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Sample records for boron nitride films

  1. Scratch-resistant transparent boron nitride films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dekempeneer, E.H.A.; Kuypers, S.; Vercammen, K.; Meneve, J.; Smeets, J. [Vlaamse Instelling voor Technologisch Onderzoek (VITO), Mol (Belgium); Gibson, P.N.; Gissler, W. [Joint Research Centre of the Commission of the European Communities, Institute for Advanced Materials, Ispra (Vatican City State, Holy See) (Italy)

    1998-03-01

    Transparent boron nitride (BN) coatings were deposited on glass and Si substrates in a conventional capacitively coupled RF PACVD system starting from diborane (diluted in helium) and nitrogen. By varying the plasma conditions (bias voltage, ion current density), coatings were prepared with hardness values ranging from 2 to 12 GPa (measured with a nano-indenter). Infrared absorption measurements indicated that the BN was of the hexagonal type. A combination of glancing-angle X-ray diffraction measurements and simulations shows that the coatings consist of hexagonal-type BN crystallites with different degrees of disorder (nanocrystalline or turbostratic material). High-resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed the presence of an amorphous interface layer and on top of this interface layer a well-developed fringe pattern characteristic for the basal planes in h-BN. Depending on the plasma process conditions, these fringe patterns showed different degrees of disorder as well as different orientational relationships with respect to the substrate surface. These observations were correlated with the mechanical properties of the films. (orig.) 14 refs.

  2. In situ synthesis of a large area boron nitride/graphene monolayer/boron nitride film by chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qinke; Jang, Sung Kyu; Park, Sangwoo; Jung, Seong Jun; Suh, Hwansoo; Lee, Young Hee; Lee, Sungjoo; Song, Young Jae

    2015-04-01

    We describe the successful in situ chemical vapor deposition synthesis of a graphene-based heterostructure in which a graphene monolayer is protected by top and bottom boron nitride films. The boron nitride film/graphene monolayer/boron nitride film (BGB) was found to be a mechanically robust and chemically inert heterostructure, from which the deleterious effects of mechanical transfer processes and unwanted chemical doping under air exposure were eliminated. The chemical compositions of each film layer were monitored ex situ using UV-visible absorption spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and the crystalline structures were confirmed using transmission electron microscopy and selected-area electron diffraction measurements. The performance of the devices fabricated using the BGB film was monitored over six months and did not display large changes in the mobility or the Dirac point, unlike the conventional graphene devices prepared on a SiO2 substrate. The in situ-grown BGB film properties suggest a novel approach to the fabrication of commercial-grade graphene-based electronic devices.We describe the successful in situ chemical vapor deposition synthesis of a graphene-based heterostructure in which a graphene monolayer is protected by top and bottom boron nitride films. The boron nitride film/graphene monolayer/boron nitride film (BGB) was found to be a mechanically robust and chemically inert heterostructure, from which the deleterious effects of mechanical transfer processes and unwanted chemical doping under air exposure were eliminated. The chemical compositions of each film layer were monitored ex situ using UV-visible absorption spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and the crystalline structures were confirmed using transmission electron microscopy and selected-area electron diffraction measurements. The performance of the devices fabricated using the BGB film was monitored over six months and did not display large changes in the

  3. Modelling heat conduction in polycrystalline hexagonal boron-nitride films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, Bohayra; Pereira, Luiz Felipe C; Jiang, Jin-Wu; Rabczuk, Timon

    2015-08-19

    We conducted extensive molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the thermal conductivity of polycrystalline hexagonal boron-nitride (h-BN) films. To this aim, we constructed large atomistic models of polycrystalline h-BN sheets with random and uniform grain configuration. By performing equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) simulations, we investigated the influence of the average grain size on the thermal conductivity of polycrystalline h-BN films at various temperatures. Using the EMD results, we constructed finite element models of polycrystalline h-BN sheets to probe the thermal conductivity of samples with larger grain sizes. Our multiscale investigations not only provide a general viewpoint regarding the heat conduction in h-BN films but also propose that polycrystalline h-BN sheets present high thermal conductivity comparable to monocrystalline sheets.

  4. Formation of graphitic carbon nitride and boron carbon nitride film on sapphire substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosaka, Maito; Urakami, Noriyuki; Hashimoto, Yoshio

    2018-02-01

    As a novel production method of boron carbon nitride (BCN) films, in this paper, we present the incorporation of B into graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4). First, we investigated the formation of g-C3N4 films via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using melamine powder as the precursor. The formation of g-C3N4 films on a c-plane sapphire substrate was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Raman spectroscopy measurements. The deposition temperature of g-C3N4 films was found to be suitable between 550 and 600 °C since the degradation and desorption of hexagonal C–N bonds should be suppressed. As for BCN films, we prepared BCN films via two-zone extended CVD using ammonia borane as the B precursor. Several XPS signals from B, C, and N core levels were detected from B-incorporated g-C3N4 films. While the N composition was almost constant, the marked tendencies for increasing B composition and decreasing C composition were achieved with the increase in the B incorporation, indicating the incorporation of B atoms by the substitution for C atoms. Optical absorptions were shifted to the high-energy side by B incorporation, which indicates the successful formation of BCN films using melamine and ammonia borane powders as precursors.

  5. Crystalline boron nitride aerogels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zettl, Alexander K.; Rousseas, Michael; Goldstein, Anna P.; Mickelson, William; Worsley, Marcus A.; Woo, Leta

    2017-12-12

    This disclosure provides methods and materials related to boron nitride aerogels. For example, one aspect relates to a method for making an aerogel comprising boron nitride, comprising: (a) providing boron oxide and an aerogel comprising carbon; (b) heating the boron oxide to melt the boron oxide and heating the aerogel; (c) mixing a nitrogen-containing gas with boron oxide vapor from molten boron oxide; and (d) converting at least a portion of the carbon to boron nitride to obtain the aerogel comprising boron nitride. Another aspect relates to a method for making an aerogel comprising boron nitride, comprising heating boron oxide and an aerogel comprising carbon under flow of a nitrogen-containing gas, wherein boron oxide vapor and the nitrogen-containing gas convert at least a portion of the carbon to boron nitride to obtain the aerogel comprising boron nitride.

  6. Boron nitride composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntz, Joshua D.; Ellsworth, German F.; Swenson, Fritz J.; Allen, Patrick G.

    2017-02-21

    According to one embodiment, a composite product includes: a matrix material including hexagonal boron nitride and one or more borate binders; and a plurality of cubic boron nitride particles dispersed in the matrix material. According to another embodiment, a composite product includes: a matrix material including hexagonal boron nitride and amorphous boron nitride; and a plurality of cubic boron nitride particles dispersed in the matrix material.

  7. Facile fabrication of boron nitride nanosheets-amorphous carbon hybrid film for optoelectronic applications

    KAUST Repository

    Wan, Shanhong

    2015-01-01

    A novel boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs)-amorphous carbon (a-C) hybrid film has been deposited successfully on silicon substrates by simultaneous electrochemical deposition, and showed a good integrity of this B-C-N composite film by the interfacial bonding. This synthesis can potentially provide the facile control of the B-C-N composite film for the potential optoelectronic devices. This journal is

  8. Methods of forming boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trowbridge, Tammy L; Wertsching, Alan K; Pinhero, Patrick J; Crandall, David L

    2015-03-03

    A method of forming a boron nitride. The method comprises contacting a metal article with a monomeric boron-nitrogen compound and converting the monomeric boron-nitrogen compound to a boron nitride. The boron nitride is formed on the same or a different metal article. The monomeric boron-nitrogen compound is borazine, cycloborazane, trimethylcycloborazane, polyborazylene, B-vinylborazine, poly(B-vinylborazine), or combinations thereof. The monomeric boron-nitrogen compound is polymerized to form the boron nitride by exposure to a temperature greater than approximately 100.degree. C. The boron nitride is amorphous boron nitride, hexagonal boron nitride, rhombohedral boron nitride, turbostratic boron nitride, wurzite boron nitride, combinations thereof, or boron nitride and carbon. A method of conditioning a ballistic weapon and a metal article coated with the monomeric boron-nitrogen compound are also disclosed.

  9. Electrostatic doping of graphene through ultrathin hexagonal boron nitride films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokdam, Menno; Khomyakov, Petr A; Brocks, Geert; Zhong, Zhicheng; Kelly, Paul J

    2011-11-09

    When combined with graphene, hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is an ideal substrate and gate dielectric with which to build metal|h-BN|graphene field-effect devices. We use first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations for Cu|h-BN|graphene stacks to study how the graphene doping depends on the thickness of the h-BN layer and on a potential difference applied between Cu and graphene. We develop an analytical model that describes the doping very well, allowing us to identify the key parameters that govern the device behavior. A predicted intrinsic doping of graphene is particularly prominent for ultrathin h-BN layers and should be observable in experiment. It is dominated by novel interface terms that we evaluate from DFT calculations for the individual materials and for interfaces between h-BN and Cu or graphene.

  10. Ion-induced stress relaxation during the growth of cubic boron nitride thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abendroth, B.E.

    2004-08-01

    in this thesis the deposition of cubic boron nitride films by magnetron sputtering is described. The deposition process is analyzed by Langmuir-probe measurement and energy resolved mass spectroscopy. the films are studied by stress measurement, spectroscopic ellipsometry, infrared spectroscopy, elastic recoil detection analysis, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. Discussed are the stress relaxation and the microstructure and bonding characteristics together with the effects of ion bombardement. (HSI)

  11. Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael W. (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes are prepared by a process which includes: (a) creating a source of boron vapor; (b) mixing the boron vapor with nitrogen gas so that a mixture of boron vapor and nitrogen gas is present at a nucleation site, which is a surface, the nitrogen gas being provided at a pressure elevated above atmospheric, e.g., from greater than about 2 atmospheres up to about 250 atmospheres; and (c) harvesting boron nitride nanotubes, which are formed at the nucleation site.

  12. Oxygen-assisted synthesis of hexagonal boron nitride films for graphene transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Pingping; Lin, Weiyi; Xu, Binbin; Cai, Weiwei

    2017-11-01

    We grow high-quality two-dimensional hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) films on copper pockets by chemical vapor deposition. A piece of sapphire embedded in the pocket serves as an oxygen supply during the growth process. To obtain clean h-BN films, source powders are placed in a U-shaped quartz tube and heated up in a water bath without the carrier-gas flow. These films are characterized by using SEM, Raman, XPS, and selected area electron diffraction analyses. As dielectric substrates, h-BN films significantly enhance the charge-carrier mobility of graphene transistors. This facile and robust method can be a scalable approach to synthesize large-area high-quality h-BN films for related electronic applications.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of boron carbon nitride thin films as protective overcoat for hard disk drives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanfeng

    The current goal in the magnetic storage industry is to reach the areal density of 1Tbit/in2 in a few years. This requires the head-media spacing (HMS), which includes media overcoat, lubricant layer, air bearing, and head overcoat, not to exceed 5.0 nm. Trade-off between these layers results in requiring the protective overcoat to be 1.0 nm or less. The protective overcoat must be hard, wear-resistant, continuous, thermally stable, and compatible with the magnetic layer and lubricant. This thesis work is mainly to develop protective overcoat for ultra high density hard disk drives (HDD). Amorphous carbon nitride (a-CNx) thin films were synthesized using pulseDC magnetron sputtering. The influence of substrate bias, substrate tilt, and substrate rotation on film growth and properties was studied. X-ray reflectivity (XRR) was used to measure film density, roughness and thickness. Surface roughness and thickness measurements from XRR are comparable to AFM and surface profiler measurements respectively. a-CNx films have good mechanical properties. Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and high resolution transmission microscope (HRTEM) were used to obtain the film composition and microstructure. HRTEM cross sectioned experiments showed that CN x film is amorphous. Chemical corrosion experiments display drastic decrease of corrosion spots for thin films synthesized under optimum conditions. In pursuit of new materials for hard disk drive protective overcoat, boron carbide (B4C) and boron carbon nitride (BxC yNz) thin films were synthesized by pulse-DC magnetron sputtering. Effects of target power, target pulse frequency, substrate bias and pulse frequency on surface roughness were studied by AFM. Nitrogen incorporation into B4C films, which gives BxCyNz thin films, has a beneficial effect to decrease the film roughness. Auger electron spectroscopy was used to characterize the film composition. High-resolution cross-sectioned TEM studies showed that both films are amorphous

  14. Boron nitride converted carbon fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseas, Michael; Mickelson, William; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2016-04-05

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to boron nitride converted carbon fiber. In one aspect, a method may include the operations of providing boron oxide and carbon fiber, heating the boron oxide to melt the boron oxide and heating the carbon fiber, mixing a nitrogen-containing gas with boron oxide vapor from molten boron oxide, and converting at least a portion of the carbon fiber to boron nitride.

  15. Increased charge storage capacity of titanium nitride electrodes by deposition of boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meijs, Suzan; McDonald, Matthew; Sørensen, Søren

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of depositing a thin layer of boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond (B-NCD) on titanium nitride (TiN) coated electrodes and the effect this has on charge injection properties. The charge storage capacity increased by applying the B-NCD film...

  16. Stress measurement and stress relaxation during magnetron sputter deposition of cubic boron nitride thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abendroth, B.; Gago, R.; Kolitsch, A.; Moeller, W.

    2004-01-01

    Dynamic in situ analysis of stress and film thickness provide fast and more physical information on growth and stress evolution in cBN layers than integrating (ex situ) methods. Especially, features of the layered structure of boron nitride films, like the evolution of instantaneous stress and growth rates during deposition can be resolved by in situ methods. This work is concerned with dynamic in-situ stress measurement by means of cantilever bending during magnetron sputter deposition of cBN thin films. Laser deflection in combination with in situ ellipsometry is used to determine the instantaneous stress of the films. The results show in agreement with results that were obtained previously from ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD), that the hBN and cBN layers exhibit different levels of stress under constant deposition conditions. The stress increases from less than -4 GPa to very high values (-10 GPa) after the coalescence of the cBN nuclei. Therefore, it is possible to establish the point of cBN nucleation instantly. A simultaneous medium energy ion bombardment is used for stress relaxation during film deposition. A modified substrate bias voltage, combining negative high and low voltage pulses, is used to enable an ion bombardment of the growing film with energies up to 8 keV. In this way, cBN films with a stress as low as -1.7 GPa could be produced without destroying the sp 3 -bonds significantly

  17. Humidity effects on the electrical properties of hexagonal boron nitride thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soltani, A. [Institut d' Electronique, de Microelectronique et de Nanotechnologie/CNRS UMR 8520, Cite Scientifique, Avenue Poincare, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France)]. E-mail: ali.soltani@iemn.univ-lille1.fr; Thevenin, P. [Laboratoire Materiaux Optiques Photonique et Systemes/CNRS FRE 2304, Universite de Metz and Supelec, 2 rue Edouard Belin, 57070 Metz (France); Bakhtiar, H. [Faculty of Science, Physics Department, Technology University of Malaysia, Karung Berkunci 791, 80990, Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia); Bath, A. [Laboratoire Materiaux Optiques Photonique et Systemes/CNRS FRE 2304, Universite de Metz and Supelec, 2 rue Edouard Belin, 57070 Metz (France)]. E-mail: bath@metz.supelec.fr

    2005-01-03

    Thin films of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) were grown by a plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) technique. The quality of the films was assessed by infrared spectroscopy, microRaman spectroscopy as a function of annealing temperature and by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The films proved to be thermally stable up to 1370 K. Current-voltage measurements were performed, as a function of humidity, using metal-insulator-semiconductor and metal-insulator-metal structures. Typical resistivities were found in the range 10{sup 13}-10{sup 14} {omega} cm in dry air and exhibit high sensitivity against humidity. The influence of the mean orientation of the c-axis of the BN films was considered. Sawtooth voltage pulse trains were also applied. Threshold switching phenomena were observed, but only in atmosphere containing humidity. The values of the switching voltages depend strongly on the relative humidity (RH), on the characteristics of the applied sawtooth voltage pulse trains, as well as on the nature of the metallic electrode.

  18. Preparation of high-content hexagonal boron nitride composite film and characterization of atomic oxygen erosion resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yu; Li, Min; Gu, Yizhuo; Wang, Shaokai, E-mail: wsk@buaa.edu.cn; Zhang, Zuoguang

    2017-04-30

    Highlights: • Hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets can be well exfoliated with the help of nanofibrillated cellulose. • A carpet-like rough surface and distortion in crystal structure of h-BN are found in both h-BN film and h-BN/epoxy film after AO exposure. • H-BN/epoxy film exhibits a higher mass loss and erosion yield, different element content changes and chemical oxidations compared with h-BN film. - Abstract: Space aircrafts circling in low earth orbit are suffered from highly reactive atomic oxygen (AO). To shield AO, a flexible thin film with 80 wt.% hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) and h-BN/epoxy film were fabricated through vacuum filtration and adding nanofibrillated cellulose fibers. H-BN nanosheets were hydroxylated for enhancing interaction in the films. Mass loss and erosion yield at accumulated AO fluence about 3.04 × 10{sup 20} atoms/cm{sup 2} were adopted to evaluate the AO resistance properties of the films. A carpet-like rough surface, chemical oxidations and change in crystal structure of h-BN were found after AO treatment, and the degrading mechanism was proposed. The mass loss and erosion yield under AO attack were compared between h-BN film and h-BN/epoxy film, and the comparison was also done for various types of shielding AO materials. Excellent AO resistance property of h-BN film is shown, and the reasons are analyzed.

  19. Vertically self-ordered orientation of nanocrystalline hexagonal boron nitride thin films for enhanced thermal characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cometto, Olivier; Sun, Bo; Tsang, Siu Hon; Huang, Xi; Koh, Yee Kan; Teo, Edwin Hang Tong

    2015-12-07

    Vertically self-ordered hexagonal boron nitride (ordered h-BN) is a highly ordered turbostratic BN (t-BN) material similar to hexagonal BN, with its planar structure perpendicularly oriented to the substrate. The ordered h-BN thin films were grown using a High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (HiPIMS) system with a lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) target reactively sputtered in nitrogen gas. The best vertical alignment was obtained at room temperature, with a grounded bias and a HiPIMS peak power density of 60 W cm(-2). Even though the film contains up to 7.5 at% lanthanum, it retains its highly insulative properties and it was observed that an increase in compressive stress is correlated to an increase in film ordering quality. Importantly, the thermal conductivity of vertically ordered h-BN is considerably high at 5.1 W m(-1) K(-1). The favourable thermal conductivity coupled with the dielectric properties of this novel material and the low temperature growth could outperform SiO2 in high power density electronic applications.

  20. Single Crystalline Film of Hexagonal Boron Nitride Atomic Monolayer by Controlling Nucleation Seeds and Domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qinke; Park, Ji-Hoon; Park, Sangwoo; Jung, Seong Jun; Suh, Hwansoo; Park, Noejung; Wongwiriyapan, Winadda; Lee, Sungjoo; Lee, Young Hee; Song, Young Jae

    2015-11-05

    A monolayer hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) film with controllable domain morphology and domain size (varying from less than 1 μm to more than 100 μm) with uniform crystalline orientation was successfully synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The key for this extremely large single crystalline domain size of a h-BN monolayer is a decrease in the density of nucleation seeds by increasing the hydrogen gas flow during the h-BN growth. Moreover, the well-defined shape of h-BN flakes can be selectively grown by controlling Cu-annealing time under argon atmosphere prior to h-BN growth, which provides the h-BN shape varies in triangular, trapezoidal, hexagonal and complex shapes. The uniform crystalline orientation of h-BN from different nucleation seeds can be easily confirmed by polarized optical microscopy (POM) with a liquid crystal coating. Furthermore, seamlessly merged h-BN flakes without structural domain boundaries were evidence by a selective hydrogen etching after a full coverage of a h-BN film was achieved. This seamless large-area and atomic monolayer of single crystalline h-BN film can offer as an ideal and practical template of graphene-based devices or alternative two-dimensional materials for industrial applications with scalability.

  1. APCVD hexagonal boron nitride thin films for passive near-junction thermal management of electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    KC, Pratik; Rai, Amit; Ashton, Taylor S.; Moore, Arden L.

    2017-12-01

    The ability of graphene to serve as an ultrathin heat spreader has been previously demonstrated with impressive results. However, graphene is electrically conductive, making its use in contact with electronic devices problematic from a reliability and integration perspective. As an alternative, hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is a similarly structured material with large in-plane thermal conductivity but which possesses a wide band gap, thereby giving it potential to be utilized for directing contact, near-junction thermal management of electronics without shorting or the need for an insulating intermediate layer. In this work, the viability of using large area, continuous h-BN thin films as direct contact, near-junction heat spreaders for electronic devices is experimentally evaluated. Thin films of h-BN several square millimeters in size were synthesized via an atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) method that is both simple and scalable. These were subsequently transferred onto a microfabricated test device that simulated a multigate transistor while also allowing for measurements of the device temperature at various locations via precision resistance thermometry. Results showed that these large-area h-BN films with thicknesses of 77–125 nm are indeed capable of significantly lowering microdevice temperatures, with the best sample showing the presence of the h-BN thin film reduced the effective thermal resistance by 15.9% ± 4.6% compared to a bare microdevice at the same power density. Finally, finite element simulations of these experiments were utilized to estimate the thermal conductivity of the h-BN thin films and identify means by which further heat spreading performance gains could be attained.

  2. Ultra-thin epitaxial films of graphite and hexagonal boron nitride on solid surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Oshima, C

    1997-01-01

    In this article, we have reviewed the recent progress of the experimental studies on ultra-thin films of graphite and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) by using angle-resolved electron spectroscopy together with other techniques. The fundamental properties of these high-quality films are discussed on the basis of the data on dispersion relations of valence electrons, phonon dispersion etc. The interfacial orbital mixing of the pi-state of the monolayer graphite (MG) with the d states of the reactive substrates is the origin for the phonon softening, expansion of the nearest-neighbour C-C distance, modification of the pi-band, low work function, and two-dimensional plasmons with high electron density, etc. In the cases of weak mixing at the interface between the MG and relatively inert substrates, the observed properties of the MG are very close to the bulk ones. In contrast to the case for MG, the interfacial interaction between the h-BN monolayer and the substrate is weak. (author)

  3. Direct deposition of cubic boron nitride films on tungsten carbide-cobalt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teii, Kungen; Matsumoto, Seiichiro

    2012-10-24

    Thick cubic boron nitride (cBN) films in micrometer-scale are deposited on tungsten carbide-cobalt (WC-Co) substrates without adhesion interlayers by inductively coupled plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (ICP-CVD) using the chemistry of fluorine. The residual film stress is reduced because of very low ion-impact energies (a few eV to ∼25 eV) controlled by the plasma sheath potential. Two types of substrate pretreatment are used successively; the removal of surface Co binder using an acid solution suppresses the catalytic effect of Co and triggers cBN formation, and the surface roughening using mechanical scratching and hydrogen plasma etching increases both the in-depth cBN fraction and deposition rate. The substrate surface condition is evaluated by the wettability of the probe liquids with different polarities and quantified by the apparent surface free energy calculated from the contact angle. The surface roughening enhances the compatibility in energy between the cBN and substrate, which are bridged by the interfacial sp(2)-bonded hexagonal BN buffer layer, and then, the cBN overlayer is nucleated and evolved easier.

  4. Functionalized boron nitride nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainsbury, Toby; Ikuno, Takashi; Zettl, Alexander K

    2014-04-22

    A plasma treatment has been used to modify the surface of BNNTs. In one example, the surface of the BNNT has been modified using ammonia plasma to include amine functional groups. Amine functionalization allows BNNTs to be soluble in chloroform, which had not been possible previously. Further functionalization of amine-functionalized BNNTs with thiol-terminated organic molecules has also been demonstrated. Gold nanoparticles have been self-assembled at the surface of both amine- and thiol-functionalized boron nitride Nanotubes (BNNTs) in solution. This approach constitutes a basis for the preparation of highly functionalized BNNTs and for their utilization as nanoscale templates for assembly and integration with other nanoscale materials.

  5. Marine corrosion protective coatings of hexagonal boron nitride thin films on stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, Esam; Narayanan, Tharangattu N; Taha-Tijerina, Jose Jaime; Vinod, Soumya; Vajtai, Robert; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2013-05-22

    Recently, two-dimensional, layered materials such as graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) have been identified as interesting materials for a range of applications. Here, we demonstrate the corrosion prevention applications of h-BN in marine coatings. The performance of h-BN/polymer hybrid coatings, applied on stainless steel, were evaluated using electrochemical techniques in simulated seawater media [marine media]. h-BN/polymer coating shows an efficient corrosion protection with a low corrosion current density of 5.14 × 10(-8) A/cm(2) and corrosion rate of 1.19 × 10(-3) mm/year and it is attributed to the hydrofobic, inert and dielectric nature of boron nitride. The results indicated that the stainless steel with coatings exhibited improved corrosion resistance. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and potentiodynamic analysis were used to propose a mechanism for the increased corrosion resistance of h-BN coatings.

  6. Nano boron nitride flatland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakdel, Amir; Bando, Yoshio; Golberg, Dmitri

    2014-02-07

    Recent years have witnessed many breakthroughs in research on two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials, among which is hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), a layered material with a regular network of BN hexagons. This review provides an insight into the marvellous nano BN flatland, beginning with a concise introduction to BN and its low-dimensional nanostructures, followed by an overview of the past and current state of research on 2D BN nanostructures. A comprehensive review of the structural characteristics and synthetic routes of BN monolayers, multilayers, nanomeshes, nanowaves, nanoflakes, nanosheets and nanoribbons is presented. In addition, electronic, optical, thermal, mechanical, magnetic, piezoelectric, catalytic, ecological, biological and wetting properties, applications and research perspectives for these novel 2D nanomaterials are discussed.

  7. Fabrication of boron nitride planar field emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Yuuko; Tagawa, Shigeru; Sugino, Takashi

    1999-05-01

    Boron nitride (BN) films are grown on sapphire substrates by plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (PACVD). BN films are doped with sulfur. Insertion of the GaN layer between the BN film and sapphire leads to a tight adhesion of the BN film. The electrical resistivity of the sulfur-doped BN film is reduced to 10 3 Ω cm. The cathode electrode is formed on the BN film and the anode electrode on the sapphire substrate by evaporating Ti and Au. An emission current of 1 μA is obtained at an electric field strength of 16 V/μm.

  8. Improvement in interfacial characteristics of low-voltage carbon nanotube thin-film transistors with solution-processed boron nitride thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Jun-Young; Ha, Tae-Jun, E-mail: taejunha0604@gmail.com

    2017-08-15

    Highlights: • We demonstrate the potential of solution-processed boron nitride (BN) thin films for nanoelectronics. • Improved interfacial characteristics reduced the leakage current by three orders of magnitude. • The BN encapsulation improves all the device key metrics of low-voltage SWCNT-TFTs. • Such improvements were achieved by reduced interaction of interfacial localized states. - Abstract: In this article, we demonstrate the potential of solution-processed boron nitride (BN) thin films for high performance single-walled carbon nanotube thin-film transistors (SWCNT-TFTs) with low-voltage operation. The use of BN thin films between solution-processed high-k dielectric layers improved the interfacial characteristics of metal-insulator-metal devices, thereby reducing the current density by three orders of magnitude. We also investigated the origin of improved device performance in SWCNT-TFTs by employing solution-processed BN thin films as an encapsulation layer. The BN encapsulation layer improves the electrical characteristics of SWCNT-TFTs, which includes the device key metrics of linear field-effect mobility, sub-threshold swing, and threshold voltage as well as the long-term stability against the aging effect in air. Such improvements can be achieved by reduced interaction of interfacial localized states with charge carriers. We believe that this work can open up a promising route to demonstrate the potential of solution-processed BN thin films on nanoelectronics.

  9. Preparation of high-content hexagonal boron nitride composite film and characterization of atomic oxygen erosion resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Li, Min; Gu, Yizhuo; Wang, Shaokai; Zhang, Zuoguang

    2017-04-01

    Space aircrafts circling in low earth orbit are suffered from highly reactive atomic oxygen (AO). To shield AO, a flexible thin film with 80 wt.% hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) and h-BN/epoxy film were fabricated through vacuum filtration and adding nanofibrillated cellulose fibers. H-BN nanosheets were hydroxylated for enhancing interaction in the films. Mass loss and erosion yield at accumulated AO fluence about 3.04 × 1020 atoms/cm2 were adopted to evaluate the AO resistance properties of the films. A carpet-like rough surface, chemical oxidations and change in crystal structure of h-BN were found after AO treatment, and the degrading mechanism was proposed. The mass loss and erosion yield under AO attack were compared between h-BN film and h-BN/epoxy film, and the comparison was also done for various types of shielding AO materials. Excellent AO resistance property of h-BN film is shown, and the reasons are analyzed.

  10. Boron Nitride Nanoribbons from Exfoliation of Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh; Hurst, Janet; Santiago, Diana

    2017-01-01

    Two types of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) were exfoliated into boron nitride nanoribbons (BNNR), which were identified using transmission electron microscopy: (1) commercial BNNTs with thin tube walls and small diameters. Tube unzipping was indicated by a large decrease of the sample's surface area and volume for pores less than 2 nm in diameter. (2) BNNTs with large diameters and thick walls synthesized at NASA Glenn Research Center. Here, tube unraveling was indicated by a large increase in external surface area and pore volume. For both, the exfoliation process was similar to the previous reported method to exfoliate commercial hexagonal boron nitride (hBN): Mixtures of BNNT, FeCl3, and NaF (or KF) were sequentially treated in 250 to 350 C nitrogen for intercalation, 500 to 750 C air for exfoliation, and finally HCl for purification. Property changes of the nanosized boron nitride throughout this process were also similar to the previously observed changes of commercial hBN during the exfoliation process: Both crystal structure (x-ray diffraction data) and chemical properties (Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy data) of the original reactant changed after intercalation and exfoliation, but most (not all) of these changes revert back to those of the reactant once the final, purified products are obtained.

  11. Preparation process of boron nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mignani, G.; Ardaud, P.

    1990-01-01

    High purity boron nitride, without Si and a low carbon content, is prepared by pyrolysis, under an ammoniac atmosphere, of the reaction product between a B-trihalogenoborazole and a primary amine RNH 2 when R is a hydrocarbon radical eventually substituted containing from 1 to 6 carbon atoms inclusively [fr

  12. Boron nitride - Composition, optical properties, and mechanical behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouch, John J.; Alterovitz, Samuel A.; Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Warner, Joseph D.

    1987-01-01

    A low energy ion beam deposition technique was used to grow boron nitride films on quartz, germanium, silicon, gallium arsenide, and indium phosphate. The film structure was amorphous with evidence of a hexagonal phase. The peak boron concentration was 82 at. percent. The carbon and oxygen impurities were in the 5 to 8 at. percent range. Boron-nitrogen and boron-boron bonds were revealed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The index of refraction varied from 1.65 to 1.67 for films deposited on III-V compound semiconductors. The coefficient of friction for boron nitride in sliding contact with diamond was less than 0.1. The substrate was silicon.

  13. Boron nitride: Composition, optical properties and mechanical behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouch, John J.; Alterovitz, Samuel A.; Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Warner, Joseph D.

    1987-01-01

    A low energy ion beam deposition technique was used to grow boron nitride films on quartz, germanium, silicon, gallium arsenide, and indium phosphate. The film structure was amorphous with evidence of a hexagonal phase. The peak boron concentration was 82 at %. The carbon and oxygen impurities were in the 5 to 8 at % range. Boron-nitrogen and boron-boron bonds were revealed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The index of refraction varied from 1.65 to 1.67 for films deposited on III-V compound semiconductors. The coefficient of friction for boron nitride in sliding contact with diamond was less than 0.1. The substrate was silicon.

  14. Flexible polyimide films hybrid with functionalized boron nitride and graphene oxide simultaneously to improve thermal conduction and dimensional stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Mei-Hui; Tseng, I-Hsiang; Chiang, Jen-Chi; Li, Jheng-Jia

    2014-06-11

    Coupling agent-functionalized boron nitride (f-BN) and glycidyl methacrylate-grafted graphene (g-TrG) are simultaneously blended with polyimide (PI) to fabricate a flexible, electrically insulating and thermally conductive PI composite film. The silk-like g-TrG successfully fills in the gap between PI and f-BN to complete the thermal conduction network. In addition, the strong interaction between surface functional groups on f-BN and g-TrG contributes to the effective phonon transfer in the PI matrix. The thermal conductivity (TC) of the PI/f-BN composite films containing additional 1 wt % of g-TrG is at least doubled to the value of PI/f-BN and as high as 16 times to that of the pure PI. The hybrid film PI/f-BN-50/g-TrG-1 exhibits excellent flexibility, sufficient insulating property, the highest TC of 2.11 W/mK, and ultralow coefficient of thermal expansion of 11 ppm/K, which are perfect conditions for future flexible substrate materials requiring efficient heat dissipation.

  15. Cubic and hexagonal boron-nitride (c-BN/h-BN) thin films deposited in situ by r.f. magnetron sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caicedo, J. M.; Bejarano, G.; Zambrano, G.; Baca, E.; Morán, O.; Prieto, P.

    2005-07-01

    Cubic boron-nitride (c-BN)/hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) thin films were grown in situ on (100) oriented silicon substrates by r.f. (13.56 MHz) magnetron sputtering technique. In order to obtain the highest fraction of the c-BN phase, a negative d.c bias voltage, varying from 0 to -200 V was applied to the substrate during deposition. Another set of boron nitride thin films was deposited in situ on (100) oriented silicon substrates under r.f. bias voltage. The substrate holder was biased from 0 to -350 V by connecting such to an auxiliary r.f. generator (operated at 13.56 MHz). Films were characterized by Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). Well-defined peaks at 787 cm-1, 1100 cm-1 and 1387 cm-1, corresponding to the 2Au (out-plane bending of B-N-B bond) h-BN vibration mode, the F2 (stretching) c-BN Transversal Optical (TO) mode and the E1u (in-plane stretching of B-N bond) vibration mode of the h-BN, respectively, were observed in the FTIR spectra. A maximal fraction of the c-BN phase close to 85% was obtained under a bias voltage of -150 V at substrate temperature of 300 °C and a total pressure of 4 × 10-2 mbar.

  16. Measuring the dielectric and optical response of millimeter-scale amorphous and hexagonal boron nitride films grown on epitaxial graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigosi, Albert F.; Hill, Heather M.; Glavin, Nicholas R.; Pookpanratana, Sujitra J.; Yang, Yanfei; Boosalis, Alexander G.; Hu, Jiuning; Rice, Anthony; Allerman, Andrew A.; Nguyen, Nhan V.; Hacker, Christina A.; Elmquist, Randolph E.; Hight Walker, Angela R.; Newell, David B.

    2018-01-01

    Monolayer epitaxial graphene (EG), grown on the Si face of SiC, is an advantageous material for a variety of electronic and optical applications. EG forms as a single crystal over millimeter-scale areas and consequently, the large scale single crystal can be utilized as a template for growth of other materials. In this work, we present the use of EG as a template to form millimeter-scale amorphous and hexagonal boron nitride (a-BN and h-BN) films. The a-BN is formed with pulsed laser deposition and the h-BN is grown with triethylboron (TEB) and NH3 precursors, making it the first metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) process of this growth type performed on epitaxial graphene. A variety of optical and non-optical characterization methods are used to determine the optical absorption and dielectric functions of the EG, a-BN, and h-BN within the energy range of 1 eV–8.5 eV. Furthermore, we report the first ellipsometric observation of high-energy resonant excitons in EG from the 4H polytype of SiC and an analysis on the interactions within the EG and h-BN heterostructure.

  17. Continuum modeling of boron nitride nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, J; Wu, J; Hwang, K C; Huang, Y

    2008-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes display unique properties and have many potential applications. A finite-deformation shell theory is developed for boron nitride nanotubes directly from the interatomic potential to account for the effect of bending and curvature. Its constitutive relation accounts for the nonlinear, multi-body atomistic interactions, and therefore can model the important effect of tube chirality and radius. The theory is then used to determine whether a single-wall boron nitride nanotube can be modeled as a linear elastic isotropic shell. Instabilities of boron nitride nanotubes under different loadings (e.g., tension, compression, and torsion) are also studied. It is shown that the tension instability of boron nitride nanotubes is material instability, while the compression and torsion instabilities are structural instabilities.

  18. Positron annihilation in boron nitride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.Amrane

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Electron and positron charge densities are calculated as a function of position in the unit cell for boron nitride. Wave functions are derived from pseudopotential band structure calculations and the independent particle approximation (IPM, respectively, for electrons and positrons. It is observed that the positron density is maximum in the open interstices and is excluded not only from ion cores but also to a considerable degree from valence bonds. Electron-positron momentum densities are calculated for (001,110 planes. The results are used in order to analyse the positron effects in BN.

  19. Radiation damage in boron nitride x-ray lithography masks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, P.L.; Pan, L.; Pianetta, P.; Shimkunas, A.; Mauger, P.; Seligson, D.

    1988-01-01

    The optical and mechanical properties of boron nitride vapor deposited at 400 0 C are shown to degrade when exposed to synchrotron radiation. The extent of the damage and the rate at which the damage occurs are similar to that first reported by Johnson et al. Transmission through membranes of boron nitride was measured in situ during exposure to x rays. Membranes darkened considerably with the transmission through a typical membrane falling from 50% to 20% after absorbing ∼250 kJ/cm 3 of x rays. Changes in local film stress were measured with a simple cantilever technique. Films originally in tension (∼5E8 dyne/cm 2 ) were found to become compressive after absorbing 300 kJ/cm 3 of x rays. Both forms of damage responded well to annealing. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and near-edge x-ray absorption measurements were made to discern the structural differences between degraded and unexposed films. No significant structural changes were observed. Boron nitride films deposited at higher temperatures (600 0 C) proved to be much less susceptible to radiation damage. In a related development, films produced through the pyrolysis of borazine appeared to be completely immune to radiation damage as were silicon and silicon nitride membranes. FTIR spectra indicate that less hydrogen is present in the 600 0 C chemical-vapor deposition (CVD) and the pyrolytic boron nitride films than in the 400 0 C CVD films. As proposed by Johnson et al., hydrogen is implicated as an intermediary in the boron nitride damage mechanism

  20. Cubic and hexagonal boron-nitride (c-BN/h-BN) thin films deposited in situ by r.f. magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caicedo, J.M.; Zambrano, G.; Baca, E.; Moran, O.; Prieto, P. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad del Valle, A.A. 25360 Cali (Colombia); Bejarano, G. [Laboratorio de Recubrimientos Duros, CDT-ASTIN SENA, Cali (Colombia)

    2005-07-01

    Cubic boron-nitride (c-BN)/hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) thin films were grown in situ on (100) oriented silicon substrates by r.f. (13.56 MHz) magnetron sputtering technique. In order to obtain the highest fraction of the c-BN phase, a negative d.c bias voltage, varying from 0 to -200 V was applied to the substrate during deposition. Another set of boron nitride thin films was deposited in situ on (100) oriented silicon substrates under r.f. bias voltage. The substrate holder was biased from 0 to -350 V by connecting such to an auxiliary r.f. generator (operated at 13.56 MHz). Films were characterized by Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). Well-defined peaks at 787 cm{sup -1}, 1100 cm{sup -1} and 1387 cm{sup -1}, corresponding to the 2{sub Au} (out-plane bending of B-N-B bond) h-BN vibration mode, the F2 (stretching) c-BN Transversal Optical (TO) mode and the E{sub 1u} (in-plane stretching of B-N bond) vibration mode of the h-BN, respectively, were observed in the FTIR spectra. A maximal fraction of the c-BN phase close to 85% was obtained under a bias voltage of -150 V at substrate temperature of 300 C and a total pressure of 4 x 10{sup -2} mbar. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  1. REVIEW ARTICLE: Nucleation, growth and characterization of cubic boron nitride (cBN) films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W. J.; Chong, Y. M.; Bello, I.; Lee, S. T.

    2007-10-01

    Cubic BN (cBN) has a set of extreme properties similar or even superior to diamond. The advance of science and technology of cBN has however been severely hampered by the poor quality of the material available (random orientation, limited film thickness, poor crystallinity and adhesion with substrates due to a non-cubic BN interlayer). This paper reviews the recent progress in the nucleation, growth and characterization techniques of cBN films. It describes various successful approaches in interface engineering and growth techniques in increasing film thickness, improving crystallinity and adhesion of cBN films to the substrate, which are the major issues hindering cBN films for both mechanical and electronic applications. Based on observations of the surface and interface structures, we further discuss the growth mechanisms of cBN films via physical and chemical routes.

  2. Composite boron nitride neutron detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, M.; Mojaev, E.; Khakhan, O.; Fleider, A.; Dul`kin, E.; Schieber, M.

    2014-09-01

    Single phase polycrystalline hexagonal boron nitride (BN) or mixed with boron carbide (BxC) embedded in an insulating polymeric matrix acting as a binder and forming a composite material as well as pure submicron size polycrystalline BN has been tested as a thermal neutron converter in a multilayer thermal neutron detector design. Metal sheet electrodes were covered with 20-50 μm thick layers of composite materials and assembled in a multi-layer sandwich configuration. High voltage was applied to the metal electrodes to create an interspacing electric field. The spacing volume could be filled with air, nitrogen or argon. Thermal neutrons were captured in converter layers due to the presence of the 10B isotope. The resulting nuclear reaction produced α-particles and 7Li ions which ionized the gas in the spacing volume. Electron-ion pairs were collected by the field to create an electrical signal proportional to the intensity of the neutron source. The detection efficiency of the multilayer neutron detectors is found to increase with the number of active converter layers. Pixel structures of such neutron detectors necessary for imaging applications and incorporation of internal moderator materials for field measurements of fast neutron flux intensities are discussed as well.

  3. Innovative boron nitride-doped propellants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thelma Manning

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The U.S. military has a need for more powerful propellants with balanced/stoichiometric amounts of fuel and oxidants. However, balanced and more powerful propellants lead to accelerated gun barrel erosion and markedly shortened useful barrel life. Boron nitride (BN is an interesting potential additive for propellants that could reduce gun wear effects in advanced propellants (US patent pending 2015-026P. Hexagonal boron nitride is a good lubricant that can provide wear resistance and lower flame temperatures for gun barrels. Further, boron can dope steel, which drastically improves its strength and wear resistance, and can block the formation of softer carbides. A scalable synthesis method for producing boron nitride nano-particles that can be readily dispersed into propellants has been developed. Even dispersion of the nano-particles in a double-base propellant has been demonstrated using a solvent-based processing approach. Stability of a composite propellant with the BN additive was verified. In this paper, results from propellant testing of boron nitride nano-composite propellants are presented, including closed bomb and wear and erosion testing. Detailed characterization of the erosion tester substrates before and after firing was obtained by electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. This promising boron nitride additive shows the ability to improve gun wear and erosion resistance without any destabilizing effects to the propellant. Potential applications could include less erosive propellants in propellant ammunition for large, medium and small diameter fire arms.

  4. Method of manufacture of atomically thin boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettl, Alexander K

    2013-08-06

    The present invention provides a method of fabricating at least one single layer hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). In an exemplary embodiment, the method includes (1) suspending at least one multilayer boron nitride across a gap of a support structure and (2) performing a reactive ion etch upon the multilayer boron nitride to produce the single layer hexagonal boron nitride suspended across the gap of the support structure. The present invention also provides a method of fabricating single layer hexagonal boron nitride. In an exemplary embodiment, the method includes (1) providing multilayer boron nitride suspended across a gap of a support structure and (2) performing a reactive ion etch upon the multilayer boron nitride to produce the single layer hexagonal boron nitride suspended across the gap of the support structure.

  5. Photo-induced site-specific nitridation of plasma-deposited B 10C 2H x films: A new pathway toward post-deposition doping of semiconducting boron carbides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behera, Swayambhu; Wilks, Justin; Dowben, Peter A.; Driver, M. Sky; Caruso, A. N.; Kelber, Jeffry A.

    2010-10-01

    We show that dopant impurities can be introduced in a controlled, site-specific manner into pre-deposited semiconducting boron carbide films. B―N bond formation has been characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy for semiconducting B 10C 2H x films exposed to vacuum ultraviolet photons in the presence of NH 3. Core level photoemission data indicate that B―NH 2 bonds are formed at B sites bonded to other boron atoms (B―B), and not at boron atoms adjacent to carbon atoms (B―C) or at carbon atom sites. Nitridation obeys diffusion-limited kinetics. These results indicate that dopant species can be introduced in a controlled, site-specific manner into pre-deposited boron carbide films, as opposed to currently required dopant incorporation during the deposition process.

  6. Boron Nitride Nanotubes for Spintronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal B. Dhungana

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available With the end of Moore’s law in sight, researchers are in search of an alternative approach to manipulate information. Spintronics or spin-based electronics, which uses the spin state of electrons to store, process and communicate information, offers exciting opportunities to sustain the current growth in the information industry. For example, the discovery of the giant magneto resistance (GMR effect, which provides the foundation behind modern high density data storage devices, is an important success story of spintronics; GMR-based sensors have wide applications, ranging from automotive industry to biology. In recent years, with the tremendous progress in nanotechnology, spintronics has crossed the boundary of conventional, all metallic, solid state multi-layered structures to reach a new frontier, where nanostructures provide a pathway for the spin-carriers. Different materials such as organic and inorganic nanostructures are explored for possible applications in spintronics. In this short review, we focus on the boron nitride nanotube (BNNT, which has recently been explored for possible applications in spintronics. Unlike many organic materials, BNNTs offer higher thermal stability and higher resistance to oxidation. It has been reported that the metal-free fluorinated BNNT exhibits long range ferromagnetic spin ordering, which is stable at a temperature much higher than room temperature. Due to their large band gap, BNNTs are also explored as a tunnel magneto resistance device. In addition, the F-BNNT has recently been predicted as an ideal spin-filter. The purpose of this review is to highlight these recent progresses so that a concerted effort by both experimentalists and theorists can be carried out in the future to realize the true potential of BNNT-based spintronics.

  7. Synthesis of boron nitride from boron containing poly (vinyl alcohol ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A ceramic precursor, prepared by condensation reaction from poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and boric acid (H3BO3) in 1:1, 2:1 and 4:1 molar ratios, was synthesized as low temperature synthesis route for boron nitride ceramic. Samples were pyrolyzed at 850°C in nitrogen atmosphere followed by characterization using Fourier ...

  8. Boron nitride nanosheets reinforced glass matrix composites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Saggar, Richa; Porwal, H.; Tatarko, P.; Dlouhý, Ivo; Reece, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 114, SEP (2015), S26-S32 ISSN 1743-6753 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 7AMB14SK155 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 264526 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Boron nitride nanosheets * Borosilicate glass * Mechanical properties Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 1.162, year: 2015

  9. Bandgap engineered graphene and hexagonal boron nitride

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this article a double-barrier resonant tunnelling diode (DBRTD) has been modelled by taking advantage of single-layer hexagonal lattice of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). The DBRTD performance and operation are explored by means of a self-consistent solution inside the non-equilibrium Green's ...

  10. Amorphous Carbon-Boron Nitride Nanotube Hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Woo (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Wise, Kristopher E. (Inventor); Lin, Yi (Inventor); Connell, John (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method for joining or repairing boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs). In joining BNNTs, the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures. In repairing BNNTs, the damaged site of the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures at the damage site.

  11. Analysis of boron nitride by flame spectrometry methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Telegin, G.F.; Chapysheva, G.Ya.; Shilkina, N.N.

    1989-01-01

    A rapid method has been developed for determination of free and total boron contents as well as trace impurities in boron nitride by using autoclave sample decomposition followed by atomic emission and atomic absorption determination. The relative standard deviation is not greater than 0.03 in the determination of free boron 0.012 in the determination of total boron content

  12. Re-sintered boron-rich polycrystalline cubic boron nitride and method for making same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavens, T.R.; Corrigan, F.R.; Shott, R.L.; Bovenkerk, H.P.

    1987-06-16

    A method is described for making re-sintered polycrystalline cubic boron nitride (CBN) which comprises: (a) placing sintered substantially catalyst-free boron-rich polycrystalline cubic boron nitride particles in a high pressure/high temperature apparatus, the particles being substantially free of sintering inhibiting impurities; (b) subjecting the boron-rich cubic boron nitride particles to a pressure and a temperature adequate to re-sinter the particles, the temperature being below the CBN reconversion temperature; (c) maintaining the temperature and pressure for a time sufficient to re-sinter the boron-rich cubic boron nitride particles in the apparatus, and (d) recovering the re-sintered polycrystalline cubic boron nitride from the apparatus.

  13. Safety Assessment of Boron Nitride as Used in Cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiume, Monice M; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Hill, Ronald A; Klaassen, Curtis D; Liebler, Daniel C; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Andersen, F Alan

    2015-01-01

    The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel (Panel) assessed the safety of boron nitride which functions in cosmetics as a slip modifier (ie, it has a lubricating effect). Boron nitride is an inorganic compound with a crystalline form that can be hexagonal, spherical, or cubic; the hexagonal form is presumed to be used in cosmetics. The highest reported concentration of use of boron nitride is 25% in eye shadow formulations. Although boron nitride nanotubes are produced, boron nitride is not listed as a nanomaterial used in cosmetic formulations. The Panel reviewed available chemistry, animal data, and clinical data and concluded that this ingredient is safe in the present practices of use and concentration in cosmetic formulations. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. Additive Manufacturing of Dense Hexagonal Boron Nitride Objects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquez Rossy, Andres E [ORNL; Armstrong, Beth L [ORNL; Elliott, Amy M [ORNL; Lara-Curzio, Edgar [ORNL

    2017-05-12

    The feasibility of manufacturing hexagonal boron nitride objects via additive manufacturing techniques was investigated. It was demonstrated that it is possible to hot-extrude thermoplastic filaments containing uniformly distributed boron nitride particles with a volume concentration as high as 60% and that these thermoplastic filaments can be used as feedstock for 3D-printing objects using a fused deposition system. Objects 3D-printed by fused deposition were subsequently sintered at high temperature to obtain dense ceramic products. In a parallel study the behavior of hexagonal boron nitride in aqueous solutions was investigated. It was shown that the addition of a cationic dispersant to an azeotrope enabled the formulation of slurries with a volume concentration of boron nitride as high as 33%. Although these slurries exhibited complex rheological behavior, the results from this study are encouraging and provide a pathway for manufacturing hexagonal boron nitride objects via robocasting.

  15. Problems and possibilities of development of boron nitride ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusanova, L.N.; Romashin, A.G.; Kulikova, G.I.; Golubeva, O.P.

    1988-01-01

    The modern state of developments in the field of technology of ceramics produced from boron nitride is analyzed. Substantial difficulties in production of pure ceramics from hexagonal and wurtzite-like boron nitride are stated as related to the structure peculiarities and inhomogeneity of chemical bonds in elementary crystal cells of various modifications. Advantages and disadvantages of familiar technological procedures in production of boron nitride ceramics are compared. A new technology is suggested, which is based on the use of electroorganic compounds for hardening and protection of porous high-purity boron-nitride die from oxidation, and as high-efficient sintered elements for treatment of powders of various structures and further pyrolisis. The method is called thermal molecular lacing (TML). Properties of ceramics produced by the TML method are compared with characteristics of well-known brands of boron nitride ceramics

  16. Ionizing and Non-ionizing Radiation Effects in Thin Layer Hexagonal Boron Nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    ray energy, x is the thickness of the h-BN or Si region, Gammaφ is the gamma flux of the cobalt 60 source, and t is the irradiation time... Boron Nitride Thin Films Grown by Atomic Layer Deposition," Thin Solid Films, no. 571, pp. 51-55, 2014. [8] H. X . Chen, X . G. Zhao, Z. J. Ma, Y. Li...Gehrke and U. Vetter, "Modeling the diode characteristics of boron nitride/silicon carbide heterojunctions," Applied Physics Letters, vol. 97, 2010

  17. Apparatus for the production of boron nitride nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael W; Jordan, Kevin

    2014-06-17

    An apparatus for the large scale production of boron nitride nanotubes comprising; a pressure chamber containing; a continuously fed boron containing target; a source of thermal energy preferably a focused laser beam; a cooled condenser; a source of pressurized nitrogen gas; and a mechanism for extracting boron nitride nanotubes that are condensed on or in the area of the cooled condenser from the pressure chamber.

  18. CVD mechanism of pyrolytic boron nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanji, H.; Monden, K.; Ide, M.

    1987-01-01

    Pyrolytic boron nitride (P-BN) has become a essential material for III-V compound semiconductor manufacturing process. As the demand from electronics industry for larger single crystals increases, the demand for larger and more economical P-BN components is growing rapidly. P-BN is manufactured by low pressure CVD using boron-trihalides and ammonia as the reactants. In spite that P-BN has been in the market for quite a long time, limited number of fundamental studies regarding the kinetics and the formation mechanism of P-BN have been reported. As it has been demonstrated in CVD of Si, knowledge and both theoretical and empirical modeling of CVD process can be applied to improve the deposition technology and to give more uniform deposition with higher efficiency, and it should also apply to the deposition of P-BN

  19. Boron Nitride Nanotube: Synthesis and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiano, Amanda L.; Park, Cheol; Lee, Joseph W.; Luong, Hoa H.; Gibbons, Luke J.; Chu, Sang-Hyon; Applin, Samantha I.; Gnoffo, Peter; Lowther, Sharon; Kim, Hyun Jung; hide

    2014-01-01

    Scientists have predicted that carbon's immediate neighbors on the periodic chart, boron and nitrogen, may also form perfect nanotubes, since the advent of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in 1991. First proposed then synthesized by researchers at UC Berkeley in the mid 1990's, the boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) has proven very difficult to make until now. Herein we provide an update on a catalyst-free method for synthesizing highly crystalline, small diameter BNNTs with a high aspect ratio using a high power laser under a high pressure and high temperature environment first discovered jointly by NASA/NIA JSA. Progress in purification methods, dispersion studies, BNNT mat and composite formation, and modeling and diagnostics will also be presented. The white BNNTs offer extraordinary properties including neutron radiation shielding, piezoelectricity, thermal oxidative stability (> 800 C in air), mechanical strength, and toughness. The characteristics of the novel BNNTs and BNNT polymer composites and their potential applications are discussed.

  20. Synthesis and characterization of boron nitrides nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, T.H.; Sousa, E.M.B.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a new synthesis for the production of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNT) from boron powder, ammonium nitrate and hematite tube furnace CVD method. The samples were subjected to some characterization techniques as infrared spectroscopy, thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy and transmission. By analyzing the results can explain the chemical reactions involved in the process and confirm the formation of BNNT with several layers and about 30 nanometers in diameter. Due to excellent mechanical properties and its chemical and thermal stability this material is promising for various applications. However, BNNT has received much less attention than carbon nanotubes, it is because of great difficulty to synthesize appreciable quantities from the techniques currently known, and this is one of the main reasons this work.(author)

  1. Wettability of Pyrolytic Boron Nitride by Aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaramonte, Francis P.; Rosenthal, Bruce N.

    1991-01-01

    The wetting of pyrolytic boron nitride by molten 99.9999 percent pure aluminum was investigated by using the sessile drop method in a vacuum operating at approximately 660 micro-Pa at temperatures ranging from 700 to 1000 C. The equilibrium contact angle decreased with an increase in temperature. For temperatures at 900 C or less, the equilibrium contact angle was greater than 90 deg. At 1000 C a nonwetting-to-wetting transition occurred and the contact angle stabilized at 49 deg.

  2. Magnesium doping of boron nitride nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legg, Robert; Jordan, Kevin

    2015-06-16

    A method to fabricate boron nitride nanotubes incorporating magnesium diboride in their structure. In a first embodiment, magnesium wire is introduced into a reaction feed bundle during a BNNT fabrication process. In a second embodiment, magnesium in powder form is mixed into a nitrogen gas flow during the BNNT fabrication process. MgB.sub.2 yarn may be used for superconducting applications and, in that capacity, has considerably less susceptibility to stress and has considerably better thermal conductivity than these conventional materials when compared to both conventional low and high temperature superconducting materials.

  3. Stability analysis of zigzag boron nitride nanoribbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rai, Hari Mohan; Late, Ravikiran; Saxena, Shailendra K.; Kumar, Rajesh; Sagdeo, Pankaj R.; Jaiswal, Neeraj K.; Srivastava, Pankaj

    2015-01-01

    We have explored the structural stability of bare and hydrogenated zigzag boron nitride nanoribbons (ZBNNRs). In order to investigate the structural stability, we calculate the cohesive energy for bare, one-edge and both edges H-terminated ZBNNRs with different widths. It is found that the ZBNNRs with width Nz=8 are energetically more favorable than the lower-width counterparts (Nz<8). Bare ZBNNRs have been found energetically most stable as compared to the edge terminated ribbons. Our analysis reveals that the structural stability is a function of ribbon-width and it is not affected significantly by the type of edge-passivation (one-edge or both-edges)

  4. Method for exfoliation of hexagonal boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A new method is disclosed for the exfoliation of hexagonal boron nitride into mono- and few-layered nanosheets (or nanoplatelets, nanomesh, nanoribbons). The method does not necessarily require high temperature or vacuum, but uses commercially available h-BN powders (or those derived from these materials, bulk crystals) and only requires wet chemical processing. The method is facile, cost efficient, and scalable. The resultant exfoliated h-BN is dispersible in an organic solvent or water thus amenable for solution processing for unique microelectronic or composite applications.

  5. Hydrothermal synthesis of cubic boron nitride crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Meiyan; Cui Deliang; Kai Li; Yin Yansheng; Wang Qilong; Lei Chu

    2005-01-01

    Cubic boron nitride (cBN) crystals have been successfully synthesized by in situ hydrothermal method. In order to obtain cBN pure phase crystals, two comparative experiments were carried out. The experimental results indicated that compared to one-step in situ hydrothermal method, multi-step in situ hydrothermal method was beneficial to the synthesis of cBN. It is believed that the multi-step in situ hydrothermal method is the optimal route to synthesize pure cBN bulk crystals

  6. Plasma Spray Synthesis of High Purity Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this project is the efficient synthesis of high quality boron nitride nanotubes (BNNT’s) using the LaRC radio frequency plasma spray (RFPS)...

  7. Preparation of boron nitride fiber by organic precursor method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingying Zhou

    Full Text Available In this paper, boron nitride polymer precursor was made by boric acid, melamine, twelve sodium alkyl sulfate as raw materials and pure water as medium which is heated to 70 °C. Boron nitride precursor polymer was soluble in formic acid solution. The boron nitride precursor can be electrostatically spun at the voltage in 23 kV and the distance between the positive and negative poles is 15 cm. The formed fiber is very uniform. The properties of the precursors were analyzed through electron microscope, infrared spectrum, X-ray and ultraviolet spectrum. The aim of the job is to got the precursor of BN and spun it. Keywords: Melamine, Boric acid, Boron nitride precursor, Electrostatic spinning

  8. Defect complexes in carbon and boron nitride nanotubes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mashapa, MG

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of defect complexes on the stability, structural and electronic properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes and boron nitride nanotubes is investigated using the ab initio pseudopotential density functional method implemented...

  9. Vacancy complexes in carbon and boron nitride nanotubes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mashapa, MG

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The effect of divacancies on the stability, structural and electronic properties of carbon and boron nitride nanotubes is studied using the ab initio density functional method. VBBN is more stable in the boron-rich and less stable in the nitrogen...

  10. Electrical and thermal conductivities of the graphene, boron nitride and silicon boron honeycomb monolayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mousavi, Hamze, E-mail: hamze.mousavi@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khodadadi, Jabbar [Department of Physics, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Moradi Kurdestany, Jamshid [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65201 (United States); Yarmohammadi, Zahra [Department of Physics, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-11-25

    Density of states, electrical and thermal conductivities of electrons in graphene, boron nitride and silicon boron single sheets are studied within the tight-binding Hamiltonian model and Green's function formalism, based on the linear response theory. The results show that while boron nitride keeps significantly the lowest amounts overall with an interval of zero value in low temperatures, due to its insulating nature, graphene exhibits the most electrical and thermal conductivities, slightly higher than silicon boron except for low temperature region where the latter surpasses, owing to its metallic character. This work might make ideas for creating new electronic devices based on honeycomb nanostructures. - Highlights: • Electronic properties of graphene, silicon boron, and boron nitride planes are compared. • Tight-binding Hamiltonian model and Green's function formalism are implemented. • This work might make ideas for creating new electronic devices based on honeycomb nanostructures.

  11. Boron nitride as two dimensional dielectric: Reliability and dielectric breakdown

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Yanfeng; Pan, Chengbin; Hui, Fei; Shi, Yuanyuan; Lanza, Mario, E-mail: mlanza@suda.edu.cn [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials, Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Soochow University, 199 Ren-Ai Road, Suzhou 215123 (China); Zhang, Meiyun; Long, Shibing [Key Laboratory of Microelectronics Devices & Integrated Technology, Institute of Microelectronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100029 (China); Lian, Xiaojuan; Miao, Feng [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, School of Physics, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Larcher, Luca [DISMI, Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia, 42122 Reggio Emilia (Italy); Wu, Ernest [IBM Research Division, Essex Junction, Vermont 05452 (United States)

    2016-01-04

    Boron Nitride (BN) is a two dimensional insulator with excellent chemical, thermal, mechanical, and optical properties, which make it especially attractive for logic device applications. Nevertheless, its insulating properties and reliability as a dielectric material have never been analyzed in-depth. Here, we present the first thorough characterization of BN as dielectric film using nanoscale and device level experiments complementing with theoretical study. Our results reveal that BN is extremely stable against voltage stress, and it does not show the reliability problems related to conventional dielectrics like HfO{sub 2}, such as charge trapping and detrapping, stress induced leakage current, and untimely dielectric breakdown. Moreover, we observe a unique layer-by-layer dielectric breakdown, both at the nanoscale and device level. These findings may be of interest for many materials scientists and could open a new pathway towards two dimensional logic device applications.

  12. Graphene nanoribbons epitaxy on boron nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Xiaobo; Wang, Shuopei; Wu, Shuang; Chen, Peng; Zhang, Jing; Zhao, Jing; Meng, Jianling; Xie, Guibai; Wang, Duoming; Wang, Guole; Zhang, Ting Ting; Yang, Rong; Shi, Dongxia [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics and Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Yang, Wei [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics and Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Laboratoire Pierre Aigrain, ENS-CNRS UMR 8551, Universités Pierre et Marie Curie and Paris-Diderot, 24 rue Lhomond, 75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan); Zhang, Guangyu, E-mail: gyzhang@aphy.iphy.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics and Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2016-03-14

    In this letter, we report a pilot study on epitaxy of monolayer graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) on hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). We found that GNRs grow preferentially from the atomic steps of h-BN, forming in-plane heterostructures. GNRs with well-defined widths ranging from ∼15 nm to ∼150 nm can be obtained reliably. As-grown GNRs on h-BN have high quality with a carrier mobility of ∼20 000 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1} for ∼100-nm-wide GNRs at a temperature of 1.7 K. Besides, a moiré pattern induced quasi-one-dimensional superlattice with a periodicity of ∼15 nm for GNR/h-BN was also observed, indicating zero crystallographic twisting angle between GNRs and h-BN substrate. The superlattice induced band structure modification is confirmed by our transport results. These epitaxial GNRs/h-BN with clean surfaces/interfaces and tailored widths provide an ideal platform for high-performance GNR devices.

  13. Inter-layer potential for hexagonal boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leven, Itai; Azuri, Ido; Kronik, Leeor; Hod, Oded

    2014-03-01

    A new interlayer force-field for layered hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) based structures is presented. The force-field contains three terms representing the interlayer attraction due to dispersive interactions, repulsion due to anisotropic overlaps of electron clouds, and monopolar electrostatic interactions. With appropriate parameterization, the potential is able to simultaneously capture well the binding and lateral sliding energies of planar h-BN based dimer systems as well as the interlayer telescoping and rotation of double walled boron-nitride nanotubes of different crystallographic orientations. The new potential thus allows for the accurate and efficient modeling and simulation of large-scale h-BN based layered structures.

  14. Inter-layer potential for hexagonal boron nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leven, Itai; Hod, Oded; Azuri, Ido; Kronik, Leeor

    2014-01-01

    A new interlayer force-field for layered hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) based structures is presented. The force-field contains three terms representing the interlayer attraction due to dispersive interactions, repulsion due to anisotropic overlaps of electron clouds, and monopolar electrostatic interactions. With appropriate parameterization, the potential is able to simultaneously capture well the binding and lateral sliding energies of planar h-BN based dimer systems as well as the interlayer telescoping and rotation of double walled boron-nitride nanotubes of different crystallographic orientations. The new potential thus allows for the accurate and efficient modeling and simulation of large-scale h-BN based layered structures

  15. Large-area monolayer hexagonal boron nitride on Pt foil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji-Hoon; Park, Jin Cheol; Yun, Seok Joon; Kim, Hyun; Luong, Dinh Hoa; Kim, Soo Min; Choi, Soo Ho; Yang, Woochul; Kong, Jing; Kim, Ki Kang; Lee, Young Hee

    2014-08-26

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) has recently been in the spotlight due to its numerous applications including its being an ideal substrate for two-dimensional electronics, a tunneling material for vertical tunneling devices, and a growth template for heterostructures. However, to obtain a large area of h-BN film while maintaining uniform thickness is still challenging and has not been realized. Here, we report the systematical study of h-BN growth on Pt foil by using low pressure chemical vapor deposition with a borazine source. The monolayer h-BN film was obtained over the whole Pt foil (2 × 5 cm(2)) under foil size. A borazine source was catalytically decomposed on the Pt surface, leading to the self-limiting growth of the monolayer without the associating precipitation, which is very similar to the growth of graphene on Cu. The orientation of the h-BN domains was largely confined by the Pt domain, which is confirmed by polarizing optical microscopy (POM) assisted by the nematic liquid crystal (LC) film. The total pressure and orientation of the Pt lattice plane are crucial parameters for thickness control. At high pressure (∼0.5 Torr), thick film was grown on Pt (111), and in contrast, thin film was grown on Pt (001). Our advances in monolayer h-BN growth will play an important role to further develop a high quality h-BN film that can be used for vertical tunneling, optoelectronic devices and growth templates for a variety of heterostructures.

  16. The purification method of packed forms of boron nitride from graphite like form of instabilized boron nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawicki, P.; Madura, A.; Juchner, R.

    1991-01-01

    The new method of purification of packed forms of boron nitride from its graphite likes form has been described. The purity of the product dedicated for machining tools production decided on their quality. The method consists in high pressure steam processing of the boron nitride powder contains their different forms in temperature range 150-400 C during 0.5-2 hours. After cooling, the intermediate product is rinsed by an acid and hot distillate water. Mixing is advantageous in this phase. Then the sediment is filtrated, washed and dried

  17. Dynamic response of multiwall boron nitride nanotubes subjected to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dynamic behaviours of multiwall boron nitride nanotubes (MWBNNTs) with finite length were studied by employing continuum ... differential equations were solved by applying the finite element method. Whole or part of thin and bulky MWBN- ... viscous fluid is found to be on the nonlocal piezoelasticity.20. Finally, vibrational ...

  18. Spin transport in fully hexagonal boron nitride encapsulated graphene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gurram, M.; Omar, S.; Zihlmann, S.; Makk, P.; Schoenenberger, C.; van Wees, B. J.

    2016-01-01

    We study fully hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) encapsulated graphene spin valve devices at room temperature. The device consists of a graphene channel encapsulated between two crystalline hBN flakes: thick-hBN flake as a bottom gate dielectric substrate which masks the charge impurities from SiO2/Si

  19. Dynamic response of multiwall boron nitride nanotubes subjected to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dynamic behaviours of multiwall boron nitride nanotubes (MWBNNTs) with finite length were studied by employing continuum structure. Multiple elastic shells with nonlinear model of van der Waals interactions were used for developing an inclusive and inexpensive dynamical model of MWBNNTs. The systems of coupled ...

  20. Bandgap engineered graphene and hexagonal boron nitride for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this article a double-barrier resonant tunnelling diode (DBRTD) has been modelled by taking advantage of single-layer hexagonal lattice of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). The DBRTD performance and operation are explored by means of a self-consistent solution inside the non-equilibrium Green's ...

  1. Boron nitride elastic and thermal properties. Irradiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jager, Bernard.

    1977-01-01

    The anisotropy of boron nitride (BN) and especially thermal and elastic properties were studied. Specific heat and thermal conductivity between 1.2 and 300K, thermal conductivity between 4 and 350K and elastic constants C 33 and C 44 were measured. BN was irradiated with electrons at 77K and with neutrons at 27K to determine properties after irradiation [fr

  2. Bandgap engineered graphene and hexagonal boron nitride for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Low-dimensional nanomaterials, such as monolayer graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), have the ... tures containing a mixture of carbon and h-BN nanodomains were of great interest for device engineers to ... nique. Another important progress towards graphene device fabrication is doping graphene using ...

  3. Measurements of the nuclear spin-spin relaxation times for commensurate {sup 3}He-Ne films adsorbed on hexagonal boron nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parks, C; Sullivan, N S [Department of Physics, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Stachowiak, P [Institute of Low Temperature and Structure Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, PO Box 1410, 50-950 Wroclaw (Poland)], E-mail: Sullivan@phys.ufl.edu

    2009-02-01

    Measurements of the {sup 3}He nuclear spin-spin relaxation time, T{sub 2}, have been carried out for commensurate layers of {sup 3}He-Ne mixtures adsorbed on hexagonal boron nitride for temperatures 0.2< T <10 K. A temperature independent relaxation is observed at low temperatures and is interpreted in terms of the effective exchange frequencies for {sup 3}He particle exchange on the surface. The results show a strong dependence on the fraction of neon in the adsorbed layer. This variation is discussed in terms of a multiple spin exchange model for {sup 3}He in a monolayer. The contributions to T{sub 2} from different components of the exchange, 2-spin exchange (J{sub 2}), 3-spin exchange (J{sub 3}), 4-spin exchange (J{sub 4}) and higher exchange permutations depend on the {sup 3}He coverage and thus permit the separation of the amplitudes of the different exchange rates, and in particular allow one to deduce the relative strengths of 2-atom and 3-atom exchange where other methods are sensitive only to the effective two-particle term J{sub eff} = J{sub 2} - 2J{sub 3}.

  4. Recombination and photosensitivity centres in boron nitride irradiated with ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabyshev, A.; Konusov, F.; Lopatin, V.

    2001-01-01

    The physical-chemical processes, taking place during the irradiation of dielectrics with ions distort the electron structure of the compounds and generate additional localise state in the forbidden zone (FZ). Consequently, the semiconductor layer with the specific surface density of σ ≥ 10 -10 S/ forms on the surface of the dielectric. In addition to his, the high concentration of the radiation-induced defects changes the optical and photoelectric properties of the materials and also the energy characteristics. Analysis of the photoelectric properties indicates that the recombination processes take part in electric transport. These processes restricted the increase of the photosensitivity and changing the kinetics of relaxation of photo conductivity (σ hv ). The practical application of the boron nitride (BN) the in the thermonuclear systems (for example, Ref. 7), stimulates research into the reasons for the deceleration of its properties under the effect of radiation of various types. The conductivity of non-irradiated boron nitride is of the electron-hole nature with a large fraction of the activation component in exchange of the charge carriers between the levels of the defects and the forbidden zones. On the basis of the correlation of the energy and kinetic parameters of luminescence and , the authors of Ref. 8 constructed a model of electron transfers accompanying the electric transport of the boron nitride. In addition to ion-thermal modification, the conductivity of boron nitride is also of the electron-hole nature and is accompanied by luminescence. Examination of the characteristics of luminescence may be useful for obtaining more information on the transport mechanism. In this work, in order to clarify the main parameters of the forbidden band, detailed investigations were carried out into the spectrum of the electronic states of radiation defects which determine the photoelectric and luminescence properties of the modified boron nitride. The

  5. Turbostratic boron nitride coated on high-surface area metal oxide templates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klitgaard, Søren Kegnæs; Egeblad, Kresten; Brorson, M.

    2007-01-01

    Boron nitride coatings on high-surface area MgAl2O4 and Al2O3 have been synthesized and characterized by transmission electron microscopy and by X-ray powder diffraction. The metal oxide templates were coated with boron nitride using a simple nitridation in a flow of ammonia starting from ammonium...

  6. Efficient Boron Nitride Nanotube Formation via Combined Laser-Gas Flow Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, R. Roy (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin (Inventor); Smith, Michael W. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A process for producing boron nitride nanotubes and/or boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes of the general formula B(sub x)C(sub y)N(sub z) The process utilizes a combination of laser light and nitrogen gas flow to support a boron ball target during heating of the boron ball target and production of a boron vapor plume which reacts with nitrogen or nitrogen and carbon to produce boron nitride nanotubes and/or boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes of the general formula B(sub x)C(sub y)N(sub z).

  7. Synthesis of boron nitride from boron containing poly(vinyl alcohol ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    acid or borax, and a nitrogen-containing compound such as melamine, urea or dicyandiamide are heated in an atmo- sphere of non-oxidizing gas such as nitrogen or ammonia. ∗. Author for correspondence (mitun@cgcri.res.in). These h-BN powders have low crystallinity and crystal- lographically it belongs to boron nitride ...

  8. Synthesis of boron nitride from boron containing poly(vinyl alcohol)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A ceramic precursor, prepared by condensation reaction from poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and boric acid (H3BO3) in 1:1, 2:1 and 4:1 molar ratios, was synthesized as low temperature synthesis route for boron nitride ceramic. Samples were pyrolyzed at 850°C in nitrogen atmosphere followed by characterization using Fourier ...

  9. Solid State Non-powder Process for Boron Nitride Nanotube Metal Matrix Composite, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) reinforced metal matrix composites (MMCs) provide potential for advanced lightweight high stiffness structures that are critical for...

  10. Electrically dependent bandgaps in graphene on hexagonal boron nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, D.; Swaminathan, V.; Recine, G.

    2014-01-01

    We present first-principles calculations on the bandgap of graphene on a layer of hexagonal boron nitride in three different stacking configurations. Relative stability of the configurations is identified and bandgap tunability is demonstrated through the application of an external, perpendicularly applied electric field. We carefully examine the bandgap's sensitivity to both magnitude of the applied field as well as separation between the graphene and hexagonal boron nitride layers. Features of the band structure are examined and configuration-dependent relationships between the field and bandgap are revealed and elucidated through the atom-projected density of states. These findings suggest the potential for opening and modulating a bandgap in graphene as high as several hundred meV

  11. Electrically dependent bandgaps in graphene on hexagonal boron nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, D., E-mail: daniel.b.kaplan.civ@mail.mil; Swaminathan, V. [U.S. Army RDECOM-ARDEC, Fuze Precision Armaments and Technology Directorate, Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey 07806 (United States); Recine, G. [Department of Applied Physics, Polytechnic Institute of New York University, Brooklyn, New York 11201 (United States); Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, Fordham University, Bronx, New York 10458 (United States)

    2014-03-31

    We present first-principles calculations on the bandgap of graphene on a layer of hexagonal boron nitride in three different stacking configurations. Relative stability of the configurations is identified and bandgap tunability is demonstrated through the application of an external, perpendicularly applied electric field. We carefully examine the bandgap's sensitivity to both magnitude of the applied field as well as separation between the graphene and hexagonal boron nitride layers. Features of the band structure are examined and configuration-dependent relationships between the field and bandgap are revealed and elucidated through the atom-projected density of states. These findings suggest the potential for opening and modulating a bandgap in graphene as high as several hundred meV.

  12. The structure and dynamics of boron nitride nanoscrolls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perim, Eric; Galvao, Douglas S

    2009-01-01

    Carbon nanoscrolls (CNSs) are structures formed by rolling up graphene layers into a scroll-like shape. CNNs have been experimentally produced by different groups. Boron nitride nanoscrolls (BNNSs) are similar structures using boron nitride instead of graphene layers. In this paper we report molecular mechanics and molecular dynamics results for the structural and dynamical aspects of BNNS formation. Similarly to CNS, BNNS formation is dominated by two major energy contributions, the increase in the elastic energy and the energetic gain due to van der Waals interactions of the overlapping surface of the rolled layers. The armchair scrolls are the most stable configuration while zigzag scrolls are metastable structures which can be thermally converted to armchairs. Chiral scrolls are unstable and tend to evolve into zigzag or armchair configurations depending on their initial geometries. The possible experimental routes to produce BNNSs are also addressed.

  13. Synthesis of few-layer, large area hexagonal-boron nitride by pulsed laser deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glavin, Nicholas R.; Jespersen, Michael L.; Check, Michael H.; Hu, Jianjun; Hilton, Al M.; Fisher, Timothy S.; Voevodin, Andrey A.

    2014-01-01

    Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) has been investigated as a technique for synthesis of ultra-thin, few-layer hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) thin films on crystalline highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and sapphire (0001) substrates. The plasma-based processing technique allows for increased excitations of deposited atoms due to background nitrogen gas collisional ionizations and extended resonance time of the energetic species presence at the condensation surface. These processes permit growth of thin, polycrystalline h-BN at 700 °C, a much lower temperature than that required by traditional growth methods. Analysis of the as-deposited films reveals epitaxial-like growth on the nearly lattice matched HOPG substrate, resulting in a polycrystalline h-BN film, and amorphous BN (a-BN) on the sapphire substrates, both with thicknesses of 1.5–2 nm. Stoichiometric films with boron-to-nitrogen ratios of unity were achieved by adjusting the background pressure within the deposition chamber and distance between the target and substrate. The reduction in deposition temperature and formation of stoichiometric, large-area h-BN films by PLD provide a process that is easily scaled-up for two-dimensional dielectric material synthesis and also present a possibility to produce very thin and uniform a-BN. - Highlights: • PLD was used to synthesize boron nitride thin films on HOPG and sapphire substrates. • Lattice matched substrate allowed for formation of polycrystalline h-BN. • Nitrogen gas pressure directly controlled film chemistry and structure. • Technique allows for ultrathin, uniform films at reduced processing temperatures

  14. Delamination of hexagonal boron nitride in a stirred media mill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damm, C., E-mail: cornelia.damm@fau.de; Koerner, J.; Peukert, W., E-mail: Wolfgang.Peukert@lfg.fau.de [University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Institute of Particle Technology (Germany)

    2013-04-15

    A scalable process for delamination of hexagonal boron nitride in an aqueous solution of the non-ionic surfactant TWEEN85 using a stirred media mill is presented. The size of the ZrO{sub 2} beads used as grinding media governs the dimensions of the ground boron nitride particles as atomic force microscopic investigations (AFM) reveal: the mean flakes thickness decreases from 3.5 to 1.5 nm and the ratio between mean flake area and mean flake thickness increases from 2,200 to 5,800 nm if the grinding media size is reduced from 0.8 to 0.1 mm. This result shows that a high number of stress events in combination with low stress energy (small grinding media) facilitate delamination of the layered material whereas at high stress energies in combination with a low number of stress events (large grinding media) breakage of the layers dominates over delamination. The results of particle height analyses by AFM show that few-layer structures have been formed by stirred media milling. This result is in agreement with the layer thickness dependence of the delamination energy for hexagonal boron nitride. The concentration of nanoparticles remaining dispersed after centrifugation of the ground suspension increases with grinding time and with decreasing grinding media size. After 5 h of grinding using 0.1 mm ZrO{sub 2} grinding media the yield of nanoparticle formation is about 5 wt%. The nanoparticles exhibit the typical Raman peak for hexagonal boron nitride at 1,366 cm{sup -1} showing that the in-plane order in the milled platelets is remained.

  15. Ultrahigh torsional stiffness and strength of boron nitride nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garel, Jonathan; Leven, Itai; Zhi, Chunyi; Nagapriya, K S; Popovitz-Biro, Ronit; Golberg, Dmitri; Bando, Yoshio; Hod, Oded; Joselevich, Ernesto

    2012-12-12

    We report the experimental and theoretical study of boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) torsional mechanics. We show that BNNTs exhibit a much stronger mechanical interlayer coupling than carbon nanotubes (CNTs). This feature makes BNNTs up to 1 order of magnitude stiffer and stronger than CNTs. We attribute this interlayer locking to the faceted nature of BNNTs, arising from the polarity of the B-N bond. This property makes BNNTs superior candidates to replace CNTs in nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS), fibers, and nanocomposites.

  16. Delamination of hexagonal boron nitride in a stirred media mill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damm, C.; Körner, J.; Peukert, W.

    2013-01-01

    A scalable process for delamination of hexagonal boron nitride in an aqueous solution of the non-ionic surfactant TWEEN85 using a stirred media mill is presented. The size of the ZrO 2 beads used as grinding media governs the dimensions of the ground boron nitride particles as atomic force microscopic investigations (AFM) reveal: the mean flakes thickness decreases from 3.5 to 1.5 nm and the ratio between mean flake area and mean flake thickness increases from 2,200 to 5,800 nm if the grinding media size is reduced from 0.8 to 0.1 mm. This result shows that a high number of stress events in combination with low stress energy (small grinding media) facilitate delamination of the layered material whereas at high stress energies in combination with a low number of stress events (large grinding media) breakage of the layers dominates over delamination. The results of particle height analyses by AFM show that few-layer structures have been formed by stirred media milling. This result is in agreement with the layer thickness dependence of the delamination energy for hexagonal boron nitride. The concentration of nanoparticles remaining dispersed after centrifugation of the ground suspension increases with grinding time and with decreasing grinding media size. After 5 h of grinding using 0.1 mm ZrO 2 grinding media the yield of nanoparticle formation is about 5 wt%. The nanoparticles exhibit the typical Raman peak for hexagonal boron nitride at 1,366 cm −1 showing that the in-plane order in the milled platelets is remained.

  17. Effect of boron nitride coating on fiber-matrix interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, R.N.; Brun, M.K.

    1987-01-01

    Coatings can modify fiber-matrix reactions and consequently interfacial bond strengths. Commercially available mullite, silicon carbide, and carbon fibers were coated with boron nitride via low pressure chemical vapor deposition and incorporated into a mullite matrix by hot-pressing. The influence of fiber-matrix interactions for uncoated fibers on fracture morphologies was studied. These observations are related to the measured values of interfacial shear strengths

  18. Boron nitride nanotubes as a reinforcement for brittle matrices

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tatarko, Peter; Grasso, S.; Porwal, H.; Saggar, Richa; Chlup, Zdeněk; Dlouhý, Ivo; Reece, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 14 (2014), s. 3339-3349 ISSN 0955-2219 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0068 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 264526 - GLACERCO Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Amorphous borosilicate glass * Boron nitride nanotubes * Composite * Toughening mechanisms * Scratch resistance Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 2.947, year: 2014

  19. Enhanced thermoelectric properties in boron nitride quantum-dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Changning; Long, Mengqiu; He, Jun

    We have investigated the ballistic thermoelectric properties in boron nitride quantum dots by using the nonequilibrium Green's function approach and the Landauer transport theory. The result shows that the phonon transport is substantially suppressed by the interface in the quantum dots. The resonant tunneling effect of electron leads to the fluctuations of the electronic conductance. It enhances significantly the Seebeck coefficient. Combined with the low thermal conductance of phonon, the high thermoelectric figure of merit ZT ∼0.78 can be obtained at room temperature T = 300 K and ZT ∼0.95 at low temperature T = 100 K. It is much higher than that of graphene quantum dots with the same geometry parameters, which is ZT ∼0.29 at room temperature T = 300 K and ZT ∼0.48 at low temperature T = 100 K. The underlying mechanism is that the boron nitride quantum dots possess higher thermopower and lower phonon thermal conductance than the graphene quantum dots. Thus the results indicate that the thermoelectric properties of boron nitride can be significantly enhanced by the quantum dot and are better than those of graphene.

  20. Ab initio study of boron nitride lines on graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata-Carrizal, Berenice; Sanginés-Mendoza, Raúl; Martinez, Edgar

    2013-03-01

    Graphene has unusual electronic properties which make it a promising material for electronic devices. Neverthless, the absence of a band gap sets limitations on its practical applications. Thus, it is crucial to find methods to create and tune the band gap of systems based on graphene. In this way, we explore the modulation of the electronic properties of graphene through doping with boron nitride lines. In particular, we studied the electronic structure of graphene sheets doped with boron nitride lines armchair and zigzag type. The calculations were performed using the pseudopotential LCAO method with a Generalized Gradient Approximation (GGA) for the exchange-correlation energy functional. We found that both doping lines type induce a bandgap and that the energy gap increases as the length of doping lines increases. Accordingly to our DFT calculations, we found that the energy gap on graphene doped with armchair and zigzag lines is due to a two different mechanisms to drain charge from pi- to sigma- orbitals. Thus, we found that doping graphene with boron nitride lines is a useful way to induce and modulate the bandgap on graphene. This research was supported by Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología (Conacyt) under Grant No. 133022.

  1. Synthesis and characterization of hexagonal boron nitride for integration with graphene electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresnehan, Michael S.

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) has attracted increased interest as a dielectric material to graphene electronics. Traditional dielectrics, such as SiO2 or various high-k materials, can introduce scattering from charged surface states, impurities, surface optical phonons, and substrate roughness; significantly degrading the transport properties of graphene. Hexagonal boron nitride boasts several key advantages over SiO2 and high-k dielectrics. Most notably, it exhibits an atomically smooth surface that is expected to be free of dangling bonds, leading to an interface that is relatively free of surface charge traps and adsorbed impurities. Additionally, h- BN's high energy surface optical phonon modes lead to reduced phonon scattering from the dielectric. Using h-BN (grown via CVD on copper foil) as a gate dielectric to quasi-freestanding epitaxial graphene (QFEG) devices, a >2.5x increase in intrinsic current gain cut-off frequency and a >3x increase in mobility over HfO2 gated devices is obtained. In addition, this thesis presents the transfer-free deposition of boron nitride on sapphire and silicon for use as a supporting substrate to CVD-grown graphene. This is accomplished via a polymer-to-ceramic conversion process involving the deposition of polyborazylene at low temperature (≤400°C) and subsequent annealing at 1000°C to BN. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) confirms the deposition of an ultra smooth (RMS roughness CVD graphene transferred to boron nitride films deposited on Al2O3 at a polyborazylene deposition temperature of 400°C is nearly strain-free and results in an improvement in mobility of >1.5x and >2.5x compared to CVD graphene transferred to bare Al2O3 and SiO2, respectively, due to a low impurity density and reduced surface optical phonon scattering.

  2. Synthesis of hexagonal boron nitride graphene-like few layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, S.; Toury, B.; Journet, C.; Brioude, A.

    2014-06-01

    Self-standing highly crystallized hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) mono-, bi- and few-layers have been obtained for the first time via the Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) route by adding lithium nitride (Li3N) micropowders to liquid-state polyborazylene (PBN). Incorporation of Li3N as a crystallization promoter allows the onset of crystallization of h-BN at a lower temperature (1200 °C) than under classical conditions (1800 °C). The hexagonal structure was confirmed by both electron and X-ray diffraction.Self-standing highly crystallized hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) mono-, bi- and few-layers have been obtained for the first time via the Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) route by adding lithium nitride (Li3N) micropowders to liquid-state polyborazylene (PBN). Incorporation of Li3N as a crystallization promoter allows the onset of crystallization of h-BN at a lower temperature (1200 °C) than under classical conditions (1800 °C). The hexagonal structure was confirmed by both electron and X-ray diffraction. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr01017e

  3. Fabrication and characterization of aluminum nitride/boron nitride nanocomposites by carbothermal reduction and nitridation of aluminum borate powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusunose, Takafumi; Sakayanagi, Nobuaki; Sekino, Tohru; Ando, Yoichi

    2008-11-01

    In order to fabricate aluminum nitride/boron nitride (AIN/BN) nanocomposites by pressureless sintering, the present study investigated the synthesis of AIN-BN nanocomposite powders by carbothermal reduction and nitridation of aluminum borate powders. Homogeneous mixtures of alumina (Al2O3), boric acid (H3BO3), and carbon powder were used to synthesize AIN/BN nanocomposite powders containing 10 and 20 vol% BN. Aluminum borate was produced by reacting Al2O3 and B2O3 above 800 degrees C, and AIN and turbostratic BN (t-BN) were produced by reacting aluminum borate with carbon powder and nitrogen gas at 1500 degrees C. Carbothermal reduction followed by nitridation yielded an AIN/BN nanocomposite powder composed of nanosized AIN and t-BN. By pressureless sintering nanocomposite AIN/BN powders containing 5 wt% Y22O3, AIN/BN nanocomposites were obtained without compromising the high thermal conductivity and high hardness.

  4. Epoxy composites filled with boron nitride and aluminum nitride for improved thermal conductivity

    OpenAIRE

    Hutchinson, John M.; Román Concha, Frida Rosario; Cortés Izquierdo, M. Pilar; Calventus Solé, Yolanda

    2017-01-01

    Epoxy composites containing boron nitride (BN) or aluminum nitride (AlN or Al2N3) particles have been studied with a view to obtaining increased thermal conductivity. The effect of these fillers on the cure reaction has been investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) for two systems, epoxy-diamine and epoxy-thiol, and for volume fractions up to about 35 % of these filler particles. For the epoxy-diamine system, the glass transition temperature of the fully cured system, the heat ...

  5. Electronic structure of superlattices of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride

    KAUST Repository

    Kaloni, Thaneshwor P.

    2011-11-14

    We study the electronic structure of superlattices consisting of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride slabs, using ab initio density functional theory. We find that the system favors a short C–B bond length at the interface between the two component materials. A sizeable band gap at the Dirac point is opened for superlattices with single graphene layers but not for superlattices with graphene bilayers. The system is promising for applications in electronic devices such as field effect transistors and metal-oxide semiconductors.

  6. Cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) filled boron nitride (BN) nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulaiman, Hanisah Syed; Hua, Chia Chin; Zakaria, Sarani [School of Applied Physic, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia.43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2015-09-25

    In this study, nanocomposite using cellulose nanofibrils filled with different percentage of boron nitride (CNF-BN) were prepared. The objective of this research is to study the effect of different percentage of BN to the thermal conductivity of the nanocomposite produced. The CNF-BN nanocomposite were characterization by FT-IR, SEM and thermal conductivity. The FT-IR analysis of the CNF-BN nanocomposite shows all the characteristic peaks of cellulose and BN present in all samples. The dispersion of BN in CNF were seen through SEM analysis. The effect of different loading percentage of BN to the thermal conductivity of the nanocomposite were also investigated.

  7. Cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) filled boron nitride (BN) nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulaiman, Hanisah Syed; Hua, Chia Chin; Zakaria, Sarani

    2015-01-01

    In this study, nanocomposite using cellulose nanofibrils filled with different percentage of boron nitride (CNF-BN) were prepared. The objective of this research is to study the effect of different percentage of BN to the thermal conductivity of the nanocomposite produced. The CNF-BN nanocomposite were characterization by FT-IR, SEM and thermal conductivity. The FT-IR analysis of the CNF-BN nanocomposite shows all the characteristic peaks of cellulose and BN present in all samples. The dispersion of BN in CNF were seen through SEM analysis. The effect of different loading percentage of BN to the thermal conductivity of the nanocomposite were also investigated

  8. Pressure effects on dynamics behavior of multiwall boron nitride nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talebian, Taha [Faculty of Engineering, Neyshabur Branch, Islamic Azad University, Neyshabur (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    The dynamic behavior of Multiwall boron nitride nanotubes (MWBNNTs) is investigated by employing multiple elastic shells model. The influences of van der Waals interactions on layers are shown as nonlinear functions of the interlayer distance of MWBNNTs. Governing equations are solved by using the developed finite element method and by employing time history diagrams. The radial wave speed from the outermost layer to the innermost layer is computed. The effects of geometrical factors such as diameter-to-thickness ratio on dynamic behavior of MWBNNTs are determined. The magnification aspects of MWBNNTs are computed, and the effects of surrounding pressures on wave speed and magnification aspect of MWBNNTs are discussed.

  9. Rotary Ultrasonic Machining of Poly-Crystalline Cubic Boron Nitride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuruc Marcel

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Poly-crystalline cubic boron nitride (PCBN is one of the hardest material. Generally, so hard materials could not be machined by conventional machining methods. Therefore, for this purpose, advanced machining methods have been designed. Rotary ultrasonic machining (RUM is included among them. RUM is based on abrasive removing mechanism of ultrasonic vibrating diamond particles, which are bonded on active part of rotating tool. It is suitable especially for machining hard and brittle materials (such as glass and ceramics. This contribution investigates this advanced machining method during machining of PCBN.

  10. Tuning the optical response in carbon doped boron nitride nanodots

    KAUST Repository

    Mokkath, Junais Habeeb

    2014-09-04

    Time dependent density functional theory and the hybrid B3LYP functional are used to investigate the structural and optical properties of pristine and carbon doped hexagonal boron nitride nanodots. In agreement with recent experiments, the embedded carbon atoms are found to favor nucleation. Our results demonstrate that carbon clusters of different shapes promote an early onset of absorption by generating in-gap states. The nanodots are interesting for opto-electronics due to their tunable optical response in a wide energy window. We identify cluster sizes and shapes with optimal conversion efficiency for solar radiation and a wide absorption range form infrared to ultraviolet. This journal is

  11. Ammonium-tungstate-promoted growth of boron nitride nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    E, Songfeng; Li, Chaowei; Li, Taotao; Geng, Renjie; Li, Qiulong; Lu, Weibang; Yao, Yagang

    2018-05-01

    Ammonium tungstate ((NH4)10W12O41 · xH2O) is a kind of oxygen-containing ammonium salt. The following study proves that it can be successfully used as a metal oxide alternative to produce boron oxide (B2O2) by oxidizing boron (B) in a traditional boron oxide chemical vapor deposition (BOCVD) process. This special oxidant promotes the simplistic fabrication of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) in a conventional horizontal tube furnace, an outcome which may have resulted from its strong oxidizability. The experimental results demonstrate that the mole ratio of B and (NH4)10W12O41 · xH2O is a key parameter in determining the formation, quality and quantity of BNNTs when stainless steel is employed as a catalyst. We also found that Mg(NO3)2 and MgO nanoparticles (NPs) can be used as catalysts to grow BNNTs with the same precursor. The BNNTs obtained from the Mg(NO3)2 catalyst were straighter than those obtained from the MgO NP catalyst. This could have been due to the different physical forms of the catalysts that were used.

  12. Isotopic Enrichment of Boron in the Sputtering of Boron Nitride with Xenon Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, P. K.; Shutthanandan, V.

    1998-01-01

    An experimental study is described to measure the isotopic enrichment of boron. Xenon ions from 100 eV to 1.5 keV were used to sputter a boron nitride target. An ion gun was used to generate the ion beam. The ion current density at the target surface was approximately 30 microA/sq cm. Xenon ions impinged on the target surface at 50 deg angle to the surface normal. Since boron nitride is an insulator, a flood electron gun was used in our experiments to neutralize the positive charge buildup on the target surface. The sputtered secondary ions of boron were detected by a quadrupole mass spectrometer. The spectrometer entrance aperture was located perpendicular to the ion beam direction and 10 mm away from the target surface. The secondary ion flux was observed to be enriched in the heavy isotopes at lower ion energies. The proportion of heavy isotopes in the sputtered secondary ion flux was found to decrease with increasing primary ion energy from 100 to 350 eV. Beyond 350 eV, light isotopes were sputtered preferentially. The light isotope enrichment factor was observed to reach an asymptotic value of 1.27 at 1.5 keV. This trend is similar to that of the isotopic enrichment observed earlier when copper was sputtered with xenon ions in the same energy range.

  13. Composite Reinforcement using Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-15

    commercial production , the production of Al alloys using powder metallurgy involves sintering in high purity N2 atmosphere to prevent formation of...distortion of the alloys produced. [1] In addition, there is a surface oxide film on each Al powder particle which, in industrial production , is disrupted by...on the interactions. Titanium and aluminium are considered due to their relatively low densities, and copper is considered because copper alloys are

  14. Single Layer Nanomaterials: The Chemical Vapor Deposition Synthesis and Atomic Scale Characterization of Hexagonal Boron Nitride and Graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Gibb, Ashley L

    2015-01-01

    The design of novel nanomaterials with tunable geometries and properties has transformed chemistry and physics in recent years. In particular, recent advances in the isolation of two-dimensional films have inspired the exploration and development of stable, self-supporting single layer systems. Most notably graphene, a single layer of hexagonal sp2 carbon, has attracted interest due to intriguing electronic, optical, and mechanical properties. Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is a closely relat...

  15. Silver Nanoparticle-Deposited Boron Nitride Nanosheets as Fillers for Polymeric Composites with High Thermal Conductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fangfang; Zeng, Xiaoliang; Yao, Yimin; Sun, Rong; Xu, Jianbin; Wong, Ching-Ping

    2016-01-19

    Polymer composites with high thermal conductivity have recently attracted much attention, along with the rapid development of the electronic devices toward higher speed and performance. However, a common method to enhance polymer thermal conductivity through an addition of high thermally conductive fillers usually cannot provide an expected value, especially for composites requiring electrical insulation. Here, we show that polymeric composites with silver nanoparticle-deposited boron nitride nanosheets as fillers could effectively enhance the thermal conductivity of polymer, thanks to the bridging connections of silver nanoparticles among boron nitride nanosheets. The thermal conductivity of the composite is significantly increased from 1.63 W/m-K for the composite filled with the silver nanoparticle-deposited boron nitride nanosheets to 3.06 W/m-K at the boron nitride nanosheets loading of 25.1 vol %. In addition, the electrically insulating properties of the composite are well preserved. Fitting the measured thermal conductivity of epoxy composite with one physical model indicates that the composite with silver nanoparticle-deposited boron nitride nanosheets outperforms the one with boron nitride nanosheets, owning to the lower thermal contact resistance among boron nitride nanosheets' interfaces. The finding sheds new light on enhancement of thermal conductivity of the polymeric composites which concurrently require the electrical insulation.

  16. Chemical Sharpening, Shortening, and Unzipping of Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yunlong; Chen, Zhongfang; Connell, John W.; Fay, Catharine C.; Park, Cheol; Kim, Jae-Woo; Lin, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs), the one-dimensional member of the boron nitride nanostructure family, are generally accepted to be highly inert to oxidative treatments and can only be covalently modifi ed by highly reactive species. Conversely, it is discovered that the BNNTs can be chemically dispersed and their morphology modifi ed by a relatively mild method: simply sonicating the nanotubes in aqueous ammonia solution. The dispersed nanotubes are significantly corroded, with end-caps removed, tips sharpened, and walls thinned. The sonication treatment in aqueous ammonia solution also removes amorphous BN impurities and shortened BNNTs, resembling various oxidative treatments of carbon nanotubes. Importantly, the majority of BNNTs are at least partially longitudinally cut, or "unzipped". Entangled and freestanding BN nanoribbons (BNNRs), resulting from the unzipping, are found to be approximately 5-20 nm in width and up to a few hundred nanometers in length. This is the fi rst chemical method to obtain BNNRs from BNNT unzipping. This method is not derived from known carbon nanotube unzipping strategies, but is unique to BNNTs because the use of aqueous ammonia solutions specifi cally targets the B-N bond network. This study may pave the way for convenient processing of BNNTs, previously thought to be highly inert, toward controlling their dispersion, purity, lengths, and electronic properties.

  17. Toward Edge-Defined Holey Boron Nitride Nanosheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi; Liao, Yunlong; Chen, Zhongfan; Connell, John W.

    2015-01-01

    "Holey" two-dimensional (2D) nanosheets with well-defined holy morphology and edge chemistry are highly desirable for applications such as energy storage, catalysis, sensing, transistors, and molecular transport/separation. For example, holey grapheme is currently under extensive investigation for energy storage applications because of the improvement in ion transport due to through the thickness pathways provided by the holes. Without the holes, the 2D materials have significant limitations for such applications in which efficient ion transport is important. As part of an effort to apply this approach to other 2D nanomaterials, a method to etch geometrically defined pits or holes on the basal plane surface of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) nanosheets has been developed. The etching, conducted via heating in ambient air using metal nanoparticles as catalysts, was facile, controllable, and scalable. Starting h-BN layered crystals were etched and subsequently exfoliated into boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs). The as-etched and exfoliated h-BN nanosheets possessed defined pit and hole shapes that were comprised of regulated nanostructures at the edges. The current finding are the first step toward the bulk preparation of holey BNNSs with defined holes and edges.

  18. Electronic structure of carbon-boron nitride nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanginés-Mendoza, Raúl; Martinez, Edgar

    2013-03-01

    Structures of carbon and boron nitride nanotubes (CNTs, BNNTs) are quite similar, conversely, electronic properties are radically different from each other. Carbon nanotubes, whose electronic properties can be either metallic or semiconducting depending on their chiral structure, boron nitride nanotubes are always semiconductors with bandgaps over 4 eV. We have looked to hybrid systems, to predict a new kind of nanostructures with novel electronic properties. In this way, we explore the electronic properties of C-BN nanotubes. In particular, we studied the electronic structure of armchair C-BN nanotubes. The calculations were performed using the pseudopotential LCAO method with a Generalized Gradient Approximation for the exchange-correlation energy functional. The band structure of most of these systems have semiconductor character with an indirect gap smaller than its analogous BNNTs. In addition, the most prominent feature of these systems is the existence of flat bands both at the valence band top and at the conduction band minimum. Such flat bands results in sharp and narrow peaks on the total density of states. The behavior of these flat bands mainly indicates that electrons are largely localized. Thus, a detailed analysis on the electronic band structure shows that hybridization between those orbitals on the interfaces is responsible to exhibit localization effects on the hybrid systems.This research was supported by Conacyt under Grant No. 133022.

  19. Recent Development of the Synthesis and Engineering Applications of One-Dimensional Boron Nitride Nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, C.; Xu, L.; Qian, Y.; Yu, H.; Ma, Q.

    2010-01-01

    One-dimensional (1D) nanomaterials with novel photoelectric, magnetic, mechanical, and electronic transport properties have long been the research focus throughout the world. Herein, the recent achievements in preparation of 1D boron nitride nanomaterials, including nanotubes, nanowires, nanoribbons, nanorods, and nanofibres are reviewed. As the most intriguing and researched polymorph, boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) are introduced thoroughly involving their functionalization and doping. The electronics and engineering applications of 1D boron nitride nanomaterials are illustrated in nanoscale devices, hydrogen storage, polymer composites, and newly developed biomedical fields in detail.

  20. Modelling structure and properties of amorphous silicon boron nitride ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johann Christian Schön

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Silicon boron nitride is the parent compound of a new class of high-temperature stable amorphous ceramics constituted of silicon, boron, nitrogen, and carbon, featuring a set of properties that is without precedent, and represents a prototypical random network based on chemical bonds of predominantly covalent character. In contrast to many other amorphous materials of technological interest, a-Si3B3N7 is not produced via glass formation, i.e. by quenching from a melt, the reason being that the binary components, BN and Si3N4, melt incongruently under standard conditions. Neither has it been possible to employ sintering of μm-size powders consisting of binary nitrides BN and Si3N4. Instead, one employs the so-called sol-gel route starting from single component precursors such as TADB ((SiCl3NH(BCl2. In order to determine the atomic structure of this material, it has proven necessary to simulate the actual synthesis route.Many of the exciting properties of these ceramics are closely connected to the details of their amorphous structure. To clarify this structure, it is necessary to employ not only experimental probes on many length scales (X-ray, neutron- and electron scattering; complex NMR experiments; IR- and Raman scattering, but also theoretical approaches. These address the actual synthesis route to a-Si3B3N7, the structural properties, the elastic and vibrational properties, aging and coarsening behaviour, thermal conductivity and the metastable phase diagram both for a-Si3B3N7 and possible silicon boron nitride phases with compositions different from Si3N4: BN = 1 : 3. Here, we present a short comprehensive overview over the insights gained using molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations to explore the energy landscape of a-Si3B3N7, model the actual synthesis route and compute static and transport properties of a-Si3BN7.

  1. Deposition of thin layers of boron nitrides and hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon assisted by high current direct current arc plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franz, D.

    1999-09-01

    In the frame of this thesis, a high current direct current arc (HCDCA) used for the industrial deposition of diamond, has been adapted to study the deposition of two types of coatings: a) boron nitride, whose cubic phase is similar to diamond, for tribological applications, b) hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon, for applications in the semiconductor fields (flat panel displays, solar cells,...). For the deposition of these coatings, the substrates were placed in the diffusion region of the arc. The substrate heating is mainly due to atomic species recombining on its surface. The deposition temperature, varying from 300 to 900 o C according to the films deposited, is determined by the substrate position, the arc power and the injected gas fluxes, without the use of any external heating or cooling system. Measurements performed on the arc plasma show that the electronic temperature is around 2 eV (23'000 K) while the gas temperature is lower than 5500 K. Typical electronic densities are in the range of 10 12 -10 1' 3 cm -3 . For the deposition of boron nitride films, different boron precursors were used and a wide parameter range was investigated. The extreme difficulty of synthesising cubic boron nitride films by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) did not allow to stabilize the cubic phase of boron nitride in HCDCA. Coatings resulted in hexagonal or amorphous boron nitride with a chemical composition close to stoichiometric. The presence of hydrogen leads to the deposition of rough and porous films. Negative biasing of the samples, for positive ion bombardment, is commonly used to stabilize the cubic phase. In HCDCA and in our biasing range, only a densification of the films could be observed. A boron nitride deposition plasma study by infrared absorption spectroscopy in a capacitive radio frequency reactor has demonstrated the usefulness of this diagnostic for the understanding of the various chemical reactions which occur in this kind of plasma. Diborane

  2. Boron nitride stamp for ultra-violet nanoimprinting lithography fabricated by focused ion beam lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altun, Ali Ozhan; Jeong, Jun-Ho; Rha, Jong-Joo; Kim, Ki-Don; Lee, Eung-Sug

    2007-01-01

    Cubic boron nitride (c-BN) is one of the hardest known materials (second after diamond). It has a high level of chemical resistance and high UV transmittance. In this study, a stamp for ultra-violet nanoimprint lithography (UV-NIL) was fabricated using a bi-layered BN film deposited on a quartz substrate. Deposition of the BN was done using RF magnetron sputtering. A hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) layer was deposited for 30 min before c-BN was deposited for 30 min. The thickness of the film was measured as 160 nm. The phase of the c-BN layer was investigated using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometry, and it was found that the c-BN layer has a 40% cubic phase. The deposited film was patterned using focused ion beam (FIB) lithography for use as a UV-NIL stamp. Line patterns were fabricated with the line width and line distance set at 150 and 150 nm, respectively. The patterning process was performed by applying different currents to observe the effect of the current value on the pattern profile. The fabricated patterns were investigated using AFM, and it was found that the pattern fabricated by applying a current value of 50 picoamperes (pA) has a better profile with a 65 nm line depth. The UV transmittance of the 160 nm thick film was measured to be 70-86%. The hardness and modulus of the BN was measured to be 12 and 150 GPa, respectively. The water contact angle of the stamp surface was measured at 75 0 . The stamp was applied to UV-NIL without coating with an anti-adhesion layer. Successful imprinting was proved via scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of the imprinted resin

  3. Boron nitride stamp for ultra-violet nanoimprinting lithography fabricated by focused ion beam lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altun, Ali Ozhan [Nano-Mechanical Systems Research Center, Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, 171 Jang-dong, Yuseung-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Jun-Ho [Nano-Mechanical Systems Research Center, Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, 171 Jang-dong, Yuseung-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Rha, Jong-Joo [Surface Technology Research Center, Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, 66 Sangnam-Dong, Changwon-Shi, Kyungnam-Do (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ki-Don [Nano-Mechanical Systems Research Center, Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, 171 Jang-dong, Yuseung-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Eung-Sug [Nano-Mechanical Systems Research Center, Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, 171 Jang-dong, Yuseung-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-11-21

    Cubic boron nitride (c-BN) is one of the hardest known materials (second after diamond). It has a high level of chemical resistance and high UV transmittance. In this study, a stamp for ultra-violet nanoimprint lithography (UV-NIL) was fabricated using a bi-layered BN film deposited on a quartz substrate. Deposition of the BN was done using RF magnetron sputtering. A hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) layer was deposited for 30 min before c-BN was deposited for 30 min. The thickness of the film was measured as 160 nm. The phase of the c-BN layer was investigated using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometry, and it was found that the c-BN layer has a 40% cubic phase. The deposited film was patterned using focused ion beam (FIB) lithography for use as a UV-NIL stamp. Line patterns were fabricated with the line width and line distance set at 150 and 150 nm, respectively. The patterning process was performed by applying different currents to observe the effect of the current value on the pattern profile. The fabricated patterns were investigated using AFM, and it was found that the pattern fabricated by applying a current value of 50 picoamperes (pA) has a better profile with a 65 nm line depth. The UV transmittance of the 160 nm thick film was measured to be 70-86%. The hardness and modulus of the BN was measured to be 12 and 150 GPa, respectively. The water contact angle of the stamp surface was measured at 75{sup 0}. The stamp was applied to UV-NIL without coating with an anti-adhesion layer. Successful imprinting was proved via scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of the imprinted resin.

  4. Boron nitride stamp for ultra-violet nanoimprinting lithography fabricated by focused ion beam lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozhan Altun, Ali; Jeong, Jun-Ho; Rha, Jong-Joo; Kim, Ki-Don; Lee, Eung-Sug

    2007-11-01

    Cubic boron nitride (c-BN) is one of the hardest known materials (second after diamond). It has a high level of chemical resistance and high UV transmittance. In this study, a stamp for ultra-violet nanoimprint lithography (UV-NIL) was fabricated using a bi-layered BN film deposited on a quartz substrate. Deposition of the BN was done using RF magnetron sputtering. A hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) layer was deposited for 30 min before c-BN was deposited for 30 min. The thickness of the film was measured as 160 nm. The phase of the c-BN layer was investigated using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometry, and it was found that the c-BN layer has a 40% cubic phase. The deposited film was patterned using focused ion beam (FIB) lithography for use as a UV-NIL stamp. Line patterns were fabricated with the line width and line distance set at 150 and 150 nm, respectively. The patterning process was performed by applying different currents to observe the effect of the current value on the pattern profile. The fabricated patterns were investigated using AFM, and it was found that the pattern fabricated by applying a current value of 50 picoamperes (pA) has a better profile with a 65 nm line depth. The UV transmittance of the 160 nm thick film was measured to be 70 86%. The hardness and modulus of the BN was measured to be 12 and 150 GPa, respectively. The water contact angle of the stamp surface was measured at 75°. The stamp was applied to UV-NIL without coating with an anti-adhesion layer. Successful imprinting was proved via scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of the imprinted resin.

  5. Deep ultraviolet emission in hexagonal boron nitride grown by high-temperature molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuong, T. Q. P.; Cassabois, G.; Valvin, P.; Rousseau, E.; Summerfield, A.; Mellor, C. J.; Cho, Y.; Cheng, T. S.; Albar, J. D.; Eaves, L.; Foxon, C. T.; Beton, P. H.; Novikov, S. V.; Gil, B.

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the opto-electronic properties of hexagonal boron nitride grown by high temperature plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. We combine atomic force microscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry, and photoluminescence spectroscopy in the deep ultraviolet to compare the quality of hexagonal boron nitride grown either on sapphire or highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. For both substrates, the emission spectra peak at 235 nm, indicating the high optical quality of hexagonal boron nitride grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The epilayers on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite demonstrate superior performance in the deep ultraviolet (down to 210 nm) compared to those on sapphire. These results reveal the potential of molecular beam epitaxy for the growth of hexagonal boron nitride on graphene, and more generally, for fabricating van der Waals heterostructures and devices by means of a scalable technology.

  6. Nitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uehlls, A.

    1987-01-01

    The structure and certain properties of the ionic and covalent nitrides of alkali earth, rare earth, transition elements, cadmium, boron, indium and thorium are considered briefly. Peculiarities of the crystal structure, the structure of coordinated polyhedrons, the character and parameters of chemical bond depending on nitride composition are discussed

  7. Atomic oxygen effects on boron nitride and silicon nitride: A comparison of ground based and space flight data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, J. B.; Lan, E. H.; Smith, C. A.; Whatley, W. J.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of atomic oxygen on boron nitride (BN) and silicon nitride (Si3N4) were evaluated in a low Earth orbit (LEO) flight experiment and in a ground based simulation facility. In both the inflight and ground based experiments, these materials were coated on thin (approx. 250A) silver films, and the electrical resistance of the silver was measured in situ to detect any penetration of atomic oxygen through the BN and Si3N4 materials. In the presence of atomic oxygen, silver oxidizes to form silver oxide, which has a much higher electrical resistance than pure silver. Permeation of atomic oxygen through BN, as indicated by an increase in the electrical resistance of the silver underneath, was observed in both the inflight and ground based experiments. In contrast, no permeation of atomic oxygen through Si3N4 was observed in either the inflight or ground based experiments. The ground based results show good qualitative correlation with the LEO flight results, indicating that ground based facilities such as the one at Los Alamos National Lab can reproduce space flight data from LEO.

  8. Phonon wave interference in graphene and boron nitride superlattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xue-Kun; Zhou, Wu-Xing; Tang, Li-Ming; Chen, Ke-Qiu, E-mail: keqiuchen@hnu.edu.cn [Department of Applied Physics, School of Physics and Electronics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Xie, Zhong-Xiang [Department of Mathematics and Physics, Hunan Institute of Technology, Hengyang 421002 (China)

    2016-07-11

    The thermal transport properties of the graphene and boron nitride superlattice (CBNSL) are investigated via nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The simulation results show that a minimum lattice thermal conductivity can be achieved by changing the period length of the superlattice. Additionally, it is found that the period length at the minimum shifts to lower values at higher temperatures, and that the depth of the minimum increases with decreasing temperature. In particular, at 200 K, the thermal conductivities of CBNSLs with certain specific period lengths are nearly equal to the corresponding values at 300 K. A detailed analysis of the phonon spectra shows that this anomalous thermal conductivity behavior is a result of strong phonon wave interference. These observations indicate a promising strategy for manipulation of thermal transport in superlattices.

  9. Gate dependent Raman spectroscopy of graphene on hexagonal boron nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattrakun, Kanokporn; Huang, Shengqiang; Watanabe, K; Taniguchi, T; Sandhu, A; LeRoy, B J

    2013-12-18

    Raman spectroscopy, a fast and nondestructive imaging method, can be used to monitor the doping level in graphene devices. We fabricated chemical vapor deposition (CVD) grown graphene on atomically flat hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) flakes and SiO2 substrates. We compared their Raman response as a function of charge carrier density using an ion gel as a top gate. The G peak position, the 2D peak position, the 2D peak width and the ratio of the 2D peak area to the G peak area show a dependence on carrier density that differs for hBN compared to SiO2. Histograms of two-dimensional mapping are used to compare the fluctuations in the Raman peak properties between the two substrates. The hBN substrate has been found to produce fewer fluctuations at the same charge density owing to its atomically flat surface and reduced charged impurities.

  10. Etched graphene quantum dots on hexagonal boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engels, S.; Epping, A.; Volk, C.; Korte, S.; Voigtländer, B.; Watanabe, K.; Taniguchi, T.; Trellenkamp, S.; Stampfer, C.

    2013-08-01

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of etched graphene quantum dots (QDs) on hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) and SiO2 with different island diameters. We perform a statistical analysis of Coulomb peak spacings over a wide energy range. For graphene QDs on hBN, the standard deviation of the normalized peak spacing distribution decreases with increasing QD diameter, whereas for QDs on SiO2 no diameter dependency is observed. In addition, QDs on hBN are more stable under the influence of perpendicular magnetic fields up to 9 T. Both results indicate a substantially reduced substrate induced disorder potential in graphene QDs on hBN.

  11. Thermophoretically driven water droplets on graphene and boron nitride surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajegowda, Rakesh; Kannam, Sridhar Kumar; Hartkamp, Remco; Sathian, Sarith P.

    2018-05-01

    We investigate thermally driven water droplet transport on graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) surfaces using molecular dynamics simulations. The two surfaces considered here have different wettabilities with a significant difference in the mode of droplet transport. The water droplet travels along a straighter path on the h-BN sheet than on graphene. The h-BN surface produced a higher driving force on the droplet than the graphene surface. The water droplet is found to move faster on h-BN surface compared to graphene surface. The instantaneous contact angle was monitored as a measure of droplet deformation during thermal transport. The characteristics of the droplet motion on both surfaces is determined through the moment scaling spectrum. The water droplet on h-BN surface showed the attributes of the super-diffusive process, whereas it was sub-diffusive on the graphene surface.

  12. Preparation of ohmic n-type cubic boron nitride contacts

    CERN Document Server

    Wang Cheng Xin; Li Xun; Zhang Tie Chen; Han Yong; Luo Ji Feng; Shen Cai Xia; Gao Chun Xi; Zou Guang Tian

    2002-01-01

    Ohmic electrodes in the form of n-type (Si-doped) cubic boron nitride (c-BN) bulk crystals were fabricated by utilizing a covering technique, depositing Ti(10 nm)/Mo/(20 nm)/Pt-Au(200 nm) ohmic contact metal on both the sides of the c-BN substrate. The size of the specimen electrode was 100 x 100 mu m sup 2 on one side and 300 x 300 mu m sup 2 on the other side. Measurements on the specimen were made using a specially made device. Linear current-voltage characteristics were obtained. It is considered that the contact between the Ti-and Si-doped c-BN was ohmic.

  13. Ultrahigh interlayer friction in multiwalled boron nitride nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niguès, A; Siria, A; Vincent, P; Poncharal, P; Bocquet, L

    2014-07-01

    Friction at the nanoscale has revealed a wealth of behaviours that depart strongly from the long-standing macroscopic laws of Amontons-Coulomb. Here, by using a 'Christmas cracker'-type of system in which a multiwalled nanotube is torn apart between a quartz-tuning-fork-based atomic force microscope (TF-AFM) and a nanomanipulator, we compare the mechanical response of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and multiwalled boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) during the fracture and telescopic sliding of the layers. We found that the interlayer friction for insulating BNNTs results in ultrahigh viscous-like dissipation that is proportional to the contact area, whereas for the semimetallic CNTs the sliding friction vanishes within experimental uncertainty. We ascribe this difference to the ionic character of the BN, which allows charge localization. The interlayer viscous friction of BNNTs suggests that BNNT membranes could serve as extremely efficient shock-absorbing surfaces.

  14. Biaxial Compressive Strain Engineering in Graphene/Boron Nitride Heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Wei; Xiao, Jianliang; Zhu, Junwei; Yu, Chenxi; Zhang, Gang; Ni, Zhenhua; Watanabe, K.; Taniguchi, T.; Shi, Yi; Wang, Xinran

    2012-11-01

    Strain engineered graphene has been predicted to show many interesting physics and device applications. Here we study biaxial compressive strain in graphene/hexagonal boron nitride heterostructures after thermal cycling to high temperatures likely due to their thermal expansion coefficient mismatch. The appearance of sub-micron self-supporting bubbles indicates that the strain is spatially inhomogeneous. Finite element modeling suggests that the strain is concentrated on the edges with regular nano-scale wrinkles, which could be a playground for strain engineering in graphene. Raman spectroscopy and mapping is employed to quantitatively probe the magnitude and distribution of strain. From the temperature-dependent shifts of Raman G and 2D peaks, we estimate the TEC of graphene from room temperature to above 1000K for the first time.

  15. Electronic properties of Mn-decorated silicene on hexagonal boron nitride

    KAUST Repository

    Kaloni, Thaneshwor P.

    2013-12-17

    We study silicene on hexagonal boron nitride, using first-principles calculations. Since hexagonal boron nitride is semiconducting, the interaction with silicene is weaker than for metallic substrates. It therefore is possible to open a 50 meV band gap in the silicene. We further address the effect of Mn decoration by determining the onsite Hubbard interaction parameter, which turns out to differ significantly for decoration at the top and hollow sites. The induced magnetism in the system is analyzed in detail.

  16. Experiment on the formation of boron nitride in the jet of low-temperature plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollo, I. (Politechnika Lubelska (Poland)); Aniol, S. (Politechnika Slaska, Gliwice (Poland). Katedra Chemii i Technologii Nieorganicznej)

    1981-01-01

    The paper deals with the experiments on the formation of boron nitride in the jet of nitric-argon plasma into which solid boron trioxide as well as gaseous ammonia were introduced. It was found out that the conversion process of B/sub 2/O/sub 3/ into nitride in the jet of low-temperature plasma affected by gaseous NH/sub 3/ is possible and in the conditions of our experiment did not exceed 20 per cent.

  17. Thermal conductivity of polymer composites with oriented boron nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Hong Jun; Eoh, Young Jun; Park, Sung Dae; Kim, Eung Soo

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermal conductivity depended on the orientation of BN in the polymer matrices. • Hexagonal boron nitride (BN) particles were treated by C 27 H 27 N 3 O 2 and C 14 H 6 O 8 . • Amphiphilic-agent-treated BN particles are more easily oriented in the composite. • BN/PVA composites with C 14 H 6 O 8 -treated BN showed the highest thermal conductivity. • Thermal conductivity of the composites was compared with several theoretical models. - Abstract: Thermal conductivity of boron nitride (BN) with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and/or polyvinyl butyral (PVB) was investigated as a function of the degree of BN orientation, the numbers of hydroxyl groups in the polymer matrices and the amphiphilic agents used. The composites with in-plane orientation of BN showed a higher thermal conductivity than the composites with out-of-plane orientation of BN due to the increase of thermal pathway. For a given BN content, the composites with in-plane orientation of BN/PVA showed higher thermal conductivity than the composites with in-plane orientation of BN/PVB. This result could be attributed to the improved degree of orientation of BN, caused by a larger number of hydroxyl groups being present. Those treated with C 14 H 6 O 8 amphiphilic agent demonstrated a higher thermal conductivity than those treated by C 27 H 27 N 3 O 2 . The measured thermal conductivity of the composites was compared with that predicted by the several theoretical models

  18. Single photon emitters in boron nitride: More than a supplementary material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koperski, M.; Nogajewski, K.; Potemski, M.

    2018-03-01

    We present comprehensive optical studies of recently discovered single photon sources in boron nitride, which appear in form of narrow lines emitting centres. Here, we aim to compactly characterise their basic optical properties, including the demonstration of several novel findings, in order to inspire discussion about their origin and utility. Initial inspection reveals the presence of narrow emission lines in boron nitride powder and exfoliated flakes of hexagonal boron nitride deposited on Si/SiO2 substrates. Generally rather stable, the boron nitride emitters constitute a good quality visible light source. However, as briefly discussed, certain specimens reveal a peculiar type of blinking effects, which are likely related to existence of meta-stable electronic states. More advanced characterisation of representative stable emitting centres uncovers a strong dependence of the emission intensity on the energy and polarisation of excitation. On this basis, we speculate that rather strict excitation selectivity is an important factor determining the character of the emission spectra, which allows the observation of single and well-isolated emitters. Finally, we investigate the properties of the emitting centres in varying external conditions. Quite surprisingly, it is found that the application of a magnetic field introduces no change in the emission spectra of boron nitride emitters. Further analysis of the impact of temperature on the emission spectra and the features seen in second-order correlation functions is used to provide an assessment of the potential functionality of boron nitride emitters as single photon sources capable of room temperature operation.

  19. Transport properties of ultrathin black phosphorus on hexagonal boron nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doganov, Rostislav A.; Özyilmaz, Barbaros; Koenig, Steven P.; Yeo, Yuting; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Ultrathin black phosphorus, or phosphorene, is a two-dimensional material that allows both high carrier mobility and large on/off ratios. Similar to other atomic crystals, like graphene or layered transition metal dichalcogenides, the transport behavior of few-layer black phosphorus is expected to be affected by the underlying substrate. The properties of black phosphorus have so far been studied on the widely utilized SiO 2 substrate. Here, we characterize few-layer black phosphorus field effect transistors on hexagonal boron nitride—an atomically smooth and charge trap-free substrate. We measure the temperature dependence of the field effect mobility for both holes and electrons and explain the observed behavior in terms of charged impurity limited transport. We find that in-situ vacuum annealing at 400 K removes the p-doping of few-layer black phosphorus on both boron nitride and SiO 2 substrates and reduces the hysteresis at room temperature

  20. Transport properties of ultrathin black phosphorus on hexagonal boron nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doganov, Rostislav A.; Özyilmaz, Barbaros [Centre for Advanced 2D Materials and Graphene Research Centre, National University of Singapore, 6 Science Drive 2, 117546 Singapore (Singapore); Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 3, 117542 Singapore (Singapore); Graduate School for Integrative Sciences and Engineering (NGS), National University of Singapore, 28 Medical Drive, 117456 Singapore (Singapore); Koenig, Steven P.; Yeo, Yuting [Centre for Advanced 2D Materials and Graphene Research Centre, National University of Singapore, 6 Science Drive 2, 117546 Singapore (Singapore); Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 3, 117542 Singapore (Singapore); Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan)

    2015-02-23

    Ultrathin black phosphorus, or phosphorene, is a two-dimensional material that allows both high carrier mobility and large on/off ratios. Similar to other atomic crystals, like graphene or layered transition metal dichalcogenides, the transport behavior of few-layer black phosphorus is expected to be affected by the underlying substrate. The properties of black phosphorus have so far been studied on the widely utilized SiO{sub 2} substrate. Here, we characterize few-layer black phosphorus field effect transistors on hexagonal boron nitride—an atomically smooth and charge trap-free substrate. We measure the temperature dependence of the field effect mobility for both holes and electrons and explain the observed behavior in terms of charged impurity limited transport. We find that in-situ vacuum annealing at 400 K removes the p-doping of few-layer black phosphorus on both boron nitride and SiO{sub 2} substrates and reduces the hysteresis at room temperature.

  1. Atomically-Precise Layer Controlled Synthesis and Characterization of cm-Scale Hexagonal Boron Nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, W.-H.; Brar, V. W.; Jariwala, D.; Sherrott, M. C.; Tseng, W.-S.; Wu, C.-I.; Yeh, N.-C.; Atwater, H. A.

    Hexagonal boron nitride is the most promising two-dimensional insulator for device applications because of its large band gap and low density of charged impurities in addition to being isostructural and isoelectronic with graphene. Here we report the synthesis of h-BN films over cm2 area on Cu foils via chemical vapor deposition, with layer control from 1 to 20 layers. We have characterized these large-area h-BN films at both atomic and macroscopic scales. Raman and infrared spectroscopy indicate the presence of B-N bonds and reveal a linear dependence of thickness with growth time. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy provides the film stoichiometry, showing the B/N atom ratio to be 1 for all thicknesses. Atomically resolved STM images of monolayer h-BN films on graphene and Au substrates display both the atomic h-BN honeycomb lattice and a Moiré superlattice between h-BN and graphene. Electrical current transport in Au/h-BN/Au heterostructures indicates that these h-BN films behave like excellent tunnel barriers and also possess a high value of the hard-breakdown field strength. Our large-area h-BN films are therefore structurally, chemically and electronically uniform over cm2 areas. Department of Energy DE-FG02- 07ER46405 and DE-SC0001293.

  2. Synthesis, Characterization, and Fabrication of Boron Nitride and Carbon Nanomaterials, their Applications, and the Extended Pressure Inductively Coupled Plasma Synthesis of Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Fathalizadeh, Aidin

    2016-01-01

    Nanoscale materials made of carbon, boron, and nitrogen, namely BCN nanostructures, exhibit many remarkable properties making them uniquely suitable for a host of applications. Boron nitride (BN) and carbon (C) nanomaterials are structurally similar. The forms studied here originate from a two-dimensional hexagonally arranged structure of sp2 bonded atoms. These nanomaterials exhibit extraordinary mechanical and thermal properties. However, the unique chemical compositions of carbon and bo...

  3. Hydrogen adsorption capacities of multi-walled boron nitride nanotubes and nanotube arrays: a grand canonical Monte Carlo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahadi, Zohreh; Shadman, Muhammad; Yeganegi, Saeed; Asgari, Farid

    2012-07-01

    Hydrogen adsorption in multi-walled boron nitride nanotubes and their arrays was studied using grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation. The results show that hydrogen storage increases with tube diameter and the distance between the tubes in multi-walled boron nitride nanotube arrays. Also, triple-walled boron nitride nanotubes present the lowest level of hydrogen physisorption, double-walled boron nitride nanotubes adsorb hydrogen better when the diameter of the inner tube diameter is sufficiently large, and single-walled boron nitride nanotubes adsorb hydrogen well when the tube diameter is small enough. Boron nitride nanotube arrays adsorb hydrogen, but the percentage of adsorbed hydrogen (by weight) in boron nitride nanotube arrays is rather similar to that found in multi-walled boron nitride nanotubes. Also, when the Langmuir and Langmuir-Freundlich equations were fitted to the simulated data, it was found that multi-layer adsorptivity occurs more prominently as the number of walls and the tube diameter increase. However, in single-walled boron nitride nanotubes with a small diameter, the dominant mechanism is monolayer adsorptivity.

  4. Integrated Rig for the Production of Boron Nitride Nanotubes via the Pressurized Vapor-Condenser Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael W. (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin C. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An integrated production apparatus for production of boron nitride nanotubes via the pressure vapor-condenser method. The apparatus comprises: a pressurized reaction chamber containing a continuously fed boron containing target having a boron target tip, a source of pressurized nitrogen and a moving belt condenser apparatus; a hutch chamber proximate the pressurized reaction chamber containing a target feed system and a laser beam and optics.

  5. Effects of deposition temperature and ammonia flow on metal-organic chemical vapor deposition of hexagonal boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Anthony; Allerman, Andrew; Crawford, Mary; Beechem, Thomas; Ohta, Taisuke; Spataru, Catalin; Figiel, Jeffrey; Smith, Michael

    2018-03-01

    The use of metal-organic chemical vapor deposition at high temperature is investigated as a means to produce epitaxial hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) at the wafer scale. Several categories of hBN films were found to exist based upon precursor flows and deposition temperature. Low, intermediate, and high NH3 flow regimes were found to lead to fundamentally different deposition behaviors. The low NH3 flow regimes yielded discolored films of boron sub-nitride. The intermediate NH3 flow regime yielded stoichiometric films that could be deposited as thick films. The high NH3 flow regime yielded self-limited deposition with thicknesses limited to a few mono-layers. A Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism is proposed to explain the onset of self-limited behavior for the high NH3 flow regime. Photoluminescence characterization determined that the intermediate and high NH3 flow regimes could be further divided into low and high temperature behaviors with a boundary at 1500 °C. Films deposited with both high NH3 flow and high temperature exhibited room temperature free exciton emission at 210 nm and 215.9 nm.

  6. Cubic boron nitride (cBN) - A new material for advanced optoelectronic devices. Properties and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nistor, S.V.; Nistor, L.C.; Dinca, G.

    2001-01-01

    Cubic boron nitride (cBN) exhibits, besides exceptional thermal and mechanical properties similar to diamond, an excellent ability to be n or p doped, which makes it a strong candidate for advanced, high - temperature optical and microelectronic devices. Despite its outstanding characteristics, there are quite a few reports concerning the physical properties of cBN. This is partly due to the absence of natural cBN gems and the extreme difficulties in producing enough large (mm 3 sized) single crystals, or single phase thin films, for physical characterization. The state of the art knowledge concerning the basic properties of crystalline cBN, as well as our recent results of microstructure and defect properties studies will be presented. (authors)

  7. On the buckling of hexagonal boron nitride nanoribbons via structural mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannopoulos, Georgios I.

    2018-03-01

    Monolayer hexagonal boron nitride nanoribbons have similar crystal structure as graphene nanoribbons, have excellent mechanical, thermal insulating and dielectric properties and additionally present chemical stability. These allotropes of boron nitride can be used in novel applications, in which graphene is not compatible, to achieve remarkable performance. The purpose of the present work is to provide theoretical estimations regarding the buckling response of hexagonal boron nitride monolayer under compressive axial loadings. For this reason, a structural mechanics method is formulated which employs the exact equilibrium atomistic structure of the specific two-dimensional nanomaterial. In order to represent the interatomic interactions appearing between boron and nitrogen atoms, the Dreiding potential model is adopted which is realized by the use of three-dimensional, two-noded, spring-like finite elements of appropriate stiffness matrices. The critical compressive loads that cause the buckling of hexagonal boron nitride nanoribbons are computed with respect to their size and chirality while some indicative buckled shapes of them are illustrated. Important conclusions arise regarding the effect of the size and chirality on the structural stability of the hexagonal boron nitride monolayers. An analytical buckling formula, which provides good fitting of the numerical outcome, is proposed.

  8. Response of alpha particles in hexagonal boron nitride neutron detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doan, T. C.; Li, J.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X.

    2017-05-01

    Thermal neutron detectors were fabricated from 10B enriched h-BN epilayers of different thicknesses. The charge carrier generation and energy loss mechanisms as well as the range of alpha daughter particles generated by the nuclear reaction between thermal neutrons and 10B atoms in hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) thermal neutron detectors have been investigated via their responses to alpha particles from a 210Po source. The ranges of alpha particles in h-BN were found to be anisotropic, which increase with the angle (θ) between the trajectory of the alpha particles and c-axis of the h-BN epilayer following (cos θ)-1 and are 4.6 and 5.6 μm, respectively, for the alpha particles with energies of 1.47 MeV and 1.78 MeV at θ = 0. However, the energy loss of an alpha particle inside h-BN is determined by the number of layers it passes through with a constant energy loss rate of 107 eV per layer due to the layered structure of h-BN. Roughly 5 electron-hole pairs are generated when an alpha particle passes through each layer. It was also shown that the durability of h-BN thermal neutron detectors is excellent based on the calculation of boron vacancies generated (or 10B atoms consumed) by neutron absorption. The results obtained here provide useful insights into the mechanisms of energy loss and charge carrier generation inside h-BN detectors and possible approaches to further improve the overall performance of h-BN thermal neutron detectors, as well as the ultimate spatial resolution of future neutron imaging devices or cameras based on h-BN epilayers.

  9. Boron-nitride and aluminum-nitride "Pringles" and flapping motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fa, Wei; Chen, Shuang; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2014-07-18

    Motivated by the recent successful synthesis of a new nanocarbon, namely, a warped, double-concave graphene "Pringle" (Nat. Chem., 2013, 5, 739), we investigate properties of warped boron-nitride (BN) and aluminum-nitride (AlN) analogues, i.e., the non-planar B40N40H30 and Al40N40H30 "Pringles" using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Particular attention is placed on the effect of non-hexagonal rings on the stability and physical properties of BN and AlN Pringles. We find that the warped BN and AlN Pringles with one pentagon and five heptagons are stable without imaginary frequencies. Both the warped B40N40H30 and Al40N40H30 Pringles are expected to be flexible in solution as both can periodically change their shape in a dynamic "flapping" fashion due to their much lower activation barrier of racemization compared to that of the C80H30 counterpart. Since the warped B40N40H30 possesses a smaller HOMO-LUMO gap than the planar B39N39H30, it is expected that incorporating non-hexagonal ring defects by design can be an effective way to modify electronic properties of BN-based nanoplates.

  10. Adsorption of sugars on Al- and Ga-doped boron nitride surfaces: A computational study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darwish, Ahmed A. [Center for Nanotechnology, Zewail City of Science and Technology, Giza 12588 (Egypt); Department of Nuclear and Radiation Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Alexandria University, Alexandria (Egypt); Fadlallah, Mohamed M. [Center for Fundamental Physics, Zewail City of Science and Technology, Giza 12588 (Egypt); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Benha University, Benha (Egypt); Badawi, Ashraf [Center for Nanotechnology, Zewail City of Science and Technology, Giza 12588 (Egypt); Maarouf, Ahmed A., E-mail: ahmed.maarouf@egnc.gov.eg [Center for Fundamental Physics, Zewail City of Science and Technology, Giza 12588 (Egypt); Egypt Nanotechnology Center & Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Cairo University, Giza 12613 (Egypt)

    2016-07-30

    Highlights: • Doping boron nitride sheets with aluminum or gallium atoms significantly enhances their molecular adsorption properties. • Adsorption of glucose or glucosamine on Al- and Ga-doped boron nitride sheets changes the band gap. • Doping concentration changes the bad gap, but has a minor effect on the adsorption energy. - Abstract: Molecular adsorption on surfaces is a key element for many applications, including sensing and catalysis. Non-invasive sugar sensing has been an active area of research due to its importance to diabetes care. The adsorption of sugars on a template surface study is at the heart of matter. Here, we study doped hexagonal boron nitride sheets (h-BNNs) as adsorbing and sensing template for glucose and glucosamine. Using first principles calculations, we find that the adsorption of glucose and glucosamine on h-BNNs is significantly enhanced by the substitutional doping of the sheet with Al and Ga. Including long range van der Waals corrections gives adsorption energies of about 2 eV. In addition to the charge transfer occurring between glucose and the Al/Ga-doped BN sheets, the adsorption alters the size of the band gap, allowing for optical detection of adsorption. We also find that Al-doped boron nitride sheet is better than Ga-doped boron nitride sheet to enhance the adsorption energy of glucose and glucosamine. The results of our work can be potentially utilized when designing support templates for glucose and glucosamine.

  11. High-Yield Synthesis of Stoichiometric Boron Nitride Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José E. Nocua

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Boron nitride (BN nanostructures are structural analogues of carbon nanostructures but have completely different bonding character and structural defects. They are chemically inert, electrically insulating, and potentially important in mechanical applications that include the strengthening of light structural materials. These applications require the reliable production of bulk amounts of pure BN nanostructures in order to be able to reinforce large quantities of structural materials, hence the need for the development of high-yield synthesis methods of pure BN nanostructures. Using borazine (B3N3H6 as chemical precursor and the hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD technique, pure BN nanostructures with cross-sectional sizes ranging between 20 and 50 nm were obtained, including nanoparticles and nanofibers. Their crystalline structure was characterized by (XRD, their morphology and nanostructure was examined by (SEM and (TEM, while their chemical composition was studied by (EDS, (FTIR, (EELS, and (XPS. Taken altogether, the results indicate that all the material obtained is stoichiometric nanostructured BN with hexagonal and rhombohedral crystalline structure.

  12. Defect sensitive etching of hexagonal boron nitride single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgar, J. H.; Liu, S.; Hoffman, T.; Zhang, Yichao; Twigg, M. E.; Bassim, Nabil D.; Liang, Shenglong; Khan, Neelam

    2017-12-01

    Defect sensitive etching (DSE) was developed to estimate the density of non-basal plane dislocations in hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) single crystals. The crystals employed in this study were precipitated by slowly cooling (2-4 °C/h) a nickel-chromium flux saturated with hBN from 1500 °C under 1 bar of flowing nitrogen. On the (0001) planes, hexagonal-shaped etch pits were formed by etching the crystals in a eutectic mixture of NaOH and KOH between 450 °C and 525 °C for 1-2 min. There were three types of pits: pointed bottom, flat bottom, and mixed shape pits. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy revealed that the pointed bottom etch pits examined were associated with threading dislocations. All of these dislocations had an a-type burgers vector (i.e., they were edge dislocations, since the line direction is perpendicular to the [ 2 11 ¯ 0 ]-type direction). The pit widths were much wider than the pit depths as measured by atomic force microscopy, indicating the lateral etch rate was much faster than the vertical etch rate. From an Arrhenius plot of the log of the etch rate versus the inverse temperature, the activation energy was approximately 60 kJ/mol. This work demonstrates that DSE is an effective method for locating threading dislocations in hBN and estimating their densities.

  13. Adhesion and size dependent friction anisotropy in boron nitride nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, Hsiang-Chih; Riedo, Elisa; Dogan, Sedat; Volkmann, Mirjam; Klinke, Christian

    2012-01-01

    The frictional properties of individual multiwalled boron nitride nanotubes (BN-NTs) synthesized by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) and deposited on a silicon substrate are investigated using an atomic force microscope tip sliding along (longitudinal sliding) and across (transverse sliding) the tube’s principal axis. Because of the tube’s transverse deformations during the tip sliding, a larger friction coefficient is found for the transverse sliding as compared to the longitudinal sliding. Here, we show that the friction anisotropy in BN-NTs, defined as the ratio between transverse and longitudinal friction forces per unit area, increases with the nanotube–substrate contact area, estimated to be proportional to (L NT R NT ) 1/2 , where L NT and R NT are the length and the radius of the nanotube, respectively. Larger contact area denotes stronger surface adhesion, resulting in a longitudinal friction coefficient closer to the value expected in the absence of transverse deformations. Compared to carbon nanotubes (C-NTs), BN-NTs display a friction coefficient in each sliding direction with intermediate values between CVD and arc discharge C-NTs. CVD BN-NTs with improved tribological properties and higher oxidation temperature might be a better candidate than CVD C-NTs for applications in extreme environments. (paper)

  14. Boron nitride ceramics from molecular precursors: synthesis, properties and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Samuel; Salameh, Chrystelle; Miele, Philippe

    2016-01-21

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) attracts considerable interest because its structure is similar to that of carbon graphite while it displays different properties which are of interest for environmental and green technologies. The polar nature of the B-N bond in sp(2)-bonded BN makes it a wide band gap insulator with different chemistry on its surface and particular physical and chemical properties such as a high thermal conductivity, a high temperature stability, a high resistance to corrosion and oxidation and a strong UV emission. It is chemically inert and nontoxic and has good environmental compatibility. h-BN also has enhanced physisorption properties due to the dipolar fields near its surface. Such properties are closely dependent on the processing method. Bottom-up approaches consist of transforming molecular precursors into non-oxide ceramics with retention of the structural units inherent to the precursor molecule. The purpose of the present review is to give an up-to-date overview on the most recent achievements in the preparation of h-BN from borazine-based molecular single-source precursors including borazine and 2,4,6-trichloroborazine through both vapor phase syntheses and methods in the liquid/solid state involving polymeric intermediates, called the Polymer-Derived Ceramics (PDCs) route. In particular, the effect of the chemistry, composition and architecture of the borazine-based precursors and derived polymers on the shaping ability as well as the properties of h-BN is particularly highlighted.

  15. Graphene on hexagonal boron nitride as a tunable hyperbolic metamaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, S.; Ma, Q.; Liu, M. K.; Andersen, T.; Fei, Z.; Goldflam, M. D.; Wagner, M.; Watanabe, K.; Taniguchi, T.; Thiemens, M.; Keilmann, F.; Janssen, G. C. A. M.; Zhu, S.-E.; Jarillo-Herrero, P.; Fogler, M. M.; Basov, D. N.

    2015-08-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is a natural hyperbolic material, in which the dielectric constants are the same in the basal plane (ɛt ≡ ɛx = ɛy) but have opposite signs (ɛtɛz photons and electric dipoles in phonons. However, control of these hyperbolic phonon polaritons modes has remained challenging, mostly because their electrodynamic properties are dictated by the crystal lattice of h-BN. Here we show, by direct nano-infrared imaging, that these hyperbolic polaritons can be effectively modulated in a van der Waals heterostructure composed of monolayer graphene on h-BN. Tunability originates from the hybridization of surface plasmon polaritons in graphene with hyperbolic phonon polaritons in h-BN, so that the eigenmodes of the graphene/h-BN heterostructure are hyperbolic plasmon-phonon polaritons. The hyperbolic plasmon-phonon polaritons in graphene/h-BN suffer little from ohmic losses, making their propagation length 1.5-2.0 times greater than that of hyperbolic phonon polaritons in h-BN. The hyperbolic plasmon-phonon polaritons possess the combined virtues of surface plasmon polaritons in graphene and hyperbolic phonon polaritons in h-BN. Therefore, graphene/h-BN can be classified as an electromagnetic metamaterial as the resulting properties of these devices are not present in its constituent elements alone.

  16. Exfoliation of Hexagonal Boron Nitride via Ferric Chloride Intercalation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ching-cheh; Hurst, Janet; Santiago, Diana; Rogers, Richard B.

    2014-01-01

    Sodium fluoride (NaF) was used as an activation agent to successfully intercalate ferric chloride (FeCl3) into hexagonal boron nitride (hBN). This reaction caused the hBN mass to increase by approx.100 percent, the lattice parameter c to decrease from 6.6585 to between 6.6565 and 6.6569 ?, the x-ray diffraction (XRD) (002) peak to widen from 0.01deg to 0.05deg of the full width half maximum value, the Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrum's broad band (1277/cm peak) to change shape, and new FTIR bands to emerge at 3700 to 2700 and 1600/cm. This indicates hBN's structural and chemical properties are significantly changed. The intercalated product was hygroscopic and interacted with moisture in the air to cause further structural and chemical changes (from XRD and FTIR). During a 24-h hold at room temperature in air with 100 percent relative humidity, the mass increased another 141 percent. The intercalated product, hydrated or not, can be heated to 750 C in air to cause exfoliation. Exfoliation becomes significant after two intercalation-air heating cycles, when 20-nm nanosheets are commonly found. Structural and chemical changes indicated by XRD and FTIR data were nearly reversed after the product was placed in hydrochloric acid (HCl), resulting in purified, exfoliated, thin hBN products.

  17. Polypropylene Biocomposites with Boron Nitride and Nanohydroxyapatite Reinforcements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Wang Chan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we develop binary polypropylene (PP composites with hexagonal boron nitride (hBN nanoplatelets and ternary hybrids reinforced with hBN and nanohydroxyapatite (nHA. Filler hybridization is a sound approach to make novel nanocomposites with useful biological and mechanical properties. Tensile test, osteoblastic cell culture and dimethyl thiazolyl diphenyl tetrazolium (MTT assay were employed to investigate the mechanical performance, bioactivity and biocompatibility of binary PP/hBN and ternary PP/hBN-nHA composites. The purpose is to prepare biocomposite nanomaterials with good mechanical properties and biocompatibility for replacing conventional polymer composites reinforced with large hydroxyapatite microparticles at a high loading of 40 vol%. Tensile test reveals that the elastic modulus of PP composites increases, while tensile elongation decreases with increasing hBN content. Hybridization of hBN with nHA further enhances elastic modulus of PP. The cell culture and MTT assay show that osteoblastic cells attach and proliferate on binary PP/hBN and ternary PP/hBN-20%nHA nanocomposites.

  18. Multifunctional Electroactive Nanocomposites Based on Piezoelectric Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jin Ho; Sauti, Godfrey; Park, Cheol; Yamakov, Vesselin I.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Lowther, Sharon E.; Fay, Catharine C.; Thibeault, Sheila A.; Bryant, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    Space exploration missions require sensors and devices capable of stable operation in harsh environments such as those that include high thermal fluctuation, atomic oxygen, and high-energy ionizing radiation. However, conventional or state-of-the-art electroactive materials like lead zirconate titanate, poly(vinylidene fluoride), and carbon nanotube (CNT)-doped polyimides have limitations on use in those extreme applications. Theoretical studies have shown that boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) have strength-to-weight ratios comparable to those of CNTs, excellent high-temperature stability (to 800 C in air), large electroactive characteristics, and excellent neutron radiation shielding capability. In this study, we demonstrated the experimental electroactive characteristics of BNNTs in novel multifunctional electroactive nanocomposites. Upon application of an external electric field, the 2 wt % BNNT/polyimide composite was found to exhibit electroactive strain composed of a superposition of linear piezoelectric and nonlinear electrostrictive components. When the BNNTs were aligned by stretching the 2 wt % BNNT/polyimide composite, electroactive characteristics increased by about 460% compared to the nonstretched sample. An all-nanotube actuator consisting of a BNNT buckypaper layer between two single-walled carbon nanotube buck-paper electrode layers was found to have much larger electroactive properties. The additional neutron radiation shielding properties and ultraviolet/visible/near-infrared optical properties of the BNNT composites make them excellent candidates for use in the extreme environments of space missions. utilizing the unique characteristics of BNNTs.

  19. Manipulation of enhanced absorption with tilted hexagonal boron nitride slabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaohu; Fu, Ceji

    2018-04-01

    The wavevector of electromagnetic wave propagation in a hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) slab can be controlled by tilting its optical axis. This property can be used to manipulate the absorption in a hBN slab. By carefully analyzing the dependence of the absorptivity of a thin hBN slab on the tilted angle of its optical axis, we propose a structure that can realize great absorptivity enhancement in a band by stacking hBN slabs of different tilted angles. Our numerical results show that the absorptivity of a structure made of 91 stacked hBN slabs can be achieved higher than 0.94 in the wavenumber range from 1367 to 1580 cm-1 when the tilted angles of the slabs are properly arranged. The strong absorption is attributed to the combination of impedance matching at the slab interfaces and enlarged wavevectors in the slabs. This work reveals a novel way to realize strong absorption with anisotropic materials for applications in areas such as thermal radiative energy harvesting and conversion.

  20. DNA translocation through single-layer boron nitride nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Zonglin; Zhang, Yuanzhao; Luan, Binquan; Zhou, Ruhong

    2016-01-21

    Ultra-thin nanopores have become promising biological sensors because of their outstanding signal-to-noise ratio and spatial resolution. Here, we show that boron nitride (BN), which is a new two-dimensional (2D) material similar to graphene, could be utilized for making a nanopore with an atomic thickness. Using an all-atom molecular dynamics simulation, we investigated the dynamics of DNA translocation through the BN nanopore. The results of our simulations demonstrated that it is possible to detect different double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) sequences from the recording of ionic currents through the pore during the DNA translocation. Surprisingly, opposite to results for a graphene nanopore, we found the calculated blockage current for poly(A-T)40 in a BN nanopore to be less than that for poly(G-C)40. Also in contrast with the case of graphene nanopores, dsDNA models moved smoothly and in an unimpeded manner through the BN nanopores in the simulations, suggesting a potential advantage for using BN nanopores to design stall-free sequencing devices. BN nanopores, which display several properties (such as being hydrophilic and non-metallic) that are superior to those of graphene, are thus expected to find applications in the next generation of high-speed and low-cost biological sensors.

  1. Ultralow-loss polaritons in isotopically pure boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Alexander J.; Dai, Siyuan; Vurgaftman, Igor; Hoffman, Timothy; Liu, Song; Lindsay, Lucas; Ellis, Chase T.; Assefa, Nathanael; Chatzakis, Ioannis; Reinecke, Thomas L.; Tischler, Joseph G.; Fogler, Michael M.; Edgar, J. H.; Basov, D. N.; Caldwell, Joshua D.

    2018-02-01

    Conventional optical components are limited to size scales much larger than the wavelength of light, as changes to the amplitude, phase and polarization of the electromagnetic fields are accrued gradually along an optical path. However, advances in nanophotonics have produced ultrathin, so-called `flat' optical components that beget abrupt changes in these properties over distances significantly shorter than the free-space wavelength. Although high optical losses still plague many approaches, phonon polariton (PhP) materials have demonstrated long lifetimes for sub-diffractional modes in comparison to plasmon-polariton-based nanophotonics. We experimentally observe a threefold improvement in polariton lifetime through isotopic enrichment of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN). Commensurate increases in the polariton propagation length are demonstrated via direct imaging of polaritonic standing waves by means of infrared nano-optics. Our results provide the foundation for a materials-growth-directed approach aimed at realizing the loss control necessary for the development of PhP-based nanophotonic devices.

  2. Computer simulation of water desalination through boron nitride nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Lijun; Li, Jia-Chen; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Zhisen; Shen, Jia-Wei; Li, Lihua; Wu, Jianyang

    2017-11-15

    Development of high-efficiency and low-cost seawater desalination technologies is critical to solving the global water crisis. Herein we report a fast water filtering method with high salt rejection by boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs). The effect of the radius of BNNTs on water filtering and salt rejection was investigated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Our simulation results demonstrate that fast water permeation and high salt rejection could be achieved by BNNT(7,7) under both high pressure and low pressure. The potential of mean force (PMF) of Na + ion and water molecule through BNNT(7,7) further revealed the mechanism of seawater desalination by BNNT(7,7). Using BNNT(7,7) array, a 10 cm 2 nanotube membrane with 1.5 × 10 13 pores per cm 2 will produce freshwater with a flow rate of 98 L per day per MPa under 100 MPa. Our study shows the potential application of BNNTs membrane for fast and efficient desalination.

  3. Anisotropic Hexagonal Boron Nitride Nanomaterials - Synthesis and Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han,W.Q.

    2008-08-01

    Boron nitride (BN) is a synthetic binary compound located between III and V group elements in the Periodic Table. However, its properties, in terms of polymorphism and mechanical characteristics, are rather close to those of carbon compared with other III-V compounds, such as gallium nitride. BN crystallizes into a layered or a tetrahedrally linked structure, like those of graphite and diamond, respectively, depending on the conditions of its preparation, especially the pressure applied. Such correspondence between BN and carbon readily can be understood from their isoelectronic structures [1, 2]. On the other hand, in contrast to graphite, layered BN is transparent and is an insulator. This material has attracted great interest because, similar to carbon, it exists in various polymorphic forms exhibiting very different properties; however, these forms do not correspond strictly to those of carbon. Crystallographically, BN is classified into four polymorphic forms: Hexagonal BN (h-BN) (Figure 1(b)); rhombohedral BN (r-BN); cubic BN (c-BN); and wurtzite BN (w-BN). BN does not occur in nature. In 1842, Balmain [3] obtained BN as a reaction product between molten boric oxide and potassium cyanide under atmospheric pressure. Thereafter, many methods for its synthesis were reported. h-BN and r-BN are formed under ambient pressure. c-BN is synthesized from h-BN under high pressure at high temperature while w-BN is prepared from h-BN under high pressure at room temperature [1]. Each BN layer consists of stacks of hexagonal plate-like units of boron and nitrogen atoms linked by SP{sup 2} hybridized orbits and held together mainly by Van der Waals force (Fig 1(b)). The hexagonal polymorph has two-layered repeating units: AA'AA'... that differ from those in graphite: ABAB... (Figure 1(a)). Within the layers of h-BN there is coincidence between the same phases of the hexagons, although the boron atoms and nitrogen atoms are alternatively located along the c

  4. Formation of boron nitride coatings on silicon carbide fibers using trimethylborate vapor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Mengjiao; Zhou, Tong; He, Jing; Chen, Lifu, E-mail: lfchen@xmu.edu.cn

    2016-09-30

    High quality boron nitride (BN) coatings have been grown on silicon carbide (SiC) fibers by carbothermal nitridation and at atmospheric pressure. SiC fibers were first treated in chlorine gas to form CDC (carbide-derived carbon) film on the fiber surface. The CDC-coated SiC fibers were then reacted with trimethylborate vapor and ammonia vapor at high temperature, forming BN coatings by carbothermal reduction. The FT-IR, XPS, XRD, SEM, TEM and AES were used to investigate the formation of the obtained coatings. It has been found that the obtained coatings are composed of phase mixture of h-BN and amorphous carbon, very uniform in thickness, have smooth surface and adhere well with the SiC fiber substrates. The BN-coated SiC fibers retain ∼80% strength of the as-received SiC fibers and show an obvious interfacial debonding and fiber pullout in the SiC{sub f}/SiOC composites. This method may be useful for the large scale production of high quality BN coating on silicon carbide fiber.

  5. Mapping the layer count of few-layer hexagonal boron nitride at high lateral spatial resolutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohsin, Ali; Cross, Nicholas G.; Liu, Lei; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Duscher, Gerd; Gu, Gong

    2018-01-01

    Layer count control and uniformity of two dimensional (2D) layered materials are critical to the investigation of their properties and to their electronic device applications, but methods to map 2D material layer count at nanometer-level lateral spatial resolutions have been lacking. Here, we demonstrate a method based on two complementary techniques widely available in transmission electron microscopes (TEMs) to map the layer count of multilayer hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) films. The mass-thickness contrast in high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) imaging in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) mode allows for thickness determination in atomically clean regions with high spatial resolution (sub-nanometer), but is limited by surface contamination. To complement, another technique based on the boron K ionization edge in the electron energy loss spectroscopy spectrum (EELS) of h-BN is developed to quantify the layer count so that surface contamination does not cause an overestimate, albeit at a lower spatial resolution (nanometers). The two techniques agree remarkably well in atomically clean regions with discrepancies within  ±1 layer. For the first time, the layer count uniformity on the scale of nanometers is quantified for a 2D material. The methodology is applicable to layer count mapping of other 2D layered materials, paving the way toward the synthesis of multilayer 2D materials with homogeneous layer count.

  6. A comparative study of the thermal interface materials with graphene and boron nitride fillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargar, F.; Salgado, R.; Legedza, S.; Renteria, J.; Balandin, A. A.

    2014-09-01

    We report the results of an experimental study that compares the performance of graphene and boron nitride flakes as fillers in the thermal interface materials. The thickness of both fillers varied from a single atomic plane to about a hundred. The measurements have been conducted using a standard TIM tester. Our results show that the addition of a small fraction of graphene (f=4 wt%) to a commercial thermal interface material increases the resulting apparent thermal conductivity substantially stronger than the addition of boron nitride. The obtained data suggest that graphene and fewlayer graphene flakes couple better to the matrix materials than the boron nitride fillers. A combination of both fillers can be used to increase the thermal conductivity while controlling the electrical conduction.

  7. First-principles calculation of the isotope effect on boron nitride nanotube thermal conductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Derek A; Savić, Ivana; Mingo, Natalio

    2009-01-01

    Isotopic composition can dramatically affect thermal transport in nanoscale heat conduits such as nanotubes and nanowires. A 50% increase in thermal conductivity for isotopically pure boron ((11)B) nitride nanotubes was recently measured, but the reason for this enhancement remains unclear. To address this issue, we examine thermal transport through boron nitride nanotubes using an atomistic Green's function transport formalism coupled with phonon properties calculated from density functional theory. We develop an independent scatterer model for (10)B defects to account for phonon isotope scattering found in natural boron nitride nanotubes. Phonon scattering from (10)B dramatically reduces phonon transport at higher frequencies and our model accounts for the experimentally observed enhancement in thermal conductivity.

  8. The different adsorption mechanism of methane molecule onto a boron nitride and a graphene flakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seyed-Talebi, Seyedeh Mozhgan; Neek-Amal, M.

    2014-01-01

    Graphene and single layer hexagonal boron-nitride are two newly discovered 2D materials with wonderful physical properties. Using density functional theory, we study the adsorption mechanism of a methane molecule over a hexagonal flake of single layer hexagonal boron-nitride (h-BN) and compare the results with those of graphene. We found that independent of the used functional in our ab-initio calculations, the adsorption energy in the h-BN flake is larger than that for graphene. Despite of the adsorption energy profile of methane over a graphene flake, we show that there is a long range behavior beyond minimum energy in the adsorption energy of methane over h-BN flake. This result reveals the higher sensitivity of h-BN sheet to the adsorption of a typical closed shell molecule with respect to graphene. The latter gives insight in the recent experiments of graphene over hexagonal boron nitride.

  9. Boron Nitride Nanoporous Membranes with High Surface Charge by Atomic Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Matthieu; Koonkaew, Boonprakrong; Balme, Sebastien; Utke, Ivo; Picaud, Fabien; Iatsunskyi, Igor; Coy, Emerson; Miele, Philippe; Bechelany, Mikhael

    2017-05-17

    In this work, we report the design and the fine-tuning of boron nitride single nanopore and nanoporous membranes by atomic layer deposition (ALD). First, we developed an ALD process based on the use of BBr 3 and NH 3 as precursors in order to synthesize BN thin films. The deposited films were characterized in terms of thickness, composition, and microstructure. Next, we used the newly developed process to grow BN films on anodic aluminum oxide nanoporous templates, demonstrating the conformality benefit of BN prepared by ALD, and its scalability for the manufacturing of membranes. For the first time, the ALD process was then used to tune the diameter of fabricated single transmembrane nanopores by adjusting the BN thickness and to enable studies of the fundamental aspects of ionic transport on a single nanopore. At pH = 7, we estimated a surface charge density of 0.16 C·m -2 without slip and 0.07 C·m -2 considering a reasonable slip length of 3 nm. Molecular dynamics simulations performed with experimental conditions confirmed the conductivities and the sign of surface charges measured. The high ion transport results obtained and the ability to fine-tune nanoporous membranes by such a scalable method pave the way toward applications such as ionic separation, energy harvesting, and ultrafiltration devices.

  10. Shear-induced phase transition of nanocrystalline hexagonal boron nitride to wurtzitic structure at room temperature and lower pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Ji, Cheng; Levitas, Valery I.; Zhu, Hongyang; Chaudhuri, Jharna; Marathe, Archis; Ma, Yanzhang

    2012-01-01

    Disordered structures of boron nitride (BN), graphite, boron carbide (BC), and boron carbon nitride (BCN) systems are considered important precursor materials for synthesis of superhard phases in these systems. However, phase transformation of such materials can be achieved only at extreme pressure–temperature conditions, which is irrelevant to industrial applications. Here, the phase transition from disordered nanocrystalline hexagonal (h)BN to superhard wurtzitic (w)BN was found at room tem...

  11. The influence of ultrasonic exposure on polytetrafluoroethylene structure modified with boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrov, D. A.; Eremin, E. N.

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of study is to state influence patterns of ultrasonic exposure on the density and porosity change of the synthesized polymer composite material based on polytetrafluoroethylene, modified with boron nitride. The density of 5 % boron nitride samples manufactured by ultrasonic pressing is 9% higher than the similar samples manufactured by cold pressing have and this confirms the structure defectiveness results received by electron microscopy. As the result of carried studies it was stated that polymer composite material pressing with ultrasonic vibration is an active technology increasing efficiency of matrix structure modification and affecting significantly the structure formation processes in it.

  12. Structure of boron nitride after the high-temperature shock compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurdyumov, A.V.; Ostrovskaya, N.F.; Pilipenko, V.A.; Pilyankevich, A.N.; Savvakin, G.I.; Trefilov, V.I.

    1979-01-01

    Boron nitride structure changes as a result of high temperature dynamic compression are studied. The X-ray technique and transmission electron microscopy have been applied. The data on the structure and regularities of formation of diamond-like modifications of boron nitride at high temperature impact compression permit to consider martensite transformation as the first stage of formation of the sphalerite phase stable at high pressures. The second stage is possible if the temperature at the impact moment is sufficiently high for intensive diffusion processes

  13. Assessing cytotoxicity of boron nitride nanotubes: Interference with the MTT assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciofani, Gianni, E-mail: g.ciofani@sssup.it [Italian Institute of Technology, Smart Materials Lab, Center of MicroBioRobotics at Scuola Superiore Sant' Anna, Viale Rinaldo Piaggio, 34, 56025 Pontedera (Pisa) (Italy); Danti, Serena; D' Alessandro, Delfo [Otology-Cochlear Implants, Cisanello Hospital, Via Paradisa 2, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Moscato, Stefania [Department of Human Morphology and Applied Biology, University of Pisa, Via Roma 55, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Menciassi, Arianna [Italian Institute of Technology, Smart Materials Lab, Center of MicroBioRobotics at Scuola Superiore Sant' Anna, Viale Rinaldo Piaggio, 34, 56025 Pontedera (Pisa) (Italy); CRIM Lab, Scuola Superiore Sant' Anna, Viale Rinaldo Piaggio, 34, 56025 Pontedera (Pisa) (Italy)

    2010-04-02

    Thanks to a non-covalent wrapping with glycol-chitosan, highly biocompatible and highly concentrated dispersions of boron nitride nanotubes were obtained and tested on human neuroblastoma cells. A systematic investigation of the cytotoxicity of these nanovectors with several complementary qualitative and quantitative assays allowed a strong interference with the MTT metabolic assay to be highlighted, similar to a phenomenon already observed for carbon nanotubes, that would wrongly suggest toxicity of boron nitride nanotubes. These results confirm the high complexity of these new nanomaterials, and the needing of extensive investigations on their exciting potential applications in the biomedical field.

  14. Quasi free-standing silicene in a superlattice with hexagonal boron nitride

    KAUST Repository

    Kaloni, T. P.

    2013-11-12

    We study a superlattice of silicene and hexagonal boron nitride by first principles calculations and demonstrate that the interaction between the layers of the superlattice is very small. As a consequence, quasi free-standing silicene is realized in this superlattice. In particular, the Dirac cone of silicene is preserved. Due to the wide band gap of hexagonal boron nitride, the superlattice realizes the characteristic physical phenomena of free-standing silicene. In particular, we address by model calculations the combined effect of the intrinsic spin-orbit coupling and an external electric field, which induces a transition from a semimetal to a topological insulator and further to a band insulator.

  15. Deep levels of nitrogen vacancies complexes in graphite-like boron nitride

    CERN Document Server

    Grinyaev, S N; Lopatin, V V

    2002-01-01

    Paper presents results of theoretical studies using methods of model pseudopotential and of extended elementary cell of deep levels of nitrogen vacancies, small clusters from di- and trivacancies of nitrogen covering nearest defects in one layer of graphite-like boron nitride. On the basis of calculated spectra and intensities of oscillators one interpreted local bands of optical absorption, luminescence, photoconductivity in pyrolytic boron nitride prior to and subsequent to irradiation by fast neutrons, protons and ions of carbon (50-150 keV). One identified not deep levels of activation of thermally stimulated luminescence and conductivity prior to and subsequent to irradiation

  16. The preparation of high-adsorption, spherical, hexagonal boron nitride by template method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ning, E-mail: zhangning5832@163.com; Liu, Huan; Kan, Hongmin; Wang, Xiaoyang; Long, Haibo; Zhou, Yonghui

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • The high-adsorption, spherical, hexagonal boron nitride powders were prepared. • The influence mechanism of template content on the micro-morphology and adsorption was explored. • At appropriate synthesis temperature, higher adsorption mesoporous spheres h-BN began to form. - Abstract: This research used low-cost boric acid and borax as a source of boron, urea as a nitrogen source, dodecyl-trimethyl ammonium chloride (DTAC) as a template, and thus prepared different micro-morphology hexagonal boron nitride powders under a flowing ammonia atmosphere at different nitriding temperatures. The effects of the template content and nitriding temperature on the micro-morphology of hexagonal boron nitride were studied and the formation mechanism analysed. The influences of the template content and nitriding temperature on adsorption performance were also explored. The results showed that at a nitriding temperature of 675 °C, the micro-morphologies of h-BN powder were orderly, inhomogeneous spherical, uniform spherical, beam, and pie-like with increasing template content. The micro-morphology was inhomogeneous spherical at a DTAC dose of 7.5%. The micro-morphology was uniform spherical at a DTAC dose of 10%. At a DTAC dose of 12%, the micro-morphology was a mixture of beam and pie-like shapes. At a certain template content (DTAC at 10%) and at lower nitriding temperatures (625 °C and 650 °C), spherical shell structures with surface subsidence began to form. The porous spheres would appear at a nitriding temperature of 675 °C, and the ball diameter thus formed was approximately 500–600 nm. The ball diameter was about 600–700 nm when the nitriding temperature was 700 °C. At a nitriding temperature of 725 °C, the ball diameter was between 800 and 1000 nm and sintering necking started to form. When the relative pressure was higher, previously closed pores opened and connected with the outside world: the adsorption then increased significantly. The

  17. Free vibration analysis of single-walled boron nitride nanotubes based on a computational mechanics framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, J. W.; Tong, L. H.; Xiang, Ping

    2017-12-01

    Free vibration behaviors of single-walled boron nitride nanotubes are investigated using a computational mechanics approach. Tersoff-Brenner potential is used to reflect atomic interaction between boron and nitrogen atoms. The higher-order Cauchy-Born rule is employed to establish the constitutive relationship for single-walled boron nitride nanotubes on the basis of higher-order gradient continuum theory. It bridges the gaps between the nanoscale lattice structures with a continuum body. A mesh-free modeling framework is constructed, using the moving Kriging interpolation which automatically satisfies the higher-order continuity, to implement numerical simulation in order to match the higher-order constitutive model. In comparison with conventional atomistic simulation methods, the established atomistic-continuum multi-scale approach possesses advantages in tackling atomic structures with high-accuracy and high-efficiency. Free vibration characteristics of single-walled boron nitride nanotubes with different boundary conditions, tube chiralities, lengths and radii are examined in case studies. In this research, it is pointed out that a critical radius exists for the evaluation of fundamental vibration frequencies of boron nitride nanotubes; opposite trends can be observed prior to and beyond the critical radius. Simulation results are presented and discussed.

  18. Properties of boron-carbon-nitrogen ternary thin films synthesized by pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, ZhongMin; Lu, Yongfeng; Mai, ZhiHong; Cheong, B. A.; Chow, S. K.; Wang, Jian P.; Chong, Tow Chong

    1999-07-01

    Boron-Carbon-Nitride BxCyNz thin films were deposited by excimer laser ablation of boron carbide under nitrogen ion-beam bombardment. Thin films were deposited in the intersection of the ablated B-C plasma and nitrogen ion beam on the silicon substrates. The laser pulse energy was selected in the range of 30-100 mJ with pulse duration of 23 ns. The electronic and compositional properties of the deposited thin films were analyzed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscope, Raman and IR spectroscope, scanning tunneling microscopy and ellipsometry measurements. The influence of the ion beam bombardment on the optical, electrical and electronic properties of the deposited thin films was studied.

  19. Formation and control of stoichiometric hafnium nitride thin films by direct sputtering of hafnium nitride target

    CERN Document Server

    Gotoh, Y; Ishikawa, J; Liao, M Y

    2003-01-01

    Hafnium nitride thin films were prepared by radio-frequency sputter deposition with a hafnium nitride target. Deposition was performed with various rf powers, argon pressures, and substrate temperatures, in order to investigate the influences of these parameters on the film properties, particularly the nitrogen composition. It was found that stoichiometric hafnium nitride films were formed at an argon gas pressure of less than 2 Pa, irrespective of the other deposition parameters within the range investigated. Maintaining the nitrogen composition almost stoichiometric, orientation, stress, and electrical resistivity of the films could be controlled with deposition parameters. (author)

  20. Hexagonal boron nitride neutron detectors with high detection efficiencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, A.; Grenadier, S. J.; Li, J.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X.

    2018-01-01

    Neutron detectors fabricated from 10B enriched hexagonal boron nitride (h-10BN or h-BN) epilayers have demonstrated the highest thermal neutron detection efficiency among solid-state neutron detectors to date at about 53%. In this work, photoconductive-like vertical detectors with a detection area of 1 × 1 mm2 were fabricated from 50 μm thick free-standing h-BN epilayers using Ni/Au and Ti/Al bilayers as ohmic contacts. Leakage currents, mobility-lifetime (μτ) products under UV photoexcitation, and neutron detection efficiencies have been measured for a total of 16 different device configurations. The results have unambiguously identified that detectors incorporating the Ni/Au bilayer on both surfaces as ohmic contacts and using the negatively biased top surface for neutron irradiation are the most desired device configurations. It was noted that high growth temperatures of h-10BN epilayers on sapphire substrates tend to yield a higher concentration of oxygen impurities near the bottom surface, leading to a better device performance by the chosen top surface for irradiation than by the bottom. Preferential scattering of oxygen donors tends to reduce the mobility of holes more than that of electrons, making the biasing scheme with the ability of rapidly extracting holes at the irradiated surface while leaving the electrons to travel a large average distance inside the detector at a preferred choice. When measured against a calibrated 6LiF filled micro-structured semiconductor neutron detector, it was shown that the optimized configuration has pushed the detection efficiency of h-BN neutron detectors to 58%. These detailed studies also provided a better understanding of growth-mediated impurities in h-BN epilayers and their effects on the charge collection and neutron detection efficiencies.

  1. Thermodynamic Approach to Boron Nitride Nanotube Solubility and Dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiano, A. L.; Gibbons, L.; Tsui, M.; Applin, S. I.; Silva, R.; Park, C.; Fay, C. C.

    2016-01-01

    Inadequate dispersion of nanomaterials is a critical issue that significantly limits the potential properties of nanocomposites and when overcome, will enable further enhancement of material properties. The most common methods used to improve dispersion include surface functionalization, surfactants, polymer wrapping, and sonication. Although these approaches have proven effective, they often achieve dispersion by altering the surface or structure of the nanomaterial and ultimately, their intrinsic properties. Co-solvents are commonly utilized in the polymer, paint, and art conservation industries to selectively dissolve materials. These co-solvents are utilized based on thermodynamic interaction parameters and are chosen so that the original materials are not affected. The same concept was applied to enhance the dispersion of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) to facilitate the fabrication of BNNT nanocomposites. Of the solvents tested, dimethylacetamide (DMAc) exhibited the most stable, uniform dispersion of BNNTs, followed by N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF), acetone, and N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP). Utilizing the known Hansen solubility parameters of these solvents in comparison to the BNNT dispersion state, a region of good solubility was proposed. This solubility region was used to identify co-solvent systems that led to improved BNNT dispersion in poor solvents such as toluene, hexane, and ethanol. Incorporating the data from the co-solvent studies further refined the proposed solubility region. From this region, the Hansen solubility parameters for BNNTs are thought to lie at the midpoint of the solubility sphere: 16.8, 10.7, and 9.0 MPa(exp 1/2) for delta d, delta p, and delta h, respectively, with a calculated Hildebrand parameter of 21.8 MPa)exp 1/2).

  2. Thermal neutron detectors based on hexagonal boron nitride epilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doan, T. C.; Marty, A.; Li, J.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X.

    2016-09-01

    Solid-state neutron detectors with high performances are urgently sought after for the detection of fissile materials. Until now, direct-conversion neutron detectors based on semiconductors with a measureable efficiency have not been realized. We have successfully synthesized hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) epilayers with varying thicknesses (0.3 μm - 50 μm) by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on sapphire substrates. In this paper, we present the detailed characterization of thermal neutron detectors fabricated from h-BN epilayers with a thickness up to 5 m to obtain insights into the h-BN epilayer thickness dependence of the device performance. The results revealed that the charge collection efficiency is almost independent of the h-BN epilayer thickness. By minimizing h-BN material removal by dry etching, it was shown that detectors incorporating an isotopically 10B-enriched h-BN epilayer of 2.7 μm in thickness exhibited an overall detection efficiency for thermal neutrons of 4% and a charge collection efficiency as high as 83%. By doing away altogether with dry etching, we have successfully realized a simple vertical 43 μm thick h-10BN detector which delivers a detection efficiency of 51.4% for thermal neutrons, which is the highest reported efficiency for any semiconductor-based neutron detector The h-BN detectors possess all the advantages of semiconductor devices including low cost, high efficiency and sensitivity, wafer-scale processing, compact size, light weight, and ability to integrate with other functional devices.

  3. Analytical boron diffusivity model in silicon for thermal diffusion from boron silicate glass film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurachi, Ikuo; Yoshioka, Kentaro

    2015-09-01

    An analytical boron diffusivity model in silicon for thermal diffusion from a boron silicate glass (BSG) film has been proposed in terms of enhanced diffusion due to boron-silicon interstitial pair formation. The silicon interstitial generation is considered to be a result of the silicon kick-out mechanism by the diffused boron at the surface. The additional silicon interstitial generation in the bulk silicon is considered to be the dissociation of the diffused pairs. The former one causes the surface boron concentration dependent diffusion. The latter one causes the local boron concentration dependent diffusion. The calculated boron profiles based on the diffusivity model are confirmed to agree with the actual diffusion profiles measured by secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) for a wide range of the BSG boron concentration. This analytical diffusivity model is a helpful tool for p+ boron diffusion process optimization of n-type solar cell manufacturing.

  4. Defect-selective dry etching for quick and easy probing of hexagonal boron nitride domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qinke; Lee, Joohyun; Park, Sangwoo; Woo, Hwi Je; Lee, Sungjoo; Song, Young Jae

    2018-03-01

    In this study, we demonstrate a new method to selectively etch the point defects or the boundaries of as-grown hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) films and flakes in situ on copper substrates using hydrogen and argon gases. The initial quality of the chemical vapor deposition-grown hBN films and flakes was confirmed by UV–vis absorption spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Different gas flow ratios of Ar/H2 were then employed to etch the same quality of samples and it was found that etching with hydrogen starts from the point defects and grows epitaxially, which helps in confirming crystalline orientations. However, etching with argon is sensitive to line defects (boundaries) and helps in visualizing the domain size. Finally, based on this defect-selective dry etching technique, it could be visualized that the domains of a polycrystalline hBN monolayer merged together with many parts, even with those that grew from a single nucleation seed.

  5. Solution-Processed Dielectrics Based on Thickness-Sorted Two-Dimensional Hexagonal Boron Nitride Nanosheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Jian; Kang, Joohoon; Kang, Junmo; Jariwala, Deep; Wood, Joshua D.; Seo, Jung-Woo T.; Chen, Kan-Sheng; Marks, Tobin J.; Hersam, Mark C.

    2015-10-14

    Gate dielectrics directly affect the mobility, hysteresis, power consumption, and other critical device metrics in high-performance nanoelectronics. With atomically flat and dangling bond-free surfaces, hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) has emerged as an ideal dielectric for graphene and related two-dimensional semiconductors. While high-quality, atomically thin h-BN has been realized via micromechanical cleavage and chemical vapor deposition, existing liquid exfoliation methods lack sufficient control over h-BN thickness and large-area film quality, thus limiting its use in solution-processed electronics. Here, we employ isopycnic density gradient ultracentrifugation for the preparation of monodisperse, thickness-sorted h-BN inks, which are subsequently layer-by-layer assembled into ultrathin dielectrics with low leakage currents of 3 × 10–9 A/cm2 at 2 MV/cm and high capacitances of 245 nF/cm2. The resulting solution-processed h-BN dielectric films enable the fabrication of graphene field-effect transistors with negligible hysteresis and high mobilities up to 7100 cm2 V–1 s–1 at room temperature. These h-BN inks can also be used as coatings on conventional dielectrics to minimize the effects of underlying traps, resulting in improvements in overall device performance. Overall, this approach for producing and assembling h-BN dielectric inks holds significant promise for translating the superlative performance of two-dimensional heterostructure devices to large-area, solution-processed nanoelectronics.

  6. The preparation and properties of aluminum nitride films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, T. L.; Kelm, R. W., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Aluminum nitride films have been deposited on silicon substrates at 800-1200 C by the pyrolysis of an aluminum trichloride-ammonia complex, AlCl3.3NH3, in a gas flow system. The deposit was transparent, tightly adherent to the substrate, and was confirmed to be aluminum nitride by X-ray and electron diffraction techniques. The deposited aluminum nitride films were found to be polycrystalline with the crystallite size increasing with increasing temperature of deposition. Other properties of aluminum nitride films relevant to device applications, including density, refractive index, dissolution rate, dielectric constant, and masking ability, have been determined. These properties indicate that aluminum nitride films have potential as a dielectric in electronic devices.

  7. Potential of P-doped carbon nanocone and Si-doped boron nitride ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    22

    The mechanisms of N2O reduction via CO on surfaces of P-doped carbon nanocone (CNC) and. Si-doped boron nitride nanocone (BNNC) by density functional theory were investigated. The adsorption energies of P and Si on surfaces of CNC and BNNC were -293.1 and -325.7 kcal/mol, respectively. The decomposition of ...

  8. First principles studies of extrinsic and intrinsic defects in boron nitride nanotubes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mashapa, MG

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available -1 Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology 2012/ Vol. 12, 7807?7814 First Principles Studies of Extrinsic and Intrinsic Defects in Boron Nitride Nanotubes M. G. Mashapa 1, 2, ?, N. Chetty1, and S. Sinha Ray2, 3 1Physics Department, University...

  9. A transfer technique for high mobility graphene devices on commercially available hexagonal boron nitride

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zomer, P. J.; Dash, S. P.; Tombros, N.; van Wees, B. J.

    2011-01-01

    We present electronic transport measurements of single and bilayer graphene on commercially available hexagonal boron nitride. We extract mobilities as high as 125 000 cm(2) V-1 s(-1) at room temperature and 275 000 cm(2) V-1 s(-1) at 4.2 K. The excellent quality is supported by the early

  10. Comparative study of the interfaces of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride with silver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garnica, Manuela; Schwarz, Martin; Ducke, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Silver opens up interesting perspectives in the fabrication of complex systems based on heteroepitaxial layers after the growth of a silicene layer on its (111) face has been proposed. In this work we explore different synthesis methods of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) and graphene sheets...

  11. Total and differential sputter yields of boron nitride measured by quartz crystal microbalance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, B; Topper, J L; Yalin, A P

    2009-01-01

    We present differential sputter yield measurements of boron nitride due to bombardment by xenon ions. A four-grid ion optics system is used to achieve a collimated ion beam at low energy ( 0 , 15 0 , 30 0 and 45 0 from the normal. Comparisons with published values are made where possible.

  12. In situ observations during chemical vapor deposition of hexagonal boron nitride on polycrystalline copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kidambi, Piran R.; Blume, Raoul; Kling, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Using a combination of complementary in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, we study the fundamental mechanisms underlying the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) on polycrystalline Cu. The nucleation and growth of h-BN layers is found to occ...

  13. The preferential permeation of ions across carbon and boron nitride nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sardroodi, Jaber Jahanbin; Azamat, Jafar; Rastkar, Alireza; Yousefnia, Negar Rad

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The permeation of ions through carbon and boron nitride nanotubes has been investigated by molecular dynamics simulation. ► The considered ions have been included Ca 2+ and Cl − . ► It has been shown that the ions permeate selectively. ► The radial distribution functions and the potential of mean force of the ions have been evaluated. -- Abstract: The preferential permeation of Ca 2+ and Cl − ions across (7, 7) and (8, 8) carbon and boron nitride nanotubes have been investigated by molecular dynamics simulation method. The simulated systems composed from a carbon, or boron nitride nanotube inserted in a silicon nitride membrane immersed in the aqueous ionic solution, in the presence of an electrical field. The water structure inside nanotubes has been analyzed and the retention time of the ions, the radial distribution functions and normalized transport rate of water with respect to the number of transported ions have been calculated. The results show that the permeation of ions across the nanotubes is dependent on the diameter of the considered nanotubes. The considered nanotubes have been fixed in a silicon-nitride membrane and an external electrical field has been applied on the systems along the axis of nanotubes.

  14. Quantifying the Solubility of Boron Nitride Nanotubes and Sheets with Static Light Scattering and Refractometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mutz, M [The University of Tennessee; Eastwood, Eric Allen [ORNL; Dadmun, Mark D [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    The dissolution of nanoparticles, particularly those containing boron, is an important area of interest for polymer nanocomposite formation and material development. In this work, the solubility of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNT), functionalized boron nitride nanotubes (FBNNT), and boron nitride sheets (BNZG) is quantified in toluene and THF with static light scattering, refractometry, UV vis spectroscopy, and physical observations. UV vis spectroscopy provides a method to determine the concentration and solubility limits of the solutions tested. Using light scattering, the second virial coefficient, A2, is determined and used to calculate , the solute solvent interaction parameter. The Hildebrand solubility parameter, , is then extracted from this data using the Hildebrand Scatchard Solution Theory. A list of potential good solvents based on the estimated value is provided for each nanoparticle. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and prepolymers (EN4 and EN8) used to synthesize polyurethanes were also tested, because the published and molar attraction constants of these materials provided a selfconsistent check. The dn/dc of SWNTs and boron-containing particles was measured for the first time in this work. A solvent screen for BN-ZG provides additional information that supports the obtained and . Three systems were found to have values below 0.5 and were thermodynamically soluble: BNNT in THF, EN8 in THF, and EN8 in toluene.

  15. Growth of large single-crystalline two-dimensional boron nitride hexagons on electropolished copper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Roland Yingjie; Griep, Mark H; Mallick, Govind; Tsang, Siu Hon; Singh, Ram Sevak; Tumlin, Travis; Teo, Edwin Hang Tong; Karna, Shashi P

    2014-02-12

    Hexagonal-boron nitride (h-BN) or "white graphene" has many outstanding properties including high thermal conductivity, high mechanical strength, chemical inertness, and high electrical resistance, which open up a wide range of applications such as thermal interface material, protective coatings, and dielectric in nanoelectronics that easily exceed the current advertised benefits pertaining to the graphene-based applications. The development of h-BN films using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has thus far led into nucleation of triangular or asymmetric diamond shapes on different metallic surfaces. Additionally, the average size of the triangular domains has remained relatively small (∼ 0.5 μm(2)) leading to a large number of grain boundaries and defects. While the morphology of Cu surfaces for CVD-grown graphene may have impacts on the nucleation density, domain sizes, thickness, and uniformity, the effects of the decreased roughness of Cu surface to develop h-BN films are unknown. Here, we report the growth and characterization of novel large area h-BN hexagons using highly electropolished Cu substrate under atmospheric pressure CVD conditions. We found that the nucleation density of h-BN is significantly reduced while domain sizes increase. In this study, the largest hexagonal-shape h-BN domain observed is 35 μm(2), which is an order of magnitude larger than a typical triangular domain. As the domains coalesce to form a continuous film, the larger grain size offers a more pristine and smoother film with lesser grain boundaries induced defects.

  16. Work Function Characterization of Potassium-Intercalated, Boron Nitride Doped Graphitic Petals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick T. McCarthy

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on characterization techniques for electron emission from potassium-intercalated boron nitride-modified graphitic petals (GPs. Carbon-based materials offer potentially good performance in electron emission applications owing to high thermal stability and a wide range of nanostructures that increase emission current via field enhancement. Furthermore, potassium adsorption and intercalation of carbon-based nanoscale emitters decreases work functions from approximately 4.6 eV to as low as 2.0 eV. In this study, boron nitride modifications of GPs were performed. Hexagonal boron nitride is a planar structure akin to graphene and has demonstrated useful chemical and electrical properties when embedded in graphitic layers. Photoemission induced by simulated solar excitation was employed to characterize the emitter electron energy distributions, and changes in the electron emission characteristics with respect to temperature identified annealing temperature limits. After several heating cycles, a single stable emission peak with work function of 2.8 eV was present for the intercalated GP sample up to 1,000 K. Up to 600 K, the potassium-intercalated boron nitride modified sample exhibited improved retention of potassium in the form of multiple emission peaks (1.8, 2.5, and 3.3 eV resulting in a large net electron emission relative to the unmodified graphitic sample. However, upon further heating to 1,000 K, the unmodified GP sample demonstrated better stability and higher emission current than the boron nitride modified sample. Both samples deintercalated above 1,000 K.

  17. Critical fields of niobium nitride films of various granularity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonova, E.A.; Sukhov, V.A.

    1983-01-01

    The behaviour of lattice parameter, specific electrical resistivity, critical temperature, and temperature dependence of upper critical field near Tsub(cr) of sputtered niobium nitride films is investigated versus the substrate temperature and gas mixture composition in the process of reactive cathode sputtering. The relation between extrapolated value of the upper critical field and granularity of niobium nitride films, close as to composition to the stoichiometric one, has been found. Values of the kappa parameter of the Ginsburg-Landau theory and of the coherence length for niobium nitride films of various granularity are estimated in an approximation of uniform distribution of impurities in a sample

  18. Vertical III-nitride thin-film power diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierer, Jr., Jonathan; Fischer, Arthur J.; Allerman, Andrew A.

    2017-03-14

    A vertical III-nitride thin-film power diode can hold off high voltages (kV's) when operated under reverse bias. The III-nitride device layers can be grown on a wider bandgap template layer and growth substrate, which can be removed by laser lift-off of the epitaxial device layers grown thereon.

  19. Vertical III-nitride thin-film power diode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wierer, Jr., Jonathan; Fischer, Arthur J.; Allerman, Andrew A.

    2017-03-14

    A vertical III-nitride thin-film power diode can hold off high voltages (kV's) when operated under reverse bias. The III-nitride device layers can be grown on a wider bandgap template layer and growth substrate, which can be removed by laser lift-off of the epitaxial device layers grown thereon.

  20. Isotope engineering of van der Waals interactions in hexagonal boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuong, T. Q. P.; Liu, S.; van der Lee, A.; Cuscó, R.; Artús, L.; Michel, T.; Valvin, P.; Edgar, J. H.; Cassabois, G.; Gil, B.

    2018-02-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride is a model lamellar compound where weak, non-local van der Waals interactions ensure the vertical stacking of two-dimensional honeycomb lattices made of strongly bound boron and nitrogen atoms. We study the isotope engineering of lamellar compounds by synthesizing hexagonal boron nitride crystals with nearly pure boron isotopes (10B and 11B) compared to those with the natural distribution of boron (20 at% 10B and 80 at% 11B). On the one hand, as with standard semiconductors, both the phonon energy and electronic bandgap varied with the boron isotope mass, the latter due to the quantum effect of zero-point renormalization. On the other hand, temperature-dependent experiments focusing on the shear and breathing motions of adjacent layers revealed the specificity of isotope engineering in a layered material, with a modification of the van der Waals interactions upon isotope purification. The electron density distribution is more diffuse between adjacent layers in 10BN than in 11BN crystals. Our results open perspectives in understanding and controlling van der Waals bonding in layered materials.

  1. Folate Functionalized Boron Nitride Nanotubes and their Selective Uptake by Glioblastoma Multiforme Cells: Implications for their Use as Boron Carriers in Clinical Boron Neutron Capture Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciofani, Gianni; Raffa, Vittoria; Menciassi, Arianna; Cuschieri, Alfred

    2008-11-25

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is increasingly being used in the treatment of several aggressive cancers, including cerebral glioblastoma multiforme. The main requirement for this therapy is selective targeting of tumor cells by sufficient quantities of (10)B atoms required for their capture/irradiation with low-energy thermal neutrons. The low content of boron targeting species in glioblastoma multiforme accounts for the difficulty in selective targeting of this very malignant cerebral tumor by this radiation modality. In the present study, we have used for the first time boron nitride nanotubes as carriers of boron atoms to overcome this problem and enhance the selective targeting and ablative efficacy of BNCT for these tumors. Following their dispersion in aqueous solution by noncovalent coating with biocompatible poly-l-lysine solutions, boron nitride nanotubes were functionalized with a fluorescent probe (quantum dots) to enable their tracking and with folic acid as selective tumor targeting ligand. Initial in vitro studies have confirmed substantive and selective uptake of these nanovectors by glioblastoma multiforme cells, an observation which confirms their potential clinical application for BNCT therapy for these malignant cerebral tumors.

  2. Folate Functionalized Boron Nitride Nanotubes and their Selective Uptake by Glioblastoma Multiforme Cells: Implications for their Use as Boron Carriers in Clinical Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciofani Gianni

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT is increasingly being used in the treatment of several aggressive cancers, including cerebral glioblastoma multiforme. The main requirement for this therapy is selective targeting of tumor cells by sufficient quantities of10B atoms required for their capture/irradiation with low-energy thermal neutrons. The low content of boron targeting species in glioblastoma multiforme accounts for the difficulty in selective targeting of this very malignant cerebral tumor by this radiation modality. In the present study, we have used for the first time boron nitride nanotubes as carriers of boron atoms to overcome this problem and enhance the selective targeting and ablative efficacy of BNCT for these tumors. Following their dispersion in aqueous solution by noncovalent coating with biocompatible poly-l-lysine solutions, boron nitride nanotubes were functionalized with a fluorescent probe (quantum dots to enable their tracking and with folic acid as selective tumor targeting ligand. Initial in vitro studies have confirmed substantive and selective uptake of these nanovectors by glioblastoma multiforme cells, an observation which confirms their potential clinical application for BNCT therapy for these malignant cerebral tumors.

  3. High Kinetic Energy Penetrator Shielding and High Wear Resistance Materials Fabricated with Boron Nitride Nanotubes (BNNTS) and BNNT Polymer Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jin Ho (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Sauti, Godfrey (Inventor); Smith, Michael W. (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin C. (Inventor); Lowther, Sharon E. (Inventor); Bryant, Robert George (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs), boron nitride nanoparticles (BNNPs), carbon nanotubes (CNTs), graphites, or combinations, are incorporated into matrices of polymer, ceramic or metals. Fibers, yarns, and woven or nonwoven mats of BNNTs are used as toughening layers in penetration resistant materials to maximize energy absorption and/or high hardness layers to rebound or deform penetrators. They can be also used as reinforcing inclusions combining with other polymer matrices to create composite layers like typical reinforcing fibers such as Kevlar.RTM., Spectra.RTM., ceramics and metals. Enhanced wear resistance and usage time are achieved by adding boron nitride nanomaterials, increasing hardness and toughness. Such materials can be used in high temperature environments since the oxidation temperature of BNNTs exceeds 800.degree. C. in air. Boron nitride based composites are useful as strong structural materials for anti-micrometeorite layers for spacecraft and space suits, ultra strong tethers, protective gear, vehicles, helmets, shields and safety suits/helmets for industry.

  4. Evaluation of Synthesis & Processing Routes for the High K Boron Nitride Nano Tubes (BNNTS) for Thermal Management Applications, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The purpose of this proposal is to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of processing the High Thermal Conductivity Boron Nitride Nano Tubes (High-K BNNTs) that...

  5. Aluminum nitride and nanodiamond thin film microstructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoebber, Fabian; Bludau, Oliver; Roehlig, Claus-Christian; Williams, Oliver; Sah, Ram Ekwal; Kirste, Lutz; Cimalla, Volker; Lebedev, Vadim; Nebel, Christoph; Ambacher, Oliver [Fraunhofer-Institute for Applied Solid State Physics, Freiburg (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    In this work, aluminum nitride (AlN) and nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) thin film microstructures have been developed. Freestanding NCD membranes were coated with a piezoelectrical AlN layer in order to build tunable micro-lens arrays. For the evaluation of the single material quality, AlN and NCD thin films on silicon substrates were fabricated using RF magnetron sputtering and microwave chemical vapor deposition techniques, respectively. The crystal quality of AlN was investigated by X-ray diffraction. The piezoelectric constant d{sub 33} was determined by scanning laser vibrometry. The NCD thin films were optimized with respect to surface roughness, mechanical stability, intrinsic stress and transparency. To determine the mechanical properties of the materials, both, micromechanical resonator and membrane structures were fabricated and measured by magnetomotive resonant frequency spectroscopy and bulging experiments, respectively. Finally, the behavior of AlN/NCD heterostructures was modeled using the finite element method and the first structures were characterized by piezoelectrical measurements.

  6. Experimental studies of hydrogen on boron nitride: II. NMR studies of orientational ordering of H2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, M.D.; Sullivan, N.S.

    1995-01-01

    The authors report the results of NMR studies of thin films of hydrogen adsorbed on hexagonal boron nitride. Orientational ordering is observed below 1 K but the ordering is not complete, and a clear two-component ordering is observed. Molecules are either (i) almost completely ordered with local order parameters σ=left-angle 1-3/2Jz 2 right-angle clustered close to a maximum value of σ congruent 0.94 (comparable to the values for long range ordering in bulk samples at high ortho concentrations), and (ii) a large fraction of the molecules that remain nearly disordered with σ≤0.25. The degree of orientational ordering depends on the number of hydrogen layers and on the ortho-hydrogen concentration, and these studies indicate that ordering occurs principally in the first four layers closest to the substrate, with weaker orientational ordering in the outer layers near the free surface even at temperatures as low as 210 mK

  7. Elastic and Piezoelectric Properties of Boron Nitride Nanotube Composites. Part II; Finite Element Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H. Alicia; Hardie, Robert; Yamakov, Vesselin; Park, Cheol

    2015-01-01

    This paper is the second part of a two-part series where the first part presents a molecular dynamics model of a single Boron Nitride Nanotube (BNNT) and this paper scales up to multiple BNNTs in a polymer matrix. This paper presents finite element (FE) models to investigate the effective elastic and piezoelectric properties of (BNNT) nanocomposites. The nanocomposites studied in this paper are thin films of polymer matrix with aligned co-planar BNNTs. The FE modelling approach provides a computationally efficient way to gain an understanding of the material properties. We examine several FE models to identify the most suitable models and investigate the effective properties with respect to the BNNT volume fraction and the number of nanotube walls. The FE models are constructed to represent aligned and randomly distributed BNNTs in a matrix of resin using 2D and 3D hollow and 3D filled cylinders. The homogenisation approach is employed to determine the overall elastic and piezoelectric constants for a range of volume fractions. These models are compared with an analytical model based on Mori-Tanaka formulation suitable for finite length cylindrical inclusions. The model applies to primarily single-wall BNNTs but is also extended to multi-wall BNNTs, for which preliminary results will be presented. Results from the Part 1 of this series can help to establish a constitutive relationship for input into the finite element model to enable the modeling of multiple BNNTs in a polymer matrix.

  8. Toward achieving flexible and high sensitivity hexagonal boron nitride neutron detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, A.; Grenadier, S. J.; Li, J.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X.

    2017-07-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) detectors have demonstrated the highest thermal neutron detection efficiency to date among solid-state neutron detectors at about 51%. We report here the realization of h-BN neutron detectors possessing one order of magnitude enhancement in the detection area but maintaining an equal level of detection efficiency of previous achievement. These 3 mm × 3 mm detectors were fabricated from 50 μm thick freestanding and flexible 10B enriched h-BN (h-10BN) films, grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition followed by mechanical separation from sapphire substrates. Mobility-lifetime results suggested that holes are the majority carriers in unintentionally doped h-BN. The detectors were tested under thermal neutron irradiation from californium-252 (252Cf) moderated by a high density polyethylene moderator. A thermal neutron detection efficiency of ˜53% was achieved at a bias voltage of 200 V. Conforming to traditional solid-state detectors, the realization of h-BN epilayers with enhanced electrical transport properties is the key to enable scaling up the device sizes. More specifically, the present results revealed that achieving an electrical resistivity of greater than 1014 Ωṡcm and a leakage current density of below 3 × 10-10 A/cm2 is needed to fabricate large area h-BN detectors and provided guidance for achieving high sensitivity solid state neutron detectors based on h-BN.

  9. Mechanical behavior enhancement of defective graphene sheet employing boron nitride coating via atomistic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setoodeh, A. R.; Badjian, H.

    2017-12-01

    The most stable form of boron nitride polymorph naming hexagonal boron nitride sheet has recently been widely concerned like graphite due to its interesting features such as electrical insulation and high thermal conductivity. In this study, the molecular dynamic simulations are implemented to investigate the mechanical properties of single-layer graphene sheets under tensile and compressive loadings in the absence and presence of boron–nitride coating layers. In this introduced hybrid nanostructure, the benefit of combining both individual interesting features of graphene and boron–nitride sheets such as exceptional mechanical and electrical properties can be simultaneously achieved for future potential application in nano devices. The influences of chiral indices, boundary conditions and presence of mono-atomic vacancy defects as well as coating dimension on the mechanical behavior of the resulted hybrid structure are reported. The interatomic forces between the atoms are modeled by employing the AIREBO and Tersoff–Brenner potentials for carbon–carbon and boron–nitrogen atoms in each layer, respectively. Furthermore, the van der Waal interlayer forces of carbon–boron and carbon–nitrogen are estimated by the Lennard–Jones potential field. Besides the potential improvement in electrical and physical properties of the nanostructure, it is demonstrated that the buckling load capacity of the fully coated graphene sheet with 3% concentration of mono-atomic vacancy defects noticeably enhances by amounts of 24.1%.

  10. Piezoelectric actuated micro-resonators based on the growth of diamond on aluminum nitride thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hees, J; Heidrich, N; Pletschen, W; Sah, R E; Wolfer, M; Williams, O A; Lebedev, V; Nebel, C E; Ambacher, O

    2013-01-18

    Unimorph heterostructures based on piezoelectric aluminum nitride (AlN) and diamond thin films are highly desirable for applications in micro- and nanoelectromechanical systems. In this paper, we present a new approach to combine thin conductive boron-doped as well as insulating nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) with sputtered AlN films without the need for any buffer layers between AlN and NCD or polishing steps. The zeta potentials of differently treated nanodiamond (ND) particles in aqueous colloids are adjusted to the zeta potential of AlN in water. Thereby, the nucleation density for the initial growth of diamond on AlN can be varied from very low (10(8) cm(-2)), in the case of hydrogen-treated ND seeding particles, to very high values of 10(11) cm(-2) for oxidized ND particles. Our approach yielding high nucleation densities allows the growth of very thin NCD films on AlN with thicknesses as low as 40 nm for applications such as microelectromechanical beam resonators. Fabricated piezo-actuated micro-resonators exhibit enhanced mechanical properties due to the incorporation of boron-doped NCD films. Highly boron-doped NCD thin films which replace the metal top electrode offer Young's moduli of more than 1000 GPa.

  11. Aluminum nitride insulating films for MOSFET devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewicki, G. W.; Maserjian, J.

    1972-01-01

    Application of aluminum nitrides as electrical insulator for electric capacitors is discussed. Electrical properties of aluminum nitrides are analyzed and specific use with field effect transistors is defined. Operational limits of field effect transistors are developed.

  12. The effect of the boron source composition ratio on the adsorption performance of hexagonal boron nitride without a template

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ning, E-mail: zhangning5832@163.com; Zhang, Tong; Kan, Hongmin; Wang, Xiaoyang; Long, Haibo; Cui, Xingyu

    2015-08-01

    An inexpensive boric acid (H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}) and borax (Na{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}·10H{sub 2}O) mix was used as a source of boron with different composition ratios, and urea was used as a nitrogen source, in flowing ammonia atmosphere, for the preparation of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) with different micro-morphologies. Under a certain synthesis process, the effects of the molar ratio of borax and boric acid (or simply the boron source composition ratio for short) on the phase composition of the sample were studied; the work also explored the effect of boron source composition ratio on the micro-morphology, adsorption desorption isotherm and specific surface area of the h-BN powder. The main purpose of this work was to determine the optimum composition ratio of preparing spherical mesoporous h-BN and ensure that the micro-mechanism underpinning the formation of spherical mesoporous h-BN was understood. The results showed that at the optimum boron source composition ratio of 1:1, globular mesoporous spheres with a diameter of approximately 600–800 nm could be obtained with the highest pore volume and specific surface area (230.2 m{sup 2}/g). - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Spherical h-BN was synthesized by controlling the boron source composition ratio. • Without extra spherical template, solid Na{sub 2}O was equal to a spherical template. • At boron source composition ratio of 1:1, h-BN had best adsorption performance.

  13. A system to deposit boron films (boronization) in the DIII-D tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodapp, T.R.; Jackson, G.L.; Phillips, J.; Holtrop, K.L.; Petersen, P.I.; Winter, J.

    1991-09-01

    A system has been added to the D3-D tokamak to coat its plasma facing surfaces with a film of boron using diborane gas. The system includes special health and safety equipment for handling the diborane gas which is toxic and inflammable. The purpose of the boron film is to reduce the levels of impurity atoms in the D3-D plasmas. Experiments following the application of the boron film in D3-D have led to significant reductions in plasma impurity levels and the observation of a new, very high confinement regime. 9 refs., 1 fig

  14. Acetylene chain reaction on hydrogenated boron nitride monolayers: a density functional theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce-Pérez, R; Cocoletzi, Gregorio H; Takeuchi, Noboru

    2017-11-28

    Spin-polarized first-principles total-energy calculations have been performed to investigate the possible chain reaction of acetylene molecules mediated by hydrogen abstraction on hydrogenated hexagonal boron nitride monolayers. Calculations have been done within the periodic density functional theory (DFT), employing the PBE exchange correlation potential, with van der Waals corrections (vdW-DF). Reactions at two different sites have been considered: hydrogen vacancies on top of boron and on top of nitrogen atoms. As previously calculated, at the intermediate state of the reaction, when the acetylene molecule is attached to the surface, the adsorption energy is of the order of -0.82 eV and -0.20 eV (measured with respect to the energy of the non interacting molecule-substrate system) for adsorption on top of boron and nitrogen atoms, respectively. After the hydrogen abstraction takes place, the system gains additional energy, resulting in adsorption energies of -1.52 eV and -1.30 eV, respectively. These results suggest that the chain reaction is energetically favorable. The calculated minimum energy path (MEP) for hydrogen abstraction shows very small energy barriers of the order of 5 meV and 22 meV for the reaction on top of boron and nitrogen atoms, respectively. Finally, the density of states (DOS) evolution study helps to understand the chain reaction mechanism. Graphical abstract Acetylene chain reaction on hydrogenated boron nitride monolayers.

  15. Magnetism of single-vacancy defects in graphene and boron-nitride nanoflakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Sabido, Silvia; Ramos, Carlos; Cifuentes-Quintal, Eduardo; de Coss, Romeo

    2012-02-01

    In this work we have used the hexagonal zigzag graphene and boron-nitride nanoflakes as a simple systems for studying the new class of magnetic materials obtained by structural vacancies in nonmagnetic s-p nanostructures. We have shown that for these systems, it is possible to predict the total spin moment from a electron counting analysis. Employing DFT calculations based on the LCAO approximation and the Fixed Spin Moment method, we have determinate the ground state spin multiplicity and the spin magnetic distribution for these structures. We have found that the ground state multiplicity of graphene nanoflakes is triplet, corresponding to a spin magnetic moment of M=2μβ. Analyzing the spin orbital distribution we have determinate that the spin-polarized for the graphene nanoflakes is equally distributed in the sp^2 and pz orbitals. For the boron-nitride nanoflakes we have obtained a quartet state (M=3μβ) in the case of a boron vacancy, and a doublet state (M=1μβ) for a nitrogen vacancy. We have found that for the boron-vacancy the spin-polarized is mainly localized on the sp^2 orbitals of nitrogen atoms. In contrast, for the nitrogen-vacancy the spin-polarized is concentrated at the pz orbitals of boron atoms.

  16. Large scale graphene/hexagonal boron nitride heterostructure for tunable plasmonics

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Kai

    2013-09-01

    Vertical integration of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) and graphene for the fabrication of vertical field-effect transistors or tunneling diodes has stimulated intense interest recently due to the enhanced performance offered by combining an ultrathin dielectric with a semi-metallic system. Wafer scale fabrication and processing of these heterostructures is needed to make large scale integrated circuitry. In this work, by using remote discharged, radio-frequency plasma chemical vapor deposition, wafer scale, high quality few layer h-BN films are successfully grown. By using few layer h-BN films as top gate dielectric material, the plasmon energy of graphene can be tuned by electrostatic doping. An array of graphene/h-BN vertically stacked micrometer-sized disks is fabricated by lithography and transfer techniques, and infrared spectroscopy is used to observe the modes of tunable graphene plasmonic absorption as a function of the repeating (G/h-BN)n units in the vertical stack. Interestingly, the plasmonic resonances can be tuned to higher frequencies with increasing layer thickness of the disks, showing that such vertical stacking provides a viable strategy to provide wide window tuning of the plasmons beyond the limitation of the monolayer. An array of graphene/h-BN vertically stacked micrometer-sized disks is fabricated by lithography and transfer techniques, and infrared spectroscopy is used to observe the modes of tunable graphene plasmonic absorption as a function of the repeating (G/h-BN)n units in the vertical stack. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Large-area few-layer hexagonal boron nitride prepared by quadrupole field aided exfoliation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lun Lu, Han; Zhi Rong, Min; Qiu Zhang, Ming

    2018-03-01

    A quadrupole electric field-mediated exfoliation method is proposed to convert micron-sized hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) powder into few-layer hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets (h-BNNS). Under optimum conditions (400 Hz, 40 V, 32 μg ml‑1, sodium deoxycholate, TAE medium), the h-BN powders (thickness >200 nm, horizontal scale ∼10 μm) are successfully exfoliated into 0.5–4 nm (1–10 layers) thick h-BNNS with the same horizontal scale. Dynamic laser scattering and atomic force microscope data show that the yield is 47.6% (for the portion with the thickness of 0.5–6 nm), and all of the vertical sizes are reduced to smaller than 18 nm (45 layers).

  18. Theoretical investigation of the electronic structures and carrier transport of hybrid graphene and boron nitride nanostructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Tao Sun

    2012-09-01

    graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (C-BN nanostructures receive much research interest due to the complementary electronic properties. Graphene is a zero-gap semiconductor, while hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN is a wide gap semiconductor. Here we studied the electronic structures and carrier transport of hybrid C-BN nanostructures by using first principles calculations and deformation potential theory. We have found that the physical quantities in these systems under study, band gap, effective mass, deformation potential, and carrier mobility, can be categorised into three different families depending on the width of graphene nanoribbon. This family behavior is similar to pristine armchair graphene nanoribbon, but with slight difference from the individual component. New opportunities of designing nanoelectric devices are discussed by utilizing the quantum confinement effect based on such kind of hybrid nanostructures.

  19. The mechanical design of hybrid graphene/boron nitride nanotransistors: Geometry and interface effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einalipour Eshkalak, Kasra; Sadeghzadeh, Sadegh; Jalaly, Maisam

    2018-02-01

    From electronic point of view, graphene resembles a metal or semi-metal and boron nitride is a dielectric material (band gap = 5.9 eV). Hybridization of these two materials opens band gap of the graphene which has expansive applications in field-effect graphene transistors. In this paper, the effect of the interface structure on the mechanical properties of a hybrid graphene/boron nitride was studied. Young's modulus, fracture strain and tensile strength of the models were simulated. Three likely types (hexagonal, octagonal and decagonal) were found for the interface of hybrid sheet after relaxation. Although Csbnd B bonds at the interface were indicated to result in more promising electrical properties, nitrogen atoms are better choice for bonding to carbon for mechanical applications.

  20. Biophysical response of living cells to boron nitride nanoparticles: uptake mechanism and bio-mechanical characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasel, Md. Alim Iftekhar; Li, Tong; Nguyen, Trung Dung; Singh, Sanjleena [Queensland University of Technology (QUT), School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering (Australia); Zhou, Yinghong; Xiao, Yin [Queensland University of Technology (QUT), Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation (Australia); Gu, YuanTong, E-mail: yuantong.gu@qut.edu.au [Queensland University of Technology (QUT), School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering (Australia)

    2015-11-15

    Boron nitride nanomaterials have attracted significant interest due to their superior chemical and physical properties. Despite these novel properties, investigation on the interaction between boron nitride nanoparticle (BN NP) and living systems has been limited. In this study, BN NP (100–250 nm) is assessed as a promising biomaterial for medical applications. The toxicity of BN NP is evaluated by assessing the cells behaviours both biologically (MTT assay, ROS detection etc.) and physically (atomic force microscopy). The uptake mechanism of BN NP is studied by analysing the alternations in cellular morphology based on cell imaging techniques. The results demonstrate in vitro cytocompatibility of BN NP with immense potential for use as an effective nanoparticle for various bio-medical applications.

  1. Chemical reaction of hexagonal boron nitride and graphite nanoclusters in mechanical milling systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muramatsu, Y.; Grush, M.; Callcott, T.A. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Synthesis of boron-carbon-nitride (BCN) hybrid alloys has been attempted extensively by many researchers because the BCN alloys are considered an extremely hard material called {open_quotes}super diamond,{close_quotes} and the industrial application for wear-resistant materials is promising. A mechanical alloying (MA) method of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) with graphite has recently been studied to explore the industrial synthesis of the BCN alloys. To develop the MA method for the BCN alloy synthesis, it is necessary to confirm the chemical reaction processes in the mechanical milling systems and to identify the reaction products. Therefore, the authors have attempted to confirm the chemical reaction process of the h-BN and graphite in mechanical milling systems using x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) methods.

  2. Thermal transport in boron nitride nanotorus—towards a nanoscopic thermal shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loh, G. C.; Baillargeat, D.

    2013-01-01

    Nanotori, or nanorings, are topological variants of nanotubes and are conceived to have different properties from their tubular form. In this study, the toroidal arrangement of boron nitride is introduced. Using classical molecular dynamics simulations, the thermal behaviour (thermal conductivity and thermal stability) of the boron nitride nanotorus and its relationship with the structural characteristics are investigated. Its circumferential thermal rectification strength displays a linear dependence on the bending coefficient of the nanostructure. Surface kinks are relatively inconsequential on its circumferential mode of conduction, as compared to its axial sense. The circumferential conductivity in the diffusive regime is calculated to be approximately 10 W/m K, while the axial conductivity is more than tenfold of this value. All nanotori with different toroidal characters show excellent thermal stability at extremely high temperatures approaching 3400 K. With consideration to its favourable properties, a thermal shield made up of a parallel row of nanotori is proposed as a nanoscale thermal insulation device

  3. Chemical reaction of hexagonal boron nitride and graphite nanoclusters in mechanical milling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muramatsu, Y.; Grush, M.; Callcott, T.A.

    1997-01-01

    Synthesis of boron-carbon-nitride (BCN) hybrid alloys has been attempted extensively by many researchers because the BCN alloys are considered an extremely hard material called open-quotes super diamond,close quotes and the industrial application for wear-resistant materials is promising. A mechanical alloying (MA) method of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) with graphite has recently been studied to explore the industrial synthesis of the BCN alloys. To develop the MA method for the BCN alloy synthesis, it is necessary to confirm the chemical reaction processes in the mechanical milling systems and to identify the reaction products. Therefore, the authors have attempted to confirm the chemical reaction process of the h-BN and graphite in mechanical milling systems using x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) methods

  4. Synthesis of boron nitride nanotubes with SiC nanowire as template

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, B.; Song, L.; Huang, X.X.; Wen, G.W.; Xia, L.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) have been fabricated using SiC nanowires as template. → SiC nanowires could be effectively etched out by the vapors decomposed from ammonia borane, leading to the formation of BNNTs. → A template self-sacrificing mechanism is responsible for the formation of BNNTs. -- Abstract: A novel template method for the preparation of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) using SiC nanowire as template and ammonia borane as precursor is reported. We find out that the SiC nanowires could be effectively etched out by the vapors decomposed from ammonia borane, leading to the formation of BNNTs. The as-prepared products are well characterized by means of complementary analytical techniques. A possible formation mechanism is disclosed. The method developed here paves the way for large scale production of BNNTs.

  5. Strain-engineered graphene grown on hexagonal boron nitride by molecular beam epitaxy

    OpenAIRE

    Summerfield, Alex; Davies, Andrew; Cheng, Tin S.; Korolkov, Vladimir V.; Cho, YongJin; Mellor, Christopher J.; Foxon, C. Thomas; Khlobystov, Andrei N.; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Eaves, Laurence; Novikov, Sergei V.; Beton, Peter H.

    2016-01-01

    Graphene grown by high temperature molecular beam epitaxy on hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) forms continuous domains with dimensions of order 20??m, and exhibits moir? patterns with large periodicities, up to ~30?nm, indicating that the layers are highly strained. Topological defects in the moir? patterns are observed and attributed to the relaxation of graphene islands which nucleate at different sites and subsequently coalesce. In addition, cracks are formed leading to strain relaxation, hig...

  6. Water-dispersed thermo-responsive boron nitride nanotubes: synthesis and properties

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kalay, S.; Stetsyshyn, Y.; Lobaz, Volodymyr; Harhay, K.; Ohar, H.; Ҫulha, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 3 (2016), 035703_1-035703_8 ISSN 0957-4484 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-08336S; GA MPO(CZ) FR-TI4/625 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : boron nitride nanotubes * thermo-responsive polymer brushes * poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.440, year: 2016

  7. Interlayer coupling enhancement in graphene/hexagonal boron nitride heterostructures by intercalated defects and vacancies

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Sohee; Park, Changwon; Kim, Gunn

    2014-01-01

    Among two-dimensional atomic crystals, hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) is one of the most remarkable materials to fabricate heterostructures revealing unusual properties. We perform first-principles calculations to determine whether intercalated metal atoms and vacancies can mediate interfacial coupling and influence the structural and electronic properties of the graphene/hBN heterostructure. Metal impurity atoms (Li, K, Cr, Mn, Co, and Cu) as extrinsic defects between the graphene and hBN she...

  8. Coating of titanium implants with boron nitride by RF-magnetron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Coating of titanium implants with boron nitride by RF-magnetron sputtering. CEREN GÖKMENO ˘GLU1,∗, NURDAN ÖZMERIÇ2, GAYE ÇAKAL3, NIHAN DÖKMETAS4,. CANSU ERGENE4 and BILGIN KAFTANO ˘GLU4. 1Department of Periodontology, Faculty of Dentistry, Ordu University, Güzelyalı Bulvarı 52100, Ordu, ...

  9. Potential of P-doped carbon nanocone and Si-doped boron nitride ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    22

    Si-doped boron nitride nanocone (BNNC) by density functional theory were investigated. The adsorption energies of P and Si on surfaces of CNC and BNNC were -293.1 and -325.7 kcal/mol, respectively. The decomposition of CNC-P-N2O and BNNC-Si-N2O and reduction of CNC-P-. O* and BNNC-Si-O* by CO molecule ...

  10. Synthesis of Few-Layer, Large Area Hexagonal-Boron Nitride by Pulsed Laser Deposition (POSTPRINT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    electrons, and minimal sites for adsorbed surface impurities [7]. The use of exfoliated h BN as a substrate dielectric material in graphene devices has...by annealing at 1000 °C [16]. This also includes recent reports on the direct CVD growth of h BN on the surface of epitaxial graphene with an ammonia...AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2015-0050 SYNTHESIS OF FEW-LAYER, LARGE AREA HEXAGONAL-BORON NITRIDE BY PULSED LASER DEPOSITION (POSTPRINT) Nicholas R Glavin

  11. Cu and Boron Doped Carbon Nitride for Highly Selective Oxidation of Toluene to Benzaldehyde

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongling Han

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A novel Cu and boron doped graphitic carbon nitride catalyst (Cu-CNB was synthesized using cheap precursors and systematically characterized. The selective oxidation of toluene proceeded very smoothly over the catalyst at 70 °C using tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP as the oxidant to exclusively afford benzaldehyde. The catalyst can be used for at least five cycles without decrease in activity and selectivity.

  12. The influence of metal Mg on micro-morphology and crystallinity of spherical hexagonal boron nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ning, E-mail: zhangning5832@163.com; Liu, Huan; Kan, Hongmin; Wang, Xiaoyang; Long, Haibo; Zhou, Yonghui

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • The action mechanism of Mg to the synthesis of spherical BN was explored. • The influence of Mg content on the crystallinity of h-BN powders was studied. • Even if not added any template, the spherical h-BN could be prepared. - Abstract: This search used the boric acid and borax as a source of boron, urea as a nitrogen source, Mg as metal catalyst, and thus prepared different micro-morphology and crystallinity hexagonal boron nitride powders under a flowing ammonia atmosphere at a nitriding temperature of 750 °C. The effect of Mg content on the crystallinity and micro-morphology of hexagonal boron nitride powders was studied, and the Mg action mechanism was explored. Without the added surfactant, the graphitization index (GI) was 6.87, and the diameter of the spherical h-BN was bigger. When the added Mg were 0.1 g, 0.3 g, 0.5 g and 0.7 g, the (GI) decreased to 6.04, 5.67, 4.62 and 4.84, respectively. When the Mg content was higher (0.9 g), GI value increased rapidly, and the crystallinity became bad. When the Mg content was 0.5 g, the dispersion of h-BN powders was at its optimum and refinement apparently, and the crystallinity at its highest.

  13. Thermal conductivity enhancement of paraffin by adding boron nitride nanostructures: A molecular dynamics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Changpeng; Rao, Zhonghao

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Different contributions to thermal conductivity are obtained. • Thermal conductivity of paraffin could be improved by boron nitride. • Crystallization effect from boron nitride was the key factor. • Paraffin nanocomposite is the desirable candidate for thermal energy storage. - Abstract: While paraffin is widely used in thermal energy storage today, its low thermal conductivity has become a bottleneck for the further applications. Here, we construct two kinds of paraffin-based phase change material nanocomposites through introducing boron nitride (BN) nanostructures into n-eicosane to enhance the thermal conductivity. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was adopted to estimate their thermal conductivities and related thermal properties. The results indicate that, after adding BN nanostructures, the latent heat of composites is reduced compared with the pure paraffin and they both show a glass-like thermal conductivity which increases as the temperature rises. This happens because the increasing temperature leads to gradually smaller inconsistency in vibrational density of state along three directions and increasingly significant overlaps among them. Furthermore, by decomposing the thermal conductivity, it is found that the major contribution to the overall thermal conductivity comes from BN nanostructures, while the contribution of n-eicosane is insignificant. Though the thermal conductivity from n-eicosane term is small, it has been improved greatly compared with amorphous state of n-eicosane, mainly due to the crystallization effects from BN nanostructures. This work will provide microscopic views and insights into the thermal mechanism of paraffin and offer effective guidances to enhance the thermal conductivity.

  14. The mechanism for low temperature growth of vertically aligned boron nitride nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiesheng; Xie, Ming; Khin Yap, Yoke

    2006-03-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) are well recognized as the candidate that will complement the uses of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in nanotechnology. However, high growth temperatures (>1100 ^oC), low production yield, and impurities have prevented effective synthesis and applications of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) in the past ten years. For the first time, we have succeeded on the growth of pure BNNTs on substrates [1, 2]. This has been realized based on our experiences of growing CNTs and boron nitride (BN) phases (cubic phase BN, hexagonal phase BN). According to our hypothetical model, energetic growth species play an important role on controlling the phases of BN solids. We have experimentally verified that BNNTs can be grown by energetic growth species by a plasma-enhanced pulsed laser deposition (PEPLD) technique. These BNNTs can be grown vertically aligned into arrays of regular patterns at 600 ^oC, and can be used for applications without purification. The growth mechanism of thee BNNTs will be discussed. [1]. Yap et al., Bull APS Vol 50, 1346-1347 (March 2005). [2]. Wang et al., nano Letters (2005) ASAP, DOI: 10.1021/nl051859n.

  15. Evolution of magnetism by rolling up hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets tailored with superparamagnetic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Da Young; Choi, Kyoung Hwan; Park, Jeong Eon; Suh, Dong Hack

    2017-02-01

    Controlling tunable properties by rolling up two dimensional nanomaterials is an exciting avenue for tailoring the electronic and magnetic properties of materials at the nanoscale. We demonstrate the tailoring of a magnetic nanocomposite through hybridization with magnetic nanomaterials using hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) templates as an effective way to evolve magnetism for the first time. Boron nitride nanosheets exhibited their typical diamagnetism, but rolled-up boron nitride sheets (called nanoscrolls) clearly have para-magnetism in the case of magnetic susceptibility. Additionally, the Fe 3 O 4 NP sample shows a maximum ZFC curve at about 103 K, which indicates well dispersed superparamagnetic nanoparticles. The ZFC curve for the h-BN-Fe 3 O 4 NP scrolls exhibited an apparent rounded maximum blocking temperature at 192 K compared to the Fe 3 O 4 NPs, leading to a dramatic increase in T B . These magnetic nanoscroll derivatives are remarkable materials and should be suitable for high-performance composites and nano-, medical- and electromechanical-devices.

  16. Defect mediated van der Waals epitaxy of hexagonal boron nitride on graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilmann, M.; Bashouti, M.; Riechert, H.; Lopes, J. M. J.

    2018-04-01

    Van der Waals heterostructures comprising of hexagonal boron nitride and graphene are promising building blocks for novel two-dimensional devices such as atomically thin transistors or capacitors. However, demonstrators of those devices have been so far mostly fabricated by mechanical assembly, a non-scalable and time-consuming method, where transfer processes can contaminate the surfaces. Here, we investigate a direct growth process for the fabrication of insulating hexagonal boron nitride on high quality epitaxial graphene using plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Samples were grown at varying temperatures and times and studied using atomic force microscopy, revealing a growth process limited by desorption at high temperatures. Nucleation was mostly commencing from morphological defects in epitaxial graphene, such as step edges or wrinkles. Raman spectroscopy combined with x-ray photoelectron measurements confirm the formation of hexagonal boron nitride and prove the resilience of graphene against the nitrogen plasma used during the growth process. The electrical properties and defects in the heterostructures were studied with high lateral resolution by tunneling current and Kelvin probe force measurements. This correlated approach revealed a nucleation apart from morphological defects in epitaxial graphene, which is mediated by point defects. The presented results help understanding the nucleation and growth behavior during van der Waals epitaxy of 2D materials, and point out a route for a scalable production of van der Waals heterostructures.

  17. Ni foam assisted synthesis of high quality hexagonal boron nitride with large domain size and controllable thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Hao; Li, Xiuting; Li, Deshuai; Huang, Mingqiang; Wan, Wen; Yao, Qian; Chen, Xiangping; Wang, Zhiwei; Wu, Yanqing; Wang, Le; Chen, Shanshan

    2018-04-01

    The scalable synthesis of two-dimensional (2D) hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is of great interest for its numerous applications in novel electronic devices. Highly-crystalline h-BN films, with single-crystal sizes up to hundreds of microns, are demonstrated via a novel Ni foam assisted technique reported here for the first time. The nucleation density of h-BN domains can be significantly reduced due to the high boron solubility, as well as the large specific surface area of the Ni foam. The crystalline structure of the h-BN domains is found to be well aligned with, and therefore strongly dependent upon, the underlying Pt lattice orientation. Growth-time dependent experiments confirm the presence of a surface mediated self-limiting growth mechanism for monolayer h-BN on the Pt substrate. However, utilizing remote catalysis from the Ni foam, bilayer h-BN films can be synthesized breaking the self-limiting effect. This work provides further understanding of the mechanisms involved in the growth of h-BN and proposes a facile synthesis technique that may be applied to further applications in which control over the crystal alignment, and the numbers of layers is crucial.

  18. Stress in and texture of PVD deposited metal nitride films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Machunze, R.

    2010-01-01

    Thin metal nitride films deposited by Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD) are used amongst many other applications as wear protective coatings in tool industry or as diffusion barriers in integrated circuit technology. Typically these films exhibit a residual in-plane stress when deposited onto rigid

  19. A Combination of Boron Nitride Nanotubes and Cellulose Nanofibers for the Preparation of a Nanocomposite with High Thermal Conductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiaoliang; Sun, Jiajia; Yao, Yimin; Sun, Rong; Xu, Jian-Bin; Wong, Ching-Ping

    2017-05-23

    With the current development of modern electronics toward miniaturization, high-degree integration and multifunctionalization, considerable heat is accumulated, which results in the thermal failure or even explosion of modern electronics. The thermal conductivity of materials has thus attracted much attention in modern electronics. Although polymer composites with enhanced thermal conductivity are expected to address this issue, achieving higher thermal conductivity (above 10 W m -1 K -1 ) at filler loadings below 50.0 wt % remains challenging. Here, we report a nanocomposite consisting of boron nitride nanotubes and cellulose nanofibers that exhibits high thermal conductivity (21.39 W m -1 K -1 ) at 25.0 wt % boron nitride nanotubes. Such high thermal conductivity is attributed to the high intrinsic thermal conductivity of boron nitride nanotubes and cellulose nanofibers, the one-dimensional structure of boron nitride nanotubes, and the reduced interfacial thermal resistance due to the strong interaction between the boron nitride nanotubes and cellulose nanofibers. Using the as-prepared nanocomposite as a flexible printed circuit board, we demonstrate its potential usefulness in electronic device-cooling applications. This thermally conductive nanocomposite has promising applications in thermal interface materials, printed circuit boards or organic substrates in electronics and could supplement conventional polymer-based materials.

  20. Elastic properties of boron nitride nanotubes and their comparison with carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santosh, Mogurampelly; Maiti, Prabal K; Sood, A K

    2009-09-01

    Boron Nitride Nanotubes (BNNTs) have alternating boron and nitrogen atoms in graphite like network and are strongly polar in nature due to a large charge on boron and nitrogen atoms. Hence electrostatic interactions are expected to play an important role in determining the elastic properties of BNNTs. In the absence of specific partial atomic charge information for boron and nitrogen, we have studied the elastic properties BNNTs varying the partial atomic charges on boron and nitrogen. We have computed Young modulus (Y) and Shear modulus (G) of BNNT as a function of the tube radius and number of walls using molecular mechanics calculation. Our calculation shows that Young modulus of BNNTs increases with increase in magnitude of the partial atomic charge on B and N and can be larger than the Young modulus of CNTs of same radius. This is in contrast to the earlier finding that CNTs has the largest tensile strength (PRL, 80, 4502, 1998). Shear modulus, on the other hand depends weakly on the magnitude of partial atomic charge and is less than the shear modulus of the CNT The values obtained for Young modulus and Shear modulus are in excellent agreement with the available experimental results.

  1. NMR STUDIES OF Co-BASED NITRIDE AMORPHOUS FILMS

    OpenAIRE

    Le Dang, K.; Veillet, P.; Sakakima, H.; Krishnan, R.

    1988-01-01

    We have carried out at 4 K spin-echo measurements in both single and multilayer (nitride and nonnitride layers) amorphous films of (Co83Nb11Ta2Zr4)1-x N100x. The average Co hyperfine field and the local in-plane anisotropy (K) increase with N (x) content in agreement with magnetization measurements. Annealing leads to a slight increase in K for single layer but a strong decrease for multilayer which remains amorphous contrary to the non-nitride films.

  2. Engineering the interface characteristics on the enhancement of field electron emission properties of vertically aligned hexagonal boron nitride nanowalls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sankaran, K.J.; Hoang, D.Q.; Drijkoningen, S.; Pobedinskas, P.; Haenen, K. [Institute for Materials Research (IMO), Hasselt University, Diepenbeek (Belgium); IMOMEC, IMEC vzw, Diepenbeek (Belgium); Srinivasu, K.; Leou, K.C. [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu (China); Korneychuk, S.; Turner, S.; Verbeeck, J. [Electron Microscopy for Materials Science (EMAT), University of Antwerp (Belgium); Lin, I.N. [Department of Physics, Tamkang University, Tamsui (China)

    2016-10-15

    Utilization of Au and nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) as interlayers noticeably modifies the microstructure and field electron emission (FEE) properties of hexagonal boron nitride nanowalls (hBNNWs) grown on Si substrates. The FEE properties of hBNNWs on Au could be turned on at a low turn-on field of 14.3 V μm{sup -1}, attaining FEE current density of 2.58 mA cm{sup -2} and life-time stability of 105 min. Transmission electron microscopy reveals that the Au-interlayer nucleates the hBN directly, preventing the formation of amorphous boron nitride (aBN) in the interface, resulting in enhanced FEE properties. But Au forms as droplets on the Si substrate forming again aBN at the interface. Conversely, hBNNWs on NCD shows superior in life-time stability of 287 min although it possesses inferior FEE properties in terms of larger turn-on field and lower FEE current density as compared to that of hBNNWs-Au. The uniform and continuous NCD film on Si also circumvents the formation of aBN phases and allows hBN to grow directly on NCD. Incorporation of carbon in hBNNWs from the NCD-interlayer improves the conductivity of hBNNWs, which assists in transporting the electrons efficiently from NCD to hBNNWs that results in better field emission of electrons with high life-time stability. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. Microstructure and spectroscopy studies on cubic boron nitride synthesized under high-pressure conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nistor, L C; Nistor, S V; Dinca, G; Georgeoni, P; Landuyt, J van; Manfredotti, C; Vittone, E

    2002-01-01

    High-resolution electron microscopy (HREM) studies of the microstructure and specific defects in hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) precursors and cubic boron nitride (c-BN) crystals made under high-pressure high-temperature conditions revealed the presence of half-nanotubes at the edges of the h-BN particles. Their sp 3 bonding tendency could strongly influence the nucleation rates of c-BN. The atomic resolution at extended dislocations was insufficient to allow us to determine the stacking fault energy in the c-BN crystals. Its mean value of 191 pm, 15 mJ m -2 is of the same order of magnitude as that of diamond. High-frequency (94 GHz) electron paramagnetic resonance studies on c-BN single crystals have produced new data on the D1 centres associated with the boron species. Ion-beam-induced luminescence measurements have indicated that c-BN is a very interesting luminescent material, which is characterized by four luminescence bands and exhibits a better resistance to ionizing radiation than CVD diamond

  4. Microstructure and spectroscopy studies on cubic boron nitride synthesized under high-pressure conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nistor, L C [National Institute for Materials Physics, Bucharest (Romania); Nistor, S V [National Institute for Materials Physics, Bucharest (Romania); Dinca, G [Dacia Synthetic Diamonds Factory, Bucharest (Romania); Georgeoni, P [Dacia Synthetic Diamonds Factory, Bucharest (Romania); Landuyt, J van [University of Antwerpen - RUCA, EMAT, Antwerpen (Belgium); Manfredotti, C [Experimental Physics Department, University of Turin, Turin (Italy); Vittone, E [Experimental Physics Department, University of Turin, Turin (Italy)

    2002-11-11

    High-resolution electron microscopy (HREM) studies of the microstructure and specific defects in hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) precursors and cubic boron nitride (c-BN) crystals made under high-pressure high-temperature conditions revealed the presence of half-nanotubes at the edges of the h-BN particles. Their sp{sup 3} bonding tendency could strongly influence the nucleation rates of c-BN. The atomic resolution at extended dislocations was insufficient to allow us to determine the stacking fault energy in the c-BN crystals. Its mean value of 191 pm, 15 mJ m{sup -2} is of the same order of magnitude as that of diamond. High-frequency (94 GHz) electron paramagnetic resonance studies on c-BN single crystals have produced new data on the D1 centres associated with the boron species. Ion-beam-induced luminescence measurements have indicated that c-BN is a very interesting luminescent material, which is characterized by four luminescence bands and exhibits a better resistance to ionizing radiation than CVD diamond.

  5. Microstructure and spectroscopy studies on cubic boron nitride synthesized under high-pressure conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Nistor, L C; Dinca, G; Georgeoni, P; Landuyt, J V; Manfredotti, C; Vittone, E

    2002-01-01

    High-resolution electron microscopy (HREM) studies of the microstructure and specific defects in hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) precursors and cubic boron nitride (c-BN) crystals made under high-pressure high-temperature conditions revealed the presence of half-nanotubes at the edges of the h-BN particles. Their sp sup 3 bonding tendency could strongly influence the nucleation rates of c-BN. The atomic resolution at extended dislocations was insufficient to allow us to determine the stacking fault energy in the c-BN crystals. Its mean value of 191 pm, 15 mJ m sup - sup 2 is of the same order of magnitude as that of diamond. High-frequency (94 GHz) electron paramagnetic resonance studies on c-BN single crystals have produced new data on the D1 centres associated with the boron species. Ion-beam-induced luminescence measurements have indicated that c-BN is a very interesting luminescent material, which is characterized by four luminescence bands and exhibits a better resistance to ionizing radiation than CVD di...

  6. Density functional study of manganese atom adsorption on hydrogen-terminated armchair boron nitride nanoribbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdullahi, Yusuf Zuntu; Rahman, Md. Mahmudur; Shuaibu, Alhassan; Abubakar, Shamsu; Zainuddin, Hishamuddin; Muhida, Rifki; Setiyanto, Henry

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we have investigated stable structural, electric and magnetic properties of manganese (Mn) atom adsorption on armchair hydrogen edge-terminated boron nitride nanoribbon (A-BNNRs) using first principles method based on density-functional theory with the generalized gradient approximation. Calculation shows that Mn atom situated on the ribbons of A-BNNRs is the most stable configuration, where the bonding is more pronounced. The projected density of states (PDOS) of the favored configuration has also been computed. It has been found that the covalent bonding of boron (B), nitrogen (N) and Mn is mainly contributed by s, d like-orbitals of Mn and partially occupied by the 2p like-orbital of N. The difference in energy between the inner and the edge adsorption sites of A-BNNRs shows that Mn atoms prefer to concentrate at the edge sites. The electronic structures of the various configurations are wide, narrow-gap semiconducting and half-metallic, and the magnetic moment of Mn atoms are well preserved in all considered configurations. This has shown that the boron nitride (BN) sheet covered with Mn atoms demonstrates additional information on its usefulness in future spintronics, molecular magnet and nanoelectronics devices.

  7. Dipolar polarization and piezoelectricity of a hexagonal boron nitride sheet decorated with hydrogen and fluorine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor-A-Alam, Mohammad; Kim, Hye Jung; Shin, Young-Han

    2014-04-14

    In contrast to graphene, a hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) monolayer is piezoelectric because it is non-centrosymmetric. However, h-BN shows neither in-plane nor out-of-plane dipole moments due to its three-fold symmetry on the plane and the fact that it is completely flat. Here, we show that the controlled adsorption of hydrogen and/or fluorine atoms on both sides of a pristine h-BN sheet induces flatness distortion in a chair form and an out-of plane dipole moment. In contrast, a boat form has no out-of-plane dipole moment due to the alternating boron and nitrogen positions normal to the plane. Consequently, the chair form of surface-modified h-BN shows both in-plane and out-of-plane piezoelectric responses; while pristine h-BN and the boat form of decorated h-BN have only in-plane piezoelectric responses. These in-plane and out-of-plane piezoelectric responses of the modified h-BN are comparable to those in known three-dimensional piezoelectric materials. Such an engineered piezoelectric two-dimensional boron nitride monolayer can be a candidate material for various nano-electromechanical applications.

  8. Encapsulation of cisplatin as an anti-cancer drug into boron-nitride and carbon nanotubes: Molecular simulation and free energy calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roosta, Sara [Molecular Simulation Research Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Iran University of Science & Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hashemianzadeh, Seyed Majid, E-mail: hashemianzadeh@iust.ac.ir [Molecular Simulation Research Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Iran University of Science & Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ketabi, Sepideh, E-mail: sepidehketabi@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, East Tehran Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-10-01

    Encapsulation of cisplatin anticancer drug into the single walled (10, 0) carbon nanotube and (10, 0) boron-nitride nanotube was investigated by quantum mechanical calculations and Monte Carlo Simulation in aqueous solution. Solvation free energies and complexation free energies of the cisplatin@ carbon nanotube and cisplatin@ boron-nitride nanotube complexes was determined as well as radial distribution functions of entitled compounds. Solvation free energies of cisplatin@ carbon nanotube and cisplatin@ boron-nitride nanotube were − 4.128 kcal mol{sup −1} and − 2457.124 kcal mol{sup −1} respectively. The results showed that cisplatin@ boron-nitride nanotube was more soluble species in water. In addition electrostatic contribution of the interaction of boron- nitride nanotube complex and solvent was − 281.937 kcal mol{sup −1} which really more than Van der Waals and so the electrostatic interactions play a distinctive role in the solvation free energies of boron- nitride nanotube compounds. On the other hand electrostatic part of the interaction of carbon nanotube complex and solvent were almost the same as Van der Waals contribution. Complexation free energies were also computed to study the stability of related structures and the free energies were negative (− 374.082 and − 245.766 kcal mol{sup −1}) which confirmed encapsulation of drug into abovementioned nanotubes. However, boron-nitride nanotubes were more appropriate for encapsulation due to their larger solubility in aqueous solution. - Highlights: • Solubility of cisplatin@ boron-nitride nanotube is larger than cisplatin@ carbon nanotube. • Boron- nitride nanotube complexes have larger electrostatic contribution in solvation free energy. • Complexation free energies confirm encapsulation of drug into the nanotubes in aqueous solution. • Boron- nitride nanotubes are appropriate drug delivery systems compared with carbon nanotubes.

  9. Nanoindentation measurements of a highly oriented wurtzite-type boron nitride bulk crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deura, Momoko; Kutsukake, Kentaro; Ohno, Yutaka; Yonenaga, Ichiro; Taniguchi, Takashi

    2017-03-01

    We succeeded in synthesizing a bulk crystal of wurtzite-type boron nitride (w-BN) by the direct conversion method. The synthesized crystal was approximately 2 mm wide and 350 µm thick, and highly oriented to the c-axis. We performed nanoindentation measurements on the c-plane of the w-BN crystal at room temperature to evaluate the mechanical properties of w-BN. The hardness and Young’s modulus of w-BN from the obtained curves were simultaneously determined to be 54 ± 2 and 860 ± 40 GPa, respectively. The underlying physical mechanism that dominates the mechanical properties of group-III nitride semiconductors is also examined.

  10. Electron beam generation and structure of defects in carbon and boron nitride nano-tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zobelli, A

    2007-10-15

    The nature and role of defects is of primary importance to understand the physical properties of C and BN (boron nitride) single walled nano-tubes (SWNTs). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a well known powerful tool to study the structure of defects in materials. However, in the case of SWNTs, the electron irradiation of the TEM may knock out atoms. This effect may alter the native structure of the tube, and has also been proposed as a potential tool for nano-engineering of nano-tubular structures. Here we develop a theoretical description of the irradiation mechanism. First, the anisotropy of the emission energy threshold is obtained via density functional based calculations. Then, we numerically derive the total Mott cross section for different emission sites of carbon and boron nitride nano-tubes with different chiralities. Using a dedicated STEM (Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope) microscope with experimental conditions optimised on the basis of derived cross-sections, we are able to control the generation of defects in nano-tubular systems. Either point or line defects can be obtained with a spatial resolution of a few nanometers. The structure, energetics and electronics of point and line defects in BN systems have been investigated. Stability of mono- and di- vacancy defects in hexagonal boron nitride layers is investigated, and their activation energies and reaction paths for diffusion have been derived using the nudged elastic band method (NEB) combined with density functional based techniques. We demonstrate that the appearance of extended linear defects under electron irradiation is more favorable than a random distribution of point defects and this is due to the existence of preferential sites for atom emission in the presence of pre-existing defects, rather than thermal vacancy nucleation and migration. (author)

  11. Electron beam generation and structure of defects in carbon and boron nitride nano-tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zobelli, A.

    2007-10-01

    The nature and role of defects is of primary importance to understand the physical properties of C and BN (boron nitride) single walled nano-tubes (SWNTs). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a well known powerful tool to study the structure of defects in materials. However, in the case of SWNTs, the electron irradiation of the TEM may knock out atoms. This effect may alter the native structure of the tube, and has also been proposed as a potential tool for nano-engineering of nano-tubular structures. Here we develop a theoretical description of the irradiation mechanism. First, the anisotropy of the emission energy threshold is obtained via density functional based calculations. Then, we numerically derive the total Mott cross section for different emission sites of carbon and boron nitride nano-tubes with different chiralities. Using a dedicated STEM (Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope) microscope with experimental conditions optimised on the basis of derived cross-sections, we are able to control the generation of defects in nano-tubular systems. Either point or line defects can be obtained with a spatial resolution of a few nanometers. The structure, energetics and electronics of point and line defects in BN systems have been investigated. Stability of mono- and di- vacancy defects in hexagonal boron nitride layers is investigated, and their activation energies and reaction paths for diffusion have been derived using the nudged elastic band method (NEB) combined with density functional based techniques. We demonstrate that the appearance of extended linear defects under electron irradiation is more favorable than a random distribution of point defects and this is due to the existence of preferential sites for atom emission in the presence of pre-existing defects, rather than thermal vacancy nucleation and migration. (author)

  12. Very long single- and few-walled boron nitride nanotubes via the pressurized vapor/condenser method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Michael W. [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States); Jordan, Kevin C. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Park, Cheol [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States); Kim, Jae-Woo [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States); Lillehei, Peter T. [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States); Crooks, Roy [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States); Harrison, Joycelyn S. [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States)

    2009-11-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) are desired for their exceptional mechanical, electronic, thermal, structural, textural, optical, and quantum properties. A new method for producing long, small-diameter, single- and few-walled, boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) in macroscopic quantities is reported. The pressurized vapor/condenser (PVC) method produces, without catalysts, highly crystalline, very long, small-diameter, BNNTs. Palm-sized, cotton-like masses of BNNT raw material were grown by this technique and spun directly into centimeters-long yarn. Nanotube lengths were observed to be 100 times that of those grown by the most closely related method. Self-assembly and growth models for these long BNNTs are discussed.

  13. Grafting titanium nitride surfaces with sodium styrene sulfonate thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorn, Gilad; Migonney, Véronique; Castner, David G.

    2014-01-01

    The importance of titanium nitride lies in its high hardness and its remarkable resistance to wear and corrosion, which has led to its use as a coating for the heads of hip prostheses, dental implants and dental surgery tools. However, the usefulness of titanium nitride coatings for biomedical applications could be significantly enhanced by modifying their surface with a bioactive polymer film. The main focus of the present work was to graft a bioactive poly(sodium styrene sulfonate) (pNaSS) thin film from titanium nitride surfaces via a two-step procedure: first modifying the surface with 3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (MPS) and then grafting the pNaSS film from the MPS modified titanium through free radical polymerization. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) were used after each step to characterize success and completeness of each reaction. The surface region of the titanium nitride prior to MPS functionalization and NaSS grafting contained a mixture of titanium nitride, oxy-nitride, oxide species as well as adventitious surface contaminants. After MPS functionalization, Si was detected by XPS, and characteristic MPS fragments were detected by ToF-SIMS. After NaSS grafting, Na and S were detected by XPS and characteristic NaSS fragments were detected by ToF-SIMS. The XPS determined thicknesses of the MPS and NaSS overlayers were ∼1.5 and ∼1.7 nm, respectively. The pNaSS film density was estimated by the toluidine blue colorimetric assay to be 260 ± 70 ng/cm2. PMID:25280842

  14. Molecular dynamics simulations of trihalomethanes removal from water using boron nitride nanosheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azamat, Jafar; Khataee, Alireza; Joo, Sang Woo

    2016-04-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to investigate the separation of trihalomethanes (THMs) from water using boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs). The studied systems included THM molecules and a functionalized BNNS membrane immersed in an aqueous solution. An external pressure was applied to the z axis of the systems. Two functionalized BNNSs with large fluorinated-hydrogenated pore (F-H-pores) and small hydrogen-hydroxyl pore (H-OH-pores) were used. The pores of the BNNS membrane were obtained by passivating each nitrogen and boron atoms at the pore edges with fluorine and hydrogen atoms in the large pore or with hydroxyl and hydrogen atoms in the small pore. The results show that the BNNS with a small functionalized pore was impermeable to THM molecules, in contrast to the BNNS with a large functionalized pore. Using these membranes, water contaminants can be removed at lower cost.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of boron nitrides nanotubes; Sintese e caracterizacao de nanotubos de nitreto de boro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, T.H.; Sousa, E.M.B. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Servico de Nanotecnologia

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents a new synthesis for the production of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNT) from boron powder, ammonium nitrate and hematite tube furnace CVD method. The samples were subjected to some characterization techniques as infrared spectroscopy, thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy and transmission. By analyzing the results can explain the chemical reactions involved in the process and confirm the formation of BNNT with several layers and about 30 nanometers in diameter. Due to excellent mechanical properties and its chemical and thermal stability this material is promising for various applications. However, BNNT has received much less attention than carbon nanotubes, it is because of great difficulty to synthesize appreciable quantities from the techniques currently known, and this is one of the main reasons this work.(author)

  16. Misfit accommodation mechanism at the heterointerface between diamond and cubic boron nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chunlin; Wang, Zhongchang; Kato, Takeharu; Shibata, Naoya; Taniguchi, Takashi; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2015-02-17

    Diamond and cubic boron nitride (c-BN) are the top two hardest materials on the Earth. Clarifying how the two seemingly incompressible materials can actually join represents one of the most challenging issues in materials science. Here we apply the temperature gradient method to grow the c-BN single crystals on diamond and report a successful epitaxial growth. By transmission electron microscopy, we reveal a novel misfit accommodation mechanism for a {111} diamond/c-BN heterointerface, that is, lattice misfit can be accommodated by continuous stacking fault networks, which are connected by periodically arranged hexagonal dislocation loops. The loops are found to comprise six 60° Shockley partial dislocations. Atomically, the carbon in diamond bonds directly to boron in c-BN at the interface, which electronically induces a two-dimensional electron gas and a quasi-1D electrical conductivity. Our findings point to the existence of a novel misfit accommodation mechanism associated with the superhard materials.

  17. The production, characterization, and neutronic performance of boron nitride coated uranium dioxide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uslu, I.; Colak, U.; Tombakoglu, M.; Gunduz, G.

    1995-01-01

    The fuel pellets produced by sol-gel technique were coated with boron nitride (BN). This was achieved through chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using boron trichloride and ammonia. Mixing and chemical reaction take place at a temperature around 875 K. The coated samples were then sintered at 1600 K. Thermal reactor physics lattice-cell code WIMS-D/4 was used in the neutronic analysis of CANDU fuel bundle to observe the neutronic performance of the coated fuel. Three types of fuel were considered; fuel made of natural uranium, slightly enriched uranium (SEU, enrichment: 0.82 % U-235), and SEU with various BN coatings. The burnup calculations showed that feasible coating thickness is between 1 to 2 μm. (author)

  18. Reactivity of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride in-plane heterostructures with oxygen: a DFT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Manh-Thuong

    2014-08-04

    A density-functional study has been undertaken to investigate the chemical properties of in-plane heterostructures of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride. The interactions of armchair and zigzag linking edges with oxygen are looked at in detail. The results of the calculations indicate that the linking edges are highly reactive to oxygen atoms and predict that oxygen molecules can accordingly be adsorbed dissociatively. Furthermore, because oxygen atoms cooperatively interact with the heterostructures, the process can lead to opening of the linking edges, thus splitting the two materials. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Ab Initio Investigations of Thermoelectric Effects in Graphene – Boron Nitride Nanoribbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Visan Camelia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermoelectric effects of graphene – hexagonal boron nitride (hBN nanoribbons have been investigated by density functional theory (DFT calculations. Pristine zig-zag nanoribbons are not suited to achieve high thermopower as the transmission function is flat around the chemical potential. By introducing hBN inclusions, the nanoribbon systems exhibit enhanced thermopower, due to the asymmetries introduced in the spin dependent transmission functions. Finite temperature differences between the two contacts are considered. The possibility of a good integration of hBN into graphene, makes the hybrid systems suitable for thermoelectric applications, which may be subject to further optimizations.

  20. Utilization of multiwalled boron nitride nanotubes for the reinforcement of lightweight aluminum ribbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Maho; Pakdel, Amir; Zhi, Chunyi; Bando, Yoshio; Tang, Dai-Ming; Faerstein, Konstantin; Shtansky, Dmitry; Golberg, Dmitri

    2013-01-02

    Multiwalled boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) have very attractive mechanical and thermal properties, e.g., elasticity, tensile strength, and high resistance to oxidation, and may be considered as ideal reinforcing agents in lightweight metal matrix composites. Herein, for the first time, Al-BNNT ribbons with various BNNT contents (up to 3 wt.%) were fabricated via melt spinning in an argon atmosphere. BNNTs were randomly dispersed within a microcrystalline Al matrix under ribbon casting and led to more than doubling of room-temperature ultimate tensile strength of the composites compared to pure Al ribbons produced at the similar conditions.

  1. Improvement of Thermal and Electrical Conductivity of Epoxy/boron Nitride/silver Nanoparticle Composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seungyong; Lim, Soonho [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Wanju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    In this study, we investigated the effect of BN (boron nitride) on the thermal and the electrical conductivity of composites. In case of epoxy/BN composites, the thermal conductivity was increased as the BN contents were increased. Epoxy/AgNP (Ag nanoparticle) nanocomposites exhibited a slight change of thermal conductivity and showed a electrical percolation threshold at 20 vol% of Ag nanoparticles. At the fixed Ag nanoparticle content below the electrical percolation threshold, increasing the amount of BN enhanced the electrical conductivity as well as thermal conductivity for the epoxy/AgNP/BN composites.

  2. Effect of reaction time on the characteristics of catalytically grown boron nitride nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamed, Norani Muti, E-mail: noranimuti-mohamed@petronas.com.my, E-mail: pervaiz-pas@yahoo.com, E-mail: shuaib-penang@yahoo.com, E-mail: zainabh@petronas.com.my; Ahmad, Pervaiz, E-mail: noranimuti-mohamed@petronas.com.my, E-mail: pervaiz-pas@yahoo.com, E-mail: shuaib-penang@yahoo.com, E-mail: zainabh@petronas.com.my; Saheed, Mohamed Shuaib Mohamed, E-mail: noranimuti-mohamed@petronas.com.my, E-mail: pervaiz-pas@yahoo.com, E-mail: shuaib-penang@yahoo.com, E-mail: zainabh@petronas.com.my; Burhanudin, Zainal Arif, E-mail: noranimuti-mohamed@petronas.com.my, E-mail: pervaiz-pas@yahoo.com, E-mail: shuaib-penang@yahoo.com, E-mail: zainabh@petronas.com.my [Center of Innovative Nanostructures and Nanodevices (COINN), Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750, Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia)

    2014-10-24

    The paper reports on the growth of boron nitride nanotube (BNNTs) on Si substrate by catalytic chemical vapor deposition technique and the effect of reaction time and temperature on the size and purity were investigated. Scanning electron microscopy image revealed the bamboo-like BNNTs of multiwalled type with interlayer spacing of 0.34 nm. EDX analysis described the presence of a small percentage of Mg in the sample, indicating the combination of base-tip growth model for the sample synthesized at 1200°C. The reaction time has an effect of extending the length of the BNNTs until the catalyst is oxidized or covered by growth precursor.

  3. Solvent-free fabrication of thermally conductive insulating epoxy composites with boron nitride nanoplatelets as fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zifeng; Fu, Yuqiao; Meng, Wenjun; Zhi, Chunyi

    2014-01-01

    A solvent-free method for the fabrication of thermally conductive epoxy-boron nitride (BN) nanoplatelet composite material is developed in this study. By this method, polymer composites with nearly any filler fractions can be easily fabricated. The maximum thermal conductivity reaches 5.24 W/mK, which is 1,600% improvement in comparison with that of pristine epoxy material. In addition, the as-fabricated samples exhibit excellent overall performances with great mechanical property and thermal stability well preserved.

  4. Nanolayering around and thermal resistivity of the water-hexagonal boron nitride interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akıner, Tolga; Mason, Jeremy K.; Ertürk, Hakan

    2017-07-01

    The water-hexagonal boron nitride interface was investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. Since the properties of the interface change significantly with the interatomic potential, a new method for calibrating the solid-liquid interatomic potential is proposed based on the experimental energy of the interface. The result is markedly different from that given by Lorentz-Berthelot mixing for the Lennard-Jones parameters commonly used in the literature. Specifically, the extent of nanolayering and interfacial thermal resistivity is measured for several interatomic potentials, and the one calibrated by the proposed method gives the least thermal resistivity.

  5. Lattice mismatch induced ripples and wrinkles in planar graphene/boron nitride superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nandwana, Dinkar [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Ertekin, Elif, E-mail: ertekin@illinois.edu [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); International Institute for Carbon Neutral Energy Research (WPI-I2CNER), Kyushu University, 744 Moto-oka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan)

    2015-06-21

    A continuum theory to describe periodic ripple formation in planar graphene/boron nitride superlattices is formulated. Due to the lattice mismatch between the two materials, it is shown that flat superlattices are unstable with respect to ripple formation of appropriate wavelengths. A competition between bending energy and transverse stretching energy gives rise to an optimal ripple wavelength that depends on the superlattice pitch. The optimal wavelengths predicted by the continuum theory are in good agreement with atomic scale total energy calculations previously reported by Nandwana and Ertekin [Nano Lett. 15, 1468 (2015)].

  6. Effect of acoustic, deformation on radiation-induced luminescence of pyrolytic boron nitride

    CERN Document Server

    Kardashev, B K; Plaksin, O A; Stepanov, V A; Stepanov, P A; Chernov, V M

    2001-01-01

    The effect of the ultrasound oscillations with the frequency of approximately 100 kHz on the radiation-induced luminescence on the pyrolytic boron nitride, originating by the protons irradiation (the energy of 8 MeV, the flux of 1.6 x 10 sup 1 sup 2 p/cm s), is studied. The impact of the ultrasound oscillations manifests itself by high deformation amplitudes (approximately 10 sup - sup 4), when the nonlinear, amplitude-dependent ultrasound absorption is observed. The obtained data are explained by the change in the kinetics of recrystallization, induced by irradiation, whereby the disappearance (radiation annealing) of the small angle boundaries occurs

  7. Boron nitride-MWCNT/epoxy hybrid nanocomposites: Preparation and mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulus, Hasan; Üstün, Tugay; Eskizeybek, Volkan; Şahin, Ömer Sinan; Avcı, Ahmet; Ekrem, Mürsel

    2014-11-01

    In this study, production and mechanical properties of hybrid nanocomposites have been investigated. Hybrid nanocomposites are consisting of boron nitride nanoplatelets (BN) and multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) embedded in epoxy resin. The BN and MWCNT were mixed to epoxy resin in different weight fractions and mixtures were utilized for tensile test specimen production. The synthesized BN and produced hybrid nanocomposites were characterized by SEM, TEM, XRD, FT-IR and TGA analyses. The elasticity modulus and tensile strength values were obtained via tensile tests. The fracture morphologies were investigated after tensile test by means of scanning electron microscopy.

  8. Hall effects on peristalsis of boron nitride-ethylene glycol nanofluid with temperature dependent thermal conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, F. M.; Gul, Maimoona; Shehzad, S. A.

    2018-05-01

    Current study provides a comprehensive numerical investigation of the peristaltic transport of boron nitride-ethylene glycol nanofluid through a symmetric channel in presence of magnetic field. Significant effects of Brownian motion and thermophoresis have been included in the energy equation. Hall and Ohmic heating effects are also taken into consideration. Resulting system of non-linear equations is solved numerically using NDSolve in Mathematica. Expressions for velocity, temperature, concentration and streamlines are derived and plotted under the assumption of long wavelength and low Reynolds number. Influence of various parameters on heat and mass transfer rates have been discussed with the help of bar charts.

  9. Origin of Improved Optical Quality of Monolayer Molybdenum Disulfide Grown on Hexagonal Boron Nitride Substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Yi; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Wei; Sheng, Bowen; Zhang, Kun; Wang, Yilun; Song, Qingjun; Mao, Nannan; Li, Yanping; Wang, Xinqiang; Zhang, Jin; Dai, Lun

    2016-01-13

    Monolayer MoS2 is synthesized on hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) flakes with a simple, high-yield method. Monolayer MoS2 on h-BN exhibits improved optical quality. Combining the theoretical and experimental analysis, it is concluded that the enhanced photoluminescence and Raman intensities of monolayer MoS2 probably originate from the relatively weak doping effect from the h-BN substrate rather than the optical interference effect. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Electronic structure of graphene/hexagonal boron nitride heterostructure revealed by Nano-ARPES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chaoyu; Avila, José; Wang, Shuopei; Yang, Rong; Zhang, Guangyu; Asensio, Maria C.

    2017-06-01

    The ability to explore electronic structure and their role in determining material’s macroscopic behaviour is essential to explain and engineer functions of material and device. Graphene/hexagonal boron nitride heterostructure (G/h-BN) has become a model system to study the emergent behaviour in 2D van der Waals heterostructure. Here by employing angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with spatial resolution ∼ 100 nm (Nano-ARPES), we give a full description on the electronic structure of G/h-BN, demonstrating the power of Nano-ARPES to detect the microscopic inhomogeneity of electronic structure for different materials.

  11. Effect of reaction time on the characteristics of catalytically grown boron nitride nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, Norani Muti; Ahmad, Pervaiz; Saheed, Mohamed Shuaib Mohamed; Burhanudin, Zainal Arif

    2014-01-01

    The paper reports on the growth of boron nitride nanotube (BNNTs) on Si substrate by catalytic chemical vapor deposition technique and the effect of reaction time and temperature on the size and purity were investigated. Scanning electron microscopy image revealed the bamboo-like BNNTs of multiwalled type with interlayer spacing of 0.34 nm. EDX analysis described the presence of a small percentage of Mg in the sample, indicating the combination of base-tip growth model for the sample synthesized at 1200°C. The reaction time has an effect of extending the length of the BNNTs until the catalyst is oxidized or covered by growth precursor

  12. Dielectric properties of silicon aluminium oxides and boron nitride during heating to 2300 deg K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litovchenko, A.V.; Brekhovskikh, S.M.; Dem'yanov, V.V.

    1983-01-01

    Temperature dependences of permittivity and tangent of the angle of dielectric losses of melted quartz, alumooxide and nitride-boron ceramics at the frequency of approximately 10 10 Hz in the range from 300 to 2300 K, are obtained. Lambda-shape anomaly E(T) and tg delta(T) of quartz glass at approximately 1950 k with characteristic decrease E and tg delta in the liquid phase is established. The applicability of the resonator method (using graphite resonator) of measuring dielectric properties when heating samples at the temperature up to 2300 K, is shown

  13. Silicon nitride films deposited with an electron beam created plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, D. C.; Emery, K. A.; Rocca, J. J.; Thompson, L. R.; Zamani, H.; Collins, G. J.

    1984-01-01

    The electron beam assisted chemical vapor deposition (EBCVD) of silicon nitride films using NH3, N2, and SiH4 as the reactant gases is reported. The films have been deposited on aluminum, SiO2, and polysilicon film substrates as well as on crystalline silicon substrates. The range of experimental conditions under which silicon nitrides have been deposited includes substrate temperatures from 50 to 400 C, electron beam currents of 2-40 mA, electron beam energies of 1-5 keV, total ambient pressures of 0.1-0.4 Torr, and NH3/SiH4 mass flow ratios of 1-80. The physical, electrical, and chemical properties of the EBCVD films are discussed.

  14. Free-standing polycrystalline boron phosphide film and method for production thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baughman, R.J.; Ginley, D.S.

    1982-09-09

    A process for producing a free-standing polycrystalline boron phosphide film comprises growing a film of boron phosphide in a vertical growth apparatus on a metal substrate. The metal substrate has a coefficient of thermal expansion sufficiently different from that of boron phosphide that the film separates cleanly from the substrate upon cooling thereof, and the substrate is preferably titanium. The invention also comprises a free-standing polycrystalline boron phosphide film for use in electronic device fabrication.

  15. Method for production of free-standing polycrystalline boron phosphide film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baughman, Richard J.; Ginley, David S.

    1985-01-01

    A process for producing a free-standing polycrystalline boron phosphide film comprises growing a film of boron phosphide in a vertical growth apparatus on a metal substrate. The metal substrate has a coefficient of thermal expansion sufficiently different from that of boron phosphide that the film separates cleanly from the substrate upon cooling thereof, and the substrate is preferably titanium. The invention also comprises a free-standing polycrystalline boron phosphide film for use in electronic device fabrication.

  16. Friction and wear performance of boron doped, undoped microcrystalline and fine grained composite diamond films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinchang; Wang, Liang; Shen, Bin; Sun, Fanghong

    2015-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond films have attracted more attentions due to their excellent mechanical properties. Whereas as-fabricated traditional diamond films in the previous studies don't have enough adhesion or surface smoothness, which seriously impact their friction and wear performance, and thus limit their applications under extremely harsh conditions. A boron doped, undoped microcrystalline and fine grained composite diamond (BD-UM-FGCD) film is fabricated by a three-step method adopting hot filament CVD (HFCVD) method in the present study, presenting outstanding comprehensive performance, including the good adhesion between the substrate and the underlying boron doped diamond (BDD) layer, the extremely high hardness of the middle undoped microcrystalline diamond (UMCD) layer, as well as the low surface roughness and favorable polished convenience of the surface fine grained diamond (FGD) layer. The friction and wear behavior of this composite film sliding against low-carbon steel and silicon nitride balls are studied on a ball-on-plate rotational friction tester. Besides, its wear rate is further evaluated under a severer condition using an inner-hole polishing apparatus, with low-carbon steel wire as the counterpart. The test results show that the BD-UM-FGCD film performs very small friction coefficient and great friction behavior owing to its high surface smoothness, and meanwhile it also has excellent wear resistance because of the relatively high hardness of the surface FGD film and the extremely high hardness of the middle UMCD film. Moreover, under the industrial conditions for producing low-carbon steel wires, this composite film can sufficiently prolong the working lifetime of the drawing dies and improve their application effects. This research develops a novel composite diamond films owning great comprehensive properties, which have great potentials as protecting coatings on working surfaces of the wear-resistant and anti

  17. Influence of point defects on the near edge structure of hexagonal boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougall, Nicholas L.; Partridge, Jim G.; Nicholls, Rebecca J.; Russo, Salvy P.; McCulloch, Dougal G.

    2017-10-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) is a wide-band-gap semiconductor with applications including gate insulation layers in graphene transistors, far-ultraviolet light emitting devices and as hydrogen storage media. Due to its complex microstructure, defects in hBN are challenging to identify. Here, we combine x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy with ab initio theoretical modeling to identify energetically favorable defects. Following annealing of hBN samples in vacuum and oxygen, the B and N K edges exhibited angular-dependent peak modifications consistent with in-plane defects. Theoretical calculations showed that the energetically favorable defects all produce signature features in XANES. Comparing these calculations with experiments, the principle defects were attributed to substitutional oxygen at the nitrogen site, substitutional carbon at the boron site, and hydrogen passivated boron vacancies. Hydrogen passivation of defects was found to significantly affect the formation energies, electronic states, and XANES. In the B K edge, multiple peaks above the major 1 s to π* peak occur as a result of these defects and the hydrogen passivated boron vacancy produces the frequently observed doublet in the 1 s to σ* transition. While the N K edge is less sensitive to defects, features attributable to substitutional C at the B site were observed. This defect was also calculated to have mid-gap states in its band structure that may be responsible for the 4.1-eV ultraviolet emission frequently observed from this material.

  18. Modeling of Laser Vaporization and Plume Chemistry in a Boron Nitride Nanotube Production Rig

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.; Fay, Catharine C.

    2012-01-01

    Flow in a pressurized, vapor condensation (PVC) boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) production rig is modeled. A laser provides a thermal energy source to the tip of a boron ber bundle in a high pressure nitrogen chamber causing a plume of boron-rich gas to rise. The buoyancy driven flow is modeled as a mixture of thermally perfect gases (B, B2, N, N2, BN) in either thermochemical equilibrium or chemical nonequilibrium assuming steady-state melt and vaporization from a 1 mm radius spot at the axis of an axisymmetric chamber. The simulation is intended to define the macroscopic thermochemical environment from which boron-rich species, including nanotubes, condense out of the plume. Simulations indicate a high temperature environment (T > 4400K) for elevated pressures within 1 mm of the surface sufficient to dissociate molecular nitrogen and form BN at the base of the plume. Modifications to Program LAURA, a finite-volume based solver for hypersonic flows including coupled radiation and ablation, are described to enable this simulation. Simulations indicate that high pressure synthesis conditions enable formation of BN vapor in the plume that may serve to enhance formation of exceptionally long nanotubes in the PVC process.

  19. Low-Energy Sputtering Studies of Boron Nitride with Xenon Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, P. K.; Shutthanandan, V.

    1999-01-01

    Sputtering of boron nitride with xenon ions was investigated using secondary ion (SIMS) and secondary neutral (SNMS) mass spectrometry. The ions generated from the ion gun were incident on the target at an angle of 50' with respect to the surface'normal. The energy of ions ranged from 100 eV to 3 keV. A flood electron gun was used to neutralize the positive charge build-up on the target surface. The intensities of sputtered neutral and charged particles, including single atoms, molecules, and clusters, were measured as a function of ion energy. Positive SIMS spectra were dominated by the two boron isotopes whereas BN- and B- were the two major constituents of the negative SIMS spectra. Nitrogen could be detected only in the SNMS spectra. The intensity-energy curves of the sputtered particles were similar in shape. The knees in P-SIMS and SNMS intensity-energy curves appear at around I keV which is significantly higher that 100 to 200 eV energy range at which knees appear in the sputtering of medium and heavy elements by ions of argon and xenon. This difference in the position of the sputter yield knee between boron nitride and heavier targets is due to the reduced ion energy differences. The isotopic composition of secondary ions of boron were measured by bombarding boron nitride with xenon ions at energies ranging from 100 eV to 1.5 keV using a quadrupole mass spectrometer. An ion gun was used to generate the ion beam. A flood electron gun was used to neutralize the positive charge buildup on the target surface. The secondary ion flux was found to be enriched in heavy isotopes at lower incident ion energies. The heavy isotope enrichment was observed to decrease with increasing primary ion energy. Beyond 350 eV, light isotopes were sputtered preferentially with the enrichment increasing to an asymptotic value of 1.27 at 1.5 keV. The trend is similar to that of the isotopic enrichment observed earlier when copper was sputtered with xenon ions in the same energy

  20. PECVD Silicon Nitride Passivation on Boron Emitter: The Analysis of Electrostatic Charge on the Interface Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalita M. Nursam

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The dependence of surface recombination of boron diffused and undiffused silicon surfaces passivated with a-SiN:H on the net charge density is investigated in detail. The films are deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition using a 2.45 GHz microwave remote plasma system. The surface charge density on the samples is varied by depositing charge using a corona discharge chamber. Excess carrier lifetime, capacitance-voltage, and Kelvin probe measurements are combined to determine the surface recombination velocity and emitter saturation current density as a function of net charge density. Our results show that the application of negative charge causes a substantial reduction in the surface recombination of samples with boron diffused emitters, even for high boron surface concentrations of 5×1019 cm−3. The significant difference observed in surface recombination between boron diffused and undiffused sample under accumulation implies that the presence of boron diffusion has results in some degradation of the Si-SiN interface. Further, (111 oriented surfaces appear more sensitive to the boron surface concentration than (100 oriented surfaces.

  1. Direct growth of hexagonal boron nitride/graphene heterostructures on cobalt foil substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zhongguang; Khanaki, Alireza; Tian, Hao; Zheng, Renjing; Suja, Mohammad; Liu, Jianlin, E-mail: jianlin@ece.ucr.edu [Quantum Structures Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Riverside, California 92521 (United States); Zheng, Jian-Guo [Irvine Materials Research Institute, University of California, Irvine, California 92697-2800 (United States)

    2016-07-25

    Graphene/hexagonal boron nitride (G/h-BN) heterostructures have attracted a great deal of attention because of their exceptional properties and wide variety of potential applications in nanoelectronics. However, direct growth of large-area, high-quality, and stacked structures in a controllable and scalable way remains challenging. In this work, we demonstrate the synthesis of h-BN/graphene (h-BN/G) heterostructures on cobalt (Co) foil by sequential deposition of graphene and h-BN layers using plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. It is found that the coverage of h-BN layers can be readily controlled on the epitaxial graphene by growth time. Large-area, uniform-quality, and multi-layer h-BN films on thin graphite layers were achieved. Based on an h-BN (5–6 nm)/G (26–27 nm) heterostructure, capacitor devices with Co(foil)/G/h-BN/Co(contact) configuration were fabricated to evaluate the dielectric properties of h-BN. The measured breakdown electric field showed a high value of ∼2.5–3.2 MV/cm. Both I-V and C-V characteristics indicate that the epitaxial h-BN film has good insulating characteristics.

  2. A hybrid MBE-based growth method for large-area synthesis of stacked hexagonal boron nitride/graphene heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wofford, Joseph M.; Nakhaie, Siamak; Krause, Thilo; Liu, Xianjie; Ramsteiner, Manfred; Hanke, Michael; Riechert, Henning; J. Lopes, J. Marcelo

    2017-01-01

    Van der Waals heterostructures combining hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) and graphene offer many potential advantages, but remain difficult to produce as continuous films over large areas. In particular, the growth of h-BN on graphene has proven to be challenging due to the inertness of the graphene surface. Here we exploit a scalable molecular beam epitaxy based method to allow both the h-BN and graphene to form in a stacked heterostructure in the favorable growth environment provided by a Ni(111) substrate. This involves first saturating a Ni film on MgO(111) with C, growing h-BN on the exposed metal surface, and precipitating the C back to the h-BN/Ni interface to form graphene. The resulting laterally continuous heterostructure is composed of a top layer of few-layer thick h-BN on an intermediate few-layer thick graphene, lying on top of Ni/MgO(111). Examinations by synchrotron-based grazing incidence diffraction, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, and UV-Raman spectroscopy reveal that while the h-BN is relaxed, the lattice constant of graphene is significantly reduced, likely due to nitrogen doping. These results illustrate a different pathway for the production of h-BN/graphene heterostructures, and open a new perspective for the large-area preparation of heterosystems combining graphene and other 2D or 3D materials. PMID:28240323

  3. Catalytic growth of vertically aligned neutron sensitive {sup 10}Boron nitride nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Pervaiz, E-mail: pervaizahmad@siswa.um.edu.my, E-mail: Pervaiz-pas@yahoo.com; Khandaker, Mayeen Uddin, E-mail: mu-khandaker@yahoo.com, E-mail: mu-khandaker@um.edu.my; Amin, Yusoff Mohd [University of Malaya, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science (Malaysia); Khan, Ghulamullah [University of Malaya, Department of Mechanical Engineering (Malaysia); Ramay, Shahid M. [King Saud University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, College of Science (Saudi Arabia); Mahmood, Asif [King Saud University, Department of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering (Saudi Arabia); Amin, Muhammad [University of the Punjab, Department of Physics (Pakistan); Muhammad, Nawshad [Interdisciplinary Research Centre in Biomedical Materials (IRCBM) COMSATS Institute of Information Technology (Pakistan)

    2016-01-15

    {sup 10}Boron nitride nanotubes ({sup 10}BNNTs) are a potential neutron sensing element in a solid-state neutron detector. The aligned {sup 10}BNNT can be used for its potential application without any further purification. Argon-supported thermal CVD is used to achieve vertically aligned {sup 10}BNNT with the help of nucleation sites produced in a thin layer of magnesium–iron alloy deposited at the top of Si substrate. FESEM shows vertically aligned {sup 10}BNNTs with ball-like catalytic tips at top. EDX reveals magnesium (Mg) contents in the tips that refer to catalytic growth of {sup 10}BNNT. HR-TEM shows tubular morphology of the synthesized {sup 10}BNNT with lattice fringes on its outer part having an interlayer spacing of ∼0.34 nm. XPS shows B 1 s and N 1 s peaks at 190.5 and 398 eV that correspond to hexagonal {sup 10}Boron nitride ({sup 10}h-BN) nature of the synthesized {sup 10}BNNT, whereas the Mg kll auger peaks at ∼301 and ∼311 eV represents Mg contents in the sample. Raman spectrum has a peak at 1390 (cm{sup −1}) that corresponds to E{sub 2g} mode of vibration in {sup 10}h-BN.

  4. Quantitative description of microstructure defects in hexagonal boron nitrides using X-ray diffraction analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schimpf, C.; Motylenko, M.; Rafaja, D.

    2013-01-01

    A routine for simultaneous quantification of turbostratic disorder, amount of puckering and the dislocation and stacking fault density in hexagonal materials was proposed and tested on boron nitride powder samples that were synthesised using different methods. The routine allows the individual microstructure defects to be recognised according to their effect on the anisotropy of the X-ray diffraction line broadening. For quantification of the microstructure defects, the total line broadening is regarded as a linear combination of the contributions from the particular defects. The total line broadening is obtained from the line profile fitting. As testing material, graphitic boron nitride (h-BN) was employed in the form of hot-isostatically pressed h-BN, pyrolytic h-BN or a h-BN, which was chemically vapour deposited at a low temperature. The kind of the dominant microstructure defects determined from the broadening of the X-ray diffraction lines was verified by high resolution transmission electron microscopy. Their amount was attempted to be verified by alternative methods. - Highlights: • Reliable method for quantification of microstructure defects in BN was suggested. • The method is based on the analysis of anisotropic XRD line broadening. • This XRD line broadening is unique and characteristic of the respective defect. • Thus, the quantification of coexistent microstructure defects is possible. • The method was tested on hexagonal BN, which was produced by different techniques

  5. Large-scale fabrication and utilization of novel hexagonal/turbostratic composite boron nitride nanosheets

    KAUST Repository

    Zhong, Bo

    2017-02-15

    In this report, we have developed a scalable approach to massive synthesis of hexagonal/turbostratic composite boron nitride nanosheets (h/t-BNNSs). The strikingly effective, reliable, and high-throughput (grams) synthesis is performed via a facile chemical foaming process at 1400°C utilizing ammonia borane (AB) as precursor. The characterization results demonstrate that high quality of h/t-BNNSs with lateral size of tens of micrometers and thickness of tens of nanometers are obtained. The growth mechanism of h/t-BNNSs is also discussed based on the thermogravimetric analysis of AB which clearly shows two step weight loss. The h/t-BNNSs are further used for making thermoconductive h/t-BNNSs/epoxy resin composites. The thermal conductivity of the composites is obviously improved due to the introduction of h/t-BNNSs. Consideration of the unique properties of boron nitride, these novel h/t-BNNSs are envisaged to be very valuable for future high performance polymer based material fabrication.

  6. Boron nitride nanotube-mediated stimulation of cell co-culture on micro-engineered hydrogels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Ricotti

    Full Text Available In this paper, we describe the effects of the combination of topographical, mechanical, chemical and intracellular electrical stimuli on a co-culture of fibroblasts and skeletal muscle cells. The co-culture was anisotropically grown onto an engineered micro-grooved (10 µm-wide grooves polyacrylamide substrate, showing a precisely tuned Young's modulus (∼ 14 kPa and a small thickness (∼ 12 µm. We enhanced the co-culture properties through intracellular stimulation produced by piezoelectric nanostructures (i.e., boron nitride nanotubes activated by ultrasounds, thus exploiting the ability of boron nitride nanotubes to convert outer mechanical waves (such as ultrasounds in intracellular electrical stimuli, by exploiting the direct piezoelectric effect. We demonstrated that nanotubes were internalized by muscle cells and localized in both early and late endosomes, while they were not internalized by the underneath fibroblast layer. Muscle cell differentiation benefited from the synergic combination of topographical, mechanical, chemical and nanoparticle-based stimuli, showing good myotube development and alignment towards a preferential direction, as well as high expression of genes encoding key proteins for muscle contraction (i.e., actin and myosin. We also clarified the possible role of fibroblasts in this process, highlighting their response to the above mentioned physical stimuli in terms of gene expression and cytokine production. Finally, calcium imaging-based experiments demonstrated a higher functionality of the stimulated co-cultures.

  7. Boron nitride nanotube-mediated stimulation of cell co-culture on micro-engineered hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricotti, Leonardo; Fujie, Toshinori; Vazão, Helena; Ciofani, Gianni; Marotta, Roberto; Brescia, Rosaria; Filippeschi, Carlo; Corradini, Irene; Matteoli, Michela; Mattoli, Virgilio; Ferreira, Lino; Menciassi, Arianna

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the effects of the combination of topographical, mechanical, chemical and intracellular electrical stimuli on a co-culture of fibroblasts and skeletal muscle cells. The co-culture was anisotropically grown onto an engineered micro-grooved (10 µm-wide grooves) polyacrylamide substrate, showing a precisely tuned Young's modulus (∼ 14 kPa) and a small thickness (∼ 12 µm). We enhanced the co-culture properties through intracellular stimulation produced by piezoelectric nanostructures (i.e., boron nitride nanotubes) activated by ultrasounds, thus exploiting the ability of boron nitride nanotubes to convert outer mechanical waves (such as ultrasounds) in intracellular electrical stimuli, by exploiting the direct piezoelectric effect. We demonstrated that nanotubes were internalized by muscle cells and localized in both early and late endosomes, while they were not internalized by the underneath fibroblast layer. Muscle cell differentiation benefited from the synergic combination of topographical, mechanical, chemical and nanoparticle-based stimuli, showing good myotube development and alignment towards a preferential direction, as well as high expression of genes encoding key proteins for muscle contraction (i.e., actin and myosin). We also clarified the possible role of fibroblasts in this process, highlighting their response to the above mentioned physical stimuli in terms of gene expression and cytokine production. Finally, calcium imaging-based experiments demonstrated a higher functionality of the stimulated co-cultures.

  8. Giant osmotic energy conversion measured in a single transmembrane boron nitride nanotube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siria, Alessandro; Poncharal, Philippe; Biance, Anne-Laure; Fulcrand, Rémy; Blase, Xavier; Purcell, Stephen T; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2013-02-28

    New models of fluid transport are expected to emerge from the confinement of liquids at the nanoscale, with potential applications in ultrafiltration, desalination and energy conversion. Nevertheless, advancing our fundamental understanding of fluid transport on the smallest scales requires mass and ion dynamics to be ultimately characterized across an individual channel to avoid averaging over many pores. A major challenge for nanofluidics thus lies in building distinct and well-controlled nanochannels, amenable to the systematic exploration of their properties. Here we describe the fabrication and use of a hierarchical nanofluidic device made of a boron nitride nanotube that pierces an ultrathin membrane and connects two fluid reservoirs. Such a transmembrane geometry allows the detailed study of fluidic transport through a single nanotube under diverse forces, including electric fields, pressure drops and chemical gradients. Using this device, we discover very large, osmotically induced electric currents generated by salinity gradients, exceeding by two orders of magnitude their pressure-driven counterpart. We show that this result originates in the anomalously high surface charge carried by the nanotube's internal surface in water at large pH, which we independently quantify in conductance measurements. The nano-assembly route using nanostructures as building blocks opens the way to studying fluid, ionic and molecule transport on the nanoscale, and may lead to biomimetic functionalities. Our results furthermore suggest that boron nitride nanotubes could be used as membranes for osmotic power harvesting under salinity gradients.

  9. Radio Frequency Plasma Synthesis of Boron Nitride Nanotubes (BNNTs) for Structural Applications: Part I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hales, Stephen J.; Alexa, Joel A.; Jensen, Brian J.; Thomsen, Donald L.

    2016-01-01

    It is evident that nanotubes, such as carbon, boron nitride and even silicon, offer great potential for many aerospace applications. The opportunity exists to harness the extremely high strength and stiffness exhibited by high-purity, low-defect nanotubes in structural materials. Even though the technology associated with carbon nanotube (CNT) development is mature, the mechanical property benefits have yet to be fully realized. Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) offer similar structural benefits, but exhibit superior chemical and thermal stability. A broader range of potential structural applications results, particularly as reinforcing agents for metal- and ceramic- based composites. However, synthesis of BNNTs is more challenging than CNTs mainly because of the higher processing temperatures required, and mass production techniques have yet to emerge. A promising technique is radio frequency plasma spray (RFPS), which is an inductively coupled, very high temperature process. The lack of electrodes and the self- contained, inert gas environment lend themselves to an ultraclean product. It is the aim of this White Paper to survey the state of the art with regard to nano-material production by analyzing the pros and cons of existing methods. The intention is to combine the best concepts and apply the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) RFPS facility to reliably synthesize large quantities of consistent, high-purity BNNTs.

  10. Thermal transport characterization of hexagonal boron nitride nanoribbons using molecular dynamics simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asir Intisar Khan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Due to similar atomic bonding and electronic structure to graphene, hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN has broad application prospects such as the design of next generation energy efficient nano-electronic devices. Practical design and efficient performance of these devices based on h-BN nanostructures would require proper thermal characterization of h-BN nanostructures. Hence, in this study we have performed equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD simulation using an optimized Tersoff-type interatomic potential to model the thermal transport of nanometer sized zigzag hexagonal boron nitride nanoribbons (h-BNNRs. We have investigated the thermal conductivity of h-BNNRs as a function of temperature, length and width. Thermal conductivity of h-BNNRs shows strong temperature dependence. With increasing width, thermal conductivity increases while an opposite pattern is observed with the increase in length. Our study on h-BNNRs shows considerably lower thermal conductivity compared to GNRs. To elucidate these aspects, we have calculated phonon density of states for both h-BNNRs and GNRs. Moreover, using EMD we have explored the impact of different vacancies, namely, point vacancy, edge vacancy and bi-vacancy on the thermal conductivity of h-BNNRs. With varying percentages of vacancies, significant reduction in thermal conductivity is observed and it is found that, edge and point vacancies are comparatively more destructive than bi-vacancies. Such study would contribute further into the growing interest for accurate thermal transport characterization of low dimensional nanostructures.

  11. Advances in pulsed laser deposition growth of nitride thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Felix E.; Pumarol, Manuel; Martinez, Antonio; Jia, Weiyi; Wang, Yanyung; Rodriguez, Edgardo; Mourad, Houssam A.

    1999-07-01

    Pulsed laser deposition of nitride semiconductor films offers an alternative to more usual techniques, such as MOCVD and MBE. PLD can produce good quality films at reduced growth temperatures. Rapid progress has been achieved in the laser few years, including demonstrations of epitaxial growth of GaN directly on sapphire. Work on PLD of direct- transition III- nitrides is briefly reviewed and our recent results for these materials are presented. Growth of these nitrides requires provision of nitrogen in a reactive form, which is usually supplied by NH3 gas flow. With the approach described here, reactive nitrogen is provided in an atomic beam, which has the advantage of reducing dependence on substrate temperature to surmount the kinetic energy barrier for formation, while eliminating a source of hydrogen during growth. Films grown from ceramic GaN targets are compared with those grown from liquid Ga. The latter method can offer better control of unintentional doping. InN films were also grown directly from In metal targets, with very good results in term so stoichiometry and crystalline quality. AlN films were grown from ceramic AlN targets, with excellent texture at reduced temperatures. Results are presented for crystal structure, composition and surface morphology. Optical properties were studied by transmission and luminescence spectroscopy.

  12. The influence of interfaces and water uptake on the dielectric response of epoxy-cubic boron nitride composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsekmes, I.A.; Morshuis, P.H.F.; Smit, J.J.; Kochetov, R.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, epoxy-cubic boron nitride composites are fabricated, and their dielectric response is investigated. They exhibit the same trend as epoxy composites reinforced with other filler types. Thus, at low filler concentrations, they exhibit a lower relative permittivity than neat epoxy. As

  13. Phase formation and microstructure of boron nitride thin layers deposited using Nd:YAG and KrF

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mroz, W.; Kosydar, R.; Jelínek, Miroslav; Kocourek, Tomáš; Major, B.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 200, - (2006), s. 6438-6443 ISSN 0257-8972 Grant - others:Polish Ministry of Science and Informatization(PL) PBZ-KBN-100/T08/2003 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : boron nitride * pulsed laser deposition * coating Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.559, year: 2006

  14. Defect-Based Modulation of Optoelectronic Properties for Biofunctionalized Hexagonal Boron Nitride Nanosheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakourian-Fard, Mehdi; Heydari, Hadiseh; Kamath, Ganesh

    2017-09-06

    Defect engineering potentially allows for dramatic tuning of the optoelectronic properties of two-dimensional materials. With the help of DFT calculations, a systematic study of DNA nucleobases adsorbed on hexagonal boron-nitride nanoflakes (h-BNNFs) with boron (V B ) and nitrogen (V N ) monovacancies is presented. The presence of V N and V B defects increases the binding strength of nucleobases by 9 and 34 kcal mol -1 , respectively (h-BNNF-V B >h-BNNF-V N >h-BNNF). A more negative electrostatic potential at the V B site makes the h-BNNF-V B surface more reactive than that of h-BNNF-V N , enabling H-bonding interactions with nucleobases. This binding energy difference affects the recovery time-a significant factor for developing DNA biosensors-of the surfaces in the order h-BNNF-V B >h-BNNF-V N >h-BNNF. The presence of V B and V N defect sites increases the electrical conductivity of the h-BNNF surface, V N defects being more favorable than V B sites. The blueshift of absorption peaks of the h-BNNF-V B -nucleobase complexes, in contrast to the redshift observed for h-BNNF-V N -nucleobase complexes, is attributed to their observed differences in binding energies, the HOMO-LUMO energy gap and other optoelectronic properties. Time-dependent DFT calculations reveal that the monovacant boron-nitride-sheet-nucleobase composites absorb visible light in the range 300-800 nm, thus making them suitable for light-emitting devices and sensing nucleobases in the visible region. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Structure and Thermal Stability of Copper Nitride Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangan Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Copper nitride (Cu3N thin films were deposited on glass via DC reactive magnetron sputtering at various N2 flow rates and partial pressures with 150°C substrate temperature. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize the microstructure and morphology. The results show that the films are composed of Cu3N crystallites with anti-ReO3 structure. The microstructure and morphology of the Cu3N film strongly depend on the N2 flow rate and partial pressure. The cross-sectional micrograph of the film shows typical columnar, compact structure. The thermal stabilities of the films were investigated using vacuum annealing under different temperature. The results show that the introducing of argon in the sputtering process decreases the thermal stability of the films.

  16. High-Speed Imaging Optical Pyrometry for Study of Boron Nitride Nanotube Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inman, Jennifer A.; Danehy, Paul M.; Jones, Stephen B.; Lee, Joseph W.

    2014-01-01

    A high-speed imaging optical pyrometry system is designed for making in-situ measurements of boron temperature during the boron nitride nanotube synthesis process. Spectrometer measurements show molten boron emission to be essentially graybody in nature, lacking spectral emission fine structure over the visible range of the electromagnetic spectrum. Camera calibration experiments are performed and compared with theoretical calculations to quantitatively establish the relationship between observed signal intensity and temperature. The one-color pyrometry technique described herein involves measuring temperature based upon the absolute signal intensity observed through a narrowband spectral filter, while the two-color technique uses the ratio of the signals through two spectrally separated filters. The present study calibrated both the one- and two-color techniques at temperatures between 1,173 K and 1,591 K using a pco.dimax HD CMOS-based camera along with three such filters having transmission peaks near 550 nm, 632.8 nm, and 800 nm.

  17. TXRF analysis of trace metals in thin silicon nitride films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vereecke, G.; Arnauts, S.; Verstraeten, K.; Schaekers, M.; Heyrts, M.M.

    2000-01-01

    As critical dimensions of integrated circuits continue to decrease, high dielectric constant materials such as silicon nitride are being considered to replace silicon dioxide in capacitors and transistors. The achievement of low levels of metal contamination in these layers is critical for high performance and reliability. Existing methods of quantitative analysis of trace metals in silicon nitride require high amounts of sample (from about 0.1 to 1 g, compared to a mass of 0.2 mg for a 2 nm thick film on a 8'' silicon wafer), and involve digestion steps not applicable to films on wafers or non-standard techniques such as neutron activation analysis. A novel approach has recently been developed to analyze trace metals in thin films with analytical techniques currently used in the semiconductor industry. Sample preparation consists of three steps: (1) decomposition of the silicon nitride matrix by moist HF condensed at the wafer surface to form ammonium fluosilicate. (2) vaporization of the fluosilicate by a short heat treatment at 300 o C. (3) collection of contaminants by scanning the wafer surface with a solution droplet (VPD-DSC procedure). The determination of trace metals is performed by drying the droplet on the wafer and by analyzing the residue by TXRF, as it offers the advantages of multi-elemental analysis with no dilution of the sample. The lower limits of detection for metals in 2 nm thick films on 8'' silicon wafers range from about 10 to 200 ng/g. The present study will focus on the matrix effects and the possible loss of analyte associated with the evaporation of the fluosilicate salt, in relation with the accuracy and the reproducibility of the method. The benefits of using an internal standard will be assessed. Results will be presented from both model samples (ammonium fluoride contaminated with metallic salts) and real samples (silicon nitride films from a production tool). (author)

  18. Compositional analysis of silicon oxide/silicon nitride thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meziani Samir

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen, amorphous silicon nitride (SiNx:H abbreviated SiNx films were grown on multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si substrate by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD in parallel configuration using NH3/SiH4 gas mixtures. The mc-Si wafers were taken from the same column of Si cast ingot. After the deposition process, the layers were oxidized (thermal oxidation in dry oxygen ambient environment at 950 °C to get oxide/nitride (ON structure. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS, Auger electron spectroscopy (AES and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX were employed for analyzing quantitatively the chemical composition and stoichiometry in the oxide-nitride stacked films. The effect of annealing temperature on the chemical composition of ON structure has been investigated. Some species, O, N, Si were redistributed in this structure during the thermal oxidation of SiNx. Indeed, oxygen diffused to the nitride layer into Si2O2N during dry oxidation.

  19. Molecular Beam Epitaxial Growth and Characterization of Graphene and Hexagonal Boron Nitride Two-Dimensional Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Renjing

    Van der Waals (vdW) materials (also called as two-dimensional (2D) material in some literature) systems have received extensive attention recently due to their potential applications in next-generation electronics platform. Exciting properties have been discovered in this field, however, the performance and properties of the systems rely on the materials' quality and interface significantly, leading to the urgent need for scalable synthesis of high-quality vdW crystals and heterostructures. Toward this direction, this dissertation is devoted on the study of Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) growth and various characterization of vdW materials and heterostructures, especially graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). The goal is to achieve high-quality vdW materials and related heterostructures. There are mainly four projects discussed in this dissertation. The first project (Chapter 2) is about MBE growth of large-area h-BN on copper foil. After the growth, the film was transferred onto SiO2 substrate for characterization. It is observed that as-grown film gives evident h-BN Raman spectrum; what's more, h-BN peak intensity and position is dependent on film thickness. N-1s and B-1s XPS peaks further suggest the formation of h-BN. AFM and SEM images show the film is flat and continuous over large area. Our synthesis method shows it's possible to use MBE to achieve h-BN growth and could also pave a way for some unique structure, such as h-BN/graphene heterostructures and doped h-BN films by MBE. The second project (Chapter 3) is focused on establishment of grapehene/h-BN heterostructure on cobalt (Co) film. In-situ epitaxial growth of graphene/h-BN heterostructures on Co film substrate was achieved by using plasma-assisted MBE. The direct graphene/h-BN vertical stacking structures were demonstrated and further confirmed by various characterizations, such as Raman spectroscopy, SEM, XPS and TEM. Large area heterostructures consisting of single- /bilayer graphene and

  20. Reactive pulsed laser deposition of gold nitride thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caricato, A.P. [University of Salento, Department of Physics, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Fernandez, M. [University of Salento, Department of Physics, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Leggieri, G. [University of Salento, Department of Physics, 73100 Lecce (Italy)]. E-mail: leggieri@le.infn.it; Luches, A. [University of Salento, Department of Physics, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Martino, M. [University of Salento, Department of Physics, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Romano, F. [University of Salento, Department of Physics, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Tunno, T. [University of Salento, Department of Physics, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Valerini, D. [University of Salento, Department of Physics, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Verdyan, A. [Science Department, Holon Academic Institute of Technology, Holon 58102 (Israel); Soifer, Y.M. [Science Department, Holon Academic Institute of Technology, Holon 58102 (Israel); Azoulay, J. [Science Department, Holon Academic Institute of Technology, Holon 58102 (Israel); Meda, L. [IGD Polimeri Europa S.p.A, Novara (Italy)

    2007-07-31

    We report on the growth and characterization of gold nitride thin films on Si <1 0 0> substrates at room temperature by reactive pulsed laser ablation. A pure (99.95%) Au target was ablated with KrF excimer laser pulses in nitrogen containing atmosphere (N{sub 2} or NH{sub 3}). The gas ambient pressure was varied in the range 0.1-100 Pa. The morphology of the films was studied by using optical, scanning electron and atomic force microscopy, evidencing compact films with RMS roughness in the range 3.6-35.1 nm, depending on the deposition pressure. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and energy dispersion spectroscopy (EDS) were used to detect the nitrogen concentration into the films. The EDS nitrogen peak does not decrease in intensity after 2 h annealing at 250 deg. C. Film resistivity was measured using a four-point probe and resulted in the (4-20) x 10{sup -8} {omega} m range, depending on the ambient pressure, to be compared with the value 2.6 x 10{sup -8} {omega} m of a pure gold film. Indentation and scratch measurements gave microhardness values of 2-3 GPa and the Young's modulus close to 100 GPa. X-ray photoemission spectra clearly showed the N 1s peak around 400 eV and displaced with respect to N{sub 2} phase. All these measurements point to the formation of the gold nitride phase.

  1. Preparation of pure boron coating film and its characterization by XPS and TDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyaidzu, M.; Yoshikawa, A.; Kodama, H.; Oya, Y.; Sagara, A.; Noda, N.; Okuno, K.

    2005-05-01

    A PACVD apparatus was designed and fabricated at Shizuoka University in order to prepare high-pure boron coating films. In the present study, some parameters, especially feeding gas concentration, substrate temperature and CVD input power, have been optimized to prepare pure boron coating films. It was found that the purity of boron coating film was controlled by the decaborane concentration of feeding gas and substrate temperature during the PACVD process, and each optimized values were 0.4 and 473 K, respectively. The atomic composition of boron in the boron coating film under the optimized condition has been achieved to be 0.94.

  2. Elasticity and inelasticity of silicon nitride/boron nitride fibrous monoliths.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnov, B. I.; Burenkov, Yu. A.; Kardashev, B. K.; Singh, D.; Goretta, K. C.; de Arellano-Lopez, A. R.; Energy Technology; Russian Academy of Sciences; Univer. de Sevilla

    2001-01-01

    A study is reported on the effect of temperature and elastic vibration amplitude on Young's modulus E and internal friction in Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and BN ceramic samples and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/BN monoliths obtained by hot pressing of BN-coated Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} fibers. The fibers were arranged along, across, or both along and across the specimen axis. The E measurements were carried out under thermal cycling within the 20-600 C range. It was found that high-modulus silicon-nitride specimens possess a high thermal stability; the E(T) dependences obtained under heating and cooling coincide well with one another. The low-modulus BN ceramic exhibits a considerable hysteresis, thus indicating evolution of the defect structure under the action of thermoelastic (internal) stresses. Monoliths demonstrate a qualitatively similar behavior (with hysteresis). This behavior of the elastic modulus is possible under microplastic deformation initiated by internal stresses. The presence of microplastic shear in all the materials studied is supported by the character of the amplitude dependences of internal friction and the Young's modulus. The experimental data obtained are discussed in terms of a model in which the temperature dependences of the elastic modulus and their features are accounted for by both microplastic deformation and nonlinear lattice-atom vibrations, which depend on internal stresses.

  3. Ab initio studies of vacancies in (8,0) and (8,8) single-walled carbon and boron nitride nanotubes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mashapa, MG

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A systematic study of vacancies in single-walled carbon nanotubes and boron nitride nanotubes was carried out. First principles calculations within the framework of density functional theory using the CASTEP code are used to optimize fully...

  4. Role of defects in the process of graphene growth on hexagonal boron nitride from atomic carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dabrowski, J.; Lippert, G.; Schroeder, T.; Lupina, G.

    2014-01-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is an attractive substrate for graphene, as the interaction between these materials is weak enough for high carrier mobility to be retained in graphene but strong enough to allow for some epitaxial relationship. We deposited graphene on exfoliated h-BN by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), we analyzed the atomistic details of the process by ab initio density functional theory (DFT), and we linked the DFT and MBE results by random walk theory. Graphene appears to nucleate around defects in virgin h-BN. The DFT analysis reveals that sticking of carbon to perfect h-BN is strongly reduced by desorption, so that pre-existing seeds are needed for the nucleation. The dominant nucleation seeds are C N C B and O N C N pairs and B 2 O 3 inclusions in the virgin substrate

  5. Spintronics with graphene-hexagonal boron nitride van der Waals heterostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamalakar, M. Venkata; Dankert, André; Bergsten, Johan; Ive, Tommy; Dash, Saroj P.

    2014-01-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is a large bandgap insulating isomorph of graphene, ideal for atomically thin tunnel barrier applications. In this letter, we demonstrate large area chemical vapor deposited (CVD) h-BN as a promising spin tunnel barrier in graphene spin transport devices. In such structures, the ferromagnetic tunnel contacts with h-BN barrier are found to show robust tunneling characteristics over a large scale with resistances in the favorable range for efficient spin injection into graphene. The non-local spin transport and precession experiments reveal spin lifetime ≈500 ps and spin diffusion length ≈1.6 μm in graphene with tunnel spin polarization ≈11% at 100 K. The electrical and spin transport measurements at different injection bias current and gate voltages confirm tunnel spin injection through h-BN barrier. These results open up possibilities for implementation of large area CVD h-BN in spintronic technologies

  6. Fabrication and properties of ceramic composites with a boron nitride matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, D.P.; Cofer, C.G.; Economy, J.

    1995-01-01

    Boron nitride (BN) matrix composites reinforced by a number of different ceramic fibers have been prepared using a low-viscosity, borazine oligomer which converts in very high yield to a stable BN matrix when heated to 1,200 C. Fibers including Nicalon (SiC), FP (Al 2 O 3 ), Sumica and Nextel 440 (Al 2 O 3 -SiO 2 ) were evaluated. The Nicalon/BN and Sumica/BN composites displayed good flexural strengths of 380 and 420 MPa, respectively, and modulus values in both cases of 80 GPa. On the other hand, FP/BN and Nextel/BN composites exhibited very brittle behavior. Nicalon fiber with a carbon coating as a buffer barrier improved the strength by 30%, with a large amount of fiber pullout from the BN matrix. In all cases except for Nicalon, the composites showed low dielectric constant and loss

  7. Preparation and thermal properties of polyacrylonitrile/hexagonal boron nitride composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madakbaş, Seyfullah; Çakmakçı, Emrah; Kahraman, Memet Vezir

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► PAN/h-BN composites with improved thermal stability were prepared. ► Thermal properties of composites were analysed by TGA and DSC. ► Flame retardancy of the composites increased up to 27%. - Abstract: Polyacrylonitrile is a thermoplastic polymer with unique properties and it has several uses. However its flammability is a major drawback for certain applications. In this study it was aimed to prepare polyacrylonitrile (PAN)/hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) composites with improved flame retardancy and thermal stability. Chemical structures of the composites were characterized by FTIR analysis. Thermal properties of these novel composites were analysed by TGA and DSC measurements. Glass transition temperatures and char yields increased with increasing h-BN percentage. Flame retardancy of the PAN composite materials improved with the addition of h-BN and the LOI value reached to 27% from 18%. Furthermore, the surface morphology of the composites was investigated by SEM analysis.

  8. Synthesis and Thermal Conductivity of Exfoliated Hexagonal Boron Nitride/Alumina Ceramic Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ching-cheh; Hurst, Janet; Santiago, Diana; Lizcano, Maricela; Kelly, Marisabel

    2017-01-01

    Exfoliated hexagonal boron nitride (hBN)/alumina composite can be fabricated by following the process of (1) heating a mixture of hBN, AlCl3, and NaF in nitrogen for intercalation; (2) heating the intercalated product in air for exfoliation and at the same time converting the intercalate (AlCl3) into Al2O3, (3) rinsing the oxidized product, (4) coating individual exfoliated hBN platelets that contain Al2O3 with new layers of aluminum oxide, and finally, (5) hot pressing the product into the composite. The composite thus obtained has a composition of approximately 60 percent by weight hBN and 40 percent by weight alumina. Its in-plane and through-plane thermal conductivity were measured to be 86 and 18 watts per meter Kelvin, respectively, at room temperature.

  9. Spin Current Switching and Spin-Filtering Effects in Mn-Doped Boron Nitride Nanoribbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Nemnes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The spin transport properties are investigated by means of the first principle approach for boron nitride nanoribbons with one or two substitutional Mn impurities, connected to graphene electrodes. The spin current polarization is evaluated using the nonequilibrium Green’s function formalism for each structure and bias. The structure with one Mn impurity reveals a transfer characteristics suitable for a spin current switch. In the case of two Mn impurities, the system behaves as an efficient spin-filter device, independent on the ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic configurations of the magnetic impurities. The experimental availability of the building blocks as well as the magnitudes of the obtained spin current polarizations indicates a strong potential of the analyzed structures for future spintronic devices.

  10. Pressure dependence of the refractive index of diamond, cubic silicon carbide and cubic boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balzaretti, N. M.; da Jornada, J. A. H.

    1996-09-01

    The pressure dependence of the refractive index of diamond, cubic boron nitride and cubic silicon carbide, was measured up to 9 GPa by an interferometric method using the diamond anvil cell. A least-square fit yields the following values for ( {1}/{n}) ( {dn }/{dP }): - 3.6 × 10 -4GPa -1 for diamond, -3.2 × 10 -4GPa -1 for c-BN and, for 3CSiC, -8.3 × 10 -4GPa -1. These results were used to investigate, for the first time under pressure, general empirical relationships between refractive index and energy gap found in the literature. The volume dependence of the electronic polarizability, α, of these compounds was determined through the Lorentz-Lorenz approach. The obtained linear behavior of α for the three cases was correlated to previous results for the pressure dependence of the transverse effective charge, e T∗.

  11. Nano-imaging and nano-spectroscopy of tunable surface phonon polaritons in hexagonal boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Siyuan; Fei, Zhe; Ma, Qiong; Rodin, Aleksandr; Wagner, Martin; McLeod, Alexander; Liu, Mengkun; Gannett, Will; Regan, William; Thiemens, Mark; Dominguez, Gerardo; Castro Neto, Antonio; Zettl, Alex; Keilmann, Fritz; Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo; Fogler, Michael; Basov, Dimitri

    2014-03-01

    Van der Waals crystals such as graphene, topological insulators, cuprate high-temperature superconductors, and many other layered structures reveal a rich variety of enigmatic electronic, photonic and magnetic properties. We report infrared (IR) nano-imaging of surface phonon polaritons in a prototypical van-der-Waals crystal: hexagonal boron nitride (hBN). In the setting of an antenna-based IR spectroscopic nanoscope, we accomplished launching, detecting, and real space imaging of the polaritonic waves. We were able to alter both the wavelength and the amplitude of such waves by varying the number of crystal layers in our specimens. We demonstrated a new nano-photonics method for mapping the polariton dispersion. The dispersion is shown to be governed by the crystal thickness according to a scaling law that persists down to a few monolayers. Our results point to novel functionalities of van-der-Waals crystals as reconfigurable nano-photonic materials.

  12. In Situ Mechanical Property Measurements of Amorphous Carbon-Boron Nitride Nanotube Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Woo; Lin, Yi; Nunez, Jennifer Carpena; Siochi, Emilie J.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Connell, John W.; Smith, Michael W.

    2011-01-01

    To understand the mechanical properties of amorphous carbon (a-C)/boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) nanostructures, in situ mechanical tests are conducted inside a transmission electron microscope equipped with an integrated atomic force microscope system. The nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation. We demonstrate multiple in situ tensile, compressive, and lap shear tests with a-C/BNNT hybrid nanostructures. The tensile strength of the a-C/BNNT hybrid nanostructure is 5.29 GPa with about 90 vol% of a-C. The tensile strength and strain of the end-to-end joint structure with a-C welding is 0.8 GPa and 5.2% whereas the lap shear strength of the side-by-side joint structure with a-C is 0.25 GPa.

  13. Boron nitride nanosheets decorated with silver nanoparticles through mussel-inspired chemistry of dopamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, Arup Kumer; In, Insik; Park, Byoungnam; Lee, Kang Seok; Park, Sung Young

    2014-01-01

    Boron nitride nanosheet (BNNS) decorated with silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) was successfully synthesized via mussel-inspired chemistry of dopamine. Poly(dopamine)-functionalized BNNS (PDA-BNNS) was prepared by adding dopamine into the aqueous dispersion of hydroxylated BNNS (OH-BNNS) at alkaline condition. AgNPs were decorated on PDA-BNNS through spontaneous reduction of silver cations by catechol moieties of a PDA layer on BNNS, resulting in AgNP-BNNS with good dispersion stability. Incorporation of PDA on BNNS not only played a role as a surface functionalization method of BNNS, but also provided a molecular platform for creating very sophisticated two-dimensional (2D) BNNS-based hybrid nanomaterials such as metal nanoparticle-decorated BNNS. (paper)

  14. Boron nitride-MWCNT/epoxy hybrid nanocomposites: Preparation and mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulus, Hasan; Üstün, Tugay [Mechanical Engineering Department, Selcuk University, Konya 42075 (Turkey); Eskizeybek, Volkan [Materials Science and Engineering, Canakkale Onsekiz Mart University, Canakkale 17100 (Turkey); Şahin, Ömer Sinan; Avcı, Ahmet [Mechanical Engineering Department, Selcuk University, Konya 42075 (Turkey); Ekrem, Mürsel, E-mail: mekrem@konya.edu.tr [Mechanical Engineering Department, Necmettin Erbakan University, Konya (Turkey)

    2014-11-01

    Highlights: • We studied the effects of BN nanoplatelets on tensile strength and elasticity modulus for polymer composites. • We investigated the synergetic effects of BN nanoplatelets and MWCNTs on tensile strength and elasticity modulus for polymer composites. • Fracture surfaces were examined by SEM analysis. - Abstract: In this study, production and mechanical properties of hybrid nanocomposites have been investigated. Hybrid nanocomposites are consisting of boron nitride nanoplatelets (BN) and multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) embedded in epoxy resin. The BN and MWCNT were mixed to epoxy resin in different weight fractions and mixtures were utilized for tensile test specimen production. The synthesized BN and produced hybrid nanocomposites were characterized by SEM, TEM, XRD, FT-IR and TGA analyses. The elasticity modulus and tensile strength values were obtained via tensile tests. The fracture morphologies were investigated after tensile test by means of scanning electron microscopy.

  15. Preparation and Properties Study of Thermally Conductive Epoxy/Modified Boron Nitride/Graphene Nanosheets Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hexiang; Zhao, Chunbao; Xu, Suichun; Yang, Xujie

    2017-12-01

    A series of thermally conductive and electric-insulating epoxy composites filled with boron nitride (BN) modified by octadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide and graphene nanosheets (GNP) were prepared. The effects of modified-BN (BNOTAB) and GNP content on thermal conductivity, electric-insulating and thermal stability properties of epoxy composite were investigated. The results indicate that the BNOTAB can homogeneously disperse into epoxy system. When the mass ratio of BNOTAB/GNP is 6:4 (total filler content is 10%), the thermal conductivity of the composites reached 0.48 W/(m·K), which is 108.7% higher than that of the neat epoxy. Meanwhile, the composite retains excellent electric-insulating property. TGA and DSC results showed that the addition of BNOTAB/GNP filler particles can improve the thermal stability of epoxy resin composites.

  16. Isotope effect on band gap and radiative transitions properties of boron nitride nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wei-Qiang; Yu, Hua-Gen; Zhi, Chunyi; Wang, Jianbin; Liu, Zhenxian; Sekiguchi, Takashi; Bando, Yoshio

    2008-02-01

    We have carried out an isotope study on the band gap and radiative transition spectra of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) using both experimental and theoretical approaches. The direct band gap of BNNTs was determined at 5.38 eV, independent of the nanotube size and isotope substitution, by cathodoluminescences (CL) spectra. At lower energies, several radiative transitions were observed, and an isotope effect was revealed. In particular, we confirmed that the rich CL spectra between 3.0 and 4.2 eV reflect a phonon-electron coupling mechanism, which is characterized by a radiative transition at 4.09 eV. The frequency red shift and peak broadening due to isotopic effect have been observed. Our Fourier transform infrared spectra and density functional theory calculations suggest that those radiative transitions in BNNTs could be generated by a replacement of some nitrogen atoms with oxygen.

  17. Role of hexagonal boron nitride in protecting ferromagnetic nanostructures from oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zihlmann, Simon; Makk, Péter; Vaz, Carlos A. F.; Schönenberger, Christian

    2016-03-01

    Ferromagnetic contacts are widely used to inject spin polarized currents into non-magnetic materials such as semiconductors or 2-dimensional materials like graphene. In these systems, oxidation of the ferromagnetic materials poses an intrinsic limitation on device performance. Here we investigate the role of ex situ transferred chemical vapour deposited hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) as an oxidation barrier for nanostructured cobalt and permalloy electrodes. The chemical state of the ferromagnets was investigated using x-ray photoemission electron microscopy because of its high sensitivity and lateral resolution. We have compared the oxide thickness formed on ferromagnetic nanostructures covered by hBN to uncovered reference structures. Our results show that hBN reduces the oxidation rate of ferromagnetic nanostructures suggesting that it could be used as an ultra-thin protection layer in future spintronic devices.

  18. Enhanced electrical conductivity in graphene and boron nitride nanoribbons in large electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chegel, Raad

    2018-02-01

    Based on data of density function theory (DFT) as the input of tight binding model, the electrical conductivity (σ(T)) of graphene nanoribbos (GNRs) and Boron Nitride nanoribbos (BNNRs) under external electric fields with different wide are studied using the Green's function method. The BNNRs are wide band gap semiconductor and they are turned into metal depending on their electric field strength. The σ(T) shows increasing in low temperature region and after reaching the maximum value, it will decrease in high temperature region. In lower temperature ranges, the electrical conductivity of the GNRs is greater than that of the BNNRs. In a low temperature region, the σ(T) of GNRs increases linearly with temperature unlike the BNNRs. The electrical conductivity are strongly dependent on the electric field strength.

  19. Electronic structure of carbon doped boron nitride nanotubes: a first-principles study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahaly, Mousumi Upadhyay; Waghmare, Umesh V

    2008-08-01

    We determine atomic and electronic structures of arm-chair and zigzag boron nitride nanotubes (BN-NTs) of different diameters using first-principles pseudopotential-based density functional theory calculations. We find that the structure of BN-NTs in bundled form is slightly different from that of the isolated BN-NTs, reflecting on the inter-tube interactions. Effects of carbon doping on the electronic structure of (5,5) and (5,0) BN-NTs are determined: carbon substitution either at B-site, being energetically very stable, or at N-site can yield magnetically polarized semiconducting state, whereas carbon substitution at neighbouring B and N sites yields a non-magnetic insulating structure.

  20. Exploring carrier transport phenomena in a CVD-assembled graphene FET on hexagonal boron nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Edwin; Jai, Nikhil; Jacobs-Gedri, Robin; Xu, Yang; Yu, Bin

    2012-03-30

    The supporting substrate plays a crucial role in preserving the superb electrical characteristicsof an atomically thin 2D carbon system. We explore carrier transport behavior in achemical-vapor-deposition- (CVD-) assembled graphene monolayer on hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) substrate. Graphene-channel field-effect transistors (GFETs) were fabricated on ultra-thin h-BN multilayers to screen out carrier scattering from the underlying SiO2 substrate. To explore the transport phenomena, we use three different approaches to extract carrier mobility, namely, effective carrier mobility (μFE), intrinsic carrier mobility (μ), and field-effect mobility (μFE). A comparative study has been conducted based on the electrical characterization results, uncovering the impacts of supporting substrate material and device geometry scaling on carrier mobility in GFETs with CVD-assembled graphene as the active channel.

  1. Growth of sub-nanometric palladium clusters on boron nitride nanotubes: a DFT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimmenti, Roberto; Cortese, Remedios; Ferrante, Francesco; Prestianni, Antonio; Duca, Dario

    2016-01-21

    A QM/MM investigation is reported dealing with the nucleation and growth of small palladium clusters, up to Pd8, on the outer surface of a suitable model of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs). It is shown that BNNTs could have a template effect on the cluster growth, which is due to the interplay between Pd-N and Pd-Pd interactions as well as due to the matching of the B3N3 ring and the Pd(111) face arrangement. The values for the cluster adsorption energies reveal a relatively strong physisorption, which suggests that under particular conditions the BNNTs could be used as supports for the preparation of shape-controlled metal clusters.

  2. Real-time oxide evolution of copper protected by graphene and boron nitride barriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galbiati, Miriam; Stoot, Adam Carsten; Mackenzie, David

    2017-01-01

    Applying protective or barrier layers to isolate a target item from the environment is a common approach to prevent or delay its degradation. The impermeability of two-dimensional materials such as graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) has generated a great deal of interest in corrosion...... and material science. Owing to their different electronic properties (graphene is a semimetal, whereas hBN is a wide-bandgap insulator), their protection behaviour is distinctly different. Here we investigate the performance of graphene and hBN as barrier coatings applied on copper substrates through a real......-time study in two different oxidative conditions. Our findings show that the evolution of the copper oxidation is remarkably different for the two coating materials....

  3. Electronic structures of an (8, 0) boron nitride/carbon nanotube heterojunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Hongxia; Zhang Heming; Song Jiuxu [Key Laboratory of Ministry of Education for Wide Band-Gap Semiconductor Materials and Devices, School of Microelectronics, Xidian University, Xi' an 710071 (China); Zhang Zhiyong, E-mail: liuhongxia_xidian@126.co [Information Science and Technology Institution, Northwest University, Xi' an 710069 (China)

    2010-01-15

    The electronic structure of the heterojunction is the foundation of the study on its working mechanism. Models of the heterojunctions formed by an (8, 0) boron nitride nanotube and an (8, 0) carbon nanotube with C-B or C-N interface have been established. The structures of the above heterojunctions were optimized with first-principle calculations based on density functional theory. The rearrangements of the heterojunctions concentrate mainly on their interfaces. The highest occupied molecular orbital and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of the heterojunctions distribute in the carbon nanotube section. As the band offsets of the above heterojunctions are achieved with the average bond energy method, the band structure is plotted. (semiconductor materials)

  4. Mass spectroscopic analysis of a plume induced by laser ablation of pyrolytic boron nitride

    CERN Document Server

    Chae, H B; Lee, I H; Park, S M

    1998-01-01

    The laser ablation of a pyrolytic boron nitride (pBN) target was investigated by time-of- flight quadrupole mass spectroscopy. According to the laser-correlated ion mass spectra, B sup + and B sub 2 sup + ions were produced, but neither N sup + , N sub 2 sup + , or BN sup + ions were observed at laser fluences below 1 J/cm sup 2. Instead, neutral N sub 2 molecules were found to be formed. The mean velocities and kinetic energies of the B sup + ions were obtained by time-of-flight analysis. Also, reactive laser ablation under a N sub 2 atmosphere was attempted by using a pulsed valve synchronized with the laser pulse.

  5. Prediction of mechanical properties for hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets using molecular mechanics model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natsuki, Toshiaki [Shinshu University, Faculty of Textile Science and Technology, Ueda (Japan); Shinshu University, Institute of Carbon Science and Technology, Nagano (Japan); Natsuki, Jun [Shinshu University, Institute of Carbon Science and Technology, Nagano (Japan)

    2017-04-15

    Mechanical behaviors of nanomaterials are not easy to be evaluated in the laboratory because of their extremely small size and difficulty controlling. Thus, a suitable model for the estimation of the mechanical properties for nanomaterials becomes very important. In this study, the elastic properties of boron nitride (BN) nanosheets, including the elastic modulus, the shear modulus, and the Poisson's ratio, are predicted using a molecular mechanics model. The molecular mechanics force filed is established to directly incorporate the Morse potential function into the constitutive model of nanostructures. According to the molecular mechanics model, the chirality effect of hexagonal BN nanosheets on the elastic modulus is investigated through a closed-form solution. The simulated result shows that BN nanosheets exhibit an isotropic elastic property. The present analysis yields a set of very simple formulas and is able to be served as a good approximation on the mechanical properties for the BN nanosheets. (orig.)

  6. Large quantity production of carbon and boron nitride nanotubes by mechano-thermal process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Y.; Fitzgerald, J.D.; Chadderton, L.; Williams, J.S.; Campbell, S.J.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Nanotube materials including carbon and boron nitride have excellent properties compared with bulk materials. The seamless graphene cylinders with a high length to diameter ratio make them as superstrong fibers. A high amount of hydrogen can be stored into nanotubes as future clean fuel source. Theses applications require large quantity of nanotubes materials. However, nanotube production in large quantity, fully controlled quality and low costs remains challenges for most popular synthesis methods such as arc discharge, laser heating and catalytic chemical decomposition. Discovery of new synthesis methods is still crucial for future industrial application. The new low-temperature mechano-thermal process discovered by the current author provides an opportunity to develop a commercial method for bulk production. This mechano-thermal process consists of a mechanical ball milling and a thermal annealing processes. Using this method, both carbon and boron nitride nanotubes were produced. I will present the mechano-thermal method as the new bulk production technique in the conference. The lecture will summarise main results obtained. In the case of carbon nanotubes, different nanosized structures including multi-walled nanotubes, nanocells, and nanoparticles have been produced in a graphite sample using a mechano-thermal process, consisting of I mechanical milling at room temperature for up to 150 hours and subsequent thermal annealing at 1400 deg C. Metal particles have played an important catalytic effect on the formation of different tubular structures. While defect structure of the milled graphite appears to be responsible for the formation of small tubes. It is found that the mechanical treatment of graphite powder produces a disordered and microporous structure, which provides nucleation sites for nanotubes as well as free carbon atoms. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes appear to grow via growth of the (002) layers during thermal annealing. In the case of BN

  7. Catalytically-etched hexagonal boron nitride flakes and their surface activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Do-Hyun, E-mail: nanotube@korea.ac.kr [School of Electrical Engineering, Korea University, 5-ga, Anam-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Minwoo; Ye, Bora [Green Manufacturing 3Rs R& D Group, Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Ulsan 681-310 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Ho-Kyun; Kim, Gyu Tae [School of Electrical Engineering, Korea University, 5-ga, Anam-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dong-Jin [New Functional Components Research Team, Korea Institute of Footware & Leather Technology, 152 Danggamseo-ro, Busanjin-gu, Busan 614-100 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eok-Soo [Green Manufacturing 3Rs R& D Group, Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Ulsan 681-310 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hong Dae, E-mail: hdkim@kitech.re.kr [Green Manufacturing 3Rs R& D Group, Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Ulsan 681-310 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-30

    Highlights: • Hexagonal boron nitride flakes are etched at low temperature in air by catalysts. • The presence of transition metal oxides produces an etched structure in the flakes. • Etched surfaces become highly active due to vacancy defects formed in the flakes. - Abstract: Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is a ceramic compound which is thermally stable up to 1000 °C in air. Due to this, it is a very challenging task to etch h-BN under air atmosphere at low temperature. In this study, we report that h-BN flakes can be easily etched by oxidation at 350 °C under air atmosphere in the presence of transition metal (TM) oxide. After selecting Co, Cu, and Zn elements as TM precursors, we simply oxidized h-BN sheets impregnated with the TM precursors at 350 °C in air. As a result, microscopic analysis revealed that an etched structure was created on the surface of h-BN flakes regardless of catalyst type. And, X-ray diffraction patterns indicated that the air oxidation led to the formation of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}, CuO, and ZnO from each precursor. Thermogravimetric analysis showed a gradual weight loss in the temperature range where the weight of h-BN flakes increased by air oxidation. As a result of etching, pore volume and pore area of h-BN flakes were increased after catalytic oxidation in all cases. In addition, the surface of h-BN flakes became highly active when the h-BN samples were etched by Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} and CuO catalysts. Based on these results, we report that h-BN flakes can be easily oxidized in the presence of a catalyst, resulting in an etched structure in the layered structure.

  8. Adsorption modes of molecular iodine on defected boron nitrides: A DFT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabieh, Masoud; Azar, Yavar Taghipour

    2018-03-01

    The interaction of molecular iodine with pristine and monovacant boron-nitride quantum dots (QDs) have been investigated using density functional theory. It was found that removing one B or N single atom significantly decreased the calculated Eg values at various exchange functional. In B-defected BN system, the localized spin densities canceled each other and overall polarization of system was found to be equal to unity. For N-defected system there was smaller spin densities localized on each closest B atoms. Both B- and N-vacancies caused appearance of new states in gap region. Our calculation revealed that spin density and polarization of defected system are localized on vacancy region and other atoms did not take part in this polarization. The results of electron localization function for N-DBN showed there was high density region at the position of removed nitrogen atom. The calculated adsorption energies implied that there was no significant chemical interaction between iodine molecule and pristine BN sheet. We suggested that when a deficiency was imposed to the BN sheet, the reactivity of the modified system toward iodine molecule significantly could increase. We found strong interaction between iodine and nitrogen atoms of B-DBN system. In the case of I2/N-DBN system the neighbor atoms had no contribution in spin polarization of the system and it seemed that all spin density of system transferred to the iodine molecule after adsorption. Strong correlation between molecular iodine orientation and BN-QDs via their interactions type has been clarified in this work. These findings may provide a deeper insight into halogen molecules interactions with low dimensional defected boron nitrides.

  9. Folate-conjugated boron nitride nanospheres for targeted delivery of anticancer drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng S

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Shini Feng,1 Huijie Zhang,1 Ting Yan,1 Dandi Huang,1 Chunyi Zhi,2 Hideki Nakanishi,1 Xiao-Dong Gao1 1Key Laboratory of Carbohydrate Chemistry and Biotechnology, Ministry of Education, School of Biotechnology, Jiangnan University, Wuxi, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, People’s Republic of China Abstract: With its unique physical and chemical properties and structural similarity to carbon, boron nitride (BN has attracted considerable attention and found many applications. Biomedical applications of BN have recently started to emerge, raising great hopes in drug and gene delivery. Here, we developed a targeted anticancer drug delivery system based on folate-conjugated BN nanospheres (BNNS with receptor-mediated targeting. Folic acid (FA was successfully grafted onto BNNS via esterification reaction. In vitro cytotoxicity assay showed that BNNS-FA complexes were non-toxic to HeLa cells up to a concentration of 100 µg/mL. Then, doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX, a commonly used anticancer drug, was loaded onto BNNS-FA complexes. BNNS-FA/DOX complexes were stable at pH 7.4 but effectively released DOX at pH 5.0, which exhibited a pH sensitive and sustained release pattern. BNNS-FA/DOX complexes could be recognized and specifically internalized by HeLa cells via FA receptor-mediated endocytosis. BNNS-FA/DOX complexes exhibited greater cytotoxicity to HeLa cells than free DOX and BNNS/DOX complexes due to the increased cellular uptake of DOX mediated by the FA receptor. Therefore, BNNS-FA complexes had strong potential for targeted cancer therapy. Keywords: boron nitride nanospheres, folic acid, doxorubicin, targeted delivery, cancer therapy

  10. Synthesis of Cubic Boron Nitride Nanoparticles from Boron Oxide, Melamine and NH3 by Non-Transferred Ar-N2 Thermal Plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Eun Ha; Kim, Tae-Hee; Choi, Sooseok; Park, Dong-Wha

    2015-11-01

    Cubic boron nitride (c-BN) which is has extremely high hardness and thermal conductivity comparable to the diamond was synthesized in nanoparticle form by using non-transferred thermal plasma. The input power of arc plasma was fixed at 13.5 kW and the operating pressure was also fixed at atmospheric pressure. Boron oxide (B2O3) and melamine (C3H6N6) were used as raw materials for the sources of boron and nitrogen. Ammonia gas (NH3) was additionally injected to plasma jet as reactive gas providing additional nitrogen. Decomposed B2O3 and C3H6N6 enhance reactivity for synthesizing c-BN with exothermic reactions between carbon, hydrogen and oxygen. Products were collected from the inner wall of reactor. In X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope measurements, the collected powder was confirmed as c-BN nanoparticles which have crystalline size smaller than 150 nm.

  11. Gas uptake and thermal stability analysis of boron nitride and carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Mengyu

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) exist in many forms and can have critical pore diameters on the angstrom length scale, making them suitable for molecular capture. By combining the porous structure of CNTs with the chemical stability of carbide and/or nitride materials, one can create a more robust, nanoporous material for gas capture in high temperature conditions. Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) are more chemically and thermally robust than pure CNTs, and were synthesized using CNTs as a structural precursor. However, this reaction mechanism was found to be unfavorable to produce high-yield and purity BNNTs. Adsorption tests using gases of interest (N2, He) were performed on commercial CNTs and BNNTs to determine their porosity and gas uptake abilities. Their thermal stability and oxidation resistance when heated up to 1773 K in air was also studied using differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis. While the CNTs began to oxidize between 450 °C and 750 °C, depending on the nanotube diameter, the BNNTs remained stable up until 1000 °C.

  12. Powder metallurgy routes toward aluminum boron nitride nanotube composites, their morphologies, structures and mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, Maho [Nanotube Unit, World Premier International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (WPI-MANA), National Institute for Materials Science, Namiki 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 3050044 (Japan); Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tennodai 1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 3050005 (Japan); Meng, Fanqiang [Research Center for Strategic Materials, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 3050044 (Japan); Firestein, Konstantin [Laboratory of Inorganic Nanomaterials, National University of Science and Technology “MISIS”, Leninsky pr. 4, Moscow 119049 (Russian Federation); Tsuchiya, Koichi [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tennodai 1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 3050005 (Japan); Research Center for Strategic Materials, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 3050044 (Japan); Golberg, Dmitri, E-mail: GOLBERG.Dmitri@nims.go.jp [Nanotube Unit, World Premier International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (WPI-MANA), National Institute for Materials Science, Namiki 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 3050044 (Japan); Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tennodai 1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 3050005 (Japan)

    2014-05-01

    Aluminum/boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) composites with up to 5 wt% (i.e., 9.7 vol%) nanotube fractions were prepared via spark plasma sintering (SPS) and high-pressure torsion (HPT) methods. Various microscopy techniques, X-ray diffraction, and energy dispersive X-ray analysis confirmed the integration of the two phases into decently dense and compact composites. No other phases, like Al borides or nitrides, formed in the Al–BNNTs macrocomposites of the two series. The BNNTs were found to be preferentially located along Al grain boundaries in SPS samples (grain size was 10–20 μm) creating micro-discontinuities and pores which were found to be detrimental for the sample hardness, whereas in HPT samples, the tubes were rather evenly distributed within a fine-grained Al matrix (grain size of several hundred nm). Therefore, the hardness of HPT samples was drastically increased with increasing BNNTs content in Al pellets. The value for Al–BNNT 3.0 wt% sample was more than doubled (190 MPa) compared to a pure Al–HPT compact (90 MPa). And the room temperature ultimate tensile strength of Al–BNNTs HPT samples containing 3.0 wt% BNNT (∼300 MPa) became ∼1.5 times larger than that of a BNNT-free HPT–Al compact (∼200 MPa)

  13. Sputtered boron indium oxide thin-film transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Kevin A.; Gouliouk, Vasily; Keszler, Douglas A.; Wager, John F.

    2017-11-01

    Boron indium oxide (BIO) is studied for thin-film transistor (TFT) channel layer applications. Sputtered BIO thin films exhibit an amorphous phase over a wide range of B2O3/In2O3 ratios and remain amorphous up to 500 °C. The band gap decreases linearly with decreasing boron content, whereas device performance generally improves with decreasing boron content. The best amorphous BIO TFT exhibits a field-effect mobility of 10 cm2 V-1 s-1, turn-on voltage of 2.5 V, and sub-threshold swing of 0.72 V/dec. Decreasing the boron content to 12.5% leads to a polycrystalline phase, but further increases the mobility up to 20-40 cm2 V-1 s-1. TCAD simulation results suggest that the reason for higher performance after increasing the anneal temperature from 200 to 400 °C is due to a lower defect density in the sub-bandgap region of the BIO channel layer.

  14. Manipulation and functionalization of nano-tubes: application to boron nitride nano-tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maguer, A.

    2007-01-01

    This PhD work is divided into two parts dealing with boron nitride (BNNT) and carbon nano-tubes. The first part is about synthesis, purification and chemical functionalization of BNNT. Single-walled BNNT are synthesized by LASER ablation of a hBN target. Improving the synthesis parameters first allowed us to limit the byproducts (hBN, boric acid). A specific purification process was then developed in order to enrich the samples in nano-tubes. Purified samples were then used to develop two new chemical functionalization methods. They both involve chemical molecules that present a high affinity towards the BN network. The use of long chain-substituted quinuclidines and borazines actually allowed the solubilization of BNNT in organic media. Purification and functionalization were developed for single-walled BNNT and were successfully applied to multi-walled BNNT. Sensibility of boron to thermic neutrons finally gave birth to a study about covalent functionalization possibilities of the network. The second part of the PhD work deals with separation of carbon nano-tubes depending on their properties. Microwave irradiation of carbon nano-tubes first allowed the enrichment of initially polydisperse samples in large diameter nano-tubes. A second strategy involving selective interaction between one type of tubes and fullerene micelles was finally envisaged to selectively solubilize carbon nano-tubes with specific electronic properties. (author) [fr

  15. Interlayer coupling enhancement in graphene/hexagonal boron nitride heterostructures by intercalated defects or vacancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sohee; Park, Changwon; Kim, Gunn

    2014-04-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride (hBN), a remarkable material with a two-dimensional atomic crystal structure, has the potential to fabricate heterostructures with unusual properties. We perform first-principles calculations to determine whether intercalated metal atoms and vacancies can mediate interfacial coupling and influence the structural and electronic properties of the graphene/hBN heterostructure. Metal impurity atoms (Li, K, Cr, Mn, Co, and Cu), acting as extrinsic defects between the graphene and hBN sheets, produce n-doped graphene. We also consider intrinsic vacancy defects and find that a boron monovacancy in hBN acts as a magnetic dopant for graphene, whereas a nitrogen monovacancy in hBN serves as a nonmagnetic dopant for graphene. In contrast, the smallest triangular vacancy defects in hBN are unlikely to result in significant changes in the electronic transport of graphene. Our findings reveal that a hBN layer with some vacancies or metal impurities enhances the interlayer coupling in the graphene/hBN heterostructure with respect to charge doping and electron scattering.

  16. Pauli magnetic susceptibility of bilayer graphene and hexagonal boron-nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mousavi, Hamze, E-mail: hamze.mousavi@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jalilvand, Samira [Department of Physics, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kurdestany, Jamshid Moradi [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65201 (United States)

    2016-12-01

    We study the contribution of s and p orbitals on the Pauli magnetic susceptibility (PMS) and density of state (DOS) of the following three structures (1) bilayer graphene (2) bilayer boron-nitride (BN) and (3) bilayer graphene-BN within a two-band tight-binding Harrison Hamiltonian and the Green's function technique. It is shown that in all three cases, the contribution of s and p{sub x} or p{sub y} orbitals have no states around the Fermi level, while for bilayer graphene and graphene-BN the total DOS and DOS of p{sub z} orbital appear to be a linear function around this level. We show explicitly that for bilayer BN the contribution of p{sub z} orbital does not have states around the Fermi level, because of ionization energy difference between the boron (B) and nitrogen (N) atoms. We find that the bandwidth of s, p{sub x} or p{sub y} is more extension than case of p{sub z} orbital as a result of the Van-Hove singularities in the DOS. This leads to consideration of the PMS in two, low and high temperature, regions.

  17. Structural, electronic and magnetic properties of carbon doped boron nitride nanowire: Ab initio study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jalilian, Jaafar, E-mail: JaafarJalilian@gmail.com [Young Researchers and Elite Club, Kermanshah Br anch, Islamic Azad University, P.O. Box: 6718997551, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kanjouri, Faramarz, E-mail: kanjouri@khu.ac.ir [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Kharazmi University, University Square, P.O. Box: 3197937551, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    Using spin-polarized density functional theory calculations, we demonstrated that carbon doped boron nitride nanowire (C-doped BNNW) has diverse electronic and magnetic properties depending on position of carbon atoms and their percentages. Our results show that only when one carbon atom is situated on the edge of the nanowire, C-doped BNNW is transformed into half-metal. The calculated electronic structure of the C-doped BNNW suggests that doping carbon can induce localized edge states around the Fermi level, and the interaction among localized edge states leads to semiconductor to half-metal transition. Overall, the bond reconstruction causes of appearance of different electronic behavior such as semiconducting, half-metallicity, nonmagnetic metallic, and ferromagnetic metallic characters. The formation energy of the system shows that when a C atom is doped on surface boron site, system is more stable than the other positions of carbon impurity. Our calculations show that C-doped BNNW may offer unique opportunities for developing nanoscale spintronic materials.

  18. Humidity resistant hydrogenated carbon nitride films

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikmeková, Eliška; Polčák, J.; Sobota, Jaroslav; Müllerová, Ilona; Peřina, Vratislav; Caha, O.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 275, 15 June (2013), s. 7-13 ISSN 0169-4332 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 ; RVO:61389005 Keywords : thin films * corrosion behanior * delamination * stress Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering; BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers (UJF-V) Impact factor: 2.538, year: 2013

  19. N-Doped Hybrid Graphene and Boron Nitride Armchair Nanoribbons As Nonmagnetic Semiconductors with Widely Tunable Electronic Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibpour, Razieh; Kashi, Eslam; Vazirib, Raheleh

    2018-03-01

    The electronic and chemical properties of N-doped hybrid graphene and boron nitride armchair nanoribbons (N-doped a-GBNNRs) in comparison with graphene armchair nanoribbon (pristine a-GNR) and hybrid graphene and boron nitride armchair nanoribbon (C-3BN) are investigated using the density functional theory method. The results show that all the mentioned nanoribbons are nonmagnetic direct semiconductors and all the graphitic N-doped a-GBNNRs are n-type semiconductors while the rest are p-type semiconductors. The N-doped graphitic 2 and N-doped graphitic 3 structures have the lowest work function and the highest number of valence electrons (Lowdin charges) which confirms that they are effective for use in electronic device applications.

  20. Ab initio self-consistent calculations of the Compton profiles and polarizabilities of diamond and cubic boron nitride

    CERN Document Server

    Ayma, D; Lichanot, A

    1998-01-01

    Compton profiles, polarizabilities and related functions of diamond and cubic boron nitride have been investigated within the Hartree-Fock approximation and the density functional theory, calculated within the local density approximation and generalized gradient approximation, but without any explicit correlation correction for the Compton profiles. The correlation part already included in the standard uncorrected density functional theory is deduced from the comparison of the two types of calculation. The Compton profile and reciprocal-form-factor anisotropies, polarizability, dielectric constant and energy loss function of the two compounds are compared at the same level of accuracy. These properties are very close in spite of the rather different chemical bonds due to the charge transfer occurring in cubic boron nitride and gaps. (author)

  1. Nanotribological performance of fullerene-like carbon nitride films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flores-Ruiz, Francisco Javier; Enriquez-Flores, Christian Ivan; Chiñas-Castillo, Fernando; Espinoza-Beltrán, Francisco Javier

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Fullerene-like CNx samples show an elastic recovery of 92.5% and 94.5% while amorphous CNx samples had only 75% elastic recovery. • Fullerene-like CNx films show an increment of 34.86% and 50.57% in fractions of C 1s and N 1s. • Fullerene-like CNx samples show a lower friction coefficient compared to amorphous CNx samples. • Friction reduction characteristics of fullerene-like CNx films are strongly related to the increase of sp 3 CN bonds. - Abstract: Fullerene-like carbon nitride films exhibit high elastic modulus and low friction coefficient. In this study, thin CNx films were deposited on silicon substrate by DC magnetron sputtering and the tribological behavior at nanoscale was evaluated using an atomic force microscope. Results show that CNx films with fullerene-like structure have a friction coefficient (CoF ∼ 0.009–0.022) that is lower than amorphous CNx films (CoF ∼ 0.028–0.032). Analysis of specimens characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows that films with fullerene-like structure have a higher number of sp 3 CN bonds and exhibit the best mechanical properties with high values of elastic modulus (E > 180 GPa) and hardness (H > 20 GPa). The elastic recovery determined on specimens with a fullerene-like CNx structure was of 95% while specimens of amorphous CNx structure had only 75% elastic recovery

  2. Nanotribological performance of fullerene-like carbon nitride films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores-Ruiz, Francisco Javier; Enriquez-Flores, Christian Ivan [Centro de Investigación y Estudios Avanzados (CINVESTAV) IPN, Unidad Querétaro, Lib. Norponiente 2000, Real de Juriquilla, C.P. 76230, Querétaro, Qro., México (Mexico); Chiñas-Castillo, Fernando, E-mail: fernandochinas@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Instituto Tecnológico de Oaxaca, Oaxaca, Oax. Calz. Tecnológico No. 125, CP. 68030, Oaxaca, Oax. (Mexico); Espinoza-Beltrán, Francisco Javier [Centro de Investigación y Estudios Avanzados (CINVESTAV) IPN, Unidad Querétaro, Lib. Norponiente 2000, Real de Juriquilla, C.P. 76230, Querétaro, Qro., México (Mexico)

    2014-09-30

    Highlights: • Fullerene-like CNx samples show an elastic recovery of 92.5% and 94.5% while amorphous CNx samples had only 75% elastic recovery. • Fullerene-like CNx films show an increment of 34.86% and 50.57% in fractions of C 1s and N 1s. • Fullerene-like CNx samples show a lower friction coefficient compared to amorphous CNx samples. • Friction reduction characteristics of fullerene-like CNx films are strongly related to the increase of sp{sup 3} CN bonds. - Abstract: Fullerene-like carbon nitride films exhibit high elastic modulus and low friction coefficient. In this study, thin CNx films were deposited on silicon substrate by DC magnetron sputtering and the tribological behavior at nanoscale was evaluated using an atomic force microscope. Results show that CNx films with fullerene-like structure have a friction coefficient (CoF ∼ 0.009–0.022) that is lower than amorphous CNx films (CoF ∼ 0.028–0.032). Analysis of specimens characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows that films with fullerene-like structure have a higher number of sp{sup 3} CN bonds and exhibit the best mechanical properties with high values of elastic modulus (E > 180 GPa) and hardness (H > 20 GPa). The elastic recovery determined on specimens with a fullerene-like CNx structure was of 95% while specimens of amorphous CNx structure had only 75% elastic recovery.

  3. Thermodynamic Studies of Decane on Boron Nitride and Graphite Substrates Using Synchrotron Radiation and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strange, Nicholas; Arnold, Thomas; Forster, Matthew; Parker, Julia; Larese, J. Z.; Diamond Light Source Collaboration; University of Tennessee Team

    2014-03-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) has a lattice structure similar to that of graphite with a slightly larger lattice parameter in the basal plane. This, among other properties, makes it an excellent substrate in place of graphite, eliciting some important differences. This work is part of a larger effort to examine the interaction of alkanes with magnesium oxide, graphite, and boron nitride surfaces. In our current presentation, we will discuss the interaction of decane with these surfaces. Decane exhibits a fully commensurate structure on graphite and hBN at monolayer coverages. In this particular experiment, we have examined the monolayer structure of decane adsorbed on the basal plane of hBN using synchrotron x-ray radiation at Diamond Light Source. Additionally, we have examined the system experimentally with volumetric isotherms as well as computationally using molecular dynamics simulations. The volumetric isotherms allow us to calculate properties which provide important information about the adsorbate's interaction with not only neighboring molecules, but also the interaction with the adsorbent boron nitride.

  4. Localization effects in the Auger spectra of ring nitrogen systems: Pyridine, poly(2-vinyl)pyridine, borazine, and boron nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rye, R.R.; Kelber, J.A.; Kellogg, G.E.; Nebesny, K.W.; Lichtenberger, D.L.

    1987-01-01

    The N(KVV) Auger spectra of gas phase pyridine (C 5 H 5 N) and borazine (B 3 N 3 H 6 ), and of solid phase poly(2-vinyl)pyridine (PVP) and hexagonal boron nitride [(BN)/sub x/] are reported and analyzed. The data indicate two Auger ''fingerprint'' types of nitrogen. Ammonia (NH 3 ) is the prototype for the first, where three of the five valence electrons are σ bonding and the other two are the lone pair. This localized electronic structure gives rise to relatively sharp features in the N(KVV) spectrum. Typical of the second fingerprint type is pyridine, where there are two σ bonding electrons, a lone pair of electrons, and one electron contributing to the delocalized π system. Theoretical nitrogen Auger transition energies and intensities are calculated for pyridine to demonstrate the general origin of the overlapping features in the relatively broad N(KVV) spectrum of this molecule. PVP fits into the second fingerprint type while borazine and boron nitride give nitrogen Auger spectra more like ammonia. Approximate calculations using the equivalent core concept are used to clarify the relationship between the ammonia, borazine, and boron nitride spectra. It is shown that in these systems the initial Auger state (core--hole) largely localizes the bonds and lone pair on the nitrogen. The Auger spectra show that it is the σ, π and nonbonding orbital characters that provide the Auger fingerprint

  5. Aqueously Dispersed Silver Nanoparticle-Decorated Boron Nitride Nanosheets for Reusable, Thermal Oxidation-Resistant Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi; Bunker, Christopher E.; Fernandos, K. A. Shiral; Connell, John W.

    2012-01-01

    The impurity-free aqueous dispersions of boron nitride nanosheets (BNNS) allowed the facile preparation of silver (Ag) nanoparticle-decorated BNNS by chemical reduction of an Ag salt with hydrazine in the presence of BNNS. The resultant Ag-BNNS nanohybrids remained dispersed in water, allowing convenient subsequent solution processing. By using substrate transfer techniques, Ag-BNNS nanohybrid thin film coatings on quartz substrates were prepared and evaluated as reusable surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) sensors that were robust against repeated solvent washing. In addition, because of the unique thermal oxidation-resistant properties of the BNNS, the sensor devices may be readily recycled by short-duration high temperature air oxidation to remove residual analyte molecules in repeated runs. The limiting factor associated with the thermal oxidation recycling process was the Ostwald ripening effect of Ag nanostructures.

  6. Core-level photoabsorption study of defects and metastable bonding configurations in boron nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez, I.; Jankowski, A.F.; Terminello, L.J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Boron nitride is an interesting material for technological applications and for fundamental solid state physics investigations. It is a compound isoelectronic with carbon and, like carbon can possess sp{sup 2} and sp{sup 3} bonded phases resembling graphite and diamond. BN crystallizes in the sp{sup 2}-bonded hexagonal (h-BN), rhombohedral (r-BN) and turbostratic phases, and in the sp{sup 3}-bonded cubic (c-BN) and wurtzite (w-BN) phases. A new family of materials is obtained when replacing C-C pairs in graphite with isoelectronic B-N pairs, resulting in C{sub 2}BN compounds. Regarding other boron compounds, BN is exceptional in the sense that it has standard two-center bonds with conventional coordination numbers, while other boron compounds (e.g. B{sub 4}C) are based on the boron icosahedron unit with three-center bonds and high coordination numbers. The existence of several allotropic forms and fullerene-like structures for BN suggests a rich variety of local bonding and poses the questions of how this affects the local electronic structure and how the material accommodates the stress induced in the transition regions between different phases. One would expect point defects to play a crucial role in stress accommodation, but these must also have a strong influence in the electronic structure, since the B-N bond is polar and a point defect will thus be a charged structure. The study of point defects in relationship to the electronic structure is of fundamental interest in these materials. Recently, the authors have shown that Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) is sensitive to point defects in h-BN, and to the formation of metastable phases even in amorphous materials. This is significant since other phase identification techniques like vibrational spectroscopies or x-ray diffraction yield ambiguous results for nanocrystalline and amorphous samples. Serendipitously, NEXAFS also combines chemical selectivity with point defect sensitivity.

  7. Characteristic Study of Boron Doped Carbon Nanowalls Films Deposited by Microwave Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chunyuan; Dong, Qi; Tulugan, Kelimu; Park, Yeong Min; More, Mahendra A; Kim, Jaeho; Kim, Tae Gyu

    2016-02-01

    In this research, catalyst-free vertically aligned boron doped carbon nanowalls films were fabricated on silicon (100) substrates by MPECVD using feeding gases CH4, H2 and B2H6 (diluted with H2 to 5% vol) as precursors. The substrates were pre-seeded with nanodiamond colloid. The fabricated CNWs films were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Raman Spectroscopy. The data obtained from SEM confirms that the CNWs films have different density and wall thickness. From Raman spectrum, a G peak around 1588 cm(-1) and a D band peak at 1362 cm(-1) were observed, which indicates a successful fabrication of CNWs films. The EDX spectrum of boron doped CNWs film shows the existence of boron and carbon. Furthermore, field emission properties of boron doped carbon nanowalls films were measured and field enhancement factor was calculated using Fowler-Nordheim plot. The result indicates that boron doped CNWs films could be potential electron emitting materials.

  8. Superconducting fluctuations in molybdenum nitride thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskaran, R.; Thanikai Arasu, A. V.; Amaladass, E. P.; Vaidhyanathan, L. S.; Baisnab, D. K.

    2018-02-01

    MoN thin films have been deposited using reactive sputtering. The change in resistance near superconducting transition temperature at various magnetic fields has been analyzed based on superconducting fluctuations in the system. The Aslamazov and Larkin scaling theory has been utilized to analyze the conductance change. The results indicate that most of the measurements show two dimensional (2D) nature and exhibit scaling behavior at lower magnetic fields (7T). We have also analyzed our data based on the model in which there is no explicit dependence of Tc. These analyses also substantiate a crossover from a 2D nature to a 3D at larger fields. Analysis using lowest Landau level scaling theory for a 2D system exhibit scaling behavior and substantiate our observations. The broadening at low resistance part has been explained based on thermally activated flux flow model and show universal behavior. The dependence of Uo on magnetic field indicates both single and collective vortex behavior.

  9. Synthesis of low oxygen concentration molybdenum nitride films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberson, S.L.; Davis, R.F.; Finello, D.

    1998-01-01

    Polycrystalline, small grain size, 15 μm thick Mo x N (x = 1 and 2) films containing ∼60 at.% γ-Mo 2 N and ∼40 at.% δ-MoN and void of Auger detectable concentrations of molybdenum oxides, have been prepared on 50-μm thick nitrided Ti substrates via programmed reaction and subsequent anneal at 750 C for 2 h of the precursor MoO 3 films with NH 3 . The latter films were prepared via liquid spray pyrolysis of an MoCl 5 /methanol mixture in air at 500 C. By contrast, residual MoO 2 occurred near the film-substrate interface in Mo x N films produced using the same programmed reaction but where MoO 3 had been deposited on bare Ti substrates. The change in density of MoO 3 (ρ = 4.69 gcm -3 ) to γ-Mo 2 N (ρ = 9.50 gcm -3 ) and δ-MoN (ρ = 9.05 gcm -3 ), as well as the nature of the topotactic conversion, produced grains which had a calculated average size of 10 nm and which exhibited good adhesion to the substrate. Variations in the conversion heating rates and the NH 3 flow rates also affected both the phase composition and the average grain size of the intermediate and the final reaction products. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of the Mo x N films revealed a highly porous surface morphology. (orig.)

  10. Effects of domain shape and size in the electronic and optical properties of boron nitride doped graphenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, L.; Azevedo, S.; de Lima Bernardo, Bertúlio

    2017-11-01

    The co-dopant, boron nitride (BN) doped graphene (BNG), has been synthesized recently and has been shown to be an efficient method to engineer band gaps in graphene. The control of the dopant domain size allows us to tailor the electronic structure and properties of graphene. We have studied the electronic and optical properties of boron nitride doped graphene with different domain shapes and sizes. Seven different doping configurations (three quantum dot types and four triangular-shaped types, being two with nitrogen and two with boron at the edges, respectively) were chosen and calculated making use of first-principles calculations based on the density functional theory (DFT). Band gap opening has been observed for such structures whose magnitude increases with the doping concentration. We found that only atoms near the dopant boundary make significant contributions to the near Fermi energy. The configurations with triangular-shaped nanodomains with nitrogen and boron at the edge show a different structure of absorption and conductivity peaks when compared with the quantum dot type structures and graphene. Such findings suggest a controllable way of manipulating the optical properties of doped graphene materials.

  11. The deposition of silicon nitride films under low pressure on wafers up to 200 mm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalivaiko O. Yu.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The influence of silicon nitride deposition condition on parameters of the obtained films has been investigated. It has been found that the deposition rate of silicon nitride films decreases with deposition temperature decreasing, and at the same time the within wafer thickness uniformity improves. It allows performing the reproducible deposition of silicon nitride films with thickness of less than 10 nm. It has been found that in order to decrease the oxidation depth of silicon nitride, it is appropriate to carry out the oxidation under 850—900°C. The developed process of silicon nitride deposition made it possible to obtain reservoir capacitors with specific capacitance of 3,8—3,9 fF/μm2 at film thickness of 7,0 nm.

  12. Radio Frequency Plasma Synthesis of Boron Nitride Nanotubes (BNNTs) for Structural Applications. Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hales, Stephen J.; Alexa, Joel A.; Jensen, Brian J.

    2016-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) are more thermally and chemically compatible with metal- and ceramic-matrix composites than carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The lack of an abundant supply of defect-free, high-aspect-ratio BNNTs has hindered development as reinforcing agents in structural materials. Recent activities at the National Research Council - Canada (NRC-C) and the University of California - Berkeley (UC-B) have resulted in bulk synthesis of few-walled, small diameter BNNTs. Both processes employ induction plasma technology to create boron vapor and highly reactive nitrogen species at temperatures in excess of 8000 K. Subsequent recombination under controlled cooling conditions results in the formation of BNNTs at a rate of 20 g/hr and 35 g/hr, respectively. The end product tends to consist of tangled masses of fibril-, sheet-, and cotton candy-like materials, which accumulate within the processing equipment. The radio frequency plasma spray (RFPS) facility at NASA Langley (LaRC), developed for metallic materials deposition, has been re-tooled for in-situ synthesis of BNNTs. The NRC-C and UC-B facilities comprise a 60 kW RF torch, a reactor with a stove pipe geometry, and a filtration system. In contrast, the LaRC facility has a 100 kW torch mounted atop an expansive reaction chamber coupled with a cyclone separator. The intent is to take advantage of both the extra power and the equipment configuration to simultaneously produce and gather BNNTs in a macroscopic form amenable to structural material applications.

  13. Semiconducting boron carbide thin films: Structure, processing, and diode applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Ruqiang

    The high energy density and long lifetime of betavoltaic devices make them very useful to provide the power for applications ranging from implantable cardiac pacemakers to deep space satellites and remote sensors. However, when made with conventional semiconductors, betavoltaic devices tend to suffer rapid degradation as a result of radiation damage. It has been suggested that the degradation problem could potentially be alleviated by replacing conventional semiconductors with a radiation hard semiconducting material like icosahedral boron carbide. The goal of my dissertation was to better understand the fundamental properties and structure of boron carbide thin films and to explore the processes to fabricate boron carbide based devices for voltaic applications. A pulsed laser deposition system and a radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering deposition system were designed and built to achieve the goals. After comparing the experimental results obtained using these two techniques, it was concluded that RF magnetron sputtering deposition technique is a good method to make B4C boron carbide thin films to fabricate repeatable and reproducible voltaic devices. The B4C thin films deposited by RF magnetron sputtering require in situ dry pre-cleaning to make ohmic contacts for B4C thin films to fabricate the devices. By adding another RF sputtering to pre-clean the substrate and thin films, a process to fabricate B4C / n-Si heterojunctions has been established. In addition, a low energy electron accelerator (LEEA) was built to mimic beta particles emitted from Pm147 and used to characterize the betavoltaic performance of betavoltaic devices as a function of beta energy and beta flux as well as do accelerated lifetime testing for betavoltaic devices. The energy range of LEEA is 20 - 250 keV with the current from several nA to 50 muA. High efficiency Si solar cells were used to demonstrate the powerful capabilities of LEEA, i.e., the characterization of betavoltaic

  14. Low temperature aluminum nitride thin films for sensory applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarar, E.; Zamponi, C.; Piorra, A.; Quandt, E., E-mail: eq@tf.uni-kiel.de [Institute for Materials Science, Chair for Inorganic Functional Materials, Kiel University, D-24143 Kiel (Germany); Hrkac, V.; Kienle, L. [Institute for Materials Science, Chair for Synthesis and Real Structure, Kiel University, D-24143 Kiel (Germany)

    2016-07-15

    A low-temperature sputter deposition process for the synthesis of aluminum nitride (AlN) thin films that is attractive for applications with a limited temperature budget is presented. Influence of the reactive gas concentration, plasma treatment of the nucleation surface and film thickness on the microstructural, piezoelectric and dielectric properties of AlN is investigated. An improved crystal quality with respect to the increased film thickness was observed; where full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the AlN films decreased from 2.88 ± 0.16° down to 1.25 ± 0.07° and the effective longitudinal piezoelectric coefficient (d{sub 33,f}) increased from 2.30 ± 0.32 pm/V up to 5.57 ± 0.34 pm/V for film thicknesses in the range of 30 nm to 2 μm. Dielectric loss angle (tan δ) decreased from 0.626% ± 0.005% to 0.025% ± 0.011% for the same thickness range. The average relative permittivity (ε{sub r}) was calculated as 10.4 ± 0.05. An almost constant transversal piezoelectric coefficient (|e{sub 31,f}|) of 1.39 ± 0.01 C/m{sup 2} was measured for samples in the range of 0.5 μm to 2 μm. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigations performed on thin (100 nm) and thick (1.6 μm) films revealed an (002) oriented AlN nucleation and growth starting directly from the AlN-Pt interface independent of the film thickness and exhibit comparable quality with the state-of-the-art AlN thin films sputtered at much higher substrate temperatures.

  15. Boron-doped nanocrystalline silicon thin films for solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fathi, E.; Vygranenko, Y.; Vieira, M.; Sazonov, A.

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on the structural, electronic, and optical properties of boron-doped hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si:H) thin films. The films were deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) at a substrate temperature of 150 deg. C. Crystalline volume fraction and dark conductivity of the films were determined as a function of trimethylboron-to-silane flow ratio. Optical constants of doped and undoped nc-Si:H were obtained from transmission and reflection spectra. By employing p + nc-Si:H as a window layer combined with a p' a-SiC buffer layer, a-Si:H-based p-p'-i-n solar cells on ZnO:Al-coated glass substrates were fabricated. Device characteristics were obtained from current-voltage and spectral-response measurements.

  16. Epitaxial ternary nitride thin films prepared by a chemical solution method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Hongmei [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Feldmann, David M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wang, Haiyan [TEXAS A& M; Bi, Zhenxing [TEXAS A& M

    2008-01-01

    It is indispensable to use thin films for many technological applications. This is the first report of epitaxial growth of ternary nitride AMN2 films. Epitaxial tetragonal SrTiN2 films have been successfully prepared by a chemical solution approach, polymer-assisted deposition. The structural, electrical, and optical properties of the films are also investigated.

  17. Influence of Carbon Content on the Crystallographic Structure of Boron Carbide Films

    OpenAIRE

    Conde, O.; Silvestre, A. J.; Oliveira, J. C.

    2002-01-01

    Boron carbide thin films were synthesised by laser-assisted chemical vapour deposition (LCVD), using a CO2 laser beam and boron trichloride and methane as precursors. Boron and carbon contents were measured by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). Microstructural analysis was carried out by Raman microspectroscopy and glancing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) was used to study the crystallographic structure and to determine the lattice parameters of the polycrystalline films. The rhombohedr...

  18. Two aspects of thin film analysis: boron profile and scattering length density profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen-Mayer, H.H. E-mail: chen-mayer@nist.gov; Lamaze, G.P.; Coakley, K.J.; Satija, S.K

    2003-06-01

    Boron/phosphorus-doped silicate glass (BPSG) thin films are widely used in microelectronic circuit devices. We employ two neutron techniques to investigate a 200-nm thick BPSG film: neutron depth profiling (NDP) and neutron reflectometry (NR) to obtain complementary information on the boron containing layer.

  19. Spin-Mechanical Scheme with Color Centers in Hexagonal Boron Nitride Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdi, Mehdi; Hwang, Myung-Joong; Aghtar, Mortaza; Plenio, Martin B.

    2017-12-01

    Recently observed quantum emitters in hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) membranes have a potential for achieving high accessibility and controllability thanks to the lower spatial dimension. Moreover, these objects naturally have a high sensitivity to vibrations of the hosting membrane due to its low mass density and high elasticity modulus. Here, we propose and analyze a spin-mechanical system based on color centers in a suspended hBN mechanical resonator. Through group theoretical analyses and ab initio calculation of the electronic and spin properties of such a system, we identify a spin doublet ground state and demonstrate that a spin-motion interaction can be engineered, which enables ground-state cooling of the mechanical resonator. We also present a toolbox for initialization, rotation, and readout of the defect spin qubit. As a result, the proposed setup presents the possibility for studying a wide range of physics. To illustrate its assets, we show that a fast and noise-resilient preparation of a multicomponent cat state and a squeezed state of the mechanical resonator is possible; the latter is achieved by realizing the extremely detuned, ultrastrong coupling regime of the Rabi model, where a phonon superradiant phase transition is expected to occur.

  20. Tribological evaluation of hexagonal boron nitride in modified jatropha oil as sustainable metalworking fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talib, Norfazillah; Rahim, Erween Abd.; Nasir, Ramdziah Md.

    2017-11-01

    The used of metalworking fluids (MWFs) from petroleum-based oil during machining process contributed negative impact to the humans and environment. Therefore, bio-based oil from vegetable oil was recently explored as an alternative solution to petroleum-based oil to implement sustainable manufacturing process. In this study, modified jatropha oil (MJO5) with and without hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) particles were evaluated through friction and wear test and orthogonal cutting performance in comparison with synthetic ester (SE). MJO5 were mixed with hBN particles at various concentrations (i.e. 0.05, 0.1 and 0.5wt.%). Experimental results showed that the addition of 0.05wt.% of hBN particles in MJO5 (MJO5a) provided lowest coefficient of friction (COF) and smallest wear scar diameter (WSD). MJO5a has the best anti-friction ability by reducing the cutting force and cutting temperature which related to the formation of thinner chips and small tool-chip contact length. MJO5a is the best substitute to SE as sustainable MWFs in the machining operation in regards to the environmental and health concern.

  1. Chemisorption of Hydroxide on 2D Materials from DFT Calculations: Graphene versus Hexagonal Boron Nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosjean, Benoit; Pean, Clarisse; Siria, Alessandro; Bocquet, Lydéric; Vuilleumier, Rodolphe; Bocquet, Marie-Laure

    2016-11-17

    Recent nanofluidic experiments revealed strongly different surface charge measurements for boron-nitride (BN) and graphitic nanotubes when in contact with saline and alkaline water (Nature 2013, 494, 455-458; Phys. Rev. Lett. 2016, 116, 154501). These observations contrast with the similar reactivity of a graphene layer and its BN counterpart, using density functional theory (DFT) framework, for intact and dissociative adsorption of gaseous water molecules. Here we investigate, by DFT in implicit water, single and multiple adsorption of anionic hydroxide on single layers. A differential adsorption strength is found in vacuum for the first ionic adsorption on the two materials-chemisorbed on BN while physisorbed on graphene. The effect of implicit solvation reduces all adsorption values, resulting in a favorable (nonfavorable) adsorption on BN (graphene). We also calculate a pK a ≃ 6 for BN in water, in good agreement with experiments. Comparatively, the unfavorable results for graphene in water echo the weaker surface charge measurements but point to an alternative scenario.

  2. QTAIM investigations of decorated graphyne and boron nitride for Li detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dehestani Maryam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The interactions between thirteen Li atoms and graphyne (GY and boron nitride (BN-yne were investigated by the density functional theory (DFT. The electronic and structural properties of the interactions between the hollow sites of GY and BN-yne with Li atoms were unveiled within the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM framework. Theoretical understanding of the interactions between Li atoms and extended carbon-based network structures is crucial for the development of new materials. Herein, calculations to explore the impact of Li decoration on the GY and BN-yne are reported. It was predicted that Li decoration would increase the density of state of these sheets. Owing to strong interactions between Li and the GY and BNyne, dramatic changes in the electronic properties of the sheets together with large band gap variations have been observed. The present study sheds deep insight into the chemical properties of the novel carbon–based two-dimensional (2D structures beyond the graphene sheet.

  3. Tunable thermal rectification in graphene/hexagonal boron nitride hybrid structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xue-Kun; Hu, Ji-Wen; Wu, Xi-Jun; Jia, Peng; Peng, Zhi-Hua; Chen, Ke-Qiu

    2018-02-01

    Using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate thermal rectification (TR) in graphene/hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) hybrid structures. Two different structural models, partially substituting graphene into h-BN (CBN) and partially substituting h-BN into graphene (BNC), are considered. It is found that CBN has a significant TR effect while that of BNC is very weak. The observed TR phenomenon can be attributed to the resonance effect between out-of-plane phonons of graphene and h-BN domains in the low-frequency region under negative temperature bias. In addition, the influences of ambient temperature, system size, defect number and substrate interaction are also studied to obtain the optimum conditions for TR. More importantly, the TR ratio could be effectively tuned through chemical and structural diversity. A moderate C/BN ratio and parallel arrangement are found to enhance the TR ratio. Detailed phonon spectra analyses are conducted to understand the thermal transport behavior. This work extends hybrid engineering to 2D materials for achieving TR.

  4. Epoxy-Thiol Systems Filled with Boron Nitride for High Thermal Conductivity Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M. Hutchinson

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available An epoxy-thiol system filled with boron nitride (BN, in the form of 80 µm agglomerates, has been investigated with a view to achieving enhanced thermal conductivity. The effect of BN content on the cure reaction kinetics has been studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and the thermal conductivity of the cured samples has been measured by the transient hot bridge method. The heat of reaction and the glass transition temperature of the fully cured samples are both independent of the BN content, but the cure reaction kinetics is not: with increasing BN content, the reaction first advances and is then delayed, this behaviour being more pronounced than for the same system with 6 µm BN particles, investigated previously. This dependence on BN content is attributed to the effects of heat transfer, and the DSC results can be correlated with the thermal conductivity of the cured systems, which is found to increase with both BN content and BN particle size. For a given BN content, the values of thermal conductivity obtained are significantly higher than many others reported in the literature, and achieve a value of over 4.0 W/mK for a BN content of about 40 vol %.

  5. Ab initio investigation of the SCN{sup -} chemisorption of single-walled boron nitride nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soltani, Alireza, E-mail: alireza.soltani46@yahoo.com [Young Researchers Club, Gorgan Branch, Islamic Azad University, Gorgan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ahmadian, Nasim [Department of Chemistry, Qaemshahr Branch, Islamic Azad University, Qaemshahr (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kanani, Yaser [Department of Chemistry, Gorgan Branch, Islamic Azad University, Gorgan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dehnokhalaji, Aliakbar; Mighani, Hossein [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Golestan University, Gorgan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-10-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We explored the adsorption behavior of the SCN{sup -} on outer surface BNNTs via DFT. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We reported the NBO charge distribution of SCN{sup -} on BNNTs surface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemisorptions are observed for SCN{sup -} on Al- and Ga-doped BNNTs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Notable changes are observed in the electronic properties of BNNT after doping. - Abstract: The thiocyanate anion (SCN{sup -}) adsorption capacity of zigzag single-walled boron nitride nanotubes (SWBNNTs) is studied via first-principles theory. Binding energy corresponding to the most stable configuration of SCN{sup -}/BNNT is found to be -148.42 kJ mol{sup -1}, which is typical for the chemisorptions. Our results indicate that both aluminum and gallium doping can significantly enhance the adsorption energy of SCN{sup -}/BNNTs complexes. Our electronic results reveal that there is a significant orbital hybridization between two species in adsorption process being an evidence of strong interaction. Thus, we arrive at the prediction that the BNNTs nanocage can be implemented as suitable sensor for practical applications.

  6. Enhanced Tunnel Spin Injection into Graphene using Chemical Vapor Deposited Hexagonal Boron Nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamalakar, M. Venkata; Dankert, André; Bergsten, Johan; Ive, Tommy; Dash, Saroj P.

    2014-01-01

    The van der Waals heterostructures of two-dimensional (2D) atomic crystals constitute a new paradigm in nanoscience. Hybrid devices of graphene with insulating 2D hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) have emerged as promising nanoelectronic architectures through demonstrations of ultrahigh electron mobilities and charge-based tunnel transistors. Here, we expand the functional horizon of such 2D materials demonstrating the quantum tunneling of spin polarized electrons through atomic planes of CVD grown h-BN. We report excellent tunneling behavior of h-BN layers together with tunnel spin injection and transport in graphene using ferromagnet/h-BN contacts. Employing h-BN tunnel contacts, we observe enhancements in both spin signal amplitude and lifetime by an order of magnitude. We demonstrate spin transport and precession over micrometer-scale distances with spin lifetime up to 0.46 nanosecond. Our results and complementary magnetoresistance calculations illustrate that CVD h-BN tunnel barrier provides a reliable, reproducible and alternative approach to address the conductivity mismatch problem for spin injection into graphene. PMID:25156685

  7. Enhanced dispersion of boron nitride nanosheets in aqueous media by using bile acid-based surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Ari; Park, Soo-Jin; Min, Byunggak; In, Insik

    2018-01-01

    Facile noncovalent surface functionalization of hydroxylated boron nitride nanosheet (BNNS-OH) was attempted through the sonication-assisted exfoliation of h-BN in aqueous media in the presence of bile acid-based surfactants such as sodium cholic acid (SC) or sodium deoxycholic acid (SDC), resulting in SC- or SDC-BNNS-OH dispersion with high up to 2 mg ml‑1 and enhanced dispersion stability due to the increased negative zeta potential. While prepared SC-BNNS-OH revealed multi-layered BNNS structures, the large lateral sizes of hundreds nanometers and clear h-BN lattice structures are very promising for the preparation and application of water-processable BNNS-based nanomaterials. It is regarded that noncovalent functionalization of BNNS-OH based on σ-π interaction between with σ-rich bile acid-based amphiphiles and π-rich BNNS is very effective to formulate multi-functional BNNS-based nanomaterials or hybrids that can be utilized in various applications where both the pristine properties of BNNS and the extra functions are simultaneously required.

  8. The effect of water absorption on the dielectric properties of polyethylene hexagonal boron nitride nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayoob, Raed; Alhabill, Fuad N.; Andritsch, Thomas; Vaughan, Alun S.

    2018-02-01

    The effect of water absorption on the dielectric response of polyethylene/hexagonal boron nitride nanocomposites has been studied by dielectric spectroscopy. The nanocomposites have been prepared with hBN concentrations ranging from 2 wt% to 30 wt%. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis revealed a very small amount of hydroxyl groups on the surface of hBN. Mass loss measurements showed that the nanocomposites did not absorb any water under ambient and dry conditions while there was some water absorption under wet conditions. The dielectric spectroscopy results showed a broad relaxation peak, indicative of different states of water with water shells of different thickness, which moved to higher frequencies with increasing water content. However, the dielectric losses were significantly lower than the losses reported in the literature of nanocomposites under wet conditions. In addition, all the absorbed water was successfully removed under vacuum conditions which demonstrated that the interactions between the water and the nanocomposites were very weak, due to the hydrophobic nature of the hBN surface. This is a highly useful property, when considering these materials for applications in electrical insulation.

  9. Removal of nickel (II from aqueous solution by graphene and boron nitride nanosheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafar Azamat

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out to study the removal of Ni2+ as a heavy metal from the water by the functionalized graphene nanosheet (GNS and boron nitride nanosheet (BNNS. Nickel causes asthma, conjunctivitis and inflammatory reactions and nickel salts act as emetics when swallowed; therefore, removal of nickel is necessary from the aqueous solutions. The systems were comprised of a nanosheet (GNS or BNNS with a pore in its center that it is containing an aqueous ionic solution of nickel chloride. For the removal of Ni2+ from an aqueous solution, the pores of nanosheet were functionalized by passivating each atom at the pores edge and then an external electric field was applied along the z-axis of the simulated system. To justify the passage of ions through the pores, the potential of the mean force (PMF of ions was calculated. To evaluate the properties of the system, the ion retention time and the radial distribution functions of species were measured. Based on the findings of this study, these nanostructure membranes can be recommended as a model for removal of heavy metals.

  10. Hydrogen storage performance of functionalized hexagonal boron nitride for fuel cell applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthu, R. Naresh; Rajashabala, S.; Kannan, R.

    2017-05-01

    Developing light weight, safe, efficient and compact hydrogen storage medium are still the major concerns for the blooming of hydrogen based energy economy. In the present article, activated hexagonal boron nitride (ABN) and ABN functionalized with lithium borohydride (ABN-LiBH4) nanocomposite based hydrogen storage medium are synthesized. where a facile solvent-assistant technique was adopted for the preparation of ABN-LiBH4 nanocomposite. The prepared hydrogen storage medium was subjected to various characterization techniques such as XRD, FTIR, SEM, EDX, CHNS - elemental analysis and TGA. Sievert's-like hydrogenation setup has been utilized for hydrogenation studies. It is noticed that the ABN-LiBH4 nanocomposite exhibits an attractive high gravimetric density of 1.67 wt% at 100 °C than pristine ABN. Moreover the stored hydrogen is released in the temperature range of 115 - 150 °C and possesses an average binding energy of 0.31 eV. These results indicate that the prepared ABN-LiBH4 nanocomposite paves a way to potential solid state hydrogen storage medium towards fuel cell technology as per the targets set by US Department of Energy (DOE).

  11. Hexagonal boron nitride nanoparticles decorated halloysite clay nanotubes as a potential hydrogen storage medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muthu, R. Naresh, E-mail: rnaresh7708@gmail.com; Rajashabala, S. [School of Physics, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai-625021, Tamil Nadu (India); Kannan, R. [Department of Physics, University College of Engineering, Anna University, Dindigul-624622 (India); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca 14850, New York (United States)

    2016-05-23

    The light weight and compact hydrogen storage materials is still prerequisite for the carbon free hydrogen fuel cell technology. In this work, the hydrogen storage performance of acid treated halloysite clay nanotubes (A-HNTs) and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) nanoparticles decorated acid treated halloysite nanoclay composite (A-HNT-h-BN) are demonstrated, where facile ultrasonic technique is adopted for the synthesis of A-HNT-h-BN nanoclay composite. Hydrogen storage studies were carried out using Sieverts-like hydrogenation setup. The A-HNTs and A-HNT-h-BN nanoclay composite were analyzed by XRD, FTIR, HRTEM, EDX, CHNS-elemental analysis and TGA. The A-HNT-h-BN nanoclay composite shows superior storage capacity of 2.19 wt% at 50 °C compared to the A-HNTs (0.58 wt%). A 100% desorption of stored hydrogen is noted in the temperature range of 138–175 °C. The average binding energy of hydrogen was found to be 0.34 eV for the prepared A-HNT-h-BN nanoclay composite. The excellent storage capability of A-HNT-h-BN nanoclay composite towards hydrogen at ambient temperature may find bright perspective in hydrogen fuel cell technology in near future.

  12. Radiolabeling and physicochemical characterization of boron nitride nanotubes functionalized with glycol chitosan polymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Daniel Cristian Ferreira; Ferreira, Tiago Hilario; Ferreira, Carolina de Aguiar; Sousa, Edesia Martins Barros de, E-mail: sousaem@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG) Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Lab. de Materiais Nanoestruturados para Bioaplicacoes; Cardoso, Valbert Nascimento, E-mail: cardosov@farmacia.ufmg.b [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Fac. de Farmacia

    2011-07-01

    In the last years, some nanostructured systems has proposed as new drugs and radioisotopes delivery systems, aiming the diagnosis and treatment of many diseases, including the cancer. Among these systems, the Boron Nitride Nanotubes (BNNTs) showed adequate characteristics to be applied in biomedical area, due to its high stability and considerable biocompatibility. However, due to its hydrophobic characteristics, these applications are limited and its behavior in vivo (guinea pigs) is unexplored yet. Seeking to overcome this problems, in the present work, we functionalized the BNNTs (noncovalent wrapped) with glycol chitosan (GC), a biocompatible and stable polymer, in order to disperse it in water. The results showed that BNNTs were well dispersed in water with mean size and polydispersity index suitable to conduct biodistribution studies in mice. The nanostructures were physicochemical and morphologically characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman Spectroscopy. The results revealed that the functionalization process with glycol chitosan was obtained with successfully on BNNTs surface. Furthermore, we developed a radiolabeling protocol with {sup 99m}Tc radioisotope in functionalized BNNTs, aiming in future, to conduct image biodistribution studies in mice. The results revealed that the nanotubes were radiolabeled with radiochemical purity above of 90%, being considered suitable to scintigraphic image acquisition. (author)

  13. Thermoconductive Thermosetting Composites Based on Boron Nitride Fillers and Thiol-Epoxy Matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac Isarn

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the effect of the addition of boron nitride (BN fillers in a thiol-cycloaliphatic epoxy formulation has been investigated. Calorimetric studies put into evidence that the kinetics of the curing has been scarcely affected and that the addition of particles does not affect the final structure of the network. Rheologic studies have shown the increase in the viscoelastic properties on adding the filler and allow the percolation threshold to be calculated, which was found to be 35.5%. The use of BN agglomerates of bigger size increases notably the viscosity of the formulation. Glass transition temperatures are not affected by the filler added, but Young’s modulus and hardness have been notably enhanced. Thermal conductivity of the composites prepared shows a linear increase with the proportion of BN particle sheets added, reaching a maximum of 0.97 W/K·m. The addition of 80 μm agglomerates, allowed to increase this value until 1.75 W/K·m.

  14. Growth of high-crystalline, single-layer hexagonal boron nitride on recyclable platinum foil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gwangwoo; Jang, A-Rang; Jeong, Hu Young; Lee, Zonghoon; Kang, Dae Joon; Shin, Hyeon Suk

    2013-04-10

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is gaining significant attention as a two-dimensional dielectric material, along with graphene and other such materials. Herein, we demonstrate the growth of highly crystalline, single-layer h-BN on Pt foil through a low-pressure chemical vapor deposition method that allowed h-BN to be grown over a wide area (8 × 25 mm(2)). An electrochemical bubbling-based method was used to transfer the grown h-BN layer from the Pt foil onto an arbitrary substrate. This allowed the Pt foil, which was not consumed during the process, to be recycled repeatedly. The UV-visible absorption spectrum of the single-layer h-BN suggested an optical band gap of 6.06 eV, while a high-resolution transmission electron microscopy image of the same showed the presence of distinct hexagonal arrays of B and N atoms, which were indicative of the highly crystalline nature and single-atom thickness of the h-BN layer. This method of growing single-layer h-BN over large areas was also compatible with use of a sapphire substrate.

  15. Huge thermal conductivity enhancement in boron nitride – ethylene glycol nanofluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Żyła, Gaweł, E-mail: gzyla@prz.edu.pl [Department of Physics and Medical Engineering, Rzeszow University of Technology, Rzeszow, 35-905 (Poland); Fal, Jacek; Traciak, Julian [Department of Physics and Medical Engineering, Rzeszow University of Technology, Rzeszow, 35-905 (Poland); Gizowska, Magdalena; Perkowski, Krzysztof [Department of Nanotechnology, Institute of Ceramics and Building Materials, Warsaw, 02-676 (Poland)

    2016-09-01

    Paper presents the results of experimental studies on thermophysical properties of boron nitride (BN) plate-like shaped particles in ethylene glycol (EG). Essentially, the studies were focused on the thermal conductivity of suspensions of these particles. Nanofluids were obtained with two-step method (by dispersing BN particles in ethylene glycol) and its’ thermal conductivity was analyzed at various mass concentrations, up to 20 wt. %. Thermal conductivity was measured in temperature range from 293.15 K to 338.15 K with 15 K step. The measurements of thermal conductivity of nanofluids were performed in the system based on a device using the transient line heat source method. Studies have shown that nanofluids’ thermal conductivity increases with increasing fraction of nanoparticles. The results of studies also presented that the thermal conductivity of nanofluids changes very slightly with the increase of temperature. - Highlights: • Huge thermal conductivity enhancement in BN-EG nanofluid was reported. • Thermal conductivity increase very slightly with increasing of the temperature. • Thermal conductivity increase linearly with volume concentration of particles.

  16. Boron nitride nanotubes coated with organic hydrophilic agents: Stability and cytocompatibility studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Tiago Hilário; Soares, Daniel Crístian Ferreira; Moreira, Luciana Mara Costa; Ornelas da Silva, Paulo Roberto; Gouvêa dos Santos, Raquel; Barros de Sousa, Edésia Martins

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, Boron Nitride Nanotubes (BNNTs) were synthesized and functionalized with organic hydrophilic agents constituted by glucosamine (GA), polyethylene glycol (PEG) 1000 , and chitosan (CH) forming new singular systems. Their size, distribution, and homogeneity were determined by photon correlation spectroscopy, while their surface charge was determined by laser Doppler anemometry. The morphology and structural organization were evaluated by Transmission Electron Microscopy. The functionalization was evaluated by Thermogravimetry analysis and Fourier Transformer Infrared Spectroscopy. The results showed that BNNTs were successfully obtained and functionalized, reaching a mean size and dispersity deemed adequate for in vitro studies. The in vitro stability tests also revealed a good adhesion of functionalized agents on BNNT surfaces. Finally, the in vitro cytocompatibility of functionalized BNNTs against MCR-5 cells was evaluated, and the results revealed that none of the different functionalization agents disturbed the propagation of normal cells up to the concentration of 50 μg/mL. Furthermore, in this concentration, no significantly chromosomal or morphologic alterations or increase in ROS (Reactive Oxygen Species) could be observed. Thus, findings from the present study reveal an important stability and cytocompatibility of functionalized BNNTs as new potential drugs or radioisotope nanocarriers to be applied in therapeutic procedures. - Highlights: • BNNTs were synthesized and functionalized with organic hydrophilic agents. • Hydrophilic molecules do not alter the biocompatibility profile of BNNTs. • No significantly chromosomal or morphologic alterations in ROS could be observed

  17. Boron nitride nanotubes coated with organic hydrophilic agents: Stability and cytocompatibility studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Tiago Hilário; Soares, Daniel Crístian Ferreira; Moreira, Luciana Mara Costa; Ornelas da Silva, Paulo Roberto [Serviço de Nanotecnologia, Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear CDTN/CNEN, Avenida Presidente Antônio Carlos, 6.627, Campus da UFMG, Pampulha, CEP 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Gouvêa dos Santos, Raquel [Laboratório de Radiobiologia, Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear CNEN/CDTN, Av. Presidente Antônio Carlos 6.627, Campus da UFMG, Pampulha, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Barros de Sousa, Edésia Martins, E-mail: sousaem@cdtn.br [Serviço de Nanotecnologia, Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear CDTN/CNEN, Avenida Presidente Antônio Carlos, 6.627, Campus da UFMG, Pampulha, CEP 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2013-12-01

    In the present study, Boron Nitride Nanotubes (BNNTs) were synthesized and functionalized with organic hydrophilic agents constituted by glucosamine (GA), polyethylene glycol (PEG){sub 1000}, and chitosan (CH) forming new singular systems. Their size, distribution, and homogeneity were determined by photon correlation spectroscopy, while their surface charge was determined by laser Doppler anemometry. The morphology and structural organization were evaluated by Transmission Electron Microscopy. The functionalization was evaluated by Thermogravimetry analysis and Fourier Transformer Infrared Spectroscopy. The results showed that BNNTs were successfully obtained and functionalized, reaching a mean size and dispersity deemed adequate for in vitro studies. The in vitro stability tests also revealed a good adhesion of functionalized agents on BNNT surfaces. Finally, the in vitro cytocompatibility of functionalized BNNTs against MCR-5 cells was evaluated, and the results revealed that none of the different functionalization agents disturbed the propagation of normal cells up to the concentration of 50 μg/mL. Furthermore, in this concentration, no significantly chromosomal or morphologic alterations or increase in ROS (Reactive Oxygen Species) could be observed. Thus, findings from the present study reveal an important stability and cytocompatibility of functionalized BNNTs as new potential drugs or radioisotope nanocarriers to be applied in therapeutic procedures. - Highlights: • BNNTs were synthesized and functionalized with organic hydrophilic agents. • Hydrophilic molecules do not alter the biocompatibility profile of BNNTs. • No significantly chromosomal or morphologic alterations in ROS could be observed.

  18. Viscoelastic sliding and diffusive relaxation along grain boundaries in polycrystalline boron nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pezzotti, G.; Nishida, Toshihiko; Kleebe, H.J.; Ota, Kenichi

    1997-01-01

    Dense hexagonal boron nitride (BN) materials were prepared via two different processing routes: (1) hot-pressing with the addition of a Ca/B-containing glass and (2) chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The resulting microstructure of both materials was studied by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. While the hot-pressed BN material shows, apart from large BN matrix grains, an inhomogeneous distribution of residual glass at room temperature, the CVD deposition yields a homogeneous fine grained microstructure with no amorphous residue detectable. Internal-friction experiments were performed to study the micromechanical response of the materials when exposed to high temperatures. The CVD material revealed no relaxation peak during testing up to 2,300 C, while the glass-doped sample showed a pronounced relaxation peak at a peak-top temperature of about 600 C. This temperature corresponds to the softening temperature known for bulk Ca/B-glasses and it is, therefore, concluded that the glass homogeneously wets the BN grains at elevated temperatures. The results presented are seen as the first clear evidence that the internal friction peak monitored for various glass-containing ceramics is indeed related to a viscous sliding process along grain boundaries

  19. Synthesis and Characterization of Nano Boron Nitride Reinforced Magnesium Composites Produced by the Microwave Sintering Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Gupta

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, magnesium composites with nano-size boron nitride (BN particulates of varying contents were synthesized using the powder metallurgy (PM technique incorporating microwave-assisted two-directional sintering followed by hot extrusion. The effect of nano-BN addition on the microstructural and the mechanical behavior of the developed Mg/BN composites were studied in comparison with pure Mg using the structure-property correlation. Microstructural characterization revealed uniform distribution of nano-BN particulates and marginal grain refinement. The coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE value of the magnesium matrix was improved with the addition of nano-sized BN particulates. The results of XRD studies indicate basal texture weakening with an increase in nano-BN addition. The composites showed improved mechanical properties measured under micro-indentation, tension and compression loading. While the tensile yield strength improvement was marginal, a significant increase in compressive yield strength was observed. This resulted in the reduction of tension-compression yield asymmetry and can be attributed to the weakening of the strong basal texture.

  20. Exfoliation and dispersion of boron nitride nanosheets to enhance ordinary Portland cement paste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Chen, Shu Jian; Basquiroto de Souza, Felipe; Wu, Bailin; Duan, Wen Hui

    2018-01-18

    Exfoliation and dispersion of boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs) is the key to achieving desired reinforcing effects for ordinary Portland cement (OPC). Few studies exist, however, of the dispersion of BNNSs in a cement-induced alkaline environment and their effect on the mechanical properties of normal OPC paste. In this study, protocols were developed to prepare BNNS-reinforced OPC paste. Ultrasonication was used to exfoliate BNNSs from h-BN in water based suspensions. The addition of surfactants in the suspension was found to hinder the exfoliation of the BNNSs. The surfactants were, however, found to be essential for the dispersion of the BNNSs in pore solution. Among the three surfactants used in this study, polycarboxylate based superplasticizer was most suitable as it maintained over 40% of the BNNSs stable in the pore solution for 4 hours and increased the hydration flow peak over 20%. Atomic force microscopy results indicated that the thickness of the BNNSs was mostly under 10 nm. With the addition of 0.003 wt% BNNSs, the compressive and tensile strengths of the cement were increased by 13% and 8%, respectively. Besides the nucleation effect as indicated by hydration heat, pore structure refinement and chemical bonding were also found as the main reinforcing mechanisms of BNNSs in OPC matrix.

  1. Hexagonal boron nitride nanoparticles decorated halloysite clay nanotubes as a potential hydrogen storage medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muthu, R. Naresh; Rajashabala, S.; Kannan, R.

    2016-01-01

    The light weight and compact hydrogen storage materials is still prerequisite for the carbon free hydrogen fuel cell technology. In this work, the hydrogen storage performance of acid treated halloysite clay nanotubes (A-HNTs) and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) nanoparticles decorated acid treated halloysite nanoclay composite (A-HNT-h-BN) are demonstrated, where facile ultrasonic technique is adopted for the synthesis of A-HNT-h-BN nanoclay composite. Hydrogen storage studies were carried out using Sieverts-like hydrogenation setup. The A-HNTs and A-HNT-h-BN nanoclay composite were analyzed by XRD, FTIR, HRTEM, EDX, CHNS-elemental analysis and TGA. The A-HNT-h-BN nanoclay composite shows superior storage capacity of 2.19 wt% at 50 °C compared to the A-HNTs (0.58 wt%). A 100% desorption of stored hydrogen is noted in the temperature range of 138–175 °C. The average binding energy of hydrogen was found to be 0.34 eV for the prepared A-HNT-h-BN nanoclay composite. The excellent storage capability of A-HNT-h-BN nanoclay composite towards hydrogen at ambient temperature may find bright perspective in hydrogen fuel cell technology in near future.

  2. Hexagonal boron nitride nanoparticles decorated halloysite clay nanotubes as a potential hydrogen storage medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthu, R. Naresh; Rajashabala, S.; Kannan, R.

    2016-05-01

    The light weight and compact hydrogen storage materials is still prerequisite for the carbon free hydrogen fuel cell technology. In this work, the hydrogen storage performance of acid treated halloysite clay nanotubes (A-HNTs) and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) nanoparticles decorated acid treated halloysite nanoclay composite (A-HNT-h-BN) are demonstrated, where facile ultrasonic technique is adopted for the synthesis of A-HNT-h-BN nanoclay composite. Hydrogen storage studies were carried out using Sieverts-like hydrogenation setup. The A-HNTs and A-HNT-h-BN nanoclay composite were analyzed by XRD, FTIR, HRTEM, EDX, CHNS-elemental analysis and TGA. The A-HNT-h-BN nanoclay composite shows superior storage capacity of 2.19 wt% at 50 °C compared to the A-HNTs (0.58 wt%). A 100% desorption of stored hydrogen is noted in the temperature range of 138-175 °C. The average binding energy of hydrogen was found to be 0.34 eV for the prepared A-HNT-h-BN nanoclay composite. The excellent storage capability of A-HNT-h-BN nanoclay composite towards hydrogen at ambient temperature may find bright perspective in hydrogen fuel cell technology in near future.

  3. Nonmagnetic Quantum Emitters in Boron Nitride with Ultranarrow and Sideband-Free Emission Spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangzhi; Shepard, Gabriella D; Cupo, Andrew; Camporeale, Nicolas; Shayan, Kamran; Luo, Yue; Meunier, Vincent; Strauf, Stefan

    2017-07-25

    Hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) is an emerging material in nanophotonics and an attractive host for color centers for quantum photonic devices. Here, we show that optical emission from individual quantum emitters in hBN is spatially correlated with structural defects and can display ultranarrow zero-phonon line width down to 45 μeV if spectral diffusion is effectively eliminated by proper surface passivation. We demonstrate that undesired emission into phonon sidebands is largely absent for this type of emitter. In addition, magneto-optical characterization reveals cycling optical transitions with an upper bound for the g-factor of 0.2 ± 0.2. Spin-polarized density functional theory calculations predict possible commensurate transitions between like-spin electron states, which are in excellent agreement with the experimental nonmagnetic defect center emission. Our results constitute a step toward the realization of narrowband quantum light sources and the development of spin-photon interfaces within 2D materials for future chip-scale quantum networks.

  4. Tunable room-temperature single photon emission from atomic defects in hexagonal boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosso, Gabriele; Moon, Hyowon; Lienhard, Benjamin; Efetov, Dmitri; Furchi, Marco; Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo; Ali, Sajid; Ford, Michael; Aharonovich, Igor; Englund, Dirk

    Two-dimensional van der Waals materials have emerged as promising platforms for solid-state quantum information processing devices with unusual potential for heterogeneous assembly. Recently, bright and photostable single photon emitters were reported from atomic defects in layered hexagonal boron nitride (hBN), but controlling inhomogeneous spectral distribution and reducing multi-photon emission presented open challenges. We demonstrate that strain control allows spectral tunability of hBN single photon emitters, and material processing sharply improves the single-photon purity. Our sample fabrication process relies on ion irradiation and high temperature annealing to isolate individual defects for single photon emission. Spectroscopy on this emitter reports high single photon purity of g(2)(0) =0.07, and high count rates exceeding 107 counts/sec at saturation. Furthermore, these emitters are stable to material transfer to other substrates, including a bendable beam that allows us to controllably apply strain. Our experiments indicate a maximum tuning of 6 meV and emission energy dependencies ranging from -3 to 6 meV/%. High-purity and photostable single photon emission at room temperature, together with spectral tunability and transferability, opens the door to scalable integration of high-quality quantum emitters in photonic quantum technologies.

  5. Nano-solenoid: helicoid carbon-boron nitride hetero-nanotube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zi-Yue; Miao, Chunyang; Guo, Wanlin

    2013-12-07

    As a fundamental element of a nanoscale passive circuit, a nano-inductor is proposed based on a hetero-nanotube consisting of a spiral carbon strip and a spiral boron nitride strip. It is shown by density functional theory associated with nonequilibrium Green function calculations that the nanotube exhibits attractive transport properties tunable by tube chirality, diameter, component proportion and connection manner between the two strips, with excellent 'OFF' state performance and high current on the order of 10-100 μA. All the hetero-nanotubes show negative differential resistance. The transmission peaks of current are absolutely derived from the helicoid carbon strips or C-BN boundaries, giving rise to a spiral current analogous with an energized nano-solenoid. According to Ampere's Law, the energized nano-solenoid can generate a uniform and tremendous magnetic field of more than 1 tesla, closing to that generated by the main magnet of medical nuclear magnetic resonance. Moreover, the magnitude of magnetic field can be easily modulated by bias voltage, providing great promise for a nano-inductor to realize electromagnetic conversion at the nanoscale.

  6. Controlled release of astaxanthin from nanoporous silicified-phospholipids assembled boron nitride complex for cosmetic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye Sun; Sung, Dae Kyung; Kim, Sung Hyun; Choi, Won Il; Hwang, Ee Tag; Choi, Doo Jin; Chang, Jeong Ho

    2017-12-01

    Nanoporous silicified-phospholipids assembled boron nitride (nSPLs@BN) powder was prepared and demonstrated for use in controlled release of anti-oxidant astaxanthin (AX) as a cosmetic application. The nanoporous silicified phospholipids (nSPLs) were obtained by the silicification with tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) of the hydrophilic region of phospholipid bilayers. This process involved the co-assembly of chemically active phospholipid bilayers within the porous silica matrix. In addition, nSPLs@BN was characterized using several analytical techniques and tested to assess their efficiency as drug delivery systems. We calculated the maximum release amounts as a function of time and various pH. The release rate of AX from the nSPLs@BN for the initial 24 h was 10.7 μmol/(h mg) at pH 7.4. Furthermore, we determined the antioxidant activity (KD) for the released AX with DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl) radical and the result was 34.6%.

  7. Tuning dissociation using isoelectronically doped graphene and hexagonal boron nitride: Water and other small molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Hamdani, Yasmine S. [Thomas Young Centre and London Centre for Nanotechnology, 17–19 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom); Department of Chemistry, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom); Alfè, Dario [Thomas Young Centre and London Centre for Nanotechnology, 17–19 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom); Department of Earth Sciences, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Lilienfeld, O. Anatole von [Institute of Physical Chemistry and National Center for Computational Design and Discovery of Novel Materials (MARVEL), Department of Chemistry, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 80, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Michaelides, Angelos, E-mail: angelos.michaelides@ucl.ac.uk [Thomas Young Centre and London Centre for Nanotechnology, 17–19 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2016-04-21

    Novel uses for 2-dimensional materials like graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) are being frequently discovered especially for membrane and catalysis applications. Still however, a great deal remains to be understood about the interaction of environmentally and industrially relevant molecules such as water with these materials. Taking inspiration from advances in hybridising graphene and h-BN, we explore using density functional theory, the dissociation of water, hydrogen, methane, and methanol on graphene, h-BN, and their isoelectronic doped counterparts: BN doped graphene and C doped h-BN. We find that doped surfaces are considerably more reactive than their pristine counterparts and by comparing the reactivity of several small molecules, we develop a general framework for dissociative adsorption. From this a particularly attractive consequence of isoelectronic doping emerges: substrates can be doped to enhance their reactivity specifically towards either polar or non-polar adsorbates. As such, these substrates are potentially viable candidates for selective catalysts and membranes, with the implication that a range of tuneable materials can be designed.

  8. Boron nitride nanosheets as improved and reusable substrates for gold nanoparticles enabled surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Cai, Qiran

    2015-01-01

    Atomically thin boron nitride (BN) nanosheets have been found to be excellent substrates for noble metal particles enabled surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), thanks to their good adsorption of aromatic molecules, high thermal stability and weak Raman scattering. Faceted gold (Au) nanoparticles have been synthesized on BN nanosheets using a simple but controllable and reproducible sputtering and annealing method. The size and density of the Au particles can be controlled by sputtering time, current and annealing temperature etc. Under the same sputtering and annealing conditions, the Au particles on BN of different thicknesses show various sizes because the surface diffusion coefficients of Au depend on the thickness of BN. Intriguingly, decorated with similar morphology and distribution of Au particles, BN nanosheets exhibit better Raman enhancements than silicon substrates as well as bulk BN crystals. Additionally, BN nanosheets show no noticeable SERS signal and hence cause no interference to the Raman signal of the analyte. The Au/BN substrates can be reused by heating in air to remove the adsorbed analyte without loss of SERS enhancement. This journal is © the Owner Societies 2015.

  9. Multifunctional fiber reinforced polymer composites using carbon and boron nitride nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashrafi, Behnam; Jakubinek, Michael B.; Martinez-Rubi, Yadienka; Rahmat, Meysam; Djokic, Drazen; Laqua, Kurtis; Park, Daesun; Kim, Keun-Su; Simard, Benoit; Yousefpour, Ali

    2017-12-01

    Recent progress in nanotechnology has made several nano-based materials available with the potential to address limitations of conventional fiber reinforced polymer composites, particularly in reference to multifunctional structures. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are the most prevalent case and offer amazing properties at the individual nanotube level. There are already a few high-profile examples of the use of CNTs in space structures to provide added electrical conductivity for static dissipation and electromagnetic shielding. Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs), which are structurally analogous to CNTs, also present a range of attractive properties. Like the more widely explored CNTs, individual BNNTs display remarkable mechanical properties and high thermal conductivity but with contrasting functional attributes including substantially higher thermal stability, high electrical insulation, polarizability, high neutron absorption and transparency to visible light. This presents the potential of employing either or both BNNTs and CNTs to achieve a range of lightweight, functional composites for space structures. Here we present the case for application of BNNTs, in addition to CNTs, in space structures and describe recent advances in BNNT production at the National Research Council Canada (NRC) that have, for the first time, provided sufficiently large quantities to enable commercialization of high-quality BNNTs and accelerate development of chemistry, composites and applications based on BNNTs. Early demonstrations showing the fabrication and limited structural testing of polymer matrix composites, including glass fiber-reinforced composite panels containing BNNTs will be discussed.

  10. High-Responsivity Graphene–Boron Nitride Photodetector and Autocorrelator in a Silicon Photonic Integrated Circuit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiue, Ren-Jye; Gao, Yuanda; Wang, Yifei; Peng, Cheng; Robertson, Alexander D.; Efetov, Dmitri K.; Assefa, Solomon; Koppens, Frank H. L.; Hone, James; Englund, Dirk

    2015-11-11

    Graphene and other two-dimensional (2D) materials have emerged as promising materials for broadband and ultrafast photodetection and optical modulation. These optoelectronic capabilities can augment complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor (CMOS) devices for high-speed and low-power optical interconnects. Here, we demonstrate an on-chip ultrafast photodetector based on a two-dimensional heterostructure consisting of high-quality graphene encapsulated in hexagonal boron nitride. Coupled to the optical mode of a silicon waveguide, this 2D heterostructure-based photodetector exhibits a maximum responsivity of 0.36 A/W and high-speed operation with a 3 dB cutoff at 42 GHz. From photocurrent measurements as a function of the top-gate and source-drain voltages, we conclude that the photoresponse is consistent with hot electron mediated effects. At moderate peak powers above 50 mW, we observe a saturating photocurrent consistent with the mechanisms of electron–phonon supercollision cooling. This nonlinear photoresponse enables optical on-chip autocorrelation measurements with picosecond-scale timing resolution and exceptionally low peak powers.

  11. High-Velocity Saturation in Graphene Encapsulated by Hexagonal Boron Nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamoah, Megan A; Yang, Wenmin; Pop, Eric; Goldhaber-Gordon, David

    2017-10-24

    We measure drift velocity in monolayer graphene encapsulated by hexagonal boron nitride (hBN), probing its dependence on carrier density and temperature. Due to the high mobility (>5 × 10 4 cm 2 /V/s) of our samples, the drift velocity begins to saturate at low electric fields (∼0.1 V/μm) at room temperature. Comparing results to a canonical drift velocity model, we extract room-temperature electron saturation velocities ranging from 6 × 10 7 cm/s at a low carrier density of 8 × 10 11 cm -2 to 2.7 × 10 7 cm/s at a higher density of 4.4 × 10 12 cm -2 . Such drift velocities are much higher than those in silicon (∼10 7 cm/s) and in graphene on SiO 2 , likely due to reduced carrier scattering with surface optical phonons whose energy in hBN (>100 meV) is higher than that in other substrates.

  12. Tuning the Schottky rectification in graphene-hexagonal boron nitride-molybdenum disulfide heterostructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Biao; Zhao, Yu-Qing; Yu, Zhuo-Liang; Wang, Lin-Zhi; Cai, Meng-Qiu

    2017-12-04

    It was still a great challenge to design high performance of rectification characteristic for the rectifier diode. Lately, a new approach was proposed experimentally to tune the Schottky barrier height (SBH) by inserting an ultrathin insulated tunneling layer to form metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) heterostructures. However, the electronic properties touching off the high performance of these heterostructures and the possibility of designing more efficient applications for the rectifier diode were not presently clear. In this paper, the structural, electronic and interfacial properties of the novel MIS diode with the graphene/hexagonal boron nitride/monolayer molybdenum disulfide (GBM) heterostructure had been investigated by first-principle calculations. The calculated results showed that the intrinsic properties of graphene and MoS 2 were preserved due to the weak van der Waals contact. The height of interfacial Schottky barrier can be tuned by the different thickness of hBN layers. In addition, the GBM Schottky diode showed more excellent rectification characteristic than that of GM Schottky diode due to the interfacial band bending caused by the epitaxial electric field. Based on the electronic band structure, we analyzed the relationship between the electronic structure and the nature of the Schottky rectifier, and revealed the potential of utilizing GBM Schottky diode for the higher rectification characteristic devices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Cytotoxicity and Efflux Pump Inhibition Induced by Molybdenum Disulfide and Boron Nitride Nanomaterials with Sheetlike Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Su; Shen, Zhuoyan; Wu, Bing; Yu, Yue; Hou, Hui; Zhang, Xu-Xiang; Ren, Hong-Qiang

    2017-09-19

    Sheetlike molybdenum disulfide (MoS 2 ) and boron nitride (BN) nanomaterials have attracted attention in the past few years due to their unique material properties. However, information on adverse effects and their underlying mechanisms for sheetlike MoS 2 and BN nanomaterials is rare. In this study, cytotoxicities of sheetlike MoS 2 and BN nanomaterials on human hepatoma HepG2 cells were systematically investigated at different toxic end points. Results showed that MoS 2 and BN nanomaterials decreased cell viability at 30 μg/mL and induced adverse effects on intracellular ROS generation (≥2 μg/mL), mitochondrial depolarization (≥4 μg/mL), and membrane integrity (≥8 μg/mL for MoS 2 and ≥2 μg/mL for BN). Furthermore, this study first found that low exposure concentrations (0.2-2 μg/mL) of MoS 2 and BN nanomaterials could increase plasma membrane fluidity and inhibit transmembrane ATP binding cassette (ABC) efflux transporter activity, which make both nanomaterials act as a chemosensitizer (increasing arsenic toxicity). Damage to plasma membrane and release of soluble Mo or B species might be two reasons that both nanomaterials inhibit efflux pump activities. This study provides a systematic understanding of the cytotoxicity of sheetlike MoS 2 and BN nanomaterials at different exposure levels, which is important for their safe use.

  14. Preparation of hydrophobic polyvinyl alcohol aerogel via the surface modification of boron nitride for environmental remediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruiyang; Wan, Wenchao; Qiu, Lijuan; Wang, Yonghua; Zhou, Ying

    2017-10-01

    Macroscopic polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) aerogel is of great interest in environmental remediation due to its low cost and easy fabrication. However, the hydrophily of PVA aerogel limited its application in oil-water separation. In this work, boron nitride (BN)-modified PVA aerogel has been successfully prepared by a cost-effective frozen-drying method. PVA plays a role as a scaffold of aerogel to support BN nanosheets which can modify the surface properties of PVA aerogel, resulting in a dramatic change of wettability from hydrophily (0°) to hydrophobicity (94.9°-100.8°). Moreover, the obtained BN-modified PVA aerogel possesses a favorable porous structure, low density (41.8-60.0 mg/cm3) and good adsorption capacity (12-38 g/g), which make it a promising wastewater treatment material. Importantly, PVA aerogel with other functions can be easily fabricated through coupling with other inorganic materials by this strategy, which can provide various promising applications for environmental remediation.

  15. Polarization and angular sensibility in the natural hyperbolic hexagonal boron nitride arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Le; Wang, Tao; Jiang, Xiaoyun; Yan, Xicheng; Xiao, Shuyuan

    2017-11-01

    This paper demonstrates a tunable and flexible metamaterial with the cuboid hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) arrays on a dielectric substrate. We numerically investigated the effect of the polarization together with the incident angle of the probe light on the transmission spectra of metamaterials and designed different geometric structures tuning the resonant frequency near the Reststrahlen bands of the h-BN in the mid-infrared. We further simulated the electric field distribution and calculated charge density associated to the specific responses that respectively exhibit the strong electric dipole resonances between the adjacent unit cells and inside the h-BN cuboids. The results show that both the positions of the resonance and the coupling strength strongly depend on geometric construction and corresponding external excitation condition. Hence the amplitude of the resonance can be actively modulated via altering excitation conditions and the metamaterial arrays can be designed to control the resonance in different spectra positions. Such metamaterials are important for its strong anisotropy and the extraordinary sensitivity which may find numerous applications in the design of metamaterials with specific sensing, nonlinear optical response and imaging capabilities creating new avenues for the development of devices in the mid-infrared.

  16. Enhanced microwave absorption properties of graphite nanoflakes by coating hexagonal boron nitride nanocrystals

    KAUST Repository

    Zhong, Bo

    2017-05-31

    We report herein the synthesis of a novel hexagonal boron nitride nanocrystal/graphite nanoflake (h-BNNC/GNF) composite through a wet-chemistry coating of graphite nanoflakes and subsequent in-situ thermal treatment process. The characterization results of X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, energy dispersive X-ray spectrum, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrate that h-BNNCs with diameter of tens of nanometers are highly crystallized and anchored on the surfaces of graphite nanoflakes without obvious aggregation. The minimum reflection loss (RL) value of the h-BNNC/GNF based absorbers could reach −32.38dB (>99.99% attenuation) with the absorber thickness of 2.0mm. This result is superior to the other graphite based and some dielectric loss microwave absorption materials recently reported. Moreover, the frequency range where the RL is less than −10dB is 3.49-17.28GHz with the corresponding thickness of 5.0 to 1.5mm. This reveals a better electromagnetic microwave absorption performance of h-BNNC/GNFs from the X-band to the Ku-band. The remarkable enhancement of the electromagnetic microwave absorption properties of h-BNNC/GNFs can be assigned to the increase of multiple scattering, interface polarization as well as the improvement of the electromagnetic impedance matching of graphite nanoflakes after being coated with h-BNNCs.

  17. Graphene-Hexagonal Boron Nitride Heterostructure as a Tunable Phonon–Plasmon Coupling System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Qu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The layered van der Waals (vdW heterostructure, assembled from monolayer graphene, hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN and other atomic crystals in various combinations, is emerging as a new paradigm with which to attain desired electronic and optical properties. In this paper, we study theoretically the mid-infrared optical properties of the vdW heterostructure based on the graphene–h-BN system. The light–matter interaction of this heterostructure system is described by the hyperbolic phonon–plasmon polaritons which originate from the coupling modes of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs in graphene with hyperbolic phonon polaritons (HPPs in h-BN. By numerical simulation, we find that the coupling modes are governed by the Fermi level of monolayer graphene, the thickness of the h-BN slab and the mode excitation sequence of SPPs and HPPs. Moreover, the response of the coupling modes of the graphene–h-BN heterostructure on a noble metal layer is also proposed in this paper.

  18. Catalytic Directional Cutting of Hexagonal Boron Nitride: The Roles of Interface and Etching Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Liang; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2017-05-10

    Transition-metal (TM) nanoparticle catalyzed cutting has been proven to be an efficient approach to carve out straight channels in graphene to produce high-quality nanoribbons. However, the applicability of such a catalytic approach to hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is still an open question due to binary element compositions. Here, our ab initio study indicates that long and straight channels along either the zigzag or the armchair direction of the BN sheet can be carved out, driven by the energetically favored TM-zigzag or TM-armchair BN interface, regardless of roughness of the TM particle surface. Optimal experimental conditions for the catalytic cutting of either BN or BN/graphene hybrid sheet across the domain boundary are proposed via the analysis of the competition between TM-BN (or TM-graphene) interface and H-terminated BN (or graphene) edge. The computation results can serve to guide the experimental design for the production of highly uniform BN (or hybrid BN/graphene) nanoribbons with atomically smooth edges.

  19. Ab-Initio Calculations of the Electronic Properties of Boron Nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Anthony; Khamala, Bethuel; Hart, Daniel; Bagayoko, Diola

    2014-03-01

    The potential of Boron Nitride (BN) in nanotechnology is tremendous. BN in its bulk form has a wide band gap with excellent thermal and chemical stability. BN structures can be tailored using various techniques in order to obtain desired materials properties. The State-of-the-art Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFCs) technology exploits graphitized carbon as a support for platinum-type catalysts. However, some forms of carbon are susceptible to long-term durability issues such as corrosion which is a detriment to fuel cell performance and viability. Novel non-carbon supports such as BN may provide a pathway for addressing the durability and performance issues associated with carbon support materials. We present preliminary theoretical studies, using an linear combination of atomic orbital (LCAO) quantum chemistry package from Ames Laboratory, of the electronic properties of this potentially important material. Our calculated band gap of 6.48 eV for the cubic structure, obtained with an LDA potential and the BZW-EF method, is in agreement with experiment. LASIGMA/ NNSA_MSIP.

  20. Electrical Transport and Network Percolation in Graphene and Boron Nitride Mixed-Platelet Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debbarma, Rousan; Behura, Sanjay; Nguyen, Phong; Sreeprasad, T S; Berry, Vikas

    2016-04-06

    Percolating network of mixed 2D nanomaterials (2DNs) can leverage the unique electronic structures of different 2DNs, their interfacial doping, manipulable conduction pathways, and local traps. Here, we report on the percolation mechanism and electro-capacitive transport pathways of mixed-platelet network of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO), two isostructural and isoelectronic 2DNs. The transport mechanism is explained in terms of electron hopping through isolated hBN defect traps between rGO (possibly via electron tunneling/hopping through "funneling" points). With optical bandgaps of 4.57 and 4.08 eV for the hBN-domains and 2.18 eV for the rGO domains, the network of hBN with rGO exhibits Poole-Frenkel emission-based transport with mean hopping gap of 1.12 nm (∼hBN trilayer) and an activation barrier of ∼15 ± 0.7 meV. Further, hBN (1.7 pF) has a 6-fold lower capacitance than 1:1 hBN:rGO, which has a resistance 2 orders of magnitude higher than that of rGO (1.46 MΩ). These carrier transport results can be applied to other multi-2DN networks for development of next-generation functional 2D-devices.

  1. Geometric and electronic structures of monolayer hexagonal boron nitride with multi-vacancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do-Hyun; Kim, Hag-Soo; Song, Min Woo; Lee, Seunghyun; Lee, Sang Yun

    2017-05-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is an electrical insulator with a large band gap of 5 eV and a good thermal conductor of which melting point reaches about 3000 °C. Due to these properties, much attention was given to the thermal stability rather than the electrical properties of h-BN experimentally and theoretically. In this study, we report calculations that the electronic structure of monolayer h-BN can be influenced by the presence of a vacancy defect which leads to a geometric deformation in the hexagonal lattice structure. The vacancy was varied from mono- to tri-vacancy in a supercell, and different defective structures under the same vacancy density were considered in the case of an odd number of vacancies. Consequently, all cases of vacancy defects resulted in a geometric distortion in monolayer h-BN, and new energy states were created between valence and conduction band with the Fermi level shift. Notably, B atoms around vacancies attracted one another while repulsion happened between N atoms around vacancies, irrespective of vacancy density. The calculation of formation energy revealed that multi-vacancy including more B-vacancies has much lower formation energy than vacancies with more N-vacancies. This work suggests that multi-vacancy created in monolayer h-BN will have more B-vacancies and that the presence of multi-vacancy can make monolayer h-BN electrically conductive by the new energy states and the Fermi level shift.

  2. Thermally conductive, dielectric PCM-boron nitride nanosheet composites for efficient electronic system thermal management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhi; Zhou, Lihui; Luo, Wei; Wan, Jiayu; Dai, Jiaqi; Han, Xiaogang; Fu, Kun; Henderson, Doug; Yang, Bao; Hu, Liangbing

    2016-11-24

    Phase change materials (PCMs) possessing ideal properties, such as superior mass specific heat of fusion, low cost, light weight, excellent thermal stability as well as isothermal phase change behavior, have drawn considerable attention for thermal management systems. Currently, the low thermal conductivity of PCMs (usually less than 1 W mK -1 ) greatly limits their heat dissipation performance in thermal management applications. Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is a two-dimensional material known for its excellent thermally conductive and electrically insulating properties, which make it a promising candidate to be used in electronic systems for thermal management. In this work, a composite, consisting of h-BN nanosheets (BNNSs) and commercialized paraffin wax was developed, which inherits high thermally conductive and electrically insulating properties from BNNSs and substantial heat of fusion from paraffin wax. With the help of BNNSs, the thermal conductivity of wax-BNNS composites reaches 3.47 W mK -1 , which exhibits a 12-time enhancement compared to that of pristine wax (0.29 W mK -1 ). Moreover, an 11.3-13.3 MV m -1 breakdown voltage of wax-BNNS composites was achieved, which shows further improved electrical insulating properties. Simultaneously enhanced thermally conductive and electrically insulating properties of wax-BNNS composites demonstrate their promising application for thermal management in electronic systems.

  3. Grain-size dependence of mechanical properties in polycrystalline boron-nitride: a computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becton, Matthew; Wang, Xianqiao

    2015-09-14

    The field of research in polycrystalline hexagonal boron nitride (PBN) has been enjoying extraordinary growth recently, in no small part due to the rise of graphene and the technical advancement of mass production in polycrystalline 2D materials. However, as the grain size in 2D materials can strongly affect their materials properties and the performance of their relevant devices, it is highly desirable to investigate this effect in PBN and leverage the service capability of PBN-based devices. Here we employ molecular dynamics simulations to explore the effects of grain size in PBN on its mechanical properties such as Young's modulus, yield strength, toughness, and energy release rate as well as its failure mechanism. By visualizing and comparing the tensile failure of PBN with and without a predefined crack we have shown that the grain size of PBN is positively correlated with its elastic modulus, yield strength and toughness. Through inclusion of a crack with varying length in the PBN samples, the energy release rate is determined for each grain size of PBN and it is concluded that the energy release rate increases with an increase in the average grain size of PBN. These findings offer useful insights into utilizing PBN for mechanical design in composite materials, abrasion resistance, and electronic devices etc.

  4. Localized emission from laser-irradiated defects in 2D hexagonal boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Songyan; Danang Birowosuto, Muhammad; Umar, Saleem; Ange Anicet, Maurice; Yingjie Tay, Roland; Coquet, Philippe; Tay, Beng Kang; Wang, Hong; Teo, Edwin Hang Tong

    2018-01-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) has emerged as a promising two-dimensional (2D) material for photonics device due to its large bandgap and flexibility in nanophotonic circuits. Here, we report bright and localized luminescent centres can be engineered in hBN monolayers and flakes using laser irradiation. The transition from hBN to cBN emerges in laser irradiated hBN large monolayers while is absent in processed hBN flakes. Remarkably, the colour centres in hBN flakes exhibit room temperature cleaner single photon emissions with g 2(0) ranging from 0.20 to 0.42, a narrower line width of 1.4 nm and higher brightness compared with monolayers. Our results pave the way to engineering deterministic defects in hBN induced by laser pulse and show great prospect for application of defects in hBN used as nano-size light source in photonics.

  5. Defective boron nitride nanotubes: mechanical properties, electronic structures and failure behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huan; Ding, Ning; Zhao, Xian; Wu, Chi-Man Lawrence

    2018-03-01

    Due to their excellent physical and chemical characteristics, boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) are regarded as a complementary addition to carbon nanotubes. Pioneer studies have demonstrated that defects in carbon nanotubes are considered tools for tuning the physical properties of these materials. In the present work, investigation on the mechanical and electronic properties of pristine and defective BNNTs was performed using the density functional theory method. The analysis on the intrinsic strength, stiffness, and failure critical strain of different types of BNNTs was conducted systematically. The computing results showed that the intrinsic strength of BNNTs decreased linearly with the increased Stone–Wales (SW) defect density around the axis. The SW defect density along the axis played a minor role on the changing of mechanical properties of BNNTs. The BNNT with a B vacancy expressed higher intrinsic strength than that of the N vacancy model. The final failure of the pristine BNNTs was due to the fracture of the Type1 bonds under the mechanical strain. Defects like SW or vacancy are served as the initial break site of BNNTs. Applying strain or creating defects are both effective methods for reducing the band gap of BNNTs.

  6. Thermal and mechanical properties of 3D printed boron nitride - ABS composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quill, Tyler J.; Smith, Matthew K.; Zhou, Tony; Baioumy, Mohamed Gamal Shafik; Berenguer, Joao Paulo; Cola, Baratunde A.; Kalaitzidou, Kyriaki; Bougher, Thomas L.

    2017-11-01

    The current work investigates the thermal conductivity and mechanical properties of Boron Nitride (BN)-Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS) composites prepared using both 3D printing and injection molding. The thermally conductive, yet electrically insulating composite material provides a unique combination of properties that make it desirable for heat dissipation and packaging applications in electronics. Materials were fabricated via melt mixing on a twin-screw compounder, then injection molded or extruded into filament for fused deposition modeling (FDM) 3D printing. Compositions of up to 35 wt.% BN in ABS were prepared, and the infill orientation of the 3D printed composites was varied to investigate the effect on properties. Injection molding produced a maximum in-plane conductivity of 1.45 W/m-K at 35 wt.% BN, whereas 3D printed samples of 35 wt.% BN showed a value of 0.93 W/m-K, over 5 times the conductivity of pure ABS. The resulting thermal conductivity is anisotropic; with the through-plane thermal conductivity lower by a factor of 3 for injection molding and 4 for 3D printing. Adding BN flakes caused a modest increase in the flexural modulus, but resulted in a large decrease in the flexural strength and impact toughness. It is shown that although injection molding produces parts with superior thermal and mechanical properties, BN shows much potential as a filler material for rapid prototyping of thermally conductive composites.

  7. Quasiparticle Band Gaps of Graphene and Graphone on Hexagonal Boron Nitride Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharche, Neerav; Nayak, Saroj

    2012-02-01

    Graphene holds great promise for post-silicon electronics; however, it faces two main challenges: opening up a band gap and finding a suitable substrate material. Graphene on hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) substrate provides a potential system to overcome these challenges. While theoretical studies suggested a possibility of a finite band gap of graphene on hBN, recent experimental studies find no band gap. We have studied graphene-hBN system using the first-principles density functional method and the many-body perturbation theory within GW approximation [1]. A Bernal stacked graphene on hBN has a band gap on the order of 0.1 eV, which disappears when graphene is misaligned with respect to hBN. The latter is the likely scenario in realistic devices. In contrast, if graphene supported on hBN is hydrogenated, the resulting system (graphone) exhibits band gaps larger than 2.5 eV. The graphone band gap is due to chemical functionalization and is robust in the presence of misalignment, however, it reduces by about 1 eV due to the polarization effects at the graphone/hBN interface.[4pt] [1] N. Kharche and S. K. Nayak, Nano Lett., DOI: 10.1021/nl202725w, (2011).

  8. Extremely large magnetoresistance in few-layer graphene/boron-nitride heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinadhan, Kalon; Shin, Young Jun; Jalil, Rashid; Venkatesan, Thirumalai; Geim, Andre K; Castro Neto, Antonio H; Yang, Hyunsoo

    2015-09-21

    Understanding magnetoresistance, the change in electrical resistance under an external magnetic field, at the atomic level is of great interest both fundamentally and technologically. Graphene and other two-dimensional layered materials provide an unprecedented opportunity to explore magnetoresistance at its nascent stage of structural formation. Here we report an extremely large local magnetoresistance of ∼2,000% at 400 K and a non-local magnetoresistance of >90,000% in an applied magnetic field of 9 T at 300 K in few-layer graphene/boron-nitride heterostructures. The local magnetoresistance is understood to arise from large differential transport parameters, such as the carrier mobility, across various layers of few-layer graphene upon a normal magnetic field, whereas the non-local magnetoresistance is due to the magnetic field induced Ettingshausen-Nernst effect. Non-local magnetoresistance suggests the possibility of a graphene-based gate tunable thermal switch. In addition, our results demonstrate that graphene heterostructures may be promising for magnetic field sensing applications.

  9. Layered insulator hexagonal boron nitride for surface passivation in quantum dot solar cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shanmugam, Mariyappan; Jain, Nikhil; Jacobs-Gedrim, Robin; Yu, Bin; Xu, Yang

    2013-01-01

    Single crystalline, two dimensional (2D) layered insulator hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), is demonstrated as an emerging material candidate for surface passivation on mesoporous TiO 2 . Cadmium selenide (CdSe) quantum dot based bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cell employed h-BN passivated TiO 2 as an electron acceptor exhibits photoconversion efficiency ∼46% more than BHJ employed unpassivated TiO 2 . Dominant interfacial recombination pathways such as electron capture by TiO 2 surface states and recombination with hole at valence band of CdSe are efficiently controlled by h-BN enabled surface passivation, leading to improved photovoltaic performance. Highly crystalline, confirmed by transmission electron microscopy, dangling bond-free 2D layered h-BN with self-terminated atomic planes, achieved by chemical exfoliation, enables efficient passivation on TiO 2 , allowing electronic transport at TiO 2 /h-BN/CdSe interface with much lower recombination rate compared to an unpassivated TiO 2 /CdSe interface

  10. The improvement of wave-absorbing ability of silicon carbide fibers by depositing boron nitride coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Fang; Zhang, Litong; Yin, Xiaowei; Liu, Yongsheng; Cheng, Laifei

    2013-04-01

    This work investigated electromagnetic wave (EMW) absorption and mechanical properties of silicon carbide (SiC) fibers with and without boron nitride (BN) coating by chemical vapor infiltration (CVI). The dielectric property and EM shielding effectiveness of SiC fiber bundles before and after being coated by BN were measured by wave guide method. The EM reflection coefficient of SiC fiber laminates with and without BN coating was determined by model calculation and NRL-arc method, respectively. Tensile properties of SiC fiber bundles with and without BN coating were tested at room temperature. Results show that SiC fibers with BN coating had a great improvement of EMW absorbing property because the composites achieved the impedance matching. BN with the low permittivity and dielectric loss contributed to the enhancive introduction and reduced reflection of EMW. The tensile strength and Weibull modulus of SiC fiber bundles coated by BN increased owing to the decrease of defects in SiC fibers and the protection of coating during loading.

  11. First-principle approach based bandgap engineering for cubic boron nitride doped with group IIA elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yubo; Wang, Pengtao; Hua, Fei; Zhan, Shijie; Wang, Xiaozhi; Luo, Jikui; Yang, Hangsheng

    2018-03-01

    Electronic properties of cubic boron nitride (c-BN) doped with group IIA elements were systematically investigated using the first principle calculation based on density functional theory. The electronic bandgap of c-BN was found to be narrowed when the impurity atom substituted either the B (IIA→B) or the N (IIA→N) atom. For IIA→B, a shallow accept level degenerated into valence band (VB); while for IIA→N, a shallow donor level degenerated conduction band (CB). In the cases of IIBe→N and IIMg→N, deep donor levels were also induced. Moreover, a zigzag bandgap narrowing pattern was found, which is in consistent with the variation pattern of dopants' radius of electron occupied outer s-orbital. From the view of formation energy, the substitution of B atom under N-rich conditions and the substitution of N atom under B-rich conditions were energetically favored. Our simulation results suggested that Mg and Ca are good candidates for p-type dopants, and Ca is the best candidate for n-type dopant.

  12. High and Stable Ionic Conductivity in 2D Nanofluidic Ion Channels between Boron Nitride Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Si; Liu, Dan; Wang, Guang; Portehault, David; Garvey, Christopher J; Gogotsi, Yury; Lei, Weiwei; Chen, Ying

    2017-05-10

    Achieving a high rate of ionic transport through porous membranes and ionic channels is important in numerous applications ranging from energy storage to water desalination, but it still remains a challenge. Herein we show that ions can quickly pass through interlayer spaces in hydrated boron nitride (BN) membranes. Measurements of surface-charge governed ionic currents between BN nanosheets in a variety of salt solutions (KCl, NaCl and CaCl 2 ) at low salt concentrations (<10 -4 M) showed several orders of magnitude higher ionic conductivity compared to that of the bulk solution. Moreover, due to the outstanding chemical and thermal stability of BN, the ionic conduits remain fully functional at temperatures up to 90 °C. The BN conduits can operate in acidic and basic environments and do not degrade after immersing in solutions with extreme pH (pH ∼ 0 or 14) for 1 week. Those excellent properties make the BN ionic conduits attractive for applications in nanofluidic devices and membrane separation.

  13. First-principle approach based bandgap engineering for cubic boron nitride doped with group IIA elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yubo Li

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Electronic properties of cubic boron nitride (c-BN doped with group IIA elements were systematically investigated using the first principle calculation based on density functional theory. The electronic bandgap of c-BN was found to be narrowed when the impurity atom substituted either the B (IIA→B or the N (IIA→N atom. For IIA→B, a shallow accept level degenerated into valence band (VB; while for IIA→N, a shallow donor level degenerated conduction band (CB. In the cases of IIBe→N and IIMg→N, deep donor levels were also induced. Moreover, a zigzag bandgap narrowing pattern was found, which is in consistent with the variation pattern of dopants’ radius of electron occupied outer s-orbital. From the view of formation energy, the substitution of B atom under N-rich conditions and the substitution of N atom under B-rich conditions were energetically favored. Our simulation results suggested that Mg and Ca are good candidates for p-type dopants, and Ca is the best candidate for n-type dopant.

  14. Composition-dependent buckling behaviour of hybrid boron nitride-carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin; Meguid, S A

    2015-05-21

    The buckling of hybrid boron nitride-carbon nanotubes (BN-CNTs) with various BN compositions and locations of the BN domain is investigated using molecular dynamics. We find that BN-CNTs with large BN composition (>38%) only undergo local shell-like buckling in their BN domain. Although similar local shell-like buckling can occur in BN-CNTs with a relatively small BN composition, it can transfer to the global column-like buckling of the whole BN-CNT with increasing strains. The critical strains for local shell-like and global column-like buckling decrease with increasing BN composition. In addition, critical strains and buckling modes of the global column-like buckling of BN-CNTs also strongly depend on the location of their BN domain. As a possible application of the buckling of BN-CNTs, we demonstrate that the BN-CNT can serve as a water channel integrated with a local natural valve using the local buckling of its BN domain.

  15. Copper nitride thin film prepared by reactive radio-frequency magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue, G.H.; Yan, P.X.; Liu, J.Z.; Wang, M.X.; Li, M.; Yuan, X.M.

    2005-01-01

    Copper nitride (Cu 3 N) thin films were deposited on glass substrates by reactive radio-frequency magnetron sputtering of a pure copper target in a nitrogen/argon atmosphere. The deposition rate of the films gradually decreased with increasing nitrogen flow rate. The color of the deposited films was a reddish dark brown. The Cu 3 N films obtained by this method were strongly textured with crystal direction [100]. The grain size of the polycrystalline films ranged from 16 to 26 nm. The Hall effect of the copper nitride (Cu 3 N) thin films was investigated. The optical energy gap of the films was obtained from the Hall coefficient and found to vary with the nitrogen content. The surface morphology was studied by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The copper nitride thin films are unstable and decompose into nitrogen and copper upon heat treatment when annealed in vacuum with argon protected at 200 deg. C for 1 h

  16. Nanopipe formation as a result of boron impurity segregation in gallium nitride grown by halogen-free vapor phase epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Taishi; Aoki, Yuko; Horibuchi, Kayo; Nakamura, Daisuke

    2016-12-01

    The work reported herein demonstrated that nanopipes can be formed via a surfactant effect, in which boron impurities preferentially migrate to semipolar and nonpolar facets. Approximately 3 μm-thick GaN layers were grown using halogen-free vapor phase epitaxy. All layers grown in pyrolytic boron nitride (pBN) crucibles were found to contain a high density of nanopipes in the range of 1010 to 1011 cm-2. The structural properties of these nanopipes were analyzed by X-ray rocking curve measurements, transmission electron microscopy, and three-dimensional atom probe (3DAP) tomography. The resulting 3DAP maps showed nanopipe-sized regions of boron segregation, and these nanopipes were not associated with the presence of dislocations. A mechanism for nanopipe formation was developed based on the role of boron as a surfactant and considering energy minima. A drastic reduction in the nanopipe density was achieved upon replacing the pBN crucibles with tantalum carbide-coated carbon crucibles. Consequently, we have confirmed that nanopipes can be formed solely due to surface energy changes induced by boron impurity surface segregation. For this reason, these results also indicate that nanopipes should be formed by other surfactant impurities such as Mg and Si.

  17. Photoluminescence and Raman Spectroscopy Studies of Carbon Nitride Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Hernández-Torres

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Amorphous carbon nitride films with N/C ratios ranging from 2.24 to 3.26 were deposited by reactive sputtering at room temperature on corning glass, silicon, and quartz as substrates. The average chemical composition of the films was obtained from the semiquantitative energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis. Photoluminescence measurements were performed to determine the optical band gap of the films. The photoluminescence spectra displayed two peaks: one associated with the substrate and the other associated with CNx films located at ≈2.13±0.02 eV. Results show an increase in the optical band gap from 2.11 to 2.15 eV associated with the increase in the N/C ratio. Raman spectroscopy measurements showed a dominant D band. ID/IG ratio reaches a maximum value for N/C ≈ 3.03 when the optical band gap is 2.12 eV. Features observed by the photoluminescence and Raman studies have been associated with the increase in the carbon sp2/sp3 ratio due to presence of high nitrogen content.

  18. Spotting 2D atomic layers on aluminum nitride thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekar, Hareesh; Bharadwaj B, Krishna; Vaidyuala, Kranthi Kumar; Suran, Swathi; Bhat, Navakanta; Varma, Manoj; Srinivasan Raghavan

    2015-10-23

    Substrates for 2D materials are important for tailoring their fundamental properties and realizing device applications. Aluminum nitride (AIN) films on silicon are promising large-area substrates for such devices in view of their high surface phonon energies and reasonably large dielectric constants. In this paper epitaxial layers of AlN on 2″ Si wafers have been investigated as a necessary first step to realize devices from exfoliated or transferred atomic layers. Significant thickness dependent contrast enhancements are both predicted and observed for monolayers of graphene and MoS2 on AlN films as compared to the conventional SiO2 films on silicon, with calculated contrast values approaching 100% for graphene on AlN as compared to 8% for SiO2 at normal incidences. Quantitative estimates of experimentally measured contrast using reflectance spectroscopy show very good agreement with calculated values. Transistors of monolayer graphene on AlN films are demonstrated, indicating the feasibility of complete device fabrication on the identified layers.

  19. Mechanical and electrochemical characterization of vanadium nitride (VN) thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caicedo, J.C., E-mail: Jcesarca@calima.univalle.edu.co [Grupo de Peliculas Delgadas, Departamento de Fisica, Universidad del Valle, Cali (Colombia); Zambrano, G. [Grupo de Peliculas Delgadas, Departamento de Fisica, Universidad del Valle, Cali (Colombia); Aperador, W. [Ingenieria Mecatronica, Universidad Militar Nueva Granada, Bogota (Colombia); Escobar-Alarcon, L.; Camps, E. [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Apdo. Postal 18-1027, Mexico, DF 11801 (Mexico)

    2011-10-15

    Vanadium nitride (V-N) thin films were grown using a reactive d.c. magnetron sputtering process, from a vanadium target (99.999%) in an Ar/N{sub 2} gas mixture at different deposition bias voltage. Films were deposited onto silicon (1 0 0) and RUS-3 steel substrates at 400 deg. C. Structural, compositional, mechanical and electrochemical characterizations were performed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), elastic forward analysis (EFA), nanoindentation, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and Tafel polarization curves, respectively. X-ray diffraction patterns show the presence of (1 1 1) and (2 0 0) crystallographic orientations associated to the V-N cubic phase. Nanoindentation measurements revealed that when the bias voltage increases from 0 V to -150 V the hardness and elastic modulus are increased from 11 GPa to 20 GPa and from 187 GPa to 221 GPa, respectively. EIS and Tafel curves showed that the corrosion rate of steel, coated with V-N single layer films deposited without bias voltage, diminishes 90% compared to the steel without this coating. On the other hand, when the V-N coating was deposited at the highest d.c. bias voltage (-150 V), the corrosion rate was greater than in the steel coated with zero-voltage (0 V) V-N films. This last result could be attributed to the formation of porosities produced by the ion bombardment during the deposition process.

  20. Mechanical and electrochemical characterization of vanadium nitride (VN) thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caicedo, J.C.; Zambrano, G.; Aperador, W.; Escobar-Alarcon, L.; Camps, E.

    2011-01-01

    Vanadium nitride (V-N) thin films were grown using a reactive d.c. magnetron sputtering process, from a vanadium target (99.999%) in an Ar/N 2 gas mixture at different deposition bias voltage. Films were deposited onto silicon (1 0 0) and RUS-3 steel substrates at 400 deg. C. Structural, compositional, mechanical and electrochemical characterizations were performed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), elastic forward analysis (EFA), nanoindentation, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and Tafel polarization curves, respectively. X-ray diffraction patterns show the presence of (1 1 1) and (2 0 0) crystallographic orientations associated to the V-N cubic phase. Nanoindentation measurements revealed that when the bias voltage increases from 0 V to -150 V the hardness and elastic modulus are increased from 11 GPa to 20 GPa and from 187 GPa to 221 GPa, respectively. EIS and Tafel curves showed that the corrosion rate of steel, coated with V-N single layer films deposited without bias voltage, diminishes 90% compared to the steel without this coating. On the other hand, when the V-N coating was deposited at the highest d.c. bias voltage (-150 V), the corrosion rate was greater than in the steel coated with zero-voltage (0 V) V-N films. This last result could be attributed to the formation of porosities produced by the ion bombardment during the deposition process.

  1. Electric Field Stiffening Effect in c-Oriented Aluminum Nitride Piezoelectric Thin Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cong; Shang, Zhengguo; Gong, Jia; Zhang, Feng; Zhou, Hong; Tang, Bin; Xu, Yi; Zhang, Chi; Yang, Ya; Mu, Xiaojing

    2018-01-17

    Aluminum nitride offers unique material advantages for the realization of ultrahigh-frequency acoustic devices attributed to its high ratio of stiffness to density, compatibility with harsh environments, and superior thermal properties. Although, to date, aluminum nitride thin films have been widely investigated regarding their electrical and mechanical characteristics under alternating small signal excitation, their ultrathin nature under large bias may also provide novel and useful properties. Here, we present a comprehensive investigation of electric field stiffening effect in c-oriented aluminum nitride piezoelectric thin films. By analyzing resonance characteristics in a 2.5 GHz aluminum nitride-based film bulk acoustic resonator, we demonstrate an up to 10% linear variation in the equivalent stiffness of aluminum nitride piezoelectric thin films when an electric field was applied from -150 to 150 MV/m along the c-axis. Moreover, for the first time, an atomic interaction mechanism is proposed to reveal the nature of electric field stiffening effect, suggesting that the nonlinear variation of the interatomic force induced by electric field modulation is the intrinsic reason for this phenomenon in aluminum nitride piezoelectric thin films. Our work provides vital experimental data and effective theoretical foundation for electric field stiffening effect in aluminum nitride piezoelectric thin films, indicating the huge potential in tunable ultrahigh-frequency microwave devices.

  2. Synthesis and mechanical properties of boron suboxide thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Music, Denis; Schneider, Jochen M.; Kugler, Veronika; Nakao, Setsuo; Jin, Ping; Oestblom, Mattias; Hultman, Lars; Helmersson, Ulf

    2002-01-01

    Boron suboxide thin films have been deposited on Si(100) and graphite substrates by reactive rf magnetron sputtering of a sintered B target in an Ar/O 2 atmosphere. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, elastic recoil detection analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy were applied to study the influence of the O 2 partial pressure on the film composition and microstructure. BO x thin films with x=[0.02-0.21] and a C impurity of approximately 0.3 at. % were formed by varying the O 2 partial pressure from 7.2x10 -7 to 3.3x10 -2 Pa. All films were amorphous and the films with x≥0.15 contained boric acid on the surface due to a probable chemical reaction with water in laboratory atmosphere. Mechanical properties were evaluated by nanoindentation. As x was increased from 0.02 to 0.21, the elastic modulus decreased from 272 to 109 GPa. The change in the elastic modulus was attributed to the O concentration variations

  3. Low-temperature glass bonding for sensor application using boron oxide thin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Legtenberg, Rob; Legtenberg, R.; Bouwstra, S.; Bouwstra, Siebe; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    Low-temperature glass bonding of silicon, silicon dioxide and silicon nitride is described. Boron oxide was used as the intermediate glass layer at a bonding temperature of 450°C. First experiments indicate that due to reflow and deformation of the molten glass layer, bonding over metal patterns is

  4. Superconducting niobium nitride films deposited by unbalanced magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olaya, J.J. [Departamento de Ingenieria Mecanica y Mecatronica, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Ciudad Universitaria, Carrera 30 Numero 45-03, Bogota (Colombia); Huerta, L. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito exterior s/n, CU Coyoacan, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Rodil, S.E. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito exterior s/n, CU Coyoacan, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico)], E-mail: ser42@iim.unam.mx; Escamilla, R. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito exterior s/n, CU Coyoacan, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico)

    2008-10-01

    Niobium nitride (NbN) thin films were deposited under different configurations of the magnetic field using a magnetron sputtering system. The magnetic field configuration varied from balanced to unbalanced leading to different growth conditions and film properties. The aim of the paper was to identify correlations between deposition conditions, film properties and the electrical properties, specially the superconductive critical temperature (T{sub C}). The results suggested that there is a critical deposition condition, having an optimum ion-atom arrival ratio that promotes a well ordered and textured nanocrystalline structure (cubic phase) with the minimum residual stress and only under this condition a high critical temperature (16K) was obtained. Lower T{sub C} values around 12K were obtained for the NbN samples having a lower degree of structural perfection and texture, and a larger fraction of intergranular voids. On the other hand, analysis of valence-band spectra showed that the contribution of the Nb 4d states remained essentially constant while the higher T{sub C} was correlated to a higher contribution of the N 2p states.

  5. Superconducting niobium nitride films deposited by unbalanced magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olaya, J.J.; Huerta, L.; Rodil, S.E.; Escamilla, R.

    2008-01-01

    Niobium nitride (NbN) thin films were deposited under different configurations of the magnetic field using a magnetron sputtering system. The magnetic field configuration varied from balanced to unbalanced leading to different growth conditions and film properties. The aim of the paper was to identify correlations between deposition conditions, film properties and the electrical properties, specially the superconductive critical temperature (T C ). The results suggested that there is a critical deposition condition, having an optimum ion-atom arrival ratio that promotes a well ordered and textured nanocrystalline structure (cubic phase) with the minimum residual stress and only under this condition a high critical temperature (16K) was obtained. Lower T C values around 12K were obtained for the NbN samples having a lower degree of structural perfection and texture, and a larger fraction of intergranular voids. On the other hand, analysis of valence-band spectra showed that the contribution of the Nb 4d states remained essentially constant while the higher T C was correlated to a higher contribution of the N 2p states

  6. Columnar structure of reactively sputtered aluminium nitride films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Chisan; Hwang Binghwai; Lu Hongyang; Hsu Tzuchien

    2002-01-01

    Columnar structure of thin aluminium nitride (AlN) films is examined by x-ray diffractometry (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The films were deposited on SiO 2 /Si(100) substrate using radiofrequency reactive sputtering method. Strong [0001] preferred orientation is observed by XRD and confirmed by selected area diffraction pattern of TEM. Columnar grains of ∼50-100 nm inclined at an angle of ∼10 deg. to the substrate normal are observed by SEM. As revealed by TEM, each columnar grain is composed of nano-grains of the order of 10 nm and no faceting is observed in the nano-grains and columns. The [0001] preferred orientation results as columnar grains are oriented at various azimuthal angles with their c-axes perpendicular to the substrate surface. A slight tilt of a few tenths of a degree between adjacent nano-grains within a column is also observed. The random azimuthal orientation of columnar grains and small tilt between nano-grains in the films are accommodated by the amorphous phase present in the grain boundaries

  7. Anticorrosive performance of waterborne epoxy coatings containing water-dispersible hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) nanosheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Mingjun [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Ren, Siming [Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Related Technologies, Zhejiang Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Protective Technologies, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Chen, Jia; Liu, Shuan [Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Related Technologies, Zhejiang Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Protective Technologies, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China); Zhang, Guangan [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Zhao, Haichao, E-mail: zhaohaichao@nimte.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Related Technologies, Zhejiang Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Protective Technologies, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China); Wang, Liping, E-mail: wangliping@nimte.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Related Technologies, Zhejiang Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Protective Technologies, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China); Xue, Qunji, E-mail: qjxue@lzb.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Related Technologies, Zhejiang Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Protective Technologies, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China)

    2017-03-01

    Highlights: • Hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets were well dispersed by using water-soluble carboxylated aniline trimer as dispersant. • The best corrosion performance of waterborne epoxy coatings was achieved with the addition of 1 wt% h-BN. • The decrease of the pores and defects of coating matrix inhibits the diffusion and water absorption of corrosive medium in the coating. - Abstract: Homogenous dispersion of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) nanosheets in solvents or in the polymer matrix is crucial to initiate their many applications. Here, homogeneous dispersion of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) in epoxy matrix was achieved with a water-soluble carboxylated aniline trimer derivative (CAT{sup −}) as a dispersant, which was attributed to the strong π-π interaction between h-BN and CAT{sup −}, as proved by Raman and UV–vis spectra. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis confirmed a random dispersion of h-BN nanosheets in the waterborne epoxy coatings. The deterioration process of water-borne epoxy coating with and without h-BN nanosheets during the long-term immersion in 3.5 wt% NaCl solution was investigated by electrochemical measurements and water absorption test. Results implied that the introduction of well dispersed h-BN nanosheets into waterborne epoxy system remarkably improved the corrosion protection performance to substrate. Moreover, 1 wt% BN/EP composite coated substrate exhibited higher impedance modulus (1.3 × 10{sup 6} Ω cm{sup 2}) and lower water absorption (4%) than those of pure waterborne epoxy coating coated electrode after long-term immersion in 3.5 wt% NaCl solution, demonstrating its superior anticorrosive performance. This enhanced anticorrosive performance was mainly ascribed to the improved water barrier property of epoxy coating via incorporating homogeneously dispersed h-BN nanosheets.

  8. First-principles investigations of the magnetic properties of graphite boron nitride sheet induced by Fe doping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xiaohui; Wang, Wenwei; Zhang, Dengyu; Lu, Wei; Fan, Bingbing

    2010-05-26

    The first-principles spin polarization method is used to investigate the magnetic properties of graphite boron nitride (g-BN) sheet induced by Fe doping. We find that a nitrogen or boron atom substituted by Fe can induce a magnetic moment. From standard Mulliken population analysis, we also find that the magnetic moment is mainly dominated by Fe 3d states. Using Heisenberg exchange coupling theory, we study the exchange coupling mechanisms by constructing two-Fe centers in g-BN. The results show the presence of relatively strong exchange coupling for two-Fe substituted two-B atoms and the coupling is ferromagnetic. For the case of two-Fe substituted two-N atoms, the coupling is antiferromagnetic and the exchange coupling is very weak. The paper enriches recent molecular magnetic investigations.

  9. Polymer-Derived Boron Nitride: A Review on the Chemistry, Shaping and Ceramic Conversion of Borazine Derivatives

    OpenAIRE

    Bernard, Samuel; Miele, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Boron nitride (BN) is a III-V compound which is the focus of important research since its discovery in the early 19th century. BN is electronic to carbon and thus, in the same way that carbon exists as graphite, BN exists in the hexagonal phase. The latter offers an unusual combination of properties that cannot be found in any other ceramics. However, these properties closely depend on the synthesis processes. This review states the recent developments in the preparation of BN through the che...

  10. Very Long Single and Few-Walled Boron Nitride Nanotubes via the Pressurized Vapor/Condenser Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael W.; Jordan, Kevin C.; Park, Cheol; Kim, Jae-Woo; Lillehei, Peter T.; Crooks, Roy; Harrison, Joycelyn S.

    2009-01-01

    A new method for producing long, small diameter, single and few-walled, boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) in macroscopic quantities is reported. The pressurized vapor/condenser (PVC) method produces, without catalysts, highly crystalline, very long, small diameter, BNNTs. Palm-sized, cotton-like masses of BNNT raw material were grown by this technique and spun directly into centimeters-long yarn. Nanotube lengths were observed to be 100 times that of those grown by the most closely related method. Self-assembly and growth models for these long BNNTs are discussed.

  11. One-pot synthesis of reduced graphene oxide@boron nitride nanosheet hybrids with enhanced oxidation-resistant properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guoxun; Bi, Jianqiang; Wang, Weili; Zhang, Jingde

    2017-12-01

    Reduced graphene oxide@boron nitride nanosheet (RGO@BNNS) hybrids were prepared for the first time using template-assisted autoclave pyrolysis technique at the temperature as low as 600 °C. The developed method can be scaled into gram-scale synthesis of the material. The BNNSs combine with RGO through van der Waals interplanar interaction without damaging the structures of RGO. Such ultrathin BNNSs on the surface of RGO can serve as high-performance oxidation-resistant coatings in oxidizing atmospheres at high temperatures. The RGO@BNNS hybrids can sustain up to 800 °C over a relatively long period of time.

  12. Ultraclean and large-area monolayer hexagonal boron nitride on Cu foil using chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yao; Shang, Xunzhong; Dong, Ji; Xu, Kai; He, Jun; Jiang, Chao

    2015-07-10

    Atomically thin hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) has been demonstrated to be an excellent dielectric layer as well as an ideal van der Waals epitaxial substrate for fabrication of two-dimensional (2D) atomic layers and their vertical heterostructures. Although many groups have obtained large-scale monolayer h-BN through low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD), it is still a challenge to grow clean monolayers without the reduction of domain size. Here we report the synthesis of large-area (4 × 2 cm(2)) high quality monolayer h-BN with an ultraclean and unbroken surface on copper foil by using LPCVD. A detailed investigation of the key factors affecting growth and transfer of the monolayer was carried out in order to eliminate the adverse effects of impurity particles. Furthermore, an optimized transfer approach allowed the nondestructive and clean transfer of the monolayer from copper foil onto an arbitrary substrate, including a flexible substrate, under mild conditions. Atomic force microscopy indicated that the root-mean-square (RMS) roughness of the monolayer h-BN on SiO2 was less than 0.269 nm for areas with fewer wrinkles. Selective area electron diffraction analysis of the h-BN revealed a pattern of hexagonal diffraction spots, which unambiguously demonstrated its highly crystalline character. Our work paves the way toward the use of ultraclean and large-area monolayer h-BN as the dielectric layer in the fabrication of high performance electronic and optoelectronic devices for novel 2D atomic layer materials.

  13. Chemically linked metal-matrix nanocomposites of boron nitride nanosheets and silver as thermal interface materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagabandi, N.; Yegin, C.; Feng, X.; King, C.; Oh, J. K.; Scholar, E. A.; Narumanchi, S.; Akbulut, M.

    2018-03-01

    Herein, novel hybrid nanocomposite thermal interface materials (TIMs) relying on the chemical linkage of silver, boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs), and organic ligands are reported. These TIMs were prepared using a co-electrodeposition/chemisorption approach where the electrolytic reduction of silver ions into silver nano-/micro-crystals was coupled with the conjugation of ligand-coated nanosheets onto silver crystals. Furthermore, the influence of the bond strength of silver/nanosheet links on the thermal, mechanical, and structural properties is investigated using a combination of techniques including laser flash analysis, phase-sensitive transient thermoreflectance, nanoindentation, and electron microscopy. The internal nanostructure was found to be strongly dependent on the linker chemistry. While the chemical grafting of 4-cyano-benzoyl chloride (CBC) and 2-mercapto-5-benzimidazole carboxylic acid (MBCA) on BNNSs led to the uniform distribution of functionalized-nanosheets in the silver crystal matrix, the physical binding of 4-bromo-benzoyl chloride linkers on nanosheets caused the aggregation and phase separation. The thermal conductivity was 236-258 W m-1 K and 306-321 W m-1 K for physically and chemically conjugated TIMs, respectively, while their hardness varied from 400-495 MPa and from 240 to 360 MPa, respectively. The corresponding ratio of thermal conductivity to hardness, which is a critical parameter controlling the performance of TIMs, was ultrahigh for the chemically conjugated TIMs: 1.3 × 10-6 m2 K-1 s for MBCA-BNNS and 8.5 × 10-7 m2 K-1 s for CBC-BNNS. We anticipate that these materials can satisfy some of the emerging thermal management needs arising from the improved performance and efficiency, miniaturization, and/or high throughput of electronic devices, energy storage devices, energy conversion systems, light-emitting diodes, and telecommunication components.

  14. Ultraclean and large-area monolayer hexagonal boron nitride on Cu foil using chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yao; Shang, Xunzhong; Dong, Ji; Xu, Kai; He, Jun; Jiang, Chao

    2015-07-01

    Atomically thin hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) has been demonstrated to be an excellent dielectric layer as well as an ideal van der Waals epitaxial substrate for fabrication of two-dimensional (2D) atomic layers and their vertical heterostructures. Although many groups have obtained large-scale monolayer h-BN through low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD), it is still a challenge to grow clean monolayers without the reduction of domain size. Here we report the synthesis of large-area (4 × 2 cm2) high quality monolayer h-BN with an ultraclean and unbroken surface on copper foil by using LPCVD. A detailed investigation of the key factors affecting growth and transfer of the monolayer was carried out in order to eliminate the adverse effects of impurity particles. Furthermore, an optimized transfer approach allowed the nondestructive and clean transfer of the monolayer from copper foil onto an arbitrary substrate, including a flexible substrate, under mild conditions. Atomic force microscopy indicated that the root-mean-square (RMS) roughness of the monolayer h-BN on SiO2 was less than 0.269 nm for areas with fewer wrinkles. Selective area electron diffraction analysis of the h-BN revealed a pattern of hexagonal diffraction spots, which unambiguously demonstrated its highly crystalline character. Our work paves the way toward the use of ultraclean and large-area monolayer h-BN as the dielectric layer in the fabrication of high performance electronic and optoelectronic devices for novel 2D atomic layer materials.

  15. Electronic properties and relative stabilities of heterogeneous edge-decorated zigzag boron nitride nanoribbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, L.L.; Yu, X.F.; Yang, X.J.; Zhang, X.H.; Xu, X.W.; Jin, P.; Zhao, J.L.; Wang, X.X.; Tang, C.C.

    2015-01-01

    The wide band gap of boron nitride (BN) materials has been a major bottleneck for a wider application of BN in electronics. In this work, density functional theory computations were used to study the band structure of zigzag BN nanoribbons (BNNRs). Due to the ionic origin of the BN band gap, a heterogeneous edge decoration is an effective way to modulate the electronic band structure of BNNRs. This study demonstrates that a metallic behavior and magnetism can be realized by applying a NO 2 –NH 2 pair edge decoration. Although the lone electron pair of the NH 2 group is partly responsible for the metallic behavior, the effective potential difference induced by the donor–acceptor pair is also crucial for metallic behavior. Furthermore, these newly formed BNNRs were found to be more stable than H-passivated BNNRs. This simple chemical modification method offers great opportunities for the development of future BNNR-based electronic devices. - Graphical abstract: Due to the ionic origin of a BN band gap, heterogeneous edge decoration is an effective way to modulate its electronic structures. Metallicity and magnetism can be realized by NO 2 –NH 2 pair decoration. Although the N lone pair electrons in NH 2 group are responsible for the metallicity, the effective potential difference induced by a donor–acceptor pair is crucial for the formation of metallicity. - Highlights: • Heterogeneous edge decoration is effective for tuning BNNRs' electronic structures. • NO 2 –NH 2 pair decoration can lead to metallic behavior and magnetism for BNNRs. • The effective potential difference is crucial for the formation of metallicity. • NO 2 –NH 2 pair decorated BNNRs is more stable than H-passivated ones

  16. Chemically Linked Metal-Matrix Nanocomposites of Boron Nitride Nanosheets and Silver as Thermal Interface Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Xuhui [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); King, Charles C [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Narumanchi, Sreekant V [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Nagabandi, Nirup [Texas A& M University; Yegin, Cengiz [Texas A& M University; Oh, Jun Kyun [Texas A& M University; Scholar, Ethan Adam [Texas A& M University; Akbulut, Mustafa [Texas A& M University

    2018-01-31

    Herein, novel hybrid nanocomposite thermal interface materials (TIMs) relying on the chemical linkage of silver, boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs), and organic ligands are reported. These TIMs were prepared using a co-electrodeposition/chemisorption approach where the electrolytic reduction of silver ions into silver nano-/micro-crystals was coupled with the conjugation of ligand-coated nanosheets onto silver crystals. Furthermore, the influence of bond strength of silver/nanosheet links on the thermal, mechanical, and structural properties is investigated using a combination of techniques; including laser flash analysis, phase-sensitive transient thermoreflectance, nanoindentation, and electron microscopy. Internal nanostructure was found to be strongly dependent on the linker chemistry. While the chemical grafting of 4-cyano-benzoyl chloride (CBC) and 2-mercapto-5-benzimidazole carboxylic acid (MBCA) on BNNSs led to the uniform distribution of functionalized-nanosheets in the silver crystal matrix, the physical binding of 4-bromo-benzoyl chloride (BBC) linkers on nanosheets caused the aggregation and phase separation. The thermal conductivity was 236-258 W/m-K and 306-321 W/m-K for physically and chemically conjugated TIMs, respectively, while their hardness varied from 495 to 400 MPa and from 240 to 360 MPa, respectively. The corresponding ratio of thermal conductivity to hardness, which is a critical parameter controlling the performance of TIMs, was ultrahigh for the chemically conjugated TIMs: 1.3x10-6 m2/K-s for MBCA-BNNS and 8.5x10-7 m2/K-s for CBC-BNNS. We anticipate that these materials can satisfy some of the emerging thermal management needs arising from the improved performance and efficiency, miniaturization, and/or high throughput of electronic devices, energy storage devices, energy conversion systems, light-emitting diodes, and telecommunication components.

  17. Boron nitride nanotubes for delivery of 5-fluorouracil as anticancer drug: a theoretical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shayan, Kolsoom; Nowroozi, Alireza

    2018-01-01

    The electronic structure and properties of the armchair boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) interacted with the 5-FU drug, as an anticancer drug, are studied at the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) level of theory. D3-Corrections were carried out for the treatment of intermolecular interactions in the hybrid complexes and encapsulated nanotubes, exactly. Results have shown that the encapsulation and adsorption of 5-FU molecule on the studied BNNTs surface are favorable processes, with a few exceptions. Also, it is found that the encapsulated nanotubes are stable than the hybrid complexes. Furthermore, we estimated the strengths of the intermolecular bonds of the benchmark systems by energetic, geometric, topological and molecular orbital descriptors. Some analyses have been made to explore any changes in the binding characteristics of the drug molecule after its attachment to the nanotubes. According to the NBO results, the charge transfer phenomenon is observed from the bonding or nonbonding orbitals of drug to the antibonding orbitals of BNNTs. Moreover, HOMO-LUMO analysis indicated that, after the adsorption process, the HOMO value slightly increased, while the LUMO value in these systems significantly reduced in the both of Drug@BNNTs groups. So, the energy gaps between HOMO and LUMO (Eg) are reduced, which emphasis on the greater intermolecular bond strength. Finally, the stability and reactivity of the Drug@BNNTs complexes have been examined from the magnitudes of the chemical reactivity descriptors such as chemical potential, global hardness, and electrophilicity index. As a consequence, BNNTs can be considered as a drug delivery vehicle for the transportation of 5-FU as anticancer drug within the biological systems.

  18. Optical properties and residual stress in aluminum nitride films prepared by alternating-current dual reactive magnetron sputtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chien-Jen; Jaing, Cheng-Chung; Lee, Kun-Hsien; Lee, Cheng-Chung

    2011-05-01

    Aluminum nitride films were deposited by alternating-current dual reactive magnetron sputtering. The influence of different nitrogen flow and working pressures at a sputtering power of 5 kW on the refractive index, extinction coefficient, crystalline structure, residual stress, and surface roughness of aluminum nitride films was discussed. The aluminum nitride film would have high refractive index, low extinction coefficient and small residual stress at suitable nitrogen flow rate and low working pressure.

  19. Enhanced energy density and thermal conductivity in poly(fluorovinylidene-co-hexafluoropropylene) nanocomposites incorporated with boron nitride nanosheets exfoliated under assistance of hyperbranched polyethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Huijian; Lu, Tiemei; Xu, Chunfeng; Zhong, Mingqiang; Xu, Lixin

    2018-03-02

    Polymer dielectric film with a large dielectric constant, high energy density and enhanced thermal conductivity are of significance for the development of impulse capacitors. However, the fabrication of polymer dielectrics combining high energy density and thermal conductivity is still a challenge at the moment. Here we demonstrate the facile exfoliation of hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs) in common organic solvents under sonication with the assistance of hyperbranched polyethylene (HBPE). The noncovalent CH-π interactions between the nanosheets and HBPE ensure the dispersion of BNNSs in organic solvents with high concentrations, because of the highly branched chain structure of HBPE. Subsequently, the resultant BNNSs with a few defects are distributed uniformly in the poly(fluorovinylidene-co-hexafluoropropylene) (P(VDF-HFP)) nanocomposite films prepared via simple solution casting. The BNNS/P(VDF-HFP) nanocomposite exhibits outstanding dielectric properties, high energy density and high thermal conductivity. The dielectric constant of the 0.5 wt% nanocomposite film is 35.5 at 100 Hz with an energy density of 5.6 J cm -3 at 325 MV m -1 and a high charge-discharge efficiency of 79% due to the depression of the charge injection and chemical species ionization in a high field. Moreover, a thermal conductivity of 1.0 wt% nanocomposite film reaches 0.91 W·m -1  · K -1 , which is 3.13 times higher than that of the fluoropolymer matrix. With dipole accumulation and orientation in the interfacial zone, lightweight, flexible BNNS/P(VDF-HFP) nanocomposite films with high charge-discharge performance and thermal conductivity, exhibit promising applications in relatively high-temperature electronics and energy storage devices.

  20. Enhanced energy density and thermal conductivity in poly(fluorovinylidene-co-hexafluoropropylene) nanocomposites incorporated with boron nitride nanosheets exfoliated under assistance of hyperbranched polyethylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Huijian; Lu, Tiemei; Xu, Chunfeng; Zhong, Mingqiang; Xu, Lixin

    2018-03-01

    Polymer dielectric film with a large dielectric constant, high energy density and enhanced thermal conductivity are of significance for the development of impulse capacitors. However, the fabrication of polymer dielectrics combining high energy density and thermal conductivity is still a challenge at the moment. Here we demonstrate the facile exfoliation of hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs) in common organic solvents under sonication with the assistance of hyperbranched polyethylene (HBPE). The noncovalent CH-π interactions between the nanosheets and HBPE ensure the dispersion of BNNSs in organic solvents with high concentrations, because of the highly branched chain structure of HBPE. Subsequently, the resultant BNNSs with a few defects are distributed uniformly in the poly(fluorovinylidene-co-hexafluoropropylene) (P(VDF-HFP)) nanocomposite films prepared via simple solution casting. The BNNS/P(VDF-HFP) nanocomposite exhibits outstanding dielectric properties, high energy density and high thermal conductivity. The dielectric constant of the 0.5 wt% nanocomposite film is 35.5 at 100 Hz with an energy density of 5.6 J cm-3 at 325 MV m-1 and a high charge-discharge efficiency of 79% due to the depression of the charge injection and chemical species ionization in a high field. Moreover, a thermal conductivity of 1.0 wt% nanocomposite film reaches 0.91 W·m-1 · K-1, which is 3.13 times higher than that of the fluoropolymer matrix. With dipole accumulation and orientation in the interfacial zone, lightweight, flexible BNNS/P(VDF-HFP) nanocomposite films with high charge-discharge performance and thermal conductivity, exhibit promising applications in relatively high-temperature electronics and energy storage devices.

  1. Investigation of wear and tool life of coated carbide and cubic boron nitride cutting tools in high speed milling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Twardowski

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the investigation was analysis of the wear of milling cutters made of sintered carbide and of boron nitride. The article presents the life period of the cutting edges and describes industrial conditions of the applicability of tools made of the materials under investigation. Tests have been performed on modern toroidal and ball-end mill cutters. The study has been performed within a production facility in the technology of high speed machining of 55NiCrMoV6 and X153CrMoV12 hardened steel. The analysed cutting speed is a parameter which significantly influences the intensity of heat generated in the cutting zone. Due to the wear characteristics, two areas of applicability of the analysed tools have been distinguished. For vc  ≤ 300 m/min, sintered carbide edges are recommended; for vc  > 500 m/min, boron nitride edges. For 300 ≤ vc  ≤ 500 m/min, a transition area has been observed. It has been proved that the application of sintered carbide edges is not economically justified above certain cutting speed.

  2. Improved tensile and buckling behavior of defected carbon nanotubes utilizing boron nitride coating – A molecular dynamic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badjian, H.; Setoodeh, A.R., E-mail: setoodeh@sutech.ac.ir

    2017-02-15

    Synthesizing inorganic nanostructures such as boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) have led to immense studies due to their many interesting functional features such as piezoelectricity, high temperature resistance to oxygen, electrical insulation, high thermal conductivity and very long lengths as physical features. In order to utilize the superior properties of pristine and defected carbon nanotubes (CNTs), a hybrid nanotube is proposed in this study by forming BNNTs surface coating on the CNTs. The benefits of such coating on the tensile and buckling behavior of single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs) are illustrated through molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the resulted nanostructures during the deformation. The AIREBO and Tersoff-Brenner potentials are employed to model the interatomic forces between the carbon and boron nitride atoms, respectively. The effects of chiral indices, aspect ratio, presence of mono-vacancy defects and coating dimension on coated/non-coated CNTs are examined. It is demonstrated that the coated defective CNTs exhibit remarkably enhanced ultimate strength, buckling load capacity and Young's modulus. The proposed coating not only enhances the mechanical properties of the resulted nanostructure, but also conceals it from few external factors impacting the behavior of the CNT such as humidity and high temperature.

  3. Impact of tensile strain on the thermal transport of zigzag hexagonal boron nitride nanoribbon: An equilibrium molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navid, Ishtiaque Ahmed; Intisar Khan, Asir; Subrina, Samia

    2018-02-01

    The thermal conductivity of single layer strained hexagonal boron nitride nanoribbon (h-BNNR) has been computed using the Green—Kubo formulation of Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics (EMD) simulation. We have investigated the impact of strain on thermal transport of h-BNNR by varying the applied tensile strain from 1% upto 5% through uniaxial loading. The thermal conductivity of h-BNNR decreases monotonically with the increase of uniaxial tensile strain keeping the sample size and temperature constant. The thermal conductivity can be reduced upto 86% for an applied uniaxial tensile strain of 5%. The impact of temperature and width variation on the thermal conductivity of h-BNNR has also been studied under different uniaxial tensile strain conditions. With the increase in temperature, the thermal conductivity of strained h-BNNR exhibits a decaying characteristics whereas it shows an opposite pattern with the increasing width. Such study would provide a good insight on the strain tunable thermal transport for the potential device application of boron nitride nanostructures.

  4. Interfacial-Bonding-Regulated CO Oxidation over Pt Atoms Immobilized on Gas-Exfoliated Hexagonal Boron Nitride

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Xin

    2017-10-12

    We compared the electronic structure and CO oxidation mechanisms over Pt atoms immobilized by both B-vacancies and N-vacancies on gas-exfoliated hexagonal boron nitride. We showed that chemical bonds are formed between the B atoms associated with dangling bonds around the vacancies and Pt atoms. These bonds not only alter the thermodynamics and kinetics for the aggregation and effectively immobilize Pt atoms, but also significantly change the composition and energetic distribution of the electronic states of the composites to circumvent CO poisoning and to favour coadsorption of CO and O2, which further regulates the reactions to proceed through a Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism. The CO oxidation over Pt atoms immobilized at N-vacancies involves formation of an intermediate with –C(O)-O−O- bonded to Pt, the generation of CO2 by peroxo O−O bond scission and the reduction of the remnant oxygen, and the calculated energy barriers are 0.49, 0.23 and 0.18 eV, respectively. Such small energy barriers are comparable to those over Pt atoms trapped at B-vacancies, showing the effectiveness of Pt/hexagonal boron nitride atomic composites as catalysts for CO oxidation. These findings also suggest the feasibility of regulating the reaction pathways over single atom catalysts via interfacial engineering.

  5. Evaluation of AS-CAST U-Mo alloys processed in graphite crucible coated with boron nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marra, Kleiner M., E-mail: kleiner.marra@prof.una.br [Centro Universitario UNA, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Curso de Engenharia Mecânica; Reis, Sérgio C.; Paula, João B. de; Pedrosa, Tércio A., E-mail: reissc@cdtn.br, E-mail: jbp@cdtn.br, E-mail: tap@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    This paper reports the production of uranium-molybdenum alloys, which have been considered promising fuel for test and research nuclear reactors. U-Mo alloys were produced in three molybdenum contents: 5w%, 7w%, and 10w%, using an electric vacuum induction furnace. A boron nitride-coated graphite crucible was employed in the production of the alloys and, after melting, the material was immediately poured into a boron nitride-coated graphite mold. The incorporation of carbon was observed, but it happened in a lower intensity than in the case of the non-coated crucible/mold. It is observed that the carbon incorporation increased and alloys density decreased with Mo addition. It was also noticed that the increase in the carbon or molybdenum content did not seem to change the as-cast structure in terms of granulation. The three alloys presented body-centered cubic crystal structure (γ-phase), after solidification, besides a seeming negative microsegregation of molybdenum, from the center to the periphery of the grains. There were signs of macrosegregation, from the base to the top of the ingots. (author)

  6. Nanostructures based in boro nitride thin films deposited by PLD onto Si/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/DLC substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roman, W S; Riascos, H [Grupo Plasma, Laser y Aplicaciones, Universidad Tecnologica de Pereira (Colombia); Caicedo, J C [Grupo de PelIculas Delgadas, Universidad del Valle, Cali (Colombia); Ospina, R [Laboratorio de Plasma, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, sede Manizales (Colombia); Tirado-MejIa, L, E-mail: hriascos@utp.edu.c [Laboratorio de Optoelectronica, Universidad del Quindio (Colombia)

    2009-05-01

    Diamond-like carbon and boron nitride were deposited like nanostructered bilayer on Si/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} substrate, both with (100) crystallographic orientation, these films were deposited through pulsed laser technique (Nd: YAG: 8 Jcm{sup -2}, 9ns). Graphite (99.99%) and boron nitride (99.99%) targets used to growth the films in argon atmosphere. The thicknesses of bilayer were determined with a perfilometer, active vibration modes were analyzed using infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), finding bands associated around 1400 cm{sup -1} for B - N bonding and bands around 1700 cm{sup -1} associated with C=C stretching vibrations of non-conjugated alkenes and azometinic groups, respectively. The crystallites of thin films were analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and determinated the h-BN (0002), alpha-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} (101) phases. The aim of this study is to relate the dependence on physical and chemical characteristics of the system Si/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/DLC/BN with gas pressure adjusted at the 1.33, 2.67 and 5.33 Pa values.

  7. High quality plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited silicon nitride films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cotler, T.J.; Chapple-Sokol, J. (IBM General Technology Division, Hopewell Junction, NY (United States))

    1993-07-01

    The qualities of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited (PECVD) silicon nitride films can be improved by increasing the deposition temperature. This report compares PECVD silicon nitride films to low pressure chemical vapor deposited (LPCVD) films. The dependence of the film properties on process parameters, specifically power and temperature, are investigated. The stress is shown to shift from tensile to compressive with increasing temperature and power. The deposition rate, uniformity, wet etch rate, index of refraction, composition, stress, hydrogen content, and conformality are considered to evaluate the film properties. Temperature affects the hydrogen content in the films by causing decreased incorporation of N-H containing species whereas the dependence on power is due to changes in the gas-phase precursors. All PECVD film properties, with the exception of conformality, are comparable to those of LPCVD films.

  8. Shear-Assisted Production of Few-Layer Boron Nitride Nanosheets by Supercritical CO2 Exfoliation and Its Use for Thermally Conductive Epoxy Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xiaojuan; Li, Yun; Chen, Zhuo; Li, Qi; Hou, Liqiang; Wu, Jiaye; Tang, Yushu; Li, Yongfeng

    2017-12-19

    Boron nitride nanosheets (BNNS) hold the similar two-dimensional structure as graphene and unique properties complementary to graphene, which makes it attractive in application ranging from electronics to energy storage. The exfoliation of boron nitride (BN) still remains challenge and hinders the applications of BNNS. In this work, the preparation of BNNS has been realized by a shear-assisted supercritical CO 2 exfoliation process, during which supercritical CO 2 intercalates and diffuses between boron nitride layers, and then the exfoliation of BN layers is obtained in the rapid depressurization process by overcoming the van der Waals forces. Our results indicate that the bulk boron nitride has been successfully exfoliated into thin nanosheets with an average 6 layers. It is found that the produced BNNS is well-dispersed in isopropyl alcohol (IPA) with a higher extinction coefficient compared with the bulk BN. Moreover, the BNNS/epoxy composite used as thermal interface materials has been prepared. The introduction of BNNS results in a 313% enhancement in thermal conductivity. Our results demonstrate that BNNS produced by supercritical CO 2 exfoliation show great potential applications for heat dissipation of high efficiency electronics.

  9. Toughening effect of multi-walled boron nitride nanotubes and their influence on the sintering behaviour of 3Y-TZP zirconia ceramics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tatarko, Peter; Grasso, S.; Chlup, Zdeněk; Porwal, H.; Kasiarova, M.; Dlouhý, Ivo; Reece, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 7 (2014), s. 1829-1843 ISSN 0955-2219 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 264526 - GLACERCO Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Zirconia * Boron nitride nanotubes * Composite * Spark plasma sintering * Toughening mechanism Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials Impact factor: 2.947, year: 2014

  10. Shear-induced phase transition of nanocrystalline hexagonal boron nitride to wurtzitic structure at room temperature and lower pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Cheng; Levitas, Valery I; Zhu, Hongyang; Chaudhuri, Jharna; Marathe, Archis; Ma, Yanzhang

    2012-11-20

    Disordered structures of boron nitride (BN), graphite, boron carbide (BC), and boron carbon nitride (BCN) systems are considered important precursor materials for synthesis of superhard phases in these systems. However, phase transformation of such materials can be achieved only at extreme pressure-temperature conditions, which is irrelevant to industrial applications. Here, the phase transition from disordered nanocrystalline hexagonal (h)BN to superhard wurtzitic (w)BN was found at room temperature under a pressure of 6.7 GPa after applying large plastic shear in a rotational diamond anvil cell (RDAC) monitored by in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. However, under hydrostatic compression to 52.8 GPa, the same hBN sample did not transform to wBN but probably underwent a reversible transformation to a high-pressure disordered phase with closed-packed buckled layers. The current phase-transition pressure is the lowest among all reported direct-phase transitions from hBN to wBN at room temperature. Usually, large plastic straining leads to disordering and amorphization; here, in contrast, highly disordered hBN transformed to crystalline wBN. The mechanisms of strain-induced phase transformation and the reasons for such a low transformation pressure are discussed. Our results demonstrate a potential of low pressure-room temperature synthesis of superhard materials under plastic shear from disordered or amorphous precursors. They also open a pathway of phase transformation of nanocrystalline materials and materials with disordered and amorphous structures under extensive shear.

  11. Hetero-junctions of Boron Nitride and Carbon Nanotubes: Synthesis and Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yap, Yoke Khin

    2013-03-14

    Hetero-junctions of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are expected to have appealing new properties that are not available from pure BNNTs and CNTs. Theoretical studies indicate that BNNT/CNT junctions could be multifunctional and applicable as memory, spintronic, electronic, and photonics devices with tunable band structures. This will lead to energy and material efficient multifunctional devices that will be beneficial to the society. However, experimental realization of BNNT/CNT junctions was hindered by the absent of a common growth technique for BNNTs and CNTs. In fact, the synthesis of BNNTs was very challenging and may involve high temperatures (up to 3000 degree Celsius by laser ablation) and explosive chemicals. During the award period, we have successfully developed a simple chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique to grow BNNTs at 1100-1200 degree Celsius without using dangerous chemicals. A series of common catalyst have then been identified for the synthesis of BNNTs and CNTs. Both of these breakthroughs have led to our preliminary success in growing two types of BNNT/CNT junctions and two additional new nanostructures: 1) branching BNNT/CNT junctions and 2) co-axial BNNT/CNT junctions, 3) quantum dots functionalized BNNTs (QDs-BNNTs), 4) BNNT/graphene junctions. We have started to understand their structural, compositional, and electronic properties. Latest results indicate that the branching BNNT/CNT junctions and QDs-BNNTs are functional as room-temperature tunneling devices. We have submitted the application of a renewal grant to continue the study of these new energy efficient materials. Finally, this project has also strengthened our collaborations with multiple Department of Energy's Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs), including the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINTs) at Sandia National Laboratories and Los

  12. Visible-light photocatalytic activity of nitrided TiO2 thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camps, Enrique; Escobar-Alarcon, L.; Camacho-Lopez, Marco Antonio; Casados, Dora A. Solis

    2010-01-01

    TiO 2 thin films have been applied in UV-light photocatalysis. Nevertheless visible-light photocatalytic activity would make this material more attractive for applications. In this work we present results on the modification of titanium oxide (anatase) sol-gel thin films, via a nitriding process using a microwave plasma source. After the treatment in the nitrogen plasma, the nitrogen content in the TiO 2 films varied in the range from 14 up to 28 at%. The titanium oxide films and the nitrided ones were characterized by XPS, micro-Raman spectroscopy and UV-vis spectroscopy. Photocatalytic activity tests were done using a Methylene Blue dye solution, and as catalyst TiO 2 and nitrided TiO 2 films. The irradiation of films was carried out with a lamp with emission in the visible (without UV). The results showed that the nitrided TiO 2 films had photocatalytic activity, while the unnitrided films did not.

  13. On the difference between optically and electrically determined resistivity of ultra-thin titanium nitride films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Hao, B.; Kovalgin, Alexeij Y.; Wolters, Robertus A.M.

    2013-01-01

    This work reports on the determination and comparison of the resistivity of ultra-thin atomic layer deposited titanium nitride films in the thickness range 0.65–20 nm using spectroscopic ellipsometry and electrical test structures. We found that for films thicker than 4 nm, the resistivity values

  14. Visible-light photocatalytic activity of nitrided TiO{sub 2} thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camps, Enrique, E-mail: enrique.camps@inin.gob.mx [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Apartado Postal 18-1027, Mexico DF 11801 (Mexico); Escobar-Alarcon, L. [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Apartado Postal 18-1027, Mexico DF 11801 (Mexico); Camacho-Lopez, Marco Antonio [Laboratorio de Investigacion y Desarrollo de Materiales Avanzados, Facultad de Quimica, UAEM, km 14.5 Carretera Toluca-Atlacomulco (Mexico); Casados, Dora A. Solis [Centro de Investigacion en Quimica Sustentable, Facultad de Quimica, UAEM, km 14.5 Carretera Toluca-Atlacomulco (Mexico)

    2010-10-25

    TiO{sub 2} thin films have been applied in UV-light photocatalysis. Nevertheless visible-light photocatalytic activity would make this material more attractive for applications. In this work we present results on the modification of titanium oxide (anatase) sol-gel thin films, via a nitriding process using a microwave plasma source. After the treatment in the nitrogen plasma, the nitrogen content in the TiO{sub 2} films varied in the range from 14 up to 28 at%. The titanium oxide films and the nitrided ones were characterized by XPS, micro-Raman spectroscopy and UV-vis spectroscopy. Photocatalytic activity tests were done using a Methylene Blue dye solution, and as catalyst TiO{sub 2} and nitrided TiO{sub 2} films. The irradiation of films was carried out with a lamp with emission in the visible (without UV). The results showed that the nitrided TiO{sub 2} films had photocatalytic activity, while the unnitrided films did not.

  15. A comparative study on carbon, boron-nitride, boron-phosphide and silicon-carbide nanotubes based on surface electrostatic potentials and average local ionization energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esrafili, Mehdi D; Behzadi, Hadi

    2013-06-01

    A density functional theory study was carried out to predict the electrostatic potentials as well as average local ionization energies on both the outer and the inner surfaces of carbon, boron-nitride (BN), boron-phosphide (BP) and silicon-carbide (SiC) single-walled nanotubes. For each nanotube, the effect of tube radius on the surface potentials and calculated average local ionization energies was investigated. It is found that SiC and BN nanotubes have much stronger and more variable surface potentials than do carbon and BP nanotubes. For the SiC, BN and BP nanotubes, there are characteristic patterns of positive and negative sites on the outer lateral surfaces. On the other hand, a general feature of all of the systems studied is that stronger potentials are associated with regions of higher curvature. According to the evaluated surface electrostatic potentials, it is concluded that, for the narrowest tubes, the water solubility of BN tubes is slightly greater than that of SiC followed by carbon and BP nanotubes.

  16. Functional nanostructured titanium nitride films obtained by sputtering magnetron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, O.; Hernandez-Velez, M.; Navas, D.; Auger, M.A.; Baldonedo, J.L.; Sanz, R.; Pirota, K.R.; Vazquez, M.

    2006-01-01

    Development of new methods in the formation of hollow structures, in particular, nanotubes and nanocages are currently generating a great interest as a consequence of the growing relevance of these nanostructures on many technological fields, ranging from optoelectronics to biotechnology. In this work, we report the formation of titanium nitride (TiN) nanotubes and nanohills via reactive sputtering magnetron processes. Anodic Alumina Membranes (AAM) were used as template substrates to grow the TiN nanostructures. The AAM were obtained through electrochemical anodization processes by using oxalic acid solutions as electrolytes. The nanotubes were produced at temperatures below 100 deg. C, and using a pure titanium (99.995%) sputtering target and nitrogen as reactive gas. The obtained TiN thin films showed surface morphologies adjusted to pore diameter and interpore distance of the substrates, as well as ordered arrays of nanotubes or nanohills depending on the sputtering and template conditions. High Resolution Scanning Electron Microscopy (HRSEM) was used to elucidate both the surface order and morphology of the different grown nanostructures. The crystalline structure of the samples was examined using X-ray Diffraction (XRD) patterns and their qualitative chemical composition by using X-ray Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (XEDS) in a scanning electron microscopy

  17. Molybdenum Nitride Films: Crystal Structures, Synthesis, Mechanical, Electrical and Some Other Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Jauberteau

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Among transition metal nitrides, molybdenum nitrides have been much less studied even though their mechanical properties as well as their electrical and catalytic properties make them very attractive for many applications. The δ-MoN phase of hexagonal structure is a potential candidate for an ultra-incompressible and hard material and can be compared with c-BN and diamond. The predicted superconducting temperature of the metastable MoN phase of NaCl-B1-type cubic structure is the highest of all refractory carbides and nitrides. The composition of molybdenum nitride films as well as the structures and properties depend on the parameters of the process used to deposit the films. They are also strongly correlated to the electronic structure and chemical bonding. An unusual mixture of metallic, covalent and ionic bonding is found in the stoichiometric compounds.

  18. Direct bonding of ALD Al2O3 to silicon nitride thin films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laganà, Simone; Mikkelsen, E. K.; Marie, Rodolphe

    2017-01-01

    microscopy (TEM) by improving low temperature annealing bonding strength when using atomic layer deposition of aluminum oxide. We have investigated and characterized bonding of Al2O3-SixNy (low stress silicon rich nitride) and Al2O3-Si3N4 (stoichiometric nitride) thin films annealed from room temperature up......, the current bonding method can be also used for further MEMS applications. ...

  19. Deposition of thin layers of boron nitrides and hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon assisted by high current direct current arc plasma; Deposition assistee par un plasma a arc a haut courant continu de couches minces de Nitrure de Bore et de Silicium microcristallin hydrogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franz, D. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas (CRPP), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    1999-09-01

    In the frame of this thesis, a high current direct current arc (HCDCA) used for the industrial deposition of diamond, has been adapted to study the deposition of two types of coatings: a) boron nitride, whose cubic phase is similar to diamond, for tribological applications, b) hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon, for applications in the semiconductor fields (flat panel displays, solar cells,...). For the deposition of these coatings, the substrates were placed in the diffusion region of the arc. The substrate heating is mainly due to atomic species recombining on its surface. The deposition temperature, varying from 300 to 900 {sup o}C according to the films deposited, is determined by the substrate position, the arc power and the injected gas fluxes, without the use of any external heating or cooling system. Measurements performed on the arc plasma show that the electronic temperature is around 2 eV (23'000 K) while the gas temperature is lower than 5500 K. Typical electronic densities are in the range of 10{sup 12}-10{sup 1'}3 cm{sup -3}. For the deposition of boron nitride films, different boron precursors were used and a wide parameter range was investigated. The extreme difficulty of synthesising cubic boron nitride films by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) did not allow to stabilize the cubic phase of boron nitride in HCDCA. Coatings resulted in hexagonal or amorphous boron nitride with a chemical composition close to stoichiometric. The presence of hydrogen leads to the deposition of rough and porous films. Negative biasing of the samples, for positive ion bombardment, is commonly used to stabilize the cubic phase. In HCDCA and in our biasing range, only a densification of the films could be observed. A boron nitride deposition plasma study by infrared absorption spectroscopy in a capacitive radio frequency reactor has demonstrated the usefulness of this diagnostic for the understanding of the various chemical reactions which occur in this kind

  20. The Effects of Boron Doping on Residual Stress of Hfcvd Diamond Film for Mems Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tianqi; Wang, Xinchang; Sun, Fanghong

    In this study, the residual stress of boron-doped diamond (BDD) films is investigated as a function of boron doping level using X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. Boron doping level is controlled from 1000ppm to 9000ppm by dissolving trimethyl borate into acetone. BDD films are deposited on silicon wafers using a bias-enhanced hot filament chemical vapor deposition (BE-HFCVD) system. Residual stress calculated by sin2 ψ method varies linearly from ‑2.4GPa to ‑1.1GPa with increasing boron doping level. On the BDD film of ‑1.75GPa, free standing BDD cantilevers are fabricated by photolithography and ICP-RIE processes, then tested by laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV). A cantilever with resonant frequency of 183KHz and Q factor of 261 in the air is fabricated.

  1. Interlayer interaction and mechanical properties in multi-layer graphene, Boron-Nitride, Aluminum-Nitride and Gallium-Nitride graphene-like structure: A quantum-mechanical DFT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbanzadeh Ahangari, Morteza; Fereidoon, A.; Hamed Mashhadzadeh, Amin

    2017-12-01

    In present study, we investigated mechanical, electronic and interlayer properties of mono, bi and 3layer of Boron-Nitride (B-N), Aluminum-Nitride (Al-N) and Gallium-Nitride (Ga-N) graphene sheets and compared these results with results obtained from carbonic graphenes (C-graphenes). For reaching this purpose, first we optimized the geometrical parameters of these graphenes by using density functional theory (DFT) method. Then we calculated Young's modulus of graphene sheet by compressing and then elongating these sheets in small increment. Our results indicates that Young's modulus of graphenes didn't changed obviously by increasing the number of layer sheet. We also found that carbonic graphene has greatest Young's modulus among another mentioned sheets because of smallest equilibrium distance between its elements. Next we modeled the van der Waals interfacial interaction exist between two sheets with classical spring model by using general form of Lennard-Jones (L-J) potential for all of mentioned graphenes. For calculating L-J parameters (ε and σ), the potential energy between layers of mentioned graphene as a function of the separation distance was plotted. Moreover, the density of states (DOS) are calculated to understand the electronic properties of these systems better.

  2. Nano Indentation Inspection of the Mechanical Properties of Gold Nitride Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armen Verdyan

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The morphology and the local mechanical properties of gold nitride thin films were studied by atomic force microscope (AFM. Gold nitride films were deposited for the first time on silicon substrate without any buffer layer at room temperature by reactive pulsed laser ablation deposition (RPLD. The films were fabricated on (100 Si wafers by RPLD technique in which KrF excimer laser was used to ablate a gold target in N2 atmosphere (0.1 GPa-100 Pa and ambient temperature. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM and atomic force microscopy inspections showed that the films were flat plane with rms roughness in the range of 35.1 nm-3.6 nm, depending on the deposition pressure. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS and energy dispersion spectroscopy (EDS used to detect the nitrogen concentration in the films, have revealed a composition close to Au3N. The film

  3. Buckling Morphologies and Interfacial Properties of Silicon Nitride Films Deposited on Float Glass Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ya-Dong; Chen, Qi-Xiang; Feng, Yu-Fei; Chen, Jun; Yu, Sen-Jiang

    2015-04-01

    We report on the buckling morphologies and interfacial properties of silicon nitride films deposited on float glass substrates. The coexistence of straight-sided and telephone cord buckles can be observed in the silicon nitride films after annealing at a high temperature. The straight-sided structure is metastable and can spontaneously evolve into the telephone cord structure accompanied by the increase in the buckle width and height. The geometric parameters of various buckling structures (including the straight blister, telephone cord and their transition state) have been measured by optical microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The internal stress and interfacial adhesion of the films are evaluated and analyzed based on the continuum elastic theory. It is valid to measure the interfacial properties of thin films by simplifying the telephone cord buckle as a straight-sided structure. This measurement technique is suitable for all the film systems provided that the buckles can form in the film.

  4. Electron and ion beam degradation effects in AES analysis of silicon nitride thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fransen, F.; Vanden Berghe, R.; Vlaeminck, R.; Hinoul, M.; Remmerie, J.; Maes, H.E.

    1985-01-01

    Silicon nitride films are currently investigated by AES combined with ion profiling techniques for their stoichiometry and oxygen content. During this analysis, ion beam and primary electron effects were observed. The effect of argon ion bombardment is the preferential sputtering of nitrogen, forming 'covalent' silicon at the surface layer (AES peak at 91 eV). The electron beam irradiation results in a decrease of the covalent silicon peak, either by an electron beam annealing effect in the bulk of the silicon nitride film, or by an ionization enhanced surface diffusion process of the silicon (electromigration). By the electron beam annealing, nitrogen species are liberated in the bulk of the silicon nitride film and migrate towards the surface where they react with the covalent silicon. The ionization enhanced diffusion originates from local charging of the surface, induced by the electron beam. (author)

  5. Reactive radio frequency sputtering deposition and characterization of zinc nitride and oxynitride thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Nanke; Georgiev, Daniel G.; Wen, Ting; Jayatissa, Ahalapitiya H.

    2012-01-01

    Zinc nitride films were deposited on glass or silicon substrates by reactive magnetron radio frequency sputtering of zinc in either N 2 –Ar or N 2 –Ar–O 2 ambient. The effects of varying the nitrogen contents and the substrate temperature were investigated. X-ray diffraction data showed that the as-deposited films contain the zinc nitride cubic crystalline phase with a preferred orientation, and Raman scattering measurements revealed Zn-N related modes. According to energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis, the as-deposited films were nitrogen-rich and contained only a small fraction of oxygen. Hall-effect measurements showed that p-type zinc nitride with carrier concentration of ∼ 10 19 cm −3 , mobility of ∼ 10 1 cm 2 /Vs, resistivity of ∼ 10 −2 Ω ∗ cm, was obtained. The photon energy dependence of optical transmittance suggested that the material has an indirect bandgap.

  6. Boron diffusion into nitrogen doped silicon films for P{sup +} polysilicon gate structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansour, Farida; Mahamdi, Ramdane; Jalabert, Laurent; Temple-Boyer, Pierre

    2003-06-23

    This paper deals with the study of the boron diffusion in nitrogen doped silicon (NIDOS) deposited from disilane Si{sub 2}H{sub 6} and ammonia NH{sub 3} for the development of P{sup +} polysilicon gate metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) devices. NIDOS films with varied nitrogen content have been boron implanted, then annealed and finally analysed by secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). In order to simulate the experimental SIMS of boron concentration profiles in the NIDOS films, a model adapted to the particular conditions of the samples elaboration, i.e. the very high boron concentration and the nitrogen content, has been established. The boron diffusion reduction in NIDOS films with increasing nitrogen rates has been evidenced by the profiles as well as by the obtained diffusion coefficients, which shows that the nitrogen incorporation reduces the boron diffusion. This has been confirmed by capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements performed on MOS capacitors: the higher the nitrogen content, the lower the flat-band voltage. Finally, these results demonstrate that the improvement of the gate oxide quality occurs with the suppression of the boron penetration.

  7. Adsorption, intercalation and sensing of helium on yttrium functionalized open edge boron nitride: A first principle DFT and TDDFT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taherpour, Avat (Arman); Shahri, Zahra; Rezaei, Omid; Jamshidi, Morteza; Fellowes, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    Open edge BN boron-nitride has a stable graphene-like structure, which could be doped by a range of impurities, so the band gap could be tuned. The optical, electrical, physicochemical properties, NBO and electron density of open edge BN that is doped by Yttrium was evaluated using DFT method as a sensor for He gas. Here, was applied HSE1PBE method exchange correlation and LANL2DZ. The density of states and natural bond orbital analysis calculated have depicted that the band gap of BN-Y flake after sensing He gas and it has shown change from 1.66 → 2.42 eV. The UV-Vis absorption in λmax area showed a significant red-shift that it is an appropriate parameter to recognize He molecule.

  8. Removal of a hazardous heavy metal from aqueous solution using functionalized graphene and boron nitride nanosheets: Insights from simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azamat, Jafar; Sattary, Batoul Shirforush; Khataee, Alireza; Joo, Sang Woo

    2015-09-01

    A computer simulation was performed to investigate the removal of Zn(2+) as a heavy metal from aqueous solution using the functionalized pore of a graphene nanosheet and boron nitride nanosheet (BNNS). The simulated systems were comprised of a graphene nanosheet or BNNS with a functionalized pore containing an aqueous ionic solution of zinc chloride. In order to remove heavy metal from an aqueous solution using the functionalized pore of a graphene nanosheet and BNNS, an external voltage was applied along the z-axis of the simulated box. For the selective removal of zinc ions, the pores of graphene and BNNS were functionalized by passivating each atom at the pore edge with appropriate atoms. For complete analysis systems, we calculated the potential of the mean force of ions, the radial distribution function of ion-water, the residence time of ions, the hydrogen bond, and the autocorrelation function of the hydrogen bond. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Enhancement of toughness and wear resistance in boron nitride nanoplatelet (BNNP) reinforced Si3N4 nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bin; Lee, Dongju; Lee, Jun Ho; Ryu, Ho Jin; Hong, Soon Hyung

    2016-06-01

    Ceramics have superior hardness, strength and corrosion resistance, but are also associated with poor toughness. Here, we propose the boron nitride nanoplatelet (BNNP) as a novel toughening reinforcement component to ceramics with outstanding mechanical properties and high-temperature stability. We used a planetary ball-milling process to exfoliate BNNPs in a scalable manner and functionalizes them with polystyrene sulfonate. Non-covalently functionalized BNNPs were homogeneously dispersed with Si3N4 powders using a surfactant and then consolidated by hot pressing. The fracture toughness of the BNNP/Si3N4 nanocomposite increased by as much as 24.7% with 2 vol.% of BNNPs. Furthermore, BNNPs enhanced strength (9.4%) and the tribological properties (26.7%) of the ceramic matrix. Microstructural analyzes have shown that the toughening mechanisms are combinations of the pull-out, crack bridging, branching and blunting mechanisms.

  10. Tuning the electronic properties of boron nitride nanotube by mechanical uni-axial deformation: a DFT study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju Shin-Pon

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The effect of uni-axial strain on the electronic properties of (8,0 zigzag and (5,5 armchair boron nitride nanotubes (BNNT is addressed by density functional theory calculation. The stress-strain profiles indicate that these two BNNTS of differing types display very similar mechanical properties, but there are variations in HOMO-LUMO gaps at different strains, indicating that the electronic properties of BNNTs not only depend on uni-axial strain, but on BNNT type. The variations in nanotube geometries, partial density of states of B and N atoms, B and N charges are also discussed for (8,0 and (5,5 BNNTs at different strains.

  11. In vivo biocompatibility of boron nitride nanotubes: effects on stem cell biology and tissue regeneration in planarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvetti, Alessandra; Rossi, Leonardo; Iacopetti, Paola; Li, Xia; Nitti, Simone; Pellegrino, Teresa; Mattoli, Virgilio; Golberg, Dmitri; Ciofani, Gianni

    2015-07-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) represent an extremely interesting class of nanomaterials, and recent findings have suggested a number of applications in the biomedical field. Anyhow, extensive biocompatibility investigations are mandatory before any further advancement toward preclinical testing. Here, we report on the effects of multiwalled BNNTs in freshwater planarians, one of the best-characterized in vivo models for developmental biology and regeneration research. Obtained results indicate that BNNTs are biocompatible in the investigated model, since they do not induce oxidative DNA damage and apoptosis, and do not show adverse effects on planarian stem cell biology and on de novo tissue regeneration. In summary, collected findings represent another important step toward BNNT realistic applications in nanomedicine.

  12. Rich interfacial chemistry and properties of carbon-doped hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets revealed by electronic structure calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wei; Tamura, Takahiro; Yanase, Takashi; Nagahama, Taro; Shimada, Toshihiro

    2018-04-01

    The effect of C doping to hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) to its electronic structure is examined by first principles calculations using the association from π-electron systems of organic molecules embedded in a two-dimensional insulator. In a monolayered carbon-doped structure, odd-number doping with carbon atoms confers metallic properties with different work functions. Various electronic interactions occur between two layers with odd-number carbon substitution. A direct sp3 covalent chemical bond is formed when C replaces adjacent B and N in different layers. A charge transfer complex between layers is found when C replaces B and N in the next-neighboring region, which results in narrower band gaps (e.g., 0.37 eV). Direct bonding between C and B atoms is found when two C atoms in different layers are at a certain distance.

  13. Facile and Green Approach to the Synthesis of Boron Nitride Quantum Dots for 2,4,6-Trinitrophenol Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Dong; Zhang, Li; Li, Fang-Fang; Cui, Wei-Rong; Liang, Ru-Ping; Qiu, Jian-Ding

    2018-02-28

    A facile and green approach has been developed for synthesis of boron nitride quantum dots (BNQDs). The obtained BNQDs exhibit strong fluorescence and excellent stabilities, including high thermostability, good salt tolerance stability, pH-independence ability, and excellent antiphotobleaching capability. The strong inner filter effect between 2,4,6-trinitrophenol (TNP) and BNQDs resulted in fluorescence quenching of BNQDs. Thus, TNP can be selectively and sensitively detected in the concentration range of 0.25-200 μM, with a limit detection of 0.14 μM. The BNQD-based turn-off sensor shows potential prospects for rapidly and selectively detecting TNP in natural water samples without tedious sample pretreatment processes.

  14. Hexagonal boron nitride intercalated multi-layer graphene: a possible ultimate solution to ultra-scaled interconnect technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Jun Li

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We proposed intercalation of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN in multilayer graphene to improve its performance in ultra-scaled interconnects for integrated circuit. The effect of intercalated hBN layer in bilayer graphene is investigated using non-equilibrium Green's functions. We find the hBN intercalated bilayer graphene exhibit enhanced transport properties compared with pristine bilayer ones, and the improvement is attributed to suppression of interlayer scattering and good planar bonding condition of inbetween hBN layer. Based on these results, we proposed a via structure that not only benefits from suppressed interlayer scattering between multilayer graphene, but also sustains the unique electrical properties of graphene when many graphene layers are stacking together. The ideal current density across the structure can be as high as 4.6×109 A/cm2 at 1V, which is very promising for the future high-performance interconnect.

  15. Influence of self-consistent screening and polarizability contractions on interlayer sliding behavior of hexagonal boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Wenbin; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Chengbin; Yao, Yagang; Lu, Weibang

    2017-11-01

    The interlayer sliding behaviors of hexagonal boron nitride (h -BN) were investigated via a density functional theory approach with dispersion interaction included. It was found that the self-consistent screening effect (SCS) and the polarizability contractions had significant influences on London dispersion forces, which are responsible for not only the stacking modes but also for the sliding behaviors of h -BN. In consideration of the ionic characteristics of h -BN, surprisingly, the calculated dispersion force was found to dominate the electrostatic interaction along a minimum-energy sliding pathway and make a pronounced contribution (˜35 %) to the barrier during the constrained sliding. This study demonstrates that the SCS and polarizability contractions play important roles in the sliding behaviors of h -BN and that the long-range dispersion interaction should be carefully treated, even in systems with ionic characteristics.

  16. Hexagonal Boron Nitride Impregnated Silane Composite Coating for Corrosion Resistance of Magnesium Alloys for Temporary Bioimplant Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saad Al-Saadi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium and its alloys are attractive potential materials for construction of biodegradable temporary implant devices. However, their rapid degradation in human body fluid before the desired service life is reached necessitate the application of suitable coatings. To this end, WZ21 magnesium alloy surface was modified by hexagonal boron nitride (hBN-impregnated silane coating. The coating was chemically characterised by Raman spectroscopy. Potentiodynamic polarisation and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS of the coated alloy in Hanks’ solution showed a five-fold improvement in the corrosion resistance of the alloy due to the composite coating. Post-corrosion analyses corroborated the electrochemical data and provided a mechanistic insight of the improvement provided by the composite coating.

  17. Silanization of boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs) through microfluidization and their use for producing thermally conductive and electrically insulating polymer nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seyhan, A.Tuğrul, E-mail: atseyhan@anadolu.edu.tr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Anadolu University - AU, Iki Eylul Campus, 26550 Eskisehir (Turkey); Composite Materials Manufacturing Science Laboratory (CMMSL), Research and Application Center of Civil Aviation (RACCA), Anadolu University - AU, Iki Eylul Campus, 26550 Eskisehir (Turkey); Göncü, Yapıncak; Durukan, Oya; Akay, Atakan; Ay, Nuran [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Anadolu University - AU, Iki Eylul Campus, 26550 Eskisehir (Turkey)

    2017-05-15

    Chemical exfoliation of boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs) from large flakes of specially synthesized micro-sized hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) ceramics was carried out through microfluidization. The surface of BNNSs obtained was then functionalized with vinyl-trimethoxy silane (VTS) coupling agent through microfluidization once again in an effort to make them compatible with organic materials, especially those including polymers. The morphology of BNNSs with and without silane treatment was then systematically characterized by conducting various different analytical techniques, including Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Bright field Transmission Electron Microscopy (BF-TEM), Contact angle analyzer (CAA), Particle size analyzer (PSA) and Fourier Transmission Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy attached with attenuated total reflectance (ATR) module. As a result, the silane treatment was determined to be properly and successfully carried out and to give rise to the irregularity of large flakes of the BNNSs by folding back their free edges upon themselves, which in turn assists in inducing further exfoliation of the few-layered nanosheets. To gain more insight into the effectiveness of the surface functionalization, thermal conductivity of polypropylene (PP) nanocomposites containing different amounts (1 wt% and 5 wt%) of BNNSs with and without silane treatment was experimentally investigated. Regardless of the weight content, PP nanocomposites containing silanized BNNSs were found to exhibit high thermal conductivity compared to PP nanocomposites containing BNNSs without silane treatment. It was concluded that microfluidization possesses the robustness to provide a reliable product quality, whether in small or large quantities, in a very time effective manner, when it comes to first exfoliating two-dimensional inorganic materials into few layered sheets, and functionalizing the surface of these sheets afterwards

  18. Silanization of boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs) through microfluidization and their use for producing thermally conductive and electrically insulating polymer nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyhan, A. Tuğrul; Göncü, Yapıncak; Durukan, Oya; Akay, Atakan; Ay, Nuran

    2017-05-01

    Chemical exfoliation of boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs) from large flakes of specially synthesized micro-sized hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) ceramics was carried out through microfluidization. The surface of BNNSs obtained was then functionalized with vinyl-trimethoxy silane (VTS) coupling agent through microfluidization once again in an effort to make them compatible with organic materials, especially those including polymers. The morphology of BNNSs with and without silane treatment was then systematically characterized by conducting various different analytical techniques, including Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Bright field Transmission Electron Microscopy (BF-TEM), Contact angle analyzer (CAA), Particle size analyzer (PSA) and Fourier Transmission Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy attached with attenuated total reflectance (ATR) module. As a result, the silane treatment was determined to be properly and successfully carried out and to give rise to the irregularity of large flakes of the BNNSs by folding back their free edges upon themselves, which in turn assists in inducing further exfoliation of the few-layered nanosheets. To gain more insight into the effectiveness of the surface functionalization, thermal conductivity of polypropylene (PP) nanocomposites containing different amounts (1 wt% and 5 wt%) of BNNSs with and without silane treatment was experimentally investigated. Regardless of the weight content, PP nanocomposites containing silanized BNNSs were found to exhibit high thermal conductivity compared to PP nanocomposites containing BNNSs without silane treatment. It was concluded that microfluidization possesses the robustness to provide a reliable product quality, whether in small or large quantities, in a very time effective manner, when it comes to first exfoliating two-dimensional inorganic materials into few layered sheets, and functionalizing the surface of these sheets afterwards

  19. Laser shock processing on microstructure and hardness of polycrystalline cubic boron nitride tools with and without nanodiamond powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melookaran, Roslyn; Melaibari, Ammar; Deng, Cheng; Molian, Pal

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Laser shock waves hardened polycrystalline cubic boron nitride tools by up to 15%. ► Laser shock waves can build layer-by-layer of nanodiamond to form micro-diamond tools. ► Multiple laser shocks induce significant phase transitions in cBN and nanodiamond. -- Abstract: High amplitude, short duration shock waves created by a 1064 nm, 10 ns Q-switched Nd:YAG laser were used to increase the hardness as well as build successive layers of nanodiamond on sintered polycrystalline cubic boron nitride (PcBN) tools. Multiple scans of laser shocking were applied. Scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, Tukon microhardness tester, and optical surface profilometer were used to evaluate the microstructure, phase change, Vicker’s microhardness and surface roughness. Results indicated that laser shock processing of plain PcBN changed the binder concentration, caused phase transition from cubic to hexagonal form, increased the hardness, and almost unaffected surface roughness. Laser shock wave sintering of nanodiamond powders on PcBN resulted in deagglomeration and layer-by-layer build-up of nanoparticles for a thickness of 30 μm inferring that a novel solid freeform technique designated as “shock wave induced freeform technique (SWIFT)” is being discovered for making micro-tools. Depending on the number of multiple laser shocks, the hardness of nanodiamond compact was lower or higher than that of PcBN. It is hypothesized that nanodiamond particles could serve as crack deflectors, increasing the fracture toughness of PcBN.

  20. Microcontact-printing-assisted access of graphitic carbon nitride films with favorable textures toward photoelectrochemical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian; Wang, Hongqiang; Chen, Zu Peng; Moehwald, Helmuth; Fiechter, Sebastian; van de Krol, Roel; Wen, Liping; Jiang, Lei; Antonietti, Markus

    2015-01-27

    An "ink" (cyanamide) infiltrated anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) stamp is found capable of printing carbon nitride films featuring regular microstructures of the stamp onto the substrates via in situ "chemical vapor deposition". A photocurrent density of 30.2 μA cm(-2 --) at 1.23 VRHE is achieved for a film on a conductive substrate, which is so far the highest value for pure carbon nitride based photoelectrochemical devices. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Anomalous response of supported few-layer hexagonal boron nitride to DC electric fields: a confined water effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Camilla; Matos, Matheus; Mazzoni, Mário; Chacham, Hélio; Neves, Bernardo

    2013-03-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is a two-dimensional compound from III-V family, with the atoms of boron and nitrogen arranged in a honeycomb lattice, similar to graphene. Unlike graphene though, h-BN is an insulator material, with a gap larger than 5 eV. Here, we use Electric Force Microscopy (EFM) to study the electrical response of mono and few-layers of h-BN to an electric field applied by the EFM tip. Our results show an anomalous behavior in the dielectric response for h-BN for different bias orientation: for a positive bias applied to the tip, h-BN layers respond with a larger dielectric constant than the dielectric constant of the silicon dioxide substrate; while for a negative bias, the h-BN dielectric constant is smaller than the dielectric constant of the substrate. Based on first-principles calculations, we showed that this anomalous response may be interpreted as a macroscopic consequence of confinement of a thin water layer between h-BN and substrate. These results were confirmed by sample annealing and also also by a comparative analysis with h-BN on a non-polar substrate. All the authors acknowledge financial support from CNPq, Fapemig, Rede Nacional de Pesquisa em Nanotubos de Carbono and INCT-Nano-Carbono.

  2. Copper atoms embedded in hexagonal boron nitride as potential catalysts for CO oxidation: A first-principles investigation

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Xin

    2014-01-01

    We addressed the electronic structure of Cu atoms embedded in hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) and their catalytic role in CO oxidation by first-principles-based calculations. We showed that Cu atoms prefer to bind directly with the localized defects on h-BN, which act as strong trapping sites for Cu atoms and inhibit their clustering. The strong binding of Cu atoms at boron vacancy also up-shifts the energy level of Cu-d states to the Fermi level and promotes the formation of peroxide-like intermediate. CO oxidation over Cu atoms embedded in h-BN would proceed through the Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism with the formation of a peroxide-like complex by reaction of coadsorbed CO and O2, with the dissociation of which the a CO2 molecule and an adsorbed O atom are formed. Then, the embedded Cu atom is regenerated by the reaction of another gaseous CO with the remnant O atom. The calculated energy barriers for the formation and dissociation of peroxide complex and regeneration of embedded Cu atoms are as low as 0.26, 0.11 and 0.03 eV, respectively, indicating the potential high catalytic performance of Cu atoms embedded in h-BN for low temperature CO oxidation. © the Partner Organisations 2014.

  3. Abrasion resistance, microhardness and microstructures of single-phase niobium nitride films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singer, I.L.; Bolster, R.N.; Wolf, S.A.; Skelton, E.F.; Jeffries, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    The relative abrasive wear resistance of single-phase niobium nitride films deposited at 900 and 500 0 C was measured. Wear resistance versus depth profiles of films abraded against 1-5 μm diamond were obtained by weight loss methods. A β phase Nb 2 N film was five to 20 times more abrasion resistant, but only slightly (40%) harder, than the delta phase NbN films made at the same temperature. The β-Nb 2 N film was deformed plastically during wear, reorienting the [002] c axis perpendicular to the plane of the substrate. The abrasion resistance of the delta-NbN films was initially proportional to the microhardness. Two films had changes in their abrasion resistance as wear proceeded: for one film the change was attributable to deviations in stoichiometry and for the other film it was attributable to increased lattice distortion. (Auth.)

  4. Electronic response of a photodiode coupled to a boron thin film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Priscila; Costa, Fabio E.; Raele, Marcus P.; Zahn, Guilherme S.; Geraldo, Bianca; Vieira Junior, Nilson D.; Samad, Ricardo E.; Genezini, Frederico A., E-mail: priscila3.costa@usp.br, E-mail: fredzini@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    A portable thermal neutron detector is proposed in this work using a silicon photodiode coupled to a boron thin film. The aim of this work was to verify the effect in the electronic response of this specific photodiode due to boron deposition, since the direct deposition of boron in the semiconductor surface could affect its electrical properties specifically the p-type layer that affects directly the depletion region of the semiconductor reducing the neutron detector efficiency count. Three boron depositions with different thickness were performed in the photodiode (S3590-09) surface by pulsed laser deposition and the photodiode was characterized, before and after the deposition process, using a radioactive americium source. Energy spectra were used to verify the electronic response of the photodiode, due to the fact that it is possible to relate it to the photopeak pulse height and resolution. Spectra from the photodiode without and with boron film deposition were compared and a standard photodiode (S3590-04) that had the electronic signal conserved was used as reference to the pulse height for electronics adjustments. The photopeak energy resolution for the photodiode without boron layer was 10.26%. For the photodiode with boron deposition at different thicknesses, the resolution was: 7.64 % (0.14 μm), 7.30 % (0.44 μm) and 6.80 % (0.63 μm). From these results it is possible to evaluate that there was not any degradation in the silicon photodiode. (author)

  5. Effect of hexagonal boron nitride and calcined petroleum coke on friction and wear behavior of phenolic resin-based friction composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi Gewen; Yan Fengyuan

    2006-01-01

    Calcined petroleum coke (CPC) and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) were used as the friction modifiers to improve the friction and wear properties of phenolic resin-based friction composites. Thus, the composites with different relative amounts of CPC and h-BN as the friction modifiers were prepared by compression molding. The hardness and bending strength of the friction composites were measured. The friction and wear behaviors of the composites sliding against cast iron at various temperatures were evaluated using a pin-on-disc test rig. The worn surfaces and wear debris of the friction composites were analyzed by means of scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It was found that the hybrid of the two friction modifiers was effective to significantly decrease the wear rate and stabilize the friction coefficient of the friction composites at various temperatures by forming a uniform lubricating and/or transferred film on the rubbing surfaces. The uniform and durable transfer films were also able to effectively diminish the direct contact between the friction composite and the cast iron counterpart and hence prevent severe wear of the latter as well. The effectiveness of the hybrid of CPC and h-BN in improving the friction and wear behavior of the phenolic resin-based friction modifiers could be attributed to the complementary action of the 'low temperature' lubricity of CPC and the 'high temperature' lubricity of h-BN. The optimum ratio of the two friction modifiers CPC and h-BN in the friction composites was suggested to be 1:1, and the corresponding friction composite showed the best friction-reducing and antiwear abilities

  6. Preparation and characterization of electrochemically deposited carbon nitride films on silicon substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Xingbin; Xu Tao; Chen Gang; Yang Shengrong; Liu Huiwen; Xue Qunji

    2004-01-01

    Carbon nitride films (CN x films) were deposited on Si(100) substrates by the electrolysis of methanol-urea solution at high voltage, atmospheric pressure, and low temperature. The microstructure and morphology of the resulting CN x films were analysed by means of Raman spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier-transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR), x-ray diffraction (XRD), and atomic force microscopy. The tribological properties of the CN x films were examined on an UMT-2MT friction and wear test rig. The Raman spectrum showed two characteristic bands: a graphite G band and a disordered D band of carbon, which suggested the presence of an amorphous carbon matrix. XPS and FTIR measurements suggested the existence of both single and double carbon-nitride bonds in the film and the hydrogenation of the carbon nitride phase. The XRD spectrum showed various peaks of different d values, which could confirm the existence of the polycrystalline carbon nitride phase. The hydrogenated CN x films were compact and uniform, with a root mean square roughness of about 18 nm. The films showed excellent friction-reduction and wear-resistance, with the friction coefficient in the stable phase being about 0.08. In addition, the growth mechanism of the CN x films in liquid phase electro-deposition was discussed as well. It was assumed that the molecules of CH 3 OH and CO(NH 2 ) 2 were polarized under high electric field, and the CN x film was formed on the substrate through the reaction of the -CH 3 and -NH 2 groups on the cathode

  7. A new class of boron nitride fibers with tunable properties by combining an electrospinning process and the polymer-derived ceramics route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salles, Vincent; Bernard, Samuel; Brioude, Arnaud; Cornu, David; Miele, Philippe

    2010-02-01

    Novel boron nitride (BN) fibers have been developed with diameters ranging from the nano- to microscale by thermal conversion of as-electrospun fibers from polyacrylonitrile and poly[B-(methylamino)borazine] blend solutions. Such a new class of ceramic fibers is seen as potential candidate for thermal management applications and filtration systems in harsh environments.Novel boron nitride (BN) fibers have been developed with diameters ranging from the nano- to microscale by thermal conversion of as-electrospun fibers from polyacrylonitrile and poly[B-(methylamino)borazine] blend solutions. Such a new class of ceramic fibers is seen as potential candidate for thermal management applications and filtration systems in harsh environments. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details and EDX results. See DOI: 10.1039/b9nr00185a

  8. Hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets as a multifunctional background-free matrix to detect small molecules and complicated samples by MALDI mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianing; Sun, Jie; Wang, Jiyun; Liu, Huihui; Xue, Jinjuan; Nie, Zongxiu

    2017-07-18

    Here we report the innovation of using hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) nanosheets as the first background-free matrix among the full laser pulse energy range for the analysis and imaging of small molecule metabolites and as an adsorbent for the enrichment of samples. Due to its totally free background and high efficiency as an adsorbent and matrix, h-BN has promising prospects in metabolomics, MALDI imaging, and environmental analysis.

  9. A Review on the Preparation of Borazine-derived Boron Nitride Nanoparticles and Nanopolyhedrons by Spray-pyrolysis and Annealing Process

    OpenAIRE

    Salles, Vincent; Bernard, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Boron nitride (BN) nanostructures (= nanoBN) are struc‐ tural analogues of carbon nanostructures but display different materials chemistry and physics, leading to a wide variety of structural, thermal, electronic, and optical applications. Proper synthesis routes and advanced structural design are among the great challenges for preparing nanoBN with such properties. This review provides an insight into the preparation and characteriza‐ tion of zero dimensional (0D) nanoBN including nanopar‐ t...

  10. Effect of contact metals on the piezoelectric properties of aluminum nitride thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harman, J.P.; Kabulski, A. (West Virginia U., Morgantown, WV); Pagan, V.R. (West Virginia U., Morgantown, WV); Famouri, K. (West Virginia U., Morgantown, WV); Kasarla, K.R.; Rodak, L.E. (West Virginia U., Morgantown, WV); Hensel, J.P.; Korakakis, D.

    2008-07-01

    The converse piezoelectric response of aluminum nitride evaluated using standard metal insulator semiconductor structures has been found to exhibit a linear dependence on the work function of the metal used as the top electrode. The apparent d33 of the 150–1100 nm films also depends on the dc bias applied to the samples.

  11. Effect of contact metals on the piezoelectric properties of aluminum nitride thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harman, J.; Kabulski, A.; Pagán, V. R.; Famouri, P.; Kasarla, K. R.; Rodak, L. E.; Peter Hensel, J.; Korakakis, D.

    2008-01-01

    The converse piezoelectric response of aluminum nitride evaluated using standard metal insulator semiconductor structures has been found to exhibit a linear dependence on the work function of the metal used as the top electrode. The apparent d33 of the 150–1100 nm films also depends on the dc bias applied to the samples.

  12. Hybrid CO2 laser/waterjet (CO2-LWJ) cutting of Polycrystalline Cubic Boron Nitride (PCBN) blanks with phase transformation induced fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhuoru; Melaibari, Ammar A.; Molian, Pal; Shrotriya, Pranav

    2015-07-01

    The present paper investigates a transformation induced fracture mechanism for the cutting of Polycrystalline Cubic Boron Nitride (PCBN) sample by a hybrid CO2 laser/waterjet (CO2-LWJ) manufacturing process. In CO2-LWJ machining, a laser was used for local heating followed by waterjet quenching leading to fracture propagation along the sample surface. Cutting results indicate that as line energy of the laser was increased the sample response transitioned from scribing to through cutting. Raman spectroscopy analysis of the cut surface indicates that laser heated PCBN undergoes chemical phase transformation from sp3-bonded cubic Boron Nitride (cBN) into hexagonal Boron Nitride (hBN) and other sp2-bonded phases. The sp2-bonded structure occupies more volume than sp3-bonded structure such that the transformed material has a tendency to expand the original material and leads to surface deformation around the cutting path. Surface profile of the cut samples was experimentally measured using profilometry and compared with numerical predictions in order to estimate the expansion strain and dimensions of transformation region. Based on the obtained expansion strain and transformation zone, stress fields and crack driving forces were computed for channeling cracks that result in material separation. Comparison of the crack driving forces with fracture toughness of PCBN shows that transformation induced crack propagation is the feasible mechanism for cutting during CO2-LWJ machining.

  13. Vibrational Spectroscopy of Chemical Species in Silicon and Silicon-Rich Nitride Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirill O. Bugaev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Vibrational properties of hydrogenated silicon-rich nitride (SiN:H of various stoichiometry (0.6≤≤1.3 and hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H films were studied using Raman spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Furnace annealing during 5 hours in Ar ambient at 1130∘C and pulse laser annealing were applied to modify the structure of films. Surprisingly, after annealing with such high-thermal budget, according to the FTIR data, the nearly stoichiometric silicon nitride film contains hydrogen in the form of Si–H bonds. From analysis of the FTIR data of the Si–N bond vibrations, one can conclude that silicon nitride is partly crystallized. According to the Raman data a-Si:H films with hydrogen concentration 15% and lower contain mainly Si–H chemical species, and films with hydrogen concentration 30–35% contain mainly Si–H2 chemical species. Nanosecond pulse laser treatments lead to crystallization of the films and its dehydrogenization.

  14. Effect of low level doping of boron and phosphorus on the properties of amorphous silicon films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran, N.T.; Epstein, K.A.; Grimmer, D.P.; Vernstrom, G.D.

    1987-01-01

    Effect of the low level doping of boron and phosphorus on the properties of amorphous silicon films (a-Si:H) were studied. Doping level of both boron and phosphorus was in the range of 10/sup 17/ atoms/cm/sup 3/. Apparent improvement in the stability of dark and photoconductivity of a-Si: films upon low level doping does not result from the elimination of light-induced defects. The stability of the dark and photoconductivity upon doping is an indication of pinning of the Fermi level

  15. Study on boron-film thermal neutron converter prepared by pulsed laser deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Zifeng; Ye Shuzhen; Chen Ziyu; Song Liao; Shen Ji

    2011-01-01

    The boron film converter used in the position-sensitive thermal neutron detector is discussed and the method of preparing this converter layer via Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) is introduced. The morphology and the composition were studied by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Both boron and boride existed on the layer surface. It was shown that the energy intensity of laser beam and the substrate temperature both had an important influence on the surface morphology of the film.

  16. Study on boron-film thermal neutron converter prepared by pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song Zifeng; Ye Shuzhen; Chen Ziyu; Song Liao [Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Anhui Hefei 230026 (China); Shen Ji, E-mail: shenji@ustc.edu.c [Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Anhui Hefei 230026 (China)

    2011-02-15

    The boron film converter used in the position-sensitive thermal neutron detector is discussed and the method of preparing this converter layer via Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) is introduced. The morphology and the composition were studied by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Both boron and boride existed on the layer surface. It was shown that the energy intensity of laser beam and the substrate temperature both had an important influence on the surface morphology of the film.

  17. Elastic properties of boron carbide films via surface acoustic waves measured by Brillouin light scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salas, E.; Jimenez-Villacorta, F.; Jimenez Rioboo, R.J.; Prieto, C. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Sanchez-Marcos, J. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Quimica-Fisica Aplicada, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Munoz-Martin, A.; Prieto, J.E.; Joco, V. [Centro de Microanalisis de Materiales, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-03-15

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) velocity has been determined by high resolution Brillouin light scattering to study the mechano-elastic properties of boron carbide films prepared by radio frequency (RF) sputtering. The comparison of experimentally observed elastic behaviour with simulations made by considering film composition obtained from elastic recoil detection analysis-time of flight (ERDA-ToF) spectroscopy allows establishing that elastic properties are determined by that of crystalline boron carbide with a lessening of the SAW velocity values due to surface oxidation. (Copyright copyright 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. Observation of ultraslow stress release in silicon nitride films on CaF2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Tianyi; Deen, M. Jamal; Xu, Changqing; Fang, Qiyin; Selvaganapathy, P. Ravi; Zhang, Haiying

    2015-01-01

    Silicon nitride thin films are deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition on (100) and (111) CaF 2 crystalline substrates. Delaminated wavy buckles formed during the release of internal compressive stress in the films and the stress releasing processes are observed macroscopically and microscopically. The stress release patterns start from the substrate edges and propagate to the center along defined directions aligned with the crystallographic orientations of the substrate. The stress releasing velocity of SiN x film on (111) CaF 2 is larger than that of SiN x film with the same thickness on (100) CaF 2 . The velocities of SiN x film on both (100) and (111) CaF 2 increase with the film thickness. The stress releasing process is initiated when the films are exposed to atmosphere, but it is not a chemical change from x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

  19. Reactive pulsed laser deposition of thin molybdenum- and tungsten-nitride films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bereznai, M. [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, H-6720 Szeged, Dom ter 9 (Hungary)]. E-mail: bereznai@physx.u-szeged.hu; Toth, Z. [Research Group on Laser Physics of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-6720 Szeged, Dom ter 9 (Hungary); Caricato, A.P. [INFM and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Lecce, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Fernandez, M. [INFM and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Lecce, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Luches, A. [INFM and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Lecce, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Majni, G. [INFM and Dipartimento di Fisica ed Ingegneria dei Materiali e del Territorio, Universita Politecnica delle Marche, 60131 Ancona (Italy); Mengucci, P. [INFM and Dipartimento di Fisica ed Ingegneria dei Materiali e del Territorio, Universita Politecnica delle Marche, 60131 Ancona (Italy); Nagy, P.M. [Department of General Physics, Lorand Eoetvoes University, H-1518 Budapest, POB 32 (Hungary); Juhasz, A. [Department of General Physics, Lorand Eoetvoes University, H-1518 Budapest, POB 32 (Hungary); Nanai, L. [Department of Physics, University of Szeged JGYTF, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary)

    2005-02-01

    In this work reactive pulsed laser deposition of molybdenum- and tungsten-nitride thin films is investigated. Metallic targets were ablated in low-pressure (1, 10 and 100 Pa) nitrogen atmosphere by KrF excimer laser pulses (fluence {approx}6.5 J/cm{sup 2}). Films were deposited on silicon wafers heated to {approx}25, 250 and 500 deg. C. The characteristics of the films strongly depend on the N{sub 2} pressure. By increasing N{sub 2} pressure, the nitrogen content increases in the films, which leads to a monotonous increase of the electrical resistivity. Deposition rate decreases at 100 Pa as indicated by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. At this pressure, hardness of the films significantly decreases also, as shown by microhardness measurements. X-ray diffractometry shows that films crystallinity is improved by increasing the substrate temperature. In addition, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were applied for visualising the film surface.

  20. XPS study of the process of oxygen gettering by thin films of PACVD boron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennaceur^1, M. M.; Terreault, B.

    2000-06-01

    Numerous collector samples have been exposed in the TdeV tokamak, either to plasma assisted chemical vapor boronization only, or to boronization plus tokamak power discharges. They have been analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) in order to characterize and better understand the process by which the boron-rich film getter ambient oxygen. It was found that the state of oxidation of the samples after boronization is the most reliable predictor of subsequent machine performance. The gettering capacity is high, on the order of 10 21 O/m 2, and affects a surprisingly thick layer (˜100 nm), but the oxide always remains substoichiometric (with a formula BO x, x < 1). The oxidation is clearly activated by the plasma, during both glow discharge deposition and power discharges, but in this respect the latter are much more effective than the former.