WorldWideScience

Sample records for borosilicates

  1. Introduction - Acid decomposition of borosilicate ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The complex processing of mineral raw materials is an effective way for the extraction of valuable components. One of these raw materials are borosilicate ores from which the boric acid, aluminium and iron salts and building materials can be obtained. In the Institute of Chemistry of the Academy of Sciences of the Republic of Tajikistan the flowsheets of the processing of borosilicate raw materials by acid and chloric methods were elaborated. The acid methods of decomposition of borosilicate ores of Ak-Arkhar Deposit were considered in present monograph. The carried out researches on elaboration of physicochemical aspects and technological acid methods allowed to define the optimal ways of extraction of valuable products from borosilicate raw materials of Tajikistan.

  2. Topological Principles of Borosilicate Glass Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup; Mauro, J. C.; Youngman, R. E.;

    2011-01-01

    Borosilicate glasses display a rich complexity of chemical behavior depending on the details of their composition and thermal history. Noted for their high chemical durability and thermal shock resistance, borosilicate glasses have found a variety of important uses from common household...... and laboratory glassware to high-tech applications such as liquid crystal displays. In this paper, we investigate the topological principles of borosilicate glass chemistry covering the extremes from pure borate to pure silicate end members. Based on NMR measurements, we present a two-state statistical...... earthborosilicate glasses that enables the accurate prediction of properties such as glass transition temperature, liquid fragility, and hardness. The modeling approach enables an understanding of the microscopic mechanisms governing macroscopic properties. The implications of the glass topology are discussed...

  3. Relaxation Behaviour of Lithium-Borosilicate Glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. B. Thombre

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Three systems of lithium borosilicate (LBS glasses namely SI 42.5Li2O: (57.5-x B2O3: xSiO2, SII 42.5Li2O: xB2O3 :( 57.5-x SiO2 where x=0, 5, 10, 20, and 30, and SIII (100-2x Li2O: xB2O3: xSiO2 where x=30, 28.75, 27.5, 25, and 22.5, are prepared using conventional melt quenching technique. Functional dependence of conductivity on temperature in the range from 523- 673K and frequency in the range from 10Hz to 13 MHz is studied. In order to analyze electrical conductivity the microscopic parameters such as ionic jump distance and barrier height are necessary. These parameters can be understood properly on the basis of the models proposed by Almond and Elliott. As frequency increases from 1MHz to 13MHz, the Tmin shifts towards low temperature side. According to this model the charge transfer is a thermally activated process and provides a correlation between the barrier height (W and the hopping length (R. The fitting of conductivity data into Almond-West type power law behavior σ = σ(o + Aωs yielded power law exponent(s. Electrical conductivity data fitted well in Elliott’s model, which is true only for amorphous materials. The temperature dependence of frequency exponent s exhibits a minimum (smin at a particular temperature (Tmin . . From the scaling behavior of the ac conductivity it is seen that all the curves scaled better, suggesting that s is temperature independent. It is observed that smin shifts to lower temperature, which shows that electrical conductivity of glassy solid electrolytes is the manifestation of ionic dynamic processes. The superposition of the reduced conductivity at all temperatures shows relaxation mechanism is temperature independent. Analysis of modulus formalism with a distribution of relaxation times using KWW stretched exponential function, the stretching exponent, β, is depend on temperature. The analysis of the temperature variation of the M″ peak indicates the relaxation process is thermally activated

  4. Er3+-Yb3+ codoped borosilicate glass for optical thermometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Infrared to green up-conversion emissions centered at the wavelengths of about 524 and 550 nm of the Er3+-Yb3+ codoped borosilicate glass are recorded,using a 978 nm semiconductor laser diode(LD) as an excitation source.The fluorescence intensity ratio(FIR) of the green up-conversion emissions at about 524 and 550 nm in the Er3+-Yb3+ codoped borosilicate glass has been studied as a function of temperature over the temperature range of 295-873 K.The maximum sensitivity and the temperature resolution derived from the FIR of the green up-conversion emissions are approximately 0.0038 K-1 and 0.2 K,respectively.It is demonstrated that the prototype optical temperature sensor based on the FIR technique from the green up-conversion emissions in the Er3+-Yb3+ codoped borosilicate glass plays a major role in temperature measurement.

  5. Using of borosilicate glass waste as a cement additive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Weiwei; Sun, Tao; Li, Xinping; Sun, Mian; Lu, Yani

    2016-08-01

    Borosilicate glass waste is investigated as a cement additive in this paper to improve the properties of cement and concrete, such as setting time, compressive strength and radiation shielding. The results demonstrate that borosilicate glass is an effective additive, which not only improves the radiation shielding properties of cement paste, but also shows the irradiation effect on the mechanical and optical properties: borosilicate glass can increase the compressive strength and at the same time it makes a minor impact on the setting time and main mineralogical compositions of hydrated cement mixtures; and when the natural river sand in the mortar is replaced by borosilicate glass sand (in amounts from 0% to 22.2%), the compressive strength and the linear attenuation coefficient firstly increase and then decrease. When the glass waste content is 14.8%, the compressive strength is 43.2 MPa after 28 d and the linear attenuation coefficient is 0.2457 cm-1 after 28 d, which is beneficial for the preparation of radiation shielding concrete with high performances.

  6. Utilization of borosilicate glass for transuranic waste immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Incinerated transuranic waste and other low-level residues have been successfully vitrified by mixing with boric acid and sodium carbonate and heating to 10500C in a bench-scale continuous melter. The resulting borosilicate glass demonstrates excellent mechanical durability and chemical stability

  7. Topological Principles of Borosilicate Glass Chemistry - An Invited Talk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mauro, J.C.; Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup; Youngman, R. E.;

    topological representation of alkali-alkaline earth-borosilicate glasses that enables the accurate prediction of properties such as glass transition temperature, liquid fragility, hardness, and configurational heat capacity. The implications of the glass topology are discussed in terms of both the temperature...

  8. Radiolysis of hexane absorbing on borosilicate surface research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiolysis process of hexane absorbing on borosilicate with various hydration degree is being investigated. Samples of borosilicate were treated by thermal vacuum at and T=493 K and P=1.33·10-4 Pa. The absorption of water and hexane was carried out on manometric equipment at 77 K temperature. An irradiation was conducted by γ-rays from 60Co source in the sealed in ampoules at 77 K with 10 kGy dose. In the irradiated samples the ESR spectrum with wide range that is characteristic for irradiated alkanes in the absorbing condition was observed. With increase of temperature of registration narrowing lines and improved sanction connected to recombination processes of radicals was observed. With increase of a hydration of a surface the redistribution and reduction of intensity separate component of a spectrum was observed. It specifies formation and stabilization bonding of radicals at smaller filling of a surface borosilicate. To reveal structure of radiolysis products IR spectra of desorbed from a borosilicate surface gas products were received at 333 K. In the field of low-frequency deformation of fluctuations CH2-groups the doublet strip with maxima was observed at 790 cm-1 and 770 cm-1 which is referred to low-molecular of radiolysis products

  9. Thermophysical Properties of Multiphase Borosilicate Glass-Ceramic Waste Forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Andrew T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Crum, Jarrod V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Tang, Ming [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rouxel, T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-01-22

    Multiphase borosilicate glass-ceramics represent one candidate to contain radioactive nuclear waste separated from used nuclear fuel. In this work, the thermophysical properties from room temperature to 1273 K were investigated for four different borosilicate glass-ceramic compositions containing waste loadings from 42 to 60 wt% to determine the sensitivity of these properties to waste loading, as-fabricated microstructure, and potential evolutions in microstructure brought about by temperature transients. The thermal expansion, specific heat capacity, thermal diffusivity, and thermal conductivity are presented. The impact of increasing waste loading is shown to have a small but measurable effect on the thermophysical properties between the four compositions, contrasted to a much greater impact observed when transitioning from predominantly crystalline to amorphous systems. Thermal cycling below 1273 K was not found to measurably impact the thermophysical properties of the compositions investigated here.

  10. Direct conversion of halogen-containing wastes to borosilicate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass has become a preferred waste form worldwide for radioactive wastes: however, there are limitations. Halogen-containing wastes can not be converted to glass because halogens form poor-quality waste glasses. Furthermore, halides in glass melters often form second phases that create operating problems. A new waste vitrification process, the Glass Material Oxidation and dissolution System (GMODS), removes these limitations by converting halogen-containing wastes into borosilicate glass and a secondary, clean, sodium-halide stream

  11. Effect of zeolite formation on borosilicate glass dissolution kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fournier, Maxime; Frugier, Pierre; Gin, Stephane [CEA, DEN-Marcoule, F30207, Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France)

    2013-07-01

    This study is a preliminary work on the description and the modeling of physico-chemical mechanisms potentially causing nuclear glass alteration to accelerate, as observed under experimental specific conditions. A better understanding of the mechanisms of alteration resumption, linked to the precipitation of zeolite, is necessary to model these phenomena. Leaching tests of a nuclear borosilicate glass show guidelines for designing experiments that promote alteration resumption and evidence the role of developed crystalline surfaces and aluminum on nucleation kinetics of zeolites. (authors)

  12. Leaching of borosilicate glasses incorporating H.L. radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The european community commission organized in the period 1983-84 an international round robin test aiming at the evaluation of a method for controlling the high-temperature leaching resistance of borosilicate glasses incorporating high-level radioactive wastes. The radwaste experimental processes laboratory of the COMB/MEPIS Division, in collaboration with the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory of the TIB/CHI Division, partecipated to this round robin test with other 12 european and 2 extra european laboratories. In this paper the main results obtained in thi partecipation are reported

  13. Boron Speciation in Soda-Lime Borosilicate Glasses Containing Zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron speciation was investigated in soda-lime borosilicate glass containing zirconium. In such compositions, competition between charge compensators (here, sodium and calcium) can occur for the compensation of tetrahedral boron or octahedral zirconium units. 11B MAS NMR is particularly suitable for obtaining data on preferential compensation behavior that directly affects the boron coordination number. In addition to the classical proportions of tri- and tetrahedral boron, additional data can be obtained on the contributions involved in these two coordination numbers. An approach is described here based on simultaneous MAS spectrum analysis of borosilicate glass with variable Zr/Si and Ca/Na ratios at two magnetic field strengths (11. 7 and 18. 8 T), with constraints arising from MQMAS spectroscopy, detailed analysis of satellite transitions, and spin-echo experiments. New possibilities of 11B NMR were presented for improving the identification and quantification of the different contributions involved in tri- and tetrahedral boron coordination. Both NMR and Raman revealed a trend of decreased tetrahedral boron proportion with the increase of Ca/Na ratio or the Zr/Si ratio. This strongly suggests that zirconium compensation takes preference over boron compensation, and that zirconium and boron are both compensated mainly by sodium rather than calcium. (authors)

  14. Moessbauer spectroscopic study of potassium borosilicate glasses at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Moessbauer technique at the liquid nitrogen temperature (78 K) was applied to the estimation of nonbridging oxygens in FeO4, BO4, and SiO4 units in potassium borosilicate glasses. Moessbauer spectra consist of a quadrupole doublet and a hyperfine structure due to Fe3+ ions with tetrahedral symmetry. The hyperfine structure is attributed to a relaxation effect because magnetic susceptibility measurements revealed the glasses to be paramagnetic in the temperature range 78 - 295 K. A linear decrease in the absorption area and a similar decrease in the internal magnetic field for the hyperfine structure were observed with an increase in the alkali content of glasses. The decrease is ascribed to a formation of non-bridging oxygen at the site adjacent to iron, because the mean life-time of the internal magnetic field produced by 3d-electrons of iron is considered to decrease with increasing thermal vibration of the iron and neighboring oxygens. Fractions of non-bridging oxygens obtained from the reduction rate of the absorption area of hyperfine structure are in good agreement with earlier results for borate glasses with the same K2O/B2O3 ratios, in the alkali region of 8 - 20 mol% where the borosilicate glasses are essentially considered to be borate glasses diluted with SiO2. (author)

  15. Barium borosilicate glass as a matrix for the uptake of dyes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barium borosilicate (BBS) and sodium borosilicate (SBS) glass samples, prepared by the conventional melt-quench method, were used for the uptake of Rhodamine 6G dye from aqueous solution. The experimental conditions were optimized to get maximum uptake and was found to be 0.4 mg of dye per gram of BBS glass sample. For the same network former to modifier ratio, barium borosilicate glasses are found to have improved extent of uptake for the dye molecules from aqueous solutions compared to sodium borosilicate glasses. Based on 29Si MAS NMR studies on these glasses, it is inferred that significantly higher number of non-bridging oxygen atoms present in barium borosilicate glasses compared to sodium borosilicate glasses is responsible for its improved uptake of Rhodamine 6G dye. 11B MAS NMR studies have confirmed the simultaneous existence of boron in BO3 and BO4 configurations in both barium borosilicate and sodium borosilicate glasses. The luminescence studies have established that the dye molecule is incorporated into the glass matrix through ion exchange mechanism by replacing the exchangeable ions like Na+/Ba2+ attached with the non-bridging oxygen atoms present in the glass.

  16. Synthesis and characterization of acidic mesoporous borosilicate thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiu, Tongping; Liu, Qian; Wang, Jiacheng

    2009-02-01

    Work on the synthesis and characterization of acidic wormhole-like ordered mesoporous borosilicate thin films (MBSTFs) on silicon wafers is described in this paper. The MBSTFs coated by the dip-coating method were prepared through an evaporation-induced self-assembly (EISA) process using nonionic block copolymers as structure-directing agents. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy confirmed the formation of borosiloxane bonds (Si-O-B). High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and N2 sorption evidenced a wormhole-like mesoporous structure in the MBSTFs obtained. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of the cross sections and surfaces of the samples showed that MBSTFs on silicon wafers were continuous, homogeneous and did not crack. The acidic properties of the MBSTFs were characterized by FT-IR spectra of chemisorbed pyridine. The MBSTFs thus prepared may find their future applications in many fields including chemical sensors, catalysis, optical coating, molecule separation, etc. PMID:19441565

  17. Modeling and simulation of the cooling process of borosilicate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For a better understanding of the thermomechanical behavior of glasses used for nuclear waste vitrification, the cooling process of a bulk borosilicate glass is modeled using the finite element code Abaqus. During this process, the thermal gradients may have an impact on the solidification process. To evaluate this impact, the simulation was based on thermal experimental data from an inactive nuclear waste package. The thermal calculations were made within a parametric window using different boundary conditions to evaluate the variations of temperature distributions for each case. The temperature differences throughout the thickness of solidified glass were found to be significantly non-uniform throughout the package. The temperature evolution in the bulk glass was highly responsive to the external cooling rates applied; thus emphasizing the role of the thermal inertia for this bulky glass cast. (authors)

  18. Behaviour of ruthenium dioxide particles in borosilicate glasses and melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pflieger, Rachel; Lefebvre, Leila; Malki, Mohammed; Allix, Mathieu; Grandjean, Agnès

    2009-06-01

    Ruthenium-glass systems are formed during the vitrification of nuclear waste. They are also widely used in micro-electronics because of their unique electrical properties. However, the interaction of this element with the glass matrix remains poorly understood. This work focuses on a RuO 2 particles-nuclear alumino-borosilicate glass system in which the electrical conductivity is known to vary considerably with the RuO 2 content and to become electronic above about 0.5-0.7 vol.% RuO 2 [R. Pflieger, M. Malki, Y. Guari, J. Larionova, A. Grandjean, J. Am. Ceram. Soc., accepted for publication]. Some RuO 2 segregation was observed in SEM/TEM investigations but no continuous chain of RuO 2 particles could be seen. Electron relays between the particles are then necessary for a low-rate percolation, such as the nanoclusters suggested by Adachi et al. [K. Adachi, S. Iida, K. Hayashi, J. Mater. Res. 9 (7) (1994) 1866; K. Adachi, H. Kuno, J. Am. Ceram. Soc. 83 (10) (2000) 2441], which could consist in dissolved ruthenium. Indeed, several observations made here clearly indicate the presence of dissolved ruthenium in the glass matrix, like the modification of the glass density in presence of RuO 2 particles or the diffusion-limited growth of RuO 2 particles in the melt.

  19. Enhancing cerium and plutonium solubility by reduction in borosilicate glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cachia, J.-N.; Deschanels, X.; Den Auwer, C.; Pinet, O.; Phalippou, J.; Hennig, C.; Scheinost, A.

    2006-06-01

    High-level radioactive wastes produced by spent fuel reprocessing containing fission and activation products as well as actinides are incorporated in a borosilicate glass. To ensure optimum radionuclide containment, the resulting glass must be as homogeneous as possible. Microscopic heterogeneity can arise from various processes including the excess loading of an element above its solubility limit. The current actinide loading limit is 0.4 wt%. Work is in progress to assess the actinide solubility in these glasses, especially for plutonium. Initially the actinides were simulated by lanthanides and hafnium. The results show that trivalent elements (La, Gd) exhibit greater solubility than tetravalent elements (Pu, Hf). Cerium is an interesting element because its oxidation state varies from IV to III depending on the process conditions, such as the temperature and redox potential of the melt. In order to quantify the solubility increase, cerium-doped glass samples were melted under reducing conditions by adding a reducing agent. The solubility observed at 1473 K increased significantly from 0.95 to 13.00 wt%. Several reducing compounds have been tested. This paper deals with this study and the application to reduce Pu(IV) to Pu(III). The reduction state was characterized by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES) for plutonium and by chemical analysis for cerium. The material homogeneity was verified by optical and scanning electron microscopy. Preliminary findings concerning the reduction of Pu-doped glasses fabricated in hot cells are also discussed.

  20. Borosilicate glass as a matrix for the immobilization of Savannah River Plant waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reference waste form for immobilization of Savannah River Plant (SRP) waste is borosilicate glass. In the reference process, waste is mixed with glass-forming chemicals and melted in a Joule-heated ceramic melter at 11500C. Waste glass made with actual or simulated waste on a small scale and glass made with simulated waste on a large scale confirm that the current reference process and glass-former composition are able to accommodate all SRP waste compositions and can produce a glass with: high waste loading; low leach rates; good thermal stability; high resistance to radiation effects; and good impact resistance. Borosilicate glass has been studied as a matrix for the immobilization of SRP waste since 1974. This paper reviews the results of extensive characterization and performance testing of the glass product. These results show that borosilicate glass is a very suitable matrix for the immobilization of SRP waste. 18 references, 3 figures, 10 tables

  1. Atomic layer deposited borosilicate glass microchannel plates for large area event counting detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; McPhate, J. B.; Tremsin, A. S.; Jelinsky, S. R.; Hemphill, R.; Frisch, H. J.; Elam, J.; Mane, A.; Lappd Collaboration

    2012-12-01

    Borosilicate glass micro-capillary array substrates with 20 μm and 40 μm pores have been deposited with resistive, and secondary electron emissive, layers by atomic layer deposition to produce functional microchannel plates. Device formats of 32.7 mm and 20 cm square have been fabricated and tested in analog and photon counting modes. The tests show amplification, imaging, background rate, pulse shape and lifetime characteristics that are comparable to standard glass microchannel plates. Large area microchannel plates of this type facilitate the construction of 20 cm format sealed tube sensors with strip-line readouts that are being developed for Cherenkov light detection. Complementary work has resulted in Na2KSb bialkali photocathodes with peak quantum efficiency of 25% being made on borosilicate glass. Additionally GaN (Mg) opaque photocathodes have been successfully made on borosilicate microchannel plates.

  2. Modelling the evaporation of boron species. Part 1: Alkali-free borosilicate glass melts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Limpt, J.A.C. van; Beerkens, R.G.C.; Cook, S.; O'Connor, R.; Simon, J.

    2011-01-01

    A laboratory test facility has been used to measure the boron evaporation rates from borosilicate glass melts. The impact of furnace atmosphere composition and glass melt composition on the temperature dependent boron evaporation rates has been investigated experimentally. In Part 1 of this paper th

  3. LIQUIDUS TEMPERATURE OF HIGH-LEVEL WASTE BOROSILICATE GLASSES WITH SPINEL PRIMARY PHASE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liquidus temperatures (TL) were measured for high-level waste (HLW) borosilicate glasses covering a Savannah River composition region. The primary crystallization phase for most glasses was spinel, a solid solution of trevorite (NiFe2O4) with other oxides (FeO, MnO, and Cr2O3). T...

  4. Monte Carlo Simulations of Coupled Diffusion and Surface Reactions during the Aqueous Corrosion of Borosilicate Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Pierce, Eric M.; Ryan, Joseph V.

    2015-01-01

    Borosilicate nuclear waste glasses develop complex altered layers as a result of coupled processes such as hydrolysis of network species, condensation of Si species, and diffusion. However, diffusion has often been overlooked in Monte Carlo models of the aqueous corrosion of borosilicate glasses. Therefore, three different models for dissolved Si diffusion in the altered layer were implemented in a Monte Carlo model and evaluated for glasses in the compositional range (75-x) mol% SiO2 (12.5+x/2) mol% B2O3 and (12.5+x/2) mol% Na2O, where 0 ≤ x ≤ 20%, and corroded in static conditions at a surface-to-volume ratio of 1000 m-1. The three models considered instantaneous homogenization (M1), linear concentration gradients (M2), and concentration profiles determined by solving Fick’s 2nd law using a finite difference method (M3). Model M3 revealed that concentration profiles in the altered layer are not linear and show changes in shape and magnitude as corrosion progresses, unlike those assumed in model M2. Furthermore, model M3 showed that, for borosilicate glasses with a high forward dissolution rate compared to the diffusion rate, the gradual polymerization and densification of the altered layer is significantly delayed compared to models M1 and M2. Models M1 and M2 were found to be appropriate models only for glasses with high release rates such as simple borosilicate glasses with low ZrO2 content.

  5. Structural aspects of barium borosilicate glasses containing thorium and uranium oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barium borosilicate glasses incorporated with 15.86 wt% ThO2 and containing different amounts of uranium oxide were prepared by conventional melt quench method. Based on 29Si and 11B magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) studies, it has been confirmed that uranium oxide incorporation is associated with distortion of borosilicate network as revealed by the increase in the relative concentration of Q2 structural units of silicon as well as the increase in the quadrupolar coupling constant (C q) of BO3 structural units. The increased number of non-bridging oxygen atoms brought about by the increase in Q2 structural units of silicon facilitates the incorporation of both uranium and thorium ions in the sites created by non-bridging oxygen atoms (network modifying positions) in the glass. Uranium oxide incorporation above 7.5 wt% resulted in the phase separation of ThO2 as revealed by the X-ray diffraction studies. The present study focuses on the structural changes with the borosilicate network of barium borosilicate glasses brought about by the introduction of thorium and uranium ions

  6. Laser Induced Damage Studies in Borosilicate Glass Using nanosecond and sub nanosecond pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Rastogi, Vinay; Munda, D S

    2016-01-01

    The damage mechanism induced by laser pulse of different duration in borosilicate glass widely used for making confinement geometry targets which are important for laser driven shock multiplication and elongation of pressure pulse, is studied. We measured the front and rear surface damage threshold of borosilicate glass and their dependency on laser parameters. In this paper, we also study the thermal effects on the damage diameters, generated at the time of plasma formation. These induced damage width, geometries and microstructure changes are measured and analyzed with optical microscope, scanning electron microscope and Raman spectroscopy. The results show that at low energies symmetrical damages are found and these damage width increases nonlinearly with laser intensity. The emitted optical spectrum during the process of breakdown is also investigated and is used for the characterization of emitted plasma such as plasma temperature and free electron density. Optical emission lines from Si I at 500 nm, Si ...

  7. Gamma-ray shielding and structural properties of barium-bismuth-borosilicate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bootjomchai, Cherdsak; Laopaiboon, Jintana; Yenchai, Chadet; Laopaiboon, Raewat

    2012-07-01

    The attenuation coefficients of barium-bismuth-borosilicate glasses have been measured for gamma-ray photon energies of 662, 1173 and 1332 keV using a narrow beam transmission geometry. These coefficients were then used to obtain the values of mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic number, effective electron density and mean free path. Good agreement has been observed between experimental and theoretical values of these parameters. From the obtained results it is reported here that from the barium-bismuth-borosilicate glasses are better shields to gamma-radiations in comparison to the standard radiation shielding concretes from the shielding point of view. The molar volume, FTIR and acoustic investigations have been used to study the structural properties of the prepared glass system. The obtained results reveal that the formation of non-bridging oxygens occurs at higher concentration of Bi2O3.

  8. Profile Control of a Borosilicate-Glass Groove Formed by Deep Reactive Ion Etching

    CERN Document Server

    Akashi, T

    2008-01-01

    Deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) of borosilicate glass and profile control of an etched groove are reported. DRIE was carried out using an anodically bonded silicon wafer as an etching mask. We controlled the groove profile, namely improving its sidewall angle, by removing excessively thick polymer film produced by carbonfluoride etching gases during DRIE. Two fabrication processes were experimentally compared for effective removal of the film : DRIE with the addition of argon to the etching gases and a novel combined process in which DRIE and subsequent ultrasonic cleaning in DI water were alternately carried out. Both processes improved the sidewall angle, and it reached 85o independent of the mask-opening width. The results showed the processes can remove excessive polymer film on sidewalls. Accordingly, the processes are an effective way to control the groove profile of borosilicate glass.

  9. Removal of OH Absorption Bands Due to Pyrohydrolysis Reactions in Fluoride-Containing Borosilicate Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Keiji

    1997-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to decrease and to remove OH ions and H2O in borosilicate glasses. Fluoride-containing borosilicate glasses followed by dry-air-bubbling showed the significant decrease of OH absorption bands around 3500 cm-1. The decrease of OH absorption bands was elucidated by the use of pyrohydrolysis reactions in these glasses where fluoride ions react with OH ions or H2O during melting. The rates of the decrease of OH absorption bands substantially depend on high valence cations of fluorides. Particularly, the decrease rates of OH absorption coefficients were in the order of ZrF4-containing glass>AlF3-containing glass>ZnF2-containing glass. ZrF4-containing glass treated by dry-air-bubbling showed a good capability to remove OH absorption band. Fluoride-containing glasses showed the low flow point in comparison with fluoride-free glasses.

  10. Chemical durability of lead borosilicate glass matrix under simulated geological conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The lead borosilicate glass has been developed for vitrification of High Level Waste (HLW) stored at Trombay. This waste is contains especially high contents of sodium, uranium sulphate and iron. The glasses containing HLW are to be ultimately disposed into deep geological repositories. Long term leach rates under simulated geological conditions need to be evaluated for glass matrix. Studies were taken up to estimate the lead borosilicate glass WTR-62 matrix for chemical durability in presence of synthetic ground water. The leachant selected was based on composition of ground water sample near proposed repository site. In the first phase of these tests, the experiments were conducted for short duration of one and half month. The leaching experiments were conducted in presence of a) distilled water b) synthetic ground water c) synthetic ground water containing granite, bentonite and ferric oxide and d) synthetic ground water containing humic acid at 1000C. The leachate samples were analysed by pHmetry , ion chromatography and UV -VIS spectrophotometry. The normalised leach rates for lead borosilicate WTR- 62 glass matrix based on silica, boron and sulphate analyses of leachates were of the order of 10-3 to 10-5 gms/cm2/day for 45 days test period in presence of synthetic ground water as well as in presence of other materials likely to be present along with synthetic ground water. These rates are comparable to those of sodium borsilicate glass matrices reported in literature. It is known that the leach rates of glass matrix decrease with longer test durations due to formation of leached layer on its surface. The observed leach rates of lead borosilicate WTR- 62 glass matrix for 45 day tests under simulated geological conditions were found to be sufficiently encouraging to take up long term tests for evaluating its performances under repository conditions. (author)

  11. Fabrication of Low Noise Borosilicate Glass Nanopores for Single Molecule Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bafna, Jayesh A.; Soni, Gautam V.

    2016-01-01

    We show low-cost fabrication and characterization of borosilicate glass nanopores for single molecule sensing. Nanopores with diameters of ~100 nm were fabricated in borosilicate glass capillaries using laser assisted glass puller. We further achieve controlled reduction and nanometer-size control in pore diameter by sculpting them under constant electron beam exposure. We successfully fabricate pore diameters down to 6 nm. We next show electrical characterization and low-noise behavior of these borosilicate nanopores and compare their taper geometries. We show, for the first time, a comprehensive characterization of glass nanopore conductance across six-orders of magnitude (1M-1μM) of salt conditions, highlighting the role of buffer conditions. Finally, we demonstrate single molecule sensing capabilities of these devices with real-time translocation experiments of individual λ-DNA molecules. We observe distinct current blockage signatures of linear as well as folded DNA molecules as they undergo voltage-driven translocation through the glass nanopores. We find increased signal to noise for single molecule detection for higher trans-nanopore driving voltages. We propose these nanopores will expand the realm of applications for nanopore platform. PMID:27285088

  12. Influence of Cu doping in borosilicate bioactive glass and the properties of its derived scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Zhao, Shichang; Xiao, Wei; Xue, Jingzhe; Shen, Youqu; Zhou, Jie; Huang, Wenhai; Rahaman, Mohamed N; Zhang, Changqing; Wang, Deping

    2016-01-01

    Copper doped borosilicate glasses (BG-Cu) were studied by means of FT-IR, Raman, UV-vis and NMR spectroscopies to investigate the changes that appeared in the structure of borosilicate glass matrix by doping copper ions. Micro-fil and immunohistochemistry analysis were applied to study the angiogenesis of its derived scaffolds in vivo. Results indicated that the Cu ions significantly increased the B-O bond of BO4 groups at 980 cm(-1), while they decrease that of BO2O(-) groups at 1440-1470 cm(-1) as shown by Raman spectra. A negative shift was observed from (11)B and (29)Si NMR spectra. The (11)B NMR spectra exhibited a clear transformation from BO3 into BO4 groups, caused by the agglutination effect of the Cu ions and the charge balance of the agglomerate in the glass network, leading to a more stable glass network and lower ions release rate in the degradation process. Furthermore, the BG-Cu scaffolds significantly enhanced blood vessel formation in rat calvarial defects at 8 weeks post-implantation. Generally, it suggested that the introduction of Cu into borosilicate glass endowed glass and its derived scaffolds with good properties, and the cooperation of Cu with bioactive glass may pave a new way for tissue engineering.

  13. Process for the fabrication of hollow core solenoidal microcoils in borosilicate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the fabrication of solenoidal microcoils with hollow core embedded within two 100 µm thick borosilicate glass wafers. The main process steps are the reactive ion etching of borosilicate glass, anodic wafer bonding, copper metal organic chemical vapor deposition (Cu MOCVD) and electroless galvanization. Our motivation stems from the need for a reliable, precise fabrication method of microcoils for high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). For reduced loss at high-frequency operation, glass, with a lower dielectric constant as compared to silicon, was chosen as a substrate material. Simultaneously, this offers MRI sample observation owing to its optical transparency. Further essential parameters for the coil design were the need for small coil dimensions, a high filling factor (region of interest within the coil occupied by the sample/overall coil volume), and low-loss electrical connectability to external devices. In an attempt to achieve those requirements, the reported process demonstrates the combination of front- and backside borosilicate glass RIE of small dimensional features (down to 10 µm wall thickness) with subsequent conformal metallization of the 3D solenoidal coil by means of Cu MOCV and electroless galvanization

  14. High-level waste borosilicate glass a compendium of corrosion characteristics. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current plans call for the United States Department of Energy (DOE) to start up facilities for vitrification of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) stored in tanks at the Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina, in 1995; West Valley Demonstration Project, West Valley, New York, in 1996; and at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington, after the year 2000. The product from these facilities will be canistered HLW borosilicate glass, which will be stored, transported, and eventually disposed of in a geologic repository. The behavior of this glass waste product, under the range of likely service conditions, is the subject of considerable scientific and public interest. Over the past few decades, a large body of scientific information on borosilicate waste glass has been generated worldwide. The intent of this document is to consolidate information pertaining to our current understanding of waste glass corrosion behavior and radionuclide release. The objective, scope, and organization of the document are discussed in Section 1.1, and an overview of borosilicate glass corrosion is provided in Section 1.2. The history of glass as a waste form and the international experience with waste glass are summarized in Sections 1.3 and 1.4, respectively

  15. Aqueous corrosion of borosilicate glasses: experiments, modeling and Monte-Carlo simulations; Alteration par l'eau des verres borosilicates: experiences, modelisation et simulations Monte-Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ledieu, A

    2004-10-01

    This work is concerned with the corrosion of borosilicate glasses with variable oxide contents. The originality of this study is the complementary use of experiments and numerical simulations. This study is expected to contribute to a better understanding of the corrosion of nuclear waste confinement glasses. First, the corrosion of glasses containing only silicon, boron and sodium oxides has been studied. The kinetics of leaching show that the rate of leaching and the final degree of corrosion sharply depend on the boron content through a percolation mechanism. For some glass contents and some conditions of leaching, the layer which appears at the glass surface stops the release of soluble species (boron and sodium). This altered layer (also called the gel layer) has been characterized with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) techniques. Second, additional elements have been included in the glass composition. It appears that calcium, zirconium or aluminum oxides strongly modify the final degree of corrosion so that the percolation properties of the boron sub-network is no more a sufficient explanation to account for the behavior of these glasses. Meanwhile, we have developed a theoretical model, based on the dissolution and the reprecipitation of the silicon. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations have been used in order to test several concepts such as the boron percolation, the local reactivity of weakly soluble elements and the restructuring of the gel layer. This model has been fully validated by comparison with the results on the three oxide glasses. Then, it has been used as a comprehensive tool to investigate the paradoxical behavior of the aluminum and zirconium glasses: although these elements slow down the corrosion kinetics, they lead to a deeper final degree of corrosion. The main contribution of this work is that the final degree of corrosion of borosilicate glasses results from the competition of two opposite mechanisms

  16. Water leaching of borosilicate glasses: experiments, modeling and Monte Carlo simulations; Alteration par l'eau des verres borosilicates: experiences, modelisation et simulations Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ledieu, A

    2004-10-15

    This work is concerned with the corrosion of borosilicate glasses with variable oxide contents. The originality of this study is the complementary use of experiments and numerical simulations. This study is expected to contribute to a better understanding of the corrosion of nuclear waste confinement glasses. First, the corrosion of glasses containing only silicon, boron and sodium oxides has been studied. The kinetics of leaching show that the rate of leaching and the final degree of corrosion sharply depend on the boron content through a percolation mechanism. For some glass contents and some conditions of leaching, the layer which appears at the glass surface stops the release of soluble species (boron and sodium). This altered layer (also called the gel layer) has been characterized with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) techniques. Second, additional elements have been included in the glass composition. It appears that calcium, zirconium or aluminum oxides strongly modify the final degree of corrosion so that the percolation properties of the boron sub-network is no more a sufficient explanation to account for the behavior of these glasses. Meanwhile, we have developed a theoretical model, based on the dissolution and the reprecipitation of the silicon. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations have been used in order to test several concepts such as the boron percolation, the local reactivity of weakly soluble elements and the restructuring of the gel layer. This model has been fully validated by comparison with the results on the three oxide glasses. Then, it has been used as a comprehensive tool to investigate the paradoxical behavior of the aluminum and zirconium glasses: although these elements slow down the corrosion kinetics, they lead to a deeper final degree of corrosion. The main contribution of this work is that the final degree of corrosion of borosilicate glasses results from the competition of two opposite mechanisms

  17. Quantification of the boron speciation in alkali borosilicate glasses by electron energy loss spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheng, D.S.; Yang, G.; Zhao, Y.Q.;

    2015-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy and related analytical techniques have been widely used to study the microstructure of different materials. However, few research works have been performed in the field of glasses, possibly due to the electron-beam irradiation damage. In this paper, we have...... developed a method based on electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) data acquisition and analyses, which enables determination of the boron speciation in a series of ternary alkali borosilicate glasses with constant molar ratios. A script for the fast acquisition of EELS has been designed, from which...

  18. High-level waste borosilicate glass: A compendium of corrosion characteristics. Volume 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this document is to summarize scientific information pertinent to evaluating the extent to which high-level waste borosilicate glass corrosion and the associated radionuclide release processes are understood for the range of environmental conditions to which waste glass may be exposed in service. Alteration processes occurring within the bulk of the glass (e.g., devitrification and radiation-induced changes) are discussed insofar as they affect glass corrosion. Volume III contains a bibliography of glass corrosion studies, including studies that are not cited in Volumes I and II

  19. High-level waste borosilicate glass: A compendium of corrosion characteristics. Volume 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunnane, J.C. [comp.; Bates, J.K.; Bradley, C.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [and others

    1994-03-01

    The objective of this document is to summarize scientific information pertinent to evaluating the extent to which high-level waste borosilicate glass corrosion and the associated radionuclide release processes are understood for the range of environmental conditions to which waste glass may be exposed in service. Alteration processes occurring within the bulk of the glass (e.g., devitrification and radiation-induced changes) are discussed insofar as they affect glass corrosion. Volume III contains a bibliography of glass corrosion studies, including studies that are not cited in Volumes I and II.

  20. The Coordination State of B and Al of Borosilicate Glass by IR Spectra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WAN Junpeng; CHENG Jinshu; LU Ping

    2008-01-01

    The IR spectra of R2O-RO-B2O3-SiO2 and R2O-RO-B2O3-Al2O3-SiO2 glasses were tested for the study of coordination state of B, Al and their content. The results show that no matter Na2O/B2O3>1,=1, or<1, both [Bo3] and destroyed Si-O bond exist in glass structure; the addition of Al2O3 to borosilicate glass reduced both the number of non-bridging oxygen in the silicate network and the number of [BO4] units.

  1. Fabrication of Silicon Nitride Dental Core Ceramics with Borosilicate Veneering material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wananuruksawong, R.; Jinawath, S.; Padipatvuthikul, P.; Wasanapiarnpong, T.

    2011-10-01

    Silicon nitride (Si3N4) ceramic is a great candidate for clinical applications due to its high fracture toughness, strength, hardness and bio-inertness. This study has focused on the Si3N4 ceramic as a dental core material. The white Si3N4 was prepared by pressureless sintering at relative low sintering temperature of 1650 °C in nitrogen atmosphere. The coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of Si3N4 ceramic is lower than that of Zirconia and Alumina ceramic which are popular in this field. The borosilicate glass veneering was employed due to its compatibility in thermal expansion. The sintered Si3N4 specimens represented the synthetic dental core were paintbrush coated by a veneer paste composed of borosilicate glass powder (veneer on the Si3N4 specimens, the firing was performed in electric tube furnace between 1000-1200°C. The veneered specimens fired at 1100°C for 15 mins show good bonding, smooth and glossy without defect and crazing. The veneer has thermal expansion coefficient as 3.98×10-6 °C-1, rather white and semi opaque, due to zirconia addition, the Vickers hardness as 4.0 GPa which is closely to the human teeth.

  2. Rhenium solubility in borosilicate nuclear waste glass: implications for the processing and immobilization of technetium-99.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCloy, John S; Riley, Brian J; Goel, Ashutosh; Liezers, Martin; Schweiger, Michael J; Rodriguez, Carmen P; Hrma, Pavel; Kim, Dong-Sang; Lukens, Wayne W; Kruger, Albert A

    2012-11-20

    The immobilization of technetium-99 ((99)Tc) in a suitable host matrix has proven to be a challenging task for researchers in the nuclear waste community around the world. In this context, the present work reports on the solubility and retention of rhenium, a nonradioactive surrogate for (99)Tc, in a sodium borosilicate glass. Glasses containing target Re concentrations from 0 to 10,000 ppm [by mass, added as KReO(4) (Re(7+))] were synthesized in vacuum-sealed quartz ampules to minimize the loss of Re from volatilization during melting at 1000 °C. The rhenium was found as Re(7+) in all of the glasses as observed by X-ray absorption near-edge structure. The solubility of Re in borosilicate glasses was determined to be ~3000 ppm (by mass) using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy. At higher rhenium concentrations, additional rhenium was retained in the glasses as crystalline inclusions of alkali perrhenates detected with X-ray diffraction. Since (99)Tc concentrations in a glass waste form are predicted to be <10 ppm (by mass), these Re results implied that the solubility should not be a limiting factor in processing radioactive wastes, assuming Tc as Tc(7+) and similarities between Re(7+) and Tc(7+) behavior in this glass system.

  3. Er3+–Al2O3 nanoparticles doping of borosilicate glass

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jonathan Massera; Laeticia Petit; Joona Koponen; Benoit Glorieux; Leena Hupa; Mikko Hupa

    2015-09-01

    Novel borosilicate glasses were developed by adding in the glass batch Er3+–Al2O3 nanoparticles synthetized by using a soft chemical method. A similar nanoparticle doping with modified chemical vapour deposition (MCVD) process was developed to increase the efficiency of the amplifying silica fibre in comparison to using MCVD and solution doping. It was shown that with the melt quench technique, a Er3+–Al22O3 nanoparticle doping neither leads to an increase in the Er3+ luminescence properties nor allows one to control the rare-earth chemical environment in a borosilicate glass. The site of Er3+ in the Er3+–Al2O3 nanoparticle containing glass seems to be similar as in glasses with the same composition prepared using standard raw materials. We suspect the Er3+ ions to diffuse from the nanoparticles into the glass matrix. There was no clear evidence of the presence of Al2O3 nanoparticles in the glasses after melting.

  4. Comparison of mechanical properties of glass-bonded sodalite and borosilicate glass high-level waste forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Holleran, T. P.; DiSanto, T.; Johnson, S. G.; Goff, K. M.

    2000-05-09

    Argonne National Laboratory has developed a glass-bonded sodalite waste form to immobilize the salt waste stream from electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The waste form consists of 75 vol.% crystalline sodalite and 25 vol.% glass. Microindentation fracture toughness measurements were performed on this material and borosilicate glass from the Defense Waste Processing Facility using a Vickers indenter. Palmqvist cracking was confined for the glass-bonded sodalite waste form, while median-radial cracking occurred in the borosilicate glass. The elastic modulus was measured by an acoustic technique. Fracture toughness, microhardness, and elastic modulus values are reported for both waste forms.

  5. Radioactive waste processing: Borosilicate glasses and synthetic rocks. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-02-01

    The biliography contains citations concerning radioactive waste processing and disposal by incorporation in borosilicate glasses and synthetic rock materials. Formulations, leach tests and evaluations, melting characteristics, phase determinations, scaled-up processes, and process variables are considered. The Synroc process, and general preparation and evaluation studies are also included. Waste vitrification in materials other than borosilicates and synthetic rocks, and waste fixation using cements and bitumens are discussed in separate bibliographies.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  6. The Effect of Sm2O3 on the Chemical Stability of Borosilicate Glass and Glass Ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yongqiang; WANG Mitang; LI Mei; WANG Ming; LIU Quansheng

    2014-01-01

    Sm2O3 containing zinc-borosilicate glass and glass ceramics were prepared by melt quenching method, and the effect of Sm2O3 and micro-crystallization on the chemical stability of borosilicate glass was explored. DTA analysis showed that the endothermic peak and exothermic peak of basic glass changed from 635℃and 834℃to 630℃and 828℃respectively as a result of the doping of Sm2O3. XRD analysis showed the promoting effect of Sm2O3 on crystallization ability of this glass. The cumulative mass loss of base glass, Sm2O3 containing glass, glass ceramic and Sm2O3 containing glass ceramic was 0.289, 0.253, 0.329, 0.269 mg/mm2 respectively after 26 days corrosion in alkali solution, and 1.293, 1.290, 0.999, 1.040 mg/mm2 respectively in acidic erosion medium. Micro-crystallization decreased and improved the alkali and acid resistance of borosilicate glass respectively, the addition of Sm2O3 increased the alkali resistance of base glass and glass ceramics, and the slight effect of Sm2O3 on the acid resistance of borosilicate glass was also observed.

  7. A kinetic approach of sulphur behaviour in borosilicate glasses and melts: implications for sulphate incorporation in nuclear waste glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenoir, Marion [Service de Confinement des Dechets et Vitrification - Laboratoire d' Etudes de Base sur les Verres, CEA Valrho, Centre de Marcoule, 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze (France); Physique des Mineraux et des Magmas, UMR 7047 - CNRS, Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, 7 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Grandjean, Agnes [Service de Confinement des Dechets et Vitrification - Laboratoire d' Etudes de Base sur les Verres, CEA Valrho, Centre de Marcoule, 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze (France); Neuville, Daniel R. [Physique des Mineraux et des Magmas, UMR 7047 - CNRS, Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, 7 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

    2008-07-01

    The kinetics of sulphate decomposition in a borosilicate melt were studied using in situ Raman spectroscopy. This technique permits the quantification of the amount of sulphate dissolved in a borosilicate glass as a function of heating time by comparison with measurements obtained by microprobe WDS (Wavelength Dispersive Spectrometry). In order to quantify the content of sulphate obtained by Raman spectroscopy, the integrated intensity of the sulphate band at 985 cm{sup -1} was scaled to the sum of the integrated bands between 800 and 1200 cm{sup -1}, bands that are assigned to Q{sup n} silica units on the basis of previous literature. Viscosities of some borosilicate glasses are also presented here in order to study the kinetics of sulphate decomposition as a function of the viscosity of the melt. This underlines the importance of variations in viscosity depending on the composition of the melt and thus shows that viscosity is an important parameter governing the kinetics of decomposition of sulphate in borosilicate glasses. (authors)

  8. X-Ray excited and photoluminescence of CdS1-xSex nanocrystals embedded in borosilicate glass matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomonnai A.V.

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available The performed experimental studies of X-ray excited and photoluminescence, optical absorption and Raman scattering of CdS1-xSex nanocrystals, embedded in borosilicate glass matrix, have enabled the nanocrystal parameters (chemical composition, average radius, acceptor levels energy depth, electron-hole Coulomb interaction energy is to be determined.

  9. Elastic properties investigation of gamma-radiated barium lead borosilicate glass using ultrasonic technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Change in acoustical parameter due to composition effect and irradiation effect. → Changes in the structure of the glass (BO3 → BO4) due to the effect of radiation. → Structural changes in the BO3 to BO4 have a more compactness structure. - Abstract: The ultrasonic velocities were measured in barium lead borosilicate glass samples of different compositions before and after irradiation with γ-rays. Measurements were carried out at room temperature and 4 MHz frequency using ultrasonic technique. The ultrasonic velocities data of glass samples have been used to find the elastic modulus and micro-hardness. Densities of glass samples were measured by Archimedes's principle using n-hexane as immersion liquid. It was found that ultrasonic velocity, elastic modulus and micro-hardness increase with increasing barium oxide content and increasing γ-radiation dose.

  10. Characteristics of borosilicate glass media fabricated by melting HEPA filter media with inorganic additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HEPA filters are widely used in the nuclear fields as a final off-gas cleaning unit. To assess the applicability of vitrification technology either to treat used filter media or to produce borosilicate glass medium for the solidification of alpha-contaminated wastes, various waste glasses of different compositions were fabricated by melting mixture of HEPA filter media and inorganic additives. Physicochemical properties such as microhardness, density, thermal expansion, and short-term leaching behavior were characterized. XRD analysis showed that amorphous glasses were formed for a wide range of mixing ratio. Leach resistances, measured by PCT-B leach tests, were superior to that of EA (Environmental Assessment) glass. Other properties were similar to those of glass media used for the vitrification of high-level radioactive wastes in foreign countries

  11. Thermal and structural studies on barium borosilicate glasses containing sulphate ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borosilicate glasses having composition SiO2)0.416(B2O3)0.208 (Na2O)0.218(BaO)0.157 containing up to 4 mol % sulphate ions were prepared by conventional melt-quench method. Incorporation of sulphate ions in the glass has been found to weaken the glass network as revealed by the decrease in the glass transition temperatures. Based on 29Si and 11B magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) studies, it has been established that the silicate network undergoes slight depolymerisation while the boron structural units remained unaffected with sulphate addition in the glass. Above 4 mol % incorporation of sulphate ions resulted in the devitrification of the glass. (author)

  12. Influence of bicarbonate ions and redox conditions on the surface composition of a leached borosilicate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A serie of short leaching tests have been performed on a borosilicate glass (I117) up to a maximum of 40 days. The tests were performed in a closed system in oxic and anoxic conditions and in presence of bicarbonate ions. The bicarbonate ions do not influence the mass losses while the oxic condition gives rise to an higher mass losses. Surface analysis was performed on the surface layer for the elements uranium and iron. Uranium is always depleted at the surface of the samples. It appears that adsorption and diffusion in the layer play an important part in the uranium released. Iron on the contrary is enriched so that solubility of the formed species are responsible of its concentration

  13. Magnetic Glass Ceramics by Sintering of Borosilicate Glass and Inorganic Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inès M. M. M. Ponsot

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Ceramics and glass ceramics based on industrial waste have been widely recognized as competitive products for building applications; however, there is a great potential for such materials with novel functionalities. In this paper, we discuss the development of magnetic sintered glass ceramics based on two iron-rich slags, coming from non-ferrous metallurgy and recycled borosilicate glass. The substantial viscous flow of the glass led to dense products for rapid treatments at relatively low temperatures (900–1000 °C, whereas glass/slag interactions resulted in the formation of magnetite crystals, providing ferrimagnetism. Such behavior could be exploited for applying the obtained glass ceramics as induction heating plates, according to preliminary tests (showing the rapid heating of selected samples, even above 200 °C. The chemical durability and safety of the obtained glass ceramics were assessed by both leaching tests and cytotoxicity tests.

  14. Plasma-mediated inactivation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms grown on borosilicate surfaces under continuous culture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandervoort, Kurt G; Brelles-Mariño, Graciela

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms are microbial communities attached to a surface and embedded in a matrix composed of exopolysaccharides and excreted nucleic acids. Bacterial biofilms are responsible for undesirable effects such as disease, prostheses colonization, biofouling, equipment damage, and pipe plugging. Biofilms are also more resilient than free-living cells to regular sterilization methods and therefore it is indispensable to develop better ways to control and remove them. The use of gas discharge plasmas is a good alternative since plasmas contain a mixture of reactive agents well-known for their decontamination potential against free microorganisms. We have previously reported that Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms were inactivated after a 1-min plasma exposure. We determined that the adhesiveness and the thickness of Pseudomonas biofilms grown on borosilicate were reduced. We also reported sequential morphological changes and loss of viability upon plasma treatment. However, the studies were carried out in batch cultures. The use of a continuous culture results in a more homogenous environment ensuring reproducible biofilm growth. The aim of this work was to study plasma-mediated inactivation of P. aeruginosa biofilms grown on borosilicate in a continuous culture system. In this paper we show that biofilms grown on glass under continuous culture can be inactivated by using gas discharge plasma. Both biofilm architecture and cell culturability are impacted by the plasma treatment. The inactivation kinetics is similar to previously described ones and cells go through sequential changes ranging from minimal modification without loss of viability at short plasma exposure times, to major structure and viability loss at longer exposure times. We report that changes in biofilm structure leading to the loss of culturability and viability are related to a decrease of the biofilm matrix adhesiveness. To our knowledge, there has been no attempt to evaluate the inactivation

  15. Intrinsic dosimetry. Properties and mechanisms of thermoluminescence in commercial borosilicate glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, Richard A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Intrinsic dosimetry is the method of measuring total absorbed dose received by the walls of a container holding radioactive material. By considering the total absorbed dose received by a container in tandem with the physical characteristics of the radioactive material housed within that container, this method has the potential to provide enhanced pathway information regarding the history of the container and its radioactive contents. The latest in a series of experiments designed to validate and demonstrate this newly developed tool are reported. Thermoluminescence (TL) dosimetry was used to measure dose effects on raw stock borosilicate container glass up to 70 days after gamma ray, x-ray, beta particle or ultraviolet irradiations at doses from 0.15 to 20 Gy. The TL glow curve when irradiated with 60Co was separated into five peaks: two relatively unstable peaks centered near 120 and 165°C, and three relatively stable peaks centered near 225, 285, and 360°C. Depending on the borosilicate glass source, the minimum measurable dose using this technique is 0.15-0.5 Gy, which is roughly equivalent to a 24 hr irradiation at 1 cm from a 50-165 ng source of 60Co. Differences in TL glow curve shape and intensity were observed for the glasses from different geographical origins. These differences can be explained by changes in the intensities of the five peaks. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and multivariate statistical methods were used to relate the TL intensity and peaks to electron/hole traps and compositional variations.

  16. Fabrication of Silicon Nitride Dental Core Ceramics with Borosilicate Veneering material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wananuruksawong, R; Jinawath, S; Wasanapiarnpong, T [Research Unit of Advanced Ceramic, Department of Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok (Thailand); Padipatvuthikul, P, E-mail: raayaa_chula@hotmail.com [Faculty of Dentistry, Srinakharinwirot University, Bangkok (Thailand)

    2011-10-29

    Silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) ceramic is a great candidate for clinical applications due to its high fracture toughness, strength, hardness and bio-inertness. This study has focused on the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramic as a dental core material. The white Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} was prepared by pressureless sintering at relative low sintering temperature of 1650 deg. C in nitrogen atmosphere. The coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramic is lower than that of Zirconia and Alumina ceramic which are popular in this field. The borosilicate glass veneering was employed due to its compatibility in thermal expansion. The sintered Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} specimens represented the synthetic dental core were paintbrush coated by a veneer paste composed of borosilicate glass powder (<150 micrometer, Pyrex) with 5 wt% of zirconia powder (3 wt% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} - partial stabilized zirconia) and 30 wt% of polyvinyl alcohol (5 wt% solution). After coating the veneer on the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} specimens, the firing was performed in electric tube furnace between 1000-1200 deg. C. The veneered specimens fired at 1100 deg. C for 15 mins show good bonding, smooth and glossy without defect and crazing. The veneer has thermal expansion coefficient as 3.98x10{sup -6} deg. C{sup -1}, rather white and semi opaque, due to zirconia addition, the Vickers hardness as 4.0 GPa which is closely to the human teeth.

  17. Plasma-mediated inactivation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms grown on borosilicate surfaces under continuous culture system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurt G Vandervoort

    Full Text Available Biofilms are microbial communities attached to a surface and embedded in a matrix composed of exopolysaccharides and excreted nucleic acids. Bacterial biofilms are responsible for undesirable effects such as disease, prostheses colonization, biofouling, equipment damage, and pipe plugging. Biofilms are also more resilient than free-living cells to regular sterilization methods and therefore it is indispensable to develop better ways to control and remove them. The use of gas discharge plasmas is a good alternative since plasmas contain a mixture of reactive agents well-known for their decontamination potential against free microorganisms. We have previously reported that Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms were inactivated after a 1-min plasma exposure. We determined that the adhesiveness and the thickness of Pseudomonas biofilms grown on borosilicate were reduced. We also reported sequential morphological changes and loss of viability upon plasma treatment. However, the studies were carried out in batch cultures. The use of a continuous culture results in a more homogenous environment ensuring reproducible biofilm growth. The aim of this work was to study plasma-mediated inactivation of P. aeruginosa biofilms grown on borosilicate in a continuous culture system. In this paper we show that biofilms grown on glass under continuous culture can be inactivated by using gas discharge plasma. Both biofilm architecture and cell culturability are impacted by the plasma treatment. The inactivation kinetics is similar to previously described ones and cells go through sequential changes ranging from minimal modification without loss of viability at short plasma exposure times, to major structure and viability loss at longer exposure times. We report that changes in biofilm structure leading to the loss of culturability and viability are related to a decrease of the biofilm matrix adhesiveness. To our knowledge, there has been no attempt to evaluate the

  18. Water leaching of borosilicate glasses: experiments, modeling and Monte Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is concerned with the corrosion of borosilicate glasses with variable oxide contents. The originality of this study is the complementary use of experiments and numerical simulations. This study is expected to contribute to a better understanding of the corrosion of nuclear waste confinement glasses. First, the corrosion of glasses containing only silicon, boron and sodium oxides has been studied. The kinetics of leaching show that the rate of leaching and the final degree of corrosion sharply depend on the boron content through a percolation mechanism. For some glass contents and some conditions of leaching, the layer which appears at the glass surface stops the release of soluble species (boron and sodium). This altered layer (also called the gel layer) has been characterized with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) techniques. Second, additional elements have been included in the glass composition. It appears that calcium, zirconium or aluminum oxides strongly modify the final degree of corrosion so that the percolation properties of the boron sub-network is no more a sufficient explanation to account for the behavior of these glasses. Meanwhile, we have developed a theoretical model, based on the dissolution and the reprecipitation of the silicon. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations have been used in order to test several concepts such as the boron percolation, the local reactivity of weakly soluble elements and the restructuring of the gel layer. This model has been fully validated by comparison with the results on the three oxide glasses. Then, it has been used as a comprehensive tool to investigate the paradoxical behavior of the aluminum and zirconium glasses: although these elements slow down the corrosion kinetics, they lead to a deeper final degree of corrosion. The main contribution of this work is that the final degree of corrosion of borosilicate glasses results from the competition of two opposite mechanisms

  19. Aqueous corrosion of borosilicate glasses: experiments, modeling and Monte-Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is concerned with the corrosion of borosilicate glasses with variable oxide contents. The originality of this study is the complementary use of experiments and numerical simulations. This study is expected to contribute to a better understanding of the corrosion of nuclear waste confinement glasses. First, the corrosion of glasses containing only silicon, boron and sodium oxides has been studied. The kinetics of leaching show that the rate of leaching and the final degree of corrosion sharply depend on the boron content through a percolation mechanism. For some glass contents and some conditions of leaching, the layer which appears at the glass surface stops the release of soluble species (boron and sodium). This altered layer (also called the gel layer) has been characterized with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) techniques. Second, additional elements have been included in the glass composition. It appears that calcium, zirconium or aluminum oxides strongly modify the final degree of corrosion so that the percolation properties of the boron sub-network is no more a sufficient explanation to account for the behavior of these glasses. Meanwhile, we have developed a theoretical model, based on the dissolution and the reprecipitation of the silicon. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations have been used in order to test several concepts such as the boron percolation, the local reactivity of weakly soluble elements and the restructuring of the gel layer. This model has been fully validated by comparison with the results on the three oxide glasses. Then, it has been used as a comprehensive tool to investigate the paradoxical behavior of the aluminum and zirconium glasses: although these elements slow down the corrosion kinetics, they lead to a deeper final degree of corrosion. The main contribution of this work is that the final degree of corrosion of borosilicate glasses results from the competition of two opposite mechanisms

  20. Surface studies on aluminized and thermally oxidized superalloy 690 substrates interacted with simulated nuclear waste and sodium borosilicate melt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusufali, C.; Kshirsagar, R. J.; Mishra, R. K.; Kaushik, C. P.; Sengupta, P.; Dutta, R. S.; Dey, G. K.

    2014-04-01

    Aluminized and thermally oxidized Ni-Cr-Fe based superalloy 690 substrates with Al2O3 layer on top have been exposed in nitrate based environment (simulated high level nuclear liquid waste) at 373 K for 216 hours and sodium borosilicate melt at 1248 K for 192 hours. The surfaces of exposed samples have been characterized by using Electron probe micro-analyzer (EPMA). Elemental X-ray mapping on coated specimen that exposed in simulated nuclear waste solution revealed that the surface is enriched with Ni, Cr and Al. X-ray mapping on surface of the specimen that interacted with sodium borosilicate melt indicated that the surface is composed of Al, Fe, Ni and Cr.

  1. Surface studies on aluminized and thermally oxidized superalloy 690 substrates interacted with simulated nuclear waste and sodium borosilicate melt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yusufali, C., E-mail: yusuf@barc.gov.in; Sengupta, P.; Dutta, R. S.; Dey, G. K. [Materials Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai-400085 (India); Kshirsagar, R. J. [High Pressure and Synchrotron Radiation Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai-400085 (India); Mishra, R. K.; Kaushik, C. P. [Waste Management Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai-400085 (India)

    2014-04-24

    Aluminized and thermally oxidized Ni-Cr-Fe based superalloy 690 substrates with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer on top have been exposed in nitrate based environment (simulated high level nuclear liquid waste) at 373 K for 216 hours and sodium borosilicate melt at 1248 K for 192 hours. The surfaces of exposed samples have been characterized by using Electron probe micro-analyzer (EPMA). Elemental X-ray mapping on coated specimen that exposed in simulated nuclear waste solution revealed that the surface is enriched with Ni, Cr and Al. X-ray mapping on surface of the specimen that interacted with sodium borosilicate melt indicated that the surface is composed of Al, Fe, Ni and Cr.

  2. Sol–gel synthesis and optical properties of CuGaS2 quantum dots embedded in sodium borosilicate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The CuGaS2 quantum dots doped sodium borosilicate glass was prepared by sol–gel methods. • The obtained glass was investigated by XRD, (S)TEM and XPS. • Tetragonal crystalline phase of CuGaS2 quantum dots with spherical shape were formed uniformly in the glass matrix. • The third-order optical nonlinearity was investigated by Z-scan technique. - Abstract: I–III–VI2 ternary semiconductor CuGaS2 quantum dots embedded in sodium borosilicate glass matrix were synthesized by combining the sol–gel process and heat treatment in H2S gas. The structure and morphology of the obtained glass were studied by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results showed that tetragonal crystalline phase of CuGaS2 quantum dots with spherical shape were formed uniformly in the sodium borosilicate glass matrix, and the sizes ranged from 5 to 25 nm with an average particle size of 12.75 nm. The optical nonlinearity was studied using Z-scan technique employing 200 fs at the wavelength of 800 nm. The glass doped with CuGaS2 quantum dots exhibited large third-order optical nonlinear susceptibility χ(3) of 1.60 × 10−9 esu

  3. Nanoindentation of the pristine and irradiated forms of a sodium borosilicate glass: Insights from molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilymis, D. A.; Delaye, J.-M.; Ispas, S.

    2016-07-01

    We have carried out classical molecular dynamics simulations in order to get insight into the atomistic mechanisms of the deformation during nanoindentation of the pristine and irradiated forms of a sodium borosilicate glass. In terms of the glass hardness, we have found that the primary factor affecting the decrease of hardness after irradiation is depolymerization rather than free volume, and we argue that this is a general trend applicable to other borosilicate glasses with similar compositions. We have analyzed the changes of the short- and medium-range structures under deformation and found that the creation of oxygen triclusters is an important mechanism in order to describe the deformation of highly polymerized borosilicate glasses and is essential in the understanding of the folding of large rings under stress. We have equally found that the less polymerized glasses present a higher amount of relative densification, while the analysis of bond-breaking during the nanoindentation has showed that shear flow is more likely to appear around sodium atoms. The results provided in this study can be proven to be useful in the interpretation of experimental results.

  4. Barium borosilicate glass - a potential matrix for immobilization of sulfate bearing high-level radioactive liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borosilicate glass formulations adopted worldwide for immobilization of high-level radioactive liquid waste (HLW) is not suitable for sulphate bearing HLW, because of its low solubility in such glass. A suitable glass matrix based on barium borosilicate has been developed for immobilization of sulphate bearing HLW. Various compositions based on different glass formulations were made to examine compatibility with waste oxide with around 10 wt% sulfate content. The vitrified waste product obtained from barium borosilicate glass matrix was extensively evaluated for its characteristic properties like homogeneity, chemical durability, glass transition temperature, thermal conductivity, impact strength, etc. using appropriate techniques. Process parameters like melt viscosity and pour temperature were also determined. It is found that SB-44 glass composition (SiO2: 30.5 wt%, B2O3: 20.0 wt%, Na2O: 9.5 wt% and BaO: 19.0 wt%) can be safely loaded with 21 wt% waste oxide without any phase separation. The other product qualities of SB-44 waste glass are also found to be on a par with internationally adopted waste glass matrices. This formulation has been successfully implemented in plant scale

  5. Luminescence properties of Gd{sup 3+}-doped borosilicate scintillating glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Chunmei [Key Laboratory of Materials for High Power Laser, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Patent Examination Cooperation HuBei Center of The Patent Office, SIPO, Wuhan, HuBei 430070 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Liu, Shuang [Key Laboratory of Materials for High Power Laser, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Liu, Liwan [Shanghai University, Shanghai 201800 (China); Chen, Dan Ping, E-mail: dpchen2008@aliyun.com [Key Laboratory of Materials for High Power Laser, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2015-04-15

    Gd{sup 3+}-doped borosilicate glasses are prepared in different melting atmosphere. Absorption spectra, decay time, luminescence spectra under UV and X-ray excitation are investigated. With melting atmosphere changing from air to CO, the luminescence intensities of Gd{sup 3+} at 313 nm under the excitation of UV and X-ray are both enhanced. This mainly results from the reduction of Gd{sup 3+}, which is validated by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). The optimal Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} content for the glasses prepared under CO atmosphere is 7.5 mol%, whose integral scintillation efficiency is 20% compared with Bi{sub 4}Ge{sub 3}O{sub 12}. - Highlights: • Glasses with various Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} contents are prepared in the air or CO atmosphere. • The glasses show stronger photoluminescence and radioluminescence intensity. • High integral scintillation efficiency obtained for the prepared glass is 20% of BGO.

  6. Supported TiO2 on Borosilicate Glass Plates for Efficient Photocatalytic Degradation of Fenamiphos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. El Yadini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Supported titanium dioxide (TiO2 was investigated for the photodegradation of the insecticide fenamiphos in water. The photocatalyst was immobilised on borosilicate glass plates and the kinetics of degradation were studied in a stirred tank reactor under UV irradiation. Two types of TiO2, for example, Millennium PC500 (100% anatase and Degussa P25 (80% anatase, 20% rutile, were used. Their activities have been based on the rates of insecticide disappearance. Experiments were investigated to evaluate the effect of pH and initial concentrations of fenamiphos as well as catalyst doses on the photocatalytic degradation of fenamiphos. Kinetic parameters were experimentally determined and an apparent first-order kinetic was observed. For photolysis process of fenamiphos, two photoproducts were identified and characterized using high performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS. The plausible mechanism of photolysis involved is the oxidation of sulfonamide group. In presence of photocatalyst TiO2, photodegradation was observed. Under identical conditions, Degussa P25 shows higher photocatalytic activity in regard to PC500 Millennium and complete degradation was observed after 180 min.

  7. Characteristics of borosilicate waste glass form for high-level radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Soo; Chun, Kwan Sik; Choi, Jong Won; Kang, Chul Hyung

    2001-03-01

    Basic data, required for the design and the performance assessment of a repository of HLW, suchas the chemical composition and the characteristics of the borosilicate waste glass have been identified according to the burn-ups of spent PWR fuels. The diemnsion of waste canister is 430mm in diameter and 1135mm in length, and the canister should hold less than 2kwatts of heat from their decay of radionuclides contained in the HLW. Based on the reprocessing of 5 years-cooled spent fuel, one canister could hold about 11.5wt.% and 10.8wt.% of oxidized HLW corresponding to their burn-ups of 45,000MWD/MTU and 55,000MWD/MTU, respectively. These waste forms have been recommanded as the reference waste forms of HLW. The characteristics of these wastes as a function of decay time been evaluated. However, after a specific waste form and a specific site for the disposal would be selected, the characteristics of the waste should be reevaluated under the consideration of solidification period, loaded waste, storage condition and duration, site circumstances for the repository system and its performance assessment.

  8. Evolutions of Molecular Oxygen Formation and Sodium Migration in Xe Ion Irradiated Borosilicate Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Liang; Zhang, Duofei F.; Lv, Peng; Zhang, Jiandong; Du, Xing; Yuan, Wei; Nan, Shuai; Zhu, Zihua; Wang, Tieshan

    2016-07-23

    The modifications of a commercial borosilicate glass induced by Xe ion irradiation have been studied by Raman spectroscopy and ToF-SIMS depth profiling. A decrease in the average Si–O–Si angle, an increase in the population of three-membered rings and an increase of the glass polymerization are evidenced. The molecular oxygen appears in the irradiated glasses after the irradiation fluence reaches approximately 1015 ions/cm2. The O2 concentration decreaseswith the depth of irradiated glass at the ion fluence of 2 × 1016 ions/cm2. A sodiumdepleted layer at the surface and a depleted zone at around the penetration depth of 5 MeV Xe ions are observed. The thickness of the sodium depleted layer increases with the irradiation fluence. Moreover, comparing with previous results after electron and Ar ion irradiation, it can be concluded that the nuclear energy deposition can partially inhibit the formation of molecular oxygen and increase the threshold value of electron energy deposition for the molecular oxygen formation.

  9. Ultrafast opacity in borosilicate glass induced by picosecond bursts of laser-driven ions

    CERN Document Server

    Dromey, B; Adams, D; Prasad, R; Kakolee, K F; Stefanuik, R; Nersisyan, G; Sarri, G; Yeung, M; Ahmed, H; Doria, D; Dzelzainis, T; Jung, D; Kar, S; Marlow, D; Romagnani, L; Correa, A A; Dunne, P; Kohanoff, J; Schleife, A; Borghesi, M; Currell, F; Riley, D; Zepf, M; Lewis, C L S

    2014-01-01

    Direct investigation of ion-induced dynamics in matter on picosecond (ps, 10-12 s) timescales has been precluded to date by the relatively long nanosecond (ns, 10-9 s) scale ion pulses typically provided by radiofrequency accelerators1. By contrast, laser-driven ion accelerators provide bursts of ps duration2, but have yet to be applied to the study of ultrafast ion-induced transients in matter. We report on the evolution of an electron-hole plasma excited in borosilicate glass by such bursts. This is observed as an onset of opacity to synchronised optical probe radiation and is characterised by the 3.0 +/- 0.8 ps ion pump rise-time . The observed decay-time of 35 +/- 3 ps i.e. is in excellent agreement with modelling and reveals the rapidly evolving electron temperature (>10 3 K) and carrier number density (>10 17cm-3). This result demonstrates that ps laser accelerated ion bursts are directly applicable to investigating the ultrafast response of matter to ion interactions and, in particular, to ultrafast pu...

  10. High-level waste borosilicate glass: A compendium of corrosion characteristics. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunnane, J.C. [comp.; Bates, J.K.; Bradley, C.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [and others

    1994-03-01

    The objective of this document is to summarize scientific information pertinent to evaluating the extent to which high-level waste borosilicate glass corrosion and the associated radionuclide release processes are understood for the range of environmental conditions to which waste glass may be exposed in service. Alteration processes occurring within the bulk of the glass (e.g., devitrification and radiation-induced changes) are discussed insofar as they affect glass corrosion.This document is organized into three volumes. Volumes I and II represent a tiered set of information intended for somewhat different audiences. Volume I is intended to provide an overview of waste glass corrosion, and Volume 11 is intended to provide additional experimental details on experimental factors that influence waste glass corrosion. Volume III contains a bibliography of glass corrosion studies, including studies that are not cited in Volumes I and II. Volume I is intended for managers, decision makers, and modelers, the combined set of Volumes I, II, and III is intended for scientists and engineers working in the field of high-level waste.

  11. Leach behavior of high-level borosilicate glasses under deep geological environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Soo; Chun, Kwan Sik; Park, Hyun Soo

    1998-02-01

    This report presents an overview of the activities in high-level radioactive waste glass which is considered as the most practicable form of waste, and also is intended to be used in the disposal of national high-level radioactive waste in future. Leach theory of waste glass and the leach effects of ground water, metal barrier, buffer materials and rocks on the waste glass were reviewed. The leach of waste glass was affected by various factors such as composition, pH and Eh of ground water, temperature, pressure, radiation and humic acid. The crystallization, crack, weathering and the formation of altered phases of waste glass which is expected to occur in real disposal site were reviewed. The results of leaching in laboratory and in-situ were compared. The behaviors of radioactive elements leached from waste glass and the use of basalt glass for the long-term natural analogue of waste glass were also written in this report. The appraisal of durability of borosilicate waste glass as a waste media was performed from the known results of leach test and international in-situ tests were introduced. (author). 134 refs., 15 tabs., 24 figs

  12. High-level waste borosilicate glass: A compendium of corrosion characteristics. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this document is to summarize scientific information pertinent to evaluating the extent to which high-level waste borosilicate glass corrosion and the associated radionuclide release processes are understood for the range of environmental conditions to which waste glass may be exposed in service. Alteration processes occurring within the bulk of the glass (e.g., devitrification and radiation-induced changes) are discussed insofar as they affect glass corrosion.This document is organized into three volumes. Volumes I and II represent a tiered set of information intended for somewhat different audiences. Volume I is intended to provide an overview of waste glass corrosion, and Volume 11 is intended to provide additional experimental details on experimental factors that influence waste glass corrosion. Volume III contains a bibliography of glass corrosion studies, including studies that are not cited in Volumes I and II. Volume I is intended for managers, decision makers, and modelers, the combined set of Volumes I, II, and III is intended for scientists and engineers working in the field of high-level waste

  13. Low temperature sintering and performance of aluminum nitride/borosilicate glass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-sheng ZHAO; Lei CHEN; Nian-zi GAO; Kai-hong ZHANG; Zi-qiang LI

    2009-01-01

    Aluminum nitride (AlN)/borosilicate glass composites were prepared by the tape casting process and hot-press sin-tered at 950 ℃ with AlN and SiO2-B2O3-ZnO-Al2O3-Li2O glass as starting materials. We characterized and analyzed the variation of the microstructure, bulk density, porosity, dielectric constant, thermal conductivity and thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) of the ceramic samples as a function of AlN content. Results show that AlN and SiO2-B2O3-ZnO-Al2O3-Li2O glass can be sintered at 950 ℃, and ZnAl2O4 and Zn2SiO4 phase precipitated to form glass-ceramic. The performance of the ceramic samples was de-termined by the composition and bulk density of the composites. Lower AlN content was found redounding to liquid phase sin-tering, and higher bulk density of composites can be accordingly obtained. With the increase of porosity, corresponding decreases were located in the dielectric constant, thermal conductivity and TEC of the ceramic samples. When the mass fraction of AlN was 40%, the ceramic samples possessed a low dielectric constant (4.5~5.0), high thermal conductivity (11.6 W/(m·K)) and a proper TEC (3.0×10K-1, which matched that of silicon). The excellent performance makes this kind of low temperature co-fired ce-ramic a promising candidate for application in the micro-electronics packaging industry.

  14. Visible to deep ultraviolet range optical absorption of electron irradiated borosilicate glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tie-Shan; Duan, Bing-Huang; Tian, Feng; Peng, Hai-Bo; Chen, Liang; Zhang, Li-Min; Yuan, Wei

    2015-07-01

    To study the room-temperature stable defects induced by electron irradiation, commercial borosilicate glasses were irradiated by 1.2 MeV electrons and then ultraviolet (UV) optical absorption (OA) spectra were measured. Two characteristic bands were revealed before irradiation, and they were attributed to silicon dangling bond (E’-center) and Fe3+ species, respectively. The existence of Fe3+ was confirmed by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements. After irradiation, the absorption spectra revealed irradiation-induced changes, while the content of E’-center did not change in the deep ultraviolet (DUV) region. The slightly reduced OA spectra at 4.9 eV was supposed to transform Fe3+ species to Fe2+ species and this transformation leads to the appearance of 4.3 eV OA band. By calculating intensity variation, the transformation of Fe was estimated to be about 5% and the optical absorption cross section of Fe2+ species is calculated to be 2.2 times larger than that of Fe3+ species. Peroxy linkage (POL, ≡Si-O-O-Si≡), which results in a 3.7 eV OA band, is speculated not to be from Si-O bond break but from Si-O-B bond, Si-O-Al bond, or Si-O-Na bond break. The co-presence defect with POL is probably responsible for 2.9-eV OA band. Project supported by the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China (Grant No. lzujbky-2014-16).

  15. Preparation and Optical Properties of Er3+ -Doped Gadolinium Borosilicate Glasses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Jiangting; Zhang Jiahua; Chen Baojiu; Lu Shaozhe; Ren Xinguang; Wang Xiaojun

    2005-01-01

    Er3+-doped Gd2 O3 -SiO2 -B2 O3 -Na2O glasses were prepared, and formation range of glass of Gd2 O3 -SiO2 -B2O3 system was experimentally obtained. It is found that the glass phase can be formed only when the content of SiO2 is 0~50%(molar fraction), Gd2O3 is 0~30%(molar fraction) and B2 O3 is above 20%(molar fraction) in this glass system. The glass can also be obtained but becomes translucent at the contents of 60%(molar fraction) SiO2 and 30% Gd2O3 , or at the contents of 60%(molar fraction) SiO2 and 30%(molar fraction) B2O3. There is no glass phase formed in other glass components. Glass forming ability for Gd2O3 content of 10%, was characterized by the value of β, the parameter of crystallization tendency, which is 0.32~1.76, obtained from the differential thermal analysis. The absorption and emission cross section, the J-O parameters Ωt(2,4,6) and radiative transition probabilities were calculated by using the theory of McCumber and Judd-Ofelt. The emission properties at 1.5 μm of the samples are discussed with the product of full width at half maximum and stimulated emission cross section. It can be seen that the value of the FWHM×σepeak product in the prepared glass is more than those of germanate, silicate and phosphate glasses. Furthermore, the maximum value of the product among these glasses reported in this work is close to that of oxyfluoride silicate glass. Therefore, the Er3+-doped gadolinium borosilicate glass in this paper is a candidate for broadband erbium doped fiber amplifiers.

  16. Dissolution of borosilicate glasses under repository conditions of pressure and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper described laboratory experimental work in progress in the UK to examine the mechanisms of fluid buffered interactions of materials at possible repository temperatures and pressures and aims at proposing limiting temperature values for a disposal facility from the geochemist's viewpoint. At present work is concentrated on reconnaissance experiments on dissolution rates of the vitrified waste form and the changes in near-field granite surface chemistry and fissure properties which will have a bearing on nuclide adsorption immediately after release. The major conclusions: in all of the experiments the fluid state remained as liquid since temperatures never exceeded 3740C, under these subcritical conditions pressure decreases dissolution rate; the ability to extrapolate dissolution rate from values of 1000C to about 2000C, together with the maintenance of physical integrity indicate that the glasses studied are likely to be stable and predictable in leach behavior to temperatures well in excess of those currently being considered for disposal; Glass 209 dissolves more slowly over a wide pressure and temperature spectrum than does glass 189, although the latter is easier to fabricate; dissolution rate decreases with increasing time. The principal conclusions of this study so far is that experimental application of realistic repository hydrothermal PT conditions indicate for the first time that current formulations of borosilicate glass would appear to provide for an adequate waste disposal medium which would maintain stability and predictable behavior over a wider pressure and temperature spectrum than previously realized, allowing sme latitude in both pre-disposal storage period and eventual loading at the time of disposal

  17. Structural and luminescent investigation of Eu3+ doped lead borosilicate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, M. Reddi; Rao, N. Madhusudhana; Babu, A. Mohan; Jaidass, N.; Moorthy, C. Krishna; Ramamoorthy, L.

    2016-05-01

    Lead borosilicate (LBS) glasses incorporated with europium (Eu3+) ions were synthesized using various chemical constituents. The structure of the glass matrix has been studied by experimental techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), optical absorption (OA) and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. From the XRD spectrum, several crystalline phases of LBS glass host were identified. The FTIR spectrum of the LBS glass host was recorded to investigate the local structural and functional groups. Due to the different characteristic nature of the Eu3+ ion, the absorption bands were observed from the ground (7F0) and the first excited (7F1) states. Further, Judd-Ofelt theory has been applied to compute the intensity parameters (Ωλ, λ = 2, 4 and 6) from the absorption intensities of 7F0 → 5D2 and 7F0 → 5L6 transitions, respectively. Characteristic emission bands are observed at 578, 592, 613,653 and 701 nm corresponding to 5D0 → 7F0, 7F1, 7F2, 7F3 and 7F4 transitions, respectively. The radiative and laser characteristic parameters like stimulated emission cross-section (σe) and branching ratios (βR) of the 5D0 excited level are computed. From the magnitude of stimulated emission cross-section (σe) and branching ratios (βR) obtained for 5D0 → 7F2 transition revealed that, Eu3+: LBS glasses are suitable for good laser action in the visible region.

  18. A space imaging concept based on a 4m structured spun-cast borosilicate monolithic primary mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, S. C.; Bailey, S. H.; Bauman, S.; Cuerden, B.; Granger, Z.; Olbert, B. H.

    2010-07-01

    Lockheed Martin Corporation (LMC) tasked The University of Arizona Steward Observatory (UASO) to conduct an engineering study to examine the feasibility of creating a 4m space telescope based on mature borosilicate technology developed at the UASO for ground-based telescopes. UASO has completed this study and concluded that existing launch vehicles can deliver a 4m monolithic telescope system to a 500 km circular orbit and provide reliable imagery at NIIRS 7-8. An analysis of such an imager based on a lightweight, high-performance, structured 4m primary mirror cast from borosilicate glass is described. The relatively high CTE of this glass is used to advantage by maintaining mirror shape quality with a thermal figuring method. Placed in a 290 K thermal shroud (similar to the Hubble Space Telescope), the orbit averaged figure surface error is 6nm rms when earth-looking. Space-looking optical performance shows that a similar thermal conditioning scheme combined with a 270 K shroud achieves primary mirror distortion of 10 nm rms surface. Analysis shows that a 3-point bipod mount will provide launch survivability with ample margin. The primary mirror naturally maintains its shape at 1g allowing excellent end-to-end pre-launch testing with e.g. the LOTIS 6.5m Collimator. The telescope includes simple systems to measure and correct mirror shape and alignment errors incorporating technologies already proven on the LOTIS Collimator. We have sketched a notional earth-looking 4m telescope concept combined with a wide field TMA concept into a DELTA IV or ATLAS 552 EELV fairing. We have combined an initial analysis of launch and space performance of a special light-weighted honeycomb borosilicate mirror (areal density 95 kg/m2) with public domain information on the existing launch vehicles.

  19. Comparative transportation risk assessment for borosilicate-glass and ceramic forms for immobilization of SRP Defense waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is currently planned to immobilize the SRP high-level nuclear waste in solid form and then ship it from SRP to a federal repository. This report compared transportation operations and risks for SRP high-level waste in a borosilicate glass form and in a ceramic form. Radiological and nonradiological impacts from normal transport and from potential accidents during transit were determined using the Defense Waste Process Facility Environmental Impact Statement (DWPF EIS) as the source of basic data. Applicable regulations and some current regulatory uncertainties are also discussed

  20. Optical properties of 3d transition metal ion-doped sodium borosilicate glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Hongli [School of Chemical Engineering and Light Industry, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006, Guangdong (China); Tanner, Peter A., E-mail: peter.a.tanner@gmail.com [Department of Science and Environmental Studies, The Hong Kong Institute of Education, 10 Lo Ping Road, Tai Po, N.T., Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (Hong Kong)

    2015-03-15

    Graphical abstract: Photographs of undoped (SiO{sub 2}){sub 50} (Na{sub 2}O){sub 25} (B{sub 2}O{sub 3}){sub 25} (SiNaB) glass and transition metal ion-doped (TM){sub 0.5} (SiO{sub 2}){sub 49.5} (Na{sub 2}O){sub 25} (B{sub 2}O{sub 3}){sub 25} glass samples. - Highlights: • 3d transition metal ion (from Ti to Zn) doped SiO{sub 2}-Na{sub 2}O-B{sub 2}O{sub 3} glasses. • Optical properties of doped glasses investigated. • V(IV,V); Cr(III, VI); Mn(II,III); Fe(II,III); Co(II); Ni(II); Cu(II) by XANES, DRS. • Strong visible absorption but only vanadium ion gives strong emission in glass. - Abstract: SiO{sub 2}-Na{sub 2}O-B{sub 2}O{sub 3} glasses doped with 3d-transition metal species from Ti to Zn were prepared by the melting-quenching technique and their optical properties were investigated. The X-ray absorption near edge spectra of V, Cr, and Mn-doped glasses indicate that the oxidation states of V(IV, V), Cr(III, VI) and Mn(II, III) exist in the studied glasses. The oxidation states revealed from the diffuse reflectance spectra of the glasses are V(IV, V), Cr(III, VI), Mn(III), Fe(II, III), Co(II), Ni(II), and Cu(II). Most of the 3d transition element ions exhibit strong absorption in the visible spectral region in the glass. Under ultraviolet excitation, the undoped sodium borosilicate glass produces weak and broad emission, while doping of vanadium introduces strong and broad emission due to the V(V) charge transfer transition. Only weak emission is observed from Ti(IV), Mn(II), Fe(III) and Cu(II), partly resulting from the strong electron–phonon coupling of the 3d-electrons and the relatively high phonon energy of the studied glass host, with the former leading to dominant nonradiative relaxation based on multiphonon processes for most of the 3d excited states.

  1. 信息动态%Spectral Analysis of Ho3+ -doped and Ho3+, Yb3+, Er3+ Co-doped Up-conversion Luminescence Borosilicate Glass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    A series of holmium ions doped borosilicate glass, including Ho3+ -doped, Ho3+/ Er3+ -doped, Ho3+/ Y Yb3+-doped and Ho3 Yb3 YEr3+ -doped galss, have been prepared by high-temperature melting. The up-conversion excitation spectra and emission spectra of the samples decrease. The analysis result reveals that both the intensities of excitation spectra and emission spectra were weaken with the Ho3+ concentration. The spectral intensities of Ho3+/Yb3+ -doped borosilicate glass increase with the increase of Ho3+ concentration because of the sensitization of Yb3+. The excitation and emission spectra intensities of Ho3+/Yb3 +/Er3+-doped borosilicate glass are weak, and the reason is the energy transfers from Ho3+ ions to Er3+ ions through energy resonant transfer process. Meanwhile the luminescence mechanism of broadband emission peaked at 550 nm is analyzed.

  2. Corrosion testing of a plutonium-loaded lanthanide borosilicate glass made with Frit B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laboratory tests were conducted with a lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass made with Frit B and added PuO2 (the glass is referred to herein as Pu LaBS-B glass) to measure the dependence of the glass dissolution rate on pH and temperature. These results are compared with the dependencies used in the Defense HLW Glass Degradation Model that was developed to account for HLW glasses in total system performance assessment (TSPA) calculations for the Yucca Mountain repository to determine if that model can also be used to represent the release of radionuclides from disposed Pu LaBS glass by using either the same parameter values that are used for HLW glasses or parameter values specific for Pu LaBS glass. Tests were conducted by immersing monolithic specimens of Pu LaBS-B glass in six solutions that imposed pH values between about pH 3.5 and pH 11, and then measuring the amounts of glass components released into solution. Tests were conducted at 40, 70, and 90 C for 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 days at low glass-surface-area-to-solution volume ratios. As intended, these test conditions maintained sufficiently dilute solutions that the impacts of solution feedback effects on the dissolution rates were negligible in most tests. The glass dissolution rates were determined from the concentrations of Si and B measured in the test solutions. The dissolution rates determined from the releases of Si and B were consistent with the 'V' shaped pH dependence that is commonly seen for borosilicate glasses and is included in the Defense HLW Glass Degradation Model. The rate equation in that model (using the coefficients determined for HLW glasses) provides values that are higher than the Pu LaBS-B glass dissolution rates that were measured over the range of pH and temperature values that were studied (i.e., an upper bound). Separate coefficients for the rate expression in acidic and alkaline solutions were also determined from the test results to model Pu LaBS-B glass dissolution directly. The

  3. Ultraflat-top midinfrared coherent broadband supercontinuum using all normal As2S5-borosilicate hybrid photonic crystal fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Salem, Amine; Diouf, Mbaye; Cherif, Rim; Wague, Ahmadou; Zghal, Mourad

    2016-06-01

    We report more than two octave spanning mid-IR flat-top supercontinuum (SC) generation using all normal As2S5-borosilicate hybrid photonic crystal fiber. Our design is based on a chalcogenide As2S5 photonic crystal fiber (PCF), where the first ring composed of six air holes is made by borosilicate glass. By injecting 50-fs pulses with 1.6 nJ energy at 2.5 μm in the all normal dispersion (ANDi) regime, a flat-top broadband SC extending from 1 to 5 μm with high-spectral flatness of 8 dB is obtained in only 4-mm fiber length. To the best of our knowledge, we present the broadest flat mid-IR spectrum generated in the ANDi regime of an optical fiber. The self-phase modulation and the optical wave breaking are identified as the main broadening mechanisms. The obtained broadband light source can be potentially used in the field of spectroscopy and in high-resolution optical coherent tomography owing to the high-spectral SC flatness generated by our designed fiber.

  4. Microwave Absorption of Barium Borosilicate, Zinc Borate, Fe-Doped Alumino-Phosphate Glasses and Its Raw Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashis Kumar Mandal

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This study presents microwave absorption of raw materials used in barium borosilicate, Fe-doped alumina phosphate and zinc borate glass. Microwave absorption was investigated for the raw materials SiO2, Na2CO3, BaCO3, BPO4, Al(PO33, Mg(PO32, Al(OH3, TiO2. The study shows that SiO2 could be heated directly above 1000 °C within 30 min at 1.5 kW microwave output (MW power and 0.8 kW MW power is necessary to initiate heating (from 260 °C. Microwave heating of material with low dielectric loss has been investigated by increasing MW power. Microwave absorption of above glass systems has also been investigated. Dielectric properties such as loss tangent of glass as a function of temperature are presented. Glass melting under direct microwave heating was demonstrated for the studied glass systems. Temperature-Microwave power-Time (T-P-t profiles for the three glasses indicate maximum MW output power ~1 kW, 0.65 kW and ~1 kW for barium borosilicate, zinc borate glass and alumino-phosphate glass for 60 g glass melting.

  5. Synthesis, characterization, and third-order nonlinear optical properties of copper quantum dots embedded in sodium borosilicate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► The sodium borosilicate glass doped Cu quantum dots have been prepared by sol–gel route. ► The crystal structure and composition of as-prepared glass were investigated by XRD and XPS. ► Size and distribution of indium nanocrystals was determined by TEM and STEM. ► The third-order optical nonlinearity was investigated by using Z-scan technique. - Abstract: Copper quantum dots embedded in sodium borosilicate glass matrix were fabricated and analyzed in terms of their structural, chemical, and optical properties. X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses revealed that copper quantum dots were in face-centered-cubic crystalline phase and in the metallic state. Size and distribution of the quantum dots were measured by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) as well as high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The results showed spherical shape have formed uniformly in the glass, and the size of these quantum dots were range from 1.5 to 5 nm with the average particle size about 2.7 nm. The third-order nonlinear optical properties of copper quantum dots doped glass were investigated by using Z-scan technique at the wavelength of 800 nm with femtosecond Ti: sapphire laser radiation. The value of third-order optical nonlinear susceptibility χ(3) of the glass was estimated to be 2.41 × 10−11 esu.

  6. Investigation of local environment around rare earths (La and Eu) by fluorescence line narrowing during borosilicate glass alteration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molières, Estelle [CEA – DEN-DTCD-LCV-SECM Laboratoire d' études du Comportement à Long Terme, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France); Panczer, Gérard; Guyot, Yannick [Institut Lumière Matière, UMR5306 Université Lyon 1-CNRS, Université de Lyon, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Jollivet, Patrick [CEA – DEN-DTCD-LCV-SECM Laboratoire d' études du Comportement à Long Terme, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France); Majérus, Odile; Aschehoug, Patrick; Barboux, Philippe [Laboratoire de Chimie de la Matière Condensée de Paris, UMR-CNRS 7574, École Nationale Supérieure de Chimie de Paris (ENSCP Chimie-ParisTech), 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75231 Paris (France); Gin, Stéphane [CEA – DEN-DTCD-LCV-SECM Laboratoire d' études du Comportement à Long Terme, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France); Angeli, Frédéric, E-mail: frederic.angeli@cea.fr [CEA – DEN-DTCD-LCV-SECM Laboratoire d' études du Comportement à Long Terme, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France)

    2014-01-15

    The local environment of europium in soda-lime borosilicate glasses with a range of La{sub 2}O{sub 3} content was probed by continuous luminescence and Fluorescence Line Narrowing (FLN) to investigate the local environment of rare earth elements in pristine and leached glass. After aqueous leaching at 90 °C at pH 7 and 9.5, rare earths were fully retained and homogeneously distributed in the amorphous alteration layer (commonly called gel). Two separate silicate environments were observed in pristine and leached glasses regardless of the lanthanum content and the leaching conditions. A borate environment surrounding europium was not observed in pristine and leached glasses. During glass alteration, OH groups were located around the europium environment, which became more organized (higher symmetry) in the first coordination shell. -- Highlights: • No borate environment surrounding europium was detected in pristine borosilicate glasses. • Up to 12 mol% of REE2O3 in glass, local environment of europium does not significantly change. • Europium environment becomes more ordered and symmetric in gels than in pristine glasses. • Two distinct silicate sites were observed, as well in pristine glass as in gels (leached glasses). • In altered glasses, OH groups were located around europium.

  7. Positive and Negative Mixed Glass Former Effects in Sodium Borosilicate and Borophosphate Glasses Studied by (23)Na NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storek, Michael; Adjei-Acheamfour, Mischa; Christensen, Randilynn; Martin, Steve W; Böhmer, Roland

    2016-05-19

    Glasses with varying compositions of constituent network formers but constant mobile ion content can display minima or maxima in their ion transport which are known as the negative or the positive mixed glass former effect, MGFE, respectively. Various nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques are used to probe the ion hopping dynamics via the (23)Na nucleus on the microscopic level, and the results are compared with those from conductivity spectroscopy, which are more sensitive to the macroscopic charge carrier mobility. In this way, the current work examines two series of sodium borosilicate and sodium borophosphate glasses that display positive and negative MGFEs, respectively, in the composition dependence of their Na(+) ion conductivities at intermediate compositions of boron oxide substitution for silicon oxide and phosphorus oxide, respectively. A coherent theoretical analysis is performed for these glasses which jointly captures the results from measurements of spin relaxation and central-transition line shapes. On this basis and including new information from (11)B magic-angle spinning NMR regarding the speciation in the sodium borosilicate glasses, a comparison is carried out with predictions from theoretical approaches, notably from the network unit trap model. This comparison yields detailed insights into how a variation of the boron oxide content and thus of either the population of silicon or phosphorus containing network-forming units with different charge-trapping capabilities leads to nonlinear changes of the microscopic transport properties. PMID:27092392

  8. Structure, thermal stability and resistance under external irradiation of rare earths and molybdenum-rich alumino-borosilicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In France, the highly radioactive nuclear liquid wastes arising from spent nuclear fuel reprocessing (fission products + minor actinides (FPA)) are currently immobilized in an alumino-borosilicate glass called 'R7T7'. In the future, the opportunity of using new alumino-borosilicate glass compositions (HTC glasses) is considered in order to increase the waste loading in glasses and thus significantly decrease the number of glass canisters. However, the increase of the concentration of FPA could lead to the crystallization of rare-earth-rich phases (Ca2RE8(SiO4)6O2) or molybdenum-rich phases (CaMoO4, Na2MoO4) during melt cooling, which can modify the confinement properties of the glass (chemical durability, self-irradiation resistance..), particularly if they can incorporate radionuclides α or β in their structure. This thesis can be divided into two parts: The first part deals with studying the relationship that can occur between the composition, the structure and the crystallization tendency of simplified seven oxides glasses, belonging to the SiO2-B2O3-Al2O3-Na2O-CaO-MoO3-Nd2O3 system and derived from the composition of the HTC glass at 22,5 wt. % in FPA. The impact of the presence of platinoid elements (RuO2 in our case) on the crystallization of the different phases is also studied. The second part deals with the effect of actinides α decays and more particularly of nuclear interactions essentially coming from recoil nuclei (simulated here by heavy ions external irradiations) on the behaviour under irradiation of an alumino-borosilicate glass containing apatite Ca2Nd8(SiO4)6O2 crystals, that can incorporate actinides in their structure. Two samples containing apatite crystals with different size are studied, in order to understand the impact of microstructure on the irradiation resistance of this kind of material. (author)

  9. High thermal neutron flux effects on structural and macroscopic properties of alkali-borosilicate glasses used as neutron guide substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boffy, R.; Peuget, S.; Schweins, R.; Beaucour, J.; Bermejo, F. J.

    2016-05-01

    The behaviour of four alkali-borosilicate glasses under homogeneous thermal neutron irradiation has been studied. These materials are used for the manufacturing of neutron guides which are installed in most facilities as devices to transport neutrons from intense sources such as nuclear reactors or spallation sources up to scientific instruments. Several experimental techniques such as Raman, NMR, SANS and STEM have been employed in order to understand the rather different macroscopic behaviour under irradiation of materials that belong to a same glass family. The results have shown that the remarkable glass shrinking observed for neutron doses below 0.5 ·1018 n/cm2 critically depends upon the presence of domains where silicate and borate network do not mix.

  10. The geochemical interactions of simulated borosilicate waste glass, granite and water at 100-3500C and 50MPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four interactions experiments involving a simulated borosilicate waste glass, granite and deionised water have been carried out at 1000, 1500, 2000 and 3500C at a total pressure of 50 MPa to simulate the near-field geochemistry of a high level waste repository in granite. Experiments were conducted in gold-titanium cell, direct sampling autoclaves for run durations of 200 days (1000, 1500 and 2000C) and 30 days (3500C), during which time solution samples were extracted for the analysis of 25 chemical species. Solid phases retrieved at the end of the experiments were examined using X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The high temperature speciation characteristics and degrees of mineral saturation of the fluids were investigated using the geochemical software packages, EQ3 and SOLMNEQ. (author)

  11. Study of Au/Cr multilayer thin-film surface morphology, structure and constituents on borosilicate glass, and quartz surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie, John; Kemble, Eric; Senevirathne, Indrajith

    2014-03-01

    Au/Cr/substrate multilayer thin films have a wide area of applications in both industry and proof of concept investigations in device engineering. Borosilicate glass and quartz are used for substrate materials. Typically, Cr deposition on substrates give rise to Stanski-Krastonov (SK) like growth while Frank-van der Merwe (FM) like growth is desired in many engineering applications. A thermal evaporator is used to deposit Cr with a thickness of ~ 100nm on the previously mentioned substrates. The additional Au layer is then deposited via magnetron sputter deposition at 100mtorr at low deposition rates (~ 1ML/min) onto the Cr thin film. These systems were then annealed using different temperatures for various durations. After annealing these systems were characterized via Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) probes for surface topography and structure. Further, the ambient contamination and elemental distribution/diffusion at annealing was investigated via Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX).

  12. Interaction of borosilicate glass and granodiorite at 1000C, 50 MPa: implications for models of radionuclide release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction of a simulated borosilicate waste glass, granodiorite and deionized water at 1000C, 50 MPa under closed system experimental conditions has revealed the rapid achievement of steady-state fluid concentrations for many chemical components of interest, (e.g., SiO2, La) and their rates of release from the near-field would be most appropriately modelled by a function of solubility and groundwater flow-rate. The conversion of these solubilities into conventional leach-rates has shown over five orders of magnitude range in relative release rates and emphasizes the need for source-term models to consider each radionuclide separately in terms of mechanisms of release

  13. A kinetic model for borosilicate glass dissolution based on the dissolution affinity of a surface alteration layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A kinetic model for the dissolution of borosilicate glass is used to predict the dissolution rate of a nuclear waste glass. In the model, the glass dissolution rate is controlled by the rate of dissolution of an alkali-depleted amorphous surface (gel) layer. Our model predicts that all components concentrated in the surface layer, affect glass dissolution rates. The good agreement between predicted and observed elemental dissolution rates suggests that the dissolution rate of the gel layer limits the overall rate of glass dissolution. The model predicts that the long-term rate of glass dissolution will depend mainly on ion concentrations in solution, and therefore on the secondary phases which precipitate and control ion concentrations. 10 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  14. Color-converted remote phosphor prototype of a multiwavelength excitable borosilicate glass for white light-emitting diodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tian Hua; Liu Ji-Wen; Qiu Kun; Song Jun; Wang Da-Jian

    2012-01-01

    We report a unique red light-emitting Eu-doped borosilicate glass to convert color for warm white light-emitting diodes.This glass can be excited from 394 nm-peaked near ultraviolet light,466 nm-peaked blue light,to 534 nm-peaked green light to emit the desired red light with an excellent transmission in the wavelength range of 400-700 nm which makes this glass suitable for color conversion without a great cost of luminous power loss.In particular,when assembling this glass for commercial white light-emitting diodes,the tested results show that the color rendering index is improved to 84 with a loss of luminous power by 12 percent at average,making this variety of glass promising for inorganic "remote-phosphor" color conversion.

  15. Mechanical and structural studies on sodium borosilicate glasses doped with Er2O3 using ultrasonic velocity and FTIR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sodium borosilicate glasses doped with different mol% content of Er2O3 have been prepared by rapid-quenching method. Ultrasonic velocities (both longitudinal and shear) measurements have been carried out at room temperature and at ultrasonic frequency of 4 MHz. Elastic moduli, Debye temperature, softening temperature, and Poisson's ratio have been obtained as a function of Er2O3 modifier content. Results show that the above-mentioned parameters have very slight change with the change of Er2O3 mol% content. Based on FTIR spectroscopy and theoretical (bond compression) model, quantitative analysis has been carried out in order to obtain more information about the structure of these glasses. The study indicated that the structure of these glasses is mainly composed of SiO4 units with four bridging oxygens (Q4), and with three bridging and one nonbridging oxygens (Q3)

  16. Release of boron and cesium or uranium from simulated borosilicate waste glasses through a compacted Ca-bentonite layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, K. S.; Kim, S. S.; Kang, C. H.

    2001-09-01

    The long-term release behavior of some elements from simulated borosilicate waste glasses (S-, K- and A-glass) in contact with a domestic compacted Ca-bentonite block and synthetic granitic groundwater at 80°C under argon atmosphere has been studied by dynamic leach tests since 1997 at KAERI. S- and K-glass differ mainly in their aluminum content, and A-glass contains 19.35 wt% UO 2 instead of fission product elements. Up to the present, the mass loss is almost the same as the normalized boron loss. This means that boron is an indicator on the dissolution of borosilicate waste glass. The leach rates of boron from K- and S-glasses after 861 days were approximately 3.1×10 -2 and 3.0×10 -2 g/ m2 day, respectively. However, the release rates of cesium through the bentonite block from K- and S-glasses were about 1/10th of the release rate of boron, which were almost the same around 2.5×10 -3 g/ m2 day. This may be due to their adsorption on the bentonite. The leach rate of boron from the A-glass was about 5.4×10 -2, but the leach rate of uranium from the A-glass specimen was quite low, below 4×10 -7 g/ m2 day. The low concentration of uranium in the leachates suggests that it hardly moves in a compacted bentonite block. By the EPMA, a yellowish uranium compound was deposited on the surface of the bentonite in contact with the A-glass specimen. The species of this phase should be identified to understand the release mechanism of uranium.

  17. Basaltic glasses from Iceland and the deep sea: Natural analogues to borosilicate nuclear waste-form glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report provides a detailed analysis of the alteration process and products for natural basaltic glasses. Information of specific applicability to the JSS project include: * The identification of typical alteration products which should be expected during the long-term corrosion process of low-silica glasses. The leached layers contain a relatively high proportion of crystalline phases, mostly in the form of smectite-type clays. Channels through the layer provide immediate access of solutions to the fresh glass/alteration layer interface. Thus, glasses are not 'protected' from further corrosion by the surface layer. * Corrosion proceeds with two rates - an initial rate in silica-undersaturated environments and a long-term rate in silica-saturated environments. This demonstrates that there is no unexpected change in corrosion rate over long periods of time. The long-term corrosion rate is consistent with that of borosilicate glasses. * Precipitation of silica-containing phases can result in increased alteration of the glass as manifested by greater alteration layer thicknesses. This emphasizes the importance of being able to predict which phases form during the reaction sequence. * For natural basaltic glasses the flow rate of water and surface area of exposed glass are critical parameters in minimizing glass alteration over long periods of time. The long-term stability of basalt glasses is enhanced when silica concentrations in solution are increased. In summary, there is considerable agreement between corrosion phenomena observed for borosilicate glasses in the laboratory and those observed for natural basalt glasses of great age. (With 121 refs.) (authors)

  18. Incorporation of Fines and Noble Metals into HLW Borosilicate Glass: Industrial Responses to a Challenging Issue - 13056

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chauvin, E.; Chouard, N.; Prod' homme, A. [AREVA, AREVA NC, Paris (France); Boudot, E. [AREVA, AREVA NC, La Hague (France); Gruber, Ph.; Pinet, O. [CEA Marcoule LCV, France (France); Grosman, R. [AREVA, SGN, Paris (France)

    2013-07-01

    During the early stages of spent fuel reprocessing, the fuel rods are cut and dissolved to separate the solid metallic parts of the rods (cladding and end pieces) from the radioactive nitric acid solution containing uranium, plutonium, minor actinides and fission products (FP). This solution contains small, solid particles produced during the shearing process. These small particles, known as 'fines', are then separated from the liquid by centrifugation. At the La Hague plant in France, the fines solution is transferred to the vitrification facilities to be incorporated into borosilicate glass along with the highly radioactive FP solution. These fines are also composed of Zr, Mo and other noble metals (i.e. Ru, Pd, Rh, etc.) that are added before vitrification to the the FP solution that already contained noble metals. As noble metals has the potential to modify the glass properties (including viscosity, electrical conductivity, etc.) and to be affected by sedimentation inside the melter, their behavior in borosilicate glass has been studied in depth over the years by the AREVA and CEA teams which are now working together in the Joint Vitrification Laboratory (LCV). At La Hague, the R7 vitrification facility started operation in 1989 using induction-heated metallic melter technology and was quickly followed by the T7 vitrification facility in 1992. Incorporating the fines into glass has been a challenge since operation began, and has given rise to several R and D studies resulting in a number of technological enhancements to improve the mixing capability of the melters (multiple bubbling technology and mechanical stirring in the mid-90's). Nowadays, the incorporation of fines into R7T7 glass is well understood and process adaptations are deployed in the La Hague facilities to increase the operating flexibility of the melters. The paper will briefly describe the fines production mechanisms, give details of the resulting fines characteristics, explain

  19. 3 and 4 oxidation state element solubilities in borosilicate glasses. Implement to actinides in nuclear glasses; Solubilite des elements aux degres d'oxydation (3) et (4) dans les verres de borosilicate. Application aux actinides dans les verres nucleaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cachia, J.N

    2005-12-15

    In order to ensure optimal radionuclides containment, the knowledge of the actinide loading limits in nuclear waste glasses and also the comprehension of the solubilization mechanisms of these elements are essential. A first part of this manuscript deals with the study of the differences in solubility of the tri and tetravalent elements (actinides and surrogates) particularly in function of the melting temperature. The results obtained indicate that trivalent elements (La, Gd, Nd, Am, Cm) exhibit a higher solubility than tetravalent elements (Hf, Th, Pu). Consequently, it was planned to reduce plutonium at the oxidation state (III), the later being essentially tetravalent in borosilicate glasses. An innovating reduction process of multi-valent elements (cerium, plutonium) using silicon nitride has been developed in a second part of this work. Reduced plutonium-bearing glasses synthesized by Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} addition made it possible to double the plutonium solubility from 2 to 4 wt% at 1200 deg C. A structural approach to investigate the differences between tri and tetravalent elements was finally undertaken. These investigations were carried out by X-rays Absorption Spectroscopy (EXAFS) and NMR. Trivalent rare earth and actinide elements seem to behave as network modifiers while tetravalent elements rather present true intermediaries' behaviour. (author)

  20. Determination of the free enthalpies of formation of borosilicate glasses; Determination des enthalpies libres de formation des verres borosilicates. Application a l'etude de l'alteration des verres de confinement de dechets radioactifs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linard, Y

    2000-07-01

    This work contributes to the study of the thermochemical properties of nuclear waste glasses. Results are used to discuss mechanisms and parameters integrated in alteration models of conditioning materials. Glass is a disordered material defined thermodynamically as a non-equilibrium state. Taking into account one order parameter to characterise its configurational state, the metastable equilibrium for the glass was considered and the main thermochemical properties were determined. Calorimetric techniques were used to measure heat capacities and formation enthalpies of borosilicate glasses (from 3 to 8 constitutive oxides). Formation Entropies were measured too, using the entropy theory of relaxation processes proposed by Adam and Gibbs (1965). The configurational entropy contribution were determined from viscosity measurements. This set of data has allowed the calculation of Gibb's free energies of dissolution of glasses in pure water. By comparison with leaching experiments, it has been demonstrated that the decreasing of the dissolution rate at high reaction progress cannot be associated to the approach of an equilibrium between the sound glass and the aqueous solution. The composition changes of the reaction area at the glass surface need to be considered too. To achieve a complete description of the thermodynamic stability, the equilibrium between hydrated de-alkalinized glass and/or the gel layer with the aqueous solution should also be evaluated. (author)

  1. Rhenium Solubility In Borosilicate Nuclear Waste Glass Implications For The Processing And Immobilization Of Technetium-99 (And Supporting Information With Graphical Abstract)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The immobilization of 99Tc in a suitable host matrix has proved a challenging task for researchers in the nuclear waste community around the world. At the Hanford site in Washington State in the U.S., the total amount of 99Tc in low-activity waste (LAW) is ∼ 1,300 kg and the current strategy is to immobilize the 99Tc in borosilicate glass with vitrification. In this context, the present article reports on the solubility and retention of rhenium, a nonradioactive surrogate for 99Tc, in a LAW sodium borosilicate glass. Due to the radioactive nature of technetium, rhenium was chosen as a simulant because of previously established similarities in ionic radii and other chemical aspects. The glasses containing target Re concentrations varying from 0 to10,000 ppm by mass were synthesized in vacuum-sealed quartz ampoules to minimize the loss of Re by volatilization during melting at 1000 DC. The rhenium was found to be present predominantly as Re7 + in all the glasses as observed by X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES). The solubility of Re in borosilicate glasses was determined to be ∼3,000 ppm (by mass) using inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). At higher rhenium concentrations, some additional material was retained in the glasses in the form of alkali perrhenate crystalline inclusions detected by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and laser ablation-ICP mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). Assuming justifiably substantial similarities between Re7 + and Tc 7+ behavior in this glass system, these results implied that the processing and immobilization of 99Tc from radioactive wastes should not be limited by the solubility of 99Tc in borosilicate LAW glasses.

  2. RHENIUM SOLUBILITY IN BOROSILICATE NUCLEAR WASTE GLASS IMPLICATIONS FOR THE PROCESSING AND IMMOBILIZATION OF TECHNETIUM-99 (AND SUPPORTING INFORMATION WITH GRAPHICAL ABSTRACT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AA KRUGER; A GOEL; CP RODRIGUEZ; JS MCCLOY; MJ SCHWEIGER; WW LUKENS; JR, BJ RILEY; D KIM; M LIEZERS; P HRMA

    2012-08-13

    The immobilization of 99Tc in a suitable host matrix has proved a challenging task for researchers in the nuclear waste community around the world. At the Hanford site in Washington State in the U.S., the total amount of 99Tc in low-activity waste (LAW) is {approx} 1,300 kg and the current strategy is to immobilize the 99Tc in borosilicate glass with vitrification. In this context, the present article reports on the solubility and retention of rhenium, a nonradioactive surrogate for 99Tc, in a LAW sodium borosilicate glass. Due to the radioactive nature of technetium, rhenium was chosen as a simulant because of previously established similarities in ionic radii and other chemical aspects. The glasses containing target Re concentrations varying from 0 to10,000 ppm by mass were synthesized in vacuum-sealed quartz ampoules to minimize the loss of Re by volatilization during melting at 1000 DC. The rhenium was found to be present predominantly as Re7 + in all the glasses as observed by X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES). The solubility of Re in borosilicate glasses was determined to be {approx}3,000 ppm (by mass) using inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). At higher rhenium concentrations, some additional material was retained in the glasses in the form of alkali perrhenate crystalline inclusions detected by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and laser ablation-ICP mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). Assuming justifiably substantial similarities between Re7 + and Tc 7+ behavior in this glass system, these results implied that the processing and immobilization of 99Tc from radioactive wastes should not be limited by the solubility of 99Tc in borosilicate LAW glasses.

  3. Silver diffusion and coloration of soda lime and borosilicate glasses, Part 1: Effect on the transmission and coloration of stained glasses

    OpenAIRE

    ABDELLAH CHORFA; NABIL BELKHIR; FAUSTO RUBIO; JUAN RUBIO

    2012-01-01

    Using the conventional method of coloration, soda lime and borosilicate glasses have been painted. Once stained, these glasses were heat treated at temperatures close to their transition temperatures (Tg). A parametric study was carried out in order to determine at first the effect of the silver concentration in the stain spread on glass. In addition, it was studied the effect of the heat treatment duration and the chemical composition of the painted glasses on the formation and size of the s...

  4. Calcium-borosilicate glass-ceramics wasteforms to immobilize rare-earth oxide wastes from pyro-processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Miae; Heo, Jong

    2015-12-01

    Glass-ceramics containing calcium neodymium(cerium) oxide silicate [Ca2Nd8-xCex(SiO4)6O2] crystals were fabricated for the immobilization of radioactive wastes that contain large portions of rare-earth ions. Controlled crystallization of alkali borosilicate glasses by heating at T ≥ 750 °C for 3 h formed hexagonal Ca-silicate crystals. Maximum lanthanide oxide waste loading was >26.8 wt.%. Ce and Nd ions were highly partitioned inside Ca-silicate crystals compared to the glass matrix; the rare-earth wastes are efficiently immobilized inside the crystalline phases. The concentrations of Ce and Nd ions released in a material characterization center-type 1 test were below the detection limit (0.1 ppb) of inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. Normalized release values performed by a product consistency test were 2.64·10-6 g m-2 for Ce ion and 2.19·10-6 g m-2 for Nd ion. Results suggest that glass-ceramics containing calcium neodymium(cerium) silicate crystals are good candidate wasteforms for immobilization of lanthanide wastes generated by pyro-processing.

  5. Effects of magnesium minerals representative of the Callovian-Oxfordian clay-stone on borosilicate glass alteration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borosilicate glasses dissolution has been studied in presence of magnesium minerals. Those minerals (dolomite, illite, smectite...) belong to the Callovo-Oxfordian (COx) clay-stone layer, studied in France as a potential site for nuclear waste disposal. Such minerals contain magnesium, an element able to sustain glass alteration when it is available in solution. In the confined media of the wastes disposal, the solids reactivity controls the solution composition and can be the driving force of nuclear glass alteration. Experiments show that magnesium carbonates (hydro-magnesite and dolomite) increase in the glass alteration: the precipitation of magnesium silicates consumes silicon which slows down the formation of the glass passivating layer. The lower the magnesium mineral solubility, the lower the glass alteration. The purified clay phases (illite, smectite...) from the COx layer increase the glass alteration. Half the magnesium was replaced by sodium during the purification process. In such conditions, the effect of clay phases on glass alteration is in part due to the acidic pH-buffering effect of the clay fraction. The GRAAL model implemented in the geochemical transport code HYTEC has confirmed and quantified the mechanisms put in evidence in the experiments. Cells diffusion experiments where the two solids were separated by an inert diffusion barrier allow to valid reactive transport modelling. Such experiments are more representative of the glass package which will be separated from the COx by corrosion products. They show that glass alteration rate is reduced when solids are not close. (author)

  6. Irradiations effects on the structure of boro-silicated glasses: long term behaviour of nuclear waste glassy matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work deals with the long term behaviour of R7T7-type nuclear waste glasses and more particularly of non-active boro-silicated glasses made up of 3 or 5 oxides. Radioactivity of active glasses is simulated by multi energies ions implantations which reproduce the same defects. The damages due to the alpha particles are simulated by helium ions implantations and those corresponding to the recoil nucleus are obtained with gold ions ones. Minor actinides, stemming from the used fuel, is simulated by trivalent rare-earths (Eu3+ and Nd3+). In a first part, we have shown by macroscopic experiments (Vickers hardness - swelling) and optical spectroscopies (Raman - ATR-IR) that the structure of the glassy matrices is modified under implantations until a dose of 2,3.1013 at.cm-2, which corresponds to a R7T7 storage time estimated at 300 years. Beyond this dose, no additional modifications have been observed. The second part concerns the local environment of the rare-earth ions in glasses. Two different environments were found and identified as follows: one is a silicate rich one and the other is attributed to a borate rich one. (author)

  7. Impact of soda-lime borosilicate glass composition on water penetration and water structure at the first time of alteration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the impact of soda-lime borosilicate glass composition and particularly the effect of charge compensators such Ca and Na and, of network formers such Si and Zr, on water penetration and water structure at the first time of alteration were investigated. Two non-destructive techniques were combined: the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in attenuated total reflection geometry to precise the predominant alteration mechanisms and assess the water structure in altered zone and the grazing incidence X-ray reflectometry to determine the thickness of the altered glass zone allowing to calculate the water diffusion coefficients through the glasses. The results of glass alteration at pH = 3 and 30 degrees C have shown that hydrolysis was the predominant mechanism after few seconds for glass having a high amount of non-binding oxygen. For the other glasses, which for the diffusion was the limiting reaction, the calculated water diffusion coefficients were comprised between 10-21 and 10-19 m2.s-1 and vary as a function of glass composition. An activation energy of 76.9 kJ.mol-1 was calculated and appears to be higher than inert gas diffusion through the glass highlighting that water molecules strongly interact with the glass matrix. (authors)

  8. A dynamic fatigue study of soda-lime silicate and borosilicate glasses using small scale indentation flaws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dynamic fatigue characteristics of two glasses, soda-lime silicate and borosilicate, in water have been studied using a controlled indentation flaw technique. It is argued that the indentation approach offers several advantages over more conventional fatigue testing procedures: (i) the reproducibility of data is relatively high, eliminating statistics as a basis of analysis: (ii) the flaw ultimately responsible for failure is well defined and may be conveniently characterised before and after (and during, if necessary) the strength test; (iii) via adjustment of the indentation load, the size of the flaw can be suitably predetermined. Particular attention is devoted to the third point because of the facility it provides for systematic investigation of the range of flaw sizes over which macroscopic crack behaviour remains applicable. The first part of the paper summarises the essential fracture mechanics theory of the extension of an indentation flaw to failure. In the next part of the paper the results of dynamic fatigue tests on glass rods in distilled water are described. Data are obtained for Vickers indentation loads in the range 0.05 to 100 N, corresponding to contact dimensions of 2 to 100 μm. Finally, the implications of the results in relation to the response of 'natural' flaws are discussed. (author)

  9. A comparative study by Molecular Dynamics of the ballistic effects and the thermal quenching effects in a sodium borosilicate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The understanding of the aging under irradiation of nuclear glasses requires to study the induced changes at the atomic scale. A sodium borosilicate glass has been modeled by molecular dynamics and then submitted to low energies (4 keV) cascades series. Between each cascade, the structural evolutions have been analyzed and have shown a linear correlation between the glass swelling and its polymerization degree. The deep analysis of the different units constituting the glass shows that the lattice depolymerization instigated by the damage is mainly induced by the BO4 units conversion to BO3 and by the increase of the non bridging oxygen number. On account of the established structural changes, a comparison of the structural effects induced by irradiation to those generated by thermal quenching has been carried out. For that, the same glass has been prepared with various quench velocities (5*1012 and 1014 k.s-1) and the different structures obtained have been analyzed. It has been shown an increase of the BO3 units to the detriment of the BO4 units when the quench velocity increases, as well the non-bridging oxygen number. Thus qualitatively, the irradiation effects lead to structural consequences equivalent to those induced by thermal quenching effects. (O.M.)

  10. Effect of boron oxide addition on the Nd3+ environment in a Nd-rich soda-lime alumino-borosilicate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The environment of Nd3+ ions has been studied using optical absorption spectroscopy and EXAFS at the Nd-L3-edge, in a series of soda lime alumino-borosilicate glasses with increasing B2O3 content. The proportion of BO4 units has been determined by 11B MAS NMR in an equivalent glass series with La3+ ions replacing the majority of Nd3+ ions, and complementary information has been obtained by measuring the Nd3+ decay fluorescence times in these latter glasses. In these glasses with low Al2O3 content, the R' ratio, with R' = [Na2O(exc)]/[B2O3] and [Na2O(exc)] = [Na2O] - [Al2O3] - [ZrO2], plays a key role in controlling the structural organization and crystallization resistance, in a similar way as the R ratio in the Dell and Bray model of sodium borosilicate glasses. At R'≥ 0.5, the Nd3+ ions are located in a mixed silicate-borate environment and, by slow cooling of the melt, they tend to crystallize within a silicate apatite phase close to the Ca2Nd8(SiO4)6O2 composition. At R' ≤ 0.5, the structural results are compatible with Nd3+ ions located in a borate-type environment (not excluding Si neighbors), and, by slow cooling of the melt, they segregate with Ca2+ ions within a Si-depleted separated borosilicate phase. (authors)

  11. Conceptual waste package interim product specifications and data requirements for disposal of borosilicate glass defense high-level waste forms in salt geologic repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conceptual waste package interim product specifications and data requirements presented are applicable specifically to the normal borosilicate glass product of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). They provide preliminary numerical values for the defense high-level waste form parameters and properties identified in the waste form performance specification for geologic isolation in salt repositories. Subject areas treated include containment and isolation, operational period safety, criticality control, waste form/production canister identification, and waste package performance testing requirements. This document was generated for use in the development of conceptual waste package designs in salt. It will be revised as additional data, analyses, and regulatory requirements become available

  12. Conceptual waste package interim product specifications and data requirements for disposal of borosilicate glass defense high-level waste forms in salt geologic repositories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-06-01

    The conceptual waste package interim product specifications and data requirements presented are applicable specifically to the normal borosilicate glass product of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). They provide preliminary numerical values for the defense high-level waste form parameters and properties identified in the waste form performance specification for geologic isolation in salt repositories. Subject areas treated include containment and isolation, operational period safety, criticality control, waste form/production canister identification, and waste package performance testing requirements. This document was generated for use in the development of conceptual waste package designs in salt. It will be revised as additional data, analyses, and regulatory requirements become available.

  13. Deep wet etching of borosilicate glass and fused silica with dehydrated AZ4330 and a Cr/Au mask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research highlights a superior glass-wet-etch technique which enables a glass wafer to be etched for more than 20 h in 49 wt% hydrofluoric acid (HF) only with Cr/Au film and a common positive photoresist, AZ4330. We demonstrated that pits on the wet-etched glass wafer were generated not only due to HF diffusion through the Cr/Au film but also due to pinholes on the Cr/Au films created by the diffusion of the Cr/Au etchant through a photoresist etching-mask during the Cr/Au wet etching process. These two types of diffusion, HF diffusion and Cr/Au etchant diffusion, were eliminated by the thermal curing of a photoresist (PR), AZ4330, before the Cr/Au wet etching process. The curing process allowed the PR to dehydrate, increased the hydrophobicity, and prevented the diffusion of the hydrophilic HF and Cr/Au etchant. Optimization of the curing process was performed, showing that curing at 130 °C for 20 min was the proper condition. With the optimized process, a 525 µm thick borosilicate glass wafer was penetrated with 49%wt HF. A fused silica wafer 525 µm thick was also wet-etched and penetrated with 49 wt% HF at 10 h. Moreover, no pits were found in wet etching of the fused silica for 20 h in 49 wt% HF. These findings demonstrate that the proposed technique allows the wet etching of a glass wafer for more than 20 h in 49%wt HF, the best result thus far. We fabricated a glass substrate with a 217.0 µm deep cavity and a penetrating through-via using the proposed technique, proving the feasibility of the product as an optical component with a surface roughness of 45.5 Å in the cavity. (paper)

  14. Study of phase separation and crystallization phenomena in soda-lime borosilicate glass enriched in MoO3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molybdenum oxide immobilization (MoO3, as fission product) is one of the major challenges in the nuclear glass formulation issues for high level waste solutions conditioning since many years, these solutions arising from spent nuclear fuel reprocessing. Phase separation and crystallisation processes may arise in molten glass when the MoO3 content is higher than its solubility limit that may depend on glass composition. Molybdenum combined with other elements such as alkali and alkaline-earth may form crystalline molybdates, known as 'yellow phases' in nuclear glasses which may decrease the glass durability. In order to confine high level wastes (HLW) such as the fission product solutions arising from the reprocessing of high burn-up UOX-type nuclear spent fuels, a new glass composition (HLW glass) is being optimized. This work is devoted to the study of the origin and the mechanism of phase separation and crystallization phenomena induced by molybdenum oxide incorporation in the HLW glass. From microstructural and structural point of view, the molybdenum oxide behavior was studied in glass compositions belonging to the SiO2-B2O3- Na2O-CaO simplified system which constituted basis for the HLW glass formulation. The structural role of molybdenum oxide in borosilicate network explaining the phase separation and crystallization tendency was studied through the coupling of structural (95Mo, 29Si, 11B, 23Na MAS NMR, XRD) and microstructural (SEM, HRTEM) analysis techniques. The determination of phase separation (critical temperature) and crystallization (liquidus temperature) appearance temperatures by in situ viscosimetry and Raman spectroscopy experiments allowed us to propose a transformation scenario during melt cooling. These processes and the nature of the crystalline phases formed (CaMoO4, Na2MoO4) that depend on the evolution of MoO3, CaO and B2O3 contents were correlated with changes of sodium and calcium cations proportions in the environment of molybdate

  15. USACE FUSRAP Maywood Team Identifies Challenges and Initiates Alternate Solutions Relating to the Radiochemical Analysis of Borosilicate Fiber Filters for Isotopes of Uranium and Thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This presentation discusses the primary purposes of particulate radionuclide air monitoring at the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Formerly Utilized Sites Remediation Program (FUSRAP) Maywood Superfund Site (FMSS), the challenges encountered by the team when standard radiochemistry analytical methods are attempted on borosilicate fiber filter samples, the surrogate evaluations used when sample specific isotopic analysis is unsuccessful, and current strategies for overcoming radiochemistry method deficiencies. Typical borosilicate fiber filter sample preparation procedures including tracer spike and digestion methods and their impact on uranium and thorium data quality are of particular interest. Analytes discussed include isotopic uranium (U-234, U-235, and U-238) and isotopic thorium (Th-228, Th-230, and Th-232). Efforts to obtain reproducible and defensible results also included discussions with commercial laboratory radiochemistry managers as well as industry experts. This presentation may benefit sites that use similar sample collection and analysis techniques, utilize data that may have unidentified method-related issues with diminished data quality, or have a similar isotopic signature. (authors)

  16. Studies of local structure of Cm3+ in borosilicate glass using laser and x-ray spectroscopic methods and computational modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The local environment of Cm3+ in a borosilicate glass has been probed by a combination of laser spectroscopy, structural modeling, and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. The Stark splitting for the Cm f-f state transitions is significantly larger than the inhomogeneous line broadening that results from the disordered environment. As a result, the Cm optical spectrum can be fit using an effective operator Hamiltonian to obtain a set of crystal-field parameters. The fitting procedure, which requires the use of a descent-in-symmetry approach, provides a set of parameters for a best fit within tetragonal symmetry. These parameters are then linked to the local environment of Cm through exchange-charge modeling (ECM) of crystal field interactions. Cm in our borosilicate glass is best modeled with six oxygen ions with approximately tetragonal symmetry, and at an average distance of 2.31 (3) Aa. The results of crystal-field modeling are supported by EXAFS results. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  17. First investigations of the influence of IVB elements (Ti, Zr, and Hf) on the chemical durability of soda-lime borosilicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of IVB elements (Zr, Ti, and Hf) on the glass structure and on the alteration kinetics of soda-lime borosilicate glasses has been studied at various stages of glass leaching corresponding to the initial dissolution rate, rate drop, and residual rate regimes. The effect of these elements on the limiting mechanisms of the glass durability as well as the chemistry of both solution and alteration layer are inter-related, depending on the reaction progress. The effect of IVB elements on the glass structure was investigated using 11B MAS NMR. The IVB elements are compensated primarily by Na rather than Ca, at the expense of tetra-coordinated boron. The addition of HfO2 or ZrO2 decreases the initial dissolution rate in a similar way. Moreover, adding ZrO2 limits the rate drop in saturated media. The initial dissolution rate decrease is less significant when Ti is added, and a quick drop of the dissolution rate is observed up to 4 mol% TiO2. At low IVB element concentration, glasses containing Ti and Zr show different residual rates arising from the precipitation of magadiite (Na2Si14O29 center dot 11H2O), at the surface of Ti-bearing glasses. The influence of IVB elements on glass alteration indicates that, unlike Ti, Zr and Hf plays a similar role in the structure of borosilicate glasses. (authors)

  18. Preparation, characterization and standard molar enthalpy of formation of BaO containing sodium borosilicate glasses and its comparison with international standard glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High level radioactive liquid waste (HLW) generated during reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel is immobilized in sodium borosilicate (NBS) glasses. Addition of BaO in NBS glass helps to improve the solubility of ThO2 in glass matrix. The knowledge of thermodynamic stability of glasses used for immobilization of HLW is important in predicting their long term stability. Several BaO substituted NBS glass samples were prepared by melt-quench technique and characterized by XRD, DTA, MAS-NMR. The standard molar enthalpy of formation of BaO substituted NBS glasses and the International Standard Glass (ISG) were determined. This work is done with an understanding that even though the above glass matrices are metastable in nature and meaningful measurement of equilibrium thermodynamic data is difficult; the information on relative thermodynamic stability data of NBS glasses with varying compositions prepared exactly in similar fashion will be helpful in deciding the most stable matrix for nuclear waste disposal

  19. Intense upconversion luminescence of Er3+/Yb3+ codoped oxyfluoride borosilicate glass ceramics containing Ba2GdF7 nanocrystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO

    2010-01-01

    Er3+/Yb3+-codoped transparent oxyfluoride borosilicate glass ceramics containing Ba2GdF7 nanocrystals were prepared and spectroscopic properties of rare earth ions were investigated.Fluoride nanocrystals Ba2GdF7 were successfully precipitated in glass matrix,which was confirmed by X-ray diffraction(XRD)and transmission electron microscopy(TEM)results.In comparison with the as-made precursor,significant enhancement ofupconversion luminescence was observed in the Er3+/Yb3+codoped oxyfluoride glass ceramics,which may be due to the variation of coordination environment around Er3+and Yb3+ions after crystallization.The transition mechanisms of the green and red upconversion luminescence were ascribed to a two-photon process,and that of the blue upconversion luminescence was a three-photon process.

  20. Elaboration and experimental study of the Borosilicate glass GP 98/12 for the vitrification of the radioactive wastes of KfKarlsruhe Centre (R.F.A.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transformation into a vitrified block of highly radioactive liquid wastes is actually the best solution for the storage in long run. In West Germany, the research institute in the field of nuclear energy (KfK) has been oriented in this way by developing industrial processes of vitrification and by following studies on the behaviour of the final products. For the fission products, the chosen glasses present good stability characteristics and are used as a first barrier during confinement. Our work, which is part of the research program on radioactive waste vitrification, consists of preparing borosilicate glass GP 98/12 and studying physical and chemical characteristics. We have also contributed to the development and the realization of glass blocks sampling system prepared at pilot scale

  1. A critical study on borosilicate glassware and silica-based QMA's in nucleophilic substitution with [{sup 18}F]fluoride: influence of aluminum, boron and silicon on the reactivity of [{sup 18}F]fluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svadberg, A., E-mail: anders.svadberg@uit.n [University of Tromso, Institute of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutics and Biopharmaceutics, N-9037 Tromso (Norway); Clarke, A.; Dyrstad, K.; Martinsen, I. [GE Healthcare MDx R and D, Nycoveien 2, NO-0401 Oslo (Norway); Hjelstuen, O.K. [University of Tromso, Institute of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutics and Biopharmaceutics, N-9037 Tromso (Norway); GE Healthcare MDx R and D, Nycoveien 2, NO-0401 Oslo (Norway)

    2011-02-15

    Leachables of borosilicate glassware and silica-based anion exchange columns (QMAs) may influence nucleophilic substitution with [{sup 18}F]fluoride ([{sup 18}F]F{sup -}). Aluminum, boron and silicon, all constituents of borosilicate glass, were found as water soluble leachables in a typical PET synthesis setup. Relevant ranges of the leachable quantities were studied based on an experimental design, in which species of the three elements were added to the labeling of the precursor for anti-1-amino-3-[{sup 18}F]fluorocyclobutyl-1-carboxylic acid ([{sup 18}F]FACBC). Levels of 0.4-2 ppm aluminum as AlCl{sub 3} had a strong negative influence on labeling yield while 4-20 ppm of boron as KBO{sub 2} and 50-250 ppm of silicon as Na{sub 2}SiO{sub 3} did not have a significant impact. Interesting interaction effects between the elements were observed, where particularly KBO{sub 2} reduced the negative effect of AlCl{sub 3} on labeling yield. It can be concluded that leachables of borosilicate glassware easily can influence nucleophilic substitution with n.c.a. [{sup 18}F]F{sup -} and give variable yields.

  2. A critical study on borosilicate glassware and silica-based QMA's in nucleophilic substitution with [18F]fluoride: influence of aluminum, boron and silicon on the reactivity of [18F]fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svadberg, A; Clarke, A; Dyrstad, K; Martinsen, I; Hjelstuen, O K

    2011-02-01

    Leachables of borosilicate glassware and silica-based anion exchange columns (QMAs) may influence nucleophilic substitution with [(18)F]fluoride ([(18)F]F(-)). Aluminum, boron and silicon, all constituents of borosilicate glass, were found as water soluble leachables in a typical PET synthesis setup. Relevant ranges of the leachable quantities were studied based on an experimental design, in which species of the three elements were added to the labeling of the precursor for anti-1-amino-3-[(18)F]fluorocyclobutyl-1-carboxylic acid ([(18)F]FACBC). Levels of 0.4-2 ppm aluminum as AlCl(3) had a strong negative influence on labeling yield while 4-20 ppm of boron as KBO(2) and 50-250 ppm of silicon as Na(2)SiO(3) did not have a significant impact. Interesting interaction effects between the elements were observed, where particularly KBO(2) reduced the negative effect of AlCl(3) on labeling yield. It can be concluded that leachables of borosilicate glassware easily can influence nucleophilic substitution with n.c.a. [(18)F]F(-) and give variable yields.

  3. Dielectric Properties of La2O3 Doped Composite (PbxSr1−xTiO3 Borosilicate Glass Ceramic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. Gautam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ferroelectric (PbxSr1−xTiO3 (PST perovskite phase has been crystallized in borosilicate glassy matrix with a suitable choice of composition and heat treatment schedule. La2O3 is a donor dopant for PST and can make it semiconducting. Dispersion of semiconducting perovskite phase in insulating glassy matrix in glass-ceramic samples may lead to the formation of space charge polarization around crystal-glass interface, leading to a high value of effective dielectric constant, εr. Therefore, with the aim of the developing glass ceramics with high dielectric constant, glasses in the system 64[(PbxSr1−xO·TiO2]-25[2SiO2·B2O3]-5[K2O]-5[BaO]-1[La2O3] have been prepared (0.5≤x≤1. It is found that the addition of La2O3 strongly affected the crystallization and dielectric behavior of glass-ceramic with PST perovskite phase. All glass ceramic samples show a diffuse broad Curie peak in their εr versus T plots. Curie peak temperature, Tc, depends on compositions of the glass-ceramic samples as well as frequency of measurements.

  4. Lanthanide-activated Na5Gd9F32 nanocrystals precipitated from a borosilicate glass: Phase-separation-controlled crystallization and optical property

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Na5Gd9F32 nanocrystals embedded glass ceramics were fabricated for the first time. • Such glass ceramics were achieved by phase-separation-controlled crystallization. • Elemental mapping evidenced the segregation of activators into the Na5Gd9F32 lattice. • Luminescent color could be tuned by controlling glass crystallization temperature. - Abstract: Lanthanide-activated cubic Na5Gd9F32 nanocrystals were precipitated from a borosilicate glass with a specifically designed composition. The precursor glass is already phase-separated after melt-quenching, which is beneficial to the realization of the controllable glass crystallization for affording desirable size, morphology and activator partition. Elemental mapping in the scanning transmission electron microscopy evidenced that the segregation of lanthanide ions into the Na5Gd9F32 lattice was in situ formed without the requirement of long-range ionic diffusion. Impressively, such fabricated glass ceramic co-doped with Yb3+/Er3+ ions exhibited intense upconversion luminescence, which was about 500 times higher than that of the precursor glass, and its luminescent color could be easily tuned from red to green by controlling glass crystallization temperature. It is anticipated that such phase-separation synthesis strategy with precise control over nanostructure of glass ceramics offer a great opportunity to design other highly transparent nanocomposites with a wide range of tunable optical properties

  5. Optical parameters of Nd3+:Er3+:Yb3+co-doped borosilicate glasses and their energy transfers at high temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Cheng-Ben; Li Shu-Feng; Dong Bin; Cheng Yu-Qi; Yin Hai-Tao; Yang Jing; Chen Yu

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports that a series of Nd3+:Er3+:yb3+ co-doped borosilicate glasses have been prepared and their absorption spectra measured. The J-O intensity parameters Ωk (k = 2, 4, 6), spontaneous radiative lifetime Τrad,spontaneous transition probability A, fluorescence branching ratio β and oscillator strength fed of the Nd3+ ions at room temperature are calculated based on Judd-Ofelt (J-O) theory. The temperature dependence of the up-conversion photoluminescence characteristics in a Nd3+:Er3+:yb3+ co-doped sample is studied under a 978 nm semiconductor laser excitation, and the energy transfer mechanisms among Yb3+, Er3+ and Nd3+ ions are analysed. The results show that the J-O intensity parameters Ω2 increase when the Nd3+ concentration of the Nd3+:Er3+:yb3+ co-doped boresilicate glasses increases. The possibility of spontaneous transition is small and lifetimes are long at levels of 4F5/2and 4F3/2. The intensity of Nd3+ emissions at 595, 691, 753, 813 and 887 nm are markedly enhanced when the sample temperature exceeds 400 K. The reasons being the cooperation of the secondary sensitization from Er3+ to Nd3+ and the contribution of a multi-phonon.

  6. Mechanism for formation of NaBH4 proposed as low-pressure process for storing hydrogen in borosilicate glass–sodium solid system: a hydrogen storage material

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Aysel Kantürk Figen; Sabriye Pişkin

    2012-04-01

    The mechanism for the formation of sodium borohydride (NaBH4) was investigated for its ability to store hydrogen in the borosilicate glass–sodium (BSG–Na) solid system under low hydrogen pressure. BSG, which was prepared by melting borax with silica, was used as the starting material in the BSG–Na system that would be prepared to store hydrogen. It was observed that the mechanism for storing hydrogen in the BSG–Na solid system consisted of six steps and when the BSG–Na system was heated under a pressure of 4 atm, which was created through the use of hydrogen atmosphere, the storage of hydrogen occurred at nearly 480°C for approximate duration of 200 min, with the excellent yield (97%). In addition, the hydrogen storage capacity of the NaBH4 sample was measured using the Au–PS structure, which was designed as a mini-hydrogen cell. It was determined that the minimum amount of NaBH4 to generate the maximum volume of hydrogen gas was 12 mg/ml at 270 mV.

  7. Ce(3+)/Yb(3+)/Er(3+) triply doped bismuth borosilicate glass: a potential fiber material for broadband near-infrared fiber amplifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Yushi; Ren, Jing; Zhang, Jianzhong; Peng, Gangding; Yang, Jun; Wang, Pengfei; Yuan, Libo

    2016-09-20

    Erbium doped bismuth borosilicate (BBS) glasses, possessing the broadest 1.55 μm near infrared (NIR) emission band among oxide glasses, stand out as excellent fiber material for optical fiber amplifiers. In this work, we demonstrate that both broadened and enhanced NIR emission of Er(3+) can be obtained by sensibly combining the effects such as mixed glass former effect, phonon-assisted energy transfer (PAET) and de-excitation effect induced by codopant. Specially, by codoping CeO2 in a controlled manner, it leads to not only much improved optical quality of the glasses, enhanced NIR emission, but also significantly suppressed energy transfer up-conversion (ETU) luminescence which is detrimental to the NIR emission. Cerium incorporated in the glasses exists overwhelmingly as the trivalent oxidation state Ce(3+) and its effects on the luminescence properties of Er(3+) are discussed. Judd-Ofelt analysis is used to evaluate gain amplification of the glasses. The result indicates that Ce(3+)/Yb(3+)/Er(3+) triply doped BBS glasses are promising candidate for erbium doped fiber amplifiers. The strategy described here can be readily extended to other rare-earth ions (REs) to improve the performance of REs doped fiber lasers and amplifiers.

  8. Ce3+/Yb3+/Er3+ triply doped bismuth borosilicate glass: a potential fiber material for broadband near-infrared fiber amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Yushi; Ren, Jing; Zhang, Jianzhong; Peng, Gangding; Yang, Jun; Wang, Pengfei; Yuan, Libo

    2016-01-01

    Erbium doped bismuth borosilicate (BBS) glasses, possessing the broadest 1.55 μm near infrared (NIR) emission band among oxide glasses, stand out as excellent fiber material for optical fiber amplifiers. In this work, we demonstrate that both broadened and enhanced NIR emission of Er3+ can be obtained by sensibly combining the effects such as mixed glass former effect, phonon-assisted energy transfer (PAET) and de-excitation effect induced by codopant. Specially, by codoping CeO2 in a controlled manner, it leads to not only much improved optical quality of the glasses, enhanced NIR emission, but also significantly suppressed energy transfer up-conversion (ETU) luminescence which is detrimental to the NIR emission. Cerium incorporated in the glasses exists overwhelmingly as the trivalent oxidation state Ce3+ and its effects on the luminescence properties of Er3+ are discussed. Judd-Ofelt analysis is used to evaluate gain amplification of the glasses. The result indicates that Ce3+/Yb3+/Er3+ triply doped BBS glasses are promising candidate for erbium doped fiber amplifiers. The strategy described here can be readily extended to other rare-earth ions (REs) to improve the performance of REs doped fiber lasers and amplifiers. PMID:27646191

  9. Performance evaluation of vitrified waste product based on barium-borosilicate matrix deployed for vitrification of sulphate bearing high level radioactive liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aqueous waste of various categories (viz., low, intermediate and high level depending on the concentration of radionuclides) is generated at different stages of the nuclear fuel cycle. Most of the radioactivity generated in entire nuclear fuel cycle is concentrated in high level radioactive liquid waste (HLW). Since the radioactivity of the waste is to be isolated from the human-environment for extended period of time, a three stage approach has been adopted for management of HLW. This involves (i) immobilization of waste oxides in stable and inert solid matrices, (ii) interim retrievable storage of conditioned waste packages under cooling and surveillance and (iii) deep underground disposal in suitable geological formulations. Composition of HLW depends on various factors like type of fuel and its cladding, off reactor cooling, reprocessing flow sheet etc. Compositional changes in HLW necessitate modification in glass formulations, so as to get the conditioned product of desired characteristics. This report describes the experimental studies and results obtained for performance evaluation of the vitrified waste product made from barium borosilicate glass matrix accommodating sulphate bearing chemically simulated HLW. Product characteristics like chemical durability, homogeneity, phase separation, thermal conductivity, impact strength etc have been evaluated and discussed in the report. (author)

  10. Silver diffusion and coloration of soda lime and borosilicate glasses, Part 1: Effect on the transmission and coloration of stained glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABDELLAH CHORFA

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Using the conventional method of coloration, soda lime and borosilicate glasses have been painted. Once stained, these glasses were heat treated at temperatures close to their transition temperatures (Tg. A parametric study was carried out in order to determine at first the effect of the silver concentration in the stain spread on glass. In addition, it was studied the effect of the heat treatment duration and the chemical composition of the painted glasses on the formation and size of the silver nanoparticles, the silver diffusion depth and also the glasses coloration. The characterization was made using UV-Vis spectroscopy, Raman confocal spectroscopy, SEM, EDX Technique and Abbe Refractometer. The obtained results shows that the coloration intensity of both glass types painted by the conventional method differs and depends essentially on the proportion of alkali ions in the glass. Moreover, it was found that the effect of the silver concentration in the stain is primordial and the heat treatment duration has a limited effect.

  11. Influence of zirconium on the structure of pristine and leached soda-lime borosilicate glasses: towards a quantitative approach by 17O MQMAS NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    17O MQMAS NMR was used to characterize the influence of zirconium on the structural organization of soda-lime borosilicate glasses. A new method of quantitative analysis of the 17O MQMAS spectra is presented, by a direct fit of the two-dimensional MQMAS spectrum which provides the resolution of all the structural groups in glasses containing up to five oxides. Additional data were also obtained from the quantitative deconvolution of the 11B MAS NMR spectra, with the help of the direct fit of MQMAS data as well. Excess of non-bridging oxygen is clearly identified in these glasses. Six-folded zirconium is preferentially compensated rather than the tetrahedral boron and calcium only partially compensate the tetrahedral boron. Alteration gels arising from glass leaching were probed by oxygen-17 supplied by the alteration solution. Most of the zirconium is inserted in the silicate network forming Si-O-Zr bonds with the same configuration in the glass and in the gel. During leaching, calcium clearly remains in the alteration gel, either near non-bridging oxygen or as a zirconium charge compensator. This quantitative approach applied to 17O MQMAS spectra demonstrates its potential for investigating the structure of increasingly complex glass and gel compositions. (authors)

  12. Dynamics of iron-bearing borosilicate melts: Effects of melt structure and composition on viscosity, electrical conductivity and kinetics of redox reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dynamic properties of a series of iron-bearing sodium borosilicate melts have been investigated to determine how structure and composition control viscosity, electrical conductivity and the kinetics of iron redox reactions and, thus, atomic mobility as involved in these different processes. For this purpose, four compositions with 67 mol% SiO2 and B2O3 contents ranging from 0 to 22 mol% have been studied. In addition to viscosity and electrical conductivity, we have determined the kinetics of the iron redox reaction by isothermal iron K-edge XANES and Raman spectroscopy experiments performed as a function of time from 710 to 1570 K. Substitution of sodium for boron at constant SiO2 content first causes transformation of BO3 triangles into BO4 tetrahedra until an excess of sodium induces instead melt depolymerization. These changes in the degree of polymerization and boron coordination lead to a maximum in oxygen diffusivity at around 18 mol% B2O3, and correlatively, to a viscosity minimum. Because this change of trigonal into tetrahedral boron requires charge compensation of B3+ by cations such as Na+ ions, the mobility of Na+ decreases and reduces the rate of oxidation. In addition, the decreasing fraction of Na+ ions and their change from a free to a charge compensating role explain the decreasing redox diffusivities and electrical conductivities of the samples. (authors)

  13. A Comparison of Modifications Induced by Li3+ and Ag14+ Ion Beam in Spectroscopic Properties of Bismuth Alumino-Borosilicate Glass Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravneet Kaur

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ion irradiation effects on the glass network and structural units have been studied by irradiating borosilicate glass thin film samples with 50 MeV Li3+ and 180 MeV Ag14+ swift heavy ions (SHI at different fluence rates ranging from 1012 ions/cm2 to 1014 ions/cm2. Glass of the composition (65-x Bi2O3-10Al2O3-(65-y B2O3-25SiO2 (x = 45, 40; y = 20, 25 has been prepared by melt quench technique. To study the effects of ionizing radiation, the glass thin films have been prepared from these glasses and characterized using XRD, FTIR, and UV-Vis spectroscopic techniques. IR spectra are used to study the structural arrangements in the glass before and after irradiation. The values of optical band gap, Urbach energy, and refractive index have been calculated from the UV-Vis measurements. The variation in optical parameters with increasing Bi2O3 content has been analyzed and discussed in terms of changes occurring in the glass network. A comparative study of the influence of Li3+ ion beam on structural and optical properties of the either glass system with Ag14+ ion is done. The results have been explained in the light of the interaction that SHI undergo on entering the material.

  14. Effect of X-ray irradiation on the optical absorption of SdSe1−xTex nanocrystals embedded in borosilicate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of X-ray irradiation on the optical absorption spectra of CdSe1−xTex nanocrystals embedded in a borosilicate matrix is studied. The observed blue shift of the absorption edge and bleaching of the confinement-related features in the spectra are related to X-ray induced negative ionization of the nanocrystals with charge transfer across the nanocrystal/matrix interface. The radiation-induced changes are observed to recover after longer post-irradiation storage at room temperature. - Highlights: ► Absorption edge of glass-embedded CdSe1−x Tex nanocrystals is blue shifted under X-ray irradiation. ► Radiation-induced bleaching bands appear at the position of HOMO-LUMO transitions. ► The reason is charge transfer between the nanocrystals and radiation-induced centres in the glass. ► Contrary to photoionization, this is a long-lived process (over 2000 h).

  15. Luminescence Properties of Eu/Tm/Tb-doped Borosilicate Glass%Eu/Tm/Tb掺杂硼硅酸盐玻璃的发光性能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石冬梅; 赵营刚

    2016-01-01

    Eu/Tm/Tb-doped singly, doubly and triply borosilicate glasses were prepared using a conventional melting-quenching method. The luminescent properties of Eu/Tm/Tb-doped samples under the UV excitation were investigated in detail by measuring the excitation and emission spectra and calculating CIE chromaticity coordinates. The results show that the sharp emission peak centered at 459 nm originating from 1 D2→3 F4 of Tm3+ is observed, and the characteristic emission intensity centered at 437 nm ascribing to the broad peak of Eu2+, 589 nm( 5 D0→7 F1 ) and 612 nm( 5 D0→7 F2 ) of Eu3+ is reduced due to the energy transfer from Eu3+,Eu2+ to Tm3+ ion. Red, green and blue light can be observed in Eu/Tm/Tb-doped triply samples simultaneously under the excitation of 377 nm. The luminescent intensity and color of borosilicate glasses might be changed by adjusting Eu2 O3 content, and the sample with CIE chromaticity coordinates(0. 33, 0. 386 7)are obtained.%采用熔融淬冷法制备了性能优越的Eu/Tm/Tb单掺、双掺和三掺的硼硅酸盐玻璃。测试了样品的激发和发射光谱,计算了CIE色坐标,研究了紫外激发下Eu/Tm/Tb掺杂的硼硅酸盐玻璃的发光性能。结果表明:在361 nm激发下,随着Tm3+加入到Eu2O3掺杂的硼硅酸盐样品中,观察到Tm3+的459 nm(1D2→3F4)锐线特征发射峰,同时由于Eu3+,Eu2+→Tm3+的能量传递的存在降低了Eu2+的437 nm宽带峰及Eu3+的589 nm(5 D0→7 F1)和612 nm(5 D0→7 F2)的特征发射峰强度。在377 nm激发下,Eu/Tm/Tb三掺样品能够同时出现红、绿和蓝光。调节 Eu2O3的含量能有效改变发光玻璃的发光强度和颜色,最终得到色坐标为(0.33,0.3867)的发光玻璃。

  16. Silicate, borosilicate, and borate bioactive glass scaffolds with controllable degradation rate for bone tissue engineering applications. I. Preparation and in vitro degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qiang; Rahaman, Mohamed N; Fu, Hailuo; Liu, Xin

    2010-10-01

    Bioactive glass scaffolds with a microstructure similar to that of dry human trabecular bone but with three different compositions were evaluated for potential applications in bone repair. The preparation of the scaffolds and the effect of the glass composition on the degradation and conversion of the scaffolds to a hydroxyapatite (HA)-type material in a simulated body fluid (SBF) are reported here (Part I). The in vitro response of osteogenic cells to the scaffolds and the in vivo evaluation of the scaffolds in a rat subcutaneous implantation model are described in Part II. Scaffolds (porosity = 78-82%; pore size = 100-500 microm) were prepared using a polymer foam replication technique. The glasses consisted of a silicate (13-93) composition, a borosilicate composition (designated 13-93B1), and a borate composition (13-93B3), in which one-third or all of the SiO2 content of 13-93 was replaced by B2O3, respectively. The conversion rate of the scaffolds to HA in the SBF increased markedly with the B2O3 content of the glass. Concurrently, the pH of the SBF also increased with the B2O3 content of the scaffolds. The compressive strengths of the as-prepared scaffolds (5-11 MPa) were in the upper range of values reported for trabecular bone, but they decreased markedly with immersion time in the SBF and with increasing B2O3 content of the glass. The results show that scaffolds with a wide range of bioactivity and degradation rate can be achieved by replacing varying amounts of SiO(2) in silicate bioactive glass with B2O3. PMID:20544804

  17. Irradiations effects on the structure of boro-silicated glasses: long term behaviour of nuclear waste glassy matrices; Effets d'irradiations sur la structure de verres borosilicates - comportement a long terme des matrices vitreuses de stockage des dechets nucleaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonfils, J. de

    2007-09-15

    This work deals with the long term behaviour of R7T7-type nuclear waste glasses and more particularly of non-active boro-silicated glasses made up of 3 or 5 oxides. Radioactivity of active glasses is simulated by multi energies ions implantations which reproduce the same defects. The damages due to the alpha particles are simulated by helium ions implantations and those corresponding to the recoil nucleus are obtained with gold ions ones. Minor actinides, stemming from the used fuel, is simulated by trivalent rare-earths (Eu{sup 3+} and Nd{sup 3+}). In a first part, we have shown by macroscopic experiments (Vickers hardness - swelling) and optical spectroscopies (Raman - ATR-IR) that the structure of the glassy matrices is modified under implantations until a dose of 2,3.10{sup 13} at.cm{sup -2}, which corresponds to a R7T7 storage time estimated at 300 years. Beyond this dose, no additional modifications have been observed. The second part concerns the local environment of the rare-earth ions in glasses. Two different environments were found and identified as follows: one is a silicate rich one and the other is attributed to a borate rich one. (author)

  18. Liquid phase sintering of 20Bi(Zn0.5Ti0.5)O 3-80BaTiO3 dielectrics with bismuth-zinc-borate and bismuth borosilicate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahin, David I.

    Dielectrics in the Bi(Zn0.5Ti0.5)O3-BaTiO 3 system (specifically 20BZT-80BT, in mol%) are promising candidates for high energy density capacitor applications due to broad temperature-dependent dielectric constant maxima and a relatively field-independent permittivity. Bulk samples require sintering temperatures of greater than 1180°C to reach useful densities. Due to incompatibility of Bi with low-pO2 processing, BZT-BT-based multilayer capacitors must utilize noble metal electrodes that resist oxidation during sintering. Sintering temperatures must be reduced to allow use of less expensive electrode materials (Cu, etc.). This work studies the reduced temperature sintering behavior and dielectric properties of BZT-BT sintered with 30Bi2O3-30ZnO-40B 2O3 and 50Bi2O3-25B2O 3-25SiO2 (mol%) liquid phase formers. Dielectrics sintered with 1v% borate additions and 5v% additions of either the borate or borosilicate achieved relative densities greater than 95% after sintering at 1000°C for four hours. All compositions retained the relaxor behavior exhibited by pure 20BZT-80BT. Increased borate additions led to greater dielectric constant reductions, while increased borosilicate additions yielded no clear trend in the dielectric constant reduction. Energy densities were estimated between 0.3-0.5 J/cm3; smaller glass additions typically led to larger energy densities. Dielectrics sintered with 1v% borate additions are of interest due to their high relative densities (approx. 96%) and energy densities of approximately 0.5 J/cm3 under 100kV/cm electric fields. Studies of BZT-BT/glass interfaces revealed the formation of crystalline interfacial layers less than 10 microns thick. The borate formed a bismuth titanate phase (likely Bi4Ti3O12) during heating to 700°C, whereas the borosilicate formed a barium silicate phase (likely BaSiO3) during processing to 800°C. Similar phases are expected to be present in the liquid phase sintered dielectrics and likely affect the BZT

  19. Single-pulse laser ablation threshold of borosilicate, fused silica, sapphire, and soda-lime glass for pulse widths of 500  fs, 10  ps, 20  ns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, Daniel; Arines, Justo; O'Connor, Gerard M; Flores-Arias, María Teresa

    2015-10-10

    In this work, we report a comparative study of the laser ablation threshold of borosilicate, fused silica, sapphire, and soda-lime glass as a function of the pulse width and for IR laser wavelengths. We determine the ablation threshold for three different pulse durations: τ=500  fs, 10 ps, and 20 ns. Experiments have been performed using a single laser pulse per shot in an ambient (air) environment. The results show a significant difference, of two orders of magnitude, between the group of ablation thresholds obtained for femtosecond, picosecond, and nanosecond pulses. This difference is reduced to 1 order of magnitude in the soda-lime substrate with tin impurities, pointing out the importance of the incubation effect. The morphology of the marks generated over the different glass materials by one single pulse of different pulse durations has been analyzed using a scanning electron microscope (FESEM ULTRA Plus). Our results are important for practical purposes, providing the ablation threshold data of four commonly used substrates at three different pulse durations in the infrared regime (1030-1064 nm) and complete data for increasing the understanding of the differences in the mechanism's leading ablation in the nanosecond, picosecond, and femtosecond regimes. PMID:26479792

  20. Spherical gold nanoparticles and SiO{sub 2}/Au core/shell microparticles under intense femtosecond laser excitation: relaxation dynamics of gold nanoparticles and nanostructuring of borosilicate glass using SiO{sub 2}/Au microparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shakhov, A M; Astaf' ev, A A; Gostev, F E; Shelaev, I V; Titov, A N; Nadtochenko, V A [N N Semenov Institute of Chemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Denisov, N N [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

    2014-09-30

    This paper reports surface nanostructuring of borosilicate glass covered with a water layer and the production of ∼150 nm diameter pits using SiO{sub 2}/Au core/shell microparticles under excitation with 50 fs pulses (λ = 780 nm) using the optical scheme of an inverted microscope with a 100{sup ×}, NA = 1.4 objective. We compare the thresholds for hole formation in glass with the use of SiO{sub 2}/Au and uncoated SiO{sub 2} microparticles. The threshold is 0.7 J cm{sup -2} for SiO{sub 2}/Au and 2.9 J cm{sup -2} for SiO{sub 2} microparticles, which coincides with the threshold for nanostructuring by a focused femtosecond pulse without microparticles: 3 J cm{sup -2}. Femtosecond pump – probe spectroscopy has been used to study the relaxation dynamics of laser pulse energy absorbed in a Au nanoparticle and the dynamics of energy dissipation to the ambient medium. The threshold for cavitation bubble formation in water with SiO{sub 2}/Au has been determined to be 0.06 mJ cm{sup -2}, which is a factor of 30 lower than the bubble formation threshold in the case of uncoated SiO{sub 2} microparticles. (nanostructures)

  1. Lanthanide-activated Na{sub 5}Gd{sub 9}F{sub 32} nanocrystals precipitated from a borosilicate glass: Phase-separation-controlled crystallization and optical property

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Daqin, E-mail: dqchen@hdu.edu.cn [College of Materials and Environmental Engineering, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Key Laboratory of Design and Assembly of Functional Nanostructures, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, CAS, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Wan, Zhongyi; Zhou, Yang [College of Materials and Environmental Engineering, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Chen, Yan, E-mail: chenyan@hdu.edu.cn [College of Materials and Environmental Engineering, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Yu, Hua; Lu, Hongwei; Ji, Zhenguo [College of Materials and Environmental Engineering, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Huang, Ping, E-mail: phuang@fjirsm.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Design and Assembly of Functional Nanostructures, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, CAS, Fuzhou 350002 (China)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Na{sub 5}Gd{sub 9}F{sub 32} nanocrystals embedded glass ceramics were fabricated for the first time. • Such glass ceramics were achieved by phase-separation-controlled crystallization. • Elemental mapping evidenced the segregation of activators into the Na{sub 5}Gd{sub 9}F{sub 32} lattice. • Luminescent color could be tuned by controlling glass crystallization temperature. - Abstract: Lanthanide-activated cubic Na{sub 5}Gd{sub 9}F{sub 32} nanocrystals were precipitated from a borosilicate glass with a specifically designed composition. The precursor glass is already phase-separated after melt-quenching, which is beneficial to the realization of the controllable glass crystallization for affording desirable size, morphology and activator partition. Elemental mapping in the scanning transmission electron microscopy evidenced that the segregation of lanthanide ions into the Na{sub 5}Gd{sub 9}F{sub 32} lattice was in situ formed without the requirement of long-range ionic diffusion. Impressively, such fabricated glass ceramic co-doped with Yb{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+} ions exhibited intense upconversion luminescence, which was about 500 times higher than that of the precursor glass, and its luminescent color could be easily tuned from red to green by controlling glass crystallization temperature. It is anticipated that such phase-separation synthesis strategy with precise control over nanostructure of glass ceramics offer a great opportunity to design other highly transparent nanocomposites with a wide range of tunable optical properties.

  2. Influence of P{sub 2}O{sub 5} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} content on the structure of erbium-doped borosilicate glasses and on their physical, thermal, optical and luminescence properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourhis, Kevin, E-mail: k.bourhis@argolight.com [Politecnico di Torino, DISAT, Istituto di Ingegneria e Fisica dei Materiali, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, I-10129 Torino (Italy); Massera, Jonathan [Process Chemistry Centre, Åbo Akademi University, Biskopsgatan 8, FI-20500 Turku (Finland); Petit, Laeticia; Ihalainen, Heikki [nLIGHT Corporation, Sorronrinne 9, FI-08500 Lohja (Finland); Fargues, Alexandre; Cardinal, Thierry [CNRS, Université de Bordeaux, ISM, 351Cours de la Libération, F-33405 Talence (France); Hupa, Leena; Hupa, Mikko [Process Chemistry Centre, Åbo Akademi University, Biskopsgatan 8, FI-20500 Turku (Finland); Dussauze, Marc; Rodriguez, Vincent [CNRS, Université de Bordeaux, ICMCB, 87 Avenue du Dr Schweitzer, F-33608 Pessac (France); Boussard-Plédel, Catherine; Bureau, Bruno; Roiland, Claire [Equipe Verres et Céramiques, UMR-CNRS 6226, Inst. des Sciences chimiques de Rennes, Université de Rennes 1, 35042 Rennes CEDEX (France); Ferraris, Monica [Politecnico di Torino, DISAT, Istituto di Ingegneria e Fisica dei Materiali, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, I-10129 Torino (Italy)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Reorganization of the glass structure induced by the addition of P{sub 2}O{sub 5} or Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. • Emission properties related to the presence of P or Al in the Er{sup 3+} coordination shell. • Declustering observed upon addition of P{sub 2}O{sub 5}. • No declustering upon addition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. - Abstract: The effect of P{sub 2}O{sub 5} and/or Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} addition in Er-doped borosilicate glasses on the physical, thermal, optical, and luminescence properties is investigated. The changes in these glass properties are related to the glass structure modifications induced by the addition of P{sub 2}O{sub 5} and/or Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, which were probed by FTIR, {sup 11}B MAS NMR and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies. Variations of the polymerization degree of the silicate tetrahedra and modifications in the {sup [3]}B/{sup [4]}B ratio are explained by a charge compensation mechanism due to the formation of AlO{sub 4}, PO{sub 4} groups and the formation of Al-O-P linkages in the glass network. From the absorption and luminescence properties of the Er{sup 3+} ions at 980 nm and 1530 nm, declustering is suspected for the highest P{sub 2}O{sub 5} concentrations while for the highest Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentrations no declustering is observed.

  3. Structural and crystallisation study of a rare earth alumino borosilicate glass designed for nuclear waste confinement; Etude de la structure et du comportement en cristallisation d'un verre nucleaire d'aluminoborosilicate de terre rare

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quintas, A

    2007-09-15

    This work is devoted to the study of a rare earth alumino borosilicate glass, which molar composition is 61,81 SiO{sub 2} - 3,05 Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} - 8,94 B{sub 2}O{sub 3} - 14,41 Na{sub 2}O - 6,33 CaO - 1,90 ZrO{sub 2} - 3,56 Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and envisaged for the immobilization of nuclear wastes originating from the reprocessing of high discharge burn up spent fuel. From a structural viewpoint, we investigated the role of the modifier cations on the arrangement of the glass network through different modifications of the glass composition: variation of the Na/Ca ratio and modification of the nature of the alkali and alkaline earth cations. The NMR and Raman spectroscopic techniques were useful to determine the distribution of modifier cations among the glass network and also to cast light on the competition phenomena occurring between alkali and alkaline earth cations for charge compensation of [AlO{sub 4}]{sup -} and [BO{sub 4}]{sup -} species. The neodymium local environment could be probed by optical absorption and EXAFS spectroscopies which enabled to better understand the insertion mode of Nd{sup 3+} ions among the silicate domains of the glass network. Concerning the crystallization behavior we were interested in how the glass composition may influence the crystallization processes and especially the formation of the apatite phase of composition Ca{sub 2}Nd{sub 8}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 6}O{sub 2}. In particular, this work underlined the important role of both alkaline earth and rare earth cations on the crystallization of the apatite phase. (author)

  4. Effects of alpha, gamma, and alpha-recoil radiation on borosilicate glass containing Savannah River Plant defense high-level nuclear waste. [Lead ions-250 keV; xenon ions-160 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bibler, N.E.

    1981-01-01

    At the Savannah River Plant, the reference process for the immobilization of defense high-level waste (DHLW) for geologic storage is vitrification into borosilicate glass. During geologic storage for 10/sup 6/ y, the glass would be exposed to approx. 3 x 10/sup 10/ rad of ..beta.. radiation, approx. 10/sup 10/ rad of ..gamma.. radiation, and 10/sup 18/ particles/g glass for both ..cap alpha.. and ..cap alpha..-recoil radiation. This paper discusses tests of the effect of these radiations on the leachability and density of the glass. Even though the doses were large, no effect of the radiations was detected that reduced the effectiveness of the glass for long-term storage of DHLW even at doses corresponding to 10/sup 6/ years storage for the actual glass. For the tests, glass containing simulated DHLW was prepared from frit of the reference composition. Three methods were used to irradiate the glass: external irradiations with beams of approx. 200 keV Xe or Pb ions, internal irradiations with Cm-244 doped glass, and external irradiations with Co-60 ..gamma.. rays. Results with both Xe and Pb ions indicate that a dose of 3 x 10/sup 13/ ions/cm/sup 2/ (simulating > 10/sup 6/ years storage) does not significantly increase the leachability of the glass in deionized water. Tests with Cm-244 doped glass show no increase in leach rate in water or brine up to a dose of 10/sup 18/ ..cap alpha.. and ..cap alpha..-recoils/g glass. Results of larger doses are being examined. The density of the Cm-244 doped glass has decreased by 1% at a dose of 10/sup 18/ particles/g glass. With ..gamma..-radiation, the density has changed by < 0.05% at a dose of 8.5 x 10/sup 10/ rad. Results of leach tests in deionized water and brine indicated that this very large dose of ..gamma..-radiation increased the leach rate by only 20%. Also, the leach rates are lower in brine.

  5. Erbium-doped borosilicate glasses containing various amounts of P{sub 2}O{sub 5} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}: Influence of the silica content on the structure and thermal, physical, optical and luminescence properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourhis, Kevin [Politecnico di Torino, DISAT, Istituto di Ingegneria e Fisica dei Materiali, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, I-10129 Torino (Italy); Massera, Jonathan [Department of Electronics and Communications Engineering, Tampere University of Technology, Korkeakoulunkatu 3, FI-33720 Tampere (Finland); BioMediTech, Tampere (Finland); Petit, Laeticia, E-mail: laeticia.petit@nlight.net [Process Chemistry Centre, Åbo Akademi University, Biskopsgatan 8, FI-20500 Turku (Finland); nLIGHT Corporation, Sorronrinne 9, FI-08500 Lohja (Finland); Koponen, Joona [nLIGHT Corporation, Sorronrinne 9, FI-08500 Lohja (Finland); Fargues, Alexandre; Cardinal, Thierry [CNRS, Université de Bordeaux, ISM, 351 Cours de la Libération, F-33405 Talence (France); Hupa, Leena; Hupa, Mikko [Process Chemistry Centre, Åbo Akademi University, Biskopsgatan 8, FI-20500 Turku (Finland); Dussauze, Marc; Rodriguez, Vincent [CNRS, Université de Bordeaux, ICMCB, 87 Avenue du Dr Schweitzer, F-33608 Pessac (France); Ferraris, Monica [Politecnico di Torino, DISAT, Istituto di Ingegneria e Fisica dei Materiali, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, I-10129 Torino (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Er{sup 3+} doped borosilicate glasses were processed with different compositions and characterizations. • An increase in the SiO{sub 2} content leads to a silicate-rich environment around the Er{sup 3+} site. • An increase in the SiO{sub 2} content decreases the Er{sup 3+} absorption cross-section at 980 nm. • Glasses with 60 mol% of SiO{sub 2} exhibit a stronger emission intensity at 1530 nm than glasses with x = 50. • Highest 1.5 μm emission intensity was achieved for the Al and P containing glass with 60 mol% of SiO{sub 2}. - Abstract: The influence of the silica content on several properties of Er-doped borosilicate glasses in the presence of various amounts of P{sub 2}O{sub 5} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} has been investigated. The introduction of P{sub 2}O{sub 5} and/or Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} are responsible for structural modifications in the glass network through a charge-compensation mechanism related to the formation of negatively-charged PO{sub 4} and AlO{sub 4} groups or through the formation of AlPO{sub 4}-like structural units. In this paper, we show that an increase in the SiO{sub 2} content leads to a silicate-rich environment around the Er{sup 3+} site, resulting in an increased dependence of the Er{sup 3+} ions optical and luminescence properties on the P{sub 2}O{sub 5} and/or Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentration. The highest emission intensity at 1.5 μm was achieved for the glass with an equal proportion of P and Al in the glass system with 60 mol% of SiO{sub 2}.

  6. Effect of ZnO and CaO on Alkali Borosilicate Glass Waste-form Immobilizing Simulated Mixed HLW%ZnO 和 CaO对模拟高放废液硅酸盐玻璃固化体性能的影响研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张华; N.C.Hyatt; J.R.Stevens; R.Hand

    2015-01-01

    针对有些高放废液含有较多Fe、Cr、Ni过渡金属元素,在玻璃固化工艺过程中易于形成晶体,导致熔融玻璃体的黏度增加、化学稳定性变差以及工艺过程中易出现出料口堵塞等问题,研究了废物包容量为15%和20%、添加ZnO (5.6%)和CaO (1.75%)的配方对形成的4种玻璃固化体的物理性能(密度、硬度、断裂韧性)、化学性能(产品一致性测试和蒸汽腐蚀测试)和结构(X射线衍射析晶分析、拉曼光谱分析)的影响。研究分析显示,提高废物包容量至20%以及添加ZnO和CaO均可促进硼硅酸盐玻璃固化体网络结构的稳定性和化学稳定性,并增强玻璃体的密度,提高硬度;但玻璃固化体的高温黏度升高,断裂韧性下降。%Since the transit metals ,such as Fe ,Cr and Ni ,contained in some kinds of mixed HLW ,can likely to form crystal ,increase the melt viscosity ,destroy the chemi‐cal durability and block the discharge port .T he results obtained from investigating four glass waste‐forms ,including the alkali borosilicate glass matrix and alkali borosilicate glass matrix doped with 5.6% ZnO and 1.75% CaO in base matrixes ,immobilizing the simulated mixed HLW with 15% and 20% waste loadings aiming to determinate the effect of ZnO on the alkali borosilicate glass chemical durability with waste loading increasing ,were presented in this paper .Glass samples were characterized with XRD and Raman spectroscopy .The chemical durability was investigated using the standard protocols PCT and VHT .The XRD analysis results show that spinel crystal appears and grows in glass samples at the waste loading in 20% without ZnO addition and waste loading in 15% and 20% added ZnO .T he Raman spectroscopy analysis results indicate that ZnO and CaO can enhance the glass network connective ,and the chemical durability test results display that the addition of ZnO and CaO can improve the short term

  7. Influence of (Na2O-Al2O3)/B2O3 on Viscosity and Thermal Properties of Silica-rich Borosilicate Glasses%(Na2O-Al2O3)/B2O3对高硼硅酸盐玻璃粘度和热学性能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何峰; 平财明; 郑媛媛; 乔勇

    2013-01-01

    采用熔融冷却法制备了不同R’系数的高硼硅酸盐玻璃,其中R’=(Na2O-Al2O3)/B2O3.利用红外光谱、高温旋转粘度计和热膨胀仪等对玻璃的结构和性能进行表征.结果表明:高温段粘度-温度关系符合阿伦尼乌斯定律;R’值的增大导致非桥氧的增加,高温粘度和熔制温度呈显著降低.当R’>0.5时,热膨胀系数近似线性增大,玻璃化转变温度增大至590℃基本维持不变.R’值影响结构中的[BO3]与[BO4]的比例及硅氧网络的完整程度,从而决定高硼硅酸盐玻璃的性能.%Silica-rich sodium borosilicate glasses with varying R' values have been prepared using conventional melt quenching method,where R' represents the ratio of (Na2O-Al2O3) and B2O3.The structure and properties have been investigated by the FTIR spectra,rotating crucible viscometer and thermal expanse dilatometer.The results show that the viscosity dependence of temperature is accord with Arrhenius law in the high temperature range.The non-bridging oxygen increases due to the increase of R',which leads to obvious decease of high temperature viscosity and melting temperature.Thermal expanse coefficient increases linearly with R' when R' exceeds 0.5,and the glass transformation temperature increases to 590 ℃.The fraction of [BO3] and [BO4] and the integrity of Si-O network are controlled mainly by R',then decide properties of borosilicate glasses.

  8. In-vitro bioactivity of zirconia doped borosilicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass composition 31B2O3-20SiO2-24.5Na2O-(24.5-x) CaO-xZrO2 x=1,2,3,4,5 were prepared by melt-quenching Technique. The formation of hydroxyapatite layer on the surface of glasses after immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) was explored through XRD, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM-EDX) analyses. In this report, we observed that hydroxyapatite formation for 5days of immersion time. Also observed that with increasing the immersion time up to 15days, higher amount of hydroxyapatite layer formation on the surface of glasses. The varying composition of zirconia in glass samples influences shown by XRD, FTIR studies. The present results indicate that, in-vitro bioactivity of glasses decreased with increasing zirconia incorporation

  9. Electrical conductivity and viscosity of borosilicate glasses and melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehrt, Doris; Keding, Ralf

    2009-01-01

    , 0 to 62·5 mol% B2O3, and 25 to 85 mol% SiO2. The glass samples were characterised by different methods. Refractive indices, density and thermal expansion were measured. Phase separation effects were investigated by electron microscopy. The electrical conductivity of glasses and melts were determined...

  10. Chemical compatibility of HLW borosilicate glasses with actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During liquid storage of HLLW the formation of actinide enriched sludges is being expected. Also during melting of HLW glasses an increase of top-to-bottom actinide concentrations can take place. Both effects have been studied. Besides, the vitrification of plutonium enriched wastes from Pu fuel element fabrication plants has been investigated with respect to an isolated vitrification process or a combined one with the HLLW. It is shown that the solidification of actinides from HLLW and actinide waste concentrates will set no principal problems. The leaching of actinides has been measured in salt brine at 230C and 1150C. (orig.)

  11. Modeling surface area to volume effects on borosilicate glass dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We simulated the reaction of SRL-131 glass with equilibrated J-13 water in order to investigate the effects of surface area to volume ratio (SA/V) on glass dissolution. We show that glass-fluid ion exchange causes solution pH to rise to progressively higher values as SA/V increases. Because the ion exchange is rapid relative to the duration of the glass dissolution experiment, the pH effect does not scale with (SA/V)*time. Experiments compared at the same (SA/V)*time value therefore have different pHs, with higher pHs at higher SA/V ratios. Both experimental data and our simulation results show similar trends of increasing reaction rate as a function of SA/V ratio when scaled to (SA/V)*time. Glasses which react in systems of differing SA/V ratio therefore follow different reaction paths and high SA/V ratios cannot be used to generate data which accurately scales to long time periods unless the ion exchange effect is taken into account. We suggest some simple test designs which enable more reliable high. SA/V accelerated tests

  12. IR study of Pb–Sr titanate borosilicate glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C R Gautam; Devendra Kumar; Om Parkash

    2010-04-01

    The infrared spectra (IR) of various glass compositions in the glass system, [(PbSr1–)O.TiO2]– [2SiO2.B2O3]–[BaO.K2O]–[La2O3], were recorded over a continuous spectral range (400–4000 cm-1) to study their structure systematically. IR spectrum of each glass composition shows a number of absorption bands. These bands are strongly influenced by the increasing substitution of SrO for PbO. Various bands shift with composition. Absorption peaks occur due to the vibrational mode of the borate network in these glasses. The vibrational modes of the borate network are seen to be mainly due to the asymmetric stretching relaxation of the B–O bond of trigonal BO3 units. More splitting is observed in strontium-rich composition.

  13. PLUTONIUM SOLUBILITY IN HIGH-LEVEL WASTE ALKALI BOROSILICATE GLASS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marra, J.; Crawford, C.; Fox, K.; Bibler, N.

    2011-01-04

    The solubility of plutonium in a Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) reference glass and the effect of incorporation of Pu in the glass on specific glass properties were evaluated. A Pu loading of 1 wt % in glass was studied. Prior to actual plutonium glass testing, surrogate testing (using Hf as a surrogate for Pu) was conducted to evaluate the homogeneity of significant quantities of Hf (Pu) in the glass, determine the most appropriate methods to evaluate homogeneity for Pu glass testing, and to evaluate the impact of Hf loading in the glass on select glass properties. Surrogate testing was conducted using Hf to represent between 0 and 1 wt % Pu in glass on an equivalent molar basis. A Pu loading of 1 wt % in glass translated to {approx}18 kg Pu per Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister, or about 10X the current allowed limit per the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (2500 g/m{sup 3} of glass or about 1700 g/canister) and about 30X the current allowable concentration based on the fissile material concentration limit referenced in the Yucca Mountain Project License Application (897 g/m{sup 3}3 of glass or about 600 g Pu/canister). Based on historical process throughput data, this level was considered to represent a reasonable upper bound for Pu loading based on the ability to provide Pu containing feed to the DWPF. The task elements included evaluating the distribution of Pu in the glass (e.g. homogeneity), evaluating crystallization within the glass, evaluating select glass properties (with surrogates), and evaluating durability using the Product Consistency Test -- Method A (PCT-A). The behavior of Pu in the melter was evaluated using paper studies and corresponding analyses of DWPF melter pour samples.The results of the testing indicated that at 1 wt % Pu in the glass, the Pu was homogeneously distributed and did not result in any formation of plutonium-containing crystalline phases as long as the glass was prepared under 'well-mixed' conditions. The incorporation of 1 wt % Pu in the glass did not adversely impact glass viscosity (as assessed using Hf surrogate) or glass durability. Finally, evaluation of DWPF glass pour samples that had Pu concentrations below the 897 g/m{sup 3} limit showed that Pu concentrations in the glass pour stream were close to targeted compositions in the melter feed indicating that Pu neither volatilized from the melt nor stratified in the melter when processed in the DWPF melter.

  14. A critical review of radiation effects on borosilicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most of the experimental values have been obtained by loading the glass with alpha emitters like Cm 244 and Pu 238. The data existing in literature on stored energy, and density variation are presented and discussed. Attention is given to the variation of the leaching rate due to the radiation effect. Samples loaded with alpha emitters have given data up to 0.17 dpa and such bombarded with heavy ions show large effects due to dose rate effects. A study on defect formation has shown that under electrons irradiation, formation of bubbles is possible. (DG)

  15. The Structural Role of Zr within Alkali Borosilicate Glasses for Nuclear Waste Immobilisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A Connelly; N Hyatt; K Travis; R Hand; E Maddrell; R Short

    2011-12-31

    Zirconium is a key constituent element of High Level nuclear Waste (HLW) glasses, occurring both as a fission product and a fuel cladding component. As part of a wider research program aimed at optimizing the solubility of zirconium in HLW glasses, we have investigated the structural chemistry of zirconium in such materials using X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS). Zirconium K-edge XAS data were acquired from several inactive simulant and simplified waste glass compositions, including a specimen of blended Magnox/UO{sub 2} fuel waste glass. These data demonstrate that zirconium is immobilized as (octahedral) six-fold coordinate ZrO{sub 6} species in these glasses, with a Zr-O contact distance of 2.09 {angstrom}. The next nearest neighbors of the Zr species are Si at 3.42 {angstrom} and possibly Na at 3.44 {angstrom}, no next nearest neighbor Zr could be resolved.

  16. A Microstructured Fiber with Defined Borosilicate Regions to Produce a Radial Micronozzle Array for Nanoelectrospray Ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Y.; Morency, S.; Bachus, K.; Simon, D.; Hutama, T.; Gibson, G. T. T.; Messaddeq, Y.; Oleschuk, R. D.

    2016-02-01

    This work highlights the possibility of using microstructured fibres with predefined doped regions to produce functional microstructures at a fibre facet with differential chemical etching. A specially designed silica microstructured fibre (MSF) that possesses specific boron-doped silica regions was fabricated for the purpose of generating a radial micronozzle array. The MSF was drawn from a preform comprising pure silica capillaries surrounded by boron-doped silica rods. Different etching rates of the boron-doped and silica regions at the fiber facet produces raised nozzles where the silica capillaries were placed. Fabrication parameters were explored in relation to the fidelity and protrusion length of the nozzle. Using etching alone, the nozzle protrusion length was limited, and the inner diameter of the channels in the array is expanded. However with the addition of a protective water counter flow, nozzle protrusion is increased to 60 μm with a limited increase in hole diameter. The radial micronozzle array generated nine individual electrosprays which were characterized using spray current measurements and related to theoretical prediction. Signal enhancement for the higher charge state ions for two peptides showed a substantial signal enhancement compared to conventional emitter technology.

  17. Molecular dynamics study of structural changes versus deposited energy dose in a sodium borosilicate glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bureau, G.; Delaye, J.M.; Peuget, S. [DEN/DTCD/SECM, CEA Marcoule, BP 17171, Bagnols-sur-Ceze cedex, 30207 (France); Calas, G. [IMPMC, 140 rue de Lourmel, Paris, 75015 (France)

    2008-07-01

    Assessing the long-term behavior of nuclear glass implies evaluating the impact of cumulative alpha decay induced by the minor actinides it contains. When subjected to alpha decay ({sup 244}Cm-doped glass specimens) or to external ion irradiation, some macroscopic properties vary appreciably with the dose. Above a given dose level, the properties do not evolve any more. To improve our understanding of these modifications, studies are carried out on simplified glass compositions (three oxides SiO{sub 2}, B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Na{sub 2}O), modeled by molecular dynamics in which irradiation effects are simulated by accelerating uranium projectiles. Accumulation of displacements cascades have been performed up to 4.5*10{sup 20} keV/cm{sup 3} nuclear energy deposited in the glass. The density variations observed in actinide-doped materials is qualitatively reproduced. At high doses, the swelling tends to stabilize. Marples model is used to fit the glass swelling versus the deposited energy dose, giving the volume damaged per projectile. This volume approximates the cascade core volume, suggesting that the underlying mechanisms of volume expansion are contained in the cascade core and are thus related to the highest energy events: atom ejection and thermal quenching. On the contrary, the volumetric parameter of the Marples model applied to the other structural properties is related to a volume corresponding to the core + periphery of the cascades. (authors)

  18. Glass transition and crystallization kinetics of a barium borosilicate glass by a non-isothermal method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, Andreia A. S.; Soares, Roque S.; Lima, Maria M. A.; Monteiro, Regina C. C., E-mail: rcm@fct.unl.pt [Department of Materials Science, CENIMAT/I3N, Faculty of Sciences and Technology, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal)

    2014-01-28

    The glass transition and crystallization kinetics of a glass with a molar composition 60BaO-30B{sub 2}O{sub 3}-10SiO{sub 2} were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) under non-isothermal conditions. DSC curves exhibited an endothermic peak associated with the glass transition and two partially overlapped exothermic peaks associated with the crystallization of the glass. The dependence of the glass transition temperature (T{sub g}) and of the maximum crystallization temperature (T{sub p}) on the heating rate was used to determine the activation energy associated with the glass transition (E{sub g}), the activation energy for crystallization (E{sub c}), and the Avrami exponent (n). X-ray diffraction (XRD) revealed that barium borate (β-BaB{sub 2}O{sub 4}) was the first crystalline phase to be formed followed by the formation of barium silicate (Ba{sub 5}Si{sub 8}O{sub 21}). The variations of activation energy for crystallization and of Avrami exponent with the fraction of crystallization (χ) were also examined. When the crystallization fraction (χ) increased from 0.1 to 0.9, the value of local activation energy (E{sub c}(χ)) decreased from 554 to 458 kJ/mol for the first exothermic peak and from 1104 to 831 kJ/mol for the second exothermic peak. The value determined for the Avrami exponent was near 2 indicating a similar one-dimensional crystallization mechanism for both crystalline phases. This was confirmed by the morphological studies performed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) on glass samples heat-treated at the first and at the second crystallization temperatures.

  19. Current Understanding and Remaining Challenges in Modeling Long-Term Degradation of Borosilicate Nuclear Waste Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vienna, John D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ryan, Joseph V. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gin, Stephane [CEA Marcoule, DTCD SECM, Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France); Inagaki, Yaohiro [Dept. of Applied Quantum Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoda (Japan)

    2013-12-01

    Chemical durability is not a single material property that can be uniquely measured. Instead it is the response to a host of coupled material and environmental processes whose rates are estimated by a combination of theory, experiment, and modeling. High-level nuclear waste (HLW) glass is perhaps the most studied of any material yet there remain significant technical gaps regarding their chemical durability. The phenomena affecting the long-term performance of HLW glasses in their disposal environment include surface reactions, transport properties to and from the reacting glass surface, and ion exchange between the solid glass and the surrounding solution and alteration products. The rates of these processes are strongly influenced and are coupled through the solution chemistry, which is in turn influenced by the reacting glass and also by reaction with the near-field materials and precipitation of alteration products. Therefore, those processes must be understood sufficiently well to estimate or bound the performance of HLW glass in its disposal environment over geologic time-scales. This article summarizes the current state of understanding of surface reactions, transport properties, and ion exchange along with the near-field materials and alteration products influences on solution chemistry and glass reaction rates. Also summarized are the remaining technical gaps along with recommended approaches to fill those technical gaps.

  20. Long-term aqueous alteration kinetics of an alpha-doped SON68 borosilicate glass

    OpenAIRE

    TRIBET M.; ROLLAND Séverine; S. Peuget; Magnin, Magali; BROUDIC Véronique; JANSSEN ARNE; Wiss, Thierry; JEGOU C.; Toulhoat, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    The long-term behavior of nuclear glass subjected to alpha radiation by minor actinides must be investigated with a view to geological disposal. This study focuses on the effect of alpha radiation on the chemical reactivity of R7T7 glass with pure water, mainly on the residual alteration rate regime. A glass specimen doped with 0.85 wt% 239PuO2 (α emitter) is leached under static conditions in argon atmosphere at 90°C and at a high surface-area-to-volume ratio (S/V = 20 cm-1). The alteration ...

  1. Use of borosilicate system for solidification of nuclear power plant wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The system Na2O-B2O3-Al2O3-SiO2 was studied in detail with regard to its use for the solidification of medium-level radioactive wastes. By experiment, in a four-dimensional space the regions of composition were determined where hydrolytic resistance makes the system suitable for solidification. Three samples, corresponding to three experimental points in the four-dimensional space with different ratios of basic components Na2O-B2O3 were chosen in order to test other properties important for the technological processing of wastes. It was found that suitable fixation products may be prepared with a high waste content exceeding 40% w.w. related to Na2O and B2O3. It is moreover possible to replace Al2O3 in the given system with oxides of corrosion products and MnO2. Hydrolytic resistance of the studied products reaches the quality level of fixation products of high-level radioactive wastes. The values of viscosity of these vitrified products are suitable for heat processing and at a temperature of 1050 degC the low corrosion activity of the respective melts may be reckoned with. The crystallization ability was found to be negligible which guarantees stability of properties over a long storage period. The possibility of metastable segregation is also low. (B.S.)

  2. Effect of cerium oxide addition on electrical and physical properties of alkali borosilicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of electrical conductivity, density and coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of Na2O:K2O:B2O3:SiO2:BaO glass samples with addition of cerium oxide has been carried out. It has been observed that the addition of cerium oxide affects the electrical conductivity, density and CTE. The results have been explained on the basis of the variation in number of bridging oxygens (BOs) and non-bridging oxygens (NBOs) present in the glass. In general, the glass with more NBOs has a weak network which exhibits higher electrical conductivity. The weakening of the network has been supported by the observed decrease in density and increase in CTE for the glasses.

  3. Experimental Study and Monte Carlo Modeling of Calcium Borosilicate Glasses Leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During aqueous alteration of glass an alteration layer appears on the glass surface. The properties of this alteration layer are of great importance for understanding and predicting the long-term behavior of high-level radioactive waste glasses. Numerical modeling can be very useful for understanding the impact of the glass composition on its aqueous reactivity and long-term properties but it is quite difficult to model these complex glasses. In order to identify the effect of the calcium content on glass alteration, seven oxide glass compositions (57SiO2 17B2O3 (22-x)Na2OxCaO 4ZrO2; 0 < x < 11) were investigated and a Monte Carlo model was developed to describe their leaching behavior. The specimens were altered at constant temperature (T = 90 deg. C) at a glass-surface-area-to-solution-volume (SA/V) ratio of 15 cm-1 in a buffered solution (pH 9.2). Under these conditions all the variations observed in the leaching behavior are attributable to composition effects. Increasing the calcium content in the glass appears to be responsible for a sharp drop in the final leached boron fraction. In parallel with this experimental work, a Monte Carlo model was developed to investigate the effect of calcium content on the leaching behavior especially on the initial stage of alteration. Monte Carlo simulations performed with this model are in good agreement with the experimental results. The dependence of the alteration rate on the calcium content can be described by a quadratic function: fitting the simulated points gives a minimum alteration rate at about 7.7 mol% calcium. This value is consistent with the figure of 8.2 mol% obtained from the experimental work. The model was also used to investigate the role of calcium in the glass structure and it pointed out that calcium act preferentially as a network modifier rather than a charge compensator in this kind of glasses. (authors)

  4. OXYGEN BUBBLE DEVELOPMENT ON A PLATINUM ELECTRODE IN BOROSILICATE GLASS MELT BY THE EFFECT OF ALTERNATING CURRENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiri Matej

    2014-10-01

    or on alternating reduction and re-forming of oxidic layer on the electrode in the transition range, has been suggested. Start of bubble evolution at low alternating current density has also been observed in simple sodium-calcium-silicate glass melt. A relation between bubble release and platinum corrosion caused by reduced silicon has been suggested

  5. Effect of focusing condition on molten area characteristics in micro-welding of borosilicate glass by picosecond pulsed laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordin, I.H.W.; Okamoto, Y.; Okada, A.; Takekuni, T. [Okayama University, Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Okayama (Japan); Sakagawa, T. [Kataoka Corporation, Yokohama (Japan)

    2016-05-15

    The characteristics of the molten area are attributed not only by laser energy condition but also the focusing condition. In this study, a picosecond pulsed laser of 1064 nm in wavelength and 12.5 ps in pulse duration was used as a laser source for joining glass material. Influence of focusing condition on micro-welding of glasses was experimentally investigated by using an objective lens with and without spherical aberration correction, and its molten area was characterized. The usage of objective lens with spherical aberration correction led to a larger molten area inside the bulk material of glass even under the same pulse energy, which related to the efficient micro-welding of glass materials. In addition, an optical system with the spherical aberration correction led to a stable absorption of laser energy inside the bulk glass material, stabilizing the shape of molten area, which resulted in the reliable weld joint. On the other hand, breaking strength of the specimens with spherical aberration correction was higher than that without spherical aberration correction. Therefore, it is concluded that the focusing condition with spherical aberration correction led to the larger and stable molten area, which resulted in higher joining strength in micro-welding of glass materials. (orig.)

  6. Synthesis and photoluminescence properties of a novel reddish orange-emitting Sm3+-doped strontium borosilicate phosphor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jianfeng; Ding, Debao; Sun, Jiayue

    2016-08-01

    Sr3-2xSmxNaxB2SiO8 phosphors were synthesized by the solid-state reactions. X-ray diffraction, diffuse reflection, photoluminescence excitation and emission, as well as fluorescence decay measurements were utilized to investigate the structural and spectral properties of the samples. The results indicated that Sr3-2xSmxNaxB2SiO8 phosphors could be efficiently excited by the near-ultraviolet light to realize a novel reddish orange luminescence corresponding to the characteristic transitions 4G5/2→6HJ (J = 5/2, 7/2, 9/2, 11/2) of Sm3+ ions, with a maximum intensity at 600 nm. Based on the theoretical calculation, the dipole-dipole interaction was dominantly involved concentration quenching of Sm3+ in the phosphors, and the critical transfer distance (Rc) was determined to be 13.59 Å. Furthermore, Judd-Ofelt analysis was applied to evaluate three phenomenological Judd-Ofelt intensity parameters (Ωλ, λ = 2, 4, 6), and in turn radiative properties such as radiative transition probabilities (AR), radiative lifetimes (τR) and fluorescence branching ratios (βR) for the excited 4G5/2 luminescent level of Sm3+ ions were determined. Upon 402 nm excitation, the composition-optimized Sr2.90Sm0.05Na0.05B2SiO8 exhibited the preferable photoluminescence intensity and CIE coordinates of (0.534, 0.448). These results suggest that the Sm3+-doped Sr3B2SiO8 phosphors are competitive as the reddish orange-emitting phosphor-converted materials for application in near-ultraviolet-pumped LEDs.

  7. Effect of focusing condition on molten area characteristics in micro-welding of borosilicate glass by picosecond pulsed laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, I. H. W.; Okamoto, Y.; Okada, A.; Takekuni, T.; Sakagawa, T.

    2016-05-01

    The characteristics of the molten area are attributed not only by laser energy condition but also the focusing condition. In this study, a picosecond pulsed laser of 1064 nm in wavelength and 12.5 ps in pulse duration was used as a laser source for joining glass material. Influence of focusing condition on micro-welding of glasses was experimentally investigated by using an objective lens with and without spherical aberration correction, and its molten area was characterized. The usage of objective lens with spherical aberration correction led to a larger molten area inside the bulk material of glass even under the same pulse energy, which related to the efficient micro-welding of glass materials. In addition, an optical system with the spherical aberration correction led to a stable absorption of laser energy inside the bulk glass material, stabilizing the shape of molten area, which resulted in the reliable weld joint. On the other hand, breaking strength of the specimens with spherical aberration correction was higher than that without spherical aberration correction. Therefore, it is concluded that the focusing condition with spherical aberration correction led to the larger and stable molten area, which resulted in higher joining strength in micro-welding of glass materials.

  8. Synthesis, IR, crystallization and dielectric study of (Pb, Sr)TiO3 borosilicate glass–ceramics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C R Gautam; D Kumar; O Parkash; Prabhakar Singh

    2013-06-01

    Eleven glass compositions were prepared by melt and quench method with progressive substitution of SrO for PbO (0 ≤ ≤ 1.0) with a step-wise increment of 0.10 in the glass [(PbSr1−)OTiO2]–[(2SiO2B2O3)]–[BaO.K2O].Nb2O5 (mol percentage) system. The infrared spectra (IR) of various glass compositions in the above mentioned glass system was recorded over a continuous spectral range 400–4000 cm-1 to study their different oxides structure systematically. Differential thermal analysis (DTA) was recorded from room temperature (∼27 °C) to 1400 °C employing a heating rate of 10 °C/min to determine glass transition temperature, g and crystallization temperature, c. The melting temperature, m, of these glass compositions was found to be in the range 597–1060 °C depending on the composition under normal atmospheric conditions. g and m of glasses were found to increase with increasing SrO content. X-ray diffraction analysis of these glass–ceramic samples shows that major crystalline phase of the glass–ceramic sample with ≤ 0.5 was found to have cubic structure similar to SrTiO3 ceramic. Scanning electron microscopy has been carried out to see the surface morphology of the crystallites dispersed in the glassy matrix.

  9. FTIR and optical assessment of zinc doped calcium phospho-borosilicate sol-gel glasses/glass-ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, V.; Arora, N.; Pandey, O. P.; Kaur, G.

    2015-08-01

    CaO-P2O5-ZnO-SiO2-B2O3 glasses with varying compositions of calcium oxide and phosphorous oxide are synthesized using sol-gel technique. The glasses are heat-treated for a duration of 10 h at 500°C to obtain the glass-ceramics. The glass-ceramics and glasses are characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and UV-Visible spectroscopy. Extinction coefficients, attenuation coefficients and dielectric constant have been obtained for all the glasses as well as glass ceramics. The results are discussed in light of non-bridging oxygens (NBO) and heat-treatment of glasses. In addition to this, the effect of calcium and phosphorous on the infra-red spectra has been analysed thoroughly.

  10. Why neutron guides may end up breaking down? Some results on the macroscopic behaviour of alkali-borosilicate glass support plates under neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boffy, R.; Kreuz, M. [Institut Laue-Langevin, 71 avenue des Martyrs, CS 20156, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Beaucour, J., E-mail: beaucour@ill.fr [Institut Laue-Langevin, 71 avenue des Martyrs, CS 20156, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Köster, U. [Institut Laue-Langevin, 71 avenue des Martyrs, CS 20156, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Bermejo, F.J. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Serrano 123, E-20886 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we report on a first part of a study on the mechanisms leading to brittle fracture in neutron guides made of glass as structural element. Such devices are widely used to deliver thermal and cold neutron beams to experimental lines in most large neutron research facilities. We present results on macroscopic properties of samples of guide glass substrates which are subjected to neutron irradiation at relatively large fluences. The results show a striking dependence of some of the macroscopic properties such as density, shape or surface curvature upon the specific chemical composition of a given glass. The relevance of the present findings for the installation of either replacement guides at the existing facilities or for the deployment of instruments for ongoing projects such as the European Spallation Source is briefly discussed.

  11. Why neutron guides may end up breaking down? Some results on the macroscopic behaviour of alkali-borosilicate glass support plates under neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we report on a first part of a study on the mechanisms leading to brittle fracture in neutron guides made of glass as structural element. Such devices are widely used to deliver thermal and cold neutron beams to experimental lines in most large neutron research facilities. We present results on macroscopic properties of samples of guide glass substrates which are subjected to neutron irradiation at relatively large fluences. The results show a striking dependence of some of the macroscopic properties such as density, shape or surface curvature upon the specific chemical composition of a given glass. The relevance of the present findings for the installation of either replacement guides at the existing facilities or for the deployment of instruments for ongoing projects such as the European Spallation Source is briefly discussed

  12. Alteration layer formation of Ca- and Zn-oxide bearing alkali borosilicate glasses for immobilisation of UK high level waste: A vapour hydration study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassingham, N. J.; Corkhill, C. L.; Stennett, M. C.; Hand, R. J.; Hyatt, N. C.

    2016-10-01

    The UK high level nuclear waste glass modified with CaO/ZnO was investigated using the vapour phase hydration test, performed at 200 °C, with the aim of understanding the impact of the modification on the chemical composition and microstructure of the alteration layer. Experiments were undertaken on non-modified and CaO/ZnO-modified base glass, with or without 25 wt% of simulant Magnox waste calcine. The modification resulted in a dramatic reduction in gel layer thickness and also a reduction in the reaction rate, from 3.4 ± 0.3 g m-2 d-1 without CaO/ZnO modification to 0.9 ± 0.1 g m-2 d-1 with CaO/ZnO. The precipitated phase assemblage for the CaO/ZnO-modified compositions was identified as hydrated Ca- and Zn-bearing silicate phases, which were absent from the non-modified counterpart. These results are in agreement with other recent studies showing the beneficial effects of ZnO additions on glass durability.

  13. Phase separation and crystallization in soda-lime borosilicate glass enriched in MoO3 studied by in situ Raman spectroscopy at high temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Magnin, Magali; Schuller, Sophie; Caurant, Daniel; Majérus, Odile; De Ligny, Dominique; Advocat, Thierry

    2008-01-01

    Phase separation and crystallisation processes may arise in molten glass when the MoO3 content exceeds its solubility limit. Molybdenum combined with other elements such as alkali and alkaline-earth may form crystalline molybdates, known as "yellow phases" in nuclear glasses. In order to establish the sequence of phase separation and crystallization processes occurring during the cooling of the melt, a non-radioactive simplified glass composition was chosen in the SiO2-B2O3Na2O-CaO system, wi...

  14. Effect of Zn- and Ca-oxides on the structure and chemical durability of simulant alkali borosilicate glasses for immobilisation of UK high level wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hua, E-mail: nzhangh@aliyun.com [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sir Robert Hadfield Building, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); China Institute of Atomic Energy, P.O. Box 275-93, 102413 Beijing (China); Corkhill, Claire L.; Heath, Paul G.; Hand, Russell J.; Stennett, Martin C. [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sir Robert Hadfield Building, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Hyatt, Neil C., E-mail: n.c.hyatt@sheffield.ac.uk [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sir Robert Hadfield Building, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Spinel crystallization incorporates ZnO from base glass, displacing Mg and Ni. • Raman spectroscopy demonstrates significant impact on glass structure by addition of ZnO to base glass. • Addition of ZnO reduces glass dissolution rate at early time periods (up to 28 days). - Abstract: Compositional modification of United Kingdom high level nuclear waste (HLW) glasses was investigated with the aim of understanding the impact of adopting a ZnO/CaO modified base glass on the vitrified product phase assemblage, glass structure, processing characteristics and dissolution kinetics. Crystalline spinel phases were identified in the vitrified products derived from the Na{sub 2}O/Li{sub 2}O and the ZnO/CaO modified base glass compositions; the volume fraction of the spinel crystallites increased with increasing waste loading from 15 to 20 wt%. The spinel composition was influenced by the base glass components; in the vitrified product obtained with the ZnO/CaO modified base glass, the spinel phase contained a greater proportion of Zn, with a nominal composition of (Zn{sub 0.60}Ni{sub 0.20}Mg{sub 0.20})(Cr{sub 1.37}Fe{sub 0.63})O{sub 4}. The addition of ZnO and CaO to the base glass was also found to significantly alter the glass structure, with changes identified in both borate and silicate glass networks using Raman spectroscopy. In particular, these glasses were characterised by a significantly higher Q{sup 3} species, which we attribute to Si–O–Zn linkages; addition of ZnO and CaO to the glass composition therefore enhanced glass network polymerisation. The increase in network polymerisation, and the presence of spinel crystallites, were found to increase the glass viscosity of the ZnO/CaO modified base glass; however, the viscosities were within the accepted range for nuclear waste glass processing. The ZnO/CaO modified glass compositions were observed to be significantly more durable than the Na{sub 2}O/Li{sub 2}O base glass up to 28 days, due to a combination of the enhanced network polymerisation and the formation of Ca/Si containing alteration layers.

  15. 新型掺铒镥硼硅酸盐玻璃的制备和红外发光性质研究%Preparation and Optical Properties of Er3+ -Doped Lutetium Borosilicate Glasses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙江亭; 吴昭君; 唐婉如; 高艳杰; 吕树臣

    2009-01-01

    用高温熔融法制备了成分为:Er2O3,Lu2O3,SiO2,B2O3和Na2O的新型玻璃体系,探索了该玻璃体系的成玻范围,发现该玻璃体系在(摩尔分数)SiO2:0~50%,Lu2O3:0~25%和B2O3:20%以上的范围内均可形成完全透明的玻璃,在Lu2O3:10%.SiO2:50%,B2O3:30%和B2O3:30%,SiO2:60%两个组分附近时玻璃轻微失透.除此以外,在其他组分实验上没有得到玻璃.利用McCumtber理论计算出了样品的吸收和受激发射截面,并从玻璃1.5 μm的吸收光谱出发拟合出了Judd-Ofelt参数Ωλ(2,4,6).结果表明,该玻璃体系具有较大的吸收和受激发射截面.差热分析的数据表明,该玻璃体系具有极好的热稳定性.因此,从1.5μm发射的增益带宽和热稳定性两个方面来考虑,本文所制备的镥硼硅酸盐玻璃体系是一种具有应用潜力的掺铒光纤放大器的基质材料.

  16. 硼硅酸盐生物玻璃的制备及其体外生物活性和降解性%PREPARATION OF BOROSILICATE GLASS AND THEIR BIOACTIVITY AND BIODEGRADABILITY IN VITRO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宁佳; 王德平; 黄文旵; 周萘; 姚爱华; 付海罗; 刘欣

    2006-01-01

    采用熔融法制备了NaO-CaO-SiO2-P2O5-B2O3玻璃,用质量损失分析、pH值测定和X射线衍射、电子显微镜以及电感耦合等离子体离子浓度分析法表征玻璃与稀K2HPO4溶液的类生物反应,研究了这类玻璃的生物活性和生物降解性.结果表明:当玻璃中B2O3/SiO2的摩尔比为3:1时,生物活性较好.随着B2O3与SiO2的摩尔比减小,玻璃的降解速度变慢,获得的羟基磷灰石结晶度较低.利用此特性可控制生物玻璃的降解速度,从而与骨细胞生长速度相匹配.因此,此类硼硅酸盐生物活性玻璃有望在硬组织工程支架材料中得到应用.

  17. 烧结助剂对硼硅钙微晶玻璃结构和介电性能的影响%EFFECTS OF SINTERING ADDITIVES ON MICROSTRUCTURE AND DIELECTRIC PROPERTIES OF CALCIUM BOROSILICATE GLASS-CERAMICS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕安国; 王美娜; 丘泰; 周洪庆; 刘敏

    2007-01-01

    研究了烧结助剂P2O5和ZnO对CaO-B2O3-SiO2(CBS)玻璃粉末的助烧作用及其对材料的相组成、显微结构和介电性能的影响.结果表明:未添加烧结助剂在1000 ℃烧成的样品晶粒粗大(1~3 μm),且结构疏松.复合添加2%(质量分数,下同)P2O5和0.5%ZnO后,850℃烧成的CBS微晶玻璃中,包含有β-CaSiO3,α-SiO2和CaB2O4 3种晶相,晶粒发育细小均匀,粒径为0.5 μm左右,具有一定量的玻璃相,且结构致密.加烧结助剂制得的样品在10 MHz下,相对介电常数εr为6.38,介电损耗tanδ为0.001 8.加复合烧结助剂P2O5和ZnO有效地降低了CBS玻璃粉末的烧结温度(低于900 ℃),可实现银、铜电极共烧.烧结助剂的作用机理是P2O5促进了液相的生成,ZnO则具有提高液相的粘度,增大烧结温度范围,细化晶粒和防止样品变形的作用.

  18. Synthesis and thermophysical property measurements on various types of glasses for nuclear waste immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borosilicate glasses (BSG) are worldwide known host matrices for immobilization of radioactive High Level Waste (HLW). Different types of borosilicate glasses were prepared by changing the modifier concentrations and compositions to know the efficacy of the resulting glass in terms of glass formation, durability towards various waste elements, stability at higher temperatures, mobility of ionic species etc. towards nuclear applications. In this study BSG, Aluminium borosilicate glass (AlBSG), Barium borosilicate glass (BaBSG) and Lead borosilicate glasses (PbBSG) were prepared and characterised to confirm the glass formations. Percentage linear thermal expansion and glass transition temperatures were measured by dilatometric techniques

  19. Study of the possibilities of using nuclear methods for characterizing the surface region of glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following a review of the different methods used for the analysis of surfaces, we give a detailed description of charged particle elastic backscattering and the experimental devices. We then apply this method to the study of the lixiviation of borosilicate glasses in aqueous media and to the characterization of two heavy elements, cerium and thorium and their possible interaction in simple borosilicates

  20. Comparison of glass and crystalline nuclear waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear waste forms may be divided into two broad categories: single phase glasses with minor crystalline components (e.g., borosilicate glasses) and crystalline waste forms, either single phase (e.g., monazite) or polyphase (e.g., SYNROC). This paper reviews the materials properties data that are available for each of these two types of waste forms. The principal data include: physical, thermal and mechanical properties, chemical durability; and radiation damage effects. Complete data are only available for borosilicate glasses and SYNROC; therefore, this comparison focuses on the performance assessment of borosilicate glass and SYNROC

  1. Materials Characterization Center workshop on the leaching mechanisms of nuclear waste forms, December 7-8, 1982, Thousand Oaks, CA. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Each of the six laboratories involved in the 3-yr leaching mechanism program presented a progress report on borosilicate glass studies. Presentations were made on various techniques for characterizing leached surfaces and on in situ characterization of leaching surfaces

  2. SUPERCONDUCTING OPEN-GRADIENT MAGNETIC SEPARATION FOR THE PRETREATMENT OF RADIOACTIVE OR MIXED WASTE VITRIFICATION FEEDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists need to gain a better understanding of the magnetic separation processes that can be used to separate deleterious constituents (crystalline, amorphous, and colloidal) in vitrification feed streams for borosilicate glass production without adding chemicals or generating...

  3. Picosecond laser welding of similar and dissimilar materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Richard M; Chen, Jianyong; Shephard, Jonathan D; Thomson, Robert R; Hand, Duncan P

    2014-07-01

    We report picosecond laser welding of similar and dissimilar materials based on plasma formation induced by a tightly focused beam from a 1030 nm, 10 ps, 400 kHz laser system. Specifically, we demonstrate the welding of fused silica, borosilicate, and sapphire to a range of materials including borosilicate, fused silica, silicon, copper, aluminum, and stainless steel. Dissimilar material welding of glass to aluminum and stainless steel has not been previously reported. Analysis of the borosilicate-to-borosilicate weld strength compares well to those obtained using similar welding systems based on femtosecond lasers. There is, however, a strong requirement to prepare surfaces to a high (10-60 nm Ra) flatness to ensure a successful weld.

  4. Picosecond laser welding of similar and dissimilar materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Richard M; Chen, Jianyong; Shephard, Jonathan D; Thomson, Robert R; Hand, Duncan P

    2014-07-01

    We report picosecond laser welding of similar and dissimilar materials based on plasma formation induced by a tightly focused beam from a 1030 nm, 10 ps, 400 kHz laser system. Specifically, we demonstrate the welding of fused silica, borosilicate, and sapphire to a range of materials including borosilicate, fused silica, silicon, copper, aluminum, and stainless steel. Dissimilar material welding of glass to aluminum and stainless steel has not been previously reported. Analysis of the borosilicate-to-borosilicate weld strength compares well to those obtained using similar welding systems based on femtosecond lasers. There is, however, a strong requirement to prepare surfaces to a high (10-60 nm Ra) flatness to ensure a successful weld. PMID:25089985

  5. Excimer laser-induced material modification to create nanometer high smooth patterns in glass using mask projection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudolph, Thomas; Zimmer, Klaus; Boehme, Rico; Ruthe, David [Leibniz-Institut fuer Oberflaechenmodifizierung e.V., Permoserstrasse 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany)

    2007-04-15

    Laser swelling of borosilicate and soda-lime glass is shown for wavelengths of 193 and 248 nm. Very smooth patterns up to 45 nm high were generated by KrF laser (248 nm) irradiation of borosilicate glass at a fluence of 1.5 J/cm{sup 2}. At 193 nm laser wavelength, lower heights (up to 13 nm) and lower swelling threshold fluences (0.1 J/cm{sup 2}) were observed due to higher material absorption. For the less absorbing soda-lime glass higher fluences than for the borosilicate glass are needed to establish elevated structures. Gratings in borosilicate glass with sub-micron periodicity demonstrate the high resolution of the method. The results can be explained by a thermo-physical model based on the change of the glass transition temperature due to fast cooling after the pulsed laser irradiation.

  6. Spent fuel from nuclear research reactors immobilized in sintered glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different kinds of glasses, borosilicates, Iron borosilicates and Iron phosphates, were tested in order to determine its capability to immobilize calcined uranium silicide in a sintering process. Iron phosphate glass developed in our laboratory showed the best results in SEM analysis. Also its gravimetric leaching rate is less than 0.45 g.m-2 .day-1 for 7 and 10% loading which is lower than any previously studied for us. (author)

  7. An assessment of methods for immobilizing reprocessed radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear waste forms presently used for the disposal of high-level wastes and other potential waste forms under development were studied using information available in the literature and by visits to the laboratories. The following waste forms were considered: Borosilicate glass, high-silica glass, glassceramics, supercalcine ceramics, synroc ceramics, borosilicate glass beads in a metal matrix, supercalcine and synroc ceramics in a metal matrix and coated ceramics. The following conclusions have been reached: To date the best developed wasteform, both in terms of overall product quality and process development, is monolithic borosilicate glass. However, hydrothermal instability is a major concern. Borosilicate glass in metal matrix waste form has better properties than monolithic borosilicate glass waste form. The process has been proven on a pilot scale. Hence, it is considered very close to monolithic glass in terms of overall development. The product qualities of the other waste forms are better than borosilicate glass. However, process development for these alternative waste forms is still in a conceptual stage. The technological basis for processing ceramic waste forms exists in a well developed state. Nevertheless, adaptation of the technology to continuous hot-cell operation, although feasible, has not been demonstrated. In view of the product potential of ceramic waste forms it is felt that their development should be given emphasis at this time. (auth)

  8. Solubility of actinides and surrogates in nuclear glasses; Solubilite des actinides et de leurs simulants dans les verres nucleaires. Limites d'incorporation et comprehension des mecanismes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, Ch

    2003-07-01

    The nuclear wastes are currently incorporated in borosilicate glass matrices. The resulting glass must be perfectly homogeneous. The work discussed here is a study of actinide (thorium and plutonium) solubility in borosilicate glass, undertaken to assess the extent of actinide solubility in the glass and to understand the mechanisms controlling actinide solubilization. Glass specimens containing; actinide surrogates were used to prepare and optimize the fabrication of radioactive glass samples. These preliminary studies revealed that actinide Surrogates solubility in the glass was enhanced by controlling the processing temperature, the dissolution kinetic of the surrogate precursors, the glass composition and the oxidizing versus reducing conditions. The actinide solubility was investigated in the borosilicate glass. The evolution of thorium solubility in borosilicate glass was determined for temperatures ranging from 1200 deg C to 1400 deg C.Borosilicate glass specimens containing plutonium were fabricated. The experimental result showed that the plutonium solubility limit ranged from 1 to 2.5 wt% PuO{sub 2} at 1200 deg C. A structural approach based on the determination of the local structure around actinides and their surrogates by EXAFS spectroscopy was used to determine their structural role in the glass and the nature of their bonding with the vitreous network. This approach revealed a correlation between the length of these bonds and the solubility of the actinides and their surrogates. (author)

  9. Development of a glass matrix for vitrification of sulphate bearing high level radioactive liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High level radioactive liquid waste (HLW) is generated during reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. In the earlier reprocessing flow sheet ferrous sulphamate has been used for valancy adjustment of Pu from IV to III for effective separation. This has resulted in generation of HLW containing significance amount of sulphate. Internationally borosilicate glass matrix has been adopted for vitrification of HLW. The first Indian vitrification facility at Waste Immobilislition Plant (WIP), Tarapur a five component borosilicate matrix (SiO2 :B2O3 :Na2O : MnO : TiO2) has been used for vitrification of waste. However at Trombay HLW contain significant amount of sulphate which is not compatible with standard borosilicate formulation. Extensive R and D efforts were made to develop a glass formulation which can accommodate sulphate and other constituents of HLW e.g., U, Al, Ca, etc. This report deals with development work of a glass formulations for immobilization of sulphate bearing waste. Different glass formulations were studied to evaluate the compatibility with respect to sulphate and other constituents as mentioned above. This includes sodium, lead and barium borosilicate glass matrices. Problems encountered in different glass matrices for containment of sulphate have also been addressed. A glass formulation based on barium borosilicate was found to be effective and compatible for sulphate bearing high level waste. (author)

  10. Effects of neodymium and gadolinium on weathering resistance of ZnO-B2O3-SiO2 glass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李雄伟; 李梅; 王觅堂; 柳召刚; 胡艳宏; 田俊虎

    2014-01-01

    The ZnO-B2O3-SiO2 glass doped with Nd2O3 and Gd2O3 was prepared by high temperature melt cooling method. The standard sample of the zinc borosilicate glass was placed in the constant temperature and humidity chamber in order to simulate the atmospheric corrosion process. The surface of the weathered glass was analyzed by scanning electron microscope and energy disper-sive spectrometry and the filtrate was analyzed by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry. The results showed that humidity was the most important factor influencing weathering; the morphology of glass surface of altered layer and the product on the surface was observed; the corroding degree of the zinc borosilicate glass doped with Nd or Gd was significantly lighter than that of the base glass.Adding rare earth Nd or Gd in the zinc borosilicate glass could suppress Na, Zn, Si ion release in weathering.

  11. Photoluminescence of X-ray irradiated CdSe nanocrystals embedded in dielectric matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prymak, M.V.; Azhniuk, Yu.M.; Zvenigorodsky, V.V.; Krasilinets, V.M.; Gomonnai, A.V. [Institute of Electron Physics, Ukrainian National Academy of Sciences, Universytetska Str. 21, Uzhhorod 88017 (Ukraine); Rayevska, O.E.; Stroyuk, O.L. [L.V. Pysarzhevsky Institute of Physical Chemistry, Ukrainian National Academy of Sciences, Prospect Nauky 31, Kyiv 03028 (Ukraine); Zahn, D.R.T. [Semiconductor Physics, Chemnitz University of Technology, 09107 Chemnitz (Germany)

    2013-06-15

    The effect of X-ray irradiation (up to 3200 Gy) on the photoluminescence (PL) of CdSe nanocrystals embedded in polyacrylamide and borosilicate glass matrices is studied. In both cases no PL quenching is observed: for the polyacrylamide-embedded CdSe nanocrystals the PL intensity remains stable, while for the borosilicate glass-embedded nanocrystals it increases somewhat. The obtained PL behavior correlates well with the optical absorption data. This testifies to the radiation stability of the optical characteristics of CdSe nanocrystals in polyacrylamide and irradiation-induced charge transfer between the nanocrystals and the borosilicate glass. (copyright 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  12. Gallium phosphide as a new material for anodically bonded atomic sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nezih Dural

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Miniaturized atomic sensors are often fabricated using anodic bonding of silicon and borosilicate glass. Here we describe a technique for fabricating anodically bonded alkali-metal cells using GaP and Pyrex. GaP is a non-birefringent semiconductor that is transparent at alkali-metal resonance wavelengths, allowing new sensor geometries. GaP also has a higher thermal conductivity and lower He permeability than borosilicate glass and can be anodically bonded below 200 °C, which can also be advantageous in other vacuum sealing applications.

  13. Volume changes in glass induced by an electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three glasses (float, borosilicate float and Schott D263 glasses) were irradiated by 50 keV electron beams with doses within the range of 0.21–318.5 kC/m2. Volume changes induced by electron bombarding were monitored by means of Atomic Force Microscopy. Incubation doses, related to mobility of alkali ions, were measured. Low doses showed compaction of all glasses while higher doses revealed volume inflation, except for borosilicate float glass. Both surfaces of float glass were irradiated and significant differences between them were found

  14. Comparison of costs for solidification of high-level radioactive waste solutions: glass monoliths vs metal matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comparative economic analysis was made of four solidification processes for liquid high-level radioactive waste. Two processes produced borosilicate glass monoliths and two others produced metal matrix composites of lead and borosilicate glass beads and lead and supercalcine pellets. Within the uncertainties of the cost (1979 dollars) estimates, the cost of the four processes was about the same, with the major cost component being the cost of the primary building structure. Equipment costs and operating and maintenance costs formed only a small portion of the building structure costs for all processes

  15. Production Process for Strong, Light Ceramic Tiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmquist, G. R.; Cordia, E. R.; Tomer, R. S.

    1985-01-01

    Proportions of ingredients and sintering time/temperature schedule changed. Production process for lightweight, high-strength ceramic insulating tiles for Space Shuttle more than just scaled-up version of laboratory process for making small tiles. Boron in aluminum borosilicate fibers allows fusion at points where fibers contact each other during sintering, thereby greatly strengthening tiles structure.

  16. Mechanical Strength and Broadband Transparency Improvement of Glass Wafers via Surface Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amarendra; Kashyap, Kunal; Hou, Max T.; Yeh, J. Andrew

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we mechanically strengthened a borosilicate glass wafer by doubling its bending strength and simultaneously enhancing its transparency using surface nanostructures for different applications including sensors, displays and panels. A fabrication method that combines dry and wet etching is used for surface nanostructure fabrication. Specifically, we improved the bending strength of plain borosilicate glass by 96% using these surface nanostructures on both sides. Besides bending strength improvement, a limited optical transmittance enhancement of 3% was also observed in the visible light wavelength region (400–800 nm). Both strength and transparency were improved by using surface nanostructures of 500 nm depth on both sides of the borosilicate glass without affecting its bulk properties or the glass manufacturing process. Moreover, we observed comparatively smaller fragments during the breaking of the nanostructured glass, which is indicative of strengthening. The range for the nanostructure depth is defined for different applications with which improvements of the strength and transparency of borosilicate glass substrate are obtained. PMID:27322276

  17. GLASSES CONTAINING IRON (II III) OXIDES FOR IMMOBILIZATION OF RADIOACTIVE TECHNETIUM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KRUGER AA; HEO J; XU K; CHOI JK; HRMA PR; UM W

    2011-11-07

    Technetium-99 (Tc-99) has posed serious environmental threats as US Department of Energy's high-level waste. This work reports the vitrification of Re, as surrogate for Tc-99, by iron-borosilicate and iron-phosphate glasses, respectively. Iron-phosphate glasses can dissolve Re as high as {approx} 1.2 wt. %, which can become candidate waste forms for Tc-99 disposal, while borosilicate glasses can retain less than 0.1 wt. % of Re due to high melting temperature and long melting duration. Vitrification of Re as Tc-99's mimic was investigated using iron-borosilicate and iron-phosphate glasses. The retention of Re in borosilicate glasses was less than 0.1 wt. % and more than 99 wt. % of Re were volatilized due to high melting temperature and long melting duration. Because the retention of Re in iron-phosphate glasses is as high as 1.2 wt. % and the volatilization is reduced down to {approx}50 wt. %, iron-phosphate glasses can be one of the glass waste form candidates for Tc (or Re) disposal. The investigations of chemical durability and leaching test of iron-phosphate glasses containing Re are now underway to test the performance of the waste form.

  18. Phase Stability Determinations of DWPF Waste Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marra, S.L.

    1999-10-22

    Liquid high-level nuclear waste will be immobilized at the Savannah River Site (SRS) by vitrification in borosilicate glass. To fulfill this requirement, glass samples were heat treated at various times and temperatures. These results will provide guidance to the repository program about conditions to be avoided during shipping, handling and storage of DWPF canistered waste forms.

  19. Capillary-force measurement on SiC surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sedighi, M.; Svetovoy, V. B.; Palasantzas, G.

    2016-01-01

    Capillary forces have been measured by atomic force microscopy in the sphere-plate geometry, in a controlled humidity environment, between smooth silicon carbide and borosilicate glass spheres. The force measurements were performed as a function of the rms surface roughness similar to 4-14 nm mainly

  20. 16 CFR 1201.4 - Test procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... bladder, the top should be either twisted around the threaded metal rod below the metal sleeve or pulled over the metal sleeve and tied with a cord or leather thong. Note that the hanging strap must be... light monitoring and control systems. Borosilicate inner and outer filters shall be used. An...

  1. Reactivity control rod for controlling reactor power distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since a cladding tube is situated at the outer side, it undergoes neutron irradiation in a reactor core and also undergoes compression force due to high pressure of reactor coolants to cause a creep phenomenon, and the diameter is reduced as it is used. Then, neutron absorbing rods as reactivity control rods for controlling the power distribution are constituted with a cladding tube, a spacer tube disposed at the central portion of the cladding tube and a borosilicate glass tube disposed between the cladding tube and the spacer tube. The gap between the borosilicate glass tube and the spacer tube is gradually changed so that the inner diameter of the borosilicate glass is increased as it comes closer to the lower end plug. The time of contact between the cladding tube and the spacer tube in the inside is delayed by the constitution of the borosilicate glass tube disposed in the cladding tube of the neutron absorbing rod as the reactivity control rod thereby capable of extending the integral working life time with no rupture of the cladding tube. (N.H.)

  2. Mechanical Strength and Broadband Transparency Improvement of Glass Wafers via Surface Nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amarendra; Kashyap, Kunal; Hou, Max T; Yeh, J Andrew

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we mechanically strengthened a borosilicate glass wafer by doubling its bending strength and simultaneously enhancing its transparency using surface nanostructures for different applications including sensors, displays and panels. A fabrication method that combines dry and wet etching is used for surface nanostructure fabrication. Specifically, we improved the bending strength of plain borosilicate glass by 96% using these surface nanostructures on both sides. Besides bending strength improvement, a limited optical transmittance enhancement of 3% was also observed in the visible light wavelength region (400-800 nm). Both strength and transparency were improved by using surface nanostructures of 500 nm depth on both sides of the borosilicate glass without affecting its bulk properties or the glass manufacturing process. Moreover, we observed comparatively smaller fragments during the breaking of the nanostructured glass, which is indicative of strengthening. The range for the nanostructure depth is defined for different applications with which improvements of the strength and transparency of borosilicate glass substrate are obtained. PMID:27322276

  3. Mechanisms of dissolution of radioactive waste storage glasses and cesium migration from a granite repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental and theoretical data are used to compare the effect of three possible leach mechanisms for borosilicate glass waste buried in a granite host-rock on the release and subsequent migration of 135Cs. Protracted release episodes and variations of up to an order of magnitude in groundwater transport times and five orders in output concentrations are possible. 4 figures

  4. 40 CFR 60.296 - Test methods and procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... production rate correction =227 g/hr for container glass, pressed and blown (soda-lime and lead) glass, and pressed and blown (other than borosilicate, soda-lime, and lead) glass. =454 g/hr for pressed and blown... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES Standards of Performance for...

  5. Physical and chemical degradation behavior of sputtered aluminum doped zinc oxide layers for Cu(In,Ga)Se2 solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theelen, M.; Boumans, T.; Stegeman, F.; Colberts, F.; Illiberi, A.; Berkum, J. van; Barreau, N.; Vroon, Z.; Zeman, M.

    2014-01-01

    Sputtered aluminum doped zinc oxide (ZnO:Al) layers on borosilicate glass were exposed to damp heat (85 C/85% relative humidity) for 2876 h to accelerate the physical and chemical degradation behavior. The ZnO:Al samples were characterized by electrical, compositional and optical measurements before

  6. The role of troublesome components in plutonium vitrification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hong; Vienna, J.D.; Peeler, D.K.; Hrma, P.; Schweiger, M.J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-05-01

    One option for immobilizing surplus plutonium is vitrification in a borosilicate glass. Two advantages of the glass form are (1) high tolerance to feed variability and, (2) high solubility of some impurity components. The types of plutonium-containing materials in the United States inventory include: pits, metals, oxides, residues, scrap, compounds, and fuel. Many of them also contain high concentrations of carbon, chloride, fluoride, phosphate, sulfate, and chromium oxide. To vitrify plutonium-containing scrap and residues, it is critical to understand the impact of each component on glass processing and chemical durability of the final product. This paper addresses glass processing issues associated with these troublesome components. It covers solubility limits of chlorine, fluorine, phosphate, sulfate, and chromium oxide in several borosilicate based glasses, and the effect of each component on vitrification (volatility, phase segregation, crystallization, and melt viscosity). Techniques (formulation, pretreatment, removal, and/or dilution) to mitigate the effect of these troublesome components are suggested.

  7. Characterization of artificial spherical particles for DEM validation studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ignazio Cavarretta; Catherine O'Sullivan; Erdin Ibraim; Martin Lings; Simon Hamlin; David Muir Wood

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a study in which advanced particle-scale characterization was carried out on spherical particles that can be used in experimental tests to validate discrete element method (DEM) simulations,Two types of particle,alkaline and borosilicate glass heads,made from two different materials,were considered.The particle shape,stiffness,contact friction properties and surface roughness were measured.The influences of hardness and roughness on the mechanical response of the particles were carefully considered.Compared to the alkaline beads,the borosilicate beads were more spherical and more uniform in size,and they exhibited mechanical characteristics closer to natural quartz sand.While only two material types were studied,the work has the broader implication as a methodology for selecting particles suitable for use in DEM studies and the key parameters that should be considered in the selection process are highlighted.

  8. Washing and caustic leaching of Hanford tank sludges: results of FY 1996 studies. Revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the past few years, the primary mission at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site has changed from producing plutonium to restoring the environment. Large volumes of high-level radioactive wastes (HLW), generated during past Pu production and other operations, are stored in underground tanks on site. The current plan for remediating the Hanford tank farms consists of waste retrieval, pretreatment, treatment (immobilization), and disposal. The HLW will be immobilized in a borosilicate glass matrix and then disposed of in a geologic repository. Because of the expected high cost of HLW vitrification and geologic disposal, pretreatment processes will be implemented to reduce the volume of borosilicate glass produced in disposing of the tank wastes. On this basis, a pretreatment plan is being developed. This report describes the sludge washing and caustic leaching test conducted to create a Hanford tank sludge pretreatment flowsheet

  9. Engineering of composite metallic microfibers towards development of plasmonic devices for sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petropoulou, A.; Antonopoulos, G.; Bastock, P.; Craig, C.; Kakarantzas, G.; Hewak, D. W.; Zervas, M. N.; Riziotis, C.

    2016-03-01

    The paper discusses the analysis of tapered hybrid composite microfibers based on a metal-core and dielectric-cladding composite material system. Its advantages over the pure metal tips conventionally used, are the inherent enhanced environmental robustness due to inert borosilicate cladding and the capability of multiple excitation of the tapered nanowire through the length of the fiber due to the enabled total internal reflection at the borosilicate/air interface. Simulations through finite element method (FEM) have demonstrated an improved field enhancement at the tapered region of such microfibers. Furthermore, experimental results on tapering in copper based microfibers together with light coupling and propagation studies will be demonstrated revealing the potential for the development of plasmonic devices for sensing applications.

  10. Immobilization of Radioactive Rare Earth oxide Waste by Solid Phase Sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the pyroprocessing of spent nuclear fuels, LiCl-KCl waste salt containing radioactive rare earth chlorides are generated. The radioactive rare earth oxides are recovered by co-oxidative precipitation of rare earth elements. The powder phase of rare earth oxide waste must be immobilized to produce a monolithic wasteform suitable for storage and ultimate disposal. The immobilization of these waste developed in this study involves a solid state sintering of the waste with host borosilicate glass and zinc titanate based ceramic matrix (ZIT). And the rare-earth monazite which synthesised by reaction of ammonium di-hydrogen phosphate with the rare earth oxides waste, were immobilized with the borosilicate glass. It is shown that the developed ZIT ceramic wasteform is highly resistant the leaching process, high density and thermal conductivity.

  11. First principles process-product models for vitrification of nuclear waste: Relationship of glass composition to glass viscosity, resistivity, liquidus temperature, and durability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borosilicate glasses will be used in the USA and in Europe to immobilize radioactive high level liquid wastes (HLLW) for ultimate geologic disposal. Process and product quality models based on glass composition simplify the fabrication of the borosilicate glass while ensuring glass processability and quality. The process model for glass viscosity is based on a relationship between the glass composition and its structural polymerization. The relationship between glass viscosity and electrical resistivity is also shown to relate to glass polymerization. The process model for glass liquidus temperature calculates the solubility of the liquidus phases based on the free energies of formation of the precipitating species. The durability product quality model is based on the calculation of the thermodynamic hydration free energy from the glass composition

  12. Preparation of bioactive glasses with controllable degradation behavior and their bioactive characterization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO AiHua; WANG DePing; FU Qiang; HUANG WenHai; Mohamed N. RAHAMAN

    2007-01-01

    Bioactive glasses and ceramics have been widely investigated for bone repair because of their excellent bioactive characteristics. However, these biomaterials undergo incomplete conversion into a bone-like material, which severely limits their biomedical application. In this paper, borosilicate bioactive glasses were prepared by traditional melting process. The results showed that borosilicate glasses possessed high biocompatibility and bioactivity. In addition, when immersed in a 0.02 mol/L K2HPO4 solution, particles of a borate glass were fully converted to HA. The desirable conversion rate to HA may be achieved through the adjustment of the B2O3/SiO2 ratio. The results of XRD and FTIR analysis indicated that the degradation product was carbonate-substituted hydroxyapatite, which was similar to the inorganic component of bone.

  13. Underwater current leakage between encapsulated NiChrome tracks: Implications for strain-gauges and other implantable devices

    OpenAIRE

    Vanhoestenberghe, A.; Bickerton, S.; Taylor, S. J. G.; Donaldson, N. D. N.

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of experiments aimed at identifying a suitable polymer for the encapsulation of thin-film strain gauges for underwater applications (with a view of using it in an instrumented bone fusion nail). The leakage currents across grooves cut (using a laser) in thin films of NiChrome over borosilicate glass were studied for encapsulated samples, immersed in water at 37 °C. The selected encapsulants were five silicone rubbers (of both medical and engineering grades), produced by...

  14. Feasibility Study for Preparation and Use of Glass Grains as an Alternative to Glass Nodules for Vitrification of Nuclear Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High level nuclear liquid waste (HLW) is immobilized using borosilicate glass matrix. Presently joule heated ceramic melter is being employed for vitrification of HLW in India. Preformed nodules of base glass are fed to melter along with liquid waste in predetermined ratio. In order to reduce the cost incurred for production of glass nodules of base glass, an alternative option of using glass grains was evaluated for its preparation and its suitability for the melter operation. (author)

  15. Glasses and Glass-Ceramic Components from Inorganic Waste and Novel Processing

    OpenAIRE

    Ponsot, Inès

    2015-01-01

    Thanks to European environmental rules and regulations establishment, waste recycling has become a more and more relevant problematic. For manufacturing plants, especially those producing hazardous wastes, expenses linked to waste production have drastically increased over the last decades. In the proposed work, various hazardous and non-hazardous wastes, among: soda-lime and borosilicate glass cullet, cathode ray tubes glass, exhausted lime from fume abatement systems residues, sludge and sl...

  16. ガラスの相分離を利用した都市ゴミ溶融スラグのマテリアルリサイクル

    OpenAIRE

    今岡, 卓也; 崎田, 真一; 難波, 徳郎; 三浦, 嘉也

    2007-01-01

    A novel recycling process of municipal waste slags obtaining Fe-free colorless materials was developed by using a phase separation of borosilicate glass. B(2)O(3) was added to a simulated waste slag to promote the phase separation. The slag glasses were heat-treated above glass transition temperatures, from which phase separation was successfully induced. The phase-separated slag glasses were still colored in black due to Fe ions, and after soaking in acid, they were successfully bleached, ob...

  17. The role of nuclear analytical techniques in the study of aqueous corrosion of glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Direct observation of resonant nuclear reactions, backscattering spectrometry and X ray microanalysis with a nuclear microprobe were used to determine elementary depth profiles in the near surface region of leached glasses. Some computing programs required to interpretate the analytical information detected were built. Experimental conditions to characterize glass samples without secondary effects were defined; and the influence of some leaching parameters was studied to describe the first stages of aqueous corrosion of borosilicate glasses

  18. High-Level Waste System Process Interface Description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    d' Entremont, P.D.

    1999-01-14

    The High-Level Waste System is a set of six different processes interconnected by pipelines. These processes function as one large treatment plant that receives, stores, and treats high-level wastes from various generators at SRS and converts them into forms suitable for final disposal. The three major forms are borosilicate glass, which will be eventually disposed of in a Federal Repository, Saltstone to be buried on site, and treated water effluent that is released to the environment.

  19. The Silicon-To-Silicon Anodic Bonding Using Sputter Deposited Intermediate Glass Layer

    OpenAIRE

    TIWARI, R; Chandra, S.

    2011-01-01

    Glass-to-silicon anodic bonding is an attractive process for packaging of microelectronics devices and Micro-electro-mechanical Systems (MEMS). Silicon to silicon anodic bonding can also be accomplished by incorporating an intermediate glass layer. In the present work, silicon-to-silicon anodic bonding has been studied with an intermediate borosilicate glass layer deposited by RF magnetron sputtering process. The bonding was carried out at low dc voltage of about 48 V at 400 °C. Surface rough...

  20. In situ measurement of humidity induced changes in the refractive index and thickness of polyethylene glycol thin films

    OpenAIRE

    Bilen, Bükem; Skarlatos, Yani; Gülen, Aktaş; İnci, Mehmet Naci; Dışpınar, Tuğba; Köse, Meliha Merve; Sanyal, Amital

    2008-01-01

    Humidity induced changes in the refractive index and thickness of polyethylene glycol (PEG) thin films are in situ determined by optical waveguide spectroscopy. PEG brushes are covalently attached to the surface of a thin gold film on a borosilicate crown glass (BK7) using a grafting-from chemical synthesis technique. The measurements are carried out in an attenuated total internal reflection setup. At low humidity levels, both the refractive index and the thickness change gradually due to sw...

  1. Long term corrosion of glasses in salt brines

    OpenAIRE

    Roggendorf, Hans; Schmidt, Helmut K.

    1989-01-01

    Borosilicate glasses are supposed to be a suitable matrix for the fixation of calcined radioactive wastes. For the safety assessment of the disposal of these glasses in geological formations like carnallite or rock salt, their chemical durability in saturated salt brines has been investigated. Temperatures up to 200° C, pressures up to 130 bar, and corrosion times up to 5 years were applied. Special attention was given to the long term corrosion which is mainly characterized by the saturation...

  2. Note: Anodic bonding with cooling of heat-sensitive areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vesborg, Peter Christian Kjærgaard; Olsen, Jakob Lind; Henriksen, Toke Riishøj;

    2010-01-01

    Anodic bonding of silicon to glass always involves heating the glass and device to high temperatures so that cations become mobile in the electric field. We present a simple way of bonding thin silicon samples to borosilicate glass by means of heating from the glass side while locally cooling heat......-sensitive areas from the silicon side. Despite the high thermal conductivity of silicon, this method allows a strong anodic bond to form just millimeters away from areas essentially at room temperature....

  3. Near orthogonal launch of SPR modes in Au films

    CERN Document Server

    Canning, John; Tzoumis, Nikki; Tan, Yanzhen; Patyk, Rodolfo; Gibson, Brant C

    2014-01-01

    We report the excitation of a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) close to the orthogonal axis of a gold (Au) film on borosilicate glass. Direct spectroscopic measurement of SPR shifts using different liquids are made at ~5{\\deg} incidence within a reflection spectrophotometer. Scattering of light that is able to penetrate across the film at the interfaces is the proposed mechanism by which coupling, and plasmon localization, is established.

  4. Characterization and photocatalytic treatability of red water from Brazilian TNT industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludwichk, Raquel [Department of Chemistry, Postgraduate Programme in Technology of Chemical and Biochemical Processes, Federal Technological University of Paraná, Pato Branco, PR (Brazil); Helferich, Oliver Karil; Kist, Cristiane Patrícia [Academic Department of Chemistry and Biology, Post graduation in Environmental Science and Technology Federal Technological University of Paraná, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Lopes, Aline Chitto; Cavasotto, Thiago [Department of Chemistry, Postgraduate Programme in Technology of Chemical and Biochemical Processes, Federal Technological University of Paraná, Pato Branco, PR (Brazil); Silva, Davi Costa [Academic Department of Chemistry and Biology, Post graduation in Environmental Science and Technology Federal Technological University of Paraná, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Barreto-Rodrigues, Marcio, E-mail: marciorodrigues@utfpr.edu.br [Department of Chemistry, Postgraduate Programme in Technology of Chemical and Biochemical Processes, Federal Technological University of Paraná, Pato Branco, PR (Brazil); Academic Department of Chemistry and Biology, Post graduation in Environmental Science and Technology Federal Technological University of Paraná, Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • The red water effluent has high levels of COD, color and acute toxicity. • The compounds 2-methyl-1, 3-dinitrobenzene, 1-methyl-2, 4-dinitrobenzene and 1-methyl-3, 5-dinitrobenzene were identified. • A nanostructured TiO{sub 2}-borosilicate glass was obtained and characterized. • The photocatalytic treatment removes all color 32% of the organic matter content of the effluent. • The borosilicate-glass-TiO{sub 2} system degrades all content of identified nitroaromatic compounds. - Abstract: The current study aims to characterize and evaluate the photocatalytic treatability of the “red water” effluent from a Brazilian TNT production industry. Analyses were performed using physical, chemical, spectroscopic and chromatographic assays, which demonstrated that the effluent presented a significant pollution potential, mainly due to COD, BOD, solids and to the high concentration of nitroaromatic compounds such as 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene, 1-methyl-2,4-dinitrobenzene, 2-methyl-1,3-dinitrobenzene, 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene-3,5-dinitro-p-toluidine and 2-methyl-3,5-dinitro-benzoamine. By a modified sol-gel and a dip-coating technique, it was possible to obtain a TiO{sub 2} film on borosilicate glass substrate which functional composition and microstructure were characterized by infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The evaluation of the photocatalytic treatability using borosilicate-glass-TiO{sub 2} demonstrated high degradation efficiency. In this context, a reduction of 32 and 100% for COD and nitroaromatic compounds, respectively, was observed. Although the proposed photocatalytic process has found difficulties in reducing the content of organic matter and effluent color in the red water, its potential for degrading refractory chemical compounds such as the nitroaromatic ones enables it to be used as tertiary treatment.

  5. Final report, Task 2: alternative waste management options, Nuclear Fuel Services, Inc., high level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Of the alternatives considered for disposal of the high-level waste in tanks 8D2 and 8D4, the following process is recommended: homogenization of the contents of tank 8D2, centrifugation of the sludge and supernate, mixing of the 8D4 acid waste with the centrifuged sludge, and converting the mixture to a borosilicate glass using the Hanford spray calciner/in-can melter

  6. Feasibility study for removal of sulphate from HLW prior to its immobilisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulphate removal from HLW can improve the waste loading significantly during vitrification using barium borosilicate glass matrix. This paper describes the experimental works carried out to see the feasibility of sulphate removal from HLW by precipitation method using barium nitrate. Various parameters like optimization of stoichiometric amount of barium, extent of sulphate removal, partitioning of radionuclide and feasibility of sludge fixation in cement matrix etc were also studied. (author)

  7. Glasses and ceramics for immobilisation of radioactive wastes for disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.K. Research Programme on Radioactive Waste Management includes the development of processes for the conversion of high level liquid reprocessing wastes from thermal and fast reactors to borosilicate glasses. The properties of these glasses and their behaviour under storage and disposal conditions have been examined. Methods for immobilising activity from other wastes by conversion to glass or ceramic forms is described. The U.K. philosophy of final solutions to waste management and disposal is presented. (author)

  8. Investigation of Design Parameters in Ultrasound Reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Jordens, Jeroen; Degrève, Jan; Braeken, Leen; Van Gerven, Tom

    2012-01-01

    The cavitational activity of a tubular sonoreactor was simulated and related to the chemical reaction rate in order to study the effect of different design parameters. The conversion was improved with a factor 10 by optimization of the reactor diameter. Further improvement of the conversion with 20% was achieved by shifting the transducers apart. When the reactor diameter is in the millimeter scale, stainless steel and borosilicate glass walls very well resemble sound-hard walls. The impact o...

  9. UK program: glasses and ceramics for immobilization of radioactive wastes for disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The UK Research Program on Radioactive Waste Management includes the development of processes for the conversion of high-level-liquid-reprocessing wastes from thermal and fast reactors to borosilicate glasses. The properties of these glasses and their behavior under storage and disposal conditions have been examined. Methods for immobilizing activity from other wastes by conversion to glass or ceramic forms are described. The UK philosophy of final solutions to waste management and disposal is presented

  10. High-Level Waste System Process Interface Description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The High-Level Waste System is a set of six different processes interconnected by pipelines. These processes function as one large treatment plant that receives, stores, and treats high-level wastes from various generators at SRS and converts them into forms suitable for final disposal. The three major forms are borosilicate glass, which will be eventually disposed of in a Federal Repository, Saltstone to be buried on site, and treated water effluent that is released to the environment

  11. Characterization and photocatalytic treatability of red water from Brazilian TNT industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The red water effluent has high levels of COD, color and acute toxicity. • The compounds 2-methyl-1, 3-dinitrobenzene, 1-methyl-2, 4-dinitrobenzene and 1-methyl-3, 5-dinitrobenzene were identified. • A nanostructured TiO2-borosilicate glass was obtained and characterized. • The photocatalytic treatment removes all color 32% of the organic matter content of the effluent. • The borosilicate-glass-TiO2 system degrades all content of identified nitroaromatic compounds. - Abstract: The current study aims to characterize and evaluate the photocatalytic treatability of the “red water” effluent from a Brazilian TNT production industry. Analyses were performed using physical, chemical, spectroscopic and chromatographic assays, which demonstrated that the effluent presented a significant pollution potential, mainly due to COD, BOD, solids and to the high concentration of nitroaromatic compounds such as 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene, 1-methyl-2,4-dinitrobenzene, 2-methyl-1,3-dinitrobenzene, 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene-3,5-dinitro-p-toluidine and 2-methyl-3,5-dinitro-benzoamine. By a modified sol-gel and a dip-coating technique, it was possible to obtain a TiO2 film on borosilicate glass substrate which functional composition and microstructure were characterized by infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The evaluation of the photocatalytic treatability using borosilicate-glass-TiO2 demonstrated high degradation efficiency. In this context, a reduction of 32 and 100% for COD and nitroaromatic compounds, respectively, was observed. Although the proposed photocatalytic process has found difficulties in reducing the content of organic matter and effluent color in the red water, its potential for degrading refractory chemical compounds such as the nitroaromatic ones enables it to be used as tertiary treatment

  12. Luminescence of powdered uranium glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eubanks, A. G.; Mcgarrity, J. M.; Silverman, J.

    1974-01-01

    Measurement of cathodoluminescence and photoluminescence efficiencies in powdered borosilicate glasses having different particle size and different uranium content. Excitation with 100 to 350 keV electrons and with 253.7 nm light was found to produce identical absolute radiant exitance spectra in powdered samples. The most efficient glass was one containing 29.4 wt% B2O3, 58.8 wt% SiO2, 9.8 wt% Na2O and 2.0 wt% UO2.

  13. Automated radiosynthesis of [18F]ciprofloxacin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We transferred the previously published manual synthesis of [18F]ciprofloxacin (decay-corrected RCY: 5.5±1.0%) to an automated synthesis module (TRACERlabTM FXFDG, GE Healthcare) and observed a strong decrease in RCY (0.4±0.4%). When replacing the standard 15-mL glassy carbon reactor of the synthesis module with a 3-mL V-shaped borosilicate glass reactor a considerable improvement in RCY was observed. [18F]Ciprofloxacin was obtained in a RCY of 2.7±1.4% (n=23) with a specific activity at EOS of 1.4±0.5 GBq/µmol in a synthesis time of 160 min. - Highlights: • Automated synthesis of [18F]ciprofloxacin in a TRACERlabTM FXFDG (GE Healthcare) synthesis module was developed. • Dependence of radiochemical yield on reactor type was observed. • 3-mL V-shaped borosilicate glass reactor gave higher radiochemical yield as compared with standard 15-mL glassy carbon reactor. • V-shaped borosilicate glass reactor might also give higher radiochemical yield for other [18F]radiotracers than [18F]ciprofloxacin

  14. Solubility of actinide surrogates in nuclear glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the results of a study of actinide surrogates in a nuclear borosilicate glass to understand the effect of processing conditions (temperature and oxidizing versus reducing conditions) on the solubility limits of these elements. The incorporation of cerium oxide, hafnium oxide, and neodymium oxide in this borosilicate glass was investigated. Cerium is a possible surrogate for tetravalent and trivalent actinides, hafnium for tetravalent actinides, and neodymium for trivalent actinides. The material homogeneity was studied by optical, scanning electron microscopy. Cerium LIII XANES spectroscopy showed that the Ce3+/Cetotal ratio increased from about 0.5 to 0.9 as the processing temperature increased from 1100 to 1400 deg. C. Cerium LIII XANES spectroscopy also confirmed that the increased Ce solubility in glasses melted under reducing conditions was due to complete reduction of all the cerium in the glass. The most significant results pointed out in the current study are that the solubility limits of the actinide surrogates increases with the processing temperature and that Ce3+ is shown to be more soluble than Ce4+ in this borosilicate glass

  15. Contributions of vitreous natural analogs to the investigation of long-term nuclear glass behavior; Apports des analogues naturels vitreux a la validation des codes de prediction du comportement a long terme des verres nucleaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Techer, I

    1999-07-01

    This study assesses the extend of the analogy between the alteration behavior in water and in a moist clay environment of aluminosilicate volcanic glass and alumino-borosilicate nuclear containment glass. Basaltic glass alteration in water initially occurs by hydrolysis processes with an activation energy on the order of 73 kJ.mol{sup -1}. As the reaction progresses, the alteration rate drops by over four orders of magnitude from the initial rate r{sub 0}, The alteration kinetics are not governed by the alteration solution chemistry alone, the glass alteration film appears to have a major role as a diffusion barrier limiting the transfer of reaction species and products. All these aspects highlight the behavioral analogy between basaltic glass and nuclear borosilicate glass in aqueous media. Conversely, the alteration reaction of obsidian-type volcanic glass involves other mechanisms than those governing the dissolution of borosilicate glass. Basaltic glass alteration is also examined in the presence of a clay environmental material, in a study of the natural basaltic glass and argillaceous pelites system of the Salagou basin in southern France, in an approach combining mineralogical, chemical and isotopic data to assess the interactions between a basaltic glass and the argillaceous pelites. Laboratory leach test results with basaltic glass and measured data for the Salagou glass in its natural environment are modeled using a code implementing a kinetic law coupling diffusive transfer of dissolved silica with a reaction affinity law. (author)

  16. Annual progress report to Battelle Pacific Northwest National Laboratories on prediction of phase separation of simulated nuclear waste glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this research is to predict the immiscibility boundaries of multi-component borosilicate glasses, on which many nuclear waste glass compositions are based. The method used is similar to the prediction method of immiscibility boundaries of multi-component silicate glass systems successfully made earlier and is based upon the superposition of immiscibility boundaries of simple systems using an appropriate parameter. This method is possible because many immiscibility boundaries have similar shapes and can be scaled by a parameter. In the alkali and alkaline earth binary silicate systems, for example, the critical temperature and compositions were scaled using the Debye-Hueckel theory. In the present study on borosilicate systems, first, immiscibility boundaries of various binary alkali and alkaline borate glass systems (e.g. BaO-B2O3) were examined and their critical temperatures were evaluated in terms of Debye-Hueckel theory. The mixing effects of two alkali and alkaline-earth borate systems on the critical temperature were also explored. Next immiscibility boundaries of ternary borosilicate glasses (e.g. Na2O-SiO2-B2O3, K2O-SiO2-B2O3, Rb2O-SiO2-B2O3, and Cs2O-SiO2-B2O3) were examined. Their mixing effects are currently under investigation

  17. Optical and structural properties of ZnO-PbO-B2O3 and ZnO-PbO-B2O3-SiO2 glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borate and borosilicate glasses with compositions of xZnO-2xPbO-(1-3x)B2O3 and xZnO-2xPbO-1/2(1-3x)B2O3-1/2(1-3x)SiO2 with x varying from 0.1 to 0.26 mole fraction were prepared by the conventional melt quench technique. Optical and structural properties have been determined by using ultraviolet-visible (UV/vis) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic techniques. Decreases in the band gap from 3.57 to 2.62 eV for borate glasses and from 3.00 to 2.35 eV for borosilicate glasses with an increase in the metal oxide content is observed. The density and molar volume has also been measured. Increases in density from 3.994 to 6.339 g cm-3 for borate and from 4.221 to 6.548 g cm-3 for borosilicate glasses are observed with an increase in metal oxide (PbO, ZnO or PbO+ZnO) content. Changes in the atomic structure with composition are observed due to the formation of BO4- units

  18. Performance testing of waste forms in a tuff environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes experimental work conducted to establish the chemical composition of water which will have reacted with Topopah Spring Member tuff prior to contact with waste packages. The experimental program to determine the behavior of spent fuel and borosilicate glass in the presence of this water is then described. Preliminary results of experiments using spent fuel segments with defects in the Zircaloy cladding are presented. Some results from parametric testing of a borosilicate glass with tuff and 304L stainless steel are also discussed. Experiments conducted using Topopah Spring tuff and J-13 well water have been conducted to provide an estimate of the post-emplacement environment for waste packages in a repository at Yucca Mountain. The results show that emplacement of waste packages should cause only small changes in the water chemistry and rock mineralogy. The changes in environment should not have any detrimental effects on the performance of metal barriers or waste forms. The NNWSI waste form testing program has provided preliminary results related to the release rate of radionuclides from the waste package. Those results indicate that release rates from both spent fuel and borosilicate glass should be below 1 part in 105 per year. Future testing will be directed toward making release rate testing more closely relevant to site specific conditions. 17 references, 7 figures

  19. Testing and evaluation of solidified high-level waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report describes research by several laboratories on the behaviour, in aqueous and salt environments, of borosilicate glass ceramics proposed for the solidification of nuclear wastes by the European Community. Results were obtained on inactive simulates, doped materials, and on borosilicate glass containing real radioactive waste. The influence of many important parameters were studied: leaching mode, nature of the leachant, pH, pressure, temperature, duration of the treatment, etc. The results of tests lasting for as little as a few hours or for as long as several hundred days, at temperatures up to 2000C or under pressures up to 200 bars, are presented. Numerous analytical techniques (ESCA, EMP, IRR, SEM, etc.) were used to determine the structure and the chemical composition of the altered layer developed by hydration at the glass surface. Information is also given on physical properties of the borosilicate glass: crystallization phase separation, alpha-irradiation stability, mechanical and thermal stability, etc. Finally, preliminary results on the structure and composition of hollandite ceramics are given

  20. Wettability measurement under high P-T conditions using X-ray imaging with application to the brine-supercritical CO2 system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Kuldeep; Guiltinan, Eric J.; Cardenas, M. Bayani; Maisano, Jessica A.; Ketcham, Richard A.; Bennett, Philip C.

    2015-09-01

    We present a new method for measuring wettability or contact angle of minerals at reservoir pressure-temperature conditions using high-resolution X-ray computed tomography (HRXCT) and radiography. In this method, a capillary or a narrow slot is constructed from a mineral or a rock sample of interest wherein two fluids are allowed to form an interface that is imaged using X-rays. After some validation measurements at room pressure-temperature conditions, we illustrate this method by measuring the contact angle of CO2-brine on quartz, muscovite, shale, borosilicate glass, polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE or Teflon), and polyether ether ketone (PEEK) surfaces at 60-71°C and 13.8-22.8 MPa. At reservoir conditions, PTFE and PEEK surfaces were found to be CO2-wet with contact angles of 140° and 127°, respectively. Quartz and muscovite were found to be water-wet with contact angles of 26° and 58°, respectively, under similar conditions. Borosilicate glass-air-brine at room conditions showed strong water-wet characteristics with a contact angle of 9°, whereas borosilicate glass-CO2-brine at 13.8 MPa and 60°C showed a decrease in its water-wetness with contact angle of 54°. This method provides a new application for X-ray imaging and an alternative to other methods.

  1. Liquidus temperature and chemical durability of selected glasses to immobilize rare earth oxides waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohd Fadzil, Syazwani Binti; Hrma, Pavel R.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Riley, Brian J.

    2015-06-30

    Pyroprocessing is a reprocessing method for managing and reusing used nuclear fuel (UNF) by dissolving it in an electrorefiner with a molten alkali or alkaline earth chloride salt mixture while avoiding wet reprocessing. Pyroprocessing UNF with a LiCl-KCl eutectic salt releases the fission products from the fuel and generates a variety of metallic and salt-based species, including rare earth (RE) chlorides. If the RE-chlorides are converted to oxides, borosilicate glass is a prime candidate for their immobilization because of its durability and ability to dissolve almost any RE waste component into the matrix at high loadings. Crystallization that occurs in waste glasses as the waste loading increases may complicate glass processing and affect the product quality. This work compares three types of borosilicate glasses in terms of liquidus temperature (TL): the International Simple Glass designed by the International Working Group, sodium borosilicate glass developed by Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power, and the lanthanide aluminoborosilicate (LABS) glass established in the United States. The LABS glass allows the highest waste loadings (over 50 mass% RE2O3) while possessing an acceptable chemical durability.

  2. High-impact resistance optical sensor windows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askinazi, Joel; Ceccorulli, Mark L.; Goldman, Lee

    2011-06-01

    Recent field experience with optical sensor windows on both ground and airborne platforms has shown a significant increase in window fracturing from foreign object debris (FOD) impacts and as a by-product of asymmetrical warfare. Common optical sensor window materials such as borosilicate glass do not typically have high impact resistance. Emerging advanced optical window materials such as aluminum oxynitride offer the potential for a significant improvement in FOD impact resistance due to their superior surface hardness, fracture toughness and strength properties. To confirm the potential impact resistance improvement achievable with these emerging materials, Goodrich ISR Systems in collaboration with Surmet Corporation undertook a set of comparative FOD impact tests of optical sensor windows made from borosilicate glass and from aluminum oxynitride. It was demonstrated that the aluminum oxynitride windows could withstand up to three times the FOD impact velocity (as compared with borosilicate glass) before fracture would occur. These highly encouraging test results confirm the utility of this new highly viable window solution for use on new ground and airborne window multispectral applications as well as a retrofit to current production windows. We believe that this solution can go a long way to significantly reducing the frequency and life cycle cost of window replacement.

  3. Aluminum elution and precipitation in glass vials: effect of pH and buffer species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Toru; Miyajima, Makoto; Wakiyama, Naoki; Terada, Katsuhide

    2015-02-01

    Inorganic extractables from glass vials may cause particle formation in the drug solution. In this study, the ability of eluting Al ion from borosilicate glass vials, and tendencies of precipitation containing Al were investigated using various pHs of phosphate, citrate, acetate and histidine buffer. Through heating, all of the buffers showed that Si and Al were eluted from glass vials in ratios almost the same as the composition of borosilicate glass, and the amounts of Al and Si from various buffer solutions at pH 7 were in the following order: citrate > phosphate > acetate > histidine. In addition, during storage after heating, the Al concentration at certain pHs of phosphate and acetate buffer solution decreased, suggesting the formation of particles containing Al. In citrate buffer, Al did not decrease in spite of the high elution amount. Considering that the solubility profile of aluminum oxide and the Al eluting profile of borosilicate glass were different, it is speculated that Al ion may be forced to leach into the buffer solution according to Si elution on the surface of glass vials. When Al ions were added to the buffer solutions, phosphate, acetate and histidine buffer showed a decrease of Al concentration during storage at a neutral range of pHs, indicating the formation of particles containing Al. In conclusion, it is suggested that phosphate buffer solution has higher possibility of forming particles containing Al than other buffer solutions.

  4. Aluminum elution and precipitation in glass vials: effect of pH and buffer species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Toru; Miyajima, Makoto; Wakiyama, Naoki; Terada, Katsuhide

    2015-02-01

    Inorganic extractables from glass vials may cause particle formation in the drug solution. In this study, the ability of eluting Al ion from borosilicate glass vials, and tendencies of precipitation containing Al were investigated using various pHs of phosphate, citrate, acetate and histidine buffer. Through heating, all of the buffers showed that Si and Al were eluted from glass vials in ratios almost the same as the composition of borosilicate glass, and the amounts of Al and Si from various buffer solutions at pH 7 were in the following order: citrate > phosphate > acetate > histidine. In addition, during storage after heating, the Al concentration at certain pHs of phosphate and acetate buffer solution decreased, suggesting the formation of particles containing Al. In citrate buffer, Al did not decrease in spite of the high elution amount. Considering that the solubility profile of aluminum oxide and the Al eluting profile of borosilicate glass were different, it is speculated that Al ion may be forced to leach into the buffer solution according to Si elution on the surface of glass vials. When Al ions were added to the buffer solutions, phosphate, acetate and histidine buffer showed a decrease of Al concentration during storage at a neutral range of pHs, indicating the formation of particles containing Al. In conclusion, it is suggested that phosphate buffer solution has higher possibility of forming particles containing Al than other buffer solutions. PMID:24261406

  5. Silica based gel as a potential waste form for high level waste from fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the feasibility of safe disposal of high-level radioactive waste as synthetic clay, or material that would react with ground water to form clay, experiments have been carried out to determine the hydrothermal crystallisation and leaching behaviour of silica based gels fired at 900 deg C. Crystallisation rates at a pressure of 500 bars and at temperatures below 400 deg C are negligible and this more or less precludes pre-disposal production of synthetic clay on the scale required. Leaching experiments suggest that the leach rates of Cs from gels by distilled water are higher than those of boro-silicate glasses and SYNROC at the lower temperatures that would be preferred for geological storage. However, amounts of bulk dissolution of gels may be lower than those of boro-silicate glasses. The initial leaching behaviour of gels might be considerably improved by hot compaction at 900 to 1000 deg C. Consideration of likely waste form dissolution behaviour in a repository environment suggests that gels of appropriate composition might perform as well as, or better than, boro-silicate glasses. A novel hypothetical plant is described that could produce the gel waste form on the scale required on a more or less continuous basis. (author)

  6. Contributions of vitreous natural analogs to the investigation of long-term nuclear glass behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study assesses the extend of the analogy between the alteration behavior in water and in a moist clay environment of aluminosilicate volcanic glass and alumino-borosilicate nuclear containment glass. Basaltic glass alteration in water initially occurs by hydrolysis processes with an activation energy on the order of 73 kJ.mol-1. As the reaction progresses, the alteration rate drops by over four orders of magnitude from the initial rate r0, The alteration kinetics are not governed by the alteration solution chemistry alone, the glass alteration film appears to have a major role as a diffusion barrier limiting the transfer of reaction species and products. All these aspects highlight the behavioral analogy between basaltic glass and nuclear borosilicate glass in aqueous media. Conversely, the alteration reaction of obsidian-type volcanic glass involves other mechanisms than those governing the dissolution of borosilicate glass. Basaltic glass alteration is also examined in the presence of a clay environmental material, in a study of the natural basaltic glass and argillaceous pelites system of the Salagou basin in southern France, in an approach combining mineralogical, chemical and isotopic data to assess the interactions between a basaltic glass and the argillaceous pelites. Laboratory leach test results with basaltic glass and measured data for the Salagou glass in its natural environment are modeled using a code implementing a kinetic law coupling diffusive transfer of dissolved silica with a reaction affinity law. (author)

  7. Structural Roles of Boron and Silicon in the CaO-SiO2-B2O3 Glasses Using FTIR, Raman, and NMR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yongqi; Zhang, Zuotai

    2015-08-01

    The present paper provided not only a deep insight of network structures of borosilicate glasses but also a basic linkage between the network structures and the viscous flow behaviors of many borosilicate melts. The structures of a ternary system of CaO-SiO2-B2O3 were characterized using Fourier transformation infrared (FTIR), Raman, and magic angular spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The results of FTIR and Raman spectra complementally verified that the main Si-related units were SiO4 tetrahedral with zero, one, two, and three bridging oxygens [Q0(Si), Q1(Si), Q2(Si), and Q3(Si)]; the added B2O3 leaded to an increase of Q3(Si) at the cost of Q0(Si) and Q2(Si), and therefore an increasing degree of polymerization (DOP) was induced. Additionally, the 11B NMR spectra demonstrated that the dominant B-related groups were BO3 trigonal and BO4 tetrahedral, while an increasing B2O3 content facilitated the existence of BO4 tetrahedral. Moreover, there was a competitive effect between the enhanced DOP and the presence of BO3 trigonal and BO4 tetrahedral in the networks, which therefore resulted in a decreasing viscosity of borosilicate melts in numerous studies.

  8. Extended Development Work to Validate a HLW Calcine Waste Form via INL's Cold Crucible Induction Melter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James A. King; Vince Maio

    2011-09-01

    To accomplish calcine treatment objectives, the Idaho Clean-up Project contractor, CWI, has chosen to immobilize the calcine in a glass-ceramic via the use of a Hot-Isostatic-Press (HIP); a treatment selection formally documented in a 2010 Record of Decision (ROD). Even though the HIP process may prove suitable for the calcine as specified in the ROD and validated in a number of past value engineering sessions, DOE is evaluating back-up treatment methods for the calcine as a result of the technical, schedule, and cost risk associated with the HIPing process. Consequently DOE HQ has requested DOE ID to make INL's bench-scale cold-crucible induction melter (CCIM) available for investigating its viability as a process alternate to calcine treatment. The waste form is the key component of immobilization of radioactive waste. Providing a solid, stable, and durable material that can be easily be stored is the rationale for immobilization of radioactive waste material in glass, ceramic, or glass-ceramics. Ceramic waste forms offer an alternative to traditional borosilicate glass waste forms. Ceramics can usually accommodate higher waste loadings than borosilicate glass, leading to smaller intermediate and long-term storage facilities. Many ceramic phases are known to possess superior chemical durability as compared to borosilicate glass. However, ceramics are generally multiphase systems containing many minor phase that make characterization and prediction of performance within a repository challenging. Additionally, the technologies employed in ceramic manufacture are typically more complex and expensive. Thus, many have proposed using glass-ceramics as compromise between in the more inexpensive, easier to characterize glass waste forms and the more durable ceramic waste forms. Glass-ceramics have several advantages over traditional borosilicate glasses as a waste form. Borosilicate glasses can inadvertently devitrify, leading to a less durable product that could

  9. Local Structure of amorphous (PbO){sub x}[(B{sub 2}O{sub 3}){sub 1-z}(Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}){sub z}]{sub y} (SiO{sub 2}){sub y} Dielectric Materials by Multinuclear Solid State NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawvel, A; Chinn, S; Bourcier, W; Maxwell, R

    2003-09-05

    Structural speciation of glasses in the systems PbO-B{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}, PbO-B{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}, and PbO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2} were studied using solid-state {sup 29}Si, {sup 27}Al, {sup 11}B, and {sup 207}Pb nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and Raman spectroscopy. Application of these methods provided insight into the role of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} incorporation in the lead-borosilicate glass networks. The general composition range studied was (PbO){sub x} [(B{sub 2}O{sub 3}){sub 1-z} (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3})z]{sub y}(SiO{sub 2}){sub y} where x = 0.35, 0.5, and 0.65, y = (1-x)/2 and z = 0.0, 0.5 and 1.0. Additional insight was obtained via {sup 27}Al 2D-3QMAS experiments. The {sup 207}Pb spin echo mapping spectra showed a transition from ionic (Pb{sup 2+}) to covalently bound lead species with increased PbO contents in the borosilicate glasses. The addition of aluminum to the glass network further enhanced the lead species transition resulting in a higher relative amount of covalent lead bonding in the high PbO content alumino-borosilicate glass. The number of BO{sub 4} units present in the {sup 11}B MAS NMR decreased with increasing PbO contents for both the borosilicate and the alumino-borosilicate glass systems, with the addition of aluminum further promoting the BO{sub 3} species. A deshielding of the {sup 11}B chemical shifts and the {sup 27}Al chemical shifts with increased lead contents (independent of changes in the quadrupolar coupling) was also observed for both glass systems and was attributed to increasingly homogeneous glass structure. The {sup 29}Si spectra of the borosilicate and alumino-borosilicate glasses showed a downfield shift with increased PbO concentrations representing incorporation of Pb into the silicate and aluminosilicate networks. The Raman spectra were characterized by increased intensities of Si-O-Pb peaks and decreased intensities of Q{sup 3} peaks with increased PbO contents and showed no evidence

  10. Vitrification of spent mordenite molecular sieves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitrification of cesium loaded inorganic ion exchangers (mordenite type molecular sieves/zeolite AR-1) was studied empolying borosilicate glass systems. Direct vitrification of aluminosilicates is rather difficult mainly on account of volatility of cesium at processing temperatures of 1100 degC-1300 degC. In the borosilicate glass system, oxides of lead, sodium and zinc along with boric oxide were employed as major glass formers. Homogeneous glass matrix was obtained incorporating simulated composition of mordenite along with oxides of sodium, lead and boron at the processing temperature of 950 degC. The waste oxide loading up to 50% on dry weight basis was incorporated in this glass formulation. Partial replacement of PbO by TeO2, Bi2O3 and CaF2 resulted in lowering of the processing temperature and also increasing homogeneity of matrix. Based on these results, a glass matrix was prepared with actual cesium AR-1 molecular sieves with processing temperature limited to 925 degC. Powdered samples of glass matrix were subjected to leaching as per ASTM-1285 Product Consistency Test in high purity water at 90 degC for 28 days. The normalised cesium leach rate of this glass was found to be 3.92 x 10-6 g/cm2/day, which is comparable to sodium borosilicate glass matrices currently in use for immobilisation of high level waste. The molecular sieves are also amenable to immobilization in cement matrix. As expected, there is substantial volume reduction by factor 3 in vitrification compared to their immobilization in cementious matrices. Also the quantity of cesium leached from vitrified product was nearly 10,000 times lower compared to cement based matrix. Vitrification of mordenite molecular sieves would lead to high capacity utilisation of zeolite AR-1 for the treatment of low and intennediate levelliquid effluents. (author)

  11. Immobilization of Uranium Silicide in Sintered Iron-Phosphate Glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is a continuation of a previous one performed in vitrification of uranium silicide in borosilicate and iron-silicate glasses, by sintering.We present the results obtained with an iron-phosphate glass developed at our laboratory and we compare this results with those obtained with the above mentioned glasses. The main objective was to develop a method as simple as possible, so as to get a monolithic glass block with the appropriate properties to be disposed in a deep geological repository.The thermal transformation of the uranium silicide was characterized by DTA/TG analysis and X-ray diffraction.We determined the evolution of the crystalline phases and the change in weight.Calcined uranium silicide was mixed with natural U3O8, the amount of U3O8 was calculated to simulate an isotopic dilution of 4%.This material was mixed with powdered iron-phosphate glass (in wt.%: 64,9 P2O5; 22,7 Fe2O3; 8,1 Al2O3; 4,3 Na2O) in different proportions (in wt%): 7%, 10% y 15%.The powders were pressed and sintered at temperatures between 585 y 670 °C. Samples of the sintered pellet were prepared for the lixiviation tests (MCC-1P: monolithic samples; deionised water; 90° C; 7, 14 and 28 days).The samples showed a quite good durability (0,6 g.m-2.day-1), similar to borosilicate glasses.The microstructure of the glass samples showed that the uranium particles are much better integrated to the glass matrix in the iron-phosphate glasses than in the borosilicate or iron-silicate glasses.We can conclude that the sintered product obtained could be a good alternative for the immobilization of nuclear wastes with high content of uranium, as the ones arising from the conditioning of research reactors spent fuels

  12. Characterization of Fast-Scan Cyclic Voltammetric Electrodes Using Paraffin as an Effective Sealant with In Vitro and In Vivo Applications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric S Ramsson

    Full Text Available Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV is a powerful technique for measuring sub-second changes in neurotransmitter levels. A great time-limiting factor in the use of FSCV is the production of high-quality recording electrodes; common recording electrodes consist of cylindrical carbon fiber encased in borosilicate glass. When the borosilicate is heated and pulled, the molten glass ideally forms a tight seal around the carbon fiber cylinder. It is often difficult, however, to guarantee a perfect seal between the glass and carbon. Indeed, much of the time spent creating electrodes is in an effort to find a good seal. Even though epoxy resins can be useful in this regard, they are irreversible (seals are permanent, wasteful (epoxy cannot be reused once hardener is added, hazardous (hardeners are often caustic, and require curing. Herein we characterize paraffin as an electrode sealant for FSCV microelectrodes. Paraffin boasts the advantages of near-immediate curing times, simplicity in use, long shelf-life and stable waterproof seals capable of withstanding extended cycling. Borosilicate electrode tips were left intact or broken and dipped in paraffin embedding wax. Excess wax was removed from the carbon surface with xyelenes or by repeated cycling at an extended waveform (-0.4 to 1.4V, 400 V/s, 60 Hz. Then, the waveform was switched to a standard waveform (-0.4 to 1.3V, 400 V/s, 10 Hz and cycled until stable. Wax-sealing does not inhibit electrode sensitivity, as electrodes detected linear changes in dopamine before and after wax (then xylenes exposure. Paraffin seals are intact after 11 days of implantation in the mouse, and still capable of measuring transient changes in in vivo dopamine. From this it is clear that paraffin wax is an effective sealant for FSCV electrodes that provides a convenient substitute to epoxy sealants.

  13. Electrical conductivity of oxides from molten state to glassy. Effect on the incorporation of RuO{sub 2} particles; Conductivite electrique des verres et fontes d'oxides. Effets de l'incorporation de particules RuO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simonnet, C

    2004-07-01

    This study concerns the electrical conductivity of oxides from molten state to glassy state and, in particular, the effect of the incorporation of RuO{sub 2} particles in the context of vitrification of radioactive waste. The material of interest in the nuclear field is basically a viscous or vitreous borosilicate containing a dispersion of RuO{sub 2} microcrystals. A very simple model of this heterogeneous material has been studied in particular (SiO{sub 2}, B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Na{sub 2}O, RuO{sub 2}). An original method of impedance measurement in the liquid at high temperature yields reliable electrical conductivity values over a temperature range covering the liquid and vitreous phases of the borosilicates studied. In the borosilicate matrix, alkaline transport is mainly responsible for the ionic conduction. The temperature dependence of the conductivity may thus be represented by an equation combining a VFT law and an Arrhenius law to represent the electrical conductivity above and below T{sub g}. Beyond a critical volume fraction V{sub c} {approx} 0.01 of RuO{sub 2}, an electronic contribution is added to the ionic contribution of the matrix and the electrical conductivity increases significantly with the RuO{sub 2} content. This effect is described in terms of electrical percolation of the particle network. An electronic mechanism by tunnel transfer between particles is demonstrated. A mathematical model is developed to describe this mechanism in the solid composite. Beyond T{sub g}, conduction by the tunnel effect persists and the partial solubilization of RuO{sub 2} appears to be mainly responsible for the significant increase in electronic conductivity with the temperature. (author)

  14. Observation of tunable optical filtering in photosensitive composite structures containing liquid crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilardi, Giovanni; De Sio, Luciano; Beccherelli, Romeo; Asquini, Rita; d'Alessandro, Antonio; Umeton, Cesare

    2011-12-15

    We report on the investigation and characterization of an optically tunable filtering effect, observed in a waveguide grating made of alternated strips of photocurable polymer and a mixture of azo-dye-doped liquid crystal. The grating is sandwiched between two borosilicate glasses, one of which includes an ion-exchanged channel waveguide, which confines the optical signal to be filtered. Exposure to a low power visible light beam modifies the azo-dye molecular configuration, thus allowing the filtered wavelength to be tuned over a 6.6 nm range. Simulations of the filtering response are well described with our experimental findings. PMID:22179873

  15. Optical devices in adverse environments; Proceedings of the Meeting, Cannes, France, Nov. 19, 20, 1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwell, Roger A.

    Recent advances in the design of fiber-optic devices, test equipment, optical sensors, and lasers for operation in hostile environments are discussed in reviews and reports. Topics examined include radiation effects on optical fibers, the effect of H2 treatment and water content on the recovery of undoped core fibers after pulsed and continuous irradiation, the NATO test program for optical fibers and components, alpha-irradiation damage to borosilicate glasses, high-reliability optical components for undersea light-wave systems, the behavior of Si optoelectronic components under gamma irradiation, optical devices and sensors of special-purpose fibers, and a fiber-optic microprobe for interferometric measurements in generators.

  16. Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant full-scale feed preparation testing with water and process simulant slurries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaskill, J.R.; Larson, D.E.; Abrigo, G.P. [and others

    1996-03-01

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant was intended to convert selected, pretreated defense high-level waste and transuranic waste from the Hanford Site into a borosilicate glass. A full-scale testing program was conducted with nonradioactive waste simulants to develop information for process and equipment design of the feed-preparation system. The equipment systems tested included the Slurry Receipt and Adjustment Tank, Slurry Mix Evaporator, and Melter-Feed Tank. The areas of data generation included heat transfer (boiling, heating, and cooling), slurry mixing, slurry pumping and transport, slurry sampling, and process chemistry. 13 refs., 129 figs., 68 tabs.

  17. Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF): The vitrification of high-level nuclear waste. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning a production-scale facility and the world`s largest plant for the vitrification of high-level radioactive nuclear wastes (HLW) located in the United States. Initially based on the selection of borosilicate glass as the reference waste form, the citations present the history of the development including R&D projects and the actual construction of the production facility at the DOE Savannah River Plant (SRP). (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  18. Radioactive waste processing: Vitrification. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the processing of radioactive wastes by vitrification (the formation of a glassy material to immobilize radioactive nuclides). In-situ vitrification; proposed glass compositions; glass properties including degradation, leachability, and physical strength; and vitrification processes are discussed. Full-scale vitrification plants and international waste vitrification programs are described. Solidification of radioactive waste with borosilicate glass and synthetic rock or cement and asphalt is discussed in separate bibliographies. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  19. Effects of chemical complexity on the autoxidation mechanisms of endocyclic alkene ozonolysis products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rissanen, Matti P.; Kurtén, Theo; Sipilä, Mikko;

    2015-01-01

    (NO3-) based ionization scheme. The experiments were performed in borosilicate glass flow tube reactors at room temperature (T = 293 ± 3 K) and at ambient pressure. An ensemble of oxidized monomer and dimer products was detected, with elemental compositions obtained from the high......Formation of highly oxidized, multifunctional products in the ozonolysis of three endocyclic alkenes, 1- methylcyclohexene, 4-methylcyclohexene, and α-pinene, was investigated using a chemical ionization atmospheric pressure interface time-of-flight (CI-APi-TOF) mass spectrometer with a nitrate ion...

  20. ガラスの分相現象を利用した高炉水砕スラグの再資源化技術の開発

    OpenAIRE

    崎田, 真一; 三上, 修平; 難波, 徳郎; 三浦, 嘉也

    2007-01-01

    A novel recycling process of blast furnace slag was developed in order to obtain colorless silica-rich solids by using phase separation of borosilicate glass. B(2)O(3) was added to blast furnace slag to promote the phase separation. The slag glasses were heat-treated above glass transition temperatures. The slag glass prepared from blast furnace slag gelled after the heat treatment and the subsequent three types of acid treatment. The ratios of SiO(2) component in the gels were 40 – 60mass%. ...

  1. ガラスの分相現象を利用した高炉水砕スラグの再資源化技術の開発

    OpenAIRE

    崎田, 真一; 三上, 修平; 難波, 徳郎; 三浦, 嘉也

    2007-01-01

    A novel recycling process of blast furnace slag was developed in order to obtain colorless silica-rich solids by using phase separation of borosilicate glass. B(2)O(3) was added to blast furnace slag to promote the phase separation. The slag glasses were heat-treated above glass transition temperatures. The slag glass prepared from blast furnace slag gelled after the heat treatment and the subsequent three types of acid treatment. The ratios of SiO(2) component in the gels were 40 - 60mass%. ...

  2. A High-Precision Micropipette Sensor for Cellular-Level Real-Time Thermal Characterization

    OpenAIRE

    Wonseok Chang; Donsik Kim; Ramesh Shrestha; Tae-Youl Choi

    2011-01-01

    We report herein development of a novel glass micropipette thermal sensor fabricated in a cost-effective manner, which is capable of measuring steady thermal fluctuation at spatial resolution of ~2 µm with an accuracy of ±0.01 °C. We produced and tested various micrometer-sized sensors, ranging from 2 µm to 30 µm. The sensor comprises unleaded low-melting-point solder alloy (Sn-based) as a core metal inside a pulled borosilicate glass pipette and a thin film of nickel coating outside, creatin...

  3. Reference commercial high-level waste glass and canister definition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents technical data and performance characteristics of a high-level waste glass and canister intended for use in the design of a complete waste encapsulation package suitable for disposal in a geologic repository. The borosilicate glass contained in the stainless steel canister represents the probable type of high-level waste product that will be produced in a commercial nuclear-fuel reprocessing plant. Development history is summarized for high-level liquid waste compositions, waste glass composition and characteristics, and canister design. The decay histories of the fission products and actinides (plus daughters) calculated by the ORIGEN-II code are presented

  4. High efficiency tantalum-based ceramic composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, David A. (Inventor); Leiser, Daniel B. (Inventor); DiFiore, Robert R. (Inventor); Katvala, Victor W. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Tantalum-based ceramics are suitable for use in thermal protection systems. These composite structures have high efficiency surfaces (low catalytic efficiency and high emittance), thereby reducing heat flux to a spacecraft during planetary re-entry. These ceramics contain tantalum disilicide, molybdenum disilicide and borosilicate glass. The components are milled, along with a processing aid, then applied to a surface of a porous substrate, such as a fibrous silica or carbon substrate. Following application, the coating is then sintered on the substrate. The composite structure is substantially impervious to hot gas penetration and capable of surviving high heat fluxes at temperatures approaching 3000.degree. F. and above.

  5. Performance of a large-scale melter off-gas system utilizing simulated SRP DWPF waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy and the DuPont Company have begun construction of a Defense Waste Processing Facility to immobilize radioactive waste now stored as liquids at the Department of Energy's Savannah River Plant. The immobilization process solidifies waste sludge by vitrification into a leach-resistant borosilicate glass. Development of the process has been the responsibility of the Savannah River Laboratory. As part of the development, two large-scale glass melter systems have been designed and operated with simulated waste. Experimental data from these operations show that process requirements will be met. 6 references, 8 figures, 4 tables

  6. Pilot production & commercialization of LAPPD{sup ™}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minot, Michael J., E-mail: mjm@incomusa.com [Incom Inc, 294 Southbridge Road, Charlton, MA 01507 (United States); Bennis, Daniel C.; Bond, Justin L.; Craven, Christopher A.; O' Mahony, Aileen; Renaud, Joseph M.; Stochaj, Michael E. [Incom Inc, 294 Southbridge Road, Charlton, MA 01507 (United States); Elam, Jeffrey W.; Mane, Anil U.; Demarteau, Marcellinus W.; Wagner, Robert G. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Lemont, IL 60439-4814 (United States); McPhate, Jason B.; Helmut Siegmund, Oswald [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Elagin, Andrey; Frisch, Henry J.; Northrop, Richard; Wetstein, Matthew J. [University of Chicago, 5640 S. Ellis Ave., Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2015-07-01

    We present a progress update on plans to establish pilot production and commercialization of Large Area (400 cm{sup 2}) Picosecond Photodetector (LAPPD{sup ™}). Steps being taken to commercialize this MCP and LAPPD{sup ™} technology and begin tile pilot production are presented including (1) the manufacture of 203 mm×203 mm borosilicate glass capillary arrays (GCAs), (2) optimization of MCP performance and creation of an ALD coating facility to manufacture MCPs and (3) design, construction and commissioning of UHV tile integration and sealing facility to produce LAPPDs. Taken together these plans provide a “pathway toward commercialization”.

  7. Dissolution of vitrified wastes in a high-pH calcium-rich solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utton, C. A.; Hand, R. J.; Bingham, P. A.; Hyatt, N. C.; Swanton, S. W.; Williams, S. J.

    2013-04-01

    The current baseline for the conditioning of most UK intermediate-level radioactive waste (ILW) is immobilisation using cement. However, vitrification of some UK ILW is being considered as an alternative. One option for the disposal of the resulting vitrified ILW would be to place it in a geological disposal facility in a high-pH environment with cemented ILW and a cement-based backfill. Therefore, the potential effects of such a high pH (˜12.5), calcium-rich cement-based environment on the dissolution behaviour of simulant ILW glasses have been studied using the product consistency test (PCT). Three non-radioactive waste compositions were assessed: a laboratory simulant ILW vitrified in a borosilicate glass and two full-scale simulant vitrified products (a slag containing simulant plutonium-contaminated material and Magnox sludge; and a glass containing clinoptilolite). Powdered samples were leached in saturated Ca(OH)2 solutions for up to 42 days at temperatures between 30 and 90 °C. In general the rates of dissolution were lower than expected at such a high pH compared to studies in the literature under alkaline conditions. In contrast to the typical dissolution behaviour of high level waste (HLW) glasses, dissolution of the simulant borosilicate ILW glass was initially slow, followed by a period of faster boron and alkali metal release. The saturation/residual regime was not reached within experimental timescales. The rate of dissolution during the period of faster release increased with increasing temperature; the activation energy for this stage of dissolution was calculated to be 47 ± 2 kJ mol-1 based on boron release. The two full-scale simulant glasses, which contained negligible boric oxide, exhibited conventional static dissolution profiles, and entered the residual rate regime after 7-14 days at 50 °C. The greater durability of the full-scale simulants is thought to be due to the greater content of network-forming oxides in these glasses compared to

  8. Immobilization of Pu-containing wastes into glass and ceramics: Results of US-Russia collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, E. B.; Aloy, A. S.; Burakov, B. E.; Jardine, L. J.

    2000-07-01

    This continuing collaboration between the V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute (KRI) in St. Petersberg, Russia, and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in the United States was initiated in 1997. The collaboration is focused on plutonium immobilization to support the disposition of excess weapons plutonium in the US and Russia. Our work consists primarily of laboratory-scale experiments and studies of borosilicate and phosphate Pu-doped glasses and zircon/zirconia, mono-zirconia, and pyrochlore ceramics. The results were used to compare and evaluate the use of these various materials in Pu immobilization.

  9. Large-scale optical diffraction tomography for inspection of optical plastic lenses

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Kyoohyun; Park, YongKeun

    2015-01-01

    Herein is presented an optical diffraction tomography (ODT) technique for measuring 3-D refractive index (RI) maps of optical plastic lenses. A Mach-Zehnder interferometer was used to measure multiple complex optical fields of a plastic lens immersed in RI matching oil, at various rotational orientations. From this, ODT was used to reconstruct a 3-D RI distribution of the plastic lens with unprecedented RI sensitivity (dn = 4.21 x 10^-5) and high resolution (12.8 um). As a demonstration, 3-D RI distributions of a 2-mm-diameter borosilicate sphere and a 5-mm-diameter plastic lens

  10. Structural evaluation of candidate space shuttle thermal protection systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, A. B.

    1972-01-01

    The characteristics and development of a lightweight reusable thermal protection system for the space shuttle are discussed. The test articles consisted of metallic substrates with upper surfaces covered with all-silica, reusable, surface insulation material. The material is processed in the form of tiles. The external surfaces of the tiles are provided with a coating system which consists of a borosilicate coating with a silicon carbide emittance agent and impregnation with a hydrophobic agent. The finished tiles are attached to the metal substrate by adhesive bonding. Charts and graphs of the properties of the material are provided.

  11. Preliminary evaluation of alternative forms for immobilization of Savannah River Plant high-level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An evaluation of available information on eleven alternative solid forms for immobilization of SRP high-level waste has been completed. Based on the assessment of both product and process characteristics, four forms were selected for more detailed evaluation: (1) borosilicate glass made in the reference process, (2) a high-silica glass made from a porous glass matrix, (3) crystalline ceramics such as supercalcine or SYNROC, and (4) ceramics coated with an impervious barrier. The assessment includes a discussion of product and process characteristics for each of the eleven forms, a cross comparison of these characteristics for the forms, and the bases for selecting the most promising forms for further study

  12. Inhomogeneity and microstructure in e-beam evaporated ZrO2 films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper thin films of zirconium dioxide are deposited by e-beam evaporation on optically polished borosilicate crown glass. Two different oxygen partial pressures in the chamber are used. The optical properties of the films are characterized by ellipsometry. The influence of oxygen stoichiometry on the composition and microstructure of the material is investigated by polycrystalline X-ray diffraction for different film thicknesses. The films are found to be inhomogeneous, and a composition gradient (i.e. amorphous ↔ tetragonal ↔ monoclinic) is observed from the substrate to the surface. The oxygen partial pressure influences the growth of the films

  13. Graphite fiber reinforced glass matrix composites for aerospace applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prewo, K. M.; Bacon, J. F.; Dicus, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    The graphite fiber reinforced glass matrix composite system is described. Although this composite is not yet a mature material, it possesses low density, attractive mechanical properties at elevated temperatures, and good environmental stability. Properties are reported for a borosilicate glass matrix unidirectionally reinforced with 60 volume percent HMS graphite fiber. The flexural strength and fatigue characteristics at room and elevated temperature, resistance to thermal cycling and continuous high temperature oxidation, and thermal expansion characteristics of the composite are reported. The properties of this new composite are compared to those of advanced resin and metal matrix composites showing that graphite fiber reinforced glass matrix composites are attractive for aerospace applications.

  14. Low-loss waveguides fabricated in BK7 glass by high repetition rate femtosecond fiber laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the first time femtosecond-laser writing has inscribed low-loss optical waveguides in Schott BK7 glass, a commercially important type of borosilicate widely used in optical applications. The use of a variable repetition rate laser enabled the identification of a narrow processing window at 1 MHz repetition rate with optimal waveguides exhibiting propagation losses of 0.3 dB/cm and efficient mode matching to standard optical fibers at a 1550 nm wavelength. The waveguides were characterized by complementary phase contrast and optical transmission microscopy, identifying a micrometer-sized guiding region within a larger complex structure of both positive and negative refractive index variations

  15. Influence of Composition of Sm2O3-Containing Rare Earth Glass on Its Absorption Spectrum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Qitu; Wang Tingwei; Meng Xianfeng; Shan Xiaobing; Xu Zhongzi

    2005-01-01

    Borosilicate glass with high rare earth content was fabricated by traditional method. The influence of glass compositions and rare earth content on absorption spectra was examined and discussed. With increasing Sm2O3 content, the intensity of characteristic absorption peak is increased and the absorption peak is broadened. With increasing of the ratios of SiO2/B2O3 and Al2O3/SiO2, the broadening degree of absorption peak is increased. The experimental results provide basis for making special optical glasses which have the characteristics of high absorption for special wavelength laser and high transparence for visible light.

  16. The effect of chromium oxide on the properties of simulated nuclear waste glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vojtech, O.; Sussmilch, J.; Urbanec, Z. [and others

    1996-02-01

    A study of the effect of chromium on the properties of selected glasses was performed in the frame of a Contract between Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories and Nuclear Research Institute, ReZ. In the period from July 1994 to June 1995 two borosilicate glasses of special composition were prepared according to the PNL procedure and their physical and structural characteristics of glasses were studied. This Final Report contains a vast documentation on the properties of all glasses studied. For the preparation of the respective technology more detailed study of physico-chemical properties and crystallinity of investigated systems would be desirable.

  17. An international initiative on long-term behavior of high-level nuclear waste glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Gin

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Nations using borosilicate glass as an immobilization material for radioactive waste have reinforced the importance of scientific collaboration to obtain a consensus on the mechanisms controlling the long-term dissolution rate of glass. This goal is deemed to be crucial for the development of reliable performance assessment models for geological disposal. The collaborating laboratories all conduct fundamental and/or applied research using modern materials science techniques. This paper briefly reviews the radioactive waste vitrification programs of the six participant nations and summarizes the current state of glass corrosion science, emphasizing the common scientific needs and justifications for on-going initiatives.

  18. Actinide speciation in glass leach-layers: An EXAFS study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biwer, B.M.; Soderholm, L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Greegor, R.B. [Boeing Co., Seattle, WA (United States); Lytle, F.W. [EXAFS Co., Pioche, NV (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Uranium L{sub 3} X-ray absorption data were obtained from two borosilicate glasses, which are considered as models for radioactive wasteforms, both before and after leaching. Surface sensitivity to uranium speciation was attained by a novel application of simultaneous fluorescence and electron-yield detection. Changes in speciation are clearly discernible, from U(VI) in the bulk to (UO{sub 2}){sup 2+}-uranyl in the leach layer. The leach-layer uranium concentration variations with leaching times are also determined from the data.

  19. Property Data for Simulated Americium/Curium Glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors studied the properties of mixed lanthanide-alumino-borosilicate glasses. Fifty-five glasses were designed to augment a previous, Phase I, study by systematically varying the composition of Ln2O3 and the concentrations of Ln2O3, SiO2, B2O3, Al2O3, and SrO in glass. These glasses were designed and fabricated at the Savannah River Technology Center and tested at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The properties measured include the high-temperature viscosity (η) as a function of temperature (T) and the liquidus temperature (TL) of Phase II test glasses

  20. Patch electrode glass composition affects ion channel currents.

    OpenAIRE

    Furman, R E; Tanaka, J C

    1988-01-01

    The influence of patch electrode glass composition on macroscopic IV relations in inside-out patches of the cGMP-activated ion channel from rod photoreceptors was examined for a soda lime glass, a Kovar sealing glass, a borosilicate glass, and several soft lead glasses. In several glasses the shape or magnitude of the currents changed as the concentration of EGTA or EDTA was increased from 200 microM to 10 mM. The changes in IV response suggest that, at low concentrations of chelator, divalen...

  1. The relationship between glass viscosity and composition: A first principles model for vitrification of nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility will incorporate high-level liquid waste into borosilicate glass for stabilization and permanent disposal in a geologic repository. The viscosity of the melt determines the rate of melting of the raw feed, the rate of gas bubble release due to foaming and fining, the rate of homogenization, and thus, the quality of the glass produced. The viscosity of the glass is in turn, a function of both glass composition and temperature. A model describing the viscosity dependence on composition, temperature, and glass structure (bonding) has been derived for glasses ranging from pure frits to frit plus 35 wt % simulated waste. 17 refs., 37 figs

  2. Fiscal Year 2010 Summary Report on the Epsilon-Metal Phase as a Waste Form for 99 Tc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strachan, Denis M.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Buck, Edgar C.; Riley, Brian J.; Zumhoff, Mac R.

    2010-09-30

    Epsilon metal (ε-metal) is generated in nuclear fuel during irradiation. This metal consists of Pd, Ru, Rh, Mo, and some Te. These accumulate at the UO2 grain boundaries as small (ca 5 µm) particles. These metals have limited solubility in the acid used to dissolve fuel during reprocessing and in typical borosilicate glass. These must be treated separately to improve overall waste loading in glass. This low solubility and their survival in 2 Gy-old natural reactors led us to investigate them as a waste form for the immobilization of 99Tc and 107Pd, two very long-lived isotopes.

  3. DWPF glass transition temperatures: What they are and why they are important

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marra, S.L.; Jantzen, C.M.; Ramsey, A.A.

    1991-12-31

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site will immobilize high-level radioactive liquid waste in borosilicate glass. The glass will be poured into stainless steel canisters for eventual disposal in a geologic repository. The Department of Energy has defined a set of requirements for the DWPF canistered waste form which must be met in order to assure compatibility with, and acceptance by, the repository. These requirements are the Waste Acceptance Preliminary Specifications (WAPS). The WAPS require DWPF to report glass transition temperatures for the projected range of compositions. This information will be used by the repository to establish waste package design limits.

  4. DWPF glass transition temperatures: What they are and why they are important

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marra, S.L.; Jantzen, C.M.; Ramsey, A.A.

    1991-01-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site will immobilize high-level radioactive liquid waste in borosilicate glass. The glass will be poured into stainless steel canisters for eventual disposal in a geologic repository. The Department of Energy has defined a set of requirements for the DWPF canistered waste form which must be met in order to assure compatibility with, and acceptance by, the repository. These requirements are the Waste Acceptance Preliminary Specifications (WAPS). The WAPS require DWPF to report glass transition temperatures for the projected range of compositions. This information will be used by the repository to establish waste package design limits.

  5. Spin-polarized lithium diffusion in a glass hot-vapor cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Kiyoshi

    2016-08-01

    We report diffusion coefficients of optically pumped lithium atoms in helium buffer gas. The free-induction decay and the spin-echo signals of ground-state atoms were optically detected in an external magnetic field with the addition of field gradient. Lithium hot vapor was produced in a borosilicate-glass cell at a temperature between 290 and 360°C. The simple setup using the glass cells enabled lithium atomic spectroscopy in a similar way to other alkali-metal atoms and study of the collisional properties of lithium atoms in a hot-vapor phase.

  6. Infrared and thermoelectric power generation in thin atomic layer deposited Nb-doped TiO{sub 2} films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, Harkirat S.; Lang, Brian N.; Schwab, Yosyp; Scarel, Giovanna, E-mail: scarelgx@jmu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, James Madison University, 901 Carrier Drive, Harrisonburg, Virginia 22807 (United States); Niemelä, Janne-Petteri; Karppinen, Maarit [Department of Chemistry, Aalto University, P.O. Box 16100, Aalto, 00076 Finland (Finland)

    2015-01-15

    Infrared radiation is used to radiatively transfer heat to a nanometric power generator (NPG) device with a thermoelectric Nb-doped TiO{sub 2} film deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) as the active element, onto a borosilicate glass substrate. The linear rise of the produced voltage with respect to the temperature difference between the “hot” and “cold” junctions, typical of the Seebeck effect, is missing. The discovery of the violation of the Seebeck effect in NPG devices combined with the ability of ALD to tune thermoelectric thin film properties could be exploited to increase the efficiency of these devices for energy harvesting purposes.

  7. Directly laser-written integrated photonics devices including diffractive optical elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jiyeon; Ramme, Mark; Richardson, Martin

    2016-08-01

    Femtosecond laser-written integrated devices involving Fresnel Zone Plates (FZPs) and waveguide arrays are demonstrated as built-in optical couplers. These structures were fabricated in borosilicate glass using a direct laser writing technique. The optical properties of these integrated photonic structures were investigated using CW lasers and high-resolution CCDs. For a single FZP coupled to a single waveguide, the overall coupling efficiency was 9%. A multiplexed optical coupler composed of three FZP layers was demonstrated to couple three waveguides simultaneously in a waveguide array. Structures of this type can be used as platforms for multichannel waveguide coupling elements or as microfluidic sensors that require higher light collecting efficiency.

  8. Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant full-scale feed preparation testing with water and process simulant slurries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant was intended to convert selected, pretreated defense high-level waste and transuranic waste from the Hanford Site into a borosilicate glass. A full-scale testing program was conducted with nonradioactive waste simulants to develop information for process and equipment design of the feed-preparation system. The equipment systems tested included the Slurry Receipt and Adjustment Tank, Slurry Mix Evaporator, and Melter-Feed Tank. The areas of data generation included heat transfer (boiling, heating, and cooling), slurry mixing, slurry pumping and transport, slurry sampling, and process chemistry. 13 refs., 129 figs., 68 tabs

  9. An international initiative on long-term behavior of high-level nuclear waste glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gin, Stephane [CEA Marcoule DTCD SECM LCLT, Bagnols/Ceze (France); Abdelouas, Abdessalam [SUBATECH, Nantes (France); Criscenti, Louise J. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ebert, W. L. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Ferrand, Karine [SCK·CEN, Mol (Belgium); Geisler, Thorsten [Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Univ., Bonn (Germany); Harrison, Mike T. [National Nuclear Laboratory, Sellafield, Cumbria (United Kingdom); Inagaki, Yaohiro [Kyushu Univ. (Japan). Dept. Appl. Quantum Physics and Nuclear Engineering; Mitsui, Seiichiro [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki (Japan); Mueller, Karl T. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Environmental and Molecular Science Lab.; Marra, James C. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States); Pantano, Carlo G. [Penn State Univ., State College, PA (United States); Pierce, Eric M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ryan, Joseph V. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schofield, James M. [AMEC, Harwell Oxford (United Kingdom); Steefel, Carl I. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.; Vienna, John D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Nations producing borosilicate glass as an immobilization material for radioactive wastes resulting from spent nuclear fuel reprocessing have reinforced scientific collaboration to obtain consensus on mechanisms controlling the long-term dissolution rate of glass. This goal is deemed to be crucial for the development of reliable performance assessment models for geological disposal. The collaborating laboratories all conduct fundamental and/or applied research with modern materials science techniques. The paper briefly reviews the radioactive waste vitrification programmes of the six participant nations and summarizes the state-of-the-art of glass corrosion science, emphasizing common scientific needs and justifications for on-going initiatives.

  10. Melting Hanford LAW into Iron-Phosphate Glass in a CCIM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nick Soelberg; Sharna Rossberg

    2011-09-01

    A vitrification test has been conducted using the cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) test system at the Idaho National Laboratory. The test was conducted to demonstrate the vitrification of a Hanford low activity waste (LAW) that contains relatively large amounts of sulfate and sodium, compared to other radioactive Hanford waste streams. The high sulfate content limits the potential loading of this waste stream in conventional borosilicate glass, so this test demonstrated how this waste stream could be vitrified in an iron-phosphate glass that can tolerate higher levels of sulfate.

  11. Small-scale, joule-heated melting of Savannah River Plant waste glass. I. Factors affecting large-scale vitrification tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A promising method of immobilizing SRP radioactive waste solids is incorporation in borosilicate glass. In the reference vitrification process, called joule-heated melting, a mixture of glass frit and calcined waste is heated by passage of an electric current. Two problems observed in large-scale tests are foaming and formation of an insoluble slag. A small joule-heated melter was designed and built to study problems such as these. This report describes the melter, identifies factors involved in foaming and slag formation, and proposes ways to overcome these problems

  12. Free-solution electrophoretic separations of DNA-drag-tag conjugates on glass microchips with no polymer network and no loss of resolution at increased electric field strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Jennifer Coyne; Kerby, Matthew B; Niedringhaus, Thomas P; Lin, Jennifer S; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Barron, Annelise E

    2011-05-01

    Here, we demonstrate the potential for high-resolution electrophoretic separations of ssDNA-protein conjugates in borosilicate glass microfluidic chips, with no sieving media and excellent repeatability. Using polynucleotides of two different lengths conjugated to moderately cationic protein polymer drag-tags, we measured separation efficiency as a function of applied electric field. In excellent agreement with prior theoretical predictions of Slater et al., resolution is found to remain constant as applied field is increased up to 700 V/cm, the highest field we were able to apply. This remarkable result illustrates the fundamentally different physical limitations of free-solution conjugate electrophoresis (FSCE)-based DNA separations relative to matrix-based DNA electrophoresis. ssDNA separations in "gels" have always shown rapidly declining resolution as the field strength is increased; this is especially true for ssDNA > 400 bases in length. FSCE's ability to decouple DNA peak resolution from applied electric field suggests the future possibility of ultra-rapid FSCE sequencing on chips. We investigated sources of peak broadening for FSCE separations on borosilicate glass microchips, using six different protein polymer drag-tags. For drag-tags with four or more positive charges, electrostatic and adsorptive interactions with poly(N-hydroxyethylacrylamide)-coated microchannel walls led to appreciable band-broadening, while much sharper peaks were seen for bioconjugates with nearly charge-neutral protein drag-tags.

  13. In-can melting process and equipment development from 1974 to 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blair, H. Thomas

    1979-08-01

    Both the defense HLLW stores in tanks presently and the HLLW from proposed reprocessing of commercial LWR fuel can be vitrified as borosilicate glass in containers made of 300-series stainless steel by the ICM (in-can melting) process. Melting rates of 50 kg/h in 12-in.-dia cans and 117 kg/h in 28-in.-dia cans can be achieved in the ICM by using the rising-level charging method and internal heat-transfer plate assemblies in the cans. The ICM process can be monitored and remotely controlled without the aid of instrumentation attached to the waste can. The ICM process is compatible with both heated-wall spray calciners and fluidized-bed calciners. The ICM process causes residual tensile stresses as high as the yield strength in vitrified product containers made of 300-series stainless steel. Spall due to oxidation of the exterior of the can during an ICM process can be prevented by using an inert cover gas, by putting a protective coating on the can surface, or by using an oxidation-resistant alloy. Processing problems are minimized and product quality is improved when the complete can is located inside the furnace chamber by setting it on the hearth. A maximum of 24 kW and an average of 15 kW is required per 15-in.-high furnace zone to melt waste borosilicate glass at a rate of 117 kg/h in a 28-in.-dia ICM.

  14. Sulfur incorporation in high level nuclear waste glass: A S K-edge XAFS investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brendebach, B.; Denecke, M. A.; Roth, G.; Weisenburger, S.

    2009-11-01

    We perform X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy measurements at the sulfur K-edge to elucidate the electronic and geometric bonding of sulfur atoms in borosilicate glass used for the vitrification of high level radioactive liquid waste. The sulfur is incorporated as sulfate, most probably as sodium sulfate, which can be deduced from the X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) by fingerprint comparison with reference compounds. This finding is backed up by Raman spectroscopy investigation. In the extended XAFS data, no second shell beyond the first oxygen layer is visible. We argue that this is due to the sulfate being present as small clusters located into voids of the borosilicate network. Hence, destructive interference of the variable surrounding prohibits the presence of higher shell signals. The knowledge of the sulfur bonding characteristics is essential for further optimization of the glass composition and to balance the requirements of the process and glass quality parameters, viscosity and electrical resistivity on one side, waste loading and sulfur uptake on the other side.

  15. Vitrification of high-level liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-level radioactive liquid wastes produced in the fuel elements reprocessing require, for their disposal, a preliminary treatment by which, through a series of engineering barriers, the dispersion into the biosphere is delayed by 10 000 years. Four groups of compounds are distinguished among a great variety of final products and methods of elaboration. From these, the borosilicate glasses were chosen. Vitrification experiences were made at a laboratory scale with simulated radioactive wastes, employing different compositions of borosilicate glass. The installations are described. A series of tests were carried out on four basic formulae using always the same methodology, consisting of a dry mixture of the vitreous matrix's products and a dry simulated mixture. Several quality tests of the glasses were made 1: Behaviour in leaching following the DIN 12 111 standard; 2: Mechanical resistance; parameters related with the facility of the different glasses for increasing their surface were studied; 3: Degree of devitrification: it is shown that devitrification turns the glasses containing radioactive wastes easily leachable. From all the glasses tested, the composition SiO2, Al2O3, B2O3, Na2O, CaO shows the best retention characteristics. (M.E.L.)

  16. Management of cesium loaded AMP- Part I preparation of 137Cesium concentrate and cementation of secondary wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Separation of 137cesium from High Level Waste can be achieved by use of composite-AMP, an engineered form of Ammonium Molybdo-Phosphate(AMP). Direct vitrification of cesium loaded composite AMP in borosilicate glass matrix leads to separation of water soluble molybdate phase. A proposed process describes two different routes of selective separation of molybdates and phosphate to obtain solutions of cesium concentrates. Elution of 137Cesium from composite-AMP by decomposing it under flow conditions using saturated barium hydroxide was investigated. This method leaves molybdate and phosphate embedded in the column but only 70% of total cesium loaded on column could be eluted. Alternatively composite-AMP was dissolved in sodium hydroxide and precipitation of barium molybdate-phosphate from the resultant solution, using barium nitrate was investigated by batch methods. The precipitation technique gave over 99.9% of 137Cesium activity in solutions, free of molybdates and phosphates, which is ideally suited for immobilization in borosilicate glass matrix. Detailed studies were carried out to immobilize secondary waste of 137Cesium contaminated barium molybdate-phosphate precipitates in the slag cement matrix using vermiculite and bentonite as admixtures. The cumulative fraction of 137Cs leached from the cement matrix blocks was 0.05 in 140 days while the 137Cs leach rate was 0.001 gm/cm2/d. (author)

  17. Performance assessment of the direct disposal in unsaturated tuff or spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste owned by USDOE: Volume 2, Methodology and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rechard, R.P. [ed.

    1995-03-01

    This assessment studied the performance of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel in a hypothetical repository in unsaturated tuff. The results of this 10-month study are intended to help guide the Office of Environment Management of the US Department of Energy (DOE) on how to prepare its wastes for eventual permanent disposal. The waste forms comprised spent fuel and high-level waste currently stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and the Hanford reservations. About 700 metric tons heavy metal (MTHM) of the waste under study is stored at INEL, including graphite spent nuclear fuel, highly enriched uranium spent fuel, low enriched uranium spent fuel, and calcined high-level waste. About 2100 MTHM of weapons production fuel, currently stored on the Hanford reservation, was also included. The behavior of the waste was analyzed by waste form and also as a group of waste forms in the hypothetical tuff repository. When the waste forms were studied together, the repository was assumed also to contain about 9200 MTHM high-level waste in borosilicate glass from three DOE sites. The addition of the borosilicate glass, which has already been proposed as a final waste form, brought the total to about 12,000 MTHM.

  18. The precision of product consistency tests conducted with a glass-bonded ceramic waste form

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, W. L.; Lewis, M. A.; Johnson, S. G.

    2002-09-01

    The product consistency test (PCT) that is used for qualification of borosilicate high-level radioactive waste (HLW) glasses for disposal can be used for the same purpose in the qualification of the glass-bonded sodalite ceramic waste form (CWF). The CWF was developed to immobilize radioactive salt wastes generated during the electrometallurgical treatment of spent sodium-bonded nuclear fuels. An interlaboratory study was conducted to measure the precision of PCTs conducted with the CWF for comparison with the precision of PCTs conducted with HLW glasses. The six independent sets of triplicate PCT results generated in the study were used to calculate the intralaboratory and interlaboratory consistency based on the concentrations of Al, B, Na, and Si in the test solutions. The results indicate that PCTs can be conducted as precisely with the CWF as with HLW glasses. For example, the values of the reproducibility standard deviation for Al, B, Na, and Si were 1.36, 0.347, 3.40, and 2.97 mg/l for PCT with CWF. These values are within the range of values measured for borosilicate glasses, including reference HLW glasses.

  19. Characteristics of high-level radioactive waste forms for their disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to develop a deep geological repository for a high-level radioactive waste coming from reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels discharged from our domestic nuclear power plants, the the required characteristics of waste form are dependent upon a solidifying medium and the amount of waste loading in the medium. And so, by the comparative analysis of the characteristics of various waste forms developed up to the present, a suitable medium is recommended.The overall characteristics of the latter is much better than those of the former, but the change of the properties due to an amorphysation by radiation exposure and its thermal expansion has not been clearly identified yet. And its process has not been commercialized. However, the overall properties of the borosilicate glass waste forms are acceptable for their disposal, their production cost is reasonable and their processes have already been commercialized. And plenty informations of their characteristics and operational experiences have been accumulated. Consequently, it is recommended that a suitable medium solidifying the HLW is a borosilicate glass and its composition for the identification of a reference waste form would be based on the glass frit of R7T7

  20. Development and radiation stability of glasses for highly radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The variation of formation temperature, crystallizing behaviour and leach resistance with composition changes for sodium-lithium borosilicate glasses suitable for vitrifying Magnox waste are discussed. Viscosities have been measured between 400 and 10500C. The principal crystal phases which occur have been identified as magnesium silicate, magnesium borate and ceria. The leach rate of polished discs in pure water at 1000C does not decrease with time if account is taken of the fragile siliceous layer that is observed to occur. The effect of 100 years' equivalent α- and β-irradiation on glass properties is discussed. Stored energy release experiments demonstrated that energy is released over a wide temperature range so that it cannot be triggered catastrophically. Temperatures required to release energy are dependent upon the original storage temperature. Helium release is by Fick's diffusion law up to at least 30% of the total inventory, with diffusion coefficients similar to those for comparable borosilicate glasses. Leach rates were not measurably affected by α-radiation. β-radiation in a Van de Graaff accelerator did not change physical properties, but irradiation in an electron microscope caused minute bubbles in lithium-containing glasses above 2000C. (author)

  1. Up- and down-conversion luminescence in the oxyfluoride glass ceramics containing Ba2+1.5xYb1−xF7:Tb3+ nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transparent oxyfluoride borosilicate glass ceramics containing Ba2+1.5xYb1−xF7:Tb3+ nanocrystals were successfully prepared by a melt-quenching method with subsequent heat treatment. The precipitated crystalline phase in the glass matrix changed gradually from BaF2 to Ba2+1.5xYb1−xF7 with the increase of YbF3 content, which was confirmed by the results of XRD, HRTEM and EDX measurements. The ultraviolet and visible up-conversion and near-infrared quantum cutting down-conversion emissions were observed and interpreted. These materials could be used to modify the solar spectrum and enhance the silicon solar cell efficiency by the up-conversion and down-conversion luminescence of Tb3+–Yb3+ couples in the oxyfluoride borosilicate glass ceramics. -- Highlights: ► Oxyfluoride glass ceramics containing Ba2+1.5xYb1−xF7:Tb nanocrystals were prepared. ► The precipitated crystal phase changed from BaF2 to Ba2+1.5xYb1−xF7. ► Strong up-conversion and down-conversion emissions were observed and interpreted.

  2. Up- and down-conversion luminescence in the oxyfluoride glass ceramics containing Ba{sub 2+1.5x}Yb{sub 1-x}F{sub 7}:Tb{sup 3+} nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xin, Fengxia [College of Materials Science and Engineering, China Jiliang University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Zhao, Shilong, E-mail: shilong_zhao@hotmail.com [College of Materials Science and Engineering, China Jiliang University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Jia, Guohua; Huang, Lihui; Deng, Degang; Wang, Huanping [College of Materials Science and Engineering, China Jiliang University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Xu, Shiqing, E-mail: sxucjlu@hotmail.com [College of Materials Science and Engineering, China Jiliang University, Hangzhou 310018 (China)

    2012-11-15

    Transparent oxyfluoride borosilicate glass ceramics containing Ba{sub 2+1.5x}Yb{sub 1-x}F{sub 7}:Tb{sup 3+} nanocrystals were successfully prepared by a melt-quenching method with subsequent heat treatment. The precipitated crystalline phase in the glass matrix changed gradually from BaF{sub 2} to Ba{sub 2+1.5x}Yb{sub 1-x}F{sub 7} with the increase of YbF{sub 3} content, which was confirmed by the results of XRD, HRTEM and EDX measurements. The ultraviolet and visible up-conversion and near-infrared quantum cutting down-conversion emissions were observed and interpreted. These materials could be used to modify the solar spectrum and enhance the silicon solar cell efficiency by the up-conversion and down-conversion luminescence of Tb{sup 3+}-Yb{sup 3+} couples in the oxyfluoride borosilicate glass ceramics. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxyfluoride glass ceramics containing Ba{sub 2+1.5x}Yb{sub 1-x}F{sub 7}:Tb nanocrystals were prepared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The precipitated crystal phase changed from BaF{sub 2} to Ba{sub 2+1.5x}Yb{sub 1-x}F{sub 7}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Strong up-conversion and down-conversion emissions were observed and interpreted.

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF GLASS AND CRYSTALLINE CERAMIC FORMS FOR DISPOSITION OF EXCESS PLUTONIUM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marra, James; Cozzi, A; Crawford, C.; Herman, C.; Marra, John; Peeler, D.

    2009-09-10

    In the aftermath of the Cold War, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) has identified up to 50 metric tons of excess plutonium that needs to be dispositioned. The bulk of the material is slated to be blended with uranium and fabricated into a Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel for subsequent burning in commercial nuclear reactors. Excess plutonium-containing impurity materials making it unsuitable for fabrication into MOX fuel will need to be dispositioned via other means. Glass and crystalline ceramics have been developed and studied as candidate forms to immobilize these impure plutonium feeds. A titanate-based ceramic was identified as an excellent actinide material host. This composition was based on Synroc compositions previously developed for nuclear waste immobilization. These titanate ceramics were found to be able to accommodate extremely high quantities of fissile material and exhibit excellent aqueous durability. A lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass was developed to accommodate high concentrations of plutonium and to be very tolerant of impurities yet still maintain good aqueous durability. Recent testing of alkali borosilicate compositions showed promise of using these compositions to disposition lower concentrations of plutonium using existing high level waste vitrification processes. The developed waste forms all appear to be suitable for Pu disposition. Depending on the actual types and concentrations of the Pu residue streams slated for disposition, each waste form offers unique advantages.

  4. Equations for predicting release rates for waste packages in unsaturated tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear waste will be placed in the potential repository at Yucca Mountain in waste packages. Spent fuel assemblies or consolidated fuel rods and borosilicate glass in steel pour canisters will be enclosed in sealed containers. The waste package consists of the waste form, the cladding on spent fuel or the defense-waste pour canister, and the outside container. Current design calls for the waste packages to be surrounded by an air gap. Although the waste package is generally not seen as the primary barrier for nuclear waste isolation it must in fact meet specific regulatory requirements: substantially complete requirement and release-rate from the engineered barrier system [USNRC 1983]. This report gives derivations of equations for predicting releases rates. We consider the release of three types of species: solubility-limited species, species released congruent with solid-solid alteration of spent-fuel matrix or borosilicate glass, and readily soluble species from the fuel-cladding gap, gas plenum, and readily accessible grain boundaries. We develop analytic expressions for the release rates of individual constituents from each of these mechanisms. For a given species and for given parameters, the mechanism that results in the lowest predicted release rate is to be adopted as the rate-controlling mechanism for that species. Some of the equations are newly derived for this report, others are restated from earlier work. Release rates have been calculated for key radionuclides in a companion report. 11 refs., 7 figs

  5. Characteristics of high-level radioactive waste forms for their disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Soo; Chun, Kwan Sik; Kang, Chul Hyung

    2000-12-01

    In order to develop a deep geological repository for a high-level radioactive waste coming from reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels discharged from our domestic nuclear power plants, the the required characteristics of waste form are dependent upon a solidifying medium and the amount of waste loading in the medium. And so, by the comparative analysis of the characteristics of various waste forms developed up to the present, a suitable medium is recommended.The overall characteristics of the latter is much better than those of the former, but the change of the properties due to an amorphysation by radiation exposure and its thermal expansion has not been clearly identified yet. And its process has not been commercialized. However, the overall properties of the borosilicate glass waste forms are acceptable for their disposal, their production cost is reasonable and their processes have already been commercialized. And plenty informations of their characteristics and operational experiences have been accumulated. Consequently, it is recommended that a suitable medium solidifying the HLW is a borosilicate glass and its composition for the identification of a reference waste form would be based on the glass frit of R7T7.

  6. Photolysis of oxyfluorfen in aqueous methanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Subhasish K; Chakraborty, Savitri; Bhattacharyya, Anjan; Chowdhury, Ashim

    2013-01-01

    Photolysis of oxyfluorfen, an herbicide of the nitrodiphenyl ether class, was studied in aqueous methanol under UV and sunlight. UV irradiation was carried out in a borosilicate glass photoreactor (containing 250 ppm oxyfluorfen in 50% aqueous methanol) equipped with a quartz filter and 125 watt mercury lamp (maximum output 254 nm) at 25 ± 1°C. Sunlight irradiation was conducted at 28 ± 1°C in borosilicate Erlenmeyer flasks containing 250 ppm oxyfluorfen in 50% aqueous methanol. The samples from both the irradiated conditions were withdrawn at a definite time interval and extracted to measure oxyfluorfen content by gas chromatography-flame ionization detector for rate study. The half-life values were 20 hours and 2.7 days under UV and sunlight exposure, respectively. Photolysis of oxyfluorfen yielded 13 photoproducts of which three were characterized by infrared spectrophotometer and (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. The rest of the photoproducts were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and thin layer chromatography (TLC). An ionization potential 70 eV was used for electron impact-mass spectrometry (EI-MS) and methane was used as reagent gas for chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (CI-MS). Two of the photoproducts were also synthesized for comparison. The main phototransformation pathways of oxyfluorfen involved nitro reduction, dechlorination, and hydrolysis as well as nucleophiles displacement reaction. PMID:23998303

  7. Low helium permeation cells for atomic microsystems technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellis, Argyrios T; Shah, Vishal; Donley, Elizabeth A; Knappe, Svenja; Kitching, John

    2016-06-15

    Laser spectroscopy of atoms confined in vapor cells can be strongly affected by the presence of background gases. A significant source of vacuum contamination is the permeation of gases such as helium (He) through the walls of the cell. Aluminosilicate glass (ASG) is a material with a helium permeation rate that is many orders of magnitude lower than borosilicate glass, which is commonly used for cell fabrication. We have identified a suitable source of ASG that is fabricated in wafer form and can be anodically bonded to silicon. We have fabricated chip-scale alkali vapor cells using this glass for the windows and we have measured the helium permeation rate using the pressure shift of the hyperfine clock transition. We demonstrate micro fabricated cells with He permeation rates at least three orders of magnitude lower than that of cells made with borosilicate glass at room temperature. Such cells may be useful in compact vapor-cell atomic clocks and as a micro fabricated platform suitable for the generation of cold atom samples. PMID:27304286

  8. Nepheline structural and chemical dependence on melt composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcial, José; Crum, Jarrod; Neill, Owen; McCloy, John

    2016-02-01

    Nepheline crystallizes upon slow-cooling in some melts concentrated in Na2O and Al2O3, which can result in a residual glass phase of low chemical durability. Nepheline can incorporate many components often found in high-level waste radioactive borosilicate glass, including glass network ions (e.g., Si, Al, Fe), alkali metals (e.g., Cs, K, Na, and possibly Li), alkaline-earth metals (e.g., Ba, Sr, Ca, Mg), and transition metals (e.g., Mn, and possibly Cr, Zn, Ni). When crystallized from melts of different compositions, nepheline chemistry varies as a function of starting glass composition. Five simulated high level nuclear waste borosilicate glasses shown to crystallize large fractions of nepheline on slow cooling, were selected for study. These melts constituted a range of Al2O3, B2O3, CaO, Na2O, K2O, Fe2O3, and SiO2 compositions. Compositional analyses of nepheline crystals in glass by electron probe micro-analysis (EPMA) indicate that boron is unlikely to be present in any significant concentration, if at all, in nepheline. Also, several models are presented for calculating the fraction of vacancies in the nepheline structure.

  9. Evolution of mechanical properties of silicate glasses: Impact of the chemical composition and effects of irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis examines: (1) how the chemical composition changes the hardness, toughness, and stress corrosion cracking behavior in model pristine and (2) how external irradiation impact these properties. It is to be incorporated in the context of the storage of nuclear waste in borosilicate glass matrix, the structural integrity of which should be assessed. Eight simplified borosilicate glasses made of 3 oxides with modulated proportions (SiO2-B2O3-Na2O (SBN) have been selected and their hardness, toughness, and stress corrosion cracking behavior have been characterized prior and after irradiation. The comparative study of the non-irradiated SBN glasses provides the role played by the chemical composition. The sodium content is found to be the key parameter: As it increases, the glass plasticity increases, leading to changes in the mechanical response to strain. Hardness (Hv) and toughness (Kc) decrease since the flow under indenter increases. The analysis of the stress corrosion behavior evidences a clear shift of the SCC curves linked also to the glass plasticity. Four of the 8 simplified SBN glass systems highlight the influence of electron, light and heavy ions irradiations on the mechanical properties. Once again, the sodium content is a key parameter. It is found to inhibit the glass modification: Glasses with high sodium content are more stable. Ions irradiations highlight the predominant role of nuclear interaction in changing the glass properties. Finally, electronic interaction induced by helium and electron irradiation does not lead to the same structural/mechanical glasses variations. (author)

  10. Nanoscale topographic changes on sterilized glass surfaces affect cell adhesion and spreading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittenburg, Gretel; Lauer, Günter; Oswald, Steffen; Labudde, Dirk; Franz, Clemens M

    2014-08-01

    Producing sterile glass surfaces is of great importance for a wide range of laboratory and medical applications, including in vitro cell culture and tissue engineering. However, sterilization may change the surface properties of glass and thereby affect its use for medical applications, for instance as a substrate for culturing cells. To investigate potential effects of sterilization on glass surface topography, borosilicate glass coverslips were left untreated or subjected to several common sterilization procedures, including low-temperature plasma gas, gamma irradiation and steam. Imaging by atomic force microscopy demonstrated that the surface of untreated borosilicate coverslips features a complex landscape of microislands ranging from 1000 to 3000 nm in diameter and 1 to 3 nm in height. Steam treatment completely removes these microislands, producing a nanosmooth glass surface. In contrast, plasma treatment partially degrades the microisland structure, while gamma irradiation has no effect on microisland topography. To test for possible effects of the nanotopographic structures on cell adhesion, human gingival fibroblasts were seeded on untreated or sterilized glass surfaces. Analyzing fibroblast adhesion 3, 6, and 24 h after cell seeding revealed significant differences in cell attachment and spreading depending on the sterilization method applied. Furthermore, single-cell force spectroscopy revealed a connection between the nanotopographic landscape of glass and the formation of cellular adhesion forces, indicating that fibroblasts generally adhere weakly to nanosmooth but strongly to nanorough glass surfaces. Nanotopographic changes induced by different sterilization methods may therefore need to be considered when preparing sterile glass surfaces for cell culture or biomedical applications.

  11. Application of cold crucible melting to NPP waste conditioning using basaltic rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cold crucible inductive melting (CCIM) is one of the most promising technologies for treatment of various inorganic and organic radioactive wastes. This technology was successfully applied for vitrification of NPP operational wastes produced at Russian RBMK and WWER reactors. These wastes with high concentration of sodium nitrate were vitrified with borosilicate glass formers and high leach resistant and mechanically strong glasses were produced. To reduce a cost of the process boron-containing additives may be substituted by local basaltic rocks. Such rocks contain major silicon, aluminium, iron oxides and minor sodium, potassium, calcium, manganese and other oxides and may be used as effective and inexpensive glass forming additives to NNP waste salts. Lab-scale tests using a cold crucible energized from 10 kW high frequency (5.28 MHz) generator were conducted. Glasses and glass-crystalline materials obtained had low leach rates of alkali elements, boron, and silicon being very similar to leach rates from HLW borosilicate glasses (PCT test). (author)

  12. ADDITIVE TESTING FOR IMPROVED SULFUR RETENTION: PRELIMINARY REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amoroso, J.; Fox, K.

    2011-09-07

    The Savannah River National Laboratory is collaborating with Alfred University to evaluate the potential for additives in borosilicate glass to improve sulfur retention. This preliminary report provides further background on the incorporation of sulfur in glass and outlines the experiments that are being performed by the collaborators. A simulated waste glass composition has been selected for the experimental studies. The first phase of experimental work will evaluate the impacts of BaO, PbO, and V{sub 2}O{sub 5} at concentrations of 1.0, 2.0, and 5.0 wt % on sulfate retention in simulated high level waste borosilicate glass. The second phase of experimental work will evaluate the effects of time at the melt temperature on sulfur retention. The resulting samples will be characterized to determine the amount of sulfur remaining as well as to identify the formation of any crystalline phases. The results will be used to guide the future selection of frits and glass forming chemicals in vitrifying Department of Energy wastes containing high sulfur concentrations.

  13. Studies of the beam finding and targeting accuracy of the CAS-LIBB single-particle microbeam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Xiao-Hua; Wu Li-Jun; Wang Shao-Hu; Yu Zeng-Liang; Wang Xu-Fei; Hu Zhi-Wen; Cheng Lian-Yun; Zhang Jun; Zhan Fu-Ru; Li Jun; Chen Bin; Xu Ming-Liang

    2005-01-01

    A single-particle microbeam facility has been constructed at the Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering (LIBB), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS). The system was designed to deliver a defined number of hydrogen ions produced by a Van de Graaff accelerator, in an energy range of 2.0-3.0MeV, into an area smaller than the nuclei of individual living cells grown on thin plastic films. The beam is collimated by a borosilicate glass capillary that forms the beam-line exit. An computer integrated control program is developed to recognize the cells and to target them one by one for irradiation.Experiments for finding (capturing and recognizing) the microbeam position in the microscope imaging system and measuring the overall targeting accuracy of the facility are presented in this article. When a borosilicate glass capillary with 5μm inner diameter and 980μm length is used as the microbeam collimator, the overall targeting accuracy is that 91% aimed pit clusters are located within 2.4μm radius, and 98% are within 3.6μm radius.

  14. The role of chemical reaction in waste-form performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dissolution rate of waste solids in a geologic repository is a complex function of waste form geometry, chemical raction rate, exterior flow field, and chemical environment. We present here an analysis to determine the stady-state mass transfer rate, over the entire range of flow conditions relevant to geologic disposal of nuclear waste. The equations for steady-state mass transfer with a chemical-reaction-rate boundary condition are solved by three different mathematical techniques which supplement each other. This theory is illustrated with laboratory leach data for borosilicate-glass and a spherical spent-fuel waste form under typical repository conditions. For borosilicate glass waste in the temperature range of 57/degree/C to 250/degree/C, dissolution rate in a repository is determined for a wide range of chemical reaction rates and for Peclet numbers from zero to well over 100, far beyond any Peclet values expected in a repository. Spent-fuel dissolution in a repository is also investigated, based on the limited leach data now available. 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  15. High-efficiency thin-film cadmium telluride photovoltaic cells. Annual technical report, January 20, 1996--January 19, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Compaan, A D; Bohn, R G; Contreras-Puente, G [Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States)

    1997-08-01

    The University of Toledo photovoltaics group has been instrumental in developing rf sputtering for CDs/CdTe thin-film solar cells. During the third phase of the present contract our work focussed on efforts to determine factors which limit the efficiency in our {open_quotes}all-sputtered{close_quotes} thin-film CdTe solar cells on soda-lime glass. We find that our all-sputtered cells, which are deposited at substantially lower temperature than those by sublimation or vapor deposition, require less aggressive CdCl{sub 2} treatments than do other deposition techniques and this is presumably related to CDs/CdTe interdiffusion. The CDs/CdTe interdiffusion process has been studied by several methods, including photoluminescence and capacitance-voltage measurements. Furthermore, we have deposited special thin bilayer films on quartz and borosilicate glass. Interdiffusion in these thin bilayers have been probed by Rutherford backscattering, with collaborators at Case Western Reserve University, and grazing incidence x-ray scattering (GIXS), with collaborators at the University at Buffalo and Brookhaven National Lab. Also, in order better to understand the properties of the ternary alloy material, we used laser physical vapor deposition to prepare a series of CdS{sub x}Te{sub 1-x} films on borosilicate glass. The composition of the alloy films was determined by wavelength dispersive x-ray spectroscopy at NREL. These films are currently being investigated by us and other groups at NREL and IEC.

  16. Development of graded Ni-YSZ composite coating on Alloy 690 by Pulsed Laser Deposition technique to reduce hazardous metallic nuclear waste inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Pranesh; Rogalla, Detlef; Becker, Hans Werner; Dey, Gautam Kumar; Chakraborty, Sumit

    2011-08-15

    Alloy 690 based 'nuclear waste vitrification furnace' components degrade prematurely due to molten glass-alloy interactions at high temperatures and thereby increase the volume of metallic nuclear waste. In order to reduce the waste inventory, compositionally graded Ni-YSZ (Y(2)O(3) stabilized ZrO(2)) composite coating has been developed on Alloy 690 using Pulsed Laser Deposition technique. Five different thin-films starting with Ni80YSZ20 (Ni 80 wt%+YSZ 20 wt%), through Ni60YSZ40 (Ni 60 wt%+YSZ 40 wt%), Ni40YSZ60 (Ni 40 wt%+YSZ 60 wt%), Ni20YSZ80 (Ni 20 wt%+YSZ 80 wt%) and Ni0YSZ100 (Ni 0 wt%+YSZ 100 wt%), were deposited successively on Alloy 690 coupons. Detailed analyses of the thin-films identify them as homogeneous, uniform, pore free and crystalline in nature. A comparative study of coated and uncoated Alloy 690 coupons, exposed to sodium borosilicate melt at 1000°C for 1-6h suggests that the graded composite coating could substantially reduced the chemical interactions between Alloy 690 and borosilicate melt.

  17. Use of light scattering, electron microscopy, and polarography in oil stability studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loveland, J.W.; Dimeler, G.R.; Bostwick, L.G.; Cali, L.J.

    1960-01-01

    Fuel oils and electrical oils were aged in both borosilicate and soft glass bottles at 43.3/sup 0/C (110/sup 0/F). The aged and fresh fuels were examined by light-scattering methods and the results compared. The ability of light-scattering measurements to detect a small difference in the number and size of particles made it a rapid and convenient tool for following the rate of sludge formation in its early stages. In an unstable oil, differences in light scattering could be detected after as little as two days of aging. However, when large quantities of sludge were formed, leading to aggregation of small particles into large particles and precipitation of sludge, the light-scattering method was no longer valid. The primary application of light scattering would be for sludge determination after short aging times where filtration methods lack the required sensitivity. In addition to the light-scattering measurements, the aged oils were centrifuged and the separated sludge particles examined by electron microscopy. There was no mention of any difference in results between borosilicate and soft glass bottles for aging the oils.

  18. Evaluation of Photocatalytic Active Coatings on Sintered Glass Tubes by Methylene Blue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Awungacha Lekelefac

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A comparative study between ten different photocatalytic active coatings was done. The effectiveness and photocatalytic activity of the coatings were studied by degradation experiments of methylene blue (MB dye under UV light illumination. The reactor design consisting of sintered glass packed in a borosilicate tube placed between two planar dielectric barrier discharge lamps (Osram Planon is reported for the first time. The coatings consisted of either titania, silica, or zinc on sintered borosilicate glass. The advantage of sol-gel in catalyst preparation was exploited to combine catalyst to act as cocatalyst. TiO2-P25 widely applied in suspension systems was effectively immobilized on sintered glass support with the aid of tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS solution which acted as support material. Results indicated that TiO2-P25+SiO2, TiO2-P25+SiO2+Pt, and TiOSO4_30,6wt% films showed highest degradation rates close to 100% after 90 min illumination with degradation rates exceeding 50% after 30 minutes. TTIP+Pt showed lowest degradation rate.

  19. Growth and properties of CdS/CdTe heterojunctions on soda lime glass substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polycrystalline thin films of CdTe grown on glass/SnO2/CdS substrates are studied using X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and time resolved photoluminescence decay techniques. CdS films were deposited by chemical solution. CdTe films were grown by close-spaced sublimation at substrate temperatures between 475--625 degree C. CdTe thin films deposited at temperatures higher than 525 degree C show preferential orientation in the left-angle 111 right-angle direction. The Grain size of the films increases with substrate temperature and the films are faceted for all the temperatures. The PL decay constant increases with substrate temperature up to 575 degree C for as-deposited films on soda-lime substrates. Films on borosilicate substrates show an increase up to the highest temperature used (625 degree C). There is systematic increase in the PL decay constant after CdCl2 heat treatment, and the range of values is 1--1.5 nsec for soda-lime samples and 1--2 nsec for borosilicate samples

  20. Gamma radiation induced changes in nuclear waste glass containing Eu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, M.; Kadam, R. M.; Mishra, R. K.; Kaushik, C. P.; Tomar, B. S.; Godbole, S. V.

    2011-10-01

    Gamma radiation induced changes were investigated in sodium-barium borosilicate glasses containing Eu. The glass composition was similar to that of nuclear waste glasses used for vitrifying Trombay research reactor nuclear waste at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, India. Photoluminescence (PL) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) techniques were used to study the speciation of the rare earth (RE) ion in the matrix before and after gamma irradiation. Judd-Ofelt ( J- O) analyses of the emission spectra were done before and after irradiation. The spin counting technique was employed to quantify the number of defect centres formed in the glass at the highest gamma dose studied. PL data suggested the stabilisation of the trivalent RE ion in the borosilicate glass matrix both before and after irradiation. It was also observed that, the RE ion distributes itself in two different environments in the irradiated glass. From the EPR data it was observed that, boron oxygen hole centre based radicals are the predominant defect centres produced in the glass after irradiation along with small amount of E’ centres. From the spin counting studies the concentration of defect centres in the glass was calculated to be 350 ppm at 900 kGy. This indicated the fact that bulk of the glass remained unaffected after gamma irradiation up to 900 kGy.

  1. Phase stability effects on the corrosion behavior of the metal barrier candidate materials for the nuclear waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Six candidate materials are currently under consideration by the Nuclear Waste Management Program (NWMP) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory as potential metal barrier materials for high-level nuclear waste storage. The waste package, which must meet the Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing requirements for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project (NNWSI), will contain spent fuel from civilian nuclear power plants PWR and BWR fuel assemblies, commercial high level waste (CHLW) in the form of borosilicate glass containing commercial spent fuel reprocessing wastes and defense high level waste (DHLW) contained in borosilicate glass. The waste package is being designed for emplacement in the unsaturated zone above the water table at the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada. This location should result in a slightly oxidizing repository environment. The Metal Barrier Selection and Testing Task is responsible for the selection of the materials to be employed in the waste package container. The candidate materials include three iron to nickel-based austenitic materials and three copper-based alloy materials. The austenitic materials are AISI 304L stainless steel, AISI 316L stainless steel and alloy 825. The copper-based alloy materials are CDA 102 (OFHC copper), CDA 613 (Cu-7Al) and CDA 715 (Cu-30Ni). The selection of the final metal barrier material is dependent upon the expected behavior of these materials in the repository environment

  2. Plutonium doping of SYNROC-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work was to perform an experimental simulation of the radiation effects that SYNROC-D (a ceramic waste form and the alternate to borosilicate glass for US defense high-level nuclear waste) will experience during the first million years of storage. Technology was developed for doping SYNROC-D with 238Pu and performing external gamma irradiation to simulate both actinide and fission product decay. The doping technique was tested using both Ce and U as stand-ins to simulate the +3 and +4 oxidation states of Pu, respectively. Samples were characterized by ceramography, density measurements, x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope-energy dispersive x-ray analysis, electron microprobe, scanning transmission electron microscope, gamma ray spectrometry, and leaching; equipment was fabricated for dilatation measurements. An early decision by the Department of Energy (DOE) to select borosilicate glass and terminate SYNROC-D development prevented doping with 238Pu or external gamma irradiation. However, a sample was doped with 239Pu in order to study the Pu distribution, and characterization of this sample was completed. Although conclusive proof was not developed, all indications from this work are that Pu will go into the zirconolite and perovskite phases in SYNROC-D, favoring perovskite under the redox conditions prevailing in a graphite die. Technology development and results of Ce, U, and 239Pu doping studies are described in this report

  3. Characteristics of porous zirconia coated with hydroxyapatite as human bones

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V V Narulkar; S Prakash; K Chandra

    2007-08-01

    Since hydroxyapatite has excellent biocompatibility and bone bonding ability, porous hydroxyapatite ceramics have been intensively studied. However, porous hydroxyapatite bodies are mechanically weak and brittle, which makes shaping and implantation difficult. One way to solve this problem is to introduce a strong porous network onto which hydroxyapatite coating is applied. In this study, porous zirconia and alumina-added zirconia ceramics were prepared by ceramic slurry infiltration of expanded polystyrene bead compacts, followed by firing at 1500°C. Then slurry of hydroxyapatite–borosilicate glass mixed powder was used to coat the porous ceramics, followed by firing at 1200°C. The porous structures without the coating had high porosities of 51–69%, high pore interconnectivity, and sufficiently large pore window sizes (300–500 m). The porous ceramics had compressive strengths of 5.3∼36.8 MPa, favourably comparable to the mechanical properties of cancellous bones. In addition, porous hydroxyapatite surface was formed on the top of the composite coating, whereas a borosilicate glass layer was found on the interface. Thus, porous zirconia-based ceramics were modified with a bioactive composite coating for biomedical applications.

  4. Washing and caustic leaching of Hanford tank sludges: Results of FY 1995 studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the past few years, the primary mission at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site has changed from producing plutonium to environmental restoration. Large volumes of high-level radioactive wastes (HLW), generated during past Pu production and other operations, are stored in underground tanks on site. The current plan for remediating the Hanford tank farms consists of waste retrieval, pretreatment, treatment (immobilization), and disposal. The HLW will be immobilized in a borosilicate glass matrix; the resulting glass canisters will then be disposed of in a geologic repository. Because of the expected high cost of HLW immobilization and disposal, pretreatment processes will be implemented to reduce the volume of borosilicate glass produced in processing the tank wastes. This document describes sludge washing and caustic leaching tests conducted in FY 1995 at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) at the request of Westinghouse Hanford Company. These tests were performed using sludges from seven Hanford waste tanks -- B-111, BX-107, C-103, S-104, SY-103, T-104, and T-111. The primary and secondary types of waste stored in each of these tanks are given in Table 1. 1. The data collected in this effort will be used to support the March 1998 Tri-Party Agreement decision on the extent of pretreatment to be performed on the Hanford tank sludges (Ecology, EPA, and DOE 1994)

  5. Oxidation of SiC/BN/SiC Composites in Reduced Oxygen Partial Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.; Boyd, Meredith

    2010-01-01

    SiC fiber-reinforced SiC composites with a BN interphase are proposed for use as leading edge structures of hypersonic vehicles. The durability of these materials under hypersonic flight conditions is therefore of interest. Thermogravimetric analysis was used to characterize the oxidation kinetics of both the constituent fibers and composite coupons at four temperatures: 816, 1149, 1343, and 1538 C (1500, 2100, 2450, and 2800 F) and in oxygen partial pressures between 5% and 0.1% (balance argon) at 1 atm total pressure. One edge of the coupons was ground off so the effects of oxygen ingress into the composite could be monitored by post-test SEM and EDS. Additional characterization of the oxidation products was conducted by XPS and TOF-SIMS. Under most conditions, the BN oxidized rapidly, leading to the formation of borosilicate glass. Rapid initial oxidation followed by volatilization of boria lead to protective oxide formation and further oxidation was slow. At 1538C in 5% oxygen, both the fibers and coupons exhibited borosilicate glass formation and bubbling. At 1538C in 0.1% oxygen, active oxidation of both the fibers and the composites was observed leading to rapid SiC degradation. BN oxidation at 1538C in 0.1% oxygen was not significant.

  6. Radiation effects in glass and glass-ceramic waste forms for the immobilization of CANDU UO2 fuel reprocessing waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECL has investigated three waste forms for the immobilization of high-level liquid wastes that would arise if used CANDU fuels were reprocessed at some time in the future to remove fissile materials for the fabrication of new power reactor fuel. These waste forms are borosilicate glasses, aluminosilicate glasses and titanosilicate glass-ceramics. This report discusses the potential effects of alpha, beta and gamma radiation on the releases of radionuclides from these waste forms as a result of aqueous corrosion by groundwaters that would be present in an underground waste disposal vault. The report discusses solid-state damage caused by radiation-induced atomic displacements in the waste forms as well as irradiation of groundwater solutions (radiolysis), and their potential effects on waste-form corrosion and radionuclide release. The current literature on radiation effects on borosilicate glasses and in ceramics is briefly reviewed, as are potential radiation effects on specialized waste forms for the immobilization of 129I, 85Kr and 14C. (author). 104 refs., 9 tabs., 5 figs

  7. Laboratory measurements of seismic attenuation in partially saturated rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Samuel; Tisato, Nicola; Quintal, Beatriz; Holliger, Klaus

    2014-05-01

    Laboratory measurements of seismic attenuation and transient pore fluid pressure are performed on partially saturated Berea sandstone and synthetic borosilicate samples. Various degrees of water (liquid) and nitrogen (gas) saturation are considered. These measurements are carried out at room temperature and under confining pressures varying from ambient conditions up to 25 MPa. The cylindrical samples are 25 cm long and have a diameter of 7.6 cm. In the context of the experimental setup, the solid frames of both the Berea sandstone and the borosilicate samples can be considered homogenous, which in turn allows for isolating and exploring the effects of partial saturation on seismic attenuation. We employ the sub-resonance method, which is based on the application of a time-harmonic vertical stress to the top of the sample and the measurement of the thus resulting strain. For any given frequency, the attenuation is then inferred as the tangent of the phase shift between the applied stress and the observed strain. Using five equally spaced sensors along the central axis of the cylindrical sample, we measure the transient fluid pressure induced by the application of a step-function-type vertical stress to the top of the sample. Both the sensors and the sample are sealed off with the regard to the confining environment. Together with the numerical results from corresponding compressibility tests based on the quasi-static poroelastic equations, these transient fluid pressure measurements are then used to assist the interpretation of the seismic attenuation measurements.

  8. Corrosion Testing of Monofrax K-3 Refractory in Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Alternate Reductant Feeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Jantzen, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Burket, P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-04-06

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) uses a combination of reductants and oxidants while converting high level waste (HLW) to a borosilicate waste form. A reducing flowsheet is maintained to retain radionuclides in their reduced oxidation states which promotes their incorporation into borosilicate glass. For the last 20 years of processing, the DWPF has used formic acid as the main reductant and nitric acid as the main oxidant. During reaction in the Chemical Process Cell (CPC), formate and formic acid release measurably significant H2 gas which requires monitoring of certain vessel’s vapor spaces. A switch to a nitric acid-glycolic acid (NG) flowsheet from the nitric-formic (NF) flowsheet is desired as the NG flowsheet releases considerably less H2 gas upon decomposition. This would greatly simplify DWPF processing from a safety standpoint as close monitoring of the H2 gas concentration could become less critical. In terms of the waste glass melter vapor space flammability, the switch from the NF flowsheet to the NG flowsheet showed a reduction of H2 gas production from the vitrification process as well. Due to the positive impact of the switch to glycolic acid determined on the flammability issues, evaluation of the other impacts of glycolic acid on the facility must be examined.

  9. Reduction of Glass Surface Reflectance by Ion Beam Surface Modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark Spitzer

    2011-03-11

    This is the final report for DOE contract DE-EE0000590. The purpose of this work was to determine the feasibility of the reduction of the reflection from the front of solar photovoltaic modules. Reflection accounts for a power loss of approximately 4%. A solar module having an area of one square meter with an energy conversion efficiency of 18% generates approximately 180 watts. If reflection loss can be eliminated, the power output can be increased to 187 watts. Since conventional thin-film anti-reflection coatings do not have sufficient environmental stability, we investigated the feasibility of ion beam modification of the glass surface to obtain reduction of reflectance. Our findings are generally applicable to all solar modules that use glass encapsulation, as well as commercial float glass used in windows and other applications. Ion implantation of argon, fluorine, and xenon into commercial low-iron soda lime float glass, standard float glass, and borosilicate glass was studied by implantation, annealing, and measurement of reflectance. The three ions all affected reflectance. The most significant change was obtained by argon implantation into both low-iron and standard soda-lime glass. In this way samples were formed with reflectance lower than can be obtained with a single-layer coatings of magnesium fluoride. Integrated reflectance was reduced from 4% to 1% in low-iron soda lime glass typical of the glass used in solar modules. The reduction of reflectance of borosilicate glass was not as large; however borosilicate glass is not typically used in flat plate solar modules. Unlike conventional semiconductor ion implantation doping, glass reflectance reduction was found to be tolerant to large variations in implant dose, meaning that the process does not require high dopant uniformity. Additionally, glass implantation does not require mass analysis. Simple, high current ion implantation equipment can be developed for this process; however, before the process

  10. Evaluation of a high-throughput peptide reactivity format assay for assessment of the skin sensitization potential of chemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin Lin eWong

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The direct peptide reactivity assay (DPRA is a validated method for in vitro assessment of the skin sensitization potential of chemicals. In the present work, we describe a peptide reactivity assay using 96-well plate format and systematically identified the optimal assay conditions for accurate and reproducible classification of chemicals with known sensitizing capacity. The aim of the research is to ensure that the analytical component of the peptide reactivity assay is robust, accurate and reproducible in accordance with criteria that are used for the validation of bioanalytical methods. Analytical performance was evaluated using quality control samples (QCs; heptapeptides at low, medium and high concentrations and incubation of control chemicals (chemicals with known sensitization capacity, weak, moderate, strong, extreme and non-sensitizers with each of three synthetic heptapeptides, viz Cor1-C420 (Ac-NKKCDLF, cysteine- (Ac-RFAACAA and lysine- (Ac-RFAAKAA containing heptapeptides. The optimal incubation temperature for all three heptapeptides was 25°C. Apparent heptapeptide depletion was affected by vial material composition. Incubation of test chemicals with Cor1-C420, showed that peptide depletion was unchanged in polypropylene vials over 3-days storage in an autosampler but this was not the case for borosilicate glass vials. For cysteine-containing heptapeptide, the concentration was not stable by day 3 post-incubation in borosilicate glass vials. Although the lysine-containing heptapeptide concentration was unchanged in both polypropylene and borosilicate glass vials, the apparent extent of lysine-containing heptapeptide depletion by ethyl acrylate, differed between polypropylene (24.7% and glass (47.3% vials. Additionally, the peptide-chemical complexes for Cor1-C420-cinnamaldehyde and cysteine-containing heptapeptide-2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene were partially reversible during 3-days of autosampler storage. These observations further

  11. Use of platinized magnesium as reagent replacing zinc in hydrogen isotope analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platinized magnesium has recently been proposed as a new reducing agent for the conversion of small quantities of water to hydrogen in a flame-sealed borosilicate glass tube at 400 deg. C for isotopic analysis. Th reagent, Mg-Pt, in contrast to zinc can be prepared in every laboratory by coating of a magnesium granulate with a thin layer of platinum by reaction with H2PtCl6*6H2O dissolved in acetone-ether mixture. Excellent reproducibility of the isotope ratios in hydrogen gas prepared from water samples has been obtained at proportion 4 μL of water to 120 mg of the reagent. (author). 12 refs, 1 fig., 1 tab

  12. Preliminary Investigation of Sulfur Loading in Hanford LAW Glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vienna, John D.; Hrma, Pavel R.; Buchmiller, William C.; Ricklefs, Joel S.

    2004-04-01

    A preliminary estimate was developed for loading limits for high-sulfur low-activity waste (LAW) feeds that will be vitrified into borosilicate glass at the Hanford Site in the waste-cleanup effort. Previous studies reported in the literature were consulted to provide a basis for the estimate. The examination of previous studies led to questions about sulfur loading in Hanford LAW glass, and scoping tests were performed to help answer these questions. These results of these tests indicated that a formulation approach developed by Vienna and colleagues shows promise for maximizing LAW loading in glass. However, there is a clear need for follow-on work. The potential for significantly lowering the amount of LAW glass produced at Hanford (after the initial phase of processing) because of higher sulfur tolerances may outweigh the cost and effort required to perform the necessary testing.

  13. Thermal control of the Magellan Project 6.5-meter telescope and enclosure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Frank S.

    1994-06-01

    The Magellan Project 6.5-meter telescope is a collaboration of the Carnegie Institution of Washington and the University of Arizona. The telescope will be located on Cerro Manqui, at the Las Campanas Observatory, Chile. A design goal for the Magellan Project is to develop a telescope and enclosure system with a 1 degree(s) centigrade per hour time constant. The primary mirror is a University of Arizona borosilicate spin-cast honeycomb design. The enclosure is an octagonal shaped spaceframe structure with an insulated panel covering. The telescope fabrication is by L & F Industries. This paper will concentrate on thermal control of the telescope environment and the telescope thermal control interface to the enclosure.

  14. Fabrication and optical properties of 3D composite photonic crystals of core-shell structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Yanping [Department of Physics, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Yan Zhijun [Department of Physics, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Lan Wei [Department of Physics, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Huang Chunming [Department of Physics, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Wang Yinyue [Department of Physics, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)]. E-mail: wangyy@lzu.edu.cn

    2007-08-31

    Three-dimensional (3D) composite colloidal photonic crystals with SiO{sub 2} core and ZnO shell were fabricated on borosilicate glass (BSG) substrate by a two-stage deposition method. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) measurements show that both the pre-deposited SiO{sub 2} and SiO{sub 2}/ZnO core-shell structures are oriented with their (1 1 1) axes parallel to the substrates. Optical measurement reveals that the periodic arrays exhibit a photonic band gap in the (1 1 1) direction. The optical properties of SiO{sub 2}/ZnO core-shell structures strongly depend on the size dispersions of colloidal spheres and the intrinsic defects in the sample.

  15. Modeling of microdevices for SAW-based acoustophoresis --- a study of boundary conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Skov, Nils Refstrup

    2016-01-01

    We present a finite-element method modeling of acoustophoretic devices consisting of a single, long, straight, water-filled microchannel surrounded by an elastic wall of either borosilicate glass (pyrex) or the elastomer polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and placed on top of a piezoelectric transducer that actuates the device by surface acoustic waves (SAW). We compare the resulting acoustic fields in these full solid-fluid models with those obtained in reduced fluid models comprising of only a water domain with simplified, approximate boundary conditions representing the surrounding solids. The reduced models are found to only approximate the acoustically hard pyrex systems to a limited degree for large wall thicknesses and not at all for the acoustically soft PDMS systems.

  16. Candlestick oven with a silica wick provides an intense collimated cesium atomic beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pailloux, A.; Alpettaz, T.; Lizon, E.

    2007-02-01

    This article shows that readily available glass and silica fibers and braids are suitable capillary structure for recirculating ovens, such as candlestick ovens, becoming then an alternative wick material to conventional metal based capillary structures. In order to study wettability and capillarity of metallic liquid cesium on borosilicate and silica microstructures, samples were selected, prepared, and tested experimentally. The contact angle of cesium on silica glass was roughly measured: θ =35°±10°. A commercially available silica braid was then introduced inside a candlestick oven to transfer the metallic liquid cesium from the cold reservoir to the hot emission point of the candlestick. A collimated cesium atomic beam of intensity of 2×1016at./ssr was obtained, stable and reproducible. Furthermore, this modified oven is easy to handle daily.

  17. Ion-sputtering deposition of Ca-P-O films for microscopic imaging of osteoblast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ananda Sagari, A.R. [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35 (YFL), FIN-40014 University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland)]. E-mail: ananda.sagari@phys.jyu.fi; Lautaret, Claire [ENSICAEN, 6 Boulevard Marechal Juin, F-14050 CAEN Cedex 04 (France); Gorelick, Sergey [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35 (YFL), FIN-40014 University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Laitinen, Mikko [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35 (YFL), FIN-40014 University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Rahkila, Paavo [Department of Health Sciences, P.O. Box 35 (L), FIN-40014 University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Putkonen, Matti [Beneq Oy, Ensimmaeinen savu, FI-01510 Vantaa (Finland); Arstila, Kai [Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, K.U.Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Sajavaara, Timo [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35 (YFL), FIN-40014 University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Cheng, Sulin [Department of Health Sciences, P.O. Box 35 (L), FIN-40014 University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Whitlow, Harry J. [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35 (YFL), FIN-40014 University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    2007-08-15

    An ion-beam sputtering technique was used to produce Ca-P-O films on borosilicate glass at room temperature from hydroxyapatite targets using nitrogen, argon and krypton beams at different acceleration voltages. The sputtering target was pressed from high purity hydroxyapatite powder or mixture of high purity hydroxyapatite powder and red phosphorus in order to optimise the film composition. The film composition, determined using time-of-flight elastic recoil detection analysis (TOF-ERDA), was found to be strongly dependent on the ion energy used for deposition. By extra doping of the target with P the correct Ca/P atomic ratio in the deposited films was reached. The films deposited on Si were amorphous even after annealing at 800 deg, C. The biocompatibility of the films was investigated using osteoblast-like cells. The film deposited under optimal conditions exhibited dendritic growth, indicative of more realistic chemical signalling than for other substratum e.g. polystyrene or plain glass.

  18. Optically transparent, mechanically durable, nanostructured superhydrophobic surfaces enabled by spinodally phase-separated glass thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aytug, Tolga; Simpson, John T.; Lupini, Andrew R.; Trejo, Rosa M.; Jellison, Gerald E.; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Pennycook, Stephen J.; Hillesheim, Daniel A.; Winter, Kyle O.; Christen, David K.; Hunter, Scott R.; Haynes, J. Allen

    2013-08-01

    We describe the formation and properties of atomically bonded, optical quality, nanostructured thin glass film coatings on glass plates, utilizing phase separation by spinodal decomposition in a sodium borosilicate glass system. Following deposition via magnetron sputtering, thermal processing and differential etching, these coatings are structurally superhydrophilic (i.e., display anti-fogging functionality) and demonstrate robust mechanical properties and superior abrasion resistance. After appropriate chemical surface modification, the surfaces display a stable, non-wetting Cassie-Baxter state and exhibit exceptional superhydrophobic performance, with water droplet contact angles as large as 172°. As an added benefit, in both superhydrophobic and superhydrophilic states these nanostructured surfaces can block ultraviolet radiation and can be engineered to be anti-reflective with broadband and omnidirectional transparency. Thus, the present approach could be tailored toward distinct coatings for numerous markets, such as residential windows, windshields, specialty optics, goggles, electronic and photovoltaic cover glasses, and optical components used throughout the US military.

  19. Development and adoption of low sodium glass frit for vitrification of high level radioactive liquid waste at Tarapur

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High level Liquid Waste (HLW) is generated during the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel which is used to recover uranium and plutonium. More than 99% of the fission product activity generated during the burning of nuclear fuel in the reactor is present in HLW. For the efficient management of HLW by vitrification, sodium borosilicate glass has been adopted worldwide. Sodium oxide acts as modifier in glass matrix and variation in its concentration may vary the properties of the glass and hence the melter parameters. The HLW presently used for vitrification has higher concentration of sodium. As the composition of the base glass is fixed the concentration of Na in the HLW is one of the limiting factors for the waste loading for the vitrification process. Present article gives a brief account of the formulation of a base glass frit with lower sodium content and the feedback after implementing in the vitrification plant. (author)

  20. Atomic layer deposition of alternative glass microchannel plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technique of atomic layer deposition (ALD) has enabled the development of alternative glass microchannel plates (MCPs) with independently tunable resistive and emissive layers, resulting in excellent thickness uniformity across the large area (20 × 20 cm), high aspect ratio (60:1 L/d) glass substrates. Furthermore, the use of ALD to deposit functional layers allows the optimal substrate material to be selected, such as borosilicate glass, which has many benefits compared to the lead-oxide glass used in conventional MCPs, including increased stability and lifetime, low background noise, mechanical robustness, and larger area (at present up to 400 cm2). Resistively stable, high gain MCPs are demonstrated due to the deposition of uniform ALD resistive and emissive layers on alternative glass microcapillary substrates. The MCP performance characteristics reported include increased stability and lifetime, low background noise (0.04 events cm−2 s−1), and low gain variation (±5%)

  1. Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant Quality Assurance Program description for high-level waste form development and qualification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant Project has been established to convert the high-level radioactive waste associated with nuclear defense production at the Hanford Site into a waste form suitable for disposal in a deep geologic repository. The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant will mix processed radioactive waste with borosilicate material, then heat the mixture to its melting point (vitrification) to forin a glass-like substance that traps the radionuclides in the glass matrix upon cooling. The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant Quality Assurance Program has been established to support the mission of the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant. This Quality Assurance Program Description has been written to document the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant Quality Assurance Program

  2. Process Testing to Support the Conceptual Design of a Plutonium Vitrification Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the aftermath of the Cold War, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) has identified up to 50 metric tonnes of excess plutonium that needs to be dispositioned. The bulk of the material is slated to be blended with uranium and fabricated into a Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel for subsequent burning in commercial nuclear reactors. Excess plutonium-containing materials that are not suitable for fabrication into MOX fuel will need to be dispositioned via other means. A lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass was identified as a preferred form for the disposition of the impure plutonium-containing feeds. The LaBS glass formulation uses a lanthanide borosilicate frit rather than the alkali borosilicate frit used to vitrify high level waste. The LaBS glass has been shown to be able to accommodate high quantities of fissile material (greater than 10 wt % elemental plutonium) and tolerate the impurities expected in the plutonium feed streams. A conceptual design effort is now underway at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to design a vitrification facility to immobilize the excess Pu feeds that are not slated for disposition via MOX fuel. The conceptual design phase is planned to complete in FY07. A test program was initiated at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to provide input data to the conceptual design effort. A major component of this test effort involves vitrification process testing. A cylindrical induction melter (CIM) was developed for the vitrification of actinide feed streams. Due to the high temperatures required to incorporate high plutonium oxide contents into the glass by dissolution and melting, the melter vessel is constructed out of Pt/Rh alloy and can be operated at temperatures up to 1600 deg. C. Additionally, the melter design is compact to facilitate installation in a glovebox (the size of the conceptual facility melter is approximately 6'' in diameter by 18'' tall). The CIM has proven to be a viable means to process the LaBS glass at processing

  3. Decontamination of DWPF canisters by glass frit blasting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-level radioactive waste at the Savannah River Plant will be incorporated in borosilicate glass for permanent disposal. The waste glass will be encapsulated in a 304L stainless steel canister. During the filling operation the outside of the canister will become contaminated. This contamination must be reduced to an accepable level before the canister leaves the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Tests with contaminated coupons have demonstrated that this decontamination can be accomplished by blasting the surface with glass frit. The contaminated glass frit byproduct of this operation is used as a feedstock for the waste glass process, so no secondary waste is created. Three blasting techniques, using glass frit as the blasting medium, were evaluated. Air-injected slurry blasting was the most promising and was chosen for further development. The optimum parametric values for this process were determined in tests using coupon weight loss as the output parameter. 1 reference, 13 figures, 3 tables

  4. Functionalized zinc oxide nanorod with ionophore-membrane coating as an intracellular Ca2+ selective sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asif, M. H.; Fulati, A.; Nur, O.; Willander, M.; Brännmark, Cecilia; Strâlfors, Peter; Börjesson, Sara I.; Elinder, Fredrik

    2009-07-01

    The tip of a borosilicate glass capillary with functionalized hexagonal ZnO nanorods was used to make a sensitive electrochemical intracellular Ca2+ sensor. To adjust the sensor for Ca2+ measurements with sufficient selectivity and stability, polyvinylchloride membrane containing Ca2+ ionophores were coated on the surface. The membrane covered ZnO nanorods exhibited a Ca2+-dependent electrochemical potential difference versus an Ag/AgCl reference electrode. The potential difference was linear over a large concentration range (100 nM-10 mM). The measurements of Ca2+ concentrations using our ZnO nanorods sensor in human fat cells or in frog egg cells were consistent with values of Ca2+ concentrations reported in the literature. This nanoelectrode device paves the way to measurements of intracellular biochemical species in specific locations within single living cells.

  5. Radiolysis of water vapor in the presence of solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An influence of a radiation and doze rate on radiolysis of water vapor at the presence of various cationic forms of aluminosilicate and borosilicate glasses are investigated. The various valency cations of Zr, Rb, P, Ce, Li and Cs were entered into aluminosilicate with mass percents from 3 up to 6. After warming-up of researched substances in ampoules they were filled by a twice-distilled water. Then the ampoules were gamma-irradiated thermostatically by 60Co source with dose rate 1,5-5,0 Gy/sec. The analysis of product of radiolysis was conducted by the gas-chromatographic method. The quantity and life time of electronic defects which are catalytically active centers of the water steam decomposition depend on a dose, temperature and dose rate. 15 refs., 2 tabs., 1 fig

  6. NMR Studies of Permanent Compression in Oxide Glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Youngman, Randall E.; Svenson, Mouritz Nolsøe; Mauro, John C.;

    Pressure-induced structural rearrangement in oxide glasses is manifested by modification of both short- and intermediate-range structures, including changes to the local coordination numbers of network forming cations and alteration of the modifier environment. NMR spectroscopy is an especially...... of the network modifying sodium atoms, will be discussed. Such changes in network structure aid in understanding the pressure-induced properties of these glasses, such as density, elastic moduli, hardness and crack resistance....... useful tool for examining these changes in network structure, especially for boron-containing glasses, which are particularly sensitive to permanent compression. Here we describe studies based on hot isostatic compression of several different borate and borosilicate glasses, where changes in short...

  7. Considerations about Large Area___Low Cost Fast Imaging Photo-detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, John; /Argonne; Attenkofer, Klaus; /Argonne; Delagnes, Eric; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Frisch, Henry; /Chicago U., EFI; Genat, Jean-Francois; /Paris U., VI-VII; Grabas, Herve; /Chicago U., EFI; Heintz, Mary K.; /Chicago U., EFI; May, Edward; /Argonne; Meehan, Samuel; /Argonne; Oberla, Eric; /Argonne; Ruckman, Larry L.; /Hawaii U.; Tang, Fukun; /Chicago U., EFI; Varner, Gary; /Hawaii U.; Vavra, Jaroslav; /SLAC; Wetstein, Matthew; /Argonne

    2012-05-07

    The Large Area Picosecond Photodetectors described in this contribution incorporate a photocathode and a borosilicate glass capillary Micro-Channel Plate (MCP) pair functionalised by atomic layer deposition (ALD) of separate resistive and secondary emission materials. Initial testing with matched pairs of small glass capillary test disks has demonstrated gains of the order of 10{sup 5}-10{sup 6}. Compared to other fast imaging devices, these photodetectors are expected to provide timing resolutions in the 10-100 ps range, and two-dimension position in the sub-millimeter range. If daisy chained, large detectors read at both ends with fast digitising integrated electronics providing zero-suppressed calibrated data should be produced at relatively low cost in large quantities.

  8. Vesicles sensing using resistive-pulse method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudzevich, Yauheni; Lin, Yuqing; Chow, Lee

    2013-03-01

    Here we present a ``resistive-pulse'' method that allows translocations, counting and measuring size distribution liposomes with radii from 25 nm to 125 nm. This technique is based on using two chambers filled with electrolyte solution and separated by a partition with a nanopore between electrodes. It was found that ionic current drops when nanoparticle entering sensing nanopore of a pulled glass micropipette, producing a clear translocation signal. Pulled borosilicate micropipette with opening 50 ~ 150 nm was used as a sensing instrument. This method provides a direct, fast and inexpensive way to characterize inorganic and organic nanoparticles in a solution. LC acknowledges the financial support of National Science Foundation through Grant ECCS 0901361.

  9. Detection of tetrahydrocannabinol residues on hands by ion-mobility spectrometry (IMS). Correlation of IMS data with saliva analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnberg, Saskia; Armenta, Sergio; Garrigues, Salvador; de la Guardia, Miguel

    2015-08-01

    Ion-mobility spectroscopy (IMS) was evaluated as a high-throughput, cheap, and efficient analytical tool for detecting residues of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) on hands. Regarding the usefulness of hand residues as potential samples for determining THC handling and abuse, we studied the correlation between data obtained from cannabis consumers who were classified as positive after saliva analysis and from those who were classified as positive on the basis of the information from hand-residue analysis. Sampling consisted of wiping the hands with borosilicate glass microfiber filters and introducing these directly into the IMS after thermal desorption. The possibility of false positive responses, resulting from the presence of other compounds with a similar drift time to THC, was evaluated and minimised by applying the truncated negative second-derivative algorithm. The possibility of false negative responses, mainly caused by competitive ionisation resulting from nicotine, was also studied. Graphical abstract THC residues: from hands to analytical signals.

  10. Chemically selective NMR imaging of a 3-component (solid-solid-liquid) sedimenting system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyea, Steven D; Altobelli, Stephen A; Mondy, Lisa A

    2003-04-01

    A novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique which resolves the separate components of the evolving vertical concentration profiles of 3-component non-colloidal suspensions is described. This method exploits the sensitivity of MRI to chemical differences between the three phases to directly image the fluid phase and one of the solid phases, with the third phase obtained by subtraction. 19F spin-echo imaging of a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) oil was interlaced with 1H SPRITE imaging of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) particles. The third phase was comprised of borosilicate glass spheres, which were not visible while imaging the PTFE or LDPE phases. The method is demonstrated by performing measurements on 2-phase materials containing only the floating (LDPE) particles, with the results contrasted to the experimental behaviour of the individual phases in the full 3-phase system. All experiments were performed using nearly monodisperse particles, with initial suspension volume fractions, phi(i), of 0.1. PMID:12713970

  11. Analysis of the coagulation of human blood cells on diamond surfaces by atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranauskas, V.; Fontana, M.; Guo, Zhao Jing; Ceragioli, H. J.; Peterlevitz, A. C.

    2004-11-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to study the morphology and coagulation of human blood cells in contact with solid surfaces. Blood was extracted from the veins of healthy adult donors and the samples were used immediately after extraction, deposited either on borosilicate glass or diamond substrates. Some blood samples were anti-coagulated by adding heparin for single cell AFM imaging. No chemicals were used for attaching or immobilizing the cells. The diamond substrates were produced by chemical vapour deposition (CVD diamond) using a hot-filament CVD system fed with ethanol highly diluted in hydrogen. AFM imaging of isolated cells (anti-coagulated by heparin) was only possible on the glass substrates due to the lack of adherence of the cells to the diamond surface. The coagulation results suggest that blood clotting on diamond produces a less rough surface than blood clotting on glass.

  12. Subcritical Crack-Growth and Lifetime Behavior of Glass and SiC under Static Load

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Crack initiation and subcritical crack growth in glass sheet and SiC bar specimen under static loading were investigated to study the failure process. It has been demonstrated that the lifetime process of brittle materials involves three possible forms of crack growth: subcritical crack growth,partly subcritical crack growth and instantaneous fracture without subcritical crack growth.Curves of v-K obtained in step-by-step static fatigue tests and in constant loading rate tests showed different trends for borosilicate glass sheet. α-SiC that is generally considered immune to mechanical fatigue effect and environmental attack was also tested under static loading and the lifetime was measured. The results showed that the threshold load to damage effect was over 80% of the initial strength for the SiC.

  13. Investigation of crystallization in glasses containing fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Five potential solidification products for high-level waste (four borosilicate glasses and one celsian glass ceramic) have been investigated in terms of crystallization. In all glasses and in the glass ceramic, crystallization, and recrystallization, respectively, were observed by heating above 7730K, however, at very different periods of time (0.1d greater than or equal to 100d). The noble metals precipitated into various phases. Crystal growth proceeded at the phase boundary glass-noble metal. In all products rare earth phases crystallized. Silicate phases rarely formed. The leach resistance (by the grain titration and Soxhlet tests) decreased after heat treatment in all cases. The changes were found to be within one order of magnitude for all products. 2 figures, 4 tables

  14. Annual report on the development and characterization of solidified forms for nuclear wastes, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development and characterization of solidified nuclear waste forms is a major continuing effort at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Contributions from seven programs directed at understanding chemical composition, process conditions, and long-term behaviors of various nuclear waste forms are included in this report. The major findings of the report are included in extended figure captions that can be read as brief technical summaries of the research, with additional information included in a traditional narrative format. Waste form development proceeded on crystalline and glass materials for high-level and transuranic (TRU) wastes. Leaching studies emphasized new areas of research aimed at more basic understanding of waste form/aqueous solution interactions. Phase behavior and thermal effects research included studies on crystal phases in defense and TRU waste glasses and on liquid-liquid phase separation in borosilicate waste glasses. Radiation damage effects in crystals and glasses from alpha decay and from transmutation are reported

  15. The behavior of silicon and boron in the surface of corroded nuclear waste glasses: an EFTEM study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using electron energy-loss filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM), we have observed the formation of silicon-rich zones on the corroded surface of a West Valley (WV6) glass. This layer is approximately 100-200 nm thick and is directly underneath a precipitated smectite clay layer. Under conventional (C)TEM illumination, this layer is invisible; indeed, more commonly used analytical techniques, such as x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), have failed to describe fully the localized changes in the boron and silicon contents across this region. Similar silicon-rich and boron-depleted zones were not found on corroded Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) borosilicate glasses, including SRL-EA and SRL-51, although they possessed similar-looking clay layers. This study demonstrates a new tool for examining the corroded surfaces of materials

  16. Letter report: Evaluation of LFCM off-gas system technologies for the HWVP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactive high-level liquid waste (HLLW), a byproduct of defense nuclear fuel reprocessing activities, is currently being stored in underground tanks at several US sites. Because its mobility poses significant environmental risks, HLLW is not a suitable waste form for long-term storage. Thus, high-temperature processes for solidifying and isolating the radioactive components of HLLW have been developed and demonstrated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors. Vitrification using liquidfed ceramic melters (LFCMs) is the reference process for converting US HLLW into a borosilicate glass. Two vitrification plants are currently under construction in the United States: the West Valley Demonstration Plant (WVDP) being built at the former West Valley Nuclear Fuels Services site in West Valley, New York; and the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), which is currently 85% complete at DOE's Savannah River Plant (SRP). A third facility, the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP), is being designed at DOE's Hanford Site

  17. Performance Characteristics of Waste Glass Powder Substituting Portland Cement in Mortar Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, P.; Csetényi, L. J.; Borosnyói, A.

    2016-04-01

    In the present work, soda-lime glass cullet (flint, amber, green) and special glass cullet (soda-alkaline earth-silicate glass coming from low pressure mercury-discharge lamp cullet and incandescent light bulb borosilicate glass waste cullet) were ground into fine powders in a laboratory planetary ball mill for 30 minutes. CEM I 42.5N Portland cement was applied in mortar mixtures, substituted with waste glass powder at levels of 20% and 30%. Characterisation and testing of waste glass powders included fineness by laser diffraction particle size analysis, specific surface area by nitrogen adsorption technique, particle density by pycnometry and chemical analysis by X-ray fluorescence spectrophotometry. Compressive strength, early age shrinkage cracking and drying shrinkage tests, heat of hydration of mortars, temperature of hydration, X-ray diffraction analysis and volume stability tests were performed to observe the influence of waste glass powder substitution for Portland cement on physical and engineering properties of mortar mixtures.

  18. Integrated microsphere whispering gallery mode probe for highly sensitive refractive index measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hanzheng; Yuan, Lei; Kim, Cheol-Woon; Huang, Jie; Lan, Xinwei; Xiao, Hai

    2016-06-01

    We report an integrated whispering gallery mode microresonator-based sensor probe for refractive index sensing. The probe was made by sealing a borosilicate glass microsphere into a thin-wall glass capillary pigtailed with a multimode optical fiber. The intensities of the resonant peaks were found decreasing exponentially (linearly in a log scale) with the increasing refractive index of the medium surrounding the capillary. The sensing capability of the integrated probe was tested using sucrose solutions of different concentrations and the resolution was estimated to be about 2.5×10-5 in the index range of 1.3458 to 1.3847. The integrated sensor probe may prove useful in many chemical and biological sensing applications where highly sensitive refractive index monitoring is needed.

  19. A Glass-Ceramic Waste Forms for the Immobilization of Rare Earth Oxides from the Pyroprocessing Waste salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Byung-Gil; Park, Hwan-Seo; Kim, Hwan-Young; Kim, In-Tae [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-05-15

    The fission product of rare earth (RE) oxide wastes are generates during the pyroprocess . Borosilicate glass or some ceramic materials such as monazite, apatite or sodium zirconium phosphate (NZP) have been a prospective host matrix through lots of experimental results. Silicate glasses have long been the preferred waste form for the immobilization of HLW. In immobilization of the RE oxides, the developed process on an industrial scale involves their incorporation into a glass matrix, by melting under 1200 {approx} 1300 .deg. C. Instead of the melting process, glass powder sintering is lower temperature ({approx} 900 .deg. C) required for the process which implies less demanding conditions for the equipment and a less evaporation of volatile radionuclides. This study reports the behaviors, direct vitrification of RE oxides with glass frit, glass powder sintering of REceramic with glass frit, formation of RE-apatite (or REmonazite) ceramic according to reaction temperature, and the leach resistance of the solidified waste forms.

  20. Hydrogen production with a solar steam–methanol reformer and colloid nanocatalyst

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Ming-Tsang

    2010-01-01

    In the present study a small steam-methanol reformer with a colloid nanocatalyst is utilized to produce hydrogen. Radiation from a focused continuous green light laser (514 nm wavelength) is used to provide the energy for steam-methanol reforming. Nanocatalyst particles, fabricated by using pulsed laser ablation technology, result in a highly active catalyst with high surface to volume ratio. A small novel reformer fabricated with a borosilicate capillary is employed to increase the local temperature of the reformer and thereby increase hydrogen production. The hydrogen production output efficiency is determined and a value of 5% is achieved. Experiments using concentrated solar simulator light as the radiation source are also carried out. The results show that hydrogen production by solar steam-methanol colloid nanocatalyst reforming is both feasible and promising. © 2009 Professor T. Nejat Veziroglu.

  1. Materials evaluation programs at the Defense Waste Processing Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has been operating a nuclear fuel cycle since the 1950s to produce nuclear materials in support of the national defense effort. About 83 million gallons of high-level waste produced since operations began has been consolidated by evaporation into 33 million gallons at the waste tank farm. The Department of Energy authorized the construction of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), the function of which is to immobilize the waste as a durable borosilicate glass contained in stainless steel canisters prior to the placement of the canisters in a federal repository. The DWPF is now mechanically complete and is undergoing commissioning and run-in activities. A brief description of the DWPF process is provided

  2. High-level waste processing at the Savannah River Site: An update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, SC mg began immobilizing high-level radioactive waste in borosilicate glass in 1996. Currently, the radioactive glass is being produced as a ''sludge-only'' composition by combining washed high-level waste sludge with glass frit. The glass is poured in stainless steel canisters which will eventually be disposed of in a permanent, geological repository. To date, DWPF has produced about 100 canisters of vitrified waste. Future processing operations will, be based on a ''coupled'' feed of washed high-level waste sludge, precipitated cesium, and glass frit. This paper provides an update of the processing activities completed to date, operational/flowsheet problems encountered, and programs underway to increase production rates

  3. Defense waste processing facility startup progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has been operating a nuclear fuel cycle since the 1950's to produce nuclear materials in support of the national defense effort. About 83 million gallons of high level waste produced since operation began have been consolidated into 33 million gallons by evaporation at the waste tank farm. The Department of Energy has authorized the construction of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) to immobilize the waste as a durable borosilicate glass contained in stainless steel canisters, prior to emplacement in a federal repository. The DWPF is now mechanically complete and undergoing commissioning and run-in activities. Cold startup testing using simulated non-radioactive feeds is scheduled to begin in November 1992 with radioactive operation scheduled to begin in May 1994. While technical issues have been identified which can potentially affect DWPF operation, they are not expected to negatively impact the start of non-radioactive startup testing

  4. Reference waste forms and packing material for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, Calif., has been given the task of designing and verifying the performance of waste packages for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project. NNWSI is studying the suitability of the tuffaceous rocks at Yucca Mountain, Nevada Test Site, for the potential construction of a high-level nuclear waste repository. This report gives a summary description of the three waste forms for which LLNL is designing waste packages: spent fuel, either as intact assemblies or as consolidated fuel pins, reprocessed commercial high-level waste in the form of borosilicate glass, and reprocessed defense high-level waste from the Defense Waste Processing Facility in Aiken, S.C. Reference packing material for use with the alternative waste package design for spent fuel is also described. 14 references, 8 figures, 20 tables

  5. Healing of lithographically introduced flaws in glass and glass containing ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackler, H.D.

    1992-12-01

    The morphological evolution of cylindrical pores or channels'' and crack-like cavities in glass and glass-containing ceramics at elevated temperatures was studied. The systems studied were: Coming 7056 alkali borosilicate glass, soda-lime glass (microscope slides), a commercially available 96% Al[sub 2]O[sub 3]with [approx]5--10% intergranular glass, 96% Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] bonded to sapphire, and a model sapphire/glass/sapphire system fabricated by diffusion bonding etched and unetched pieces of sapphire onto which 30--50 nm of SiO[sub 2] had been sputter deposited. These systems span a broad range of glass contents, and permit observation of healing behavior with varying glass content. The results were compared with analytical models and results of similar studies in completely crystalline systems.

  6. Healing of lithographically introduced flaws in glass and glass containing ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackler, H.D.

    1992-12-01

    The morphological evolution of cylindrical pores or ``channels`` and crack-like cavities in glass and glass-containing ceramics at elevated temperatures was studied. The systems studied were: Coming 7056 alkali borosilicate glass, soda-lime glass (microscope slides), a commercially available 96% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}with {approx}5--10% intergranular glass, 96% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} bonded to sapphire, and a model sapphire/glass/sapphire system fabricated by diffusion bonding etched and unetched pieces of sapphire onto which 30--50 nm of SiO{sub 2} had been sputter deposited. These systems span a broad range of glass contents, and permit observation of healing behavior with varying glass content. The results were compared with analytical models and results of similar studies in completely crystalline systems.

  7. The study of velocimetry in high temperature flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High temperature flow velocity measurement system is presented. This system employs the ultrasonic buffer rod method and pulsed Doppler method. The buffer rod has a cooling jacket to use the high efficiency room temperature transducer. A numerical simulation is applied to design the optimised buffer rod, and its result shows good agreement with an experiment. For considering ultrasonic velocimetry method, the temperature dependency of sound velocity in the molten glass at the temperature of 1000°C to 1200°C is obtained and its difference is within plus-minus 5 per-cent in the molten borosilicate glass. Therefore, we can apply ultrasonic technique. Using this technique, the velocity, especially the speed of relative moving wall is obtained. (author)

  8. Safeguardability of the vitrification option for disposal of plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pillay, K.K.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-05-01

    Safeguardability of the vitrification option for plutonium disposition is rather complex and there is no experience base in either domestic or international safeguards for this approach. In the present treaty regime between the US and the states of the former Soviet Union, bilaterial verifications are considered more likely with potential for a third-party verification of safeguards. There are serious technological limitations to applying conventional bulk handling facility safeguards techniques to achieve independent verification of plutonium in borosilicate glass. If vitrification is the final disposition option chosen, maintaining continuity of knowledge of plutonium in glass matrices, especially those containing boron and those spike with high-level wastes or {sup 137}Cs, is beyond the capability of present-day safeguards technologies and nondestructive assay techniques. The alternative to quantitative measurement of fissile content is to maintain continuity of knowledge through a combination of containment and surveillance, which is not the international norm for bulk handling facilities.

  9. Observation of the transition state for pressure-induced BO₃→ BO₄ conversion in glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Trenton; Endo, Takatsugu; Walton, Jeffrey H; Sen, Sabyasachi

    2014-08-29

    A fundamental mechanistic understanding of the pressure- and/or temperature-induced facile transformation of the coordination environment of boron is important for changing the physical properties of glass. We have used in situ high-pressure (up to 2 gigapascals) boron-11 solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in combination with ab initio calculations to investigate the nature of the transition state for the pressure-induced BO3→ BO4 conversion in a borosilicate glass at ambient temperature. The results indicate an anisotropic elastic deformation of the BO3 planar triangle, under isotropic stress, into a trigonal pyramid that likely serves as a precursor for the subsequent formation of a BO4 tetrahedron. PMID:25170146

  10. Effects of beta/gamma radiation on nuclear waste glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, W.J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-07-01

    A key challenge in the disposal of high-level nuclear waste (HLW) in glass waste forms is the development of models of long-term performance based on sound scientific understanding of relevant phenomena. Beta decay of fission products is one source of radiation that can impact the performance of HLW glasses through the interactions of the emitted {beta}-particles and g-rays with the atoms in the glass by ionization processes. Fused silica, alkali silicate glasses, alkali borosilicate glasses, and nuclear waste glasses are all susceptible to radiation effects from ionization. In simple glasses, defects (e.g., non-bridging oxygen and interstitial molecular oxygen) are observed experimentally. In more complex glasses, including nuclear waste glasses, similar defects are expected, and changes in microstructure, such as the formation of bubbles, have been reported. The current state of knowledge regarding the effects of {beta}/{gamma} radiation on the properties and microstructure of nuclear waste glasses are reviewed. (author)

  11. Radioactive waste vitrification: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research and development of an immobilization process for the containment of nuclear high-level liquid waste has been underway for well-over the past four decades. The method that has become the state-of-the-art is the liquid-fed ceramic melter process which converts a mixture of high-level liquid waste and glass forming frit to a borosilicate glass product. This report gives a chronological review of the various vitrification processes starting with the very first reported process in 1960. Information on the early methods of frit selection as well as information on the currently computerized method are presented. The importance of all these parameters is discussed with regard to product durability. 26 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  12. Kinetic and thermodynamic controls on silica reactivity: an analog for waste disposal media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silicate glasses are currently being proposed as the disposal media for radioactive and other toxic wastes. The dissolution behaviour of borosilicate glass is incompletely understood. One approach is to simplify the chemistry and first develop a better understanding of vitreous silica (v-SiO2) as a simple analog of waste glass. This article reviews all the knowledge that is known about the dissolution of silica. Studies quantifying the effects of temperature, solution pH, and single salts on dissolution rates of quartz suggest that pH and cation-dependent dissolution trends hold for all of the silica polymorphs. The purpose of this review is to develop a consistent picture of glass reactivity by understanding how the molecular arrangement of constituents within glass, beginning with the Si-O bond, affects the dissolution processes. (A.C.)

  13. Control of oxidation potential for basalt repository simulation tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borosilicate waste glass durability in simulated repository environments can be assessed by use of static tests in leach vessels fabricated of the representative geomedia. Control of the oxidation potential during the test simulates a basalt repository environment. Under very anoxic conditions (i.e. at negative Eh values), the interactions between basalt and SRP waste glass in silica-saturated basaltic groundwaters are the same as those of basalt and groundwater when no waste glass is present. The lack of significant leaching of ions from the waste glass and the lack of any significant changes in either the leached surfaces of glass or basalt under anoxic conditions suggests that the components of this system are at equilibrium when oxygen is absent. 11 refs., 4 figs

  14. Axial dependence of optical weak measurements in the critical region

    CERN Document Server

    Araujo, Manoel P; Maia, Gabriel G

    2015-01-01

    The interference between optical beams of different polarizations plays a fundamental role in reproducing the optical analog of the electron spin weak measurement. The extraordinary point in optical weak measurements is represented by the possibility to estimate with great accuracy the Goos-Haenchen (GH) shift by measuring the distance between the peak of the outgoing beams for two opposite rotation angles of the polarizers located before and after the dielectric block. Starting from the numerical calculation of the GH shift, which clearly shows a frequency crossover for incidence near to the critical angle, we present a detailed study of the interference between s and p polarized waves in the critical region. This allows to determine in which conditions it is possible to avoid axial deformations and reproduce the GH curves. In view of a possible experimental implementation, we give the expected weak measurement curves for Gaussian lasers of different beam waist sizes propagating through borosilicate (BK7) an...

  15. Vitrification of low level and mixed (radioactive and hazardous) wastes: Lessons learned from high level waste vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borosilicate glasses will be used in the USA and in Europe immobilize radioactive high level liquid wastes (HLLW) for ultimate geologic disposal. Simultaneously, tehnologies are being developed by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Nuclear Facility sites to immobilize low-level and mixed (radioactive and hazardous) wastes (LLMW) in durable glass formulations for permanent disposal or long-term storage. Vitrification of LLMW achieves large volume reductions (86--97 %) which minimize the associated long-term storage costs. Vitrification of LLMW also ensures that mixed wastes are stabilized to the highest level reasonably possible, e.g. equivalent to HLLW, in order to meet both current and future regulatory waste disposal specifications The tehnologies being developed for vitrification of LLMW rely heavily on the technologies developed for HLLW and the lessons learned about process and product control

  16. Evaluation and selection of candidate high-level waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seven candidate waste forms being developed under the direction of the Department of Energy's National High-Level Waste (HLW) Technology Program, were evaluated as potential media for the immobilization and geologic disposal of high-level nuclear wastes. The evaluation combined preliminary waste form evaluations conducted at DOE defense waste-sites and independent laboratories, peer review assessments, a product performance evaluation, and a processability analysis. Based on the combined results of these four inputs, two of the seven forms, borosilicate glass and a titanate based ceramic, SYNROC, were selected as the reference and alternative forms for continued development and evaluation in the National HLW Program. Both the glass and ceramic forms are viable candidates for use at each of the DOE defense waste-sites; they are also potential candidates for immobilization of commercial reprocessing wastes. This report describes the waste form screening process, and discusses each of the four major inputs considered in the selection of the two forms

  17. Demonstrating compliance with WAPS 1.3 in the Hanford waste vitrification plant process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryan, M.F.; Piepel, G.F.; Simpson, D.B.

    1996-03-01

    The high-level waste (HLW) vitrification plant at the Hanford Site was being designed to immobilize transuranic and high-level radioactive waste in borosilicate glass. This document describes the statistical procedure to be used in verifying compliance with requirements imposed by Section 1.3 of the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS, USDOE 1993). WAPS 1.3 is a specification for ``product consistency,`` as measured by the Product Consistency Test (PCT, Jantzen 1992b), for each of three elements: lithium, sodium, and boron. Properties of a process batch and the resulting glass are largely determined by the composition of the feed material. Empirical models are being developed to estimate some property values, including PCT results, from data on feed composition. These models will be used in conjunction with measurements of feed composition to control the HLW vitrification process and product.

  18. Radiochemical analyses for the defense waste processing facility startup at the Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highly radioactive waste from defense-related activities at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina are to be incorporated into a borosilicate glass in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) for long-term geological isolation. Processing and repository safety considerations require the determination of 24 radioisotopes that meet the reporting criteria. These isotopes include fission products, activation products, and daughter nuclei that grow into the waste. Four isotopes, 137Cs, 90Sr, 238Pu and 238U will be routinely measured in the DWPF operation for process control. This work shows that the concentrations of the other 20 reportable radioisotopes in the final glass product can be predicted from a thorough characterization of the high level waste (HLW) tanks and a knowledge of the concentrations of the major non-radioactive components in the vitrification process. (author)

  19. Vitrification of low level and mixed (radioactive and hazardous) wastes: Lessons learned from high level waste vitrification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, C.M.

    1994-07-01

    Borosilicate glasses will be used in the USA and in Europe immobilize radioactive high level liquid wastes (HLLW) for ultimate geologic disposal. Simultaneously, tehnologies are being developed by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Nuclear Facility sites to immobilize low-level and mixed (radioactive and hazardous) wastes (LLMW) in durable glass formulations for permanent disposal or long-term storage. Vitrification of LLMW achieves large volume reductions (86--97 %) which minimize the associated long-term storage costs. Vitrification of LLMW also ensures that mixed wastes are stabilized to the highest level reasonably possible, e.g. equivalent to HLLW, in order to meet both current and future regulatory waste disposal specifications The tehnologies being developed for vitrification of LLMW rely heavily on the technologies developed for HLLW and the lessons learned about process and product control.

  20. ESO Conference on Very Large Telescopes and Their Instrumentation, Garching, Federal Republic of Germany, Mar. 21-24, 1988, Proceedings. Volumes 1 & 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, M.-H.

    Topics discussed in this conference include the very large telescope projects, mirrors and supports, adaptive optics, telescope environment, and instruments and components. Papers are presented on the primary design of an 8-m pneumatic telescope, a configuration of a 3-m multiple Schmidt telescope, eight-meter borosilicate honeycomb mirrors, the fabrication and support of the Keck telescope primary mirror segments, and highly precise reflectors and mirrors in fiber-composite technology. Also considered is the prototype of an adaptive optical system for infrared astronomy, self compensating phase control for venetian blind steering in phased arrays, environmental effects and enclosure design for large telescopes, classical and holographic gratings design and manufacture, grisms for infrared observations, the design of a new cross-dispersed high-resolution spectrograph for the 2.7-m telescope at McDonald Observatory, and a near-IR spectrometer for use on an 8-m telescope.

  1. Planar patch-clamp force microscopy on living cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pamir, Evren [Center for Nano Science, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Amalienstr 54, 80799 Munich (Germany); George, Michael; Fertig, Niels [Nanion Technologies GmbH, Erzgiessereistr. 4, 80335 Munich (Germany); Benoit, Martin [Center for Nano Science, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Amalienstr 54, 80799 Munich (Germany)], E-mail: martin.benoit@physik.uni-muenchen.de

    2008-05-15

    Here we report a new combination of the patch-clamp technique with the atomic force microscope (AFM). A planar patch-clamp chip microstructured from borosilicate glass was used as a support for mechanical probing of living cells. The setup not only allows for immobilizing even a non-adherent cell for measurements of its mechanical properties, but also for simultaneously measuring the electrophysiological properties of a single cell. As a proof of principle experiment we measured the voltage-induced membrane movement of HEK293 and Jurkat cells in the whole-cell voltage clamp configuration. The results of these measurements are in good agreement with previous studies. By using the planar patch-clamp chip for immobilization, the AFM not only can image non-adhering cells, but also gets easily access to an electrophysiologically controlled cellular probe at low vibrational noise.

  2. Influences of deposition rate and oxygen partial pressure on residual stress and microstructure of YSZ thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) thin films were deposited on borosilicate crown glass substrates using electron beam evaporation technique and controlling technological parameters: deposition rate and oxygen partial pressure. Spectrophotometry, optical interferometry and X-ray diffraction were used to investigate how the thin film optical properties, residual stresses, and structure depend on these parameters. The results showed that the deposition rate had a significant influence on the increase of the refractive index of YSZ thin films while the oxygen partial pressure had less influence on it. In all samples, the tensile stress increased with the increasing of deposition rate and the decreasing of oxygen partial pressure. Meanwhile, all deposited films were poly-crystallizations, while crystallite size and preferential orientation of YSZ thin films changed as a function of deposition rate and oxygen partial pressure. The variations of the optical spectra and residual stress corresponded to the evolution of the film structures induced by the deposition parameters.

  3. Fiber pigtailed thin wall capillary coupler for excitation of microsphere WGM resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hanzheng; Lan, Xinwei; Huang, Jie; Yuan, Lei; Kim, Cheol-Woon; Xiao, Hai

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate a fiber pigtailed thin wall capillary coupler for excitation of Whispering Gallery Modes (WGMs) of microsphere resonators. The coupler is made by fusion-splicing an optical fiber with a capillary tube and consequently etching the capillary wall to a thickness of a few microns. Light is coupled through the peripheral contact between inserted microsphere and the etched capillary wall. The coupling efficiency as a function of the wall thickness was studied experimentally. WGM resonance with a Q-factor of 1.14 × 10(4) was observed using a borosilicate glass microsphere with a diameter of 71 μm. The coupler operates in the reflection mode and provides a robust mechanical support to the microsphere resonator. It is expected that the new coupler may find broad applications in sensors, optical filters and lasers. PMID:23842369

  4. High level waste vitrification at the SRP [Savannah River Plant] (DWPF [Defense Waste Processing Facility] summary)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Savannah River Plant has been operating a nuclear fuel cycle since the early 1950's. Fuel and target elements are fabricated and irradiated to produce nuclear materials. After removal from the reactors, the fuel elements are processed to extract the products, and waste is stored. During the thirty years of operation including evaporation, about 30 million gallons of high level radioactive waste has accumulated. The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) under construction at Savannah River will process this waste into a borosilicate glass for long-term geologic disposal. The construction of the DWPF is about 70% complete; this paper will describe the status of the project, including design demonstrations, with an emphasis on the melter system. 9 figs

  5. Measurements of recombination coefficient of hydrogen atoms on plasma deposited thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have performed experiments in plasma afterglow in order to determine the recombination coefficients of plasma deposited thin films of tungsten and graphite. Plasma deposited films rather than bulk material were used in order to more closely emulate surface structure of plasma-facing material deposits in fusion reactors. We have also determined the recombination coefficient of 85250 borosilicate glass and Teflon. Plasma was created by means of a radio frequency generator in a mixture of argon and hydrogen at the pressures between 60 Pa and 280 Pa. The degree of dissociation of hydrogen molecules was found to be between 0.1 and 1. The H-atom density was measured by Fiber Optic Catalytic Probe. The recombination coefficient was determined by measuring the axial profile of the H-atom density and using Smith's side arm diffusion model. (author)

  6. Optical Evaluation of DMDs with UV-Grade FS, Sapphire, MgF2 Windows and Reflectance of Bare Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quijada, Manuel A.; Heap, Sara; Travinsky, Anton; Vorobiev, Dmitry; Ninkov, Zoran; Raisanen, Alan; Roberto, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Digital Micro-mirror Devices (DMDs) have been identified as an alternative to microshutter arrays for space-based multi-object spectrometers (MOS). Specifically, the MOS at the heart of a proposed Galactic Evolution Spectroscopic Explorer (GESE) that uses the DMD as a reprogrammable slit mask. Unfortunately, the protective borosilicate windows limit the use of DMDs in the UV and IR regimes, where the glass has insufficient throughput. In this work, we present our efforts to replace standard DMD windows with custom windows made from UV-grade fused silica, Low Absorption Optical Sapphire (LAOS) and magnesium fluoride. We present reflectance measurements of the antireflection coated windows and a reflectance study of the DMDs active area (window removed). Furthermore, we investigated the long-term stability of the DMD reflectance and recoating device with fresh Al coatings.

  7. Compressive Creep and Thermophysical Performance of Mullite Refractories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemrick, JG

    2002-04-01

    Compressive creep testing of ten commercially available mullite refractories was performed at 1300-1450 C and at static stresses between 0.2-0.6 MPa. These refractories were examined because they are used in borosilicate glass furnace crowns and superstructures along with in sidewall applications. Additionally, despite their high cost ({approx}$500/ft{sup 3}) they are cheaper than other refractories such as chrome alumina ({approx}$3000/ft{sup 3}) or fusion-cast alumina ({approx}900/ft{sup 3}) which are used as replacements for traditional silica refractories in harsh oxy-fuel environments. The corrosion resistances of these ten materials were also evaluated. In addition, measurements were made that tracked their dimensional stability, phase content, microstructure, and composition as a function of temperature and time. The techniques used for these characterizations and their respective analyses are described. An intent of this study was to provide objective and factual results whose interpretations were left to the reader.

  8. Enhancement of skin permeation of ibuprofen from ointments and gels by sesame oil, sunflower oil and oleic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinda S

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Several batches of paraffin ointments were prepared and ibuprofen was incorporated into them. Sesame oil, sunflower oil, and oleic acid in different concentrations were incorporated into different batches. Commercial ibuprofen gel was obtained and divided into several batches and different concentrations of sesame oil, sunflower oil, and oleic acid were incorporated into them. The in vitro drug release characteristics through hairless (88 mm rat skin was carried out by using modified Insertion cell designed in our laboratory. The cell was placed into a borosil beaker containing 50 ml of pH 7.4 phosphate buffer as the diffusion fluid. The beaker was placed over the magnetic stirrer, which was maintained at 37±0.5° to maintain the temperature of diffusion fluid. The released drug content at predetermined time interval was measured using U-V-double beam spectrophotometer at 272 nm. The drug release was raised with increase in oil concentration.

  9. Letter report: Evaluation of LFCM off-gas system technologies for the HWVP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goles, R.W.; Mishima, J.; Schmidt, A.J.

    1996-03-01

    Radioactive high-level liquid waste (HLLW), a byproduct of defense nuclear fuel reprocessing activities, is currently being stored in underground tanks at several US sites. Because its mobility poses significant environmental risks, HLLW is not a suitable waste form for long-term storage. Thus, high-temperature processes for solidifying and isolating the radioactive components of HLLW have been developed and demonstrated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors. Vitrification using liquidfed ceramic melters (LFCMs) is the reference process for converting US HLLW into a borosilicate glass. Two vitrification plants are currently under construction in the United States: the West Valley Demonstration Plant (WVDP) being built at the former West Valley Nuclear Fuels Services site in West Valley, New York; and the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), which is currently 85% complete at DOE`s Savannah River Plant (SRP). A third facility, the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP), is being designed at DOE`s Hanford Site.

  10. PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF SAND AND CHITOSAN AS DUAL FILTER MEDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MADHUKAR M

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuisance due to suspended and colloidal particles causing turbidity has become widespread, severe problem due to urban population and industrial activities. The consequences of turbidity are presence of microorganisms,reduction of dissolved oxygen, etc. Consumption of such water is known to cause water borne diseases.Available water treatment methods for the removal of turbidity and pathogens are coagulation, filtration and disinfection. The common filter media used are sand, activated carbon etc. Chitosan has been used as acoagulant aid and adsorbent. Chitosan when used as a filter media causes the colloidal particles to bind together and is subsequently removed during the process. The column studies using Chitosan in combination with conventional sand filter was carried out in a borosilicate glass column. Chitosan was placed on top of sand layerand constant down flow pattern of 100mL/min was followed. Dual filter media was effective in the reducing turbidity by 93%.

  11. Large dynamic range SPR measurements in the visible using a ZnSe prism

    CERN Document Server

    Canning, John; Cook, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Large dynamic index measurement range (n = 1 to n = 1.7) using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) shifts is demonstrated with a ZnSe prism at 632.8 nm, limited by the available high index liquid hosts. In contrast to borosilicate based SPR measurements where angular limitations restrict solvent use to water and requires considerable care dealing with Fresnel reflections, the ZnSe approach allows SPR spectroscopies to be applied to a varied range of solvents An uncertainty in angular resolution between 1.5 and 6 deg, depending on the solvent and SPR angle, was estimated. The refractive index change for a given glucose concentration in water was measured to be n = (0.114 to 0.007) per precentage C6H12O6 conc. Given the transmission properties of ZnSe the processes can be readily extended into the mid infrared.

  12. Second harmonic generation and two-photon luminescence upconversion in glasses doped with ZnSe nanocrystalline quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thantu, Napoleon [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, 2525 Fremont Avenue, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)]. E-mail: Napoleon.Thantu@ngc.com

    2005-01-01

    We report two-photon excited emission in borosilicate glasses doped with ZnSe nanocrystalline quantum dots. The emission, predominantly near the two-photon energy and detected in the direction of the excitation beam, is in the visible, and the fundamental excitation is the near-infrared output of a tunable femtosecond laser. Depending on the two-photon energy, time- and frequency-resolved measurements at room temperature reveal that the emission largely consists of second harmonic generation (SHG) and two-photon luminescence upconversion, and a much smaller luminescence from redshifted, low-lying trap states and other trap levels residing near the semiconductor band edge. We discuss the SHG origin in terms of bulk-like and surface contributions from the nanocrystals and the two-photon resonant enhancement near the excitonic absorption.

  13. Tunable Room Temperature Second Harmonic Generation in Glasses Doped with CuCI Nanocrystalline Quantum Dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thantu, Napoleon; Schley, Robert Scott; B. L. Justus

    2003-05-01

    Two-photon excited emission centered at 379-426 nm in photodarkening borosilicate glass doped with CuCl nanocrystalline quantum dots at room temperature has been observed. The emission is detected in the direction of the fundamental near-infrared beam. Time- and frequency-resolved measurements at room temperature and 77 K indicate that the emission is largely coherent light characteristic of second harmonic generation (SHG). An average conversion efficiency of ~10-10 is obtained for a 2 mm thick sample. The observed SHG can originate in the individual noncentrosymmetric nanocrystals, leading to a bulk-like contribution, and at the nanocrystal-glass interface, leading to a surface contribution. The bulk-like conversion efficiency is estimated using previously reported values of coherence length (5m) and bulk nonlinear susceptibility. This bulk-like conversion efficiency estimate is found to be smaller than the measured value, suggesting a more prominent surface contribution.

  14. Intracellular ZnO Nanorods Conjugated with Protoporphyrin for Local Mediated Photochemistry and Efficient Treatment of Single Cancer Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larsson Per-Olof

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract ZnO nanorods (NRs with high surface area to volume ratio and biocompatibility is used as an efficient photosensitizer carrier system and at the same time providing intrinsic white light needed to achieve cancer cell necrosis. In this letter, ZnO nanorods used for the treatment of breast cancer cell (T47D are presented. To adjust the sample for intracellular experiments, we have grown the ZnO nanorods on the tip of borosilicate glass capillaries (0.5 μm diameter by aqueous chemical growth technique. The grown ZnO nanorods were conjugated using protoporphyrin dimethyl ester (PPDME, which absorbs the light emitted by the ZnO nanorods. Mechanism of cytotoxicity appears to involve the generation of singlet oxygen inside the cell. The novel findings of cell-localized toxicity indicate a potential application of PPDME-conjugated ZnO NRs in the necrosis of breast cancer cell within few minutes.

  15. Synthesis of novel ICIE16/BSG and ICIE16/BSG-NITRI bioglasses and description of ionic release kinetics upon immersion in SBF fluid: Effect of nitridation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orgaz, Felipe; Amat, Daniel; Szycht, Olga; Dzika, Aleksandra; Barba, Flora; Becerra, José; Santos-Ruiz, Leonor

    2015-01-01

    A novel bioactive glass scaffold ICIE16/BSG has been prepared from a mixture of two different melt-derived glasses: a silicate bioglass (ICIE16) and a borosilicate bioglass (BSG). Combined processing techniques (gel casting and foam replication) were used to form three-dimensional, interconnected porous monolith scaffolds (Orgaz et al., 2016) [1]. They were then nitrided with a hot ammonia flow as described in (Aleixandre et al., 1973) [3] and (Nieto, 1984) [4] to synthesize the ICIE16/BSG-NITRI bioglass (Orgaz et al., 2016) [1]. Herein we present a flow chart summarizing the forming process, plus images of the resulting scaffold after sintering and drying. Bioactivity was characterized in vitro by immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) for up to seven days. Data of ionic release kinetics upon SBF immersion are presented. PMID:26858981

  16. Fabrication and characterization of MCC [Materials Characterization Center] approved testing material---ATM-2, ATM-3, and ATM-4 glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Materials Characterization Center glasses ATM-2, ATM-3, and ATM-4 are designed to simulate high-level waste glasses that are likely to result from the reprocessing of commercial nuclear reactor fuels. The three Approved Testing Materials (ATMs) are borosilicate glasses based upon the MCC-76-68 glass composition. One radioisotope was added to form each ATM. The radioisotopes added to form ATM-2, ATM-3, and ATM-4 were 241Am, 237Np, and 239Pu, respectively. Each of the ATM lots was produced in a nominal lot size of 450 g from feed stock melted in a nitrogen-atmosphere glove box at 1200/degree/C in a platinum crucible. Each ATM was then cast into bars. Analyzed compositions of these glasses are listed. The nonradioactive elements were analyzed by inductively coupled argon plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP), and the radioisotope analyses were done by alpha energy analysis. Results are discussed. 7 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs

  17. Ceramics chemistry from the standpoint of the high activity level water treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Towards closing the reactor accident of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plants, the integrated activities are continued for remediation and for management of storing and disposal of radioactive wastes produced and large amount of remaining contaminated water to find out an adequate method for decontamination and preparing the manual for it. The paper introduces a cyclic water-injection cooling system in which such adsorbent materials as zeolite, insoluble ferrovanides, or ammonium molybdophosphate are employed as the adsorbent material. Selective adsorption characteristics of these adsorbents for cesium and strontium (structural analysis, correlation between adsorption rate and Cs partition distribution, high temperature phase transition of zeolite adsorbing Cs and Sr were examined and then solidification methods using borosilicate glass, high density concrete, and synthetic rocks for the waste disposal with their safety evaluation are presented. (S. Ohno)

  18. High rate operation of micro-strip gas chambers on diamond-coated glass

    CERN Document Server

    Bouclier, Roger; Million, Gilbert; Ropelewski, Leszek; Sauli, Fabio; Temmel, T; Cooke, R A; Donnel, S; Sastri, S A; Sonderer, N

    1996-01-01

    Very high rate operation of micro­strip gas chambers can be achieved using slightly conducting substrates. We describe preliminary measurements realized with detectors manufactured on boro-silicate glass coated, before the photo-lithographic processing, with a diamond layer having a surface resistivity of around 1014 ‡/o. Stable medium-term operation, and a rate capability largely exceeding the one obtained with identical plates manufactured on uncoated glass are demonstrated. If these results are confirmed by long-term measurements the diamond coating technology appears very attractive since it allows, with a moderate cost overhead, to use thin, commercially available glass with the required surface quality for the large-scale production of gas micro-strip detectors.

  19. Cd And Se Atomic Environments During the Growth of CdSe Nanoparticles in Glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, T.M.; Persans, P.D.; Filin, A.; Peng, C.; Huang, W.

    2006-10-27

    Thermal treatment of Cd and Se doped borosilicate glass yields CdSe nanoparticles that are interesting for applied and fundamental studies of quantum and size effects in semiconductors. Using x-ray absorption spectroscopy at both the Cd and Se K-edges, we have studied the local atomic structure for each of these reactants at several stages of particle growth. When the doped glass is quenched from 1050 C, the Cd neighbor is mostly oxygen and the Se neighbor is mostly Zn. With heat treatment at 600-750 C, the concentration of nearest neighbor Cd-Se bonds increases and becomes dominant while the optical spectrum evolves toward that of a composite containing CdSe.

  20. Development of lightweight, glass mirror segments for the Large Deployable Reflector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melugin, R. K.; Miller, J. H.; Angel, J. R. P.; Wangsness, P. A. A.; Parks, R. E.

    1986-01-01

    Accomplishments in the development of lightweight, honeycomb-core, sandwich mirror blanks made of borosilicate and high-silica glasses at the University of Arizona for the Large Deployable Reflector program are described. In this paper, work spanning the last 2 years is reported, highlighting a new mirror blank fabrication technique that permits the fabrication of the honeycomb core integrally with the front and back plates of the blank in a single furnace cycle. Two types of mirror blanks made by this method, an off-axis, aspheric segment and a smaller Vycor circular piece, are described. The fabrication of two off-axis, aspheric mirror segments is also described. Cryogenic test results are included on the test of a 38-cm diameter, lightweight, honeycomb core, sandwich mirror made of Pyrex.

  1. Defense Waste Processing Facility Radioactive Operations - Year Two

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Occhipinti, J.E.; Carter, J.T.; Edwards, R.E.; Beck, R.S.; Iverson, D.C.

    1998-03-01

    The Savannah River Site`s Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) near Aiken, SC is the nation`s first high-level radioactive waste vitrification facility. This waste (130 million liters) which has been stored in carbon steel underground tanks and is now being pretreated, melted into a highly durable borosilicate glass and poured into stainless steel canisters for eventual disposal in a geologic repository. Following a ten-year construction period and nearly three-year nonradioactive test program, the DWPF began radioactive operations in March 1996. The first nine months of radioactive operations have been reported previously. As with any complex technical facility, difficulties were encountered during the transition to radioactive operations. Results of the second year of radioactive operations are presented in this paper. The discussion includes: feed preparation and glass melting, resolution of the melter pouring issues, improvements in processing attainment and throughput, and planned improvements in laboratory attainment and throughput.

  2. Invisibility Cloak Printed on a Photonic Chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhen; Wu, Bing-Hong; Zhao, Yu-Xi; Gao, Jun; Qiao, Lu-Feng; Yang, Ai-Lin; Lin, Xiao-Feng; Jin, Xian-Min

    2016-01-01

    Invisibility cloak capable of hiding an object can be achieved by properly manipulating electromagnetic field. Such a remarkable ability has been shown in transformation and ray optics. Alternatively, it may be realistic to create a spatial cloak by means of confining electromagnetic field in three-dimensional arrayed waveguides and introducing appropriate collective curvature surrounding an object. We realize the artificial structure in borosilicate by femtosecond laser direct writing, where we prototype up to 5,000 waveguides to conceal millimeter-scale volume. We characterize the performance of the cloak by normalized cross correlation, tomography analysis and continuous three-dimensional viewing angle scan. Our results show invisibility cloak can be achieved in waveguide optics. Furthermore, directly printed invisibility cloak on a photonic chip may enable controllable study and novel applications in classical and quantum integrated photonics, such as invisualising a coupling or swapping operation with on-chip circuits of their own. PMID:27329510

  3. Control of DWPF melter feed composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility will be used to immobilize Savannah River Site high-level waste into a stable borosilicate glass for disposal in a geologic repository. Proper control of the melter feed composition in this facility is essential to the production of glass which meets product durability constraints dictated by repository regulations and facility processing constraints dictated by melter design. A technique has been developed which utilizes glass property models to determine acceptable processing regions based on the multiple constraints imposed on the glass product and to display these regions graphically. This system along with the batch simulation of the process is being used to form the basis for the statistical process control system for the facility

  4. Synthesis of Glass Nanofibers Using Femtosecond Laser Radiation Under Ambient Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatakrishnan K

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report the unique growth of nanofibers in silica and borosilicate glass using femtosecond laser radiation at 8 MHz repetition rate and a pulse width of 214 fs in air at atmospheric pressure. The nanofibers are grown perpendicular to the substrate surface from the molten material in laser-drilled microvias where they intertwine and bundle up above the surface. The fibers are few tens of nanometers in thickness and up to several millimeters in length. Further, it is found that at some places nanoparticles are attached to the fiber surface along its length. Nanofiber growth is explained by the process of nanojets formed in the molten liquid due to pressure gradient induced from the laser pulses and subsequently drawn into fibers by the intense plasma pressure. The attachment of nanoparticles is due to the condensation of vapor in the plasma.

  5. RETENTION OF SULFATE IN HIGH LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE GLASS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K.

    2010-09-07

    High level radioactive wastes are being vitrified at the Savannah River Site for long term disposal. Many of the wastes contain sulfate at concentrations that can be difficult to retain in borosilicate glass. This study involves efforts to optimize the composition of a glass frit for combination with the waste to improve sulfate retention while meeting other process and product performance constraints. The fabrication and characterization of several series of simulated waste glasses are described. The experiments are detailed chronologically, to provide insight into part of the engineering studies used in developing frit compositions for an operating high level waste vitrification facility. The results lead to the recommendation of a specific frit composition and a concentration limit for sulfate in the glass for the next batch of sludge to be processed at Savannah River.

  6. Development of the CAS-LIBB single-particle microbeam for localized irradiation of living cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xufei; XU Mingliang; WU Lijun; WANG Shaohu; FENG Huiyun; ZHAN Furu; PENG Shixiang; HU Chundong; ZHANG Shuqing; CHENG Jianjun; SHI Zhongtao; WANG Xiaohua; YUAN Hang; YUAN Haitao; YU Zengliang; CHEN Lianyun; HU Zhiwen; LI Jun; WU Yu; CHEN Bin; HU Suhua; ZHANG Jun

    2004-01-01

    A single-particle microbeam facility has been constructed at the Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering (LIBB), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS). The system was designed to deliver a defined numbers of hydrogen ions, produced by a van de Graaff accelerator, in an energy range of 2.0-3.0 MeV, into an area smaller than that of the nucleus of an individual living cell. The beam is collimated by a borosilicate glass capillary that forms the beam-line exit. An integrated computer program recognizes the cells and locates them one by one over the microbeam exit for irradiation. We present technical details of the CAS-LIBB microbeam facility, particularly on the collimator, hardware, control program, as well as cell irradiation protocols available. Various factors contributing to the targeting and positioning precision are discussed along with accuracy measurement results.

  7. Review of world experience and properties of materials for encapsulation of terrestrial photovoltaic arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, D. C.; Gaines, G. B.; Sliemers, F. A.; Kistler, C. W.; Igou, R. D.

    1976-01-01

    Published and unpublished information relating to encapsulation systems and materials properties was collected by searching the literature and appropriate data bases (over 1,300 documents were selected and reviewed) and by personal contacts including site and company visits. A data tabulation summarizing world experience with terrestrial photovoltaic arrays (50 installations) is presented in the report. Based on criteria of properties, processability, availability, and cost, candidate materials were identified which have potential for use in encapsulation systems for arrays with a lifetime of over 20 years high reliability, an efficiency greater than 10 percent, a total price less than $500/kW, and a production capacity of 500,000 kW/yr. The recommended materials (all commercially available) include, depending upon the device design, various borosilicate and soda-lime glasses and numerous polymerics suitable for specific encapsulation system functions.

  8. Nondestructive evaluation of a ceramic matrix composite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosskopf, Paul P.; Duke, John C., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Monolithic ceramic materials have proven their usefulness in many applications, yet, their potential for critical structural applications is limited because of their sensitivity to small imperfections. To overcome this extreme sensitivity to small imperfections, ceramic matrix composite materials have been developed that have the ability to withstand some distributed damage. A borosilicate glass reinforced with several layers of silicon-carbide fiber mat has been studied. Four-point flexure and tension tests were performed not only to determine some of the material properties, but also to initiate a controlled amount of damage within each specimen. Acousto-ultrasonic (AU) measurements were performed periodically during mechanical testing. This paper will compare the AU results to the mechanical test results and data from other nondestructive methods including acoustic emission monitoring and X-ray radiography. It was found that the AU measurements were sensitive to the damage that had developed within the material.

  9. Degradação do pesticida Padron® por processos fotoquímicos utilizando luz artificial e solar Degradation of Padron® by photochemical processes using artificial and sunlight radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvio César Godinho Teixeira

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Destruction of Padron® (dye and picloram was evaluated using a photoreactor and a solar reactor. Photolysis was observed using only a germicide lamp (GL. Black light (BL and H2O2 (172 mmol L-1 promoted a conversion of 49% and 6% of dye and picloram, respectively. Photocatalytic processes were more efficient using TiO2/GL (96%-dye; 60%-picloram than TiO2/BL (44%-dye; 40%-picloram. Photolysis using sunlight was not observed during PadronÒ recirculation in the reactor constructed with four borosilicate tubes. Meanwhile, adding H2O2 resulted in 12% conversion of dissolved organic compounds. Finally, the most efficient mineralization (60% was obtained using the Fenton reaction ( H2O2-176 mmol L-1; FeSO4x6H2O-90 mmol L-1 and sunlight.

  10. Burst behavior at a capillary tip: Effect of low and high surface tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agonafer, Damena D; Lopez, Ken; Palko, James W; Won, Yoonjin; Santiago, Juan G; Goodson, Kenneth E

    2015-10-01

    Liquid retention in micron and millimeter scale devices is important for maintaining stable interfaces in various processes including bimolecular separation, phase change heat transfer, and water desalination. There have been several studies of re-entrant geometries, and very few studies on retaining low surface tension liquids such as fluorocarbon-based dielectric liquids. Here, we study retention of a liquid with very low contact angles using borosilicate glass capillary tips. We analyzed capillary tips with outer diameters ranging from 250 to 840 μm and measured Laplace pressures up to 2.9 kPa. Experimental results agree well with a numerical model that predicts burst pressure (the maximum Laplace pressure for liquid retention), which is a function of the outer diameter (D) and capillary exit edge radius of curvature (r). PMID:26046980

  11. An investigation of Au/Ti multilayer thin-films: surface morphology, structure and interfacial/surface migration of constituents under applied thermal stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senevirathne, Indrajith; Kemble, Eric; Lavoie, John

    2014-03-01

    Multilayer thin films are ubiquitous in industry. Au/Ti/substrate is unique due to possible biological applications in proof of concept devices. Material used for substrates include borosilicate glass, and quartz. Typical Ti depositions on substrates give rise to Stanski-Krastonov (SK) like growth while Frank-van der Merwe (FM) like growth is preferred. Ti films with thickness of ~ 100nm were deposited onto varying substrates using a thermal evaporator. The additional Au layer is then deposited via magnetron sputter deposition at 100mtorr at low deposition rates (~ 1ML/min) onto the Ti thin film. These systems were annealed at varying temperatures and at different durations. Systems were investigated via AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy) probes to examine the surface morphology, and structure. Further, the ambient contamination and elemental distribution/diffusion at annealing was investigated via Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). PASSHE FPDC Annual Grant (LOU # 2010-LHU-03)

  12. Operating experience during high-level waste vitrification at the West Valley Demonstration Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides a summary of operational experiences, component and system performance, and lessons learned associated with the operation of the Vitrification Facility (VF) at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP). The VF was designed to convert stored high-level radioactive waste (HLW) into a stable waste form (borosilicate glass) suitable for disposal in a federal repository. Following successful completion on nonradioactive test, HLW processing began in July 1995. Completion of Phase 1 of HLW processing was reached on 10 June 1998 and represented the processing of 9.32 million curies of cesium-137 (Cs-137) and strontium-90 (Sr-90) to fill 211 canisters with over 436,000 kilograms of glass. With approximately 85% of the total estimated curie content removed from underground waste storage tanks during Phase 1, subsequent operations will focus on removal of tank heel wastes

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF AN IMPROVED SODIUM TITANATE FOR THE PRETREATMENT OF NUCLEAR WASTE AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, D

    2008-01-22

    High-level nuclear waste produced from fuel reprocessing operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) requires pretreatment to remove Cs-137, Sr-90 and alpha-emitting radionuclides (i.e., actinides) prior to disposal onsite as low level waste. Separation processes planned at SRS include sorption of Sr-90 and alpha-emitting radionuclides onto monosodium titanate (MST) and caustic side solvent extraction, for Cs-137 removal. The MST and separated Cs-137 will be encapsulated into a borosilicate glass waste form for eventual entombment at the federal repository. The predominant alpha-emitting radionuclides in the highly alkaline waste solutions include plutonium isotopes Pu-238, Pu-239 and Pu-240. This paper describes recent results to produce an improved sodium titanate material that exhibits increased removal kinetics and capacity for Sr-90 and alpha-emitting radionuclides compared to the baseline MST material.

  14. Long-term performance assessment of nuclear waste and natural glasses in the geological repository: a geochemical modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear waste loaded and natural (analogue) glasses were studied to understand neo-formed mineral species, formed in equilibrium with the physico-chemical conditions existing in the geological repository. To predict alteration-phases, dissolution equations for average vitrification system (AVS), barium borosilicate (BBS) and obsidian glasses were calculated, considering glass composition, pressure, temperature and pH conditions. Progress of reaction plotted against saturation index indicates saturation with solid phases - chamosite, chalcedony and Ca-beidellite in obsidian; greenalite and fayalite in AVS; and coffinite in BBS glass. Activities and molalities of aqueous species together with the number of moles of each mineral species produced and degenerated during the progress of the reaction (as a function of time) are discussed here. (author)

  15. Estimating model parameter values for total system performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The intrinsic dissolution rates of nine borosilicate waste glasses were extracted from the results of MCC-1 tests conducted for durations long enough that the solution pH reached a nearly constant value but short enough that the buildup of dissolved species did not affect the dissolution rate. The effects of the pH and temperature on the measured rates were deconvoluted to determine the sensitivity of the rate to the glass composition. The intrinsic dissolution rates were similar for all of these glasses and were not correlated with the glass composition. The mean and standard deviation of the intrinsic dissolution rates of these glasses are log k0/[g/(m2·d)] = 8.2 ± 0.2

  16. Challenges in commercial manufacture of radiation shielding glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactive hot-cells employ Radiation Shielding Windows (RSWs), assembled from specialty glasses, developed exclusively for nuclear industry. RSWs serve the twin purpose of direct viewing and shielding protection to the operator and use various types of radiation resistant and optically compatible glasses, such as low-density borosilicate glass; medium-density glass with up to 45% Lead and high-density glass with over 70% lead. Some glasses are Ceria-doped for enhancing their resistance threshold to radiation browning. A clear view of future requirement, capital and environmental costs could be the driving force towards bringing about changes in melting practices, encourage melting development, and enhancing collaboration. With DAE and CGCRI working in tandem, production of the entire range of RSW glasses by an Indian glass industry participant may no longer be a distant dream

  17. Estimating frame bulk and shear moduli of two double porosity layers by ultrasound transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Ruonan; Tinel, Alain; Alem, Abdellah; Franklin, Hervé; Wang, Huaqing

    2016-08-01

    The acoustic plane wave transmission by water saturated double porosity media is investigated. Two samples of double porosity media assumed to obey Berryman and Wang (BW) extension (Berryman and Wang, 1995, 2000) of Biot's theory in the low frequency regime are under consideration: ROBU® (pure binder-free borosilicate glass 3.3 manufactured to form the individual grains) and Tobermorite 11Å (the individual porous cement grains show irregular shapes). The de facto gap existing between theoretical and experimental data can be minimized by modifying adequately two of the parameters estimated from triaxial tests: the frame bulk and shear moduli. The frequency dependent imaginary parts that follow necessary from the minimization are in relation with the energy losses due to contact relaxation and friction between grains. PMID:27209582

  18. Damage thresholds in laser-irradiated optical materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guignard, Franck; Autric, Michel L.; Baudinaud, Vincent

    1997-05-01

    An experimental study on the damage induced by laser irradiation on different materials, borosilicate glass, fused silicate, molded and stretched polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), has been performed. The irradiation source is a 1KL pulsed cold cathode electron gun preionized TEA CO2 laser. Damage mechanisms are controlled by the in-depth absorption of the 10.6 micrometers radiation according to the Beer-Lambert law. PMMA is damaged following a boiling process. Stretched PMMA is fractured first, releasing stresses, then boiled like molded PMMA at a higher energy. BK7 crazed after the irradiation due to thermomechanical stresses, silicate melt and vaporized. Optical damages have been characterized by measuring the contrast transfer function through the irradiated samples.

  19. Effect of leaching in Na{sub 2}O-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-B{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2} system glass on borate anomaly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Myeong Jeong; Lee, Byung Chul; Ryu, Bong Ki [Pusan National Univ., Pusan(Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jong Rak; Kim, Cheon Woo; Park, Jong Kil; Shin, Sang Woon; Ha, Jong Hyun; Song, Myung Jae [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-07-01

    Vitrification is an attractive approach for treatment of the radioactive waste from nuclear power plants. The borosilicate glass has received major consideration as the primary waste form for the disposal of the radioactive waste. In this study, we examined Na{sub 2}O-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-B{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2} system glass as radioactive waste glass. The quantitative analysis by ICP for leached solution has shown that the more SiO{sub 2} in glass decrease the leaching rate from the glass. It was found that higher BO{sub 4} tetrahedra structure leads to increase the chemical durability.

  20. Construction report of 6 x 6 rod bundle reflood test facility (ATHER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 6x6 reflood test facility has been constructed by KAERI to quantify rewetting mechanism and evaluate the effect of dispersed flow cooling with respect to droplet behavior. The test section consists of a simulated 6 x 6 rod bundle, a flow housing, 4 pairs of borosilicate glasses for a visual observation and instrumentation. Axial power shape of the simulated heater rod is cosine. Peaking factor and heated length of the rod bundle are 1.468 and 3,810 mm, respectively. Special features of this facility are a separator tank to measure the amount of entrained droplet and a superheated steam probe for the measurement of superheated steam temperature in sub-channel. The experimental results from this study will be useful for the performance evaluation and the program update of the related computer code

  1. Construction report of 6 x 6 rod bundle reflood test facility (ATHER)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Seok; Chun, Se Young; Choi, Ki Yong; Moon, Sang Ki; Yun, Young Jung; Park, Jong Kuk; Kim, Bok Duk; Song, Chul Hwa; Baek, Won Pil

    2008-10-15

    The 6x6 reflood test facility has been constructed by KAERI to quantify rewetting mechanism and evaluate the effect of dispersed flow cooling with respect to droplet behavior. The test section consists of a simulated 6 x 6 rod bundle, a flow housing, 4 pairs of borosilicate glasses for a visual observation and instrumentation. Axial power shape of the simulated heater rod is cosine. Peaking factor and heated length of the rod bundle are 1.468 and 3,810 mm, respectively. Special features of this facility are a separator tank to measure the amount of entrained droplet and a superheated steam probe for the measurement of superheated steam temperature in sub-channel. The experimental results from this study will be useful for the performance evaluation and the program update of the related computer code.

  2. Intrinsic single- and multiple-pulse laser-induced damage in silicate glasses in the femtosecond-to-nanosecond region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show that the threshold power density of the intrinsic laser-induced damage in borosilicate glass at ∼1 μm wavelength does not depend on pulse duration from 2x10-13 to 3x10-8 s and has the same value for both single- and multiple-pulse exposure of the sample. This indicates that the mechanism of the intrinsic damage in glasses involves a collective response of a certain volume in the dielectric as a whole, such as 'dielectric-metal' phase transition, rather than a process of individual generation and accumulation of electrons, such as multiphoton, tunneling, or avalanche. Also, we demonstrate that under femtosecond exposure the threshold of the plasma formation in transparent glasses is considerably higher than the threshold of the residual change of medium parameters

  3. Effects of beta/gamma radiation on nuclear waste glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A key challenge in the disposal of high-level nuclear waste (HLW) in glass waste forms is the development of models of long-term performance based on sound scientific understanding of relevant phenomena. Beta decay of fission products is one source of radiation that can impact the performance of HLW glasses through the interactions of the emitted β-particles and g-rays with the atoms in the glass by ionization processes. Fused silica, alkali silicate glasses, alkali borosilicate glasses, and nuclear waste glasses are all susceptible to radiation effects from ionization. In simple glasses, defects (e.g., non-bridging oxygen and interstitial molecular oxygen) are observed experimentally. In more complex glasses, including nuclear waste glasses, similar defects are expected, and changes in microstructure, such as the formation of bubbles, have been reported. The current state of knowledge regarding the effects of β/γ radiation on the properties and microstructure of nuclear waste glasses are reviewed. (author)

  4. Ion beam sputter implantation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By means of ion beam atomizing or sputtering an integrally composed coating, the composition of which continuously changes from 100% of the substrate to 100% of the coating, can be surfaced on a substrate (e.g. molten quartz on plastic lenses). In order to do this in the facility there is directed a primary beam of accelerated noble gas ions on a target from the group of the following materials: SiO2, Al2O3, Corning Glass 7070, Corning Glass 7740 or borosilicate glass. The particles leaving the target are directed on the substrate by means of an acceleration potential of up to 10 KV. There may, however, be coated also metal layers (Ni, Co) on a mylar film resulting in a semireflecting metal film. (RW)

  5. Inorganic Corrosion-Inhibitive Pigments for High-Temperature Alkali-activated Well Casing Foam Cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugama, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Pyatina, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-11-01

    This study evaluates inorganic pigments for improving carbon steel (CS) brine-corrosion protection by the sodium metasilicate-activated calcium aluminate cement/Fly Ash blend at 300°C. Calcium borosilicate (CBS) and zinc phosphate, significantly improved CS corrosion-protection by decreasing cement’s permeability for corrosive ions and inhibiting anodic corrosion. An amorphous Na2O-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O phase tightly attached to CS surface formed at 300oC in CBS-modified cement pore solution. The corrosion rate of the CS covered with this phase was nearly 4-fold lower than in the case of nonmodified cement pore solution where the major phase formed on the surface of CS was crystalline analcime.

  6. Inorganic Corrosion-Inhibitive Pigments for High-Temperature Alkali-activated Well Casing Foam Cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugama, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Pyatina, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-11-14

    This study evaluates inorganic pigments for improving carbon steel (CS) brine-corrosion protection by the sodium metasilicate-activated calcium aluminate cement/Fly Ash blend at 300°C. Calcium borosilicate (CBS) and zinc phosphate, significantly improved CS corrosion-protection by decreasing cement’s permeability for corrosive ions and inhibiting anodic corrosion. An amorphous Na2O-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O phase tightly attached to CS surface formed at 300oC in CBS-modified cement pore solution. The corrosion rate of the CS covered with this phase was nearly 4-fold lower than in the case of nonmodified cement pore solution where the major phase formed on the surface of CS was crystalline analcime.

  7. Observation of Supercontinuum Generation and Darkening Effect in Bro-Silicate Glass under 800 nm Femtosecond Irradiations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdolahpour, D.; Jamshidi-Ghaleh, K.

    2007-04-01

    In this paper, we report the experimental observations of supercontinuum generation and darkening effect in bro-silicate glasses under 200 femtosecond pulses at wavelength of 800 nm. The spectrum of supercontinuum emission from the sample is recorded in the UV wavelength range. The length of filamentation or white light and darkening are investigated at different incident laser pulse energies. The begging position of the generated white light and darkening moves inside glass bulk with decreasing of incident pulse energy. The pulse energy threshold for supercontinuum generation and the laser-induced darkening in this material has been measured. By controlling of the laser-induced darkening in borosilicate glasses prepares a promising technique for designing optical devices.

  8. Long term chemical durability studies of vitrified waste products containing sulphate bearing high level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaluation of the term durability of the vitrified waste product (VWP) is of paramount importance for ascertaining safe containment of radionuclide immobilized in the matrix, because leaching is the principle mechanism through which radionuclide can migrate to human environment. Sodium released out from the glass was taken as the index element to examine the leach rate as a function of time. Average leach rate of VWPs based on barium borosilicate glass matrix immobilizing sulphate bearing HLW is 2.32'10-6 g.cm-2, day-1 after a period of 710 days at 373 deg K using demineralised water as leachant indicating adequate leach resistance of the conditioned product. The paper presented here describes the outcome of the work carried out for studying long term chemical durability of the vitrified waste period. (author)

  9. Invisibility Cloak Printed on a Photonic Chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhen; Wu, Bing-Hong; Zhao, Yu-Xi; Gao, Jun; Qiao, Lu-Feng; Yang, Ai-Lin; Lin, Xiao-Feng; Jin, Xian-Min

    2016-01-01

    Invisibility cloak capable of hiding an object can be achieved by properly manipulating electromagnetic field. Such a remarkable ability has been shown in transformation and ray optics. Alternatively, it may be realistic to create a spatial cloak by means of confining electromagnetic field in three-dimensional arrayed waveguides and introducing appropriate collective curvature surrounding an object. We realize the artificial structure in borosilicate by femtosecond laser direct writing, where we prototype up to 5,000 waveguides to conceal millimeter-scale volume. We characterize the performance of the cloak by normalized cross correlation, tomography analysis and continuous three-dimensional viewing angle scan. Our results show invisibility cloak can be achieved in waveguide optics. Furthermore, directly printed invisibility cloak on a photonic chip may enable controllable study and novel applications in classical and quantum integrated photonics, such as invisualising a coupling or swapping operation with on-chip circuits of their own. PMID:27329510

  10. A high performance, variable capacitance accelerometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilner, L. Bruce

    1988-12-01

    A variable capacitance acceleration sensor is described. Manufactured using silicon microfabrication techniques, the sensor uses a midplane, flat plate suspension, gas damping, and overrange stops. The sensor is assembled from three silicon wafers, using anodic bonds to inlays of borosilicate glass. Typical sensor properties are 7-pF active capacitance, 3-pF tare capacitance, a response of 0.05 pF/G, a resonance frequency of 3.4 kHz, and damping 0.7 critical. It is concluded that this sensor, with appropriate electronics, forms an accelerometer with an order-of-magnitude greater sensitivity-bandwidth product than a comparable piezoresistive acclerometer, and with extraordinary shock resistance.

  11. Iron Phosphate Glasses: An Alternative for Vitrifying Certain Nuclear Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitrification of nuclear waste in a glass is currently the preferred process for waste disposal. DOE currently approves only borosilicate (BS) type glasses for such purposes. However, many nuclear wastes, presently awaiting disposal, have complex and diverse chemical compositions, and often contain components that are poorly soluble or chemically incompatible in BS glasses. Such problematic wastes can be pre-processed and/or diluted to compensate for their incompatibility with a BS glass matrix, but both of these solutions increases the wasteform volume and the overall cost for vitrification. Direct vitrification using alternative glasses that utilize the major components already present in the waste is preferable, since it avoids pre-treating or diluting the waste, and, thus, minimizes the wasteform volume and overall cost

  12. Large-area surface wave plasmas using microwave multi-slot antennas for nanocrystalline diamond film deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J; Tsugawa, K; Ishihara, M; Koga, Y; Hasegawa, M [Nanotube Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Central 5, Higashi 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan)], E-mail: jaeho.kim@aist.go.jp

    2010-02-15

    An advanced slot antenna was developed and the enlargement of surface wave plasma was experimentally investigated using the array configuration of slot antennas for large-area nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) film depositions. An original-geometry slot antenna with an annular shape, designed in this work, permitted broad microwave radiations and vast extent of plasma propagations. Uniform plasmas were produced over a deposition area of 600 x 360 mm{sup 2} with densities of {approx}10{sup 17} m{sup -3} using hydrogen gas by an array configuration of five slot antennas and four rows of the array. A uniform (thickness variation: 10%) and smooth (Ra: 11 nm) NCD film deposition on a 300 x 300 mm{sup 2} borosilicate glass plate was achieved using the plasma and a mixed gas of H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4}/CO{sub 2}.

  13. Incubation of human blood fractions leads to changes in apparent miRNA abundance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Kerstin; Jørgensen, Stine Thuen; Heegaard, Peter M. H.

    was performed. 19 specific miRNAs were compared in control samples (0 hours), incubated 24 hour samples, and incubated 24 hour samples with glass bead stimulation for each blood fraction. All 19 miRNAs were expressed in all blood fractions albeit at different levels for different miRNAs. Incubation resulted...... in plasma, RBC, PBMC and PMN, while expression of miR-25, miR15a, miR-126 and miR223 was significantly changed in PRP. Thus, PRP, as the only blood fraction depended on stimulation to change its miRNA profile upon incubation. For the other fractions, stimulation either leveled out the changes induced......A basic investigation on the presence and composition of miRNA species and their reaction to in vitro incubation and stimulation (borosilicate glass beads), in plasma, platelet-rich plasma (PRP), red blood cells (RBC), peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and polymorphonuclear (PMN) cells...

  14. Chemical durability of soda-lime-aluminosilicate glass for radioactive waste vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitrification has been identified as one of the most viable waste treatment alternatives for nuclear waste disposal. Currently, the most popular glass compositions being selected for vitrification are the borosilicate family of glasses. Another popular type that has been around in glass industry is the soda-lime-silicate variety, which has often been characterized as the least durable and a poor candidate for radioactive waste vitrification. By replacing the boron constituent with a cheaper substitute, such as silica, the cost of vitrification processing can be reduced. At the same time, addition of network intermediates such as Al2O3 to the glass composition increases the environmental durability of the glass. The objective of this study is to examine the ability of the soda-lime-aluminosilicate glass as an alternative vitrification tool for the disposal of radioactive waste and to investigate the sensitivity of product chemical durability to variations in composition

  15. Vitrification of TRU wastes at Rocky Flats Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Immobilization of incinerator ash and various noncombustible TRU wastes was investigated. In three different research projects borosilicate glass proved to be the best candidate for TRU waste fixation. This glass has excellent chemical durability, long-term stability in the presence of radiation, and will withstand continuous temperatures up to 4000C without devitrification. In addition, wastes prepared in the form of glass will attain densities of approximately 2500 kg/m3 (2.5 g/cc). The free forming method of producing glass buttons provides a very simple, consistent, low maintenance way of producing a final waste form for transporting and either retrievable or permanent storage for TRU waste. The vitrification process produces a durable glass from the low density ash generated by the fluidized bed incinerator process and provides volume and weight reductions that are superior to other fixation processes. This results in decreased transportation and storage costs

  16. Spectroscopic investigations on Er3+/yb3+-doped oxyfluoride glass ceramicscontaining YOF nanocrystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Fei; XU Shiqing; ZHAO Shilong; DENG Degang; HUA Youjie; WANG Huanping

    2012-01-01

    Spectroscopic properties of Er3+/yb3+-doped transparent oxyfluoride borosilicate glass ceramics containing YOF nanocrystals were systematically investigated.X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirmed the formation of YOF nanocrystals in the glassy matrix.Based on the Judd-Ofelt theory,the intensity parameters Ω(i) (i=2,4,6),spontaneous emission probability,radiative lifetime,radiative quantum efficiency and the effective emission bandwidth were investigated.The upconversion luminescence intensity ofEr3+ ions in the glass ceramics increased significantly with the increasing crystallization temperature.The transition mechanisms of the green and red upeonversion luminescence were ascribed to a two-photon process,and the blue upconversion luminescence was a three-photon absorption process.

  17. Physicochemical Properties of Gold Nanostructures Deposited on Glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdenka Novotna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Properties of gold films sputtered onto borosilicate glass substrate were studied. UV-Vis absorption spectra were used to investigate optical parameters. XRD analysis provided information about the gold crystalline nanostructure, the texture, and lattice parameter and biaxial tension was also determined by the XRD method. The surface morphology was examined by atomic force microscopy (AFM; chemical structure of sputtered gold nanostructures was examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS. The gold crystallites are preferentially [111] oriented on the sputtered samples. Gold deposition leads to dramatic changes in the surface morphology in comparison to pristine glass substrate. Oxygen is not incorporated into the gold layer during gold deposition. Experimental data on lattice parameter were also confirmed by theoretical investigations of nanoclusters using tight-binding potentials.

  18. Invisibility Cloak Printed on a Photonic Chip

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Zhen; Zhao, Yu-Xi; Gao, Jun; Qiao, Lu-Feng; Yang, Ai-Lin; Lin, Xiao-Feng; Jin, Xian-Min

    2016-01-01

    Invisibility cloak capable of hiding an object can be achieved by properly manipulating electromagnetic field. Such a remarkable ability has been shown in transformation and ray optics. Alternatively, it may be realistic to create a spatial cloak by means of confining electromagnetic field in three-dimensional arrayed waveguides and introducing appropriate collective curvature surrounding an object. We realize the artificial structure in borosilicate by femtosecond laser direct writing, where we prototype up to 5000 waveguides to conceal millimeter-scale volume. We characterize the performance of the cloak by normalized cross correlation, tomography analysis and continuous three-dimensional viewing angle scan. Our results show invisibility cloak can be achieved in waveguide optics. Furthermore, directly printed invisibility cloak on a photonic chip may enable controllable study and novel applications in classical and quantum integrated photonics, such as invisualising a coupling or swapping operation with on-...

  19. HIGH TEMPERATURE TREATMENT OF INTERMEDIATE-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES - SIA RADON EXPERIENCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobolev, I.A.; Dmitriev, S.A.; Lifanov, F.A.; Kobelev, A.P.; Popkov, V.N.; Polkanov, M.A.; Savkin, A.E.; Varlakov, A.P.; Karlin, S.V.; Stefanovsky, S.V.; Karlina, O.K.; Semenov, K.N.

    2003-02-27

    This review describes high temperature methods of low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste (LILW) treatment currently used at SIA Radon. Solid and liquid organic and mixed organic and inorganic wastes are subjected to plasma heating in a shaft furnace with formation of stable leach resistant slag suitable for disposal in near-surface repositories. Liquid inorganic radioactive waste is vitrified in a cold crucible based plant with borosilicate glass productivity up to 75 kg/h. Radioactive silts from settlers are heat-treated at 500-700 0C in electric furnace forming cake following by cake crushing, charging into 200 L barrels and soaking with cement grout. Various thermochemical technologies for decontamination of metallic, asphalt, and concrete surfaces, treatment of organic wastes (spent ion-exchange resins, polymers, medical and biological wastes), batch vitrification of incinerator ashes, calcines, spent inorganic sorbents, contaminated soil, treatment of carbon containing 14C nuclide, reactor graphite, lubricants have been developed and implemented.

  20. Prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis methodology for determination of boron from trace to major contents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prompt gamma ray neutron activation analysis methodologies were standardized using a reflected neutron beam and Compton suppressed γ-ray spectrometer to quantify boron from trace to major concentrations. Neutron self-shielding correction factors for higher boron contents (0.2-10 mg) in samples were obtained from the sensitivity of chlorine by irradiating KCl with and without boron. This method was validated by determining boron concentrations in six boron compounds and applied to three borosilicate glass samples with boron contents in the range of 1-10 mg. Low concentrations of boron (10-58 mg kg-1) were also determined in two samples and five reference materials from NIST and IAEA. (author)

  1. Nuclear waste-form risk assessment for US Defense waste at Savannah River Plant. Annual report FY 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savannah River Plant has been supporting the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in its present effort to perform risk assessments of alternative waste forms for defense waste. This effort relates to choosing a suitable combination of solid form and geologic medium on the basis of risk of exposure to future generations; therefore, the focus is on post-closure considerations of deep geologic repositories. The waste forms being investigated include borosilicate glass, SYNROC, and others. Geologic media under consideration are bedded salt, basalt, and tuff. The results of our work during FY 1981 are presented in this, our second annual report. The two complementary tasks that comprise our program, analysis of waste-form dissolution and risk assessment, are described

  2. Reaction of formic and nitric acids with Savannah River Site radioactive HLW sludge in the DWPF pretreatment steps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) will combine borosilicate frit with highly radioactive waste sludge to produce glass waste forms for disposal. A key step in the DWPF will be acidification of the sludge with formic and nitric acids prior to vitrification. The reducing properties of formic acid will be used to reduce mercury (II) oxide and salts to elemental mercury. The mercury will then be steam-stripped, recovered, and purified. Another benefit of acidifying the sludge will be to reduce its viscosity so that a sludge-frit mixture can be pumped to the melter. The sludge viscosity decreases with pH as various sludge components dissolve with increasing acidity

  3. Acid dissolution of soils and rocks for the determination of boron by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The boron concentration in rocks, soils and standard reference materials was determined using hydrofluoric acid-aqua regia dissolution followed by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) using the B 1 249.773 -nm line, corrected for spectral interference by iron. An excess of fluoride was complexed with aluminium to release boron from the stable fluoroborate ion and to protect the borosilicate and quartz components of the instrument. Boron was not lost by volatilisation during volume reduction. Soil and rock boron values determined using the recommended dissolution procedures were comparable to those obtained using the accepted sodium carbonate fusion procedure and by d.c. arc emission spectrophotometry, and those for standard reference materials showed good agreement and precision with the literature values. (author)

  4. Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) startup test program: Glass characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liquid high-level nuclear waste will be immobilized at the Savannah River Site (SRS) by vitrification in borosilicate glass. The glass will be processed in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and poured into stainless steel canisters for eventual geologic disposal. Six simulated glass compositions will be processed in the DWPF during initial startup. The glass in 86 of the first 106 full sized canisters will be sampled and characterized. Extensive glass characterization will determine the following: (1) sampling frequency for radioactive operation, (2) verification of the compositionally dependent process-product models, (3) verification of melter mixing, (4) representativeness of the glass from the canister throat sampler, and (5) homogeneity of the canister glass

  5. Synthesis of novel ICIE16/BSG and ICIE16/BSG-NITRI bioglasses and description of ionic release kinetics upon immersion in SBF fluid: Effect of nitridation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Orgaz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A novel bioactive glass scaffold ICIE16/BSG has been prepared from a mixture of two different melt-derived glasses: a silicate bioglass (ICIE16 and a borosilicate bioglass (BSG. Combined processing techniques (gel casting and foam replication were used to form three-dimensional, interconnected porous monolith scaffolds (Orgaz et al., 2016 [1]. They were then nitrided with a hot ammonia flow as described in (Aleixandre et al., 1973 [3] and (Nieto, 1984 [4] to synthesize the ICIE16/BSG-NITRI bioglass (Orgaz et al., 2016 [1]. Herein we present a flow chart summarizing the forming process, plus images of the resulting scaffold after sintering and drying. Bioactivity was characterized in vitro by immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF for up to seven days. Data of ionic release kinetics upon SBF immersion are presented.

  6. Advanced processing of CdTe- and CuIn{sub x}Ga{sub 1{minus}x}Se{sub 2}-based solar cells. Phase 1 annual subcontract report, 18 April 1995--17 April 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morel, D L; Ferekides, C S [Univ. of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States)

    1997-03-01

    The main objective of this project to develop high-efficiency CdTe solar cells based on processing conditions favorable for manufacturing processes. This report presents the results on work performed during the first phase of this project. One of the major issues addressed is the use of soda-lime glass substrates in place of the borosilicate glass often used for laboratory devices; another task is the preparation of Cu(In, Ga) Se{sub 2} solar cells by selenizing suitable precursor films. Emphasis is placed on processing and how different reaction schemes affect device performance. It was found that different reaction schemes not only change the bulk properties of Cu(In, Ga) Se{sub 2}, but also its surface properties, which critically affect device performance. Although the objective is to optimize processing to meet the manufacturing constraints, work has not been limited within these requirements.

  7. The effects of CdS processing and glass substrates on the performance of CdTe solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferekides, C.S.; Dugan, K.; Ceekala, V.; Killian, J.; Oman, D.; Swaminathan, R.; Morel, D.L. [Univ. of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering

    1994-12-31

    Cadmium Sulfide films prepared by rf sputtering and close spaced sublimation (CSS) have been used for the fabrication of CdTe/CdS thin film solar cells on borosilicate glass substrates. The CdTe layer was prepared by CSS at high processing temperatures (600 C). CdS films prepared by the chemical bath deposition process (CBD) were deposited on tin oxide coated soda lime glass substrates. For these devices the CSS CdTe films were prepared at low substrate temperatures (< 550 C). Devices prepared at low processing temperatures (CdTe-CSS/CdS-CBD) on soda lime glass substrates exhibited efficiencies in excess of 13% as measured under AM 1.5 conditions at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

  8. Method for making glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for making better quality molten (borosilicate and other) glass in a glass melter, the glass having the desired viscosity and, preferably, also the desired resistivity so that the glass melt can be established effectively and the product of the glass melter will have the desired level of quality. The method includes the adjustment of the composition of the a ass constituents that are fed into the melterin accordance with certain correlations that reliably predict the viscosity and resistivity from the melter temperature and the melt composition, then heating the ingredients to the melter's operating temperature until they melt and homogenize. The equations include the calculation of a ''non-bridging oxygen'' term from the numbers of moles of the various ingredients, and then the determination of the viscosity and resistivity from the operating temperature of the melter and the non-bridging oxygen term

  9. Immobilization of nuclear waste: Raman Spectroscopic probing of structural changes in glass matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barium borosilicate glass used for immobilization of sulphate containing simulated high level radioactive liquid waste was prepared using conventional melt and quench method. Conventional leach test under total reflux method was used for the assessment of chemical durability of waste glass. The leaching was carried out using a conventional boiling water unit wherein powdered and screened glass sample of -16+25 BSS (850 micron) grain size was exposed to boiling distilled water for 2 years. Exposed glass specimens were subjected to Raman spectroscopic investigations to understand the structural modifications, if any, during leaching experiments. The results revealed that the leaching leads to a redistribution of bridged and non-bridged oxygen in glass. The redistribution is tentatively assigned to the possible release of structure breaking ions/atoms from the vitreous waste. (author)

  10. 3-D mapping with ellipsometrically determined physical thickness/refractive index of spin coated sol–gel silica layer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Das; P Pal; S Roy; S Chakraboarty; P K Biswas

    2002-11-01

    Precursor sol for sol–gel silica layer was prepared from the starting material, tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS). The sol was deposited onto borosilicate crown (BSC) glass by the spinning technique (rpm 2500). The gel layer thus formed transformed to oxide layer on heating to 450°C for ∼ 30 min. The physical thicknessand the refractive index of the layer were measured ellipsometrically (Rudolph Auto EL II) at 632.8 nm. About 10 × 10 mm surface area of the silica layer was chosen for evaluation of thickness and refractive index values at different points (121 nos.) with 1 mm gap between two points. Those data were utilized in the Autolisp programme for 3-D mapping. Radial distribution of the evaluated values was also displayed.

  11. Effect of Kovar alloy oxidized in simulated N2/H2O atmosphere on its sealing with glass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dawei Luo; Wenbo Leng; Zhuoshen Shen

    2008-01-01

    The effect of Kovar alloy oxidized in simulated field atmosphere on its sealing with glass was studied in this article. After Kovar plates and pins were preoxidized in N2 with 0℃, 10℃ and 20℃ dew points at 1000℃ for different times, Fe3O4 and Fe2O3 existed in the oxidation products on Kovar surface, and the quantity of Fe2O3 increased with increasing dew point and oxidation time.Then they were sealed with borosilicate glass insulator at 1030℃ for 20 min. The results indicated that the type and quantity of oxidation products would directly influence the quality of glass-to-metal seals. With the increase of oxidation products, gas bubbles in the glass insulator were more serious, the climbing height of glass along the pins was higher, and corrosion of Kovar pins caused from the molten glass was transformed from uniform to the localized.

  12. R7T7-type HLW glass alteration under irradiation. Study of the residual alteration rate regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In France, fission products and minor actinides remaining after reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel are confined in a borosilicate glass matrix, named R7T7, for disposal in a geological repository. However, in these conditions, after several thousand years, water could arrive in contact with glass and be radio-lysed. In this work, we investigated the irradiation influence and especially the influence of the energy deposition on the residual glass alteration rate regime in pure water. Two types of leaching tests have been carried out. The first were performed on radioactive glass and the second on a SON68 glass (nonradioactive surrogate of R7T7 glass) under external irradiation γ. (author)

  13. Salvage of plutonium-and americium-contaminated metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melt-slagging techniques were evaluated as a decontamination and consolidation step for metals contaminated with oxides of plutonium and americium. Experiments were performed in which mild steel, stainless steel, and nickel metals contaminated with oxides of plutonium and americium were melted in the presence of silicate slags of various compositions. The metal products were low in contamination, with the plutonium and americium strongly fractionated to the slags. Partition coefficients (plutonium in slag/plutonium in steel) of 7*10/sup 6/ with borosilicate slag and 3*10/sup 6/ for calcium, magnesium silicate slag were measured. Decontamination of metals containing as much as 14,000 p.p.m. plutonium appears to be as efficient as that of metals with plutonium levels of 400 p.p.m. Staged extraction, that is, a remelting of processed metal with clean slag, results in further decontamination of the metal. 10 refs

  14. Highly Nonlinear Luminescence Induced by Gold Nanoparticles on Glass Surfaces with Continuous-Wave Laser Illumination

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Yong; Toro, Ligia; Stefani, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    We report on highly nonlinear luminescence being observed from individual spherical gold nanoparticles immobilized on a borosilicate glass surface and illuminated by continuous-wave (CW) lasers with relatively low power. The nonlinear luminescence shows optical super-resolution beyond the diffraction limit in three dimensions compared to the scatting of the excitation laser light. The luminescence intensity from most nanoparticles is proportional to the 5th--7th power of the excitation laser power and has wide excitation and emission spectra across the visible wavelength range. Strong nonlinear luminescence is only observed near the glass surface. High optical nonlinearity excited by low CW laser power is related to a long-lived dark state of the gold nanoparticles, where the excitation light is strongly absorbed. This phenomenon has potential biological applications in super-resolution and deep tissue imaging.

  15. Rhenium volatilization in waste glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Kai; Pierce, David A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Hrma, Pavel, E-mail: pavel.hrma@pnnl.gov [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Schweiger, Michael J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Kruger, Albert A. [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Re did not volatilize from a HLW feed until 1000 °C. • Re began to volatilize from LAW feeds at ∼600 °C. • The vigorous foaming and generation of gases from salts enhanced Re evaporation in LAW feeds. • The HLW glass with less foaming and salts is a promising medium for Tc immobilization. - Abstract: We investigated volatilization of rhenium (Re), sulfur, cesium, and iodine during the course of conversion of high-level waste melter feed to glass and compared the results for Re volatilization with those in low-activity waste borosilicate glasses. Whereas Re did not volatilize from high-level waste feed heated at 5 K min{sup −1} until 1000 °C, it began to volatilize from low-activity waste borosilicate glass feeds at ∼600 °C, a temperature ∼200 °C below the onset temperature of evaporation from pure KReO{sub 4}. Below 800 °C, perrhenate evaporation in low-activity waste melter feeds was enhanced by vigorous foaming and generation of gases from molten salts as they reacted with the glass-forming constituents. At high temperatures, when the glass-forming phase was consolidated, perrhenates were transported to the top surface of glass melt in bubbles, typically together with sulfates and halides. Based on the results of this study (to be considered preliminary at this stage), the high-level waste glass with less foaming and salts appears a promising medium for technetium immobilization.

  16. Chemical analysis of simulated high level waste glasses to support stage III sulfate solubility modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-03-17

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management (EM) is sponsoring an international, collaborative project to develop a fundamental model for sulfate solubility in nuclear waste glass. The solubility of sulfate has a significant impact on the achievable waste loading for nuclear waste forms within the DOE complex. These wastes can contain relatively high concentrations of sulfate, which has low solubility in borosilicate glass. This is a significant issue for low-activity waste (LAW) glass and is projected to have a major impact on the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Sulfate solubility has also been a limiting factor for recent high level waste (HLW) sludge processed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The low solubility of sulfate in glass, along with melter and off-gas corrosion constraints, dictate that the waste be blended with lower sulfate concentration waste sources or washed to remove sulfate prior to vitrification. The development of enhanced borosilicate glass compositions with improved sulfate solubility will allow for higher waste loadings and accelerate mission completion.The objective of the current scope being pursued by SHU is to mature the sulfate solubility model to the point where it can be used to guide glass composition development for DWPF and WTP, allowing for enhanced waste loadings and waste throughput at these facilities. A series of targeted glass compositions was selected to resolve data gaps in the model and is identified as Stage III. SHU fabricated these glasses and sent samples to SRNL for chemical composition analysis. SHU will use the resulting data to enhance the sulfate solubility model and resolve any deficiencies. In this report, SRNL provides chemical analyses for the Stage III, simulated HLW glasses fabricated by SHU in support of the sulfate solubility model development.

  17. Formic Acid Free Flowsheet Development To Eliminate Catalytic Hydrogen Generation In The Defense Waste Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, Dan P.; Stone, Michael E.; Newell, J. David; Fellinger, Terri L.; Bricker, Jonathan M.

    2012-09-14

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) processes legacy nuclear waste generated at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during production of plutonium and tritium demanded by the Cold War. The nuclear waste is first treated via a complex sequence of controlled chemical reactions and then vitrified into a borosilicate glass form and poured into stainless steel canisters. Converting the nuclear waste into borosilicate glass canisters is a safe, effective way to reduce the volume of the waste and stabilize the radionuclides. Testing was initiated to determine whether the elimination of formic acid from the DWPF's chemical processing flowsheet would eliminate catalytic hydrogen generation. Historically, hydrogen is generated in chemical processing of alkaline High Level Waste sludge in DWPF. In current processing, sludge is combined with nitric and formic acid to neutralize the waste, reduce mercury and manganese, destroy nitrite, and modify (thin) the slurry rheology. The noble metal catalyzed formic acid decomposition produces hydrogen and carbon dioxide. Elimination of formic acid by replacement with glycolic acid has the potential to eliminate the production of catalytic hydrogen. Flowsheet testing was performed to develop the nitric-glycolic acid flowsheet as an alternative to the nitric-formic flowsheet currently being processed at the DWPF. This new flowsheet has shown that mercury can be reduced and removed by steam stripping in DWPF with no catalytic hydrogen generation. All processing objectives were also met, including greatly reducing the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) product yield stress as compared to the baseline nitric/formic flowsheet. Ten DWPF tests were performed with nonradioactive simulants designed to cover a broad compositional range. No hydrogen was generated in testing without formic acid.

  18. Chemical analysis of simulated high level waste glasses to support stage III sulfate solubility modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management (EM) is sponsoring an international, collaborative project to develop a fundamental model for sulfate solubility in nuclear waste glass. The solubility of sulfate has a significant impact on the achievable waste loading for nuclear waste forms within the DOE complex. These wastes can contain relatively high concentrations of sulfate, which has low solubility in borosilicate glass. This is a significant issue for low-activity waste (LAW) glass and is projected to have a major impact on the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Sulfate solubility has also been a limiting factor for recent high level waste (HLW) sludge processed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The low solubility of sulfate in glass, along with melter and off-gas corrosion constraints, dictate that the waste be blended with lower sulfate concentration waste sources or washed to remove sulfate prior to vitrification. The development of enhanced borosilicate glass compositions with improved sulfate solubility will allow for higher waste loadings and accelerate mission completion.The objective of the current scope being pursued by SHU is to mature the sulfate solubility model to the point where it can be used to guide glass composition development for DWPF and WTP, allowing for enhanced waste loadings and waste throughput at these facilities. A series of targeted glass compositions was selected to resolve data gaps in the model and is identified as Stage III. SHU fabricated these glasses and sent samples to SRNL for chemical composition analysis. SHU will use the resulting data to enhance the sulfate solubility model and resolve any deficiencies. In this report, SRNL provides chemical analyses for the Stage III, simulated HLW glasses fabricated by SHU in support of the sulfate solubility model development.

  19. 利用废旧镁碳砖制备包沿料的研究%The Research of Using Waste MgO-C Materials Preparation Package Along

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    巩秀民

    2015-01-01

    Flint, magnesia carbon brick, as the main raw material, pure calcium aluminate cement as binding agents, boron glass and spodumene as composite sintering agent, ladle along the material are prepared. The MgO-C recycled materials and borosilicate glass addition on material properties are studied. The application test showed that: the addition of 15% renewable materials bricks 0.5%~1% of borosilicate glass, the material properties is best, with high strength, slag release and good thermal shock resistance of both the refractory castable. The refractory recycling technology can significantly enhance the use of quality materials ladle along, not only can save the national mineral resources and energy , but also can reduce environmental pollution and greatly reduce the cost of refractories.%以焦宝石、废旧镁碳砖为主要原料,采用纯铝酸钙水泥为结合剂,硼玻璃、锂辉石为复合烧结剂制备钢包包沿料,研究了镁碳砖再生料和硼玻璃加入量对材料性能的影响。工业应用试验表明:加入15%的镁碳砖再生料及0.5%~1%的硼玻璃时,材料性能最好,可以显著提升钢包包沿料的使用质量,研究开发使用后耐火材料再利用技术,不仅可节约矿产资源和能源,大大降低耐火材料的生产成本,还可减少环境污染。

  20. Effect of microstructural evolution on magnetic properties of Ni thin films

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prashant Kumar; M Ghanashyam Krishna; A K Bhattacharya

    2009-06-01

    The magnetic properties of Ni thin films, in the range 20–500 nm, at the crystalline–nanocrystalline interface are reported. The effect of thickness, substrate and substrate temperature has been studied. For the films deposited at ambient temperatures on borosilicate glass substrates, the crystallite size, coercive field and magnetization energy density first increase and achieve a maximum at a critical value of thickness and decrease thereafter. At a thickness of 50 nm, the films deposited at ambient temperature onto borosilicate glass, MgO and silicon do not exhibit long-range order but are magnetic as is evident from the non-zero coercive field and magnetization energy. Phase contrast microscopy revealed that the grain sizes increase from a value of 30–50 nm at ambient temperature to 120–150 nm at 503 K and remain approximately constant in this range up to 593 K. The existence of grain boundary walls of width 30–50 nm is demonstrated using phase contrast images. The grain boundary area also stagnates at higher substrate temperature. There is pronounced shape anisotropy as evidenced by the increased aspect ratio of the grains as a function of substrate temperature. Nickel thin films of 50 nm show the absence of long-range crystalline order at ambient temperature growth conditions and a preferred [111] orientation at higher substrate temperatures. Thin films are found to be thermally relaxed at elevated deposition temperature and having large compressive strain at ambient temperature. This transition from nanocrystalline to crystalline order causes a peak in the coercive field in the region of transition as a function of thickness and substrate temperature. The saturation magnetization on the other hand increases with increase in substrate temperature.

  1. Platinoids and molybdenum in nuclear waste containment glasses: a structural study; Les platinoides et le molybdene dans des verres d'interet nucleaires: etude structurale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Grand, M. [CEA/VALRHO - site de Marcoule, Dept. de Recherche en Retraitement et en Vitrification (DRRV), 30 - Marcoule (France)]|[Paris-7 Univ., 75 (France)

    2000-07-01

    This work deals with the structure of borosilicate nuclear glasses and with some relationships between structure and macroscopic properties. Two types of elements which may disturb the industrial process - platinoids (Ru and Pd) and molybdenum - are central to this work. Platinoids induce weak modifications on the structure of the glass, causing a depolymerization of the glassy network, an increase of the {sup [3]}B/{sup [4]}B ratio and a modification of the medium range order around Si between 3.3 and 4.5 angstrom. The modifications of viscosity and density induced by platinoids in the glass are not due to the structural effect of the platinoids. The increase of viscosity is attributed to needle shaped RuO{sub 2}. It can be moderated by imposing reducing conditions during the elaboration of the glass. The slight difference between experimental and calculated densities is due to the increase of the volume percentage of bubbles in the glass with increasing platinoid content. Mo is either present in the glass as molybdic groupings, or mobilized in chemically complex molybdic crystalline phases. The chemical composition and mineralogy of these phases has been obtained using electronic microprobe data and XRD with Rietveld analysis. The distribution of the different elements between the crystalline phases and the glass is strongly influenced by the structural role of the various cations in the glass. The Mo present in the glass appears as MoO{sub 4} tetrahedra, independent of the borosilicate network. The formation of the crystalline phases can be explained by the existence of a precursor in which the MoO{sub 4} tetrahedra are concentrated in rich alkali and earth-alkali bearing areas of the glass. (author)

  2. X-ray absorption fine structure of aged, Pu-doped glass and ceramic waste forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, N. J.; Weber, W. J.; Conradson, S. D.

    1998-04-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopic (XAS) studies were performed on three compositionally identical, Pu-doped, borosilicate glasses prepared 15 years ago at different α-activities by varying the 239Pu/ 238Pu isotopic ratio. The resulting α-activities ranged from 1.9×10 7 to 4.2×10 9 Bq/g and have current, accumulated doses between 8.8×10 15 to 1.9×10 18 α-decays/g. Two ceramic, polycrystalline zircon (ZrSiO 4) samples prepared 16 years ago with 10.0 wt% Pu was also investigated. Varying the 239Pu/ 238Pu isotopic ratio in these samples resulted in α-activities of 2.5×10 8 and 5.6×10 10 Bq/g and current, accumulated doses of 1.2×10 17 and 2.8×10 19 α-decays/g. The multicomponent composition of the waste forms permitted XAS investigations at six absorption edges for the borosilicate glass and at three absorption edges for the polycrystalline zircons. For both waste forms, analysis of extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra indicates that the local environment around the cations exhibits different degrees of disorder as a result of the accumulated α-decay dose. In general, cations with short cation-oxygen bonds show little effect from self-radiation whereas cations with long cation-oxygen bonds show a greater degree of disorder with accumulated α-decay dose.

  3. Technical Status Report on the Effect of Phosphate and Aluminum on the Development of Amorphous Phase Separation in Sodium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cozzi, A.D.

    1998-11-03

    The objective of the Tank Focus Area ''Optimize Waste Loading'' task is to enhance the definition of the acceptable processing window for high-level waste vitrification plants. One possible manner in which the acceptable processing window may be enhanced is by reducing the uncertainty of various compositional/property models through a specifically defined experimental plan. A reduction in model uncertainty can reduce limitations on current acceptance constraints and may allow for a larger processing or operational window. Enhanced composition/property model predictions coupled with an increased waste loading may decrease the processing time and waste glass disposal costs (i.e., overall lifecycle costs). One of the compositional/property models currently being evaluated by the Tanks Focus Area is related to the development of amorphous phase separation in multi-component borosilicate glasses.Described in this report is the current status for evaluating the effect of phosphorus and alumina on both simple sodium borosilicate and high-level waste glasses on the formation of amorphous phase separation. The goal of this subtask is to increase the understanding of the formation of phase separation by adding significant amounts (3-5 wt. percent) of phosphorus and alumina to well-characterized glasses. Additional scope includes evaluating the effects of thermal history on the formation of amorphous phase separation and durability of select glasses.The development of data, understanding, and quantitative description for composition and kinetic effects on the development of amorphous phase separation will continue in FY99. This effort will provide insight into the compositional and thermal effects on phase stability and will lead to a better understanding of the methods used to predict the development of amorphous phase separation in HLW glasses.

  4. Redox kinetics and mechanism in silicate melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work contributes to better understand iron redox reactions and mechanisms in silicate melts. It was conducted on compositions in both Na2O-B2O3-SiO2-FeO and Na2O-Al2O3-SiO2-FeO systems. The influence of boron-sodium and aluminum-sodium substitutions and iron content on properties and structure of glasses and on the iron redox kinetics has been studied by Raman, Moessbauer and XANES spectroscopies at the B and Fe K-edges. In borosilicate glasses, an increase in iron content or in the Fe3+/ΣFe redox state implies a structural rearrangement of the BO4 species in the glass network whereas the BO3 and BO4 relative proportions remain nearly constant. In all studied glasses and melts, Fe3+ is a network former in tetrahedral coordination, unless for aluminosilicates of ratio Al/Na≥1 where Fe3+ is a network modifier in five-fold coordination. Near Tg, diffusion of network modifying cations controls the iron redox kinetics along with a flux of electron holes. At liquidus temperatures, oxygen diffusion is considered to be the mechanism that governs redox reactions. This study shows the role played by the silicate network polymerization on the redox kinetics. In borosilicate melts, iron redox kinetics depends on the boron speciation between BO3 and BO4 that depends itself on the sodium content. Furthermore, an increase in the network-former/network-modifier ratio implies a decrease in oxygen diffusion that results in a slowing down of the redox kinetics. The obtained results allow a description of the iron redox kinetics for more complex compositions as natural lavas or nuclear waste model glasses. (author)

  5. Understanding of the mechanical and structural changes induced by alpha particles and heavy ions in the French simulated nuclear waste glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakurt, G.; Abdelouas, A.; Guin, J.-P.; Nivard, M.; Sauvage, T.; Paris, M.; Bardeau, J.-F.

    2016-07-01

    Borosilicate glasses are considered for the long-term confinement of high-level nuclear wastes. External irradiations with 1 MeV He+ ions and 7 MeV Au5+ ions were performed to simulate effects produced by alpha particles and by recoil nuclei in the simulated SON68 nuclear waste glass. To better understand the structural modifications, irradiations were also carried out on a 6-oxides borosilicate glass, a simplified version of the SON68 glass (ISG glass). The mechanical and macroscopic properties of the glasses were studied as function of the deposited electronic and nuclear energies. Alpha particles and gold ions induced a volume change up to -0.7% and -2.7%, respectively, depending on the glass composition. Nano-indentations tests were used to determine the mechanical properties of the irradiated glasses. A decrease of about -22% to -38% of the hardness and a decrease of the reduced Young's modulus by -8% were measured after irradiations. The evolution of the glass structure was studied by Raman spectroscopy, and also 11B and 27Al Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (MAS-NMR) on a 20 MeV Kr irradiated ISG glass powder. A decrease of the silica network connectivity after irradiation with alpha particles and gold ions is deduced from the structural changes observations. NMR spectra revealed a partial conversion of BO4 to BO3 units but also a formation of AlO5 and AlO6 species after irradiation with Kr ions. The relationships between the mechanical and structural changes are also discussed.

  6. Temperature-dependent evolution of RbBSi{sub 2}O{sub 6} glass into crystalline Rb-boroleucite according to X-ray diffraction data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levin, Aleksandr A. [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). Inst. fuer Strukturphysik; Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Dresden (Germany); Filatov, Stanislav K.; Krzhizhanovskaya, Maria G. [Sankt-Peterburgskij Univ., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation). Dept. of Crystallography; Paufler, Peter [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). Inst. fuer Strukturphysik; Bubnova, Rimma S. [Sankt-Peterburgskij Univ., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation). Dept. of Crystallography; Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation). Grebenshchikov Institute of Silicate Chemistry; Meyer, Dirk C. [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). Inst. fuer Strukturphysik; Technische Univ. Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Experimentelle Physik

    2013-07-01

    The temperature-dependent evolution of the glass into a crystalline phase is studied for a rubidium borosilicate glass of composition 16.7 Rb{sub 2}O . 16.7 B{sub 2}O{sub 3} . 66.6 SiO{sub 2} employing X-ray diffraction (XRD) data. A glass sample was prepared by melt quenching from 1500 within 0.5 hour. The glass sample was step-wise annealed at 13 distinct temperatures from 300 C up to 900 C for 1 h at every annealing step. To investigate changes in the glass structure, angle-dispersive XRD was applied by using an energy-resolving semiconductor detector. The radial distribution functions (RDFs) were calculated at every stage. For polycrystalline states the crystal structure of the samples with different thermal history was refined using the Rietveld method. Comparing correlation distances estimated from RDFs of glass and polycrystalline samples and mean interatomic distances calculated for polycrystalline samples by using atomic coordinates after Rietveld refinement, it is concluded that the borosilicate glass under study is converted into the crystalline state in the temperature range of 625-750 C (i.e. in the temperature range close to the glass transition range 620-695 C as determined by differential scanning calorimetry by using of heating rate of 20 K/min) at an average heating rate of about 0.35 K/min. When the heating rate is increased up to 10 or 20 K/min, the crystallisation temperature shifts sharply up to 831-900 C and 878-951 C, respectively. XRD data give evidence that distinctive traces of cubic RbBSi{sub 2}O{sub 6} appear from glass at about 625 C and a two-phase range exists up to 750 C. After annealing at higher temperatures (800-900 C) the crystal structure practically does not change any more. (orig.)

  7. Electrical and optical properties of magnetron sputtered Cd{sub 2}SnO{sub 4} transparent conducting oxide thin films for use in CdTe solar devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoke, J.A., E-mail: jastoke2012@gmail.com [Rocky Mountain College, Billings, MT 59102 (United States); Beach, J.D.; Bradford, W.C.; Ohno, T.R. [Physics Department, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80102 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    In this study cadmium stannate Cd{sub 2}SnO{sub 4} (CTO), was sputtered onto borosilicate glass under substrate temperatures of ∼ 25 °C (room temp), 200 °C, 300 °C and 400 °C. The CTO films were then annealed in contact with cadmium sulfide (CdS). This annealing process consisted of placing the CTO samples face up in a thermal furnace with a separate piece of CdS film on a borosilicate substrate face down on top of the CTO sample. This arrangement was then heated to a temperature of 600 °C and annealed for one hour. The goal was to fabricate a CTO film with the highest transparency without sacrificing good electrical conductivity. The quality of CTO films, i.e. transparency and electrical conductivity can be greatly affected by processing conditions. In this paper the optical and electrical properties of CTO are investigated before and after thermal annealing to determine the affect of varying process conditions on the quality of the film. Spectroscopic ellipsometry analysis was performed on both as-deposited and annealed CTO to determine the nature of the optical response of the films over the spectral range of 0.73 to 3.34 eV. The electrical properties of the films were examined using both Hall effect data and optical Drude modeling of free carrier absorption. Structural properties of the films were determined from X-ray diffraction data. The result of this investigation is a high quality CTO film with a sheet resistance of ∼ 8 Ω/□. - Highlights: • Cadmium stannate (CTO) is characterized to achieve optimization as a transparent conducting oxide (TCO). • Spectroscopic ellipsometry results were substantiated with other measurements. • Specialized CTO processing yields a TCO film with low sheet resistance.

  8. Description of DWPF reference waste form and canister

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-06-01

    This document describes the reference waste form and canister for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The facility is planned for location at the Savannah River Plant in Aiken, SC, and is scheduled for construction authorization during FY-1983. The reference canister is fabricated of 24-in.-OD 304L stainless steel pipe with a dished bottom, domed head, and lifting and welding flanges on the head neck. The overall canister length is 9 ft 10 in., with a wall thickness of 3/8-in. (schedule 20 pipe). The canister length was selected to reduce equipment cell height in the DWPF to a practical size. The canister diameter was selected to ensure that a filled canister with its shipping cask could be accommodated on a legal-weight truck. The overall dimensions and weight appear to be generally compatible with preliminary assessments of repository requirements. The reference waste form is borosilicate glass containing approximately 28 wt % sludge oxides with the balance glass frit. Borosilicate glass was chosen because of its high resistance to leaching by water, its relatively high solubility for nuclides found in the sludge, and its reasonably low melting temperature. The glass frit contains approximately 58% SiO/sub 2/ and 15% B/sub 2/O/sub 3/. This composition results in a low average leachability in the waste form of approximately 5 x 10/sup -9/ g/cm/sup 2/-day based on /sup 137/Cs over 365 days in 25/sup 0/C water. The canister is filled with 3260 lb of glass which occupies about 85% of the free canister volume. The filled canister will generate approximately 425 watts when filled with oxides from 5-year-old sludge and 15-year-old supernate from the Stage 1 and Stage 2 processes. The radionuclide content of the canister is about 150,000 curies, with a radiation level of 2 x 10/sup 4/ rem/hour at 1 cm.

  9. Confinement matrices for low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laverov, N. P.; Omel'Yanenko, B. I.; Yudintsev, S. V.; Stefanovsky, S. V.

    2012-02-01

    Mining of uranium for nuclear fuel production inevitably leads to the exhaustion of natural uranium resources and an increase in market price of uranium. As an alternative, it is possible to provide nuclear power plants with reprocessed spent nuclear fuel (SNF), which retains 90% of its energy resource. The main obstacle to this solution is related to the formation in the course of the reprocessing of SNF of a large volume of liquid waste, and the necessity to concentrate, solidify, and dispose of this waste. Radioactive waste is classified into three categories: low-, intermediate-, and high-level (LLW, ILW, and HLW); 95, 4.4, and 0.6% of the total waste are LLW, ILW, and HLW, respectively. Despite its small relative volume, the radioactivity of HLW is approximately equal to the combined radioactivity of LLW + ILW (LILW). The main hazard of HLW is related to its extremely high radioactivity, the occurrence of long-living radionuclides, heat release, and the necessity to confine HLW for an effectively unlimited time period. The problems of handling LILW are caused by the enormous volume of such waste. The available technology for LILW confinement is considered, and conclusion is drawn that its concentration, vitrification, and disposal in shallow-seated repositories is a necessary condition of large-scale reprocessing of SNF derived from VVER-1000 reactors. The significantly reduced volume of the vitrified LILW and its very low dissolution rate at low temperatures makes borosilicate glass an ideal confinement matrix for immobilization of LILW. At the same time, the high corrosion rate of the glass matrix at elevated temperatures casts doubt on its efficient use for immobilization of heat-releasing HLW. The higher cost of LILW vitrification compared to cementation and bitumen impregnation is compensated for by reduced expenditure for construction of additional engineering barriers, as well as by substantial decrease in LLW and ILW volume, localization of shallow

  10. Chemical and mechanical performance properties for various final waste forms -- PSPI scoping study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farnsworth, R.K.; Larsen, E.D.; Sears, J.W.; Eddy, T.L.; Anderson, G.L.

    1996-09-01

    The US DOE is obtaining data on the performance properties of the various final waste forms that may be chosen as primary treatment products for the alpha-contaminated low-level and transuranic waste at the INEL`s Transuranic Storage Area. This report collects and compares selected properties that are key indicators of mechanical and chemical durability for Portland cement concrete, concrete formed under elevated temperature and pressure, sulfur polymer cement, borosilicate glass, and various forms of alumino-silicate glass, including in situ vitrification glass and various compositions of iron-enriched basalt (IEB) and iron-enriched basalt IV (IEB4). Compressive strength and impact resistance properties were used as performance indicators in comparative evaluation of the mechanical durability of each waste form, while various leachability data were used in comparative evaluation of each waste form`s chemical durability. The vitrified waste forms were generally more durable than the non-vitrified waste forms, with the iron-enriched alumino-silicate glasses and glass/ceramics exhibiting the most favorable chemical and mechanical durabilities. It appears that the addition of zirconia and titania to IEB (forming IEB4) increases the leach resistance of the lanthanides. The large compositional ranges for IEB and IEB4 more easily accommodate the compositions of the waste stored at the INEL than does the composition of borosilicate glass. It appears, however, that the large potential variation in IEB and IEB4 compositions resulting from differing waste feed compositions can impact waste form durability. Further work is needed to determine the range of waste stream feed compositions and rates of waste form cooling that will result in acceptable and optimized IEB or IEB4 waste form performance. 43 refs.

  11. Performance assessment of the direct disposal in unsaturated tuff of spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste owned by U.S. Department of Energy. Volume 1: Executive summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rechard, R.P. [ed.] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). WIPP Performance Assessment Dept.

    1995-03-01

    This assessment studied the performance of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel in a hypothetical repository in unsaturated tuff. The results of this 10-month study are intended to help guide the Office of Environment Management of the US Department of Energy (DOE) on how to prepare its wastes for eventual permanent disposal. The waste forms comprised spent fuel and high-level waste currently stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and the Hanford reservation. About 700 metric tons heavy metal (MTHM) of the waste under study is stored at INEL, including graphite spent nuclear fuel, highly enriched uranium spent fuel, low enriched uranium spent fuel, and calcined high-level waste. About 2,100 MTHM of weapons production fuel, currently stored on the Hanford reservation, was also included. The behavior of the waste was analyzed by waste form and also as a group of waste forms in the hypothetical tuff repository. When the waste forms were studied together, the repository was assumed also to contain about 9,200 MTHM high-level waste in borosilicate glass from three DOE sites. The addition of the borosilicate glass, which has already been proposed as a final waste form, brought the total to about 12,000 MTHM. A source term model was developed to study the wide variety of waste forms, which included radionuclides residing in 10 different matrices and up to 8 nested layers of material that might react with water. The possibility and consequences of critical conditions occurring in or near containers of highly enriched uranium spent nuclear fuel were also studied.

  12. Summary Report: Glass-Ceramic Waste Forms for Combined Fission Products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crum, Jarrod V.; Riley, Brian J.; Turo, Laura A.; Tang, Ming; Kossoy, Anna

    2011-09-23

    Glass-ceramic waste form development began in FY 2010 examining two combined waste stream options: (1) alkaline earth (CS) + lanthanide (Ln), and (2) + transition metal (TM) fission-product waste streams generated by the uranium extraction (UREX+) separations process. Glass-ceramics were successfully developed for both options however; Option 2 was selected over Option 1, at the conclusion of 2010, because Option 2 immobilized all three waste streams with only a minimal decrease in waste loading. During the first year, a series of three glass (Option 2) were fabricated that varied waste loading-WL (42, 45, and 50 mass%) at fixed molar ratios of CaO/MoO{sub 3} and B{sub 2}O{sub 3}/alkali both at 1.75. These glass-ceramics were slow cooled and characterized in terms of phase assemblage and preliminary irradiation stability. This fiscal year, further characterization was performed on the FY 2010 Option 2 glass-ceramics in terms of: static leach testing, phase analysis by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and irradiation stability (electron and ion). Also, a new series of glass-ceramics were developed for Option 2 that varied the additives: Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (0-6 mass%), molar ratio of CaO/MoO{sub 3} and B{sub 2}O{sub 3}/alkali (1.75 to 2.25) and waste loading (50, 55, and 60 mass%). Lastly, phase pure powellite and oxyapatite were synthesized for irradiation studies. Results of this fiscal year studies showed compositional flexibility, chemical stability, and radiation stability in the current glass-ceramic system. First, the phase assemblages and microstructure of all of the FY 2010 and 2011 glass-ceramics are very similar once subjected to the slow cool heat treatment. The phases identified in these glass-ceramics were oxyapatite, powellite, cerianite, and ln-borosilicate. This shows that variations in waste loading or additives can be accommodated without drastically changing the phase assemblage of the waste form, thus making the processing and performance

  13. Glasses for immobilization of low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laverov, N. P.; Omel'yanenko, B. I.; Yudintsev, S. V.; Stefanovsky, S. V.; Nikonov, B. S.

    2013-03-01

    Reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) for recovery of fissionable elements is a precondition of long-term development of nuclear energetics. Solution of this problem is hindered by the production of a great amount of liquid waste; 99% of its volume is low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste (LILW). The volume of high-level radioactive waste (HLW), which is characterized by high heat release, does not exceed a fraction of a percent. Solubility of glasses at an elevated temperature makes them unfit for immobilization of HLW, the insulation of which is ensured only by mineral-like matrices. At the same time, glasses are a perfect matrix for LILW, which are distinguished by low heat release. The solubility of borosilicate glass at a low temperature is so low that even a glass with relatively low resistance enables them to retain safety of under-ground LILW depositories without additional engineering barriers. The optimal technology of liquid confinement is their concentration and immobilization in borosilicate glasses, which are disposed in shallow-seated geological repositories. The vitrification of 1 m3 liquid LILW with a salt concentration of ˜300 kg/m3 leaves behind only 0.2 m3 waste, that is, 4-6 times less than by bitumen impregnation and 10 times less than by cementation. Environmental and economic advantages of LILW vitrification result from (1) low solubility of the vitrified LILW in natural water; (2) significant reduction of LILW volume; (3) possibility to dispose the vitrified waste without additional engineering barriers under shallow conditions and in diverse geological media; (4) the strength of glass makes its transportation and storage possible; and finally (5) reliable longterm safety of repositories. When the composition of the glass matrix for LILW is being chosen, attention should be paid to the factors that ensure high technological and economic efficiency of vitrification. The study of vitrified LILW from the Kursk nuclear power plant

  14. 含 Pu废物的玻璃和玻璃陶瓷固化基材研究进展%Development of Glass-based Confinement Matrix for Plutonium-containing Waste

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁晓宁; 张振涛; 蔡溪南; 赵康; 毛仙鹤; 秦志桂

    2015-01-01

    Plutonium‐containing waste with characteristics of high 239 Pu content and difficult reuse must be immobilized as soon as possible before safe disposal .Glass and glass‐ceramics considered to be more excellent confinement matrices (simpler process , lower cost and higher productivity ) for immobilizing plutonium‐containing waste than ceramics were studied extensively and thoroughly including alkali borosilicate glass , lanthanide borosilicate glass ,iron phosphate glass and zirconolite ,pyrochlore or mona‐zite‐based glass‐ceramics .T heir chemical composition ,chemical durability and the con‐tent of plutonium or its surrogate were presented and discussed by contrast in this paper .It is believed that glass‐ceramics will be a good alternative for immobilizing most of plutonium‐containing waste through consistently investigating and applying .%对于239 Pu含量较高且很难回收利用的含Pu废物,在安全处置前须进行妥善的固化处理。玻璃和玻璃陶瓷因在制备方面具有较陶瓷简单的工艺、低廉的成本和高效的产出被认为是目前处理含Pu废物综合优势明显的固化基材,因而得到了广泛和深入的研究。本文对碱硼硅酸盐玻璃、镧硼硅酸盐玻璃、铁磷酸盐玻璃以及含钙钛锆石、烧绿石或独居石结晶相的玻璃陶瓷等在含Pu废物固化方面的研究进展进行了综述,包括其组分、Pu包容量和化学稳定性,并进行了对比分析,认为在对玻璃固化基材继续研究与应用的基础上,玻璃陶瓷有望成为固化绝大多数含Pu废物的较佳选择。

  15. Development of Glass and Ceramic Matrices for the Immobilization of High-level Radioactive Waste from Fast Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Govindan Kutty, K.V.; Kitheri, Joseph; Asuvathraman, R.; Raja Madhavan, R.; Vasudeva Rao, P.R.; Baldev, Raj [Liquid Metals And Structural Chemistry Division, Indira Gandhi Centre For Atomic Research - IGCAR, Kalpakkam, Tamil Nadu 603 102 (India)

    2009-06-15

    Borosilicate glass is a favoured matrix worldwide for the immobilization of high-level waste (HLW). The HLW from the reprocessing of fast reactor fuels contains higher concentrations of actinide elements and noble metals than that from thermal reactors. These elements have poor solubility in borosilicate glass, leading to phase segregation and consequent loss of chemical durability. Alternate glass and crystalline ceramic matrices thus need to be developed for the long-term disposal of fast reactor HLW. In this context, we have undertaken work on simulated waste forms based on three different systems, viz., iron phosphate glass (IPG), SYNROC, and monazites. IPG is known to be a versatile host matrix for radioactive wastes. An IPG waste form with 20 wt% simulated HLW expected from the FBTR after a burnup of 150 GWD/T, was found to form readily at 1323 K in air. The glass transition temperature of the waste-loaded glass was found to be similar to that of bare IPG. The ease of glass formation and favourable physico-chemical properties make IPG a candidate matrix for fixing radioactive wastes of fast reactor origin. Among the crystalline ceramic matrices for HLW immobilization, SYNROC is a well known system. The flexibility of the conventional titanate phase assemblage to incorporate fast reactor wastes was investigated. SYNROC precursor powders were synthesized using an inexpensive nano-anatase reagent as the main ingredient. High-density simulated waste forms were then fabricated by hot pressing or hot isostatic pressing at 1373-1473 K. Monoliths of near-theoretical density were obtained, and thermophysical and chemical durability measurements were carried out on them. In contrast to the poly-phase SYNROC, monazite is known to be a single-phase orthophosphate waste form. Monazite (CePO{sub 4}) can accommodate widely different elements in its crystal structure due to the irregular oxygen coordination around the metal ions. The phase can be formed at low temperatures

  16. 高机械灵敏度悬空导电薄膜的制备方法研究%Research on the Preparation Method of Free-handing Conductive Membrane with High Mechanical Sensitivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑志霞; 冯勇建

    2012-01-01

    微机电系统中的悬空薄膜的制备技术是微结构制备的关键技术之一.研究了周边固支方形薄膜的机械灵敏度及通过浓硼扩散自停止腐蚀法制备高灵敏度悬空导电薄膜.实验结果表明,当扩散温度为1 175℃,扩散时间为3h,去除硼硅玻璃后四甲基氢氧化铵(TMAH)腐蚀液中腐蚀7.5h,可得到厚度为3μm,边长为5 mm,方块电阻为1.12 Ω/sq,致密均匀的悬空导电薄膜.给出了详细的制备工艺;针对扩散过程中出现的硼硅玻璃等问题,给出了切实可行的解决办法.%The preparation method of the free-handing film in MEMS is one of the key technologies of micro structure preparation. This article focuses on the mechanical sensitivity of peripheral fixed supported square film and introduces how to fabricate highly sensitive free-handing film by adopting the deep boron-diffusion self-stopped etching technique. The experiment shows that when the silicon was diffused for 3 h at a temperature of 1 175 ℃ and then,after removing the borosilicate glass covering it,was etched in TMAH for 7. 5 h,an even free-handing film which is 3 μm in thickness.5 mm in length and 1.12 Ω/sq in sheet resistance was fabricated. The article provides a detailed introduction to the preparation method of the free-handing film and proposes some feasible solutions to solve the problem of borosilicate glass that appears during the process of diffusion.

  17. A glass capillary based microfluidic electromembrane extraction of basic degradation products of nitrogen mustard and VX from water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tak, Vijay; Kabra, Ankur; Pardasani, Deepak; Goud, D Raghavender; Jain, Rajeev; Dubey, D K

    2015-12-24

    In this work, a glass capillary based microfluidic electromembrane extraction (μ-EME) was demonstrated for the first time. The device was made by connecting an auxillary borosilicate glass tubing (O.D. 3mm, I.D. 2mm) perpendicular to main borosilicate glass capillary just below one end of the capillary (O.D. 8mm, I.D. 1.2mm). It generated the distorted T-shaped device with inlet '1' and inlet '2' for the introduction of sample and acceptor solutions, respectively. At one end of this device (inlet '2'), a microsyringe containing acceptor solution along with hollow fiber (O.D. 1000μm) was introduced. This configuration creates the micro-channel between inner wall of glass capillary and outer surface of hollow fiber. Sample solution was pumped into the system through another end of glass capillary (inlet '1'), with a micro-syringe pump. The sample was in direct contact with the supported liquid membrane (SLM), consisted of 20% (w/w) di-(2-ethylhexyl)phosphate in 2-nitrophenyl octyl ether immobilized in the pores of the hollow fiber. In the lumen of the hollow fiber, the acceptor phase was present. The driving force for extraction was direct current (DC) electrical potential sustained over the SLM. Highly polar (logP=-2.5 to 1.4) basic degradation products of nitrogen mustard and VX were selected as model analytes. The influence of chemical composition of SLM, extraction time, voltage and pH of donor and acceptor phase were investigated. The model analytes were extracted from 10μL of pure water with recoveries ranging from 15.7 to 99.7% just after 3min of operation time. Under optimized conditions, good limits of detection (2-50ngmL(-1)), linearity (from 5-1000 to 100-1000ngmL(-1)), and repeatability (RSDs below 11.9%, n=3) were achieved. Applicability of the proposed μ-EME was proved by recovering triethanolamine (31.3%) from 10μL of five times diluted original water sample provided by the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons during 28th official

  18. Synthesis and ceramic processing of alumina and zirconia based composites infiltrated with glass phase for dental applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interest for the use of ceramic materials for dental applications started due to the good aesthetic appearance promoted by the similarity to natural teeth. However, the fragility of traditional ceramics was a limitation for their use in stress conditions. The development of alumina and zirconia based materials, that associate aesthetic results, biocompatibility and good mechanical behaviour, makes possible the employment of ceramics for fabrication of dental restorations. The incorporation of vitreous phase in these ceramics is an alternative to minimize the ceramic retraction and to improve the adhesion to resin-based cements, necessary for the union of ceramic frameworks to the remaining dental structure. In the dentistry field, alumina and zirconia ceramic infiltrated with glassy phase are represented commercially by the In-Ceram systems. Considering that the improvement of powder's synthesis routes and of techniques of ceramic processing contributes for good performance of these materials, the goal of the present work is the study of processing conditions of alumina and/or 3 mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia ceramics infiltrated with aluminum borosilicate lanthanum glass. The powders, synthesized by hydroxide coprecipitation route, were pressed by uniaxial compaction and pre-sintered at temperature range between 950 and 1650 degree C in order to obtain porous ceramics bodies. Vitreous phase incorporation was performed by impregnation of aluminum borosilicate lanthanum powder, also prepared in this work, followed by heat treatment between 1200 and 1400 degree C .Ceramic powders were characterized by thermogravimetry, X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, gaseous adsorption (BET) and laser diffraction. Sinterability of alumina and /or stabilized zirconia green pellets was evaluated by dilatometry. Pre-sintered ceramics were characterized by apparent density measurements (Archimedes method), X-ray diffraction and scanning electron

  19. Thermal Treatment of Salt-Loaded Zeolite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeong Guk; Lee, Jae Hee; Kim, Eung Ho; Kim, Joon Hyung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    For disposal in a geological repository, the waste salts such as molten LiCl salt from an oxide fuel reduction process and molten LiCl-KCl eutectic salt from an electro refining process must meet the acceptance criteria. For a waste form containing chloride salt, two of the more important criteria are known to be leach resistance and waste form durability. US Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) developed a ceramic waste form (CWF) fabrication technology for LiCl-KCl eutectic salt from ANL Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II). The CWF, which was made by first occluding salt in zeolite A at 730 K and then encapsulating the zeolite in a borosilicate binder glass by a hot isostatic press (HIP) method or pressureless consolidation (PC) method, has the phase composition of about 70% sodalite, 25% binder glass, and a 5% total of inclusion phases (halite, nepheline, and various oxides and silicates). US ANL showed that the chemical durability and leach resistance of the CWF were higher than those of glass waste form for high level waste from aqueous process, by a 7-day product consistency test (PCT). However, the waste form fabrication process for waste LiCl salt is somewhat different in mixing temperature from that for LiCl-KCl eutectic salt at US ANL. The former is mixed at 920 K, whereas, the later mixing is accomplished at 730 K. Such difference in mixing temperature results in the different major phase of SLZ, that is, zeolite Li-A from LiCl salt, and unchanged zeolite A from LiCl-KCl eutectic salt. This unchanged phase of zeolite A during an immobilization step is transformed to sodalite, which was known to be very high leach-resistant, in the step of encapsulating with borosilicate glass. In this work, we tried to investigate the transformation of major phase of SLZ, from zeolite Li-A to Na{sub 8}Cl{sub 2}-Sod using zeolite only sodalite, by a quantitative analysis with a software for X-ray diffractometer during the thermal treatment under 1170 K.

  20. Supramolecular Chemistry of Selective Anion Recognition for Anions of Environmental Relevance. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This project focused on identifying selective binding agents for the removal of negative ions that hamper vitrification efforts. The project was led by Professor Kristin Bowman-James at the University of Kansas (KU) and consisted of a collaborative effort between the KU group, the group of Professor Jonathan Sessler at the University of Texas Austin (UT), and Dr. Bruce Moyer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Research efforts during this funding period have focused on a particularly difficult target species, sulfate ion, which is highly insoluble in borosilicate glass. The project is unique in that it combines the synthetic expertise of the Bowman-James and Sessler groups with the analytical/extraction expertise of the Moyer group at ORNL, with a synergy that can bridge disciplines. Sulfate ion is a relatively small ionic species that, because of its solubility characteristics as well as its caustic nature, are a hindrance to the vitrification process. Not only is it relatively insoluble in the medium that has been chosen to store the wastes, but it also has the potential for accelerating the corrosion of the furnaces used to vitrify the borosilicate in a liquid to allow for waste incorporation. The goal of the Bowman-James group has been to design sequestering agents for sulfate that are selective for that ion over nitrate, for example, to allow for a liquid-liquid extraction step that can remove most of the sulfate prior to vitrification. The collaborative design efforts between the Bowman-James and Sessler groups helped to accelerate progress in the design process. In particular the Bowman-James group has been probing the influence of dimensionality and charge on sulfate binding, i.e., progressing from circular to spherical extractants, while at the same time adding positive charges to the agents so that when sulfate is bound, the resulting species is neutral. Not only does this project serve to benefit the remediation process, but it also provides an

  1. Description of Defense Waste Processing Facility reference waste form and canister. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxter, R.G.

    1983-08-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will be located at the Savannah River Plant in Aiken, SC, and is scheduled for construction authorization during FY-1984. The reference waste form is borosilicate glass containing approx. 28 wt % sludge oxides, with the balance glass frit. Borosilicate glass was chosen because of its high resistance to leaching by water, its relatively high solubility for nuclides found in the sludge, and its reasonably low melting temperature. The glass frit contains about 58% SiO/sub 2/ and 15% B/sub 2/O/sub 3/. Leachabilities of SRP waste glasses are expected to approach 10/sup -8/ g/m/sup 2/-day based upon 1000-day tests using glasses containing SRP radioactive waste. Tests were performed under a wide variety of conditions simulating repository environments. The canister is filled with 3260 lb of glass which occupies about 85% of the free canister volume. The filled canister will generate approx. 470 watts when filled with oxides from 5-year-old sludge and 15-year-old supernate from the sludge and supernate processes. The radionuclide content of the canister is about 177,000 ci, with a radiation level of 5500 rem/h at canister surface contact. The reference canister is fabricated of standard 24-in.-OD, Schedule 20, 304L stainless steel pipe with a dished bottom, domed head, and a combined lifting and welding flange on the head neck. The overall canister length is 9 ft 10 in. with a 3/8-in. wall thickness. The 3-m canister length was selected to reduce equipment cell height in the DWPF to a practical size. The canister diameter was selected as an optimum size from glass quality considerations, a logical size for repository handling and to ensure that a filled canister with its double containment shipping cask could be accommodated on a legal-weight truck. The overall dimensions and weight appear to be compatible with preliminary assessments of repository requirements. 10 references.

  2. Synthesis and ceramic processing of alumina and zirconia based composites infiltrated with glass phase for dental applications; Sintese e processamento de compositos a base de alumina e zirconia com infiltracao de fase vitrea para aplicacoes odontologicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duarte, Daniel Gomes

    2009-07-01

    The interest for the use of ceramic materials for dental applications started due to the good aesthetic appearance promoted by the similarity to natural teeth. However, the fragility of traditional ceramics was a limitation for their use in stress conditions. The development of alumina and zirconia based materials, that associate aesthetic results, biocompatibility and good mechanical behaviour, makes possible the employment of ceramics for fabrication of dental restorations. The incorporation of vitreous phase in these ceramics is an alternative to minimize the ceramic retraction and to improve the adhesion to resin-based cements, necessary for the union of ceramic frameworks to the remaining dental structure. In the dentistry field, alumina and zirconia ceramic infiltrated with glassy phase are represented commercially by the In-Ceram systems. Considering that the improvement of powder's synthesis routes and of techniques of ceramic processing contributes for good performance of these materials, the goal of the present work is the study of processing conditions of alumina and/or 3 mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia ceramics infiltrated with aluminum borosilicate lanthanum glass. The powders, synthesized by hydroxide coprecipitation route, were pressed by uniaxial compaction and pre-sintered at temperature range between 950 and 1650 degree C in order to obtain porous ceramics bodies. Vitreous phase incorporation was performed by impregnation of aluminum borosilicate lanthanum powder, also prepared in this work, followed by heat treatment between 1200 and 1400 degree C .Ceramic powders were characterized by thermogravimetry, X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, gaseous adsorption (BET) and laser diffraction. Sinterability of alumina and /or stabilized zirconia green pellets was evaluated by dilatometry. Pre-sintered ceramics were characterized by apparent density measurements (Archimedes method), X-ray diffraction and scanning

  3. Thermochemical study of rare earth and nitrogen incorporation in glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yahong

    Rare earth containing aluminosilicate, borosilicate, aluminate and nitrogen containing aluminosilicate glasses are technically important materials. They have extraordinary physical and chemical properties such as high glass transition temperature, very low electrical conductivity, and excellent chemical stability. These unique properties lead to applications as coatings on metals and ceramics, optical fibers, semiconductors, and nuclear waste containment materials. In addition, such systems contain the most widely used additives for sintering of Si3N4, SiAlON and SiC ceramics for high temperature applications. Thermodynamic properties and the relations among energetics, structure and bonding are essential to controlling processing parameters to synthesize, at lower cost, materials having better properties. Earlier investigations mainly pertained to specific physical properties of rare-earth doped oxide and oxynitride glasses. Work on the thermodynamic stability and materials compatibility has been very sparse. High temperature solution calorimetry in molten oxide solvents is a powerful tool for the thermodynamic study of refractory materials. With implementation and improvement, this technique has been applied to the first measurement of enthalpies of formation of RE-Si-Al-O glasses, REAlO3 glasses, RE-Si-Al-O-N glasses, and Si3N 4 and Ge3N4 with high pressure spinel structure. The first successful synthesis of REAlO3 glasses has been achieved by containerless melting. Their large enthalpies of crystallization confirm that they are reluctant glass formers. For glasses along the 2REAlO3 -3SiO2 join, the strongly negative heats of mixing support the absence of miscibility gaps except possibly at very high silica content. Energetic evidence has been presented for incipient phase-ordered regions in Gd- or Hf-containing sodium alumino-borosilicate glasses for plutonium immobilization. Linear relations between enthalpies of formation of RESiAlON glasses from elements and

  4. ACCOUNTING FOR A VITRIFIED PLUTONIUM WASTE FORM IN THE YUCCA MOUNTAIN REPOSITORY TOTAL SYSTEM PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT (TSPA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marra, J

    2007-02-12

    A vitrification technology utilizing a lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass appears to be a viable option for dispositioning excess weapons-useable plutonium that is not suitable for processing into mixed oxide (MOX) fuel. A significant effort to develop a glass formulation and vitrification process to immobilize plutonium was completed in the mid-1990s to support the Plutonium Immobilization Program (PIP). Further refinement of the vitrification process was accomplished as part of the Am/Cm solution vitrification project. The LaBS glass formulation was found to be capable of immobilizing in excess of 10 wt% Pu and to be very tolerant of the impurities accompanying the plutonium material streams. Thus, this waste form would be suitable for dispositioning plutonium owned by the Department of Energy-Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) that may not be well characterized and may contain high levels of impurities. The can-in-canister technology demonstrated in the PIP could be utilized to dispose of the vitrified plutonium in the federal radioactive waste repository. The can-in-canister technology involves placing small cans of the immobilized Pu form into a high level waste (HLW) glass canister fitted with a rack to hold the cans and then filling the canister with HLW glass. Testing was completed to demonstrate that this technology could be successfully employed with little or no impact to current Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) operation and that the resulting canisters were essentially equivalent to the present HLW glass canisters to be dispositioned in the federal repository. The performance of wastes in the repository and, moreover, the performance of the entire repository system is being evaluated by the Department of Energy-Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (DOE-RW) using a Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) methodology. Technical bases documents (e.g., Analysis/Modeling Reports (AMR)) that address specific issues regarding

  5. Evaluation and compilation of DOE waste package test data: Biannual report, August 1986-January 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Interrante, C.; Escalante, E.; Fraker, A.; Harrison, S.; Shull, R.; Linzer, M.; Ricker, R.; Ruspi, J.

    1987-10-01

    This report summarizes results of the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) evaluations of Department of Energy (DOE) activities on waste packages designed for containment of radioactive high-level nuclear waste (HLW). The waste package is a proposed engineered barrier that is part of a permanent repository for HLW. Metal alloys are the principal barriers within the engineered system. Technical discussions are given for the corrosion of metals proposed for the canister, particularly carbon and stainless steels, and copper. In the section on tuff, the current level of understanding of several canister materials is questioned. Within the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) section, discussions are given on problems concerning groundwater, materials for use in the metallic overpack, and diffusion through the packing. For the proposed salt site, questions are raised on the work on both ASTM A216 Steel and Ti-Code 12. NBS work related to the vitrification of HLW borosilicate glass at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) and the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is covered. NBS reviews of selected DOE technical reports and a summary of current waste-package activities of the Materials Characterization Center (MCC) is presented. Using a database management system, a computerized database for storage and retrieval of reviews and evaluations of HLW data has been developed and is described. 17 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Worldwide trends in battery separator technology and usage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weighall, M. J.

    This paper reviews trends in battery separator usage for starting-lighting-and-ignition (SLI), motive power, and sealed valve-regulated lead/acid batteries. For SLI batteries, the dominant trend in the USA and Western Europe has been a dramatic increase in polyethylene envelope separator usage, with other countries now following this trend. This is at the expense of traditional leaf-type separators such as cellulose or sintered polyvinyl chloride (PVC). For motive power applications, several different types of separator materials are currently favoured, including polyethylene, microporous rubber, microporous PVC and resin-impregnated polyester fibres. Worldwide trends in the motive power battery and separator market are shown. For sealed valve-regulated lead/acid batteries, the favoured construction uses a recombinant battery separator mat, normally of 100% borosilicate glass (binder free). Alternative mats containing a proportion of polymeric fibres are now being investigated. Market trends and factors affecting growth in the use of recombinant battery separator mats (RBSM) are reviewed. Results of mercury-intrusion porosimetry data for different separator materials are shown and reviewed. This technique provides an interesting way of differentiating between different separator materials based on their pore size distribution.

  7. White light emitting Ho{sup 3+}-doped CdS nanocrystal ingrained glass nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dey, Chirantan; Karmakar, Basudeb, E-mail: basudebk@cgcri.res.in [Glass Science and Technology Section, Glass Division, CSIR-Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, 196, Raja S. C. Mullick Road, Kolkata 700032 (India); Goswami, Madhumita [Glass and Advanced Materials Division, Bhaba Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2015-02-23

    We report the generation of white light from Ho{sup 3+} ion doped CdS nanocrystal ingrained borosilicate glass nanocomposites prepared by the conventional melt-quench method. Near visible 405 nm diode laser excited white light emission is produced by tuning the blue emission from the Ho{sup 3+} ions, green band edge, and orange-red surface-state emissions of the nanocrystalline CdS, which are further controlled by the size of the nanocrystals. The absorption and emission spectra evidenced the excitation of Ho{sup 3+} ions by absorption of photons emitted by the CdS nanocrystals. The high color rendering index (CRI = 84–89) and befitting chromaticity coordinates (x = 0.308–0.309, y = 0.326–0.338) of white light emission, near visible harmless excitation wavelength (405 nm), and high absorbance values at excitation wavelength point out that these glass nanocomposites may serve as a prominent candidate for resin free high power white light emitting diodes.

  8. Structural and optical properties of ZnSe quantum dots in glass nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dey, Chirantan [Glass Science and Technology Section, Glass Division, CSIR – Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, 196, Raja S. C. Mullick Road, 700032 Kolkata (India); Goswami, Madhumita [Glass and Advanced Materials Division, Bhaba Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, 400085 Mumbai (India); Karmakar, Basudeb, E-mail: basudebk@cgcri.res.in [Glass Science and Technology Section, Glass Division, CSIR – Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, 196, Raja S. C. Mullick Road, 700032 Kolkata (India)

    2015-08-01

    Zinc selenide (ZnSe) quantum dots (QDs) were synthesized in a dielectric (borosilicate glass) matrix for the first time by melt-quenching process followed by thermal treatment. Sizes of the quantum dots were varied by post thermal treatment. UV–Vis optical absorption spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy were deployed to investigate the ZnSe QDs. TEM analysis reveals QD sizes of the order of 2–4 nm and relatively larger nanocrystals having sizes of the order of 15–26 nm. The sizes of the QDs have also been verified with the help of effective mass approximation model and optical absorption spectroscopy. The quantum confinement effect has been observed for both variation of heat treatment temperature and time. The Raman spectra of the nanocomposites reveal blue-shifted Raman peaks of ZnSe at 295 and 315 cm{sup −1} due to phonon confinement effect. The decrease in Raman intensity with heat treatment indicates increase in size of the QDs. Red luminescence from the ZnSe-glass nanocomposites peaking at 708 nm due to the size related as well as traps related states makes their applications towards luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs). - Highlights: • ZnSe quantum dots embedded glass-nanocomposites were synthesized. • Nanocrystal sizes were controlled by the heat treatment schedule. • Structure and optical properties of nano-sized ZnSe in glass were investigated. • Strong visible red photoluminescence was obtained from these nanocomposites.

  9. Photoactive transparent nano-crystalline glass-ceramic for remazole red dye degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gad-Allah, Tarek A., E-mail: tareqabdelshafy@yahoo.ca [Water Pollution Research Department, National Research Centre, Cairo 12311 (Egypt); Margha, Fatma H. [Department of Glass Research, National Research Centre, Cairo 12311 (Egypt)

    2012-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► Preparation and characterization of novel transparent nanocrystalline glass-ceramic. ► Precipitation of photoactive phases by using controlled heat-treatment. ► Conservation of transparency along with photoactivity. ► Using the prepared nanocrystalline glass-ceramic in water purification. -- Abstract: Transparent glass ceramic material was prepared from alkali-borosilicate glass containing titania by proper heat treatment scheme. The prepared samples were characterized using differential thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscope, selected area electron diffraction and UV–visible spectroscopy. The applied heat treatment program allowed the crystallization of nano-crystalline anatase, rutile, barium titanate, titanium borate and silicate phases while maintaining the transparency. The precipitated nano-crystalline anatase and rutile phases were responsible for the observed high photocatalytic activity of the prepared samples. Samples of 24.29 and 32.39 TiO{sub 2} wt% showed better efficiency for the decolorization of remazole red dye compared with commercial-TiO{sub 2} used in preparation of glass-ceramic. The reuse of prepared glass-ceramic photocatalyst with nearly same efficiency for different times was also proved.

  10. Accurate integration of segmented x-ray optics using interfacing ribs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civitani, Marta Maria; Basso, Stefano; Citterio, Oberto; Conconi, Paolo; Ghigo, Mauro; Pareschi, Giovanni; Proserpio, Laura; Salmaso, Bianca; Sironi, Giorgia; Spiga, Daniele; Tagliaferri, Gianpiero; Zambra, Alberto; Martelli, Francesco; Parodi, Giancarlo; Fumi, Pierluigi; Gallieni, Daniele; Tintori, Matteo; Bavdaz, Marcos; Wille, Eric

    2013-09-01

    Future lightweight and long-focal-length x-ray telescopes must guarantee a good angular resolution (e.g., 5 arc sec HEW) and reach an unprecedented large effective area. This goal can be reached with the slumping of borosilicate glass sheets that allow the fabrication of lightweight and low-cost x-ray optical units (XOU). These XOUs, based on mirror segments, have to be assembled together to form complete multishell Wolter-I optics. The technology for the fabrication and the integration of these XOUs is under development in Europe, funded by European Space Agency, and led by the Brera Observatory (INAF-OAB). While the achievement of the required surface accuracy on the glass segments by means of a hot slumping technique is a challenging aspect, adequate attention must be given to the correct integration and coalignment of the mirror segments into the XOUs. To this aim, an innovative assembly concept has been investigated, based on glass reinforcing ribs. The ribs connect pairs of consecutive foils, stacked into a XOU, with both structural and functional roles, providing robust monolithic stacks of mirror plates. Moreover, this integration concept allows the correction of residual low-frequency errors still present on the mirror foil profile after slumping. We present the integration concept, the related error budget, and the results achieved so far with a semi-robotic integration machine especially designed and realized to assemble slumped glass foils into XOUs.

  11. Active thermal figure control for the TOPS II primary mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel, Roger; Kang, Tae; Cuerden, Brian; Guyon, Olivier; Stahl, Phil

    2007-09-01

    TOPS (Telescope to Observe Planetary Systems) is the first coronagraphic telescope concept designed specifically to take advantage of Guyon's method of Phase Induced Amplitude Apodization PIAA).1 The TOPS primary mirror may incorporates active figure control to help achieve the desired wavefront control to approximately 1 angstrom RMS accurate across the spectral bandwidth. Direct correction of the primary figure avoids the need for a separate small deformable mirror. Because of Fresnel propagation, correction at a separate surface can introduce serious chromatic errors unless it is precisely conjugated to the primary. Active primary control also reduces complexity and mass and increases system throughput, and will likely enable a full system test to the 10-10 level in the 1 g environment before launch. We plan to use thermal actuators with no mechanical disturbance, using radiative heating or cooling fingers distributed inside the cells of a honeycomb mirror. The glass would have very small but finite coefficient of expansion of ~ 5x10 -8/C. Low order modes would be controlled by front-to-back gradients and high order modes by local rib expansion and contraction. Finite element models indicate that for a mirror with n cells up to n Zernike modes can be corrected to better than 90% fidelity, with still higher accuracy for the lower modes. An initial demonstration has been made with a borosilicate honeycomb mirror. Interferometric measurements show a single cell influence function with 300 nm stroke and ~5 minute time constant.

  12. Vitrification Facility integrated system performance testing report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides a summary of component and system performance testing associated with the Vitrification Facility (VF) following construction turnover. The VF at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) was designed to convert stored radioactive waste into a stable glass form for eventual disposal in a federal repository. Following an initial Functional and Checkout Testing of Systems (FACTS) Program and subsequent conversion of test stand equipment into the final VF, a testing program was executed to demonstrate successful performance of the components, subsystems, and systems that make up the vitrification process. Systems were started up and brought on line as construction was completed, until integrated system operation could be demonstrated to produce borosilicate glass using nonradioactive waste simulant. Integrated system testing and operation culminated with a successful Operational Readiness Review (ORR) and Department of Energy (DOE) approval to initiate vitrification of high-level waste (HLW) on June 19, 1996. Performance and integrated operational test runs conducted during the test program provided a means for critical examination, observation, and evaluation of the vitrification system. Test data taken for each Test Instruction Procedure (TIP) was used to evaluate component performance against system design and acceptance criteria, while test observations were used to correct, modify, or improve system operation. This process was critical in establishing operating conditions for the entire vitrification process

  13. Extensive separations (CLEAN) processing strategy compared to TRUEX strategy and sludge wash ion exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numerous pretreatment flowsheets have been proposed for processing the radioactive wastes in Hanford's 177 underground storage tanks. The CLEAN Option is examined along with two other flowsheet alternatives to quantify the trade-off of greater capital equipment and operating costs for aggressive separations with the reduced waste disposal costs and decreased environmental/health risks. The effect on the volume of HLW glass product and radiotoxicity of the LLW glass or grout product is predicted with current assumptions about waste characteristics and separations processes using a mass balance model. The prediction is made on three principal processing options: washing of tank wastes with removal of cesium and technetium from the supernatant, with washed solids routed directly to the glass (referred to as the Sludge Wash C processing strategy); the previous steps plus dissolution of the solids and removal of transuranic (TRU) elements, uranium, and strontium using solvent extraction processes (referred to as the Transuranic Extraction Option C (TRUEX-C) processing strategy); and an aggressive yet feasible processing strategy for separating the waste components to meet several main goals or objectives (referred to as the CLEAN Option processing strategy), such as the LLW is required to meet the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Class A limits; concentrations of technetium, iodine, and uranium are reduced as low as reasonably achievable; and HLW will be contained within 1,000 borosilicate glass canisters that meet current Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant glass specifications

  14. Role of sensitivity of zinc oxide nanorods (ZnO-NRs) based photosensitizers in hepatocellular site of biological tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atif, M.; Fakhar-E-Alam, M.; Alsalhi, M. S.

    2011-11-01

    Zinc oxide nanorods (ZnO-NRs) with high surface to volume ratio and bio compatibility are used as an efficient photosensitizer carrier system for achievement of Hepatocellular cancer cell (HepG2) necrosis within few minutes. Present study highlights the role of effectiveness of ZnO-NRs in photodynamic therapy (PDT). We have grown the ZnO-NRs on the tip of borosilicate glass capillaries (0.5 μm diameter). The grown ZnO-NRs were conjugated using Photofrin® and ALA for the efficient intracellular drug delivery, which produces reactive oxygen species (ROS) via photochemical reactions leading to cell death within few minutes after exposing UV light (240 nm). Viability of controlled and treated HepG2 cells with optimum dose of light (UV-visible) has been assessed by neutral red assay (NRA). The results were verified by staining of mitochondria using Mitotracker® red as an efficient dye as well as ROS detection. ZnO-NRs based Phogem® (PG) treated normal liver tissues of Sprague-Dawley rats were used as comparative experimental model. Morphological apoptotic changes in liver tissue of Sprague-Dawley rats before and after ZnO-NRs conjugated with photosensitizer (PS)-mediated PDT were investigated by microscopic examination.

  15. Investigation of the phototoxic effect of ZnO nanorods on fibroblasts and melanoma human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishwar, S.; Siddique, M.; Israr-Qadir, M.; Nur, O.; Willander, M.; Öllinger, K.

    2014-11-01

    Photocytotoxic effects of as-grown and zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods coated with 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) have been studied on human cells, i.e. melanoma and foreskin fibroblast, under dark and ultraviolet light exposures. Zinc oxide nanorods have been grown on the very sharp tip (diameter = 700 nm) of borosilicate glass pipettes and then were coated by the photosensitizer for targeted investigations inside human cells. The coated glass pipette’s tip with photosensitizer has been inserted inside the cells with the help of a micro-manipulator and irradiated through ultraviolet light (UVA), which reduces the membrane potential of the mitochondria leading to cell death. Cell viability loss has been detected by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) reduction assay when exposed to the dissolved ZnO nanorods and the production of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been detected along with the enhanced cytotoxic effect under UVA irradiation. Additionally, the influence of the lipid soluble antioxidant vitamin E and water-soluble N-acetyl-cysteine toward the enhancement or reduction of the toxicity has been investigated. A comparative analysis of the toxic nature of ZnO nanorods has been drawn between normal human fibroblast and melanoma cells, which can be favorable for understanding the clinical setting for killing tumor cells.

  16. Phototoxic effects of zinc oxide nanowires (ZnO NWs) complexed with 5-ALA in RD cell line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhar-e-Alam, M.; Ali, S. M. U.; Ibupoto, Z. H.; Atif, M.; Willander, M.

    2011-12-01

    In this current study, we have manifested the photosensitizing effects of zinc oxide nanowires (ZnO NWs) in dark as well as under ultra violet light exposure with 240 nm of UV region, using human muscle cancer (Rhybdomyosarcoma cells, RD) as in vitro experimental model. We have fabricated ZnO-NWs on the tip of borosilicate glass capillaries (0.5 μm diameter) and were conjugated using 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) for the efficient intracellular drug delivery. When ZnO NWs were applied on tumor localizing drugs with non ionizing illumination, then excited drug liberates reactive oxygen species (ROS), effecting mitochondria and nucleus resulting in cell necrosis within few minutes. During investigations, we observed that when ZnO-NWs grown on intracellular tip was excited by using 240 nm of UV light, as a resultant 625 nm of emitted red light were used as appetizer in the presence of 5-ALA for chemical reaction, which produces singlet oxygen, responsible for cell necrosis. Morphological changes of necrosed cells were examined under microscopy. Moreover, Viability of controlled and treated RD cells with optimum dose of light (UV-Visible) has been assessed by MTT assay as well as reactive oxygen species (ROS) detection.

  17. The Giant Magellan Telescope phasing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchez, Antonin H.; McLeod, Brian A.; Acton, D. Scott; Kanneganti, Srikrishna; Kibblewhite, Edward J.; Shectman, Stephen A.; van Dam, Marcos A.

    2012-07-01

    The 25 m Giant Magellan Telescope consists of seven circular 8.4 m primary mirror segments with matching segmentation of the Gregorian secondary mirror. Achieving the diffraction limit in the adaptive optics observing modes will require equalizing the optical path between pairs of segments to a small fraction of the observing wavelength. This is complicated by the fact that primary mirror segments are separated by up to 40 cm, and composed of borosilicate glass. The phasing system therefore includes both edge sensors to sense high-frequency disturbances, and wavefront sensors to measure their long-term drift and sense atmosphere-induced segment piston errors. The major subsystems include a laser metrology system monitoring the primary mirror segments, capacitive edge sensors between secondary mirror segments, a phasing camera with a wide capture range, and an additional sensitive optical piston sensor incorporated into each AO instrument. We describe in this paper the overall phasing strategy, controls scheme, and the expected performance of the system with respect to the overall adaptive optics error budget. Further details may be found in specific papers on each of the subsystems.

  18. Wind responses of Giant Magellan telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irarrazaval, Benjamin; Buleri, Christine; Johns, Matt

    2014-08-01

    The Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT) is 25 meter diameter extremely large ground based infrared/optical telescope being built by an international consortium of universities and research institutions. It will be located at the Las Campanas Observatory in Chile. The GMT primary mirror consists of seven 8.4 meter diameter borosilicate mirror segments. Two seven segment Gregorian secondary mirror systems will be built; an Adaptive Secondary Mirror (ASM) to support adaptive optics modes and a Fast-steering Secondary Mirror (FSM) with monolithic segments to support natural seeing modes when the ASM is being serviced. Wind excitation results in static deformation and vibration in the telescope structure that affects alignment and image jitter performance. The telescope mount will reject static and lower frequency windshake, while each of the Faststeering Secondary Mirror (FSM) segments will be used to compensate for the higher frequency wind-shake, up to 20 Hz. Using a finite element model of the GMT, along with CFD modeling of the wind loading on the telescope structure, wind excitation scenarios were created to study the performance of the FSM and telescope against wind-induced jitter. A description of the models, methodology and results of the analyses are presented.

  19. Adhesive forces and surface properties of cold gas plasma treated UHMWPE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preedy, Emily Callard; Brousseau, Emmanuel; Evans, Sam L; Perni, Stefano; Prokopovich, Polina

    2014-10-20

    Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) treatment was used on ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE), a common articulating counter material employed in hip and knee replacements. UHMWPE is a biocompatible polymer with low friction coefficient, yet does not have robust wear characteristics. CAP effectively cross-links the polymer chains of the UHMWPE improving wear performance (Perni et al., Acta Biomater. 8(3) (2012) 1357). In this work, interactions between CAP treated UHMWPE and spherical borosilicate sphere (representing model material for bone) were considered employing AFM technique. Adhesive forces increased, in the presence of PBS, after treatment with helium and helium/oxygen cold gas plasmas. Furthermore, a more hydrophilic surface of UHMWPE was observed after both treatments, determined through a reduction of up to a third in the contact angles of water. On the other hand, the asperity density also decreased by half, yet the asperity height had a three-fold decrease. This work shows that CAP treatment can be a very effective technique at enhancing the adhesion between bone and UHMWPE implant material as aided by the increased adhesion forces. Moreover, the hydrophilicity of the CAP treated UHMWPE can lead to proteins and cells adhesion to the surface of the implant stimulating osseointegration process.

  20. Process control and glass product quality assessment applied in the VEK plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitrification of about 60 m3 of high-level liquid waste (HLLW) with a total activity of 7.7E17 Bq has been a major step within the decommissioning program of the former WAK pilot reprocessing plant. The immobilization in borosilicate glass was carried out in a new vitrification plant designated VEK using a liquid-fed ceramic-lined melter as melting technique. Approval of the waste glass canisters produced by VEK required the accordance with a set of 16 specified final disposal-relevant parameters/properties. To meet these specified parameters, an appropriate process and product control strategy has been used. Main focus has been laid on control of the melter feed streams (HLLW, glass frit) as they are decisive for the glass composition and, therefore, for a major part of the mentioned properties. As a result of these control steps all 140 glass canisters produced by VEK have passed the check and have been released for final disposal. The examination of the respective canister specification was performed by experts on behalf of the German federal government. The paper describes the method of process and product control of VEK and depicts the compliance of the generated waste glass properties with the required specification. (author)