WorldWideScience

Sample records for bosons mediating interactions

  1. Anomalous gauge boson interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss the direct measurement of the trilinear vector boson couplings in present and future collider experiments. The major goals of such experiments will be the confirmation of the Standard Model (SM) predictions and the search for signals of new physics. We review our current theoretical understanding of anomalous trilinear gauge-boson self interactions. If the energy scale of the new physics is ∼ 1 TeV, these low energy anomalous couplings are expected to be no larger than Ο(10-2). Constraints from high precision measurements at LEP and low energy charged and neutral current processes are critically reviewed

  2. Interacting boson approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lectures notes on the Interacting Boson Approximation are given. Topics include: angular momentum tensors; properties of T/sub i//sup (n)/ matrices; T/sub i//sup (n)/ matrices as Clebsch-Gordan coefficients; construction of higher rank tensors; normalization: trace of products of two s-rank tensors; completeness relation; algebra of U(N); eigenvalue of the quadratic Casimir operator for U(3); general result for U(N); angular momentum content of U(3) representation; p-Boson model; Hamiltonian; quadrupole transitions; S,P Boson model; expectation value of dipole operator; S-D model: U(6); quadratic Casimir operator; an O(5) subgroup; an O(6) subgroup; properties of O(5) representations; quadratic Casimir operator; quadratic Casimir operator for U(6); decomposition via SU(5) chain; a special O(3) decomposition of SU(3); useful identities; a useful property of D/sub αβγ/(α,β,γ = 4-8) as coupling coefficients; explicit construction of T/sub x//sup (2)/ and d/sub αβγ/; D-coefficients; eigenstates of T3; and summary of T = 2 states

  3. Bosonic interactions with a domain wall

    CERN Document Server

    Morris, J R

    2016-01-01

    We consider here the interaction of scalar bosons with a topological domain wall. Not only is there a continuum of scattering states, but there is also an interesting "quasi-discretuum" of positive energy bosonic bound states, describing bosons entrapped within the wall's core. The full spectrum of the scattering and bound state energies and eigenstates is obtainable from a Schr\\"odinger-type of equation with a P\\"oschl-Teller potential. We also consider the presence of a boson gas within the wall and high energy boson emission.

  4. Microscopic foundation of the interacting boson model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A microscopic foundation of the interacting boson model is described. The importance of monopole and quadrupole pairs of nucleons is emphasized. Those pairs are mapped onto the s and d bosons. It is shown that this mapping provides a good approximation in vibrational and transitional nuclei. In appendix, it is shown that the monopole pair of electrons plays possibly an important role in metal clusters. (orig.)

  5. Interaction between bosonic dark matter and stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, Richard; Cardoso, Vitor; Macedo, Caio F. B.; Okawa, Hirotada; Palenzuela, Carlos

    2016-02-01

    We provide a detailed analysis of how bosonic dark matter "condensates" interact with compact stars, extending significantly the results of a recent Letter [1]. We focus on bosonic fields with mass mB , such as axions, axion-like candidates and hidden photons. Self-gravitating bosonic fields generically form "breathing" configurations, where both the spacetime geometry and the field oscillate, and can interact and cluster at the center of stars. We construct stellar configurations formed by a perfect fluid and a bosonic condensate, and which may describe the late stages of dark matter accretion onto stars, in dark-matter-rich environments. These composite stars oscillate at a frequency which is a multiple of f =2.5 ×1014(mBc2/eV ) Hz . Using perturbative analysis and numerical relativity techniques, we show that these stars are generically stable, and we provide criteria for instability. Our results also indicate that the growth of the dark matter core is halted close to the Chandrasekhar limit. We thus dispel a myth concerning dark matter accretion by stars: dark matter accretion does not necessarily lead to the destruction of the star, nor to collapse to a black hole. Finally, we argue that stars with long-lived bosonic cores may also develop in other theories with effective mass couplings, such as (massless) scalar-tensor theories.

  6. (spdf) interacting boson model and its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The group structure and the general form of Hamiltonian of (spdf) interaction boson model are discussed. The energy spectra and the E1,E2 and E3 transition rates of 144Ba and 152Sm are calculated. The results agree with the experimental data quite well

  7. Microscopic approach to the interacting boson model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method is outlined for analyzing the interacting boson model microscopically in terms of S- and D-fermion pairs. We derive the number operator approximation (NOA) of Otsuka and Arima by considering functions that generate normalizations and matrix elements of states built of S-pairs. An extension of the formalism leads to a generalization of the NOA including both S and D. This approximation is suggested as a starting point for determining the collective SD subspace in a dynamical way. The simplified fermion problem that results from restriction of the hamiltonian to the SD subspace can be mapped onto a corresponding sd boson problem. Due to the finiteness of the spermion space, and the non-orthogonality of the collective SD basis, the boson hamiltonian obtained is non-hermitian. (orig.)

  8. Interaction between bosonic dark matter and stars

    CERN Document Server

    Brito, Richard; Macedo, Caio F B; Okawa, Hirotada; Palenzuela, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    We provide a detailed analysis of how bosonic dark matter "condensates" interact with compact stars, extending significantly the results of a recent Letter. We focus on bosonic fields with mass $m_B$, such as axions, axion-like candidates and hidden photons. Self-gravitating bosonic fields generically form "breathing" configurations, where both the spacetime geometry and the field oscillate, and can interact and cluster at the center of stars. We construct stellar configurations formed by a perfect fluid and a bosonic condensate, and which may describe the late stages of dark-matter accretion onto stars, in dark matter-rich environments. These composite stars oscillate at a frequency which is a multiple of $f=2.5\\times 10^{14}\\,\\left(m_{B}c^2/eV\\right)\\,{\\rm Hz}$. Using perturbative analysis and Numerical Relativity techniques, we show that these stars are generically stable, and we provide criteria for instability. Our results also indicate that the growth of the dark matter core is halted close to the Chand...

  9. Standard electroweak interactions and Higgs bosons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, B.; Gilman, F.J.

    1984-09-01

    In the standard model, only one basic component remains to be found: the Higgs boson. The specifics of Higgs boson production and detection, with decay to t anti t and a particular t quark mass range in mind, have not been examined in detail. As such, the working group on Standard Electroweak Interactions and Higgs Bosons at this meeting decided to concentrate on Higgs boson production and detection at SSC energies in the particular case where the Higgs mass is in the range so as to make t anti t quark-antiquark pairs the dominant decay mode. The study of this case, that of the so-called intermediate mass Higgs, had already been launched in the Berkeley PSSC Workshop on Electroweak Symmetry Breaking, and was continued and extended here. The problems of t quark jet identification and detection efficiency and the manner of rejection of background (especially from b quark jets) with realistic detectors then occupied much of the attention of the group. The subject of making precise measurements of parameters in the standard model at SSC energies is briefly examined. Then we delve into the Higgs sector, with an introduction to the neutral Higgs of the standard model together with its production cross-sections in various processes and the corresponding potential backgrounds. A similar, though briefer, discussion for a charged Higgs boson (outside the Standard Model) follows. The heart of the work on identifying and reconstructing the t and then the Higgs boson in the face of backgrounds is discussed. The problems with semileptonic decays, low energy jet fragments, mass resolution, and b-t discrimination all come to the fore. We have tried to make a serious step here towards a realistic assessment of the problems entailed in pulling a signal out of the background, including a rough simulation of calorimeter-detector properties. 25 references.

  10. Hexadecapole degree of freedom in the interacting boson model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hexadecapole degree of freedom in the interacting boson models with sd and sdg bosons is reviewed with the aim of providing experimental signatures that distinguish between the two models. (orig.)

  11. Integrability and Quantum Phase Transitions in Interacting Boson Models

    CERN Document Server

    Dukelsky, J; García-Ramos, J E; Pittel, S

    2003-01-01

    The exact solution of the boson pairing hamiltonian given by Richardson in the sixties is used to study the phenomena of level crossings and quantum phase transitions in the integrable regions of the sd and sdg interacting boson models.

  12. Investigations of interactions mediated by neutral currents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report is devoted to four-fermion interactions mediated by the neutral currents. The results from the second phase of LEP are presented, when the production of two massive bosons was possible with the increased energy of the e+e- collisions. It enabled for a direct test of nonabelian structure of the electroweak theory. The results concern the four-fermion production of the pairs of the ZZ bosons, single Z and Zγ* production as well as search for anomalous gauge bosons couplings. The large part of the report is devoted to experimental techniques, physics analyses and discussion of results. (author)

  13. Microscopic approach to the interacting boson model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An attempt is made to calculate the parameters of the interacting boson model (IBM) microscopically, by truncating the shell model space to states composed of pairs of fermions coupled to angular momentum L=0 and 2. A new derivation of the number-operator approximation (NOA) of Otsuka and Arima is presented allowing a number-conserving treatment of pairing correlations in terms of one collective monopole pair S. Application of the NOA to Ni yields results that are in good agreement with exact shell model calculations. Using a finite boson representation the generalization to neutron-proton systems is made, and the Sm isotopes are calculated as a realistic example. Renormalization effects due to the g boson are considered and shown to be of minor importance in Sm. Finally, the truncated quadrupole-phonon model (TQM) interpretation of the IBM is investigated, with particular emphasis on its relation with the SD-pair picture. An explanation of the prolate-oblate transition in Pt and Os is given in terms of subshell effects. (author)

  14. Interacting vector boson model and other versions of IBM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Dyson mapping of interacting vector boson model (IVBM) on the standard IBM with dynamical symmetry U(21) is obtained. This version of IBM contains the S(T=1), D(T=1) and P(T=0) bosons, where T is isospin of bosons. From group theory view point it corresponds to the realization of the Sp(12,R) generators in terms of generators of HW(21)xU(6) group. The problem of elimination of spurious states and Hermitization of this boson representation is discussed. The image of the IVBM Hamiltonian in the space of above mentioned S, D, P-bosons is found. 22 refs

  15. Coriolis coupling in the interacting boson fermion model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The properties of a boson core coupled to a single-j particle are examined in the framework of the SU(3) limit of the interacting boson fermion model. It is shown that the Coriolis interaction arises in a natural way in this model. Excitation energies are calculated in the large boson number approximation. The analogy to the particle plus rotor model is discussed. (orig.)

  16. Exactly solvable models of proton and neutron interacting bosons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe a class of exactly-solvable models of interacting bosons based on the algebra SO(3, 2). Each copy of the algebra represents a system of neutron and proton bosons in a given bosonic level interacting via a pairing interaction. The model that includes s and d bosons is a specific realization of the IBM2, restricted to the transition regime between vibrational and γ-soft nuclei. By including additional copies of the algebra, we can generate proton-neutron boson models involving other boson degrees of freedom, while still maintaining exact solvability. In each of these models, we can study not only the states of maximal symmetry, but also those of mixed symmetry, albeit still in the vibrational to γ-soft transition regime. Furthermore, in each of these models we can study some features of F-spin symmetry breaking. We report systematic calculations as a function of the pairing strength for models based on s,d, and g bosons and on s,d, and f bosons. The formalism of exactly-solvable models based on the SO(3, 2) algebra is not limited to systems of proton and neutron bosons, however, but can also be applied to other scenarios that involve two species of interacting bosons

  17. Interacting boson models of nuclear and nucleon structure

    OpenAIRE

    Bijker, R.; Leviatan, A.

    1998-01-01

    Interacting boson models provide an elegant and powerful method to describe collective excitations of complex systems by introducing a set of effective degrees of freedom. We review the interacting boson model of nuclear structure and discuss a recent extension to the nucleon and its excited states.

  18. Mixtures of Strongly Interacting Bosons in Optical Lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the properties of strongly interacting heteronuclear boson-boson mixtures loaded in realistic optical lattices, with particular emphasis on the physics of interfaces. In particular, we numerically reproduce the recent experimental observation that the addition of a small fraction of 41K induces a significant loss of coherence in 87Rb, providing a simple explanation. We then investigate the robustness against the inhomogeneity typical of realistic experimental realizations of the glassy quantum emulsions recently predicted to occur in strongly interacting boson-boson mixtures on ideal homogeneous lattices

  19. Mixtures of strongly interacting bosons in optical lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buonsante, P; Giampaolo, S M; Illuminati, F; Penna, V; Vezzani, A

    2008-06-20

    We investigate the properties of strongly interacting heteronuclear boson-boson mixtures loaded in realistic optical lattices, with particular emphasis on the physics of interfaces. In particular, we numerically reproduce the recent experimental observation that the addition of a small fraction of 41K induces a significant loss of coherence in 87Rb, providing a simple explanation. We then investigate the robustness against the inhomogeneity typical of realistic experimental realizations of the glassy quantum emulsions recently predicted to occur in strongly interacting boson-boson mixtures on ideal homogeneous lattices. PMID:18643555

  20. Bosonization

    CERN Document Server

    1994-01-01

    Bosonization is a useful technique for studying systems of interacting fermions in low dimensions. It has applications in both particle and condensed matter physics.This book contains reprints of papers on the method as used in these fields. The papers range from the classic work of Tomonaga in the 1950's on one-dimensional electron gases, through the discovery of fermionic solitons in the 1970's, to integrable systems and bosonization on Riemann surfaces. A four-chapter pedagogical introduction by the editor should make the book accessible to graduate students and experienced researchers alik

  1. Interacting boson model for exotic nuclei at low isospin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With Wigner's SU(4) supermultiplet symmetry [and its generalization to pseudo-SU(4)] as a starting point, a boson-model space is constructed that includes T = 0 as well as T = 1 bosons (IBM-4). The boson Hamiltonian is derived microscopically from a realistic shell-model interaction through a mapping that relies on the existence of approximate shell-model symmetries. Applications are presented for odd-odd N = Z nuclei from 2958Cu29 to 3570Br35. (authors)

  2. Bosonization of interacting fermions in arbitrary dimensions / Peter Kopietz

    OpenAIRE

    Kopietz, Peter

    2006-01-01

    This review is a summary of my work (partially in collaboration with Kurt Schoenhammer) on higher-dimensional bosonization during the years 1994-1996. It has been published as a book entitled "Bosonization of interacting fermions in arbitrary dimensions" by Springer Verlag (Lecture Notes in Physics m48, Springer, Berlin, 1997). I have NOT revised this review, so that there is no reference to the literature after 1996. However, the basic ideas underlying the functional bosonization approach ou...

  3. The Interacting Boson Model for Anomalous Rotational Bands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIANCheng-De; LIUDang-Bo; 等

    2002-01-01

    The interacting boson model for anomalous rotational bands is proposed.In the rotational SU(3) limit an asymptotic limit is discussed.Within the framework of the model several analytic relations for energies and electromagnetic transition rates are derived.

  4. Hexadecapole interacting boson approximation structure functions in neodymium isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrino, R.; Blasi, N.; Bordewijk, J.A.; De Leo, R.; Harakeh, M.N.; de Jager, C.W.; Micheletti, S.; Pignanelli, M.; Sandor, R.K.J.; de Vries, H.; van der Werf, S.Y.; Wesseling, J. (Universita di Lecce and Sezione Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare di Lecce, I-73100 Lecce (Italy) Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Milano, Milano (Italy) Sezione Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare di Milano I-20133 Milano (Italy) Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, 9747 AA Groningen (Netherlands) Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Bari, I-70100 Bari (Italy) Sezione Istituto Naionale di Fisica Nucleare di Lecce, I-73100 Lecce (Italy) Faculteit Natuurkunde en Sterrenkunde, Vrije Universiteit, de Boelelaan 1081, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands) Nationaal Instituut voor Kernfysica en Hoge-Energie-Fysica, Sectie K, P.O. Box 41882, 1009 DB Amsterdam (Netherlands))

    1993-04-01

    Low-lying hexadecapole states in stable even-even neodymium isotopes have been investigated by means of inelastic electron scattering. Transition charge densities were extracted in a Fourier-Bessel analysis of the form factors. The analysis of the experimental results within the interacting [ital sdg]-boson model with only one [ital g] boson allowed the extraction of the radial shapes of the hexadecapole structure functions of three of the different boson-pair configurations (i.e., [ital dd], [ital sg], and [ital dg]) involved in the hexadecapole excitations.

  5. Mixtures of strongly interacting bosons in optical lattices

    OpenAIRE

    Buonsante, P.; Giampaolo, S. M.; Illuminati, F.; Penna, V; Vezzani, A.

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the properties of strongly interacting heteronuclear boson-boson mixtures loaded in realistic optical lattices, with particular emphasis on the physics of interfaces. In particular, we numerically reproduce the recent experimental observation that the addition of a small fraction of K induces a significant loss of coherence in Rb, providing a simple explanation. We then investigate the robustness against the inhomogeneity typical of realistic experimental realizations of the gl...

  6. Two-level interacting boson models beyond the mean field

    CERN Document Server

    Arias, J M; García-Ramos, J E; Vidal, J

    2007-01-01

    The phase diagram of two-level boson Hamiltonians, including the Interacting Boson Model (IBM), is studied beyond the standard mean field approximation using the Holstein-Primakoff mapping. The limitations of the usual intrinsic state (mean field) formalism concerning finite-size effects are pointed out. The analytic results are compared to numerics obtained from exact diagonalizations. Excitation energies and occupation numbers are studied in different model space regions (Casten triangle for IBM) and especially at the critical points.

  7. Interactive Mediated Reality

    OpenAIRE

    Grasset, Raphaël; Boissieux, Laurence; Gascuel, Jean-Dominique; Schmalstieg, Dieter

    2005-01-01

    International audience Mediated reality describes the concept of filtering our vision of reality, typically using a head-mounted video mixing display. We can redefine this idea in a more constructive context, applying dynamic changes to the appearance and geometry of objects in a real scene using computer graphics. In this paper, we propose new tools for interactively mediated reality. After describing a new generic framework for achieving this goal, we present a prototype system for paint...

  8. Relatively heavy Higgs boson in more generic gauge mediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss gauge mediation models where the doublet messengers and Higgs doublets are allowed to mix through a “charged” coupling. The charged coupling replaces messenger parity as a means of suppressing flavor changing neutral currents without introducing any unwanted CP violation. As a result of this mixing between the Higgs doublets and the messengers, relatively large A-terms are generated at the messenger scale. These large A-terms produce a distinct weak scale mass spectrum. Particularly, we show that the lightest Higgs boson mass is enhanced and can be as heavy as 125 GeV for a gluino mass as light as 2 TeV. We also show that the stops are heavier than that predicted by conventional gauge mediation models. It is also shown that these models have a peculiar slepton mass spectrum.

  9. Fundamental fermion interactions via vector bosons of unified SU(2 x SU(4 gauge fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eckart eMarsch

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Employing the fermion unification model based on the intrinsic SU(8 symmetry of a generalized Dirac equation, we discuss the fundamental interactions under the SU(8=SU(2$otimes$SU(4 symmetry group. The physics involved can describe all fermions, the leptons (electron and neutrino, and the coloured up and down quarks of the first generation in the standard model (SM by a complex SU(8 octet of Dirac spinor fields. The fermion interactions are found to be mediated by the unified SU(4 and SU(2 vector gauge boson fields, which include the photon, the gluons, and the bosons $Z$ and $W$ as well known from the SM, but also comprise new ones, namely three coloured $X$ bosons carrying a fractional hypercharge of $pm4/3$ and transmuting leptons into quarks and vice versa. The full covariant derivative of the model is derived and discussed. The Higgs mechanism gives mass to the $Z$ and $W$ bosons, but also permits one to derive the mass of the coloured $X$ boson, for which depending on the choice of the values of the coupling constant, the estimates are 35~GeV or 156~GeV, values that are well within reach of the LHC. The scalar Higgs field can also lend masses to the fermions and fix their physical values for given appropriate coupling constants to that field.

  10. Geometry of coexistence in the interacting boson model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Interacting Boson Model (IBM) with configuration mixing is applied to describe the phenomenon of coexistence in nuclei. The analysis suggests that the IBM with configuration mixing, used in conjunction with a (matrix) coherent-state method, may be a reliable tool for the study of geometric aspects of shape coexistence in nuclei

  11. Inertial parameters in the interacting boson fermion approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hartree-Bose-Fermi and the adiabatic approximations are used to derive analytic formulas for the moment of inertia and the decoupling parameter of the interacting boson fermion approximation for deformed systems. These formulas are applied to the SU(3) dynamical symmetry, obtaining perfect agreement with the exact results. (Authors)

  12. A Coriolis-like effect of the dynamical boson-fermion interaction in the interacting boson-fermion model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown that in a particular basis the dynamical interaction of IBFM for a boson core coupled to a single-j particle in the SU(3) limit takes a tridiagonal form, as does the Coriolis interaction. Interference between this Coriolis-like effect in the boson-fermion dynamical interaction and the genuine Coriolis effect results in interesting features of IBFM: For a particular ratio of the interaction strength, depending only on the angular momentum of the odd particle, the K=j band exactly follows the rotational energy rule, is completely uncoupled from the other bands and has exactly the same moment of inertia as a ground-state band of the core. A possible interpretation of this feature in terms of spectrum-generating supersymmetry is suggested. (orig.)

  13. Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy on Electron-Boson Interactions in Superconductors

    OpenAIRE

    Schackert, Michael Peter

    2014-01-01

    This thesis describes the experimental study of electron-boson interactions in superconductors by means of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy performed with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) at temperatures below 1 K. This new approach allows the direct measurement of the Eliashberg function of conventional superconductors as demonstrated on lead (Pb) and niobium (Nb). Preparative experiments on unconventional iron-pnictides are presented in the end.

  14. Centrifugal stretching of 170Hf in the interacting boson model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner V.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of a recent experiment to deduce lifetimes of members of the ground state rotational band of 170Hf, which show the effect of centrifugal stretching in this deformed isotope. Results are compared to the geometrical confined beta-soft(CBS rotor model, as well as to the interacting boson model (IBM. Two methods to correct for effects due to the finite valence space within the IBM are proposed.

  15. Phase transitions in the $sdg$ interacting boson model

    OpenAIRE

    P. Van Isacker(Ganil, Caen, France;); Bouldjedri, A.; Zerguine, S.

    2010-01-01

    19 pages, 5 figures, submitted to Nuclear Physics A A geometric analysis of the $sdg$ interacting boson model is performed. A coherent-state is used in terms of three types of deformation: axial quadrupole ($\\beta_2$), axial hexadecapole ($\\beta_4$) and triaxial ($\\gamma_2$). The phase-transitional structure is established for a schematic $sdg$ hamiltonian which is intermediate between four dynamical symmetries of U(15), namely the spherical ${\\rm U}(5)\\otimes{\\rm U}(9)$, the (prolate and ...

  16. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy on electron-boson interactions in superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Schackert, Michael Peter

    2015-01-01

    This work describes the experimental study of electron-boson interactions in superconductors by means of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy performed with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) at temperatures below 1 K. This new approach allows the direct measurement of the Eliashberg function of conventional superconductors as demonstrated on lead (Pb) and niobium (Nb). Preparative experiments on unconventional iron-pnictides are presented in the end.

  17. Study of 152Sm using interacting boson model-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The large experimental data is now available for 152Sm from decay and reaction work. The interacting boson model-1 (IBM-1) is used to study the energy spectra, B(E2) values/ratios for inter-band and intra-band transitions. The theoretical results of present IBM calculation are compared with the predictions of DPPQ, BEM and RVM models and the experimental data

  18. Angular momentum I ground state probabilities of boson systems interacting by random interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Y M; Yoshinaga, N

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we report our systematic calculations of angular momentum $I$ ground state probabilities ($P(I)$) of boson systems with spin $l$ in the presence of random two-body interactions. It is found that the P(0) dominance is usually not true for a system with an odd number of bosons, while it is valid for an even number of bosons, which indicates that the P(0) dominance is partly connected to the even number of identical particles. It is also noticed that the $P(I_{max})$'s of bosons with spin $l$ do not follow the 1/N ($N=l+1$, referring to the number of independent two-body matrix elements) relation. The properties of the $P(I)$'s obtained in boson systems with spin $l$ are discussed.

  19. Interacting bosons in two-dimensional flat band systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pudleiner, Petra; Mielke, Andreas

    2015-08-01

    The Hubbard model of bosons on two dimensional lattices with a lowest flat band is discussed. In these systems there is a critical density, where the ground state is known exactly and can be represented as a charge density wave. Above this critical filling, depending on the lattice structure and the interaction strength, the additional particles are either delocalised and condensate in the ground state, or they form pairs. Pairs occur at strong interactions, e.g., on the chequerboard lattice. The general mechanism behind this phenomenon is discussed.

  20. Search for intermediate boson production in high-energy neutrino interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that if weak interaction are mediated by a boson W, it should be produced in high-energy neutrino experiments, provided its mass is not too high. The reaction would be νμ + Z → W+ + μ- + Z where Z is a nucleus or a proton. The boson would then decay within 10-18 sec into a neutrino and a charged lepton or into a system of pions and kaons W+ → μ+ + νμ; W+ → e+ + νe; W+ → pions and/or kaons. The rate expected to be almost equal, whereas the rate is unknown. Previously these reactions have been searched for by Danby et al. in the Columbia neutrino spark chamber. In the CERN neutrino spark chamber, we have made a systematic search for lepton pairs, μ-μ+ and μ-E+ which would show up as a result of reactions

  1. Spinning boson stars and Kerr black holes with scalar hair: the effect of self-interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Herdeiro, Carlos A. R.; Radu, Eugen; Rúnarsson, Helgi F.

    2016-01-01

    Self-interacting boson stars have been shown to alleviate the astrophysically low maximal mass of their non-self-interacting counterparts. We report some physical features of spinning self-interacting boson stars, namely their compactness, the occurence of ergo-regions and the scalar field profiles, for a sample of values of the coupling parameter. The results agree with the general picture that these boson stars are comparatively less compact than the non-self-interacting ones. We also brief...

  2. Landau theory and Ginzburg criterion for interacting bosons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starting with a microscopic Hamiltonian for a system of interacting bosons, and using perturbation theory, a Landau type theory is developed to describe the system in the vicinity of the Bose-Einstein transition curve. The theory is, however, seen to be valid only if the dimensionality d of the system is larger than 4; for d < 4, higher order graphs make divergent contributions. An attempt to remove the divergences in a self-consistent manner yields Ginzburg's criterion for the validity of the Landau theory. (author)

  3. Numerical simulation of bosonic-superconducting-string interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laguna, P. (Department of Physics and Atomspheric Science, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (USA)); Matzner, R.A. (Department of Physics, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 (USA) Center for Relativity, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (USA))

    1990-03-15

    Numerical simulations show that bosonic superconducting U(1) gauge cosmic strings interact by reconnecting and chopping off in a fashion similar to nonconducting strings. Cancellation of the electromagnetic current occurs when, in one of the strings, the direction of the U(1) gauge magnetic field is opposite to the electromagnetic current flow. Electric charge accumulates on the segments of the reconnected strings where the current is discontinuous or vanishes. A {ital virtual} {ital photon} appears after the collision and intercommutation, and a bubble of electromagnetic radiation emerges as the currents in the reconnected strings equalize. These phenomena suggest new possible mechanisms for void production in the large-scale distribution of galaxies.

  4. Berry Curvature of interacting bosons in a honeycomb lattice

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yun; Sengupta, Pinaki; Batrouni, George G.; Miniatura, Christian; Grémaud, Benoît

    2015-01-01

    We consider soft-core bosons with onsite interaction loaded in the honeycomb lattice with different site energies for the two sublattices. Using both a mean-field approach and quantum Monte-Carlo simulations, we show that the topology of the honeycomb lattice results in a non-vanishing Berry curvature for the band structure of the single-particle excitations of the system. This Berry curvature induces an anomalous Hall effect. It is seen by studying the time evolution of a wavepacket, namely ...

  5. Triaxial shapes in the interacting vector boson model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new dynamical symmetry limit of the two-fluid interacting vector boson model (IVBM), defined through the chain Sp(12,R) superset of U(3,3) superset of U*(3) x SU(1,1) superset of SU*(3) superset of SO(3), is introduced. The SU*(3) algebra considered in the present paper closely resembles many properties of the SU*(3) limit of the interacting boson model-2, which have been shown by many authors geometrically to correspond to the rigid triaxial model. The influence of different types of perturbations on the SU*(3) energy surface, in particular the addition of a Majorana interaction and an O(6) term to the model Hamiltonian, is studied. The effect of these perturbations results in the formation of a stable triaxial minimum in the energy surface of the IVBM Hamiltonian under consideration. Using a schematic Hamiltonian that possesses a perturbed SU*(3) dynamical symmetry, the theory is applied for the calculation of the low-lying energy spectrum of the nucleus 192Os. The theoretical results obtained agree reasonably with the experimental data and show a very shallow triaxial minimum in the energy surface for the ground state in 192Os, suggesting that the proposed dynamical symmetry might be appropriate for the description of the collective properties of different nuclei, exhibiting triaxial features.

  6. Strongly-interacting bosons in a disordered optical lattice

    CERN Document Server

    White, M; McKay, D; Zhou, S; Ceperley, D; De Marco, B L

    2008-01-01

    Disorder, prevalent in nature, is intimately involved in such spectacular effects as the fractional quantum Hall effect and vortex pinning in type-II superconductors. Understanding the role of disorder is therefore of fundamental interest to materials research and condensed matter physics. Universal behavior, such as Anderson localization, in disordered non-interacting systems is well understood. But, the effects of disorder combined with strong interactions remains an outstanding challenge to theory. Here, we experimentally probe a paradigm for disordered, strongly-correlated bosonic systems-the disordered Bose-Hubbard (DBH) model-using a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) of ultra-cold atoms trapped in a completely characterized disordered optical lattice. We determine that disorder suppresses condensate fraction for superfluid (SF) or coexisting SF and Mott insulator (MI) phases by independently varying the disorder strength and the ratio of tunneling to interaction energy. In the future, these results can con...

  7. The 126 GeV Higgs boson mass and naturalness in (deflected) mirage mediation

    OpenAIRE

    Hiroyuki Abe; Junichiro Kawamura

    2014-01-01

    We study the mass of the lightest CP-even Higgs boson in the deflected mirage mediation that is a quite general framework of the mediation of supersymmetry breaking, incorporating the case where all of the modulus-, the anomaly- and the gauge-mediated contributions to the soft supersymmetry breaking parameters become sizable. We evaluate the degree of tuning the so-called mu parameter required for realizing a correct electroweak symmetry breaking and study how to accomplish both the observed ...

  8. Superweak C.P. violation mediated by neutral Higgs bosons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the framework of the standard SU(2) tensorial product of U(1) model, it is shown that a triplet and a singlet of Higgs bosons give rise to the ΔI=1/2 rule and to superweak CP violation in the non-leptonic sector

  9. Quantum and Classical Behavior in Interacting Bosonic Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Hertzberg, Mark P

    2016-01-01

    It is understood that in free bosonic theories, the classical field theory accurately describes the full quantum theory when the occupancy numbers of systems are very large. However, the situation is less understood in interacting theories, especially on time scales longer than the dynamical relaxation time. Recently there have been claims that the quantum theory deviates spectacularly from the classical theory on this time scale, even if the occupancy numbers are extremely large. Furthermore, it is claimed that the quantum theory quickly thermalizes while the classical theory does not. The evidence for these claims comes from noticing a spectacular difference in the time evolution of expectation values of quantum operators compared to the classical micro-state evolution. If true, this would have dramatic consequences for many important phenomena, including laboratory studies of interacting BECs, dark matter axions, preheating after inflation, etc. In this work we critically examine these claims. We show that...

  10. Water-Mediated Hydrophobic Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Amotz, Dor

    2016-05-27

    Hydrophobic interactions are driven by the combined influence of the direct attraction between oily solutes and an additional water-mediated interaction whose magnitude (and sign) depends sensitively on both solute size and attraction. The resulting delicate balance can lead to a slightly repulsive water-mediated interaction that drives oily molecules apart rather than pushing them together and thus opposes their direct (van der Waals) attraction for each other. As a consequence, competing solute size-dependent crossovers weaken hydrophobic interactions sufficiently that they are only expected to significantly exceed random thermal energy fluctuations for processes that bury more than ∼1 nm(2) of water-exposed area. PMID:27215821

  11. The interacting boson approximation and the spectroscopy of the even Cadmium and Tin isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the framework of the Interacting Boson Approximation (IBA), the authors investigate, using the even-mass isotopes Cd108 to Cd116 and Sn116 to Sn124, whether a single two-boson interaction can describe the energy, B(E2), quadrupole moment and some inelastic nucleon scattering systematics of these nuclei

  12. One-Dimensional w-Component Fermions and Bosons with Delta Function Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Bo-Bo

    2011-01-01

    @@ The ground state energy for 1D multicomponent fermions and bosons with repulsive or attractive delta function interparticle interaction is studied.%The ground state energy for ID multicomponent fermions and bosons with repulsive or attractive delta function interparticle interaction is studied.

  13. Berry curvature of interacting bosons in a honeycomb lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yun; Sengupta, Pinaki; Batrouni, George G.; Miniatura, Christian; Grémaud, Benoît.

    2015-10-01

    We consider soft-core bosons with on-site interaction loaded in the honeycomb lattice with different site energies for the two sublattices. Using both a mean-field approach and quantum Monte Carlo simulations, we show that the topology of the honeycomb lattice results in a nonvanishing Berry curvature for the band structure of the single-particle excitations of the system. This Berry curvature induces an anomalous Hall effect when driving the system out of equilibrium. It is seen by studying the time evolution of a wave packet, namely, a superfluid ground state in a harmonic trap, subjected either to a constant force (Bloch oscillations) or to a sudden shift of the trap center.

  14. Phase transitions in the $sdg$ interacting boson model

    CERN Document Server

    Van Isacker, P; Zerguine, S

    2009-01-01

    A geometric analysis of the $sdg$ interacting boson model is performed. A coherent-state is used in terms of three types of deformation: axial quadrupole ($\\beta_2$), axial hexadecapole ($\\beta_4$) and triaxial ($\\gamma_2$). The phase-transitional structure is established for a schematic $sdg$ hamiltonian which is intermediate between four dynamical symmetries of U(15), namely the spherical ${\\rm U}(5)\\otimes{\\rm U}(9)$, the (prolate and oblate) deformed ${\\rm SU}_\\pm(3)$ and the $\\gamma_2$-soft SO(15) limits. For realistic choices of the hamiltonian parameters the resulting phase diagram has properties close to what is obtained in the $sd$ version of the model and, in particular, no transition towards a stable triaxial shape is found.

  15. Spinning boson stars and Kerr black holes with scalar hair: the effect of self-interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Herdeiro, Carlos A R; Rúnarsson, Helgi F

    2016-01-01

    Self-interacting boson stars have been shown to alleviate the astrophysically low maximal mass of their non-self-interacting counterparts. We report some physical features of spinning self-interacting boson stars, namely their compactness, the occurence of ergo-regions and the scalar field profiles, for a sample of values of the coupling parameter. The results agree with the general picture that these boson stars are comparatively less compact than the non-self-interacting ones. We also briefly discuss the effect of scalar self-interactions on the properties of Kerr black holes with scalar hair.

  16. Restrictions on the four vector boson vertex in a weakly interacting standard model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is no experimental evidence that the four vector boson (4W) vertex predicted by the standard model exists. To study the effects of this vertex, we introduce the parameter κ such that κg2 is the new 4W coupling constant. We set constraints on κ by considering unitarity requirements for vector boson scattering amplitudes. We find that the 4W vertex must exist if the vector bosons interact weakly up to √s≅300-350 GeV. (orig.)

  17. Vector boson self-interactions and vector boson production within the BESS-model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Predictions of the BESS model were calculated for e+e-→W+W- and for e+e-→ three gauge bosons (W+W-Z, W+W-γ, ZZZ, ZZγ, Zγγ, γγγ) processes. Total cross sections and angular distributions both for unpolarized and polarized final vector bosons and the angular asymmetries were calculated. The results are compared with Standard Model predictions. (K.A.) 11 refs., 5 figs

  18. The 126 GeV Higgs boson mass and naturalness in (deflected) mirage mediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Hiroyuki; Kawamura, Junichiro

    2014-07-01

    We study the mass of the lightest CP-even Higgs boson in the deflected mirage mediation that is a quite general framework of the mediation of supersymmetry breaking, incorporating the case where all of the modulus-, the anomaly- and the gauge-mediated contributions to the soft supersymmetry breaking parameters become sizable. We evaluate the degree of tuning the so-called μ parameter required for realizing a correct electroweak symmetry breaking and study how to accomplish both the observed Higgs boson mass and the relaxed fine-tuning. We identify the parameter space favored from such a perspective and show the superparticle mass spectrum with some input parameters inside the indicated region. The results here would be useful when we aim to prove the communication between the visible and the hidden sectors in supergravity and superstring models based on the recent observations.

  19. The 126 GeV Higgs boson mass and naturalness in (deflected) mirage mediation

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    We study the mass of the lightest CP-even Higgs boson in the deflected mirage mediation that is a quite general framework of the mediation of supersymmetry breaking, incorporating the case where all of the modulus-, the anomaly- and the gauge-mediated contributions to the soft supersymmetry breaking parameters become sizable. We evaluate the degree of tuning the so-called mu parameter required for realizing a correct electroweak symmetry breaking and study how to accomplish both the observed Higgs boson mass and the relaxed fine-tuning. We identify the parameter space favored from such a perspective and show the superparticle mass spectrum with some input parameters inside the indicated region. The results here would be useful when we aim to prove the communication between the visible and the hidden sectors in supergravity and superstring models based on the recent observations.

  20. One-Dimensional w-Component Fermions and Bosons with Repulsive Delta Function Interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We prove in theorems 2 and 3 that for 1D Bosons with repulsive delta function interaction with any number of components and any Young tableau, the energy per particle as N → ∞ is the same as for spinless Bosons. (general)

  1. Operators of transitions and a hamiltonian for the system of interacting quasiparticles and quadrupolar bosons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The suggested earlier extention of the interacting boson model to odd nuclei - the interacting boson and fermion model (IBFM) - is investigated. In this model the description of odd particle interaction with the core includes the standard quadrupolar interaction as well as the additional component - boson-fermion exchange interaction, being firstly introduced by Mottelson. The contributions of exchange components both into operators of electromagnetic transitions and into a hamiltonian of boson-fermion interaction are considered just in general. It is shown that in both cases it is necessary to introduce an additional components in comparison with the standard variant of IBFM. Microscopic expressions for hamiltonian parameters are given with regard for particle-hole and particle-particle effective forces taken as the multipole product

  2. Interacting vector boson model of collective nuclear states. Tensorial structure of the Hamiltonian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most general one- and two-body interaction is constructed by means of two interacting vector bosons. The group U(6) is the group of dynamical symmetry if the Hamiltonian conserves the number of bosons. All possible types of one- and two-boson interactions are expressed by irreducible tensor operators corresponding to the decomposition: U(6) is contained in U(3)+U(2) is contained in U(3)+(U(1)+U(1)) is contained in O(3). The necessary isoscalar factors are calculated. This representation of the Hamiltonian makes possible its diagonalization through a direct application of the Wigner-Eckart theorem

  3. Prospective results for vector-boson fusion-mediated Higgs-boson searches in the four lepton final state at the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider is expected to be completed and operational in the second half of 2026, and will necessitate substantial upgrades to the ATLAS inner tracker detector. The impact of increased tracking coverage in the forward direction was investigated in terms of the separation of vector-boson fusion and gluon fusion-mediated Higgs-boson decays to four leptons in association with two jets. For an analysis dominated by statistical uncertainty, with vector-boson fusion production events treated as signal on top of gluon fusion background, the extension of tracking from pseudorapidity $|\\eta| < 2.7$ to $|\\eta| < 4.0$ improved the prospective vector-boson fusion discovery significance by 16%, while the relative uncertainty on the signal strength $\\Delta\\mu/\\mu$ was reduced by 6%.

  4. Shape coexistence in the microscopically guided interacting boson model

    CERN Document Server

    Nomura, K; Van Isacker, P

    2015-01-01

    Shape coexistence has been a subject of great interest in nuclear physics for many decades. In the context of the nuclear shell model, intruder excitations may give rise to remarkably low-lying excited $0^+$ states associated with different intrinsic shapes. In heavy open-shell nuclei, the dimension of the shell-model configuration space that includes such intruder excitations becomes exceedingly large, thus requiring a drastic truncation scheme. Such a framework has been provided by the interacting boson model (IBM). In this article we address the phenomenon of shape coexistence and its relevant spectroscopy from the point of view of the IBM. A special focus is placed on the method developed recently which makes use of the link between the IBM and the self-consistent mean-field approach based on the nuclear energy density functional. The method is extended to deal with various intruder configurations associated with different equilibrium shapes. We assess the predictive power of the method and suggest possib...

  5. Characteristic slepton signal in anomaly mediated SUSY breaking models via gauge boson fusion at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Datta, A; Datta, Anindya; Huitu, Katri

    2003-01-01

    We point out that slepton pairs produced via gauge boson fusion in anomaly mediated supersymmetry breaking (AMSB) model have very characteristic and almost clean signal at the Large Hadron Collider. In this letter, we discuss how one lepton associated with missing energy and produced in between two high-$p_T$ and high-mass forward jets can explore quite heavy sleptons in this scenario.

  6. A toy model for weak interaction based on condensed gauge bosons

    CERN Document Server

    Kohyama, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    We construct a toy model for weak interaction based on the assumption that gauge bosons form condensates. We then discuss the model predictions calculated from the effective Feynman rules which are derived through computing the effective action.

  7. Spherical to axially symmetric shape transition SU(5) → SU(3) in the frame work of interacting boson model IBM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the interacting boson model-1, one assumes that low-lying collective quadrupole states can be generated as states of a system of N bosons able to occupy two levels, one with angular momentum J = 0, called s, and other with angular momentum J = 2, called d-boson

  8. Bose-Einstein condensation in a one-dimensional system of interacting bosons

    OpenAIRE

    Tomchenko, Maksim

    2016-01-01

    Using the Vakarchuk formulae for the density matrix, we calculate the number N_k of atoms with momentum \\hbar k for the ground state of a uniform one-dimensional periodic system of interacting bosons. We obtain for impenetrable point bosons N_0 = 2\\sqrt{N} and N_{k=2\\pi j/L} = 0.31N_{0}/\\sqrt{|j|}. That is, there is no condensate or quasicondensate on low levels at large N. For almost point bosons with weak coupling (\\beta=\\frac{\

  9. Inelastic proton scattering from Pt isotopes and the interacting boson model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inelastic proton scattering has been used to measure the dσ/dΩ and Ay angular distributions for several low-lying collective states in 194,196Pt using 647 MeV polarized protons with special emphasis on the excitation of the 4+ states below 2 MeV. The data have been analyzed in the framework of the coupled-channels scheme using the program ECIS. Large E4 transition strengths to the 4+ states in both nuclei are found in sharp contrast with the predictions of the interacting boson model with only s (L=0) and d (L=2) bosons. It is found that although the E2 properties of these nuclei are consistent with the interacting boson model (sd) predictions, higher degrees of freedom, e.g., g (L=4) bosons, need to be invoked in order to get a reasonable agreement with the measured E4 properties

  10. Self-interacting boson stars with a single Killing vector field in Anti-de Sitter

    CERN Document Server

    Brihaye, Yves; Riedel, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    We construct rotating boson stars in (4+1)-dimensional asymptotically Anti-de Sitter space-time (aAdS) with two equal angular momenta that are composed out of a massive and self-interacting scalar field. These solutions possess a single Killing vector field. Next to the fundamental solutions radially excited rotating boson stars exist. We find that the behaviour of the solutions for small angular momenta is very well described by the corresponding oscillons. We also discuss the classical stability and find that self-interacting rotating boson stars in aAdS are classically unstable for a large range of the gravitational coupling and the Anti-de Sitter radius, respectively, can -however- be classically stable for sufficiently large angular momenta. Furthermore, very compact boson stars suffer from a superradiant instability. Our results indicate that this superradiant instability appears only for classically unstable solutions.

  11. Nuclear Structure and Electromagnetic Transitions Investigation in Er Isotopes within Framework of Interacting Boson Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interacting Boson Model-2 (IBM-2) is used to determine the Hamiltonian for Er nuclei. Fit values of parameters are used to construct the Hamiltonian, energy levels and electromagnetic transitions (B(E2), B(M1)) multipole mixing ratios (δ(E2/M1)) for some even-even Er nuclei and monopole transition probability are estimated. New ideas are used for counting bosons number at N = 64 and results are compared with previous works. (nuclear physics)

  12. The Protophobic Light Vector Boson as a Mediator to the Dark Sector

    CERN Document Server

    Kitahara, Teppei

    2016-01-01

    Observation of a protophobic 16.7 MeV vector boson has been reported by a $^8$Be nuclear transition experiment. Such a new particle could mediate between the Standard Model and a dark sector which includes the dark matter. In this Letter, we show some simple models which satisfy the thermal relic abundance under the current experimental bounds from the direct and the indirect detections. In a model, it is found that an appropriate self-scattering cross section to solve the small scale structure puzzles can be achieved.

  13. An Introduction to the Interacting Boson Model of the Atomic Nucleus, Part I

    CERN Document Server

    Pfeifer, Walter

    2002-01-01

    This work introduces to the Interacting Boson Model, which was created in 1974 by F. Iachello and A. Arima and then extend by numerous papers. Many-body configurations with s- and d-boson states are described and creation- and annihilation-operators for bosons are introduced. States with defined angular momentum are dealt with and the Hamilton operator of the IBM1-model is expressed in terms of Casimir operators. Level energies and electromagnetic transition probabilities are compared with measured data. A short introduction to Lie algebras and their application to the IBM1-model are given. In the IBM2-model protons and neutrons are treated separately and in IBFM single nucleons are added to the boson model. Comparison with experimental results.

  14. An Introduction to the Interacting Boson Model of the Atomic Nucleus. Part II

    CERN Document Server

    Pfeifer, Walter

    2002-01-01

    This work introduces to the Interacting Boson Model, which was created in 1974 by F. Iachello and A. Arima and then extended by numerous papers. Many-body configurations with s- and d-boson states are described and creation- and annihilation-operators for bosons are introduced. States with defined angular momentum are dealt with and the Hamilton operator of the IBM1-model is expressed in terms of Casimir operators. Level energies and electromagnetic transition probabilities are compared with measured data. A short introduction to Lie algebras and their application to the IBM1-model are given. In the IBM2-model protons and neutrons are treated separately and in IBFM single nucleons are added to the boson model. Comparison with experimental results.

  15. Emerging bosons with three-body interactions from spin-1 atoms in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study two many-body systems of bosons interacting via an infinite three-body contact repulsion in a lattice: a pairs quasicondensate induced by correlated hopping and the discrete version of the Pfaffian wave function. We propose to experimentally realize systems characterized by such interaction by means of a proper spin-1 lattice Hamiltonian: spin degrees of freedom are locally mapped into occupation numbers of emerging bosons, in a fashion similar to spin-1/2 and hardcore bosons. Such a system can be realized with ultracold spin-1 atoms in a Mott insulator with a filling factor of 1. The high versatility of these setups allows us to engineer spin-hopping operators breaking the SU(2) symmetry, as needed to approximate interesting bosonic Hamiltonians with three-body hardcore constraint. For this purpose we combine bichromatic spin-independent superlattices and Raman transitions to induce a different hopping rate for each spin orientation. Finally, we illustrate how our setup could be used to experimentally realize the first setup, that is, the transition to a pairs quasicondensed phase of the emerging bosons. We also report on a route toward the realization of a discrete bosonic Pfaffian wave function and list some open problems for reaching this goal.

  16. Probing Leptonic Interactions of a Family-Nonuniversal Z' Boson

    OpenAIRE

    Chiang, Cheng-Wei; Lin, Yi-Fan; Tandean, Jusak

    2011-01-01

    We explore a Z' boson with family-nonuniversal couplings to charged leptons. The general effect of Z-Z' mixing, of both kinetic and mass types, is included in the analysis. Adopting a model-independent approach, we perform a comprehensive study of constraints on the leptonic Z' couplings from currently available experimental data on a number of flavor-conserving and flavor-changing transitions. Detailed comparisons are made to extract the most stringent bounds on the leptonic couplings. Such ...

  17. LEGAL CULTURES AND MEDIATION. INTERACTIONS AND EVOLUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudiu Ramon D. BUTCULESCU

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Mediation, as an alternative dispute resolution method, is closely connected with the system of legal cultures. Mediation is an important link between legal culture and the judicial system. Mediation also acts as an interface between internal legal culture and external legal culture. This paper addresses the issues regarding the links and interactions between mediation and legal cultures, as well as the effects that arise from these interactions.

  18. CELLULAR INTERACTIONS MEDIATED BY GLYCONECTIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.Popescu

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular interactions involve many types of cell surface molecules and operate via homophilic and/or heterophilic protein-protein and protein-carbohydrate binding. Our investigations in different model-systems (marine invertebrates and mammals have provided direct evidence that a novel class of primordial proteoglycans, named by us gliconectins, can mediate cell adhesion via a new alternative molecular mechanism of polyvalent carbohydrate-carbohydrate binding. Biochemical characterization of isolated and purified glyconectins revealed the presence of specific carbohydrate structures, acidic glycans, different from classical glycosaminoglycans. Such acidic glycans of high molecular weight containing fucose, glucuronic or galacturonic acids, and sulfate groups, originally found in sponges and sea urchin embryos, may represent a new class of carbohydrate carcino-embryonal antigens in mice and humans. Such interactions between biological macromolecules are usually investigated by kinetic binding studies, calorimetric methods, X-ray diffraction, nuclear magnetic resonance, and other spectroscopic analyses. However, these methods do not supply a direct estimation of the intermolecular binding forces that are fundamental for the function of the ligand-receptor association. Recently, we have introduced atomic force microscopy to quantify the binding strength between cell adhesion proteoglycans. Measurement of binding forces intrinsic to cell adhesion proteoglycans is necessary to assess their contribution to the maintenance of the anatomical integrity of multicellular organisms. As a model, we selected the glyconectin 1, a cell adhesion proteoglycan isolated from the marine sponge Microciona prolifera. This glyconectin mediates in vivo cell recognition and aggregation via homophilic, species-specific, polyvalent, and calcium ion-dependent carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions. Under physiological conditions, an adhesive force of up to 400 piconewtons

  19. Nambu-Goldstone Boson Hypothesis for Squarks and Sleptons in Pure Gravity Mediation

    CERN Document Server

    Yanagida, Tsutomu T; Yokozaki, Norimi

    2016-01-01

    We point out that a hypothesis of squarks and sleptons being Nambu-Goldstone (NG) bosons is consistent with pure gravity mediation or minimal split supersymmetry (SUSY). As a concrete example, we consider a SUSY $E_7/SU(5) \\times U(1)^3$ non-linear sigma model in the framework of pure gravity mediation. The model accommodates three families of the quark and lepton chiral multiplets as (pseudo) NG multiplets of the Kahler manifold, which may enable us to understand the origin and number of the families. We point out that squarks in the first and second generations are likely to be as light as a few TeV if the observed baryon asymmetry is explained by the thermal leptogenesis; therefore, these colored particles can be discovered at the LHC Run-2 or at the high luminosity LHC.

  20. Probing nonstandard bosonic interactions via W-boson pair production at lepton colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Hagiwara, K; Ishihara, S; Szalapski, R

    1996-01-01

    The process e+e- --> W+W- provides a valuable laboratory to test the Standard Model (SM) and to search for new physics. The most general helicity amplitudes for this process require the introduction of nine form-factors which we calculate in the context of SU(2) X U(1) gauge-invariant extensions of the SM. The contributions of new physics are parametrized via an effective Lagrangian constructed from the light fields. Because the mechanism of electroweak symmetry-breaking remains an open problem we consider both the effective Lagrangian with a linearly realized Higgs sector, i.e. with a light physical Higgs boson, and the effective Lagrangian which utilizes a nonlinear realization of the Higgs mechanism. The use of an effective Lagrangian allows one to calculate consistently nonstandard contributions to e+e- --> W+W- amplitudes as well as the nonstandard contributions to other processes. We study the interplay of the low-energy and Z-pole measurements with measurements via the processes e+e- --> fermion pairs ...

  1. A 125 GeV Higgs boson mass and gravitino dark matter in R-invariant direct gauge mediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss the Standard Model-like Higgs boson mass in the Supersymmetric Standard Model in an R-invariant direct gauge mediation model with the gravitino mass in the O(1) keV range. The gravitino dark matter scenario in this mass range is a good candidate for a slightly warm dark matter. We show that the Higgs boson mass around 125 GeV suggested by the ATLAS and CMS experiments can be easily achieved in R-invariant direct gauge mediation models with the gravitino mass in this range.

  2. Interference of composite bosons

    OpenAIRE

    Brougham, Thomas; Barnett, Stephen M.; Jex, Igor

    2010-01-01

    We investigate multi-boson interference. A Hamiltonian is presented that treats pairs of bosons as a single composite boson. This Hamiltonian allows two pairs of bosons to interact as if they were two single composite bosons. We show that this leads to the composite bosons exhibiting novel interference effects such as Hong-Ou-Mandel interference. We then investigate generalizations of the formalism to the case of interference between two general composite bosons. Finally, we show how one can ...

  3. Mediation Revisited: The Interactive Organization of Mediation in Learning Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Pekarek Doehler, Simona

    2013-01-01

    This article is concerned with the social organization of mediation in learning environments. It seeks to further articulate the sociocultural notion of mediation in sociointeractional terms, combining insights from the sociocultural approach to cognition and the microinteractionist, especially ethnomethodological approach to social activities. A microanalysis of mediation in communicative 2nd-language classroom activities where the task at hand is the management of interaction itself is pres...

  4. The interacting boson model, BSC-RPA theory and the theory of pairing interactions applied to Ge nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The low lying states and especialy the extraordinary behaviour of the first excited O+ state as a function of neutron number in the sequence of nuclei, 68Ge, 70Ge, 72Ge, 74Ge, 76Ge, are described (except for 76Ge) by introducing a s'-boson into the interacting boson model (IBM) which usually involves only s- and d-bosons. This introduction could be understood by considering results from BCS-RPA calculations in the neutron configuration only. BCS-RPA theory is, however, shown to be a poor approximation in the case under consideration. Results from the exact diagonalisation of the Hamiltonian for the charge independant pairing interaction in both the proton and neutron configuration are discussed. 7 figs., 2 tabs., 21 refs

  5. On the properties of W-boson within the subconstituent models of electroweak interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss some properties of the W- boson using spectral function sum rules within the framework of constituent models of quantum haplo-dynamics (QHD). Contraints on the W- decay amplitude and so on its mass and total width have been derived. The results may give a test on possible aspects of this model of electroweak interactions

  6. E4 properties in deformed nuclei and the sdg interacting boson model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, H.C.; Dieperink, A. E. L.; Scholten, O.; Harakeh, M. N.; de Leo, R.; Pignanelli, M.; Morrison, I.

    1988-01-01

    The hexadecapole transition strength distribution is measured for the deformed nucleus 150Nd using the (p,p') reaction at Ep=30 MeV. The experimental information on B(E4) values in this nucleus and in 156Gd is interpreted in the framework of the sdg interacting boson model. It is found that the main

  7. Disentangling the nuclear shape coexistence in even-even Hg isotopes using the interacting boson model

    CERN Document Server

    García-Ramos, J E

    2014-01-01

    We intend to provide a consistent description of the even-even Hg isotopes, 172-200Hg, using the interacting boson model including configuration mixing. We pay special attention to the description of the shape of the nuclei and to its connection with the shape coexistence phenomenon.

  8. Nuclear charge radii and electric monopole transitions in the interacting boson model

    CERN Document Server

    Van Isacker, P

    2012-01-01

    The interacting boson model (IBM) of Arima and Iachello is applied to calculate nuclear charge radii and electric monopole transitions of even-even nuclei in the rare-earth region. Consistent operators are used for the two observables. A relation between summed M1 strength and $\\rho({\\rm E0})$ values is pointed out.

  9. A geometrical representation of the interacting-boson model of nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The representation of the interacting-boson-model Hamiltonian as a second-order differential operator in geometrical variables is studied in detail. It is shown that, with appropriate boundary conditions and biorthogonal weight functions, it reproduces exactly both the spectrum and matrix elements of operators of the algebraic boson model. It can be written in self-adjoint form and expanded in a symmetrized moment expansion, allowing the identification of collective mass parameters and energy surfaces, but differs in detail from conventional geometrical collective model. (author)

  10. Systematics of β and γ parameters of O(6)-like nuclei in the interacting boson model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By comparing quadrupole moments between the interacting boson model (IBM) and the collective model, a simple calculation for the triaxial deformation parameters β and γ in the O(6)-like nuclei is presented, based on the intrinsic frame in the IBM. The systematics of the β and γ are studied. The realistic cases are calculated for the even-even Xe, Ba and Ce isotopes, and the smooth dependences of the strength ratios θ3/κ and the effective charges e2 on the proton and neutron boson numbers Nπ and Nν are discovered

  11. Tests and applications of self-consistent cranking in the interacting boson model

    CERN Document Server

    Kuyucak, S; Kuyucak, Serdar; Sugita, Michiaki

    1999-01-01

    The self-consistent cranking method is tested by comparing the cranking calculations in the interacting boson model with the exact results obtained from the SU(3) and O(6) dynamical symmetries and from numerical diagonalization. The method is used to study the spin dependence of shape variables in the $sd$ and $sdg$ boson models. When realistic sets of parameters are used, both models lead to similar results: axial shape is retained with increasing cranking frequency while fluctuations in the shape variable $\\gamma$ are slightly reduced.

  12. Quantum integrable models of interacting bosons and classical r-matrices with spectral parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrypnyk, T.

    2015-11-01

    Using the technique of classical r-matrices with spectral parameters we construct a general form of quantum Lax operators of interacting boson systems corresponding to an arbitrary simple (or reductive) Lie algebra. We prove quantum integrability of these models in the physically important case of g = gl(n) and "diagonal" in the root basis classical r-matrices. We consider in detail two classes of non-skew-symmetric classical r-matrices with spectral parameters and obtain the corresponding quantum Lax operators and quantum integrable many-boson hamiltonians that generalize Bose-Hubbard dimer hamiltonians.

  13. 194,198Pt(p vector,p') reaction and the interacting boson model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angular distributions of dσ/dΩ and Ay were measured for low-lying collective states, Jπ=01+, 21+, 22+, 41+, 42+, 43+ in 194,198Pt using 135 MeV polarized protons. Coupled-channels analysis of the data indicates large E4 moments for the 4i (i=1, 2, 3) states in both the isotopes. These data have been analyzed in the framework of the interacting boson model (IBM). Although the standard IBM-1 scheme with only s- and d-bosons can describe the E2 properties of both isotopes quite well, a more generalized version which also includes a g-boson is needed to correctly reproduce simultaneously both the E2 and E4 data. Another model using the 'projected IBM-2' parameters gives similar results. (orig.)

  14. Perfect state transfer over interacting boson networks associated with group schemes

    CERN Document Server

    Jafarizadeh, M A; Azimia, M; Fama, F Eghbali

    2010-01-01

    It is shown how to perfectly transfer an arbitrary qudit state in interacting boson networks. By defining a family of Hamiltonians related to Bose-Hubbard model, we describe a possible method for state transfer through bosonic atoms trapped in these networks with different kinds of coupling strengths between them. Particularly, by taking the underlying networks of so called group schemes as interacting boson networks, we show how choose suitable coupling strengths between the nodes, in order that an arbitrary qudit state be transferred from one node to its antipode, perfectly. In fact, by employing the group theory properties of these networks, an explicit formula for suitable coupling strengths has been given in order that perfect state transfer (PST) be achieved. Finally, as examples, PST on the underlying networks associated with cyclic group C2m, dihedral group D2n, Clifford group CL(n), and the groups U6n and V8n has been considered in details. Keywords: Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian, Interacting boson networ...

  15. Mean-field plus various types of pairing interactions and an exact boson mapping of the reduced BCS pairing interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exact solutions of Nilsson mean-field plus various type of pairing interactions are briefly reviewed. Some even-odd mass differences and moment of inertia of low-lying states for rare earth and actinide nuclei calculated in nearest-orbit pairing and extended pairing models and comparison with the corresponding experimental data are shown. An exact boson mapping of the reduced BCS pairing Hamiltonian is reported. In the mapping, fermion pair operators are mapped exactly to the corresponding bosons. The image of the mapping results in a Bose-Hubbard model with level dependent hopping. (author)

  16. Magnetism of one-dimensional strongly repulsive spin-1 bosons with antiferromagnetic spin-exchange interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate magnetism and quantum phase transitions in a one-dimensional system of integrable spin-1 bosons with strongly repulsive density-density interaction and antiferromagnetic spin-exchange interaction via the thermodynamic Bethe ansatz method. At zero temperature, the system exhibits three quantum phases: (i) a singlet phase of boson pairs when the external magnetic field H is less than the lower critical field Hc1; (ii) a ferromagnetic phase of atoms in the hyperfine state |F=1, mF=1> when the external magnetic field exceeds the upper critical field Hc2; and (iii) a mixed phase of singlet pairs and unpaired atoms in the intermediate region Hc1c2. At finite temperatures, the spin fluctuations affect the thermodynamics of the model through coupling the spin bound states to the dressed energy for the unpaired mF=1 bosons. However, such spin dynamics is suppressed by a sufficiently strong external field at low temperatures. Thus the singlet pairs and unpaired bosons may form a two-component Luttinger liquid in the strong coupling regime.

  17. Energy fluctuation of a finite number of interacting bosons: A correlated many-body approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Satadal; Lekala, M. L.; Chakrabarti, Barnali; Rampho, G. J.

    2016-03-01

    We calculate the energy fluctuation of a truly finite number of interacting bosons and study the role of interaction. Although the ideal Bose gas in thermodynamic limit is an exactly solvable problem and analytic expression of various fluctuation measures exists, the experimental Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) is a nontrivial many-body problem. We employ a two-body correlated basis function and utilize the realistic van der Waals interaction. We calculate the energy fluctuation (△E2) of the interacting trapped bosons and plot △E/2 kB2T2 as a function of T/Tc. In the classical limit △E2 is related to the specific heat per particle cv through the relation △E2=kBT2cv . We have obtained a distinct hump in △E/2 kB2T2 around the condensation point for three-dimesional harmonically trapped Bose gas when the particle number N ≃5000 and above which corresponds to the second-order phase transition. However for finite-size interacting bosons (N ≃ a few hundred) the hump is not sharp, and the maximum in △E/2 kB2T2 can be interpreted as a smooth increase in the scaled fluctuation below Tc and then a decrease above Tc. To illustrate the justification we also calculate cv, which exhibits the same feature, which leads to the conjecture that for finite-sized interacting bosons phase transition is ruled out.

  18. Retarded Boson-Fermion interaction in atomic systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sambhu N Datta

    2007-09-01

    The retarded interaction between an electron and a spin-0 nucleus, that has been derived from electro-dynamical perturbation theory is discussed here. A brief account of the derivation is given. The retarded form is correct through order 2/2. Use of the relative coordinates leads to an effective oneelectron operator that can be used through all orders of perturbation theory. A few unitary transformations give rise to the interaction that is valid in the non-relativistic limit.

  19. Higgs gravitational interaction, weak boson scattering, and Higgs inflation in Jordan and Einstein frames

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study gravitational interaction of Higgs boson through the unique dimension-4 operator ξH†HR, with H  the Higgs doublet and R  the Ricci scalar curvature. We analyze the effect of this dimensionless nonminimal coupling ξ  on weak gauge boson scattering in both Jordan and Einstein frames. We explicitly establish the longitudinal-Goldstone equivalence theorem with nonzero ξ coupling in both frames, and analyze the unitarity constraints. We study the ξ-induced weak boson scattering cross sections at O(1−30) TeV scales, and propose to probe the Higgs-gravity coupling via weak boson scattering experiments at the LHC (14 TeV) and the next generation pp colliders (50-100 TeV). We further extend our study to Higgs inflation, and quantitatively derive the perturbative unitarity bounds via coupled channel analysis, under large field background at the inflation scale. We analyze the unitarity constraints on the parameter space in both the conventional Higgs inflation and the improved models in light of the recent BICEP2 data

  20. Energy level statistics of the U(5) and O(6) symmetries in the interacting boson model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the energy level statistics of the states in U(5) and O(6) dynamical symmetries of the interacting boson model and the high spin states with backbending in U(5) symmetry. In the calculations, the degeneracy resulting from the additional quantum number is eliminated manually. The calculated results indicate that the finite boson number N effect is prominent. When N has a value close to a realistic one, increasing the interaction strength of subgroup O(5) makes the statistics vary from Poisson type to Gaussian orthogonal ensemble type and further recover to Poisson type. However, in the case of N→∞, they all tend to be Poisson type. The fluctuation property of the energy levels with backbending in high spin states in U(5) symmetry involves a signal of shape-phase transition between spherical vibration and axial rotation

  1. Bounds on Higgs and Gauge-Boson Interactions from LEP2 Data

    CERN Document Server

    Éboli, Oscar J P; Lietti, S M; Novaes, S F

    1998-01-01

    We derive bounds on Higgs and gauge--boson anomalous interactions using the LEP2 data on the production of three photons and photon pairs in association with hadrons. In the framework of $SU(2)_L \\otimes U(1)_Y$ effective Lagrangians, we examine all dimension--six operators that lead to anomalous Higgs interactions involving $\\gamma$ and $Z$. The search for Higgs boson decaying to $\\gamma\\gamma$ pairs allow us to obtain constrains on these anomalous couplings that are comparable with the ones originating from the analyses of $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at the Tevatron. Our results also show that if the coefficients of all ``blind'' operators are assumed to have same magnitude, the indirect constraints on the anomalous couplings obtained from this analyses, for Higgs masses $M_H \\lesssim$ 140 GeV, are more restrictive than the ones coming from the $W^+W^-$ production.

  2. Microscopic interacting boson model calculations for even–even 128−138Ce nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nurettin Turkan; Ismail Maras

    2007-05-01

    In this study, we determined the most appropriate Hamiltonian that is needed for the present calculations of energy levels and (2) values of 128−138Ce nuclei which have a mass around ≅ 130 using the interacting boson model (IBM). Using the best-fitted values of parameters in the Hamiltonian of the IBM-2, we have calculated energy levels and (2) values for a number of transitions in 128,130,132,134,136,138Ce. The results were compared with the previous experimental and theoretical (PTSM model) data and it was observed that they are in good agreement. Also some predictions of this model have better accuracy than those of PTSM model. It has turned out that the interacting boson approximation (IBA) is fairly reliable for calculating spectra in the entire set of 128,130,132,134,136,138Ce isotopes and the quality of the fits presented in this paper is acceptable.

  3. Semiclassical interpretation of an M1 sum rule derived within the interacting boson model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A summed M1 strength of the scissors mode derived within the proton-neutron interacting boson model under the assumption of F-spin symmetry is expressed in terms of classical quantities borrowed from the two-rotor model. In this classical form, the M1 strength shows explicitly a quadratic dependence on deformation in agreement with experiments. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  4. Quantum Phase Transitions in the Interacting Boson Model: Integrability, level repulsion and level crossing

    OpenAIRE

    Arias Carrasco, José Miguel; J. Dukelsky; García Ramos, José Enrique

    2003-01-01

    We study the quantum phase transition mechanisms that arise in the Interacting Boson Model. We show that the second-order nature of the phase transition from U(5) to O(6) may be attributed to quantum integrability, whereas all the first-order phase transitions of the model are due to level repulsion with one singular point of level crossing. We propose a model Hamiltonian with a true first-order phase transition for finite systems due to level crossings.

  5. Interacting Vector Boson Model Analysis of the ^{160}Dy Excited States Spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Garistov, V P; Solnyshkin, A A

    2004-01-01

    Analysis of the recently obtained experimental data for collective states of ^{160}Dy is presented. The Interacting Vector Boson Model (IVBM) was applied for the classification of low lying states with positive parity 0^{+},2^{+},4^{+},6^{+}and for description of rotational ground, S, γ and two octupole bands. The energies of the bands are reproduced with high accuracy using only one set of the model parameters for all bands.

  6. Lower branch of the spectrum of a fermion interacting with a bosonic gas (polaron)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The lower single-particle bound state of a fermion interacting with a bosonic gas is studied. In the case of a small coupling constant, the employed method makes it possible to improve significantly the accuracy of the previously known results on the polaron branch of the spectrum. The results give a hint that in one- and two-dimensional systems there may exist an excited polaron state with small value of the momentum. 6 refs

  7. HEXADECAPOLE INTERACTING BOSON APPROXIMATION STRUCTURE FUNCTIONS IN NEODYMIUM ISOTOPES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PERRINO, R; BLASI, N; BORDEWIJK, JA; DELEO, R; HARAKEH, MN; DEJAGER, CW; MICHELETTI, S; PIGNANELLI, M; SANDOR, RKJ; DEVRIES, H; VANDERWERF, SY; WESSELING, J

    1993-01-01

    Low-lying hexadecapole states in stable even-even neodymium isotopes have been investigated by means of inelastic electron scattering. Transition charge densities were extracted in a Fourier-Bessel analysis of the form factors. The analysis of the experimental results within the interacting sdg-boso

  8. Equivalence relations between interacting Kemmer-Duffin and Klein-Gordon spin 0 and 1 boson fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two formalisms- the Kemmer-Duffin and Klein-Gordon ones - are considered parallely in the spin 0 and 1 cases. Using the S-matrix approach which bases on interaction Lagrangian the transitions between the formalisms are found. A more detailed study is made for one-boson and two-boson interactions. An equivalence between the formalisms inside certain quite natural preconditions is evident

  9. A broken pair approach to interacting (fermion-) boson models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this thesis a model is adopted where the nucleus is described in terms of protons and neutrons only and effects caused by the presence of mesons or nucleonic resonances are not considered explicitly. Moreover only a small part of the complete Hilbert space of nuclear states is selected to describe the nuclear motion. For this purpose a Shell Model basis is adopted and it is assumed that the majority of the protons and neutrons occupy the orbits in a closed core and do not contribute to the nuclear excitations. Only a relatively small number of valence nucleous is assumed to be essential in the description of the system. These are supposed to move in only a rather small number of SM orbits. This valence space comprises usually one or two major shells. An effective interaction is used between the valence nucleons and effective g-factors and charges is the electromagnetic operators. The effective spin g-factors are 0.7 times the free values. The effective interaction is a pairing force, a delta force and a mixture of a delta force and a Gaussian force. (Auth.)

  10. A Hubbard model for ultracold bosonic atoms interacting via zero-point-energy induced three-body interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Paul, Saurabh; Johnson, P R; Tiesinga, Eite

    2016-01-01

    We show that for ultra-cold neutral bosonic atoms held in a three-dimensional periodic potential or optical lattice, a Hubbard model with dominant, attractive three-body interactions can be generated. In fact, we derive that the effect of pair-wise interactions can be made small or zero starting from the realization that collisions occur at the zero-point energy of an optical lattice site and the strength of the interactions is energy dependent from effective-range contributions. We determine...

  11. Statistical properties of spectral fluctuations of N interacting bosons in a harmonic trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Kamalika; Chakrabarti, Barnali; Kota, V. K. B.

    2014-11-01

    Spectral fluctuations of a system of N weakly interacting bosons in an isotropic harmonic trap are studied, with the focus on the deviations from Poisson spectral statistics, typical of a quantum integrable systems. We have utilized the ideas formulated by Makino et al. [Phys. Rev. E 67, 066205 (2003), 10.1103/PhysRevE.67.066205] who have extended the approach of Berry and Robnik [J. Phys. A 17, 2413 (1984), 10.1088/0305-4470/17/12/013]. Earlier investigations of the Berry conjecture [Proc. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 356, 375 (1977), 10.1098/rspa.1977.0140] of Poisson spectral statistics mainly considered quantum systems whose classical counterparts are integrable. However, the system of N weakly interacting bosons in the external trap has no classical counterpart. Also, it is a realistic and experimentally achievable system with close relation to Bose-Einstein condensation. Thus, a stringent analysis of the applicability of the Berry conjecture to this kind of systems is indeed required. We observe that for small boson number, the system is close to integrability and the nearest-neighbor level spacing distribution and the level number variance exhibit deviations from Poisson statistics similar to those of rational rectangular billiards.

  12. Particle-hole excitations in the interacting boson model; 4, the U(5)-SU(3) coupling

    CERN Document Server

    De Coster, C; Heyde, Kris L G; Jolie, J; Lehmann, H; Wood, J L

    1999-01-01

    In the extended interacting boson model (EIBM) both particle- and hole-like bosons are incorporated to encompass multi-particle-multi-hole excitations at and near to closed shells.We apply the group theoretical concepts of the EIBM to the particular case of two coexisting systems in the same nucleus exhibiting a U(5) (for the regular configurations) and an SU(3) symmetry (for the intruder configurations).Besides the description of ``global'' symmetry aspects in terms of I-spin , also the very specific local mixing effects characteristic for the U(5)-SU(3) symmetry coupling are studied.The model is applied to the Po isotopes and a comparison with a morerealistic calculation is made.

  13. Isotropization in Bianchi type-I cosmological model with fermions and bosons interacting via Yukawa potential

    CERN Document Server

    Ribas, M O; Devecchi, F P; Kremer, G M

    2015-01-01

    In this work we investigate a model for the early Universe in a Bianchi type-I metric, where the sources of the gravitational field are a fermionic and a bosonic field, interacting through a Yukawa potential, following the standard model of elementary particles. It is shown that the fermionic field has a negative pressure, while the boson has a small positive pressure. The fermionic field is the responsible for an accelerated regime at early times, but since the total pressure tends to zero for large times, a transition to a decelerated regime occurs. Here the Yukawa potential answers for the duration of the accelerated regime, since by decreasing the value of its coupling constant the transition accelerated-decelerated occurs in later times. The isotropization which occurs for late times is due to the presence of the fermionic field as one of the sources of the gravitational field.

  14. Plant volatiles mediate tritrophic interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Ninkovic, Velemir

    2002-01-01

    The effects of plant-plant interactions via volatiles (aerial allelopathy) on herbivores and their natural enemies were investigated. The model system consisted of four barley varieties, an aphid pest, Rhopalosiphum padi (L.), and a common aphid predator, ladybird, Coccinella septempunctata (L). Aerial allelopathy significantly affected plant leaf temperature and biomass allocation, favouring root growth during the vegetative period, the main period for development of R. padi populations in S...

  15. U(5)-SU(3) nuclear shape transition within the interacting boson model applied to dysprosium isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotb, M.

    2016-07-01

    In the framework of the interacting boson model (IBM) with intrinsic coherent state, the shape Hamiltonian from spherical vibrator U(5) to axially symmetric prolate deformed rotator SU(3) are examined. The Hamiltonian used is composed of a single boson energy term and quadrupole term. The potential energy surfaces (PES' s) corresponding to the U(5)-SU(3) transition are calculated with variation of a scaling and control parameters. The model is applied to 150-162Dy chain of isotopes. In this chain a change from spherical to well deformed nuclei is observed when moving from the lighter to heavier isotopes. 156Dy is a good candidate for the critical point symmetry X(5). The parameters of the model are determined by using a computer simulated search program in order to minimize the deviation between our calculated and some selected experimental energy levels, B(E2) transition rates and the two neutron separation energies S2n. We have also studied the energy ratios and the B(E2) values for the yrast state of the critical nucleus. The nucleon pair transfer intensities between ground-ground and ground-beta states are examined within IBM and boson intrinsic coherent framework.

  16. Dark matter production from Goldstone boson interactions and implications for direct searches and dark radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stability of the dark matter particle could be attributed to the remnant Z2 symmetry that arises from the spontaneous breaking of a global U(1) symmetry. This plausible scenario contains a Goldstone boson which, as recently shown by Weinberg, is a strong candidate for dark radiation. We show in this paper that this Goldstone boson, together with the CP-even scalar associated to the spontaneous breaking of the global U(1) symmetry, plays a central role in the dark matter production. Besides, the mixing of the CP-even scalar with the Standard Model Higgs boson leads to novel Higgs decay channels and to interactions with nucleons, thus opening the possibility of probing this scenario at the LHC and in direct dark matter search experiments. We carefully analyze the latter possibility and we show that there are good prospects to observe a signal at the future experiments LUX and XENON1T provided the dark matter particle was produced thermally and has a mass larger than ∼ 25 GeV

  17. Effect on cavity optomechanics of the interaction between a cavity field and a one-dimensional interacting bosonic gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate optomechanical coupling between one-dimensional interacting bosons and the electromagnetic field in a high-finesse optical cavity. We show that by tuning interatomic interactions, one can realize effective optomechanics with mechanical resonators ranging from side-mode excitations of a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) to particle-hole excitations of a Tonks-Girardeau (TG) gas. We propose that this unique feature can be formulated to detect the BEC-TG gas crossover and measure the sine-Gordon transition continuously and nondestructively.

  18. Inelastic proton scattering from 194,198Pt isotopes and the interacting boson model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to obtain the direct excitation E4 matrix elements from the ground state to the first three 4+ states in 194,198Pt and analyze these results in the framework of the Interacting Boson Model (IBM). Specifically, the role played by g-bosons in the IBM has been investigated. Inelastic scattering using 135 MeV polarized protons was performed on 194,198Pt targets. Angular distributions of the cross section and analyzing power have been measured for the excitation of several low-lying levels: 01+, 21+, 22+, 31-, 41+, 42+, 43+, 51-, and 71- in both these isotopes. Coupled-channels analyses of the data revealed large negative hexadecapole moments for the first three 4+ states. The sign of only the 01+ → 41+ transition matrix element was unambiguously determined in these experiments. The first measurements of the magnitude of the matrix element for the transition, 01+ → 43+ are reported. The data for 198Pt has also provided a more accurate determination of the sign and magnitude of the matrix element for the transition, 01+ → 22+. These data were next analyzed using the IBM. Although the conventional form of the model, which includes only s- (L = 0) and d-(L = 2) bosons could describe the E2 properties adequately, this form failed badly in describing the observed E4 properties. However, when the model was extended to include a g- (L = 4) boson, both E2 and E4 properties of these nuclei were quite well reproduced. The parameters required for such calculations were reasonable in the context of this being an extension of the conventional IBM

  19. Delta-function interactions for the bosonic and spinning strings and the generation of Abelian gauge theory

    OpenAIRE

    Edwards, James; Mansfield, Paul

    2015-01-01

    We construct contact interactions for bosonic and spinning strings. In the tensionless limit of the spinning string this reproduces the super-Wilson loop that couples spinor matter to Abelian gauge theory. Adding boundary terms that quantise the motion of charges results in a string model equivalent to spinor QED. The strings represent lines of electric flux connected to the charges. The purely bosonic model is spoilt by divergences that are excluded from the spinning model by world-sheet sup...

  20. Spectra and electromagnetic transitions of 72–84Kr in the interacting boson model-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Hong-Bo; Li, Xiao-Wei; Lü, Li-Jun; Dong, Hong-Fei; Wang, Yin; Zhang, Jin-Fu

    2016-07-01

    Within the framework of the interacting boson model-1, the energy levels and electromagnetic transitions in 72–84Kr isotopes are calculated. The structures of the eigenstate and Hamiltonian matrix for some low-lying states are also calculated. The calculated results are compared with available experimental data, and the results are generally in good agreement. The present study shows that the 72,74,76,80,82,84Kr isotopes are in the transition from U(5) → SU(3), and 78Kr is in the transition from U(5) → O(6). Supported by NSFC(11465001,11165001) and Natural Science Foundation of Inner Mongolia of China (2013MS0117)

  1. Self-interacting boson stars with a single Killing vector field in Anti-de Sitter

    OpenAIRE

    Brihaye, Yves; Hartmann, Betti; Riedel, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    We construct rotating boson stars in (4+1)-dimensional asymptotically Anti-de Sitter space-time (aAdS) with two equal angular momenta that are composed out of a massive and self-interacting scalar field. These solutions possess a single Killing vector field. We construct explicit solutions of the equations in the case of a fixed AdS background and vanishing self-coupling of the scalar field. These are the generalizations of the oscillons discussed in the literature previously now taking the m...

  2. Non-equilibrium slave bosons approach to quantum pumping in interacting quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citro, Roberta; Romeo, Francesco

    2016-03-01

    We review a time-dependent slave bosons approach within the non-equilibrium Green's function technique to analyze the charge and spin pumping in a strongly interacting quantum dot. We study the pumped current as a function of the pumping phase and of the dot energy level and show that a parasitic current arises, beyond the pure pumping one, as an effect of the dynamical constraints. We finally illustrate an all-electrical mean for spin-pumping and discuss its relevance for spintronics applications.

  3. Final state interactions at the threshold of Higgs boson pair production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhentao

    2015-11-01

    We study the effect of final state interactions at the threshold of Higgs boson pair production in the Glashow-Weinberg-Salam model. We consider three major processes of the pair production in the model: lepton pair annihilation, ZZ fusion, and WW fusion. We find that the corrections caused by the effect for these processes are markedly different. According to our results, the effect can cause non-negligible corrections to the cross sections for lepton pair annihilation and small corrections for ZZ fusion, and this effect is negligible for WW fusion.

  4. Final state interactions at the threshold of Higgs boson pair production

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Zhentao

    2015-01-01

    We study the effect of final state interactions at the threshold of Higgs boson pair production in the Glashow-Weinberg-Salam model. We consider three major processes of the pair production in the model: lepton pair annihilation, ZZ fusion, and WW fusion. We find that the corrections caused by the effect for these processes are markedly different. According to our results, the effect can cause non-negligible corrections to the cross sections for lepton pair annihilation and small corrections for ZZ fusion, and this effect is negligible for WW fusion.

  5. Interacting quantum walkers: two-body bosonic and fermionic bound states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krapivsky, P. L.; Luck, J. M.; Mallick, K.

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the dynamics of bound states of two interacting particles, either bosons or fermions, performing a continuous-time quantum walk on a one-dimensional lattice. We consider the situation where the distance between both particles has a hard bound, and the richer situation where the particles are bound by a smooth confining potential. The main emphasis is on the velocity characterizing the ballistic spreading of these bound states, and on the structure of the asymptotic distribution profile of their center-of-mass coordinate. The latter profile generically exhibits many internal fronts.

  6. Gravitons as Force Mediating Bosons in the Context of Spacetime Curvature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallal, Shawqi Al

    2016-07-01

    In the framework of quantum gravity, gravitons are massless, spin-2 elementary particles. Their spin follows from the nature of the second rank stress energy tensor. In general relativity, matter modifies the curvature of spacetime. This proven fact may appear at first sight difficult to reconcile with the idea of a force mediating particle. Gravitons in string theory are closed loops with no end points to anchor, and therefore they can move freely between branes. This partially explains the weak force of gravity. However, the idea of gravitons as force mediating particles encounters certain difficulties associated with the vast cosmological distances between gravitationally interacting bodies, which might set a limit on the temporal scale for force propagation. The aim of this work is to discuss and reconcile the apparent discrepancies between spacetime curvature as a source of gravity and the graviton as a mediating particle for the gravitational force. To achieve that, we explore the ideas brought about by brane physics and the concept of nonlocality of interacting particles. Keywords: gravitation - graviton - spacetime curvature - nonlocality.

  7. Decay of the Higgs boson to $\\tau^- \\tau^+$ and non-Hermiticy of the Yukawa interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Korchin, Alexander Yu

    2016-01-01

    Issue of Hermiticity of the Higgs boson interaction with fermions is addressed. A model for non-Hermitian Yukawa interaction is proposed and approximation of one fermion generation is considered. Symmetry properties of the corresponding $h f \\bar{f}$ Lagrangian with respect to the discrete P, C and T transformations are analyzed, and the modified Dirac equation for the free fermion is studied. Longitudinal polarization of the fermions in the decay $h \\to f \\bar{f}$, which arises due to non-Hermiticity of the $h f \\bar{f}$ interaction, is discussed. It is suggested to study effects of this non-Hermiticity in the decay $h \\to \\tau^- \\tau^+ \\to \\mu^- {\\bar \

  8. Structure of Even-Even 218-230 Ra Isotopes within the Interacting Boson Approximation Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diab S. M.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A good description of the excited positive and negative parity states of radium nuclei (Z=88, N=130-142 is achieved using the interacting boson approximation model (IBA-1. The potential energy surfaces, energy levels, parity shift, electromagnetic transition rates B(E1, B(E2 and electric monopole strength X(E0/E2 are calculated for each nucleus. The analysis of the eigenvalues of the model Hamiltonian reveals the presence of an interaction between the positive and negative parity bands. Due to this interaction the $Delta I = 1$ staggering effect, between the energies of the ground state band and the negative parity state band, is produced including beat patterns.

  9. Membrane-mediated interaction between retroviral capsids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Nguyen, Toan

    2012-02-01

    A retrovirus is an RNA virus that is replicated through a unique strategy of reverse transcription. Unlike regular enveloped viruses which are assembled inside the host cells, the assembly of retroviral capsids happens right on the cell membrane. During the assembly process, the partially formed capsids deform the membrane, giving rise to an elastic energy. When two such partial capsids approach each other, this elastic energy changes. Or in other words, the two partial capsids interact with each other via the membrane. This membrane mediated interaction between partial capsids plays an important role in the kinetics of the assembly process. In this work, this membrane mediated interaction is calculated both analytically and numerically. It is worth noting that the diferential equation determining the membrane shape in general nonlinear and cannot be solved analytically,except in the linear region of small deformations. And it is exactly the nonlinear regime that is important for the assembly kinetics of retroviruses as it provides a large energy barrier. The theory developed here is applicable to more generic cases of membrane mediated interactions between two membrane-embedded proteins.

  10. Level Density In Interacting Boson-Fermion-Fermion Model (IBFFM) Of The Odd-Odd Nucleus 196Au

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The level density of the odd-odd nucleus 196Au is investigated in the interacting boson-fermion-fermion model (IBFFM) which accounts for collectivity and complex interaction between quasiparticle and collective modes.The IBFFM total level density is fitted by Gaussian and its tail is also fitted by Bethe formula and constant temperature Fermi gas model

  11. New Microscopic Derivation of the Interacting Boson Model and its Applications to Exotic Nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a new approach to microscopic derivation of the Interacting Boson Model (IBM) Hamiltonian for general cases, starting from the mean-field model, e.g., the one with Skyrme-type interactions [1]. The multi-fermion dynamics of the surface deformations and the effects of the nuclear force are simulated in terms of bosons. By comparing Potential Energy Surface (PES) of the mean-field model with that of the IBM, the parameters of the IBM Hamiltonian can be obtained as functions of N and Z. Using this method, levels and wave functions of the excited states are computed precisely: Various situations of three dynamical symmetries and quantum shape/phase transitions, including the recently proposed critical-point symmetries [2,3], can be reproduced quite nicely. Moreover, intriguing spectroscopic properties, e.g., unexpectedly large region of the E(5) symmetry, are predicted for experimentally unknown exotic nuclei such as W-Os isotopes with A ≥200. As another application, we will present the results of the systematic calculations for Z ≤50 nuclei such as Ru isotopes. These results contain the predicted energy levels for unexplored territory. Finally, we would like to discuss the uniqueness of the derived IBM parameters with the aid of the wavelet analysis, taking Sm and Ba isotopes as examples.(author)

  12. Interaction-driven exotic quantum phases in spin-orbit-coupled spin-1 bosons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pixley, J. H.; Natu, Stefan S.; Spielman, I. B.; Das Sarma, S.

    2016-02-01

    We study the interplay between large-spin, spin-orbit coupling, and superfluidity for bosons in a two-dimensional optical lattice, focusing on the spin-1 spin-orbit-coupled system recently realized at the Joint Quantum Institute [Campbell et al., arXiv:1501.05984]. We find a rich quantum phase diagram where, in addition to the conventional phases—superfluid and insulator—contained in the spin-1 Bose-Hubbard model, there are new lattice symmetry breaking phases. For weak interactions, the interplay between two length scales, the lattice momentum and the spin-orbit wave vector, induce a phase transition from a uniform superfluid to a phase where bosons simultaneously condense at the center and edge of the Brillouin zone at a nonzero spin-orbit strength. This state is characterized by spin-density-wave order, which arises from the spin-1 nature of the system. Interactions suppress spin-density-wave order, and favor a superfluid only at the Brillouin zone edge. This state has spatially oscillating mean-field order parameters, but a homogeneous density. We show that the spin-density-wave superfluid phase survives in a two-dimensional harmonic trap, and thus establish that our results are directly applicable to experiments on 87Rb,7Li, and 41K.

  13. Nuclear structure of 110Pd and 110Cd isobar by interacting boson model (ibm-1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a computational study in the field of nuclear structure by interacting boson model (IBM) to represents very important step formed in the description of collective nuclear excitations and the properties of electromagnetic transition. The ground state energy bands and the reduced transition probabilities B(E2) ↓ up to 81+ level of even-even nuclei 110Pd and 110Cd have been calculated by interacting boson model (IBM-1) and compared with previous experimental values. The set of parameters used in this calculation is the best approximation that has been carried out so far. The ratio of the excitation energies of the first 4+ and the first 2+ excited states, R4/2, is also calculated and an achievable degree of agreement has been investigated in transitional symmetry U(5) - O(6) for 110Cd and O(6) for 110Pd nuclei. We have been compared B(E2) values of 110Pd and 110Cd nuclei with theoretically and experimentally and their systematic studies as a function of angular momentum (L). We have been studied systematically the ratios RL = E(L+) / E(21+) and R = B(E2 : L+- > (L - 2)+) / B(E2 : 2+ -> 0+) of those nuclei in the ground-state band. Moreover, we have compared the attention to the analogy between the rotational frequency in ordinary space and Fermi energy in gauge space between 110Pd and 110Cd nuclei.

  14. Light Front Boson Model Propagation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jorge Henrique Sales; Alfredo Takashi Suzuki

    2011-01-01

    stract The scope and aim of this work is to describe the two-body interaction mediated by a particle (either the scalar or the gauge boson) within the light-front formulation. To do this, first of all we point out the importance of propagators and Green functions in Quantum Mechanics. Then we project the covariant quantum propagator onto the light front time to get the propagator for scalar particles in these coordinates. This operator propagates the wave function from x+ = 0 to x+ > O. It corresponds to the definition of the time ordering operation in the light front time x+. We calculate the light-front Green's function for 2 interacting bosons propagating forward in x+. We also show how to write down the light front Green's function from the Feynman propagator and finally make a generalization to N bosons.

  15. Microscopic foundation and geometric interpretation of the interacting-boson model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of aspects of the relation between the shell model and the interacting-boson model are studied. The IBM is assumed to describe that part of the shell-model space where all states are built from selected, correlated pairs with angular momentum zero or two, which are mapped onto bosons. The goal of a microscopic derivation of IBM is to determine this subspace and to obtain the parameters that govern the dynamics in boson space. A formalism is introduced to calculate the expectation value of the hamiltonian between states containing such correlated fermion pairs. This formalism only applies to spherical nuclei, where zero-coupled pairs dominate. It is applied to the semimagic tin nuclei. Several methods are compared to determine the structure of the collective pairs in order to find a method which gives the 'best pairs'. The formalism is also applied to the mercury isotopes for which both neutrons and protons are active. In this more realistic case the above-mentioned methods to determine the pairs are also studied. The IBM-2 parameters are derived from the microscopic calculation. Group-theoretical aspects of the SU(3) limits of IBM-1 and IBM-2 are investigated. A complete decomposition for the SU(3) limits is given. Specific attention is paid to the 'triaxial-rotor' SU(3)*-limit, which is thought to describe nuclei with a triaxial shape. The SU(3)* symmetry of IBM-2 is applied in a study of the 192Os nucleus. The relation between IBM and geometrical models is discussed. (Auth.)

  16. Shell model tests of the interacting boson model description of nuclear collective motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of a large shell-model calculation of a pseudo-nucleus which displays striking behavior suggestive of rotational phenomena are presented. In these calculations, a specific and physically reasonable single-particle structure is given to the wave functions, and an explicit two-body residual interaction is used. The calculations show the coupling of key low-lying neutron and proton states of valence particles can lead to collective rotational features which appear to be more distinct and which extend to higher angular momenta as the number of particles increases and that those states which are rotational are dominated by states formed by coupling J = 0 and J = 2 two-particle states. Considerable supporting evidence is offered for the validity of the assumptions of the interacting boson model. 2 references

  17. Vortex and Meissner phases of strongly-interacting bosons on a two-leg ladder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piraud, Marie; Heidrich-Meisner, Fabian; McCulloch, Ian P.; Greshner, Sebastian; Vekua, Temo; Schollwoeck, Ulrich

    2015-05-01

    We present the phase diagram of the strongly-interacting Bose-Hubbard model defined on a two-leg ladder geometry in the presence of a homogeneous flux. Our work was motivated by a recent experiment, which studied the same system, in the complementary regime of weak interactions. Based on extensive density matrix renormalization group simulations and a bosonization analysis, we have fully explored the parameter space spanned by filling, inter-leg tunneling, and flux. As a main result, we demonstrate the existence of gapless and gapped Meissner and vortex phases, with the gapped states emerging in Mott-insulating regimes. We calculate experimentally accessible observables such as chiral currents and vortex patterns and study their dependence on model parameters. The research of M.P. was supported by the European Union through the Marie-Curie grant ``ToPOL'' (No. 624033) (funded within FP7-MC- IEF).

  18. P ,T -odd electron-nucleus interaction in atomic systems as an exchange by Higgs bosons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubukov, D. V.; Labzowsky, L. N.

    2016-06-01

    Scalar-pseudoscalar P ,T -odd interaction between the electron and the nucleus in atomic systems is constructed within the standard model as an exchange by Higgs boson. The necessary P - and T -violating contribution is obtained at the three-loop level on the basis of Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix. This contribution, unlike the corresponding contribution to the electron electric dipole moment (EDM), does not vanish since the "Higgs charges" of quarks, contrary to their electric charges, are flavor dependent. Order-of-magnitude estimates of the effect expressed as an "equivalent" electron EDM give the values within the range deeqv˜10-40-10-45e cm , depending on the known different estimates for the electron EDM. This can be compared with the known "benchmark" two-photon P ,T -odd electron-nucleus interaction effect, which provides deeqv˜10-38e cm .

  19. The structure of 193Au within the Interacting Boson Fermion Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A γγ angular correlation experiment investigating the nucleus 193Au is presented. In this work the level scheme of 193Au is extended by new level information on spins, multipolarities and newly observed states. The new results are compared with theoretical predictions from a general Interacting Boson Fermion Model (IBFM) calculation for the positive-parity states. The experimental data is in good agreement with an IBFM calculation using all proton orbitals between the shell closures at Z=50 and Z=126. As a dominant contribution of the d3/2 orbital to the wave function of the lowest excited states is observed, a truncated model of the IBFM using a Bose–Fermi symmetry is applied to the describe 193Au. Using the parameters of a fit performed for 193Au, the level scheme of 192Pt, the supersymmetric partner of 193Au, is predicted but shows a too small boson seniority splitting. We obtained a common fit by including states observed in 192Pt. With the new parameters a supersymmetric description of both nuclei is established

  20. Contact Interactions in Higgs-Vector Boson Associated Production at the ILC

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, Jonathan; Eilam, Gad

    2016-01-01

    We explore new physics (NP) effects in Higgs-Vector boson associated production at a future International Linear Collider (ILC) via e+e- -> Zh,Zhh, using effective field theory (EFT) techniques. In particular, we focus on a certain class of dimension 6 operators, which are generated by tree-level exchanges of a new heavy vector field in the underlying theory. These operators induce new contact terms of the form \\psi\\psi\\phi D\\phi, involving the Standard Model (SM) fermions (\\psi), gauge-bosons (D is the covariant derivative) and the SM Higgs field (\\phi). We investigate the high-energy behaviour of these new effective interactions in e+e- -> Zh,Zhh, imposing bounds from electroweak precision measurements, and show that the ILC is an excellent testing ground for probing this type of NP via e+e- -> Zh,Zhh. We also address the validity of the EFT expansion and we study the correlation between the hZ and hhZ signals, which can be utilized in future searches for NP in these channels.

  1. Nuclear Phase Transition from Spherical to Axially Symmetric Deformed Shapes Using Interacting Boson Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalaf A. M.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The interacting boson model (sd-IBM1 with intrinsic coherent state is used to study the shape phase transitions from spherical U(5 to prolate deformed SU(3 shapes in Nd- Sm isotopic chains. The Hamiltonian is written in the creation and annihilation form with one and two body terms.For each nucleus a fitting procedure is adopted to get the best model parameters by fitting selected experimental energy levels, B(E2 transi- tion rates and two-neutron separation energies with the calculated ones.The U(5-SU(3 IBM potential energy surfaces (PES’s are analyzed and the critical phase transition points are identified in the space of model parameters.In Nd-Sm isotopic chains nuclei evolve from spherical to deformed shapes by increasing the boson number. The nuclei 150 Nd and 152 Sm have been found to be close to critical points.We have also studied the energy ratios and the B(E2 values for yrast band at the critical points.

  2. Implications of gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking with vector-like quarks and a ~125 GeV Higgs boson

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Stephen P. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Wells, James D. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2012-08-01

    We investigate the implications of models that achieve a Standard Model-like Higgs boson of mass near 125 GeV by introducing additional TeV-scale supermultiplets in the vector-like 10+\\bar{10} representation of SU(5), within the context of gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking. We study the resulting mass spectrum of superpartners, comparing and contrasting to the usual gauge-mediated and CMSSM scenarios, and discuss implications for LHC supersymmetry searches. This approach implies that exotic vector-like fermions t'_{1,2}, b',and \\tau' should be within the reach of the LHC. We discuss the masses, the couplings to electroweak bosons, and the decay branching ratios of the exotic fermions, with and without various unification assumptions for the mass and mixing parameters. We comment on LHC prospects for discovery of the exotic fermion states, both for decays that are prompt and non-prompt on detector-crossing time scales.

  3. Hubbard model for ultracold bosonic atoms interacting via zero-point-energy-induced three-body interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Saurabh; Johnson, P. R.; Tiesinga, Eite

    2016-04-01

    We show that, for ultracold neutral bosonic atoms held in a three-dimensional periodic potential or optical lattice, a Hubbard model with dominant, attractive three-body interactions can be generated. In fact, we derive that the effect of pairwise interactions can be made small or zero starting from the realization that collisions occur at the zero-point energy of an optical lattice site and the strength of the interactions is energy dependent from effective-range contributions. We determine the strength of the two- and three-body interactions for scattering from van der Waals potentials and near Fano-Feshbach resonances. For van der Waals potentials, which for example describe scattering of alkaline-earth atoms, we find that the pairwise interaction can only be turned off for species with a small negative scattering length, leaving the 88Sr isotope a possible candidate. Interestingly, for collisional magnetic Feshbach resonances this restriction does not apply and there often exist magnetic fields where the two-body interaction is small. We illustrate this result for several known narrow resonances between alkali-metal atoms as well as chromium atoms. Finally, we compare the size of the three-body interaction with hopping rates and describe limits due to three-body recombination.

  4. 750 GeV Diphoton Excess as a Composite (Pseudo)scalar Boson from New Strong Interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Ko, P; Yuan, Tzu-Chiang

    2016-01-01

    The diphoton excess at 750 GeV would make a definite signal of new physics beyond the Standard Model, if it is confirmed. In this letter, we consider a possibility that the excess is due to a composite (pseudo)scalar boson, whose constituents are either new vector-like quarks (Q\\overline{Q}) or scalar quarks (\\widetilde{Q} \\widetilde{Q}^\\dagger) which feel new QCD-like vectorlike confining force with confinement scale Lambda_h. Assuming m_Q (m_{\\widetilde Q}) >> Lambda_h, the observed 750 GeV excess could be either Q\\overline{Q} (^1S_0) state with J^{PC} = 0^{-+} or \\widetilde{Q} \\widetilde{Q}^\\dagger (^1S_0) state with J^{PC}=0^{++}. For the Q\\bar{Q} scenario, there will be a spin-triplet partner psi_Q which is slightly heavier that eta_Q because of the hyper fine interactions mediated by h-gluon exchange. We consider productions and decays of eta_Q, eta_{\\widetilde Q} and psi_Q using the nonrelativistic QCD methods, and identify the parameter regions which can explain the observed diphoton excess. We discus...

  5. Extended interacting boson model description of Pd nuclei in the A∼100 transitional region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Böyükata M.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Studies of even-even nuclei in the A∼100 transitional mass region within the framework of the interacting boson model-1 (IBM-1 have been expanded down to 98Pd nuclei to compare the calculation with new experimental results from measurements obtained at the Institute of Nuclear Physics in Cologne. The low-lying energy levels and the E2 transition rates of 98−100Pd nuclei are investigated and their geometric structures are described in the present work. We have also focused on the new B(E2:21+ → 01+ values of 112,114Pd nuclei to compare with previously calculated values.

  6. Neutrinoless double positron decay and positron emitting electron capture in the interacting boson model

    CERN Document Server

    Barea, J; Iachello, F

    2015-01-01

    Neutrinoless double-$\\beta$ decay is of fundamental importance for determining the neutrino mass. Although double electron ($\\beta^-\\beta^-$) decay is the most promising mode, in very recent years interest in double positron ($\\beta^+\\beta^+$) decay, positron emitting electron capture ($EC\\beta^+$), and double electron capture ($ECEC$) has been renewed. We present here results of a calculation of nuclear matrix elements for neutrinoless double-$\\beta^+$ decay and positron emitting electron capture within the framework of the microscopic interacting boson model (IBM-2) for $^{58}$Ni, $^{64}$Zn, $^{78}$Kr, $^{96}$Ru, $^{106}$Cd, $^{124}$Xe, $^{130}$Ba, and $^{136}$Ce decay. By combining these with a calculation of phase space factors we calculate expected half-lives.

  7. Quadrupole Collective Dynamics from Energy Density Functionals: Collective Hamiltonian and the Interacting Boson Model

    CERN Document Server

    Nomura, K; Otsuka, T; Shimizu, N; Vretenar, D

    2011-01-01

    Microscopic energy density functionals (EDF) have become a standard tool for nuclear structure calculations, providing an accurate global description of nuclear ground states and collective excitations. For spectroscopic applications this framework has to be extended to account for collective correlations related to restoration of symmetries broken by the static mean field, and for fluctuations of collective variables. In this work we compare two approaches to five-dimensional quadrupole dynamics: the collective Hamiltonian for quadrupole vibrations and rotations, and the Interacting Boson Model. The two models are compared in a study of the evolution of non-axial shapes in Pt isotopes. Starting from the binding energy surfaces of $^{192,194,196}$Pt, calculated with a microscopic energy density functional, we analyze the resulting low-energy collective spectra obtained from the collective Hamiltonian, and the corresponding IBM-2 Hamiltonian. The calculated excitation spectra and transition probabilities for t...

  8. Disentangling phase transitions and critical points in the proton–neutron interacting boson model by catastrophe theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Ramos, J.E., E-mail: enrique.ramos@dfaie.uhu.es [Departamento de Física Aplicada, Universidad de Huelva, 21071 Huelva (Spain); Unidad Asociada de la Universidad de Huelva al IEM (CSIC), Madrid (Spain); Arias, J.M., E-mail: ariasc@us.es [Departamento de Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Sevilla, Apdo 1065, 41080 Sevilla (Spain); Unidad Asociada de la Universidad de Sevilla al IEM (CSIC), Madrid (Spain); Dukelsky, J., E-mail: dukelsky@iem.cfmac.csic.es [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, Serrano 123, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-09-07

    We introduce the basic concepts of catastrophe theory needed to derive analytically the phase diagram of the proton–neutron interacting boson model (IBM-2). Previous studies [1–3] were based on numerical solutions. We here explain the whole IBM-2 phase diagram including the precise order of the phase transitions in terms of the cusp catastrophe.

  9. Interacting boson model study of the spin evolution of the yrast E2 transition probabilities in Yb-162

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dobeš, Jan; Jolos, R. V.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 70, - (2004), 044308. ISSN 0556-2813 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/02/0939; GA AV ČR KSK1048102 Keywords : interacting boson model * yrast transition Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 3.125, year: 2004

  10. Spinless Bosons in a 1D Harmonic Trap with Repulsive Delta Function Interparticle Interaction II: Numerical Solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following the general theory developed in paper I [Chin. Phys. Lett. 26 (2009) 120506] we present here the numerical results for an N spinless boson system in a 1D harmonic trap with repulsive delta function interparticle interaction as N → ∞, with √N/g = fixed. (general)

  11. Disentangling phase transitions and critical points in the proton–neutron interacting boson model by catastrophe theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We introduce the basic concepts of catastrophe theory needed to derive analytically the phase diagram of the proton–neutron interacting boson model (IBM-2). Previous studies [1–3] were based on numerical solutions. We here explain the whole IBM-2 phase diagram including the precise order of the phase transitions in terms of the cusp catastrophe

  12. Secret Interactions of Sterile Neutrinos and MeV-scale gauge boson

    CERN Document Server

    Tabrizi, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Recent results from neutrino experiments show evidence for light sterile neutrinos which do not have any Standard Model interactions. These light sterile states are disfavored by cosmology due to the constraints from the Big Bang Nucleosynthesis and Large Scale Structure Formation. This tension could be solved if the sterile neutrino states had Secret Interaction with a light gauge boson $X$ with mass $M_X$ and coupling $g_X$, and with a field strength at least $10^3-10^4$ times larger than the Fermi constant. We show that such large interaction strength is ruled out due to the constraints from MINOS experiment. By performing an analysis on the Secret Interaction of the sterile neutrinos using the MINOS data and comparing with the results of cosmology, the CCFR experiment and the $(g-2)_\\mu$ data we have found a concordance region for $g_X\\sim (4-8)\\times 10^{-4}$ and $M_X\\sim (10-24)$~MeV.

  13. Collective states of the odd-mass nuclei within the framework of the Interacting Vector Boson Model

    OpenAIRE

    Ganev, H. G.

    2007-01-01

    A supersymmetric extension of the dynamical symmetry group $Sp^{B}(12,R)$ of the Interacting Vector Boson Model (IVBM), to the orthosymplectic group $OSp(2\\Omega/12,R)$ is developed in order to incorporate fermion degrees of freedom into the nuclear dynamics and to encompass the treatment of odd mass nuclei. The bosonic sector of the supergroup is used to describe the complex collective spectra of the neighboring even-even nuclei and is considered as a core structure of the odd nucleus. The f...

  14. (12) limit and complete classification of symmetry schemes in proton–neutron interacting boson model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V K B Kota

    2003-01-01

    It is shown that the proton–neutron interacting boson model (pnIBM) admits new symmetry limits with (12) algebra which break spin but preserves the quantum number . The generators of (12) are derived and the quantum number of (12) for a given boson number is determined by identifying the corresponding quasi-spin algebra. The (12) algebra generates two symmetry schemes and for both of them, complete classification of the basis states and typical spectra are given. With the (12) algebra identified, complete classification of pnIBM symmetry limits with good is established.

  15. Second order corrections to mean field evolution for weakly interacting Bosons in the case of 3-body interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Xuwen

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the Hamiltonian evolution of N weakly interacting Bosons. Assuming triple collisions with singular potentials, its mean field approximation is given by a quintic Hartree equation. We construct a second order correction to the mean field approximation using a kernel k(t,x,y) and derive an evolution equation for k. We show the global existence for the resulting evolution equation for the correction and establish an apriori estimate comparing the approximation to the exact Hamiltonian evolution. Our error estimate is global and uniform in time. Comparing with the work in [20,11,12] where the error estimate grows in time, our approximation tracks the exact dynamics for all time with an error of the order O(1/$\\sqrt{N}$).

  16. Collisional interactions between self-interacting non-relativistic boson stars: effective potential analysis and numerical simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Cotner, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Scalar particles are a common prediction of many beyond the Standard Model theories. If they are light and cold enough, there is a possibility they may form Bose-Einstein condensates, which will then become gravitationally bound. These boson stars are solitonic solutions to the Einstein-Klein-Gordon equations, but may be approximated in the non-relativistic regime with a coupled Schr\\"odinger-Poisson system. General properties of single soliton states are derived, including the possibility of quartic self-interactions. Binary collisions between two solitons are then studied, and the effects of different mass ratios, relative phases, self-couplings, and separation distances are characterized, leading to an easy conceptual understanding of how these parameters affect the collision outcome in terms of conservation of energy. Applications to dark matter are discussed.

  17. String-localized massive vector bosons in self-interaction without ghosts and indefinite metric

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: It is well-known that the Hilbert space representation of the massive vector boson Bμ, the so-called Proca field, does not admit renormalizable self-interactions due to its bad UV behavior. In the usual approach to overcome this problem, one uses a different version Aμ of the vector field living in an indefinite metric space and introduces a scalar partner (the Stueckelberg field), and ghosts. The unphysical degrees of freedom are divided out by requiring gauge (or BRST) invariance. The gauge principle is quite restrictive: In particular, it requires additional physical degrees of freedom in any model with self-interacting massive vector fields - the Higgs particles. I propose a version of the massive vector field Aμ which is localized on Mandelstam strings extending to spacelike infinity. It acts in a Hilbert space without ghosts and has better UV-behavior than its point-localized counterpart Bμ. It differs from the latter by the gradient of a string-localized scalar field, which is analogous to the Stueckelberg field but does not describe any new degrees of freedom. Suitably chosen interaction Lagrangians then differ from their point-localized (non-renormalizable) counterparts by a divergence. The crucial question is whether the divergence operator can be taken out of the time-ordered products. This amounts to a normalization condition for the time-ordered products. If it can be satisfied, then (an adapted version of) the Epstein-Glaser perturbative construction should lead to a renormalizable, unitary and local model. We are presently applying this strategy to massive QED and to models with self-interacting vector bosons, analogous to the Abelian and non-Abelian Higgs models. Our motivations are threefold: 1: the method might admit new models since it differs technically from the usual point-local Epstein-Glaser method; 2: the unitarity of the S-matrix is guaranteed since there are no unphysical sectors; 3: aesthetic reasons: We have no unphysical

  18. Gravity-induced four-fermion contact interaction: liberating the intermediate W and Z type gauge bosons

    CERN Document Server

    Boos, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Coupling fermions to gravity necessarily leads to a non-renormalizable, gravitational four-fermion contact interaction. In this essay, we argue that augmenting the Einstein--Cartan Lagrangian with suitable kinetic terms quadratic in the gauge field strengths gives rise to new, massive propagating gravitational degrees of freedom. This is to be seen in close analogy to Fermi's effective four-fermion interaction and its emergent W and Z bosons.

  19. Spin-dependent level density in interacting Boson-Fermion-Fermion model of the Odd-Odd Nucleus 196Au

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The level density of the odd-odd nucleus 196Au is investigated in the interacting boson-fermion-fermion model (IBFFM) which accounts for collectivity and complex interaction between quasiparticle and collective modes.The IBFFM spin-dependent level densities show high-spin reduction with respect to Bethe formula.This can be well accounted for by a modified spin-dependent level density formula. (authors)

  20. Extended Bose Hubbard model of interacting bosonic atoms in optical lattices: From superfluidity to density waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For systems of interacting, ultracold spin-zero neutral bosonic atoms, harmonically trapped and subject to an optical lattice potential, we derive an Extended Bose Hubbard (EBH) model by developing a systematic expansion for the Hamiltonian of the system in powers of the lattice parameters and of a scale parameter, the lattice attenuation factor. We identify the dominant terms that need to be retained in realistic experimental conditions, up to nearest-neighbor interactions and nearest-neighbor hoppings conditioned by the on-site occupation numbers. In the mean field approximation, we determine the free energy of the system and study the phase diagram both at zero and at finite temperature. At variance with the standard on site Bose Hubbard model, the zero-temperature phase diagram of the EBH model possesses a dual structure in the Mott insulating regime. Namely, for specific ranges of the lattice parameters, a density wave phase characterizes the system at integer fillings, with domains of alternating mean occupation numbers that are the atomic counterparts of the domains of staggered magnetizations in an antiferromagnetic phase. We show as well that in the EBH model, a zero-temperature quantum phase transition to pair superfluidity is, in principle, possible, but completely suppressed at the lowest order in the lattice attenuation factor. Finally, we determine the possible occurrence of the different phases as a function of the experimentally controllable lattice parameters

  1. U-boson at BESIII

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, S

    2006-01-01

    The $O$(MeV) spin-1 U-boson has been proposed to mediate the interaction among electron-positron and $O$(MeV) dark matter, in order to account for the 511 keV $\\gamma$-ray observation by SPI/INTEGRAL. In this paper the observability of such kind of U-boson at BESIII is investigated through the processes $e^+e^- \\to U \\gamma$ and $e^+e^- \\to J/\\Psi \\to e^+e^- U$. We find that BESIII and high luminosity B-factories have the comparable capacity to detect such U-boson. If U-boson decays mainly into dark matter, i.e. invisibly, BESIII can measure the coupling among U-boson and electron-positron $g_{eR}$ (see text) down to $O(10^{-5})$, and cover large parameter space which can account for 511 keV $\\gamma$-ray observation. On the other hand, provided that U decays mainly into electron-positron, BESIII can detect $g_{eR}$ down to $O(10^{-3})$, and it is hard to explore 511 keV $\\gamma$-ray measurement allowed parameter space due to the irreducible QED backgrounds.

  2. A search for invisible Higgs bosons produced in $e^{+} e^{-}$ interactions at LEP 2 energies

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P; Adye, T; Adzic, P; Albrecht, Z; Alderweireld, T; Alekseev, G D; Alemany, R; Allmendinger, T; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Amaldi, Ugo; Amapane, N; Amato, S; Anassontzis, E G; Andersson, P; Andreazza, A; Andringa, S; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Bambade, P; Barão, F; Barbiellini, Guido; Barbier, R; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Barker, G; Baroncelli, A; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Behrmann, A; Beillière, P; Belokopytov, Yu A; Belous, K S; Benekos, N C; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Bérat, C; Berggren, M; Bertini, D; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Bigi, M; Bilenky, S M; Bizouard, M A; Bloch, D; Blom, H M; Bonesini, M; Bonivento, W; Boonekamp, M; Booth, P S L; Borgland, A W; Borisov, G; Bosio, C; Botner, O; Boudinov, E; Bouquet, B; Bourdarios, C; Bowcock, T J V; Boyko, I; Bozovic, I; Bozzo, M; Branchini, P; Brenke, T; Brenner, R A; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Burgsmüller, T; Buschbeck, Brigitte; Buschmann, P; Cabrera, S; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Carena, F; Carroll, L; Caso, Carlo; Castillo-Gimenez, M V; Cattai, A; Cavallo, F R; Chabaud, V; Chapkin, M M; Charpentier, P; Chaussard, L; Checchia, P; Chelkov, G A; Chierici, R; Shlyapnikov, P; Chochula, P; Chorowicz, V; Chudoba, J; Cieslik, K; Collins, P; Contri, R; Cortina, E; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Cowell, J H; Crawley, H B; Crennell, D J; Crépé, S; Crosetti, G; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Czellar, S; Davenport, Martyn; Da Silva, W; Deghorain, A; Della Ricca, G; Delpierre, P A; Demaria, N; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Clercq, C; De Lotto, B; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; Dijkstra, H; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Dolbeau, J; Doroba, K; Dracos, M; Drees, J; Dris, M; Duperrin, A; Durand, J D; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ekspong, Gösta; Ellert, M; Elsing, M; Engel, J P; Erzen, B; Espirito-Santo, M C; Falk, E; Fanourakis, G K; Fassouliotis, D; Fayot, J; Feindt, Michael; Fenyuk, A; Ferrari, P; Ferrer, A; Ferrer-Ribas, E; Ferro, F; Fichet, S; Firestone, A; Flagmeyer, U; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Franek, B J; Frodesen, A G; Frühwirth, R; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Galloni, A; Gamba, D; Gamblin, S; Gandelman, M; García, C; Gaspar, C; Gaspar, M; Gasparini, U; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gelé, D; Ghodbane, N; Gil, I; Glege, F; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gómez-Ceballos, G; Gonçalves, P; González-Caballero, I; Gopal, Gian P; Gorn, L; Górski, M; Guz, Yu; Gracco, Valerio; Grahl, J; Graziani, E; Green, C; Grimm, H J; Gris, P; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Günther, M; Guy, J; Hahn, F; Hahn, S; Haider, S; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hansen, J; Harris, F J; Hedberg, V; Heising, S; Hernández, J J; Herquet, P; Herr, H; Hessing, T L; Heuser, J M; Higón, E; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Hoorelbeke, S; Houlden, M A; Hrubec, Josef; Huet, K; Hughes, G J; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, P; Janik, R; Jarlskog, C; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jean-Marie, B; Johansson, E K; Jönsson, P E; Joram, C; Juillot, P; Kapusta, F; Karafasoulis, K; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Kersevan, Borut P; Khomenko, B A; Khovanskii, N N; Kiiskinen, A P; King, B J; Kinvig, A; Kjaer, N J; Klapp, O; Klein, H; Kluit, P M; Kokkinias, P; Koratzinos, M; Kostyukhin, V; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Krammer, Manfred; Kriznic, E; Krstic, J; Krumshtein, Z; Kubinec, P; Kurowska, J; Kurvinen, K L; Lamsa, J; Lane, D W; Langefeld, P; Lapin, V; Laugier, J P; Lauhakangas, R; Leder, Gerhard; Ledroit, F; Lefébure, V; Leinonen, L; Leisos, A; Leitner, R; Lemonne, J; Lenzen, Georg; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Lethuillier, M; Libby, J; Liko, D; Lipniacka, A; Lippi, I; Lörstad, B; Loken, J G; Lopes, J H; López, J M; López-Fernandez, R; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J N; Mahon, J R; Maio, A; Malek, A; Malmgren, T G M; Maltezos, S; Malychev, V; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R P; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Martí i García, S; Masik, J; Mastroyiannopoulos, N; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Matthiae, Giorgio; Mazzucato, F; Mazzucato, M; McCubbin, M L; McKay, R; McNulty, R; McPherson, G; Meroni, C; Meyer, W T; Migliore, E; Mirabito, L; Mitaroff, Winfried A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Moch, M; Møller, R; Mönig, K; Monge, M R; Moreau, X; Morettini, P; Morton, G A; Müller, U; Münich, K; Mulders, M; Mulet-Marquis, C; Muresan, R; Murray, W J; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Myklebust, T; Naraghi, F; Nassiakou, M; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Navas, S; Nawrocki, K; Negri, P; Némécek, S; Neufeld, N; Neumeister, N; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, B S; Nikolenko, M; Nomokonov, V P; Normand, Ainsley; Nygren, A; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Orazi, G; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Paganoni, M; Paiano, S; Pain, R; Paiva, R; Palacios, J; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Papageorgiou, K; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Parzefall, U; Passeri, A; Passon, O; Pegoraro, M; Peralta, L; Pernicka, Manfred; Perrotta, A; Petridou, C; Petrolini, A; Phillips, H T; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Piotto, E; Podobnik, T; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Privitera, P; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Radojicic, D; Ragazzi, S; Rahmani, H; Ratoff, P N; Read, A L; Rebecchi, P; Redaelli, N G; Reid, D; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P B; Resvanis, L K; Richard, F; Rídky, J; Rinaudo, G; Røhne, O M; Romero, A; Ronchese, P; Rosenberg, E I; Rosinsky, P; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Royon, C; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ruiz, A; Saarikko, H; Sacquin, Yu; Sadovskii, A; Sajot, G; Salt, J; Sampsonidis, D; Sannino, M; Schneider, H; Schwemling, P; Schwering, B; Schwickerath, U; Schyns, M A E; Scuri, F; Seager, P; Sedykh, Yu; Segar, A M; Sekulin, R L; Shellard, R C; Sheridan, A; Siebel, M; Simard, L C; Simonetto, F; Sissakian, A N; Smadja, G; Smirnov, N; Smirnova, O G; Smith, G R; Sopczak, André; Sosnowski, R; Spassoff, Tz; Spiriti, E; Sponholz, P; Squarcia, S; Stanescu, C; Stanic, S; Stevenson, K; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Strub, R; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tegenfeldt, F; Terranova, F; Thomas, J; Timmermans, J; Tinti, N; Tkatchev, L G; Todorova-Nová, S; Tomaradze, A G; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortora, L; Tranströmer, G; Treille, D; Tristram, G; Trochimczuk, M; Troncon, C; Tsirou, A L; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tzamarias, S; Ullaland, O; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; Vallazza, E; Van der Velde, C; van Apeldoorn, G W; van Dam, P; Van Doninck, W K; Van Eldik, J; Van Lysebetten, A; Van Remortel, N; Van Vulpen, I B; Vassilopoulos, N; Vegni, G; Ventura, L; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verlato, M; Vertogradov, L S; Verzi, V; Vilanova, D; Vitale, L; Vlasov, E; Vodopyanov, A S; Vollmer, C F; Voulgaris, G; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Walck, C; Weiser, C; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wilkinson, G R; Winter, M; Witek, M; Wolf, G; Yi, J; Yushchenko, O P; Zaitsev, A; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zevgolatakos, E; Zimin, N I; Zucchelli, G C; Zumerle, G

    1999-01-01

    Searches for HZ production with the Higgs boson decaying into an invisible final state have been performed with the data collected by the DELPHI experiment up to the centre-of-mass energy of 183 GeV. The hadronic and muon pair final states of the Z boson were analysed. From the absence of signal, upper limits on the cross-section and the corresponding Higgs boson mass limits were set at 95\\% confidence level. The results are interpreted as excluded parameter regions in the framework of the minimal supersymmetric standard model and in the simplest Majoron model with one Higgs doublet and one Higgs singlet field.

  3. Search for extra dimensions in boson and fermion pair production in $e^{+}e^{-}$ interactions at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Adriani, O; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Balandras, A; Ball, R C; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Bellucci, L; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brochu, F; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Button, A M; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chiefari, G; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; Cozzoni, B; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Cucciarelli, S; Dai, T S; van Dalen, J A; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Déglon, P L; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; De Salvo, A; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Dufournaud, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falagán, M A; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gataullin, M; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Gong, Z F; Grenier, G; Grimm, O; Grünewald, M W; Guida, M; van Gulik, R; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Hidas, P; Hirschfelder, J; Hofer, H; Holzner, G; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Iashvili, I; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, D H; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Koutsenko, V F; Kräber, M H; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Lee, H J; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Lugnier, L; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Marchesini, P A; Marian, G; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; Mazumdar, K; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mihul, A; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Mohanty, G B; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Musy, M; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Oh, Yu D; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Oulianov, A; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Paramatti, R; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pedace, M; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Piccolo, D; Pierella, F; Pieri, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Pothier, J; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Quartieri, J; Rahal-Callot, G; Rahaman, M A; Raics, P; Raja, N; Ramelli, R; Rancoita, P G; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosca, A; Rosier-Lees, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Saremi, S; Sarkar, S; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Seganti, A; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, A; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Szillási, Z; Sztaricskai, T; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Timmermans, C; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Valente, E; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Vicinanza, D; Viertel, Gert M; Villa, S; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Vodopyanov, I; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, M; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Weber, M; Wienemann, P; Wilkens, H; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xia, L; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yang, H J; Yang, M; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zhang, Z P; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, A; Ziegler, F; Zilizi, G; Zöller, M

    1999-01-01

    Extra spatial dimensions are proposed by recent theories that postulate the scale of gravity to be of the same order as the electroweak scale. A sizeable interaction between gravitons and Standard Model particles is then predicted. Effects of these new interactions in boson and fermion pair production are searched for in the data sample collected at centre--of--mass energies above the Z pole by the L3 detector at LEP. In addition, the direct production of a graviton associated with a Z boson is investigated. No statistically significant hints for the existence of these effects are found and lower limits in excess of 1\\,TeV are derived on the scale of this new theory of gravity.

  4. Evolution of ground state nuclear shapes in tungsten nuclei in terms of interacting boson model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalaf, A. M.; El-Shal, A. O.; Taha, M. M.; El-Sayed, M. A.

    2016-03-01

    The tungsten nuclei 180-190W are investigated within the framework of the interacting boson model using an intrinsic coherent state formalism. The Hamiltonian operator contains only multipole operators of the subalgebra associated with the dynamical symmetries SU(3) and O(6). The study includes the behavior of potential energy surfaces (BES's) and critical points in the space of the model parameters to declare the geometric character of the tungsten isotopic chain. Some selected energy levels and reduced E2 transition probabilities B(E2) for each nucleus are calculated to adjust the model parameters by using a computer code PH INT and simulated computer fitting programme to fit the experimental data with the IBM calculation by minimizing the root mean square deviations. The 180-190W isotopes lies in shape transition SU(3)-O(6) region of the IBM such that the lighter isotopes comes very clare to the SU(3) limit, while the behavior ones tend to be near the γ-unstable O(6) limit.

  5. sdg Interaction boson model : hexadecupole degree of freedom in nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sdg interacting boson model (sdgIBM), which includes monopoles (s), quadrupole(d) and hexadecupole(g) degrees of freedom, enables one to analyze hexadecupole (E4) properties of atomic nuclei. Various aspects of the model, both analytical and numerical, are reviewed emphasizing the symmetry structures involved. A large number of examples are given to provide understanding and tests, and to demonstrate the predictiveness of the sdg model. Extensions of the model to include proton-neutron degrees of freedom and fermion degrees of freedom (appropriate for odd mass nuclei) are briefly described. A comprehensive account of sdgIBM analysis of all the existing data on hexadecupole observables (mainly in the rare-earth region) is presented, including β4 (hexadecupole deformation) systematics, B(IS4; 0GS+→47+) systematics that give information about hexadecupole component in γ-vibration, E4 matrix elements involving few low-lying 4+ levels, E4 strength distributions and hexadecupole vibrational bands in deformed nuclei. (author). 282 refs., 27 figs., 4 tabs

  6. β -decay rates of Cs-131121 in the microscopic interacting boson-fermion model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardones, E.; Barea, J.; Alonso, C. E.; Arias, J. M.

    2016-03-01

    β -decay rates of Cs-131121 have been calculated in the framework of the neutron-proton interacting boson-fermion model (IBFM-2). For odd-A nuclei, the decay operator can be written in a relatively simple form in terms of the one-nucleon transfer operator. Previous studies of β decay in IBFM-2 were based on a transfer operator obtained by using the number operator approximation (NOA). In this work a new form of the one-nucleon transfer operator, derived microscopically without the NOA approximation, is used. The results from both approaches are compared and show that the deviation from experimental data is reduced without using the NOA approximation. Indications about the renormalization of the Fermi and Gamow-Teller matrix elements are discussed. This is a further step toward a more complete description of low-lying states in medium and heavy nuclei which is necessary to compute reliable matrix elements in studies of current active interest such as double-β decay or neutrino absorption experiments.

  7. Observation of the Higgs Boson of strong interaction via Compton scattering by the nucleon

    CERN Document Server

    Schumacher, Martin

    2010-01-01

    It is shown that the Quark-Level Linear $\\sigma$ Model (QLL$\\sigma$M) leads to a prediction for the diamagnetic term of the polarizabilities of the nucleon which is in excellent agreement with the experimental data. The bare mass of the $\\sigma$ meson is predicted to be $m_\\sigma=666$ MeV and the two-photon width $\\Gamma(\\sigma\\to\\gamma\\gamma)=(2.6\\pm 0.3)$ keV. It is argued that the mass predicted by the QLL$\\sigma$M corresponds to the $\\gamma\\gamma\\to\\sigma\\to NN$ reaction, i.e. to a $t$-channel pole of the $\\gamma N\\to N\\gamma$ reaction. Large -angle Compton scattering experiments revealing effects of the $\\sigma$ meson in the differential cross section are discussed. Arguments are presented that these findings may be understood as an observation of the Higgs boson of strong interaction while being part of the constituent quark.

  8. Nuclear shape coexistence in Po isotopes: An interacting boson model study

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia-Ramos, J E

    2015-01-01

    Background: The lead region, Po, Pb, Hg, and Pt, shows up the presence of coexisting structures having different deformation and corresponding to different particle-hole configurations in the Shell Model language. Purpose: We intend to study the importance of configuration mixing in the understanding of the nuclear structure of even-even Po isotopes, where the shape coexistence phenomena are not clear enough. Method: We study in detail a long chain of polonium isotopes, 190-208Po, using the interacting boson model with configuration mixing (IBM-CM). We fix the parameters of the Hamiltonians through a least-squares fit to the known energies and absolute B(E2) transition rates of states up to 3 MeV. Results: We obtained the IBM-CM Hamiltonians and we calculate excitation energies, B(E2)'s, electric quadrupole moments, nuclear radii and isotopic shifts, quadrupole shape invariants, wave functions, and deformations. Conclusions: We obtain a good agreement with the experimental data for all the studied observables...

  9. Description of nuclei in the A$\\sim$100 mass region with the interacting boson model

    CERN Document Server

    Böyükata, M; Uluer, I

    2010-01-01

    Even--even nuclei in the $A\\sim100$ mass region are investigated within the framework of the interacting boson model-1 (\\mbox{IBM-1}). The study includes energy spectra and electric quadrupole transition properties of zirconium, molybdenum, ruthenium and palladium isotopes with neutron number $N\\geq52$. A global parametrization of the \\mbox{IBM-1} Hamiltonian is found leading to a description of about 300 collective levels in 30 nuclei with a root-mean-square deviation from the observed level energies of 120~keV. The importance of the $d_{5/2}$ subshell closure at neutron number $N=56$ is pointed out. The geometric character of the nuclei can be visualized by plotting the potential energy surface $V(\\beta,\\gamma)$ obtained from the \\mbox{IBM-1} Hamiltonian in the classical limit. The parametrization established on the basis of known elements is used to predict properties of the unknown, neutron-rich isotopes $^{106}$Zr, $^{112}$Mo, $^{116}$Ru and $^{122}$Pd.

  10. Microscopic foundations of some doubly even Ru and Pd nuclei by the point of view of interacting boson model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present article, we suggested the most appropriate Hamiltonian that is needed for present calculations of nuclei at the onset of the deformed region by the view of interacting boson model (IBM-2). B(E2) transition probabilities and mixing ratios of some doubly even Ru and Pd nuclei were calculated. The results were compared with the previous experimental and theoretical data and it is observed that they are in good agreement

  11. Ensemble averaged coherent state path integral for disordered bosons with a repulsive interaction and derivation of a nonlinear sigma model

    OpenAIRE

    Mieck, Bernhard

    2010-01-01

    A coherent state path integral is considered for bosons with an ensemble average of a random potential and with an additional, repulsive interaction in the context of BEC under inclusion of specially prepared disorder. The essential normalization of the coherent state path integral, as a generating function of observables, is obtained from the non-equilibrium time contour for 'forward' and 'backward' propagation so that a time contour metric has to be taken into account in the ensemble averag...

  12. Sub quantum space and interactions properties from photon structure to fermions and bosons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Javadi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This article is based on a concept; "During the conversion of energy into mass, the interaction properties between the Sub Quantum Energies (SQEs are transferred from photon to fermions and bosons". We have accepted that nature of gravity is quantized, but according to the behavior of photons in the gravitational field, we provide a new definition of gravitons. Then we explain the relationship between gravity and electromagnetic energy. According to the experimental observations, we generalize the Maxwell equations of electromagnetism to the gravitational field. We use the pair production and decay to show that a charged particle acts like a generator, the generator input and output are gravitons and virtual photon. The negative charged particle produces positive virtual photon and positive charged particle produces negative virtual photon. A negative and a positive virtual photon combine with each other in the vicinity of a charged particle and cause the charged particle to accelerate. Although this approach to Quantum Field Theory (QFT is presented, it has some differences. The mechanism of negative and positive virtual photons interaction is easier and more realistic than exchange particles of QFT, and it also has no ambiguities of QFT. After all, we explain the real photon and its structure by using the virtual photons. Regarding the equivalence of mass-energy and the photon structure, structure of matter was explained. Then we will explain the relationship between speed and spontaneous symmetry breaking, when the particles linear speed is reduced, physical symmetry, one after the other is broken spontaneously.

  13. Forms of Mediation: The Case of Interpreter-Mediated Interactions in Medical Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraldi, Claudio

    2009-01-01

    This paper analyses the forms of mediation in interlinguistic interactions performed in Italian healthcare services and in contexts of migration. The literature encourages dialogic transformative mediation, empowering participants' voices and changing cultural presuppositions in social systems. It may be doubtful, however, whether mediation can…

  14. Probing Higgs-Portal Dark Matter with Weakly Interacting Mediators

    OpenAIRE

    Westhoff, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    The hypothesis of dark matter interacting with the standard model uniquely via the Higgs portal is severely challenged by experiments. However, if dark matter is a fermion, the Higgs-portal interaction implies the presence of mediators, which can change the phenomenology significantly. This article discusses the impact of weakly-interacting mediators on the dark-matter relic abundance, direct detection, and collider searches. At the LHC, a typical signature of Higgs-portal fermion dark matter...

  15. The width of the Higgs boson decay into hadrons: three-loop corrections of strong interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The three-loop perturbative QCD correction to the total hadronic decay width of the Higgs boson is calculated. For the Higgs-boson mass M=50 GeV it amounts to about 10% of the lead.ing term and is three times as less as the next-leading one. The result of the calculation is the first physical one obtained in the third order of the perturbation theory with the account of the three-loop corrections to the QCD renormalization group functions

  16. 1/N expansion in the interacting boson model. II. The neutron-proton degree of freedon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1/N expansion method is used to study the neutron-proton degree of freedom in a general boson model. Employing a standard IBM-2 hamiltonian, analytic expressions for energies and electromagnetic transition rates are derived both for the symmetric and mixed-symmetry states. A formalism for F-spin analysis is developed. Effects of the g-boson and F-spin breaking in various quantities are discussed. The method is not restricted to dynamic symmetries and allows for explicit breaking of the F-spin symmetry. Thus, the formulae derived here should be useful for systematic analysis of deformed nuclei in realistic situations. 42 refs., 13 figs

  17. Microscopic foundation of the interacting boson model in the sd-shell nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starting from an isospin invariant shell-model hamiltonian, we describe a method for deriving microscopically the IBM-hamiltonian appropriate to light sd-shell nuclei. The key ingredients of our approach are: a) The Belyaev-Zelevinsky-Marshalek (BZM) bosonization procedure; b) two successive unitary transformations that extract the 'maximally decoupled' collective bosons with angular momenta J = 0 (s+ππ, s+νν, s+πν) and J = 2 (d+ππ, d+νν, d+πν(T = 0), d+πν(T = 1)). The method is applied to obtain the low-energy spectra and the electron scattering form factors for the 01+ → 21+ transitions in 20Ne and 24Mg. Good agreement with the exact shell-model results is achieved. The inclusion of proton-neutron bosons (s+πν, d+πν(T = 1), d+πν(T = 0)), as well as the renormalization of boson parameters due to the non-collective degrees of freedom, are shown to play a crucial role. (orig.)

  18. Particle-Hole Symmetry in Generalized Seniority, Microscopic Interacting Boson (Fermion) Model, Nucleon-Pair Approximation, and Others

    CERN Document Server

    Jia, L Y

    2016-01-01

    The particle-hole symmetry (equivalence) of the full shell-model Hilbert space is straightforward and routinely used in practical calculations. In this work we show that this symmetry is preserved in the subspace truncated at a certain generalized seniority, and give the explicit transformation between the states in the two types (particle and hole) of representations. Based on the results, we study the particle-hole symmetry in popular theories that could be regarded as further truncations on top of the generalized seniority, including the microscopic interacting boson (fermion) model, the nucleon-pair approximation, and others.

  19. (Pseudo-Goldstone boson interaction in D=2+1 systems with a spontaneously broken internal rotation symmetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph P. Hofmann

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The low-temperature properties of systems characterized by a spontaneously broken internal rotation symmetry, O(N→O(N−1, are governed by Goldstone bosons and can be derived systematically within effective Lagrangian field theory. In the present study we consider systems living in two spatial dimensions, and evaluate their partition function at low temperatures and weak external fields up to three-loop order. Although our results are valid for any such system, here we use magnetic terminology, i.e., we refer to quantum spin systems. We discuss the sign of the (pseudo-Goldstone boson interaction in the pressure, staggered magnetization, and susceptibility as a function of an external staggered field for general N. As it turns out, the d=2+1 quantum XY model (N=2 and the d=2+1 Heisenberg antiferromagnet (N=3, are rather special, as they represent the only cases where the spin-wave interaction in the pressure is repulsive in the whole parameter regime where the effective expansion applies. Remarkably, the d=2+1 XY model is the only system where the interaction contribution in the staggered magnetization (susceptibility tends to positive (negative values at low temperatures and weak external field.

  20. (Pseudo-)Goldstone boson interaction in D = 2 + 1 systems with a spontaneously broken internal rotation symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Christoph P.

    2016-03-01

    The low-temperature properties of systems characterized by a spontaneously broken internal rotation symmetry, O (N) → O (N - 1), are governed by Goldstone bosons and can be derived systematically within effective Lagrangian field theory. In the present study we consider systems living in two spatial dimensions, and evaluate their partition function at low temperatures and weak external fields up to three-loop order. Although our results are valid for any such system, here we use magnetic terminology, i.e., we refer to quantum spin systems. We discuss the sign of the (pseudo-)Goldstone boson interaction in the pressure, staggered magnetization, and susceptibility as a function of an external staggered field for general N. As it turns out, the d = 2 + 1 quantum XY model (N = 2) and the d = 2 + 1 Heisenberg antiferromagnet (N = 3), are rather special, as they represent the only cases where the spin-wave interaction in the pressure is repulsive in the whole parameter regime where the effective expansion applies. Remarkably, the d = 2 + 1 XY model is the only system where the interaction contribution in the staggered magnetization (susceptibility) tends to positive (negative) values at low temperatures and weak external field.

  1. The Structure of Even-Even 218-230 Ra Isotopes within the Interacting Boson Approximation Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diab S. M.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A good description of the excited positive and negative parity states of radium nuclei ( Z = 88, N = 130–142 is achieved using the interacting boson approximation model (IBA-1. The potential energy surfaces, energy levels, parity shift, electromagnetic tran- sition rates B ( E 1 , B ( E 2 and electric monopole strength X ( E 0 / E 2 are calculated for each nucleus. The analysis of the eigenvalues of the model Hamiltonian reveals the presence of an interaction between the positive and negative parity bands. Due to this interaction the I = 1 staggering e ect, between the energies of the ground state band and the negative parity state band, is produced including beat patterns.

  2. Momentum-Space Entanglement Spectrum of Bosons and Fermions with Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundgren, Rex; Blair, Jonathan; Greiter, Martin; Läuchli, Andreas; Fiete, Gregory A.; Thomale, Ronny

    2014-12-01

    We study the momentum space entanglement spectra of bosonic and fermionic formulations of the spin-1 /2 X X Z chain with analytical methods and exact diagonalization. We investigate the behavior of the entanglement gaps, present in both formulations, across quantum phase transitions in the X X Z chain. In both cases, finite size scaling suggests that the entanglement gap closure does not occur at the physical transition points. For bosons, we find that the entanglement gap observed in Thomale et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 116805 (2010)] depends on the scaling dimension of the conformal field theory as varied by the X X Z anisotropy. For fermions, the infinite entanglement gap present at the X X point persists well past the phase transition at the Heisenberg point. We elaborate on how these shifted transition points in the entanglement spectra may support the numerical study of phase transitions in the momentum space density matrix renormalization group.

  3. Observed supersymmetry in baryon and meson spectra with IBFM, the interacting boson fermion model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supersymetry is already observed in (i) nuclear physics where the same empirical formula based on a graded Lie group describles even-even and odd-even nuclear spectra and (ii) in Nambu-BCS theory where there is a simple relationship between the energy gap of the basic fermion and the bosonic collective modes. Similar relationships between large number of mesonic and baryonic excitations based on the SU(3) substructure in the U(15/30) graded Lie group, are proposed. (author)

  4. Localized-interaction-induced quantum reflection and filtering of bosonic matter in a one-oimensional lattice guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbiero, L.; Malomed, B. A.; Salasnich, L.

    2016-05-01

    We study the dynamics of quantum bosonic waves in a one-dimensional tilted optical lattice. An effective spatially localized nonlinear two-body potential barrier is set at the center of the lattice. This version of the Bose–Hubbard model can be realized in atomic Bose–Einstein condensates, with the help of localized optical Feshbach resonance, controlled by a focused laser beam, and in quantum optics, using an arrayed waveguide with selectively doped guiding cores. Our numerical analysis demonstrates that the central barrier induces anomalous quantum reflection of incident wave packets, which acts solely on bosonic components with multiple onsite occupancies, while single-occupancy components pass the barrier, allowing one to distill them in the interaction zone. As a consequence, in this region one finds a hard-core-like state, in which the multiple occupancy is forbidden. Our results demonstrate that this regime can be attained dynamically, using relatively weak interactions, irrespective of their sign. Physical parameters necessary for the experimental implementation of the setting in ultracold atomic gases are estimated.

  5. Water-mediated ionic interactions in protein structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Sabarinathan; K Aishwarya; R Sarani; M Kirti Vaishnavi; K Sekar

    2011-06-01

    It is well known that water molecules play an indispensable role in the structure and function of biological macromolecules. The water-mediated ionic interactions between the charged residues provide stability and plasticity and in turn address the function of the protein structures. Thus, this study specifically addresses the number of possible water-mediated ionic interactions, their occurrence, distribution and nature found in 90% non-redundant protein chains. Further, it provides a statistical report of different charged residue pairs that are mediated by surface or buried water molecules to form the interactions. Also, it discusses its contributions in stabilizing various secondary structural elements of the protein. Thus, the present study shows the ubiquitous nature of the interactions that imparts plasticity and flexibility to a protein molecule.

  6. Even-even nuclei with a≅70 in the Interaction Boson Model (IBM) interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The region of nuclei with N≅Z and A≅70 has been the focus of extensive theoretical and experimental study. These nuclei exhibit a range of interesting features, including oblate and strong prolate deformations, as well as rapid variations in shape as a function of both spin and particle number. The schemes of excited levels in even-even Zn, Ge and Se isotopes have been the subject of a large number of recent experimental studies involving in-beam gamma-ray spectrometry. Also, a large number of theoretical studies have attempted a description of the low-lying levels in these nuclei. These studies have been carried out in the framework of the shell model involving restricted configuration mixing, self-consistent Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov methods, as well as collective models. The theoretical approach of nuclear structure by collective models such as Interacting Approximation Models (IBA/IBM) is capable of treating a large variety of even-even nuclei. For this reason, this class of algebraic models was chosen for our calculations. In order to get insight into the structure of low-lying 64-70Zn, 64-76Ge and 70-80Se states, the present work is using the IBA-1 model. Our calculations have been performed based on the PHINT software package and the parameters of Hamiltonian and electromagnetic transition operators are specifically to these computer programs. In the first step, only the h parameters, C0, C2 and C4 anharmonicities have been adjusted in order to obtain a good agreement with the experimental energy levels of 2g+, 0β+, 2γ+ and 4g+ states, respectively. The following steps of our calculations were performed by some proper modifications of all parameters: a) the previous parameters have been altered slightly so as to fit the ground state band energies; b) the identified γ and β band states and the F-one phonon and G-two phonon parameters were modified with respect to the R[(22+ →21+)/(22+ → 01+)] experimental branching ratios and keeping the χ value

  7. Energy Level Statistics of SO(5) Limit of Super-symmetry U(6/4) in Interacting Boson-Fermion Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    We study the energy level statistics of the SO(5) limit of super-symmetry U(6/4) in odd-A nucleus using the interacting boson-fermion model. The nearest neighbor spacing distribution (NSD) and the spectral rigidity (△3)are investigated, and the factors that affect the properties of level statistics are also discussed. The results show that the boson number N is a dominant factor. If N is small, both the interaction strengths of subgroups SOB(5) and SOBF(5)and the spin play important roles in the energy level statistics, however, along with the increase of N, the statistics distribution would tend to be in Poisson form.

  8. Polyakov loop correlators from D0-brane interactions in bosonic string theory

    OpenAIRE

    M., Billo'; M., Caselle

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we re-derive the effective Nambu-Goto theory result for the Polyakov loop correlator, starting from the free bosonic string and using a covariant quantization. The boundary conditions are those of an open string attached to two D0-branes at spatial distance R, in a target space with compact euclidean time. The one-loop free energy contains topologically distinct sectors corresponding to multiple covers of the cylinder in target space bordered by the Polyakov loops. The sector th...

  9. Study of a hard-core boson model with ring-only interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Tay, Tiamhock; Motrunich, Olexei I.

    2010-01-01

    We present a Quantum Monte Carlo study of a hardcore boson model with ring-only exchanges on a square lattice, where a $K_1$ term acts on 1$\\times$1 plaquettes and a $K_2$ term acts on 1$\\times$2 and 2$\\times$1 plaquettes. At half-filling, the phase diagram reveals charge density wave for small $K_2$, valence bond solid for intermediate $K_2$, and possibly for large $K_2$ the novel Exciton Bose Liquid (EBL) phase first proposed by Paramekanti, et al[Phys. Rev. B {\\bf 66}, 054526 (2002)]. Away...

  10. Relevance of Two Boson Exchange Effect in Quasi-Elastic Charged Current Neutrino-Nucleon Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Graczyk, Krzysztof M.

    2013-01-01

    Two-boson exchange (TBE) correction in νn→l−p and ν¯p→l+n reactions is estimated. The TBE contribution is given by Wγ box diagrams. The calculations are performed for 1 GeV neutrinos and for the MiniBooNE and the T2K energy spectra. The TBE correction to the total cross section is of the order of 2–4% (with respect to the Born contribution) in the case of νe and ν¯e and 1–2% in the case of νμ and ν¯μ .

  11. Mobile mediated interaction with pervasive displays

    OpenAIRE

    Seifert, Julian

    2015-01-01

    With the rise of pervasive computing, technology becomes increasingly embedded into our environments. As an effect, the number of available computing devices in our surroundings is increasing substantially. That is, a growing number of different device classes is at the user’s disposal. All these device classes potentially serve as pervasive displays that support users to perform all kinds of tasks. Possibilities based on direct interaction, such as touch, are limited regarding a number ...

  12. Nonlinear quantum optics mediated by Rydberg interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firstenberg, O.; Adams, C. S.; Hofferberth, S.

    2016-08-01

    By mapping the strong interaction between Rydberg excitations in ultra-cold atomic ensembles onto single photons via electromagnetically induced transparency, it is now possible to realize a medium which exhibits a strong optical nonlinearity at the level of individual photons. We review the theoretical concepts and the experimental state-of-the-art of this exciting new field, and discuss first applications in the field of all-optical quantum information processing.

  13. Flavour-changing neutral currents in models with extra ' boson

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Sahoo; L Maharana

    2004-09-01

    New neutral gauge bosons ' are the features of many models addressing the physics beyond the standard model. Together with the existence of new neutral gauge bosons, models based on extended gauge groups (rank > 4) often predict new charged fermions also. A mixing of the known fermions with new states, with exotic weak-isospin assignments (left-handed singlets and right-handed doublets) will induce tree-level flavour-changing neutral interactions mediated by exchange, while if the mixing is only with new states with ordinary weak-isospin assignments, the flavour-changing neutral currents are mainly due to the exchange of the new neutral gauge boson '. We review flavour-changing neutral currents in models with extra ' boson. Then we discuss some flavour-changing processes forbidden in the standard model and new contributions to standard model processes.

  14. U boson at the BES III detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The O(MeV) spin-1 U boson has been proposed to mediate the interaction among electron-positron and O(MeV) dark matter, in order to account for the 511 keV γ-ray observation by SPI/INTEGRAL. In this paper the observability of such a kind of U boson at BESIII is investigated through the processes e+e-→Uγ and e+e-→J/Ψ→e+e-U. We find that BESIII and high luminosity B factories have a comparable capacity to detect such a U boson. If the U boson decays mainly into dark matter, i.e. invisibly, BESIII can measure the coupling between the U boson and an electron-positron pair geR (see text) down to O(10-5), and cover large parameter space which can account for 511 keV γ-ray observation. On the other hand, provided that U decays mainly into the electron-positron, BESIII can detect geR down to O(10-3), and it is hard to explore the 511 keV γ-ray measurement allowed parameter space due to the irreducible QED backgrounds

  15. Audio Interaction in Computer Mediated Games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. R. Parker

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of sound in an interactive media environment has not been advanced, as a technology, as far as graphics or artificial intelligence. This discussion will explore the use of sound as a way to influence the player of a computer game, will show ways that a game can use sound as input, and will describe ways that the player can influence sound in a game. The role of sound in computer games will be explored some practical design ideas that can be used to improve the current state of the art will be given.

  16. Short-time-interaction quantum measurement through an incoherent mediator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a method of indirect measurements where a probe is able to read, in short interaction times, the quantum state of a remote system through an incoherent third party, hereafter called a mediator. The probe and system can interact briefly with the mediator in an incoherent state but not directly among themselves and, nevertheless, the transfer of quantum information can be achieved with robustness. We exemplify our measurement scheme with a paradigmatic example of this tripartite problem--a qubit-oscillator-qubit setup--and discuss different physical scenarios, pointing out the associated advantages and limitations.

  17. U(5) Symmetry of Even 96,98Ru Isotopes Under the Framework of Interacting Boson Model (IBM-1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharrad, Fadhil I.; Hossain, I.; Ahmed, I. M.; Abdullah, Hewa Y.; Ahmad, S. T.; Ahmed, A. S.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, the yrast bands of the even 96,98Ru isotopes are studied within the framework of the interacting boson model-1 (IBM-1), using the MATLAB computer code (IBM-1.Mat). The theoretical energy levels are obtained for the 96,98Ru isotopes, with neutron numbers 52 and 54, up to spin-parity 16+ and 12+, respectively. The ratio of the excitation energies of the first 4+ to the first 2+ excited states ( R 4/2), the backbending curves and the potential energy surfaces are also calculated. The calculated and experimental R4/2 values show that the 96,98Ru nuclei have U(5) dynamic symmetry. The calculated energies of the yrast states are compared with experimental results and they are shown to be in good agreement with the data. The contour plots of the potential energy surfaces show two interesting nuclei having a slightly oblate but almost spherical vibrator-like character.

  18. Probing Higgs-Portal Dark Matter with Weakly Interacting Mediators

    CERN Document Server

    Westhoff, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    The hypothesis of dark matter interacting with the standard model uniquely via the Higgs portal is severely challenged by experiments. However, if dark matter is a fermion, the Higgs-portal interaction implies the presence of mediators, which can change the phenomenology significantly. This article discusses the impact of weakly-interacting mediators on the dark-matter relic abundance, direct detection, and collider searches. At the LHC, a typical signature of Higgs-portal fermion dark matter features soft leptons and missing energy, similarly to gaugino production in models with supersymmetry. We suggest to re-interpret existing gaugino searches in the context of Higgs-portal models and to extend future searches to the broader class of dark sectors with weakly-interacting fermions.

  19. Octupole excitations in vibrational nuclei and the sdf interacting boson model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proton and deuteron inelastic scattering experiments, performed with an energy resolution of 12-15 keV, have been used to study negative-parity states of vibrational and transitional nuclei with mass between 98 and 150. The analysis has been focussed on the isovector components, on the quadrupole-octupole two-phonon states and on the fragmentation of the octupole strength. This latter displays a regular dependence on the product of proton and neutron valence particle numbers and is satisfactorily reproduced by IBM-1+f-boson calculations. Other features of the experimental spectra, as the relative positions of the 3- states, exhibit a dependence on the ratio of valence particle numbers and indicate that a IBM-2 approach might be more appropriate. (orig.)

  20. Anomalously interacting Z* bosons: an example of JINR's contribution to physics at LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednyakov, V. A.; Yeletskikh, I. V.; Chizhov, M. V.; Boyko, I. R.

    2016-04-01

    Fundamental particle physics research at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) has always included the use of highest-energy accelerator machines, and it is only natural that from its very beginning, the institute played an active role in work on developing, assembling, and upgrading both the Large Hadron Collider itself and its detectors. Along with providing hardware and software support to secure the failure-free operation of detectors and the gathering and processing of experimental data, JINR sets as its primary goal to effectively participate in the unprecedentedly comprehensive and important LHC research program. As part of this program, the experimental search for new heavy chiral Z* and W* bosons is carried out by the ATLAS collaboration, an effort whose necessity was fully justified and strategy exhaustively developed by JINR physicists. The search results from the first run of the LHC are briefly discussed, together with the decisive contribution from JINR and future prospects.

  1. Inclusion of g boson in the microscopic sdgIBM and the g boson effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The inclusion of g boson in the microscopic sdgIBM is presented. The collectivity of g boson, the relationship between g boson properties and the strengths of the effective nucleon-nucleon interaction, and the influence of g boson on the sdIBM are discussed in detail

  2. INTERACTION OF SIMILARLY CHARGED SURFACES MEDIATED BY NANOPARTICLES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Klemen Bohinc; Leo Lue

    2011-01-01

    We study the interaction between two like charged surfaces embedded in a solution of oppositely charged multivalent rod-like counterions. The counterions consist of two rigidly bonded point charges, each of valency Z. The strength of the electrostatic coupling increases with increasing surface charge density or valency of the charges. The system is analyzed by employing a self-consistent field theory, which treats the short and long range interactions of the counterions within different approximations. We find that in the weak coupling limit, the interactions are only repulsive. In the intermediate coupling regime, the multivalent rod-like counterions can mediate attractive interactions between the surfaces.For sufficiently long rods, bridging contributes to the attractive interaction. In the strong coupling limit, the charge correlations can contribute to the attractive interactions at short separations between the charged surfaces. Two minima can then appear in the force curve between surfaces.

  3. Nanofiber-Mediated Interaction of Light with Cold Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheremet, A. S.; Gauraud, B.; Corzo-Trejo, N.; Laurat, J.; Kupriyanov, D. V.

    2015-09-01

    Light-matter interaction processes are extremely attractive for quantum information problems, where one of the main goals consists in a quantum state of light mapping into a collective atomic state. By analogy with the Purcell effect, which exhibits in the presence of a resonator, enhancement of light-matter interaction can be achieved by using a nanofiber [1-2]. In this work we present a theoretical description of light interaction with a cold atomic ensemble mediated the nanofiber, which lies in a base of the experimental realization of a quantum memory protocol [3].

  4. Interaction-driven fractional quantum Hall state of hard-core bosons on kagome lattice at one-third filling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, W.; Gong, S. S.; Sheng, D. N.

    2016-07-01

    There has been a growing interest in realizing topologically nontrivial states of matter in band insulators, where a quantum Hall effect can appear as an intrinsic property of the band structure. While ongoing progress is under way with a number of directions, the possibility of realizing novel interaction-generated topological phases, without the requirement of a nontrivial invariant encoded in single-particle wave function or band structure, can significantly extend the class of topological materials and is thus of great importance. Here, we show an interaction-driven topological phase emerging in an extended Bose-Hubbard model on a kagome lattice, where the noninteracting band structure is topological trivial with zero Berry curvature in the Brillouin zone. By means of an unbiased state-of-the-art density-matrix renormalization group technique, we identify that the ground state in a broad parameter region is equivalent to a bosonic fractional quantum Hall Laughlin state, based on the characterization of universal properties including ground-state degeneracy, edge excitations, and anyonic quasiparticle statistics. Our work paves a way to finding an interaction-induced topological phase at the phase boundary of conventionally ordered solid phases.

  5. Contextual specificity in peptide-mediated protein interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelie Stein

    Full Text Available Most biological processes are regulated through complex networks of transient protein interactions where a globular domain in one protein recognizes a linear peptide from another, creating a relatively small contact interface. Although sufficient to ensure binding, these linear motifs alone are usually too short to achieve the high specificity observed, and additional contacts are often encoded in the residues surrounding the motif (i.e. the context. Here, we systematically identified all instances of peptide-mediated protein interactions of known three-dimensional structure and used them to investigate the individual contribution of motif and context to the global binding energy. We found that, on average, the context is responsible for roughly 20% of the binding and plays a crucial role in determining interaction specificity, by either improving the affinity with the native partner or impeding non-native interactions. We also studied and quantified the topological and energetic variability of interaction interfaces, finding a much higher heterogeneity in the context residues than in the consensus binding motifs. Our analysis partially reveals the molecular mechanisms responsible for the dynamic nature of peptide-mediated interactions, and suggests a global evolutionary mechanism to maximise the binding specificity. Finally, we investigated the viability of non-native interactions and highlight cases of potential cross-reaction that might compensate for individual protein failure and establish backup circuits to increase the robustness of cell networks.

  6. Bosons system with finite repulsive interaction: self-consistent field method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some static properties of a boson system (T = zero degree Kelvin), under the action of a repulsive potential are studied. For the repulsive potential, a model was adopted consisting of a region where it is constant (r c), and a decay as 1/r (r > rc). The self-consistent field approximation used takes into account short range correlations through a local field corrections, which leads to an effective field. The static structure factor S(q-vector) and the effective potential ψ(q-vector) are obtained through a self-consistent calculation. The pair-correlation function g(r-vector) and the energy of the collective excitations E(q-vector) are also obtained, from the structure factor. The density of the system and the parameters of the repulsive potential, that is, its height and the size of the constant region were used as variables for the problem. The results obtained for S(q-vector), g(r-vector) and E(q-vector) for a fixed ratio ro/rc and a variable λ, indicates the raising of a system structure, which is more noticeable when the potential became more repulsive. (author)

  7. Quantum quenches and generalized Gibbs ensemble in a Bethe Ansatz solvable lattice model of interacting bosons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We consider quantum quenches in the so-called q-boson lattice model. We argue that the Generalized Eigenstate Thermalization Hypothesis holds in this model, therefore the Generalized Gibbs Ensemble (GGE) gives a valid description of the stationary states in the long time limit. For a special class of initial states (which are the pure Fock states in the local basis) we are able to provide the GGE predictions for the resulting root densities. We also give predictions for the long-time limit of certain local operators. In the q → ∞ limit the calculations simplify considerably, the wave functions are given by Schur polynomials and the overlaps with the initial states can be written as simple determinants. In two cases we prove rigorously that the GGE prediction for the root density is correct. Moreover, we calculate the exact time dependence of a physical observable (the one-site Emptiness Formation Probability) for the quench starting from the state with exactly one particle per site. In the long-time limit the GGE prediction is recovered. (paper)

  8. Apriori Estimates for Many-Body Hamiltonian Evolution of Interacting Boson System

    OpenAIRE

    Grillakis, Manoussos G.; Margetis, Dionisios

    2008-01-01

    We study the evolution of a many-particle system whose wave function obeys the N-body Schroedinger equation under Bose symmetry. The system Hamiltonian describes pairwise particle interactions in the absence of an external potential. We derive apriori dispersive estimates that express the overall repulsive nature of the particle interactions. These estimates hold for a wide class of two-body interaction potentials which are independent of the particle number, N. We discuss applications of the...

  9. Interacting Open Bosonic String in the Proper-Time Gauge: Covariant Open Bosonic String Field Theory on Multiple D-Branes

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Taejin

    2016-01-01

    We construct a covariant open bosonic string field theory on multiple D-branes, which reduces to a non-Abelian group Yang-Mills gauge theory in the zero-slope limit. Making use of the first quantized open bosonic string in the proper time gauge, we convert the string amplitudes given by the Polyakov path integrals on string world sheets into those of the second quantized theory. On multiple D-branes, the string field takes values in the Lie-algebra of $U(N)$ group and the three-string vertex function must be invariant under the global $U(N)$ transformation. This requirement together with the condition that the string field theory reduces to the non-Abelian gauge field theory in the zero-slope limit, uniquely determines the three-string vertex function. We also examine the effective four-string vertex diagrams generated perturbatively by the three-string vertex at tree level. In the zero-slope limit they reduce to the tree diagrams with four external gauge fields with an intermediate massless gauge field propa...

  10. Interaction of TCP4-mediated growth module with phytohormones

    OpenAIRE

    Sarvepalli, Kavitha; Nath, Utpal

    2011-01-01

    TCP4 and related members of class II TCP genes regulate leaf morphogenesis. We earlier demonstrated that level of TCP4 activity determines leaf size and aspects of plant maturity. The mechanism of TCP function and their target genes remain unidentified, limiting our understanding of TCP-mediated growth control. As leaf growth is influenced simultaneously by multiple phytohormones, we have studied if TCP4 interacts with any of the hormone-response pathways. Our analyses indicate a role for aux...

  11. Theory and modeling of particles with DNA-mediated interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licata, Nicholas A.

    2008-05-01

    In recent years significant attention has been attracted to proposals which utilize DNA for nanotechnological applications. Potential applications of these ideas range from the programmable self-assembly of colloidal crystals, to biosensors and nanoparticle based drug delivery platforms. In Chapter I we introduce the system, which generically consists of colloidal particles functionalized with specially designed DNA markers. The sequence of bases on the DNA markers determines the particle type. Due to the hybridization between complementary single-stranded DNA, specific, type-dependent interactions can be introduced between particles by choosing the appropriate DNA marker sequences. In Chapter II we develop a statistical mechanical description of the aggregation and melting behavior of particles with DNA-mediated interactions. In Chapter III a model is proposed to describe the dynamical departure and diffusion of particles which form reversible key-lock connections. In Chapter IV we propose a method to self-assemble nanoparticle clusters using DNA scaffolds. A natural extension is discussed in Chapter V, the programmable self-assembly of nanoparticle clusters where the desired cluster geometry is encoded using DNA-mediated interactions. In Chapter VI we consider a nanoparticle based drug delivery platform for targeted, cell specific chemotherapy. In Chapter VII we present prospects for future research: the connection between DNA-mediated colloidal crystallization and jamming, and the inverse problem in self-assembly.

  12. Quantum dynamics of interacting spins mediated by phonons and photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senko, Crystal

    2015-03-01

    Techniques that enable robust, controllable interactions among quantum particles are now being actively explored. They constitute a key ingredient for quantum information processing and quantum simulations. We describe two atom-based platforms to experimentally realize and study quantum dynamics with controllable, long-range spin-spin interactions. Using trapped atomic ions, we implemented tunable spin-spin interactions mediated by optical dipole forces, which represent a new approach to study quantum magnetism. This platform has enabled sophisticated manipulations of more than 10 spins, and realization of quantum simulations of integer-spin chains. In a separate set of experiments we realized a hybrid system in which single photons, confined to sub-wavelength dimensions with a photonic crystal cavity, are coupled to single trapped neutral atoms. Extending this architecture to multiple atoms enables photon-induced quantum gates, and tunable spin-spin interactions, between distant atoms.

  13. Phytohormone mediation of interactions between herbivores and plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazebnik, Jenny; Frago, Enric; Dicke, Marcel; van Loon, Joop J A

    2014-07-01

    Induced plant defenses against either pathogens or herbivore attackers are regulated by phytohormones. These phytohormones are increasingly recognized as important mediators of interactions between organisms associated with plants. In this review, we discuss the role of plant defense hormones in sequential tri-partite interactions among plants, pathogenic microbes, and herbivorous insects, based on the most recent literature. We discuss the importance of pathogen trophic strategy in the interaction with herbivores that exhibit different feeding modes. Plant resistance mechanisms also affect plant quality in future interactions with attackers. We discuss exemplary evidence for the hypotheses that (i) biotrophic pathogens can facilitate chewing herbivores, unless plants exhibit effector-triggered immunity, but (ii) facilitate or inhibit phloem feeders. (iii) Necrotrophic pathogens, on the other hand, can inhibit both phloem feeders and chewers. We also propose herbivore feeding mode as predictor of effects on pathogens of different trophic strategies, providing evidence for the hypotheses that (iv) phloem feeders inhibit pathogen attack by increasing SA induction, whereas (v) chewing herbivores tend not to affect necrotrophic pathogens, while they may either inhibit or facilitate biotrophic pathogens. Putting these hypotheses to the test will increase our understanding of phytohormonal regulation of plant defense to sequential attack by plant pathogens and insect herbivores. This will provide valuable insight into plant-mediated ecological interactions among members of the plant-associated community. PMID:25059974

  14. Root signals that mediate mutualistic interactions in the rhizosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmann, Sergio; Turlings, Ted Cj

    2016-08-01

    A recent boom in research on belowground ecology is rapidly revealing a multitude of fascinating interactions, in particular in the rhizosphere. Many of these interactions are mediated by photo-assimilates that are excreted by plant roots. Root exudates are not mere waste products, but serve numerous functions to control abiotic and biotic processes. These functions range from changing the chemical and physical properties of the soil, inhibiting the growth of competing plants, combatting herbivores, and regulating the microbial community. Particularly intriguing are root-released compounds that have evolved to serve mutualistic interactions with soil-dwelling organisms. These mutually beneficial plant-mediated signals are not only of fundamental ecological interest, but also exceedingly important from an agronomical perspective. Here, we attempt to provide an overview of the plant-produced compounds that have so far been implicated in mutualistic interactions. We propose that these mutualistic signals may have evolved from chemical defenses and we point out that they can be (mis)used by specialized pathogens and herbivores. We speculate that many more signals and interactions remain to be uncovered and that a good understanding of the mechanisms and ecological implications can be the basis for exploitation and manipulation of the signals for crop improvement and protection. PMID:27393937

  15. Fermion-fermion and boson-boson amplitudes: surprising similarities

    CERN Document Server

    Dvoeglazov, Valeri V

    2007-01-01

    Amplitudes for fermion-fermion, boson-boson and fermion-boson interactions are calculated in the second order of perturbation theory in the Lobachevsky space. An essential ingredient of the model is the Weinberg's 2(2j+1)-component formalism for describing a particle of spin j. The boson-boson amplitude is then compared with the two-fermion amplitude obtained long ago by Skachkov on the basis of the Hamiltonian formulation of quantum field theory on the mass hyperboloid, p_0^2 - p^2=M^2, proposed by Kadyshevsky. The parametrization of the amplitudes by means of the momentum transfer in the Lobachevsky space leads to same spin structures in the expressions of T-matrices for the fermion case and the boson case. However, certain differences are found. Possible physical applications are discussed.

  16. The nucleon-nucleon interaction in the framework of the boson exchange model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this thesis was the description of the nucleon-nucleon interaction in a microscopically founded model. For this the description of the 2-nucleon problem by an interacting 2-nucleon-pion system was presented. The starting point of our description was a relativistic eigenvalue equation for the system of mesons and two baryons. The interaction of the baryons with the mesons was described by interaction Hamiltonians. By the elimination of antinucleon states by means of a unitary tansformation (Foldy-Wouthuysen transformation) the interaction Hamiltonians for nucleons could be generated for the field-theoretical Lagrangian densities. The Hamiltonians for resonant baryon states were obtained by means of a simplified procedure from the corresponding Lagrangian densities. Because the determination of Lagrangian densities is not unique, for the pion-nucleon coupling two alternative Lagrangian densities were allowed. For the interaction of positive-energy nucleonic states these two coupling yield nearly equal results; the production or annihilation of negative-energy nucleon states (antiparticles) the predictions however are very different. (orig./HSI)

  17. Equation of state and hybrid star properties with the weakly interacting light U-boson in relativistic models

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Dong-Rui; Wei, Si-Na; Yang, Rong-Yao; Xiang, Qian-Fei

    2016-01-01

    It has been a puzzle whether quarks may exist in the interior of massive neutron stars, since the hadron-quark phase transition softens the equation of state (EOS) and reduce the neutron star (NS) maximum mass very significantly. In this work, we consider the light U-boson that increases the NS maximum mass appreciably through its weak coupling to fermions. The inclusion of the U-boson may thus allow the existence of the quark degrees of freedom in the interior of large mass neutron stars. Unlike the consequence of the U-boson in hadronic matter, the stiffening role of the U-boson in the hybrid EOS is not sensitive to the choice of the hadron phase models. In addition, we have also investigated the effect of the effective QCD correction on the hybrid EOS. This correction may reduce the coupling strength of the U-boson that is needed to satisfy NS maximum mass constraint. While the inclusion of the U-boson also increases the NS radius significantly, we find that appropriate in-medium effects of the U-boson may...

  18. Higgs boson production at Linear Colliders from a generic 2HDM: the role of triple Higgs self-interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Lopez-Val, David; Sola, Joan

    2012-01-01

    We review selected results for Higgs boson production at Linear Colliders in the framework of the general Two-Higgs-Doublet Model (2HDM). We concentrate on the analysis of i) the pairwise production of neutral Higgs bosons (hA,HA); and ii) the neutral Higgs boson-strahlung modes (hZ, HZ). We identify sizable production rates, in the range of 10-100 fb for center-of-mass energies of 0.5 TeV, alongside with large quantum effects (up to 50 %), which we can fundamentally track down to the enhance...

  19. Boson stars with nonminimal coupling

    CERN Document Server

    Marunovic, Anja

    2015-01-01

    Boson stars coupled to Einstein's general relativity possess some features similar to gravastars, such as the anisotropy in principal pressures and relatively large compactness ($\\mu_{max} = 0.32$). However, no matter how large the self-interaction is, the ordinary boson star cannot obtain arbitrarily large compression and as such does not represent a good black hole mimicker. When the boson star is nonminimally coupled to gravity, the resulting configurations resemble more the dark energy stars then the ordinary boson stars, with compactness significantly larger then that in ordinary boson stars (if matter is not constrained with the energy conditions). The gravitationally bound system of a boson star and a global monopole represents a good black hole mimicker.

  20. U(5) symmetry of even {sup 96,98}Ru isotopes under the framework of interacting Boson model (IBM-1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharrad, Fadhil I.; Ahmed, A.S. [Department of Physics, College of Science, Kerbala University, Karbala (Iraq); Hossain, I., E-mail: mihossain@kau.edu.sa [Department of Physics, Rabigh College of Science and Arts, King Abdulaziz University, Rabigh (Saudi Arabia); Ahmed, I.M. [Department of Physics, College of Education, Mosul University, Mosul (Iraq); Abdullah, Hewa Y. [Department of Physics, College of Science Education, Salahaddin University, Erbil, KRG (Iraq); Ahmad, S.T. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Koya University, Koya, KRG (Iraq)

    2015-06-15

    In this paper, the yrast bands of the even {sup 96,98}Ru isotopes are studied within the framework of the interacting boson model-1 (IBM-1), using the MATLAB computer code (IBM-1.Mat). The theoretical energy levels are obtained for the {sup 96,98}Ru isotopes, with neutron numbers 52 and 54, up to spin-parity 16{sup +} and 12{sup +}, respectively. The ratio of the excitation energies of the first 4{sup +} to the first 2{sup +} excited states (R{sub 4/2}), the backbending curves and the potential energy surfaces are also calculated. The calculated and experimental R{sub 4/2} values show that the {sup 96,98}Ru nuclei have U(5) dynamic symmetry. The calculated energies of the yrast states are compared with experimental results and they are shown to be in good agreement with the data. The contour plots of the potential energy surfaces show two interesting nuclei having a slightly oblate but almost spherical vibrator-like character. (author)

  1. The relationship between the interacting boson model and the algebraic version of Bohr's collective model in its triaxial limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent developments and applications of an algebraic version of Bohr's collective model, known as the algebraic collective model (ACM), have shown that fully converged calculations can be performed for a large range of Hamiltonians. Examining the algebraic structure underlying the Bohr model (BM) has also clarified its relationship with the interacting boson model (IBM), with which it has related solvable limits and corresponding dynamical symmetries. In particular, the algebraic structure of the IBM is obtained as a compactification of the BM and conversely the BM is regained in various contraction limits of the IBM. In a previous paper, corresponding contractions were identified and confirmed numerically for axially-symmetric states of relatively small deformation. In this paper, we extend the comparisons to realistic deformations and compare results of the two models in the rotor-vibrator limit. These models describe rotations and vibrations about an axially symmetric prolate or oblate rotor, and rotations and vibrations of a triaxial rotor. It is determined that most of the standard results of the BM can be obtained as contraction limits of the IBM in its U(5)-SO(6) dynamical symmetries.

  2. U(5) symmetry of even 96,98Ru isotopes under the framework of interacting Boson model (IBM-1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the yrast bands of the even 96,98Ru isotopes are studied within the framework of the interacting boson model-1 (IBM-1), using the MATLAB computer code (IBM-1.Mat). The theoretical energy levels are obtained for the 96,98Ru isotopes, with neutron numbers 52 and 54, up to spin-parity 16+ and 12+, respectively. The ratio of the excitation energies of the first 4+ to the first 2+ excited states (R4/2), the backbending curves and the potential energy surfaces are also calculated. The calculated and experimental R4/2 values show that the 96,98Ru nuclei have U(5) dynamic symmetry. The calculated energies of the yrast states are compared with experimental results and they are shown to be in good agreement with the data. The contour plots of the potential energy surfaces show two interesting nuclei having a slightly oblate but almost spherical vibrator-like character. (author)

  3. B(E2) value of even-even 108-112Pd isotopes by interacting boson model-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work studies the systematic reduced transition probabilities B(E2)↓, intrinsic quadrupole moments and deformation parameters of Pd isotopes with even neutrons from N = 62 to 66. The downward reduced transition probabilities B(E2)↓ from gamma transition 8+ to 6+, 6+ to 4+, 4+ to 2+ and 2+ to 0+ states of even-even 108-112Pd isotopes were calculated by the Interacting Boson Model (IBM-1) and compared with the available previous experimental results. The ratio of the excitation energies of the first 4+ and the first 2+ excited states, R4/2, is also studied for the classification of symmetry of these nuclei. Furthermore we have studied systematically the transition rate R = B(E2: L+ → (L-2)+)/B(E2:2+ →0+) of some of the low-lying quadrupole collective states in comparison with the available experimental data. The associated quadrupole moments and deformation parameters have been calculated. The results of this calculation are in good agreement with the corresponding available experimental data. The 108-112Pd isotopes show the O(6) symmetry. (authors)

  4. Nuclear shape coexistence: A study of the even-even Hg isotopes using the interacting boson model with configuration mixing

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia-Ramos, J E

    2013-01-01

    Background: The Po, Pb, Hg, and Pt region is known for the presence of coexisting structures that correspond to different particle-hole configurations in the Shell Model language or equivalently to nuclear shapes with different deformation. Purpose: We intend to study the configuration mixing phenomenon in the Hg isotopes and to understand how different observables are influenced by it. Method: We study in detail a long chain of mercury isotopes, $^{172-200}$Hg, using the interacting boson model with configuration mixing. The parameters of the Hamiltonians are fixed through a least square fit to the known energies and absolute B(E2) transition rates of states up to $3$ MeV. Results: We obtained the IBM-CM Hamiltonians and we calculate excitation energies, B(E2)'s, quadrupole shape invariants, wave functions, isotopic shifts, and mean field energy surfaces. Conclusions: We obtain a fairly good agreement with the experimental data for all the studied observables and we conclude that the Hamiltonian and the stat...

  5. The study of nuclear structure of 76-78Kr and 24Mg nuclei in the frame work of interacting boson model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of this work show that the IBM-1 provides a good description of even-even 76-78Kr and 24Mg isotopes of the nuclei. The interacting boson model can reproduce a considerable quantity of experimental data and gives useful indications where data are lacking. One observe the transitions between three limit symmetries of the model, corresponding to different nuclear shapes

  6. Boson resonance production in p-barp interactions at 32 GeV/c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New data on inclusive production of ρ0(770), f(1270) and S*(975) resonances in p-barp-interaction at 32 GeV/c are presented. The estimates of topological cross section for ρ0(770) and f(1270) mesons have been obtained. The data for their differential cross section of longitudinal and transverse momenta are presented

  7. Water-mediated correlations in DNA-enzyme interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Capolupo, A; Kurian, P; Vitiello, G

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we consider dipole-mediated correlations between DNA and enzymes in the context of their water environment. Such correlations emerge from electric dipole-dipole interactions between aromatic ring structures in DNA and in enzymes, and they are mediated by radiative fields that stimulate transitions between the $l=0$ and $l=1$ rotational levels of the molecular water electric dipoles. We show that there are matching collective modes between DNA and enzyme dipole fields, and that a dynamic time-averaged polarization vanishes in the water dipole field only if either DNA, enzyme, or both are absent from the sample. This persistent field may serve as the electromagnetic image that, in popular colloquialisms about DNA biochemistry, allows enzymes to "scan" or "read" the double helix. Topologically nontrivial configurations in the coherent ground state requiring clamplike enzyme behavior on the DNA may stem, ultimately, from spontaneously broken gauge symmetries.

  8. Boson stars in the centre of galaxies?

    CERN Document Server

    Schunck, Franz E

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the possible gravitational redshift values for boson stars with a self-interaction, studying a wide range of possible masses. We find a limiting value of z_lim \\simeq 0.687 for stable boson star configurations. We can exclude the direct observation of boson stars. X-ray spectroscopy is perhaps the most interesting possibility.

  9. Bilayer-thickness-mediated interactions between integral membrane proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahraman, Osman; Koch, Peter D.; Klug, William S.; Haselwandter, Christoph A.

    2016-04-01

    Hydrophobic thickness mismatch between integral membrane proteins and the surrounding lipid bilayer can produce lipid bilayer thickness deformations. Experiment and theory have shown that protein-induced lipid bilayer thickness deformations can yield energetically favorable bilayer-mediated interactions between integral membrane proteins, and large-scale organization of integral membrane proteins into protein clusters in cell membranes. Within the continuum elasticity theory of membranes, the energy cost of protein-induced bilayer thickness deformations can be captured by considering compression and expansion of the bilayer hydrophobic core, membrane tension, and bilayer bending, resulting in biharmonic equilibrium equations describing the shape of lipid bilayers for a given set of bilayer-protein boundary conditions. Here we develop a combined analytic and numerical methodology for the solution of the equilibrium elastic equations associated with protein-induced lipid bilayer deformations. Our methodology allows accurate prediction of thickness-mediated protein interactions for arbitrary protein symmetries at arbitrary protein separations and relative orientations. We provide exact analytic solutions for cylindrical integral membrane proteins with constant and varying hydrophobic thickness, and develop perturbative analytic solutions for noncylindrical protein shapes. We complement these analytic solutions, and assess their accuracy, by developing both finite element and finite difference numerical solution schemes. We provide error estimates of our numerical solution schemes and systematically assess their convergence properties. Taken together, the work presented here puts into place an analytic and numerical framework which allows calculation of bilayer-mediated elastic interactions between integral membrane proteins for the complicated protein shapes suggested by structural biology and at the small protein separations most relevant for the crowded membrane

  10. Self-Interacting Dark Matter with Naturally Light Mediator

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Ernest

    2016-01-01

    A promising proposal for resolving the cusp-core anomaly in the density profile of dwarf galaxies is to allow dark matter to interact with itself through a light mediator of mass much less than a GeV. The theoretical challenge is to have a complete renormalizable theory where this happens naturally even though dark matter itself may be of the electroweak scale, i.e. 100 GeV to 1 TeV. I propose here such a model, with just two neutral complex scalar singlets under a softly broken dark global U(1) symmetry.

  11. Bose-Einstein condensation of strongly interacting bosons: From liquid 4He to QCD monopoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starting from the classic work of Feynman on the λ point of liquid helium, we show that his idea of universal action per particle at the Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) transition point is much more robust that it was known before. Using a simple 'moving string model' for supercurrent and calculating the action, both semiclassically and numerically, we show that the critical action is the same for noninteracting and strongly interacting systems such as liquid 4He. Inversely, one can obtain an accurate dependence of critical temperature on density: one important consequence is that high density (solid) He cannot be a BEC state of He atoms, with upper density accurately matching the observations. We then use this model for the deconfinement phase transition of QCD-like gauge theories, treated as BEC of (color-)magnetic monopoles. We start with a Feynman-like approach without interaction, estimating the monopole mass at Tc. Then we include the monopole's Coulomb repulsion, and formulate a relation between the mass, density and coupling which should be fulfilled at the deconfinement point. We end up proposing various ways to test on the lattice whether it is indeed the BEC point for monopoles.

  12. Non-monotonic temperature response of polymer mediated interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Fei; Woodward, Clifford E; Forsman, Jan

    2016-01-21

    In a recent publication, Feng et al. [Feng et al., Nat. Mater., 2015, 14, 61] reported a very interesting re-entrant solidification behaviour of colloidal particles in an aqueous solution containing polyethylene oxide (PEO). In this system, a crystalline colloidal phase, which is present at low temperatures, melts to a homogeneous fluid upon increasing the temperature. Further raising the temperature, however, eventually gives rise to a flocculated colloidal phase. Feng et al. proposed that the low-temperature crystalline phase is caused by polymer depletion while, at higher temperature, an increased attraction between polymers and particles leads to bridging attractions, and colloidal flocculation. The intermediate temperature regime sees the colloidal interactions dominated by charge repulsion, giving rise to a fluid phase. In the model by Feng et al., polymers are treated as hard spheres, which interact with the colloids via a phenomenological, temperature dependent potential. In this work, we develop a more detailed polymer density functional treatment, based on a model for aqueous PEO solutions that was originally developed by Karlström [Karlström, J. Phys. Chem., 1985, 89, 4962] for bulk solutions. In this model, monomers are assumed to be in either of two classes of states, labelled A and B, where B is more solvophobic than A. On the other hand, the degeneracy of the B states exceed that of A, causing the population of solvophobic monomers to increase with temperature. If the colloidal particles are also solvophobic, then this model displays the same qualitative temperature response as was observed by Feng et al. That is, at low temperatures, A type monomers predominate and one observes depletion interactions, whereas polymer bridging dominates at higher temperatures, due to the attraction between B-type monomers and the colloidal surface. Interestingly, the intermediate temperature regime is characterized by a polymer mediated interaction between colloids

  13. New interactions in the dark sector mediated by dark energy

    CERN Document Server

    Brookfield, A W; Hall, L M H

    2007-01-01

    Cosmological observations have revealed the existence of a dark matter sector, which is commonly assumed to be made up of one particle species only. However, this sector might be more complicated than we currently believe: there might be more than one dark matter species (for example two components of cold dark matter or a mixture of hot and cold dark matter) and there may be new interactions between these particles. In this paper we study the possibility of multiple dark matter species and interactions mediated by a dark energy field. We study both the background and the perturbation evolution in these scenarios. We find that the background evolution of a system of multiple dark matter particles (with constant couplings) mimics a single fluid with a time-varying coupling parameter. However, this is no longer true on the perturbative level. We study the case of attractive and repulsive forces as well as a mixture of cold and hot dark matter particles.

  14. Search for light vector boson production in e+e−→μ+μ−γ interactions with the KLOE experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have searched for a light vector boson U, the possible carrier of a “dark force”, with the KLOE detector at the DAΦNE e+e− collider, motivated by astrophysical evidence for the presence of dark matter in the Universe. Using e+e− collisions collected with an integrated luminosity of 239.3 pb−1, we look for a dimuon mass peak in the reaction e+e−→μ+μ−γ, corresponding to the decay U→μ+μ−. We find no evidence for a U vector boson signal. We set a 90% CL upper limit for the mixing parameter squared between the photon and the U boson of 1.6×10−5 to 8.6×10−7 for the mass region 520

  15. A search for invisible Higgs bosons produced in $e^{+} e^{-}$ interactions up to $\\sqrt{s}$ = 189 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P; Adye, T; Adzic, P; Albrecht, Z; Alderweireld, T; Alekseev, G D; Alemany, R; Allmendinger, T; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Amaldi, Ugo; Amapane, N; Amato, S; Anassontzis, E G; Andersson, P; Andreazza, A; Andringa, S; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Ballestrero, A; Bambade, P; Barão, F; Barbiellini, Guido; Barbier, R; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Barker, G; Baroncelli, A; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Behrmann, A; Beillière, P; Belokopytov, Yu A; Belous, K S; Benekos, N C; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Bérat, C; Berggren, M; Berntzon, L; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Bilenky, S M; Bizouard, M A; Bloch, D; Blom, H M; Bonesini, M; Boonekamp, M; Booth, P S L; Borisov, G; Bosio, C; Botner, O; Boudinov, E; Bouquet, B; Bourdarios, C; Bowcock, T J V; Boyko, I; Bozovic, I; Bozzo, M; Bracko, M; Branchini, P; Brenner, R A; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Buschbeck, Brigitte; Buschmann, P; Cabrera, S; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Carena, F; Carroll, L; Caso, Carlo; Castillo-Gimenez, M V; Cattai, A; Cavallo, F R; Chapkin, M M; Charpentier, P; Checchia, P; Chelkov, G A; Chierici, R; Shlyapnikov, P; Chochula, P; Chorowicz, V; Chudoba, J; Cieslik, K; Collins, P; Contri, R; Cortina, E; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Costa, M; Crawley, H B; Crennell, D J; Crosetti, G; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Czellar, S; D'Hondt, J; Dalmau, J; Davenport, M; Da Silva, W; Della Ricca, G; Delpierre, P A; Demaria, N; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Clercq, C; De Lotto, B; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; Dijkstra, H; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Dolbeau, J; Doroba, K; Dracos, M; Drees, J; Dris, M; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ellert, M; Elsing, M; Engel, J P; Espirito-Santo, M C; Fanourakis, G K; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, Michael; Fernández, J; Ferrer, A; Ferrer-Ribas, E; Ferro, F; Firestone, A; Flagmeyer, U; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Franek, B J; Frodesen, A G; Frühwirth, R; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Galloni, A; Gamba, D; Gamblin, S; Gandelman, M; García, C; Gaspar, C; Gaspar, M; Gasparini, U; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gelé, D; Geralis, T; Ghodbane, N; Gil, I; Glege, F; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gómez-Ceballos, G; Gonçalves, P; González-Caballero, I; Gopal, Gian P; Gorn, L; Guz, Yu; Gracco, Valerio; Grahl, J; Graziani, E; Gris, P; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Guy, J; Haag, C; Hahn, F; Hahn, S; Haider, S; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hansen, J; Harris, F J; Hauler, F; Hedberg, V; Heising, S; Hernández, J J; Herquet, P; Herr, H; Higón, E; Holmgren, Sven Olof; Holt, P J; Hoorelbeke, S; Houlden, M A; Hrubec, Josef; Huber, M; Hughes, G J; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, P; Janik, R; Jarlskog, C; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jean-Marie, B; Jeans, D; Johansson, E K; Jönsson, P E; Joram, C; Juillot, P; Jungermann, L; Kapusta, F; Karafasoulis, K; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Kernel, G; Kersevan, Borut P; Khokhlov, Yu A; Khomenko, B A; Khovanskii, N N; Kiiskinen, A P; King, B J; Kinvig, A; Kjaer, N J; Klapp, O; Kluit, P M; Kokkinias, P; Kostyukhin, V; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Krammer, Manfred; Kriznic, E; Krumshtein, Z; Kubinec, P; Kurowska, J; Kurvinen, K L; Lamsa, J; Lane, D W; Lapin, V; Laugier, J P; Lauhakangas, R; Leder, Gerhard; Ledroit, F; Leinonen, L; Leisos, A; Leitner, R; Lenzen, Georg; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Lethuillier, M; Libby, J; Liebig, W; Liko, D; Lipniacka, A; Lippi, I; Lörstad, B; Loken, J G; Lopes, J H; López, J M; López-Fernandez, R; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J N; Mahon, J R; Maio, A; Malek, A; Maltezos, S; Malychev, V; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R P; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martí i García, S; Masik, J; Mastroyiannopoulos, N; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Matthiae, Giorgio; Mazzucato, F; Mazzucato, M; McCubbin, M L; McKay, R; McNulty, R; McPherson, G; Merle, E; Meroni, C; Meyer, W T; Myagkov, A; Migliore, E; Mirabito, L; Mitaroff, Winfried A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Moch, M; Møller, R; Mönig, K; Monge, M R; Moraes, D; Morettini, P; Morton, G A; Müller, U; Münich, K; Mulders, M; Mulet-Marquis, C; Mundim, L M; Muresan, R; Murray, W J; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Myklebust, T; Naraghi, F; Nassiakou, M; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Nawrocki, K; Negri, P; Neufeld, N; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, B S; Niezurawski, P; Nikolenko, M; Nomokonov, V P; Nygren, A; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Orazi, G; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Oyanguren, A; Paganoni, M; Paiano, S; Pain, R; Paiva, R; Palacios, J; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Parzefall, U; Passeri, A; Passon, O; Pavel, T; Pegoraro, M; Peralta, L; Pernicka, Manfred; Perrotta, A; Petridou, C; Petrolini, A; Phillips, H T; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Piotto, E; Podobnik, T; Poireau, V; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Privitera, P; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Radojicic, D; Ragazzi, S; Rahmani, H; Rames, J; Ratoff, P N; Read, A L; Rebecchi, P; Redaelli, N G; Regler, Meinhard; Rehn, J; Reid, D; Reinertsen, P L; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P B; Resvanis, L K; Richard, F; Rídky, J; Rinaudo, G; Ripp-Baudot, I; Romero, A; Ronchese, P; Rosenberg, E I; Rosinsky, P; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ruiz, A; Saarikko, H; Sacquin, Yu; Sadovskii, A; Sajot, G; Salt, J; Sampsonidis, D; Sannino, M; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Schwemling, P; Schwering, B; Schwickerath, U; Scuri, F; Seager, P; Sedykh, Yu; Segar, A M; Seibert, N; Sekulin, R L; Sette, G; Shellard, R C; Siebel, M; Simard, L C; Simonetto, F; Sissakian, A N; Smadja, G; Smirnova, O G; Smith, G R; Solovyanov, O; Sopczak, André; Sosnowski, R; Spassoff, Tz; Spiriti, E; Squarcia, S; Stanescu, C; Stanitzki, M; Stevenson, K; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Strub, R; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Taffard, A C; Tegenfeldt, F; Terranova, F; Timmermans, J; Tinti, N; Tkatchev, L G; Tobin, M; Todorova-Nová, S; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortora, L; Tortosa, P; Tranströmer, G; Treille, D; Tristram, G; Trochimczuk, M; Troncon, C; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyapkin, P; Tzamarias, S; Ullaland, O; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; Vallazza, E; van Dam, P; Van den Boeck, W; Van Doninck, W K; Van Eldik, J; Van Lysebetten, A; Van Remortel, N; Van Vulpen, I B; Vegni, G; Ventura, L; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verdier, P; Verlato, M; Vertogradov, L S; Verzi, V; Vilanova, D; Vitale, L; Vlasov, E; Vodopyanov, A S; Voulgaris, G; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Washbrook, A J; Weiser, C; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wilkinson, G R; Winter, M; Witek, M; Wolf, G; Yi, J; Yushchenko, O P; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zevgolatakos, E; Zimin, N I; Zinchenko, A I; Zoller, P; Zumerle, G; Zupan, M

    2000-01-01

    Searches for {\\mbox{$ {\\mathrm H} {\\mathrm Z} $}} production d with the Higgs boson decaying into an invisible final state have been performedd the data collected by the DELPHI experimentd up to the centre-of-mass energy of 188.6~{\\mbox{$ {\\mathrm{GeV}}$}}. d The hadronic and muon pair final states of the d {\\mbox{$ {\\mathrm Z} $}} d boson were analysed. No signal was found. d Upper limits on the cross-section and the corresponding Higgs boson mass d limits were set d at 95\\% confidence level. Combining these results with DELPHI results for the vd a 95\\% confidence level Higgs mass lower limit of 92.3~{\\mbox{$d {\\mathrm{GeV}}$}} was obtained, independentd of the branching ratio into visible and invisible decays.

  16. Search for light vector boson production in e+e−→μ+μ−γ interactions with the KLOE experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Babusci

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We have searched for a light vector boson U, the possible carrier of a “dark force”, with the KLOE detector at the DAΦNE e+e− collider, motivated by astrophysical evidence for the presence of dark matter in the Universe. Using e+e− collisions collected with an integrated luminosity of 239.3 pb−1, we look for a dimuon mass peak in the reaction e+e−→μ+μ−γ, corresponding to the decay U→μ+μ−. We find no evidence for a U vector boson signal. We set a 90% CL upper limit for the mixing parameter squared between the photon and the U boson of 1.6×10−5 to 8.6×10−7 for the mass region 520

  17. Effect of dominant three-body interaction to the hard-core boson Hubbard model on a two-dimensional square lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of dominant three-body interaction to the hard-core boson Hubbard model is studied on a two-dimensional square lattice. In terms of the quantum Monte Carlo method, a ρ = 2/3 solid phase is shown explicitly with the coexistence of a charge-density wave and a bond-order wave appearing due to the presence of the dominant three-body interaction. For the strong three-body interaction, the ρ = 2/3 solid phase appears between superfluid phases and shrinks as the strength of the three-body interaction decreases, forming a lobe structure in the phase diagram. For weak three-body interactions, the superfluid phase exists for the whole range of hard-core densities except the full filled case, where the system is a Mott insulator. Our results may be realized in cold-atom experiments.

  18. Effect of dominant three-body interaction to the hard-core boson Hubbard model on a two-dimensional square lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ying; Guo, Huaiming

    2012-09-01

    The effect of dominant three-body interaction to the hard-core boson Hubbard model is studied on a two-dimensional square lattice. In terms of the quantum Monte Carlo method, a ρ = 2/3 solid phase is shown explicitly with the coexistence of a charge-density wave and a bond-order wave appearing due to the presence of the dominant three-body interaction. For the strong three-body interaction, the ρ = 2/3 solid phase appears between superfluid phases and shrinks as the strength of the three-body interaction decreases, forming a lobe structure in the phase diagram. For weak three-body interactions, the superfluid phase exists for the whole range of hard-core densities except the full filled case, where the system is a Mott insulator. Our results may be realized in cold-atom experiments.

  19. Search for neutral Higgs bosons in $e^{+}e^{-}$ interactions at center-of-mass energies between 130 GeV and 183 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Matzner-Dominguez, David Aaron

    1998-01-01

    We have implemented precision tracking algorithms and developed novel techniques to efficiently identify the production of b quarks with a high purity. These techniques would allow us to discover the Higgs boson through its decay into b quark pairs. The search for the Higgs boson was carried out within the framework of the Standard Model and a restricted version of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model using the four-jets channel in the data from e$\\sp+$e$\\sp-$ interactions with center-of-mass energies 130 $\\rm GeV \\le \\sqrt{s} \\le 183$ GeV collected by the L3 detector. After combining the results of the search in the four-jets channel with the other decay modes, no evidence of the production of a Higgs signal is observed. Lower limits are set on the mass of the Standard Model Higgs and on the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model Higgs as a function of tan $\\beta.$ The mass of the Standard Model Higgs boson, h, is restricted to be

  20. Search for WIMP dark matter produced in association with a Z boson with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Basalaev, Artem; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The search for weakly interacting dark matter particle (WIMP) candidates produced in association with a Z boson is presented. Events with large missing transverse momentum and consistent with the decay of a Z boson into oppositely charged electron or muon pairs were selected in analysis. Background estimates and corresponding systematic uncertainties are shown. The limits on the mass scale of the contact interaction as a function of the dark matter particle mass and the limits on the coupling and scalar particle mediator mass for 8 TeV proton-proton collisions data are presented. Prospects for analysis using 13 TeV proton-proton collisions data are discussed.

  1. Study on ground state energy band of even 114-124Cd isotopes under the framework of interacting boson model (IBM-1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this research, the ground state gamma ray bands of even 114-124Cd isotopes are calculated using interacting boson model (IBM-1). The theoretical energy levels for Z = 48, N = 66–76 up to spin-parity 8+ have been obtained by using PHINT computer program. The values of the parameters in the IBM-1 Hamiltonian yield the best fit to the experimental energy spectrum. The calculated results of the ground state energy band are compared to the previous experimental results and the obtained theoretical calculations in IBM-1 are in good agreement with the experimental energy level. (author)

  2. Calculations of low laying energy levels of even-even Cd, Sn and Te isotopes in the “Interacting Boson Model” framework

    OpenAIRE

    S. M. Mostajabodda’vati; Parvaresh, A.; E. Hassanzadeh

    2004-01-01

      The dynamical symmetries in even-even nuclei were investigated by Arima and Iachello in 1974, and led to a model called &quotInteracting Boson Model, (IBM)".   In this article we have outlined some basic ideas used in IBM-1 and carried out the calculations for low laying energy levels of even-even isotopes Cd, Sn and Te via PHINT code.   The calculations for energy and quadra pole moment transitions is done and compared to the available experimental data and IBM -.2 calculations...

  3. Internal guide RNA interactions interfere with Cas9-mediated cleavage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyme, Summer B.; Akhmetova, Laila; Montague, Tessa G.; Valen, Eivind; Schier, Alexander F.

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas system uses guide RNAs (gRNAs) to direct sequence-specific DNA cleavage. Not every gRNA elicits cleavage and the mechanisms that govern gRNA activity have not been resolved. Low activity could result from either failure to form a functional Cas9–gRNA complex or inability to recognize targets in vivo. Here we show that both phenomena influence Cas9 activity by comparing mutagenesis rates in zebrafish embryos with in vitro cleavage assays. In vivo, our results suggest that genomic factors such as CTCF inhibit mutagenesis. Comparing near-identical gRNA sequences with different in vitro activities reveals that internal gRNA interactions reduce cleavage. Even though gRNAs containing these structures do not yield cleavage-competent complexes, they can compete with active gRNAs for binding to Cas9. These results reveal that both genomic context and internal gRNA interactions can interfere with Cas9-mediated cleavage and illuminate previously uncharacterized features of Cas9–gRNA complex formation. PMID:27282953

  4. TDHBB (time dependent Hartree-Bose-Bogoliubov) description of a two-level bosonic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The time-dependent Hartree-Bose-Bogoliubov approximation was applied to a two level bosonic model with pairing interaction. Phase transitions between boson condensates and boson pairs condensate were also studied. (Author)

  5. Associated production of electroweak bosons and heavy mesons at LHCb and prospects to observe double parton interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Baranov, S P; Malyshev, M A; Snigirev, A M; Zotov, N P

    2016-01-01

    The production of weak gauge bosons in association with heavy flavored mesons at the LHCb conditions is considered, and a detailed study of the different contributing processes is presented including single (SPS) and double (DPS) parton scattering mechanisms. We find that the usual DPS factorization formula needs to be corrected for the limited partonic phase space, and that including the relevant corrections reduces discrepancies in the associated $ZD$ production. We conclude finally that double parton scattering dominates the production of same-sign $W^\\pm D^\\pm$ states, as well as the production of $W^-$ bosons associated with $B$-mesons. The latter processes can thus be regarded as new useful DPS indicators.

  6. Limit on light gauge boson production in $e^+e^- \\rightarrow \\mu^+ \\mu^- \\gamma$ interactions with the KLOE experiment

    CERN Document Server

    :,; Balwierz-Pytko, I; Bencivenni, G; Bloise, C; Bossi, F; Branchini, P; Budano, A; Balkest°ahl, L Caldeira; Ceradini, F; Ciambrone, P; Curciarello, F; Czerwinski, E; Danè, E; De Leo, V; De Lucia, E; De Robertis, G; De Santis, A; De Simone, P; Di Cicco, A; Di Domenico, A; Di Salvo, R; Domenici, D; Erriquez, O; Fanizzi, G; Fantini, A; Felici, G; Fiore, S; Franzini, P; Gajos, A; Gauzzi, P; Giardina, G; Giovannella, S; Graziani, E; Happacher, F; Heijkenskjold, L; Hoistad, B; Johansson, T; Kacprzak, K; Kaminska, D; Krzemien, W; Kupsc, A; Lee-Franzini, J; Loddo, F; Loffredo, S; Mandaglio, G; Martemianov, M; Martini, M; Mascolo, M; Messi, R; Miscetti, S; Morello, G; Moricciani, D; Moskal, P; Nguyen, F; Palladino, A; Passeri, A; Patera, V; Longhi, I Prado; Ranieri, A; Santangelo, P; Sarra, I; Schioppa, M; Sciascia, B; Silarski, M; Tortora, L; Venanzoni, G; Wislicki, W; Wolke, M; Zdebik, J

    2014-01-01

    We have searched for a light vector boson $U$, the possible carrier of a "dark force", with the KLOE detector at the DA$\\Phi$NE $e^+e^-$ collider, motivated by the astrophysical evidence for the presence of "dark matter" in the universe. Using $e^+e^-$ collisions collected for an integrated luminosity of $239.3$~pb$^{-1}$, we look for a dimuon mass peak in the reaction $e^+e^- \\rightarrow\\mu^+ \\mu^-\\gamma$, corresponding to the decay $U \\rightarrow \\mu^+\\mu^-$. We find no evidence for a $U$ vector boson signal. We set a 90% CL upper limit for the kinetic mixing parameter $\\epsilon^2$ of 1.6$\\times$10$^{-5}$ to 8.5$\\times$10$^{-7}$ for the mass region $520

  7. Search for Dark Matter in association with a Higgs boson decaying to $b$-quarks in $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 13$ TeV with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    A search for dark matter pair production in association with a Higgs boson decaying to a pair of bottom quarks is presented, using 3.2 \\ifb\\ of $pp$ collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV collected by the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The decay of the Higgs boson is reconstructed as a high-momentum $b\\bar{b}$ system with either a pair of small-radius jets, or a single large-radius jet with substructure. The observed data are found to be consistent with the expected backgrounds. Results are interpreted using a simplified model with a $Z'$ gauge boson mediating the interaction between dark matter and the Standard Model as well as a two-Higgs-doublet model containing an additional $Z'$ boson which decays to a Standard Model Higgs boson and a new pseudoscalar Higgs boson, the latter decaying into a pair of dark matter particles.

  8. Search for dark matter in association with a Higgs boson decaying to $b$-quarks in $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 13$ TeV with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aaboud, Morad; ATLAS Collaboration; Abbott, Brad; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abeloos, Baptiste; Aben, Rosemarie; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abraham, Nicola; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Affolder, Tony; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Agricola, Johannes; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Ali, Babar; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Alkire, Steven Patrick; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allen, Benjamin William; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Alstaty, Mahmoud; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Άlvarez Piqueras, Damián; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amadio, Brian Thomas; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anders, John Kenneth; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antel, Claire; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Armitage, Lewis James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Artz, Sebastian; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Augsten, Kamil; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, Bradley; Ayoub, Mohamad Kassem; Azuelos, Georges; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Baca, Matthew John; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baldin, Evgenii; Balek, Petr; Balestri, Thomas; Balli, Fabrice; Balunas, William Keaton; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Barak, Liron; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisits, Martin-Stefan; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska-Blenessy, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barranco Navarro, Laura; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Basalaev, Artem; Bassalat, Ahmed; Bates, Richard; Batista, Santiago Juan; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Bauce, Matteo; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beacham, James; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans~Peter; Becker, Kathrin; Becker, Maurice; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bedognetti, Matteo; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Janna Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Andrew Stuart; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Belyaev, Nikita; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bender, Michael; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez, Jose; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Beresford, Lydia; Beretta, Matteo; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Beringer, Jürg; Berlendis, Simon; Bernard, Nathan Rogers; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertram, Iain Alexander; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bevan, Adrian John; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Biedermann, Dustin; Bielski, Rafal; Biesuz, Nicolo Vladi; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biondi, Silvia; Bjergaard, David Martin; Black, Curtis; Black, James; Black, Kevin; Blackburn, Daniel; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blanco, Jacobo Ezequiel; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Blunier, Sylvain; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Bock, Christopher; Boehler, Michael; Boerner, Daniela; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogavac, Danijela; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bohm, Christian; Boisvert, Veronique; Bokan, Petar; Bold, Tomasz; Boldyrev, Alexey; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bortoletto, Daniela; Bortolotto, Valerio; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Bossio Sola, Jonathan David; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouffard, Julian; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Boutle, Sarah Kate; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bracinik, Juraj; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Breaden Madden, William Dmitri; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brennan, Amelia Jean; Brenner, Lydia; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Bristow, Timothy Michael; Britton, Dave; Britzger, Daniel; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brosamer, Jacquelyn; Brost, Elizabeth; Broughton, James; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruni, Lucrezia Stella; Brunt, Benjamin; Bruschi, Marco; Bruscino, Nello; Bryant, Patrick; Bryngemark, Lene; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Buchholz, Peter; Buckley, Andrew; Budagov, Ioulian; Buehrer, Felix; Bugge, Magnar Kopangen; Bulekov, Oleg; Bullock, Daniel; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burgard, Carsten Daniel; Burghgrave, Blake; Burka, Klaudia; Burke, Stephen; Burmeister, Ingo; Burr, Jonathan Thomas Peter; Busato, Emmanuel; Büscher, Daniel; Büscher, Volker; Bussey, Peter; Butler, John; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buttinger, William; Buzatu, Adrian; Buzykaev, Aleksey; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cairo, Valentina; Cakir, Orhan; Calace, Noemi; Calafiura, Paolo; Calandri, Alessandro; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Caloba, Luiz; Calvente Lopez, Sergio; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Calvet, Thomas Philippe; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarda, Stefano; Camarri, Paolo; Cameron, David; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Camincher, Clement; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Camplani, Alessandra; Campoverde, Angel; Canale, Vincenzo; Canepa, Anadi; Cano Bret, Marc; Cantero, Josu; Cantrill, Robert; Cao, Tingting; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Carbone, Ryne Michael; Cardarelli, Roberto; Cardillo, Fabio; Carli, Ina; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrillo-Montoya, German D; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Casolino, Mirkoantonio; Casper, David William; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castelijn, Remco; Castelli, Angelantonio; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Caudron, Julien; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavallaro, Emanuele; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerda Alberich, Leonor; Cerio, Benjamin; Cerqueira, Augusto Santiago; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cerv, Matevz; Cervelli, Alberto; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chan, Stephen Kam-wah; Chan, Yat Long; Chang, Philip; Chapman, John Derek; Charlton, Dave; Chatterjee, Avishek; Chau, Chav Chhiv; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Che, Siinn; Cheatham, Susan; Chegwidden, Andrew; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Karen; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Shion; Chen, Xin; Chen, Ye; Cheng, Hok Chuen; Cheng, Huajie; Cheng, Yangyang; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cheremushkina, Evgenia; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiarella, Vitaliano; Chiarelli, Giorgio; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chitan, Adrian; Chizhov, Mihail; Choi, Kyungeon; Chomont, Arthur Rene; Chouridou, Sofia; Chow, Bonnie Kar Bo; Christodoulou, Valentinos; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chudoba, Jiri; Chuinard, Annabelle Julia; Chwastowski, Janusz; Chytka, Ladislav; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Cioara, Irina Antonela; Ciocca, Claudia; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirotto, Francesco; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Citterio, Mauro; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Brian Lee; Clark, Michael; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coffey, Laurel; Colasurdo, Luca; Cole, Brian; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Compostella, Gabriele; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Connell, Simon Henry; Connelly, Ian; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cormier, Kyle James Read; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Corso-Radu, Alina; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Cottin, Giovanna; Cowan, Glen; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Crawley, Samuel Joseph; Cree, Graham; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Crescioli, Francesco; Cribbs, Wayne Allen; Crispin Ortuzar, Mireia; Cristinziani, Markus; Croft, Vince; Crosetti, Giovanni; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Cúth, Jakub; Cuthbert, Cameron; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; D'amen, Gabriele; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dado, Tomas; Dai, Tiesheng; Dale, Orjan; Dallaire, Frederick; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Dandoy, Jeffrey Rogers; Dang, Nguyen Phuong; Daniells, Andrew Christopher; Dann, Nicholas Stuart; Danninger, Matthias; Dano Hoffmann, Maria; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darmora, Smita; Dassoulas, James; Dattagupta, Aparajita; Davey, Will; David, Claire; Davidek, Tomas; Davies, Merlin; Davison, Peter; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Daya-Ishmukhametova, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Benedetti, Abraham; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; De Maria, Antonio; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dedovich, Dmitri; Dehghanian, Nooshin; Deigaard, Ingrid; Del Gaudio, Michela; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Delgove, David; Deliot, Frederic; Delitzsch, Chris Malena; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; DeMarco, David; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demilly, Aurelien; Denisov, Sergey; Denysiuk, Denys; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Deterre, Cecile; Dette, Karola; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Clemente, William Kennedy; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Di Valentino, David; Diaconu, Cristinel; Diamond, Miriam; Dias, Flavia; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Diglio, Sara; Dimitrievska, Aleksandra; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; Djuvsland, Julia Isabell; do Vale, Maria Aline Barros; Dobos, Daniel; Dobre, Monica; Doglioni, Caterina; Dohmae, Takeshi; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donati, Simone; Dondero, Paolo; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doyle, Tony; Drechsler, Eric; Dris, Manolis; Du, Yanyan; Duarte-Campderros, Jorge; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Ducu, Otilia Anamaria; Duda, Dominik; Dudarev, Alexey; Duffield, Emily Marie; Duflot, Laurent; Duguid, Liam; Dührssen, Michael; Dumancic, Mirta; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Düren, Michael; Durglishvili, Archil; Duschinger, Dirk; Dutta, Baishali; Dyndal, Mateusz; Eckardt, Christoph; Ecker, Katharina Maria; Edgar, Ryan Christopher; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellajosyula, Venugopal; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Elliot, Alison; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Enari, Yuji; Endner, Oliver Chris; Endo, Masaki; Ennis, Joseph Stanford; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Ernis, Gunar; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Esch, Hendrik; Escobar, Carlos; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evans, Hal; Ezhilov, Alexey; Fabbri, Federica; Fabbri, Laura; Facini, Gabriel; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Falla, Rebecca Jane; Faltova, Jana; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farina, Christian; Farina, Edoardo Maria; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Faucci Giannelli, Michele; Favareto, Andrea; Fawcett, William James; Fayard, Louis; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Feigl, Simon; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Feng, Haolu; Fenyuk, Alexander; Feremenga, Last; Fernandez Martinez, Patricia; Fernandez Perez, Sonia; Ferrando, James; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filipuzzi, Marco; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Finelli, Kevin Daniel; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Adam; Fischer, Cora; Fischer, Julia; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Flaschel, Nils; Fleck, Ivor; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fletcher, Gareth Thomas; Fletcher, Rob Roy MacGregor; Flick, Tobias; Floderus, Anders; Flores Castillo, Luis; Flowerdew, Michael; Forcolin, Giulio Tiziano; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Foster, Andrew Geoffrey; Fournier, Daniel; Fox, Harald; Fracchia, Silvia; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Francis, David; Franconi, Laura; Franklin, Melissa; Frate, Meghan; Fraternali, Marco; Freeborn, David; Fressard-Batraneanu, Silvia; Friedrich, Felix; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fusayasu, Takahiro; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gabrielli, Alessandro; Gabrielli, Andrea; Gach, Grzegorz; Gadatsch, Stefan; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Louis Guillaume; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galster, Gorm Aske Gram Krohn; Gan, KK; Gao, Jun; Gao, Yanyan; Gao, Yongsheng; Garay Walls, Francisca; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garonne, Vincent; Gascon Bravo, Alberto; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudiello, Andrea; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Gecse, Zoltan; Gee, Norman; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Geisen, Marc; Geisler, Manuel Patrice; Gemme, Claudia; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Geng, Cong; Gentile, Simonetta; Gentsos, Christos; George, Simon; Gerbaudo, Davide; Gershon, Avi; Ghasemi, Sara; Ghazlane, Hamid; Ghneimat, Mazuza; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giannetti, Paola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Stephen; Gignac, Matthew; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillam, Thomas; Gillberg, Dag; Gilles, Geoffrey; Gingrich, Douglas; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giorgi, Filippo Maria; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giromini, Paolo; Giugni, Danilo; Giuli, Francesco; Giuliani, Claudia; Giulini, Maddalena; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gkaitatzis, Stamatios; Gkialas, Ioannis; Gkougkousis, Evangelos Leonidas; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glaysher, Paul; Glazov, Alexandre; Goblirsch-Kolb, Maximilian; Godlewski, Jan; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golubkov, Dmitry; Gomes, Agostinho; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Giulia; Gonella, Laura; Gongadze, Alexi; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Goshaw, Alfred; Gössling, Claus; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Goudet, Christophe Raymond; Goujdami, Driss; Goussiou, Anna; Govender, Nicolin; Gozani, Eitan; Graber, Lars; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Gradin, Per Olov Joakim; Grafström, Per; Gramling, Johanna; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Gratchev, Vadim; Gravila, Paul Mircea; Gray, Heather; Graziani, Enrico; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Grefe, Christian; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Grevtsov, Kirill; Griffiths, Justin; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Groh, Sabrina; Grohs, Johannes Philipp; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Grossi, Giulio Cornelio; Grout, Zara Jane; Guan, Liang; Guan, Wen; Guenther, Jaroslav; Guescini, Francesco; Guest, Daniel; Gueta, Orel; Guido, Elisa; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gumpert, Christian; Guo, Jun; Guo, Yicheng; Gupta, Ruchi; Gupta, Shaun; Gustavino, Giuliano; Gutierrez, Phillip; Gutierrez Ortiz, Nicolas Gilberto; Gutschow, Christian; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Haddad, Nacim; Hadef, Asma; Haefner, Petra; Hageböck, Stephan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haleem, Mahsana; Haley, Joseph; Halladjian, Garabed; Hallewell, Gregory David; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamity, Guillermo Nicolas; Hamnett, Phillip George; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Haney, Bijan; Hanke, Paul; Hanna, Remie; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Maike Christina; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hard, Andrew; Harenberg, Torsten; Hariri, Faten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harrington, Robert; Harrison, Paul Fraser; Hartjes, Fred; Hartmann, Nikolai Marcel; Hasegawa, Makoto; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hasib, A; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauser, Reiner; Hauswald, Lorenz; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hays, Jonathan Michael; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Heck, Tobias; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heim, Timon; Heinemann, Beate; Heinrich, Jochen Jens; Heinrich, Lukas; Heinz, Christian; Hejbal, Jiri; Helary, Louis; Hellman, Sten; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, James; Henderson, Robert; Heng, Yang; Henkelmann, Steffen; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Herbert, Geoffrey Henry; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Hetherly, Jeffrey Wayne; Hickling, Robert; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Ewan; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hinman, Rachel Reisner; Hirose, Minoru; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoenig, Friedrich; Hohn, David; Holmes, Tova Ray; Homann, Michael; Hong, Tae Min; Hooberman, Benjamin Henry; Hopkins, Walter; Horii, Yasuyuki; Horton, Arthur James; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howarth, James; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hrynevich, Aliaksei; Hsu, Catherine; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Diedi; Hu, Qipeng; Huang, Yanping; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Huo, Peng; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Ideal, Emma; Idrissi, Zineb; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Iizawa, Tomoya; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Yuriy; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Ince, Tayfun; Introzzi, Gianluca; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Ishijima, Naoki; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Ito, Fumiaki; Iturbe Ponce, Julia Mariana; Iuppa, Roberto; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jabbar, Samina; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, Matthew; Jackson, Paul; Jain, Vivek; Jakobi, Katharina Bianca; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansen, Eric; Jansky, Roland; Janssen, Jens; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Javadov, Namig; Javůrek, Tomáš; Jeanneau, Fabien; Jeanty, Laura; Jeng, Geng-yuan; Jennens, David; Jenni, Peter; Jentzsch, Jennifer; Jeske, Carl; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Ji, Haoshuang; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Hai; Jiang, Yi; Jiggins, Stephen; Jimenez Pena, Javier; Jin, Shan; Jinaru, Adam; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Johansson, Per; Johns, Kenneth; Johnson, William Joseph; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Sarah; Jones, Tim; Jongmanns, Jan; Jorge, Pedro; Jovicevic, Jelena; Ju, Xiangyang; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Köhler, Markus Konrad; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kahn, Sebastien Jonathan; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalderon, Charles William; Kaluza, Adam; Kama, Sami; Kamenshchikov, Andrey; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneti, Steven; Kanjir, Luka; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kaplan, Laser Seymour; Kapliy, Anton; Kar, Deepak; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karamaoun, Andrew; Karastathis, Nikolaos; Kareem, Mohammad Jawad; Karentzos, Efstathios; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karpov, Sergey; Karpova, Zoya; Karthik, Krishnaiyengar; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kasahara, Kota; Kashif, Lashkar; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Yousuke; Kato, Chikuma; Katre, Akshay; Katzy, Judith; Kawade, Kentoro; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kazama, Shingo; Kazanin, Vassili; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keller, John; Kempster, Jacob Julian; Keoshkerian, Houry; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Keyes, Robert; Khader, Mazin; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khanov, Alexander; Kharlamov, Alexey; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kido, Shogo; Kim, Hee Yeun; Kim, Shinhong; Kim, Young-Kee; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver Maria; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Samuel Burton; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kiss, Florian; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kivernyk, Oleh; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Matthew Henry; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Knapik, Joanna; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Kobayashi, Aine; Kobayashi, Dai; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolanoski, Hermann; Kolb, Mathis; Koletsou, Iro; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kondrashova, Nataliia; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; Kono, Takanori; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Köpke, Lutz; Kopp, Anna Katharina; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kosek, Tomas; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumeli-Charalampidi, Athina; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Kowalewska, Anna Bozena; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozakai, Chihiro; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasnopevtsev, Dimitriy; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, Jana; Kravchenko, Anton; Kretz, Moritz; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Krieger, Peter; Krizka, Karol; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Krumnack, Nils; Kruse, Amanda; Kruse, Mark; Kruskal, Michael; Kubota, Takashi; Kucuk, Hilal; Kuday, Sinan; Kuechler, Jan Thomas; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuger, Fabian; Kuhl, Andrew; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kukla, Romain; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuna, Marine; Kunigo, Takuto; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; Kwan, Tony; Kyriazopoulos, Dimitrios; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rosa Navarro, Jose Luis; La Rotonda, Laura; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Lammers, Sabine; Lampl, Walter; Lançon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lange, J örn Christian; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Lanza, Agostino; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Lasagni Manghi, Federico; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Law, Alexander; Laycock, Paul; Lazovich, Tomo; Lazzaroni, Massimo; Le, Brian; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Quilleuc, Eloi; LeBlanc, Matthew Edgar; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Claire Alexandra; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Lefebvre, Michel; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehan, Allan; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leight, William Axel; Leister, Andrew Gerard; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatjana; Lenzi, Bruno; Leone, Robert; Leone, Sandra; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Lerner, Giuseppe; Leroy, Claude; Lesage, Arthur; Lester, Christopher; Levchenko, Mikhail; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levy, Mark; Lewis, Dave; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bing; Li, Haifeng; Li, Ho Ling; Li, Lei; Li, Liang; Li, Qi; Li, Shu; Li, Xingguo; Li, Yichen; Liang, Zhijun; Liberti, Barbara; Liblong, Aaron; Lichard, Peter; Lie, Ki; Liebal, Jessica; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limosani, Antonio; Lin, Simon; Lin, Tai-Hua; Lindquist, Brian Edward; Lionti, Anthony Eric; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Liss, Tony; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Bo; Liu, Dong; Liu, Hao; Liu, Hongbin; Liu, Jian; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Kun; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanlin; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Lobodzinska, Ewelina Maria; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loebinger, Fred; Loevschall-Jensen, Ask Emil; Loew, Kevin Michael; Loginov, Andrey; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Long, Brian Alexander; Long, Jonathan David; Long, Robin Eamonn; Longo, Luigi; Looper, Kristina Anne; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lopez Paredes, Brais; Lopez Paz, Ivan; Lopez Solis, Alvaro; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Lösel, Philipp Jonathan; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lu, Haonan; Lu, Nan; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Luedtke, Christian; Luehring, Frederick; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lundberg, Olof; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Luzi, Pierre Marc; Lynn, David; Lysak, Roman; Lytken, Else; Lyubushkin, Vladimir; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Ma, Yanhui; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Macdonald, Calum Michael; Maček, Boštjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Madaffari, Daniele; Madar, Romain; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Madsen, Alexander; Maeda, Junpei; Maeland, Steffen; Maeno, Tadashi; Maevskiy, Artem; Magradze, Erekle; Mahlstedt, Joern; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maier, Andreas Alexander; Maier, Thomas; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyukov, Sergei; Mamuzic, Judita; Mancini, Giada; Mandelli, Beatrice; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Maneira, José; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany; Mann, Alexander; Manousos, Athanasios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mansour, Jason Dhia; Mantifel, Rodger; Mantoani, Matteo; Manzoni, Stefano; Mapelli, Livio; Marceca, Gino; March, Luis; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marjanovic, Marija; Marley, Daniel; Marroquim, Fernando; Marsden, Stephen Philip; Marshall, Zach; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Brian; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Mario; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martoiu, Victor Sorin; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massa, Lorenzo; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mättig, Peter; Mattmann, Johannes; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mazini, Rachid; Mazza, Simone Michele; Mc Fadden, Neil Christopher; Mc Goldrick, Garrin; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McClymont, Laurie; McDonald, Emily; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Medinnis, Michael; Meehan, Samuel; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meineck, Christian; Meirose, Bernhard; Melini, Davide; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Melo, Matej; Meloni, Federico; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mergelmeyer, Sebastian; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer Zu Theenhausen, Hanno; Miano, Fabrizio; Middleton, Robin; Miglioranzi, Silvia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Milesi, Marco; Milic, Adriana; Miller, David; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Minaenko, Andrey; Minami, Yuto; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mistry, Khilesh; Mitani, Takashi; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Miucci, Antonio; Miyagawa, Paul; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Mochizuki, Kazuya; Mohapatra, Soumya; Molander, Simon; Moles-Valls, Regina; Monden, Ryutaro; Mondragon, Matthew Craig; Mönig, Klaus; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montalbano, Alyssa; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Morange, Nicolas; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morgenstern, Stefanie; Mori, Daniel; Mori, Tatsuya; Morii, Masahiro; Morinaga, Masahiro; Morisbak, Vanja; Moritz, Sebastian; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Mortensen, Simon Stark; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Motohashi, Kazuki; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Muanza, Steve; Mudd, Richard; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Ralph Soeren Peter; Mueller, Thibaut; Muenstermann, Daniel; Mullen, Paul; Mullier, Geoffrey; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Murillo Quijada, Javier Alberto; Murray, Bill; Musheghyan, Haykuhi; Muškinja, Miha; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nachman, Benjamin Philip; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagata, Kazuki; Nagel, Martin; Nagy, Elemer; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Namasivayam, Harisankar; Naranjo Garcia, Roger Felipe; Narayan, Rohin; Narrias Villar, Daniel Isaac; Naryshkin, Iouri; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Nef, Pascal Daniel; Negri, Andrea; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nellist, Clara; Nelson, Andrew; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen, Duong Hai; Nguyen Manh, Tuan; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Jon Kerr; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nisius, Richard; Nobe, Takuya; Nodulman, Lawrence; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Nooney, Tamsin; Norberg, Scarlet; Nordberg, Markus; Norjoharuddeen, Nurfikri; Novgorodova, Olga; Nowak, Sebastian; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Ntekas, Konstantinos; Nurse, Emily; Nuti, Francesco; O'grady, Fionnbarr; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Rourke, Abigail Alexandra; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Obermann, Theresa; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Ochoa, Ines; Ochoa-Ricoux, Juan Pedro; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohman, Henrik; Oide, Hideyuki; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Oleiro Seabra, Luis Filipe; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onogi, Kouta; Onyisi, Peter; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Otono, Hidetoshi; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Oussoren, Koen Pieter; Ouyang, Qun; Owen, Mark; Owen, Rhys Edward; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pachal, Katherine; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Pacheco Rodriguez, Laura; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagáčová, Martina; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Palazzo, Serena; Palestini, Sandro; Palka, Marek; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Pandini, Carlo Enrico; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Paolozzi, Lorenzo; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Papageorgiou, Konstantinos; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Parker, Adam Jackson; Parker, Michael Andrew; Parker, Kerry Ann; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pascuzzi, Vincent; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Pater, Joleen; Pauly, Thilo; Pearce, James; Pearson, Benjamin; Pedersen, Lars Egholm; Pedersen, Maiken; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Pedro, Rute; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Pelikan, Daniel; Penc, Ondrej; Peng, Cong; Peng, Haiping; Penwell, John; Peralva, Bernardo; Perego, Marta Maria; Perepelitsa, Dennis; Perez Codina, Estel; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrella, Sabrina; Peschke, Richard; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Peters, Yvonne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petroff, Pierre; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrov, Mariyan; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Pettersson, Nora Emilia; Peyaud, Alan; Pezoa, Raquel; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Pianori, Elisabetta; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Pickering, Mark Andrew; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pin, Arnaud Willy J; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinfold, James; Pingel, Almut; Pires, Sylvestre; Pirumov, Hayk; Pitt, Michael; Plazak, Lukas; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskot, Vojtech; Plotnikova, Elena; Plucinski, Pawel; Pluth, Daniel; Poettgen, Ruth; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, David-leon; Polesello, Giacomo; Poley, Anne-luise; Policicchio, Antonio; Polifka, Richard; Polini, Alessandro; Pollard, Christopher Samuel; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potamianos, Karolos; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozdnyakov, Valery; Pozo Astigarraga, Mikel Eukeni; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prell, Soeren; Price, Darren; Price, Lawrence; Primavera, Margherita; Prince, Sebastien; Proissl, Manuel; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Przybycien, Mariusz; Puddu, Daniele; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Qian, Jianming; Qin, Gang; Qin, Yang; Quadt, Arnulf; Quayle, William; Queitsch-Maitland, Michaela; Quilty, Donnchadha; Raddum, Silje; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radhakrishnan, Sooraj Krishnan; Radloff, Peter; Rados, Pere; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Raine, John Andrew; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Rangel-Smith, Camila; Ratti, Maria Giulia; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Stefan; Ravenscroft, Thomas; Ravinovich, Ilia; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Readioff, Nathan Peter; Reale, Marilea; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Rehnisch, Laura; Reichert, Joseph; Reisin, Hernan; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Huan; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Rezanova, Olga; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Richter, Stefan; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ricken, Oliver; Ridel, Melissa; Rieck, Patrick; Riegel, Christian Johann; Rieger, Julia; Rifki, Othmane; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rimoldi, Marco; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Ristić, Branislav; Ritsch, Elmar; Riu, Imma; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Rizzi, Chiara; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Roda, Chiara; Rodina, Yulia; Rodriguez Perez, Andrea; Rodriguez Rodriguez, Daniel; Roe, Shaun; Rogan, Christopher Sean; Røhne, Ole; Röhrig, Rainer; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romano Saez, Silvestre Marino; Romero Adam, Elena; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Ronzani, Manfredi; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Peyton; Rosenthal, Oliver; Rosien, Nils-Arne; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rosten, Jonatan; Rosten, Rachel; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexandre; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubbo, Francesco; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Rühr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Ruschke, Alexander; Russell, Heather; Rutherfoord, John; Ruthmann, Nils; Ryabov, Yury; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryu, Soo; Ryzhov, Andrey; Rzehorz, Gerhard Ferdinand; Saavedra, Aldo; Sabato, Gabriele; Sacerdoti, Sabrina; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Saha, Puja; Sahinsoy, Merve; Saimpert, Matthias; Saito, Tomoyuki; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Yuki; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Salazar Loyola, Javier Esteban; Salek, David; Sales De Bruin, Pedro Henrique; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sammel, Dirk; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Sánchez, Javier; Sanchez Martinez, Victoria; Sanchez Pineda, Arturo; Sandaker, Heidi; Sandbach, Ruth Laura; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Carlos; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sankey, Dave; Sannino, Mario; Sansoni, Andrea; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Santoyo Castillo, Itzebelt; Sapp, Kevin; Sapronov, Andrey; Saraiva, João; Sarrazin, Bjorn; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Yuichi; Sato, Koji; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Savage, Graham; Savard, Pierre; Sawyer, Craig; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, James; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scanlon, Tim; Scannicchio, Diana; Scarcella, Mark; Scarfone, Valerio; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schachtner, Balthasar Maria; Schaefer, Douglas; Schaefer, Ralph; Schaeffer, Jan; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schäfer, Uli; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R Dean; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Schiavi, Carlo; Schier, Sheena; Schillo, Christian; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, Korbinian Ralf; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Stefan; Schmitz, Simon; Schneider, Basil; Schnoor, Ulrike; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schoening, Andre; Schoenrock, Bradley Daniel; Schopf, Elisabeth; Schott, Matthias; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schramm, Steven; Schreyer, Manuel; Schuh, Natascha; Schulte, Alexandra; Schultens, Martin Johannes; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwarz, Thomas Andrew; Schwegler, Philipp; Schweiger, Hansdieter; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Sciolla, Gabriella; Scuri, Fabrizio; Scutti, Federico; Searcy, Jacob; Seema, Pienpen; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sekhon, Karishma; Sekula, Stephen; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Serkin, Leonid; Sessa, Marco; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sfiligoj, Tina; Sforza, Federico; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shaikh, Nabila Wahab; Shan, Lianyou; Shang, Ruo-yu; Shank, James; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Kate; Shaw, Savanna Marie; Shcherbakova, Anna; Shehu, Ciwake Yusufu; Sherwood, Peter; Shi, Liaoshan; Shimizu, Shima; Shimmin, Chase Owen; Shimojima, Makoto; Shiyakova, Mariya; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shoaleh Saadi, Diane; Shochet, Mel; Shojaii, Seyed Ruhollah; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Sicho, Petr; Sickles, Anne Marie; Sidebo, Per Edvin; Sidiropoulou, Ourania; Sidorov, Dmitri; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silva, José; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simioni, Eduard; Simmons, Brinick; Simon, Dorian; Simon, Manuel; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sioli, Maximiliano; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Skinner, Malcolm Bruce; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Slawinska, Magdalena; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Slovak, Radim; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smestad, Lillian; Smiesko, Juraj; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Matthew; Smith, Russell; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snyder, Scott; Sobie, Randall; Socher, Felix; Soffer, Abner; Soh, Dart-yin; Sokhrannyi, Grygorii; Solans Sanchez, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solodkov, Alexander; Soloshenko, Alexei; Solovyanov, Oleg; Solovyev, Victor; Sommer, Philip; Son, Hyungsuk; Song, Hong Ye; Sood, Alexander; Sopczak, Andre; Sopko, Vit; Sorin, Veronica; Sosa, David; Sotiropoulou, Calliope Louisa; Soualah, Rachik; Soukharev, Andrey; South, David; Sowden, Benjamin; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spalla, Margherita; Spangenberg, Martin; Spanò, Francesco; Sperlich, Dennis; Spettel, Fabian; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spiller, Laurence Anthony; Spousta, Martin; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stabile, Alberto; Stamen, Rainer; Stamm, Soren; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanescu-Bellu, Madalina; Stanitzki, Marcel Michael; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Giordon; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Stärz, Steffen; Staszewski, Rafal; Steinberg, Peter; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoebe, Michael; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stolte, Philipp; Stonjek, Stefan; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Stramaglia, Maria Elena; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Strubig, Antonia; Stucci, Stefania Antonia; Stugu, Bjarne; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Su, Dong; Su, Jun; Subramaniam, Rajivalochan; Suchek, Stanislav; Sugaya, Yorihito; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Siyuan; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Shota; Svatos, Michal; Swiatlowski, Maximilian; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Ta, Duc; Taccini, Cecilia; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taenzer, Joe; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tan, Kong Guan; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Shuji; Tannenwald, Benjamin Bordy; Tapia Araya, Sebastian; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tarem, Shlomit; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tashiro, Takuya; Tassi, Enrico; Tavares Delgado, Ademar; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Aaron; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Pierre Thor Elliot; Taylor, Wendy; Teischinger, Florian Alfred; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Temple, Darren; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Teoh, Jia Jian; Tepel, Fabian-Phillipp; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terzo, Stefano; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thomas, Juergen; Thomas-Wilsker, Joshuha; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Tibbetts, Mark James; Ticse Torres, Royer Edson; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todome, Kazuki; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tolley, Emma; Tomlinson, Lee; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Tong, Baojia(Tony); Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Trefzger, Thomas; Tricoli, Alessandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Tripiana, Martin; Trischuk, William; Trocmé, Benjamin; Trofymov, Artur; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trovatelli, Monica; Truong, Loan; Trzebinski, Maciej; Trzupek, Adam; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsirintanis, Nikolaos; Tsiskaridze, Shota; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsui, Ka Ming; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tuna, Alexander Naip; Tupputi, Salvatore; Turchikhin, Semen; Turecek, Daniel; Turgeman, Daniel; Turra, Ruggero; Turvey, Andrew John; Tuts, Michael; Tyndel, Mike; Ucchielli, Giulia; Ueda, Ikuo; Ughetto, Michael; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Ungaro, Francesca; Unno, Yoshinobu; Unverdorben, Christopher; Urban, Jozef; Urquijo, Phillip; Urrejola, Pedro; Usai, Giulio; Usanova, Anna; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Valderanis, Chrysostomos; Valdes Santurio, Eduardo; Valencic, Nika; Valentinetti, Sara; Valero, Alberto; Valery, Loic; Valkar, Stefan; Vallecorsa, Sofia; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; Van Den Wollenberg, Wouter; Van Der Deijl, Pieter; van der Geer, Rogier; van der Graaf, Harry; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; Van Nieuwkoop, Jacobus; van Vulpen, Ivo; van Woerden, Marius Cornelis; Vanadia, Marco; Vandelli, Wainer; Vanguri, Rami; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vankov, Peter; Vardanyan, Gagik; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varol, Tulin; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vasquez, Jared Gregory; Vazeille, Francois; Vazquez Schroeder, Tamara; Veatch, Jason; Veloce, Laurelle Maria; Veloso, Filipe; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Venturini, Alessio; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Viazlo, Oleksandr; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Vickey Boeriu, Oana Elena; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Vigani, Luigi; Vigne, Ralph; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Vittori, Camilla; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vlasak, Michal; Vogel, Marcelo; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Volpi, Matteo; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorobev, Konstantin; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Vykydal, Zdenek; Wagner, Peter; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wahlberg, Hernan; Wahrmund, Sebastian; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wallangen, Veronica; Wang, Chao; Wang, Chao; Wang, Fuquan; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Kuhan; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Wang, Tan; Wang, Tingting; Wang, Wenxiao; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Wanotayaroj, Chaowaroj; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Wardrope, David Robert; Washbrook, Andrew; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Ben; Webb, Samuel; Weber, Michele; Weber, Stefan Wolf; Webster, Jordan S; Weidberg, Anthony; Weinert, Benjamin; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Weits, Hartger; Wells, Phillippa; Wenaus, Torre; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Michael David; Werner, Per; Wessels, Martin; Wetter, Jeffrey; Whalen, Kathleen; Whallon, Nikola Lazar; Wharton, Andrew Mark; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Ryan; Whiteson, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik-Fuchs, Liv Antje Mari; Wildauer, Andreas; Wilk, Fabian; Wilkens, Henric George; Williams, Hugh; Williams, Sarah; Willis, Christopher; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, John; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winklmeier, Frank; Winston, Oliver James; Winter, Benedict Tobias; Wittgen, Matthias; Wittkowski, Josephine; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Worm, Steven D; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wozniak, Krzysztof; Wu, Mengqing; Wu, Miles; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wyatt, Terry Richard; Wynne, Benjamin; Xella, Stefania; Xu, Da; Xu, Lailin; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yakabe, Ryota; Yamaguchi, Daiki; Yamaguchi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamauchi, Katsuya; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Hongtao; Yang, Yi; Yang, Zongchang; Yao, Weiming; Yap, Yee Chinn; Yasu, Yoshiji; Yatsenko, Elena; Yau Wong, Kaven Henry; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yeletskikh, Ivan; Yen, Andy L; Yildirim, Eda; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Rikutaro; Yoshihara, Keisuke; Young, Charles; Young, Christopher John; Youssef, Saul; Yu, David Ren-Hwa; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jiaming; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yuen, Stephanie P; Yusuff, Imran; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zakharchuk, Nataliia; Zalieckas, Justas; Zaman, Aungshuman; Zambito, Stefano; Zanello, Lucia; Zanzi, Daniele; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeman, Martin; Zemla, Andrzej; Zeng, Jian Cong; Zeng, Qi; Zengel, Keith; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zerwas, Dirk; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Fangzhou; Zhang, Guangyi; Zhang, Huijun; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Ruiqi; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Xiandong; Zhao, Yongke; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Chen; Zhou, Lei; Zhou, Li; Zhou, Mingliang; Zhou, Ning; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhukov, Konstantin; Zibell, Andre; Zieminska, Daria; Zimine, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Christoph; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Zinonos, Zinonas; Zinser, Markus; Ziolkowski, Michael; Živković, Lidija; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; zur Nedden, Martin; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2016-01-01

    A search for dark matter pair production in association with a Higgs boson decaying to a pair of bottom quarks is presented, using 3.2 $fb^{-1}$ of $pp$ collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV collected by the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The decay of the Higgs boson is reconstructed as a high-momentum $b\\bar{b}$ system with either a pair of small-radius jets, or a single large-radius jet with substructure. The observed data are found to be consistent with the expected backgrounds. Results are interpreted using a simplified model with a $Z'$ gauge boson mediating the interaction between dark matter and the Standard Model as well as a two-Higgs-doublet model containing an additional $Z'$ boson which decays to a Standard Model Higgs boson and a new pseudoscalar Higgs boson, the latter decaying into a pair of dark matter particles.

  9. A Review of Peer-Mediated Social Interaction Interventions for Students with Autism in Inclusive Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Laci; O'Reilly, Mark; Kuhn, Michelle; Gevarter, Cindy; Lancioni, Giulio E.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Lang, Russell

    2015-01-01

    This review addresses the use of peer-mediated interventions (PMI) to improve the social interaction skills of students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in inclusive settings. The purpose of this review is to (a) identify the characteristics and components of peer-mediated social interaction interventions, (b) evaluate the effectiveness of PMI…

  10. Vector boson scattering and electroweak production of two like-charge W bosons and two jets at the current and future ATLAS detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The scattering of electroweak gauge bosons is closely connected to the electroweak gauge symmetry and its spontaneous breaking through the Brout-Englert-Higgs mechanism. Since it contains triple and quartic gauge boson vertices, the measurement of this scattering process allows to probe the self-interactions of weak bosons. The contribution of the Higgs boson to the weak boson scattering amplitude ensures unitarity of the scattering matrix. Therefore, the scattering of massive electroweak gauge bosons is sensitive to deviations from the Standard Model prescription of the electroweak interaction and of the properties of the Higgs boson. At the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the scattering of massive electroweak gauge bosons is accessible through the measurement of purely electroweak production of two jets and two gauge bosons. No such process has been observed before. Being the channel with the least amount of background from QCD-mediated production of the same final state, the most promising channel for the first measurement of a process containing massive electroweak gauge boson scattering is the one with two like-charge W bosons and two jets in the final state. This thesis presents the first measurement of electroweak production of two jets and two identically charged W bosons, which yields the first observation of a process with contributions from quartic gauge interactions of massive electroweak gauge bosons. An overview of the most important issues in Monte Carlo simulation of vector boson scattering processes with current Monte Carlo generators is given in this work. The measurement of the final state of two jets and two leptonically decaying same-charge W bosons is conducted based on proton-proton collision data with a center-of-mass energy of √(s)=8 TeV, taken in 2012 with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. The cross section of electroweak production of two jets and two like-charge W bosons is measured with a significance of 3.6 standard deviations to be

  11. Search for a Light Higgs Boson Decaying to Long-Lived Weakly Interacting Particles in Proton-Proton Collisions at s=7TeV with the ATLAS Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acerbi, E.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Aderholz, M.; Adomeit, S.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Akiyama, A.; Alam, M. S.; Alam, M. A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Aliyev, M.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral, P.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amorim, A.; Amorós, G.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Andrieux, M.-L.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoun, S.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Archambault, J. P.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J.-F.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, S.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Aubert, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Ay, C.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Bachy, G.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bahinipati, S.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, M. D.; Baker, S.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barashkou, A.; Barbaro Galtieri, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; da Costa, J. Barreiro Guimarães; Barrillon, P.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartsch, V.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beale, S.; Beare, B.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K. H.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Begel, M.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Behera, P. K.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Beloborodova, O.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Ben Ami, S.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Benchouk, C.; Bendel, M.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Berry, T.; Bertella, C.; Bertin, A.; Bertinelli, F.; Bertolucci, F.; Besana, M. I.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bitenc, U.; Black, K. M.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanchot, G.; Blazek, T.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. B.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boelaert, N.; Böser, S.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bolnet, N. M.; Bona, M.; Bondarenko, V. G.; Bondioli, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Boorman, G.; Booth, C. N.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borjanovic, I.; Borroni, S.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Botterill, D.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozhko, N. I.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Braem, A.; Branchini, P.; Brandenburg, G. W.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Breton, D.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Brodet, E.; Broggi, F.; Bromberg, C.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, W. K.; Brown, G.; Brown, H.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.

    2012-06-01

    A search for the decay of a light Higgs boson (120-140 GeV) to a pair of weakly interacting, long-lived particles in 1.94fb-1 of proton-proton collisions at s=7TeV recorded in 2011 by the ATLAS detector is presented. The search strategy requires that both long-lived particles decay inside the muon spectrometer. No excess of events is observed above the expected background and limits on the Higgs boson production times branching ratio to weakly interacting, long-lived particles are derived as a function of the particle proper decay length.

  12. Propagation of chaos for many-boson systems in one dimension with a point pair-interaction

    OpenAIRE

    AMMARI, Zied; Breteaux, Sébastien

    2012-01-01

    35 pages International audience We consider the semiclassical limit of nonrelativistic quantum many-boson systems with delta potential in one dimensional space. We prove that time evolved coherent states behave semiclassically as squeezed states by a Bogoliubov time-dependent affine transformation. This allows us to obtain properties analogous to those proved by Hepp and Ginibre-Velo (\\cite{Hep}, \\cite{GiVe1,GiVe2}) and also to show propagation of chaos for Schrödinger dynamics in the m...

  13. Study of Z Boson Pair Production in $e^+ e^-$ Interactions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 192-202 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Adriani, O; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Bajo, A; Baksay, L; Balandras, A; Baldew, S V; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Bartalini, P; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Bellucci, L; Berbeco, R; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brochu, F; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chiefari, G; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coignet, G; Colino, N; Conventi, F; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Cucciarelli, S; Dai, T S; van Dalen, J A; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Déglon, P L; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Pietra, M; Della Volpe, D; Delmeire, E; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; De Salvo, A; Diemoz, M; Dierckxsens, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Dufournaud, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Falagán, M A; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Ferguson, T; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gataullin, M; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Gong, Z F; Grenier, G; Grimm, O; Grünewald, M W; Guida, M; van Gulik, R; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Hidas, P; Hirschfelder, J; Hofer, H; Holzner, G; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, Y; Iashvili, I; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Khan, R A; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, J K; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopal, M; Kopp, A; Koutsenko, V F; Kräber, M H; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Krüger, A; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Lee, H J; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Likhoded, S A; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Lugnier, L; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mans, J; Marian, G; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Mazumdar, K; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mihul, A; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Mohanty, G B; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Muijs, A J M; Musicar, B; Musy, M; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Ofierzynski, R A; Organtini, G; Oulianov, A; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Paramatti, R; Park, H K; Park, I H; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Pedace, M; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Piccolo, D; Pierella, F; Pieri, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Pothier, J; Prokofiev, D O; Prokofev, D; Quartieri, J; Rahal-Callot, G; Rahaman, M A; Raics, P; Raja, N; Ramelli, R; Rancoita, P G; Ranieri, R; Raspereza, A V; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosca, A; Rosier-Lees, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruggiero, G; Rykaczewski, H; Saremi, S; Sarkar, S; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Seganti, A; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, A; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Szillási, Z; Sztaricskai, T; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Tellili, B; Timmermans, C; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Valente, E; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Vicinanza, D; Viertel, Gert M; Villa, S; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Vodopyanov, I; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, M; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Weber, M; Wienemann, P; Wilkens, H; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xia, L; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, J; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yang, H J; Yang, M; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zhang, Z P; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, A; Zilizi, G; Zimmermann, B; Zöller, M

    2001-01-01

    The cross section for the production of Z boson pairs is measured using the data collected by the L3 detector at LEP in 1999 in $\\rm e^+e^-$ collisions at centre--of--mass energies ranging from 192 GeV up to 202 GeV. Events in all the visible final states are selected, measuring the cross section of this process. The special case of final states containing b quarks is also investigated. All results are in agreement with the Standard Model predictions.

  14. Sudden expansion and domain-wall melting of strongly interacting bosons in two-dimensional optical lattices and on multileg ladders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauschild, Johannes; Pollmann, Frank; Heidrich-Meisner, Fabian

    2015-11-01

    We numerically investigate the expansion of clouds of hard-core bosons in the two-dimensional square lattice using a matrix-product-state-based method. This nonequilibrium setup is induced by quenching the trapping potential to zero and our work is specifically motivated by a recent experiment with interacting bosons in an optical lattice [Ronzheimer et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 205301 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.205301]. As the anisotropy of the amplitudes Jx and Jy for hopping in different spatial directions is varied from the one- to the two-dimensional case, we observe a crossover from a fast ballistic expansion in the one-dimensional limit Jx≫Jy to much slower dynamics in the isotropic two-dimensional limit Jx=Jy . We further study the dynamics on multileg ladders and long cylinders. For these geometries we compare the expansion of a cloud to the melting of a domain wall, which helps us to identify several different regimes of the expansion as a function of time. By studying the dependence of expansion velocities on both the anisotropy Jy/Jx and the number of legs, we observe that the expansion on two-leg ladders, while similar to the two-dimensional case, is slower than on wider ladders. We provide a qualitative explanation for this observation based on an analysis of the rung spectrum.

  15. Two-boson composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tichy, Malte C.; Bouvrier, P. Alexander; Mølmer, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Composite bosons made of two bosonic constituents exhibit deviations from ideal bosonic behavior due to their substructure. This deviation is reflected by the normalization ratio of the quantum state of N composites. We find a set of saturable, efficiently evaluable bounds for this indicator, which...... quantifies the bosonic behavior of composites via the entanglement of their constituents. We predict an abrupt transition between ordinary and exaggerated bosonic behavior in a condensate of two-boson composites....

  16. Soluble mediators and the interaction of drugs in IBD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rask-Madsen, J

    1998-01-01

    , which provides the clinical manifestations of IBD. Other important soluble mediators of inflammation include complement-derived and chemotactic peptides, specific adhesion molecules, neuropeptides and reactive metabolites of oxygen and nitrogen. Current established therapies, such as glucocorticoids and...... 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA), inhibit raised concentrations of these interdependent soluble mediators of inflammation, which may amplify one another or have parallel effects. Future medical options for treatment of IBD aim at removing perpetuating antigens or inhibiting the entry of inflammatory...

  17. Boson mapping and the microscopic collective nuclear Hamiltonian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starting with the mapping of the quadrupole collective states in the fermion space onto the boson space, the fermion nuclear problem is transformed into the boson one. The boson images of the bifermion operators and of the fermion Hamiltonian are found. Recurrence relations are used to obtain approximately the norm matrix which appears in the boson-fermion mapping. The resulting boson Hamiltonian contains terms which go beyond the ordinary SU(6) symmetry Hamiltonian of the interacting boson model. Calculations, however, suggest that on the phenomenological level the differences between the mapped Hamiltonian and the SU(6) Hamiltonian are not too important. 18 refs.; 2 figs

  18. Electroweakly interacting scalar and gauge bosons, and leptons, from field equations on spin 5+1 dimensional space

    CERN Document Server

    Besprosvany, J

    2002-01-01

    Unification ideas motivate the formulation of field equations on an extended spin space. Demanding that the Poincare symmetry be maintained, one derives scalar symmetries that are associated with flavor and gauge groups. Boson and fermion solutions are obtained with a fixed representation. A field theory can be equivalently written and interpreted in terms of elements of such space and is similarly constrained. At 5+1 dimensions, one obtains isospin and hypercharge SU(2)_L X U(1) symmetries, their vector carriers, two-flavor charged and chargeless leptons, and scalar particles. Mass terms produce breaking of the symmetry to an electromagnetic U(1), a Weinberg's angle with sin^2(theta_W)=.25, and additional information on the respective coupling constants. Their underlying spin symmetry gives information on the particles' masses; one reproduces the standard-model ratio M_Z/M_W, and predicts a Higgs mass of M_H ~114 GeV, at tree level.

  19. Diffractive Higgs Boson photoproduction in peripheral collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An alternative process is proposed for the diffractive Higgs boson production inspired in the Durham model, exploring it through the photon-proton interaction. In this sense, we estimate the production cross section of the Higgs boson, comparing some sets of parton distributions in the proton and confronting this results with those from other processes. (author)

  20. CHILDERN-CHILDREN´S INTERACTIONS IN SIMULATION TASKS: THE IMPORTANCE OF THE HISTORY OF MEDIATION

    OpenAIRE

    ASSOL CORTÉS MORENO; PATRICIA ROMERO SÁNCHEZ; ROSENDO HERNÁNDEZ CASTRO

    2002-01-01

    Inside an interbehavioural framework, this study analyse child’s behavioural detachment depending on thesystematic variations of the adult’s behaviour. Eight interaction units experimenter-child “A”-child “B” wereinvolved in a pretending situation. First, child “A” (mediated) played with the experimenter (mediator) accordingwith an instructional group: Episode by Episode Modelling, Global Modelling, General Instructions or PlayPrompting. In a later moment, child “A” played as mediator directi...

  1. Left and right handedness of fermions and bosons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown, by using Grassmann space to describe the internal degrees of freedom of fermions and bosons, that the Weyl-like equation exists not only for massless fermions but also for massless vector bosons. The corresponding states have well defined helicity and handedness. It is also shown that spinors and vector bosons interact only if both are of the same handedness. (author)

  2. Spin models and boson sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Ripoll, Juan Jose; Peropadre, Borja; Aspuru-Guzik, Alan

    Aaronson & Arkhipov showed that predicting the measurement statistics of random linear optics circuits (i.e. boson sampling) is a classically hard problem for highly non-classical input states. A typical boson-sampling circuit requires N single photon emitters and M photodetectors, and it is a natural idea to rely on few-level systems for both tasks. Indeed, we show that 2M two-level emitters at the input and output ports of a general M-port interferometer interact via an XY-model with collective dissipation and a large number of dark states that could be used for quantum information storage. More important is the fact that, when we neglect dissipation, the resulting long-range XY spin-spin interaction is equivalent to boson sampling under the same conditions that make boson sampling efficient. This allows efficient implementations of boson sampling using quantum simulators & quantum computers. We acknowledge support from Spanish Mineco Project FIS2012-33022, CAM Research Network QUITEMAD+ and EU FP7 FET-Open Project PROMISCE.

  3. Probing Electroweak Gauge Boson Scattering with the ATLAS Detector at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Anger, Philipp; Lammers, Sabine

    Electroweak gauge bosons as central components of the Standard Model of particle physics are well understood theoretically and have been studied with high precision at past and present collider experiments. The electroweak theory predicts the existence of a scattering process of these particles consisting of contributions from triple and quartic bosonic couplings as well as Higgs boson mediated interactions. These contributions are not separable in a gauge invariant way and are only unitarized in the case of a Higgs boson as it is described by the Standard Model. The process is tied to the electroweak symmetry breaking which introduces the longitudinal modes for the massive electroweak gauge bosons. A study of this interaction is also a direct verification of the local gauge symmetry as one of the fundamental axioms of the Standard Model. With the start of the Large Hadron Collider and after collecting proton-proton collision data with an integrated luminosity of $20.3\\;\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ at a center-of-mass e...

  4. Physics of W bosons at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Mele, S

    2004-01-01

    The high-energy and high-luminosity data-taking campaigns of the LEP e+e- collider provided the four collaborations, ALEPH, DELPHI, L3 and OPAL, with about 50 000 W-boson pairs and about a thousand singly-produced W bosons. This unique data sample has an unprecedented reach in probing some aspects of the Standard Model of the electroweak interactions, and this article reviews several achievements in the understanding of W-boson physics at LEP. The measurements of the cross sections for W-boson production are discussed, together with their implication on the existence of the coupling between Z and W bosons. The precision measurements of the magnitude of triple gauge-boson couplings are presented. The observation of the longitudinal helicity component of the W-boson spin, related to the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking, is described together with the techniques used to probe the CP and CPT symmetries in the W-boson system. A discussion on the intricacies of the measurement of the mass of the W boson, ...

  5. Infectious disease agents mediate interaction in food webs and ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Selakovic, S.; Ruiter, de P.C.; Heesterbeek, J.A.P.

    2014-01-01

    Infectious agents are part of food webs and ecosystems via the relationship with their host species that, in turn, interact with both hosts and non-hosts. Through these interactions, infectious agents influence food webs in terms of structure, functioning and stability. The present literature shows

  6. Infectious disease agents mediate interaction in food webs and ecosystems.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Selakovic, Sanja; de Ruiter, P.C.; Heesterbeek, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Infectious agents are part of food webs and ecosystems via the relationship with their host species that, in turn, interact with both hosts and non-hosts. Through these interactions, infectious agents influence food webs in terms of structure, functioning and stability. The present literature shows

  7. A Z' Boson and the Higgs Boson Mass

    OpenAIRE

    Chanowitz, Michael S.

    2008-01-01

    The Standard Model fit prefers values of the Higgs boson mass that are below the 114 GeV direct lower limit from LEP II. The discrepancy is acute if the 3.2 sigma disagreement for the effective weak interaction mixing angle from the two most precise measurements is attributed to underestimated systematic error. In that case the data suggests new physics to raise the predicted value of the Higgs mass. One of the simplest possibilities is a Z' boson, which would generically increase the predict...

  8. Biotic interactions mediate soil microbial feedbacks to climate change

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Crowther, T. W.; Thomas, S.M.; Maynard, D.S.; Baldrian, Petr; Covey, K.; Frey, S. D.; van Diepen, L. T. A.; Bradford, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 112, č. 22 (2015), s. 7033-7038. ISSN 0027-8424 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : global change * soil feedback * biotic interaction Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 9.674, year: 2014

  9. Lepton Flavor Violating Non-Standard Interactions via Light Mediators

    CERN Document Server

    Farzan, Yasaman

    2016-01-01

    Non-Standard neutral current Interactions (NSIs) of neutrinos with matter can alter the pattern of neutrino oscillations due to the coherent forward scattering of neutrinos on the medium. This effect makes long-baseline neutrino experiments such as NO$\

  10. Pilot Whales Attracted to Killer Whale Sounds: Acoustically-Mediated Interspecific Interactions in Cetaceans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cure, C.; Antunes, R.; Samarra, F.; Alves, A.C.; Visser, F.; Kvadsheim, P.H.; Miller, P.J.O.

    2012-01-01

    In cetaceans’ communities, interactions between individuals of different species are often observed in the wild. Yet, due to methodological and technical challenges very little is known about the mediation of these interactions and their effect on cetaceans’ behavior. Killer whales (Orcinus orca) ar

  11. Social Skills as a Mediator between Anxiety Symptoms and Peer Interactions among Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motoca, Luci M.; Williams, Sandra; Silverman, Wendy K.

    2012-01-01

    The present study used a cross-sectional design to examine the relations among youth anxiety symptoms, positive and negative peer interactions, and social skills. Also examined was the mediating role of social skills in the relations between youth anxiety symptoms and positive and negative peer interactions. Youth sex and age were examined as…

  12. Vectorial versus axial goldstone bosons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Yukawa interactions of fermions with Goldstone bosons are given in closed form for an arbitrary renormalizable field theory to all orders of perturbation theory or for a general effective Lagrangian. Although the diagonal couplings are always pseudoscalar there is an important difference between spontaneously broken vector and axial-vector global symmetries. Compared to the axial case, the diagonal douplings of 'vectorial' Goldstone bosons to charged fermions are suppressed by mixing angles or appear only via radiative corrections involving gauge fields. This general result may be relevant for the problem of flavour symmetry breaking in composite models. (Author)

  13. The theory for Higgs boson search in Υ-meson decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Search for Higgs boson in Y-meson decay is considered. The problems on the H-boson small mass, the H boson interaction with quarks and H boson production in electromagnetic and hadronic decays of an Y-meson are discussed

  14. Unconventional quantum phases of lattice bosonic mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Buonsante, P.; Giampaolo, S. M.; Illuminati, F.; Penna, V; Vezzani, A.

    2008-01-01

    We consider strongly interacting boson-boson mixtures on one-dimensional lattices and, by adopting a qualitative mean-field approach, investigate their quantum phases as the interspecies repulsion is increased. In particular, we analyze the low-energy "quantum emulsion" metastable states occurring at large values of the interspecies interaction, which are expected to prevent the system from reaching its true ground state. We argue a significant decrease in the visibility of the time-of-flight...

  15. Exosomes: messengers and mediators of tumor–stromal interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shkarina K. A.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Intercellular communication is one of the most important factors involved in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. The alteration of intercellular interaction correlates with a lot of human diseases including cancerogenesis. There are several types of such interconnection. First of all, it is a direct cell-cell contact, as it takes place in epithelium. The disturbance of this communication is expressed as a loss of cell-cell, cell-matrix contacts, disturbances of cell polarity etc. Another way of intercellular interaction involves mutual influence via paracrine factors produced by corresponding cells. However, there is another kind of information exchange between the cells, namely microvesicular transportation. It was revealed that the exosomes take part in intercellular communication in normal tissues as well as in malignant neoplasia. The present review provides the recent information on the formation of exosomes, their composition and especially the exosome participation in tumor-stromal interactions.

  16. Percolation of optical excitation mediated by near-field interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Naruse, Makoto; Takahashi, Taiki; Aono, Masashi; Akahane, Kouichi; D'Acunto, Mario; Hori, Hirokazu; Thylen, Lars; Katori, Makoto; Ohtsu, Motoichi

    2016-01-01

    Optical excitation transfer in nanostructured matter has been intensively studied in various material systems for versatile applications. Herein, we discuss the percolation of optical excitations in randomly organized nanostructures caused by optical near-field interactions governed by Yukawa potential in a two-dimensional stochastic model. The model results demonstrate the appearance of two phases of percolation of optical excitation as a function of the localization degree of near-field interaction. Moreover, it indicates sublinear scaling with percolation distance when the light localization is strong. The results provide fundamental insights into optical excitation transfer and will facilitate the design and analysis of nanoscale signal-transfer characteristics.

  17. On the ion-mediated interaction between protein and DNA

    CERN Document Server

    Barbi, Maria

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism allowing a protein to search of a target sequence on DNA is currently described as an intermittent process composed of 3D diffusion in bulk and 1D diffusion along the DNA molecule. Due to the relevant charge of protein and DNA, electrostatic interaction should play a crucial role during this search. In this paper, we explicitly derive the mean field theory allowing for a description of the protein-DNA electrostatics in solution. This approach leads to a unified model of the search process, where 1D and 3D diffusion appear as a natural consequence of the diffusion on an extended interaction energy profile.

  18. Networked Mobilities and new sites of mediated interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.

    This paper takes point of departure in an understanding of mobility as an important cultural dimension to contemporary life. The movement of objects, signs, and people constitutes material sites of networked relationships. However, as an increasing number of mobility practices are making up our...... the relationship to sites and places. Furthermore, an increasing number of such mobile practices are mediated by technologies of tangible and less tangible sorts. The paper concludes with a research agenda for unfolding a ‘politics of visibility', engaging with the ambivalences of networked mobilities...... everyday life experiences the movement is much more than a travel from point A to point B. The mobile experiences of the contemporary society are practices that are meaningful and normatively embedded. That is to say, mobility is seen as a cultural phenomenon shaping notions of self and other as well as...

  19. Using tethered triblock copolymers to mediate the interaction between substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using scaling analysis and a self-consistent field (SCF) theory, we compress two copolymer-coated surfaces and isolate conditions that yield multiple, distinct minima in the interaction profile. We focus on planar surfaces that are coated with ABC triblock copolymers. Tethered to the surface by the last monomer in the C block, the copolymers are grafted at relatively low densities. The surrounding solution is a poor solvent for both the A and C blocks, and is a good solvent for the B blocks. Through scaling theory, we pinpoint the parameters that yield two minima in the interaction profile. The SCF calculations reveal the changes in the morphology of the polymers as the layers are compressed. Through both studies, we determine how the morphological changes give rise to the observed surface interactions. The results provide guidelines for creating polymer-coated colloidal systems that can form two stable crystal structures. Such systems could be used for bistable, optical switches. The findings also yield a prescription for creating systems that exhibit additional minima in the free energy of interaction. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  20. Polymorphism of DNA–anionic liposome complexes reveals hierarchy of ion-mediated interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Hongjun; Harries, Daniel; Gerard C L Wong

    2005-01-01

    Self-assembled DNA delivery systems based on anionic lipids (ALs) complexed with DNA mediated by divalent cations have been recently introduced as an alternative to cationic lipid–DNA complexes because of their low cytotoxicity. We investigate AL–DNA complexes induced by different cations by using synchrotron small angle x-ray scattering and confocal microscopy to show how different ion-mediated interactions are expressed in the self-assembled structures and phase behavior of AL–DNA complexes...

  1. Interaction of two walkers: Wave-mediated energy and force

    CERN Document Server

    Borghesi, Christian; Labousse, Matthieu; Eddi, Antonin; Fort, Emmanuel; Couder, Yves

    2014-01-01

    A bouncing droplet, self-propelled by its interaction with the waves it generates, forms a classical wave-particle association called a "walker." Previous works have demonstrated that the dynamics of a single walker is driven by its global surface wave field that retains information on its past trajectory. Here, we investigate the energy stored in this wave field for two coupled walkers and how it conveys an interaction between them. For this purpose, we characterize experimentally the "promenade modes" where two walkers are bound, and propagate together. Their possible binding distances take discrete values, and the velocity of the pair depends on their mutual binding. The mean parallel motion can be either rectilinear or oscillating. The experimental results are recovered analytically with a simple theoretical framework. A relation between the kinetic energy of the droplets and the total energy of the standing waves is established.

  2. Kinetic theory of particle interactions mediated by dynamical networks

    OpenAIRE

    Barré, Julien; Degond, Pierre; Zatorska, Ewelina

    2016-01-01

    We provide a detailed multiscale analysis of a system of particles interacting through a dynamical network of links. Starting from a microscopic model, via the mean field limit, we formally derive coupled kinetic equations for the particle and link densities, following the approach of [Degond et al., M3AS, 2016]. Assuming that the process of remodelling the network is very fast, we simplify the description to a macroscopic model taking the form of single aggregation-diffusion equation for the...

  3. The semiochemically mediated interactions between bacteria and insects

    OpenAIRE

    Leroy, Pascal; Sabri, Ahmed; Verheggen, François; Francis, Frédéric; Thonart, Philippe; Haubruge, Eric

    2011-01-01

    In natural environment, semiochemicals are involved in many interactions between the different trophic levels involving insects, plants and hosts for parasitoids or prey for predators. These volatile compounds act as messengers within or between insect species, inducing particular behaviours such as the localisation of a source of food, the orientation to an adequate oviposition site, the selection of a suitable breeding site and the localisation of hosts or prey. In this sense, bacteria have...

  4. Motif mediated protein-protein interactions as drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbi-Verge, Carles; Kim, Philip M

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPI) are involved in virtually every cellular process and thus represent an attractive target for therapeutic interventions. A significant number of protein interactions are frequently formed between globular domains and short linear peptide motifs (DMI). Targeting these DMIs has proven challenging and classical approaches to inhibiting such interactions with small molecules have had limited success. However, recent new approaches have led to the discovery of potent inhibitors, some of them, such as Obatoclax, ABT-199, AEG-40826 and SAH-p53-8 are likely to become approved drugs. These novel inhibitors belong to a wide range of different molecule classes, ranging from small molecules to peptidomimetics and biologicals. This article reviews the main reasons for limited success in targeting PPIs, discusses how successful approaches overcome these obstacles to discovery promising inhibitors for human protein double minute 2 (HDM2), B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP), and provides a summary of the promising approaches currently in development that indicate the future potential of PPI inhibitors in drug discovery. PMID:26936767

  5. Systematic discovery of new recognition peptides mediating protein interaction networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Many aspects of cell signalling, trafficking, and targeting are governed by interactions between globular protein domains and short peptide segments. These domains often bind multiple peptides that share a common sequence pattern, or "linear motif" (e.g., SH3 binding to PxxP. Many domains are known, though comparatively few linear motifs have been discovered. Their short length (three to eight residues, and the fact that they often reside in disordered regions in proteins makes them difficult to detect through sequence comparison or experiment. Nevertheless, each new motif provides critical molecular details of how interaction networks are constructed, and can explain how one protein is able to bind to very different partners. Here we show that binding motifs can be detected using data from genome-scale interaction studies, and thus avoid the normally slow discovery process. Our approach based on motif over-representation in non-homologous sequences, rediscovers known motifs and predicts dozens of others. Direct binding experiments reveal that two predicted motifs are indeed protein-binding modules: a DxxDxxxD protein phosphatase 1 binding motif with a KD of 22 microM and a VxxxRxYS motif that binds Translin with a KD of 43 microM. We estimate that there are dozens or even hundreds of linear motifs yet to be discovered that will give molecular insight into protein networks and greatly illuminate cellular processes.

  6. Cytoskeletal Interactions at the Nuclear Envelope Mediated by Nesprins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surayya Taranum

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nesprin-1 is a giant tail-anchored nuclear envelope protein composed of an N-terminal F-actin binding domain, a long linker region formed by multiple spectrin repeats and a C-terminal transmembrane domain. Based on this structure, it connects the nucleus to the actin cytoskeleton. Earlier reports had shown that Nesprin-1 binds to nuclear envelope proteins emerin and lamin through C-terminal spectrin repeats. These repeats can also self-associate. We focus on the N-terminal Nesprin-1 sequences and show that they interact with Nesprin-3, a further member of the Nesprin family, which connects the nucleus to the intermediate filament network. We show that upon ectopic expression of Nesprin-3 in COS7 cells, which are nearly devoid of Nesprin-3 in vitro, vimentin filaments are recruited to the nucleus and provide evidence for an F-actin interaction of Nesprin-3 in vitro. We propose that Nesprins through interactions amongst themselves and amongst the various Nesprins form a network around the nucleus and connect the nucleus to several cytoskeletal networks of the cell.

  7. Search for a Higgs Boson Decaying into Two Photons in $e{^+} e^{-}$ Interactions at $\\sqrt{s}$= 189 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Adriani, O; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Bajo, A; Baksay, L; Balandras, A; Baldew, S V; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Bartalini, P; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Bellucci, L; Berbeco, R; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brochu, F; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chiefari, G; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coignet, G; Colino, N; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Cucciarelli, S; Dai, T S; van Dalen, J A; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Déglon, P L; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Delmeire, E; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; De Salvo, A; Diemoz, M; Dierckxsens, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Dufournaud, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Falagán, M A; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Ferguson, T; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gataullin, M; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Gong, Z F; Grenier, G; Grimm, O; Grünewald, M W; Guida, M; van Gulik, R; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Hidas, P; Hirschfelder, J; Hofer, H; Holzner, G; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, Y; Iashvili, I; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Khan, R A; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, J K; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Koutsenko, V F; Kräber, M H; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Krüger, A; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Lee, H J; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Likhoded, S A; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Lugnier, L; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mans, J; Marian, G; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Mazumdar, K; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mihul, A; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Mohanty, G B; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Muijs, A J M; Musicar, B; Musy, M; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Ofierzynski, R A; Organtini, G; Oulianov, A; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Paramatti, R; Park, H K; Park, I H; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Pedace, M; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Piccolo, D; Pierella, F; Pieri, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Pothier, J; Prokofiev, D O; Prokofev, D; Quartieri, J; Rahal-Callot, G; Rahaman, M A; Raics, P; Raja, N; Ramelli, R; Rancoita, P G; Ranieri, R; Raspereza, A V; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosca, A; Rosier-Lees, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruggiero, G; Rykaczewski, H; Saremi, S; Sarkar, S; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Seganti, A; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, A; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Szillási, Z; Sztaricskai, T; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Tellili, B; Timmermans, C; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Valente, E; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Vicinanza, D; Viertel, Gert M; Villa, S; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Vodopyanov, I; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, M; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Weber, M; Wienemann, P; Wilkens, H; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xia, L; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, J; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yang, H J; Yang, M; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zhang, Z P; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, A; Zilizi, G; Zimmermann, B; Zöller, M

    2000-01-01

    A search is performed for a Higgs boson produced in association with a Z boson and decaying into two photons, using the L3 data collected at LEP at a centre-of-mass energy of 189 GeV. All decay modes of the Z are considered. No signal is observed and limits on the branching fraction of the Higgs boson decay into two photons as a function of the Higgs mass are derived assuming a Standard Model production rate. A lower limit on the mass of a fermiophobic Higgs is set at 94.9 GeV at 95$\\%$ confidence level.

  8. The Higgs Boson.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veltman, Martinus J. G.

    1986-01-01

    Reports recent findings related to the particle Higgs boson and examines its possible contribution to the standard mode of elementary processes. Critically explores the strengths and uncertainties of the Higgs boson and proposed Higgs field. (ML)

  9. Evolution of yrast states and B(E2 : 81+ -> 61+) values of 114, 116, 1:1:8, 120, 122Cd by interacting boson model (ibm-1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we address the evolution of yrast levels of low-lying structure in the neutron-rich even-even 114-122Cd nuclei within the framework of interaction boson model (IBM-1). The reduced transition probabilities B(E2) ↓ between 81+ to 61+ states of even-even neutron rich Cd nuclei for N = 66, 68, 70, 72, 74 have been calculated by IBM-1 and compared with the previous available experimental values. The calculated values of 114Cd, 116Cd, 118Cd, 120Cd, and 122Cd, are 0.272 e2b2, 0.281 e2b2, 0.259 e2b2, 0.190 e2b2 and 0.149 e2b2 respectively. The ratio of the excitation energies of the first 4+ and the first 2+ excited states, R4/2, were also calculated for those nuclei. The 114-122Cd isotopes in U(5) - O(6) transitional symmetry were investigated. We have studied the systematic B(E2) values as a function of even neutrons from N = 66 to 74. Furthermore as a measure to quantify the evolution, we have studied systematically the ground state energy ratios RL = E(L+) / E(21+ ) and transition rate R = B(E2 : L+ > (L - 2)+) / B(E2 : 2+- > 0+) of some of the low-lying quadrupole collective states in comparison to the available experimental data.

  10. Higgs boson : production and decays into bosons

    CERN Document Server

    Escalier, Marc; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The results on the Higgs boson with decay channels into bosons from the ATLAS and CMS experiments at LHC Run 1 and early Run 2 are reviewed in the context of the Standard Model. : observation of a signal, measurement of mass, width, spin, cross-sections, search for decay channels and production modes, Higgs couplings to various particles.

  11. Coefficient of restitution mediated by a diamagnetic interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista-Leyva, A J; Ruiz-Suárez, J C

    2016-07-01

    We study how a magnetic bead bounces onto a horizontal diamagnetic conducting plane. The bead, falling down by gravity from a certain height, produces an Eddy current that creates a repelling force. For low velocities the bead is trapped by the surface, for intermediate ones it escapes. In such a case the induced current changes its sign, and so does the force. The balance between diamagnetic and viscoelastic interactions determines the bouncing dynamics. We find experimentally the restitution coefficient as a function of the impact speed of the bead and develop, taking into account simple energetic considerations, a model able to reproduce our findings. PMID:27456219

  12. On the ion-mediated interaction between protein and DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Barbi, Maria; PAILLUSSON, Fabien

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism allowing a protein to search of a target sequence on DNA is currently described as an intermittent process composed of 3D diffusion in bulk and 1D diffusion along the DNA molecule. Due to the relevant charge of protein and DNA, electrostatic interaction should play a crucial role during this search. In this paper, we explicitly derive the mean field theory allowing for a description of the protein-DNA electrostatics in solution. This approach leads to a unified model of the sear...

  13. Hidden GeV-scale interactions of quarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrescu, Bogdan A; Frugiuele, Claudia

    2014-08-01

    We explore quark interactions mediated by new gauge bosons of masses in the 0.3-50 GeV range. A tight upper limit on the gauge coupling of light Z(') bosons is imposed by the anomaly cancellation conditions in conjunction with collider bounds on new charged fermions. Limits from quarkonium decays are model dependent, while electroweak constraints are mild. We derive the limits for a Z(') boson coupled to baryon number and then construct a Z(') model with relaxed constraints, allowing quark couplings as large as 0.2 for a mass of a few GeV. PMID:25148315

  14. Hidden GeV-scale interactions of quarks

    OpenAIRE

    Dobrescu, Bogdan A.; Frugiuele, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    We explore quark interactions mediated by new gauge bosons of masses in the 0.3 - 50 GeV range. A tight upper limit on the gauge coupling of light Z' bosons is imposed by the anomaly cancellation conditions in conjunction with collider bounds on new charged fermions. Limits from quarkonium decays are model dependent, while electroweak constraints are mild. We derive the limits for a Z' boson coupled to baryon number, and then construct a Z' model with relaxed constraints, allowing quark coupl...

  15. Hidden GeV-scale interactions of quarks

    CERN Document Server

    Dobrescu, Bogdan A

    2014-01-01

    We explore quark interactions mediated by new gauge bosons of masses in the 0.3 - 50 GeV range. A tight upper limit on the gauge coupling of light Z' bosons is imposed by the anomaly cancellation conditions in conjunction with collider bounds on new charged fermions. Limits from quarkonium decays are model dependent, while electroweak constraints are mild. We derive the limits for a Z' boson coupled to baryon number, and then construct a Z' model with relaxed constraints, allowing quark couplings as large as 0.2 for a mass of a few GeV.

  16. Systematic discovery of new recognition peptides mediating protein interaction networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neduva, Victor; Linding, Rune; Su-Angrand, Isabelle;

    2005-01-01

    Many aspects of cell signalling, trafficking, and targeting are governed by interactions between globular protein domains and short peptide segments. These domains often bind multiple peptides that share a common sequence pattern, or "linear motif" (e.g., SH3 binding to PxxP). Many domains are...... that binds Translin with a KD of 43 microM. We estimate that there are dozens or even hundreds of linear motifs yet to be discovered that will give molecular insight into protein networks and greatly illuminate cellular processes.Many aspects of cell signalling, trafficking, and targeting are governed...... known, though comparatively few linear motifs have been discovered. Their short length (three to eight residues), and the fact that they often reside in disordered regions in proteins makes them difficult to detect through sequence comparison or experiment. Nevertheless, each new motif provides critical...

  17. Bosonization and quantum hydrodynamics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Girish S Setlur

    2006-03-01

    It is shown that it is possible to bosonize fermions in any number of dimensions using the hydrodynamic variables, namely the velocity potential and density. The slow part of the Fermi field is defined irrespective of dimensionality and the commutators of this field with currents and densities are exponentiated using the velocity potential as conjugate to the density. An action in terms of these canonical bosonic variables is proposed that reproduces the correct current and density correlations. This formalism in one dimension is shown to be equivalent to the Tomonaga-Luttinger approach as it leads to the same propagator and exponents. We compute the one-particle properties of a spinless homogeneous Fermi system in two spatial dimensions with long-range gauge interactions and highlight the metal-insulator transition in the system. A general formula for the generating function of density correlations is derived that is valid beyond the random phase approximation. Finally, we write down a formula for the annihilation operator in momentum space directly in terms of number conserving products of Fermi fields.

  18. Search for dark matter in events with a $Z$ boson and missing transverse momentum in $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abbott, Brad; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdel Khalek, Samah; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Addy, Tetteh; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Agustoni, Marco; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allison, Lee John; Allport, Phillip; Allwood-Spiers, Sarah; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alon, Raz; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Ammosov, Vladimir; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Anduaga, Xabier; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Ask, Stefan; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Auerbach, Benjamin; Auge, Etienne; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Bacci, Cesare; Bach, Andre; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Backus Mayes, John; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bailey, David; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baker, Sarah; Balek, Petr; Balli, Fabrice; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Banfi, Danilo; Bangert, Andrea Michelle; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barber, Tom; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Bartsch, Valeria; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batkova, Lucia; Batley, Richard; Battistin, Michele; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Anne Kathrin; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bedikian, Sourpouhi; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belloni, Alberto; Beloborodova, Olga; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Berglund, Elina; Beringer, Jürg; Bernard, Clare; Bernat, Pauline; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertolucci, Federico; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia, Olga; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Bierwagen, Katharina; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Black, Curtis; Black, James; Black, Kevin; Blackburn, Daniel; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Boddy, Christopher Richard; Boehler, Michael; Boek, Jennifer; Boek, Thorsten Tobias; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bogouch, Andrei; Bohm, Christian; Bohm, Jan; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Boldyrev, Alexey; Bolnet, Nayanka Myriam; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borri, Marcello; Borroni, Sara; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bortolotto, Valerio; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boterenbrood, Hendrik; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouffard, Julian; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boutouil, Sara; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, Ivanka; Bracinik, Juraj; Branchini, Paolo; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Brazzale, Simone Federico; Brelier, Bertrand; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brennan, Amelia Jean; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Bristow, Kieran; Bristow, Timothy Michael; Britton, Dave; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Bromberg, Carl; Bronner, Johanna; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brosamer, Jacquelyn; Brost, Elizabeth; Brown, Gareth; Brown, Jonathan; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Brunet, Sylvie; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Bryngemark, Lene; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Bucci, Francesca; Buchholz, Peter; Buckingham, Ryan; Buckley, Andrew; Buda, Stelian Ioan; Budagov, Ioulian; Buehrer, Felix; Bugge, Lars; Bugge, Magnar Kopangen; Bulekov, Oleg; Bundock, Aaron Colin; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burghgrave, Blake; Burke, Stephen; Burmeister, Ingo; Busato, Emmanuel; Büscher, Volker; Bussey, Peter; Buszello, Claus-Peter; Butler, Bart; Butler, John; Butt, Aatif Imtiaz; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buttinger, William; Buzatu, Adrian; Byszewski, Marcin; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cakir, Orhan; Calafiura, Paolo; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Calkins, Robert; Caloba, Luiz; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarri, Paolo; Cameron, David; Caminada, Lea Michaela; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Campoverde, Angel; Canale, Vincenzo; Canepa, Anadi; Cantero, Josu; Cantrill, Robert; Cao, Tingting; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Cardarelli, Roberto; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrillo-Montoya, German D; Carter, Antony; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castelli, Angelantonio; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Catastini, Pierluigi; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Cattani, Giordano; Caughron, Seth; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerio, Benjamin; Cerny, Karel; Cerqueira, Augusto Santiago; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cerv, Matevz; Cervelli, Alberto; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chalupkova, Ina; Chan, Kevin; Chang, Philip; Chapleau, Bertrand; Chapman, John Derek; Charfeddine, Driss; Charlton, Dave; Chau, Chav Chhiv; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Cheatham, Susan; Chegwidden, Andrew; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Karen; Chen, Liming; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Xin; Chen, Yujiao; Cheng, Hok Chuen; Cheng, Yangyang; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiarella, Vitaliano; Chiefari, Giovanni; Childers, John Taylor; Chilingarov, Alexandre; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chislett, Rebecca Thalatta; Chitan, Adrian; Chizhov, Mihail; Chouridou, Sofia; Chow, Bonnie Kar Bo; Christidi, Ilektra-Athanasia; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chu, Ming-Lee; Chudoba, Jiri; Chytka, Ladislav; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Ciftci, Rena; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirkovic, Predrag; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Citterio, Mauro; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Cleland, Bill; Clemens, Jean-Claude; Clement, Benoit; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coffey, Laurel; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Coggeshall, James; Cole, Brian; Cole, Stephen; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collins-Tooth, Christopher; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Colon, German; Compostella, Gabriele; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Conidi, Maria Chiara; Connelly, Ian; Consonni, Sofia Maria; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cooper-Smith, Neil; Copic, Katherine; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Corso-Radu, Alina; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Côté, David; Cottin, Giovanna; Cowan, Glen; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Cree, Graham; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Crescioli, Francesco; Crispin Ortuzar, Mireia; Cristinziani, Markus; Crosetti, Giovanni; Cuciuc, Constantin-Mihai; Cuenca Almenar, Cristóbal; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Cuthbert, Cameron; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; Czyczula, Zofia; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dafinca, Alexandru; Dai, Tiesheng; Dale, Orjan; Dallaire, Frederick; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Daniells, Andrew Christopher; Dano Hoffmann, Maria; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darlea, Georgiana Lavinia; Darmora, Smita; Dassoulas, James; Davey, Will; David, Claire; Davidek, Tomas; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davignon, Olivier; Davison, Adam; Davison, Peter; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Daya-Ishmukhametova, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; de Graat, Julien; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De La Taille, Christophe; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; De Nooij, Lucie; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; De Zorzi, Guido; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dechenaux, Benjamin; Dedovich, Dmitri; Degenhardt, James; Deigaard, Ingrid; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Deliot, Frederic; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demilly, Aurelien; Denisov, Sergey; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Deterre, Cecile; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Domenico, Antonio; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Di Valentino, David; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Dietzsch, Thorsten; Diglio, Sara; Dimitrievska, Aleksandra; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dionisi, Carlo; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; do Vale, Maria Aline Barros; Do Valle Wemans, André; Doan, Thi Kieu Oanh; Dobos, Daniel; Dobson, Ellie; Doglioni, Caterina; Doherty, Tom; Dohmae, Takeshi; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donati, Simone; Dondero, Paolo; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dos Anjos, Andre; Dotti, Andrea; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doyle, Tony; Dris, Manolis; Dubbert, Jörg; Dube, Sourabh; Dubreuil, Emmanuelle; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Ducu, Otilia Anamaria; Duda, Dominik; Dudarev, Alexey; Dudziak, Fanny; Duflot, Laurent; Duguid, Liam; Dührssen, Michael; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Düren, Michael; Dwuznik, Michal; Dyndal, Mateusz; Ebke, Johannes; Edson, William; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Ellis, Katherine; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Enari, Yuji; Endner, Oliver Chris; Endo, Masaki; Engelmann, Roderich; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Eriksson, Daniel; Ernis, Gunar; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Ernwein, Jean; Errede, Deborah; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Esch, Hendrik; Escobar, Carlos; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evans, Hal; Fabbri, Laura; Facini, Gabriel; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Fehling-Kaschek, Mirjam; Feigl, Simon; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Feng, Haolu; Fenyuk, Alexander; Fernandez Perez, Sonia; Fernando, Waruna; Ferrag, Samir; Ferrando, James; Ferrara, Valentina; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filipuzzi, Marco; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Finelli, Kevin Daniel; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Julia; Fisher, Matthew; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Fitzgerald, Eric Andrew; Flechl, Martin; Fleck, Ivor; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Fletcher, Gareth Thomas; Fletcher, Gregory; Flick, Tobias; Floderus, Anders; Flores Castillo, Luis; Florez Bustos, Andres Carlos; Flowerdew, Michael; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fortin, Dominique; Fournier, Daniel; Fox, Harald; Fracchia, Silvia; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Franchino, Silvia; Francis, David; Franklin, Melissa; Franz, Sebastien; Fraternali, Marco; French, Sky; Friedrich, Conrad; Friedrich, Felix; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fulsom, Bryan Gregory; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gabrielli, Alessandro; Gabrielli, Andrea; Gadatsch, Stefan; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallo, Valentina Santina; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galster, Gorm Aske Gram Krohn; Gan, KK; Gandrajula, Reddy Pratap; Gao, Jun; Gao, Yongsheng; Garay Walls, Francisca; Garberson, Ford; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garonne, Vincent; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gauzzi, Paolo; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gecse, Zoltan; Gee, Norman; Geerts, Daniël Alphonsus Adrianus; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Gellerstedt, Karl; Gemme, Claudia; Gemmell, Alistair; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Matthias; George, Simon; Gerbaudo, Davide; Gershon, Avi; Ghazlane, Hamid; Ghodbane, Nabil; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Giannetti, Paola; Gianotti, Fabiola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Stephen; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillam, Thomas; Gillberg, Dag; Gillman, Tony; Gingrich, Douglas; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giordano, Raffaele; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giugni, Danilo; Giuliani, Claudia; Giunta, Michele; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gkialas, Ioannis; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glazov, Alexandre; Glonti, George; Goblirsch-Kolb, Maximilian; Goddard, Jack Robert; Godfrey, Jennifer; Godlewski, Jan; Goeringer, Christian; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golubkov, Dmitry; Gomes, Agostinho; Gomez Fajardo, Luz Stella; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez Silva, Laura; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorfine, Grant; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Goshaw, Alfred; Gössling, Claus; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Gouighri, Mohamed; Goujdami, Driss; Goulette, Marc Phillippe; Goussiou, Anna; Goy, Corinne; Gozpinar, Serdar; Grabas, Herve Marie Xavier; Graber, Lars; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Grafström, Per; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Gramling, Johanna; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Francesco; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Grassi, Valerio; Gratchev, Vadim; Gray, Heather; Graziani, Enrico; Grebenyuk, Oleg; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griffiths, Justin; Grigalashvili, Nugzar; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grishkevich, Yaroslav; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Grohs, Johannes Philipp; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Grossi, Giulio Cornelio; Groth-Jensen, Jacob; Grout, Zara Jane; Grybel, Kai; Guan, Liang; Guescini, Francesco; Guest, Daniel; Gueta, Orel; Guicheney, Christophe; Guido, Elisa; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gumpert, Christian; Gunther, Jaroslav; Guo, Jun; Gupta, Shaun; Gutierrez, Phillip; Gutierrez Ortiz, Nicolas Gilberto; Gutschow, Christian; Guttman, Nir; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Haddad, Nacim; Haefner, Petra; Hageboeck, Stephan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haleem, Mahsana; Hall, David; Halladjian, Garabed; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamer, Matthias; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamilton, Samuel; Hamnett, Phillip George; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Hanke, Paul; Hansen, John Renner; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hard, Andrew; Harenberg, Torsten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harper, Devin; Harrington, Robert; Harris, Orin; Harrison, Paul Fraser; Hartjes, Fred; Harvey, Alex; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauschild, Michael; Hauser, Reiner; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Anthony David; Hayashi, Takayasu; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Heck, Tobias; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heim, Timon; Heinemann, Beate; Heinrich, Lukas; Heisterkamp, Simon; Hejbal, Jiri; Helary, Louis; Heller, Claudio; Heller, Matthieu; Hellman, Sten; Hellmich, Dennis; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, James; Henderson, Robert; Hengler, Christopher; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Hensel, Carsten; Herbert, Geoffrey Henry; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herrberg-Schubert, Ruth; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Hickling, Robert; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillert, Sonja; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hirose, Minoru; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoffman, Julia; Hoffmann, Dirk; Hofmann, Julia Isabell; Hohlfeld, Marc; Holmes, Tova Ray; Hong, Tae Min; Hooft van Huysduynen, Loek; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howard, Jacob; Howarth, James; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Diedi; Hu, Xueye; Huang, Yanping; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Hülsing, Tobias Alexander; Hurwitz, Martina; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Idarraga, John; Ideal, Emma; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Iizawa, Tomoya; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikematsu, Katsumasa; Ikeno, Masahiro; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Inamaru, Yuki; Ince, Tayfun; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Isaksson, Charlie; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Iturbe Ponce, Julia Mariana; Ivashin, Anton; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, John; Jackson, Matthew; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jakubek, Jan; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansen, Eric; Jansen, Hendrik; Janssen, Jens; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Javůrek, Tomáš; Jeanty, Laura; Jeng, Geng-yuan; Jen-La Plante, Imai; Jennens, David; Jenni, Peter; Jentzsch, Jennifer; Jeske, Carl; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Ji, Haoshuang; Ji, Weina; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jimenez Belenguer, Marcos; Jin, Shan; Jinaru, Adam; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Joffe, David; Johansson, Erik; Johansson, Per; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tim; Jongmanns, Jan; Jorge, Pedro; Joshi, Kiran Daniel; Jovicevic, Jelena; Ju, Xiangyang; Jung, Christian; Jungst, Ralph Markus; Jussel, Patrick; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kama, Sami; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneda, Michiru; Kaneti, Steven; Kanno, Takayuki; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kapliy, Anton; Kar, Deepak; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karastathis, Nikolaos; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karpov, Sergey; Karthik, Krishnaiyengar; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kasieczka, Gregor; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Yousuke; Katre, Akshay; Katzy, Judith; Kaushik, Venkatesh; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kazama, Shingo; Kazanin, Vassili; Kazarinov, Makhail; Keeler, Richard; Keener, Paul; Kehoe, Robert; Keil, Markus; Keller, John; Keoshkerian, Houry; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Kessoku, Kohei; Keung, Justin; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Khodinov, Alexander; Khomich, Andrei; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khoriauli, Gia; Khoroshilov, Andrey; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Shinhong; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Robert Steven Beaufoy; King, Samuel Burton; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kiss, Florian; Kitamura, Takumi; Kittelmann, Thomas; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klinkby, Esben; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Klok, Peter; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Koevesarki, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kogan, Lucy Anne; Kohlmann, Simon; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolanoski, Hermann; Koletsou, Iro; Koll, James; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; König, Sebastian; Kono, Takanori; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Köpke, Lutz; Kopp, Anna Katharina; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Korotkov, Vladislav; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotov, Sergey; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kral, Vlastimil; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasnopevtsev, Dimitriy; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, Jana; Kravchenko, Anton; Kreiss, Sven; Kretz, Moritz; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Krieger, Peter; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Kruker, Tobias; Krumnack, Nils; Krumshteyn, Zinovii; Kruse, Amanda; Kruse, Mark; Kruskal, Michael; Kubota, Takashi; Kuday, Sinan; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuhl, Andrew; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuna, Marine; Kunkle, Joshua; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kurumida, Rie; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rotonda, Laura; Labarga, Luis; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Laier, Heiko; Lambourne, Luke; Lammers, Sabine; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lançon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lange, Clemens; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Lanza, Agostino; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavorini, Vincenzo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Laycock, Paul; Le, Bao Tran; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Menedeu, Eve; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Claire, Alexandra; Lee, Hurng-Chun; Lee, Jason; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Lefebvre, Michel; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehan, Allan; Lehmacher, Marc; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leister, Andrew Gerard; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatjana; Lenzen, Georg; Lenzi, Bruno; Leone, Robert; Leonhardt, Kathrin; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Leroy, Claude; Lester, Christopher; Lester, Christopher Michael; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Lewis, Adrian; Lewis, George; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bing; Li, Bo; Li, Haifeng; Li, Ho Ling; Li, Shu; Li, Xuefei; Liang, Zhijun; Liao, Hongbo; Liberti, Barbara; Lichard, Peter; Lie, Ki; Liebal, Jessica; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Limper, Maaike; Lin, Simon; Linde, Frank; Lindquist, Brian Edward; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Bo; Liu, Dong; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Kun; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Livermore, Sarah; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loddenkoetter, Thomas; Loebinger, Fred; Loevschall-Jensen, Ask Emil; Loginov, Andrey; Loh, Chang Wei; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Lombardo, Vincenzo Paolo; Long, Jonathan; Long, Robin Eamonn; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lopez Paredes, Brais; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Loscutoff, Peter; Losty, Michael; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lowe, Andrew; Lu, Feng; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Luehring, Frederick; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lundberg, Olof; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lungwitz, Matthias; Lynn, David; Lysak, Roman; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Maček, Boštjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Macina, Daniela; Madaffari, Daniele; Madar, Romain; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Madsen, Alexander; Maeno, Mayuko; Maeno, Tadashi; Magradze, Erekle; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahlstedt, Joern; Mahmoud, Sara; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Mal, Prolay; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mamuzic, Judita; Mandelli, Beatrice; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Manfredini, Alessandro; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany Andreina; Mann, Alexander; Manning, Peter; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mantifel, Rodger; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchand, Jean-Francois; Marchese, Fabrizio; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marino, Christopher; Marques, Carlos; Marroquim, Fernando; Marsden, Stephen Philip; Marshall, Zach; Marti, Lukas Fritz; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Brian; Martin, Brian; Martin, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Homero; Martinez, Mario; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massol, Nicolas; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Matricon, Pierre; Matsunaga, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Takashi; Mättig, Peter; Mättig, Stefan; Mattmann, Johannes; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mazini, Rachid; Mazzaferro, Luca; Mc Goldrick, Garrin; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; Mclaughlan, Tom; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Meade, Andrew; Mechnich, Joerg; Mechtel, Markus; Medinnis, Mike; Meehan, Samuel; Meera-Lebbai, Razzak; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meineck, Christian; Meirose, Bernhard; Melachrinos, Constantinos; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Meloni, Federico; Mendoza Navas, Luis; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mergelmeyer, Sebastian; Meric, Nicolas; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Merritt, Hayes; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Middleton, Robin; Migas, Sylwia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Miller, David; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Milstein, Dmitry; Minaenko, Andrey; Miñano Moya, Mercedes; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mirabelli, Giovanni; Mitani, Takashi; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Mitsui, Shingo; Miucci, Antonio; Miyagawa, Paul; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Mochizuki, Kazuya; Moeller, Victoria; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohr, Wolfgang; Molander, Simon; Moles-Valls, Regina; Mönig, Klaus; Monini, Caterina; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Moraes, Arthur; Morange, Nicolas; Morel, Julien; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morgenstern, Marcus; Morii, Masahiro; Moritz, Sebastian; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Moser, Hans-Guenther; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Muanza, Steve; Mudd, Richard; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Klemens; Mueller, Thibaut; Mueller, Timo; Muenstermann, Daniel; Munwes, Yonathan; Murillo Quijada, Javier Alberto; Murray, Bill; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagai, Yoshikazu; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagarkar, Advait; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagel, Martin; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Namasivayam, Harisankar; Nanava, Gizo; Narayan, Rohin; Nattermann, Till; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Negri, Andrea; Negri, Guido; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nelson, Andrew; Nelson, Timothy Knight; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Neusiedl, Andrea; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newcomer, Mitchel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen, Duong Hai; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforou, Nikiforos; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolics, Katalin; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nisius, Richard; Nobe, Takuya; Nodulman, Lawrence; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Norberg, Scarlet; Nordberg, Markus; Novakova, Jana; Nowak, Sebastian; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Ntekas, Konstantinos; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; Nuti, Francesco; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'grady, Fionnbarr; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Obermann, Theresa; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Ochoa, Ines; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohman, Henrik; Ohshima, Takayoshi; Okamura, Wataru; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Olchevski, Alexander; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olivito, Dominick; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Otono, Hidetoshi; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ouellette, Eric; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Oussoren, Koen Pieter; Ouyang, Qun; Ovcharova, Ana; Owen, Mark; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pachal, Katherine; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagáčová, Martina; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganis, Efstathios; Pahl, Christoph; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Palestini, Sandro; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Palmer, Jody; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panikashvili, Natalia; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Papageorgiou, Konstantinos; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Parker, Michael Andrew; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Passeri, Antonio; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Patricelli, Sergio; Pauly, Thilo; Pearce, James; Pedersen, Maiken; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Pedro, Rute; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Pelikan, Daniel; Peng, Haiping; Penning, Bjoern; Penwell, John; Perepelitsa, Dennis; Perez Codina, Estel; Pérez García-Estañ, María Teresa; Perez Reale, Valeria; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrino, Roberto; Peschke, Richard; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Peters, Yvonne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Jorgen; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Petteni, Michele; Pettersson, Nora Emilia; Pezoa, Raquel; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Pianori, Elisabetta; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Piec, Sebastian Marcin; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pignotti, David; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinder, Alex; Pinfold, James; Pingel, Almut; Pinto, Belmiro; Pires, Sylvestre; Pizio, Caterina; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskot, Vojtech; Plotnikova, Elena; Plucinski, Pawel; Poddar, Sahill; Podlyski, Fabrice; Poettgen, Ruth; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, David-leon; Pohl, Martin; Polesello, Giacomo; Policicchio, Antonio; Polifka, Richard; Polini, Alessandro; Pollard, Christopher Samuel; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Portell Bueso, Xavier; Pospelov, Guennady; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potamianos, Karolos; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozdnyakov, Valery; Prabhu, Robindra; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prasad, Srivas; Pravahan, Rishiraj; Prell, Soeren; Price, Darren; Price, Joe; Price, Lawrence; Prieur, Damien; Primavera, Margherita; Proissl, Manuel; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopapadaki, Eftychia-sofia; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Przybycien, Mariusz; Przysiezniak, Helenka; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Pueschel, Elisa; Puldon, David; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Pylypchenko, Yuriy; Qian, Jianming; Qin, Gang; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Quilty, Donnchadha; Qureshi, Anum; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radhakrishnan, Sooraj Krishnan; Radloff, Peter; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Rammes, Marcus; Randle-Conde, Aidan Sean; Rangel-Smith, Camila; Rao, Kanury; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Tobias Christian; Ravenscroft, Thomas; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Rehnisch, Laura; Reinsch, Andreas; Reisin, Hernan; Relich, Matthew; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Zhongliang; Renaud, Adrien; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Resende, Bernardo; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Ridel, Melissa; Rieck, Patrick; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Ritsch, Elmar; Riu, Imma; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Roda, Chiara; Rodrigues, Luis; Roe, Shaun; Røhne, Ole; Rolli, Simona; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romeo, Gaston; Romero Adam, Elena; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Anthony; Rose, Matthew; Rosendahl, Peter Lundgaard; Rosenthal, Oliver; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rosten, Rachel; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexandre; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubbo, Francesco; Rubinskiy, Igor; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Christian; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Rühr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Ruschke, Alexander; Rutherfoord, John; Ruthmann, Nils; Ruzicka, Pavel; Ryabov, Yury; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryder, Nick; Saavedra, Aldo; Sacerdoti, Sabrina; Saddique, Asif; Sadeh, Iftach; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Yuki; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Saleem, Muhammad; Salek, David; Sales De Bruin, Pedro Henrique; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvachua Ferrando, Belén; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Sanchez, Arturo; Sánchez, Javier; Sanchez Martinez, Victoria; Sandaker, Heidi; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Tanya; Sandoval, Carlos; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sankey, Dave; Sansoni, Andrea; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Santoyo Castillo, Itzebelt; Sapp, Kevin; Sapronov, Andrey; Saraiva, João; Sarrazin, Bjorn; Sartisohn, Georg; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Yuichi; Satsounkevitch, Igor; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Savard, Pierre; Savu, Dan Octavian; Sawyer, Craig; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, David; Saxon, James; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scanlon, Tim; Scannicchio, Diana; Scarcella, Mark; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schaefer, Douglas; Schaefer, Ralph; Schaelicke, Andreas; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schäfer, Uli; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R~Dean; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Scherzer, Max; Schiavi, Carlo; Schieck, Jochen; Schillo, Christian; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schmidt, Evelyn; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Christopher; Schmitt, Sebastian; Schneider, Basil; Schnellbach, Yan Jie; Schnoor, Ulrike; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schoening, Andre; Schoenrock, Bradley Daniel; Schorlemmer, Andre Lukas; Schott, Matthias; Schouten, Doug; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schram, Malachi; Schramm, Steven; Schreyer, Manuel; Schroeder, Christian; Schuh, Natascha; Schultens, Martin Johannes; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwegler, Philipp; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Schwoerer, Maud; Sciacca, Gianfranco; Scifo, Estelle; Sciolla, Gabriella; Scott, Bill; Scuri, Fabrizio; Scutti, Federico; Searcy, Jacob; Sedov, George; Sedykh, Evgeny; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sekula, Stephen; Selbach, Karoline Elfriede; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Sellers, Graham; Seman, Michal; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Serkin, Leonid; Serre, Thomas; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sforza, Federico; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shamim, Mansoora; Shan, Lianyou; Shank, James; Shao, Qi Tao; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Kate; Sherwood, Peter; Shimizu, Shima; Shimmin, Chase Owen; Shimojima, Makoto; Shin, Taeksu; Shiyakova, Mariya; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shochet, Mel; Short, Daniel; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Shushkevich, Stanislav; Sicho, Petr; Sidorov, Dmitri; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silbert, Ohad; Silva, José; Silver, Yiftah; Silverstein, Daniel; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simioni, Eduard; Simmons, Brinick; Simoniello, Rosa; Simonyan, Margar; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sipica, Valentin; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sircar, Anirvan; Sisakyan, Alexei; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skinnari, Louise Anastasia; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skovpen, Kirill; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smestad, Lillian; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Kenway; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snidero, Giacomo; Snow, Joel; Snyder, Scott; Sobie, Randall; Socher, Felix; Sodomka, Jaromir; Soffer, Abner; Soh, Dart-yin; Solans, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Solc, Jaroslav; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solfaroli Camillocci, Elena; Solodkov, Alexander; Solovyanov, Oleg; Solovyev, Victor; Sommer, Philip; Song, Hong Ye; Soni, Nitesh; Sood, Alexander; Sopko, Vit; Sopko, Bruno; Sosebee, Mark; Soualah, Rachik; Soueid, Paul; Soukharev, Andrey; South, David; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spanò, Francesco; Spearman, William Robert; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spousta, Martin; Spreitzer, Teresa; Spurlock, Barry; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanescu-Bellu, Madalina; Stanitzki, Marcel Michael; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staszewski, Rafal; Stavina, Pavel; Steele, Genevieve; Steinberg, Peter; Stekl, Ivan; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stern, Sebastian; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoebe, Michael; Stoerig, Kathrin; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stolte, Philipp; Stonjek, Stefan; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strauss, Emanuel; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Stucci, Stefania Antonia; Stugu, Bjarne; Stumer, Iuliu; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Su, Dong; Su, Jun; Subramania, Halasya Siva; Subramaniam, Rajivalochan; Succurro, Antonella; Sugaya, Yorihito; Suhr, Chad; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Yu; Svatos, Michal; Swedish, Stephen; Swiatlowski, Maximilian; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Ta, Duc; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taenzer, Joe; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takahashi, Yuta; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tam, Jason; Tamsett, Matthew; Tan, Kong Guan; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Satoshi; Tanaka, Shuji; Tanasijczuk, Andres Jorge; Tani, Kazutoshi; Tannoury, Nancy; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tarem, Shlomit; Tarrade, Fabien; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tashiro, Takuya; Tassi, Enrico; Tavares Delgado, Ademar; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Christopher; Taylor, Frank; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Wendy; Teischinger, Florian Alfred; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, Matilde; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terzo, Stefano; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Therhaag, Jan; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thoma, Sascha; Thomas, Juergen; Thomas-Wilsker, Joshuha; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Peter; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Thong, Wai Meng; Thun, Rudolf; Tian, Feng; Tibbetts, Mark James; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tiouchichine, Elodie; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Toggerson, Brokk; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tollefson, Kirsten; Tomlinson, Lee; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Topilin, Nikolai; Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Tran, Huong Lan; Trefzger, Thomas; Tremblet, Louis; Tricoli, Alessandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Tripiana, Martin; Triplett, Nathan; Trischuk, William; Trocmé, Benjamin; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trovatelli, Monica; True, Patrick; Trzebinski, Maciej; Trzupek, Adam; Tsarouchas, Charilaos; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsionou, Dimitra; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsirintanis, Nikolaos; Tsiskaridze, Shota; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tua, Alan; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tuna, Alexander Naip; Tupputi, Salvatore; Turchikhin, Semen; Turecek, Daniel; Turk Cakir, Ilkay; Turra, Ruggero; Tuts, Michael; Tykhonov, Andrii; Tylmad, Maja; Tyndel, Mike; Uchida, Kirika; Ueda, Ikuo; Ueno, Ryuichi; Ughetto, Michael; Ugland, Maren; Uhlenbrock, Mathias; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Ungaro, Francesca; Unno, Yoshinobu; Urbaniec, Dustin; Urquijo, Phillip; Usai, Giulio; Usanova, Anna; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Valencic, Nika; Valentinetti, Sara; Valero, Alberto; Valery, Loic; Valkar, Stefan; Valladolid Gallego, Eva; Vallecorsa, Sofia; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; Van Berg, Richard; Van Der Deijl, Pieter; van der Geer, Rogier; van der Graaf, Harry; Van Der Leeuw, Robin; van der Ster, Daniel; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; Van Nieuwkoop, Jacobus; van Vulpen, Ivo; van Woerden, Marius Cornelis; Vanadia, Marco; Vandelli, Wainer; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vankov, Peter; Vannucci, Francois; Vardanyan, Gagik; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varol, Tulin; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vassilakopoulos, Vassilios; Vazeille, Francois; Vazquez Schroeder, Tamara; Veatch, Jason; Veloso, Filipe; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Ventura, Daniel; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Venturini, Alessio; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Viazlo, Oleksandr; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Vickey Boeriu, Oana Elena; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Vigne, Ralph; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Virzi, Joseph; Vitells, Ofer; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vives Vaque, Francesc; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vladoiu, Dan; Vlasak, Michal; Vogel, Adrian; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Volpi, Matteo; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Radziewski, Holger; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vu Anh, Tuan; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Vykydal, Zdenek; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wagner, Peter; Wahrmund, Sebastian; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wall, Richard; Waller, Peter; Walsh, Brian; Wang, Chao; Wang, Chiho; Wang, Fuquan; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Kuhan; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Wang, Tan; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Wardrope, David Robert; Warsinsky, Markus; Washbrook, Andrew; Wasicki, Christoph; Watanabe, Ippei; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Ian; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Ben; Webb, Samuel; Weber, Michele; Weber, Stefan Wolf; Webster, Jordan S; Weidberg, Anthony; Weigell, Philipp; Weinert, Benjamin; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Weits, Hartger; Wells, Phillippa; Wenaus, Torre; Wendland, Dennis; Weng, Zhili; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Per; Wessels, Martin; Wetter, Jeffrey; Whalen, Kathleen; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Ryan; White, Sebastian; Whiteson, Daniel; Wicke, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik-Fuchs, Liv Antje Mari; Wijeratne, Peter Alexander; Wildauer, Andreas; Wildt, Martin Andre; Wilkens, Henric George; Will, Jonas Zacharias; Williams, Hugh; Williams, Sarah; Willis, Christopher; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, John; Wilson, Alan; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winkelmann, Stefan; Winklmeier, Frank; Wittgen, Matthias; Wittig, Tobias; Wittkowski, Josephine; Wollstadt, Simon Jakob; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wozniak, Krzysztof; Wright, Michael; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wulf, Evan; Wyatt, Terry Richard; Wynne, Benjamin; Xella, Stefania; Xiao, Meng; Xu, Da; Xu, Lailin; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yamada, Miho; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Kyoko; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamamura, Taiki; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamauchi, Katsuya; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Hongtao; Yang, Un-Ki; Yang, Yi; Yanush, Serguei; Yao, Liwen; Yao, Weiming; Yasu, Yoshiji; Yatsenko, Elena; Yau Wong, Kaven Henry; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yen, Andy L; Yildirim, Eda; Yilmaz, Metin; Yoosoofmiya, Reza; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Rikutaro; Yoshihara, Keisuke; Young, Charles; Young, Christopher John; Youssef, Saul; Yu, David Ren-Hwa; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jiaming; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yurkewicz, Adam; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zaman, Aungshuman; Zambito, Stefano; Zanello, Lucia; Zanzi, Daniele; Zaytsev, Alexander; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeman, Martin; Zemla, Andrzej; Zengel, Keith; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zerwas, Dirk; Zevi della Porta, Giovanni; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Fangzhou; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Lei; Zhou, Ning; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zibell, Andre; Zieminska, Daria; Zimine, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Christoph; Zimmermann, Robert; Zimmermann, Simone; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Zinonos, Zinonas; Ziolkowski, Michael; Zitoun, Robert; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; zur Nedden, Martin; Zurzolo, Giovanni; Zutshi, Vishnu; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2014-01-01

    A search is presented for production of dark matter particles recoiling against a leptonically decaying $Z$ boson in 20.3 fb$^{-1}$ of $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. Events with large missing transverse momentum and two oppositely-charged electrons or muons consistent with the decay of a $Z$ boson are analyzed. No excess above the Standard Model prediction is observed. Limits are set on the mass scale of the contact interaction as a function of the dark matter particle mass using an effective field theory description of the interaction of dark matter with quarks or with $Z$ bosons. Limits are also set on the coupling and mediator mass of a model in which the interaction is mediated by a scalar particle.

  19. An enigma called the Higgs boson

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The search for the Higgs boson, the missing pillar of the currently prevailing theory of weak and electromagnetic interactions, is a prime goal of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiment. We review the circumstances, based on which our expectation of the existence of the Higgs boson has grown, how it is expected to be seen at the LHC, and where we stand in the drop of the presently available data. Moreover, we touch upon the fact that the very existence of the Higgs boson as an elementary particle provides a strong hint on possible new laws of physics. (author)

  20. Mapping the genuine bosonic quartic couplings

    CERN Document Server

    Eboli, O J P

    2016-01-01

    The larger center-of-mass energy of the Large Hadron Collider Run 2 opens up the possibility of a more detailed study of the quartic vertices of the electroweak gauge bosons. Our goal in this work is to classify all operators possessing quartic interactions among the electroweak gauge bosons that do not exhibit triple gauge-boson vertices associated to them. We obtain all relevant operators in the non-linear and linear realizations of the $SU(2)_L \\otimes U(1)_Y$ gauge symmetry.

  1. Interactive and Mediational Etiologic Models of Eating Disorder Onset: Evidence from Prospective Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stice, Eric

    2016-03-28

    It is vital to elucidate how risk factors work together to predict eating disorder onset because it should improve the yield of prevention efforts. Risk factors that have predicted eating disorder onset in multiple studies include low body mass index (BMI) for anorexia nervosa; thin-ideal internalization, perceived pressure to be thin, body dissatisfaction, dieting, and negative affect for bulimia nervosa; and body dissatisfaction and dieting for purging disorder. No such risk factors have been identified for binge eating disorder. Classification tree analyses have identified several amplifying interactions, mitigating interactions, and alternative pathway interactions between risk factors, such as evidence that elevated BMI amplifies the risk between appearance overvaluation and the future onset of recurrent binge eating. However, there have been no tests of mediational risk factor models in the prediction of eating disorder onset. Gaps in the literature are identified and procedures for providing rigorous tests of interactive and mediational etiologic models are outlined. PMID:26651521

  2. Peer mediation encourages student learning and context interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Concepción MONGE CRESPO

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Teenagers share time with «peers», with friends, while enjoying and feeling understood and accepted by them. For students of ESO, peers hold a central place in their life, hence their multiple and diverse experiences, for the most part, are performed along with them. During one course, the 2009/2010 academic year, I proposed that they also should share their educational tasks, support each other, help one another, and together achieve better and more efficiently the proposed objective: to pass learning together. Nowadays before this society, framed by new technologies of information and communication, it becomes very necessary for students to work in teams, think critically and creatively and think about their own learning process. Likewise, many studies hold that learning is most successful when it meets certain requirements such as: Taking place in real situations, having a direct and qualified feedback about lear- ning, working together in solving a problem, reflect on their performance and being able to perceive one’s self as competent persons capable of action. Relying on these conditions and knowing that learning is primarily a social process in which students learn best in collaboration with: peers, teachers, parents and/or other context agents where they live and interact provided they are actively engaged in meaningful and interesting tasks.This research was conducted with students from 2º ESO.

  3. A conserved docking surface on calcineurin mediates interaction with substrates and immunosuppressants

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez, Antonio; Roy, Jagoree; Martínez-Martínez, Sara; López-Maderuelo, Ma Dolores; Niño-Moreno, Perla; Ortí, Leticia; Pantoja, David; Pineda-Lucena, Antonio; Martha S Cyert; Redondo, Juan Miguel

    2009-01-01

    The phosphatase calcineurin, target of the immunosuppressants cyclosporin A and FK506, dephosphorylates NFAT transcription factors to promote immune activation and development of the vascular and nervous systems. NFAT interacts with calcineurin through distinct binding motifs: the PxIXIT and LxVP sites. While many calcineurin substrates contain PxIxIT motifs, the generality of LxVP-mediated interactions is unclear. We define critical residues in the LxVP motif, and demonstrate its binding to ...

  4. Coaggregation-Mediated Interactions of Streptococci and Actinomyces Detected in Initial Human Dental Plaque

    OpenAIRE

    Palmer, JR; Gordon, Sharon M.; Cisar, John O.; Kolenbrander, Paul E.

    2003-01-01

    Streptococci and actinomyces that initiate colonization of the tooth surface frequently coaggregate with each other as well as with other oral bacteria. These observations have led to the hypothesis that interbacterial adhesion influences spatiotemporal development of plaque. To assess the role of such interactions in oral biofilm formation in vivo, antibodies directed against bacterial surface components that mediate coaggregation interactions were used as direct immunofluorescent probes in ...

  5. Programmed hydrolysis of nanoassemblies by electrostatic interaction-mediated enzymatic-degradation†

    OpenAIRE

    Samarajeewa, Sandani; Zentay, Ryan P.; Jhurry, Nema D.; Li, Ang; Seetho, Kellie; Zou, Jiong; Wooley, Karen L.

    2014-01-01

    Electrostatic interaction-mediated enzymatic-hydrolysis of poly(lactide)-containing nanoscale assemblies is described. At physiological pH, degradable core–shell morphologies with charged shells can readily attract or repel enzymes carrying opposite or similar charges, respectively.

  6. Activity Theory and Technology Mediated Interaction: Cognitive Scaffolding Using Question-Based Consultation on "Facebook"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambe, Patient

    2012-01-01

    Studies that employed activity theory as a theoretical lens for exploring computer-mediated interaction have not adopted social media as their object of study. However, social media provides lecturers with personalised learning environments for diagnostic and prognostic assessments of student mastery of content and deep learning. The integration…

  7. Patterns of Computer-Mediated Interaction in Small Writing Groups Using Wikis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mimi; Zhu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Informed by sociocultural theory and guided especially by "collective scaffolding", this study investigated the nature of computer-mediated interaction of three groups of English as a Foreign Language students when they performed collaborative writing tasks using wikis. Nine college students from a Chinese university participated in the…

  8. An Epistemological Framework for Analyzing Student Interactions in Computer Mediated Communication Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena-Shaff, Judith; Martin, Wendy; Gay, Geraldine

    2001-01-01

    Presents a case study that examined communication patterns, participation, the epistemological character of interactions, knowledge construction, and learning processes of college students who used two forms of computer mediated communication to discuss class topics: an asynchronous electronic bulletin board, and a synchronous text chat…

  9. Targeting CD47-SIRPα interactions for potentiating therapeutic antibody-mediated tumor cell destruction by phagocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, X.W.

    2014-01-01

    The primary aim of the studies described in this thesis was to investigate the role of CD47-SIRPα interactions in therapeutic antibody-dependent tumor cell destruction by human phagocytes and also explore the killing mechanism(s) by which human phagocytes, and in particular human neutrophils, mediate therapeutic antibody-dependent cytotoxicity towards cancer cells.

  10. Higgs constraints from vector boson fusion and scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present results on 4-lepton + 2-jet production, the partonic processes most commonly described as vector boson pair production in the Vector Boson Fusion (VBF) mode. That final state contains diagrams that are mediated by Higgs boson exchange. We focus particularly on the high-mass behaviour of the Higgs boson mediated diagrams, which unlike on-shell production, gives information about the Higgs couplings without assumptions on the Higgs boson total width. We assess the sensitivity of the high-mass region to Higgs coupling strengths, considering all vector boson pair channels, W- W+, W± W±, W± Z and ZZ. Because of the small background, the most promising mode is W+ W+ which has sensitivity to Higgs couplings because of Higgs boson exchange in the t-channel. Furthermore, using the Caola-Melnikov (CM) method, the off-shell couplings can be interpreted as bounds on the Higgs boson total width. We estimate the bound that can be obtained with current data, as well as the bounds that could be obtained at √s=13 TeV in the VBF channel for data samples of 100 and 300 fb-1. The CM method has already been successfully applied in the gluon fusion (GGF) production channel. The VBF production channel gives important complementary information, because both production and decay of the Higgs boson occur already at tree graph level

  11. Experimental characteristics of dynamical pseudo-Goldstone bosons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hypothetical existence of new color interactions, which participate in the spontaneous breaking of the weak interaction group, will in general lead to relatively light composite pseudo-Goldstone bosons. Their production and decay characteristics are analyzed to be close to, yet actually distinguishable from, those of the elementary Higgs bosons of the Weinberg-Salam model

  12. Energy and structural properties of N -boson clusters attached to three-body Efimov states: Two-body zero-range interactions and the role of the three-body regulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yangqian; Blume, D.

    2015-09-01

    The low-energy spectrum of N -boson clusters with pairwise zero-range interactions is believed to be governed by a three-body parameter. We study the ground state of N -boson clusters with infinite two-body s -wave scattering length by performing ab initio Monte Carlo simulations. To prevent Thomas collapse, different finite-range three-body regulators are used. The energy and structural properties for the three-body Hamiltonian with two-body zero-range interactions and three-body regulator are in much better agreement with the "ideal zero-range Efimov theory" results than those for Hamiltonian with two-body finite-range interactions. For larger clusters we find that the ground-state energy and structural properties of the Hamiltonian with two-body zero-range interactions and finite-range three-body regulators are not universally determined by the three-body parameter, i.e., dependencies on the specific form of the three-body regulator are observed. For comparison, we consider Hamiltonian with two-body van der Waals interactions and no three-body regulator. For the interactions considered, the ground-state energy of the N -body clusters is—if scaled by the three-body ground-state energy—fairly universal, i.e., the dependence on the short-range details of the two-body van der Waals potentials is small. Our results are compared with those in the literature.

  13. A conserved patch of hydrophobic amino acids modulates Myb activity by mediating protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukare, Sandeep; Klempnauer, Karl-Heinz

    2016-07-01

    The transcription factor c-Myb plays a key role in the control of proliferation and differentiation in hematopoietic progenitor cells and has been implicated in the development of leukemia and certain non-hematopoietic tumors. c-Myb activity is highly dependent on the interaction with the coactivator p300 which is mediated by the transactivation domain of c-Myb and the KIX domain of p300. We have previously observed that conservative valine-to-isoleucine amino acid substitutions in a conserved stretch of hydrophobic amino acids have a profound effect on Myb activity. Here, we have explored the function of the hydrophobic region as a mediator of protein-protein interactions. We show that the hydrophobic region facilitates Myb self-interaction and binding of the histone acetyl transferase Tip60, a previously identified Myb interacting protein. We show that these interactions are affected by the valine-to-isoleucine amino acid substitutions and suppress Myb activity by interfering with the interaction of Myb and the KIX domain of p300. Taken together, our work identifies the hydrophobic region in the Myb transactivation domain as a binding site for homo- and heteromeric protein interactions and leads to a picture of the c-Myb transactivation domain as a composite protein binding region that facilitates interdependent protein-protein interactions of Myb with regulatory proteins. PMID:27080133

  14. Search for a light Higgs boson decaying to long-lived weakly-interacting particles in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Abdesselam, Abdelouahab; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Acerbi, Emilio; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Addy, Tetteh; Adelman, Jahred; Aderholz, Michael; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adragna, Paolo; Adye, Tim; Aefsky, Scott; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Aharrouche, Mohamed; Ahlen, Steven; Ahles, Florian; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahsan, Mahsana; Aielli, Giulio; Akdogan, Taylan; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Akiyama, Kunihiro; Alam, Mohammad; Alam, Muhammad Aftab; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alessandria, Franco; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Aliyev, Magsud; Allport, Phillip; Allwood-Spiers, Sarah; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alon, Raz; Alonso, Alejandro; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral, Pedro; Amelung, Christoph; Ammosov, Vladimir; Amorim, Antonio; Amorós, Gabriel; Amram, Nir; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Andrieux, Marie-Laure; Anduaga, Xabier; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoun, Sahar; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Arce, Ayana; Archambault, John-Paul; Arfaoui, Samir; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Arik, Engin; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnault, Christian; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Arutinov, David; Asai, Shoji; Asfandiyarov, Ruslan; Ask, Stefan; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astbury, Alan; Astvatsatourov, Anatoli; Aubert, Bernard; Auge, Etienne; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Avramidou, Rachel Maria; Axen, David; Ay, Cano; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Baccaglioni, Giuseppe; Bacci, Cesare; Bach, Andre; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Bachy, Gerard; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bahinipati, Seema; Bai, Yu; Bailey, David; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baker, Mark; Baker, Sarah; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Piyali; Banerjee, Swagato; Banfi, Danilo; Bangert, Andrea Michelle; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barashkou, Andrei; Barbaro Galtieri, Angela; Barber, Tom; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Bardin, Dmitri; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Barrillon, Pierre; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartsch, Valeria; Bates, Richard; Batkova, Lucia; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Andreas; Battistin, Michele; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beale, Steven; Beare, Brian; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becks, Karl-Heinz; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bedikian, Sourpouhi; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Begel, Michael; Behar Harpaz, Silvia; Behera, Prafulla; Beimforde, Michael; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellina, Francesco; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belloni, Alberto; Beloborodova, Olga; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Ben Ami, Sagi; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Benchouk, Chafik; Bendel, Markus; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Benoit, Mathieu; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Berglund, Elina; Beringer, Jürg; Bernat, Pauline; Bernhard, Ralf; Bernius, Catrin; Berry, Tracey; Bertella, Claudia; Bertin, Antonio; Bertinelli, Francesco; Bertolucci, Federico; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besson, Nathalie; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Bierwagen, Katharina; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biscarat, Catherine; Bitenc, Urban; Black, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    A search for the decay of a light Higgs (120 - 140 GeV) to a pair of weakly-interacting, long-lived particles in 1.94 fb${^-1}$ of proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV recorded in 2011 by the ATLAS detector is presented. The search strategy requires that both long-lived particles decay inside the muon spectrometer. No excess of events is observed above the expected background and limits on the Higgs boson production times branching ratio to weakly-interacting, long-lived particles are derived as a function of the particle proper decay length.

  15. A general approach to bosonization

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Girish S Setulur; V Meera

    2007-10-01

    We summarize recent developments in the field of higher dimensional bosonization made by Setlur and collaborators and propose a general formula for the field operator in terms of currents and densities in one dimension using a new ingredient known as a `singular complex number'. Using this formalism, we compute the Green function of the homogeneous electron gas in one spatial dimension with short-range interaction leading to the Luttinger liquid and also with long-range interactions that lead to a Wigner crystal whose momentum distribution computed recently exhibits essential singularities. We generalize the formalism to finite temperature by combining with the author's hydrodynamic approach. The one-particle Green function of this system with essential singularities cannot be easily computed using the traditional approach to bosonization which involves the introduction of momentum cutoffs, hence the more general approach of the present formalism is proposed as a suitable alternative.

  16. Molecular Principles of Gene Fusion Mediated Rewiring of Protein Interaction Networks in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latysheva, Natasha S; Oates, Matt E; Maddox, Louis; Flock, Tilman; Gough, Julian; Buljan, Marija; Weatheritt, Robert J; Babu, M Madan

    2016-08-18

    Gene fusions are common cancer-causing mutations, but the molecular principles by which fusion protein products affect interaction networks and cause disease are not well understood. Here, we perform an integrative analysis of the structural, interactomic, and regulatory properties of thousands of putative fusion proteins. We demonstrate that genes that form fusions (i.e., parent genes) tend to be highly connected hub genes, whose protein products are enriched in structured and disordered interaction-mediating features. Fusion often results in the loss of these parental features and the depletion of regulatory sites such as post-translational modifications. Fusion products disproportionately connect proteins that did not previously interact in the protein interaction network. In this manner, fusion products can escape cellular regulation and constitutively rewire protein interaction networks. We suggest that the deregulation of central, interaction-prone proteins may represent a widespread mechanism by which fusion proteins alter the topology of cellular signaling pathways and promote cancer. PMID:27540857

  17. Bosonic behavior of entangled fermions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    C. Tichy, Malte; Alexander Bouvrie, Peter; Mølmer, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Two bound, entangled fermions form a composite boson, which can be treated as an elementary boson as long as the Pauli principle does not affect the behavior of many such composite bosons. The departure of ideal bosonic behavior is quantified by the normalization ratio of multi-composite-boson st......Two bound, entangled fermions form a composite boson, which can be treated as an elementary boson as long as the Pauli principle does not affect the behavior of many such composite bosons. The departure of ideal bosonic behavior is quantified by the normalization ratio of multi...

  18. Gauge-boson self-interactions and t (bar)t production as probes of new physics at high energy e(+)e(-) colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gintner, Mikulas

    1997-11-01

    We address two phenomenological problems, both related to the search for new physics beyond the SM with potential sensitivity to the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking (ESB). In the first problem, we analyze the sensitivity of the process e+e/sp-/to/ell/nu/sb/ell q/bar q/prime to anomalous triple gauge boson couplings at energies appropriate to LEP2 and the NLC, considering all tree level diagrams and finite widths of the gauge bosons. While it is unlikely that LEP2 measurements would reveal anomalous couplings, the 500 GeV NLC measurements should be sensitive to loop contributions to the triple gauge boson vertices (TGV) while the 1 TeV NLC will be able to measure such effects. The different polarizations of initial states give different correlations between bounds on anomalous couplings. Thus the use of polarized beams at the NLC energies can help disentangle the nature of anomalous TGV's. We also examine the sensitivity of the off W-resonance production to the anomalous couplings and find that useful information could be extracted from this region of phase space. In the second problem, we investigate t/bar t production via vector boson fusion at e+e/sp- colliders as a means to study the mechanism of ESB. We calculate the cross sections for four different channels of the reaction e+e/sp- /to/ell/bar/ell V1V2/to/ell/bar/ell t/bar t using the effective vector boson approximation (EVA). We find that the WW mode is sufficiently sensitive to distinguish different Higgs boson masses. We examine the error introduced to the σ(e+e/sp-/to t/bar t) calculation by using high-energy approximations of the V1V2/to t/bar t cross sections rather than the full expressions and find it comparable to the error expected from the use of the EVA.

  19. Interactional justice as a mediator of the relationship between pay for performance and job satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azman Ismail

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study was conducted to examine the effect of pay for performance and interactional justice on job satisfaction.Design/methodology/approach: A survey method was used to collect 107 usable questionnaires from employees who work in the US subsidiary manufacturing firm operating in a silicon valley in East Malaysia, Malaysia.Findings: The outcomes showed two important findings: first, relationship between interactional justice and adequacy of pay significantly correlated with job satisfaction. Second, relationship between interactional justice and participation in pay systems significantly correlated with job satisfaction. Statistically, this result confirms that interactional justice does act as a mediating variable in the pay for performance models of the studied organization.Originality/value: Most previous research tested a direct effect of pay for performance on job satisfaction. Unlike such research approach, this study discovers that interactional justice has strengthened the effect of pay for performance on job satisfaction in a compensation system framework.

  20. Pilot whales attracted to killer whale sounds: acoustically-mediated interspecific interactions in cetaceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curé, Charlotte; Antunes, Ricardo; Samarra, Filipa; Alves, Ana Catarina; Visser, Fleur; Kvadsheim, Petter H; Miller, Patrick J O

    2012-01-01

    In cetaceans' communities, interactions between individuals of different species are often observed in the wild. Yet, due to methodological and technical challenges very little is known about the mediation of these interactions and their effect on cetaceans' behavior. Killer whales (Orcinus orca) are a highly vocal species and can be both food competitors and potential predators of many other cetaceans. Thus, the interception of their vocalizations by unintended cetacean receivers may be particularly important in mediating interspecific interactions. To address this hypothesis, we conducted playbacks of killer whale vocalizations recorded during herring-feeding activity to free-ranging long-finned pilot whales (Globicephala melas). Using a multi-sensor tag, we were able to track the whales and to monitor changes of their movements and social behavior in response to the playbacks. We demonstrated that the playback of killer whale sounds to pilot whales induced a clear increase in group size and a strong attraction of the animals towards the sound source. These findings provide the first experimental evidence that the interception of heterospecific vocalizations can mediate interactions between different cetacean species in previously unrecognized ways. PMID:23300613

  1. Pilot whales attracted to killer whale sounds: acoustically-mediated interspecific interactions in cetaceans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Curé

    Full Text Available In cetaceans' communities, interactions between individuals of different species are often observed in the wild. Yet, due to methodological and technical challenges very little is known about the mediation of these interactions and their effect on cetaceans' behavior. Killer whales (Orcinus orca are a highly vocal species and can be both food competitors and potential predators of many other cetaceans. Thus, the interception of their vocalizations by unintended cetacean receivers may be particularly important in mediating interspecific interactions. To address this hypothesis, we conducted playbacks of killer whale vocalizations recorded during herring-feeding activity to free-ranging long-finned pilot whales (Globicephala melas. Using a multi-sensor tag, we were able to track the whales and to monitor changes of their movements and social behavior in response to the playbacks. We demonstrated that the playback of killer whale sounds to pilot whales induced a clear increase in group size and a strong attraction of the animals towards the sound source. These findings provide the first experimental evidence that the interception of heterospecific vocalizations can mediate interactions between different cetacean species in previously unrecognized ways.

  2. Upregulation of fibronectin expression by COX-2 is mediated by interaction with ELMO1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chen; Sorokin, Andrey

    2011-01-01

    Engulfment and cell motility 1 (ELMO1), a bipartite guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for the small GTPase Rac 1, was identified as a susceptibility gene for glomerular disease. Here, we reported that ELMO1 interacted with COX-2 in human mesangial cells. Furthermore, we identified ELMO1 as a posttranslational regulator of COX-2 activity. We demonstrated that COX-2 cyclooxygenase activity increased fibronectin promoter activity. The protein-protein interaction between ELMO1 and COX-2 increased the cyclooxygenase activity of COX-2 and, correspondingly, fibronectin expression. We also found that ET625, the dominant negative form of ELMO1 lacking Rac1 activity, interacted with COX-2, increased cyclooxygenase activity of COX-2 and enhanced COX-2-mediated fibronectin upregulation. To further rule out Rac1 as an ELMO1-mediated regulator of COX-2 activity, we employed the constitutive active Rac1, Rac1(Q63E), and demonstrated that Rac1 signaling has no effect on COX-2-mediated fibronectin promoter activity. These results suggest that ELMO1 contributes to the development of glomerular injury through serving as a regulator of COX-2 activity. The interaction of ELMO1 with COX-2 could play an important role in the development and progression of renal glomerular injury. PMID:20732417

  3. Direct detection signatures of self-interacting dark matter with a light mediator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Self-interacting dark matter (SIDM) is a simple and well-motivated scenario that could explain long-standing puzzles in structure formation on small scales. If the required self-interaction arises through a light mediator (with mass ∼10 MeV) in the dark sector, this new particle must be unstable to avoid overclosing the universe. The decay of the light mediator could happen due to a weak coupling of the hidden and visible sectors, providing new signatures for direct detection experiments. The SIDM nuclear recoil spectrum is more peaked towards low energies compared to the usual case of contact interactions, because the mediator mass is comparable to the momentum transfer of nuclear recoils. We show that the SIDM signal could be distinguished from that of DM particles with contact interactions by considering the time-average energy spectrum in experiments employing different target materials, or the average and modulated spectra in a single experiment. Using current limits from LUX and SuperCDMS, we also derive strong bounds on the mixing parameter between hidden and visible sector

  4. Direct detection signatures of self-interacting dark matter with a light mediator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nobile, Eugenio Del [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles,CA, 90095 (United States); Kaplinghat, Manoj [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside,CA, 92507 (United States); Yu, Hai-Bo [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine,CA, 92697 (United States)

    2015-10-27

    Self-interacting dark matter (SIDM) is a simple and well-motivated scenario that could explain long-standing puzzles in structure formation on small scales. If the required self-interaction arises through a light mediator (with mass ∼10 MeV) in the dark sector, this new particle must be unstable to avoid overclosing the universe. The decay of the light mediator could happen due to a weak coupling of the hidden and visible sectors, providing new signatures for direct detection experiments. The SIDM nuclear recoil spectrum is more peaked towards low energies compared to the usual case of contact interactions, because the mediator mass is comparable to the momentum transfer of nuclear recoils. We show that the SIDM signal could be distinguished from that of DM particles with contact interactions by considering the time-average energy spectrum in experiments employing different target materials, or the average and modulated spectra in a single experiment. Using current limits from LUX and SuperCDMS, we also derive strong bounds on the mixing parameter between hidden and visible sector.

  5. Direct detection signatures of self-interacting dark matter with a light mediator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Nobile, Eugenio; Kaplinghat, Manoj; Yu, Hai-Bo

    2015-10-01

    Self-interacting dark matter (SIDM) is a simple and well-motivated scenario that could explain long-standing puzzles in structure formation on small scales. If the required self-interaction arises through a light mediator (with mass ~ 10 MeV) in the dark sector, this new particle must be unstable to avoid overclosing the universe. The decay of the light mediator could happen due to a weak coupling of the hidden and visible sectors, providing new signatures for direct detection experiments. The SIDM nuclear recoil spectrum is more peaked towards low energies compared to the usual case of contact interactions, because the mediator mass is comparable to the momentum transfer of nuclear recoils. We show that the SIDM signal could be distinguished from that of DM particles with contact interactions by considering the time-average energy spectrum in experiments employing different target materials, or the average and modulated spectra in a single experiment. Using current limits from LUX and SuperCDMS, we also derive strong bounds on the mixing parameter between hidden and visible sector.

  6. Direct Detection Signatures of Self-Interacting Dark Matter with a Light Mediator

    CERN Document Server

    Del Nobile, Eugenio; Yu, Hai-Bo

    2015-01-01

    Self-interacting dark matter (SIDM) is a simple and well-motivated scenario that could explain long-standing puzzles in structure formation on small scales. If the required self-interaction arises through a light mediator (with mass $\\sim 10$ MeV) in the dark sector, this new particle must be unstable to avoid overclosing the universe. The decay of the light mediator could happen due to a weak coupling of the hidden and visible sectors, providing new signatures for direct detection experiments. The SIDM nuclear recoil spectrum is more peaked towards low energies compared to the usual case of contact interactions, because the mediator mass is comparable to the momentum transfer of nuclear recoils. We show that the SIDM signal could be distinguished from that of DM particles with contact interactions by considering the time-average energy spectrum in experiments employing different target materials, or the average and modulated spectra in a single experiment. Using current limits from LUX and SuperCDMS, we also...

  7. The new bosonic mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Taratuta, Rostislav

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to introduce the new bosonic mechanism and newtreatment of dark energy. The bosonic mechanism focuses on obtaining masses by gauge bosonswithout assuming the existence of Higgs boson. The hypothesis on dark energy as the energy ofa postulated dark field was made and a combined gravitational-dark field was introduced. This fieldis the key to a specified approach and allows addressing the fundamental starting points of the mechanism.i. Complex scalar field is i...

  8. Bosonic Cascade Laser

    OpenAIRE

    Liew, T. C. H.; Glazov, M. M.; Kavokin, K. V.; Shelykh, I. A.; Kaliteevski, M A; Kavokin, A.V.

    2012-01-01

    We propose a concept of a quantum cascade laser based on transitions of bosonic quasiparticles (excitons and exciton-polaritons) in a parabolic potential trap in a semiconductor microcavity. This laser would emit terahertz radiation due to bosonic stimulation of excitonic transitions. Dynamics of a bosonic cascade is strongly different from the dynamics of a conventional fermionic cascade laser. We show that populations of excitonic ladders are parity-dependent and quantized if the laser oper...

  9. Leptophobic boson signals with leptons, jets and missing energy

    OpenAIRE

    Dobrescu, Bogdan A.

    2015-01-01

    Color-singlet gauge bosons with renormalizable couplings to quarks but not to leptons must interact with additional fermions ("anomalons") required to cancel the gauge anomalies. Analyzing the decays of such leptophobic bosons into anomalons, I show that they produce final states involving leptons at the LHC. Resonant production of a flavor-universal leptophobic $Z'$ boson leads to cascade decays via anomalons, whose signatures include a leptonically decaying $Z$, missing energy and several j...

  10. New effects in the interaction between electromagnetic sources mediated by nonminimal Lorentz violating interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Borges, L H C; Barone, F A

    2016-01-01

    This paper is dedicated to the study of interactions between external sources for the electromagnetic field in a Lorentz symmetry breaking scenario. We focus on a particular higher derivative, Lorentz violating interaction that arises from a specific model that was argued to lead to interesting effects in the low energy phenomenology of light pseudoscalars interacting with photons. The kind of higher derivative Lorentz violating interaction we discuss do not appear in the well known Standard Model Extension, therefore they are called nonminimal. They are usually expected to be relevant only at very high energies, but we argue they might also induce relevant effects in low energy phenomena. Special attention is given for phenomena that have no counterpart in Maxwell theory.

  11. See you on Facebook! A framework for analyzing the role of computer-mediated interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Antoci, Angelo; Sabatini, Fabio; Sodini, Mauro

    2011-01-01

    Empirical studies have documented a decline in indicators of social participation in the last decades. The responsibility of social disengagement has been often attributed to pervasive busyness and the rising pressure of time. In this paper we argue that computer-mediated interaction, and particularly online networking, can help mitigate this downward trend. We develop a logical framework for assessing the role of the internet in the evolution of social participation. We analyze an economy wh...

  12. Formation of semi-dilute adhesion domains driven by weak elasticity-mediated interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharan, Nadiv; Farago, Oded

    2016-08-21

    Cell-cell adhesion is established by specific binding of receptor and ligand proteins anchored in the cell membranes. The adhesion bonds attract each other and often aggregate into large clusters that are central to many biological processes. One possible origin of attractive interactions between adhesion bonds is the elastic response of the membranes to their deformation by the bonds. Here, we analyze these elasticity-mediated interactions using a novel mean-field approach. Our analysis of systems at different densities of bonds, ϕ, reveals that the phase diagram, i.e., the binodal and spinodal lines, exhibit a nearly universal behavior when the temperature T is plotted against the scaled density x = ϕξ(2), where ξ is the linear size of the membrane's region affected by the presence of a single isolated bond. The critical point (ϕc , Tc) is located at very low densities, and slightly below Tc we identify phase coexistence between two low-density phases. Dense adhesion domains are observed only when the height by which the bonds deform the membranes, h0, is much larger than their thermal roughness, Δ, which occurs at very low temperatures T≪Tc. We, thus, conclude that the elasticity-mediated interactions are weak and cannot be regarded as responsible for the formation of dense adhesion domains. The weakness of the elasticity-mediated effect and its relevance to dilute systems only can be attributed to the fact that the membrane's elastic energy saturates in the semi-dilute regime, when the typical spacing between the bonds r≳ξ, i.e., for x≲ 1. Therefore, at higher densities, only the mixing entropy of the bonds (which always favors uniform distributions) is thermodynamically relevant. We discuss the implications of our results for the question of immunological synapse formation, and demonstrate that the elasticity-mediated interactions may be involved in the aggregation of these semi-dilute membrane domains. PMID:27426284

  13. Theoretical analysis of hydrophobic matching and membrane-mediated interactions in lipid bilayers containing gramicidin.

    OpenAIRE

    Harroun, T A; Heller, W T; Weiss, T M; Yang, L; Huang, H W

    1999-01-01

    We present a quantitative analysis of the effects of hydrophobic matching and membrane-mediated protein-protein interactions exhibited by gramicidin embedded in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dilauroylphosphatidylcholine (DLPC) bilayers (Harroun et al., 1999. Biophys. J. 76:937-945). Incorporating gramicidin, at 1:10 peptide/lipid molar ratio, decreases the phosphate-to-phosphate (PtP) peak separation in the DMPC bilayer from 35.3 A without gramicidin to 32.7 A. In contrast, the sa...

  14. The Parkinson's disease-linked proteins Fbxo7 and Parkin interact to mediate mitophagy

    OpenAIRE

    Burchell, Victoria S; Nelson, David E.; Sanchez-Martinez, Alvaro; Delgado-Camprubi, Marta; Ivatt, Rachael M; Pogson, Joe H.; Randle, Suzanne J.; Wray, Selina; Lewis, Patrick A.; Houlden, Henry; Abramov, Andrey Y; Hardy, John; Wood, Nicholas W; Whitworth, Alexander J.; Laman, Heike

    2013-01-01

    Compelling evidence indicates that two autosomal recessive Parkinson’s disease genes, PINK1 (PARK6) and Parkin (PARK2), co-operate to mediate the autophagic clearance of damaged mitochondria (mitophagy). Mutations in the F-box domain containing protein Fbxo7 (PARK15) also cause early onset autosomal recessive Parkinson’s disease by an unknown mechanism. Here we show that Fbxo7 participates in mitochondrial maintenance through direct interaction with PINK1 and Parkin and plays a role in Parkin...

  15. Introduction to bosonic string theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is an introductory set of five lectures on bosonic string theory. The first one deals with the classical theory of bosonic strings. The second and third lectures cover quantization. Three basic quantization methods are sketched: the old covariant formalism, the light-cone gauge quantization, where the spectrum is derived and the Polyakov path integral formalism and in particular the partition function at one loop. Finally, the last lecture covers interactions, low energy effective action, the general idea of compactification and in particular toroidal compactification. The notes are based on books by Green, Schwarz and Witten, Polchinski, Lust and Theissen and Kaku and review papers by D'Hocker and Phong and O. Alvarez. (author)

  16. Mini Force: the (B-L) + xY gauge interaction with a light mediator

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Hye-Sung

    2016-01-01

    The relevant phenomenology and the best search schemes of a sub-electroweak scale gauge boson can be vastly different depending on its coupling. For instance, the rare decay into a light gauge boson and the high precision parity test can be sensitive if it has an axial coupling. The minimal gauge extension of the standard model with the U(1)_{B-L + xY} requires only three right-handed neutrinos, well-suited with the current neutrino mass and mixing data, and no additional exotic matter fields. We study the light gauge boson of this symmetry in detail including its axial coupling property from the hypercharge shift.

  17. Critical Scaling and a Dynamical Higgs Boson

    CERN Document Server

    Mannheim, Philip D

    2016-01-01

    In a quantum electrodynamics theory that is realized by critical scaling and anomalous dimensions, even though the fermion mass is generated dynamically, the Lagrangian is not chiral invariant and no dynamical pseudoscalar Goldstone boson or scalar Higgs boson accompanies the mass generation. In the mean-field approximation to a chiral invariant four-fermion theory there is also dynamical mass generation. However, the associated mean-field sector Lagrangian is not chirally invariant and possesses no dynamical bound states, with Goldstone and Higgs boson bound states instead being generated by the residual interaction. In this paper we show that if a critical scaling electrodynamics is augmented with a four-fermion interaction, precisely because it possesses no dynamical bound states the electrodynamic sector can be reinterpreted as a mean-field approximation to a larger theory that is chiral symmetric, and in this larger theory there is a residual interaction that then does generate dynamical Goldstone and Hi...

  18. Plant-Mediated Systemic Interactions Between Pathogens, Parasitic Nematodes, and Herbivores Above- and Belowground.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biere, Arjen; Goverse, Aska

    2016-08-01

    Plants are important mediators of interactions between aboveground (AG) and belowground (BG) pathogens, arthropod herbivores, and nematodes (phytophages). We highlight recent progress in our understanding of within- and cross-compartment plant responses to these groups of phytophages in terms of altered resource dynamics and defense signaling and activation. We review studies documenting the outcome of cross-compartment interactions between these phytophage groups and show patterns of cross-compartment facilitation as well as cross-compartment induced resistance. Studies involving soilborne pathogens and foliar nematodes are scant. We further highlight the important role of defense signaling loops between shoots and roots to activate a full resistance complement. Moreover, manipulation of such loops by phytophages affects systemic interactions with other plant feeders. Finally, cross-compartment-induced changes in root defenses and root exudates extend systemic defense loops into the rhizosphere, enhancing or reducing recruitment of microbes that induce systemic resistance but also affecting interactions with root-feeding phytophages. PMID:27359367

  19. Interactional and Structural Characteristics of Communication and Social Interactions during Computer-Mediated Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, William J.; Bernas, Roman S.

    2008-01-01

    This study used precepts of social network theory to examine the interactional and structural characteristics of communication in peer-mentoring conferences. Twelve discussion conferences were set up to support students during a teaching practicum experience. The conferences were governed by students with minimal instructor involvement. It was…

  20. Search for an Invisibly Decaying Higgs Boson Produced via Vector Boson Fusion with ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Bassalat, Ahmed; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The recently discovered Higgs boson at a mass 125 GeV provides an excellent tool to probe beyond the Standard Model physics. Many extensions of the Standard Model predict the decay of the Higgs boson into weakly interacting or neutral particles which do not interact with the detector, that could be candidates for dark matter. Using proton-proton collision data collected by the ATLAS detector during Run 1, searches have been performed for an invisibly decaying Higgs boson in three production channels: via vector boson fusion (VBF). An upper bound of 0.28 is set on the branching fraction of H -> invisible at 95% confidence level, where the expected upper limit is 0.31. The results are interpreted in models of Higgs-portal dark matter and of supersymmetry with a compressed mass spectrum.

  1. Charged Q-balls and boson stars and dynamics of charged test particles

    CERN Document Server

    Brihaye, Yves; Hartmann, Betti

    2014-01-01

    We construct electrically charged Q-balls and boson stars in a model with a scalar self-interaction potential resulting from gauge mediated supersymmetry breaking. We discuss the properties of these solutions in detail and emphasize the differences to the uncharged case. We observe that $Q$-balls can only be constructed up to a maximal value of the charge of the scalar field, while for boson stars the interplay between the attractive gravitational force and the repulsive electromagnetic force determines their behaviour. We also study the motion of charged, massive test particles in the space-time of boson stars. We find that in contrast to charged black holes the motion of charged test particles in charged boson star space-times is planar, but that the presence of the scalar field plays a crucial r\\^ole for the qualitative features of the trajectories. Applications of this test particle motion can be made in the study of extreme-mass ratio inspirals (EMRIs) as well as astrophysical plasmas relevant e.g. in th...

  2. Novel peptide-mediated interactions derived from high-resolution 3-dimensional structures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelie Stein

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Many biological responses to intra- and extracellular stimuli are regulated through complex networks of transient protein interactions where a globular domain in one protein recognizes a linear peptide from another, creating a relatively small contact interface. These peptide stretches are often found in unstructured regions of proteins, and contain a consensus motif complementary to the interaction surface displayed by their binding partners. While most current methods for the de novo discovery of such motifs exploit their tendency to occur in disordered regions, our work here focuses on another observation: upon binding to their partner domain, motifs adopt a well-defined structure. Indeed, through the analysis of all peptide-mediated interactions of known high-resolution three-dimensional (3D structure, we found that the structure of the peptide may be as characteristic as the consensus motif, and help identify target peptides even though they do not match the established patterns. Our analyses of the structural features of known motifs reveal that they tend to have a particular stretched and elongated structure, unlike most other peptides of the same length. Accordingly, we have implemented a strategy based on a Support Vector Machine that uses this features, along with other structure-encoded information about binding interfaces, to search the set of protein interactions of known 3D structure and to identify unnoticed peptide-mediated interactions among them. We have also derived consensus patterns for these interactions, whenever enough information was available, and compared our results with established linear motif patterns and their binding domains. Finally, to cross-validate our identification strategy, we scanned interactome networks from four model organisms with our newly derived patterns to see if any of them occurred more often than expected. Indeed, we found significant over-representations for 64 domain-motif interactions, 46 of

  3. Where Is Higgs Boson?

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Quantum physicists think they know the answer. Probabilistic calculations reveal than the data provided by previous experiments has been miscalculated and that the Higgs boson has in fact been discovered. Weird! The Higgs boson is the only particle predicted by the Standard Model that hasn't been discovered yet.

  4. Med5(Nut1 and Med17(Srb4 are direct targets of mediator histone H4 tail interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongle Liu

    Full Text Available The Mediator complex transmits activation signals from DNA bound transcription factors to the core transcription machinery. In addition to its canonical role in transcriptional activation, recent studies have demonstrated that S. cerevisiae Mediator can interact directly with nucleosomes, and their histone tails. Mutations in Mediator subunits have shown that Mediator and certain chromatin structures mutually impact each other structurally and functionally in vivo. We have taken a UV photo cross-linking approach to further delineate the molecular basis of Mediator chromatin interactions and help determine whether the impact of certain Mediator mutants on chromatin is direct. Specifically, by using histone tail peptides substituted with an amino acid analog that is a UV activatible crosslinker, we have identified specific subunits within Mediator that participate in histone tail interactions. Using Mediator purified from mutant yeast strains we have evaluated the impact of these subunits on histone tail binding. This analysis has identified the Med5 subunit of Mediator as a target for histone tail interactions and suggests that the previously observed effect of med5 mutations on telomeric heterochromatin and silencing is direct.

  5. Constraints on non-Standard Model Higgs boson interactions in an effective Lagrangian using differential cross sections measured in the H → γγ decay channel at √{ s} = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgard, C. D.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calace, N.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerny, K.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chang, P.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiarelli, G.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocio, A.; Cirotto, F.; Citron, Z. H.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Cleland, W.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Colasurdo, L.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cúth, J.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davison, P.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Benedetti, A.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Deigaard, I.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Dell'Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; DeMarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Diaconu, C.; Diamond, M.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Diglio, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobos, D.; Dobre, M.; Doglioni, C.; Dohmae, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Drechsler, E.; Dris, M.; Dubreuil, E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Duflot, L.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Duschinger, D.; Dyndal, M.; Eckardt, C.; Ecker, K. M.; Edgar, R. C.; Edson, W.; Edwards, N. C.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elliot, A. A.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Endo, M.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Faucci Giannelli, M.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Feremenga, L.; Fernandez Martinez, P.; Fernandez Perez, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, A.; Fischer, C.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, W. C.; Fitzgerald, E. A.; Flaschel, N.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleischmann, S.; Fletcher, G. T.; Fletcher, G.; Fletcher, R. R. M.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Fracchia, S.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Francis, D.; Franconi, L.; Franklin, M.; Frate, M.; Fraternali, M.; Freeborn, D.; French, S. T.; Friedrich, F.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fulsom, B. G.; Fusayasu, T.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Gach, G. P.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galster, G.; Gan, K. K.; Gao, J.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Y. S.; Garay Walls, F. M.; Garberson, F.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garonne, V.; Gatti, C.; Gaudiello, A.; Gaudio, G.; Gaur, B.; Gauthier, L.; Gauzzi, P.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Ge, P.; Gecse, Z.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Geisler, M. P.; Gemme, C.; Genest, M. H.; Gentile, S.; George, M.; George, S.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gershon, A.; Ghasemi, S.; Ghazlane, H.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giangiobbe, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, S. M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gillam, T. P. S.; Gillberg, D.; Gilles, G.; Gingrich, D. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M. P.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giraud, P. F.; Giromini, P.; Giugni, D.; Giuliani, C.; Giulini, M.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gkaitatzis, S.; Gkialas, I.; Gkougkousis, E. L.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glatzer, J.; Glaysher, P. C. F.; Glazov, A.; Goblirsch-Kolb, M.; Goddard, J. R.; Godlewski, J.; Goldfarb, S.; Golling, T.; Golubkov, D.; Gomes, A.; Gonçalo, R.; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, J.; Gonella, L.; González de la Hoz, S.; Gonzalez Parra, G.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goossens, L.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Gordon, H. A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Goshaw, A. T.; Gössling, C.; Gostkin, M. I.; Goujdami, D.; Goussiou, A. G.; Govender, N.; Gozani, E.; Grabas, H. M. X.; Graber, L.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Gradin, P. O. J.; Grafström, P.; Grahn, K.-J.; Gramling, J.; Gramstad, E.; Grancagnolo, S.; Gratchev, V.; Gray, H. M.; Graziani, E.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Grefe, C.; Gregersen, K.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Griffiths, J.; Grillo, A. A.; Grimm, K.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohs, J. P.; Grohsjean, A.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Grossi, G. C.; Grout, Z. J.; Guan, L.; Guenther, J.; Guescini, F.; Guest, D.; Gueta, O.; Guido, E.; Guillemin, T.; Guindon, S.; Gul, U.; Gumpert, C.; Guo, J.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, S.; Gustavino, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutierrez Ortiz, N. G.; Gutschow, C.; Guyot, C.; Gwenlan, C.; Gwilliam, C. B.; Haas, A.; Haber, C.; Hadavand, H. K.; Haddad, N.; Haefner, P.; Hageböck, S.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Haleem, M.; Haley, J.; Hall, D.; Halladjian, G.; Hallewell, G. D.; Hamacher, K.; Hamal, P.; Hamano, K.; Hamilton, A.; Hamity, G. N.; Hamnett, P. G.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Hanawa, K.; Hance, M.; Haney, B.; Hanke, P.; Hanna, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, M. C.; Hansen, P. H.; Hara, K.; Hard, A. S.; Harenberg, T.; Hariri, F.; Harkusha, S.; Harrington, R. D.; Harrison, P. F.; Hartjes, F.; Hasegawa, M.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hasib, A.; Hassani, S.; Haug, S.; Hauser, R.; Hauswald, L.; Havranek, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Hawkings, R. J.; Hawkins, A. D.; Hayashi, T.; Hayden, D.; Hays, C. P.; Hays, J. M.; Hayward, H. S.; Haywood, S. J.; Head, S. J.; Heck, T.; Hedberg, V.; Heelan, L.; Heim, S.; Heim, T.; Heinemann, B.; Heinrich, L.; Hejbal, J.; Helary, L.; Hellman, S.; Hellmich, D.; Helsens, C.; Henderson, J.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Heng, Y.; Hengler, C.; Henkelmann, S.; Henrichs, A.; Henriques Correia, A. M.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Herbert, G. H.; Hernández Jiménez, Y.; Herrberg-Schubert, R.; Herten, G.; Hertenberger, R.; Hervas, L.; Hesketh, G. G.; Hessey, N. P.; Hetherly, J. W.; Hickling, R.; Higón-Rodriguez, E.; Hill, E.; Hill, J. C.; Hiller, K. H.; Hillier, S. J.; Hinchliffe, I.; Hines, E.; Hinman, R. R.; Hirose, M.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hobbs, J.; Hod, N.; Hodgkinson, M. C.; Hodgson, P.; Hoecker, A.; Hoeferkamp, M. R.; Hoenig, F.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hohn, D.; Holmes, T. R.; Homann, M.; Hong, T. M.; Hopkins, W. H.; Horii, Y.; Horton, A. J.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Hou, S.; Hoummada, A.; Howard, J.; Howarth, J.; Hrabovsky, M.; Hristova, I.; Hrivnac, J.; Hryn'ova, T.; Hrynevich, A.; Hsu, C.; Hsu, P. J.; Hsu, S.-C.; Hu, D.; Hu, Q.; Hu, X.; Huang, Y.; Hubacek, Z.; Hubaut, F.; Huegging, F.; Huffman, T. B.; Hughes, E. W.; Hughes, G.; Huhtinen, M.; Hülsing, T. A.; Huseynov, N.; Huston, J.; Huth, J.; Iacobucci, G.; Iakovidis, G.; Ibragimov, I.; Iconomidou-Fayard, L.; Ideal, E.; Idrissi, Z.; Iengo, P.; Igonkina, O.; Iizawa, T.; Ikegami, Y.; Ikematsu, K.; Ikeno, M.; Ilchenko, Y.; Iliadis, D.; Ilic, N.; Ince, T.; Introzzi, G.; Ioannou, P.; Iodice, M.; Iordanidou, K.; Ippolito, V.; Irles Quiles, A.; Isaksson, C.; Ishino, M.; Ishitsuka, M.; Ishmukhametov, R.; Issever, C.; Istin, S.; Iturbe Ponce, J. M.; Iuppa, R.; Ivarsson, J.; Iwanski, W.; Iwasaki, H.; Izen, J. M.; Izzo, V.; Jabbar, S.; Jackson, B.; Jackson, M.; Jackson, P.; Jaekel, M. R.; Jain, V.; Jakobs, K.; Jakobsen, S.; Jakoubek, T.; Jakubek, J.; Jamin, D. O.; Jana, D. K.; Jansen, E.; Jansky, R.; Janssen, J.; Janus, M.; Jarlskog, G.; Javadov, N.; Javůrek, T.; Jeanty, L.; Jejelava, J.; Jeng, G.-Y.; Jennens, D.; Jenni, P.; Jentzsch, J.; Jeske, C.; Jézéquel, S.; Ji, H.; Jia, J.; Jiang, Y.; Jiggins, S.; Jimenez Pena, J.; Jin, S.; Jinaru, A.; Jinnouchi, O.; Joergensen, M. D.; Johansson, P.; Johns, K. A.; Jon-And, K.; Jones, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Jones, T. J.; Jongmanns, J.; Jorge, P. M.; Joshi, K. D.; Jovicevic, J.; Ju, X.; Jung, C. A.; Jussel, P.; Juste Rozas, A.; Kaci, M.; Kaczmarska, A.; Kado, M.; Kagan, H.; Kagan, M.; Kahn, S. J.; Kajomovitz, E.; Kalderon, C. W.; Kama, S.; Kamenshchikov, A.; Kanaya, N.; Kaneti, S.; Kantserov, V. A.; Kanzaki, J.; Kaplan, B.; Kaplan, L. S.; Kapliy, A.; Kar, D.; Karakostas, K.; Karamaoun, A.; Karastathis, N.; Kareem, M. J.; Karentzos, E.; Karnevskiy, M.; Karpov, S. N.; Karpova, Z. M.; Karthik, K.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Karyukhin, A. N.; Kasahara, K.; Kashif, L.; Kass, R. D.; Kastanas, A.; Kataoka, Y.; Kato, C.; Katre, A.; Katzy, J.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kawamura, G.; Kazama, S.; Kazanin, V. F.; Keeler, R.; Kehoe, R.; Keller, J. S.; Kempster, J. J.; Keoshkerian, H.; Kepka, O.; Kerševan, B. P.; Kersten, S.; Keyes, R. A.; Khalil-zada, F.; Khandanyan, H.; Khanov, A.; Kharlamov, A. G.; Khoo, T. J.; Khovanskiy, V.; Khramov, E.; Khubua, J.; Kido, S.; Kim, H. Y.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kind, O. M.; King, B. T.; King, M.; King, S. B.; Kirk, J.; Kiryunin, A. E.; Kishimoto, T.; Kisielewska, D.; Kiss, F.; Kiuchi, K.; Kivernyk, O.; Kladiva, E.; Klein, M. H.; Klein, M.; Klein, U.; Kleinknecht, K.; Klimek, P.; Klimentov, A.; Klingenberg, R.; Klinger, J. A.; Klioutchnikova, T.; Kluge, E.-E.; Kluit, P.; Kluth, S.; Knapik, J.; Kneringer, E.; Knoops, E. B. F. G.; Knue, A.; Kobayashi, A.; Kobayashi, D.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Kocian, M.; Kodys, P.; Koffas, T.; Koffeman, E.; Kogan, L. A.; Kohlmann, S.; Kohout, Z.; Kohriki, T.; Koi, T.; Kolanoski, H.; Kolb, M.; Koletsou, I.; Komar, A. A.; Komori, Y.; Kondo, T.; Kondrashova, N.; Köneke, K.; König, A. C.; Kono, T.; Konoplich, R.; Konstantinidis, N.; Kopeliansky, R.; Koperny, S.; Köpke, L.; Kopp, A. K.; Korcyl, K.; Kordas, K.; Korn, A.; Korol, A. A.; Korolkov, I.; Korolkova, E. V.; Kortner, O.; Kortner, S.; Kosek, T.; Kostyukhin, V. V.; Kotov, V. M.; Kotwal, A.; Kourkoumeli-Charalampidi, A.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouskoura, V.; Koutsman, A.; Kowalewski, R.; Kowalski, T. Z.; Kozanecki, W.; Kozhin, A. S.; Kramarenko, V. A.; Kramberger, G.; Krasnopevtsev, D.; Krasny, M. W.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Kraus, J. K.; Kravchenko, A.; Kreiss, S.; Kretz, M.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kreutzfeldt, K.; Krieger, P.; Krizka, K.; Kroeninger, K.; Kroha, H.; Kroll, J.; Kroseberg, J.; Krstic, J.; Kruchonak, U.; Krüger, H.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, A.; Kruse, M. C.; Kruskal, M.; Kubota, T.; Kucuk, H.; Kuday, S.; Kuehn, S.; Kugel, A.; Kuger, F.; Kuhl, A.; Kuhl, T.; Kukhtin, V.; Kukla, R.; Kulchitsky, Y.; Kuleshov, S.; Kuna, M.; Kunigo, T.; Kupco, A.; Kurashige, H.; Kurochkin, Y. A.; Kus, V.; Kuwertz, E. S.; Kuze, M.; Kvita, J.; Kwan, T.; Kyriazopoulos, D.; La Rosa, A.; La Rosa Navarro, J. L.; La Rotonda, L.; Lacasta, C.; Lacava, F.; Lacey, J.; Lacker, H.; Lacour, D.; Lacuesta, V. R.; Ladygin, E.; Lafaye, R.; Laforge, B.; Lagouri, T.; Lai, S.; Lambourne, L.; Lammers, S.; Lampen, C. L.; Lampl, W.; Lançon, E.; Landgraf, U.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lang, V. S.; Lange, J. C.; Lankford, A. J.; Lanni, F.; Lantzsch, K.; Lanza, A.; Laplace, S.; Lapoire, C.; Laporte, J. F.; Lari, T.; Lasagni Manghi, F.; Lassnig, M.; Laurelli, P.; Lavrijsen, W.; Law, A. T.; Laycock, P.; Lazovich, T.; Le Dortz, O.; Le Guirriec, E.; Le Menedeu, E.; LeBlanc, M.; LeCompte, T.; Ledroit-Guillon, F.; Lee, C. A.; Lee, S. C.; Lee, L.; Lefebvre, G.; Lefebvre, M.; Legger, F.; Leggett, C.; Lehan, A.; Lehmann Miotto, G.; Lei, X.; Leight, W. A.; Leisos, A.; Leister, A. G.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitner, R.; Lellouch, D.; Lemmer, B.; Leney, K. J. C.; Lenz, T.; Lenzi, B.; Leone, R.; Leone, S.; Leonidopoulos, C.; Leontsinis, S.; Leroy, C.; Lester, C. G.; Levchenko, M.; Levêque, J.; Levin, D.; Levinson, L. J.; Levy, M.; Lewis, A.; Leyko, A. M.; Leyton, M.; Li, B.; Li, H.; Li, H. L.; Li, L.; Li, L.; Li, S.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Liang, Z.; Liao, H.; Liberti, B.; Liblong, A.; Lichard, P.; Lie, K.; Liebal, J.; Liebig, W.; Limbach, C.; Limosani, A.; Lin, S. C.; Lin, T. H.; Linde, F.; Lindquist, B. E.; Linnemann, J. T.; Lipeles, E.; Lipniacka, A.; Lisovyi, M.; Liss, T. M.; Lissauer, D.; Lister, A.; Litke, A. M.; Liu, B.; Liu, D.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, J. B.; Liu, K.; Liu, L.; Liu, M.; Liu, M.; Liu, Y.; Livan, M.; Lleres, A.; Llorente Merino, J.; Lloyd, S. L.; Lo Sterzo, F.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loch, P.; Lockman, W. S.; Loebinger, F. K.; Loevschall-Jensen, A. E.; Loew, K. M.; Loginov, A.; Lohse, T.; Lohwasser, K.; Lokajicek, M.; Long, B. A.; Long, J. D.; Long, R. E.; Looper, K. A.; Lopes, L.; Lopez Mateos, D.; Lopez Paredes, B.; Lopez Paz, I.; Lorenz, J.; Lorenzo Martinez, N.; Losada, M.; Lösel, P. J.; Lou, X.; Lounis, A.; Love, J.; Love, P. A.; Lu, N.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luci, C.; Lucotte, A.; Luehring, F.; Lukas, W.; Luminari, L.; Lundberg, O.; Lund-Jensen, B.; Lynn, D.; Lysak, R.; Lytken, E.; Ma, H.; Ma, L. L.; Maccarrone, G.; Macchiolo, A.; Macdonald, C. M.; Maček, B.; Machado Miguens, J.; Macina, D.; Madaffari, D.; Madar, R.; Maddocks, H. J.; Mader, W. F.; Madsen, A.; Maeda, J.; Maeland, S.; Maeno, T.; Maevskiy, A.; Magradze, E.; Mahboubi, K.; Mahlstedt, J.; Maiani, C.; Maidantchik, C.; Maier, A. A.; Maier, T.; Maio, A.; Majewski, S.; Makida, Y.; Makovec, N.; Malaescu, B.; Malecki, Pa.; Maleev, V. P.; Malek, F.; Mallik, U.; Malon, D.; Malone, C.; Maltezos, S.; Malyshev, V. M.; Malyukov, S.; Mamuzic, J.; Mancini, G.; Mandelli, B.; Mandelli, L.; Mandić, I.; Mandrysch, R.; Maneira, J.; Manfredini, A.; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, L.; Manjarres Ramos, J.; Mann, A.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Mansoulie, B.; Mantifel, R.; Mantoani, M.; Mapelli, L.; March, L.; Marchiori, G.; Marcisovsky, M.; Marino, C. P.; Marjanovic, M.; Marley, D. E.; Marroquim, F.; Marsden, S. P.; Marshall, Z.; Marti, L. F.; Marti-Garcia, S.; Martin, B.; Martin, T. A.; Martin, V. J.; Martin dit Latour, B.; Martinez, M.; Martin-Haugh, S.; Martoiu, V. S.; Martyniuk, A. C.; Marx, M.; Marzano, F.; Marzin, A.; Masetti, L.; Mashimo, T.; Mashinistov, R.; Masik, J.; Maslennikov, A. L.; Massa, I.; Massa, L.; Mastrandrea, P.; Mastroberardino, A.; Masubuchi, T.; Mättig, P.; Mattmann, J.; Maurer, J.; Maxfield, S. J.; Maximov, D. A.; Mazini, R.; Mazza, S. M.; Mazzaferro, L.; Mc Goldrick, G.; Mc Kee, S. P.; McCarn, A.; McCarthy, R. L.; McCarthy, T. G.; McCubbin, N. A.; McFarlane, K. W.; Mcfayden, J. A.; Mchedlidze, G.; McMahon, S. J.; McPherson, R. A.; Medinnis, M.; Meehan, S.; Mehlhase, S.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meineck, C.; Meirose, B.; Mellado Garcia, B. R.; Meloni, F.; Mengarelli, A.; Menke, S.; Meoni, E.; Mercurio, K. M.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Mermod, P.; Merola, L.; Meroni, C.; Merritt, F. S.; Messina, A.; Metcalfe, J.; Mete, A. S.; Meyer, C.; Meyer, C.; Meyer, J.-P.; Meyer, J.; Meyer Zu Theenhausen, H.; Middleton, R. P.; Miglioranzi, S.; Mijović, L.; Mikenberg, G.; Mikestikova, M.; Mikuž, M.; Milesi, M.; Milic, A.; Miller, D. W.; Mills, C.; Milov, A.; Milstead, D. A.; Minaenko, A. A.; Minami, Y.; Minashvili, I. A.; Mincer, A. I.; Mindur, B.; Mineev, M.; Ming, Y.; Mir, L. M.; Mistry, K. P.; Mitani, T.; Mitrevski, J.; Mitsou, V. A.; Miucci, A.; Miyagawa, P. S.; Mjörnmark, J. U.; Moa, T.; Mochizuki, K.; Mohapatra, S.; Mohr, W.; Molander, S.; Moles-Valls, R.; Monden, R.; Mönig, K.; Monini, C.; Monk, J.; Monnier, E.; Montejo Berlingen, J.; Monticelli, F.; Monzani, S.; Moore, R. W.; Morange, N.; Moreno, D.; Moreno Llácer, M.; Morettini, P.; Mori, D.; Mori, T.; Morii, M.; Morinaga, M.; Morisbak, V.; Moritz, S.; Morley, A. K.; Mornacchi, G.; Morris, J. D.; Mortensen, S. S.; Morton, A.; Morvaj, L.; Mosidze, M.; Moss, J.; Motohashi, K.; Mount, R.; Mountricha, E.; Mouraviev, S. V.; Moyse, E. J. W.; Muanza, S.; Mudd, R. D.; Mueller, F.; Mueller, J.; Mueller, R. S. P.; Mueller, T.; Muenstermann, D.; Mullen, P.; Mullier, G. A.; Murillo Quijada, J. A.; Murray, W. J.; Musheghyan, H.; Musto, E.; Myagkov, A. G.; Myska, M.; Nachman, B. P.; Nackenhorst, O.; Nadal, J.; Nagai, K.; Nagai, R.; Nagai, Y.; Nagano, K.; Nagarkar, A.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nagata, K.; Nagel, M.; Nagy, E.; Nairz, A. M.; Nakahama, Y.; Nakamura, K.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, I.; Namasivayam, H.; Naranjo Garcia, R. F.; Narayan, R.; Narrias Villar, D. I.; Naumann, T.; Navarro, G.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Nechaeva, P. Yu.; Neep, T. J.; Nef, P. D.; Negri, A.; Negrini, M.; Nektarijevic, S.; Nellist, C.; Nelson, A.; Nemecek, S.; Nemethy, P.; Nepomuceno, A. A.; Nessi, M.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neumann, M.; Neves, R. M.; Nevski, P.; Newman, P. R.; Nguyen, D. H.; Nickerson, R. B.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nicquevert, B.; Nielsen, J.; Nikiforou, N.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikolaenko, V.; Nikolic-Audit, I.; Nikolopoulos, K.; Nilsen, J. K.; Nilsson, P.; Ninomiya, Y.; Nisati, A.; Nisius, R.; Nobe, T.; Nomachi, M.; Nomidis, I.; Nooney, T.; Norberg, S.; Nordberg, M.; Novgorodova, O.; Nowak, S.; Nozaki, M.; Nozka, L.; Ntekas, K.; Nunes Hanninger, G.; Nunnemann, T.; Nurse, E.; Nuti, F.; O'Brien, B. J.; O'grady, F.; O'Neil, D. C.; O'Shea, V.; Oakham, F. G.; Oberlack, H.; Obermann, T.; Ocariz, J.; Ochi, A.; Ochoa, I.; Ochoa-Ricoux, J. P.; Oda, S.; Odaka, S.; Ogren, H.; Oh, A.; Oh, S. H.; Ohm, C. C.; Ohman, H.; Oide, H.; Okamura, W.; Okawa, H.; Okumura, Y.; Okuyama, T.; Olariu, A.; Olivares Pino, S. A.; Oliveira Damazio, D.; Oliver Garcia, E.; Olszewski, A.; Olszowska, J.; Onofre, A.; Onogi, K.; Onyisi, P. U. E.; Oram, C. J.; Oreglia, M. J.; Oren, Y.; Orestano, D.; Orlando, N.; Oropeza Barrera, C.; Orr, R. S.; Osculati, B.; Ospanov, R.; Otero y Garzon, G.; Otono, H.; Ouchrif, M.; Ould-Saada, F.; Ouraou, A.; Oussoren, K. P.; Ouyang, Q.; Ovcharova, A.; Owen, M.; Owen, R. E.; Ozcan, V. E.; Ozturk, N.; Pachal, K.; Pacheco Pages, A.; Padilla Aranda, C.; Pagáčová, M.; Pagan Griso, S.; Paganis, E.; Paige, F.; Pais, P.; Pajchel, K.; Palacino, G.; Palestini, S.; Palka, M.; Pallin, D.; Palma, A.; Pan, Y. B.; Panagiotopoulou, E.; Pandini, C. E.; Panduro Vazquez, J. G.; Pani, P.; Panitkin, S.; Pantea, D.; Paolozzi, L.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Papageorgiou, K.; Paramonov, A.; Paredes Hernandez, D.; Parker, M. A.; Parker, K. A.; Parodi, F.; Parsons, J. A.; Parzefall, U.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passaggio, S.; Pastore, F.; Pastore, Fr.; Pásztor, G.; Pataraia, S.; Patel, N. D.; Pater, J. R.; Pauly, T.; Pearce, J.; Pearson, B.; Pedersen, L. E.; Pedersen, M.; Pedraza Lopez, S.; Pedro, R.; Peleganchuk, S. V.; Pelikan, D.; Penc, O.; Peng, C.; Peng, H.; Penning, B.; Penwell, J.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perez Codina, E.; Pérez García-Estañ, M. T.; Perini, L.; Pernegger, H.; Perrella, S.; Peschke, R.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Peters, K.; Peters, R. F. Y.; Petersen, B. A.; Petersen, T. C.; Petit, E.; Petridis, A.; Petridou, C.; Petroff, P.; Petrolo, E.; Petrucci, F.; Pettersson, N. E.; Pezoa, R.; Phillips, P. W.; Piacquadio, G.; Pianori, E.; Picazio, A.; Piccaro, E.; Piccinini, M.; Pickering, M. A.; Piegaia, R.; Pignotti, D. T.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pilkington, A. D.; Pina, J.; Pinamonti, M.; Pinfold, J. L.; Pingel, A.; Pires, S.; Pirumov, H.; Pitt, M.; Pizio, C.; Plazak, L.; Pleier, M.-A.; Pleskot, V.; Plotnikova, E.; Plucinski, P.; Pluth, D.; Poettgen, R.; Poggioli, L.; Pohl, D.; Polesello, G.; Poley, A.; Policicchio, A.; Polifka, R.; Polini, A.; Pollard, C. S.; Polychronakos, V.; Pommès, K.; Pontecorvo, L.; Pope, B. G.; Popeneciu, G. A.; Popovic, D. S.; Poppleton, A.; Pospisil, S.; Potamianos, K.; Potrap, I. N.; Potter, C. J.; Potter, C. T.; Poulard, G.; Poveda, J.; Pozdnyakov, V.; Pralavorio, P.; Pranko, A.; Prasad, S.; Prell, S.; Price, D.; Price, L. E.; Primavera, M.; Prince, S.; Proissl, M.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopapadaki, E.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Przybycien, M.; Ptacek, E.; Puddu, D.; Pueschel, E.; Puldon, D.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Qian, J.; Qin, G.; Qin, Y.; Quadt, A.; Quarrie, D. R.; Quayle, W. B.; Queitsch-Maitland, M.; Quilty, D.; Raddum, S.; Radeka, V.; Radescu, V.; Radhakrishnan, S. K.; Radloff, P.; Rados, P.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rammensee, M.; Rangel-Smith, C.; Rauscher, F.; Rave, S.; Ravenscroft, T.; Raymond, M.; Read, A. L.; Readioff, N. P.; Rebuzzi, D. M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reeves, K.; Rehnisch, L.; Reichert, J.; Reisin, H.; Rembser, C.; Ren, H.; Renaud, A.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Rezanova, O. L.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richter, R.; Richter, S.; Richter-Was, E.; Ricken, O.; Ridel, M.; Rieck, P.; Riegel, C. J.; Rieger, J.; Rifki, O.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rinaldi, L.; Ristić, B.; Ritsch, E.; Riu, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J. E. M.; Robson, A.; Roda, C.; Roe, S.; Røhne, O.; Rolli, S.; Romaniouk, A.; Romano, M.; Romano Saez, S. M.; Romero Adam, E.; Rompotis, N.; Ronzani, M.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosbach, K.; Rose, P.; Rosendahl, P. L.; Rosenthal, O.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, E.; Rossi, L. P.; Rosten, J. H. N.; Rosten, R.; Rotaru, M.; Roth, I.; Rothberg, J.; Rousseau, D.; Royon, C. R.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Rubbo, F.; Rubinskiy, I.; Rud, V. I.; Rudolph, C.; Rudolph, M. S.; Rühr, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Ruschke, A.; Russell, H. L.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruthmann, N.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Rybar, M.; Rybkin, G.; Ryder, N. C.; Saavedra, A. F.; Sabato, G.; Sacerdoti, S.; Saddique, A.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Sahinsoy, M.; Saimpert, M.; Saito, T.; Sakamoto, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Salazar Loyola, J. E.; Saleem, M.; Salek, D.; Sales De Bruin, P. H.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sammel, D.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sanchez, A.; Sánchez, J.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Sandaker, H.; Sandbach, R. L.; Sander, H. G.; Sanders, M. P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, C.; Sandstroem, R.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sannino, M.; Sansoni, A.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Santoyo Castillo, I.; Sapp, K.; Sapronov, A.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarrazin, B.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, Y.; Sato, K.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Savage, G.; Savard, P.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scanlon, T.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Scarfone, V.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schaefer, D.; Schaefer, R.; Schaeffer, J.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Schiavi, C.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnellbach, Y. J.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schopf, E.; Schorlemmer, A. L. S.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schramm, S.; Schreyer, M.; Schroeder, C.; Schuh, N.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwarz, T. A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schweiger, H.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Sciacca, F. G.; Scifo, E.; Sciolla, G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Seema, P.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekhon, K.; Sekula, S. J.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Serre, T.; Sessa, M.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shaw, S. M.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoaleh Saadi, D.; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Shushkevich, S.; Sicho, P.; Sidebo, P. E.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sioli, M.; Siragusa, G.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinner, M. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smith, R. W.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Sokhrannyi, G.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Song, H. Y.; Soni, N.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, B.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sosebee, M.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Sowden, B. C.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spangenberg, M.; Spanò, F.; Spearman, W. R.; Sperlich, D.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stabile, A.; Staerz, S.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Svatos, M.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, P. T. E.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Temple, D.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thun, R. P.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todome, K.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yao, W.-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, Q.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2016-02-01

    The strength and tensor structure of the Higgs boson's interactions are investigated using an effective Lagrangian, which introduces additional CP-even and CP-odd interactions that lead to changes in the kinematic properties of the Higgs boson and associated jet spectra with respect to the Standard Model. The parameters of the effective Lagrangian are probed using a fit to five differential cross sections previously measured by the ATLAS experiment in the H → γγ decay channel with an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb-1 at √{ s} = 8 TeV. In order to perform a simultaneous fit to the five distributions, the statistical correlations between them are determined by re-analysing the H → γγ candidate events in the proton-proton collision data. No significant deviations from the Standard Model predictions are observed and limits on the effective Lagrangian parameters are derived. The statistical correlations are made publicly available to allow for future analysis of theories with non-Standard Model interactions.

  6. Constraints on non-Standard Model Higgs boson interactions in an effective Lagrangian using differential cross sections measured in the H→γγ decay channel at s=8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Aad

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The strength and tensor structure of the Higgs boson's interactions are investigated using an effective Lagrangian, which introduces additional CP-even and CP-odd interactions that lead to changes in the kinematic properties of the Higgs boson and associated jet spectra with respect to the Standard Model. The parameters of the effective Lagrangian are probed using a fit to five differential cross sections previously measured by the ATLAS experiment in the H→γγ decay channel with an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb−1 at s=8 TeV. In order to perform a simultaneous fit to the five distributions, the statistical correlations between them are determined by re-analysing the H→γγ candidate events in the proton–proton collision data. No significant deviations from the Standard Model predictions are observed and limits on the effective Lagrangian parameters are derived. The statistical correlations are made publicly available to allow for future analysis of theories with non-Standard Model interactions.

  7. Partition function of a chiral boson on a 2-torus from the Floreanini–Jackiw Lagrangian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We revisit the problem of quantizing a chiral boson on a torus. The conventional approach is to extract the partition function of a chiral boson from the path integral of a non-chiral boson. Instead we compute it directly from the chiral boson Lagrangian of Floreanini and Jackiw modified by topological terms involving an auxiliary field. A careful analysis of the gauge-fixing condition for the extra gauge symmetry reproduces the correct results for the free chiral boson, and has the advantage of being applicable to a wider class of interacting chiral boson theories

  8. Invisibly decaying Higgs boson at e+e- collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In many extensions of the standard model the Higgs boson can have substantial ''invisible'' decay modes, for example, into light or massless weakly interacting Goldstone bosons associated to the spontaneous violation of lepton number below the weak scale. In this work, we first review the model independent limits on the Higgs boson from the analysis of the present LEP samples after including the possibility of invisible decays and study the prospects for LEP II. Next, we study the detectability prospects for such invisible Higgs boson at the Next Linear Collider. (orig.)

  9. Invisible Higgs bosons at present and future colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In many extensions of the standard model the Higgs boson can have substantial invisible decay modes, for example, into light or massless weakly interacting Goldstone bosons associated to the spontaneous violation of lepton number below the weak scale. In this work, we first report on the model independent limits on the Higgs boson from the analysis of the present LEP samples after including the possibility of invisible decays and study the prospects for LEP II. Next, we review the detectability prospects for such invisible Higgs boson at the Next Linear Collider. ((orig.))

  10. The Higgs boson

    CERN Document Server

    Pimenta, Jean Jûnio Mendes; Natti, Érica Regina Takano; Natti, Paulo Laerte

    2013-01-01

    The Higgs boson was predicted in 1964 by British physicist Peter Higgs. The Higgs is the key to explain the origin of the mass of other elementary particles of Nature. However, only with the coming into operation of the LHC, in 2008, there were technological conditions to search for the Higgs boson. Recently, a major international effort conducted at CERN, by means of ATLAS and CMS experiments, has enabled the observation of a new bosonic particle in the region of 125 GeVs. In this paper, by means of known mechanisms of symmetry breaking that occur in the BCS theory of superconductivity and in the theory of nuclear pairing, we discuss the Higgs mechanism in the Standard Model. Finally, we present the current state of research looking for the Higgs boson and the alternative theories and extensions of the Standard Model for the elementary particle physics. Keywords: Higgs boson, BCS theory, nuclear pairing, Higgs mechanism, Standard Model.

  11. Bosonic Partition Functions

    CERN Document Server

    Kellerstein, M; Verbaarschot, J J M

    2016-01-01

    The behavior of quenched Dirac spectra of two-dimensional lattice QCD is consistent with spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking which is forbidden according to the Coleman-Mermin-Wagner theorem. One possible resolution of this paradox is that, because of the bosonic determinant in the partially quenched partition function, the conditions of this theorem are violated allowing for spontaneous symmetry breaking in two dimensions or less. This goes back to work by Niedermaier and Seiler on nonamenable symmetries of the hyperbolic spin chain and earlier work by two of the auhtors on bosonic partition functions at nonzero chemical potential. In this talk we discuss chiral symmetry breaking for the bosonic partition function of QCD at nonzero isospin chemical potential and a bosonic random matrix theory at imaginary chemical potential and compare the results with the fermionic counterpart. In both cases the chiral symmetry group of the bosonic partition function is noncompact.

  12. IBM: parameter symmetry, hidden symmetries and transformations of boson operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A symmetry of the parameter space of interacting boson models IBM-1 and IBM-2 is studied. The symmetry is associated with linear canonical transformations of boson operators, or, equivalently, with the existence of different realizations of the symmetry algebras of the models. The relevance of the parameter symmetry to physical observables is discussed. (Author)

  13. Oxidative modification of caspase-9 facilitates its activation via disulfide-mediated interaction with Apaf-1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Zuo; Binggang Xiang; Jie Yang; Xuxu Sun; Yumei Wang; Hui Cang; Jing Yi

    2009-01-01

    Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) are known to regulate apoptosis. Activation of caspase-9, the initial caspase in the mitochondrial apoptotic cascade, is closely associated with ROS, but it is unclear whether ROS regulate caspase-9 via direct oxidative modification. The present study aims to elucidate the molecular mechanisms by which ROS mediate caspase-9 activation. Our results show that the cellular oxidative state facilitates caspase-9 activation. Hydrogen peroxide treatment causes the activation of caspase-9 and apoptosis, and promotes an interaction between caspase-9 and apoptotic protease-activating factor 1 (Apaf-1) via disulfide formation. In addition, in an in vitro mitochondria-free system, the thiol-oxidant diamide promotes auto-cleavage of caspase-9 and the caspase-9/ Apaf-1 interaction by facilitating the formation of disulfide-linked complexes. Finally, a point mutation at C403 of caspase-9 impairs both H202-promoted caspase-9 activation and interaction with Apaf-1 through the abolition of disulfide formation. The association between cytochrome c and the C403S mutant is significantly weaker than that between cytochrome c and wild-type caspase-9, indicating that oxidative modification of caspase-9 contributes to apoptosome formation under oxidative stress. Taken together, oxidative modification of caspase-9 by ROS can mediate its interaction with Apaf-1, and can thus promote its auto-cleavage and activation. This mechanism may facilitate apoptosome formation and caspase-9 activation under oxidative stress.

  14. Search for Neutral Higgs Bosons of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model in $e^{+}e^{-}$ Interactions at $\\sqrt{s}$ up to 209 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Bajo, A; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldew, S V; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Bartalini, P; Basile, M; Batalova, N; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Bellucci, L; Berbeco, R; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Biasini, M; Biglietti, M; Biland, A; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bottai, S; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brochu, F; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada, M; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chiefari, G; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coignet, G; Colino, N; Costantini, S; de la Cruz, B; Cucciarelli, S; van Dalen, J A; De Asmundis, R; Déglon, P L; Debreczeni, J; Degré, A; Dehmelt, K; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Delmeire, E; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; De Salvo, A; Diemoz, M; Dierckxsens, M; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Echenard, B; Eline, A; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Ewers, A; Extermann, Pierre; Falagán, M A; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Ferguson, T; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisher, W; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gataullin, M; Gentile, S; Giagu, S; Gong, Z F; Grenier, G; Grimm, O; Grünewald, M W; Guida, M; van Gulik, R; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Hakobyan, R S; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Hirschfelder, J; Hofer, H; Hohlmann, M; Holzner, G; Hou, S R; Hu, Y; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Käfer, D; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, J K; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopal, M; Koutsenko, V F; Kräber, M H; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Krüger, A; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Levtchenko, M; Levchenko, P M; Li, C; Likhoded, S A; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mans, J; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Mazumdar, K; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Mihul, A; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Mohanty, G B; Muanza, G S; Muijs, A J M; Musicar, B; Musy, M; Nagy, S; Natale, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Ofierzynski, R A; Organtini, G; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paolucci, P; Paramatti, R; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Pedace, M; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Piccolo, D; Pierella, F; Pioppi, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Pothier, J; Prokofiev, D O; Prokofev, D; Quartieri, J; Rahal-Callot, G; Rahaman, M A; Raics, P; Raja, N; Ramelli, R; Rancoita, P G; Ranieri, R; Raspereza, A V; Razis, P A; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosca, A; Rosier-Lees, S; Roth, S; Rosenbleck, C; Roux, B; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruggiero, G; Rykaczewski, H; Sakharov, A; Saremi, S; Sarkar, S; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Souga, C; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Sushkov, S V; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Szillási, Z; Tang, X W; Tarjan, P; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Tellili, B; Teyssier, D; Timmermans, C; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tung, K L; Ulbricht, J; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vásquez, R P; Veszpremi, V; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Vicinanza, D; Viertel, Gert M; Villa, S; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Vodopyanov, I; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, M; Wienemann, P; Wilkens, H; Wynhoff, S; Xia, L; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, J; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yang, H J; Yang, M; Yeh, S C; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, J; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zhuang, H L; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, B; Zöller, M

    2002-01-01

    A search for the lightest neutral CP-even and neutral CP-odd Higgs bosons of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model is performed using 216.6 pb-1 of data collected with the L3 detector at LEP at centre-of-mass energies between 203 and 209 GeV. No indication of a signal is found. Including our results from lower centre-of-mass energies, lower limits on the Higgs boson masses are set as a function of tan(beta) for several scenarios. For tan(beta) greater than 0.7 they are mh > 84.5 GeV and mA > 86.3 GeV at 95% confidence level.

  15. Search for neutral higgs bosons of the minimal supersymmetric standard model in $e^{+}e^{-}$ Interactions at $\\sqrt{s}= 189$ GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Adriani, O; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Balandras, A; Ball, R C; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Bellucci, L; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brochu, F; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Button, A M; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chéreau, X J; Chiefari, G; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; Cozzoni, B; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Cucciarelli, S; Dai, T S; van Dalen, J A; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Déglon, P L; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; De Salvo, A; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Dufournaud, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falagán, M A; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gataullin, M; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Gong, Z F; Grenier, G; Grimm, O; Grünewald, M W; Guida, M; van Gulik, R; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Hidas, P; Hirschfelder, J; Hofer, H; Holzner, G; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Iashvili, I; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, D H; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Koutsenko, V F; Kräber, M H; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Lee, H J; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Lugnier, L; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Marchesini, P A; Marian, G; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; Mazumdar, K; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mihul, A; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Mohanty, G B; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Musy, M; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Oh, Yu D; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Oulianov, A; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Paramatti, R; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pedace, M; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Piccolo, D; Pierella, F; Pieri, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Pothier, J; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Quartieri, J; Rahal-Callot, G; Rahaman, M A; Raics, P; Raja, N; Ramelli, R; Rancoita, P G; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosca, A; Rosier-Lees, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Saremi, S; Sarkar, S; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Seganti, A; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, A; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Szillási, Z; Sztaricskai, T; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Timmermans, C; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Valente, E; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Vicinanza, D; Viertel, Gert M; Villa, S; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Vodopyanov, I; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, M; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Weber, M; Wienemann, P; Wilkens, H; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xia, L; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yang, H J; Yang, M; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zhang, Z P; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, A; Ziegler, F; Zilizi, G; Zöller, M

    1999-01-01

    A search for the lightest neutral scalar and neutral pseudoscalar Higgs bosons in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model is performed using 176.4 pb$^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity collected by L3 at a center-of-mass energy of 189 GeV. No signal is observed, and the data are consistent with the expected Standard Model background. Lower limits on the masses of the lightest neutral scalar and pseudoscalar Higgs bosons are given as a function of $\\tan\\beta$. Lower mass limits for $\\tan\\beta > 1$ are set at the 95\\% confidence level to be $m_{\\rm h} > 77.1$ GeV and $m_{\\rm A} > 77.1$ GeV.

  16. RNF43 interacts with NEDL1 and regulates p53-mediated transcription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → RNF43 binds to NEDD-4-like ubiquitin-protein ligase-1 (NEDL1). → RNF43 interacts with p53 and suppresses transcriptional activity of p53. → RNF43 attenuates apoptosis induced by ultraviolet irradiation. → RNF43 is likely associated with p53-mediated apoptosis in collaboration with NEDL1 in colorectal carcinogenesis. -- Abstract: The ubiquitin-proteasomal system plays a crucial role in oncogenesis in colorectal tissues. Recent studies have shown that stability of β-catenin, which functions as an oncogene for colorectal cancer, is regulated by ubiquitin-mediated degradation. It has been reported that a putative E3 ubiquitin ligase, RNF43, is highly expressed in human colorectal carcinoma and that RNF43 promotes cell growth. However, the involvement of RNF43 in carcinogenesis has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we found by using yeast two-hybrid screening that RNF43 binds to NEDD-4-like ubiquitin-protein ligase-1 (NEDL1), which enhances pro-apoptotic activity by p53. In addition, we found that RNF43 also interacts with p53 and that RNF43 suppresses transcriptional activity of p53 in H1299 cells and attenuates apoptosis induced by ultraviolet irradiation. These findings suggest that RNF43 is associated with p53-mediated apoptosis in collaboration with NEDL1 in colorectal carcinogenesis.

  17. Constraining Flavor Changing Interactions from LHC Run-2 Dilepton Bounds with Vector Mediators

    CERN Document Server

    Queiroz, Farinaldo S; Valle, José W F

    2016-01-01

    Within the context of vector mediators, is a new signal observed in flavor changing interactions, particularly in the neutral mesons systems $K^{0}-\\bar{K}^{0}$, $D^{0}-\\bar{D}^{0}$ and $B^0-\\bar{B^0}$, consistent with dilepton resonance searches at the LHC? In the attempt to address this very simple question, we discuss the complementarity between flavor changing neutral current (FCNC) and dilepton resonance searches at the LHC run 2 at $13$TeV with $3.2\\, {\\rm fb^{-1}}$ of integrated luminosity, in the context of vector mediators at tree level. Vector mediators, are often studied in the flavor changing framework, specially in the light of the recent LHCb anomaly observed at the rare B decay. However, the existence of stringent dilepton bound severely constrains flavor changing interactions, due to restrictive limits on the $Z^{\\prime}$ mass. We discuss this interplay explicitly in the well motivated framework of a 3-3-1 scheme, where fermions and scalars are arranged in the fundamental representation of the...

  18. Collider Signatures of Goldstone Bosons

    CERN Document Server

    Cheung, Kingman; Yuan, Tzu-Chiang

    2014-01-01

    Recently Weinberg suggested that Goldstone bosons arising from the spontaneous breakdown of some global hidden symmetries can interact weakly in the early Universe and account for a fraction of the effective number of neutrino species N_{eff}, which has been reported persistently 2\\sigma away from its expected value of three. In this work, we study in some details a number of experimental constraints on this interesting idea based on the simplest possibility of a global U(1), as studied by Weinberg. We work out the decay branching ratios of the associated light scalar field \\sigma and suggest a possible collider signature at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). In some corners of the parameter space, the scalar field \\sigma can decay into a pair of pions with a branching ratio of order 10% while the rest is mostly a pair of Goldstone bosons. The collider signature would be gluon fusion into the standard model Higgs boson gg -> H followed by H -> \\sigma \\sigma -> (\\pi\\pi) (\\alpha\\alpha) where \\alpha is the Goldsto...

  19. Inductive interactions mediated by interplay of asymmetric signalling underlie development of adult haematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souilhol, Céline; Gonneau, Christèle; Lendinez, Javier G; Batsivari, Antoniana; Rybtsov, Stanislav; Wilson, Heather; Morgado-Palacin, Lucia; Hills, David; Taoudi, Samir; Antonchuk, Jennifer; Zhao, Suling; Medvinsky, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    During embryonic development, adult haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) emerge preferentially in the ventral domain of the aorta in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region. Several signalling pathways such as Notch, Wnt, Shh and RA are implicated in this process, yet how these interact to regulate the emergence of HSCs has not previously been described in mammals. Using a combination of ex vivo and in vivo approaches, we report here that stage-specific reciprocal dorso-ventral inductive interactions and lateral input from the urogenital ridges are required to drive HSC development in the aorta. Our study strongly suggests that these inductive interactions in the AGM region are mediated by the interplay between spatially polarized signalling pathways. Specifically, Shh produced in the dorsal region of the AGM, stem cell factor in the ventral and lateral regions, and BMP inhibitory signals in the ventral tissue are integral parts of the regulatory system involved in the development of HSCs. PMID:26952187

  20. Syndecan-4, a PRRSV attachment factor, mediates PRRSV entry through its interaction with EGFR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Wang, Xin; Ni, Bo; Huan, Chang-Chao; Wu, Jia-Qiang; Wen, Li-Bin; Liao, Ying; Tong, Guang-Zhi; Ding, Chan; Fan, Hong-Jie; Mao, Xiang

    2016-06-24

    The causative agent of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome is the PRRS virus (PRRSV), an enveloped, single-stranded and positive-sense RNA virus. The host factors and mechanisms that are involved in PRRSV entry are still largely unknown. In our present studies, we found that syndecan-4, one of the heparan sulfate proteoglycans, plays a critical role in PRRSV entry, especially in PRRSV attachment. Moreover, EGFR interacts with syndecan-4 in MACR-145 cells and disruption of their interaction impaired PRRSV entry. Furthermore, EGFR inhibitor AG1478 or syndecan-4 derived peptide SSTN87-131 inhibited syndecan-4 endocytosis induced by PRRSV entry. Altogether, syndecan-4, a PRRSV attachment factor, mediated PRRSV entry by interacting with EGFR. PMID:27208778

  1. Combined modeling of cell aggregation and adhesion mediated by receptor–ligand interactions under shear flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Du

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Blood cell aggregation and adhesion to endothelial cells under shear flow are crucial to many biological processes such as thrombi formation, inflammatory cascade, and tumor metastasis, in which these cellular interactions are mainly mediated by the underlying receptor–ligand bindings. While theoretical modeling of aggregation dynamics and adhesion kinetics of interacting cells have been well studied separately, how to couple these two processes remains unclear. Here we develop a combined model that couples cellular aggregation dynamics and adhesion kinetics under shear flow. The impacts of shear rate (or shear stress and molecular binding affinity were elucidated. This study provides a unified model where the action of a fluid flow drives cell aggregation and adhesion under the modulations of the mechanical shear flow and receptor–ligand interaction kinetics. It offers an insight into understanding the relevant biological processes and functions.

  2. Phonon-mediated interactions and polaron formation of slow-light polaritons in a BEC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haug, Hanna-Lena; Fleischhauer, Michael

    2014-05-01

    We study the motion of dark-state polaritons (DSP) in a Bose-Einstein condensate. DSPs are formed in an atomic ensemble interacting in a Λ-type configuration with two light fields under conditions of electromagnetically induced transparency. In particular, we consider the ground-state atoms to form a BEC which can be well described by a macroscopic Gross-Pitaevskii wavefunction. Taking into account the interaction of pairs of ground-state atoms and between ground and spin-state atoms leads to the formation of polaronic quasi-particles consisting of DSPs and Bogoliubov phonons. In additon, the coupling to phonons results into a coupling between dark and bright-state polaritons as well as into phonon-mediated interactions between DSPs.

  3. On the role of noncovalent interactions in electrocatalysis. Two cases of mediated reductive dehalogenation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Noncovalent forces explain the electrocatalytic effects. • Transient {MoI-Oalkoxide}·−⋯HCCl3 with exceptionally strong C-H⋯O H-bonding. • Halogen bond and dispersive interactions in HBCD-porphyrin adduct enhance electron transfer. • Effects of van der Waals interactions on the structure and energetics. -- Abstract: Two cases of mediated electron transfer are presented: chloroform reduction catalysed by MoII/I alkoxy scorpionates and debromination of hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) in the presence of free-base tetraphenylporphyrin (H2TPP). Although H2TPP should act as a typical outer-sphere mediator, it is not active towards analogous dehalogenation of 1,2-dibromocyclododecane. The observed phenomena can be rationalised by considering the catalytically relevant transient adducts formed owing to noncovalent interactions (C-H hydrogen bonds and dispersive C-halogen⋯π interactions or directional halogen bonding), which warrants the close and prolonged contact between the catalyst and its substrate, thus increases the probability of electron transfer, and decisively accelerates the reaction. Crucial for this action is thermodynamic stability of the adducts, which can only be explained if dispersive van der Waals interactions are properly accounted for, e.g., as by dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D) calculations. The structures involving strong and anisotropic interactions, like the surprisingly short C-H⋯Oalkoxide H-bonding in the MoI–chloroform adduct, may be reasonably well described by standard DFT calculations and the energy needs only be corrected for dispersion without the need for structure re-optimisation at the DFT-D level. The latter is, however, a method of choice for the prediction of supramolecular structures chiefly controlled by weak non-directional van der Waals forces

  4. Constraints on non-Standard Model Higgs boson interactions in an effective Lagrangian using differential cross sections measured in the $H \\rightarrow \\gamma\\gamma$ decay channel at $\\sqrt{s} = 8$ TeV with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Affolder, Tony; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Agricola, Johannes; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Alkire, Steven Patrick; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Άlvarez Piqueras, Damián; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amadio, Brian Thomas; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anders, John Kenneth; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, Bradley; Ayoub, Mohamad Kassem; Azuelos, Georges; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Baca, Matthew John; Bacci, Cesare; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baldin, Evgenii; Balek, Petr; Balestri, Thomas; Balli, Fabrice; Balunas, William Keaton; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Basalaev, Artem; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batista, Santiago Juan; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Bauce, Matteo; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beacham, James Baker; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Kathrin; Becker, Maurice; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Janna Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bender, Michael; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Beresford, Lydia; Beretta, Matteo; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Beringer, Jürg; Bernard, Clare; Bernard, Nathan Rogers; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bevan, Adrian John; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Biedermann, Dustin; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biondi, Silvia; Bjergaard, David Martin; Black, Curtis; Black, James; Black, Kevin; Blackburn, Daniel; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blanco, Jacobo Ezequiel; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Bock, Christopher; Boehler, Michael; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogavac, Danijela; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bohm, Christian; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Boldyrev, Alexey; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borroni, Sara; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bortolotto, Valerio; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouffard, Julian; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boutle, Sarah Kate; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bozic, Ivan; Bracinik, Juraj; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Brazzale, Simone Federico; Breaden Madden, William Dmitri; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brennan, Amelia Jean; Brenner, Lydia; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Bristow, Kieran; Bristow, Timothy Michael; Britton, Dave; Britzger, Daniel; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Bronner, Johanna; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brosamer, Jacquelyn; Brost, Elizabeth; Brown, Jonathan; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Bruscino, Nello; Bryngemark, Lene; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Buchholz, Peter; Buckley, Andrew; Buda, Stelian Ioan; Budagov, Ioulian; Buehrer, Felix; Bugge, Lars; Bugge, Magnar Kopangen; Bulekov, Oleg; Bullock, Daniel; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burgard, Carsten Daniel; Burghgrave, Blake; Burke, Stephen; Burmeister, Ingo; Busato, Emmanuel; Büscher, Daniel; Büscher, Volker; Bussey, Peter; Butler, John; Butt, Aatif Imtiaz; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buttinger, William; Buzatu, Adrian; Buzykaev, Aleksey; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cairo, Valentina; Cakir, Orhan; Calace, Noemi; Calafiura, Paolo; Calandri, Alessandro; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Caloba, Luiz; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarda, Stefano; Camarri, Paolo; Cameron, David; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Campoverde, Angel; Canale, Vincenzo; Canepa, Anadi; Cano Bret, Marc; Cantero, Josu; Cantrill, Robert; Cao, Tingting; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Cardarelli, Roberto; Cardillo, Fabio; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrillo-Montoya, German D; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Casolino, Mirkoantonio; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castelli, Angelantonio; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Catastini, Pierluigi; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Caudron, Julien; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerio, Benjamin; Cerny, Karel; Cerqueira, Augusto Santiago; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cerv, Matevz; Cervelli, Alberto; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chalupkova, Ina; Chang, Philip; Chapman, John Derek; Charlton, Dave; Chau, Chav Chhiv; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Cheatham, Susan; Chegwidden, Andrew; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Karen; Chen, Liming; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Shion; Chen, Xin; Chen, Ye; Cheng, Hok Chuen; Cheng, Yangyang; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cheremushkina, Evgenia; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiarella, Vitaliano; Chiarelli, Giorgio; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chislett, Rebecca Thalatta; Chitan, Adrian; Chizhov, Mihail; Choi, Kyungeon; Chouridou, Sofia; Chow, Bonnie Kar Bo; Christodoulou, Valentinos; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chudoba, Jiri; Chuinard, Annabelle Julia; Chwastowski, Janusz; Chytka, Ladislav; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Cioara, Irina Antonela; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirotto, Francesco; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Brian Lee; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Cleland, Bill; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coffey, Laurel; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Colasurdo, Luca; Cole, Brian; Cole, Stephen; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Compostella, Gabriele; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Connell, Simon Henry; Connelly, Ian; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Corso-Radu, Alina; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Côté, David; Cottin, Giovanna; Cowan, Glen; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Cree, Graham; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Crescioli, Francesco; Cribbs, Wayne Allen; Crispin Ortuzar, Mireia; Cristinziani, Markus; Croft, Vince; Crosetti, Giovanni; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Cúth, Jakub; Cuthbert, Cameron; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dafinca, Alexandru; Dai, Tiesheng; Dale, Orjan; Dallaire, Frederick; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Dandoy, Jeffrey Rogers; Dang, Nguyen Phuong; Daniells, Andrew Christopher; Danninger, Matthias; Dano Hoffmann, Maria; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darmora, Smita; Dassoulas, James; Dattagupta, Aparajita; Davey, Will; David, Claire; Davidek, Tomas; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davison, Peter; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Daya-Ishmukhametova, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Benedetti, Abraham; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dedovich, Dmitri; Deigaard, Ingrid; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Delgove, David; Deliot, Frederic; Delitzsch, Chris Malena; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; DeMarco, David; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demilly, Aurelien; Denisov, Sergey; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Deterre, Cecile; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Domenico, Antonio; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Di Valentino, David; Diaconu, Cristinel; Diamond, Miriam; Dias, Flavia; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Diglio, Sara; Dimitrievska, Aleksandra; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; Djuvsland, Julia Isabell; do Vale, Maria Aline Barros; Dobos, Daniel; Dobre, Monica; Doglioni, Caterina; Dohmae, Takeshi; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donati, Simone; Dondero, Paolo; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doyle, Tony; Drechsler, Eric; Dris, Manolis; Dubreuil, Emmanuelle; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Ducu, Otilia Anamaria; Duda, Dominik; Dudarev, Alexey; Duflot, Laurent; Duguid, Liam; Dührssen, Michael; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Düren, Michael; Durglishvili, Archil; Duschinger, Dirk; Dyndal, Mateusz; Eckardt, Christoph; Ecker, Katharina Maria; Edgar, Ryan Christopher; Edson, William; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Elliot, Alison; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Enari, Yuji; Endner, Oliver Chris; Endo, Masaki; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Ernis, Gunar; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Esch, Hendrik; Escobar, Carlos; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evans, Hal; Ezhilov, Alexey; Fabbri, Laura; Facini, Gabriel; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Falla, Rebecca Jane; Faltova, Jana; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Faucci Giannelli, Michele; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Feigl, Simon; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Feng, Haolu; Fenyuk, Alexander; Feremenga, Last; Fernandez Martinez, Patricia; Fernandez Perez, Sonia; Ferrando, James; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filipuzzi, Marco; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Finelli, Kevin Daniel; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Adam; Fischer, Cora; Fischer, Julia; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Fitzgerald, Eric Andrew; Flaschel, Nils; Fleck, Ivor; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Fletcher, Gareth Thomas; Fletcher, Gregory; Fletcher, Rob Roy MacGregor; Flick, Tobias; Floderus, Anders; Flores Castillo, Luis; Flowerdew, Michael; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fournier, Daniel; Fox, Harald; Fracchia, Silvia; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Francis, David; Franconi, Laura; Franklin, Melissa; Frate, Meghan; Fraternali, Marco; Freeborn, David; French, Sky; Friedrich, Felix; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fulsom, Bryan Gregory; Fusayasu, Takahiro; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gabrielli, Alessandro; Gabrielli, Andrea; Gach, Grzegorz; Gadatsch, Stefan; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galster, Gorm Aske Gram Krohn; Gan, KK; Gao, Jun; Gao, Yanyan; Gao, Yongsheng; Garay Walls, Francisca; Garberson, Ford; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garonne, Vincent; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudiello, Andrea; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gauzzi, Paolo; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gecse, Zoltan; Gee, Norman; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Geisler, Manuel Patrice; Gemme, Claudia; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Matthias; George, Simon; Gerbaudo, Davide; Gershon, Avi; Ghasemi, Sara; Ghazlane, Hamid; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Giannetti, Paola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Stephen; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillam, Thomas; Gillberg, Dag; Gilles, Geoffrey; Gingrich, Douglas; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giorgi, Filippo Maria; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giromini, Paolo; Giugni, Danilo; Giuliani, Claudia; Giulini, Maddalena; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gkaitatzis, Stamatios; Gkialas, Ioannis; Gkougkousis, Evangelos Leonidas; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glaysher, Paul; Glazov, Alexandre; Goblirsch-Kolb, Maximilian; Goddard, Jack Robert; Godlewski, Jan; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golubkov, Dmitry; Gomes, Agostinho; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Goshaw, Alfred; Gössling, Claus; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Goujdami, Driss; Goussiou, Anna; Govender, Nicolin; Gozani, Eitan; Grabas, Herve Marie Xavier; Graber, Lars; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Gradin, Per Olov Joakim; Grafström, Per; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Gramling, Johanna; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Gratchev, Vadim; Gray, Heather; Graziani, Enrico; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Grefe, Christian; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griffiths, Justin; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Grohs, Johannes Philipp; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Grossi, Giulio Cornelio; Grout, Zara Jane; Guan, Liang; Guenther, Jaroslav; Guescini, Francesco; Guest, Daniel; Gueta, Orel; Guido, Elisa; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gumpert, Christian; Guo, Jun; Guo, Yicheng; Gupta, Shaun; Gustavino, Giuliano; Gutierrez, Phillip; Gutierrez Ortiz, Nicolas Gilberto; Gutschow, Christian; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Haddad, Nacim; Haefner, Petra; Hageböck, Stephan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haleem, Mahsana; Haley, Joseph; Hall, David; Halladjian, Garabed; Hallewell, Gregory David; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamity, Guillermo Nicolas; Hamnett, Phillip George; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Haney, Bijan; Hanke, Paul; Hanna, Remie; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Maike Christina; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hard, Andrew; Harenberg, Torsten; Hariri, Faten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harrington, Robert; Harrison, Paul Fraser; Hartjes, Fred; Hasegawa, Makoto; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hasib, A; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauser, Reiner; Hauswald, Lorenz; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Anthony David; Hayashi, Takayasu; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hays, Jonathan Michael; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Heck, Tobias; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heim, Timon; Heinemann, Beate; Heinrich, Lukas; Hejbal, Jiri; Helary, Louis; Hellman, Sten; Hellmich, Dennis; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, James; Henderson, Robert; Heng, Yang; Hengler, Christopher; Henkelmann, Steffen; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Herbert, Geoffrey Henry; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herrberg-Schubert, Ruth; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Hetherly, Jeffrey Wayne; Hickling, Robert; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Ewan; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hinman, Rachel Reisner; Hirose, Minoru; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoenig, Friedrich; Hohlfeld, Marc; Hohn, David; Holmes, Tova Ray; Homann, Michael; Hong, Tae Min; Hopkins, Walter; Horii, Yasuyuki; Horton, Arthur James; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howard, Jacob; Howarth, James; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hrynevich, Aliaksei; Hsu, Catherine; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Diedi; Hu, Qipeng; Hu, Xueye; Huang, Yanping; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Hülsing, Tobias Alexander; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Ideal, Emma; Idrissi, Zineb; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Iizawa, Tomoya; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikematsu, Katsumasa; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Iurii; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Ince, Tayfun; Introzzi, Gianluca; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Isaksson, Charlie; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Iturbe Ponce, Julia Mariana; Iuppa, Roberto; Ivarsson, Jenny; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jabbar, Samina; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, Matthew; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jakubek, Jan; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansen, Eric; Jansky, Roland; Janssen, Jens; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Javadov, Namig; Javůrek, Tomáš; Jeanty, Laura; Jejelava, Juansher; Jeng, Geng-yuan; Jennens, David; Jenni, Peter; Jentzsch, Jennifer; Jeske, Carl; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Ji, Haoshuang; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jiggins, Stephen; Jimenez Pena, Javier; Jin, Shan; Jinaru, Adam; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Johansson, Per; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tim; Jongmanns, Jan; Jorge, Pedro; Joshi, Kiran Daniel; Jovicevic, Jelena; Ju, Xiangyang; Jung, Christian; Jussel, Patrick; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kahn, Sebastien Jonathan; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalderon, Charles William; Kama, Sami; Kamenshchikov, Andrey; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneti, Steven; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kaplan, Laser Seymour; Kapliy, Anton; Kar, Deepak; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karamaoun, Andrew; Karastathis, Nikolaos; Kareem, Mohammad Jawad; Karentzos, Efstathios; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karpov, Sergey; Karpova, Zoya; Karthik, Krishnaiyengar; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kasahara, Kota; Kashif, Lashkar; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Yousuke; Kato, Chikuma; Katre, Akshay; Katzy, Judith; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kazama, Shingo; Kazanin, Vassili; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keller, John; Kempster, Jacob Julian; Keoshkerian, Houry; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Keyes, Robert; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Kharlamov, Alexey; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kido, Shogo; Kim, Hee Yeun; Kim, Shinhong; Kim, Young-Kee; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver Maria; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Samuel Burton; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kiss, Florian; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kivernyk, Oleh; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Matthew Henry; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Knapik, Joanna; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Kobayashi, Aine; Kobayashi, Dai; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kogan, Lucy Anne; Kohlmann, Simon; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolanoski, Hermann; Kolb, Mathis; Koletsou, Iro; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kondrashova, Nataliia; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; Kono, Takanori; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Köpke, Lutz; Kopp, Anna Katharina; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kosek, Tomas; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumeli-Charalampidi, Athina; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasnopevtsev, Dimitriy; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, Jana; Kravchenko, Anton; Kreiss, Sven; Kretz, Moritz; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Krieger, Peter; Krizka, Karol; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Krumnack, Nils; Kruse, Amanda; Kruse, Mark; Kruskal, Michael; Kubota, Takashi; Kucuk, Hilal; Kuday, Sinan; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuger, Fabian; Kuhl, Andrew; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kukla, Romain; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuna, Marine; Kunigo, Takuto; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; Kwan, Tony; Kyriazopoulos, Dimitrios; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rosa Navarro, Jose Luis; La Rotonda, Laura; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Lambourne, Luke; Lammers, Sabine; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lançon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lange, J örn Christian; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Lanza, Agostino; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Lasagni Manghi, Federico; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Law, Alexander; Laycock, Paul; Lazovich, Tomo; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Menedeu, Eve; LeBlanc, Matthew Edgar; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Claire Alexandra; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Lefebvre, Michel; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehan, Allan; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leight, William Axel; Leisos, Antonios; Leister, Andrew Gerard; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatjana; Lenzi, Bruno; Leone, Robert; Leone, Sandra; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Leroy, Claude; Lester, Christopher; Levchenko, Mikhail; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levy, Mark; Lewis, Adrian; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bing; Li, Haifeng; Li, Ho Ling; Li, Lei; Li, Liang; Li, Shu; Li, Xingguo; Li, Yichen; Liang, Zhijun; Liao, Hongbo; Liberti, Barbara; Liblong, Aaron; Lichard, Peter; Lie, Ki; Liebal, Jessica; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Lin, Simon; Lin, Tai-Hua; Linde, Frank; Lindquist, Brian Edward; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Bo; Liu, Dong; Liu, Hao; Liu, Jian; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Kun; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loebinger, Fred; Loevschall-Jensen, Ask Emil; Loew, Kevin Michael; Loginov, Andrey; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Long, Brian Alexander; Long, Jonathan David; Long, Robin Eamonn; Looper, Kristina Anne; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lopez Paredes, Brais; Lopez Paz, Ivan; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Lösel, Philipp Jonathan; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lu, Nan; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Luehring, Frederick; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lundberg, Olof; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lynn, David; Lysak, Roman; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Macdonald, Calum Michael; Maček, Boštjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Macina, Daniela; Madaffari, Daniele; Madar, Romain; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Madsen, Alexander; Maeda, Junpei; Maeland, Steffen; Maeno, Tadashi; Maevskiy, Artem; Magradze, Erekle; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahlstedt, Joern; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maier, Andreas Alexander; Maier, Thomas; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mamuzic, Judita; Mancini, Giada; Mandelli, Beatrice; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Manfredini, Alessandro; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany; Mann, Alexander; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mantifel, Rodger; Mantoani, Matteo; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marino, Christopher; Marjanovic, Marija; Marley, Daniel; Marroquim, Fernando; Marsden, Stephen Philip; Marshall, Zach; Marti, Lukas Fritz; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Brian; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Mario; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martoiu, Victor Sorin; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massa, Lorenzo; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mättig, Peter; Mattmann, Johannes; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mazini, Rachid; Mazza, Simone Michele; Mazzaferro, Luca; Mc Goldrick, Garrin; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Medinnis, Michael; Meehan, Samuel; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meineck, Christian; Meirose, Bernhard; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Meloni, Federico; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mergelmeyer, Sebastian; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer Zu Theenhausen, Hanno; Middleton, Robin; Miglioranzi, Silvia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Milesi, Marco; Milic, Adriana; Miller, David; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Minaenko, Andrey; Minami, Yuto; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mistry, Khilesh; Mitani, Takashi; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Miucci, Antonio; Miyagawa, Paul; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Mochizuki, Kazuya; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohr, Wolfgang; Molander, Simon; Moles-Valls, Regina; Monden, Ryutaro; Mönig, Klaus; Monini, Caterina; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Morange, Nicolas; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Mori, Daniel; Mori, Tatsuya; Morii, Masahiro; Morinaga, Masahiro; Morisbak, Vanja; Moritz, Sebastian; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Mortensen, Simon Stark; Morton, Alexander; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Motohashi, Kazuki; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Muanza, Steve; Mudd, Richard; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Ralph Soeren Peter; Mueller, Thibaut; Muenstermann, Daniel; Mullen, Paul; Mullier, Geoffrey; Murillo Quijada, Javier Alberto; Murray, Bill; Musheghyan, Haykuhi; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nachman, Benjamin Philip; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagai, Yoshikazu; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagarkar, Advait; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagata, Kazuki; Nagel, Martin; Nagy, Elemer; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Namasivayam, Harisankar; Naranjo Garcia, Roger Felipe; Narayan, Rohin; Narrias Villar, Daniel Isaac; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Nef, Pascal Daniel; Negri, Andrea; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nellist, Clara; Nelson, Andrew; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen, Duong Hai; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforou, Nikiforos; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Jon Kerr; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nisius, Richard; Nobe, Takuya; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Nooney, Tamsin; Norberg, Scarlet; Nordberg, Markus; Novgorodova, Olga; Nowak, Sebastian; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Ntekas, Konstantinos; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; Nuti, Francesco; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'grady, Fionnbarr; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Obermann, Theresa; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Ochoa, Ines; Ochoa-Ricoux, Juan Pedro; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohman, Henrik; Oide, Hideyuki; Okamura, Wataru; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onogi, Kouta; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Otono, Hidetoshi; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Oussoren, Koen Pieter; Ouyang, Qun; Ovcharova, Ana; Owen, Mark; Owen, Rhys Edward; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pachal, Katherine; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagáčová, Martina; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganis, Efstathios; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Palestini, Sandro; Palka, Marek; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Pandini, Carlo Enrico; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Paolozzi, Lorenzo; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Papageorgiou, Konstantinos; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Parker, Michael Andrew; Parker, Kerry Ann; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Pauly, Thilo; Pearce, James; Pearson, Benjamin; Pedersen, Lars Egholm; Pedersen, Maiken; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Pedro, Rute; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Pelikan, Daniel; Penc, Ondrej; Peng, Cong; Peng, Haiping; Penning, Bjoern; Penwell, John; Perepelitsa, Dennis; Perez Codina, Estel; Pérez García-Estañ, María Teresa; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrella, Sabrina; Peschke, Richard; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Peters, Yvonne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petroff, Pierre; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Pettersson, Nora Emilia; Pezoa, Raquel; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Pianori, Elisabetta; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Pickering, Mark Andrew; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pignotti, David; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinfold, James; Pingel, Almut; Pires, Sylvestre; Pirumov, Hayk; Pitt, Michael; Pizio, Caterina; Plazak, Lukas; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskot, Vojtech; Plotnikova, Elena; Plucinski, Pawel; Pluth, Daniel; Poettgen, Ruth; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, David-leon; Polesello, Giacomo; Poley, Anne-luise; Policicchio, Antonio; Polifka, Richard; Polini, Alessandro; Pollard, Christopher Samuel; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potamianos, Karolos; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozdnyakov, Valery; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prasad, Srivas; Prell, Soeren; Price, Darren; Price, Lawrence; Primavera, Margherita; Prince, Sebastien; Proissl, Manuel; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopapadaki, Eftychia-sofia; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Przybycien, Mariusz; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Puddu, Daniele; Pueschel, Elisa; Puldon, David; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Qian, Jianming; Qin, Gang; Qin, Yang; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Queitsch-Maitland, Michaela; Quilty, Donnchadha; Raddum, Silje; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radhakrishnan, Sooraj Krishnan; Radloff, Peter; Rados, Pere; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Rangel-Smith, Camila; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Stefan; Ravenscroft, Thomas; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Readioff, Nathan Peter; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Rehnisch, Laura; Reichert, Joseph; Reisin, Hernan; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Huan; Renaud, Adrien; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Rezanova, Olga; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Richter, Stefan; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ricken, Oliver; Ridel, Melissa; Rieck, Patrick; Riegel, Christian Johann; Rieger, Julia; Rifki, Othmane; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Ristić, Branislav; Ritsch, Elmar; Riu, Imma; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Roda, Chiara; Roe, Shaun; Røhne, Ole; Rolli, Simona; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romano Saez, Silvestre Marino; Romero Adam, Elena; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Ronzani, Manfredi; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Peyton; Rosendahl, Peter Lundgaard; Rosenthal, Oliver; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rosten, Jonatan; Rosten, Rachel; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexandre; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubbo, Francesco; Rubinskiy, Igor; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Christian; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Rühr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Ruschke, Alexander; Russell, Heather; Rutherfoord, John; Ruthmann, Nils; Ryabov, Yury; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryder, Nick; Saavedra, Aldo; Sabato, Gabriele; Sacerdoti, Sabrina; Saddique, Asif; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Sahinsoy, Merve; Saimpert, Matthias; Saito, Tomoyuki; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Yuki; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Salazar Loyola, Javier Esteban; Saleem, Muhammad; Salek, David; Sales De Bruin, Pedro Henrique; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sammel, Dirk; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Sanchez, Arturo; Sánchez, Javier; Sanchez Martinez, Victoria; Sandaker, Heidi; Sandbach, Ruth Laura; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Carlos; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sankey, Dave; Sannino, Mario; Sansoni, Andrea; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Santoyo Castillo, Itzebelt; Sapp, Kevin; Sapronov, Andrey; Saraiva, João; Sarrazin, Bjorn; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Yuichi; Sato, Koji; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Savage, Graham; Savard, Pierre; Sawyer, Craig; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, James; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scanlon, Tim; Scannicchio, Diana; Scarcella, Mark; Scarfone, Valerio; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schaefer, Douglas; Schaefer, Ralph; Schaeffer, Jan; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schäfer, Uli; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R Dean; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Schiavi, Carlo; Schillo, Christian; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Sebastian; Schmitt, Stefan; Schneider, Basil; Schnellbach, Yan Jie; Schnoor, Ulrike; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schoening, Andre; Schoenrock, Bradley Daniel; Schopf, Elisabeth; Schorlemmer, Andre Lukas; Schott, Matthias; Schouten, Doug; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schramm, Steven; Schreyer, Manuel; Schroeder, Christian; Schuh, Natascha; Schultens, Martin Johannes; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwarz, Thomas Andrew; Schwegler, Philipp; Schweiger, Hansdieter; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Sciacca, Gianfranco; Scifo, Estelle; Sciolla, Gabriella; Scuri, Fabrizio; Scutti, Federico; Searcy, Jacob; Sedov, George; Sedykh, Evgeny; Seema, Pienpen; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sekhon, Karishma; Sekula, Stephen; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Serkin, Leonid; Serre, Thomas; Sessa, Marco; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sfiligoj, Tina; Sforza, Federico; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shamim, Mansoora; Shan, Lianyou; Shang, Ruo-yu; Shank, James; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Kate; Shaw, Savanna Marie; Shcherbakova, Anna; Shehu, Ciwake Yusufu; Sherwood, Peter; Shi, Liaoshan; Shimizu, Shima; Shimmin, Chase Owen; Shimojima, Makoto; Shiyakova, Mariya; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shoaleh Saadi, Diane; Shochet, Mel; Shojaii, Seyedruhollah; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Shushkevich, Stanislav; Sicho, Petr; Sidebo, Per Edvin; Sidiropoulou, Ourania; Sidorov, Dmitri; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silva, José; Silver, Yiftah; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simioni, Eduard; Simmons, Brinick; Simon, Dorian; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sioli, Maximiliano; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sisakyan, Alexei; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skinner, Malcolm Bruce; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Slawinska, Magdalena; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smestad, Lillian; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Matthew; Smith, Russell; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snidero, Giacomo; Snyder, Scott; Sobie, Randall; Socher, Felix; Soffer, Abner; Soh, Dart-yin; Sokhrannyi, Grygorii; Solans, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Solc, Jaroslav; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solodkov, Alexander; Soloshenko, Alexei; Solovyanov, Oleg; Solovyev, Victor; Sommer, Philip; Song, Hong Ye; Soni, Nitesh; Sood, Alexander; Sopczak, Andre; Sopko, Bruno; Sopko, Vit; Sorin, Veronica; Sosa, David; Sosebee, Mark; Sotiropoulou, Calliope Louisa; Soualah, Rachik; Soukharev, Andrey; South, David; Sowden, Benjamin; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spalla, Margherita; Spangenberg, Martin; Spanò, Francesco; Spearman, William Robert; Sperlich, Dennis; Spettel, Fabian; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spiller, Laurence Anthony; Spousta, Martin; Spreitzer, Teresa; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stabile, Alberto; Staerz, Steffen; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stamm, Soren; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanescu-Bellu, Madalina; Stanitzki, Marcel Michael; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staszewski, Rafal; Steinberg, Peter; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoebe, Michael; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stolte, Philipp; Stonjek, Stefan; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Stramaglia, Maria Elena; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strauss, Emanuel; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Strubig, Antonia; Stucci, Stefania Antonia; Stugu, Bjarne; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Su, Dong; Su, Jun; Subramaniam, Rajivalochan; Succurro, Antonella; Sugaya, Yorihito; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Siyuan; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Shota; Svatos, Michal; Swiatlowski, Maximilian; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Ta, Duc; Taccini, Cecilia; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taenzer, Joe; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tam, Jason; Tan, Kong Guan; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Shuji; Tannenwald, Benjamin Bordy; Tannoury, Nancy; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tarem, Shlomit; Tarrade, Fabien; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tashiro, Takuya; Tassi, Enrico; Tavares Delgado, Ademar; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Frank; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Pierre Thor Elliot; Taylor, Wendy; Teischinger, Florian Alfred; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, Matilde; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Temple, Darren; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Teoh, Jia Jian; Tepel, Fabian-Phillipp; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terzo, Stefano; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thomas, Juergen; Thomas-Wilsker, Joshuha; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Ray; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Thun, Rudolf; Tibbetts, Mark James; Ticse Torres, Royer Edson; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tiouchichine, Elodie; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todome, Kazuki; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tollefson, Kirsten; Tolley, Emma; Tomlinson, Lee; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Trefzger, Thomas; Tremblet, Louis; Tricoli, Alessandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Tripiana, Martin; Trischuk, William; Trocmé, Benjamin; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trovatelli, Monica; Truong, Loan; Trzebinski, Maciej; Trzupek, Adam; Tsarouchas, Charilaos; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsionou, Dimitra; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsirintanis, Nikolaos; Tsiskaridze, Shota; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tuna, Alexander Naip; Tupputi, Salvatore; Turchikhin, Semen; Turecek, Daniel; Turra, Ruggero; Turvey, Andrew John; Tuts, Michael; Tykhonov, Andrii; Tylmad, Maja; Tyndel, Mike; Ueda, Ikuo; Ueno, Ryuichi; Ughetto, Michael; Ugland, Maren; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Ungaro, Francesca; Unno, Yoshinobu; Unverdorben, Christopher; Urban, Jozef; Urquijo, Phillip; Urrejola, Pedro; Usai, Giulio; Usanova, Anna; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Valderanis, Chrysostomos; Valencic, Nika; Valentinetti, Sara; Valero, Alberto; Valery, Loic; Valkar, Stefan; Valladolid Gallego, Eva; Vallecorsa, Sofia; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; Van Den Wollenberg, Wouter; Van Der Deijl, Pieter; van der Geer, Rogier; van der Graaf, Harry; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; Van Nieuwkoop, Jacobus; van Vulpen, Ivo; van Woerden, Marius Cornelis; Vanadia, Marco; Vandelli, Wainer; Vanguri, Rami; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vannucci, Francois; Vardanyan, Gagik; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varol, Tulin; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vazeille, Francois; Vazquez Schroeder, Tamara; Veatch, Jason; Veloce, Laurelle Maria; Veloso, Filipe; Velz, Thomas; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Ventura, Daniel; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Venturini, Alessio; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Viazlo, Oleksandr; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Vickey Boeriu, Oana Elena; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Vigne, Ralph; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vives Vaque, Francesc; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vladoiu, Dan; Vlasak, Michal; Vogel, Marcelo; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Volpi, Matteo; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Radziewski, Holger; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorobev, Konstantin; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Vykydal, Zdenek; Wagner, Peter; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wahlberg, Hernan; Wahrmund, Sebastian; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wang, Chao; Wang, Fuquan; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Kuhan; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Wang, Tan; Wang, Tingting; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Wanotayaroj, Chaowaroj; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Wardrope, David Robert; Washbrook, Andrew; Wasicki, Christoph; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Ian; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Ben; Webb, Samuel; Weber, Michele; Weber, Stefan Wolf; Webster, Jordan S; Weidberg, Anthony; Weinert, Benjamin; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Weits, Hartger; Wells, Phillippa; Wenaus, Torre; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Per; Wessels, Martin; Wetter, Jeffrey; Whalen, Kathleen; Wharton, Andrew Mark; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Ryan; White, Sebastian; Whiteson, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik-Fuchs, Liv Antje Mari; Wildauer, Andreas; Wilkens, Henric George; Williams, Hugh; Williams, Sarah; Willis, Christopher; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, Alan; Wilson, John; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winklmeier, Frank; Winter, Benedict Tobias; Wittgen, Matthias; Wittkowski, Josephine; Wollstadt, Simon Jakob; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wozniak, Krzysztof; Wu, Mengqing; Wu, Miles; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wyatt, Terry Richard; Wynne, Benjamin; Xella, Stefania; Xu, Da; Xu, Lailin; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yakabe, Ryota; Yamada, Miho; Yamaguchi, Daiki; Yamaguchi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamauchi, Katsuya; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Hongtao; Yang, Yi; Yao, Weiming; Yasu, Yoshiji; Yatsenko, Elena; Yau Wong, Kaven Henry; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yeletskikh, Ivan; Yen, Andy L; Yildirim, Eda; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Rikutaro; Yoshihara, Keisuke; Young, Charles; Young, Christopher John; Youssef, Saul; Yu, David Ren-Hwa; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jiaming; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yuen, Stephanie P; Yurkewicz, Adam; Yusuff, Imran; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zalieckas, Justas; Zaman, Aungshuman; Zambito, Stefano; Zanello, Lucia; Zanzi, Daniele; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeman, Martin; Zemla, Andrzej; Zeng, Qi; Zengel, Keith; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zerwas, Dirk; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Fangzhou; Zhang, Huijun; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Ruiqi; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Xiandong; Zhao, Yongke; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Chen; Zhou, Lei; Zhou, Li; Zhou, Mingliang; Zhou, Ning; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhukov, Konstantin; Zibell, Andre; Zieminska, Daria; Zimine, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Christoph; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Zinonos, Zinonas; Zinser, Markus; Ziolkowski, Michael; Živković, Lidija; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; zur Nedden, Martin; Zurzolo, Giovanni; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2016-01-01

    The strength and tensor structure of the Higgs boson's interactions are investigated within an effective field theory framework, which allows new CP-even and CP-odd interactions that can lead to changes in the kinematic properties of the Higgs boson and associated jet spectra. The parameters of the effective field theory are probed using a fit to five differential cross sections previously measured by the ATLAS experiment in the $H \\rightarrow \\gamma\\gamma$ decay channel with an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb$^{-1}$ at $\\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV. In order to perform a simultaneous fit to the five distributions, the statistical correlations between them are determined by re-analysing the $H \\rightarrow \\gamma\\gamma$ candidate events in the proton-proton collision data. No significant deviations from the Standard Model are observed and limits on the effective field theory parameters are derived. The statistical correlations are made publicly available to allow for future analysis of theories with non-Standard Model int...

  5. The Higgs boson

    OpenAIRE

    Pimenta, Jean Jûnio Mendes; Belussi, Lucas Francisco Bosso; Natti, Érica Regina Takano; Natti, Paulo Laerte

    2013-01-01

    The Higgs boson was predicted in 1964 by British physicist Peter Higgs. The Higgs is the key to explain the origin of the mass of other elementary particles of Nature. However, only with the coming into operation of the LHC, in 2008, there were technological conditions to search for the Higgs boson. Recently, a major international effort conducted at CERN, by means of ATLAS and CMS experiments, has enabled the observation of a new bosonic particle in the region of 125 GeVs. In this paper, by ...

  6. Photoproduction of leptophobic bosons

    CERN Document Server

    Fanelli, Cristiano

    2016-01-01

    We propose a search for photoproduction of leptophobic bosons that couple to quarks at the GlueX experiment at Jefferson Lab. We study in detail a new gauge boson that couples to baryon number $B$, and estimate that $\\gamma p \\to p B$ will provide the best sensitivity for $B$ masses above 0.5 GeV. This search will also provide sensitivity to other proposed dark-sector states that couple to quarks. Finally, our results motivate a similar search for $B$ boson electroproduction at the CLAS experiment.

  7. Pili-mediated Interactions between Neisseria Gonorrhoeae Bacteria are the Driving Mechanism of Microcolony Merging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poenisch, Wolfram; Weber, Christoph; Alzurqa, Khaled; Nasrollahi, Hadi; Biais, Nicolas; Zaburdaev, Vasily; Collective Dynamics of Cells Team; Mechano-Micro-Biology Lab Team

    2015-03-01

    During the early infection with Neisseria gonorrhoeae the bacteria form microcolonies consisting of a few hundreds to a few thousands of cells. The formation of colonies is mediated by type IV pili, thin and long filaments that are also involved in the motion of single cells over a substrate. A related process causes attractive cell-cell-interactions. While the motion of single cells has been extensively studied during the past years, the physical principles driving the growth of these colonies are poorly understood. One key mechanism of colony growth is coalescence of smaller colonies. Therefore we experimentally examine the process of merging of two Neisseria gonorrhoeae colonies. We develop a theoretical microscopic model of single cells interacting solely by their pili. The experimental data and the results obtained from our model are in excellent quantitative agreement. We observe a fast initial approach of the two merging colonies within a few minutes, that is followed by a slow relaxation of the colony shape with a characteristic time of several hours. These findings suggest that pili-mediated interactions are the primary driving mechanism of the microcolony merging process.

  8. DNA-HMGB1 interaction: The nuclear aggregates of polyamine mediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacomino, Giuseppe; Picariello, Gianluca; Sbrana, Francesca; Raiteri, Roberto; D'Agostino, Luciano

    2016-10-01

    Nuclear aggregates of polyamines (NAPs) are supramolecular compounds generated by the self-assembly of protonated nuclear polyamines (spermine, spermidine and putrescine) and phosphate ions. In the presence of genomic DNA, the hierarchical process of self-structuring ultimately produces nanotube-like polymers that envelop the double helix. Because of their modular nature and their aggregation-disaggregation dynamics, NAPs confer plasticity and flexibility to DNA. Through the disposition of charges, NAPs also enable a bidirectional stream of information between the genome and interacting moieties. High mobility group (HMG) B1 is a non-histone chromosomal protein that binds to DNA and that influences multiple nuclear processes. Because genomic DNA binds to either NAPs or HMGB1 protein, we explored the ability of in vitro self-assembled NAPs (ivNAPs) to mediate the DNA-HMGB1 interaction. To this end, we structured DNA-NAPs-HMGB1 and DNA-HMGB1-NAPs ternary complexes in vitro through opportune sequential incubations. Mobility shift electrophoresis and atomic force microscopy showed that the DNA-ivNAPs-HGMB1 complex had conformational assets supposedly more suitable those of the DNA-HGMB1-ivNAPs to comply with the physiological and functional requirements of DNA. Our findings indicated that ivNAPs act as mediators of the DNA-HMGB1 interaction. PMID:27451951

  9. CD66 carcinoembryonic antigens mediate interactions between Opa-expressing Neisseria gonorrhoeae and human polymorphonuclear phagocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray-Owen, S D; Dehio, C; Haude, A; Grunert, F; Meyer, T F

    1997-06-16

    Colonization of urogenital tissues by the human pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae is characteristically associated with purulent exudates of polymorphonuclear phagocytes (PMNs) containing apparently viable bacteria. Distinct variant forms of the phase-variable opacity-associated (Opa) outer membrane proteins mediate the non-opsonized binding and internalization of N. gonorrhoeae by human PMNs. Using overlay assays and an affinity isolation technique, we demonstrate the direct interaction between Opa52-expressing gonococci and members of the human carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) family which express the CD66 epitope. Gonococci and recombinant Escherichia coli strains synthesizing Opa52 showed specific binding and internalization by transfected HeLa cell lines expressing the CD66 family members BGP (CD66a), NCA (CD66c), CGM1 (CD66d) and CEA (CD66e), but not that expressing CGM6 (CD66b). Bacterial strains expressing either no opacity protein or the epithelial cell invasion-associated Opa50 do not bind these CEA family members. Consistent with their different receptor specificities, Opa52-mediated interactions could be inhibited by polyclonal anti-CEA sera, while Opa50 binding was instead inhibited by heparin. Using confocal laser scanning microscopy, we observed a marked recruitment of CD66 antigen by Opa52-expressing gonococci on both the transfected cell lines and infected PMNs. These data indicate that members of the CEA family constitute the cellular receptors for the interaction with, and internalization of, N. gonorrhoeae. PMID:9218786

  10. Search for dark matter produced in association with a Higgs boson decaying to two bottom quarks at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector.

    CERN Document Server

    Whallon, Nikola Lazar; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    A search for dark matter produced in association with a Higgs boson decaying to two bottom quarks has been carried out using data from 20.3 fb−1 of pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV collected by the ATLAS detector at the LHC. Events with large missing transverse energy are selected. The decay of the Higgs boson is reconstructed at low momentum with two resolved b-tagged small radius jets, and at high momentum with one large radius jet containing two b-tagged subjets. Exclusion limits are presented for the mass scales of various effective field theory operators and for the mass of the Z' mediator and tan(beta) of a Z'-2HDM simplified model that describe the interaction between dark matter particles and the Higgs boson.

  11. The London-Anderson-Englert-Brout-Higgs-Guralnik-Hagen-Kibble-Weinberg mechanism and Higgs boson reveal the unity and future excitement of physics

    CERN Document Server

    Allen, Roland E

    2013-01-01

    The particle recently discovered by the CMS and ATLAS collaborations at CERN is almost certainly a Higgs boson, fulfilling a quest that can be traced back to three seminal high energy papers of 1964, but which is intimately connected to ideas in other areas of physics that go back much further. One might oversimplify the history of the features which (i) give mass to the W and Z particles that mediate the weak nuclear interaction, (ii) effectively break gauge invariance, (iii) eliminate physically unacceptable Nambu-Goldstone bosons, and (iv) give mass to fermions (like the electron) by collectively calling them the London-Anderson-Englert-Brout-Higgs-Guralnik-Hagen-Kibble-Weinberg mechanism. More important are the implications for the future: a Higgs boson appears to point toward supersymmetry, since new physics is required to protect its mass from enormous quantum corrections, while the discovery of neutrino masses seems to point toward grand unification of the nongravitational forces.

  12. γ-unstable nuclei in the sdg boson model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following the recent Pt(p,p') experiments which indicated the need for g bosons to reproduce the E4 data, we have extended the O(6) limit of the sd boson model to the sdg bosons. It is shown that a γ-unstable Hamiltonian in the sdg model consisting of a quadrupole interaction and a g boson energy leads to results that are very similar to the O(6) limit. Deviations from the empirical energy spectrum that stem from the γ-unstable nature of the Hamiltonian can be improved by including a consistent hexadecapole interaction which induces triaxiality. The same hexadecapole operator can also account for the strong E4 transitions to the 4+ states presumed to be g boson states. Specific applications are made to the Xe and Pt isotopes. 12 refs., 2 tabs., 4 figs

  13. Comparison of associated Higgs boson-radion and Higgs boson pair production processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boos, E.; Keizerov, S.; Rakhmetov, E.; Svirina, K.

    2016-07-01

    Many models—in particular, the brane-world models with two branes—predict the existence of the scalar radion, whose mass can be somewhat smaller than those of all the Kaluza-Klein modes of the graviton and Standard Model (SM) particles. Due to its origin the radion interacts with the trace of the energy-momentum tensor of the SM. The fermion part of the radion interaction Lagrangian is different from that for the SM Higgs boson due to the presence of additional terms playing a role for off-shell fermions. It was shown previously [Phys. Rev. D 90, 095026 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevD.90.095026] that for the case of the single radion and single Higgs boson production processes in association with an arbitrary number of SM gauge bosons all the contributions to the perturbative amplitudes appearing due to these additional terms were canceled out, making the processes similar up to a replacement of masses and overall coupling constants. For the case of the associated Higgs boson-radion and the Higgs boson pair-production processes involving the SM gauge bosons, the similarity property also appears. However, a detailed consideration shows that in this case it is not enough to simply replace the masses and the constants (mh→mr and v →Λr). One should also rescale the triple Higgs coupling by the factor ξ ≡1 +m/r2-mh2 3 mh2 .

  14. Comparison of associated Higgs boson-radion and Higgs boson pair production processes

    CERN Document Server

    Boos, E; Rakhmetov, E; Svirina, K

    2016-01-01

    Many models, in particular, the brane-world models with two branes, predict the existence of the scalar radion, whose mass can be somewhat smaller than those of all the Kaluza-Klein modes of the graviton and Standard Model (SM) particles. Due to its origin the radion interacts with the trace of the energy-momentum tensor of the SM. The fermion part of the radion interaction Lagrangian is different from that for the SM Higgs boson due to the presence of additional terms playing a role for off-shell fermions. It was shown previously that for the case of the single radion and single Higgs boson production processes in association with an arbitrary number of SM gauge bosons all the contributions to the perturbative amplitudes appearing due to these additional terms were cancelled out making the processes similar up to a replacement of masses and overall coupling constants. For the case of the associated Higgs boson-radion and the Higgs boson pair production processes involving the SM gauge bosons the similarity p...

  15. Bosonic and Fermionic Dipoles on a Ring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zöllner, Sascha; Bruun, Georg; Pethick, Christopher;

    2011-01-01

    We show that dipolar bosons and fermions confined in a quasi-one-dimensional ring trap exhibit a rich variety of states because their interaction is inhomogeneous. For purely repulsive interactions, with increasing strength of the dipolar coupling there is a crossover from a gaslike state to an i...... to an inhomogeneous crystal-like one. For small enough angles between the dipoles and the plane of the ring, there are regions with attractive interactions, and clustered states can form....

  16. Towards hot electron mediated charge exchange in hyperthermal energy ion-surface interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ray, M. P.; Lake, R. E.; Thomsen, Lasse Bjørchmar;

    2010-01-01

    electrons useful for driving chemical reactions at surfaces. Using the binary collision approximation and a nonadiabatic model that takes into account the time-varying nature of the ion–surface interaction, the energy loss of the ions is reproduced. The energy loss for Na + ions incident on the devices...... shows that the primary energy loss mechanism is the atomic displacement of Au atoms in the thin film of the metal–oxide–semiconductor device. We propose that neutral particle detection of the scattered flux from a biased device could be a route to hot electron mediated charge exchange....

  17. Probing electroweak gauge boson scattering with the ATLAS detector at the large hadron collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electroweak gauge bosons as central components of the Standard Model of particle physics are well understood theoretically and have been studied with high precision at past and present collider experiments. The electroweak theory predicts the existence of a scattering process of these particles consisting of contributions from triple and quartic bosonic couplings as well as Higgs boson mediated interactions. These contributions are not separable in a gauge invariant way and are only unitarized in the case of a Higgs boson as it is described by the Standard Model. The process is tied to the electroweak symmetry breaking which introduces the longitudinal modes for the massive electroweak gauge bosons. A study of this interaction is also a direct verification of the local gauge symmetry as one of the fundamental axioms of the Standard Model. With the start of the Large Hadron Collider and after collecting proton-proton collision data with an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb-1 at a center-of-mass energy of √(s)=8 TeV with the ATLAS detector, first-ever evidence for this process could be achieved in the context of this work. A study of leptonically decaying W±W±jj, same-electric-charge diboson production in association with two jets resulted in an observation of the electroweak W±W±jj production with same electric charge of the W bosons, inseparably comprising W±W±→W±W± electroweak gauge boson scattering contributions, with a significance of 3.6 standard deviations. The measured production cross section is in agreement with the Standard Model prediction. In the course of a study for leptonically decaying WZ productions, methods for background estimation, the extraction of systematic uncertainties and cross section measurements were developed. They were extended and applied to the WZjj final state whereof the purely electroweakly mediated contribution is intrinsically tied to the scattering of all Standard Model electroweak gauge bosons: Wγ→WZ and WZ

  18. Probing electroweak gauge boson scattering with the ATLAS detector at the large hadron collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anger, Philipp

    2014-09-01

    Electroweak gauge bosons as central components of the Standard Model of particle physics are well understood theoretically and have been studied with high precision at past and present collider experiments. The electroweak theory predicts the existence of a scattering process of these particles consisting of contributions from triple and quartic bosonic couplings as well as Higgs boson mediated interactions. These contributions are not separable in a gauge invariant way and are only unitarized in the case of a Higgs boson as it is described by the Standard Model. The process is tied to the electroweak symmetry breaking which introduces the longitudinal modes for the massive electroweak gauge bosons. A study of this interaction is also a direct verification of the local gauge symmetry as one of the fundamental axioms of the Standard Model. With the start of the Large Hadron Collider and after collecting proton-proton collision data with an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb{sup -1} at a center-of-mass energy of √(s)=8 TeV with the ATLAS detector, first-ever evidence for this process could be achieved in the context of this work. A study of leptonically decaying W{sup ±}W{sup ±}jj, same-electric-charge diboson production in association with two jets resulted in an observation of the electroweak W{sup ±}W{sup ±}jj production with same electric charge of the W bosons, inseparably comprising W{sup ±}W{sup ±}→W{sup ±}W{sup ±} electroweak gauge boson scattering contributions, with a significance of 3.6 standard deviations. The measured production cross section is in agreement with the Standard Model prediction. In the course of a study for leptonically decaying WZ productions, methods for background estimation, the extraction of systematic uncertainties and cross section measurements were developed. They were extended and applied to the WZjj final state whereof the purely electroweakly mediated contribution is intrinsically tied to the scattering of all Standard

  19. The bosonic birthday paradox

    CERN Document Server

    Arkhipov, Alex

    2011-01-01

    We motivate and prove a version of the birthday paradox for $k$ identical bosons in $n$ possible modes. If the bosons are in the uniform mixed state, also called the maximally mixed quantum state, then we need $k \\sim \\sqrt{n}$ bosons to expect two in the same state, which is smaller by a factor of $\\sqrt{2}$ than in the case of distinguishable objects (boltzmannons). While the core result is elementary, we generalize the hypothesis and strengthen the conclusion in several ways. One side result is that boltzmannons with a randomly chosen multinomial distribution have the same birthday statistics as bosons. This last result is interesting as a quantum proof of a classical probability theorem; we also give a classical proof.

  20. Understanding the Adsorbate-Substrate and Substrate Mediated Interaction Potentials on Au111

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykes, Charles; Mantooth, Brent; Han, Patrick; Weiss, Paul

    2004-03-01

    We have studied the ordering and dynamics of CS2 and C6H6 physisorbed on Au111 at 4 K using scanning tunneling microscopy. The weakly bound state of the molecules allows one to probe the weak intermolecular interactions that dominate ordering in such systems. Preferred adsorption of CS2 at specific surface sites is observed and correlated to the positions of standing waves arising from interaction of surface state electrons with surface steps. CS2 molecules have increased interactions with the areas of high electron density on the peaks of standing waves arising from electrons close to the Fermi energy. The importance of this result is discussed in terms of the fundamental surface physics of adsorbate/metal bonding. Using an automated approach to monitor single benzene molecule motion on the same Au surface we are, for the first time, able to quantify substrate-mediated interaction strength using a simple Arrhenius approach. We demonstrate that these weak, attractive, through-substrate forces control the growth of benzene overlayers on Au and we show how benzene self-orders in well defined structures that maximize these interactions.

  1. Salinity and disturbance mediate direct and indirect plant-plant interactions in an assembled marsh community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cheng-Huan; Li, Bo

    2016-09-01

    Direct and indirect plant-plant interactions play important roles in structuring plant communities, but the relative importance of physical stress and biological disturbance in mediating competitive outcomes remains debated. We conducted two common garden experiments to examine the influence of salinity and disturbance (sediment accretion and clipping) on competitive interactions among three native sedges (Scirpus mariqueter, Scirpus triqueter, and Carex scabrifolia) in the Yangtze estuary. In both experiments, the relative competitive abilities of these plants shifted among different treatments. Competition importance rather than intensity significantly decreased with increasing stress. At the community level, competition importance showed reduced variation along the stress gradient in the disturbance experiment. Notably, the performance of these sedges in three-species mixtures could not be predicted by their competitive relationships in two-species mixtures, which was an indication of indirect interactions. Salinity, disturbance and indirect interactions all affected the competitive dynamics of these sedges, which could explain their different performances and natural distributions in the Yangtze estuary. Our findings of the complex effects of physical factors and multi-species interactions, as well as the different patterns of competition importance along stress gradients at the species level and the community level can improve our understanding of plant community organization in salt marshes and other ecosystems with sharp environmental gradients. PMID:27164913

  2. Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungal Mediation of Plant-Plant Interactions in a Marshland Plant Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Obligate aerobic AMF taxa have high species richness under waterlogged conditions, but their ecological role remains unclear. Here we focused on AM fungal mediation of plant interactions in a marshland plant community. Five cooccurring plant species were chosen for a neighbor removal experiment in which benomyl was used to suppress AMF colonization. A Phragmites australis removal experiment was also performed to study its role in promoting AMF colonization by increasing rhizosphere oxygen concentration. Mycorrhizal fungal effects on plant interactions were different for dominant and subdominant plant species. AMF colonization has driven positive neighbor effects for three subdominant plant species including Kummerowia striata, Leonurus artemisia, and Ixeris polycephala. In contrast, AMF colonization enhanced the negative effects of neighbors on the dominant Conyza canadensis and had no significant impact on the neighbor interaction to the dominant Polygonum pubescens. AM colonization was positively related to oxygen concentration. P. australis increased oxygen concentration, enhanced AMF colonization, and was thus indirectly capable of influencing plant interactions. Aerobic AM fungi appear to be ecologically relevant in this wetland ecosystem. They drive positive neighbor interactions for subdominant plant species, effectively increasing plant diversity. We suggest, therefore, that AM fungi may be ecologically important even under waterlogged conditions.

  3. Driven Boson Sampling

    OpenAIRE

    Barkhofen, Sonja; Bartley, Tim J.; Sansoni, Linda; Kruse, Regina; Hamilton, Craig S.; Jex, Igor; Silberhorn, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Sampling the distribution of bosons that have undergone a random unitary evolution is strongly believed to be a computationally hard problem. Key to outperforming classical simulations of this task is to increase both the number of input photons and the size of the network. We propose driven boson sampling, in which photons are input within the network itself, as a means to approach this goal. When using heralded single-photon sources based on parametric down-conversion, this approach offers ...

  4. Plant-Agrobacterium interaction mediated by ethylene and super-Agrobacterium conferring efficient gene transfer ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoko eNonaka

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Agrobacterium tumefaciens has a unique ability to transfer genes into plant genomes. This ability has been utilized for plant genetic engineering. However, the efficiency is not sufficient for all plant species. Several studies have shown that ethylene decreased the Agrobacterium-mediated transformation frequency. Thus, A. tumefaciens with an ability to suppress ethylene evolution would increase the efficiency of Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Some studies showed that plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR can reduce ethylene levels in plants through 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC deaminase, which cleaves the ethylene precursor ACC into α-ketobutyrate and ammonia, resulting in reduced ethylene production. The whole genome sequence data showed that A. tumefaciens does not possess an ACC deaminase gene in its genome. Therefore, providing ACC deaminase activity to the bacteria would improve gene transfer. As expected, A. tumefaciens with ACC deaminase activity, designated as super-Agrobacterium, could suppress ethylene evolution and increase the gene transfer efficiency in several plant species. In this review, we summarize plant–Agrobacterium interactions and their applications for improving Agrobacterium-mediated genetic engineering techniques via super-Agrobacterium.

  5. Complement-mediated solubilization of immune complexes and their interaction with complement C3 receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Ivan; Baatrup, Gunnar; Jepsen, H H;

    1985-01-01

    membrane attack complex do not participate in the reaction. Besides affecting the size and solubility of circulating IC the interaction with C factors influences the reactivities of the complexes towards fluid phase reactants and mediates the reversible binding of IC to cellular C3 receptors. Our knowledge...... of the cellular localization, expression and structure of the C3 receptors, especially the C3b (CR1) receptor, has been considerably extended in the last few years, whereas our understanding of the physiological role of these receptors is still fragmentary. However, it is becoming increasingly...... evident that impaired solubilization of IC in patients with compromised C function may permit the complexes to deviate from their normal pattern of interaction with C3 receptors probably influencing both the organ distribution and clearance of IC and thereby also their phlogistic potentials....

  6. Prediction of allosteric sites and mediating interactions through bond-to-bond propensities

    CERN Document Server

    Amor, Benjamin R C; Yaliraki, Sophia N; Barahona, Mauricio

    2016-01-01

    Allosteric regulation is central to many biochemical processes. Allosteric sites provide a target to fine-tune protein activity, yet we lack computational methods to predict them. Here, we present an efficient graph-theoretical approach for identifying allosteric sites and the mediating interactions that connect them to the active site. Using an atomistic graph with edges weighted by covalent and non-covalent bond energies, we obtain a bond-to-bond propensity that quantifies the effect of instantaneous bond fluctuations propagating through the protein. We use this propensity to detect the sites and communication pathways most strongly linked to the active site, assessing their significance through quantile regression and comparison against a reference set of 100 generic proteins. We exemplify our method in detail with three well-studied allosteric proteins: caspase-1, CheY, and h-Ras, correctly predicting the location of the allosteric site and identifying key allosteric interactions. Consistent prediction of...

  7. Production of single W bosons in $e^+ e^-$ interactions at $130 \\leq \\sqrt{s} \\leq 183 GeV$ and limits on anomalous $WW\\gamma$ couplings

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Banicz, K; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Button, A M; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chéreau, X J; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Easo, S; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falagán, M A; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gataullin, M; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; van Gulik, R; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Hidas, P; Hirschfelder, J; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Iashvili, I; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, D H; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Lacentre, P E; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lavorato, A; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Lee, H J; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Marchesini, P A; Marian, G; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; Mazumdar, K; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Migani, D; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Oh, Yu D; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Palit, S; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Pothier, J; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Quartieri, J; Rahal-Callot, G; Raja, N; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, A; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Timmermans, C; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Valente, E; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yang, H J; Yang, M; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Ziegler, F; Zilizi, G

    1998-01-01

    We report on a study of single W boson production in a data sample collected by the L3 detector at centre-of-mass energies from 130 to 183 GeV. The signal consists of large missing energy final states with a single energetic lepton or two hadronic jets. The measured cross sections at five different centre-of-mass energies are consistent with the Standard Model expectations. The following limits on the anomalous WW$\\gamma$ gauge couplings are derived at 95\\% CL: $-0.46 < \\Delta \\kappa_\\gamma < 0.57$ and $-0.86 < \\lambda_\\gamma < 0.75$.

  8. Search for Neutral Higgs Bosons of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model in $e^+ e^-$ Interactions at $\\sqrt{s}$=192-202 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Adriani, O; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Bajo, A; Baksay, L; Balandras, A; Baldew, S V; Todorova-Nová, S; Banerjee, Sw; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Bartalini, P; Basile, M; Batalova, N; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Bellucci, L; Berbeco, R; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brochu, F; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chiefari, G; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coignet, G; Colino, N; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Cucciarelli, S; Dai, T S; van Dalen, J A; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Déglon, P L; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Delmeire, E; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; De Salvo, A; Diemoz, M; Dierckxsens, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Dufournaud, D; Duinker, P; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ewers, A; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Falagán, M A; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Ferguson, T; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gataullin, M; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Gong, Z F; Grenier, G; Grimm, O; Grünewald, M W; Guida, M; van Gulik, R; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Hidas, P; Hirschfelder, J; Hofer, H; Holzner, G; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, Y; Iashvili, I; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Khan, R A; Käfer, D; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, J K; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopal, M; Kopp, A; Koutsenko, V F; Kräber, M H; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Krüger, A; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Lee, H J; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Likhoded, S A; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Lugnier, L; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mans, J; Marian, G; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Mazumdar, K; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mihul, A; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Mohanty, G B; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Muijs, A J M; Musicar, B; Musy, M; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Ofierzynski, R A; Organtini, G; Oulianov, A; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Paramatti, R; Park, H K; Park, I H; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Pedace, M; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Piccolo, D; Pierella, F; Pieri, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Pothier, J; Prokofiev, D O; Prokofev, D; Quartieri, J; Rahal-Callot, G; Rahaman, M A; Raics, P; Raja, N; Ramelli, R; Rancoita, P G; Ranieri, R; Raspereza, A V; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosca, A; Rosier-Lees, S; Roth, S; Rosenbleck, C; Roux, B; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruggiero, G; Rykaczewski, H; Saremi, S; Sarkar, S; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Seganti, A; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, A; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Sushkov, S V; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Szillási, Z; Sztaricskai, T; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Tellili, B; Teyssier, D; Timmermans, C; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Valente, E; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Vicinanza, D; Viertel, Gert M; Villa, S; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Vodopyanov, I; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, M; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Weber, M; Wienemann, P; Wilkens, H; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xia, L; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, J; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yang, H J; Yang, M; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zhang, Z P; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, A; Zilizi, G; Zimmermann, B; Zöller, M

    2001-01-01

    A search for the lightest neutral CP-even and the neutral CP-odd Higgs bosons of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model is performed using 233.2 pb-1 of integrated luminosity collected with the L3 detector at LEP at centre-of-mass energies 192-202 GeV. No signal is observed and lower mass limits are given as a function of tan(beta) for two scalar top mixing hypotheses. For tan(beta) greater than 0.8, they are mh > 83.4 GeV and mA > 83.8 GeV at 95 % confidence level.

  9. Higgs Boson Pizza Day

    CERN Multimedia

    Stefania Pandolfi

    2016-01-01

    CERN celebrated the fourth anniversary of the historical Higgs boson announcement with special pizzas.    400 pizzas were served on Higgs pizza day in Restaurant 1 at CERN to celebrate the fourth anniversary of the announcement of the discovery of the Higgs Boson (Image: Maximilien Brice/ CERN) What do the Higgs boson and a pizza have in common? Pierluigi Paolucci, INFN and CMS collaboration member, together with INFN president Fernando Ferroni found out the answer one day in Naples: the pizza in front of them looked exactly like a Higgs boson event display. A special recipe was then created in collaboration with the chef of the historic “Ettore” pizzeria in the St. Lucia area of Naples, and two pizzas were designed to resemble two Higgs boson decay channel event displays. The “Higgs Boson Pizza Day” was held on Monday, 4 July 2016, on the fourth anniversary of the announcement of the discovery of the Higgs boso...

  10. Higgs boson pizza

    CERN Multimedia

    Cinzia De Melis

    2016-01-01

    Four years after the historic announcement of the Higgs boson discovery at CERN, a collaboration between INFN and CERN has declared 4 July 2016 as “Higgs Boson Pizza Day”. The idea was born in Naples, by Pierluigi Paolucci and INFN president Fernando Ferroni, who inspired the chef of the historic “Ettore” pizzeria in St. Lucia to create the Higgs boson pizza in time for the opening of a Art&Science exhibition on 15 September 2015 in Naples. The animation shows the culinary creation of a Higgs boson in form of a vegetarian and ham&salami pizza. Ham&Salami: A two asparagus (proton-proton) collision produces a spicy Higgs boson (chorizo) decaying into two high-energy salami (photon) clusters and a lot of charged (sliced ham) and neutral (olive) particles that are detected in the pizza (detector) entirely covered with mozzarella sensors. A two asparagus (proton-proton) collision produces a juicy Higgs boson (cherry tomato) decaying into four high-energy (charged) peppers producing a tasty sign...

  11. Simulating spin-boson models with matrix product states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Michael; Safavi-Naini, Arghavan; Rey, Ana Maria

    2016-05-01

    The global coupling of few-level quantum systems (``spins'') to a discrete set of bosonic modes is a key ingredient for many applications in quantum science, including large-scale entanglement generation, quantum simulation of the dynamics of long-range interacting spin models, and hybrid platforms for force and spin sensing. In many situations, the bosons are integrated out, leading to effective long-range interactions between the spins; however, strong spin-boson coupling invalidates this approach, and spin-boson entanglement degrades the fidelity of quantum simulation of spin models. We present a general numerical method for treating the out-of-equilibrium dynamics of spin-boson systems based on matrix product states. While most efficient for weak coupling or small numbers of boson modes, our method applies for any spatial and operator dependence of the spin-boson coupling. In addition, our approach allows straightforward computation of many quantities of interest, such as the full counting statistics of collective spin measurements and quantum simulation infidelity due to spin-boson entanglement. We apply our method to ongoing trapped ion quantum simulator experiments in analytically intractable regimes. This work is supported by JILA-NSF-PFC-1125844, NSF-PIF- 1211914, ARO, AFOSR, AFOSR-MURI, and the NRC.

  12. Multivalent ion-mediated nucleic acid helix-helix interactions: RNA versus DNA

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Yuan-Yan; Zhang, Jin-Si; Zhu, Xiao-Long; Tan, Zhi-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Ion-mediated interaction is critical to the structure and stability of nucleic acids. Recent experiments suggest that the multivalent ion-induced aggregation of double-stranded (ds) RNAs and DNAs may strongly depend on the topological nature of helices, while there is still lack of an understanding on the relevant ion-mediated interactions at atomistic level. In this work, we have directly calculated the potentials of mean force (PMF) between two dsRNAs and between two dsDNAs in Cobalt Hexammine ion (Co-Hex) solutions by the atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. Our calculations show that at low [Co-Hex], the PMFs between B-DNAs and between A-RNAs are both (strongly) repulsive.However, at high [Co-Hex], the PMF between B-DNAs is strongly attractive, while those between A-RNAs and between A-DNAs are still (weakly) repulsive. The microscopic analyses show that for A-form helices, Co-Hex would become internal binding into the deep major groove and consequently cannot form the evident ion-bridge between adjac...

  13. Oral Computer-Mediated Interaction Between L2 Learners: It’s About Time!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanguas, Íñigo

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This study explores task-based, synchronous oral computer-mediated communication (CMC among intermediate-level learners of Spanish. In particular, this paper examines (a how learners in video and audio CMC groups negotiate for meaning during task-based interaction, (b possible differences between both oral CMC modes and traditional face-to-face (FTF communication, and (c how this oral computer mediated negotiation compares to that found in the text-based CMC literature. Fifteen learner-to-learner dyads were randomly assigned to an audio group, a video group, and a FTF control group to complete a jigsaw task that was seeded with 16 unknown lexical items. Experimental groups used Skype, free online communication software, to carry out the task. The transcripts of the conversations reveal that oral CMC groups do indeed negotiate for meaning in this multimedia context when non-understanding occurs between speakers. In addition, results showed differences in the way audio and video groups carry out these negotiations, which were mainly due to the lack of visual contact in the audio group. No differences were found between video and FTF groups. Furthermore, oral CMC turn-taking patterns were shown to be very similar to FTF patterns but opposite to those found in written synchronous CMC. Oral CMC interaction patterns are shown to be more versatile.

  14. Experimental study of the deformed nucleus {sup 153}Sm via ({rvec d},t) and average resonance capture as a test case for the multiorbit interacting boson fermion model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gollwitzer, A.; Hertenberger, R.; Metz, A.; Schiemenz, P.; Valnion, B.D.; Graw, G. [Sektion Physik der Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Blasi, N.; Lucchini, S.; Micheletti, S.; Pignanelli, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica dellUniversita di Milano, I-20133 Milano (Italy); de Leo, R. [Universita di Bari and Sezione INFN di Bari (Italy); Gill, R.L. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Hategan, C. [Institute of Atomic Physics, Bukarest (Romania); Casten, R.F. [Yale University, A.W. Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States)

    1998-06-01

    The {sup 154}Sm({rvec d},t) reaction at high energy resolution (n,{gamma}), average resonance capture (ARC), and coincidence measurements were performed to study the deformed nucleus {sup 153}Sm. Strength distributions from ({rvec d},t) and completeness for I{sup {pi}}= (1) /(2) {sup {minus}} and (3) /(2) {sup {minus}} states up to 1500 keV from ARC provide one of the first detailed tests of the interacting boson fermion model (IBFM) in a deformed nucleus in a multiorbit environment. For negative parity states the model accounts for the large number of low spin ( (1) /(2) {sup {minus}}, (3) /(2) {sup {minus}}) states much better than the Nilsson model since the even-even core in the IBFM calculations automatically includes excited vibrational states. The IBFM calculations also predict (d,t) spectroscopic factors better than the Nilsson model with pairing and Coriolis mixing. Neither the IBFM nor the Nilsson approach can explain the low lying positive parity states. The IBFM calculations show that for certain combinations of parameters, the monopole term in the boson-fermion Hamiltonian has more than a scaling effect: it can attenuate the Coriolis mixing (energy staggering). Finally suggested improvements in the treatment of pairing in the IBFM are made. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  15. A primer on Higgs boson low-energy theorems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We give a pedagogical review of Higgs boson low-energy theorems and their applications in the study of light Higgs boson interactions with mesons and baryons. In particular, it is shown how to combine the chiral Lagrangian method with the Higgs low-energy theorems to obtain predictions for the interaction of Higgs bosons and pseudoscalar mesons. Finally, we discuss the relation between the low-energy theorems and a technique which makes use of the trace of the QCD energy-momentum tensor. 35 refs

  16. Constraining interactions mediated by axion-like particles with ultracold neutrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Afach

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We report a new limit on a possible short range spin-dependent interaction from the precise measurement of the ratio of Larmor precession frequencies of stored ultracold neutrons and Hg199 atoms confined in the same volume. The measurement was performed in a ∼1μT vertical magnetic holding field with the apparatus searching for a permanent electric dipole moment of the neutron at the Paul Scherrer Institute. A possible coupling between freely precessing polarized neutron spins and unpolarized nucleons of the wall material can be investigated by searching for a tiny change of the precession frequencies of neutron and mercury spins. Such a frequency change can be interpreted as a consequence of a short range spin-dependent interaction that could possibly be mediated by axions or axion-like particles. The interaction strength is proportional to the CP violating product of scalar and pseudoscalar coupling constants gSgP. Our result confirms limits from complementary experiments with spin-polarized nuclei in a model-independent way. Limits from other neutron experiments are improved by up to two orders of magnitude in the interaction range of 10−6<λ<10−4m.

  17. Interparticle interactions mediated superspin glass to superferromagnetic transition in Ni-bacterial cellulose aerogel nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiruvengadam, V.; Vitta, Satish

    2016-06-01

    The interparticle interactions in the magnetic nanocomposites play a dominant role in controlling phase transitions: superparamagnetic to superspin glass and to superferromagnetic. These interactions can be tuned by controlling the size and number density of nanoparticles. The aerogel composites, 0.3Ni-BC and 0.7Ni-BC, consisting of Ni nanoparticles distributed in the bacterial cellulose have been used as a model system to study these interactions. Contrary to conventional approach, size of Ni-nanoparticles is not controlled and allowed to form naturally in bacterial cellulose template. The uncontrolled growth of Ni results in the formation of nanoparticles with 3 different size distributions - 100 nm particles in voids formed by reticulate structure. At room temperature, the composites exhibit a weakly ferromagnetic behaviour with a coercivity of 40 Oe, which increases to 160 Oe at 10 K. The transition from weakly ferromagnetic state to superferromagnetic state at low temperatures is mediated by the superspin glass state at intermediate temperatures via the interparticle interactions aided by nanoparticles present along the length of fibres. A temperature dependent microstructural model has been developed to understand the magnetic behaviour of nanocomposite aerogels.

  18. Scattering problem for four-boson system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The s-wave phase shift of boson-triboson scattering has been obtained by solving the Faddeev-Osborn equation in the exact approach based on rigorous Faddeev theory. The Schmidt expansion theorem is used to express the 3+1- and 2+2-subamplitudes at energies in the continuous spectrum region as an infinite series of separable terms. Employing the pole term decomposition for these subamplitudes expressed in terms of the Schmidt expansion we can define, in conformity with the Faddeev residue prescription, respective four-nucleon amplitudes that describe elastic/rearrangement, partial breakup and full breakup scattering processes. Acquired simultaneous equations of these amplitudes take the form of multichannel two-particle Lippmann-Schwinger type, which we call Faddeev-Osborn equation. Assuming as an s-wave spin-independent, rank one separable potential of the Yamaguchi type for the two-particle interaction, are derived the Faddeev-Osborn equation for the boson-triboson elastic scattering. To treat singularities appeared in our equation, the numerical calculation is performed in the framework of the complex-valued analysis by introducing contour rotation method. The boson-triboson elastic scattering amplitude for L=0 state of a four-boson system is obtained numerically in the incident boson laboratory energy region of 0.01-24.0 Mev, including only 1=0 state for the 3+1-subamplitude. The results of the phase shift obtained from the amplitudes are plotted as dots in Fig. 1. (author)

  19. Bosonic behavior of entangled fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two bound, entangled fermions form a composite boson, which can be treated as an elementary boson as long as the Pauli principle remains irrelevant. The bosonic character of the composite is intimately linked to the entanglement of the fermions: Large entanglement implies good bosonic properties. The deviation from perfect bosonic behavior manifests itself in the statistical properties of the composites and in their collective interference. As a consequence, the counting statistics exhibited by composites allow one to infer the form of the two-fermion wave-function. Bosonic behavior can thus be used as a probe for the underlying structure of composite particles without directly accessing their constituents.

  20. Electroweak boson production in Pb+Pb

    CERN Document Server

    Balestri, T; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    Lead-lead collisions at the LHC are capable of producing a system of deconfined quarks and gluons at unprecedented energy density and temperature. Partonic-level interactions and energy-loss mechanisms in the medium can be studied with the aid of electroweak bosons which carry important information about the properties of the medium. Electroweak bosons form a class of unique high-$p_{T}$ probes because their decay products do not interact with the strongly-coupled medium, providing a benchmark for a variety of other phenomena measured with strongly interacting particles. The ATLAS experiment measures isolated high-$p_{T}$ photons, W and Z bosons via different decay channels. New analyses of experimental data obtained at the LHC with lead-lead beams at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 2.76 TeV. This talk will present a comprehensive study of the scaling properties of electroweak bosons showing linear proportionality of production rates to the nuclear thickness function; rapidity distributions W-decays directly sensitivity to...

  1. Leptophobic Boson Signals with Leptons, Jets and Missing Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobrescu, Bogdan A.

    2015-06-14

    Color-singlet gauge bosons with renormalizable couplings to quarks but not to leptons must interact with additional fermions (''anomalons'') required to cancel the gauge anomalies. Analyzing the decays of such leptophobic bosons into anomalons, I show that they produce final states involving leptons at the LHC. Resonant production of a flavor-universal leptophobic Z' boson leads to cascade decays via anomalons, whose signatures include a leptonically decaying Z, missing energy and several jets. A Z' boson that couples to the right-handed quarks of the first and second generations undergoes cascade decays that violate lepton universality and include signals with two leptons and jets, or with a Higgs boson, a lepton, a W and missing energy.

  2. Detecting invisible Higgs bosons at the SSC and LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In some extensions of the Standard Model the (lightest) Higgs boson can have mainly invisible decays, decaying to a pair of the lightest supersymmetric partners, or to Goldstone bosons, or to Majorons, none of which interact in the detector. Thus it is not clear how such a Higgs boson can be detected. We show that associated production of such Higgs bosons with Z's at high-luminosity hadron colliders can provide a detectable signal for the mass region of most interest, Mh approx-lt 150 GeV. Associated production with W's can provide confirmation of such a signal. If a Higgs boson is detected another way, so that Mh is known, this method may allow a measurement of branching ratio (BR) (h → invisible), and may also allow measurement of other BR

  3. Detecting invisible Higgs bosons at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In some extensions of the standard model the (lightest) Higgs boson can have mainly invisible decays, decaying to a pair of the lightest supersymmetric partners, or to Goldstone bosons, or to Majorons, none of which interact in the detector. Thus it is not clear how such a Higgs boson can be detected. We show that associated production of such Higgs bosons with Z's at high-luminosity hadron colliders can provide a detectable signal for the mass region of most interest, Mh≤150 GeV. If a Higgs boson is detected another way, so that Mh is known, this method may allow a measurement of the branching ratio (B) (h→invisible), and may also allow measurement of other branching ratios

  4. Mediation Analysis Without Sequential Ignorability: Using Baseline Covariates Interacted with Random Assignment as Instrumental Variables

    OpenAIRE

    Small, Dylan S.

    2011-01-01

    In randomized trials, researchers are often interested in mediation analysis to understand how a treatment works, in particular how much of a treatment's effect is mediated by an intermediated variable and how much the treatment directly affects the outcome not through the mediator. The standard regression approach to mediation analysis assumes sequential ignorability of the mediator, that is that the mediator is effectively randomly assigned given baseline covariates and the randomized treat...

  5. Search for associated production of a Z boson with a single top quark and for tZ flavour-changing interactions in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=8~\\mathrm{TeV}$

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    A search for the production of a single top quark in association with a Z boson is presented, both to identify the expected standard model (SM) process and to search for flavour changing neutral current (FCNC) interactions. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of $19.7~\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 8~\\mathrm{TeV}$. Final states with three leptons, electrons or muons, and at least one jet are investigated. A moderate excess of events compatible with SM tZq production is observed, and the corresponding cross section is measured to be $\\sigma ({\\rm tZq \\rightarrow \\ell} \

  6. Role of TARP interaction in S-SCAM-mediated regulation of AMPA receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielson, Eric; Metallo, Jacob; Lee, Sang H

    2012-01-01

    Scaffolding proteins are involved in the incorporation, anchoring, maintenance, and removal of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) at synapses, either through a direct interaction with AMPARs or via indirect association through auxiliary subunits of transmembrane AMPAR regulatory proteins (TARPs). Synaptic scaffolding molecule (S-SCAM) is a newly characterized member of the scaffolding proteins critical for the regulation and maintenance of AMPAR levels at synapses, and directly binds to TARPs through a PDZ interaction. However, the functional significance of S-SCAM-TARP interaction in the regulation of AMPARs has not been tested. Here we show that overexpression of the C-terminal peptide of TARP-γ2 fused to EGFP abolished the S-SCAM-mediated enhancement of surface GluA2 expression. Conversely, the deletion of the PDZ-5 domain of S-SCAM that binds TARPs greatly attenuated the S-SCAM-induced increase of surface GluA2 expression. In contrast, the deletion of the guanylate kinase domain of S-SCAM did not show a significant effect on the regulation of AMPARs. Together, these results suggest that S-SCAM is regulating AMPARs through TARPs. PMID:22878254

  7. Constraining interactions mediated by axion-like particles with ultracold neutrons

    CERN Document Server

    Afach, S; Bison, G; Bodek, K; Burghoff, M; Daum, M; Fertl, M; Franke, B; Grujić, Z D; Hélaine, V; Kasprzak, M; Kermaïdic, Y; Kirch, K; Knowles, P; Koch, H -C; Komposch, S; Kozela, A; Krempel, J; Lauss, B; Lefort, T; Lemière, Y; Mtchedlishvili, A; Naviliat-Cuncic, O; Piegsa, F M; Pignol, G; Prashanth, P N; Quéméner, G; Rebreyend, D; Ries, D; Roccia, S; Schmidt-Wellenburg, P; Schnabel, A; Severijns, N; Voigt, J; Weis, A; Zejma, G Wyszynski J; Zenner, J; Zsigmond, G

    2014-01-01

    We report a new limit on a possible short range spin-dependent interaction from the precise measurement of the ratio of Larmor precession frequencies of stored ultracold neutrons and $^{199}$Hg atoms confined in the same volume. The measurement was performed in a $\\sim$1$\\mu$ T vertical magnetic holding field with the apparatus searching for a permanent electric dipole moment of the neutron at the Paul Scherrer Institute. A possible coupling between freely precessing polarized neutron spins and unpolarized nucleons of the wall material can be investigated by searching for a tiny change of the precession frequencies of neutron and mercury spins. Such a frequency change can be interpreted as a consequence of a short range spin-dependent interaction that could possibly be mediated by axions or axion-like particles. The interaction strength is proportional to the CP violating product of scalar and pseudoscalar coupling constants $g_Sg_P$. Our result confirms limits from complementary experiments with spin-polariz...

  8. Student-faculty interaction: Mediating between student engagement factors and educational outcome gains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yueh-Luen Hu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The concepts of engagement have long been said to bring forth positive outcomes on students’ university schooling. The reports of the National Survey for Student Engagement (NSSE in the US have opened up various discussions on the benefits of such meaningful activities. On the other hand, the reemergence of the Chinese academies called Shuyuan or residential colleges have been spreading to both the East and West. It is said that the concept of having students living together with their faculty would instill a sense of belongingness that fosters learning. More important, both models of learning have within them the notion of student-faculty interactions. To dwell further on these concepts, the current study shall focus on the analysis of residential college students in Taiwan. A total of 724 students from four key universities that practices the model of residential colleges were surveyed. Structured equation modelling was accomplished resulting in the verification of a model of learning. Results show that student-faculty interaction successfully mediated the effects between the student engagement factors and students’ educational outcome gains. The current results further provided an empirical proof of the importance of quality student and faculty communications and interactions. The current study hopes that the findings will be able to help educational administrators, policy makers, and researchers in designing future curriculum programs that fosters meaningful learning.

  9. PAS domain of the deduced Org35 protein mediates the interaction with NifA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TU Ran; CUI Yanhua; CHEN Sanfeng; LI Jilun

    2006-01-01

    NifA in Azospirillum brasilense plays a key role in regulating the synthesis of nitrogenase in response to ammonia and oxygen available. Recently,our laboratory has identified four clones, whose gene prodcuts interact with NifA, from A. brasilense Sp7genomic libraries by using the yeast two-hybrid system with NifA as bait. We are interested in clone S35,one of the four clones, because it contains a PAS-domain coding region. The entire open reading frame (ORF) for the PAS domain-containing protein was isolated and designated as org35 here. org35gene is 2211-bp long and encodes a protein of 736aa with a predicted molecular weight of about 78.4 kD.The predicted amino acid sequence of org35 has similarity to some two-component sensor kinase/response regulator hybrids of bacteria. Structural analyses showed that Org35 comprises at least three discrete conserved domains: the N-terminal PAS, the central histidine protein kinase (HPK) and the C-terminal response regulator (RR). The PAS domain of the deduced Org35 protein was found to interact directly with NifA, but the central HPK and the C-terminal RR domains of Org35 were not. These results indicated that interaction between NifA and Org35 was mediated by PAS domain.

  10. Modeling of cell adhesion and deformation mediated by receptor-ligand interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golestaneh, Amirreza F; Nadler, Ben

    2016-04-01

    The current work is devoted to studying adhesion and deformation of biological cells mediated by receptors and ligands in order to enhance the existing models. Due to the sufficient in-plane continuity and fluidity of the phospholipid molecules, an isotropic continuum fluid membrane is proposed for modeling the cell membrane. The developed constitutive model accounts for the influence of the presence of receptors on the deformation and adhesion of the cell membrane through the introduction of spontaneous area dilation. Motivated by physics, a nonlinear receptor-ligand binding force is introduced based on charge-induced dipole interaction. Diffusion of the receptors on the membrane is governed by the receptor-ligand interaction via Fick's Law and receptor-ligand interaction. The developed model is then applied to study the deformation and adhesion of a biological cell. The proposed model is used to study the role of the material, binding, spontaneous area dilation and environmental properties on the deformation and adhesion of the cell. PMID:26093646

  11. Bottom-up and top-down mechanisms indirectly mediate interactions between benthic biotic ecosystem components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Colen, Carl; Thrush, Simon F.; Parkes, Samantha; Harris, Rachel; Woodin, Sally A.; Wethey, David S.; Pilditch, Conrad A.; Hewitt, Judi E.; Lohrer, Andrew M.; Vincx, Magda

    2015-04-01

    The loss or decline in population size of key species can instigate a cascade of effects that have implications for interacting species, therewith impacting biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. We examined how top-down and bottom-up interactions may mediate knock-on effects of a coastal deposit-feeding clam, Macomona liliana (hereafter Macomona), on sandflat meiobenthos densities. Therefore we manipulated densities of Macomona in combination with predator exclusion and experimental shading that was expected to alter microphytobenthos biomass. We show that Macomona regulated densities of meiobenthic (38-500 μm) nematodes, copepods, polychaetes, turbellarians, and ostracodes during the three months of incubation via indirect mechanisms. Predator pressure on Macomona by eagle rays (Myliobatis tenuicaudatus) was found to have a negative effect on densities of some meiobenthic taxa. Furthermore, experimental shading resulted in the loss of a positive relation between Macomona and microphytobenthos biomass, while concurrently increasing the density of some meiobenthic taxa. We suggest that this observation can be explained by the release from bioturbation interference effects of the cockle Austrovenus stutchburyi that was found to thrive in the presence of Macomona under non-shaded conditions. Our results highlight the importance of interactions between macrofaunal bioturbation, microphyte biomass, sediment stability, and predation pressure for the structuring of benthic communities. This experiment illustrates that manipulative field experiments may be particularly suitable to study such multiple indirect mechanisms that regulate ecosystem diversity and related functioning because such approaches may best capture the complex feedbacks and processes that determine ecosystem dynamics.

  12. Reflexivity, mediations and education. The subject and the interaction with audiovisual screens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan David Zabala Sandoval

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Thinking about massive media is a task that should opt for a complex conception of its effects. Also, the importance in the process of constitution of the subject in their social environment. Specially, television that is a source of particular and group ways of seeing in the world and being part of it. Which at the same time, allows us to look back on it, giving rise to processes of identification and construction of social and daily realities. As well as, deal with the world from basic socialization processes in the education of subjects and subjectivities. Thus, it is interesting to understand, the interaction between the subject and the television screen from the critical approach of reception that proposes to understand the interaction of diverse institutional, situational and contextual mediations that make possible to understand the reception as a changing process. Process in which the subject is active, who negotiates senses, positions, values, and perceptions with the massive media of communication. Therefore, it is a way to study educational processes, reflection, and social construction of realities, which purpose is not only to prohibit the media consumption or think of massive media as products sections while alienating reality; but also, the intention is to perceive that television, as massive media, is a fundamental part of the current socializing process; thus, it is necessary, to propose alternative forms in order to understand the structure/production of the subject, as well as other forms of reading and interact with these commercial and educational contents.

  13. Child-to-Child Interaction and Corrective Feedback in a Computer Mediated L2 Class

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Morris

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The current study examined the provision of corrective feedback and learner repair following feedback in the interactional context of child-to-child conversations, particularly computer mediated, in an elementary Spanish immersion class. The relationship among error types, feedback types, and immediate learner repair were also examined. A total of 46, fifth-grade children participated in the study. Using Blackboard, the instructor randomly paired students and created a "virtual group" for each pair. Each pair was asked to interact and complete a jigsaw task in the "virtual classroom." Blackboard recorded the pairs' interactions, which were later printed and coded for types of error (syntactic/lexical, types of negative feedback (explicit/recasts/negotiation and immediate learner repairs. Findings indicate that learners did not provide explicit negative feedback. Learners provided implicit negative feedback (recasts and negotiation while completing the jigsaw task in the virtual classroom. The majority of lexical errors and syntactic errors were corrected using negotiation. Over half of feedback moves led to immediate repair. Negotiation moves proved more effective at leading to immediate repair of errors than did recasts.

  14. Self-interacting dark matter and cosmology of a light scalar mediator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kainulainen, Kimmo; Tuominen, Kimmo; Vaskonen, Ville

    2016-01-01

    We consider a fermionic dark matter candidate interacting via a scalar mediator coupled with the Standard Model through a Higgs portal. We consider a general setting including both scalar and pseudoscalar interactions between the scalar and fermion, and illustrate the relevant features for dark matter abundance, direct search limits and collider constraints. The case where dark matter has a self-interaction strength ⟨σV⟩ /mψ˜0.1 - 1 cm2/g is strongly constrained, in particular by the big bang nucleosynthesis. We show that these constraints can be alleviated by introducing a new light sterile neutrino N . The allowed region for the extended model consists of two triangles as a function of the mass mN and a sufficiently small sterile-active neutrino mixing angle sin θ <0.007 : first 10 (sin θ )-2 /5 MeV ≲mN≲1 GeV and second 15 (sin θ )-2 /5 keV ≲mN≲1 MeV .

  15. Searches for decays of a Higgs boson to tau lepton pairs with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Tuna, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    Measurements involving the newly discovered boson with a mass of approximately 125 GeV have been all consistent with the Standard Model Higgs boson hypothesis. If this particle is indeed the Standard Model Higgs boson, then it should interact with fermions via Yukawa couplings. The investigation of whether this boson couples to fermions (and in particular leptons) is a fundamental test of this central prediction. This presentation discusses direct searches for leptonic couplings of the new boson, by searching for its decays in the ditau final states. The event selection, analysis techniques and systematic uncertainties for these searches are described, and the results are compared with Standard Model predictions.

  16. Microscopic boson approach to the description of sd-shell nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A microscopic method is proposed for analyzing the properties of light nuclei with an equal number of protons and neutrons in terms of many interacting bosons. An exact boson image of the underlying shell-model Hamiltonian is derived and the dynamical behaviour of the original fermion system is studied directly in the boson picture using the mean field approximation. The resulting boson states are shown to be free from spurios components, so that the cubersome procedure of constructing the physical boson states can be avoided. The method is applied to calculating the energy spectra of 20Ne, 24Mg and a satisfactory agreement with experimental data is found

  17. Bosonization of Weyl Fermions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Eduardo

    The electron, discovered by Thomson by the end of the nineteenth century, was the first experimentally observed particle. The Weyl fermion, though theoretically predicted since a long time, was observed in a condensed matter environment in an experiment reported only a few weeks ago. Is there any linking thread connecting the first and the last observed fermion (quasi)particles? The answer is positive. By generalizing the method known as bosonization, the first time in its full complete form, for a spacetime with 3+1 dimensions, we are able to show that both electrons and Weyl fermions can be expressed in terms of the same boson field, namely the Kalb-Ramond anti-symmetric tensor gauge field. The bosonized form of the Weyl chiral currents lead to the angle-dependent magneto-conductance behavior observed in these systems.

  18. Dynamical Boson Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Liebling, Steven L

    2012-01-01

    The idea of stable, localized bundles of energy has strong appeal as a model for particles. In the 1950s John Wheeler envisioned such bundles as smooth configurations of electromagnetic energy that he called {\\em geons}, but none were found. Instead, particle-like solutions were found in the late 1960s with the addition of a scalar field, and these were given the name {\\em boson stars}. Since then, boson stars find use in a wide variety of models as sources of dark matter, as black hole mimickers, in simple models of binary systems, and as a tool in finding black holes in higher dimensions with only a single killing vector. We discuss important varieties of boson stars, their dynamic properties, and some of their uses, concentrating on recent efforts.

  19. Dynamical Boson Stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven L. Liebling

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The idea of stable, localized bundles of energy has strong appeal as a model for particles. In the 1950s, John Wheeler envisioned such bundles as smooth configurations of electromagnetic energy that he called geons, but none were found. Instead, particle-like solutions were found in the late 1960s with the addition of a scalar field, and these were given the name boson stars. Since then, boson stars find use in a wide variety of models as sources of dark matter, as black hole mimickers, in simple models of binary systems, and as a tool in finding black holes in higher dimensions with only a single Killing vector. We discuss important varieties of boson stars, their dynamic properties, and some of their uses, concentrating on recent efforts.

  20. Microbial metabolism mediates interactions between dissolved organic matter and clay minerals in streamwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, W R; Battin, T J

    2016-01-01

    Sorption of organic molecules to mineral surfaces is an important control upon the aquatic carbon (C) cycle. Organo-mineral interactions are known to regulate the transport and burial of C within inland waters, yet the mechanisms that underlie these processes are poorly constrained. Streamwater contains a complex and dynamic mix of dissolved organic compounds that coexists with a range of organic and inorganic particles and microorganisms. To test how microbial metabolism and organo-mineral complexation alter amino acid and organic carbon fluxes we experimented with (13)C-labelled amino acids and two common clay minerals (kaolinite and montmorillonite). The addition of (13)C-labelled amino acids stimulated increased microbial activity. Amino acids were preferentially mineralized by the microbial community, concomitant with the leaching of other (non-labelled) dissolved organic molecules that were removed from solution by clay-mediated processes. We propose that microbial processes mediate the formation of organo-mineral particles in streamwater, with potential implications for the biochemical composition of organic matter transported through and buried within fluvial environments. PMID:27481013

  1. Microbial metabolism mediates interactions between dissolved organic matter and clay minerals in streamwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, W. R.; Battin, T. J.

    2016-08-01

    Sorption of organic molecules to mineral surfaces is an important control upon the aquatic carbon (C) cycle. Organo-mineral interactions are known to regulate the transport and burial of C within inland waters, yet the mechanisms that underlie these processes are poorly constrained. Streamwater contains a complex and dynamic mix of dissolved organic compounds that coexists with a range of organic and inorganic particles and microorganisms. To test how microbial metabolism and organo-mineral complexation alter amino acid and organic carbon fluxes we experimented with 13C-labelled amino acids and two common clay minerals (kaolinite and montmorillonite). The addition of 13C-labelled amino acids stimulated increased microbial activity. Amino acids were preferentially mineralized by the microbial community, concomitant with the leaching of other (non-labelled) dissolved organic molecules that were removed from solution by clay-mediated processes. We propose that microbial processes mediate the formation of organo-mineral particles in streamwater, with potential implications for the biochemical composition of organic matter transported through and buried within fluvial environments.

  2. Fumed silica nanoparticle mediated biomimicry for optimal cell-material interactions for artificial organ development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mel, Achala; Ramesh, Bala; Scurr, David J; Alexander, Morgan R; Hamilton, George; Birchall, Martin; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2014-03-01

    Replacement of irreversibly damaged organs due to chronic disease, with suitable tissue engineered implants is now a familiar area of interest to clinicians and multidisciplinary scientists. Ideal tissue engineering approaches require scaffolds to be tailor made to mimic physiological environments of interest with specific surface topographical and biological properties for optimal cell-material interactions. This study demonstrates a single-step procedure for inducing biomimicry in a novel nanocomposite base material scaffold, to re-create the extracellular matrix, which is required for stem cell integration and differentiation to mature cells. Fumed silica nanoparticle mediated procedure of scaffold functionalization, can be potentially adapted with multiple bioactive molecules to induce cellular biomimicry, in the development human organs. The proposed nanocomposite materials already in patients for number of implants, including world first synthetic trachea, tear ducts and vascular bypass graft. PMID:24243739

  3. Membrane-mediated interactions and the dynamics of dynamin oligomers on membrane tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shlomovitz, R; Gov, N S [Department of Chemical Physics, Weizmann Institute of Science, PO Box 26, Rehovot, Israel 76100 (Israel); Roux, A, E-mail: nir.gov@weizmann.ac.il [Department of Biochemistry, University of Geneva, 30 quai Ernest Ansermet, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland)

    2011-06-15

    Dynamin is a protein that plays a key role in the transport and recycling of membrane tubes and vesicles within a living cell. This protein adsorbs from solution to PIP{sub 2}-containing membranes, and on these tubes it forms curved oligomers that condense into tight helical domains of uniform radius. The dynamics of this process is treated here in terms of the linear stability of a continuum model, whereby membrane-mediated interactions are shown to drive the spontaneous nucleation of condensed dynamin domains. We furthermore show that the deformation of the membrane outside the dynamin domains induces an energy barrier that can hinder the full coalescence of neighboring growing domains. We compare these calculations to experimental observations on dynamin dynamics in vitro.

  4. Impacts of pH-mediated EPS structure on probiotic bacterial pili-whey proteins interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgain, Jennifer; Scher, Joel; Lebeer, Sarah; Vanderleyden, Jos; Corgneau, Magda; Guerin, Justine; Caillet, Céline; Duval, Jérôme F L; Francius, Gregory; Gaiani, Claire

    2015-10-01

    Probiotic bacteria are routinely incorporated into dairy foods because of the health benefits they can provide when consumed. In this work, the marked pH-dependence of the pili/EPS organization at the outer surface of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG is characterized in detail by Single Cell Force Microscopy and cell electrophoretic mobility measurements analyzed according to formalisms for nanomechanical contact and soft particle electrokinetics, respectively. At pH 6.8, LGG pili are easily accessible by AFM tips functionalized with whey proteins for specific binding, while at pH 4.8 the collapsed EPS surface layer significantly immobilized the LGG pili. This resulted in their reduced accessibility to the specific whey-coated AFM tip, and to stronger whey protein-pili rupture forces. Thus, pili interactions with whey proteins are screened to an extent that depends on the pH-mediated embedment of the pili within the EPS layer. PMID:26209966

  5. DNA-controlled dynamic colloidal nanoparticle systems for mediating cellular interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Seiichi; Glancy, Dylan; Chan, Warren C. W.

    2016-02-01

    Precise control of biosystems requires development of materials that can dynamically change physicochemical properties. Inspired by the ability of proteins to alter their conformation to mediate function, we explored the use of DNA as molecular keys to assemble and transform colloidal nanoparticle systems. The systems consist of a core nanoparticle surrounded by small satellites, the conformation of which can be transformed in response to DNA via a toe-hold displacement mechanism. The conformational changes can alter the optical properties and biological interactions of the assembled nanosystem. Photoluminescent signal is altered by changes in fluorophore-modified particle distance, whereas cellular targeting efficiency is increased 2.5 times by changing the surface display of targeting ligands. These concepts provide strategies for engineering dynamic nanotechnology systems for navigating complex biological environments.

  6. Boson/Fermion Janus Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Tsekov, R

    2016-01-01

    Thermodynamically, bosons and fermions differ by their statistics only. A general entropy functional is proposed by superposition of entropic terms, typical for different quantum gases. The statistical properties of the corresponding Janus particles are derived by variation of the weight of the boson/fermion fraction. It is shown that di-bosons and anti-fermions separate in gas and liquid phases, while three-phase equilibrium appears for poly-boson/fermion Janus particles.

  7. Natural NMSSM Higgs bosons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the phenomenology of Higgs bosons close to 126 GeV within the scale invariant unconstrained Next-to-Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (NMSSM), focusing on the regions of parameter space favoured by low fine-tuning considerations, namely stop masses of order 400 GeV to 1 TeV and an effective μ parameter between 100–200 GeV, with large (but perturbative) λ and low tanβ=2–4. We perform scans over the above parameter space, focusing on the observable Higgs cross sections into γγ, WW, ZZ, bb, ττ final states, and study the correlations between these observables. We show that the γγ signal strength may be enhanced up to a factor of about two not only due to the effect of singlet–doublet mixing, which occurs more often when the 126 GeV Higgs boson is the next-to-lightest CP-even one, but also due to light stops (and to a lesser extent light chargino and charged Higgs loops). There may be also smaller enhancements in the Higgs decay channels into WW, ZZ, correlated with the γγ enhancement. However there is no such correlation observed involving the Higgs decay channels into bb, ττ. The requirement of having perturbative couplings up to the GUT scale favours the interpretation of the 126 GeV Higgs boson as being the second lightest NMSSM CP-even state, which can decay into pairs of lighter neutralinos, CP-even or CP-odd Higgs bosons, leading to characteristic signatures of the NMSSM. In a non-negligible part of the parameter range the increase in the γγ rate is due to the superposition of rates from nearly degenerate Higgs bosons. Resolving these Higgs bosons would rule out the Standard Model, and provide evidence for the NMSSM

  8. Comment on "Dark Matter with Pseudoscalar-Mediated Interactions Explains the DAMA Signal and the Galactic Center Excess"

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Kwei-Chou

    2016-01-01

    Arina et al. have proposed the Dirac fermionic dark matter with pseudoscalar-mediated interactions to explain the Galactic Center excess, correct relic density and DAMA signal. They have assumed that contact interactions remain roughly valid in calculating scattering rates at the direct detection even when the mediator mass is the same order as the typical momentum transfer. We show that such a replacement is not suitable. Adopting the full form of interactions, we show that the gamma-ray excess allowed parameters are completely outside of the DAMA iodine 3$\\sigma$ region, even for heavy-flavor-universal couplings, for which $m_{DM} \\sim 40$ GeV in the gamma-ray excess fit. As for Higgs-like couplings, the two regions overlap for $m_a\\lesssim$ 15 MeV, where long-range interactions, instead of contact interactions, occur at the DAMA.

  9. Linking agricultural practices, mycorrhizal fungi, and traits mediating plant-insect interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Nicholas A; Kiers, E Toby; Theis, Nina; Hazzard, Ruth V; Adler, Lynn S

    2013-10-01

    Agricultural management has profound effects on soil communities. Activities such as fertilizer inputs can modify the composition of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) communities, which form important symbioses with the roots of most crop plants. Intensive conventional agricultural management may select for less mutualistic AMF with reduced benefits to host plants compared to organic management, but these differences are poorly understood. AMF are generally evaluated based on their direct growth effects on plants. However, mycorrhizal colonization also may alter plant traits such as tissue nutrients, defensive chemistry, or floral traits, which mediate important plant-insect interactions like herbivory and pollination. To determine the effect of AMF from different farming practices on plant performance and traits that putatively mediate species interactions, we performed a greenhouse study by inoculating Cucumis sativus (cucumber, Cucurbitaceae) with AMF from conventional farms, organic farms, and a commercial AMF inoculum. We measured growth and a suite of plant traits hypothesized to be important predictors of herbivore resistance and pollinator attraction. Several leaf and root traits and flower production were significantly affected by AMF inoculum. Both conventional and organic AMF reduced leaf P content but increased Na content compared to control and commercial AMF. Leaf defenses were unaffected by AMF treatments, but conventional AMF increased root cucurbitacin C, the primary defensive chemical of C. sativus, compared to organic AMF. These effects may have important consequences for herbivore preference and population dynamics. AMF from both organic and conventional farms decreased flower production relative to commercial and control treatments, which may reduce pollinator attraction and plant reproduction. AMF from both farm types also reduced seed germination, but effects on plant growth were limited. Our results suggest that studies only considering AMF

  10. Higgs boson hunting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the summary report of the Higgs Boson Working Group. We discuss a variety of search techniques for a Higgs boson which is lighter than the Z. The processes K → πH, η prime → ηH,Υ → Hγ and e+e- → ZH are examined with particular attention paid to theoretical uncertainties in the calculations. We also briefly examine new features of Higgs phenomenology in a model which contains Higgs triplets as well as the usual doublet of scalar fields. 33 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  11. Nonexotic Neutral Gauge Bosons

    OpenAIRE

    Appelquist, Thomas; Dobrescu, Bogdan A.; Hopper, Adam R.

    2002-01-01

    We study theoretical and experimental constraints on electroweak theories including a new color-singlet and electrically-neutral gauge boson. We first note that the electric charges of the observed fermions imply that any such Z' boson may be described by a gauge theory in which the Abelian gauge groups are the usual hypercharge along with another U(1) component in a kinetic-diagonal basis. Assuming that the observed quarks and leptons have generation-independent U(1) charges, and that no new...

  12. Higgs boson hunting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is the summary report of the Higgs Boson Working Group. The authors discuss a variety of search techniques for a Higgs boson which is lighter than the Z. The processes K → πH, η' → ηH, Υ → Hγ and e+e- → ZH are examined with particular attention paid to theoretical uncertainties in the calculations. The authors also briefly examine new features of Higgs phenomenology in a model which contains Higgs triplets as well as the usual doublet of scalar fields

  13. Search for invisible decays of Higgs bosons in the vector boson fusion and associated ZH production modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A search for invisible decays of Higgs bosons is performed using the vector boson fusion and associated ZH production modes. In the ZH mode, the Z boson is required to decay to a pair of charged leptons or a b anti b quark pair. The searches use the 8 TeV pp collision dataset collected by the CMS detector at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of up to 19.7 fb-1. Certain channels include data from 7 TeV collisions corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.9 fb-1. The searches are sensitive to non-standard model invisible decays of the recently observed Higgs boson, as well as additional Higgs bosons with similar production modes and large invisible branching fractions. In all channels, the observed data are consistent with the expected standard model backgrounds. Limits are set on the production cross section times invisible branching fraction, as a function of the Higgs boson mass, for the vector boson fusion and ZH production modes. By combining all channels, and assuming standard model Higgs boson cross sections and acceptances, the observed (expected) upper limit on the invisible branching fraction at mH = 125 GeV is found to be 0.58 (0.44) at 95% confidence level. We interpret this limit in terms of a Higgs-portal model of dark matter interactions. (orig.)

  14. Bosonic variables in nuclear matters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown that the boson theoretical interpretation of nuclear forces nessecitates the introduction of bosonic variables within the state function of nuclear matter. In this framework the 2-boson exchange plays a decisive role and calls for the introduction of special selfenergy diagrams. This generalized scheme is discussed with the help of a solvable field theoretical model. (orig.)

  15. Intermediate mass Higgs boson(s)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finding and understanding the spectrum of scalar bosons is the central problem of particle physics today. Considerable work has been done to learn how to study Standard Model heavy and obese Higgs bosons; simulations including the problems induced by standard model backgrounds are underway, and some results are reported elsewhere in these proceedings. The mass region MH Z/2 will be covered at SLC and LEP. LEPII will be able to extend this range to about 85 GeV. Above MH > 2MZ the search is easy for a Standard Model H degree at the SSC, though not so simple for the neutral scalars of a supersymmetric theory. The intermediate region, MZ/2 ≤ MH ≤ 2MZ is one of the most difficult mass regions to study, and it is the subject of this report. The authors concentrate on a neutral Standard Model scalar to be specific. The lightest scalar of a supersymmetric theory behaves very much like a Standard Model scalar for most ranges of parameters, so the results generally apply to that case as well, and for any form the scalar spectrum might take our results indicate how the analysis might go. Ultimately, to fully understand spontaneous symmetry breaking and the origin of mass, it will be necessary to find any intermediate mass scalar and to know in what mass ranges no scalars exist. Their analysis is only in progress, and their results reported here must be regarded as tentative

  16. p62 regulates CD40-mediated NFκB activation in macrophages through interaction with TRAF6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seibold, Kristina; Ehrenschwender, Martin, E-mail: martin.ehrenschwender@ukr.de

    2015-08-14

    CD40 is a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor family. Activation-induced recruitment of adapter proteins, so-called TNF-receptor-associated factors (TRAFs) to the cytoplasmic tail of CD40 triggers signaling cascades important in the immune system, but has also been associated with excessive inflammation in diseases such as atherosclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis. Especially, pro-inflammatory nuclear factor κB (NFκB) signaling emanating from CD40-associated TRAF6 appears to be a key pathogenic driving force. Consequently, targeting the CD40-TRAF6 interaction is emerging as a promising therapeutic strategy, but the underlying molecular machinery of this signaling axis is to date poorly understood. Here, we identified the multifunctional adaptor protein p62 as a critical regulator in CD40-mediated NFκB signaling via TRAF6. CD40 activation triggered formation of a TRAF6-p62 complex. Disturbing this interaction tremendously reduced CD40-mediated NFκB signaling in macrophages, while TRAF6-independent signaling pathways remained unaffected. This highlights p62 as a potential target in hyper-inflammatory, CD40-associated pathologies. - Highlights: • CD40 activation triggers interaction of the adapter protein TRAF6 with p62. • TRAF6-p62 interaction regulates CD40-mediated NFκB signaling in macrophages. • Defective TRAF6-p62 interaction reduces CD40-mediated NFκB activation in macrophages.

  17. p62 regulates CD40-mediated NFκB activation in macrophages through interaction with TRAF6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CD40 is a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor family. Activation-induced recruitment of adapter proteins, so-called TNF-receptor-associated factors (TRAFs) to the cytoplasmic tail of CD40 triggers signaling cascades important in the immune system, but has also been associated with excessive inflammation in diseases such as atherosclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis. Especially, pro-inflammatory nuclear factor κB (NFκB) signaling emanating from CD40-associated TRAF6 appears to be a key pathogenic driving force. Consequently, targeting the CD40-TRAF6 interaction is emerging as a promising therapeutic strategy, but the underlying molecular machinery of this signaling axis is to date poorly understood. Here, we identified the multifunctional adaptor protein p62 as a critical regulator in CD40-mediated NFκB signaling via TRAF6. CD40 activation triggered formation of a TRAF6-p62 complex. Disturbing this interaction tremendously reduced CD40-mediated NFκB signaling in macrophages, while TRAF6-independent signaling pathways remained unaffected. This highlights p62 as a potential target in hyper-inflammatory, CD40-associated pathologies. - Highlights: • CD40 activation triggers interaction of the adapter protein TRAF6 with p62. • TRAF6-p62 interaction regulates CD40-mediated NFκB signaling in macrophages. • Defective TRAF6-p62 interaction reduces CD40-mediated NFκB activation in macrophages

  18. Photodynamic therapy mediates innate immune responses via fibroblast-macrophage interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulaziz, N; Azhim, A; Himeno, N; Tanaka, M; Satoh, Y; Kinoshita, M; Miyazaki, H; Saitoh, D; Shinomiya, N; Morimoto, Y

    2015-10-01

    Antibacterial photodynamic therapy (PDT) has come to attract attention as an alternative therapy for drug-resistant bacteria. Recent reports revealed that antibacterial PDT induces innate immune response and stimulates abundant cytokine secretion as a part of inflammatory responses. However, the underlying mechanism how antibacterial PDT interacts with immune cells responsible for cytokine secretion has not been well outlined. In this study, we aimed to clarify the difference in gene expression and cytokine secretion between combined culture of fibroblasts and macrophages and their independent cultures. SCRC-1008, mouse fibroblast cell line and J774, mouse macrophage-like cell line were co-cultured and PDT treatments with different parameters were carried out. After various incubation periods (1-24 h), cells and culture medium were collected, and mRNA and protein levels for cytokines were measured using real-time PCR and ELISA, respectively. Our results showed that fibroblasts and macrophages interact with each other to mediate the immune response. We propose that fibroblasts initially respond to PDT by expressing Hspa1b, which regulates the NF-κB pathway via Tlr2 and Tlr4. Activation of the NF-κB pathway then results in an enhanced secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β) and neutrophil chemoattractant MIP-2 and KC from macrophages. PMID:25997703

  19. Social interaction, noise and antibiotic-mediated switches in the intestinal microbiota.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanni Bucci

    Full Text Available The intestinal microbiota plays important roles in digestion and resistance against entero-pathogens. As with other ecosystems, its species composition is resilient against small disturbances but strong perturbations such as antibiotics can affect the consortium dramatically. Antibiotic cessation does not necessarily restore pre-treatment conditions and disturbed microbiota are often susceptible to pathogen invasion. Here we propose a mathematical model to explain how antibiotic-mediated switches in the microbiota composition can result from simple social interactions between antibiotic-tolerant and antibiotic-sensitive bacterial groups. We build a two-species (e.g. two functional-groups model and identify regions of domination by antibiotic-sensitive or antibiotic-tolerant bacteria, as well as a region of multistability where domination by either group is possible. Using a new framework that we derived from statistical physics, we calculate the duration of each microbiota composition state. This is shown to depend on the balance between random fluctuations in the bacterial densities and the strength of microbial interactions. The singular value decomposition of recent metagenomic data confirms our assumption of grouping microbes as antibiotic-tolerant or antibiotic-sensitive in response to a single antibiotic. Our methodology can be extended to multiple bacterial groups and thus it provides an ecological formalism to help interpret the present surge in microbiome data.

  20. DAPK1 Interaction with NMDA Receptor NR2B Subunits Mediates Brain Damage in Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Weihong; Xu, Xin; Peng, Lisheng; Zhong, Xiaofen; Zhang, Wenfeng; Soundarapandian, Mangala M.; Balel, Cherine; Wang, Manqi; Jia, Nali; Zhang, Wen; Lew, Frank; Chan, Sic Lung; Chen, Yanfang; Lu, Youming

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors constitute a major subtype of glutamate receptors at extra-synaptic sites that link multiple intracellular catabolic processes responsible for irreversible neuronal death. Here, we report that cerebral ischemia recruits death-associated protein kinase 1 (DAPK1) into the NMDA receptor NR2B protein complex in the cortex of adult mice. DAPK1 directly binds with the NMDA receptor NR2B C-terminal tail consisting of amino acid 1292–1304 (NR2BCT). A constitutively active DAPK1 phosphorylates NR2B subunit at Ser-1303 and in turn enhances the NR1/NR2B receptor channel conductance. Genetic deletion of DAPK1 or administration of NR2BCT that uncouples an activated DAPK1 from an NMDA receptor NR2B subunit in vivo in mice blocks injurious Ca2+ influx through NMDA receptor channels at extrasynaptic sites and protects neurons against cerebral ischemic insults. Thus, DAPK1 physically and functionally interacts with the NMDA receptor NR2B subunit at extra-synaptic sites and this interaction acts as a central mediator for stroke damage. PMID:20141836

  1. Formation of dilute adhesion domains driven by weak elasticity-mediated interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Dharan, Nadiv

    2016-01-01

    Cell-cell adhesion is established by specific binding of receptor and ligand proteins. The adhesion bonds attract each other and often aggregate into large clusters that are central to many biological processes. One possible origin of attractive interactions between adhesion bonds is the elastic response of the membranes to their deformation by the bonds. Here, we analyze these elasticity-mediated interactions using a novel mean-field approach. Analysis of systems at different densities of bonds, $\\phi$, reveals that the phase diagram exhibits a nearly-universal behavior when the temperature $T$ is plotted vs. the scaled density $x=\\phi \\xi^2$, where $\\xi$ is the linear size of the membrane's region affected by a single bond. The critical point $(\\phi_c,T_c)$ is located at very low densities and slightly below $T_c$ we identify phase coexistence between two low-density phases. Dense domains are observed only when the height by which the bonds deform the membranes, $h_0$, is much larger than their thermal roug...

  2. Indirect plant-parasitoid interactions mediated by changes in herbivore physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Ian; Carrillo, Juli; Garvey, Michael; Ode, Paul J

    2016-04-01

    In occupying an intermediate trophic position, herbivorous insects serve a vital link between plants at the base of the food chain and parasitoids at the top. Although these herbivore-mediated indirect plant-parasitoid interactions are well-documented, new studies have uncovered previously undescribed mechanisms that are fundamentally changing how we view tri-trophic relationships. In this review we highlight recent advances in this field focusing on both plant-driven and parasitoid-driven outcomes that flow up and down the trophic web, respectively. From the bottom-up, plant metabolites can impact parasitoid success by altering host immune function; however, few have considered the potential effects of other plant defense strategies such as tolerance on parasitoid ecology and behavior. From the top-down, parasitoids have long been considered plant bodyguards, but in reality the consequences of parasitism for herbivory rates and induction of plant defensive chemistry are far more complicated with cascading effects on community-level interactions. PMID:27436656

  3. Low Energy Constraints and Anomalous Triple Gauge Boson Couplings

    CERN Document Server

    Zeppenfeld, Dieter

    1993-01-01

    Low energy (1-loop) constraints on anomalous triple gauge boson vertices (TGV's) are revisited and compared to the sensitivity achievable at LEP II and at future linear $e^+e^-$ colliders. The analysis is performed within the framework of an effective Lagrangian of gauge invariant dimension six operators with the gauge bosons and a single Higgs doublet field as the low energy degrees of freedom. The low energy data do not directly bound TGV's but they provide strong constraints on models which lead to anomalous gauge boson interactions in addition to other low energy effects.

  4. Hunting the Elusive Higgs Boson and the Origin of Mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For over 40 years, physicists have been trying to track down a hypothetical particle called the Higgs boson. This particle could explain how known elementary particles like the electron can have mass, and also why one of the basic forces, the weak interaction, is in fact so incredibly weak. However, the Higgs boson has escaped detection so far, even at the most powerful particle accelerators. The next big chance to 'bag' this particle will come when the Large Hadron Collider turns on next year. Will the Higgs boson finally be found? Or will an unexpected explanation for these mysteries be revealed?

  5. The Mechanosensory Lateral Line System Mediates Activation of Socially-Relevant Brain Regions during Territorial Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Julie M.; Maruska, Karen P.

    2016-01-01

    territorial interactions to mediate crucial behavioral choices such as whether or not to engage in a territorial fight. To our knowledge, this is also the first evidence of a subpallial nucleus receiving mechanosensory input, providing important information for elucidating homologies of decision-making circuits across vertebrates. These novel results highlight the importance of considering multimodal sensory input in mediating context-appropriate behaviors that will provide broad insights on the evolution of decision-making networks across all taxa. PMID:27242462

  6. The Mechanosensory Lateral Line System Mediates Activation of Socially-Relevant Brain Regions during Territorial Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Julie M; Maruska, Karen P

    2016-01-01

    interactions to mediate crucial behavioral choices such as whether or not to engage in a territorial fight. To our knowledge, this is also the first evidence of a subpallial nucleus receiving mechanosensory input, providing important information for elucidating homologies of decision-making circuits across vertebrates. These novel results highlight the importance of considering multimodal sensory input in mediating context-appropriate behaviors that will provide broad insights on the evolution of decision-making networks across all taxa. PMID:27242462

  7. Higgs boson otherwise

    CERN Document Server

    Jora, Renata

    2009-01-01

    We propose an electroweak model based on the identification of the Higgs with the dilaton. We show that it is possible in this context to have a massless Higgs boson at tree and one loop levels without contradicting the main experimental and theoretical constraints.

  8. Z Bosons in LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2077480; Müller, Katharina; Anderson, Jonathan

    In this thesis several measurements of the $Z$ boson production cross section in the LHCb detector are presented. After an introduction with the description of the underlying theory; the detector and the properties of the collisions the machine provided to us in LHC run I in Chapter 1, in Chapter 2 the details of the $Z$ reconstruction in the $Z\\rightarrow\\mu^+\\mu^-$ final state is discussed. In Chapter 3 jets are added to the $Z$ bosons. Several aspects of jet reconstruction are presented and a cross section measurement for the associated production of $Z$ bosons with jets at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV is presented for two transverse momentum thresholds of the jets. In Chapter 4 the capability of the LHCb detector to reconstruct charmed mesons is used to establish a $ZD^{0}$ and a $ZD^{+}$ signal and to measure the total cross section. In Chapter 5 the cross section of inclusive $Z$ boson production is measured at a low statistics sample of $3.3~\\text{pb}^{-1}$ at $\\sqrt{s}=2.76$ TeV.

  9. Phytoplankton-bacterial interactions mediate micronutrient colimitation at the coastal Antarctic sea ice edge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Erin M; McCrow, John P; Moustafa, Ahmed; Zheng, Hong; McQuaid, Jeffrey B; Delmont, Tom O; Post, Anton F; Sipler, Rachel E; Spackeen, Jenna L; Xu, Kai; Bronk, Deborah A; Hutchins, David A; Allen, Andrew E

    2015-08-11

    Southern Ocean primary productivity plays a key role in global ocean biogeochemistry and climate. At the Southern Ocean sea ice edge in coastal McMurdo Sound, we observed simultaneous cobalamin and iron limitation of surface water phytoplankton communities in late Austral summer. Cobalamin is produced only by bacteria and archaea, suggesting phytoplankton-bacterial interactions must play a role in this limitation. To characterize these interactions and investigate the molecular basis of multiple nutrient limitation, we examined transitions in global gene expression over short time scales, induced by shifts in micronutrient availability. Diatoms, the dominant primary producers, exhibited transcriptional patterns indicative of co-occurring iron and cobalamin deprivation. The major contributor to cobalamin biosynthesis gene expression was a gammaproteobacterial population, Oceanospirillaceae ASP10-02a. This group also contributed significantly to metagenomic cobalamin biosynthesis gene abundance throughout Southern Ocean surface waters. Oceanospirillaceae ASP10-02a displayed elevated expression of organic matter acquisition and cell surface attachment-related genes, consistent with a mutualistic relationship in which they are dependent on phytoplankton growth to fuel cobalamin production. Separate bacterial groups, including Methylophaga, appeared to rely on phytoplankton for carbon and energy sources, but displayed gene expression patterns consistent with iron and cobalamin deprivation. This suggests they also compete with phytoplankton and are important cobalamin consumers. Expression patterns of siderophore- related genes offer evidence for bacterial influences on iron availability as well. The nature and degree of this episodic colimitation appear to be mediated by a series of phytoplankton-bacterial interactions in both positive and negative feedback loops. PMID:26221022

  10. Production of intermediate vector bosons W and Z in proton and anti-protons interactions at 540 GeV in the center of mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most important and the most expected result of the s = 540 GeV pantip collider at CERN is the proof of the existence of the weak intermediate bosons W+- and Z0, and the study of their properties. This study in the UA1 experiment is presented. 52W+(W-)→e+(e-)νsub(e)(antiνsub(e)) and 4 Z0 → e+e- have been produced. Their measured masses are Msub(W) = 80.9sub(-1.4)sup(+0.6) GeV/c2 et Msub(Z) = 95.6 +- 1.4 GeV/c2. Their properties are entirely consistent with the ''standard model'' and their characteristics of production are consistent with QCD expectations. The relative numbers of W → eνsub(e) and Z → e+e-, as well as the width of the Z, give an upper limit of the number of ''generations''

  11. Interactions between multiple recruitment drivers: post-settlement predation mortality and flow-mediated recruitment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antony M Knights

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dispersal is a primary driver in shaping the future distribution of species in both terrestrial and marine systems. Physical transport by advection can regulate the distance travelled and rate of propagule supply to a habitat but post-settlement processes such as predation can decouple supply from recruitment. The effect of flow-mediated recruitment and predation on the recruitment success of an intertidal species, the eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica was evaluated in two-replicated field experiments. Two key crab species were manipulated to test predator identity effects on oyster mortality. FINDINGS: Recruitment was ∼58% higher in high flow compared to low flow, but predation masked those differences. Predation mortality was primarily attributed to the blue crab Callinectes sapidus, whilst the mud crab Panopeus herbstii had no effect on recruit mortality. Recruit mortality from predation was high when recruit densities were high, but when recruit density was low, predation effects were not seen. Under high recruitment (supply, predation determined maximum population size and in low flow environments, recruitment success is likely determined by a combination of recruitment and resource limitation but not predation. CONCLUSIONS: Four processes are demonstrated: (1 Increases in flow rate positively affect recruitment success; (2 In high flow (recruitment environments, resource availability is less important than predation; (3 predation is an important source of recruit mortality, but is dependent upon recruit density; and (4 recruitment and/or resource limitation is likely a major driver of population structure and functioning, modifying the interaction between predators and prey. Simultaneous testing of flow-mediated recruitment and predation was required to differentiate between the role of each process in determining population size. Our results reinforce the importance of propagule pressure, predation and post

  12. Increasing Responsive Parent-Child Interactions and Joint Engagement: Comparing the Influence of Parent-Mediated Intervention and Parent Psychoeducation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shire, Stephanie Y; Gulsrud, Amanda; Kasari, Connie

    2016-05-01

    Enhancing immediate and contingent responding by caregivers to children's signals is an important strategy to support social interactions between caregivers and their children with autism. Yet, there has been limited examination of parents' responsive behaviour in association with children's social behaviour post caregiver-mediated intervention. Eighty-five dyads were randomized to one of two 10-week caregiver-training interventions. Parent-child play interactions were coded for parental responsivity and children's joint engagement. Significant gains in responsivity and time jointly engaged were found post JASPER parent-mediated intervention over a psychoeducation intervention. Further, combining higher levels of responsive behaviour with greater adoption of intervention strategies was associated with greater time jointly engaged. Findings encourage a focus on enhancing responsive behaviour in parent-mediated intervention models. PMID:26797940

  13. Phase structure of a two-fluid bosonic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The phase diagram of a two-fluid bosonic system is investigated. The proton-neutron interacting boson model (IBM-2) possesses a rich phase structure involving three control parameters and multiple order parameters. The surfaces of quantum phase transition between spherical, axially symmetric deformed, and SUπν*(3) triaxial phases are determined, and the evolution of classical equilibrium properties across these transitions is investigated. Spectroscopic observables are considered in relation to the phase diagram

  14. Increasing Responsive Parent-Child Interactions and Joint Engagement: Comparing the Influence of Parent-Mediated Intervention and Parent Psychoeducation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shire, Stephanie Y.; Gulsrud, Amanda; Kasari, Connie

    2016-01-01

    Enhancing immediate and contingent responding by caregivers to children's signals is an important strategy to support social interactions between caregivers and their children with autism. Yet, there has been limited examination of parents' responsive behaviour in association with children's social behaviour post caregiver-mediated intervention.…

  15. Light-regulated stapled peptides to inhibit protein-protein interactions involved in clathrin-mediated endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevola, Laura; Martín-Quirós, Andrés; Eckelt, Kay; Camarero, Núria; Tosi, Sébastien; Llobet, Artur; Giralt, Ernest; Gorostiza, Pau

    2013-07-22

    Control of membrane traffic: Photoswitchable inhibitors of protein-protein interactions were applied to photoregulate clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) in living cells. Traffic light (TL) peptides acting as "stop" and "go" signals for membrane traffic can be used to dissect the role of CME in receptor internalization and in cell growth, division, and differentiation. PMID:23775788

  16. Physics of the intermediate vector bosons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conversion of the CERN 450 GeV proton synchrotron (SPS) into a proton-antiproton collider was originally proposed in 1976 as a fast and relatively cheap way to produce and detect the weak intermediate Vector Bosons (IVB), W* and Z, by achieving hadronic collisions at an energy large enough to provide observable rates. The properties of such particles had been predicted already in the 60's in the framework of the so-called Standard Model of the unified electroweak theory developed; however, the interest in this theory arose only some years later, following the proof of renormalizability and the first experimental observation of neutrino interactions mediated by Z-exchange. In particular, the experiment obtained a measurement of the weak mixing angle, which allowed a quantitative prediction of the IVB mass values. The CERN Collider project was approved in 1978 and the first bar pp collisions at a total center-of-mass energy (√s) of 546 GeV were observed in 1981. The decay W → eν was first observed among data collected at the end of 1982, and the decay Z → e+e- and Z → μ+μ- were observed a few months later. At present, following two more data-taking runs in 1984 and 1985 at a slightly increased center-of-mass energy (√s = 630 GeV), samples of ∼250 W → eν and ∼30 Z → e+e- events are available from each of the two major experiments (UA1 and UA2), making possible a quantitative comparison of IVB properties with the predictions of the Standard Model. In this article the authors first describe the Standard Model of the unified electroweak theory, and the authors use the theoretical framework to derive the IVB mass values and their decay properties

  17. Search for new phenomena in events with missing transverse momentum and a Higgs boson decaying to two photons in pp collisions at s√=13 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    A search for new phenomena in events with large missing transverse momentum and a Higgs boson decaying to two photons is presented. The search uses $ 13.3 ~\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ of proton-proton collision data collected at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider in 2015 and 2016. No excess over the background expectation is observed. Limits are set on the production rates of the following theoretical models: two simplified models where the Standard Model--dark matter interaction is mediated by a new vector particle emitting a Higgs boson and decaying, either directly or through an intermediate state, into two invisible particles, and an effective theory model where a heavy scalar decays into a Higgs boson and a pair of dark matter candidates.

  18. Can boson stars supplant black holes?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The time-like geodesics of spherically symmetric boson stars (BS) are compared to those of the Schwarzschild black hole (BH). It is shown that the compactness of the BS is the quantity that determines how similar time-like geodesics are to those of a BH with the same mass. It is also found that the self-interaction of the scalarfield the BS is made of, determines how compact a stable BS can be. The combination of these two results indicates that BSs could supplant BHs better when they are stable, have strong self-interaction and high central density. If boson stars will be considered as serious toy models for astrophysical BH candidates it will be important to choose correctly the free parameters of the scalarfield; here the basic guidelines are pointed out for the case of spherical symmetry

  19. Neutrino and Z gauge boson physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larios, F. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, CINVESTAV-Merida, A.P. 73, 97310 Merida, Yucatan (Mexico); Perez, M. A. [Departamento de Fisica, CINVESTAV, A.P. 14-740, 07000, Mexico D.F (Mexico)

    2013-06-12

    We present a short review of the physics of neutrino-photon interactions and the rare decays of the Z and Z Prime gauge bosons. In particular, we emphasize on processes induced by the anomalous trilinear and quartic vertices VVV and VVVV, where V=Z,Z Prime or a photon, within the Standard Model (SM), the 331 model and some extensions of the SM. We also include the phenomenological and experimental limits reported for these couplings.

  20. Higgs Quantum Numbers in Weak Boson Fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Englert, Christoph; Gonçalves-Netto, Dorival; Mawatari, Kentarou; Plehn, Tilman

    2012-01-01

    Recently, the ATLAS and CMS experiments have reported the discovery of a Higgs like resonance at the LHC. The next analysis step will include the determination of its spin and CP quantum numbers or the form of its interaction Lagrangian channel-by-channel. We show how weak-boson-fusion Higgs production and associated ZH production can be used to separate different spin and CP states.

  1. Higgs boson studies at the Tevatron

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aaltonen, L.; Abbott, B.; Abazov, V. M.; Kupčo, Alexander; Lokajíček, Miloš; Lysák, Roman

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 88, č. 5 (2013), "052014-1"-"052014-29". ISSN 1550-7998 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG12006 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : Higgs particle * mass * vector boson * gluon * fusion * Batavia TEVATRON Coll * CDF * DZERO * anti-p p * interaction Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 4.864, year: 2013

  2. Yellow Pigment Aurovertins Mediate Interactions between the Pathogenic Fungus Pochonia chlamydosporia and Its Nematode Host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan-li; Li, Lin-fang; Li, Dong-xian; Wang, Baile; Zhang, Keqin; Niu, Xuemei

    2015-07-29

    Nematophagous fungi are globally distributed soil fungi and well-known natural predators of soil-dwelling nematodes. Pochonia chlamydosporia can be found in diverse nematode-suppressive soils as a parasite of nematode eggs and is one of the most studied potential biological control agents of nematodes. However, little is known about the functions of small molecules in the process of infection of nematodes by this parasitic fungus or about small-molecule-mediated interactions between the pathogenic fungus and its host. Our recent study demonstrated that a P. chlamydosporia strain isolated from root knots of tobacco infected by the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita produced a class of yellow pigment metabolite aurovertins, which induced the death of the free-living nematode Panagrellus redivevus. Here we report that nematicidal P. chlamydosporia strains obtained from the nematode worms tended to yield a total yellow pigment aurovertin production exceeding the inhibitory concentration shown in nematicidal bioassays. Aurovertin D was abundant in the pigment metabolites of P. chlamydosporia strains. Aurovertin D showed strong toxicity toward the root-knot nematode M. incognita and exerted profound and detrimental effects on the viability of Caenorhabditis elegans even at a subinhibitory concentration. Evaluation of the nematode mutation in the β subunit of F1-ATPase, together with the application of RNA interference in screening each subunit of F1FO-ATPase in the nematode worms, demonstrated that the β subunit of F1-ATPase might not be the specific target for aurovertins in nematodes. The resistance of C. elegans daf-2(e1370) and the hypersensitivity of C. elegans daf-16(mu86) to aurovertin D indicated that DAF-16/FOXO transcription factor in nematodes was triggered in response to the aurovertin attack. These findings advance our understanding of the roles of aurovertin production in the interactions between nematodes and the pathogen fungus P. chlamydosporia

  3. Distinct parietal sites mediate the influences of mood, arousal, and their interaction on human recognition memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Ciara M; Flannery, Oliver; Soto, David

    2014-12-01

    The two dimensions of emotion, mood valence and arousal, have independent effects on recognition memory. At present, however, it is not clear how those effects are reflected in the human brain. Previous research in this area has generally dealt with memory for emotionally valenced or arousing stimuli, but the manner in which interacting mood and arousal states modulate responses in memory substrates remains poorly understood. We investigated memory for emotionally neutral items while independently manipulating mood valence and arousal state by means of music exposure. Four emotional conditions were created: positive mood/high arousal, positive mood/low arousal, negative mood/high arousal, and negative mood/low arousal. We observed distinct effects of mood valence and arousal in parietal substrates of recognition memory. Positive mood increased activity in ventral posterior parietal cortex (PPC) and orbitofrontal cortex, whereas arousal condition modulated activity in dorsal PPC and the posterior cingulate. An interaction between valence and arousal was observed in left ventral PPC, notably in a parietal area distinct from the those identified for the main effects, with a stronger effect of mood on recognition memory responses here under conditions of relative high versus low arousal. We interpreted the PPC activations in terms of the attention-to-memory hypothesis: Increased arousal may lead to increased top-down control of memory, and hence dorsal PPC activation, whereas positive mood valence may result in increased activity in ventral PPC regions associated with bottom-up attention to memory. These findings indicate that distinct parietal sites mediate the influences of mood, arousal, and their interplay during recognition memory. PMID:24604603

  4. Ketamine, propofol and the EEG: a neural field analysis of HCN1-mediated interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingo eBojak

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Ketamine and propofol are two well-known, powerful anesthetic agents, yet at first sight this appears to be their only commonality. Ketamine is a dissociative anesthetic agent, whose main mechanism of action is considered to be N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA antagonism; whereas propofol is a general anesthetic agent, which is assumed to primarily potentiate currents gated by γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA A receptors. However, several experimental observations suggest a closer relationship. First, the effect of ketamine on the electroencephalogram (EEG is markedly changed in the presence of propofol: on its own ketamine increases theta (4–8 Hz and decreases alpha (8–13 Hz oscillations, whereas ketamine induces a significant shift to beta band frequencies (13–30 Hz in the presence of propofol. Second, both ketamine and propofol cause inhibition of the inward pacemaker current Ih, by binding to the corresponding hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated potassium channel 1 (HCN1 subunit. The resulting effect is a hyperpolarization of the neuron’s resting membrane potential. Third, the ability of both ketamine and propofol to induce hypnosis is reduced in HCN1-knockout mice. Here we show that one can theoretically understand the observed spectral changes of the EEG based on HCN1-mediated hyperpolarizations alone, without involving the supposed main mechanisms of action of these drugs through NMDA and GABA A, respectively. On the basis of our successful EEG model we conclude that ketamine and propofol should be antagonistic to each other in their interaction at HCN1 subunits. Such a prediction is in accord with the results of clinical experiment in which it is found that ketamine and propofol interact in an infra-additive manner with respect to the endpoints of hypnosis and immobility.

  5. Coexistence of CP eigenstates in Higgs boson decay

    OpenAIRE

    Oshimo, Noriyuki

    2012-01-01

    The supersymmetric extension of the standard model contains an intrinsic sourceof CP violation mediated by the charginos. As an effect, both CP-even and CP-odd final states could be observed in the Higgs boson decay into two photons whose evidences were reported recently.

  6. Entanglement of bosonic modes in symmetric graphs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ground and thermal states of a quadratic Hamiltonian representing the interaction of bosonic modes or particles are always Gaussian states. We investigate the entanglement properties of these states for the case where the interactions are represented by harmonic forces acting along the edges of symmetric graphs - i.e., one-, two-, and three-dimensional rectangular lattices, mean-field clusters, and platonic solids. We determine the entanglement of formation (EOF) as a function of the interaction strength, calculate the maximum EOF in each case, and compare these values with the bounds found previously for quadratic Hamiltonians

  7. Dipolar bosons on an optical lattice ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maik, Michal [Instytut Fizyki imienia Mariana Smoluchowskiego, Uniwersytet Jagiellonski, ulica Reymonta 4, PL-30-059 Krakow (Poland); Buonsante, Pierfrancesco [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Parma, Viale G.P. Usberti n.7/A, IT-43100 Parma (Italy); Vezzani, Alessandro [Centro S3, CNR Istituto di Nanoscienze, via Campi 213/a, IT-41100 Modena (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Parma, Viale G.P. Usberti n.7/A, 43100 Parma (Italy); Zakrzewski, Jakub [Instytut Fizyki imienia Mariana Smoluchowskiego, Uniwersytet Jagiellonski, ulica Reymonta 4, PL-30-059 Krakow (Poland); Mark Kac Complex Systems Research Center, Uniwersytet Jagiellonski, ulica Reymonta 4, PL-30-059 Krakow (Poland)

    2011-11-15

    We consider an ultrasmall system of polarized bosons on an optical lattice with a ring topology, interacting via long-range dipole-dipole interactions. Dipoles polarized perpendicular to the plane of the ring reveal sharp transitions between different density-wave phases. As the strength of the dipolar interactions is varied, the behavior of the transitions is first-order-like. For dipoles polarized in the plane of the ring, the transitions between possible phases show pronounced sensitivity to the lattice depth. The abundance of possible configurations may be useful for quantum-information applications.

  8. Dipolar bosons on an optical lattice ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maik, Michał; Buonsante, Pierfrancesco; Vezzani, Alessandro; Zakrzewski, Jakub

    2011-11-01

    We consider an ultrasmall system of polarized bosons on an optical lattice with a ring topology, interacting via long-range dipole-dipole interactions. Dipoles polarized perpendicular to the plane of the ring reveal sharp transitions between different density-wave phases. As the strength of the dipolar interactions is varied, the behavior of the transitions is first-order-like. For dipoles polarized in the plane of the ring, the transitions between possible phases show pronounced sensitivity to the lattice depth. The abundance of possible configurations may be useful for quantum-information applications.

  9. Tumour–stromal interactions in acid-mediated invasion: A mathematical model

    KAUST Repository

    Martin, Natasha K.

    2010-12-01

    It is well established that the tumour microenvironment can both promote and suppress tumour growth and invasion, however, most mathematical models of invasion view the normal tissue as inhibiting tumour progression via immune modulation or spatial constraint. In particular, the production of acid by tumour cells and the subsequent creation of a low extracellular pH environment has been explored in several \\'acid-mediated tumour invasion\\' models where the acidic environment facilitates normal cell death and permits tumour invasion. In this paper, we extend the acid-invasion model developed by Gatenby and Gawlinski (1996) to include both the competitive and cooperative interactions between tumour and normal cells, by incorporating the influence of extracellular matrix and protease production at the tumour-stroma interface. Our model predicts an optimal level of tumour acidity which produces both cell death and matrix degradation. Additionally, very aggressive tumours prevent protease production and matrix degradation by excessive normal cell destruction, leading to an acellular (but matrix filled) gap between the tumour and normal tissue, a feature seen in encapsulated tumours. These results suggest, counterintuitively, that increasing tumour acidity may, in some cases, prevent tumour invasion.

  10. The α11 integrin mediates fibroblast-extracellular matrix-cardiomyocyte interactions in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civitarese, Robert A; Talior-Volodarsky, Ilana; Desjardins, Jean-Francois; Kabir, Golam; Switzer, Jennifer; Mitchell, Melissa; Kapus, Andras; McCulloch, Christopher A; Gullberg, Donald; Connelly, Kim A

    2016-07-01

    Excessive cardiac interstitial fibrosis impairs normal cardiac function. We have shown that the α11β1 (α11) integrin mediates fibrotic responses to glycated collagen in rat myocardium by a pathway involving transforming growth factor-β. Little is known of the role of the α11 integrin in the developing mammalian heart. Therefore, we examined the impact of deletion of the α11 integrin in wild-type mice and in mice treated with streptozotocin (STZ) to elucidate the role of the α11 integrin in normal cardiac homeostasis and in the pathogenesis of diabetes-related fibrosis. As anticipated, cardiac fibrosis was reduced in α11 integrin knockout mice (α11(-/-); C57BL/6 background) treated with STZ compared with STZ-treated wild-type mice (P organization at intercalated disks and impaired gap-junction development. Overall, deletion of the α11 integrin attenuates cardiac fibrosis in the mammalian mouse heart and reduces ECM formation as a result of diabetes. Furthermore, α11 integrin deletion impairs cardiac function and alters cardiomyocyte morphology. These findings shed further light on the poorly understood interaction between the fibroblast-cardiomyocyte and the ECM. PMID:27199132

  11. Tomato extract suppresses the production of proinflammatory mediators induced by interaction between adipocytes and macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-il; Mohri, Shinsuke; Hirai, Shizuka; Lin, Shan; Goto, Tsuyoshi; Ohyane, Chie; Sakamoto, Tomoya; Takahashi, Haruya; Shibata, Daisuke; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Kawada, Teruo

    2015-01-01

    Obese adipose tissue is characterized by enhanced macrophage infiltration. A loop involving monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) between adipocytes and macrophages establishes a vicious cycle that augments inflammatory changes and insulin resistance in obese adipose tissue. Tomatoes, one of the most popular crops worldwide, contain many beneficial phytochemicals that improve obesity-related diseases such as diabetes. Some of them have also been reported to have anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, we focused on the potential protective effects of phytochemicals in tomatoes on inflammation. We screened fractions of tomato extract using nitric oxide (NO) assay in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264 macrophages. One fraction, RF52, significantly inhibited NO production in LPS-stimulated RAW264 macrophages. Furthermore, RF52 significantly decreased MCP-1 and TNFα productions. The coculture of 3T3-L1 adipocytes and RAW264 macrophages markedly enhanced MCP-1, TNFα, and NO productions compared with the control cultures; however, the treatment with RF52 inhibited the production of these proinflammatory mediators. These results suggest that RF52 from tomatoes may have the potential to suppress inflammation by inhibiting the production of NO or proinflammatory cytokines during the interaction between adipocytes and macrophages. PMID:25603813

  12. Effects of Abiotic Factors on HIPV-Mediated Interactions between Plants and Parasitoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Christine; Desneux, Nicolas; Monticelli, Lucie; Fernandez, Xavier; Michel, Thomas; Lavoir, Anne-Violette

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to constitutively emitted plant volatiles (PV), herbivore-induced plant volatiles (HIPV) are specifically emitted by plants when afflicted with herbivores. HIPV can be perceived by parasitoids and predators which parasitize or prey on the respective herbivores, including parasitic hymenoptera. HIPV act as signals and facilitate host/prey detection. They comprise a blend of compounds: main constituents are terpenoids and "green leaf volatiles." Constitutive emission of PV is well known to be influenced by abiotic factors like temperature, light intensity, water, and nutrient availability. HIPV share biosynthetic pathways with constitutively emitted PV and might therefore likewise be affected by abiotic conditions. However, the effects of abiotic factors on HIPV-mediated biotic interactions have received only limited attention to date. HIPV being influenced by the plant's growing conditions could have major implications for pest management. Quantitative and qualitative changes in HIPV blends may improve or impair biocontrol. Enhanced emission of HIPV may attract a larger number of natural enemies. Reduced emission rates or altered compositions, however, may render blends imperceptible to parasitoides and predators. Predicting the outcome of these changes is highly important for food production and for ecosystems affected by global climate change. PMID:26788501

  13. Trait-mediated interactions: influence of prey size, density and experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Michael W; Bolker, Benjamin M

    2008-05-01

    1. The role of non-consumptive predator effects in structuring ecological communities has become an important area of study for ecologists. Numerous studies have shown that adaptive changes in prey in response to a predator can improve survival in subsequent encounters with that predator. 2. Prey-mediated changes in the shapes of predators' functional response surfaces determine the qualitative predictions of theoretical models. However, few studies have quantified the effects of adaptive prey responses on the shape of predator functional responses. 3. This study explores how prey density, size and previous predator experience interact to change the functional response curves of different-sized predators. 4. We use a response surface design to determine how previous exposure to small or large odonate predators affected the short-term survival of squirrel tree frog (Hyla squirella) tadpoles across a range of sizes and densities (i.e. the shape of odonate functional response curves). 5. Predator-induced tadpoles in a given size class did not differ in shape, although induction changed tadpole behaviour significantly. Induced tadpoles survived better in lethal encounters with either predator than did similar-sized predator-naive tadpoles. 6. Induction by either predator resulted in increased survival with both predators at a given size. However, different mechanisms led to increased survival for induced tadpoles. Attack rate for the small predators, whereas handling time increased for the large predators. PMID:18312336

  14. Neuroimmune Interaction in the Regulation of Peripheral Opioid-Mediated Analgesia in Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral immune cell-mediated analgesia in inflammation is an important endogenous mechanism of pain control. Opioid receptors localized on peripheral sensory nerve terminals are activated by endogenous opioid peptides released from immune cells to produce significant analgesia. Following transendothelial migration of opioid-containing leukocytes into peripheral sites of inflammation, opioid peptides are released into a harsh milieu associated with an increase in temperature, low pH, and high proteolytic activity. Together, this microenvironment has been suggested to increase the activity of opioid peptide metabolism. Therefore, the proximity of immune cells and nerve fibers may be essential to produce adequate analgesic effects. Close associations between opioid-containing immune cells and peripheral nerve terminals have been observed. However, it is not yet determined whether these immune cells actually form synaptic-like contacts with peripheral sensory terminals and/or whether they secrete opioids in a paracrine manner. This review will provide novel insight into the peripheral mechanisms of immune-derived analgesia in inflammation, in particular, the importance of direct interactions between immune cells and the peripheral nervous system. PMID:27532001

  15. Impact of robot-mediated interaction system on joint attention skills for children with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhi; Zhang, Lian; Bekele, Esubalew; Swanson, Amy; Crittendon, Julie A; Warren, Zachary; Sarkar, Nilanjan

    2013-06-01

    With Centers for Disease Control and Prevention prevalence estimates for children with autism spectrum disorder 1 in 88, identification and effective treatment of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is often characterized as a public health emergency. There is an urgent need for more efficacious treatments whose realistic application will yield more substantial impact on the neurodevelopmental trajectories of young children with ASD. Robotic technology appears particularly promising for potential application to ASD intervention. Initial results applying robotic technology to ASD intervention have consistently demonstrated a unique potential to elicit interest and attention in young children with ASD. As such, technologies capable of intelligently harnessing this potential, along with capabilities for detecting and meaningfully responding to young children's attention and behavior, may represent intervention platforms with substantial promise for impacting early symptoms of ASD. Our current work describes development and application of a novel adaptive robot-mediated interaction technology for facilitating early joint attention skills for children with ASD. The system is composed of a humanoid robot endowed with a prompt decision hierarchy to alter behavior in concert with reinforcing stimuli within an intervention environment to promote joint attention skills. Results of implementation of this system over time, including specific analyses of attentional bias and performance enhancement, with 6 young children with ASD are presented. PMID:24187227

  16. Photon-Mediated Interactions: A Scalable Tool to Create and Sustain Entangled States of N Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aron, Camille; Kulkarni, Manas; Türeci, Hakan E.

    2016-01-01

    We propose and study the use of photon-mediated interactions for the generation of long-range steady-state entanglement between N atoms. Through the judicious use of coherent drives and the placement of the atoms in a network of cavity QED systems, a balance between their unitary and dissipative dynamics can be precisely engineered to stabilize a long-range correlated state of qubits in the steady state. We discuss the general theory behind such a scheme and present an example of how it can be used to drive a register of N atoms to a generalized W state and how the entanglement can be sustained indefinitely. The achievable steady-state fidelities for entanglement and its scaling with the number of qubits are discussed for presently existing superconducting quantum circuits. While the protocol is primarily discussed for a superconducting circuit architecture, it is ideally realized in any cavity QED platform that permits controllable delivery of coherent electromagnetic radiation to specified locations.

  17. Mediated entanglement and correlations in a star network of interacting spins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate analytically a star network of spins, in which all spins interact exclusively and continuously with a central spin through Heisenberg XX couplings of equal strength. We find that the central spin correlates and entangles the other spins at zero temperature to a degree that depends on the total number of spins. We find that the entanglement mediating capability of the central spin depends on the evenness or oddness of this number. In the limit of an infinite collection of spins, the difference between entanglement and correlations in terms of divisibility among multiple parties is clearly demonstrated. We also show that with a significant probability one can maximally entangle any two noncentral spins by measuring all the other spins (a process related to the recently introduced notion of localizable entanglement). This probability depends on the evenness and oddness of the total number of spins and remains substantial even for an infinite collection of spins. We show how symmetric multiparty states for optimal sharing and splitting of entanglement can be obtained as ground states of this system using a magnetic field. These states can then be mapped on to flying qubits for transmission to distant parties. We discuss a number of advantages of this mode of generation and distribution of entanglement over other standard methods

  18. Experimental Boson Sampling

    CERN Document Server

    Spring, Justin B; Humphreys, Peter C; Kolthammer, W Steven; Jin, Xian-Min; Barbieri, Marco; Datta, Animesh; Thomas-Peter, Nicholas; Langford, Nathan K; Kundys, Dmytro; Gates, James C; Smith, Brian J; Smith, Peter G R; Walmsley, Ian A

    2013-01-01

    While universal quantum computers ideally solve problems such as factoring integers exponentially more efficiently than classical machines, the formidable challenges in building such devices motivate the demonstration of simpler, problem-specific algorithms that still promise a quantum speedup. We construct a quantum boson sampling machine (QBSM) to sample the output distribution resulting from the nonclassical interference of photons in an integrated photonic circuit, a problem thought to be exponentially hard to solve classically. Unlike universal quantum computation, boson sampling merely requires indistinguishable photons, linear state evolution, and detectors. We benchmark our QBSM with three and four photons and analyze sources of sampling inaccuracy. Our studies pave the way to larger devices that could offer the first definitive quantum-enhanced computation.

  19. DMPD: Signal transduction pathways mediated by the interaction of CpG DNA withToll-like receptor 9. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 14751759 Signal transduction pathways mediated by the interaction of CpG DNA withTo...;16(1):17-22. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Signal transduction pathways mediated by the interaction of... CpG DNA withToll-like receptor 9. PubmedID 14751759 Title Signal transduction pa

  20. AGE-RAGE interaction in the TGFβ2-mediated epithelial to mesenchymal transition of human lens epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Cibin T; Nagaraj, Ram H

    2016-08-01

    Basement membrane (BM) proteins accumulate chemical modifications with age. One such modification is glycation, which results in the formation of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs). In a previous study, we reported that AGEs in the human lens capsule (BM) promote the TGFβ2-mediated epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of lens epithelial cells, which we proposed as a mechanism for posterior capsule opacification (PCO) or secondary cataract formation. In this study, we investigated the role of a receptor for AGEs (RAGE) in the TGFβ2-mediated EMT in a human lens epithelial cell line (FHL124). RAGE was present in FHL124 cells, and its levels were unaltered in cells cultured on either native or AGE-modified BM or upon treatment with TGFβ2. RAGE overexpression significantly enhanced the TGFβ2-mediated EMT responses in cells cultured on AGE-modified BM compared with the unmodified matrix. In contrast, treatment of cells with a RAGE antibody or EN-RAGE (an endogenous ligand for RAGE) resulted in a significant reduction in the TGFβ2-mediated EMT response. This was accompanied by a reduction in TGFβ2-mediated Smad signaling and ROS generation. These results imply that the interaction of matrix AGEs with RAGE plays a role in the TGFβ2-mediated EMT of lens epithelial cells and suggest that the blockade of RAGE could be a strategy to prevent PCO and other age-associated fibrosis. PMID:27263094

  1. Young children accessing the learning of others: mediation through the ‘witnessing’ of others’ gestural interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Wall

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Contextualisation Children’s interactions in the classroom arguably underpin many of the learning events and activities they experience. These may involve their classroom teacher, teaching assistants, other adults (including, in the primary school, context, parents / carers, their peers or other children entering the room where they are working. The paper that follows, reflects on the nature of such interactions, focusing on gestural behaviours, observed as part of a programme of doctoral study. It explores the notion of how the ‘witnessing’ of others’ interactions may contribute to and inform the behaviour, understanding and learning of a child, as they work with their peers and a teacher on a grouped task. In so doing, it re-examines the notion of the more experienced other, associated with Vygotsky’s ideas on social interaction in a pedagogic context and draws on a range of disciplines for both practical and theoretical inspiration. Abstract: Arising from a study of grouped 5-6 year olds’ gestural interactions, an extension to Vygotskian notions of mediation is proposed. This is developed through a consideration of ideas grounded in: cultural psychology, situated learning, distributed cognition , the analysis of ‘task affordances’. The potential significance and role of a child’s ‘witnessing’ of the mediational interactions of others is discussed informed by data drawn from the author’s current research. The implications for teachers’ practice as a more ‘experienced other’, in such interactions, are briefly discussed.

  2. Mott-superfluid transition of q-deformed bosons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of q-deformation of the bosonic algebra on the Mott-superfluid transition for interacting lattice bosons described by the Bose–Hubbard model is studied using mean-filed theory. It has been shown that the Mott state proliferates and the initial periodicity of the Mott lobes as a function of the chemical potential disappears as the q-deformation increases. The ground state phase diagram as a function of the q-parameter exhibits superfluid order, which intervenes in narrow regions between Mott lobes, demonstrating the new concept of statistically induced quantum phase transition. - Highlights: • We study the effect of q-deformed bosons on superfluid transition. • A mean-field theory is employed. • Bosons can change statistics due to deformation of the commutation rules. • Statistically induced quantum phase transition is found

  3. Mott-superfluid transition of q-deformed bosons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopeć, T.K., E-mail: kopec@int.pan.wroc.pl

    2015-10-16

    The effect of q-deformation of the bosonic algebra on the Mott-superfluid transition for interacting lattice bosons described by the Bose–Hubbard model is studied using mean-filed theory. It has been shown that the Mott state proliferates and the initial periodicity of the Mott lobes as a function of the chemical potential disappears as the q-deformation increases. The ground state phase diagram as a function of the q-parameter exhibits superfluid order, which intervenes in narrow regions between Mott lobes, demonstrating the new concept of statistically induced quantum phase transition. - Highlights: • We study the effect of q-deformed bosons on superfluid transition. • A mean-field theory is employed. • Bosons can change statistics due to deformation of the commutation rules. • Statistically induced quantum phase transition is found.

  4. Boson star at finite temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Latifah, S; Mart, T

    2014-01-01

    By using a simple thermodynamical method we confirm the finding of Chavanis and Harko that stable Bose-Einstein condensate stars can form. However, by using a thermodynamically consistent boson equation of state, we obtain a less massive Bose-Einstein condensate star compared to the one predicted by Chavanis and Harko. We also obtain that the maximum mass of a boson star is insensitive to the change of matter temperature. However, the mass of boson star with relatively large radius depends significantly on the temperature of the boson matter.

  5. Bosonization and Lie Group Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Ha, Yuan K

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a concise quantum operator formula for bosonization in which the Lie group structure appears in a natural way. The connection between fermions and bosons is found to be exactly the connection between Lie group elements and the group parameters. Bosonization is an extraordinary way of expressing the equation of motion of a complex fermion field in terms of a real scalar boson in two dimensions. All the