SB203580, p38 inhibitor, attenuated PTH down-regulation of CARP-1

  18. Identification of Egg White Proteins and Divergence in the Regulatory Region of the Ovalbumin Gene in Avians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jindong; Hu, Jianhong; Chen, Li; Liu, Yali; Xu, Xiaoqin; He, Jun; Shen, Jianliang; Lu, Lizhi

    2017-01-01

    Egg white proteins play an important role in avian reproductive systems and are an ideal resource for bioreactor construction. In this study, 1D electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF-MS were performed to analyze egg white proteins in four species. In total, 18, 11, 28, and 13 proteins were identified in the egg whites of the chicken, duck, goose, and pigeon, respectively. Egg white proteins in chickens have been studied previously; therefore, we focused on the proteins in goose and duck egg whites. Based on the amino acid sequence analysis and a comparison of the unique peptides, high similarity was observed between the goose and duck egg whites. Diversity in the regulatory region of the ovalbumin gene explained the higher ovalbumin expression in the duck and goose than in the chicken. These data clarify the evolutionary processes underlying to the unique peptides contributing to the differential expression of ovalbumin in avians. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  19. Using BAC transgenesis in zebrafish to identify regulatory sequences of the amyloid precursor protein gene in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakes Leighcraft A

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-coding DNA in and around the human Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP gene that is central to Alzheimer’s disease (AD shares little sequence similarity with that of appb in zebrafish. Identifying DNA domains regulating expression of the gene in such situations becomes a challenge. Taking advantage of the zebrafish system that allows rapid functional analyses of gene regulatory sequences, we previously showed that two discontinuous DNA domains in zebrafish appb are important for expression of the gene in neurons: an enhancer in intron 1 and sequences 28–31 kb upstream of the gene. Here we identify the putative transcription factor binding sites responsible for this distal cis-acting regulation, and use that information to identify a regulatory region of the human APP gene. Results Functional analyses of intron 1 enhancer mutations in enhancer-trap BACs expressed as transgenes in zebrafish identified putative binding sites of two known transcription factor proteins, E4BP4/ NFIL3 and Forkhead, to be required for expression of appb. A cluster of three E4BP4 sites at −31 kb is also shown to be essential for neuron-specific expression, suggesting that the dependence of expression on upstream sequences is mediated by these E4BP4 sites. E4BP4/ NFIL3 and XFD1 sites in the intron enhancer and E4BP4/ NFIL3 sites at −31 kb specifically and efficiently bind the corresponding zebrafish proteins in vitro. These sites are statistically over-represented in both the zebrafish appb and the human APP genes, although their locations are different. Remarkably, a cluster of four E4BP4 sites in intron 4 of human APP exists in actively transcribing chromatin in a human neuroblastoma cell-line, SHSY5Y, expressing APP as shown using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP experiments. Thus although the two genes share little sequence conservation, they appear to share the same regulatory logic and are regulated by a similar set of transcription

  20. Using BAC transgenesis in zebrafish to identify regulatory sequences of the amyloid precursor protein gene in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakes, Leighcraft A; Du, Hansen; Wolf, Hope M; Hatcher, Charles; Norford, Derek C; Precht, Patricia; Sen, Ranjan; Chatterjee, Pradeep K

    2012-09-04

    Non-coding DNA in and around the human Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) gene that is central to Alzheimer's disease (AD) shares little sequence similarity with that of appb in zebrafish. Identifying DNA domains regulating expression of the gene in such situations becomes a challenge. Taking advantage of the zebrafish system that allows rapid functional analyses of gene regulatory sequences, we previously showed that two discontinuous DNA domains in zebrafish appb are important for expression of the gene in neurons: an enhancer in intron 1 and sequences 28-31 kb upstream of the gene. Here we identify the putative transcription factor binding sites responsible for this distal cis-acting regulation, and use that information to identify a regulatory region of the human APP gene. Functional analyses of intron 1 enhancer mutations in enhancer-trap BACs expressed as transgenes in zebrafish identified putative binding sites of two known transcription factor proteins, E4BP4/ NFIL3 and Forkhead, to be required for expression of appb. A cluster of three E4BP4 sites at -31 kb is also shown to be essential for neuron-specific expression, suggesting that the dependence of expression on upstream sequences is mediated by these E4BP4 sites. E4BP4/ NFIL3 and XFD1 sites in the intron enhancer and E4BP4/ NFIL3 sites at -31 kb specifically and efficiently bind the corresponding zebrafish proteins in vitro. These sites are statistically over-represented in both the zebrafish appb and the human APP genes, although their locations are different. Remarkably, a cluster of four E4BP4 sites in intron 4 of human APP exists in actively transcribing chromatin in a human neuroblastoma cell-line, SHSY5Y, expressing APP as shown using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) experiments. Thus although the two genes share little sequence conservation, they appear to share the same regulatory logic and are regulated by a similar set of transcription factors. The results suggest that the clock

  1. Phosphorylation of the regulatory beta-subunit of protein kinase CK2 by checkpoint kinase Chk1: identification of the in vitro CK2beta phosphorylation site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Lars P; Larsen, Martin Røssel; Højrup, Peter

    2004-01-01

    The regulatory beta-subunit of protein kinase CK2 mediates the formation of the CK2 tetrameric form and it has functions independent of CK2 catalytic subunit through interaction with several intracellular proteins. Recently, we have shown that CK2beta associates with the human checkpoint kinase Chk...

  2. Mapping of protein phosphatase-6 association with its SAPS domain regulatory subunit using a model of helical repeats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edelson Jessica R

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Helical repeat motifs are common among regulatory subunits for type-1 and type-2A protein Ser/Thr phosphatases. Yeast Sit4 is a distinctive type-2A phosphatase that has dedicated regulatory subunits named Sit4-Associated Proteins (SAPS. These subunits are conserved, and three human SAPS-related proteins are known to associate with PP6 phosphatase, the Sit4 human homologue. Results Here we show that endogenous SAPS subunit PP6R3 co-precipitates half of PP6 in cell extracts, and the SAPS region of PP6R3 is sufficient for binding PP6. The SAPS domain of recombinant GST-PP6R3 is relatively resistant to trypsin despite having many K and R residues, and the purified SAPS domain (residues 1-513 has a circular dichroic spectrum indicative of mostly alpha helical structure. We used sequence alignments and 3D-jury methods to develop alternative models for the SAPS domain, based on available structures of other helical repeat proteins. The models were used to select sites for charge-reversal substitutions in the SAPS domain of PP6R3 that were tested by co-precipitation of endogenous PP6c with FLAG-tagged PP6R3 from mammalian cells. Mutations that reduced binding with PP6 suggest that SAPS adopts a helical repeat similar to the structure of p115 golgin, but distinct from the PP2A-A subunit. These mutations did not cause perturbations in overall PP6R3 conformation, evidenced by no change in kinetics or preferential cleavage by chymotrypsin. Conclusion The conserved SAPS domain in PP6R3 forms helical repeats similar to those in golgin p115 and negatively charged residues in interhelical loops are used to associate specifically with PP6. The results advance understanding of how distinctive helical repeat subunits uniquely distribute and differentially regulate closely related Ser/Thr phosphatases.

  3. FK506 BINDING PROTEIN 12 DEFICIENCY IN ENDOTHELIAL AND HEMATOPOIETIC CELLS DECREASES REGULATORY T CELLS AND CAUSES HYPERTENSION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiasson, Valorie L.; Talreja, Deepa; Young, Kristina J.; Chatterjee, Piyali; Banes-Berceli, Amy K.; Mitchell, Brett M.

    2011-01-01

    Patients treated with the immunosuppressive drug tacrolimus (FK506), which binds FK506 Binding Protein 12 (FKBP12) then inhibits the calcium-dependent phosphatase calcineurin, exhibit decreased regulatory T cells, endothelial dysfunction, and hypertension; however the mechanisms and whether altered T cell polarization play a role are unknown. Tacrolimus treatment of mice for 1 week dose-dependently decreased CD4+/FoxP3+ (regulatory T cells) and increased CD4+/IL-17+ (T helper 17) cells in the spleen, and caused endothelial dysfunction and hypertension. To determine the mechanisms, we crossed floxed FKBP12 mice with Tie2-Cre mice to generate offspring lacking FKBP12 in endothelial and hematopoietic cells only (FKBP12EC KO). Given FKBP12’s role in inhibiting TGF-β receptor activation, Tie2-Cre-mediated deletion of FKBP12 increased TGF-β receptor activation and SMAD2/3 signaling. FKBP12EC KO mice exhibited increased vascular expression of genes and proteins related to endothelial cell activation and inflammation. Serum levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-2, IL-6, IFNγ, IL-17a, IL-21, and IL-23 were increased significantly suggesting a Th17 cell-mediated inflammatory state. Flow cytometry studies confirmed this as splenocyte levels of CD4+/IL-17+ cells were increased significantly while CD4+/FoxP3+ cells were decreased in FKBP12EC KO mice. Furthermore, spleens from FKBP12EC KO mice showed increased STAT3 activation, involved in Th17 cell induction, and decreased STAT5 activation, involved in regulatory T cell induction. FKBP12EC KO mice also exhibited endothelial dysfunction and hypertension. These data suggest that tacrolimus, through its activation of TGF-β receptors in endothelial and hematopoietic cells, may cause endothelial dysfunction and hypertension by activating endothelial cells, reducing Tregs, and increasing Th17 cell polarization and inflammation. PMID:21518963

  4. Phosphorylation of protein kinase A (PKA) regulatory subunit RIα by protein kinase G (PKG) primes PKA for catalytic activity in cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haushalter, Kristofer J; Casteel, Darren E; Raffeiner, Andrea; Stefan, Eduard; Patel, Hemal H; Taylor, Susan S

    2018-03-23

    cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKAc) is a pivotal signaling protein in eukaryotic cells. PKAc has two well-characterized regulatory subunit proteins, RI and RII (each having α and β isoforms), which keep the PKAc catalytic subunit in a catalytically inactive state until activation by cAMP. Previous reports showed that the RIα regulatory subunit is phosphorylated by cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) in vitro , whereupon phosphorylated RIα no longer inhibits PKAc at normal (1:1) stoichiometric ratios. However, the significance of this phosphorylation as a mechanism for activating type I PKA holoenzymes has not been fully explored, especially in cellular systems. In this study, we further examined the potential of RIα phosphorylation to regulate physiologically relevant "desensitization" of PKAc activity. First, the serine 101 site of RIα was validated as a target of PKGIα phosphorylation both in vitro and in cells. Analysis of a phosphomimetic substitution in RIα (S101E) showed that modification of this site increases PKAc activity in vitro and in cells, even without cAMP stimulation. Numerous techniques were used to show that although Ser 101 variants of RIα can bind PKAc, the modified linker region of the S101E mutant has a significantly reduced affinity for the PKAc active site. These findings suggest that RIα phosphorylation may be a novel mechanism to circumvent the requirement of cAMP stimulus to activate type I PKA in cells. We have thus proposed a model to explain how PKG phosphorylation of RIα creates a "sensitized intermediate" state that is in effect primed to trigger PKAc activity.

  5. Endothelin and calciotropic hormones share regulatory pathways in multidrug resistance protein 2-mediated transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wever, K.E.; Masereeuw, R.; Miller, D.S.; Hang, X.M.; Flik, G.

    2007-01-01

    The kidney of vertebrates plays a key role in excretion of endogenous waste products and xenobiotics. Active secretion in the proximal nephron is at the basis of this excretion, mediated by carrier proteins including multidrug resistance protein 2 (Mrp2). We previously showed that Mrp2 function is

  6. Endothelin and calciotropic hormones share regulatory pathways in multidrug resistance protein 2-mediated transport.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wever, K.E.; Masereeuw, R.; Miller, D.S.; Hang, X.M.; Flik, G.

    2007-01-01

    The kidney of vertebrates plays a key role in excretion of endogenous waste products and xenobiotics. Active secretion in the proximal nephron is at the basis of this excretion, mediated by carrier proteins including multidrug resistance protein 2 (Mrp2). We previously showed that Mrp2 function is

  7. Endothelin and calciotropic hormones share regulatory pathways in multidrug resistance protein 2 (Mrp2-) mediated transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wever, K.E.; Masereeuw, R.; Miller, D.S.; Hang, X.M.; Flik, G.

    2006-01-01

    The kidney of vertebrates plays a key role in excretion of endogenous waste products and xenobiotics. Active secretion in the proximal nephron is at the basis of this excretion, mediated by carrier proteins including multidrug resistance protein 2 (Mrp2). We previously showed that Mrp2 function is

  8. Distinct responses of protein turnover regulatory pathways in hypoxia- and semistarvation-induced muscle atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Theije, Chiel C.; Langen, Ramon C. J.; Lamers, Wouter H.; Schols, Annemie M. W. J.; Köhler, S. Eleonore

    2013-01-01

    The balance of muscle protein synthesis and degradation determines skeletal muscle mass. We hypothesized that hypoxia-induced muscle atrophy and alterations in the regulation of muscle protein turnover include a hypoxia-specific component, in addition to the observed effects of reduction in food

  9. Guanine nucleotide regulatory protein co-purifies with the D2-dopamine receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senogles, S.E.; Caron, M.G.

    1986-01-01

    The D 2 -dopamine receptor from bovine anterior pituitary was purified ∼1000 fold by affinity chromatography on CMOS-Sepharose. Reconstitution of the affinity-purified receptor into phospholipid vesicles revealed the presence of high and low affinity agonist sites as detected by N-n-propylnorapomorphine (NPA) competition experiments with 3 H-spiperone. High affinity agonist binding could be converted to the low affinity form by guanine nucleotides, indicating the presence of an endogenous guanine nucleotide binding protein (N protein) in the affinity-purified D 2 receptor preparations. Furthermore, this preparation contained an agonist-sensitive GTPase activity which was stimulated 2-3 fold over basal by 10 μM NPA. 35 S-GTPγS binding to these preparations revealed a stoichiometry of 0.4-0.7 mole N protein/mole receptor, suggesting the N protein may be specifically coupled with the purified D 2 -dopamine receptor and not present as a contaminant. Pertussis toxin treatment of the affinity purified receptor preparations prevented high affinity agonist binding, as well as agonist stimulation of the GTPase activity, presumably by inactivating the associated N protein. Pertussis toxin lead to the ADP-ribosylation of a protein of 39-40K on SDS-PAGE. These findings indicate that an endogenous N protein, N/sub i/ or N/sub o/, co-purifies with the D 2 -dopamine receptor which may reflect a precoupling of this receptor with an N protein within the membranes

  10. Endothelin and calciotropic hormones share regulatory pathways in multidrug resistance protein 2-mediated transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wever, K.E.; Masereeuw, R.; Miller, D.S.; Hang, X.M.; Flik, G.

    2006-01-01

    The kidney of vertebrates plays a key role in excretion of endogenous waste products and xenobiotics. Active secretion in the proximal nephron is at the basis of this excretion, mediated by carrier proteins including multidrug resistance protein 2 (Mrp2). We previously showed that Mrp2 function is

  11. Quantitative Profiling Identifies Potential Regulatory Proteins Involved in Development from Dauer Stage to L4 Stage in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sunhee; Lee, Hyoung-Joo; Hahm, Jeong-Hoon; Jeong, Seul-Ki; Park, Don-Ha; Hancock, William S; Paik, Young-Ki

    2016-02-05

    When Caenorhabditis elegans encounters unfavorable growth conditions, it enters the dauer stage, an alternative L3 developmental period. A dauer larva resumes larval development to the normal L4 stage by uncharacterized postdauer reprogramming (PDR) when growth conditions become more favorable. During this transition period, certain heterochronic genes involved in controlling the proper sequence of developmental events are known to act, with their mutations suppressing the Muv (multivulva) phenotype in C. elegans. To identify the specific proteins in which the Muv phenotype is highly suppressed, quantitative proteomic analysis with iTRAQ labeling of samples obtained from worms at L1 + 30 h (for continuous development [CD]) and dauer recovery +3 h (for postdauer development [PD]) was carried out to detect changes in protein abundance in the CD and PD states of both N2 and lin-28(n719). Of the 1661 unique proteins identified with a proteomic approach identifies and quantitates the regulatory proteins potentially involved in PDR in C. elegans, which safeguards the overall lifecycle in response to environmental changes.

  12. CCAAT displacement protein (CDP/cut) binds a negative regulatory element in the human tryptophan hydroxylase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teerawatanasuk, N; Skalnik, D G; Carr, L G

    1999-01-01

    Tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of serotonin, a neurotransmitter that has been implicated in many psychiatric illnesses. The mechanism of transcriptional regulation of the human TPH gene is largely unknown. We have identified a negative regulatory element located between nucleotides -310 and -220 in the human TPH (hTPH) gene. Electromobility shift analyses performed with the -310/-220 hTPH probe and nuclear extract from P815-HTR (a TPH-expressing cell line) revealed two slow migrating protein-DNA complexes, designated I and II. CCAAT displacement protein (CDP/Cut) is involved in complex I formation as shown in electromobility shift analysis, using consensus oligonucleotide competitor and antibody. Mutations in the CDP/Cut binding site not only disrupted the CDP-DNA complex but also disrupted the second complex, suggesting that the core binding sequences of the two proteins are overlapping. The functional importance of these protein-DNA interactions was assessed by transiently transfecting wild-type and mutant pTPH/luciferase reporter constructs into P815-HTR cells. Mutations in the core CDP/Cut site resulted in an approximately fourfold increase in relative luciferase activities. Because CDP/Cut has been shown to repress transcription of many target genes, we speculate that disruption of the CDP/Cut binding was responsible, at least in part, for the activation of hTPH gene.

  13. PuF, an antimetastatic and developmental signaling protein, interacts with the Alzheimer's amyloid-β precursor protein via a tissue-specific proximal regulatory element (PRE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahiri, Debomoy K; Maloney, Bryan; Rogers, Jack T; Ge, Yuan-Wen

    2013-01-31

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is intimately tied to amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide. Extraneuronal brain plaques consisting primarily of Aβ aggregates are a hallmark of AD. Intraneuronal Aβ subunits are strongly implicated in disease progression. Protein sequence mutations of the Aβ precursor protein (APP) account for a small proportion of AD cases, suggesting that regulation of the associated gene (APP) may play a more important role in AD etiology. The APP promoter possesses a novel 30 nucleotide sequence, or "proximal regulatory element" (PRE), at -76/-47, from the +1 transcription start site that confers cell type specificity. This PRE contains sequences that make it vulnerable to epigenetic modification and may present a viable target for drug studies. We examined PRE-nuclear protein interaction by gel electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and PRE mutant EMSA. This was followed by functional studies of PRE mutant/reporter gene fusion clones. EMSA probed with the PRE showed DNA-protein interaction in multiple nuclear extracts and in human brain tissue nuclear extract in a tissue-type specific manner. We identified transcription factors that are likely to bind the PRE, using competition gel shift and gel supershift: Activator protein 2 (AP2), nm23 nucleoside diphosphate kinase/metastatic inhibitory protein (PuF), and specificity protein 1 (SP1). These sites crossed a known single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). EMSA with PRE mutants and promoter/reporter clone transfection analysis further implicated PuF in cells and extracts. Functional assays of mutant/reporter clone transfections were evaluated by ELISA of reporter protein levels. EMSA and ELISA results correlated by meta-analysis. We propose that PuF may regulate the APP gene promoter and that AD risk may be increased by interference with PuF regulation at the PRE. PuF is targeted by calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II inhibitor 1, which also interacts with the integrins. These proteins are connected

  14. Identification of a novel Leucine-rich repeat protein and candidate PP1 regulatory subunit expressed in developing spermatids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sperry Ann O

    2008-01-01

    . TLRR is homologous to a class of regulatory subunits for PP1, a central phosphatase in the reversible phosphorylation of proteins that is key to modulation of many intracellular processes. TLRR may serve to target this important signaling molecule near the nucleus of developing spermatids in order to control the cellular rearrangements of spermiogenesis.

  15. Temperature inducible β-sheet structure in the transactivation domains of retroviral regulatory proteins of the Rev family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thumb, Werner; Graf, Christine; Parslow, Tristram; Schneider, Rainer; Auer, Manfred

    1999-11-01

    The interaction of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) regulatory protein Rev with cellular cofactors is crucial for the viral life cycle. The HIV-1 Rev transactivation domain is functionally interchangeable with analog regions of Rev proteins of other retroviruses suggesting common folding patterns. In order to obtain experimental evidence for similar structural features mediating protein-protein contacts we investigated activation domain peptides from HIV-1, HIV-2, VISNA virus, feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) by CD spectroscopy, secondary structure prediction and sequence analysis. Although different in polarity and hydrophobicity, all peptides showed a similar behavior with respect to solution conformation, concentration dependence and variations in ionic strength and pH. Temperature studies revealed an unusual induction of β-structure with rising temperatures in all activation domain peptides. The high stability of β-structure in this region was demonstrated in three different peptides of the activation domain of HIV-1 Rev in solutions containing 40% hexafluoropropanol, a reagent usually known to induce α-helix into amino acid sequences. Sequence alignments revealed similarities between the polar effector domains from FIV and EIAV and the leucine rich (hydrophobic) effector domains found in HIV-1, HIV-2 and VISNA. Studies on activation domain peptides of two dominant negative HIV-1 Rev mutants, M10 and M32, pointed towards different reasons for the biological behavior. Whereas the peptide containing the M10 mutation (L 78E 79→D 78L 79) showed wild-type structure, the M32 mutant peptide (L 78L 81L 83→A 78A 81A 83) revealed a different protein fold to be the reason for the disturbed binding to cellular cofactors. From our data, we conclude, that the activation domain of Rev proteins from different viral origins adopt a similar fold and that a β-structural element is involved in binding to a

  16. Selection on Coding and Regulatory Variation Maintains Individuality in Major Urinary Protein Scent Marks in Wild Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Sheehan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Recognition of individuals by scent is widespread across animal taxa. Though animals can often discriminate chemical blends based on many compounds, recent work shows that specific protein pheromones are necessary and sufficient for individual recognition via scent marks in mice. The genetic nature of individuality in scent marks (e.g. coding versus regulatory variation and the evolutionary processes that maintain diversity are poorly understood. The individual signatures in scent marks of house mice are the protein products of a group of highly similar paralogs in the major urinary protein (Mup gene family. Using the offspring of wild-caught mice, we examine individuality in the major urinary protein (MUP scent marks at the DNA, RNA and protein levels. We show that individuality arises through a combination of variation at amino acid coding sites and differential transcription of central Mup genes across individuals, and we identify eSNPs in promoters. There is no evidence of post-transcriptional processes influencing phenotypic diversity as transcripts accurately predict the relative abundance of proteins in urine samples. The match between transcripts and urine samples taken six months earlier also emphasizes that the proportional relationships across central MUP isoforms in urine is stable. Balancing selection maintains coding variants at moderate frequencies, though pheromone diversity appears limited by interactions with vomeronasal receptors. We find that differential transcription of the central Mup paralogs within and between individuals significantly increases the individuality of pheromone blends. Balancing selection on gene regulation allows for increased individuality via combinatorial diversity in a limited number of pheromones.

  17. Protein-Thiol Oxidation and Cell Death: Regulatory Role of Glutaredoxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Erin M.G.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Glutaredoxin (Grx) is the primary enzyme responsible for catalysis of deglutathionylation of protein-mixed disulfides with glutathione (GSH) (protein-SSG). This reversible post-translational modification alters the activity and function of many proteins important in regulation of critical cellular processes. Aberrant regulation of protein glutathionylation/deglutathionylation reactions due to changes in Grx activity can disrupt both apoptotic and survival signaling pathways. Recent Advances: Grx is known to regulate the activity of many proteins through reversible glutathionylation, such as Ras, Fas, ASK1, NFκB, and procaspase-3, all of which play important roles in control of apoptosis. Reactive oxygen species and/or reactive nitrogen species mediate oxidative modifications of critical Cys residues on these apoptotic mediators, facilitating protein-SSG formation and thereby altering protein function and apoptotic signaling. Critical Issues: Much of what is known about the regulation of apoptotic mediators by Grx and reversible glutathionylation has been gleaned from in vitro studies of discrete apoptotic pathways. To relate these results to events in vivo it is important to examine changes in protein-SSG status in situ under natural cellular conditions, maintaining relevant GSH:GSSG ratios and using appropriate inducers of apoptosis. Future Directions: Apoptosis is a highly complex, tightly regulated process involving many different checks and balances. The influence of Grx activity on the interconnectivity among these various pathways remains unknown. Knowledge of the effects of Grx is essential for developing novel therapeutic approaches for treating diseases involving dysregulated apoptosis, such as cancer, heart disease, diabetes, and neurodegenerative diseases, where alterations in redox homeostasis are hallmarks for pathogenesis. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 17, 1748–1763. PMID:22530666

  18. Reversible oxidation of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) alters its interactions with signaling and regulatory proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrastro, Ivan; Tveen-Jensen, Karina; Woscholski, Rudiger; Spickett, Corinne M; Pitt, Andrew R

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) is involved in a number of different cellular processes including metabolism, apoptosis, cell proliferation and survival. It is a redox-sensitive dual-specificity protein phosphatase that acts as a tumor suppressor by negatively regulating the PI3K/Akt pathway. While direct evidence of redox regulation of PTEN downstream signaling has been reported, the effect of PTEN redox status on its protein-protein interactions is poorly understood. PTEN-GST in its reduced and a DTT-reversible H2O2-oxidized form was immobilized on a glutathione-sepharose support and incubated with cell lysate to capture interacting proteins. Captured proteins were analyzed by LC-MSMS and comparatively quantified using label-free methods. 97 Potential protein interactors were identified, including a significant number that are novel. The abundance of fourteen interactors was found to vary significantly with the redox status of PTEN. Altered binding to PTEN was confirmed by affinity pull-down and Western blotting for Prdx1, Trx, and Anxa2, while DDB1 was validated as a novel interactor with unaltered binding. These results suggest that the redox status of PTEN causes a functional variation in the PTEN interactome. The resin capture method developed had distinct advantages in that the redox status of PTEN could be directly controlled and measured. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Coordination of Hepatitis C Virus Assembly by Distinct Regulatory Regions in Nonstructural Protein 5A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Zayas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV nonstructural protein (NS5A is a RNA-binding protein composed of a N-terminal membrane anchor, a structured domain I (DI and two intrinsically disordered domains (DII and DIII interacting with viral and cellular proteins. While DI and DII are essential for RNA replication, DIII is required for assembly. How these processes are orchestrated by NS5A is poorly understood. In this study, we identified a highly conserved basic cluster (BC at the N-terminus of DIII that is critical for particle assembly. We generated BC mutants and compared them with mutants that are blocked at different stages of the assembly process: a NS5A serine cluster (SC mutant blocked in NS5A-core interaction and a mutant lacking the envelope glycoproteins (ΔE1E2. We found that BC mutations did not affect core-NS5A interaction, but strongly impaired core-RNA association as well as virus particle envelopment. Moreover, BC mutations impaired RNA-NS5A interaction arguing that the BC might be required for loading of core protein with viral RNA. Interestingly, RNA-core interaction was also reduced with the ΔE1E2 mutant, suggesting that nucleocapsid formation and envelopment are coupled. These findings argue for two NS5A DIII determinants regulating assembly at distinct, but closely linked steps: (i SC-dependent recruitment of replication complexes to core protein and (ii BC-dependent RNA genome delivery to core protein, triggering encapsidation that is tightly coupled to particle envelopment. These results provide a striking example how a single viral protein exerts multiple functions to coordinate the steps from RNA replication to the assembly of infectious virus particles.

  20. Purification and binding analysis of the nitrogen fixation regulatory NifA protein from Azospirillum brasilense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.M.P. Passaglia

    1998-11-01

    Full Text Available NifA protein activates transcription of nitrogen fixation operons by the alternative sigma54 holoenzyme form of RNA polymerase. This protein binds to a well-defined upstream activator sequence (UAS located at the -200/-100 position of nif promoters with the consensus motif TGT-N10-ACA. NifA of Azospirillum brasilense was purified in the form of a glutathione-S-transferase (GST-NifA fusion protein and proteolytic release of GST yielded inactive and partially soluble NifA. However, the purified NifA was able to induce the production of specific anti-A. brasilense NifA-antiserum that recognized NifA from A. brasilense but not from K. pneumoniae. Both GST-NifA and NifA expressed from the E. coli tac promoter are able to activate transcription from the nifHDK promoter but only in an A. brasilense background. In order to investigate the mechanism that regulates NifA binding capacity we have used E. coli total protein extracts expressing A. brasilense nifA in mobility shift assays. DNA fragments carrying the two overlapping, wild-type or mutated UAS motifs present in the nifH promoter region revealed a retarded band of related size. These data show that the binding activity present in the C-terminal domain of A. brasilense NifA protein is still functional even in the presence of oxygen.

  1. Vanadate stimulates adenylate cyclase via the guanine nucleotide regulatory protein by a mechanism differing from that of fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawietz, W; Downs, R W; Spiegel, A M; Aurbach, G D

    1982-03-01

    Vanadate stimulates adenylate cyclase activity in turkey erythrocyte membranes. The maximal stimulation is 7-fold over basal at 3 mM vanadate; higher concentrations are inhibitory. A suboptimal concentration of fluoride (1 mM) together with vanadate (3 mM) activates adenylate cyclase in a non-additive manner; cyclase activation by optimal fluoride (10 mM) is inhibited by vanadate (3 mM). There is no stimulation by vanadate of adenylate cyclase activity (measured either with Mg2+ or Mn2+) in CYC- S49 lymphoma cell membranes. Vanadate (3 mM) shows no effect on binding of Beta-adrenergic agonists or antagonists to the [3H] (-)-dihydroalprenolol binding site in turkey erythrocyte membranes. These results suggest that the effect of vanadate on Adenylate cyclase is mediated through the nucleotide regulatory protein and may act by a mechanism similar to fluoride. However, in cholera toxic-treated membranes as well as in GDP-beta-S plus isoproterenol-treated membranes, fluoride-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity is significantly reduced, but vanadate stimulation is not. Our results suggest that although the actions of vanadate and fluoride in adenylate cyclase may each involve the nucleotide regulatory unit, the exact mechanisms of activation by the two anions differ.

  2. Phosphorylation of the 19S regulatory particle ATPase subunit, Rpt6, modifies susceptibility to proteotoxic stress and protein aggregation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Magdalena Marquez-Lona

    Full Text Available The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS is a highly conserved and tightly regulated biochemical pathway that degrades the majority of proteins in eukaryotic cells. Importantly, the UPS is responsible for counteracting altered protein homeostasis induced by a variety of proteotoxic stresses. We previously reported that Rpt6, the ATPase subunit of the 19S regulatory particle (RP of the 26S proteasome, is phosphorylated in mammalian neurons at serine 120 in response to neuronal activity. Furthermore, we found that Rpt6 S120 phosphorylation, which regulates the activity and distribution of proteasomes in neurons, is relevant for proteasome-dependent synaptic remodeling and function. To better understand the role of proteasome phosphorylation, we have constructed models of altered Rpt6 phosphorylation in S. cerevisiae by introducing chromosomal point mutations that prevent or mimic phosphorylation at the conserved serine (S119. We find that mutants which prevent Rpt6 phosphorylation at this site (rpt6-S119A, had increased susceptibility to proteotoxic stress, displayed abnormal morphology and had reduced proteasome activity. Since impaired proteasome function has been linked to the aggregation of toxic proteins including the Huntington's disease (HD related huntingtin (Htt protein with expanded polyglutamine repeats, we evaluated the extent of Htt aggregation in our phospho-dead (rpt6-S119A and phospho-mimetic (rpt6-S119D mutants. We showed Htt103Q aggregate size to be significantly larger in rpt6-S119A mutants compared to wild-type or rpt6-S119D strains. Furthermore, we observed that phosphorylation of endogenous Rpt6 at S119 is increased in response to various stress conditions. Together, these data suggest that Rpt6 phosphorylation at S119 may play an important function in proteasome-dependent relief of proteotoxic stress that can be critical in protein aggregation pathologies.

  3. Visualizing the regulatory role of Angiopoietin-like protein 8 (ANGPTL8) in glucose and lipid metabolic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqa, Amnah; Cirillo, Elisa; Tareen, Samar H K; Ali, Amjad; Kutmon, Martina; Eijssen, Lars M T; Ahmad, Jamil; Evelo, Chris T; Coort, Susan L

    2017-10-01

    ANGPTL8 (Angiopoietin-like protein 8) is a newly identified hormone emerging as a novel drug target for treatment of diabetes mellitus and dyslipidemia due to its unique metabolic nature. With increasing number of studies targeting the regulation of ANGPTL8, integration of their findings becomes indispensable. This study has been conducted with the aim to collect, analyze, integrate and visualize the available knowledge in the literature about ANGPTL8 and its regulation. We utilized this knowledge to construct a regulatory pathway of ANGPTL8 which is available at WikiPathways, an open source pathways database. It allows us to visualize ANGPTL8's regulation with respect to other genes/proteins in different pathways helping us to understand the complex interplay of novel hormones/genes/proteins in metabolic disorders. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to present an integrated pathway view of ANGPTL8's regulation and its associated pathways and is important resource for future omics-based studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Uncovering packaging features of co-regulated modules based on human protein interaction and transcriptional regulatory networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Weiming

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Network co-regulated modules are believed to have the functionality of packaging multiple biological entities, and can thus be assumed to coordinate many biological functions in their network neighbouring regions. Results Here, we weighted edges of a human protein interaction network and a transcriptional regulatory network to construct an integrated network, and introduce a probabilistic model and a bipartite graph framework to exploit human co-regulated modules and uncover their specific features in packaging different biological entities (genes, protein complexes or metabolic pathways. Finally, we identified 96 human co-regulated modules based on this method, and evaluate its effectiveness by comparing it with four other methods. Conclusions Dysfunctions in co-regulated interactions often occur in the development of cancer. Therefore, we focussed on an example co-regulated module and found that it could integrate a number of cancer-related genes. This was extended to causal dysfunctions of some complexes maintained by several physically interacting proteins, thus coordinating several metabolic pathways that directly underlie cancer.

  5. Calcium-regulatory proteins as modulators of chemotherapy in human neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florea, Ana-Maria; Varghese, Elizabeth; McCallum, Jennifer E; Mahgoub, Safa; Helmy, Irfan; Varghese, Sharon; Gopinath, Neha; Sass, Steffen; Theis, Fabian J; Reifenberger, Guido; Büsselberg, Dietrich

    2017-04-04

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is a pediatric cancer treated with poly-chemotherapy including platinum complexes (e.g. cisplatin (CDDP), carboplatin), DNA alkylating agents, and topoisomerase I inhibitors (e.g. topotecan (TOPO)). Despite aggressive treatment, NB may become resistant to chemotherapy. We investigated whether CDDP and TOPO treatment of NB cells interacts with the expression and function of proteins involved in regulating calcium signaling. Human neuroblastoma cell lines SH-SY5Y, IMR-32 and NLF were used to investigate the effects of CDDP and TOPO on cell viability, apoptosis, calcium homeostasis, and expression of selected proteins regulating intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i). In addition, the impact of pharmacological inhibition of [Ca2+]i-regulating proteins on neuroblastoma cell survival was studied. Treatment of neuroblastoma cells with increasing concentrations of CDDP (0.1-10 μM) or TOPO (0.1 nM-1 μM) induced cytotoxicity and increased apoptosis in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Both drugs increased [Ca2+]i over time. Treatment with CDDP or TOPO also modified mRNA expression of selected genes encoding [Ca2+]i-regulating proteins. Differentially regulated genes included S100A6, ITPR1, ITPR3, RYR1 and RYR3. With FACS and confocal laser scanning microscopy experiments we validated their differential expression at the protein level. Importantly, treatment of neuroblastoma cells with pharmacological modulators of [Ca2+]i-regulating proteins in combination with CDDP or TOPO increased cytotoxicity. Thus, our results confirm an important role of calcium signaling in the response of neuroblastoma cells to chemotherapy and suggest [Ca2+]i modulation as a promising strategy for adjunctive treatment.

  6. A simple promoter containing two Sp1 sites controls the expression of sterol-regulatory-element-binding protein 1a (SREBP-1a)

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Chengkang; Shin, Dong-Ju; Osborne, Timothy F.

    2005-01-01

    The mammalian gene for SREBP-1 (sterol-regulatory-element-binding protein 1) contains two promoters that control the production of two proteins, SREBP-1a and -1c, and each contains a unique N-terminal transcriptional activation domain, but they are otherwise identical. The relative level of each mRNA varies from tissue to tissue and they respond differently to regulatory stimuli. SREBP-1c is more abundantly expressed in liver, where its level is also regulated by insulin and liver X receptor ...

  7. The regulatory beta-subunit of protein kinase CK2 regulates cell-cycle progression at the onset of mitosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yde, C W; Olsen, B B; Meek, D

    2008-01-01

    Cell-cycle transition from the G(2) phase into mitosis is regulated by the cyclin-dependent protein kinase 1 (CDK1) in complex with cyclin B. CDK1 activity is controlled by both inhibitory phosphorylation, catalysed by the Myt1 and Wee1 kinases, and activating dephosphorylation, mediated by the CDC...... interference results in delayed cell-cycle progression at the onset of mitosis. Knockdown of CK2beta causes stabilization of Wee1 and increased phosphorylation of CDK1 at the inhibitory Tyr15. PLK1-Wee1 association is an essential event in the degradation of Wee1 in unperturbed cell cycle. We have found...... regulatory subunit, identifying it as a new component of signaling pathways that regulate cell-cycle progression at the entry of mitosis.Oncogene advance online publication, 12 May 2008; doi:10.1038/onc.2008.146....

  8. Conservation of protein abundance patterns reveals the regulatory architecture of the EGFR-MAPK pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, T.; Niepel, M.; McDermott, J. E.; Gao, Y.; Nicora, C. D.; Chrisler, W. B.; Markillie, L. M.; Petyuk, V. A.; Smith, R. D.; Rodland, K. D.; Sorger, P. K.; Qian, W. -J.; Wiley, H. S.

    2016-07-12

    It is not known whether cancer cells generally show quantitative differences in the expression of signaling pathway proteins that could dysregulate signal transduction. To explore this issue, we first defined the primary components of the EGF-MAPK pathway in normal human mammary epithelial cells, identifying 16 core proteins and 10 feedback regulators. We then quantified their absolute abundance across a panel of normal and cancer cell lines. We found that core pathway proteins were expressed at very similar levels across all cell types. In contrast, the EGFR and transcriptionally controlled feedback regulators were expressed at highly variable levels. The absolute abundance of most core pathway proteins was between 50,000- 70,000 copies per cell, but the adaptors SOS1, SOS2, and GAB1 were found at far lower levels (2,000-5,000 per cell). MAPK signaling showed saturation in all cells between 3,000-10,000 occupied EGFR, consistent with the idea that low adaptor levels limit signaling. Our results suggest that the core MAPK pathway is essentially invariant across different cell types, with cell- specific differences in signaling likely due to variable levels of feedback regulators. The low abundance of adaptors relative to the EGFR could be responsible for previous observation of saturable signaling, endocytosis, and high affinity EGFR.

  9. Heat Shock Protein A2 (HSPA2): Regulatory Roles in Germ Cell Development and Sperm Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Brett; Bromfield, Elizabeth G; Cui, Jinwei; De Iuliis, Geoffry N

    2017-01-01

    Among the numerous families of heat shock protein (HSP) that have been implicated in the regulation of reproductive system development and function, those belonging to the 70 kDa HSP family have emerged as being indispensable for male fertility. In particular, the testis-enriched heat shock 70 kDa protein 2 (HSPA2) has been shown to be critical for the progression of germ cell differentiation during spermatogenesis in the mouse model. Beyond this developmentally important window, mounting evidence has also implicated HSPA2 in the functional transformation of the human sperm cell during their ascent of the female reproductive tract. Specifically, HSPA2 appears to coordinate the remodelling of specialised sperm domains overlying the anterior region of the sperm head compatible with their principle role in oocyte recognition. The fact that levels of the HSPA2 protein in mature spermatozoa tightly correlate with the efficacy of oocyte binding highlight its utility as a powerful prognostic biomarker of male fertility. In this chapter, we consider the unique structural and biochemical characteristics of HSPA2 that enable this heat shock protein to fulfil its prominent roles in orchestrating the morphological differentiation of male germ cells during spermatogenesis as well as their functional transformation during post-testicular sperm maturation.

  10. Studies on Shigella boydii infection in Caenorhabditis elegans and bioinformatics analysis of immune regulatory protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesika, Periyanaina; Balamurugan, Krishnaswamy

    2012-12-01

    Shigella boydii causes bacillary dysentery or shigellosis and generates a significant burden in the developing nations. S. boydii-mediated infection assays were performed at both physiological and molecular levels using Caenorhabditis elegans as a host. Continuous exposure of worms to S. boydii showed a reduced life span indicating the pathogenicity of Shigella. Quantitative Real-Time PCR analysis was performed to analyze the expression and regulation of host specific candidate-antimicrobial genes (clec-60, clec-87, lys-7), which were expressed significantly during early infection, but weakened during the latter hours. Increased mortality of mutant RB1285 by S. boydii and Shigella flexneri indicated the role of lys-7 during Shigella infection. Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) database was used to analyze the interaction of immune proteins in both C. elegans and humans. In addition, the expression and regulation were revealed about immune genes (clec-61, clec-62, clec-63, F54D5.3 and ZK1320.2), which encode several intermediate immune protein partners (CLEC-61, CLEC-62, CLEC-63, F54D5.3, ZK1320.2, W03D2.6 and THN-2) that interact with LYS-7 and CLEC-60 and were found to play a role in C. elegans immune defense against S. boydii infections. Similarly, the immune genes that are specific to the human defense system, which encode IGHV4-39, A2M, LTF, and CD79A, were predicted to be expressed with LYZ and MBL2, thus indicating their regulation during Shigella infections. Our results using the lowest eukaryotic model system and human database indicated that the major players involved in immunity-related processes appear to be common in cases of Shigella sp. mediated immune responses. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Computational Methods for Protein Interaction and Structural Prediction. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. WrpA Is an Atypical Flavodoxin Family Protein under Regulatory Control of the Brucella abortus General Stress Response System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrou, Julien; Czyż, Daniel M; Willett, Jonathan W; Kim, Hye-Sook; Chhor, Gekleng; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Kim, Youngchang; Crosson, Sean

    2016-04-01

    The general stress response (GSR) system of the intracellular pathogen Brucella abortus controls the transcription of approximately 100 genes in response to a range of stress cues. The core genetic regulatory components of the GSR are required for B. abortus survival under nonoptimal growth conditions in vitro and for maintenance of chronic infection in an in vivo mouse model. The functions of the majority of the genes in the GSR transcriptional regulon remain undefined. bab1_1070 is among the most highly regulated genes in this regulon: its transcription is activated 20- to 30-fold by the GSR system under oxidative conditions in vitro. We have solved crystal structures of Bab1_1070 and demonstrate that it forms a homotetrameric complex that resembles those of WrbA-type NADH:quinone oxidoreductases, which are members of the flavodoxin protein family. However, B. abortus WrbA-related protein (WrpA) does not bind flavin cofactors with a high affinity and does not function as an NADH:quinone oxidoreductase in vitro. Soaking crystals with flavin mononucleotide (FMN) revealed a likely low-affinity binding site adjacent to the canonical WrbA flavin binding site. Deletion of wrpA (ΔwrpA) does not compromise cell survival under acute oxidative stress in vitro or attenuate infection in cell-based or mouse models. However, a ΔwrpA strain does elicit increased splenomegaly in a mouse model, suggesting that WrpA modulates B. abortus interaction with its mammalian host. Despite high structural homology with canonical WrbA proteins, we propose that B. abortus WrpA represents a functionally distinct member of the diverse flavodoxin family. Brucella abortus is an etiological agent of brucellosis, which is among the most common zoonotic diseases worldwide. The general stress response (GSR) regulatory system of B. abortus controls the transcription of approximately 100 genes and is required for maintenance of chronic infection in a murine model; the majority of GSR-regulated genes

  12. Bovine proteins containing poly-glutamine repeats are often polymorphic and enriched for components of transcriptional regulatory complexes

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Whan, Vicki

    2010-11-23

    Abstract Background About forty human diseases are caused by repeat instability mutations. A distinct subset of these diseases is the result of extreme expansions of polymorphic trinucleotide repeats; typically CAG repeats encoding poly-glutamine (poly-Q) tracts in proteins. Polymorphic repeat length variation is also apparent in human poly-Q encoding genes from normal individuals. As these coding sequence repeats are subject to selection in mammals, it has been suggested that normal variations in some of these typically highly conserved genes are implicated in morphological differences between species and phenotypic variations within species. At present, poly-Q encoding genes in non-human mammalian species are poorly documented, as are their functions and propensities for polymorphic variation. Results The current investigation identified 178 bovine poly-Q encoding genes (Q ≥ 5) and within this group, 26 genes with orthologs in both human and mouse that did not contain poly-Q repeats. The bovine poly-Q encoding genes typically had ubiquitous expression patterns although there was bias towards expression in epithelia, brain and testes. They were also characterised by unusually large sizes. Analysis of gene ontology terms revealed that the encoded proteins were strongly enriched for functions associated with transcriptional regulation and many contributed to physical interaction networks in the nucleus where they presumably act cooperatively in transcriptional regulatory complexes. In addition, the coding sequence CAG repeats in some bovine genes impacted mRNA splicing thereby generating unusual transcriptional diversity, which in at least one instance was tissue-specific. The poly-Q encoding genes were prioritised using multiple criteria for their likelihood of being polymorphic and then the highest ranking group was experimentally tested for polymorphic variation within a cattle diversity panel. Extensive and meiotically stable variation was identified

  13. Structural and dynamic characterization of eukaryotic gene regulatory protein domains in solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Andrew Loyd [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1996-05-01

    Solution NMR was primarily used to characterize structure and dynamics in two different eukaryotic protein systems: the δ-Al-ε activation domain from c-jun and the Drosophila RNA-binding protein Sex-lethal. The second system is the Drosophila Sex-lethal (Sxl) protein, an RNA-binding protein which is the ``master switch`` in sex determination. Sxl contains two adjacent RNA-binding domains (RBDs) of the RNP consensus-type. The NMR spectrum of the second RBD (Sxl-RBD2) was assigned using multidimensional heteronuclear NMR, and an intermediate-resolution family of structures was calculated from primarily NOE distance restraints. The overall fold was determined to be similar to other RBDs: a βαβ-βαβ pattern of secondary structure, with the two helices packed against a 4-stranded anti-parallel β-sheet. In addition 15N T1, T2, and 15N/1H NOE relaxation measurements were carried out to characterize the backbone dynamics of Sxl-RBD2 in solution. RNA corresponding to the polypyrimidine tract of transformer pre-mRNA was generated and titrated into 3 different Sxl-RBD protein constructs. Combining Sxl-RBD1+2 (bht RBDs) with this RNA formed a specific, high affinity protein/RNA complex that is amenable to further NMR characterization. The backbone 1H, 13C, and 15N resonances of Sxl-RBD1+2 were assigned using a triple-resonance approach, and 15N relaxation experiments were carried out to characterize the backbone dynamics of this complex. The changes in chemical shift in Sxl-RBD1+2 upon binding RNA are observed using Sxl-RBD2 as a substitute for unbound Sxl-RBD1+2. This allowed the binding interface to be qualitatively mapped for the second domain.

  14. Transcriptional analysis of the jamaicamide gene cluster from the marine cyanobacterium Lyngbya majuscula and identification of possible regulatory proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorrestein Pieter C

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The marine cyanobacterium Lyngbya majuscula is a prolific producer of bioactive secondary metabolites. Although biosynthetic gene clusters encoding several of these compounds have been identified, little is known about how these clusters of genes are transcribed or regulated, and techniques targeting genetic manipulation in Lyngbya strains have not yet been developed. We conducted transcriptional analyses of the jamaicamide gene cluster from a Jamaican strain of Lyngbya majuscula, and isolated proteins that could be involved in jamaicamide regulation. Results An unusually long untranslated leader region of approximately 840 bp is located between the jamaicamide transcription start site (TSS and gene cluster start codon. All of the intergenic regions between the pathway ORFs were transcribed into RNA in RT-PCR experiments; however, a promoter prediction program indicated the possible presence of promoters in multiple intergenic regions. Because the functionality of these promoters could not be verified in vivo, we used a reporter gene assay in E. coli to show that several of these intergenic regions, as well as the primary promoter preceding the TSS, are capable of driving β-galactosidase production. A protein pulldown assay was also used to isolate proteins that may regulate the jamaicamide pathway. Pulldown experiments using the intergenic region upstream of jamA as a DNA probe isolated two proteins that were identified by LC-MS/MS. By BLAST analysis, one of these had close sequence identity to a regulatory protein in another cyanobacterial species. Protein comparisons suggest a possible correlation between secondary metabolism regulation and light dependent complementary chromatic adaptation. Electromobility shift assays were used to evaluate binding of the recombinant proteins to the jamaicamide promoter region. Conclusion Insights into natural product regulation in cyanobacteria are of significant value to drug discovery

  15. Role of Heat Shock Factor 1 in Conserving Cholesterol Transportation in Leydig Cell Steroidogenesis via Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, Shintaro; Shiraishi, Koji; Fujimoto, Mitsuaki; Katiyar, Arpit; Takii, Ryosuke; Nakai, Akira; Matsuyama, Hideyasu

    2017-08-01

    Testicular testosterone synthesis begins with cholesterol transport into mitochondria via steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein in Leydig cells. Acute heat stress is known to obstruct testicular steroidogenesis by transcriptional repression of StAR. In contrast, chronic heat stress such as cryptorchidism or varicocele generally does not affect testicular steroidogenesis, suggesting that Leydig cells adapt to heat stress and retain their steroid synthesis ability. However, the mechanisms of the stress response in steroid-producing cells are unclear. We examined the relationship between the heat stress response and heat shock factor 1 (HSF1), which protects cells from proteotoxic stress by inducing heat shock protein as a molecular chaperone. The influences of HSF1 deficiency on cholesterol transport by StAR and the expression of steroidogenic enzymes under chronic heat stress were studied in testes of HSF1-knockout (HSF1KO) mice with experimental cryptorchidism. StAR protein in wild-type-cryptorchid mice was transiently decreased after induction of cryptorchidism and then gradually returned to basal levels. In contrast, StAR protein in HSF1KO mice continued to decrease and failed to recover, resulting in impaired serum testosterone. StAR messenger RNA was not decreased with cryptorchidism, indicating that posttranslational modification of StAR, not its transcription, was obstructed in cryptorchidism. Other steroidogenic enzymes, including CYP11A1, 3β-HSD, and CYP17A1, were not decreased. Lipid droplets were increased in the cytosol of HSF1KO-cryptorchid mice, suggesting dysfunctional cholesterol transportation. These findings provide insight into the role of HSF1 in Leydig cell steroidogenesis, suggesting that it maintains cholesterol transport by recovering StAR under chronic heat stress. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society.

  16. Sterol regulatory element binding protein and dietary lipid regulation of fatty acid synthesis in the mammary epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, Michael C; Monks, Jenifer; Burns, Valerie; Phistry, Meridee; Marians, Russell; Foote, Monica R; Bauman, Dale E; Anderson, Steven M; Neville, Margaret C

    2010-12-01

    The lactating mammary gland synthesizes large amounts of triglyceride from fatty acids derived from the blood and from de novo lipogenesis. The latter is significantly increased at parturition and decreased when additional dietary fatty acids become available. To begin to understand the molecular regulation of de novo lipogenesis, we tested the hypothesis that the transcription factor sterol regulatory element binding factor (SREBF)-1c is a primary regulator of this system. Expression of Srebf1c mRNA and six of its known target genes increased ≥2.5-fold at parturition. However, Srebf1c-null mice showed only minor deficiencies in lipid synthesis during lactation, possibly due to compensation by Srebf1a expression. To abrogate the function of both isoforms of Srebf1, we bred mice to obtain a mammary epithelial cell-specific deletion of SREBF cleavage-activating protein (SCAP), the SREBF escort protein. These dams showed a significant lactation deficiency, and expression of mRNA for fatty acid synthase (Fasn), insulin-induced gene 1 (Insig1), mitochondrial citrate transporter (Slc25a1), and stearoyl-CoA desaturase 2 (Scd2) was reduced threefold or more; however, the mRNA levels of acetyl-CoA carboxylase-1α (Acaca) and ATP citrate lyase (Acly) were unchanged. Furthermore, a 46% fat diet significantly decreased de novo fatty acid synthesis and reduced the protein levels of ACACA, ACLY, and FASN significantly, with no change in their mRNA levels. These data lead us to conclude that two modes of regulation exist to control fatty acid synthesis in the mammary gland of the lactating mouse: the well-known SREBF1 system and a novel mechanism that acts at the posttranscriptional level in the presence of SCAP deletion and high-fat feeding to alter enzyme protein.

  17. Dentin Sialophosphoprotein: A Regulatory Protein for Dental Pulp Stem Cell Identity and Fate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shiliang; Lim, Dandrich; Dong, Zhihong; Saunders, Thomas L.; Ma, Peter X.; Marcelo, Cynthia L.

    2014-01-01

    The dentin sialophosphoprotein (dspp) transcript is expressed during tooth development as a DSPP precursor protein, which then undergoes cleavage to form mature dentin sialoprotein (DSP) and phosphophoryn (PP) proteins. Previous studies using DSPP-knockout (KO) mice have reported that these animals have hypomineralized teeth, thin dentin, and a large dental pulp chamber, similar to those from patients with dentinogenesis imperfecta III. However, there is no information about factors that regulate dental pulp stem cell lineage fate, a critical early event in the odontoblast-dentin mineralization scheme. To reveal the role of DSPP in odontoblast lineage differentiation during tooth development, we systematically examined teeth from wild-type (wt) and DSPP-KO C57BL/6 mice between the ages of postnatal day 1 and 3 months. We found developmental abnormalities not previously reported, such as circular dentin formation within dental pulp cells and altered odontoblast differentiation in DSPP-KO mice, even as early as 1 day after birth. Surprisingly, we also identified chondrocyte-like cells in the dental pulp from KO-mice teeth. Thus, these studies that compare wt and DSPP-KO mice suggest that the expression of DSPP precursor protein is required for normal odontoblast lineage differentiation and that the absence of DSPP allows dental pulp cells to differentiate into chondrocyte-like cells, which could negatively impact pulpal wound healing and tissue regeneration. PMID:25027178

  18. Direct control of type IIA topoisomerase activity by a chromosomally encoded regulatory protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, Seychelle M; Lyubimov, Artem Y; Hershey, David M; Schoeffler, Allyn J; Sengupta, Sugopa; Nagaraja, Valakunja; Berger, James M

    2014-07-01

    Precise control of supercoiling homeostasis is critical to DNA-dependent processes such as gene expression, replication, and damage response. Topoisomerases are central regulators of DNA supercoiling commonly thought to act independently in the recognition and modulation of chromosome superstructure; however, recent evidence has indicated that cells tightly regulate topoisomerase activity to support chromosome dynamics, transcriptional response, and replicative events. How topoisomerase control is executed and linked to the internal status of a cell is poorly understood. To investigate these connections, we determined the structure of Escherichia coli gyrase, a type IIA topoisomerase bound to YacG, a recently identified chromosomally encoded inhibitor protein. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that YacG is frequently associated with coenzyme A (CoA) production enzymes, linking the protein to metabolism and stress. The structure, along with supporting solution studies, shows that YacG represses gyrase by sterically occluding the principal DNA-binding site of the enzyme. Unexpectedly, YacG acts by both engaging two spatially segregated regions associated with small-molecule inhibitor interactions (fluoroquinolone antibiotics and the newly reported antagonist GSK299423) and remodeling the gyrase holoenzyme into an inactive, ATP-trapped configuration. This study establishes a new mechanism for the protein-based control of topoisomerases, an approach that may be used to alter supercoiling levels for responding to changes in cellular state. © 2014 Vos et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  19. Drosophila Protein Kinase CK2: Genetics, Regulatory Complexity and Emerging Roles during Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohna Bandyopadhyay

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available CK2 is a Ser/Thr protein kinase that is highly conserved amongst all eukaryotes. It is a well-known oncogenic kinase that regulates vital cell autonomous functions and animal development. Genetic studies in the fruit fly Drosophila are providing unique insights into the roles of CK2 in cell signaling, embryogenesis, organogenesis, neurogenesis, and the circadian clock, and are revealing hitherto unknown complexities in CK2 functions and regulation. Here, we review Drosophila CK2 with respect to its structure, subunit diversity, potential mechanisms of regulation, developmental abnormalities linked to mutations in the gene encoding CK2 subunits, and emerging roles in multiple aspects of eye development. We examine the Drosophila CK2 “interaction map” and the eye-specific “transcriptome” databases, which raise the prospect that this protein kinase has many additional targets in the developing eye. We discuss the possibility that CK2 functions during early retinal neurogenesis in Drosophila and mammals bear greater similarity than has been recognized, and that this conservation may extend to other developmental programs. Together, these studies underscore the immense power of the Drosophila model organism to provide new insights and avenues to further investigate developmentally relevant targets of this protein kinase.

  20. Transcriptome-wide analysis of regulatory interactions of the RNA-binding protein HuR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedeva, Svetlana; Jens, Marvin; Theil, Kathrin; Schwanhäusser, Björn; Selbach, Matthias; Landthaler, Markus; Rajewsky, Nikolaus

    2011-08-05

    Posttranscriptional gene regulation relies on hundreds of RNA binding proteins (RBPs) but the function of most RBPs is unknown. The human RBP HuR/ELAVL1 is a conserved mRNA stability regulator. We used PAR-CLIP, a recently developed method based on RNA-protein crosslinking, to identify transcriptome-wide ∼26,000 HuR binding sites. These sites were on average highly conserved, enriched for HuR binding motifs and mainly located in 3' untranslated regions. Surprisingly, many sites were intronic, implicating HuR in mRNA processing. Upon HuR knockdown, mRNA levels and protein synthesis of thousands of target genes were downregulated, validating functionality. HuR and miRNA binding sites tended to reside nearby but generally did not overlap. Additionally, HuR knockdown triggered strong and specific upregulation of miR-7. In summary, we identified thousands of direct and functional HuR targets, found a human miRNA controlled by HuR, and propose a role for HuR in splicing. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Analysis of A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP) interaction with protein kinase A (PKA) regulatory subunits: PKA isoform specificity in AKAP binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herberg, F W; Maleszka, A; Eide, T; Vossebein, L; Tasken, K

    2000-04-28

    Compartmentalization of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) is in part mediated by specialized protein motifs in the dimerization domain of the regulatory (R)-subunits of PKA that participate in protein-protein interactions with an amphipathic helix region in A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs). In order to develop a molecular understanding of the subcellular distribution and specific functions of PKA isozymes mediated by association with AKAPs, it is of importance to determine the apparent binding constants of the R-subunit-AKAP interactions. Here, we present a novel approach using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) to examine directly the association and dissociation of AKAPs with all four R-subunit isoforms immobilized on a modified cAMP surface with a high level of accuracy. We show that both AKAP79 and S-AKAP84/D-AKAP1 bind RIIalpha very well (apparent K(D) values of 0.5 and 2 nM, respectively). Both proteins also bind RIIbeta quite well, but with three- to fourfold lower affinities than those observed versus RIIalpha. However, only S-AKAP84/D-AKAP1 interacts with RIalpha at a nanomolar affinity (apparent K(D) of 185 nM). In comparison, AKAP95 binds RIIalpha (apparent K(D) of 5.9 nM) with a tenfold higher affinity than RIIbeta and has no detectable binding to RIalpha. Surface competition assays with increasing concentrations of a competitor peptide covering amino acid residues 493 to 515 of the thyroid anchoring protein Ht31, demonstrated that Ht31, but not a proline-substituted peptide, Ht31-P, competed binding of RIIalpha and RIIbeta to all the AKAPs examined (EC(50)-values from 6 to 360 nM). Furthermore, RIalpha interaction with S-AKAP84/D-AKAP1 was competed (EC(50) 355 nM) with the same peptide. Here we report for the first time an approach to determine apparent rate- and equilibria binding constants for the interaction of all PKA isoforms with any AKAP as well as a novel approach for characterizing peptide competitors that disrupt PKA-AKAP anchoring

  2. Regulation of steroid 5-{alpha} reductase type 2 (Srd5a2) by sterol regulatory element binding proteins and statin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Young-Kyo [Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, 3244 McGaugh Hall, University of California, UC Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-3900 (United States); Zhu, Bing [Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555-0144 (United States); Jeon, Tae-Il [Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, 3244 McGaugh Hall, University of California, UC Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-3900 (United States); Osborne, Timothy F., E-mail: tfosborn@uci.edu [Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, 3244 McGaugh Hall, University of California, UC Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-3900 (United States)

    2009-11-01

    In this study, we show that sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs) regulate expression of Srd5a2, an enzyme that catalyzes the irreversible conversion of testosterone to dihydroxytestosterone in the male reproductive tract and is highly expressed in androgen-sensitive tissues such as the prostate and skin. We show that Srd5a2 is induced in livers and prostate from mice fed a chow diet supplemented with lovastatin plus ezitimibe (L/E), which increases the activity of nuclear SREBP-2. The three fold increase in Srd5a2 mRNA mediated by L/E treatment was accompanied by the induction of SREBP-2 binding to the Srd5a2 promoter detected by a ChIP-chip assay in liver. We identified a SREBP-2 responsive region within the first 300 upstream bases of the mouse Srd5a2 promoter by co-transfection assays which contain a site that bound SREBP-2 in vitro by an EMSA. Srd5a2 protein was also induced in cells over-expressing SREBP-2 in culture. The induction of Srd5a2 through SREBP-2 provides a mechanistic explanation for why even though statin therapy is effective in reducing cholesterol levels in treating hypercholesterolemia it does not compromise androgen production in clinical studies.

  3. Genome-wide targeting of the epigenetic regulatory protein CTCF to gene promoters by the transcription factor TFII-I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Hernández, Rodrigo; Marques, Maud; Hilmi, Khalid; Zhao, Teijun; Saad, Amine; Alaoui-Jamali, Moulay A; del Rincon, Sonia V; Ashworth, Todd; Roy, Ananda L; Emerson, Beverly M; Witcher, Michael

    2015-02-17

    CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) is a key regulator of nuclear chromatin structure and gene regulation. The impact of CTCF on transcriptional output is highly varied, ranging from repression to transcriptional pausing and transactivation. The multifunctional nature of CTCF may be directed solely through remodeling chromatin architecture. However, another hypothesis is that the multifunctional nature of CTCF is mediated, in part, through differential association with protein partners having unique functions. Consistent with this hypothesis, our mass spectrometry analyses of CTCF interacting partners reveal a previously undefined association with the transcription factor general transcription factor II-I (TFII-I). Biochemical fractionation of CTCF indicates that a distinct CTCF complex incorporating TFII-I is assembled on DNA. Unexpectedly, we found that the interaction between CTCF and TFII-I is essential for directing CTCF to the promoter proximal regulatory regions of target genes across the genome, particularly at genes involved in metabolism. At genes coregulated by CTCF and TFII-I, we find knockdown of TFII-I results in diminished CTCF binding, lack of cyclin-dependent kinase 8 (CDK8) recruitment, and an attenuation of RNA polymerase II phosphorylation at serine 5. Phenotypically, knockdown of TFII-I alters the cellular response to metabolic stress. Our data indicate that TFII-I directs CTCF binding to target genes, and in turn the two proteins cooperate to recruit CDK8 and enhance transcription initiation.

  4. Regulatory proteins (inhibitors or activators) affect estimates of Msub(r) of enzymes and receptors by radiation inactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potier, M.; Giroux, S.

    1985-01-01

    The radiation-inactivation method allows the determination of the Msub(r) of enzymes and receptors by monitoring the decay of biological activity as a function of absorbed dose. The presence of regulatory or effector proteins (inhibitors or activators) associated with an enzyme or receptor, or released in the preparation after tissue homogenization, may affect the decay of biological activity. How the activity is affected, however, will depend on the type of inhibition (competitive or non-competitive), the inhibitor or activator concentration, the dissociation constant of the enzyme-effector system, and the effector Msub(r) relative to that of the enzyme. Since little is known on how effector proteins influence radiation inactivation of enzymes and receptors, we have considered a theoretical model in an effort to provide a framework for the interpretation of experimentally obtained data. Our model predicts that competitive and non-competitive inhibitors of enzymes could be distinguished by analysing irradiated samples with various substrate concentrations. Inhibitors will decrease whereas activators will increase the apparent target size of enzymes or receptors. (author)

  5. Protein Arginine Methyltransferase 5 Inhibition Upregulates Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cells Frequency and Function during the Ulcerative Colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingxia Zheng

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Ulcerative colitis (UC pathogenesis is related to imbalance of immune responses, and the equilibrium between inflammatory T cells and Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs plays an important role in the intestinal homeostasis. Protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs regulate chromatin remodeling and gene expression. Here, we investigated whether inhibition of PRMTs affects colitis pathogenesis in mice and inflammatory bowel disease patients and further explored the underlying mechanisms. In this study, we found that protein arginine N-methyltransferase inhibitor 1 (AMI-1 treatments increased Tregs frequency, function, and reduced colitis incidence. Adoptive transfer of AMI-1-treated Tregs could reduce the colitis incidence. Colitis was associated with increased local PRMT5 expression, which was inhibited by AMI-1 treatment. Additionally, PRMT5 knockdown T cells produced a better response to TGFβ and promoted Tregs differentiation through decreased DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1 expression. PRMT5 also enhanced H3K27me3 and DNMT1 binding to Foxp3 promoter, which restricted Tregs differentiation. Furthermore, PRMT5 knockdown led to decreased Foxp3 promoter methylation during Tregs induction. PRMT5 expression had a negative relationship with Tregs in UC patients, knockdown of PRMT5 expression increased Tregs frequency and decreased TNFα, IL-6, and IL-13 levels. Our study outlines a novel regulation of PRMT5 on Tregs development and function. Strategies to decrease PRMT5 expression might have therapeutic potential to control UC.

  6. Histone/protein deacetylase inhibitor therapy for enhancement of Foxp3+ T-regulatory cell function post-transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L; Beier, U H; Akimova, T; Dahiya, S; Han, R; Samanta, A; Levine, M H; Hancock, W W

    2018-03-30

    T-regulatory (Treg) cells are like other cells present throughout the body in being subject to biochemical modifications in response to extracellular signals. An important component of these responses involves changes in post-translational modifications (PTMs) of histones and many non-histone proteins, including phosphorylation/dephosphorylation, ubiquitination/deubiquitination and acetylation/deacetylation. Foxp3, the key transcription factor of Tregs, is constantly being rapidly turned over, and a number of these PTMs determine its level of expression and activity. Of interest in the transplant setting, modulation of the acetylation or deacetylation of key lysine residues in Foxp3 can promote the stability and function, leading to increased Treg production and increased Treg suppressive activity. This mini-review focuses on recent data concerning the roles that histone/protein deacetylases (HDACs) play in control of Treg function, and how small molecule HDAC inhibitors can be used to promote Treg-dependent allograft survival in experimental models. These data are discussed in the light of increasing interest in the identification and clinical evaluation of isoform-selective HDAC inhibitors, and their potential application as tools to modulate Foxp3+ Treg cell numbers and function in transplant recipients. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. Antioxidant and regulatory role of mitochondrial uncoupling protein UCP2 in pancreatic beta-cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ježek, Petr; Olejár, Tomáš; Smolková, Katarína; Ježek, Jan; Dlasková, Andrea; Plecitá-Hlavatá, Lydie; Zelenka, Jaroslav; Špaček, Tomáš; Engstová, Hana; Reguera Pajuelo, David; Jabůrek, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 63, Suppl.1 (2014), S73-S91 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/10/0346; GA ČR(CZ) GAP305/12/1247; GA ČR(CZ) GPP304/10/P204; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0025 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : mitochondria * uncoupling protein UCP2 * pancreatic beta-cells * reactive oxygen species * glucose-stimulated insulin secretion Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 1.293, year: 2014

  8. A widespread amino acid polymorphism at codon 905 of the glycogen-associated regulatory subunit of protein phosphatase-1 is associated with insulin resistance and hypersecretion of insulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, L; Hansen, T; Vestergaard, H

    1995-01-01

    The regulatory G-subunit of the glycogen-associated form of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) plays a crucial part in muscle tissue glycogen synthesis and breakdown. As impaired insulin stimulated glycogen synthesis in peripheral tissues is considered to be a pathogenic factor in subsets of non-insulin...

  9. Altered expression of the cell cycle regulatory protein cyclin D1 in the rat dentate gyrus after adrenalectomy-induced granular cell lass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postigo, JA; Van der Werf, YD; Korf, J; Krugers, HJ

    1998-01-01

    The loss of dentate gyrus (DG) granular cells after removal of the rat adrenal glands (ADX) is mediated by a process that is apoptotic in nature. The present study was initiated to compare changes in the immunocytochemical distribution of the cell-cycle regulatory protein cyclin D1, which has been

  10. Sterol regulatory element binding protein 2 overexpression is associated with reduced adipogenesis and ectopic fat accumulation in transgenic spontaneously hypertensive rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Landa, Vladimír; Zídek, Václav; Mlejnek, Petr; Šimáková, Miroslava; Šilhavý, Jan; Trnovská, J.; Kazdová, L.; Pravenec, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 63, č. 5 (2014), s. 587-590 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH12061 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : sterol regulatory element binding protein 2 * transgenic * spontaneously hypertensive rat * lipid metabolism Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.293, year: 2014

  11. Novel functions for the endocytic regulatory proteins MICAL-L1 and EHD1 in mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinecke, James B; Katafiasz, Dawn; Naslavsky, Naava; Caplan, Steve

    2015-01-01

    During interphase, recycling endosomes mediate the transport of internalized cargo back to the plasma membrane. However, in mitotic cells, recycling endosomes are essential for the completion of cytokinesis, the last phase of mitosis that promotes the physical separation the two daughter cells. Despite recent advances, our understanding of the molecular determinants that regulate recycling endosome dynamics during cytokinesis remains incomplete. We have previously demonstrated that Molecule Interacting with CasL Like-1 (MICAL-L1) and C-terminal Eps15 Homology Domain protein 1 (EHD1) coordinately regulate receptor transport from tubular recycling endosomes during interphase. However, their potential roles in controlling cytokinesis had not been addressed. In this study, we show that MICAL-L1 and EHD1 regulate mitosis. Depletion of either protein resulted in increased numbers of bi-nucleated cells. We provide evidence that bi-nucleation in MICAL-L1- and EHD1-depleted cells is a consequence of impaired recycling endosome transport during late cytokinesis. However, depletion of MICAL-L1, but not EHD1, resulted in aberrant chromosome alignment and lagging chromosomes, suggesting an EHD1-independent function for MICAL-L1 earlier in mitosis. Moreover, we provide evidence that MICAL-L1 and EHD1 differentially influence microtubule dynamics during early and late mitosis. Collectively, our new data suggest several unanticipated roles for MICAL-L1 and EHD1 during the cell cycle. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. A novel Snf2 protein maintains trans-generational regulatory states established by paramutation in maize.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Hale

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Paramutations represent heritable epigenetic alterations that cause departures from Mendelian inheritance. While the mechanism responsible is largely unknown, recent results in both mouse and maize suggest paramutations are correlated with RNA molecules capable of affecting changes in gene expression patterns. In maize, multiple required to maintain repression (rmr loci stabilize these paramutant states. Here we show rmr1 encodes a novel Snf2 protein that affects both small RNA accumulation and cytosine methylation of a proximal transposon fragment at the Pl1-Rhoades allele. However, these cytosine methylation differences do not define the various epigenetic states associated with paramutations. Pedigree analyses also show RMR1 does not mediate the allelic interactions that typically establish paramutations. Strikingly, our mutant analyses show that Pl1-Rhoades RNA transcript levels are altered independently of transcription rates, implicating a post-transcriptional level of RMR1 action. These results suggest the RNA component of maize paramutation maintains small heterochromatic-like domains that can affect, via the activity of a Snf2 protein, the stability of nascent transcripts from adjacent genes by way of a cotranscriptional repression process. These findings highlight a mechanism by which alleles of endogenous loci can acquire novel expression patterns that are meiotically transmissible.

  13. Regulatory T cells in the humoral response of protein deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, P; Turner, K J

    1979-01-01

    Cell suspensions from the spleen or thymus of mice fed normally or mice that were protein deficient were injected into mice from each dietary group and also syngeneic nudes. Antigen, polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP), was injected at the stage of cell transfer and the antibody titres of the recipient animals were compared with those of control animals given only antigen. The regime was repeated using cell suspensions from donor animals which had been primed with antigen. These experiments showed that spleen cells were suppressive only when transferred from deficient to normal mice. Thymocytes generally lacked suppressive effects, except when given to irradiated mice also injected with "normal" spleen cells. However, thymocytes from deficient mice were marginally enhancing in nude mice, deficient mice and older "normals". To explain these results, it is suggested that responses to PVP are determined by distinct "suppressor-inducing" and "suppressor" T cells which act via helper T cells. The latter probably affect B cells directly and largely influence IgG production. It also appears likely that the ratio of helper to suppressor (inducer and effector) T cells is increased by protein deficiency.

  14. Multiple regulatory roles of the mouse transmembrane adaptor protein NTAL in gene transcription and mast cell physiology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iva Polakovicova

    Full Text Available Non-T cell activation linker (NTAL; also called LAB or LAT2 is a transmembrane adaptor protein that is expressed in a subset of hematopoietic cells, including mast cells. There are conflicting reports on the role of NTAL in the high affinity immunoglobulin E receptor (FcεRI signaling. Studies carried out on mast cells derived from mice with NTAL knock out (KO and wild type mice suggested that NTAL is a negative regulator of FcεRI signaling, while experiments with RNAi-mediated NTAL knockdown (KD in human mast cells and rat basophilic leukemia cells suggested its positive regulatory role. To determine whether different methodologies of NTAL ablation (KO vs KD have different physiological consequences, we compared under well defined conditions FcεRI-mediated signaling events in mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs with NTAL KO or KD. BMMCs with both NTAL KO and KD exhibited enhanced degranulation, calcium mobilization, chemotaxis, tyrosine phosphorylation of LAT and ERK, and depolymerization of filamentous actin. These data provide clear evidence that NTAL is a negative regulator of FcεRI activation events in murine BMMCs, independently of possible compensatory developmental alterations. To gain further insight into the role of NTAL in mast cells, we examined the transcriptome profiles of resting and antigen-activated NTAL KO, NTAL KD, and corresponding control BMMCs. Through this analysis we identified several genes that were differentially regulated in nonactivated and antigen-activated NTAL-deficient cells, when compared to the corresponding control cells. Some of the genes seem to be involved in regulation of cholesterol-dependent events in antigen-mediated chemotaxis. The combined data indicate multiple regulatory roles of NTAL in gene expression and mast cell physiology.

  15. Responsibility of regulatory gene expression and repressed protein synthesis for triacylglycerol accumulation on sulfur-starvation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi eSato

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Triacylglycerol (TG synthesis is induced for energy and carbon storage in algal cells under nitrogen(N-starved conditions, and helps prevent reactive oxygen species production through fatty acid synthesis that consumes excessive reducing power. Here, the regulatory mechanism for the TG content in sulfur(S-starved cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was examined, in comparison to that in N- or phosphorus(P-starved cells. S- and N-starved cells exhibited markedly increased TG contents with up-regulation of mRNA levels of diacylglycerol acyltransferase genes. S-Starvation also induced expression of the genes for phosphatidate synthesis. In contrast, P-starved cells exhibited little alteration of the TG content with almost no induction of these genes. The results implied deficient nutrient-specific regulation of the TG content. An arg9 disruptant defective in arginine synthesis, even without nutritional deficiencies, exhibited an increased TG content upon removal of supplemented arginine, which repressed protein synthesis. Repression of protein synthesis thus seemed crucial for TG accumulation in S- or N-starved cells. Meanwhile, the results of inhibitor experiments involving cells inferred that TG accumulation during S-starvation is supported by photosynthesis and de novo fatty acid synthesis. During S-starvation, sac1 and snrk2.2 disruptants, which are defective in the response to the ambient S-status, accumulated TG at lower and higher levels, respectively, than the wild type. The sac1 and snrk2.2 disruptants showed no or much greater up-regulation of diacylglycerol acyltransferase genes, respectively. In conclusion, TG synthesis would be activated in S-starved cells, through the diversion of metabolic carbon-flow from protein to TG synthesis, and simultaneously through up-regulation of the expression of a particular set of genes for TG synthesis at proper levels through the actions of SAC1 and SNRK2.2.

  16. Congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia caused by a novel splicing mutation in the gene for the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Alexis A; Reyes, M Loreto; Carvajal, Cristian A; Tobar, Jaime A; Mosso, Lorena M; Baquedano, Paulina; Solar, Antonieta; Venegas, Alejandro; Fardella, Carlos E

    2004-02-01

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) plays a crucial role in the transport of cholesterol from the cytoplasm to the inner mitochondrial membrane, facilitating its conversion to pregnenolone by cytochrome P450scc. Its essential role in steroidogenesis was demonstrated after observing that StAR gene mutations gave rise to a potentially lethal disease named congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia, in which virtually no steroids are produced. We report here a 2-month-old female patient, karyotype 46XY, who presented with growth failure, convulsions, dehydration, hypoglycemia, hyponatremia, hypotension, and severe hyperpigmentation suggestive of adrenal insufficiency. Serum cortisol, 17OH-progesterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, testosterone, 17OH-pregnenolone, and aldosterone levels were undetectable in the presence of high ACTH and plasma renin activity levels. Immunohistochemical analysis of testis tissues revealed the absence of StAR protein. Molecular analysis of StAR gene demonstrated a homozygous G to T mutation within the splice donor site of exon 1 (IVS1 + 1G>T). Her parents and one brother were heterozygous for this mutation. In vitro analysis of the mutation was performed in COS cells transfected with minigenes coding regions spanning exon-intron 1 to 3 carrying the mutant and the wild-type sequences. RT-PCR analyses of the mutant gene showed an abnormal mRNA transcript of 2430 bp (normal size 433 bp). Sequence analysis of the mutant mRNA demonstrated the retention of intron 1. Immunolocalization of the StAR minigene product detected the peptide in the mitochondria of COS cells transfected with the wild-type minigene but not in those transfected with the mutant minigene. We conclude that this mutation gives rise to a truncated StAR protein, which lacks an important N-terminal region and the entire lipid transfer domain.

  17. Perilipin-mediated lipid droplet formation in adipocytes promotes sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 processing and triacylglyceride accumulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Takahashi

    Full Text Available Sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 (SREBP-1 has been thought to be a critical factor that assists adipogenesis. During adipogenesis SREBP-1 stimulates lipogenic gene expression, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ enhances perilipin (plin gene expression, resulting in generating lipid droplets (LDs to store triacylglycerol (TAG in adipocytes. Plin coats adipocyte LDs and protects them from lipolysis. Here we show in white adipose tissue (WAT of plin-/- mice that nuclear active SREBP-1 and its target gene expression, but not nuclear SREBP-2, significantly decreased on attenuated LD formation. When plin-/- mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs differentiated into adipocytes, attenuated LDs were formed and nuclear SREBP-1 decreased, but enforced plin expression restored them to their original state. Since LDs are largely derived from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER, alterations in the ER cholesterol content were investigated during adipogenesis of 3T3-L1 cells. The ER cholesterol greatly reduced in differentiated adipocytes. The ER cholesterol level in plin-/- WAT was significantly higher than that of wild-type mice, suggesting that increased LD formation caused a change in ER environment along with a decrease in cholesterol. When GFP-SREBP-1 fusion proteins were exogenously expressed in 3T3-L1 cells, a mutant protein lacking the S1P cleavage site was poorly processed during adipogenesis, providing evidence of the increased canonical pathway for SREBP processing in which SREBP-1 is activated by two cleavage enzymes in the Golgi. Therefore, LD biogenesis may create the ER microenvironment favorable for SREBP-1 activation. We describe the novel interplay between LD formation and SREBP-1 activation through a positive feedback loop.

  18. The function of the RNA-binding protein TEL1 in moss reveals ancient regulatory mechanisms of shoot development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivancos, Julien; Spinner, Lara; Mazubert, Christelle; Charlot, Florence; Paquet, Nicolas; Thareau, Vincent; Dron, Michel; Nogué, Fabien; Charon, Céline

    2012-03-01

    The shoot represents the basic body plan in land plants. It consists of a repeated structure composed of stems and leaves. Whereas vascular plants generate a shoot in their diploid phase, non-vascular plants such as mosses form a shoot (called the gametophore) in their haploid generation. The evolution of regulatory mechanisms or genetic networks used in the development of these two kinds of shoots is unclear. TERMINAL EAR1-like genes have been involved in diploid shoot development in vascular plants. Here, we show that disruption of PpTEL1 from the moss Physcomitrella patens, causes reduced protonema growth and gametophore initiation, as well as defects in gametophore development. Leafy shoots formed on ΔTEL1 mutants exhibit shorter stems with more leaves per shoot, suggesting an accelerated leaf initiation (shortened plastochron), a phenotype shared with the Poaceae vascular plants TE1 and PLA2/LHD2 mutants. Moreover, the positive correlation between plastochron length and leaf size observed in ΔTEL1 mutants suggests a conserved compensatory mechanism correlating leaf growth and leaf initiation rate that would minimize overall changes in plant biomass. The RNA-binding protein encoded by PpTEL1 contains two N-terminus RNA-recognition motifs, and a third C-terminus non-canonical RRM, specific to TEL proteins. Removal of the PpTEL1 C-terminus (including this third RRM) or only 16-18 amino acids within it seriously impairs PpTEL1 function, suggesting a critical role for this third RRM. These results show a conserved function of the RNA-binding PpTEL1 protein in the regulation of shoot development, from early ancestors to vascular plants, that depends on the third TEL-specific RRM.

  19. The expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, its receptors and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein during corpus luteum regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arfuso Frank

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Corpus luteum (CL regression is known to occur as two parts; functional regression when steroidogenesis declines and structural regression when apoptosis is induced. Previous studies suggest this process occurs by the production of luteolytic factors, such as tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha. Methods We examined TNF-alpha, TNF-alpha receptors (TNFR1 and 2 and steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR protein expression during CL regression in albino Wistar rats. CL from Days 16 and 22 of pregnancy and Day 3 post-partum were examined, in addition CL from Day 16 of pregnancy were cultured in vitro to induce apoptosis. mRNA was quantitated by kinetic RT-PCR and protein expression examined by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analyses. Results TNF-alpha mRNA increased on Day 3 post-partum. TNFR were immunolocalized to luteal cells, and an increase in TNFR2 mRNA observed on Day 3 post-partum whilst no change was detected in TNFR1 mRNA relative to Day 16. StAR protein decreased on Day 3 post-partum and following trophic withdrawal but no change was observed following exogenous TNF-alpha treatment. StAR mRNA decreased on Day 3 post-partum; however, it increased following trophic withdrawal and TNF-alpha treatment in vitro. Conclusion These results demonstrate the existence of TNFR1 and TNFR2 in rat CL and suggest the involvement of TNF-alpha in rat CL regression following parturition. Furthermore, decreased StAR expression over the same time points was consistent with the functional regression of the CL.

  20. Molecular dynamics simulations of conformation changes of HIV-1 regulatory protein on graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Daohui; Li, Libo; He, Daohang; Zhou, Jian, E-mail: jianzhou@scut.edu.cn

    2016-07-30

    Graphical abstract: Preferential adsorption of Vpr13-33 on graphene accompanied by early conformational change from α-helix to β-sheet structures was observed by molecular simulations. This work presents the molecular mechanism of graphene-induced peptide conformational alteration and sheds light on developing graphene-based materials to inhibit HIV. - Highlights: • Graphene induced early structural transition of Vpr13-33 is studied by MD simulations. • Both π-π stacking and hydrophobic interactions orchestrate the peptide adsorption. • Vpr has an increased propensity of β-sheet content on graphene surface. • To develop graphene-based materials to inhibit HIV is possible. - Abstract: The fragment of viral protein R (Vpr), Vpr13-33, plays an important role in regulating nuclear importing of HIV genes through channel formation in which it adopts a leucine-zipper-like alpha-helical conformation. A recent experimental study reported that helical Vpr13-33 would transform to β-sheet or random coil structures and aggregate on the surface of graphene or graphene oxide through hydrophobic interactions. Due to experimental limitations, however, there is still a considerable lack of understanding on the adsorption dynamics at the early stage of the conformational transition at water-graphene interface and the underlying driving force at molecular level. In this study, atomistic molecular dynamics simulations were used to explore the conformation transition phenomena. Vpr13-33 kept α-helical structure in solution, but changed to β-sheet structure when strongly adsorbed onto graphene. Preferential adsorption of Vpr13-33 on graphene is dominated by hydrophobic interactions. The cluster analysis identified the most significant populated conformation and the early stage of structure conversion from α-helical to β-sheet was found, but the full β-sheet propagation was not observed. Free energy landscape analysis further complemented the transformation analysis of

  1. Molecular dynamics simulations of conformation changes of HIV-1 regulatory protein on graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Daohui; Li, Libo; He, Daohang; Zhou, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Preferential adsorption of Vpr13-33 on graphene accompanied by early conformational change from α-helix to β-sheet structures was observed by molecular simulations. This work presents the molecular mechanism of graphene-induced peptide conformational alteration and sheds light on developing graphene-based materials to inhibit HIV. - Highlights: • Graphene induced early structural transition of Vpr13-33 is studied by MD simulations. • Both π-π stacking and hydrophobic interactions orchestrate the peptide adsorption. • Vpr has an increased propensity of β-sheet content on graphene surface. • To develop graphene-based materials to inhibit HIV is possible. - Abstract: The fragment of viral protein R (Vpr), Vpr13-33, plays an important role in regulating nuclear importing of HIV genes through channel formation in which it adopts a leucine-zipper-like alpha-helical conformation. A recent experimental study reported that helical Vpr13-33 would transform to β-sheet or random coil structures and aggregate on the surface of graphene or graphene oxide through hydrophobic interactions. Due to experimental limitations, however, there is still a considerable lack of understanding on the adsorption dynamics at the early stage of the conformational transition at water-graphene interface and the underlying driving force at molecular level. In this study, atomistic molecular dynamics simulations were used to explore the conformation transition phenomena. Vpr13-33 kept α-helical structure in solution, but changed to β-sheet structure when strongly adsorbed onto graphene. Preferential adsorption of Vpr13-33 on graphene is dominated by hydrophobic interactions. The cluster analysis identified the most significant populated conformation and the early stage of structure conversion from α-helical to β-sheet was found, but the full β-sheet propagation was not observed. Free energy landscape analysis further complemented the transformation analysis of

  2. Differential 3’ processing of specific transcripts expands regulatory and protein diversity across neuronal cell types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jereb, Saša; Hwang, Hun-Way; Van Otterloo, Eric; Govek, Eve-Ellen; Fak, John J; Yuan, Yuan; Hatten, Mary E

    2018-01-01

    Alternative polyadenylation (APA) regulates mRNA translation, stability, and protein localization. However, it is unclear to what extent APA regulates these processes uniquely in specific cell types. Using a new technique, cTag-PAPERCLIP, we discovered significant differences in APA between the principal types of mouse cerebellar neurons, the Purkinje and granule cells, as well as between proliferating and differentiated granule cells. Transcripts that differed in APA in these comparisons were enriched in key neuronal functions and many differed in coding sequence in addition to 3’UTR length. We characterize Memo1, a transcript that shifted from expressing a short 3’UTR isoform to a longer one during granule cell differentiation. We show that Memo1 regulates granule cell precursor proliferation and that its long 3’UTR isoform is targeted by miR-124, contributing to its downregulation during development. Our findings provide insight into roles for APA in specific cell types and establish a platform for further functional studies. PMID:29578408

  3. Absence of residual structure in the intrinsically disordered regulatory protein CP12 in its reduced state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Launay, Hélène; Barré, Patrick; Puppo, Carine; Manneville, Stéphanie; Gontero, Brigitte; Receveur-Bréchot, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    The redox switch protein CP12 is a key player of the regulation of the Benson–Calvin cycle. Its oxidation state is controlled by the formation/dissociation of two intramolecular disulphide bridges during the day/night cycle. CP12 was known to be globally intrinsically disordered on a large scale in its reduced state, while being partly ordered in the oxidised state. By combining Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Small Angle X-ray Scattering experiments, we showed that, contrary to secondary structure or disorder predictions, reduced CP12 is fully disordered, with no transient or local residual structure likely to be precursor of the structures identified in the oxidised active state and/or in the bound state with GAPDH or PRK. These results highlight the diversity of the mechanisms of regulation of conditionally disordered redox switches, and question the stability of oxidised CP12 scaffold. - Highlights: • CP12 is predicted to form two helices in its N-terminal sequence. • Reduced CP12 is disordered as a random coil according to SAXS. • Limited or no transient structures are observed in reduced CP12 by NMR.

  4. Absence of residual structure in the intrinsically disordered regulatory protein CP12 in its reduced state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Launay, Hélène; Barré, Patrick [Laboratory of integrative Structural and Chemical Biology (iSCB), Centre de Recherche en Cancérologie de Marseille (CRCM), CNRS UMR 7258, INSERM U 1068, Institut Paoli-Calmettes, Aix-Marseille Universités, Marseille 13009 (France); Puppo, Carine [Aix-Marseille Université, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, UMR 7281, Laboratoire de Bioénergétique et Ingénierie des Protéines, 31 Chemin Joseph Aiguier, 13402, Marseille Cedex 20 (France); Manneville, Stéphanie [Laboratory of integrative Structural and Chemical Biology (iSCB), Centre de Recherche en Cancérologie de Marseille (CRCM), CNRS UMR 7258, INSERM U 1068, Institut Paoli-Calmettes, Aix-Marseille Universités, Marseille 13009 (France); Gontero, Brigitte [Aix-Marseille Université, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, UMR 7281, Laboratoire de Bioénergétique et Ingénierie des Protéines, 31 Chemin Joseph Aiguier, 13402, Marseille Cedex 20 (France); Receveur-Bréchot, Véronique, E-mail: veronique.brechot@inserm.fr [Laboratory of integrative Structural and Chemical Biology (iSCB), Centre de Recherche en Cancérologie de Marseille (CRCM), CNRS UMR 7258, INSERM U 1068, Institut Paoli-Calmettes, Aix-Marseille Universités, Marseille 13009 (France)

    2016-08-12

    The redox switch protein CP12 is a key player of the regulation of the Benson–Calvin cycle. Its oxidation state is controlled by the formation/dissociation of two intramolecular disulphide bridges during the day/night cycle. CP12 was known to be globally intrinsically disordered on a large scale in its reduced state, while being partly ordered in the oxidised state. By combining Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Small Angle X-ray Scattering experiments, we showed that, contrary to secondary structure or disorder predictions, reduced CP12 is fully disordered, with no transient or local residual structure likely to be precursor of the structures identified in the oxidised active state and/or in the bound state with GAPDH or PRK. These results highlight the diversity of the mechanisms of regulation of conditionally disordered redox switches, and question the stability of oxidised CP12 scaffold. - Highlights: • CP12 is predicted to form two helices in its N-terminal sequence. • Reduced CP12 is disordered as a random coil according to SAXS. • Limited or no transient structures are observed in reduced CP12 by NMR.

  5. Whole Genome Shotgun Sequencing Shows Selection on Leptospira Regulatory Proteins during in vitro Culture Attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Jason S.; Corey, Victoria C.; Ricaldi, Jessica N.; Vinetz, Joseph M.; Winzeler, Elizabeth A.; Matthias, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Leptospirosis is the most common zoonotic disease worldwide with an estimated 500,000 severe cases reported annually, and case fatality rates of 12–25%, due primarily to acute kidney and lung injuries. Despite its prevalence, the molecular mechanisms underlying leptospirosis pathogenesis remain poorly understood. To identify virulence-related genes in Leptospira interrogans, we delineated cumulative genome changes that occurred during serial in vitro passage of a highly virulent strain of L. interrogans serovar Lai into a nearly avirulent isogenic derivative. Comparison of protein coding and computationally predicted noncoding RNA (ncRNA) genes between these two polyclonal strains identified 15 nonsynonymous single nucleotide variant (nsSNV) alleles that increased in frequency and 19 that decreased, whereas no changes in allelic frequency were observed among the ncRNA genes. Some of the nsSNV alleles were in six genes shown previously to be transcriptionally upregulated during exposure to in vivo-like conditions. Five of these nsSNVs were in evolutionarily conserved positions in genes related to signal transduction and metabolism. Frequency changes of minor nsSNV alleles identified in this study likely contributed to the loss of virulence during serial in vitro culture. The identification of new virulence-associated genes should spur additional experimental inquiry into their potential role in Leptospira pathogenesis. PMID:26711524

  6. MAR binding protein SMAR1 favors IL-10 mediated regulatory T cell function in acute colitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirlekar, Bhalchandra; Patil, Sachin; Bopanna, Ramanamurthy; Chattopadhyay, Samit

    2015-01-01

    T reg cells are not only crucial for controlling immune responses to autoantigens but also prevent those directed towards commensal pathogens. Control of effector immune responses by T reg cells depend on their capacity to accumulate at inflammatory site and accordingly accommodate to inflammatory environment. Till date, the factors associated with maintaining these aspects of T reg phenotype is not understood properly. Here we have shown that a known nuclear matrix binding protein SMAR1 is selectively expressed more in colonic T reg cells and is required for their ability to accumulate at inflammatory site and to sustain high levels of Foxp3 and IL-10 expression during acute colitis. Elimination of anti-inflammatory subsets revealed a protective role for IL-10 producing T reg cells in SMAR1 −/− mice. Moreover, a combined action of Foxp3 and SMAR1 restricts effector cytokine production and enhance the production of IL-10 by colonic T reg cells that controls acute colitis. This data highlights a critical role of SMAR1 in maintaining T reg physiology during inflammatory disorders. - Highlights: • SMAR1 is essential to sustain high level of Foxp3 and IL-10 in T reg cells. • SMAR1 −/− T reg cells produce pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-17 leads to inflammation. • IL-10 administration can control the inflammation in SMAR1 −/− mice. • Both Foxp3 and SMAR1 maintain T reg phenotype that controls colitis

  7. Microtubule plus-end tracking of end-binding protein 1 (EB1) is regulated by CDK5 regulatory subunit-associated protein 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Ka-Wing; Au, Franco K C; Jia, Yue; Yang, Shaozhong; Zhou, Liying; Qi, Robert Z

    2017-05-05

    Microtubules are polar cytoskeleton filaments that extend via growth at their plus ends. Microtubule plus-end-tracking proteins (+TIPs) accumulate at these growing plus ends to control microtubule dynamics and attachment. The +TIP end-binding protein 1 (EB1) and its homologs possess an autonomous plus-end-tracking mechanism and interact with other known +TIPs, which then recruit those +TIPs to the growing plus ends. A major +TIP class contains the S X IP (Ser- X -Ile-Pro, with X denoting any amino acid residue) motif, known to interact with EB1 and its homologs for plus-end tracking, but the role of S X IP in regulating EB1 activities is unclear. We show here that an interaction of EB1 with the S X IP-containing +TIP CDK5 regulatory subunit-associated protein 2 (CDK5RAP2) regulates several EB1 activities, including microtubule plus-end tracking, dynamics at microtubule plus ends, microtubule and α/β-tubulin binding, and microtubule polymerization. The S X IP motif fused with a dimerization domain from CDK5RAP2 significantly enhanced EB1 plus-end-tracking and microtubule-polymerizing and bundling activities, but the S X IP motif alone failed to do so. An S X IP-binding-deficient EB1 mutant displayed significantly lower microtubule plus-end tracking than the wild-type protein in transfected cells. These results suggest that EB1 cooperates with CDK5RAP2 and perhaps other S X IP-containing +TIPs in tracking growing microtubule tips. We also generated plus-end-tracking chimeras of CDK5RAP2 and the adenomatous polyposis coli protein (APC) and found that overexpression of the dimerization domains interfered with microtubule plus-end tracking of their respective S X IP-containing chimeras. Our results suggest that disruption of S X IP dimerization enables detailed investigations of microtubule plus-end-associated functions of individual S X IP-containing +TIPs. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Identification and Utility of FdmR1 as a Streptomyces Antibiotic Regulatory Protein Activator for Fredericamycin Production in Streptomyces griseus ATCC 49344 and Heterologous Hosts▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yihua; Wendt-Pienkowski, Evelyn; Shen, Ben

    2008-01-01

    The fredericamycin (FDM) A biosynthetic gene cluster, cloned previously from Streptomyces griseus ATCC 49344, contains three putative regulatory genes, fdmR, fdmR1, and fdmR2. Their deduced gene products show high similarity to members of the Streptomyces antibiotic regulatory protein (SARP) family (FdmR1) or to MarR-like regulators (FdmR and FdmR2). Here we provide experimental data supporting FdmR1 as a SARP-type activator. Inactivation of fdmR1 abolished FDM biosynthesis, and FDM productio...

  9. MAR binding protein SMAR1 favors IL-10 mediated regulatory T cell function in acute colitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirlekar, Bhalchandra; Patil, Sachin [Chromatin and Disease Biology Laboratory, National Centre for Cell Science, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007 (India); Bopanna, Ramanamurthy [Experimental Animal Facility, National Centre for Cell Science, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007 (India); Chattopadhyay, Samit, E-mail: samit@nccs.res.in [Chromatin and Disease Biology Laboratory, National Centre for Cell Science, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007 (India)

    2015-08-21

    T{sub reg} cells are not only crucial for controlling immune responses to autoantigens but also prevent those directed towards commensal pathogens. Control of effector immune responses by T{sub reg} cells depend on their capacity to accumulate at inflammatory site and accordingly accommodate to inflammatory environment. Till date, the factors associated with maintaining these aspects of T{sub reg} phenotype is not understood properly. Here we have shown that a known nuclear matrix binding protein SMAR1 is selectively expressed more in colonic T{sub reg} cells and is required for their ability to accumulate at inflammatory site and to sustain high levels of Foxp3 and IL-10 expression during acute colitis. Elimination of anti-inflammatory subsets revealed a protective role for IL-10 producing T{sub reg} cells in SMAR1{sup −/−} mice. Moreover, a combined action of Foxp3 and SMAR1 restricts effector cytokine production and enhance the production of IL-10 by colonic T{sub reg} cells that controls acute colitis. This data highlights a critical role of SMAR1 in maintaining T{sub reg} physiology during inflammatory disorders. - Highlights: • SMAR1 is essential to sustain high level of Foxp3 and IL-10 in T{sub reg} cells. • SMAR1{sup −/−} T{sub reg} cells produce pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-17 leads to inflammation. • IL-10 administration can control the inflammation in SMAR1{sup −/−} mice. • Both Foxp3 and SMAR1 maintain T{sub reg} phenotype that controls colitis.

  10. Cardiac myosin binding protein-C plays no regulatory role in skeletal muscle structure and function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Lin

    Full Text Available Myosin binding protein-C (MyBP-C exists in three major isoforms: slow skeletal, fast skeletal, and cardiac. While cardiac MyBP-C (cMyBP-C expression is restricted to the heart in the adult, it is transiently expressed in neonatal stages of some skeletal muscles. However, it is unclear whether this expression is necessary for the proper development and function of skeletal muscle. Our aim was to determine whether the absence of cMyBP-C alters the structure, function, or MyBP-C isoform expression in adult skeletal muscle using a cMyBP-C null mouse model (cMyBP-C((t/t. Slow MyBP-C was expressed in both slow and fast skeletal muscles, whereas fast MyBP-C was mostly restricted to fast skeletal muscles. Expression of these isoforms was unaffected in skeletal muscle from cMyBP-C((t/t mice. Slow and fast skeletal muscles in cMyBP-C((t/t mice showed no histological or ultrastructural changes in comparison to the wild-type control. In addition, slow muscle twitch, tetanus tension, and susceptibility to injury were all similar to the wild-type controls. Interestingly, fMyBP-C expression was significantly increased in the cMyBP-C((t/t hearts undergoing severe dilated cardiomyopathy, though this does not seem to prevent dysfunction. Additionally, expression of both slow and fast isoforms was increased in myopathic skeletal muscles. Our data demonstrate that i MyBP-C isoforms are differentially regulated in both cardiac and skeletal muscles, ii cMyBP-C is dispensable for the development of skeletal muscle with no functional or structural consequences in the adult myocyte, and iii skeletal isoforms can transcomplement in the heart in the absence of cMyBP-C.

  11. Identification of Rbd2 as a candidate protease for sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP) cleavage in fission yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jinsil; Ha, Hye-Jeong [Aging Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB), 125 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34141 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sujin [Aging Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB), 125 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34141 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Functional Genomics, University of Science and Technology (UST), 217 Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34113 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Ah-Reum [Aging Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB), 125 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34141 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sook-Jeong [Department of New Drug Discovery and Development, Chungnam National University, 99 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34134 (Korea, Republic of); Hoe, Kwang-Lae, E-mail: kwanghoe@cnu.ac.kr [Department of New Drug Discovery and Development, Chungnam National University, 99 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34134 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong-Uk, E-mail: kimdongu@kribb.re.kr [Aging Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB), 125 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34141 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-25

    Lipid homeostasis in mammalian cells is regulated by sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) transcription factors that are activated through sequential cleavage by Golgi Site-1 and Site-2 proteases. Fission yeast SREBP, Sre1, engages a different mechanism involving the Golgi Dsc E3 ligase complex, but it is not clearly understood exactly how Sre1 is proteolytically cleaved and activated. In this study, we screened the Schizosaccharomyces pombe non-essential haploid deletion collection to identify missing components of the Sre1 cleavage machinery. Our screen identified an additional component of the SREBP pathway required for Sre1 proteolysis named rhomboid protein 2 (Rbd2). We show that an rbd2 deletion mutant fails to grow under hypoxic and hypoxia-mimetic conditions due to lack of Sre1 activity and that this growth phenotype is rescued by Sre1N, a cleaved active form of Sre1. We found that the growth inhibition phenotype under low oxygen conditions is specific to the strain with deletion of rbd2, not any other fission yeast rhomboid-encoding genes. Our study also identified conserved residues of Rbd2 that are required for Sre1 proteolytic cleavage. All together, our results suggest that Rbd2 is a functional SREBP protease with conserved residues required for Sre1 cleavage and provide an important piece of the puzzle to understand the mechanisms for Sre1 activation and the regulation of various biological and pathological processes involving SREBPs. - Highlights: • An rbd2-deleted yeast strain shows defects in growth in response to low oxygen levels. • rbd2-deficient cells fail to generate cleaved Sre1 (Sre1N) under hypoxic conditions. • Expression of Sre1N rescues the rbd2 deletion mutant growth phenotype. • Rbd2 contains conserved residues potentially critical for catalytic activity. • Mutation of the conserved Rbd2 catalytic residues leads to defects in Sre1 cleavage.

  12. Regulation of the CDP-choline pathway by sterol regulatory element binding proteins involves transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgway, Neale D; Lagace, Thomas A

    2003-06-15

    The synthesis of phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho) by the CDP-choline pathway is under the control of the rate-limiting enzyme CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase (CCT). Sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs) have been proposed to regulate CCT at the transcriptional level, or via the synthesis of lipid activators or substrates of the CDP-choline pathway. To assess the contributions of these two mechanisms, we examined CCTalpha expression and PtdCho synthesis by the CDP-choline pathway in cholesterol and fatty acid auxotrophic CHO M19 cells inducibly expressing constitutively active nuclear forms of SREBP1a or SREBP2. Induction of either SREBP resulted in increased expression of mRNAs for sterol-regulated genes, elevated fatty acid and cholesterol synthesis (>10-50-fold) and increased PtdCho synthesis (2-fold). CCTalpha mRNA was increased 2-fold by enforced expression of SREBP1a or SREBP2. The resultant increase in CCTalpha protein and activity (2-fold) was restricted primarily to the soluble fraction of cells, and increased CCTalpha activity in vivo was not detected. Inhibition of the synthesis of fatty acids or their CoA esters by cerulenin or triacsin C respectively following SREBP induction effectively blocked the accompanying elevation in PtdCho synthesis. Thus PtdCho synthesis was driven by increased synthesis of fatty acids or a product thereof. These data show that transcriptional activation of CCTalpha is modest relative to that of other SREBP-regulated genes, and that stimulation of PtdCho synthesis by SREBPs in CHO cells is due primarily to increased fatty acid synthesis.

  13. Characterization of novel StAR (steroidogenic acute regulatory protein mutations causing non-classic lipoid adrenal hyperplasia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christa E Flück

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR is crucial for transport of cholesterol to mitochondria where biosynthesis of steroids is initiated. Loss of StAR function causes lipoid congenital adrenal hyperplasia (LCAH. OBJECTIVE: StAR gene mutations causing partial loss of function manifest atypical and may be mistaken as familial glucocorticoid deficiency. Only a few mutations have been reported. DESIGN: To report clinical, biochemical, genetic, protein structure and functional data on two novel StAR mutations, and to compare them with published literature. SETTING: Collaboration between the University Children's Hospital Bern, Switzerland, and the CIBERER, Hospital Vall d'Hebron, Autonomous University, Barcelona, Spain. PATIENTS: Two subjects of a non-consanguineous Caucasian family were studied. The 46,XX phenotypic normal female was diagnosed with adrenal insufficiency at the age of 10 months, had normal pubertal development and still has no signs of hypergonodatropic hypogonadism at 32 years of age. Her 46,XY brother was born with normal male external genitalia and was diagnosed with adrenal insufficiency at 14 months. Puberty was normal and no signs of hypergonadotropic hypogonadism are present at 29 years of age. RESULTS: StAR gene analysis revealed two novel compound heterozygote mutations T44HfsX3 and G221S. T44HfsX3 is a loss-of-function StAR mutation. G221S retains partial activity (∼30% and is therefore responsible for a milder, non-classic phenotype. G221S is located in the cholesterol binding pocket and seems to alter binding/release of cholesterol. CONCLUSIONS: StAR mutations located in the cholesterol binding pocket (V187M, R188C, R192C, G221D/S seem to cause non-classic lipoid CAH. Accuracy of genotype-phenotype prediction by in vitro testing may vary with the assays employed.

  14. Glucokinase regulatory protein genetic variant interacts with omega-3 PUFA to influence insulin resistance and inflammation in metabolic syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Perez-Martinez

    Full Text Available Glucokinase Regulatory Protein (GCKR plays a central role regulating both hepatic triglyceride and glucose metabolism. Fatty acids are key metabolic regulators, which interact with genetic factors and influence glucose metabolism and other metabolic traits. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA have been of considerable interest, due to their potential to reduce metabolic syndrome (MetS risk.To examine whether genetic variability at the GCKR gene locus was associated with the degree of insulin resistance, plasma concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP and n-3 PUFA in MetS subjects.Homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR, HOMA-B, plasma concentrations of C-peptide, CRP, fatty acid composition and the GCKR rs1260326-P446L polymorphism, were determined in a cross-sectional analysis of 379 subjects with MetS participating in the LIPGENE dietary cohort.Among subjects with n-3 PUFA levels below the population median, carriers of the common C/C genotype had higher plasma concentrations of fasting insulin (P = 0.019, C-peptide (P = 0.004, HOMA-IR (P = 0.008 and CRP (P = 0.032 as compared with subjects carrying the minor T-allele (Leu446. In contrast, homozygous C/C carriers with n-3 PUFA levels above the median showed lower plasma concentrations of fasting insulin, peptide C, HOMA-IR and CRP, as compared with individuals with the T-allele.We have demonstrated a significant interaction between the GCKR rs1260326-P446L polymorphism and plasma n-3 PUFA levels modulating insulin resistance and inflammatory markers in MetS subjects. Further studies are needed to confirm this gene-diet interaction in the general population and whether targeted dietary recommendations can prevent MetS in genetically susceptible individuals.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00429195.

  15. The Global Regulatory Cyclic AMP Receptor Protein (CRP) Controls Multifactorial Fluoroquinolone Susceptibility in Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kary, Stefani C; Yoneda, Joshua R K; Olshefsky, Stephen C; Stewart, Laura A; West, Steven B; Cameron, Andrew D S

    2017-11-01

    Fluoroquinolone antibiotics are prescribed for the treatment of Salmonella enterica infections, but resistance to this family of antibiotics is growing. Here we report that loss of the global regulatory protein cyclic AMP (cAMP) receptor protein (CRP) or its allosteric effector, cAMP, reduces susceptibility to fluoroquinolones. A Δ crp mutation was synergistic with the primary fluoroquinolone resistance allele gyrA83 , thus able to contribute to clinically relevant resistance. Decreased susceptibility to fluoroquinolones could be partly explained by decreased expression of the outer membrane porin genes ompA and ompF with a concomitant increase in the expression of the ciprofloxacin resistance efflux pump gene acrB in Δ crp cells. Expression of gyrAB , which encode the DNA supercoiling enzyme GyrAB, which is blocked by fluoroquinolones, and expression of topA , which encodes the dominant supercoiling-relaxing enzyme topoisomerase I, were unchanged in Δ crp cells. Yet Δ crp cells maintained a more relaxed state of DNA supercoiling, correlating with an observed increase in topoisomerase IV ( parCE ) expression. Surprisingly, the Δ crp mutation had the unanticipated effect of enhancing fitness in the presence of fluoroquinolone antibiotics, which can be explained by the observation that exposure of Δ crp cells to ciprofloxacin had the counterintuitive effect of restoring wild-type levels of DNA supercoiling. Consistent with this, Δ crp cells did not become elongated or induce the SOS response when challenged with ciprofloxacin. These findings implicate the combined action of multiple drug resistance mechanisms in Δ crp cells: reduced permeability and elevated efflux of fluoroquinolones coupled with a relaxed DNA supercoiling state that buffers cells against GyrAB inhibition by fluoroquinolones. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  16. Extracellular Acidic pH Activates the Sterol Regulatory Element-Binding Protein 2 to Promote Tumor Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Ayano; Yamamoto, Shogo; Nakaki, Ryo; Shimamura, Teppei; Hamakubo, Takao; Sakai, Juro; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Yoshida, Tetsuo; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Osawa, Tsuyoshi

    2017-02-28

    Conditions of the tumor microenvironment, such as hypoxia and nutrient starvation, play critical roles in cancer progression. However, the role of acidic extracellular pH in cancer progression is not studied as extensively as that of hypoxia. Here, we show that extracellular acidic pH (pH 6.8) triggered activation of sterol regulatory element-binding protein 2 (SREBP2) by stimulating nuclear translocation and promoter binding to its targets, along with intracellular acidification. Interestingly, inhibition of SREBP2, but not SREBP1, suppressed the upregulation of low pH-induced cholesterol biosynthesis-related genes. Moreover, acyl-CoA synthetase short-chain family member 2 (ACSS2), a direct SREBP2 target, provided a growth advantage to cancer cells under acidic pH. Furthermore, acidic pH-responsive SREBP2 target genes were associated with reduced overall survival of cancer patients. Thus, our findings show that SREBP2 is a key transcriptional regulator of metabolic genes and progression of cancer cells, partly in response to extracellular acidification. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The TEAD/TEF family protein Scalloped mediates transcriptional output of the Hippo growth-regulatory pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shian; Liu, Yi; Zheng, Yonggang; Dong, Jixin; Pan, Duojia

    2008-03-01

    The Hippo (Hpo) kinase cascade restricts tissue growth by inactivating the transcriptional coactivator Yorkie (Yki), which regulates the expression of target genes such as the cell death inhibitor diap1 by unknown mechanisms. Here we identify the TEAD/TEF family protein Scalloped (Sd) as a DNA-binding transcription factor that partners with Yki to mediate the transcriptional output of the Hpo growth-regulatory pathway. The diap1 (th) locus harbors a minimal Sd-binding Hpo Responsive Element (HRE) that mediates transcriptional regulation by the Hpo pathway. Sd binds directly to Yki, and a Yki missense mutation that abrogates Sd-Yki binding also inactivates Yki function in vivo. We further demonstrate that sd is required for yki-induced tissue overgrowth and target gene expression, and that sd activity is conserved in its mammalian homolog. Our results uncover a heretofore missing link in the Hpo signaling pathway and provide a glimpse of the molecular events on a Hpo-responsive enhancer element.

  18. WrpA Is an Atypical Flavodoxin Family Protein under Regulatory Control of the Brucella abortus General Stress Response System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrou, Julien; Czyż, Daniel M.; Willett, Jonathan W.; Kim, Hye-Sook; Chhor, Gekleng; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Kim, Youngchang; Crosson, Sean; Stock, A. M.

    2016-02-08

    ABSTRACT

    The general stress response (GSR) system of the intracellular pathogenBrucella abortuscontrols the transcription of approximately 100 genes in response to a range of stress cues. The core genetic regulatory components of the GSR are required forB. abortussurvival under nonoptimal growth conditionsin vitroand for maintenance of chronic infection in anin vivomouse model. The functions of the majority of the genes in the GSR transcriptional regulon remain undefined.bab1_1070is among the most highly regulated genes in this regulon: its transcription is activated 20- to 30-fold by the GSR system under oxidative conditionsin vitro. We have solved crystal structures of Bab1_1070 and demonstrate that it forms a homotetrameric complex that resembles those of WrbA-type NADH:quinone oxidoreductases, which are members of the flavodoxin protein family. However,B. abortusWrbA-relatedprotein (WrpA) does not bind flavin cofactors with a high affinity and does not function as an NADH:quinone oxidoreductasein vitro. Soaking crystals with flavin mononucleotide (FMN) revealed a likely low-affinity binding site adjacent to the canonical WrbA flavin binding site. Deletion ofwrpAwrpA) does not compromise cell survival under acute oxidative stressin vitroor attenuate infection in cell-based or mouse models. However, a ΔwrpAstrain does elicit increased splenomegaly in a mouse model, suggesting that WrpA modulatesB. abortusinteraction with its mammalian host. Despite

  19. Driving midgut-specific expression and secretion of a foreign protein in transgenic mosquitoes with AgAper1 regulatory elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, E G; Donnelly-Doman, M; Fujioka, H; Ghosh, A; Moreira, L; Jacobs-Lorena, M

    2005-06-01

    The Anopheles gambiae adult peritrophic matrix protein 1 (AgAper1) regulatory elements were used to drive the expression of phospholipase A2 (PLA2), a protein known to disrupt malaria parasite development in mosquitoes. These AgAper1 regulatory elements were sufficient to promote the accumulation of PLA2 in midgut epithelial cells before a blood meal and its release into the lumen upon blood ingestion. Plasmodium berghei oocyst formation was reduced by approximately 80% (74-91% range) in transgenic mosquitoes. Blood-seeking behaviour and survival of AgAper1-PLA2 transgenic mosquitoes were comparable to sibling wild-type mosquitoes, while fertility was substantially lower. Ultrastructural studies suggest that decreased fitness is a consequence of internal damage to midgut epithelial cells.

  20. Effects of retinoic acid and hydrogen peroxide on sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1a activation during adipogenic differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells

    OpenAIRE

    Eldaim, Mabrouk A. Abd; Okamatsu-Ogura, Yuko; Terao, Akira; Kimura, Kazuhiro

    2010-01-01

    Both retinoic acid (RA) and oxidative stress (H2O2) increased transcription and cleavage of membrane-bound sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP)-1, leading to enhanced transcription of fatty acid synthase (FAS) in hepatoma cells. On the other hand, RA and H2O2 decreased and increased lipogenesis in adipocytes, respectively, although roles of SREBP-1 activation in these effects remain to be elucidated. To elucidate its involvement, we examined the activation of SREBP...

  1. Platelet cytosolic 44-kDa protein is a substrate of cholera toxin-induced ADP-ribosylation and is not recognized by antisera against the. alpha. subunit of the stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina Y Vedia, L.M.; Reep, B.R.; Lapetina, E.G. (Burroughs Wellcome Co., Research Triangle Park, NC (USA))

    1988-08-01

    ADP-ribosylation induced by cholera toxin and pertussis toxin was studied in particulate and cytosolic fractions of human platelets. Platelets were disrupted by a cycle of freezing and thawing in the presence of a hyposmotic buffer containing protease inhibitors. In both fractions, the A subunit of cholera toxin ADP-ribosylates two proteins with molecular masses of 42 and 44 kDa, whereas pertussis toxin ADP-ribosylates a 41-kDa polypeptide. Two antisera against the {alpha} subunit of the stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein recognize only the 42-kDa polypeptide. Cholera toxin-induced ADP-ribosylation of the 42- and 44-kDa proteins is reduced by pretreatment of platelets with iloprost, a prostacyclin analog. The 44-kDa protein, which is substrate of cholera toxin, could be extracted completely from the membrane and recovered in the cytosolic fraction when the cells were disrupted by Dounce homogenization and the pellet was extensively washed. A 44-kDa protein can also be labeled with 8-azidoguanosine 5{prime}-({alpha}-{sup 32}P)triphosphate in the cytosol and membranes. These finding indicate that cholera and pertussis toxins produced covalent modifications of proteins present in particulate and cytosolic platelet fractions. Moreover, the 44-kDa protein might be an {alpha} subunit of a guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein that is not recognized by available antisera.

  2. Platelet cytosolic 44-kDa protein is a substrate of cholera toxin-induced ADP-ribosylation and is not recognized by antisera against the α subunit of the stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molina Y Vedia, L.M.; Reep, B.R.; Lapetina, E.G.

    1988-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation induced by cholera toxin and pertussis toxin was studied in particulate and cytosolic fractions of human platelets. Platelets were disrupted by a cycle of freezing and thawing in the presence of a hyposmotic buffer containing protease inhibitors. In both fractions, the A subunit of cholera toxin ADP-ribosylates two proteins with molecular masses of 42 and 44 kDa, whereas pertussis toxin ADP-ribosylates a 41-kDa polypeptide. Two antisera against the α subunit of the stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein recognize only the 42-kDa polypeptide. Cholera toxin-induced ADP-ribosylation of the 42- and 44-kDa proteins is reduced by pretreatment of platelets with iloprost, a prostacyclin analog. The 44-kDa protein, which is substrate of cholera toxin, could be extracted completely from the membrane and recovered in the cytosolic fraction when the cells were disrupted by Dounce homogenization and the pellet was extensively washed. A 44-kDa protein can also be labeled with 8-azidoguanosine 5'-[α- 32 P]triphosphate in the cytosol and membranes. These finding indicate that cholera and pertussis toxins produced covalent modifications of proteins present in particulate and cytosolic platelet fractions. Moreover, the 44-kDa protein might be an α subunit of a guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein that is not recognized by available antisera

  3. Detection of Signal Regulatory Protein α in Saimiri sciureus (Squirrel Monkey) by Anti-Human Monoclonal Antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Hugo Amorim dos Santos; Costa-Correa, Edmar Henrique; Bianco-Junior, Cesare; Andrade, Márcia Cristina Ribeiro; Lima-Junior, Josué da Costa; Pratt-Riccio, Lilian Rose; Daniel-Ribeiro, Cláudio Tadeu; Totino, Paulo Renato Rivas

    2017-01-01

    Non-human primates (NHP) are suitable models for studying different aspects of the human system, including pathogenesis and protective immunity to many diseases. However, the lack of specific immunological reagents for neo-tropical monkeys, such as Saimiri sciureus, is still a major factor limiting studies in these models. An alternative strategy to circumvent this obstacle has been the selection of immunological reagents directed to humans, which present cross-reactivity with NHP molecules. In this context and considering the key role of inhibitory immunoreceptors—such as the signal regulatory protein α (SIRPα)—in the regulation of immune responses, in the present study, we attempted to evaluate the ability of anti-human SIRPα monoclonal antibodies to recognize SIRPα in antigen-presenting S. sciureus peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). As shown by flow cytometry analysis, the profile of anti-SIRPα staining as well as the levels of SIRPα-positive cells in PBMC from S. sciureus were similar to those observed in human PBMC. Furthermore, using anti-SIRPα monoclonal antibody, it was possible to detect a decrease of the SIRPα levels on surface of S. sciureus cells after in vitro stimulation with lipopolysaccharides. Finally, using computed-based analysis, we observed a high degree of conservation of SIRPα across six species of primates and the presence of shared epitopes in the extracellular domain between humans and Saimiri genus that could be targeted by antibodies. In conclusion, we have identified a commercially available anti-human monoclonal antibody that is able to detect SIRPα of S. sciureus monkeys and that, therefore, can facilitate the study of the immunomodulatory role of SIRPα when S. sciureus is used as a model. PMID:29312325

  4. Detection of Signal Regulatory Protein α in Saimiri sciureus (Squirrel Monkey by Anti-Human Monoclonal Antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Amorim dos Santos de Souza

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Non-human primates (NHP are suitable models for studying different aspects of the human system, including pathogenesis and protective immunity to many diseases. However, the lack of specific immunological reagents for neo-tropical monkeys, such as Saimiri sciureus, is still a major factor limiting studies in these models. An alternative strategy to circumvent this obstacle has been the selection of immunological reagents directed to humans, which present cross-reactivity with NHP molecules. In this context and considering the key role of inhibitory immunoreceptors—such as the signal regulatory protein α (SIRPα—in the regulation of immune responses, in the present study, we attempted to evaluate the ability of anti-human SIRPα monoclonal antibodies to recognize SIRPα in antigen-presenting S. sciureus peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC. As shown by flow cytometry analysis, the profile of anti-SIRPα staining as well as the levels of SIRPα-positive cells in PBMC from S. sciureus were similar to those observed in human PBMC. Furthermore, using anti-SIRPα monoclonal antibody, it was possible to detect a decrease of the SIRPα levels on surface of S. sciureus cells after in vitro stimulation with lipopolysaccharides. Finally, using computed-based analysis, we observed a high degree of conservation of SIRPα across six species of primates and the presence of shared epitopes in the extracellular domain between humans and Saimiri genus that could be targeted by antibodies. In conclusion, we have identified a commercially available anti-human monoclonal antibody that is able to detect SIRPα of S. sciureus monkeys and that, therefore, can facilitate the study of the immunomodulatory role of SIRPα when S. sciureus is used as a model.

  5. The adeno-associated virus major regulatory protein Rep78-c-Jun-DNA motif complex modulates AP-1 activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, C. Krishna; Meyers, Craig; Zhan Dejin; You Hong; Chiriva-Internati, Maurizio; Mehta, Jawahar L.; Liu Yong; Hermonat, Paul L.

    2003-01-01

    Multiple epidemiologic studies show that adeno-associated virus (AAV) is negatively associated with cervical cancer (CX CA), a cancer which is positively associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Mechanisms for this correlation may be by Rep78's (AAV's major regulatory protein) ability to bind the HPV-16 p97 promoter DNA and inhibit transcription, to bind and interfere with the functions of the E7 oncoprotein of HPV-16, and to bind a variety of HPV-important cellular transcription factors such as Sp1 and TBP. c-Jun is another important cellular factor intimately linked to the HPV life cycle, as well as keratinocyte differentiation and skin development. Skin is the natural host tissue for both HPV and AAV. In this article it is demonstrated that Rep78 directly interacts with c-Jun, both in vitro and in vivo, as analyzed by Western blot, yeast two-hybrid cDNA, and electrophoretic mobility shift-supershift assay (EMSA supershift). Addition of anti-Rep78 antibodies inhibited the EMSA supershift. Investigating the biological implications of this interaction, Rep78 inhibited the c-Jun-dependent c-jun promoter in transient and stable chloramphenicol acetyl-transferase (CAT) assays. Rep78 also inhibited c-Jun-augmented c-jun promoter as well as the HPV-16 p97 promoter activity (also c-Jun regulated) in in vitro transcription assays in T47D nuclear extracts. Finally, the Rep78-c-Jun interaction mapped to the amino-half of Rep78. The ability of Rep78 to interact with c-Jun and down-regulate AP-1-dependent transcription suggests one more mechanism by which AAV may modulate the HPV life cycle and the carcinogenesis process

  6. Leucine responsive regulatory protein is involved in methionine metabolism and polyamine homeostasis in acetic acid bacterium Komagataeibacter europaeus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Yuri; Akasaka, Naoki; Sakoda, Hisao; Hidese, Ryota; Fujiwara, Shinsuke

    2018-01-01

    The leucine responsive regulatory protein (Lrp) is a global transcription factor that regulates the expression of genes involved in amino acid metabolism. To identify metabolic pathways and related genes under the control of Lrp in the acetic acid bacterium Komagataeibacter europaeus, the Kelrp null mutant (KGMA7110), which requires supplementation of all 20 amino acids for normal growth, was cultivated in minimal media containing or lacking particular amino acids. The results confirmed that KGMA7110 was auxotrophic for methionine and its catabolites S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) and spermidine (SPD). Quantitative reverse-transcription PCR analysis revealed lower metK (SAM synthetase) and mdtI (SPD efflux pump) expression in KGMA7110 than in wild-type KGMA0119. By contrast, these genes were significantly up-regulated in the Kelrp mutant lacking the putative C-terminal ligand-sensing domain (KGMA7203), indicating abnormal regulation of target genes by the KeLrp variant in KGMA7203. KGMA7110 (0.69±0.27 μM) and KGMA7203 (4.90±0.61 μM) excreted lower and higher quantities of SPD, respectively, than KGMA0119 (2.28±0.26 μM). This was attributed to imbalanced carbon flow caused by Kelrp disruption that respectively attenuated and stimulated metK and mdtI expression. These findings indicate that KeLrp plays a key role in SAM biosynthesis and intracellular polyamine homeostasis in K. europaeus. Copyright © 2017 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Interaction of the regulatory subunit of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase with PATZ1 (ZNF278)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Weng-Lang; Ravatn, Roald; Kudoh, Kazuya; Alabanza, Leah; Chin, Khew-Voon

    2010-01-01

    The effects of cAMP in cell are predominantly mediated by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), which is composed of two genetically distinct subunits, catalytic (C) and regulatory (R), forming a tetrameric holoenzyme R 2 C 2 . The only known function for the R subunit is that of inhibiting the activity of the C subunit kinase. It has been shown that overexpression of RIα, but not the C subunit kinase, is associated with neoplastic transformation. In addition, it has also been demonstrated that mutation in the RIα, but not the C subunit is associated with increased resistance to the DNA-damaging anticancer drug cisplatin, thus suggesting that the RIα subunit of PKA may have functions independent of the kinase. We show here that the RIα subunit interacts with a BTB/POZ domain zinc-finger transcription factor, PATZ1 (ZNF278), and co-expression with RIα results in its sequestration in the cytoplasm. The cytoplasmic/nuclear translocation is inducible by cAMP. C-terminus deletion abolishes PATZ1 interaction with RIα and results in its localization in the nucleus. PATZ1 transactivates the cMyc promoter and the presence of cAMP and co-expression with RIα modulates its transactivation. Moreover, PATZ1 is aberrantly expressed in cancer. Taken together, our results showed a potentially novel mechanism of cAMP signaling mediated through the interaction of RIα with PATZ1 that is independent of the kinase activity of PKA, and the aberrant expression of PATZ1 in cancer point to its role in cell growth regulation.

  8. Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) overexpression attenuates HFD-induced hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yanyan; Sui, Xianxian; Zhan, Yongkun; Xu, Chen; Li, Xiaobo; Ning, Yanxia; Zhi, Xiuling; Yin, Lianhua

    2017-04-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) covers a wide spectrum of liver pathology. Intracellular lipid accumulation is the first step in the development and progression of NAFLD. Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) plays an important role in the synthesis of bile acid and intracellular lipid homeostasis and cholesterol metabolism. We hypothesize that StAR is involved in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) pathogenesis. The hypothesis was identified using free fatty acid (FFA)-overloaded NAFLD in vitro model and high-fat diet (HFD)-induced NAFLD mouse model transfected by recombinant adenovirus encoding StAR (StAR). StAR expression was also examined in pathology samples of patients with fatty liver by immunohistochemical staining. We found that the expression level of StAR was reduced in the livers obtained from fatty liver patients and NAFLD mice. Additionally, StAR overexpression decreased the levels of hepatic lipids and maintained the hepatic glucose homeostasis due to the activation of farnesoid x receptor (FXR). StAR overexpression attenuated the impairment of insulin signaling in fatty liver. This protective role of StAR was owing to a reduction of intracellular diacylglycerol levels and the phosphorylation of PKCε. Furthermore, FXR inactivation reversed the observed beneficial effects of StAR. The present study revealed that StAR overexpression can reduce hepatic lipid accumulation, regulate glucose metabolism and attenuate insulin resistance through a mechanism involving the activation of FXR. Our study suggests that StAR may be a potential therapeutic target for NAFLD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins are regulators of the rat thyroid peroxidase gene in thyroid cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Rauer

    Full Text Available Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs-1c and -2, which were initially discovered as master transcriptional regulators of lipid biosynthesis and uptake, were recently identified as novel transcriptional regulators of the sodium-iodide symporter gene in the thyroid, which is essential for thyroid hormone synthesis. Based on this observation that SREBPs play a role for thyroid hormone synthesis, we hypothesized that another gene involved in thyroid hormone synthesis, the thyroid peroxidase (TPO gene, is also a target of SREBP-1c and -2. Thyroid epithelial cells treated with 25-hydroxycholesterol, which is known to inhibit SREBP activation, had about 50% decreased mRNA levels of TPO. Similarly, the mRNA level of TPO was reduced by about 50% in response to siRNA mediated knockdown of both, SREBP-1 and SREBP-2. Reporter gene assays revealed that overexpression of active SREBP-1c and -2 causes a strong transcriptional activation of the rat TPO gene, which was localized to an approximately 80 bp region in the intron 1 of the rat TPO gene. In vitro- and in vivo-binding of both, SREBP-1c and SREBP-2, to this region in the rat TPO gene could be demonstrated using gel-shift assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation. Mutation analysis of the 80 bp region of rat TPO intron 1 revealed two isolated and two overlapping SREBP-binding elements from which one, the overlapping SRE+609/InvSRE+614, was shown to be functional in reporter gene assays. In connection with recent findings that the rat NIS gene is also a SREBP target gene in the thyroid, the present findings suggest that SREBPs may be possible novel targets for pharmacological modulation of thyroid hormone synthesis.

  10. High concentrations of protein test substances may have non-toxic effects on Daphnia magna: implications for regulatory study designs and ecological risk assessments for GM crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raybould, Alan; Burns, Andrea; Hamer, Mick

    2014-01-01

    Laboratory testing for possible adverse effects of insecticidal proteins on non-target organisms (NTOs) is an important part of many ecological risk assessments for regulatory decision-making about the cultivation of insect-resistant genetically modified (IRGM) crops. To increase confidence in the risk assessments, regulatory guidelines for effects testing specify that representative surrogate species for NTOs are exposed to concentrations of insecticidal proteins that are in excess of worst-case predicted exposures in the field. High concentrations in effects tests are achieved by using protein test substances produced in microbes, such as Escherichia coli. In a study that exposed Daphnia magna to a single high concentration of a microbial test substance containing Vip3Aa20, the insecticidal protein in MIR162 maize, small reductions in growth were observed. These effects were surprising as many other studies strongly suggest that the activity of Vip3Aa20 is limited to Lepidoptera. A plausible explanation for the effect on growth is that high concentrations of test substance have a non-toxic effect on Daphnia, perhaps by reducing its feeding rate. A follow-up study tested that hypothesis by exposing D. magna to several concentrations of Vip3Aa20, and a high concentration of a non-toxic protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA). Vip3Aa20 and BSA had sporadic effects on the reproduction and growth of D. magna. The pattern of the effects suggests that they result from non-toxic effects of high concentrations of protein, and not from toxicity. The implications of these results for regulatory NTO effects testing and ERA of IRGM crops are discussed.

  11. Identification of a phosphorylation-dependent nuclear localization motif in interferon regulatory factor 2 binding protein 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen C T Teng

    Full Text Available Interferon regulatory factor 2 binding protein 2 (IRF2BP2 is a muscle-enriched transcription factor required to activate vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGFA expression in muscle. IRF2BP2 is found in the nucleus of cardiac and skeletal muscle cells. During the process of skeletal muscle differentiation, some IRF2BP2 becomes relocated to the cytoplasm, although the functional significance of this relocation and the mechanisms that control nucleocytoplasmic localization of IRF2BP2 are not yet known.Here, by fusing IRF2BP2 to green fluorescent protein and testing a series of deletion and site-directed mutagenesis constructs, we mapped the nuclear localization signal (NLS to an evolutionarily conserved sequence (354ARKRKPSP(361 in IRF2BP2. This sequence corresponds to a classical nuclear localization motif bearing positively charged arginine and lysine residues. Substitution of arginine and lysine with negatively charged aspartic acid residues blocked nuclear localization. However, these residues were not sufficient because nuclear targeting of IRF2BP2 also required phosphorylation of serine 360 (S360. Many large-scale phosphopeptide proteomic studies had reported previously that serine 360 of IRF2BP2 is phosphorylated in numerous human cell types. Alanine substitution at this site abolished IRF2BP2 nuclear localization in C(2C(12 myoblasts and CV1 cells. In contrast, substituting serine 360 with aspartic acid forced nuclear retention and prevented cytoplasmic redistribution in differentiated C(2C(12 muscle cells. As for the effects of these mutations on VEGFA promoter activity, the S360A mutation interfered with VEGFA activation, as expected. Surprisingly, the S360D mutation also interfered with VEGFA activation, suggesting that this mutation, while enforcing nuclear entry, may disrupt an essential activation function of IRF2BP2.Nuclear localization of IRF2BP2 depends on phosphorylation near a conserved NLS. Changes in phosphorylation status

  12. Candida albicans Lacking the Gene Encoding the Regulatory Subunit of Protein Kinase A Displays a Defect in Hyphal Formation and an Altered Localization of the Catalytic Subunit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassola, Alejandro; Parrot, Marc; Silberstein, Susana; Magee, Beatrice B.; Passeron, Susana; Giasson, Luc; Cantore, María L.

    2004-01-01

    The fungal pathogen Candida albicans switches from a yeast-like to a filamentous mode of growth in response to a variety of environmental conditions. We examined the morphogenetic behavior of C. albicans yeast cells lacking the BCY1 gene, which encodes the regulatory subunit of protein kinase A. We cloned the BCY1 gene and generated a bcy1 tpk2 double mutant strain because a homozygous bcy1 mutant in a wild-type genetic background could not be obtained. In the bcy1 tpk2 mutant, protein kinase A activity (due to the presence of the TPK1 gene) was cyclic AMP independent, indicating that the cells harbored an unregulated phosphotransferase activity. This mutant has constitutive protein kinase A activity and displayed a defective germinative phenotype in N-acetylglucosamine and in serum-containing medium. The subcellular localization of a Tpk1-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein was examined in wild-type, tpk2 null, and bcy1 tpk2 double mutant strains. The fusion protein was observed to be predominantly nuclear in wild-type and tpk2 strains. This was not the case in the bcy1 tpk2 double mutant, where it appeared dispersed throughout the cell. Coimmunoprecipitation of Bcy1p with the Tpk1-GFP fusion protein demonstrated the interaction of these proteins inside the cell. These results suggest that one of the roles of Bcy1p is to tether the protein kinase A catalytic subunit to the nucleus. PMID:14871949

  13. Helicobacter pylori CheZ(HP) and ChePep form a novel chemotaxis-regulatory complex distinct from the core chemotaxis signaling proteins and the flagellar motor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lertsethtakarn, Paphavee; Howitt, Michael R; Castellon, Juan; Amieva, Manuel R; Ottemann, Karen M

    2015-09-01

    Chemotaxis is important for Helicobacter pylori to colonize the stomach. Like other bacteria, H. pylori uses chemoreceptors and conserved chemotaxis proteins to phosphorylate the flagellar rotational response regulator, CheY, and modulate the flagellar rotational direction. Phosphorylated CheY is returned to its non-phosphorylated state by phosphatases such as CheZ. In previously studied cases, chemotaxis phosphatases localize to the cellular poles by interactions with either the CheA chemotaxis kinase or flagellar motor proteins. We report here that the H. pylori CheZ, CheZ(HP), localizes to the poles independently of the flagellar motor, CheA, and all typical chemotaxis proteins. Instead, CheZ(HP) localization depends on the chemotaxis regulatory protein ChePep, and reciprocally, ChePep requires CheZ(HP) for its polar localization. We furthermore show that these proteins interact directly. Functional domain mapping of CheZ(HP) determined the polar localization motif lies within the central domain of the protein and that the protein has regions outside of the active site that participate in chemotaxis. Our results suggest that CheZ(HP) and ChePep form a distinct complex. These results therefore suggest the intriguing idea that some phosphatases localize independently of the other chemotaxis and motility proteins, possibly to confer unique regulation on these proteins' activities. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Interaction of activator of G-protein signaling 3 (AGS3) with LKB1, a serine/threonine kinase involved in cell polarity and cell cycle progression: phosphorylation of the G-protein regulatory (GPR) motif as a regulatory mechanism for the interaction of GPR motifs with Gi alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumer, Joe B; Bernard, Michael L; Peterson, Yuri K; Nezu, Jun-ichi; Chung, Peter; Dunican, Dara J; Knoblich, Juergen A; Lanier, Stephen M

    2003-06-27

    Activator of G-protein signaling 3 (AGS3) has a modular domain structure consisting of seven tetratricopeptide repeats (TPRs) and four G-protein regulatory (GPR) motifs. Each GPR motif binds to the alpha subunit of Gi/Go (Gialpha > Goalpha) stabilizing the GDP-bound conformation of Galpha and apparently competing with Gbetagamma for GalphaGDP binding. As an initial approach to identify regulatory mechanisms for AGS3-G-protein interactions, a yeast two-hybrid screen was initiated using the TPR and linker region of AGS3 as bait. This screen identified the serine/threonine kinase LKB1, which is involved in the regulation of cell cycle progression and polarity. Protein interaction assays in mammalian systems using transfected cells or brain lysate indicated the regulated formation of a protein complex consisting of LKB1, AGS3, and G-proteins. The interaction between AGS3 and LKB1 was also observed with orthologous proteins in Drosophila where both proteins are involved in cell polarity. LKB1 immunoprecipitates from COS7 cells transfected with LKB1 phosphorylated the GPR domains of AGS3 and the related protein LGN but not the AGS3-TPR domain. GPR domain phosphorylation was completely blocked by a consensus GPR motif peptide, and placement of a phosphate moiety within a consensus GPR motif reduced the ability of the peptide to interact with G-proteins. These data suggest that phosphorylation of GPR domains may be a general mechanism regulating the interaction of GPR-containing proteins with G-proteins. Such a mechanism may be of particular note in regard to localized signal processing in the plasma membrane involving G-protein subunits and/or intracellular functions regulated by heterotrimeric G-proteins that occur independently of a typical G-protein-coupled receptor.

  15. Cell cycle and apoptosis regulatory proteins, proliferative markers, cell signaling molecules, CD209, and decorin immunoreactivity in low-grade myxofibrosarcoma and myxoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cates, Justin M M; Memoli, Vincent A; Gonzalez, Raul S

    2015-08-01

    The histologic differential diagnosis between intramuscular myxoma and low-grade myxofibrosarcoma can be quite difficult in some cases. To identify a diagnostic immunohistochemical marker, we compared the staining profiles of 19 different antigens, including cell cycle proteins, apoptosis proteins, and proliferative markers, and selected other signaling and structural proteins in these two tumors. Ten cases each of intramuscular myxoma and low-grade myxofibrosarcoma were stained with antibodies directed against apoptosis regulatory proteins (Bcl2, activated caspase-3, phospho-H2A.X, and cleaved PARP), cell cycle regulatory proteins (Rb1, Cyclin-A, CDKN1B, and Cdt1), proliferative markers (KI67, MCM2, phospho-histone H3, and geminin), cell signalling molecules (c-Myc, EGF, EGFR, PLA2G4A, and HSP90), a dendritic cell marker (CD209), and the extracellular matrix proteoglycan decorin. Staining patterns of myxoma and myxofibrosarcoma were compared using Fisher's exact test and the Mann-Whitney test. For each potential diagnostic marker studied, the proportions of cases scored as positive on both dichotomous or ordinal scales were not significantly different between myxoma and myxofibrosarcoma. Myxoma and myxofibrosarcoma share a common immunophenotype for each of the markers studied. Distinction between these tumors is still predominantly based on morphologic criteria.

  16. Effect of nerve growth factor on the expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins in PC12 cells: dissection of the neurotrophic response from the anti-mitogenic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Grunsven, L A; Billon, N; Savatier, P; Thomas, A; Urdiales, J L; Rudkin, B B

    1996-03-21

    PC12 cells treated with nerve growth factor (NGF) undergo a G1 block and differentiate. Expression of selected cell cycle regulatory proteins was studied under culture conditions which permit observation of a differentiation response independently from a mitogenic or anti-mitogenic response. The expression of all cell cycle regulatory proteins studied is modulated by NGF addition to exponentially-growing cultures in the presence of serum. While levels of most of these proteins decrease, accumulation of cyclin D1 and the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 Cip1/WAF1 is observed. Cyclin D1 associated kinase activity is inhibited, correlating with an increase in p21 protein. PC12 cells, synchronized by serum starvation, undergo morphological and functional differentiation in the presence of NGF. Neither cyclin D1 nor p21 are present in such cultures, nor is their expression upregulated by NGF, indicating that they are not required for this process. Removal of serum from differentiated PC12 cells results in loss of these proteins, but has no effect on differentiation or the nonproliferative state in presence of NGF. Together, the results indicate that cyclin D1 and p21 are not necessary for differentiation per se, nor are they required for maintenance of the differentiated state in the absence of serum.

  17. Evaluation of global sequence comparison and one-to-one FASTA local alignment in regulatory allergenicity assessment of transgenic proteins in food crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ping; Herman, Rod A; Kumpatla, Siva

    2014-09-01

    To address the high false positive rate using >35% identity over 80 amino acids in the regulatory assessment of transgenic proteins for potential allergenicity and the change of E-value with database size, the Needleman-Wunsch global sequence alignment and a one-to-one (1:1) local FASTA search (one protein in the target database at a time) using FASTA were evaluated by comparing proteins randomly selected from Arabidopsis, rice, corn, and soybean with known allergens in a peer-reviewed allergen database (http://www.allergenonline.org/). Compared with the approach of searching >35%/80aa+, the false positive rate measured by specificity rate for identification of true allergens was reduced by a 1:1 global sequence alignment with a cut-off threshold of ≧30% identity and a 1:1 FASTA local alignment with a cut-off E-value of ≦1.0E-09 while maintaining the same sensitivity. Hence, a 1:1 sequence comparison, especially using the FASTA local alignment tool with a biological relevant E-value of 1.0E-09 as a threshold, is recommended for the regulatory assessment of sequence identities between transgenic proteins in food crops and known allergens. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. High constitutive activity of a broad panel of housekeeping and tissue-specificcis-regulatory elements depends on a subset of ETS proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curina, Alessia; Termanini, Alberto; Barozzi, Iros; Prosperini, Elena; Simonatto, Marta; Polletti, Sara; Silvola, Alessio; Soldi, Monica; Austenaa, Liv; Bonaldi, Tiziana; Ghisletti, Serena; Natoli, Gioacchino

    2017-02-15

    Enhancers and promoters that control the transcriptional output of terminally differentiated cells include cell type-specific and broadly active housekeeping elements. Whether the high constitutive activity of these two groups of cis -regulatory elements relies on entirely distinct or instead also on shared regulators is unknown. By dissecting the cis -regulatory repertoire of macrophages, we found that the ELF subfamily of ETS proteins selectively bound within 60 base pairs (bp) from the transcription start sites of highly active housekeeping genes. ELFs also bound constitutively active, but not poised, macrophage-specific enhancers and promoters. The role of ELFs in promoting high-level constitutive transcription was suggested by multiple evidence: ELF sites enabled robust transcriptional activation by endogenous and minimal synthetic promoters, ELF recruitment was stabilized by the transcriptional machinery, and ELF proteins mediated recruitment of transcriptional and chromatin regulators to core promoters. These data suggest that the co-optation of a limited number of highly active transcription factors represents a broadly adopted strategy to equip both cell type-specific and housekeeping cis -regulatory elements with the ability to efficiently promote transcription. © 2017 Curina et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  19. Inability of a fusion protein of IL-2 and diphtheria toxin (Denileukin Diftitox, DAB389IL-2, ONTAK) to eliminate regulatory T lymphocytes in patients with melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attia, Peter; Maker, Ajay V; Haworth, Leah R; Rogers-Freezer, Linda; Rosenberg, Steven A

    2005-01-01

    Elimination of regulatory T lymphocytes may provide a way to break self-tolerance and unleash the anti-tumor properties of circulating lymphocytes. The use of fusion proteins, which link cytotoxic molecules to receptor targets, provides one approach to this problem. This study examined the ability of a fusion protein of interleukin-2 (IL-2) and diphtheria toxin (Denileukin Diftitox, DAB389IL-2, ONTAK) to eliminate regulatory T lymphocytes based on their expression of high-affinity IL-2 receptors. Thirteen patients (12 with metastatic melanoma, 1 with metastatic renal cell carcinoma) were treated at one of the two Food and Drug Administration-approved doses of Denileukin Diftitox (seven patients at 9 microg/kg, six patients at 18 microg/kg). None of the patients experienced an objective clinical response. Foxp3 expression did not decrease significantly overall, although it did decrease minimally among patients receiving 18 microg/kg (-2.01+/-0.618 copies of Foxp3/10(3) copies of beta-actin; P=0.031). Denileukin Diftitox did not decrease the suppressive ability of CD4CD25 cells as quantified by an in vitro co-culture suppression assay. Furthermore, the increased numbers of lymphocytes in patients resulting from treatment with IL-2 were not susceptible to Denileukin Diftitox. Administration of Denileukin Diftitox does not appear to eliminate regulatory T lymphocytes or cause regression of metastatic melanoma.

  20. Hepatic overexpression of idol increases circulating protein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 in mice and hamsters via dual mechanisms: sterol regulatory element-binding protein 2 and low-density lipoprotein receptor-dependent pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Makoto; Terao, Yoshio; Ayaori, Makoto; Uto-Kondo, Harumi; Iizuka, Maki; Yogo, Makiko; Hagisawa, Kosuke; Takiguchi, Shunichi; Yakushiji, Emi; Nakaya, Kazuhiro; Ogura, Masatsune; Komatsu, Tomohiro; Ikewaki, Katsunori

    2014-06-01

    Low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) is degraded by inducible degrader of LDLR (Idol) and protein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9), thereby regulating circulating LDL levels. However, it remains unclear whether, and if so how, these LDLR degraders affect each other. We therefore investigated effects of liver-specific expression of Idol on LDL/PCSK9 metabolism in mice and hamsters. Injection of adenoviral vector expressing Idol (Ad-Idol) induced a liver-specific reduction in LDLR expression which, in turn, increased very-low-density lipoprotein/LDL cholesterol levels in wild-type mice because of delayed LDL catabolism. Interestingly, hepatic Idol overexpression markedly increased plasma PCSK9 levels. In LDLR-deficient mice, plasma PCSK9 levels were already elevated at baseline and unchanged by Idol overexpression, which was comparable with the observation for Ad-Idol-injected wild-type mice, indicating that Idol-induced PCSK9 elevation depended on LDLR. In wild-type mice, but not in LDLR-deficient mice, Ad-Idol enhanced hepatic PCSK9 expression, with activation of sterol regulatory element-binding protein 2 and subsequently increased expression of its target genes. Supporting in vivo findings, Idol transactivated PCSK9/LDLR in sterol regulatory element-binding protein 2/LDLR-dependent manners in vitro. Furthermore, an in vivo kinetic study using (125)I-labeled PCSK9 revealed delayed clearance of circulating PCSK9, which could be another mechanism. Finally, to extend these findings into cholesteryl ester transfer protein-expressing animals, we repeated the above in vivo experiments in hamsters and obtained similar results. A vicious cycle in LDLR degradation might be generated by PCSK9 induced by hepatic Idol overexpression via dual mechanisms: sterol regulatory element-binding protein 2/LDLR. Furthermore, these effects would be independent of cholesteryl ester transfer protein expression. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. TRAP1 and the proteasome regulatory particle TBP7/Rpt3 interact in the endoplasmic reticulum and control cellular ubiquitination of specific mitochondrial proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoroso, M R; Matassa, D S; Laudiero, G; Egorova, A V; Polishchuk, R S; Maddalena, F; Piscazzi, A; Paladino, S; Sarnataro, D; Garbi, C; Landriscina, M; Esposito, F

    2012-04-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated protein-1 (TRAP1) is a mitochondrial (MITO) antiapoptotic heat-shock protein. The information available on the TRAP1 pathway describes just a few well-characterized functions of this protein in mitochondria. However, our group's use of mass-spectrometric analysis identified TBP7, an AAA-ATPase of the 19S proteasomal subunit, as a putative TRAP1-interacting protein. Surprisingly, TRAP1 and TBP7 colocalize in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), as demonstrated by biochemical and confocal/electron microscopic analyses, and interact directly, as confirmed by fluorescence resonance energy transfer analysis. This is the first demonstration of TRAP1's presence in this cellular compartment. TRAP1 silencing by short-hairpin RNAs, in cells exposed to thapsigargin-induced ER stress, correlates with upregulation of BiP/Grp78, thus suggesting a role of TRAP1 in the refolding of damaged proteins and in ER stress protection. Consistently, TRAP1 and/or TBP7 interference enhanced stress-induced cell death and increased intracellular protein ubiquitination. These experiments led us to hypothesize an involvement of TRAP1 in protein quality control for mistargeted/misfolded mitochondria-destined proteins, through interaction with the regulatory proteasome protein TBP7. Remarkably, expression of specific MITO proteins decreased upon TRAP1 interference as a consequence of increased ubiquitination. The proposed TRAP1 network has an impact in vivo, as it is conserved in human colorectal cancers, is controlled by ER-localized TRAP1 interacting with TBP7 and provides a novel model of the ER-mitochondria crosstalk.

  2. Nitrosylation of Nitric-Oxide-Sensing Regulatory Proteins Containing [4Fe-4S] Clusters Gives Rise to Multiple Iron-Nitrosyl Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrano, Pauline N. [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Davis CA 95616 USA; Wang, Hongxin [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Davis CA 95616 USA; Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley CA 94720 USA; Crack, Jason C. [Centre for Molecular and Structural Biochemistry, School of Chemistry, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park Norwich NR4 7TJ UK; Prior, Christopher [Centre for Molecular and Structural Biochemistry, School of Chemistry, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park Norwich NR4 7TJ UK; Hutchings, Matthew I. [School of Biological Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich NR4 7TJ UK; Thomson, Andrew J. [Centre for Molecular and Structural Biochemistry, School of Chemistry, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park Norwich NR4 7TJ UK; Kamali, Saeed [University of Tennessee Space Institute, Tullahome TN 37388-9700 USA; Yoda, Yoshitaka [Research and Utilization Division, SPring-8/JASRI, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo Hyogo 679-5198 Japan; Zhao, Jiyong [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA; Hu, Michael Y. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA; Alp, Ercan E. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA; Oganesyan, Vasily S. [Centre for Molecular and Structural Biochemistry, School of Chemistry, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park Norwich NR4 7TJ UK; Le Brun, Nick E. [Centre for Molecular and Structural Biochemistry, School of Chemistry, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park Norwich NR4 7TJ UK; Cramer, Stephen P. [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Davis CA 95616 USA; Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley CA 94720 USA

    2016-10-25

    The reaction of protein-bound iron–sulfur (Fe-S) clusters with nitric oxide (NO) plays key roles in NO-mediated toxicity and signaling. Elucidation of the mechanism of the reaction of NO with DNA regulatory proteins that contain Fe-S clusters has been hampered by a lack of information about the nature of the iron-nitrosyl products formed. Herein, we report nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations that identify NO reaction products in WhiD and NsrR, regulatory proteins that use a [4Fe-4S] cluster to sense NO. This work reveals that nitrosylation yields multiple products structurally related to Roussin's Red Ester (RRE, [Fe2(NO)4(Cys)2]) and Roussin's Black Salt (RBS, [Fe4(NO)7S3]. In the latter case, the absence of 32S/34S shifts in the Fe-S region of the NRVS spectra suggest that a new species, Roussin's Black Ester (RBE), may be formed, in which one or more of the sulfide ligands is replaced by Cys thiolates.

  3. Expanded roles of leucine-responsive regulatory protein in transcription regulation of the Escherichia coli genome: Genomic SELEX screening of the regulation targets

    OpenAIRE

    Shimada, Tomohiro; Saito, Natsumi; Maeda, Michihisa; Tanaka, Kan; Ishihama, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp) is a transcriptional regulator for the genes involved in transport, biosynthesis and catabolism of amino acids in Escherichia coli. In order to identify the whole set of genes under the direct control of Lrp, we performed Genomic SELEX screening and identified a total of 314 Lrp-binding sites on the E. coli genome. As a result, the regulation target of Lrp was predicted to expand from the hitherto identified genes for amino acid metabolism to a set ...

  4. Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein 1a Regulates Hepatic Fatty Acid Partitioning by Activating Acetyl Coenzyme A Carboxylase 2 ▿ ‡

    OpenAIRE

    Im, Seung-Soon; Hammond, Linda E.; Yousef, Leyla; Nugas-Selby, Cherryl; Shin, Dong-Ju; Seo, Young-Kyo; Fong, Loren G.; Young, Stephen G.; Osborne, Timothy F.

    2009-01-01

    We generated a line of mice in which sterol regulatory element binding protein 1a (SREBP-1a) was specifically inactivated by insertional mutagenesis. Homozygous mutant mice were completely viable despite expressing SREBP-1a mRNA below 5% of normal, and there were minimal effects on expression of either SREBP-1c or -2. Microarray expression studies in liver, where SREBP-1a mRNA is 1/10 the level of the highly similar SREBP-1c, demonstrated that only a few genes were affected. The only downregu...

  5. The vasa regulatory region mediates germline expression and maternal transmission of proteins in the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae: a versatile tool for genetic control strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burt Austin

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Germline specific promoters are an essential component of potential vector control strategies which function by genetic drive, however suitable promoters are not currently available for the main human malaria vector Anopheles gambiae. Results We have identified the Anopheles gambiae vasa-like gene and found its expression to be specifically localized to both the male and female gonads in adult mosquitoes. We have functionally characterised using transgenic reporter lines the regulatory regions required for driving transgene expression in a pattern mirroring that of the endogenous vasa locus. Two reporter constructs indicate the existence of distinct vasa regulatory elements within the 5' untranslated regions responsible not only for the spatial and temporal but also for the sex specific germline expression. vasa driven eGFP expression in the ovary of heterozygous mosquitoes resulted in the progressive accumulation of maternal protein and transcript in developing oocytes that were then detectable in all embryos and neonatal larvae. Conclusion We have characterized the vasa regulatory regions that are not only suited to drive transgenes in the early germline of both sexes but could also be utilized to manipulate the zygotic genome of developing embryos via maternal deposition of active molecules. We have used computational models to show that a homing endonuclease-based gene drive system can function in the presence of maternal deposition and describe a novel non-invasive control strategy based on early vasa driven homing endonuclease expression.

  6. The dengue vector Aedes aegypti contains a functional high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein with a unique regulatory C-terminus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Fabio Schneider; de Abreu da Silva, Isabel Caetano; Carneiro, Vitor Coutinho; Belgrano, Fabrício dos Santos; Mohana-Borges, Ronaldo; de Andrade Rosa, Ivone; Benchimol, Marlene; Souza, Nathalia Rocha Quintino; Mesquita, Rafael Dias; Sorgine, Marcos Henrique Ferreira; Gazos-Lopes, Felipe; Vicentino, Amanda Roberta Revoredo; Wu, Wenjie; de Moraes Maciel, Renata; da Silva-Neto, Mario Alberto Cardoso; Fantappié, Marcelo Rosado

    2012-01-01

    The mosquito Aedes aegypti can spread the dengue, chikungunya and yellow fever viruses. Thus, the search for key molecules involved in the mosquito survival represents today a promising vector control strategy. High Mobility Group Box (HMGB) proteins are essential nuclear factors that maintain the high-order structure of chromatin, keeping eukaryotic cells viable. Outside the nucleus, secreted HMGB proteins could alert the innate immune system to foreign antigens and trigger the initiation of host defenses. In this work, we cloned and functionally characterized the HMGB1 protein from Aedes aegypti (AaHMGB1). The AaHMGB1 protein typically consists of two HMG-box DNA binding domains and an acidic C-terminus. Interestingly, AaHMGB1 contains a unique alanine/glutamine-rich (AQ-rich) C-terminal region that seems to be exclusive of dipteran HMGB proteins. AaHMGB1 is localized to the cell nucleus, mainly associated with heterochromatin. Circular dichroism analyses of AaHMGB1 or the C-terminal truncated proteins revealed α-helical structures. We showed that AaHMGB1 can effectively bind and change the topology of DNA, and that the AQ-rich and the C-terminal acidic regions can modulate its ability to promote DNA supercoiling, as well as its preference to bind supercoiled DNA. AaHMGB1 is phosphorylated by PKA and PKC, but not by CK2. Importantly, phosphorylation of AaHMGB1 by PKA or PKC completely abolishes its DNA bending activity. Thus, our study shows that a functional HMGB1 protein occurs in Aedes aegypt and we provide the first description of a HMGB1 protein containing an AQ-rich regulatory C-terminus.

  7. The dengue vector Aedes aegypti contains a functional high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1 protein with a unique regulatory C-terminus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Schneider Ribeiro

    Full Text Available The mosquito Aedes aegypti can spread the dengue, chikungunya and yellow fever viruses. Thus, the search for key molecules involved in the mosquito survival represents today a promising vector control strategy. High Mobility Group Box (HMGB proteins are essential nuclear factors that maintain the high-order structure of chromatin, keeping eukaryotic cells viable. Outside the nucleus, secreted HMGB proteins could alert the innate immune system to foreign antigens and trigger the initiation of host defenses. In this work, we cloned and functionally characterized the HMGB1 protein from Aedes aegypti (AaHMGB1. The AaHMGB1 protein typically consists of two HMG-box DNA binding domains and an acidic C-terminus. Interestingly, AaHMGB1 contains a unique alanine/glutamine-rich (AQ-rich C-terminal region that seems to be exclusive of dipteran HMGB proteins. AaHMGB1 is localized to the cell nucleus, mainly associated with heterochromatin. Circular dichroism analyses of AaHMGB1 or the C-terminal truncated proteins revealed α-helical structures. We showed that AaHMGB1 can effectively bind and change the topology of DNA, and that the AQ-rich and the C-terminal acidic regions can modulate its ability to promote DNA supercoiling, as well as its preference to bind supercoiled DNA. AaHMGB1 is phosphorylated by PKA and PKC, but not by CK2. Importantly, phosphorylation of AaHMGB1 by PKA or PKC completely abolishes its DNA bending activity. Thus, our study shows that a functional HMGB1 protein occurs in Aedes aegypt and we provide the first description of a HMGB1 protein containing an AQ-rich regulatory C-terminus.

  8. Regulatory agencies and regulatory risk

    OpenAIRE

    Knieps, Günter; Weiß, Hans-Jörg

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to show that regulatory risk is due to the discretionary behaviour of regulatory agencies, caused by a too extensive regulatory mandate provided by the legislator. The normative point of reference and a behavioural model of regulatory agencies based on the positive theory of regulation are presented. Regulatory risk with regard to the future behaviour of regulatory agencies is modelled as the consequence of the ex ante uncertainty about the relative influence of inter...

  9. Regulatory-associated protein of TOR (RAPTOR) alters the hormonal and metabolic composition of Arabidopsis seeds, controlling seed morphology, viability and germination potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Mohamed A; Li, Yan; Wiszniewski, Andrew; Giavalisco, Patrick

    2017-11-01

    Target of Rapamycin (TOR) is a positive regulator of growth and development in all eukaryotes, which positively regulates anabolic processes like protein synthesis, while repressing catabolic processes, including autophagy. To better understand TOR function we decided to analyze its role in seed development and germination. We therefore performed a detailed phenotypic analysis using mutants of the REGULATORY-ASSOCIATED PROTEIN OF TOR 1B (RAPTOR1B), a conserved TOR interactor, acting as a scaffold protein, which recruits substrates for the TOR kinase. Our results show that raptor1b plants produced seeds that were delayed in germination and less resistant to stresses, leading to decreased viability. These physiological phenotypes were accompanied by morphological changes including decreased seed-coat pigmentation and reduced production of seed-coat mucilage. A detailed molecular analysis revealed that many of these morphological changes were associated with significant changes of the metabolic content of raptor1b seeds, including elevated levels of free amino acids, as well as reduced levels of protective secondary metabolites and storage proteins. Most of these observed changes were accompanied by significantly altered phytohormone levels in the raptor1b seeds, with increases in abscisic acid, auxin and jasmonic acid, which are known to inhibit germination. Delayed germination and seedling growth, observed in the raptor1b seeds, could be partially restored by the exogenous supply of gibberellic acid, indicating that TOR is at the center of a regulatory hub controlling seed metabolism, maturation and germination. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Induction of Regulatory T Cells and Its Regulation with Insulin-like Growth Factor/Insulin-like Growth Factor Binding Protein-4 by Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagawa, Ippei; Nakayamada, Shingo; Nakano, Kazuhisa; Yamagata, Kaoru; Sakata, Kei; Yamaoka, Kunihiro; Tanaka, Yoshiya

    2017-09-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent and exert anti-inflammatory effects, but the underlying mechanism remains to be elucidated. In the current study, we investigated the regulatory mechanism of regulatory T cell (Treg) induction through the growth factors released by human MSCs. Human naive CD4 + T cells were stimulated with anti-CD3/28 Abs and cocultured with human MSC culture supernatant for 48 h. The proliferation and cytokine production of CD4 + T cells and surface molecule expression on CD4 + T cells were evaluated. The proliferation of anti-CD3/28 Abs-stimulated CD4 + T cells was suppressed by the addition of human MSC culture supernatant; in addition, the production of IL-10 and IL-4 increased. The human MSC culture supernatant induced CD4 + FOXP3 + Tregs that expressed CD25, CTLA-4, glucocorticoid-induced TNFR-related protein, insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1R, and IGF-2R, showing antiproliferative activity against CD4 + T cells. In addition, the induction of Tregs by human MSC culture supernatant was enhanced by the addition of IGF and suppressed by the inhibition of IGF-1R. In contrast, a significant amount of IGF binding protein (IGFBP)-4, an inhibitor of IGF action, was detected in the human MSC culture supernatant. After neutralization of IGFBP-4 in the human MSC culture supernatant by anti-IGFBP-4 Ab, Treg numbers increased significantly. Thus, our results raise the possibility that human MSC actions also involve a negative-regulatory mechanism that suppresses Treg proliferation by releasing IGFBP-4. The results of this study suggest that regulation of IGF may be important for treatments using human MSCs. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  11. Lrp, a major regulatory protein in Escherichia coli, bends DNA and can organize the assembly of a higher-order nucleoprotein structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q; Calvo, J M

    1993-06-01

    Lrp (Leucine-responsive regulatory protein) is a global regulatory protein that controls the expression of many operons in Escherichia coli. One of those operons, ilvIH, contains six Lrp binding sites located within a several hundred base pair region upstream of the promoter region. Analysis of the binding of Lrp to a set of circularly permuted DNA fragments from this region indicates that Lrp induces DNA bending. The results of DNase I footprinting experiments suggest that Lrp binding to this region facilitates the formation of a higher-order nucleoprotein structure. To define more precisely the degree of bending associated with Lrp binding, one or two binding sites were separately cloned into a pBend vector and analyzed. Lrp induced a bend of approximately 52 degrees upon binding to a single binding site, and the angle of bending is increased to at least 135 degrees when Lrp binds to two adjacent sites. Lrp-induced DNA bending, and a natural sequence-directed bend that exists within ilvIH DNA, may be architectural elements that facilitate the assembly of a nucleoprotein complex.

  12. Phenylarsine Oxide Binding Reveals Redox-Active and Potential Regulatory Vicinal Thiols on the Catalytic Subunit of Protein Phosphatase 2A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melideo, Scott L.; Healey, Adriana E.; Lucas, Eugene J.; Koval, Jason A.

    2011-01-01

    Our earlier finding that the activity of protein phosphatase 2A from rat brain is inhibited by micromolar concentrations of the dithiol cross-linking reagent phenylarsine oxide (PAO) has encouraged the hypothesis that the catalytic subunit (PP2Ac) of PP2A contains one or more pairs of closely-spaced (vicinal) thiol pairs that may contribute to regulation of the enzyme. The results of the present study demonstrate using immobilized PAO-affinity chromatography that PP2Ac from rat brain formed stable DTT-sensitive adducts with PAO with or without associated regulatory subunits. In addition, a subset of the PAO-binding vicinal thiols of PP2Ac was readily oxidized to disulfide bonds in vitro. Importantly, a small fraction of PP2Ac was still found to contain disulfide bonds after applying stringent conditions designed to prevent protein disulfide bond formation during homogenization and fractionation of the brains. These findings establish the presence of potentially regulatory and redox-active PAO-binding vicinal thiols on the catalytic subunit of PP2A and suggest that a population of PP2Ac may contain disulfide bonds in vivo. PMID:21080067

  13. Variations at regulatory regions of the milk protein genes are associated with milk traits and coagulation properties in the Sarda sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noce, A; Pazzola, M; Dettori, M L; Amills, M; Castelló, A; Cecchinato, A; Bittante, G; Vacca, G M

    2016-12-01

    Regulatory variation at the ovine casein genes could have important effects on the composition and coagulation properties of milk. Herewith, we have partially resequenced the promoters and the 3'-UTR of the four casein genes in 25 Sarda sheep. Alignment of these sequences allowed us to identify a total of 29 SNPs. This level of polymorphism (one SNP every 250 bp) is remarkably high if compared with SNP densities estimated in human genic regions (approximately one SNP per bp). The 29 SNPs identified in our resequencing experiment, plus three previously reported SNPs mapping to the lactalbumin, alpha (LALBA) and β-lactoglobulin (BLG, also known as progestagen-associated endometrial protein, PAEP) genes, were genotyped with a multiplex TaqMan Open Array Real-Time PCR assay in 760 Sarda sheep with records for milk composition and coagulation properties. Association analysis revealed the existence of significant associations of CSN1S2 and CSN3 genotypes with milk protein and casein contents. Moreover, genotypes at CSN1S1 were significantly associated with rennet coagulation time, curd firming time and curd firmness, whereas CSN2 was associated with curd firming time. These results suggest that SNPs mapping to the promoters and 3'-UTRs of ovine casein genes may exert regulatory effects on gene expression and that they could be used for improving sheep milk quality and technological traits at the population level through marker assisted selection. © 2016 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  14. Increased expression and purification of soluble iron-regulatory protein 1 from Escherichia coli co-expressing chaperonins GroES and GroEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Carvalho

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Iron is an essential metal for all living organisms. However, iron homeostasis needs to be tightly controlled since iron can mediate the production of reactive oxygen species, which can damage cell components and compromise the integrity and/or cause DNA mutations, ultimately leading to cancer. In eukaryotes, iron-regulatory protein 1 (IRP1 plays a central role in the control of intracellular iron homeostasis. This occurs by interaction of IRP1 with iron-responsive element regions at 5' of ferritin mRNA and 3' of transferrin mRNA which, respectively, represses translation and increases mRNA stability. We have expressed IRP1 using the plasmid pT7-His-hIRP1, which codifies for human IRP1 attached to an NH2-terminal 6-His tag. IRP1 was expressed in Escherichia coli using the strategy of co-expressing chaperonins GroES and GroEL, in order to circumvent inclusion body formation and increase the yield of soluble protein. The protein co-expressed with these chaperonins was obtained mostly in the soluble form, which greatly increased the efficiency of protein purification. Metal affinity and FPLC ion exchange chromatography were used in order to obtain highly purified IRP1. Purified protein was biologically active, as assessed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay, and could be converted to the cytoplasmic aconitase form. These results corroborate previous studies, which suggest the use of folding catalysts as a powerful strategy to increase protein solubility when expressing heterologous proteins in E. coli.

  15. Regulatory elements in the promoter region of the rat gene encoding the acyl-CoA-binding protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elholm, M; Bjerking, G; Knudsen, J

    1996-01-01

    Acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) is an ubiquitously expressed 10-kDa protein which is present in high amounts in cells involved in solute transport or secretion. Rat ACBP is encoded by a gene containing the typical hallmarks of a housekeeping gene. Analysis of the promoter region of the rat ACBP g...

  16. CAT‐2003: A novel sterol regulatory element‐binding protein inhibitor that reduces steatohepatitis, plasma lipids, and atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E*3‐Leiden mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bista, Pradeep; Benson, Ericka L.; Lee, Diana Y.; Liu, Feng; Picarella, Dominic; Vega, Rick B.; Vu, Chi B.; Yeager, Maisy; Ding, Min; Liang, Guosheng; Horton, Jay D.; Kleemann, Robert; Kooistra, Teake; Morrison, Martine C.; Wielinga, Peter Y.; Milne, Jill C.; Jirousek, Michael R.; Nichols, Andrew J.

    2017-01-01

    CAT‐2003 is a novel conjugate of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and niacin designed to be hydrolyzed by fatty acid amide hydrolase to release EPA inside cells at the endoplasmic reticulum. In cultured liver cells, CAT‐2003 blocked the maturation of sterol regulatory element‐binding protein (SREBP)‐1 and SREBP‐2 proteins and decreased the expression of multiple SREBP target genes, including HMGCR and PCSK9. Consistent with proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) reduction, both low‐density lipoprotein receptor protein at the cell surface and low‐density lipoprotein particle uptake were increased. In apolipoprotein E*3‐Leiden mice fed a cholesterol‐containing western diet, CAT‐2003 decreased hepatic inflammation and steatosis as evidenced by fewer inflammatory cell aggregates in histopathologic sections, decreased nuclear factor kappa B activity in liver lysates, reduced inflammatory gene expression, reduced intrahepatic cholesteryl ester and triglyceride levels, and decreased liver mass. Plasma PCSK9 was reduced and hepatic low‐density lipoprotein receptor protein expression was increased; plasma cholesterol and triglyceride levels were lowered. Aortic root segments showed reduction of several atherosclerotic markers, including lesion size, number, and severity. CAT‐2003, when dosed in combination with atorvastatin, further lowered plasma cholesterol levels and decreased hepatic expression of SREBP target genes. Conclusion: SREBP inhibition is a promising new strategy for the prevention and treatment of diseases associated with abnormal lipid metabolism, such as atherosclerosis and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. (Hepatology Communications 2017;1:311–325) PMID:29404461

  17. Complementary transcriptomic and proteomic analyses reveal regulatory mechanisms of milk protein production in dairy cows consuming different forages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Wenting; Chen, Qiong; Wang, Quanjuan; White, Robin R.; Liu, Jianxin; Liu, Hongyun

    2017-01-01

    Forage plays a critical role in the milk production of dairy cows; however, the mechanisms regulating bovine milk synthesis in dairy cows fed high forage rations with different basal forage types are not well-understood. In the study, rice straw (RS, low-quality) and alfalfa hay (AH, high-quality) diets were fed to lactating cows to explore how forage quality affected the molecular mechanisms regulating milk production using RNA-seq transcriptomic method with iTRAQ proteomic technique. A total of 554 transcripts (423 increased and 131 decreased) and 517 proteins (231 up-regulated and 286 down-regulated) were differentially expressed in the mammary glands of the two groups. The correlation analysis demonstrated seven proteins (six up-regulated and one down-regulated) had consistent mRNA expression. Functional analysis of the differentially expressed transcripts/proteins suggested that enhanced capacity for energy and fatty acid metabolism, increased protein degradation, reduced protein synthesis, decreased amino acid metabolism and depressed cell growth were related to RS consumption. The results indicated cows consuming RS diets may have had depressed milk protein synthesis because these animals had decreased capacity for protein synthesis, enhanced proteolysis, inefficient energy generation and reduced cell growth. Additional work evaluating RS- and AH-based rations may help better isolate molecular adaptations to low nutrient availability during lactation. PMID:28290485

  18. Complementary transcriptomic and proteomic analyses reveal regulatory mechanisms of milk protein production in dairy cows consuming different forages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Wenting; Chen, Qiong; Wang, Quanjuan; White, Robin R; Liu, Jianxin; Liu, Hongyun

    2017-03-14

    Forage plays a critical role in the milk production of dairy cows; however, the mechanisms regulating bovine milk synthesis in dairy cows fed high forage rations with different basal forage types are not well-understood. In the study, rice straw (RS, low-quality) and alfalfa hay (AH, high-quality) diets were fed to lactating cows to explore how forage quality affected the molecular mechanisms regulating milk production using RNA-seq transcriptomic method with iTRAQ proteomic technique. A total of 554 transcripts (423 increased and 131 decreased) and 517 proteins (231 up-regulated and 286 down-regulated) were differentially expressed in the mammary glands of the two groups. The correlation analysis demonstrated seven proteins (six up-regulated and one down-regulated) had consistent mRNA expression. Functional analysis of the differentially expressed transcripts/proteins suggested that enhanced capacity for energy and fatty acid metabolism, increased protein degradation, reduced protein synthesis, decreased amino acid metabolism and depressed cell growth were related to RS consumption. The results indicated cows consuming RS diets may have had depressed milk protein synthesis because these animals had decreased capacity for protein synthesis, enhanced proteolysis, inefficient energy generation and reduced cell growth. Additional work evaluating RS- and AH-based rations may help better isolate molecular adaptations to low nutrient availability during lactation.

  19. Chronic exposure of HIT cells to high glucose concentrations paradoxically decreases insulin gene transcription and alters binding of insulin gene regulatory protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, L K; Redmon, J B; Towle, H C; Robertson, R P

    1993-07-01

    Chronically culturing HIT-T15 cells in media containing high glucose concentrations leads to decreased insulin mRNA levels, insulin content, and insulin secretion. These changes can be prevented by culturing the cells in media containing lower glucose levels (Robertson, R. P., H.-J. Zhang, K. L. Pyzdrowski, and T. F. Walseth. 1992. J. Clin. Invest. 90:320-325). The mechanism of this seemingly paradoxical phenomenon was examined by transiently transfecting HIT cells with a chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) reporter gene controlled by the 5'-regulatory domain of the human insulin gene (INSCAT). Early passages of HIT cells readily expressed INSCAT, whereas late passages of cells chronically cultured in 11.1 mM glucose expressed only 28.7 +/- 2.3% (mean +/- SEM) of the CAT activity expressed in early passages. In contrast, late passages of HIT cells chronically cultured in 0.8 mM glucose retained the ability to express the INSCAT reporter gene to 69.6 +/- 10.0% of the CAT activity observed in early passages. The decrease in INSCAT expression in late passages of cells serially cultured in 11.1 mM glucose was associated with the inability to form a specific nuclear protein-DNA complex with the CT motifs of the human insulin promoter. Formation of this specific protein-DNA complex was preserved in late passages of HIT cells when serially cultured in 0.8 mM glucose. Mutations of the CT motifs caused markedly diminished CAT activity in all passages examined. These data indicate that chronic exposure of the beta cell to high glucose concentrations can paradoxically decrease insulin gene transcription, in part, by altering the ability of a regulatory protein (GSTF) to interact with the insulin gene promoter. This provides a potential mechanism for glucotoxic effects on the beta cell at the level of the insulin gene.

  20. Role of calpain in eccentric contraction-induced proteolysis of Ca2+-regulatory proteins and force depression in rat fast-twitch skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanzaki, Keita; Watanabe, Daiki; Kuratani, Mai; Yamada, Takashi; Matsunaga, Satoshi; Wada, Masanobu

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the in vivo effects of eccentric contraction (ECC) on calpain-dependent proteolysis of Ca 2+ -regulatory proteins and force production in fast-twitch skeletal muscles. Rat extensor digitorum longus muscles were exposed to 200 repeated ECC in situ and excised immediately [recovery 0 (REC0)] or 3 days [recovery 3 (REC3)] after cessation of ECC. Calpain inhibitor (CI)-treated rats were intraperitoneally injected with MDL-28170 before ECC and during REC3. Tetanic force was markedly reduced at REC0 and remained reduced at REC3. CI treatment ameliorated the ECC-induced force decline but only at REC3. No evidence was found for proteolysis of dihydropyridine receptor (DHPR), junctophilin (JP)1, JP2, ryanodine receptor (RyR), sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca 2+ -ATPase (SERCA)1a, or junctional face protein-45 at REC0. At REC3, ECC resulted in decreases in DHPR, JP1, JP2, RyR, and SERCA1a. CI treatment prevented the decreases in DHPR, JP1, and JP2, whereas it had little effect on RyR and SERCA1a. These findings suggest that DHPR, JP1, and JP2, but not RyR and SERCA1a, undergo calpain-dependent proteolysis in in vivo muscles subjected to ECC and that impaired function of DHPR and/or JP might cause prolonged force deficits with ECC. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Calpain-dependent proteolysis is one of the contributing factors to muscle damage that occurs with eccentric contraction (ECC). It is unclear, however, whether calpains account for proteolysis of Ca 2+ -regulatory proteins in in vivo muscles subjected to ECC. Here, we provide evidence that dihydropyridine receptor and junctophilin, but not ryanodine receptor and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca 2+ -ATPase, undergo calpain-dependent proteolysis. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  1. ChIPBase v2.0: decoding transcriptional regulatory networks of non-coding RNAs and protein-coding genes from ChIP-seq data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ke-Ren; Liu, Shun; Sun, Wen-Ju; Zheng, Ling-Ling; Zhou, Hui; Yang, Jian-Hua; Qu, Liang-Hu

    2017-01-04

    The abnormal transcriptional regulation of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) and protein-coding genes (PCGs) is contributed to various biological processes and linked with human diseases, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. In this study, we developed ChIPBase v2.0 (http://rna.sysu.edu.cn/chipbase/) to explore the transcriptional regulatory networks of ncRNAs and PCGs. ChIPBase v2.0 has been expanded with ∼10 200 curated ChIP-seq datasets, which represent about 20 times expansion when comparing to the previous released version. We identified thousands of binding motif matrices and their binding sites from ChIP-seq data of DNA-binding proteins and predicted millions of transcriptional regulatory relationships between transcription factors (TFs) and genes. We constructed 'Regulator' module to predict hundreds of TFs and histone modifications that were involved in or affected transcription of ncRNAs and PCGs. Moreover, we built a web-based tool, Co-Expression, to explore the co-expression patterns between DNA-binding proteins and various types of genes by integrating the gene expression profiles of ∼10 000 tumor samples and ∼9100 normal tissues and cell lines. ChIPBase also provides a ChIP-Function tool and a genome browser to predict functions of diverse genes and visualize various ChIP-seq data. This study will greatly expand our understanding of the transcriptional regulations of ncRNAs and PCGs. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  2. The gene encoding acyl-CoA-binding protein is subject to metabolic regulation by both sterol regulatory element-binding protein and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha in hepatocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandberg, Maria B; Bloksgaard, Maria; Duran-Sandoval, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    that ACBP expression is significantly lower in livers from PPARalpha knock-out mice than in livers from wild type mice. In conclusion, expression of ACBP in rodent hepatocytes is subject to dual metabolic regulation by PPARalpha and SREBP-1c, which may reflect the need for ACBP during lipogenic as well...... observation that ACBP expression in rodent liver is down-regulated by fasting, and we show that insulin but not glucose is the inducer of ACBP expression in primary rat hepatocytes. In keeping with the regulation by insulin, we show that ACBP is a sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c (SREBP-1c) target...

  3. IBT-based quantitative proteomics identifies potential regulatory proteins involved in pigmentation of purple sea cucumber, Apostichopus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Lili; Sun, Lina; Liu, Shilin; Li, Xiaoni; Zhang, Libin; Yang, Hongsheng

    2017-09-01

    Sea cucumbers are an important economic species and exhibit high yield value among aquaculture animals. Purple sea cucumbers are very rare and beautiful and have stable hereditary patterns. In this study, isobaric tags (IBT) were first used to reveal the molecular mechanism of pigmentation in the body wall of the purple sea cucumber. We analyzed the proteomes of purple sea cucumber in early pigmentation stage (Pa), mid pigmentation stage (Pb) and late pigmentation stage (Pc), resulting in the identification of 5580 proteins, including 1099 differentially expressed proteins in Pb: Pa and 339 differentially expressed proteins in Pc: Pb. GO and KEGG analyses revealed possible differentially expressed proteins, including"melanogenesis", "melanosome", "melanoma", "pigment-biosynthetic process", "Epidermis development", "Ras-signaling pathway", "Wnt-signaling pathway", "response to UV light", and "tyrosine metabolism", involved in pigment synthesis and regulation in purple sea cucumbers. The large number of differentially expressed proteins identified here should be highly useful in further elucidating the mechanisms underlying pigmentation in sea cucumbers. Furthermore, these results may also provide the base for further identification of proteins involved in resistance mechanisms against melanoma, albinism, UV damage, and other diseases in sea cucumbers. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. The muscle regulatory and structural protein MLP is a cytoskeletal binding partner of betaI-spectrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flick, M J; Konieczny, S F

    2000-05-01

    Muscle LIM protein (MLP) is a striated muscle-specific factor that enhances myogenic differentiation and is critical to maintaining the structural integrity of the contractile apparatus. The ability of MLP to regulate myogenesis is particularly interesting since it exhibits multiple subcellular localizations, being found in both nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments. Despite extensive biochemical analyses on MLP, the mechanism(s) by which it influences the myogenic program remains largely undefined. To further examine the role of MLP as a positive myogenic regulator, a yeast two-hybrid screen was employed to identify cytoplasmic-associated MLP binding partners. From this screen, the cytoskeletal protein betaI-spectrin was isolated. Protein interaction assays demonstrate that MLP and betaI-spectrin associate with one another in vivo as well as when tested under several in vitro binding conditions. betaI-spectrin binds specifically to MLP but not to the MLP related proteins CRP1 and CRP2 or to other LIM domain containing proteins. The MLP:beta-spectrin interaction is mediated by the second LIM motif of MLP and by repeat 7 of beta-spectrin. Confocal microscopy studies also reveal that MLP co-localizes with beta-spectrin at the sarcolemma overlying the Z- and M-lines of myofibrils in both cardiac and skeletal muscle tissue. Given that beta-spectrin is a known costamere protein, we propose that sarcolemma-associated MLP also serves as a key costamere protein, stabilizing the association of the contractile apparatus with the sarcolemma by linking the beta-spectrin network to the alpha-actinin crosslinked actin filaments of the myofibril.

  5. Signal peptide cleavage is essential for surface expression of a regulatory T cell surface protein, leucine rich repeat containing 32 (LRRC32

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugiyama Hideaki

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elevated numbers of regulatory T cells (Tregs have been implicated in certain cancers. Depletion of Tregs has been shown to increase anti-tumor immunity. Tregs also play a critical role in the suppression of autoimmune responses. The study of Tregs has been hampered by a lack of adequate surface markers. Leucine Rich Repeat Containing 32 (LRRC32, also known as Glycoprotein A Repetitions Predominant (GARP, has been postulated as a novel surface marker of activated Tregs. However, there is limited information regarding the processing of LRRC32 or the regulatory phenotype and functional activity of Tregs expressing LRRC32. Results Using naturally-occurring freshly isolated Tregs, we demonstrate that low levels of LRRC32 are present intracellularly prior to activation and that freshly isolated LRRC32+ Tregs are distinct from LRRC32- Tregs with respect to the expression of surface CD62L. Using LRRC32 transfectants of HEK cells, we demonstrate that the N-terminus of LRRC32 is cleaved prior to expression of the protein at the cell surface. Furthermore, we demonstrate using a construct containing a deleted putative signal peptide region that the presence of a signal peptide region is critical to cell surface expression of LRRC32. Finally, mixed lymphocyte assays demonstrate that LRRC32+ Tregs are more potent suppressors than LRRC32- Tregs. Conclusions A cleaved signal peptide site in LRRC32 is necessary for surface localization of native LRRC32 following activation of naturally-occurring freshly-isolated regulatory T cells. LRRC32 expression appears to alter the surface expression of activation markers of T cells such as CD62L. LRRC32 surface expression may be useful as a marker that selects for more potent Treg populations. In summary, understanding the processing and expression of LRRC32 may provide insight into the mechanism of action of Tregs and the refinement of immunotherapeutic strategies aimed at targeting these cells.

  6. Single-Nucleotide Mutations in Reveal Novel Functions and Regulatory Mechanisms of the Fragile X Syndrome Protein FMRP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua A. Suhl

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fragile X syndrome is a monogenic disorder and a common cause of intellectual disability. Despite nearly 25 years of research on FMR1, the gene underlying the syndrome, very few pathological mutations other than the typical CGG-repeat expansion have been reported. This is in contrast to other X-linked, monogenic, intellectual disability disorders, such as Rett syndrome, where many point mutations have been validated as causative of the disorder. As technology has improved and significantly driven down the cost of sequencing, allowing for whole genes to be sequenced with relative ease, in-depth sequencing studies on FMR1 have recently been performed. These studies have led to the identification of novel variants in FMR1 , where some of which have been functionally evaluated and are likely pathogenic. In this review, we discuss recently identified FMR1 variants, the ways these novel variants cause dysfunction, and how they reveal new regulatory mechanisms and functionalities of the gene.

  7. The G-protein regulatory (GPR) motif-containing Leu-Gly-Asn-enriched protein (LGN) and Gialpha3 influence cortical positioning of the mitotic spindle poles at metaphase in symmetrically dividing mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumer, Joe B; Kuriyama, Ryoko; Gettys, Thomas W; Lanier, Stephen M

    2006-12-01

    We addressed the role of the G-protein regulatory (GPR) motif-containing Leu-Gly-Asn-enriched protein (LGN) and G-proteins (Gialpha3) in the positioning of the spindle pole during mammalian cell division. Immunocytochemistry indicated that both LGN and Gialpha3 co-localized at the spindle pole and at the midbody and the cell cortex during the different phases of mitosis. In marked contrast to the positioning of the spindle pole at metaphase midway between the cell cortex and the metaphase plate, the spindle pole was juxtaposed with the cell cortex at metaphase following increased expression of Gialpha3 and LGN. This repositioning of the spindle pole required the interaction of LGN with Gialpha. The influence of LGN and Gialpha3 on the cortical positioning of the spindle pole likely reflects either stronger pulling forces on the spindle pole exerted from the cell cortex or increased pushing forces exerted on the spindle pole from the mitotic spindle indicating that these events are regulated by GPR motif-containing proteins and G-proteins independent of asymmetry.

  8. Industry Perspective on Contemporary Protein-Binding Methodologies: Considerations for Regulatory Drug-Drug Interaction and Related Guidelines on Highly Bound Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Li; Breen, Christopher; Chambers, Rob; Eckley, Sean T; Fricke, Robert; Ghosh, Avijit; Harradine, Paul; Kalvass, J Cory; Ho, Stacy; Lee, Caroline A; Marathe, Punit; Perkins, Everett J; Qian, Mark; Tse, Susanna; Yan, Zhengyin; Zamek-Gliszczynski, Maciej J

    2017-12-01

    Regulatory agencies have recently issued drug-drug interaction guidelines, which require determination of plasma protein binding (PPB). To err on the conservative side, the agencies recommend that a 0.01 lower limit of fraction unbound (f u ) be used for highly bound compounds (>99%), irrespective of the actual measured values. While this may avoid false negatives, the recommendation would likely result in a high rate of false positive predictions, resulting in unnecessary clinical studies and more stringent inclusion/exclusion criteria, which may add cost and time in delivery of new medicines to patients. In this perspective, we provide a review of current approaches to measure PPB, and important determinants in enabling the accuracy and precision in these measurements. The ability to measure f u is further illustrated by a cross-company data comparison of PPB for warfarin and itraconazole, demonstrating good concordance of the measured f u values. The data indicate that f u values of ≤0.01 may be determined accurately across laboratories when appropriate methods are used. These data, along with numerous other examples presented in the literature, support the use of experimentally measured f u values for drug-drug interaction predictions, rather than using the arbitrary cutoff value of 0.01 as recommended in current regulatory guidelines. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Mitochondria-associated Endoplasmic Reticulum Membrane (MAM) Regulates Steroidogenic Activity via Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory Protein (StAR)-Voltage-dependent Anion Channel 2 (VDAC2) Interaction*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Manoj; Kaur, Jasmeet; Pawlak, Kevin J.; Bose, Mahuya; Whittal, Randy M.; Bose, Himangshu S.

    2015-01-01

    Steroid hormones are essential for carbohydrate metabolism, stress management, and reproduction and are synthesized from cholesterol in mitochondria of adrenal glands and gonads/ovaries. In acute stress or hormonal stimulation, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) transports substrate cholesterol into the mitochondria for steroidogenesis by an unknown mechanism. Here, we report for the first time that StAR interacts with voltage-dependent anion channel 2 (VDAC2) at the mitochondria-associated endoplasmic reticulum membrane (MAM) prior to its translocation to the mitochondrial matrix. In the MAM, StAR interacts with mitochondrial proteins Tom22 and VDAC2. However, Tom22 knockdown by siRNA had no effect on pregnenolone synthesis. In the absence of VDAC2, StAR was expressed but not processed into the mitochondria as a mature 30-kDa protein. VDAC2 interacted with StAR via its C-terminal 20 amino acids and N-terminal amino acids 221–229, regulating the mitochondrial processing of StAR into the mature protein. In the absence of VDAC2, StAR could not enter the mitochondria or interact with MAM-associated proteins, and therefore steroidogenesis was inhibited. Furthermore, the N terminus was not essential for StAR activity, and the N-terminal deletion mutant continued to interact with VDAC2. The endoplasmic reticulum-targeting prolactin signal sequence did not affect StAR association with the MAM and thus its mitochondrial targeting. Therefore, VDAC2 controls StAR processing and activity, and MAM is thus a central location for initiating mitochondrial steroidogenesis. PMID:25505173

  10. Mitochondria-associated endoplasmic reticulum membrane (MAM) regulates steroidogenic activity via steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR)-voltage-dependent anion channel 2 (VDAC2) interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Manoj; Kaur, Jasmeet; Pawlak, Kevin J; Bose, Mahuya; Whittal, Randy M; Bose, Himangshu S

    2015-01-30

    Steroid hormones are essential for carbohydrate metabolism, stress management, and reproduction and are synthesized from cholesterol in mitochondria of adrenal glands and gonads/ovaries. In acute stress or hormonal stimulation, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) transports substrate cholesterol into the mitochondria for steroidogenesis by an unknown mechanism. Here, we report for the first time that StAR interacts with voltage-dependent anion channel 2 (VDAC2) at the mitochondria-associated endoplasmic reticulum membrane (MAM) prior to its translocation to the mitochondrial matrix. In the MAM, StAR interacts with mitochondrial proteins Tom22 and VDAC2. However, Tom22 knockdown by siRNA had no effect on pregnenolone synthesis. In the absence of VDAC2, StAR was expressed but not processed into the mitochondria as a mature 30-kDa protein. VDAC2 interacted with StAR via its C-terminal 20 amino acids and N-terminal amino acids 221-229, regulating the mitochondrial processing of StAR into the mature protein. In the absence of VDAC2, StAR could not enter the mitochondria or interact with MAM-associated proteins, and therefore steroidogenesis was inhibited. Furthermore, the N terminus was not essential for StAR activity, and the N-terminal deletion mutant continued to interact with VDAC2. The endoplasmic reticulum-targeting prolactin signal sequence did not affect StAR association with the MAM and thus its mitochondrial targeting. Therefore, VDAC2 controls StAR processing and activity, and MAM is thus a central location for initiating mitochondrial steroidogenesis. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Maturation and activity of sterol regulatory element binding protein 1 is inhibited by acyl-CoA binding domain containing 3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Chen

    Full Text Available Imbalance of lipid metabolism has been linked with pathogenesis of a variety of human pathological conditions such as diabetes, obesity, cancer and neurodegeneration. Sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs are the master transcription factors controlling the homeostasis of fatty acids and cholesterol in the body. Transcription, expression, and activity of SREBPs are regulated by various nutritional, hormonal or stressful stimuli, yet the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in these adaptative responses remains elusive. In the present study, we found that overexpressed acyl-CoA binding domain containing 3 (ACBD3, a Golgi-associated protein, dramatically inhibited SREBP1-sensitive promoter activity of fatty acid synthase (FASN. Moreover, lipid deprivation-stimulated SREBP1 maturation was significantly attenuated by ACBD3. With cell fractionation, gene knockdown and immunoprecipitation assays, it was showed that ACBD3 blocked intracellular maturation of SREBP1 probably through directly binding with the lipid regulator rather than disrupted SREBP1-SCAP-Insig1 interaction. Further investigation revealed that acyl-CoA domain-containing N-terminal sequence of ACBD3 contributed to its inhibitory effects on the production of nuclear SREBP1. In addition, mRNA and protein levels of FASN and de novo palmitate biosynthesis were remarkably reduced in cells overexpressed with ACBD3. These findings suggest that ACBD3 plays an essential role in maintaining lipid homeostasis via regulating SREBP1's processing pathway and thus impacting cellular lipogenesis.

  12. In silico analysis, mapping of regulatory elements and corresponding dna-protein interaction in polyphenol oxidase gene promoter from different rice varieties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmood, T.; Rehman, M.; Aziz, E.

    2015-01-01

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) is an important enzyme that has positive impact regarding plant resistance against different biotic and abiotic stresses. In the present study PPO promoter from six different rice varieties was amplified and then analyzed for cis- and trans-acting elements. The study revealed a total of 79 different cis-acting regulatory elements including 11 elements restricted to only one or other variety. Among six varieties Pakhal-Basmati had highest number (5) of these elements, whereas C-622 and Rachna-Basmati have no such sequences. Rachna-Basmati, IR-36-Basmati and Kashmir- Basmati had 1, 2 and 3 unique elements, respectively. Different elementsrelated to pathogen, salt and water stresses were found, which may be helpful in controlling PPO activity according to changing environment. Moreover, HADDOCK was used to understand molecular mechanism of PPO regulation and it was found that DNA-protein interactions are stabilized by many potential hydrogen bonds. Adenine and arginine were the most reactive residues in DNA and proteins respectively.Structural comparison of different protein-DNA complexes show that even a highly conserved transcriptional factor can adopt different conformations when they contact a different DNA binding sequence, however their stable interactions depend on the number of hydrogen bonds formed and distance. (author)

  13. Identification and characterization of PhbF: A DNA binding protein with regulatory role in the PHB metabolism of Herbaspirillum seropedicae SmR1

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    Pedrosa Fabio O

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Herbaspirillum seropedicae SmR1 is a nitrogen fixing endophyte associated with important agricultural crops. It produces polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB which is stored intracellularly as granules. However, PHB metabolism and regulatory control is not yet well studied in this organism. Results In this work we describe the characterization of the PhbF protein from H. seropedicae SmR1 which was purified and characterized after expression in E. coli. The purified PhbF protein was able to bind to eleven putative promoters of genes involved in PHB metabolism in H. seropedicae SmR1. In silico analyses indicated a probable DNA-binding sequence which was shown to be protected in DNA footprinting assays using purified PhbF. Analyses using lacZ fusions showed that PhbF can act as a repressor protein controlling the expression of PHB metabolism-related genes. Conclusions Our results indicate that H. seropedicae SmR1 PhbF regulates expression of phb-related genes by acting as a transcriptional repressor. The knowledge of the PHB metabolism of this plant-associated bacterium may contribute to the understanding of the plant-colonizing process and the organism's resistance and survival in planta.

  14. Metal ion interaction of an oligopeptide fragment representing the regulatory metal binding site of a CueR protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jancsó, Attila; Szokolai, Hajnalka; Roszahegyi, Livia

    2013-01-01

    Metalloregulatory proteins of the MerR family are transcriptional activators that sense/control the concentration of various metal ions inside bacteria.1 The Cu+ efflux regulator CueR, similarly to other MerR proteins, possesses a short multiple Cys-containing metal binding loop close to the C......-terminus. CueR has a high selectivity for Cu+, Ag+ and Au+, but exhibits no transcriptional activity for the divalent ions Hg2+ and Zn2+.2 The two Cys- residues of the metal binding loop were shown to settle M+ ions into a linear coordination environment but other factors may also play a role in the recognition...... of cognate metal ions.2 Nevertheless, it is an interesting question whether the same sequence, when removed from the protein, shows a flexibility to adopt different coordination environments and may efficiently bind metal ions having preferences for larger coordination numbers....

  15. Physical interaction between the herpes simplex virus type 1 immediate-early regulatory proteins ICP0 and ICP4.

    OpenAIRE

    Yao, F; Schaffer, P A

    1994-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus type 1 immediate-early protein ICP0 enhances expression of a spectrum of viral genes alone and synergistically with ICP4. To test whether ICP0 and ICP4 interact physically, we performed far-Western blotting analysis of proteins from mock-, wild-type-, and ICP4 mutant virus-infected cells with in vitro-synthesized [35S]Met-labeled ICP0 and ICP4 as probes. The ICP4 and ICP0 polypeptides synthesized in vitro exhibited molecular weights similar to those of their counterpa...

  16. A widespread amino acid polymorphism at codon 905 of the glycogen-associated regulatory subunit of protein phosphatase-1 is associated with insulin resistance and hypersecretion of insulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, L; Hansen, T; Vestergaard, H

    1995-01-01

    The regulatory G-subunit of the glycogen-associated form of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) plays a crucial part in muscle tissue glycogen synthesis and breakdown. As impaired insulin stimulated glycogen synthesis in peripheral tissues is considered to be a pathogenic factor in subsets of non......-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) and obesity, the G-subunit of PP1 should be viewed as a candidate gene for inherited insulin resistance. When applying heteroduplex formation analysis and nucleotide sequencing of PP1G-subunit cDNA from 30 insulin resistant white NIDDM patients two cases were identified...... as heterozygous carriers of an Asp905 --> Tyr substitution. The carrier prevalence of the PP1G-subunit variant was 18% in 150 healthy subjects and 13% in 313 NIDDM subjects (chi 2 = 1.94, p = 0.16). Twenty-seven healthy subjects volunteered for a 4 h euglycaemic, hyperinsulinaemic clamp in combination...

  17. Potential of acute phase proteins as predictor of postpartum uterine infections during transition period and its regulatory mechanism in dairy cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Manimaran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Among the various systemic reactions against infection or injury, the acute phase response is the cascade of reaction and mostly coordinated by cytokines-mediated acute phase proteins (APPs production. Since APPs are sensitive innate immune molecules, they are useful for early detection of inflammation in bovines and believed to be better discriminators than routine hematological parameters. Therefore, the possibility of using APPs as a diagnostic and prognostic marker of inflammation in major bovine health disorders including postpartum uterine infection has been explored by many workers. In this review, we discussed specifically importance of postpartum uterine infection, the role of energy balance in uterine infections and potential of APPs as a predictor of postpartum uterine infections during the transition period and its regulatory mechanism in dairy cattle.

  18. Aspergillus nidulans synthesize insect juvenile hormones upon expression of a heterologous regulatory protein and in response to grazing by Drosophila melanogaster larvae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morten Thrane Nielsen

    Full Text Available Secondary metabolites are known to serve a wide range of specialized functions including communication, developmental control and defense. Genome sequencing of several fungal model species revealed that the majority of predicted secondary metabolite related genes are silent in laboratory strains, indicating that fungal secondary metabolites remain an underexplored resource of bioactive molecules. In this study, we combine heterologous expression of regulatory proteins in Aspergillus nidulans with systematic variation of growth conditions and observe induced synthesis of insect juvenile hormone-III and methyl farnesoate. Both compounds are sesquiterpenes belonging to the juvenile hormone class. Juvenile hormones regulate developmental and metabolic processes in insects and crustaceans, but have not previously been reported as fungal metabolites. We found that feeding by Drosophila melanogaster larvae induced synthesis of juvenile hormone in A. nidulans indicating a possible role of juvenile hormone biosynthesis in affecting fungal-insect antagonisms.

  19. Effects of light and the regulatory B-subunit composition of protein phosphatase 2A on the susceptibility of Arabidopsis thaliana to aphid (Myzus persicae) infestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasool, Brwa; Karpinska, Barbara; Konert, Grzegorz; Durian, Guido; Denessiouk, Konstantin; Kangasjärvi, Saijaliisa; Foyer, Christine H

    2014-01-01

    The interactions between biotic and abiotic stress signaling pathways are complex and poorly understood but protein kinase/phosphatase cascades are potentially important components. Aphid fecundity and susceptibility to Pseudomonas syringae infection were determined in the low light-grown Arabidopsis thaliana wild type and in mutant lines defective in either the protein phosphatase (PP)2A regulatory subunit B'γ (gamma; pp2a-b'γ) or B'ζ (zeta; pp2a-b'ζ1-1 and pp2a-b'ζ 1-2) and in gamma zeta double mutants (pp2a-b'γζ) lacking both subunits. All the mutants except for pp2a-b'ζ 1-1 had significantly lower leaf areas than the wild type. Susceptibility to P. syringae was similar in all genotypes. In contrast, aphid fecundity was significantly decreased in the pp2a-b'γ mutant relative to the wild type but not in the pp2a-b'γζ double mutant. A high light pre-treatment, which led to a significant increase in rosette growth in all mutant lines but not in the wild type, led to a significant decrease in aphid fecundity in all genotypes. The high light pre-treatment abolished the differences in aphid resistance observed in the pp2a-b'γ mutant relative to the wild type. The light and CO2 response curves for photosynthesis were changed in response to the high light pre-treatment, but the high light effects were similar in all genotypes. These data demonstrate that a pre-exposure to high light and the composition of B-subunits on the trimeric PP2A holoenzymes are important in regulating plant resistance to aphids. The functional specificity for the individual regulatory B-subunits may therefore limit aphid colonization, depending on the prevailing abiotic stress environment.

  20. Effects of light and the regulatory Beta subunit composition of protein phosphatase 2A on the susceptibility of Arabidopsis thaliana to aphid (Myzus persicae infestation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brwa eRasool

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The interactions between biotic and abiotic stress signalling pathways are complex and poorly understood but protein kinase/phosphatase cascades are potentially important components. Aphid fecundity and susceptibility to Pseudomonas syringae infection were determined in the low light-grown Arabidopsis thaliana wild type and in mutant lines defective in either the protein phosphatase (PP2A regulatory subunit B’γ (gamma; pp2a-b’γ or B’ζ (zeta; pp2a-b’ζ1-1 and pp2a-b’ζ1-2 and in gamma zeta double mutants (pp2a-b’γζ lacking both subunits. All the mutants except for pp2a-b’ζ1-1 had significantly lower leaf areas than the wild type. Susceptibility to P. syringae was similar in all genotypes. In contrast, aphid fecundity was significantly decreased in the pp2a-b’γ mutant relative to the wild type but not in the pp2a-b’γζ double mutant. A high light pre-treatment, which led to a significant increase in rosette growth in all mutant lines but not in the wild type, led to a significant decrease in aphid fecundity in all genotypes. The high light pre-treatment abolished the differences in aphid resistance observed in the pp2a-b’γ mutant relative to the wild type. The light and CO2 response curves for photosynthesis were changed in response to the high light pre-treatment, but the high light effects were similar in all genotypes. These data demonstrate that a pre-exposure to high light and the composition of subunits on the trimeric PP2A holoenzymes are important in regulating plant resistance to aphids. The functional specificity for the individual regulatory B-subunits may therefore limit aphid colonisation, depending on the prevailing abiotic stress environment.

  1. The Yersinia enterocolitica type three secretion chaperone SycO is integrated into the Yop regulatory network and binds to the Yop secretion protein YscM1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heesemann Jürgen

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pathogenic yersiniae (Y. pestis, Y. pseudotuberculosis, Y. enterocolitica share a virulence plasmid encoding a type three secretion system (T3SS. This T3SS comprises more than 40 constituents. Among these are the transport substrates called Yops (Yersinia outer proteins, the specific Yop chaperones (Sycs, and the Ysc (Yop secretion proteins which form the transport machinery. The effectors YopO and YopP are encoded on an operon together with SycO, the chaperone of YopO. The characterization of SycO is the focus of this study. Results We have established the large-scale production of recombinant SycO in its outright form. We confirm that Y. enterocolitica SycO forms homodimers which is typical for Syc chaperones. SycO overproduction in Y. enterocolitica decreases secretion of Yops into the culture supernatant suggesting a regulatory role of SycO in type III secretion. We demonstrate that in vitro SycO interacts with YscM1, a negative regulator of Yop expression in Y. enterocolitica. However, the SycO overproduction phenotype was not mediated by YscM1, YscM2, YopO or YopP as revealed by analysis of isogenic deletion mutants. Conclusion We present evidence that SycO is integrated into the regulatory network of the Yersinia T3SS. Our picture of the Yersinia T3SS interactome is supplemented by identification of the SycO/YscM1 interaction. Further, our results suggest that at least one additional interaction partner of SycO has to be identified.

  2. Inhibition of mRNA export and dimerization of interferon regulatory factor 3 by Theiler's virus leader protein.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ricour, C.; Delhaye, S.; Hato, S.V.; Olenyik, T.D.; Michel, B.; Kuppeveld, F.J.M. van; Gustin, K.E.; Michiels, T.

    2009-01-01

    Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV or Theiler's virus) is a neurotropic picornavirus that can persist lifelong in the central nervous system of infected mice, causing a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease. The leader (L) protein of the virus is an important determinant of viral

  3. Regulatory mechanisms for 3'-end alternative splicing and polyadenylation of the Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein, GFAP, transcript

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blechingberg, Jenny; Lykke-Andersen, Søren; Jensen, Torben Heick

    2007-01-01

    The glial fibrillary acidic protein, GFAP, forms the intermediate cytoskeleton in cells of the glial lineage. Besides the common GFAP alpha transcript, the GFAP epsilon and GFAP kappa transcripts are generated by alternative mRNA 3'-end processing. Here we use a GFAP minigene to characterize...

  4. A regulatory effect of INMAP on centromere proteins: antisense INMAP induces CENP-B variation and centromeric halo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Tan

    Full Text Available CENP-B is a highly conserved protein that facilitates the assembly of specific centromere structures both in interphase nuclei and on mitotic chromosomes. INMAP is a conserved protein that localizes at nucleus in interphase cells and at mitotic apparatus in mitotic cells. Our previous results showed that INMAP over-expression leads to spindle defects, mitotic arrest and formation of polycentrosomal and multinuclear cells, indicating that INMAP may modulate the function of (a key protein(s in mitotic apparatus. In this study, we demonstrate that INMAP interacts with CENP-B and promotes cleavage of the N-terminal DNA binding domain from CENP-B. The cleaved CENP-B cannot associate with centromeres and thus lose its centromere-related functions. Consistent with these results, CENP-B in INMAP knockdown cells becomes more diffused around kinetochores. Although INMAP knockdown cells do not exhibit gross defects in mitotic spindle formation, these cells go through mitosis, especially prophase and metaphase, with different relative timing, indicating subtle abnormality. These results identify INMAP as a model regulator of CENP-B and support the notion that INMAP regulates mitosis through modulating CENP-B-mediated centromere organization.

  5. 14-3-3 checkpoint regulatory proteins interact specifically with DNA repair protein human exonuclease 1 (hEXO1) via a semi-conserved motif

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Sofie Dabros; Keijzers, Guido; Rampakakis, Emmanouil

    2012-01-01

    Human exonuclease 1 (hEXO1) acts directly in diverse DNA processing events, including replication, mismatch repair (MMR), and double strand break repair (DSBR), and it was also recently described to function as damage sensor and apoptosis inducer following DNA damage. In contrast, 14-3-3 proteins...... are specifically induced by replication inhibition leading to protein ubiquitination and degradation. We demonstrate direct and robust interaction between hEXO1 and six of the seven 14-3-3 isoforms in vitro, suggestive of a novel protein interaction network between DNA repair and cell cycle control. Binding...... and most likely a second unidentified binding motif. 14-3-3 associations do not appear to directly influence hEXO1 in vitro nuclease activity or in vitro DNA replication initiation. Moreover, specific phosphorylation variants, including hEXO1 S746A, are efficiently imported to the nucleus; to associate...

  6. PuF, an antimetastatic and developmental signaling protein, interacts with the Alzheimer’s amyloid-β precursor protein via a tissue-specific proximal regulatory element (PRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lahiri Debomoy K

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alzheimer’s disease (AD is intimately tied to amyloid-β (Aβ peptide. Extraneuronal brain plaques consisting primarily of Aβ aggregates are a hallmark of AD. Intraneuronal Aβ subunits are strongly implicated in disease progression. Protein sequence mutations of the Aβ precursor protein (APP account for a small proportion of AD cases, suggesting that regulation of the associated gene (APP may play a more important role in AD etiology. The APP promoter possesses a novel 30 nucleotide sequence, or “proximal regulatory element” (PRE, at −76/−47, from the +1 transcription start site that confers cell type specificity. This PRE contains sequences that make it vulnerable to epigenetic modification and may present a viable target for drug studies. We examined PRE-nuclear protein interaction by gel electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA and PRE mutant EMSA. This was followed by functional studies of PRE mutant/reporter gene fusion clones. Results EMSA probed with the PRE showed DNA-protein interaction in multiple nuclear extracts and in human brain tissue nuclear extract in a tissue-type specific manner. We identified transcription factors that are likely to bind the PRE, using competition gel shift and gel supershift: Activator protein 2 (AP2, nm23 nucleoside diphosphate kinase/metastatic inhibitory protein (PuF, and specificity protein 1 (SP1. These sites crossed a known single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP. EMSA with PRE mutants and promoter/reporter clone transfection analysis further implicated PuF in cells and extracts. Functional assays of mutant/reporter clone transfections were evaluated by ELISA of reporter protein levels. EMSA and ELISA results correlated by meta-analysis. Conclusions We propose that PuF may regulate the APP gene promoter and that AD risk may be increased by interference with PuF regulation at the PRE. PuF is targeted by calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II inhibitor 1, which also

  7. Functional interaction between a novel protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit, PR59, and the retinoblastoma-related p107 protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorhoeve, P.M.; Hijmans, E.M.; Bernards, R.A.

    1999-01-01

    The proteins of the retinoblastoma family are potent inhibitors of cell cycle progression. It is well documented that their growth-inhibitory activity can be abolished by phosphorylation on serine and threonine residues by cyclin dependent kinases. In contrast, very little is known about the

  8. Regulatory activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This publication, compiled in 8 chapters, presents the regulatory system developed by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (NRA) of the Argentine Republic. The following activities and developed topics in this document describe: the evolution of the nuclear regulatory activity in Argentina; the Argentine regulatory system; the nuclear regulatory laws and standards; the inspection and safeguards of nuclear facilities; the emergency systems; the environmental systems; the environmental monitoring; the analysis laboratories on physical and biological dosimetry, prenatal irradiation, internal irradiation, radiation measurements, detection techniques on nuclear testing, medical program on radiation protection; the institutional relations with national and international organization; the training courses and meeting; the technical information

  9. A widespread family of serine/threonine protein phosphatases shares a common regulatory switch with proteasomal proteases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradshaw, Niels [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, United States; Levdikov, Vladimir M. [Structural Biology Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of York, York, United Kingdom; Zimanyi, Christina M. [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, United States; Gaudet, Rachelle [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, United States; Wilkinson, Anthony J. [Structural Biology Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of York, York, United Kingdom; Losick, Richard [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, United States

    2017-05-20

    PP2C phosphatases control biological processes including stress responses, development, and cell division in all kingdoms of life. Diverse regulatory domains adapt PP2C phosphatases to specific functions, but how these domains control phosphatase activity was unknown. We present structures representing active and inactive states of the PP2C phosphatase SpoIIE from Bacillus subtilis. Based on structural analyses and genetic and biochemical experiments, we identify an α-helical switch that shifts a carbonyl oxygen into the active site to coordinate a metal cofactor. Our analysis indicates that this switch is widely conserved among PP2C family members, serving as a platform to control phosphatase activity in response to diverse inputs. Remarkably, the switch is shared with proteasomal proteases, which we identify as evolutionary and structural relatives of PP2C phosphatases. Although these proteases use an unrelated catalytic mechanism, rotation of equivalent helices controls protease activity by movement of the equivalent carbonyl oxygen into the active site.

  10. Clonorchis sinensis-derived total protein attenuates airway inflammation in murine asthma model by inducing regulatory T cells and modulating dendritic cell functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Young-Il; Kim, Seung Hyun; Ju, Jung Won; Cho, Shin Hyeong; Lee, Won Ja; Park, Jin Wook; Park, Yeong-Min; Lee, Sang Eun

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Treatment with Clonorchis sinensis-derived total protein attenuates OVA-induced airway inflammation and AHR to methacholine. → Induction of CD4 + CD25 + Foxp3 + T cells and IL-10 along with suppression of splenocyte proliferation by C. sinensis-derived total protein. → C. sinensis-derived total protein interferes with the expression of co-stimulatory molecules in DCs. -- Abstract: Asthma is characterized by Th2-mediated inflammation, resulting in airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) through airway remodeling. Recent epidemiological and experimental reports have suggested an inverse relationship between the development of allergy and helminth infections. Infection by Clonorchis sinensis, a liver fluke that resides in the bile duct of humans, is endemic predominantly in Asia including Korea and China. Using a murine model for asthma, we investigated the effects of C. sinensis-derived total protein (Cs-TP) on allergen-induced airway inflammation and the mechanism underlying the protective effects of Cs-TP administration on asthma. Treatment with Cs-TP attenuated OVA-induced airway inflammation and methacholine-induced AHR, as well as eosinophilia development, lymphocyte infiltration into the lung, and goblet cell metaplasia. This protective effect of Cs-TP is associated with markedly reduced OVA-specific IgE and Th1/Th2 cytokine production. Moreover, Cs-TP increased the number of CD4 + CD25 + Foxp3 + regulatory T (Treg) cells as well as their suppressive activity. In fact, proliferation of OVA-restimulated splenocytes was suppressed significantly. Cs-TP also inhibited the expression of such co-stimulatory molecules as CD80, CD86, and CD40 in LPS- or OVA-stimulated dendritic cells (DCs), suggesting that Cs-TP could interfere with the capacity of airway DCs to prime naive T cells. These data demonstrate the capacity of C. sinensis to ameliorate allergic asthma and broaden our understanding of the paradoxical relationship between the allergic immune

  11. Iron Starvation Conditions Upregulate Ehrlichia ruminantium Type IV Secretion System, tr1 Transcription Factor and map1 Genes Family through the Master Regulatory Protein ErxR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal Moumène

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Ehrlichia ruminantium is an obligatory intracellular bacterium that causes heartwater, a fatal disease in ruminants. Due to its intracellular nature, E. ruminantium requires a set of specific virulence factors, such as the type IV secretion system (T4SS, and outer membrane proteins (Map proteins in order to avoid and subvert the host's immune response. Several studies have been conducted to understand the regulation of the T4SS or outer membrane proteins, in Ehrlichia, but no integrated approach has been used to understand the regulation of Ehrlichia pathogenicity determinants in response to environmental cues. Iron is known to be a key nutrient for bacterial growth both in the environment and within hosts. In this study, we experimentally demonstrated the regulation of virB, map1, and tr1 genes by the newly identified master regulator ErxR (for Ehrlichia ruminantium expression regulator. We also analyzed the effect of iron depletion on the expression of erxR gene, tr1 transcription factor, T4SS and map1 genes clusters in E. ruminantium. We show that exposure of E. ruminantium to iron starvation induces erxR and subsequently tr1, virB, and map1 genes. Our results reveal tight co-regulation of T4SS and map1 genes via the ErxR regulatory protein at the transcriptional level, and, for the first time link map genes to the virulence function sensu stricto, thereby advancing our understanding of Ehrlichia's infection process. These results suggest that Ehrlichia is able to sense changes in iron concentrations in the environment and to regulate the expression of virulence factors accordingly.

  12. The effects of HIV-1 regulatory TAT protein expression on brain reward function, response to psychostimulants and delay-dependent memory in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesby, James P; Markou, Athina; Semenova, Svetlana

    2016-10-01

    Depression and psychostimulant abuse are common comorbidities among humans with immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease. The HIV regulatory protein TAT is one of multiple HIV-related proteins associated with HIV-induced neurotoxicity. TAT-induced dysfunction of dopamine and serotonin systems in corticolimbic brain areas may result in impaired reward function, thus, contributing to depressive symptoms and psychostimulant abuse. Transgenic mice with doxycycline-induced TAT protein expression in the brain (TAT+, TAT- control) show neuropathology resembling brain abnormalities in HIV+ humans. We evaluated brain reward function in response to TAT expression, nicotine and methamphetamine administration in TAT+ and TAT- mice using the intracranial self-stimulation procedure. We evaluated the brain dopamine and serotonin systems with high-performance liquid chromatography. The effects of TAT expression on delay-dependent working memory in TAT+ and TAT- mice using the operant delayed nonmatch-to-position task were also assessed. During doxycycline administration, reward thresholds were elevated by 20% in TAT+ mice compared with TAT- mice. After the termination of doxycycline treatment, thresholds of TAT+ mice remained significantly higher than those of TAT- mice and this was associated with changes in mesolimbic serotonin and dopamine levels. TAT+ mice showed a greater methamphetamine-induced threshold lowering compared with TAT- mice. TAT expression did not alter delay-dependent working memory. These results indicate that TAT expression in mice leads to reward deficits, a core symptom of depression, and a greater sensitivity to methamphetamine-induced reward enhancement. Our findings suggest that the TAT protein may contribute to increased depressive-like symptoms and continued methamphetamine use in HIV-positive individuals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The Hepatitis C Virus-induced NLRP3 Inflammasome Activates the Sterol Regulatory Element-binding Protein (SREBP) and Regulates Lipid Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRae, Steven; Iqbal, Jawed; Sarkar-Dutta, Mehuli; Lane, Samantha; Nagaraj, Abhiram; Ali, Naushad; Waris, Gulam

    2016-02-12

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) relies on host lipids and lipid droplets for replication and morphogenesis. The accumulation of lipid droplets in infected hepatocytes manifests as hepatosteatosis, a common pathology observed in chronic hepatitis C patients. One way by which HCV promotes the accumulation of intracellular lipids is through enhancing de novo lipogenesis by activating the sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs). In general, activation of SREBPs occurs during cholesterol depletion. Interestingly, during HCV infection, the activation of SREBPs occurs under normal cholesterol levels, but the underlying mechanisms are still elusive. Our previous study has demonstrated the activation of the inflammasome complex in HCV-infected human hepatoma cells. In this study, we elucidate the potential link between chronic hepatitis C-associated inflammation and alteration of lipid homeostasis in infected cells. Our results reveal that the HCV-activated NLRP3 inflammasome is required for the up-regulation of lipogenic genes such as 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase, fatty acid synthase, and stearoyl-CoA desaturase. Using pharmacological inhibitors and siRNA against the inflammasome components (NLRP3, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD, and caspase-1), we further show that the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome plays a critical role in lipid droplet formation. NLRP3 inflammasome activation in HCV-infected cells enables caspase-1-mediated degradation of insulin-induced gene proteins. This subsequently leads to the transport of the SREBP cleavage-activating protein·SREBP complex from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi, followed by proteolytic activation of SREBPs by S1P and S2P in the Golgi. Typically, inflammasome activation leads to viral clearance. Paradoxically, here we demonstrate how HCV exploits the NLRP3 inflammasome to activate SREBPs and host lipid metabolism, leading to liver disease pathogenesis associated with

  14. Involvement of the Iron Regulatory Protein from Eisenia andrei Earthworms in the Regulation of Cellular Iron Homeostasis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Procházková, Petra; Škanta, František; Roubalová, Radka; Šilerová, Marcela; Dvořák, Jiří; Bilej, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 10 (2014) E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.20.0055 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : MULTIPLE SEQUENCE ALIGNMENT * ELEMENT-BINDING PROTEIN * FERRITIN MESSENGER-RNA Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.234, year: 2014

  15. The Regulatory Role of MeAIB in Protein Metabolism and the mTOR Signaling Pathway in Porcine Enterocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulong Tang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Amino acid transporters play an important role in cell growth and metabolism. MeAIB, a transporter-selective substrate, often represses the adaptive regulation of sodium-coupled neutral amino acid transporter 2 (SNAT2, which may act as a receptor and regulate cellular amino acid contents, therefore modulating cellular downstream signaling. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of MeAIB to SNAT2 on cell proliferation, protein turnover, and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR signaling pathway in porcine enterocytes. Intestinal porcine epithelial cells (IPEC-J2 cells were cultured in a high-glucose Dulbecco’s modified Eagle’s (DMEM-H medium with 0 or 5 mmoL/L System A amino acid analogue (MeAIB for 48 h. Cells were collected for analysis of proliferation, cell cycle, protein synthesis and degradation, intracellular free amino acids, and the expression of key genes involved in the mTOR signaling pathway. The results showed that SNAT2 inhibition by MeAIB depleted intracellular concentrations of not only SNAT2 amino acid substrates but also of indispensable amino acids (methionine and leucine, and suppressed cell proliferation and impaired protein synthesis. MeAIB inhibited mTOR phosphorylation, which might be involved in three translation regulators, EIF4EBP1, IGFBP3, and DDIT4 from PCR array analysis of the 84 genes related to the mTOR signaling pathway. These results suggest that SNAT2 inhibition treated with MeAIB plays an important role in regulating protein synthesis and mTOR signaling, and provide some information to further clarify its roles in the absorption of amino acids and signal transduction in the porcine small intestine.

  16. Mapping the ribosomal protein S7 regulatory binding site on mRNA of the E. coli streptomycin operon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surdina, A V; Rassokhin, T I; Golovin, A V; Spiridonova, V A; Kopylov, A M

    2010-07-01

    In this work it is shown by deletion analysis that an intercistronic region (ICR) approximately 80 nucleotides in length is necessary for interaction with recombinant E. coli S7 protein (r6hEcoS7). A model is proposed for the interaction of S7 with two ICR sites-region of hairpin bifurcations and Shine-Dalgarno sequence of cistron S7. A de novo RNA binding site for heterologous S7 protein of Thermus thermophilus (r6hTthS7) was constructed by selection of a combinatorial RNA library based on E. coli ICR: it has only a single supposed protein recognition site in the region of bifurcation. The SERW technique was used for selection of two intercistronic RNA libraries in which five nucleotides of a double-stranded region, adjacent to the bifurcation, had the randomized sequence. One library contained an authentic AG (-82/-20) pair, while in the other this pair was replaced by AU. A serwamer capable of specific binding to r6hTthS7 was selected; it appeared to be the RNA68 mutant with eight nucleotide mutations. The serwamer binds to r6hTthS7 with the same affinity as homologous authentic ICR of str mRNA binds to r6hEcoS7; apparent dissociation constants are 89 +/- 43 and 50 +/- 24 nM, respectively.

  17. Altered expression of iron regulatory proteins with aging is associated with transient hepatic iron accumulation after environmental heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomer, Steven A; Han, Okhee; Kregel, Kevin C; Brown, Kyle E

    2014-01-01

    An increasing body of evidence suggests that dysregulation of iron metabolism contributes to age-related pathologies. We have previously observed increased hepatic iron with aging, and that environmental heat stress stimulates a further increase in iron and oxidative liver injury in old rats. The purpose of this study was to determine a mechanism for the increase in hepatic iron in old rats after heat stress. Young (6 mo) and old (24 mo) Fischer 344 rats were exposed to two heating bouts separated by 24 h. Livers were harvested after the second heat stress, and protein levels of the iron import protein, transferrin receptor-1 (TFR1), and the iron export protein, ferroportin (Fpn) were determined by immunoblot. In the nonheated condition, old rats had lower TFR1 expression, and higher Fpn expression. After heat stress, TFR1 declined in the old rats, and iron chelation studies demonstrated that this decline was dependent on a hyperthermia-induced increase in iron. TFR1 did not change in the young rats after heat stress. Since TFR1 is inversely regulated by iron, our results suggest that the increase in intracellular iron with aging and heat stress lower TFR1 expression. Fpn expression increased in both age groups after heat stress, but this response was delayed in old rats. This delay in the induction of an iron exporter suggests a mechanism for the increase in hepatic iron and oxidative injury after heat stress in aged organisms. © 2013.

  18. Comparisons of Ribosomal Protein Gene Promoters Indicate Superiority of Heterologous Regulatory Sequences for Expressing Transgenes in Phytophthora infestans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poidevin, Laetitia; Andreeva, Kalina; Khachatoorian, Careen; Judelson, Howard S

    2015-01-01

    Molecular genetics approaches in Phytophthora research can be hampered by the limited number of known constitutive promoters for expressing transgenes and the instability of transgene activity. We have therefore characterized genes encoding the cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins of Phytophthora and studied their suitability for expressing transgenes in P. infestans. Phytophthora spp. encode a standard complement of 79 cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins. Several genes are duplicated, and two appear to be pseudogenes. Half of the genes are expressed at similar levels during all stages of asexual development, and we discovered that the majority share a novel promoter motif named the PhRiboBox. This sequence is enriched in genes associated with transcription, translation, and DNA replication, including tRNA and rRNA biogenesis. Promoters from the three P. infestans genes encoding ribosomal proteins S9, L10, and L23 and their orthologs from P. capsici were tested for their ability to drive transgenes in stable transformants of P. infestans. Five of the six promoters yielded strong expression of a GUS reporter, but the stability of expression was higher using the P. capsici promoters. With the RPS9 and RPL10 promoters of P. infestans, about half of transformants stopped making GUS over two years of culture, while their P. capsici orthologs conferred stable expression. Since cross-talk between native and transgene loci may trigger gene silencing, we encourage the use of heterologous promoters in transformation studies.

  19. Cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) enhances cAMP-responsive element binding (CREB) protein phosphorylation and phospho-CREB interaction with the mouse steroidogenic acute regulatory protein gene promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clem, Brian F; Hudson, Elizabeth A; Clark, Barbara J

    2005-03-01

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) transcription is regulated through cAMP-protein kinase A-dependent mechanisms that involve multiple transcription factors including the cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) family members. Classically, binding of phosphorylated CREB to cis-acting cAMP-responsive elements (5'-TGACGTCA-3') within target gene promoters leads to recruitment of the coactivator CREB binding protein (CBP). Herein we examined the extent of CREB family member phosphorylation on protein-DNA interactions and CBP recruitment with the StAR promoter. Immunoblot analysis revealed that CREB, cAMP-responsive element modulator (CREM), and activating transcription factor (ATF)-1 are expressed in MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells, yet only CREB and ATF-1 are phosphorylated. (Bu)2cAMP treatment of MA-10 cells increased CREB phosphorylation approximately 2.3-fold within 30 min but did not change total nuclear CREB expression levels. Using DNA-affinity chromatography, we now show that CREB and ATF-1, but not CREM, interact with the StAR promoter, and this interaction is dependent on the activator protein-1 (AP-1) cis-acting element within the cAMP-responsive region. In addition, (Bu)2cAMP-treatment increased phosphorylated CREB (P-CREB) association with the StAR promoter but did not influence total CREB interaction. In vivo chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated CREB binding to the StAR proximal promoter is independent of (Bu)2cAMP-treatment, confirming our in vitro analysis. However, (Bu)2cAMP-treatment increased P-CREB and CBP interaction with the StAR promoter, demonstrating for the first time the physical role of P-CREB:DNA interactions in CBP recruitment to the StAR proximal promoter.

  20. Expanded roles of leucine-responsive regulatory protein in transcription regulation of the Escherichia coli genome: Genomic SELEX screening of the regulation targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Tomohiro; Saito, Natsumi; Maeda, Michihisa; Tanaka, Kan; Ishihama, Akira

    2015-07-01

    Leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp) is a transcriptional regulator for the genes involved in transport, biosynthesis and catabolism of amino acids in Escherichia coli . In order to identify the whole set of genes under the direct control of Lrp, we performed Genomic SELEX screening and identified a total of 314 Lrp-binding sites on the E. coli genome. As a result, the regulation target of Lrp was predicted to expand from the hitherto identified genes for amino acid metabolism to a set of novel target genes for utilization of amino acids for protein synthesis, including tRNAs, aminoacyl-tRNA synthases and rRNAs. Northern blot analysis indicated alteration of mRNA levels for at least some novel targets, including the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase genes. Phenotype MicroArray of the lrp mutant indicated significant alteration in utilization of amino acids and peptides, whilst metabolome analysis showed variations in the concentration of amino acids in the lrp mutant. From these two datasets we realized a reverse correlation between amino acid levels and cell growth rate: fast-growing cells contain low-level amino acids, whilst a high level of amino acids exists in slow-growing cells. Taken together, we propose that Lrp is a global regulator of transcription of a large number of the genes involved in not only amino acid transport and metabolism, but also amino acid utilization.

  1. Signal regulatory protein α associated with the progression of oral leukoplakia and oral squamous cell carcinoma regulates phenotype switch of macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xiaojing; Zhang, Jing; Lu, Rui; Zhou, Gang

    2016-12-06

    Signal regulatory protein α (SIRPα) is a cell-surface protein expressed on macrophages that are regarded as an important component of the tumor microenvironment. The expression of SIRPα in oral leukoplakia (OLK) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), and further explored the role of SIRPα on the phenotype, phagocytosis ability, migration, and invasion of macrophages in OSCC were investigated. The expression of SIRPα in OLK was higher than in OSCC, correlating with the expression of CD68 and CD163 on macrophages. After cultured with the conditioned media of oral cancer cells, the expression of SIRPα on THP-1 cells was decreased gradually. In co-culture system, macrophages were induced into M2 phenotype by oral cancer cells. Blockade of SIRPα inhibited phagocytosis ability and IL-6, TNF-α productions of macrophages. In addition, the proliferation, migration, and IL-10, TGF-β productions of macrophages were upregulated after blockade of SIRPα. Macrophages upregulated the expression of SIRPα and phagocytosis ability, and inhibited the migration and invasion when the activation of NF-κB was inhibited by pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate ammonium (PDTC). Hence, SIRPα might play an important role in the progression of OLK and oral cancer, and could be a pivotal therapeutic target in OSCC by regulating the phenotype of macrophages via targeting NF-κB.

  2. Dynamic regulation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK by protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit B56γ1 in nuclei induces cell migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ei Kawahara

    Full Text Available Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK signalling plays a central role in various biological processes, including cell migration, but it remains unknown what factors directly regulate the strength and duration of ERK activation. We found that, among the B56 family of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A regulatory subunits, B56γ1 suppressed EGF-induced cell migration on collagen, bound to phosphorylated-ERK, and dephosphorylated ERK, whereas B56α1 and B56β1 did not. B56γ1 was immunolocalized in nuclei. The IER3 protein was immediately highly expressed in response to costimulation of cells with EGF and collagen. Knockdown of IER3 inhibited cell migration and enhanced dephosphorylation of ERK. Analysis of the time course of PP2A-B56γ1 activity following the costimulation showed an immediate loss of phosphatase activity, followed by a rapid increase in activity, and this activity then remained at a stable level that was lower than the original level. Our results indicate that the strength and duration of the nuclear ERK activation signal that is initially induced by ERK kinase (MEK are determined at least in part by modulation of the phosphatase activity of PP2A-B56γ1 through two independent pathways.

  3. A CLCA regulatory protein present in the chemosensory cilia of olfactory sensory neurons induces a Ca2+-activated Cl-current when transfected into HEK293.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mura, Casilda V; Delgado, Ricardo; Delgado, María Graciela; Restrepo, Diego; Bacigalupo, Juan

    2017-08-11

    CLCA is a family of metalloproteases that regulate Ca 2+ -activated Cl - fluxes in epithelial tissues. In HEK293 cells, CLCA1 promotes membrane expression of an endogenous Anoctamin 1 (ANO1, also termed TMEM16A)-dependent Ca 2+ -activated Cl - current. Motif architecture similarity with CLCA2, 3 and 4 suggested that they have similar functions. We previously detected the isoform CLCA4L in rat olfactory sensory neurons, where Anoctamin 2 is the principal chemotransduction Ca 2+ -activated Cl - channel. We explored the possibility that this protein plays a role in odor transduction. We cloned and expressed CLCA4L from rat olfactory epithelium in HEK293 cells. In the transfected HEK293 cells we measured a Cl - -selective Ca 2+ -activated current, blocked by niflumic acid, not present in the non-transfected cells. Thus, CLCA4L mimics the CLCA1 current on its ability to induce the ANO1-dependent Ca 2+ -activated Cl - current endogenous to these cells. By immunocytochemistry, a CLCA protein, presumably CLCA4L, was detected in the cilia of olfactory sensory neurons co-expressing with ANO2. These findings suggests that a CLCA isoform, namely CLCA4L, expressed in OSN cilia, might have a regulatory function over the ANO2-dependent Ca 2+ -activated Cl - channel involved in odor transduction.

  4. Role of AtCDC48 & the AtCDC48 Regulatory Protein Family, PUX, in Plant Cell Morphogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bednarek, Sebastian, Y.

    2009-11-08

    The long-term objective of this work is to understand the molecular events and mechanisms involved in secretory membrane trafficking and organelle biogenesis, which are crucial for normal plant growth and development. Our studies have suggested a vital role for the cytosolic chaperone Cdc48p/p97 during cytokinesis and cell expansion which are highly dependent upon secretory membrane trafficking. Localization studies have shown that the plant Cdc48p/p97, AtCDC48, and the Arabidopsis ortholog of the ER- and Golgi-associated SNARE, syntaxin 5, (referred to as SYP31) are targeted to the division plane during cytokinesis. In addition, AtCDC48 and SYP31 were shown to interact in vitro and in vivo. To characterize further the function of AtCDC48 and SYP31 we have utilized affinity chromatography and MALDI-MS to identify several plant-specific proteins that interact with SYP31 and/or modulate the activity of AtCDC48 including two UBX (i.e. ubiquitin-like) domain containing proteins, PUX1 and PUX2 (Proteins containing UBX domain). These proteins define a plant protein family consisting of 15 uncharacterized members that we postulate interact with AtCDC48. Biochemical studies have demonstrated that PUX2 is a novel membrane adapter for AtCDC48 that mediates AtCDC48/SYP31 interaction and is likely to control AtCDC48-dependent membrane fusion. In contrast, PUX1 negatively regulates AtCDC48 by inhibiting its ATPase activity and by promoting the disassembly of the active hexamer. These findings provide the first evidence that the assembly and disassembly of the CDC48/p97complex is actually a dynamic process. This new unexpected level of regulation for CDC48/p97 was demonstrated to be critical in vivo as pux1 loss-of-function mutants grow faster than wild-type plants. These studies suggest a role for AtCDC48 in plant cell cycle progression including cytokinesis and/or cell expansion. The proposed studies are designed to: 1) characterize further the localization and function of At

  5. Capping protein regulatory cycle driven by CARMIL and V-1 may promote actin network assembly at protruding edges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Ikuko; Remmert, Kirsten; Piszczek, Grzegorz; Hammer, John A

    2014-05-13

    Although capping protein (CP) terminates actin filament elongation, it promotes Arp2/3-dependent actin network assembly and accelerates actin-based motility both in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, capping protein Arp2/3 myosin I linker (CARMIL) antagonizes CP by reducing its affinity for the barbed end and by uncapping CP-capped filaments, whereas the protein V-1/myotrophin sequesters CP in an inactive complex. Previous work showed that CARMIL can readily retrieve CP from the CP:V-1 complex, thereby converting inactive CP into a version with moderate affinity for the barbed end. Here we further clarify the mechanism of this exchange reaction, and we demonstrate that the CP:CARMIL complex created by complex exchange slows the rate of barbed-end elongation by rapidly associating with, and dissociating from, the barbed end. Importantly, the cellular concentrations of V-1 and CP determined here argue that most CP is sequestered by V-1 at steady state in vivo. Finally, we show that CARMIL is recruited to the plasma membrane and only at cell edges undergoing active protrusion. Assuming that CARMIL is active only at this location, our data argue that a large pool of freely diffusing, inactive CP (CP:V-1) feeds, via CARMIL-driven complex exchange, the formation of weak-capping complexes (CP:CARMIL) at the plasma membrane of protruding edges. In vivo, therefore, CARMIL should promote Arp2/3-dependent actin network assembly at the leading edge by promoting barbed-end capping there.

  6. A DNA Structural Alphabet Distinguishes Structural Features of DNA Bound to Regulatory Proteins and in the Nucleosome Core Particle

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schneider, Bohdan; Bozikova, Paulina; Čech, P.; Svozil, D.; Černý, Jiří

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 10 (2017), č. článku 278. ISSN 2073-4425 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) EF16_013/0001777 Institutional support: RVO:86652036 Keywords : DNA * DNA-protein recognition * transcription factors Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Computer sciences, information science, bioinformathics (hardware development to be 2.2, social aspect to be 5.8) Impact factor: 3.600, year: 2016

  7. Conserved regulatory modules in the Sox9 testis-specific enhancer predict roles for SOX, TCF/LEF, Forkhead, DMRT, and GATA proteins in vertebrate sex determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri-Fam, Stefan; Sinclair, Andrew H; Koopman, Peter; Harley, Vincent R

    2010-03-01

    While the primary sex determining switch varies between vertebrate species, a key downstream event in testicular development, namely the male-specific up-regulation of Sox9, is conserved. To date, only two sex determining switch genes have been identified, Sry in mammals and the Dmrt1-related gene Dmy (Dmrt1bY) in the medaka fish Oryzias latipes. In mice, Sox9 expression is evidently up-regulated by SRY and maintained by SOX9 both of which directly activate the core 1.3 kb testis-specific enhancer of Sox9 (TESCO). How Sox9 expression is up-regulated and maintained in species without Sry (i.e. non-mammalian species) is not understood. In this study, we have undertaken an in-depth comparative genomics approach and show that TESCO contains an evolutionarily conserved region (ECR) of 180 bp which is present in marsupials, monotremes, birds, reptiles and amphibians. The ECR contains highly conserved modules that predict regulatory roles for SOX, TCF/LEF, Forkhead, DMRT, and GATA proteins in vertebrate sex determination/differentiation. Our data suggest that tetrapods share common aspects of Sox9 regulation in the testis, despite having different sex determining switch mechanisms. They also suggest that Sox9 autoregulation is an ancient mechanism shared by all tetrapods, raising the possibility that in mammals, SRY evolved by mimicking this regulation. The validation of ECR regulatory sequences conserved from human to frogs will provide new insights into vertebrate sex determination. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Trametes versicolor protein YZP activates regulatory B lymphocytes - gene identification through de novo assembly and function analysis in a murine acute colitis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuan, Yen-Chou; Wu, Ying-Jou; Hung, Chih-Liang; Sheu, Fuu

    2013-01-01

    Trametes versicolor (Yun-Zhi) is a medicinal fungus used as a chemotherapy co-treatment to enhance anti-tumor immunity. Although the efficacies of T. versicolor extracts have been documented, the active ingredients and mechanisms underlying the actions of these extracts remain uncharacterized. We purified a new protein, YZP, from the fruiting bodies of T. versicolor and identified the gene encoding YZP using RNA-seq and de novo assembly technologies. YZP is a 12-kDa non-glycosylated protein comprising 139 amino acids, including an 18-amino acids signal peptide. YZP induced a greater than 60-fold increase in IL-10 secretion in mice B lymphocytes; moreover, YZP specifically triggered the differentiation of CD1d(+) B cells into IL-10-producing regulatory B cells (Bregs) and enhanced the expression of CD1d. YZP-induced B cells suppressed approximately 40% of the LPS-activated macrophage production of inflammatory cytokines in a mixed leukocyte reaction and significantly alleviated the disease activity and colonic inflammation in a DSS-induced acute colitis murine model. Furthermore, YZP activated Breg function via interaction with TLR2 and TLR4 and up-regulation of the TLR-mediated signaling pathway. We purified a novel Breg-stimulating protein, YZP, from T. versicolor and developed an advanced approach combining RNA-seq and de novo assembly technologies.to clone its gene. We demonstrated that YZP activated CD1d(+) Breg differentiation through TLR2/4-mediated signaling pathway, and the YZP-stimulated B cells exhibited anti-inflammatory efficacies in vitro and in murine acute colitis models.

  9. Trametes versicolor protein YZP activates regulatory B lymphocytes - gene identification through de novo assembly and function analysis in a murine acute colitis model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Chou Kuan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Trametes versicolor (Yun-Zhi is a medicinal fungus used as a chemotherapy co-treatment to enhance anti-tumor immunity. Although the efficacies of T. versicolor extracts have been documented, the active ingredients and mechanisms underlying the actions of these extracts remain uncharacterized. RESULTS: We purified a new protein, YZP, from the fruiting bodies of T. versicolor and identified the gene encoding YZP using RNA-seq and de novo assembly technologies. YZP is a 12-kDa non-glycosylated protein comprising 139 amino acids, including an 18-amino acids signal peptide. YZP induced a greater than 60-fold increase in IL-10 secretion in mice B lymphocytes; moreover, YZP specifically triggered the differentiation of CD1d(+ B cells into IL-10-producing regulatory B cells (Bregs and enhanced the expression of CD1d. YZP-induced B cells suppressed approximately 40% of the LPS-activated macrophage production of inflammatory cytokines in a mixed leukocyte reaction and significantly alleviated the disease activity and colonic inflammation in a DSS-induced acute colitis murine model. Furthermore, YZP activated Breg function via interaction with TLR2 and TLR4 and up-regulation of the TLR-mediated signaling pathway. CONCLUSIONS: We purified a novel Breg-stimulating protein, YZP, from T. versicolor and developed an advanced approach combining RNA-seq and de novo assembly technologies.to clone its gene. We demonstrated that YZP activated CD1d(+ Breg differentiation through TLR2/4-mediated signaling pathway, and the YZP-stimulated B cells exhibited anti-inflammatory efficacies in vitro and in murine acute colitis models.

  10. Trametes versicolor Protein YZP Activates Regulatory B Lymphocytes – Gene Identification through De Novo Assembly and Function Analysis in a Murine Acute Colitis Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuan, Yen-Chou; Wu, Ying-Jou; Hung, Chih-Liang; Sheu, Fuu

    2013-01-01

    Background Trametes versicolor (Yun-Zhi) is a medicinal fungus used as a chemotherapy co-treatment to enhance anti-tumor immunity. Although the efficacies of T. versicolor extracts have been documented, the active ingredients and mechanisms underlying the actions of these extracts remain uncharacterized. Results We purified a new protein, YZP, from the fruiting bodies of T. versicolor and identified the gene encoding YZP using RNA-seq and de novo assembly technologies. YZP is a 12-kDa non-glycosylated protein comprising 139 amino acids, including an 18-amino acids signal peptide. YZP induced a greater than 60-fold increase in IL-10 secretion in mice B lymphocytes; moreover, YZP specifically triggered the differentiation of CD1d+ B cells into IL-10-producing regulatory B cells (Bregs) and enhanced the expression of CD1d. YZP-induced B cells suppressed approximately 40% of the LPS-activated macrophage production of inflammatory cytokines in a mixed leukocyte reaction and significantly alleviated the disease activity and colonic inflammation in a DSS-induced acute colitis murine model. Furthermore, YZP activated Breg function via interaction with TLR2 and TLR4 and up-regulation of the TLR-mediated signaling pathway. Conclusions We purified a novel Breg-stimulating protein, YZP, from T. versicolor and developed an advanced approach combining RNA-seq and de novo assembly technologies.to clone its gene. We demonstrated that YZP activated CD1d+ Breg differentiation through TLR2/4-mediated signaling pathway, and the YZP-stimulated B cells exhibited anti-inflammatory efficacies in vitro and in murine acute colitis models. PMID:24019869

  11. Prostasin and its regulatory proteins in human placentas from pregnant women with preeclampsia and healthy pregnant controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen-Møller, Britta; Jørgensen, Jan Stener; Vogel, Lotte Katrine

    2015-01-01

    for normal placental development in mice. Prostasin is regulated by aldosterone in the kidney and may activate the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC). Preeclampsia is characterized by disturbed placentation, suppression of aldosterone and avid renal sodium retention with hypertension. It was hypothesized...... that preeclampsia is associated with low prostasin expression in placenta and spillover of prostasin into urine across the defect glomerular barrier. METHODS: This hypothesis was addressed in a cross-sectional design with 20 healthy pregnant women and 20 women with new onset of preeclampsia (hypertension and 1......+ for protein on urine dipstick). Blood and urine samples were obtained in relation to delivery and placental biopsies were taken immediately after delivery (control = 39 and preeclampsia 40 weeks). RESULTS: Women with preeclampsia displayed lower levels of aldosterone in plasma (p=0.0475) and in spot urine...

  12. Cross-regulatory network in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm genes and TiO2anatase induced molecular perturbations in key proteins unraveled by a systems biology approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anupama, Rani; Sajitha Lulu, S; Mukherjee, Amitava; Babu, Subramanian

    2018-03-20

    A systems biology approach was used to study all the biofilm related genes of P. aeruginosa PAO1, and the interaction of titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) anatase with biofilm related proteins. Among the 71 genes, the interactions of all the nodal pairs were extracted by STRING 10.5 database. The inter-relationship among these genes was predicted by constructing complete PPI network and visualized in Cytoscape v 3.4.0. Total number of nodes of the network was found to be 335 and edges were 795. The network was further investigated for its clusters and the best cluster was further analyzed for the hub proteins which significantly contribute in cross-regulation of the biofilm related process. The hub proteins were identified based on four topological parameters of degree, closeness, betweeness and radiality. Four major hub proteins of P. aeruginosa PAO1 were identified to be algD, gacS, rpoS and rpoN which were common in all the hubs. Further, we have also elucidated the probable mechanism of TiO 2 interaction with P. aeruginosa PAO1 at molecular level. Using STITCH server, the major target gene of TiO 2 was identified as katA which also appeared commonly in our main dataset and this gene has been focused for the further study because of its unique common appearance in gene-gene network as well as gene-anatase network. The direct interacting partners of katA were found to be dnaK, hfq, rpoS and rpoA. Based on these findings and available gene regulatory information, probable TiO 2 interacting cascade has been represented. This in silico study of P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilm genes and the interaction of protein products with TiO 2 might be significant to understand the perspective pathogenic resistance as well as the toxicity research pertaining to nanoparticles. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. CpG site DNA methylation patterns reveal a novel regulatory element in the mouse prion protein gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    DALAI, Wuyun; MATSUO, Eiko; TAKEYAMA, Natsumi; KAWANO, Junichi; SAEKI, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    The cellular isoform of the prion protein (PrPC) plays critical roles in the development of prion disorders. Although PrP mRNA is ubiquitously present in a tissue-specific manner, the DNA methylation of PrP gene (Prnp) is still unknown. In this study, we demonstrated that the CpG island (CGI, positioned at −218 to +152 bp from the transcriptional start site) including the Prnp core promoter region was completely unmethylated in all tested tissues. On the other hand, CpG methylation in the CGI shore region (positioned at −599 to −238 bp) occurred in various tissue- and site-specific proportions. Interestingly, the correlation analysis between CpG methylation status and PrP mRNA levels showed that one CpG site methylation at −576 was negatively correlated with the PrP mRNA level (Pearson’s r = −0.374, P=0.035). Taken together, our results suggest that Prnp is a typical housekeeping gene and various methylation frequencies of the CGI shore region are likely to affect Prnp expression in a tissue-specific manner. PMID:27666463

  14. Diminished presentation of complement regulatory protein CD55 on red blood cells from patients with hereditary haemolytic anaemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loniewska-Lwowska, A; Koza, K; Mendek-Czajkowska, E; Wieszczy, P; Adamowicz-Salach, A; Branicka, K; Witos, I; Sapala-Smoczynska, A; Jackowska, T; Fabijanska-Mitek, J

    2018-04-01

    Hereditary haemolytic anaemias (HHA) encompass a heterogeneous group of anaemias characterized by decreased red blood cell survival. The aim of this study was to evaluate the status of red blood cell (RBC) surface molecules known or previously proposed to participate in preventing premature RBC clearance, analysing erythrocytes from patients with two types of HHA: hereditary spherocytosis (HS) and microcytosis. Relative binding of five monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), anti-CD55, anti-CD59, anti-CD44, anti-CD47 and anti-CD58, was evaluated in erythrocytes of patients with HS and hereditary microcytosis, using flow cytometry. The amount of CD55 protein was assessed by semi-quantitative Western blots densitometry analysis. The majority of both HS and microcytic patients demonstrated significant reduction of anti-CD55 binding by erythrocytes (average 23% and 19%, respectively, P presentation in HS and hereditary microcytosis. Moreover, deficiency of CD55 antigen presentation on RBC does not correlate with the amount of CD55 in RBC membrane. Further studies using molecular techniques will clarify the exact participation of CD55 deficiency in premature RBC clearance in HHA. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Immunohistochemical Localization of GFAP and Glutamate Regulatory Proteins in Chick Retina and Their Levels of Expressions in Altered Photoperiods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Kumar Abhiram; Nag, Tapas C; Wadhwa, Shashi; Roy, Tara Sankar

    2017-08-01

    Moderate to intense light is reported to damage the chick retina, which is cone dominated. Light damage alters neurotransmitter pools, such as those of glutamate. Glutamate level in the retina is regulated by glutamate-aspartate transporter (GLAST) and glutamine synthetase (GS). We examined immunolocalization patterns and the expression levels of both markers and of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, a marker of neuronal stress) in chick retina exposed to 2000 lux under 12-h light:12-h dark (12L:12D; normal photoperiod), 18L:6D (prolonged photoperiod), and 24L:0D (constant light) at post-hatch day 30. Retinal damage (increased death of photoreceptors and inner retinal neurons and Müller cell hypertrophy) and GFAP expression in Müller cells were maximal in 24L:0D condition compared to that seen in 12L:12D and 18L:6D conditions. GS was present in Müller cells and GLAST expressed in Müller cell processes and photoreceptor inner segments. GLAST expression was decreased in 24L:0D condition, and the expression levels between 12L:12D and 18L:6D, though increased marginally, were statistically insignificant. Similar was the case with GS expression that significantly decreased in 24L:0D condition. Our previous study with chicks exposed to 2000 lux reported increased retinal glutamate level in 24L:0D condition. The present results indicate that constant light induces decreased expressions of GLAST and GS, a condition that might aggravate glutamate-mediated neurotoxicity and delay neuroprotection in a cone-dominated retina.

  16. Regulatory mechanism of the arginine vasopressin-enhanced green fluorescent protein fusion gene expression in acute and chronic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Hitoshi; Kawasaki, Makoto; Ohnishi, Hideo; Nakamura, Toshitaka; Ueta, Yoichi

    2009-09-01

    Various kinds of stress cause neuroendocrine responses such as corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) or arginine vasopressin (AVP) release from parvocellular division of the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and activation of the hypothalamo-pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis. We examined the effects of acute and chronic stress on the expression of the AVP-enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) fusion gene in the hypothalamus, using chronic salt loading as an osmotic stimulation, intraperitoneal administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as acute inflammatory stress and adjuvant arthritis (AA) as chronic inflammatory/nociceptive stress. Salt loading caused a marked increase in the eGFP gene expression and eGFP fluorescence in the supraoptic nucleus, magnocellular division of the PVN and internal layer of the median eminence (ME). Administration of LPS caused increased fluorescence in parvocellular division of the PVN and external layer of the ME. AA rats revealed an increased expression of the eGFP gene and eGFP fluorescence in both magnocellular and parvocellular divisions of the PVN and both internal and external layers of the ME. On the other hand, the levels of the CRH gene expression in parvocellular division of the PVN were significantly decreased as AA developed, though plasma concentrations of corticosterone were significantly increased. These results indicate that AVP-eGFP transgenic rats enable the detection of changes in AVP expression more easily than by using procedures such as immunohistochemistry. We propose that AVP-eGFP transgenic rats represent a useful animal model for further understanding of the physiology of AVP expression in the hypothalamo-pituitary system under various physiological conditions, including various kinds of stress.

  17. Expression of Angiogenesis Regulatory Proteins and Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition Factors in Platelets of the Breast Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Han

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Platelets play a role in tumor angiogenesis and growth and are the main transporters of several angiogenesis regulators. Here, we aimed to determine the levels of angiogenesis regulators and epithelial-mesenchymal transition factors sequestered by circulating platelets in breast cancer patients and age-matched healthy controls. Platelet pellets (PP and platelet-poor plasma (PPP were collected by routine protocols. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB, thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1, platelet factor 4 (PF4, and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1 were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Angiogenesis-associated expression of VEGF (2.1 pg/106 platelets versus 0.9 pg/106 platelets, P < 0.001, PF4 (21.2 ng/106 platelets versus 10.2 ng/106 platelets, P < 0.001, PDGF-BB (42.9 pg/106 platelets versus 19.1 pg/106 platelets, P < 0.001, and TGF-β1 (15.3 ng/106 platelets versus 4.3 ng/106 platelets, P < 0.001 differed in the PP samples of cancer and control subjects. In addition, protein concentrations were associated with clinical characteristics (P<0.05. Circulating platelets in breast cancer sequester higher levels of PF4, VEGF, PDGF-BB, and TGF-β1, suggesting a possible target for early diagnosis. VEGF, PDGF, and TGF-β1 concentrations in platelets may be associated with prognosis.

  18. Molecular recognition of pyr mRNA by the Bacillus subtilis attenuation regulatory protein PyrR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonner, Eric R.; D’Elia, John N.; Billips, Benjamin K.; Switzer, Robert L.

    2001-01-01

    The pyrimidine nucleotide biosynthesis (pyr) operon in Bacillus subtilis is regulated by transcriptional attenuation. The PyrR protein binds in a uridine nucleotide-dependent manner to three attenuation sites at the 5′-end of pyr mRNA. PyrR binds an RNA-binding loop, allowing a terminator hairpin to form and repressing the downstream genes. The binding of PyrR to defined RNA molecules was characterized by a gel mobility shift assay. Titration indicated that PyrR binds RNA in an equimolar ratio. PyrR bound more tightly to the binding loops from the second (BL2 RNA) and third (BL3 RNA) attenuation sites than to the binding loop from the first (BL1 RNA) attenuation site. PyrR bound BL2 RNA 4–5-fold tighter in the presence of saturating UMP or UDP and 150- fold tighter with saturating UTP, suggesting that UTP is the more important co-regulator. The minimal RNA that bound tightly to PyrR was 28 nt long. Thirty-one structural variants of BL2 RNA were tested for PyrR binding affinity. Two highly conserved regions of the RNA, the terminal loop and top of the upper stem and a purine-rich internal bulge and the base pairs below it, were crucial for tight binding. Conserved elements of RNA secondary structure were also required for tight binding. PyrR protected conserved areas of the binding loop in hydroxyl radical footprinting experiments. PyrR likely recognizes conserved RNA sequences, but only if they are properly positioned in the correct secondary structure. PMID:11726695

  19. The homeodomain-interacting protein kinase HPK-1 preserves protein homeostasis and longevity through master regulatory control of the HSF-1 chaperone network and TORC1-restricted autophagy in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritika Das

    2017-10-01

    maturity. We show that HPK-1 fortifies proteostasis and extends longevity by an additional independent mechanism: induction of autophagy. HPK-1 is necessary for induction of autophagosome formation and autophagy gene expression in response to dietary restriction (DR or inactivation of TORC1. The autophagy-stimulating transcription factors pha-4/FoxA and mxl-2/Mlx, but not hlh-30/TFEB or the nuclear hormone receptor nhr-62, are necessary for extended longevity resulting from HPK-1 overexpression. HPK-1 expression is itself induced by transcriptional mechanisms after nutritional stress, and post-transcriptional mechanisms in response to thermal stress. Collectively our results position HPK-1 at a central regulatory node upstream of the greater proteostatic network, acting at the transcriptional level by promoting protein folding via chaperone expression, and protein turnover via expression of autophagy genes. HPK-1 therefore provides a promising intervention point for pharmacological agents targeting the protein homeostasis system as a means of preserving robust longevity.

  20. Clonorchis sinensis-derived total protein attenuates airway inflammation in murine asthma model by inducing regulatory T cells and modulating dendritic cell functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Young-Il [Div. of Malaria and Parasitic Diseases, Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Osong (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seung Hyun [Div. of AIDS, National Institute of Health, Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Osong (Korea, Republic of); Ju, Jung Won; Cho, Shin Hyeong; Lee, Won Ja [Div. of Malaria and Parasitic Diseases, Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Osong (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jin Wook; Park, Yeong-Min [Dept. of Microbiology and Immunology, College of Medicine, Pusan National University, Yang-San (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Eun, E-mail: ondalgl@cdc.go.kr [Div. of Malaria and Parasitic Diseases, Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Osong (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-04-22

    Highlights: {yields} Treatment with Clonorchis sinensis-derived total protein attenuates OVA-induced airway inflammation and AHR to methacholine. {yields} Induction of CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +}Foxp3{sup +} T cells and IL-10 along with suppression of splenocyte proliferation by C. sinensis-derived total protein. {yields} C. sinensis-derived total protein interferes with the expression of co-stimulatory molecules in DCs. -- Abstract: Asthma is characterized by Th2-mediated inflammation, resulting in airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) through airway remodeling. Recent epidemiological and experimental reports have suggested an inverse relationship between the development of allergy and helminth infections. Infection by Clonorchis sinensis, a liver fluke that resides in the bile duct of humans, is endemic predominantly in Asia including Korea and China. Using a murine model for asthma, we investigated the effects of C. sinensis-derived total protein (Cs-TP) on allergen-induced airway inflammation and the mechanism underlying the protective effects of Cs-TP administration on asthma. Treatment with Cs-TP attenuated OVA-induced airway inflammation and methacholine-induced AHR, as well as eosinophilia development, lymphocyte infiltration into the lung, and goblet cell metaplasia. This protective effect of Cs-TP is associated with markedly reduced OVA-specific IgE and Th1/Th2 cytokine production. Moreover, Cs-TP increased the number of CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +}Foxp3{sup +} regulatory T (Treg) cells as well as their suppressive activity. In fact, proliferation of OVA-restimulated splenocytes was suppressed significantly. Cs-TP also inhibited the expression of such co-stimulatory molecules as CD80, CD86, and CD40 in LPS- or OVA-stimulated dendritic cells (DCs), suggesting that Cs-TP could interfere with the capacity of airway DCs to prime naive T cells. These data demonstrate the capacity of C. sinensis to ameliorate allergic asthma and broaden our understanding of the paradoxical

  1. Hepatic protein phosphatase 1 regulatory subunit 3B (Ppp1r3b) promotes hepatic glycogen synthesis and thereby regulates fasting energy homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Minal B; Shewale, Swapnil V; Sequeira, Raymond N; Millar, John S; Hand, Nicholas J; Rader, Daniel J

    2017-06-23

    Maintenance of whole-body glucose homeostasis is critical to glycemic function. Genetic variants mapping to chromosome 8p23.1 in genome-wide association studies have been linked to glycemic traits in humans. The gene of known function closest to the mapped region, PPP1R3B (protein phosphatase 1 regulatory subunit 3B), encodes a protein (G L ) that regulates glycogen metabolism in the liver. We therefore sought to test the hypothesis that hepatic PPP1R3B is associated with glycemic traits. We generated mice with either liver-specific deletion ( Ppp1r3b Δ hep ) or liver-specific overexpression of Ppp1r3b The Ppp1r3b deletion significantly reduced glycogen synthase protein abundance, and the remaining protein was predominantly phosphorylated and inactive. As a consequence, glucose incorporation into hepatic glycogen was significantly impaired, total hepatic glycogen content was substantially decreased, and mice lacking hepatic Ppp1r3b had lower fasting plasma glucose than controls. The concomitant loss of liver glycogen impaired whole-body glucose homeostasis and increased hepatic expression of glycolytic enzymes in Ppp1r3b Δ hep mice relative to controls in the postprandial state. Eight hours of fasting significantly increased the expression of two critical gluconeogenic enzymes, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and glucose-6-phosphatase, above the levels in control livers. Conversely, the liver-specific overexpression of Ppp1r3b enhanced hepatic glycogen storage above that of controls and, as a result, delayed the onset of fasting-induced hypoglycemia. Moreover, mice overexpressing hepatic Ppp1r3b upon long-term fasting (12-36 h) were protected from blood ketone-body accumulation, unlike control and Ppp1r3b Δ hep mice. These findings indicate a major role for Ppp1r3b in regulating hepatic glycogen stores and whole-body glucose/energy homeostasis. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Foot-and-mouth disease virus leader proteinase inhibits dsRNA-induced type I interferon transcription by decreasing interferon regulatory factor 3/7 in protein levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Dang; Fang, Liurong; Luo, Rui; Ye, Rui; Fang, Ying; Xie, Lilan; Chen, Huanchun [Division of Animal Infectious Diseases, State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Xiao, Shaobo, E-mail: shaoboxiao@yahoo.com [Division of Animal Infectious Diseases, State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2010-08-13

    Research highlights: {yields} FMDV L{sup pro} inhibits poly(I:C)-induced IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} mRNA expression. {yields} L{sup pro} inhibits MDA5-mediated activation of the IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} promoter. {yields} L{sup pro} significantly reduced the transcription of multiple IRF-responsive genes. {yields} L{sup pro} inhibits IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} promoter activation by decreasing IRF-3/7 in protein levels. {yields} The ability to process eIF-4G of L{sup pro} is not necessary to inhibit IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} activation. -- Abstract: The leader proteinase (L{sup pro}) of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) has been identified as an interferon-{beta} (IFN-{beta}) antagonist that disrupts the integrity of transcription factor nuclear factor {kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B). In this study, we showed that the reduction of double stranded RNA (dsRNA)-induced IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} expression caused by L{sup pro} was also associated with a decrease of interferon regulatory factor 3/7 (IRF-3/7) in protein levels, two critical transcription factors for activation of IFN-{alpha}/{beta}. Furthermore, overexpression of L{sup pro} significantly reduced the transcription of multiple IRF-responsive genes including 2',5'-OAS, ISG54, IP-10, and RANTES. Screening L{sup pro} mutants indicated that the ability to process eIF-4G of L{sup pro} is not required for suppressing dsRNA-induced activation of the IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} promoter and decreasing IRF-3/7 expression. Taken together, our results demonstrate that, in addition to disrupting NF-{kappa}B, L{sup pro} also decreases IRF-3/7 expression to suppress dsRNA-induced type I IFN production, suggesting multiple strategies used by FMDV to counteract the immune response to viral infection.

  3. Progesterone stimulates adipocyte determination and differentiation 1/sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c gene expression. potential mechanism for the lipogenic effect of progesterone in adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacasa, D; Le Liepvre, X; Ferre, P; Dugail, I

    2001-04-13

    Fatty acid synthase (FAS), a nutritionally regulated lipogenic enzyme, is transcriptionally controlled by ADD1/SREBP1c (adipocyte determination and differentiation 1/sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c), through insulin-mediated stimulation of ADD1/SREBP1c expression. Progesterone exerts lipogenic effects on adipocytes, and FAS is highly induced in breast tumor cell lines upon progesterone treatment. We show here that progesterone up-regulates ADD1/SREBP1c expression in the MCF7 breast cancer cell line and the primary cultured preadipocyte from rat parametrial adipose tissue. In MCF7, progesterone induced ADD1/SREBP1c and Metallothionein II (a well known progesterone-regulated gene) mRNAs, with comparable potency. In preadipocytes, progesterone increased ADD1/SREBP1c mRNA dose-dependently, but not SREBP1a or SREBP2. Run-on experiments demonstrated that progesterone action on ADD1/SREBP1c was primarily at the transcriptional level. The membrane-bound and mature nuclear forms of ADD1/SREBP1 protein accumulated in preadipocytes cultured with progesterone, and FAS induction could be abolished by adenovirus-mediated overexpression of a dominant negative form of ADD1/SREBP1 in these cells. Finally, in the presence of insulin, progesterone was unable to up-regulate ADD1/SREBP1c mRNA in preadipocytes, whereas its effect was restored after 24 h of insulin deprivation. Together these results demonstrate that ADD1/SREBP1c is controlled by progesterone, which, like insulin, acts by increasing ADD1/SREBP1c gene transcription. This provides a potential mechanism for the lipogenic actions of progesterone on adipose tissue.

  4. Expression of cold and drought regulatory protein (CcCDR) of pigeonpea imparts enhanced tolerance to major abiotic stresses in transgenic rice plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunitha, Mellacheruvu; Srinath, Tamirisa; Reddy, Vudem Dashavantha; Rao, Khareedu Venkateswara

    2017-06-01

    Transgenic rice expressing pigeonpea Cc CDR conferred high-level tolerance to different abiotic stresses. The multiple stress tolerance observed in CcCDR -transgenic lines is attributed to the modulation of ABA-dependent and-independent signalling-pathway genes. Stable transgenic plants expressing Cajanus cajan cold and drought regulatory protein encoding gene (CcCDR), under the control of CaMV35S and rd29A promoters, have been generated in indica rice. Different transgenic lines of CcCDR, when subjected to drought, salt, and cold stresses, exhibited higher seed germination, seedling survival rates, shoot length, root length, and enhanced plant biomass when compared with the untransformed control plants. Furthermore, transgenic plants disclosed higher leaf chlorophyll content, proline, reducing sugars, SOD, and catalase activities, besides lower levels of MDA. Localization studies revealed that the CcCDR-GFP fusion protein was mainly present in the nucleus of transformed cells of rice. The CcCDR transgenics were found hypersensitive to abscisic acid (ABA) and showed reduced seed germination rates as compared to that of control plants. When the transgenic plants were exposed to drought and salt stresses at vegetative and reproductive stages, they revealed larger panicles and higher number of filled grains compared to the untransformed control plants. Under similar stress conditions, the expression levels of P5CS, bZIP, DREB, OsLEA3, and CIPK genes, involved in ABA-dependent and-independent signal transduction pathways, were found higher in the transgenic plants than the control plants. The overall results amply demonstrate that the transgenic rice expressing CcCDR bestows high-level tolerance to drought, salt, and cold stress conditions. Accordingly, the CcCDR might be deployed as a promising candidate gene for improving the multiple stress tolerance of diverse crop plants.

  5. Foot-and-mouth disease virus leader proteinase inhibits dsRNA-induced type I interferon transcription by decreasing interferon regulatory factor 3/7 in protein levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Dang; Fang, Liurong; Luo, Rui; Ye, Rui; Fang, Ying; Xie, Lilan; Chen, Huanchun; Xiao, Shaobo

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → FMDV L pro inhibits poly(I:C)-induced IFN-α1/β mRNA expression. → L pro inhibits MDA5-mediated activation of the IFN-α1/β promoter. → L pro significantly reduced the transcription of multiple IRF-responsive genes. → L pro inhibits IFN-α1/β promoter activation by decreasing IRF-3/7 in protein levels. → The ability to process eIF-4G of L pro is not necessary to inhibit IFN-α1/β activation. -- Abstract: The leader proteinase (L pro ) of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) has been identified as an interferon-β (IFN-β) antagonist that disrupts the integrity of transcription factor nuclear factor κB (NF-κB). In this study, we showed that the reduction of double stranded RNA (dsRNA)-induced IFN-α1/β expression caused by L pro was also associated with a decrease of interferon regulatory factor 3/7 (IRF-3/7) in protein levels, two critical transcription factors for activation of IFN-α/β. Furthermore, overexpression of L pro significantly reduced the transcription of multiple IRF-responsive genes including 2',5'-OAS, ISG54, IP-10, and RANTES. Screening L pro mutants indicated that the ability to process eIF-4G of L pro is not required for suppressing dsRNA-induced activation of the IFN-α1/β promoter and decreasing IRF-3/7 expression. Taken together, our results demonstrate that, in addition to disrupting NF-κB, L pro also decreases IRF-3/7 expression to suppress dsRNA-induced type I IFN production, suggesting multiple strategies used by FMDV to counteract the immune response to viral infection.

  6. Association between single nucleotide polymorphisms of sterol regulatory element binding protein-2 gene and risk of knee osteoarthritis in a Chinese Han population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Xiao-Ming; Jin, Cheng-Tao; Wang, Wei

    2014-04-01

    To investigate associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs2228314 and rs2267443 in the sterol regulatory element binding protein-2 gene (SREBP-2) and knee osteoarthritis (OA) susceptibility in a Chinese Han population. SREBP-2 rs2228314 and rs2267443 polymorphisms were genotyped in patients with knee OA and age- and sex-matched OA-free controls from a Chinese Han population. A total of 402 patients with knee OA and 410 controls were enrolled in the study. GC and CC genotypes of rs2228314, and variant C, were associated with a significantly increased risk of knee OA. On stratification analysis, the association between the risk of OA and rs2228314 GC heterozygotes compared with GG homozygotes was stronger in females and those aged >65 years. In contrast, the GA and AA genotypes of rs2267443 were not significantly associated with the risk of knee OA, even after further stratification analysis according to age or sex. SREBP-2 rs2228314 G to C change and variant C genotype may contribute to knee OA risk in a Chinese Han population.

  7. Micro-RNA 10a Is Increased in Feline T Regulatory Cells and Increases Foxp3 Protein Expression Following In Vitro Transfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Nag, Mukta; Tuohy, Joanne L; Fogle, Jonathan E

    2017-02-21

    CD4⁺CD25⁺Foxp3⁺ T regulatory (Treg) cells are activated during the course of lentiviral infection and exhibit heightened suppressor function when compared to Treg cells from uninfected controls. Foxp3 is essential to Treg cell function and multiple studies have documented that lentivirus-activated Treg cells exhibit heightened Foxp3 expression when compared to Treg cells from uninfected controls. Our hypothesis was that lentivirus-induced micro-RNAs (miRNAs) contribute to heightened Treg cell suppressor function by stabilizing Foxp3 expression. We demonstrated that CD4⁺CD25⁺ T cells from both feline immunodeficiency virus infected (FIV⁺) cats and uninfected control cats exhibit increased miRNA 10a and 21 levels compared to autologous CD4⁺CD25 - T cells but there was no difference in the levels of these miRNAs when Treg cells from FIV⁺ cats were compared to Treg cells from uninfected controls. Further, there was no increase in Foxp3 mRNA following transfection of miRNA 10a or 21 into a feline cell line. However, transfection with miRNA 10a resulted in increased Foxp3 protein expression.

  8. Arctigenin induces cell cycle arrest by blocking the phosphorylation of Rb via the modulation of cell cycle regulatory proteins in human gastric cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jin Boo; Hong, Se Chul; Jeong, Hyung Jin; Koo, Jin Suk

    2011-10-01

    Gastric cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths, worldwide being second only to lung cancer as a cause of death. Arctigenin, a representative dibenzylbutyrolactone lignan, occurs in a variety of plants. However, the molecular mechanisms of arctigenin for anti-tumor effect on gastric cancer have not been examined. This study examined the biological effects of arctigenin on the human gastric cancer cell line SNU-1 and AGS. Cell proliferation was determined by MTT assay. In MTT assay, the proliferation of SNU-1 and AGS cells was significantly inhibited by arctigenin in a time and dose dependent manner, as compared with SNU-1 and AGS cells cultured in the absence of arctigenin. Inhibition of cell proliferation by arctigenin was in part associated with apoptotic cell death, as shown by changes in the expression ratio of Bcl-2 to Bax by arctigenin. Also, arctigenin blocked cell cycle arrest from G(1) to S phase by regulating the expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins such as Rb, cyclin D1, cyclin E, CDK4, CDK2, p21Waf1/Cip1 and p15 INK4b. The antiproliferative effect of arctigenin on SNU-1 and AGS gastric cancer cells revealed in this study suggests that arctigenin has intriguing potential as a chemopreventive or chemotherapeutic agent. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A feedback regulatory loop between G3P and lipid transfer proteins DIR1 and AZI1 mediates azelaic-acid-induced systemic immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Keshun; Soares, Juliana Moreira; Mandal, Mihir Kumar; Wang, Caixia; Chanda, Bidisha; Gifford, Andrew N; Fowler, Joanna S; Navarre, Duroy; Kachroo, Aardra; Kachroo, Pradeep

    2013-04-25

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR), a highly desirable form of plant defense, provides broad-spectrum immunity against diverse pathogens. The recent identification of seemingly unrelated chemical inducers of SAR warrants an investigation of their mutual interrelationships. We show that SAR induced by the dicarboxylic acid azelaic acid (AA) requires the phosphorylated sugar derivative glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P). Pathogen inoculation induced the release of free unsaturated fatty acids (FAs) and thereby triggered AA accumulation, because these FAs serve as precursors for AA. AA accumulation in turn increased the levels of G3P, which is required for AA-conferred SAR. The lipid transfer proteins DIR1 and AZI1, both of which are required for G3P- and AA-induced SAR, were essential for G3P accumulation. Conversely, reduced G3P resulted in decreased AZI1 and DIR1 transcription. Our results demonstrate that an intricate feedback regulatory loop among G3P, DIR1, and AZI1 regulates SAR and that AA functions upstream of G3P in this pathway. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A Feedback Regulatory Loop between G3P and Lipid Transfer Proteins DIR1 and AZI1 Mediates Azelaic-Acid-Induced Systemic Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keshun Yu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Systemic acquired resistance (SAR, a highly desirable form of plant defense, provides broad-spectrum immunity against diverse pathogens. The recent identification of seemingly unrelated chemical inducers of SAR warrants an investigation of their mutual interrelationships. We show that SAR induced by the dicarboxylic acid azelaic acid (AA requires the phosphorylated sugar derivative glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P. Pathogen inoculation induced the release of free unsaturated fatty acids (FAs and thereby triggered AA accumulation, because these FAs serve as precursors for AA. AA accumulation in turn increased the levels of G3P, which is required for AA-conferred SAR. The lipid transfer proteins DIR1 and AZI1, both of which are required for G3P- and AA-induced SAR, were essential for G3P accumulation. Conversely, reduced G3P resulted in decreased AZI1 and DIR1 transcription. Our results demonstrate that an intricate feedback regulatory loop among G3P, DIR1, and AZI1 regulates SAR and that AA functions upstream of G3P in this pathway.

  11. Methanol assimilation in Escherichia coli is improved by co-utilization of threonine and deletion of leucine-responsive regulatory protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Jacqueline E; Bennett, R Kyle; Papoutsakis, E Terry; Antoniewicz, Maciek R

    2018-01-01

    Methane, the main component of natural gas, can be used to produce methanol which can be further converted to other valuable products. There is increasing interest in using biological systems for the production of fuels and chemicals from methanol, termed methylotrophy. In this work, we have examined methanol assimilation metabolism in a synthetic methylotrophic E. coli strain. Specifically, we applied 13 C-tracers and evaluated 25 different co-substrates for methanol assimilation, including amino acids, sugars and organic acids. In particular, co-utilization of threonine significantly enhanced methylotrophy. Through our investigations, we proposed specific metabolic pathways that, when activated, correlated with increased methanol assimilation. These pathways are normally repressed by the leucine-responsive regulatory protein (lrp), a global regulator of metabolism associated with the feast-or-famine response in E. coli. By deleting lrp, we were able to further enhance the methylotrophic ability of our synthetic strain, as demonstrated through increased incorporation of 13 C carbon from 13 C-methanol into biomass. Copyright © 2017 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Micro-RNA 10a Is Increased in Feline T Regulatory Cells and Increases Foxp3 Protein Expression Following In Vitro Transfection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Wang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T regulatory (Treg cells are activated during the course of lentiviral infection and exhibit heightened suppressor function when compared to Treg cells from uninfected controls. Foxp3 is essential to Treg cell function and multiple studies have documented that lentivirus-activated Treg cells exhibit heightened Foxp3 expression when compared to Treg cells from uninfected controls. Our hypothesis was that lentivirus-induced micro-RNAs (miRNAs contribute to heightened Treg cell suppressor function by stabilizing Foxp3 expression. We demonstrated that CD4+CD25+ T cells from both feline immunodeficiency virus infected (FIV+ cats and uninfected control cats exhibit increased miRNA 10a and 21 levels compared to autologous CD4+CD25− T cells but there was no difference in the levels of these miRNAs when Treg cells from FIV+ cats were compared to Treg cells from uninfected controls. Further, there was no increase in Foxp3 mRNA following transfection of miRNA 10a or 21 into a feline cell line. However, transfection with miRNA 10a resulted in increased Foxp3 protein expression.

  13. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 mediates a mechanism of metabolic cardioprotection consisting of negative regulation of the sterol regulatory element-binding protein-2/3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase pathway in the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiang; Berry, Evan; Hernandez-Anzaldo, Samuel; Takawale, Abhijit; Kassiri, Zamaneh; Fernandez-Patron, Carlos

    2015-04-01

    Previously, we reported that cardiac matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 is upregulated in hypertensive mice. How MMP-2 affects the development of cardiac disease is unclear. Here, we report that MMP-2 protects from hypertensive cardiac disease. In mice infused with angiotensin II, the lack of MMP-2 (Mmp2(-/-)) did not affect the severity of the hypertension but caused cardiac hypertrophy to develop earlier and to a greater extent versus wild-type (Mmp2(+/+)) mice, as measured by heart weight:body weight ratio and upregulation of hypertrophy and fibrosis markers. We further found numerous metabolic and inflammatory gene expression abnormalities in the left ventricle of Mmp2(-/-) mice. Interestingly, Mmp2(-/-) mice expressed greater amounts of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-2 and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (a target of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-2-mediated transcription and rate limiting enzyme in cholesterol and isoprenoids biosynthesis) in addition to markers of inflammation including chemokines of the C-C motif ligand family. We focused on the functionally related genes for sterol regulatory binding protein-2 and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase. The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitor, lovastatin, attenuated angiotensin II-induced cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis in Mmp2(-/-) and wild-type (Mmp2(+/+)) mice, with Mmp2(-/-) mice showing resistance to cardioprotection by lovastatin. MMP-2 deficiency predisposes to cardiac dysfunction as well as metabolic and inflammatory gene expression dysregulation. This complex phenotype is, at least in part, because of the cardiac sterol regulatory element-binding protein-2/3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase pathway being upregulated in MMP-2 deficiency. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Andrographolide prevents high-fat diet-induced obesity in C57BL/6 mice by suppressing the sterol regulatory element-binding protein pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Lili; Li, Jinmei; Song, Baoliang; Xiao, Xu; Huang, Wendong; Zhang, Binfeng; Tang, Xiaowen; Qi, Meng; Yang, Qiming; Yang, Qiaoling; Yang, Li; Wang, Zhengtao

    2014-11-01

    Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) are major transcription factors regulating the expression of genes involved in biosynthesis of cholesterol, fatty acids, and triglycerides. We investigated the effect of the specific SREBP suppressor andrographolide, a natural compound isolated from Andrographis paniculata, on the regulation of SREBP signaling by use of Western blot, reporter gene assay, and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis. In addition, the antiobesity effects of andrographolide were evaluated in C57BL/6 mice with high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity. Our results showed that andrographolide downregulated the expressions of SREBPs target genes and decreased cellular lipid accumulation in vitro. Further, andrographolide (100 mg/kg per day) attenuated HFD-induced body weight gain and fat accumulation in liver or adipose tissues, and improved serum lipid levels and insulin or glucose sensitivity in HFD-induced obese mice. Andrographolide effectively suppressed the respiratory quotient, energy expenditure, and oxygen consumption, which may have contributed to the decreased body-weight gain of the obese mice fed with a HFD. Consistently, andrographolide regulated SREBP target genes and metabolism-associated genes in liver or brown adipose tissue, which may have directly contributed to the lower lipid levels and enhanced insulin sensitivity. Taken together, our results indicated that andrographolide ameliorated lipid metabolism and improved glucose use in mice with HFD-induced obesity. Andrographolide has potential as a leading compound in the prevention or treatment of obesity and insulin resistance. Copyright © 2014 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  15. Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) gene expression construct: Development, nanodelivery and effect on reproduction in air-breathing catfish, Clarias batrachus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathor, Pravesh Kumar; Bhat, Irfan Ahmad; Rather, Mohd Ashraf; Gireesh-Babu, Pathakota; Kumar, Kundan; Purayil, Suresh Babu Padinhate; Sharma, Rupam

    2017-11-01

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) is responsible for the relocation of cholesterol across mitochondrial membrane in vertebrates and is, therefore, a key factor in regulating the rate and timing of steroidogenesis. In the present study, we developed chitosan nanoparticle (CNP) conjugated StAR gene construct (CNP-pcDNA4-StAR) in a eukaryotic expression vector, pcDNA4/HisMax A. CNPs of 135.4nm diameter, 26.7mV zeta potential and 0.381 polydispersity index were used for conjugation. The loading efficiency (LE) of pcDNA4-StAR construct with CNPs was found to be 86%. After the 24h of intramuscular injection, the CNP-pcDNA4-StAR plasmid could be detected from testis, brain, kidney and muscle tissues of Clarias batrachus. The transcript levels of important reproductive genes viz. cyp11a1, cyp17a1, 3β-hsd, 17β-hsd and cyp19a1 in CNP-pcDNA4-StAR treated group were initially low up to 24h, but significantly increased subsequently up to 120h. In naked pcDNA4-StAR treated group, the mRNA level of 3β-hsd, 17β-hsd and cyp19a1 increased initially up to 24h, while cyp11a1 and cyp17a1 increased up to 48h and then started declining. Similar results were obtained for 11-Ketotestosterone and 17β-estradiol. The results indicate relatively long lasting effects of nano-conjugated construct compared to the construct alone. Furthermore, the histopathology of gonads and liver authenticates its possible role in the gonadal development in fish without any adverse effect. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The Rts1 regulatory subunit of protein phosphatase 2A is required for control of G1 cyclin transcription and nutrient modulation of cell size.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Artiles

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The key molecular event that marks entry into the cell cycle is transcription of G1 cyclins, which bind and activate cyclin-dependent kinases. In yeast cells, initiation of G1 cyclin transcription is linked to achievement of a critical cell size, which contributes to cell-size homeostasis. The critical cell size is modulated by nutrients, such that cells growing in poor nutrients are smaller than cells growing in rich nutrients. Nutrient modulation of cell size does not work through known critical regulators of G1 cyclin transcription and is therefore thought to work through a distinct pathway. Here, we report that Rts1, a highly conserved regulatory subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A, is required for normal control of G1 cyclin transcription. Loss of Rts1 caused delayed initiation of bud growth and delayed and reduced accumulation of G1 cyclins. Expression of the G1 cyclin CLN2 from an inducible promoter rescued the delayed bud growth in rts1Delta cells, indicating that Rts1 acts at the level of transcription. Moreover, loss of Rts1 caused altered regulation of Swi6, a key component of the SBF transcription factor that controls G1 cyclin transcription. Epistasis analysis revealed that Rts1 does not work solely through several known critical upstream regulators of G1 cyclin transcription. Cells lacking Rts1 failed to undergo nutrient modulation of cell size. Together, these observations demonstrate that Rts1 is a key player in pathways that link nutrient availability, cell size, and G1 cyclin transcription. Since Rts1 is highly conserved, it may function in similar pathways in vertebrates.

  17. Correlation between cellular expression of complement regulatory proteins with depletion and repopulation of B-lymphocytes in peripheral blood of patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with rituximab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viecceli, Daniela; Garcia, Mariana Pires; Schneider, Laiana; Alegretti, Ana Paula; Silva, Cristiano Kohler; Ribeiro, André Lucas; Brenol, Claiton Viegas; Xavier, Ricardo Machado

    To correlate the basal expression of complement regulatory proteins (CRPs) CD55, CD59, CD35, and CD46 in B-lymphocytes from the peripheral blood of a cohort of 10 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) initiating treatment with rituximab (RTX) with depletion and time repopulation of such cells. Ten patients with RA received two infusions of 1g of RTX with an interval of 14 days. Immunophenotypic analysis for the detection of CD55, CD59, CD35, and CD46 on B-lymphocytes was carried out immediately before the first infusion. The population of B-lymphocytes was analyzed by means of basal CD19 expression and after 1, 2, and 6 months after the infusion of RTX, and then quarterly until clinical relapse. Depletion of B-lymphocytes in peripheral blood was defined as a CD19 expression <0.005×109/L. Ten women with a median of 49 years and a baseline DAS28=5.6 were evaluated; 9 were seropositive for rheumatoid factor. Five patients showed a repopulation of B-lymphocytes after 2 months, and the other five after 6 months. There was a correlation between the basal expression of CD46 and the time of repopulation (correlation coefficient=-0.733, p=0.0016). A similar trend was observed with CD35, but without statistical significance (correction coefficient=-0.522, p=0.12). The increased CD46 expression was predictive of a faster repopulation of B-lymphocytes in patients treated with RTX. Studies involving a larger number of patients will be needed to confirm the utility of basal expression of CRPs as a predictor of clinical response. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  18. An antisense oligodeoxynucleotide targeted against the type IIβ regulatory subunit mRNA of protein kinase inhibits cAMP-induced differentiation in HL-60 leukemia cells without affecting phorbol ester effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tortora, G.; Clair, T.; Cho-Chung, Y.S.

    1990-01-01

    The type II β regulatory subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (RII β ) has been hypothesized to play an important role in the growth inhibition and differentiation induced by site-selective cAMP analogs in human cancer cells, but direct proof of this function has been lacking. To address this tissue, HL-60 human promyelocytic leukemia cells were exposed to RII β antisense synthetic oligodeoxynucleotide, and the effects on cAMP-induced growth regulation were examined. Exposure of these cells to RII β antisense oligodeoxynucleotide resulted in a decrease in cAMP analog-induced growth inhibition and differentiation without apparent effect on differentiation induced by phorbol esters. This loss in cAMP growth regulatory function correlated with a decrease in basal and induced levels of RII β protein. Exposure to RII β sense, RI α and RII α antisense, or irrelevant oligodeoxynucleotides had no such effect. These results show that the RII β regulatory subunit of protein kinase plays a critical role in the cAMP-induced growth regulation of HL-60 leukemia cells

  19. Regulatory Protein OmpR Influences the Serum Resistance of Yersinia enterocolitica O:9 by Modifying the Structure of the Outer Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skorek, Karolina; Raczkowska, Adrianna; Dudek, Bartłomiej; Miętka, Katarzyna; Guz-Regner, Katarzyna; Pawlak, Aleksandra; Klausa, Elżbieta; Bugla-Płoskońska, Gabriela; Brzostek, Katarzyna

    2013-01-01

    The EnvZ/OmpR two-component system constitutes a regulatory pathway involved in bacterial adaptive responses to environmental cues. Our previous findings indicated that the OmpR regulator in Yersinia enterocolitica O:9 positively regulates the expression of FlhDC, the master flagellar activator, which influences adhesion/invasion properties and biofilm formation. Here we show that a strain lacking OmpR grown at 37°C exhibits extremely high resistance to the bactericidal activity of normal human serum (NHS) compared with the wild-type strain. Analysis of OMP expression in the ompR mutant revealed that OmpR reciprocally regulates Ail and OmpX, two homologous OMPs of Y. enterocolitica, without causing significant changes in the level of YadA, the major serum resistance factor. Analysis of mutants in individual genes belonging to the OmpR regulon (ail, ompX, ompC and flhDC) and strains lacking plasmid pYV, expressing YadA, demonstrated the contribution of the respective proteins to serum resistance. We show that Ail and OmpC act in an opposite way to the OmpX protein to confer serum resistance to the wild-type strain, but are not responsible for the high resistance of the ompR mutant. The serum resistance phenotype of ompR seems to be multifactorial and mainly attributable to alterations that potentiate the function of YadA. Our results indicate that a decreased level of FlhDC in the ompR mutant cells is partly responsible for the serum resistance and this effect can be suppressed by overexpression of flhDC in trans. The observation that the loss of FlhDC enhances the survival of wild-type cells in NHS supports the involvement of FlhDC regulator in this phenotype. In addition, the ompR mutant exhibited a lower level of LPS, but this was not correlated with changes in the level of FlhDC. We propose that OmpR might alter the susceptibility of Y. enterocolitica O:9 to complement-mediated killing through remodeling of the outer membrane. PMID:24260242

  20. Identification of a novel conserved mixed-isoform B56 regulatory subunit and spatiotemporal regulation of protein phosphatase 2A during Xenopus laevis development

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    Seeling Joni M

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wnt signaling is a key regulator of development and tumorigenesis. Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A, which consists of a catalytic C, a structural A, and a regulatory B subunit, plays diverse roles in Wnt signaling through its B56 subunits. B56 is a multigene family encoding for proteins with a conserved core domain and divergent amino- and carboxy-termini. Ectopic B56α and B56γ reduce β-catenin abundance and B56α reduces Wnt-dependent transcription, suggesting that B56α and B56γ inhibit Wnt signaling. In contrast, B56ε is required for Wnt signaling. Knowledge of where and when B56 subunits are expressed during Xenopus development will aid in our understanding of their roles in Wnt signaling. Results We have undertaken expression analyses of B56α and B56γ in Xenopus laevis. We cloned Xenopus B56α; it is 88% identical to human B56α. Xenopus B56γ is 94% identical with human B56γ, however, a novel evolutionarily conserved mixed-isoform transcript was identified that contains a B56δ-like amino-terminal domain and a B56γ core domain. The B56δ-like variable domain exon is located upstream of the B56γ variable domain exon at the human B56γ locus, suggesting that the mixed-isoform transcript is due to alternative splicing. B56γ transcripts with different 3' ends were identified that lack or possess a 35 base pair sequence, resulting in either a transcript similar to human B56γ1, or an uncharacterized evolutionarily conserved sequence. Real time RT-PCR analyses revealed that B56α is expressed at moderate levels before the midblastula transition (MBT, at reduced levels during gastrulation and neurulation, and at high levels during organogenesis, while B56γ is expressed at low levels until organogenesis. B56α is enriched in the ventral hemisphere pre-MBT, while B56γ is ventrally enriched post-MBT. Aα, Aβ, Cα and Cβ are expressed in early Xenopus development, suggesting the presence of a functional heterotrimer

  1. Regulatory protein OmpR influences the serum resistance of Yersinia enterocolitica O:9 by modifying the structure of the outer membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Skorek

    Full Text Available The EnvZ/OmpR two-component system constitutes a regulatory pathway involved in bacterial adaptive responses to environmental cues. Our previous findings indicated that the OmpR regulator in Yersinia enterocolitica O:9 positively regulates the expression of FlhDC, the master flagellar activator, which influences adhesion/invasion properties and biofilm formation. Here we show that a strain lacking OmpR grown at 37°C exhibits extremely high resistance to the bactericidal activity of normal human serum (NHS compared with the wild-type strain. Analysis of OMP expression in the ompR mutant revealed that OmpR reciprocally regulates Ail and OmpX, two homologous OMPs of Y. enterocolitica, without causing significant changes in the level of YadA, the major serum resistance factor. Analysis of mutants in individual genes belonging to the OmpR regulon (ail, ompX, ompC and flhDC and strains lacking plasmid pYV, expressing YadA, demonstrated the contribution of the respective proteins to serum resistance. We show that Ail and OmpC act in an opposite way to the OmpX protein to confer serum resistance to the wild-type strain, but are not responsible for the high resistance of the ompR mutant. The serum resistance phenotype of ompR seems to be multifactorial and mainly attributable to alterations that potentiate the function of YadA. Our results indicate that a decreased level of FlhDC in the ompR mutant cells is partly responsible for the serum resistance and this effect can be suppressed by overexpression of flhDC in trans. The observation that the loss of FlhDC enhances the survival of wild-type cells in NHS supports the involvement of FlhDC regulator in this phenotype. In addition, the ompR mutant exhibited a lower level of LPS, but this was not correlated with changes in the level of FlhDC. We propose that OmpR might alter the susceptibility of Y. enterocolitica O:9 to complement-mediated killing through remodeling of the outer membrane.

  2. Overexpression of the herpes simplex virus type 1 immediate-early regulatory protein, ICP27, is responsible for the aberrant localization of ICP0 and mutant forms of ICP4 in ICP4 mutant virus-infected cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Z; DeLuca, N A; Schaffer, P A

    1996-01-01

    ICP0 and ICP4 are immediate-early regulatory proteins of herpes simplex virus type 1. Previous studies by Knipe and Smith demonstrated that these two proteins are characteristically observed in the nuclei of wild-type virus-infected cells but predominantly in the cytoplasms of cells infected with several ICP4 temperature-sensitive (ts) mutant viruses at the nonpermissive temperature (NPT) (D. M. Knipe and J. L. Smith, Mol. Cell. Biol. 6:2371-2381, 1986). Consistent with this observation, it h...

  3. Regulatory Governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Poul F.; Vetterlein, Antje

    2018-01-01

    , legal and cultural, on a global scale. Against this background, this special issue sets out to explore the multifaceted meaning, potential and impact as well as the social praxis of regulatory governance. Under the notions rules, resistance and responsibility the special issue pins out three overall......Regulatory governance frameworks have become essential building blocks of world society. From supply chains to the regimes surrounding international organizations, extensive governance frameworks have emerged which structure and channel a variety of social exchanges, including economic, political...

  4. Duodenal-jejunal bypass surgery up-regulates the expression of the hepatic insulin signaling proteins and the key regulatory enzymes of intestinal gluconeogenesis in diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Dong; Wang, Kexin; Yan, Zhibo; Zhang, Guangyong; Liu, Shaozhuang; Liu, Fengjun; Hu, Chunxiao; Hu, Sanyuan

    2013-11-01

    Duodenal-jejunal bypass (DJB), which is not routinely applied in metabolic surgery, is an effective surgical procedure in terms of type 2 diabetes mellitus resolution. However, the underlying mechanisms are still undefined. Our aim was to investigate the diabetic improvement by DJB and to explore the changes in hepatic insulin signaling proteins and regulatory enzymes of gluconeogenesis after DJB in a non-obese diabetic rat model. Sixteen adult male Goto-Kakizaki rats were randomly divided into DJB and sham-operated groups. The body weight, food intake, hormone levels, and glucose metabolism were measured. The levels of protein expression and phosphorylation of insulin receptor-beta (IR-β) and insulin receptor substrate 2 (IRS-2) were evaluated in the liver. We also detected the expression of key regulatory enzymes of gluconeogenesis [phosphoenoylpyruvate carboxykinase-1 (PCK1), glucose-6-phosphatase-alpha (G6Pase-α)] in small intestine and liver. DJB induced significant diabetic improvement with higher postprandial glucagons-like peptide 1, peptide YY, and insulin levels, but without weight loss. The DJB group exhibited increased expression and phosphorylation of IR-β and IRS-2 in liver, up-regulated the expression of PCK1 and G6Pase-α in small intestine, and down-regulated the expression of these enzymes in liver. DJB is effective in up-regulating the expression of the key proteins in the hepatic insulin signaling pathway and the key regulatory enzymes of intestinal gluconeogenesis and down-regulating the expression of the key regulatory enzymes of hepatic gluconeogenesis without weight loss. Our study helps to reveal the potential role of hepatic insulin signaling pathway and intestinal gluconeogenesis in ameliorating insulin resistance after metabolic surgery.

  5. Regulatory Anatomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoeyer, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    , legal documents, technological devices, organizational structures, and work practices aimed at minimizing risk. I use this term to reorient the analytical attention with respect to safety regulation. Instead of evaluating whether safety is achieved, the point is to explore the types of “safety” produced...... they arise. In short, I expose the regulatory anatomy of the policy landscape....

  6. Anti-regulatory T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Hald

    2017-01-01

    Our initial understanding of immune-regulatory cells was based on the discovery of suppressor cells that assure peripheral T-cell tolerance and promote immune homeostasis. Research has particularly focused on the importance of regulatory T cells (Tregs) for immune modulation, e.g. directing host...... responses to tumours or inhibiting autoimmunity development. However, recent studies report the discovery of self-reactive pro-inflammatory T cells—termed anti-regulatory T cells (anti-Tregs)—that target immune-suppressive cells. Thus, regulatory cells can now be defined as both cells that suppress immune...... reactions as well as effector cells that counteract the effects of suppressor cells and support immune reactions. Self-reactive anti-Tregs have been described that specifically recognize human leukocyte antigen-restricted epitopes derived from proteins that are normally expressed by regulatory immune cells...

  7. Myelin down-regulates myelin phagocytosis by microglia and macrophages through interactions between CD47 on myelin and SIRPα (signal regulatory protein-α on phagocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reichert Fanny

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Traumatic injury to axons produces breakdown of axons and myelin at the site of the lesion and then further distal to this where Wallerian degeneration develops. The rapid removal of degenerated myelin by phagocytosis is advantageous for repair since molecules in myelin impede regeneration of severed axons. Thus, revealing mechanisms that regulate myelin phagocytosis by macrophages and microglia is important. We hypothesize that myelin regulates its own phagocytosis by simultaneous activation and down-regulation of microglial and macrophage responses. Activation follows myelin binding to receptors that mediate its phagocytosis (e.g. complement receptor-3, which has been previously studied. Down-regulation, which we test here, follows binding of myelin CD47 to the immune inhibitory receptor SIRPα (signal regulatory protein-α on macrophages and microglia. Methods CD47 and SIRPα expression was studied by confocal immunofluorescence microscopy, and myelin phagocytosis by ELISA. Results We first document that myelin, oligodendrocytes and Schwann cells express CD47 without SIRPα and further confirm that microglia and macrophages express both CD47 and SIRPα. Thus, CD47 on myelin can bind to and subsequently activate SIRPα on phagocytes, a prerequisite for CD47/SIRPα-dependent down-regulation of CD47+/+ myelin phagocytosis by itself. We then demonstrate that phagocytosis of CD47+/+ myelin is augmented when binding between myelin CD47 and SIRPα on phagocytes is blocked by mAbs against CD47 and SIRPα, indicating that down-regulation of phagocytosis indeed depends on CD47-SIRPα binding. Further, phagocytosis in serum-free medium of CD47+/+ myelin is augmented after knocking down SIRPα levels (SIRPα-KD in phagocytes by lentiviral infection with SIRPα-shRNA, whereas phagocytosis of myelin that lacks CD47 (CD47-/- is not. Thus, myelin CD47 produces SIRPα-dependent down-regulation of CD47+/+ myelin phagocytosis in phagocytes

  8. Cell Cycle Regulatory Proteins p27(kip), Cyclins Dl and E and Proliferative Activity in Oncocytic (Hurthle Cell) Lesions of the Thyroid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynes, Lincoln J.; Hutzler, Michael J.; Patwardhan, Nilima A.; Wang, Songtao; Khan, Ashraf

    2000-01-01

    Cyclins are prime cell-cycle regulators central to the control of cell proliferation in eukaryotic cells. The formation of cyclin/cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK) complexes activates the kinases and initiates a cascade of events, which directs cells through the cell cycle. CDK inhibitors (CDKIs) such as p27(kip1) inhibit cyclln-CDK complexes and function as negative regulators of the cell cycle. Previous studies have shown that p27(kip1) is decreased In malignant relative to benign thyroid tumors, but its role and Interaction with other cell cycle regulatory proteins have not been well established In oncocytic lesions of the thyroid. We studied the expression of p27(kip1), cyclins D1 and E, and Ki67 In 20 cases of oncocytic adenoma (AD). 6 cases of oncocytic carcinoma (CA). 8 cases of Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT). and 9 cases of nodular goiter with oncocytic change (NG) by Immunohistochemlstry. In the latter two lesions only oncocytic cells were evaluated. The positive staining was stratified Into four groups. Statistical analysis was done using the Kruslcal-Wallis one-way analysis of variance test, and, when significant the Dunn multiple-comparisons procedure was used to determine pairwise differences. AllI 20 AD were p27(kip1) posItive, 10 were 4+, 2 were 3+, and the remaining 8 were 1+. In contrast all 6 CA showed 4+ p27(kip1) staining, of the 8 HT 2 were 4+, two 3+, three1+, and I was negative.All 9 NG were p27 positive, 7 showed 4+, one 3+, and one 1+ staining. On pairwise comparison differences in p27(kip1) staining between AD and CA and between HT and CA were statistically significant (p=0.0243 and p=0.0142, respectively). In all but one case Ki67 expression was either very low (<3%) or negative. No significant differences were seen in the expression of cyclin D1 or cyclin E among the groups observed. In conclusion, the increased p27(kip1) expression in malignant oncocytlc tumors relative to benign oncocytic lesions is unlike any other malignant progression

  9. Relationship of the CreBC two-component regulatory system and inner membrane protein CreD with swimming motility in Stenotrophomonas maltophilia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Hui Huang

    Full Text Available The CreBC two-component system (TCS is a conserved regulatory system found in Escherichia coli, Aeromonas spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. In this study, we determined how CreBC TCS regulates secreted protease activities and swimming motility using creB, creC, and creBC in-frame deletion mutants (KJΔCreB, KJΔCreC, and KJΔBC of S. maltophilia KJ. Compared to wild-type KJ, KJΔCreB had a comparable secreted protease activity; however, the secreted protease activities were obviously reduced in KJΔCreC and KJΔBC, suggesting that CreC works together with another unidentified response regulator (not CreB to regulate secreted protease activity. Single gene inactivation of creB or creC resulted in mutants with an enhanced swimming motility, and this phenotype was exacerbated in a double mutant KJΔBC. To elucidate the underlying mechanism responsible for the ΔcreBC-mediated swimming enhancement, flagella morphology observation, RNA-seq based transcriptome assay, qRT-PCR, and membrane integrity and potential assessment were performed. Flagella morphological observation ruled out the possibility that swimming enhancement was due to altered flagella morphology. CreBC inactivation upregulated the expression of creD and flagella-associated genes encoding the basal body- and motor-associated proteins. Furthermore, KJΔBC had an increased membrane susceptibility to Triton X-100 and CreD upregulation in KJΔBC partially alleviated the compromise of membrane integrity. The impact of creBC TCS on bacterial membrane potential was assessed by carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazine (CCCP50 concentration at which 50% of bacterial swimming is inhibited. CCCP50 of wild-type KJ increased when creBC was deleted, indicating an association between the higher membrane potential of KJΔBC cells and enhanced motility. Upregulation of the basal body- and motor-associated genes of flagella in KJΔBC cells may explain the increased

  10. Reversible cycling between cysteine persulfide-ligated [2Fe-2S] and cysteine-ligated [4Fe-4S] clusters in the FNR regulatory protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Crack, Jason C; Subramanian, Sowmya; Green, Jeffrey; Thomson, Andrew J; Le Brun, Nick E; Johnson, Michael K

    2012-09-25

    Fumarate and nitrate reduction (FNR) regulatory proteins are O(2)-sensing bacterial transcription factors that control the switch between aerobic and anaerobic metabolism. Under anaerobic conditions [4Fe-4S](2+)-FNR exists as a DNA-binding homodimer. In response to elevated oxygen levels, the [4Fe-4S](2+) cluster undergoes a rapid conversion to a [2Fe-2S](2+) cluster, resulting in a dimer-to-monomer transition and loss of site-specific DNA binding. In this work, resonance Raman and UV-visible absorption/CD spectroscopies and MS were used to characterize the interconversion between [4Fe-4S](2+) and [2Fe-2S](2+) clusters in Escherichia coli FNR. Selective (34)S labeling of the bridging sulfides in the [4Fe-4S](2+) cluster-bound form of FNR facilitated identification of resonantly enhanced Cys(32)S-(34)S stretching modes in the resonance Raman spectrum of the O(2)-exposed [2Fe-2S](2+) cluster-bound form of FNR. This result indicates O(2)-induced oxidation and retention of bridging sulfides in the form of [2Fe-2S](2+) cluster-bound cysteine persulfides. MS also demonstrates that multiple cysteine persulfides are formed on O(2) exposure of [4Fe-4S](2+)-FNR. The [4Fe-4S](2+) cluster in FNR can also be regenerated from the cysteine persulfide-coordinated [2Fe-2S](2+) cluster by anaerobic incubation with DTT and Fe(2+) ion in the absence of exogenous sulfide. Resonance Raman data indicate that this type of cluster conversion involving sulfide oxidation is not unique to FNR, because it also occurs in O(2)-exposed forms of O(2)-sensitive [4Fe-4S] clusters in radical S-adenosylmethionine enzymes. The results provide fresh insight into the molecular mechanism of O(2) sensing by FNR and iron-sulfur cluster conversion reactions in general, and suggest unique mechanisms for the assembly or repair of biological [4Fe-4S] clusters.

  11. REGULATORY AND TRANSPORT PROTEINS OF BLOOD SERUM AND FOLLICULAR FLUID IN PREDICTION OF EFFICIENCY OF THE PROGRAMS OF IN VITRO FERTILIZATION IN WOMEN WITH ADENOMYOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Виктория Васильевна Лихачева

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Research objective: Study of the content as well as the effect on the outcomes of in vitro fertilization (IVF programs of some regulatory and transport proteins: (alfa-2-macroglobulin (α2-МG, alfa-1-antitrypsin (α1-АТ, pregnancy associated alfa-2-glycoprotein (PAG, lactoferrin (LF, and albumin (ALB in blood serum and follicular fluid in women with adenomyosis and tubal factor of infertility. Materials and methods. The study included 89 patients, among them in 31 women the cause of infertility was adenomyosis (as a result of IVF, 12 patients got pregnant and 19 did not, and 58 patients with tubal infertility (24 patients got pregnant and 34 did not. The content of alfa-2-macroglobulin (α2-MG, alfa-1-antitrypsin (α1-АТ and pregnancy associated alfa-2-glycoprotein (PAG, lactoferrin (LF was determined by the quantitative rocket ummunoelectrophoresis method with the application of research test systems developed on the basis of research laboratory (RL of immunology at Novokuznetsk State Institute for Further Training of Physicians. The concentration of albumin was determined by biochemistry methods (with bromcresol green. Results. The research revealed that serum levels of alfa-2-macroglobulin, alfa-1-antitrypsin, pregnancy associated globulin, lactoferrin and albumin in women with adenomyosis generally over the group did not reliably differ from such indexes in women with tubal infertility. In the group of women with adenomyosis the low level of alfa-2-macroglobulin (less than 1.75 g/L and alfa-1-antitrypsin (less than 1.9 g/L in blood serum was associated with negative IVF program outcome. In tubal infertility negative outcome of IVF program was registered at the reduction in the blood serum albumin level below 41.5 g/L. Conclusion: The revealed changes, namely the α2-MG level below 1.75 g/L and α1-AT below 1.9 g/L in the infertile patients with adenomyosis, as well as the serum albumin level below 41.5 g/L in women with

  12. Loss of the interferon-γ-inducible regulatory immunity-related GTPase (IRG), Irgm1, causes activation of effector IRG proteins on lysosomes, damaging lysosomal function and predicting the dramatic susceptibility of Irgm1-deficient mice to infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maric-Biresev, Jelena; Hunn, Julia P; Krut, Oleg; Helms, J Bernd; Martens, Sascha; Howard, Jonathan C

    2016-04-20

    The interferon-γ (IFN-γ)-inducible immunity-related GTPase (IRG), Irgm1, plays an essential role in restraining activation of the IRG pathogen resistance system. However, the loss of Irgm1 in mice also causes a dramatic but unexplained susceptibility phenotype upon infection with a variety of pathogens, including many not normally controlled by the IRG system. This phenotype is associated with lymphopenia, hemopoietic collapse, and death of the mouse. We show that the three regulatory IRG proteins (GMS sub-family), including Irgm1, each of which localizes to distinct sets of endocellular membranes, play an important role during the cellular response to IFN-γ, each protecting specific membranes from off-target activation of effector IRG proteins (GKS sub-family). In the absence of Irgm1, which is localized mainly at lysosomal and Golgi membranes, activated GKS proteins load onto lysosomes, and are associated with reduced lysosomal acidity and failure to process autophagosomes. Another GMS protein, Irgm3, is localized to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes; in the Irgm3-deficient mouse, activated GKS proteins are found at the ER. The Irgm3-deficient mouse does not show the drastic phenotype of the Irgm1 mouse. In the Irgm1/Irgm3 double knock-out mouse, activated GKS proteins associate with lipid droplets, but not with lysosomes, and the Irgm1/Irgm3(-/-) does not have the generalized immunodeficiency phenotype expected from its Irgm1 deficiency. The membrane targeting properties of the three GMS proteins to specific endocellular membranes prevent accumulation of activated GKS protein effectors on the corresponding membranes and thus enable GKS proteins to distinguish organellar cellular membranes from the membranes of pathogen vacuoles. Our data suggest that the generalized lymphomyeloid collapse that occurs in Irgm1(-/-) mice upon infection with a variety of pathogens may be due to lysosomal damage caused by off-target activation of GKS proteins on lysosomal

  13. The Nitrogen Regulatory PII Protein (GlnB) andN-Acetylglucosamine 6-Phosphate Epimerase (NanE) Allosterically Activate Glucosamine 6-Phosphate Deaminase (NagB) in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodionova, Irina A; Goodacre, Norman; Babu, Mohan; Emili, Andrew; Uetz, Peter; Saier, Milton H

    2018-03-01

    Amino sugars are good sources of both ammonia and fructose-6-phosphate, produced by the glucosamine 6-phosphate deaminase, NagB. NagB is known to be allosterically regulated by N -acetylglucosamine 6-phosphate (GlcNAc-6P) and the phosphocarrier protein of the bacterial phosphotransferase system, HPr, in Escherichia coli We provide evidence that NanE, GlcNAc-6P epimerase, and the uridylylated PII protein (U-PII) also allosterically activate NagB by direct protein-protein interactions. NanE is essential for neuraminic acid (NANA) and N -acetylmannosamine (ManNAc) utilization, and PII is known to be a central metabolic nitrogen regulator. We demonstrate that uridylylated PII (but not underivatized PII) activates NagB >10-fold at low concentrations of substrate, whereas NanE increases NagB activity >2-fold. NanE activates NagB in the absence or presence of GlcNAc-6P, but HPr and U-PII activation requires the presence of GlcNAc-6P. Activation of NagB by HPr and uridylylated PII, as well as by NanE and HPr (but not by NanE and U-PII), is synergistic, and the modeling, which suggests specific residues involved in complex formation, provides possible explanations. Specific physiological functions for the regulation of NagB by its three protein activators are proposed. Each regulatory agent is suggested to mediate signal transduction in response to a different stimulus. IMPORTANCE The regulation of amino sugar utilization is important for the survival of bacteria in a competitive environment. NagB, a glucosamine 6-phosphate deaminase in Escherichia coli , is essential for amino sugar utilization and is known to be allosterically regulated by N -acetylglucosamine 6-phosphate (GlcNAc-6P) and the histidine-phosphorylatable phosphocarrier protein, HPr. We provide evidence here that NanE, GlcNAc-6P epimerase, and the uridylylated PII protein allosterically activate NagB by direct protein-protein interactions. NanE is essential for N -acetylneuraminic acid (NANA) and N

  14. Correlation of cell cycle regulatory proteins (p53 and p16ink4a and bcl-2 oncoprotein with mitotic index and thickness of primary cutaneous malignant melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miloš Kostov

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to determine the frequency of expression p53 and p16INK4a proteins and bcl2- oncoprotein in malignant skin melanoma and to determine their correlation with the proliferative index and tumor thickness. The study involved 53 patients: 27 (51% male and 26 (49% female. Mitotic index showed a correlation with p53 protein expression, a negative correlation with p16INK4a protein expression. Statistically significant correlations were determined between the Breslow tumor thickness, Clark invasion level and p53 protein expression, as well as Breslow tumor thickness and bcl-2 oncoprotein expression (p<0.05, whereas there was no correlation between the p16INK4a protein expression and melanoma thicknes and Clark invasion level. Overexpression p53 protein and bcl-2 oncoprotein, with the loss p16INK4a protein of expression in the nodular melanoma, confirms a frequent loss of function of these tumor suppressor gene and oncogene, and indicates a vertical tumor growth phase. The loss of tumor suppression function the p53 protein and bcl-2 oncoprotein overexpression in cutaneous melanoma correlates with larger tumor thickness, whereas the overexpression of mutated p53 protein and loss p16INK4a protein of expression indicate a higher proliferative tumour potential. Therefore, these evaluated proteins may be the aggressive biological tumour activity markers.

  15. Characterization of an AGAMOUS-like MADS box protein, a probable constituent of flowering and fruit ripening regulatory system in banana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swarup Roy Choudhury

    Full Text Available The MADS-box family of genes has been shown to play a significant role in the development of reproductive organs, including dry and fleshy fruits. In this study, the molecular properties of an AGAMOUS like MADS box transcription factor in banana cultivar Giant governor (Musa sp, AAA group, subgroup Cavendish has been elucidated. We have detected a CArG-box sequence binding AGAMOUS MADS-box protein in banana flower and fruit nuclear extracts in DNA-protein interaction assays. The protein fraction in the DNA-protein complex was analyzed by mass spectrometry and using this information we have obtained the full length cDNA of the corresponding protein. The deduced protein sequence showed ~95% amino acid sequence homology with MA-MADS5, a MADS-box protein described previously from banana. We have characterized the domains of the identified AGAMOUS MADS-box protein involved in DNA binding and homodimer formation in vitro using full-length and truncated versions of affinity purified recombinant proteins. Furthermore, in order to gain insight about how DNA bending is achieved by this MADS-box factor, we performed circular permutation and phasing analysis using the wild type recombinant protein. The AGAMOUS MADS-box protein identified in this study has been found to predominantly accumulate in the climacteric fruit pulp and also in female flower ovary. In vivo and in vitro assays have revealed specific binding of the identified AGAMOUS MADS-box protein to CArG-box sequence in the promoters of major ripening genes in banana fruit. Overall, the expression patterns of this MADS-box protein in banana female flower ovary and during various phases of fruit ripening along with the interaction of the protein to the CArG-box sequence in the promoters of major ripening genes lead to interesting assumption about the possible involvement of this AGAMOUS MADS-box factor in banana fruit ripening and floral reproductive organ development.

  16. Characterization of an AGAMOUS-like MADS box protein, a probable constituent of flowering and fruit ripening regulatory system in banana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy Choudhury, Swarup; Roy, Sujit; Nag, Anish; Singh, Sanjay Kumar; Sengupta, Dibyendu N

    2012-01-01

    The MADS-box family of genes has been shown to play a significant role in the development of reproductive organs, including dry and fleshy fruits. In this study, the molecular properties of an AGAMOUS like MADS box transcription factor in banana cultivar Giant governor (Musa sp, AAA group, subgroup Cavendish) has been elucidated. We have detected a CArG-box sequence binding AGAMOUS MADS-box protein in banana flower and fruit nuclear extracts in DNA-protein interaction assays. The protein fraction in the DNA-protein complex was analyzed by mass spectrometry and using this information we have obtained the full length cDNA of the corresponding protein. The deduced protein sequence showed ~95% amino acid sequence homology with MA-MADS5, a MADS-box protein described previously from banana. We have characterized the domains of the identified AGAMOUS MADS-box protein involved in DNA binding and homodimer formation in vitro using full-length and truncated versions of affinity purified recombinant proteins. Furthermore, in order to gain insight about how DNA bending is achieved by this MADS-box factor, we performed circular permutation and phasing analysis using the wild type recombinant protein. The AGAMOUS MADS-box protein identified in this study has been found to predominantly accumulate in the climacteric fruit pulp and also in female flower ovary. In vivo and in vitro assays have revealed specific binding of the identified AGAMOUS MADS-box protein to CArG-box sequence in the promoters of major ripening genes in banana fruit. Overall, the expression patterns of this MADS-box protein in banana female flower ovary and during various phases of fruit ripening along with the interaction of the protein to the CArG-box sequence in the promoters of major ripening genes lead to interesting assumption about the possible involvement of this AGAMOUS MADS-box factor in banana fruit ripening and floral reproductive organ development.

  17. Characterization of an AGAMOUS-like MADS Box Protein, a Probable Constituent of Flowering and Fruit Ripening Regulatory System in Banana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy Choudhury, Swarup; Roy, Sujit; Nag, Anish; Singh, Sanjay Kumar; Sengupta, Dibyendu N.

    2012-01-01

    The MADS-box family of genes has been shown to play a significant role in the development of reproductive organs, including dry and fleshy fruits. In this study, the molecular properties of an AGAMOUS like MADS box transcription factor in banana cultivar Giant governor (Musa sp, AAA group, subgroup Cavendish) has been elucidated. We have detected a CArG-box sequence binding AGAMOUS MADS-box protein in banana flower and fruit nuclear extracts in DNA-protein interaction assays. The protein fraction in the DNA-protein complex was analyzed by mass spectrometry and using this information we have obtained the full length cDNA of the corresponding protein. The deduced protein sequence showed ∼95% amino acid sequence homology with MA-MADS5, a MADS-box protein described previously from banana. We have characterized the domains of the identified AGAMOUS MADS-box protein involved in DNA binding and homodimer formation in vitro using full-length and truncated versions of affinity purified recombinant proteins. Furthermore, in order to gain insight about how DNA bending is achieved by this MADS-box factor, we performed circular permutation and phasing analysis using the wild type recombinant protein. The AGAMOUS MADS-box protein identified in this study has been found to predominantly accumulate in the climacteric fruit pulp and also in female flower ovary. In vivo and in vitro assays have revealed specific binding of the identified AGAMOUS MADS-box protein to CArG-box sequence in the promoters of major ripening genes in banana fruit. Overall, the expression patterns of this MADS-box protein in banana female flower ovary and during various phases of fruit ripening along with the interaction of the protein to the CArG-box sequence in the promoters of major ripening genes lead to interesting assumption about the possible involvement of this AGAMOUS MADS-box factor in banana fruit ripening and floral reproductive organ development. PMID:22984496

  18. A study of bacterial gene regulatory mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Sabine

    the different regulatory mechanisms affect system dynamics. We have designed a synthetic gene regulatory network (GRN) in bacterial cells that enables us to study the dynamics of GRNs. The results presented in this PhD thesis show that model equations based on the established mechanisms of action of each...... of a particular type of regulatory mechanism. The synthetic system presented in this thesis is, to our knowledge, the first of its kind to allow a direct comparison of the dynamic behaviors of gene regulatory networks that employ different mechanisms of regulation. In addition to studying the dynamic behavior...... switch off the expression of unfavorable proteins. This dynamic regulation requires a coordinated effort by a network of regulatory factors. The regulatory mechanisms employed by bacterial cell to regulate their protein expression have been extensively studied. However, little is known about how...

  19. Sequence of the human glycogen-associated regulatory subunit of type 1 protein phosphatase and analysis of its coding region and mRNA level in muscle from patients with NIDDM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Y H; Hansen, L; Chen, Min

    1994-01-01

    Impaired insulin-stimulated glycogen synthesis of peripheral tissues is a characteristic feature of many patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) and their first-degree relatives with normal glucose tolerance, suggesting putative inherited defects in this metabolic pathway....... In previous studies, we have failed to reveal mutations in the coding regions of the muscle-specific glycogen synthase gene and the three genes that encode the catalytic subunits of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) as frequent causes of insulin resistance. Because the glycogen-associated regulatory subunit...... of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1 G-subunit) plays a key role in the insulin stimulation of glycogen synthesis and the activity of PP1 is decreased in insulin-resistant subjects, we have now cloned the human G-subunit cDNA to search for abnormalities in the corresponding gene (designated PPP1R3 in the human...

  20. Regulatory Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Helen W.; Whitson, Peggy A.; Putcha, Lakshmi; Baker, Ellen; Smith, Scott M.; Stewart, Karen; Gretebeck, Randall; Nimmagudda, R. R.; Schoeller, Dale A.; Davis-Street, Janis

    1999-01-01

    As noted elsewhere in this report, a central goal of the Extended Duration Orbiter Medical Project (EDOMP) was to ensure that cardiovascular and muscle function were adequate to perform an emergency egress after 16 days of spaceflight. The goals of the Regulatory Physiology component of the EDOMP were to identify and subsequently ameliorate those biochemical and nutritional factors that deplete physiological reserves or increase risk for disease, and to facilitate the development of effective muscle, exercise, and cardiovascular countermeasures. The component investigations designed to meet these goals focused on biochemical and physiological aspects of nutrition and metabolism, the risk of renal (kidney) stone formation, gastrointestinal function, and sleep in space. Investigations involved both ground-based protocols to validate proposed methods and flight studies to test those methods. Two hardware tests were also completed.

  1. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YML109W, YGL190C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available sential regulatory subunit B of protein phosphatase 2A, which has multiple roles ...-essential regulatory subunit B of protein phosphatase 2A, which has multiple roles in mitosis and protein b

  2. SREBP-2, a second basic-helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper protein that stimulates transcription by binding to a sterol regulatory element.

    OpenAIRE

    Hua, X; Yokoyama, C; Wu, J; Briggs, M R; Brown, M S; Goldstein, J L; Wang, X

    1993-01-01

    We report the cDNA cloning of SREBP-2, the second member of a family of basic-helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper (bHLH-Zip) transcription factors that recognize sterol regulatory element 1 (SRE-1). SRE-1, a conditional enhancer in the promoters for the low density lipoprotein receptor and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase genes, increases transcription in the absence of sterols and is inactivated when sterols accumulate. Human SREBP-2 contains 1141 amino acids and is 47% identical t...

  3. Mutant Forms of the Azotobacter vinelandii Transcriptional Activator NifA Resistant to Inhibition by the NifL Regulatory Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Reyes-Ramirez, Francisca; Little, Richard; Dixon, Ray

    2002-01-01

    The Azotobacter vinelandii σ54-dependent transcriptional activator protein NifA is regulated by the NifL protein in response to redox, carbon, and nitrogen status. Under conditions inappropriate for nitrogen fixation, NifL inhibits transcription activation by NifA through the formation of the NifL-NifA protein complex. NifL inhibits the ATPase activity of the central AAA+ domain of NifA required to drive open complex formation by σ54-RNA polymerase and may also inhibit the activator-polymeras...

  4. Mutational Analysis of the QRRQ Motif in the Yeast Hig1 Type 2 Protein Rcf1 Reveals a Regulatory Role for the Cytochrome c Oxidase Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garlich, Joshua; Strecker, Valentina; Wittig, Ilka; Stuart, Rosemary A

    2017-03-31

    The yeast Rcf1 protein is a member of the conserved family of proteins termed the hypoxia-induced gene (domain) 1 (Hig1 or HIGD1) family. Rcf1 interacts with components of the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation system, in particular the cytochrome bc 1 (complex III)-cytochrome c oxidase (complex IV) supercomplex (termed III-IV) and the ADP/ATP carrier proteins. Rcf1 plays a role in the assembly and modulation of the activity of complex IV; however, the molecular basis for how Rcf1 influences the activity of complex IV is currently unknown. Hig1 type 2 isoforms, which include the Rcf1 protein, are characterized in part by the presence of a conserved motif, (Q/I) X 3 (R/H) X R X 3 Q, termed here the QRRQ motif. We show that mutation of conserved residues within the Rcf1 QRRQ motif alters the interactions between Rcf1 and partner proteins and results in the destabilization of complex IV and alteration of its enzymatic properties. Our findings indicate that Rcf1 does not serve as a stoichiometric component, i.e. as a subunit of complex IV, to support its activity. Rather, we propose that Rcf1 serves to dynamically interact with complex IV during its assembly process and, in doing so, regulates a late maturation step of complex IV. We speculate that the Rcf1/Hig1 proteins play a role in the incorporation and/or remodeling of lipids, in particular cardiolipin, into complex IV and. possibly, other mitochondrial proteins such as ADP/ATP carrier proteins. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Protein: FBA2 [TP Atlas

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FBA2 19S regulatory particles(RP) Rpn11 yip5 26S proteasome non-ATPase regulatory subunit 14 26S pr...oteasome regulatory complex subunit p37B, 26S proteasome regulatory subunit rpn11, Yippee-interacting protein 5 7227 Drosophila melanogaster Q9V3H2 Q9V3H2 19075009 ...

  6. Multiple pertussis toxin substrates as candidates for regulatory G proteins of adenylate cyclase coupled to the somatostatin receptor in primary rat astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebicke-Haerter, P J; Seregi, A; Wurster, S; Schobert, A; Allgaier, C; Hertting, G

    1988-10-01

    The involvement of G proteins in receptor mediated astroglial cAMP formation was studied. Isoproterenol or prostaglandin E2 stimulated adenylate cyclase of primary astroglial cells was inhibited by somatostatin. Preincubation of cells with increasing concentrations of islet activating protein (IAP) diminished somatostatin inhibition of adenylate cyclase. At an IAP concentration of 50 ng/ml somatostatin inhibition was completely abolished. Studies on IAP catalyzed 32P-ADP-ribosylation of astroglial cell particulate material revealed an incorporation of radiolabel into three polypeptides in the molecular weight range of 41,000-39,000 Dalton. Pretreatment of intact cells with IAP reduced radiolabeling of this molecular species in a concentration dependent manner. No further radiolabeling above background level was detectable after pretreatment of cultures with 10 ng IAP/ml or more. At present, the occurrence of at least three IAP substrates (G proteins) does not permit an identification of the somatostatin receptor coupled G protein. Rather, the finding reveals that astrocytes are endowed with multiple variants of GTP binding proteins likely to be coupled to different receptors.

  7. Protein and mRNA levels support the notion that a genetic regulatory circuit controls growth phases in E. coli populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustino Martinez-Antonio

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial populations transition between growing and non-growing phases, based on nutrient availability and stresses conditions. The hallmark of a growing state is anabolism, including DNA replication and cell division. In contrast, bacteria in a growth-arrested state acquire a resistant physiology and diminished metabolism. However, there is little knowledge on how this transition occurs at the molecular level. Here, we provide new evidence that a multi-element genetic regulatory circuit might work to maintain genetic control among growth-phase transitions in Escherichia coli. This work contributes to the discovering of design principles behind the performance of biological functions, which could be of relevance on the new disciplines of biological engineering and synthetic biology.

  8. Sequence of the human glycogen-associated regulatory subunit of type 1 protein phosphatase and analysis of its coding region and mRNA level in muscle from patients with NIDDM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Y H; Hansen, L; Chen, Min

    1994-01-01

    . In previous studies, we have failed to reveal mutations in the coding regions of the muscle-specific glycogen synthase gene and the three genes that encode the catalytic subunits of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) as frequent causes of insulin resistance. Because the glycogen-associated regulatory subunit...... of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1 G-subunit) plays a key role in the insulin stimulation of glycogen synthesis and the activity of PP1 is decreased in insulin-resistant subjects, we have now cloned the human G-subunit cDNA to search for abnormalities in the corresponding gene (designated PPP1R3 in the human...... genome nomenclature) in patients with NIDDM. The human cDNA was isolated from a skeletal muscle cDNA library and was found to encode a 126-kDa protein, which shows 73% amino acid identity to the rabbit PP1 G-subunit. The human G-subunit cDNA from 30 insulin-resistant NIDDM patients was analyzed...

  9. Short communication: Effects of β-lactoglobulin, stearoyl-coenzyme A desaturase 1, and sterol regulatory element binding protein gene allelic variants on milk production, composition, acidity, and coagulation properties of Brown Swiss cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecchinato, A; Ribeca, C; Maurmayr, A; Penasa, M; De Marchi, M; Macciotta, N P P; Mele, M; Secchiari, P; Pagnacco, G; Bittante, G

    2012-01-01

    Associations of allelic variants of the β-lactoglobulin (LGB), stearoyl-coenzyme A desaturase 1 (SCD), and sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP-1) genes with milk production, composition (fat, protein, and casein content), acidity (pH and titratable acidity), and coagulation properties (rennet coagulation time and curd firmness) were investigated in Brown Swiss cows. In total, 294 animals (progeny of 15 sires) reared in 16 herds were milk-sampled once. The additive effects of LGB (rs109625649:C>T), SCD (ss469414220:C>T), and SREBP-1 (AB355704: g.101_185ins) polymorphisms on the aforementioned traits were analyzed through Bayesian linear models. The LGB genotype affected rennet coagulation time, with TT (or BB) alleles showing longer rennet coagulation time compared with CC (or AA) cows. The SCD gene allelic variants were found to be associated with protein and casein contents and curd firmness: CC animals had the lowest values for the aforementioned traits. An association was found between SREBP-1 alleles and fat content, with the highest values for cows carrying the 84-bp insertion (or L) allele. Results suggest a possible use of these loci in gene-assisted selection programs for the improvement of milk quality traits and coagulation properties in Brown Swiss cattle. Copyright © 2012 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Dietary fiber prevents obesity-related liver lipotoxicity by modulating sterol-regulatory element binding protein pathway in C57BL/6J mice fed a high-fat/cholesterol diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Shufen; Jiao, Jun; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Jiaying; Wan, Zhongxiao; Zhang, Weiguo; Gao, Xiaoran; Qin, Liqiang

    2015-10-29

    Adequate intake of dietary fibers has proven metabolic and cardiovascular benefits, molecular mechanisms remain still limited. This study was aimed to investigate the effects of cereal dietary fiber on obesity-related liver lipotoxicity in C57BL/6J mice fed a high-fat/cholesterol (HFC) diet and underlying mechanism. Forty-eight adult male C57BL/6J mice were randomly given a reference chow diet, or a high fat/cholesterol (HFC) diet supplemented with or without oat fiber or wheat bran fiber for 24 weeks. Our results showed mice fed oat or wheat bran fiber exhibited lower weight gain, lipid profiles and insulin resistance, compared with HFC diet. The two cereal dietary fibers potently decreased protein expressions of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 and key factors involved in lipogenesis, including fatty acid synthase and acetyl-CoA carboxylase in target tissues. At molecular level, the two cereal dietary fibers augmented protein expressions of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha and gamma, liver X receptor alpha, and ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 in target tissues. Our findings indicated that cereal dietary fiber supplementation abrogated obesity-related liver lipotoxicity and dyslipidemia in C57BL/6J mice fed a HFC diet. In addition, the efficacy of oat fiber is greater than wheat bran fiber in normalizing these metabolic disorders and pathological profiles.

  11. Structure of the Na,K-ATPase regulatory protein FXYD2b in micelles: implications for membrane-water interfacial arginines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Xiao-Min; Ding, Yi; Yu, Jinghua; Yao, Yong; Marassi, Francesca M

    2015-01-01

    FXYD2 is a membrane protein responsible for regulating the function of the Na,K-ATPase in mammalian kidney epithelial cells. Here we report the structure of FXYD2b, one of two splice variants of the protein, determined by NMR spectroscopy in detergent micelles. Solid-state NMR characterization of the protein embedded in phospholipid bilayers indicates that several arginine side chains may be involved in hydrogen bond interactions with the phospholipid polar head groups. The structure and the NMR data suggest that FXYD2b could regulate the Na,K-ATPase by modulating the effective membrane surface electrostatics near the ion binding sites of the pump. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Maize and Arabidopsis ARGOS Proteins Interact with Ethylene Receptor Signaling Complex, Supporting a Regulatory Role for ARGOS in Ethylene Signal Transduction[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jinrui; Wang, Hongyu; Habben, Jeffrey E.

    2016-01-01

    The phytohormone ethylene regulates plant growth and development as well as plant response to environmental cues. ARGOS genes reduce plant sensitivity to ethylene when overexpressed in transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and maize (Zea mays). A previous genetic study suggested that the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi-localized maize ARGOS1 targets the ethylene signal transduction components at or upstream of CONSTITUTIVE TRIPLE RESPONSE1, but the mechanism of ARGOS modulating ethylene signaling is unknown. Here, we demonstrate in Arabidopsis that ZmARGOS1, as well as the Arabidopsis ARGOS homolog ORGAN SIZE RELATED1, physically interacts with Arabidopsis REVERSION-TO-ETHYLENE SENSITIVITY1 (RTE1), an ethylene receptor interacting protein that regulates the activity of ETHYLENE RESPONSE1. The protein-protein interaction was also detected with the yeast split-ubiquitin two-hybrid system. Using the same yeast assay, we found that maize RTE1 homolog REVERSION-TO-ETHYLENE SENSITIVITY1 LIKE4 (ZmRTL4) and ZmRTL2 also interact with maize and Arabidopsis ARGOS proteins. Like AtRTE1 in Arabidopsis, ZmRTL4 and ZmRTL2 reduce ethylene responses when overexpressed in maize, indicating a similar mechanism for ARGOS regulating ethylene signaling in maize. A polypeptide fragment derived from ZmARGOS8, consisting of a Pro-rich motif flanked by two transmembrane helices that are conserved among members of the ARGOS family, can interact with AtRTE1 and maize RTL proteins in Arabidopsis. The conserved domain is necessary and sufficient to reduce ethylene sensitivity in Arabidopsis and maize. Overall, these results suggest a physical association between ARGOS and the ethylene receptor signaling complex via AtRTE1 and maize RTL proteins, supporting a role for ARGOS in regulating ethylene perception and the early steps of signal transduction in Arabidopsis and maize. PMID:27268962

  13. Maize and Arabidopsis ARGOS Proteins Interact with Ethylene Receptor Signaling Complex, Supporting a Regulatory Role for ARGOS in Ethylene Signal Transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jinrui; Drummond, Bruce J; Wang, Hongyu; Archibald, Rayeann L; Habben, Jeffrey E

    2016-08-01

    The phytohormone ethylene regulates plant growth and development as well as plant response to environmental cues. ARGOS genes reduce plant sensitivity to ethylene when overexpressed in transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and maize (Zea mays). A previous genetic study suggested that the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi-localized maize ARGOS1 targets the ethylene signal transduction components at or upstream of CONSTITUTIVE TRIPLE RESPONSE1, but the mechanism of ARGOS modulating ethylene signaling is unknown. Here, we demonstrate in Arabidopsis that ZmARGOS1, as well as the Arabidopsis ARGOS homolog ORGAN SIZE RELATED1, physically interacts with Arabidopsis REVERSION-TO-ETHYLENE SENSITIVITY1 (RTE1), an ethylene receptor interacting protein that regulates the activity of ETHYLENE RESPONSE1. The protein-protein interaction was also detected with the yeast split-ubiquitin two-hybrid system. Using the same yeast assay, we found that maize RTE1 homolog REVERSION-TO-ETHYLENE SENSITIVITY1 LIKE4 (ZmRTL4) and ZmRTL2 also interact with maize and Arabidopsis ARGOS proteins. Like AtRTE1 in Arabidopsis, ZmRTL4 and ZmRTL2 reduce ethylene responses when overexpressed in maize, indicating a similar mechanism for ARGOS regulating ethylene signaling in maize. A polypeptide fragment derived from ZmARGOS8, consisting of a Pro-rich motif flanked by two transmembrane helices that are conserved among members of the ARGOS family, can interact with AtRTE1 and maize RTL proteins in Arabidopsis. The conserved domain is necessary and sufficient to reduce ethylene sensitivity in Arabidopsis and maize. Overall, these results suggest a physical association between ARGOS and the ethylene receptor signaling complex via AtRTE1 and maize RTL proteins, supporting a role for ARGOS in regulating ethylene perception and the early steps of signal transduction in Arabidopsis and maize. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Host MicroRNA miR-197 Plays a Negative Regulatory Role in the Enterovirus 71 Infectious Cycle by Targeting the RAN Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wen-Fang; Huang, Ru-Ting; Chien, Kun-Yi; Huang, Jo-Yun; Lau, Kean-Seng; Jheng, Jia-Rong; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun; Wu, Tzong-Yuan; Chen, Chung-Yung; Horng, Jim-Tong

    2016-02-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71), a member of Picornaviridae, is associated with severe central nervous system complications. In this study, we identified a cellular microRNA (miRNA), miR-197, whose expression was downregulated by viral infection in a time-dependent manner. In miR-197 mimic-transfected cells, EV71 replication was inhibited, whereas the internal ribosome entry site (IRES) activity was decreased in EV71 strains with or without predicted miR-197 target sites, indicating that miR-197 targets host proteins to modulate viral replication. We thus used a quantitative proteomics approach, aided by the TargetScan algorithm, to identify putative target genes of miR-197. Among them, RAN was selected and validated as a genuine target in a 3' untranslated region (UTR) reporter assay. Reduced production of RAN by RNA interference markedly reduced the synthesis of EV71-encoded viral proteins and virus titers. Furthermore, reintroduction of nondegradable RAN into these knockdown cells rescued viral protein synthesis. miR-197 levels were modulated by EV71 to maintain RAN mRNA translatability at late times postinfection since we demonstrated that cap-independent translation exerted by its intrinsic IRES activity was occurring at times when translation attenuation was induced by EV71. EV71-induced downregulation of miR-197 expression increased the expression of RAN, which supported the nuclear transport of the essential viral proteins 3D/3CD and host protein hnRNP K for viral replication. Our data suggest that downregulation of cellular miRNAs may constitute a newly identified mechanism that sustains the expression of host proteins to facilitate viral replication. Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a picornavirus with a positive-sense single-stranded RNA that globally inhibits the cellular translational system, mainly by cleaving cellular eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4G (eIF4G) and poly(A)-binding protein (PABP), which inhibits the association of the ribosome with the host

  15. An oral administration of a recombinant anti-TNF fusion protein is biologically active in the gut promoting regulatory T cells: Results of a phase I clinical trial using a novel oral anti-TNF alpha-based therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almon, Einat; Khoury, Tawfik; Drori, Ariel; Gingis-Velitski, Svetlana; Alon, Sari; Chertkoff, Raul; Mushkat, Mordechai; Shaaltiel, Yoseph; Ilan, Yaron

    2017-07-01

    An orally administered BY-2 plant cell-expressed recombinant anti-TNF fusion protein (PRX-106) consists of the soluble form of the human TNF receptor (TNFR) fused to the Fc component of a human IgG1 domain. Aim This study aim at determining the safety and the immune modulatory effect of an oral administration of PRX-106 in humans. Three different doses (2, 8 or 16mg/day) of PRX-106 were orally administered for five consecutive days in 14 healthy volunteered participants. Subjects were followed for safety parameters and for an effect on T lymphocytes subsets and cytokine levels. An oral administration of PRX-106 was safe and well tolerated. The PK study showed that PRX106 is not absorbed. No effect on white blood cells and lymphocytes counts were noted. A dose dependent effect was noted on systemic lymphocytes. The oral administration of all three dosages was associated with an increase in CD4+CD25+ and CD8+CD25+ subset of suppressor lymphocytes. A marked increase in CD4+CD25+FoxP3 regulatory T cells was noted in the 8mg treated group. In addition, NKT regulatory cells, CD3+CD69+ and CD4+CD62 lymphocyte subsets increased with treatment. No changes in serum TNF alpha were observed. An oral administration of the non-absorbable recombinant anti-TNF fusion protein, PRX-106, is safe, not associated with immune suppression, while inducing a favorable anti-inflammatory immune modulation. The PRX-106 may provide a safe orally administered effective anti-TNF alpha-based immune therapy for inflammatory bowel diseases and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, as well as other autoimmune, TNF-mediated diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Partially hydrolyzed whey proteins prevent clinical symptoms in a cow's milk allergy mouse model and enhance regulatory T and B cell frequencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiewiet, Mensiena B Gea; van Esch, Betty C A M; Garssen, Johan; Faas, Marijke M; Vos, Paul

    2017-01-01

    SCOPE: Partially hydrolyzed cow's milk proteins are used to prevent cow's milk allergy in children. Here we studied the immunomodulatory mechanisms of partial cow's milk hydrolysates in vivo. METHODS AND RESULTS: Mice were sensitized with whey or partially hydrolyzed whey using cholera toxin.

  17. Partially hydrolyzed whey proteins prevent clinical symptoms in a cow's milk allergy mouse model and enhance regulatory T and B cell frequencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiewiet, Mensiena B. Gea; van Esch, Betty C. A. M.; Garssen, Johan; Faas, Marijke M.; de Vos, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Scope: Partially hydrolyzed cow's milk proteins are used to prevent cow's milk allergy in children. Here we studied the immunomodulatory mechanisms of partial cow's milk hydrolysates in vivo. Methods and results: Mice were sensitized with whey or partially hydrolyzed whey using cholera toxin.

  18. Identification of the human zinc transcriptional regulatory element (ZTRE): a palindromic protein-binding DNA sequence responsible for zinc-induced transcriptional repression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coneyworth, L.J.; Jackson, K.A.; Tyson, J.; Bosomworth, H.J.; Hagen, E.A.E. van der; Hann, G.M.; Ogo, O.A.; Swann, D.C.; Mathers, J.C.; Valentine, R.A.; Ford, D.

    2012-01-01

    Many genes with crucial roles in zinc homeostasis in mammals respond to fluctuating zinc supply through unknown mechanisms, and uncovering these mechanisms is essential to understanding the process at cellular and systemic levels. We detected zinc-dependent binding of a zinc-induced protein to a

  19. Effect of subsoiling in fallow period on soil water storage and grain protein accumulation of dryland wheat and its regulatory effect by nitrogen application.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Sun

    Full Text Available To provide a new way to increase water storage and retention of dryland wheat, a field study was conducted at Wenxi experimental site of Shanxi Agricultural University. The effect of subsoiling in fallow period on soil water storage, accumulation of proline, and formation of grain protein after anthesis were determined. Our results showed that subsoiling in fallow period could increase water storage in the 0-300 cm soil at pre-sowing stage and at anthesis stage with low or medium N application, especially for the 60-160 cm soil. However, the proline content, glutamine synthetase (GS activity, glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH activity in flag leaves and grains were all decreased by subsoiling in fallow period. In addition, the content of albumin, gliadin, and total protein in grains were also decreased while globulin content, Glu/Gli, protein yield, and glutelin content were increased. With N application increasing, water storage of soil layers from 20 to 200 cm was decreased at anthesis stage. High N application resulted in the increment of proline content and GS activity in grains. Besides, correlation analysis showed that soil storage in 40-160 cm soil was negatively correlated with proline content in grains; proline content in grains was positively correlated with GS and GDH activity in flag leaves. Contents of albumin, globulin and total protein in grains were positively correlated with proline content in grains and GDH activity in flag leaves. In conclusion, subsoiling in fallow period, together with N application at 150 kg·hm(-2, was beneficial to increase the protein yield and Glu/Gli in grains which improve the quality of wheat.

  20. Inhibition of miR301 enhances Akt-mediated cell proliferation by accumulation of PTEN in nucleus and its effects on cell-cycle regulatory proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Mayur V; Shareef, Ahmad; Likus, Wirginia; Cieślar-Pobuda, Artur; Ghavami, Saeid; Łos, Marek J

    2016-04-12

    Micro-RNAs (miRs) represent an innovative class of genes that act as regulators of gene expression. Recently, the aberrant expression of several miRs has been associated with different types of cancers. In this study, we show that miR301 inhibition influences PI3K-Akt pathway activity. Akt overexpression in MCF7 and MDAMB468 cells caused downregulation of miR301 expression. This effect was confirmed by co-transfection of miR301-modulators in the presence of Akt. Cells overexpressing miR301-inhibitor and Akt, exhibited increased migration and proliferation. Experimental results also confirmed PI3K, PTEN and FoxF2 as regulatory targets for miR301. Furthermore, Akt expression in conjunction with miR301-inhibitor increased nuclear accumulation of PTEN, thus preventing it from downregulating the PI3K-signalling. In summary, our data emphasize the importance of miR301 inhibition on PI3K-Akt pathway-mediated cellular functions. Hence, it opens new avenues for the development of new anti-cancer agents preferentially targeting PI3K-Akt pathway.

  1. In-silico analysis of cis-acting regulatory elements of pathogenesis-related proteins of Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Amritpreet; Pati, Pratap Kumar; Pati, Aparna Maitra; Nagpal, Avinash Kaur

    2017-01-01

    Pathogenesis related (PR) proteins are low molecular weight family of proteins induced in plants under various biotic and abiotic stresses. They play an important role in plant-defense mechanism. PRs have wide range of functions, acting as hydrolases, peroxidases, chitinases, anti-fungal, protease inhibitors etc. In the present study, an attempt has been made to analyze promoter regions of PR1, PR2, PR5, PR9, PR10 and PR12 of Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa. Analysis of cis-element distribution revealed the functional multiplicity of PRs and provides insight into the gene regulation. CpG islands are observed only in rice PRs, which indicates that monocot genome contains more GC rich motifs than dicots. Tandem repeats were also observed in 5’ UTR of PR genes. Thus, the present study provides an understanding of regulation of PR genes and their versatile roles in plants. PMID:28910327

  2. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, a potential target for drugs: Cellular regulatory role of the polymer and the polymerase protein mediated by catalytic and macromolecular colligative actions (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kun

    1998-08-01

    The cellular coenzymatic role of NAD, being a pleiotropic cofactor for diverse cellular reactions, is extended to poly(ADP-ribose) and to the highly abundant nuclear protein, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, with special focus on the pharmacological action of ligands on the latter. The polymer is defined to possess a helical configuration. From direct analyses of the polymer under physiological conditions, it is concluded that the polymerase is dormant in normal tissues, but is activated under certain pathological conditions: malignancy, retroviral integrate containing cells, and in a variety of inflammatory states. The interaction of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase ligands with the DNA component of the active poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase - DNA complex is shown. A major cellular function of the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase protein is its binding capacity to a large number of nuclear proteins and DNA sites, an effect which is induced by drugs that inhibit the polymerase activity. The malignancy-reverting effect of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase ligand drugs is illustrated in chemically and oncovirally transformed cancer cells. The poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase ligand-induced cessation of HIV replication is analyzed. Peroxynitrite-induced DNA damage-initiated pathological responses are shown to be inhibited by a specific poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase ligand. The irreversibly acting C-NO drugs oxidize asymmetric zinc fingers [poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, HIV gag-precursor protein] and act as anti-cancer and anti-HIV agents, an effect that is regulated by cellular concentration of GSH.

  3. Accumulation of the D2 Protein Is a Key Regulatory Step for Assembly of the Photosystem II Reaction Center Complex in Synechocystis PCC 6803

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Komenda, Josef; Reisinger, V.; Muller, B. Ch.; Dobáková, Marika; Granvogl, B.; Eichacker, L. A.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 279, č. 47 (2004), s. 48620-48629 ISSN 0021-9258 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A141 Grant - others:GA Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft Grants(DE) SFB TR1; GA Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft Grants(DE) SFB 594 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : synechocystis PCC 6803 * D2 protein * photosystem PSII Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 6.355, year: 2004

  4. Regulatory Phosphorylation of Bacterial-Type PEP Carboxylase by the Ca2+-Dependent Protein Kinase RcCDPK1 in Developing Castor Oil Seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Sheng; Hill, Allyson T; Pyc, Michal; Anderson, Erin M; Snedden, Wayne A; Mullen, Robert T; She, Yi-Min; Plaxton, William C

    2017-06-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) is a tightly controlled cytosolic enzyme situated at a crucial branch point of central plant metabolism. In developing castor oil seeds ( Ricinus communis ) a novel, allosterically desensitized 910-kD Class-2 PEPC hetero-octameric complex, arises from a tight interaction between 107-kD plant-type PEPC and 118-kD bacterial-type (BTPC) subunits. The native Ca 2+ -dependent protein kinase (CDPK) responsible for in vivo inhibitory phosphorylation of Class-2 PEPC's BTPC subunit's at Ser-451 was highly purified from COS and identified as RcCDPK1 (XP_002526815) by mass spectrometry. Heterologously expressed RcCDPK1 catalyzed Ca 2+ -dependent, inhibitory phosphorylation of BTPC at Ser-451 while exhibiting: ( i ) a pair of Ca 2+ binding sites with identical dissociation constants of 5.03 μM, ( ii ) a Ca 2+ -dependent electrophoretic mobility shift, and ( iii ) a marked Ca 2+ -independent hydrophobicity. Pull-down experiments established the Ca 2+ -dependent interaction of N-terminal GST-tagged RcCDPK1 with BTPC. RcCDPK1-Cherry localized to the cytosol and nucleus of tobacco bright yellow-2 cells, but colocalized with mitochondrial-surface associated BTPC-enhanced yellow fluorescent protein when both fusion proteins were coexpressed. Deletion analyses demonstrated that although its N-terminal variable domain plays an essential role in optimizing Ca 2+ -dependent RcCDPK1 autophosphorylation and BTPC transphosphorylation activity, it is not critical for in vitro or in vivo target recognition. Arabidopsis ( Arabidopsis thaliana ) CPK4 and soybean ( Glycine max ) CDPKβ are RcCDPK1 orthologs that effectively phosphorylated castor BTPC at Ser-451. Overall, the results highlight a potential link between cytosolic Ca 2+ signaling and the posttranslational control of respiratory CO 2 refixation and anaplerotic photosynthate partitioning in support of storage oil and protein biosynthesis in developing COS. © 2017 American Society of Plant

  5. Regulatory Phosphorylation of Bacterial-Type PEP Carboxylase by the Ca2+-Dependent Protein Kinase RcCDPK1 in Developing Castor Oil Seeds1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Allyson T.; Anderson, Erin M.; She, Yi-Min

    2017-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) is a tightly controlled cytosolic enzyme situated at a crucial branch point of central plant metabolism. In developing castor oil seeds (Ricinus communis) a novel, allosterically desensitized 910-kD Class-2 PEPC hetero-octameric complex, arises from a tight interaction between 107-kD plant-type PEPC and 118-kD bacterial-type (BTPC) subunits. The native Ca2+-dependent protein kinase (CDPK) responsible for in vivo inhibitory phosphorylation of Class-2 PEPC’s BTPC subunit’s at Ser-451 was highly purified from COS and identified as RcCDPK1 (XP_002526815) by mass spectrometry. Heterologously expressed RcCDPK1 catalyzed Ca2+-dependent, inhibitory phosphorylation of BTPC at Ser-451 while exhibiting: (i) a pair of Ca2+ binding sites with identical dissociation constants of 5.03 μM, (ii) a Ca2+-dependent electrophoretic mobility shift, and (iii) a marked Ca2+-independent hydrophobicity. Pull-down experiments established the Ca2+-dependent interaction of N-terminal GST-tagged RcCDPK1 with BTPC. RcCDPK1-Cherry localized to the cytosol and nucleus of tobacco bright yellow-2 cells, but colocalized with mitochondrial-surface associated BTPC-enhanced yellow fluorescent protein when both fusion proteins were coexpressed. Deletion analyses demonstrated that although its N-terminal variable domain plays an essential role in optimizing Ca2+-dependent RcCDPK1 autophosphorylation and BTPC transphosphorylation activity, it is not critical for in vitro or in vivo target recognition. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) CPK4 and soybean (Glycine max) CDPKβ are RcCDPK1 orthologs that effectively phosphorylated castor BTPC at Ser-451. Overall, the results highlight a potential link between cytosolic Ca2+ signaling and the posttranslational control of respiratory CO2 refixation and anaplerotic photosynthate partitioning in support of storage oil and protein biosynthesis in developing COS. PMID:28363991

  6. Prognostic significance of catalase expression and its regulatory effects on hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx) in HBV-related advanced hepatocellular carcinomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Mi-Young; Cheong, Jae Youn; Lim, Wonchung; Jo, Sujin; Lee, Youngsoo; Wang, Hee-Jung; Han, Kyou-Hoon; Cho, Hyeseong

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx) plays a role in liver cancer development. We previously showed that ROS increased HBx levels and here, we investigated the role of antioxidants in the regulation of HBx expression and their clinical relevance. We found that overexpression of catalase induced a significant loss in HBx levels. The cysteine null mutant of HBx (Cys−) showed a dramatic reduction in its protein stability. In clonogenic proliferation assays, Huh7-X cells produced a significant number of colonies whereas Huh7-Cys− cells failed to generate them. The Cys at position 69 of HBx was crucial to maintain its protein stability and transactivation function in response to ROS. Among 50 HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) specimens, 72% of HCCs showed lower catalase levels than those of surrounding non-tumor tissues. In advanced stage IV, catalase levels in non-tumor tissues were increased whereas those in tumors were further reduced. Accordingly, patients with a high T/N ratio for catalase showed significantly longer survival than those with a low T/N ratio. Together, catalase expression in HCC patients can be clinically useful for prediction of patient survival, and restoration of catalase expression in HCCs could be an important strategy for intervention in HBV-induced liver diseases. PMID:25361011

  7. Prognostic significance of catalase expression and its regulatory effects on hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx) in HBV-related advanced hepatocellular carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Mi-Young; Cheong, Jae Youn; Lim, Wonchung; Jo, Sujin; Lee, Youngsoo; Wang, Hee-Jung; Han, Kyou-Hoon; Cho, Hyeseong

    2014-12-15

    Hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx) plays a role in liver cancer development. We previously showed that ROS increased HBx levels and here, we investigated the role of antioxidants in the regulation of HBx expression and their clinical relevance. We found that overexpression of catalase induced a significant loss in HBx levels. The cysteine null mutant of HBx (Cys-) showed a dramatic reduction in its protein stability. In clonogenic proliferation assays, Huh7-X cells produced a significant number of colonies whereas Huh7-Cys- cells failed to generate them. The Cys at position 69 of HBx was crucial to maintain its protein stability and transactivation function in response to ROS. Among 50 HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) specimens, 72% of HCCs showed lower catalase levels than those of surrounding non-tumor tissues. In advanced stage IV, catalase levels in non-tumor tissues were increased whereas those in tumors were further reduced. Accordingly, patients with a high T/N ratio for catalase showed significantly longer survival than those with a low T/N ratio. Together, catalase expression in HCC patients can be clinically useful for prediction of patient survival, and restoration of catalase expression in HCCs could be an important strategy for intervention in HBV-induced liver diseases.

  8. ALK Protein Analysis by IHC Staining after Recent Regulatory Changes: A Comparison of Two Widely Used Approaches, Revision of the Literature, and a New Testing Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, Antonio; Di Lorito, Alessia; Pace, Maria Vittoria; Iezzi, Manuela; Felicioni, Lara; D'Antuono, Tommaso; Filice, Giampaolo; Guetti, Luigi; Mucilli, Felice; Buttitta, Fiamma

    2016-04-01

    Recent regulatory changes have allowed the diagnostic use of immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis for the identification of patients with non-small cell lung cancer who are eligible for treatment with anaplastic lymphoma receptor tyrosine kinase (ALK) inhibitors. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the VENTANA ALK (D5F3) CDx Assay (Ventana Medical Systems, Tucson, AZ) as companion diagnostics, and the Italian Medicines Agency has recognized IHC analysis as a diagnostic test indicating an algorithm for patient selection. On the basis of the new regulations, we compared two commonly used IHC assays on 1031 lung adenocarcinomas: the VENTANA ALK (D5F3) CDx Assay with the OptiView Amplification Kit (Ventana Medical Systems) and a standard IHC test with the clone 5A4 (Novocastra, Leica Biosystems, Newcastle Upon Tyne, United Kingdom) along with their interpretative algorithms. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was performed in all cases. Next-generation sequencing was performed in FISH/IHC analysis-discordant samples. FISH gave positive results in 33 (3.2%) cases. When FISH was used as a reference, the VENTANA ALK (D5F3) CDx assay had a sensitivity of 90.9% ± 2.6%, a specificity of 99.8% ± 0.6%, and positive and negative predictive values of 93.8% ± 2.1% and 99.7% ± 0.6%, respectively. The clone 5A4-based IHC test showed a sensitivity of 90.9% ± 2.6%, a specificity of 98.3% ± 1.3%, and positive and negative predictive values of 63.8% ± 4.2% and 99.7% ± 0.6%, respectively. Five cases with IHC analysis/FISH-discordant results in our series were analyzed together with those previously reported in the literature. Overall, data from 35 patients indicate a response rate to ALK inhibitors in 100% of FISH-negative/IHC analysis-positive cases (seven of seven) and 46% of FISH-positive/IHC analysis-negative cases (13 of 28), respectively. Our results confirm the difficulty in managing an IHC test without amplification in the absence of

  9. Dsc E3 ligase localization to the Golgi requires the ATPase Cdc48 and cofactor Ufd1 for activation of sterol regulatory element-binding protein in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burr, Risa; Ribbens, Diedre; Raychaudhuri, Sumana; Stewart, Emerson V; Ho, Jason; Espenshade, Peter J

    2017-09-29

    Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe regulate lipid homeostasis and the hypoxic response under conditions of low sterol or oxygen availability. SREBPs are cleaved in the Golgi through the combined action of the Dsc E3 ligase complex, the rhomboid protease Rbd2, and the essential ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities (AAA + ) ATPase Cdc48. The soluble SREBP N-terminal transcription factor domain is then released into the cytosol to enter the nucleus and regulate gene expression. Previously, we reported that Cdc48 binding to Rbd2 is required for Rbd2-mediated SREBP cleavage. Here, using affinity chromatography and mass spectrometry experiments, we identified Cdc48-binding proteins in S. pombe , generating a list of many previously unknown potential Cdc48-binding partners. We show that the established Cdc48 cofactor Ufd1 is required for SREBP cleavage but does not interact with the Cdc48-Rbd2 complex. Cdc48-Ufd1 is instead required at a step prior to Rbd2 function, during Golgi localization of the Dsc E3 ligase complex. Together, these findings demonstrate that two distinct Cdc48 complexes, Cdc48-Ufd1 and Cdc48-Rbd2, are required for SREBP activation and low-oxygen adaptation in S. pombe . © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Identification of the adenovirus E4orf4 protein binding site on the B55α and Cdc55 regulatory subunits of PP2A: Implications for PP2A function, tumor cell killing and viral replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Z Mui

    Full Text Available Adenovirus E4orf4 protein induces the death of human cancer cells and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Binding of E4orf4 to the B/B55/Cdc55 regulatory subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A is required, and such binding inhibits PP2A(B55 activity leading to dose-dependent cell death. We found that E4orf4 binds across the putative substrate binding groove predicted from the crystal structure of B55α such that the substrate p107 can no longer interact with PP2A(B55α. We propose that E4orf4 inhibits PP2A(B55 activity by preventing access of substrates and that at high E4orf4 levels this inhibition results in cell death through the failure to dephosphorylate substrates required for cell cycle progression. However, E4orf4 is expressed at much lower and less toxic levels during a normal adenovirus infection. We suggest that in this context E4orf4 largely serves to recruit novel substrates such as ASF/SF2/SRSF1 to PP2A(B55 to enhance adenovirus replication. Thus E4orf4 toxicity probably represents an artifact of overexpression and does not reflect the evolutionary function of this viral product.

  11. Regulation of follitropin-sensitive adenylate cyclase by stimulatory and inhibitory forms of the guanine nucleotide regulatory protein in immature rat Sertoli cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, G.P.

    1987-01-01

    Studies have been designed to examine the role of guanine nucleotides in mediating FSH-sensitive adenylate cyclase activity in Sertoli cell plasma membranes. Analysis of [ 3 H]GDP binding to plasma membranes suggested a single high affinity site with a K d = 0.24 uM. Competition studies indicated that GTP γ S was 7-fold more potent than GDP β S. Bound GDP could be released by FSH in the presence of GTP γ S, but not by FSH alone. Adenylate cyclase activity was enhanced 5-fold by FSH in the presence of GTP. Addition of GDP β S to the activated enzyme (FSH plus GTP) resulted in a time-dependent decay to basal activity within 20 sec. GDP β S competitively inhibited GTP γ S-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity with a K i = 0.18 uM. Adenylate cyclase activity was also demonstrated to be sensitive to the nucleotide bound state. In the presence of FSH, only the GTP γ S-bound form persisted even if GDP β S previously occupied all available binding sites. Two membrane proteins, M r = 43,000 and 48,000, were ADP·ribosylated using cholera toxin and labeling was enhanced 2 to 4-fold by GTP γ S but not by GDP β S. The M r = 43,000 and 48,000 proteins represented variant forms of G S . A single protein of M r = 40,000 (G i ) was ADP-ribosylated by pertussis toxin in vitro. GTP inhibited forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity with an IC 50 = 0.1 uM. The adenosine analog, N 6 ·phenylisopropyl adenosine enhanced GTP inhibition of forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity by an additional 15%. GTP-dependent inhibition of forskolin-sensitive adenylate cyclase activity was abolished in membranes prepared from Sertoli cells treated in culture with pertussis toxin

  12. Phenylarsine Oxide Binding Reveals Redox-Active and Potential Regulatory Vicinal Thiols on the Catalytic Subunit of Protein Phosphatase 2A

    OpenAIRE

    Foley, Timothy D.; Melideo, Scott L.; Healey, Adriana E.; Lucas, Eugene J.; Koval, Jason A.

    2010-01-01

    Our earlier finding that the activity of protein phosphatase 2A from rat brain is inhibited by micromolar concentrations of the dithiol cross-linking reagent phenylarsine oxide (PAO) has encouraged the hypothesis that the catalytic subunit (PP2Ac) of PP2A contains one or more pairs of closely-spaced (vicinal) thiol pairs that may contribute to regulation of the enzyme. The results of the present study demonstrate using immobilized PAO-affinity chromatography that PP2Ac from rat brain formed s...

  13. Fibroblast-Specific Genetic Manipulation of p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase In Vivo Reveals Its Central Regulatory Role in Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molkentin, Jeffery D; Bugg, Darrian; Ghearing, Natasha; Dorn, Lisa E; Kim, Peter; Sargent, Michelle A; Gunaje, Jagadambika; Otsu, Kinya; Davis, Jennifer

    2017-08-08

    In the heart, acute injury induces a fibrotic healing response that generates collagen-rich scarring that is at first protective but if inappropriately sustained can worsen heart disease. The fibrotic process is initiated by cytokines, neuroendocrine effectors, and mechanical strain that promote resident fibroblast differentiation into contractile and extracellular matrix-producing myofibroblasts. The mitogen-activated protein kinase p38α ( Mapk14 gene) is known to influence the cardiac injury response, but its direct role in orchestrating programmed fibroblast differentiation and fibrosis in vivo is unknown. A conditional Mapk14 allele was used to delete the p38α encoding gene specifically in cardiac fibroblasts or myofibroblasts with 2 different tamoxifen-inducible Cre recombinase-expressing gene-targeted mouse lines. Mice were subjected to ischemic injury or chronic neurohumoral stimulation and monitored for survival, cardiac function, and fibrotic remodeling. Antithetically, mice with fibroblast-specific transgenic overexpression of activated mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 6, a direct inducer of p38, were generated to investigate whether this pathway can directly drive myofibroblast formation and the cardiac fibrotic response. In mice, loss of Mapk14 blocked cardiac fibroblast differentiation into myofibroblasts and ensuing fibrosis in response to ischemic injury or chronic neurohumoral stimulation. A similar inhibition of myofibroblast formation and healing was also observed in a dermal wounding model with deletion of Mapk14 . Transgenic mice with fibroblast-specific activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 6-p38 developed interstitial and perivascular fibrosis in the heart, lung, and kidney as a result of enhanced myofibroblast numbers. Mechanistic experiments show that p38 transduces cytokine and mechanical signals into myofibroblast differentiation through the transcription factor serum response factor and the signaling effector

  14. Lyoniresinol 3α-O-β-D-glucopyranoside-mediated hypoglycaemia and its influence on apoptosis-regulatory protein expression in the injured kidneys of streptozotocin-induced mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingwei Wen

    Full Text Available Averrhoa carambola L. (Oxalidaceae root (ACLR has a long history of use in traditional Chinese medicine for treating diabetes and diabetic nephropathy (DN. (±-Lyoniresinol 3α-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (LGP1, LGP2 were two chiral lignan glucosides that were isolated from the ACLR. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of LGP1 and LGP2-mediated hypoglycaemia on renal injury in streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetic mice. STZ-induced diabetic mice were administrated LGP1 and LGP2 orally (20, 40, 80 mg/kg body weight/d for 14 days. Hyperglycaemia and the expression of related proteins such as nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB, caspase-3, -8, -9, and Bcl-associated X protein (Bax were markedly decreased by LGP1 treatment. However, LGP2 treatment had no hypoglycaemic activity. Diabetes-dependent alterations in the kidney such as glomerular hypertrophy, excessive extracellular matrix amassing, and glomerular and tubular basement membrane thickening were improved after 14 days of LGP1 treatment. B cell lymphoma Leukaemia-2 (Bcl-2 expression was reduced in the STZ-induced diabetic mouse kidneys but was enhanced by LGP1 treatment. These findings suggest that LGP1 treatment may inhibit diabetic nephropathy progression and may regulate several pharmacological targets for treating or preventing diabetic nephropathy.

  15. DLX5, FGF8 and the Pin1 isomerase control ΔNp63α protein stability during limb development: a regulatory loop at the basis of the SHFM and EEC congenital malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restelli, Michela; Lopardo, Teresa; Lo Iacono, Nadia; Garaffo, Giulia; Conte, Daniele; Rustighi, Alessandra; Napoli, Marco; Del Sal, Giannino; Perez-Morga, David; Costanzo, Antonio; Merlo, Giorgio Roberto; Guerrini, Luisa

    2014-07-15

    Ectrodactyly, or Split-Hand/Foot Malformation (SHFM), is a congenital condition characterized by the loss of central rays of hands and feet. The p63 and the DLX5;DLX6 transcription factors, expressed in the embryonic limb buds and ectoderm, are disease genes for these conditions. Mutations of p63 also cause the ectodermal dysplasia-ectrodactyly-cleft lip/palate (EEC) syndrome, comprising SHFM. Ectrodactyly is linked to defects of the apical ectodermal ridge (AER) of the developing limb buds. FGF8 is the key signaling molecule in this process, able to direct proximo-distal growth and patterning of the skeletal primordial of the limbs. In the limb buds of both p63 and Dlx5;Dlx6 murine models of SHFM, the AER is poorly stratified and FGF8 expression is severely reduced. We show here that the FGF8 locus is a downstream target of DLX5 and that FGF8 counteracts Pin1-ΔNp63α interaction. In vivo, lack of Pin1 leads to accumulation of the p63 protein in the embryonic limbs and ectoderm. We show also that ΔNp63α protein stability is negatively regulated by the interaction with the prolyl-isomerase Pin1, via proteasome-mediated degradation; p63 mutant proteins associated with SHFM or EEC syndromes are resistant to Pin1 action. Thus, DLX5, p63, Pin1 and FGF8 participate to the same time- and location-restricted regulatory loop essential for AER stratification, hence for normal patterning and skeletal morphogenesis of the limb buds. These results shed new light on the molecular mechanisms at the basis of the SHFM and EEC limb malformations. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  16. Multisite contacts involved in coupling of the beta-adrenergic receptor with the stimulatory guanine-nucleotide-binding regulatory protein. Structural and functional studies by beta-receptor-site-specific synthetic peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münch, G; Dees, C; Hekman, M; Palm, D

    1991-06-01

    Synthetic peptides, 12-22 amino acid residues long, comprising the presumed coupling sites of the beta-adrenergic receptor with the stimulatory guanine-nucleotide-binding regulatory protein (Gs), were examined for their ability to modulate Gs activation in turkey erythrocyte membranes. Three peptides corresponding to the second cytoplasmic loop, the N-terminal region of the third cytoplasmic loop, and the N-terminal region of the putative fourth cytoplasmic loop, compete synergistically with the hormone-stimulated receptor for Gs activation with median effector concentrations of 15-35 microM, or 3-4 microM for combinations of two peptides. One peptide, corresponding to the C-terminal region of the third cytoplasmic loop, carries the unique ability to activate the Gs-adenylate-cyclase complex independent of the signalling state of the receptor. These observations are consistent with a dynamic model of receptor-mediated G-protein activation in membranes, where domains composed of the second, third and fourth intracellular loop of the receptor bind to and are interactive with the G-protein heterotrimer, resulting in ligand-induced conformational changes of the receptor. In response to hormone binding, the extent or the number of sites involved in interaction with Gs may be readjusted using a fourth site. Modulation of coupling sites may elicit congruent conformational changes within the Gs heterotrimer, with qualitatively different effects on GTP/GDP exchange in the alpha subunit of Gs and downstream effector regulation. This model corroborates and expands a similar model suggested for activated rhodopsin-transducin interaction [König, B., Arendt, A., McDowell, J. H., Kahlert, M., Hargrave, P. A. & Hofmann, K. P. (1989) Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 86, 6878-6882].

  17. Retinol-binding protein 4 in twins: regulatory mechanisms and impact of circulating and tissue expression levels on insulin secretion and action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ribel-Madsen, Rasmus; Friedrichsen, Martin; Vaag, Allan

    2009-01-01

    expression was not associated with circulatory RBP4. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, our data indicate that RBP4 levels in plasma, skeletal muscle, and fat may be linked to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes in a secondary and noncausal manner.......OBJECTIVE: Retinol-binding protein (RBP) 4 is an adipokine of which plasma levels are elevated in obesity and type 2 diabetes. The aims of the study were to identify determinants of plasma RBP4 and RBP4 mRNA expression in subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and skeletal muscle and to investigate....... Plasma RBP4 was elevated in type 2 diabetes and increased with duration of disease. Plasma RBP4 correlated inversely with peripheral, but not hepatic, insulin sensitivity. However, the association disappeared after correction for covariates, including plasma adiponectin. Plasma retinol, and not RBP4...

  18. The C. elegans DSB-2 protein reveals a regulatory network that controls competence for meiotic DSB formation and promotes crossover assurance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Rosu

    Full Text Available For most organisms, chromosome segregation during meiosis relies on deliberate induction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs and repair of a subset of these DSBs as inter-homolog crossovers (COs. However, timing and levels of DSB formation must be tightly controlled to avoid jeopardizing genome integrity. Here we identify the DSB-2 protein, which is required for efficient DSB formation during C. elegans meiosis but is dispensable for later steps of meiotic recombination. DSB-2 localizes to chromatin during the time of DSB formation, and its disappearance coincides with a decline in RAD-51 foci marking early recombination intermediates and precedes appearance of COSA-1 foci marking CO-designated sites. These and other data suggest that DSB-2 and its paralog DSB-1 promote competence for DSB formation. Further, immunofluorescence analyses of wild-type gonads and various meiotic mutants reveal that association of DSB-2 with chromatin is coordinated with multiple distinct aspects of the meiotic program, including the phosphorylation state of nuclear envelope protein SUN-1 and dependence on RAD-50 to load the RAD-51 recombinase at DSB sites. Moreover, association of DSB-2 with chromatin is prolonged in mutants impaired for either DSB formation or formation of downstream CO intermediates. These and other data suggest that association of DSB-2 with chromatin is an indicator of competence for DSB formation, and that cells respond to a deficit of CO-competent recombination intermediates by prolonging the DSB-competent state. In the context of this model, we propose that formation of sufficient CO-competent intermediates engages a negative feedback response that leads to cessation of DSB formation as part of a major coordinated transition in meiotic prophase progression. The proposed negative feedback regulation of DSB formation simultaneously (1 ensures that sufficient DSBs are made to guarantee CO formation and (2 prevents excessive DSB levels that could

  19. Distinct interaction modes of an AKAP bound to two regulatory subunit isoforms of protein kinase A revealed by amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns-Hamuro, Lora L.; Hamuro, Yoshitomo; Kim, Jack S.; Sigala, Paul; Fayos, Rosa; Stranz, David D.; Jennings, Patricia A.; Taylor, Susan S.; Woods, Virgil L.

    2005-01-01

    The structure of an AKAP docked to the dimerization/docking (D/D) domain of the type II (RIIα) isoform of protein kinase A (PKA) has been well characterized, but there currently is no detailed structural information of an AKAP docked to the type I (RIα) isoform. Dual-specific AKAP2 (D-AKAP2) binds in the nanomolar range to both isoforms and provided us with an opportunity to characterize the isoform-selective nature of AKAP binding using a common docked ligand. Hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange combined with mass spectrometry (DXMS) was used to probe backbone structural changes of an α-helical A-kinase binding (AKB) motif from D-AKAP2 docked to both RIα and RIIα D/D domains. The region of protection upon complex formation and the magnitude of protection from H/D exchange were determined for both interacting partners in each complex. The backbone of the AKB ligand was more protected when bound to RIα compared to RIIα, suggesting an increased helical stabilization of the docked AKB ligand. This combined with a broader region of backbone protection induced by the AKAP on the docking surface of RIα indicated that there were more binding constraints for the AKB ligand when bound to RIα. This was in contrast to RIIα, which has a preformed, localized binding surface. These distinct modes of AKAP binding may contribute to the more discriminating nature of the RIα AKAP-docking surface. DXMS provides valuable structural information for understanding binding specificity in the absence of a high-resolution structure, and can readily be applied to other protein–ligand and protein–protein interactions. PMID:16260760

  20. The influence of sleep deprivation on expression of apoptosis regulatory proteins p53, bcl-2 and bax following rat tongue carcinogenesis induced by 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Noguti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate whether paradoxical sleep deprivation could affects the mechanisms and pathways essentials for cancer cells in tongue cancer induced by 4-nitroquinole 1-oxide in Wistar rats. Materials and Methods: For this purpose, the animals were distributed into 4 groups of 5 animals each treated with 50 ppm 4 nitroquinoline 1 oxide (4 NQO solution through their drinking water for 4 and 12 weeks. The animals were submitted to paradoxical sleep deprivation (PSD for 72 h using the modified multiple platform method, which consisted of placing 5 mice in a cage (41 × 34 × 16 cm containing 10 circular platforms (3.5 cm in diameter with water 1 cm below the upper surface. The investigations were conducted using immunohistochemistry of p53, Bax and Bcl-2 proteins related to apoptosis and its pathways. Statistical analysis was performed by Kruskal-Wallis non-parametric test followed by the Dunn′s test using SPSS software pack (version 1.0. P value < 0.05 was considered for statistic significance. Results: Although no histopathological abnormalities were induced in the epithelium after 4 weeks of carcinogen exposure in all groups, in 12 weeks were observed pre-neoplasic lesions. Data analysis revealed statistically significant differences ( P < 0.05 in 4 weeks group for p53 and for bcl-2 and for all immunomarkers after 12 weeks of 4NQO administration. Conclusion: Our results reveal that sleep deprivation exerted alterations in proteins associated with proliferation and apoptosis in carcinogenesis.

  1. Perilipin-2 Deletion Impairs Hepatic Lipid Accumulation by Interfering with Sterol Regulatory Element-binding Protein (SREBP) Activation and Altering the Hepatic Lipidome*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libby, Andrew E.; Bales, Elise; Orlicky, David J.; McManaman, James L.

    2016-01-01

    Perilipin-2 (PLIN2) is a constitutively associated cytoplasmic lipid droplet coat protein that has been implicated in fatty liver formation in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Mice with or without whole-body deletion of perilipin-2 (Plin2-null) were fed either Western or control diets for 30 weeks. Perilipin-2 deletion prevents obesity and insulin resistance in Western diet-fed mice and dramatically reduces hepatic triglyceride and cholesterol levels in mice fed Western or control diets. Gene and protein expression studies reveal that PLIN2 deletion suppressed SREBP-1 and SREBP-2 target genes involved in de novo lipogenesis and cholesterol biosynthetic pathways in livers of mice on either diet. GC-MS lipidomics demonstrate that this reduction correlated with profound alterations in the hepatic lipidome with significant reductions in both desaturation and elongation of hepatic neutral lipid species. To examine the possibility that lipidomic actions of PLIN2 deletion contribute to suppression of SREBP activation, we isolated endoplasmic reticulum membrane fractions from long-term Western diet-fed wild type (WT) and Plin2-null mice. Lipidomic analyses reveal that endoplasmic reticulum membranes from Plin2-null mice are markedly enriched in ω-3 and ω-6 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, which others have shown inhibit SREBP activation and de novo lipogenesis. Our results identify PLIN2 as a determinant of global changes in the hepatic lipidome and suggest the hypothesis that these actions contribute to SREBP-regulated de novo lipogenesis involved in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. PMID:27679530

  2. Perilipin-2 Deletion Impairs Hepatic Lipid Accumulation by Interfering with Sterol Regulatory Element-binding Protein (SREBP) Activation and Altering the Hepatic Lipidome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libby, Andrew E; Bales, Elise; Orlicky, David J; McManaman, James L

    2016-11-11

    Perilipin-2 (PLIN2) is a constitutively associated cytoplasmic lipid droplet coat protein that has been implicated in fatty liver formation in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Mice with or without whole-body deletion of perilipin-2 (Plin2-null) were fed either Western or control diets for 30 weeks. Perilipin-2 deletion prevents obesity and insulin resistance in Western diet-fed mice and dramatically reduces hepatic triglyceride and cholesterol levels in mice fed Western or control diets. Gene and protein expression studies reveal that PLIN2 deletion suppressed SREBP-1 and SREBP-2 target genes involved in de novo lipogenesis and cholesterol biosynthetic pathways in livers of mice on either diet. GC-MS lipidomics demonstrate that this reduction correlated with profound alterations in the hepatic lipidome with significant reductions in both desaturation and elongation of hepatic neutral lipid species. To examine the possibility that lipidomic actions of PLIN2 deletion contribute to suppression of SREBP activation, we isolated endoplasmic reticulum membrane fractions from long-term Western diet-fed wild type (WT) and Plin2-null mice. Lipidomic analyses reveal that endoplasmic reticulum membranes from Plin2-null mice are markedly enriched in ω-3 and ω-6 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, which others have shown inhibit SREBP activation and de novo lipogenesis. Our results identify PLIN2 as a determinant of global changes in the hepatic lipidome and suggest the hypothesis that these actions contribute to SREBP-regulated de novo lipogenesis involved in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Hepatitis C virus core protein inhibits interferon production by a human plasmacytoid dendritic cell line and dysregulates interferon regulatory factor-7 and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 1 protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Amy E L; Mitchell, Angela; Brownell, Jessica; Miklin, Daniel J; Golden-Mason, Lucy; Polyak, Stephen J; Gale, Michael J; Rosen, Hugo R

    2014-01-01

    Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells (pDCs) represent a key immune cell population in the defense against viruses. pDCs detect viral pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) through pattern recognition receptors (PRR). PRR/PAMP interactions trigger signaling events that induce interferon (IFN) production to initiate local and systemic responses. pDCs produce Type I and Type III (IFNL) IFNs in response to HCV RNA. Extracellular HCV core protein (Core) is found in the circulation in chronic infection. This study defined how Core modulates PRR signaling in pDCs. Type I and III IFN expression and production following exposure to recombinant Core or β-galactosiade was assessed in human GEN2.2 cells, a pDC cell line. Core suppressed type I and III IFN production in response to TLR agonists and the HCV PAMP agonist of RIG-I. Core suppression of IFN induction was linked with decreased IRF-7 protein levels and increased non-phosphorylated STAT1 protein. Circulating Core protein interferes with PRR signaling by pDCs to suppress IFN production. Strategies to define and target Core effects on pDCs may serve to enhance IFN production and antiviral actions against HCV.

  4. Identification of a malonyl CoA-acyl carrier protein transacylase and its regulatory role in fatty acid biosynthesis in oleaginous microalga Nannochloropsis oceanica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jia-Wen; Liu, Wan-Jun; Hu, Dong-Xiong; Wang, Xiang; Balamurugan, Srinivasan; Alimujiang, Adili; Yang, Wei-Dong; Liu, Jie-Sheng; Li, Hong-Ye

    2017-09-01

    Oleaginous microalgae hold great promises for biofuel production. However, commercialization of microalgal biofuels remains impracticable due to the lack of suitable industrial strains with high growth rate and lipid productivity. Engineering of metabolic pathways is a potential strategy for the improvement of microalgal strains for the production of lipids and also value-added products in microalgae. Malonyl CoA-acyl carrier protein transacylase (MCAT) has been reported to be involved in fatty acid biosynthesis. Here, we identified a putative MCAT in the oleaginous marine microalga Nannochloropsis oceanica. NoMCAT overexpressing N. oceanica showed a higher growth rate and photosynthetic efficiency. The neutral lipid content of engineered lines showed a significant increase by up to 31% compared to wild type. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis revealed that NoMCAT overexpression significantly altered the fatty acid composition. The composition of eicosapentaenoic acid (C20:5), which is a polyunsaturated fatty acid necessary for animal nutrition, increased by 8%. These results demonstrate the role of MCAT in enhancing fatty acid biosynthesis and growth in microalgae, and also provide an insight into metabolic engineering of microalgae with high industrial potential. © 2016 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Down-regulation of outer membrane proteins by noncoding RNAs: unraveling the cAMP-CRP- and sigmaE-dependent CyaR-ompX regulatory case

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Jesper; Eriksen, Maiken; Kallipolitis, Birgitte

    2008-01-01

    The sigma(E) (extracytoplasmic stress response sigma factor in Escherichia coli) signaling system of Gram-negative bacteria plays an essential role in the maintenance of the extracytoplasmic compartment. Upon induction of this system, approximately 100 genes are up-regulated. The majority...... is sufficient to trigger the envelope stress response. Recent work indicates that small Hfq-binding RNAs play a major role in maintaining envelope homeostasis and, so far, two sigma(E)-dependent small noncoding RNAs (sRNAs), MicA and RybB, have been shown to facilitate rapid removal of multiple omp transcripts...... in response to elevated activity of the alternative sigma factor. Here we report the identification of the sRNA (CyaR, cyclic AMP-activated RNA) that promotes decay of the ompX mRNA. The transcription of the cyaR gene is stringently controlled by cAMP-cAMP receptor protein and, unexpectedly, cyaR expression...

  6. The Yeast Iron Regulatory Proteins Grx3/4 and Fra2 Form Heterodimeric Complexes Containing a [2Fe-2S] Cluster with Cysteinyl and Histidyl Ligation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, H.; Mapolelo, D; Dingra, N; Naik, S; Lees, N; Hoffman, B; Riggs-Gelasco, P; Huynh, B; Johnson, M; Outten, C

    2009-01-01

    The transcription of iron uptake and storage genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is primarily regulated by the transcription factor Aft1. Nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of Aft1 is dependent upon mitochondrial Fe-S cluster biosynthesis via a signaling pathway that includes the cytosolic monothiol glutaredoxins (Grx3 and Grx4) and the BolA homologue Fra2. However, the interactions between these proteins and the iron-dependent mechanism by which they control Aft1 localization are unclear. To reconstitute and characterize components of this signaling pathway in vitro, we have overexpressed yeast Fra2 and Grx3/4 in Escherichia coli. We have shown that coexpression of recombinant Fra2 with Grx3 or Grx4 allows purification of a stable [2Fe-2S]{sup 2+} cluster-containing Fra2-Grx3 or Fra2-Grx4 heterodimeric complex. Reconstitution of a [2Fe-2S] cluster on Grx3 or Grx4 without Fra2 produces a [2Fe-2S]-bridged homodimer. UV?visible absorption and CD, resonance Raman, EPR, ENDOR, M{umlt o}ssbauer, and EXAFS studies of [2Fe-2S] Grx3/4 homodimers and the [2Fe-2S] Fra2-Grx3/4 heterodimers indicate that inclusion of Fra2 in the Grx3/4 Fe-S complex causes a change in the cluster stability and coordination environment. Taken together, our analytical, spectroscopic, and mutagenesis data indicate that Grx3/4 and Fra2 form a Fe-S-bridged heterodimeric complex with Fe ligands provided by the active site cysteine of Grx3/4, glutathione, and a histidine residue. Overall, these results suggest that the ability of the Fra2-Grx3/4 complex to assemble a [2Fe-2S] cluster may act as a signal to control the iron regulon in response to cellular iron status in yeast.

  7. Rad and Rem are non-canonical G-proteins with respect to the regulatory role of guanine nucleotide binding in Ca(V)1.2 channel regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Donald D; Colecraft, Henry M

    2015-12-01

    Rad and Rem are Ras-like G-proteins linked to diverse cardiovascular functions and pathophysiology. Understanding how Rad and Rem are regulated is important for deepened insights into their pathophysiological roles. As in other Ras-like G-proteins, Rad and Rem contain a conserved guanine-nucleotide binding domain (G-domain). Canonically, G-domains are key control modules, functioning as nucleotide-regulated switches of G-protein activity. Whether Rad and Rem G-domains conform to this canonical paradigm is ambiguous. Here, we used multiple functional measurements in HEK293 cells and cardiomyocytes (Ca(V)1.2 currents, Ca(2+) transients, Ca(V)β binding) as biosensors to probe the role of the G-domain in regulation of Rad and Rem function. We utilized Rad(S105N) and Rem(T94N), which are the cognate mutants to Ras(S17N), a dominant-negative variant of Ras that displays decreased nucleotide binding affinity. In HEK293 cells, over-expression of either Rad(S105N) or Rem(T94N) strongly inhibited reconstituted Ca(V)1.2 currents to the same extent as their wild-type (wt) counterparts, contrasting with reports that Rad(S105N) is functionally inert in HEK293 cells. Adenovirus-mediated expression of either wt Rad or Rad(S105N) in cardiomyocytes dramatically blocked L-type calcium current (I(Ca,L)) and inhibited Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release, contradicting reports that Rad(S105N) acts as a dominant negative in heart. By contrast, Rem(T94N) was significantly less effective than wt Rem at inhibiting I(Ca,L) and Ca(2+) transients in cardiomyocytes. FRET analyses in cardiomyocytes revealed that both Rad(S105N) and Rem(T94N) had moderately reduced binding affinity for Ca(V)βs relative to their wt counterparts. The results indicate Rad and Rem are non-canonical G-proteins with respect to the regulatory role of their G-domain in Ca(V)1.2 regulation. © 2015 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2015 The Physiological Society.

  8. The association between Mediterranean Diet Score and glucokinase regulatory protein gene variation on the markers of cardiometabolic risk: an analysis in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer (EPIC)-Norfolk study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotos-Prieto, Mercedes; Luben, Robert; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nicholas J; Forouhi, Nita G

    2014-07-14

    Consumption of a Mediterranean diet (MD) and genetic variation in the glucokinase regulatory protein (GCKR) gene have been reported to be associated with TAG and glucose metabolism. It is uncertain whether there is any interaction between these factors. Therefore, the aims of the present study were to test the association of adherence to a MD and rs780094 (G>A) SNP in the GCKR gene with the markers of cardiometabolic risk, and to investigate the interaction between genetic variation and MD adherence. We studied 20 986 individuals from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer (EPIC)-Norfolk study. The relative Mediterranean Diet Score (rMED: range 0-18) was used to assess MD adherence. Linear regression was used to estimate the association between the rMED, genotype and cardiometabolic continuous traits, adjusting for potential confounders. In adjusted analyses, we observed independent associations of MD adherence and genotype with cardiometabolic risk, with the highest risk group (AA genotype; lowest rMED) having higher concentrations of TAG, total cholesterol and apoB (12·5, 2·3 and 3·1%, respectively) v. those at the lowest risk (GG genotype; highest rMED). However, the associations of MD adherence with metabolic markers did not differ by genotype, with no significant gene-diet interactions for lipids or for glycated Hb. In conclusion, we found independent associations of the rMED and of the GCKR genotype with cardiometabolic profile, but found no evidence of interaction between them.

  9. Steroidogenic impairment due to reduced ovarian transcription of cytochrome P450 side-chain-cleavage (P450scc) and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) during experimental nephrotic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Rico, Miguel; Guadalupe Ortiz-López, María; Camacho-Castillo, Luz; Cárdenas, Mario; Pedraza-Chaverri, José; Menjívar, Marta

    2006-07-10

    The nephrotic syndrome is a renal disease characterized by proteinuria, hypoproteinemia, edema and hyperlipidemia. It has been reported that female nephrotic rats are characterized by loss of the oestrus cycle, follicle atresia, low gonadotropin and steroid concentrations; particularly, undetectable estradiol levels. Therefore, to determine the mechanisms involved in the ovarian steroidogenesis impairment, in this present study we evaluated the ovarian expression of the essential steroidogenesis components: cytochrome P450 side cholesterol chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc) and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR). The experiments were conducted in the rat experimental model of nephrosis induced by puromycin aminonucleoside (PAN) and in control groups. The evaluation of the expression of P450scc and StAR mRNA were performed during the acute phase of nephrosis as well as after the exogenous administration of 1 or 4 doses of human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG), or a daily dose of FSH or FSH+hCG for 10 days. In addition, serum hormone concentrations, intra-ovarian steroid content, and the reproductive capacity were determined. The results revealed a decreased expression of mRNA of P450scc enzyme and StAR during nephrosis, and eventhough they increased after gonadotropins treatment, they did not conduce to a normal cycling rat period or fertility recovery. This study demonstrates that the mechanism by which ovarian steroid biosynthesis is altered during acute nephrosis involves damage at the P450scc and StAR mRNA synthesis and processing.

  10. Effects of tryptophan starvation on levels of the trp RNA-binding attenuation protein (TRAP) and anti-TRAP regulatory protein and their influence on trp operon expression in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wen-Jen; Yanofsky, Charles

    2005-03-01

    The anti-TRAP protein (AT), encoded by the rtpA gene of Bacillus subtilis, can bind to and inhibit the tryptophan-activated trp RNA-binding attenuation protein (TRAP). AT binding can prevent TRAP from promoting transcription termination in the leader region of the trp operon, thereby increasing trp operon expression. We show here that AT levels continue to increase as tryptophan starvation becomes more severe, whereas the TRAP level remains relatively constant and independent of tryptophan starvation. Assuming that the functional form of AT is a trimer, we estimate that the ratios of AT trimers per TRAP molecule are 0.39 when the cells are grown under mild tryptophan starvation conditions, 0.83 under more severe starvation conditions, and approximately 2.0 when AT is expressed maximally. As the AT level is increased, a corresponding increase is observed in the anthranilate synthase level. When AT is expressed maximally, the anthranilate synthase level is about 70% of the level observed in a strain lacking TRAP. In a nutritional shift experiment where excess phenylalanine and tyrosine could potentially starve cells of tryptophan, both the AT level and anthranilate synthase activity were observed to increase. Expression of the trp operon is clearly influenced by the level of AT.

  11. Regulatory RNAs in Planarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlicka, Kamila; Perrigue, Patrick M; Barciszewski, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The full scope of regulatory RNA evolution and function in epigenetic processes is still not well understood. The development of planarian flatworms to be used as a simple model organism for research has shown a great potential to address gaps in the knowledge in this field of study. The genomes of planarians encode a wide array of regulatory RNAs that function in gene regulation. Here, we review planarians as a suitable model organism for the identification and function of regulatory RNAs.

  12. Ex vivo expanded human regulatory T cells delay islet allograft rejection via inhibiting islet-derived monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 production in CD34+ stem cells-reconstituted NOD-scid IL2rγnull mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Fang; Ma, Liang; Zhao, Min; Huang, Guocai; Mirenda, Vincenzo; Dorling, Anthony; Lechler, Robert; Lombardi, Giovanna

    2014-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is an autoimmune disease caused by immune-mediated destruction of insulin-secreting β cells of the pancreas. Near complete dependence on exogenous insulin makes T1DM very difficult to control, with the result that patients are exposed to high blood glucose and risk of diabetic complications and/or intermittent low blood glucose that can cause unconsciousness, fits and even death. Allograft transplantation of pancreatic islets restores normoglycemia with a low risk of surgical complications. However, although successful immediately after transplantation, islets are progressively lost, with most of the patients requiring exogenous insulin within 2 years post-transplant. Therefore, there is an urgent requirement for the development of new strategies to prevent islet rejection. In this study, we explored the importance of human regulatory T cells in the control of islets allograft rejection. We developed a pre-clinical model of human islet transplantation by reconstituting NOD-scid IL2rγnull mice with cord blood-derived human CD34+ stem cells and demonstrated that although the engrafted human immune system mediated the rejection of human islets, their survival was significantly prolonged following adoptive transfer of ex vivo expanded human Tregs. Mechanistically, Tregs inhibited the infiltration of innate immune cells and CD4+ T cells into the graft by down-regulating the islet graft-derived monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. Our findings might contribute to the development of clinical strategies for Treg therapy to control human islet rejection. We also show for the first time that CD34+ cells-reconstituted NOD-scid IL2rγnull mouse model could be beneficial for investigating human innate immunity in vivo.

  13. Ex vivo expanded human regulatory T cells delay islet allograft rejection via inhibiting islet-derived monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 production in CD34+ stem cells-reconstituted NOD-scid IL2rγnull mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Xiao

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM is an autoimmune disease caused by immune-mediated destruction of insulin-secreting β cells of the pancreas. Near complete dependence on exogenous insulin makes T1DM very difficult to control, with the result that patients are exposed to high blood glucose and risk of diabetic complications and/or intermittent low blood glucose that can cause unconsciousness, fits and even death. Allograft transplantation of pancreatic islets restores normoglycemia with a low risk of surgical complications. However, although successful immediately after transplantation, islets are progressively lost, with most of the patients requiring exogenous insulin within 2 years post-transplant. Therefore, there is an urgent requirement for the development of new strategies to prevent islet rejection. In this study, we explored the importance of human regulatory T cells in the control of islets allograft rejection. We developed a pre-clinical model of human islet transplantation by reconstituting NOD-scid IL2rγnull mice with cord blood-derived human CD34+ stem cells and demonstrated that although the engrafted human immune system mediated the rejection of human islets, their survival was significantly prolonged following adoptive transfer of ex vivo expanded human Tregs. Mechanistically, Tregs inhibited the infiltration of innate immune cells and CD4+ T cells into the graft by down-regulating the islet graft-derived monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. Our findings might contribute to the development of clinical strategies for Treg therapy to control human islet rejection. We also show for the first time that CD34+ cells-reconstituted NOD-scid IL2rγnull mouse model could be beneficial for investigating human innate immunity in vivo.

  14. Advanced Running Performance by Genetic Predisposition in Male Dummerstorf Marathon Mice (DUhTP Reveals Higher Sterol Regulatory Element-Binding Protein (SREBP Related mRNA Expression in the Liver and Higher Serum Levels of Progesterone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Ohde

    Full Text Available Long-term-selected DUhTP mice represent a non-inbred model for inborn physical high-performance without previous training. Abundance of hepatic mRNA in 70-day male DUhTP and control mice was analyzed using the Affymetrix mouse array 430A 2.0. Differential expression analysis with PLIER corrected data was performed using AltAnalyze. Searching for over-representation in biochemical pathways revealed cholesterol metabolism being most prominently affected in DUhTP compared to unselected control mice. Furthermore, pathway analysis by AltAnalyze plus PathVisio indicated significant induction of glycolysis, fatty acid synthesis and cholesterol biosynthesis in the liver of DUhTP mice versus unselected control mice. In contrast, gluconeogenesis was partially inactivated as judged from the analysis of hepatic mRNA transcript abundance in DUhTP mice. Analysis of mRNA transcripts related to steroid hormone metabolism inferred elevated synthesis of progesterone and reduced levels of sex steroids. Abundance of steroid delta isomerase-5 mRNA (Hsd3b5, FC 4.97 was increased and steroid 17-alpha-monooxygenase mRNA (Cyp17a1, FC -11.6 was massively diminished in the liver of DUhTP mice. Assessment of steroid profiles by LC-MS revealed increased levels of progesterone and decreased levels of sex steroids in serum from DUhTP mice versus controls. Analysis of hepatic mRNA transcript abundance indicates that sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 (SREBP-1 may play a major role in metabolic pathway activation in the marathon mouse model DUhTP. Thus, results from bioinformatics modeling of hepatic mRNA transcript abundance correlated with direct steroid analysis by mass spectrometry and further indicated functions of SREBP-1 and steroid hormones for endurance performance in DUhTP mice.

  15. Antigen-specific over-expression of human cartilage glycoprotein 39 on CD4+ CD25+ forkhead box protein 3+ regulatory T cells in the generation of glucose-6-phosphate isomerase-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Y; Matsumoto, I; Inoue, A; Umeda, N; Takai, C; Sumida, T

    2014-08-01

    Human cartilage gp-39 (HC gp-39) is a well-known autoantigen in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, the exact localization, fluctuation and function of HC gp-39 in RA are unknown. Therefore, using a glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (GPI)-induced model of arthritis, we investigated these aspects of HC gp-39 in arthritis. The rise in serum HC gp-39 levels was detected on the early phase of GPI-induced arthritis (day 7) and the HC gp-39 mRNA was increased significantly on splenic CD4(+) T cells on day7, but not on CD11b(+) cells. Moreover, to identify the characterization of HC gp-39(+) CD4(+) T cells, we assessed the analysis of T helper (Th) subsets. As a result, HC gp-39 was expressed dominantly in CD4(+) CD25(+) forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3)(+) refulatory T cells (T(reg)), but not in Th1, Th2 or Th17 cells. Furthermore, to investigate the effect of HC gp-39 to CD4(+) T cells, T cell proliferation assay and cytokine production from CD4(+) T cells using recombinant HC gp-39 was assessed. We found that GPI-specific T cell proliferation and interferon (IFN)-γ or interleukin (IL)-17 production were clearly suppressed by addition of recombinant HC gp-39. Antigen-specific over-expression of HC gp-39 in splenic CD4(+) CD25(+) FoxP3(+) T(reg) cells occurs in the induction phase of GPI-induced arthritis, and addition of recombinant HC gp-39 suppresses antigen-specific T-cell proliferation and cytokine production, suggesting that HC gp-39 in CD4(+) T cells might play a regulatory role in arthritis. © 2014 British Society for Immunology.

  16. Overexpression of the protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit a gene ZmPP2AA1 improves low phosphate tolerance by remodeling the root system architecture of maize.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiemin Wang

    Full Text Available Phosphate (Pi limitation is a constraint for plant growth and development in many natural and agricultural ecosystems. In this study, a gene encoding Zea mays L. protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit A, designated ZmPP2AA1, was induced in roots by low Pi availability. The function of the ZmPP2AA1 gene in maize was analyzed using overexpression and RNA interference. ZmPP2AA1 modulated root gravitropism, negatively regulated primary root (PR growth, and stimulated the development of lateral roots (LRs. A detailed characterization of the root system architecture (RSA in response to different Pi concentrations with or without indole-3-acetic acid and 1-N-naphthylphthalamic acid revealed that auxin was involved in the RSA response to low Pi availability. Overexpression of ZmPP2AA1 enhanced tolerance to Pi starvation in transgenic maize in hydroponic and soil pot experiments. An increased dry weight (DW, root-to-shoot ratio, and total P content and concentration, along with a delayed and reduced accumulation of anthocyanin in overexpressing transgenic maize plants coincided with their highly branched root system and increased Pi uptake capability under low Pi conditions. Inflorescence development of the ZmPP2AA1 overexpressing line was less affected by low Pi stress, resulting in higher grain yield per plant under Pi deprivation. These data reveal the biological function of ZmPP2AA1, provide insights into a linkage between auxin and low Pi responses, and drive new strategies for the efficient utilization of Pi by maize.

  17. Assignment of human protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit genes B56{alpha}, B56{beta}, B56{gamma}, B56{delta}, and B56{epsilon} (PPP2R5A-PPP2R5E), highly expressed in muscle and brain, to chromosome regions 1q41, 11q12, 3p21, 6p21.1, and 7p11.1 {r_arrow} p12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCright, B.; Virshup, D.M.; Brothman, A.R. [Univ. of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1996-08-15

    The activity of the major intracellular protein phosphatase, protein phosphatase 2A WPM, is determined by the nature of the associated regulatory subunit. A new family of human PP2A regulatory subunits has recently been identified. Three of these subunits, B56{beta}, B56{delta}, and B56{epsilon}, are most highly expressed in brain, while the B56{alpha} and B56{gamma} isoforms are highly expressed in cardiac and skeletal muscle. Genes PPP2R5A-PPP2R5E encoding the phosphatase regulatory proteins B56{alpha}, B56{beta}, B56{gamma}, B56{delta}, and B56{epsilon} have now been mapped by fluorescence in situ hybridization to chromosome regions 1q41, 11q12, 3p21, 6p21.1, and 7p11.2-p12, respectively. 16 refs., 1 fig.

  18. Genomic regulatory landscapes and chromosomal rearrangements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladegaard, Elisabete L Engenheiro

    2008-01-01

    and mental retardation-AUTS2), where the breakpoints in all cases mutated the known disease-causing protein-coding genes. In two rearrangements with breakpoints within putative regulatory landscapes of genes where human phenotypes are unknown (HMX2/HMX3 and FOXP1), the functional characterization of CNEs...

  19. Mutational robustness of gene regulatory networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aalt D J van Dijk

    Full Text Available Mutational robustness of gene regulatory networks refers to their ability to generate constant biological output upon mutations that change network structure. Such networks contain regulatory interactions (transcription factor-target gene interactions but often also protein-protein interactions between transcription factors. Using computational modeling, we study factors that influence robustness and we infer several network properties governing it. These include the type of mutation, i.e. whether a regulatory interaction or a protein-protein interaction is mutated, and in the case of mutation of a regulatory interaction, the sign of the interaction (activating vs. repressive. In addition, we analyze the effect of combinations of mutations and we compare networks containing monomeric with those containing dimeric transcription factors. Our results are consistent with available data on biological networks, for example based on evolutionary conservation of network features. As a novel and remarkable property, we predict that networks are more robust against mutations in monomer than in dimer transcription factors, a prediction for which analysis of conservation of DNA binding residues in monomeric vs. dimeric transcription factors provides indirect evidence.

  20. 3 CFR - Regulatory Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Departments and Agencies For well over two decades, the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OIRA) at... opportunities and security. While recognizing the expertise and authority of executive branch departments and... as a means of promoting regulatory goals. The fundamental principles and structures governing...

  1. NRC Regulatory Agenda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-10-01

    The NRC Regulatory Agenda is a compilation of all rules on which the NRC has recently completed action, or has proposed action, or is considering action, and all petitions for rulemaking which have been received by the Commission and are pending disposition by the Commission. The Regulatory Agenda is updated and issued each quarter

  2. NRC Regulatory Agenda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-08-01

    The NRC Regulatory Agenda is a compilation of all rules on which the NRC has recently completed action or has proposed, or is considering action and all petitions for rulemaking which have been received by the commission and are pending disposition by the Commission. The Regulatory Agenda is updated and issued each quarter

  3. NRC regulatory agenda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-04-01

    The NRC Regulatory Agenda is a compilation of all rules on which the NRC has recently completed action or has proposed, or is considering action and all petitions for rulemaking which have been received by the Commission and are pending disposition by the Commission. The Regulatory Agenda is updated and issued each quarter

  4. Nuclear Regulatory legislation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-06-01

    This compilation of statutes and material pertaining to nuclear regulatory legislation through the 97th Congress, 2nd Session, has been prepared by the Office of the Executive Legal Director, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, with the assistance of staff, for use as an internal resource document

  5. NRC regulatory agenda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-04-01

    The NRC Regulatory Agenda is a compilation of all rules on which the NRC has recently completed action, or has proposed action, or is considering action, and all petitions for rulemaking which have been received by the Commission and are pending disposition by the Commission. The Regulatory Agenda is updated and issued each quarter

  6. NRC regulatory agenda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The NRC Regulatory Agenda is a compilation of all rules on which the NRC has proposed or is considering action and all petitions for rulemaking which have been received by the Commission and are pending disposition by the Commission. The Regulatory Agenda is updated and issued each quarter

  7. Regulatory guidance document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-05-01

    The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Program Management System Manual requires preparation of the OCRWM Regulatory Guidance Document (RGD) that addresses licensing, environmental compliance, and safety and health compliance. The document provides: regulatory compliance policy; guidance to OCRWM organizational elements to ensure a consistent approach when complying with regulatory requirements; strategies to achieve policy objectives; organizational responsibilities for regulatory compliance; guidance with regard to Program compliance oversight; and guidance on the contents of a project-level Regulatory Compliance Plan. The scope of the RGD includes site suitability evaluation, licensing, environmental compliance, and safety and health compliance, in accordance with the direction provided by Section 4.6.3 of the PMS Manual. Site suitability evaluation and regulatory compliance during site characterization are significant activities, particularly with regard to the YW MSA. OCRWM's evaluation of whether the Yucca Mountain site is suitable for repository development must precede its submittal of a license application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Accordingly, site suitability evaluation is discussed in Chapter 4, and the general statements of policy regarding site suitability evaluation are discussed in Section 2.1. Although much of the data and analyses may initially be similar, the licensing process is discussed separately in Chapter 5. Environmental compliance is discussed in Chapter 6. Safety and Health compliance is discussed in Chapter 7

  8. Managing Regulatory Body Competence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    In 2001, the IAEA published TECDOC 1254, which examined the way in which the recognized functions of a regulatory body for nuclear facilities results in competence needs. Using the systematic approach to training (SAT), TECDOC 1254 provided a framework for regulatory bodies for managing training and developing and their maintaining their competence. It has been successfully used by many regulators. The IAEA has also introduced a methodology and an assessment tool - Guidelines for Systematic Assessment of Regulatory Competence Needs (SARCoN) - which provides practical guidance on analysing the training and development needs of a regulatory body and, through a gap analysis, guidance on establishing competence needs and how to meet them. In 2009, the IAEA established a steering committee (supported by a bureau) with the mission to advise the IAEA on how it could best assist Member States to develop suitable competence management systems for their regulatory bodies. The committee recommended the development of a safety report on managing staff competence as an integral part of a regulatory body's management system. This Safety Report was developed in response to this request. It supersedes TECDOC 1254, broadens its application to regulatory bodies for all facilities and activities, and builds upon the experience gained through the application of TECDOC 1254 and SARCoN and the feedback received from Member States. This Safety Report applies to the management of adequate competence as needs change, and as such is equally applicable to the needs of States 'embarking' on a nuclear power programme. It also deals with the special case of building up the competence of regulatory bodies as part of the overall process of establishing an 'embarking' State's regulatory system

  9. Evolution of Cis-Regulatory Elements and Regulatory Networks in Duplicated Genes of Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsovski, Andrej A; Pradinuk, Julian; Guo, Xu Qiu; Wang, Sishuo; Adams, Keith L

    2015-12-01

    Plant genomes contain large numbers of duplicated genes that contribute to the evolution of new functions. Following duplication, genes can exhibit divergence in their coding sequence and their expression patterns. Changes in the cis-regulatory element landscape can result in changes in gene expression patterns. High-throughput methods developed recently can identify potential cis-regulatory elements on a genome-wide scale. Here, we use a recent comprehensive data set of DNase I sequencing-identified cis-regulatory binding sites (footprints) at single-base-pair resolution to compare binding sites and network connectivity in duplicated gene pairs in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). We found that duplicated gene pairs vary greatly in their cis-regulatory element architecture, resulting in changes in regulatory network connectivity. Whole-genome duplicates (WGDs) have approximately twice as many footprints in their promoters left by potential regulatory proteins than do tandem duplicates (TDs). The WGDs have a greater average number of footprint differences between paralogs than TDs. The footprints, in turn, result in more regulatory network connections between WGDs and other genes, forming denser, more complex regulatory networks than shown by TDs. When comparing regulatory connections between duplicates, WGDs had more pairs in which the two genes are either partially or fully diverged in their network connections, but fewer genes with no network connections than the TDs. There is evidence of younger TDs and WGDs having fewer unique connections compared with older duplicates. This study provides insights into cis-regulatory element evolution and network divergence in duplicated genes. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Expression of sterol regulatory element-binding transcription factor (SREBF 2 and SREBF cleavage-activating protein (SCAP in human atheroma and the association of their allelic variants with sudden cardiac death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kytömäki Leena

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Disturbed cellular cholesterol homeostasis may lead to accumulation of cholesterol in human atheroma plaques. Cellular cholesterol homeostasis is controlled by the sterol regulatory element-binding transcription factor 2 (SREBF-2 and the SREBF cleavage-activating protein (SCAP. We investigated whole genome expression in a series of human atherosclerotic samples from different vascular territories and studied whether the non-synonymous coding variants in the interacting domains of two genes, SREBF-2 1784G>C (rs2228314 and SCAP 2386A>G, are related to the progression of coronary atherosclerosis and the risk of pre-hospital sudden cardiac death (SCD. Methods Whole genome expression profiling was completed in twenty vascular samples from carotid, aortic and femoral atherosclerotic plaques and six control samples from internal mammary arteries. Three hundred sudden pre-hospital deaths of middle-aged (33–69 years Caucasian Finnish men were subjected to detailed autopsy in the Helsinki Sudden Death Study. Coronary narrowing and areas of coronary wall covered with fatty streaks or fibrotic, calcified or complicated lesions were measured and related to the SREBF-2 and SCAP genotypes. Results Whole genome expression profiling showed a significant (p = 0.02 down-regulation of SREBF-2 in atherosclerotic carotid plaques (types IV-V, but not in the aorta or femoral arteries (p = NS for both, as compared with the histologically confirmed non-atherosclerotic tissues. In logistic regression analysis, a significant interaction between the SREBF-2 1784G>C and the SCAP 2386A>G genotype was observed on the risk of SCD (p = 0.046. Men with the SREBF-2 C allele and the SCAP G allele had a significantly increased risk of SCD (OR 2.68, 95% CI 1.07–6.71, compared to SCAP AA homologous subjects carrying the SREBF-2 C allele. Furthermore, similar trends for having complicated lesions and for the occurrence of thrombosis were found, although the

  11. NRC regulatory agenda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-04-01

    The Regulatory Agenda is a quarterly compilation of all rules on which the NRC has recently completed action or has proposed, or is considering action and of all petitions for rulemaking that the NRC has received that are pending disposition

  12. NRC regulatory agenda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-10-01

    The Regulatory Agenda is a quarterly compilation of all rules on which the NRC has recently completed action or has proposed, or is considering action and of all petitions for rulemaking that the NRC has received that are pending disposition

  13. Transcription regulatory networks analysis using CAGE

    KAUST Repository

    Tegnér, Jesper N.

    2009-10-01

    Mapping out cellular networks in general and transcriptional networks in particular has proved to be a bottle-neck hampering our understanding of biological processes. Integrative approaches fusing computational and experimental technologies for decoding transcriptional networks at a high level of resolution is therefore of uttermost importance. Yet, this is challenging since the control of gene expression in eukaryotes is a complex multi-level process influenced by several epigenetic factors and the fine interplay between regulatory proteins and the promoter structure governing the combinatorial regulation of gene expression. In this chapter we review how the CAGE data can be integrated with other measurements such as expression, physical interactions and computational prediction of regulatory motifs, which together can provide a genome-wide picture of eukaryotic transcriptional regulatory networks at a new level of resolution. © 2010 by Pan Stanford Publishing Pte. Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Perceptions of regulatory approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halin, Magnus; Leinonen, Ruusaliisa

    2012-01-01

    Ms. Ruusaliisa Leinonen and Mr. Magnus Halin from Fortum gave a joint presentation on industry perceptions of regulatory oversight of LMfS/SC. It was concluded that an open culture of discussion exists between the regulator (STUK) and the licensee, based on the common goal of nuclear safety. An example was provided of on how regulatory interventions helped foster improvements to individual and collective dose rate trends, which had remained static. Regulatory interventions included discussions on the ALARA concept to reinforce the requirement to continuously strive for improvements in safety performance. Safety culture has also been built into regulatory inspections in recent years. Training days have also been organised by the regulatory body to help develop a shared understanding of safety culture between licensee and regulatory personnel. Fortum has also developed their own training for managers and supervisors. Training and ongoing discussion on LMfS/SC safety culture is considered particularly important because both Fortum and the regulatory body are experiencing an influx of new staff due to the demographic profile of their organisations. It was noted that further work is needed to reach a common understanding of safety culture on a practical level (e.g., for a mechanic setting to work), and in relation to the inspection criteria used by the regulator. The challenges associated with companies with a mix of energy types were also discussed. This can make it more difficult to understand responsibilities and decision making processes, including the role of the parent body organisation. It also makes communication more challenging due to increased complexity and a larger number of stakeholders

  15. The binding site for regulatory 14-3-3 protein in plant plasma membrane H+-ATPase: Involvement of a region promoting phosphorylation-independent interaction in addition to the phosphorylation-dependent C-terminal end

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang, Anja T; Borch, Jonas; Bych, Katrine

    2003-01-01

    14-3-3 proteins constitute a family of well conserved proteins interacting with a large number of phosphorylated binding partners in eukaryotic cells. The plant plasma membrane H+-ATPase is an unusual target in that a unique phosphothreonine motif (946YpTV, where pT represents phosphothreonine......, Thr-924 is important for interaction with 14-3-3 protein even when Thr-947 is phosphorylated. We suggest that the role of phosphorylation, which is accentuated by fusicoccin, is to stabilize protein-protein interaction between 14-3-3 protein and several residues of the H+-ATPase C-terminal domain....

  16. Functional characterization of variations on regulatory motifs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Lapidot

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Transcription factors (TFs regulate gene expression through specific interactions with short promoter elements. The same regulatory protein may recognize a variety of related sequences. Moreover, once they are detected it is hard to predict whether highly similar sequence motifs will be recognized by the same TF and regulate similar gene expression patterns, or serve as binding sites for distinct regulatory factors. We developed computational measures to assess the functional implications of variations on regulatory motifs and to compare the functions of related sites. We have developed computational means for estimating the functional outcome of substituting a single position within a binding site and applied them to a collection of putative regulatory motifs. We predict the effects of nucleotide variations within motifs on gene expression patterns. In cases where such predictions could be compared to suitable published experimental evidence, we found very good agreement. We further accumulated statistics from multiple substitutions across various binding sites in an attempt to deduce general properties that characterize nucleotide substitutions that are more likely to alter expression. We found that substitutions involving Adenine are more likely to retain the expression pattern and that substitutions involving Guanine are more likely to alter expression compared to the rest of the substitutions. Our results should facilitate the prediction of the expression outcomes of binding site variations. One typical important implication is expected to be the ability to predict the phenotypic effect of variation in regulatory motifs in promoters.

  17. Federal Reserve System Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-20

    ... [The Regulatory Plan and Unified Agenda of Federal Regulatory and Deregulatory Actions] [Federal Reserve System Semiannual Regulatory Agenda ] Part XXI Federal Reserve System Semiannual Regulatory Agenda... Flexibility Agenda AGENCY: Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. ACTION: Semiannual regulatory...

  18. Nuclear regulatory decision making

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieland, Patricia; Almeida, Ivan Pedro Salati de

    2011-01-01

    The scientific considerations upon which the nuclear regulations are based provide objective criteria for decisions on nuclear safety matters. However, the decisions that a regulatory agency takes go far beyond granting or not an operating license based on assessment of compliance. It may involve decisions about hiring experts or research, appeals, responses to other government agencies, international agreements, etc.. In all cases, top management of the regulatory agency should hear and decide the best balance between the benefits of regulatory action and undue risks and other associated impacts that may arise, including issues of credibility and reputation. The establishment of a decision framework based on well established principles and criteria ensures performance stability and consistency, preventing individual subjectivity. This article analyzes the challenges to the decision-making by regulatory agencies to ensure coherence and consistency in decisions, even in situations where there is uncertainty, lack of reliable information and even divergence of opinions among experts. The article explores the basic elements for a framework for regulatory decision-making. (author)

  19. Dietary α-lactalbumin induced fatty liver by enhancing nuclear liver X receptor αβ/sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c/PPARγ expression and minimising PPARα/carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 expression and AMP-activated protein kinase α phosphorylation associated with atherogenic dyslipidaemia, insulin resistance and oxidative stress in Balb/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Oliva, María Elvira; Garcimartin, Alba; Muñoz-Martínez, Emilia

    2017-12-01

    The effect and the role played by dietary α-lactalbumin (α-LAC) on hepatic fat metabolism are yet to be fully elucidated. We reported previously that α-LAC intake induced atherogenic dyslipidaemia in Balb/c mice. The aim of the present study was to investigate if this atherogenic effect could be due to a possible α-LAC-induced hepatic steatosis. We examine the ability of dietary α-LAC to induce liver steatosis, identifying the molecular mechanisms underlying hepatic lipid metabolism in association with the lipid profile, peripheral insulin resistance (IR) and changes in the hepatic oxidative environment. Male Balb/c mice (n 6) were fed with diets containing either chow or 14 % α-LAC for 4 weeks. The α-LAC-fed mice developed abdominal adiposity and IR. Moderate liver steatosis with increased TAG and NEFA contents was correlated with atherogenic dyslipidaemia. There was increased nuclear expression of liver X receptor αβ (LXRαβ), sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) and PPARγ transcription factors and of the cytosolic enzymes acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1 (ACC1) and fatty acid synthase involved in the hepatic de novo lipogenesis. The opposite was found for the nuclear receptor PPARα and the mitochondrial enzyme carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 (CPT-1), leading to reduced fatty acid β-oxidation (FAO). These changes were associated with a significant decrease in both p-Thr172-AMP-activated protein kinase α (AMPKα) (inactivation) and p-Ser79-ACC1 (activation) and with a more oxidative liver environment increasing lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation and reducing GSH:GSSG ratio in the α-LAC-fed mice. In conclusion, 4 weeks of 14 % α-LAC feeding induced liver steatosis associated with atherogenic dyslipidaemia, IR and oxidative stress by enhancing nuclear LXRαβ/SREBP-1c/PPARγ expression and diminishing PPARα/CPT-1 expression and AMPKα phosphorylation shifting the hepatic FAO toward fatty acid synthesis in Balb/c mice.

  20. Nuclear Regulatory Legislation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-08-01

    This compilation of statutes and material pertaining to nuclear regulatory legislation through the 100th Congress, 2nd Session, has been prepared by the Office of the General Counsel, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, with the assistance of staff, for use as an internal resource document. Persons using this document are placed on notice that it may not be used as an authoritative citation in lieu of the primary legislative sources. Furthermore, while every effort has been made to ensure the completeness and accuracy of this material, neither the United States Government, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, nor any of their employees makes any expressed or implied warranty or assumes liability for the accuracy or completeness of the material presented in this compilation

  1. Regulatory and licensee surveys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    Prior to the workshop two CSNI/WGHOF surveys were distributed. One survey was directed at regulatory bodies and the other was directed at plant licensees. The surveys were: 1 - Regulatory Expectations of Licensees' Arrangements to Ensure Suitable Organisational Structure, Resources and Competencies to Manage Safety (sent to WGHOF regulatory members). The survey requested that the respondents provide a brief overview of the situation related to plant organisations in their country, their regulatory expectations and their formal requirements. The survey addressed three subjects: the demonstration and documentation of organisational structures, resources and competencies, organisational changes, issues for improvement (for both current and new plants). Responses were received from eleven regulatory bodies. 2 - Approaches to Justify Organisational Suitability (sent to selected licensees). The purpose of the survey to was to gain an understanding of how licensees ensure organisational suitability, resources and competencies. This information was used to assist in the development of the issues and subjects that were addressed at the group discussion sessions. Responses were received from over fifteen licensees from nine countries. The survey requested that the licensees provide information on how they ensure effective organisational structures at their plants. The survey grouped the questions into the following four categories: organisational safety functions, resource and competence, decision-making and communication, good examples and improvement needs. The findings from these surveys were used in conjunction with other factors to identify the key issues for the workshop discussion sessions. The responses from these two surveys are discussed briefly in Sections 4 and 5 of this report. More extensive reviews of the regulatory and licensee responses are provided in Appendix 1

  2. Balanced Integrated Regulatory Oversight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borchardt, R.W.

    2010-01-01

    Reactor safety, protecting the public health and safety, and protecting the environment must always be the nuclear regulator's top priorities. Enabling the use of nuclear power for the benefit of society, while protecting the public and the environment requires the regulator to balance many factors. In addition, the regulator is only one part of the overall government that must consider many factors as it carries out its societal responsibilities. Some of the factors that must be balanced and the practical impacts on how the regulator carries out its responsibilities will be addressed. The first International Conference on Effective Regulatory Systems, held in Moscow, Russian Federation, in 2006, focused on safety and security challenges with a goal of improving regulatory effectiveness through cooperation and sharing of information and best practices. The challenge of meeting both safety and security objectives is one example of potentially competing programmes that must be balanced. Other balances that must be evaluated include the benefits of safety improvements compared to the cost of implementation, the use of deterministic and probabilistic approaches, communication openness balanced with the protection of information that could be used for detrimental purposes, and timeliness of regulatory decision making balanced with the need to perform quality work in support of oversight responsibilities. A balanced and integrated approach to regulatory oversight is vital to ensuring that the regulatory body remains effective in its mission to enable the use of nuclear power while protecting the public and the environment. This concept is applicable to nations beginning a nuclear programme as well as established and experienced regulatory bodies. (author)

  3. Deconstructing the pluripotency gene regulatory network

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Mo

    2018-04-04

    Pluripotent stem cells can be isolated from embryos or derived by reprogramming. Pluripotency is stabilized by an interconnected network of pluripotency genes that cooperatively regulate gene expression. Here we describe the molecular principles of pluripotency gene function and highlight post-transcriptional controls, particularly those induced by RNA-binding proteins and alternative splicing, as an important regulatory layer of pluripotency. We also discuss heterogeneity in pluripotency regulation, alternative pluripotency states and future directions of pluripotent stem cell research.

  4. Biosimilars: policy, clinical, and regulatory considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Scott

    2008-07-15

    The regulatory background surrounding biosimilars (biopharmaceuticals that are considered similar in composition to an innovator product, but not necessarily clinically interchangeable); equivalence, interchangeability, and unique considerations associated with biopharmaceuticals; the biopharmaceutical protein production process; scientific facts for use in the policy discussion about biosimilars; the European Union system for biosimilars; and the current status of biosimilars legislation in the United States are described. An abbreviated regulatory pathway for the approval of biosimilars, and a process for safely demonstrating the therapeutic interchangeability of these proteins, has the potential to provide meaningful cost savings. This economic advantage to patients can translate into important public health benefits. But to date, no formal regulatory process exists in the United States for bringing these drugs to market. In addition, the current tools for fully characterizing biopharmaceuticals are not--in certain cases--well developed, especially for proteins that have complex structures or are heavily glycosylated. In addition, using "similar" but not completely "identical" proteins interchangeably raises concerns about potentiating immunogenicity. The bottom line is that demonstrating therapeutic equivalence and interchangeability for biosimilars is not a straightforward matter--it cannot be based on the same criteria as for conventional small-molecule drugs. The science, while obtainable, is more complex. For example, it is assumed that showing that a biosimilar protein can be safely used interchangeably with an innovator protein would require, at the least, some limited clinical data and interchangeability studies. Notwithstanding the more complex scientific and clinical issues particular to protein products, most believe that a process for enabling the approval of safe and effective biosimilar proteins is not only possible, but an important public health

  5. Regulatory stability and credibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, B. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The author discusses programs within the nuclear industry dedicated to enhancing the utilities' role in achieving operational excellence. The activities of the Nuclear Management and Resources Council (NUMARC), INPO, and EPRI are described. NRC regulations are addressed. The author identifies and focuses on the importance of a stable and credible regulatory process for the achievement of operational excellence

  6. NRC Regulatory Agenda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-07-01

    This document is a compilation of all rules on which the NRC has proposed or is considering action and all petitions for rulemaking which have been received by the Commission and are pending disposition by the Commission. The Regulatory Agenda is updated and issued each quarter

  7. Developing regulatory approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axelsson, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Lars Axelsson presented SSM progress on oversight of LMfS/SC since the Chester 1 Workshop in 2007. Current SSM approaches for safety culture oversight include targeted safety management and safety culture inspections, compliance inspections which cover aspects of safety management/safety culture and multi-disciplinary team inspections. Examples of themes for targeted inspections include management of ambiguous operational situations or other weak signals, understanding of and attitudes to Human Performance tools, the Safety Department's role and authority and Leadership for safety. All regulatory activities provide inputs for the SSM yearly safety evaluation of each licensee. A form has been developed to capture safety culture observations from inspections and other interactions with licensees. Analysis will be performed to identify patterns and provide information to support planning of specific Safety Culture activities. Training has been developed for regulatory staff to enhance the quality of regulatory interventions on safety culture. This includes a half-day seminar to provide an overview of safety culture, and a workshop which provides more in-depth discussion on cultural issues and how to capture those during regulatory activities. Future plans include guidance for inspectors, and informal seminars on safety culture with licensees

  8. Comments on regulatory reform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendrie, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    Nuclear regulatory reform is divided into two parts. The first part contains all those matters for which new legislation is required. The second part concerns all those matters that are within the power of the Commission under existing statutes. Recommendations are presented

  9. OAR Regulatory Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. EPA's Office of Air and Radiation is hosting a public teleconference to solicit input on specific air and radiation actions that should be considered for “repeal, replacement, or modification” to reduce regulatory burden consistent with EO 13777.

  10. NRC regulatory agenda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-02-01

    This document is a compilation of all rules on which the NRC has recently completed action, or has proposed action, or is considered action, and all petitions for rulemaking which have been received by the Commission and are pending disposition by the Commission. The Regulatory Agenda is updated and issued each quarter

  11. NRC Regulatory Agenda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-07-01

    This document compilation of all rules on which the NRC has recently completed action, or has proposed action, or is considering action, and all petitions for rule making which have been received by the Commission and are pending disposition by the Commission. The Regulatory Agenda is updated and issued each quarter

  12. Prediction of regulatory elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandelin, Albin

    2008-01-01

    Finding the regulatory mechanisms responsible for gene expression remains one of the most important challenges for biomedical research. A major focus in cellular biology is to find functional transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) responsible for the regulation of a downstream gene. As wet-lab...

  13. NRC regulatory agenda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-11-01

    This document provides a compilation of all rules on which the NRC has recently completed action, or has proposed action, or is considering action, and all petitions for rulemaking which have been received by the Commission and are pending disposition by the Commission. The Regulatory Agenda is updated and issued each quarter

  14. State Observer Design for Delayed Genetic Regulatory Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Ping Tian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic regulatory networks are dynamic systems which describe the interactions among gene products (mRNAs and proteins. The internal states of a genetic regulatory network consist of the concentrations of mRNA and proteins involved in it, which are very helpful in understanding its dynamic behaviors. However, because of some limitations such as experiment techniques, not all internal states of genetic regulatory network can be effectively measured. Therefore it becomes an important issue to estimate the unmeasured states via the available measurements. In this study, we design a state observer to estimate the states of genetic regulatory networks with time delays from available measurements. Furthermore, based on linear matrix inequality (LMI approach, a criterion is established to guarantee that the dynamic of estimation error is globally asymptotically stable. A gene repressillatory network is employed to illustrate the effectiveness of our design approach.

  15. Subversion of Cell Cycle Regulatory Mechanisms by HIV

    OpenAIRE

    Rice, Andrew P.; Kimata, Jason T.

    2015-01-01

    To establish a productive infection, HIV-1 must counteract cellular innate immune mechanisms and redirect cellular process towards viral replication. Recent studies have discovered that HIV-1 and other primate immunodeficiency viruses subvert cell cycle regulatory mechanisms to achieve these ends. The viral Vpr and Vpx proteins target cell cycle controls to counter innate immunity. The cell cycle-related protein Cyclin L2 is also utilized to counter innate immunity. The viral Tat protein util...

  16. Delay-independent stability of genetic regulatory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fang-Xiang

    2011-11-01

    Genetic regulatory networks can be described by nonlinear differential equations with time delays. In this paper, we study both locally and globally delay-independent stability of genetic regulatory networks, taking messenger ribonucleic acid alternative splicing into consideration. Based on nonnegative matrix theory, we first develop necessary and sufficient conditions for locally delay-independent stability of genetic regulatory networks with multiple time delays. Compared to the previous results, these conditions are easy to verify. Then we develop sufficient conditions for global delay-independent stability for genetic regulatory networks. Compared to the previous results, this sufficient condition is less conservative. To illustrate theorems developed in this paper, we analyze delay-independent stability of two genetic regulatory networks: a real-life repressilatory network with three genes and three proteins, and a synthetic gene regulatory network with five genes and seven proteins. The simulation results show that the theorems developed in this paper can effectively determine the delay-independent stability of genetic regulatory networks.

  17. Functional footprinting of regulatory DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vierstra, Jeff; Reik, Andreas; Chang, Kai-Hsin; Stehling-Sun, Sandra; Zhou, Yuanyue; Hinkley, Sarah J; Paschon, David E; Zhang, Lei; Psatha, Nikoletta; Bendana, Yuri R; O'Neil, Colleen M; Song, Alexander H; Mich, Andrea K; Liu, Pei-Qi; Lee, Gary; Bauer, Daniel E; Holmes, Michael C; Orkin, Stuart H; Papayannopoulou, Thalia; Stamatoyannopoulos, George; Rebar, Edward J; Gregory, Philip D; Urnov, Fyodor D; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A

    2015-10-01

    Regulatory regions harbor multiple transcription factor (TF) recognition sites; however, the contribution of individual sites to regulatory function remains challenging to define. We describe an approach that exploits the error-prone nature of genome editing-induced double-strand break repair to map functional elements within regulatory DNA at nucleotide resolution. We demonstrate the approach on a human erythroid enhancer, revealing single TF recognition sites that gate the majority of downstream regulatory function.

  18. Consistent Regulatory Policy under Uncertainty

    OpenAIRE

    Michael J. Brennan; Eduardo S. Schwartz

    1982-01-01

    This article is concerned with the effects of regulation on the risk and value of the regulated firm in a dynamic context. Current regulatory practice is shown to be logically deficient, since it ignores the effect of regulatory policy on the cost of capital and therefore on the appropriate allowed rate of return. A notion of consistency in regulatory policy is developed, and it is shown how consistent regulatory policies may be implemented once the valuation problem is solved.

  19. Nuclear Regulatory Commission information digest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None,

    1990-03-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission information digest provides summary information regarding the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, its regulatory responsibilities, and areas licensed by the commission. This is an annual publication for the general use of the NRC Staff and is available to the public. The digest is divided into two parts: the first presents an overview of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the second provides data on NRC commercial nuclear reactor licensees and commercial nuclear power reactors worldwide.

  20. Aquaporin Protein-Protein Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Virginia Roche

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Aquaporins are tetrameric membrane-bound channels that facilitate transport of water and other small solutes across cell membranes. In eukaryotes, they are frequently regulated by gating or trafficking, allowing for the cell to control membrane permeability in a specific manner. Protein–protein interactions play crucial roles in both regulatory processes and also mediate alternative functions such as cell adhesion. In this review, we summarize recent knowledge about aquaporin protein–protein interactions; dividing the interactions into three types: (1 interactions between aquaporin tetramers; (2 interactions between aquaporin monomers within a tetramer (hetero-tetramerization; and (3 transient interactions with regulatory proteins. We particularly focus on the structural aspects of the interactions, discussing the small differences within a conserved overall fold that allow for aquaporins to be differentially regulated in an organism-, tissue- and trigger-specific manner. A deep knowledge about these differences is needed to fully understand aquaporin function and regulation in many physiological processes, and may enable design of compounds targeting specific aquaporins for treatment of human disease.

  1. Targeting proteins for degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, Erin K; Harstad, Kristine G; Matouschek, Andreas

    2009-11-01

    Protein degradation plays a central role in many cellular functions. Misfolded and damaged proteins are removed from the cell to avoid toxicity. The concentrations of regulatory proteins are adjusted by degradation at the appropriate time. Both foreign and native proteins are digested into small peptides as part of the adaptive immune response. In eukaryotic cells, an ATP-dependent protease called the proteasome is responsible for much of this proteolysis. Proteins are targeted for proteasomal degradation by a two-part degron, which consists of a proteasome binding signal and a degradation initiation site. Here we describe how both components contribute to the specificity of degradation.

  2. NRC regulatory agenda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-07-01

    The NRC Regulatory Agenda is a compilation of all rules on which the NRC has recently completed action, or has proposed action, or is considering action, and all petitions for rulemaking which have been received by the Commission and are pending disposition by the Commission. The Regulatory Agenda is updated and issued each quarter. The rules on which final action has been taken since March 31, 1993 are: Repeal of NRC standards of conduct; Fitness-for-duty requirements for licensees who possess, use, or transport Category I material; Training and qualification of nuclear power plant personnel; Monitoring the effectiveness of maintenance at nuclear power plants; Licensing requirements for land disposal of radioactive wastes; and Licensees' announcements of safeguards inspections

  3. A flexible regulatory framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvennoinen, T.

    2000-01-01

    Regulatory reform of the Finnish electricity market meant opening up potentially competitive parts of the electricity sector to competition and eliminating all unnecessary forms of regulation covering generation, wholesale supply, retail supply, and foreign trade in electricity. New types of control and regulatory mechanisms and institutions were set up for those parts of the electricity industry that were excluded from competition, such as network operations. Network activities now have to be licensed, whereas no licence is needed for generation or supply. A new sector-specific regulatory authority was established in 1995 to coincide with the implementation of the Electricity Market Act, known as the Electricity Market Authority. This is responsible for regulating network activities and retail supply to captive customers. The core function of the authority, which employs some 14 people, is to promote the smooth operation of the Finnish electricity market and to oversee the implementation of the Electricity Market Act and its provisions. Its most important duties are linked to overseeing the process by which network companies price their electricity. As price regulation no longer exists, all the companies in the electricity sector set their tariffs independently, even network companies. The job of controlling the pricing of network services is handed by the Electricity Market Authority, following the principles of competition control. Pricing control takes place ex post - after a pricing system has been adopted by a company and concentrates on individual cases and companies. There is no ex ante system of setting or approving prices and tariffs by the regulator. The tariffs and pricing of network services can be evaluated, however, by both the Electricity Market Authority and the Finnish Competition Authority, which have overlapping powers as regards the pricing of network activities. The Finnish regulatory framework can be described as a system of light

  4. Essays in Regulatory Economics

    OpenAIRE

    Guerrero, Santiago

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation consists of three essays. The objective of the essays is to study the impacts of different regulations on the behavior of regulated agents. The first two essays focus on the analysis of non-traditional regulatory policies that complement traditional regulations consisting of inspections and fines for plants that violate regulations. The third essay studies the impacts of the Minimum Legal Drinking Age regulation on alcohol and marijuana consumption. The first essay of this d...

  5. The Role of Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated Protein 4 (CTLA-4) Gene, Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Receptor (TSHR) Gene and Regulatory T-cells as Risk Factors for Relapse in Patients with Graves Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliana, Fatimah; Suwondo, Pradana; Asmarinah, Asmarinah; Harahap, Alida; Djauzi, Samsuridjal; Prihartono, Joedo; Pemayun, Tjokorda Gde Dalem

    2017-07-01

    graves' disease (GD) is the most common condition of thyrotoxicosis. The management of GD is initiated with the administration of antithyroid drugs; however, it requires a long time to achieve remission. In reality more than 50% of patients who had remission may be at risk for relapse after the drug is stopped. This study aimed to evaluate the role of clinical factors such as smoking habit, degree of ophtalmopathy, degree of thyroid enlargement; genetic factors such as CTLA-4 gene on nucleotide 49 at codon 17 of exon 1, CTLA-4 gene of promotor -318, TSHR gene polymorphism rs2268458 of intron 1; and immunological factors such as regulatory T cells (Treg) and thyroid receptor antibody (TRAb); that affecting the relapse of patients with Graves' disease in Indonesia. this was a case-control study, that compared 72 subjects who had relapse and 72 subjects without relapse at 12 months after cessation of antithyroid treatment, who met the inclusion criteria. Genetic polymorphism examination was performed using PCR-RFLP. The number of regulatory T cells was counted using flow cytometry analysis and ELISA was used to measure TRAb. The logistic regression was used since the dependent variables were categorical variables. the analysis of this study demonstrated that there was a correlation between relapse of disease and family factors (p=0.008), age at diagnosis (p=0.021), 2nd degree of Graves' ophthalmopathy (p=0.001), enlarged thyroid gland, which exceeded the lateral edge of the sternocleidomastoid muscles (p=0.040), duration of remission period (p=0.029), GG genotype of CTLA-4 gene on the nucleotide 49 at codon 17 of exon 1 (p=0.016), CC genotype of TSHR gene on the rs2268458 of intron 1 (p=0.003), the number of regulatory T cells (p=0.001) and TRAb levels (p=0.002). genetic polymorphisms of CTLA-4 gene on the nucleotide 49 at codon 17 of exon 1, TSHR gene SNP rs2268458 of intron 1, number of regulatory T cells and TRAb levels play a role as risk factors for relapse in

  6. Regulatory aspects of radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kristensen, K.

    1985-01-01

    Regulatory systems in the field of radiopharmaceuticals have two main purposes: efficacy and safety. Efficacy expresses the quality of the diagnostic and therapeutic process for the patient. Safety involves the patient, the staff, and the environment. The world situation regarding regulations for radiopharmaceuticals is reviewed on the basis of a survey in WHO Member States. The main content of such regulations is discussed. The special properties of radiopharmaceuticals compared with ordinary drugs may call for modified regulations. Several countries are preparing such regulations. Close co-operation and good understanding among scientists working in hospital research, industry and regulatory bodies will be of great importance for the fast and safe introduction of new radiopharmaceuticals for the benefit of the patient. Before introducing new legislation in this field, a radiopharmaceutical expert should analyse the situation in the country and the relationship to the existing regulations. It is expected that the most important factor in promoting the fast introduction of new, safe and effective radiopharmaceuticals will be the training of people working within the regulatory bodies. It is foreseen that the IAEA and WHO will have an important role to play by providing expert advice and training in this area. (author)

  7. The changing regulatory environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caron, G.

    1999-01-01

    The role and value of regulation in the energy sector was discussed, demonstrating how, despite common perception, regulation is an essential part of Canada's strategy to find and develop new opportunities. The future vision of regulation for industry participants was presented with particular focus on issues related to streamlining the regulatory process. As far as pipelines are concerned, regulatory actions are necessary to facilitate capacity increases and to ensure the line's integrity, safety and environmental record. Furthermore, regulation provides economic solutions where market forces cannot provide them, as for example where business has elements of monopoly. It arbitrates interests of landowners, business, consumers, and environmental groups. It looks for ways to ensure conditions under which competition can flourish. It acts as the guardian of citizens' rights in a democratic society by providing citizens with an opportunity to be heard on the building or expansion of pipelines and associated facilities. As citizens become more and more concerned about their property and the land that surrounds them, citizen involvement in decision making about how industry activity affects their quality of life will become correspondingly more important. Regulatory agencies are committed to facilitate this engagement by flexible hearing procedures and by making use of evolving communication and information technology

  8. 75 FR 21955 - Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-26

    ... Part XXI National Credit Union Administration ###Semiannual Regulatory Agenda### [[Page 21956... Regulatory Agenda AGENCY: National Credit Union Administration (NCUA). ACTION: Semiannual regulatory agenda... included in the Unified Agenda of Federal Regulatory and Deregulatory Actions. DATES: This information is...

  9. 78 FR 1698 - Semiannual Regulatory Flexibility Agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-08

    ...: Regulatory Capital, Implementation of Basel III, Minimum Regulatory Capital Ratios, Capital Adequacy, and...--Regulatory Capital Rules: Regulatory Capital, Implementation of Basel III, Minimum Regulatory Capital Ratios... Supervision (BCBS) in ``Basel III: A Global Regulatory Framework for More Resilient Banks and Banking Systems...

  10. Special regulatory T-cell review: FOXP3 biochemistry in regulatory T cells – how diverse signals regulate suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bin; Greene, Mark I

    2008-01-01

    FOXP3 is an acetylated and phosphorylated protein active in human regulatory T cells and forms oligomers which then associate with an even larger molecular complex. FOXP3 actively regulates transcription by recruiting enzymatic co-repressors and/or co-activators. FOXP3 complex ensembles are dynamically regulated by physiological stimuli such as T-cell receptor, IL-2 and proinflammation cytokine signals. Understanding the post-translational modifications of FOXP3 regulated by diverse signals and the biochemistry and structural chemistry of enzymatic proteins in the FOXP3 complex is critical for therapeutically modulating regulatory T cell function. PMID:18154614

  11. New regulatory mechanisms for the intracellular localization and trafficking of influenza A virus NS1 protein revealed by comparative analysis of A/PR/8/34 and A/Sydney/5/97.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Han; Cui, Zong-Qiang; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Zhi-Ping; Wei, Hong-Ping; Zhou, Ya-Feng; Zhang, Xian-En

    2010-12-01

    During influenza A virus infection, the NS1 protein is engaged in different functions in different intracellular compartments. In this study, we showed that the NS1 of A/PR/8/34 localized in different positions from that of A/Sydney/5/97 when transiently expressed in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. Residue 221 of NS1 was identified to be a new key residue involved in the C-terminal nuclear localization signal (NLS) and nucleolar localization signal (NoLS) of NS1 from A/Sydney/5/97. Analysis of chimeric NS1 and further mutants showed that residues responsible for the binding between NS1 and the cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor (CPSF) are correlated with the intracellular localization of transiently expressed NS1 proteins. Fluorescence loss in photobleaching imaging revealed that the NS1 protein with both functional NLSs and nuclear export signal (NES) was able to shuttle between the nucleus and cytoplasm. Drug inhibition experiments and fluorescence resonance energy transfer analysis suggested that NS1 was exported out of the cell nuclei via a Crm1-independent pathway. Moreover, it is likely that another cytoplasmic localization-related sequence exists in the NS1 protein other than the leucine-rich NES. These findings provide new insights into the mechanism of intracellular localization and trafficking of influenza A virus NS1 protein, which is important for understanding its function.

  12. Politically Induced Regulatory Risk and Independent Regulatory Agencies

    OpenAIRE

    Strausz, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Uncertainty in election outcomes generates politically induced regulatory risk. Political parties' risk attitudes towards such risk depend on a fluctuation effect that hurts both parties and an output--expansion effect that benefits at least one party. Notwithstanding the parties' risk attitudes, political parties have incentives to negotiate away all regulatory risk by pre-electoral bargaining. Efficient pre-electoral bargaining outcomes fully eliminate politically induced regulatory risk. P...

  13. Metabolism of biologics: biotherapeutic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamuro, Lora L; Kishnani, Narendra S

    2012-01-01

    Recombinant therapeutic protein drugs have now been in clinical use for nearly three decades and have advanced considerably in complexity over this time period. Regulatory approvals of some early pioneering protein drugs did not require characterization of metabolism, but more recently regulatory expectations and guidance have appropriately evolved. Sponsors may now be expected to investigate metabolism of newer biologics as the structural complexity of proteins has increased markedly, particularly with the introduction of conjugated and modified proteins. This review discusses the value and need for metabolite characterization of some therapeutic proteins by presenting select examples. Regulatory expectations will undoubtedly evolve further with the development of other novel macromolecular biologic therapeutics based on modified nucleic acids, novel conjugated lipids and polysaccharides.

  14. Assessment of regulatory effectiveness. Peer discussions on regulatory practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-09-01

    This report arises from the seventh series of peer discussions on regulatory practices entitled 'Assessment of Regulatory Effectiveness'. The term 'regulatory effectiveness' covers the quality of the work and level of performance of a regulatory body. In this sense, regulatory effectiveness applies to regulatory body activities aimed at preventing safety degradation and ensuring that an acceptable level of safety is being maintained by the regulated operating organizations. In addition, regulatory effectiveness encompasses the promotion of safety improvements, the timely and cost effective performance of regulatory functions in a manner which ensures the confidence of the operating organizations, the general public and the government, and striving for continuous improvements to performance. Senior regulators from 22 Member States participated in two peer group discussions during March and May 1999. The discussions were focused on the elements of an effective regulatory body, possible indicators of regulatory effectiveness and its assessment. This report presents the outcome of these meetings and recommendations of good practices identified by senior regulators, which do not necessarily reflect those of the governments of the nominating Member States, the organizations they belong to, or the International Atomic Energy Agency. In order to protect people and the environment from hazards associated with nuclear facilities, the main objective of a nuclear regulatory body is to ensure that a high level of safety in the nuclear activities under its jurisdiction is achieved, maintained and within the control of operating organizations. Even if it is possible to directly judge objective safety levels at nuclear facilities, such safety levels would not provide an exclusive indicator of regulatory effectiveness. The way the regulatory body ensures the safety of workers and the public and the way it discharges its responsibilities also determine its effectiveness. Hence the

  15. Gap junctions and connexin-interacting proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giepmans, Ben N G

    2004-01-01

    Gap junctions form channels between adjacent cells. The core proteins of these channels are the connexins. Regulation of gap junction communication (GJC) can be modulated by connexin-associating proteins, such as regulatory protein phosphatases and protein kinases, of which c-Src is the

  16. Visions of regulatory renewal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edgeworth, A.

    1998-01-01

    The economic contribution of the CEPA (Canadian Energy Pipeline Association) member companies to Canada's trade balance was discussed. CEPA member companies transport 95 per cent of the crude oil and natural gas produced in Canada to domestic and export markets. This represents a total of 5.6 Tcf of gas annually. Half of Canada's natural gas and oil production is exported to U.S. markets. All of these exports are transported by pipeline. CEPA member companies operate 90,000 km of pipeline from British Columbia to Quebec. Expansions are needed as a result of a significant increase in demand for natural gas and crude oil since 1990. Several issues exist for regulatory renewal. They include the need to create a level playing field, the overseeing of tolls and contract renewal terms, changing risk/reward trade-offs, the right to confidentiality of information and price discovery mechanism. The drivers for regulatory reform at Westcoast Energy are the need for pricing flexibility, customers desire for toll certainty, decontracting and opposition to rolled-in expansions for gathering and processing. An overview of Westcoast Energy's negotiated toll settlement, its implications, and the components of Westcoast Energy's 'light handed regulation' (LHR) was presented

  17. The regulatory dynamic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dybwad, C.

    2001-01-01

    An outline of the activities and efforts expanded by the National Energy Board to adjust to the changing natural gas market was provided in this presentation. The author began by defining the role of the National Energy Board in energy markets. It must ensure the adoption of rules and procedures that result in a more competitive and efficient market. Light-handed regulatory techniques are the norm, and the National Energy Board is now committed to facilitating the availability and flow of information so that all parties know where opportunities exist, the terms offered to buy or sell goods and services, their quality and costs. It will specialize in providing new participants with information on the workings of the market, who the players are, the regulatory processes in place, and how, when and where the market can be accessed. The manner in which the Board deals with information was reviewed, providing examples along the way to clarify some points. Some of the documents produced by the National Energy Board are being reviewed with the intent of making them easier to read and understand. Audio streaming over the Internet is another avenue being pursued to ensure individuals can listen in real time to hearings without having to be present in the room. The National Energy Board is also exploring alternative dispute resolution techniques. Consultation with energy market participants represents another facet of these efforts to be more accessible and responsive

  18. Radiation and the regulatory landscape of neo2-Darwinism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rollo, C. David

    2006-01-01

    Several recently revealed features of eukaryotic genomes were not predicted by earlier evolutionary paradigms, including the relatively small number of genes, the very large amounts of non-functional code and its quarantine in heterochromatin, the remarkable conservation of many functionally important genes across relatively enormous phylogenetic distances, and the prevalence of extra-genomic information associated with chromatin structure and histone proteins. All of these emphasize a paramount role for regulatory evolution, which is further reinforced by recent perspectives highlighting even higher-order regulation governing epigenetics and development (EVO-DEVO). Modern neo 2 -Darwinism, with its emphasis on regulatory mechanisms and regulatory evolution provides new vision for understanding radiation biology, particularly because free radicals and redox states are central to many regulatory mechanisms and free radicals generated by radiation mimic and amplify endogenous signalling. This paper explores some of these aspects and their implications for low-dose radiation biology

  19. RNA interference analyses suggest a transcript-specific regulatory role for mitochondrial RNA-binding proteins MRP1 and MRP2 in RNA editing and other RNA processing in Trypanosoma brucei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vondrusková, Eva; van den Burg, Janny; Zíková, Alena; Ernst, Nancy Lewis; Stuart, Kenneth; Benne, Rob; Lukes, Julius

    2005-01-01

    Mitochondrial RNA-binding proteins MRP1 and MRP2 occur in a heteromeric complex that appears to play a role in U-insertion/deletion editing in trypanosomes. Reduction in the levels of MRP1 (gBP21) and/or MRP2 (gBP25) mRNA by RNA interference in procyclic Trypanosoma brucei resulted in severe growth

  20. The central proline rich region of POB1/REPS2 plays a regulatory role in epidermal growth factor receptor endocytosis by binding to 14-3-3 and SH3 domain-containing proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesareni Gianni

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human POB1/REPS2 (Partner of RalBP1 protein is highly conserved in mammals where it has been suggested to function as a molecular scaffold recruiting proteins involved in vesicular traffic and linking them to the actin cytoskeleton remodeling machinery. More recently POB1/REPS2 was found highly expressed in androgen-dependent prostate cancer cell lines, while one of its isoforms (isoform 2 is down regulated during prostate cancer progression. Results In this report we characterize the central proline rich domain of POB1/REPS2 and we describe for the first time its functional role in receptor endocytosis. We show that the ectopic expression of this domain has a dominant negative effect on the endocytosis of activated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR while leaving transferrin receptor endocytosis unaffected. By a combination of different approaches (phage display, bioinformatics predictions, peptide arrays, mutagenic analysis, in vivo co-immunoprecipitation, we have identified two closely spaced binding motifs for 14-3-3 and for the SH3 of the proteins Amphiphysin II and Grb2. Differently from wild type, proline rich domains that are altered in these motifs do not inhibit EGFR endocytosis, suggesting that these binding motifs play a functional role in this process. Conclusion Our findings are relevant to the characterization of the molecular mechanism underlying the involvement of POB1/REPS2, SH3 and 14-3-3 proteins in receptor endocytosis, suggesting that 14-3-3 could work by bridging the EGF receptor and the scaffold protein POB1/REPS2.

  1. National legislative and regulatory activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    This section gathers the following national legislative and regulatory activities sorted by country: Bulgaria: General legislation; Czech Republic: General legislation; France: General legislation, Regulatory infrastructure and activity; Germany: General legislation; India: Liability and compensation, Organisation and structure; Ireland: Radiation protection, General legislation; Korea (Republic of): Organisation and structure; Lithuania: Regulatory infrastructure and activity, Radioactive waste management, Radiation protection, international cooperation, Nuclear safety; Poland: General legislation; Romania: Environmental protection; Russian Federation: Radioactive waste management; Slovenia: Nuclear safety; Spain: Liability and compensation, Nuclear security; Sweden: Nuclear safety; Turkey: Radiation protection, Regulatory infrastructure and activity, Nuclear safety, Liability and compensation; United States: General legislation

  2. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Issuances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This is the thirty-sixth volume of issuances (1-396) of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and its Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards, Administrative Law Judges, and Office Directors. It covers the period from July 1, 1992-December 31, 1992. Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards are authorized by Section 191 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954. These Boards, comprised of three members conduct adjudicatory hearings on applications to construct and operate nuclear power plants and related facilities and issue initial decisions which, subject to internal review and appellate procedures, become the final Commission action with respect to those applications. Boards are drawn from the Atomic Safety and Licensing Board Panel, comprised of lawyers, nuclear physicists and engineers, environmentalists, chemists, and economists. The Atomic Energy Commission first established Licensing Boards in 1962 and the Panel in 1967

  3. Regulatory mark; Marco regulatorio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-10-15

    This chapter is based on a work performed in distinct phases. The first phase consisted in of the analysis regulatory legislation existent in Brazil for the sugar-alcohol sector since the beginning of the X X century. This analysis allowed the identification of non existent points and legal devices related to the studied aspects, and that were considered as problematic for the sector expansion. In the second phase, related treaties and international agreements was studied and possible obstacles for the brazilian bio ethanol exportation for the international market. Initiatives were examined at European Union, United States of America, Caribbean and countries of the sub-Saharan Africa. In this phase, policies were identified related to the incentives and adoption of use of bio fuels added to the gasoline in countries or group of countries considered as key for the consolidation of bio ethanol as a world commodity.

  4. Regulatory actions post - Fukushima

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciurea Ercau, C.

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents the results of the safety reviews performed in Romania after the Fukushima accident and the resulting actions for improving the safety. The actions taken by the National Commission for Nuclear Activities Control (CNCAN) to improve the regulatory framework include the development of new regulations and the enhancement of inspection practices, taking account of the lessons learned from the Fukushima accident. A regulation on the response to transients, accidents and emergency situations at nuclear power plants has been developed, which includes requirements on transient and accident scenarios that have to be covered by the Emergency Operating Procedures (EOPs), accident scenarios to be covered by the Severe Accident Management Guidelines (SAMGs), emergency situations to be covered by the on-site emergency response plan and emergency response procedures. (authors)

  5. Regulatory considerations for biosimilars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjani Nellore

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently there is considerable interest in the legislative debate around generic biological drugs or "biosimilars" in the EU and US due to the large, lucrative market that it offers to the industry. While some countries have issued a few regulatory guidelines as well as product specific requirements, there is no general consensus as to a single, simple mechanism similar to the bioequivalence determination that leads to approval of generic small molecules all over the world. The inherent complex nature of the molecules, along with complicated manufacturing and analytical techniques to characterize them make it difficult to rely on a single human pharmacokinetic study for assurance of safety and efficacy. In general, the concept of comparability has been used for evaluation of the currently approved "similar" biological where a step by step assessment on the quality, preclinical and clinical aspects is made. In India, the focus is primarily on the availability and affordability of life-saving drugs. In this context every product needs to be evaluated on its own merit irrespective of the innovator brand. The formation of the National Biotechnology Regulatory Authority may provide a step in the right direction for regulation of these complex molecules. However, in order to have an efficient machinery for initial approval and ongoing oversight with a country-specific focus, cooperation with international authorities for granting approvals and continuous risk-benefit review is essential. Several steps are still needed for India to be perceived as a country that leads the world in providing quality biological products.

  6. Evolution of cichlid vision via trans-regulatory divergence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O’Quin Kelly E

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phenotypic evolution may occur through mutations that affect either the structure or expression of protein-coding genes. Although the evolution of color vision has historically been attributed to structural mutations within the opsin genes, recent research has shown that opsin regulatory mutations can also tune photoreceptor sensitivity and color vision. Visual sensitivity in African cichlid fishes varies as a result of the differential expression of seven opsin genes. We crossed cichlid species that express different opsin gene sets and scanned their genome for expression Quantitative Trait Loci (eQTL responsible for these differences. Our results shed light on the role that different structural, cis-, and trans-regulatory mutations play in the evolution of color vision. Results We identified 11 eQTL that contribute to the divergent expression of five opsin genes. On three linkage groups, several eQTL formed regulatory “hotspots” associated with the expression of multiple opsins. Importantly, however, the majority of the eQTL we identified (8/11 or 73% occur on linkage groups located trans to the opsin genes, suggesting that cichlid color vision has evolved primarily via trans-regulatory divergence. By modeling the impact of just two of these trans-regulatory eQTL, we show that opsin regulatory mutations can alter cichlid photoreceptor sensitivity and color vision at least as much as opsin structural mutations can. Conclusions Combined with previous work, we demonstrate that the evolution of cichlid color vision results from the interplay of structural, cis-, and especially trans-regulatory loci. Although there are numerous examples of structural and cis-regulatory mutations that contribute to phenotypic evolution, our results suggest that trans-regulatory mutations could contribute to phenotypic divergence more commonly than previously expected, especially in systems like color vision, where compensatory changes in the

  7. Protein: MPB2 [TP Atlas

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available MPB2 Ubiquitin ligases SMURF1 KIAA1625 SMURF1 E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase SMURF1 SM...AD ubiquitination regulatory factor 1, SMAD-specific E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase 1 9606 Homo sapiens Q9HCE7 57154 2LB1, 2LAZ, 2LB0, 3PYC 57154 Q9HCE7 ...

  8. Regulatory focus in groupt contexts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faddegon, Krispijn Johannes

    2009-01-01

    The thesis examines the influence of group processes on the regulatory focus of individual group members. It is demonstrated that the group situation can affect group members' regulatory focus both in a top-down fashion (via the identitiy of the group) and in a bottom-up fashion (emerging from the

  9. Regulatory Quality and Competition Policy

    OpenAIRE

    International Finance Corporation; Multilateral Investment Guarantee Agency; World Bank

    2010-01-01

    Regulatory reform and competition policy are two important and inter-related areas of regulatory policy and public administration. Both can play a key role in improving the quality of regulation, and creating healthy and competitive markets and an attractive investment climate. This in turn leads to greater economic growth, employment and incomes. Part one of this paper discusses definitio...

  10. Reconsidering Styles of Regulatory Enforcement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    May, Peter J.; Winter, Søren

    2000-01-01

    This study addresses enforcement styles of regulatory inspectors, based on an examination of the municipal enforcement of agro-environmental policies in Denmark. Our findings make three contributions to the regulatory literature. One contribution is to add empirical support for theorizing about...

  11. Glucocorticoids as regulatory signals during intrauterine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowden, Abigail L; Forhead, Alison J

    2015-12-01

    What is the topic of this review? This review discusses the role of the glucocorticoids as regulatory signals during intrauterine development. It examines the functional significance of these hormones as maturational, environmental and programming signals in determining offspring phenotype. What advances does it highlight? It focuses on the extensive nature of the regulatory actions of these hormones. It highlights the emerging data that these actions are mediated, in part, by the placenta, other endocrine systems and epigenetic modifications of the genome. Glucocorticoids are important regulatory signals during intrauterine development. They act as maturational, environmental and programming signals that modify the developing phenotype to optimize offspring viability and fitness. They affect development of a wide range of fetal tissues by inducing changes in cellular expression of structural, transport and signalling proteins, which have widespread functional consequences at the whole organ and systems levels. Glucocorticoids, therefore, activate many of the physiological systems that have little function in utero but are vital at birth to replace the respiratory, nutritive and excretory functions previously carried out by the placenta. However, by switching tissues from accretion to differentiation, early glucocorticoid overexposure in response to adverse conditions can programme fetal development with longer term physiological consequences for the adult offspring, which can extend to the next generation. The developmental effects of the glucocorticoids can be direct on fetal tissues with glucocorticoid receptors or mediated by changes in placental function or other endocrine systems. At the molecular level, glucocorticoids can act directly on gene transcription via their receptors or indirectly by epigenetic modifications of the genome. In this review, we examine the role and functional significance of glucocorticoids as regulatory signals during intrauterine

  12. Global Regulatory Pathways in the Alphaproteobacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none

    2007-04-27

    A major goal for microbiologists in the twenty-first century is to develop an understanding of the microbial cell in all its complexity. In addition to understanding the function of individual gene products we need to focus on how the cell regulates gene expression at a global level to respond to different environmental parameters. Development of genomic technologies such as complete genome sequencing, proteomics, and global comparisons of mRNA expression patterns allows us to begin to address this issue. This proposal focuses on a number of phylogenetically related bacteria that are involved in environmentally important processes such as carbon sequestration and bioremediation. Genome sequencing projects of a number of these bacteria have revealed the presence of a small family of regulatory genes found thus far only in the alpha-proteobacteria. These genes encode proteins that are related to the global regulatory protein RosR in Rhizobium etli, which is involved in determining nodulation competitiveness in this bacterium. Our goal is to examine the function of the proteins encoded by this gene family in several of the bacteria containing homologs to RosR. We will construct gene disruption mutations in a number of these bacteria and characterize the resulting mutant strains using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and genetic and biochemical techniques. We will thus determine if the other proteins also function as global regulators of gene expression. Using proteomics methods we will identify the specific proteins whose expression varies depending on the presence or absence of the RosR homolog. Over fifty loci regulated by RosR have been identified in R. etli using transposon mutagenesis; this will serve as out benchmark to which we will compare the other regulons. We expect to identify genes regulated by RosR homologs in several bacterial species, including, but not limited to Rhodopseudomonas palustris and Sphingomonas aromaticivorans. In this way we will

  13. Virginia Power's regulatory reduction program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, G.D.

    1996-01-01

    Virginia Power has two nuclear plants, North Anna and Surry Power Stations, which have two units each for a total of four nuclear units. In 1992, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission solicited comments from the nuclear industry to obtain their ideas for reducing the regulatory burden on nuclear facilities. Pursuant to the new regulatory climate, Virginia Power developed an internal program to evaluate and assess the regulatory and self-imposed requirements to which they were committed, and to pursue regulatory relief or internal changes where possible and appropriate. The criteria were that public safety must be maintained, and savings must be significant. Up to the date of the conference, over US$22 million of one-time saving had been effected, and US$2.75 million in annual savings

  14. Regulatory Streamlining and Improvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark A. Carl

    2006-07-11

    The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) engaged in numerous projects outlined under the scope of work discussed in the United States Department of Energy (DOE) grant number DE-FC26-04NT15456 awarded to the IOGCC. Numerous projects were completed that were extremely valuable to state oil and gas agencies as a result of work performed utilizing resources provided by the grant. There are numerous areas in which state agencies still need assistance. This additional assistance will need to be addressed under future scopes of work submitted annually to DOE's Project Officer for this grant. This report discusses the progress of the projects outlined under the grant scope of work for the 2005-2006 areas of interest, which are as follows: Area of Interest No. 1--Regulatory Streamlining and Improvement: This area of interest continues to support IOGCC's regulatory streamlining efforts that include the identification and elimination of unnecessary duplications of efforts between and among state and federal programs dealing with exploration and production on public lands. Area of Interest No. 2--Technology: This area of interest seeks to improve efficiency in states through the identification of technologies that can reduce costs. Area of Interest No. 3--Training and Education: This area of interest is vital to upgrading the skills of regulators and industry alike. Within the National Energy Policy, there are many appropriate training and education opportunities. Education was strongly endorsed by the President's National Energy Policy Development group. Acting through the governors offices, states are very effective conduits for the dissemination of energy education information. While the IOGCC favors the development of a comprehensive, long-term energy education plan, states are also supportive of immediate action on important concerns, such as energy prices, availability and conservation. Area of Interest No. 4--Resource Assessment and

  15. 76 FR 32878 - Draft Regulatory Guide: Issuance, Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-07

    ...; ] NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION 10 CFR Part 50 Draft Regulatory Guide: Issuance, Availability AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Notice of Issuance and Availability of Draft Regulatory Guide, DG...

  16. Regulatory risk coherence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remick, F.J.

    1992-01-01

    As one of the most progressive users of risk assessment in decision making, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is in a position to play an important role in influencing the development of standard government wide policies for the application of risk assessment in decision making. The NRC, with the support of the nuclear industry, should use the opportunity provided by its experience with risk assessment to actively encourage the adoption of standard national and international health-based safety goals and at the same time accelerate its own efforts to implement the safety goals it has already developed for itself. There are signs of increased recognition of the need for consistency and coherence in the application of risk assessment in government decision making. The NRC and the nuclear industry have recently taken a great step toward establishing a consistant and coherent risk assessment-based culture in the US nuclear industry. As a result of Generic Letter 88-20, which asks each commercial nuclear power plant licensee to perform an individual plant examination by September 1992, for the first time a risk assessment characterizing initiating events in each plant will exist

  17. Internationalization of regulatory requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juillet, Y

    2003-02-01

    The aim of harmonisation of medicines regulatory requirements is to allow the patient quicker access to new drugs and to avoid animal and human duplications. Harmonisation in the European Union (EU) is now completed, and has led to the submission of one dossier in one language study leading to European marketing authorizations, thanks in particular to efficacy guidelines published at the European level. With the benefit of the European experience since 1989, more than 40 guidelines have been harmonised amongst the EU, Japan and the USA through the International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH). ICH is a unique process gathering regulators and industry experts from the three regions. Its activity is built on expertise and trust. The Common Technical Document (CTD), an agreed common format for application in the three regions, is a logical follow-up to the ICH first phase harmonising the content of the dossier. The CTD final implementation in July 2003 will have considerable influence on the review process and on the exchange of information in the three regions.

  18. Subversion of Cell Cycle Regulatory Mechanisms by HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Andrew P; Kimata, Jason T

    2015-06-10

    To establish a productive infection, HIV-1 must counteract cellular innate immune mechanisms and redirect cellular processes toward viral replication. Recent studies have discovered that HIV-1 and other primate immunodeficiency viruses subvert cell cycle regulatory mechanisms to achieve these ends. The viral Vpr and Vpx proteins target cell cycle controls to counter innate immunity. The cell-cycle-related protein Cyclin L2 is also utilized to counter innate immunity. The viral Tat protein utilizes Cyclin T1 to activate proviral transcription, and regulation of Cyclin T1 levels in CD4(+) T cells has important consequences for viral replication and latency. This review will summarize this emerging evidence that primate immunodeficiency viruses subvert cell cycle regulatory mechanisms to enhance replication. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Strengthening Regulatory Competence in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadiq, M.

    2016-01-01

    Capacity building of Pakistan Nuclear Regulatory Authority is considered an essential element in pursuit of its vision to become a world class regulatory body. Since its inception in 2001, PNRA has continuously endeavoured to invest in its people, develop training infrastructure and impart sound knowledge and professional skills with the aim to improve its regulatory effectiveness. The use of nuclear and radioactive material in Pakistan has increased manifold in recent years, thus induction of more manpower was needed for regulatory oversight. PNRA adopted two pronged approach for meeting the manpower demand (a) employment of university graduates through fast track recruitment drive and (b) induction of graduates by offering fellowships for Master degree programs. Although, the newly employed staff was selected on the basis of their excellent academic qualifications in basic and applied sciences, but they required rigorous knowledge and skills in regulatory perspectives. In order to implement a structured training program, PNRA conducted Training Needs Assessment (TNA) and identified competency gaps of the regulatory staff in legal, technical, regulatory practice and behavioural domains. PNRA took several initiatives for capacity building which included establishment of a training centre for sustainability of trainings, initiation of a fellowship scheme for Master program, attachment of staff at local institutes for on-the-job training and placement at foreign regulatory bodies and organizations for technical development with the assistance of IAEA. The above strategies have been very beneficial in competence building of the PNRA staff to perform all regulatory activities indigenously for nuclear power plants, research reactors and radiation facilities. Provision of vibrant technical support to IAEA and Member States in various programs by PNRA is a landmark of these competence development efforts. This paper summarizes PNRA initiatives and the International Atomic

  20. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YNL201C, YBL046W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YNL201C PSY2 Putative subunit of an evolutionarily conserved protein phosphatase co...s prey (0) YBL046W PSY4 Putative regulatory subunit of an evolutionarily conserve...ne name PSY2 Bait description Putative subunit of an evolutionarily conserved protein phosphatase complex co...gene name PSY4 Prey description Putative regulatory subunit of an evolutionarily conserved protein phosphata

  1. The Danish Regulatory Reform of Telecommunications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skouby, Knud Erik

    1998-01-01

    An overview of the liberalisation process and regulatory reform of telecommunications in Denmark......An overview of the liberalisation process and regulatory reform of telecommunications in Denmark...

  2. International regulatory activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2004-01-01

    The 48. session of the IAEA general conference was held in Vienna from 20 to 24 september 2004 with the participation of delegates from 125 members states and representatives of various international organisations. A number of resolutions were adopted by the conference in the following fields: nuclear safety, radiation, transport and waste safety. The general conference also adopted a resolution on measures to protect against nuclear terrorism. The Director General decided in 2003 to appoint a group of experts to explore and advise on issues related to nuclear liability. This group called the International Expert Group on Nuclear Liability (I.N.L.E.X.) consists of 20 experts members from nuclear power and non nuclear power countries and from shipping and non shipping states. It serves three major functions: to create a forum of expertise to explore and advise on issues related to nuclear liability; to enhance global adherence by nuclear and non nuclear states to an effective nuclear liability regime, inter alia, on the basis of the convention on supplementary compensation for nuclear damage and the annex thereto, the Vienna convention on civil liability for nuclear damage, the Paris convention on third party liability in the field of nuclear energy, the joint protocol relating to the application of the vienna convention and the paris convention and the amendments thereto; and to assist in the development and strengthening of the national nuclear liability legal frameworks in IAEA members states to protect the public and the environment and to enhance nuclear safety. The second part of international regulatory concerns a directive on public access to environmental information made by the European Parliament. (N.C.)

  3. Strategies for Protein Overproduction in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mott, John E.

    1984-01-01

    Examines heterologous expression in Escherichia coli and the role of regulatory sequences which control gene expression at transcription resulting in abundant production of messenger RNA and regulatory sequences in mRNA which promote efficient translation. Also examines the role of E. coli cells in stabilizing mRNA and protein that is…

  4. Regulatory Snapshots: integrative mining of regulatory modules from expression time series and regulatory networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana P Gonçalves

    Full Text Available Explaining regulatory mechanisms is crucial to understand complex cellular responses leading to system perturbations. Some strategies reverse engineer regulatory interactions from experimental data, while others identify functional regulatory units (modules under the assumption that biological systems yield a modular organization. Most modular studies focus on network structure and static properties, ignoring that gene regulation is largely driven by stimulus-response behavior. Expression time series are key to gain insight into dynamics, but have been insufficiently explored by current methods, which often (1 apply generic algorithms unsuited for expression analysis over time, due to inability to maintain the chronology of events or incorporate time dependency; (2 ignore local patterns, abundant in most interesting cases of transcriptional activity; (3 neglect physical binding or lack automatic association of regulators, focusing mainly on expression patterns; or (4 limit the discovery to a predefined number of modules. We propose Regulatory Snapshots, an integrative mining approach to identify regulatory modules over ti