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Sample records for boron nitride nanotubes

  1. Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael W. (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes are prepared by a process which includes: (a) creating a source of boron vapor; (b) mixing the boron vapor with nitrogen gas so that a mixture of boron vapor and nitrogen gas is present at a nucleation site, which is a surface, the nitrogen gas being provided at a pressure elevated above atmospheric, e.g., from greater than about 2 atmospheres up to about 250 atmospheres; and (c) harvesting boron nitride nanotubes, which are formed at the nucleation site.

  2. Functionalized boron nitride nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainsbury, Toby; Ikuno, Takashi; Zettl, Alexander K

    2014-04-22

    A plasma treatment has been used to modify the surface of BNNTs. In one example, the surface of the BNNT has been modified using ammonia plasma to include amine functional groups. Amine functionalization allows BNNTs to be soluble in chloroform, which had not been possible previously. Further functionalization of amine-functionalized BNNTs with thiol-terminated organic molecules has also been demonstrated. Gold nanoparticles have been self-assembled at the surface of both amine- and thiol-functionalized boron nitride Nanotubes (BNNTs) in solution. This approach constitutes a basis for the preparation of highly functionalized BNNTs and for their utilization as nanoscale templates for assembly and integration with other nanoscale materials.

  3. Formation and Structure of Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang ZHANG; Zongquan LI; Jin XU

    2005-01-01

    Boron nitride (BN) nanotubes were simply synthesized by heating well-mixed boric acid, urea and iron nitrate powders at 1000℃. A small amount of BN nanowires was also obtained in the resultants. The morphological and structural characters of the BN nanostructures were studied using transmission electron microscopy. Other novel BN nanostructures, such as Y-junction nanotubes and bamboo-like nanotubes, were simultaneously observed. The growth mechanism of the BN nanotubes was discussed briefly.

  4. Amorphous Carbon-Boron Nitride Nanotube Hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Woo (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Wise, Kristopher E. (Inventor); Lin, Yi (Inventor); Connell, John (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method for joining or repairing boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs). In joining BNNTs, the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures. In repairing BNNTs, the damaged site of the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures at the damage site.

  5. Boron Nitride Nanotubes for Spintronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal B. Dhungana

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available With the end of Moore’s law in sight, researchers are in search of an alternative approach to manipulate information. Spintronics or spin-based electronics, which uses the spin state of electrons to store, process and communicate information, offers exciting opportunities to sustain the current growth in the information industry. For example, the discovery of the giant magneto resistance (GMR effect, which provides the foundation behind modern high density data storage devices, is an important success story of spintronics; GMR-based sensors have wide applications, ranging from automotive industry to biology. In recent years, with the tremendous progress in nanotechnology, spintronics has crossed the boundary of conventional, all metallic, solid state multi-layered structures to reach a new frontier, where nanostructures provide a pathway for the spin-carriers. Different materials such as organic and inorganic nanostructures are explored for possible applications in spintronics. In this short review, we focus on the boron nitride nanotube (BNNT, which has recently been explored for possible applications in spintronics. Unlike many organic materials, BNNTs offer higher thermal stability and higher resistance to oxidation. It has been reported that the metal-free fluorinated BNNT exhibits long range ferromagnetic spin ordering, which is stable at a temperature much higher than room temperature. Due to their large band gap, BNNTs are also explored as a tunnel magneto resistance device. In addition, the F-BNNT has recently been predicted as an ideal spin-filter. The purpose of this review is to highlight these recent progresses so that a concerted effort by both experimentalists and theorists can be carried out in the future to realize the true potential of BNNT-based spintronics.

  6. Boron nitride nanotubes for spintronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhungana, Kamal B; Pati, Ranjit

    2014-01-01

    With the end of Moore's law in sight, researchers are in search of an alternative approach to manipulate information. Spintronics or spin-based electronics, which uses the spin state of electrons to store, process and communicate information, offers exciting opportunities to sustain the current growth in the information industry. For example, the discovery of the giant magneto resistance (GMR) effect, which provides the foundation behind modern high density data storage devices, is an important success story of spintronics; GMR-based sensors have wide applications, ranging from automotive industry to biology. In recent years, with the tremendous progress in nanotechnology, spintronics has crossed the boundary of conventional, all metallic, solid state multi-layered structures to reach a new frontier, where nanostructures provide a pathway for the spin-carriers. Different materials such as organic and inorganic nanostructures are explored for possible applications in spintronics. In this short review, we focus on the boron nitride nanotube (BNNT), which has recently been explored for possible applications in spintronics. Unlike many organic materials, BNNTs offer higher thermal stability and higher resistance to oxidation. It has been reported that the metal-free fluorinated BNNT exhibits long range ferromagnetic spin ordering, which is stable at a temperature much higher than room temperature. Due to their large band gap, BNNTs are also explored as a tunnel magneto resistance device. In addition, the F-BNNT has recently been predicted as an ideal spin-filter. The purpose of this review is to highlight these recent progresses so that a concerted effort by both experimentalists and theorists can be carried out in the future to realize the true potential of BNNT-based spintronics. PMID:25248070

  7. Pure and doped boron nitride nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Terrones

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available More than ten years ago, it was suggested theoretically that boron nitride (BN nanotubes could be produced. Soon after, various reports on their synthesis appeared and a new area of nanotube science was born. This review aims to cover the latest advances related to the synthesis of BN nanotubes. We show that these tubes can now be produced in larger amounts and, in particular, that the chemistry of BN tubes appears to be very important to the production of reinforced composites with insulating characteristics. From the theoretical standpoint, we also show that (BN-C heteronanotubes could have important implications for nanoelectronics. We believe that BN nanotubes (pure and doped could be used in the fabrication of novel devices in which pure carbon nanotubes do not perform very efficiently.

  8. Boron Nitride Nanotube: Synthesis and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiano, Amanda L.; Park, Cheol; Lee, Joseph W.; Luong, Hoa H.; Gibbons, Luke J.; Chu, Sang-Hyon; Applin, Samantha I.; Gnoffo, Peter; Lowther, Sharon; Kim, Hyun Jung; Danehy, Paul M.; Inman, Jennifer A.; Jones, Stephen B.; Kang, Jin Ho; Sauti, Godfrey; Thibeault, Sheila A.; Yamakov, Vesselin; Wise, Kristopher E.; Su, Ji; Fay, Catharine C.

    2014-01-01

    Scientists have predicted that carbon's immediate neighbors on the periodic chart, boron and nitrogen, may also form perfect nanotubes, since the advent of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in 1991. First proposed then synthesized by researchers at UC Berkeley in the mid 1990's, the boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) has proven very difficult to make until now. Herein we provide an update on a catalyst-free method for synthesizing highly crystalline, small diameter BNNTs with a high aspect ratio using a high power laser under a high pressure and high temperature environment first discovered jointly by NASA/NIA JSA. Progress in purification methods, dispersion studies, BNNT mat and composite formation, and modeling and diagnostics will also be presented. The white BNNTs offer extraordinary properties including neutron radiation shielding, piezoelectricity, thermal oxidative stability (> 800 C in air), mechanical strength, and toughness. The characteristics of the novel BNNTs and BNNT polymer composites and their potential applications are discussed.

  9. Synthesis and characterization of boron nitrides nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a new synthesis for the production of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNT) from boron powder, ammonium nitrate and hematite tube furnace CVD method. The samples were subjected to some characterization techniques as infrared spectroscopy, thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy and transmission. By analyzing the results can explain the chemical reactions involved in the process and confirm the formation of BNNT with several layers and about 30 nanometers in diameter. Due to excellent mechanical properties and its chemical and thermal stability this material is promising for various applications. However, BNNT has received much less attention than carbon nanotubes, it is because of great difficulty to synthesize appreciable quantities from the techniques currently known, and this is one of the main reasons this work.(author)

  10. Magnesium doping of boron nitride nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legg, Robert; Jordan, Kevin

    2015-06-16

    A method to fabricate boron nitride nanotubes incorporating magnesium diboride in their structure. In a first embodiment, magnesium wire is introduced into a reaction feed bundle during a BNNT fabrication process. In a second embodiment, magnesium in powder form is mixed into a nitrogen gas flow during the BNNT fabrication process. MgB.sub.2 yarn may be used for superconducting applications and, in that capacity, has considerably less susceptibility to stress and has considerably better thermal conductivity than these conventional materials when compared to both conventional low and high temperature superconducting materials.

  11. Apparatus for the production of boron nitride nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael W; Jordan, Kevin

    2014-06-17

    An apparatus for the large scale production of boron nitride nanotubes comprising; a pressure chamber containing; a continuously fed boron containing target; a source of thermal energy preferably a focused laser beam; a cooled condenser; a source of pressurized nitrogen gas; and a mechanism for extracting boron nitride nanotubes that are condensed on or in the area of the cooled condenser from the pressure chamber.

  12. Synthesis of Boron Nitride Nanotubes for Engineering Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Janet; Hull, David; Gorican, Dan

    2005-01-01

    Boron Nitride nanotubes (BNNT) are of interest to the scientific and technical communities for many of the same reasons that carbon nanotubes (CNT) have attracted large amounts of attention. Both materials have potentially unique and significant properties which may have important structural and electronic applications in the future. However of even more interest than their similarities may be the differences between carbon and boron nanotubes. Whilt boron nitride nanotubes possess a very high modulus similaar to CNT, they are also more chemically and thermally inert. Additionally BNNT possess more uniform electronic properties, having a uniform band gap of approximately 5.5 eV while CNT vary from semi-conductin to conductor behavior. Boron Nitride nanotubes have been synthesized by a variety of methods such as chemical vapor deposition, arc discharge and reactive milling. Consistently producing a reliable product has proven difficult. Progress in synthesis of 1-2 gram sized batches of Boron Nitride nanotubes will be discussed as well as potential uses for this unique material.

  13. Efficient boron nitride nanotube formation via combined laser-gas flow levitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitney, R. Roy; Jordan, Kevin; Smith, Michael

    2014-03-18

    A process for producing boron nitride nanotubes and/or boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes of the general formula B.sub.xC.sub.yN.sub.z. The process utilizes a combination of laser light and nitrogen gas flow to support a boron ball target during heating of the boron ball target and production of a boron vapor plume which reacts with nitrogen or nitrogen and carbon to produce boron nitride nanotubes and/or boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes of the general formula B.sub.xC.sub.yN.sub.z.

  14. Efficient Boron Nitride Nanotube Formation via Combined Laser-Gas Flow Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, R. Roy (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin (Inventor); Smith, Michael W. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A process for producing boron nitride nanotubes and/or boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes of the general formula B(sub x)C(sub y)N(sub z) The process utilizes a combination of laser light and nitrogen gas flow to support a boron ball target during heating of the boron ball target and production of a boron vapor plume which reacts with nitrogen or nitrogen and carbon to produce boron nitride nanotubes and/or boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes of the general formula B(sub x)C(sub y)N(sub z).

  15. Salt rejection and water transport through boron nitride nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilder, Tamsyn A; Gordon, Daniel; Chung, Shin-Ho

    2009-10-01

    Nanotube-based water-purification devices have the potential to transform the field of desalination and demineralization through their ability to remove salts and heavy metals without significantly affecting the fast flow of water molecules. Boron nitride nanotubes have shown superior water flow properties compared to carbon nanotubes, and are thus expected to provide a more efficient water purification device. Using molecular dynamics simulations it is shown that a (5, 5) boron nitride nanotube embedded in a silicon nitride membrane can, in principle, obtain 100% salt rejection at concentrations as high as 1 M owing to a high energy barrier while still allowing water molecules to flow at a rate as high as 10.7 water molecules per nanosecond (or 0.9268 L m(-2) h(-1)). Furthermore, ions continue to be rejected under the influence of high hydrostatic pressures up to 612 MPa. When the nanotube radius is increased to 4.14 A the tube becomes cation-selective, and at 5.52 A the tube becomes anion-selective. PMID:19582727

  16. Phonon spectrum of single-walled boron nitride nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao Yang; Yan Xiao-Hong; Cao Jue-Xian; Mao Yu-Liang; Xiang Jun

    2004-01-01

    Based on a force constant model, we investigated the phonon spectrum and then specific heat of single-walled boron nitride nanotubes. The results show that the frequencies of Raman and infrared active modes decrease with increasing diameter in the low frequency, which is consistent with the results calculated by density functional theory.The fitting formulae for diameter and chirality dependence of specific heat at 300K are given.

  17. Chemical Sharpening, Shortening, and Unzipping of Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yunlong; Chen, Zhongfang; Connell, John W.; Fay, Catharine C.; Park, Cheol; Kim, Jae-Woo; Lin, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs), the one-dimensional member of the boron nitride nanostructure family, are generally accepted to be highly inert to oxidative treatments and can only be covalently modifi ed by highly reactive species. Conversely, it is discovered that the BNNTs can be chemically dispersed and their morphology modifi ed by a relatively mild method: simply sonicating the nanotubes in aqueous ammonia solution. The dispersed nanotubes are significantly corroded, with end-caps removed, tips sharpened, and walls thinned. The sonication treatment in aqueous ammonia solution also removes amorphous BN impurities and shortened BNNTs, resembling various oxidative treatments of carbon nanotubes. Importantly, the majority of BNNTs are at least partially longitudinally cut, or "unzipped". Entangled and freestanding BN nanoribbons (BNNRs), resulting from the unzipping, are found to be approximately 5-20 nm in width and up to a few hundred nanometers in length. This is the fi rst chemical method to obtain BNNRs from BNNT unzipping. This method is not derived from known carbon nanotube unzipping strategies, but is unique to BNNTs because the use of aqueous ammonia solutions specifi cally targets the B-N bond network. This study may pave the way for convenient processing of BNNTs, previously thought to be highly inert, toward controlling their dispersion, purity, lengths, and electronic properties.

  18. Ultrahigh interlayer friction in multiwalled boron nitride nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niguès, A; Siria, A; Vincent, P; Poncharal, P; Bocquet, L

    2014-07-01

    Friction at the nanoscale has revealed a wealth of behaviours that depart strongly from the long-standing macroscopic laws of Amontons-Coulomb. Here, by using a 'Christmas cracker'-type of system in which a multiwalled nanotube is torn apart between a quartz-tuning-fork-based atomic force microscope (TF-AFM) and a nanomanipulator, we compare the mechanical response of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and multiwalled boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) during the fracture and telescopic sliding of the layers. We found that the interlayer friction for insulating BNNTs results in ultrahigh viscous-like dissipation that is proportional to the contact area, whereas for the semimetallic CNTs the sliding friction vanishes within experimental uncertainty. We ascribe this difference to the ionic character of the BN, which allows charge localization. The interlayer viscous friction of BNNTs suggests that BNNT membranes could serve as extremely efficient shock-absorbing surfaces.

  19. Exciton Effects in Optical Absorption of Boron-Nitride Nanotubes

    CERN Document Server

    Harigaya, Kikuo

    2007-01-01

    Exciton effects are studied in single-wall boron-nitride (BN) nanotubes. Linear absorption spectra are calculated with changing the chiral index of the zigzag nanotubes. We consider the extended Hubbard model with atomic energies at the boron and nitrogen sites. Exciton effects are calculated using the configuration interaction technique. The Coulomb interaction dependence of the band gap, the lowest exciton energy, and the binding energy of the exciton are discussed. The optical gap of the (5,0) nanotube is about 6 eV at the onsite interaction U=2t with the hopping integral t=1.2 eV. The binding energy of the exciton is 0.50 eV for these parameters. This energy agrees well with that of other theoretical investigations. We find that the energy gap and the binding energy are almost independent of the geometries of the nanotubes. This novel property is in contrast with that of the carbon nanotubes which show metallic and semiconducting properties depending on the chiral index.

  20. Pressure effects on dynamics behavior of multiwall boron nitride nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talebian, Taha [Faculty of Engineering, Neyshabur Branch, Islamic Azad University, Neyshabur (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    The dynamic behavior of Multiwall boron nitride nanotubes (MWBNNTs) is investigated by employing multiple elastic shells model. The influences of van der Waals interactions on layers are shown as nonlinear functions of the interlayer distance of MWBNNTs. Governing equations are solved by using the developed finite element method and by employing time history diagrams. The radial wave speed from the outermost layer to the innermost layer is computed. The effects of geometrical factors such as diameter-to-thickness ratio on dynamic behavior of MWBNNTs are determined. The magnification aspects of MWBNNTs are computed, and the effects of surrounding pressures on wave speed and magnification aspect of MWBNNTs are discussed.

  1. Carbon nanotube quantum dots on hexagonal boron nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumgartner, A., E-mail: andreas.baumgartner@unibas.ch; Abulizi, G.; Gramich, J.; Schönenberger, C. [Institute of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, 4056 Basel (Switzerland); Watanabe, K.; Taniguchi, T. [National Institute for Material Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan)

    2014-07-14

    We report the fabrication details and low-temperature characteristics of carbon nanotube (CNT) quantum dots on flakes of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) as substrate. We demonstrate that CNTs can be grown on hBN by standard chemical vapor deposition and that standard scanning electron microscopy imaging and lithography can be employed to fabricate nanoelectronic structures when using optimized parameters. This proof of concept paves the way to more complex devices on hBN, with more predictable and reproducible characteristics and electronic stability.

  2. Synthesis of boron nitride nanotubes and their applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saban Kalay

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs have been increasingly investigated for use in a wide range of applications due to their unique physicochemical properties including high hydrophobicity, heat and electrical insulation, resistance to oxidation, and hydrogen storage capacity. They are also valued for their possible medical and biomedical applications including drug delivery, use in biomaterials, and neutron capture therapy. In this review, BNNT synthesis methods and the surface modification strategies are first discussed, and then their toxicity and application studies are summarized. Finally, a perspective for the future use of these novel materials is discussed.

  3. Thermal vibration characteristics of armchair boron-nitride nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandra, Anirban [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur 721302 (India); Patra, Puneet Kumar [Advanced Technology Development Center, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur 721302 (India); Bhattacharya, Baidurya, E-mail: baidurya@civil.iitkgp.ernet.in [Department of Civil Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur 721302 (India)

    2015-12-21

    A nanomechanical resonator based sensor works by detecting small changes in the natural frequency of the device in presence of external agents. In this study, we address the length and the temperature-dependent sensitivity of precompressed armchair Boron-Nitride nanotubes towards their use as sensors. The vibrational data, obtained using molecular dynamics simulations, are analyzed for frequency content through the fast Fourier transformation. As the temperature of the system rises, the vibrational spectrum becomes noisy, and the modal frequencies show a red-shift irrespective of the length of the nanotube, suggesting that the nanotube based sensors calibrated at a particular temperature may not function desirably at other temperatures. Temperature-induced noise becomes increasingly pronounced with the decrease in the length of the nanotube. For the shorter nanotube at higher temperatures, we observe multiple closely spaced peaks near the natural frequency, that create a masking effect and reduce the sensitivity of detection. However, longer nanotubes do not show these spurious frequencies, and are considerably more sensitive than the shorter ones.

  4. Nanomechanical cutting of boron nitride nanotubes by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Meng; Chen, Xiaoming; Park, Cheol; Fay, Catharine C; Pugno, Nicola M; Ke, Changhong

    2013-12-20

    The length of nanotubes is a critical structural parameter for the design and manufacture of nanotube-based material systems and devices. High-precision length control of nanotubes by means of mechanical cutting using a scriber has not materialized due to the lack of the knowledge of the appropriate cutting conditions and the tube failure mechanism. In this paper, we present a quantitative nanomechanical study of the cutting of individual boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) using atomic force microscopy (AFM) probes. In our nanotube cutting measurements, a nanotube standing still on a flat substrate was laterally scribed by an AFM tip. The tip-tube collision force deformed the tube, and eventually fractured the tube at the collision site by increasing the cutting load. The mechanical response of nanotubes during the tip-tube collision process and the roles of the scribing velocity and the frictional interaction on the tip-tube collision contact in cutting nanotubes were quantitatively investigated by cutting double-walled BNNTs of 2.26-4.28 nm in outer diameter. The fracture strength of BNNTs was also quantified based on the measured collision forces and their structural configurations using contact mechanics theories. Our analysis reports fracture strengths of 9.1-15.5 GPa for the tested BNNTs. The nanomechanical study presented in this paper demonstrates that the AFM-based nanomechanical cutting technique not only enables effective control of the length of nanotubes with high precision, but is also promising as a new nanomechanical testing technique for characterizing the mechanical properties of tubular nanostructures. PMID:24285263

  5. Multifunctional Electroactive Nanocomposites Based on Piezoelectric Boron Nitride Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jin Ho; Sauti, Godfrey; Park, Cheol; Yamakov, Vesselin I; Wise, Kristopher E; Lowther, Sharon E; Fay, Catharine C; Thibeault, Sheila A; Bryant, Robert G

    2015-12-22

    Space exploration missions require sensors and devices capable of stable operation in harsh environments such as those that include high thermal fluctuation, atomic oxygen, and high-energy ionizing radiation. However, conventional or state-of-the-art electroactive materials like lead zirconate titanate, poly(vinylidene fluoride), and carbon nanotube (CNT)-doped polyimides have limitations on use in those extreme applications. Theoretical studies have shown that boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) have strength-to-weight ratios comparable to those of CNTs, excellent high-temperature stability (to 800 °C in air), large electroactive characteristics, and excellent neutron radiation shielding capability. In this study, we demonstrated the experimental electroactive characteristics of BNNTs in novel multifunctional electroactive nanocomposites. Upon application of an external electric field, the 2 wt % BNNT/polyimide composite was found to exhibit electroactive strain composed of a superposition of linear piezoelectric and nonlinear electrostrictive components. When the BNNTs were aligned by stretching the 2 wt % BNNT/polyimide composite, electroactive characteristics increased by about 460% compared to the nonstretched sample. An all-nanotube actuator consisting of a BNNT buckypaper layer between two single-walled carbon nanotube buckypaper electrode layers was found to have much larger electroactive properties. The additional neutron radiation shielding properties and ultraviolet/visible/near-infrared optical properties of the BNNT composites make them excellent candidates for use in the extreme environments of space missions.

  6. Dynamic response of multiwall boron nitride nanotubes subjected to impact

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S T Talebian; M Tahani

    2015-12-01

    Dynamic behaviours of multiwall boron nitride nanotubes (MWBNNTs) with finite length were studied by employing continuum structure. Multiple elastic shells with nonlinear model of van der Waals interactions were used for developing an inclusive and inexpensive dynamical model of MWBNNTs. The systems of coupled partial differential equations were solved by applying the finite element method. Whole or part of thin and bulky MWBNNTs were exposed to external pressure impact and dynamical treatment were investigated and precision of results were checked by evaluating the answers with those found by other methods. Both deflection and stress studies were carried out for tubes of MWBNNTs and the influences of longitudinal wave caused by external pressure impact were considered in MWBNNTs. Also, time history diagrams of MWBNNTs with impact of initial longitudinal deflection were investigated and the extension of the longitudinal waves through the length of layers were shown and so, wave speed was determined.

  7. Mechanical strength of boron nitride nanotube-polymer interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiaoming; Ke, Changhong, E-mail: xqwang@uga.edu, E-mail: cke@binghamton.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, State University of New York at Binghamton, Binghamton, New York 13902 (United States); Zhang, Liuyang; Wang, Xianqiao, E-mail: xqwang@uga.edu, E-mail: cke@binghamton.edu [College of Engineering, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602 (United States); Park, Cheol [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia 23681 (United States); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States); Fay, Catharine C. [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia 23681 (United States)

    2015-12-21

    We investigate the mechanical strength of boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) polymer interfaces by using in situ electron microscopy nanomechanical single-tube pull-out techniques. The nanomechanical measurements show that the shear strengths of BNNT-epoxy and BNNT-poly(methyl methacrylate) interfaces reach 323 and 219 MPa, respectively. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal that the superior load transfer capacity of BNNT-polymer interfaces is ascribed to both the strong van der Waals interactions and Coulomb interactions on BNNT-polymer interfaces. The findings of the extraordinary mechanical strength of BNNT-polymer interfaces suggest that BNNTs are excellent reinforcing nanofiller materials for light-weight and high-strength polymer nanocomposites.

  8. Thermal conductivity of vertically aligned boron nitride nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essedik Belkerk, Boubakeur; Achour, Amine; Zhang, Dongyan; Sahli, Salah; Djouadi, M.-Abdou; Khin Yap, Yoke

    2016-07-01

    For the first time, we report the thermal conductivity of vertically aligned boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) films produced by catalytic chemical vapor deposition. High-quality BNNTs were synthesized at 1200 °C on fused silica substrates precoated with Pt thin-film thermometers. The thermal conductivity of the BNNTs was measured at room temperature by using a pulsed photothermal technique. The apparent thermal conductivity of the BNNT coatings increased from 55 to 170 W m‑1 K‑1 when the thickness increased from 10 to 28 µm, while the thermal conductivity attained a value as high as 2400 W m‑1 K‑1. These results suggested that BNNTs, which are highly thermally conductive, but electrically insulating, are promising materials with unique properties.

  9. Mechanical strength of boron nitride nanotube-polymer interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoming; Zhang, Liuyang; Park, Cheol; Fay, Catharine C.; Wang, Xianqiao; Ke, Changhong

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the mechanical strength of boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) polymer interfaces by using in situ electron microscopy nanomechanical single-tube pull-out techniques. The nanomechanical measurements show that the shear strengths of BNNT-epoxy and BNNT-poly(methyl methacrylate) interfaces reach 323 and 219 MPa, respectively. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal that the superior load transfer capacity of BNNT-polymer interfaces is ascribed to both the strong van der Waals interactions and Coulomb interactions on BNNT-polymer interfaces. The findings of the extraordinary mechanical strength of BNNT-polymer interfaces suggest that BNNTs are excellent reinforcing nanofiller materials for light-weight and high-strength polymer nanocomposites.

  10. Adhesion and size dependent friction anisotropy in boron nitride nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The frictional properties of individual multiwalled boron nitride nanotubes (BN-NTs) synthesized by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) and deposited on a silicon substrate are investigated using an atomic force microscope tip sliding along (longitudinal sliding) and across (transverse sliding) the tube’s principal axis. Because of the tube’s transverse deformations during the tip sliding, a larger friction coefficient is found for the transverse sliding as compared to the longitudinal sliding. Here, we show that the friction anisotropy in BN-NTs, defined as the ratio between transverse and longitudinal friction forces per unit area, increases with the nanotube–substrate contact area, estimated to be proportional to (LNTRNT)1/2, where LNT and RNT are the length and the radius of the nanotube, respectively. Larger contact area denotes stronger surface adhesion, resulting in a longitudinal friction coefficient closer to the value expected in the absence of transverse deformations. Compared to carbon nanotubes (C-NTs), BN-NTs display a friction coefficient in each sliding direction with intermediate values between CVD and arc discharge C-NTs. CVD BN-NTs with improved tribological properties and higher oxidation temperature might be a better candidate than CVD C-NTs for applications in extreme environments. (paper)

  11. One-dimensional surface phonon polaritons in boron nitride nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoji G; Ghamsari, Behnood G; Jiang, Jian-Hua; Gilburd, Leonid; Andreev, Gregory O; Zhi, Chunyi; Bando, Yoshio; Golberg, Dmitri; Berini, Pierre; Walker, Gilbert C

    2014-01-01

    Surface polaritons, which are electromagnetic waves coupled to material charge oscillations, have enabled applications in concentrating, guiding and harvesting optical energy below the diffraction limit. Surface plasmon polaritons involve oscillations of electrons and are accessible in noble metals at visible and near-infrared wavelengths, whereas surface phonon polaritons (SPhPs) rely on phonon resonances in polar materials, and are active in the mid-infrared. Noble metal surface plasmon polaritons have limited applications in the mid-infrared. SPhPs at flat interfaces normally possess long polariton wavelengths and provide modest field confinement/enhancement. Here we demonstrate propagating SPhPs in a one-dimensional material consisting of a boron nitride nanotube at mid-infrared wavelengths. The observed SPhP exhibits high field confinement and enhancement, and a very high effective index (neff~70). We show that the modal and propagation length characteristics of the SPhPs may be controlled through the nanotube size and the supporting substrates, enabling mid-infrared applications. PMID:25154586

  12. Interaction of carbohydrate modified boron nitride nanotubes with living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanet, Melis; Şen, Özlem; Çobandede, Zehra; Çulha, Mustafa

    2015-10-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) are composed of boron and nitrogen atoms and they show significantly different properties from their carbon analogues (carbon nanotubes, CNTs). Due to their unique properties including low electrical conductivity, and imaging contrast and neutron capture properties; they can be used in biomedical applications. When their use in biological fields is considered, the route of their toxic effect should be clarified. Therefore, the study of interactions between BNNTs and living systems is important in envisaging biological applications at both cellular and sub-cellular levels to fully gain insights of their potential adverse effects. In this study, BNNTs were modified with lactose, glucose and starch and tested for their cytotoxicity. First, the interactions and the behavior of BNNTs with bovine serum albumin (BSA), Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium (DMEM) and DMEM/Nutrient Mixture F-12Ham were investigated. Thereafter, their cellular uptake and the cyto- and genotoxicity on human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) and adenocarcinoma human alveolar basal epithelial cells (A549) were evaluated. HDFs and A549 cells internalized the modified and unmodified BNNTs, and BNNTs were found to not cause significant viability change and DNA damage. A higher uptake rate of BNNTs by A549 cells compared to HDFs was observed. Moreover, a concentration-dependent cytotoxicity was observed on A549 cells while they were safer for HDFs in the same concentration range. Based on these findings, it can be concluded that BNNTs and their derivatives made with biomacromolecules might be good candidates for several applications in medicine and biomedical applications. PMID:26222410

  13. Efficient FEM simulation of static and free vibration behavior of single walled boron nitride nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannopoulos, Georgios I.; Kontoni, Denise-Penelope N.; Georgantzinos, Stylianos K.

    2016-08-01

    This paper describes the static and free vibration behavior of single walled boron nitride nanotubes using a structural mechanics based finite element method. First, depending on the type of nanotube under investigation, its three dimensional nanostructure is developed according to the well-known corresponding positions of boron and nitride atoms as well as boron nitride bonds. Then, appropriate point masses are assigned to the atomic positions of the developed space frame. Next, these point masses are suitably interconnected with two-noded, linear, spring-like, finite elements. In order to simulate effectively the interactions observed between boron and nitride atoms within the nanotube, appropriate potential energy functions are introduced for these finite elements. In this manner, various atomistic models for both armchair and zigzag nanotubes with different aspect ratios are numerically analyzed and their effective elastic modulus as well as their natural frequencies and corresponding mode shapes are obtained. Regarding the free vibration analysis, the computed results reveal bending, breathing and axial modes of vibration depending on the nanotube size and chirality as well as the applied boundary support conditions. The longitudinal stiffness of the boron nitride nanotubes is found also sensitive to their geometric characteristics.

  14. Assessing cytotoxicity of boron nitride nanotubes: Interference with the MTT assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciofani, Gianni, E-mail: g.ciofani@sssup.it [Italian Institute of Technology, Smart Materials Lab, Center of MicroBioRobotics at Scuola Superiore Sant' Anna, Viale Rinaldo Piaggio, 34, 56025 Pontedera (Pisa) (Italy); Danti, Serena; D' Alessandro, Delfo [Otology-Cochlear Implants, Cisanello Hospital, Via Paradisa 2, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Moscato, Stefania [Department of Human Morphology and Applied Biology, University of Pisa, Via Roma 55, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Menciassi, Arianna [Italian Institute of Technology, Smart Materials Lab, Center of MicroBioRobotics at Scuola Superiore Sant' Anna, Viale Rinaldo Piaggio, 34, 56025 Pontedera (Pisa) (Italy); CRIM Lab, Scuola Superiore Sant' Anna, Viale Rinaldo Piaggio, 34, 56025 Pontedera (Pisa) (Italy)

    2010-04-02

    Thanks to a non-covalent wrapping with glycol-chitosan, highly biocompatible and highly concentrated dispersions of boron nitride nanotubes were obtained and tested on human neuroblastoma cells. A systematic investigation of the cytotoxicity of these nanovectors with several complementary qualitative and quantitative assays allowed a strong interference with the MTT metabolic assay to be highlighted, similar to a phenomenon already observed for carbon nanotubes, that would wrongly suggest toxicity of boron nitride nanotubes. These results confirm the high complexity of these new nanomaterials, and the needing of extensive investigations on their exciting potential applications in the biomedical field.

  15. Boron nitride nanotubes enhance properties of chitosan-based scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanet, Melis; Kazanç, Emine; Çobandede, Zehra; Çulha, Mustafa

    2016-10-20

    With their low toxicity, high mechanical strength and chemical stability, boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) are good candidates to enhance the properties of polymers, composites and scaffolds. Chitosan-based scaffolds are exhaustively investigated in tissue engineering because of their biocompatibility and antimicrobial activity. However, their spontaneous degradation prevents their use in a range of tissue engineering applications. In this study, hydroxylated BNNTs (BNNT-OH) were included into a chitosan scaffold and tested for their mechanical strength, swelling behavior and biodegradability. The results show that inclusion of BNNTs-OH into the chitosan scaffold increases the mechanical strength and pore size at values optimal for high cellular proliferation and adhesion. The chitosan/BNNT-OH scaffold was also found to be non-toxic to Human Dermal Fibroblast (HDF) cells due to its slow degradation rate. HDF cell proliferation and adhesion were increased as compared to the chitosan-only scaffold as observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and fluorescent microscopy images. PMID:27474572

  16. Integrated Rig for the Production of Boron Nitride Nanotubes via the Pressurized Vapor-Condenser Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael W. (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin C. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An integrated production apparatus for production of boron nitride nanotubes via the pressure vapor-condenser method. The apparatus comprises: a pressurized reaction chamber containing a continuously fed boron containing target having a boron target tip, a source of pressurized nitrogen and a moving belt condenser apparatus; a hutch chamber proximate the pressurized reaction chamber containing a target feed system and a laser beam and optics.

  17. Manipulation and functionalization of nano-tubes: application to boron nitride nano-tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This PhD work is divided into two parts dealing with boron nitride (BNNT) and carbon nano-tubes. The first part is about synthesis, purification and chemical functionalization of BNNT. Single-walled BNNT are synthesized by LASER ablation of a hBN target. Improving the synthesis parameters first allowed us to limit the byproducts (hBN, boric acid). A specific purification process was then developed in order to enrich the samples in nano-tubes. Purified samples were then used to develop two new chemical functionalization methods. They both involve chemical molecules that present a high affinity towards the BN network. The use of long chain-substituted quinuclidines and borazines actually allowed the solubilization of BNNT in organic media. Purification and functionalization were developed for single-walled BNNT and were successfully applied to multi-walled BNNT. Sensibility of boron to thermic neutrons finally gave birth to a study about covalent functionalization possibilities of the network. The second part of the PhD work deals with separation of carbon nano-tubes depending on their properties. Microwave irradiation of carbon nano-tubes first allowed the enrichment of initially polydisperse samples in large diameter nano-tubes. A second strategy involving selective interaction between one type of tubes and fullerene micelles was finally envisaged to selectively solubilize carbon nano-tubes with specific electronic properties. (author)

  18. Thermodynamic approach to boron nitride nanotube solubility and dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiano, A. L.; Gibbons, L.; Tsui, M.; Applin, S. I.; Silva, R.; Park, C.; Fay, C. C.

    2016-02-01

    Inadequate dispersion of nanomaterials is a critical issue that significantly limits the potential properties of nanocomposites and when overcome, will enable further enhancement of material properties. The most common methods used to improve dispersion include surface functionalization, surfactants, polymer wrapping, and sonication. Although these approaches have proven effective, they often achieve dispersion by altering the surface or structure of the nanomaterial and ultimately, their intrinsic properties. Co-solvents are commonly utilized in the polymer, paint, and art conservation industries to selectively dissolve materials. These co-solvents are utilized based on thermodynamic interaction parameters and are chosen so that the original materials are not affected. The same concept was applied to enhance the dispersion of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) to facilitate the fabrication of BNNT nanocomposites. Of the solvents tested, dimethylacetamide (DMAc) exhibited the most stable, uniform dispersion of BNNTs, followed by N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF), acetone, and N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP). Utilizing the known Hansen solubility parameters of these solvents in comparison to the BNNT dispersion state, a region of good solubility was proposed. This solubility region was used to identify co-solvent systems that led to improved BNNT dispersion in poor solvents such as toluene, hexane, and ethanol. Incorporating the data from the co-solvent studies further refined the proposed solubility region. From this region, the Hansen solubility parameters for BNNTs are thought to lie at the midpoint of the solubility sphere: 16.8, 10.7, and 9.0 MPa1/2 for δd, δp, and δh, respectively, with a calculated Hildebrand parameter of 21.8 MPa1/2.Inadequate dispersion of nanomaterials is a critical issue that significantly limits the potential properties of nanocomposites and when overcome, will enable further enhancement of material properties. The most common methods used to

  19. Theory of thermal transport in multilayer hexagonal boron nitride and nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, L.; Broido, D. A.

    2012-01-01

    We present a theory for the lattice thermal conductivity κL of single-walled boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) and multilayer hexagonal boron nitride (MLBN), which is based on an exact numerical solution of the phonon Boltzmann equation. Coupling between layers in MLBN and nanotube curvature in BNNTs each break a phonon scattering selection rule found in single-layer hexagonal boron nitride (SLBN), which reduces κL in these systems. We show that out-of-plane flexural phonons in MLBN and out-of-tube phonons in BNNTs provide large contributions to κL, qualitatively similar to multilayer graphene (MLG) and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). However, we find that the κL's in BNNTs and MLBN are considerably smaller compared to similar SWCNTs and MLG structures because of stronger anharmonic phonon scattering in the former. A large and strongly temperature-dependent isotope effect is found reflecting the interplay between anharmonic and isotope scattering phonons. Finally, we also demonstrate convergence of BNNTs into SLBN for large-diameter nanotubes and MLBN to bulk hexagonal boron nitride within a few layers.

  20. Is hexagonal boron nitride always good as a substrate for carbon nanotube-based devices?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Seoung-Hun; Kim, Gunn; Kwon, Young-Kyun

    2015-02-21

    Hexagonal boron nitride sheets have been noted especially for their enhanced properties as substrates for sp(2) carbon-based nanodevices. To evaluate whether such enhanced properties would be retained under various realistic conditions, we investigate the structural and electronic properties of semiconducting carbon nanotubes on perfect and defective hexagonal boron nitride sheets under an external electric field as well as with a metal impurity, using density functional theory. We verify that the use of a perfect hexagonal boron nitride sheet as a substrate indeed improves the device performances of carbon nanotubes, compared with the use of conventional substrates such as SiO2. We further show that even the hexagonal boron nitride with some defects can show better performance as a substrate. Our calculations, on the other hand, also suggest that some defective boron nitride layers with a monovacancy and a nickel impurity could bring about poor device behavior since the imperfections impair electrical conductivity due to residual scattering under an applied electric field.

  1. The Effects of Radial Compression on Thermal Conductivity of Carbon and Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haijun Shen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available By using molecular dynamics method, thermal conductivity of (10, 10 carbon and boron nitride (BN nanotubes under radial compression was investigated, and the - (thermal conductivity versus temperature curves of the two nanotubes were obtained. It is found that with the increase of temperature the thermal conductivity of two nanotubes decreases; the nanotubes, under both the local compression and whole compression, have lower thermal conductivity, and the larger the compressive deformation is, the lower the thermal conductivity is; the whole compression has more remarkable effect on thermal conductivity than the local compression.

  2. Quantifying the Solubility of Boron Nitride Nanotubes and Sheets with Static Light Scattering and Refractometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mutz, M [The University of Tennessee; Eastwood, Eric Allen [ORNL; Dadmun, Mark D [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    The dissolution of nanoparticles, particularly those containing boron, is an important area of interest for polymer nanocomposite formation and material development. In this work, the solubility of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNT), functionalized boron nitride nanotubes (FBNNT), and boron nitride sheets (BNZG) is quantified in toluene and THF with static light scattering, refractometry, UV vis spectroscopy, and physical observations. UV vis spectroscopy provides a method to determine the concentration and solubility limits of the solutions tested. Using light scattering, the second virial coefficient, A2, is determined and used to calculate , the solute solvent interaction parameter. The Hildebrand solubility parameter, , is then extracted from this data using the Hildebrand Scatchard Solution Theory. A list of potential good solvents based on the estimated value is provided for each nanoparticle. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and prepolymers (EN4 and EN8) used to synthesize polyurethanes were also tested, because the published and molar attraction constants of these materials provided a selfconsistent check. The dn/dc of SWNTs and boron-containing particles was measured for the first time in this work. A solvent screen for BN-ZG provides additional information that supports the obtained and . Three systems were found to have values below 0.5 and were thermodynamically soluble: BNNT in THF, EN8 in THF, and EN8 in toluene.

  3. Simulation of STM technique for electron transport through boron-nitride nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganji, M.D. [Department of Chemistry, Azad University, Ghaemshahr Branch, Mazandaran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: ganji_md@yahoo.com; Mohammadi-nejad, A. [Department of Computer Engineering, Olom Fonon University of Mazandaran, Babol (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2008-06-30

    We report first-principles calculations on the electrical transport properties of boron-nitrid nanotubes (BNNTs). We consider a single walled (5,0) boron-nitrid nanotube sandwiched between an Au(1 0 0) substrate and a monatomic Au scanning tunneling microscope (STM) tip. Lateral motion of the tip over the nanotube wall cause it to change from one conformation class to the others and to switch between a strongly and a weakly conducting state. Thus, surprisingly, despite their apparent simplicity these Au/BNNT/Au nanowires are shown to be a convenient switch. Experiments with a conventional STM are proposed to test these predictions. The projection of the density of states (PDOS) and the transmission coefficients T(E) of the two-probe systems at zero bias are analyzed, and it suggests that the variation of the coupling between the wire and the electrodes leads to switching behaviour.

  4. Electron beam machining of nanometer-sized tips from multiwalled boron nitride nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik-Aktas, Ayten; Stubbins, James F.; Zuo, Jian-Min

    2007-07-01

    We report here that high energy electron irradiation of multiwalled boron nitride nanotubes can be used to form sharp, crystalline, conical tips, or to cut boron nitride nanotubes by controlling the electron beam size. Electron beam cutting is observed when a focused electron beam with a diameter much smaller than the tube diameter is used. The tip formation is observed when a shaped, disklike, electron beam is used to irradiate the tube; the diameter of the beam in this case is similar to the tube diameter. In situ electron microscopy observation shows that the tip formation effect is driven by layer peeling and the collapse of the inner walls of the nanotube. This is very different from the formation of nanoarches observed during cutting. The combination of shaping and cutting can be used to fabricate atomically sharp tips for field emitters, nanoimaging, and manipulations.

  5. Applicability of carbon and boron nitride nanotubes as biosensors: Effect of biomolecular adsorption on the transport properties of carbon and boron nitride nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xiaoliang; Mukhopadhyay, Saikat; Gowtham, S.; Pandey, Ravindra; Karna, Shashi P.

    2013-04-01

    The effect of molecular adsorption on the transport properties of single walled carbon and boron nitride nanotubes (CNTs and BNNTs) is investigated using density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's function methods. The calculated I-V characteristics predict noticeable changes in the conductivity of semiconducting BNNTs due to physisorption of nucleic acid base molecules. Specifically, guanine which binds to the side wall of BNNT significantly enhances its conductivity by introducing conduction channels near the Fermi energy of the bioconjugated system. For metallic CNTs, a large background current masks relatively small changes in current due to the biomolecular adsorption. The results therefore suggest the suitability of BNNTs for biosensing applications.

  6. The effect of temperature on the compressive buckling of boron nitride nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shokuhfar, Ali; Ebrahimi-Nejad, Salman [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, K.N. Toosi University of Technology, 19991-43344 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hosseini-Sadegh, Amin [Faculty of Petroleum Engineering, Petroleum University of Technology, 14539-53153 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zare-Shahabadi, Abolfazl [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yazd Branch, Islamic Azad University, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-07-15

    Inspired by the stability at high temperature and the high mechanical strength of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs), the effect of temperature on the compressive buckling of BNNTs has been investigated in this paper. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of BNNTs subjected to high temperatures (up to 3000 K) were performed and their structures were analyzed by studying their optimized structures at different temperatures through the radial distribution function (RDF). Then, the structural stability and compressive resistance properties of these nanotubes were investigated and the critical buckling loads and critical buckling strains of the nanotubes and their susceptibility to high temperatures were determined. The gradual decrease in the sharpness of the peaks of RDF plots of non-loaded nanotubes implies that at higher temperatures the structure displays greater deviations from that at room temperature. Results of buckling simulations also indicate a general weakening of the nanotubes and lower critical buckling loads and critical buckling strains at increased temperatures. The decrease in the critical buckling load is more significant for the longer nanotube (L {proportional_to} 6 nm) than the shorter one (L {proportional_to} 3 nm). The critical buckling strain experienced a drop of about 35-50% at temperatures higher than 1500 K. A transitional behavior was observed between T = 1000 and 2000 K. Temperature-dependent axial buckling behavior of boron nitride nanotubes. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Negative differential resistance in an (8, 0) carbon/boron nitride nanotube heterojunction*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Song Jiuxu; Yang Yintang; Liu Hongxia; Guo Lixin

    2011-01-01

    Using the method combined non-equilibrium Green's function with density functional theory, the electronic transport properties of an (8, 0) carbon/boron nitride nanotube heterojunction coupled to Au electrodes were investigated. In the current voltage characteristic of the heterojunction, negative differential resistance was found under positive and negative bias, which is the variation of the localization for corresponding molecular orbital caused by the applied bias voltage These results are meaningful to modeling and simulating on related electronic devices.

  8. Thermal conduction mechanisms in isotope-disordered boron nitride and carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savic, Ivana; Mingo, Natalio; Stewart, Derek

    2009-03-01

    We present first principles studies which determine dominant effects limiting the heat conduction in isotope-disordered boron nitride and carbon nanotubes [1]. Using an ab initio atomistic Green's function approach, we demonstrate that localization cannot be observed in the thermal conductivity measurements [1], and that diffusive scattering is the dominant mechanism which reduces the thermal conductivity [2]. We also give concrete predictions of the magnitude of the isotope effect on the thermal conductivities of carbon and boron nitride single-walled nanotubes [2]. We furthermore show that intershell scattering is not the main limiting mechanism for the heat flow through multi-walled boron nitride nanotubes [1], and that heat conduction restricted to a few shells leads to the low thermal conductivities experimentally measured [1]. We consequently successfully compare the results of our calculations [3] with the experimental measurements [1]. [1] C. W. Chang, A. M. Fennimore, A. Afanasiev, D. Okawa, T. Ikuno, H. Garcia, D. Li, A. Majumdar, A. Zettl, Phys. Rev. Lett. 2006, 97, 085901. [2] I. Savic, N. Mingo, D. A. Stewart, Phys. Rev. Lett. 2008, 101, 165502. [3] I. Savic, D. A. Stewart, N. Mingo, to be published.

  9. The mechanism for low temperature growth of vertically aligned boron nitride nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiesheng; Xie, Ming; Khin Yap, Yoke

    2006-03-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) are well recognized as the candidate that will complement the uses of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in nanotechnology. However, high growth temperatures (>1100 ^oC), low production yield, and impurities have prevented effective synthesis and applications of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) in the past ten years. For the first time, we have succeeded on the growth of pure BNNTs on substrates [1, 2]. This has been realized based on our experiences of growing CNTs and boron nitride (BN) phases (cubic phase BN, hexagonal phase BN). According to our hypothetical model, energetic growth species play an important role on controlling the phases of BN solids. We have experimentally verified that BNNTs can be grown by energetic growth species by a plasma-enhanced pulsed laser deposition (PEPLD) technique. These BNNTs can be grown vertically aligned into arrays of regular patterns at 600 ^oC, and can be used for applications without purification. The growth mechanism of thee BNNTs will be discussed. [1]. Yap et al., Bull APS Vol 50, 1346-1347 (March 2005). [2]. Wang et al., nano Letters (2005) ASAP, DOI: 10.1021/nl051859n.

  10. Encapsulation of cisplatin as an anti-cancer drug into boron-nitride and carbon nanotubes: Molecular simulation and free energy calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roosta, Sara; Hashemianzadeh, Seyed Majid; Ketabi, Sepideh

    2016-10-01

    Encapsulation of cisplatin anticancer drug into the single walled (10, 0) carbon nanotube and (10, 0) boron-nitride nanotube was investigated by quantum mechanical calculations and Monte Carlo Simulation in aqueous solution. Solvation free energies and complexation free energies of the cisplatin@ carbon nanotube and cisplatin@ boron-nitride nanotube complexes was determined as well as radial distribution functions of entitled compounds. Solvation free energies of cisplatin@ carbon nanotube and cisplatin@ boron-nitride nanotube were -4.128kcalmol(-1) and -2457.124kcalmol(-1) respectively. The results showed that cisplatin@ boron-nitride nanotube was more soluble species in water. In addition electrostatic contribution of the interaction of boron- nitride nanotube complex and solvent was -281.937kcalmol(-1) which really more than Van der Waals and so the electrostatic interactions play a distinctive role in the solvation free energies of boron- nitride nanotube compounds. On the other hand electrostatic part of the interaction of carbon nanotube complex and solvent were almost the same as Van der Waals contribution. Complexation free energies were also computed to study the stability of related structures and the free energies were negative (-374.082 and -245.766kcalmol(-1)) which confirmed encapsulation of drug into abovementioned nanotubes. However, boron-nitride nanotubes were more appropriate for encapsulation due to their larger solubility in aqueous solution. PMID:27287103

  11. Encapsulation of cisplatin as an anti-cancer drug into boron-nitride and carbon nanotubes: Molecular simulation and free energy calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roosta, Sara; Hashemianzadeh, Seyed Majid; Ketabi, Sepideh

    2016-10-01

    Encapsulation of cisplatin anticancer drug into the single walled (10, 0) carbon nanotube and (10, 0) boron-nitride nanotube was investigated by quantum mechanical calculations and Monte Carlo Simulation in aqueous solution. Solvation free energies and complexation free energies of the cisplatin@ carbon nanotube and cisplatin@ boron-nitride nanotube complexes was determined as well as radial distribution functions of entitled compounds. Solvation free energies of cisplatin@ carbon nanotube and cisplatin@ boron-nitride nanotube were -4.128kcalmol(-1) and -2457.124kcalmol(-1) respectively. The results showed that cisplatin@ boron-nitride nanotube was more soluble species in water. In addition electrostatic contribution of the interaction of boron- nitride nanotube complex and solvent was -281.937kcalmol(-1) which really more than Van der Waals and so the electrostatic interactions play a distinctive role in the solvation free energies of boron- nitride nanotube compounds. On the other hand electrostatic part of the interaction of carbon nanotube complex and solvent were almost the same as Van der Waals contribution. Complexation free energies were also computed to study the stability of related structures and the free energies were negative (-374.082 and -245.766kcalmol(-1)) which confirmed encapsulation of drug into abovementioned nanotubes. However, boron-nitride nanotubes were more appropriate for encapsulation due to their larger solubility in aqueous solution.

  12. 机械法合成BN纳米管%Mechanosynthesis of Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    籍凤秋; 曹传宝; 徐红; 杨子光

    2006-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes (BN-NTs) with pure hexagonal BN phase have been synthesized by heating ball-milled boron powders in flowing ammonia gas at a temperature of 1200℃. The as-synthesized products were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). The diameters of nanotubes are in the rage of 40120nm and the lengths are more than 10μm. EELS result identifies that the ratio of boron and nitrogen is almost 1:1. The growth temperature is a crucial growth parameter in controlling the structure and crystalline of BN-NTs. The nanotubes grown at 1100℃ possesses of a bamboo-like structure, while as the temperature increased to 1200℃, most of the nanotubes exhibited a cylindrical structure. In addition, changing the heating time can control the size of the nanotubes. The gas atmosphere has influence on the yield of BN-NTs during heating process. When heating atmosphere was replaced by nitrogen, the yield of nanotubes was remarkably decreased.

  13. High Kinetic Energy Penetrator Shielding and High Wear Resistance Materials Fabricated with Boron Nitride Nanotubes (BNNTS) and BNNT Polymer Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jin Ho (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Sauti, Godfrey (Inventor); Smith, Michael W. (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin C. (Inventor); Lowther, Sharon E. (Inventor); Bryant, Robert George (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs), boron nitride nanoparticles (BNNPs), carbon nanotubes (CNTs), graphites, or combinations, are incorporated into matrices of polymer, ceramic or metals. Fibers, yarns, and woven or nonwoven mats of BNNTs are used as toughening layers in penetration resistant materials to maximize energy absorption and/or high hardness layers to rebound or deform penetrators. They can be also used as reinforcing inclusions combining with other polymer matrices to create composite layers like typical reinforcing fibers such as Kevlar.RTM., Spectra.RTM., ceramics and metals. Enhanced wear resistance and usage time are achieved by adding boron nitride nanomaterials, increasing hardness and toughness. Such materials can be used in high temperature environments since the oxidation temperature of BNNTs exceeds 800.degree. C. in air. Boron nitride based composites are useful as strong structural materials for anti-micrometeorite layers for spacecraft and space suits, ultra strong tethers, protective gear, vehicles, helmets, shields and safety suits/helmets for industry.

  14. Very long single- and few-walled boron nitride nanotubes via the pressurized vapor/condenser method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Michael W. [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States); Jordan, Kevin C. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Park, Cheol [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States); Kim, Jae-Woo [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States); Lillehei, Peter T. [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States); Crooks, Roy [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States); Harrison, Joycelyn S. [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States)

    2009-11-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) are desired for their exceptional mechanical, electronic, thermal, structural, textural, optical, and quantum properties. A new method for producing long, small-diameter, single- and few-walled, boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) in macroscopic quantities is reported. The pressurized vapor/condenser (PVC) method produces, without catalysts, highly crystalline, very long, small-diameter, BNNTs. Palm-sized, cotton-like masses of BNNT raw material were grown by this technique and spun directly into centimeters-long yarn. Nanotube lengths were observed to be 100 times that of those grown by the most closely related method. Self-assembly and growth models for these long BNNTs are discussed.

  15. Mid-infrared polaritonic coupling between boron nitride nanotubes and graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoji G; Jiang, Jian-Hua; Gilburd, Leonid; Rensing, Rachel G; Burch, Kenneth S; Zhi, Chunyi; Bando, Yoshio; Golberg, Dmitri; Walker, Gilbert C

    2014-11-25

    Boron nitride (BN) is considered to be a promising substrate for graphene-based devices in part because its large band gap can serve to insulate graphene in layered heterostructures. At mid-infrared frequencies, graphene supports surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs), whereas hexagonal-BN (h-BN) is found to support surface phonon polaritons (SPhPs). We report on the observation of infrared polaritonic coupling between graphene SPPs and boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) SPhPs. Infrared scattering type scanning near-field optical microscopy is used to obtain spatial distribution of the two types of polaritons at the nanoscale. The observation suggests that those polaritons interact at the nanoscale in a one-dimensional/two-dimensional (1D/2D) geometry, exchanging energy in a nonplanar configuration at the nanoscale. Control of the polaritonic interaction is achieved by adjustment of the graphene Fermi level through voltage gating. Our observation suggests that boron nitride nanotubes and graphene can interact at mid-infrared frequencies and coherently exchange their energies at the nanoscale through the overlap of mutual electric near field of surface phonon polaritons and surface plasmon polaritons. Such interaction enables the design of nano-optical devices based on BNNT-graphene polaritonics in the mid-infrared range. PMID:25365544

  16. Ultrafast optical nonlinearity and photoacoustic studies on chitosan-boron nitride nanotube composite films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuthirummal, Narayanan; Philip, Reji; Mohan, Athira; Jenks, Cassidy; Levi-Polyachenko, Nicole

    2016-07-01

    Ultrafast optical nonlinearity in chitosan (CS) films doped with multi-walled boron nitride nanotubes (MWBN) has been investigated using 800 nm, 100 fs laser pulses, employing the open aperture Z-scan technique. Two-photon absorption coefficients (β) of CS-MWBN films have been measured at 800 nm by Z-scan. While chitosan with 0.01% MWBN doping gives a β value of 0.28×10-13 m/W, 1% doping results in a higher β value of 1.43×10-13 m/W, showing nonlinearity enhancement by a factor of 5. These nonlinearity coefficients are comparable to those reported for silver nanoclusters in glass matrix and Pt-PVA nanocomposites, indicating potential photonic applications for MWBN doped chitosan films. Characterization of the synthesized films using Fourier transform infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy (FTIR-PAS) reveals significant interactions between the NH and CO groups of chitosan with boron nitride.

  17. Method and device to synthesize boron nitride nanotubes and related nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zettl, Alexander K.

    2016-07-19

    Methods and apparatus for producing chemical nanostructures having multiple elements, such as boron and nitride, e.g. boron nitride nanotubes, are disclosed. The method comprises creating a plasma jet, or plume, such as by an arc discharge. The plasma plume is elongated and has a temperature gradient along its length. It extends along its length into a port connector area having ports for introduction of feed materials. The feed materials include the multiple elements, which are introduced separately as fluids or powders at multiple ports along the length of the plasma plume, said ports entering the plasma plume at different temperatures. The method further comprises modifying a temperature at a distal portion of or immediately downstream of said plasma plume; and collecting said chemical nanostructures after said modifying.

  18. A quantum chemistry study of curvature effects on boron nitride nanotubes/nanosheets for gas adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, Haoyan; Faller, Roland

    2016-07-20

    Quantum chemistry calculations were performed to investigate the effect of the surface curvature of a Boron Nitride (BN) nanotube/nanosheet on gas adsorption. Curved boron nitride layers with different curvatures interacting with a number of different gases including noble gases, oxygen, and water on both their convex and concave sides of the surface were studied using density functional theory (DFT) with a high level dispersion corrected functional. Potential energy surfaces of the gas molecules interacting with the selected BN surfaces were investigated. In addition, the charge distribution and electrostatic potential contour of the selected BN surfaces are discussed. The results reveal how the curvature of the BN surfaces affects gas adsorption. In particular, small curvatures lead to a slight difference in the physisorption energy, while large curvatures present distinct potential energy surfaces, especially for the short-range repulsion. PMID:27399852

  19. Giant osmotic energy conversion measured in a single transmembrane boron nitride nanotube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siria, Alessandro; Poncharal, Philippe; Biance, Anne-Laure; Fulcrand, Rémy; Blase, Xavier; Purcell, Stephen T; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2013-02-28

    New models of fluid transport are expected to emerge from the confinement of liquids at the nanoscale, with potential applications in ultrafiltration, desalination and energy conversion. Nevertheless, advancing our fundamental understanding of fluid transport on the smallest scales requires mass and ion dynamics to be ultimately characterized across an individual channel to avoid averaging over many pores. A major challenge for nanofluidics thus lies in building distinct and well-controlled nanochannels, amenable to the systematic exploration of their properties. Here we describe the fabrication and use of a hierarchical nanofluidic device made of a boron nitride nanotube that pierces an ultrathin membrane and connects two fluid reservoirs. Such a transmembrane geometry allows the detailed study of fluidic transport through a single nanotube under diverse forces, including electric fields, pressure drops and chemical gradients. Using this device, we discover very large, osmotically induced electric currents generated by salinity gradients, exceeding by two orders of magnitude their pressure-driven counterpart. We show that this result originates in the anomalously high surface charge carried by the nanotube's internal surface in water at large pH, which we independently quantify in conductance measurements. The nano-assembly route using nanostructures as building blocks opens the way to studying fluid, ionic and molecule transport on the nanoscale, and may lead to biomimetic functionalities. Our results furthermore suggest that boron nitride nanotubes could be used as membranes for osmotic power harvesting under salinity gradients.

  20. Radio Frequency Plasma Synthesis of Boron Nitride Nanotubes (BNNTs) for Structural Applications: Part I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hales, Stephen J.; Alexa, Joel A.; Jensen, Brian J.; Thomsen, Donald L.

    2016-01-01

    It is evident that nanotubes, such as carbon, boron nitride and even silicon, offer great potential for many aerospace applications. The opportunity exists to harness the extremely high strength and stiffness exhibited by high-purity, low-defect nanotubes in structural materials. Even though the technology associated with carbon nanotube (CNT) development is mature, the mechanical property benefits have yet to be fully realized. Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) offer similar structural benefits, but exhibit superior chemical and thermal stability. A broader range of potential structural applications results, particularly as reinforcing agents for metal- and ceramic- based composites. However, synthesis of BNNTs is more challenging than CNTs mainly because of the higher processing temperatures required, and mass production techniques have yet to emerge. A promising technique is radio frequency plasma spray (RFPS), which is an inductively coupled, very high temperature process. The lack of electrodes and the self- contained, inert gas environment lend themselves to an ultraclean product. It is the aim of this White Paper to survey the state of the art with regard to nano-material production by analyzing the pros and cons of existing methods. The intention is to combine the best concepts and apply the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) RFPS facility to reliably synthesize large quantities of consistent, high-purity BNNTs.

  1. Modeling of Laser Vaporization and Plume Chemistry in a Boron Nitride Nanotube Production Rig

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.; Fay, Catharine C.

    2012-01-01

    Flow in a pressurized, vapor condensation (PVC) boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) production rig is modeled. A laser provides a thermal energy source to the tip of a boron ber bundle in a high pressure nitrogen chamber causing a plume of boron-rich gas to rise. The buoyancy driven flow is modeled as a mixture of thermally perfect gases (B, B2, N, N2, BN) in either thermochemical equilibrium or chemical nonequilibrium assuming steady-state melt and vaporization from a 1 mm radius spot at the axis of an axisymmetric chamber. The simulation is intended to define the macroscopic thermochemical environment from which boron-rich species, including nanotubes, condense out of the plume. Simulations indicate a high temperature environment (T > 4400K) for elevated pressures within 1 mm of the surface sufficient to dissociate molecular nitrogen and form BN at the base of the plume. Modifications to Program LAURA, a finite-volume based solver for hypersonic flows including coupled radiation and ablation, are described to enable this simulation. Simulations indicate that high pressure synthesis conditions enable formation of BN vapor in the plume that may serve to enhance formation of exceptionally long nanotubes in the PVC process.

  2. Tubular Shape Fullerenes Inside Single Wall Boron Nitride Nanotubes: A Theoretical Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Fengxian; Yao, Zhen; Yao, Mingguang; Liu, Ran; Cui, Tian; Liu, Bingbing

    2016-06-01

    The orientations of fullerene molecules filled in nanotubes have important influence on the electronic properties of the formed peapods and their transformations such as polymerization under certain conditions. Here we present a investigation on the preferable orientations of tubular C70, C80 and C90 fullerenes confined inside single-walled boron nitride nanotubes (SWBNNTs) by calculating the van der Waals energy between the encapsulated molecule and the hosting nanotube. The minimum entering radius and the energetically favorable radius for encapsulating C70, C80 and C90 have been determined by the reaction energy calculation. We also show that the three studied molecules filled in SWBNNTs exhibit a transition from lying (five-fold axis) orientation to tilted orientation and then to standing orientation (two-fold axis) with increasing the tube radius. The preferable orientations of the encapsulated fullerenes are irrelevant on the tube chirality, but are dependent on the radius. PMID:27427630

  3. Electro-Orientation of Boron-Nitride Nanotubes in Aqueous Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetindag, Semih; Kim, Sangil; Tiwari, Bishnu; Bhandari, Shiva; Zhang, Dongyan; Yap, Yoke Khin; Shan, Jerry

    2015-11-01

    Boron-nitride nanotubes (BNNTs), which have similar structure to carbon nanotubes but very different electronic properties, are of interest for a variety of applications, including hydrogen storage, water desalination, mechanical reinforcement and improving the thermal conductivity of composites. Many potential applications would benefit from alignment of BNNTs. We demonstrate, for the first time, the ability to align BNNTs, which are insulating at room temperature, with spatially uniform AC fields in aqueous solution. Electro-orientation rates are experimentally found to decline as the frequency of the AC field is increased. The behavior of the cross-over frequency with varying solution conductivity is suggestive of induced-charge-electro-osmotic (ICEO) alignment, despite the extremely low electrical conductivity of BNNTs. We further discuss electro-orientation with DNA-wrapped BNNTs and compare with pristine nanotubes.

  4. Boron nitride nanotube-mediated stimulation of cell co-culture on micro-engineered hydrogels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Ricotti

    Full Text Available In this paper, we describe the effects of the combination of topographical, mechanical, chemical and intracellular electrical stimuli on a co-culture of fibroblasts and skeletal muscle cells. The co-culture was anisotropically grown onto an engineered micro-grooved (10 µm-wide grooves polyacrylamide substrate, showing a precisely tuned Young's modulus (∼ 14 kPa and a small thickness (∼ 12 µm. We enhanced the co-culture properties through intracellular stimulation produced by piezoelectric nanostructures (i.e., boron nitride nanotubes activated by ultrasounds, thus exploiting the ability of boron nitride nanotubes to convert outer mechanical waves (such as ultrasounds in intracellular electrical stimuli, by exploiting the direct piezoelectric effect. We demonstrated that nanotubes were internalized by muscle cells and localized in both early and late endosomes, while they were not internalized by the underneath fibroblast layer. Muscle cell differentiation benefited from the synergic combination of topographical, mechanical, chemical and nanoparticle-based stimuli, showing good myotube development and alignment towards a preferential direction, as well as high expression of genes encoding key proteins for muscle contraction (i.e., actin and myosin. We also clarified the possible role of fibroblasts in this process, highlighting their response to the above mentioned physical stimuli in terms of gene expression and cytokine production. Finally, calcium imaging-based experiments demonstrated a higher functionality of the stimulated co-cultures.

  5. Plasma Spray Synthesis of High Purity Boron Nitride Nanotubes Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Compared with carbon nanotubes, BNNT's possess better mechanical properties and are thermally stable to much higher temperatures. The potential benefits of...

  6. Carbon nanotubes with atomic impurities on boron nitride sheets under applied electric fields

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Seoung-Hun; Kim, Gunn; Kwon, Young-Kyun

    2013-01-01

    We perform first-principles calculations to investigate the structural and electronic properties of metal-doped (10, 0) carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on a single hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) sheet in the presence of an external electric field. We consider K, Cl and Ni atoms as dopants to study the dependence of the electronic properties of the CNT on doping polarity and concentration. The electric field strength is varied from -0.2 V/\\AA to +0.2 V/\\AA to explore the effects of an external electric...

  7. Near-Field Infrared Pump-Probe Imaging of Surface Phonon Coupling in Boron Nitride Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilburd, Leonid; Xu, Xiaoji G; Bando, Yoshio; Golberg, Dmitri; Walker, Gilbert C

    2016-01-21

    Surface phonon modes are lattice vibrational modes of a solid surface. Two common surface modes, called longitudinal and transverse optical modes, exhibit lattice vibration along or perpendicular to the direction of the wave. We report a two-color, infrared pump-infrared probe technique based on scattering type near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM) to spatially resolve coupling between surface phonon modes. Spatially varying couplings between the longitudinal optical and surface phonon polariton modes of boron nitride nanotubes are observed, and a simple model is proposed. PMID:26727539

  8. Effect of reaction time on the characteristics of catalytically grown boron nitride nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamed, Norani Muti, E-mail: noranimuti-mohamed@petronas.com.my, E-mail: pervaiz-pas@yahoo.com, E-mail: shuaib-penang@yahoo.com, E-mail: zainabh@petronas.com.my; Ahmad, Pervaiz, E-mail: noranimuti-mohamed@petronas.com.my, E-mail: pervaiz-pas@yahoo.com, E-mail: shuaib-penang@yahoo.com, E-mail: zainabh@petronas.com.my; Saheed, Mohamed Shuaib Mohamed, E-mail: noranimuti-mohamed@petronas.com.my, E-mail: pervaiz-pas@yahoo.com, E-mail: shuaib-penang@yahoo.com, E-mail: zainabh@petronas.com.my; Burhanudin, Zainal Arif, E-mail: noranimuti-mohamed@petronas.com.my, E-mail: pervaiz-pas@yahoo.com, E-mail: shuaib-penang@yahoo.com, E-mail: zainabh@petronas.com.my [Center of Innovative Nanostructures and Nanodevices (COINN), Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750, Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia)

    2014-10-24

    The paper reports on the growth of boron nitride nanotube (BNNTs) on Si substrate by catalytic chemical vapor deposition technique and the effect of reaction time and temperature on the size and purity were investigated. Scanning electron microscopy image revealed the bamboo-like BNNTs of multiwalled type with interlayer spacing of 0.34 nm. EDX analysis described the presence of a small percentage of Mg in the sample, indicating the combination of base-tip growth model for the sample synthesized at 1200°C. The reaction time has an effect of extending the length of the BNNTs until the catalyst is oxidized or covered by growth precursor.

  9. Utilization of multiwalled boron nitride nanotubes for the reinforcement of lightweight aluminum ribbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Maho; Pakdel, Amir; Zhi, Chunyi; Bando, Yoshio; Tang, Dai-Ming; Faerstein, Konstantin; Shtansky, Dmitry; Golberg, Dmitri

    2013-01-01

    Multiwalled boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) have very attractive mechanical and thermal properties, e.g., elasticity, tensile strength, and high resistance to oxidation, and may be considered as ideal reinforcing agents in lightweight metal matrix composites. Herein, for the first time, Al-BNNT ribbons with various BNNT contents (up to 3 wt.%) were fabricated via melt spinning in an argon atmosphere. BNNTs were randomly dispersed within a microcrystalline Al matrix under ribbon casting and led to more than doubling of room-temperature ultimate tensile strength of the composites compared to pure Al ribbons produced at the similar conditions. PMID:23279813

  10. Nonlocal piezoelastic surface effect on the vibration of visco-Pasternak coupled boron nitride nanotube system under a moving nanoparticle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghorbanpour Arani, A., E-mail: aghorban@kashanu.ac.ir [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University of Kashan, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, University of Kashan, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Roudbari, M.A. [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University of Kashan, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-09-02

    In this article, the nonlocal longitudinal and transverse vibrations of coupled boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) system under a moving nanoparticle using piezoelastic theory and surface stress based on Euler–Bernoulli beam are developed. BNNTs are coupled by visco-Pasternak medium and single-walled zigzag structure BNNT is selected in this study. Hamilton's principle is employed to derive the corresponding higher order equations of motion for both nanotubes. The detailed parametric study is conducted, focusing on the remarkable effects of the small scale parameter, aspect ratio, surface stress and visco-Pasternak coefficients on the vibration behavior of the coupled BNNT system. Also it is demonstrated that the normalized dynamic deflections obtained by using the classical beam theory are smaller than those obtained by the nonlocal beam theory. The influence of the smart controller is proved on the nondimensional fundamental longitudinal frequency. The result of this study can be useful to manufacture of smart microelectromechanical system and nanoelectromechanical system in advanced biomechanics applications with electric field as a parametric controller. - Highlights: • Vibration of coupled boron nitride nanotube system is studied. • Boron nitride nanotubes are coupled by a visco-Pasternak medium. • Single-walled zigzag boron nitride nanotube structure is considered. • The applied electric potential effect on the longitudinal vibration is studied. • The results may be useful to design of micro/nanoelectromechanical systems.

  11. High Purity and Yield of Boron Nitride Nanotubes Using Amorphous Boron and a Nozzle-Type Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaewoo Kim

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Enhancement of the production yield of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs with high purity was achieved using an amorphous boron-based precursor and a nozzle-type reactor. Use of a mixture of amorphous boron and Fe decreases the milling time for the preparation of the precursor for BNNTs synthesis, as well as the Fe impurity contained in the B/Fe interdiffused precursor nanoparticles by using a simple purification process. We also explored a nozzle-type reactor that increased the production yield of BNNTs compared to a conventional flow-through reactor. By using a nozzle-type reactor with amorphous boron-based precursor, the weight of the BNNTs sample after annealing was increased as much as 2.5-times with much less impurities compared to the case for the flow-through reactor with the crystalline boron-based precursor. Under the same experimental conditions, the yield and quantity of BNNTs were estimated as much as ~70% and ~1.15 g/batch for the former, while they are ~54% and 0.78 g/batch for the latter.

  12. Electron beam generation and structure of defects in carbon and boron nitride nano-tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zobelli, A

    2007-10-15

    The nature and role of defects is of primary importance to understand the physical properties of C and BN (boron nitride) single walled nano-tubes (SWNTs). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a well known powerful tool to study the structure of defects in materials. However, in the case of SWNTs, the electron irradiation of the TEM may knock out atoms. This effect may alter the native structure of the tube, and has also been proposed as a potential tool for nano-engineering of nano-tubular structures. Here we develop a theoretical description of the irradiation mechanism. First, the anisotropy of the emission energy threshold is obtained via density functional based calculations. Then, we numerically derive the total Mott cross section for different emission sites of carbon and boron nitride nano-tubes with different chiralities. Using a dedicated STEM (Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope) microscope with experimental conditions optimised on the basis of derived cross-sections, we are able to control the generation of defects in nano-tubular systems. Either point or line defects can be obtained with a spatial resolution of a few nanometers. The structure, energetics and electronics of point and line defects in BN systems have been investigated. Stability of mono- and di- vacancy defects in hexagonal boron nitride layers is investigated, and their activation energies and reaction paths for diffusion have been derived using the nudged elastic band method (NEB) combined with density functional based techniques. We demonstrate that the appearance of extended linear defects under electron irradiation is more favorable than a random distribution of point defects and this is due to the existence of preferential sites for atom emission in the presence of pre-existing defects, rather than thermal vacancy nucleation and migration. (author)

  13. Boron nitride nanotube-enhanced osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xia; Wang, Xiupeng; Jiang, Xiangfen; Yamaguchi, Maho; Ito, Atsuo; Bando, Yoshio; Golberg, Dmitri

    2016-02-01

    The interaction between boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) layer and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is evaluated for the first time in this study. BNNTs layer supports the attachment and growth of MSCs and exhibits good biocompatibility with MSCs. BNNTs show high protein adsorption ability, promote the proliferation of MSCs and increase the secretion of total protein by MSCs. Especially, BNNTs enhance the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity as an early marker of osteoblasts, ALP/total protein and osteocalcin (OCN) as a late marker of osteogenic differentiation, which shows that BNNTs can enhance osteogenesis of MSCs. The release of trace boron and the stress on cells exerted by BNNTs with a fiber structure may account for the enhanced differentiation of MSCs into osteoblasts. Therefore BNNTs are potentially useful for bone regeneration in orthopedic applications.

  14. Effects of carbon doping on the electronic properties of boron nitride nanotubes: Tight binding calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chegel, Raad

    2016-10-01

    The electronic properties of pure and carbon doped zigzag and armchair Boron Nitride Nanotubes (BNNTs) have been investigated based on tight binding formalism. It was found that the band gap is reduced due to substitution of Boron or Nitrogen atoms by carbon atoms and the doping effects of B- and N-substituted BNNTs are different. The applied electric field converts the carbon doped BNNTs from semiconductor to metal. The gap energy reduction shows an identical dependence to electric field and doping for both armchair and zigzag carbon doped BNNTs. Our results indicate that the band gap of carbon doped BNNTs is a function of the Impurity concentration, electric field strength and the direction between the electric field and dopant location. The band gap for C-doped BNNTs with four carbon atoms decreases linearly but for two carbon atoms, it is constant at first then decreases linearly.

  15. Influence of oxygen impurity on electronic properties of carbon and boron nitride nanotubes: A comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Ram Sevak, E-mail: singh915@gmail.com [Department of Physics, National Institute of TechnologyKurukshetra 136119 (Haryana) (India)

    2015-11-15

    Influence of oxygen impurity on electronic properties of carbon and boron nitride nanotubes (CNTs and BNNTs) is systematically studied using first principle calculations based on density functional theory. Energy band structures and density of states of optimized zigzag (5, 0), armchair (3, 3), and chiral (4, 2) structures of CNT and BNNT are calculated. Oxygen doping in zigzag CNT exhibits a reduction in metallicity with opening of band gap in near-infrared region while metallicity is enhanced in armchair and chiral CNTs. Unlike oxygen-doped CNTs, energy bands are drastically modulated in oxygen-doped zigzag and armchair BNNTs, showing the nanotubes to have metallic behaviour. Furthermore, oxygen impurity in chiral BNNT induces narrowing of band gap, indicating a gradual modification of electronic band structure. This study underscores the understanding of different electronic properties induced in CNTs and BNNTs under oxygen doping, and has potential in fabrication of various nanoelectronic devices.

  16. In Situ Mechanical Property Measurements of Amorphous Carbon-Boron Nitride Nanotube Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Woo; Lin, Yi; Nunez, Jennifer Carpena; Siochi, Emilie J.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Connell, John W.; Smith, Michael W.

    2011-01-01

    To understand the mechanical properties of amorphous carbon (a-C)/boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) nanostructures, in situ mechanical tests are conducted inside a transmission electron microscope equipped with an integrated atomic force microscope system. The nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation. We demonstrate multiple in situ tensile, compressive, and lap shear tests with a-C/BNNT hybrid nanostructures. The tensile strength of the a-C/BNNT hybrid nanostructure is 5.29 GPa with about 90 vol% of a-C. The tensile strength and strain of the end-to-end joint structure with a-C welding is 0.8 GPa and 5.2% whereas the lap shear strength of the side-by-side joint structure with a-C is 0.25 GPa.

  17. Influence of oxygen impurity on electronic properties of carbon and boron nitride nanotubes: A comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Influence of oxygen impurity on electronic properties of carbon and boron nitride nanotubes (CNTs and BNNTs) is systematically studied using first principle calculations based on density functional theory. Energy band structures and density of states of optimized zigzag (5, 0), armchair (3, 3), and chiral (4, 2) structures of CNT and BNNT are calculated. Oxygen doping in zigzag CNT exhibits a reduction in metallicity with opening of band gap in near-infrared region while metallicity is enhanced in armchair and chiral CNTs. Unlike oxygen-doped CNTs, energy bands are drastically modulated in oxygen-doped zigzag and armchair BNNTs, showing the nanotubes to have metallic behaviour. Furthermore, oxygen impurity in chiral BNNT induces narrowing of band gap, indicating a gradual modification of electronic band structure. This study underscores the understanding of different electronic properties induced in CNTs and BNNTs under oxygen doping, and has potential in fabrication of various nanoelectronic devices

  18. Influence of oxygen impurity on electronic properties of carbon and boron nitride nanotubes: A comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram Sevak Singh

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Influence of oxygen impurity on electronic properties of carbon and boron nitride nanotubes (CNTs and BNNTs is systematically studied using first principle calculations based on density functional theory. Energy band structures and density of states of optimized zigzag (5, 0, armchair (3, 3, and chiral (4, 2 structures of CNT and BNNT are calculated. Oxygen doping in zigzag CNT exhibits a reduction in metallicity with opening of band gap in near-infrared region while metallicity is enhanced in armchair and chiral CNTs. Unlike oxygen-doped CNTs, energy bands are drastically modulated in oxygen-doped zigzag and armchair BNNTs, showing the nanotubes to have metallic behaviour. Furthermore, oxygen impurity in chiral BNNT induces narrowing of band gap, indicating a gradual modification of electronic band structure. This study underscores the understanding of different electronic properties induced in CNTs and BNNTs under oxygen doping, and has potential in fabrication of various nanoelectronic devices.

  19. In situ mechanical property measurements of amorphous carbon-boron nitride nanotube nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Woo; Carpena Núñez, Jennifer; Siochi, Emilie J.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Lin, Yi; Connell, John W.; Smith, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    To understand the mechanical properties of amorphous carbon (a-C)/boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) nanostructures, in situ mechanical tests are conducted inside a transmission electron microscope equipped with an integrated atomic force microscope system. The nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation. We demonstrate multiple in situ tensile, compressive, and lap shear tests with a-C/BNNT hybrid nanostructures. The tensile strength of the a-C/BNNT hybrid nanostructure is 5.29 GPa with about 90 vol% of a-C. The tensile strength and strain of the end-to-end joint structure with a-C welding is 0.8 GPa and 5.2% whereas the lap shear strength of the side-by-side joint structure with a-C is 0.25 GPa.

  20. Theoretical studies of urea adsorption on single wall boron-nitride nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chermahini, Alireza Najafi, E-mail: anajafi@cc.iut.ac.ir [Department of Chemistry, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan, 841543111, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Teimouri, Abbas [Chemistry Department, Payame Noor University, 19395-4697, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Farrokhpour, Hossein [Department of Chemistry, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan, 841543111, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-11-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • DFT base investigations of urea molecule with various type of armchair BNNTs studied. • The adsorption of urea molecule is observed to be exothermic and physical in nature. • The most effective interaction occurs when urea located inside of BNNTs. • The electronic analysis indicated ΔE{sub g} values changed after urea adsorption. - Abstract: Surface modification of a boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) with urea molecule was investigated in terms of its energetic, geometric, and electronic properties using B3LYP and PW91 density functionals. In this investigation, various armchair (n,n) nanotubes, where n = 5, 6, 7 have been used. Two different interaction modes, including interaction with outer layer and inner layer of tube were studied. The results indicated that the adsorption of single urea molecule in all of its configurations is observed to be exothermic and physical in nature. Interestingly, the adsorption energy for the most stable configuration of urea was observed when the molecule located inside of the nanotube. Besides, the adsorption of urea on BNNTs changes the conductivity of nanotube.

  1. Nano-solenoid: helicoid carbon-boron nitride hetero-nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zi-Yue; Miao, Chunyang; Guo, Wanlin

    2013-11-01

    As a fundamental element of a nanoscale passive circuit, a nano-inductor is proposed based on a hetero-nanotube consisting of a spiral carbon strip and a spiral boron nitride strip. It is shown by density functional theory associated with nonequilibrium Green function calculations that the nanotube exhibits attractive transport properties tunable by tube chirality, diameter, component proportion and connection manner between the two strips, with excellent `OFF' state performance and high current on the order of 10-100 μA. All the hetero-nanotubes show negative differential resistance. The transmission peaks of current are absolutely derived from the helicoid carbon strips or C-BN boundaries, giving rise to a spiral current analogous with an energized nano-solenoid. According to Ampere's Law, the energized nano-solenoid can generate a uniform and tremendous magnetic field of more than 1 tesla, closing to that generated by the main magnet of medical nuclear magnetic resonance. Moreover, the magnitude of magnetic field can be easily modulated by bias voltage, providing great promise for a nano-inductor to realize electromagnetic conversion at the nanoscale.As a fundamental element of a nanoscale passive circuit, a nano-inductor is proposed based on a hetero-nanotube consisting of a spiral carbon strip and a spiral boron nitride strip. It is shown by density functional theory associated with nonequilibrium Green function calculations that the nanotube exhibits attractive transport properties tunable by tube chirality, diameter, component proportion and connection manner between the two strips, with excellent `OFF' state performance and high current on the order of 10-100 μA. All the hetero-nanotubes show negative differential resistance. The transmission peaks of current are absolutely derived from the helicoid carbon strips or C-BN boundaries, giving rise to a spiral current analogous with an energized nano-solenoid. According to Ampere's Law, the energized nano

  2. Catalytic growth of vertically aligned neutron sensitive {sup 10}Boron nitride nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Pervaiz, E-mail: pervaizahmad@siswa.um.edu.my, E-mail: Pervaiz-pas@yahoo.com; Khandaker, Mayeen Uddin, E-mail: mu-khandaker@yahoo.com, E-mail: mu-khandaker@um.edu.my; Amin, Yusoff Mohd [University of Malaya, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science (Malaysia); Khan, Ghulamullah [University of Malaya, Department of Mechanical Engineering (Malaysia); Ramay, Shahid M. [King Saud University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, College of Science (Saudi Arabia); Mahmood, Asif [King Saud University, Department of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering (Saudi Arabia); Amin, Muhammad [University of the Punjab, Department of Physics (Pakistan); Muhammad, Nawshad [Interdisciplinary Research Centre in Biomedical Materials (IRCBM) COMSATS Institute of Information Technology (Pakistan)

    2016-01-15

    {sup 10}Boron nitride nanotubes ({sup 10}BNNTs) are a potential neutron sensing element in a solid-state neutron detector. The aligned {sup 10}BNNT can be used for its potential application without any further purification. Argon-supported thermal CVD is used to achieve vertically aligned {sup 10}BNNT with the help of nucleation sites produced in a thin layer of magnesium–iron alloy deposited at the top of Si substrate. FESEM shows vertically aligned {sup 10}BNNTs with ball-like catalytic tips at top. EDX reveals magnesium (Mg) contents in the tips that refer to catalytic growth of {sup 10}BNNT. HR-TEM shows tubular morphology of the synthesized {sup 10}BNNT with lattice fringes on its outer part having an interlayer spacing of ∼0.34 nm. XPS shows B 1 s and N 1 s peaks at 190.5 and 398 eV that correspond to hexagonal {sup 10}Boron nitride ({sup 10}h-BN) nature of the synthesized {sup 10}BNNT, whereas the Mg kll auger peaks at ∼301 and ∼311 eV represents Mg contents in the sample. Raman spectrum has a peak at 1390 (cm{sup −1}) that corresponds to E{sub 2g} mode of vibration in {sup 10}h-BN.

  3. Catalytic growth of vertically aligned neutron sensitive 10Boron nitride nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    10Boron nitride nanotubes (10BNNTs) are a potential neutron sensing element in a solid-state neutron detector. The aligned 10BNNT can be used for its potential application without any further purification. Argon-supported thermal CVD is used to achieve vertically aligned 10BNNT with the help of nucleation sites produced in a thin layer of magnesium–iron alloy deposited at the top of Si substrate. FESEM shows vertically aligned 10BNNTs with ball-like catalytic tips at top. EDX reveals magnesium (Mg) contents in the tips that refer to catalytic growth of 10BNNT. HR-TEM shows tubular morphology of the synthesized 10BNNT with lattice fringes on its outer part having an interlayer spacing of ∼0.34 nm. XPS shows B 1 s and N 1 s peaks at 190.5 and 398 eV that correspond to hexagonal 10Boron nitride (10h-BN) nature of the synthesized 10BNNT, whereas the Mg kll auger peaks at ∼301 and ∼311 eV represents Mg contents in the sample. Raman spectrum has a peak at 1390 (cm−1) that corresponds to E2g mode of vibration in 10h-BN

  4. Powder metallurgy routes toward aluminum boron nitride nanotube composites, their morphologies, structures and mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aluminum/boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) composites with up to 5 wt% (i.e., 9.7 vol%) nanotube fractions were prepared via spark plasma sintering (SPS) and high-pressure torsion (HPT) methods. Various microscopy techniques, X-ray diffraction, and energy dispersive X-ray analysis confirmed the integration of the two phases into decently dense and compact composites. No other phases, like Al borides or nitrides, formed in the Al–BNNTs macrocomposites of the two series. The BNNTs were found to be preferentially located along Al grain boundaries in SPS samples (grain size was 10–20 μm) creating micro-discontinuities and pores which were found to be detrimental for the sample hardness, whereas in HPT samples, the tubes were rather evenly distributed within a fine-grained Al matrix (grain size of several hundred nm). Therefore, the hardness of HPT samples was drastically increased with increasing BNNTs content in Al pellets. The value for Al–BNNT 3.0 wt% sample was more than doubled (190 MPa) compared to a pure Al–HPT compact (90 MPa). And the room temperature ultimate tensile strength of Al–BNNTs HPT samples containing 3.0 wt% BNNT (∼300 MPa) became ∼1.5 times larger than that of a BNNT-free HPT–Al compact (∼200 MPa)

  5. Powder metallurgy routes toward aluminum boron nitride nanotube composites, their morphologies, structures and mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, Maho [Nanotube Unit, World Premier International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (WPI-MANA), National Institute for Materials Science, Namiki 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 3050044 (Japan); Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tennodai 1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 3050005 (Japan); Meng, Fanqiang [Research Center for Strategic Materials, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 3050044 (Japan); Firestein, Konstantin [Laboratory of Inorganic Nanomaterials, National University of Science and Technology “MISIS”, Leninsky pr. 4, Moscow 119049 (Russian Federation); Tsuchiya, Koichi [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tennodai 1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 3050005 (Japan); Research Center for Strategic Materials, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 3050044 (Japan); Golberg, Dmitri, E-mail: GOLBERG.Dmitri@nims.go.jp [Nanotube Unit, World Premier International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (WPI-MANA), National Institute for Materials Science, Namiki 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 3050044 (Japan); Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tennodai 1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 3050005 (Japan)

    2014-05-01

    Aluminum/boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) composites with up to 5 wt% (i.e., 9.7 vol%) nanotube fractions were prepared via spark plasma sintering (SPS) and high-pressure torsion (HPT) methods. Various microscopy techniques, X-ray diffraction, and energy dispersive X-ray analysis confirmed the integration of the two phases into decently dense and compact composites. No other phases, like Al borides or nitrides, formed in the Al–BNNTs macrocomposites of the two series. The BNNTs were found to be preferentially located along Al grain boundaries in SPS samples (grain size was 10–20 μm) creating micro-discontinuities and pores which were found to be detrimental for the sample hardness, whereas in HPT samples, the tubes were rather evenly distributed within a fine-grained Al matrix (grain size of several hundred nm). Therefore, the hardness of HPT samples was drastically increased with increasing BNNTs content in Al pellets. The value for Al–BNNT 3.0 wt% sample was more than doubled (190 MPa) compared to a pure Al–HPT compact (90 MPa). And the room temperature ultimate tensile strength of Al–BNNTs HPT samples containing 3.0 wt% BNNT (∼300 MPa) became ∼1.5 times larger than that of a BNNT-free HPT–Al compact (∼200 MPa)

  6. The structural and dynamical aspects of boron nitride nanotubes under high velocity impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Leonardo D; Ozden, Sehmus; Tiwary, ChandraSekhar; Autreto, Pedro A S; Vajtai, Robert; Barrera, Enrique V; Galvao, Douglas S; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2016-06-01

    This communication report is a study on the structural and dynamical aspects of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) shot at high velocities (∼5 km s(-1)) against solid targets. The experimental results show unzipping of BNNTs and the formation of hBN nanoribbons. Fully atomistic reactive molecular dynamics simulations were also carried out to gain insights into the BNNT fracture patterns and deformation mechanisms. Our results show that longitudinal and axial tube fractures occur, but the formation of BN nanoribbons from fractured tubes was only observed for some impact angles. Although some structural and dynamical features of the impacts are similar to the ones reported for CNTs, because BNNTs are more brittle than CNTs this results in a larger number of fractured tubes but with fewer formed nanoribbons. PMID:27189765

  7. Boron nitride nanotubes included thermally cross-linked gelatin-glucose scaffolds show improved properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şen, Özlem; Culha, Mustafa

    2016-02-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) are increasingly investigated for their medical and biomedical applications due to their unique properties such as resistance to oxidation, thermal and electrical insulation, and biocompatibility. BNNTs can be used to enhance mechanical strength of biomedical structures such as scaffolds in tissue engineering applications. In this study, we report the use of BNNTs and hydroxylated BNNTs (BNNT-OH) to improve the properties of gelatin-glucose scaffolds prepared with electrospinning technique. Human dermal fibroblast (HDF) cells are used for the toxicity assessment and cell seeding studies. It is found that the addition of BNNTs into the scaffold does not influence cell viability, decreases the scaffold degradation rate, and improves cell attachment and proliferation compared to only-gelatin scaffold.

  8. Boron Nitride Coated Carbon Nanotube Arrays with Enhanced Compressive Mechanical Property

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Lin; Tay, Roland Yingjie; Li, Hongling; Tsang, Siu Hon; Tan, Dunlin; Zhang, Bowei; Tok, Alfred Iing Yoong; Teo, Edwin Hang Tong

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) array is one of the most promising energy dissipating materials due to its excellent temperature invariant mechanical property. However, the CNT arrays with desirable recoverability after compression is still a challenge. Here, we report on the mechanical enhancement of the CNT arrays reinforced by coating with boron nitride (BN) layers. These BN coated CNT (BN/CNT) arrays exhibit excellent compressive strength and recoverability as compared to those of the as-prepared CNT arrays which totally collapsed after compression. In addition, the BN coating also provides better resistance to oxidation due to its intrinsic thermal stability. This work presented here opens a new pathway towards tuning mechanical behavior of any arbitrary CNT arrays for promising potential such as damper, vibration isolator and shock absorber applications.

  9. High-Speed Imaging Optical Pyrometry for Study of Boron Nitride Nanotube Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inman, Jennifer A.; Danehy, Paul M.; Jones, Stephen B.; Lee, Joseph W.

    2014-01-01

    A high-speed imaging optical pyrometry system is designed for making in-situ measurements of boron temperature during the boron nitride nanotube synthesis process. Spectrometer measurements show molten boron emission to be essentially graybody in nature, lacking spectral emission fine structure over the visible range of the electromagnetic spectrum. Camera calibration experiments are performed and compared with theoretical calculations to quantitatively establish the relationship between observed signal intensity and temperature. The one-color pyrometry technique described herein involves measuring temperature based upon the absolute signal intensity observed through a narrowband spectral filter, while the two-color technique uses the ratio of the signals through two spectrally separated filters. The present study calibrated both the one- and two-color techniques at temperatures between 1,173 K and 1,591 K using a pco.dimax HD CMOS-based camera along with three such filters having transmission peaks near 550 nm, 632.8 nm, and 800 nm.

  10. Theoretical investigation of methane adsorption onto boron nitride and carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Darvish Ganji, Amir Mirnejad and Ali Najafi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Methane adsorption onto single-wall boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs and carbon nanotubes (CNTs was studied using the density functional theory within the generalized gradient approximation. The structural optimization of several bonding configurations for a CH4 molecule approaching the outer surface of the (8,0 BNNT and (8,0 CNT shows that the CH4 molecule is preferentially adsorbed onto the CNT with a binding energy of −2.84 kcal mol−1. A comparative study of nanotubes with different diameters (curvatures reveals that the methane adsorptive capability for the exterior surface increases for wider CNTs and decreases for wider BNNTs. The introduction of defects in the BNNT significantly enhances methane adsorption. We also examined the possibility of binding a bilayer or a single layer of methane molecules and found that methane molecules preferentially adsorb as a single layer onto either BNNTs or CNTs. However, bilayer adsorption is feasible for CNTs and defective BNNTs and requires binding energies of −3.00 and −1.44 kcal mol−1 per adsorbed CH4 molecule, respectively. Our first-principles findings indicate that BNNTs might be an unsuitable material for natural gas storage.

  11. Dynamical properties of ultrathin armchair boron nitride nanotubes using density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabhi, Shweta D.; Jha, Prafulla K.

    2016-08-01

    Using density functional theory, we studied electronic and vibrational properties of small (n, n; n = 2-7) single walled boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) in armchair configuration with diameter ranging from 3 Å to 9.8 Å. We used plane wave pseudo potential method and generalized gradient approximation as exchange correlation functional. Armchair BNNT is a semiconductor with a large indirect band gap ˜4-5 eV unlike armchair carbon nanotubes (CNT) which are metallic. As n varies from 2 to 7 i.e. with increasing diameter, there is no major variation in band-gap. For even number of n, the lowest π* is at Z point and singly degenerate, while for odd n, it is doubly degenerate. Density of states show sharp singularities following E-1/2 trend which is characteristics of 1D structure. Phonon dispersion curves for all BNNTs show no imaginary frequencies throughout the Brillouin zone confirming the dynamical stability of BNNTs with small diameter. Phonon frequencies are found to be diameter dependent. Results of the electronic and vibrational properties using ab initio calculations are comparable to the previous experimental and theoretical studies with highlighting variation in properties as change in diameter of nanotube.

  12. The Tunable Hybrid Surface Phonon and Plasmon Polariton Modes in Boron Nitride Nanotube and Graphene Monolayer Heterostructures

    OpenAIRE

    SUN, Yu; Zheng, Zheng; Cheng, Jiangtao; Liu, Jiansheng

    2014-01-01

    The hybrid modes incorporating surface phonon polariton (SPhP) modes in boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) and surface plasmon polariton (SPP) modes in graphene monolayers are theoretically studied. The combination of the 1D BNNTs and 2D graphene monolayer further improves the modal characteristics with electrical tunability. Superior to the graphene monolayers, the proposed heterostructures supports single mode transmission with lateral optical confinement. The modal characteristics can be shif...

  13. Oxidative Unzipping and Transformation of High Aspect Ratio Boron Nitride Nanotubes into “White Graphene Oxide” Platelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nautiyal, Pranjal; Loganathan, Archana; Agrawal, Richa; Boesl, Benjamin; Wang, Chunlei; Agarwal, Arvind

    2016-01-01

    Morphological and chemical transformations in boron nitride nanotubes under high temperature atmospheric conditions is probed in this study. We report atmospheric oxygen induced cleavage of boron nitride nanotubes at temperatures exceeding 750 °C for the first time. Unzipping is then followed by coalescence of these densely clustered multiple uncurled ribbons to form stacks of 2D sheets. FTIR and EDS analysis suggest these 2D platelets to be Boron Nitride Oxide platelets, with analogous structure to Graphene Oxide, and therefore we term them as “White Graphene Oxide” (WGO). However, not all BNNTs deteriorate even at temperatures as high as 1000 °C. This leads to the formation of a hybrid nanomaterial system comprising of 1D BN nanotubes and 2D BN oxide platelets, potentially having advanced high temperature sensing, radiation shielding, mechanical strengthening, electron emission and thermal management applications due to synergistic improvement of multi-plane transport and mechanical properties. This is the first report on transformation of BNNT bundles to a continuous array of White Graphene Oxide nanoplatelet stacks. PMID:27388704

  14. Radiolabeling and physicochemical characterization of boron nitride nanotubes functionalized with glycol chitosan polymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Daniel Cristian Ferreira; Ferreira, Tiago Hilario; Ferreira, Carolina de Aguiar; Sousa, Edesia Martins Barros de, E-mail: sousaem@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG) Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Lab. de Materiais Nanoestruturados para Bioaplicacoes; Cardoso, Valbert Nascimento, E-mail: cardosov@farmacia.ufmg.b [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Fac. de Farmacia

    2011-07-01

    In the last years, some nanostructured systems has proposed as new drugs and radioisotopes delivery systems, aiming the diagnosis and treatment of many diseases, including the cancer. Among these systems, the Boron Nitride Nanotubes (BNNTs) showed adequate characteristics to be applied in biomedical area, due to its high stability and considerable biocompatibility. However, due to its hydrophobic characteristics, these applications are limited and its behavior in vivo (guinea pigs) is unexplored yet. Seeking to overcome this problems, in the present work, we functionalized the BNNTs (noncovalent wrapped) with glycol chitosan (GC), a biocompatible and stable polymer, in order to disperse it in water. The results showed that BNNTs were well dispersed in water with mean size and polydispersity index suitable to conduct biodistribution studies in mice. The nanostructures were physicochemical and morphologically characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman Spectroscopy. The results revealed that the functionalization process with glycol chitosan was obtained with successfully on BNNTs surface. Furthermore, we developed a radiolabeling protocol with {sup 99m}Tc radioisotope in functionalized BNNTs, aiming in future, to conduct image biodistribution studies in mice. The results revealed that the nanotubes were radiolabeled with radiochemical purity above of 90%, being considered suitable to scintigraphic image acquisition. (author)

  15. Axially compressed buckling of an embedded boron nitride nanotube subjected to thermo-electro-mechanical loadings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi-Khojin, Amin; Jalili, Nader

    2007-04-01

    Unlike widely-used carbon nanotubes, boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) have shown to possess stable semiconducting behavior and strong piezoelectricity. Such properties along with their outstanding mechanical properties and thermal conductivity, make BNNTs promising candidate reinforcement materials for a verity of applications especially nanoelectronic and nanophotonic devices. Motivated by these abilities, we aim to study the buckling behavior of BNNT-reinforced piezoelectric polymeric composites when subjected to combined electro-thermo-mechanical loadings. For this, the multi-walled structure of BNNT is considered as elastic media and a set of concentric cylindrical shell with van der Waals interaction between them. Using three-dimensional equilibrium equations, Donnell shell theory is utilized to show that the axially compressive resistance of BNNT varies with applying thermal and electrical loads. The effect of BNNT piezoelectric property on the buckling behavior of the composites is demonstrated. More specifically, it is shown that applying direct and reverse voltages to BNNT changes the buckling loads for any axial and circumferential wavenumbers. Such capability could be uniquely utilized when designing BNNT-reinforced composites.

  16. Adsorption properties of boroxol ring doped zigzag boron nitride nanotube toward NO molecule using DFT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahedi, Ehsan; Babaie, Mahsa; Bahmanpour, Hooman

    2016-05-01

    In previous researches it is demonstrated that reactivity and sensitivity of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) toward gas molecules can be modified by impurity. In this work, oxygen defect for three nitrogen sites was used to study the adsorption of NO molecule through the surface of boroxol ring of oxygen doped BNNT (7,0) with different adsorption patterns, including side-on and end-on. All calculations are performed using the DFT-B3LYP/6-31G∗ level of theory, and their electronic energies are corrected by gCP and D3 correction terms. High binding energies indicate that NO molecule undergoes chemical adsorption with large charge transfer from the tube which can significantly change electronic properties of the tube. Density of state (DOS) and partial DOS (PDOS) analyses revealed that adsorption of NO molecule on the boroxol ring position is covalent in nature with significant effect on the electronic properties of tube. The Laplacian of electron density, Lagrangian kinetic energy density, Hamiltonian kinetic energy density and potential energy density at bond critical points between the tube and NO indicate that the interaction between the tube and NO molecule is covalent in nature. Topological analysis of the electron localization function shows that electrons in the new formed bonds are approximately localized, meaning that the nature of adsorption process is chemical covalent. The studied nanotube is a suitable candidate to filter and eliminate NO gas molecule.

  17. Torsional properties of hexagonal boron nitride nanotubes, carbon nanotubes and their hybrid structures: A molecular dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, Qi-lin, E-mail: xiongql@hust.edu.cn [Department of Mechanics, Huazhong University of Science & Technology, 1037 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430074 (China); Hubei Key Laboratory of Engineering Structural Analysis and Safety Assessment, Luoyu Road 1037, Wuhan 430074 (China); Tian, Xiao Geng [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Structure Strength and Vibration, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China)

    2015-10-15

    The torsional mechanical properties of hexagonal single-walled boron nitride nanotubes (SWBNNTs), single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), and their hybrid structures (SWBN-CNTs) are investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Two approaches - force approach and energy approach, are adopted to calculate the shear moduli of SWBNNTs and SWCNTs, the discrepancy between two approaches is analyzed. The results show that the shear moduli of single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs), including SWBNNTs and SWCNTs are dependent on the diameter, especially for armchair SWNTs. The armchair SWNTs show the better ability of resistance the twisting comparable to the zigzag SWNTs. The effects of diameter and length on the critical values of torque of SWNTs are obtained by comparing the torsional behaviors of SWNTs with different diameters and different lengths. It is observed that the MD results of the effect of diameter and length on the critical values of torque agrees well with the prediction of continuum shell model. The shear modulus of SWBN-CNT has a significant dependence on the percentages of SWCNT and the hybrid style has also an influence on shear modulus. The critical values of torque of SWBN-CNTs increase with the increase of the percentages of SWCNT. This phenomenon can be interpreted by the function relationship between the torque of different bonds (B-N-X, C-C-X, C-B-X, C-N-X) and the angles of bonds.

  18. Torsional properties of hexagonal boron nitride nanotubes, carbon nanotubes and their hybrid structures: A molecular dynamics study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi-lin Xiong

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The torsional mechanical properties of hexagonal single-walled boron nitride nanotubes (SWBNNTs, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs, and their hybrid structures (SWBN-CNTs are investigated using molecular dynamics (MD simulation. Two approaches - force approach and energy approach, are adopted to calculate the shear moduli of SWBNNTs and SWCNTs, the discrepancy between two approaches is analyzed. The results show that the shear moduli of single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs, including SWBNNTs and SWCNTs are dependent on the diameter, especially for armchair SWNTs. The armchair SWNTs show the better ability of resistance the twisting comparable to the zigzag SWNTs. The effects of diameter and length on the critical values of torque of SWNTs are obtained by comparing the torsional behaviors of SWNTs with different diameters and different lengths. It is observed that the MD results of the effect of diameter and length on the critical values of torque agrees well with the prediction of continuum shell model. The shear modulus of SWBN-CNT has a significant dependence on the percentages of SWCNT and the hybrid style has also an influence on shear modulus. The critical values of torque of SWBN-CNTs increase with the increase of the percentages of SWCNT. This phenomenon can be interpreted by the function relationship between the torque of different bonds (B-N-X, C-C-X, C-B-X, C-N-X and the angles of bonds.

  19. Very Long Single and Few-Walled Boron Nitride Nanotubes via the Pressurized Vapor/Condenser Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael W.; Jordan, Kevin C.; Park, Cheol; Kim, Jae-Woo; Lillehei, Peter T.; Crooks, Roy; Harrison, Joycelyn S.

    2009-01-01

    A new method for producing long, small diameter, single and few-walled, boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) in macroscopic quantities is reported. The pressurized vapor/condenser (PVC) method produces, without catalysts, highly crystalline, very long, small diameter, BNNTs. Palm-sized, cotton-like masses of BNNT raw material were grown by this technique and spun directly into centimeters-long yarn. Nanotube lengths were observed to be 100 times that of those grown by the most closely related method. Self-assembly and growth models for these long BNNTs are discussed.

  20. Effects of Polydopamine Functionalization on Boron Nitride Nanotube Dispersion and Cytocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Yague, Marc A; Larrañaga, Aitor; Gladkovskaya, Olga; Stanley, Alanna; Tadayyon, Ghazal; Guo, Yina; Sarasua, Jose-Ramon; Tofail, Syed A M; Zeugolis, Dimitrios I; Pandit, Abhay; Biggs, Manus J

    2015-10-21

    Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) have unique physical properties, of value in biomedical applications; however, their dispersion and functionalization represent a critical challenge in their successful employment as biomaterials. In the present study, we report a process for the efficient disentanglement of BNNTs via a dual surfactant/polydopamine (PD) process. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) indicated that individual BNNTs become coated with a uniform PD nanocoating, which significantly enhanced dispersion of BNNTs in aqueous solutions. Furthermore, the cytocompatibility of PD-coated BNNTs was assessed in vitro with cultured human osteoblasts (HOBs) at concentrations of 1, 10, and 30 μg/mL and over three time-points (24, 48, and 72 h). In this study it was demonstrated that PD-functionalized BNNTs become individually localized within the cytoplasm by endosomal escape and that concentrations of up to 30 μg/mL of PD-BNNTs were cytocompatible in HOBs cells following 72 h of exposure. PMID:26282841

  1. Structural, energetic and electrical properties of boron nitride nanotubes interacting with DMMP chemical agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • ab initio DFT calculations were used for interaction of DMMP with BNNTs. • Full structural optimization was performed for several possible active sites. • Electronic structure of the energetically favorable complexes was analyzed. • The stability of the most stable complex was evaluated at ambient condition. • First-principles calculations showed that DMMP is strongly bound to the small diameter BNNTs. - Abstract: The adsorption of DMMP as an intoxicating chemical warfare agent onto the boron nitride nanotube has been investigated by using density functional theory calculations. Several active sites were considered for both interacting systems and full structural optimization was performed to accurately find the energetically favorable state. It is found that DMMP molecule prefers to be adsorbed strongly on the top site above the B atom of a (5, 0) BNNT with a binding energy of about −103.24 kJ mol−1 and an O–B binding distance of 1.641 Å. We have performed a comparative investigation of BNNTs with different diameters and the results indicate that the DMMP adsorption ability for the side wall of the tubes significantly decreases for higher diameters BNNTs. Furthermore, the adsorption properties of DMMP molecule onto the BNNT have been investigated using the ab initio MD simulation at room temperature. Our result showed that BNNTs facilitates the DMMP detection at ambient conditions for practical applications

  2. Boron nitride nanotubes coated with organic hydrophilic agents: Stability and cytocompatibility studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Tiago Hilário; Soares, Daniel Crístian Ferreira; Moreira, Luciana Mara Costa; Ornelas da Silva, Paulo Roberto [Serviço de Nanotecnologia, Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear CDTN/CNEN, Avenida Presidente Antônio Carlos, 6.627, Campus da UFMG, Pampulha, CEP 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Gouvêa dos Santos, Raquel [Laboratório de Radiobiologia, Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear CNEN/CDTN, Av. Presidente Antônio Carlos 6.627, Campus da UFMG, Pampulha, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Barros de Sousa, Edésia Martins, E-mail: sousaem@cdtn.br [Serviço de Nanotecnologia, Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear CDTN/CNEN, Avenida Presidente Antônio Carlos, 6.627, Campus da UFMG, Pampulha, CEP 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2013-12-01

    In the present study, Boron Nitride Nanotubes (BNNTs) were synthesized and functionalized with organic hydrophilic agents constituted by glucosamine (GA), polyethylene glycol (PEG){sub 1000}, and chitosan (CH) forming new singular systems. Their size, distribution, and homogeneity were determined by photon correlation spectroscopy, while their surface charge was determined by laser Doppler anemometry. The morphology and structural organization were evaluated by Transmission Electron Microscopy. The functionalization was evaluated by Thermogravimetry analysis and Fourier Transformer Infrared Spectroscopy. The results showed that BNNTs were successfully obtained and functionalized, reaching a mean size and dispersity deemed adequate for in vitro studies. The in vitro stability tests also revealed a good adhesion of functionalized agents on BNNT surfaces. Finally, the in vitro cytocompatibility of functionalized BNNTs against MCR-5 cells was evaluated, and the results revealed that none of the different functionalization agents disturbed the propagation of normal cells up to the concentration of 50 μg/mL. Furthermore, in this concentration, no significantly chromosomal or morphologic alterations or increase in ROS (Reactive Oxygen Species) could be observed. Thus, findings from the present study reveal an important stability and cytocompatibility of functionalized BNNTs as new potential drugs or radioisotope nanocarriers to be applied in therapeutic procedures. - Highlights: • BNNTs were synthesized and functionalized with organic hydrophilic agents. • Hydrophilic molecules do not alter the biocompatibility profile of BNNTs. • No significantly chromosomal or morphologic alterations in ROS could be observed.

  3. Lattice mismatch induced curved configurations of hybrid boron nitride-carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin

    2016-10-01

    A unique curved configuration is observed in freestanding hybrid boron nitride-carbon nanotubes (BN-CNTs) based on molecular dynamics simulations, which, in previous studies, was tacitly assumed as a straight configuration. The physical fundamentals of this phenomenon are explored by using the continuum mechanics theory, where the curved configuration of BN-CNTs is found to be induced by the bending effect due to the lattice mismatch between the C domain and the BN domain. In addition, our results show that the curvature of the curved BN-CNTs is determined by their radius and composition. The curvature of BN-CNTs decreases with growing radius of BN-CNTs and becomes ignorable when their radius is relatively large. A non-monotonic relationship is detected between the curvature and the composition of BN-CNTs. Specifically, the curvature of BN-CNTs increases with growing BN concentration when the molar fraction of BN atoms is smaller than a critical value 0.52, but decreases with growing BN concentration when the molar fraction of BN atoms is larger than this critical value.

  4. Platinum nanoparticle modified polyaniline-functionalized boron nitride nanotubes for amperometric glucose enzyme biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jianmin; Yin, Longwei

    2011-11-01

    A novel amperometric biosensor based on the BNNTs-Pani-Pt hybrids with Pt nanoparticle homogeneously decorated on polyaniline (Pani)-wrapped boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs), was developed. It is shown that π interactions take place between BNNTs and polyaniline (Pani) located at N atoms from BNNTs and C atoms from Pani, resulting in the water solubility for the Pani wrapped BNNTs hybrids. The developed glucose biosensor displayed high sensitivity and stability, good reproducibility, anti-interference ability, especially excellent acid stability and heat resistance. The resulted BNNTs-Pani-Pt hybrid amperometric glucose biosensor exhibited a fast response time (within 3 s) and a linear calibration range from 0.01 to 5.5 mM with a high sensitivity and low detection limit of 19.02 mA M(-1) cm(-2) and 0.18 μM glucose (S/N = 3). Surprisedly, the relative activity of the GC/BNNTs-Pani-Pt-GOD electrode keeps almost no change in a range from pH 3 to 7. Futhermore, the BNNTs-Pani-Pt hybrid biosensor maintains a high GOD enzymatic activity even at a relatively high temperature of 60 °C. This might be attributed to the effect of electrostatic field and hydrophobia of BNNTs. The unique acid stability and heat resistance of this sensor indicate great promising application in numerous industrial and biotechnological operations involving harsh conditions. PMID:22013877

  5. Coaxial carbon@boron nitride nanotube arrays with enhanced thermal stability and compressive mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Lin; Tay, Roland Yingjie; Li, Hongling; Tsang, Siu Hon; Huang, Jingfeng; Tan, Dunlin; Zhang, Bowei; Teo, Edwin Hang Tong; Tok, Alfred Iing Yoong

    2016-05-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays have aroused considerable interest because of their remarkable mechanical properties. However, the mechanical behaviour of as-synthesized CNT arrays could vary drastically at a macro-scale depending on their morphologies, dimensions and array density, which are determined by the synthesis method. Here, we demonstrate a coaxial carbon@boron nitride nanotube (C@BNNT) array with enhanced compressive strength and shape recoverability. CNT arrays are grown using a commercially available thermal chemical vapor deposition (TCVD) technique and an outer BNNT with a wall thickness up to 1.37 nm is introduced by a post-growth TCVD treatment. Importantly, compared to the as-grown CNT arrays which deform almost plastically upon compression, the coaxial C@BNNT arrays exhibit an impressive ~4-fold increase in compressive strength with nearly full recovery after the first compression cycle at a 50% strain (76% recovery maintained after 10 cycles), as well as a significantly high and persistent energy dissipation ratio (~60% at a 50% strain after 100 cycles), attributed to the synergistic effect between the CNT and outer BNNT. Additionally, the as-prepared C@BNNT arrays show an improved structural stability in air at elevated temperatures, attributing to the outstanding thermal stability of the outer BNNT. This work provides new insights into tailoring the mechanical and thermal behaviours of arbitrary CNT arrays which enables a broader range of applications.Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays have aroused considerable interest because of their remarkable mechanical properties. However, the mechanical behaviour of as-synthesized CNT arrays could vary drastically at a macro-scale depending on their morphologies, dimensions and array density, which are determined by the synthesis method. Here, we demonstrate a coaxial carbon@boron nitride nanotube (C@BNNT) array with enhanced compressive strength and shape recoverability

  6. Boron nitride composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntz, Joshua D.; Ellsworth, German F.; Swenson, Fritz J.; Allen, Patrick G.

    2016-02-16

    According to one embodiment, a composite product includes hexagonal boron nitride (hBN), and a plurality of cubic boron nitride (cBN) particles, wherein the plurality of cBN particles are dispersed in a matrix of the hBN. According to another embodiment, a composite product includes a plurality of cBN particles, and one or more borate-containing binders.

  7. DFT Study on Structural and Mechanical Properties of Single-walled Carbon and Boron Nitride Nanotubes Functionalized with Carbenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.K. Petrushenko

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents quantum chemistry study on structural and mechanical properties of a series of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs and boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs functionalized with carbenes. At the PBE/SVP level, the obtained data on pristine nanotubes are in good accordance with the results of previous experimental and theoretical studies. The calculations show that carbenes functionalization, in general, distorts both SWNCTs and BNNTs frameworks, but there exists the difference between ‘axial’ and ‘circumferential’ functionalization. It turns out that in both cases elastic properties diminish with increasing concentration of adsorbents, however, the functionalized SWCNTs and BNNTs remain strong enough to be suitable for reinforcement of composites.

  8. Structure and Properties of Nanomaterials: From Inorganic Boron Nitride Nanotubes to the Calcareous Biomineralized Tubes of H. dianthus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanur, Adrienne Elizabeth

    Several nanomaterials systems, both inorganic and organic in nature, have been extensively investigated by a number of characterization techniques including atomic force microscopy (AFM), electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The first system consists of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) synthesized via two different methods. The first method, silica-assisted catalytic chemical vapour deposition (SA-CVD), produced boron nitride nanotubes with different morphologies depending on the synthesis temperature. The second method, growth vapour trapping chemical vapour deposition (GVT-CVD), produced multiwall boron nitride nanotubes (MWBNNTs). The bending modulus of individual MWBNNTs was determined using an AFM three-point bending technique, and was found to be diameter-dependent due to the presence of shear effects. The second type of nanomaterial investigated is the biomineralized calcareous shell of the serpulid Hydroides dianthus. This material was found to be an inorganic-organic composite material composed of two different morphologies of CaCO3, collagen, and carboxylated and sulphated polysaccharides. The organic components were demonstrated to mediate the mineralization of CaCO3 in vitro. The final system studied is the proteinaceous cement of the barnacle Amphibalanus amphitrite. The secondary structure of the protein components was investigated via FTIR, revealing the presence of beta-sheet conformation, and nanoscale rod-shaped structures within the cement were identified as beta-sheet containing amyloid fibrils via chemical staining. These rod-shaped structures exhibited a stiffer nature compared with other structures in the adhesive, as measured by AFM nanoindentation.

  9. Boron nitride converted carbon fiber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousseas, Michael; Mickelson, William; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2016-04-05

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to boron nitride converted carbon fiber. In one aspect, a method may include the operations of providing boron oxide and carbon fiber, heating the boron oxide to melt the boron oxide and heating the carbon fiber, mixing a nitrogen-containing gas with boron oxide vapor from molten boron oxide, and converting at least a portion of the carbon fiber to boron nitride.

  10. Boron Nitride Nanotubes Reinforce Tricalcium Phosphate Scaffolds and Promote the Osteogenic Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuai, Cijun; Gao, Chengde; Feng, Pei; Xiao, Tao; Yu, Kun; Deng, Youwen; Peng, Shuping

    2016-05-01

    Incorporating boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) into ceramic matrices is a promising strategy for obtaining multifunctional composites. In this study, the application of BNNTs in reinforcing β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) scaffolds manufactured using laser sintering is demonstrated. BNNTs contribute to the effective inhibition of both grain growth and phase transformation in β-TCP. Moreover, they can strengthen the grain boundaries and boost the fracture mode transition from intergranular to transgranular. BNNTs play an active role in reinforcing β-TCP in terms of load transfer and energy absorption by the synergistic mechanisms of pull-out, peel-off, crack bridging and deflection. With a BNNT content of 4 wt%, the elastic modulus, hardness, compressive strength and fracture toughness of β-TCP increase by 46%, 39%, 109% and 35%, respectively. Umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs) were isolated with high purity, and surface molecule characterization revealed that they were CD90+, CD29+, CD73+, CD31-, CD34- and CD45-. UC-MSCs on BNNTs/β-TCP scaffolds were characterized by more positive Alizarin Red staining as well as up-regulated expression of osteoblast markers, as revealed by quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis and immunofluorescence staining. These results are the first to demonstrate that BNNTs promote the osteogenic differentiation of UC-MSCs, indicating good osteoinductive properties for use in bone scaffolds. This study paves the way for the potential use of a BNNT/β-TCP scaffold in bone repair. PMID:27305816

  11. Adsorption of diazinon and hinosan molecules on the iron-doped boron nitride nanotubes surface in gas phase and aqueous solution: A computational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmanzadeh, Davood; Rezainejad, Hamid

    2016-02-01

    In this study, the geometric structures and electronic properties of two widely used organophosphorus pesticides, diazinon and hinosan, boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) and Fe doped boron nitride nanotubes (FeBNNTs) as adsorbents of these pesticides are studied by density functional theory calculation as well as dispersion correction by Grimme method. The results show that Fe doping in boron nitride nanotubes structures increases the potency of nanotubes to adsorb mentioned pesticides, especially when Fe atom located instead of N atom. Comparing the adsorption energies of diazinon on FeBNNTs with ones for hinosan demonstrate that the adsorption of hinosan is energetically more favorable by FeBNNTs. Assessment of adsorption energies in aqueous solution confirmed significant decrease in their values compared to ones in gaseous phase. However, the adsorption of diazinon and hinosan on both BNNTs and FeBNNTs are exothermic. So, BNNTs and FeBNNTs may be promising candidates as appropriate adsorbents for adsorbing diazinon and hinosan. Also, the results of calculations have revealed that van der Waals interaction energies are remarkably large in adsorption of diazinon and hinosan on all boron nitride nanotubes.

  12. Hetero-junctions of Boron Nitride and Carbon Nanotubes: Synthesis and Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yap, Yoke Khin

    2013-03-14

    Hetero-junctions of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are expected to have appealing new properties that are not available from pure BNNTs and CNTs. Theoretical studies indicate that BNNT/CNT junctions could be multifunctional and applicable as memory, spintronic, electronic, and photonics devices with tunable band structures. This will lead to energy and material efficient multifunctional devices that will be beneficial to the society. However, experimental realization of BNNT/CNT junctions was hindered by the absent of a common growth technique for BNNTs and CNTs. In fact, the synthesis of BNNTs was very challenging and may involve high temperatures (up to 3000 degree Celsius by laser ablation) and explosive chemicals. During the award period, we have successfully developed a simple chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique to grow BNNTs at 1100-1200 degree Celsius without using dangerous chemicals. A series of common catalyst have then been identified for the synthesis of BNNTs and CNTs. Both of these breakthroughs have led to our preliminary success in growing two types of BNNT/CNT junctions and two additional new nanostructures: 1) branching BNNT/CNT junctions and 2) co-axial BNNT/CNT junctions, 3) quantum dots functionalized BNNTs (QDs-BNNTs), 4) BNNT/graphene junctions. We have started to understand their structural, compositional, and electronic properties. Latest results indicate that the branching BNNT/CNT junctions and QDs-BNNTs are functional as room-temperature tunneling devices. We have submitted the application of a renewal grant to continue the study of these new energy efficient materials. Finally, this project has also strengthened our collaborations with multiple Department of Energy's Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs), including the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINTs) at Sandia National Laboratories and Los

  13. The role of boron nitride nanotube as a new chemical sensor and potential reservoir for hydrogen halides environmental pollutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoosefian, Mehdi; Etminan, Nazanin; Moghani, Maryam Zeraati; Mirzaei, Samaneh; Abbasi, Shima

    2016-10-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) studies on the interaction of hydrogen halides (HX) environmental pollutants and the boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) have been reported. To exploit the possibility of BNNTs as gas sensors, the adsorption of hydrogen fluoride (HF), hydrogen chloride (HCl) and hydrogen bromide (HBr) on the side wall of armchair (5,5) boron nitride nanotubes have been investigated. B3LYP/6-31G (d) level were used to analyze the structural and electronic properties of investigate sensor. The adsorption process were interpreted by highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO)-lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO), quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM), natural bond orbital (NBO) and molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) analysis. Topological parameters of bond critical points have been used to calculate as measure of hydrogen bond (HB) strength. Stronger binding energy, larger charge transfer and charge density illustrate that HF gas possesses chemisorbed adsorption process. The obtained results also show the strongest HB in HF/BNNT complex. We expect that results could provide helpful information for the design of new BNNTs based sensing devices.

  14. Theoretical study of physisorption of nucleobases on boron nitride nanotubes: a new class of hybrid nano-biomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the adsorption of the nucleic acid bases-adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), thymine (T) and uracil (U)-on the outer wall of a high curvature semiconducting single-walled boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) by first-principles density functional theory calculations. The calculated binding energy shows the order: G > A∼C∼T∼U, implying that the interaction strength of the high curvature BNNT with the nucleobases, G being an exception, is nearly the same. A higher binding energy for the G-BNNT conjugate appears to result from hybridization of the molecular orbitals of G and the BNNT. A smaller energy gap predicted for the G-BNNT conjugate relative to that of the pristine BNNT may be useful in the application of this class of biofunctional materials to the design of next-generation sensing devices.

  15. Physisorption of Nucleic Acid Bases on Boron Nitride Nanotubes: A new class of Hybrid Nano-Bio Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Mukhopadhyay, Saikat; Scheicher, Ralph H; Pandey, Ravindra; Karna, Shashi P

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the adsorption of the nucleic acid bases, adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), thymine (T) and uracil (U) on the outer wall of a high curvature semiconducting single-walled boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) by first principles density functional theory calculations. The calculated binding energy shows the order: G>A~C~T~U implying that the interaction strength of the (high-curvature) BNNT with the nucleobases, G being an exception, is nearly the same. A higher binding energy for the G-BNNT conjugate appears to result from a stronger hybridization of the molecular orbitals of G and BNNT, since the charge transfer involved in the physisorption process is insignificant. A smaller energy gap predicted for the G-BNNT conjugate relative to that of the pristine BNNT may be useful in application of this class of biofunctional materials to the design of the next generation sensing devices.

  16. Physisorption of Nucleic Acid Bases on Boron Nitride Nanotubes: A new class of Hybrid Nano-Bio Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Saikat; Gowtham, S.; Scheicher, Ralph; Pandey, Ravindra; Karna, Shashi

    2010-03-01

    We investigate the adsorption of the nucleic acid bases, adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), thymine (T) and uracil (U) on the outer wall of a high curvature semiconducting single-walled boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) by first principles density functional theory calculations. The calculated binding energy shows the order: G>A C T U implying that the interaction strength of the (high-curvature) BNNT with the nucleobases, G being an exception, is nearly the same. A higher binding energy for the G-BNNT conjugate appears to result from a stronger hybridization of the molecular orbitals of G and BNNT, since the charge transfer involved in the physisorption process is insignificant. A smaller energy gap predicted for the G-BNNT conjugate relative to that of the pristine BNNT may be useful in application of this class of biofunctional materials to the design of the next generation sensing devices.

  17. Theoretical study of physisorption of nucleobases on boron nitride nanotubes: a new class of hybrid nano-biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Saikat; Gowtham, S.; Scheicher, Ralph H.; Pandey, Ravindra; Karna, Shashi P.

    2010-04-01

    We investigate the adsorption of the nucleic acid bases—adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), thymine (T) and uracil (U)—on the outer wall of a high curvature semiconducting single-walled boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) by first-principles density functional theory calculations. The calculated binding energy shows the order: G > A≈C≈T≈U, implying that the interaction strength of the high curvature BNNT with the nucleobases, G being an exception, is nearly the same. A higher binding energy for the G-BNNT conjugate appears to result from hybridization of the molecular orbitals of G and the BNNT. A smaller energy gap predicted for the G-BNNT conjugate relative to that of the pristine BNNT may be useful in the application of this class of biofunctional materials to the design of next-generation sensing devices.

  18. Boron nitride nanotube reinforced polylactide-polycaprolactone copolymer composite: mechanical properties and cytocompatibility with osteoblasts and macrophages in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahiri, Debrupa; Rouzaud, Francois; Richard, Tanisha; Keshri, Anup K; Bakshi, Srinivasa R; Kos, Lidia; Agarwal, Arvind

    2010-09-01

    Biodegradable polylactide-polycaprolactone copolymer (PLC) has been reinforced with 0, 2 and 5wt.% boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) for orthopedic scaffold application. Elastic modulus of the PLC-5wt.% BNNT composite, evaluated through nanoindentation technique, shows a 1370% increase. The same amount of BNNT addition to PLC enhances the tensile strength by 109%, without any adverse effect on the ductility up to 240% elongation. Interactions of the osteoblasts and macrophages with bare BNNTs prove them to be non-cytotoxic. PLC-BNNT composites displayed increased osteoblast cell viability as compared to the PLC matrix. The addition of BNNTs also resulted in an increase in the expression levels of the Runx2 gene, the main regulator of osteoblast differentiation. These results indicate that BNNT is a potential reinforcement for composites for orthopedic applications. PMID:20226282

  19. The Tunable Hybrid Surface Phonon and Plasmon Polariton Modes in Boron Nitride Nanotube and Graphene Monolayer Heterostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Yu; Cheng, Jiangtao; Liu, Jiansheng

    2014-01-01

    The hybrid modes incorporating surface phonon polariton (SPhP) modes in boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) and surface plasmon polariton (SPP) modes in graphene monolayers are theoretically studied. The combination of the 1D BNNTs and 2D graphene monolayer further improves the modal characteristics with electrical tunability. Superior to the graphene monolayers, the proposed heterostructures supports single mode transmission with lateral optical confinement. The modal characteristics can be shifted from SPP-like toward SPhP-like. Both the figure of merit and field enhancement of hybrid modes are improved over 3 times than those of BNNT SPhP modes, which may further enable sub-wavelength mid-infrared applications.

  20. Density functional theory study of ultrasmall diameter (2,2) boron nitride, silicon carbide, and carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fakhrabad, Davoud Vahedi; Shahtahmassebi, Nasser [Nano Research Center, Department of Physics, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Movlarooy, Tayebeh [Department of Physics, Shahrood University of Technology, Shahrood (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    We present a first principles calculation on the electronic structure and optical properties of ultrasmall-diameter (2,2) boron nitride, silicon carbide, and carbon nanotubes (BNNT, SiCNT, and CNT) by using full potential linear augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) and pseudo potential plane wave (PP-PW) methods. The atomic geometries of all considered models are optimized. Calculations of optical spectra are performed under electric fields polarized both parallel and perpendicular with respect to the nanotube (NT) axis. Our results show that the dielectric function is anisotropic and it is revealed that (2,2) SiCNT would be better dielectric material than (2,2) BNNT. We have calculated the first, second and third optical transitions for the considered models. The value of the optical gap for (2,2) BNNT is obtained much larger than that of (2,2) SiCNT and (2,2) CNT. The results show that contrary to the (2,2) CNT being metallic, the (2,2) BNNT, and (2,2) SiCNT are wide indirect gap semiconductors. We also present the energy loss function; in this case the intertube interactions play an important role with respect to the optical spectroscopy. Our results revealed that unlike the dielectric function, the calculated energy loss function show rather weak anisotropy. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. Theoretical study of interaction between Tacrine and finite-length Al-doped Carbon and Boron nitride Nanotubes: A Semiempirical drug delivery study in thermodynamic view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrin Zeighami

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to extend our previous theoretical calculations that dealt with the thermochemistry of doping the single walled boron nitride nano tubes, BNNTs, and carbon nanotubes ,CNTs, with alminium atoms [1], we have used the AM 1, PM 3, and PM 6 semiempirical methods to investigate the interaction of the tacrine molecule (a drug for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease with the side-walls of aluminum doped boron nitride and carbon nano tubes in thermodynamic views.At first, the frequency calculations were carried out to confirm the stability of the involved structures. In addition, the theoretical thermodynamic study of tacrine adsorption onto the considered nanotubes was performed and the thermodynamic functions such as enthalpy changes, entropy changes and Gibbs free energy changes of the adsorption process were evaluated at different temperatures. Our results suggest the aluminum doped boron nitride nano tubes and alminium doped carbon nano tubes may be considered as the proper carries for the drug delivery of tacrine.

  2. Safety Assessment of Boron Nitride as Used in Cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiume, Monice M; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Hill, Ronald A; Klaassen, Curtis D; Liebler, Daniel C; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Andersen, F Alan

    2015-01-01

    The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel (Panel) assessed the safety of boron nitride which functions in cosmetics as a slip modifier (ie, it has a lubricating effect). Boron nitride is an inorganic compound with a crystalline form that can be hexagonal, spherical, or cubic; the hexagonal form is presumed to be used in cosmetics. The highest reported concentration of use of boron nitride is 25% in eye shadow formulations. Although boron nitride nanotubes are produced, boron nitride is not listed as a nanomaterial used in cosmetic formulations. The Panel reviewed available chemistry, animal data, and clinical data and concluded that this ingredient is safe in the present practices of use and concentration in cosmetic formulations.

  3. Largely enhanced dielectric properties of carbon nanotubes/polyvinylidene fluoride binary nanocomposites by loading a few boron nitride nanosheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Minhao; Zhao, Hang; He, Delong; Bai, Jinbo

    2016-08-01

    The ternary nanocomposites of boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs)/carbon nanotubes (CNTs)/polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) are fabricated via a combination of solution casting and extrusion-injection processes. The effects of BNNSs on the electrical conductivity, dielectric behavior, and microstructure changes of CNTs/PVDF binary nanocomposites are systematically investigated. A low percolation value (fc) for the CNTs/PVDF binary system is obtained due to the integration of solution and melting blending procedures. Two kinds of CNTs/PVDF binary systems with various CNTs contents (fCNTs) as the matrix are discussed. The results reveal that compared with CNTs/PVDF binary systems at the same fCNTs, the ternary BNNSs/CNTs/PVDF nanocomposites exhibit largely enhanced dielectric properties due to the improvement of the CNTs dispersion state and the conductive network. The dielectric constant of CNTs/PVDF binary nanocomposite with 6 vol. % CNTs (fCNTs fc), it displays a 43.32% improvement from 1325 to 1899 after the addition of 3 vol. % BNNSs. The presence of BNNSs facilitates the formation of the denser conductive network. Meanwhile, the ternary BNNSs/CNTs/PVDF systems exhibit a low dielectric loss. The adjustable dielectric properties could be obtained by employing the ternary systems due to the microstructure changes of nanocomposites.

  4. A DFT study on the possibility of using boron nitride nanotubes as a dehydrogenation catalyst for methanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esrafili, Mehdi D., E-mail: esrafili@maragheh.ac.ir; Nurazar, Roghaye

    2014-09-30

    Graphical abstract: The most stable complex of CH{sub 3}OH and BNNT. - Highlights: • The adsorption and dissociative reaction of CH{sub 3}OH on the BNNT is investigated. • Five adsorption types and four reaction pathways are identified. • The O–H bond scission is the most favorable pathway of CH{sub 3}OH decomposition on the BNNT surface. - Abstract: The adsorption and subsequent dissociative dehydrogenation reaction of methanol (CH{sub 3}OH) on (6,0) zigzag boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) are investigated using the density functional theory calculations. Five adsorption types and four reaction channels are identified. The calculated adsorption energies range from −1.4 to −21.9 kcal/mol. The results indicate that O–H bond scission is the most favorable pathway on the tube surface. It is predicted that on the surface of the BNNT, the rate-determining step is the dehydrogenation of adsorbed OCH{sub 3}. The activation energy barrier for generation of a H{sub 2} molecule and its subsequent desorption from the surface is approximately 28 kcal/mol. The side reaction that generates CH{sub 3} and OH fragments is exothermic by −1.6 kcal/mol with an energy-barrier height of 58 kcal/mol.

  5. Synthesis, structural analysis and in situ transmission electron microscopy mechanical tests on individual aluminum matrix/boron nitride nanotube nanohybrids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron nitride nanotube (BNNT)/aluminum matrix composite nanohybrids were fabricated through magnetron sputtering of Al onto dispersed multiwalled BNNTs with average external diameters of 40–50 nm. Aluminum phase coating tightly wrapped the BNNTs after the deposition. The coating thickness in the range of 5–200 nm was controlled by changing sputtering time. Using imaging techniques and electron diffraction analysis in a transmission electron microscope, the Al phase was found to create nanocrystalline shields around individual BNNTs. The chemical states of the hybrid nanomaterials during the initial stages of sputtering were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Direct in situ bending and tensile tests on individual BNNT–Al nanocomposites were carried out by using a dedicated transmission electron microscope-atomic force microscope holder. In parallel, high-resolution TEM images and video recordings were taken for the analysis of deformation kinetics and fracture mechanisms. The nanohybrids with a suitably thick aluminum coating (∼40 nm) withstood at least nine times higher stresses compared to a pure non-armed Al metal. This pioneering work opens up a prospective pathway for making ultralight and superstrong “dream” structural materials for future automotive and aerospace applications.

  6. Optical and electronic properties of SO2 molecule adsorbed on Si-doped (8, 0) boron nitride nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shuang-Shuang; Wei, Xiu-Mei; Zhang, Jian-Min; Zhu, Gang-Qiang; Guo, Wan-Jin

    2016-09-01

    The study of the optical properties of pristine BNNT, Si-doped BNNTs and SO2 molecule adsorption on Si-doped BNNTs is that, to our knowledge, few relevant research have ever been found. In this paper, the adsorption behaviors of Sulfur dioxide (SO2) molecule on Si-doped Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) are investigated applying the first-principles calculations. The main contribution of this paper is that the foremost investigation for the optical properties of the pristine BNNT, Si-doped BNNTs and SO2 adsorption on Si-doped BNNTs. Additionally, the electronic properties and the structural properties are also presented. In our calculations of optical properties, the dielectric constant, the refractive index and the absorption coefficient are obtained. Comparing the pristine BNNT, our results indicate that, the blue-shifts (in the main peaks of the dielectric constant of SiB -BNNT and SO2-SiB -BNNT), and the red-shifts (in the main peaks of the refractive index of SiN -BNNT and SO2-SiN -BNNT) are appeared. Under these conditions, Si-doped BNNT and Si-doped BNNT with SO2 adsorption, the gaps are reduced both for the speculated optical band gaps and the electronic structure band gaps.

  7. Boron nitride nanotubes and primary human osteoblasts: in vitro compatibility and biological interactions under low frequency ultrasound stimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we investigated a novel and non-invasive approach for an endogenous osteoblast stimulation mediated by boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs). Specifically, following the cellular uptake of the piezoelectric nanotubes, cultures of primary human osteoblasts (hOBs) were irradiated with low frequency ultrasound (US), as a simple method to apply a mechanical input to the cells loaded with BNNTs. This in vitro study was aimed at investigating the main interactions between hOBs and BNNTs and to study the effects of the ‘BNNTs + US’ stimulatory method on the osteoblastic function and maturation. A non-cytotoxic BNNT concentration to be used in vitro with hOB cultures was established. Moreover, investigation with transmission electron microscopy/electron energy loss spectroscopy (TEM/EELS) confirmed that BNNTs were internalized in membranal vesicles. The panel of investigated osteoblastic markers disclosed that BNNTs were capable of fostering the expression of late-stage bone proteins in vitro, without using any mineralizing culture supplements. In our samples, the maximal osteopontin expression, with the highest osteocalcin and Ca2+ production, in the presence of mineral matrix with nodular morphology, was observed in the samples treated with BNNTs + US. In this group was also shown a significantly enhanced synthesis of TGF-β1, a molecule sensitive to electric stimulation in bone. Finally, gene deregulations of the analyzed osteoblastic genes leading to depletive cellular effects were not detected. Due to their piezoelectricity, BNNT-based therapies might disclose advancements in the treatment of bone diseases. (paper)

  8. Efficient Boron-Carbon-Nitrogen Nanotube Formation Via Combined Laser-Gas Flow Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, R. Roy (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin (Inventor); Smith, Michael W. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A process for producing boron nitride nanotubes and/or boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes of the general formula BxCyNz. The process utilizes a combination of laser light and nitrogen gas flow to support a boron ball target during heating of the boron ball target and production of a boron vapor plume which reacts with nitrogen or nitrogen and carbon to produce boron nitride nanotubes and/or boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes of the general formula BxCyNz.

  9. Efficient boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotube formation via combined laser-gas flow levitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitney, R Roy; Jordan, Kevin; Smith, Michael W

    2015-03-24

    A process for producing boron nitride nanotubes and/or boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes of the general formula B.sub.xC.sub.yN.sub.z. The process utilizes a combination of laser light and nitrogen gas flow to support a boron ball target during heating of the boron ball target and production of a boron vapor plume which reacts with nitrogen or nitrogen and carbon to produce boron nitride nanotubes and/or boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes of the general formula B.sub.xC.sub.yN.sub.z.

  10. Molecular Dynamics Modeling of Piezoelectric Boron Nirtride Nanotubes Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Boron-nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) exhibit electroactive behavior in response to mechanical deformation, but the origin of this phenomenon is not well understood. Our...

  11. Effect of Screening on electronic properties of Boron Nitride Nanotube under an electric field in the proximity of a possible metal insulator transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sau, Jay

    2005-03-01

    Previous theoretical calculations have shown that the band gap of boron nitride nanotubes can change significantly in a transverse electric field. For large nanotubes it is possible to close the LDA gap with moderately high field strengths. The conduction and valence states in this system are spatially separated creating the possibilty of long-lived excitons. LDA calculations indicate a metallic screening of the field after gap closure. However due to the innately weak screening in Boron Nitride and 1D geometry one can also expect excitonic and other correlation effects to be strong in this system. The screening properties are critical to understanding whether metallic ground state can be reached and whether the possibly long-lived excitons have large binding energies. We estimate the field induced modification of the screening using a tight-binding approach similar to the tight-binding GW/Bethe-Salpeter approach that has previously been used for nanocrystals. The implications of the screening on the possible electronic structures are also examined. This research is supported by National Science Foundation Grant No. DMR-39768, Office of Energy Research, the Office of Basic Energy Sciences and Materials Sciences Division of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098. Computational Resources were provided by NPACI and by NERSC.

  12. Low-dimensional boron nitride nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Pakdel

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this review, a concise research history of low-dimensional boron nitride (BN nanomaterials followed by recent developments in their synthesis, morphology, properties, and applications are presented. Seventeen years after the initial synthesis of BN nanotubes, research on BN nanomaterials has developed far enough to establish them as one of the most promising inorganic nanosystems. In this regard, it is envisaged that the unique properties of low-dimensional BN systems, such as superb mechanical stiffness, high thermal conductivity, wide optical bandgap, strong ultraviolet emission, thermal stability and chemical inertness will play a key role in prospective developments.

  13. Lithium absorption on single-walled boron nitride, aluminum nitride, silicon carbide and carbon nanotubes: A first-principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darvish Ganji, M.; Dalirandeh, Z.; Khorasani, M.

    2016-03-01

    Using the DFT-B3LYP calculations we investigate the adsorption of Li atom on CNT, BNNT, AlNNT and SiCNT. We found that Li atom can be chemisorbed on zig-zag SiCNT with binding energy of -2.358 eV and charge transfer of 0.842 |e|, which are larger than the results of other nanotubes. The binding energy of Li on SiCNT is foun to be stronger than activation energy barrier indicating that Li metal could be well dispersed on SiCNTs. Furthermore, the average voltage caused by the lithium adsorption on SiCNT demonstrated that SiCNTs could exhibit as a stable anode similar to the lithium metal anode. The binding nature has been rationalized by analyzing the electronic structures. Our findings demonstrate that Li-BNNT, Li-SiCNT and Li-AlNNT systems exhibit spin polarized behaviors and can fascinating potential application in future spintronics. Also, Li-SiCNT system with rather small band gap might be a promising material for optical applications and active molecule in its environment.

  14. Role of structural defects in the ultraviolet luminescence of multiwall boron nitride nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierret, Aurélie; Nong, Hanond; Fossard, Frédéric; Loiseau, Annick, E-mail: annick.loiseau@onera.fr [Laboratoire d' Etude des Microstructures (LEM), ONERA-CNRS, BP 72, 92322 Châtillon cedex (France); Attal-Trétout, Brigitte [DMPH, ONERA, Chemin de la Hunière et des Joncherettes, BP 80100, 91123 Palaiseau (France); Xue, Yanming; Golberg, Dmitri [International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Namiki 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 3050044 (Japan); Barjon, Julien, E-mail: julien.barjon@uvsq.fr [Groupe d' Etude de la Matière Condensée, University of Versailles St-Quentin and CNRS, Université Paris-Saclay, 45 Avenue des Etats-Unis, 78000 Versailles (France)

    2015-12-21

    BN nanotubes (BNNTs) are structurally similar to their carbon counterparts, though much less investigated. New synthesis methods have been recently reported, enabling the production of industrial quantities and stimulating the search of new applications for the BNNTs. In this paper, we investigate the luminescence of multiwall BNNTs. By performing cathodoluminescence experiments on single tubes at 10 K, we show that the tube luminescence is highly heterogeneous (i) from tube to tube and (ii) spatially along a single tube. By combining cathodoluminescence measurements with a nanometer excitation and transmission electron microscopy on the same tube, we correlate luminescence and structural features. We conclude that the near-band-edge luminescence of BNNTs (≈5.4 eV) is related to the presence of extended structural defects, such as dislocations or ruptures in the wall stacking.

  15. Role of structural defects in the ultraviolet luminescence of multiwall boron nitride nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierret, Aurélie; Nong, Hanond; Fossard, Frédéric; Attal-Trétout, Brigitte; Xue, Yanming; Golberg, Dmitri; Barjon, Julien; Loiseau, Annick

    2015-12-01

    BN nanotubes (BNNTs) are structurally similar to their carbon counterparts, though much less investigated. New synthesis methods have been recently reported, enabling the production of industrial quantities and stimulating the search of new applications for the BNNTs. In this paper, we investigate the luminescence of multiwall BNNTs. By performing cathodoluminescence experiments on single tubes at 10 K, we show that the tube luminescence is highly heterogeneous (i) from tube to tube and (ii) spatially along a single tube. By combining cathodoluminescence measurements with a nanometer excitation and transmission electron microscopy on the same tube, we correlate luminescence and structural features. We conclude that the near-band-edge luminescence of BNNTs (≈5.4 eV) is related to the presence of extended structural defects, such as dislocations or ruptures in the wall stacking.

  16. Structure, Mechanics and Synthesis of Nanoscale Carbon and Boron Nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldo, Steven G.

    This thesis is divided into two parts. In Part I, we examine the properties of thin sheets of carbon and boron nitride. We begin with an introduction to the theory of elastic sheets, where the stretching and bending modes are considered in detail. The coupling between stretching and bending modes is thought to play a crucial role in the thermodynamic stability of atomically-thin 2D sheets such as graphene. In Chapter 2, we begin by looking at the fabrication of suspended, atomically thin sheets of graphene. We then study their mechanical resonances which are read via an optical transduction technique. The frequency of the resonators was found to depend on their temperature, as was their quality factor. We conclude by offering some interpretations of the data in terms of the stretching and bending modes of graphene. In Chapter 3, we look briefly at the fabrication of thin sheets of carbon and boron nitride nanotubes. We examine the structure of the sheets using transmission and scanning electron microscopy (TEM and SEM, respectively). We then show a technique by which one can make sheets suspended over a trench with adjustable supports. Finally, DC measurements of the resistivity of the sheets in the temperature range 600 -- 1400 C are presented. In Chapter 4, we study the folding of few-layer graphene oxide, graphene and boron nitride into 3D aerogel monoliths. The properties of graphene oxide are first considered, after which the structure of graphene and boron nitride aerogels is examined using TEM and SEM. Some models for their structure are proposed. In Part II, we look at synthesis techniques for boron nitride (BN). In Chapter 5, we study the conversion of carbon structures of boron nitride via the application of carbothermal reduction of boron oxide followed by nitridation. We apply the conversion to a wide variety of morphologies, including aerogels, carbon fibers and nanotubes, and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. In the latter chapters, we look at the

  17. Influence of Defects in Boron Nitride Nanotubes in the Adsorption of Molecules. Insights from B3LYP-D2* Periodic Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oriol Matarín

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption of H2O, NH3 and HCOOH as polar molecules and C6H6 and CH4 as non-polar ones on a series of zig-zag (6,0 single-walled boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs both being defect-free (P_BNNT and containing defects at the nanotube walls has been studied by means of B3LYP-D2* periodic calculations. We focused on defects derived from monovacancies of B (N-rich_BNNT and N (B-rich_BNNT atoms and also on Stone-Wales defects (SW_BNNT. The adsorption of polar molecules with defective BNNTs is generally based on dative interactions and H-bonding, and their adsorption energies strongly depend on the type of BNNT. N-rich_BNNT is the most reactive nanotube towards adsorption of polar molecules, as in all cases deprotonation of the polar molecules is spontaneously given upon adsorption. The strength in the adsorption energies is followed by B-rich_BNNT, SW_BNNT and P_BNNT. Adsorption of non-polar molecules is mainly dictated by dispersion interactions, and, accordingly, the adsorption energies are almost constant for a given molecule irrespective of the type of nanotube.

  18. Interaction of vitamins B3 and C and their radicals with (5, 0) single-walled boron nitride nanotube for use as biosensor or in drug delivery

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Davood Farmanzadeh; Samereh Ghazanfary

    2013-11-01

    Electronic properties of the covalent and noncovalent adsorption of single-walled boron nitride nanotube with vitamins B3 and C and their radicals are investigated through the density functional theory. Results show that noncovalent and covalent adsorption of vitamin B3 on BNNT could make these systems of interest for drug delivery purposes due to the possibility of easily detaching the pristine molecule from the BNNT surface. Noncovalent and covalent adsorption of vitamin C on BNNT result in modification of the electronic properties of BNNT, these results are extremely relevant in identifying the potential application of functionalized BNNT with vitamin C as nano-sensor. The present results are expected to provide useful guidance for the relevant experimental study.

  19. Cryogenic separation of hydrogen isotopes in single-walled carbon and boron-nitride nanotubes: insight into the mechanism of equilibrium quantum sieving in quasi-one-dimensional pores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczyk, Piotr; Gauden, Piotr A; Terzyk, Artur P

    2008-07-17

    Quasi-one-dimensional cylindrical pores of single-walled boron nitride and carbon nanotubes efficiently differentiate adsorbed hydrogen isotopes at 33 K. Extensive path integral Monte Carlo simulations revealed that the mechanisms of quantum sieving for both types of nanotubes are quantitatively similar; however, the stronger and heterogeneous external solid-fluid potential generated from single-walled boron nitride nanotubes enhanced the selectivity of deuterium over hydrogen both at zero coverage and at finite pressures. We showed that this enhancement of the D(2)/H(2) equilibrium selectivity results from larger localization of hydrogen isotopes in the interior space of single-walled boron nitride nanotubes in comparison to that of equivalent single-walled carbon nanotubes. The operating pressures for efficient quantum sieving of hydrogen isotopes are strongly depending on both the type as well as the size of the nanotube. For all investigated nanotubes, we predicted the occurrence of the minima of the D(2)/H(2) equilibrium selectivity at finite pressure. Moreover, we showed that those well-defined minima are gradually shifted upon increasing of the nanotube pore diameter. We related the nonmonotonic shape of the D(2)/H(2) equilibrium selectivity at finite pressures to the variation of the difference between the average kinetic energy computed from single-component adsorption isotherms of H(2) and D(2). In the interior space of both kinds of nanotubes hydrogen isotopes formed solid-like structures (plastic crystals) at 33 K and 10 Pa with densities above the compressed bulk para-hydrogen at 30 K and 30 MPa.

  20. Investigation of interactions between poly-L-lysine-coated boron nitride nanotubes and C2C12 cells: up-take, cytocompatibility, and differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Ciofani

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available G Ciofani1, L Ricotti1, S Danti2,3, S Moscato4, C Nesti2, D D’Alessandro2,4, D Dinucci5, F Chiellini5, A Pietrabissa3, M Petrini2,3, A Menciassi1,61Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna, Pisa, Italy; 2CUCCS-RRMR, Center for the Clinical Use of Stem Cells – Regional Network of Regenerative Medicine, 3Department of Oncology, Transplants and Advanced Technologies, 4Department of Human Morphology and Applied Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy; 5Laboratory of Bioactive Polymeric Materials for Biomedical and Environmental Applications (BIOlab, UdR INSTM, Department of Chemistry and Industrial Chemistry, University of Pisa, San Piero a Grado, Italy; 6Italian Institute of Technology, Genova, ItalyAbstract: Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs have generated considerable interest within the scientific community by virtue of their unique physical properties, which can be exploited in the biomedical field. In the present in vitro study, we investigated the interactions of poly-L-lysine-coated BNNTs with C2C12 cells, as a model of muscle cells, in terms of cytocompatibility and BNNT internalization. The latter was performed using both confocal and transmission electron microscopy. Finally, we investigated myoblast differentiation in the presence of BNNTs, evaluating the protein synthesis of differentiating cells, myotube formation, and expression of some constitutive myoblastic markers, such as MyoD and Cx43, by reverse transcription – polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. We demonstrated that BNNTs are highly internalized by C2C12 cells, with neither adversely affecting C2C12 myoblast viability nor significantly interfering with myotube formation.Keywords: boron nitride nanotubes, C2C12 cells, cytocompatibility, up-take, differentiation, MyoD, connexin 43

  1. Boron nitride nanotubes radiolabeled with ⁹⁹mTc: preparation, physicochemical characterization, biodistribution study, and scintigraphic imaging in Swiss mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Daniel Crístian Ferreira; Ferreira, Tiago Hilário; Ferreira, Carolina de Aguiar; Cardoso, Valbert Nascimento; de Sousa, Edésia Martins Barros

    2012-02-28

    In the present study, boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) were synthesized from an innovative process and functionalized with a glycol chitosan polymer in CDTN (Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear) laboratories. As a means of studying their in vivo biodistribution behavior, these nanotubes were radiolabeled with (99m)Tc and injected in mice. Their size, distribution, and homogeneity were determined by photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS), while their zeta potential was determined by laser Doppler anemometry. The morphology and structural organization were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The functionalization in the nanotubes was evaluated by thermogravimetry analysis (TGA) and Fourier transformer infrared spectroscopy. The results showed that BNNTs were obtained and functionalized successfully, reaching a mean size and dispersity deemed adequate for in vivo studies. The BNNTs were also evaluated by ex vivo biodistribution studies and scintigraphic imaging in healthy mice. The results showed that nanostructures, after 24h, having accumulated in the liver, spleen and gut, and eliminated via renal excretion. The findings from this study reveal a potential application of functionalized BNNTs as new potential drugs or radioisotope nanocarriers to be applied in therapeutic procedures.

  2. Inter-layer potential for hexagonal boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leven, Itai; Azuri, Ido; Kronik, Leeor; Hod, Oded

    2014-03-01

    A new interlayer force-field for layered hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) based structures is presented. The force-field contains three terms representing the interlayer attraction due to dispersive interactions, repulsion due to anisotropic overlaps of electron clouds, and monopolar electrostatic interactions. With appropriate parameterization, the potential is able to simultaneously capture well the binding and lateral sliding energies of planar h-BN based dimer systems as well as the interlayer telescoping and rotation of double walled boron-nitride nanotubes of different crystallographic orientations. The new potential thus allows for the accurate and efficient modeling and simulation of large-scale h-BN based layered structures.

  3. Quantum emission from hexagonal boron nitride monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Toan Trong; Bray, Kerem; Ford, Michael J; Toth, Milos; Aharonovich, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Artificial atomic systems in solids are widely considered the leading physical system for a variety of quantum technologies, including quantum communications, computing and metrology. To date, however, room-temperature quantum emitters have only been observed in wide-bandgap semiconductors such as diamond and silicon carbide, nanocrystal quantum dots, and most recently in carbon nanotubes. Single-photon emission from two-dimensional materials has been reported, but only at cryogenic temperatures. Here, we demonstrate room-temperature, polarized and ultrabright single-photon emission from a colour centre in two-dimensional hexagonal boron nitride. Density functional theory calculations indicate that vacancy-related defects are a probable source of the emission. Our results demonstrate the unprecedented potential of van der Waals crystals for large-scale nanophotonics and quantum information processing. PMID:26501751

  4. Innovative boron nitride-doped propellants

    OpenAIRE

    Thelma Manning; Richard Field; Kenneth Klingaman; Michael Fair; John Bolognini; Robin Crownover; Carlton P. Adam; Viral Panchal; Eugene Rozumov; Henry Grau; Paul Matter; Michael Beachy; Christopher Holt; Samuel Sopok

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. military has a need for more powerful propellants with balanced/stoichiometric amounts of fuel and oxidants. However, balanced and more powerful propellants lead to accelerated gun barrel erosion and markedly shortened useful barrel life. Boron nitride (BN) is an interesting potential additive for propellants that could reduce gun wear effects in advanced propellants (US patent pending 2015-026P). Hexagonal boron nitride is a good lubricant that can provide wear resistance and lower ...

  5. Innovative boron nitride-doped propellants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thelma Manning

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The U.S. military has a need for more powerful propellants with balanced/stoichiometric amounts of fuel and oxidants. However, balanced and more powerful propellants lead to accelerated gun barrel erosion and markedly shortened useful barrel life. Boron nitride (BN is an interesting potential additive for propellants that could reduce gun wear effects in advanced propellants (US patent pending 2015-026P. Hexagonal boron nitride is a good lubricant that can provide wear resistance and lower flame temperatures for gun barrels. Further, boron can dope steel, which drastically improves its strength and wear resistance, and can block the formation of softer carbides. A scalable synthesis method for producing boron nitride nano-particles that can be readily dispersed into propellants has been developed. Even dispersion of the nano-particles in a double-base propellant has been demonstrated using a solvent-based processing approach. Stability of a composite propellant with the BN additive was verified. In this paper, results from propellant testing of boron nitride nano-composite propellants are presented, including closed bomb and wear and erosion testing. Detailed characterization of the erosion tester substrates before and after firing was obtained by electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. This promising boron nitride additive shows the ability to improve gun wear and erosion resistance without any destabilizing effects to the propellant. Potential applications could include less erosive propellants in propellant ammunition for large, medium and small diameter fire arms.

  6. Innovative boron nitride-doped propellants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thelma MANNING; Henry GRAU; Paul MATTER; Michael BEACHY; Christopher HOLT; Samuel SOPOK; Richard FIELD; Kenneth KLINGAMAN; Michael FAIR; John BOLOGNINI; Robin CROWNOVER; Carlton P. ADAM; Viral PANCHAL; Eugene ROZUMOV

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. military has a need for more powerful propellants with balanced/stoichiometric amounts of fuel and oxidants. However, balanced and more powerful propellants lead to accelerated gun barrel erosion and markedly shortened useful barrel life. Boron nitride (BN) is an interesting potential additive for propellants that could reduce gun wear effects in advanced propellants (US patent pending 2015-026P). Hexagonal boron nitride is a good lubricant that can provide wear resistance and lower flame temperatures for gun barrels. Further, boron can dope steel, which drastically improves its strength and wear resistance, and can block the formation of softer carbides. A scalable synthesis method for producing boron nitride nano-particles that can be readily dispersed into propellants has been developed. Even dispersion of the nano-particles in a double-base propellant has been demonstrated using a solvent-based processing approach. Stability of a composite propellant with the BN additive was verified. In this paper, results from propellant testing of boron nitride nano-composite propellants are presented, including closed bomb and wear and erosion testing. Detailed characterization of the erosion tester substrates before and after firing was obtained by electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. This promising boron nitride additive shows the ability to improve gun wear and erosion resistance without any destabilizing effects to the propellant. Potential applications could include less erosive propellants in propellant ammunition for large, medium and small diameter fire arms.

  7. Method of manufacture of atomically thin boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettl, Alexander K

    2013-08-06

    The present invention provides a method of fabricating at least one single layer hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). In an exemplary embodiment, the method includes (1) suspending at least one multilayer boron nitride across a gap of a support structure and (2) performing a reactive ion etch upon the multilayer boron nitride to produce the single layer hexagonal boron nitride suspended across the gap of the support structure. The present invention also provides a method of fabricating single layer hexagonal boron nitride. In an exemplary embodiment, the method includes (1) providing multilayer boron nitride suspended across a gap of a support structure and (2) performing a reactive ion etch upon the multilayer boron nitride to produce the single layer hexagonal boron nitride suspended across the gap of the support structure.

  8. Adsorption of carbon dioxide (CO2) at S functionalized boron nitride (BN) and aluminum nitride (AlN) nanotubes (9, 0): A quantum chemical investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi, Meysam

    2016-10-01

    We employed density functional theory to characterize CO2 adsorption on BNNT and AlNNT surfaces. The effects of S functionalization on the adsorption of CO2 gas on BNNT and AlNNT surfaces were investigated. Results reveal that adsorptions of CO2 on studied nanotubes were exothermic and experimentally possible from the energetic viewpoint. Results show that, Ead values of CO2 on AlNNT surface were more negative than corresponding values of BNNT. Results reveal that, S functionalization of studied nanotubes causes an increase in the absolute values of Ead of CO2 on surface of studied nanotubes. These results show that, there are good linearity dependencies between Ead and orbital energy values of studied nanotubes. Therefore we can conclude the Ead and orbital energy values are highly sensitive to the adsorption process which these may be used for the selection the suitable nanotubes with enhanced CO2 adsorption potential.

  9. Computational Evidence for the Smallest Boron Nanotube

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xian Jie LIN; Dong Ju ZHANG; Cheng Bu LIU

    2006-01-01

    The structure of boron nanotubes (BNTs) was found not to be limited to hexagonal pyramidal structures. Based on density functional theory calculations we provided evidence for the smallest boron nanotube, a geometrical analog of the corresponding carbon nanotube. As shown by our calculations, the smallest BNT possesses highly structural, dynamical, and thermal stability, which should be interest for attempts at its synthesis.

  10. The effect of C atom concentration on the electronic properties of boron carbonitride alloy nanotube in zig-zag form

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H Milani Moghaddam

    2011-06-01

    Electronic properties of single-walled boron nitride nanotube in zig-zag form are numerically investigated by replacing B atoms with C atoms. Using a tight-binding Hamiltonian, the methods based on Green’s function theory, Landauer formalism and Dyson equation, the electronic density of states and electronic conductance in boron nitride nanotube and boron carbonitride nanotube are calculated. Our calculations indicate that in a boron nitride nanotube, the localized states associated with C impurities appear as the concentration of C atoms increases. The boron carbonitride nanotube thus behaves like a semiconductor. Also, by increasing the C atom concentration, the voltage in the first step on the – characteristics decreases, whereas the corresponding current increases.

  11. Site and chirality selective chemical modifications of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) via Lewis acid-base interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaram, Rajashabala; Scheiner, Steve; Roy, Ajit K; Kar, Tapas

    2015-02-01

    The pristine BNNTs contain both Lewis acid (boron) and Lewis base (nitrogen) centers at their surface. Interactions of ammonia and borane molecules, representatives of Lewis base and acid as adsorbates respectively, with matching sites at the surface of BNNTs, have been explored in the present DFT study. Adsorption energies suggest stronger chemisorption (about 15-20 kcal mol(-1)) of borane than ammonia (about 5-10 kcal mol(-1)) in both armchair (4,4) and zigzag (8,0) variants of the tube. NH3 favors (8,0) over the (4,4) tube, whereas BH3 exhibits the opposite preference, indicating some chirality dependence on acid-base interactions. A new feature of bonding is found in BH3/AlH3-BNNTs (at the edge site) complexes, where one hydrogen of the guest molecule is involved in three-center two-electron bonding, in addition to dative covalent bond (N: → B). This interaction causes a reversal of electron flow from borane/alane to BNNT, making the tube an electron acceptor, suggesting tailoring of electronic properties could be possible by varying strength of incoming Lewis acids. On the contrary, BNNTs always behave as electron acceptor in ammonia complexes. IR, XPS and NMR spectra show some characteristic features of complexes and can help experimentalists to identify not only structures of such complexes but also the location of the guest molecules and design second functionalizations. Interaction with several other neutral BF3, BCl3, BH2CH3 and ionic CH3(+) acids as well as amino group (CH3NH2 and NH2COOH) were also studied. The strongest interaction (>100 kcal mol(-1)) is found in BNNT-CH3(+) complexes and H-bonds are the only source of stability of NH2COOH-BNNT complexes. PMID:25559141

  12. Boron Nitride Nanosheets for Metal Protection

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Lu Hua; Xing, Tan; Chen, Ying; Jones, Rob

    2015-01-01

    Although the high impermeability of graphene makes it an excellent barrier to inhibit metal oxidation and corrosion, graphene can form a galvanic cell with the underlying metal that promotes corrosion of the metal in the long term. Boron nitride (BN) nanosheets which have a similar impermeability could be a better choice as protective barrier, because they are more thermally and chemically stable than graphene and, more importantly, do not cause galvanic corrosion due to their electrical insu...

  13. Anomalous thermal conductivity of monolayer boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabarraei, Alireza; Wang, Xiaonan

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we use nonequilibrium molecular dynamics modeling to investigate the thermal properties of monolayer hexagonal boron nitride nanoribbons under uniaxial strain along their longitudinal axis. Our simulations predict that hexagonal boron nitride shows an anomalous thermal response to the applied uniaxial strain. Contrary to three dimensional materials, under uniaxial stretching, the thermal conductivity of boron nitride nanoribbons first increases rather than decreasing until it reaches its peak value and then starts decreasing. Under compressive strain, the thermal conductivity of monolayer boron nitride ribbons monolithically reduces rather than increasing. We use phonon spectrum and dispersion curves to investigate the mechanism responsible for the unexpected behavior. Our molecular dynamics modeling and density functional theory results show that application of longitudinal tensile strain leads to the reduction of the group velocities of longitudinal and transverse acoustic modes. Such a phonon softening mechanism acts to reduce the thermal conductivity of the nanoribbons. On the other hand, a significant increase in the group velocity (stiffening) of the flexural acoustic modes is observed, which counteracts the phonon softening effects of the longitudinal and transverse modes. The total thermal conductivity of the ribbons is a result of competition between these two mechanisms. At low tensile strain, the stiffening mechanism overcomes the softening mechanism which leads to an increase in the thermal conductivity. At higher tensile strain, the softening mechanism supersedes the stiffening and the thermal conductivity slightly reduces. Our simulations show that the decrease in the thermal conductivity under compressive strain is attributed to the formation of buckling defects which reduces the phonon mean free path.

  14. Influence of disorder on thermal transport properties of boron nitride nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevik, Cem; Kinaci, Alper; Haskins, Justin B.; Çaǧın, Tahir

    2012-08-01

    The impact of isotopes on thermal transport in boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) and boron nitride white graphene is systematically studied via molecular dynamic simulations. By varying the concentration of the 10B isotope in these materials, we find that thermal conductivity ranges from 340 to 500 W/m-1 K-1, closely agreeing with experimental observations for isotopically pure and natural (19.9% 10B) BNNTs. Further, we investigate the interplay between dimension and isotope disorder in several C-based materials. Our results show a general trend of decreasing influence of isotope disorder with dimension of these materials.

  15. Investigation of tensile response and thermal conductivity of boron-nitride nanosheets using molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, Bohayra; Rémond, Yves

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we employed classical molecular dynamics simulations using the Tersoff potential for the evaluation of thermal conductivity and tensile response of single-layer boron-nitride sheets (SBNS). By carrying out uniaxial tension simulations, the elastic moduli of SBNS structures are predicted to be close to those of boron-nitride nanotubes in a range between 0.8 and 0.85 TPa for different chirality directions. Performing non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, the thermal conductivity of SBNS is predicted to be around 80 W/m-K, which is shown to be independent of chirality directions.

  16. Composition and microhardness of CAE boron nitride films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper deals with boron nitride produced by cathodic arc evaporation techniques.The films were applied on titanium and cemented carbide substrates. Their characterization was carried out using X-ray diffraction and Knoop microhardness tests. Demonstrated are the high properties of two-phase films, containing β (cubic) and γ (wurtzitic) modifications of boron nitride. (author). 7 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  17. Computational Aspects of Carbon and Boron Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Manuel

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Carbon hexagonal nanotubes, boron triangular nanotubes and boron a-nanotubes are a few popular nano structures. Computational researchers look at these structures as graphs where each atom is a node and an atomic bond is an edge. While researchers are discussing the differences among the three nanotubes, we identify the topological and structural similarities among them. We show that the three nanotubes have the same maximum independent set and their matching ratios are independent of the number of columns. In addition, we illustrate that they also have similar underlying broadcasting spanning tree and identical communication behavior.

  18. Dimensional Crossover of Thermal Transport in Hybrid Boron Nitride Nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakhavand, Navid; Shahsavari, Rouzbeh

    2015-08-26

    Although boron nitride nanotubes (BNNT) and hexagonal-BN (hBN) are superb one-dimensional (1D) and 2D thermal conductors respectively, bringing this quality into 3D remains elusive. Here, we focus on pillared boron nitride (PBN) as a class of 3D BN allotropes and demonstrate how the junctions, pillar length and pillar distance control phonon scattering in PBN and impart tailorable thermal conductivity in 3D. Using reverse nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, our results indicate that although a clear phonon scattering at the junctions accounts for the lower thermal conductivity of PBN compared to its parent BNNT and hBN allotropes, it acts as an effective design tool and provides 3D thermo-mutable features that are absent in the parent structures. Propelled by the junction spacing, while one geometrical parameter, e.g., pillar length, controls the thermal transport along the out-of-plane direction of PBN, the other parameter, e.g., pillar distance, dictates the gross cross-sectional area, which is key for design of 3D thermal management systems. Furthermore, the junctions have a more pronounced effect in creating a Kapitza effect in the out-of-plane direction, due to the change in dimensionality of the phonon transport. This work is the first report on thermo-mutable properties of hybrid BN allotropes and can potentially impact thermal management of other hybrid 3D BN architectures. PMID:26158661

  19. Ballistic thermoelectric properties in boron nitride nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhong-Xiang; Tang, Li-Ming; Pan, Chang-Ning; Chen, Qiao; Chen, Ke-Qiu

    2013-10-01

    Ballistic thermoelectric properties (TPs) in boron nitride nanoribbons (BNNRs) are studied using the nonequilibrium Green's function atomistic simulation of electron and phonon transport. A comparative analysis for TPs between BNNRs and graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) is made. Results show that the TPs of BNNRs are better than those of GNRs stemming from the higher power factor and smaller thermal conductance of BNNRs. With increasing the ribbon width, the maximum value of ZT (ZTmax) of BNNRs exhibits a transformation from the monotonic decrease to nonlinear increase. We also show that the lattice defect can enhance the ZTmax of these nanoribbons strongly depending on its positions and the edge shape.

  20. Method for exfoliation of hexagonal boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A new method is disclosed for the exfoliation of hexagonal boron nitride into mono- and few-layered nanosheets (or nanoplatelets, nanomesh, nanoribbons). The method does not necessarily require high temperature or vacuum, but uses commercially available h-BN powders (or those derived from these materials, bulk crystals) and only requires wet chemical processing. The method is facile, cost efficient, and scalable. The resultant exfoliated h-BN is dispersible in an organic solvent or water thus amenable for solution processing for unique microelectronic or composite applications.

  1. Boron nitride nanomaterials for thermal management applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meziani, Mohammed J; Song, Wei-Li; Wang, Ping; Lu, Fushen; Hou, Zhiling; Anderson, Ankoma; Maimaiti, Halidan; Sun, Ya-Ping

    2015-05-18

    Hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets (BNNs) are analogous to their two-dimensional carbon counterparts in many materials properties, in particular, ultrahigh thermal conductivity, but also offer some unique attributes, including being electrically insulating, high thermal stability, chemical and oxidation resistance, low color, and high mechanical strength. Significant recent advances in the production of BNNs, understanding of their properties, and the development of polymeric nanocomposites with BNNs for thermally conductive yet electrically insulating materials and systems are highlighted herein. Major opportunities and challenges for further studies in this rapidly advancing field are also discussed. PMID:25652360

  2. Synthesis of Boron Nanowires, Nanotubes, and Nanosheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajen B. Patel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of boron nanowires, nanotubes, and nanosheets using a thermal vapor deposition process is reported. This work confirms previous research and provides a new method capable of synthesizing boron nanomaterials. The materials were made by using various combinations of MgB2, Mg(BH42, MCM-41, NiB, and Fe wire. Unlike previously reported methods, a nanoparticle catalyst and a silicate substrate are not required for synthesis. Two types of boron nanowires, boron nanotubes, and boron nanosheets were made. Their morphology and chemical composition were determined through the use of scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and electron energy loss spectroscopy. These boron-based materials have potential for electronic and hydrogen storage applications.

  3. High Temperature Oxidation of Boron Nitride. Part 1; Monolithic Boron Nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Nathan; Farmer, Serene; Moore, Arthur; Sayir, Haluk

    1997-01-01

    High temperature oxidation of monolithic boron nitride (BN) is examined. Hot pressed BN and both low and high density CVD BN were studied. It is shown that oxidation rates are quite sensitive to microstructural factors such as orientation, porosity, and degree of crystallinity. In addition small amounts of water vapor lead to volatilization of the B2O3 oxide as H(x)B(y)O(z). For these reasons, very different oxidation kinetics were observed for each type of BN.

  4. Immunosuppressive agent leflunomide: a SWNTs-immobilized dihydroortate dehydrogenase inhibitory effect and computational study of its adsorption properties on zigzag single walled (6,0) carbon and boron nitride nanotubes as controlled drug delivery devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raissi, Heidar; Mollania, Fariba

    2014-06-01

    Leflunomide [HWA 486 or RS-34821, 5-methyl-N-(4trifluoromethylphenyl)-4-isoxazole carboximide] is an immunosuppressive agent effective in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Dihydroortate dehydrogenase (DHODH, EC 1.3.3.1) immobilization on the nanotubes was carried out and biochemical characterization of free and immobilized enzyme was determined. In comparison with free enzyme, the immobilized DHODH showed improved stability and reusability for investigation of inhibition pattern of drugs such as leflunomide. The experimental data showed that, DHODH was inhibited by the active metabolite of leflunomide (RS-61980) with a Ki and KI of 0.82 and 0.06 mM, respectively. Results exhibited mixed-type inhibition kinetics towards dihydroorotate as a substrate in the free and immobilized enzyme. Furthermore, the behavior of anticancer drug leflunomide adsorbed on the external surface of zigzag single walled (6,0) carbon and boron nitride nanotubes (SWCNT and SWBNNT) was studied by means of DFT calculations at the B3LYP/6-31G(*) level of theory. The larger adsorption energies and charges transfer showed that the adsorption of leflunomide onto SWBNNT is more stable than that the adsorption of leflunomide onto SWCNT. Frontier molecular orbitals (HOMO and LUMO) suggest that adsorption of leflunomide onto SWBNNT behave as charge transfer compounds with leflunomide as an electron donor and SWBNNT as an electron acceptor. Thus, nanotubes (NTs) have been proposed and actively explored as multipurpose innovative carriers for drug delivery and diagnostic application. The AIM theory has been also applied to analyze the properties of the bond critical points: their electron densities and their laplacians. Also, the natural bond orbital (NBO) calculations were performed to derive natural atomic orbital occupancies, and partial charges of the interacting atoms in the equilibrium tube-molecule distance.

  5. Facile Synthesis of Ternary Boron Carbonitride Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luo Lijie

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this study, a novel and facile approach for the synthesis of ternary boron carbonitride (B–C–N nanotubes was reported. Growth occurred by heating simple starting materials of boron powder, zinc oxide powder, and ethanol absolute at 1150 °C under a mixture gas flow of nitrogen and hydrogen. As substrate, commercial stainless steel foil with a typical thickness of 0.05 mm played an additional role of catalyst during the growth of nanotubes. The nanotubes were characterized by SEM, TEM, EDX, and EELS. The results indicate that the synthesized B–C–N nanotubes exhibit a bamboo-like morphology and B, C, and N elements are homogeneously distributed in the nanotubes. A catalyzed vapor–liquid–solid (VLS mechanism was proposed for the growth of the nanotubes.

  6. Boron nitride: A new photonic material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chubarov, M., E-mail: mihcu@ifm.liu.se [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Pedersen, H., E-mail: henke@ifm.liu.se [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Högberg, H., E-mail: hanho@ifm.liu.se [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Filippov, S., E-mail: stafi@ifm.liu.se [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Engelbrecht, J.A.A., E-mail: Japie.Engelbrecht@nmmu.ac.za [Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth (South Africa); O' Connel, J., E-mail: jacques.oconnell@gmail.com [Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth (South Africa); Henry, A., E-mail: anne.henry@liu.se [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden)

    2014-04-15

    Rhombohedral boron nitride (r-BN) layers were grown on sapphire substrate in a hot-wall chemical vapor deposition reactor. Characterization of these layers is reported in details. X-ray diffraction (XRD) is used as a routine characterization tool to investigate the crystalline quality of the films and the identification of the phases is revealed using detailed pole figure measurements. Transmission electron microscopy reveals stacking of more than 40 atomic layers. Results from Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) spectroscopy measurements are compared with XRD data showing that FTIR is not phase sensitive when various phases of sp{sup 2}-BN are investigated. XRD measurements show a significant improvement of the crystalline quality when adding silicon to the gas mixture during the growth; this is further confirmed by cathodoluminescence which shows a decrease of the defects related luminescence intensity.

  7. Hexagonal boron nitride and water interaction parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yanbin; Wagner, Lucas K.; Aluru, Narayana R.

    2016-04-01

    The study of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) in microfluidic and nanofluidic applications at the atomic level requires accurate force field parameters to describe the water-hBN interaction. In this work, we begin with benchmark quality first principles quantum Monte Carlo calculations on the interaction energy between water and hBN, which are used to validate random phase approximation (RPA) calculations. We then proceed with RPA to derive force field parameters, which are used to simulate water contact angle on bulk hBN, attaining a value within the experimental uncertainties. This paper demonstrates that end-to-end multiscale modeling, starting at detailed many-body quantum mechanics and ending with macroscopic properties, with the approximations controlled along the way, is feasible for these systems.

  8. Boron nitride: A new photonic material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhombohedral boron nitride (r-BN) layers were grown on sapphire substrate in a hot-wall chemical vapor deposition reactor. Characterization of these layers is reported in details. X-ray diffraction (XRD) is used as a routine characterization tool to investigate the crystalline quality of the films and the identification of the phases is revealed using detailed pole figure measurements. Transmission electron microscopy reveals stacking of more than 40 atomic layers. Results from Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) spectroscopy measurements are compared with XRD data showing that FTIR is not phase sensitive when various phases of sp2-BN are investigated. XRD measurements show a significant improvement of the crystalline quality when adding silicon to the gas mixture during the growth; this is further confirmed by cathodoluminescence which shows a decrease of the defects related luminescence intensity.

  9. Mechanical Hysteresis of Hexagonal Boron Nitride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Aiguo; LI Haoran

    2011-01-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is an important structural material with layered microstructure.Because of the plastic anisotropy,this material shows obvious mechanical hysteresis (nonlinear elastic deformation).There are hysteretic loops at the cyclical load-unload stress-strain curves of h-BN.Consequently,two hot-pressed h-BN cylinders with different textures were studied.The mechanical hysteresis is heavily texture-dependent.The area of hysteretic loop is linearly related with the square of loading stresslevel.Two minor loops attached on the hysteretic loops with the same extreme stresses have congruent shapes.It can be concluded that the mechanical hysteresis of h-BN can he explained by a Kink Nonlinear Elastic model developed from the study of a ternary carbide Ti3SiC2.

  10. Excitons in boron nitride single layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvani, Thomas; Paleari, Fulvio; Miranda, Henrique P. C.; Molina-Sánchez, Alejandro; Wirtz, Ludger; Latil, Sylvain; Amara, Hakim; Ducastelle, François

    2016-09-01

    Boron nitride single layer belongs to the family of two-dimensional materials whose optical properties are currently receiving considerable attention. Strong excitonic effects have already been observed in the bulk and still stronger effects are predicted for single layers. We present here a detailed study of these properties by combining ab initio calculations and a tight-binding Wannier analysis in both real and reciprocal space. Due to the simplicity of the band structure with single valence (π ) and conduction (π*) bands the tight-binding analysis becomes quasiquantitative with only two adjustable parameters and provides tools for a detailed analysis of the exciton properties. Strong deviations from the usual hydrogenic model are evidenced. The ground-state exciton is not a genuine Frenkel exciton, but a very localized tightly bound one. The other ones are similar to those found in transition-metal dichalcogenides and, although more localized, can be described within a Wannier-Mott scheme.

  11. Hexagonal boron nitride and water interaction parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yanbin; Wagner, Lucas K; Aluru, Narayana R

    2016-04-28

    The study of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) in microfluidic and nanofluidic applications at the atomic level requires accurate force field parameters to describe the water-hBN interaction. In this work, we begin with benchmark quality first principles quantum Monte Carlo calculations on the interaction energy between water and hBN, which are used to validate random phase approximation (RPA) calculations. We then proceed with RPA to derive force field parameters, which are used to simulate water contact angle on bulk hBN, attaining a value within the experimental uncertainties. This paper demonstrates that end-to-end multiscale modeling, starting at detailed many-body quantum mechanics and ending with macroscopic properties, with the approximations controlled along the way, is feasible for these systems. PMID:27131542

  12. Method for determination of boron carbide in wurtzite-like boron nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A technique for increase of sensitivity and analysis accuracy while boron carbide determination in wurtzite-like boron nitride is proposed. Boron nitride with an addition of boron carbide is bjected to treatment by the mixture of concentrated sulphuric acid and 0.1-0.5 N of porassium bichromate solution at ratio of (2-1):1 at the temperature of mixture boiling. Boron carboide content is calculated according to the quantity of restored Cr(3+), which is determined by titration of Cr(6+) excess with the Mohr's salt solution

  13. Research of nanocomposite structure of boron nitride at proton radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Borodin, Yuri Viktorovich; Ermolaev, D. S.; Pak, V.; Zhang, K.

    2016-01-01

    Using roentgen diffraction and electron microscopy, the influence of nanosecond irradiation by ion beams of high energy on forming of self-organized nanoblocks in near surface's layers of boron nitride (BN) has been studied. It was shown that low temperature transitions from hexagonal to wrutz boron nitrides is associated with changes of shape and sizes of self-organized particles consisting the nanoblocks. We have calculated the parameters of nanoblocks using the meanings of interplane dista...

  14. Cubic boron nitride- a new material for ultracold neutron application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the first time, the Fermi potential of cubic boron nitride (cBN) was measured at the ultra cold neutron source at the TRIGA reactor, Mainz using the time of flight method (TOF). The investigated samples have a Fermi potential of about 300 neV. Because of its good dielectric characteristics, cubic boron nitride could be used as suitable coating for insulator in storage chambers of future EDM projects. This talk presents recent results and an outlook on further investigations.

  15. Vertical transport in graphene-hexagonal boron nitride heterostructure devices

    OpenAIRE

    Samantha Bruzzone; Demetrio Logoteta; Gianluca Fiori; Giuseppe Iannaccone

    2015-01-01

    Research in graphene-based electronics is recently focusing on devices based on vertical heterostructures of two-dimensional materials. Here we use density functional theory and multiscale simulations to investigate the tunneling properties of single- and double-barrier structures with graphene and few-layer hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) or hexagonal boron carbon nitride (h-BC2N). We find that tunneling through a single barrier exhibit a weak dependence on energy. We also show that in double...

  16. Boron-Filled Hybrid Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rajen B; Chou, Tsengming; Kanwal, Alokik; Apigo, David J; Lefebvre, Joseph; Owens, Frank; Iqbal, Zafar

    2016-01-01

    A unique nanoheterostructure, a boron-filled hybrid carbon nanotube (BHCNT), has been synthesized using a one-step chemical vapor deposition process. The BHCNTs can be considered to be a novel form of boron carbide consisting of boron doped, distorted multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) encapsulating boron nanowires. These MWCNTs were found to be insulating in spite of their graphitic layered outer structures. While conventional MWCNTs have great axial strength, they have weak radial compressive strength, and do not bond well to one another or to other materials. In contrast, BHCNTs are shown to be up to 31% stiffer and 233% stronger than conventional MWCNTs in radial compression and have excellent mechanical properties at elevated temperatures. The corrugated surface of BHCNTs enables them to bond easily to themselves and other materials, in contrast to carbon nanotubes (CNTs). BHCNTs can, therefore, be used to make nanocomposites, nanopaper sheets, and bundles that are stronger than those made with CNTs. PMID:27460526

  17. Boron-Filled Hybrid Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rajen B.; Chou, Tsengming; Kanwal, Alokik; Apigo, David J.; Lefebvre, Joseph; Owens, Frank; Iqbal, Zafar

    2016-07-01

    A unique nanoheterostructure, a boron-filled hybrid carbon nanotube (BHCNT), has been synthesized using a one-step chemical vapor deposition process. The BHCNTs can be considered to be a novel form of boron carbide consisting of boron doped, distorted multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) encapsulating boron nanowires. These MWCNTs were found to be insulating in spite of their graphitic layered outer structures. While conventional MWCNTs have great axial strength, they have weak radial compressive strength, and do not bond well to one another or to other materials. In contrast, BHCNTs are shown to be up to 31% stiffer and 233% stronger than conventional MWCNTs in radial compression and have excellent mechanical properties at elevated temperatures. The corrugated surface of BHCNTs enables them to bond easily to themselves and other materials, in contrast to carbon nanotubes (CNTs). BHCNTs can, therefore, be used to make nanocomposites, nanopaper sheets, and bundles that are stronger than those made with CNTs.

  18. Boron-Filled Hybrid Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rajen B.; Chou, Tsengming; Kanwal, Alokik; Apigo, David J.; Lefebvre, Joseph; Owens, Frank; Iqbal, Zafar

    2016-01-01

    A unique nanoheterostructure, a boron-filled hybrid carbon nanotube (BHCNT), has been synthesized using a one-step chemical vapor deposition process. The BHCNTs can be considered to be a novel form of boron carbide consisting of boron doped, distorted multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) encapsulating boron nanowires. These MWCNTs were found to be insulating in spite of their graphitic layered outer structures. While conventional MWCNTs have great axial strength, they have weak radial compressive strength, and do not bond well to one another or to other materials. In contrast, BHCNTs are shown to be up to 31% stiffer and 233% stronger than conventional MWCNTs in radial compression and have excellent mechanical properties at elevated temperatures. The corrugated surface of BHCNTs enables them to bond easily to themselves and other materials, in contrast to carbon nanotubes (CNTs). BHCNTs can, therefore, be used to make nanocomposites, nanopaper sheets, and bundles that are stronger than those made with CNTs. PMID:27460526

  19. BORON NITRIDE CAPACITORS FOR ADVANCED POWER ELECTRONIC DEVICES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N. Badi; D. Starikov; C. Boney; A. Bensaoula; D. Johnstone

    2010-11-01

    This project fabricates long-life boron nitride/boron oxynitride thin film -based capacitors for advanced SiC power electronics with a broad operating temperature range using a physical vapor deposition (PVD) technique. The use of vapor deposition provides for precise control and quality material formation.

  20. Process for producing wurtzitic or cubic boron nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disclosed is a process for producing wurtzitic or cubic boron nitride comprising the steps of: [A] preparing an intimate mixture of powdered boron oxide, a powdered metal selected from the group consisting of magnesium or aluminum, and a powdered metal azide; [B] igniting the mixture and bringing it to a temperature at which self-sustaining combustion occurs; [C] shocking the mixture at the end of the combustion thereof with a high pressure wave, thereby forming as a reaction product, wurtzitic or cubic boron nitride and occluded metal oxide; and, optionally [D] removing the occluded metal oxide from the reaction product. Also disclosed are reaction products made by the process described

  1. Nanotube phonon waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chih-Wei; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2013-10-29

    Disclosed are methods and devices in which certain types of nanotubes (e.g., carbon nanotubes and boron nitride nanotubes conduct heat with high efficiency and are therefore useful in electronic-type devices.

  2. Hexagonal boron-nitride nanomesh magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohata, C.; Tagami, R.; Nakanishi, Y.; Iwaki, R.; Nomura, K.; Haruyama, J.

    2016-09-01

    The formation of magnetic and spintronic devices using two-dimensional (2D) atom-thin layers has attracted attention. Ferromagnetisms (FMs) arising from zigzag-type atomic structure of edges of 2D atom-thin materials have been experimentally observed in graphene nanoribbons, hydrogen (H)-terminated graphene nanomeshes (NMs), and few-layer oxygen (O)-terminated black phosphorus NMs. Herein, we report room-temperature edge FM in few-layer hexagonal boron-nitride (hBN) NMs. O-terminated hBNNMs annealed at 500 °C show the largest FM, while it completely disappears in H-terminated hBNNMs. When hBNNMs are annealed at other temperatures, amplitude of the FM significantly decreases. These are highly in contrast to the case of graphene NMs but similar to the cases of black phosphorus NM and suggest that the hybridization of the O atoms with B(N) dangling bonds of zigzag pore edges, formed at the 500 °C annealing, strongly contribute to this edge FM. Room-temperature FM realizable only by exposing hBNNMs into air opens the way for high-efficiency 2D flexible magnetic and spintronic devices without the use of rare magnetic elements.

  3. Enhanced thermal-mechanical properties of polymer composites with hybrid boron nitride nanofillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Haiyan; Tang, Yanxia; Su, Juling; Yang, Xiaoyan

    2014-02-01

    The present work focuses on the investigation of the thermal-mechanical properties of the epoxy composites with hybrid boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) and boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs). The stable dispersions of BNNTs-BNNSs were achieved by a noncovalent functionalization with pyrene carboxylic acid. The resulting epoxy/BNNTs-BNNSs composites exhibited homogeneously dispersed BNNTs-BNNSs and a strong filler-matrix interface interaction. The composites showed a 95 % increase in thermal conductivity and a 57 % improvement in Young's modulus by addition of only 1 vol. % BNNTs-BNNSs. Meanwhile, the composites also retained a high electrical resistance of pure epoxy. Our study thus shows the potential for hybrid BNNTs-BNNSs to be successfully used as the nanofillers of polymer composites for applications in electrically insulating thermal interface materials.

  4. Thermal transport in boron nitride nanotorus—towards a nanoscopic thermal shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, G. C.; Baillargeat, D.

    2013-11-01

    Nanotori, or nanorings, are topological variants of nanotubes and are conceived to have different properties from their tubular form. In this study, the toroidal arrangement of boron nitride is introduced. Using classical molecular dynamics simulations, the thermal behaviour (thermal conductivity and thermal stability) of the boron nitride nanotorus and its relationship with the structural characteristics are investigated. Its circumferential thermal rectification strength displays a linear dependence on the bending coefficient of the nanostructure. Surface kinks are relatively inconsequential on its circumferential mode of conduction, as compared to its axial sense. The circumferential conductivity in the diffusive regime is calculated to be approximately 10 W/m K, while the axial conductivity is more than tenfold of this value. All nanotori with different toroidal characters show excellent thermal stability at extremely high temperatures approaching 3400 K. With consideration to its favourable properties, a thermal shield made up of a parallel row of nanotori is proposed as a nanoscale thermal insulation device.

  5. Boron coating on boron nitride coated nuclear fuels by chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durmazuçar, Hasan H.; Gündüz, Güngör

    2000-12-01

    Uranium dioxide-only and uranium dioxide-gadolinium oxide (5% and 10%) ceramic nuclear fuel pellets which were already coated with boron nitride were coated with thin boron layer by chemical vapor deposition to increase the burn-up efficiency of the fuel during reactor operation. Coating was accomplished from the reaction of boron trichloride with hydrogen at 1250 K in a tube furnace, and then sintering at 1400 and 1525 K. The deposited boron was identified by infrared spectrum. The morphology of the coating was studied by using scanning electron microscope. The plate, grainy and string (fiber)-like boron structures were observed.

  6. Communication: Water on hexagonal boron nitride from diffusion Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Hamdani, Yasmine S.; Ma, Ming; Michaelides, Angelos, E-mail: angelos.michaelides@ucl.ac.uk [Thomas Young Centre and London Centre for Nanotechnology, 17–19 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom); Department of Chemistry, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom); Alfè, Dario [Thomas Young Centre and London Centre for Nanotechnology, 17–19 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom); Department of Earth Sciences, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Lilienfeld, O. Anatole von [Institute of Physical Chemistry and National Center for Computational Design and Discovery of Novel Materials, Department of Chemistry, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 80, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Argonne Leadership Computing Facility, Argonne National Laboratories, 9700 S. Cass Avenue Argonne, Lemont, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2015-05-14

    Despite a recent flurry of experimental and simulation studies, an accurate estimate of the interaction strength of water molecules with hexagonal boron nitride is lacking. Here, we report quantum Monte Carlo results for the adsorption of a water monomer on a periodic hexagonal boron nitride sheet, which yield a water monomer interaction energy of −84 ± 5 meV. We use the results to evaluate the performance of several widely used density functional theory (DFT) exchange correlation functionals and find that they all deviate substantially. Differences in interaction energies between different adsorption sites are however better reproduced by DFT.

  7. The energy landscape of fullerene materials: a comparison between boron, boron-nitride and carbon

    CERN Document Server

    De, Sandip; Amsler, Maximilian; Pochet, Pascal; Genovese, Luigi; Goedecker, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Using the minima hopping global geometry optimization method on the density functional potential energy surface we study medium size and large boron clusters. Even though for isolated medium size clusters the ground state is a cage like structure they are unstable against external perturbations such as contact with other clusters. The energy landscape of larger boron clusters is glass like and has a large number of structures which are lower in energy than the cages. This is in contrast to carbon and boron nitride systems which can be clearly identified as structure seekers in our minima hopping runs. The differences in the potential energy landscape explain why carbon and boron nitride systems are found in nature whereas pure boron fullerenes have not been found.

  8. Connecting effect on the first hyperpolarizability of armchair carbon-boron-nitride heteronanotubes: pattern versus proportion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Rong-Lin; Xu, Hong-Liang; Su, Zhong-Min

    2016-05-18

    Carbon-boron-nitride heteronanotubes (BNCNT) have attracted a lot of attention because of their adjustable properties and potential applications in many fields. In this work, a series of CA, PA and HA armchair BNCNT models were designed to explore their nonlinear optical (NLO) properties and provide physical insight into the structure-property relationships; CA, PA and HA represent the models that are obtained by doping the carbon segment into pristine boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) fragments circularly around the tube axis, parallel to the tube axis and helically to the tube axis, respectively. Results show that the first hyperpolarizability (β0) of an armchair BNCNT model is dramatically dependent on the connecting patterns of carbon with the boron nitride fragment. Significantly, the β0 value of PA-6 is 2.00 × 10(4) au, which is almost two orders of magnitude larger than those (6.07 × 10(2) and 1.55 × 10(2) au) of HA-6 and CA-6. In addition, the β0 values of PA and CA models increase with the increase in carbon proportion, whereas those of HA models show a different tendency. Further investigations on transition properties show that the curved charge transfer from N-connecting carbon atoms to B-connecting carbon atoms of PA models is essentially the origin of the big difference among these models. This new knowledge about armchair BNCNTs may provide important information for the design and preparation of advanced NLO nano-materials.

  9. Boron nitride elastic and thermal properties. Irradiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The anisotropy of boron nitride (BN) and especially thermal and elastic properties were studied. Specific heat and thermal conductivity between 1.2 and 300K, thermal conductivity between 4 and 350K and elastic constants C33 and C44 were measured. BN was irradiated with electrons at 77K and with neutrons at 27K to determine properties after irradiation

  10. Investigations on the characterization of ion implanted hexagonal boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aradi, E.; Naidoo, S. R.; Erasmus, R. M.; Julies, B.; Derry, T. E.

    2013-07-01

    The effect of ion implantation on hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is studied herein. We use boron as an ion of choice to introduce radiation damage into h-BN, at fluences ranging from 1 × 1014-1 × 1016 ions/cm2 and implantation energy ranges from 40 to 160 keV. The thermal dependence is also investigated by varying the annealing temperature from room temperature to 400 °C after implantation. Raman spectroscopy showed Raman active defects one of which is possibly related to the formation of cubic boron nitride nanocrystals (nc-BN) within the implanted range. The relationship of these defect induced Raman active peaks was investigated by varying the implantation parameters. The preliminary Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) results also are reported briefly.

  11. Grain refinement by boron nitride; Gefuegemodifizierung durch Bornitrid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bach, F.W.; Guenther, A.; Phan-Tan, T.; Kruessel, T.; Wilk, P. [Institut fuer Werkstoffkunde der Universitaet Hannover, Struktur- und Biomedizinwerkstoffe, Garbsen (Germany)

    2005-01-01

    Grain refinement of magnesium alloys aims at better deformation behaviour, higher strength and improved corrosion resistance. Besides mechanical treatment like pressing, it is possible to refine the grainsize by using nucleation materials. Whereas calcium and rare earth elements are already widely used, the use of boron nitride offers a cheap alternative to refine grains of magnesium aluminum alloys. The effect is achieved by the reaction of boron nitride with aluminum which cracks the chemical compound to form aluminum nitride with the nitrogen while boron is forming different magnesium borides. These two compounds both exhibit very high melting points and are stable in this environment so that they can act as seed crystals. Because boron nitride shows a bad wettability to metal molds, it would float on top of the mold. Therefore, it is necessary to produce pellets out of boron nitride and aluminum powder to improve contact to the mold and enhance reaction velocity. (Abstract Copyright [2005], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.) [German] Durch die Kornfeinung von Magnesiumlegierungen wird das Ziel einer Festigkeitssteigerung, einer verbesserten Umformbarkeit und einer erhoehten Korrosionsbestaendigkeit verfolgt. Neben mechanischen Loesungswegen (Strangpressen etc.) besteht die Moeglichkeit legierungstechnisch durch den Einsatz keimbildender Stoffe eine Kornfeinung zu erzielen. Neben dem Einsatz von Kalzium oder Seltenen Erden bietet Bornitrid eine kostenguenstige Moeglichkeit eine Kornfeinung fuer aluminiumhaltige Magnesiumlegierungen zu erzeugen. Die Kornfeinung beruht dabei auf der Reaktion des Bornitrids mit dem Aluminium in der Schmelze, durch welche das Bornitrid zersetzt wird und mit dem freiwerdenden Stickstoff zu Aluminiumnitrid reagiert, waehrend sich das Bor mit Magnesium zu Magnesiumboriden verbindet. Bei beiden Produkten handelt es sich um hochschmelzende, in dieser Umgebung stabile Verbindungen, die als Kristallisationskeime wirken koennen. Die Zugabe des

  12. Turbostratic boron nitride coated on high-surface area metal oxide templates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klitgaard, Søren Kegnæs; Egeblad, Kresten; Brorson, M.;

    2007-01-01

    Boron nitride coatings on high-surface area MgAl2O4 and Al2O3 have been synthesized and characterized by transmission electron microscopy and by X-ray powder diffraction. The metal oxide templates were coated with boron nitride using a simple nitridation in a flow of ammonia starting from ammoniu...

  13. Anisotropic Hexagonal Boron Nitride Nanomaterials - Synthesis and Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han,W.Q.

    2008-08-01

    Boron nitride (BN) is a synthetic binary compound located between III and V group elements in the Periodic Table. However, its properties, in terms of polymorphism and mechanical characteristics, are rather close to those of carbon compared with other III-V compounds, such as gallium nitride. BN crystallizes into a layered or a tetrahedrally linked structure, like those of graphite and diamond, respectively, depending on the conditions of its preparation, especially the pressure applied. Such correspondence between BN and carbon readily can be understood from their isoelectronic structures [1, 2]. On the other hand, in contrast to graphite, layered BN is transparent and is an insulator. This material has attracted great interest because, similar to carbon, it exists in various polymorphic forms exhibiting very different properties; however, these forms do not correspond strictly to those of carbon. Crystallographically, BN is classified into four polymorphic forms: Hexagonal BN (h-BN) (Figure 1(b)); rhombohedral BN (r-BN); cubic BN (c-BN); and wurtzite BN (w-BN). BN does not occur in nature. In 1842, Balmain [3] obtained BN as a reaction product between molten boric oxide and potassium cyanide under atmospheric pressure. Thereafter, many methods for its synthesis were reported. h-BN and r-BN are formed under ambient pressure. c-BN is synthesized from h-BN under high pressure at high temperature while w-BN is prepared from h-BN under high pressure at room temperature [1]. Each BN layer consists of stacks of hexagonal plate-like units of boron and nitrogen atoms linked by SP{sup 2} hybridized orbits and held together mainly by Van der Waals force (Fig 1(b)). The hexagonal polymorph has two-layered repeating units: AA'AA'... that differ from those in graphite: ABAB... (Figure 1(a)). Within the layers of h-BN there is coincidence between the same phases of the hexagons, although the boron atoms and nitrogen atoms are alternatively located along the c

  14. The structure and local chemical properties of boron-terminated tetravacancies in hexagonal boron-nitride

    OpenAIRE

    Cretu, Ovidiu; Lin, Yung-Chang; Koshino, Masanori; Tizei, Luiz H. G.; Liu, Zheng; Suenaga, Kazutomo

    2014-01-01

    Imaging and spectroscopy performed in a low-voltage scanning transmission electron microscope (LV-STEM) are used to characterize the structure and chemical properties of boron-terminated tetravacancies in hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). We confirm earlier theoretical predictions about the structure of these defects and identify new features in the electron energy-loss spectra (EELS) of B atoms using high resolution chemical maps, highlighting differences between these areas and pristine sampl...

  15. Substrate-induced bandgap in graphene on hexagonal boron nitride

    OpenAIRE

    Giovannetti, Gianluca; Khomyakov, Petr A.; Brocks, Geert; Paul J. Kelly; Brink, Jeroen van den

    2007-01-01

    We determine the electronic structure of a graphene sheet on top of a lattice-matched hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) substrate using ab initio density functional calculations. The most stable configuration has one carbon atom on top of a boron atom, the other centered above a BN ring. The resulting inequivalence of the two carbon sites leads to the opening of a gap of 53 meV at the Dirac points of graphene and to finite masses for the Dirac fermions. Alternative orientations of the graphene s...

  16. Tunable Band Gap of Boron Nitride Interfaces under Uniaxial Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Elizane; Manhabosco, Taise; de Oliveira, Alan; Batista, Ronaldo

    2013-03-01

    In this work we show, by means of a density functional theory formalism, that the interaction between hydrogen terminated boron nitride surfaces gives rise to a metallic interface with free carries of opposite sign at each surface. A band gap can be induced by decreasing the surface separation. The size of the band gap changes continuously from zero up to 4.4 eV with decreasing separation, which is understood in terms of the interaction between surface states.Due to the high thermal conductivity of cubic boron nitride and the coupling between band gap and applied pressure, such tunable band gap interfaces may be used in high stable electronic and electromechanical devices. In addition, the spacial separation of charge carries at the interface may lead to photovoltaic applications. The authors thank tha brazilian agencies Fapemig, CNPq and Capes

  17. A new interlayer potential for hexagonal boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akıner, Tolga; Mason, Jeremy K.; Ertürk, Hakan

    2016-09-01

    A new interlayer potential is developed for interlayer interactions of hexagonal boron nitride sheets, and its performance is compared with other potentials in the literature using molecular dynamics simulations. The proposed potential contains Coulombic and Lennard-Jones 6–12 terms, and is calibrated with recent experimental data including the hexagonal boron nitride interlayer distance and elastic constants. The potentials are evaluated by comparing the experimental and simulated values of interlayer distance, density, elastic constants, and thermal conductivity using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics. The proposed potential is found to be in reasonable agreement with experiments, and improves on earlier potentials in several respects. Simulated thermal conductivity values as a function of the number of layers and of temperature suggest that the proposed LJ 6–12 potential has the ability to predict some phonon behaviour during heat transport in the out-of-plane direction.

  18. Preparation of high-pressure phase boron nitride films by physical vapor deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, P W; Zhao, Y N; Li, D M; Liu, H W; Zou Guang Tian

    2002-01-01

    The high-pressure phases boron nitride films together with cubic, wurtzic, and explosive high-pressure phases, were successfully deposited on the metal alloy substrates by tuned substrate radio frequency magnetron sputtering. The percentage of cubic boron nitride phase in the film was about 50% as calculated by Fourier transform infrared measurements. Infrared peak position of cubic boron nitride at 1006.3 cm sup - sup 1 , which is close to the stressless state, indicates that the film has very low internal stress. Transition electron microscope micrograph shows that pure cubic boron nitride phase exits on the surface of the film. The growth mechanism of the BN films was also discussed.

  19. Observation of viscoelasticity in boron nitride nanosheet aerogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiaoliang; Ye, Lei; Sun, Rong; Xu, Jianbin; Wong, Ching-Ping

    2015-07-14

    The viscoelasticity of boron nitride nanosheet (BNNS) aerogel has been observed and investigated. It is found that the BNNS aerogel has a high damping ratio (0.2), while it exhibits lightweight and negligible temperature dependence below 180 °C. The creep behavior of the BNNS aerogel markedly demonstrates its strain dependence on stress magnitude and temperature, and can be well simulated by the classical models.

  20. Method for forming monolayer graphene-boron nitride heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, Peter Werner; Sutter, Eli Anguelova

    2016-08-09

    A method for fabricating monolayer graphene-boron nitride heterostructures in a single atomically thin membrane that limits intermixing at boundaries between graphene and h-BN, so as to achieve atomically sharp interfaces between these materials. In one embodiment, the method comprises exposing a ruthenium substrate to ethylene, exposing the ruthenium substrate to oxygen after exposure to ethylene and exposing the ruthenium substrate to borazine after exposure to oxygen.

  1. Effect of boron nitride coating on fiber-matrix interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coatings can modify fiber-matrix reactions and consequently interfacial bond strengths. Commercially available mullite, silicon carbide, and carbon fibers were coated with boron nitride via low pressure chemical vapor deposition and incorporated into a mullite matrix by hot-pressing. The influence of fiber-matrix interactions for uncoated fibers on fracture morphologies was studied. These observations are related to the measured values of interfacial shear strengths

  2. Tribological properties of boron nitride synthesized by ion beam deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.; Spalvins, T.

    1985-01-01

    The adhesion and friction behavior of boron nitride films on 440 C bearing stainless steel substrates was examined. The thin films containing the boron nitride were synthesized using an ion beam extracted from a borazine plasma. Sliding friction experiments were conducted with BN in sliding contact with itself and various transition metals. It is indicated that the surfaces of atomically cleaned BN coating film contain a small amount of oxides and carbides, in addition to boron nitride. The coefficients of friction for the BN in contact with metals are related to the relative chemical activity of the metals. The more active the metal, the higher is the coefficient of friction. The adsorption of oxygen on clean metal and BN increases the shear strength of the metal - BN contact and increases the friction. The friction for BN-BN contact is a function of the shear strength of the elastic contacts. Clean BN surfaces exhibit relatively strong interfacial adhesion and high friction. The presence of adsorbates such as adventitious carbon contaminants on the BN surfaces reduces the shear strength of the contact area. In contrast, chemically adsorbed oxygen enhances the shear strength of the BN-BN contact and increases the friction.

  3. DFT Studies on Electronic Structures of Boro-Nitride-Carbon Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Ming; HUANG Chun-Hui

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, the configurations of Boro-Nitride-Carbon nanotubes with BNC2 composition were optimized by ROHF method. According to the density functional theory, the electronic structures of Boro-Nitride-Carbon nanotubes were calculated by DFT/ROB3LYP method. By analyzing the energy gap, density of electronic state and bonding maps of atoms, the conductive properties of Boro-Nitride-Carbon nanotubes were obtained, and compared with those of carbon nanotubes and other Boro-Nitride nanotubes.

  4. High Temperature Characteristic in Electrical Breakdown and Electrical Conduction of Epoxy/Boron-nitride Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenaka, Yutaka; Kurimoto, Muneaki; Murakami, Yoshinobu; Nagao, Masayuki

    The power module for the electrical vehicle needs electrical insulation material with high thermal conductivity. Recently, the epoxy insulating material filled with boron-nitride particles (epoxy/boron-nitride composite) is focused as an effective solution. However, the insulation performance of epoxy/boron-nitride composite was not investigated enough especially at the high temperature in which the power module was used, i.e. more than 100°C. In this paper, we investigated high temperature characteristics in electrical breakdown and conduction current of epoxy/boron-nitride composite. Breakdown test under the application of DC lamp voltage and impulse voltage clarified that the epoxy/boron-nitride composite had the constant breakdown strength even in the high temperature. Comparison of the epoxy/boron-nitride composite with previous material, which was epoxy/alumina composite, indicated that the breakdown voltage of the epoxy/boron-nitride composite in the high temperature was found to be higher than that of epoxy/alumina composite under the same thermal-transfer quantity among them. Furthermore, conduction current measurement of epoxy/boron-nitride composite in the high temperature suggested the possibility of the ionic conduction mechanism.

  5. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Thermal Transport Properties for Boron Nitride Nanotubes%氮化硼纳米管热输运性能的分子动力学模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高宇飞; 孟庆元; 张璐; 刘甲秋; 荆宇航

    2012-01-01

    采用基于声子散射理论的Boltzmann-Peierls声子传输方程(BTE)和非平衡态分子动力学模拟(NEMD)方法研究了氮化硼纳米管(BNNT)的热输运性能.分析了BNNT的热力耦合效应,通过BTE与NEMD两种方法相结合,分析了温度和长度对BNNT热输运性能的影响,并应用量子修正扩大了NEMD的研究范围.结果表明:随着拉伸或压缩应变的增加,BNNT热输运性能均呈降低的趋势.通过计算声子态密度(PDOS)在理论上分析了以上结果,发现在拉伸状态下,声子模式的变化是决定BNNT热输运性能变化的主要因素;在压缩状态下,热导率变化是由于模型发生明显的屈曲变形引起的.在低温段,BNNT的热输运性能受量子效应影响最初有一个线性增加的过程,当温度超过一定值时,其开始显著地降低;当BNNT长度小于120 nm时,随着长度的增加,其弹道性能逐渐减弱,但仍主要体现为弹道特征,其热导率(K)与长度(L)基本满足K㏄L(α)这一关系.%The Boltzmann-Peierls phonon transport equation (BTE) and non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation (NEMD) are used to investigate the thermal transport properties of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs). First, the thermal-mechanical coupling is explored using NEMD. Then, by combining BTE and NEMD, the influence of temperature and length is investigated. Quantum correction is used to extend the range over which NEMD can be used. The results demonstrate that under low-strain conditions, the thermal conductivity decreases with increasing tensile or compressive strain. Then the phonon density of state (PDOS) is used to analyze the trends in thermal transport properties theoretically; it is found that the variations in thermal transport properties under tension are caused by changes in the phonon modes, and that under compression changes are induced by the flection of the BNNT structure. The BNNT thermal conductivity increases linearly with increasing temperature because

  6. Structure and local chemical properties of boron-terminated tetravacancies in hexagonal boron nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cretu, Ovidiu; Lin, Yung-Chang; Koshino, Masanori; Tizei, Luiz H G; Liu, Zheng; Suenaga, Kazutomo

    2015-02-20

    Imaging and spectroscopy performed in a low-voltage scanning transmission electron microscope are used to characterize the structure and chemical properties of boron-terminated tetravacancies in hexagonal boron nitride. We confirm earlier theoretical predictions about the structure of these defects and identify new features in the electron energy-loss spectra of B atoms using high resolution chemical maps, highlighting differences between these areas and pristine sample regions. We correlate our experimental data with calculations which help explain our observations. PMID:25763963

  7. Ultrathin high-temperature oxidation-resistant coatings of hexagonal boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zheng; Gong, Yongji; Zhou, Wu; Ma, Lulu; Yu, Jingjiang; Idrobo, Juan Carlos; Jung, Jeil; MacDonald, Allan H.; Vajtai, Robert; Lou, Jun; Ajayan, Pulickel M.

    2013-10-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride is a two-dimensional layered material that can be stable at 1,500 °C in air and will not react with most chemicals. Here we demonstrate large-scale, ultrathin, oxidation-resistant coatings of high-quality hexagonal boron nitride layers with controlled thicknesses from double layers to bulk. We show that such ultrathin hexagonal boron nitride films are impervious to oxygen diffusion even at high temperatures and can serve as high-performance oxidation-resistant coatings for nickel up to 1,100 °C in oxidizing atmospheres. Furthermore, graphene layers coated with a few hexagonal boron nitride layers are also protected at similarly high temperatures. These hexagonal boron nitride atomic layer coatings, which can be synthesized via scalable chemical vapour deposition method down to only two layers, could be the thinnest coating ever shown to withstand such extreme environments and find applications as chemically stable high-temperature coatings.

  8. A Comparative Study of Ab-Initio Thermal Conductivity Approaches: The Case of Cubic Boron Nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Saikat; Lindsay, Lucas; Broido, David; Stewart, Derek

    2013-03-01

    Given its high strength and large thermal conductivity, cubic boron nitride (cBN) provides an important complement to diamond films for heat spreading applications. However, cBN, in contrast to diamond, is a polar material with significant LO-TO splitting in the phonon dispersion. In this talk, we examine the lattice thermal conductivity of cBN using several approaches based on first principles calculations. These approaches include: (1) an analytic modified Callaway-Debye model that relies on parameters from ab-initio harmonic force constants, (2) a fully self-consistent calculation of the thermal conductivity that links an iterative solution of the phonon Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) with harmonic and anharmonic interatomic force constants. The force constants for the BTE are calculated using two approaches: density functional perturbation theory and a real-space supercell approach. We will compare the results from these approaches, highlight the role of normal phonon-phonon scattering, and also examine the impact of optical modes and LO-TO splitting. In addition, we will discuss how isotope scattering affects thermal conductivity and compare this to other boron nitride structures (hexagonal BN, BN sheets and BN nanotubes).

  9. Synthesis of boron nitride from boron containing poly(vinyl alcohol) as ceramic precursor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Das; S Ghatak

    2012-02-01

    A ceramic precursor, prepared by condensation reaction from poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and boric acid (H3BO3) in 1:1, 2:1 and 4:1 molar ratios, was synthesized as low temperature synthesis route for boron nitride ceramic. Samples were pyrolyzed at 850°C in nitrogen atmosphere followed by characterization using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD).

  10. Low-Cost Preparation of Boron Nitride Ceramic Powders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Duan; ZHANG Changrui; LI Bin; CAO Feng; WANG Siqing; LIU Kun; FANG Zhenyu

    2012-01-01

    The amorphous boron nitride ceramic powders were prepared at 750-950 ℃ by the lowcost urea route,and the effects of preparation temperatures,molar ratios of the raw materials and oxidation treatment on the composition,structure and surface morphology of the products were investigated through FTIR,XRD and SEM.The results show that the products ceramize and crystallize gradually with the increase of the temperature.When the molar ratio and reaction temperature are 3:2 and 850 ℃,respectively,the products have high purity,compact structure and nice shape.The oxidation treatment at 450 ℃ will not impair the composition and structure of boron nitfide but effectively remove the impurities.

  11. Cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) filled boron nitride (BN) nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulaiman, Hanisah Syed; Hua, Chia Chin; Zakaria, Sarani [School of Applied Physic, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia.43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2015-09-25

    In this study, nanocomposite using cellulose nanofibrils filled with different percentage of boron nitride (CNF-BN) were prepared. The objective of this research is to study the effect of different percentage of BN to the thermal conductivity of the nanocomposite produced. The CNF-BN nanocomposite were characterization by FT-IR, SEM and thermal conductivity. The FT-IR analysis of the CNF-BN nanocomposite shows all the characteristic peaks of cellulose and BN present in all samples. The dispersion of BN in CNF were seen through SEM analysis. The effect of different loading percentage of BN to the thermal conductivity of the nanocomposite were also investigated.

  12. Research on the Cutting Performance of Cubic Boron Nitride Tools

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    There were only two kinds of superhard tool material at the past, i.e. diamond and cubic boron nitride (CBN). Manmade diamond and CBN are manufactured by the middle of 20th century. Various manufacturing methods and manmade superhard materials were developed later. They were widely used in different industry and science areas. Recently, a new kind of superhard tool material, C 3N 4 coating film, had been developed. American physical scientists, A. M. Liu and M. L. Cohen, designed a new kind of inorganic c...

  13. Exciton optical transitions in a hexagonal boron nitride single crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Museur, L. [Laboratoire de Physique des Lasers - LPL, CNRS UMR 7538, Institut Galilee, Universite Paris 13, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); Brasse, G.; Maine, S.; Ducastelle, F.; Loiseau, A. [ONERA - Laboratoire d' Etude des Microstructures - LEM, ONERA-CNRS, UMR 104, BP 72, 92322 Chatillon Cedex (France); Pierret, A. [ONERA - Laboratoire d' Etude des Microstructures - LEM, ONERA-CNRS, UMR 104, BP 72, 92322 Chatillon Cedex (France); CEA-CNRS, Institut Neel/CNRS, Universite J. Fourier, CEA/INAC/SP2M, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38 054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Attal-Tretout, B. [ONERA - Departement Mesures Physiques - DMPh, 27 Chemin de la Huniere, 91761 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Barjon, J. [GEMaC, Universite de Versailles St Quentin, CNRS Bellevue, 1 Place Aristide Briand, 92195 Meudon Cedex (France); Watanabe, K.; Taniguchi, T. [National Institute for Materials Science, Namiki 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Kanaev, A. [Laboratoire des Sciences des Procedes et des Materiaux - LSPM, CNRS UPR 3407, Universite Paris 13, 93430 Villetaneuse (France)

    2011-06-15

    Near band gap photoluminescence (PL) of a hexagonal boron nitride single crystal has been studied at cryogenic temperatures with synchrotron radiation excitation. The PL signal is dominated by trapped-exciton optical transitions, while the photoluminescence excitation (PLE) spectra show features assigned to free excitons. Complementary photoconductivity and PLE measurements set the band gap transition energy to 6.4 eV and the Frenkel exciton binding energy larger than 380 meV. (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  14. Field emission characteristics from graphene on hexagonal boron nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Takatoshi, E-mail: takatoshi-yamada@aist.go.jp [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan); Masuzawa, Tomoaki; Ebisudani, Taishi; Okano, Ken [International Christian University, 3-10-2 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8585 (Japan); Taniguchi, Takashi [National Institute for Material Science (NIMS), 1-1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan)

    2014-06-02

    An attempt has been made to utilize uniquely high electron mobility of graphene on hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) to electron emitter. The field emission property of graphene/h-BN/Si structure has shown enhanced threshold voltage and emission current, both of which are key to develop novel vacuum nanoelectronics devices. The field emission property was discussed along with the electronic structure of graphene investigated by Fowler-Nordheim plot and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy. The result suggested that transferring graphene on h-BN modified its work function, which changed field emission mechanism. Our report opens up a possibility of graphene-based vacuum nanoelectronics devices with tuned work function.

  15. Tuning the optical response in carbon doped boron nitride nanodots

    KAUST Repository

    Mokkath, Junais Habeeb

    2014-09-04

    Time dependent density functional theory and the hybrid B3LYP functional are used to investigate the structural and optical properties of pristine and carbon doped hexagonal boron nitride nanodots. In agreement with recent experiments, the embedded carbon atoms are found to favor nucleation. Our results demonstrate that carbon clusters of different shapes promote an early onset of absorption by generating in-gap states. The nanodots are interesting for opto-electronics due to their tunable optical response in a wide energy window. We identify cluster sizes and shapes with optimal conversion efficiency for solar radiation and a wide absorption range form infrared to ultraviolet. This journal is

  16. Superior thermal conductivity in suspended bilayer hexagonal boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chengru; Guo, Jie; Dong, Lan; Aiyiti, Adili; Xu, Xiangfan; Li, Baowen

    2016-05-01

    We reported the basal-plane thermal conductivity in exfoliated bilayer hexagonal boron nitride h-BN that was measured using suspended prepatterned microstructures. The h-BN sample suitable for thermal measurements was fabricated by dry-transfer method, whose sample quality, due to less polymer residues on surfaces, is believed to be superior to that of PMMA-mediated samples. The measured room temperature thermal conductivity is around 484 Wm‑1K‑1(+141 Wm‑1K‑1/ ‑24 Wm‑1K‑1) which exceeds that in bulk h-BN, providing experimental observation of the thickness-dependent thermal conductivity in suspended few-layer h-BN.

  17. Cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) filled boron nitride (BN) nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, Hanisah Syed; Hua, Chia Chin; Zakaria, Sarani

    2015-09-01

    In this study, nanocomposite using cellulose nanofibrils filled with different percentage of boron nitride (CNF-BN) were prepared. The objective of this research is to study the effect of different percentage of BN to the thermal conductivity of the nanocomposite produced. The CNF-BN nanocomposite were characterization by FT-IR, SEM and thermal conductivity. The FT-IR analysis of the CNF-BN nanocomposite shows all the characteristic peaks of cellulose and BN present in all samples. The dispersion of BN in CNF were seen through SEM analysis. The effect of different loading percentage of BN to the thermal conductivity of the nanocomposite were also investigated.

  18. Van der Waals interaction in a boron nitride bilayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have carried out quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) calculations to study the interlayer interaction in a boron nitride (BN) bilayer. The binding energy, 81 meV/2BN after finite-size corrections, was found to be larger than that obtained by density functional theory (DFT) with local density approximation, and smaller than those using van der Waals density functionals, both by considerable amounts. The QMC calculated interaction beyond the equilibrium interlayer separation was found to have a longer-range behavior than all the available DFT schemes. (paper)

  19. Electronic structure of superlattices of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride

    KAUST Repository

    Kaloni, Thaneshwor P.

    2011-11-14

    We study the electronic structure of superlattices consisting of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride slabs, using ab initio density functional theory. We find that the system favors a short C–B bond length at the interface between the two component materials. A sizeable band gap at the Dirac point is opened for superlattices with single graphene layers but not for superlattices with graphene bilayers. The system is promising for applications in electronic devices such as field effect transistors and metal-oxide semiconductors.

  20. Molecular dynamics of halogenated graphene - hexagonal boron nitride nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemnes, G. A.; Visan, Camelia; Anghel, D. V.; Manolescu, A.

    2016-08-01

    The hybrid graphene - hexagonal boron nitride (G-hBN) systems offer new routes in the design of nanoscale electronic devices. Using ab initio density functional theory calculations we investigate the dynamics of zig-zag nanoribbons a few interatomic distances wide. Several structures are analyzed, namely pristine graphene, hBN and G-hBN systems. By passivating the nanoribbon edges with hydrogen and different halogen atoms, one may tune the electronic and mechanical properties, like the band gap energies and the natural frequencies of vibration.

  1. Wafer-Scale and Wrinkle-Free Epitaxial Growth of Single-Orientated Multilayer Hexagonal Boron Nitride on Sapphire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, A-Rang; Hong, Seokmo; Hyun, Chohee; Yoon, Seong In; Kim, Gwangwoo; Jeong, Hu Young; Shin, Tae Joo; Park, Sung O; Wong, Kester; Kwak, Sang Kyu; Park, Noejung; Yu, Kwangnam; Choi, Eunjip; Mishchenko, Artem; Withers, Freddie; Novoselov, Kostya S; Lim, Hyunseob; Shin, Hyeon Suk

    2016-05-11

    Large-scale growth of high-quality hexagonal boron nitride has been a challenge in two-dimensional-material-based electronics. Herein, we present wafer-scale and wrinkle-free epitaxial growth of multilayer hexagonal boron nitride on a sapphire substrate by using high-temperature and low-pressure chemical vapor deposition. Microscopic and spectroscopic investigations and theoretical calculations reveal that synthesized hexagonal boron nitride has a single rotational orientation with AA' stacking order. A facile method for transferring hexagonal boron nitride onto other target substrates was developed, which provides the opportunity for using hexagonal boron nitride as a substrate in practical electronic circuits. A graphene field effect transistor fabricated on our hexagonal boron nitride sheets shows clear quantum oscillation and highly improved carrier mobility because the ultraflatness of the hexagonal boron nitride surface can reduce the substrate-induced degradation of the carrier mobility of two-dimensional materials. PMID:27120101

  2. INFLUENCE OF ANNEALING TEMPERATURE ON SOME PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF CUBIC BORON NITRIDES OBTAINED FROM PYROLITIC BORON NITRIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. D. Bayluk

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of investigations on dependence of dielectric, electromechanical and elastic properties of BNпсф  polycrystals (sphalerite with texture axis [111]сф, obtained from pyrolitic boron nitride  BNпг on annealing temperature up to 2173 К. Peculiar features concerning changes of the given properties in the zone of low-temperature annealing 700–773 К and phase transformation BNпг — BNпсф  are shown in the paper.

  3. Controlled route to the fabrication of carbon and boron nitride nanoscrolls: A molecular dynamics investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perim, Eric; Paupitz, Ricardo; Galvão, Douglas S.

    2013-02-01

    Carbon nanoscrolls (graphene layers rolled up into papyrus-like tubular structures) are nanostructures with unique and interesting characteristics that could be exploited to build several new nanodevices. However, an efficient and controlled synthesis of these structures was not achieved yet, making its large scale production a challenge to materials scientists. Also, the formation process and detailed mechanisms that occur during its synthesis are not completely known. In this work, using fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, we discuss a possible route to nanoscrolls made from graphene layers deposited over silicon oxide substrates containing chambers/pits. The scrolling mechanism is triggered by carbon nanotubes deposited on the layers. The process is completely general and can be used to produce scrolls from other lamellar materials, like boron nitride, for instance.

  4. Facile preparation and multifunctional applications of boron nitride quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Zhouyue; Xu, Shengjie; Wan, Jiaxun; Wu, Peiyi

    2015-11-01

    Boron nitride quantum dots are obtained by a facile sonication-solvothermal technique. They are proven to be promising fluorescent bioimaging probes for bioimaging with remarkably low cytotoxicity and easily integrated into high-performance proton exchange membranes. This work will probably trigger research interest in BN and its new applications in a variety of fields.Boron nitride quantum dots are obtained by a facile sonication-solvothermal technique. They are proven to be promising fluorescent bioimaging probes for bioimaging with remarkably low cytotoxicity and easily integrated into high-performance proton exchange membranes. This work will probably trigger research interest in BN and its new applications in a variety of fields. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: AFM images of BN nanosheets, TEM, HRTEM and AFM images of BN QDs prepared in DMSO, digital photographs of DMF, DMSO, DMF with the addition of BN raw materials and DMSO with the addition of BN raw materials, UV-vis and FTIR spectra of the BN QDs, cell viability of the BN QDs, a summary of cell viabilities of different fluorescent QDs, digital photographs and CLSM images of the as-prepared PEMs, TGA and DSC curves of the PEMs, and AFM images of the PEMs. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr05960g

  5. Vertical transport in graphene-hexagonal boron nitride heterostructure devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruzzone, Samantha; Logoteta, Demetrio; Fiori, Gianluca; Iannaccone, Giuseppe

    2015-09-01

    Research in graphene-based electronics is recently focusing on devices based on vertical heterostructures of two-dimensional materials. Here we use density functional theory and multiscale simulations to investigate the tunneling properties of single- and double-barrier structures with graphene and few-layer hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) or hexagonal boron carbon nitride (h-BC2N). We find that tunneling through a single barrier exhibit a weak dependence on energy. We also show that in double barriers separated by a graphene layer we do not observe resonant tunneling, but a significant increase of the tunneling probability with respect to a single barrier of thickness equal to the sum of the two barriers. This is due to the fact that the graphene layer acts as an effective phase randomizer, suppressing resonant tunneling and effectively letting a double-barrier structure behave as two single-barriers in series. Finally, we use multiscale simulations to reproduce a current-voltage characteristics resembling that of a resonant tunneling diode, that has been experimentally observed in single barrier structure. The peak current is obtained when there is perfect matching between the densities of states of the cathode and anode graphene regions.

  6. Band gap effects of hexagonal boron nitride using oxygen plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sevak Singh, Ram; Leong Chow, Wai [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Yingjie Tay, Roland [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Temasek Laboratories-NTU, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Hon Tsang, Siu [Temasek Laboratories-NTU, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Mallick, Govind [Temasek Laboratories-NTU, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland 21005 (United States); Tong Teo, Edwin Hang, E-mail: htteo@ntu.edu.sg [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2014-04-21

    Tuning of band gap of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) has been a challenging problem due to its inherent chemical stability and inertness. In this work, we report the changes in band gaps in a few layers of chemical vapor deposition processed as-grown h-BN using a simple oxygen plasma treatment. Optical absorption spectra show a trend of band gap narrowing monotonically from 6 eV of pristine h-BN to 4.31 eV when exposed to oxygen plasma for 12 s. The narrowing of band gap causes the reduction in electrical resistance by ∼100 fold. The x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results of plasma treated hexagonal boron nitride surface show the predominant doping of oxygen for the nitrogen vacancy. Energy sub-band formations inside the band gap of h-BN, due to the incorporation of oxygen dopants, cause a red shift in absorption edge corresponding to the band gap narrowing.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of boron-doped carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceragioli, H J; Peterlevitz, A C; Quispe, J C R; Pasquetto, M P; Sampaio, M A; Baranauskas, V [Faculdade de Engenharia Eletrica e Computacao, Departamento de Semicondutores, Instrumentos e Fotonica, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, UNICAMP, Av. Albert Einstein N.400, 13083-852 Campinas SP Brasil (Brazil); Larena, A [Department of Chemical Industrial Engineering and Environment, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, E.T.S. Ingenieros Industriales, C/ Jose Gutierrez Abascal, Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: vitor.baranauskas@gmail.com

    2008-03-15

    Boron-doped carbon nanotubes have been prepared by chemical vapour deposition of ethyl alcohol doped with B{sub 2}O{sub 3} using a hot-filament system. Multi-wall carbon nanotubes of diameters in the range of 30-100 nm have been observed by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). Raman measurements indicated that the degree of C-C sp{sup 2} order decreased with boron doping. Lowest threshold fields achieved were 1.0 V/{mu}m and 2.1 V/{mu}m for undoped and boron-doped samples, respectively.

  8. Silver Nanoparticle-Deposited Boron Nitride Nanosheets as Fillers for Polymeric Composites with High Thermal Conductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fangfang; Zeng, Xiaoliang; Yao, Yimin; Sun, Rong; Xu, Jianbin; Wong, Ching-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Polymer composites with high thermal conductivity have recently attracted much attention, along with the rapid development of the electronic devices toward higher speed and performance. However, a common method to enhance polymer thermal conductivity through an addition of high thermally conductive fillers usually cannot provide an expected value, especially for composites requiring electrical insulation. Here, we show that polymeric composites with silver nanoparticle-deposited boron nitride nanosheets as fillers could effectively enhance the thermal conductivity of polymer, thanks to the bridging connections of silver nanoparticles among boron nitride nanosheets. The thermal conductivity of the composite is significantly increased from 1.63 W/m-K for the composite filled with the silver nanoparticle-deposited boron nitride nanosheets to 3.06 W/m-K at the boron nitride nanosheets loading of 25.1 vol %. In addition, the electrically insulating properties of the composite are well preserved. Fitting the measured thermal conductivity of epoxy composite with one physical model indicates that the composite with silver nanoparticle-deposited boron nitride nanosheets outperforms the one with boron nitride nanosheets, owning to the lower thermal contact resistance among boron nitride nanosheets' interfaces. The finding sheds new light on enhancement of thermal conductivity of the polymeric composites which concurrently require the electrical insulation. PMID:26783258

  9. Silver Nanoparticle-Deposited Boron Nitride Nanosheets as Fillers for Polymeric Composites with High Thermal Conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fangfang; Zeng, Xiaoliang; Yao, Yimin; Sun, Rong; Xu, Jianbin; Wong, Ching-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Polymer composites with high thermal conductivity have recently attracted much attention, along with the rapid development of the electronic devices toward higher speed and performance. However, a common method to enhance polymer thermal conductivity through an addition of high thermally conductive fillers usually cannot provide an expected value, especially for composites requiring electrical insulation. Here, we show that polymeric composites with silver nanoparticle-deposited boron nitride nanosheets as fillers could effectively enhance the thermal conductivity of polymer, thanks to the bridging connections of silver nanoparticles among boron nitride nanosheets. The thermal conductivity of the composite is significantly increased from 1.63 W/m-K for the composite filled with the silver nanoparticle-deposited boron nitride nanosheets to 3.06 W/m-K at the boron nitride nanosheets loading of 25.1 vol %. In addition, the electrically insulating properties of the composite are well preserved. Fitting the measured thermal conductivity of epoxy composite with one physical model indicates that the composite with silver nanoparticle-deposited boron nitride nanosheets outperforms the one with boron nitride nanosheets, owning to the lower thermal contact resistance among boron nitride nanosheets’ interfaces. The finding sheds new light on enhancement of thermal conductivity of the polymeric composites which concurrently require the electrical insulation.

  10. Silver Nanoparticle-Deposited Boron Nitride Nanosheets as Fillers for Polymeric Composites with High Thermal Conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fangfang; Zeng, Xiaoliang; Yao, Yimin; Sun, Rong; Xu, Jianbin; Wong, Ching-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Polymer composites with high thermal conductivity have recently attracted much attention, along with the rapid development of the electronic devices toward higher speed and performance. However, a common method to enhance polymer thermal conductivity through an addition of high thermally conductive fillers usually cannot provide an expected value, especially for composites requiring electrical insulation. Here, we show that polymeric composites with silver nanoparticle-deposited boron nitride nanosheets as fillers could effectively enhance the thermal conductivity of polymer, thanks to the bridging connections of silver nanoparticles among boron nitride nanosheets. The thermal conductivity of the composite is significantly increased from 1.63 W/m-K for the composite filled with the silver nanoparticle-deposited boron nitride nanosheets to 3.06 W/m-K at the boron nitride nanosheets loading of 25.1 vol %. In addition, the electrically insulating properties of the composite are well preserved. Fitting the measured thermal conductivity of epoxy composite with one physical model indicates that the composite with silver nanoparticle-deposited boron nitride nanosheets outperforms the one with boron nitride nanosheets, owning to the lower thermal contact resistance among boron nitride nanosheets’ interfaces. The finding sheds new light on enhancement of thermal conductivity of the polymeric composites which concurrently require the electrical insulation. PMID:26783258

  11. Hydrogen storage in pillared Li-dispersed boron carbide nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Xiaojun; Gao, Yi; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2007-01-01

    Ab initio density-functional theory study suggests that pillared Li-dispersed boron carbide nanotubes is capable of storing hydrogen with a mass density higher than 6.0 weight% and a volumetric density higher than 45 g/L. The boron substitution in carbon nanotube greatly enhances the binding energy of Li atom to the nanotube, and this binding energy (~ 2.7 eV) is greater than the cohesive energy of lithium metal (~1.7 eV), preventing lithium from aggregation (or segregation) at high lithium d...

  12. Physical properties of CVD boron-doped multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mondal, Kartick C. [Molecular Sciences Institute and School of Chemistry, University of the Witwatersrand, P.O. Wits, 2050 Johannesburg (South Africa); DST/NRF Centre of Excellence in Strong Materials, P.O. Wits, 2050 Johannesburg (South Africa); Strydom, Andre M. [Department of Physics, University of Johannesburg, PO Box 524, Auckland Park 2006 (South Africa)], E-mail: amstrydom@uj.ac.za; Erasmus, Rudolph M.; Keartland, Jonathan M. [DST/NRF Centre of Excellence in Strong Materials, P.O. Wits, 2050 Johannesburg (South Africa); School of Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, P.O. Wits, 2050 Johannesburg (South Africa); Coville, Neil J. [Molecular Sciences Institute and School of Chemistry, University of the Witwatersrand, P.O. Wits, 2050 Johannesburg (South Africa); DST/NRF Centre of Excellence in Strong Materials, P.O. Wits, 2050 Johannesburg (South Africa)], E-mail: Neil.Coville@wits.ac.za

    2008-10-15

    The effects of boron doping and electron correlation on the transport properties of CVD boron-doped multiwalled carbon nanotubes are reported. The boron-doped multiwalled carbon nanotubes were characterized by TEM as well as Raman spectroscopy using different laser excitations (viz. 488, 514.5 and 647 nm). The intensity of the D-band laser excitation line increased after the boron incorporation into the carbon nanotubes. The G-band width increased on increasing the boron concentration, indicating the decrease of graphitization with increasing boron concentration. Electrical conductivity of the undoped and boron-doped carbon nanotubes reveal a 3-dimensional variable-range-hopping conductivity over a wide range of temperature, viz. from room temperature down to 2 K. The electrical conductivity is not found to be changed significantly by the present levels of B-doping. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) results for the highest B-doped samples showed similarities with previously reported EPR literature measurements, but the low concentration sample gives a very broad ESR resonance line.

  13. Hydrogen Storage in Boron Nitride and Carbon Nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeo Oku

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Boron nitride (BN nanomaterials were synthesized from LaB6 and Pd/boron powder, and the hydrogen storage was investigated by differential thermogravimetric analysis, which showed possibility of hydrogen storage of 1–3 wt%. The hydrogen gas storage in BN and carbon (C clusters was also investigated by molecular orbital calculations, which indicated possible hydrogen storage of 6.5 and 4.9 wt%, respectively. Chemisorption calculation was also carried out for B24N24 cluster with changing endohedral elements in BN cluster to compare the bonding energy at nitrogen and boron, which showed that Li is a suitable element for hydrogenation to the BN cluster. The BN cluster materials would store H2 molecule easier than carbon fullerene materials, and its stability for high temperature would be good. Molecular dynamics calculations showed that a H2 molecule remains stable in a C60 cage at 298 K and 0.1 MPa, and that pressures over 5 MPa are needed to store H2 molecules in the C60 cage.

  14. Charge carrier transport properties in layer structured hexagonal boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doan, T. C.; Li, J.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X.

    2014-10-01

    Due to its large in-plane thermal conductivity, high temperature and chemical stability, large energy band gap (˜ 6.4 eV), hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) has emerged as an important material for applications in deep ultraviolet photonic devices. Among the members of the III-nitride material system, hBN is the least studied and understood. The study of the electrical transport properties of hBN is of utmost importance with a view to realizing practical device applications. Wafer-scale hBN epilayers have been successfully synthesized by metal organic chemical deposition and their electrical transport properties have been probed by variable temperature Hall effect measurements. The results demonstrate that undoped hBN is a semiconductor exhibiting weak p-type at high temperatures (> 700 °K). The measured acceptor energy level is about 0.68 eV above the valence band. In contrast to the electrical transport properties of traditional III-nitride wide bandgap semiconductors, the temperature dependence of the hole mobility in hBN can be described by the form of μ ∝ (T/T0)-α with α = 3.02, satisfying the two-dimensional (2D) carrier transport limit dominated by the polar optical phonon scattering. This behavior is a direct consequence of the fact that hBN is a layer structured material. The optical phonon energy deduced from the temperature dependence of the hole mobility is ħω = 192 meV (or 1546 cm-1), which is consistent with values previously obtained using other techniques. The present results extend our understanding of the charge carrier transport properties beyond the traditional III-nitride semiconductors.

  15. Charge carrier transport properties in layer structured hexagonal boron nitride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. C. Doan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Due to its large in-plane thermal conductivity, high temperature and chemical stability, large energy band gap (˜ 6.4 eV, hexagonal boron nitride (hBN has emerged as an important material for applications in deep ultraviolet photonic devices. Among the members of the III-nitride material system, hBN is the least studied and understood. The study of the electrical transport properties of hBN is of utmost importance with a view to realizing practical device applications. Wafer-scale hBN epilayers have been successfully synthesized by metal organic chemical deposition and their electrical transport properties have been probed by variable temperature Hall effect measurements. The results demonstrate that undoped hBN is a semiconductor exhibiting weak p-type at high temperatures (> 700 °K. The measured acceptor energy level is about 0.68 eV above the valence band. In contrast to the electrical transport properties of traditional III-nitride wide bandgap semiconductors, the temperature dependence of the hole mobility in hBN can be described by the form of μ ∝ (T/T0−α with α = 3.02, satisfying the two-dimensional (2D carrier transport limit dominated by the polar optical phonon scattering. This behavior is a direct consequence of the fact that hBN is a layer structured material. The optical phonon energy deduced from the temperature dependence of the hole mobility is ħω = 192 meV (or 1546 cm-1, which is consistent with values previously obtained using other techniques. The present results extend our understanding of the charge carrier transport properties beyond the traditional III-nitride semiconductors.

  16. Beryllium decorated armchair boron nitride nanoribbon: A new planar tetracoordinate nitride containing system with enhanced conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Bo; Yu, Xuefang; Hu, Hong; Ding, Yihong

    2014-07-01

    In this Letter, a new kind of planar tetracoordinate nitride (ptN) structure is obtained via Be-decorated armchair boron nitride nanoribbon (aBNNR). The high stability of such a ptN system is confirmed by both global minimization and molecular dynamical simulation at 1500 K. The results suggest that this Be-decorated aBNNR will be a thermally stable material. The electronic property of aBNNR is significantly increased after the addition of Be atoms to the edges and the band gap decreases as the width of the ribbon decreases. Our Letter posits a new and potentially stable and useful BNNR and augments the literature on ptN.

  17. Modelling structure and properties of amorphous silicon boron nitride ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johann Christian Schön

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Silicon boron nitride is the parent compound of a new class of high-temperature stable amorphous ceramics constituted of silicon, boron, nitrogen, and carbon, featuring a set of properties that is without precedent, and represents a prototypical random network based on chemical bonds of predominantly covalent character. In contrast to many other amorphous materials of technological interest, a-Si3B3N7 is not produced via glass formation, i.e. by quenching from a melt, the reason being that the binary components, BN and Si3N4, melt incongruently under standard conditions. Neither has it been possible to employ sintering of μm-size powders consisting of binary nitrides BN and Si3N4. Instead, one employs the so-called sol-gel route starting from single component precursors such as TADB ((SiCl3NH(BCl2. In order to determine the atomic structure of this material, it has proven necessary to simulate the actual synthesis route.Many of the exciting properties of these ceramics are closely connected to the details of their amorphous structure. To clarify this structure, it is necessary to employ not only experimental probes on many length scales (X-ray, neutron- and electron scattering; complex NMR experiments; IR- and Raman scattering, but also theoretical approaches. These address the actual synthesis route to a-Si3B3N7, the structural properties, the elastic and vibrational properties, aging and coarsening behaviour, thermal conductivity and the metastable phase diagram both for a-Si3B3N7 and possible silicon boron nitride phases with compositions different from Si3N4: BN = 1 : 3. Here, we present a short comprehensive overview over the insights gained using molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations to explore the energy landscape of a-Si3B3N7, model the actual synthesis route and compute static and transport properties of a-Si3BN7.

  18. Electron field emission from boron nitride thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Encarnacion, Pedro Aron

    A systematic study of electron field emission from boron nitride thin films is presented, establishing nanostructured thin film cubic boron nitride (cBN) as a robust and chemically inert material with a low effective workfunction, able to sustain electron emission in a space plasma environment. RHEED data shows the films as polycrystalline, composed of partially oriented crystallites of cBN with predominantly (001) crystallographic texture relative to the Si substrate. FTIR data showed our films to be overwhelmingly cBN, with a volume fraction greater than 75%. AFM images show nanostructures relevant to field enhancement, with a mean feature height of 79 nm, mean RMS roughness of 19 nm, average grain size of 155 nm2 +/- 84 nm2, and a mean feature radius of ˜7 nm. The results are discussed in the light of current theoretical models for electron field emission, including particulars relevant to semiconductors and nanostructured surfaces. Electron emission thresholds were measured from under 1V/mum up to just under 20V/mum in vacuum. Voltage sweep measurements were made both in vacuo and in various gas environments relevant to space applications. Repeatability of emission results was demonstrated, albeit with indications of threshold shifts, possibly due to desorption of adsorbate impurities. Time dependence measurements at constant extraction field show stable field emission over periods of extended operation. An effective barrier height ow of approximately 9.3 meV for the as-grown cBN thin films is measured, based on the application of the generalised Fowler-Nordheim theory to the electron field emission measurements, and employing a model of the film surface as an ensemble of self-assembled protruberances in the shape of prolate half ellipsoids of revolution on a flat surface. To our knowledge, this is the first experimental determination of this important parameter for cBN films. It appears that the low value of o w measured for cBN is a direct consequence of the

  19. Nitrogen implantation effects on the chemical bonding and hardness of boron and boron nitride coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, S; Felter, T; Hayes, J; Jankowski, A F; Patterson, R; Poker, D; Stamler, T

    1999-02-08

    Boron nitride (BN) coatings are deposited by the reactive sputtering of fully dense, boron (B) targets utilizing an argon-nitrogen (Ar-N{sub 2}) reactive gas mixture. Near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure analysis reveals features of chemical bonding in the B 1s photoabsorption spectrum. Hardness is measured at the film surface using nanoindentation. The BN coatings prepared at low, sputter gas pressure with substrate heating are found to have bonding characteristic of a defected hexagonal phase. The coatings are subjected to post-deposition nitrogen (N{sup +} and N{sub 2}{sup +}) implantation at different energies and current densities. The changes in film hardness attributed to the implantation can be correlated to changes observed in the B 1s NEXAFS spectra.

  20. Microplasma Processed Ultrathin Boron Nitride Nanosheets for Polymer Nanocomposites with Enhanced Thermal Transport Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ri-Chao; Sun, Dan; Lu, Ai; Askari, Sadegh; Macias-Montero, Manuel; Joseph, Paul; Dixon, Dorian; Ostrikov, Kostya; Maguire, Paul; Mariotti, Davide

    2016-06-01

    This Research Article reports on the enhancement of the thermal transport properties of nanocomposite materials containing hexagonal boron nitride in poly(vinyl alcohol) through room-temperature atmospheric pressure direct-current microplasma processing. Results show that the microplasma treatment leads to exfoliation of the hexagonal boron nitride in isopropyl alcohol, reducing the number of stacks from >30 to a few or single layers. The thermal diffusivity of the resulting nanocomposites reaches 8.5 mm(2) s(-1), 50 times greater than blank poly(vinyl alcohol) and twice that of nanocomposites containing nonplasma treated boron nitride nanosheets. From TEM analysis, we observe much less aggregation of the nanosheets after plasma processing along with indications of an amorphous carbon interfacial layer, which may contribute to stable dispersion of boron nitride nanosheets in the resulting plasma treated colloids. PMID:27153343

  1. Structure and energetics of nanotwins in cubic boron nitrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Shijian; Zhang, Ruifeng; Huang, Rong; Taniguchi, Takashi; Ma, Xiuliang; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Beyerlein, Irene J.

    2016-08-01

    Recently, nanotwinned cubic boron nitrides (NT c-BN) have demonstrated extraordinary leaps in hardness. However, an understanding of the underlying mechanisms that enable nanotwins to give orders of magnitude increases in material hardness is still lacking. Here, using transmission electron microscopy, we report that the defect density of twin boundaries depends on nanotwin thickness, becoming defect-free, and hence more stable, as it decreases below 5 nm. Using ab initio density functional theory calculations, we reveal that the Shockley partials, which may dominate plastic deformation in c-BNs, show a high energetic barrier. We also report that the c-BN twin boundary has an asymmetrically charged electronic structure that would resist migration of the twin boundary under stress. These results provide important insight into possible nanotwin hardening mechanisms in c-BN, as well as how to design these nanostructured materials to reach their full potential in hardness and strength.

  2. Shock induced polymorphic transition in quartz, carbon, and boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Hua; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1990-01-01

    The model proposed by Ahrens (1988) to explain the mechanism of the polymorphism in silicates is revised, and the revised model is applied to the quartz/stishovite, graphite/diamond, and graphite-boron nitride (g-BN) phase transformations. In this model, a key assumption is that transformation to a high-density amorphous or possibly liquid phase which rapidly crystallized to the high-pressure phase is triggered by the high temperatures in the shear band and upon crossing the metastable extension of a melting curve. Good agreement between the calcualted results and published data is obtained. The present theory predicts the standard entropy for cubic BN to be 0.4-0.5 J/g K.

  3. Hexagonal-boron nitride substrates for electroburnt graphene nanojunctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Hatef; Sangtarash, Sara; Lambert, Colin

    2016-08-01

    We examine the effect of a hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) substrate on electron transport through graphene nanojunctions just before gap formation. Junctions in vacuum and on hBN are formed using classical molecular dynamics to create initial structures, followed by relaxation using density functional theory. We find that the hBN only slightly reduces the current through the junctions at low biases. Furthermore due to quantum interference at the last moments of breaking, the current though a single carbon filament spanning the gap is found to be higher than the current through two filaments spanning the gap in parallel. This feature is present both in the presence of absence of hBN.

  4. Functionalized hexagonal boron nitride nanomaterials: emerging properties and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Qunhong; Wang, Xuebin; Wang, Xi; Bando, Yoshio; Golberg, Dmitri

    2016-07-11

    Functionalization is an important way to breed new properties and applications for a material. This review presents an overview of the progresses in functionalized hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) nanomaterials. It begins with an introduction of h-BN structural features, physical and chemical properties, followed by an emphasis on the developments of BN functionalization strategies and its emerging properties/applications, and ends with the research perspectives. Different functionalization methods, including physical and chemical routes, are comprehensively described toward fabrication of various BN derivatives, hetero- and porous structures, etc. Novel properties of functionalized BN materials, such as high water solubility, excellent biocompatibility, tunable surface affinities, good processibility, adjustable band gaps, etc., have guaranteed wide applications in biomedical, electronic, composite, environmental and "green" energy-related fields. PMID:27173728

  5. Transverse electric surface mode in atomically thin Boron-Nitride

    CERN Document Server

    Merano, Michele

    2016-01-01

    The spatial confinement and the propagation length of surface waves in a single-layer two-dimensional atomic crystal are analysed in term of its surface susceptibility and its surface conductivity. Based on the values of these macroscopic parameters, extracted from experimental observations, it is confirmed that graphene supports a transverse magnetic non-radiating surface mode in the ultraviolet spectral region while a single-layer hexagonal Boron-Nitride is predicted to support a transverse electric non-radiating surface mode in the visible spectrum. This last mode, at a vacuum wavelength of 633 nm, has a spatial confinement of 15 microns and an intensity-propagation distance greater than 2 cm.

  6. Boron nitride as two dimensional dielectric: Reliability and dielectric breakdown

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Yanfeng; Pan, Chengbin; Hui, Fei; Shi, Yuanyuan; Lanza, Mario, E-mail: mlanza@suda.edu.cn [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials, Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Soochow University, 199 Ren-Ai Road, Suzhou 215123 (China); Zhang, Meiyun; Long, Shibing [Key Laboratory of Microelectronics Devices & Integrated Technology, Institute of Microelectronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100029 (China); Lian, Xiaojuan; Miao, Feng [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, School of Physics, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Larcher, Luca [DISMI, Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia, 42122 Reggio Emilia (Italy); Wu, Ernest [IBM Research Division, Essex Junction, Vermont 05452 (United States)

    2016-01-04

    Boron Nitride (BN) is a two dimensional insulator with excellent chemical, thermal, mechanical, and optical properties, which make it especially attractive for logic device applications. Nevertheless, its insulating properties and reliability as a dielectric material have never been analyzed in-depth. Here, we present the first thorough characterization of BN as dielectric film using nanoscale and device level experiments complementing with theoretical study. Our results reveal that BN is extremely stable against voltage stress, and it does not show the reliability problems related to conventional dielectrics like HfO{sub 2}, such as charge trapping and detrapping, stress induced leakage current, and untimely dielectric breakdown. Moreover, we observe a unique layer-by-layer dielectric breakdown, both at the nanoscale and device level. These findings may be of interest for many materials scientists and could open a new pathway towards two dimensional logic device applications.

  7. A molecular dynamics study of nanofracture in monolayer boron nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we use molecular dynamics (MD) modeling to study the fracture properties of monolayer hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) under mixed mode I and II loading. We investigate the impact of crack edge chirality, crack tip configuration and loading phase angle on the crack propagation path and critical stress intensity factors. The MD results predict that under all the loading phase angles cracks prefer to propagate along a zigzag direction and the critical stress intensity factors of zigzag cracks are higher than those of armchair cracks. Under mixed mode loading, the h-BN sheets can undergo out-of-plane deformations due to the buckling induced by compressive stresses. The out-of-plane deformations can be significant when mode II loading is dominant. An excessive amount of out-of-plane deformation can induce buckling cracks. Depending on the loading phase angle and crack configurations, buckling cracks can nucleate before or after the propagation of the original cracks

  8. Submicron cubic boron nitride as hard as diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Guoduan; Kou, Zili, E-mail: kouzili@scu.edu.cn, E-mail: yanxz@hpstar.ac.cn; Lei, Li; Peng, Fang; Wang, Qiming; Wang, Kaixue; Wang, Pei; Li, Liang; Li, Yong; Wang, Yonghua [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Yan, Xiaozhi, E-mail: kouzili@scu.edu.cn, E-mail: yanxz@hpstar.ac.cn; Li, Wentao [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Center for High Pressure Science and Technology Advanced Research (HPSTAR), Shanghai 201203 (China); Bi, Yan [Institute of Fluid Physics and National Key Laboratory of Shockwave and Detonation Physic, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Leng, Yang [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); He, Duanwei [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Institute of Fluid Physics and National Key Laboratory of Shockwave and Detonation Physic, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2015-03-23

    Here, we report the sintering of aggregated submicron cubic boron nitride (sm-cBN) at a pressure of 8 GPa. The sintered cBN compacts exhibit hardness values comparable to that of single crystal diamond, fracture toughness about 5-fold that of cBN single crystal, in combination with a high oxidization temperature. Thus, another way has been demonstrated to improve the mechanical properties of cBN besides reducing the grain size to nano scale. In contrast to other ultrahard compacts with similar hardness, the sm-cBN aggregates are better placed for potential industrial application, as their relative low pressure manufacturing perhaps be easier and cheaper.

  9. Photoresponsive memory device based on Graphene/Boron Nitride heterostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Salman; Velasco, Jairo, Jr.; Ju, Long; Wong, Dillon; Lee, Juwon; Tsai, Hsin Zon; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Zettl, Alex; Wang, Feng; Crommie, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Recent technological advancements have allowed the stacking of two dimensional layered material in order to create van der Waals heterostructures (VDH), enabling the design of novel properties by exploiting the proximal interaction between layers with different electronic properties. We report the creation of an optoelectronic memory device using a Graphene/Boron Nitride (hBN) heterostructure. Using the photo-induced doping phenomenon, we are able to spatially ``write'' a doping profile on graphene and ``read'' the profile through electrical transport and local probe techniques. We then utilize defect engineering to enhance the optoelectronic response of graphene and explore the effect of defects in hBN. Our work introduces a simple device architecture to create an optoelectronic memory device and contributes towards understanding the proximal effects of hBN on Graphene.

  10. Fabrication of hexagonal boron nitride based ceramics by combustion synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Pure h-BN (hexagonal boron nitride) and h-BN based ceramic parts were fabricated by combustion synthesis technique, i.e. self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS). Components were manufactured by the combustion reaction of 80  MPa nitrogen and the compact made by cool isostatic pressing. In h-BN based ceramic parts, h-BN powder was used as diluent and SiO2 powder as reinforcing phase. The density of pure h-BN and h-BN-based ceramic parts were 58% and 78% of theoretical density, respectively. With XRD and SEM, phases and microstructures of ceramic parts were analyzed. Mechanical properties were also tested.

  11. Nanocrystalline-graphene-tailored hexagonal boron nitride thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang Hyuck; Shin, Hyeon-Jin; Kumar, Brijesh; Kim, Han Sol; Lee, Jinyeong; Bhatia, Ravi; Kim, Sang-Hyeob; Lee, In-Yeal; Lee, Hyo Sug; Kim, Gil-Ho; Yoo, Ji-Beom; Choi, Jae-Young; Kim, Sang-Woo

    2014-10-20

    Unintentionally formed nanocrystalline graphene (nc-G) can act as a useful seed for the large-area synthesis of a hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) thin film with an atomically flat surface that is comparable to that of exfoliated single-crystal h-BN. A wafer-scale dielectric h-BN thin film was successfully synthesized on a bare sapphire substrate by assistance of nc-G, which prevented structural deformations in a chemical vapor deposition process. The growth mechanism of this nc-G-tailored h-BN thin film was systematically analyzed. This approach provides a novel method for preparing high-quality two-dimensional materials on a large surface. PMID:25204810

  12. Etched graphene quantum dots on hexagonal boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engels, S.; Epping, A.; Volk, C.; Korte, S.; Voigtländer, B.; Watanabe, K.; Taniguchi, T.; Trellenkamp, S.; Stampfer, C.

    2013-08-01

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of etched graphene quantum dots (QDs) on hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) and SiO2 with different island diameters. We perform a statistical analysis of Coulomb peak spacings over a wide energy range. For graphene QDs on hBN, the standard deviation of the normalized peak spacing distribution decreases with increasing QD diameter, whereas for QDs on SiO2 no diameter dependency is observed. In addition, QDs on hBN are more stable under the influence of perpendicular magnetic fields up to 9 T. Both results indicate a substantially reduced substrate induced disorder potential in graphene QDs on hBN.

  13. Piezoelectricity in planar boron nitride via a geometric phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droth, Matthias; Burkard, Guido; Pereira, Vitor M.

    2016-08-01

    Due to their low surface mass density, two-dimensional materials with a strong piezoelectric response are interesting for nanoelectromechanical systems with high force sensitivity. Unlike graphene, the two sublattices in a monolayer of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) are occupied by different elements, which breaks inversion symmetry and allows for piezoelectricity. This has been confirmed with density functional theory calculations of the piezoelectric constant of hBN. Here, we formulate an entirely analytical derivation of the electronic contribution to the piezoelectric response in this system based on the concepts of strain-induced pseudomagnetic vector potential and the modern theory of polarization that relates the polar moment to the Berry curvature. Our findings agree with the symmetry restrictions expected for the hBN lattice and reproduce well the magnitude of the piezoelectric effect previously obtained ab initio.

  14. High thermal conductivity of hexagonal boron nitride laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jin-Cheng; Zhang, Liang; Kretinin, A. V.; Morozov, S. V.; Wang, Yi Bo; Wang, Tun; Li, Xiaojun; Ren, Fei; Zhang, Jingyu; Lu, Ching-Yu; Chen, Jia-Cing; Lu, Miao; Wang, Hui-Qiong; Geim, A. K.; Novoselov, K. S.

    2016-03-01

    Two-dimensional materials are characterised by a number of unique physical properties which can potentially make them useful to a wide diversity of applications. In particular, the large thermal conductivity of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) has already been acknowledged and these materials have been suggested as novel core materials for thermal management in electronics. However, it was not clear if mass produced flakes of hBN would allow one to achieve an industrially-relevant value of thermal conductivity. Here we demonstrate that laminates of hBN exhibit thermal conductivity of up to 20 W/m·K, which is significantly larger than that currently used in thermal management. We also show that the thermal conductivity of laminates increases with the increasing volumetric mass density, which creates a way of fine tuning its thermal properties.

  15. Phonon wave interference in graphene and boron nitride superlattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xue-Kun; Xie, Zhong-Xiang; Zhou, Wu-Xing; Tang, Li-Ming; Chen, Ke-Qiu

    2016-07-01

    The thermal transport properties of the graphene and boron nitride superlattice (CBNSL) are investigated via nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The simulation results show that a minimum lattice thermal conductivity can be achieved by changing the period length of the superlattice. Additionally, it is found that the period length at the minimum shifts to lower values at higher temperatures, and that the depth of the minimum increases with decreasing temperature. In particular, at 200 K, the thermal conductivities of CBNSLs with certain specific period lengths are nearly equal to the corresponding values at 300 K. A detailed analysis of the phonon spectra shows that this anomalous thermal conductivity behavior is a result of strong phonon wave interference. These observations indicate a promising strategy for manipulation of thermal transport in superlattices.

  16. Modelling heat conduction in polycrystalline hexagonal boron-nitride films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, Bohayra; Pereira, Luiz Felipe C.; Jiang, Jin-Wu; Rabczuk, Timon

    2015-08-01

    We conducted extensive molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the thermal conductivity of polycrystalline hexagonal boron-nitride (h-BN) films. To this aim, we constructed large atomistic models of polycrystalline h-BN sheets with random and uniform grain configuration. By performing equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) simulations, we investigated the influence of the average grain size on the thermal conductivity of polycrystalline h-BN films at various temperatures. Using the EMD results, we constructed finite element models of polycrystalline h-BN sheets to probe the thermal conductivity of samples with larger grain sizes. Our multiscale investigations not only provide a general viewpoint regarding the heat conduction in h-BN films but also propose that polycrystalline h-BN sheets present high thermal conductivity comparable to monocrystalline sheets.

  17. Ultraviolet dielectric hyperlens with layered graphene and boron nitride

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Junxia; Zhang, Baile

    2012-01-01

    The concept of hyperlens, as a novel transformation optics device, is a promising real-time super-resolution lens that can effectively transform evanescent waves into propagating waves and thus break the diffraction limit. However, previous hyperlens implementations usually adopted metal which would absorb most energy during light transmission and thus deteriorate imaging efficiency. Here we propose a novel hyperlens design based on dielectric layered graphene and h-boron nitride (h-BN) whose performance can surpass the counterpart design with metal. Our first-principle and Kramers-Kronig relation calculation shows that both layered graphene and layered h-BN exhibit strong anisotropic properties in ultraviolet spectrum regions, where their permittivity components perpendicular to the optic axis can be negative while the components parallel to the optic axis can be positive. Based on the anisotropic properties, flat and cylindrical hyperlenses are designed and numerically verified with layered graphene at 1200...

  18. Preparation of ohmic n-type cubic boron nitride contacts

    CERN Document Server

    Wang Cheng Xin; Li Xun; Zhang Tie Chen; Han Yong; Luo Ji Feng; Shen Cai Xia; Gao Chun Xi; Zou Guang Tian

    2002-01-01

    Ohmic electrodes in the form of n-type (Si-doped) cubic boron nitride (c-BN) bulk crystals were fabricated by utilizing a covering technique, depositing Ti(10 nm)/Mo/(20 nm)/Pt-Au(200 nm) ohmic contact metal on both the sides of the c-BN substrate. The size of the specimen electrode was 100 x 100 mu m sup 2 on one side and 300 x 300 mu m sup 2 on the other side. Measurements on the specimen were made using a specially made device. Linear current-voltage characteristics were obtained. It is considered that the contact between the Ti-and Si-doped c-BN was ohmic.

  19. Thermal conductivity of polymer composites with oriented boron nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Hong Jun; Eoh, Young Jun [Department of Materials Engineering, Kyonggi University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sung Dae [Electronic Materials and Device Research Center, Korea Electronics Technology Institute, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eung Soo, E-mail: eskim@kyonggi.ac.kr [Department of Materials Engineering, Kyonggi University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-20

    Highlights: • Thermal conductivity depended on the orientation of BN in the polymer matrices. • Hexagonal boron nitride (BN) particles were treated by C{sub 27}H{sub 27}N{sub 3}O{sub 2} and C{sub 14}H{sub 6}O{sub 8}. • Amphiphilic-agent-treated BN particles are more easily oriented in the composite. • BN/PVA composites with C{sub 14}H{sub 6}O{sub 8}-treated BN showed the highest thermal conductivity. • Thermal conductivity of the composites was compared with several theoretical models. - Abstract: Thermal conductivity of boron nitride (BN) with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and/or polyvinyl butyral (PVB) was investigated as a function of the degree of BN orientation, the numbers of hydroxyl groups in the polymer matrices and the amphiphilic agents used. The composites with in-plane orientation of BN showed a higher thermal conductivity than the composites with out-of-plane orientation of BN due to the increase of thermal pathway. For a given BN content, the composites with in-plane orientation of BN/PVA showed higher thermal conductivity than the composites with in-plane orientation of BN/PVB. This result could be attributed to the improved degree of orientation of BN, caused by a larger number of hydroxyl groups being present. Those treated with C{sub 14}H{sub 6}O{sub 8} amphiphilic agent demonstrated a higher thermal conductivity than those treated by C{sub 27}H{sub 27}N{sub 3}O{sub 2}. The measured thermal conductivity of the composites was compared with that predicted by the several theoretical models.

  20. Thermal conductivity of polymer composites with oriented boron nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Thermal conductivity depended on the orientation of BN in the polymer matrices. • Hexagonal boron nitride (BN) particles were treated by C27H27N3O2 and C14H6O8. • Amphiphilic-agent-treated BN particles are more easily oriented in the composite. • BN/PVA composites with C14H6O8-treated BN showed the highest thermal conductivity. • Thermal conductivity of the composites was compared with several theoretical models. - Abstract: Thermal conductivity of boron nitride (BN) with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and/or polyvinyl butyral (PVB) was investigated as a function of the degree of BN orientation, the numbers of hydroxyl groups in the polymer matrices and the amphiphilic agents used. The composites with in-plane orientation of BN showed a higher thermal conductivity than the composites with out-of-plane orientation of BN due to the increase of thermal pathway. For a given BN content, the composites with in-plane orientation of BN/PVA showed higher thermal conductivity than the composites with in-plane orientation of BN/PVB. This result could be attributed to the improved degree of orientation of BN, caused by a larger number of hydroxyl groups being present. Those treated with C14H6O8 amphiphilic agent demonstrated a higher thermal conductivity than those treated by C27H27N3O2. The measured thermal conductivity of the composites was compared with that predicted by the several theoretical models

  1. Reduced stability of copper interconnects due to wrinkles and steps on hexagonal boron nitride substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jian; Chow, Philippe K.; Thomas, Abhay V.; Lu, Toh-Ming; Borca-Tasciuc, Theodorian; Koratkar, Nikhil

    2014-09-01

    There is great scientific and technological interest in the use of chemical-vapor-deposition grown hexagonal boron nitride dielectric substrates for microelectronics applications. This interest stems from its superior heat spreading capability compared to silicon dioxide as well as the lack of surface dangling bonds or charge traps in hexagonal boron nitride which results in superior performance for graphene based electronics devices. However, surface heterogeneities, such as wrinkles or steps, are ubiquitous in such devices due to the fabrication and processing of chemical vapor deposition grown hexagonal boron nitride. In this study, we characterize the effect of such surface heterogeneities on the stability of copper interconnects used in microelectronics devices. Based on the theoretical thermo-physical properties of the constituent thin film layers, our simulations predict that copper interconnects deposited on hexagonal boron nitride can withstand ˜1.9 times more power than on a silicon dioxide substrate, due to its superior in-plane thermal conductivity. However, our electrical measurements reveal that copper wires melt and fail at consistently lower current densities on hexagonal boron nitride than on silicon dioxide. This was verified by testing in air as well as under vacuum. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy characterization of the hexagonal boron nitride surface indicates that this contradictory result is due to nanoscale surface non-uniformities (i.e., wrinkles and steps) which are omnipresent in chemical-vapor-deposition grown and transferred hexagonal boron nitride films. Our results highlight the critical need for improved processing methods before large-scale microelectronics applications of chemical vapor deposition grown hexagonal boron nitride can be realized.

  2. Computer-aided analytical control of diamond and cubic boron nitride grits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methodical and information aspects of the superhard materials powder uniformity as a characteristics of the powder quality are discussed. Computer-aided analytical methods of the rapid diagnostics of the sieve granulometric composition and the external specific surface of diamond and cubic boron nitride grits are described. The results of the application of the developed methods and software to standard powders of synthetic diamond and cubic boron nitride are given

  3. Electronic properties of Mn-decorated silicene on hexagonal boron nitride

    KAUST Repository

    Kaloni, Thaneshwor P.

    2013-12-17

    We study silicene on hexagonal boron nitride, using first-principles calculations. Since hexagonal boron nitride is semiconducting, the interaction with silicene is weaker than for metallic substrates. It therefore is possible to open a 50 meV band gap in the silicene. We further address the effect of Mn decoration by determining the onsite Hubbard interaction parameter, which turns out to differ significantly for decoration at the top and hollow sites. The induced magnetism in the system is analyzed in detail.

  4. Effect of alloying on the properties of a cubic boron nitride ceramic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shipilo, V.B.; Anichenko, N.G.; Rud' , A.E.; Vrublevskii, A.I. (AN BSSR, Institut Fiziki Tverdogo Tela i Poluprovodnikov, Minsk, Belorussian (USSR))

    1990-01-01

    The effect of Group-VI elements on the density, electrical resistance, microhardness, and parallel electron resonance spectra of a cubic boron nitride ceramic was investigated experimentally. It is shown that the above characteristics are determined to a large extent by the concentration and type of dopants. The sensitivity of the physical characteristics to doping and subsequent annealing indicates that the impurities are incorporated in the boron nitride lattice.

  5. Transport properties of ultrathin black phosphorus on hexagonal boron nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doganov, Rostislav A.; Özyilmaz, Barbaros [Centre for Advanced 2D Materials and Graphene Research Centre, National University of Singapore, 6 Science Drive 2, 117546 Singapore (Singapore); Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 3, 117542 Singapore (Singapore); Graduate School for Integrative Sciences and Engineering (NGS), National University of Singapore, 28 Medical Drive, 117456 Singapore (Singapore); Koenig, Steven P.; Yeo, Yuting [Centre for Advanced 2D Materials and Graphene Research Centre, National University of Singapore, 6 Science Drive 2, 117546 Singapore (Singapore); Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 3, 117542 Singapore (Singapore); Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan)

    2015-02-23

    Ultrathin black phosphorus, or phosphorene, is a two-dimensional material that allows both high carrier mobility and large on/off ratios. Similar to other atomic crystals, like graphene or layered transition metal dichalcogenides, the transport behavior of few-layer black phosphorus is expected to be affected by the underlying substrate. The properties of black phosphorus have so far been studied on the widely utilized SiO{sub 2} substrate. Here, we characterize few-layer black phosphorus field effect transistors on hexagonal boron nitride—an atomically smooth and charge trap-free substrate. We measure the temperature dependence of the field effect mobility for both holes and electrons and explain the observed behavior in terms of charged impurity limited transport. We find that in-situ vacuum annealing at 400 K removes the p-doping of few-layer black phosphorus on both boron nitride and SiO{sub 2} substrates and reduces the hysteresis at room temperature.

  6. Effects of heat treatment on properties of boron nitride fiber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Duan; ZHANG ChangRui; LI Bin; CAO Feng; WANG SiQing

    2012-01-01

    The boron nitride fibers were heated at the range of 600-1400°C in flowing nitrogen and air,respectively,and the effects of heat treatment on the structure,composition and morphology of BN fibers were studied.The results showed that BN fibers exhibited smooth surfaces,and that t-BN was the main phase with a little B2O3 included.After heat treatment at 1400°C in nitrogen atmosphere,the fibers displayed rough surfaces with little change in mass.Better crystallinity was obtained with the increasing temperature.During heat treatment in air,the fibers were oxidized severely as the temperature went up,especially at 1400°C.The volatilization of B2O3,HBO2 and H3BO3 led to the pores on the surfaces of the fibers,while the boron oxide glaze and nitrogen gas produced during the oxidation process protected the fibers from further oxidation.

  7. Two-dimensional boron nitride structures functionalization: first principles studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce-Pérez, R; Cocoletzi, Gregorio H; Takeuchi, Noboru

    2016-09-01

    Density functional theory calculations have been performed to investigate two-dimensional hexagonal boron nitride (2D hBN) structures functionalization with organic molecules. 2x2, 4x4 and 6x6 periodic 2D hBN layers have been considered to interact with acetylene. To deal with the exchange-correlation energy the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) is invoked. The electron-ion interaction is treated with the pseudopotential method. The GGA with the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhoff (PBE) functionals together with van der Waals interactions are considered to deal with the composed systems. To investigate the functionalization two main configurations have been explored; in one case the molecule interacts with the boron atom and in the other with the nitrogen atom. Results of the adsorption energies indicate chemisorption in both cases. The total density of states (DOS) displays an energy gap in both cases. The projected DOS indicate that the B-p and N-p orbitals are those that make the most important contribution in the valence band and the H-s and C-p orbitals provide an important contribution in the conduction band to the DOS. Provided that the interactions of the acetylene with the 2D layer modify the structural and electronic properties of the hBN the possibility of structural functionalization using organic molecules may be concluded. PMID:27566317

  8. Transport properties of ultrathin black phosphorus on hexagonal boron nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultrathin black phosphorus, or phosphorene, is a two-dimensional material that allows both high carrier mobility and large on/off ratios. Similar to other atomic crystals, like graphene or layered transition metal dichalcogenides, the transport behavior of few-layer black phosphorus is expected to be affected by the underlying substrate. The properties of black phosphorus have so far been studied on the widely utilized SiO2 substrate. Here, we characterize few-layer black phosphorus field effect transistors on hexagonal boron nitride—an atomically smooth and charge trap-free substrate. We measure the temperature dependence of the field effect mobility for both holes and electrons and explain the observed behavior in terms of charged impurity limited transport. We find that in-situ vacuum annealing at 400 K removes the p-doping of few-layer black phosphorus on both boron nitride and SiO2 substrates and reduces the hysteresis at room temperature

  9. Preparation and properties of unidirectional boron nitride fibre reinforced boron nitride matrix composites via precursor infiltration and pyrolysis route

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → BN fibres degrade little when exposed at elevated temperatures. → Precursor infiltration and pyrolysis route is useful to prepare BNf/BN composites. → Few reports have related to the preparation and properties of BNf/BN composites. → BNf/BN composites have desirable high-temperature mechanical properties. → BNf/BN composites have excellent dielectric properties at 2-18 GHz. - Abstract: The unidirectional boron nitride fibre reinforced boron nitride matrix (BNf/BN) composites were prepared via the precursor infiltration and pyrolysis (PIP) route, and the structure, composition, mechanical and dielectric properties were studied. The composites have a high content and fine crystallinity of BN. The density is 1.60 g cm-3 with a low open porosity of 4.66%. The composites display good mechanical properties with the average flexural strength, elastic modulus and fracture toughness being 53.8 MPa, 20.8 GPa and 6.88 MPa m1/2, respectively. Lots of long fibres pull-out from the fracture surface, suggesting a good fibre/matrix interface. As temperature increases, both of the flexural strength and elastic modulus exhibit a decreasing trend, with the lowest values being 36.2 MPa and 8.6 GPa at 1000 deg. C, respectively. The desirable residual ratios of the flexural strength and elastic modulus at 1000 deg. C are 67.3% and 41.3%, respectively. The composites have excellent dielectric properties, with the average dielectric constant and loss tangent being 3.07 and 0.0044 at 2-18 GHz, respectively.

  10. Optical Spectroscopy of Two Dimensional Graphene and Boron Nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Long

    This dissertation describes the use of optical spectroscopy in studying the physical properties of two dimensional nano materials like graphene and hexagonal boron nitride. Compared to bulk materials, atomically thin two dimensional materials have a unique character that is the strong dependence of physical properties on external control. Both electronic band structure and chemical potential can be tuned in situ by electric field-which is a powerful knob in experiment. Therefore the optical study at atomic thickness scale can greatly benefit from modern micro-fabrication technique and electric control of the material properties. As will be shown in this dissertation, such control of both gemometric and physical properties enables new possibilities of optical spectroscopic measurement as well as opto-electronic studies. Other experimental techniques like electric transport and scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy are also combined with optical spectroscopy to reveal the physics that is beyond the reach of each individual technique. There are three major themes in the dissertation. The first one is focused on the study of plasmon excitation of Dirac electrons in monolayer graphene. Unlike plasmons in ordinary two dimensional electron gas, plasmons of 2D electrons as in graphene obey unusual scaling laws. We fabricate graphene micro-ribbon arrays with photolithography technique and use optical absorption spectroscopy to study its absorption spectrum. The experimental result demonstrates the extraordinarily strong light-plasmon coupling and its novel dependence on both charge doping and geometric dimensions. This work provides a first glance at the fundamental properties of graphene plasmons and forms the basis of an emerging subfield of graphene research and applications such as graphene terahertz metamaterials. The second part describes the opto-electronic response of heterostructures composed of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride. We found that there is

  11. The Adhesion Improvement of Cubic Boron Nitride Film on High Speed Steel Substrate Implanted by Boron Element

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Zhi-hai; ZHANG Ping; TAN Jun

    2005-01-01

    Cubic boron nitride(c-BN) films were deposited on W6Mo5Cr4V2 high speed steel(HSS) substrate implanted with boron ion by RF-magnetron sputtering. The films were analyzed by the bending beam method, scratch test, XPS and AFM. The experimental results show that the implantation of boron atom can reduce the in ternal stress and improve the adhesion strength of the films. The critical load of scratch test rises to 27.45 N, compared to 1.75 N of c-BN film on the unimplanted HSS. The AFM shows that the surface of the c-BN film on the implanted HSS is low in roughness and small in grain size. Then the composition of the boron implanted layer was analyzed by the XPS. And the influence of the boron implanted layer on the internal stress and adhesion strength of c-BN films were investigated.

  12. Boron nitride hollow nanospheres: Synthesis, formation mechanism and dielectric property

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, B.; Tang, X.H. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology at Weihai, Weihai 264209 (China); Huang, X.X., E-mail: swliza@hit.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Xia, L. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology at Weihai, Weihai 264209 (China); Zhang, X.D. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Wang, C.J. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology at Weihai, Weihai 264209 (China); Wen, G.W., E-mail: g.wen@hit.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology at Weihai, Weihai 264209 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • BN hollow nanospheres are fabricated in large scale via a new CVD method. • Morphology and structure are elucidated by complementary analytical techniques. • Formation mechanism is proposed based on experimental observations. • Dielectric properties are investigated in the X-band microwave frequencies. • BN hollow nanospheres show lower dielectric loss than regular BN powders. - Abstract: Boron nitride (BN) hollow nanospheres have been successfully fabricated by pyrolyzing vapors decomposed from ammonia borane (NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3}) at 1300 °C. The final products have been extensively characterized by X-ray diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The BN hollow nanospheres were ranging from 100 to 300 nm in diameter and around 30–100 nm in thickness. The internal structure of the products was found dependent on the reaction temperatures. A possible formation mechanism of the BN hollow nanospheres was proposed on the basis of the experimental observations. Dielectric measurements in the X-band microwave frequencies (8–12 GHz) showed that the dielectric loss of the paraffin filled by the BN hollow nanospheres was lower than that filled by regular BN powders, which indicated that the BN hollow nanospheres could be potentially used as low-density fillers for microwave radomes.

  13. Graphene on hexagonal boron nitride as a tunable hyperbolic metamaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, S.; Ma, Q.; Liu, M. K.; Andersen, T.; Fei, Z.; Goldflam, M. D.; Wagner, M.; Watanabe, K.; Taniguchi, T.; Thiemens, M.; Keilmann, F.; Janssen, G. C. A. M.; Zhu, S.-E.; Jarillo-Herrero, P.; Fogler, M. M.; Basov, D. N.

    2015-08-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is a natural hyperbolic material, in which the dielectric constants are the same in the basal plane (ɛt ≡ ɛx = ɛy) but have opposite signs (ɛtɛz phonon polaritons—collective modes that originate from the coupling between photons and electric dipoles in phonons. However, control of these hyperbolic phonon polaritons modes has remained challenging, mostly because their electrodynamic properties are dictated by the crystal lattice of h-BN. Here we show, by direct nano-infrared imaging, that these hyperbolic polaritons can be effectively modulated in a van der Waals heterostructure composed of monolayer graphene on h-BN. Tunability originates from the hybridization of surface plasmon polaritons in graphene with hyperbolic phonon polaritons in h-BN, so that the eigenmodes of the graphene/h-BN heterostructure are hyperbolic plasmon-phonon polaritons. The hyperbolic plasmon-phonon polaritons in graphene/h-BN suffer little from ohmic losses, making their propagation length 1.5-2.0 times greater than that of hyperbolic phonon polaritons in h-BN. The hyperbolic plasmon-phonon polaritons possess the combined virtues of surface plasmon polaritons in graphene and hyperbolic phonon polaritons in h-BN. Therefore, graphene/h-BN can be classified as an electromagnetic metamaterial as the resulting properties of these devices are not present in its constituent elements alone.

  14. High-Yield Synthesis of Stoichiometric Boron Nitride Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José E. Nocua

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Boron nitride (BN nanostructures are structural analogues of carbon nanostructures but have completely different bonding character and structural defects. They are chemically inert, electrically insulating, and potentially important in mechanical applications that include the strengthening of light structural materials. These applications require the reliable production of bulk amounts of pure BN nanostructures in order to be able to reinforce large quantities of structural materials, hence the need for the development of high-yield synthesis methods of pure BN nanostructures. Using borazine (B3N3H6 as chemical precursor and the hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD technique, pure BN nanostructures with cross-sectional sizes ranging between 20 and 50 nm were obtained, including nanoparticles and nanofibers. Their crystalline structure was characterized by (XRD, their morphology and nanostructure was examined by (SEM and (TEM, while their chemical composition was studied by (EDS, (FTIR, (EELS, and (XPS. Taken altogether, the results indicate that all the material obtained is stoichiometric nanostructured BN with hexagonal and rhombohedral crystalline structure.

  15. Thermal transport across graphene and single layer hexagonal boron nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jingchao, E-mail: zhang@unl.edu, E-mail: yyue@whu.edu.cn [Holland Computing Center, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States); Hong, Yang [Department of Chemistry, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States); Yue, Yanan, E-mail: zhang@unl.edu, E-mail: yyue@whu.edu.cn [School of Power and Mechanical Engineering, Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei 430072 (China)

    2015-04-07

    As the dimensions of nanocircuits and nanoelectronics shrink, thermal energies are being generated in more confined spaces, making it extremely important and urgent to explore for efficient heat dissipation pathways. In this work, the phonon energy transport across graphene and hexagonal boron-nitride (h-BN) interface is studied using classic molecular dynamics simulations. Effects of temperature, interatomic bond strength, heat flux direction, and functionalization on interfacial thermal transport are investigated. It is found out that by hydrogenating graphene in the hybrid structure, the interfacial thermal resistance (R) between graphene and h-BN can be reduced by 76.3%, indicating an effective approach to manipulate the interfacial thermal transport. Improved in-plane/out-of-plane phonon couplings and broadened phonon channels are observed in the hydrogenated graphene system by analyzing its phonon power spectra. The reported R results monotonically decrease with temperature and interatomic bond strengths. No thermal rectification phenomenon is observed in this interfacial thermal transport. Results reported in this work give the fundamental knowledge on graphene and h-BN thermal transport and provide rational guidelines for next generation thermal interface material designs.

  16. Origin of rectification in boron nitride heterojunctions to silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teii, Kungen; Hori, Takuro; Mizusako, Yusei; Matsumoto, Seiichiro

    2013-04-10

    Cubic and hexagonal boron nitride (cBN and hBN) heterojunctions to n-type Si are fabricated under low-energy ion bombardment by inductively coupled plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition using the chemistry of fluorine. The sp2-bonded BN/Si heterojunction shows no rectification, while the cBN/sp2BN/Si heterojunction has rectification properties analogue to typical p-n junction diodes despite a large thickness (∼130 nm) of the sp2BN interlayer. The current-voltage characteristics at temperatures up to 573 K are governed by thermal excitation of carriers, and mostly described with the ideal diode equation and the Frenkel-Poole emission model at low and high bias voltages, respectively. The rectification in the cBN/sp2BN/Si heterojunction is caused by a bias-dependent change in the barrier height for holes arising from stronger p-type conduction in the cBN layer and enhanced with the thick sp2BN interlayer for impeding the reverse current flow at defect levels mainly associated with grain boundaries.

  17. Precursor design of vapour deposited cubic boron nitride versus diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The similarities and dissimilarities in the growth of diamond vs. cubic boron nitride (c-BN) were studied using quantum mechanical calculations. Great similarities were observed when considering the surface stabilization by H atoms. Very great similarities were recorded when considering the adsorption of various growth species to these materials. It was found necessary to avoid mixtures of B- and N-containing species in the gas phase during c-BN growth, since they should most probably result in a mixture of these species also on the surfaces. Greater dissimilarities were observed when studying the surface migrations on the diamond and c-BN surfaces and nucleation of the cubic phases on the corresponding hexagonal ones. Nucleation of diamond/c-BN on graphite/h-BN was found to be energetically feasible. This was calculated to be especially the situation for the armchair edge of the basal plane of h-BN and of the zigzag edge of the basal plane of graphite. These theoretical results can be used as guidelines in the strive towards thin film deposition of c-BN using gentle chemical vapour deposition methods like atomic layer deposition. (author)

  18. Exfoliation of Hexagonal Boron Nitride via Ferric Chloride Intercalation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ching-cheh; Hurst, Janet; Santiago, Diana; Rogers, Richard B.

    2014-01-01

    Sodium fluoride (NaF) was used as an activation agent to successfully intercalate ferric chloride (FeCl3) into hexagonal boron nitride (hBN). This reaction caused the hBN mass to increase by approx.100 percent, the lattice parameter c to decrease from 6.6585 to between 6.6565 and 6.6569 ?, the x-ray diffraction (XRD) (002) peak to widen from 0.01deg to 0.05deg of the full width half maximum value, the Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrum's broad band (1277/cm peak) to change shape, and new FTIR bands to emerge at 3700 to 2700 and 1600/cm. This indicates hBN's structural and chemical properties are significantly changed. The intercalated product was hygroscopic and interacted with moisture in the air to cause further structural and chemical changes (from XRD and FTIR). During a 24-h hold at room temperature in air with 100 percent relative humidity, the mass increased another 141 percent. The intercalated product, hydrated or not, can be heated to 750 C in air to cause exfoliation. Exfoliation becomes significant after two intercalation-air heating cycles, when 20-nm nanosheets are commonly found. Structural and chemical changes indicated by XRD and FTIR data were nearly reversed after the product was placed in hydrochloric acid (HCl), resulting in purified, exfoliated, thin hBN products.

  19. Hydrothermal Synthesis and Photoluminescence of Boron Nitride Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongling; Tay, Roland Yingjie; Tsang, Siu Hon; Teo, Edwin Hang Tong

    Boron nitride quantum dots (BNQDs), as a new member of heavy metal-free quantum dots, have attracted great interest owing to its unique structure as well as fascinating physical/chemical properties. However, it is still a challenge to controllably synthesize high quality BNQDs with high quantum yield (QY), uniform size and strong luminescence. Here we present a facile and effective approach to controllablly fabricate BNQDs by snoication-solvothermal technique. Encouragingly, the as-prepared BNQDs possess strong blue luminescence with high QY of up to 19.5%, which can be attributed to the synergic effect of size, surface chemistry and edge defects. In addition, the size of the BNQDs could be controlled with a narrow size distribution of 1.32 nm and the smallest average size achieved is 2.62 nm with an average thickness of ~3 atomic layers. Furthermore, the as-prepared BNQDs are non-toxic to cells and show nanosecond-scaled lifetimes and little photobleaching effect. Therefore, it is believed that BNQDs are promising as one of the novel heavy metal-free QDs for multi-purpose applications in a range of fields. Moreover, this synthesis concept is expected to open a new window to controllably prepare other heavy metal-free QDs, as well as to understand their luminescence mechanism.

  20. Controllable Synthesis of Highly Luminescent Boron Nitride Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongling; Tay, Roland Yingjie; Tsang, Siu Hon; Zhen, Xu; Teo, Edwin Hang Tong

    2015-12-22

    Boron nitride quantum dots (BNQDs), as a new member of heavy metal-free quantum dots, have aroused great interest in fundamental research and practical application due to their unique physical/chemical properties. However, it is still a challenge to controllably synthesize high-quality BNQDs with high quantum yield (QY), uniform size and strong fluorescent. In this work, BNQDs have been successfully fabricated by the liquid exfoliation and the subsequent solvothermal process with respect to its facileness and easy large scale up. Importantly, BNQDs with high-quality can be controllably obtained by adjusting the synthetic parameters involved in the solvothermal process including filling factor, synthesis temperature, and duration time. Encouragingly, the as-prepared BNQDs possess strong blue luminescence with QY as high as 19.5%, which can be attributed to the synergetic effect of size, surface chemistry and edge defects. In addition, this strategy presented here provides a new reference for the controllable synthesis of other heavy metal-free QDs. Furthermore, the as-prepared BNQDs are non-toxic to cells and exhibit nanosecond-scaled lifetimes, suggesting they have great potential biological and optoelectronic applications. PMID:26574683

  1. Highly thermally conductive papers with percolative layered boron nitride nanosheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongli; Li, Yuanyuan; Fang, Zhiqiang; Xu, Jiajun; Cao, Fangyu; Wan, Jiayu; Preston, Colin; Yang, Bao; Hu, Liangbing

    2014-04-22

    In this work, we report a dielectric nanocomposite paper with layered boron nitride (BN) nanosheets wired by one-dimensional (1D) nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) that has superior thermal and mechanical properties. These nanocomposite papers are fabricated from a filtration of BN and NFC suspensions, in which NFC is used as a stabilizer to stabilize BN nanosheets. In these nanocomposite papers, two-dimensional (2D) nanosheets form a thermally conductive network, while 1D NFC provides mechanical strength. A high thermal conductivity has been achieved along the BN paper surface (up to 145.7 W/m K for 50 wt % of BN), which is an order of magnitude higher than that in randomly distributed BN nanosheet composites and is even comparable to the thermal conductivity of aluminum alloys. Such a high thermal conductivity is mainly attributed to the structural alignment within the BN nanosheet papers; the effects of the interfacial thermal contact resistance are minimized by the fact that the heat transfer is in the direction parallel to the interface between BN nanosheets and that a large contact area occurs between BN nanosheets. PMID:24601534

  2. Periodic buckling patterns of graphene/hexagonal boron nitride heterostructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphene/hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) heterostructure has showed great potential to improve the performance of a graphene device. A graphene on an h-BN substrate may buckle due to the thermal expansion mismatch between the graphene and h-BN. We used an energy method to investigate the periodic buckling patterns including one-dimensional, square checkerboard, hexagonal, equilateral triangular and herringbone mode in a graphene/h-BN heterostructure under equi-biaxial compression. The total energy, consisting of cohesive energy, graphene membrane energy and graphene bending energy, for each buckling pattern is obtained analytically. At a compression slightly larger than the critical strain, all buckling patterns have the same total energies, which suggests that any buckling pattern may occur. At a compression much larger than the critical strain, the herringbone mode has the lowest total energy by significantly reducing the membrane energy of graphene at the expense of a slight increase of the bending energy of graphene and cohesive energy. These results may serve as guidelines for strain engineering in graphene/h-BN heterostructures. (paper)

  3. Preparation of Poly(p-phenylene sulfi de)/Carbon Composites with Enhanced Thermal Conductivity and Electrical Insulativity via Hybrids of Boron Nitride and Carbon Fillers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Jieli; WANG Jinwen; CHEN Feng

    2015-01-01

    The present work enhanced the thermal conductivity of poly(p-phenylene sulfi de)/expanded graphites and poly(p-phenylene sulfi de)/carbon nanotubes, by incorporating composites with hexagonal boron nitride, which simultaneously succeeded in raising the electrical conductivity of the systems. A two-step mechanical processing method which includes rotating solid-state premixing and inner mixing was adopted to improve dispersion of the hybrids, contributing to the formation of an interspered thermal conductive network. Similar synergic effect in thermal conductivity enhancement was discovered in the hybrid systems regardless of the dimension difference between the two carbonfi llers. Such is postulated to be the one satisfying advantage generated by the afore-mentioned network; the other is the insulativity of the hybrid systems given by the effective blockage of hexagonal boron nitride as an insulating material in our network.

  4. Preparation and characterization of sputtered boron nitride and boron carbide films and their modification by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanocrystalline cubic boron nitride and boron carbide films have been synthesized using sputtering. The relationship between the structures and properties as well as the influence of the deposition parameters, such as rf power, bias voltage, substrate temperature, composition and flow rate of the sputtering gas, on the structures and properties have been studied. The influence of the ion bombardment could be described by the specific ion momentum P*=[ion momentum.(ion flux/atom flux)]. The specific ion momentum was found to be proportional to the rf power and to the 1.5th power of the bias voltage. Two phases have been identified in our boron nitride films: hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) and cubic boron nitride (c-BN); the films were either single phase or contained a mixture of these two phases. Nanocrystalline boron films have been grown with a deposition rate of 2 nm/s not only on Si but also on hard metal (WC-6%Co) substrates. Stoichiometric and crystalline films have already been grown at room temperature (about 0.1 Tm, Tm=melting point-3900 K). All the films contained about 8 at% carbon and 6 at% oxygen as impurities, which come mainly from the targt. The concentration of the impurities is independent of the deposition paramters. The growth of c-BN appears after the specific ion momentum larger than a threshold value, which is dependent on the substrate temperature, composition and on the flow rate of the sputtering gas. The volume content of c-BN runs through a maximum value with increasing specific ion momentum. (orig.)

  5. A comparative study of the thermal interface materials with graphene and boron nitride fillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargar, F.; Salgado, R.; Legedza, S.; Renteria, J.; Balandin, A. A.

    2014-09-01

    We report the results of an experimental study that compares the performance of graphene and boron nitride flakes as fillers in the thermal interface materials. The thickness of both fillers varied from a single atomic plane to about a hundred. The measurements have been conducted using a standard TIM tester. Our results show that the addition of a small fraction of graphene (f=4 wt%) to a commercial thermal interface material increases the resulting apparent thermal conductivity substantially stronger than the addition of boron nitride. The obtained data suggest that graphene and fewlayer graphene flakes couple better to the matrix materials than the boron nitride fillers. A combination of both fillers can be used to increase the thermal conductivity while controlling the electrical conduction.

  6. Plasma-Chemical Synthesis of Nanosized Powders-Nitrides, Carbides, Oxides, Carbon Nanotubes and Fullerenes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Katerina ZAHARIEVA; Gheorghi VISSOKOV; Janis GRABIS; Slavcho RAKOVSKY

    2012-01-01

    In this article the plasma-chemical synthesis of nanosized powders (nitrides, car- bides, oxides, carbon nanotubes and fullerenes) is reviewed. Nanosized powders - nitrides, carbides, oxides, carbon nanotubes and fullerenes have been successfully produced using different techniques, technological apparatuses and conditions for their plasma-chemical synthesis.

  7. Ultralight boron nitride aerogels via template-assisted chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yangxi; Li, Bin; Yang, Siwei; Ding, Guqiao; Zhang, Changrui; Xie, Xiaoming

    2015-05-01

    Boron nitride (BN) aerogels are porous materials with a continuous three-dimensional network structure. They are attracting increasing attention for a wide range of applications. Here, we report the template-assisted synthesis of BN aerogels by catalyst-free, low-pressure chemical vapor deposition on graphene-carbon nanotube composite aerogels using borazine as the B and N sources with a relatively low temperature of 900 °C. The three-dimensional structure of the BN aerogels was achieved through the structural design of carbon aerogel templates. The BN aerogels have an ultrahigh specific surface area, ultralow density, excellent oil absorbing ability, and high temperature oxidation resistance. The specific surface area of BN aerogels can reach up to 1051 m2 g-1, 2-3 times larger than the reported BN aerogels. The mass density can be as low as 0.6 mg cm-3, much lower than that of air. The BN aerogels exhibit high hydrophobic properties and can absorb up to 160 times their weight in oil. This is much higher than porous BN nanosheets reported previously. The BN aerogels can be restored for reuse after oil absorption simply by burning them in air. This is because of their high temperature oxidation resistance and suggests broad utility as water treatment tools.

  8. The preparation of high-adsorption, spherical, hexagonal boron nitride by template method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ning, E-mail: zhangning5832@163.com; Liu, Huan; Kan, Hongmin; Wang, Xiaoyang; Long, Haibo; Zhou, Yonghui

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • The high-adsorption, spherical, hexagonal boron nitride powders were prepared. • The influence mechanism of template content on the micro-morphology and adsorption was explored. • At appropriate synthesis temperature, higher adsorption mesoporous spheres h-BN began to form. - Abstract: This research used low-cost boric acid and borax as a source of boron, urea as a nitrogen source, dodecyl-trimethyl ammonium chloride (DTAC) as a template, and thus prepared different micro-morphology hexagonal boron nitride powders under a flowing ammonia atmosphere at different nitriding temperatures. The effects of the template content and nitriding temperature on the micro-morphology of hexagonal boron nitride were studied and the formation mechanism analysed. The influences of the template content and nitriding temperature on adsorption performance were also explored. The results showed that at a nitriding temperature of 675 °C, the micro-morphologies of h-BN powder were orderly, inhomogeneous spherical, uniform spherical, beam, and pie-like with increasing template content. The micro-morphology was inhomogeneous spherical at a DTAC dose of 7.5%. The micro-morphology was uniform spherical at a DTAC dose of 10%. At a DTAC dose of 12%, the micro-morphology was a mixture of beam and pie-like shapes. At a certain template content (DTAC at 10%) and at lower nitriding temperatures (625 °C and 650 °C), spherical shell structures with surface subsidence began to form. The porous spheres would appear at a nitriding temperature of 675 °C, and the ball diameter thus formed was approximately 500–600 nm. The ball diameter was about 600–700 nm when the nitriding temperature was 700 °C. At a nitriding temperature of 725 °C, the ball diameter was between 800 and 1000 nm and sintering necking started to form. When the relative pressure was higher, previously closed pores opened and connected with the outside world: the adsorption then increased significantly. The

  9. Thermal conductivity of ultra-thin chemical vapor deposited hexagonal boron nitride films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, M. T.; Bresnehan, M. S.; Robinson, J. A.; Haque, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    Thermal conductivity of freestanding 10 nm and 20 nm thick chemical vapor deposited hexagonal boron nitride films was measured using both steady state and transient techniques. The measured value for both thicknesses, about 100 ± 10 W m-1 K-1, is lower than the bulk basal plane value (390 W m-1 K-1) due to the imperfections in the specimen microstructure. Impressively, this value is still 100 times higher than conventional dielectrics. Considering scalability and ease of integration, hexagonal boron nitride grown over large area is an excellent candidate for thermal management in two dimensional materials-based nanoelectronics.

  10. Non-linear excitation of quantum emitters in two-dimensional hexagonal boron nitride

    CERN Document Server

    Schell, Andreas W; Takashima, Hideaki; Takeuchi, Shigeki; Aharonovich, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Two-photon absorption is an important non-linear process employed for high resolution bio-imaging and non-linear optics. In this work we realize two-photon excitation of a quantum emitter embedded in a two-dimensional material. We examine defects in hexagonal boron nitride and show that the emitters exhibit similar spectral and quantum properties under one-photon and two-photon excitation. Furthermore, our findings are important to deploy two-dimensional hexagonal boron nitride for quantum non-linear photonic applications.

  11. Cubic boron nitride: a new prospective material for ultracold neutron application

    CERN Document Server

    Sobolev, Yu; Borisov, Yu; Daum, M; Fresne, N du; Goeltl, L; Hampel, G; Heil, W; Knecht, A; Keunecke, M; Kratz, J V; Lang, T; Meister, M; Plonka-Spehr, Ch; Pokotilovski, Yu; Reichert, P; Schmidt, U; Krist, Th; Wiehl, N; Zenner, J

    2009-01-01

    For the first time, the neutron optical wall-potential of natural cubic boron nitride (cBN) was measured at the ultracold neutron (UCN) source of the research reactor TRIGA Mainz using the time-of-flight method (TOF). The samples investigated had a wall-potential of (305 +/- 15) neV. This value is in good agreement with the result extracted from neutron reflectometry data and theoretical expectations. Because of its high critical velocity for UCN and its good dielectric characteristics, cubic boron nitride coatings (isotopically enriched) will be useful for a number of applications in UCN experiments.

  12. Deep levels of nitrogen vacancies complexes in graphite-like boron nitride

    CERN Document Server

    Grinyaev, S N; Lopatin, V V

    2002-01-01

    Paper presents results of theoretical studies using methods of model pseudopotential and of extended elementary cell of deep levels of nitrogen vacancies, small clusters from di- and trivacancies of nitrogen covering nearest defects in one layer of graphite-like boron nitride. On the basis of calculated spectra and intensities of oscillators one interpreted local bands of optical absorption, luminescence, photoconductivity in pyrolytic boron nitride prior to and subsequent to irradiation by fast neutrons, protons and ions of carbon (50-150 keV). One identified not deep levels of activation of thermally stimulated luminescence and conductivity prior to and subsequent to irradiation

  13. Phonon-Photon Mapping in a Color Center in Hexagonal Boron Nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuong, T Q P; Cassabois, G; Valvin, P; Ouerghi, A; Chassagneux, Y; Voisin, C; Gil, B

    2016-08-26

    We report on the ultraviolet optical response of a color center in hexagonal boron nitride. We demonstrate a mapping between the vibronic spectrum of the color center and the phonon dispersion in hexagonal boron nitride, with a striking suppression of the phonon assisted emission signal at the energy of the phonon gap. By means of nonperturbative calculations of the electron-phonon interaction in a strongly anisotropic phonon dispersion, we reach a quantitative interpretation of the acoustic phonon sidebands from cryogenic temperatures up to room temperature. Our analysis provides an original method for estimating the spatial extension of the electronic wave function in a point defect. PMID:27610882

  14. Quasi free-standing silicene in a superlattice with hexagonal boron nitride

    KAUST Repository

    Kaloni, T. P.

    2013-11-12

    We study a superlattice of silicene and hexagonal boron nitride by first principles calculations and demonstrate that the interaction between the layers of the superlattice is very small. As a consequence, quasi free-standing silicene is realized in this superlattice. In particular, the Dirac cone of silicene is preserved. Due to the wide band gap of hexagonal boron nitride, the superlattice realizes the characteristic physical phenomena of free-standing silicene. In particular, we address by model calculations the combined effect of the intrinsic spin-orbit coupling and an external electric field, which induces a transition from a semimetal to a topological insulator and further to a band insulator.

  15. Nanostructured Boron Nitride: From Molecular Design to Hydrogen Storage Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georges Moussa

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The spray-pyrolysis of borazine at 1400 °C under nitrogen generates boron nitride (BN nanoparticles (NPs. The as-prepared samples form elementary blocks containing slightly agglomerated NPs with sizes ranging from 55 to 120 nm, a Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET-specific surface area of 34.6 m2 g−1 and a helium density of 1.95 g cm−3. They are relatively stable in air below 850 °C in which only oxidation of the NP surface proceeds, whereas under nitrogen, their lower size affects their high temperature thermal behavior in the temperature range of 1450–2000 °C. Nitrogen heat-treated nanostructures have been carefully analyzed using X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The high temperature treatment (2000 °C gives hollow-cored BN-NPs that are strongly facetted, and after ball-milling, hollow core-mesoporous shell NPs displaying a BET-specific surface area of 200.5 m2·g−1 and a total pore volume of 0.287 cm3·g−1 were produced. They have been used as host material to confine, then destabilize ammonia borane (AB, thus improving its dehydrogenation properties. The as-formed AB@BN nanocomposites liberated H2 at 40 °C, and H2 is pure in the temperature range 40–80 °C, leading to a safe and practical hydrogen storage composite material.

  16. Electron affinity of cubic boron nitride terminated with vanadium oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yu; Sun, Tianyin; Shammas, Joseph; Hao, Mei; Nemanich, Robert J. [Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1504 (United States); Kaur, Manpuneet [School for Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-6106 (United States)

    2015-10-28

    A thermally stable negative electron affinity (NEA) for a cubic boron nitride (c-BN) surface with vanadium-oxide-termination is achieved, and its electronic structure was analyzed with in-situ photoelectron spectroscopy. The c-BN films were prepared by electron cyclotron resonance plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition employing BF{sub 3} and N{sub 2} as precursors. Vanadium layers of ∼0.1 and 0.5 nm thickness were deposited on the c-BN surface in an electron beam deposition system. Oxidation of the metal layer was achieved by an oxygen plasma treatment. After 650 °C thermal annealing, the vanadium oxide on the c-BN surface was determined to be VO{sub 2}, and the surfaces were found to be thermally stable, exhibiting an NEA. In comparison, the oxygen-terminated c-BN surface, where B{sub 2}O{sub 3} was detected, showed a positive electron affinity of ∼1.2 eV. The B{sub 2}O{sub 3} evidently acts as a negatively charged layer introducing a surface dipole directed into the c-BN. Through the interaction of VO{sub 2} with the B{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer, a B-O-V layer structure would contribute a dipole between the O and V layers with the positive side facing vacuum. The lower enthalpy of formation for B{sub 2}O{sub 3} is favorable for the formation of the B-O-V layer structure, which provides a thermally stable surface dipole and an NEA surface.

  17. Pentagonal monolayer crystals of carbon, boron nitride, and silver azide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yagmurcukardes, M., E-mail: mehmetyagmurcukardes@iyte.edu.tr; Senger, R. T., E-mail: tugrulsenger@iyte.edu.tr [Department of Physics, Izmir Institute of Technology, 35430 Urla, Izmir (Turkey); Sahin, H.; Kang, J.; Torun, E.; Peeters, F. M. [Department of Physics, University of Antwerp, Campus Groenenborgerlaan, 2020, Antwerp (Belgium)

    2015-09-14

    In this study, we present a theoretical investigation of structural, electronic, and mechanical properties of pentagonal monolayers of carbon (p-graphene), boron nitride (p-B{sub 2}N{sub 4} and p-B{sub 4}N{sub 2}), and silver azide (p-AgN{sub 3}) by performing state-of-the-art first principles calculations. Our total energy calculations suggest feasible formation of monolayer crystal structures composed entirely of pentagons. In addition, electronic band dispersion calculations indicate that while p-graphene and p-AgN{sub 3} are semiconductors with indirect bandgaps, p-BN structures display metallic behavior. We also investigate the mechanical properties (in-plane stiffness and the Poisson's ratio) of four different pentagonal structures under uniaxial strain. p-graphene is found to have the highest stiffness value and the corresponding Poisson's ratio is found to be negative. Similarly, p-B{sub 2}N{sub 4} and p-B{sub 4}N{sub 2} have negative Poisson's ratio values. On the other hand, the p-AgN{sub 3} has a large and positive Poisson's ratio. In dynamical stability tests based on calculated phonon spectra of these pentagonal monolayers, we find that only p-graphene and p-B{sub 2}N{sub 4} are stable, but p-AgN{sub 3} and p-B{sub 4}N{sub 2} are vulnerable against vibrational excitations.

  18. Structural Modification in Carbon Nanotubes by Boron Incorporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Handuja Sangeeta

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We have synthesized boron-incorporated carbon nanotubes (CNTs by decomposition of ferrocene and xylene in a thermal chemical vapor deposition set up using boric acid as the boron source. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy studies of the synthesized CNT samples showed that there was deterioration in crystallinity and improvement in alignment of the CNTs as the boron content in precursor solution increased from 0% to 15%. Raman analysis of these samples showed a shift of ~7 cm−1in wave number to higher side and broadening of the G band with increasing boron concentration along with an increase in intensity of the G band. Furthermore, there was an increase in the intensity of the D band along with a decrease in its wave number position with increase in boron content. We speculate that these structural modifications in the morphology and microstructure of CNTs might be due to the charge transfer from boron to the graphite matrix, resulting in shortening of the carbon–carbon bonds.

  19. Synthesis and radiation response of BCON: a graphene oxide and hexagonal boron nitride hybrid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhimanapati, Ganesh R.; Wetherington, Maxwell; Mahabir, Shawn; Robinson, Joshua A.

    2016-06-01

    Since graphene, there has been a focus on several two-dimensional material systems (e.g. boron nitride, borocarbon nitride (BCN), transition-metal dichalcogenides) that provide an even wider array of unique chemistries and properties to explore future applications. Specifically, tailoring graphene/boron nitride heterostructures—which can theoretically retain the character of a single-atom thick sheet, withstand large physical strains, are easily functionalized, and have entirely different optical and mechanical properties compared to graphene—can provide the foundation for entirely new research avenues. In recent years, it has been shown that because of the similar crystal structure, carbon, boron, and nitrogen can co-exist as atomic sheets in a layered structure. We have developed a facile method of integrating boron nitride (hBN) and graphene oxide (GO) via chemical exfoliation which we refer to as BCON. The study of the stability of this material at different pH conditions indicates a stable and a uniform solution is achievable at pH 4–8. X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy helped to identify the new bonds which indicated the formation of BCON linkage. Further, an in situ XPS technique was used to understand the chemical changes while exposing it to ionization radiation specially focusing on the C/O ratio. It was observed that even with a very low energy source, this material is highly sensitive to ionizing radiation, such as neutron, alpha and beta particles.

  20. Topological phase transition in hexagonal boron-nitride bilayers modulated by gate voltage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Guojun; Zhai, Xuechao

    2013-03-01

    We study the gate-voltage modulated electronic properties of hexagonal boron-nitride bilayers with two different stacking structures in the presence of intrinsic and Rashba spin-orbit interactions. Our analytical results show that there are striking cooperation effects arising from the spin-orbit interactions and the interlayer bias voltage. For realizing topological phase transition, in contrast to a gated graphene bilayer for increasing its energy gap, the energy gap of a boron-nitride bilayer is significantly reduced by an applied gate voltage. For the AA stacking-bilayer which has the inversion symmetry, a strong topological phase is found, and there is an interesting reentrant behavior from a normal phase to a topological phase and then to a normal phase again, characterized by the topological index. Therefore, the gate voltage modulated AA-boron nitride bilayer can be taken as a newcomer of the topological insulator family. For the AB stacking-bilayer which is lack of the inversion symmetry, it is always topologically trivial, but exhibits an unusual quantum Hall phase with four degenerate low-energy states localized at a single edge. It is suggested that these theoretical findings could be verified experimentally in the transport properties of boron-nitride bylayers. This research was supported by the NSFC (Nos. 60876065, 11074108), PAPD, and NBRPC (Nos. 2009CB929504, 2011CB922102).

  1. Interband transitions, plasmons, and dispersion in hexagonal boron nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarrio, C.; Schnatterly, S.E. (Jesse W. Beams Laboratory of Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22901 (US))

    1989-10-15

    We have measured inelastic-electron-scattering spectra of several hexagonal-boron-nitride samples with momentum transfer both in and out of the {ital a}-{ital b} plane and obtained the dielectric and optical constants from 0 to 60 eV. The low-{ital q} energy-loss spectrum with momentum in the plane is dominated by the {pi}-electron plasmon at 8.5 eV and the total ({sigma}+{pi}) plasmon at 26.4 eV. The {pi} plasmon arises from two strong interband transitions at 6.1 and 6.95 eV, and a continuum threshold at 7.6 eV. The plasmons are well described as collective oscillations of bound electrons. We have inferred a band gap of 5.9 eV by observing the intrinsic absorption threshold in a series of samples of varying purity. The dispersion in the plasmons and the second interband transition is quadratic for 0{lt}{ital q}{lt}1.0 A{sup {minus}1}, while the first interband transition disperses upward in energy up to 0.6 A{sup {minus}1}, above which its energy remains almost constant. The dispersion of the {pi} plasmon is equal to that of the second interband transition, and its width remains constant up to a critical momentum, indicating that its width is dominated by decay into single-particle transitions. The energy-loss function with {ital q} along {ital c} shows three collective oscillations at 7.7, 11.7, and 23 eV. The interband spectrum is similar to that with {ital q} in the plane, except that an additional transition appears at 9.9 eV and the oscillator strength is shifted to higher energies. The similarity in the spectra for {ital q} in and out of the plane indicates nearly degenerate occupied {sigma} and {pi} states near {ital E}{sub {ital F}}, which is inconsistent with existing band-structure calculations.

  2. Fabrication of particular structures of hexagonal boron nitride and boron-carbon-nitrogen layers by anisotropic etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishwakarma, Riteshkumar; Sharma, Subash; Shinde, Sachin M.; Sharma, Kamal P.; Thangaraja, Amutha; Kalita, Golap; Tanemura, Masaki

    2016-05-01

    Anisotropic etching of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) and boron-carbon-nitrogen (BCN) basal plane can be an exciting platform to develop well-defined structures with interesting properties. Here, we developed an etching process of atomically thin h-BN and BCN layers to fabricate nanoribbons (NRs) and other distinct structures by annealing in H2 and Ar gas mixture. BCN and h-BN films are grown on Cu foil by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using solid camphor and ammonia borane as carbon, nitrogen and boron source, respectively. Formation of micron size well-defined etched holes and NRs are obtained in both h-BN and BCN layers by the post growth annealing process. The etching process of h-BN and BCN basal plane to fabricate NRs and other structures with pronounced edges can open up new possibilities in 2D hybrid materials.

  3. Synthesis and anti-oxidation performance of nanoflake-decorated boron nitride hollow microspheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Juan [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China); Lin, Hong [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Chen, Yongjun, E-mail: chenyj99@163.com [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China); College of Material and Chemical Engineering, Hainan University, Haikou 570228 (China); Su, Qiaoqiao; Bi, Xiaofan [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China)

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A novel boron nitride (BN) composite structure composed of nanoflake and hollow microspheres was synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The raw materials are simple precursors of boron and Fe(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}{center_dot}9H{sub 2}O ethanol solution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structures have a high anti-oxidation temperature of 900 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The growth mechanism consists of a combined vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) and vapor-solid (VS) model. - Abstract: In this study, a novel boron nitride composite structure composed of nanoflake-decorated hollow microspheres is demonstrated. A paste-like mixture is firstly prepared by mixing amorphous boron with ferric nitrate ethanol solution, followed by heating at 1300 Degree-Sign C in a flowing ammonia atmosphere for 5 h. Both the nanoflakes and microspheres are composed of crystalline hexagonal boron nitride. The hollow spheres have outer diameters of 0.8-3 {mu}m with thickness of about 300 nm, while the nanoflakes have thicknesses of 2-7 nm and lengths of 10-100 nm. Heating temperature is found to be crucial for the formation of this composite structure. The growth process consists of a vapor-liquid-solid growth stage of smooth hollow microspheres at lower temperature and a vapor-solid growth stage of nanoflakes on the surface of the microspheres at higher temperature. The boron nitride composite structure exhibits excellent anti-oxidation performance up to 900 Degree-Sign C.

  4. Evaluation of Synthesis & Processing Routes for the High K- Boron Nitride Nano Tubes (BNNTS) for Thermal Management Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The purpose of this proposal is to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of processing the High Thermal Conductivity Boron Nitride Nano Tubes (High-K BNNTs) that...

  5. The effect of the boron source composition ratio on the adsorption performance of hexagonal boron nitride without a template

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ning, E-mail: zhangning5832@163.com; Zhang, Tong; Kan, Hongmin; Wang, Xiaoyang; Long, Haibo; Cui, Xingyu

    2015-08-01

    An inexpensive boric acid (H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}) and borax (Na{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}·10H{sub 2}O) mix was used as a source of boron with different composition ratios, and urea was used as a nitrogen source, in flowing ammonia atmosphere, for the preparation of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) with different micro-morphologies. Under a certain synthesis process, the effects of the molar ratio of borax and boric acid (or simply the boron source composition ratio for short) on the phase composition of the sample were studied; the work also explored the effect of boron source composition ratio on the micro-morphology, adsorption desorption isotherm and specific surface area of the h-BN powder. The main purpose of this work was to determine the optimum composition ratio of preparing spherical mesoporous h-BN and ensure that the micro-mechanism underpinning the formation of spherical mesoporous h-BN was understood. The results showed that at the optimum boron source composition ratio of 1:1, globular mesoporous spheres with a diameter of approximately 600–800 nm could be obtained with the highest pore volume and specific surface area (230.2 m{sup 2}/g). - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Spherical h-BN was synthesized by controlling the boron source composition ratio. • Without extra spherical template, solid Na{sub 2}O was equal to a spherical template. • At boron source composition ratio of 1:1, h-BN had best adsorption performance.

  6. RF plasma reactive pulsed laser deposition of boron nitride thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitu, B. [CNR-IMIP/PZ Zona Industriale di Tito Scalo, I - 85050 Tito Scalo (PZ) (Italy)]. E-mail: mitub@alpha1.infim.ro; Bilkova, P. [CNR-IMIP/PZ Zona Industriale di Tito Scalo, I - 85050 Tito Scalo (PZ) (Italy)]. E-mail: bilkova.petra@tiscali.cz; Marotta, V. [CNR-IMIP/PZ Zona Industriale di Tito Scalo, I - 85050 Tito Scalo (PZ) (Italy); Orlando, S. [CNR-IMIP/PZ Zona Industriale di Tito Scalo, I - 85050 Tito Scalo (PZ) (Italy)]. E-mail: orlando@imip.pz.cnr.it; Santagata, A. [CNR-IMIP/PZ Zona Industriale di Tito Scalo, I - 85050 Tito Scalo (PZ) (Italy)

    2005-07-15

    Thin films of boron nitride (BN) have been deposited on Si(1 0 0) substrates by reactive pulsed laser ablation (PLA) of a boron target in the presence of a 13.56 MHz radio frequency (RF) nitrogen plasma. The gaseous species have been deposited at several substrate temperatures, using the on-axis configuration. The film properties have been investigated by Scanning Electron Microscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy, Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction characterization techniques, and compared to those resulting from the conventional PLA method. The behavior of hexagonal-BN and cubic-BN phases grown by PLA as function of substrate temperature is also reported.

  7. Boundary scattering in quasi-ballistic graphene/hexagonal boron nitride mesoscopic wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iguchi, Kazuyuki; Masubuchi, Satoru; Yamaguchi, Takehiro; Ohnuki, Masahiro; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Machida, Tomoki

    2012-02-01

    In a quasi-ballistic transport regime where the mean free path is larger than the width of conduction channel, diffusive boundary scattering results in an anomalous positive magnetoresistance due to a megnetic commensurability effect between cyclotron motion and sample width. In this work, we fabricate a high-mobility two terminal graphene mesoscopic wire on hexagonal boron nitride with a mean free path comparable to sample width ˜ 1 μm. Magnetoresistance of the graphene mesoscopic wire shows a peak structure at a magnetic field which scales with the ratio of the cyclotron radius Rc to the wire width w. The peak field increases with back-gate voltage as a consequence that the ratio w/Rc is modified due to the change in Rc. These results indicate the quasi-ballistic transport and diffusive boundary scattering in graphene on hexagonal boron nitride.

  8. Hyperbolic phonon-polaritons in boron nitride for near-field optical imaging and focusing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peining; Lewin, Martin; Kretinin, Andrey V.; Caldwell, Joshua D.; Novoselov, Kostya S.; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Gaussmann, Fabian; Taubner, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Hyperbolic materials exhibit sub-diffractional, highly directional, volume-confined polariton modes. Here we report that hyperbolic phonon polaritons allow for a flat slab of hexagonal boron nitride to enable exciting near-field optical applications, including unusual imaging phenomenon (such as an enlarged reconstruction of investigated objects) and sub-diffractional focusing. Both the enlarged imaging and the super-resolution focusing are explained based on the volume-confined, wavelength dependent propagation angle of hyperbolic phonon polaritons. With advanced infrared nanoimaging techniques and state-of-art mid-infrared laser sources, we have succeeded in demonstrating and visualizing these unexpected phenomena in both Type I and Type II hyperbolic conditions, with both occurring naturally within hexagonal boron nitride. These efforts have provided a full and intuitive physical picture for the understanding of the role of hyperbolic phonon polaritons in near-field optical imaging, guiding, and focusing applications.

  9. Phonon-Assisted Resonant Tunneling of Electrons in Graphene-Boron Nitride Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vdovin, E E; Mishchenko, A; Greenaway, M T; Zhu, M J; Ghazaryan, D; Misra, A; Cao, Y; Morozov, S V; Makarovsky, O; Fromhold, T M; Patanè, A; Slotman, G J; Katsnelson, M I; Geim, A K; Novoselov, K S; Eaves, L

    2016-05-01

    We observe a series of sharp resonant features in the differential conductance of graphene-hexagonal boron nitride-graphene tunnel transistors over a wide range of bias voltages between 10 and 200 mV. We attribute them to electron tunneling assisted by the emission of phonons of well-defined energy. The bias voltages at which they occur are insensitive to the applied gate voltage and hence independent of the carrier densities in the graphene electrodes, so plasmonic effects can be ruled out. The phonon energies corresponding to the resonances are compared with the lattice dispersion curves of graphene-boron nitride heterostructures and are close to peaks in the single phonon density of states. PMID:27203338

  10. Ultra-sensitive Hall sensors based on graphene encapsulated in hexagonal boron nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dauber, Jan; Stampfer, Christoph [JARA-FIT and 2nd Institute of Physics, RWTH Aachen University, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Peter Grünberg Institute (PGI-8/9), Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Sagade, Abhay A.; Neumaier, Daniel [Advanced Microelectronic Center Aachen (AMICA), AMO GmbH, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Oellers, Martin [JARA-FIT and 2nd Institute of Physics, RWTH Aachen University, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan)

    2015-05-11

    The encapsulation of graphene in hexagonal boron nitride provides graphene on substrate with excellent material quality. Here, we present the fabrication and characterization of Hall sensor elements based on graphene boron nitride heterostructures, where we gain from high mobility and low charge carrier density at room temperature. We show a detailed device characterization including Hall effect measurements under vacuum and ambient conditions. We achieve a current- and voltage-related sensitivity of up to 5700 V/AT and 3 V/VT, respectively, outpacing state-of-the-art silicon and III/V Hall sensor devices. Finally, we extract a magnetic resolution limited by low frequency electric noise of less than 50 nT/√(Hz) making our graphene sensors highly interesting for industrial applications.

  11. Biophysical response of living cells to boron nitride nanoparticles: uptake mechanism and bio-mechanical characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasel, Md. Alim Iftekhar; Li, Tong; Nguyen, Trung Dung; Singh, Sanjleena [Queensland University of Technology (QUT), School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering (Australia); Zhou, Yinghong; Xiao, Yin [Queensland University of Technology (QUT), Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation (Australia); Gu, YuanTong, E-mail: yuantong.gu@qut.edu.au [Queensland University of Technology (QUT), School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering (Australia)

    2015-11-15

    Boron nitride nanomaterials have attracted significant interest due to their superior chemical and physical properties. Despite these novel properties, investigation on the interaction between boron nitride nanoparticle (BN NP) and living systems has been limited. In this study, BN NP (100–250 nm) is assessed as a promising biomaterial for medical applications. The toxicity of BN NP is evaluated by assessing the cells behaviours both biologically (MTT assay, ROS detection etc.) and physically (atomic force microscopy). The uptake mechanism of BN NP is studied by analysing the alternations in cellular morphology based on cell imaging techniques. The results demonstrate in vitro cytocompatibility of BN NP with immense potential for use as an effective nanoparticle for various bio-medical applications.

  12. The electronic transport behavior of hybridized zigzag graphene and boron nitride nanoribbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this present work, we have investigated the electronic transport properties of the hybridized structure constructed by the zigzag graphene and boron-nitride (BN) nanoribbons (Z-BnNmCp, n + m + p = 16) through employing nonequilibrium Green's functions in combination with the density-functional theory. The results demonstrate that the electronic transport properties of the hybridized Z-BnNmCp nanoribbons are strongly dependent on the width of boron-nitride or graphene nanoribbons. When the numbers of n and m are not equal, the negative differential resistance behavior is observed, which can be modulated by varying the width of BN nanoribbons. The conductance of the hybridized Z-BnNmCp nanoribbons with odd numbers of zigzag carbon chains also increases by the width of BN nanoribbons

  13. Theoretical investigation of the electronic structures and carrier transport of hybrid graphene and boron nitride nanostructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Tao Sun

    2012-09-01

    graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (C-BN nanostructures receive much research interest due to the complementary electronic properties. Graphene is a zero-gap semiconductor, while hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN is a wide gap semiconductor. Here we studied the electronic structures and carrier transport of hybrid C-BN nanostructures by using first principles calculations and deformation potential theory. We have found that the physical quantities in these systems under study, band gap, effective mass, deformation potential, and carrier mobility, can be categorised into three different families depending on the width of graphene nanoribbon. This family behavior is similar to pristine armchair graphene nanoribbon, but with slight difference from the individual component. New opportunities of designing nanoelectric devices are discussed by utilizing the quantum confinement effect based on such kind of hybrid nanostructures.

  14. Biophysical response of living cells to boron nitride nanoparticles: uptake mechanism and bio-mechanical characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron nitride nanomaterials have attracted significant interest due to their superior chemical and physical properties. Despite these novel properties, investigation on the interaction between boron nitride nanoparticle (BN NP) and living systems has been limited. In this study, BN NP (100–250 nm) is assessed as a promising biomaterial for medical applications. The toxicity of BN NP is evaluated by assessing the cells behaviours both biologically (MTT assay, ROS detection etc.) and physically (atomic force microscopy). The uptake mechanism of BN NP is studied by analysing the alternations in cellular morphology based on cell imaging techniques. The results demonstrate in vitro cytocompatibility of BN NP with immense potential for use as an effective nanoparticle for various bio-medical applications

  15. Chemical reaction of hexagonal boron nitride and graphite nanoclusters in mechanical milling systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muramatsu, Y.; Grush, M.; Callcott, T.A. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Synthesis of boron-carbon-nitride (BCN) hybrid alloys has been attempted extensively by many researchers because the BCN alloys are considered an extremely hard material called {open_quotes}super diamond,{close_quotes} and the industrial application for wear-resistant materials is promising. A mechanical alloying (MA) method of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) with graphite has recently been studied to explore the industrial synthesis of the BCN alloys. To develop the MA method for the BCN alloy synthesis, it is necessary to confirm the chemical reaction processes in the mechanical milling systems and to identify the reaction products. Therefore, the authors have attempted to confirm the chemical reaction process of the h-BN and graphite in mechanical milling systems using x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) methods.

  16. Enrichment and desalting of tryptic protein digests and the protein depletion using boron nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischnaller, Martin; Köck, Rainer; Bakry, Rania, E-mail: rania.bakry@uibk.ac.at; Bonn, Günther K.

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • Protein tryptic digests were desalted and enriched utilizing hexagonal boron nitride. • Phosphopeptides were desalted with high recovery rates. • Boron nitride exhibits high wettability allowing fast sample preparation. • Boron nitride shows protein depletion capability applied for peptide purification. - Abstract: Sample preparation still remains a great challenge in modern bioanalysis and the interest in new efficient solid phase extraction (SPE) materials still remains high. In this work, hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is introduced as a new SPE material for the isolation and enrichment of peptides. The h-BN is isoelectronic and structurally similar to graphite. It has remarkable properties including good thermal conductivity, excellent thermal and chemical stability and a better oxidation resistance than graphite. BN attracts increasing interest because of its wide range of applicability. In the present work, the great potential of h-BN, as a new SPE-material, on the enrichment, preconcentration and desalting of tryptic digest of model proteins is demonstrated. A special attention was dedicated to the efficient enrichment of hydrophilic phosphopeptides. Two elution protocols were developed for the enrichment of peptides compatible for subsequent MALDI-MS and ESI-MS analysis. In addition, the recoveries of 5 peptides and 3 phosphopeptides with wide range of pI values utilizing h-BN materials with different surface areas were investigated. 84–106% recovery rate could be achieved using h-BN materials. The results were compared with those obtained using graphite and silica C18 under the same elution conditions, and lower recoveries were obtained. In addition, h-BN was found to have a capability of protein depletion, which is requisite for the peptide profiling.

  17. Edge Chemistry Effects on the Structural, Electronic, and Electric Response Properties of Boron Nitride Quantum Dots

    OpenAIRE

    Krepel, Dana; Kalikhman-Razvozov, Lena; Hod, Oded

    2014-01-01

    The effects of edge hydrogenation and hydroxylation on the relative stability and electronic properties of hexagonal boron nitride quantum dots (h-BNQDs) are investigated. Zigzag edge hydroxylation is found to result in considerable energetic stabilization of h-BNQDs as well as a reduction of their electronic gap with respect to their hydrogenated counterparts. The application of an external in-plane electric field leads to a monotonous decrease of the gap. When compared to their edge-hydroge...

  18. Effects of Edge Oxidation on the Structural, Electronic, and Magnetic Properties of Zigzag Boron Nitride Nanoribbons

    OpenAIRE

    Krepel, Dana; Hod, Oded

    2013-01-01

    The effects of edge chemistry on the relative stability and electronic properties of zigzag boron nitride nanoribbons (ZBNNRs) are investigated. Among all functional groups considered, fully hydroxylated ZBNNRs are found to be the most energetically stable. When an in-plane external electric field is applied perpendicular to the axis of both hydrogenated and hydroxylated ZBNNRs, a spin-polarized half-metallic state is induced, whose character is different than that predicted for ZGNRs. The on...

  19. Amplitude- and phase-resolved nano-spectral imaging of phonon polaritons in hexagonal boron nitride

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Zhiwen; Bechte, Hans A.; Berweger, Samuel; Sun, Yinghui; Zeng, Bo; Jin, Chenhao; Chang, Henry; Martin, Michael C.; Raschke, Markus B.; Wang, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Phonon polaritons are quasiparticles resulting from strong coupling of photons with optical phonons. Excitation and control of these quasiparticles in 2D materials offer the opportunity to confine and transport light at the nanoscale. Here, we image the phonon polariton (PhP) spectral response in thin hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) crystals as a representative 2D material using amplitude- and phase-resolved near-field interferometry with broadband mid-IR synchrotron radiation. The large spectr...

  20. Hyperbolic phonon-polaritons in boron nitride for near-field optical imaging and focusing

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Peining; Lewin, Martin; Kretinin, Andrey V.; Caldwell, Joshua D.; Novoselov, Kostya S.; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Gaussmann, Fabian; Taubner, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Hyperbolic materials exhibit sub-diffractional, highly directional, volume-confined polariton modes. Here we report that hyperbolic phonon polaritons allow for a flat slab of hexagonal boron nitride to enable exciting near-field optical applications, including unusual imaging phenomenon (such as an enlarged reconstruction of investigated objects) and sub-diffractional focusing. Both the enlarged imaging and the super-resolution focusing are explained based on the volume-confined, wavelength d...

  1. Cu and Boron Doped Carbon Nitride for Highly Selective Oxidation of Toluene to Benzaldehyde

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongling Han

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A novel Cu and boron doped graphitic carbon nitride catalyst (Cu-CNB was synthesized using cheap precursors and systematically characterized. The selective oxidation of toluene proceeded very smoothly over the catalyst at 70 °C using tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP as the oxidant to exclusively afford benzaldehyde. The catalyst can be used for at least five cycles without decrease in activity and selectivity.

  2. Growth Feature of Cubic Boron Nitride on c-BN Crystal Substrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Da-Peng; SU Zuo-Peng; DU Yong-Hui; JI Xiao-Rui; YANG Xu-Xin; GONG Xi-Liang; ZHANG Tie-Chen

    2006-01-01

    @@ Cubic boron nitride (c-BN) films were deposited on highly-oriented (111) bulk c-BN crystal by using the rf magnetron sputtering method. The growth films are characterized by micro-Raman spectroscopy (μ-RS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results show that the high crystallization electron transparent c-BN films in thickness of about 10μm are obtained. Island and step growth models are clearly shown.

  3. Ion-induced stress relaxation during the growth of cubic boron nitride thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abendroth, B.E.

    2004-08-01

    in this thesis the deposition of cubic boron nitride films by magnetron sputtering is described. The deposition process is analyzed by Langmuir-probe measurement and energy resolved mass spectroscopy. the films are studied by stress measurement, spectroscopic ellipsometry, infrared spectroscopy, elastic recoil detection analysis, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. Discussed are the stress relaxation and the microstructure and bonding characteristics together with the effects of ion bombardement. (HSI)

  4. Asymmetric energy transport in defected boron nitride nanoribbons: Implications for thermal rectification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Muralidharan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Using molecular dynamics simulations, the thermal transport properties of boron nitride nanoribbons (BNNR containing geometrically-asymmetric triangular nano-vacancies were investigated. By suitably interpreting the time-evolution of spatially decomposed heat-current autocorrelation function in terms of phonon propagation characteristics, we have demonstrated the possibility of observing defect induced direction-dependent thermal transport in BNNR. This was further confirmed by appropriate analysis of direction dependent thermal diffusivity estimations in BNNR.

  5. Ion-induced stress relaxation during the growth of cubic boron nitride thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    in this thesis the deposition of cubic boron nitride films by magnetron sputtering is described. The deposition process is analyzed by Langmuir-probe measurement and energy resolved mass spectroscopy. the films are studied by stress measurement, spectroscopic ellipsometry, infrared spectroscopy, elastic recoil detection analysis, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. Discussed are the stress relaxation and the microstructure and bonding characteristics together with the effects of ion bombardement. (HSI)

  6. Picosecond laser structuration under high pressures: observation of boron nitride nanorods

    OpenAIRE

    Museur, L.; Petitet, J. P.; Michel, J.P.; Marine, V.; Anglos, D.; Fotakis, C.; Kanaev, A.V.

    2008-01-01

    We report on picosecond UV-laser processing of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) at moderately high pressures above 500 bar. The main effect is specific to the ambient gas and laser pulse duration in the ablation regime: when samples are irradiated by 5 ps or 0.45 ps laser pulses in nitrogen gas environment, multiple nucleation of a new crystalline product - BN nanorods - takes place. This process is triggered on structural defects, which number density strongly decreases upon recrystallization. ...

  7. Load capacity of hardened gear wheels machined with cubic boron nitride (CBN wedges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Talar

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of exploitation examination of gear wheels with hardened bearing surface. The gears under investigation have been finish machined by the method elaborated by the author, with a tool possessing wedges made of CBN (cubic boron nitride. The symptoms of tooth surface wear having arisen during operation on the test rig with power loop. Assessment of the gear wheels’ capacity of carrying loads under EHL (ElastoHydrodynamic Lubrication conditions has been performed.

  8. Silver Nanoparticle-Deposited Boron Nitride Nanosheets as Fillers for Polymeric Composites with High Thermal Conductivity

    OpenAIRE

    Fangfang Wang; Xiaoliang Zeng; Yimin Yao; Rong Sun; Jianbin Xu; Ching-Ping Wong

    2016-01-01

    Polymer composites with high thermal conductivity have recently attracted much attention, along with the rapid development of the electronic devices toward higher speed and performance. However, a common method to enhance polymer thermal conductivity through an addition of high thermally conductive fillers usually cannot provide an expected value, especially for composites requiring electrical insulation. Here, we show that polymeric composites with silver nanoparticle-deposited boron nitride...

  9. Solvent-free fabrication of thermally conductive insulating epoxy composites with boron nitride nanoplatelets as fillers

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Zifeng; Fu, Yuqiao; Meng, Wenjun; Zhi, Chunyi

    2014-01-01

    A solvent-free method for the fabrication of thermally conductive epoxy-boron nitride (BN) nanoplatelet composite material is developed in this study. By this method, polymer composites with nearly any filler fractions can be easily fabricated. The maximum thermal conductivity reaches 5.24 W/mK, which is 1,600% improvement in comparison with that of pristine epoxy material. In addition, the as-fabricated samples exhibit excellent overall performances with great mechanical property and thermal...

  10. Moire superlattice effects in graphene/boron-nitride van der Waals heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallbank, John R.; Chen, Xi; Fal' ko, Vladimir I. [Department of Physics, Lancaster University, Lancaster (United Kingdom); Mucha-Kruczynski, Marcin [Department of Physics, University of Bath (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-15

    Van der Waals heterostructures of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride feature a moire superlattice for graphene's Dirac electrons. Here, we review the effects generated by this superlattice, including a specific miniband structure featuring gaps and secondary Dirac points, and a fractal spectrum of magnetic minibands known as Hofstadter's butterfly. (copyright 2015 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Graphene quantum dot on boron nitride: Dirac cone replica and Hofstadter butterfly

    OpenAIRE

    Chizhova, L. A.; Libisch, F.; Burgdörfer, J.

    2014-01-01

    Graphene flakes placed on hexagonal boron nitride feature in the presence of a magnetic field a complex electronic structure due to a hexagonal moir\\'e potential resulting from the van der Waals interaction with the substrate. The slight lattice mismatch gives rise to a periodic supercell potential. Zone folding is expected to create replica of the original Dirac cone and Hofstadter butterflies. Our large-scale tight binding simulation reveals an unexpected coexistence of a relativistic and n...

  12. Facile fabrication of boron nitride nanosheets-amorphous carbon hybrid film for optoelectronic applications

    KAUST Repository

    Wan, Shanhong

    2015-01-01

    A novel boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs)-amorphous carbon (a-C) hybrid film has been deposited successfully on silicon substrates by simultaneous electrochemical deposition, and showed a good integrity of this B-C-N composite film by the interfacial bonding. This synthesis can potentially provide the facile control of the B-C-N composite film for the potential optoelectronic devices. This journal is

  13. Influence of Biofield Treatment on Physical, Structural and Spectral Properties of Boron Nitride

    OpenAIRE

    Trivedi, Mahendra; Nayak, Gopal

    2015-01-01

    Boron nitride (BN) is known for high hardness, thermal stability, thermal conductivity, and catalytic action. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of biofield treatment on physical, structural and spectral properties of BN powder. The control and treated sample of BN powder were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), surface area analysis and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). XRD results indicated that biofield treatment had substantially changed the crystalli...

  14. Cu and Boron Doped Carbon Nitride for Highly Selective Oxidation of Toluene to Benzaldehyde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hongling; Ding, Guodong; Wu, Tianbin; Yang, Dexin; Jiang, Tao; Han, Buxing

    2015-07-13

    A novel Cu and boron doped graphitic carbon nitride catalyst (Cu-CNB) was synthesized using cheap precursors and systematically characterized. The selective oxidation of toluene proceeded very smoothly over the catalyst at 70 °C using tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP) as the oxidant to exclusively afford benzaldehyde. The catalyst can be used for at least five cycles without decrease in activity and selectivity.

  15. Adsorption of sugars on Al- and Ga-doped boron nitride surfaces: A computational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwish, Ahmed A.; Fadlallah, Mohamed M.; Badawi, Ashraf; Maarouf, Ahmed A.

    2016-07-01

    Molecular adsorption on surfaces is a key element for many applications, including sensing and catalysis. Non-invasive sugar sensing has been an active area of research due to its importance to diabetes care. The adsorption of sugars on a template surface study is at the heart of matter. Here, we study doped hexagonal boron nitride sheets (h-BNNs) as adsorbing and sensing template for glucose and glucosamine. Using first principles calculations, we find that the adsorption of glucose and glucosamine on h-BNNs is significantly enhanced by the substitutional doping of the sheet with Al and Ga. Including long range van der Waals corrections gives adsorption energies of about 2 eV. In addition to the charge transfer occurring between glucose and the Al/Ga-doped BN sheets, the adsorption alters the size of the band gap, allowing for optical detection of adsorption. We also find that Al-doped boron nitride sheet is better than Ga-doped boron nitride sheet to enhance the adsorption energy of glucose and glucosamine. The results of our work can be potentially utilized when designing support templates for glucose and glucosamine.

  16. Kinetics and film properties of boron nitride derived from trimethoxyborane/ammonia by chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The kinetics of the CVD of boron nitride from trimethoxyborane (TMOB) and ammonia (NH3) under atmospheric pressure was investigated by varying the following process parameters: temperature, residence time of the reactants, molar fraction of TMOB, and the NH3/TMOB ratio, γ. A kinetic power law equation was derived, that describes the experimental results with good accuracy. The reaction order with respect to TMOB is found to be 0.9 and -0.2 with respect to NH3. Between 800 C and 950 C, the deposition rate is controlled by the surface reaction kinetics with apparent activation energy of 115.1 kJ mol-1. The deposited BN films were characterized by IR spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The microstructure of the deposits depends on the nature of the substrates used. Turbostratic boron nitride (t-BN) was deposited on graphite, and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) on alumina substrates. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses show nearly stoichiometric BN films for deposition temperatures in the range 850-950 C for high amounts of ammonia (100< γ <150) in the feed gas. (Abstract Copyright [2004], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  17. Feasibility study of Boron Nitride coating on Lithium-ion battery casing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increasing in public awareness about global warming and exhaustion of energy resources has led to a flourishing electric vehicle industry that would help realize a zero-emission society. The thermal management of battery packs, which is an essential issue closely linked to a number of challenges for electric vehicles including cost, safety, reliability and lifetime, has been extensively studied. However, relatively little is known about the thermal effect of polymer insulation on the Lithium-ion battery casing. This study investigates the feasibility of replacing the polymer insulation with a Boron Nitride coating on the battery casing using the Taguchi experimental method. The effect of casing surface roughness, coating thickness and their interaction were examined using orthogonal array L9 (34). Nominal the best is chosen for the optimization process to achieve optimum adhesion strength. In addition, the thermal improvements of the coating as compared to conventional polymer insulator on the battery are further investigated. - Highlights: • We studied the Boron Nitride coating on battery casing using Taguchi method. • We investigated the effect of surface roughness and coating thickness on adhesion strength. • We compared the effect of coating and polymer insulator in heat transfer. • The Boron Nitride coating could enhance the thermal management of the battery

  18. The influence of metal Mg on micro-morphology and crystallinity of spherical hexagonal boron nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ning, E-mail: zhangning5832@163.com; Liu, Huan; Kan, Hongmin; Wang, Xiaoyang; Long, Haibo; Zhou, Yonghui

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • The action mechanism of Mg to the synthesis of spherical BN was explored. • The influence of Mg content on the crystallinity of h-BN powders was studied. • Even if not added any template, the spherical h-BN could be prepared. - Abstract: This search used the boric acid and borax as a source of boron, urea as a nitrogen source, Mg as metal catalyst, and thus prepared different micro-morphology and crystallinity hexagonal boron nitride powders under a flowing ammonia atmosphere at a nitriding temperature of 750 °C. The effect of Mg content on the crystallinity and micro-morphology of hexagonal boron nitride powders was studied, and the Mg action mechanism was explored. Without the added surfactant, the graphitization index (GI) was 6.87, and the diameter of the spherical h-BN was bigger. When the added Mg were 0.1 g, 0.3 g, 0.5 g and 0.7 g, the (GI) decreased to 6.04, 5.67, 4.62 and 4.84, respectively. When the Mg content was higher (0.9 g), GI value increased rapidly, and the crystallinity became bad. When the Mg content was 0.5 g, the dispersion of h-BN powders was at its optimum and refinement apparently, and the crystallinity at its highest.

  19. Layer speciation and electronic structure investigation of freestanding hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    WangEqual Contribution To This Work., Jian; Wang, Zhiqiang; Cho, Hyunjin; Kim, Myung Jong; Sham, T. K.; Sun, Xuhui

    2015-01-01

    Chemical imaging, thickness mapping, layer speciation and polarization dependence have been performed on single and multilayered (up to three layers and trilayered nanosheets overlapping to form 6 and 9 layers) hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) nanosheets by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy. Spatially-resolved XANES directly from freestanding regions of different layers has been extracted and compared with sample normal and 30° tilted configurations. Notably a double feature σ* excitonic state and a stable high energy σ* state were observed at the boron site in addition to the intense π* excitonic state. The boron projected σ* DOS, especially the first σ* exciton, is sensitive to surface modification, particularly in the single layered hBN nanosheet which shows more significant detectable contaminants and defects such as tri-coordinated boron/nitrogen oxide. The nitrogen site has shown very weak or no excitonic character. The distinct excitonic effect on boron and nitrogen was interpreted to the partly ionic state of hBN. Bulk XANES of hBN nanosheets was also measured to confirm the spectro-microscopic STXM result. Finally, the unoccupied electronic structures of hBN and graphene were compared.Chemical imaging, thickness mapping, layer speciation and polarization dependence have been performed on single and multilayered (up to three layers and trilayered nanosheets overlapping to form 6 and 9 layers) hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) nanosheets by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy. Spatially-resolved XANES directly from freestanding regions of different layers has been extracted and compared with sample normal and 30° tilted configurations. Notably a double feature σ* excitonic state and a stable high energy σ* state were observed at the boron site in addition to the intense π* excitonic state. The boron projected σ* DOS, especially the first σ* exciton, is sensitive to surface modification, particularly in the single layered hBN nanosheet which

  20. Laser-initiated primary and secondary nuclear reactions in Boron-Nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labaune, C.; Baccou, C.; Yahia, V.; Neuville, C.; Rafelski, J.

    2016-02-01

    Nuclear reactions initiated by laser-accelerated particle beams are a promising new approach to many applications, from medical radioisotopes to aneutronic energy production. We present results demonstrating the occurrence of secondary nuclear reactions, initiated by the primary nuclear reaction products, using multicomponent targets composed of either natural boron (B) or natural boron nitride (BN). The primary proton-boron reaction (p + 11B → 3 α + 8.7 MeV), is one of the most attractive aneutronic fusion reaction. We report radioactive decay signatures in targets irradiated at the Elfie laser facility by laser-accelerated particle beams which we interpret as due to secondary reactions induced by alpha (α) particles produced in the primary reactions. Use of a second nanosecond laser beam, adequately synchronized with the short laser pulse to produce a plasma target, further enhanced the reaction rates. High rates and chains of reactions are essential for most applications.

  1. Processing, mechanical and thermophysical properties of silicon nitride based composites with carbon nanotubes and graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Koszor

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Silicon nitride based composites with different amount (1, 2 and 3 wt% of multi-wall and single-wall carbon nanotubes, and graphene have been prepared. Optimisation of the manufacturing processes has been conducted to preserve the carbon nanotubes in composites and to avoid damaging during high temperature processing. The first results show that carbon nanotubes have a good contact to the surface of silicon nitride grains. In the case of increase of sintering pressure an increase of bending strength was achieved. It was found that microstructure features achieved by properly designed sintering parameters are the main responsible factors for the strength improvements.

  2. Transport properties of boron nanotubes investigated by ab initio calculation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Wei; Hu Yi-Bin; Zhang Yu-Yang; Du Shi-Xuan; Gao Hong-Jun

    2009-01-01

    We investigate atomic and electronic structures of boron nanotubes (BNTs) by using the density functional theory(DFT). The transport properties of BNTs with different diameters and chiralities are studied by the Keldysh nonequi-librium Green function (NEGF) method. It is found that the cohesive energies and conductances of BNTs decrease as their diameters decrease. It is more difficult to form (N, 0) tubes than (M, M) tubes when the diameters of the two kinds of tubes are comparable. However, the (N, 0) tubes have a higher conductance than the (M, M) tubes. When the BNTs are connected to gold electrodes, the coupling between the BNTs and the electrodes will affect the transport properties of tubes significantly.

  3. Experimental core electron density of cubic boron nitride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlberg, Nanna; Bindzus, Niels; Bjerg, Lasse;

    and an extended multipolar model an experimental modeling of the core density is possible.4 The thermal motion is a problem since it is strongly correlated to the changes of the core density, but by combining the average displacement from a Wilson plot and a constrained refinement, a reasonable result has been...... obtained. The displacement parameters reported here are significantly lower than those previously reported, stressing the importance of an adequate description of the core density. The charge transfer from boron to nitrogen clearly affects the inner electron density, which is evident from theoretical...

  4. Characterization of bulk hexagonal boron nitride single crystals grown by the metal flux technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgar, J. H.; Hoffman, T. B.; Clubine, B.; Currie, M.; Du, X. Z.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X.

    2014-10-01

    The optical and physical properties of hexagonal boron nitride single crystals grown from a molten metal solution are reported. The hBN crystals were grown by precipitation from a nickel-chromium flux with a boron nitride source, by slowly cooling from 1500 °C at 2-4 °C/h under a nitrogen flow at atmospheric pressure. The hBN crystals formed on the surface of the flux with an apparent crystal size up to 1-2 mm in diameter. Individual grains were as large as 100-200 μm across. Typically, the flakes removed from the metal were 6-20 μm thick. Optical absorption measurements suggest a bandgap of 5.8 eV by neglecting the binding energy of excitons in hBN. The highest energy photoluminescence peak was at 5.75 eV at room temperature. The hBN crystals typically had a pit density of 5×106 cm-2 after etching in a molten eutectic mixture of potassium hydroxide and sodium hydroxide. The quality of these crystals suggests they are suitable as substrates for two dimensional materials such as graphene and gallium nitride based devices.

  5. Effect of Nitrogen Impurity on Electronic Properties of Boron Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Kumar Jain

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available For the first time we present electronic band structure and density of states for nitrogen doped hexagonal ultrathin boron nanotubes in the framework of density functional theory. The considered models of nanotubes below 5 Å diameter are armchair (3,3, zigzag (5,0, and chiral (4,2. The impurity chosen for the study is nitrogen and concentration of impurity atoms is limited to two. The study reveals that (3,3 BNT retains its metallic nature after nitrogen doping. However, metallicity gets increased which is attributed by the excess electrons of nitrogen. Further, it also brings out that (5,0 BNT which is originally metal transforms into semiconductor after nitrogen interaction and the band gap at G point increases with the impurity. Moreover, the band gap of (4,2 BNT reduces significantly and turns into semimetal for nitrogen doping. Thus, the nitrogen impurity has the predominant effect on the electronic properties of BNTs and therefore can be regarded as suitable candidates for nanoelectronic and field emission devices.

  6. Defect charge states in Si doped hexagonal boron-nitride monolayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapasha, R E; Molepo, M P; Andrew, R C; Chetty, N

    2016-02-10

    We perform ab initio density functional theory calculations to investigate the energetics, electronic and magnetic properties of isolated stoichiometric and non-stoichiometric substitutional Si complexes in a hexagonal boron-nitride monolayer. The Si impurity atoms substituting the boron atom sites SiB giving non-stoichiometric complexes are found to be the most energetically favourable, and are half-metallic and order ferromagnetically in the neutral charge state. We find that the magnetic moments and magnetization energies increase monotonically when Si defects form a cluster. Partial density of states and standard Mulliken population analysis indicate that the half-metallic character and magnetic moments mainly arise from the Si 3p impurity states. The stoichiometric Si complexes are energetically unfavorable and non-magnetic. When charging the energetically favourable non-stoichiometric Si complexes, we find that the formation energies strongly depend on the impurity charge states and Fermi level position. We also find that the magnetic moments and orderings are tunable by charge state modulation q  =  -2, -1, 0, +1, +2. The induced half-metallic character is lost (retained) when charging isolated (clustered) Si defect(s). This underlines the potential of a Si doped hexagonal boron-nitride monolayer for novel spin-based applications.

  7. Covalently bonded three-dimensional carbon nanotube solids via boron induced nanojunctions

    OpenAIRE

    Hashim, Daniel P.; Narayanan, Narayanan T.; Romo-Herrera, Jose M.; Cullen, David A.; Myung Gwan Hahm; Peter Lezzi; Suttle, Joseph R.; Doug Kelkhoff; E. Muñoz-Sandoval; Sabyasachi Ganguli; Roy, Ajit K.; Smith, David J.; Robert Vajtai; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Vincent Meunier

    2012-01-01

    The establishment of covalent junctions between carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and the modification of their straight tubular morphology are two strategies needed to successfully synthesize nanotube-based three-dimensional (3D) frameworks exhibiting superior material properties. Engineering such 3D structures in scalable synthetic processes still remains a challenge. This work pioneers the bulk synthesis of 3D macroscale nanotube elastic solids directly via a boron-doping strategy during chemical va...

  8. Polymer-Derived Boron Nitride: A Review on the Chemistry, Shaping and Ceramic Conversion of Borazine Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Bernard

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Boron nitride (BN is a III-V compound which is the focus of important research since its discovery in the early 19th century. BN is electronic to carbon and thus, in the same way that carbon exists as graphite, BN exists in the hexagonal phase. The latter offers an unusual combination of properties that cannot be found in any other ceramics. However, these properties closely depend on the synthesis processes. This review states the recent developments in the preparation of BN through the chemistry, shaping and ceramic conversion of borazine derivatives. This concept denoted as Polymer-Derived Ceramics (PDCs route allows tailoring the chemistry of precursors to elaborate complex BN shapes which cannot be obtained by conventional process. The effect of the chemistry of the molecular precursors, i.e., borazine and trichloroborazine, and their polymeric derivatives i.e., polyborazylene and poly[tri(methylaminoborazine], in which the specific functional groups and structural motifs determine the shaping potential by conventional liquid-phase process and plastic-forming techniques is discussed. Nanotubes, nano-fibers, coatings, monoliths and fiber-reinforced matrix composites are especially described. This leads to materials which are of significant engineering interest.

  9. Enhanced optoelectronic performances of vertically aligned hexagonal boron nitride nanowalls-nanocrystalline diamond heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaran, Kamatchi Jothiramalingam; Hoang, Duc Quang; Kunuku, Srinivasu; Korneychuk, Svetlana; Turner, Stuart; Pobedinskas, Paulius; Drijkoningen, Sien; van Bael, Marlies K.; D' Haen, Jan; Verbeeck, Johan; Leou, Keh-Chyang; Lin, I.-Nan; Haenen, Ken

    2016-07-01

    Field electron emission (FEE) properties of vertically aligned hexagonal boron nitride nanowalls (hBNNWs) grown on Si have been markedly enhanced through the use of nitrogen doped nanocrystalline diamond (nNCD) films as an interlayer. The FEE properties of hBNNWs-nNCD heterostructures show a low turn-on field of 15.2 V/μm, a high FEE current density of 1.48 mA/cm2 and life-time up to a period of 248 min. These values are far superior to those for hBNNWs grown on Si substrates without the nNCD interlayer, which have a turn-on field of 46.6 V/μm with 0.21 mA/cm2 FEE current density and life-time of 27 min. Cross-sectional TEM investigation reveals that the utilization of the diamond interlayer circumvented the formation of amorphous boron nitride prior to the growth of hexagonal boron nitride. Moreover, incorporation of carbon in hBNNWs improves the conductivity of hBNNWs. Such a unique combination of materials results in efficient electron transport crossing nNCD-to-hBNNWs interface and inside the hBNNWs that results in enhanced field emission of electrons. The prospective application of these materials is manifested by plasma illumination measurements with lower threshold voltage (370 V) and longer life-time, authorizing the role of hBNNWs-nNCD heterostructures in the enhancement of electron emission.

  10. Enhanced optoelectronic performances of vertically aligned hexagonal boron nitride nanowalls-nanocrystalline diamond heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaran, Kamatchi Jothiramalingam; Hoang, Duc Quang; Kunuku, Srinivasu; Korneychuk, Svetlana; Turner, Stuart; Pobedinskas, Paulius; Drijkoningen, Sien; Van Bael, Marlies K; D' Haen, Jan; Verbeeck, Johan; Leou, Keh-Chyang; Lin, I-Nan; Haenen, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Field electron emission (FEE) properties of vertically aligned hexagonal boron nitride nanowalls (hBNNWs) grown on Si have been markedly enhanced through the use of nitrogen doped nanocrystalline diamond (nNCD) films as an interlayer. The FEE properties of hBNNWs-nNCD heterostructures show a low turn-on field of 15.2 V/μm, a high FEE current density of 1.48 mA/cm(2) and life-time up to a period of 248 min. These values are far superior to those for hBNNWs grown on Si substrates without the nNCD interlayer, which have a turn-on field of 46.6 V/μm with 0.21 mA/cm(2) FEE current density and life-time of 27 min. Cross-sectional TEM investigation reveals that the utilization of the diamond interlayer circumvented the formation of amorphous boron nitride prior to the growth of hexagonal boron nitride. Moreover, incorporation of carbon in hBNNWs improves the conductivity of hBNNWs. Such a unique combination of materials results in efficient electron transport crossing nNCD-to-hBNNWs interface and inside the hBNNWs that results in enhanced field emission of electrons. The prospective application of these materials is manifested by plasma illumination measurements with lower threshold voltage (370 V) and longer life-time, authorizing the role of hBNNWs-nNCD heterostructures in the enhancement of electron emission. PMID:27404130

  11. Transport properties through hexagonal boron nitride clusters embedded in graphene nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, F. W. N.; Cruz-Silva, E.; Terrones, M.; Terrones, H.; Barros, E. B.

    2016-05-01

    First-principles calculations are employed in the study of the electronic and quantum transport properties of hexagonally shaped boron nitride (h-BN) clusters embedded in either zigzag or armchair graphene nanoribbons. Chemical doping of the h-BN cluster was taken into consideration by using carbon atoms to replace either the boron ({{{B}}}24{{{N}}}27{{{C}}}3) or the nitrogen ({{{B}}}27{{{N}}}24{{{C}}}3) sites in the central ring. While the quantum conductance of the system with zigzag edges is found to be spin-dependent, it was observed that the system with an armchair edge requires an electron imbalance in order to show a spin-dependent conductance. Furthermore, the possibility of molecular adsorption onto these doped systems is studied. The effects of the attached molecules to the quantum conductance shows the potential of these hybrid systems for molecular sensing applications.

  12. Solvent-free fabrication of thermally conductive insulating epoxy composites with boron nitride nanoplatelets as fillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zifeng; Fu, Yuqiao; Meng, Wenjun; Zhi, Chunyi

    2014-11-01

    A solvent-free method for the fabrication of thermally conductive epoxy-boron nitride (BN) nanoplatelet composite material is developed in this study. By this method, polymer composites with nearly any filler fractions can be easily fabricated. The maximum thermal conductivity reaches 5.24 W/mK, which is 1,600% improvement in comparison with that of pristine epoxy material. In addition, the as-fabricated samples exhibit excellent overall performances with great mechanical property and thermal stability well preserved.

  13. Atomic Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy of Defects in Hexagonal Boron Nitride and Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibb, Ashley; Alem, Nasim; Song, Chengyu; Ciston, Jim; Zettl, Alex

    2014-03-01

    Monolayer sheets of sp2-bonded materials such as graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) have been studied extensively due to their properties including high mechanical strength, thermal conductivity, stability, interesting electronic properties, and potential for integration into novel devices. Understanding the atomic scale structure of defects in these materials is important because defects can significantly affect the physical properties in these materials. In particular, understanding the dynamics of these defects explains much about the material's stability. We have synthesized h-BN and graphene using low pressure chemical vapor deposition and imaged defects using atomic resolution aberration corrected transmission electron microscopy.

  14. Effect of Structural Relaxation on the Electronic Structure of Graphene on Hexagonal Boron Nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slotman, G J; van Wijk, M M; Zhao, Pei-Liang; Fasolino, A; Katsnelson, M I; Yuan, Shengjun

    2015-10-30

    We performed calculations of electronic, optical, and transport properties of graphene on hexagonal boron nitride with realistic moiré patterns. The latter are produced by structural relaxation using a fully atomistic model. This relaxation turns out to be crucially important for electronic properties. We describe experimentally observed features such as additional Dirac points and the "Hofstadter butterfly" structure of energy levels in a magnetic field. We find that the electronic structure is sensitive to many-body renormalization of the local energy gap. PMID:26565485

  15. Phonon-assisted resonant tunneling of electrons in graphene-boron nitride transistors

    OpenAIRE

    Vdovin, E.E.; Mishchenko, A.; Greenaway, M. T.; Zhu, M. J.; Ghazaryan, D.; A. Misra; Y. Cao; Morozov, S. V.; Makarovsky, O.; Fromhold, T. M.; Patanè, A.; Slotman, G. J.; Katsnelson, M. I.; Geim, A K; Novoselov, K. S.

    2015-01-01

    We observe a series of sharp resonant features in the differential conductance of graphene-hexagonal boron nitride-graphene tunnel transistors over a wide range of bias voltages between $\\sim$10 and 200 mV. We attribute them to electron tunneling assisted by the emission of phonons of well-defined energy. The bias voltages at which they occur are insensitive to the applied gate voltage and hence independent of the carrier densities in the graphene electrodes, so plasmonic effects can be ruled...

  16. The unique Raman fingerprint of boron nitride substitution patterns in graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maschio, Lorenzo; Lorenz, Marco; Pullini, Daniele; Sgroi, Mauro; Civalleri, Bartolomeo

    2016-07-27

    Boron nitride-substituted graphene (BNsG) two-dimensional structures are new materials of wide technological interest due to the rich variety of electronic structures and properties they can exploit. The ability to accurately characterize them is key to their future success. Here we show, by means of ab initio simulations, that the vibrational Raman spectra of such compounds are extremely sensitive to substitution motifs and concentration, and that each structure has unique and distinct features. This result can be useful as a guide for the optimization of production processes. PMID:27406407

  17. Search for giant magnetic anisotropy in transition-metal dimers on defected hexagonal boron nitride sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J; Wang, H; Hu, J; Wu, R Q

    2016-05-28

    Structural and magnetic properties of many transition-metal dimers embedded in a defected hexagonal boron nitride monolayer are investigated through density functional calculations to search for systems with magnetic anisotropy energies (MAEs) larger than 30meV. In particular, Ir-Ir@Dh-BN is found to have both large MAE (∼126 meV) and high structural stability against dissociation and diffusion, and it hence can serve as magnetic unit in spintronics and quantum computing devices. This giant MAE mainly results from the spin orbit coupling and the magnetization of the upper Ir atom, which is in a rather isolated environment. PMID:27250322

  18. Science and technology in the recent development of boron nitride materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukunaga, Osamu [Ace - Tech Co. Ltd, 1-167-1Higashi-Ome, Ome 198-0042 (Japan)

    2002-11-11

    In this paper, we review recent developments relating to cubic boron nitride (cBN) abrasive grains and sintered cutting tools. The demand for high-speed machining and the ecological benefits of using ferrous materials have led to developments in the area of heavy-duty dry cutting and grinding processes in recent years. Optimization of the process of manufacturing cBN materials is an important issue, both fundamentally and as regards applications. We review recent developments in cBN applications and discuss the challenges arising from new processes encountered in basic cBN study at high pressure and high temperature.

  19. Static tensile and tensile creep testing of four boron nitride coated ceramic fibers at elevated temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coguill, Scott L.; Adams, Donald F.; Zimmerman, Richard S.

    1989-01-01

    Six types of uncoated ceramic fibers were static tensile and tensile creep tested at various elevated temperatures. Three types of boron nitride coated fibers were also tested. Room temperature static tensile tests were initially performed on all fibers, at gage lengths of 1, 2, and 4 inches, to determine the magnitude of end effects from the gripping system used. Tests at one elevated temperature, at gage lengths of 8 and 10 inches, were also conducted, to determine end effects at elevated temperatures. Fiber cross sectional shapes and areas were determined using scanning electron microscopy. Creep testing was typically performed for 4 hours, in an air atmosphere.

  20. Opening of triangular hole in triangular-shaped chemical vapor deposited hexagonal boron nitride crystal

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Subash; Kalita, Golap; Vishwakarma, Riteshkumar; Zulkifli, Zurita; Tanemura, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    In-plane heterostructure of monolayer hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) and graphene is of great interest for its tunable bandgap and other unique properties. Here, we reveal a H2-induced etching process to introduce triangular hole in triangular-shaped chemical vapor deposited individual h-BN crystal. In this study, we synthesized regular triangular-shaped h-BN crystals with the sizes around 2-10 μm on Cu foil by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The etching behavior of individual h-BN crystal w...

  1. Formation of hexagonal Boron Nitride on Graphene-covered Copper Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Gopalan, Devashish P.; Mende, Patrick C.; de la Barrera, Sergio C.; Dhingra, Shonali; Jun LI; Zhang, Kehao; Simonson, Nicholas A.; Robinson, Joshua A.; Lu, Ning; Wang, Qingxiao; Kim, Moon J.; D'Urso, Brian; Feenstra, Randall M.

    2015-01-01

    Graphene-covered copper surfaces have been exposed to borazine, (BH)3(NH)3, with the resulting surfaces characterized by low-energy electron microscopy. Although the intent of the experiment was to form hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) on top of the graphene, such layers were not obtained. Rather, in isolated surface areas, h-BN is found to form micrometer-size islands that substitute for the graphene. Additionally, over nearly the entire surface, the properties of the layer that was originally...

  2. Single Crystalline Film of Hexagonal Boron Nitride Atomic Monolayer by Controlling Nucleation Seeds and Domains

    OpenAIRE

    Qinke Wu; Ji-Hoon Park; Sangwoo Park; Seong Jun Jung; Hwansoo Suh; Noejung Park; Winadda Wongwiriyapan; Sungjoo Lee; Young Hee Lee; Young Jae Song

    2015-01-01

    A monolayer hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) film with controllable domain morphology and domain size (varying from less than 1 μm to more than 100 μm) with uniform crystalline orientation was successfully synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The key for this extremely large single crystalline domain size of a h-BN monolayer is a decrease in the density of nucleation seeds by increasing the hydrogen gas flow during the h-BN growth. Moreover, the well-defined shape of h-BN flakes can ...

  3. High-quality, faceted cubic boron nitride films grown by chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W. J.; Jiang, X.; Matsumoto, S.

    2001-12-01

    Thick cubic boron nitride (cBN) films showing clear crystal facets were achieved by chemical vapor deposition. The films show the highest crystallinity of cBN films ever achieved from gas phase. Clear evidence for the growth via a chemical route is obtained. A growth mechanism is suggested, in which fluorine preferentially etches hBN and stabilizes the cBN surface. Ion bombardment of proper energy activates the cBN surface bonded with fluorine so as to enhance the bonding probability of nitrogen-containing species on the F-stabilized B (111) surface.

  4. Solvent-free fabrication of thermally conductive insulating epoxy composites with boron nitride nanoplatelets as fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zifeng; Fu, Yuqiao; Meng, Wenjun; Zhi, Chunyi

    2014-01-01

    A solvent-free method for the fabrication of thermally conductive epoxy-boron nitride (BN) nanoplatelet composite material is developed in this study. By this method, polymer composites with nearly any filler fractions can be easily fabricated. The maximum thermal conductivity reaches 5.24 W/mK, which is 1,600% improvement in comparison with that of pristine epoxy material. In addition, the as-fabricated samples exhibit excellent overall performances with great mechanical property and thermal stability well preserved. PMID:25489292

  5. Effect of acoustic, deformation on radiation-induced luminescence of pyrolytic boron nitride

    CERN Document Server

    Kardashev, B K; Plaksin, O A; Stepanov, V A; Stepanov, P A; Chernov, V M

    2001-01-01

    The effect of the ultrasound oscillations with the frequency of approximately 100 kHz on the radiation-induced luminescence on the pyrolytic boron nitride, originating by the protons irradiation (the energy of 8 MeV, the flux of 1.6 x 10 sup 1 sup 2 p/cm s), is studied. The impact of the ultrasound oscillations manifests itself by high deformation amplitudes (approximately 10 sup - sup 4), when the nonlinear, amplitude-dependent ultrasound absorption is observed. The obtained data are explained by the change in the kinetics of recrystallization, induced by irradiation, whereby the disappearance (radiation annealing) of the small angle boundaries occurs

  6. Graphene-hexagonal boron nitride resonant tunneling diodes as high-frequency oscillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We assess the potential of two-terminal graphene-hexagonal boron nitride-graphene resonant tunneling diodes as high-frequency oscillators, using self-consistent quantum transport and electrostatic simulations to determine the time-dependent response of the diodes in a resonant circuit. We quantify how the frequency and power of the current oscillations depend on the diode and circuit parameters including the doping of the graphene electrodes, device geometry, alignment of the graphene lattices, and the circuit impedances. Our results indicate that current oscillations with frequencies of up to several hundred GHz should be achievable

  7. Graphene-hexagonal boron nitride resonant tunneling diodes as high-frequency oscillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaskell, J.; Fromhold, T. M.; Greenaway, M. T. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Eaves, L. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Novoselov, K. S.; Mishchenko, A. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Geim, A. K. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Centre for Mesoscience and Nanotechnology, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-07

    We assess the potential of two-terminal graphene-hexagonal boron nitride-graphene resonant tunneling diodes as high-frequency oscillators, using self-consistent quantum transport and electrostatic simulations to determine the time-dependent response of the diodes in a resonant circuit. We quantify how the frequency and power of the current oscillations depend on the diode and circuit parameters including the doping of the graphene electrodes, device geometry, alignment of the graphene lattices, and the circuit impedances. Our results indicate that current oscillations with frequencies of up to several hundred GHz should be achievable.

  8. Graphene-hexagonal boron nitride resonant tunneling diodes as high-frequency oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskell, J.; Eaves, L.; Novoselov, K. S.; Mishchenko, A.; Geim, A. K.; Fromhold, T. M.; Greenaway, M. T.

    2015-09-01

    We assess the potential of two-terminal graphene-hexagonal boron nitride-graphene resonant tunneling diodes as high-frequency oscillators, using self-consistent quantum transport and electrostatic simulations to determine the time-dependent response of the diodes in a resonant circuit. We quantify how the frequency and power of the current oscillations depend on the diode and circuit parameters including the doping of the graphene electrodes, device geometry, alignment of the graphene lattices, and the circuit impedances. Our results indicate that current oscillations with frequencies of up to several hundred GHz should be achievable.

  9. Deposition of diamond and boron nitride films by plasma chemical vapour deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albella, J.M. [Universidad Autonoma, CSIC, Madrid (Spain). Inst. of Mater. Sci.; Gomez-Aleixandre, C. [Universidad Autonoma, CSIC, Madrid (Spain). Inst. of Mater. Sci.; Sanchez-Garrido, O. [Universidad Autonoma, CSIC, Madrid (Spain). Inst. of Mater. Sci.; Vazquez, L. [Universidad Autonoma, CSIC, Madrid (Spain). Inst. of Mater. Sci.; Martinez-Duart, J.M. [Universidad Autonoma, CSIC, Madrid (Spain). Inst. of Mater. Sci.

    1995-01-01

    The deposition problems of diamond and cubic boron nitride (c-BN) by chemical vapour deposition techniques are reviewed, with major emphasis on the nucleation and reaction mechanisms. A discussion is made of the main deposition parameters (i.e. gas mixture, substrate conditioning, plasma discharges etc.) which favour the formation of the cubic phase. Most of the work is devoted to diamond owing to the large progress attained in this material. In fact, the use of diamond as a hard protective coating is now on a commercial scale. By contrast, the preparation of c-BN layers with good characteristics still needs of further research. ((orig.))

  10. Ab Initio Investigations of Thermoelectric Effects in Graphene – Boron Nitride Nanoribbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Visan Camelia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermoelectric effects of graphene – hexagonal boron nitride (hBN nanoribbons have been investigated by density functional theory (DFT calculations. Pristine zig-zag nanoribbons are not suited to achieve high thermopower as the transmission function is flat around the chemical potential. By introducing hBN inclusions, the nanoribbon systems exhibit enhanced thermopower, due to the asymmetries introduced in the spin dependent transmission functions. Finite temperature differences between the two contacts are considered. The possibility of a good integration of hBN into graphene, makes the hybrid systems suitable for thermoelectric applications, which may be subject to further optimizations.

  11. Cubic boron nitride: a new prospective material for ultracold neutron application

    OpenAIRE

    Sobolev, Yu.; Lauer, Th.; Borisov, Yu.; Daum, M.; Fresne, N. du; Goeltl, L.; Hampel, G.; Heil, W.; Knecht, A.; Keunecke, M.; Kratz, J.V.; Lang, T.; Meister, M.; Plonka-Spehr, Ch.; Pokotilovski, Yu.

    2009-01-01

    For the first time, the neutron optical wall-potential of natural cubic boron nitride (cBN) was measured at the ultracold neutron (UCN) source of the research reactor TRIGA Mainz using the time-of-flight method (TOF). The samples investigated had a wall-potential of (305 +/- 15) neV. This value is in good agreement with the result extracted from neutron reflectometry data and theoretical expectations. Because of its high critical velocity for UCN and its good dielectric characteristics, cubic...

  12. Tantalum (oxy)nitrides nanotube arrays for the degradation of atrazine in vis-Fenton-like process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Yingxun, E-mail: yxdu@niglas.ac.cn [Nanjing Institute of Geography and Limnology, State Key Laboratory of Lake Science and Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Zhao, Lu [Nanjing Institute of Geography and Limnology, State Key Laboratory of Lake Science and Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Chang, Yuguang [School of Biochemical and Environmental Engineering, Nanjing Xiaozhuang Univeristy, Nanjing 211171 (China); Su, Yaling [Nanjing Institute of Geography and Limnology, State Key Laboratory of Lake Science and Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China)

    2012-07-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tantala nanotubes on a Ta foil were formed by anodization in a NH{sub 4}F-containing electrolyte. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tantalum (oxy)nitrides nanotubes were active for Fe{sup 3+} reduction under visible light. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Atrazine degradation by {center_dot}OH was accelerated with tantalum (oxy)nitrides nanotubes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tantalum (oxy)nitrides nanotubes display stable performance for atrazine degradation. - Abstract: In order to overcome the limitation of the application of nanoparticles, tantalum (oxy)nitrides nanotube arrays on a Ta foil were synthesized and introduced in vis (visible light)-Fenton-like system to enhance the degradation of atrazine. At first, the anodization of tantalum foil in a mild electrolyte solution containing ethylene glycol and water (v:v = 2:1) plus 0.5 wt.% NH{sub 4}F produced tantala nanotubes with an average diameter of 30 nm and a length of approximately 1 {mu}m. Then the nitridation of tantala nanotube arrays resulted in the replacement of N atoms to O atoms to form tantalum (oxy)nitrides (TaON and Ta{sub 3}N{sub 5}), as testified by XRD and XPS analyses. The synthesized tantalum (oxy)nitrides nanotubes absorb well in the visible region up to 600 nm. Under visible light, tantalum (oxy)nitrides nanotube arrays were catalytically active for Fe{sup 3+} reduction. With tantalum (oxy)nitrides nanotube arrays, the degradation of atrazine and the formation of the intermediates in vis/Fe{sup 3+}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} system were significantly accelerated. This was explained by the higher concentration of Fe{sup 2+} and thus the faster decomposition of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} with tantalum (oxy)nitrides nanotubes. In addition, tantalum (oxy)nitrides nanotubes exhibited stable performance during atrazine degradation for three runs. The good performance and stability of the tantalum (oxy)nitrides nanotubes film with the convenient separation, suggest that this film is

  13. Superior thermal conductivity of polymer nanocomposites by using graphene and boron nitride as fillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liem, H.; Choy, H. S.

    2013-06-01

    We report a significant enhancement of thermal conductivity in polymer nanocomposites with graphene and boron nitride as fillers. Strong variations in the Raman spectra for different single-layer graphene flakes are related to the measured thermal conductivity in polymer nanocomposites. In the absence of doping, variations in the Raman parameters are most common, suggesting the presence of excess charges in the samples. Graphene has a Raman D-peak that indicates structural disorder is present, causing the large variations in Raman G peaks. Using this type of graphene and boron nitride for preparing the polymer nanocomposites, the thermal conductivities of the polymer nanocomposites are measured to be in the range of 6.2-9.5 W/mK. The absence of Raman D peaks suggests that structural defects are infinitesimal and the graphene is pristine. Polymer nanocomposites filled with graphene without a D-peak exhibit thermal conductivities as high as ˜21.6 W/mK. As a thermal management material, thermal imaging shows that the polymer nanocomposite can effectively lower the surface mounted LED temperature by 21.1 °C. The existence of Raman D peaks can be used to distinguish two different types of graphenes, establishing the primary prerequisite for achieving a higher thermal conductivity.

  14. Flexible band gap tuning of hexagonal boron nitride sheets interconnected by acetylenic bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongyu; Luo, Youhua; Feng, Xiaojuan; Zhao, Lixia; Zhang, Meng

    2015-08-21

    The energetic and electronic properties of acetylenic-bond-interconnected hexagonal boron nitride sheets (BNyne), in which the number of rows of BN hexagonal rings (denoted as BN width) between neighboring arrays of acetylenic linkages increases consecutively, have been explored using first-principles calculations. Depending on the spatial position of B/N atoms with respect to the acetylenic linkages, there are two different types of configurations. The band structure features and band gap evolutions of BNyne structures as a function of the BN width can be categorized into two families, corresponding to two distinct types of configurations. In particular, for both types of BNyne structures, the band gap variations exhibit odd-even oscillating behavior depending on the BN width, which is related to the different symmetries of acetylenic chains in the unit cell. These results suggest that the embedded linear acetylenic chains can provide more flexibility for manipulation of the atomic and electronic properties of hexagonal boron nitride. These sp-sp(2) hybrid structures might promise importantly potential applications for developing nanoscale electronic and optoelectronic devices. PMID:26194068

  15. Two-dimensional hexagonal boron nitride as lateral heat spreader in electrically insulating packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Jie; Edwards, Michael; Huang, Shirong; Zhang, Yong; Fu, Yifeng; Lu, Xiuzhen; Yuan, Zhichao; Jeppson, Kjell; Liu, Johan

    2016-07-01

    The need for electrically insulating materials with a high in-plane thermal conductivity for lateral heat spreading applications in electronic devices has intensified studies of layered hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) films. Due to its physicochemical properties, h-BN can be utilised in power dissipating devices such as an electrically insulating heat spreader material for laterally redistributing the heat from hotspots caused by locally excessive heat flux densities. In this study, two types of boron nitride based heat spreader test structures have been assembled and evaluated for heat dissipation. The test structures separately utilised a few-layer h-BN film with and without graphene enhancement drop coated onto the hotspot test structure. The influence of the h-BN heat spreader films on the temperature distribution across the surface of the hotspot test structure was studied at a range of heat flux densities through the hotspot. It was found that the graphene-enhanced h-BN film reduced the hotspot temperature by about 8–10 °C at a 1000 W cm‑2 heat flux density, a temperature decrease significantly larger than for h-BN film without graphene enhancement. Finite element simulations of the h-BN film predict that further improvements in heat spreading ability are possible if the thermal contact resistance between the film and test chip are minimised.

  16. Melting and spheroidization of hexagonal boron nitride in a microwave-powered, atmospheric pressure nitrogen plasma `

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gleiman, S. S. (Seth S.); Phillips, J. (Jonathan)

    2001-01-01

    We have developed a method for producing spherically-shaped, hexagonal phase boron nitride (hBN) particles of controlled diameter in the 10-100 micron size range. Specifically, platelet-shaped hBN particles are passed as an aerosol through a microwave-generated, atmospheric pressure, nitrogen plasma. In the plasma, agglomerates formed by collisions between input hBN particles, melt and forms spheres. We postulate that this unprecedented process takes place in the unique environment of a plasma containing a high N-atom concentration, because in such an environment the decomposition temperature can be raised above the melting temperature. Indeed, given the following relationship [1]: BN{sub (condensed)} {leftrightarrow} B{sub (gas)} + N{sub (gas)}. Standard equilibrium thermodynamics indicate that the decomposition temperature of hBN is increased in the presence of high concentrations of N atoms. We postulate that in our plasma system the N atom concentration is high enough to raise the decomposition temperature above the (undetermined) melting temperature. Keywords Microwave plasma, boron nitride, melting, spherical, thermodynamics, integrated circuit package.

  17. Reaction between Ti and boron nitride based investment shell molds used for casting titanium alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to study the reaction between a Ti-6A1-4V alloy and boron nitride based investment shell molds used for investment casting titanium.In BN based investment shell molds,the face coatings are made of pretreated hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) with a few yttria (Y2O3) and colloidal yttria as binder.The Ti-6A1-4V alloy was melted in a controlled atmosphere induction furnace with a segment water-cooled copper crucible.The cross-section of reaction interface between Ti alloys and shell mold was investigated by electron probe micro-analyzer (EPMA) and microhardness tester.The results show that the reaction is not serious,the thickness of the reacting layer is about 30-50 tun,and the thickness of ct-case is about 180-200 μm.Moreover the o-case formation mechanism was also discussed.

  18. Enhancement of thermal conductive pathway of boron nitride coated polymethylsilsesquioxane composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gyungbok; Ryu, Seung Han; Lee, Jun-Tae; Seong, Ki-Hun; Lee, Jae Eun; Yoon, Phil-Joong; Kim, Bum-Sung; Hussain, Manwar; Choa, Yong-Ho

    2013-11-01

    We report here in the fabrication of enhanced thermal conductive pathway nanocomposites of boron nitride (BN)-coated polymethylsilsesquioxane (PMSQ) composite beads using isopropyl alcohol (IPA) as a mixing medium. Exfoliated and size-reduced boron nitride particles were successfully coated on the PMSQ beads and explained by surface charge differences. A homogeneous dispersion and coating of BN on the PMSQ beads using IPA medium was confirmed by SEM. Each condition of the composite powder was carried into the stainless still mould and then hot pressed in an electrically heated hot press machine. Three-dimensional percolation networks and conductive pathways created by exfoliated BN were precisely formed in the nanocomposites. The thermal conductivity of nanocomposites was measured by multiplying specific gravity, specific heat, and thermal diffusivity, based upon the laser flash method. Densification of the composite resulted in better thermal properties. For an epoxy reinforced composite with 30 vol% BN and PMSQ, a thermal conductivity of nine times higher than that of pristine PMSQ was observed. PMID:24245317

  19. Irradiation studies on carbon nanotube-reinforced boron carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aitkaliyeva, Assel [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); McCarthy, Michael C.; Jeong, Hae-Kwon [Artie McFerrin Department of Chemical Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Shao, Lin, E-mail: lshao@ne.tamu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Radiation response of carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced boron carbide composite has been studied for its application as a structural component in nuclear engineering. The composite was bombarded by 140 keV He ions at room temperature to a fluence ranging from 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} to 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2}. Two-dimensional Raman mapping shows inhomogeneous distribution of CNTs, and was used to select regions of interest for damage characterization. For CNTs, the intensities ratio of D-G bands (I{sub D}/I{sub G}) increased with fluence up to a certain value, and decreased at the fluence of 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}. This fluence also corresponds to a trend break in the plot of FWHM (full width at half maximum) of G band vs. I{sub D}/I{sub G} ratio, which indicates amorphization of CNTs. The study shows that Raman spectroscopy is a powerful tool to quantitatively characterize radiation damage in CNT-reinforced composites.

  20. A template-free solvent-mediated synthesis of high surface area boron nitride nanosheets for aerobic oxidative desulfurization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Peiwen; Zhu, Wenshuai; Chao, Yanhong; Zhang, Jinshui; Zhang, Pengfei; Zhu, Huiyuan; Li, Changfeng; Chen, Zhigang; Li, Huaming; Dai, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets (h-BNNs) with rather high specific surface area (SSA) are important two-dimensional layer-structured materials. Here, a solvent-mediated synthesis of h-BNNs revealed a template-free lattice plane control strategy that induced high SSA nanoporous structured h-BNNs with outstanding aerobic oxidative desulfurization performance. PMID:26502800

  1. Controlled growth of few-layer hexagonal boron nitride on copper foils using ion beam sputtering deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haolin; Zhang, Xingwang; Meng, Junhua; Yin, Zhigang; Liu, Xin; Zhao, Yajuan; Zhang, Liuqi

    2015-04-01

    Ion beam sputtering deposition (IBSD) is used to synthesize high quality few-layer hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) on copper foils. Compared to the conventional chemical vapor deposition, the IBSD technique avoids the use of unconventional precursors and is much easier to control, which should be very useful for the large-scale production of h-BN in the future.

  2. Increased charge storage capacity of titanium nitride electrodes by deposition of boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meijs, Suzan; McDonald, Matthew; Sørensen, Søren;

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of depositing a thin layer of boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond (B-NCD) on titanium nitride (TiN) coated electrodes and the effect this has on charge injection properties. The charge storage capacity increased by applying the B-NCD film...

  3. Synthesis of few-layer, large area hexagonal-boron nitride by pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glavin, Nicholas R. [Nanoelectronic Materials Branch, Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, Dayton, OH 45433 (United States); School of Mechanical Engineering and Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Jespersen, Michael L. [Nanoelectronic Materials Branch, Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, Dayton, OH 45433 (United States); University of Dayton Research Institute, 300 College Park, Dayton, OH 45469 (United States); Check, Michael H. [Nanoelectronic Materials Branch, Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, Dayton, OH 45433 (United States); Hu, Jianjun [Nanoelectronic Materials Branch, Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, Dayton, OH 45433 (United States); University of Dayton Research Institute, 300 College Park, Dayton, OH 45469 (United States); Hilton, Al M. [Nanoelectronic Materials Branch, Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, Dayton, OH 45433 (United States); Wyle Laboratories, Dayton, OH 45433 (United States); Fisher, Timothy S. [School of Mechanical Engineering and Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Voevodin, Andrey A. [Nanoelectronic Materials Branch, Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, Dayton, OH 45433 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) has been investigated as a technique for synthesis of ultra-thin, few-layer hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) thin films on crystalline highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and sapphire (0001) substrates. The plasma-based processing technique allows for increased excitations of deposited atoms due to background nitrogen gas collisional ionizations and extended resonance time of the energetic species presence at the condensation surface. These processes permit growth of thin, polycrystalline h-BN at 700 °C, a much lower temperature than that required by traditional growth methods. Analysis of the as-deposited films reveals epitaxial-like growth on the nearly lattice matched HOPG substrate, resulting in a polycrystalline h-BN film, and amorphous BN (a-BN) on the sapphire substrates, both with thicknesses of 1.5–2 nm. Stoichiometric films with boron-to-nitrogen ratios of unity were achieved by adjusting the background pressure within the deposition chamber and distance between the target and substrate. The reduction in deposition temperature and formation of stoichiometric, large-area h-BN films by PLD provide a process that is easily scaled-up for two-dimensional dielectric material synthesis and also present a possibility to produce very thin and uniform a-BN. - Highlights: • PLD was used to synthesize boron nitride thin films on HOPG and sapphire substrates. • Lattice matched substrate allowed for formation of polycrystalline h-BN. • Nitrogen gas pressure directly controlled film chemistry and structure. • Technique allows for ultrathin, uniform films at reduced processing temperatures.

  4. EPR observation of first point defects in cubic boron nitride crystalline powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nistor, S. V.; Stefan, M.; Schoemaker, D.; Dinca, G.

    2000-05-01

    An X-band electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) study of nominally pure, diamond-like cubic boron nitride (c-BN) crystalline powders, has led to the first identification of a spectrum attributed to two related paramagnetic species. The composite EPR spectrum can be observed only in dark brown colored powders known to contain excess of boron. It consists of two superimposed lorentzian components, called D1 and D2, centered at g1=2.0063 and g2=2.0084, with peak-to-peak linewidths of 3.3 and 17.9 mT, respectively. The temperature dependence of the integrated intensities, their linewidths and intensity ratio D2/D1 allows one to conclude that the narrow line D1 originates from EPR transitions inside a S=1/2 ground doublet and the broad line D2 from transitions inside the excited levels of another center. Evidence suggests that both centers are boron related paramagnetic species.

  5. Ion beam modification of the structure and properties of hexagonal boron nitride: An infrared and X-ray diffraction study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aradi, E.; Naidoo, S. R.; Billing, D. G.; Wamwangi, D.; Motochi, I.; Derry, T. E.

    2014-07-01

    The vibrational mode for the cubic symmetry of boron nitride (BN) has been produced by boron ion implantation of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). The optimum fluence at 150 keV was found to be 5 × 1014 ions/cm2. The presence of the c-BN phase was inferred using glancing incidence XRD (GIXRD) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). After implantation, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy indicated a peak at 1092 cm-1 which corresponds to the vibrational mode for nanocrystalline BN (nc-BN). The glancing angle XRD pattern after implantation exhibited c-BN diffraction peaks relative to the implantation depth of 0.4 μm.

  6. Removal of boron from aqueous solution using magnetic carbon nanotube improved with tartaric acid

    OpenAIRE

    Zohdi, Nima; Mahdavi, Fariba; Abdullah, Luqman Chuah; Choong, Thomas SY

    2014-01-01

    Boron removal capacity of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) modified with tartaric acid was investigated in this study. Modification of MWCNTs with tartaric acid was confirmed by Boehm surface chemistry method and fourier transform infra-red (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Experiments were performed to determine the adsorption isotherm and adsorption thermodynamic parameters of boron adsorption on tartaric acid modified MWCNTs (TA-MWCNTs). The effect of variables including initial pH, dosage of ad...

  7. Catalytic self-assembly preparation and characterization of carbon nitride nanotubes by a solvothermal method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Fuling; CAO Chuanbao; ZHU Hesun

    2005-01-01

    A solvothermal reaction of anhydrous C3N3Cl3 and sodium using cyclohexane as solvent and NiCl2 as catalyst precursor has been carried out to prepare carbon nitride nanotubes successfully at 230℃ and 1.8 MPa. The carbon nitride nanotubes were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electron diffraction (ED), electron energy loss spectrum (EELS) and Raman spectrum. SEM and TEM results indicated that the tubes have a length of 20-30 μm, a uniform outer diameter of about 50-60 nm, an inner diameter of 30-40 nm and are highly ordered assembled as bundles. The EELS measurement indicated that the ratio of N/C was about 1.00. The ED and XRD analyses revealed that the tube may have a new CN crystalline structure. The growth mechanism of nanotubes was discussed.

  8. Elasticity and inelasticity of silicon nitride/boron nitride fibrous monoliths.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnov, B. I.; Burenkov, Yu. A.; Kardashev, B. K.; Singh, D.; Goretta, K. C.; de Arellano-Lopez, A. R.; Energy Technology; Russian Academy of Sciences; Univer. de Sevilla

    2001-01-01

    A study is reported on the effect of temperature and elastic vibration amplitude on Young's modulus E and internal friction in Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and BN ceramic samples and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/BN monoliths obtained by hot pressing of BN-coated Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} fibers. The fibers were arranged along, across, or both along and across the specimen axis. The E measurements were carried out under thermal cycling within the 20-600 C range. It was found that high-modulus silicon-nitride specimens possess a high thermal stability; the E(T) dependences obtained under heating and cooling coincide well with one another. The low-modulus BN ceramic exhibits a considerable hysteresis, thus indicating evolution of the defect structure under the action of thermoelastic (internal) stresses. Monoliths demonstrate a qualitatively similar behavior (with hysteresis). This behavior of the elastic modulus is possible under microplastic deformation initiated by internal stresses. The presence of microplastic shear in all the materials studied is supported by the character of the amplitude dependences of internal friction and the Young's modulus. The experimental data obtained are discussed in terms of a model in which the temperature dependences of the elastic modulus and their features are accounted for by both microplastic deformation and nonlinear lattice-atom vibrations, which depend on internal stresses.

  9. Effects of boron-doping on the morphology and magnetic property of carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Qi; QIAN Lan; YI Jing; ZHU Xiaotong; ZHAO Yong

    2007-01-01

    Boron carbide nanotubes (nano-fibers) was prepared by B powder and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) at high temperature in a vacuumed quartz tube.The morphology,microstructure,component and magnetic property of samples were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM),X-ray diffraction(XRD),X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy(XPS)and magnetic property measurement system (MPMS) controller.The results showed that B-doping CNTs have great difference in the morphology and magnetic property from those of pristine CNTs.

  10. Enhancing Thermal Conductivity of Hexagonal Boron Nitride Filled Thermoplastics for Thermal Interface Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prindl, John

    Hexagonal Boron Nitride has been shown to enhance thermal conductivity in polymer composites more so than conventional ceramic fillers. However, to see a significant increase in thermal conductivity a high loading level of the advanced ceramic is often needed which can have an adverse effect on the mechanical behavior of the composite part. Applications for thermal management using thermal interface materials (TIM) continue to grow with thermoplastic injection molded parts emerging as an area for market growth. There is a growing need for published technical data in this particular area of application. In the current study, the thermal conductivity and mechanical behavior of hexagonal Boron Nitride (hBN) loaded thermoplastic composites is investigated. The main objectives of this work is produce a novel data package which illustrates the effects of hBN, loaded at high concentrations, across several different thermoplastic resins with the ultimate goal being to find a desirable formulation for specific thermal management applications. The desired properties for such applications being high thermal conductivity and high electrical resistivity with a minimal decrease in mechanical properties. Hexagonal BN cooling filler agglomerates were compounded into polypropylene (PP), nylon-6 (PA-6), and thermoplastic elastomer (TPE) via twin-screw extruder at 3 different loading levels. Injection molded samples were produced and characterized to show varying degrees of thermal conductivity and mechanical strength. Results from this research showed that in all cases, the thermal conductivity increased with increasing levels of hBN addition. The largest increases in thermal conductivity were seen in the PA-6 and TPE systems with the possible indication of exceeding the percolation threshold in the TPE system. This is hypothesized to occur due to the preferential migration of hBN to form conduction pathways around the elastomeric domains in the TPE matrix. Though TPE produced

  11. Effects of domains in phonon conduction through hybrid boron nitride and graphene sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevinçli, H.; Li, W.; Mingo, N.; Cuniberti, G.; Roche, S.

    2011-11-01

    We theoretically investigate the phonon propagation and thermal conductivity κ in hybrid boron nitride and graphene sheets. By using a real-space Kubo-computational transport scheme, large and disordered graphene structures are simulated, introducing disk-shaped domains with varying sizes of 2 to 8 nm and concentrations ranging from 0% to 100%. A strong influence of the domain size and concentration on the transport properties is obtained. The mean free paths are minimized at 50% domain concentration, and stronger suppression of κ is achieved with smaller domains. It is found to decrease by up to 65% at room temperature when the domain size is 2 nm. These results are beyond the scope of any effective medium approximation.

  12. Thermal Conductivity and Phonon Transport in Suspended Few-Layer Hexagonal Boron Nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Insun; Pettes, Michael Thompson; Kim, Jaehyun; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Yao, Zhen; Shi, Li

    2013-02-01

    The thermal conductivity of suspended few-layer hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) was measured using a micro-bridge device with built-in resistance thermometers. Based on the measured thermal resistance values of 11-12 atomic layer h-BN samples with suspended length ranging between 3 and 7.5 um, the room-temperature thermal conductivity of a 11-layer sample was found to be about 360 Wm-1K-1, approaching the basal plane value reported for bulk h-BN. The presence of a polymer residue layer on the sample surface was found to decrease the thermal conductivity of a 5-layer h-BN sample to be about 250 Wm-1K-1 at 300 K. Thermal conductivities for both the 5 layer and the 11 layer samples are suppressed at low temperatures, suggesting increasing scattering of low frequency phonons in thin h-BN samples by polymer residue.

  13. High performance vertical tunneling diodes using graphene/hexagonal boron nitride/graphene hetero-structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwan Lee, Seung; Lee, Jia; Ho Ra, Chang; Liu, Xiaochi; Hwang, Euyheon [Samsung-SKKU Graphene Center (SSGC), Sungkyunkwan University, 2066, Seobu-ro, Jangan-gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nano Science and Technology, SKKU Advanced Institute of Nano-Technology (SAINT), Sungkyunkwan University, 2066, Seobu-ro, Jangan-gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Sup Choi, Min [Department of Nano Science and Technology, SKKU Advanced Institute of Nano-Technology (SAINT), Sungkyunkwan University, 2066, Seobu-ro, Jangan-gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Center for Human Interface Nano Technology (HINT), Sungkyunkwan University, 2066, Seobu-ro, Jangan-gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Hee Choi, Jun [Frontier Research Laboratory, Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd., Yongin, Gyeonggi-do 446-711 (Korea, Republic of); Zhong, Jianqiang; Chen, Wei [Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Department of Chemistry, National University of Singapore, 3 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117543 (Singapore); Jong Yoo, Won, E-mail: yoowj@skku.edu [Samsung-SKKU Graphene Center (SSGC), Sungkyunkwan University, 2066, Seobu-ro, Jangan-gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nano Science and Technology, SKKU Advanced Institute of Nano-Technology (SAINT), Sungkyunkwan University, 2066, Seobu-ro, Jangan-gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Center for Human Interface Nano Technology (HINT), Sungkyunkwan University, 2066, Seobu-ro, Jangan-gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-03

    A tunneling rectifier prepared from vertically stacked two-dimensional (2D) materials composed of chemically doped graphene electrodes and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) tunneling barrier was demonstrated. The asymmetric chemical doping to graphene with linear dispersion property induces rectifying behavior effectively, by facilitating Fowler-Nordheim tunneling at high forward biases. It results in excellent diode performances of a hetero-structured graphene/h-BN/graphene tunneling diode, with an asymmetric factor exceeding 1000, a nonlinearity of ∼40, and a peak sensitivity of ∼12 V{sup −1}, which are superior to contending metal-insulator-metal diodes, showing great potential for future flexible and transparent electronic devices.

  14. Hexagonal Boron Nitride Tunnel Barriers Grown on Graphite by High Temperature Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yong-Jin; Summerfield, Alex; Davies, Andrew; Cheng, Tin S.; Smith, Emily F.; Mellor, Christopher J.; Khlobystov, Andrei N.; Foxon, C. Thomas; Eaves, Laurence; Beton, Peter H.; Novikov, Sergei V.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate direct epitaxial growth of high-quality hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) layers on graphite using high-temperature plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Atomic force microscopy reveals mono- and few-layer island growth, while conducting atomic force microscopy shows that the grown hBN has a resistance which increases exponentially with the number of layers, and has electrical properties comparable to exfoliated hBN. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman microscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements on hBN confirm the formation of sp2-bonded hBN and a band gap of 5.9 ± 0.1 eV with no chemical intermixing with graphite. We also observe hexagonal moiré patterns with a period of 15 nm, consistent with the alignment of the hBN lattice and the graphite substrate. PMID:27681943

  15. Mass spectroscopic analysis of a plume induced by laser ablation of pyrolytic boron nitride

    CERN Document Server

    Chae, H B; Lee, I H; Park, S M

    1998-01-01

    The laser ablation of a pyrolytic boron nitride (pBN) target was investigated by time-of- flight quadrupole mass spectroscopy. According to the laser-correlated ion mass spectra, B sup + and B sub 2 sup + ions were produced, but neither N sup + , N sub 2 sup + , or BN sup + ions were observed at laser fluences below 1 J/cm sup 2. Instead, neutral N sub 2 molecules were found to be formed. The mean velocities and kinetic energies of the B sup + ions were obtained by time-of-flight analysis. Also, reactive laser ablation under a N sub 2 atmosphere was attempted by using a pulsed valve synchronized with the laser pulse.

  16. Emission and propagation of hyperbolic phonon polaritons in hexagonal boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Siyuan; Ma, Qiong; Yang, Yafang; Rosenfeld, Jeremy; Goldflam, Michael; McLeod, Alex; Andersen, Trond; Fei, Zhe; Liu, Mengkun; Sun, Zhiyuan; Shao, Yinming; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Thiemens, Mark; Keilmann, Fritz; Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo; Fogler, Michael; Basov, D. N.

    Using scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscope (s-SNOM), we studied various kinds of emission and propagation of hyperbolic phonon polaritons (HP2s) in hexagonal boron nitride (hBN). The systematic study via real-space nano-imaging reveals the emission mechanisms and propagating properties of HP2s excited by crystal edges, artificial structures, surface defects and impurities. Compared with traditional s-SNOM tip emitter, the polaritons from new emitters reported in this work possess longer propagation length and can be artificially manipulated on the hBN surface. Our work may benefit the future applications and engineering of HP2s using convenient emitters which are analogous to collective modes in other materials.

  17. Imaging of Anomalous Internal Reflections of Hyperbolic Phonon-Polaritons in Hexagonal Boron Nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Alexander J.; Dai, Siyuan; Glembocki, Orest J.; Kretinin, Andrey V.; Sun, Zhiyuan; Ellis, Chase T.; Tischler, Joseph G.; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Fogler, Michael M.; Novoselov, Kostya S.; Basov, Dimitri. N.; Caldwell, Joshua D.

    2016-06-01

    We use scanning near-field optical microscopy to study the response of hexagonal boron nitride nanocones at infrared frequencies, where this material behaves as a hyperbolic medium. The obtained images are dominated by a series of hot rings that occur on the sloped sidewalls of the nanocones. The ring positions depend on the incident laser frequency and the nanocone shape. Both dependences are consistent with directional propagation of hyperbolic phonon polariton rays that are launched at the edges and zigzag through the interior of the nanocones, sustaining multiple internal reflections off the sidewalls. Additionally, we observe a strong overall enhancement of the near-field signal at discrete resonance frequencies. These resonances attest to low dielectric losses that permit coherent standing waves of the sub-diffractional polaritons to form. We comment on potential applications of such shape-dependent resonances and the field concentration at the hot rings.

  18. Decoupled electron and phonon transports in hexagonal boron nitride-silicene bilayer heterostructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Yongqing; Pei, Qing-Xiang, E-mail: peiqx@ihpc.a-star.edu.sg, E-mail: zhangg@ihpc.a-star.edu.sg; Zhang, Gang, E-mail: peiqx@ihpc.a-star.edu.sg, E-mail: zhangg@ihpc.a-star.edu.sg; Zhang, Yong-Wei [Institute of High Performance Computing, A*STAR, Singapore 138632 (Singapore)

    2016-02-14

    Calculations based on the density functional theory and empirical molecular dynamics are performed to investigate interlayer interaction, electronic structure and thermal transport of a bilayer heterostructure consisting of silicene and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). In this heterostructure, the two layers are found to interact weakly via a non-covalent binding. As a result, the Dirac cone of silicene is preserved with the Dirac cone point being located exactly at the Fermi level, and only a small amount of electrons are transferred from h-BN to silicene, suggesting that silicene dominates the electronic transport. Molecular dynamics calculation results demonstrate that the heat current along h-BN is six times of that along silicene, suggesting that h-BN dominates the thermal transport. This decoupled role of h-BN and silicene in thermal and electronic transport suggests that the BN-silicene bilayer heterostructure is promising for thermoelectric applications.

  19. Nanosecond spin relaxation times in single layer graphene spin valves with hexagonal boron nitride tunnel barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Simranjeet; Katoch, Jyoti; Xu, Jinsong; Tan, Cheng; Zhu, Tiancong; Amamou, Walid; Hone, James; Kawakami, Roland

    2016-09-01

    We present an experimental study of spin transport in single layer graphene using atomic sheets of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) as a tunnel barrier for spin injection. While h-BN is expected to be favorable for spin injection, previous experimental studies have been unable to achieve spin relaxation times in the nanosecond regime, suggesting potential problems originating from the contacts. Here, we investigate spin relaxation in graphene spin valves with h-BN barriers and observe room temperature spin lifetimes in excess of a nanosecond, which provides experimental confirmation that h-BN is indeed a good barrier material for spin injection into graphene. By carrying out measurements with different thicknesses of h-BN, we show that few layer h-BN is a better choice than monolayer for achieving high non-local spin signals and longer spin relaxation times in graphene.

  20. Evidence for Defect-Mediated Tunneling in Hexagonal Boron Nitride-Based Junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandni, U; Watanabe, K; Taniguchi, T; Eisenstein, J P

    2015-11-11

    We investigate electron tunneling through atomically thin layers of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN). Metal (Cr/Au) and semimetal (graphite) counter-electrodes are employed. While the direct tunneling resistance increases nearly exponentially with barrier thickness as expected, the thicker junctions also exhibit clear signatures of Coulomb blockade, including strong suppression of the tunnel current around zero bias and step-like features in the current at larger biases. The voltage separation of these steps suggests that single-electron charging of nanometer-scale defects in the hBN barrier layer are responsible for these signatures. We find that annealing the metal-hBN-metal junctions removes these defects and the Coulomb blockade signatures in the tunneling current. PMID:26509431

  1. In silico rational design of ionic liquids for the exfoliation and dispersion of boron nitride nanosheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Gregorio; Atilhan, Mert; Aparicio, Santiago

    2016-01-14

    A requirement for exploiting most of the unique properties of boron-nitride (BN) nanosheets is their isolation from the bulk material. A rational design of task-specific ionic liquids (ILs) through DFT simulations is reported in this work. The applied computational protocol allowed the screening of large IL families, which was carried out bearing in mind the achievement of strong π-π stacking between the anions and BN nanosheets as well as a negative charge transfer from the anion to the surface. The selected ionic liquids yielded strong interaction energies with BN nanosheets and high charge transfer values, while the main features of the ionic liquid are not affected in the presence of nanosheets. DFT simulations provided a detailed picture of the interaction mechanism and useful structure-property relationships in the search of a new ionic liquid for BN exfoliation. PMID:26658819

  2. Two-level spatial modulation of vibronic conductance in conjugated oligophenylenes on boron nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Carlos-Andres; Joshi, Sushobhan; Hoh, Tobias; Ecija, David; Barth, Johannes V; Auwärter, Willi

    2015-04-01

    Intramolecular current-induced vibronic excitations are reported in highly ordered monolayers of quaterphenylene dicarbonitriles at an electronically patterned boron nitride on copper platform (BN/Cu(111)). A first level of spatially modulated conductance at the nanometer-scale is induced by the substrate. Moreover, a second level of conductance variations at the molecular level is found. Low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy studies in conjunction with molecular dynamics calculations reveal collective amplification of the molecule's interphenylene torsion angles in the monolayer. Librational modes influencing these torsion angles are identified as initial excitations during vibronic conductance. Density functional theory is used to map phenylene breathing modes and other vibrational excitations that are suggested to be at the origin of the submolecular features during vibronic conductance. PMID:25756645

  3. Synthesis and characterization of boron nitride sponges as a novel support for metal nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG MingTao; LIU YingLiang; GU YunLe; XU ZiLin

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a simple synthetic route for the synthesis of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) powders with high specific surface area, in which BBr3, NH4Cl and Al powders are used as starting materials. The structure and composition of the powders were characterized by electron diffraction, Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in the selected area. X-ray diffraction shows wide peaks of crystalline h-BN with the particle size on the nanometer scale, and transmission electron microscopy reveals that the products have a novel spongy morphol-ogy. Silver nanoparticles loaded h-BN sponges were prepared via a one-step synthesis method. Dif-ferent reaction conditions for the formation of h-BN sponges were also investigated.

  4. Bandgap engineered graphene and hexagonal boron nitride for resonant tunnelling diode

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PENCHALAIAH PALLA; GOPI RAJA UPPU; ANITA S ETHIRAJ; J P RAINA

    2016-10-01

    In this article a double-barrier resonant tunnelling diode (DBRTD) has been modelled by taking advantage of single-layer hexagonal lattice of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). The DBRTD performance and operation are explored by means of a self-consistent solution inside the non-equilibrium Green’s function formalism on an effective mass-Hamiltonian. Both p- and n-type DBRTDs exhibit a negative differential resistance effect, which entails the resonant tunnelling through the hole and electron bound states in the graphene quantum well, respectively. The peak-to-valley ratio of approximately 8 (3) for p-type (n-type) DBRTD with quantum well of 5.1 nm (4.3 nm) at a barrier width of 1.3 nm was achieved for zero bandgap graphene at room temperature.

  5. Synthesis and Characterization of Hexagonal Boron Nitride as a Gate Dielectric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Sung Kyu; Youn, Jiyoun; Song, Young Jae; Lee, Sungjoo

    2016-07-01

    Two different growth modes of large-area hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) film, a conventional chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth mode and a high-pressure CVD growth mode, were compared as a function of the precursor partial pressure. Conventional self-limited CVD growth was obtained below a critical partial pressure of the borazine precursor, whereas a thick h-BN layer (thicker than a critical thickness of 10 nm) was grown beyond a critical partial pressure. An interesting coincidence of a critical thickness of 10 nm was identified in both the CVD growth behavior and in the breakdown electric field strength and leakage current mechanism, indicating that the electrical properties of the CVD h-BN film depended significantly on the film growth mode and the resultant film quality.

  6. Exploring carrier transport phenomena in a CVD-assembled graphene FET on hexagonal boron nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The supporting substrate plays a crucial role in preserving the superb electrical characteristics of an atomically thin 2D carbon system. We explore carrier transport behavior in a chemical-vapor-deposition- (CVD-) assembled graphene monolayer on hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) substrate. Graphene-channel field-effect transistors (GFETs) were fabricated on ultra-thin h-BN multilayers to screen out carrier scattering from the underlying SiO2 substrate. To explore the transport phenomena, we use three different approaches to extract carrier mobility, namely, effective carrier mobility (μeff), intrinsic carrier mobility (μ), and field-effect mobility (μFE). A comparative study has been conducted based on the electrical characterization results, uncovering the impacts of supporting substrate material and device geometry scaling on carrier mobility in GFETs with CVD-assembled graphene as the active channel. (paper)

  7. Synthesis and characterization of boron nitride sponges as a novel support for metal nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a simple synthetic route for the synthesis of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) powders with high specific surface area, in which BBr3, NH4Cl and Al powders are used as starting materials. The structure and composition of the powders were characterized by electron diffraction, Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in the selected area. X-ray diffraction shows wide peaks of crystalline h-BN with the particle size on the nanometer scale, and transmission electron microscopy reveals that the products have a novel spongy morphology. Silver nanoparticles loaded h-BN sponges were prepared via a one-step synthesis method. Different reaction conditions for the formation of h-BN sponges were also investigated.

  8. Engineering and localization of quantum emitters in large hexagonal boron nitride layers

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, Sumin; ElBadawi, Christopher; Lobo, Charlene; Wang, Xuewen; Juodkazis, Saulius; Seniutinas, Gediminas; Toth, Milos; Aharonovich, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) is a wide bandgap van der Waals material that has recently emerged as promising platform for quantum photonics experiments. In this work we study the formation and localization of narrowband quantum emitters in large flakes (up to tens of microns wide) of hBN. The emitters can be activated in as-grown hBN by electron irradiation or high temperature annealing, and the emitter formation probability can be increased by ion implantation or focused laser irradiation of the as-grown material. Interestingly, we show that the emitters are always localized at edges of the flakes, unlike most luminescent point defects in 3D materials. Our results constitute an important step on the road map of deploying hBN in nanophotonics applications.

  9. The electrical properties of sulfur-implanted cubic boron nitride thin films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deng Jin-Xiang; Qin Yang; Kong Le; Yang Xue-Liang; Li Ting; Zhao Wei-Ping; Yang Ping

    2012-01-01

    Cubic boron nitride (c-BN) thin films are deposited on p-type Si wafers using radio frequency (RF) sputtering and then doped by implanting S ions.The implantation energy of the ions is 19 keV,and the implantation dose is between 1015 ions/cm2 and 1016 ions/cm2.The doped c-BN thin films are then annealed at a temperature between 400 ℃ and 800 ℃.The results show that the surface resistivity of doped and annealed c-BN thin films is lowered by two to three orders,and the activation energy of c-BN thin films is 0.18 eV.

  10. Influence of Thickness on Field Emission Characteristics of Nanometre Boron Nitride Thin Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾广瑞; 李英爱; 陶艳春; 何志; 李俊杰; 殷红; 李卫青; 赵永年

    2003-01-01

    Nanometre boron nitride (BN) thin films with various thickness (54-135 nm) were prepared on Si(100) by rf magnetic sputtering physical vapour deposition. The field emission characteristics of the BN thin films were measured in an ultrahigh vacuum system. A threshold electric field of 11 V/μm and the highest emission current density of 240 μA/cm2 at an electric field of 23 V/μm were obtained for the about 54-nm-thick BN film. The threshold electric field increases with increasing the thickness in the nanometre range. The Fowler-Nordheim plots show that electrons were emitted from BN to vacuum by tunnelling through the potential barrier at the surface of BN thin films.

  11. The thermal conductivity in hybridised graphene and boron nitride nanoribbons modulated with strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xue-Kun; Xie, Zhong-Xiang; Zhou, Wu-Xing; Chen, Ke-Qiu

    2016-03-01

    Thermal transport properties in hybridised graphene and boron nitride ribbons (HGBNRs) under different strains are studied by using reverse nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. It is found that the effect of strains on the thermal conductivity is different for different types of strains. When the tensile and shear strains are applied, the thermal conductivity can be modulated at least up to 50% at room temperature as the strain ε ranges from 0 to 0.2. However, when the compressive and flexural strains are respectively applied, the thermal conductivity is insensitive to the variation of the strain. In addition, it is also found that the thermal conductivity of HGBNRs depends sensitively on the dimension of the hybridised ribbon and the relative amount of h-BN to graphene. A brief analysis of these results is given.

  12. Thermal transport across few-layer boron nitride encased by silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Yuxiang; Jiang, Jiechao; Meletis, Efstathios; Dumitric, Traian

    2015-07-01

    Two dimensional hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) attracted attention for use in applications. Using equilibrium molecular dynamics, we examine the phonon transport in few-layer h-BN encased by silica (SiO2). We report large interfacial thermal resistances, of about 2.2 × 10-8 m2 K W-1, which are not sensitive to the number of h-BN layers or the SiO2 crystallinity. The h-BN/SiO2 superlattices exhibit ultra-low thermal conductivities across layers, as low as 0.3 W/m K. They are structurally stable up to 2000 K while retaining the low-thermal conductivity attributes. Our simulations indicate that incorporation of h-BN layers and nanoparticles in silica could establish thermal barriers and heat spreading paths, useful for high performance coatings and electronic device applications.

  13. Nanoscale structure and superhydrophobicity of sp(2)-bonded boron nitride aerogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Thang; Goldstein, Anna P; Lewicki, James P; Kucheyev, Sergei O; Wang, Cheng; Russell, Thomas P; Worsley, Marcus A; Woo, Leta; Mickelson, William; Zettl, Alex

    2015-06-21

    Aerogels have much potential in both research and industrial applications due to their high surface area, low density, and fine pore size distribution. Here we report a thorough structural study of three-dimensional aerogels composed of highly crystalline sp(2)-bonded boron nitride (BN) layers synthesized by a carbothermic reduction process. The structure, crystallinity and bonding of the as-prepared BN aerogels are elucidated by X-ray diffraction, (11)B nuclear magnetic resonance, transmission electron microscopy, and resonant soft X-ray scattering. The macroscopic roughness of the aerogel's surface causes it to be superhydrophobic with a contact angle of ∼155° and exhibit high oil uptake capacity (up to 1500 wt%). The oil can be removed from the BN aerogel by oxidizing in air without damaging the crystalline porous structure of the aerogel or diminishing its oil absorption capacity. PMID:26007693

  14. Molecular dynamics simulation of nano-indentation of (111) cubic boron nitride with optimized Tersoff potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yinbo; Peng, Xianghe; Fu, Tao; Huang, Cheng; Feng, Chao; Yin, Deqiang; Wang, Zhongchang

    2016-09-01

    We conduct molecular dynamics simulation of nanoindentation on (111) surface of cubic boron nitride and find that shuffle-set dislocations slip along direction on {111} plane at the initial stage of the indentation. The shuffle-set dislocations are then found to meet together, forming surfaces of a tetrahedron. We also find that the surfaces are stacking-fault zones, which intersect with each other, forming edges of stair-rod dislocations along direction. Moreover, we also calculate the generalized stacking fault (GSF) energies along various gliding directions on several planes and find that the GSF energies of the {111} and {111} systems are relatively smaller, indicating that dislocations slip more easily along and directions on the {111} plane.

  15. Multiple delta doping of single crystal cubic boron nitride films heteroepitaxially grown on (001)diamonds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, H., E-mail: hyin@jlu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Superhard Materials, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Ziemann, P. [Institute of Solid State Physics, Ulm University, D-89069 Ulm (Germany)

    2014-06-23

    Phase pure cubic boron nitride (c-BN) films have been epitaxially grown on (001) diamond substrates at 900 °C. The n-type doping of c-BN epitaxial films relies on the sequential growth of nominally undoped (p-) and Si doped (n-) layers with well-controlled thickness (down to several nanometer range) in the concept of multiple delta doping. The existence of nominally undoped c-BN overgrowth separates the Si doped layers, preventing Si dopant segregation that was observed for continuously doped epitaxial c-BN films. This strategy allows doping of c-BN films can be scaled up to multiple numbers of doped layers through atomic level control of the interface in the future electronic devices. Enhanced electronic transport properties with higher hall mobility (10{sup 2} cm{sup 2}/V s) have been demonstrated at room temperature as compared to the normally continuously Si doped c-BN films.

  16. Forchlorfenuron detection based on its inhibitory effect towards catalase immobilized on boron nitride substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qin; Cai, Lijuan; Zhao, Huijie; Tang, Jiaqian; Shen, Yuanyuan; Hu, Xiaoya; Zeng, Haibo

    2015-01-15

    An enzymatic procedure based on a catalase biosensor for the detection of forchlorfenuron (CPPU) has been reported in this work. Catalase was immobilized on boron nitride (BN) sheets dispersed in chitosan by adsorption. The immobilized catalase exhibited direct electron transfer character and excellent electrocatalytic activity towards H2O2 reduction. After introducing CPPU into the H2O2 containing phosphate buffer solution, the catalase-catalyzed H2O2 reduction current decreased. By measuring the current decrease, CPPU can be determined in the range of 0.5-10.0 µM with the detection limit of 0.07 μM. The non-competitive inhibition behavior of CPPU towards catalase was verified by the Lineweaver-Burk plots. Long stability character has been ascribed to this biosensor. Possible use of this biosensor in flow systems is illustrated. The proposed biosensor has been successfully applied to CPPU determination in fruits samples with satisfactory results.

  17. Investigation of hexagonal boron nitride as an atomically thin corrosion passivation coating in aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Yang, Yingchao; Lou, Jun

    2016-09-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) atomic layers were utilized as a passivation coating in this study. A large-area continuous h-BN thin film was grown on nickel foil using a chemical vapor deposition method and then transferred onto sputtered copper as a corrosion passivation coating. The corrosion passivation performance in a Na2SO4 solution of bare and coated copper was investigated by electrochemical methods including cyclic voltammetry (CV), Tafel polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). CV and Tafel analysis indicate that the h-BN coating could effectively suppress the anodic dissolution of copper. The EIS fitting result suggests that defects are the dominant leakage source on h-BN films, and improved anti-corrosion performances could be achieved by further passivating these defects.

  18. Effects of strain on carbon donors and acceptors in hexagonal boron nitride monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Yoshitaka; Saito, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    We present first-principles density functional calculations that clarify the electronic properties of carbon defects in hexagonal boron nitride (h -BN) monolayers under biaxially applied strains. We find that strain can control the ionization energies of both donor and acceptor states. Furthermore, we also find that strain can lead to the dramatic change in conduction channel properties of donor states due to the interchange of the conduction-band-minimum state with the nearly-free-electron state. We also report the simulated scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images of carbon defects in h -BN monolayers for experimental identification of those defects. We show that the STM images strongly reflect distinctive spatial distributions of local density of states around carbon defects depending on the substitution sites and thereby they could be identified by using STM experiments.

  19. Boron nitride colloidal solutions, ultralight aerogels and freestanding membranes through one-step exfoliation and functionalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Weiwei; Mochalin, Vadym N.; Liu, Dan; Qin, Si; Gogotsi, Yury; Chen, Ying

    2015-11-01

    Manufacturing of aerogels and membranes from hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is much more difficult than from graphene or graphene oxides because of the poor dispersibility of h-BN in water, which limits its exfoliation and preparation of colloidal solutions. Here, a simple, one-step mechano-chemical process to exfoliate and functionalize h-BN into highly water-dispersible, few-layer h-BN containing amino groups is presented. The colloidal solutions of few-layer h-BN can have unprecedentedly high concentrations, up to 30 mg ml-1, and are stable for up to several months. They can be used to produce ultralight aerogels with a density of 1.4 mg cm-3, which is ~1,500 times less than bulk h-BN, and freestanding membranes simply by cryodrying and filtration, respectively. The material shows strong blue light emission under ultraviolet excitation, in both dispersed and dry state.

  20. Patterning monolayer graphene with zigzag edges on hexagonal boron nitride by anisotropic etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guole; Wu, Shuang; Zhang, Tingting; Chen, Peng; Lu, Xiaobo; Wang, Shuopei; Wang, Duoming; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Shi, Dongxia; Yang, Rong; Zhang, Guangyu

    2016-08-01

    Graphene nanostructures are potential building blocks for nanoelectronic and spintronic devices. However, the production of monolayer graphene nanostructures with well-defined zigzag edges remains a challenge. In this paper, we report the patterning of monolayer graphene nanostructures with zigzag edges on hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) substrates by an anisotropic etching technique. We found that hydrogen plasma etching of monolayer graphene on h-BN is highly anisotropic due to the inert and ultra-flat nature of the h-BN surface, resulting in zigzag edge formation. The as-fabricated zigzag-edged monolayer graphene nanoribbons (Z-GNRs) with widths below 30 nm show high carrier mobility and width-dependent energy gaps at liquid helium temperature. These high quality Z-GNRs are thus ideal structures for exploring their valleytronic or spintronic properties.

  1. Surface functionalization of hexagonal boron nitride and its effect on the structure and performance of composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Wenqin; Zhang, Wei; Gao, Yuwen; Liang, Guozheng; Gu, Aijuan; Yuan, Li

    2013-04-01

    A new organized hexagonal boron nitride (OhBN) with significantly increased amount of amine groups was synthesized, and characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Thermogravimetric (TG) analysis, UV-vis Transmittance Spectra, Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) and the potentiometric titration. The content of amine groups for OhBN is about 5 times of that for original hexagonal boron nitride (hBN). Based on the preparation of OhBN, new composites consisting of OhBN and bismaleimide (BD) resin were developed, which show greatly improved integrated performance (including dynamic mechanical, dielectric and thermal properties) compared with BD resin and the hBN/BD composites. In the case of the OhBN/BD composite with 15 wt% OhBN, its storage modulus, dielectric loss, thermal conductivity and coefficient of thermal expansion are about 1.2, 0.56, 1.11 and 0.92 times of the corresponding values of hBN/BD composite, respectively; moreover, the glass transition temperature of the former is 15 °C higher than that of the latter. These interesting results suggest that the integrated performance of the composites is closely related to the surface nature of the fillers because the change in the surface nature not only varies the chemical structure, free volume and crosslinking density of the composite, but also determines the interfacial nature between inorganic fillers and the resin matrix. This investigation demonstrates that the method proposed herein provides a new approach to prepare organized inorganic fillers as well as corresponding composites with controlled structure and expected performances for cutting-edge industries.

  2. [FTIR spectroscopic studies of inner stress on boron carbon nitride thin films].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Xin; Zheng, Ya-Ru; Song, Zhe; Feng, Ke-Cheng; Zhao, Yong-Nian

    2008-07-01

    Boron carbon nitride thin films were deposited by radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering technique using a 50 mm-diameter composite target consisting of h-BN and graphite in an Ar-N2 gas mixture. The composite target was composed of two semi disks: one of h-BN and the other one of graphite. The distance between the target and the substrate was kept at 50 mm. The chamber base pressure was below 5 x 10(-4) Pa. During the deposition, the mixture of Ar (80%) and N2 (20%) was injected into the vacuum chamber and the total pressure was 1.3 Pa. The films were grown on silicon substrates at different deposition parameters, including sputtering power of 80-130 W, deposition temperature of 300-500 degrees C and deposition time of 1-4 h. The chemical bonding state of the samples was characterized by Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopy (FTIR). The results suggested that all of the films deposited at these deposition parameters are atomic-level hybrids composed of B, C and N atoms. Besides BN and carbons bonds, the boron carbide and carbon nitride bonds were formed in the BCN thin films. And the deposition parameters have important influences on the growth and inner stress of BCN thin films. That is the higher the sputtering power, the larger the inner stress; the higher or lower the deposition temperature, the larger the inner stress; the longer the deposition time, the larger the inner stress. So changing deposition parameters properly is a feasible method to relax the inner stress between the films and substrate. In the conditions of changing one parameter each time, the optimum deposition parameters to prepare BCN thin films with lower inner stress were obtained: sputtering power of 80 W, deposition temperature of 400 degrees C and deposition time of 2 h.

  3. Folate-conjugated boron nitride nanospheres for targeted delivery of anticancer drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng S

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Shini Feng,1 Huijie Zhang,1 Ting Yan,1 Dandi Huang,1 Chunyi Zhi,2 Hideki Nakanishi,1 Xiao-Dong Gao1 1Key Laboratory of Carbohydrate Chemistry and Biotechnology, Ministry of Education, School of Biotechnology, Jiangnan University, Wuxi, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, People’s Republic of China Abstract: With its unique physical and chemical properties and structural similarity to carbon, boron nitride (BN has attracted considerable attention and found many applications. Biomedical applications of BN have recently started to emerge, raising great hopes in drug and gene delivery. Here, we developed a targeted anticancer drug delivery system based on folate-conjugated BN nanospheres (BNNS with receptor-mediated targeting. Folic acid (FA was successfully grafted onto BNNS via esterification reaction. In vitro cytotoxicity assay showed that BNNS-FA complexes were non-toxic to HeLa cells up to a concentration of 100 µg/mL. Then, doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX, a commonly used anticancer drug, was loaded onto BNNS-FA complexes. BNNS-FA/DOX complexes were stable at pH 7.4 but effectively released DOX at pH 5.0, which exhibited a pH sensitive and sustained release pattern. BNNS-FA/DOX complexes could be recognized and specifically internalized by HeLa cells via FA receptor-mediated endocytosis. BNNS-FA/DOX complexes exhibited greater cytotoxicity to HeLa cells than free DOX and BNNS/DOX complexes due to the increased cellular uptake of DOX mediated by the FA receptor. Therefore, BNNS-FA complexes had strong potential for targeted cancer therapy. Keywords: boron nitride nanospheres, folic acid, doxorubicin, targeted delivery, cancer therapy

  4. Surface functionalization of hexagonal boron nitride and its effect on the structure and performance of composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Wenqin; Zhang, Wei; Gao, Yuwen [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Advanced Functional Polymer Design and Application, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Liang, Guozheng, E-mail: lgzheng@suda.edu.cn [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Advanced Functional Polymer Design and Application, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Gu, Aijuan, E-mail: ajgu@suda.edu.cn [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Advanced Functional Polymer Design and Application, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Yuan, Li [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Advanced Functional Polymer Design and Application, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2013-04-01

    A new organized hexagonal boron nitride (OhBN) with significantly increased amount of amine groups was synthesized, and characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Thermogravimetric (TG) analysis, UV–vis Transmittance Spectra, Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) and the potentiometric titration. The content of amine groups for OhBN is about 5 times of that for original hexagonal boron nitride (hBN). Based on the preparation of OhBN, new composites consisting of OhBN and bismaleimide (BD) resin were developed, which show greatly improved integrated performance (including dynamic mechanical, dielectric and thermal properties) compared with BD resin and the hBN/BD composites. In the case of the OhBN/BD composite with 15 wt% OhBN, its storage modulus, dielectric loss, thermal conductivity and coefficient of thermal expansion are about 1.2, 0.56, 1.11 and 0.92 times of the corresponding values of hBN/BD composite, respectively; moreover, the glass transition temperature of the former is 15 °C higher than that of the latter. These interesting results suggest that the integrated performance of the composites is closely related to the surface nature of the fillers because the change in the surface nature not only varies the chemical structure, free volume and crosslinking density of the composite, but also determines the interfacial nature between inorganic fillers and the resin matrix. This investigation demonstrates that the method proposed herein provides a new approach to prepare organized inorganic fillers as well as corresponding composites with controlled structure and expected performances for cutting-edge industries.

  5. Formation of boron nitride coatings on silicon carbide fibers using trimethylborate vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Mengjiao; Zhou, Tong; He, Jing; Chen, Lifu

    2016-09-01

    High quality boron nitride (BN) coatings have been grown on silicon carbide (SiC) fibers by carbothermal nitridation and at atmospheric pressure. SiC fibers were first treated in chlorine gas to form CDC (carbide-derived carbon) film on the fiber surface. The CDC-coated SiC fibers were then reacted with trimethylborate vapor and ammonia vapor at high temperature, forming BN coatings by carbothermal reduction. The FT-IR, XPS, XRD, SEM, TEM and AES were used to investigate the formation of the obtained coatings. It has been found that the obtained coatings are composed of phase mixture of h-BN and amorphous carbon, very uniform in thickness, have smooth surface and adhere well with the SiC fiber substrates. The BN-coated SiC fibers retain ∼80% strength of the as-received SiC fibers and show an obvious interfacial debonding and fiber pullout in the SiCf/SiOC composites. This method may be useful for the large scale production of high quality BN coating on silicon carbide fiber.

  6. Synthesis and characterization of nanocrystalline hexagonal boron carbo-nitride under high temperature and high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of the synthesis of hexagonal boron carbo-nitride (h-BCN) compounds via a two-step high-temperature and high-pressure (HTHP) technique using melamine (C3N6H6) and boron oxide (B2O3) as raw materials is presented. An amorphous BCN precursor was prepared at 1000 K under vacuum in a resistance furnace and then single-phase h-BCN nanocrystalline was synthesized at 1600 K and 5.1 GPa in a multi-anvil apparatus. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) indicated that the final products were pure h-BCN crystals with the lattice constants a 0.2510 nm and c = 0.6690 nm. The average grain size was about 150 nm. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results confirmed the occurrence of bonding between C-C, C-N, C-B and N-B atoms. Raman scattering analysis suggested that there were three strong Raman bands centered at 1359, 1596 and 1617 cm-1, respectively. The band at 1617 cm-1 was considered to be consistent with the characteristic Raman peak of h-BCN

  7. First-principles study of the effects of mechanical strains on the radiation hardness of hexagonal boron nitride monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Qing; Ji, Wei; de, Suvranu

    2012-12-01

    We investigate the strain effect on the radiation hardness of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) monolayers using density functional theory calculations. Both compressive and tensile strains are studied in elastic domains along the zigzag, armchair, and biaxial directions. We observe a reduction in radiation hardness to form boron and nitrogen monovacancies under all strains. The origin of this effect is the strain-induced reduction of the energy barrier to displace an atom. An implication of our results is the vulnerability of strained nanomaterials to radiation damage.

  8. Electrical behavior of multi-walled carbon nanotube network embedded in amorphous silicon nitride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buiculescu Raluca

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The electrical behavior of multi-walled carbon nanotube network embedded in amorphous silicon nitride is studied by measuring the voltage and temperature dependences of the current. The microstructure of the network is investigated by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy. The multi-walled carbon nanotube network has an uniform spatial extension in the silicon nitride matrix. The current-voltage and resistance-temperature characteristics are both linear, proving the metallic behavior of the network. The I-V curves present oscillations that are further analyzed by computing the conductance-voltage characteristics. The conductance presents minima and maxima that appear at the same voltage for both bias polarities, at both 20 and 298 K, and that are not periodic. These oscillations are interpreted as due to percolation processes. The voltage percolation thresholds are identified with the conductance minima.

  9. Research on the direct doping effect of silicon on cubic boron nitride ceramics by UV-VIS diffuse reflectance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cubic boron nitride (cBN) micro-powders mixed with 1 wt% silicon were sintered at 1450 deg. C under a pressure of 5.0 GPa. The grain boundaries and silicon distribution in Si-cBN ceramics were studied by scanning electronic microscope (SEM) and energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS). Optical properties of the ceramics were investigated by UV-VIS diffuse reflectance and photoluminescence spectra at room temperature. Some important parameters of studied ceramics such as absorption coefficient and defect levels were identified from reflection spectra by intercept method. The experimental results indicated the direct n-doped effect of silicon on cubic boron nitride ceramics. With a direct forbidden transition characteristic, the donor energy level of Si in forbidden zone of cBN ceramics was found to be 2.82 eV. The phonon energy related to the direct forbidden transition was 0.235 eV.

  10. Dielectric Engineering of a Boron Nitride/Hafnium Oxide Heterostructure for High-Performance 2D Field Effect Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Xuming; Huang, Chun-Wei; Wang, Lifeng; Yin, Long-Jing; Li, Wenqing; Wang, Jingli; Wu, Bin; Liu, Yunqi; Yao, Qian; Jiang, Changzhong; Wu, Wen-Wei; He, Lin; Chen, Shanshan; Ho, Johnny C; Liao, Lei

    2016-03-01

    A unique design of a hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN)/HfO2 dielectric heterostructure stack is demonstrated, with few-layer h-BN to alleviate the surface optical phonon scattering, followed by high-κ HfO2 deposition to suppress Coulombic impurity scattering so that high-performance top-gated two-dimensional semiconductor transistors are achieved. Furthermore, this dielectric stack can also be extended to GaN-based transistors to enhance their performance. PMID:26762171

  11. Wafer-scale CVD Growth of Monolayer Hexagonal Boron Nitride with Large Domain Size by Cu Foil Enclosure Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Xiuju; Gao, Junfeng; Gao, Teng; Nie, Yufeng; Sun, Jingyu; Chen, Yubin; Jin, Chuanhong; Ding, Feng; Zhang, Yanfeng; Liu, Zhongfan

    2015-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition synthesis of large domain hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) with uniform thickness on Cu foils is of great challenge, originating from the extremely high nucleation densities and the reverse hydrogen etching competition reaction. We report herein the successful growth of wafer-scale high-quality h-BN monolayer film with the largest single crystalline domain sizes up to 72 micrometer in edge length using a folded Cu enclosure approach. The highly-confined growth space wi...

  12. Controlling Electronic and Geometrical Structure of Honeycomb-Lattice Materials Supported on Metal Substrates : Graphene and Hexagonal Boron Nitride

    OpenAIRE

    Vinogradov, Nikolay

    2013-01-01

    The present thesis is focused on various methods of controlling electronic and geometrical structure of two-dimensional overlayers adsorbed on metal surfaces exemplified by graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) grown on transition metal (TM) substrates. Combining synchrotron-radiation-based spectroscopic and various microscopic techniques with in situ sample preparation, we are able to trace the evolution of overlayer electronic and geometrical properties in overlayer/substrate systems,...

  13. Bonding distances as Exact Sums of the Radii of the Constituent Atoms in Nanomaterials - Boron Nitride and Coronene

    OpenAIRE

    Heyrovska, Raji

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents for the first time the exact structures at the atomic level of two important nanomaterials, boron nitride and coronene. Both these compounds are hexagonal layer structures similar to graphene in two dimensions and to graphite in three-dimensions. However, they have very different properties: whereas graphene is a conductor, h-BN is an electrical insulator and coronene is a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon of cosmological interest. The atomic structures presented here for bo...

  14. Biofouling resistance of boron-doped diamond neural stimulation electrodes is superior to titanium nitride electrodes in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meijs, Suzan; Alcaide, Maria; Sørensen, Charlotte;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The goal of this study was to assess the electrochemical properties of boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrodes in relation to conventional titanium nitride (TiN) electrodes through in vitro and in vivo measurements. APPROACH: Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and ...... electrodes possess a superior biofouling resistance, which provides significantly stable electrochemical properties both in protein solution as well as in vivo compared to TiN electrodes....

  15. Core-level photoabsorption study of defects and metastable bonding configurations in boron nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez, I.; Jankowski, A.F.; Terminello, L.J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Boron nitride is an interesting material for technological applications and for fundamental solid state physics investigations. It is a compound isoelectronic with carbon and, like carbon can possess sp{sup 2} and sp{sup 3} bonded phases resembling graphite and diamond. BN crystallizes in the sp{sup 2}-bonded hexagonal (h-BN), rhombohedral (r-BN) and turbostratic phases, and in the sp{sup 3}-bonded cubic (c-BN) and wurtzite (w-BN) phases. A new family of materials is obtained when replacing C-C pairs in graphite with isoelectronic B-N pairs, resulting in C{sub 2}BN compounds. Regarding other boron compounds, BN is exceptional in the sense that it has standard two-center bonds with conventional coordination numbers, while other boron compounds (e.g. B{sub 4}C) are based on the boron icosahedron unit with three-center bonds and high coordination numbers. The existence of several allotropic forms and fullerene-like structures for BN suggests a rich variety of local bonding and poses the questions of how this affects the local electronic structure and how the material accommodates the stress induced in the transition regions between different phases. One would expect point defects to play a crucial role in stress accommodation, but these must also have a strong influence in the electronic structure, since the B-N bond is polar and a point defect will thus be a charged structure. The study of point defects in relationship to the electronic structure is of fundamental interest in these materials. Recently, the authors have shown that Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) is sensitive to point defects in h-BN, and to the formation of metastable phases even in amorphous materials. This is significant since other phase identification techniques like vibrational spectroscopies or x-ray diffraction yield ambiguous results for nanocrystalline and amorphous samples. Serendipitously, NEXAFS also combines chemical selectivity with point defect sensitivity.

  16. Implementation of Outstanding Electronic Transport in Polar Covalent Boron Nitride Atomic Chains: another Extraordinary Odd-Even Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaodong; Li, Weiqi; Liu, Linhua; Feng, Jikang; Jiang, Yongyuan; Tian, Wei Quan

    2016-05-01

    A theoretical investigation of the unique electronic transport properties of the junctions composed of boron nitride atomic chains bridging symmetric graphene electrodes with point-contacts is executed through non-equilibrium Green’s function technique in combination with density functional theory. Compared with carbon atomic chains, the boron nitride atomic chains have an alternative arrangement of polar covalent B-N bonds and different contacts coupling electrodes, showing some unusual properties in functional atomic electronic devices. Remarkably, they have an extraordinary odd-even behavior of conductivity with the length increase. The rectification character and negative differential resistance of nonlinear current-voltage characteristics can be achieved by manipulating the type of contacts between boron nitride atomic chains bridges and electrodes. The junctions with asymmetric contacts have an intrinsic rectification, caused by stronger coupling in the C-N contact than the C-B contact. On the other hand, for symmetric contact junctions, it is confirmed that the transport properties of the junctions primarily depend on the nature of contacts. The junctions with symmetric C-N contacts have higher conductivity than their C-B contacts counterparts. Furthermore, the negative differential resistances of the junctions with only C-N contacts is very conspicuous and can be achieved at lower bias.

  17. Rectifying Properties of a Nitrogen/Boron-Doped Capped-Carbon-Nanotube-Based Molecular Junction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Peng; LIU De-Sheng; ZHANG Ying; WANG Pei-Ji; ZHANG Zhong

    2011-01-01

    @@ Based on the non-equilibrium Green's function method and first-principles density functional theory calculations, we investigate the electronic transport properties of a nitrogen/boron-doped capped-single-walled carbonnanotube-based molecular junction.Obvious rectifying behavior is observed and it is strongly dependent on the doping site.The best rectifying performance can be carried out when the nitrogen/boron atom dopes at a carbon site in the second layer.Moreover, the rectifying performance can be further improved by adjusting the distance between the Cso nanotube caps.%Based on the non-equilibrium Green's function method and first-principles density functional theory calculations, we investigate the electronic transport properties of a nitrogen/boron-doped capped-single-walled carbon-nanotube-based molecular junction. Obvious rectifying behavior is observed and it is strongly dependent on the doping site. The best rectifying performance can be carried out when the nitrogen/boron atom dopes at a carbon site in the second layer. Moreover, the rectifying performance can be further improved by adjusting the distance between the C60 nanotube caps.

  18. Size effects on the infrared responses of boron carbide nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ElBiyaali, A.; Bentaleb, M.; Chadli, H.; Boutahir, M.; Rahmani, A. H.; Fakrach, B.; Hermet, P.; Rahmani, A.

    2016-10-01

    The spectral moment's method combined with a force constant model is used to calculate the polarized infrared spectra in single-walled BC3 nanotubes. We discuss the evolution of these spectra as a function of the diameter, chirality and length of nanotubes. Our work provides benchmark theoretical data for the assignment of experimental infrared spectra.

  19. Covalently bonded three-dimensional carbon nanotube solids via boron induced nanojunctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumpter, Bobby G [ORNL; Meunier, Vincent [ORNL; Terrones Maldonado, Humberto [ORNL; Terrones Maldonado, Mauricio [ORNL; Ajayan, Pullikel M [Rice University; Hashim, Daniel [Rice University; Romo Herrera, Jose M [ORNL; Cullen, David [ORNL; Munoz-Sandoval, Emilio [IPICyT; Smith, David J [Arizona State University; Vajtai, Robert [Rice University; Roy, Ajit K [ORNL; Ganguli, Sabyasachi [Arizona State University; Kelkhoff, Doug [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Suttle, Joesph [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Lezzi, Peter [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI); Hahm, Gwan [Rice University; Narayanan, Narayanan [Rice University

    2012-01-01

    The establishment of covalent junctions between carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and the modification of their straight tubular morphology are two strategies needed to successfully synthesize nanotube-based three-dimensional (3D) frameworks exhibiting superior material properties. Engineering such 3D structures in scalable synthetic processes still remains a challenge. This work pioneers the bulk synthesis of 3D macroscale nanotube elastic solids directly via a boron-doping strategy during chemical vapor deposition, which influences the formation of atomic-scale elbow junctions and nanotube covalent interconnections. Detailed elemental analysis revealed that the elbow junctions are preferred sites for excess boron atoms, indicating the role of boron and curvature in the junction formation mechanism, in agreement with our first principle theoretical calculations. Exploiting this material s ultra-light weight, super-hydrophobicity, high porosity, thermal stability, and mechanical flexibility, the strongly oleophilic sponge-like solids are demonstrated as unique reusable sorbent scaffolds able to efficiently remove oil from contaminated seawater even after repeated use.

  20. Vertically self-ordered orientation of nanocrystalline hexagonal boron nitride thin films for enhanced thermal characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cometto, Olivier; Sun, Bo; Tsang, Siu Hon; Huang, Xi; Koh, Yee Kan; Teo, Edwin Hang Tong

    2015-11-01

    Vertically self-ordered hexagonal boron nitride (ordered h-BN) is a highly ordered turbostratic BN (t-BN) material similar to hexagonal BN, with its planar structure perpendicularly oriented to the substrate. The ordered h-BN thin films were grown using a High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (HiPIMS) system with a lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) target reactively sputtered in nitrogen gas. The best vertical alignment was obtained at room temperature, with a grounded bias and a HiPIMS peak power density of 60 W cm-2. Even though the film contains up to 7.5 at% lanthanum, it retains its highly insulative properties and it was observed that an increase in compressive stress is correlated to an increase in film ordering quality. Importantly, the thermal conductivity of vertically ordered h-BN is considerably high at 5.1 W m-1 K-1. The favourable thermal conductivity coupled with the dielectric properties of this novel material and the low temperature growth could outperform SiO2 in high power density electronic applications.Vertically self-ordered hexagonal boron nitride (ordered h-BN) is a highly ordered turbostratic BN (t-BN) material similar to hexagonal BN, with its planar structure perpendicularly oriented to the substrate. The ordered h-BN thin films were grown using a High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (HiPIMS) system with a lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) target reactively sputtered in nitrogen gas. The best vertical alignment was obtained at room temperature, with a grounded bias and a HiPIMS peak power density of 60 W cm-2. Even though the film contains up to 7.5 at% lanthanum, it retains its highly insulative properties and it was observed that an increase in compressive stress is correlated to an increase in film ordering quality. Importantly, the thermal conductivity of vertically ordered h-BN is considerably high at 5.1 W m-1 K-1. The favourable thermal conductivity coupled with the dielectric properties of this novel material and the low temperature

  1. Nanoscale structure and superhydrophobicity of sp2-bonded boron nitride aerogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Thang; Goldstein, Anna P.; Lewicki, James P.; Kucheyev, Sergei O.; Wang, Cheng; Russell, Thomas P.; Worsley, Marcus A.; Woo, Leta; Mickelson, William; Zettl, Alex

    2015-06-01

    Aerogels have much potential in both research and industrial applications due to their high surface area, low density, and fine pore size distribution. Here we report a thorough structural study of three-dimensional aerogels composed of highly crystalline sp2-bonded boron nitride (BN) layers synthesized by a carbothermic reduction process. The structure, crystallinity and bonding of the as-prepared BN aerogels are elucidated by X-ray diffraction, 11B nuclear magnetic resonance, transmission electron microscopy, and resonant soft X-ray scattering. The macroscopic roughness of the aerogel's surface causes it to be superhydrophobic with a contact angle of ~155° and exhibit high oil uptake capacity (up to 1500 wt%). The oil can be removed from the BN aerogel by oxidizing in air without damaging the crystalline porous structure of the aerogel or diminishing its oil absorption capacity.Aerogels have much potential in both research and industrial applications due to their high surface area, low density, and fine pore size distribution. Here we report a thorough structural study of three-dimensional aerogels composed of highly crystalline sp2-bonded boron nitride (BN) layers synthesized by a carbothermic reduction process. The structure, crystallinity and bonding of the as-prepared BN aerogels are elucidated by X-ray diffraction, 11B nuclear magnetic resonance, transmission electron microscopy, and resonant soft X-ray scattering. The macroscopic roughness of the aerogel's surface causes it to be superhydrophobic with a contact angle of ~155° and exhibit high oil uptake capacity (up to 1500 wt%). The oil can be removed from the BN aerogel by oxidizing in air without damaging the crystalline porous structure of the aerogel or diminishing its oil absorption capacity. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: High resolution TEM images of different portions of sample, photos of aerogels in oil bath over time, thermal gravimetric analysis data of the aerogels, and

  2. Electrochemical flexible supercapacitor based on manganese dioxide-titanium nitride nanotube hybrid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The manganese dioxide-titanium nitride (MnO2-TiN) nanotube hybrid has been designed to improve its electroactivity and conductivity for a supercapacitor application. Titanium nitride (TiN) nanotube array was prepared by an anodization process of titanium in ethylene glycol (EG) solution containing ammonium fluoride, subsequent calcination process in an air atmosphere, and final nitridation process in an ammonia atmosphere. Electroactive MnO2 was then loaded into well-aligned TiN nanotubes to form MnO2-TiN nanotube hybrid with well-designed shell layer of MnO2 through a controlled cyclic voltammetry electrodeposition process, which was directly supported on ultra thin and supple titanium foil to establish a bendable electrode. The morphology and microstructure of MnO2-TiN nanotube hybrid were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The electrochemical capacitance was investigated by cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge/discharge measurements. The villiform MnO2 thin shell layer was fully covered on TiN nanotube walls to form a coaxial heterogeneous structure. Superior electrical conductivity and accessible nanochannels of TiN contributed to a high capacitance performance of MnO2. The specific capacitance of MnO2-TiN was determined to be 853.3 F g−1 (or 213.2 mF cm−2) at a current density of 1.0 A g−1 (or 0.25 mA cm−2). All-solid-state flexible supercapacitor was constructed using two symmetric film electrodes of MnO2-TiN nanotube hybrid and a polyvinyl alcohol gel electrolyte of KOH-KI-EG. The volume specific capacitance, energy and power density were determined to be 4.01 F cm−3, 1.81 mW h cm−3 and 32.8 mW cm−3 at a high potential window of 1.8 V and a current density of 2.0 mA cm−2. Such MnO2-TiN nanotube hybrid electrode material exhibited effective energy storage in flexible supercapacitor application

  3. Combination of carbon nitride and carbon nanotubes: synergistic catalysts for energy conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yutong; Wang, Jing; Wei, Zhongzhe; Zhang, Pengfei; Li, Haoran; Wang, Yong

    2014-08-01

    Due to their versatile features and environmental friendliness, functionalized carbon materials show great potential in practical applications, especially in energy conversion. Developing carbon composites with properties that can be modulated by simply changing the ratio of the original materials is an intriguing synthetic strategy. Here, we took cyanamide and multiwalled carbon nanotubes as precursors and introduced a facile method to fabricate a series of graphitic carbon nitride/carbon nanotubes (g-C3 N4 /CNTs) composites. These composites demonstrated different practical applications with different weight ratios of the components, that is, they showed synergistic effects in optoelectronic conversion when g-C3 N4 was the main ingredient and in oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) when CNTs dominated the composites. Our experiments indicated that the high electrical conductivity of carbon nanotubes promoted the transmission of the charges in both cases.

  4. Conformational analysis and electronic structure of chiral carbon and carbon nitride nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano Geraldo de Faria

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Geometry and electronic structure of chiral carbon and carbon nitride (CNx nanotubes were investigated through quantum chemical methods. Finite nanotubes with diameters ranging from 5 to 10 Å and containing up to 500 atoms were considered. CNx structures were built through random substitution of carbon atoms by nitrogen. The molecules were fully optimized by semi-empirical quantum chemical method (PM3. Our results show that the energy associated with nitrogen incorporation depends strongly upon the tube helicity and diameter. The doping of nanotubes with nitrogen contributes to reduce the stress caused by the small diameter of the studied systems. Density of States (DOS results for pure carbon and CNx nanostructures, obtained through DFT and Hartree-Fock calculations, were analyzed. The introduction of nitrogen in the tube produce states in the gap region which characterizes the metallic behavior, as expected for these systems after N-doping.

  5. Phonon transport at the interfaces of vertically stacked graphene and hexagonal boron nitride heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhequan; Chen, Liang; Yoon, Mina; Kumar, Satish

    2016-02-21

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is a promising substrate for graphene based nano-electronic devices. We investigate the ballistic phonon transport at the interface of vertically stacked graphene and h-BN heterostructures using first principles density functional theory and atomistic Green's function simulations considering the influence of lattice stacking. We compute the frequency and wave-vector dependent transmission function and observe distinct stacking-dependent phonon transmission features for the h-BN/graphene/h-BN sandwiched systems. We find that the in-plane acoustic modes have the dominant contributions to the phonon transmission and thermal boundary conductance (TBC) for the interfaces with the carbon atom located directly on top of the boron atom (C-B matched) because of low interfacial spacing. The low interfacial spacing is a consequence of the differences in the effective atomic volume of N and B and the difference in the local electron density around N and B. For the structures with the carbon atom directly on top of the nitrogen atom (C-N matched), the spatial distance increases and the contribution of in-plane modes to the TBC decreases leading to higher contributions by out-of-plane acoustic modes. We find that the C-B matched interfaces have stronger phonon-phonon coupling than the C-N matched interfaces, which results in significantly higher TBC (more than 50%) in the C-B matched interface. The findings in this study will provide insights to understand the mechanism of phonon transport at h-BN/graphene/h-BN interfaces, to better explain the experimental observations and to engineer these interfaces to enhance heat dissipation in graphene based electronic devices. PMID:26817419

  6. Metal-functionalized single-walled graphitic carbon nitride nanotubes: a first-principles study on magnetic property

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenoy Vivek

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The magnetic properties of metal-functionalized graphitic carbon nitride nanotubes were investigated based on first-principles calculations. The graphitic carbon nitride nanotube can be either ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic by functionalizing with different metal atoms. The W- and Ti-functionalized nanotubes are ferromagnetic, which are attributed to carrier-mediated interactions because of the coupling between the spin-polarized d and p electrons and the formation of the impurity bands close to the band edges. However, Cr-, Mn-, Co-, and Ni-functionalized nanotubes are antiferromagnetic because of the anti-alignment of the magnetic moments between neighboring metal atoms. The functionalized nanotubes may be used in spintronics and hydrogen storage.

  7. Hexagonal Boron Nitride assisted transfer and encapsulation of large area CVD graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shautsova, Viktoryia; Gilbertson, Adam M; Black, Nicola C G; Maier, Stefan A; Cohen, Lesley F

    2016-01-01

    We report a CVD hexagonal boron nitride (hBN-) assisted transfer method that enables a polymer-impurity free transfer process and subsequent top encapsulation of large-area CVD-grown graphene. We demonstrate that the CVD hBN layer that is utilized in this transfer technique acts as a buffer layer between the graphene film and supporting polymer layer. We show that the resulting graphene layers possess lower doping concentration, and improved carrier mobilities compared to graphene films produced by conventional transfer methods onto untreated SiO2/Si, SAM-modified and hBN covered SiO2/Si substrates. Moreover, we show that the top hBN layer used in the transfer process acts as an effective top encapsulation resulting in improved stability to ambient exposure. The transfer method is applicable to other CVD-grown 2D materials on copper foils, thereby facilitating the preparation of van der Waals heterostructures with controlled doping. PMID:27443219

  8. Phonon transport on two-dimensional graphene/boron nitride superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Taishan; Ertekin, Elif

    2014-11-01

    Using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics and lattice dynamics, we investigate phonon conduction on two-dimensional graphene/boron nitride superlattices with varying periods and interface structures. As the period of superlattice increases to a critical value near 5 nm the lattice thermal conductivity drops sharply to a minimum, and beyond that it smoothly increases with the period. We show that the minimum in the thermal conductivity arises from a competition between lattice dispersion and anharmonic effects such as interface scattering. The initial reduction of thermal conductivity can partially be accounted for by harmonic wave effects induced by interfacial modulation, such as the opening of phononic band gaps and reduction of group velocity. Beyond the minimum, reduced inelastic interface scattering is responsible for the recovery. The overall range of thermal conductivity exhibited by the superlattices is substantially reduced with respect to the parent materials. A universal scaling of the thermal conductivity with total superlattice length is found, suggesting that the critical period is independent of total length and that long-wavelength phonons are dominant carriers. Furthermore, we demonstrate the ultrasensitivity of thermal conductivity to interfacial defects and superlattice periodicity disorder.

  9. Investigation on cubic boron nitride crystals doped with Si by high temperature thermal diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinlu; Feng, Shuang; Liu, Xiuhuan; Hou, Lixin; Gao, Yanjun; Wang, Qi; Liu, Nian; Zhang, Hai; Chen, Zhanguo; Zheng, Jie; Jia, Gang

    2014-07-01

    The method of high temperature thermal diffusion was successfully applied for doping Si impurities into cubic boron nitride (cBN) crystals. X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) and the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics at different temperatures were respectively used for analyzing the chemical states and the activation energy of Si impurity in cBN. According to the XPS results, Si impurities mainly replace B atoms bonding with the adjacent N atoms and become donors in cBN. Without surface cleaning, there are a lot of C and O contaminations on the surface of cBN, so a small quantity of C-Si and Si-N-O bonds also exist at the surface of cBN. Most Si impurities distribute in the shallow layer underneath the surface of cBN. Based on the electric measurement, Si impurities in cBN usually have the activation energy beyond 0.4 eV, and they can only be slightly ionized at room temperature, therefore the resistivity of Si-doped cBN is still high, and the space charge limited current becomes the main conductive mechanism in cBN. However, the conductivity of Si-doped cBN can rapidly increase with the temperature. In addition, the activation energy and the concentration of Si impurity in cBN can be affected by the temperature and the time of thermal diffusion, which needs to be verified further.

  10. Enhanced thermal conductivity and isotope effect in single-layer hexagonal boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broido, David; Lindsay, Lucas

    2012-02-01

    We have calculated the lattice thermal conductivity, k, of both naturally occurring and isotopically enriched single layers of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) as well as bulk h-BN using an exact numerical solution of the Boltzmann transport equation for phonons [1]. Good agreement is obtained with measured bulk h-BN data [2], and the stronger phonon-phonon scattering identified in these systems explains why their k values are significantly lower than those in graphene and graphite. A reduction in such scattering in the single layer arising mainly from a symmetry-based selection rule leads to a substantial increase in k, with calculated room temperature values of more than 600 W/m-K. Additional enhancement is obtained from isotopic enrichment, which exhibits a strong peak as a function of temperature, with magnitude growing rapidly with crystallite size. [1] L. Lindsay and D. A. Broido, Phys. Rev. B 84, 155421 (2011). [2] E. K. Sichel, R. E. Miller, M. S. Abrahams, and C. J. Buiocchi, Phys. Rev. B 13, 4607 (1976).

  11. Functionalized hexagonal boron nitride nano-coatings for protection of transparent plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Tran, Thu; Usta, Aybala; Asmatulu, Ramazan

    2016-04-01

    Nanocoating is the result of a coating application of nanomaterials to build a consistent network of molecules in a paint to protect the surfaces of various materials and devices. Hexagonal Boron Nitride (h-BN) is in two dimensional form with excellent thermal, mechanical and chemical properties. These BN nanocoatings are also a thermally insulating material for heat management. After adding functionalized h-BNs into paints or other coatings, they will absorb the harmful UV part of sunlight and prevent coating against the environmental degradations. The impacts of the environmental factors on the coatings can be substantially eliminated. In the present study, h-BNs were modified with [2-(2-Aminoethylamino) propyl] trimethoxysilane and uniformly dispersed into the polyurethane coatings with different amounts, such as 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, and 0.8wt% to increase hardness and water resistance, and decrease the UV degradation level of coatings and transparent plastics. The prepared samples were characterized by using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), UV-Vis Spectroscopy, Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Water Contact Angle, and Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC). The test results showed that the nanocoatings with functionalized h-BN provided excellent physical and chemical behaviors against the UV and other physical degradations on the substrates.

  12. High-Responsivity Graphene-Boron Nitride Photodetector and Autocorrelator in a Silicon Photonic Integrated Circuit

    CERN Document Server

    Shiue, Ren-Jye; Wang, Yifei; Peng, Cheng; Robertson, Alexander D; Efetov, Dimitri; Assefa, Solomon; Koppens, Frank H L; Hone, James; Englund, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Graphene and other two-dimensional (2D) materials have emerged as promising materials for broadband and ultrafast photodetection and optical modulation. These optoelectronic capabilities can augment complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) devices for high-speed and low-power optical interconnects. Here, we demonstrate an on-chip ultrafast photodetector based on a two-dimensional heterostructure consisting of high-quality graphene encapsulated in hexagonal boron nitride. Coupled to the optical mode of a silicon waveguide, this 2D heterostructure-based photodetector exhibits a maximum responsivity of 0.36 A/W and high-speed operation with a 3 dB cut-off at 42 GHz. From photocurrent measurements as a function of the top-gate and source-drain voltages, we conclude that the photoresponse is consistent with hot electron mediated effects. At moderate peak powers above 50 mW, we observe a saturating photocurrent consistent with the mechanisms of electron-phonon supercollision cooling. This nonlinear photorespo...

  13. Huge nanodielectric effects in polyimide/boron nitride nanocomposites revealed by the nanofiller size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaham, S.; Saysouk, F.; Locatelli, M.-L.; Lebey, T.

    2015-09-01

    The dielectric properties of polyimide/boron nitride (PI/BN) nanocomposite films are investigated as a function of the BN nanofiller size from 20 to 350 °C and at low filler content (1-2 vol.%). The role of the BN nanofiller size on the large reduction of the electrode polarization relaxation phenomenon due to ionic movements is reported. For the two smallest BN nanoparticles (95 nm and 35 nm), the permittivity, dielectric losses and dc conductivity are strongly attenuated above 200 °C by a factor of 10 to 1000 compared to neat PI. Thus, the dc conductivity at 350 °C is reduced from 4   ×   10-8 Ω-1 cm-1 for neat PI to 3   ×   10-11 Ω-1 cm-1 for PI/BN (35 nm). Moreover, a further decrease is obtained by functionalizing the nanofiller surface with a silane coupling agent which improves the grafting of PI chains on those latter nanoparticles. These results highlight the trapping efficiency in the interphase region introduced by the small BN nanofillers (<100 nm) and provides evidence as to the huge nanodielectric effects on the charge carrier transport controlled by the nanoparticle diameter. This finding should be of great importance for advanced high temperature electrical insulation in the future.

  14. Folate-conjugated boron nitride nanospheres for targeted delivery of anticancer drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Shini; Zhang, Huijie; Yan, Ting; Huang, Dandi; Zhi, Chunyi; Nakanishi, Hideki; Gao, Xiao-Dong

    2016-01-01

    With its unique physical and chemical properties and structural similarity to carbon, boron nitride (BN) has attracted considerable attention and found many applications. Biomedical applications of BN have recently started to emerge, raising great hopes in drug and gene delivery. Here, we developed a targeted anticancer drug delivery system based on folate-conjugated BN nanospheres (BNNS) with receptor-mediated targeting. Folic acid (FA) was successfully grafted onto BNNS via esterification reaction. In vitro cytotoxicity assay showed that BNNS-FA complexes were non-toxic to HeLa cells up to a concentration of 100 μg/mL. Then, doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX), a commonly used anticancer drug, was loaded onto BNNS-FA complexes. BNNS-FA/DOX complexes were stable at pH 7.4 but effectively released DOX at pH 5.0, which exhibited a pH sensitive and sustained release pattern. BNNS-FA/DOX complexes could be recognized and specifically internalized by HeLa cells via FA receptor-mediated endocytosis. BNNS-FA/DOX complexes exhibited greater cytotoxicity to HeLa cells than free DOX and BNNS/DOX complexes due to the increased cellular uptake of DOX mediated by the FA receptor. Therefore, BNNS-FA complexes had strong potential for targeted cancer therapy. PMID:27695318

  15. Ultra-thin epitaxial films of graphite and hexagonal boron nitride on solid surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Oshima, C

    1997-01-01

    In this article, we have reviewed the recent progress of the experimental studies on ultra-thin films of graphite and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) by using angle-resolved electron spectroscopy together with other techniques. The fundamental properties of these high-quality films are discussed on the basis of the data on dispersion relations of valence electrons, phonon dispersion etc. The interfacial orbital mixing of the pi-state of the monolayer graphite (MG) with the d states of the reactive substrates is the origin for the phonon softening, expansion of the nearest-neighbour C-C distance, modification of the pi-band, low work function, and two-dimensional plasmons with high electron density, etc. In the cases of weak mixing at the interface between the MG and relatively inert substrates, the observed properties of the MG are very close to the bulk ones. In contrast to the case for MG, the interfacial interaction between the h-BN monolayer and the substrate is weak. (author)

  16. Carbon- and crack-free growth of hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets and their uncommon stacking order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Majharul Haque; Casillas, Gilberto; Mitchell, David R G; Liu, Hua Kun; Jiang, Lei; Huang, Zhenguo

    2016-09-21

    The quality of hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets (h-BNNS) is often associated with the most visible aspects such as lateral size and thickness. Less obvious factors such as sheet stacking order could also have a dramatic impact on the properties of BNNS and therefore its applications. The stacking order can be affected by contamination, cracks, and growth temperatures. In view of the significance of chemical-vapour-decomposition (CVD) assisted growth of BNNS, this paper reports on strategies to grow carbon- and crack-free BNNS by CVD and describes the stacking order of the resultant BNNS. Pretreatment of the most commonly used precursor, ammonia borane, is necessary to remove carbon contamination caused by residual hydrocarbons. Flattening the Cu and W substrates prior to growth and slow cooling around the Cu melting point effectively facilitate the uniform growth of h-BNNS, as a result of a minimal temperature gradient across the Cu substrate. Confining the growth inside alumina boats effectively minimizes etching of the nanosheet by silica nanoparticles originating from the commonly used quartz reactor tube. h-BNNS grown on solid Cu surfaces using this method adopt AB, ABA, AC', and AC'B stacking orders, which are known to have higher energies than the most stable AA' configuration. These findings identify a pathway for the fabrication of high-quality h-BNNS via CVD and should spur studies on stacking order-dependent properties of h-BNNS.

  17. Self-assembled diacetylene molecular wire polymerization on an insulating hexagonal boron nitride (0001) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarova, Marina V.; Okawa, Yuji; Verveniotis, Elisseos; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Joachim, Christian; Aono, Masakazu

    2016-09-01

    The electrical characterization of single-polymer chains on a surface is an important step towards novel molecular device development. The main challenge is the lack of appropriate atomically flat insulating substrates for fabricating single-polymer chains. Here, using atomic force microscopy, we demonstrate that the (0001) surface of an insulating hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) substrate leads to a flat-lying self-assembled monolayer of diacetylene compounds. The subsequent heating or ultraviolet irradiation can initiate an on-surface polymerization process leading to the formation of long polydiacetylene chains. The frequency of photo-polymerization occurrence on h-BN(0001) is two orders of magnitude higher than that on graphite(0001). This is explained by the enhanced lifetime of the molecular excited state, because relaxation via the h-BN is suppressed due to a large band gap. We also demonstrate that on-surface polymerization on h-BN(0001) is possible even after the lithography process, which opens up the possibility of further electrical investigations.

  18. Thermal stability of boron nitride/silicon p-n heterojunction diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teii, Kungen, E-mail: teii@asem.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Mizusako, Yusei; Hori, Takuro [Department of Applied Science for Electronics and Materials, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Sciences, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Matsumoto, Seiichiro [Department of Applied Science for Electronics and Materials, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Sciences, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Exploratory Materials Research Laboratory for Energy and Environment, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan)

    2015-10-21

    Heterojunctions of p-type cubic boron nitride (cBN) and n-type silicon with sp{sup 2}-bonded BN (sp{sup 2}BN) interlayers are fabricated under low-energy ion impact by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition, and their rectification properties are studied at temperatures up to 573 K. The rectification ratio is increased up to the order of 10{sup 5} at room temperature by optimizing the thickness of the sp{sup 2}BN interlayer and the cBN fraction for suppressing the reverse leakage current. A highly rectifying p-type cBN/thick sp{sup 2}BN/n-type silicon junction diode shows irreversible rectification properties mainly characterized by a marked decrease in reverse current by an order of magnitude in an initial temperature ramp/down cycle. This irreversible behavior is much more reduced by conducting the cycle twice or more. The temperature-dependent properties confirm an overall increase in effective barrier heights for carrier injection and conduction by biasing at high temperatures, which consequently increases the thermal stability of the diode performance.

  19. Decorated graphyne and its boron nitride analogue as versatile nanomaterials for CO detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidvar, Akbar; Mohajeri, Afshan

    2015-12-01

    The sensitivity of a new two-dimensional (2D) carbon allotrope built from sp- and sp2-hybridised carbon atoms, graphyne (GY), as well as its boron nitride analogue (BN-yne) towards CO molecule has been theoretically investigated. Indeed, a theoretical understanding of the interaction between gas molecules and extended carbon-based network structures is crucial for developing new materials that could have a wide range of applications. Here, we report our first-principles calculations to explore the impact of metal decoration on the GY and BN-yne upon the CO adsorption. We predict that Ca and Li decorations significantly enhance the CO-sensing ability of the GY and BN-yne compared to that of their pristine sheets. Owing to strong interactions between CO and the decorated GY and BN-yne, dramatic changes in the electronic properties of the sheets together with large band gap variations were observed. The present study sheds a deep insight into the sensing properties of the novel carbon-based 2D structures beyond the graphene sheet.

  20. Nanoscale Control of Rewriteable Doping Patterns in Pristine Graphene/Boron Nitride Heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, Jairo; Ju, Long; Wong, Dillon; Kahn, Salman; Lee, Juwon; Tsai, Hsin-Zon; Germany, Chad; Wickenburg, Sebastian; Lu, Jiong; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Zettl, Alex; Wang, Feng; Crommie, Michael F

    2016-03-01

    Nanoscale control of charge doping in two-dimensional (2D) materials permits the realization of electronic analogs of optical phenomena, relativistic physics at low energies, and technologically promising nanoelectronics. Electrostatic gating and chemical doping are the two most common methods to achieve local control of such doping. However, these approaches suffer from complicated fabrication processes that introduce contamination, change material properties irreversibly, and lack flexible pattern control. Here we demonstrate a clean, simple, and reversible technique that permits writing, reading, and erasing of doping patterns for 2D materials at the nanometer scale. We accomplish this by employing a graphene/boron nitride heterostructure that is equipped with a bottom gate electrode. By using electron transport and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), we demonstrate that spatial control of charge doping can be realized with the application of either light or STM tip voltage excitations in conjunction with a gate electric field. Our straightforward and novel technique provides a new path toward on-demand graphene p-n junctions and ultrathin memory devices. PMID:26852622

  1. Solid-state neutron detectors based on thickness scalable hexagonal boron nitride

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmed, Kawser; Weltz, Adam; Lu, James J -Q; Danon, Yaron; Bhat, Ishwara B

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on the device processing and characterization of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) based solid-state thermal neutron detectors, where hBN thickness varied from 2.5 to 15 microns. These natural hBN epilayers (with 19.9% B-10) were grown by a low pressure chemical vapor deposition process. Complete dry processing was adopted for the fabrication of these metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) configuration detectors. These detectors showed intrinsic thermal neutron detection efficiency values of 0.86%, 2.4%, 3.15%, and 4.71% for natural hBN thickness values of 2.5, 7.5, 10, and 15 microns, respectively. Measured efficiencies are very close (more than 92%) to the theoretical maximum efficiencies for corresponding hBN thickness values for these detectors. This clearly shows the hBN thickness scalability of these detectors. A 15-micron thick hBN based MSM detector is expected to yield an efficiency of 21.4%, if enriched hBN (with ~100% B-10) is used instead of natural hBN. These results demonstrate that the...

  2. Evolution of Moiré Profiles from van der Waals Superstructures of Boron Nitride Nanosheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yunlong; Cao, Wei; Connell, John W; Chen, Zhongfang; Lin, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) van der Waals (vdW) superstructures, or vdW solids, are formed by the precise restacking of 2D nanosheet lattices, which can lead to unique physical and electronic properties that are not available in the parent nanosheets. Moiré patterns formed by the crystalline mismatch between adjacent nanosheets are the most direct features for vdW superstructures under microscopic imaging. In this article, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation of hexagonal Moiré patterns with unusually large micrometer-sized lateral areas (up to ~1 μm(2)) and periodicities (up to ~50 nm) from restacking of liquid exfoliated hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs) is reported. This observation was attributed to the long range crystallinity and the contaminant-free surfaces of these chemically inert nanosheets. Parallel-line-like Moiré fringes with similarly large periodicities were also observed. The simulations and experiments unambiguously revealed that the hexagonal patterns and the parallel fringes originated from the same rotationally mismatched vdW stacking of BNNSs and can be inter-converted by simply tilting the TEM specimen following designated directions. This finding may pave the way for further structural decoding of other 2D vdW superstructure systems with more complex Moiré images. PMID:27188697

  3. Negative differential resistance in boron nitride graphene heterostructures: physical mechanisms and size scaling analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y; Wan, Z; Xu, X; Patil, S R; Hetmaniuk, U; Anantram, M P

    2015-01-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) is drawing increasing attention as an insulator and substrate material to develop next generation graphene-based electronic devices. In this paper, we investigate the quantum transport in heterostructures consisting of a few atomic layers thick hBN film sandwiched between graphene nanoribbon electrodes. We show a gate-controllable vertical transistor exhibiting strong negative differential resistance (NDR) effect with multiple resonant peaks, which stay pronounced for various device dimensions. We find two distinct mechanisms that are responsible for NDR, depending on the gate and applied biases, in the same device. The origin of first mechanism is a Fabry-Pérot like interference and that of the second mechanism is an in-plane wave vector matching when the Dirac points of the electrodes align. The hBN layers can induce an asymmetry in the current-voltage characteristics which can be further modulated by an applied bias. We find that the electron-phonon scattering suppresses the first mechanism whereas the second mechanism remains relatively unaffected. We also show that the NDR features are tunable by varying device dimensions. The NDR feature with multiple resonant peaks, combined with ultrafast tunneling speed provides prospect for the graphene-hBN-graphene heterostructure in the high-performance electronics. PMID:25991076

  4. The defect-induced fracture behaviors of hexagonal boron-nitride monolayer nanosheets under uniaxial tension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to its excellent mechanical and electrical insulating properties, the hexagonal boron-nitride (h-BN) monolayer nanosheet is regarded as a complementary addition to graphene. However, its mechanical strength can be significantly affected by various defects pre-existing in it, such as a Stone–Wales defect, a vacancy defect, an atomic anti-site defect, etc. In this work, the influences of various pre-existing defects on the fracture behaviors of an h-BN monolayer nanosheet are investigated carefully using molecular dynamics simulation. The results show that the nucleation and evolution of a fracture induced by defects in the h-BN monolayer nanosheet are directional, and that the crack always starts from the location which has a weak bond energy. An unexpected observation is that the defect propagates mostly in the zigzag direction but occasionally in the armchair direction. The fracture strength and the fracture strain of the h-BN monolayer nanosheet are reduced at different extents due to the various pre-existing defects. Additionally, for the defective h-BN monolayer nanosheets, the fracture strength and strain measured in the armchair direction is much higher than the strength found in the zigzag direction. However, the strengths measured in the armchair and zigzag directions for the defect-free h-BN monolayer nanosheets almost are identical which implies that the armchair direction has a stronger ability to resist various defects compared to the zigzag direction. (paper)

  5. Quasiparticle Band Gaps of Graphene and Graphone on Hexagonal Boron Nitride Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharche, Neerav; Nayak, Saroj

    2012-02-01

    Graphene holds great promise for post-silicon electronics; however, it faces two main challenges: opening up a band gap and finding a suitable substrate material. Graphene on hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) substrate provides a potential system to overcome these challenges. While theoretical studies suggested a possibility of a finite band gap of graphene on hBN, recent experimental studies find no band gap. We have studied graphene-hBN system using the first-principles density functional method and the many-body perturbation theory within GW approximation [1]. A Bernal stacked graphene on hBN has a band gap on the order of 0.1 eV, which disappears when graphene is misaligned with respect to hBN. The latter is the likely scenario in realistic devices. In contrast, if graphene supported on hBN is hydrogenated, the resulting system (graphone) exhibits band gaps larger than 2.5 eV. The graphone band gap is due to chemical functionalization and is robust in the presence of misalignment, however, it reduces by about 1 eV due to the polarization effects at the graphone/hBN interface.[4pt] [1] N. Kharche and S. K. Nayak, Nano Lett., DOI: 10.1021/nl202725w, (2011).

  6. In Vivo Biodistribution and Toxicity of Highly Soluble PEG-Coated Boron Nitride in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Qi, Wei; Tian, Longlong; Li, Zhan; Miao, Guoying; An, Wenzhen; Liu, Dan; Lin, Jing; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Wu, Wangsuo

    2015-12-01

    The boron nitride (BN) nanoparticles, as the structural analogues of graphene, are the potential biomedicine materials because of the excellent biocompatibility, but their solubility and biosafety are the biggest obstacle for the clinic application. Here, we first synthesized the highly soluble BN nanoparticles coated by PEG (BN-PEG) with smaller size (~10 nm), then studied their biodistribution in vivo through radioisotope (Tc99mO4 -) labeling, and the results showed that BN-PEG nanoparticles mainly accumulated in the liver, lung, and spleen with the less uptake by the brain. Moreover, the pathological changes induced by BN-PEG could be significantly observed in the sections of the liver, lung, spleen, and heart, which can be also supported by the test of biochemical indexes in serum. More importantly, we first observed the biodistribution of BN-PEG in the heart tissues with high toxicity, which would give a warning about the cardiovascular disease, and provide some opportunities for the drug delivery and treatment.

  7. Synthesis of large single-crystal hexagonal boron nitride grains on Cu-Ni alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Guangyuan; Wu, Tianru; Yuan, Qinghong; Wang, Huishan; Wang, Haomin; Ding, Feng; Xie, Xiaoming; Jiang, Mianheng

    2015-01-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) has attracted significant attention because of its superior properties as well as its potential as an ideal dielectric layer for graphene-based devices. The h-BN films obtained via chemical vapour deposition in earlier reports are always polycrystalline with small grains because of high nucleation density on substrates. Here we report the successful synthesis of large single-crystal h-BN grains on rational designed Cu-Ni alloy foils. It is found that the nucleation density can be greatly reduced to 60 per mm2 by optimizing Ni ratio in substrates. The strategy enables the growth of single-crystal h-BN grains up to 7,500 μm2, approximately two orders larger than that in previous reports. This work not only provides valuable information for understanding h-BN nucleation and growth mechanisms, but also gives an effective alternative to exfoliated h-BN as a high-quality dielectric layer for large-scale nanoelectronic applications.

  8. Growth and Contrast of Hexagonal Boron Nitride: From Submonolayer Islands to Multilayer Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koepke, Justin; Wood, Joshua; Pop, Eric; Lyding, Joseph

    2013-03-01

    Strong interest in hexagon boron nitride (h-BN) as a substrate for graphene devices or as a template for growth of other layered compounds has motivated recent attempts to synthesize large scale h-BN by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). We synthesize h-BN by low pressure CVD on polycrystalline Cu foil in a hot wall tube furnace with a heated ammonia borane precursor carried downstream by Ar and H2 gas. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) diffraction patterns show that the resulting growths are highly crystalline, with several layers obtained for longer growth times. Short growth times show that the h-BN nucleates in triangular islands at a higher precursor temperature than previously reported in and a lower temperature than reported in. In-air calcination of the Cu foils after partial h-BN growth allows optical contrast of the previously transparent h-BN islands on the Cu foil. This observed resistance to oxidation suggests that grown h-BN films can serve as an insulating anti-corrosion layer.

  9. Direct growth of nanocrystalline hexagonal boron nitride films on dielectric substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tay, Roland Yingjie [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Temasek Laboratories@NTU, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Tsang, Siu Hon [Temasek Laboratories@NTU, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Loeblein, Manuela; Chow, Wai Leong [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); CNRS-International NTU Thales Research Alliance CINTRA UMI 3288, Research Techno Plaza, 50 Nanyang Drive, Singapore, Singapore 637553 (Singapore); Loh, Guan Chee [Institue of High Performance Computing, 1 Fusionopolis Way, #16-16 Connexis, Singapore 138632 (Singapore); Department of Physics, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Michigan 49931 (United States); Toh, Joo Wah; Ang, Soon Loong [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Teo, Edwin Hang Tong, E-mail: htteo@ntu.edu.sg [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2015-03-09

    Atomically thin hexagonal-boron nitride (h-BN) films are primarily synthesized through chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on various catalytic transition metal substrates. In this work, a single-step metal-catalyst-free approach to obtain few- to multi-layer nanocrystalline h-BN (NCBN) directly on amorphous SiO{sub 2}/Si and quartz substrates is demonstrated. The as-grown thin films are continuous and smooth with no observable pinholes or wrinkles across the entire deposited substrate as inspected using optical and atomic force microscopy. The starting layers of NCBN orient itself parallel to the substrate, initiating the growth of the textured thin film. Formation of NCBN is due to the random and uncontrolled nucleation of h-BN on the dielectric substrate surface with no epitaxial relation, unlike on metal surfaces. The crystallite size is ∼25 nm as determined by Raman spectroscopy. Transmission electron microscopy shows that the NCBN formed sheets of multi-stacked layers with controllable thickness from ∼2 to 25 nm. The absence of transfer process in this technique avoids any additional degradation, such as wrinkles, tears or folding and residues on the film which are detrimental to device performance. This work provides a wider perspective of CVD-grown h-BN and presents a viable route towards large-scale manufacturing of h-BN substrates and for coating applications.

  10. MOCVD of hexagonal boron nitride thin films on Si(100) using new single source precursors

    CERN Document Server

    Boo, J H; Yu, K S; Kim, Y S; Kim, Y S; Park, J T

    1999-01-01

    We have been carried out the growth of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) thin films on Si(100) substrates by low pressure metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (LPMOCVD) method using triethylborane tert-butylamine complex (TEBTBA), Et sub 3 BNH sub 2 ( sup t Bu), and triethylborane isopropylamine complex (TEBIPA), Et sub 3 BNH sub 2 ( sup t Pr) as a new single molecular precursors in the temperature range of 850 approx 1000 .deg. C. polycrystalline, crack-free h-BN film was successfully grown on Si(100) substrate at 850 .deg. C using TEBTBA. This growth temperature is very lower than those in previous reports. Carbon-rich polycrystalline BN was also obtained at 900 .deg. C from TEBIPA. With increasing substrate temperature to 1000 .deg. C, however, BC sub 4 N-like species are strongly formed along with h-BN and the BN films obtained from both TEBTBA and TEBIPA but almost polycrystalline. To our best knowledge, this is the first report of the growth of h-BN films formed with the new single source precursors of ...

  11. Dry etching techniques for active devices based on hexagonal boron nitride epilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) has emerged as a fundamentally and technologically important material system owing to its unique physical properties including layered structure, wide energy bandgap, large optical absorption, and neutron capture cross section. As for any materials under development, it is necessary to establish device processing techniques to realize active devices based on hBN. The authors report on the advancements in dry etching techniques for active devices based on hBN epilayers via inductively coupled plasma (ICP). The effect of ICP radio frequency (RF) power on the etch rate and vertical side wall profile was studied. The etching depth and angle with respect to the surface were measured using atomic force microscopy showing that an etching rate ∼1.25 μm/min and etching angles >80° were obtained. Profilometer data and scanning electron microscope images confirmed these results. This work demonstrates that SF6 is very suitable for etching hBN epilayers in RF plasma environments and can serve as a guide for future hBN device processing

  12. Dry etching techniques for active devices based on hexagonal boron nitride epilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grenadier, Samuel; Li, Jing; Lin, Jingyu; Jiang, Hongxing [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) has emerged as a fundamentally and technologically important material system owing to its unique physical properties including layered structure, wide energy bandgap, large optical absorption, and neutron capture cross section. As for any materials under development, it is necessary to establish device processing techniques to realize active devices based on hBN. The authors report on the advancements in dry etching techniques for active devices based on hBN epilayers via inductively coupled plasma (ICP). The effect of ICP radio frequency (RF) power on the etch rate and vertical side wall profile was studied. The etching depth and angle with respect to the surface were measured using atomic force microscopy showing that an etching rate ∼1.25 μm/min and etching angles >80° were obtained. Profilometer data and scanning electron microscope images confirmed these results. This work demonstrates that SF{sub 6} is very suitable for etching hBN epilayers in RF plasma environments and can serve as a guide for future hBN device processing.

  13. Bilayer Graphene-Hexagonal Boron Nitride Heterostructure Negative Differential Resistance Interlayer Tunnel FETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sangwoo; Fallahazad, Babak; Lee, Kayoung; Movva, Hema; Kim, Kyounghwan; Corbet, Chris; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Colombo, Luigi; Register, Leonard; Tutuc, Emanuel; Banerjee, Sanjay

    2015-03-01

    We present the operation of a vertical tunneling field effect transistor using a stacked double bilayer graphene (BLG) and hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) heterostructure. The device is fabricated with the so-called Van der Waals transfer method with the edges of the top and bottom BLG flakes being rotationally aligned to roughly 60°. The device shows multiple negative differential resistance (NDR) peaks which can be adjusted through the gate bias. Temperature dependent measurements show that the peak width of the differential conductance broadens and the height lowered when the temperature is increased, which is indicative of resonant tunneling. Through electrostatic calculations, it is shown that the multiple peaks occur when the two conduction bands at the K-point of the top and bottom bilayer graphene become aligned at certain bias conditions. It is also shown that by adjusting the rotational alignment of the bands of the top and bottom BLG through an in-plane magnetic field, the conductance peaks can be broadened. In addition, utilizing the NDR characteristic of the device, one-transistor latch or SRAM operation is demonstrated.

  14. Functionalization of boron nitride nanoparticles and their utilization in epoxy composites with enhanced thermal conductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Yong-Ming; Wang, Qian-Qian; Liu, Wei; Liu, Yi-Sheng [College of Energy Resources, Chengdu University of Technology, Chengdu (China)

    2014-03-15

    This work proposes a facile method to greatly improve the thermal conductivity, while retaining the low electrical conductivity, of epoxy composites by incorporating boron nitride nanoparticles (BNNPs). BNNPs were surface modified by noncovalent functionalization with 1-pyrenebutyric acid to obtain a stable aqueous BNNP dispersion. The functionalized BNNPs (f-BNNPs) were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transformation infrared (FTIR), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The f-BNNPs were found to yield the f-BNNP/epoxy composites showing a homogeneous dispersion of BNNPs and a strong BNNP-epoxy interfacial adhesion. The f-BNNP/epoxy composites with 10 wt.% f-BNNPs exhibited a high thermal conductivity of 1.58 W m{sup -1} K{sup -1} and a low electrical conductivity of 2.5 x 10{sup -16} S m{sup -1}. The present f-BNNP/epoxy composites can be potentially utilized in electronic packaging that requires electronic insulators with high thermal conductivity. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. The magnetism and spin-dependent electronic transport properties of boron nitride atomic chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Yipeng; Zhang, Mengjun; Wu, Dapeng; Fu, Zhaoming; Wang, Tianxing; Jiao, Zhaoyong; Wang, Kun

    2016-07-28

    Very recently, boron nitride atomic chains were successively prepared and observed in experiments [O. Cretu et al., ACS Nano 8, 11950 (2015)]. Herein, using a first-principles technique, we study the magnetism and spin-dependent electronic transport properties of three types of BN atomic chains whose magnetic moment is 1 μB for BnNn-1, 2 μB for BnNn, and 3 μB for BnNn+1 type atomic chains, respectively. The spin-dependent electronic transport results demonstrate that the short BnNn+1 chain presents an obvious spin-filtering effect with high spin polarization ratio (>90%) under low bias voltages. Yet, this spin-filtering effect does not occur for long BnNn+1 chains under high bias voltages and other types of BN atomic chains (BnNn-1 and BnNn). The proposed short BnNn+1 chain is predicted to be an effective low-bias spin filters. Moreover, the length-conductance relationships of these BN atomic chains were also studied.

  16. Boron nitride nanosheets as improved and reusable substrates for gold nanoparticles enabled surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Cai, Qiran

    2015-01-01

    Atomically thin boron nitride (BN) nanosheets have been found to be excellent substrates for noble metal particles enabled surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), thanks to their good adsorption of aromatic molecules, high thermal stability and weak Raman scattering. Faceted gold (Au) nanoparticles have been synthesized on BN nanosheets using a simple but controllable and reproducible sputtering and annealing method. The size and density of the Au particles can be controlled by sputtering time, current and annealing temperature etc. Under the same sputtering and annealing conditions, the Au particles on BN of different thicknesses show various sizes because the surface diffusion coefficients of Au depend on the thickness of BN. Intriguingly, decorated with similar morphology and distribution of Au particles, BN nanosheets exhibit better Raman enhancements than silicon substrates as well as bulk BN crystals. Additionally, BN nanosheets show no noticeable SERS signal and hence cause no interference to the Raman signal of the analyte. The Au/BN substrates can be reused by heating in air to remove the adsorbed analyte without loss of SERS enhancement. This journal is © the Owner Societies 2015.

  17. Self-assembled diacetylene molecular wire polymerization on an insulating hexagonal boron nitride (0001) surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarova, Marina V; Okawa, Yuji; Verveniotis, Elisseos; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Joachim, Christian; Aono, Masakazu

    2016-09-30

    The electrical characterization of single-polymer chains on a surface is an important step towards novel molecular device development. The main challenge is the lack of appropriate atomically flat insulating substrates for fabricating single-polymer chains. Here, using atomic force microscopy, we demonstrate that the (0001) surface of an insulating hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) substrate leads to a flat-lying self-assembled monolayer of diacetylene compounds. The subsequent heating or ultraviolet irradiation can initiate an on-surface polymerization process leading to the formation of long polydiacetylene chains. The frequency of photo-polymerization occurrence on h-BN(0001) is two orders of magnitude higher than that on graphite(0001). This is explained by the enhanced lifetime of the molecular excited state, because relaxation via the h-BN is suppressed due to a large band gap. We also demonstrate that on-surface polymerization on h-BN(0001) is possible even after the lithography process, which opens up the possibility of further electrical investigations. PMID:27573286

  18. Hybrid boron nitride-natural fiber composites for enhanced thermal conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Changlei; Garcia, Andres C.; Shi, Sheldon Q.; Qiu, Ying; Warner, Nathaniel; Wu, Yingji; Cai, Liping; Rizvi, Hussain R.; D’Souza, Nandika A.; Nie, Xu

    2016-10-01

    Thermal conductivity was dramatically increased after adding natural fiber into hexagonal boron nitride (hBN)/epoxy composites. Although natural fiber does not show high-thermal conductivity itself, this study found that the synergy of natural fiber with hBN could significantly improve thermal conductivity, compared with that solely using hBN. A design of mixtures approach using constant fibers with increasing volume fractions of hBN was examined and compared. The thermal conductivity of the composite containing 43.6% hBN, 26.3% kenaf fiber and 30.1% epoxy reached 6.418 W m‑1 K‑1, which was 72.3% higher than that (3.600 W m‑1 K‑1) of the 69.0% hBN and 31.0% epoxy composite. Using the scanning electron microscope (SEM) and micro computed tomography (micro-CT), it was observed that the hBN powders were well distributed and ordered on the fiber surfaces enhancing the ceramic filler’s interconnection, which may be the reason for the increase in thermal conductivity. Additionally, the results from mechanical and dynamic mechanical tests showed that performances dramatically improved after adding kenaf fibers into the hBN/epoxy composite, potentially benefiting the composite’s use as an engineered material.

  19. Effects of domain size on x-ray absorption spectra of boron nitride doped graphenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Hua, Weijie; Wang, Bo-Yao; Pong, Way-Faung; Glans, Per-Anders; Guo, Jinghua; Luo, Yi

    2016-08-01

    Doping is an efficient way to open the zero band gap of graphene. The control of the dopant domain size allows us to tailor the electronic structure and the properties of the graphene. We have studied the electronic structure of boron nitride doped graphenes with different domain sizes by simulating their near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra at the N K-edge. Six different doping configurations (five quantum dot type and one phase-separated zigzag-edged type) were chosen, and N K-edge NEXAFS spectra were calculated with large truncated cluster models by using the density functional theory with hybrid functional and the equivalent core hole approximation. The opening of the band gap as a function of the domain size is revealed. We found that nitrogens in the dopant boundary contribute a weaker, red-shifted π* peak in the spectra as compared to those in the dopant domain center. The shift is related to the fact that these interfacial nitrogens dominate the lowest conduction band of the system. Upon increasing the domain size, the ratio of interfacial atom decreases, which leads to a blue shift of the π* peak in the total NEXAFS spectra. The spectral evolution agrees well with experiments measured at different BN-dopant concentrations and approaches to that of a pristine h-BN sheet.

  20. Coherent phonon transport in short-period two-dimensional superlattices of graphene and boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Carlos; Saiz, Fernan; Romero, David A.; Amon, Cristina H.

    2016-03-01

    Promoting coherent transport of phonons at material interfaces is a promising strategy for controlling thermal transport in nanostructures and an alternative to traditional methods based on structural defects. Coherent transport is particularly relevant in short-period heterostructures with smooth interfaces and long-wavelength heat-carrying phonons, such as two-dimensional superlattices of graphene and boron nitride. In this work, we predict phonon properties and thermal conductivities in these superlattices using a normal mode decomposition approach. We study the variation of the frequency dependence of these properties with the periodicity and interface configuration (zigzag and armchair) for superlattices with period lengths within the coherent regime. Our results showed that the thermal conductivity decreases significantly from the first period length (0.44 nm) to the second period length (0.87 nm), 13% across the interfaces and 16% along the interfaces. For greater periods, the conductivity across the interfaces continues decreasing at a smaller rate of 11 W/mK per period length increase (0.43 nm), driven by changes in the phonon group velocities (coherent effects). In contrast, the conductivity along the interfaces slightly recovers at a rate of 2 W/mK per period, driven by changes in the phonon relaxation times (diffusive effects). By changing the interface configuration from armchair to zigzag, the conductivities for all period lengths increase by approximately 7% across the interfaces and 19% along the interfaces.

  1. Growth and spectroscopic characterization of monolayer and few-layer hexagonal boron nitride on metal substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigelson, Boris N.; Bermudez, Victor M.; Hite, Jennifer K.; Robinson, Zachary R.; Wheeler, Virginia D.; Sridhara, Karthik; Hernández, Sandra C.

    2015-02-01

    Atomically thin two dimensional hexagonal boron nitride (2D h-BN) is one of the key materials in the development of new van der Waals heterostructures due to its outstanding properties including an atomically smooth surface, high thermal conductivity, high mechanical strength, chemical inertness and high electrical resistance. The development of 2D h-BN growth is still in the early stages and largely depends on rapid and accurate characterization of the grown monolayer or few layers h-BN films. This paper demonstrates a new approach to characterizing monolayer h-BN films directly on metal substrates by grazing-incidence infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS). Using h-BN films grown by atmospheric-pressure chemical vapor deposition on Cu and Ni substrates, two new sub-bands are found for the A2u out-of-plane stretching mode. It is shown, using both experimental and computational methods, that the lower-energy sub-band is related to 2D h-BN coupled with substrate, while the higher energy sub-band is related to decoupled (or free-standing) 2D h-BN. It is further shown that this newly-observed fine structure in the A2u mode can be used to assess, quickly and easily, the homogeneity of the h-BN-metal interface and the effects of metal surface contamination on adhesion of the layer.

  2. Thermal diffusivity of hexagonal boron nitride composites based on cross-linked liquid crystalline polyimides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoji, Yu; Higashihara, Tomoya; Tokita, Masatoshi; Morikawa, Junko; Watanabe, Junji; Ueda, Mitsuru

    2013-04-24

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) composites with the oriented cross-linked liquid crystalline (LC) polyimide have been developed as high thermally conductive materials. Well-dispersed h-BN composite films were obtained, as observed by scanning electron microscopy. The morphology of the composite films was further investigated in detail by the wide-angle X-ray diffraction. The obtained composite films based on the cross-linked LC polyimide showed that the polymer chains vertically aligned in the direction parallel to the films, while those based on the amorphous polyimide showed an isotropic nature. Moreover, the alignment of the cross-linked LC polyimides was maintained, even after increasing the volume fraction of h-BN. This alignment plays an important role in the effective phonon conduction between h-BN and the matrices. Indeed, the thermal diffusivity in the thickness direction of the composite films based on the LC polyimide measured by a temperature wave analysis method was increased to 0.679 mm(2) s(-1) at a 30 vol % h-BN loading, which was higher than that based on the amorphous polyimide. PMID:23506319

  3. Thermal stability of boron nitride/silicon p-n heterojunction diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teii, Kungen; Mizusako, Yusei; Hori, Takuro; Matsumoto, Seiichiro

    2015-10-01

    Heterojunctions of p-type cubic boron nitride (cBN) and n-type silicon with sp2-bonded BN (sp2BN) interlayers are fabricated under low-energy ion impact by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition, and their rectification properties are studied at temperatures up to 573 K. The rectification ratio is increased up to the order of 105 at room temperature by optimizing the thickness of the sp2BN interlayer and the cBN fraction for suppressing the reverse leakage current. A highly rectifying p-type cBN/thick sp2BN/n-type silicon junction diode shows irreversible rectification properties mainly characterized by a marked decrease in reverse current by an order of magnitude in an initial temperature ramp/down cycle. This irreversible behavior is much more reduced by conducting the cycle twice or more. The temperature-dependent properties confirm an overall increase in effective barrier heights for carrier injection and conduction by biasing at high temperatures, which consequently increases the thermal stability of the diode performance.

  4. Synthesis and applications of two-dimensional hexagonal boron nitride in electronics manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Jie; Jeppson, Kjell; Edwards, Michael; Fu, Yifeng; Ye, Lilei; Lu, Xiuzhen; Liu, Johan

    2016-01-01

    In similarity to graphene, two-dimensional (2D) hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) has some remarkable properties, such as mechanical robustness and high thermal conductivity. In addition, hBN has superb chemical stability and it is electrically insulating. 2D hBN has been considered a promising material for many applications in electronics, including 2D hBN based substrates, gate dielectrics for graphene transistors and interconnects, and electronic packaging insulators. This paper reviews the synthesis, transfer and fabrication of 2D hBN films, hBN based composites and hBN-based van der Waals heterostructures. In particular, this review focuses on applications in manufacturing electronic devices where the insulating and thermal properties of hBN can potentially be exploited. 2D hBN and related composite systems are emerging as new and industrially important materials, which could address many challenges in future complex electronics devices and systems. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  5. Preparation and thermal properties of polyacrylonitrile/hexagonal boron nitride composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madakbas, Seyfullah, E-mail: smadakbas@marmara.edu.tr [Marmara University, Department of Chemistry, 34722 Istanbul (Turkey); Cakmakc Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I , Emrah; Kahraman, Memet Vezir [Marmara University, Department of Chemistry, 34722 Istanbul (Turkey)

    2013-01-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PAN/h-BN composites with improved thermal stability were prepared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal properties of composites were analysed by TGA and DSC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Flame retardancy of the composites increased up to 27%. - Abstract: Polyacrylonitrile is a thermoplastic polymer with unique properties and it has several uses. However its flammability is a major drawback for certain applications. In this study it was aimed to prepare polyacrylonitrile (PAN)/hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) composites with improved flame retardancy and thermal stability. Chemical structures of the composites were characterized by FTIR analysis. Thermal properties of these novel composites were analysed by TGA and DSC measurements. Glass transition temperatures and char yields increased with increasing h-BN percentage. Flame retardancy of the PAN composite materials improved with the addition of h-BN and the LOI value reached to 27% from 18%. Furthermore, the surface morphology of the composites was investigated by SEM analysis.

  6. TiAl-Nb melt interaction with pyrolytic boron nitride crucibles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kartavykh, A.V., E-mail: karta@girmet.ru [Institute of Chemical Problems for Microelectronics (IChPM), B. Tolmachevsky per. 5, 119017 Moscow (Russian Federation); Tcherdyntsev, V.V. [Moscow State Institute of Steel and Alloys (Technological University), Leninsky pr. 4, 119049 Moscow (Russian Federation); Zollinger, J. [ACCESS e.V., Intzestrasse 5, 52072 Aachen (Germany)

    2010-02-15

    This paper studies the chemical interaction on contact, and the related evolution of composition and microstructure of cast TiAl-based alloy, when using refractory oxygen-free pyrolytic boron nitride (pBN) crucibles/moulds instead of traditional oxide ceramic ones. We extend the research begun with AlN crucibles and reported in . Three melting tests were performed in resistive SiC electro-furnace with Ti-46Al-8Nb (at%) alloy in 6N-purity pBN boat crucibles with fixed melt superheating times of 5, 12 and 25 min at 1670 deg. C and subsequent quenching with high-purity Ar gas flow. As-cast samples were examined by optical microscopy/metallography, X-ray diffractometry, SEM-BSE, EDX and EBSD micro-analyses, and compared to the initial material. Unlike the AlN it was shown that dissolved BN reacts with the melt, forming Ti{sub 2}AlN and (Ti,Nb)B micro-precipitates at the expense of selective destruction of the {alpha}{sub 2}-Ti{sub 3}Al major intermetallic phase in the solidified alloy: Ti{sub 3}Al + (Nb) + BN {yields} Ti{sub 2}AlN + (Ti,Nb)B. The key features and temporal dynamics of this interaction are studied.

  7. High-Responsivity Graphene-Boron Nitride Photodetector and Autocorrelator in a Silicon Photonic Integrated Circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiue, Ren-Jye; Gao, Yuanda; Wang, Yifei; Peng, Cheng; Robertson, Alexander D; Efetov, Dmitri K; Assefa, Solomon; Koppens, Frank H L; Hone, James; Englund, Dirk

    2015-11-11

    Graphene and other two-dimensional (2D) materials have emerged as promising materials for broadband and ultrafast photodetection and optical modulation. These optoelectronic capabilities can augment complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) devices for high-speed and low-power optical interconnects. Here, we demonstrate an on-chip ultrafast photodetector based on a two-dimensional heterostructure consisting of high-quality graphene encapsulated in hexagonal boron nitride. Coupled to the optical mode of a silicon waveguide, this 2D heterostructure-based photodetector exhibits a maximum responsivity of 0.36 A/W and high-speed operation with a 3 dB cutoff at 42 GHz. From photocurrent measurements as a function of the top-gate and source-drain voltages, we conclude that the photoresponse is consistent with hot electron mediated effects. At moderate peak powers above 50 mW, we observe a saturating photocurrent consistent with the mechanisms of electron-phonon supercollision cooling. This nonlinear photoresponse enables optical on-chip autocorrelation measurements with picosecond-scale timing resolution and exceptionally low peak powers.

  8. Mobility enhancement in graphene transistors on low temperature pulsed laser deposited boron nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low temperature pulsed laser deposited (PLD) ultrathin boron nitride (BN) on SiO2 was investigated as a dielectric for graphene electronics, and a significant enhancement in electrical transport properties of graphene/PLD BN compared to graphene/SiO2 has been observed. Graphene synthesized by chemical vapor deposition and transferred on PLD deposited and annealed BN exhibited up to three times higher field effect mobility compared to graphene on the SiO2 substrate. Graphene field effect transistor devices fabricated on 5 nm BN/SiO2 (300 nm) yielded maximum hole and electron mobility of 4980 and 4200 cm2/V s, respectively. In addition, significant improvement in carrier homogeneity and reduction in extrinsic doping in graphene on BN has been observed. An average Dirac point of 3.5 V and residual carrier concentration of 7.65 × 1011 cm−2 was observed for graphene transferred on 5 nm BN at ambient condition. The overall performance improvement on PLD BN can be attributed to dielectric screening of charged impurities, similar crystal structure and phonon modes, and reduced substrate induced doping

  9. Suppressing bacterial interaction with copper surfaces through graphene and hexagonal-boron nitride coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Carolina; Montero-Silva, Francisco; Henríquez, Ricardo; Flores, Marcos; Garín, Carolina; Ramírez, Cristian; Moreno, Macarena; Correa, Jonathan; Seeger, Michael; Häberle, Patricio

    2015-04-01

    Understanding biological interaction with graphene and hexagonal-boron nitride (h-BN) membranes has become essential for the incorporation of these unique materials in contact with living organisms. Previous reports show contradictions regarding the bacterial interaction with graphene sheets on metals. Here, we present a comprehensive study of the interaction of bacteria with copper substrates coated with single-layer graphene and h-BN. Our results demonstrate that such graphitic coatings substantially suppress interaction between bacteria and underlying Cu substrates, acting as an effective barrier to prevent physical contact. Bacteria do not "feel" the strong antibacterial effect of Cu, and the substrate does not suffer biocorrosion due to bacteria contact. Effectiveness of these systems as barriers can be understood in terms of graphene and h-BN impermeability to transfer Cu(2+) ions, even when graphene and h-BN domain boundary defects are present. Our results seem to indicate that as-grown graphene and h-BN films could successfully protect metals, preventing their corrosion in biological and medical applications.

  10. Thermal contact resistance across a linear heterojunction within a hybrid graphene/hexagonal boron nitride sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yang; Zhang, Jingchao; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2016-09-21

    Interfacial thermal conductance plays a vital role in defining the thermal properties of nanostructured materials in which heat transfer is predominantly phonon mediated. In this work, the thermal contact resistance (R) of a linear heterojunction within a hybrid graphene/hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) sheet is characterized using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations. The effects of system dimension, heat flux direction, temperature and tensile strain on the predicted R values are investigated. The spatiotemporal evolution of thermal energies from the graphene to the h-BN sheet reveals that the main energy carrier in graphene is the flexural phonon (ZA) mode, which also has the most energy transmissions across the interface. The calculated R decreases monotonically from 5.2 × 10(-10) to 2.2 × 10(-10) K m(2) W(-1) with system lengths ranging from 20 to 100 nm. For a 40 nm length hybrid system, the calculated R decreases by 42% from 4.1 × 10(-10) to 2.4 × 10(-10) K m(2) W(-1) when the system temperature increases from 200 K to 600 K. The study of the strain effect shows that the thermal contact resistance R between h-BN and graphene sheets increases with the tensile strain. Detailed phonon density of states (PDOS) is computed to understand the thermal resistance results. PMID:27531348

  11. Local charge states in hexagonal boron nitride with Stone-Wales defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Yang, Jiali; Wu, Xiaozhi; Wang, Shaofeng

    2016-04-14

    A Stone-Wales (SW) defect is the simplest topological defect in graphene-like materials and can be potentially employed to design electronic devices . In this paper, we have systematically investigated the formation, structural, and electronic properties of the neutral and charged SW defects in hexagonal boron nitride (BN) using first-principles calculations. The transition states and energy barrier for the formation of SW defects demonstrate that the defected BN is stable. Our calculations show that there are two in-gap defect levels, which originate from the asymmetrical pentagon-heptagon pairs. The local defect configurations and electronic properties are sensitive to their charge states induced by the defect levels. The electronic band structures show that the negative and positive charged defects are mainly determined by shifting the conduction band minimum (CBM) and valence band maximum (VBM) respectively, and the SW-defected BN can realize -1 and +1 spin-polarized charge states. The effects of carbon (C) substitution on neutral and charged SW-defected BN have also been studied. Our results indicate that the C substitution of B in BN is in favour of the formation of SW defects. Structural and electronic calculations show rich charge-dependent properties of C substitutions in SW-defected BN, thus our theoretical study is important for various applications in the design of BN nanostructure-based devices. PMID:27030259

  12. Enhanced deposition of cubic boron nitride films on roughened silicon and tungsten carbide-cobalt surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teii, K., E-mail: teii@asem.kyushu-u.ac.j [Department of Applied Science for Electronics and Materials, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Sciences, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Hori, T. [Department of Applied Science for Electronics and Materials, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Sciences, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Matsumoto, S. [Exploratory Materials Research Laboratory for Energy and Environment, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Ceramic Forum Co. Ltd., 1-6-6 Taitoh, Taitoh-ku, Tokyo 110-0016 (Japan)

    2011-01-03

    We report the influence of substrate surface roughness on cubic boron nitride (cBN) film deposition under low-energy ion bombardment in an inductively coupled plasma. Silicon and cemented tungsten carbide-cobalt (WC-Co) surfaces are roughened by low-energy ion-assisted etching in a hydrogen plasma, followed by deposition in a fluorine-containing plasma. Infrared absorption coefficients are measured to be 22,000 cm{sup -1} and 17,000 cm{sup -1} for sp{sup 2}-bonded BN and cBN phases, respectively, for our films. For the silicon substrates, the film growth rate and the cBN content in the film increase with increasing the surface roughness, while the amount of sp{sup 2}BN phase in the film shows only a small increase. A larger surface roughness of the substrate results in a smaller contact angle of water, indicating that a higher surface free energy of the substrate contributes to enhancing growth of the cBN film. For the WC-Co substrates, the film growth rate and the cBN content in the film increase similarly by roughening the surface.

  13. Direct deposition of cubic boron nitride films on tungsten carbide-cobalt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teii, Kungen; Matsumoto, Seiichiro

    2012-10-24

    Thick cubic boron nitride (cBN) films in micrometer-scale are deposited on tungsten carbide-cobalt (WC-Co) substrates without adhesion interlayers by inductively coupled plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (ICP-CVD) using the chemistry of fluorine. The residual film stress is reduced because of very low ion-impact energies (a few eV to ∼25 eV) controlled by the plasma sheath potential. Two types of substrate pretreatment are used successively; the removal of surface Co binder using an acid solution suppresses the catalytic effect of Co and triggers cBN formation, and the surface roughening using mechanical scratching and hydrogen plasma etching increases both the in-depth cBN fraction and deposition rate. The substrate surface condition is evaluated by the wettability of the probe liquids with different polarities and quantified by the apparent surface free energy calculated from the contact angle. The surface roughening enhances the compatibility in energy between the cBN and substrate, which are bridged by the interfacial sp(2)-bonded hexagonal BN buffer layer, and then, the cBN overlayer is nucleated and evolved easier. PMID:22950830

  14. Enhanced deposition of cubic boron nitride films on roughened silicon and tungsten carbide-cobalt surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the influence of substrate surface roughness on cubic boron nitride (cBN) film deposition under low-energy ion bombardment in an inductively coupled plasma. Silicon and cemented tungsten carbide-cobalt (WC-Co) surfaces are roughened by low-energy ion-assisted etching in a hydrogen plasma, followed by deposition in a fluorine-containing plasma. Infrared absorption coefficients are measured to be 22,000 cm-1 and 17,000 cm-1 for sp2-bonded BN and cBN phases, respectively, for our films. For the silicon substrates, the film growth rate and the cBN content in the film increase with increasing the surface roughness, while the amount of sp2BN phase in the film shows only a small increase. A larger surface roughness of the substrate results in a smaller contact angle of water, indicating that a higher surface free energy of the substrate contributes to enhancing growth of the cBN film. For the WC-Co substrates, the film growth rate and the cBN content in the film increase similarly by roughening the surface.

  15. Hexagonal boron nitride thin film thermal neutron detectors with high energy resolution of the reaction products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is highly promising for solid-state thermal neutron detector applications due to its many outstanding physical properties, especially its very large thermal neutron capture cross-section (~3840 barns for 10B), which is several orders of magnitude larger than those of most other isotopes. The focus of the present work is to carry out studies on h-BN thin film and detector properties to lay the foundation for the development of a direct-conversion solid-state thermal neutron detector with high sensitivity. The measured carrier mobility-lifetime (μτ) product of h-BN thin films grown on sapphire substrates is 2.83×10−7 cm2/V for electrons and holes, which is comparable to the value of about 10−7 cm2/V for GaN thin films grown on sapphire. Detectors based on h-BN thin films were fabricated and the nuclear reaction product pulse height spectra were measured. Under a bias of 20 V, very narrow individual peaks corresponding to the reaction product energies of α and Li particles as well as the sum peaks have been clearly resolved in the pulse height spectrum for the first time by a B-based direct-conversion semiconductor neutron detector. Our results indicate that h-BN thin film detectors possess unique advantages including small size, low weight, portability, low voltage operation and high energy resolution of specific reaction products

  16. Hexagonal boron nitride thin film thermal neutron detectors with high energy resolution of the reaction products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doan, T. C.; Majety, S.; Grenadier, S.; Li, J.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X.

    2015-05-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is highly promising for solid-state thermal neutron detector applications due to its many outstanding physical properties, especially its very large thermal neutron capture cross-section (~3840 barns for 10B), which is several orders of magnitude larger than those of most other isotopes. The focus of the present work is to carry out studies on h-BN thin film and detector properties to lay the foundation for the development of a direct-conversion solid-state thermal neutron detector with high sensitivity. The measured carrier mobility-lifetime (μτ) product of h-BN thin films grown on sapphire substrates is 2.83×10-7 cm2/V for electrons and holes, which is comparable to the value of about 10-7 cm2/V for GaN thin films grown on sapphire. Detectors based on h-BN thin films were fabricated and the nuclear reaction product pulse height spectra were measured. Under a bias of 20 V, very narrow individual peaks corresponding to the reaction product energies of α and Li particles as well as the sum peaks have been clearly resolved in the pulse height spectrum for the first time by a B-based direct-conversion semiconductor neutron detector. Our results indicate that h-BN thin film detectors possess unique advantages including small size, low weight, portability, low voltage operation and high energy resolution of specific reaction products.

  17. High-temperature stability of polycrystalline cubic boron nitride cutting tool materials in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Oxidation of cBN–TiC composites is not passive within 550–1100 °C, obeying a linear rate law. ► Outward diffusion of Ti, Al and C, and inward diffusion of O2 controlled this oxidation. ► Ultimately, the oxidation scale is made of a porous outer layer (TiO2 and Al2O3 sub-layers) and an inner layer. ► Constitution and morphology of the inner layer vary with temperature. ► Formation and evaporation of B2O3 keeps the porosity within the oxidation scale. - Abstract: Thermal stability of cubic boron nitride (cBN)–TiC cutting tool material in air was analyzed using TGA and oxidation tests in a muffle furnace within the temperature range 550–1100 °C for a holding time of 60 min. A scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis system was particularly used for the characterization of the oxidation scales obtained thereafter. The significance of the results obtained was discussed in terms of oxidation kinetics law, oxidation mechanisms as well as variation of constitution and morphology of the oxidation scale with temperature, keeping focus on the machining context.

  18. Mobility enhancement in graphene transistors on low temperature pulsed laser deposited boron nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uddin, Md Ahsan, E-mail: uddin2@email.sc.edu, E-mail: gkoley@clemson.edu; Koley, Goutam, E-mail: uddin2@email.sc.edu, E-mail: gkoley@clemson.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Advanced Materials Research Laboratory, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina 29208 (United States); Glavin, Nicholas [Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433 (United States); School of Mechanical Engineering and Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Singh, Amol [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina 29208 (United States); Naguy, Rachel; Jespersen, Michael; Voevodin, Andrey [Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433 (United States)

    2015-11-16

    Low temperature pulsed laser deposited (PLD) ultrathin boron nitride (BN) on SiO{sub 2} was investigated as a dielectric for graphene electronics, and a significant enhancement in electrical transport properties of graphene/PLD BN compared to graphene/SiO{sub 2} has been observed. Graphene synthesized by chemical vapor deposition and transferred on PLD deposited and annealed BN exhibited up to three times higher field effect mobility compared to graphene on the SiO{sub 2} substrate. Graphene field effect transistor devices fabricated on 5 nm BN/SiO{sub 2} (300 nm) yielded maximum hole and electron mobility of 4980 and 4200 cm{sup 2}/V s, respectively. In addition, significant improvement in carrier homogeneity and reduction in extrinsic doping in graphene on BN has been observed. An average Dirac point of 3.5 V and residual carrier concentration of 7.65 × 10{sup 11 }cm{sup −2} was observed for graphene transferred on 5 nm BN at ambient condition. The overall performance improvement on PLD BN can be attributed to dielectric screening of charged impurities, similar crystal structure and phonon modes, and reduced substrate induced doping.

  19. Picosecond pulsed laser processing of polycrystalline diamond and cubic boron nitride composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warhanek, Maximilian G.; Pfaff, Josquin; Meier, Linus; Walter, Christian; Wegener, Konrad

    2016-03-01

    Capabilities and advantages of laser ablation processes utilizing ultrashort pulses have been demonstrated in various applications of scientific and industrial nature. Of particular interest are applications that require high geometrical accuracy, excellent surface integrity and thus tolerate only a negligible heat-affected zone in the processed area. In this context, this work presents a detailed study of the ablation characteristics of common ultrahard composite materials utilized in the cutting tool industry, namely polycrystalline diamond (PCD) and polycrystalline cubic boron nitride composite (PCBN). Due to the high hardness of these materials, conventional mechanical processing is time consuming and costly. Herein, laser ablation is an appealing solution, since no process forces and no wear have to be taken into consideration. However, an industrially viable process requires a detailed understanding of the ablation characteristics of each material. Therefore, the influence of various process parameters on material removal and processing quality at 10 ps pulse duration are investigated for several PCD and PCBN grades. The main focus of this study examines the effect of different laser energy input distributions, such as pulse frequency and burst pulses, on the processing conditions in deep cutting kerfs and the resulting processing speed. Based on these results, recommendations for efficient processing of such materials are derived.

  20. Tuning dissociation using isoelectronically doped graphene and hexagonal boron nitride: Water and other small molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hamdani, Yasmine S.; Alfè, Dario; von Lilienfeld, O. Anatole; Michaelides, Angelos

    2016-04-01

    Novel uses for 2-dimensional materials like graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) are being frequently discovered especially for membrane and catalysis applications. Still however, a great deal remains to be understood about the interaction of environmentally and industrially relevant molecules such as water with these materials. Taking inspiration from advances in hybridising graphene and h-BN, we explore using density functional theory, the dissociation of water, hydrogen, methane, and methanol on graphene, h-BN, and their isoelectronic doped counterparts: BN doped graphene and C doped h-BN. We find that doped surfaces are considerably more reactive than their pristine counterparts and by comparing the reactivity of several small molecules, we develop a general framework for dissociative adsorption. From this a particularly attractive consequence of isoelectronic doping emerges: substrates can be doped to enhance their reactivity specifically towards either polar or non-polar adsorbates. As such, these substrates are potentially viable candidates for selective catalysts and membranes, with the implication that a range of tuneable materials can be designed.