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Sample records for boron nanoparticles inhibit

  1. Boron nanoparticles inhibit turnour growth by boron neutron capture therapy in the murine B16-OVA model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Mikkel Steen; Petersen, Charlotte Christie; Agger, Ralf

    2008-01-01

    Background: Boron neutron capture therapy usually relies on soluble, rather than particulate, boron compounds. This study evaluated the use of a novel boron nanoparticle for boron neutron capture therapy. Materials and Methods: Two hundred and fifty thousand B16-OVA tumour cells, pre......-incubated with boron nanoparticles for 12 hours, were injected subcutaneously into C57BL16J mice. The tumour sites were exposed to different doses of neutron radiation one, four, or eight days after tumour cell inoculation. Results: When the tumour site was irradiated with thermal neutrons one day after injection......, tumour growth was delayed and the treated mice survived longer than untreated controls (median survival time 20 days (N=8) compared with 10 days (N=7) for untreated mice). Conclusion: Boron nanoparticles significantly delay the growth of an aggressive B16-OVA tumour in vivo by boron neutron capture...

  2. Functionalization and cellular uptake of boron carbide nanoparticles. The first step toward T cell-guided boron neutron capture therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, M W; Björkdahl, O; Sørensen, P G; Hansen, T; Jensen, M R; Gundersen, H J G; Bjørnholm, T

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we present surface modification strategies of boron carbide nanoparticles, which allow for bioconjugation of the transacting transcriptional activator (TAT) peptide and fluorescent dyes. Coated nanoparticles can be translocated into murine EL4 thymoma cells and B16 F10 malignant melanoma cells in amounts as high as 0.3 wt. % and 1 wt. %, respectively. Neutron irradiation of a test system consisting of untreated B16 cells mixed with B16 cells loaded with boron carbide nanoparticles were found to inhibit the proliferative capacity of untreated cells, showing that cells loaded with boron-containing nanoparticles can hinder the growth of neighboring cells upon neutron irradiation. This could provide the first step toward a T cell-guided boron neutron capture therapy.

  3. Functionalization and cellular uptake of boron carbide nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, M. W.; Björkdahl, O.; Sørensen, P. G.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we present surface modification strategies of boron carbide nanoparticles, which allow for bioconjugation of the transacting transcriptional activator (TAT) peptide and fluorescent dyes. Coated nanoparticles can be translocated into murine EL4 thymoma cells and B16 F10 malignant...

  4. Preparation and characterization of Boron carbide nanoparticles for use as a novel agent in T cell-guided boron neutron capture therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, M. W.; Sørensen, P. G.; Björkdahl, O.

    2006-01-01

    Boron carbide nanoparticles are proposed as a system for T cell-guided boron neutron capture therapy. Nanoparticles were produced by ball milling in various atmospheres of commercially available boron carbide. The physical and chemical properties of the particles were investigated using...

  5. Biocompatibility of functionalized boron phosphate (BPO4) nanoparticles for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achilli, Cesare; Grandi, Stefania; Ciana, Annarita; Guidetti, Gianni F; Malara, Alessandro; Abbonante, Vittorio; Cansolino, Laura; Tomasi, Corrado; Balduini, Alessandra; Fagnoni, Maurizio; Merli, Daniele; Mustarelli, Piercarlo; Canobbio, Ilaria; Balduini, Cesare; Minetti, Giampaolo

    2014-04-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a radiotherapy treatment based on the accumulation in the tumor of a (10)B-containing drug and subsequent irradiation with low energy neutrons, which bring about the decay of (10)B to (7)Li and an α particle, causing the death of the neoplastic cell. The effectiveness of BNCT is limited by the low delivery and accumulation of the used boron-containing compounds. Here we report the development and the characterization of BPO4 nanoparticles (NPs) as a novel possible alternative drug for BNCT. An extensive analysis of BPO4 NP biocompatibility was performed using both mature blood cells (erythrocytes, neutrophils and platelets) and a model of hematopoietic progenitor cells. A time- and concentration-dependent cytotoxicity study was performed on neoplastic coloncarcinoma and osteosarcoma cell lines. BPO4 functionalization with folic acid, introduced to improve the uptake by tumor cells, appeared to effectively limit the unwanted effects of NPs on the analyzed blood components. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a radiotherapy treatment modality based on the accumulation of a (10)B-containing drug and subsequent irradiation with low energy neutrons, inducing the decay of (10)B to (7)Li and an α particle, causing neoplastic cell death. This team of authors reports on a folic acid functionalized BPO4 nanoparticle with improved characteristics compared with conventional BNCT approaches, as demonstrated in tumor cell lines, and hopefully to be followed by translational human studies. © 2014.

  6. Aerolization During Boron Nanoparticle Multi-Component Fuel Group Burning Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-03

    that clogged against a counting plate grid spacing of 50 m. (B) Microscope photograph of a 1% w/v CeO2 (w/ oleic acid) + JP-5 slurry against a... CeO2 -coated boron slurries , but not in the CeO2 slurries . Tendency of boron-nanoparticles to form agglomerates in liquid hydrocarbon fuels may...alcohols; 3) dilute slurries of boron nanoparticles in either JP-5 or alcohol; 4) dilute slurries of CeO2 coated boron nanoparticles in either JP-5 or

  7. Preparation and characterization of Boron carbide nanoparticles for use as a novel agent in T cell-guided boron neutron capture therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, M W; Sørensen, P G; Björkdahl, O; Jensen, M R; Gundersen, H J G; Bjørnholm, T

    2006-03-01

    Boron carbide nanoparticles are proposed as a system for T cell-guided boron neutron capture therapy. Nanoparticles were produced by ball milling in various atmospheres of commercially available boron carbide. The physical and chemical properties of the particles were investigated using transmission electron microscopy, photon correlation spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, vibrational spectroscopy, gel electrophoresis and chemical assays and reveal profound changes in surface chemistry and structural characteristics. In vitro thermal neutron irradiation of B16 melanoma cells incubated with sub-100 nm nanoparticles (381.5 microg/g (10)B) induces complete cell death. The nanoparticles alone induce no toxicity.

  8. A thermo dynamical model for the shape and size effect on melting of boron carbide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniammal, Paneerselvam; Arivuoli, Dakshanamoorthy

    2012-02-01

    The size and shape dependence of the melting temperature of Boron Carbide (B4C) nanoparticles has been investigated with a numerical thermo dynamical approach. The problem considered in this paper is the inward melting of nanoparticles with spherical and cylindrical geometry. The cylindrical Boron Carbide (B4C) nanoparticles, whose melting point has been reported to decrease with decreasing particle radius, become larger than spherical shaped nanoparticle. Comparative investigation of the size dependence of the melting temperature with respect to the two shapes is also been done. The melting temperature obtained in the present study is approximately a dealing function of radius, in a good agreement with prediction of thermo dynamical model.

  9. Silver Nanoparticle-Deposited Boron Nitride Nanosheets as Fillers for Polymeric Composites with High Thermal Conductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fangfang; Zeng, Xiaoliang; Yao, Yimin; Sun, Rong; Xu, Jianbin; Wong, Ching-Ping

    2016-01-19

    Polymer composites with high thermal conductivity have recently attracted much attention, along with the rapid development of the electronic devices toward higher speed and performance. However, a common method to enhance polymer thermal conductivity through an addition of high thermally conductive fillers usually cannot provide an expected value, especially for composites requiring electrical insulation. Here, we show that polymeric composites with silver nanoparticle-deposited boron nitride nanosheets as fillers could effectively enhance the thermal conductivity of polymer, thanks to the bridging connections of silver nanoparticles among boron nitride nanosheets. The thermal conductivity of the composite is significantly increased from 1.63 W/m-K for the composite filled with the silver nanoparticle-deposited boron nitride nanosheets to 3.06 W/m-K at the boron nitride nanosheets loading of 25.1 vol %. In addition, the electrically insulating properties of the composite are well preserved. Fitting the measured thermal conductivity of epoxy composite with one physical model indicates that the composite with silver nanoparticle-deposited boron nitride nanosheets outperforms the one with boron nitride nanosheets, owning to the lower thermal contact resistance among boron nitride nanosheets' interfaces. The finding sheds new light on enhancement of thermal conductivity of the polymeric composites which concurrently require the electrical insulation.

  10. Preparation of bio-compatible boron nanoparticles and novel mesoporous silica nanoparticles for bio-applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhe

    This dissertation presents the synthesis and characterization of several novel inorganic and hybrid nanoparticles, including the bio-compatible boron nanoparticles (BNPs) for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), tannic acid-templated mesoporous silica nanoparticles and degradable bridged silsesquioxane silica nanoparticles. Chapter 1 provides background information of BNCT and reviews the development of design and synthesizing silica nanoparticles and the study of silica material degradability. Chapter 2 describes the preparation and characterization of dopamine modified BNPs and the preliminary cell study of them. The BNPs were first produced via ball milling, with fatty acid on the surface to stabilize the combustible boron elements. This chapter will mainly focus on the ligand-exchange strategy, in which the fatty acids were replaced by non-toxic dopamines in a facile one-pot reaction. The dopamine-coated BNPs (DA-BNPs) revealed good water dispersibility and low cytotoxicity. Chapter 3 describes the synthesis of tannic acid template mesoporous silica nanoparticles (TA-TEOS SiNPs) and their application to immobilize proteins. The monodispersed TA SiNPs with uniform pore size up to approximately 13 nm were produced by utilizing tannic acid as a molecular template. We studied the influence of TA concentration and reaction time on the morphology and pore size of the particles. Furthermore, the TA-TEOS particles could subsequently be modified with amine groups allowing them to be capable of incorporating imaging ligands and other guest molecules. The ability of the TA-TEOS particles to store biomolecules was preliminarily assessed with three proteins of different charge characteristics and dimensions. The immobilization of malic dehydrogenase on TA-TEOS enhanced the stability of the enzyme at room temperature. Chapter 4 details the synthesis of several bridged silsesquioxanes and the preparation of degradable hybrid SiNPs via co-condensation of bridged

  11. Boron Stress Activates the General Amino Acid Control Mechanism and Inhibits Protein Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uluisik, Irem; Kaya, Alaattin; Fomenko, Dmitri E.; Karakaya, Huseyin C.; Carlson, Bradley A.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.; Koc, Ahmet

    2011-01-01

    Boron is an essential micronutrient for plants, and it is beneficial for animals. However, at high concentrations boron is toxic to cells although the mechanism of this toxicity is not known. Atr1 has recently been identified as a boron efflux pump whose expression is upregulated in response to boron treatment. Here, we found that the expression of ATR1 is associated with expression of genes involved in amino acid biosynthesis. These mechanisms are strictly controlled by the transcription factor Gcn4 in response to boron treatment. Further analyses have shown that boron impaired protein synthesis by promoting phosphorylation of eIF2α in a Gcn2 kinase dependent manner. The uncharged tRNA binding domain (HisRS) of Gcn2 is necessary for the phosphorylation of eIF2α in the presence of boron. We postulate that boron exerts its toxic effect through activation of the general amino acid control system and inhibition of protein synthesis. Since the general amino acid control pathway is conserved among eukaryotes, this mechanism of boron toxicity may be of general importance. PMID:22114689

  12. Boron containing magnetic nanoparticles for neutron capture therapy--an innovative approach for specifically targeting tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tietze, Rainer; Unterweger, Harald; Dürr, Stephan; Lyer, Stefan; Canella, Lea; Kudejova, Petra; Wagner, Franz M; Petry, Winfried; Taccardi, Nicola; Alexiou, Christoph

    2015-12-01

    The selective delivery of (10)B into the tumor tissue remains to be further improved for successful and reliable Boron Neutron Capture Therapy applications. Magnetic Drug Targeting using intraarterially administered superparamagnetic nanoparticles and external magnetic fields already exhibited convincing results in terms of highly efficient and selective drug deposition. Using the same technique for the targeted (10)B delivery is a promising new approach. Here, systematic irradiation experiments of phantom cubes containing different concentrations of boron and nanoparticles as well as varying three-dimensional arrangements have been performed. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Folate receptor-mediated boron-10 containing carbon nanoparticles as potential delivery vehicles for boron neutron capture therapy of nonfunctional pituitary adenomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Congxin; Cai, Feng; Hwang, Kuo Chu; Zhou, Yongmao; Zhang, Zizhu; Liu, Xiaohai; Ma, Sihai; Yang, Yakun; Yao, Yong; Feng, Ming; Bao, Xinjie; Li, Guilin; Wei, Junji; Jiao, Yonghui; Wei, Zhenqing; Ma, Wenbin; Wang, Renzhi

    2013-02-01

    Invasive nonfunctional pituitary adenomas (NFPAs) are difficult to completely resect and often develop tumor recurrence after initial surgery. Currently, no medications are clinically effective in the control of NFPA. Although radiation therapy and radiosurgery are useful to prevent tumor regrowth, they are frequently withheld because of severe complications. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a binary radiotherapy that selectively and maximally damages tumor cells without harming the surrounding normal tissue. Folate receptor (FR)-targeted boron-10 containing carbon nanoparticles is a novel boron delivery agent that can be selectively taken up by FR-expressing cells via FR-mediated endocytosis. In this study, FR-targeted boron-10 containing carbon nanoparticles were selectively taken up by NFPAs cells expressing FR but not other types of non-FR expressing pituitary adenomas. After incubation with boron-10 containing carbon nanoparticles and following irradiation with thermal neutrons, the cell viability of NFPAs was significantly decreased, while apoptotic cells were simultaneously increased. However, cells administered the same dose of FR-targeted boron-10 containing carbon nanoparticles without neutron irradiation or received the same neutron irradiation alone did not show significant decrease in cell viability or increase in apoptotic cells. The expression of Bcl-2 was down-regulated and the expression of Bax was up-regulated in NFPAs after treatment with FR-mediated BNCT. In conclusion, FR-targeted boron-10 containing carbon nanoparticles may be an ideal delivery system of boron to NFPAs cells for BNCT. Furthermore, our study also provides a novel insight into therapeutic strategies for invasive NFPA refractory to conventional therapy, while exploring these new applications of BNCT for tumors, especially benign tumors.

  14. Improvement of Thermal and Electrical Conductivity of Epoxy/boron Nitride/silver Nanoparticle Composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seungyong; Lim, Soonho [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Wanju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    In this study, we investigated the effect of BN (boron nitride) on the thermal and the electrical conductivity of composites. In case of epoxy/BN composites, the thermal conductivity was increased as the BN contents were increased. Epoxy/AgNP (Ag nanoparticle) nanocomposites exhibited a slight change of thermal conductivity and showed a electrical percolation threshold at 20 vol% of Ag nanoparticles. At the fixed Ag nanoparticle content below the electrical percolation threshold, increasing the amount of BN enhanced the electrical conductivity as well as thermal conductivity for the epoxy/AgNP/BN composites.

  15. Design, development and characterization of multi-functionalized gold nanoparticles for biodetection and targeted boron delivery in BNCT applications.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mandal, S.; Bakeine, G.J.; Krol, S.; Ferrari, C.; Clerici, A.M.; Zonta, C.; Cansolino, L.; Ballarini, F.; Bortolussi, S.; Stella, S.; Protti, N.; Bruschi, P.; Altieri, S.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to optimize targeted boron delivery to cancer cells and its tracking down to the cellular level. To this end, we describe the design and synthesis of novel nanovectors that double as targeted boron delivery agents and fluorescent imaging probes. Gold nanoparticles were

  16. Biophysical response of living cells to boron nitride nanoparticles: uptake mechanism and bio-mechanical characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasel, Md. Alim Iftekhar; Li, Tong; Nguyen, Trung Dung; Singh, Sanjleena [Queensland University of Technology (QUT), School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering (Australia); Zhou, Yinghong; Xiao, Yin [Queensland University of Technology (QUT), Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation (Australia); Gu, YuanTong, E-mail: yuantong.gu@qut.edu.au [Queensland University of Technology (QUT), School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering (Australia)

    2015-11-15

    Boron nitride nanomaterials have attracted significant interest due to their superior chemical and physical properties. Despite these novel properties, investigation on the interaction between boron nitride nanoparticle (BN NP) and living systems has been limited. In this study, BN NP (100–250 nm) is assessed as a promising biomaterial for medical applications. The toxicity of BN NP is evaluated by assessing the cells behaviours both biologically (MTT assay, ROS detection etc.) and physically (atomic force microscopy). The uptake mechanism of BN NP is studied by analysing the alternations in cellular morphology based on cell imaging techniques. The results demonstrate in vitro cytocompatibility of BN NP with immense potential for use as an effective nanoparticle for various bio-medical applications.

  17. Synthesis of Cubic Boron Nitride Nanoparticles from Boron Oxide, Melamine and NH3 by Non-Transferred Ar-N2 Thermal Plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Eun Ha; Kim, Tae-Hee; Choi, Sooseok; Park, Dong-Wha

    2015-11-01

    Cubic boron nitride (c-BN) which is has extremely high hardness and thermal conductivity comparable to the diamond was synthesized in nanoparticle form by using non-transferred thermal plasma. The input power of arc plasma was fixed at 13.5 kW and the operating pressure was also fixed at atmospheric pressure. Boron oxide (B2O3) and melamine (C3H6N6) were used as raw materials for the sources of boron and nitrogen. Ammonia gas (NH3) was additionally injected to plasma jet as reactive gas providing additional nitrogen. Decomposed B2O3 and C3H6N6 enhance reactivity for synthesizing c-BN with exothermic reactions between carbon, hydrogen and oxygen. Products were collected from the inner wall of reactor. In X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope measurements, the collected powder was confirmed as c-BN nanoparticles which have crystalline size smaller than 150 nm.

  18. Interstitial modification of palladium nanoparticles with boron atoms as a green catalyst for selective hydrogenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Chun Wong Aaron; Mahadi, Abdul Hanif; Li, Molly Meng-Jung; Corbos, Elena Cristina; Tang, Chiu; Jones, Glenn; Kuo, Winson Chun Hsin; Cookson, James; Brown, Christopher Michael; Bishop, Peter Trenton; Tsang, Shik Chi Edman

    2014-12-01

    Lindlar catalysts comprising of palladium/calcium carbonate modified with lead acetate and quinoline are widely employed industrially for the partial hydrogenation of alkynes. However, their use is restricted, particularly for food, cosmetic and drug manufacture, due to the extremely toxic nature of lead, and the risk of its leaching from catalyst surface. In addition, the catalysts also exhibit poor selectivities in a number of cases. Here we report that a non-surface modification of palladium gives rise to the formation of an ultra-selective nanocatalyst. Boron atoms are found to take residence in palladium interstitial lattice sites with good chemical and thermal stability. This is favoured due to a strong host-guest electronic interaction when supported palladium nanoparticles are treated with a borane tetrahydrofuran solution. The adsorptive properties of palladium are modified by the subsurface boron atoms and display ultra-selectivity in a number of challenging alkyne hydrogenation reactions, which outclass the performance of Lindlar catalysts.

  19. Boronic acid-modified lipid nanocapsules: a novel platform for the highly efficient inhibition of hepatitis C viral entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanal, Manakamana; Barras, Alexandre; Vausselin, Thibaut; Fénéant, Lucie; Boukherroub, Rabah; Siriwardena, Aloysius; Dubuisson, Jean; Szunerits, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    The search for viral entry inhibitors that selectively target viral envelope glycoproteins has attracted increasing interest in recent years. Amongst the handful of molecules reported to show activity as hepatitis C virus (HCV) entry inhibitors are a variety of glycan-binding proteins including the lectins, cyanovirin-N (CV-N) and griffithsin. We recently demonstrated that boronic acid-modified nanoparticles are able to reduce HCV entry through a similar mechanism to that of lectins. A major obstacle to any further development of these nanostructures as viral entry inhibitors is their only moderate maximal inhibition potential. In the present study, we report that lipid nanocapsules (LNCs), surface-functionalized with amphiphilic boronic acid (BA) through their post-insertion into the semi-rigid shell of the LNCs, are indeed far superior as HCV entry inhibitors when compared with previously reported nanostructures. These 2nd generation particles (BA-LNCs) are shown to prevent HCV infection in the micromolar range (IC50 = 5.4 μM of BA moieties), whereas the corresponding BA monomers show no significant effects even at the highest analyzed concentration (20 μM). The new BA-LNCs are the most promising boronolectin-based HCV entry inhibitors reported to date and are thus observed to show great promise in the development of a pseudolectin-based therapeutic agent.The search for viral entry inhibitors that selectively target viral envelope glycoproteins has attracted increasing interest in recent years. Amongst the handful of molecules reported to show activity as hepatitis C virus (HCV) entry inhibitors are a variety of glycan-binding proteins including the lectins, cyanovirin-N (CV-N) and griffithsin. We recently demonstrated that boronic acid-modified nanoparticles are able to reduce HCV entry through a similar mechanism to that of lectins. A major obstacle to any further development of these nanostructures as viral entry inhibitors is their only moderate maximal

  20. Evolution of magnetism by rolling up hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets tailored with superparamagnetic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Da Young; Choi, Kyoung Hwan; Park, Jeong Eon; Suh, Dong Hack

    2017-02-01

    Controlling tunable properties by rolling up two dimensional nanomaterials is an exciting avenue for tailoring the electronic and magnetic properties of materials at the nanoscale. We demonstrate the tailoring of a magnetic nanocomposite through hybridization with magnetic nanomaterials using hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) templates as an effective way to evolve magnetism for the first time. Boron nitride nanosheets exhibited their typical diamagnetism, but rolled-up boron nitride sheets (called nanoscrolls) clearly have para-magnetism in the case of magnetic susceptibility. Additionally, the Fe 3 O 4 NP sample shows a maximum ZFC curve at about 103 K, which indicates well dispersed superparamagnetic nanoparticles. The ZFC curve for the h-BN-Fe 3 O 4 NP scrolls exhibited an apparent rounded maximum blocking temperature at 192 K compared to the Fe 3 O 4 NPs, leading to a dramatic increase in T B . These magnetic nanoscroll derivatives are remarkable materials and should be suitable for high-performance composites and nano-, medical- and electromechanical-devices.

  1. Boron nitride nanosheets decorated with silver nanoparticles through mussel-inspired chemistry of dopamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, Arup Kumer; In, Insik; Park, Byoungnam; Lee, Kang Seok; Park, Sung Young

    2014-01-01

    Boron nitride nanosheet (BNNS) decorated with silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) was successfully synthesized via mussel-inspired chemistry of dopamine. Poly(dopamine)-functionalized BNNS (PDA-BNNS) was prepared by adding dopamine into the aqueous dispersion of hydroxylated BNNS (OH-BNNS) at alkaline condition. AgNPs were decorated on PDA-BNNS through spontaneous reduction of silver cations by catechol moieties of a PDA layer on BNNS, resulting in AgNP-BNNS with good dispersion stability. Incorporation of PDA on BNNS not only played a role as a surface functionalization method of BNNS, but also provided a molecular platform for creating very sophisticated two-dimensional (2D) BNNS-based hybrid nanomaterials such as metal nanoparticle-decorated BNNS. (paper)

  2. Multi-phase structures of boron-doped copper tin sulfide nanoparticles synthesized by chemical bath deposition for optoelectronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakspun, Jariya; Kantip, Nathakan; Vailikhit, Veeramol; Choopun, Supab; Tubtimtae, Auttasit

    2018-04-01

    We investigated the influence of boron doping on the structural, optical, and electrical properties of copper tin sulfide (CTS) nanoparticles coated on a WO3 surface and synthesized using chemical bath deposition. Boron doping at concentrations of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 wt% was investigated. The X-ray diffraction pattern of CTS showed the presence of monoclinic Cu2Sn3S7, cubic Cu2SnS3, and orthorhombic Cu4SnS4. Boron doping influenced the preferred orientation of the nanoparticles for all phase structures and produced a lattice strain effect and changes in the dislocation density. Increasing the concentration of boron in CTS from 0.5 wt% to 2.0 wt% reduced the band gap for all phases of CTS from 1.46 to 1.29 eV and reduced the optical transmittance. Optical constants, such as the refractive index, extinction coefficient, and dissipation factor, were also obtained for B-doped CTS. The dispersion behavior of the refractive index was investigated in terms of a single oscillator model and the physical parameters were determined. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirmed the successful synthesis of CTS nanoparticles. Cyclic voltammetry indicated that optimum boron doping (<1.5 wt% for all phases) resulted in desirable p-n junction behavior for optoelectronic applications.

  3. One-pot synthesis of biocompatible boronic acid-functionalized poly(methyl methacrylate) nanoparticles at sub-100 nm scale for glucose sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakalak, Huseyin [Selcuk University, Metallurgy and Materials Engineering (Turkey); Ulasan, Mehmet; Yavuz, Emine [Selcuk University, Advanced Technology Research and Application Center (Turkey); Camli, Sevket Tolga, E-mail: tolgacamli@gmail.com [Biyotez Machinery Chemistry R& D Co. Ltd. (Turkey); Yavuz, Mustafa Selman, E-mail: selmanyavuz@selcuk.edu.tr [Selcuk University, Metallurgy and Materials Engineering (Turkey)

    2014-12-15

    Poly(methyl methacrylate) nanoparticles containing 4-vinylphenyl boronic acid were synthesized in one pot by surfactant-free emulsion polymerization. The nanoparticles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. Boron content in the nanoparticles was confirmed by electron-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. In polymerization process, several co-monomer ratios were studied in order to obtain optimum nanoparticle size. Average hydrodynamic diameter and polydispersity index of nanoparticles versus variation of acetone percentage in the solvent mixture and total monomer concentration were investigated. The effect of boronic acid concentration in the monomer mixture on nanoparticle size and size distribution was also reported. Without further functionalization to the nanoparticles, the catechol dye, alizarin red S, was bound to boronic acid-containing nanoparticles. These nanoparticles behave as a nanosensor by which glucose or fructose can be easily detected. Dye-containing nanoparticles were undertaken displacement reaction by glucose or fructose. The glucose or fructose content was also monitored by UV–Visible spectrophotometer. Furthermore, cytotoxicity studies of boronic acid-carrying poly(methyl methacrylate) nanoparticles were carried out in 3T3 cells, which showed no toxicity effect on the cells.

  4. Structural basis of metallo-β-lactamase, serine-β-lactamase and penicillin-binding protein inhibition by cyclic boronates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brem, Jürgen; Cain, Ricky; Cahill, Samuel; McDonough, Michael A.; Clifton, Ian J.; Jiménez-Castellanos, Juan-Carlos; Avison, Matthew B.; Spencer, James; Fishwick, Colin W. G.; Schofield, Christopher J.

    2016-08-01

    β-Lactamases enable resistance to almost all β-lactam antibiotics. Pioneering work revealed that acyclic boronic acids can act as `transition state analogue' inhibitors of nucleophilic serine enzymes, including serine-β-lactamases. Here we report biochemical and biophysical analyses revealing that cyclic boronates potently inhibit both nucleophilic serine and zinc-dependent β-lactamases by a mechanism involving mimicking of the common tetrahedral intermediate. Cyclic boronates also potently inhibit the non-essential penicillin-binding protein PBP 5 by the same mechanism of action. The results open the way for development of dual action inhibitors effective against both serine- and metallo-β-lactamases, and which could also have antimicrobial activity through inhibition of PBPs.

  5. Structure of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteasome and mechanism of inhibition by a peptidyl boronate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu,G.; Lin, G.; Wang, M.; Dick, L.; Xu, R.; Nathan, C.; Li, H.

    2006-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) has the remarkable ability to resist killing by human macrophages. The 750 kDa proteasome, not available in most eubacteria except Actinomycetes, appears to contribute to Mtb's resistance. The crystal structure of the Mtb proteasome at 3.0 Angstroms resolution reveals a substrate-binding pocket with composite features of the distinct {beta}1, {beta}2 and {beta}5 substrate binding sites of eukaryotic proteasomes, accounting for the broad specificity of the Mtb proteasome towards oligopeptides described in the companion article [Lin et al. (2006), Mol Microbiol doi:10.1111/j.1365-2958.2005.05035.x]. The substrate entrance at the end of the cylindrical proteasome appears open in the crystal structure due to partial disorder of the a-subunit N-terminal residues. However, cryo-electron microscopy of the core particle reveals a closed end, compatible with the density observed in negative-staining electron microscopy that depended on the presence of the N-terminal octapeptides of the a-subunits in the companion article, suggesting that the Mtb proteasome has a gated structure. We determine for the first time the proteasomal inhibition mechanism of the dipeptidyl boronate N-(4-morpholine)carbonyl-{beta}-(1-naphthyl)-l-alanine-l-leucine boronic acid (MLN-273), an analogue of the antimyeloma drug bortezomib. The structure improves prospects for designing Mtb-specific proteasomal inhibitors as a novel approach to chemotherapy of tuberculosis.

  6. Cross-Linked Dependency of Boronic Acid-Conjugated Chitosan Nanoparticles by Diols for Sustained Insulin Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabil A. Siddiqui

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Boronic acids have been widely investigated for their potential use as glucose sensors in glucose responsive polymeric insulin delivery systems. Interactions between cyclic diols and boronic acids, anchored to polymeric delivery systems, may result in swelling of the delivery system, releasing the drug. In this study, 4-formylphenylboronic acid conjugated chitosan was formulated into insulin containing nanoparticles via polyelectrolyte complexation. The nanoparticles had an average diameter of 140 ± 12.8 nm, polydispersity index of 0.17 ± 0.1, zeta potential of +19.1 ± 0.69 mV, encapsulation efficiency of 81% ± 1.2%, and an insulin loading capacity of 46% ± 1.8% w/w. Changes in size of the nanoparticles and release of insulin were type of sugar- and concentration-dependent. High concentration of diols resulted in a sustained release of insulin due to crosslink formation with boronic acid moieties within the nanoparticles. The formulation has potential to be developed into a self-regulated insulin delivery system for the treatment of diabetes.

  7. Anodic stripping voltammetry of synthesized CdS nanoparticles at boron-doped diamond electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayat, Mohammad; Ivandini, Tribidasari A., E-mail: ivandini.tri@sci.ui.ac.id; Saepudin, Endang [Department of Chemistry, FMIPA, Universitas Indonesia, Kampus UI Depok (Indonesia); Einaga, Yasuaki [Department of Chemistry, Keio University (Japan)

    2016-04-19

    Cadmium sulphide (CdS) nanoparticles were chemically synthesized using reverse micelles microreactor methods. By using different washing treatments, UV-Vis spectroscopy showed that the absorption peaks appeared at 465 nm, 462 nm, 460 nm, and 459 nm respectively for CdS nanoparticles without and with 1, 2, and 3 times washing treatments using pure water. In comparison with the absorbance peak of bulk CdS at 512 nm, the shifted absorption peaks, indicates that the different sizes of CdS can be prepared. Anodic stripping voltammetry of the CdS nanoparticles was then studied at a boron-doped diamond electrode using 0.1 M KClO{sub 4} and 0.1 M HClO{sub 4} as the electrolytes. A scan rate of 100 mV/s with a deposition potential of -1000 mV (vs. Ag/AgCl) for 60 s at a potential scan from -1600 mV to +800 mV (vs. Ag/AgCl) was applied as the optimum condition of the measurements. Highly-accurate linear calibration curves (R{sup 2} = 0.99) in 0.1 M HClO{sub 4} with the sensitivity of 0.075 mA/mM and the limit of detection of 81 µM in 0.1 M HClO{sub 4} can be achieved, which is promising for an application of CdS nanoparticles as a label for biosensors.

  8. Synthesis of PBAD-lipiodol nanoparticles for combination treatment with boric acid in boron neutron capture therapy for hepatoma in-vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, F.I.; Chung, H.P.; Liu, H.M.; Wen, H.W.; Chi, C.W.; Lin, Shanyang; Lui, W.Y.; Kai, J.J.

    2006-01-01

    This study attempted to increase BNCT efficiency for hepatoma by a combined treatment of phenylboric acid derivative entrapped lipiodol nanoparticles (PBAD-L nanoparticles) with boric acid. The size of PBAD-L nanoparticles were 400-750 nm at the boron concentrations of 0.3-2.7 mg/ml. After 24 hours the boron concentration in PBAD-L nanoparticles treated human hepatoma HepG2 cells was 112 ppm, while that in rat liver Clone 9 cells was 52 ppm. With the use of 25 μg B/ml boric acid, after 6 hours the boron concentration in HepG2 and Clone 9 cells were 75 ppm and 40 ppm, respectively. In a combined treatment, boron concentration in HepG2 cells which were treated with PBAD-L nanoparticles for 18 hours and then combined with boric acid for 6 hours was 158 ppm. After neutron irradiation, the surviving fraction of HepG2 cells treated with PBAD-L nanoparticles was 12.6%, while that in the ones with a combined treatment was 1.3%. In conclusion, the combined treatment provided a higher boron concentration in HepG2 cells than treatments with either PBAD-L nanoparticles or boric acid, resulting in a higher therapeutic efficacy of BNCT in hepatoma cells. (author)

  9. Boron containing magnetic nanoparticles for neutron capture therapy – an innovative approach for specifically targeting tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tietze, Rainer; Unterweger, Harald; Dürr, Stephan; Lyer, Stefan; Canella, Lea; Kudejova, Petra; Wagner, Franz M.; Petry, Winfried; Taccardi, Nicola; Alexiou, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    The selective delivery of 10 B into the tumor tissue remains to be further improved for successful and reliable Boron Neutron Capture Therapy applications. Magnetic Drug Targeting using intraarterially administered superparamagnetic nanoparticles and external magnetic fields already exhibited convincing results in terms of highly efficient and selective drug deposition. Using the same technique for the targeted 10 B delivery is a promising new approach. Here, systematic irradiation experiments of phantom cubes containing different concentrations of boron and nanoparticles as well as varying three-dimensional arrangements have been performed. - Highlights: • Magnetic Drug Targeting is a possible approach to substantially improve BNCT. • SPIONs did not influence the radiation dose deposition. • Superior dose deposition in gel phantoms reflecting Magnetic Drug Targeting set up.

  10. Cytotoxicity and Efflux Pump Inhibition Induced by Molybdenum Disulfide and Boron Nitride Nanomaterials with Sheetlike Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Su; Shen, Zhuoyan; Wu, Bing; Yu, Yue; Hou, Hui; Zhang, Xu-Xiang; Ren, Hong-Qiang

    2017-09-19

    Sheetlike molybdenum disulfide (MoS 2 ) and boron nitride (BN) nanomaterials have attracted attention in the past few years due to their unique material properties. However, information on adverse effects and their underlying mechanisms for sheetlike MoS 2 and BN nanomaterials is rare. In this study, cytotoxicities of sheetlike MoS 2 and BN nanomaterials on human hepatoma HepG2 cells were systematically investigated at different toxic end points. Results showed that MoS 2 and BN nanomaterials decreased cell viability at 30 μg/mL and induced adverse effects on intracellular ROS generation (≥2 μg/mL), mitochondrial depolarization (≥4 μg/mL), and membrane integrity (≥8 μg/mL for MoS 2 and ≥2 μg/mL for BN). Furthermore, this study first found that low exposure concentrations (0.2-2 μg/mL) of MoS 2 and BN nanomaterials could increase plasma membrane fluidity and inhibit transmembrane ATP binding cassette (ABC) efflux transporter activity, which make both nanomaterials act as a chemosensitizer (increasing arsenic toxicity). Damage to plasma membrane and release of soluble Mo or B species might be two reasons that both nanomaterials inhibit efflux pump activities. This study provides a systematic understanding of the cytotoxicity of sheetlike MoS 2 and BN nanomaterials at different exposure levels, which is important for their safe use.

  11. Phytotoxicity of nanoparticles: Inhibition of seed germination and root growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin Daohui [Department of Environmental Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310028 (China); Department of Plant, Soil and Insect Sciences, University of Massachusetts, Stockbridge Hall, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Xing Baoshan [Department of Plant, Soil and Insect Sciences, University of Massachusetts, Stockbridge Hall, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States)], E-mail: bx@pssci.umass.edu

    2007-11-15

    Plants need to be included to develop a comprehensive toxicity profile for nanoparticles. Effects of five types of nanoparticles (multi-walled carbon nanotube, aluminum, alumina, zinc, and zinc oxide) on seed germination and root growth of six higher plant species (radish, rape, ryegrass, lettuce, corn, and cucumber) were investigated. Seed germination was not affected except for the inhibition of nanoscale zinc (nano-Zn) on ryegrass and zinc oxide (nano-ZnO) on corn at 2000 mg/L. Inhibition on root growth varied greatly among nanoparticles and plants. Suspensions of 2000 mg/L nano-Zn or nano-ZnO practically terminated root elongation of the tested plant species. Fifty percent inhibitory concentrations (IC{sub 50}) of nano-Zn and nano-ZnO were estimated to be near 50 mg/L for radish, and about 20 mg/L for rape and ryegrass. The inhibition occurred during the seed incubation process rather than seed soaking stage. These results are significant in terms of use and disposal of engineered nanoparticles. - Engineered nanoparticles can inhibit the seed germination and root growth.

  12. Hexagonal boron nitride nanoparticles decorated halloysite clay nanotubes as a potential hydrogen storage medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muthu, R. Naresh, E-mail: rnaresh7708@gmail.com; Rajashabala, S. [School of Physics, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai-625021, Tamil Nadu (India); Kannan, R. [Department of Physics, University College of Engineering, Anna University, Dindigul-624622 (India); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca 14850, New York (United States)

    2016-05-23

    The light weight and compact hydrogen storage materials is still prerequisite for the carbon free hydrogen fuel cell technology. In this work, the hydrogen storage performance of acid treated halloysite clay nanotubes (A-HNTs) and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) nanoparticles decorated acid treated halloysite nanoclay composite (A-HNT-h-BN) are demonstrated, where facile ultrasonic technique is adopted for the synthesis of A-HNT-h-BN nanoclay composite. Hydrogen storage studies were carried out using Sieverts-like hydrogenation setup. The A-HNTs and A-HNT-h-BN nanoclay composite were analyzed by XRD, FTIR, HRTEM, EDX, CHNS-elemental analysis and TGA. The A-HNT-h-BN nanoclay composite shows superior storage capacity of 2.19 wt% at 50 °C compared to the A-HNTs (0.58 wt%). A 100% desorption of stored hydrogen is noted in the temperature range of 138–175 °C. The average binding energy of hydrogen was found to be 0.34 eV for the prepared A-HNT-h-BN nanoclay composite. The excellent storage capability of A-HNT-h-BN nanoclay composite towards hydrogen at ambient temperature may find bright perspective in hydrogen fuel cell technology in near future.

  13. Hexagonal boron nitride nanoparticles decorated halloysite clay nanotubes as a potential hydrogen storage medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muthu, R. Naresh; Rajashabala, S.; Kannan, R.

    2016-01-01

    The light weight and compact hydrogen storage materials is still prerequisite for the carbon free hydrogen fuel cell technology. In this work, the hydrogen storage performance of acid treated halloysite clay nanotubes (A-HNTs) and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) nanoparticles decorated acid treated halloysite nanoclay composite (A-HNT-h-BN) are demonstrated, where facile ultrasonic technique is adopted for the synthesis of A-HNT-h-BN nanoclay composite. Hydrogen storage studies were carried out using Sieverts-like hydrogenation setup. The A-HNTs and A-HNT-h-BN nanoclay composite were analyzed by XRD, FTIR, HRTEM, EDX, CHNS-elemental analysis and TGA. The A-HNT-h-BN nanoclay composite shows superior storage capacity of 2.19 wt% at 50 °C compared to the A-HNTs (0.58 wt%). A 100% desorption of stored hydrogen is noted in the temperature range of 138–175 °C. The average binding energy of hydrogen was found to be 0.34 eV for the prepared A-HNT-h-BN nanoclay composite. The excellent storage capability of A-HNT-h-BN nanoclay composite towards hydrogen at ambient temperature may find bright perspective in hydrogen fuel cell technology in near future.

  14. Hexagonal boron nitride nanoparticles decorated halloysite clay nanotubes as a potential hydrogen storage medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthu, R. Naresh; Rajashabala, S.; Kannan, R.

    2016-05-01

    The light weight and compact hydrogen storage materials is still prerequisite for the carbon free hydrogen fuel cell technology. In this work, the hydrogen storage performance of acid treated halloysite clay nanotubes (A-HNTs) and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) nanoparticles decorated acid treated halloysite nanoclay composite (A-HNT-h-BN) are demonstrated, where facile ultrasonic technique is adopted for the synthesis of A-HNT-h-BN nanoclay composite. Hydrogen storage studies were carried out using Sieverts-like hydrogenation setup. The A-HNTs and A-HNT-h-BN nanoclay composite were analyzed by XRD, FTIR, HRTEM, EDX, CHNS-elemental analysis and TGA. The A-HNT-h-BN nanoclay composite shows superior storage capacity of 2.19 wt% at 50 °C compared to the A-HNTs (0.58 wt%). A 100% desorption of stored hydrogen is noted in the temperature range of 138-175 °C. The average binding energy of hydrogen was found to be 0.34 eV for the prepared A-HNT-h-BN nanoclay composite. The excellent storage capability of A-HNT-h-BN nanoclay composite towards hydrogen at ambient temperature may find bright perspective in hydrogen fuel cell technology in near future.

  15. Boron nitride nanosheets as improved and reusable substrates for gold nanoparticles enabled surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Cai, Qiran

    2015-01-01

    Atomically thin boron nitride (BN) nanosheets have been found to be excellent substrates for noble metal particles enabled surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), thanks to their good adsorption of aromatic molecules, high thermal stability and weak Raman scattering. Faceted gold (Au) nanoparticles have been synthesized on BN nanosheets using a simple but controllable and reproducible sputtering and annealing method. The size and density of the Au particles can be controlled by sputtering time, current and annealing temperature etc. Under the same sputtering and annealing conditions, the Au particles on BN of different thicknesses show various sizes because the surface diffusion coefficients of Au depend on the thickness of BN. Intriguingly, decorated with similar morphology and distribution of Au particles, BN nanosheets exhibit better Raman enhancements than silicon substrates as well as bulk BN crystals. Additionally, BN nanosheets show no noticeable SERS signal and hence cause no interference to the Raman signal of the analyte. The Au/BN substrates can be reused by heating in air to remove the adsorbed analyte without loss of SERS enhancement. This journal is © the Owner Societies 2015.

  16. Zinc oxide nanoparticle inhibits the biofilm formation of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Purnita; Agarwal, Bikash; Goswami, Madhurankhi; Maiti, Debasish; Baruah, Sunandan; Tribedi, Prosun

    2018-01-01

    Biofilms are structured consortia of microbial cells that grow on living and non living surfaces and surround themselves with secreted polymers. Infections with bacterial biofilms have emerged as a foremost public health concern because biofilm growing cells can be highly resistant to both antibiotics and host immune defenses. Zinc oxide nanoparticles have been reported as a potential antimicrobial agent, thus, in the current study, we have evaluated the antimicrobial as well as antibiofilm activity of zinc oxide nanoparticles against the bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae which is a significant cause of disease. Zinc oxide nanoparticles showed strong antimicrobial activity against S. pneumoniae, with an MIC value of 40 μg/ml. Biofilm inhibition of S. pneumoniae was also evaluated by performing a series of experiments such as crystal violet assay, microscopic observation, protein count, EPS secretion etc. using sub-MIC concentrations (3, 6 and 12 µg/ml) of zinc oxide nanoparticles. The results showed that the sub-MIC doses of zinc oxide nanoparticles exhibited significant anti-biofilm activity against S. pneumoniae, with maximum biofilm attenuation found at 12 μg/ml. Taken together, the results indicate that zinc oxide nanoparticles can be considered as a potential agent for the inhibition of microbial biofilms.

  17. Preparation of boron-doped porous titania networks containing gold nanoparticles with enhanced visible-light photocatalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingdong; Blackford, Mark; Prince, Kathryn; Caruso, Rachel A

    2012-01-01

    The ability to decrease the electron/hole recombination rate, and decrease the band gap of titania to allow photoactivity on irradiation with visible light is attracting more and more attention. Here, boron doping of the titania, the deposition of gold nanoparticles, along with a meso-macroporous structure were obtained using a facile agarose gel templating process combined with sol-gel chemistry. The Au/B/TiO(2) nanocomposites were characterized using SEM, TEM, XRD, N(2) gas sorption, diffuse UV-vis, photoluminescence, and SIMS. The photocatalytic activity was assessed by degradation of an organic probe molecule (methylene blue) under visible light (λ > 420 nm). The resulting materials achieved photocatalytic activities up to 50% greater than the commercial Degussa P25 under visible light. The enhancement in photocatalytic activity was primarily attributed to the decrease in band gap as a result of the boron doping and its influence on the anatase to rutile phase formation: The doped materials were highly crystalline and an optimum anatase to rutile ratio (3:1) was obtained with 0.25 wt % boron in the sample calcined at 650 °C. In addition, the presence of the gold nanoparticles decreased recombination between the photoexcited electrons and holes, which further improved the photocatalytic activity. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  18. Gold Nanoparticles and Microwave Irradiation Inhibit Beta-Amyloid Amyloidogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastus Neus

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Peptide-Gold nanoparticles selectively attached to β-amyloid protein (Aβ amyloidogenic aggregates were irradiated with microwave. This treatment produces dramatic effects on the Aβ aggregates, inhibiting both the amyloidogenesis and the restoration of the amyloidogenic potential. This novel approach offers a new strategy to inhibit, locally and remotely, the amyloidogenic process, which could have application in Alzheimer’s disease therapy. We have studied the irradiation effect on the amyloidogenic process in the presence of conjugates peptide-nanoparticle by transmission electronic microscopy observations and by Thioflavine T assays to quantify the amount of fibrils in suspension. The amyloidogenic aggregates rather than the amyloid fibrils seem to be better targets for the treatment of the disease. Our results could contribute to the development of a new therapeutic strategy to inhibit the amyloidogenic process in Alzheimer’s disease.

  19. Stability and electronic structure of iron nanoparticle anchored on defective hexagonal boron nitrogen nanosheet: A first-principle study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Sen; Huang, Jing; Ye, Xinxin

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Fe 13 nanoparticle strongly interacts with the monovacancy of h-BN nanosheet. • Significant charges are transferred from Fe 13 to the defective h-BN nanosheet. • The upshift of d-band center makes the surface Fe atoms of supported Fe 13 with higher reactivity. - Abstract: By first-principle methods, we investigate the stability and electronic structures of Fe 13 nanoparticles anchored on hexagonal boron nitrogen nanosheets (h-BNNSs) with monovacancy defect sites. It is found that the defect sites such as boron and nitrogen vacancy significantly increase the adsorption energies of Fe 13 , suggesting that the supported Fe 13 nanoparticles should be very stable against sintering at high temperatures. From the calculated density of states, we testify that the strong interaction is attributed to the coupling between the 3d orbitals of Fe atoms with the sp 2 dangling bonds at the defect sites. The Bader charge and differential charge density analyses reveal that there is significant charge redistribution at the interface between Fe 13 and the substrates, leading to positive charges located on most of the Fe atoms. Additionally, our results show that the strong binding of the nanoparticle results in the upshift of d-band center of Fe 13 toward the Fermi level, thus making the surface Fe atoms with higher reactivity. This work gives a detailed understanding the interaction between Fe 13 nanoparticle and defective h-BNNS and will provide helpful instructions in the design and synthesis of supported Fe-based catalysts in heterogeneous catalysis

  20. Inhibition of tumor growth in a glioma model treated with boron neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, J.H.; McGregor, J.M.; Clendenon, N.R.; Gahbauer, R.A.; Barth, R.F.; Soloway, A.H.; Fairchild, R.G.

    1990-01-01

    This investigation attempts to determine whether increased survival time seen when the F98 glioma model is treated with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a result of inhibition of tumor growth caused by radiation-induced alterations in endothelial cells and normal tissue components. This indirect effect of radiation has been called the tumor bed effect. A series of tumor-bearing rats was studied, using a standardized investigational BNCT protocol consisting of 50 mg/kg of Na2B12H11SH injected intravenously 14 to 17 hours before neutron irradiation at 4 x 10(12) n/cm2. Ten rats, serving as controls, received no treatment either before or after tumor implantation. A second group of 10 rats was treated with BNCT 4 days before tumor implantation; these animals received no further treatment. The remaining group of 10 rats received no pretreatment but was treated with BNCT 10 days after implantation. Histological and ultrastructural analyses were performed in 2 animals from each group 17 days after implantation. Survival times of the untreated control animals (mean, 25.8 days) did not differ statistically from the survival times of the rats in the pretreated group (mean, 25.5 days). The rats treated with BNCT after implantation survived significantly longer (P less than 0.02; mean, 33.2 days) than the controls and the preirradiated animals. Tumor size indices calculated from measurements taken at the time of death were similar in all groups. These results indicate that, with this tumor model, BNCT does not cause a tumor bed effect in cerebral tissue. The therapeutic gains observed with BNCT result from direct effects on tumor cells or on the peritumoral neovascularity

  1. Inhibition studies of soybean (Glycine max) urease with heavy metals, sodium salts of mineral acids, boric acid, and boronic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Kayastha, Arvind M

    2010-10-01

    Various inhibitors were tested for their inhibitory effects on soybean urease. The K(i) values for boric acid, 4-bromophenylboronic acid, butylboronic acid, and phenylboronic acid were 0.20 +/- 0.05 mM, 0.22 +/- 0.04 mM, 1.50 +/- 0.10 mM, and 2.00 +/- 0.11 mM, respectively. The inhibition was competitive type with boric acid and boronic acids. Heavy metal ions including Ag(+), Hg(2+), and Cu(2+) showed strong inhibition on soybean urease, with the silver ion being a potent inhibitor (IC(50) = 2.3 x 10(-8) mM). Time-dependent inhibition studies exhibited biphasic kinetics with all heavy metal ions. Furthermore, inhibition studies with sodium salts of mineral acids (NaF, NaCl, NaNO(3), and Na(2)SO(4)) showed that only F(-) inhibited soybean urease significantly (IC(50) = 2.9 mM). Competitive type of inhibition was observed for this anion with a K(i) value of 1.30 mM.

  2. Non-catalytic facile synthesis of superhard phase of boron carbide (B13C2) nanoflakes and nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Sky Shumao; Su, Liap Tat; Guo, Jun; Vasylkiv, Oleg; Borodianska, Hanna; Xi, Zhu; Krishnan, Gireesh M; Su, Haibin; Tokl, Alfred I Y

    2012-01-01

    Boron Carbide is one the hardest and lightest material that is also relatively easier to synthesis as compared to other superhard ceramics like cubic boron nitride and diamond. However, the brittle nature of monolithic advanced ceramics material hinders its use in various engineering applications. Thus, strategies that can toughen the material are of fundamental and technological importance. One approach is to use nanostructure materials as building blocks, and organize them into a complex hierarchical structure, which could potentially enhance its mechanical properties to exceed that of the monolithic form. In this paper, we demonstrated a simple approach to synthesize one- and two-dimension nanostructure boron carbide by simply changing the mixing ratio of the initial compound to influence the saturation condition of the process at a relatively low temperature of 1500 degrees C with no catalyst involved in the growing process. Characterization of the resulting nano-structures shows B13C2, which is a superhard phase of boron carbide as its hardness is almost twice as hard as the commonly known B4C. Using ab-initio density functional theory study on the elastic properties of both B12C3 and B13C2, the high hardness of B13C2 is consistent to our calculation results, where bulk modulus of B13C2 is higher than that of B4C. High resolution transmission electron microscopy of the nanoflakes also reveals high density of twinning defects which could potentially inhibit the crack propagation, leading to toughening of the materials.

  3. Determination of organophosphate pesticides using an acetylcholinesterase-based biosensor based on a boron-doped diamond electrode modified with gold nanoparticles and carbon spheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Min; Zeng, Gaoying; Lu, Qiyu

    2014-01-01

    We report on a biosensor for organophosphate pesticides (OPs) by exploiting their inhibitory effect on the activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE). A boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrode was modified with a nanocomposite prepared from carbon spheres (CSs; with an average diameter of 500 nm) that were synthesized from resorcinol and formaldehyde, and then were coated with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) by chemically growing them of the CSs. Compared to a bare BDD electrode, the electron transfer resistance is lower on this new electrode. Compared to an electrode without Au-NPs, the peak potential is negatively shifted by 42 mV, and the peak current is increased by 55 %. This is ascribed to the larger surface in the AuNP-CS nanocomposite which improves the adsorption of AChE, enhances its activity, and facilitates electrocatalysis. Under optimum conditions, the inhibitory effect of chlorpyrifos is linearly related to the negative log of its concentration in the 10−11 to 10−7 M range, with a detection limit of 1.3 × 10 −13 M. For methyl parathion, the inhibition effect is linear in the 10 −12 to 10 −6 M range, and the detection limit is 4.9 × 10 −13 M. The biosensor exhibits good precision and acceptable operational and temporal stability. (author)

  4. Synthesis of biocompatible nanoparticle drug complexes for inhibition of mycobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhave, Tejashree; Ghoderao, Prachi; Sanghavi, Sonali; Babrekar, Harshada; Bhoraskar, S. V.; Ganesan, V.; Kulkarni, Anjali

    2013-12-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the most critical infectious diseases affecting the world today. Current TB treatment involves six months long daily administration of four oral doses of antibiotics. Due to severe side effects and the long treatment, a patient's adherence is low and this results in relapse of symptoms causing an alarming increase in the prevalence of multi-drug resistant (MDR) TB. Hence, it is imperative to develop a new drug delivery technology wherein these effects can be reduced. Rifampicin (RIF) is one of the widely used anti-tubercular drugs (ATD). The present study discusses the development of biocompatible nanoparticle-RIF complexes with superior inhibitory activity against both Mycobacterium smegmatis (M. smegmatis) and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis). Iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) synthesized by gas phase condensation and NP-RIF complexes were tested against M. smegmatis SN2 strain as well as M. tuberculosis H37Rv laboratory strain. These complexes showed significantly better inhibition of M. smegmatis SN2 strain at a much lower effective concentration (27.5 μg ml-1) as compared to neat RIF (125 μg ml-1). Similarly M. tuberculosis H37Rv laboratory strain was susceptible to both nanoparticle-RIF complex and neat RIF at a minimum inhibitory concentration of 0.22 and 1 μg ml-1, respectively. Further studies are underway to determine the efficacy of NPs-RIF complexes in clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis as well as MDR isolates.

  5. Ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) fiber epoxy composite hybridized with Gadolinium and Boron nanoparticles for radiation shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Venkat; Prasad, Narasimha S.; Kelkar, Ajit

    2016-09-01

    Deep space radiations pose a major threat to the astronauts and their spacecraft during long duration space exploration missions. The two sources of radiation that are of concern are the galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) and the short lived secondary neutron radiations that are generated as a result of fragmentation that occurs when GCR strikes target nuclei in a spacecraft. Energy loss, during the interaction of GCR and the shielding material, increases with the charge to mass ratio of the shielding material. Hydrogen with no neutron in its nucleus has the highest charge to mass ratio and is the element which is the most effective shield against GCR. Some of the polymers because of their higher hydrogen content also serve as radiation shield materials. Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE) fibers, apart from possessing radiation shielding properties by the virtue of the high hydrogen content, are known for extraordinary properties. An effective radiation shielding material is the one that will offer protection from GCR and impede the secondary neutron radiations resulting from the fragmentation process. Neutrons, which result from fragmentation, do not respond to the Coulombic interaction that shield against GCR. To prevent the deleterious effects of secondary neutrons, targets such as Gadolinium are required. In this paper, the radiation shielding studies that were carried out on the fabricated sandwich panels by vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) process are presented. VARTM is a manufacturing process used for making large composite structures by infusing resin into base materials formed with woven fabric or fiber using vacuum pressure. Using the VARTM process, the hybridization of Epoxy/UHMWPE composites with Gadolinium nanoparticles, Boron, and Boron carbide nanoparticles in the form of sandwich panels were successfully carried out. The preliminary results from neutron radiation tests show that greater than 99% shielding performance was

  6. Unique Boron Carbide Nanoparticle Nanobio Interface: Effects on Protein-RNA Interactions and 3-D Spheroid Metastatic Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delong, Robert K; Hurst, Miranda N; Aryal, Santosh; Inchun, Nantipoor K

    2016-05-01

    The effect of boron carbide (B4C) nanoparticles (NP) on protein-RNA complexes and metastatic phenotype of 3-D tumor spheroids was investigated. Characterization was performed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), zeta potential (ZP), 2-dimensional fluorescence difference spectroscopy (2-D FDS), gel electrophoresis, MTT, haemolysis and 3-D tumor spheroid assays. TEM showed NP were homogenous (≤50 nm) and spherical in shape. Zeta potential (ζ) of NP (-43.3) shifted upon protein:RNA interaction (+26.9). Protein:RNA complex interaction with NP was confirmed by 2-D FDS, demonstrating excitation/emission blue shift and lowered fluorescence intensity, and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), where presence of B4C ablated visualization of the complex. B4C NP cytotoxicity was less than zinc oxide by MTT assay, protected haemolysis and effected 3-D tumor spheroid metastatic phenotype. Nanobio interface of B4C nanoparticles is unique and its anticancer potential may be mediated by altering protein and RNA interactions. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  7. Size-Dependent Electrocatalytic Activity of Gold Nanoparticles on HOPG and Highly Boron-Doped Diamond Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tine Brülle

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticles were prepared by electrochemical deposition on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG and boron-doped, epitaxial 100-oriented diamond layers. Using a potentiostatic double pulse technique, the average particle size was varied in the range from 5 nm to 30 nm in the case of HOPG as a support and between < 1 nm and 15 nm on diamond surfaces, while keeping the particle density constant. The distribution of particle sizes was very narrow, with standard deviations of around 20% on HOPG and around 30% on diamond. The electrocatalytic activity towards hydrogen evolution and oxygen reduction of these carbon supported gold nanoparticles in dependence of the particle sizes was investigated using cyclic voltammetry. For oxygen reduction the current density normalized to the gold surface (specific current density increased for decreasing particle size. In contrast, the specific current density of hydrogen evolution showed no dependence on particle size. For both reactions, no effect of the different carbon supports on electrocatalytic activity was observed.

  8. Boron Nanoparticles with High Hydrogen Loading: Mechanism for B-H Binding, Size Reduction, and Potential for Improved Combustibility and Specific Impulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    particles, and particle growth by cold welding , which can occur when particles are forced together by impacts. Generally, size reduction is more...fracture on impact, or by reducing cold welding via formation of a B−H surface layer. Figure 5 compares SEM images of boron nanoparticles obtained by...to improve size reduction, by some combination of enhanced fracturing and reduced cold- welding probabilities. Thermal desorption experiments showed

  9. Plasma synthesis and HPHT consolidation of BN nanoparticles, nanospheres, and nanotubes to produce nanocrystalline cubic boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stout, Christopher

    Plasma methods offer a variety of advantages to nanomaterials synthesis. The process is robust, allowing varying particle sizes and phases to be generated simply by modifying key parameters. The work here demonstrates a novel approach to nanopowder synthesis using inductively-coupled plasma to decompose precursor, which are then quenched to produce a variety of boron nitride (BN)-phase nanoparticles, including cubic phase, along with short-range-order nanospheres (e.g., nano-onions) and BN nanotubes. Cubic BN (c-BN) powders can be generated through direct deposition onto a chilled substrate. The extremely-high pyrolysis temperatures afforded by the equilibrium plasma offer a unique particle growth environment, accommodating long deposition times while exposing resulting powders to temperatures in excess of 5000K without any additional particle nucleation and growth. Such conditions can yield short-range ordered amorphous BN structures in the form of 20nm diameter nanospheres. Finally, when introducing a rapid-quenching counter-flow gas against the plasma jet, high aspect ratio nanotubes are synthesized, which are collected on substrate situated radially. The benefits of these morphologies are also evident in high-pressure/high-temperature consolidation experiments, where nanoparticle phases can offer a favorable conversion route to super-hard c-BN while maintaining nanocrystallinity. Experiments using these morphologies are shown to begin to yield c-BN conversion at conditions as low as 2.0 GPa and 1500°C when using micron sized c-BN seeding to create localized regions of high pressures due to Hertzian forces acting on the nanoparticles.

  10. Copper oxide nanoparticles inhibit the metabolic activity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashock, Michael J; Kappell, Anthony D; Hallaj, Nadia; Hristova, Krassimira R

    2016-01-01

    Copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NPs) are used increasingly in industrial applications and consumer products and thus may pose risk to human and environmental health. The interaction of CuO NPs with complex media and the impact on cell metabolism when exposed to sublethal concentrations are largely unknown. In the present study, the short-term effects of 2 different sized manufactured CuO NPs on metabolic activity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were studied. The role of released Cu(2+) during dissolution of NPs in the growth media and the CuO nanostructure were considered. Characterization showed that the 28 nm and 64 nm CuO NPs used in the present study have different primary diameter, similar hydrodynamic diameter, and significantly different concentrations of dissolved Cu(2+) ions in the growth media released from the same initial NP mass. Exposures to CuO NPs or the released Cu(2+) fraction, at doses that do not have impact on cell viability, showed significant inhibition on S. cerevisiae cellular metabolic activity. A greater CuO NP effect on the metabolic activity of S. cerevisiae growth under respiring conditions was observed. Under the tested conditions the observed metabolic inhibition from the NPs was not explained fully by the released Cu ions from the dissolving NPs. © 2015 SETAC.

  11. Silver nanoparticles inhibit vaccinia virus infection by preventing viral entry through a macropinocytosis-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trefry, John C; Wooley, Dawn P

    2013-09-01

    Silver nanoparticles have been shown to inhibit viruses. However, very little is known about the mechanism of antiviral activity. This study tested the hypothesis that 25-nm silver nanoparticles inhibited Vaccinia virus replication by preventing viral entry. Plaque reduction, confocal microscopy, and beta-galactosidase reporter gene assays were used to examine viral attachment and entry in the presence and absence of silver nanoparticles. To explore the mechanism of inhibition, viral entry experiments were conducted with silver nanoparticles and small interfering RNAs designed to silence the gene coding for p21-activated kinase 1, a key mediator of macropinocytosis. The silver nanoparticles caused a 4- to 5-log reduction in viral titer at concentrations that were not toxic to cells. Virus was capable of adsorbing to cells but could not enter cells in the presence of silver nanoparticles. Virus particles that had adsorbed to cells in the presence of silver nanoparticles were found to be infectious upon removal from the cells, indicating lack of direct virucidal effect. The half maximal inhibitory concentration for viral entry in the presence of silver nanoparticles was 27.4+/-3.3 microg/ml. When macropinocytosis was blocked, this inhibition was significantly reduced. Thus, macropinocytosis was required for the full antiviral effect. For the first time, this study points to the novel result that a cellular process involved in viral entry is responsible for the antiviral effects of silver nanoparticles.

  12. Synthesis and characterization of carbon or/and boron-doped CdS nanoparticles and investigation of optical and photoluminescence properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fakhri, Ali; Khakpour, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Un-doped and carbon or/and boron doped Cadmium sulfide nanoparticles were prepared via chemical co-precipitation procedure by Polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) as a stabilizer. The optical and structural properties were investigated using several techniques. The morphology of CdS nanophotocatalyst was characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy. The optical properties of both un-doped and doped samples were carried out by photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy and UV–vis Diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS). An optimum doping level of the atoms dopant for enhanced PL properties are found through optical study. Degradation of Amoxicillin under UV light elucidation was applied to appraise the photocatalytic efficiency. The results show that the carbon and boron doping CdS nanoparticles has high potential in green chemistry. - Highlights: • Un-doped, C or/and B-doped CdS nanoparticles were successfully synthesized. • The Blue shift was observed in UV–vis absorption spectra for the doped nanoparticles. • Doping of CdS with C and B enhances the fluorescence

  13. Synthesis and characterization of carbon or/and boron-doped CdS nanoparticles and investigation of optical and photoluminescence properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fakhri, Ali, E-mail: ali.fakhri88@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Shahr-e-Qods Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Young Researchers and Elite Club, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khakpour, Reza [Department of Physics, Tehran North Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    Un-doped and carbon or/and boron doped Cadmium sulfide nanoparticles were prepared via chemical co-precipitation procedure by Polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) as a stabilizer. The optical and structural properties were investigated using several techniques. The morphology of CdS nanophotocatalyst was characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy. The optical properties of both un-doped and doped samples were carried out by photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy and UV–vis Diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS). An optimum doping level of the atoms dopant for enhanced PL properties are found through optical study. Degradation of Amoxicillin under UV light elucidation was applied to appraise the photocatalytic efficiency. The results show that the carbon and boron doping CdS nanoparticles has high potential in green chemistry. - Highlights: • Un-doped, C or/and B-doped CdS nanoparticles were successfully synthesized. • The Blue shift was observed in UV–vis absorption spectra for the doped nanoparticles. • Doping of CdS with C and B enhances the fluorescence.

  14. Antibody-engineered nanoparticles selectively inhibit mesenchymal cells isolated from patients with chronic lung allograft dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cova, Emanuela; Colombo, Miriam; Inghilleri, Simona; Morosini, Monica; Miserere, Simona; Peñaranda-Avila, Jesus; Santini, Benedetta; Piloni, Davide; Magni, Sara; Gramatica, Furio; Prosperi, Davide; Meloni, Federica

    2015-01-01

    Chronic lung allograft dysfunction represents the main cause of death after lung transplantation, and so far there is no effective therapy. Mesenchymal cells (MCs) are primarily responsible for fibrous obliteration of small airways typical of chronic lung allograft dysfunction. Here, we engineered gold nanoparticles containing a drug in the hydrophobic section to inhibit MCs, and exposing on the outer hydrophilic surface a monoclonal antibody targeting a MC-specific marker (half-chain gold nanoparticles with everolimus). Half-chain gold nanoparticles with everolimus have been synthesized and incubated with MCs to evaluate the effect on proliferation and apoptosis. Drug-loaded gold nanoparticles coated with the specific antibody were able to inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis without stimulating an inflammatory response, as assessed by in vitro experiments. These findings demonstrate the effectiveness of our nanoparticles in inhibiting MCs and open new perspectives for a local treatment of chronic lung allograft dysfunction.

  15. Anodic stripping voltammetry of gold nanoparticles at boron-doped diamond electrodes and its application in immunochromatographic strip tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivandini, Tribidasari A; Wicaksono, Wiyogo P; Saepudin, Endang; Rismetov, Bakhadir; Einaga, Yasuaki

    2015-03-01

    Anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV) of colloidal gold-nanoparticles (AuNPs) was investigated at boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrodes in 50 mM HClO4. A deposition time of 300 s at-0.2 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) was fixed as the condition for the ASV. The voltammograms showed oxidation peaks that could be attributed to the oxidation of gold. These oxidation peaks were then investigated for potential application in immunochromatographic strip tests for the selective and quantitative detection of melamine, in which AuNPs were used as the label for the antibody of melamine. Linear regression of the oxidation peak currents appeared in the concentration range from 0.05-0.6 μg/mL melamine standard, with an estimated LOD of 0.069 μg/mL and an average relative standard deviation of 8.0%. This indicated that the method could be considered as an alternative method for selective and quantitative immunochromatographic applications. The validity was examined by the measurements of melamine injected into milk samples, which showed good recovery percentages during the measurements. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Chlorin e6 fused with a cobalt-bis(dicarbollide) nanoparticle provides efficient boron delivery and photoinduced cytotoxicity in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efremenko, Anastasija V; Ignatova, Anastasija A; Grin, Mikhail A; Sivaev, Igor B; Mironov, Andrey F; Bregadze, Vladimir I; Feofanov, Alexey V

    2014-01-01

    Further development of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) requires new neutronsensitizers with improved ability to deliver (10)B isotopes in cancer cells. Conjugation of boron nanoparticles with porphyrin derivatives is an attractive and recognized strategy to solve this task. We report on breakthroughs in the structural optimization of conjugates of chlorin e6 derivative with cobalt-bis(dicarbollide) nanoparticles resulting in the creation of dimethyl ester 13-carbomoylchlorin e6 [N-hexylamine-N'-ethoxyethoxy]-cobalt-bis(dicarbollide) (conjugate 1). Conjugate 1 is able to accumulate quickly and efficiently (distribution factor of 80) in cancer cells, thus delivering more than 10(9) boron atoms per cell when its extracellular concentration is more than 1 μmol L(-1). Also 1 is an active photosensitizer and is phototoxic towards human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells at 80 nmol L(-1) (50% cell death). Photoinduced cytotoxicity of 1 is associated with lipid peroxidation, lysosome rupture and protease activity enhancement. Conjugate 1 fluoresces in the red region (670 nm), which is useful to monitor its accumulation and distribution in vivo. It is not toxic to cells without activation by neutrons or photons. Structural features that improve the functional properties of 1 are discussed. The properties of 1 warrant its preclinical evaluation as a multifunctional agent for BNCT, photodynamic therapy and fluorescent tumor diagnosis.

  17. Preparation of nitrilotriacetic acid/Co2+-linked, silica/boron-coated magnetite nanoparticles for purification of 6 x histidine-tagged proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yiqun; Cheng, Yangjian; Li, Qingge

    2007-03-02

    In this report, we describe the preparation of novel nitrilotriacetic acid/Co2+-linked, silica/boron-coated magnetite nanoparticles for purification of 6 x His-tagged proteins. The nanoparticles were approximately 200 nm in size and were stable against hydrochloric acid and had negligible non-specific binding for protein. Elimination of non-specific binding by nucleic acids was readily achieved by digestion of samples with DNase and RNase. The modified nanoparticles were used to purify two model proteins: one had a C-terminal 6 x His tag, and the other had an internal 6 x His tag. Both proteins were purified within one hour into single band purity on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide electrophoresis gel.

  18. Inhibition of SREBP transcriptional activity by a boron-containing compound improves lipid homeostasis in diet-induced obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaoping; Xiaoli; Zong, Haihong; Abdulla, Arian; Yang, Ellen S T; Wang, Qun; Ji, Jun-Yuan; Pessin, Jeffrey E; Das, Bhaskar C; Yang, Fajun

    2014-07-01

    Dysregulation of lipid homeostasis is intimately associated with obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases. Sterol regulatory-element binding proteins (SREBPs) are the master regulators of lipid biosynthesis. Previous studies have shown that the conserved transcriptional cofactor Mediator complex is critically required for the SREBP transcriptional activity, and recruitment of the Mediator complex to the SREBP transactivation domains (TADs) is through the MED15-KIX domain. Recently, we have synthesized several boron-containing small molecules. Among these novel compounds, BF175 can specifically block the binding of MED15-KIX to SREBP1a-TAD in vitro, resulting in an inhibition of the SREBP transcriptional activity and a decrease of SREBP target gene expression in cultured hepatocytes. Furthermore, BF175 can improve lipid homeostasis in the mouse model of diet-induced obesity. Compared with the control, BF175 treatment decreased the expression of SREBP target genes in mouse livers and decreased hepatic and blood levels of lipids. These results suggest that blocking the interaction between SREBP-TADs and the Mediator complex by small molecules may represent a novel approach for treating diseases with aberrant lipid homeostasis. © 2014 by the American Diabetes Association.

  19. Designing nanoscale constructs from atomic thin sheets of graphene, boron nitride and gold nanoparticles for advanced material applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasuja, Kabeer

    2011-12-01

    Nanoscale materials invite immense interest from diverse scientific disciplines as these provide access to precisely understand the physical world at their most fundamental atomic level. In concert with this aim of enhancing our understanding of the fundamental behavior at nanoscale, this dissertation presents research on three nanomaterials: Gold nanoparticles (GNPs), Graphene and ultra-thin Boron Nitride sheets (UTBNSs). The three-fold goals which drive this research are: incorporating mobility in nanoparticle based single-electron junction constructs, developing effective strategies to functionalize graphene with nano-forms of metal, and exfoliating ultrathin sheets of Boron Nitride. Gold nanoparticle based electronic constructs can achieve a new degree of operational freedom if nanoscale mobility is incorporated in their design. We achieved such a nano-electromechanical construct by incorporating elastic polymer molecules between GNPs to form 2-dimensional (2-D) molecular junctions which show a nanoscale reversible motion on applying macro scale forces. This GNP-polymer assembly works like a molecular spring opening avenues to maneuver nano components and store energy at nano-scale. Graphene is the first isolated nanomaterial that displays single-atom thickness. It exhibits quantum confinement that enables it to possess a unique combination of fascinating electronic, optical, and mechanical properties. Modifying the surface of graphene is extremely significant to enable its incorporation into applications of interest. We demonstrated the ability of chemically modified graphene sheets to act as GNP stabilizing templates in solution, and utilized this to process GNP composites of graphene. We discovered that GNPs synthesized by chemical or microwave reduction stabilize on graphene-oxide sheets to form snow-flake morphologies and bare-surfaces respectively. These hybrid nano constructs were extensively studied to understand the effect and nature of GNPs

  20. Kaempferol nanoparticles achieve strong and selective inhibition of ovarian cancer cell viability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Haitao; Jiang, Bingbing; Li, Bingyun; Li, Zhaoliang; Jiang, Bing-Hua; Chen, Yi Charlie

    2012-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death for women throughout the Western world. Kaempferol, a natural flavonoid, has shown promise in the chemoprevention of ovarian cancer. A common concern about using dietary supplements for chemoprevention is their bioavailability. Nanoparticles have shown promise in increasing the bioavailability of some chemicals. Here we developed five different types of nanoparticles incorporating kaempferol and tested their efficacy in the inhibition of viability of cancerous and normal ovarian cells. We found that positively charged nanoparticle formulations did not lead to a significant reduction in cancer cell viability, whereas nonionic polymeric nanoparticles resulted in enhanced reduction of cancer cell viability. Among the nonionic polymeric nanoparticles, poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO-PPO-PEO) nanoparticles incorporating kaempferol led to significant reduction in cell viability of both cancerous and normal cells. Poly(DL-lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles incorporating kaempferol resulted in enhanced reduction of cancer cell viability together with no significant reduction in cell viability of normal cells compared with kaempferol alone. Therefore, both PEO-PPO-PEO and PLGA nanoparticle formulations were effective in reducing cancer cell viability, while PLGA nanoparticles incorporating kaempferol had selective toxicity against cancer cells and normal cells. A PLGA nanoparticle formulation could be advantageous in the prevention and treatment of ovarian cancers. On the other hand, PEO-PPO-PEO nanoparticles incorporating kaempferol were more effective inhibitors of cancer cells, but they also significantly reduced the viability of normal cells. PEO-PPO-PEO nanoparticles incorporating kaempferol may be suitable as a cancer-targeting strategy, which could limit the effects of the nanoparticles on normal cells while retaining their potency against cancer cells. We

  1. Synthesis of biocompatible nanoparticle drug complexes for inhibition of mycobacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhave, Tejashree; Ghoderao, Prachi; Sanghavi, Sonali; Babrekar, Harshada; Bhoraskar, S V; Ganesan, V; Kulkarni, Anjali

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the most critical infectious diseases affecting the world today. Current TB treatment involves six months long daily administration of four oral doses of antibiotics. Due to severe side effects and the long treatment, a patient's adherence is low and this results in relapse of symptoms causing an alarming increase in the prevalence of multi-drug resistant (MDR) TB. Hence, it is imperative to develop a new drug delivery technology wherein these effects can be reduced. Rifampicin (RIF) is one of the widely used anti-tubercular drugs (ATD). The present study discusses the development of biocompatible nanoparticle–RIF complexes with superior inhibitory activity against both Mycobacterium smegmatis (M. smegmatis) and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis). Iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) synthesized by gas phase condensation and NP-RIF complexes were tested against M. smegmatis SN2 strain as well as M. tuberculosis H37Rv laboratory strain. These complexes showed significantly better inhibition of M. smegmatis SN2 strain at a much lower effective concentration (27.5 μg ml −1 ) as compared to neat RIF (125 μg ml −1 ). Similarly M. tuberculosis H37Rv laboratory strain was susceptible to both nanoparticle–RIF complex and neat RIF at a minimum inhibitory concentration of 0.22 and 1 μg ml −1 , respectively. Further studies are underway to determine the efficacy of NPs–RIF complexes in clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis as well as MDR isolates. (paper)

  2. Aptamer-Conjugated Calcium Phosphate Nanoparticles for Reducing Diabetes Risk via Retinol Binding Protein 4 Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torabi, Raheleh; Ghourchian, Hedayatollah; Amanlou, Massoud; Pasalar, Parvin

    2017-06-01

    Inhibition of the binding of retinol to its carrier, retinol binding protein 4, is a new strategy for treating type 2 diabetes; for this purpose, we have provided an aptamer-functionalized multishell calcium phosphate nanoparticle. First, calcium phosphate nanoparticles were synthesized and conjugated to the aptamer. The cytotoxicity of nanoparticles releases the process of aptamer from nanoparticles and their inhibition function of binding retinol to retinol binding protein 4. After synthesizing and characterizing the multishell calcium phosphate nanoparticles and observing the noncytotoxicity of conjugate, the optimum time (48 hours) and the pH (7.4) for releasing the aptamer from the nanoparticles was determined. The half-maximum inhibitory concentration (IC 50 ) value for inhibition of retinol binding to retinol binding protein 4 was 210 femtomolar (fmol). The results revealed that the aptamer could prevent connection between retinol and retinol binding protein 4 at a very low IC 50 value (210 fmol) compared to other reported inhibitors. It seems that this aptamer could be used as an efficient candidate not only for decreasing the insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes, but also for inhibiting the other retinol binding protein 4-related diseases. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Inhibition of Candida albicans biofilm by pure selenium nanoparticles synthesized by pulsed laser ablation in liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guisbiers, Grégory; Lara, Humberto H; Mendoza-Cruz, Ruben; Naranjo, Guillermo; Vincent, Brandy A; Peralta, Xomalin G; Nash, Kelly L

    2017-04-01

    Selenoproteins play an important role in the human body by accomplishing essential biological functions like oxido-reductions, antioxidant defense, thyroid hormone metabolism and immune response; therefore, the possibility to synthesize selenium nanoparticles free of any contaminants is exciting for future nano-medical applications. This paper reports the first synthesis of selenium nanoparticles by femtosecond pulsed laser ablation in de-ionized water. Those pure nanoparticles have been successfully used to inhibit the formation of Candida albicans biofilms. Advanced electron microscopy images showed that selenium nanoparticles easily adhere on the biofilm, then penetrate into the pathogen, and consequently damage the cell structure by substituting with sulfur. 50% inhibition of Candida albicans biofilm was obtained at only 25 ppm. Finally, the two physical parameters proved to affect strongly the viability of Candida albicans are the crystallinity and particle size. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Inhibition of a sulfate reducing bacterium, Desulfovibrio marinisediminis GSR3, by biosynthesized copper oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alasvand Zarasvand, Kiana; Rai, V Ravishankar

    2016-06-01

    To control the severe problem of microbiologically influenced corrosion, industries require highly potent antibacterial agent which can inhibit the growth of bacteria on man-made surfaces. This need drove the research towards the synthesis of nanoscale antimicrobial compounds. We, therefore, screened several bacteria for the biosynthesis of copper/copper compound nanoparticles which could inhibit the growth of Desulfovibrio marinisediminis, a sulfate reducing bacterium. Supernatant of thirty bacteria isolated from the biofilm formed on ship hull was mixed with 1 mM CuCl 2 solution at room temperature. Eight bacterial strains, whose mixtures exhibited colour change, were selected for antimicrobial test. One nanoparticle which has been biosynthesized by Shewanella indica inhibited the growth of D. marinisediminis. Characterization of this particle by UV-visible spectrophotometer, XRD, TEM, DLS and FTIR showed that the particle is polydisperse CuO nanoparticle with average size of 400 nm.

  5. Nanoparticles of Selaginella doederleinii leaf extract inhibit human lung cancer cells A549

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syaefudin; Juniarti, A.; Rosiyana, L.; Setyani, A.; Khodijah, S.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to evaluate cytotoxicity effect of nanoparticles of Selaginella doederleinii (S. doederleinii) leaves extract. S. doederleinii was extracted by maceration method using 70%(v/v) ethanol as solvent. Phytochemical content was analyzed qualitatively by using Harborne and Thin Layer Chromatography (TLC) methods. Nanoparticle extract was prepared by ionic gelation using chitosan as encapsulant agent. Anticancer activity was performed by using 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The results showed that S. doederleinii contains of flavonoids. Nanoparticle of S. doederleinii leaves extract greatly inhibited A549 cells growth (cancer cells), with IC50 of 3% or 1020 μg/ml. These nanoparticles extract also inhibited the growth of Chang cells (normal cells), with IC50 of 4% or 1442 μg/ml. The effective concentration of nanoparticles extract which inhibits cancer cells without harming the normal cells is 0.5% or 167 μg/ml. Further studies are needed to obtain the concentration of nanoparticles extract which can selectively suppress cancer cells.

  6. Biophysical inhibition of synthetic vs. naturally-derived pulmonary surfactant preparations by polymeric nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck-Broichsitter, Moritz; Ruppert, Clemens; Schmehl, Thomas; Günther, Andreas; Seeger, Werner

    2014-01-01

    Reasonable suspicion has accumulated that inhaled nano-scale particulate matter influences the biophysical function of the pulmonary surfactant system. Hence, it is evident to provide novel insights into the extent and mechanisms of nanoparticle-surfactant interactions in order to facilitate the fabrication of safe nanomedicines suitable for pulmonary applications. Negatively- and positively-charged poly(styrene) nanoparticles (diameters of ~100nm) served as model carriers. Nanoparticles were incubated with several synthetic and naturally-derived pulmonary surfactants to characterize the sensitivity of each preparation to biophysical inactivation. Changes in surface properties (i.e. adsorption and dynamic surface tension behavior) were monitored in a pulsating bubble surfactometer. Both nanoparticle formulations revealed a dose-dependent influence on the biophysical behavior of all investigated pulmonary surfactants. However, the surfactant sensitivity towards inhibition depended on both the carrier type, where negatively-charged nanoparticles showed increased inactivation potency compared to their positively-charged counterparts, and surfactant composition. Among the surfactants tested, synthetic mixtures (i.e. phospholipids, phospholipids supplemented with surfactant protein B, and Venticute®) were more susceptible to surface-activity inhibition as the more complex naturally-derived preparations (i.e. Alveofact® and large surfactant aggregates isolated from rabbit bronchoalveolar lavage fluid). Overall, nanoparticle characteristics and surfactant constitution both influence the extent of biophysical inhibition of pulmonary surfactants. © 2013.

  7. Nanoparticles of carbon allotropes inhibit glioblastoma multiforme angiogenesis in ovo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grodzik M

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Marta Grodzik1, Ewa Sawosz1, Mateusz Wierzbicki1, Piotr Orlowski1, Anna Hotowy2, Tomasz Niemiec1, Maciej Szmidt3, Katarzyna Mitura4, André Chwalibog21Division of Biotechnology and Biochemistry of Nutrition, Warsaw University of Life Sciences, Warsaw, Poland; 2Department of Basic Animal and Veterinary Science, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; 3Division of Histology and Embryology, Warsaw University of Life Sciences, Warsaw, Poland; 4Department of Biomedical Engineering, Koszalin University of Technology, Koszalin, PolandAbstract: The objective of the study was to determine the effect of carbon nanoparticles produced by different methods on the growth of brain tumor and the development of blood vessels. Glioblastoma multiforme cells were cultured on the chorioallantoic membrane of chicken embryo and after 7 days of incubation, were treated with carbon nanoparticles administered in ovo to the tumor. Both types of nanoparticles significantly decreased tumor mass and volume, and vessel area. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis showed downregulated fibroblast growth factor-2 and vascular endothelial growth factor expression at the messenger ribonucleic acid level. The present results demonstrate antiangiogenic activity of carbon nanoparticles, making them potential factors for anticancer therapy.Keywords: cancer, nanoparticle, embryo, angiogenesis, FGF-2, VEGF

  8. In vitro developmental toxicity test detects inhibition of stem cell differentiation by silica nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Margriet V.D.Z.; Annema, Wijtske; Salvati, Anna; Lesniak, Anna; Elsaesser, Andreas; Barnes, Clifford; McKerr, George; Howard, C. Vyvyan; Lynch, Iseult; Dawson, Kenneth A.; Piersma, Aldert H.; Jong, Wim H. de

    2009-01-01

    While research into the potential toxic properties of nanomaterials is now increasing, the area of developmental toxicity has remained relatively uninvestigated. The embryonic stem cell test is an in vitro screening assay used to investigate the embryotoxic potential of chemicals by determining their ability to inhibit differentiation of embryonic stem cells into spontaneously contracting cardiomyocytes. Four well characterized silica nanoparticles of various sizes were used to investigate whether nanomaterials are capable of inhibition of differentiation in the embryonic stem cell test. Nanoparticle size distributions and dispersion characteristics were determined before and during incubation in the stem cell culture medium by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering. Mouse embryonic stem cells were exposed to silica nanoparticles at concentrations ranging from 1 to 100 μg/ml. The embryonic stem cell test detected a concentration dependent inhibition of differentiation of stem cells into contracting cardiomyocytes by two silica nanoparticles of primary size 10 (TEM 11) and 30 (TEM 34) nm while two other particles of primary size 80 (TEM 34) and 400 (TEM 248) nm had no effect up to the highest concentration tested. Inhibition of differentiation of stem cells occurred below cytotoxic concentrations, indicating a specific effect of the particles on the differentiation of the embryonic stem cells. The impaired differentiation of stem cells by such widely used particles warrants further investigation into the potential of these nanoparticles to migrate into the uterus, placenta and embryo and their possible effects on embryogenesis.

  9. Application of boron-entrapped stealth liposomes to inhibition of growth of tumour cells in the in vivo boron neutron-capture therapy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagie, H; Maruyama, K; Takizawa, T; Ishida, O; Ogura, K; Matsumoto, T; Sakurai, Y; Kobayashi, T; Shinohara, A; Rant, J; Skvarc, J; Ilic, R; Kuhne, G; Chiba, M; Furuya, Y; Sugiyama, H; Hisa, T; Ono, K; Kobayashi, H; Eriguchi, M

    2006-01-01

    Tumour cell destruction in boron neutron-capture therapy (BNCT) is due to the nuclear reaction between (10)B and thermal neutrons. It is necessary for effective BNCT therapy to accumulate (10)B atoms in the tumour cells. The delivery system consisted of polyethylene-glycol (PEG) binding liposomes (DPPC/cholesterol/DSPC-PEG2000) with an entrapped (10)B-compound and we evaluated the cytotoxic effects of intravenously injected (10)B-PEG-liposomes on human pancreatic carcinoma xenografts in nude mice with thermal neutron irradiation. After thermal neutron irradiation of mice injected with (10)B-PEG-liposomes, growth of AsPC-1 tumours was suppressed relative to controls. Injection of (10)B-PEG-liposomes caused the greatest tumour suppression with thermal neutron irradiation in vivo. These results suggest that intravenous injection of (10)B-PEG-liposomes can increase the retention of (10)B atoms by tumour cells, causing suppression of tumour growth in vivo, after thermal neutron irradiation.

  10. Nanoparticles of carbon allotropes inhibit glioblastoma multiforme angiogenesis in ovo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grodzik, Marta; Sawosz, Ewa; Wierzbicki, Mateusz

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the effect of carbon nanoparticles produced by different methods on the growth of brain tumor and the development of blood vessels. Glioblastoma multiforme cells were cultured on the chrioallantoic membrane of chicken embryo and after 7 days of incubati...

  11. The inhibition effect of starch nanoparticles on tyrosinase activity and its mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie; Chang, Ranran; Ge, Shengju; Zhao, Mei; Liang, Caifeng; Xiong, Liu; Sun, Qingjie

    2016-12-07

    The objective of the current research was to investigate the effects of starch nanoparticles (SNPs) prepared from waxy maize, potato, normal corn, and tapioca starches on the activity of tyrosinase. As a main polyphenol oxidase, tyrosinase not only induces fruit and vegetable browning but also causes skin diseases by overproducing melanin. Herein, for the first time, we evaluated the inhibitory kinetics of SNPs on tyrosinase. It turned out that SNPs inhibited tyrosinase activity reversibly. The IC 50 values of hollow nanoparticles, amylopectin nanoparticles, corn starch nanoparticles, and tapioca starch nanoparticles were 0.308, 0.669, 1.490, and 4.774 μM, respectively. Assay of fluorescence spectra demonstrated that SNPs quenched the tyrosinase intrinsic fluorescence. Moreover, binding constant and binding sites found that SNPs were bound to tyrosinase through van der Waals forces, hydrogen bonds, as well as electrostatic interactions. Analysis of circular dichroism indicated that the incorporation of SNPs into tyrosinase prompted conformational alteration of the enzyme. Furthermore, inhibition of browning by SNPs loading with l-dopa compound indicated that not only the tyrosinase activity was inhibited, but also SNPs decreased free dopa content by adsorption. This research on SNPs as potential inhibitors could give rise to advancement in the realm of anti-tyrosinase and have versatile applications in medicine, food, cosmetics, materials and drugs.

  12. Aqueously Dispersed Silver Nanoparticle-Decorated Boron Nitride Nanosheets for Reusable, Thermal Oxidation-Resistant Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi; Bunker, Christopher E.; Fernandos, K. A. Shiral; Connell, John W.

    2012-01-01

    The impurity-free aqueous dispersions of boron nitride nanosheets (BNNS) allowed the facile preparation of silver (Ag) nanoparticle-decorated BNNS by chemical reduction of an Ag salt with hydrazine in the presence of BNNS. The resultant Ag-BNNS nanohybrids remained dispersed in water, allowing convenient subsequent solution processing. By using substrate transfer techniques, Ag-BNNS nanohybrid thin film coatings on quartz substrates were prepared and evaluated as reusable surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) sensors that were robust against repeated solvent washing. In addition, because of the unique thermal oxidation-resistant properties of the BNNS, the sensor devices may be readily recycled by short-duration high temperature air oxidation to remove residual analyte molecules in repeated runs. The limiting factor associated with the thermal oxidation recycling process was the Ostwald ripening effect of Ag nanostructures.

  13. Adherence inhibition of Streptococcus mutans on dental enamel surface using silver nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinosa-Cristóbal, L.F. [Doctorado Institucional en Ingeniería y Ciencia de Materiales, Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Av. Salvador Nava S/N, Zona Universitaria, C.P. 78290 San Luis Potosí, S.L.P. (Mexico); Maestría en Ciencias Odontológicas en el Área de Odontología Integral Avanzada, Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Av. Salvador Nava S/N, Zona Universitaria, C.P. 78290 San Luis Potosí, S.L.P. (Mexico); Martínez-Castañón, G.A., E-mail: mtzcastanon@fciencias.uaslp.mx [Doctorado Institucional en Ingeniería y Ciencia de Materiales, Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Av. Salvador Nava S/N, Zona Universitaria, C.P. 78290 San Luis Potosí, S.L.P. (Mexico); Maestría en Ciencias Odontológicas en el Área de Odontología Integral Avanzada, Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Av. Salvador Nava S/N, Zona Universitaria, C.P. 78290 San Luis Potosí, S.L.P. (Mexico); Téllez-Déctor, E.J. [Facultad de Odontología de la Universidad Veracruzana campus Río Blanco, Mariano Abasolo S/N. Col. Centro. Río Blanco, Veracruz (Mexico); and others

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this ex vivo study was to evaluate the adherence capacity of Streptococcus mutans after being exposed to three different sizes of silver nanoparticles on healthy human dental enamel. Three different sizes of silver nanoparticles (9.3, 21.3 and 98 nm) were prepared, characterized and an adherence testing was performed to evaluate their anti-adherence activity on a reference strain of S. mutans on healthy dental enamel surfaces. Colony-Forming Unit count was made for adherence test and light microscopy, atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to compare qualitative characteristics of S. mutans. 9.3 nm and 21.3 nm groups did not show differences between them but statistical differences were found when 9.3 nm and 21.3 nm groups were compared with 98 nm and negative control groups (p < 0.05). Microscopy analysis shows a better inhibition of S. mutans adherence in 9.3 nm and 21.3 nm groups than the 98 nm group when compared with control group. Silver nanoparticles showed an adherence inhibition on S. mutans and the anti-adherence capacity was better when silver nanoparticles were smaller. Highlights: ► We examined how SNP can affect cellular adhesion from S. mutans. ► Several techniques were applied to analyzed S. mutans biofilm on enamel. ► All SNP sizes had an adhesion inhibition of S. mutans. ► Smaller SNP showed a better adhesion inhibition than larger SNP. ► Inhibition effect of SNP could be related with adhesion inhibition from S. mutans.

  14. Adherence inhibition of Streptococcus mutans on dental enamel surface using silver nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinosa-Cristóbal, L.F.; Martínez-Castañón, G.A.; Téllez-Déctor, E.J.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this ex vivo study was to evaluate the adherence capacity of Streptococcus mutans after being exposed to three different sizes of silver nanoparticles on healthy human dental enamel. Three different sizes of silver nanoparticles (9.3, 21.3 and 98 nm) were prepared, characterized and an adherence testing was performed to evaluate their anti-adherence activity on a reference strain of S. mutans on healthy dental enamel surfaces. Colony-Forming Unit count was made for adherence test and light microscopy, atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to compare qualitative characteristics of S. mutans. 9.3 nm and 21.3 nm groups did not show differences between them but statistical differences were found when 9.3 nm and 21.3 nm groups were compared with 98 nm and negative control groups (p < 0.05). Microscopy analysis shows a better inhibition of S. mutans adherence in 9.3 nm and 21.3 nm groups than the 98 nm group when compared with control group. Silver nanoparticles showed an adherence inhibition on S. mutans and the anti-adherence capacity was better when silver nanoparticles were smaller. Highlights: ► We examined how SNP can affect cellular adhesion from S. mutans. ► Several techniques were applied to analyzed S. mutans biofilm on enamel. ► All SNP sizes had an adhesion inhibition of S. mutans. ► Smaller SNP showed a better adhesion inhibition than larger SNP. ► Inhibition effect of SNP could be related with adhesion inhibition from S. mutans

  15. Bismuth oxide aqueous colloidal nanoparticles inhibit Candida albicans growth and biofilm formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Delgadillo, Rene; Velasco-Arias, Donaji; Martinez-Sanmiguel, Juan Jose; Diaz, David; Zumeta-Dube, Inti; Arevalo-Niño, Katiushka; Cabral-Romero, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    Multiresistance among microorganisms to common antimicrobials has become one of the most significant concerns in modern medicine. Nanomaterials are a new alternative to successfully treat the multiresistant microorganisms. Nanostructured materials are used in many fields, including biological sciences and medicine. Recently, it was demonstrated that the bactericidal activity of zero-valent bismuth colloidal nanoparticles inhibited the growth of Streptococcus mutans; however the antimycotic potential of bismuth nanostructured derivatives has not yet been studied. The main objective of this investigation was to analyze the fungicidal activity of bismuth oxide nanoparticles against Candida albicans, and their antibiofilm capabilities. Our results showed that aqueous colloidal bismuth oxide nanoparticles displayed antimicrobial activity against C. albicans growth (reducing colony size by 85%) and a complete inhibition of biofilm formation. These results are better than those obtained with chlorhexidine, nystatin, and terbinafine, the most effective oral antiseptic and commercial antifungal agents. In this work, we also compared the antimycotic activities of bulk bismuth oxide and bismuth nitrate, the precursor metallic salt. These results suggest that bismuth oxide colloidal nanoparticles could be a very interesting candidate as a fungicidal agent to be incorporated into an oral antiseptic. Additionally, we determined the minimum inhibitory concentration for the synthesized aqueous colloidal Bi2O3 nanoparticles. PMID:23637533

  16. Inhibition of influenza A virus infection in vitro by saliphenylhalamide-loaded porous silicon nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bimbo, Luis M; Denisova, Oxana V; Mäkilä, Ermei; Kaasalainen, Martti; De Brabander, Jef K; Hirvonen, Jouni; Salonen, Jarno; Kakkola, Laura; Kainov, Denis; Santos, Hélder A

    2013-08-27

    Influenza A viruses (IAVs) cause recurrent epidemics in humans, with serious threat of lethal worldwide pandemics. The occurrence of antiviral-resistant virus strains and the emergence of highly pathogenic influenza viruses have triggered an urgent need to develop new anti-IAV treatments. One compound found to inhibit IAV, and other virus infections, is saliphenylhalamide (SaliPhe). SaliPhe targets host vacuolar-ATPase and inhibits acidification of endosomes, a process needed for productive virus infection. The major obstacle for the further development of SaliPhe as antiviral drug has been its poor solubility. Here, we investigated the possibility to increase SaliPhe solubility by loading the compound in thermally hydrocarbonized porous silicon (THCPSi) nanoparticles. SaliPhe-loaded nanoparticles were further investigated for the ability to inhibit influenza A infection in human retinal pigment epithelium and Madin-Darby canine kidney cells, and we show that upon release from THCPSi, SaliPhe inhibited IAV infection in vitro and reduced the amount of progeny virus in IAV-infected cells. Overall, the PSi-based nanosystem exhibited increased dissolution of the investigated anti-IAV drug SaliPhe and displayed excellent in vitro stability, low cytotoxicity, and remarkable reduction of viral load in the absence of organic solvents. This proof-of-principle study indicates that PSi nanoparticles could be used for efficient delivery of antivirals to infected cells.

  17. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) inhibits tumor development from precancerous tissue: An experimental study that supports a potential new application of BNCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monti Hughes, A.; Heber, E.M. [Department of Radiobiology, National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Pozzi, E. [Department of Radiobiology, National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Department of Research and Production Reactors, Ezeiza Atomic Center, CNEA, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Nigg, D.W. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho (United States); Calzetta, O.; Blaumann, H.; Longhino, J. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Bariloche Atomic Center, CNEA, Rio Negro (Argentina); Nievas, S.I. [Department of Chemistry, CNEA, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Aromando, R.F. [Department of Oral Pathology, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Itoiz, M.E. [Department of Radiobiology, National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Department of Oral Pathology, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Trivillin, V.A. [Department of Radiobiology, National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Schwint, A.E. [Department of Radiobiology, National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA), Buenos Aires (Argentina)], E-mail: schwint@cnea.gov.ar

    2009-07-15

    We previously demonstrated the efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) mediated by boronophenylalanine (BPA), GB-10 (Na{sub 2}{sup 10}B{sub 10}H{sub 10}) and (GB-10+BPA) to control tumors, with no normal tissue radiotoxicity, in the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model. Herein we developed a novel experimental model of field-cancerization and precancerous lesions (globally termed herein precancerous tissue) in the hamster cheek pouch to explore the long-term potential inhibitory effect of the same BNCT protocols on the development of second primary tumors from precancerous tissue. Clinically, second primary tumor recurrences occur in field-cancerized tissue, causing therapeutic failure. We performed boron biodistribution studies followed by in vivo BNCT studies, with 8 months follow-up. All 3 BNCT protocols induced a statistically significant reduction in tumor development from precancerous tissue, reaching a maximum inhibition of 77-100%. The inhibitory effect of BPA-BNCT and (GB-10+BPA)-BNCT persisted at 51% at the end of follow-up (8 months), whereas for GB-10-BNCT it faded after 2 months. Likewise, beam-only elicited a significant but transient reduction in tumor development. No normal tissue radiotoxicity was observed. At 8 months post-treatment with BPA-BNCT or (GB-10+BPA)-BNCT, the precancerous pouches that did not develop tumors had regained the macroscopic and histological appearance of normal (non-cancerized) pouches. A potential new clinical application of BNCT would lie in its capacity to inhibit local regional recurrences.

  18. A Review on the Preparation of Borazine-derived Boron Nitride Nanoparticles and Nanopolyhedrons by Spray-pyrolysis and Annealing Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Salles

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Boron nitride (BN nanostructures (= nanoBN are struc‐ tural analogues of carbon nanostructures but display different materials chemistry and physics, leading to a wide variety of structural, thermal, electronic, and optical applications. Proper synthesis routes and advanced structural design are among the great challenges for preparing nanoBN with such properties. This review provides an insight into the preparation and characteriza‐ tion of zero dimensional (0D nanoBN including nanopar‐ ticles and nanopolyhedrons from borazine, an economically competitive and attractive (from a technical point of view molecule, beginning with a concise intro‐ duction to hexagonal BN, followed by an overview on the past and current state of research on nanoparticles. Thus, a review of the spray-pyrolysis of borazine to form BN nanoparticles is firstly presented. The use of BN nanopar‐ ticles as precursors of BN nanopolyhedrons is then de‐ tailed. Applications and research perspectives for these 0D nanoBN are discussed in the conclusion.

  19. Targeted Delivery of Glucan Particle Encapsulated Gallium Nanoparticles Inhibits HIV Growth in Human Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto R. Soto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Glucan particles (GPs are hollow, porous 3–5 μm microspheres derived from the cell walls of Baker’s yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The 1,3-β-glucan outer shell provides for receptor-mediated uptake by phagocytic cells expressing β-glucan receptors. GPs have been used for macrophage-targeted delivery of a wide range of payloads (DNA, siRNA, protein, small molecules, and nanoparticles encapsulated inside the hollow GPs or bound to the surface of chemically derivatized GPs. Gallium nanoparticles have been proposed as an inhibitory agent against HIV infection. Here, macrophage targeting of gallium using GPs provides for more efficient delivery of gallium and inhibition of HIV infection in macrophages compared to free gallium nanoparticles.

  20. Targeted Delivery of Glucan Particle Encapsulated Gallium Nanoparticles Inhibits HIV Growth in Human Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Ernesto R.; O'Connell, Olivia; Dikengil, Fusun; Peters, Paul J.; Clapham, Paul R.

    2016-01-01

    Glucan particles (GPs) are hollow, porous 3–5 μm microspheres derived from the cell walls of Baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). The 1,3-β-glucan outer shell provides for receptor-mediated uptake by phagocytic cells expressing β-glucan receptors. GPs have been used for macrophage-targeted delivery of a wide range of payloads (DNA, siRNA, protein, small molecules, and nanoparticles) encapsulated inside the hollow GPs or bound to the surface of chemically derivatized GPs. Gallium nanoparticles have been proposed as an inhibitory agent against HIV infection. Here, macrophage targeting of gallium using GPs provides for more efficient delivery of gallium and inhibition of HIV infection in macrophages compared to free gallium nanoparticles. PMID:27965897

  1. Effect of chemically and biologically synthesized Ag nanoparticles on the algae growth inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anna, Mražiková; Oksana, Velgosová; Jana, Kavuličová

    2017-12-01

    Over the past few years green methods for preparation of silver nanoparticles has become necessary due to its friendly influence on ecosystem. In the present work antimicrobial properties of biologically synthesized silver nanoparticles (Bio-AgNPs) using green algae extract and chemically synthesized silver nanoparticles (Chem-AgNPs) using sodium citrate against algae Parachlorella kessleri is investigated. Both used Bio-AgNPs and Chem-AgNPs exhibit long-term stability as demonstrated by UV-vis spectroscopy measurements. The results revealed stronger toxic effects of Bio-AgNPs on agar plates what was confirmed clear inhibition zone around wells impregnated with Bio-AgNPs. On the other hand Bio-AgNPs were confirmed to be less toxic in aquatic environments for the growths of green algae P. kessleri comparing to Chem-AgNPs.

  2. Boron reclamation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.M.

    1980-07-01

    A process to recover high purity 10 B enriched crystalline boron powder from a polymeric matrix was developed on a laboratory basis and ultimately scaled up to production capacity. The process is based on controlled pyrolysis of boron-filled scrap followed by an acid leach and dry sieving operation to return the powder to the required purity and particle size specifications. Typically, the recovery rate of the crystalline powder is in excess of 98.5 percent, and some of the remaining boron is recovered in the form of boric acid. The minimum purity requirement of the recovered product is 98.6 percent total boron

  3. Intracellular Accumulation of Gold Nanoparticles Leads to Inhibition of Macropinocytosis to Reduce the Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunduz, Nuray; Ceylan, Hakan; Guler, Mustafa O.; Tekinay, Ayse B.

    2017-02-01

    Understanding the toxicity of nanomaterials remains largely limited to acute cellular response, i.e., short-term in vitro cell-death based assays, and analyses of tissue- and organ-level accumulation and clearance patterns in animal models, which have produced very little information about how these materials (from the toxicity point of view) interact with the complex intracellular machinery. In particular, understanding the mechanism of toxicity caused by the gradual accumulation of nanomaterials due to prolonged exposure times is essential yet still continue to be a largely unexplored territory. Herein, we show intracellular accumulation and the associated toxicity of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) for over two-months in the cultured vascular endothelial cells. We observed that steady exposure of AuNPs at low (non-lethal) dose leads to rapid intracellular accumulation without causing any detectable cell death while resulting in elevated endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Above a certain intracellular AuNP threshold, inhibition of macropinocytosis mechanism ceases further nanoparticle uptake. Interestingly, the intracellular depletion of nanoparticles is irreversible. Once reaching the maximum achievable intracellular dose, a steady depletion is observed, while no cell death is observed at any stage of this overall process. This depletion is important for reducing the ER stress. To our knowledge, this is the first report suggesting active regulation of nanoparticle uptake by cells and the impact of long-term exposure to nanoparticles in vitro.

  4. Zerovalent bismuth nanoparticles inhibit Streptococcus mutans growth and formation of biofilm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Delgadillo, Rene; Velasco-Arias, Donaji; Diaz, David; Arevalo-Niño, Katiushka; Garza-Enriquez, Marianela; De la Garza-Ramos, Myriam A; Cabral-Romero, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    Background and methods Despite continuous efforts, the increasing prevalence of resistance among pathogenic bacteria to common antibiotics has become one of the most significant concerns in modern medicine. Nanostructured materials are used in many fields, including biological sciences and medicine. While some bismuth derivatives has been used in medicine to treat vomiting, nausea, diarrhea, and stomach pain, the biocidal activity of zerovalent bismuth nanoparticles has not yet been studied. The objective of this investigation was to analyze the antimicrobial activity of bismuth nanoparticles against oral bacteria and their antibiofilm capabilities. Results Our results showed that stable colloidal bismuth nanoparticles had 69% antimicrobial activity against Streptococcus mutans growth and achieved complete inhibition of biofilm formation. These results are similar to those obtained with chlorhexidine, the most commonly used oral antiseptic agent. The minimal inhibitory concentration of bismuth nanoparticles that interfered with S. mutans growth was 0.5 mM. Conclusion These results suggest that zerovalent bismuth nanoparticles could be an interesting antimicrobial agent to be incorporated into an oral antiseptic preparation. PMID:22619547

  5. Curcumin modified silver nanoparticles for highly efficient inhibition of respiratory syncytial virus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao Xi; Li, Chun Mei; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between nanoparticles and viruses have attracted increasing attention due to the antiviral activity of nanoparticles and the resulting possibility to be employed as biomedical interventions. In this contribution, we developed a very simple route to prepare uniform and stable silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) with antiviral properties by using curcumin, which is a member of the ginger family isolated from rhizomes of the perennial herb Curcuma longa and has a wide range of biological activities like antioxidant, antifungal, antibacterial and anti-inflammatory effects, and acts as reducing and capping agents in this synthetic route. The tissue culture infectious dose (TCID50) assay showed that the curcumin modified silver nanoparticles (cAgNPs) have a highly efficient inhibition effect against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection, giving a decrease of viral titers about two orders of magnitude at the concentration of cAgNPs under which no toxicity was found to the host cells. Mechanism investigations showed that cAgNPs could prevent RSV from infecting the host cells by inactivating the virus directly, indicating that cAgNPs are a novel promising efficient virucide for RSV.Interactions between nanoparticles and viruses have attracted increasing attention due to the antiviral activity of nanoparticles and the resulting possibility to be employed as biomedical interventions. In this contribution, we developed a very simple route to prepare uniform and stable silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) with antiviral properties by using curcumin, which is a member of the ginger family isolated from rhizomes of the perennial herb Curcuma longa and has a wide range of biological activities like antioxidant, antifungal, antibacterial and anti-inflammatory effects, and acts as reducing and capping agents in this synthetic route. The tissue culture infectious dose (TCID50) assay showed that the curcumin modified silver nanoparticles (cAgNPs) have a highly efficient inhibition

  6. Novel Insights Into The Mode of Inhibition of Class A SHV-1 Beta-Lactamases Revealed by Boronic Acid Transition State Inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W Ke; J Sampson; C Ori; F Prati; S Drawz; C Bethel; R Bonomo; F van den Akker

    2011-12-31

    Boronic acid transition state inhibitors (BATSIs) are potent class A and C {beta}-lactamase inactivators and are of particular interest due to their reversible nature mimicking the transition state. Here, we present structural and kinetic data describing the inhibition of the SHV-1 {beta}-lactamase, a clinically important enzyme found in Klebsiella pneumoniae, by BATSI compounds possessing the R1 side chains of ceftazidime and cefoperazone and designed variants of the latter, compounds 1 and 2. The ceftazidime and cefoperazone BATSI compounds inhibit the SHV-1 {beta}-lactamase with micromolar affinity that is considerably weaker than their inhibition of other {beta}-lactamases. The solved crystal structures of these two BATSIs in complex with SHV-1 reveal a possible reason for SHV-1's relative resistance to inhibition, as the BATSIs adopt a deacylation transition state conformation compared to the usual acylation transition state conformation when complexed to other {beta}-lactamases. Active-site comparison suggests that these conformational differences might be attributed to a subtle shift of residue A237 in SHV-1. The ceftazidime BATSI structure revealed that the carboxyl-dimethyl moiety is positioned in SHV-1's carboxyl binding pocket. In contrast, the cefoperazone BATSI has its R1 group pointing away from the active site such that its phenol moiety moves residue Y105 from the active site via end-on stacking interactions. To work toward improving the affinity of the cefoperazone BATSI, we synthesized two variants in which either one or two extra carbons were added to the phenol linker. Both variants yielded improved affinity against SHV-1, possibly as a consequence of releasing the strain of its interaction with the unusual Y105 conformation.

  7. Butyrate-Loaded Chitosan/Hyaluronan Nanoparticles: A Suitable Tool for Sustained Inhibition of ROS Release by Activated Neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sacco, Pasquale; Decleva, Eva; Tentor, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    that butyrate inhibits neutrophil ROS release in a dose and time-dependent fashion. Given the short half-life of butyrate, chitosan/hyaluronan nanoparticles are next designed and developed as controlled release carriers able to provide cells with a long-lasting supply of this SCFA. Notably, while the inhibition...... of neutrophil ROS production by free butyrate declines over time, that of butyrate-loaded chitosan/hyaluronan nanoparticles (B-NPs) is sustained. Additional valuable features of these nanoparticles are inherent ROS scavenger activity, resistance to cell internalization, and mucoadhesiveness. B-NPs appear...

  8. Chirality Controls Reaction-Diffusion of Nanoparticles for Inhibiting Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xuewen; Zhou, Jie; Wang, Jiaqing; Zhou, Rong; Xu, Bing

    2017-01-01

    Reaction-diffusion (RD) is the most important inherent feature of living organism, but it has yet to be used for developing biofunctional nanoparticles (NPs). Here we show the use of chirality to control the RD of NPs for selectively inhibiting cancer cells. We observe that L-phosphotyrosine (L-pY) decorated NPs (NP@L-pYs) are innocuous to cells, but D-pY decorated ones (NP@D-pYs) selectively inhibit cancer cells. Our study shows that alkaline phosphatases (ALP), presented in the culture and overexpressed on the cancer cells, dephosphorylates NP@L-pYs much faster than NP@D-pYs. Such a rate difference allows the NP@D-pYs to be mainly dephosphorylated on cell surface, thus adhering selectively on the cancer cells to result in poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase (PARP) hyperactivation mediated cell death. Without phosphate groups or being prematurely dephosphorylated before reaching cancer cells (as the case of NP@L-pYs), the NPs are innocuous to cells. Moreover, NP@D-pYs even exhibit more potent activity than cisplatin for inhibiting platinum-resistant ovarian cancer cells (e.g., A2780-cis). As the first example of chirality controlling RD process of NPs for inhibiting cancer cells, this work illustrates a fundamentally new way for developing nanomedicine based on RD processes and nanoparticles.

  9. Zerovalent bismuth nanoparticles inhibit Streptococcus mutans growth and formation of biofilm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernandez-Delgadillo R

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Rene Hernandez-Delgadillo1, Donaji Velasco-Arias2, David Diaz2, Katiushka Arevalo-Niño1, Marianela Garza-Enriquez1, Myriam A De la Garza-Ramos1, Claudio Cabral-Romero11Instituto de Biotecnologia, Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo en Ciencias de la Salud, CIDICS, Facultad de Odontologia, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, UANL, Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, 2Facultad de Quimica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Distrito Federal, MexicoBackground and methods: Despite continuous efforts, the increasing prevalence of resistance among pathogenic bacteria to common antibiotics has become one of the most significant concerns in modern medicine. Nanostructured materials are used in many fields, including biological sciences and medicine. While some bismuth derivatives has been used in medicine to treat vomiting, nausea, diarrhea, and stomach pain, the biocidal activity of zerovalent bismuth nanoparticles has not yet been studied. The objective of this investigation was to analyze the antimicrobial activity of bismuth nanoparticles against oral bacteria and their antibiofilm capabilities.Results: Our results showed that stable colloidal bismuth nanoparticles had 69% antimicrobial activity against Streptococcus mutans growth and achieved complete inhibition of biofilm formation. These results are similar to those obtained with chlorhexidine, the most commonly used oral antiseptic agent. The minimal inhibitory concentration of bismuth nanoparticles that interfered with S. mutans growth was 0.5 mM.Conclusion: These results suggest that zerovalent bismuth nanoparticles could be an interesting antimicrobial agent to be incorporated into an oral antiseptic preparation.Keywords: zerovalent bismuth nanoparticles, antimicrobial agent, biofilm, Streptococcus mutans

  10. Investigating inhibition of microbes inducing microbiologically-influenced-corrosion by Tectona grandis based Fe-nanoparticle material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okeniyi, Joshua Olusegun; Omotosho, Olugbenga Adeshola; Inyang, Michael Anietie; Okeniyi, Elizabeth Toyin; Nwaokorie, Ikechi Thaddeus; Adidi, Emmanuel Amanogho; Owoeye, Taiwo Felicia; Nwakudu, Kelechukwu Chinedu; Akinlabu, Deborah Kehinde; Gabriel, Olanrewaju Oyewale; Taiwo, Olugbenga Samson; Awotoye, Olufisayo Adebola

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, inhibition of microbes inducing microbiologically-influenced-corrosion (MIC) of metals by Tectona grandis based Fe (iron) Nanoparticle material was investigated. For this, extract was obtained from the leaf of Tectona grandis and this was employed as precursor for synthesizing the Fe-nanoparticle material. From this, the synthesized plant extract based nanoparticle material was characterized using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM+EDS) instrument. The developed Fe bio-nanoparticle material was then employed for sensitivity and/or resistance study application against different strains of microbes that are known to induce microbiologically-influenced-corrosion, in metallic materials, and for this, microbial growth inhibition effect was compared with that from a commercial antibiotic employed as control. Results showed that the Tectona grandis based Fe-nanoparticle exhibited good inhibition effects on the growth of many of the MIC inducing microbes investigated. Sensitivity measures of zone of inhibition against the growth of MIC inducing microbial strains either outperformed or compares well with that obtained from the commercial antibiotic control, in the study. These results indicate positive prospect on the suitability of Fe bio-nanoparticle for corrosion inhibition applications for the protection of metals against microbiological corrosion influencing environment.

  11. Re-sintered boron-rich polycrystalline cubic boron nitride and method for making same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavens, T.R.; Corrigan, F.R.; Shott, R.L.; Bovenkerk, H.P.

    1987-06-16

    A method is described for making re-sintered polycrystalline cubic boron nitride (CBN) which comprises: (a) placing sintered substantially catalyst-free boron-rich polycrystalline cubic boron nitride particles in a high pressure/high temperature apparatus, the particles being substantially free of sintering inhibiting impurities; (b) subjecting the boron-rich cubic boron nitride particles to a pressure and a temperature adequate to re-sinter the particles, the temperature being below the CBN reconversion temperature; (c) maintaining the temperature and pressure for a time sufficient to re-sinter the boron-rich cubic boron nitride particles in the apparatus, and (d) recovering the re-sintered polycrystalline cubic boron nitride from the apparatus.

  12. Efficient inhibition of ovarian cancer by degradable nanoparticle-delivered survivin T34A gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Li; Du, Ting; Zhang, Jiumeng; Zhao, Wei; Cheng, Hao; Yang, Yuping; Wu, Yujiao; Wang, Chunmei; Men, Ke; Gou, Maling

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy has promising applications in ovarian cancer therapy. Blocking the function of the survivin protein could lead to the growth inhibition of cancer cells. Herein, we used degradable heparin–polyethyleneimine (HPEI) nanoparticles to deliver a dominant-negative human survivin T34A (hs-T34A) gene to treat ovarian cancer. HPEI nanoparticles were characterized and were found to have a dynamic diameter of 66±4.5 nm and a zeta potential of 27.1±1.87 mV. The constructed hs-T34A gene expression plasmid could be effectively delivered into SKOV3 ovarian carcinoma cells by HPEI nanoparticles with low cytotoxicity. Intraperitoneal administration of HPEI/hs-T34A complexes could markedly inhibit tumor growth in a mouse xenograft model of SKOV3 human ovarian cancer. Moreover, according to our results, apparent apoptosis of cancer cells was observed both in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, the prepared HPEI/hs-T34A formulation showed potential applications in ovarian cancer gene therapy. PMID:26893558

  13. Mussel-inspired synthesis of boron nitride nanosheet-supported gold nanoparticles and their application for catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Arup Kumer; Park, Sung Young; In, Insik

    2015-03-13

    Gold nanoparticle (AuNP)-decorated boron nitride nanosheet (BNNS) was successfully prepared through the simultaneous reduction of Au(3+) ions and the growth of AuNPs on polydopamine (PDA)-grafted BNNS. Both BNNS-AuNP and PDA-BNNS are successfully synthesized in an aqueous buffer solution (pH 8.5) in the absence of any chemical reducing agent and organic reaction, which is therefore environmentally friendly and highly beneficial for the mass production of green catalysts from 2D nanomaterials. BNNS-AuNP showed remarkable dispersion stability in aqueous media and revealed high catalytic efficiency for the reduction of nitrophenol as (4-NP) into 4-aminophenol (4-AP) within 8 min in water. The 2D structural feature of BNNS-AuNP also enables isolation and recycling of catalyst from 4-AP through the ultracentrifugation, which shows the retention of more than 60% of catalytic activity of BNNS-AuNP after five repetitions of the of recycling steps.

  14. Silver nanoparticles inhibit fish gill cell proliferation in protein-free culture medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Yang; Behra, Renata; Sigg, Laura; Schirmer, Kristin

    2016-10-01

    While short-term exposures of vertebrate cells, such as from fish, can be performed in defined, serum-free media, long-term cultures generally require addition of growth factors and proteins, normally supplied with a serum supplement. However, proteins are known to alter nanoparticle properties by binding to nanoparticles. Therefore, in order to be able to study nanoparticle-cell interactions for extended periods, the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) gill cell line, RTgill-W1, was adapted to proliferate in a commercial, serum-free medium, InVitrus VP-6. The newly adapted cell strain was named RTgill-W1-pf (protein free). These cells proliferate at a speed similar to the RTgill-W1 cells cultured in a fully supplemented medium containing 5% fetal bovine serum. As well, they were successfully cryopreserved in liquid nitrogen and fully recovered after thawing. Yet, senescence set in after about 10 passages in InVitrus VP-6 medium, revealing that this medium cannot fully support long-term culture of the RTgill-W1 strain. The RTgill-W1-pf cell line was subsequently applied to investigate the effect of silver nanoparticles (AgNP) on cell proliferation over a period of 12 days. Indeed, cell proliferation was inhibited by 10 μM AgNP. This effect correlated with high levels of silver being associated with the cells. The new cell line, RTgill-W1-pf, can serve as a unique representation of the gill cell-environment interface, offering novel opportunities to study nanoparticle-cell interactions without serum protein interference.

  15. Effect of Nanoparticles on Modified Screen Printed Inhibition Superoxide Dismutase Electrodes for Aluminum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Barquero-Quirós

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A novel amperometric biosensor for the determination of Al(III based on the inhibition of the enzyme superoxide dismutase has been developed. The oxidation signal of epinephrine substrate was affected by the presence of Al(III ions leading to a decrease in its amperometric current. The immobilization of the enzyme was performed with glutaraldehyde on screen-printed carbon electrodes modifiedwith tetrathiofulvalene (TTF and different types ofnanoparticles. Nanoparticles of gold, platinum, rhodium and palladium were deposited on screen printed carbon electrodes by means of two electrochemical procedures. Nanoparticles were characterized trough scanning electronic microscopy, X-rays fluorescence, and atomic force microscopy. Palladium nanoparticles showed lower atomic force microscopy parameters and higher slope of aluminum calibration curves and were selected to perform sensor validation. The developed biosensor has a detection limit of 2.0 ± 0.2 μM for Al(III, with a reproducibility of 7.9% (n = 5. Recovery of standard reference material spiked to buffer solution was 103.8% with a relative standard deviation of 4.8% (n = 5. Recovery of tap water spiked with the standard reference material was 100.5 with a relative standard deviation of 3.4% (n = 3. The study of interfering ions has also been carried out.

  16. Functionalized boron nitride nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainsbury, Toby; Ikuno, Takashi; Zettl, Alexander K

    2014-04-22

    A plasma treatment has been used to modify the surface of BNNTs. In one example, the surface of the BNNT has been modified using ammonia plasma to include amine functional groups. Amine functionalization allows BNNTs to be soluble in chloroform, which had not been possible previously. Further functionalization of amine-functionalized BNNTs with thiol-terminated organic molecules has also been demonstrated. Gold nanoparticles have been self-assembled at the surface of both amine- and thiol-functionalized boron nitride Nanotubes (BNNTs) in solution. This approach constitutes a basis for the preparation of highly functionalized BNNTs and for their utilization as nanoscale templates for assembly and integration with other nanoscale materials.

  17. A statin-loaded reconstituted high-density lipoprotein nanoparticle inhibits atherosclerotic plaque inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duivenvoorden, Raphaël; Tang, Jun; Cormode, David P.; Mieszawska, Aneta J.; Izquierdo-Garcia, David; Ozcan, Canturk; Otten, Maarten J.; Zaidi, Neeha; Lobatto, Mark E.; van Rijs, Sarian M.; Priem, Bram; Kuan, Emma L.; Martel, Catherine; Hewing, Bernd; Sager, Hendrik; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Randolph, Gwendalyn J.; Stroes, Erik S. G.; Fuster, Valentin; Fisher, Edward A.; Fayad, Zahi A.; Mulder, Willem J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is a key feature of atherosclerosis and a target for therapy. Statins have potent anti-inflammatory properties but these cannot be fully exploited with oral statin therapy due to low systemic bioavailability. Here we present an injectable reconstituted high-density lipoprotein (rHDL) nanoparticle carrier vehicle that delivers statins to atherosclerotic plaques. We demonstrate the anti-inflammatory effect of statin-rHDL in vitro and show that this effect is mediated through the inhibition of the mevalonate pathway. We also apply statin-rHDL nanoparticles in vivo in an apolipoprotein E-knockout mouse model of atherosclerosis and show that they accumulate in atherosclerotic lesions in which they directly affect plaque macrophages. Finally, we demonstrate that a 3-month low-dose statin-rHDL treatment regimen inhibits plaque inflammation progression, while a 1-week high-dose regimen markedly decreases inflammation in advanced atherosclerotic plaques. Statin-rHDL represents a novel potent atherosclerosis nanotherapy that directly affects plaque inflammation.

  18. Fluorescent boronate-based polymer nanoparticles with reactive oxygen species (ROS)-triggered cargo release for drug-delivery applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jäger, Eliezer; Höcherl, Anita; Janoušková, Olga; Jäger, Alessandro; Hrubý, Martin; Konefal, Rafal; Netopilík, Miloš; Pánek, Jiří; Šlouf, Miroslav; Ulbrich, Karel; Štěpánek, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 13 (2016), s. 6958-6963 ISSN 2040-3364 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 7F14009; GA MPO(CZ) FR-TI4/625; GA MŠk(CZ) LH14292; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1507; GA TA ČR(CZ) TE01020118 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : reactive oxygen species (ROS) * responsive nanoparticles * fluorescence life-time imaging (FLIM) Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 7.367, year: 2016

  19. Crystalline boron nitride aerogels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zettl, Alexander K.; Rousseas, Michael; Goldstein, Anna P.; Mickelson, William; Worsley, Marcus A.; Woo, Leta

    2017-12-12

    This disclosure provides methods and materials related to boron nitride aerogels. For example, one aspect relates to a method for making an aerogel comprising boron nitride, comprising: (a) providing boron oxide and an aerogel comprising carbon; (b) heating the boron oxide to melt the boron oxide and heating the aerogel; (c) mixing a nitrogen-containing gas with boron oxide vapor from molten boron oxide; and (d) converting at least a portion of the carbon to boron nitride to obtain the aerogel comprising boron nitride. Another aspect relates to a method for making an aerogel comprising boron nitride, comprising heating boron oxide and an aerogel comprising carbon under flow of a nitrogen-containing gas, wherein boron oxide vapor and the nitrogen-containing gas convert at least a portion of the carbon to boron nitride to obtain the aerogel comprising boron nitride.

  20. A novel paper-based device coupled with a silver nanoparticle-modified boron-doped diamond electrode for cholesterol detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nantaphol, Siriwan [Electrochemistry and Optical Spectroscopy Research Unit, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, 254 Phayathai Road, Pathumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Chailapakul, Orawon, E-mail: corawon@chula.ac.th [Electrochemistry and Optical Spectroscopy Research Unit, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, 254 Phayathai Road, Pathumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Center for Petroleum, Petrochemicals and Advanced Materials, Chulalongkorn University, 254 Phayathai Road, Pathumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Siangproh, Weena, E-mail: weenasi@hotmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Srinakharinwirot University, Sukhumvit 23, Wattanna, Bangkok 10110 (Thailand)

    2015-09-03

    A novel paper-based analytical device (PAD) coupled with a silver nanoparticle-modified boron-doped diamond (AgNP/BDD) electrode was first developed as a cholesterol sensor. The AgNP/BDD electrode was used as working electrode after modification by AgNPs using an electrodeposition method. Wax printing was used to define the hydrophilic and hydrophobic areas on filter paper, and then counter and reference electrodes were fabricated on the hydrophilic area by screen-printing in house. For the amperometric detection, cholesterol and cholesterol oxidase (ChOx) were directly drop-cast onto the hydrophilic area, and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} produced from the enzymatic reaction was monitored. The fabricated device demonstrated a good linearity (0.39 mg dL{sup −1} to 270.69 mg dL{sup −1}), low detection limit (0.25 mg dL{sup −1}), and high sensitivity (49.61 μA mM{sup −1} cm{sup −2}). The precision value for ten replicates was 3.76% RSD for 1 mM H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. In addition, this biosensor exhibited very high selectivity for cholesterol detection and excellent recoveries for bovine serum analysis (in the range of 99.6–100.8%). The results showed that this new sensing platform will be an alternative tool for cholesterol detection in routine diagnosis and offers the advantages of low sample/reagent consumption, low cost, portability, and short analysis time. - Highlights: • Novel PAD coupled with AgNP/BDDE for cholesterol determination was developed. • Wide linear range, low detection limit and high selectivity were achieved. • This sensor was successfully applied for cholesterol determination in bovine serum. • This platform offers the advantages of low sample/reagent consumption and low cost.

  1. Tumor development in field-cancerized tissue is inhibited by a double application of Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) without exceeding radio-tolerance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monti Hughes, Andrea; Heber, Elisa M.; Itoiz, Maria E.; Molinari, Ana J.; Garabalino, Marcela A.; Trivillin, Veronica A.; Schwint, Amanda E.; Aromando, Romina F.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: BNCT is based on the capture reaction between boron, selectively targeted to tumor tissue, and thermal neutrons which gives rise to lethal, short-range high linear energy transfer particles that selectively damage tumor tissue, sparing normal tissue. We previously evidenced a remarkable therapeutic success of a 'single' application of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) mediated by boronophenylalanine (BPA), GB-1(Na 2 10 B 10 H 10 ) or (GB-10+BPA) to treat hamster cheek pouch tumors with no normal tissue radiotoxicity. Based on these results, we developed a model of precancerous tissue in the hamster cheek pouch for long-term studies. Employing this model we evaluated the long-term potential inhibitory effect on the development of second primary tumors from precancerous tissue and eventual radiotoxicity of a single application of BNCT mediated by BPA, GB-10 or (GB-10+BPA), in the RA-6. The clinical rationale of this study was to search for a BNCT protocol that is therapeutic for tumor, not radio-toxic for the normal tissue that lies in the neutron beam path, and exerts the desired inhibitory effect on the development of second primary tumors, without exceeding the radio-tolerance of precancerous tissue, the dose limiting tissue in this case. Second primary tumors that arise in precancerous tissue (also called locoregional recurrences) are a frequent cause of therapeutic failure in head and neck tumors. Aim: Evaluate the radiotoxicity and inhibitory effect of a 'double' application of the same BNCT protocols that were proved therapeutically successful for tumor and precancerous tissue, with a long term follow up (8 months). A 'double' application of BNCT is a potentially useful strategy for the treatment of tumors, in particular the larger ones, but the cost in terms of side-effects in dose-limiting tissues might preclude its application and requires cautious evaluation. Materials and methods: We performed a double application of 1) BPA-BNCT; 2) (GB

  2. Exposure to silver nanoparticles inhibits selenoprotein synthesis and the activity of thioredoxin reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Milan; Singh, Sanjay; Self, William T

    2012-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and silver (Ag)-based materials are increasingly being incorporated into consumer products, and although humans have been exposed to colloidal Ag in many forms for decades, this rise in the use of Ag materials has spurred interest into their toxicology. Recent reports have shown that exposure to AgNPs or Ag ions leads to oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and reduced cell proliferation. Previous studies have shown that Ag accumulates in tissues as silver sulfides (Ag2S) and silver selenide (Ag2Se). In this study we investigated whether exposure of cells in culture to AgNPs or Ag ions at subtoxic doses would alter the effective metabolism of selenium, that is, the incorporation of selenium into selenoproteins. For these studies we used a keratinocyte cell model (HaCat) and a lung cell model (A549). We also tested (in vitro, both cellular and chemical) whether Ag ions could inhibit the activity of a key selenoenzyme, thioredoxin reductase (TrxR). We found that exposure to AgNPs or far lower levels of Ag ions led to a dose-dependent inhibition of selenium metabolism in both cell models. The synthesis of protein was not altered under these conditions. Exposure to nanomolar levels of Ag ions effectively blocked selenium metabolism, suggesting that Ag ion leaching was likely the mechanism underlying observed changes during AgNP exposure. Exposure likewise inhibited TrxR activity in cultured cells, and Ag ions were potent inhibitors of purified rat TrxR isoform 1 (cytosolic) (TrxR1) enzyme. Exposure to AgNPs leads to the inhibition of selenoprotein synthesis and inhibition of TrxR1. Further, we propose these two sites of action comprise the likely mechanism underlying increases in oxidative stress, increases endoplasmic reticulum stress, and reduced cell proliferation during exposure to Ag.

  3. Prevention of uncontrolled boron dilution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sere, J. L.

    1997-01-01

    The paper presents a synthesis of the global analysis of uncontrolled boron dilution risk performed by (European Consortium Mochovce (EUCOM) in the frame of Safety Measures RC 01 and AA 11. Recommendation for additional improvements (mainly I and C interlocks or inhibition) are presented. (author)

  4. In vitro transcription and translation inhibition via DNA functionalized gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conde, J; Baptista, P V [Centro de Investigacao em Genetica Molecular Humana (CIGMH), Departamento de Ciencias da Vida, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); De la Fuente, J M, E-mail: pmvb@fct.unl.pt [Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragon, Universidad de Zaragoza, Pedro Cerbuna 12, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2010-12-17

    The use of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) has been gaining momentum as vectors for gene silencing strategies, combining the AuNPs' ease of functionalization with DNA and/or siRNA, high loading capacity and fast uptake by target cells. Here, we used AuNP functionalized with thiolated oligonucleotides to specifically inhibit transcription in vitro, demonstrating the synergetic effect between AuNPs and a specific antisense sequence that blocks the T7 promoter region. Also, AuNPs efficiently protect the antisense oligonucleotide against nuclease degradation, which can thus retain its inhibitory potential. In addition, we demonstrate that AuNPs functionalized with a thiolated oligonucleotide complementary to the ribosome binding site and the start codon, effectively shut down in vitro translation. Together, these two approaches can provide for a simple yet robust experimental set up to test for efficient gene silencing of AuNP-DNA conjugates. What is more, these results show that appropriate functionalization of AuNPs can be used as a dual targeting approach to an enhanced control of gene expression-inhibition of both transcription and translation.

  5. Aqueous extract of Rabdosia rubescens leaves: forming nanoparticles, targeting P-selectin, and inhibiting thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Y

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Yuji Wang,1 Jingcheng Tang,1 Haimei Zhu,1 Xueyun Jiang,1 Jiawang Liu,1 Wenyun Xu,1 Haiping Ma,1 Qiqi Feng,1 Jianhui Wu,1 Ming Zhao,1,2 Shiqi Peng1 1Beijing Area Major Laboratory of Peptide and Small Molecular Drugs, Engineering Research Center of Endogenous Prophylactic of Ministry of Education of China, Beijing Laboratory of Biomedical Materials, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Capital Medical University, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 2Faculty of Biomedical Science and Environmental Biology, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan Abstract: The hot water extract of Rabdosia rubescens was traditionally used as an antithrombotic medicine. To explore its antithrombotic utility and mechanism, we carried out a series of in vitro and in vivo assays in this study. In vitro platelet aggregation assay showed that the half maximal inhibitory concentration values of aqueous extract of R. rubescens leaves (AERL inhibiting platelet aggregation induced by thrombin, arachidonic acid, adenosine diphosphate, and platelet-activating factor ranged from 0.12 mg/mL to 1.43 mg/mL. The minimal effective oral dose of AERL inhibiting the rats from forming thrombus was 25 mg/kg. Both in vitro and in vivo actions were correlated with AERL concentration-dependently inhibiting sP-selectin release. In water, AERL formed nanoparticles, and their size depended on the concentration. Docking the five nucleotides, 21 phenolic acids, and four diterpenoids identified by high-performance liquid chromatography–photodiode array detector/(-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry analysis into the active site of P-selectin, rosmarinic acid was predicted to be the antithrombotic ingredient of AERL. In flow cytometry analysis, 1 µM of rosmarinic acid effectively inhibited sP-selectin release in arachidonic acid-activated platelets. In a rat model, 5 mg/kg of oral rosmarinic acid effectively inhibited thrombosis. Keywords: R. rubescens, s

  6. Inclusion of the helper lipid dioleoyl-phosphatidylethanolamine in solid lipid nanoparticles inhibits their transfection efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jesus, Marcelo B; Radaic, Allan; Hinrichs, Wouter L J; Ferreira, Carmen V; de Paula, Eneida; Hoekstra, Dick; Zuhorn, Inge S

    2014-02-01

    Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) are a promising system for the delivery of lipophilic and hydrophilic drugs. They consist of a solid lipid core that is stabilized by a layer of surfactants. By the incorporation of cationic lipids in the formulation, positively charged SLNs can be generated, that are suitable carriers for nucleic acids (DNA, siRNA). Considering the beneficial effect of helper lipids on the transfection efficiency with cationic liposomes, the effect of the helper lipid 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DOPE) on transfection with cationic lipid-containing solid lipid nanoparticles was investigated in PC3 prostate cancer cells. The inclusion of DOPE in SLN formulations, instead of promoted, strongly inhibited SLN transfection efficiency, by frustrating the accommodation of DNA by the particles, as was revealed by biochemical analysis. SLNs devoid of DOPE maintained a homogenous size distribution of approximately 150 nm following lipoplex assembly and cellular delivery, and showed transfection efficiency comparable to that of Lipofectamine 2000' (LF2k). Moreover, the SLNs maintain their high transfection efficiency after lyophilization and long-term storage (1-2 years), an important asset for biomedical applications. There is even the possibility to lyophilize the SLN carrier together with its DNA cargo, which represents an interesting pharmaceutical advantage of the SLN formulations over LF2k. These results reflect marked differences between the physicochemical properties of cationic liposomes and SLNs, the latter requiring more critical lipid-depending properties for effective 'packaging' of DNA but displaying a higher storage stability than cationic lipid based carriers like LF2k.

  7. Innovative boron nitride-doped propellants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thelma Manning

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The U.S. military has a need for more powerful propellants with balanced/stoichiometric amounts of fuel and oxidants. However, balanced and more powerful propellants lead to accelerated gun barrel erosion and markedly shortened useful barrel life. Boron nitride (BN is an interesting potential additive for propellants that could reduce gun wear effects in advanced propellants (US patent pending 2015-026P. Hexagonal boron nitride is a good lubricant that can provide wear resistance and lower flame temperatures for gun barrels. Further, boron can dope steel, which drastically improves its strength and wear resistance, and can block the formation of softer carbides. A scalable synthesis method for producing boron nitride nano-particles that can be readily dispersed into propellants has been developed. Even dispersion of the nano-particles in a double-base propellant has been demonstrated using a solvent-based processing approach. Stability of a composite propellant with the BN additive was verified. In this paper, results from propellant testing of boron nitride nano-composite propellants are presented, including closed bomb and wear and erosion testing. Detailed characterization of the erosion tester substrates before and after firing was obtained by electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. This promising boron nitride additive shows the ability to improve gun wear and erosion resistance without any destabilizing effects to the propellant. Potential applications could include less erosive propellants in propellant ammunition for large, medium and small diameter fire arms.

  8. Highly efficient inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase by aptamers functionalized gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiang, Yen-Chun; Ou, Chung-Mao; Chen, Shih-Ju; Ou, Ting-Yu; Lin, Han-Jia; Huang, Chih-Ching; Chang, Huan-Tsung

    2013-03-01

    We have developed aptamer (Apt)-conjugated gold nanoparticles (Apt-Au NPs, 13 nm in diameter) as highly effective inhibitors for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase (HIV-1 RT). Two Apts, RT1t49 (Aptpol) and ODN 93 (AptRH), which recognize the polymerase and RNase H regions of HIV-1 RT, are used to conjugate Au NPs to prepare Aptpol-Au NPs and AptRH-Au NPs, respectively. In addition to DNA sequence, the surface density of the aptamers on Au NPs (nApt-Au NPs; n is the number of aptamer molecules on each Au NP) and the linker length number (Tm; m is the base number of the deoxythymidine linker) between the aptamer and Au NPs play important roles in determining their inhibition activity. A HIV-lentiviral vector-based antiviral assay has been applied to determine the inhibitory effect of aptamers or Apt-Au NPs on the early stages of their replication cycle. The nuclease-stable G-quadruplex structure of 40AptRH-T45-Au NPs shows inhibitory efficiency in the retroviral replication cycle with a decreasing infectivity (40.2%).We have developed aptamer (Apt)-conjugated gold nanoparticles (Apt-Au NPs, 13 nm in diameter) as highly effective inhibitors for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase (HIV-1 RT). Two Apts, RT1t49 (Aptpol) and ODN 93 (AptRH), which recognize the polymerase and RNase H regions of HIV-1 RT, are used to conjugate Au NPs to prepare Aptpol-Au NPs and AptRH-Au NPs, respectively. In addition to DNA sequence, the surface density of the aptamers on Au NPs (nApt-Au NPs; n is the number of aptamer molecules on each Au NP) and the linker length number (Tm; m is the base number of the deoxythymidine linker) between the aptamer and Au NPs play important roles in determining their inhibition activity. A HIV-lentiviral vector-based antiviral assay has been applied to determine the inhibitory effect of aptamers or Apt-Au NPs on the early stages of their replication cycle. The nuclease-stable G-quadruplex structure of 40AptRH-T45

  9. Stability and enzyme inhibition activities of au nanoparticles using an aqueous extract of clove as a reducing and stabilizing agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hameed, A.; Khan, I.; Naz, S.S.; Islam, N.U.

    2014-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were synthesized in one pot using aqueous extract of clove buds (CB) to reduce HAuCl/sub 4/ and stabilize gold in its atomic form at room temperature. To determine the potential of gold nanoparticles with clove buds (AuCB) for in vivo applications, the stability of the nanoparticles was explored as a function of temperature, pH and salt concentration. The suspensions were found to be stable for salt concentrations up to 1 mol/L, temperatures of up to 100 degree C and a pH range of 2-13. Our results indicate that CB exhibited comparable activities to standards of urease and carbonic anhydrase, but its conjugation to Au knocks out the enzyme inhibition activity by about two times. In case of xanthine oxidase activity, CB and its gold Au bio-conjugates (AuCB) are found to be absolutely inactive. (author)

  10. Surface modification of PLGA nanoparticles to deliver nitric oxide to inhibit Escherichia coli growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reger, Nina A. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA 15282 (United States); Meng, Wilson S. [Division of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA 15282 (United States); Gawalt, Ellen S., E-mail: gawalte@duq.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA 15282 (United States); McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15219 (United States)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Thin film functionalized PLGA nanoparticles were modified to release nitric oxide from an s-nitrosothiol donor. • The nitric oxide modified nanoparticles were bacteriostatic against Escherichia coli. • The nitric oxide modified nanoparticles increased the effectiveness of tetracycline against Escherichia coli. • The modified nitric oxide nanoparticles did not exhibit cytotoxic effects against fibroblasts. - Abstract: Polymer nanoparticles consisting of poly (DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) were surface functionalized to deliver nitric oxide. These biodegradable and biocompatible nanoparticles were modified with an S-nitrosothiol molecule, S-nitrosocysteamine, as the nitric oxide delivery molecule. S-nitrosocysteamine was covalently immobilized on the nanoparticle surface using small organic molecule linkers and carbodiimide coupling. Nanoparticle size, zeta potential, and morphology were determined using dynamic light scattering and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. Subsequent attachment of the S-nitrosothiol resulted in a nitric oxide release of 37.1 ± 1.1 nmol per milligram of nanoparticles under physiological conditions. This low concentration of nitric oxide reduced Escherichia coli culture growth by 31.8%, indicating that the nitric oxide donor was effective at releasing nitric oxide even after attachment to the nanoparticle surface. Combining the nitric oxide modified nanoparticles with tetracycline, a commonly prescribed antibiotic for E. coli infections, increased the effectiveness of the antibiotic by 87.8%, which allows for lower doses of antibiotics to be used in order to achieve the same effect. The functionalized nanoparticles were not cytotoxic to mouse fibroblasts.

  11. Surface modification of PLGA nanoparticles to deliver nitric oxide to inhibit Escherichia coli growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reger, Nina A.; Meng, Wilson S.; Gawalt, Ellen S.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Thin film functionalized PLGA nanoparticles were modified to release nitric oxide from an s-nitrosothiol donor. • The nitric oxide modified nanoparticles were bacteriostatic against Escherichia coli. • The nitric oxide modified nanoparticles increased the effectiveness of tetracycline against Escherichia coli. • The modified nitric oxide nanoparticles did not exhibit cytotoxic effects against fibroblasts. - Abstract: Polymer nanoparticles consisting of poly (DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) were surface functionalized to deliver nitric oxide. These biodegradable and biocompatible nanoparticles were modified with an S-nitrosothiol molecule, S-nitrosocysteamine, as the nitric oxide delivery molecule. S-nitrosocysteamine was covalently immobilized on the nanoparticle surface using small organic molecule linkers and carbodiimide coupling. Nanoparticle size, zeta potential, and morphology were determined using dynamic light scattering and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. Subsequent attachment of the S-nitrosothiol resulted in a nitric oxide release of 37.1 ± 1.1 nmol per milligram of nanoparticles under physiological conditions. This low concentration of nitric oxide reduced Escherichia coli culture growth by 31.8%, indicating that the nitric oxide donor was effective at releasing nitric oxide even after attachment to the nanoparticle surface. Combining the nitric oxide modified nanoparticles with tetracycline, a commonly prescribed antibiotic for E. coli infections, increased the effectiveness of the antibiotic by 87.8%, which allows for lower doses of antibiotics to be used in order to achieve the same effect. The functionalized nanoparticles were not cytotoxic to mouse fibroblasts.

  12. Antimicrobial Activity and Mechanism of inhibition of Silver Nanoparticles against Extreme Halophilic Archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Thombre

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Haloarchaea are salt-loving halophilic microorganism’s that inhabit marine environments, sea water, salterns, and lakes. The resistance of haloarchaea to physical extremities that challenge organismic survival is ubiquitous. Metal and antibiotic resistance of haloarchaea has been on an upsurge due to the exposure of these organisms to metal sinks and drug resistance genes augmented in their natural habitats due to anthropogenic activities and environmental pollution. The efficacy of silver nanoparticles (SNPs as a potent and broad spectrum inhibitory agent is known however, there are no reports on the inhibitory activity of SNPs against haloarchaea. In the present study, we have investigated the antimicrobial potentials of SNPs synthesized using aqueous leaf extract of Cinnamomum tamala against antibiotic resistant haloarchaeal isolates Haloferax prahovense RR8, Haloferax lucentense RR15, Haloarcula argentinensis RR10 and Haloarcula tradensis RR13. The synthesized SNPs were characterized by UV-Vis spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The SNPs demonstrated potent antimicrobial activity against the haloarchaea with a minimum inhibitory concentration of 300- 400µg/ml. Growth kinetics of haloarchaea in the presence of SNPs was studied by employing the Baranyi mathematical model for microbial growth using the DMFit curve fitting programme. The C. tamala SNPs also demonstrated cytotoxic activity against human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cell line (A540 and human breast adenocarcinoma cell line (MCF-7. The mechanism of inhibition of haloarchaea by the SNPs was investigated. The plausible mechanism proposed is the alterations and disruption of haloarchaeal membrane permeability by turbulence, inhibition of respiratory dehydrogenases and lipid peroxidation causing cellular and DNA damage resulting in cell death.

  13. Antimicrobial Activity and Mechanism of Inhibition of Silver Nanoparticles against Extreme Halophilic Archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thombre, Rebecca S; Shinde, Vinaya; Thaiparambil, Elvina; Zende, Samruddhi; Mehta, Sourabh

    2016-01-01

    Haloarchaea are salt-loving halophilic microorganisms that inhabit marine environments, sea water, salterns, and lakes. The resistance of haloarchaea to physical extremities that challenge organismic survival is ubiquitous. Metal and antibiotic resistance of haloarchaea has been on an upsurge due to the exposure of these organisms to metal sinks and drug resistance genes augmented in their natural habitats due to anthropogenic activities and environmental pollution. The efficacy of silver nanoparticles (SNPs) as a potent and broad spectrum inhibitory agent is known, however, there are no reports on the inhibitory activity of SNPs against haloarchaea. In the present study, we have investigated the antimicrobial potentials of SNPs synthesized using aqueous leaf extract of Cinnamomum tamala against antibiotic resistant haloarchaeal isolates Haloferax prahovense RR8, Haloferax lucentense RR15, Haloarcula argentinensis RR10 and Haloarcula tradensis RR13. The synthesized SNPs were characterized by UV-Vis spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The SNPs demonstrated potent antimicrobial activity against the haloarchaea with a minimum inhibitory concentration of 300-400 μg/ml. Growth kinetics of haloarchaea in the presence of SNPs was studied by employing the Baranyi mathematical model for microbial growth using the DMFit curve fitting program. The C. tamala SNPs also demonstrated cytotoxic activity against human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cell line (A540) and human breast adenocarcinoma cell line (MCF-7). The mechanism of inhibition of haloarchaea by the SNPs was investigated. The plausible mechanism proposed is the alterations and disruption of haloarchaeal membrane permeability by turbulence, inhibition of respiratory dehydrogenases and lipid peroxidation causing cellular and DNA damage resulting in cell death.

  14. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles inhibit proliferation and induce morphological changes and apoptosis in glial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Márquez-Ramírez, Sandra Gissela; Delgado-Buenrostro, Norma Laura; Chirino, Yolanda Irasema; Iglesias, Gisela Gutiérrez; López-Marure, Rebeca

    2012-01-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO 2 NPs) are widely used in the chemical, electrical and electronic industries. TiO 2 NPs can enter directly into the brain through the olfactory bulb and be deposited in the hippocampus region. We determined the effect of TiO 2 NPs on rat and human glial cells, C6 and U373, respectively. We evaluated proliferation by crystal violet staining, internalization of TiO 2 NPs, and cellular morphology by TEM analysis, as well as F-actin distribution by immunostaining and cell death by detecting active caspase-3 and DNA fragmentation. TiO 2 NPs inhibited proliferation and induced morphological changes that were related with a decrease in immuno-location of F-actin fibers. TiO 2 NPs were internalized and formation of vesicles was observed. TiO 2 NPs induced apoptosis after 96 h of treatment. Hence, TiO 2 NPs had a cytotoxic effect on glial cells, suggesting that exposure to TiO 2 NPs could cause brain injury and be hazardous to health.

  15. Assaying multiple restriction endonucleases functionalities and inhibitions on DNA microarray with multifunctional gold nanoparticle probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lan; Zhu, Zhijun; Li, Tao; Wang, Zhenxin

    2014-02-15

    Herein, a double-stranded (ds) DNA microarray-based resonance light scattering (RLS) assay with multifunctional gold nanoparticle (GNP) probes has been developed for studying restriction endonuclease functionality and inhibition. Because of decreasing significantly melting temperature, the enzyme-cleaved dsDNAs easily unwind to form single-stranded (ss) DNAs. The ssDNAs are hybridized with multiplex complementary ssDNAs functionalized GNP probes followed by silver enhancement and RLS detection. Three restriction endonucleases (EcoRI, BamHI and EcoRV) and three potential inhibitors (doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX), ethidium bromide (EB) and an EcoRI-derived helical peptide (α4)) were selected to demonstrate capability of the assay. Enzyme activities of restriction endonucleases are detected simultaneously with high specificity down to the limits of 2.0 × 10(-2)U/mL for EcoRI, 1.1 × 10(-2)U/mL for BamHI and 1.6 × 10(-2)U/mL for EcoRV, respectively. More importantly, the inhibitory potencies of three inhibitors are showed quantitatively, indicating that our approach has great promise for high-throughput screening of restriction endonuclease inhibitors. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Broad-spectrum non-toxic antiviral nanoparticles with a virucidal inhibition mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagno, Valeria; Andreozzi, Patrizia; D'Alicarnasso, Marco; Jacob Silva, Paulo; Mueller, Marie; Galloux, Marie; Le Goffic, Ronan; Jones, Samuel T.; Vallino, Marta; Hodek, Jan; Weber, Jan; Sen, Soumyo; Janeček, Emma-Rose; Bekdemir, Ahmet; Sanavio, Barbara; Martinelli, Chiara; Donalisio, Manuela; Rameix Welti, Marie-Anne; Eleouet, Jean-Francois; Han, Yanxiao; Kaiser, Laurent; Vukovic, Lela; Tapparel, Caroline; Král, Petr; Krol, Silke; Lembo, David; Stellacci, Francesco

    2018-02-01

    Viral infections kill millions yearly. Available antiviral drugs are virus-specific and active against a limited panel of human pathogens. There are broad-spectrum substances that prevent the first step of virus-cell interaction by mimicking heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG), the highly conserved target of viral attachment ligands (VALs). The reversible binding mechanism prevents their use as a drug, because, upon dilution, the inhibition is lost. Known VALs are made of closely packed repeating units, but the aforementioned substances are able to bind only a few of them. We designed antiviral nanoparticles with long and flexible linkers mimicking HSPG, allowing for effective viral association with a binding that we simulate to be strong and multivalent to the VAL repeating units, generating forces (~190 pN) that eventually lead to irreversible viral deformation. Virucidal assays, electron microscopy images, and molecular dynamics simulations support the proposed mechanism. These particles show no cytotoxicity, and in vitro nanomolar irreversible activity against herpes simplex virus (HSV), human papilloma virus, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), dengue and lenti virus. They are active ex vivo in human cervicovaginal histocultures infected by HSV-2 and in vivo in mice infected with RSV.

  17. Nanoparticles containing a liver X receptor agonist inhibit inflammation and atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue-Qing; Even-Or, Orli; Xu, Xiaoyang; van Rosmalen, Mariska; Lim, Lucas; Gadde, Suresh; Farokhzad, Omid C; Fisher, Edward A

    2015-01-28

    Liver X receptor (LXR) signaling pathways regulate lipid metabolism and inflammation, which has generated widespread interest in developing synthetic LXR agonists as potential therapeutics for the management of atherosclerosis. In this study, it is demonstrated that nanoparticles (NPs) containing the synthetic LXR agonist GW3965 (NP-LXR) exert anti-inflammatory effects and inhibit the development of atherosclerosis without causing hepatic steatosis. These NPs are engineered through self-assembly of a biodegradable diblock poly(lactide-co-glycolide)-b-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLGA-b-PEG) copolymer. NP-LXR is significantly more effective than free GW3965 at inducing LXR-target gene expression and suppressing inflammatory factors in macrophages in vitro and in vivo. Additionally, the NPs elicit negligible lipogenic gene stimulation in the liver. Using the Ldlr (-/-) mouse model of atherosclerosis, abundant colocalization of fluorescently labeled NPs within plaque macrophages following systemic administration is seen. Notably, six intravenous injections of NP-LXR over 2 weeks markedly reduce the CD68-positive cell (macrophage) content of plaques (by 50%) without increasing total cholesterol or triglycerides in the liver and plasma. Together, these findings identify GW3965-encapsulated PLGA-b-PEG NPs as a promising nanotherapeutic approach to combat atherosclerosis, providing the benefits of LXR agonists without their adverse effects on hepatic and plasma lipid metabolism. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Boron nitride composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntz, Joshua D.; Ellsworth, German F.; Swenson, Fritz J.; Allen, Patrick G.

    2017-02-21

    According to one embodiment, a composite product includes: a matrix material including hexagonal boron nitride and one or more borate binders; and a plurality of cubic boron nitride particles dispersed in the matrix material. According to another embodiment, a composite product includes: a matrix material including hexagonal boron nitride and amorphous boron nitride; and a plurality of cubic boron nitride particles dispersed in the matrix material.

  19. Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael W. (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes are prepared by a process which includes: (a) creating a source of boron vapor; (b) mixing the boron vapor with nitrogen gas so that a mixture of boron vapor and nitrogen gas is present at a nucleation site, which is a surface, the nitrogen gas being provided at a pressure elevated above atmospheric, e.g., from greater than about 2 atmospheres up to about 250 atmospheres; and (c) harvesting boron nitride nanotubes, which are formed at the nucleation site.

  20. Inhibition of E. coli and S. aureus with selenium nanoparticles synthesized by pulsed laser ablation in deionized water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guisbiers G

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available G Guisbiers,1 Q Wang,2 E Khachatryan,1 LC Mimun,1 R Mendoza-Cruz,1 P Larese-Casanova,3 TJ Webster,2,4,5 KL Nash1 1Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, 2Department of Bioengineering, 3Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 4Department of Chemical Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA, USA; 5Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials Research, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia Abstract: Nosocomial diseases are mainly caused by two common pathogens, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, which are becoming more and more resistant to conventional antibiotics. Therefore, it is becoming increasingly necessary to find other alternative treatments than commonly utilized drugs. A promising strategy is to use nanomaterials such as selenium nanoparticles. However, the ability to produce nanoparticles free of any contamination is very challenging, especially for nano-medical applications. This paper reports the successful synthesis of pure selenium nanoparticles by laser ablation in water and determines the minimal concentration required for ~50% inhibition of either E. coli or S. aureus after 24 hours to be at least ~50 ppm. Total inhibition of E. coli and S. aureus is expected to occur at 107±12 and 79±4 ppm, respectively. In this manner, this study reports for the first time an easy synthesis process for creating pure selenium to inhibit bacterial growth. Keywords: nosocomial disease, bacteria, antibiotics resistant, cytotoxicity

  1. Synthesis of Boron Nano wires, Nano tubes, and Nano sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, R.B.; Chou, T.; Iqbal, Z.

    2014-01-01

    The synthesis of boron nano wires, nano tubes, and nano sheets using a thermal vapor deposition process is reported. This work confirms previous research and provides a new method capable of synthesizing boron nano materials. The materials were made by using various combinations of MgB 2 , Mg(BH 4 ) 2 , MCM-41, NiB, and Fe wire. Unlike previously reported methods, a nanoparticle catalyst and a silicate substrate are not required for synthesis. Two types of boron nano wires, boron nano tubes, and boron nano sheets were made. Their morphology and chemical composition were determined through the use of scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and electron energy loss spectroscopy. These boron-based materials have potential for electronic and hydrogen storage applications.

  2. Influence of Biological Macromolecules and Aquatic Chemistries on the Inhibition of Nitrifying Bacteria by Silver Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radniecki, T. S.; Anderson, J. W.; Schneider, M. C.; Stankus, D. P.; Nason, J. A.; Semprini, L.

    2010-12-01

    The use of silver nanoparticles (Ag-NP) as a broad spectrum biocide in a wide range of consumer goods has grown exponentially since 2006 (1), which may result in an increased release of Ag-NP into wastewater streams and ultimately the receiving bodies of water. Ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) play a critical role in the global nitrogen cycle through the oxidation of ammonia (NH3) to nitrite (NO2-) and are widely considered to be the most sensitive microbial fauna in the environment being readily inhibited by contaminants, including Ag-NP (2). This research used physiological techniques in combination with physical/chemical assays to characterize the inhibition of Nitrosomonas europaea, the model AOB, by silver ions (Ag+), 3-5 nm Ag-NP, 20 nm Ag-NP and 80 nm Ag-NP under a variety of aqueous chemistries. In addition, the stability of Ag-NP suspensions was examined under a variety of aqueous chemistries including in the presences of divalent cations, chloride anions, natural organic matter (NOM), proteins (BSA) and lipopolysaccharides (alginate). Using the stable Ag-NP/test media suspensions, N. europaea was found to be extremely sensitive to Ag+, 3-5 nm Ag-NP, 20 nm Ag-NP and 80 nm Ag-NP with concentrations of 0.1, 0.12, 0.5 and 1.5 ppm, respectively, resulting in a 50% decrease in nitrification rates. The inhibition was correlated with the amount of Ag+ released into solution. It is suspected that the inhibition observed from Ag-NP exposure is caused by the liberated Ag+. The aquatic chemistry of the test media was found to have a profound influence on the stability of Ag-NP suspensions. The presence of Ag ligands (e.g. EDTA and Cl-) reduced toxicity of Ag-NP through the formation of Ag-ligand complexes with the liberated Ag+. The presence of divalent cations (e.g. Ca2+ or Mg2+) resulted in the rapid aggregation of Ag-NP leading to a decrease in Ag+ liberation and thus a decrease in N. europaea inhibition. The presence of 5 ppm NOM resulted in a highly stable Ag

  3. Silencing β3 Integrin by Targeted ECO/siRNA Nanoparticles Inhibits EMT and Metastasis of Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Margaret A.; Schiemann, William P.; Lu, Zheng-Rong

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths amongst women. Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a highly aggressive subcategory of breast cancer and currently lacks well-defined molecular targets for effective targeted therapies. Disease relapse, metastasis, and drug resistance render standard chemotherapy ineffective in the treatment of TNBC. Since previous studies coupled β3 integrin to epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and metastasis, we exploited β3 integrin as a therapeutic target to treat TNBC by delivering β3 integrin siRNA via lipid ECO-based nanoparticles (ECO/siβ3). Treatment of TNBC cells with ECO/siβ3 was sufficient to effectively silence β3 integrin expression, attenuate TGF-β-mediated EMT and invasion, restore TGF-β-mediated cytostasis, and inhibit 3-dimensional organoid growth. Modification of ECO/siβ3 nanoparticles with an RGD peptide via a PEG spacer enhanced siRNA uptake by post-EMT cells. Intravenous injections of RGD-targeted ECO/siβ3 nanoparticles in vivo alleviated primary tumor burden, and more importantly, significantly inhibited metastasis. Mice bearing orthotopic, TGF-β-pre-stimulated MDA-MB-231 tumors that were treated with RGD-targeted ECO/siβ3 nanoparticles were free of metastases and relapse after primary tumor resection and 4 weeks after release from the treatment, in comparison to untreated mice. Collectively, these results highlight ECO/siβ3 nanoparticles as a promising therapeutic regimen to combat TNBC. PMID:25858145

  4. Methods of forming boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trowbridge, Tammy L; Wertsching, Alan K; Pinhero, Patrick J; Crandall, David L

    2015-03-03

    A method of forming a boron nitride. The method comprises contacting a metal article with a monomeric boron-nitrogen compound and converting the monomeric boron-nitrogen compound to a boron nitride. The boron nitride is formed on the same or a different metal article. The monomeric boron-nitrogen compound is borazine, cycloborazane, trimethylcycloborazane, polyborazylene, B-vinylborazine, poly(B-vinylborazine), or combinations thereof. The monomeric boron-nitrogen compound is polymerized to form the boron nitride by exposure to a temperature greater than approximately 100.degree. C. The boron nitride is amorphous boron nitride, hexagonal boron nitride, rhombohedral boron nitride, turbostratic boron nitride, wurzite boron nitride, combinations thereof, or boron nitride and carbon. A method of conditioning a ballistic weapon and a metal article coated with the monomeric boron-nitrogen compound are also disclosed.

  5. Synthesis of Nanocrystalline Boron Carbide by Direct Microwave Carbothermal Reduction of Boric Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo F. K. Gunnewiek

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The excellent physical and chemical properties of boron carbide make it suitable for many applications. However, its synthesis requires a large amount of energy and is time-consuming. Microwave carbothermal reduction is a fast technique for producing well crystallized equiaxial boron carbide nanoparticles of about 50 nm and very few amounts of elongated nanoparticles were also synthesized. They presented an average length of 82 nm and a high aspect ratio (5.5. The total reaction time was only 20 minutes, which disfavor the growing process, leading to the synthesis of nanoparticles. Microwave-assisted synthesis leaded to producing boron-rich boron carbide. Increasing the forward power increases the boron content and enhances the efficiency of the reaction, resulting in better crystallized boron carbide.

  6. Exploiting BSA to Inhibit the Fibrous Aggregation of Magnetic Nanoparticles under an Alternating Magnetic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Gu

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The alternating magnetic field was discovered to be capable of inducing the fibrous aggregation of magnetic nanoparticles. However, this anisotropic aggregation may be unfavorable for practical applications. Here, we reported that the adsorption of BSA (bovine serum albumin on the surfaces of magnetic nanoparticles can effectively make the fibrous aggregation of γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles turn into a more isotropic aggregation in the presence of the alternating magnetic field. Also, the heating curves with and without BSA adsorption under different pH conditions were measured to show the influence of the colloidal aggregation states on the collective calorific behavior of magnetic nanoparticles.

  7. Antithrombin nanoparticles inhibit stent thrombosis in ex vivo static and flow models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palekar, Rohun U; Vemuri, Chandu; Marsh, Jon N; Arif, Batool; Wickline, Samuel A

    2016-11-01

    Despite significant advances in intravascular stent technology, safe prevention of stent thrombosis over prolonged periods after initial deployment persists as a medical need to decrease device failure. The objective of this project was to assess the potential of perfluorocarbon nanoparticles (NP) conjugated with the direct thrombin inhibitor D-phenylalanyl-L-prolyl-L-arginyl chloromethylketone (PPACK-NP) to inhibit stent thrombosis. In a static model of stent thrombosis, 3 × 3-mm pieces of stainless steel coronary stents were cut and adsorbed with thrombin to create a procoagulant surface that would facilitate thrombus development. After treatment with PPACK-NP or control NP, stents were exposed to platelet-poor plasma (PPP) or platelet-rich plasma (PRP) for set time points up to 60 minutes. Measurements of final clot weight in grams were used for assessing the effect of NP treatment on limiting thrombosis. Additionally, groups of stents were exposed to flowing plasma containing various treatments (saline, free PPACK, control NP, and PPACK-NP) and generated thrombi were stained and imaged to investigate the treatment effects of PPACK-NP under flow conditions. The static model of stent thrombosis used in this study indicated a significant reduction in thrombus deposition with PPACK-NP treatment (0.00067 ± 0.00026 g; n = 3) compared with control NP (0.0098 ± 0.0015 g; n = 3; P = .026) in PPP. Exposure to PRP demonstrated similar effects with PPACK-NP treatment (0.00033 ± 0.00012 g; n = 3) vs control NP treatment (0.0045 ± 0.00012 g; n = 3; P = .000017). In additional studies, stents were exposed to both PRP pretreated with vorapaxar and PPACK-NP, which illustrated adjunctive benefit to oral platelet inhibitors for prevention of stent thrombosis. Additionally, an in vitro model of stent thrombosis under flow conditions established that PPACK-NP treatment inhibited thrombus deposition on stents significantly. This study demonstrates that

  8. Electrochemically reduced graphene and iridium oxide nanoparticles for inhibition-based angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurbanoglu, Sevinc; Rivas, Lourdes; Ozkan, Sibel A; Merkoçi, Arben

    2017-02-15

    In this work, a novel biosensor based on electrochemically reduced graphene oxide and iridium oxide nanoparticles for the detection of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor drug, captopril, is presented. For the preparation of the biosensor, tyrosinase is immobilized onto screen printed electrode by using 1-Ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide and N-Hydroxysuccinimide coupling reagents, in electrochemically reduced graphene oxide and iridium oxide nanoparticles matrix. Biosensor response is characterized towards catechol, in terms of graphene oxide concentration, number of cycles to reduce graphene oxide, volume of iridium oxide nanoparticles and tyrosinase solution. The designed biosensor is used to inhibit tyrosinase activity by Captopril, which is generally used to treat congestive heart failure. It is an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor that operates via chelating copper at the active site of tyrosinase and thioquinone formation. The captopril detections using both inhibition ways are very sensitive with low limits of detection: 0.019µM and 0.008µM for chelating copper at the active site of tyrosinase and thioquinone formation, respectively. The proposed methods have been successfully applied in captopril determination in spiked human serum and pharmaceutical dosage forms with acceptable recovery values. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Inhibition of Phytophthora parasitica and P. capsici by Silver Nanoparticles Synthesized Using Aqueous Extract of Artemisia absinthium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mohammad; Kim, Bosung; Belfield, Kevin D; Norman, David; Brennan, Mary; Ali, Gul Shad

    2015-09-01

    Application of nanoparticles for controlling plant pathogens is a rapidly emerging area in plant disease management, and nanoparticles synthesis methods that are economical and ecofriendly are extensively investigated. In this project, we investigated the potential of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) synthesized with aqueous extract of Artemisia absinthium against several Phytophthora spp., which cause many economically important crop diseases. In in vitro dose-response tests conducted in microtiter plates, 10 µg ml⁻¹ of AgNPs inhibited mycelial growth of P. parasitica, P. infestans, P. palmivora, P. cinnamomi, P. tropicalis, P. capsici, and P. katsurae. Detailed in vitro dose-response analyses conducted with P. parasitica and P. capsici revealed that AgNPs synthesized with A. absinthium extract were highly potent (IC50: 2.1 to 8.3 µg ml⁻¹) and efficacious (100%) in inhibiting mycelial growth, zoospore germination, germ tube elongation, and zoospore production. Interestingly, AgNP treatment accelerated encystment of zoospores. Consistent with in vitro results, in planta experiments conducted in a greenhouse revealed that AgNP treatments prevented Phytophthora infection and improved plant survival. Moreover, AgNP in in planta experiments did not produce any adverse effects on plant growth. These investigations provide a simple and economical method for controlling Phytophthora with AgNP without affecting normal plant physiology.

  10. Surface modification of PLGA nanoparticles to deliver nitric oxide to inhibit Escherichia coli growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reger, Nina A.; Meng, Wilson S.; Gawalt, Ellen S.

    2017-04-01

    Polymer nanoparticles consisting of poly (DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) were surface functionalized to deliver nitric oxide. These biodegradable and biocompatible nanoparticles were modified with an S-nitrosothiol molecule, S-nitrosocysteamine, as the nitric oxide delivery molecule. S-nitrosocysteamine was covalently immobilized on the nanoparticle surface using small organic molecule linkers and carbodiimide coupling. Nanoparticle size, zeta potential, and morphology were determined using dynamic light scattering and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. Subsequent attachment of the S-nitrosothiol resulted in a nitric oxide release of 37.1 ± 1.1 nmol per milligram of nanoparticles under physiological conditions. This low concentration of nitric oxide reduced Escherichia coli culture growth by 31.8%, indicating that the nitric oxide donor was effective at releasing nitric oxide even after attachment to the nanoparticle surface. Combining the nitric oxide modified nanoparticles with tetracycline, a commonly prescribed antibiotic for E. coli infections, increased the effectiveness of the antibiotic by 87.8%, which allows for lower doses of antibiotics to be used in order to achieve the same effect. The functionalized nanoparticles were not cytotoxic to mouse fibroblasts.

  11. A Review on the Preparation of Borazine-derived Boron Nitride Nanoparticles and Nanopolyhedrons by Spray-pyrolysis and Annealing Process

    OpenAIRE

    Salles, Vincent; Bernard, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Boron nitride (BN) nanostructures (= nanoBN) are struc‐ tural analogues of carbon nanostructures but display different materials chemistry and physics, leading to a wide variety of structural, thermal, electronic, and optical applications. Proper synthesis routes and advanced structural design are among the great challenges for preparing nanoBN with such properties. This review provides an insight into the preparation and characteriza‐ tion of zero dimensional (0D) nanoBN including nanopar‐ t...

  12. Boron nitride converted carbon fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseas, Michael; Mickelson, William; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2016-04-05

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to boron nitride converted carbon fiber. In one aspect, a method may include the operations of providing boron oxide and carbon fiber, heating the boron oxide to melt the boron oxide and heating the carbon fiber, mixing a nitrogen-containing gas with boron oxide vapor from molten boron oxide, and converting at least a portion of the carbon fiber to boron nitride.

  13. Trichophyton rubrum is inhibited by free and nanoparticle encapsulated curcumin by induction of nitrosative stress after photodynamic activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltazar, Ludmila Matos; Krausz, Aimee E; Souza, Ana Camila Oliveira; Adler, Brandon L; Landriscina, Angelo; Musaev, Tagai; Nosanchuk, Joshua D; Friedman, Adam J

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial photodynamic inhibition (aPI) utilizes radical stress generated from the excitation of a photosensitizer (PS) with light to destroy pathogens. Its use against Trichophyton rubrum, a dermatophytic fungus with increasing incidence and resistance, has not been well characterized. Our aim was to evaluate the mechanism of action of aPI against T. rubrum using curcumin as the PS in both free and nanoparticle (curc-np) form. Nanocarriers stabilize curcumin and allow for enhanced solubility and PS delivery. Curcumin aPI, at optimal conditions of 10 μg/mL of PS with 10 J/cm² of blue light (417 ± 5 nm), completely inhibited fungal growth (paPI efficacy, suggesting that curcumin acts potently via a nitrosative pathway. The curc-np induced greater NO˙ expression and enhanced apoptosis of fungal cells, highlighting curc-np aPI as a potential treatment for T. rubrum skin infections.

  14. Study of Inhibition, Reactivation and Aging Processes of Pesticides Using Graphene Nanosheets/Gold Nanoparticles-Based Acetylcholinesterase Biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Lin; Long, Linjuan; Zhang, Weiying; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2012-09-10

    Organophosphate (OP) and carbamate pesticides exert their toxicity via attacking the hydroxyl moiety of serine in the 'active site' of acetylcholinesterase (AChE). In this paper we developed a stable AChE biosensor based on self-assembling AChE to graphene nanosheet (GN)-gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) nanocomposite electrode for investigation of inhibition, reactivation and aging processes of different pesticides. It is confirmed that pesticides can inhibit AChE in a short time. OPs poisoning is treatable with oximes while carbarmates exposure is insensitive to oximes. The proposed electrochemical approach thus provides a new simple tool for comparison of pesticide sensitivity and guide of therapeutic intervention.

  15. The inhibition of optical excitations and enhancement of Rabi flopping in hybrid quantum dot-metallic nanoparticle systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadeghi, S M

    2009-01-01

    We study the inhibition of optical excitation and enhancement of Rabi flopping and frequency in semiconductor quantum dots via plasmonic effects. This is done by demonstrating that the interaction of a quantum dot with a laser field in the vicinity of a metallic nanoparticle can be described in terms of optical Bloch equations with a plasmically normalized Rabi frequency. We show that in the weak-field regime plasmonic effects can suppress the interband transitions, inhibiting exciton generation. In the strong-field regime these effects delay the response of the quantum dot to the laser field and enhance Rabi flopping. We relate these to the conversion of Rabi frequency from a real quantity into a complex and strongly frequency-dependent quantity as plasmonic effects become significant. We show that, within the strong-field regime, in the wavelength range where real and imaginary parts of this frequency reach their maxima, a strongly frequency-dependent enhancement of carrier excitation can happen.

  16. Sugar-Terminated Nanoparticle Chaperones Are 102-105Times Better Than Molecular Sugars in Inhibiting Protein Aggregation and Reducing Amyloidogenic Cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Nibedita; Shekhar, Shashi; Jana, Nihar R; Jana, Nikhil R

    2017-03-29

    Sugar-based osmolyte molecules are known to stabilize proteins under stress, but usually they have poor chaperone performance in inhibiting protein aggregation. Here, we show that the nanoparticle form of sugars molecule can enhance their chaperone performance typically by 10 2 -10 5 times, compared to molecular sugar. Sugar-based plate-like nanoparticles of 20-40 nm hydrodynamic size have been synthesized by simple heating of acidic aqueous solution of glucose/sucrose/maltose/trehalose. These nanoparticles have excitation-dependent green/yellow/orange emission and surface chemistry identical to the respective sugar molecule. Fibrillation of lysozyme/insulin/amyloid beta in extracellular space, aggregation of mutant huntingtin protein inside model neuronal cell, and cytotoxic effect of fibrils are investigated in the presence of these sugar nanoparticles. We found that sugar nanoparticles are 10 2 -10 5 times efficient than respective sugar molecules in inhibiting protein fibrillation and preventing cytotoxicity arising of fibrils. We propose that better performance of the nanoparticle form is linked to its stronger binding with fibril structure and enhanced cell uptake. This result suggests that nanoparticle form of osmolyte can be an attractive option in prevention and curing of protein aggregation-derived diseases.

  17. Nanoparticle-Encapsulated Curcumin Inhibits Diabetic Neuropathic Pain Involving the P2Y12 Receptor in the Dorsal Root Ganglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianyu Jia

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic peripheral neuropathy results in diabetic neuropathic pain (DNP. Satellite glial cells (SGCs enwrap the neuronal soma in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG. The purinergic 2 (P2 Y12 receptor is expressed on SGCs in the DRG. SGC activation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of DNP. Curcumin has anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. Because curcumin has poor metabolic stability in vivo and low bioavailability, nanoparticle-encapsulated curcumin was used to improve its targeting and bioavailability. In the present study, our aim was to investigate the effects of nanoparticle-encapsulated curcumin on DNP mediated by the P2Y12 receptor on SGCs in the rat DRG. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy increased the expression levels of the P2Y12 receptor on SGCs in the DRG and enhanced mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in rats with diabetes mellitus (DM. Up-regulation of the P2Y12 receptor in SGCs in the DRG increased the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Up-regulation of interleukin-1β (IL-1β and connexin43 (Cx43 resulted in mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in rats with DM. The nanoparticle-encapsulated curcumin decreased up-regulated IL-1β and Cx43 expression and reduced levels of phosphorylated-Akt (p-Akt in the DRG of rats with DM. The up-regulation of P2Y12 on SGCs and the up-regulation of the IL-1β and Cx43 in the DRG indicated the activation of SGCs in the DRG. The nano-curcumin treatment inhibited the activation of SGCs accompanied by its anti-inflammatory effect to decrease the up-regulated CGRP expression in the DRG neurons. Therefore, the nanoparticle-encapsulated curcumin treatment decreased the up-regulation of the P2Y12 receptor on SGCs in the DRG and decreased mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in rats with DM.

  18. Nanoparticles and Ethylene Diamine Tetra Acetic Acid on Growth Inhibition of Standard Strain of Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Haghighi

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: In recent years, the incidence of opportunistic fungi has shown a marked increase. Infection caused by common pathogenic fungi is a significant health problem in immune compromised hosts. The present study evaluated antifungal activity of Titanum dioxide nanoparticles and Ethylene Diamine Tetra-acetic Acid against Candida albicans as self-cleaning agent by standard micro dilution test. Materials & Methods: The present study was conducted at the Medical University of Tarbiyat Modares in 2009. TiO2 nanoparticles were obtained through the hydrolysis of TiCl4 (Titanium tetrachloride. Size and type of these nanoparticles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and X-Ray-Diffraction (XRD. Afterwards, the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC and Minimal Fungicide Concentration (MFC test for TiO2 and EDTA were performed. Results: Concentration of synthesised TiO2 was 7.03 mg/ml and 5.63 5.63 ×1020 particles/ml. Evaluation of morphology and diameter of the TiO2 nanoparticles with SEM showed that nanoparticles were spherical with diameter between 40-65 nm. MIC50 of 2.2, 1.24 and 0.125 µg/ml respectively. MIC90 and MFC of TiO2, EDTA and fluconazole were 3.51, 2.48 , 0.5 µg/ml and 4.06, 3.1 ,1 µg/ml respectively. Conclusion: In the present study, using of synthesized TiO2 nanoparticles with chemical method showed a suitable activity against Candida in comparison with Fluconazole. Thus it might represent a good candidates in elimination of Candida in medical from medical devices. Key Words:

  19. Silver nanoparticles inhibit the function of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 and target genes: insight into the cytotoxicity and antiangiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang T

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Tieshan Yang,1 Qian Yao,1 Fei Cao,1 Qianqian Liu,1 Binlei Liu,2 Xiu-Hong Wang1 1Laboratory for Biomedical Photonics, Institute of Laser Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, 2Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1 is a transcription factor that is activated upon exposure to hypoxic stress. It modulates a number of cellular responses including proliferation, apoptosis, angiogenesis, and metabolism by activating a panel of target genes in response to hypoxia. The HIF-1 level is often upregulated in the hypoxic microenvironment of solid tumors, which contributes to cancer treatment failure. Here we report that silver nanoparticles (AgNPs, which are widely used as an antimicrobial agent, are an effective inhibitor of HIF-1. AgNPs inhibited the activation of a HIF-dependent reporter construct after the cells were exposed to hypoxic conditions or treated with cobalt chloride, a hypoxia mimetic agent. The AgNPs also interfered with the accumulation of HIF-1α protein and the induction of the endogenous HIF target genes, VEGF-A and GLUT1. Since both HIF-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor-A play an important role in angiogenesis, AgNPs also inhibited angiogenesis in vitro. Our data reveal a new mechanism of how AgNPs act on cellular function, that is, they disrupt HIF signaling pathway. This finding provides a novel insight into how AgNPs can inhibit cancer cell growth and angiogenesis. Keywords: silver nanoparticles (AgNPs, hypoxia-inducible factor, transcriptional activity, vascular endothelial growth factor-A, angiogenesis

  20. Positively charged biopolymeric nanoparticles for the inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chronopoulou, Laura [University of Rome La Sapienza, Department of Chemistry (Italy); Di Domenico, Enea Gino [IRCCS, Department of Clinical Pathology and Microbiology, San Gallicano Institute (Italy); Ascenzioni, Fiorentina [University of Rome La Sapienza, Department of Biology and Biotechnology C. Darwin (Italy); Palocci, Cleofe, E-mail: cleofe.palocci@uniroma1.it [University of Rome La Sapienza, Department of Chemistry (Italy)

    2016-10-15

    Currently, many microbial infections have the potential to become lethal owing to the development of antimicrobial resistance by means of different mechanisms and mainly on the basis of the fact that many drugs are unable to reach therapeutic levels in the target sites. This requires the use of high doses and frequent administrations, causing adverse side effects or in some cases toxicity. The use of nanoparticle systems could help overcome such problems and increase drug efficacy. In the present study, we developed a new drug delivery system based on the use of biopolymeric nanovectors loaded with tobramycin (Tb), which is the standard antibiotic for the treatment of Cystic Fibrosis-associated P. aeruginosa lung infections. Tb-loaded biopolymeric nanoparticles composed by dextran sulfate (DS) and chitosan (CS) were prepared by ionotropic gelation. We optimized drug entrapment in DS/CS nanoparticles, obtaining particles of 170 nm and with a drug loading of 400 µg Tb/mg of nanoparticles. In accord with in vitro release experiments, such preparations were able to release approximately 25 % of their cargo in 60 h. In vitro, the antimicrobial efficacy of the drug delivery system on P. aeruginosa biofilm was tested and compared to the effects of free drug revealing that this formulation can reduce the viability of P. aeruginosa biofilms for 48 h with a single-dose administration.

  1. Positively charged biopolymeric nanoparticles for the inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chronopoulou, Laura; Di Domenico, Enea Gino; Ascenzioni, Fiorentina; Palocci, Cleofe

    2016-01-01

    Currently, many microbial infections have the potential to become lethal owing to the development of antimicrobial resistance by means of different mechanisms and mainly on the basis of the fact that many drugs are unable to reach therapeutic levels in the target sites. This requires the use of high doses and frequent administrations, causing adverse side effects or in some cases toxicity. The use of nanoparticle systems could help overcome such problems and increase drug efficacy. In the present study, we developed a new drug delivery system based on the use of biopolymeric nanovectors loaded with tobramycin (Tb), which is the standard antibiotic for the treatment of Cystic Fibrosis-associated P. aeruginosa lung infections. Tb-loaded biopolymeric nanoparticles composed by dextran sulfate (DS) and chitosan (CS) were prepared by ionotropic gelation. We optimized drug entrapment in DS/CS nanoparticles, obtaining particles of 170 nm and with a drug loading of 400 µg Tb/mg of nanoparticles. In accord with in vitro release experiments, such preparations were able to release approximately 25 % of their cargo in 60 h. In vitro, the antimicrobial efficacy of the drug delivery system on P. aeruginosa biofilm was tested and compared to the effects of free drug revealing that this formulation can reduce the viability of P. aeruginosa biofilms for 48 h with a single-dose administration.

  2. Cerium oxide nanoparticles inhibit lipopolysaccharide induced MAP kinase/NF-kB mediated severe sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vellaisamy Selvaraj

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The life threatening disease of sepsis is associated with high mortality. Septic patient survivability with currently available treatments has failed to improve. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether lipopolysaccharide (LPS induced sepsis mortality and associated hepatic dysfunction can be prevented by cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO2NPs treatment in male Sprague Dawley rats. Here we provide the information about the methods processing of raw data related to our study published in Biomaterials (Selvaraj et al., Biomaterials, 2015, In press and Data in Brief (Selvaraj et al., Data in Brief, 2015, In Press. The data present here provides confirmation of cerium oxide nanoparticle treatments ability to prevent the LPS induced sepsis associated changes in physiological, blood cell count, inflammatory protein and growth factors in vivo. In vitro assays investigation the treated of macrophages cells with different concentrations of cerium oxide nanoparticle demonstrate that concentration of cerium oxide nanoparticles below 1 µg/ml did not significantly influence cell survival as determined by the MTT assay.

  3. Inclusion of the helper lipid dioleoyl-phosphatidylethanolamine in solid lipid nanoparticles inhibits their transfection efficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jesus, Marcelo B.; Radaic, Allan; Hinrichs, Wouter L J; Ferreira, Carmen V; de Paula, Eneida; Hoekstra, Dirk; Zuhorn, Inge S

    Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) are a promising system for the delivery of lipophilic and hydrophilic drugs. They consist of a solid lipid core that is stabilized by a layer of surfactants. By the incorporation of cationic lipids in the formulation, positively charged SLNs can be generated, that

  4. Positively charged biopolymeric nanoparticles for the inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronopoulou, Laura; Di Domenico, Enea Gino; Ascenzioni, Fiorentina; Palocci, Cleofe

    2016-10-01

    Currently, many microbial infections have the potential to become lethal owing to the development of antimicrobial resistance by means of different mechanisms and mainly on the basis of the fact that many drugs are unable to reach therapeutic levels in the target sites. This requires the use of high doses and frequent administrations, causing adverse side effects or in some cases toxicity. The use of nanoparticle systems could help overcome such problems and increase drug efficacy. In the present study, we developed a new drug delivery system based on the use of biopolymeric nanovectors loaded with tobramycin (Tb), which is the standard antibiotic for the treatment of Cystic Fibrosis-associated P. aeruginosa lung infections. Tb-loaded biopolymeric nanoparticles composed by dextran sulfate (DS) and chitosan (CS) were prepared by ionotropic gelation. We optimized drug entrapment in DS/CS nanoparticles, obtaining particles of 170 nm and with a drug loading of 400 µg Tb/mg of nanoparticles. In accord with in vitro release experiments, such preparations were able to release approximately 25 % of their cargo in 60 h. In vitro, the antimicrobial efficacy of the drug delivery system on P. aeruginosa biofilm was tested and compared to the effects of free drug revealing that this formulation can reduce the viability of P. aeruginosa biofilms for 48 h with a single-dose administration.

  5. Release Profile and Inhibition Test of The Nanoparticles A. Paniculata Extract as Inhibitor of α-Glucosidase in The Process of Carbohydrates Breakdown Into Glucose Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imansari, Farisa; Sahlan, Muhammad; Arbianti, Rita

    2017-07-01

    Andrographis paniculata (A.paniculata) contain the main active substances Andrographolide which helps lower glucose levels in diabetics by inhibiting the enzyme α-glucosidase. The ability of the extract A.paniculata in lowering glucose levels will increase with the technique encapsulation with a coating of composition Chitosan-STPP as a drug delivery to the target organ. This study aimed to get an overview of A.paniculata release profile of nanoparticles in a synthetic fluid media with various concentrations of coating and inhibition testing nasty shard extract in inhibiting the enzyme α-glucosidase. This research resulted in nanoparticles by coating efficiency and loading capacity of chitosan greatest variation of 2% and 1% STPP 60% and 46.29%. chitosan greatest variation of 2% and 1% STPP 60% and 46.29%. The ability of A.paniculata extracts as α-glucosidase enzyme inhibitors has been demonstrated in this study, the percent inhibition of 33.17%.

  6. Chitosan-coated doxorubicin nano-particles drug delivery system inhibits cell growth of liver cancer via p53/PRC1 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Bai-Liang; Zheng, Ru; Ruan, Xiao-Jiao; Zheng, Zhi-Hai; Cai, Hua-Jie

    2018-01-01

    Nano-particles have been widely used in target-specific drug delivery system and showed advantages in cancers treatment. This study aims to evaluate the effect of chitosan coated doxorubicin nano-particles drug delivery system in liver cancer. The chitosan nano-particles were prepared by using the ionic gelation method. The characterizations of the nano-particles were determined by transmission electron microscopy. The cytotoxicity was detected by MTT assay, and the endocytosis, cell apoptosis and cell cycle were examined by flow cytometry. The protein level was analyzed with western blot. The dual luciferase reporter assay was performed to assess the interaction between p53 and the promoter of PRC1, and chromatin immune-precipitation was used to verify the binding between them. The FA-CS-DOX nano-particles were irregular and spherical particles around 30-40 nm, with uniform size and no adhesion. No significant difference was noted in doxorubicin release rate between CS-DOX and FA-CS-DOX. FA-CS-DOX nano-particles showed stronger cytotoxicity than CS-DOX. FA-CS-DOX nano-particles promoted the apoptosis and arrested cell cycle at G2/M phase, and they up-regulated p53. FA-CS-DOX nano-particles inhibited cell survival through p53/PRC1 pathway. Chitosan-coated doxorubicin nano-particles drug delivery system inhibits cell growth of liver cancer by promoting apoptosis and arresting cell cycle at G2/M phase through p53/PRC1 pathway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Detention of copper by sulfur nanoparticles inhibits the proliferation of A375 malignant melanoma and MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hao [Department of Chemistry, Jinan University, Guangzhou (China); Zhang, Yikai [Institute of Hematology, Jinan University, Guangzhou (China); Zheng, Shanyuan [School of Life Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Weng, Zeping; Ma, Jun [First Affiliated Hospital, Jinan University, Guangzhou (China); Li, Yangqiu [Institute of Hematology, Jinan University, Guangzhou (China); First Affiliated Hospital, Jinan University, Guangzhou (China); Key Laboratory for Regenerative Medicine of Ministry of Education, Jinan University, Guangzhou, 510632 (China); Xie, Xinyuan [Department of Chemistry, Jinan University, Guangzhou (China); Zheng, Wenjie, E-mail: tzhwj@jnu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Jinan University, Guangzhou (China)

    2016-09-02

    Selective induction of cell death or growth inhibition of cancer cells is the future of chemotherapy. Clinical trials have found that cancer tissues are enriched with copper. Based on this finding, many copper-containing compounds and complexes have been designed to “copper” cancer cells using copper as bait. However, recent studies have demonstrated that copper boosts tumor development, and copper deprivation from serum was shown to effectively inhibit the promotion of cancer. Mechanistically, copper is an essential cofactor for mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/extracellular activating kinase (ERK) kinase (MEK), a central molecule in the BRAF/MEK/ERK pathway. Therefore, depleting copper from cancer cells by directly sequestering copper has a wider field for research and potential for combination therapy. Based on the affinity between sulfur and copper, we therefore designed sulfur nanoparticles (Nano-S) that detain copper, achieving tumor growth restriction. We found that spherical Nano-S could effectively bind copper and form a tighter surficial structure. Moreover, this Nano-S detention of copper effectively inhibited the proliferation of A375 melanoma and MCF-7 breast cancer cells with minimum toxicity to normal cells. Mechanistic studies revealed that Nano-S triggered inactivation of the MEK-ERK pathway followed by inhibition of the proliferation of the A375 and MCF-7 cells. In addition, lower Nano-S concentrations and shorter exposure stimulated the expression of a copper transporter as compensation, which further increased the cellular uptake and anticancer activities of cisplatin. Collectively, our results highlight the potential of Nano-S as an anticancer agent or adjuvant through its detention of copper. - Highlights: • Nano-S selectively inhibited the mitosis of A375 and MCF-7 cells by depleting copper. • Nano-S inactivated MEK/ERK pathway through the detention of copper. • Nano-S improved the cellular uptake and anticancer activities

  8. Detention of copper by sulfur nanoparticles inhibits the proliferation of A375 malignant melanoma and MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Hao; Zhang, Yikai; Zheng, Shanyuan; Weng, Zeping; Ma, Jun; Li, Yangqiu; Xie, Xinyuan; Zheng, Wenjie

    2016-01-01

    Selective induction of cell death or growth inhibition of cancer cells is the future of chemotherapy. Clinical trials have found that cancer tissues are enriched with copper. Based on this finding, many copper-containing compounds and complexes have been designed to “copper” cancer cells using copper as bait. However, recent studies have demonstrated that copper boosts tumor development, and copper deprivation from serum was shown to effectively inhibit the promotion of cancer. Mechanistically, copper is an essential cofactor for mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/extracellular activating kinase (ERK) kinase (MEK), a central molecule in the BRAF/MEK/ERK pathway. Therefore, depleting copper from cancer cells by directly sequestering copper has a wider field for research and potential for combination therapy. Based on the affinity between sulfur and copper, we therefore designed sulfur nanoparticles (Nano-S) that detain copper, achieving tumor growth restriction. We found that spherical Nano-S could effectively bind copper and form a tighter surficial structure. Moreover, this Nano-S detention of copper effectively inhibited the proliferation of A375 melanoma and MCF-7 breast cancer cells with minimum toxicity to normal cells. Mechanistic studies revealed that Nano-S triggered inactivation of the MEK-ERK pathway followed by inhibition of the proliferation of the A375 and MCF-7 cells. In addition, lower Nano-S concentrations and shorter exposure stimulated the expression of a copper transporter as compensation, which further increased the cellular uptake and anticancer activities of cisplatin. Collectively, our results highlight the potential of Nano-S as an anticancer agent or adjuvant through its detention of copper. - Highlights: • Nano-S selectively inhibited the mitosis of A375 and MCF-7 cells by depleting copper. • Nano-S inactivated MEK/ERK pathway through the detention of copper. • Nano-S improved the cellular uptake and anticancer activities

  9. Silver nanoparticles inhibit the function of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 and target genes: insight into the cytotoxicity and antiangiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tieshan; Yao, Qian; Cao, Fei; Liu, Qianqian; Liu, Binlei; Wang, Xiu-Hong

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is a transcription factor that is activated upon exposure to hypoxic stress. It modulates a number of cellular responses including proliferation, apoptosis, angiogenesis, and metabolism by activating a panel of target genes in response to hypoxia. The HIF-1 level is often upregulated in the hypoxic microenvironment of solid tumors, which contributes to cancer treatment failure. Here we report that silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), which are widely used as an antimicrobial agent, are an effective inhibitor of HIF-1. AgNPs inhibited the activation of a HIF-dependent reporter construct after the cells were exposed to hypoxic conditions or treated with cobalt chloride, a hypoxia mimetic agent. The AgNPs also interfered with the accumulation of HIF-1α protein and the induction of the endogenous HIF target genes, VEGF-A and GLUT1. Since both HIF-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor-A play an important role in angiogenesis, AgNPs also inhibited angiogenesis in vitro. Our data reveal a new mechanism of how AgNPs act on cellular function, that is, they disrupt HIF signaling pathway. This finding provides a novel insight into how AgNPs can inhibit cancer cell growth and angiogenesis.

  10. Innovative approach for urease inhibition by Ficus carica extract-fabricated silver nanoparticles: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borase, Hemant P; Salunkhe, Rahul B; Patil, Chandrashekhar D; Suryawanshi, Rahul K; Salunke, Bipinchandra K; Wagh, Nilesh D; Patil, Satish V

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, a rapid, low-cost, and ecofriendly method of stable silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) synthesis using leaves extract of Ficus carica (F. carica), a plant with diverse metabolic consortium, is reported for the first time. An absorption peak at 422 nm in UV-Vis spectroscopy, a spherical shape with an average size of 21 nm in transmission electron microscopy, and crystalline nature in X-ray powder diffraction studies were observed for the synthesized AgNPs. Fourier transform infrared analysis indicated that proteins of F. carica might have a vital role in AgNP synthesis and stabilization. AgNPs were found to inhibit urease, a key enzyme responsible for the survival and pathogenesis of the bacterium, Helicobacter pylori. Inhibition of urease by AgNPs was monitored spectrophotometrically by the evaluation of ammonia release. The urease inhibition potential of AgNPs can be explored in the treatment of H. pylori by preparing novel combinations of standard drugs with AgNPs- or AgNPs-encapsulated drug molecules. © 2015 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Mixed metal oxide nanoparticles inhibit growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis into THP-1 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A R Jafari

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Although Ag NPs exhibited low cytotoxicity, they were unable to inhibit Mtb growth in vitro. ZnO NPs exhibited strong anti-Mtb activity and inhibited bacterial growth, but exhibited high cytotoxicity to human macrophage cells. By mixing Ag and ZnO NPs at a ratio of 8ZnO/2Ag, we acquired a mixture that exhibited potent antibacterial activity against Mtb and no cytotoxic effects on THP-1 cells, resulting in inhibition of both in vitro and ex vivo Mtb growth [Figure 1],[Figure 2],[Figure 3], [Table 1],[Table 2],[Table 3].{Figure 1}{Figure 2}{Figure 3} {Table 1}{Table 2}{Table 3}

  12. Combined Effects of Boron and NaCl on Wheat Seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHEN Mei-nan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the combined effects of boron(Band NaCl on the growth of wheat, a pot experiment was conducted using wheat (Triticum aestivum Linn.seedlings. Boron concentrations of culture medium were set as 0, 50 mg·kg-1 and 100 mg·kg-1, and NaCl concentrations were 0, 1 g·kg-1 and 2 g·kg-1. The results showed that both boron and NaCl could significantly inhibit wheat growth. At 50 mg B·kg-1, NaCl aggravated growth inhibition caused by boron. At 100 mg B·kg-1, however, NaCl alleviated the inhibition caused by boron. The combined stress of boron and NaCl significantly increased the root to shoot ratio of wheat. NaCl inhibited the uptake of boron by wheat. It suggests that under severe boron stress, NaCl is able to alleviate boron toxicity in wheat by increasing root to shoot ratio and reducing boron uptake.

  13. Inhibition of pathogenic bacterial growth on excision wound by green synthesized copper oxide nanoparticles leads to accelerated wound healing activity in Wistar Albino rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, Renu; Baskaran, Athmanathan; Shivashangari, Kanchi Subramanian; Ravikumar, Vilwanathan

    2015-07-01

    An impaired wound healing is one of the major health related problem in diabetic and non-diabetic patients around the globe. The pathogenic bacteria play a predominant role in delayed wound healing, owing to interaction in the wound area. In our previous work we developed green chemistry mediated copper oxide nanoparticles using Ficus religiosa leaf extract. In the present study we make an attempt to evaluate the anti-bacterial, and wound healing activity of green synthesized copper oxide nanoparticles in male Wistar Albino rats. The agar well diffusion assay revealed copper oxide nanoparticles have substantial inhibition activity against human pathogenic strains such as Klebsiella pneumoniae, Shigella dysenteriae, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli, which were responsible for delayed wound healing process. Furthermore, the analyses results of wound closure, histopathology and protein profiling confirmed that the F. religiosa leaf extract tailored copper oxide nanoparticles have enhanced wound healing activity in Wistar Albino rats.

  14. Characterization and Molecular Mechanism of Peptide-Conjugated Gold Nanoparticle Inhibiting p53-HDM2 Interaction in Retinoblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushma Kalmodia

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Inhibition of the interaction between p53 and HDM2 is an effective therapeutic strategy in cancers that harbor a wild-type p53 protein such as retinoblastoma (RB. Nanoparticle-based delivery of therapeutic molecules has been shown to be advantageous in localized delivery, including to the eye, by overcoming ocular barriers. In this study, we utilized biocompatible gold nanoparticles (GNPs to deliver anti-HDM2 peptide to RB cells. Characterization studies suggested that GNP-HDM2 was stable in biologically relevant solvents and had optimal cellular internalization capability, the primary requirement of any therapeutic molecule. GNP-HDM2 treatment in RB cells in vitro suggested that they function by arresting RB cells at the G2M phase of the cell cycle and initiating apoptosis. Analysis of molecular changes in GNP-HDM2-treated cells by qRT-PCR and western blotting revealed that the p53 protein was upregulated; however, transactivation of its downstream targets was minimal, except for the PUMA-BCl2 and Bax axis. Global gene expression and in silico bioinformatic analysis of GNP-HDM2-treated cells suggested that upregulation of p53 might presumptively mediate apoptosis through the induction of p53-inducible miRNAs.

  15. Inhibition of bacterial growth by iron oxide nanoparticles with and without attached drug: Have we conquered the antibiotic resistance problem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armijo, Leisha M.; Jain, Priyanka; Malagodi, Angelina; Fornelli, F. Zuly; Hayat, Allison; Rivera, Antonio C.; French, Michael; Smyth, Hugh D. C.; Osiński, Marek

    2015-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is among the top three leading causative opportunistic human pathogens, possessing one of the largest bacterial genomes and an exceptionally large proportion of regulatory genes therein. It has been known for more than a decade that the size and complexity of the P. aeruginosa genome is responsible for the adaptability and resilience of the bacteria to include its ability to resist many disinfectants and antibiotics. We have investigated the susceptibility of P. aeruginosa bacterial biofilms to iron oxide (magnetite) nanoparticles (NPs) with and without attached drug (tobramycin). We also characterized the susceptibility of zero-valent iron NPs, which are known to inactivate microbes. The particles, having an average diameter of 16 nm were capped with natural alginate, thus doubling the hydrodynamic size. Nanoparticle-drug conjugates were produced via cross-linking drug and alginate functional groups. Drug conjugates were investigated in the interest of determining dosage, during these dosage-curve experiments, NPs unbound to drug were tested in cultures as a negative control. Surprisingly, we found that the iron oxide NPs inhibited bacterial growth, and thus, biofilm formation without the addition of antibiotic drug. The inhibitory dosages of iron oxide NPs were investigated and the minimum inhibitory concentrations are presented. These findings suggest that NP-drug conjugates may overcome the antibiotic drug resistance common in P. aeruginosa infections.

  16. Magnetic nanoparticle-mediated hyperthermia therapy induces tumour growth inhibition by apoptosis and Hsp90/AKT modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetake, Neena G; Kumar, Amit; Gaikwad, Snehal; Ray, Pritha; Desai, Sejal; Ningthoujam, Raghumani Singh; Vatsa, Rajesh Kumar; Pandey, Badri N

    2015-01-01

    We have evaluated the hyperthermia efficacy of oleic acid-functionalised Fe(3)O(4) magnetic nanoparticles (MN-OA) under in vivo conditions and elucidated the underlying mechanism of tumour growth inhibition. The efficacy and mechanism of tumour growth inhibition by MN-OA-mediated magnetic hyperthermia therapy (MHT) was evaluated in a murine fibrosarcoma tumour model (WEHI-164) using techniques such as TUNEL assay, Western blotting (WB), immunofluorescence (IF) staining and histopathological examination. In addition, bio-distribution of MN-OA in tumour/other target organs and its effect on normal organ function were studied by Prussian blue staining and serum biochemical analysis, respectively. MN-OA-induced MHT resulted in significant inhibition of tumour growth as determined by measurement of tumour volume, as well as by in vivo imaging of tumour derived from luciferase-transfected WEHI-164 cells. Histopathology analysis showed presence of severe apoptosis and reduced tumour cells proliferation, which was further confirmed by TUNEL assay, reduced expression of Ki-67 and enhanced level of cleaved caspase-3, in tumours treated with MHT. Moreover, expression of heat stress marker, Hsp90 and its client protein, AKT/PKB was reduced by ∼50 and 80%, respectively, in tumours treated with MHT as studied by WB and IF staining. Serum analysis suggested insignificant toxicity of MN-OA (in terms of liver and kidney function), which was further correlated with minimal accumulation of MN-OA in target organs. These results suggest the involvement of apoptosis and Hsp90/AKT modulation in MN-OA-mediated MHT-induced tumour growth inhibition.

  17. Interaction of TiO2 nanoparticles with the marine microalga Nitzschia closterium: Growth inhibition, oxidative stress and internalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia, Bin; Chen, Bijuan; Sun, Xuemei; Qu, Keming; Ma, Feifei; Du, Meirong

    2015-01-01

    The toxicity of TiO 2 engineered nanoparticles (NPs) to the marine microalga Nitzschia closterium was investigated by examining growth inhibition, oxidative stress and uptake. The results indicated that the toxicity of TiO 2 particles to algal cells significantly increased with decreasing nominal particle size, which was evidenced by the 96 EC 50 values of 88.78, 118.80 and 179.05 mg/L for 21 nm, 60 nm and 400 nm TiO 2 particles, respectively. The growth rate was significantly inhibited when the alga was exposed to 5 mg/L TiO 2 NPs (21 nm). Measurements of antioxidant enzyme activities showed that superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and peroxidase (POD) activities were first induced and subsequently inhibited following exposure to 5 mg/L TiO 2 NPs. The depletion of antioxidant enzymes with a concomitant increase in malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and reactive oxygen species (ROS) posed a hazard to membrane integrity. A combination of flow cytometry analysis, transmission electron microscopy and Ti content measurement indicated that TiO 2 NPs were internalized in N. closterium cells. The level of extracellular ROS, which was induced by TiO 2 NPs under visible light, was negligible when compared with the intracellular ROS level (accounting for less than 6.0% of the total ROS level). These findings suggest that elevated TiO 2 nanotoxicity in marine environments is related to increased ROS levels caused by internalization of TiO 2 NPs. - Highlights: • Inhibition of marine microalgae by TiO 2 NPs and bulk particles was evaluated. • Aggregation of TiO 2 NPs and bulk particles was observed in marine algal test medium. • TiO 2 NPs induced damage to algal cell membranes as detected by flow cytometry. • Increased TiO 2 nanotoxicity to algal cells was caused by internalization of NPs

  18. Curcumin induces chemo/radio-sensitization in ovarian cancer cells and curcumin nanoparticles inhibit ovarian cancer cell growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yallapu Murali M

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemo/radio-resistance is a major obstacle in treating advanced ovarian cancer. The efficacy of current treatments may be improved by increasing the sensitivity of cancer cells to chemo/radiation therapies. Curcumin is a naturally occurring compound with anti-cancer activity in multiple cancers; however, its chemo/radio-sensitizing potential is not well studied in ovarian cancer. Herein, we demonstrate the effectiveness of a curcumin pre-treatment strategy for chemo/radio-sensitizing cisplatin resistant ovarian cancer cells. To improve the efficacy and specificity of curcumin induced chemo/radio sensitization, we developed a curcumin nanoparticle formulation conjugated with a monoclonal antibody specific for cancer cells. Methods Cisplatin resistant A2780CP ovarian cancer cells were pre-treated with curcumin followed by exposure to cisplatin or radiation and the effect on cell growth was determined by MTS and colony formation assays. The effect of curcumin pre-treatment on the expression of apoptosis related proteins and β-catenin was determined by Western blotting or Flow Cytometry. A luciferase reporter assay was used to determine the effect of curcumin on β-catenin transcription activity. The poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid (PLGA nanoparticle formulation of curcumin (Nano-CUR was developed by a modified nano-precipitation method and physico-chemical characterization was performed by transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering methods. Results Curcumin pre-treatment considerably reduced the dose of cisplatin and radiation required to inhibit the growth of cisplatin resistant ovarian cancer cells. During the 6 hr pre-treatment, curcumin down regulated the expression of Bcl-XL and Mcl-1 pro-survival proteins. Curcumin pre-treatment followed by exposure to low doses of cisplatin increased apoptosis as indicated by annexin V staining and cleavage of caspase 9 and PARP. Additionally, curcumin pre

  19. Collagen-based silver nanoparticles: Study on cell viability, skin permeation, and swelling inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Vinicius Saura; de Carvalho Filgueiras, Marcelo; Dutra, Yago Medeiros; Teles, Ramon Handerson Gomes; de Araújo, Alyne Rodrigues; Primo, Fernando Lucas; Mafud, Ana Carolina; Batista, Larissa Fernandes; Mascarenhas, Yvonne Primerano; Paino, Iêda Maria Martinez; Zucolotto, Valtencir; Tedesco, Antonio Claudio; Silva, Durcilene Alves; Leite, José Roberto S A; Dos Santos, José Ribeiro

    2017-05-01

    Collagen is considered the most abundant protein in the animal kingdom, comprising 30% of the total amount of proteins and 6% of the human body by weight. Studies that examine the interaction between silver nanoparticles and proteins have been highlighted in the literature in order to understand the stability of the nanoparticle system, the effects observed in biological systems, and the appearance of new chemical pharmaceutical products. The objective of this study was to analyze the behavior of silver nanoparticles stabilized with collagen (AgNPcol) and to check the skin permeation capacity and action in paw edema induced by carrageenan. AgNPcol synthesis was carried out using solutions of reducing agent sodium borohydride (NaBH 4 ), silver nitrate (AgNO 3 ) and collagen. Characterization was done by using dynamic light scattering (DLS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) and AFM. Cellular viability testing was performed by using flow cytometry in human melanoma cancer (MV3) and murine fibroblast (L929) cells. The skin permeation study was conducted using a Franz diffusion cell, and the efficiency of AgNPcol against the formation of paw edema in mice was evaluated. The hydrodynamic diameter and zeta potential of AgNPcol were 140.7±7.8nm and 20.1±0.7mV, respectively. AgNPcol failed to induce early apoptosis, late apoptosis, and necrosis in L929 cells; however, it exhibited enhanced toxicity in cancer cells (MV3) compared to normal cells (L929). AgNPcol demonstrated increased toxicological effects in cancer MV3 cells, promoting skin permeation, and preventing paw edema. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Targeted Delivery of Glucan Particle Encapsulated Gallium Nanoparticles Inhibits HIV Growth in Human Macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Soto, Ernesto R.; O'Connell, Olivia; Dikengil, Fusun; Peters, Paul J.; Clapham, Paul R.; Ostroff, Gary R.

    2016-01-01

    Glucan particles (GPs) are hollow, porous 3–5 μm microspheres derived from the cell walls of Baker’s yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). The 1,3-β-glucan outer shell provides for receptor-mediated uptake by phagocytic cells expressing β-glucan receptors. GPs have been used for macrophage-targeted delivery of a wide range of payloads (DNA, siRNA, protein, small molecules, and nanoparticles) encapsulated inside the hollow GPs or bound to the surface of chemically derivatized GPs. Gallium nanopart...

  1. Adsorption and inhibition of CuO nanoparticles on Arabidopsis thaliana root

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lina

    2018-02-01

    CuO NPs, the size ranging from 20 to 80 nm were used to detect the adsorption and inhibition on the Arabidopsis thaliana roots. In this study, CuO NPs were adsorbed and agglomerated on the surface of root top after exposed for 7 days. With the increasing of CuO NPs concentrations, CuO NPs also adsorbed on the meristernatic zone. The growth of Arabidopsis thaliana lateral roots were also inhibited by CuO NPs exposure. The Inhibition were concentration dependent. The number of root top were 246, 188 and 123 per Arabidopsis thaliana, respectively. The number of root tops after CuO NPs exposure were significantly decreased compared with control groups. This results suggested the phytotoxicity of CuO NPs on Arabidopsis thaliana roots.

  2. Update on human health effects of boron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Forrest H

    2014-10-01

    In vitro, animal, and human experiments have shown that boron is a bioactive element in nutritional amounts that beneficially affects bone growth and central nervous system function, alleviates arthritic symptoms, facilitates hormone action and is associated with a reduced risk for some types of cancer. The diverse effects of boron suggest that it influences the formation and/or activity of substances that are involved in numerous biochemical processes. Several findings suggest that this influence is through the formation of boroesters in biomolecules containing cis-hydroxyl groups. These biomolecules include those that contain ribose (e.g., S-adenosylmethionine, diadenosine phosphates, and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide). In addition, boron may form boroester complexes with phosphoinositides, glycoproteins, and glycolipids that affect cell membrane integrity and function. Both animal and human data indicate that an intake of less than 1.0mg/day inhibits the health benefits of boron. Dietary surveys indicate such an intake is not rare. Thus, increasing boron intake by consuming a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, nuts and pulses should be recognized as a reasonable dietary recommendation to enhance health and well-being. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  3. Trichophyton rubrum is inhibited by free and nanoparticle encapsulated curcumin by induction of nitrosative stress after photodynamic activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludmila Matos Baltazar

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial photodynamic inhibition (aPI utilizes radical stress generated from the excitation of a photosensitizer (PS with light to destroy pathogens. Its use against Trichophyton rubrum, a dermatophytic fungus with increasing incidence and resistance, has not been well characterized. Our aim was to evaluate the mechanism of action of aPI against T. rubrum using curcumin as the PS in both free and nanoparticle (curc-np form. Nanocarriers stabilize curcumin and allow for enhanced solubility and PS delivery. Curcumin aPI, at optimal conditions of 10 μg/mL of PS with 10 J/cm² of blue light (417 ± 5 nm, completely inhibited fungal growth (p<0.0001 via induction of reactive oxygen (ROS and nitrogen species (RNS, which was associated with fungal death by apoptosis. Interestingly, only scavengers of RNS impeded aPI efficacy, suggesting that curcumin acts potently via a nitrosative pathway. The curc-np induced greater NO˙ expression and enhanced apoptosis of fungal cells, highlighting curc-np aPI as a potential treatment for T. rubrum skin infections.

  4. Inhibition of various gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria growth on selenium nanoparticle coated paper towels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Larese-Casanova, Philip; Webster, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    There are wide spread bacterial contamination issues on various paper products, such as paper towels hanging in sink splash zones or those used to clean surfaces, filter papers used in water and air purifying systems, and wrappings used in the food industry; such contamination may lead to the potential spread of bacteria and consequent severe health concerns. In this study, selenium nanoparticles were coated on normal paper towel surfaces through a quick precipitation method, introducing antibacterial properties to the paper towels in a healthy way. Their effectiveness at preventing biofilm formation was tested in bacterial assays involving Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus epidermidis. The results showed significant and continuous bacteria inhibition with about a 90% reduction from 24 to 72 hours for gram-positive bacteria including S. aureus and S. epidermidis. The selenium coated paper towels also showed significant inhibition of gram-negative bacteria like P. aeruginosa and E. coli growth at about 57% and 84%, respectively, after 72 hours of treatment. Therefore, this study established a promising selenium-based antibacterial strategy to prevent bacterial growth on paper products, which may lead to the avoidance of bacteria spreading and consequent severe health concerns.

  5. Biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles usingArtemisia annuacallus for inhibiting stem-end bacteria in cut carnation flowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Qian Hua; Zheng, Li Ping; Zhao, Pei Fei; Wang, Jian Wen

    2017-03-01

    A biological method for synthesising silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) was developed using the callus extracts from Artemisia annua L. under sunlight at 25,000 lx. The AgNPs were characterised using transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscope, X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The AgNPs were mostly spherical with the size of 2.1 to 45.2 nm (average 10.9 nm). Pulse treatments of AgNPs at 125, 250 and 500 mg/l for 1 h extended vase life of cut carnation ( Dianthus caryophyllus cv. Green Land) flowers. Four dominant bacteria strains Arthrobacter arilaitensis, Kocuria sp., Staphylococcus equorum and Microbacterium oxydans were isolated from the stem-ends of cut D. caryophyllus flowers. AgNP pulse inhibited significantly bacterial growth in vase solution and cut stem ends during all of the vase period. The bacteria related blockage in the stem-ends was significantly alleviated by AgNP pulse because of its higher antibacterial efficacy against the dominant bacteria. In addition, ethylene release of cut carnation flowers was inhibited in response to AgNP pulse. This is the first time that the biologically synthesised AgNPs could be applied as a promising preservative agent for cut carnation flowers.

  6. Liposomal Nanoparticles Carrying anti-IL6R Antibody to the Tumour Microenvironment Inhibit Metastasis in Two Molecular Subtypes of Breast Cancer Mouse Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Chunlei; Chen, Yanan; Gao, Wenjuan; Chang, Antao; Ye, Yujie; Shen, Wenzhi; Luo, Yunping; Yang, Shengyong; Sun, Peiqing; Xiang, Rong; Li, Na

    2017-01-01

    Tumour microenvironment (TME) contributes significantly towards potentiating the stemness and metastasis properties of cancer cells. IL6-Stat3 is one of the important cell signaling pathways in mediating the communication between tumour and immune cells. Here, we have systematically developed a novel anti-CD44 antibody-mediated liposomal nanoparticle delivery system loaded with anti-IL6R antibody, which could specifically target the TME of CD44 + breast cancer cells in different mouse models for triple negative and luminal breast cancer. This nanoparticle had an enhanced and specific tumour targeting efficacy with dramatic anti-tumour metastasis effects in syngeneic BALB/c mice bearing 4T1 cells as was in the syngeneic MMTV-PyMT mice. It inhibited IL6R-Stat3 signaling and moderated the TME, characterized by the reduced expression of genes encoding Stat3, Sox2, VEGFA, MMP-9 and CD206 in the breast tissues. Furthermore, this nanoparticle reduced the subgroups of Sox2 + and CD206 + cells in the lung metastatic foci, demonstrating its inhibitory effect on the lung metastatic niche for breast cancer stem cells. Taken together, the CD44 targeted liposomal nanoparticles encapsulating anti-IL6R antibody achieved a significant effect to inhibit the metastasis of breast cancer in different molecular subtypes of breast cancer mouse models. Our results shed light on the application of nanoparticle mediated cancer immune-therapy through targeting TME.

  7. nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreu-Cabedo, Patricia; Mondragon, Rosa; Hernandez, Leonor; Martinez-Cuenca, Raul; Cabedo, Luis; Julia, J. Enrique

    2014-10-01

    Thermal energy storage (TES) is extremely important in concentrated solar power (CSP) plants since it represents the main difference and advantage of CSP plants with respect to other renewable energy sources such as wind, photovoltaic, etc. CSP represents a low-carbon emission renewable source of energy, and TES allows CSP plants to have energy availability and dispatchability using available industrial technologies. Molten salts are used in CSP plants as a TES material because of their high operational temperature and stability of up to 500°C. Their main drawbacks are their relative poor thermal properties and energy storage density. A simple cost-effective way to improve thermal properties of fluids is to dope them with nanoparticles, thus obtaining the so-called salt-based nanofluids. In this work, solar salt used in CSP plants (60% NaNO3 + 40% KNO3) was doped with silica nanoparticles at different solid mass concentrations (from 0.5% to 2%). Specific heat was measured by means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). A maximum increase of 25.03% was found at an optimal concentration of 1 wt.% of nanoparticles. The size distribution of nanoparticle clusters present in the salt at each concentration was evaluated by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and image processing, as well as by means of dynamic light scattering (DLS). The cluster size and the specific surface available depended on the solid content, and a relationship between the specific heat increment and the available particle surface area was obtained. It was proved that the mechanism involved in the specific heat increment is based on a surface phenomenon. Stability of samples was tested for several thermal cycles and thermogravimetric analysis at high temperature was carried out, the samples being stable.

  8. Liver-targeted cyclosporine A-encapsulated poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid nanoparticles inhibit hepatitis C virus replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyothi KR

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available KR Jyothi,1 Jagadish Beloor,2 Ara Jo,1 Minh Nam Nguyen,1 Tae Gyu Choi,1 Jin-Hwan Kim,1 Salima Akter,1 Sang-Kyung Lee,2 Chi Hoon Maeng,3 Hyung Hwan Baik,1 Insug Kang,1 Joohun Ha,1 Sung Soo Kim1 1Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Republic of Korea; 2Department of Bioengineering and Institute for Bioengineering and Biopharmaceutical Research, Hanyang University, Seoul, Republic of Korea; 3Department of Medical Oncology and Hematology, Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea Abstract: Therapeutic options for hepatitis C virus (HCV infection have been limited by drug resistance and adverse side effects. Targeting the host factor cyclophilin A (CypA, which is essential for HCV replication, offers a promising strategy for antiviral therapy. However, due to its immunosuppressive activity and severe side effects, clinical application of cyclosporine A (CsA has been limited as an antiviral agent. To overcome these drawbacks, we have successfully developed a liver-specific, sustained drug delivery system by conjugating the liver-targeting peptide (LTP to PEGylated CsA-encapsulated poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA nanoparticles. Furthermore, our delivery system exhibited high specificity to liver, thus contributing to the reduced immunosuppressive effect and toxicity profile of CsA. Finally, targeted nanoparticles were able to effectively inhibit viral replication in vitro and in an HCV mouse model. As a proof of principle, we herein show that our delivery system is able to negate the adverse effects of CsA and produce therapeutic effects in an HCV mouse model.Keywords: HCV, liver-targeting peptide, targeted drug delivery

  9. Covalent immobilization of porcine pancreatic lipase on carboxyl-activated magnetic nanoparticles: Characterization and application for enzymatic inhibition assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Yuan-Ting; Ren, Xiao-Yun; Liu, Yi-Ming; Wei, Ying; Qing, Lin-Sen; Liao, Xun

    2014-01-01

    Using carboxyl functionalized silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) as carrier, a novel immobilized porcine pancreatic lipase (PPL) was prepared through the 1-ethyl-3-[3-dimethylaminopropyl] carbodiimide hydrochloride/N-hydroxysuccinimide (EDC/NHS) coupling reaction. Transmission electron microscopic images showed that the synthesized nanoparticles (Fe 3 O 4 –SiO 2 ) possessed three dimensional core–shell structures with an average diameter of ∼ 20 nm. The effective enzyme immobilization onto the nanocomposite was confirmed by atomic force microscopic (AFM) analysis. Results from Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Bradford protein assay, and thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) indicated that PPL was covalently attached to the surface of magnetic nanoparticles with a PPL immobilization yield of 50 mg enzyme/g MNPs. Vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) analysis revealed that the MNPs-PPL nanocomposite had a high saturation magnetization of 42.25 emu·g −1 . The properties of the immobilized PPL were investigated in comparison with the free enzyme counterpart. Enzymatic activity, reusability, thermo-stability, and storage stability of the immobilized PPL were found significantly superior to those of the free one. The K m and the V max values (0.02 mM, 6.40 U·mg −1 enzyme) indicated the enhanced activity of the immobilized PPL compared to those of the free enzyme (0.29 mM, 3.16 U·mg −1 enzyme). Furthermore, at an elevated temperature of 70 °C, immobilized PPL retained 60% of its initial activity. The PPL-MNPs nanocomposite was applied in the enzyme inhibition assays using orlistat, and two natural products isolated from oolong tea (i.e., EGCG and EGC) as the test compounds. - Highlights: • Porcine pancreatic lipase was firstly covalently immobilized onto carboxylated MNPs. • Immobilized porcine pancreatic lipase (PPL) was characterized by various techniques. • MNPs-PPL showed higher activity, reusability, and thermo-stability than

  10. Covalent immobilization of porcine pancreatic lipase on carboxyl-activated magnetic nanoparticles: Characterization and application for enzymatic inhibition assays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Yuan-Ting [Chengdu Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610041 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Ren, Xiao-Yun [Chengdu Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610041 (China); Liu, Yi-Ming [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch St., Jackson, MS 39217 (United States); Wei, Ying [Changzhi Medical College, Changzhi 046000 (China); Qing, Lin-Sen [Chengdu Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610041 (China); Liao, Xun, E-mail: liaoxun@cib.ac.cn [Chengdu Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2014-05-01

    Using carboxyl functionalized silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) as carrier, a novel immobilized porcine pancreatic lipase (PPL) was prepared through the 1-ethyl-3-[3-dimethylaminopropyl] carbodiimide hydrochloride/N-hydroxysuccinimide (EDC/NHS) coupling reaction. Transmission electron microscopic images showed that the synthesized nanoparticles (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}–SiO{sub 2}) possessed three dimensional core–shell structures with an average diameter of ∼ 20 nm. The effective enzyme immobilization onto the nanocomposite was confirmed by atomic force microscopic (AFM) analysis. Results from Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Bradford protein assay, and thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) indicated that PPL was covalently attached to the surface of magnetic nanoparticles with a PPL immobilization yield of 50 mg enzyme/g MNPs. Vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) analysis revealed that the MNPs-PPL nanocomposite had a high saturation magnetization of 42.25 emu·g{sup −1}. The properties of the immobilized PPL were investigated in comparison with the free enzyme counterpart. Enzymatic activity, reusability, thermo-stability, and storage stability of the immobilized PPL were found significantly superior to those of the free one. The K{sub m} and the V{sub max} values (0.02 mM, 6.40 U·mg{sup −1} enzyme) indicated the enhanced activity of the immobilized PPL compared to those of the free enzyme (0.29 mM, 3.16 U·mg{sup −1} enzyme). Furthermore, at an elevated temperature of 70 °C, immobilized PPL retained 60% of its initial activity. The PPL-MNPs nanocomposite was applied in the enzyme inhibition assays using orlistat, and two natural products isolated from oolong tea (i.e., EGCG and EGC) as the test compounds. - Highlights: • Porcine pancreatic lipase was firstly covalently immobilized onto carboxylated MNPs. • Immobilized porcine pancreatic lipase (PPL) was characterized by various techniques. • MNPs-PPL showed higher activity

  11. Pulverization of boron element and proportions of boron carbide in boron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, F.M.; Finck, C.

    1956-01-01

    It is possible to reduce boron element into fine powder by means of a mortar and pestle made of sintered boron carbide, the ratio of boron carbide introduced being less than one per cent. Boron element at our disposal is made of sharp edged, dark brown, little grains of average size greater than 5 μ. Grain sizes smaller than 1μ are required for applying thin layers of such boron. (author) [fr

  12. Interaction of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles with the marine microalga Nitzschia closterium: Growth inhibition, oxidative stress and internalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Bin, E-mail: xiabin@ysfri.ac.cn; Chen, Bijuan; Sun, Xuemei; Qu, Keming; Ma, Feifei; Du, Meirong

    2015-03-01

    The toxicity of TiO{sub 2} engineered nanoparticles (NPs) to the marine microalga Nitzschia closterium was investigated by examining growth inhibition, oxidative stress and uptake. The results indicated that the toxicity of TiO{sub 2} particles to algal cells significantly increased with decreasing nominal particle size, which was evidenced by the 96 EC{sub 50} values of 88.78, 118.80 and 179.05 mg/L for 21 nm, 60 nm and 400 nm TiO{sub 2} particles, respectively. The growth rate was significantly inhibited when the alga was exposed to 5 mg/L TiO{sub 2} NPs (21 nm). Measurements of antioxidant enzyme activities showed that superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and peroxidase (POD) activities were first induced and subsequently inhibited following exposure to 5 mg/L TiO{sub 2} NPs. The depletion of antioxidant enzymes with a concomitant increase in malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and reactive oxygen species (ROS) posed a hazard to membrane integrity. A combination of flow cytometry analysis, transmission electron microscopy and Ti content measurement indicated that TiO{sub 2} NPs were internalized in N. closterium cells. The level of extracellular ROS, which was induced by TiO{sub 2} NPs under visible light, was negligible when compared with the intracellular ROS level (accounting for less than 6.0% of the total ROS level). These findings suggest that elevated TiO{sub 2} nanotoxicity in marine environments is related to increased ROS levels caused by internalization of TiO{sub 2} NPs. - Highlights: • Inhibition of marine microalgae by TiO{sub 2} NPs and bulk particles was evaluated. • Aggregation of TiO{sub 2} NPs and bulk particles was observed in marine algal test medium. • TiO{sub 2} NPs induced damage to algal cell membranes as detected by flow cytometry. • Increased TiO{sub 2} nanotoxicity to algal cells was caused by internalization of NPs.

  13. A gold nanoparticle-based label free colorimetric aptasensor for adenosine deaminase detection and inhibition assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Fen; He, Yue; Xing, Xiao-Jing; Tan, Dai-Di; Lin, Yi; Pang, Dai-Wen; Tang, Hong-Wu

    2015-03-07

    A novel strategy for the fabrication of a colorimetric aptasensor using label free gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) is proposed in this work, and the strategy has been employed for the assay of adenosine deaminase (ADA) activity. The aptasensor consists of adenosine (AD) aptamer, AD and AuNPs. The design of the biosensor takes advantage of the special optical properties of AuNPs and the interaction between AuNPs and single-strand DNA. In the absence of ADA, the AuNPs are aggregated and are blue in color under appropriate salt concentration because of the grid structure of an AD aptamer when binding to AD, while in the presence of the analyte, AuNPs remain dispersed with red color under the same concentration of salt owing to ADA converting AD into inosine which has no affinity with the AD aptamer, thus allowing quantitative investigation of ADA activity. The present strategy is simple, cost-effective, selective and sensitive for ADA with a detection limit of 1.526 U L(-1), which is about one order of magnitude lower than that previously reported. In addition, a very low concentration of the inhibitor erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl) adenine (EHNA) could generate a distinguishable response. Therefore, the AuNP-based colorimetric biosensor has great potential in the diagnosis of ADA-relevant diseases and drug screening.

  14. Enhanced Growth Inhibition of Osteosarcoma by Cytotoxic Polymerized Liposomal Nanoparticles Targeting the Alcam Cell Surface Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noah Federman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteosarcoma is the most common primary malignancy of bone in children, adolescents, and adults. Despite extensive surgery and adjuvant aggressive high-dose systemic chemotherapy with potentially severe bystander side effects, cure is attainable in about 70% of patients with localized disease and only 20%–30% of those patients with metastatic disease. Targeted therapies clearly are warranted in improving our treatment of this adolescent killer. However, a lack of osteosarcoma-associated/specific markers has hindered development of targeted therapeutics. We describe a novel osteosarcoma-associated cell surface antigen, ALCAM. We, then, create an engineered anti-ALCAM-hybrid polymerized liposomal nanoparticle immunoconjugate (α-AL-HPLN to specifically target osteosarcoma cells and deliver a cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agent, doxorubicin. We have demonstrated that α-AL-HPLNs have significantly enhanced cytotoxicity over untargeted HPLNs and over a conventional liposomal doxorubicin formulation. In this way, α-AL-HPLNs are a promising new strategy to specifically deliver cytotoxic agents in osteosarcoma.

  15. Synthesis of glycyrrhetinic acid-modified chitosan 5-fluorouracil nanoparticles and its inhibition of liver cancer characteristics in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Mingrong; Gao, Xiaoyan; Wang, Yong; Chen, Houxiang; He, Bing; Xu, Hongzhi; Li, Yingchun; Han, Jiang; Zhang, Zhiping

    2013-09-17

    Nanoparticle drug delivery (NDDS) is a novel system in which the drugs are delivered to the site of action by small particles in the nanometer range. Natural or synthetic polymers are used as vectors in NDDS, as they provide targeted, sustained release and biodegradability. Here, we used the chitosan and hepatoma cell-specific binding molecule, glycyrrhetinic acid (GA), to synthesize glycyrrhetinic acid-modified chitosan (GA-CTS). The synthetic product was confirmed by Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and ¹H-nuclear magnetic resonance (¹H-NMR). By combining GA-CTS and 5-FU (5-fluorouracil), we obtained a GA-CTS/5-FU nanoparticle, with a particle size of 217.2 nm, a drug loading of 1.56% and a polydispersity index of 0.003. The GA-CTS/5-FU nanoparticle provided a sustained release system comprising three distinct phases of quick, steady and slow release. We demonstrated that the nanoparticle accumulated in the liver. In vitro data indicated that it had a dose- and time-dependent anti-cancer effect. The effective drug exposure time against hepatic cancer cells was increased in comparison with that observed with 5-FU. Additionally, GA-CTS/5-FU significantly inhibited the growth of drug-resistant hepatoma, which may compensate for the drug-resistance of 5-FU. In vivo studies on an orthotropic liver cancer mouse model demonstrated that GA-CTS/5-FU significantly inhibited tumor growth, resulting in increased survival time.

  16. Polyphenon-E encapsulated into chitosan nanoparticles inhibited proliferation and growth of Ehrlich solid tumor in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azza I. Othman

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Limited bioavailability of green tea polyphenols hampered their delivery to tumor and hence therapeutic effectiveness. This study investigated the antitumor activity of polyphenon-E (PE encapsulated into chitosan nanoparticles (CSNPs in Ehrlich solid tumor in mice. CSNPs-PE, with a particle size of 53–69 nm showed 83% entrapment efficiency and a sustained release of PE in pH = 7.4 at 37 °C. The data demonstrated a higher percentage of released drug in case of less crosslinked formulations. Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC cells (2.5 × 106/0.2 ml/mouse were injected subcutaneously in the back of mice. Oral administration of CSNPs-PE for 30 days produced a significant decrease in tumor volume (53% and weight (60% compared with free PE and voids CSNPs (72%. Compared with free PE and control, cell cycle revealed G0/G1 arrest associated with decrease in proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA. In tumor tissue of CSNPs-PE treated mice, compared with free PE, there were; 1 induction of Bax and p53, 2 activation of caspases-3,-8 and -9, and CD95, 3 decrease in Bcl-2 expression of 4 inhibition of VEGF and CD31 expressions in tumor tissue. In conclusion, encapsulation of PE into CSNPs provided a good platform for cancer chemotherapy and raised existing application of different polyphenols for nanochemotherapy/prevention.

  17. Delivery of siRNAs to Dendritic Cells Using DEC205-Targeted Lipid Nanoparticles to Inhibit Immune Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katakowski, Joseph A; Mukherjee, Gayatri; Wilner, Samantha E; Maier, Keith E; Harrison, Michael Travis; DiLorenzo, Teresa P; Levy, Matthew; Palliser, Deborah

    2016-02-01

    Due to their ability to knock down the expression of any gene, siRNAs have been heralded as ideal candidates for treating a wide variety of diseases, including those involving "undruggable" targets. However, the therapeutic potential of siRNAs remains severely limited by a lack of effective delivery vehicles. Recently, lipid nanoparticles (LNPs) containing ionizable cationic lipids have been developed for hepatic siRNA delivery. However, their suitability for delivery to other cell types has not been determined. We have modified LNPs for preferential targeting to dendritic cells (DCs), central regulators of immune responses. To achieve directed delivery, we coated LNPs with a single-chain antibody (scFv; DEC-LNPs), specific to murine DEC205, which is highly expressed on distinct DC subsets. Here we show that injection of siRNAs encapsulated in DEC-LNPs are preferentially delivered to DEC205(+) DCs. Gene knockdown following uptake of DEC-LNPs containing siRNAs specific for the costimulatory molecules CD40, CD80, and CD86 dramatically decreases gene expression levels. We demonstrate the functionality of this knockdown with a mixed lymphocyte response (MLR). Overall, we report that injection of LNPs modified to restrict their uptake to a distinct cell population can confer profound gene knockdown, sufficient to inhibit powerful immune responses like the MLR.

  18. Orally delivered thioketal nanoparticles loaded with TNF-α-siRNA target inflammation and inhibit gene expression in the intestines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, D. Scott; Dalmasso, Guillaume; Wang, Lixin; Sitaraman, Shanthi V.; Merlin, Didier; Murthy, Niren

    2010-11-01

    Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) directed against proinflammatory cytokines have the potential to treat numerous diseases associated with intestinal inflammation; however, the side-effects caused by the systemic depletion of cytokines demands that the delivery of cytokine-targeted siRNAs be localized to diseased intestinal tissues. Although various delivery vehicles have been developed to orally deliver therapeutics to intestinal tissue, none of these strategies has demonstrated the ability to protect siRNA from the harsh environment of the gastrointestinal tract and target its delivery to inflamed intestinal tissue. Here, we present a delivery vehicle for siRNA, termed thioketal nanoparticles (TKNs), that can localize orally delivered siRNA to sites of intestinal inflammation, and thus inhibit gene expression in inflamed intestinal tissue. TKNs are formulated from a polymer, poly-(1,4-phenyleneacetone dimethylene thioketal), that degrades selectively in response to reactive oxygen species (ROS). Therefore, when delivered orally, TKNs release siRNA in response to the abnormally high levels of ROS specific to sites of intestinal inflammation. Using a murine model of ulcerative colitis, we demonstrate that orally administered TKNs loaded with siRNA against the proinflammatory cytokine tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) diminish TNF-α messenger RNA levels in the colon and protect mice from ulcerative colitis.

  19. Aqueous zymography screening of matrix metalloproteinase activity and inhibition based on colorimetric gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Yao-Chen; Huang, Wei-Ting; Chiang, Pin-Hsuan; Tang, Meng-Che; Lin, Chih-Sheng

    2012-02-15

    An optical gold nanoparticles (AuNPs)-based method was fabricated for the rapid detection of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity and screening potential MMP inhibitors without sophisticated instruments. The diagnosis platform was composed of AuNPs, particular MMP substrates and 6-mercapto-1-hexanol (MCH). The functionalized AuNPs were subjected to specific MMP digestion, and the MMP found the substrate on AuNPs, such that the AuNPs lost shelter and MCH increased the attraction force between AuNPs. Consequently, AuNPs aggregation and a color change from red to purple with increasing MMP concentration were observed. The surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of the formed AuNPs allowed for the quantitative detection of MMP activity. A sensitive linear correlation existed between the absorbance and the activity of the MMPs, which ranged from 10 ng/mL to 700 ng/mL in NTTC buffer and plasma samples. The proposed colorimetric method could be accomplished in a homogeneous solution with one-step operation in 30 min and has been successfully applied to the determination of particular MMP activity in plasma samples, in which the results are consistent with substrate zymography. This technology may become a simple platform for parallel screening a number of inhibitors and offer an alternative method to studying the efficiency of inhibitors for suppressing MMP activity. The absorbance ratio at 625 nm and 525 nm (A(625)/A(525)) confirmed the efficiency of the inhibitors as observed in substrate zymography. The IC(50) of ONO-4817 and galardin for MMP-1, MMP-2 and MMP-7 determined by the proposed colorimetric method was similar to the results of substrate zymography. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Silencing β3 Integrin by Targeted ECO/siRNA Nanoparticles Inhibits EMT and Metastasis of Triple-Negative Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvani, Jenny G; Gujrati, Maneesh D; Mack, Margaret A; Schiemann, William P; Lu, Zheng-Rong

    2015-06-01

    Metastatic breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths among women. Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a highly aggressive subcategory of breast cancer and currently lacks well-defined molecular targets for effective targeted therapies. Disease relapse, metastasis, and drug resistance render standard chemotherapy ineffective in the treatment of TNBC. Because previous studies coupled β3 integrin (ITGB3) to epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and metastasis, we exploited β3 integrin as a therapeutic target to treat TNBC by delivering β3 integrin siRNA via lipid ECO-based nanoparticles (ECO/siβ3). Treatment of TNBC cells with ECO/siβ3 was sufficient to effectively silence β3 integrin expression, attenuate TGFβ-mediated EMT and invasion, restore TGFβ-mediated cytostasis, and inhibit three-dimensional organoid growth. Modification of ECO/siβ3 nanoparticles with an RGD peptide via a PEG spacer enhanced siRNA uptake by post-EMT cells. Intravenous injections of RGD-targeted ECO/siβ3 nanoparticles in vivo alleviated primary tumor burden and, more importantly, significantly inhibited metastasis. In the span of 16 weeks of the experiments and observations, including primary tumor resection at week 9 and release from the treatment for 4 weeks, the mice bearing orthotopic, TGFβ-prestimulated MDA-MB-231 tumors that were treated with RGD-targeted ECO/siβ3 nanoparticles were free of metastases and relapse, in comparison with untreated mice. Collectively, these results highlight ECO/siβ3 nanoparticles as a promising therapeutic regimen to combat TNBC. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  1. Boronated liposome development and evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawthorne, M.F.

    1995-01-01

    The boronated liposome development and evaluation effort consists of two separate tasks. The first is the development of new boron compounds and the synthesis of known boron species with BNCT potential. These compounds are then encapsulated within liposomes for the second task, biodistribution testing in tumor-bearing mice, which examines the potential for the liposomes and their contents to concentrate boron in cancerous tissues

  2. Structural characterization of electrodeposited boron

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    mental phase contrast images and the diffraction pattern. Figure 3. (a) Bright field image of electrodeposited boron spec- imen showing a crystallite of size ∼10 × 5 nm; (b) phase contrast image of electrodeposited boron specimen showing a resolved la- ttice and (c) power spectrum of electrodeposited boron specimen.

  3. MPEG-CS/Bmi-1RNAi Nanoparticles Synthesis and Its Targeted Inhibition Effect on CD133+ Laryngeal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xudong; He, Jian; Wang, Jingyu; Wang, Wei

    2018-03-01

    Previous studies have confirmed that CD133+ cells in laryngeal tumor tissue have the characteristics of cancer stem cells. Bmi-1 gene expression is central to the tumorigenicity of CD133+ cells. In this study, we tried to develop a new siRNA carrier system using chitosan-methoxypolyethylene nanoparticles (CS-mPEG-NPs) that exhibit higher tumor-targeting ability and enhanced gene silencing efficacy in CD133+ tumor stem cells. It is hoped to block the self-renewal and kill the stem cells of laryngeal carcinoma. The mPEG-CS-Bmi-1RNAi-NPs were synthesized and their characters were checked. The changes in invasion ability and sensitivity to radiotherapy and chemotherapy of CD133+Hep-2 tumor cells were observed after Bmi-1 gene silencing. The mPEG-CS-Bmi-1RNAi-NPs synthesized in this experiment have a regular spherical form, a mean size of 139.70 ±6.40 nm, an encapsulation efficiency of 85.21 ± 1.94%, with drug loading capacity of 18.47 ± 1.83%, as well as low cytotoxicity, providing good protection to the loaded gene, strong resistance to nuclease degradation and high gene transfection efficiency. After Bmi-1 gene silencing, the invasion ability of CD133+ cells was weakened. Co-cultured with paclitaxel, the survival rates of CD133+Bmi-1RNAi cells were lower. After radiotherapy, the mean growth inhibition rate of CD133+/Bmi-1RNAi cells was significantly lower than CD133+ cells. In conclusion, the mPEG-CS nano-carrier is an ideal vector in gene therapy, while silencing the Bmi-1 gene can enhance the sensitivity of CD133+ tumor stem cells to chemoradiotherapy and abate their invasion ability.

  4. Inhibited transport of graphene oxide nanoparticles in granular quartz sand coated with Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas putida biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jian-Zhou; Wang, Deng-Jun; Fang, Huan; Fu, Qing-Long; Zhou, Dong-Mei

    2017-02-01

    Increasing production and use of graphene oxide nanoparticles (GONPs) boost their wide dissemination in the subsurface environments where biofilms occur ubiquitously, representative of the physical and chemical heterogeneities. This study aimed at investigating the influence of Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis (BS) and Gram-negative Pseudomonas putida (PP) biofilms on the transport of GONPs under different ionic strengths (0.1, 0.5, and 1.0 mM CaCl 2 ) at neutral pH 7.2 in water-saturated porous media. Particularly, the X-ray micro-computed tomography was used to quantitatively characterize the pore structures of sand columns in the presence and absence of biofilms. Our results indicated that the presence of biofilms reduced the porosity and narrowed down the pore sizes of packed columns. Transport experiments in biofilm-coated sand showed that biofilms, irrespective of bacterial species, significantly inhibited the mobility of GONPs compared to that in cleaned sand. This could be due to the Ca 2+ complexation, increased surface roughness and charge heterogeneities of collectors, and particularly enhanced physical straining caused by biofilms. The two-site kinetic retention model-fitted value of maximum solid-phase concentration (S max2 ) for GONPs was higher for biofilm-coated sand than for cleaned sand, demonstrating that biofilms act as favorable sites for GONPs retention. Our findings presented herein are important to deepen our current understanding on the nature of particle-collector interactions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Inhibition of anaerobic wastewater treatment after long-term exposure to low levels of CuO nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero-González, Lila; Field, Jim A; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes

    2014-07-01

    CuO nanoparticles (NPs) are released into wastewater due to the widespread use and generation as by-product in various applications (e.g. semiconductor manufacturing). However, information on the behavior and impact of CuO NPs on wastewater treatment processes is very limited. The objective of this study was to evaluate the fate and long-term effect of CuO NPs (average size = 37 nm) on high-rate anaerobic bioreactors. A laboratory-scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor was operated with a synthetic wastewater containing low concentrations of CuO NPs (1.4 mg Cu L(-1)) and a mixture of volatile fatty acids for 107 days. CuO NPs were largely removed during anaerobic treatment and on the average only 20-32% of the NPs fed to the reactor escaped with the effluent. Scanning electron microscopy and chemical analysis confirmed that CuO NPs were partitioned into the anaerobic sludge. While short-term exposure to CuO NPs (1.4 mg Cu L(-1)) only caused minor inhibition to methanogenesis, extended exposure caused severe toxicity and reduced the acetoclastic methanogenic activity by more than 85%. Moreover, the reactor performance was completely disrupted and the methane production decreased by more than 50%. The study is the first to demonstrate a significant long-term effect of low levels of CuO NPs on methanogenesis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Enrichment of boron 10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coutinho, C.M.M.; Rodrigues Filho, J.S.R.; Umeda, K.; Echternacht, M.V.

    1990-01-01

    A isotopic separation pilot plant with five ion exchange columns interconnected in series were designed and built in the IEN. The columns are charged with a strong anionic resin in its alkaline form. The boric acid solution is introduced in the separation columns until it reaches a absorbing zone length which is sufficient to obtain the desired boron-10 isotopic concentration. The boric acid absorbing zone movement is provided by the injection of a diluted hydrochloric acid solution, which replace the boric acid throughout the columns. The absorbing zone equilibrium length is proportional to its total length. The enriched boron-10 and the depleted boron are located in the final boundary and in the initial position of the absorbing zones, respectively. (author)

  7. In Vivo Boron Uptake Determination for Boron Neutron Capture Synovectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binello, Emanuela; Shortkroff, Sonya; Yanch, Jacquelyn C.

    1999-06-06

    Boron neutron capture synovectomy (BNCS) has been proposed as a new application of the boron neutron capture reaction for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. In BNCS, a boron compound is injected into the joint space, where it is taken up by the synovium. The joint is then irradiated with neutrons of a desired energy range, inducing the boron neutron capture reaction in boron-loaded cells. Boron uptake by the synovium is an important parameter in the assessment of the potential of BNCS and in the determination of whether to proceed to animal irradiations for the testing of therapeutic efficacy. We present results from an investigation of boron uptake in vivo by the synovium.

  8. Substitutional Boron in Nanodiamond, Bucky-Diamond, and Nanocrystalline Diamond Grain Boundaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnard, Amanda S.; Sternberg, Michael G.

    2006-10-05

    Although boron has been known for many years to be a successful dopant in bulk diamond, efficient doping of nanocrystalline diamond with boron is still being developed. In general, the location, configuration, and bonding structure of boron in nanodiamond is still unknown, including the fundamental question of whether it is located within grains or grain boundaries of thin films and whether it is within the core or at the surface of nanoparticles. Presented here are density functional tight-binding simulations examining the configuration, potential energy surface, and electronic charge of substitutional boron in various types of nanocrystalline diamond. The results predict that boron is likely to be positioned at the surface of isolated particles and at the grain boundary of thin-film samples.

  9. Synthesis of Glycyrrhetinic Acid-Modified Chitosan 5-Fluorouracil Nanoparticles and Its Inhibition of Liver Cancer Characteristics in Vitro and in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Han

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticle drug delivery (NDDS is a novel system in which the drugs are delivered to the site of action by small particles in the nanometer range. Natural or synthetic polymers are used as vectors in NDDS, as they provide targeted, sustained release and biodegradability. Here, we used the chitosan and hepatoma cell-specific binding molecule, glycyrrhetinic acid (GA, to synthesize glycyrrhetinic acid-modified chitosan (GA-CTS. The synthetic product was confirmed by Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR and 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR. By combining GA-CTS and 5-FU (5-fluorouracil, we obtained a GA-CTS/5-FU nanoparticle, with a particle size of 217.2 nm, a drug loading of 1.56% and a polydispersity index of 0.003. The GA-CTS/5-FU nanoparticle provided a sustained release system comprising three distinct phases of quick, steady and slow release. We demonstrated that the nanoparticle accumulated in the liver. In vitro data indicated that it had a dose- and time-dependent anti-cancer effect. The effective drug exposure time against hepatic cancer cells was increased in comparison with that observed with 5-FU. Additionally, GA-CTS/5-FU significantly inhibited the growth of drug-resistant hepatoma, which may compensate for the drug-resistance of 5-FU. In vivo studies on an orthotropic liver cancer mouse model demonstrated that GA-CTS/5-FU significantly inhibited tumor growth, resulting in increased survival time.

  10. Process for microwave sintering boron carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcombe, C.E.; Morrow, M.S.

    1993-10-12

    A method of microwave sintering boron carbide comprises leaching boron carbide powder with an aqueous solution of nitric acid to form a leached boron carbide powder. The leached boron carbide powder is coated with a glassy carbon precursor to form a coated boron carbide powder. The coated boron carbide powder is consolidated in an enclosure of boron nitride particles coated with a layer of glassy carbon within a container for microwave heating to form an enclosed coated boron carbide powder. The enclosed coated boron carbide powder is sintered within the container for microwave heating with microwave energy.

  11. Bright prospects for boron

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nanver, L.; Wassink, J.

    2012-01-01

    Professor Lis Nanver at Dimes has laid the foundation for a range of new photodetectors by creating a thin coating of boron on a silicon substrate. The sensors are used in ASML’s latest lithography machines and FEI’s most sensitive electron microscopes.

  12. Methods of producing continuous boron carbide fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnier, John E.; Griffith, George W.

    2015-12-01

    Methods of producing continuous boron carbide fibers. The method comprises reacting a continuous carbon fiber material and a boron oxide gas within a temperature range of from approximately 1400.degree. C. to approximately 2200.degree. C. Continuous boron carbide fibers, continuous fibers comprising boron carbide, and articles including at least a boron carbide coating are also disclosed.

  13. Transition metal oxide nanoparticles are effective in inhibiting lung cancer cell survival in the hypoxic tumor microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Namita; Dhiman, Shikha; Srivastava, Tapasya; Majumder, Sudip

    2016-07-25

    The transition metal oxide nanoparticles are in focus for their anti-cancer potential. In this study we have synthesized and characterized CuO, NiO and Fe2O3 nanoparticles and, investigated their cytotoxic potential in the heterogeneous tumour microenvironment. Nanoparticles were synthesized by aqueous precipitation method and characterized with UV-Visible spectrophotometer, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Cell viability of lung cancer cells (A549) grown in normoxia (18%O2) and hypoxia (1%O2) was determined for all nanoparticles. The mechanism of cell death was assessed by nuclear morphological analysis, flow cytometry analysis and western blotting. Generation of intracellular ROS in treated cells and its contribution to cell viability was determined. The synthesized metal oxide nanoparticles were successfully characterized with SEM, spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction patterns. Cell viability of lung cancer cells was compromised in both normoxia and hypoxia. ROS generation was shown to contribute to cellular toxicity in CuO, but not NiO and Fe2O3. We have shown the therapeutic potential of CuO, NiO and Fe2O3 nanoparticles in non small cell lung cancer cells cultured in hypoxia, a relevant feature of solid tumors along with normoxia. The newly synthesized nanoparticles showed efficacy in both conditions. Hypoxia drives metabolic alterations and epigenetic modifications in the tumor microenvironment. By using conditions that mimic tumour microenvironment, this study expands the possibility of using metal oxide nanoparticles as a therapeutic agent for lung cancer treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Encapsulated boron as an osteoinductive agent for bone scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gümüşderelioğlu, Menemşe; Tunçay, Ekin Ö; Kaynak, Gökçe; Demirtaş, Tolga T; Aydın, Seda Tığlı; Hakkı, Sema S

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop boron (B)-releasing polymeric scaffold to promote regeneration of bone tissue. Boric acid-doped chitosan nanoparticles with a diameter of approx. 175 nm were produced by tripolyphosphate (TPP)-initiated ionic gelation process. The nanoparticles strongly attached via electrostatic interactions into chitosan scaffolds produced by freeze-drying with approx. 100 μm pore diameter. According to the ICP-OES results, following first 5h initial burst release, fast release of B from scaffolds was observed for 24h incubation period in conditioned medium. Then, slow release of B was performed over 120 h. The results of the cell culture studies proved that the encapsulated boron within the scaffolds can be used as an osteoinductive agent by showing its positive effects on the proliferation and differentiation of MC3T3-E1 preosteoblastic cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. pH-responsive artemisinin derivatives and lipid nanoparticle formulations inhibit growth of breast cancer cells in vitro and induce down-regulation of HER family members.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yitong J Zhang

    Full Text Available Artemisinin (ART dimers show potent anti-proliferative activities against breast cancer cells. To facilitate their clinical development, novel pH-responsive artemisinin dimers were synthesized for liposomal nanoparticle formulations. A new ART dimer was designed to become increasingly water-soluble as pH declines. The new artemisinin dimer piperazine derivatives (ADPs remained tightly associated with liposomal nanoparticles (NPs at neutral pH but were efficiently released at acidic pH's that are known to exist within solid tumors and organelles such as endosomes and lysosomes. ADPs incorporated into nanoparticles down regulated the anti-apoptotic protein, survivin, and cyclin D1 when incubated at low concentrations with breast cancer cell lines. We demonstrate for the first time, for any ART derivative, that ADP NPs can down regulate the oncogenic protein HER2, and its counterpart, HER3 in a HER2+ cell line. We also show that the wild type epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR or HER1 declines in a triple negative breast cancer (TNBC cell line in response to ADP NPs. The declines in these proteins are achieved at concentrations of NP109 at or below 1 µM. Furthermore, the new artemisinin derivatives showed improved cell-proliferation inhibition effects compared to known dimer derivatives.

  16. Inhibitory effect of boron against Botrytis cinerea on table grapes and its possible mechanisms of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Guozheng; Zong, Yuanyuan; Chen, Qiling; Hua, Donglai; Tian, Shiping

    2010-03-31

    Boron, an essential plant micronutrient, was effective in the form of potassium tetraborate for control of postharvest gray mold caused by Botrytis cinerea on table grapes stored at room temperature or at 0 degrees C. The inhibition of fruit decay was closely correlated with boron concentrations and partially influenced by pH value of the solution. Boron strongly inhibited spore germination, germ tube elongation, and mycelial spread of B. cinerea in the culture medium. Application of boron at 1% caused the appearance of abnormal spores (disrupted) in some cases. By using propidium iodide fluorescent staining, loss of membrane integrity in B. cinerea was observed after boron treatment. Furthermore, boron led to the leakage of cellular constituents (soluble proteins and carbohydrates) from hyphae of B. cinerea. These data suggest that the mechanisms by which boron decreased gray mold decay of table grapes may be directly related to the disruption effect of boron on cell membrane of the fungal pathogen that resulted in the breakdown of the cell membrane and loss of cytoplasmic materials from the hyphae. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Structures, stability, mechanical and electronic properties of α-boron and α*-boron

    OpenAIRE

    Chaoyu He; J. X. Zhong

    2013-01-01

    The structures, stability, mechanical and electronic properties of α-boron and a promising metastable boron phase (α*-boron) have been studied by first-principles calculations. α-boron and α*-boron consist of equivalent icosahedra B12 clusters in different connecting configurations of “3S-6D-3S” and “2S-6D-4S”, respectively. The total energy calculations show that α*-boron is less stable than α-boron but more favorable than the well-known β-boron and γ-boron at zero pressure. Both α-boron and...

  18. Fivefold twinned boron carbide nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xin; Jiang, Jun; Liu, Chao; Yuan, Jun

    2009-09-09

    Chemical composition and crystal structure of fivefold twinned boron carbide nanowires have been determined by electron energy-loss spectroscopy and electron diffraction. The fivefold cyclic twinning relationship is confirmed by systematic axial rotation electron diffraction. Detailed chemical analysis reveals a carbon-rich boron carbide phase. Such boron carbide nanowires are potentially interesting because of their intrinsic hardness and high temperature thermoelectric property. Together with other boron-rich compounds, they may form a set of multiply twinned nanowire systems where the misfit strain could be continuously tuned to influence their mechanical properties.

  19. The influence of boron dopant on the electrochemical properties of graphene as an electrode material and a support for Pt catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bo, Xiangjie; Li, Mian; Han, Ce; Guo, Liping

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •More defective sites in graphene after the doping of boron atoms. •Fine dispersion of Pt nanoparticles supported on boron-doped graphene. •Low electron transfer resistance at boron-doped graphene. •High performance of boron-doped graphene as an electrode material or a support for Pt catalysts. -- Abstract: Boron-doped graphene (BGR) is prepared by thermal annealing of graphene oxide (GO) in the presence of boric acid. More defective sites are introduced into GR accompanied by the doping of boron. Low electron transfer resistance towards redox probe is observed at BGR. The BGR modified electrode can effectively distinguish the anodic peaks for ascorbic acid (AA), dopamine (DA), and uric acid (UA). The defective sites of BGR can also act as anchoring sites for the deposition of Pt nanoparticles. When used as a support for Pt electrocatalysts, Pt nanoparticles with an average diameter of 3.2 nm are deposited on BGR. The doping of boron into GR facilitates the dispersion of Pt nanoparticles and increases the utilization efficiency of Pt nanoparticles. The Pt/BGR exhibits significant catalytic activity towards the oxidation of methanol. The results demonstrate that BGR is a good support for Pt catalysts or an electrode material compared with the undoped GR

  20. Antibacterial activity againstStreptococcus mutansand inhibition of bacterial induced enamel demineralization of propolis, miswak, and chitosan nanoparticles based dental varnishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassel, Mariem O; Khattab, Mona A

    2017-07-01

    Using natural products can be a cost-effective approach for caries prevention especially in low income countries where dental caries is highly prevalent and the resources are limited. Specially prepared dental varnishes containing propolis, miswak, and chitosan nanoparticles (CS-NPs) with or without sodium fluoride (NaF) were assessed for antibacterial effect against Streptococcus mutans ( S. mutans ) using disk diffusion test. In addition, the protective effect of a single pretreatment of primary teeth enamel specimens against in vitro bacterial induced enamel demineralization was assessed for 3 days. All natural products containing varnishes inhibited bacterial growth significantly better than 5% NaF varnish, with NaF loaded CS-NPs (CSF-NPs) showing the highest antibacterial effect, though it didn't significantly differ than those of other varnishes except miswak ethanolic extract (M) varnish. Greater inhibitory effect was noted with varnish containing freeze dried aqueous miswak extract compared to that containing ethanolic miswak extract, possibly due to concentration of antimicrobial substances by freeze drying. Adding natural products to NaF in a dental varnish showed an additive effect especially compared to fluoride containing varnish. 5% NaF varnish showed the best inhibition of demineralization effect. Fluoride containing miswak varnish (MF) and CSF-NPs varnish inhibited demineralization significantly better than all experimental varnishes, especially during the first 2 days, though CSF-NPs varnish had a low fluoride concentration, probably due to better availability of fluoride ions and the smaller size of nanoparticles. Incorporating natural products with fluoride into dental varnishes can be an effective approach for caries prevention, especially miswak and propolis when financial resources are limited.

  1. Antibacterial activity against Streptococcus mutans and inhibition of bacterial induced enamel demineralization of propolis, miswak, and chitosan nanoparticles based dental varnishes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariem O. Wassel

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Using natural products can be a cost-effective approach for caries prevention especially in low income countries where dental caries is highly prevalent and the resources are limited. Specially prepared dental varnishes containing propolis, miswak, and chitosan nanoparticles (CS-NPs with or without sodium fluoride (NaF were assessed for antibacterial effect against Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans using disk diffusion test. In addition, the protective effect of a single pretreatment of primary teeth enamel specimens against in vitro bacterial induced enamel demineralization was assessed for 3 days. All natural products containing varnishes inhibited bacterial growth significantly better than 5% NaF varnish, with NaF loaded CS-NPs (CSF-NPs showing the highest antibacterial effect, though it didn’t significantly differ than those of other varnishes except miswak ethanolic extract (M varnish. Greater inhibitory effect was noted with varnish containing freeze dried aqueous miswak extract compared to that containing ethanolic miswak extract, possibly due to concentration of antimicrobial substances by freeze drying. Adding natural products to NaF in a dental varnish showed an additive effect especially compared to fluoride containing varnish. 5% NaF varnish showed the best inhibition of demineralization effect. Fluoride containing miswak varnish (MF and CSF-NPs varnish inhibited demineralization significantly better than all experimental varnishes, especially during the first 2 days, though CSF-NPs varnish had a low fluoride concentration, probably due to better availability of fluoride ions and the smaller size of nanoparticles. Incorporating natural products with fluoride into dental varnishes can be an effective approach for caries prevention, especially miswak and propolis when financial resources are limited.

  2. Development of antibody-modified chitosan nanoparticles for the targeted delivery of siRNA across the blood-brain barrier as a strategy for inhibiting HIV replication in astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jijin; Al-Bayati, Karam; Ho, Emmanuel A

    2017-08-01

    RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated gene silencing offers a novel treatment and prevention strategy for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. HIV was found to infect and replicate in human brain cells and can cause neuroinfections and neurological deterioration. We designed dual-antibody-modified chitosan/small interfering RNA (siRNA) nanoparticles to deliver siRNA across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) targeting HIV-infected brain astrocytes as a strategy for inhibiting HIV replication. We hypothesized that transferrin antibody and bradykinin B2 antibody could specifically bind to the transferrin receptor (TfR) and bradykinin B2 receptor (B2R), respectively, and deliver siRNA across the BBB into astrocytes as potential targeting ligands. In this study, chitosan nanoparticles (CS-NPs) were prepared by a complex coacervation method in the presence of siRNA, and antibody was chemically conjugated to the nanoparticles. The antibody-modified chitosan nanoparticles (Ab-CS-NPs) were spherical in shape, with an average particle size of 235.7 ± 10.2 nm and a zeta potential of 22.88 ± 1.78 mV. The therapeutic potential of the nanoparticles was evaluated based on their cellular uptake and gene silencing efficiency. Cellular accumulation and gene silencing efficiency of Ab-CS-NPs in astrocytes were significantly improved compared to non-modified CS-NPs and single-antibody-modified CS-NPs. These results suggest that the combination of anti-Tf antibody and anti-B2 antibody significantly increased the knockdown effect of siRNA-loaded nanoparticles. Thus, antibody-mediated dual-targeting nanoparticles are an efficient and promising delivery strategy for inhibiting HIV replication in astrocytes. Graphical abstract Graphic representation of dual-antibody-conjugated chitosan nanoparticles for the targeted delivery of siRNA across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) for inhibiting HIV replication in astrocytes. a Nanoparticle delivery to the BBB and penetration. b Tf

  3. Boron-Containing Compounds for Liposome-Mediated Tumor Localization and Application to Neutron Capture Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawthorne, M. Frederick

    2005-01-01

    Medical application of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) has been significantly hindered by the slow development of boron drug-targeting methodologies for the selective delivery of high boron concentration sto malignant cells. We have successfully sought to fill this need by creating liposomes suitable as in vivo boron delivery vehicles for BNCT. Delivery of therapeutic quantities of boron to tumors in murine models has been achieved with small unilamellar boron-rich liposomes. Subsequently, attempts have been made to improve delivery efficiency of liposomes encapsulating boron-containing water-soluble species into their hollow core by incorporating lipophilic boron compounds as addenda to the liposome bilayer, incorporating boron compounds as structural components of the bilayer (which however, poses the risk of sacrificing some stability), and combinations thereof. Regardless of the method, approximately 90% of the total liposome mass remains therapeutically inactive and comprised of the vehicle's construction materials, while less than 5% is boron for neutron targeting. Following this laboratory's intensive study, the observed tumor specificity of certain liposomes has been attributed to their diminutive size of these liposomes (30-150 nm), which enables these small vesicles to pass through the porous, immature vasculature of rapidly growing tumor tissue. We surmised that any amphiphilic nanoparticle of suitable size could possess some tumor selectivity. Consequently, the discovery of a very boron-rich nanoparticle delivery agent with biodistribution performance similar to unilamellar liposomes became one of our goals. Closomers, a new class of polyhedral borane derivatives, attracted us as an alternative BNCT drug-delivery system. We specifically envisioned dodeca (nido-carboranyl)-substituted closomers as possibly having a great potential role in BNCT drug delivery. They could function as extraordinarily boron-rich BNCT drugs since they are amphiphilic

  4. Boron-Containing Compounds for Liposome-Mediated Tumor Localization and Application to Neutron Capture Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawthorne, M. Frederick [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2005-04-07

    Medical application of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) has been significantly hindered by the slow development of boron drug-targeting methodologies for the selective delivery of high boron concentration sto malignant cells. We have successfully sought to fill this need by creating liposomes suitable as in vivo boron delivery vehicles for BNCT. Delivery of therapeutic quantities of boron to tumors in murine models has been achieved with small unilamellar boron-rich liposomes. Subsequently, attempts have been made to improve delivery efficiency of liposomes encapsulating boron-containing water-soluble species into their hollow core by incorporating lipophilic boron compounds as addenda to the liposome bilayer, incorporating boron compounds as structural components of the bilayer (which however, poses the risk of sacrificing some stability), and combinations thereof. Regardless of the method, approximately 90% of the total liposome mass remains therapeutically inactive and comprised of the vehicle's construction materials, while less than 5% is boron for neutron targeting. Following this laboratory's intensive study, the observed tumor specificity of certain liposomes has been attributed to their diminutive size of these liposomes (30-150 nm), which enables these small vesicles to pass through the porous, immature vasculature of rapidly growing tumor tissue. We surmised that any amphiphilic nanoparticle of suitable size could possess some tumor selectivity. Consequently, the discovery of a very boron-rich nanoparticle delivery agent with biodistribution performance similar to unilamellar liposomes became one of our goals. Closomers, a new class of polyhedral borane derivatives, attracted us as an alternative BNCT drug-delivery system. We specifically envisioned dodeca (nido-carboranyl)-substituted closomers as possibly having a great potential role in BNCT drug delivery. They could function as extraordinarily boron-rich BNCT drugs since they are

  5. Structural characterization of electrodeposited boron

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Raman spectroscopic examination was carried out to study the nature of bonding and the allotropic form of boron obtained after electrodeposition. The results obtained from transmission electron microscopy showed the presence of nanocrystallites embedded in an amorphous mass of boron. Raman microscopic studies ...

  6. Delamination of hexagonal boron nitride in a stirred media mill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damm, C., E-mail: cornelia.damm@fau.de; Koerner, J.; Peukert, W., E-mail: Wolfgang.Peukert@lfg.fau.de [University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Institute of Particle Technology (Germany)

    2013-04-15

    A scalable process for delamination of hexagonal boron nitride in an aqueous solution of the non-ionic surfactant TWEEN85 using a stirred media mill is presented. The size of the ZrO{sub 2} beads used as grinding media governs the dimensions of the ground boron nitride particles as atomic force microscopic investigations (AFM) reveal: the mean flakes thickness decreases from 3.5 to 1.5 nm and the ratio between mean flake area and mean flake thickness increases from 2,200 to 5,800 nm if the grinding media size is reduced from 0.8 to 0.1 mm. This result shows that a high number of stress events in combination with low stress energy (small grinding media) facilitate delamination of the layered material whereas at high stress energies in combination with a low number of stress events (large grinding media) breakage of the layers dominates over delamination. The results of particle height analyses by AFM show that few-layer structures have been formed by stirred media milling. This result is in agreement with the layer thickness dependence of the delamination energy for hexagonal boron nitride. The concentration of nanoparticles remaining dispersed after centrifugation of the ground suspension increases with grinding time and with decreasing grinding media size. After 5 h of grinding using 0.1 mm ZrO{sub 2} grinding media the yield of nanoparticle formation is about 5 wt%. The nanoparticles exhibit the typical Raman peak for hexagonal boron nitride at 1,366 cm{sup -1} showing that the in-plane order in the milled platelets is remained.

  7. Delamination of hexagonal boron nitride in a stirred media mill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damm, C.; Körner, J.; Peukert, W.

    2013-01-01

    A scalable process for delamination of hexagonal boron nitride in an aqueous solution of the non-ionic surfactant TWEEN85 using a stirred media mill is presented. The size of the ZrO 2 beads used as grinding media governs the dimensions of the ground boron nitride particles as atomic force microscopic investigations (AFM) reveal: the mean flakes thickness decreases from 3.5 to 1.5 nm and the ratio between mean flake area and mean flake thickness increases from 2,200 to 5,800 nm if the grinding media size is reduced from 0.8 to 0.1 mm. This result shows that a high number of stress events in combination with low stress energy (small grinding media) facilitate delamination of the layered material whereas at high stress energies in combination with a low number of stress events (large grinding media) breakage of the layers dominates over delamination. The results of particle height analyses by AFM show that few-layer structures have been formed by stirred media milling. This result is in agreement with the layer thickness dependence of the delamination energy for hexagonal boron nitride. The concentration of nanoparticles remaining dispersed after centrifugation of the ground suspension increases with grinding time and with decreasing grinding media size. After 5 h of grinding using 0.1 mm ZrO 2 grinding media the yield of nanoparticle formation is about 5 wt%. The nanoparticles exhibit the typical Raman peak for hexagonal boron nitride at 1,366 cm −1 showing that the in-plane order in the milled platelets is remained.

  8. Gold Nanoparticle Aggregation as a Probe of Antifreeze (Glyco) Protein-Inspired Ice Recrystallization Inhibition and Identification of New IRI Active Macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Daniel E; Congdon, Thomas; Rodger, Alison; Gibson, Matthew I

    2015-10-26

    Antifreeze (glyco)proteins are found in polar fish species and act to slow the rate of growth of ice crystals; a property known as ice recrystallization inhibition. The ability to slow ice growth is of huge technological importance especially in the cryopreservation of donor cells and tissue, but native antifreeze proteins are often not suitable, nor easily available. Therefore, the search for new materials that mimic this function is important, but currently limited by the low-throughout assays associated with the antifreeze properties. Here 30 nm gold nanoparticles are demonstrated to be useful colorimetric probes for ice recrystallization inhibition, giving a visible optical response and is compatible with 96 well plates for high-throughout studies. This method is faster, requires less infrastructure, and has easier interpretation than the currently used 'splat' methods. Using this method, a series of serum proteins were identified to have weak, but specific ice recrystallization inhibition activity, which was removed upon denaturation. It is hoped that high-throughput tools such as this will accelerate the discovery of new antifreeze mimics.

  9. Boron Activated Neutron Thermometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapsley, A. C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Instrument Research & Development

    1952-01-09

    The Brown Instrument Division of Minneapolis-Honeywell Regulator Co. have been making pilot models of boron coated neutron sensitive thermopiles, which show considerable promise of being effective indicators of slow neutron flux. Their loss in sensitivity in a year of operation in the maximum flux of CP-6 calculates to be less than 6 per cent. When used as rooftop indicators, the ratio of the signal of the two units would change by about 2 per cent in a year's time.

  10. Boron atom reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estes, R.; Tabacco, M.B.; Digiuseppe, T.G.; Davidovits, P.

    1982-01-01

    The reaction rates of atomic boron with various epoxides have been measured in a flow tube apparatus. The bimolecular rate constants, in units of cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 , are: 1,2-epoxypropane (8.6 x 10 -11 ), 1,2-epoxybutane (8.8 x 10 -11 ), 1,2,3,4-diepoxybutane (5.5 x 10 -11 ), 1-chloro-2,3-epoxypropane (5.7 x 10 -11 ), and 1,2-epoxy-3,3,3-trichloropropane (1.5 x 10 -11 ). (orig.)

  11. Facile Fabrication of Boron-Doped Titania Nanopowders by Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Vapor Synthesis Route and its Photocatalytic Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Saberyan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Vapor Synthesis (APCVS route is a process that can be used for the synthesis of doped-nanocrystalline powders with very small crystallite sizes having a narrow particle size distribution and high purity. In this study, APCVS technique was used to prepare boron-doped titania nanopowders. The effects of temperature, borate flow rate and water flow rate on the amount of doped boron were studied. The resultant powders were characterized by inductively coupled plasma (ICP, X-ray diffraction (XRD, nitrogen adsorption technique (BET, UV-visible DRS spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The optimum boron precursor flow rate was 80 sccm. The highest amount of doped boron was attained when water flow rate was 900 sccm. In comparison to the pristine TiO2, the boron-doped TiO2 nanoparticles showed blue-shift in band-gap energy of the samples.

  12. Ammonium-tungstate-promoted growth of boron nitride nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    E, Songfeng; Li, Chaowei; Li, Taotao; Geng, Renjie; Li, Qiulong; Lu, Weibang; Yao, Yagang

    2018-05-01

    Ammonium tungstate ((NH4)10W12O41 · xH2O) is a kind of oxygen-containing ammonium salt. The following study proves that it can be successfully used as a metal oxide alternative to produce boron oxide (B2O2) by oxidizing boron (B) in a traditional boron oxide chemical vapor deposition (BOCVD) process. This special oxidant promotes the simplistic fabrication of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) in a conventional horizontal tube furnace, an outcome which may have resulted from its strong oxidizability. The experimental results demonstrate that the mole ratio of B and (NH4)10W12O41 · xH2O is a key parameter in determining the formation, quality and quantity of BNNTs when stainless steel is employed as a catalyst. We also found that Mg(NO3)2 and MgO nanoparticles (NPs) can be used as catalysts to grow BNNTs with the same precursor. The BNNTs obtained from the Mg(NO3)2 catalyst were straighter than those obtained from the MgO NP catalyst. This could have been due to the different physical forms of the catalysts that were used.

  13. Therapeutic potential of inhibiting ABCE1 and eRF3 genes via siRNA strategy using chitosan nanoparticles in breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cengiz, Bagdat Burcu; Asik, Mehmet Dogan; Kara, Goknur; Turk, Mustafa; Denkbas, Emir Baki

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, targeted cancer therapy strategies have begun to take the place of the conventional treatments. Inhibition of the specific genes, involved in cancer progress, via small interfering RNA (siRNA) has become one of the promising therapeutic approaches for cancer therapy. However, due to rapid nuclease degradation and poor cellular uptake of siRNA, a suitable carrier for siRNA penetration inside the cells is required. We used chitosan nanoparticles (CS-NPs) to efficiently deliver ATP-binding casette E1 (ABCE1) and eukaryotic release factor 3 (eRF3)-targeting siRNAs, individually and together, to reduce the proliferation and induce the apoptosis of breast cancer cells. The CS-NPs were generated by ionic gelation method using tripolyphosphate (TPP) as a crosslinker. Nanoparticles (NPs) were obtained with diameters ranging between 110 and 230 nm and the zeta potential of approximately 27 mV optimizing the solution pH to 4.5 and CS/TPP mass ratio to 3:1. Loading efficiencies of 98.69 % ± 0.051 and 98.83 % ± 0.047 were achieved when ABCE1 siRNA and eRF3 siRNA were entrapped into the NPs, respectively. Cell proliferation assay demonstrated that siRNA-loaded CS-NPs were more effective on cancer cells when compared to siRNAs without CS-NPs. Parallel results were also obtained by apoptosis/necrosis, double-staining analysis. Within our study, the potency of ABCE1 and eRF3 siRNAs were shown for the first time with this kind of polymeric delivery system. The results also indicated that ABCE1 and eRF3, important molecules in protein synthesis, could serve as effective targets to inhibit the cancer cells.

  14. Therapeutic potential of inhibiting ABCE1 and eRF3 genes via siRNA strategy using chitosan nanoparticles in breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cengiz, Bagdat Burcu; Asik, Mehmet Dogan [Hacettepe University, Nanotechnology and Nanomedicine Division (Turkey); Kara, Goknur [Hacettepe University, Biochemistry Division, Chemistry Department (Turkey); Turk, Mustafa [Kirikkale University, Bioengineering Department (Turkey); Denkbas, Emir Baki, E-mail: denkbas@hacettepe.edu.tr [Hacettepe University, Biochemistry Division, Chemistry Department (Turkey)

    2015-04-15

    In recent years, targeted cancer therapy strategies have begun to take the place of the conventional treatments. Inhibition of the specific genes, involved in cancer progress, via small interfering RNA (siRNA) has become one of the promising therapeutic approaches for cancer therapy. However, due to rapid nuclease degradation and poor cellular uptake of siRNA, a suitable carrier for siRNA penetration inside the cells is required. We used chitosan nanoparticles (CS-NPs) to efficiently deliver ATP-binding casette E1 (ABCE1) and eukaryotic release factor 3 (eRF3)-targeting siRNAs, individually and together, to reduce the proliferation and induce the apoptosis of breast cancer cells. The CS-NPs were generated by ionic gelation method using tripolyphosphate (TPP) as a crosslinker. Nanoparticles (NPs) were obtained with diameters ranging between 110 and 230 nm and the zeta potential of approximately 27 mV optimizing the solution pH to 4.5 and CS/TPP mass ratio to 3:1. Loading efficiencies of 98.69 % ± 0.051 and 98.83 % ± 0.047 were achieved when ABCE1 siRNA and eRF3 siRNA were entrapped into the NPs, respectively. Cell proliferation assay demonstrated that siRNA-loaded CS-NPs were more effective on cancer cells when compared to siRNAs without CS-NPs. Parallel results were also obtained by apoptosis/necrosis, double-staining analysis. Within our study, the potency of ABCE1 and eRF3 siRNAs were shown for the first time with this kind of polymeric delivery system. The results also indicated that ABCE1 and eRF3, important molecules in protein synthesis, could serve as effective targets to inhibit the cancer cells.

  15. Boron isotopes and groundwater pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vengosh, A.

    1999-01-01

    Boron can be used as a tracer in ground water because of its high solubility in aqueous solutions, natural abundance in all waters, and the lack of effects by evaporation, volatilisation, oxidation-reduction reactions. Since the boron concentrations in pristine ground waters are generally low and contaminant sources are usually enriched in boron, the δ 11 B of groundwater is highly sensitive to the impact of contamination. The large isotopic variations of the potential sources can be used to trace the origin of the contamination and to reconstruct mixing and flow paths

  16. Lattice dynamics of α boron and of boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vast, N.

    1999-01-01

    The atomic structure and the lattice dynamics of α boron and of B 4 C boron carbide have been studied by Density Functional Theory (D.F.T.) and Density Functional Perturbation Theory (D.F.P.T.). The bulk moduli of the unit-cell and of the icosahedron have been investigated, and the equation of state at zero temperature has been determined. In α boron, Raman diffusion and infrared absorption have been studied under pressure, and the theoretical and experimental Grueneisen coefficients have been compared. In boron carbide, inspection of the theoretical and experimental vibrational spectra has led to the determination of the atomic structure of B 4 C. Finally, the effects of isotopic disorder have been modeled by an exact method beyond the mean-field approximation, and the effects onto the Raman lines has been investigated. The method has been applied to isotopic alloys of diamond and germanium. (author)

  17. A new and effective approach to boron removal by using novel boron-specific fungi isolated from boron mining wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taştan, Burcu Ertit; Çakir, Dilara Nur; Dönmez, Gönül

    2016-01-01

    Boron-resistant fungi were isolated from the wastewater of a boron mine in Turkey. Boron removal efficiencies of Penicillium crustosum and Rhodotorula mucilaginosa were detected in different media compositions. Minimal Salt Medium (MSM) and two different waste media containing molasses (WM-1) or whey + molasses (WM-2) were tested to make this process cost effective when scaled up. Both isolates achieved high boron removal yields at the highest boron concentrations tested in MSM and WM-1. The maximum boron removal yield by P. crustosum was 45.68% at 33.95 mg l(-1) initial boron concentration in MSM, and was 38.97% at 42.76 mg l(-1) boron for R. mucilaginosa, which seemed to offer an economically feasible method of removing boron from the effluents.

  18. A multi-target therapeutic potential of Prunus domestica gum stabilized nanoparticles exhibited prospective anticancer, antibacterial, urease-inhibition, anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Nazar Ul; Amin, Raza; Shahid, Muhammad; Amin, Muhammad; Zaib, Sumera; Iqbal, Jamshed

    2017-05-23

    Phytotherapeutics exhibit diverse pharmacological effects that are based on the combined action of a mixture of phytoconstituents. In this study, Prunus domestica gum-loaded, stabilized gold and silver nanoparticles (Au/Ag-NPs) were evaluated for their prospective anticancer, antibacterial, urease-inhibition, anti-inflammatory, and analgesic properties. Au/Ag-NPs were biosynthesized and characterized with UV-Vis, FTIR, SEM, EDX, and XRD techniques. The effect of gum and metal ion concentration, reaction temperature, and time on the synthetic stability of nanoparticles was studied along with their post-synthetic stability against varying pH and salt concentrations, long-term storage and extremes of temperature. Nanoparticles were tested for anticancer (HeLa cervical cancer cells), antibacterial (Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa), urease inhibition (jack-bean urease), anti-inflammatory (carrageenan-induced paw edema), and antinociceptive (abdominal constriction response) activities. The nanoparticles were mostly spherical with an average particle size between 7 and 30 nm (Au-NPs) and 5-30 nm (Ag-NPs). Au/Ag-NPs maintained their colloidal stability and nanoscale characteristics against variations in physicochemical factors. Au/Ag-NPs have potent anticancer potential (IC 50  = 2.14 ± 0.15 μg/mL and 3.45 ± 0.23 μg/mL). Au/Ag-NPs selectively suppressed the growth of S. aureus (10.5 ± 0.6 mm, 19.7 ± 0.4 mm), E. coli (10 ± 0.4 mm, 14.4 ± 0.7 mm), and P. aeruginosa (8.2 ± 0.3 mm, 13.1 ± 0.2 mm), as well as showed preferential inhibition against jack-bean urease (19.2 ± 0.86%, 21.5 ± 1.17%). At doses of 40 and 80 mg/kg, Au-NPs significantly ameliorated the increase in paw edema during the 1st h (P < 0.05, P < 0.01) and 2-5 h (P < 0.001) of carrageenan-induced inflammation compared to the 200 and 400 mg/kg doses of P. domestica gum (P < 0.05, P < 0.001). At similar doses, Au-NPs also

  19. Nothing Boring About Boron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzorno, Lara

    2015-01-01

    The trace mineral boron is a micronutrient with diverse and vitally important roles in metabolism that render it necessary for plant, animal, and human health, and as recent research suggests, possibly for the evolution of life on Earth. As the current article shows, boron has been proven to be an important trace mineral because it (1) is essential for the growth and maintenance of bone; (2) greatly improves wound healing; (3) beneficially impacts the body’s use of estrogen, testosterone, and vitamin D; (4) boosts magnesium absorption; (5) reduces levels of inflammatory biomarkers, such as high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α); (6) raises levels of antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, and glutathione peroxidase; (7) protects against pesticide-induced oxidative stress and heavy-metal toxicity; (8) improves the brains electrical activity, cognitive performance, and short-term memory for elders; (9) influences the formation and activity of key biomolecules, such as S-adenosyl methionine (SAM-e) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+); (10) has demonstrated preventive and therapeutic effects in a number of cancers, such as prostate, cervical, and lung cancers, and multiple and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma; and (11) may help ameliorate the adverse effects of traditional chemotherapeutic agents. In none of the numerous studies conducted to date, however, do boron’s beneficial effects appear at intakes > 3 mg/d. No estimated average requirements (EARs) or dietary reference intakes (DRIs) have been set for boron—only an upper intake level (UL) of 20 mg/d for individuals aged ≥ 18 y. The absence of studies showing harm in conjunction with the substantial number of articles showing benefits support the consideration of boron supplementation of 3 mg/d for any individual who is consuming a diet lacking in fruits and vegetables or who is at risk for or has osteopenia; osteoporosis

  20. Inhibition of murine bladder cancer cell growth in vitro by photocontrollable siRNA based on upconversion fluorescent nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huichen Guo

    Full Text Available This study provides a unique approach to activate caged small interfering RNAs (siRNAs using indirect UV light emitted by the near-infrared (NIR-to-UV upconversion process to achieve high spatial and temporal gene interference patterns. siRNA molecules against the anti-apoptotic gene survivin was caged by light-sensitive molecules (4,5-dimethoxy-2-nitroacetophenone, DMNPE, which rendered them temporarily non-functional. NIR-to-UV NaYF4:Yb,Tm upconversion nanoparticles (UCPs served as delivery vehicles and activators of the caged siRNA molecules in murine bladder cancer cells (MB49 cell line. Upconverted UV light at 355 nm was emitted from the NIR-irradiated UCPs, which well coincided with the wavelength needed to uncage DMNPE. Consequently, UV light acted as a switch to uncage the delivered siRNA molecule, thereby rendering fully functional for exerting its therapeutic effect in the bladder cancer cells. To achieve the highest RNA interference efficiency, conditions such as time after cellular uptake, excitation time, UCPs concentration and laser power were optimized. Results showed that 200 µg/mL nanoparticle concentration combined with 12 h incubation with MB49 cells and excitation with NIR laser at 100 mW power for 15 min provided the ideal interference efficiency and strongest induction of MB49 cell death. Our findings demonstrate the potential biological application of UCPs in treating bladder cancer by a novel therapeutic approach.

  1. Alleviation of Boron Stress through Plant Derived Smoke Extracts in Sorghum bicolor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pirzada Khan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Boron is an essential micronutrient necessary for plant growth at optimum concentration. However, at high concentrations boron affects plant growth and is toxic to cells. Aqueous extract of plant-derived smoke has been used as a growth regulator for the last two decades to improve seed germination and seedling vigor. It has been established that plant-derived smoke possesses some compounds that act like plant growth hormones. The present research was the first comprehensive attempt to investigate the alleviation of boron stress with plant-derived smoke aqueous extract on Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor seed. Smoke extracts of five plants, i.e. Cymbopogon jwarancusa, Eucalyptus camaldulensis, Peganum harmala, Datura alba and Melia azedarach each with six dilutions (Concentrated, 1:100, 1:200, 1:300, 1:400 and 1:500 were used. While boron solutions at concentrations of 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 ppm were used for stress. Among the dilutions of smoke, 1:500 of E. camaldulensis significantly increased germination percentage, root and shoot length, number of secondary roots and fresh weight of root and shoot while, boron stress reduced growth of Sorghum. It was observed that combined effect of boron solution and E. camaldulensis smoke extract overcome inhibition and significantly improved plant growth. Present research work investigated that the smoke solution has the potential to alleviate boron toxicity by reducing the uptake of boron by maintaining integrity of plant cell wall. The present investigation suggested that plant derived smoke has the potential to alleviate boron stress and can be used to overcome yield losses caused by boron stress to plants.

  2. Nano boron nitride flatland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakdel, Amir; Bando, Yoshio; Golberg, Dmitri

    2014-02-07

    Recent years have witnessed many breakthroughs in research on two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials, among which is hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), a layered material with a regular network of BN hexagons. This review provides an insight into the marvellous nano BN flatland, beginning with a concise introduction to BN and its low-dimensional nanostructures, followed by an overview of the past and current state of research on 2D BN nanostructures. A comprehensive review of the structural characteristics and synthetic routes of BN monolayers, multilayers, nanomeshes, nanowaves, nanoflakes, nanosheets and nanoribbons is presented. In addition, electronic, optical, thermal, mechanical, magnetic, piezoelectric, catalytic, ecological, biological and wetting properties, applications and research perspectives for these novel 2D nanomaterials are discussed.

  3. Metal interactions with boron clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimes, R.N.

    1982-01-01

    This book presents information on the following topics: the structural and bonding features of metallaboranes and metallacarboranes; transition-metal derivatives of nido-boranes and some related species; interactions of metal groups with the octahydrotriborate (1-) anion, B 3 H 8 ; metallaboron cage compounds of the main group metals; closo-carborane-metal complexes containing metal-carbon and metal-boron omega-bonds; electrochemistry of metallaboron cage compounds; and boron clusters with transition metal-hydrogen bonds

  4. Boron diffusion in silicon devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohatgi, Ajeet; Kim, Dong Seop; Nakayashiki, Kenta; Rounsaville, Brian

    2010-09-07

    Disclosed are various embodiments that include a process, an arrangement, and an apparatus for boron diffusion in a wafer. In one representative embodiment, a process is provided in which a boric oxide solution is applied to a surface of the wafer. Thereafter, the wafer is subjected to a fast heat ramp-up associated with a first heating cycle that results in a release of an amount of boron for diffusion into the wafer.

  5. Boron Fullerenes: A First-Principles Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalez Szwacki Nevill

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractA family of unusually stable boron cages was identified and examined using first-principles local-density functional method. The structure of the fullerenes is similar to that of the B12icosahedron and consists of six crossing double-rings. The energetically most stable fullerene is made up of 180 boron atoms. A connection between the fullerene family and its precursors, boron sheets, is made. We show that the most stable boron sheets are not necessarily precursors of very stable boron cages. Our finding is a step forward in the understanding of the structure of the recently produced boron nanotubes.

  6. Arsenite-loaded nanoparticles inhibit the invasion and metastasis of a hepatocellular carcinoma: in vitro and in vivo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Xiaoqin; Yin, Zhenyu; Jin, Jianbin; Li, Hui; Zhou, Jian; Zhao, Zhenghuan; Zhang, Sheng; Zhao, Wenxiu; Xie, Chengrong; Li, Jie; Feng, Min; Lin, Hongyu; Wang, Xiaomin; Gao, Jinhao

    2017-11-01

    Postoperative recurrence and metastasis are the major problems for the current treatment of hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC) in the clinic, including hepatectomy and liver transplantation. Here, we report that arsentic-loaded nanoparticles (ALNPs) are able to reduce the invasion of HCC cells in vitro, and, more importantly, can strongly suppress the invasion and metastasis of HCC in vivo without adverse side effects. Compared to free drug arsenic trioxide , ALNPs can deliver the drug into cancer cells more efficiently, destroy the structure of microtubules and reduce the aggregation of microfilaments in cell membranes more significantly. Furthermore, our results also reveal that tumor cells in murine blood were reduced remarkably after intravenous injection of ALNPs, indicating that this nano-drug may efficiently kill circulating tumor cells in vivo. In conclusion, our nano-drug ALNPs have great potential for the suppression of metastasis of HCC, which may open up a new avenue for the effective treatment of HCC without metastasis and recurrence.

  7. Quantifying the Solubility of Boron Nitride Nanotubes and Sheets with Static Light Scattering and Refractometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mutz, M [The University of Tennessee; Eastwood, Eric Allen [ORNL; Dadmun, Mark D [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    The dissolution of nanoparticles, particularly those containing boron, is an important area of interest for polymer nanocomposite formation and material development. In this work, the solubility of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNT), functionalized boron nitride nanotubes (FBNNT), and boron nitride sheets (BNZG) is quantified in toluene and THF with static light scattering, refractometry, UV vis spectroscopy, and physical observations. UV vis spectroscopy provides a method to determine the concentration and solubility limits of the solutions tested. Using light scattering, the second virial coefficient, A2, is determined and used to calculate , the solute solvent interaction parameter. The Hildebrand solubility parameter, , is then extracted from this data using the Hildebrand Scatchard Solution Theory. A list of potential good solvents based on the estimated value is provided for each nanoparticle. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and prepolymers (EN4 and EN8) used to synthesize polyurethanes were also tested, because the published and molar attraction constants of these materials provided a selfconsistent check. The dn/dc of SWNTs and boron-containing particles was measured for the first time in this work. A solvent screen for BN-ZG provides additional information that supports the obtained and . Three systems were found to have values below 0.5 and were thermodynamically soluble: BNNT in THF, EN8 in THF, and EN8 in toluene.

  8. Tribological behaviour of mechanically synthesized titanium-boron carbide nanostructured coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliofkhazraei, M; Rouhaghdam, A Sabour

    2012-08-01

    In this paper, titanium-boron carbide (Ti/B4C) nanocomposite coatings with different B4C nanoparticles contents were fabricated by surface mechanical attrition treatment (SMAT) method by using B4C nanoparticles with average nanoparticle size of 40 nm. The characteristics of the nanopowder and coatings were evaluated by microhardness test, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Friction and wear performances of nanocomposite coatings and pure titanium substrate were comparatively investigated, with the effect of the boron carbide content on the friction and wear behaviours to be emphasized. The results show the microhardness, friction and wear behaviours of nanocomposite coatings are closely related with boron carbide nanoparticle content. Nanocomposite coating with low B4C content shows somewhat (slight) increased microhardness and wear resistance than pure titanium substrate, while nanocomposite coating with high B4C content has much better (sharp increase) wear resistance than pure titanium substrate. The effect of B4C nanoparticles on microhardness and wear resistance was discussed.

  9. Boron Drug Delivery via Encapsulated Magnetic Nanocomposites: A New Approach for BNCT in Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinghuai Zhu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ortho-carborane cages have been successfully attached to modified magnetic nanoparticles via catalytic azide-alkyne cycloadditions between 1-R-2-butyl-Ortho-C2B10H10(R=Me,3;Ph,4 and propargyl group-enriched magnetic nanoparticles. A loading amount of 9.83 mmol boron atom/g starch-matrixed magnetic nanoparticles has been reached. The resulting nanocomposites have been found to be highly tumor-targeted vehicles under the influence of an external magnetic field (1.14T, yielding a high boron concentration of 51.4 μg/g tumor and ratios of around 10 : 1 tumor to normal tissues.

  10. A polymeric nanoparticle formulation of curcumin in combination with sorafenib synergistically inhibits tumor growth and metastasis in an orthotopic model of human hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Bo [Department of Liver Surgery, Liver Cancer Institute, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Cancer Invasion, Ministry of Education, Shanghai, 200032 (China); Sun, Ding [Department of Liver Surgery, Liver Cancer Institute, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Cancer Invasion, Ministry of Education, Shanghai, 200032 (China); Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou, 215004 (China); Sun, Chao; Sun, Yun-Fan; Sun, Hai-Xiang [Department of Liver Surgery, Liver Cancer Institute, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Cancer Invasion, Ministry of Education, Shanghai, 200032 (China); Zhu, Qing-Feng [The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Division of Gastrointestinal and Liver Pathology, Baltimore, MD, 21205 (United States); Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200032 (China); Yang, Xin-Rong [Department of Liver Surgery, Liver Cancer Institute, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Cancer Invasion, Ministry of Education, Shanghai, 200032 (China); Gao, Ya-Bo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200032 (China); Tang, Wei-Guo [Department of Liver Surgery, Liver Cancer Institute, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Cancer Invasion, Ministry of Education, Shanghai, 200032 (China); Fan, Jia [Department of Liver Surgery, Liver Cancer Institute, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Cancer Invasion, Ministry of Education, Shanghai, 200032 (China); Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200032 (China); Maitra, Anirban [The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Departments of Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 21205 (United States); and others

    2015-12-25

    Curcumin, a yellow polyphenol extracted from the rhizome of turmeric root (Curcuma longa) has potent anti-cancer properties in many types of tumors with ability to reverse multidrug resistance of cancer cells. However, widespread clinical application of this agent in cancer and other diseases has been limited due to its poor aqueous solubility. The recent findings of polymeric nanoparticle formulation of curcumin (NFC) have shown the potential for circumventing the problem of poor solubility, however evidences for NFC's anti-cancer and reverse multidrug resistance properties are lacking. Here we provide models of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the most common form of primary liver cancer, in vitro and in vivo to evaluate the efficacy of NFC alone and in combination with sorafenib, a kinase inhibitor approved for treatment of HCC. Results showed that NFC not only inhibited the proliferation and invasion of HCC cell lines in vitro, but also drastically suppressed primary tumor growth and lung metastases in vivo. Moreover, in combination with sorafenib, NFC induced HCC cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Mechanistically, NFC and sorafenib synergistically down-regulated the expression of MMP9 via NF-κB/p65 signaling pathway. Furthermore, the combination therapy significantly decreased the population of CD133-positive HCC cells, which have been reported as cancer initiating cells in HCC. Taken together, NanoCurcumin provides an opportunity to expand the clinical repertoire of this agent. Additional studies utilizing a combination of NanoCurcumin and sorafenib in HCC are needed for further clinical development. - Highlights: • Polymeric nanoparticle formulation of curcumin not only inhibited the proliferation and invasion of HCC cell lines in vitro, but also drastically suppressed primary tumor growth and lung metastases in vivo. • In combination with sorafenib, NanoCurcumin induced HCC cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. • NanoCurcumin and

  11. A polymeric nanoparticle formulation of curcumin in combination with sorafenib synergistically inhibits tumor growth and metastasis in an orthotopic model of human hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Bo; Sun, Ding; Sun, Chao; Sun, Yun-Fan; Sun, Hai-Xiang; Zhu, Qing-Feng; Yang, Xin-Rong; Gao, Ya-Bo; Tang, Wei-Guo; Fan, Jia; Maitra, Anirban

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin, a yellow polyphenol extracted from the rhizome of turmeric root (Curcuma longa) has potent anti-cancer properties in many types of tumors with ability to reverse multidrug resistance of cancer cells. However, widespread clinical application of this agent in cancer and other diseases has been limited due to its poor aqueous solubility. The recent findings of polymeric nanoparticle formulation of curcumin (NFC) have shown the potential for circumventing the problem of poor solubility, however evidences for NFC's anti-cancer and reverse multidrug resistance properties are lacking. Here we provide models of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the most common form of primary liver cancer, in vitro and in vivo to evaluate the efficacy of NFC alone and in combination with sorafenib, a kinase inhibitor approved for treatment of HCC. Results showed that NFC not only inhibited the proliferation and invasion of HCC cell lines in vitro, but also drastically suppressed primary tumor growth and lung metastases in vivo. Moreover, in combination with sorafenib, NFC induced HCC cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Mechanistically, NFC and sorafenib synergistically down-regulated the expression of MMP9 via NF-κB/p65 signaling pathway. Furthermore, the combination therapy significantly decreased the population of CD133-positive HCC cells, which have been reported as cancer initiating cells in HCC. Taken together, NanoCurcumin provides an opportunity to expand the clinical repertoire of this agent. Additional studies utilizing a combination of NanoCurcumin and sorafenib in HCC are needed for further clinical development. - Highlights: • Polymeric nanoparticle formulation of curcumin not only inhibited the proliferation and invasion of HCC cell lines in vitro, but also drastically suppressed primary tumor growth and lung metastases in vivo. • In combination with sorafenib, NanoCurcumin induced HCC cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. • NanoCurcumin and

  12. Aurora kinase inhibitors attached to iron oxide nanoparticles enhances inhibition of the growth of liver cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiquan [Southeast University, State Key Laboratory of Bioelectronics and Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Biomaterials and Devices, School of Biological Science & Medical Engineering (China); Xie, Li [Southeast University, Zhongda Hospital, School of Medicine (China); Zheng, Ming; Yao, Juan [Jiangsu Chai Tai Tianqing Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd. (China); Song, Lina [Southeast University, State Key Laboratory of Bioelectronics and Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Biomaterials and Devices, School of Biological Science & Medical Engineering (China); Chang, Weiwei [Jiangsu Chai Tai Tianqing Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd. (China); Zhang, Yu; Ji, Min, E-mail: minji888@hotmail.com; Gu, Ning, E-mail: guning@seu.edu.cn [Southeast University, State Key Laboratory of Bioelectronics and Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Biomaterials and Devices, School of Biological Science & Medical Engineering (China); Zhan, Xi, E-mail: zhan01@gmail.com [University of Maryland School of Medicine, The Center of Vascular and Inflammatory Diseases, The Department of Pathology (United States)

    2015-06-15

    We have developed a novel Aurora kinase inhibitor (AKI) AM-005, an analogue of pan-AKI AT-9283. To improve the intracellular efficacy of AM-005 and AT-9283, we utilized magnetite nanoparticles (NPs) to deliver AM-005 and AT-9283 into human SMMC-7721 and HepG2 liver cancer cells. The drug-loaded NPs were prepared through quasi-emulsion solvent diffusion of magnetite NPs with AM-005 or AT-9283. The encapsulated drugs were readily released from NPs, preferentially at low pHs. Upon exposure, cancer cells effectively internalized drug-loaded NPs into lysosome-like vesicles, which triggered a series of cellular changes, including the formation of enlarged cytoplasm, the significant increase of membrane permeability, and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The increased ROS synthesis sustained over 72 h, whereas that in the cells treated with free-form drugs declined rapidly after 48 h. However, chemical sequestration of the iron core of NPs had a minor influence on the generation of intracellular ROS. On the other hand, uncoupling of AM-005 uptake with NP internalization into cells failed to induce ROS synthesis. Overall, our approach achieved two-fold increase in suppressing the viability of tumor cells in vitro and the growth of tumors in vivo. We conclude that magnetite NPs can be used as pH responsive nanocarriers that are able to improve the efficacy of AKIs.

  13. Magnetite nanoparticles inhibit tumor growth and upregulate the expression of p53/p16 in Ehrlich solid carcinoma bearing mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heba Bassiony

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs have been widely used as contrast agents and have promising approaches in cancer treatment. In the present study we used Ehrlich solid carcinoma (ESC bearing mice as a model to investigate MNPs antitumor activity, their effect on expression of p53 and p16 genes as an indicator for apoptotic induction in tumor tissues. METHOD: MNPs coated with ascorbic acid (size: 25.0±5.0 nm were synthesized by co-precipitation method and characterized. Ehrlich mice model were treated with MNPs using 60 mg/Kg day by day for 14 injections; intratumorally (IT or intraperitoneally (IP. Tumor size, pathological changes and iron content in tumor and normal muscle tissues were assessed. We also assessed changes in expression levels of p53 and p16 genes in addition to p53 protein level by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: Our results revealed that tumor growth was significantly reduced by IT and IP MNPs injection compared to untreated tumor. A significant increase in p53 and p16 mRNA expression was detected in Ehrlich solid tumors of IT and IP treated groups compared to untreated Ehrlich solid tumor. This increase was accompanied with increase in p53 protein expression. It is worth mentioning that no significant difference in expression of p53 and p16 could be detected between IT ESC and control group. CONCLUSION: MNPs might be more effective in breast cancer treatment if injected intratumorally to be directed to the tumor tissues.

  14. Boronic acid-tethered amphiphilic hyaluronic acid derivative-based nanoassemblies for tumor targeting and penetration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jae Young; Hong, Eun-Hye; Lee, Song Yi; Lee, Jae-Young; Song, Jae-Hyoung; Ko, Seung-Hak; Shim, Jae-Seong; Choe, Sunghwa; Kim, Dae-Duk; Ko, Hyun-Jeong; Cho, Hyun-Jong

    2017-04-15

    (3-Aminomethylphenyl)boronic acid (AMPB)-installed hyaluronic acid-ceramide (HACE)-based nanoparticles (NPs), including manassantin B (MB), were fabricated for tumor-targeted delivery. The amine group of AMPB was conjugated to the carboxylic acid group of hyaluronic acid (HA) via amide bond formation, and synthesis was confirmed by spectroscopic methods. HACE-AMPB/MB NPs with a 239-nm mean diameter, narrow size distribution, negative zeta potential, and >90% drug encapsulation efficiency were fabricated. Exposed AMPB in the outer surface of HACE-AMPB NPs (in the aqueous environment) may react with sialic acid of cancer cells. The improved cellular accumulation efficiency, in vitro antitumor efficacy, and tumor penetration efficiency of HACE-AMPB/MB NPs, compared with HACE/MB NPs, in MDA-MB-231 cells (CD44 receptor-positive human breast adenocarcinoma cells) may be based on the CD44 receptor-mediated endocytosis and phenylboronic acid-sialic acid interaction. Enhanced in vivo tumor targetability, infiltration efficiency, and antitumor efficacies of HACE-AMPB NPs, compared with HACE NPs, were observed in a MDA-MB-231 tumor-xenografted mouse model. In addition to passive tumor targeting (based on an enhanced permeability and retention effect) and active tumor targeting (interaction between HA and CD44 receptor), the phenylboronic acid-sialic acid interaction can play important roles in augmented tumor targeting and penetration of HACE-AMPB NPs. STATEMENT OF SIGNIFICANCE: (3-Aminomethylphenyl)boronic acid (AMPB)-tethered hyaluronic acid-ceramide (HACE)-based nanoparticles (NPs), including manassantin B (MB), were fabricated and their tumor targeting and penetration efficiencies were assessed in MDA-MB-231 (CD44 receptor-positive human adenocarcinoma) tumor models. MB, which exhibited antitumor efficacies via the inhibition of angiogenesis and hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1, was entrapped in HACE-AMPB NPs in this study. Phenylboronic acid located in the outer surface

  15. Suppression of mRNA Nanoparticle Transfection in Human Fibroblasts by Selected Interferon Inhibiting Small Molecule Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Krishnan, Manoj N; Phua, Kyle K L

    2017-07-31

    In vitro transcribed (IVT) mRNA is increasingly applied in lieu of DNA to deliver reprogramming genes to fibroblasts for stem cell derivation. However, IVT mRNA induces interferon (IFN) responses from mammalian cells that reduces transfection efficiency. It has been previously suggested that small molecule inhibitors of IFN are a viable strategy to enhance mRNA transfection efficiency. Herein, we screen a list of commercially available small molecules, including published IFN inhibitors, for their potential to enhance mRNA transfection in BJ fibroblasts. Transfection enhancement is quantified by relative mean fluorescence intensity of translated green fluorescent protein (GFP) in treated cells compared to dimethyl sulfoxide treated controls. Within toxicological constrains, all tested small molecules did not enhance mRNA transfection in BJ fibroblasts while a third of the tested compounds unexpectedly inhibited GFP expression even though IFN-β production is inhibited. Based on the results of our study, we conclude that small molecule inhibitors, including IFN inhibitors, tested in this study do not enhance in vitro mRNA transfection efficiency in human fibroblasts.

  16. Future boronated molecules for neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soloway, A.H.; Alam, F.; Barth, R.F.

    1986-01-01

    The ability of several boron compounds to localize in tumor cells is examined. A number of first and second generation compounds which were not synthesized specifically for localization are described. Among these are the boron hydrides and boranes. A third generation of boron compounds are designed for selective localization. These fall into two groups: relatively small organic compounds and boronated antibodies, both of which are discussed here

  17. Compression and Associated Properties of Boron Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    Klandadze, G.I., and Eristavi, A.M., 1999: IR- Active Phonons and Structure Elements of Isotope - Enriched Boron Carbide, J. Sol. State Chem. 154, 79- 86...COMPRESSION AND ASSOCIATED PROPERTIES OF BORON CARBIDE D. P. Dandekar*and J. A. Ciezak Army Research Laboratory, APG, MD 21005 M. Somayazulu...of the observed loss of shear strength in boron carbide under plane shock wave compression to amorphization in boron carbide under triaxial stress

  18. Lattice vibrations in α-boron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, W.

    1976-01-01

    α-rhombohedral boron is the simplest boron modification, with only 12 atoms per unit cell. The boron atoms are arranged in B 12 icosahedra, which are centered at the lattice points of a primitive rhombohedral lattice. The icosahedra are slightly deformed, as the five-fold symmetry of the ideal icosahedron is incompatible with any crystal structure. The lattice dynamics of α-boron are discussed in terms of the model developed by Weber and Thorpe. (Auth.)

  19. Synthesis of oligomeric boron-containing phospolyols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondarenko, S.N.; Khokhlova, T.V.; Orlova, S.A.; Tuzhikov, O.I.

    2006-01-01

    Structure is investigated and reactivity of oligomeric boron-containing phospolyols is studied. Oligomeric boron-containing compound interacts with ethylene glycol, diethylene glycol, glycerol, 1,4-butandiol with formation of linear boron-containing phospolyols. Reactions proceed in noncatalytic conditions with stoichiometric quantities of reagents at 170-200 Deg C in inert gas media. Boron-containing phospolyols are viscous uncolored liquids, their physicochemical characteristics are represented [ru

  20. Nanoparticle-mediated dual delivery of resveratrol and DAP5 ameliorates kidney ischemia/reperfusion injury by inhibiting cell apoptosis and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yong; Zhang, Bo; Xie, Da; Hu, Yu; Li, Hai-Lun; Zhong, Li-Li; Wang, Hong-Wu; Jiang, Wei; Ke, Zun-Ping; Zheng, Dong-Hui

    2017-06-13

    Ischemia reperfusion (I/R) injury is a leading cause of acute kidney injury with high morbidity and mortality due to limited therapy. NMDA receptor inhibitor (DAP5) and resveratrol (Res) could ameliorate kidney I/R injury, but their use is limited by low aqueous solubility and poor stability. Here, we examined the potential protective effects of Res-DAP5 nanoparticles (NP) against renal I/R injury. Mice were subjected to renal ischemia for 30 min followed by reperfusion for 24 h. The results showed that Res-DAP5-NP could decreased serum creatinine (Cr) and urea nitrogen (BUN), alleviated tubular damage and oxidative stress. In addition, Res-DAP5-NP suppressed cell apoptosis, promoted the expression of p-DAPK, and inhibited the expression of p-CaMK and p-AKT. Furthermore, Res-DAP5-NP decreased the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and p-IκBα induced by renal I/R injury. In addition, Res-DAP5-NP also attenuated renal I/R injury in vivo, as manifested by increase in cell viability, SOD level, and the expression of p-DAPK, decreases in intracellular Ca2+ concentration and the expression of p-CaMK. Taken together, our findings indicates that Res-DAP5-NP could effectively protect renal I/R injury by inhibiting apoptosis and inflammation responses, possibly through AKT/NMDA/CaMK/DAPK and NF-κB pathways.

  1. Effects of adsorbed and templated nanosilver in mesoporous calcium-silicate nanoparticles on inhibition of bacteria colonization of dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan W

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Wei Fan,1,* Daming Wu,1,* Franklin R Tay,2 Tengjiao Ma,1 Yujie Wu,1 Bing Fan1 1The State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Basic Science of Stomatology (Hubei-MOST and Key Laboratory of Oral Biomedicine Ministry of Education, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Wuhan University, Wuhan, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Endodontics, Georgia Regents University, Augusta, Georgia, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Mesoporous calcium-silicate nanoparticles (MCSNs are advanced biomaterials for controlled drug delivery and mineralization induction. Nanosilver-incorporated MCSNs (Ag-MCSNs were prepared in the present study using both the adsorption and template methods. Both versions of Ag-MCSNs showed characteristic morphology of mesoporous materials and exhibited sustained release of ions over time. In antibacterial testing against planktonic Enterococcus faecalis, Ag-MCSNs showed significantly better antibacterial effects when compared with MCSNs (P<0.05. The Ag-MCSNs aggregated on the dentin surface of root canal walls and infiltrated into dentinal tubules after ultrasound activation, significantly inhibiting the adherence and colonization of E. faecalis on dentin (P<0.05. Despite this, Ag-MCSNs with templated nanosilver showed much lower cytotoxicity than Ag-MCSNs with adsorbed nanosilver (P<0.05. The results of the present study indicated that nanosilver could be incorporated into MCSNs using the template method. The templated nanosilver could release silver ions and inhibit the growth and colonization of E. faecalis both in the planktonic form and as biofilms on dentin surfaces as absorbed nanosilver. Templated Ag-MCSNs may be developed into a new intracanal disinfectant for root canal disinfection due to their antibacterial ability and low cytotoxicity, and as controlled release devices for other bioactive molecules to produce multifunctional biomaterials. Keywords: antibacterial effect, mesoporosity

  2. An overview of male reproductive studies of boron with an emphasis on studies of highly exposed Chinese workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scialli, Anthony R; Bonde, Jens Peter; Brüske-Hohlfeld, Irene

    2010-01-01

    Boron treatment of rats, mice, and dogs has been associated with testicular toxicity, characterized by inhibited spermiation at lower dose levels and a reduction in epididymal sperm count at higher dose levels. The no-adverse-effect level for reproductive effects in male rats is 17.5mg B/kg bw...... in the same community and in a remote community were used as controls. Boron workers (n=75) had a mean daily boron intake of 31.3mg B/day, and a subset of 16 of these men, employed at a plant where there was heavy boron contamination of the water supply, had an estimated mean daily boron intake of 125 mg B...

  3. Multifunctional Silica Nanoparticles Modified via Silylated-Decaborate Precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima Abi-Ghaida

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new class of multifunctional silica nanoparticles carrying boron clusters (10-vertex closo-decaborate and incorporating luminescent centers (fluorescein has been developed as potential probes/carriers for potential application in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT. These silica nanoparticles were charged in situ with silylated-fluorescein fluorophores via the Stöber method and their surface was further functionalized with decaborate-triethoxysilane precursors. The resulting decaborate dye-doped silica nanoparticles were characterized by TEM, solid state NMR, DLS, nitrogen sorption, elemental analysis, and fluorescence spectroscopy.

  4. Nanoparticle-Mediated Delivery of Mitochondrial Division Inhibitor 1 to the Myocardium Protects the Heart From Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury Through Inhibition of Mitochondria Outer Membrane Permeabilization: A New Therapeutic Modality for Acute Myocardial Infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikita, Ayako; Matoba, Tetsuya; Ikeda, Gentaro; Koga, Jun-Ichiro; Mao, Yajing; Nakano, Kaku; Takeuchi, Osamu; Sadoshima, Junichi; Egashira, Kensuke

    2016-07-22

    Mitochondria-mediated cell death plays a critical role in myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury. We hypothesized that nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery of mitochondrial division inhibitor 1 (Mdivi1) protects hearts from IR injury through inhibition of mitochondria outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP), which causes mitochondrial-mediated cell death. We formulated poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles containing Mdivi1 (Mdivi1-NP). We recently demonstrated that these nanoparticles could be successfully delivered to the cytosol and mitochondria of cardiomyocytes under H2O2-induced oxidative stress that mimicked IR injury. Pretreatment with Mdivi1-NP ameliorated H2O2-induced cell death in rat neonatal cardiomyocytes more potently than Mdivi1 alone, as indicated by a lower estimated half-maximal effective concentration and greater maximal effect on cell survival. Mdivi1-NP treatment of Langendorff-perfused mouse hearts through the coronary arteries at the time of reperfusion reduced infarct size after IR injury more effectively than Mdivi1 alone. Mdivi1-NP treatment also inhibited Drp1-mediated Bax translocation to the mitochondria and subsequent cytochrome c leakage into the cytosol, namely, MOMP, in mouse IR hearts. MOMP inhibition was also observed in cyclophilin D knockout (CypD-KO) mice, which lack the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) opening. Intravenous Mdivi1-NP treatment in vivo at the time of reperfusion reduced IR injury in wild-type and CypD-KO mice, but not Bax-KO mice. Mdivi1-NP treatment reduced IR injury through inhibition of MOMP, even in the absence of a CypD/MPTP opening. Thus, nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery of Mdivi1 may be a novel treatment strategy for IR injury. © 2016 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  5. Polysaccharide-capped silver Nanoparticles inhibit biofilm formation and eliminate multi-drug-resistant bacteria by disrupting bacterial cytoskeleton with reduced cytotoxicity towards mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanyasi, Sridhar; Majhi, Rakesh Kumar; Kumar, Satish; Mishra, Mitali; Ghosh, Arnab; Suar, Mrutyunjay; Satyam, Parlapalli Venkata; Mohapatra, Harapriya; Goswami, Chandan; Goswami, Luna

    2016-04-01

    Development of effective anti-microbial therapeutics has been hindered by the emergence of bacterial strains with multi-drug resistance and biofilm formation capabilities. In this article, we report an efficient green synthesis of silver nanoparticle (AgNP) by in situ reduction and capping with a semi-synthetic polysaccharide-based biopolymer (carboxymethyl tamarind polysaccharide). The CMT-capped AgNPs were characterized by UV, DLS, FE-SEM, EDX and HR-TEM. These AgNPs have average particle size of ~20-40 nm, and show long time stability, indicated by their unchanged SPR and Zeta-potential values. These AgNPs inhibit growth and biofilm formation of both Gram positive (B. subtilis) and Gram negative (E. coli and Salmonella typhimurium) bacterial strains even at concentrations much lower than the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) breakpoints of antibiotics, but show reduced or no cytotoxicity against mammalian cells. These AgNPs alter expression and positioning of bacterial cytoskeletal proteins FtsZ and FtsA. CMT-capped AgNPs can effectively block growth of several clinical isolates and MDR strains representing different genera and resistant towards multiple antibiotics belonging to different classes. We propose that the CMT-capped AgNPs can have potential bio-medical application against multi-drug-resistant microbes with minimal cytotoxicity towards mammalian cells.

  6. CRLX101, a nanoparticle-drug conjugate containing camptothecin, improves rectal cancer chemoradiotherapy by inhibiting DNA repair and HIF-1α

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xi; Nguyen, Minh; Foote, Henry P.; Caster, Joseph M.; Roche, Kyle C.; Peters, Christian G.; Wu, Pauline; Jayaraman, Lata; Garmey, Edward G.; Tepper, Joel E.; Eliasof, Scott; Wang, Andrew Z.

    2016-01-01

    Novel agents are needed to improve chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer. In this study, we assessed the ability of CRLX101, an investigational nanoparticle-drug conjugate containing the payload camptothecin (CPT), to improve therapeutic responses as compared to standard chemotherapy. CRLX101 was evaluated as a radiosensitizer in colorectal cancer cell lines and murine xenograft models. CRLX101 was as potent as CPT in vitro in its ability to radiosensitize cancer cells. Evaluations in vivo demonstrated that the addition of CRLX101 to standard chemoradiotherapy significantly increased therapeutic efficacy by inhibiting DNA repair and HIF-1α pathway activation in tumor cells. Notably, CRLX101 was more effective than oxaliplatin at enhancing the efficacy of chemoradiotherapy, with CRLX101 and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) producing the highest therapeutic efficacy. Gastrointestinal toxicity was also significantly lower for CRLX101 compared to CPT when combined with radiotherapy. Our results offer a preclinical proof of concept for CRLX101 as a modality to improve the outcome of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer treatment, in support of ongoing clinical evaluation of this agent (LCC1315 NCT02010567). PMID:27784746

  7. Thin coatings based on ZnO@C18-usnic acid nanoparticles prepared by MAPLE inhibit the development of Salmonella enterica early biofilm growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stan, Miruna Silvia; Constanda, Sabrina; Grumezescu, Valentina; Andronescu, Ecaterina; Ene, Ana Maria; Holban, Alina Maria; Vasile, Bogdan Stefan; Mogoantă, Laurenţiu; Bălşeanu, Tudor-Adrian; Mogoşanu, George Dan; Socol, Gabriel; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Dinischiotu, Anca; Lazar, Veronica; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a nanostructured bioactive surface based on zinc oxide, sodium stearate (C18) and usnic acid (UA) exhibiting harmless effects with respect to the human cells, but with a significant antimicrobial effect, limiting the attachment and biofilm formation of food pathogens. ZnO nanoparticles were synthesized by sol-gel method and functionalized with C18 and UA. The coatings were fabricated by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation technique (MAPLE) and further characterized by TEM, SEM, SAED, XRD and IRM. The biological characterization of the prepared coatings consisted in cytotoxicity and antimicrobial assays. The cytotoxicity of ZnO@C18 and ZnO@C18-UA films was evaluated with respect to the human skin fibroblasts (CCD 1070SK cell line) by phase contrast microscopy, MTT assay and nitric oxide (NO) release. The covered surfaces exhibited a decreased cell attachment, effect which was more pronounced in the presence of UA as shown by purple formazan staining of adhered cells. The unattached fibroblasts remained viable after 24 h in the culture media as it was revealed by their morphology analysis and NO level which were similar to uncovered slides. The quantitative microbiological assays results have demonstrated that the bioactive coatings have significantly inhibited the adherence and biofilm formation of Salmonella enterica. The obtained results recommend these materials as efficient approaches in developing anti-adherent coatings for various industrial, medical and food processing applications.

  8. Interaction of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles with endothelial cells: internalization and inhibition of angiogenesis in vitro through the PI3K/Akt pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xingxing; Zhou, Kai; Huang, Fei; Wang, Chen

    2017-01-01

    Nano-hydroxyapatite (nano-HAP) has been proposed as a better candidate for bone tissue engineering; however, the interactions of nano-HAP with endothelial cells are currently unclear. In this study, HAP nanoparticles (HANPs; 20 nm np20 and 80 nm np80) and micro-sized HAP particles (m-HAP; 12 μm) were employed to explore and characterize cellular internalization, subcellular distribution, effects of HANPs on endothelial cell function and underlying mechanisms using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) as an in vitro model. It was found that HANPs were able to accumulate in the cytoplasm, and both adhesion and uptake of the HANPs followed a function of time; compared to np80, more np20 had been uptaken at the end of the observation period. HANPs were mainly uptaken via clathrin- and caveolin-mediated endocytosis, while macropinocytosis was the main pathway for m-HAP uptake. Unexpectedly, exposure to HANPs suppressed the angiogenic ability of HUVECs in terms of cell viability, cell cycle, apoptosis response, migration and capillary-like tube formation. Strikingly, HANPs reduced the synthesis of nitric oxide (NO) in HUVECs, which was associated with the inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and phosphorylation of eNOS. These findings provide additional insights into specific biological responses as HANPs interface with endothelial cells. PMID:28848353

  9. Structures, stability, mechanical and electronic properties of a-boron and its twined brother a*-boron

    OpenAIRE

    He, Chaoyu; Zhong, Jianxin

    2013-01-01

    The structures, stability, mechanical and electronic properties of a-boron and its twined brother a*-boron have been studied by first-principles calculations. Both a-boron and a*-boron consist of equivalent icosahedra B12 clusters in different connecting configurations of "3S-6D-3S" and "2S-6D-4S", respectively. The total energy calculations show that a*-boron is less stable than a-boron but more favorable than beta-boron and Gamma-boron at zero pressure. Both a-boron and a*-boron are confirm...

  10. Preparation of arginine-glycine-aspartic acid-modified biopolymeric nanoparticles containing epigalloccatechin-3-gallate for targeting vascular endothelial cells to inhibit corneal neovascularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Che-Yi; Wang, Ming-Chen; Miyagawa, Takuya; Chen, Zhi-Yu; Lin, Feng-Huei; Chen, Ko-Hua; Liu, Guei-Sheung; Tseng, Ching-Li

    2017-01-01

    Neovascularization (NV) of the cornea can disrupt visual function, causing ocular diseases, including blindness. Therefore, treatment of corneal NV has a high public health impact. Epigalloccatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), presenting antiangiogenesis effects, was chosen as an inhibitor to treat human vascular endothelial cells for corneal NV treatment. An arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptide-hyaluronic acid (HA)-conjugated complex coating on the gelatin/EGCG self-assembly nanoparticles (GEH-RGD NPs) was synthesized for targeting the α v β 3 integrin on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in this study, and a corneal NV mouse model was used to evaluate the therapeutic effect of this nanomedicine used as eyedrops. HA-RGD conjugation via COOH and amine groups was confirmed by 1 H-nuclear magnetic resonance and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The average diameter of GEH-RGD NPs was 168.87±22.5 nm with positive charge (19.7±2 mV), with an EGCG-loading efficiency up to 95%. Images of GEH-RGD NPs acquired from transmission electron microscopy showed a spherical shape and shell structure of about 200 nm. A slow-release pattern was observed in the nanoformulation at about 30% after 30 hours. Surface plasmon resonance confirmed that GEH-RGD NPs specifically bound to the integrin α v β 3 . In vitro cell-viability assay showed that GEH-RGD efficiently inhibited HUVEC proliferation at low EGCG concentrations (20 μg/mL) when compared with EGCG or non-RGD-modified NPs. Furthermore, GEH-RGD NPs significantly inhibited HUVEC migration down to 58%, lasting for 24 hours. In the corneal NV mouse model, fewer and thinner vessels were observed in the alkali-burned cornea after treatment with GEH-RGD NP eyedrops. Overall, this study indicates that GEH-RGD NPs were successfully developed and synthesized as an inhibitor of vascular endothelial cells with specific targeting capacity. Moreover, they can be used in eyedrops to inhibit angiogenesis in corneal NV

  11. High Kinetic Energy Penetrator Shielding and High Wear Resistance Materials Fabricated with Boron Nitride Nanotubes (BNNTS) and BNNT Polymer Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jin Ho (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Sauti, Godfrey (Inventor); Smith, Michael W. (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin C. (Inventor); Lowther, Sharon E. (Inventor); Bryant, Robert George (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs), boron nitride nanoparticles (BNNPs), carbon nanotubes (CNTs), graphites, or combinations, are incorporated into matrices of polymer, ceramic or metals. Fibers, yarns, and woven or nonwoven mats of BNNTs are used as toughening layers in penetration resistant materials to maximize energy absorption and/or high hardness layers to rebound or deform penetrators. They can be also used as reinforcing inclusions combining with other polymer matrices to create composite layers like typical reinforcing fibers such as Kevlar.RTM., Spectra.RTM., ceramics and metals. Enhanced wear resistance and usage time are achieved by adding boron nitride nanomaterials, increasing hardness and toughness. Such materials can be used in high temperature environments since the oxidation temperature of BNNTs exceeds 800.degree. C. in air. Boron nitride based composites are useful as strong structural materials for anti-micrometeorite layers for spacecraft and space suits, ultra strong tethers, protective gear, vehicles, helmets, shields and safety suits/helmets for industry.

  12. Boron steel. I Part. Preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaraiz Franco, E.; Esteban Hernandez, J. A.

    1960-01-01

    With the advent of the first nuclear reactors arise the need for control rods and shielding duties for some types of radiations. One of the materials used for this purpose has been the high boron steel. This paper describes the melting and casting procedures employed for the production, at laboratory scale, of steels with Boron content ranging from 1 to 4 per cent, as well as the metallographic and X-Ray techniques used for the identification of the present phases. The electrolytic technique employed for the isolation of the Fe 2 B phase and its subsequent X-Ray identification has proved to be satisfactory. (Author) 11 refs

  13. Thermal conductivity of boron carbides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, C.; Emin, D.; Gray, P. E.

    1985-01-01

    Knowledge of the thermal conductivity of boron carbide is necessary to evaluate its potential for high-temperature thermoelectric energy conversion applications. Measurements have been conducted of the thermal diffusivity of hot-pressed boron carbide BxC samples as a function of composition (x in the range from 4 to 9), temperature (300-1700 K), and temperature cycling. These data, in concert with density and specific-heat data, yield the thermal conductivities of these materials. The results are discussed in terms of a structural model that has been previously advanced to explain the electronic transport data. Some novel mechanisms for thermal conduction are briefly discussed.

  14. New Icosahedral Boron Carbide Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverria Mora, Elena Maria

    Novel semiconductor boron carbide films and boron carbide films doped with aromatic compounds have been investigated and characterized. Most of these semiconductors were formed by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The aromatic compound additives used, in this thesis, were pyridine (Py), aniline, and diaminobenzene (DAB). As one of the key parameters for semiconducting device functionality is the metal contact and, therefore, the chemical interactions or band bending that may occur at the metal/semiconductor interface, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy has been used to investigate the interaction of gold (Au) with these novel boron carbide-based semiconductors. Both n- and p-type films have been tested and pure boron carbide devices are compared to those containing aromatic compounds. The results show that boron carbide seems to behave differently from other semiconductors, opening a way for new analysis and approaches in device's functionality. By studying the electrical and optical properties of these films, it has been found that samples containing the aromatic compound exhibit an improvement in the electron-hole separation and charge extraction, as well as a decrease in the band gap. The hole carrier lifetimes for each sample were extracted from the capacitance-voltage, C(V), and current-voltage, I(V), curves. Additionally, devices, with boron carbide with the addition of pyridine, exhibited better collection of neutron capture generated pulses at ZERO applied bias, compared to the pure boron carbide samples. This is consistent with the longer carrier lifetimes estimated for these films. The I-V curves, as a function of external magnetic field, of the pure boron carbide films and films containing DAB demonstrate that significant room temperature negative magneto-resistance (> 100% for pure samples, and > 50% for samples containing DAB) is possible in the resulting dielectric thin films. Inclusion of DAB is not essential for significant negative magneto

  15. Chemical separation of boron isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palko, A.A.

    1978-06-01

    This is the final report of the research performed at ORNL on the chemical fractionation of boron isotopes between BF 3 gas and the liquid molecular addition compounds of BF 3 . Thirty compounds were studied, ten of them in detail. Graphs and equations are given for variation of isotopic equilibrium constant, vapor pressure, and BF 3 solubility as a function of temperature. Rate of isotopic exchange and melting points were determined. Several of the compounds are likely candidates for use in a gas-liquid countercurrent exchange system for large-scale separation of boron isotopes. 23 figs, 53 tables, 39 references

  16. Chemical separation of boron isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palko, A.A.

    1978-06-01

    This is the final report of the research performed at ORNL on the chemical fractionation of boron isotopes between BF/sub 3/ gas and the liquid molecular addition compounds of BF/sub 3/. Thirty compounds were studied, ten of them in detail. Graphs and equations are given for variation of isotopic equilibrium constant, vapor pressure, and BF/sub 3/ solubility as a function of temperature. Rate of isotopic exchange and melting points were determined. Several of the compounds are likely candidates for use in a gas-liquid countercurrent exchange system for large-scale separation of boron isotopes. 23 figs, 53 tables, 39 references.

  17. Boron cycling in subduction zones

    OpenAIRE

    Palmer, Martin R.

    2017-01-01

    Subduction zones are geologically dramatic features, with much of the drama being driven by the movement of water. The “light and lively” nature of boron, coupled with its wide variations in isotopic composition shown by the different geo-players in this drama, make it an ideal tracer for the role and movement of water during subduction. The utility of boron ranges from monitoring how the fluids that are expelled from the accretionary prism influence seawater chemistry, to the subduction of c...

  18. Boron Nitride Nanoribbons from Exfoliation of Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh; Hurst, Janet; Santiago, Diana

    2017-01-01

    Two types of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) were exfoliated into boron nitride nanoribbons (BNNR), which were identified using transmission electron microscopy: (1) commercial BNNTs with thin tube walls and small diameters. Tube unzipping was indicated by a large decrease of the sample's surface area and volume for pores less than 2 nm in diameter. (2) BNNTs with large diameters and thick walls synthesized at NASA Glenn Research Center. Here, tube unraveling was indicated by a large increase in external surface area and pore volume. For both, the exfoliation process was similar to the previous reported method to exfoliate commercial hexagonal boron nitride (hBN): Mixtures of BNNT, FeCl3, and NaF (or KF) were sequentially treated in 250 to 350 C nitrogen for intercalation, 500 to 750 C air for exfoliation, and finally HCl for purification. Property changes of the nanosized boron nitride throughout this process were also similar to the previously observed changes of commercial hBN during the exfoliation process: Both crystal structure (x-ray diffraction data) and chemical properties (Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy data) of the original reactant changed after intercalation and exfoliation, but most (not all) of these changes revert back to those of the reactant once the final, purified products are obtained.

  19. Synthesis of boron nitride from boron containing poly (vinyl alcohol ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A ceramic precursor, prepared by condensation reaction from poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and boric acid (H3BO3) in 1:1, 2:1 and 4:1 molar ratios, was synthesized as low temperature synthesis route for boron nitride ceramic. Samples were pyrolyzed at 850°C in nitrogen atmosphere followed by characterization using Fourier ...

  20. Boron analysis and boron imaging in biological materials for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittig, Andrea; Michel, Jean; Moss, Raymond L; Stecher-Rasmussen, Finn; Arlinghaus, Heinrich F; Bendel, Peter; Mauri, Pier Luigi; Altieri, Saverio; Hilger, Ralf; Salvadori, Piero A; Menichetti, Luca; Zamenhof, Robert; Sauerwein, Wolfgang A G

    2008-10-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is based on the ability of the stable isotope 10B to capture neutrons, which leads to a nuclear reaction producing an alpha- and a 7Li-particle, both having a high biological effectiveness and a very short range in tissue, being limited to approximately one cell diameter. This opens the possibility for a highly selective cancer therapy. BNCT strongly depends on the selective uptake of 10B in tumor cells and on its distribution inside the cells. The chemical properties of boron and the need to discriminate different isotopes make the investigation of the concentration and distribution of 10B a challenging task. The most advanced techniques to measure and image boron are described, both invasive and non-invasive. The most promising approach for further investigation will be the complementary use of the different techniques to obtain the information that is mandatory for the future of this innovative treatment modality.

  1. Boron-enhanced diffusion of boron from ultralow-energy boron implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, A.; Eaglesham, D.J.; Gossmann, H.J.; Pelaz, L.; Herner, S.B.; Jacobson, D.C.

    1998-01-01

    The authors have investigated the diffusion enhancement mechanism of BED (boron enhanced diffusion), wherein the boron diffusivity is enhanced three to four times over the equilibrium diffusivity at 1,050 C in the proximity of a silicon layer containing a high boron concentration. It is shown that BED is associated with the formation of a fine-grain polycrystalline silicon boride phase within an initially amorphous Si layer having a high B concentration. For 0.5 keV B + , the threshold implantation dose which leads to BED lies between 3 x 10 14 and of 1 x 10 15 /cm -2 . Formation of the shallowest possible junctions by 0.5 keV B + requires that the implant dose be kept lower than this threshold

  2. Analytical boron diffusivity model in silicon for thermal diffusion from boron silicate glass film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurachi, Ikuo; Yoshioka, Kentaro

    2015-09-01

    An analytical boron diffusivity model in silicon for thermal diffusion from a boron silicate glass (BSG) film has been proposed in terms of enhanced diffusion due to boron-silicon interstitial pair formation. The silicon interstitial generation is considered to be a result of the silicon kick-out mechanism by the diffused boron at the surface. The additional silicon interstitial generation in the bulk silicon is considered to be the dissociation of the diffused pairs. The former one causes the surface boron concentration dependent diffusion. The latter one causes the local boron concentration dependent diffusion. The calculated boron profiles based on the diffusivity model are confirmed to agree with the actual diffusion profiles measured by secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) for a wide range of the BSG boron concentration. This analytical diffusivity model is a helpful tool for p+ boron diffusion process optimization of n-type solar cell manufacturing.

  3. Inhibition of Neuroblastoma cancer cells viability by ferromagnetic Mn doped CeO{sub 2} monodisperse nanoparticles mediated through reactive oxygen species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbas, Fazal; Jan, Tariq [Laboratory of Nanoscience and Technology (LNT), Department of Physics, International Islamic University Islamabad (Pakistan); Iqbal, Javed, E-mail: javed.saggu@iiu.edu.pk [Laboratory of Nanoscience and Technology (LNT), Department of Physics, International Islamic University Islamabad (Pakistan); Haider Naqvi, M. Sajjad [Department of Biochemistry, University of Karachi, Karachi (Pakistan); Ahmad, Ishaq [Experimental Physics Labs, National Center for Physics, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2016-04-15

    Here we report the Mn doping induced effects on structural, Raman, optical, magnetic and anticancer properties of CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles prepared via soft chemical route. Structural and microstructural results infer that the synthesized nanoparticles have single phase cubic fluorite structure of CeO{sub 2} and that Mn doping results in enhancement of the structural defects. Scanning electron microscopy results reveal the formation of monodisperse nanoparticles having average particle size ranging from 30 to 41 nm. The optical absorbance spectroscopy analysis discloses the band gap energy tailoring of CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles via Mn doping. Room temperature ferromagnetism (RTFM) has been found in both as-prepared and Mn doped CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles. This RTFM of the synthesized nanoparticles have been attributed to the Mn ions and surface defects such as oxygen vacancies. Finally, the influence of Mn dopant on the cell viability and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation levels of CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles in the presence of healthy and cancerous cells have been studied. It has been observed that the differential cytotoxicity of the synthesized nanoparticles is strongly correlated with level of ROS generation. - Highlights: • Mn doped CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles with cubic fluorite structure were synthesized. • Mn dopant significantly tailored the band gap of CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles. • The synthesized nanoparticles exhibited room temperature ferromagnetic behavior. • The cytotoxicity of these nanoparticles was reported for the first time. • The synthesized nanoparticles exhibited differential cytotoxicity.

  4. Inactivation of microbial infectiousness by silver nanoparticles-coated condom: a new approach to inhibit HIV- and HSV-transmitted infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed Fayaz, A; Ao, Zhujun; Girilal, Morkattu; Chen, Liyu; Xiao, Xianzhong; Kalaichelvan, Pt; Yao, Xiaojian

    2012-01-01

    Recent research suggests that today's condoms are only 85% effective in preventing human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and other sexually transmitted diseases. In response, there has been a push to develop more effective ways of decreasing the spread of the disease. The new nanotechnology-based condom holds the promise of being more potent than the first-generation products. The preliminary goal of this study was to develop a silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs)-coated polyurethane condom (PUC) and to investigate its antimicrobial potential including the inactivation of HIV and herpes simplex virus (HSV) infectiousness. The Ag-NPs-coated PUC was characterized by using ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry, Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy, high-resolution scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive analysis of X-ray spectroscopy. Nanoparticles were stable on the PUC and not washed away by water. Morphology of the PUC was retained after coating. The NP binding is due to its interaction with the nitrogen atom of the PUC. No significant toxic effects was observed when human HeLa cells, 293T and C8166 T cells were contacted to Ag-NPs-coated PUC for three hours. Interestingly, our results demonstrated that the contact of the Ag-NPs-coated PUC with HIV-1 and HSV-1/2 was able to efficiently inactivate their infectiousness. In an attempt to elucidate the antiviral action of the Ag-NPs, we have demonstrated that the anti-HIV activity was primarily mediated by the Ag-NPs, which are associated with the PUC. In addition, the data showed that both macrophage (M)-tropic and T lymphocyte (T)-tropic strains of HIV-1 were highly sensitive to the Ag-NPs-coated PUC. Furthermore, we also showed that the Ag-NPs-coated PUC was able to inhibit the growth of bacteria and fungi. These results demonstrated that the Ag-NPs-coated PUC is able to directly inactivate the microbe's infectious ability and provides another defense line against these sexually transmitted microbial infections.

  5. Boron removal from wastewater using adsorbents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluczka, J; Trojanowska, J; Zolotajkin, M; Ciba, J; Turek, M; Dydo, P

    2007-01-01

    In the present study, boron adsorption on activated alumina and activated carbon impregnated with calcium chloride, tartaric acid and mannitol was investigated. The adsorbate in question was the wastewater from the chemical landfill in Tarnowskie Gory of 25-70 mg l(-1) boron content. The removal of boron from the above-described wastewater was examined in the static (batch) and dynamic (column) experiments. The static experiments were carried out to assess boron adsorption isotherms, based on which the most efficient adsorbent as well as the rough resin load was determined. On the basis of the dynamic experiment results, the boron adsorptive capacities of the examined resins were deduced. It was concluded that the use of the impregnants increased the ability of activated carbon to adsorb boron. Granulated activated carbon WG-12 impregnated with mannitol was found to be the most promising for the boron removal from wastewater of the Chemical Wastewater Plant in Tarnowskie Gory.

  6. Advanced microstructure of boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werheit, Helmut; Shalamberidze, Sulkhan

    2012-09-26

    The rhombohedral elementary cell of the complex boron carbide structure is composed of B(12) or B(11)C icosahedra and CBC, CBB or B□B (□, vacancy) linear arrangements, whose shares vary depending on the actual chemical compound. The evaluation of the IR phonon spectra of isotopically pure boron carbide yields the quantitative concentrations of these components within the homogeneity range. The structure formula of B(4.3)C at the carbon-rich limit of the homogeneity range is (B(11)C) (CBC)(0.91) (B□B)(0.09) (□, vacancy); and the actual structure formula of B(13)C(2) is (B(12))(0.5)(B(11)C)(0.5)(CBC)(0.65)(CBB)(0.16) (B□B)(0.19), and deviates fundamentally from (B(12))CBC, predicted by theory to be the energetically most favourable structure of boron carbide. In reality, it is the most distorted structure in the homogeneity range. The spectra of (nat)B(x)C make it evident that boron isotopes are not randomly distributed in the structure. However, doping with 2% silicon brings about a random distribution.

  7. Boron isotopes in geothermal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, J.

    1997-01-01

    Boron is a highly mobile element and during water-rock reactions, boron is leached out of rocks with no apparent fractionation. In geothermal systems where the water recharging the systems are meteoric in origin, the B isotope ratio of the geothermal fluid reflects the B isotope ratio of the rocks. Seawater has a distinctive B isotope ratio and where seawater recharges the geothermal system, the B isotope ratio of the geothermal system reflects the mixing of rock derived B and seawater derived B. Any deviations of the actual B isotope ratio of a mixture reflects subtle differences in the water-rock ratios in the cold downwelling limb of the hydrothermal system. This paper will present data from a variety of different geothermal systems, including New Zealand; Iceland; Yellowston, USA; Ibusuki, Japan to show the range in B isotope ratios in active geothermal systems. Some of these systems show well defined mixing trends between seawater and the host rocks, whilst others show the boron isotope ratios of the host rock only. In geothermal systems containing high amounts of CO 2 boron isotope ratios from a volatile B source can also be inferred. (auth)

  8. Structural characterization of electrodeposited boron

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    electrolysis was crystalline in nature, X-ray diffraction pat-. ∗. Author for correspondence (sas@igcar.gov.in) .... Elemental boron was synthesized by the electrolysis of molten potassium fluroborate dissolved in a ... A high-throughput Renishaw micro-Raman spectrome- ter (model Invia) was employed to record Raman ...

  9. Preparation process of boron nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mignani, G.; Ardaud, P.

    1990-01-01

    High purity boron nitride, without Si and a low carbon content, is prepared by pyrolysis, under an ammoniac atmosphere, of the reaction product between a B-trihalogenoborazole and a primary amine RNH 2 when R is a hydrocarbon radical eventually substituted containing from 1 to 6 carbon atoms inclusively [fr

  10. Structural characterization of electrodeposited boron

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Structural characterization of electrodeposited boron was carried out by using transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Electron diffraction and phase contrast imaging were carried out by using transmission electron microscopy. Phase identification was done based on the analysis of electron diffraction ...

  11. Method of separating boron isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Reed J.; Thorne, James M.; Cluff, Coran L.; Hayes, John K.

    1984-01-01

    A method of boron isotope enrichment involving the isotope preferential photolysis of (2-chloroethenyl)dichloroborane as the feed material. The photolysis can readily be achieved with CO.sub.2 laser radiation and using fluences significantly below those required to dissociate BCl.sub.3.

  12. Boron-11 MRI and MRS of intact animals infused with a boron neutron capture agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabalka, G.W.; Davis, M.; Bendel, P.

    1988-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) depends on the delivery of boron-containing drugs to a targeted lesion. Currently, the verification and quantification of in vivo boron content is a difficult problem. Boron-11 spectroscopy was utilized to confirm the presence of a dimeric sulfhydryl dodecaborane BNCT agent contained in an intact animal. Spectroscopy experiments revealed that the decay time of transverse magnetization of the boron-11 spins was less than 1 ms which precluded the use of a 2DFT imaging protocol. A back-projection protocol was developed and utilized to generate the first boron-11 image of a BNCT agent in the liver of an intact Fisher 344 rat

  13. Targeted delivery of miR-200c/DOC to inhibit cancer stem cells and cancer cells by the gelatinases-stimuli nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qin; Li, Ru-Tian; Qian, Han-Qing; Wei, Jia; Xie, Li; Shen, Jie; Yang, Mi; Qian, Xiao-Ping; Yu, Li-Xia; Jiang, Xi-Qun; Liu, Bao-Rui

    2013-09-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are recently discovered as vital obstacles for the successful cancer therapy. Emerging evidences suggest that miR-200c functions as an effective CSCs inhibitor and can restore sensitivity to microtubule-targeting drugs. In the present work, the intelligent gelatinases-stimuli nanoparticles (NPs) was set up to co-deliver miR-200c and docetaxel (DOC) to verify their synergetic effects on inhibition of CSCs and non-CSC cancer cells. After tumor cells were treated with miR-200c NPs, miR-200c and its targeted gene class III beta-tubulin (TUBB3)TUBB3 expression were evaluated. The effects of miR-200c/DOC NPs on tumor cell viability, migration and invasion as well as the expression of E-cadherin and CD44 were studied. The antitumor effects of miR-200c/DOC NPs were compared with DOC NPs in xenograft gastric cancer mice. Moreover, the residual tumors after treatment were subcutaneously seeded into nude mice to further investigate the effective maintenance of NPs. We found that the gelatinases-stimuli NPs facilitated miR-200c into cells, achieving sustained miR-200c expression in tumor cells during 9 days. The miR-200c/DOC NPs significantly enhanced cytotoxicity of DOC, possibly by decreasing TUBB3 level, and reversing EMT. The miR-200c NPs achieved high levels of in vivo accumulation and long retention in gastric cancer xenografts after intravenous administration. The miR-200c/DOC NPs prominently suppressed in vivo tumor growth with elevated miR-200c and E-cadherin levels and down-regulated TUBB3 and CD44 expressions. When the residual tumors after miR-200c/DOC NPs treatment were re-transplanted into nude mice, the tumors demonstrated the slowest growth speed. The miR-200c/DOC NPs may provide a promising modality for co-delivery of nucleic acid and drugs to simultaneously inhibit CSCs and non-CSC cancer cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Evaluation of Aluminum-Boron Carbide Neutron Absorbing Materials for Interim Storage of Used Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lumin [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Science; Wierschke, Jonathan Brett [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Science

    2015-04-08

    The objective of this work was to understand the corrosion behavior of Boral® and Bortec® neutron absorbers over long-term deployment in a used nuclear fuel dry cask storage environment. Corrosion effects were accelerated by flowing humidified argon through an autoclave at temperatures up to 570°C. Test results show little corrosion of the aluminum matrix but that boron is leaching out of the samples. Initial tests performed at 400 and 570°C were hampered by reduced flow caused by the rapid build-up of solid deposits in the outlet lines. Analysis of the deposits by XRD shows that the deposits are comprised of boron trioxide and sassolite (H3BO3). The collection of boron- containing compounds in the outlet lines indicated that boron was being released from the samples. Observation of the exposed samples using SEM and optical microscopy show the growth of new phases in the samples. These phases were most prominent in Bortec® samples exposed at 570°C. Samples of Boral® exposed at 570°C showed minimal new phase formation but showed nearly the complete loss of boron carbide particles. Boron carbide loss was also significant in Boral samples at 400°C. However, at 400°C phases similar to those found in Bortec® were observed. The rapid loss of the boron carbide particles in the Boral® is suspected to inhibit the formation of the new secondary phases. However, Material samples in an actual dry cask environment would be exposed to temperatures closer to 300°C and less water than the lowest test. The results from this study conclude that at the temperature and humidity levels present in a dry cask environment, corrosion and boron leaching will have no effect on the performance of Boral® and Bortec® to maintain criticality control.

  15. Effects of boron-water on cattle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, G.H.; Weeth, H.J.

    1975-01-01

    To determine the effects of subtoxic concentrations of boron in drinking water, 12 Hereford heifers were used in a 3 x 3 latin-square experiment with four squares. Treatments were tap-water (0.8 ppm boron), 150 ppm boron-water, and 300 ppm boron-water. Periods were 30 days each. Total urine was collected during the last week of each period, and renal clearance observations (based on creatinine) were made on the last day of each period. While water consumption and total urine weight were not affected by the boron treatments, hay consumption decreased, and weight loss was noted. Plasma boron concentrations were 0.53 +/- 0.151 ppm, 11.2 +/- 0.91 ppm, and 18.9 +/- 0.60 ppm while the heifers were drinking tap-water, 150 ppm boron-water, and 300 ppm boron-water respectively. Urinary boron excretion rates were tap water, 64 +/- 5.6 mg/day; 150 ppm, 2841 +/- 181.2 mg/day; 300 ppm, 4932 +/- 173.3 mg/day. Although glomerular filtration and osmolal clearance were unaffected by the boron-waters, a relative diuresis was indicated by the free water clearance effects. The percent of filtered boron which was reabsorbed decreased with increased exogenous boron, as well as both plasma and urinary phosphate. These data indicate that 300 ppm boron is not acutely toxic to heifers when consumed via the drinking water. The safe tolerance concentration, however, must lie below 150 ppm because this concentration was responsible for some deleterious effects.

  16. Identification of proteins ınvolved in excess boron stress response in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aylin Eşiz Dereboylu

    2011-11-07

    Nov 7, 2011 ... affects every aspect of plant physiology and metabolism. The physiological effects of boron toxicity include reduced root cell division (Liu et al., 2000), decreased shoot and root growth (Lowatt and Bates, 1984; Nable et al., 1990), decrease in leaf chlorophyll, inhibition of photosynthesis, lower stomatal ...

  17. Effect of Boron on Thymic Cytokine Expression, Hormone Secretion, Antioxidant Functions, Cell Proliferation, and Apoptosis Potential via the Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinases 1 and 2 Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Erhui; Ren, Man; Liu, Wenwen; Liang, Shuang; Hu, Qianqian; Gu, Youfang; Li, Shenghe

    2017-12-27

    Boron is an essential trace element in animals. Appropriate boron supplementation can promote thymus development; however, a high dose of boron can lead to adverse effects and cause toxicity. The influencing mechanism of boron on the animal body remains unclear. In this study, we examined the effect of boron on cytokine expression, thymosin and thymopoietin secretion, antioxidant function, cell proliferation and apoptosis, and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) pathway in the thymus of rats. We found that supplementation with 10 and 20 mg/L boron to the drinking water significantly elevated levels of interleukin 2 (IL-2), interferon γ (IFN-γ), interleukin 4 (IL-4), and thymosin α1 in the thymus of rats (p boron had no apparent effect on many of the above indicators. In contrast, supplementation with 480 and 640 mg/L boron had the opposite effect on the above indicators in rats and elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin 6 (IL-6), interleukin 1β (IL-1β), and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) (p boron to the drinking water had a U-shaped dose-effect relationship with thymic cytokine expression, hormone secretion, antioxidant function, cell proliferation, and apoptosis. Specifically, supplementation with 10 and 20 mg/L boron promoted thymocyte proliferation and enhanced thymic functions. However, supplementation with 480 and 640 mg/L boron inhibited thymic functions and increased the number of apoptotic thymocytes, suggesting that the effects of boron on thymic functions may be caused via the ERK1/2 signaling pathway.

  18. Newly synthesized salicylidene-4,4′-dimorpholine (SDM) assembled on nickel oxide nanoparticles (NiONPs) and its inhibitive effect on mild steel in 2 N hydrochloric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wadhwani, Poonam M. [Department of Chemistry, School of Sciences, Gujarat University, Ahmedabad 380009, Gujarat (India); Panchal, Vikram K., E-mail: vikram60panchal@gmail.com [R.G. Shah Science College, Vasna, Ahmedabad 382170, Gujarat (India); Shah, Nisha K. [Department of Chemistry, School of Sciences, Gujarat University, Ahmedabad 380009, Gujarat (India)

    2015-03-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Nanoparticles with inhibitor were found to be better corrosion inhibitor than only organic compound. • A strong binding mechanism was confirmed by FTIR, PXRD. • Inhibition efficiency increases drastically for SDM assembled on NiONPs as compared to SDM. • The adsorption model obeys Langmuir adsorption isotherm. • The protective layer over the surface of mild steel has been confirmed by AFM analysis. - Abstract: Corrosion inhibition of mild steel in hydrochloric acid solution by salicylidene-4,4′-dimorpholine (SDM) and SDM assembled on nickel oxide nanoparticles (NiONPs) has been studied with gravimetric, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and polarization techniques. Inhibition was found to increase with increasing concentration of the inhibitors. While studying the temperature effect on corrosion behaviour of SDM and SDM assembled on NiONPs, the inhibition efficiency decreases for SDM only but increases for SDM assembled on NiONPs. The adsorption of both the inhibitors on the mild steel surface obeys the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The activation energy as well as other thermodynamic parameters (ΔH* and ΔS*) for the inhibition process was calculated. EIS analysis results showed that the capacitive loops for SDM assembled on NiONPs were far away from blank when compared with SDM only. Polarization curve shows that the inhibitors are of mixed type. Further, the protective layer formation was confirmed from atomic force microscopy (AFM) results. Various methods such as EIS-MS, {sup 1}H NMR, XRD, FTIR, and DLS were performed for the confirmation of the structure, interaction of SDM with NiONPs and size of NiONPs.

  19. Boron clusters in luminescent materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sanjoy; Thilagar, Pakkirisamy

    2016-01-21

    In recent times, luminescent materials with tunable emission properties have found applications in almost all aspects of modern material sciences. Any discussion on the recent developments in luminescent materials would be incomplete if one does not account for the versatile photophysical features of boron containing compounds. Apart from triarylboranes and tetra-coordinate borate dyes, luminescent materials consisting of boron clusters have also found immense interest in recent times. Recent studies have unveiled the opportunities hidden within boranes, carboranes and metalloboranes, etc. as active constituents of luminescent materials. From simple illustrations of luminescence, to advanced applications in LASERs, OLEDs and bioimaging, etc., the unique features of such compounds and their promising versatility have already been established. In this review, recent revelations about the excellent photophysical properties of such materials are discussed.

  20. Boron-10 ABUNCL Active Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Siciliano, Edward R.

    2013-07-09

    The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security (NA-241) is supporting the project Coincidence Counting With Boron-Based Alternative Neutron Detection Technology at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the development of a 3He proportional counter alternative neutron coincidence counter. The goal of this project is to design, build and demonstrate a system based upon 10B-lined proportional tubes in a configuration typical for 3He-based coincidence counter applications. This report provides results from testing of the active mode of the General Electric Reuter-Stokes Alternative Boron-Based Uranium Neutron Coincidence Collar (ABUNCL) at Los Alamos National Laboratory using sources and fuel pins.

  1. Boron removal from geothermal waters by electrocoagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, A Erdem; Boncukcuoğlu, Recep; Kocakerim, M Muhtar; Yilmaz, M Tolga; Paluluoğlu, Cihan

    2008-05-01

    Most of the geothermal waters in Turkey contain extremely high concentration of boron when they are used for irrigation. The use of geothermal waters for irrigation can results in excess amount deposition of boron in soil. On the other hand, a minimal boron concentration is required for irrigational waters. In this study, electrocoagulation (EC) was selected as a treatment process for the removal of boron from thermal waters obtained from Ilica-Erzurum in Turkey. Current density (CD), pH of solution and temperature of solution were selected as operational parameters. The results showed that boron removal efficiency increased from pH 4.0 to 8.0 and decreased at pH 10.0. Although boron removal efficiency was highest at pH 8.0, energy consumption was very high at this pH value compared to other pH intervals. Boron removal efficiency reached to 95% with increasing current density from 1.5 to 6.0 mA/cm(2), but energy consumption was also increased in this interval. At higher temperatures of solution, such as 313 and 333 K, boron removal efficiency increased. At optimum conditions, boron removal efficiency in geothermal water reached up to 95%.

  2. Removal of boron (B) from waste liquors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, J Q; Xu, Y; Simon, J; Quill, K; Shettle, K

    2006-01-01

    This paper explores the use of electrocoagulation to remove boron from waste effluent in comparison with alum coagulation. In treating model test wastes, greater boron removals were achieved with electrocoagulation at low doses than conventional alum coagulation when reaction was undertaken for the same conditions (pH 8.5, and initial boron concentration was 500 mg/L). Al electrocoagulation can achieve good boron removal performance (68.3%) at a dose of 2.1 (as molar ratio of Al:B, and for current density of 62.1 A/m2), while alum coagulation can only achieve the maximum boron removal of 56% at a dose of 2.4. Also, Al electrocoagulation can remove 15-20% more boron than alum coagulation for the same dose compared in the treatment of both model test wastes and industry effluent. The estimation of running costs shows that to achieve 75% boron removal from industry waste effluent, i.e. removing 150 g of boron from 1 m3 of effluent, electrocoagulation was 6.2 times cheaper than alum coagulation. The economic advantage of electrocoagulation in the treatment of boron-containing waste effluent is thus significant.

  3. The boron geochemistry of siliceous sponges

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Leon, A.; Wille, M.; Eggins, S. M.; Ellwood, M. J.

    2009-12-01

    The boron content and isotopic composition (δ11B) of marine carbonate organisms can be linked to the pH of the seawater in which they have grown, making carbonates a useful tool for palaeo-seawater pH reconstruction. A study by Furst (1981) documented unusually high boron concentrations in siliceous sponge spicules, in range from hundreds to a thousand ppm. This observation and the potential for preferential incorporation of the tetrahedral borate species into biogenic silica raises the question as to whether the boron chemistry of biogenic silica might also be influenced by seawater pH. We have measured the boron concentration and isotopic composition of siliceous sponges from the Southern Ocean region, with a view to (1) confirming the observations of Furst (1981), (2) assessing the factors that control boron incorporation and isotopic compositions of sponge silica, and (3) investigating the potentially significant role of siliceous sponges in the marine boron cycle. The measured boron concentrations in a diverse range of both demosponge and hexactinellid sponges confirm the high boron concentrations previously reported. The boron isotope compositions of these sponges vary from around +2‰ to +25‰ and greatly exceed the range in marine carbonates. This isotopic variation is inconsistent with seawater pH control but is correlated with ambient seawater silicon concentration, in a manner that suggests a link to silicon uptake kinetics and demand by sponges.

  4. Mineral resource of the month: boron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crangle, Robert D.

    2012-01-01

    The article offers information on the mineral, boron. Boron compounds, particularly borates, have more commercial applications than its elemental relative which is a metalloid. Making up the 90% of the borates that are used worldwide are colemanite, kernite, tincal, and ulexite. The main borate deposits are located in the Mojave Desert of the U.S., the Tethyan belt in southern Asia, and the Andean belt of South America. Underground and surface mining are being used in gathering boron compounds. INSETS: Fun facts;Boron production and consumption.

  5. Conduction mechanism in boron carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, C.; Emin, D.

    1984-01-01

    Electrical conductivity, Seebeck-coefficient, and Hall-effect measurements have been made on single-phase boron carbides, B(1-x)C(x), in the compositional range from 0.1 to 0.2 X, and between room temperature and 1273 K. The results indicate that the predominant conduction mechanism is small-polaron hopping between carbon atoms at geometrically inequivalent sites.

  6. Electronic metal-support interaction enhanced oxygen reduction activity and stability of boron carbide supported platinum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Colleen; Smith, Graham T.; Inwood, David W.; Leach, Andrew S.; Whalley, Penny S.; Callisti, Mauro; Polcar, Tomas; Russell, Andrea E.; Levecque, Pieter; Kramer, Denis

    2017-06-01

    Catalysing the reduction of oxygen in acidic media is a standing challenge. Although activity of platinum, the most active metal, can be substantially improved by alloying, alloy stability remains a concern. Here we report that platinum nanoparticles supported on graphite-rich boron carbide show a 50-100% increase in activity in acidic media and improved cycle stability compared to commercial carbon supported platinum nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy and x-ray absorption fine structure analysis confirm similar platinum nanoparticle shapes, sizes, lattice parameters, and cluster packing on both supports, while x-ray photoelectron and absorption spectroscopy demonstrate a change in electronic structure. This shows that purely electronic metal-support interactions can significantly improve oxygen reduction activity without inducing shape, alloying or strain effects and without compromising stability. Optimizing the electronic interaction between the catalyst and support is, therefore, a promising approach for advanced electrocatalysts where optimizing the catalytic nanoparticles themselves is constrained by other concerns.

  7. Electronic metal-support interaction enhanced oxygen reduction activity and stability of boron carbide supported platinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Colleen; Smith, Graham T; Inwood, David W; Leach, Andrew S; Whalley, Penny S; Callisti, Mauro; Polcar, Tomas; Russell, Andrea E; Levecque, Pieter; Kramer, Denis

    2017-06-22

    Catalysing the reduction of oxygen in acidic media is a standing challenge. Although activity of platinum, the most active metal, can be substantially improved by alloying, alloy stability remains a concern. Here we report that platinum nanoparticles supported on graphite-rich boron carbide show a 50-100% increase in activity in acidic media and improved cycle stability compared to commercial carbon supported platinum nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy and x-ray absorption fine structure analysis confirm similar platinum nanoparticle shapes, sizes, lattice parameters, and cluster packing on both supports, while x-ray photoelectron and absorption spectroscopy demonstrate a change in electronic structure. This shows that purely electronic metal-support interactions can significantly improve oxygen reduction activity without inducing shape, alloying or strain effects and without compromising stability. Optimizing the electronic interaction between the catalyst and support is, therefore, a promising approach for advanced electrocatalysts where optimizing the catalytic nanoparticles themselves is constrained by other concerns.

  8. Boron carbide synthesis by carbothermic reduction of boron oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, A.R.M. de; Paschoal, J.O.A.

    1988-01-01

    Boron carbide (B 4 C) is a ceramic material of technological applications due to its extreme hardness and high chemical as well as thermal stability. Some parameters of the process for obtaining B 4 C by carbothermic reduction of B 2 O 3 have been determined. The starting powders and the final products have been analysed by chemical, spectrographic and X-ray diffraction methods. The results show that the B 4 C obtained by the carbothermic reduction process is suitable for applications with a definite determination of the free carbon content. (author) [pt

  9. Boron Carbides As Thermo-electric Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Charles

    1988-01-01

    Report reviews recent theoretical and experimental research on thermoelectric materials. Recent work with narrow-band semiconductors demonstrated possibility of relatively high thermoelectric energy-conversion efficiencies in materials withstanding high temperatures needed to attain such efficiencies. Among promising semiconductors are boron-rich borides, especially boron carbides.

  10. Boron carbide whiskers produced by vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    1965-01-01

    Boron carbide whiskers have an excellent combination of properties for use as a reinforcement material. They are produced by vaporizing boron carbide powder and condensing the vapors on a substrate. Certain catalysts promote the growth rate and size of the whiskers.

  11. Hot flow behavior of boron microalloyed steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-Chipres, E.; Mejia, I.; Maldonado, C.; Bedolla-Jacuinde, A.; El-Wahabi, M.; Cabrera, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    This research work studies the effect of boron contents on the hot flow behavior of boron microalloyed steels. For this purpose, uniaxial hot-compression tests were carried out in a low carbon steel microalloyed with four different amounts of boron over a wide range of temperatures (950, 1000, 1050 and 1100 deg. C) and constant true strain rates (10 -3 , 10 -2 and 10 -1 s -1 ). Experimental results revealed that both peak stress and peak strain tend to decrease as boron content increases, which indicates that boron additions have a solid solution softening effect. Likewise, the flow curves show a delaying effect on the kinetics of dynamic recrystallization (DRX) when increasing boron content. Deformed microstructures show a finer austenitic grain size in the steel with higher boron content (grain refinement effect). Results are discussed in terms of boron segregation towards austenitic grain boundaries during plastic deformation, which increases the movement of dislocations, enhances the grain boundary cohesion and modificates the grain boundary structure

  12. Compression and associated properties of boron carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciezak, Jennifer; Dandekar, Dattatraya

    2009-06-01

    The observed loss of shear strength of boron carbide around 22 GPa has been attributed to presence of amorphous material in the shock recovered, and statically indented and pressurized boron carbide. The present work presents a more direct association of the observed loss of shear strength in boron carbide under plane shock wave compression to amorphization in boron carbide under triaxial stress compression. This evidence is obtained from in-situ measurement of Raman, and infrared vibrational spectra of boron carbide confined in a Diamond Anvil Cell (DAC) under hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic pressures. X-ray-diffraction measurements do show a shift in the compression of boron carbide around 27 GPa. However, X-ray diffraction measurements indicate that the amorphization does not extend to micron scale, as there is no evidence of a loss of crystallinity in the recorded diffraction pattern of boron carbide to 47 GPa. Our work shows that shear plays a very dominant role in the stress-induced amorphization of boron carbide.

  13. Ultratough single crystal boron-doped diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemley, Russell J [Carnegie Inst. for Science, Washington, DC ; Mao, Ho-Kwang [Carnegie Inst. for Science, Washington, DC ; Yan, Chih-Shiue [Carnegie Inst. for Science, Washington, DC ; Liang, Qi [Carnegie Inst. for Science, Washington, DC

    2015-05-05

    The invention relates to a single crystal boron doped CVD diamond that has a toughness of at least about 22 MPa m.sup.1/2. The invention further relates to a method of manufacturing single crystal boron doped CVD diamond. The growth rate of the diamond can be from about 20-100 .mu.m/h.

  14. Spectral tailoring for boron Neutron capture therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nievaart, V.A.

    2007-01-01

    In several places in the world, such as Petten and Delft in the Netherlands, investigations are in progress in the fight against certain types of cancer with Boron Neutron Capture Therapy. The basic idea is very simple: boron is loaded only into the cancer cells, using a special drug, after which

  15. Fabrication of boron-phosphide neutron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzsimmons, M.; Pynn, R.

    1997-01-01

    Boron phosphide is a potentially viable candidate for high neutron flux neutron detectors. The authors have explored chemical vapor deposition methods to produce such detectors and have not been able to produce good boron phosphide coatings on silicon carbide substrates. However, semi-conducting quality films have been produced. Further testing is required

  16. Possible toxicity of boron on sugar cane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bravo C., M.

    Analyses of necrotic and green leaf tissues from sugar cane grown in the Tambo Valley (Arequipa, Peru) have shown that the boron concentration in necrotic tissue (average 657.7 ppm) is several times higher than that in the green tissue (average 55.7 ppm). This suggests that the necrosis may be due to boron toxicity.

  17. Boron isotopic enrichment by displacement chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohapatra, K.K.; Bose, Arun

    2014-01-01

    10 B enriched boron is used in applications requiring high volumetric neutron absorption (absorption cross section- 3837 barn for thermal and 1 barn for 1 MeV fast neutron). It is used in fast breeder reactor (as control rod material), in neutron counter, in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy etc. Owing to very small separation factor, boron isotopic enrichment is a complex process requiring large number of separation stages. Heavy Water Board has ventured in industrial scale production of 10 B enriched boron using Exchange Distillation Process as well as Ion Displacement Chromatography Process. Ion Displacement Chromatography process is used in Boron Enrichment Plant at HWP, Manuguru. It is based on isotopic exchange between borate ions (B(OH) 4 - ) on anion exchange resin and boric acid passing through resin. The isotopic exchange takes place due to difference in zero point energy of 10 B and 11 B

  18. XPS analysis of boron doped heterofullerenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnyder, B.; Koetz, R. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Muhr, H.J.; Nesper, R. [ETH Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    Boron heterofullerenes were generated through arc-evaporation of doped graphite rods in a helium atmosphere. According to mass spectrometric analysis only mono-substituted fullerenes like C{sub 59}B, C{sub 69}B and higher homologues together with a large fraction of higher undoped fullerenes were extracted and enriched when pyridine was used as the solvent. XPS analysis of the extracts indicated the presence of two boron species with significantly different binding energies. One peak was assigned to borid acid. The second one corresponds to boron in the fullerene cage, which is mainly C{sub 59}B, according to the mass spectrum. This boron is in a somewhat higher oxidation state than that of ordinary boron-carbon compounds. The reported synthesis and extraction procedure opens a viable route for production of macroscopic amounts of these compounds. (author) 2 figs., 1 tab., 7 refs.

  19. Continuum modeling of boron nitride nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, J; Wu, J; Hwang, K C; Huang, Y

    2008-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes display unique properties and have many potential applications. A finite-deformation shell theory is developed for boron nitride nanotubes directly from the interatomic potential to account for the effect of bending and curvature. Its constitutive relation accounts for the nonlinear, multi-body atomistic interactions, and therefore can model the important effect of tube chirality and radius. The theory is then used to determine whether a single-wall boron nitride nanotube can be modeled as a linear elastic isotropic shell. Instabilities of boron nitride nanotubes under different loadings (e.g., tension, compression, and torsion) are also studied. It is shown that the tension instability of boron nitride nanotubes is material instability, while the compression and torsion instabilities are structural instabilities.

  20. Stabilization of boron carbide via silicon doping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, J E; Bhakhri, V; Hao, R; Prior, T J; Scheler, T; Gregoryanz, E; Chhowalla, M; Giulani, F

    2015-01-14

    Boron carbide is one of the lightest and hardest ceramics, but its applications are limited by its poor stability against a partial phase separation into separate boron and carbon. Phase separation is observed under high non-hydrostatic stress (both static and dynamic), resulting in amorphization. The phase separation is thought to occur in just one of the many naturally occurring polytypes in the material, and this raises the possibility of doping the boron carbide to eliminate this polytype. In this work, we have synthesized boron carbide doped with silicon. We have conducted a series of characterizations (transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction) on pure and silicon-doped boron carbide following static compression to 50 GPa non-hydrostatic pressure. We find that the level of amorphization under static non-hydrostatic pressure is drastically reduced by the silicon doping.

  1. Investigation of amyloid formation inhibition of chemically and biogenically from Citrus aurantium L. blossoms and Rose damascena oils of gold nanoparticles: Toxicity evaluation in rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattarahmady, N; Firoozabadi, V; Nazari-Vanani, R; Azarpira, N

    2018-02-06

    Fibrillation inhibition effects of chemically and biogenically gold nanoparticles (GNPs) were investigated in vitro using human insulin as a model for fibrillation of protein. This inspection was followed using the Congo red assay, thioflavin T fluorescence measurements, transmission electron microscopy, and evaluation of cytotoxicity effects on rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells. Biogenic GNPs were synthesized using oil extracts of Citrus aurantium L. blossoms and Rose damascena blossoms as reducing and concomitant agents. Congo red assay showed development of fibril formation of insulin at acidic media at 60°C over a period of 48h. In these circumstances, transmission electron micrographs confirmed the progress of fibril state from globular chains to amyloid. However, the results of ThT fluorescence measurements indicated a concentration-dependent inhibiting effect of chemically synthesized GNPs on insulin fibrillation in vitro, simultaneously by conversion of the formed fibrils into amorphous aggregates. Furthermore, biogenic GNPs were found to more effectively inhibit the fibril formation, compared to chemically synthesized GNPs. Accordingly, just 0.05nmolL -1 of the biogenic GNPs showed similar inhibition property of chemically synthesized GNPs with a concentration of 10nmolL -1 . Both types of GNPs diminished toxicity of insulin fibrils in rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells viability. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Non inflammatory boronate based glucose-responsive insulin delivery systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indrani Dasgupta

    Full Text Available Boronic acids, known to bind diols, were screened to identify non-inflammatory cross-linkers for the preparation of glucose sensitive and insulin releasing agglomerates of liposomes (Agglomerated Vesicle Technology-AVT. This was done in order to select a suitable replacement for the previously used cross-linker, ConcanavalinA (ConA, a lectin known to have both toxic and inflammatory effects in vivo. Lead-compounds were selected from screens that involved testing for inflammatory potential, cytotoxicity and glucose-binding. These were then conjugated to insulin-encapsulating nanoparticles and agglomerated via sugar-boronate ester linkages to form AVTs. In vitro, the particles demonstrated triggered release of insulin upon exposure to physiologically relevant concentrations of glucose (10 mmoles/L-40 mmoles/L. The agglomerates were also shown to be responsive to multiple spikes in glucose levels over several hours, releasing insulin at a rate defined by the concentration of the glucose trigger.

  3. Toward Edge-Defined Holey Boron Nitride Nanosheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi; Liao, Yunlong; Chen, Zhongfan; Connell, John W.

    2015-01-01

    "Holey" two-dimensional (2D) nanosheets with well-defined holy morphology and edge chemistry are highly desirable for applications such as energy storage, catalysis, sensing, transistors, and molecular transport/separation. For example, holey grapheme is currently under extensive investigation for energy storage applications because of the improvement in ion transport due to through the thickness pathways provided by the holes. Without the holes, the 2D materials have significant limitations for such applications in which efficient ion transport is important. As part of an effort to apply this approach to other 2D nanomaterials, a method to etch geometrically defined pits or holes on the basal plane surface of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) nanosheets has been developed. The etching, conducted via heating in ambient air using metal nanoparticles as catalysts, was facile, controllable, and scalable. Starting h-BN layered crystals were etched and subsequently exfoliated into boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs). The as-etched and exfoliated h-BN nanosheets possessed defined pit and hole shapes that were comprised of regulated nanostructures at the edges. The current finding are the first step toward the bulk preparation of holey BNNSs with defined holes and edges.

  4. Analysis of boron nitride by flame spectrometry methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Telegin, G.F.; Chapysheva, G.Ya.; Shilkina, N.N.

    1989-01-01

    A rapid method has been developed for determination of free and total boron contents as well as trace impurities in boron nitride by using autoclave sample decomposition followed by atomic emission and atomic absorption determination. The relative standard deviation is not greater than 0.03 in the determination of free boron 0.012 in the determination of total boron content

  5. Chemical vapor deposited boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackinnon, I.D.R.; Smith, K.L.

    1987-01-01

    Detailed analytical electron microscope (AEM) studies of yellow whiskers produced by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) show that two basic types of whiskers are produced at low temperatures (between 1200 0 C and 1400 0 C) and low boron to carbon gas ratios. Both whisker types show planar microstructures such as twin planes and stacking faults oriented parallel to, or at a rhombohedral angle to, the growth direction. For both whisker types, the presence of droplet-like terminations containing both Si and Ni indicate that the growth process during CVD is via a vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanisms

  6. Boron enrichment in martian clay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James D Stephenson

    Full Text Available We have detected a concentration of boron in martian clay far in excess of that in any previously reported extra-terrestrial object. This enrichment indicates that the chemistry necessary for the formation of ribose, a key component of RNA, could have existed on Mars since the formation of early clay deposits, contemporary to the emergence of life on Earth. Given the greater similarity of Earth and Mars early in their geological history, and the extensive disruption of Earth's earliest mineralogy by plate tectonics, we suggest that the conditions for prebiotic ribose synthesis may be better understood by further Mars exploration.

  7. Boron Enrichment in Martian Clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, Kazuhide; Freeland, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    We have detected a concentration of boron in martian clay far in excess of that in any previously reported extra-terrestrial object. This enrichment indicates that the chemistry necessary for the formation of ribose, a key component of RNA, could have existed on Mars since the formation of early clay deposits, contemporary to the emergence of life on Earth. Given the greater similarity of Earth and Mars early in their geological history, and the extensive disruption of Earth's earliest mineralogy by plate tectonics, we suggest that the conditions for prebiotic ribose synthesis may be better understood by further Mars exploration. PMID:23762242

  8. Positron annihilation in boron nitride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.Amrane

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Electron and positron charge densities are calculated as a function of position in the unit cell for boron nitride. Wave functions are derived from pseudopotential band structure calculations and the independent particle approximation (IPM, respectively, for electrons and positrons. It is observed that the positron density is maximum in the open interstices and is excluded not only from ion cores but also to a considerable degree from valence bonds. Electron-positron momentum densities are calculated for (001,110 planes. The results are used in order to analyse the positron effects in BN.

  9. Boron nutrition and yield of alfalfa cultivar crioula in relation to boron supply

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos Anacleto Ranulfo dos

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Alfalfa cultivar Crioula (Medicago sativa cv. Crioula is grown in South Brazil and only a few studies on the plants' boron requirement are available. A greenhouse experiment was carried out with alfalfa to measure boron acquisition, production and distribution in the plant; data on critical level and production potentials were recorded. Plants were grown in ground quartz added with 1 L of solution, with the following boron rates: 0, 0.0625, 0.125, 0.25, 0.50, 1.00, and 2.00 mg L-1. Plants were harvested at 46 days of growth. Forage dry mass was increased by boron supply and dry matter accumulation was considerably low in control. Boron concentration in the leaves was higher than in the stems or roots. Boron utilization from the external solution reached 90% at 0.0625 mg L-1 and sharply decreased with further increasing boron rates. Boron concentration and content in the leaves and in plant tops were at maximum when applied boron was between 1.5 and 1.6 mg L-1. Critical levels of boron in plant were 61 mg kg-1 in the leaves and 39 mg kg-1 in plant tops for this cultivar of alfalfa.

  10. Experimental boron neutron capture therapy for melanoma: Systemic delivery of boron to melanotic and amelanotic melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coderre, J.A.; Glass, J.D.; Micca, P.; Greenberg, D.; Packer, S.

    1990-01-01

    The boron-containing melanin precursor analogue p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) has previously been shown to selectively deliver boron to pigmented murine melanomas when administered in a single intragastric dose. If boron neutron capture therapy is to become a clinically useful method of radiation therapy for human malignant melanoma, the boron carrier must be capable of delivering useful amounts of boron to remote tumor sites (metastases) and to poorly pigmented melanomas. The authors have now determined the ability of BPA to accumulate in several nonpigmented melanoma models including human melanoma xenografts in nude mice. The absolute amount of boron in the nonpigmented melanomas was about 50% of the observed in the pigmented counterparts but was still selectively concentrated in the tumor relative to normal tissues in amounts sufficient for effective neutron capture therapy. Single intragastric doses of BPA resulted in selective localization of boron in the amelanotic Greene melanoma carried in the anterior chamber of the rabbit eye and in a pigmented murine melanoma growing in the lungs. The ratio of the boron concentration in these tumors to the boron concentration in the immediately adjacent normal tissue was in the range of 3:1 to 4:1. These distribution studies support the proposal that boron neutron capture therapy may be useful as a regional therapy for malignant melanoma

  11. Study of ceramic mixed boron element as a neutron shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismail Mustapha; Mohd Reusmaazran Yusof; Md Fakarudin Ab Rahman; Nor Paiza Mohamad Hasan; Samihah Mustaffha; Yusof Abdullah; Mohamad Rabaie Shari; Airwan Affandi Mahmood; Nurliyana Abdullah; Hearie Hassan

    2012-01-01

    Shielding upon radiation should not be underestimated as it can causes hazard to health. Precautions on the released of radioactive materials should be well concerned and considered. Therefore, the combination of ceramic and boron make them very useful for shielding purpose in areas of low and intermediate neutron. A six grades of ceramic tile have been produced namely IMN05 - 5 % boron, IMN06 - 6 % boron, IMN07 - 7 % boron, IMN08 - 8 % boron, IMN09 - 9 % boron, IMN10 - 10 % boron from mixing, press and sintered process. Boron is a material that capable of absorbing and capturing neutron, so that neutron and gamma test were conducted to analyze the effectiveness of boron material in combination with ceramic as shielding. From the finding, percent reduction number of count per minute shows the ceramic tiles are capable to capture neutron. Apart from all the percentage of boron used, 10 % is the most effective shields since the percent reduction indicating greater neutron captured increased. (author)

  12. Analysis of Boron Distribution in Steel using Neutron at HANARO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Eun-Joo; Seong, Baek-Seok; Kim, Hark-Rho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    Boron is very useful element in steels to improve the mechanical properties. In steel matrix, boron exist several types such as solute, segregation in grain boundary and many kinds of precipitate, which influence the properties of the steel. But, detecting of boron using X-ray or ion-beam is not easy because boron is very light atom than iron. However neutron gives the clear image of boron distribution from the particle tracking autoradiography (PTA) method. The PTA method of boron uses the phenomenon that boron irradiated by neutron emits Liion and alpha particle. Boron distribution can be obtained by observing the traces of the emitted Li-ion and alpha particle. At HANARO, the study for observing of boron distribution has been performed several years ago. Recently, the experimental techniques were improved for the reactor power of 30 MW. In this paper, improved experimental techniques were described and some results for boron added low-carbon steel plate were introduced.

  13. Studies on Separation Process and Production Technology of Boron Isotope

    OpenAIRE

    LI Jian-ping

    2014-01-01

    The boron isotopes separation test was performed by chemical exchange reaction in the benzene ether -three boron fluoride system, which resulted to the boron isotopic enrichment of -10 in the liquid phase, the boron isotopic enrichment of -11 in the gas phase. After then, boron isotope separation trial production has been finished. In this process, the exchange column and complex tower normal operating parameters and the complex tower technology have been obtained, the problems of material di...

  14. Composite boron nitride neutron detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, M.; Mojaev, E.; Khakhan, O.; Fleider, A.; Dul`kin, E.; Schieber, M.

    2014-09-01

    Single phase polycrystalline hexagonal boron nitride (BN) or mixed with boron carbide (BxC) embedded in an insulating polymeric matrix acting as a binder and forming a composite material as well as pure submicron size polycrystalline BN has been tested as a thermal neutron converter in a multilayer thermal neutron detector design. Metal sheet electrodes were covered with 20-50 μm thick layers of composite materials and assembled in a multi-layer sandwich configuration. High voltage was applied to the metal electrodes to create an interspacing electric field. The spacing volume could be filled with air, nitrogen or argon. Thermal neutrons were captured in converter layers due to the presence of the 10B isotope. The resulting nuclear reaction produced α-particles and 7Li ions which ionized the gas in the spacing volume. Electron-ion pairs were collected by the field to create an electrical signal proportional to the intensity of the neutron source. The detection efficiency of the multilayer neutron detectors is found to increase with the number of active converter layers. Pixel structures of such neutron detectors necessary for imaging applications and incorporation of internal moderator materials for field measurements of fast neutron flux intensities are discussed as well.

  15. Boron-Loaded Silicone Rubber Scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, Z.W.; Maya, L.; Brown, G.M.; Sloop, F.V.Jr

    2003-05-12

    Silicone rubber received attention as an alternative to polyvinyltoluene in applications in which the scintillator is exposed to high doses because of the increased resistance of the rubber to the formation of blue-absorbing color centers. Work by Bowen, et al., and Harmon, et al., demonstrated their properties under gamma/x-ray irradiation, and Bell, et al. have shown their response to thermal neutrons. This last work, however, provided an example of a silicone in which both the boron and the scintillator were contained in the rubber as solutes, a formulation which led to the precipitation of solids and sublimation of the boron component. In the present work we describe a scintillator in which the boron is chemically bonded to the siloxane and so avoids the problem of precipitation and loss of boron to sublimation. Material containing up to 18% boron, by weight, was prepared, mounted on photomultipliers, and exposed to both neutron and gamma fluxes. Pulse height spectra showing the neutron and photon response were obtained, and although the light output was found to be much poorer than from samples in which boron was dissolved, the higher boron concentrations enabled essentially 100% neutron absorption in only a few millimeters' thickness of rubber.

  16. Density separation of boron particles. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.M.

    1980-04-01

    A density distribution much broader than expected was observed in lots of natural boron powder supplied by two different sources. The material in both lots was found to have a rhombohedral crystal structure, and the only other parameters which seemed to account for such a distribution were impurities within the crystal structure and varying isotopic ratios. A separation technique was established to isolate boron particles in narrow densty ranges. The isolated fractions were subsequently analyzed for B 10 and total boron content in an effort to determine whether selective isotopic enrichment and nonhomogeneous impurity distribution were the causes for the broad density distribution of the boron powders. It was found that although the B 10 content remained nearly constant around 18%, the total boron content varied from 37.5 to 98.7%. One of the lots also was found to contain an apparently high level of alpha rhombohedral boron which broadened the density distribution considerably. During this work, a capability for removing boron particles containing gross amounts of impurities and, thereby, improving the overall purity of the remaining material was developed. In addition, the separation technique used in this study apparently isolated particles with alpha and beta rhombohedral crystal structures, although the only supporting evidence is density data

  17. Proceedings of workshop on 'Boron Chemistry and Boron Neutron Capture Therapy'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitaoka, Y.

    1991-07-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of the 3rd Workshop on 'the Boron Chemistry and Boron Neutron Capture Therapy' held on February 12, in 1991. In this workshop, our attention was focused on the chemical nature of boron compounds and the boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). First, clinical experiences of BNCT in KURRI in 1990 and 1991 were reported (Chap. 3). The feasibility of the gadolinium neutron capture therapy for brain tumors was discussed (Chap. 4). In the chemical field, a rapid spectrophotometric determination of trace amounts of borons in biological samples is described (Chap. 5). The chemical behaviours of p-boronophenylalanine and its analogs in aqueous solutions were investigated by a paper electrophoresis and infrared spectroscopy (Chap. 6). On the molecular design and synthesis of new boron carriers for BNCT, several new synthetic methods for B-10 containing nucleoside derivatives were shown (Chap. 7). (author)

  18. Electrical and thermal conductivities of the graphene, boron nitride and silicon boron honeycomb monolayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mousavi, Hamze, E-mail: hamze.mousavi@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khodadadi, Jabbar [Department of Physics, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Moradi Kurdestany, Jamshid [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65201 (United States); Yarmohammadi, Zahra [Department of Physics, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-11-25

    Density of states, electrical and thermal conductivities of electrons in graphene, boron nitride and silicon boron single sheets are studied within the tight-binding Hamiltonian model and Green's function formalism, based on the linear response theory. The results show that while boron nitride keeps significantly the lowest amounts overall with an interval of zero value in low temperatures, due to its insulating nature, graphene exhibits the most electrical and thermal conductivities, slightly higher than silicon boron except for low temperature region where the latter surpasses, owing to its metallic character. This work might make ideas for creating new electronic devices based on honeycomb nanostructures. - Highlights: • Electronic properties of graphene, silicon boron, and boron nitride planes are compared. • Tight-binding Hamiltonian model and Green's function formalism are implemented. • This work might make ideas for creating new electronic devices based on honeycomb nanostructures.

  19. The determination of boron and carbon in reactor grade boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crossley, D.; Wood, A.J.; McInnes, C.A.J.; Jones, I.G.

    1978-09-01

    The sealed tube method of dissolution at high temperature and pressure has been successfully applied in the analysis of reactor grade boron carbide for the determination of boron. A 50 mg sample of boron carbide is completely dissolved by heating with concentrated nitric acid in a sealed tube at 300 0 C. The boron content of the resultant sample solution is determined by the mannitol potentiometric titration method. The precision of the method for the determination of 2.5 mg of boron using the Harwell automatic potentiometric titrator is 0.2% (coefficient of variation). The carbon content of a boron carbide sample is determined by combustion of the sample at 1050 0 C in a stream of oxygen using vanadium pentoxide to ensure the complete oxidation of the sample. The carbon dioxide produced from the sample is measured manometrically and the precision of the method for the determination of 4 mg of carbon is 0.4% (coefficient of variation). (author)

  20. Self-assembling nanoparticles encapsulating zoledronic acid inhibit mesenchymal stromal cells differentiation, migration and secretion of proangiogenic factors and their interactions with prostate cancer cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Borghese, C.; Casagrande, N.; Pivetta, E.; Colombatti, A.; Boccellino, M.; Amler, Evžen; Normanno, N.; Caraglia, M.; de Rosa, G.; Aldinucci, D.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 26 (2017), s. 42926-42938 ISSN 1949-2553 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : zoledronic acid * self-assembling nanoparticles * mesenchymal stromal cells * prostate cancer * tumor microenvironment Subject RIV: FP - Other Medical Disciplines OBOR OECD: Technologies involving the manipulation of cells, tissues, organs or the whole organism (assisted reproduction) Impact factor: 5.168, year: 2016

  1. Quantitative boron detection by neutron transmission method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okka, M.; Genceli, M.; Eren, E.; Bayulken, A.

    2008-01-01

    //Quantitative boron detection is mainly performed by chemical methods like colorimetric titration. High neutron absorption cross section of natural boron makes attractive its detection by absorption measurements. This work is an extension of earlier investigations where neutron radiography technique was used for boron detection. In the present investigation, the neutron absorption rate of boron containing solutions is the way to measure quantitatively the boron content of the solutions. The investigation was carried out in Istanbul TRIGA Mark-II reactor. In the end of the experiments, it was observed that even |ppw| grade boron in aqueous solution can be easily detected. The use of this method is certainly very useful for boron utilizing industries like glass and steel industries.The major disadvantage of the method is the obligation to use always aqueous solutions to be able to detect homogeneously the boron content. Then, steel or glass samples have to be put first in an appropriate solution form. The irradiation of steel samples can give the distribution of boron by the help of a imaging and this suggested method will give its quantitative measurement. The superiority of this method are its quick response time and its accuracy. To test this accuracy, a supposed unknown , solution of boric acid is irradiated and then calculated by the help of the calibration curve. The measured value of boric acid was 0.89 mg and the calculated value was found to be 0.98 mg which gives an accuracy of 10 %. It was also seen that the method is more accurate for low concentration. (authors)

  2. Paclitaxel-Fe3O4 nanoparticles inhibit growth of CD138–  CD34– tumor stem-like cells in multiple myeloma-bearing mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang C

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Cuiping Yang,1,3,* Jing Wang,2,* Dengyu Chen,1,* Junsong Chen,1 Fei Xiong,4 Hongyi Zhang,1 Yunxia Zhang,2 Ning Gu,4 Jun Dou11Department of Pathogenic Biology and Immunology, Medical School, 2Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Zhongda Hospital, Southeast University, Nanjing, 3Department of Pathogenic Biology and Immunology, School of Basic Medicine, Jiangxi University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Nanchang, 4School of Biological Science and Medical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: There is growing evidence that CD138– CD34– cells may actually be tumor stem cells responsible for initiation and relapse of multiple myeloma. However, effective drugs targeted at CD138– CD34– tumor stem cells are yet to be developed. The purpose of this study was to investigate the inhibitory effect of paclitaxel-loaded Fe3O4 nanoparticles (PTX-NPs on CD138– CD34– tumor stem cells in multiple myeloma-bearing mice.Methods: CD138– CD34– cells were isolated from a human U266 multiple myeloma cell line using an immune magnetic bead sorting method and then subcutaneously injected into mice with nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency to develop a multiple myeloma-bearing mouse model. The mice were treated with Fe3O4 nanoparticles 2 mg/kg, paclitaxel 4.8 mg/kg, and PTX-NPs 0.64 mg/kg for 2 weeks. Tumor growth, pathological changes, serum and urinary interleukin-6 levels, and molecular expression of caspase-3, caspase-8, and caspase-9 were evaluated.Results: CD138– CD34– cells were found to have tumor stem cell characteristics. All the mice developed tumors in 40 days after injection of 1 × 106 CD138– CD34– tumor stem cells. Tumor growth in mice treated with PTX-NPs was significantly inhibited compared with the controls (P <  0.005, and the groups that received nanoparticles alone (P < 0.005 or paclitaxel alone (P < 0.05. In addition

  3. Effect of boron concentration on physicochemical properties of boron-doped carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keru, Godfrey; Ndungu, Patrick G.; Nyamori, Vincent O., E-mail: nyamori@ukzn.ac.za

    2015-03-01

    Boron-doped carbon nanotubes (B-CNTs) were synthesized using chemical vapour deposition (CVD) floating catalyst method. Toluene was used as the carbon source, triphenylborane as boron as well as the carbon source while ferrocene was used as the catalyst. The amount of triphenylborane used was varied in a solution of toluene and ferrocene. Ferrocene was kept constant at 2.5 wt.%. while a maximum temperature of 900 °C was used for the synthesis of the shaped carbon nanomaterial (SCNMs). SCNMs obtained were characterized by the use of transmission electron microscope (TEM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), high resolution-electron microscope, electron dispersive X-ay spectroscopy (EDX), Raman spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), nitrogen adsorption at 77 K, and inverse gas chromatography. TEM and SEM analysis confirmed SCNMs obtained were a mixture of B-CNTs and carbon nanofibres (B-CNF). EDX and ICP-OES results showed that boron was successively incorporated into the carbon hexagonal network of CNTs and its concentration was dependent on the amount of triphenylborane used. From the VSM results, the boron doping within the CNTs introduced ferromagnetic properties, and as the percentage of boron increased the magnetic coactivity and squareness changed. In addition, boron doping changed the conductivity and the surface energy among other physicochemical properties of B-CNTs. - Highlights: • Boron-doping of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) changes their physiochemical properties. • Amount of boron-doping was dependent on the wt.% of boron precursor used. • Boron-doping changed CNTs surfaces and the distribution of dispersive energy sites. • Boron-doping affected the conductivity and ferromagnetic properties. • Increased boron-doping results in a more favourable interaction with polar probes.

  4. Boron Isotope Fractionation in Bell Pepper

    OpenAIRE

    Geilert, Sonja; Vogl, Jochen; Rosner, Martin; Voerkelius, Susanne; Eichert, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Various plant compartments of a single bell pepper plant were studied to verify the variability of boron isotope composition in plants and to identify possible intra-plant isotope fractionation. Boron mass fractions varied from 9.8 mg/kg in the fruits to 70.0 mg/kg in the leaves. Boron (B) isotope ratios reported as δ11B ranged from -11.0‰ to +16.0‰ (U ≤ 1.9‰, k=2) and showed a distinct trend to heavier δ11B values the higher the plant compartments were located in the plant. A fractionatio...

  5. Study on plasma sprayed boron carbide coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yi; Lee, Soo W.; Ding, Chuanxian

    2002-03-01

    The microstructure, phase composition, and mechanical properties of boron carbide coatings formed by atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) are studied in the present work. The boron carbide coating with high microhardness and low porosity could be produced by APS. The decomposition of boron carbide powder during the plasma spray process would result in the formation of the BxC phase and an increase of the carbon phase, which is confirmed by transmission electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction results.

  6. Controlling the microstructure and properties of wire arc additive manufactured Ti–6Al–4V with trace boron additions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bermingham, M.J.; Kent, D.; Zhan, H.; StJohn, D.H.; Dargusch, M.S.

    2015-01-01

    This study demonstrates that trace boron addition to Ti–6Al–4V coupons produced by additive layer manufacturing is an effective way to eliminate the deleterious anisotropic microstructures often encountered with this manufacturing technique. Trace boron additions (up to 0.13 wt.%) to this alloy eliminate grain boundary-α and colony-α, and instead produce a homogeneous α-microstructure consisting of fine equiaxed α-grains in both as-deposited and heat treated coupons. Prior-β grains remain columnar with boron addition but become narrower due to the wider solidification range and growth restricting effect of the boron solute. Compared to unmodified Ti–6Al–4V alloy, Ti–6Al–4V modified with trace boron additions showed up to 40% improvement in plasticity with no loss in strength under uniaxial compression at room temperature. Boron additions were found to inhibit twinning transmission that causes sudden large load drops during deformation of the unmodified Ti–6Al–4V alloy in the heat treated condition

  7. Characterization of boron tolerant bacteria isolated from a fly ash dumping site for bacterial boron remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edward Raja, Chellaiah; Omine, Kiyoshi

    2013-08-01

    Boron is an essential micronutrient for plants, but can above certain concentrations be toxic to living organisms. A major environmental concern is the removal of boron from contaminated water and fly ash. For this purpose, the samples were collected from a fly ash dumping site, Nagasaki prefecture, Japan. The chemical characteristics and heavy metal concentration of the samples were performed by X-ray fluorescent analysis and leaching test. For bacterial analysis, samples were collected in sterile plastic sheets and isolation was carried out by serial dilution method. The boron tolerant isolates that showed values of maximum inhibitory concentration toward boron ranging from 100 to 260 mM level were screened. Based on 16S rRNA sequencing and phylogenetic analysis, the isolates were most closely related to the genera Bacillus, Lysinibacillus, Microbacterium and Ralstonia. The boron tolerance of these strains was also associated with resistant to several heavy metals, such as As (III), Cr (VI), Cd, Cu, Pb, Ni, Se (III) and Zn. Indeed, these strains were arsenic oxidizing bacteria confirmed by silver nitrate test. These strains exhibited their salt resistances ranging from 4 to 15 % were determined in Trypticase soy agar medium. The boron tolerant strains were capable of removing 0.1-2.0 and 2.7-3.7 mg l(-1) boron from the medium and fly ash at 168 h. Thus, we have successfully identified the boron tolerant and removal bacteria from a fly ash dumping site for boron remediation.

  8. Silicon doped boron carbide nanorod growth via a solid-liquid-solid process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wei-Qiang

    2006-03-01

    Here we report the synthesis of silicon doped boron carbide (Si-doped B4C) nanorods via a solid reaction using activated carbon, boron, and silicon powder as reactants. These nanorods have been studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometry. The diameter of Si-doped B4C nanorods ranges from 15to70nm. The length of Si-doped B4C nanorods is up to 30μm. NixCoyBz nanoparticles are used as catalysts for the growth of Si-doped B4C nanorods. A solid-liquid-solid growth mechanism is proposed.

  9. Boron Doped Graphene 3-Dimensi untuk Superkapasitor Kapasitas Tinggi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurlia Pramita Sari

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Chemical doping is an effective approach to improve the property of carbon material. In this study boron doped graphene with 3D structure used as the electrode was investigated. Boron doped graphene was prepared through freeze-dried process followed by pyrolysis of graphene oxide (GO with three types of chemical substances; boron oxide, boric acid, and boron powder in an argon and hydrogen atmosphere at 1000 C for 3 hours. The difference of chemical composition generated a different percentage of boron bond with GO. The results shows that the highest electrochemical performance was found in graphene samples with the addition of boric acid (BA 86 F/g, followed by boron oxide (BO 59.2 F/g, and boron powder (BP 2 F/g. It can be caused by boron concentration bound with graphene. The higher concentration of boron could be increased the electrochemical performance due to better of ion movement.

  10. Breaking the icosahedra in boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Kelvin Y; An, Qi; Sato, Takanori; Breen, Andrew J; Ringer, Simon P; Goddard, William A; Cairney, Julie M; Hemker, Kevin J

    2016-10-25

    Findings of laser-assisted atom probe tomography experiments on boron carbide elucidate an approach for characterizing the atomic structure and interatomic bonding of molecules associated with extraordinary structural stability. The discovery of crystallographic planes in these boron carbide datasets substantiates that crystallinity is maintained to the point of field evaporation, and characterization of individual ionization events gives unexpected evidence of the destruction of individual icosahedra. Statistical analyses of the ions created during the field evaporation process have been used to deduce relative atomic bond strengths and show that the icosahedra in boron carbide are not as stable as anticipated. Combined with quantum mechanics simulations, this result provides insight into the structural instability and amorphization of boron carbide. The temporal, spatial, and compositional information provided by atom probe tomography makes it a unique platform for elucidating the relative stability and interactions of primary building blocks in hierarchically crystalline materials.

  11. Boron adsorption on hematite and clinoptilolite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gainer, G.M.

    1993-01-01

    This thesis describes experiments performed to determine the suitability of boron as a potential reactive tracer for use in saturated-zone C-well reactive tracer studies for the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP). Experiments were performed to identify the prevalent sorption mechanism of boron and to determine adsorption of boron on hematite and clinoptilolite as a function of pH. These minerals are present in the Yucca Mountain tuff in which the C-well studies will be conducted. Evaluation of this sorption mechanism was done by determining the equilibration time of boron-mineral suspensions, by measuring changes in equilibrium to titrations, and by measuring electrophoretic mobility. Experiments were performed with the minerals suspended in NaCl electrolytes of concentrations ranging from 0.1 N NaCl to 0.001 N NaCl. Experimentalconditions included pH values between 3 and 12 and temperature of about 38 degrees C

  12. Determination of boron in amorphous alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grazhulene, S.S.; Grossman, O.V.; Kuntscher, K.K.; Malygina, L.I.; Muller, E.N.; Telegin, G.F.

    1985-10-01

    In the determination of boron in amorphous alloys containingFe, Co, B, Si, Ni, and P having unusal magnetic and electrical properties, precise analysis and rapid analysis are necessary. To improve the metrological properties of the existing procedure, to find a rapid determination of boron in amorphous alloys, and to verify the accuracy of the results, in the present work the optimization of the photometric determination after extraction of the BF/sup -//sub 4/ ion pair with methylene blue has been studied, and a boron determination by flame photometry using selective methylation has been developed. The determination of boron by the flame photometric and spectrophotometric methods is shown. When a highly precise determination is needed, the spectrophotometric procedure can be used. This procedure is distinguished by its labor intensity and duration. When the need for reproducibility is less severe, the rapid flame photometric procedure is best.

  13. Boron precipitates in ion implanted silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, W.K.; Washburn, J.

    1975-03-01

    Long rod-like defects are observed in ion implanted silicon when boron is present either as a prior dopant addition or as the implanted species. Results of recent work indicates that these defects have the characteristics of narrow extrinsic dipoles or elongated dislocation loops and that there are two different types along each of the six (110) directions. An annealing kinetics method has been used to identify the nature of these defects formed during post-implantation annealing in boron ion (100 keV) implanted silicon irradiated at room temperature to a dose of 2 x 10 14 /cm 2 . It is concluded that at least two different kinds of rod-like defects exist in boron ion implanted silicon. From the activation energy for shrinkage, it is also concluded that one type (anti A) is composed largely of boron atoms. (U.S.)

  14. Spectromicroscopy in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Benjamin; Redondo, Jose; Andres, Roger; Suda, Takashi; Neumann, Michael; Steen, Steffi; Gabel, Detlef; Mercanti, Delio; Ciotti, Teresa; Perfetti, Paolo; Margaritondo, Giorgio; de Stasio, Gelsomina

    1998-03-01

    The MEPHISTO synchrotron imaging spectromicroscope can analyse ashed cells or tissue sections to reveal the microdistribution of trace elements. MEPHISTO performs core level x-ray absorption spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation, and uses an electron optics system to provide magnified photoelectron images. An application of the MEPHISTO spectromicroscope is in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). BNCT is a binary cancer therapy that will selectively destroy cancer cells provided that compounds containing a boron isotope are selectively accumulated in tumor tissue. Important factors for the success of BNCT include the ability to target every cancer cell, and the distribution of boron inside the cell. To investigate the boron distribution in tissue, sections of human glioblastoma containing a BNCT compound, and stained with nickel against a protein found in the nuclei of proliferating (cancer) cells, were studied with MEPHISTO.

  15. Behaviour of boron in Mandovi estuary (Goa)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shirodkar, P.V.; Anand, S.P.

    and alkalinity gave positive correlations with a linear variation. Though the overall behavioural pattern of boron indicated non-conservative nature, it showed a quasi-conservative character during premonsoon and a non-conservative during rest of the seasons...

  16. Boron

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... feeding women over 19 years of age. For adolescents 14 to 18 years of age and pregnant or breast-feeding women 14 to 18 years of age, the ... be expected, is 17 mg per day for adolescents 14 to 18 years of age and pregnant or breast-feeding women 14 to 18 years of age. For ...

  17. Antibacterial activity against Streptococcus mutans and inhibition of bacterial induced enamel demineralization of propolis, miswak, and chitosan nanoparticles based dental varnishes

    OpenAIRE

    Wassel, Mariem O.; Khattab, Mona A.

    2017-01-01

    Using natural products can be a cost-effective approach for caries prevention especially in low income countries where dental caries is highly prevalent and the resources are limited. Specially prepared dental varnishes containing propolis, miswak, and chitosan nanoparticles (CS-NPs) with or without sodium fluoride (NaF) were assessed for antibacterial effect against Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) using disk diffusion test. In addition, the protective effect of a single pretreatment of prim...

  18. Inhibition of Neuroblastoma Tumor Growth by Targeted Delivery of MicroRNA-34a Using Anti-Disialoganglioside GD2 Coated Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Tivnan, Amanda; Orr, Wayne Shannon; Gubala, Vladimir; Nooney, Robert; Williams, David E.; McDonagh, Colette; Prenter, Suzanne; Harvey, Harry; Domingo-Fernández, Raquel; Bray, Isabella M.; Piskareva, Olga; Ng, Catherine Y.; Lode, Holger N.; Davidoff, Andrew M.; Stallings, Raymond L.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Neuroblastoma is one of the most challenging malignancies of childhood, being associated with the highest death rate in paediatric oncology, underlining the need for novel therapeutic approaches. Typically, patients with high risk disease undergo an initial remission in response to treatment, followed by disease recurrence that has become refractory to further treatment. Here, we demonstrate the first silica nanoparticle-based targeted delivery of a tumor suppressive, pro-apoptoti...

  19. Synthesis of Glycyrrhetinic Acid-Modified Chitosan 5-Fluorouracil Nanoparticles and Its Inhibition of Liver Cancer Characteristics in Vitro and in Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Mingrong; Gao, Xiaoyan; Wang, Yong; Chen, Houxiang; He, Bing; Xu, Hongzhi; Li, Yingchun; Han, Jiang; Zhang, Zhiping

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticle drug delivery (NDDS) is a novel system in which the drugs are delivered to the site of action by small particles in the nanometer range. Natural or synthetic polymers are used as vectors in NDDS, as they provide targeted, sustained release and biodegradability. Here, we used the chitosan and hepatoma cell-specific binding molecule, glycyrrhetinic acid (GA), to synthesize glycyrrhetinic acid-modified chitosan (GA-CTS). The synthetic product was confirmed by Fourier transformed inf...

  20. Abrasive slurry composition for machining boron carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, Edward L.

    1985-01-01

    An abrasive slurry particularly suited for use in drilling or machining boron carbide consists essentially of a suspension of boron carbide and/or silicon carbide grit in a carrier solution consisting essentially of a dilute solution of alkylaryl polyether alcohol in octyl alcohol. The alkylaryl polyether alcohol functions as a wetting agent which improves the capacity of the octyl alcohol for carrying the grit in suspension, yet without substantially increasing the viscosity of the carrier solution.

  1. Boron-rich oligomers for BNCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gula, M.; Perleberg, O.; Gabel, D.

    2000-01-01

    The synthesis of two BSH derivatives is described, which can be used for oligomerization in DNA-synthesizers. Synthesis pathways lead to final products in five and six steps, respectively. Because of chirality interesting results were expected. NMR-measurements confirm this expectation. Possible oligomers with high concentrations of boron can be attached to biomolecules. These oligomers can be explored with several imaging methods (EELS, PEM) to determine the lower detection limit of boron with these methods. (author)

  2. Inhibition of neuroblastoma tumor growth by targeted delivery of microRNA-34a using anti-disialoganglioside GD2 coated nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tivnan, Amanda; Orr, Wayne Shannon; Gubala, Vladimir; Nooney, Robert; Williams, David E; McDonagh, Colette; Prenter, Suzanne; Harvey, Harry; Domingo-Fernández, Raquel; Bray, Isabella M; Piskareva, Olga; Ng, Catherine Y; Lode, Holger N; Davidoff, Andrew M; Stallings, Raymond L

    2012-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is one of the most challenging malignancies of childhood, being associated with the highest death rate in paediatric oncology, underlining the need for novel therapeutic approaches. Typically, patients with high risk disease undergo an initial remission in response to treatment, followed by disease recurrence that has become refractory to further treatment. Here, we demonstrate the first silica nanoparticle-based targeted delivery of a tumor suppressive, pro-apoptotic microRNA, miR-34a, to neuroblastoma tumors in a murine orthotopic xenograft model. These tumors express high levels of the cell surface antigen disialoganglioside GD2 (GD(2)), providing a target for tumor-specific delivery. Nanoparticles encapsulating miR-34a and conjugated to a GD(2) antibody facilitated tumor-specific delivery following systemic administration into tumor bearing mice, resulted in significantly decreased tumor growth, increased apoptosis and a reduction in vascularisation. We further demonstrate a novel, multi-step molecular mechanism by which miR-34a leads to increased levels of the tissue inhibitor metallopeptidase 2 precursor (TIMP2) protein, accounting for the highly reduced vascularisation noted in miR-34a-treated tumors. These novel findings highlight the potential of anti-GD(2)-nanoparticle-mediated targeted delivery of miR-34a for both the treatment of GD(2)-expressing tumors, and as a basic discovery tool for elucidating biological effects of novel miRNAs on tumor growth.

  3. Inhibition of neuroblastoma tumor growth by targeted delivery of microRNA-34a using anti-disialoganglioside GD2 coated nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Tivnan

    Full Text Available Neuroblastoma is one of the most challenging malignancies of childhood, being associated with the highest death rate in paediatric oncology, underlining the need for novel therapeutic approaches. Typically, patients with high risk disease undergo an initial remission in response to treatment, followed by disease recurrence that has become refractory to further treatment. Here, we demonstrate the first silica nanoparticle-based targeted delivery of a tumor suppressive, pro-apoptotic microRNA, miR-34a, to neuroblastoma tumors in a murine orthotopic xenograft model. These tumors express high levels of the cell surface antigen disialoganglioside GD2 (GD(2, providing a target for tumor-specific delivery.Nanoparticles encapsulating miR-34a and conjugated to a GD(2 antibody facilitated tumor-specific delivery following systemic administration into tumor bearing mice, resulted in significantly decreased tumor growth, increased apoptosis and a reduction in vascularisation. We further demonstrate a novel, multi-step molecular mechanism by which miR-34a leads to increased levels of the tissue inhibitor metallopeptidase 2 precursor (TIMP2 protein, accounting for the highly reduced vascularisation noted in miR-34a-treated tumors.These novel findings highlight the potential of anti-GD(2-nanoparticle-mediated targeted delivery of miR-34a for both the treatment of GD(2-expressing tumors, and as a basic discovery tool for elucidating biological effects of novel miRNAs on tumor growth.

  4. Discharge cleaning on TFTR after boronization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, D.; Dylla, H.F.; LaMarche, P.H.; Bell, M.G.; Blanchard, W.; Bush, C.E.; Gentile, C.; Hawryluk, R.J.; HIll, K.W.; Janos, A.C.; Jobes, F.C; Owens, D.K.; Pearson, G.; Schivell, J.; Ulrickson, M.A.; Vannoy, C.; Wong, K.L.

    1991-05-01

    At the beginning of the 1990 TFTR experimental run, after replacement of POCO-AXF-5Q graphite tiles on the midplane of the bumper limiter by carbon fiber composite (CFC) tiles and prior to any Pulse Discharge Cleaning (PDC), boronization was performed. Boronization is the deposition of a layer of boron and carbon on the vacuum vessel inner surface by a glow discharge in a diborane, methane and helium mixture. The amount of discharge cleaning required after boronization was substantially reduced compared to that which was needed after previous openings when boronization was not done. Previously, after a major shutdown, about 10 5 low current (∼20 kA) Taylor Discharge Cleaning (TDC) pulses were required before high current (∼400 kA) aggressive Pulse Discharge Cleaning (PDC) pulses could be performed successfully. Aggressive PDC is used to heat the limiters from the vessel bakeout temperature of 150 degrees C to 250 degrees C for a period of several hours. Heating the limiters is important to increase the rate at which water is removed from the carbon limiter tiles. After boronization, the number of required TDC pulses was reduced to <5000. The number of aggressive PDC pulses required was approximately unchanged. 14 refs., 1 tab

  5. Biosynthesized Platinum Nanoparticles Inhibit the Proliferation of Human Lung-Cancer Cells in vitro and Delay the Growth of a Human Lung-Tumor Xenograft in vivo -In vitro and in vivo Anticancer Activity of bio-Pt NPs-

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bendale Yogesh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Lung cancer remains a deadly disease with unsatisfactory overall survival. Cisplatin, a standard platinum (Pt-based chemotherapeutic agent, has the potential to inhibit the growth of lung cancer. Its use, however, is occasionally limited by severe organ toxicity. However, until now, no systematic study has been conducted to verify its efficacy with proper experimental support in vivo. Therefore, we examined whether biosynthesized Pt nanoparticles (NPs inhibited human lung cancer in vitro and in vivo to validate their use in alternative and complementary medicine. Methods: We evaluated the in vitro and the in vivo anticancer efficiencies of biosynthesized Pt NPs in a subcutaneous xenograft model with A549 cells. Severe combined immune deficient mice (SCID were divided into four groups: group 1 being the vehicle control group and groups 2, 3 and 4 being the experimental groups. Once the tumor volume had reached 70 ─ 75 mm3, the progression profile of the tumor growth kinetics and the body weights of the mice were measured every week for 6 weeks after oral administration of Pt NPs. Doses of Pt NPs of 500, 1,000 and 2,000 mg/kg of body weight were administered to the experimental groups and a dose of honey was administered to the vehicle control group. The efficacy was quantified by using the delay in tumor growth following the administration of Pt NPs of A549 human-lung-cancer xenografts growing in SCID mice. Results: The in vitro cytotoxicity evaluation indicated that Pt NPs, in a dose-dependent manner, inhibited the growth of A549 cells, and the in vivo evaluation showed that Pt NPs at the mid and high doses effectively inhibited and delayed the growth of lung cancer in SCID mice. Conclusion: These findings confirm the antitumor properties of biosynthesized Pt NPs and suggest that they may be a cost-effective alternative for the treatment of patients with lung cancer.

  6. Real-time boronization in PBX-M using erosion of solid boronized targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kugel, H.W.; Timberlake, J.; Bell, R.

    1994-01-01

    Thirty one real-time boronizations were applied to PBX-M using the plasma ablation of solid target probes. More than 17 g of boron was deposited in PBX-M using this technique. The probes were positioned at the edge plasma to optimize ablation and minimize spallation. Auger depth profile analysis of poloidal and toroidal deposition sample coupon arrays indicate that boron was transported by the plasma around the torus and deep into the divertors. During discharges with continuous real-time boronization, low-Z and high-Z impurities decreased rapidly as plasma surfaces were covered during the first 20--30 discharges. After boronization, a short-term improvement in plasma conditions persisted prior to significant boron erosion from plasma surfaces, and a longer term, but less significant, improvement persisted as boron farther from the edge continued gettering. Real-time solid target boronization has been found to be very effective for accelerating conditioning to new regimes and maintaining high performance plasma conditions

  7. The effect of boron deficiency on gene expression and boron compartmentalization in sugarbeet

    Science.gov (United States)

    NIP5, BOR1, NIP6, and WRKY6 genes were investigated for their role in boron deficiency in sugar beet, each with a proposed role in boron use in model plant species. All genes showed evidence of polymorphism in fragment size and gene expression in the target genomic DNA and cDNA libraries, with no co...

  8. Proceedings of workshop on 'boron science and boron neutron capture therapy'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitaoka, Y. [ed.

    1998-12-01

    This volume contains the abstracts and programs of the 8th (1996), 9th (1997) and 10th (1998) of the workshop on 'the Boron Science and Boron Neutron Capture Therapy' and the recent progress reports especially subscribed. The 11 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  9. Ceramic silicon-boron-carbon fibers from organic silicon-boron-polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccitiello, Salvatore R. (Inventor); Hsu, Ming-Ta S. (Inventor); Chen, Timothy S. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Novel high strength ceramic fibers derived from boron, silicon, and carbon organic precursor polymers are discussed. The ceramic fibers are thermally stable up to and beyond 1200 C in air. The method of preparation of the boron-silicon-carbon fibers from a low oxygen content organosilicon boron precursor polymer of the general formula Si(R2)BR(sup 1) includes melt-spinning, crosslinking, and pyrolysis. Specifically, the crosslinked (or cured) precursor organic polymer fibers do not melt or deform during pyrolysis to form the silicon-boron-carbon ceramic fiber. These novel silicon-boron-carbon ceramic fibers are useful in high temperature applications because they retain tensile and other properties up to 1200 C, from 1200 to 1300 C, and in some cases higher than 1300 C.

  10. Enhanced diffusion of boron by oxygen precipitation in heavily boron-doped silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torigoe, Kazuhisa; Ono, Toshiaki

    2017-06-01

    The enhanced diffusion of boron has been investigated by analyzing out-diffusion profiles in the vicinity of the interface between a lightly boron-doped silicon epitaxial layer and a heavily boron-doped silicon substrate with a resistivity of 8.2 mΩ cm and an oxide precipitate (O.P.) density of 108-1010 cm-3. It is found that the boron diffusion during annealing at 850-1000 °C is enhanced with the increase of the oxide precipitate density. On the basis of a model for boron diffusion mediated by silicon self-interstitials, we reveal that the enhanced diffusion is attributed to self-interstitials supersaturated as a result of the emission from oxide precipitates and the absorption by punched-out dislocations. In addition, the temperature dependence of the fraction of the self-interstitial emission obtained analyzing the diffusion enhancement well explains the morphology changes of oxide precipitates reported in literature.

  11. Reduction of shallow boron and phosphorus diffusion by co-implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderpool, Aaron

    Control of Boron and Phosphorus Transient Enhanced Diffusion (TED) is the key to the development of high performance n and p type Ultra Shallow Junctions (USJ). Carbon, Fluorine, and Germanium co-implants can be used to reduce or modify the Boron or Phosphorus Interstitialcy Clusters (BIC or PIC) that drive TED. Substitutional Carbon (Cs) or Fluorine-Vacancy (F-V) clusters do this by consuming the interstitials that drive TED by Carbon Kick-out or F-V annihilation. Germanium does this by inhibiting Interstitialcy formation through local lattice strain. It has been found that certain combinations of these techniques can combine to maximize TED reduction and several of the mechanisms have been characterized. Low energy 5keV Germanium and Carbon have yielded a Boron USJ with a junction depth (xj) of 16.8 nm and a sheet resistance (Rs) of 602 O/□, while 8keV Fluorine and Carbon have formed a Phosphorus USJ with xj = 29.5 nm and Rs ≈ 150 O/□. In addition record levels of Boron TED control have been found using Carbon and 12keV Phosphorus co-implants (xj = 13.3 nm). Record levels of Phosphorus TED control have been found using Carbon and 4keV Boron co-implants (xj = 22.2 nm). In these cases the counter-dopant below the USJ is probably forming PIC or BIC consuming interstitials more efficiently than non-electrical dopants dramatically limiting TED. For Phosphorus USJ there is a strong TED dependence on Boron co-implant energy. Uphill diffusion has been observed if the Phosphorus implant energy is below 3 keV, or without amorphization, and increases as Boron co-implant energy decreases. This work has also found the first experimental evidence of F-V clustering acting to limit TED in USJ by toggling the order of Halo implantation which generates a vacancy distribution. This causes a change in Boron diffusion that is well explained by the lack or presence of the F-V clusters. In addition, Phosphorus TED shows a slight decrease as Fluorine co-implant energy decreases

  12. Boron-containing thioureas for neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketz, H.

    1993-01-01

    Melanin is produced in large amounts in malignant melanotic melanomas. Because thiourea compounds are covalently incorporated into melanin during its biosynthesis, the preparation of boronated thiourea-derivatives is of particular interest for the BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy). Accumulation of boron in tumors by means of boronated thiourea-derivatives may therefore provide levels of 10 B which are useful for BNCT. In BNCT the tumor containing the boron compound is irradiated with epithermal neutrons to generate He- and Li-nuclei from the 10 B which can then destroy the tumor cells. Because of the short ranges of these particles (approximately one cell diameter) the damage will be almost exclusively confined to the tumor leaving normal tissue unharmed. High accumulation of 2-mercapto-1-methylimidazole (methimazole) in melanotic melanomas has been described in the literature. Boronated derivatives of methimazole were therefore synthesized. Boron was in the form of a boronic acid, a nido-carbonate and a mercaptoundeca hydro-closo-dodecaborate (BSH). The synthesis of the boron cluster derivatives of methimazole (nido-carborate- and BSH-derivatives) with 9 resp. 12 boron atoms in the molecule were expected to achieve higher concentrations of boron in the tumor than in the case of the boronic acid compound with its single boron atom. (orig.) [de

  13. Atmospheric contribution to boron enrichment in aboveground wheat tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cheng; Ji, Junfeng; Chen, Mindong; Zhong, Cong; Yang, Zhongfang; Browne, Patrick

    2017-05-01

    Boron is an essential trace element for all organisms and has both beneficial and harmful biological functions. A particular amount of boron is discharged into the environment every year because of industrial activities; however, the effects of environmental boron emissions on boron accumulation in cereals has not yet been estimated. The present study characterized the accumulation of boron in wheat under different ecological conditions in the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) area. This study aimed to estimate the effects of atmospheric boron that is associated with industrial activities on boron accumulation in wheat. The results showed that the concentrations of boron in aboveground wheat tissues from the highly industrialized region were significantly higher than those from the agriculture-dominated region, even though there was no significant difference in boron content in soils. Using the model based on the translocation coefficients of boron in the soil-wheat system, we estimated that the contribution of atmosphere to boron accumulation in wheat straw in the highly industrialized region exceeded that in the agriculture-dominated region by 36%. In addition, from the environmental implication of the model, it was estimated that the development of boron-utilizing industries had elevated the concentration of boron in aboveground wheat tissues by 28-53%. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Synthesis of Ni2B nanoparticles by RF thermal plasma for fuel cell catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Y; Tanaka, M; Watanabe, T; Choi, S Y; Shin, M S; Lee, K H

    2014-01-01

    The catalyst of Ni 2 B nanoparticles was successfully prepared using nickel and boron as precursors with the quenching gas in radio frequency thermal plasmas. The generating of Ni 2 B needs adequate reaction temperature and boron content in precursors. The quenching gas is beneficial for the synthesis of Ni 2 B in RF thermal plasma. The effect of quenching rate, powder feed rate and boron content in feeding powders on the synthesis of nickel boride nanoparticles was studied in this research. The high mass fraction of 28 % of Ni 2 B nanoparticles can be generated at the fixed initial composition of Ni:B = 2:3. Quenching gas is necessary in the synthesis of Ni 2 B nanoaprticles. In addition, the mass fraction of Ni 2 B increases with the increase of quenching gas flow rate and powder feed rate

  15. Synthetic approach of norbadione A: new preparation of alcohols from sulfones and boron compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billaud, C.

    2005-12-01

    The synthetic approach of norbadione A, a pigment from mushrooms related to pulvinic acids, was studied. This compound has the property to complex caesium and has shown an antioxidant activity. The first strategy, based on a double Suzuki-Miyaura coupling between a naphtho-lactone with two boron functions and two pulvinic moieties with a triflate was unsuccessful and has shown a deactivating effect of the lactone. Modifications aimed to inhibit the electro-attracting character of the lactone permitted to obtain a bis(coupled) product with a poor yield. A second approach based on a the cyclization of enol aryl-acetates was studied in order to build the pulvinic moiety in several steps. The important reaction of introduction of an alkyl-acetate from a triflate was realised by a palladium-mediated coupling. The cyclization attempts carried out using a naphthalenic compound allowed us to isolate a monocyclised product. A parallel study was to first build a tetronic moiety and then to construct the exocyclic double bond by a method developed in the laboratory for the preparation of an iodated pulvinic compound. Finally, a new preparation of alcohols from sulfones and boron compounds was developed. Two known reactions in the chemistry of boron were combined. The first one is the reaction between anions of sulfones and tri-alkyl-boranes, the second one is a thermal isomerization which places the boron atom in a terminal position. A new preparation of primary alcohols was thus carried out. (author)

  16. 15th International Conference on Boron Chemistry (IMEBORON XV)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grüner, Bohumír; Štíbr, Bohumil

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 87, č. 2 (2015), s. 121 ISSN 0033-4545 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : boranes * boron * boron materials * carboranes * IMEBORON XV * medicinal chemistry Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry

  17. Removal of boron from aqueous solution using cryptocrystalline magnesite

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Masindi, Vhahangwele

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to evaluate the efficiency of using cryptocrystalline magnesite to remove boron ions from aqueous systems. Batch experimental protocols were used to evaluate the adsorption capacity of magnesite for boron. Parameters...

  18. Boron: out of the sky and onto the ground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuehl, D.K.

    1975-01-01

    Now an accepted, engineered material for aerospace applications, boron is taking its place on the ground. Both current production applications, prototype (development) applications, and speculative applications abound. In the leisure product market, boron epoxy or boron aluminum has been used or tried in golf clubs (in combination with graphite epoxy or to reinforce aluminum or steel), in tennis racquets, in bicycles, racing shells, skis and skipoles, bows and arrows, and others. In the industrial area, boron has been used to reduce fatigue, increase stiffness, or for its abrasive properties. Textile machinery, honing tools, and cut off wheels or saws are among the applications. In the medical field, prosthetics and orthotic braces, wheel chairs, canes, and crutches are all good applications for boron. Applications for boron in transportation, construction, and heavy industry are also possible. The volume of boron used in these applications could have a major impact on prices, making boron composite parts cost competitive with conventional materials. (U.S.)

  19. Method of manufacture of atomically thin boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettl, Alexander K

    2013-08-06

    The present invention provides a method of fabricating at least one single layer hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). In an exemplary embodiment, the method includes (1) suspending at least one multilayer boron nitride across a gap of a support structure and (2) performing a reactive ion etch upon the multilayer boron nitride to produce the single layer hexagonal boron nitride suspended across the gap of the support structure. The present invention also provides a method of fabricating single layer hexagonal boron nitride. In an exemplary embodiment, the method includes (1) providing multilayer boron nitride suspended across a gap of a support structure and (2) performing a reactive ion etch upon the multilayer boron nitride to produce the single layer hexagonal boron nitride suspended across the gap of the support structure.

  20. Water-Soluble Chitosan Nanoparticles Inhibit Hypercholesterolemia Induced by Feeding a High-Fat Diet in Male Sprague-Dawley Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao, Y.; Zhang, H.; Gao, B.; Guo, J.; Hu, Y.; Su, Z.

    2011-01-01

    Chitosan, a deacetylated product of chitin, has been demonstrated to lower cholesterol in humans and animals. However, chitosan is not fully soluble in water which would influence absorption in the human intestine. In addition, water-soluble chitosan (WSC) has higher reactivity compared to chitosan. The present study was designed to clarify the effects of WSC and water-soluble chitosan nanoparticles (WSC-NPs) on hypercholesterolemia induced by feeding a high-fat diet in male Sprague-Dawley rats. WSC-NPs were prepared by the ionic gelation method and the spray-drying technique. The nanoparticles were spherical in shape and had a smooth surface. The mean size of WSC-NPs was 650 nm variing from 500 to 800?nm. Results showed that WSC-NPs reduced the blood lipids and plasma viscosity significantly and increased the serum superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities significantly. This paper is the first report of the lipid-lowering effects of WSC-NPs suggesting that the WSC-NPs could be used for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia

  1. Water-Soluble Chitosan Nanoparticles Inhibit Hypercholesterolemia Induced by Feeding a High-Fat Diet in Male Sprague-Dawley Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Tao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan, a deacetylated product of chitin, has been demonstrated to lower cholesterol in humans and animals. However, chitosan is not fully soluble in water which would influence absorption in the human intestine. In addition, water-soluble chitosan (WSC has higher reactivity compared to chitosan. The present study was designed to clarify the effects of WSC and water-soluble chitosan nanoparticles (WSC-NPs on hypercholesterolemia induced by feeding a high-fat diet in male Sprague-Dawley rats. WSC-NPs were prepared by the ionic gelation method and the spray-drying technique. The nanoparticles were spherical in shape and had a smooth surface. The mean size of WSC-NPs was 650 nm variing from 500 to 800 nm. Results showed that WSC-NPs reduced the blood lipids and plasma viscosity significantly and increased the serum superoxide dismutase (SOD activities significantly. This paper is the first report of the lipid-lowering effects of WSC-NPs suggesting that the WSC-NPs could be used for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia.

  2. Interaction of silver nanoparticles with Tacaribe virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Speshock Janice L

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Silver nanoparticles possess many unique properties that make them attractive for use in biological applications. Recently they received attention when it was shown that 10 nm silver nanoparticles were bactericidal, which is promising in light of the growing number of antibiotic resistant bacteria. An area that has been largely unexplored is the interaction of nanomaterials with viruses and the possible use of silver nanoparticles as an antiviral agent. Results This research focuses on evaluating the interaction of silver nanoparticles with a New World arenavirus, Tacaribe virus, to determine if they influence viral replication. Surprisingly exposing the virus to silver nanoparticles prior to infection actually facilitated virus uptake into the host cells, but the silver-treated virus had a significant reduction in viral RNA production and progeny virus release, which indicates that silver nanoparticles are capable of inhibiting arenavirus infection in vitro. The inhibition of viral replication must occur during early replication since although pre-infection treatment with silver nanoparticles is very effective, the post-infection addition of silver nanoparticles is only effective if administered within the first 2-4 hours of virus replication. Conclusions Silver nanoparticles are capable of inhibiting a prototype arenavirus at non-toxic concentrations and effectively inhibit arenavirus replication when administered prior to viral infection or early after initial virus exposure. This suggests that the mode of action of viral neutralization by silver nanoparticles occurs during the early phases of viral replication.

  3. Characterization of boron carbide with an electron microprobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteudi, G.; Ruste, J.

    1983-01-01

    Within the framework of a study of heterogeneous materials (Matteudi et al., 1971: Matteudi and Verchery, 1972) thin deposits of boron carbide were characterized. Experiments using an electronic probe microanalyzer to analyze solid boron carbide or boron carbide in the form of thick deposits are described. Quantitative results on boron and carbon are very close to those obtained when applying the Monte Carlo-type correction calculations.

  4. Impact scenarios in boron carbide: A computational study

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, R. G.; Sugden, I. J.; Plant, D. F.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of radiative impacts on the structure of boron carbide has been studied by both classical and ab initio simulations. As a part of this study, a new forcefield was developed for use in studying boron carbide materials. Impact scenarios in boron carbide were simulated in order to investigate the exceptional resistance of this material, and other icosahedral boron solids, to high-energy impact events. It was observed that interstitial defects created by radiative impacts are likely to...

  5. Technology of boron-containing polyphosphate fertilizer 'Phosphobor'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldabergenov, M.K.; Balakaeva, T.G.

    1995-01-01

    A technology is developed for producing 'Phosphobor' fertilizer based on the rock phosphate weal (17-18% P 2 O 5 ) with additions of boron-magnesium compound. Boron is part of polyphosphate fertilizer in the form of polymeric compounds of phosphorus and boron. Phosphorus and boron copolymers -boratophosphates - are easily formed in the process of polyphosphate fertilizers production, since borates undergo a mutual polycondensation reaction with phosphates. 8 refs., 1 fig

  6. Determination of free carbon content in boron carbide ceramic powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, A.R.M. de; Lima, N.B. de; Paschoal, J.O.A.

    1990-01-01

    Boron carbide is a ceramic material of technological importance due to its hardness and high chemical and thermal stabilities. Free carbon is always found as a process dependent impurity in boron carbide. The development of procedures for its detection is required because its presence leads to a degradation of the boron carbide properties. In this work, several procedures for determining free carbon content in boron carbide specimens are reported and discussed for comparison purposes. (author) [pt

  7. Boron Removal in Seawater Reverse Osmosis System

    KAUST Repository

    Rahmawati, Karina

    2011-07-01

    Reverse osmosis successfully proves to remove more than 99% of solute in seawater, providing fresh water supply with satisfied quality. Due to some operational constraints, however, some trace contaminants removal, such as boron, cannot be achieved in one pass system. The stringent criterion for boron from World Health Organization (WHO) and Saudi Arabia local standard (0.5 mg/l) is hardly fulfilled by single pass sea water reverse osmosis (SWRO) plants. Some design processes have been proposed to deal with boron removal, but they are not economically efficient due to high energy and chemical consumption. The objective of this study was to study boron removal by different reverse osmosis membranes in two pH conditions, with and without antiscalant addition. Thus, it was expected to observe the possibility of operating single pass system and necessity to operate two pass system using low energy membrane. Five membrane samples were obtained from two different manufacturers. Three types of feed water pH were used, pH 8, pH 10, and pH 10 with antiscalant addition. Experiment was conducted in parallel to compare membrane performance from two manufacturers. Filtration was run with fully recycle mode for three days. Sample of permeate and feed were taken every 12 hours, and analyzed for their boron and TDS concentration. Membrane samples were also tested for their surface charge. The results showed that boron rejection increases as the feed pH increases. This was caused by dissociation of boric acid to negatively charged borate ion and more negatively charged membrane surface at elevated pH which enhance boron rejection. This study found that single pass reverse osmosis system, with and without elevating the pH, may not be possible to be applied because of two reasons. First, permeate quality in term of boron, does not fulfill WHO and local Saudi Arabia regulations. Second, severe scaling occurs due to operation in alkaline condition, since Ca and Mg concentration are

  8. Boron-Loaded Silicone Rubber Scintillators

    CERN Document Server

    Bell, Z W; Maya, L; Sloop, F V J

    2003-01-01

    Silicone rubber received attention as an alternative to polyvinyltoluene in applications in which the scintillator is exposed to high doses because of the increased resistance of the rubber to the formation of blue-absorbing color centers. Work by Bowen, et al., and Harmon, et al., demonstrated their properties under gamma/x-ray irradiation, and Bell, et al. have shown their response to thermal neutrons. This last work, however, provided an example of a silicone in which both the boron and the scintillator were contained in the rubber as solutes, a formulation which led to the precipitation of solids and sublimation of the boron component. In the present work we describe a scintillator in which the boron is chemically bonded to the siloxane and so avoids the problem of precipitation and loss of boron to sublimation. Material containing up to 18% boron, by weight, was prepared, mounted on photomultipliers, and exposed to both neutron and gamma fluxes. Pulse height spectra showing the neutron and photon respons...

  9. Hot ductility behavior of boron microalloyed steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-Chipres, E.; Mejia, I.; Maldonado, C.; Bedolla-Jacuinde, A.; Cabrera, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    The current study analyses the influence of boron contents (between 29 and 105 ppm) on the hot ductility of boron microalloyed steels. For this purpose, hot tensile tests were carried out at different temperatures (700, 800, 900 and 1000 deg. C) at a constant true strain rate of 0.001 s -1 . In general, results revealed an improvement of the hot ductility of steels at increasing boron content. At 700, 900 and 1000 deg. C the ductility is higher than at 800 deg. C, where boron microalloyed steels exhibit a region of ductility loss (trough region). Likewise, dynamic recrystallization only occurred at 900 and 1000 deg. C. The fracture surfaces of the tested steels at temperatures giving the high temperature ductility regime show that the fracture mode is a result of ductile failure, whereas it is ductile-brittle failure in the trough region. Results are discussed in terms of dynamic recrystallization and boron segregation towards austenite grain boundaries, which may retard the formation of pro-eutectoid ferrite and increase grain boundary cohesion

  10. INFLUENCE OF FINE-DISPERSED BORON CARBIDE ON THE STRUCTURE AND CHARACTERISTICS OF IRON-BORON ALLOY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. F. Nevar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of boron carbide as fine-dispersed material input into the melt on structure morphology, founding, technological and exploitation characterisstics of cast iron-boron material is shown.

  11. Proceedings of workshop on 'boron chemistry and boron neutron capture therapy'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitaoka, Yoshinori

    1992-09-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of the 4th Workshop on 'the Boron Chemistry and Boron Neutron Capture Therapy' held on February 24 in 1992. First, clinical experiences of BNCT in the Kyoto University Research Reactor in 1992 were briefly reported. Then, the killing effects of boron cluster-containing nucleic acid precursors on tumor cells were shown (Chap. 2). The various trials of the optical resolution of B-p-boronophenylalanine for neutron capture therapy were made (Chap. 3). The borate-dextran gel complexes were investigated by the nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The stability constants of borate complexes were listed, and are useful in the solution chemistry of boron compounds (Chap. 4). The interactions between boron compounds and biological materials were studied by the paper electrophoresis which had been developed by us (Chap. 5). Molecular design of boron-10 carriers and their organic synthesis were reported (Chap. 6). Carborane-containing aziridine boron carriers which were directed to the DNA alkylation were synthesized and their cancer cell killing efficacies were tested (Chap. 7). The solution chemistry of deuterium oxide which is a good neutron moderator was reported, relating to the BNCT (Chap. 8). (author)

  12. Simulating the effect of boron doping in superconducting carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Yuki; Chelikowsky, James R.; Cohen, Marvin L.

    2018-02-01

    We examine the effect of boron doping in superconducting forms of amorphous carbon. By judiciously optimizing boron substitutional sites in simulated amorphous carbon, we predict a superconducting transition temperature near 37 K at 14% boron concentration. Our findings have direct implications for understanding the recently discovered high-Tc superconductivity in Q-carbon.

  13. Effects of dietary boron on performance, egg production, egg quality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    engin

    Body weight was not affected by dietary boron supplementation at 16 and 40 weeks of age. ... and human nutrition. In bone metabolism, boron interacts with Ca, vitamin D and Mg (Chapin et al., 1998). In animals and plants, boron affects at least 26 enzymes involved in substrate metabolism, insulin release, oxidation and.

  14. Mesoscale Modeling of Dynamic Compression of Boron Carbide Polycrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    occurs in ballistic impact, and accompanies amorphization in diamond anvil cell (DAC) experiments (Yan et al., 2009). Fracture in boron carbide ...Mesoscale Modeling of Dynamic Compression of Boron Carbide Polycrystals by J. D. Clayton ARL-RP-440 May 2013...Ground, MD 21005-5069 ARL-RP-440 May 2013 Mesoscale Modeling of Dynamic Compression of Boron Carbide Polycrystals J. D. Clayton

  15. Colorimetric Sugar Sensing Using Boronic Acid-Substituted Azobenzenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuya Egawa

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In association with increasing diabetes prevalence, it is desirable to develop new glucose sensing systems with low cost, ease of use, high stability and good portability. Boronic acid is one of the potential candidates for a future alternative to enzyme-based glucose sensors. Boronic acid derivatives have been widely used for the sugar recognition motif, because boronic acids bind adjacent diols to form cyclic boronate esters. In order to develop colorimetric sugar sensors, boronic acid-conjugated azobenzenes have been synthesized. There are several types of boronic acid azobenzenes, and their characteristics tend to rely on the substitute position of the boronic acid moiety. For example, o-substitution of boronic acid to the azo group gives the advantage of a significant color change upon sugar addition. Nitrogen-15 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR studies clearly show a signaling mechanism based on the formation and cleavage of the B–N dative bond between boronic acid and azo moieties in the dye. Some boronic acid-substituted azobenzenes were attached to a polymer or utilized for supramolecular chemistry to produce glucose-selective binding, in which two boronic acid moieties cooperatively bind one glucose molecule. In addition, boronic acid-substituted azobenzenes have been applied not only for glucose monitoring, but also for the sensing of glycated hemoglobin and dopamine.

  16. Screening of Wheat Genotypes for Boron Efficiency in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    A number of Bangladeshi wheat genotypes (varieties and advanced lines) have been tested for boron efficiency through sand culture experiments over two years (2007-08 & 2008-09) against two Thai check varieties ‘Fang 60’ (boron efficient) and ‘SW41’ (boron inefficient). Performances of the genotypes ...

  17. Dietary boron: possible roles in human and animal physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boron is a bioactive element of low molecular weight. Since discovery of the first boron biomolecule, boromycin, in 1967, several other similar biomolecules are now well-characterized. Most recently described was a bacterial cell-to-cell communication signal that requires boron, autoinducer-II. Boro...

  18. Infiltration processing of boron carbide-, boron-, and boride-reactive metal cermets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halverson, Danny C.; Landingham, Richard L.

    1988-01-01

    A chemical pretreatment method is used to produce boron carbide-, boron-, and boride-reactive metal composites by an infiltration process. The boron carbide or other starting constituents, in powder form, are immersed in various alcohols, or other chemical agents, to change the surface chemistry of the starting constituents. The chemically treated starting constituents are consolidated into a porous ceramic precursor which is then infiltrated by molten aluminum or other metal by heating to wetting conditions. Chemical treatment of the starting constituents allows infiltration to full density. The infiltrated precursor is further heat treated to produce a tailorable microstructure. The process at low cost produces composites with improved characteristics, including increased toughness, strength.

  19. Biological evaluation of boronated unnatural amino acids as new boron carriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabalka, G.W. [Departments of Radiology and Chemistry, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)], E-mail: kabalka@utk.edu; Yao, M.-L.; Marepally, S.R. [Departments of Radiology and Chemistry, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Chandra, S. [Cornell SIMS Laboratory, Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Snee Hall, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2009-07-15

    There is a pressing need for new and more efficient boron delivery agents to tumor cells for use in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). A class of boronated unnatural cyclic amino acids has demonstrated a remarkable selectivity toward tumors in animal and cell culture models, far superior to currently used agents in clinical BNCT. One of these amino acids, 1-amino-3-boronocyclopentanecarboxylic acid (ABCPC), has shown a tumor to blood ratio of 8 and a tumor to normal brain ratio of nearly 21 in a melanoma bearing mouse model. This work represents further biological characterization of this compound for tumor targeting in an EMT6 murine mammary carcinoma mouse model and a T98G human glioblastoma cell line. Female BALB/c mice bearing EMT6 tumors were injected with the fructose complex form of racemic mixtures of cis and trans isomers of ABCPC in identical concentrations. Boron concentrations were measured in the tumor, blood, brain, skin, and liver tissues at 1, 3, and 5 h post-injection. These observations revealed a remarkable difference in racemic mixtures of cis and trans isomers in tumor targeting by boron. This implies that further separation of the L and D forms of this compound may enhance tumor targeting to an even higher degree than that provided by the racemic mixtures. Since the uptake measurements were made in homogenized tumor and normal tissues, little is known about the subcellular location of the boron arising from the various isomeric forms of the amino acid. To study subcellular delivery of boron from ABCPC in T98G human glioblastoma cells, we employed secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) based technique of ion microscopy, which is capable of quantitatively imaging isotopic (elemental) gradients in cells and tissues at 500 nm spatial resolution. The T98G cells were exposed to the nutrient medium containing 100 ppm boron equivalent of a mixture of both L and D isomers of ABCPC in the form of a fructose complex for 1 h. Following this treatment

  20. A system to deposit boron films (boronization) in the DIII-D tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodapp, T.R.; Jackson, G.L.; Phillips, J.; Holtrop, K.L.; Petersen, P.I.; Winter, J.

    1991-09-01

    A system has been added to the D3-D tokamak to coat its plasma facing surfaces with a film of boron using diborane gas. The system includes special health and safety equipment for handling the diborane gas which is toxic and inflammable. The purpose of the boron film is to reduce the levels of impurity atoms in the D3-D plasmas. Experiments following the application of the boron film in D3-D have led to significant reductions in plasma impurity levels and the observation of a new, very high confinement regime. 9 refs., 1 fig

  1. Biological Evaluation of Boronated Unnatural Amino Acids as New Boron Carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabalka, G.W.; Yao, M.-L.; Marepally, S.R.; Chandra, S.

    2010-01-01

    There is a pressing need for new and more efficient boron delivery agents to tumor cells for use in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). A class of boronated unnatural cyclic amino acids has demonstrated a remarkable selectivity toward tumors in animal and cell culture models, far superior to currently used agents in clinical BNCT. One of these amino acids, 1-amino-3-boronocyclopentanecarboxylic acid (ABCPC), has shown a tumor to blood ratio of 8 and a tumor to normal brain ratio of nearly 21 in a melanoma bearing mouse model. This work represents further biological characterization of this compound for tumor targeting in an EMT6 murine mammary carcinoma mouse model and a T98G human glioblastoma cell line. Female BALB/c mice bearing EMT6 tumors were injected with the fructose complex form of racemic mixtures of cis- and trans isomers of ABCPC in identical concentrations. Boron concentrations were measured in the tumor, blood, brain, skin, and liver tissues at 1, 3, and 5 hr post injection. These observations revealed a remarkable difference in racemic mixtures of cis and trans isomers in tumor targeting by boron. This implies that further separation of the L and D forms of this compound may enhance tumor targeting to an even higher degree than that provided by the racemic mixtures. Since the uptake measurements were made in homogenized tumor and normal tissues, little is known about the subcellular location of the boron arising from the various isomeric forms of the amino acid. To study subcellular delivery of boron from ABCPC in T98G human glioblastoma cells, we employed secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) based technique of ion microscopy, which is capable of quantitatively imaging isotopic (elemental) gradients in cells and tissues at 500 nm spatial resolution. The T98G cells were exposed to the nutrient medium containing 100 ppm boron equivalent of a mixture of both L and D isomers of ABCPC in the form of a fructose complex for 1 hr. Following this

  2. Deposition of boron doped DLC films on TiNb and characterization of their mechanical properties and blood compatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liza, Shahira; Hieda, Junko; Akasaka, Hiroki; Ohtake, Naoto; Tsutsumi, Yusuke; Nagai, Akiko; Hanawa, Takao

    2017-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) material is used in blood contacting devices as the surface coating material because of the antithrombogenicity behavior which helps to inhibit platelet adhesion and activation. In this study, DLC films were doped with boron during pulsed plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) to improve the blood compatibility. The ratio of boron to carbon (B/C) was varied from 0 to 0.4 in the film by adjusting the flow rate of trimethylboron and acetylene. Tribological tests indicated that boron doping with a low B/C ratio of 0.03 is beneficial for reducing friction (μ = 0.1), lowering hardness and slightly increasing wear rate compared to undoped DLC films. The B/C ratio in the film of 0.03 and 0.4 exhibited highly hydrophilic surface owing to their high wettability and high surface energy. An in vitro platelet adhesion experiment was conducted to compare the blood compatibility of TiNb substrates before and after coating with undoped and boron doped DLC. Films with highly hydrophilic surface enhanced the blood compatibility of TiNb, and the best results were obtained for DLC with the B/C ratio of 0.03. Boron doped DLC films are promising surface coatings for blood contacting devices.

  3. Accelerator-driven boron neutron capture therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgecock, Rob

    2014-05-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy is a binary treatment for certain types of cancer. It works by loading the cancerous cells with a boron-10 carrying compound. This isotope has a large cross-section for thermal neutrons, the reaction producing a lithium nucleus and alpha particle that kill the cell in which they are produced. Recent studies of the boron carrier compound indicate that the uptake process works best in particularly aggressive cancers. Most studied is glioblastoma multiforme and a trial using a combination of BNCT and X-ray radiotherapy has shown an increase of nearly a factor of two in mean survival over the state of the art. However, the main technical problem with BNCT remains producing a sufficient flux of neutrons for a reasonable treatment duration in a hospital environment. This paper discusses this issue.

  4. The ternary system nickel-boron-silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lugscheider, E.; Reimann, H.; Knotek, O.

    1975-01-01

    The ternary system Nickel-Boron-Silicon was established at 850 0 C by means of X-ray diffraction, metallographic and micro-hardness examinations. The well known binary nickel borides and silicides resp. were confirmed. In the boron-silicon system two binary phases, SiBsub(4-x) with x approximately 0.7 and SiB 6 were found the latter in equilibrium with the β-rhombohedral boron. Confirming the two ternary silicon borides a greater homogeneity range was found for Ni 6 Si 2 B, the phase Nisub(4,6)Si 2 B published by Uraz and Rundqvist can better be described by the formula Nisub(4.29)Si 2 Bsub(1.43). In relation to further investigations we measured melting temperatures in ternary Ni-10 B-Si alloys by differential thermoanalysis. (author)

  5. Structure of Boron Carbide: Where's the Carbon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, David; Seidler, Gerald; Fister, Timothy; Nagle, Kenneth; Segre, Carlo

    2008-03-01

    Although the structure of the boron carbide series, B12-xCx with 0.06 x x-ray scattering (LERIX) spectrometer on the PNC-CAT beamline at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Lab has enabled differentiation of the boron and carbon absorption edge data for the various crystallographic sites. The structure (R-3m) consists of twelve-atom icosahedra and three-atom chains. Boron carbide may have a maximum of three carbon atoms, which may be located on the two end of chain sites and in one of two inequivalent sites on the icosahedra. At least one carbon atom must be present in the structure for it to be stable. In this presentation, structural results from non-resonant x-ray scattering for seven samples, ranging from B4C to B10.1C will be presented.

  6. On the Mechanism of Boron Ignition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keil, D. G.; Dreizin, E. L.; Felder, W.; Vicenzi, E. P.

    1997-01-01

    Boron filaments were electrically heated in air and argon/oxygen mixtures while their resistance, temperature, and radiation at the wavelengths of BO and BO2 bands were monitored. The filaments 'burned' in two distinct stages. Samples of the filaments were quenched at different times before and during the burning and analyzed using electron microscopy. The beginning of the first stage combustion characterized by a local resistance minimum, a sharp spike in boron oxide radiation emission, and a rapid rise in temperature, occurred at 1500 +/- 70 deg. C, independent of pre-heating history and oxygen content (540%) in the gas environment. The data suggest that a phase transition occurs in the filaments at this temperature that triggers stage one combustion. Significant amounts of oxygen were found inside quenched filaments. Large spherical voids formed in the boron filaments during their second stage combustion which is interpreted to indicate a crucial role for the gas dissolution processes in the combustion scenario.

  7. Preparation and characterization of Au nanoparticles capped with mercaptocarboranyl clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioran, Ana M; Teixidor, Francesc; Krpetić, Željka; Brust, Mathias; Viñas, Clara

    2014-04-07

    The preparation of 3-4 nm and 10 nm gold nanoparticles capped with neutral carborane-based mercaptocarboranes, via two different preparative routes, is reported. The resulting boron-enriched nanomaterials exhibit complete dispersibility in water, opening the way for the use of these monolayer protected clusters (MPCs) in medical applications, such as boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). These newly prepared MPCs have been characterized by FTIR, (1)H and (11)B NMR spectroscopy, UV-visible, centrifugal particle sizing (CPS), and, in some cases, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Water dispersibility exhibited by these MPCs allowed the study of the cellular uptake by HeLa cells.

  8. Lateral gas phase diffusion length of boron atoms over Si/B surfaces during CVD of pure boron layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohammadi, V.; Nihtianov, S.

    2016-01-01

    The lateral gas phase diffusion length of boron atoms, LB, along silicon and boron surfaces during chemical vapor deposition(CVD) using diborane (B2H6) is reported. The value of LB is critical for reliable and uniform boron layer coverage. The presented information was obtained experimentally and

  9. Enhancement and retardation of thermal boron diffusion in silicon from atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposited boron silicate glass film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurachi, Ikuo; Yoshioka, Kentaro

    2014-03-01

    Thermal boron diffusion into silicon from boron silicate glass (BSG) prepared by atmospheric pressure CVD (AP-CVD) has been investigated in terms of the BSG boron concentration dependence on diffusion mechanism for N-type solar cell applications. With thermal diffusion at 950 °C in N2 for 20 min, the sheet resistance of the boron-diffused layer decreases with BSG boron concentration up to approximately 4 × 1021 cm-3 at which a boron-rich layer (BRL) is formed at the surface. However, the resistance increases with BSG boron concentration when the BSG boron concentration is higher than 4 × 1021 cm-3. It is also confirmed that the diffusion depth decreases with increasing BSG boron concentration within this BSG concentration region. To clarify this mechanism, the BSG boron concentration dependence on boron diffusivity has also been studied. From extracted diffusivities, the anomalous diffusion can be explained by silicon interstitials formed owing to kick-out by diffused boron atoms and by silicon interstitial generation-degradation due to BRL formation.

  10. Chemical and mechanical analysis of boron-rich boron carbide processed via spark plasma sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munhollon, Tyler Lee

    Boron carbide is a material of choice for many industrial and specialty applications due to the exceptional properties it exhibits such as high hardness, chemical inertness, low specific gravity, high neutron cross section and more. The combination of high hardness and low specific gravity makes it especially attractive for high pressure/high strain rate applications. However, boron carbide exhibits anomalous behavior when high pressures are applied. Impact pressures over the Hugoniot elastic limit result in catastrophic failure of the material. This failure has been linked to amorphization in cleavage planes and loss of shear strength. Atomistic modeling has suggested boron-rich boron carbide (B13C2) may be a better performing material than the commonly used B4C due to the elimination of amorphization and an increase in shear strength. Therefore, a clear experimental understanding of the factors that lead to the degradation of mechanical properties as well as the effects of chemistry changes in boron carbide is needed. For this reason, the goal of this thesis was to produce high purity boron carbide with varying stoichiometries for chemical and mechanical property characterization. Utilizing rapid carbothermal reduction and pressure assisted sintering, dense boron carbides with varying stoichiometries were produced. Microstructural characteristics such as impurity inclusions, porosity and grain size were controlled. The chemistry and common static mechanical properties that are of importance to superhard materials including elastic moduli, hardness and fracture toughness of the resulting boron-rich boron carbides were characterized. A series of six boron carbide samples were processed with varying amounts of amorphous boron (up to 45 wt. % amorphous boron). Samples with greater than 40 wt.% boron additions were shown to exhibit abnormal sintering behavior, making it difficult to characterize these samples. Near theoretical densities were achieved in samples with

  11. Boron removal by electrocoagulation and recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isa, Mohamed Hasnain; Ezechi, Ezerie Henry; Ahmed, Zubair; Magram, Saleh Faraj; Kutty, Shamsul Rahman Mohamed

    2014-03-15

    This work investigated the removal of boron from wastewater and its recovery by electrocoagulation and hydrothermal mineralization methods respectively. The experimental design was developed using Box-Behnken Model. An initial study was performed based on four preselected variables (pH, current density, concentration and time) using synthetic wastewater. Response surface methodology (RSM) was used to evaluate the effect of process variables and their interaction on boron removal. The optimum conditions were obtained as pH 6.3, current density 17.4 mA/cm(2), and time 89 min. At these applied optimum conditions, 99.7% boron removal from an initial concentration of 10.4 mg/L was achieved. The process was effectively optimized by RSM with a desirability value of 1.0. The results showed that boron removal efficiency enhanced with increase in current density and treatment time. Removal efficiency also increased when pH was increased from 4 to 7 and subsequently decreased at pH 10. Adsorption kinetics study revealed that the reaction followed pseudo second order kinetic model; evidenced by high correlation and goodness of fit. Thermodynamics study showed that mechanism of boron adsorption was chemisorption and the reaction was endothermic in nature. Furthermore, the adsorption process was spontaneous as indicated by negative values of the adsorption free energy. Treatment of real produced water using electrocoagulation resulted in 98% boron removal. The hydrothermal mineralization study showed that borate minerals (Inyoite, Takadaite and Nifontovite) can be recovered as recyclable precipitate from electrocoagulation flocs of produced water. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Enhanced Boron Tolerance in Plants Mediated by Bidirectional Transport Through Plasma Membrane Intrinsic Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosa, Kareem A; Kumar, Kundan; Chhikara, Sudesh; Musante, Craig; White, Jason C; Dhankher, Om Parkash

    2016-02-23

    High boron (B) concentration is toxic to plants that limit plant productivity. Recent studies have shown the involvement of the members of major intrinsic protein (MIP) family in controlling B transport. Here, we have provided experimental evidences showing the bidirectional transport activity of rice OsPIP1;3 and OsPIP2;6. Boron transport ability of OsPIP1;3 and OsPIP2;6 were displayed in yeast HD9 mutant strain (∆fps1∆acr3∆ycf1) as a result of increased B sensitivity, influx and accumulation by OsPIP1;3, and rapid efflux activity by OsPIP2;6. RT-PCR analysis showed strong upregulation of OsPIP1;3 and OsPIP2;6 transcripts in roots by B toxicity. Transgenic Arabidopsis lines overexpressing OsPIP1;3 and OsPIP2;6 exhibited enhanced tolerance to B toxicity. Furthermore, B concentration was significantly increased after 2 and 3 hours of tracer boron ((10)B) treatment. Interestingly, a rapid efflux of (10)B from the roots of the transgenic plants was observed within 1 h of (10)B treatment. Boron tolerance in OsPIP1;3 and OsPIP2;6 lines was inhibited by aquaporin inhibitors, silver nitrate and sodium azide. Our data proved that OsPIP1;3 and OsPIP2;6 are indeed involved in both influx and efflux of boron transport. Manipulation of these PIPs could be highly useful in improving B tolerance in crops grown in high B containing soils.

  13. Boron Nitride Nanotubes for Spintronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal B. Dhungana

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available With the end of Moore’s law in sight, researchers are in search of an alternative approach to manipulate information. Spintronics or spin-based electronics, which uses the spin state of electrons to store, process and communicate information, offers exciting opportunities to sustain the current growth in the information industry. For example, the discovery of the giant magneto resistance (GMR effect, which provides the foundation behind modern high density data storage devices, is an important success story of spintronics; GMR-based sensors have wide applications, ranging from automotive industry to biology. In recent years, with the tremendous progress in nanotechnology, spintronics has crossed the boundary of conventional, all metallic, solid state multi-layered structures to reach a new frontier, where nanostructures provide a pathway for the spin-carriers. Different materials such as organic and inorganic nanostructures are explored for possible applications in spintronics. In this short review, we focus on the boron nitride nanotube (BNNT, which has recently been explored for possible applications in spintronics. Unlike many organic materials, BNNTs offer higher thermal stability and higher resistance to oxidation. It has been reported that the metal-free fluorinated BNNT exhibits long range ferromagnetic spin ordering, which is stable at a temperature much higher than room temperature. Due to their large band gap, BNNTs are also explored as a tunnel magneto resistance device. In addition, the F-BNNT has recently been predicted as an ideal spin-filter. The purpose of this review is to highlight these recent progresses so that a concerted effort by both experimentalists and theorists can be carried out in the future to realize the true potential of BNNT-based spintronics.

  14. Thermal conductivity behavior of boron carbides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, C.; Zoltan, A.; Emin, D.; Gray, P. E.

    1983-01-01

    Knowledge of the thermal conductivity of boron carbides is necessary to evaluate its potential for high temperature thermoelectric energy conversion applications. The thermal diffusivity of hot pressed boron carbide B/sub 1-x/C/sub x/ samples as a function of composition, temperature and temperature cycling was measured. These data in concert with density and specific heat data yield the thermal conductivities of these materials. The results in terms of a structural model to explain the electrical transport data and novel mechanisms for thermal conduction are discussed.

  15. Designing your boron-charging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.

    1979-01-01

    High-pressure positive-displacement pumps used in the boron-charging setups of pressurized-water (PWR) nuclear plants because of their inherently high efficiencies over a wide range of pressures and speeds are described. Hydrogen-saturated water containing 4-12% boric acid is fed to the pump from a volume-control tank under a gas blanket. Complicated piping and the pulsation difficulties associated with reciprocating pumps make hydrogen-saturated boron-charging systems a challenge to the designer. The article describes the unusual hydraulics of the systems to help assure a trouble-free design

  16. Unveiling polytype transformation assisted growth mechanism in boron carbide nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ningning; Li, Xiaodong

    2018-01-01

    We demonstrate direct evidence that the lattice distortion, induced by boron carbide (BxCy) stoichiometry, assists the growth of boron carbide nanowires. The transformation between different polytypic boron carbide phases lowers the energy barrier for boron diffusion, promoting boron migration in the nanowire growth. An atomistic mass transport model has been established to explain such volume-diffusion-induced nanowire growth which cannot be explained by the conventional surface diffusion model alone. These findings significantly advance our understanding of nanowire growth processes and mass transport mechanisms and provide new guidelines for the design of nanowire-structured devices.

  17. Model for calculating the boron concentration in PWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reis Martins Junior, L.L. dos; Vanni, E.A.

    1986-01-01

    A PWR boron concentration model has been developed for use with RETRAN code. The concentration model calculates the boron mass balance in the primary circuit as the injected boron mixes and is transported through the same circuit. RETRAN control blocks are used to calculate the boron concentration in fluid volumes during steady-state and transient conditions. The boron reactivity worth is obtained from the core concentration and used in RETRAN point kinetics model. A FSAR type analysis of a Steam Line Break Accident in Angra I plant was selected to test the model and the results obtained indicate a sucessfull performance. (Author) [pt

  18. Removal properties of dissolved boron by glucomannan gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Kyoko; Maehata, Yugo

    2013-04-01

    Boron ions have long been known to form complexes with the cis-diol group of a polysaccharide. Konjac glucomannan (KGM) which is one of polysaccharides was used to remove dissolved boron in this study. KGM forms a complex with boron, but does not remove boron from contaminated waters as well as other polysaccharides because of its high water solubility. Therefore, the removal efficiencies of dissolved boron were examined using both an insoluble KGM gel and KGM semi-gel. The former did not remove dissolved boron, but the latter did. The difference in the ability of boron removal was due to the presence of diol group inside. KGM loses free diol group during the process of gelation. On the other hand, the semi-gel gelated only surface layer in water has diol group inside. The boron removal capacity of the semi-gel was highest at pHs⩾11, when the boron species is present as B(OH)4(-). The capacity was slightly increased by the addition of Al, Ca and Mg under high pH conditions. This was due to co-precipitation of boron with Ca dissolved from the semi-gel. The boron adsorbed to the semi-gel easily was desorbed under low pH conditions and the hysteresis was not found. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Determination of boron concentration in biopsy-sized tissue samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, Yougjin; Fong, Katrina; Edwards, Benjamin; Autry-Conwell, Susan; Boggan, James

    2000-01-01

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is the most sensitive analytical method for boron determination. However, because boron is volatile and ubiquitous in nature, low-concentration boron sample measurement remains a challenge. In this study, an improved ICP-MS method was developed for quantitation of tissue samples with low (less than 10 ppb) and high (100 ppb) boron concentrations. The addition of an ammonia-mannitol solution converts volatile boric acid to the non-volatile ammonium borate in the spray chamber and with the formation of a boron-mannitol complex, the boron memory effect and background are greatly reduced. This results in measurements that are more accurate, repeatable, and efficient. This improved analysis method has facilitated rapid and reliable tissue biodistribution analyses of newly developed boronated compounds for potential use in neutron capture therapy. (author)

  20. Boron carbide coating deposition on tungsten substrates from atomic fluxes of boron and carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadovskiy, Y.; Begrambekov, L.; Ayrapetov, A.; Gretskaya, I.; Grunin, A.; Dyachenko, M.; Puntakov, N.

    2016-09-01

    A device used for both coating deposition and material testing is presented in the paper. By using lock chambers, sputtering targets are easily exchanged with sample holder thus allowing testing of deposited samples with high power density electron or ion beams. Boron carbide coatings were deposited on tungsten samples. Methods of increasing coating adhesion are described in the paper. 2 μm boron carbide coatings sustained 450 heating cycles from 100 to 900 C. Ion beam tests have shown satisfactory results.

  1. A colorimetric determination of boron in biological sample for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camillo, M.A.P.; Tomac Junior, U.

    1990-01-01

    The boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) has shown better prognosis in the treatment of glyemas and gluoblastomas grade III and IV than other therapies. During the treatment the levels of Na 2 10 B 12 H 11 SH must be known in several compartiments of the organism and with this purpose the method of colorimetric determination of boron using curcumine was established. This method is simple, reprodutible and adequate sensitivity for this control. (author) [pt

  2. A colorimetric determination of boron in biological sample for boron neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camilo, M.A.P.; Tomac Junior, U.

    1989-01-01

    The boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) has shown better prognosis in the treatment of gliomas and glioblastomas grade III and IV than other therapies. During the treatment of levels of Na 2 10 B 12 H 11 S H must be known in several compartments of the organism and with this purpose the method of colorimetric determination of boron using curcumin was established. This method is simples, reproducible and has adequate sensitivity for this control. (author). 7 refs, 3 figs, 1 tab

  3. Effect of low temperature oxidation (LTO) in reducing boron skin in boron spin on dopant diffused emitter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singha, Bandana; Solanki, Chetan Singh [Department of Energy Science and Technology, Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay Mumbai-400076, Maharashtra (India)

    2016-05-06

    Formation of boron skin is an unavoidable phenomenon in p-type emitter formation with boron dopant source. The boron skin thickness is generally less than 100 nm and difficult to remove by chemical and physical means. Low temperature oxidation (LTO) used in this work is useful in removing boron skin thickness up to 30 nm and improves the emitter performance. The effective minority carrier lifetime gets improved by more than 30% after using LTO and leakage current of the emitter gets lowered by 100 times thereby showing the importance of low temperature oxidation in boron spin on dopant diffused emitters.

  4. Polyvinylpyrrolidone-Capped Silver Nanoparticle Inhibits Infection of Carbapenem-Resistant Strain of Acinetobacter baumannii in the Human Pulmonary Epithelial Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishvanath Tiwari

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii, an opportunistic ESKAPE pathogen, causes respiratory and urinary tract infections. Its prevalence increases gradually in the clinical setup. Pathogenicity of Acinetobacter is significantly influenced by its ability to infect and survive in human pulmonary cells. Therefore, it is important to study the infection of A. baumannii in human pulmonary host cell (A-549, monitoring surface interacting and internalized bacteria. It was found that during infection of A. baumannii, about 40% bacteria adhered to A-549, whereas 20% got internalized inside pulmonary cell and induces threefold increase in the reactive oxygen species production. We have synthesized polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP-capped AgNPs using chemical methods and tested its efficacy against carbapenem-resistant strain of A. baumannii. PVP-capped silver nanoparticles (PVP-AgNPs (30 µM have shown antibacterial activity against carbapenem-resistant strain of A. baumannii and this concentration does not have any cytotoxic effect on the human pulmonary cell line (IC50 is 130 µM. Similarly, PVP-AgNPs treatment decreases 80% viability of intracellular bacteria, decreases adherence of A. baumannii to A-549 (40 to 2.2%, and decreases intracellular concentration (20 to 1.3% of A. baumannii. This concludes that PVP-AgNPs can be developed as a substitute for carbapenem to control the infection caused by carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii.

  5. Boron exposure through drinking water during pregnancy and birth size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igra, Annachiara Malin; Harari, Florencia; Lu, Ying; Casimiro, Esperanza; Vahter, Marie

    2016-10-01

    Boron is a metalloid found at highly varying concentrations in soil and water. Experimental data indicate that boron is a developmental toxicant, but the few human toxicity data available concern mostly male reproduction. To evaluate potential effects of boron exposure through drinking water on pregnancy outcomes. In a mother-child cohort in northern Argentina (n=194), 1-3 samples of serum, whole blood and urine were collected per woman during pregnancy and analyzed for boron and other elements to which exposure occurred, using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Infant weight, length and head circumference were measured at birth. Drinking water boron ranged 377-10,929μg/L. The serum boron concentrations during pregnancy ranged 0.73-605μg/L (median 133μg/L) and correlated strongly with whole-blood and urinary boron, and, to a lesser extent, with water boron. In multivariable-adjusted linear spline regression analysis (non-linear association), we found that serum boron concentrations above 80μg/L were inversely associated with birth length (B-0.69cm, 95% CI -1.4; -0.024, p=0.043, per 100μg/L increase in serum boron). The impact of boron appeared stronger when we restricted the exposure to the third trimester, when the serum boron concentrations were the highest (0.73-447μg/L). An increase in serum boron of 100μg/L in the third trimester corresponded to 0.9cm shorter and 120g lighter newborns (p=0.001 and 0.021, respectively). Considering that elevated boron concentrations in drinking water are common in many areas of the world, although more screening is warranted, our novel findings warrant additional research on early-life exposure in other populations. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Rapid mass-spectrometric determination of boron isotopic distribution in boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rein, J E; Abernathey, R M

    1972-07-01

    Boron isotopic ratios are measured in boron carbide by thermionic ionization mass spectrometry with no prior chemical separation. A powder blend of boron carbide and sodium hydroxide is prepared, a small portion is transferred to a tantalum filament, the filament is heated to produce sodium borate, and the filament is transferred to the mass spectrometer where the(11)B/(10)B ratio is measured, using the Na(2)BO(2)(+) ion. Variables investigated for their effect on preferential volatilization of (10)B include the sodium hydroxide-boron carbide ratio and the temperature and duration of filament heating. A series of boron carbide pellets containing natural boron, of the type proposed for the control rods of the Fast Flux Test Facility reactor, were analysed with an apparently unbiased result of 4.0560 for the (11)B/(10)B ratio (standard deviation 0.0087). The pellets contained over 3% metal impurities typically found in this material. Time of analysis is 45 min per sample, with one analyst.

  7. The investigation of physical conditions of boron uptake region in proton boron fusion therapy (PBFT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joo-Young Jung

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We conducted a quantitative study to identify the effectiveness of proton boron fusion therapy (PBFT. Four simulation scenarios were designed to investigate the escalation in total dose with the proton boron reaction using a Monte Carlo n-particle extended (MCNPX 2.6.0 simulation. The peak integrated dose was obtained for three different physical conditions (i.e., boron uptake region (BUR thickness, BUR location, and boron concentration with differing proton beam energy (60–90 MeV. We found that the peak integrated dose was increased by up to 96.62% compared to the pristine proton Bragg-peak. For the synergetic effect to take place with 60–70 MeV proton beam, the BUR had to be at least 0.3 cm thick while spanning the Bragg-peak. Similarly to the thickness, the BUR location needed to be within 0.3 cm from the Bragg-peak when the thickness was maintained at 0.9 cm. An effective proton boron reaction required the boron concentration to be equal to or greater than 14.4 mg/g. These results demonstrate the impact of various physical and beam conditions of the PBFT, which are critical environmental factors for the treatment planning. We envision that this study will advance our understanding of the PBFT, which can be an invaluable treatment method for maximizing the potential of proton therapy.

  8. Testing boron carbide under triaxial compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Charles; Chocron, Sidney; Dannemann, Kathryn A.; Nicholls, Arthur E.

    2012-03-01

    This article focuses on the pressure dependence and summarizes the characterization work conducted on intact and predamaged specimens of boron carbide under confinement in a pressure vessel and in a thick steel sleeve. The failure curves obtained are presented, and the data compared to experimental data from the literature.

  9. Kinetic analysis of boron carbide sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borchert, W.; Kerler, A.R.

    1975-01-01

    The kinetics of the sintering of boron carbide were investigated by shrinkage measurements with a high-temperature dilatometer under argon atmosphere in dependence on temperature, grain size, and pressure. The activation energies and the reaction mechanisms of the different stages of sintering were determined. (orig.) [de

  10. Compaction of amorphous iron–boron powder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendriksen, Peter Vang; Mørup, Steen; Koch, Christian

    1993-01-01

    report on attempts to compact amorphous iron–boron particles prepared by chemical reduction of Fe(II) ions in aqueous solution by NaBH4 (Ref. 2). The particles prepared in this way are pyrophoric, but can be passivated. The small particle size (10–100 nm), characteristic of this preparation technique...

  11. Boron nitride nanosheets reinforced glass matrix composites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Saggar, Richa; Porwal, H.; Tatarko, P.; Dlouhý, Ivo; Reece, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 114, SEP (2015), S26-S32 ISSN 1743-6753 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 7AMB14SK155 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 264526 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Boron nitride nanosheets * Borosilicate glass * Mechanical properties Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 1.162, year: 2015

  12. Energetics of Boron Doping of Carbon Pores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wexler, Carlos; St. John, Alexander; Connolly, Matthew

    2014-03-01

    Carbon-based materials show promise, given their light weight, large surface areas and low cost for storage of hydrogen and other gases, e.g., for energy applications. Alas, the interaction of H2 and carbon, 4-5kJ/mol, is insufficient for room-temperature operation. Boron doping of carbon materials could raise the binding energy of H2 to 12-15kJ/mol. The nature of the incorporation of boron into a carbon structure has not been studied so far. In this talk we will address the energetics of boron incorporation into a carbon matrix via adsorption and decomposition of decaborane by first principles calculations. These demonstrate: (a) A strong adsorption of decaborane to carbon (70-80kJ/mol) resulting in easy incorporation of decaborane, sufficient for up to 10-20% B:C at low decaborane vapour pressures. (b) Identification that boron acts as an electron acceptor when incorporated substitutionally into a graphene-like material, as expected due to its valence. (c) The electrostatic field near the molecule is responsible for ca. 2/3 of the enhancement of the H2-adsorbent interaction in aromatic compounds such as pyrene, coronene and ovalene. Supported by DOE DE-FG36-08GO18142, ACS-PRF 52696-ND5, and NSF 1069091.

  13. Anomalous Seebeck coefficient in boron carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aselage, T.L.; Emin, D.; Wood, C.; Mackinnon, I.D.R.; Howard, I.A.

    1987-01-01

    Boron carbides exhibit an anomalously large Seebeck coefficient with a temperature coefficient that is characteristic of polaronic hopping between inequivalent sites. The inequivalence in the sites is associated with disorder in the solid. The temperature dependence of the Seebeck coefficient for materials prepared by different techniques provides insight into the nature of the disorder

  14. Reaction of boron carbide with molybdenum disilicide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novikov, A.V.; Melekhin, V.F.; Pegov, V.S.

    1989-01-01

    The investigation results of interaction in the B 4 C-MoSi 2 system during sintering in vacuum are presented. Sintering of boron carbide with molybdenum disilicide is shown to lead to the formation of MoB 2 , SiC, Mo 5 Si 3 compounds, the presence of carbon-containing covering plays an important role in sintering

  15. New insight into pecan boron nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alternate bearing by individual pecan [Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh.) K. Koch] trees is problematic for nut producers and processors. There are many unknowns regarding alternate bearing physiology, such as the relationship between boron and fruit set, nutmeat quality, and kernel maladies. Evidence...

  16. NEW ADVANCES IN BORON SOIL CHEMISTRY - Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boron is an essential plant micronutrient for which the range between deficiency and toxicity is narrower than for any other nutrient element. Plants respond directly to the amount of B in soil solution and only indirectly to the amount of B adsorbed on soil particle surfaces. ...

  17. NEW ADVANCES IN BORON SOIL CHEMISTRY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boron is an essential plant micronutrient for which the range between deficiency and toxicity is narrower than for any other nutrient element. Plants respond directly to the amount of B in soil solution and only indirectly to the amount of B adsorbed on soil particle surfaces. ...

  18. Perfomance analysis of boron carbide in LMFBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitner, A.L.; Birney, K.R.

    1975-01-01

    Reactivity control in the FFTF and LMFBR's will be maintained by control elements utilizing boron carbide pellets contained in stainless steel pins. Computer performance codes predict irradiation service conditions of absorber pellets and identify required experimental testing. Test results are incorporated in the codes to improve performance prediction capabilities

  19. Bandgap engineered graphene and hexagonal boron nitride

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this article a double-barrier resonant tunnelling diode (DBRTD) has been modelled by taking advantage of single-layer hexagonal lattice of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). The DBRTD performance and operation are explored by means of a self-consistent solution inside the non-equilibrium Green's ...

  20. Investigation into organic boron compounds complexing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuzhakova, G.A.; Belonovich, M.I.; Rybakova, M.N.; Morozova, T.L.; Lapkin, I.I.

    1983-01-01

    Triarylboranes interact with 4-amino-1, 2, 4-triazole With the formation of complexes of the composition 1:1. Ligand forms coordination bond with boron at the expense of pyridine atom of triazole cycle nitrogen. IR spectra, yields and decomposition temperatures of the complexes are presented

  1. Biological activity of N(4)-boronated derivatives of 2'-deoxycytidine, potential agents for boron-neutron capture therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizioł, Joanna; Uram, Łukasz; Szuster, Magdalena; Sekuła, Justyna; Ruman, Tomasz

    2015-10-01

    Boron-neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a binary anticancer therapy that requires boron compound for nuclear reaction during which high energy alpha particles and lithium nuclei are formed. Unnatural, boron-containing nucleoside with hydrophobic pinacol moiety was investigated as a potential BNCT boron delivery agent. Biological properties of this compound are presented for the first time and prove that boron nucleoside has low cytotoxicity and that observed apoptotic effects suggest alteration of important functions of cancer cells. Mass spectrometry analysis of DNA from cancer cells proved that boron nucleoside is inserted into nucleic acids as a functional nucleotide derivative. NMR studies present very high degree of similarity of natural dG-dC base pair with dG-boron nucleoside system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Boron carbide nanowires: Synthesis and characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Zhe

    Bulk boron carbide has been widely used in ballistic armored vest and the property characterization has been heavily focused on mechanical properties. Even though boron carbides have also been projected as a promising class of high temperature thermoelectric materials for energy harvesting, the research has been limited in this field. Since the thermal conductivity of bulk boron carbide is still relatively high, there is a great opportunity to take advantage of the nano effect to further reduce it for better thermoelectric performance. This dissertation work aims to explore whether improved thermoelectric performance can be found in boron carbide nanowires compared with their bulk counterparts. This dissertation work consists of four main parts. (1) Synthesis of boron carbide nanowires. Boron carbide nanowires were synthesized by co-pyrolysis of diborane and methane at low temperatures (with 879 °C as the lowest) in a home-built low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) system. The CVD-based method is energy efficient and cost effective. The as-synthesized nanowires were characterized by electron microscopy extensively. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results show the nanowires are single crystalline with planar defects. Depending on the geometrical relationship between the preferred growth direction of the nanowire and the orientation of the defects, the as-synthesized nanowires could be further divided into two categories: transverse fault (TF) nanowires grow normal to the defect plane, while axial fault (AF) ones grow within the defect plane. (2) Understanding the growth mechanism of as-synthesized boron carbide nanowires. The growth mechanism can be generally considered as the famous vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism. TF and AF nanowires were found to be guided by Ni-B catalysts of two phases. A TF nanowire is lead by a hexagonal phase catalyst, which was proved to be in a liquid state during reaction. While an AF nanowires is catalyzed by a

  3. Rutin and rutin-conjugated gold nanoparticles ameliorate collagen-induced arthritis in rats through inhibition of NF-κB and iNOS activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gul, Anum; Kunwar, Bimal; Mazhar, Maryam; Faizi, Shaheen; Ahmed, Dania; Shah, Muhammad Raza; Simjee, Shabana U

    2018-04-18

    Numerous studies have suggested that nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) are important mediators of inflammatory response in human and animal models of arthritis. Besides, oxidative stress markers, nitric oxide (NO) and peroxide (PO) are also major contributors in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Over expression of these inflammatory mediators leads to the extracellular matrix degradation, and excessive cartilage and bone resorption, ultimately leading to the irreversible damage to joints. The aim of the present study was to investigate the anti-arthritic mechanism of bioflavonoids, rutin and rutin-conjugated gold nanoparticles (R-AuNPs) by determining their role in the modulation of NF-κB and iNOS expression in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model of rats. Arthritis was induced by the subcutaneous administration of bovine type II collagen. Treatment was started with rutin, indomethacin + rutin (I + R) and R-AuNPs on the day of CIA induction. The severity of arthritis was determined by measuring the arthritic score on alternate days until mean arthritic score of 4 was observed. The NO and PO levels were also analyzed in serum samples. NF-κB and iNOS expression levels were determined in spleen tissue samples by real time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Marked reduction in the arthritic score as well as in the NO and PO levels was observed in the treated groups. A significant downregulation in the NF-κB and iNOS expression levels was also observed in the treatment groups compared to the arthritic control group. Collectively, the findings suggest potential clinical role of rutin and R-AuNPs in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. High-Yield Synthesis of Stoichiometric Boron Nitride Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José E. Nocua

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Boron nitride (BN nanostructures are structural analogues of carbon nanostructures but have completely different bonding character and structural defects. They are chemically inert, electrically insulating, and potentially important in mechanical applications that include the strengthening of light structural materials. These applications require the reliable production of bulk amounts of pure BN nanostructures in order to be able to reinforce large quantities of structural materials, hence the need for the development of high-yield synthesis methods of pure BN nanostructures. Using borazine (B3N3H6 as chemical precursor and the hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD technique, pure BN nanostructures with cross-sectional sizes ranging between 20 and 50 nm were obtained, including nanoparticles and nanofibers. Their crystalline structure was characterized by (XRD, their morphology and nanostructure was examined by (SEM and (TEM, while their chemical composition was studied by (EDS, (FTIR, (EELS, and (XPS. Taken altogether, the results indicate that all the material obtained is stoichiometric nanostructured BN with hexagonal and rhombohedral crystalline structure.

  5. Raman spectroscopy of boron-doped single-layer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoong Ahm; Fujisawa, Kazunori; Muramatsu, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Takuya; Endo, Morinobu; Fujimori, Toshihiko; Kaneko, Katsumi; Terrones, Mauricio; Behrends, Jan; Eckmann, Axel; Casiraghi, Cinzia; Novoselov, Kostya S; Saito, Riichiro; Dresselhaus, Mildred S

    2012-07-24

    The introduction of foreign atoms, such as nitrogen, into the hexagonal network of an sp(2)-hybridized carbon atom monolayer has been demonstrated and constitutes an effective tool for tailoring the intrinsic properties of graphene. Here, we report that boron atoms can be efficiently substituted for carbon in graphene. Single-layer graphene substitutionally doped with boron was prepared by the mechanical exfoliation of boron-doped graphite. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrated that the amount of substitutional boron in graphite was ~0.22 atom %. Raman spectroscopy demonstrated that the boron atoms were spaced 4.76 nm apart in single-layer graphene. The 7-fold higher intensity of the D-band when compared to the G-band was explained by the elastically scattered photoexcited electrons by boron atoms before emitting a phonon. The frequency of the G-band in single-layer substitutionally boron-doped graphene was unchanged, which could be explained by the p-type boron doping (stiffening) counteracting the tensile strain effect of the larger carbon-boron bond length (softening). Boron-doped graphene appears to be a useful tool for engineering the physical and chemical properties of graphene.

  6. Laser-induced photochemical enrichment of boron isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freund, S.M.; Ritter, J.J.

    1976-01-01

    A boron trichloride starting material containing both boron-10 isotopes and boron-11 isotopes is selectively enriched in one or the other of these isotopes by a laser-induced photochemical method involving the reaction of laser-excited boron trichloride with either H 2 S or D 2 S. The method is carried out by subjecting a low pressure gaseous mixture of boron trichloride starting material and the sulfide to infrared radiation from a carbon dioxide TE laser. The wave length of the radiation is selected so as to selectively excite one or the other of boron-10 BCl 3 molecules or boron-11 BCl 3 molecules, thereby making them preferentially more reactive with the sulfide. The laser-induced reaction produces both a boron-containing solid phase reaction product and a gaseous phase containing mostly unreacted BCl 3 and small amounts of sulfhydroboranes. Pure boron trichloride selectively enriched in one of the isotopes is recovered as the primary product of the method from the gaseous phase by a multi-step recovery procedure. Pure boron trichloride enriched in the other isotope is recovered as a secondary product of the method by the subsequent chlorination of the solid phase reaction product followed by separation of BCl 3 from the mixture of gaseous products resulting from the chlorination

  7. Higher boron rejection with a new TFC forward osmosis membrane

    KAUST Repository

    Valladares Linares, Rodrigo

    2014-07-17

    Due to the stringent limits for boron in drinking and irrigation water, water treatment facilities have to incur additional treatment to remove boron down to a safe concentration. Forward osmosis (FO) is a membrane technology that may reduce the energy required to remove boron present in seawater. In direct FO desalination hybrid systems, fresh water is recovered from seawater using a recoverable draw solution, FO membranes are expected to show high boron rejection. This study focuses on determining the boron rejection capabilities of a new generation thin-film composite (TFC) FO membrane compared to a first generation cellulose triacetate (CTA) FO membrane. The effects of water permeate flux, membrane structure, draw solute charge, and reverse solute flux on boron rejection were determined. For TFC and CTA FO membranes, experiments showed that when similar operating conditions are applied (e.g. membrane type and draw solute type) boron rejection decreases with increase in permeate flux. Reverse draw solute flux and membrane fouling have no significant impact on boron rejection. Compared to the first generation CTA FO membrane operated at the same conditions, the TFC FO membrane showed a 40% higher boron rejection capability and a 20% higher water flux. This demonstrates the potential for boron removal for new generation TFC FO membranes. © 2014 © 2014 Balaban Desalination Publications. All rights reserved.

  8. Boron removal from aqueous solution by direct contact membrane distillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Deyin; Wang, Jun; Sun, Xiangcheng; Luan, Zhaokun; Zhao, Changwei; Ren, Xiaojing

    2010-05-15

    The removal of boron from aqueous solution by direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) was studied with self-prepared polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) hollow fiber membranes in the present work. The effect of pH, boron concentration, temperature and salt concentration of the feed solution on the boron rejection was investigated. The experimental results indicated that boron rejection was less dependent on the feed pH and salt concentration. DCMD process had high boron removal efficiency (>99.8%) and the permeate boron was below the maximum permissible level even at feed concentration as high as 750 mg/L. Although the permeate flux was enhanced exponentially with the feed temperature increasing, the influence of feed temperature on the boron rejection could be neglected. Finally, the natural groundwater sample containing 12.7 mg/L of boron was treated by DCMD process. The permeate boron kept below 20 microg/L whether the feed was acidified or not, but pre-acidification was helpful to maintain the permeate flux stability. All the experimental results indicated that DCMD could be efficiently used for boron removal from aqueous solution. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The synthesis and characterization of iron nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Tyler

    Nanoparticle synthesis has garnered attention for technological applications for catalysts, industrial processing, and medical applications. The size ranges for these is in the particles nanostructural domain. Pure iron nanoparticles have been of particular interest for their reactivity and relative biological inertness. Applications include cancer treatment and carrying medicine to a relevant site. Unfortunately, because of their reactivity, pure iron nanoparticles have been difficult to study. This is because of their accelerated tendency to form oxides in air, due to the increased surface area to volume ratio. Using synthesis processes with polyphenols or long chain amines, air stable iron nanoparticles have been produced with a diameter size range of ~ 2 to about ~10 nm, but apparently have transformed due to internal pressure and crystallographic defects to the FCC phase. The FCC crystals have been seen to form icosahedral and decahedral shapes. This size is within the range for use as a catalyst for the growth of both carbon nanotubes and boron nitride nanotubes as well for biomedical applications. The advantages of these kinds of catalysts are that nanotube growth can be for the first time separated from the catalyst formation. Additionally, the catalyst size can be preselected for a certain size nanotube to grow. In summary: (1) we found the size distributions of nanoparticles for various synthesis processes, (2) we discovered the right size range for growth of nanotubes from the iron nanoparticles, (3) the nanoparticles are under a very high internal pressure, (4) the nanoparticles are in the FCC phase, (5) they appear to be in icosahedral and decahedral structures, (6) they undergo room temperature twinning, (7) the FCC crystals are distorted due to carbon in octahedral sites, (8) the iron nanoparticles are stable in air, (9) adding small amounts of copper make the iron nanoparticles smaller.

  10. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles mediated 131I-hVEGF siRNA inhibits hepatocellular carcinoma tumor growth in nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Jing; Zhu, Shu; Tong, Liangqian; Li, Jiansha; Chen, Fei; Han, Yunfeng; Zhao, Ming; Xiong, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a primary liver tumor and is the most difficult human malignancy to treat. In this study, we sought to develop an integrative approach in which real-time tumor monitoring, gene therapy, and internal radiotherapy can be performed simultaneously. This was achieved through targeting HCC with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs) carrying small interfering RNA with radiolabled iodine 131 ( 131 I) against the human vascular endothelial growth factor (hVEGF). hVEGF siRNA was labeled with 131 I by the Bolton-Hunter method and conjugated to SilenceMag, a type of SPIOs. 131 I-hVEGF siRNA/SilenceMag was then subcutaneously injected into nude mice with HCC tumors exposed to an external magnetic field (EMF). The biodistribution and cytotoxicity of 131 I-hVEGF siRNA/SilenceMag was assessed by SPECT (Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography) and MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) studies and blood kinetics analysis. The body weight and tumor size of nude mice bearing HCC were measured daily for the 4-week duration of the experiment. 131 I-hVEGF siRNA/SilenceMag was successfully labeled; with a satisfactory radiochemical purity (>80%) and biological activity in vitro. External application of an EMF successfully attracted and retained more 131 I-hVEGF siRNA/SilenceMag in HCC tumors as shown by SPECT, MRI and biodistribution studies. The tumors treated with 131 I-hVEGF siRNA/SilenceMag grew nearly 50% slower in the presence of EMF than those without EMF and the control. Immunohistochemical assay confirmed that the tumor targeted by 131 I-hVEGF siRNA/SilenceMag guided by an EMF had a lower VEGF protein level compared to that without EMF exposure and the control. EMF-guided 131 I-hVEGF siRNA/SilenceMag exhibited an antitumor effect. The synergic therapy of 131 I-hVEGF siRNA/SilenceMag might be a promising future treatment option against HCC with the dual functional properties of tumor therapy and imaging

  11. Polar Localization of the NIP5;1 Boric Acid Channel Is Maintained by Endocytosis and Facilitates Boron Transport in Arabidopsis Roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheliang; Yoshinari, Akira; Shimada, Tomoo; Hara-Nishimura, Ikuko; Mitani-Ueno, Namiki; Feng Ma, Jian; Naito, Satoshi; Takano, Junpei

    2017-04-01

    Boron uptake in Arabidopsis thaliana is mediated by nodulin 26-like intrinsic protein 5;1 (NIP5;1), a boric acid channel that is located preferentially on the soil side of the plasma membrane in root cells. However, the mechanism underlying this polar localization is poorly understood. Here, we show that the polar localization of NIP5;1 in epidermal and endodermal root cells is mediated by the phosphorylation of Thr residues in the conserved TPG (ThrProGly) repeat in the N-terminal region of NIP5;1. Although substitutions of Ala for three Thr residues in the TPG repeat did not affect lateral diffusion in the plasma membrane, these substitutions inhibited endocytosis and strongly compromised the polar localization of GFP-NIP5;1. Consistent with this, the polar localization was compromised in µ subunit mutants of the clathrin adaptor AP2. The Thr-to-Ala substitutions did not affect the boron transport activity of GFP-NIP5;1 in Xenopus laevis oocytes but did inhibit the ability to complement boron translocation to shoots and rescue growth defects in nip5;1-1 mutant plants under boron-limited conditions. These results demonstrate that the polar localization of NIP5;1 is maintained by clathrin-mediated endocytosis, is dependent on phosphorylation in the TPG repeat, and is necessary for the efficient transport of boron in roots. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  12. Boron Arsenide and Boron Phosphide for High Temperature and Luminescent Devices. [semiconductor devices - crystal growth/crystal structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, T. L.

    1975-01-01

    The crystal growth of boron arsenide and boron phosphide in the form of bulk crystals and epitaxial layers on suitable substrates is discussed. The physical, chemical, and electrical properties of the crystals and epitaxial layers are examined. Bulk crystals of boron arsenide were prepared by the chemical transport technique, and their carrier concentration and Hall mobility were measured. The growth of boron arsenide crystals from high temperature solutions was attempted without success. Bulk crystals of boron phosphide were also prepared by chemical transport and solution growth techniques. Techniques required for the fabrication of boron phosphide devices such as junction shaping, diffusion, and contact formation were investigated. Alloying techniques were developed for the formation of low-resistance ohmic contacts to boron phosphide. Four types of boron phosphide devices were fabricated: (1) metal-insulator-boron phosphide structures, (2) Schottky barriers; (3) boron phosphide-silicon carbide heterojunctions; and (4) p-n homojunctions. Easily visible red electroluminescence was observed from both epitaxial and solution grown p-n junctions.

  13. Analytical techniques for boron and boron 10 analysis in a solid experimental tumor EO.771

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porschen, W.; Marx, J.; Feinendegen, L.E.

    1987-01-01

    If a tumor can be preferentially loaded with a suitable boron-10 compound and irradiated with thermal neutrons, malignant cells can be selectively destroyed via the α-particle + Li 7-nucleus from the reaction 10 B(n,α) 7 Li. Neutron capture therapy with two boron-10 amino acid analogs of low toxicity has been tested in recent years: (a) trimethylamine carboxyborane, (A3) and (b) amine-carboxyborane, (A7). Now the boron-10 glycineamide analog (A8), amineboryl carboxamide has been synthsized; it contains 13.81% boron (90% Boron 10+10% Boron 11) and shows a very low toxicity in mice. The effects of this compund were tested on the syngeneic solid adenocarcinoma EO 771 on the right hind leg of male C57 BL/6J mice under standard conditions, by measuring tumor volume growth delay and cell cycle changes using flow cytometry. Boron distribution between tumor and muscle was analyzed by emission spectroscopy with inductively coupled plasma (ICP) following injection of a suspension of peanut oil emulsion. In addition, boron-10 concentration in the tumor were analyzed with prompt γ-activation analysis and neutron capture radiography (Kodak-Pathe LR115) at the MRR reactor in Brookhaven after i.p. injection of 0.4 mg/g A8. Application of A8 alone (0.4 mg/g i.p.) or thermal neutron irradiation of the tumor EO. 771 produced a tumor growth delay of 1-2 days for tumor volume doubling. Application of the boron 10 glycine-amide analog A8 i.p. plus 5x10 12 n/cm 2 resulted in a growth delay of 3-6 days. In contrast intratumoral application of A8 plus 4x10 12 n/cm 2 neutrons gave a growth delay of 7-14 days; the fraction of (G2+M) cells rose from 35% (neutrons alone) to 52%, as evaluated from flow cytometry. (orig.)

  14. Diffusion Boronizing of H11 Hot Work Tool Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurči, Peter; Hudáková, Mária

    2011-10-01

    The H11 hot work tool steel was boronized at various processing parameters, austenitized, quenched, and tempered to a core hardness of 47-48 HRC. Microstructure, phase constitution, and microhardness of boronized layers were investigated. Effect of boronized region on the bulk properties was determined by the Charpy impact test. Structure of boronized regions is formed by the compound layers and diffusion inter-layer. The compound layers consisted of only (Fe,Cr)2B phase, but in the case of longer processing time, they contained also of the (Fe,Cr)B-phase. The inter-layer contained enhanced portion of carbides, formed due to carbon diffusion from the boride compounds toward the substrate. Microhardness of boronized layers exceeded considerably 2000 HV 0.1. However, boronizing led to a substantial lowering of the Charpy impact toughness of the material.

  15. Synthesis of borophenes: Anisotropic, two-dimensional boron polymorphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannix, Andrew J; Zhou, Xiang-Feng; Kiraly, Brian; Wood, Joshua D; Alducin, Diego; Myers, Benjamin D; Liu, Xiaolong; Fisher, Brandon L; Santiago, Ulises; Guest, Jeffrey R; Yacaman, Miguel Jose; Ponce, Arturo; Oganov, Artem R; Hersam, Mark C; Guisinger, Nathan P

    2015-12-18

    At the atomic-cluster scale, pure boron is markedly similar to carbon, forming simple planar molecules and cage-like fullerenes. Theoretical studies predict that two-dimensional (2D) boron sheets will adopt an atomic configuration similar to that of boron atomic clusters. We synthesized atomically thin, crystalline 2D boron sheets (i.e., borophene) on silver surfaces under ultrahigh-vacuum conditions. Atomic-scale characterization, supported by theoretical calculations, revealed structures reminiscent of fused boron clusters with multiple scales of anisotropic, out-of-plane buckling. Unlike bulk boron allotropes, borophene shows metallic characteristics that are consistent with predictions of a highly anisotropic, 2D metal. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  16. Influence of dopants, particularly carbon, on β-rhombohedral boron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werheit, H.; Flachbart, K.; Pristáš, G.; Lotnyk, D.; Filipov, V.; Kuhlmann, U.; Shitsevalova, N.; Lundström, T.

    2017-09-01

    Due to the high affinity of carbon to boron, the preparation of carbon-free boron is problematic. Even high-purity (6 N) β-rhombohedral boron contains 30-60 ppm of C. Hence, carbon affects the boron physical properties published so far more or less significantly. We studied well-defined carbon-doped boron samples based on pure starting material carefully annealed with up to about 1% C, thus assuring homogeneity. We present and discuss their electrical conductivity, optical absorption, luminescence and phonon spectra. Earlier attempts of other authors to determine the conductivity of C-doped boron are revised. Our results allow estimating the effects of oxygen and iron doping on the electrical conductivity using results taken from literature. Discontinuities at low T impair the electronic properties.

  17. Boron autoradiography method applied to the study of steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gugelmeier, R.; Barcelo, G.N.; Boado, J.H.; Fernandez, C.

    1986-01-01

    The boron state, contained in the steel microestructure, is determined. The autoradiography by neutrons is used, permiting to obtain boron distribution images by means of additional information which is difficult to acquire by other methods. The application of the method is described, based on the neutronic irradiation of a polished steel sample, over which a celulose nitrate sheet or other appropriate material is fixed to constitute the detector. The particles generated by the neutron-boron interaction affect the detector sheet, which is subsequently revealed with a chemical treatment and can be observed at the optical microscope. In the case of materials used for the construction of nuclear reactors, special attention must be given to the presence of boron, since owing to the exceptionaly high capacity of neutron absorption, lowest quantities of boron acquire importance. The adaption of the method to metallurgical problems allows the obtainment of a correlation between the boron distribution images and the material's microstructure. (M.E.L.) [es

  18. Boron nitride - Composition, optical properties, and mechanical behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouch, John J.; Alterovitz, Samuel A.; Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Warner, Joseph D.

    1987-01-01

    A low energy ion beam deposition technique was used to grow boron nitride films on quartz, germanium, silicon, gallium arsenide, and indium phosphate. The film structure was amorphous with evidence of a hexagonal phase. The peak boron concentration was 82 at. percent. The carbon and oxygen impurities were in the 5 to 8 at. percent range. Boron-nitrogen and boron-boron bonds were revealed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The index of refraction varied from 1.65 to 1.67 for films deposited on III-V compound semiconductors. The coefficient of friction for boron nitride in sliding contact with diamond was less than 0.1. The substrate was silicon.

  19. Boron nitride: Composition, optical properties and mechanical behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouch, John J.; Alterovitz, Samuel A.; Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Warner, Joseph D.

    1987-01-01

    A low energy ion beam deposition technique was used to grow boron nitride films on quartz, germanium, silicon, gallium arsenide, and indium phosphate. The film structure was amorphous with evidence of a hexagonal phase. The peak boron concentration was 82 at %. The carbon and oxygen impurities were in the 5 to 8 at % range. Boron-nitrogen and boron-boron bonds were revealed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The index of refraction varied from 1.65 to 1.67 for films deposited on III-V compound semiconductors. The coefficient of friction for boron nitride in sliding contact with diamond was less than 0.1. The substrate was silicon.

  20. Potential of using boric acid as a boron drug for boron neutron capture therapy for osteosarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, C.F.; Lin, S.Y. [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing Hua University, Taiwan (China); Peir, J.J. [Nuclear Science and Technology Development Center, National Tsing Hua University, Taiwan (China); Liao, J.W. [Graduate Institute of Veterinary Pathobiology, National Chung Hsing University, Taiwan (China); Lin, Y.C. [Department of Veterinary Medicine, National Chung Hsing University, Taiwan (China); Chou, F.I., E-mail: fichou@mx.nthu.edu.tw [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing Hua University, Taiwan (China)] [Nuclear Science and Technology Development Center, National Tsing Hua University, Taiwan (China)

    2011-12-15

    Osteosarcoma is a malignant tumor commonly found in human and animals. The ability of boric acid (BA) to accumulate in osteosarcoma due to the mechanism of the bone formation of cancer cells would make boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) an alternative therapy for osteosarcoma. This study evaluated the feasibility of using BA as the boron drug for BNCT of bone cancer. The cytotoxicity of BA to L929 cells exceeded that of UMR-106 cells. With 25 {mu}g {sup 10}B/mL medium of BA treatment, the boron concentration in UMR-106 cells was higher than that in L929 cells. The biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of BA in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were studied by administrating 25 mg {sup 10}B/kg body weight to SD rats. Blood boron level decreased rapidly within one hour after BA injection. Boron concentration in the long bone was 4-6 time higher than that of blood. Results of this study suggest that BA may be a potential drug for BNCT for osteosarcoma.

  1. Strongly Phosphorescent Transition Metal π-Complexes of Boron-Boron Triple Bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braunschweig, Holger; Dellermann, Theresa; Dewhurst, Rian D; Hupp, Benjamin; Kramer, Thomas; Mattock, James D; Mies, Jan; Phukan, Ashwini K; Steffen, Andreas; Vargas, Alfredo

    2017-04-05

    Herein are reported the first π-complexes of compounds with boron-boron triple bonds with transition metals, in this case Cu I . Three different compounds were isolated that differ in the number of copper atoms bound to the BB unit. Metalation of the B-B triple bonds causes lengthening of the B-B and B-C NHC bonds, as well as large upfield shifts of the 11 B NMR signals, suggesting greater orbital interactions between the boron and transition metal atoms than those observed with recently published diboryne/alkali metal cation complexes. In contrast to previously reported fluorescent copper(I) π-complexes of boron-boron double bonds, the Cu n -π-diboryne compounds (n = 2, 3) show intense phosphorescence in the red to near-IR region from their triplet excited states, according to their microsecond lifetimes, with quantum yields of up to 58%. While the Cu diborene bond is dominated by electrostatic interactions, giving rise to S 1 and T 1 states of pure IL(π-π*) nature, DFT studies show that the Cu I π-complexes of diborynes reported herein exhibit enhanced metal d orbital contributions to HOMO and HOMO-1, which results in S 1 and T 1 having significant MLCT character, enabling strong spin-orbit coupling for highly efficient intersystem-crossing S 1 → T n and phosphorescence T 1 → S 0 .

  2. Separation and Analysis of Boron Isotope in High Plant by Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Qingcai; Dong, Yuliang; Zhu, Huayu; Sun, Aide

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of boron and its isotope in plants is useful to better understand the transposition and translocation of boron within plant, the geochemical behavior in the interface between soil and plant, and the biogeochemical cycle of boron. It is critical to develop a useful method to separate boron from the plant for the geochemical application of boron and its isotope. A method was developed for the extraction of boron in plant sample, whose isotope was determined by thermal ionization mass ...

  3. Covalent docking of selected boron-based serine beta-lactamase inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgrignani, Jacopo; Novati, Beatrice; Colombo, Giorgio; Grazioso, Giovanni

    2015-05-01

    AmpC β-lactamase is a hydrolytic enzyme conferring resistance to β-lactam antibiotics in multiple Gram-negative bacteria. Therefore, identification of non-β-lactam compounds able to inhibit the enzyme is crucial for the development of novel antibacterial therapies. In general, AmpC inhibitors have to engage the highly solvent-exposed catalytic site of the enzyme. Therefore, understanding the implications of ligand-protein induced-fit and water-mediated interactions behind the inhibitor-enzyme recognition process is fundamental for undertaking structure-based drug design process. Here, we focus on boronic acids, a promising class of beta-lactamase covalent inhibitors. First, we optimized a docking protocol able to reproduce the experimentally determined binding mode of AmpC inhibitors bearing a boronic group. This goal was pursued (1) performing rigid and flexible docking calculations aiming to establish the role of the side chain conformations; and (2) investigating the role of specific water molecules in shaping the enzyme active site and mediating ligand protein interactions. Our calculations showed that some water molecules, conserved in the majority of the considered X-ray structures, are needed to correctly predict the binding pose of known covalent AmpC inhibitors. On this basis, we formalized our findings in a docking and scoring protocol that could be useful for the structure-based design of new boronic acid AmpC inhibitors.

  4. Isotopic effects on the phonon modes in boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werheit, H; Kuhlmann, U; Rotter, H W; Shalamberidze, S O

    2010-10-06

    The effect of isotopes ((10)B-(11)B; (12)C-(13)C) on the infrared- and Raman-active phonons of boron carbide has been investigated. For B isotopes, the contributions of the virtual crystal approximation, polarization vector and isotopical disorder are separated. Boron and carbon isotope effects are largely opposite to one another and indicate the share of the particular atoms in the atomic assemblies vibrating in specific phonon modes. Some infrared-active phonons behave as expected for monatomic boron crystals.

  5. Apparatus for the production of boron nitride nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael W; Jordan, Kevin

    2014-06-17

    An apparatus for the large scale production of boron nitride nanotubes comprising; a pressure chamber containing; a continuously fed boron containing target; a source of thermal energy preferably a focused laser beam; a cooled condenser; a source of pressurized nitrogen gas; and a mechanism for extracting boron nitride nanotubes that are condensed on or in the area of the cooled condenser from the pressure chamber.

  6. Behavior of disordered boron carbide under stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanchini, Giovanni; McCauley, James W; Chhowalla, Manish

    2006-07-21

    Gibbs free-energy calculations based on density functional theory have been used to determine the possible source of failure of boron carbide just above the Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL). A range of B4C polytypes is found to be stable at room pressure. The energetic barrier for shock amorphization of boron carbide is by far the lowest for the B12(CCC) polytype, requiring only 6 GPa approximately = P(HEL) for collapse under hydrostatic conditions. The results clearly demonstrate that the collapse of the B12(CCC) phase leads to segregation of B12 and amorphous carbon in the form of 2-3 nm bands along the (113) lattice direction, in excellent agreement with recent transmission electron microscopy results.

  7. Steam activation of boron doped diamond electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohashi, Tatsuya; Zhang Junfeng; Takasu, Yoshio; Sugimoto, Wataru

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Steam activation of boron doped diamond (BDD) electrodes. → Steam activated BDD has a porous columnar texture. → Steam activated BDD has a wide potential window. - Abstract: Boron doped diamond (BDD) electrodes were activated in steam at various temperatures, resulting in high quality BDD electrodes with a porous microstructure. Distinct columnar structures were observed by scanning electron microscopy. The electrochemically active surface area of the steam-activated BDD was up to 20 times larger than the pristine BDD electrode owing to the porous texture. In addition, a widening of the potential window was observed after steam activation, suggesting that the quality of BDD was enhanced due to oxidative removal of graphitic impurities during the activation process.

  8. Facile Synthesis of Ternary Boron Carbonitride Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luo Lijie

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this study, a novel and facile approach for the synthesis of ternary boron carbonitride (B–C–N nanotubes was reported. Growth occurred by heating simple starting materials of boron powder, zinc oxide powder, and ethanol absolute at 1150 °C under a mixture gas flow of nitrogen and hydrogen. As substrate, commercial stainless steel foil with a typical thickness of 0.05 mm played an additional role of catalyst during the growth of nanotubes. The nanotubes were characterized by SEM, TEM, EDX, and EELS. The results indicate that the synthesized B–C–N nanotubes exhibit a bamboo-like morphology and B, C, and N elements are homogeneously distributed in the nanotubes. A catalyzed vapor–liquid–solid (VLS mechanism was proposed for the growth of the nanotubes.

  9. CVD mechanism of pyrolytic boron nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanji, H.; Monden, K.; Ide, M.

    1987-01-01

    Pyrolytic boron nitride (P-BN) has become a essential material for III-V compound semiconductor manufacturing process. As the demand from electronics industry for larger single crystals increases, the demand for larger and more economical P-BN components is growing rapidly. P-BN is manufactured by low pressure CVD using boron-trihalides and ammonia as the reactants. In spite that P-BN has been in the market for quite a long time, limited number of fundamental studies regarding the kinetics and the formation mechanism of P-BN have been reported. As it has been demonstrated in CVD of Si, knowledge and both theoretical and empirical modeling of CVD process can be applied to improve the deposition technology and to give more uniform deposition with higher efficiency, and it should also apply to the deposition of P-BN

  10. Boron Nitride Nanotube: Synthesis and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiano, Amanda L.; Park, Cheol; Lee, Joseph W.; Luong, Hoa H.; Gibbons, Luke J.; Chu, Sang-Hyon; Applin, Samantha I.; Gnoffo, Peter; Lowther, Sharon; Kim, Hyun Jung; hide

    2014-01-01

    Scientists have predicted that carbon's immediate neighbors on the periodic chart, boron and nitrogen, may also form perfect nanotubes, since the advent of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in 1991. First proposed then synthesized by researchers at UC Berkeley in the mid 1990's, the boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) has proven very difficult to make until now. Herein we provide an update on a catalyst-free method for synthesizing highly crystalline, small diameter BNNTs with a high aspect ratio using a high power laser under a high pressure and high temperature environment first discovered jointly by NASA/NIA JSA. Progress in purification methods, dispersion studies, BNNT mat and composite formation, and modeling and diagnostics will also be presented. The white BNNTs offer extraordinary properties including neutron radiation shielding, piezoelectricity, thermal oxidative stability (> 800 C in air), mechanical strength, and toughness. The characteristics of the novel BNNTs and BNNT polymer composites and their potential applications are discussed.

  11. Synthesis and characterization of boron nitrides nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, T.H.; Sousa, E.M.B.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a new synthesis for the production of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNT) from boron powder, ammonium nitrate and hematite tube furnace CVD method. The samples were subjected to some characterization techniques as infrared spectroscopy, thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy and transmission. By analyzing the results can explain the chemical reactions involved in the process and confirm the formation of BNNT with several layers and about 30 nanometers in diameter. Due to excellent mechanical properties and its chemical and thermal stability this material is promising for various applications. However, BNNT has received much less attention than carbon nanotubes, it is because of great difficulty to synthesize appreciable quantities from the techniques currently known, and this is one of the main reasons this work.(author)

  12. Characterization of boron doped nanocrystalline diamonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterlevitz, A C; Manne, G M; Sampaio, M A; Quispe, J C R; Pasquetto, M P; Iannini, R F; Ceragioli, H J; Baranauskas, V

    2008-01-01

    Nanostructured diamond doped with boron was prepared using a hot-filament assisted chemical vapour deposition system fed with an ethyl alcohol, hydrogen and argon mixture. The reduction of the diamond grains to the nanoscale was produced by secondary nucleation and defects induced by argon and boron atoms via surface reactions during chemical vapour deposition. Raman measurements show that the samples are nanodiamonds embedded in a matrix of graphite and disordered carbon grains, while morphological investigations using field electron scanning microscopy show that the size of the grains ranges from 20 to 100 nm. The lowest threshold fields achieved were in the 1.6 to 2.4 V/μm range

  13. Development of boron epoxy rocket motor chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, W. M.; Knoell, A. C.; Zweben, C.

    1972-01-01

    A 71 cm diameter 74 cm length boron/epoxy composite rocket motor chamber was designed based on the geometric configuration of the JPL Applications Technology Satellite titanium alloy apogee motor chamber. Because analyses showed large stress concentrations in the domes, the configuration was modified using the same basic constraints for openings and attachments. The rocket motor chamber was then fabricated by filament winding with boron/epoxy tape and hydrostatically tested to failure at 264 N/sq cm, 57.2 N/sq cm above the design value. Two more rocket motor chambers were fabricated with the same basic constraints, but shortened to 57.6 cm for a smaller propellant load. The first of these short chambers failed in proof because of filament winding fabrication difficulties. The second chamber was successfully fabricated and passed the hydrostatic proof test.

  14. Microadditions of boron and vanadium in ADI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rzychoń T.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In the second part of the study, describing the role of vanadium and boron microadditions in the process of structure formation in heavy-walled castings made from ADI, the results of own investigations were presented. Within this study two series of melts of the ductile iron were made, introducing microadditions of the above mentioned elements to both unalloyed ductile iron and the ductile iron containing high levels of nickel and copper (the composition typical of ADI. Melts were conducted with iron-nickel-magnesium master alloy. Thermal analysis of the solidification process of the cast keel blocks was conducted, the heat treatment of the alloys was carried out, and then the effect of the introduced additions of boron and vanadium on the hardenability of the investigated cast iron was examined and evaluated.

  15. Dependence of boron cluster dissolution on the annealing ambient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radic, Ljubo; Lilak, Aaron D.; Law, Mark E.

    2002-01-01

    Boron is introduced into silicon via implantation to form p-type layers. This process creates damage in the crystal that upon annealing causes enhanced diffusion and clustering of the boron layer. Reactivation of the boron is not a well-understood process. In this letter we experimentally investigate the effect of the annealing ambient on boron reactivation kinetics. An oxidizing ambient which injects silicon interstitials is compared to an inert ambient. Contrary to published theory, an excess of interstitials does not accelerate the reactivation process

  16. Molecular Dynamics Modeling of Piezoelectric Boron Nirtride Nanotubes

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Conduct a systematic computational study on the physical and electro-mechanical properties of Boron Nitride Nanotubes (BNNTs) to evaluate their functional...

  17. Cobalt Doping of Semiconducting Boron Carbide Using Cobaltocene

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carlson, Lonnie

    2007-01-01

    .... This temperature dependent surface photovoltage effect is not compelling evidence for the majority carrier type but does suggest an increase in the carrier concentration in semiconducting boron...

  18. Electron-Spin Resonance in Boron Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Charles; Venturini, Eugene L.; Azevedo, Larry J.; Emin, David

    1987-01-01

    Samples exhibit Curie-law behavior in temperature range of 2 to 100 K. Technical paper presents studies of electron-spin resonance of samples of hot pressed B9 C, B15 C2, B13 C2, and B4 C. Boron carbide ceramics are refractory solids with high melting temperatures, low thermal conductives, and extreme hardnesses. They show promise as semiconductors at high temperatures and have unusually large figures of merit for use in thermoelectric generators.

  19. High resolution imaging of boron carbide microstructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacKinnon, I.D.R.; Aselage, T.; Van Deusen, S.B.

    1986-01-01

    Two samples of boron carbide have been examined using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). A hot-pressed B 13 C 2 sample shows a high density of variable width twins normal to (10*1). Subtle shifts or offsets of lattice fringes along the twin plane and normal to approx.(10*5) were also observed. A B 4 C powder showed little evidence of stacking disorder in crystalline regions

  20. Amorphous Carbon-Boron Nitride Nanotube Hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Woo (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Wise, Kristopher E. (Inventor); Lin, Yi (Inventor); Connell, John (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method for joining or repairing boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs). In joining BNNTs, the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures. In repairing BNNTs, the damaged site of the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures at the damage site.

  1. Boron isotopes as an artificial tracer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quast, Konrad W; Lansey, Kevin; Arnold, Robert; Bassett, Randy L; Rincon, Martha

    2006-01-01

    A field study was conducted using a combination of intrinsic and artificial tracers to estimate travel times and dilution during transport of infiltrate from a reclaimed water infiltration basin to nearby monitoring wells. A major study objective was to validate boric acid enriched in (10)B as an artificial tracer. Basin 10E at the Rio Hondo Spreading Grounds in Whittier, California, was the site of the test. The basin normally receives a mixture of treated municipal waste water, purchased State Project water, and local runoff from the San Gabriel River. Approximately 3.5 kg of (10)B-enriched boric acid was dispersed among 2.05 x 10(5) m(3) of basin water to initiate the experiment. The resultant median delta(11)B in the infiltration basin was -71 per thousand. Prior to tracer addition, the basin water had an intrinsic delta(11)B of +2 per thousand. Local monitoring wells that were used to assess travel times had delta(11)B values of +5 per thousand and +8 per thousand at the time of tracer addition. Analytic results supported an assumption that boron is conserved during ground water transport and that boron enriched in (10)B is a useful artificial tracer. Several intrinsic tracers were used to reinforce the boric acid tracer findings. These included stable isotopes of oxygen (delta(18)O) and hydrogen (deltaD), sulfate concentration, and the boron to chloride ratio. Xenon isotopes, (136)Xe and (124)Xe, also supported boron isotope results. Xenon isotopes were added to the recharge basin as dissolved gases by investigators from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  2. Boron Isotopes Enrichment via Continuous Annular Chromatography

    OpenAIRE

    Sağlam, Gonca

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Boron has two stable isotopes namely 10B and 11B isotopes. The large cross section of 10B isotope for thermal neutrons is used for reactor control in nuclear fission reactors. The thermal neutrons absorption cross sections of pure 10B and 11B are 3837 and 0.005 barns respectively. In the literature, amongst others, batch elution chromatography techniques are reported for 10B isotope enrichment. This work focuses on continuous chromatographic 10B isotope separation system via continuo...

  3. Clinical aspects of boron neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, J.H.; Gahbauer, R.; Clendenon, N.

    1986-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy is potentially useful in treating malignant tumors of the central nervous system and is technically possible. Additional in vitro and in vivo testing is required to determine toxicities, normal tissue tolerances and tissue responses to treatment parameters. Adequate tumor uptake of the capture agent can be evaluated clinically prior to implementation of a finalized treatment protocol. Phase I and Phase II protocol development, clinical pharmacokinetic studies and neutron beam development

  4. Nanotwins soften boron-rich boron carbide (B13C2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Qi; Goddard, William A.

    2017-03-01

    Extensive studies of metals and alloys have observed that nanotwins lead to strengthening, but the role of nanotwins in ceramics is not well established. We compare here the shear strength and the deformation mechanism of nanotwinned boron-rich boron carbide (B13C2) with the perfect crystal under both pure shear and biaxial shear deformations. We find that the intrinsic shear strength of crystalline B13C2 is higher than that of crystalline boron carbide (B4C). But nanotwins in B13C2 lower the strength, making it softer than crystalline B4C. This reduction in strength of nanotwinned B13C2 arises from the interaction of the twin boundary with the C-B-C chains that connect the B12 icosahedra.

  5. Boron-carbide-aluminum and boron-carbide-reactive metal cermets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halverson, Danny C.; Pyzik, Aleksander J.; Aksay, Ilhan A.

    1986-01-01

    Hard, tough, lightweight boron-carbide-reactive metal composites, particularly boron-carbide-aluminum composites, are produced. These composites have compositions with a plurality of phases. A method is provided, including the steps of wetting and reacting the starting materials, by which the microstructures in the resulting composites can be controllably selected. Starting compositions, reaction temperatures, reaction times, and reaction atmospheres are parameters for controlling the process and resulting compositions. The ceramic phases are homogeneously distributed in the metal phases and adhesive forces at ceramic-metal interfaces are maximized. An initial consolidation step is used to achieve fully dense composites. Microstructures of boron-carbide-aluminum cermets have been produced with modulus of rupture exceeding 110 ksi and fracture toughness exceeding 12 ksi.sqroot.in. These composites and methods can be used to form a variety of structural elements.

  6. Boron determination in U3O8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogura, Nadia S.; Sarkis, Jorge E.S.; Rosa, Daniele S.; Ulrich, Joao C.

    2009-01-01

    There exist specifications of the concentration as far the limit of impurities in the used uranium compounds is concerned. Among those impurities the boron element is detached. that in the uranium compounds acts as neutron absorber in nuclear reactions. Therefore, the determination of this element in uranium compounds, it is fundamental for the quality and performance of the nuclear fuels. However, the determination of this element is many times prejudiced by the presence of the uranium. For solving this problem, it is performed a chemical separation of the uranium (matrix) out of the interest. The most used methods to accomplish that separation are the solvent extraction and the ion exchange. In this work, the boron concentration will be done through the ion exchange technique, using polypropylene columns and Dowex AG 50W - X8 100-200 mesh cation resin in chloricide medium 0.25 M. The boron concentration will be determined through high resolution inductive coupling plasma mass spectrometry (HRICP-MS)

  7. A fundamental study of industrial boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuppiroli, L.; Kormann, R.; Lesueur, D.

    1983-09-01

    Some of the physical properties of boron carbide, before and after irradiation are reviewed on the basis of several new experiments performed in our laboratory. The layered aspect of the grains of this ceramic, due to a microtwinning of the rhomboedral structure, is emphasized first. Then, the location of free carbon in samples of composition close to B 4 C is discussed in relation with new sputtering experiments. Coupled studies of the electric conductivities and the electron spin resonance lines have demonstrated the important role of free carbon in the electronic properties of boron carbide and revealed the existence of a homogeneous short range disorder, the origin of which is not very clear (amorphous concept). The elementary processes responsible of the swelling and microcracking of neutron irradiated boron carbide are rather well understood. The role of the point defects in these processes is reported. The displacement threshold energies and formation volumes are discussed in relation with electron irradiation experiments, and displacement rates are calculated in different irradiation situations including neutron irradiations [fr

  8. Considerations for boron neutron capture therapy studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faria Gaspar, P. de.

    1994-01-01

    Radiotherapy is indispensable as a mean to eradicate deeply or infiltrating tumor tissue that can not be removed surgically. Therefore, it is not selective and may also kill the surrounding health tissue. The principle of BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) consist in targeting a tumor selectively with a boron-10 compound. This nuclide has a large capture cross section for thermal neutrons and the nuclear reaction and the delivered energy in locus will selective the tumor. Since its initial proposal in 1963 BNCT has made much progress, however it is not used in a routine treatment. In this work it was approached some complex procedures, as the obtention of selective boron compounds, the adequate set up of neutron beams, the biodistribution, the in vivo and in vitro studies, and also human patients treatments. This work provide fundamentals about BNCT to professional of different areas of knowledge since it comprises multidisciplinary study. It includes appendixes for the ones not related to the field for a better comprehension of the many aspects involved. It is also presented a glossary containing technical and basic aspects involved. It is also presented a glossary containing technical and basic terms referred in the work. (author). 174 refs, 1 fig, 12 apps

  9. Non-invasive estimation of BPA-derived boron concentration in tumors by18F-FBPA PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimoto, Mitsuyoshi; Honda, Natsuki; Kurihara, Hiroaki; Hiroi, Kenta; Nakamura, Satoshi; Ito, Masashi; Shikano, Naoto; Itami, Jun; Fujii, Hirofumi

    2018-03-02

    In boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), 10 B-4-borono-L-phenylalanine (BPA) is commonly used as a 10 B carrier. Positron emission tomography using 4-borono-2- 18 F-fluoro-phenylalanine ( 18 F-FBPA PET) has been performed to estimate boron concentration and predict the therapeutic effects of BNCT; however, the association between tumor uptake of 18 F-FBPA and boron concentration in tumors remains unclear. The present study investigated the transport mechanism of 18 F-FBPA and BPA, and evaluated the utility of 18 F-FBPA PET in predicting boron concentration in tumors. The transporter assay revealed that 2-aminobicyclo-(2.2.1)-heptane-2-carboxylic acid, an inhibitor of the L-type amino acid transporter, significantly inhibited 18 F-FBPA and 14 C-BPA uptake in FaDu and LN-229 human cancer cells. 18 F-FBPA uptake strongly correlated with 14 C-BPA uptake in seven human tumor cell lines (r = 0.93; p BPA uptake by continuous intravenous infusion. The results of this study revealed that evaluating tumor uptake of 18 F-FBPA by PET was useful for estimating 10 B concentration in tumors. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Synovectomy by neutron capture in boron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega C, H.R.

    2002-01-01

    The rheumatoid arthritis is an illness which affect approximately at 3% of the World population. This illness is characterized by the inflammation of the joints which reduces the quality of life and the productivity of the patients. Since, it is an autoimmune illness, the inflammation is due to the overproduction of synovial liquid by the increase in the quantity of synoviocytes. The rheumatoid arthritis does not have a definitive recovery and the patients have three options of treatment: the use of drugs, the surgery and the radio synovectomy. The synovectomy by neutron capture in Boron is a novel proposal of treatment of the rheumatoid arthritis that consists in using a charged compound with Boron 10 that is preferently incorporated in the synoviocytes and to a less extent in the rest of surrounding tissues of the joint. Then, the joint is exposed to a thermal neutron field that induces the reaction (n, α) in the 10 B. the products of this reaction place their energy inside synoviocytes producing their reduction and therefore the reduction of the joint inflammation. Since it is a novel procedure, the synovectomy by neutron capture in boron has two problems: the source design and the design of the adequate drug. In this work it has been realized a Monte Carlo study with the purpose to design a moderating medium that with a 239 Pu Be source in its center, produces a thermal neutron field. With the produced neutron spectra, the neutrons spectra and neutron doses were calculated in different sites inside a model of knee joint. In Monte Carlo studies it is necessary to know the elemental composition of all the joint components, for the case of synovia and the synovial liquid this information does not exist in such way that it is supposed that its composition is equal than the water. In this work also it has been calculated the kerma factors by neutrons of synovia and the synovial liquid supposing that their elemental composition are similar to the blood tissue

  11. A new adsorbent for boron removal from aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluczka, Joanna; Korolewicz, Teofil; Zołotajkin, Maria; Simka, Wojciech; Raczek, Malwina

    2013-01-01

    A new adsorbent based on natural clinoptilolite and amorphous zirconium dioxide (ZrO2) was prepared for the uptake of boron from fresh water. The sorption behaviour of this adsorbent for boron was investigated using a batch system and found to obey Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherm models. The ZrO2 loading level, pH, temperature, contact time, initial boron concentration and adsorbent dose, on the removal of boron were studied. It was found that the removal of boron increased while the adsorbent dose increased and the temperature decreased at an optimum pH (pH = 8) and a contact time of 30 min. At optimum conditions, the maximum boron percentage removal was 75%. According to the D-R model, the maximum capacity was estimated to be > 3 mg B/g of the adsorbent. The adsorption energy value (calculated as 9.13 kJ/mol) indicated that the adsorption of boron on clinoptilolite modified with ZrO2 was physical in nature. The parameters of the adsorption models and the pH investigations pointed to the possibility of a chemisorption process. The thermodynamic parameters (standard entropy deltaS degrees, enthalpy deltaH degrees , and free energy deltaG degrees changes) of boron adsorption were also calculated. The negative value of deltaS degrees indicated a decreased randomness at the solid-solution interface during the boron adsorption. Negative values of deltaH degrees showed the exothermic nature of the process. The negative values of deltaG degrees implied that the adsorption of boron on clinoptilolite modified with amorphous ZrO2 at 25 degrees C was spontaneous. It was considered that boron dissolved in water had been adsorbed both physically and chemically on clinoptilolite modified with 30% ZrO2.

  12. Boron Removal in Radioactive Liquid Waste by Forward Osmosis Membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Dooseong; Choi, Hei Min; Lee, Kune Woo; Moon Jeikwon

    2014-01-01

    These wastes contain about 0.3-0.8 wt% boric acid and have been concentrated through an evaporation treatment. Boric acid tends to crystallize owing to its solubility, and to plug the evaporator. The volume reduction obtained through evaporation is limited by the amount of boric acid in the waste. As an emerging technology, forward osmosis (FO) has attracted growing interest in wastewater treatment and desalination. FO is a membrane process in which water flows across a semi-permeable membrane from a feed solution of lower osmotic pressure to a draw solution of higher osmotic pressure. However, very few studies on the removal of boron by FO have been performed. The objective of this study is to evaluate the possibility of boron separation in radioactive liquid waste by FO. In this study, the performance of FO was investigated to separate boron in the simulated liquid waste under the factors such as pH, osmotic pressure, ionic strength of the solution, and membrane characteristic. The boron separation in radioactive borate liquid waste was investigated with an FO membrane. When the feed solution containing boron is treated by the FO membrane, the boron permeation depends on the type of membrane, membrane orientation, pH of the feed solution, salt and boron concentration in the feed solution, and osmotic pressure of the draw solution. The boron flux begins to decline from pH 7, and increases with an increase in the osmotic driving force. The boron flux of the CTA-ES and ALFD membrane orientation is higher than those of the CTA-NW and ALFF orientation, respectively. The boron permeation rate is constant regardless of the osmotic pressure and membrane orientation. The boron flux decreases slightly with the salt concentration, but it is not heavily influenced at a low salt concentration

  13. Copper Nanoparticles: Synthesis and Biological Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satyvaldiev, A. S.; Zhasnakunov, Z. K.; Omurzak, E.; Doolotkeldieva, T. D.; Bobusheva, S. T.; Orozmatova, G. T.; Kelgenbaeva, Z.

    2018-01-01

    By means of XRD and FESEM analysis, it is established that copper nanoparticles with sizes less than 10 nm are formed during the chemical reduction, which form aggregates mainly with spherical shape. Presence of gelatin during the chemical reduction of copper induced formation of smaller size distribution nanoparticles than that of nanoparticles synthesized without gelatin and it can be related to formation of protective layer. Synthesized Cu nano-powders have sufficiently high activity against the Erwinia amylovora bacterium, and the bacterial growth inhibition depends on the Cu nanoparticles concentration. At a concentration of 5 mg / ml of Cu nanoparticles, the exciter growth inhibition zone reaches a maximum value within 72 hours and the lysis zone is 20 mm, and at a concentration of 1 mg / ml this value is 16 mm, which also indicates the significant antibacterial activity of this sample.

  14. Removal of boron species by layered double hydroxides: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theiss, Frederick L; Ayoko, Godwin A; Frost, Ray L

    2013-07-15

    Boron, which is an essential element for plants, is toxic to humans and animals at high concentrations. Layered double hydroxides (LDHs) and thermally activated LDHs have shown good uptake of a range of boron species in laboratory scale experiments when compared to current available methods, which are for the most part ineffective or prohibitively expensive. LDHs were able to remove anions from water by anion exchange, the reformation (or memory) effect and direct precipitation. The main mechanism of boron uptake appeared to be anion exchange, which was confirmed by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. Solution pH appeared to have little effect on boron sorption while thermal activation did not always significantly improve boron uptake. In addition, perpetration of numerous LDHs with varying boron anions in the interlayer region by direct co-precipitation and anion exchange have been reported by a number of groups. The composition and orientation of the interlayer boron ions could be identified with reasonable certainty by applying a number of characterisation techniques including: powder XRD, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and infrared (IR) spectroscopy. There is still considerable scope for future research on the application of LDHs for the removal of boron contaminants. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Activation and deprotection of F-BODIPYs using boron trihalides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundrigan, Travis; Cameron, T Stanley; Thompson, Alison

    2014-07-07

    The activation of F-BODIPYs with boron trihalides, followed by treatment with a nucleophile, effects facile substitution at boron; using water as the nucleophile promotes deprotective removal of the -BF2 moiety and thereby production of the corresponding parent dipyrrin salt in quantitative yield under extremely mild conditions.

  16. Method for removal of phosgene from boron trichloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, S.M.

    1983-09-20

    Selective ultraviolet photolysis using an unfiltered mercury arc lamp has been used to substantially reduce the phosgene impurity in a mixture of boron trichloride and phosgene. Infrared spectrophotometric analysis of the sample before and after irradiation shows that it is possible to highly purify commercially available boron trichloride with this method. 5 figs.

  17. Finite Element Analysis Of Boron Diffusion In Wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbenhøft, Kristian; Hoffmeyer, Preben; Bechgaard, Carl

    2002-01-01

    The coupled heat and mass transfer equations for air, water and heat transfer are supplemented with a conservation equation for an additional species representing the concentration of boron in wood. Boundary conditions for wood-air. wood-soil and wood-boron interfaces arc discussed and finally...

  18. Boron Diffusion in Surface-Treated Framing Lumber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patricia K. Lebow; Stan T. Lebow; Steven A. Halverson

    2013-01-01

    The extent of boron penetration in framing lumber treated by spray applications during construction is not well quantified. This study evaluated the effect of formulation and concentration on diffusion of boron in lumber specimens that were equilibrated in conditions that produced wood moisture contents of 18 to 21 percent. One set of specimens was pressure treated...

  19. Low-dimensional boron structures based on icosahedron B12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kah, C. B.; Yu, M.; Tandy, P.; Jayanthi, C. S.; Wu, S. Y.

    2015-10-01

    One-dimensional icosahedral boron chains and two-dimensional icosahedral boron sheets (icosahedral α, δ6, and δ4 sheets) that contain icosahedra B12 as their building units have been predicted in a computer simulation study using a state-of-the-art semi-empirical Hamiltonian. These novel low-dimensional icosahedral structures exhibit interesting bonding and electronic properties. Specifically, the three-center, two-electron bonding between icosahedra B12 of the boron bulk (rhombohedral boron) transforms into a two-center bonding in these new allotropes of boron sheets. In contrast to the previously reported stable buckled α and triangular boron monolayer sheets, these new allotropes of boron sheets form a planar network. Calculations of electronic density of states (DOS) reveal a semiconducting nature for both the icosahedral chain and the icosahedral δ6 and δ4 sheets, as well as a nearly gapless (or metallic-like) feature in the DOS for the icosahedral α sheet. The results for the energy barrier per atom between the icosahedral δ6 and α sheets (0.17 eV), the icosahedral δ6 and δ4 sheets (0.38 eV), and the icosahedral α and δ4 sheets (0.27 eV), as indicated in the respective parentheses, suggest that these new allotropes of boron sheets are relatively stable.

  20. New applications of the interaction between diols and boronic acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duval, F.L.

    2015-01-01

    Florine Duval - New applications of the interaction between diols and boronic acids – Summary Chapter 1 introduces the theory and known applications of the interaction between boronic acids and diols, and explains the context of this thesis. Diagnosis of

  1. Appraisal of SIMS applicability to boron studies in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dérue, Cedric; Gibouin, David; Verdus, Marie-Claire; Lefebvre, Fabrice; Demarty, Maurice; Ripoll, Camille; Thellier, Michel

    2002-07-15

    In the search for a new methodological approach applicable to the determination of the still poorly known primary role of boron in plant physiology, we have undertaken to appraise the potential of the SIMS method for the analytical imaging of the boron isotopes, (10)B and (11)B, at physiological concentrations in plants. With our own, CAMECA IMS4F SIMS ion analyser, and using O(2)(+) as primary ions for the detection of B(+) (plus (12)C(+) and (40)Ca(+)) secondary ions, we have been able to map quantitatively the two boron isotopes in control and boron-enriched plants, to evaluate boron concentrations at the level of individual cells and to determine boron isotopic ratios. This provides the opportunity to carry out the simultaneous labeling and imaging of boron, using enrichment with the stable isotopes, (10)B and (11)B. The method has also the potential for the simultaneous, quantitative detection of the boron isotopes and of the borate-binding sites in plant cells. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Feasibility study of SMART core with soluble boron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kang Seog; Lee, Chung Chan; Zee, Sung Quun

    2000-11-01

    The excess reactivity of SMART core without soluble boron is effectively controlled by 49 CEDM. We suggest another method to control the core excess reactivity using both the checkerboard type of 25 CEDM and soluble boron and perform a feasibility calculation. The soluble boron operation is categorized into the on-line and the off-line mechanisms. The former is to successively control the boron concentration according to the excess reactivity during operation and the latter is to add and change some soluble boron during refueling and repairing. Since the on-line soluble boron control system of SMART is conceptually identical to that of the commercial pressurized water reactor, we did not perform the analysis. Since the soluble boron in the complete off-line system increases the moderator temperature coefficient, the reactivity defect between hot and cold moderator temperature is decreased. However, the decrease of the reactivity is not big to satisfy the core reactivity limits. When using 25 CEDM, the possible mechanism is to control the excess reactivity by both control rod and on-line boron control mechanism between cold and hot zero power and by only control rod at hot full power. We selected the loading pattern satisfying the requirement in the view of nuclear design

  3. Effect of boron on growth criteria of some wheat cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Metwally

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Toxic soil concentrations of the essential micronutrient boron (B represent major limitations to crop production worldwide. Plants have a range of defense systems that might be involved in their affinity to resist and tolerate nutrients stress.Materials and methods: The experiments were carried out to study the differential responses in five wheat cultivars to boron toxicity. Results: The fresh and dry matter yield of the test wheat cultivars showed marked decrease as the concentration of boron was increased. Elevated concentration of boron had a notable inhibitory effect on the biosynthesis of pigments fractions in the test wheat cultivars as severely as dry matter gain. The adverse concentration effects of boron on some metabolic responses were clearly displayed by shoot and root systems, exhibited in the elevated rates of proline, hydrogen peroxide and malondialdehyde formation. Potassium leakage was severely affected by boron-stress in some cultivars at all tested concentrations, while in some others a moderate damage was manifested only at the higher boron concentrations.Conclusions: Sakha 93 out of all the different cultivars investigated was found to display the lowest sensitivity to boron-stress, while Gemmeza 9 was the most sensitive one.

  4. Production of boron carbide powder by carbothermal synthesis of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    weight armour plates etc (Alizadeh et al 2004). It can also be used as a reinforcing material for ceramic matrix composites. It is an excellent neutron absorption material in nuclear industry due to its high neutron absorption co- efficient (Sinha et al 2002). Boron carbide can be prepared by reaction of elemental boron and ...

  5. Eleventh international conference on boron chemistry. Programme and abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Abstracts of reports at the Eleventh International Conference on Boron Chemistry are presented. Born chemistry as a connecting bridge between many fields maintains one of the leading positions in modern chemistry. Methods of synthesis of different boron compounds, properties of the compounds, their use in other regions of chemistry and medicine are widely presented in reports [ru

  6. Production of boron carbide powder by carbothermal synthesis of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    Production of boron carbide powder by carbothermal synthesis of gel material. A K KHANRA. Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721 302, India. MS received 21 August 2006; revised 29 January 2007. Abstract. Boron carbide (B4C) powder has been produced ...

  7. Vacancy complexes in carbon and boron nitride nanotubes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mashapa, MG

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The effect of divacancies on the stability, structural and electronic properties of carbon and boron nitride nanotubes is studied using the ab initio density functional method. VBBN is more stable in the boron-rich and less stable in the nitrogen...

  8. Research on weed species for phytoremediation of boron polluted soil

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-09-15

    Sep 15, 2009 ... This research was aimed to investigate the application of weed species for phytoremediation of soil polluted with boron. A greenhouse experiment was conducted to study the effect of increasing boron. (B) application on the growth and B uptake of common weed species, Sorghum halepense L. Pers.,.

  9. Comparison of boron and neon damage effects in boron ion-implanted resistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacIver, B.A.

    1975-01-01

    Boron and neon damage implants were used in fabricating integrated-circuit resistors in silicon. Resistor properties were studied as functions of damaging ion species and dose. Sheet resistances in the 10 000 Ω/square range were obtained with low temperature and voltage sensitivities and d.c. isolation. (author)

  10. Isotopic Enrichment of Boron in the Sputtering of Boron Nitride with Xenon Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, P. K.; Shutthanandan, V.

    1998-01-01

    An experimental study is described to measure the isotopic enrichment of boron. Xenon ions from 100 eV to 1.5 keV were used to sputter a boron nitride target. An ion gun was used to generate the ion beam. The ion current density at the target surface was approximately 30 microA/sq cm. Xenon ions impinged on the target surface at 50 deg angle to the surface normal. Since boron nitride is an insulator, a flood electron gun was used in our experiments to neutralize the positive charge buildup on the target surface. The sputtered secondary ions of boron were detected by a quadrupole mass spectrometer. The spectrometer entrance aperture was located perpendicular to the ion beam direction and 10 mm away from the target surface. The secondary ion flux was observed to be enriched in the heavy isotopes at lower ion energies. The proportion of heavy isotopes in the sputtered secondary ion flux was found to decrease with increasing primary ion energy from 100 to 350 eV. Beyond 350 eV, light isotopes were sputtered preferentially. The light isotope enrichment factor was observed to reach an asymptotic value of 1.27 at 1.5 keV. This trend is similar to that of the isotopic enrichment observed earlier when copper was sputtered with xenon ions in the same energy range.

  11. Synthesis of boron nitride from boron containing poly(vinyl alcohol ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    acid or borax, and a nitrogen-containing compound such as melamine, urea or dicyandiamide are heated in an atmo- sphere of non-oxidizing gas such as nitrogen or ammonia. ∗. Author for correspondence (mitun@cgcri.res.in). These h-BN powders have low crystallinity and crystal- lographically it belongs to boron nitride ...

  12. Synthesis of boron nitride from boron containing poly(vinyl alcohol)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A ceramic precursor, prepared by condensation reaction from poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and boric acid (H3BO3) in 1:1, 2:1 and 4:1 molar ratios, was synthesized as low temperature synthesis route for boron nitride ceramic. Samples were pyrolyzed at 850°C in nitrogen atmosphere followed by characterization using Fourier ...

  13. From boron analogues of amino acids to boronated DNA: potential new pharmaceuticals and neutron capture agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spielvogel, B.F.; Sood, Anup; Duke Univ., Durham, NC; Shaw, B.R.; Hall, I.H.

    1991-01-01

    Isoelectronic and isostructural boron analogues of the α-amino acids ranging from simple glycine analogues such as H 3 NBH 2 COOH and Me 2 NHBH 2 COOH to alanine analogues have been synthesised. A diverse variety of analogues, including precursors and derivatives (such as peptides) have potent pharmacological activity, including anticancer, antiinflammatory, analgesic, and hypolipidemic activity in animal model studies and in vitro cell cultures. Boronated nucleosides and (oligo)nucleotides, synthetic oligonucleotide analogues of ''antisense'' agents interact with a complementary nucleic acid sequence blocking the biological effect of the target sequence. Nucleosides boronated on the pyrimidine and purine bases have been prepared. It has been established that an entirely new class of nucleic acid derivatives is feasible in which one of the non-bridging oxygens in the internucleotide phosphodiester linkage can be replaced by an isoelectronic analogue, the borane group, (BH 3 ). The boronated oligonucleotides can be viewed as hybrids of the normal oxygen oligonucleotides and the methylphosphonate oligonucleotides. (author)

  14. The water decomposition reactions on boron-doped diamond electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suffredini Hugo B

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The electrochemical processes occurring at both edges of the wide electrochemical window of the boron doped diamond (BDD electrode were studied by polarization curves experiments to evaluate the apparent energy of activation for the rate determining step in each reaction. It was found that the hydrogen evolution reaction occurs by a Volmer-Heyrovsky mechanism with the first step being the RDS. Moreover, the apparent energy of activation calculated from the Tafel plots presented a value as high as 150 kJ mol-1, indicating the formation of the M-H intermediate that is characteristic for the Volmer step. On the other hand, the apparent energy of activation for the oxygen evolution reaction was found to be 106 kJ mol-1 suggesting that the RDS in this mechanism is the initial adsorption step. In this way, it was demonstrated that the interaction between water molecules and the electrode surface is strongly inhibited on BDD thus justifying the extended potential window observed for this material.

  15. Dietary boron: progress in establishing essential roles in human physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Curtiss D

    2012-06-01

    This review summarizes the progress made in establishing essential roles for boron in human physiology and assesses that progress in view of criteria for essentiality of elements. The evidence to date suggests that humans and at least some higher animals may use boron to support normal biological functions. These include roles in calcium metabolism, bone growth and maintenance, insulin metabolism, and completion of the life cycle. The biochemical mechanisms responsible for these effects are poorly understood but the nature of boron biochemistry suggests further characterization of the cell signaling molecules capable of complexing with boron. Such characterization may provide insights into the biochemical function(s) of boron in humans. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Safety Assessment of Boron Nitride as Used in Cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiume, Monice M; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Hill, Ronald A; Klaassen, Curtis D; Liebler, Daniel C; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Andersen, F Alan

    2015-01-01

    The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel (Panel) assessed the safety of boron nitride which functions in cosmetics as a slip modifier (ie, it has a lubricating effect). Boron nitride is an inorganic compound with a crystalline form that can be hexagonal, spherical, or cubic; the hexagonal form is presumed to be used in cosmetics. The highest reported concentration of use of boron nitride is 25% in eye shadow formulations. Although boron nitride nanotubes are produced, boron nitride is not listed as a nanomaterial used in cosmetic formulations. The Panel reviewed available chemistry, animal data, and clinical data and concluded that this ingredient is safe in the present practices of use and concentration in cosmetic formulations. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Boron effect on stainless steel plasticity under hot deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulat, S.I.; Kardonov, B.A.; Sorokina, N.A.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of boron on plasticity of stainless steels at temperatures of hot deformation has been studied at three levels of alloying, i.e. 0-0.01% (micro-alloying or modifying), 0.01-0.02% (low alloying) and 0.02-2.0% (high alloying). Introduction of 0.001-0.005% of boron increases hot plasticity of both low and high carbon stainless steels due to decrease in grain size and strengthening of grain boundaries. Microalloying by boron has a positive effect at temperatures below 1200-1220 deg C. At higher temperatures, particularly when its content exceeds 0.008%, boron deteriorates plasticity by increasing the size of grains and weakening their boundaries. 0.1-2% boron strengthen the stainless steel and dectease its plasticity

  18. Fracture toughness of borides formed on boronized ductile iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sen, Ugur; Sen, Saduman; Koksal, Sakip; Yilmaz, Fevzi

    2005-01-01

    In this study, fracture toughness properties of boronized ductile iron were investigated. Boronizing was realized in a salt bath consisting of borax, boric acid and ferro-silicon. Boronizing heat treatment was carried out between 850 and 950 deg. C under the atmospheric pressure for 2-8 h. Borides e.g. FeB, Fe 2 B formed on ductile iron was verified by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, SEM and optical microscope. Experimental results revealed that longer boronizing time resulted in thicker boride layers. Optical microscope cross-sectional observation of borided layers showed dentricular morphology. Both microhardness and fracture toughness of borided surfaces were measured via Vickers indenter. The harnesses of borides formed on the ductile iron were in the range of 1160-2140 HV 0.1 and fracture toughness were in the range of 2.19-4.47 MPa m 1/2 depending on boronizing time and temperature

  19. Metal-Free Boron-Containing Heterogeneous Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yuanxing; Wang, Xinchen

    2017-12-04

    Metal-free catalysts have distinct advantages over metal and metal oxide catalysts, such as lower cost as well as higher reliability and sustainability. Among the nonmetal compounds used in catalysis, boron-containing compounds with a few unique properties have been developed. In this Minireview, the recent advances in the field of boron-containing metal-free catalysts are presented, including binary and ternary boron-containing catalytic materials. Additionally, the three main applications in catalysis are considered, namely, electrocatalysis, thermal catalysis, and photocatalysis, with the role of boron discussed in depth for each specific catalytic application. Boron-containing compounds could have a substantial impact on the field of metal-free catalysts in the future. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Additive Manufacturing of Dense Hexagonal Boron Nitride Objects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquez Rossy, Andres E [ORNL; Armstrong, Beth L [ORNL; Elliott, Amy M [ORNL; Lara-Curzio, Edgar [ORNL

    2017-05-12

    The feasibility of manufacturing hexagonal boron nitride objects via additive manufacturing techniques was investigated. It was demonstrated that it is possible to hot-extrude thermoplastic filaments containing uniformly distributed boron nitride particles with a volume concentration as high as 60% and that these thermoplastic filaments can be used as feedstock for 3D-printing objects using a fused deposition system. Objects 3D-printed by fused deposition were subsequently sintered at high temperature to obtain dense ceramic products. In a parallel study the behavior of hexagonal boron nitride in aqueous solutions was investigated. It was shown that the addition of a cationic dispersant to an azeotrope enabled the formulation of slurries with a volume concentration of boron nitride as high as 33%. Although these slurries exhibited complex rheological behavior, the results from this study are encouraging and provide a pathway for manufacturing hexagonal boron nitride objects via robocasting.