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Sample records for boron hydrides

  1. Effect of metal hydrides on the burning characteristics of boron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The effect of some metal hydrides on the burning characteristics of boron is studied for the first time. • We are the first to conduct a TG experiment on boron samples at high temperatures (a maximum of 1750 °C). • The thermal reaction process of boron is firstly divided into five stages according to the weight gain rate of the sample. • Specific values of metal hydrides on ignition delay time and combustion intensity of boron are obtained. - Abstract: In this study, the effect of four metal hydrides on the burning characteristics of boron was investigated. Thermogravimetric experiment results show that the thermal reaction process of boron samples can be divided into five stages. The thermal reactions of boron can be significantly promoted with LiH, which can reduce the initial temperature of the first violent reaction stage by ∼140 °C. The starting temperature of the post-reaction stage also decreases by ∼260 °C. The results of the laser ignition experiment suggest that all four metal hydrides can promote boron burning. Nonetheless, different metal hydrides display varied promotional effects. Among the studied hydrides, LiH is the most effective additive and shortens the ignition delay time of boron by ∼34.1%. Moreover, it enhances the combustion intensity of boron by ∼117.6%. The other three metal hydrides (CaH2, TiH2, and ZrH2) can also contribute to boron burning

  2. Photoelectron spectroscopy of boron aluminum hydride cluster anions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Haopeng; Zhang, Xinxing; Ko, Yeon Jae; Gantefoer, Gerd; Bowen, Kit H., E-mail: kbowen@jhu.edu, E-mail: kiran@mcneese.edu [Department of Chemistry, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Li, Xiang [Center for Space Science and Technology, University of Maryland–Baltimore County, Baltimore, Maryland 21250 (United States); Kiran, Boggavarapu, E-mail: kbowen@jhu.edu, E-mail: kiran@mcneese.edu [Department of Chemistry and Physics, McNeese State University, Lake Charles, Louisiana 70609 (United States); Kandalam, Anil K. [Department of Physics, West Chester University, West Chester, Pennsylvania 19383 (United States)

    2014-04-28

    Boron aluminum hydride clusters are studied through a synergetic combination of anion photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory based calculations. Boron aluminum hydride cluster anions, B{sub x}Al{sub y}H{sub z}{sup −}, were generated in a pulsed arc cluster ionization source and identified by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. After mass selection, their photoelectron spectra were measured by a magnetic bottle-type electron energy analyzer. The resultant photoelectron spectra as well as calculations on a selected series of stoichiometries reveal significant geometrical changes upon substitution of aluminum atoms by boron atoms.

  3. Studies of boron hydrides: new heteroboranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    I. The chemistry of the bipentaborane 2,2'-(B5H8)2 is investigated to some extent. Pyrolysis of 2,2'-(B5H8)2 resulted in the formation of non-volatile solid boron hydrides and hydrogen. Treatment of 2,2'-(B5H8)2 with bromine in the presence of AlBr3 resulted in the isolation of 1,1'Br2-2,2'-(B5H7)2. Reaction of 2,2'-(B5H8)2 with deprotonating agents resulted in the formation of the corresponding anions. Reaction of 2,2'-(B5H8)2 with diborane followed by acidification afforded n-B9H15 and B10H14 in moderate yield. II. Reaction of K+B9H12S- with potassium polyselenide resulted in the isolation of stable white crystals of B9H9SSe. Treatment of B9H9SSe with one equivalent of base in methanol gave the unstable heteroborane B8H9(OCH3)SSE and treatment with two equivalents of base afforded yellow crystals of B7H9SSe. Reaction of K+B9H12S- with arsenic trioxide in aqueous basic solution gave the electron-rich heteroborane, B8H8As2S in moderate yield. This resulted in the isolation and identification of Et3N.BH3 and the new metalloborane B7H7As2SCo(C5H5). Treatment of B10H11Se- with As2O3 resulted in the isolation of the stable nido-heteroborane B8H8As2Se in low yield. Reaction of B7C2H13 with potassium polyselenide gave the arachno selenacarborane B7H2C11Se in low yield. The structure of the new heteroborane is proposed on the basis of 11B and 1H nmr spectra. Reaction of B7C2H13 with AsCl3 resulted in the isolation of white stable crystals of B7C2H9As2 in 40 percent yield

  4. Aluminum-titanium hydride-boron carbide composite provides lightweight neutron shield material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poindexter, A. M.

    1967-01-01

    Inexpensive lightweight neutron shield material has high strength and ductility and withstands high internal heat generation rates without excessive thermal stress. This composite material combines structural and thermal properties of aluminum, neutron moderating properties of titanium hydride, and neutron absorbing characteristics of boron carbide.

  5. Two-Dimensional Boron Hydride Sheets: High Stability, Massless Dirac Fermions, and Excellent Mechanical Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Yalong; Ma, Fengxian; Bell, John; Bilic, Ante; Du, Aijun

    2016-08-22

    Two-dimensional (2D) boron sheets have been successfully synthesized in recent experiments, however, some important issues remain, including the dynamical instability, high energy, and the active surface of the sheets. In an attempt to stabilize 2D boron layers, we have used density functional theory and global minimum search with the particle-swarm optimization method to predict four stable 2D boron hydride layers, namely the C2/m, Pbcm, Cmmm, and Pmmn sheets. The vibrational normal mode calculations reveal all these structures are dynamically stable, indicating potential for successful experimental synthesis. The calculated Young's modulus indicates a high mechanical strength for the C2/m and Pbcm phases. Most importantly, the C2/m, Pbcm, and Pmmn structures exhibit Dirac cones with massless Dirac fermions and the Fermi velocities for the Pbcm and Cmmm structures are even higher than that of graphene. The Cmmm phase is reported as the first discovery of Dirac ring material among boron-based 2D structures. The unique electronic structure of the 2D boron hydride sheets makes them ideal for nanoelectronics applications. PMID:27460282

  6. Boron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The trace element boron (B) is of interest in reclamation situations for several reasons. It plays an essential through largely unidentified role in the growth of higher plants. In argronomic situations B deficiencies are common, and deficiencies in reclamation situations have been suggested but not documented. Among micronutrients, B is unique because the range from deficient concentrations to toxic concentrations either in the soil solution or in plant tissue is narrower than for any other micronutrient. In reclamation situations excessive amounts of B can occur in the soil or in near-surface mining wastes and thus interfere with reclamation objectives, especially in arid and semiarid regions. Also, B is mobile and appears subject to both upward transport (and possible contamination of overlying material) and downward transport (and possible contamination of surface water and groundwater)

  7. A New Reducing Regent: Dichloroindium Hydride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A. BABA; I. SHIBATA; N. HAYASHI

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1Introduction Among the hydride derivatives of group 13 elements, various types of aluminum hydrides and boron hydrides have been employed as powerful reduction tools. Indium hydrides have not received much attention,whereas the synthesis of indium trihydride (InH3) was reported several decades ago[1]. There have been no precedents for monometallic indium hydrides having practical reactivity, while activated hydrides such as an ate complex LiPhn InH4-n (n = 0- 2) and phosphine-coordinated indium hydrides readily reduce carbonyl compounds. In view of this background, we focused on the development of dichloroindium hydrides (Cl2InH) as novel reducing agents that bear characteristic features in both ionic and radical reactions.

  8. Interstellar Hydrides

    CERN Document Server

    Gerin, Maryvonne; Goicoechea, Javier R

    2016-01-01

    Interstellar hydrides -- that is, molecules containing a single heavy element atom with one or more hydrogen atoms -- were among the first molecules detected outside the solar system. They lie at the root of interstellar chemistry, being among the first species to form in initially-atomic gas, along with molecular hydrogen and its associated ions. Because the chemical pathways leading to the formation of interstellar hydrides are relatively simple, the analysis of the observed abundances is relatively straightforward and provides key information about the environments where hydrides are found. Recent years have seen rapid progress in our understanding of interstellar hydrides, thanks largely to far-IR and submillimeter observations performed with the Herschel Space Observatory. In this review, we will discuss observations of interstellar hydrides, along with the advanced modeling approaches that have been used to interpret them, and the unique information that has thereby been obtained.

  9. Spectrophotometric determination of volautile inorganic hydrides in binary gaseous mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was made on possibility of single and continuons analysis of binary mixtures (hydride-gas) for the content of volatile inorganic hydrides (VIH) from absorption spectra in the 185-280 nm band. Dependences of the percentage of VIH transmission on the wavelength are presented. It is shown that the maximum of their absorption depends on the element-hydrogen the bond length and binding energy. Detection limit for boron hydride was established to be n x 10-3% vol at 185-190 nm wavelength. Technique for spectrophotometric hydride determination in binary mixtures with hydrogen, argon, helium was developed. The technique provides the continuous control of gaseous mixture composition

  10. Synthesis of conjugates of polyhedral boron compounds with tumor-seeking molecules for neutron capture therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bregadze, V., E-mail: bre@ineos.ac.ru [A.N. Nesmeyanov Institute of Organoelement Compounds, Russian Academy of Sciences, Vavilov Str. 28, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Semioshkin, A.; Sivaev, I. [A.N. Nesmeyanov Institute of Organoelement Compounds, Russian Academy of Sciences, Vavilov Str. 28, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2011-12-15

    Recent achievements in design and synthesis of boronated acids, amino acids, glycerols as well as conjugates of polyhedral boron hydrides (ortho-carborane, closo-dodecaborate and cobalt bis(dicarbollide)) with natural porphyrins, carbohydrates and nucleosides are described.

  11. Hydride compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, James R.; Salzano, Francis J.

    1978-01-01

    Method of producing high energy pressurized gas working fluid power from a low energy, low temperature heat source, wherein the compression energy is gained by using the low energy heat source to desorb hydrogen gas from a metal hydride bed and the desorbed hydrogen for producing power is recycled to the bed, where it is re-adsorbed, with the recycling being powered by the low energy heat source. In one embodiment, the adsorption-desorption cycle provides a chemical compressor that is powered by the low energy heat source, and the compressor is connected to a regenerative gas turbine having a high energy, high temperature heat source with the recycling being powered by the low energy heat source.

  12. Synthesis of ruthenium hydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzovnikov, M. A.; Tkacz, M.

    2016-02-01

    Ruthenium hydride was synthesized at a hydrogen pressure of about 14 GPa in a diamond-anvil cell. Energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction was used to monitor the ruthenium crystal structure as a function of hydrogen pressure up to 30 GPa. The hydride formation was accompanied by phase transition from the original hcp structure of the pristine metal to the fcc structure. Our results confirmed the theoretical prediction of ruthenium hydride formation under hydrogen pressure. The standard Gibbs free energy of the ruthenium hydride formation reaction was calculated assuming the pressure of decomposition as the equilibrium pressure.

  13. Hydrolysis of lithium hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to its high hydrogen density and unique nuclear chemistry, lithium hydride, in all its isotopic forms, has an unsurpassed place in modem nuclear weapons. The hydrolysis of the material, and the outgassing of hydrogen from the bulk, are crucial to the performance of the material in service. This thesis describes research conducted at AWE Aldermaston, UK, to examine the hydrolysis and hydrogen outgassing from the bulk material, with the aim of ultimately developing the kinetics 8c mechanisms responsible. The basic chemistry is of great interest, especially the reaction with water. This reaction, whilst being fairly extensively studied in the past, has not been conclusively described with an accepted mechanism and associated kinetics. The last significant UK work on the topic was by Imperial College, London, under contract to AW(R)E in the late 1960s. This thesis describes the development of: (i) a solid state NMR spectroscopy technique to examine semi-quantitatively the surface of bulk lithium hydride for its chemical composition, and (ii) a dedicated lithium hydride inert atmosphere gravimetric analysis glove box to study the hydride/water reaction. Solid State NMR Spectroscopy has been utilised for the first time to probe the hydride/hydroxide ratio of partially hydrolysed lithium hydride. 6Li chemical shifts have been established for species of interest and extremely long, up to 17 hours, T1 relaxation times have been measured for 6Li hydride and hydroxide. A method for semi-quantitatively determining the hydroxide/hydride composition of a partially reacted sample has been developed, based on a 'dual-scan' technique using one short and one long pulse sequence. Gravimetric analysis has been developed for lithium hydride/humidity studies. This facility fully contains gravimetric analysis within an argon glove box, with the ability to control the sample atmosphere from room temperature to 60 deg C and from 0.5 to 40 percent relative humidity. The hydrolysis of

  14. Lightweight hydride storage materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, G.J.; Guthrie, S.E.; Bauer, W. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The need for lightweight hydrides in vehicular applications has prompted considerable research into the use of magnesium and its alloys. Although this earlier work has provided some improved performance in operating temperature and pressure, substantial improvements are needed before these materials will significantly enhance the performance of an engineered system on a vehicle. We are extending the work of previous investigators on Mg alloys to reduce the operating temperature and hydride heat of formation in light weight materials. Two important results will be discussed in this paper: (1) a promising new alloy hydride was found which has better pressure-temperature characteristics than any previous Mg alloy and, (2) a new fabrication process for existing Mg alloys was developed and demonstrated. The new alloy hydride is composed of magnesium, aluminum and nickel. It has an equilibrium hydrogen overpressure of 1.3 atm. at 200{degrees}C and a storage capacity between 3 and 4 wt.% hydrogen. A hydrogen release rate of approximately 5 x 10{sup -4} moles-H{sub 2}/gm-min was measured at 200{degrees}C. The hydride heat of formation was found to be 13.5 - 14 kcal/mole-H{sub 2}, somewhat lower than Mg{sub 2}Ni. The new fabrication method takes advantage of the high vapor transport of magnesium. It was found that Mg{sub 2}Ni produced by our low temperature process was better than conventional materials because it was single phase (no Mg phase) and could be fabricated with very small particle sizes. Hydride measurements on this material showed faster kinetic response than conventional material. The technique could potentially be applied to in-situ hydride bed fabrication with improved packing density, release kinetics, thermal properties and mechanical stability.

  15. Conference 'Chemistry of hydrides' Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This collection of thesis of conference of Chemistry hydrides presents the results of investigations concerning of base questions of chemistry of nonorganic hydrides, including synthesis questions, studying of physical and chemical properties, thermodynamics, analytical chemistry, investigation of structure, equilibriums in the systems of metal-hydrogen, behaviour of nonorganic hydrides in non-water mediums and applying investigations in the chemistry area and technology of nonorganic hydrides

  16. Metal hydride actuation device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A self-recocking actuation device is disclosed. One possible use for it is in conjunction with a pneumatic fire protection system. This invention employs the process known as occlusion to store large amounts of gas in a small volume. Metal hydrides in a chamber are used to store hydrogen in the disclosed preferred embodiment. Upon the application of heat-from a heat source like a resistance heater-the charged metal hydride releases its hydrogen (H2) in a chamber having only one exit opening which empties into a sealed bellows. This bellows contacts a piston located in another chamber wherein a biased resetting spring is provided to normally maintain the piston in contact with the bellows. As the pressure from the H2 gas builds up, it overcomes the biased spring to move it and the piston along with an associated pin or other actuator. If used to actuate a pneumatic fire protection system, the pin or actuator at the downward side of its stroke in turn, may puncture a shearable diaphragm or in some other way releases the contents of a container containing a second gas, like nitrogen (N2), which is then released from a second exit port in a different chamber to charge the fire protection system. Recocking of the piston begins as the heating of the metal hydride ceases. As cooling takes place the hydrogen is absorbed to reenter the hydride to decrease the gas pressure supplied. The piston's biased resetting spring then recocks the piston to its original position

  17. Air and metal hydride battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lampinen, M.; Noponen, T. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland). Lab. of Applied Thermodynamics

    1998-12-31

    The main goal of the air and metal hydride battery project was to enhance the performance and manufacturing technology of both electrodes to such a degree that an air-metal hydride battery could become a commercially and technically competitive power source for electric vehicles. By the end of the project it was possible to demonstrate the very first prototype of the air-metal hydride battery at EV scale, achieving all the required design parameters. (orig.)

  18. Materials engineering of metal hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intermetallic hydrides of the AB5 type have enthalpies in the range valid for chemical heat pumps. A scheme for manufacturing hydrides with optimal properties for a chemical heat pump is described, using LaNi/sub 5-x/Al/sub x/ and ZrV/sub 2x/Cr/sub x as examples. The Laves-phase ternary hydrides appear to be good candidates for gettering hydrogen in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

  19. Electroextraction of boron from boron carbide scrap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Ashish [Chemistry Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam – 603102 (India); Anthonysamy, S., E-mail: sas@igcar.gov.in [Chemistry Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam – 603102 (India); Ghosh, C. [Physical Metallurgy Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam – 603102 (India); Ravindran, T.R. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam – 603102 (India); Divakar, R.; Mohandas, E. [Physical Metallurgy Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam – 603102 (India)

    2013-10-15

    Studies were carried out to extract elemental boron from boron carbide scrap. The physicochemical nature of boron obtained through this process was examined by characterizing its chemical purity, specific surface area, size distribution of particles and X-ray crystallite size. The microstructural characteristics of the extracted boron powder were analyzed by using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Raman spectroscopic examination of boron powder was also carried out to determine its crystalline form. Oxygen and carbon were found to be the major impurities in boron. Boron powder of purity ∼ 92 wt. % could be produced by the electroextraction process developed in this study. Optimized method could be used for the recovery of enriched boron ({sup 10}B > 20 at. %) from boron carbide scrap generated during the production of boron carbide. - Highlights: • Recovery of {sup 10}B from nuclear grade boron carbide scrap • Development of process flow sheet • Physicochemical characterization of electroextracted boron • Microscopic examination of electroextracted boron.

  20. Electroextraction of boron from boron carbide scrap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies were carried out to extract elemental boron from boron carbide scrap. The physicochemical nature of boron obtained through this process was examined by characterizing its chemical purity, specific surface area, size distribution of particles and X-ray crystallite size. The microstructural characteristics of the extracted boron powder were analyzed by using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Raman spectroscopic examination of boron powder was also carried out to determine its crystalline form. Oxygen and carbon were found to be the major impurities in boron. Boron powder of purity ∼ 92 wt. % could be produced by the electroextraction process developed in this study. Optimized method could be used for the recovery of enriched boron (10B > 20 at. %) from boron carbide scrap generated during the production of boron carbide. - Highlights: • Recovery of 10B from nuclear grade boron carbide scrap • Development of process flow sheet • Physicochemical characterization of electroextracted boron • Microscopic examination of electroextracted boron

  1. Effects of microwave irradiation on metal hydrides and complex hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effects of single-mode microwave irradiation on metal hydrides, MHn (LiH, MgH2, CaH2, TiH2, VH0.81, ZrH2, and LaH2.48) and complex hydrides MBH4 (LiBH4, NaBH4, and KBH4) were systematically investigated. Among the metal hydrides, TiH2, VH0.81, ZrH2, and LaH2.48 exhibit a rapid heating by microwave irradiation, where small amount of hydrogen (less than 0.5 mass%) are desorbed. On the other hand, LiBH4 is heated above 380 K by microwave irradiation, where 13.7 mass% of hydrogen is desorbed. The rapid heating of metal hydrides such as TiH2, VH0.81, ZrH2, and LaH2.48 are mainly due to the conductive loss. Meanwhile the microwave heating in LiBH4 is attributed to the conductive loss which is caused by a structural transition. The difference in the amount of desorbed hydrogen between metal hydrides and complex hydrides might be caused by the different microwave penetration depth and/or the temperature saturation in the microwave irradiation process. Microwave heating might be applied to hydrogen storage system, though further development of hydrides themselves and engineering techniques are required

  2. Preparation of metallic terbium and terbium hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method of metallic terbium preparation is described. The method consists in vacuum thermolysis of terbium hydride prepared as a result of terbium chloride interaction with lithium hydride. The prepared modification of terbium hydride demonstrates a high stability in the air. It is pointed out that problems arising from direct hydridation of the metal are responsible for certain advantages of the terbium hydride preparation method described

  3. Erbium hydride decomposition kinetics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrizz, Robert Matthew

    2006-11-01

    Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) is used to study the decomposition kinetics of erbium hydride thin films. The TDS results presented in this report are analyzed quantitatively using Redhead's method to yield kinetic parameters (E{sub A} {approx} 54.2 kcal/mol), which are then utilized to predict hydrogen outgassing in vacuum for a variety of thermal treatments. Interestingly, it was found that the activation energy for desorption can vary by more than 7 kcal/mol (0.30 eV) for seemingly similar samples. In addition, small amounts of less-stable hydrogen were observed for all erbium dihydride films. A detailed explanation of several approaches for analyzing thermal desorption spectra to obtain kinetic information is included as an appendix.

  4. Metal hydride air conditioner

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG; Ke; DU; Ping; LU; Man-qi

    2005-01-01

    The relationship among the hydrogen storage properties, cycling characteristics and thermal parameters of the metal hydride air conditioning systems was investigated. Based on a new alloy selection model, three pairs of hydrogen storage alloys, LaNi4.4 Mn0.26 Al0.34 / La0.6 Nd0.4 Ni4.8 Mn0.2 Cu0. 1, LaNi4.61Mn0. 26 Al0.13/La0.6 Nd0.4 Ni4.8 Mn0.2 Cu0. 1 and LaNi4.61 Mn0.26 Al0.13/La0.6 Y0.4 Ni4.8 Mn0. 2, were selected as the working materials for the metal hydride air conditioning system. Studies on the factors affecting the COP of the system showed that higher COP and available hydrogen content need the proper operating temperature and cycling time,large hydrogen storage capacity, flat plateau and small hysterisis of hydrogen alloys, proper original input hydrogen content and mass ratio of the pair of alloys. It also needs small conditioning system was established by using LaNi4.61 Mn0.26 Al0. 13/La0.6 Y0.4 Ni4.8 Mn0.2 alloys as the working materials, which showed that under the operating temperature of 180℃/40℃, a low temperature of 13℃ was reached, with COP =0.38 and Wnet =0.09 kW/kg.

  5. Hydride development for hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, G.J.; Guthrie, S.E.; Bauer, W.; Yang, N.Y.C. [Sandia National Lab., Livermore, CA (United States); Sandrock, G. [SunaTech, Inc., Ringwood, NJ (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this project is to develop and demonstrate improved hydride materials for hydrogen storage. The work currently is organized into four tasks: hydride development, bed fabrication, materials support for engineering systems, and IEA Annex 12 activities. At the present time, hydride development is focused on Mg alloys. These materials generally have higher weight densities for storing hydrogen than rare earth or transition metal alloys, but suffer from high operating temperatures, slow kinetic behavior and material stability. The authors approach is to study bulk alloy additions which increase equilibrium overpressure, in combination with stable surface alloy modification and particle size control to improve kinetic properties. This work attempts to build on the considerable previous research in this area, but examines specific alloy systems in greater detail, with attention to known phase properties and structures. The authors have found that specific phases can be produced which have significantly improved hydride properties compared to previous studies.

  6. Complex Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slattery, Darlene; Hampton, Michael

    2003-03-10

    This report describes research into the use of complex hydrides for hydrogen storage. The synthesis of a number of alanates, (AIH4) compounds, was investigated. Both wet chemical and mechano-chemical methods were studied.

  7. Determination of boron content in boron carbide, boron nitride and amorphous boron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present article an analyzing method of determination of boron content in boron carbide, boron nitride and amorphous boron described. Examined samples were digested with potassium hydroxide and potassium nitrate in nickel crucible and the boron contents determined subsequently by an alcalimetric titration of boric acid in presence of mannite resp. sorbite. (author)

  8. Low density metal hydride foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disclosed is a low density foam having a porosity of from 0 to 98% and a density less than about 0.67 gm/cc, prepared by heating a mixture of powered lithium hydride and beryllium hydride in an inert atmosphere at a temperature ranging from about 455 to about 490 K for a period of time sufficient to cause foaming of said mixture, and cooling the foam thus produced. Also disclosed is the process of making the foam. 6 figures

  9. Geoneutrino and Hydridic Earth model

    CERN Document Server

    Bezrukov, Leonid

    2013-01-01

    Uranium, Thorium and Potassium-40 abundances in the Earth were calculated in the frame of Hydridic Earth model. Terrestrial heat producton from U, Th and K40 decays was calculated also. We must admit the existance of Earth expansion process to understand the obtained large value of terrestrial heat producton. The geoneutrino detector with volume more than 5 kT (LENA type) must be constructed to definitely separate between Bulk Silicat Earth model and Hydridic Earth model.

  10. Boron–nitrogen based hydrides and reactive composites for hydrogen storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars H. Jepsen

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen forms chemical compounds with most other elements and forms a variety of different chemical bonds. This fascinating chemistry of hydrogen has continuously provided new materials and composites with new prospects for rational design and the tailoring of properties. This review highlights a range of new boron and nitrogen based hydrides and illustrates how hydrogen release and uptake properties can be improved.

  11. Mechanical properties and fracture of titanium hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titanium hydrides tend to suffer fracture when their thicknesses reach a critical thickness. Morphology and mechanical property of the hydrides are, however, not well known. The study aims to reveal the hydride morphology and fracture types of the hydrides. Chevron shaped plate hydrides were found to be produced on the surface of pure titanium (Grade 1) and Grade 7 titanium absorbing hydrogen. There were tree types of fracture of the hydrides, i.e., crack in hydride layer, exfoliation of the layer and shear-type fracture of the hydride plates, during the growth of the hydrides and deformation. We next estimated the true stress-strain curves of the hydrides on Grade 1 and 7 titanium using the dual Vickers indentation method, and the critical strain causing the Mode-I fine crack by indentation. Fracture strength and strain of the hydrides in Grade 1 titanium were estimated as 566 MPa and 4.5%, respectively. Those of the hydride in Grade 7 titanium were 498 MPa and 16%. Though the fracture strains estimated from the plastic instability of true stress-strain curves were approximately the half of those estimated by finite element method, the titanium hydrides were estimated to possess some extent of toughness or plastic deformation capability. (author)

  12. Hydrogen storage in magnesium-based hydrides and hydride composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mg and Mg-based hydrides have attracted much attention because of their high gravimetric hydrogen storage densities and favourable kinetic properties. Due to novel preparation methods and the development of suitable catalysts, hydrogen uptake and desorption is now possible within less than 2 min. However, the hydrogen reaction enthalpy of pure Mg is too high for many applications, for example, for the zero emission car. Therefore, different routes are explored to tailor the hydrogen reaction enthalpy to potential applications. This article summarizes the recent developments concerning sorption properties and thermodynamics of Mg-based hydrides for hydrogen storage applications. In particular, promising strategies to decrease the hydrogen reaction enthalpy by alloying and the use of reactive hydride composites are discussed

  13. Luminescent properties of aluminum hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied cathodoluminescence and photoluminescence of α-AlH3– a likely candidate for use as possible hydrogen carrier in hydrogen-fueled vehicles. Luminescence properties of original α-AlH3 and α-AlH3 irradiated with ultraviolet were compared. The latter procedure leads to activation of thermal decomposition of α-AlH3 and thus has a practical implementation. We showed that the original and UV-modified aluminum hydride contain luminescence centers ‐ structural defects of the same type, presumably hydrogen vacancies, characterized by a single set of characteristic bands of radiation. The observed luminescence is the result of radiative intracenter relaxation of the luminescence center (hydrogen vacancy) excited by electrons or photons, and its intensity is defined by the concentration of vacancies, and the area of their possible excitation. UV-activation of the dehydrogenation process of aluminum hydride leads to changes in the spatial distribution of the luminescence centers. For short times of exposure their concentration increases mainly in the surface regions of the crystals. At high exposures, this process extends to the bulk of the aluminum hydride and ends with a decrease in concentration of luminescence centers in the surface region. - Highlights: • Aluminum hydride contains hydrogen vacancies which serve as luminescence centers. • The luminescence is the result of radiative relaxation of excited centers. • Hydride UV-irradiation alters distribution and concentration of luminescence centers

  14. Luminescent properties of aluminum hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baraban, A.P.; Gabis, I.E.; Dmitriev, V.A. [Saint-Petersburg State University, Department of Physics, Saint-Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation); Dobrotvorskii, M.A., E-mail: mstislavd@gmail.com [Saint-Petersburg State University, Department of Physics, Saint-Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation); Kuznetsov, V.G. [Saint-Petersburg State University, Department of Physics, Saint-Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation); Matveeva, O.P. [National Mineral Resources University, Saint Petersburg 199106 (Russian Federation); Titov, S.A. [Petersburg State University of Railway Transport, Saint-Petersburg 190031 (Russian Federation); Voyt, A.P.; Elets, D.I. [Saint-Petersburg State University, Department of Physics, Saint-Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-15

    We studied cathodoluminescence and photoluminescence of α-AlH{sub 3}– a likely candidate for use as possible hydrogen carrier in hydrogen-fueled vehicles. Luminescence properties of original α-AlH{sub 3} and α-AlH{sub 3} irradiated with ultraviolet were compared. The latter procedure leads to activation of thermal decomposition of α-AlH{sub 3} and thus has a practical implementation. We showed that the original and UV-modified aluminum hydride contain luminescence centers ‐ structural defects of the same type, presumably hydrogen vacancies, characterized by a single set of characteristic bands of radiation. The observed luminescence is the result of radiative intracenter relaxation of the luminescence center (hydrogen vacancy) excited by electrons or photons, and its intensity is defined by the concentration of vacancies, and the area of their possible excitation. UV-activation of the dehydrogenation process of aluminum hydride leads to changes in the spatial distribution of the luminescence centers. For short times of exposure their concentration increases mainly in the surface regions of the crystals. At high exposures, this process extends to the bulk of the aluminum hydride and ends with a decrease in concentration of luminescence centers in the surface region. - Highlights: • Aluminum hydride contains hydrogen vacancies which serve as luminescence centers. • The luminescence is the result of radiative relaxation of excited centers. • Hydride UV-irradiation alters distribution and concentration of luminescence centers.

  15. Hydrogen, lithium, and lithium hydride production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Sam W; Spencer, Larry S; Phillips, Michael R; Powell, G. Louis; Campbell, Peggy J

    2014-03-25

    A method of producing high purity lithium metal is provided, where gaseous-phase lithium metal is extracted from lithium hydride and condensed to form solid high purity lithium metal. The high purity lithium metal may be hydrided to provide high purity lithium hydride.

  16. Mono- and di-cationic hydrido boron compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadwal, Rajendra S; Schürmann, Christian J; Andrada, Diego M; Frenking, Gernot

    2015-08-28

    Brønsted acid HNTf2 (Tf = SO2CF3) mediated dehydrogenative hydride abstraction from (L(1))BH3 () and (L(2))BH3 () (L(1) = IPrCH2 = 1,3-(2,6-di-isopropylphenyl)imidazol-2-methylidene (); L(2) = SIPrCH2 = 1,3-(2,6-di-isopropylphenyl)imidazolidin-2-methylidiene ()) affords thermally stable hydride bridged mono-cationic hydrido boron compounds [{(L(1))BH2}2(μ-H)](NTf2) () and [{(L(2))BH2}2(μ-H)](NTf2) (). Furthermore, hydride abstraction yields di-cationic hydrido boron compounds [{(L(1))BH}2(μ-H)2](NTf2)2 () and [{(L(2))BH}2(μ-H)2](NTf2)2 (). Unique cationic boron compounds with CH2BH2(μ-H)BH2CH2 ( and ) and CH2BH(μ-H)2BHCH2 ( and ) moieties feature a 3c-2e bond and have been fully characterized. Interesting electronic and structural features of compounds are analysed using spectroscopic, crystallographic, and computational methods. PMID:26200103

  17. Thermomechanical properties of hafnium hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fine bulk samples of delta-phase Hf hydride with various hydrogen contents (CH) ranging from 1.62 to 1.72 in the atomic ratio (H/Hf) were prepared, and their thermomechanical properties were characterized. At room temperature, the sound velocity and Vickers hardness were measured. The elastic modulus was calculated from the measured sound velocity. In the temperature range from room temperature to 673 K, the thermal expansion was measured by using a dilatometer, and the linear thermal expansion coefficient was calculated. Empirical equations describing the thermomechanical properties of Hf hydride as a function of CH were proposed. (author)

  18. Elementary boron and metal-boron compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elementary boron is of interest for its peculiar and difficult bonding behaviour in solids. Due to its high oxygen affinity we find no elementary boron in nature. For the same reason it is difficult to isolate pure, elementary boron, and much confusion about 'boron crystals' has been the result of more than 100 years of research. The polymorphic forms of elementary boron and its closely related higher carbides and higher metal borides as well as the simple metal borides, B3C and BN are reported. The quantum-mechanical background responsible for structure and stoichiometry of these crystals is given. (orig.)

  19. Properties of nanoscale metal hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanoscale hydride particles may exhibit chemical stabilities which differ from those of a macroscopic system. The stabilities are mainly influenced by a surface energy term which contains size-dependent values of the surface tension, the molar volume and an additional term which takes into account a potential reduction of the excess surface energy. Thus, the equilibrium of a nanoparticular hydride system may be shifted to the hydrogenated or to the dehydrogenated side, depending on the size and on the prefix of the surface energy term of the hydrogenated and dehydrogenated material. Additional complexity appears when solid-state reactions of complex hydrides are considered and phase segregation has to be taken into account. In such a case the reversibility of complex hydrides may be reduced if the nanoparticles are free standing on a surface. However, it may be enhanced if the system is enclosed by a nanoscale void which prevents the reaction partners on the dehydrogenated side from diffusing away from each other. Moreover, the generally enhanced diffusivity in nanocrystalline systems may lower the kinetic barriers for the material's transformation and, thus, facilitate hydrogen absorption and desorption.

  20. Deformation of vanadium and niobium on hydridation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deformation of wire samples made of polycrystalline vanadium and niobium on hydridation is studied. It is shown that sample allowance under loading after deformation below the yield strength doesn't cause considerable creep. Cathode saturation of samples with hydrogen sharply accelerates vanadium microdeformation velocity, that is connected with the beginning of intensive vanadium hydride precipitation (β-phase) from α-solid vanadium-hydrogen solution. Niobium hydridation at the first stage doesn't hydridation at the first stage doesn't cause negative deformation, then change in deformation direction takes place at the moment of intensive growth of the hydride phase. The conclusion is made that in both metals microdeformation is determined by contribution of two components: deformation caused by changing a shift module of metal-hydrogen system, and deformation caused by the oriented growth of the hydride phase in the field of apphed stresses

  1. Anodematerials for Metal Hydride Batteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Oluf

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the work on development of hydride forming alloys for use as electrode materials in metal hydride batteries. The work has primarily been concentrated on calcium based alloys derived from the compound CaNi5. This compound has a higher capacity compared with alloys used in today...... was developed. The parameters milling time, milling intensity, number of balls and form of the alloying metals were investigated. Based on this a final alloying technique for the subsequent preparation of electrode materials was established. The technique comprises milling for 4 hours twice possibly...... followed by annealing at 700°C for 12 hours. The alloys appeared to be nanocrystalline with an average crystallite size around 10 nm before annealing. Special steel containers was developed for the annealing of the metal powders in inert atmosphere. The use of various annealing temperatures was...

  2. Tritium processing using metal hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    E.I. duPont de Nemours and Company is commissioned by the US Department of Energy to operate the Savannah River Plant and Laboratory. The primary purpose of the plant is to produce radioactive materials for national defense. In keeping with current technology, new processes for the production of tritium are being developed. Three main objectives of this new technology are to ease the processing of, ease the storage of, and to reduce the operating costs of the tritium production facility. Research has indicated that the use of metal hydrides offers a viable solution towards satisfying these objectives. The Hydrogen and Fuels Technology Division has the responsibility to conduct research in support of the tritium production process. Metal hydride technology and its use in the storage and transportation of hydrogen will be reviewed

  3. Drying dichloromethane over calcium hydride

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    Authors: Lucas Kinard, Kurtis Kasper & Antonios Mikos ### Abstract This protocol describes the drying of dichloromethane by a simple 10 step procedure. One can implement this protocol using common lab glass and lab equipment. First, dichloromethane is refluxed with calcium hydride to remove water. Then, dichloromethane is distilled to separate it from the byproducts of the reflux reaction. This procedure can be implemented in 1 day. ### Introduction In many instances i...

  4. Complex hydrides for hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidan, Ragaiy

    2006-08-22

    A hydrogen storage material and process of forming the material is provided in which complex hydrides are combined under conditions of elevated temperatures and/or elevated temperature and pressure with a titanium metal such as titanium butoxide. The resulting fused product exhibits hydrogen desorption kinetics having a first hydrogen release point which occurs at normal atmospheres and at a temperature between 50.degree. C. and 90.degree. C.

  5. Nanostructured, complex hydride systems for hydrogen generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A. Varin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Complex hydride systems for hydrogen (H2 generation for supplying fuel cells are being reviewed. In the first group, the hydride systems that are capable of generating H2 through a mechanical dehydrogenation phenomenon at the ambient temperature are discussed. There are few quite diverse systems in this group such as lithium alanate (LiAlH4 with the following additives: nanoiron (n-Fe, lithium amide (LiNH2 (a hydride/hydride system and manganese chloride MnCl2 (a hydride/halide system. Another hydride/hydride system consists of lithium amide (LiNH2 and magnesium hydride (MgH2, and finally, there is a LiBH4-FeCl2 (hydride/halide system. These hydride systems are capable of releasing from ~4 to 7 wt.% H2 at the ambient temperature during a reasonably short duration of ball milling. The second group encompasses systems that generate H2 at slightly elevated temperature (up to 100 °C. In this group lithium alanate (LiAlH4 ball milled with the nano-Fe and nano-TiN/TiC/ZrC additives is a prominent system that can relatively quickly generate up to 7 wt.% H2 at 100 °C. The other hydride is manganese borohydride (Mn(BH42 obtained by mechano-chemical activation synthesis (MCAS. In a ball milled (2LiBH4 + MnCl2 nanocomposite, Mn(BH42 co-existing with LiCl can desorb ~4.5 wt.% H2 at 100 °C within a reasonable duration of dehydrogenation. Practical application aspects of hydride systems for H2 generation/storage are also briefly discussed.

  6. Crystal structure of gold hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Volume expansion of metal hydrides is due to the increase in the s-band filling. • AuH structure is similar to that of Hg having one more s electron compared to Au. • Structure stability of both Hg and AuH is governed by the Hume-Rothery rule. - Abstract: A number of transition metal hydrides with close-packed metal sublattices of fcc or hcp structures with hydrogen in octahedral interstitial positions were obtained by the high-pressure-hydrogen technique described by Ponyatovskii et al. (1982). In this paper we consider volume increase of metals by hydrogenation and possible crystal structure of gold hydride in relation with the structure of mercury, the nearest neighbor of Au in the Periodic table. Suggested structure of AuH has a basic tetragonal body-centered cell that is very similar to the mercury structure Hg-t I 2. The reasons of stability for this structure are discussed within the model of Fermi sphere–Brillouin zone interactions

  7. NMR study of hydride systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hydrides of thorium (ThH2, Th4H15 and Th4D15) and the intermetallic compound system (Zr(Vsub(1-x)Cosub(x))2 and its hydrides were investigated using the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique. From the results for the thorium hydride samples it was concluded that the density of states at the Fermi level n(Esub(f)) is higher in Th4H15 than in ThH2; there is an indirect reaction between the protons and the d electrons belonging to the Th atoms in Th4H15; n(E) has a sharp structure near Esub(f). It was also found that the hydrogen diffusion mechanism changes with temperature. From the results for the intermetallic compound system conclusions were drawn concerning variations in the electronic structure, which explain the behavior of the system. In hydrogen diffusion studies in several samples it was found that Co atoms slow the diffusion rate. Quadrupole spectra obtained at low temperatures show that the H atoms preferably occupy tetrahedral sites formed by three V atoms and one Z atom. (H.K.)

  8. Crystal structure of gold hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degtyareva, Valentina F., E-mail: degtyar@issp.ac.ru

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • Volume expansion of metal hydrides is due to the increase in the s-band filling. • AuH structure is similar to that of Hg having one more s electron compared to Au. • Structure stability of both Hg and AuH is governed by the Hume-Rothery rule. - Abstract: A number of transition metal hydrides with close-packed metal sublattices of fcc or hcp structures with hydrogen in octahedral interstitial positions were obtained by the high-pressure-hydrogen technique described by Ponyatovskii et al. (1982). In this paper we consider volume increase of metals by hydrogenation and possible crystal structure of gold hydride in relation with the structure of mercury, the nearest neighbor of Au in the Periodic table. Suggested structure of AuH has a basic tetragonal body-centered cell that is very similar to the mercury structure Hg-t I 2. The reasons of stability for this structure are discussed within the model of Fermi sphere–Brillouin zone interactions.

  9. Sputtering behavior of boron and boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sputtering yields of boron were measured with D+ and B+ ions for normal and oblique angles of incidence. Self-sputtering data of boron carbide were simulated in the experiment by using Ne+ ions. The energies of the impinging ions were between 20 eV and 10 keV. The measured data are compared with computer simulated values calculated with the TRIMSP program. The boron data for normal ion impact are higher than the calculated values, whereas those for oblique ion incidence are smaller than the calculation predicts. This discrepancy is explained by the surface roughness and supported by SEM micrographs. The comparison of the boron carbide data with TRIMSP calculations shows much better agreement than the boron data. In this case the target surface was much smoother. (orig.)

  10. Boron nitride converted carbon fiber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousseas, Michael; Mickelson, William; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2016-04-05

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to boron nitride converted carbon fiber. In one aspect, a method may include the operations of providing boron oxide and carbon fiber, heating the boron oxide to melt the boron oxide and heating the carbon fiber, mixing a nitrogen-containing gas with boron oxide vapor from molten boron oxide, and converting at least a portion of the carbon fiber to boron nitride.

  11. Delayed hydride cracking in Zr-2.5 % Nb: effect of hydride blisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the zirconium base alloys subjected to a local thermal gradient, in presence of hydrogen, fully hydride region (frequently called blisters) can be formed. Due to the brittle character of the zirconium hydride, cracks are usually found inside the blisters. These cracks are prone to growing, under stress and temperature, by successive hydride precipitation at the crack tip. This process is called hydride induced delayed cracking (HIDC). In a previous work, hydride platelets were observed in the radial direction of the blister. In the present one, blisters were grown on Zr-2.5 wt % Nb pressure tubes. Then, tensile specimens were submitted to HIDC tests. During the test, the radial hydrides length increase due to stress concentrator effect of the blister. If a crack, that was initiated into the blister, reaches the Zr matrix therefore can propagate through the radial hydrides. (author)

  12. Kinetics of hydride front in Zircaloy-2 and H release from a fractional hydrided surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz, M.; Gonzalez-Gonzalez, A.; Moya, J. S.; Remartinez, B.; Perez, S.; Sacedon, J. L. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (CSIC), Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Iberdrola, Tomas Redondo 3, 28033 Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (CSIC), Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2009-07-15

    The authors study the hydriding process on commercial nuclear fuel claddings from their inner surface using an ultrahigh vacuum method. The method allows determining the incubation and failure times of the fuel claddings, as well as the dissipated energy and the partial pressure of the desorbed H{sub 2} from the outer surface of fuel claddings during the hydriding process. The correlation between the hydriding dissipated energy and the amount of zirconium hydride (formed at different stages of the hydriding process) leads to a near t{sup 1/2} potential law corresponding to the time scaling of the reaction for the majority of the tested samples. The calibrated relation between energy and hydride thickness allows one to calculate the enthalpy of the {delta}-ZrH{sub 1.5} phase. The measured H{sub 2} desorption from the external surface is in agreement with a proposed kinetic desorption model from the hydrides precipitated at the surface.

  13. Mass spectrometric determination of boron isotope in boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron isotopes in boron carbide are measured by thermionic ionization mass spectrometry with no prior chemical separation. Boron is converted to sodium borate by fusion of the boron carbide with sodium hydroxide (or sodium carbonate) directly on the rhenium filament. The boron isotopic ratios are measured by using the Na2BO2+ ion

  14. Predicting formation enthalpies of metal hydrides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, A.

    2004-01-01

    In order for the hydrogen based society viz. a society in which hydrogen is the primary energy carrier to become realizable an efficient way of storing hydrogen is required. For this purpose metal hydrides are serious candidates. Metal hydrides are formedby chemical reaction between hydrogen and ...

  15. Submillimeter Spectroscopy of Hydride Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, T. G.

    1998-05-01

    Simple hydride molecules are of great importance in astrophysics and astrochemistry. Physically they dominate the cooling of dense, warm phases of the ISM, such as the cores and disks of YSOs. Chemically they are often stable end points of chemical reactions, or may represent important intermediate stages of the reaction chains, which can be used to test the validity of the process. Through the efforts of astronomers, physicists, chemists, and laboratory spectroscopists we have an approximate knowledge of the abundance of some of the important species, but a great deal of new effort will be required to achieve the comprehensive and accurate data set needed to determine the energy balance and firmly establish the chemical pathways. Due to the low moment of inertia, the hydrides rotate rapidly and so have their fundamental spectral lines in the submillimeter. Depending on the cloud geometry and temperature profile they may be observed in emission or absorption. Species such as HCl, HF, OH, CH, CH(+) , NH_2, NH_3, H_2O, H_2S, H_3O(+) and even H_3(+) have been detected, but this is just a fraction of the available set. Also, most deduced abundances are not nearly sufficiently well known to draw definitive conclusions about the chemical processes. For example, the most important coolant for many regions, H_2O, has a possible range of deduced abundance of a factor of 1000. The very low submillimeter opacity at the South Pole site will be a significant factor in providing a new capabilty for interstellar hydride spectroscopy. The new species and lines made available in this way will be discussed.

  16. Activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions and uses thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandrock, Gary; Reilly, James; Graetz, Jason; Wegrzyn, James E.

    2010-11-23

    In one aspect, the invention relates to activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions containing aluminum hydride in the presence of, or absence of, hydrogen desorption stimulants. The invention particularly relates to such compositions having one or more hydrogen desorption stimulants selected from metal hydrides and metal aluminum hydrides. In another aspect, the invention relates to methods for generating hydrogen from such hydrogen storage compositions.

  17. Metal Hydrides for Rechargeable Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valoeen, Lars Ole

    2000-03-01

    Rechargeable battery systems are paramount in the power supply of modern electronic and electromechanical equipment. For the time being, the most promising secondary battery systems for the future are the lithium-ion and the nickel metal hydride (NiMH) batteries. In this thesis, metal hydrides and their properties are described with the aim of characterizing and improving those. The thesis has a special focus on the AB{sub 5} type hydrogen storage alloys, where A is a rare earth metal like lanthanum, or more commonly misch metal, which is a mixture of rare earth metals, mainly lanthanum, cerium, neodymium and praseodymium. B is a transition metal, mainly nickel, commonly with additions of aluminium, cobalt, and manganese. The misch metal composition was found to be very important for the geometry of the unit cell in AB{sub 5} type alloys, and consequently the equilibrium pressure of hydrogen in these types of alloys. The A site substitution of lanthanum by misch metal did not decrease the surface catalytic properties of AB{sub 5} type alloys. B-site substitution of nickel with other transition elements, however, substantially reduced the catalytic activity of the alloy. If the internal pressure within the electrochemical test cell was increased using inert argon gas, a considerable increase in the high rate charge/discharge performance of LaNi{sub 5} was observed. An increased internal pressure would enable the utilisation of alloys with a high hydrogen equivalent pressure in batteries. Such alloys often have favourable kinetics and high hydrogen diffusion rates and thus have a potential for improving the high current discharge rates in metal hydride batteries. The kinetic properties of metal hydride electrodes were found to improve throughout their lifetime. The activation properties were found highly dependent on the charge/discharge current. Fewer charge/discharge cycles were needed to activate the electrodes if a small current was used instead of a higher

  18. Hydrogen-storing hydride complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Sesha S.; Niemann, Michael U.; Goswami, D. Yogi; Stefanakos, Elias K.

    2012-04-10

    A ternary hydrogen storage system having a constant stoichiometric molar ratio of LiNH.sub.2:MgH.sub.2:LiBH.sub.4 of 2:1:1. It was found that the incorporation of MgH.sub.2 particles of approximately 10 nm to 20 nm exhibit a lower initial hydrogen release temperature of 150.degree. C. Furthermore, it is observed that the particle size of LiBNH quaternary hydride has a significant effect on the hydrogen sorption concentration with an optimum size of 28 nm. The as-synthesized hydrides exhibit two main hydrogen release temperatures, one around 160.degree. C. and the other around 300.degree. C., with the main hydrogen release temperature reduced from 310.degree. C. to 270.degree. C., while hydrogen is first reversibly released at temperatures as low as 150.degree. C. with a total hydrogen capacity of 6 wt. % to 8 wt. %. Detailed thermal, capacity, structural and microstructural properties have been demonstrated and correlated with the activation energies of these materials.

  19. Experimental reproducibility analysis in DU hydriding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Daeseo; Park, Jongcheol; Chung, Hongsuk [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    A storage and delivery system (SDS) is used for storing hydrogen isotopes as a metal hydride form. The rapid hydriding of tritium is very important not only for safety reasons but also for the economic design and operation of the SDS. For the storage, supply, and recovery of hydrogen isotopes, depleted uranium (DU) has been extensively proposed. To develop nuclear fusion technology, it will be necessary to store and supply hydrogen isotopes needed for Tokamak operation. The experimental reproducibility of bed temperature on DU hydriding was also analyzed. The experimental reproducibility of apparatus was acceptable for all the experiments. The experimental reproducibility of tank pressure on DU hydriding was analyzed. As the hydriding performs, the tank pressure showed decreasing trend. The experimental reproducibility of bed temperature on DU hydriding was also analyzed. As the hydriding performs, the bed temperatures increased up to maximum temperature with exothermic reaction and then they showed decreasing trend. The experimental reproducibility of apparatus was acceptable for all the experiments.

  20. Hydriding failure analysis based on PIE data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Failure causes of the two fuel rods of a Korean nuclear power plant had been investigated by using PIE technique. The destructive and physico-chemical examinations revealed that the clad hydriding phenomena had caused the rod failures primarily and secondarily in each case. In this study the basic mechanisms of the primary and the secondary hydriding failures are reviewed, PIE data such as cladding inner and outer surface oxide thickness and the restructuring of fuel pellets are analyzed, and they are compared with predicted behaviors by a fuel performance code. The results strongly support that the hydriding processes, primary and secondary, had played critical roles in the respective fuel rods failures. (author)

  1. Solid hydrides as hydrogen storage reservoirs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metal hydrides as hydrogen storage materials are briefly reviewed in this paper. Fundamental properties of metal-hydrogen (gas) system such as Pressure-Composition-Temperature (P-C-T) characteristics are discussed on the light of the metal-hydride thermodynamics. Attention is specially paid to light metal hydrides which might have application in the car and transport sector. The pros and cons of MgH2 as a light material are outlined. Researches in course oriented to improve the behaviour of MgH2 are presented. Finally, other very promising alternative materials such as Al compounds (alanates) or borohydrides as light hydrogen accumulators are also considered. (Author)

  2. Hydride observations using the neutrography technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron radiography observations were performed at the RA-6 experimental nuclear facility in Bariloche. Images from a prototype of a hydride-based hydrogen storage device have been obtained. The technique allows visualizing the inner hydride space distribution. The hydride appeared compacted at the lower part of the prototype after several cycles of hydrogen charge and discharge. The technique has also been applied to the study of Zr/ZrH2 samples. There is a linear relation between the sample width/hydrogen concentration and the photograph grey scale. This information could be useful for the study of nuclear engineering materials and to determine their possible degradation by hydrogen pick up (author)

  3. The electrochemical impedance of metal hydride electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valøen, Lars Ole; Lasia, Andrzej; Jensen, Jens Oluf; Tunold, Reidar

    2002-01-01

    The electrochemical impedance responses for different laboratory type metal hydride electrodes were successfully modeled and fitted to experimental data for AB5 type hydrogen storage alloys as well as one MgNi type electrode. The models fitted the experimental data remarkably well. Several AC......, explaining the experimental impedances in a wide frequency range for electrodes of hydride forming materials mixed with copper powder, were obtained. Both charge transfer and spherical diffusion of hydrogen in the particles are important sub processes that govern the total rate of the electrochemical...... observed. The impedance analysis was found to be an efficient method for characterizing metal hydride electrodes in situ....

  4. Tritium removal using vanadium hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of an initial examination of the feasibility of separation of tritium from gaseous protium-tritium mixtures using vanadium hydride in cyclic processes is reported. Interest was drawn to the vanadium-hydrogen system because of the so-called inverse isotope effect exhibited by this system. Thus the tritide is more stable than the protide, a fact which makes the system attractive for removal of tritium from a mixture in which the light isotope predominates. The initial results of three phases of the research program are reported, dealing with studies of the equilibrium and kinetics properties of isotope exchange, development of an equilibrium theory of isotope separation via heatless adsorption, and experiments on the performance of a single heatless adsorption stage. In the equilibrium and kinetics studies, measurements were made of pressure-composition isotherms, the HT--H2 separation factors and rates of HT--H2 exchange. This information was used to evaluate constants in the theory and to understand the performance of the heatless adsorption experiments. A recently developed equilibrium theory of heatless adsorption was applied to the HT--H2 separation using vanadium hydride. Using the theory it was predicted that no separation would occur by pressure cycling wholly within the β phase but that separation would occur by cycling between the β and γ phases and using high purge-to-feed ratios. Heatless adsorption experiments conducted within the β phase led to inverse separations rather than no separation. A kinetic isotope effect may be responsible. Cycling between the β and γ phases led to separation but not to the predicted complete removal of HT from the product stream, possibly because of finite rates of exchange. Further experimental and theoretical work is suggested which may ultimately make possible assessment of the feasibility and practicability of hydrogen isotope separation by this approach

  5. Geoneutrino and Hydridic Earth model. Version 2

    OpenAIRE

    Bezrukov, Leonid

    2013-01-01

    Uranium, Thorium and Potassium-40 abundances in the Earth were calculated in the frame of Hydridic Earth model. Terrestrial heat producton from U, Th and K40 decays was calculated also. We must admit the existance of Earth expansion process to understand the obtained large value of terrestrial heat producton. The geoneutrino detector with volume more than 5 kT (LENA type) must be constructed to definitely separate between Bulk Silicat Earth model and Hydridic Earth model. In second version of...

  6. Atomistic Potentials for Palladium-Silver Hydrides

    OpenAIRE

    Hale, L. M.; Wong, B. M.; Zimmerman, J. A.; Zhou, X.

    2013-01-01

    New EAM potentials for the ternary palladium-silver-hydrogen system are developed by extending a previously developed palladium-hydrogen potential. The ternary potentials accurately capture the heat of mixing and structural properties associated with solid solution alloys of palladium-silver. Stable hydrides are produced with properties that smoothly transition across the compositions. Additions of silver to palladium are predicted to alter the properties of the hydrides by decreasing the mis...

  7. Determination of boron and silicon in boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sodium carbonate fusion technique for the dissolution of boron carbide followed by the determination of boron by alkalimetric titration and silicon impurity by spectrophotometry is described. The elemental boron content in the commercially available boron carbide ranged from 77.2 to 77.60 % and the silicon in the range 1170 to 2500 ppm. (author)

  8. Probing the cerium/cerium hydride interface using nanoindentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brierley, Martin, E-mail: martin.brierley@awe.co.uk [Atomic Weapons Establishment, Aldermaston, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Knowles, John, E-mail: john.knowles@awe.co.uk [Atomic Weapons Establishment, Aldermaston, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • A disparity exists between the minimum energy and actual shape of a cerium hydride. • Cerium hydride is found to be harder than cerium metal by a ratio of 1.7:1. • A zone of material under compressive stress was identified surrounding the hydride. • No distribution of hardness was apparent within the hydride. - Abstract: A cerium hydride site was sectioned and the mechanical properties of the exposed phases (cerium metal, cerium hydride, oxidised cerium hydride) were measured using nanoindentation. An interfacial region under compressive stress was observed in the cerium metal surrounding a surface hydride that formed as a consequence of strain energy generated by the volume expansion associated with precipitation of the hydride phase.

  9. Probing the cerium/cerium hydride interface using nanoindentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A disparity exists between the minimum energy and actual shape of a cerium hydride. • Cerium hydride is found to be harder than cerium metal by a ratio of 1.7:1. • A zone of material under compressive stress was identified surrounding the hydride. • No distribution of hardness was apparent within the hydride. - Abstract: A cerium hydride site was sectioned and the mechanical properties of the exposed phases (cerium metal, cerium hydride, oxidised cerium hydride) were measured using nanoindentation. An interfacial region under compressive stress was observed in the cerium metal surrounding a surface hydride that formed as a consequence of strain energy generated by the volume expansion associated with precipitation of the hydride phase

  10. Influence of hydrides orientation on strain, damage and failure of hydrided zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In pressurized water reactors of nuclear power plants, fuel pellets are contained in cladding tubes, made of Zirconium alloy, for instance Zircaloy-4. During their life in the primary water of the reactor (155 bars, 300 C), cladding tubes are oxidized and consequently hydrided. A part of the hydrogen given off precipitates as Zirconium hydrides in the bulk material and embrittles the material. This embrittlement depends on many parameters, among which hydrogen content and orientation of hydrides with respect to the applied stress. This investigation is devoted to the influence of the orientation of hydrides with respect to the applied stress on strain, damage and failure mechanisms. Macroscopic and SEM in-situ ring tensile tests are performed on cladding tube material (unirradiated cold worked stress-relieved Zircaloy-4) hydrided with about 200 and 500 wppm hydrogen, and with different main hydrides orientation: either parallel or perpendicular to the circumferential tensile direction. We get the mechanical response of the material as a function of hydride orientation and hydrogen content and we investigate the deformation, damage and failure mechanisms. In both cases, digital image correlation techniques are used to estimate local and global strain distributions. Neither the tensile stress-strain response nor the global and local strain modes are significantly affected by hydrogen content or hydride orientation, but the failure modes are strongly modified. Indeed, only 200 wppm radial hydrides embrittle Zy-4: sample fail in the elastic domain at about 350 MPa before strain bands could develop; whereas in other cases sample reach at least 750 MPa before necking and final failure, in ductile or brittle mode. To model this particular heterogeneous material behavior, a non-coupled damage approach which takes into account the anisotropic distribution of the hydrides is proposed. Its parameters are identified from the macroscopic strain field measurements and a

  11. gamma-Zr-Hydride Precipitate in Irradiated Massive delta- Zr-Hydride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warren, M. R.; Bhattacharya, D. K.

    1975-01-01

    During examination of A Zircaloy-2-clad fuel pin, which had been part of a test fuel assembly in a boiling water reactor, several regions of severe internal hydriding were noticed in the upper-plenum end of the pin. Examination of similar fuel pins has shown that hydride of this type is caused by...

  12. First boronization in KSTAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, S.H., E-mail: sukhhong@nfri.re.kr [National Fusion Research Institute, 113 Gwahangno, Yusung-Gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Center for Edge Plasma Science (cEps), Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, K.S.; Kim, K.M.; Kim, H.T.; Kim, G.P. [National Fusion Research Institute, 113 Gwahangno, Yusung-Gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Sun, J.H.; Woo, H.J. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Center for Edge Plasma Science (cEps), Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Park, J.M.; Kim, W.C.; Kim, H.K.; Park, K.R.; Yang, H.L.; Na, H.K. [National Fusion Research Institute, 113 Gwahangno, Yusung-Gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, K.S. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Center for Edge Plasma Science (cEps), Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    First boronization in KSTAR is reported. KSTAR boronization system is based on a carborane (C{sub 2}B{sub 10}H{sub 12}) injection system. The design, construction, and test of the system are accomplished and it is tested by using a small vacuum vessel before it is mounted to a KSTAR port. After the boronization in KSTAR, impurity levels are significantly reduced by factor of 3 (oxygen) and by 10 (carbon). Characteristics of a-C/B:H thin films deposited by carborane vapor are investigated. Re-condensation of carborane vapor during the test phase has been reported.

  13. Boron in sillimanite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grew, E S; Hinthorne, J R

    1983-08-01

    Sillimanite in six granulite-facies, kornerupine-bearing rocks contains 0.035 to 0.43 percent B(2)O(3) and 0.02 to 0.23 percent MgO (by weight). Substitution of boron for silicon and magnesium for aluminum is coupled such that the ratio of magnesium to boron is about 0.5. Sillimanite incorporates more than 0.1 percent B(2)O(3) only at high temperatures in a boron-rich environment at very low partial pressures of water. In the amphibolite facies, the sillimanite boron contents are too low to appreciably affect the stability relations of sillimanite with kyanite and andalusite. PMID:17830955

  14. Boron nitride composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuntz, Joshua D.; Ellsworth, German F.; Swenson, Fritz J.; Allen, Patrick G.

    2016-02-16

    According to one embodiment, a composite product includes hexagonal boron nitride (hBN), and a plurality of cubic boron nitride (cBN) particles, wherein the plurality of cBN particles are dispersed in a matrix of the hBN. According to another embodiment, a composite product includes a plurality of cBN particles, and one or more borate-containing binders.

  15. Mechanism of corrosion of zirconium hydride and impact of precipitated hydrides on the Zircaloy-4 corrosion behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Higher corrosion rate of hydride compared to matrix (Zy4). • Higher oxygen diffusion coefficient through oxide formed on hydride. • Presence of Zr3O phase between hydride and oxide. • Hydrogen from the hydride phase is not integrated in the oxide during the corrosion process. - Abstract: In Pressurized Water Reactors, zirconium hydrides precipitate in the matrix and could increase the oxidation rate of the claddings. To understand their effect, corrosion tests, TEM and μ-XRD analyses have been performed. This work showed that the oxidation rate and the oxygen diffusion coefficient in the oxide formed on massive hydride are much greater than those of Zircaloy-4. Moreover, oxide characterizations indicated an additional phase indexed as the sub-oxide Zr3O between the oxide film and the massive hydride. Finally, the hydrogen of the hydrides is not incorporated in the oxide during the corrosion process

  16. Hydrogen storage in complex metal hydrides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BORISLAV BOGDANOVIĆ

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Complex metal hydrides such as sodium aluminohydride (NaAlH4 and sodium borohydride (NaBH4 are solid-state hydrogen-storage materials with high hydrogen capacities. They can be used in combination with fuel cells as a hydrogen source thus enabling longer operation times compared with classical metal hydrides. The most important point for a wide application of these materials is the reversibility under moderate technical conditions. At present, only NaAlH4 has favourable thermodynamic properties and can be employed as a thermally reversible means of hydrogen storage. By contrast, NaBH4 is a typical non- -reversible complex metal hydride; it reacts with water to produce hydrogen.

  17. The versatility of hydride-forming materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Already in 1866 it was realised by Graham that large amounts of hydrogen gas were, as he called it, occluded in pure metallic palladium. Even after more than one century of research in the field of hydrogen storage materials this area is still of great interest. This is not only due to the present-day commercial importance of rechargeable Nickel-Metal Hydride (NiMH) batteries, in which hydride-forming intermetallic materials are widely exploited, but also from a fundamental point of view where new discoveries are still being made. In this review these two areas will be highlighted on the basis of two illustrative examples. The first example relates to the application of hydride-forming bulk materials as electrodes in NiMH batteries. Several hydride-forming compounds are, in principle, available to be used as energy storage electrode material. It turned out, however, that AB5 -type compounds are most successfully applied due to their excellent electrode properties, like high storage capacity, rate capability and rapid electrode activation. Another important aspect is the electrode stability during cycling, which determines the battery cycle life. By designing multicomponent AB5 compounds it has been shown that this stability can be drastically improved. Recently, a second class of very stable compounds has been proposed. These so-called non-stoichiometric AB5+x compounds are characterised by the fact that the severe particle size reduction, always accompanying the hydride-formation process, is reduced. The stability mechanism responsible for this remarkable behaviour will be outlined. The second example relates to thin film applications. Recently, it has been found that the electronic conductivity of thin films composed of rare earth metal hydrides like, for example, yttrium hydride and gadolinium hydride, changes dramatically from metallic in the dihydride state to semiconducting in the trihydride state. In line with these conductivity changes the

  18. Stress induced reorientation of vanadium hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beardsley, M. B.

    1977-10-01

    The critical stress for the reorientation of vanadium hydride was determined for the temperature range 180/sup 0/ to 280/sup 0/K using flat tensile samples containing 50 to 500 ppM hydrogen by weight. The critical stress was observed to vary from a half to a third of the macroscopic yield stress of pure vanadium over the temperature range. The vanadium hydride could not be stress induced to precipitate above its stress-free precipitation temperature by uniaxial tensile stresses or triaxial tensile stresses induced by a notch.

  19. Automotive cooling systems based on metal hydrides

    OpenAIRE

    Linder, Marc

    2010-01-01

    The present work focuses on metal hydride sorption systems as an alternative technology for automotive air-conditioning systems. Although this technology offers the possibility to increase the energy efficiency of a car (by utilising waste heat) and consequently reduces the CO2 emissions, its weight specific cooling power has so far been the main obstacle for an automotive application. Based on investigations of various metal hydrides, two alloys (LmNi4.91Sn0.15 and Ti0.99Zr0.01V0.43Fe0.09Cr0...

  20. Delta-doping of boron atoms by photoexcited chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron delta-doped structures in Si crystals were fabricated by means of photoexcited chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Core electronic excitation with high-energy photons ranging from vacuum ultraviolet to soft x rays decomposes B2H6 molecules into fragments. Combined with in situ monitoring by spectroscopic ellipsometry, limited number of boron hydrides can be delivered onto a Si(100) surface by using the incubation period before the formation of a solid boron film. The boron-covered surface is subsequently embedded in a Si cap layer by Si2H6 photo-excited CVD. The crystallinity of the Si cap layer depended on its thickness and the substrate temperature. The evaluation of the boron depth profile by secondary ion mass spectroscopy revealed that boron atoms were confined within the delta-doped layer at a concentration of 2.5 x 1020 cm-3 with a full width at half maximum of less than 9 nm, while the epitaxial growth of a 130-nm-thick Si cap layer was sustained at 420 deg. C.

  1. Effects of δ-hydride precipitation at a crack tip on crack propagation in delayed hydride cracking of Zircaloy-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Steady state crack velocity of delayed hydride cracking in Zircaloy-2 was analyzed. • A large stress peak is induced at an end of hydride by volume expansion of hydride. • Hydrogen diffuses to the stress peak, thereby accelerating steady hydride growth. • Crack velocity was estimated from the calculated hydrogen flux into the stress peak. • There was good agreement between calculation results and experimental data. -- Abstract: Delayed hydride cracking (DHC) of Zircaloy-2 is one possible mechanism for the failure of boiling water reactor fuel rods in ramp tests at high burnup. Analyses were made for hydrogen diffusion around a crack tip to estimate the crack velocity of DHC in zirconium alloys, placing importance on effects of precipitation of δ-hydride. The stress distribution around the crack tip is significantly altered by precipitation of hydride, which was strictly analyzed using a finite element computer code. Then, stress-driven hydrogen diffusion under the altered stress distribution was analyzed by a differential method. Overlapping of external stress and hydride precipitation at a crack tip induces two stress peaks; one at a crack tip and the other at the front end of the hydride precipitate. Since the latter is larger than the former, more hydrogen diffuses to the front end of the hydride precipitate, thereby accelerating hydride growth compared with that in the absence of the hydride. These results indicated that, after hydride was formed in front of the crack tip, it grew almost steadily accompanying the interaction of hydrogen diffusion, hydride growth and the stress alteration by hydride precipitation. Finally, crack velocity was estimated from the calculated hydrogen flux into the crack tip as a function of temperature, stress intensity factor and material strength. There was qualitatively good agreement between calculation results and experimental data

  2. Effect of yttrium on nucleation and growth of zirconium hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Addition of yttrium in zirconium causes precipitates of yttrium, which form two types of particles and are oxidized upon heat treatment. One type of particles with sub-micrometer scale sizes has a low population, whereas the other with nano scale sizes has a high population and cluster distribution. Owing to strong affinity of yttrium to hydrogen, the nanoparticles, mostly within the grains of the Zr–Y alloy, attract nucleation of hydrides at the clusters of the nanoparticles and cause preferential distribution of intragranular hydrides. In comparison with that of Zr, additional nanoparticles in the Zr–Y alloy impede further growth of hydride precipitates during hydriding. It is deduced that the impediment of growing hydride precipitates by the nanoparticles is developed during an auto-catalytic nucleation process, which leads to formation of thin and intragranular hydrides, favorable to mitigation of hydride embrittlement

  3. Effect of yttrium on nucleation and growth of zirconium hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Changji; Xiong, Liangyin; Wu, Erdong; Liu, Shi, E-mail: sliu@imr.ac.cn

    2015-02-15

    Addition of yttrium in zirconium causes precipitates of yttrium, which form two types of particles and are oxidized upon heat treatment. One type of particles with sub-micrometer scale sizes has a low population, whereas the other with nano scale sizes has a high population and cluster distribution. Owing to strong affinity of yttrium to hydrogen, the nanoparticles, mostly within the grains of the Zr–Y alloy, attract nucleation of hydrides at the clusters of the nanoparticles and cause preferential distribution of intragranular hydrides. In comparison with that of Zr, additional nanoparticles in the Zr–Y alloy impede further growth of hydride precipitates during hydriding. It is deduced that the impediment of growing hydride precipitates by the nanoparticles is developed during an auto-catalytic nucleation process, which leads to formation of thin and intragranular hydrides, favorable to mitigation of hydride embrittlement.

  4. Metal hydrides for hydrogen storage in nickel hydrogen batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metal hydride hydrogen storage in nickel hydrogen (Ni/H2) batteries has been shown to increase battery energy density and improve battery heat management capabilities. However the properties of metal hydrides in a Ni/H2 battery environment, which contains water vapor and oxygen in addition to the hydrogen, have not been well characterized. This work evaluates the use of hydrides in Ni/H2 batteries by fundamental characterization of metal hydride properties in a Ni/H2 cell environment. Hydrogen sorption properties of various hydrides have been measured in a Ni/H2 cell environment. Results of detailed thermodynamic and kinetic studies of hydrogen sorption in LaNi5 in a Ni/H2 cell environment are presented. Long-term cycling studies indicate that degradation of the hydride can be minimized by cycling between certain pressure limits. A model describing the mechanism of hydride degradation is presented

  5. Boronated liposome development and evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawthorne, M.F. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1995-11-01

    The boronated liposome development and evaluation effort consists of two separate tasks. The first is the development of new boron compounds and the synthesis of known boron species with BNCT potential. These compounds are then encapsulated within liposomes for the second task, biodistribution testing in tumor-bearing mice, which examines the potential for the liposomes and their contents to concentrate boron in cancerous tissues.

  6. Are RENiAl hydrides metallic?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Eichinger, K.; Havela, L.; Prokleška, J.; Stelmakhovych, O.; Daniš, S.; Šantavá, Eva; Miliyanchuk, K.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 100, č. 9 (2009), s. 1200-1202. ISSN 1862-5282 Grant ostatní: GA ČR(CZ) GA202/07/0418 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : rare earth metals * magnetism * hydrides Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.862, year: 2009

  7. Computational study of metal hydride cooling system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satheesh, A.; Muthukumar, P.; Dewan, Anupam [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Guwahati, Guwahati 781039 (India)

    2009-04-15

    A computational study of a metal hydride cooling system working with MmNi{sub 4.6}Al{sub 0.4}/MmNi{sub 4.6}Fe{sub 0.4} hydride pair is presented. The unsteady, two-dimensional mathematical model in an annular cylindrical configuration is solved numerically for predicting the time dependent conjugate heat and mass transfer characteristics between coupled reactors. The system of equations is solved by the fully implicit finite volume method (FVM). The effects of constant and variable wall temperature boundary conditions on the reaction bed temperature distribution, hydrogen concentration, and equilibrium pressures of the reactors are investigated. A dynamic correlation of the pressure-concentration-temperature plot is presented. At the given operating temperatures of 363/298/278 K (T{sub H}/T{sub M}/T{sub C}), the cycle time for the constant and variable wall temperature boundary conditions of a single-stage and single-effect metal hydride system are found to be 1470.0 s and 1765.6 s, respectively. The computational results are compared with the experimental data reported in the literature for LaNi{sub 4.61}Mn{sub 0.26}Al{sub 0.13}/La{sub 0.6}Y{sub 0.4}Ni{sub 4.8}Mn{sub 0.2} hydride pair and a good agreement between the two was observed. (author)

  8. Magnetron sputter deposition of boron and boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fabrication of X-ray optical coatings with greater reflectivity required the development of sputter deposition processes for boron and boron carbide. The use of high density boron and boron carbide (B4C) and a vacuum-brazed target design was required to achieve the required sputter process stability and resistance to the thermal stress created by high rate sputtering. Our results include a description of the target fabrication procedures and sputter process parameters necessary to fabricate B4C and boron modulated thin film structures. (orig.)

  9. Boron cures cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work the authors cite a few examples of the use of radiopharmaceuticals for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes in nuclear medicine. They point to the possibility of boron neutron capture therapy and the use for the neutron capture therapy of other light elements.

  10. Boron contamination in drinking - irrigation water and boron removal methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meltem Bilici Başkan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Boron presents in IIIA group of periodic table and has high ionization capacity. Therefore it is classified as a metalloid. Average boron concentration in earth's crust is 10 mg/kg. It presents in the environment as a salts of Ca, Na, and Mg. Boron reserves having high concentration and economical extent are found mostly in Turkey and in arid, volcanic and high hydrothermal activity regions of U.S. as compounds of boron attached to oxygen. Boron is an essential micronutrient for plants, although it may be toxic at higher levels. The range in which it is converted from a nutrient to a contaminant is quite narrow. Boron presents in water environment as a boric acid and rarely borate salts. The main boron sources, whose presence is detected in surface waters, are urban wastes and industrial wastes, which can come from a wide range of different activities as well as several chemical products used in agriculture. In Turkey, the most pollutant toxic element in drinking and irrigation water is boron. Therefore boron removal is very important in terms of human health and agricultural products in high quality. Mainly boron removal methods from drinking water and irrigation water are ion exchange, ultrafiltration, reverse osmosis, and adsorption.

  11. Hydrogen storage in metallic hydrides: the hydrides of magnesium-nickel alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The massive and common use of hydrogen as an energy carrier requires an adequate solution to the problem of storing it. High pressure or low temperatures are not entirely satisfactory, having each a limited range of applications. Reversible metal hydrides cover a range of applications intermediate to high pressure gas and low temperature liquid hydrogen, retaining very favorable safety and energy density characteristics, both for mobile and stationary applications. This work demonstrates the technical viability of storing hydrogen in metal hydrides of magnesium-nickel alloys. Also, it shows that technology, a product of science, can be generated within an academic environment, of the goal is clear, the demand outstanding and the means available. We review briefly theoretical models relating to metal hydride properties, specially the thermodynamics properties relevant to this work. We report our experimental results on hydrides of magnesium-nickel alloys of various compositions including data on structure, hydrogen storage capacities, reaction kinetics, pressure-composition isotherms. We selected a promising alloy for mass production, built and tested a modular storage tank based on the hydrides of the alloy, with a capacity for storing 10 Nm sup(3) of hydrogen of 1 atm and 20 sup(0)C. The tank weighs 46,3 Kg and has a volume of 21 l. (author)

  12. Process for microwave sintering boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method of microwave sintering boron carbide comprises leaching boron carbide powder with an aqueous solution of nitric acid to form a leached boron carbide powder. The leached boron carbide powder is coated with a glassy carbon precursor to form a coated boron carbide powder. The coated boron carbide powder is consolidated in an enclosure of boron nitride particles coated with a layer of glassy carbon within a container for microwave heating to form an enclosed coated boron carbide powder. The enclosed coated boron carbide powder is sintered within the container for microwave heating with microwave energy

  13. Metal hydrides based high energy density thermal battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The principle of the thermal battery using advanced metal hydrides was demonstrated. • The thermal battery used MgH2 and TiMnV as a working pair. • High energy density can be achieved by the use of MgH2 to store thermal energy. - Abstract: A concept of thermal battery based on advanced metal hydrides was studied for heating and cooling of cabins in electric vehicles. The system utilized a pair of thermodynamically matched metal hydrides as energy storage media. The pair of hydrides that was identified and developed was: (1) catalyzed MgH2 as the high temperature hydride material, due to its high energy density and enhanced kinetics; and (2) TiV0.62Mn1.5 alloy as the matching low temperature hydride. Further, a proof-of-concept prototype was built and tested, demonstrating the potential of the system as HVAC for transportation vehicles

  14. METHOD OF FABRICATING A URANIUM-ZIRCONIUM HYDRIDE REACTOR CORE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, I.F.; Goeddel, W.V.

    1960-03-22

    A method is described of evenly dispersing uranlum metal in a zirconium hydride moderator to produce a fuel element for nuclear reactors. According to the invention enriched uranium hydride and zirconium hydride powders of 200 mesh particle size are thoroughly admixed to form a mixture containing 0.1 to 3% by weight of U/sup 235/ hydride. The mixed powders are placed in a die and pressed at 100 tons per square inch at room temperature. The resultant compacts are heated in a vacuum to 300 deg C, whereby the uranium hydride deoomposes into uranium metal and hydrogen gas. The escaping hydrogen gas forms a porous matrix of zirconium hydride, with uramum metal evenly dispersed therethrough. The advantage of the invention is that the porosity and uranium distribution of the final fuel element can be more closely determined and controlled than was possible using prior methods of producing such fuel ele- ments.

  15. Methods of producing continuous boron carbide fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garnier, John E.; Griffith, George W.

    2015-12-01

    Methods of producing continuous boron carbide fibers. The method comprises reacting a continuous carbon fiber material and a boron oxide gas within a temperature range of from approximately 1400.degree. C. to approximately 2200.degree. C. Continuous boron carbide fibers, continuous fibers comprising boron carbide, and articles including at least a boron carbide coating are also disclosed.

  16. SANS Measurement of Hydrides in Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SANS scattering is shown to be an effective method for detecting the presence of hydrogen precipitates in uranium. High purity polycrystalline samples of depleted uranium were given several hydriding treatments which included extended exposures to hydrogen gas at two different pressures at 630 C as well as a furnace anneal at 850 C followed by slow cooling in the near absence hydrogen gas. All samples exhibited neutron scattering that was in proportion to the expected levels of hydrogen content. While the scattering signal was strong, the shape of the scattering curve indicated that the scattering objects were large sized objects. Only by use of a very high angular resolution SANS technique was it possible to make estimates of the major diameter of the scattering objects. This analysis permits an estimate of the volume fraction and means size of the hydride precipitates in uranium

  17. NMR investigations of YMn2Hx hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The YMn2Hx hydrides with x = 1, 2, 3 were investigated by 55Mn NMR spin echo measurements at atmospheric and high pressure. Resonance lines at frequencies up to 440 MHz were observed for the hydrides, corresponding to a huge increase of the hyperfine fields at those Mn with hydrogen neighbours. At high pressure the initial decrease of the magnitude of the Mn hyperfine field of YMn2H1 at 4.2 K was found to be 4% per kbar which is an order of magnitude bigger than observed in the other magnetically ordered materials. The effects are interpreted in terms of changes of the orbital contribution and valence electron contribution to the hyperfine field caused by hydrogenation and the influence of the external pressure. (orig.)

  18. The electrochemical impedance of metal hydride electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valøen, Lars Ole; Lasia, Andrzej; Jensen, Jens Oluf;

    2002-01-01

    The electrochemical impedance responses for different laboratory type metal hydride electrodes were successfully modeled and fitted to experimental data for AB5 type hydrogen storage alloys as well as one MgNi type electrode. The models fitted the experimental data remarkably well. Several AC......, explaining the experimental impedances in a wide frequency range for electrodes of hydride forming materials mixed with copper powder, were obtained. Both charge transfer and spherical diffusion of hydrogen in the particles are important sub processes that govern the total rate of the electrochemical...... hydrogen absorption/desorption reaction. To approximate the experimental data, equations describing the current distribution in porous electrodes were needed. Indications of one or more parallel reduction/oxidation processes competing with the electrochemical hydrogen absorption/desorption reaction were...

  19. Synthesis of metal hydrides by cold rolling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'Full text:' In the development of metal hydrides for commercial applications, a special attention should be devoted to the ways of production. For commercial success, the raw elements of the hydrogen storage materials should be of low cost, the synthesis process should be inexpensive and easily scalable. Therefore, it is important to put some effort on the elaboration of new and more efficient means of producing metal hydrides. In this perspective, cold rolling was investigated as a new means of producing nanocrystalline materials. This technique is well-known in the industry and easily scalable. Cold rolling was performed on Mg-Ni system. The evolution of morphology, crystal structure, crystallite size, deformation, and preferred orientation was studied as a function of number of rolling passes. Cold rolling followed by a heat treatment produced the intermetallic Mg2Ni. Without heat treatment and for a large number of rolling, an amorphous phase was synthesized. (author)

  20. Numerical study of a magnesium hydride tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delhomme, Baptiste; de Rango, Patricia; Marty, Philippe

    2012-11-01

    Hydrogen storage in metal hydride tanks (MHT) is a very promising solution. Several experimental tanks, studied by different teams, have already proved the feasibility and the interesting performances of this solution. However, in much cases, an optimization of tank geometry is still needed in order to perform fast hydrogen loading. The development of efficient numerical tools is a key issue for MHT design and optimization. We propose a simple model representing a metal hydride tank exchanging its heat of reaction with a thermal fluid flow. In this model, the radial and axial discretisations have been decoupled by using Matlab® one-dimensional tools. Calculations are compared to experimental results obtained in a previous study. A good agreement is found for the loading case. The discharging case shows some discrepancies, which are discussed in this paper.

  1. The hydride fluoride crystal structure database, HFD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gingl, F.; Gelato, L.; Yvon, K. [Geneva Univ. (Switzerland). Lab. Crystallographie aux Rayons X

    1997-05-20

    HFD is a new data base containing crystal structure information on more than one thousand metal hydrides and fluorides. It includes space group, cell parameters, standardized atom positions, site occupancies and references. The compilation is critical as only refined crystal structures are considered and the data are checked for internal consistency. It is comprehensive as structural information is extracted from all major scientific journals, and it is continuously updated. HFD can be searched according to various criteria such as symmetry, chemical elements, composition etc. The primary motivation for creating HFD was to predict new metal hydrides and to study their structural analogies with metal fluorides. However, HFD can also be used for other applications such as the simulation of diffraction patterns and the drawing of crystal structures. (orig.) 13 refs.

  2. Speciesion arsenic and selenium using hydride method atomic absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrides production - atomic absorption spectroscopy system was studied. Hydrides production tool and gas-liquid separator were tested and successfully used in this work. Hydride was produced through natrium borohydride reaction with sample solution. Emitted gas was separated by gas-liquid separator before it is carried by nitrogen gas through T tube which is put in atomic absorption flame spectrophotometer. Efficiency of the system was tested through standard reference sample and seawater / sediment samples which is collected from Negeri Johor water bays

  3. Plasmonic hydrogen sensing with nanostructured metal hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadell, Carl; Syrenova, Svetlana; Langhammer, Christoph

    2014-12-23

    In this review, we discuss the evolution of localized surface plasmon resonance and surface plasmon resonance hydrogen sensors based on nanostructured metal hydrides, which has accelerated significantly during the past 5 years. We put particular focus on how, conceptually, plasmonic resonances can be used to study metal-hydrogen interactions at the nanoscale, both at the ensemble and at the single-nanoparticle level. Such efforts are motivated by a fundamental interest in understanding the role of nanosizing on metal hydride formation processes in the quest to develop efficient solid-state hydrogen storage materials with fast response times, reasonable thermodynamics, and acceptable long-term stability. Therefore, a brief introduction to the thermodynamics of metal hydride formation is also given. However, plasmonic hydrogen sensors not only are of academic interest as research tool in materials science but also are predicted to find more practical use as all-optical gas detectors in industrial and medical applications, as well as in a future hydrogen economy, where hydrogen is used as a carbon free energy carrier. Therefore, the wide range of different plasmonic hydrogen sensor designs already available is reviewed together with theoretical efforts to understand their fundamentals and optimize their performance in terms of sensitivity. In this context, we also highlight important challenges to be addressed in the future to take plasmonic hydrogen sensors from the laboratory to real applications in devices, including poisoning/deactivation of the active materials, sensor lifetime, and cross-sensitivity toward other gas species. PMID:25427244

  4. METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR MAKING URANIUM-HYDRIDE COMPACTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellborn, W.; Armstrong, J.R.

    1959-03-10

    A method and apparatus are presented for making compacts of pyrophoric hydrides in a continuous operation out of contact with air. It is particularly useful for the preparation of a canned compact of uranium hydride possessing high density and purity. The metallic uranium is enclosed in a container, positioned in a die body evacuated and nvert the uranium to the hydride is admitted and the container sealed. Heat is applied to bring about the formation of the hydride, following which compression is used to form the compact sealed in a container ready for use.

  5. Identification of the zirconium hydrides metallography in zircaloy-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technique for the Identification of the zirconium hydrides in metallographic specimens have been developed. Microhardness, quantitative estimation and relative orientation of the present hydrides as well as grain size determination of the different Zircaloy-2 tube specimens have also been made. The specimens used were corrosion- tested in water during various periods of time at 300 degree castrating, prior to the metallographic examination. Reference specimens, as received, and heavily hydride specimens in a hydrogen atmosphere at 800 degree centigrees, have been used in the previous stages of the work. No difficulties have been met in this early stage of acquaintanceship with the zirconium hydrides. (Author) 5 refs

  6. Uranium-zirconium hydride fuel properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olander, D. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)], E-mail: fuelpr@nuc.berkeley.edu; Greenspan, Ehud [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Garkisch, Hans D. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Pittsburgh, PA 15236 (United States); Petrovic, Bojan [School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2009-08-15

    Properties of the two-phase hydride U{sub 0.3}ZrH{sub 1.6} pertinent to performance as a nuclear fuel for LWRs are reviewed. Much of the available data come from the Space Nuclear Auxiliary Power (SNAP) program of 4 decades ago and from the more restricted data base prepared for the TRIGA research reactors some 3 decades back. Transport, mechanical, thermal and chemical properties are summarized. A principal difference between oxide and hydride fuels is the high thermal conductivity of the latter. This feature greatly decreases the temperature drop over the fuel during operation, thereby reducing the release of fission gases to the fraction due only to recoil. However, very unusual early swelling due to void formation around the uranium particles has been observed in hydride fuels. Avoidance of this source of swelling limits the maximum fuel temperature to {approx}650 deg. C (the design limit recommended by the fuel developer is 750 deg. C). To satisfy this temperature limitation, the fuel-cladding gap needs to be bonded with a liquid metal instead of helium. Because the former has a thermal conductivity {approx}100 times larger than the latter, there is no restriction on gap thickness as there is in helium-bonded fuel rods. This opens the possibility of initial gap sizes large enough to significantly delay the onset of pellet-cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI). The large fission-product swelling rate of hydride fuel (3x that of oxide fuel) requires an initial radial fuel-cladding gap of {approx}300 m if PCMI is to be avoided. The liquid-metal bond permits operation of the fuel at current LWR linear-heat-generation rates without exceeding any design constraint. The behavior of hydrogen in the fuel is the source of phenomena during operation that are absent in oxide fuels. Because of the large heat of transport (thermal diffusivity) of H in ZrH{sub x}, redistribution of hydrogen in the temperature gradient in the fuel pellet changes the initial H/Zr ratio of 1

  7. Uranium-zirconium hydride fuel properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Properties of the two-phase hydride U0.3ZrH1.6 pertinent to performance as a nuclear fuel for LWRs are reviewed. Much of the available data come from the Space Nuclear Auxiliary Power (SNAP) program of 4 decades ago and from the more restricted data base prepared for the TRIGA research reactors some 3 decades back. Transport, mechanical, thermal and chemical properties are summarized. A principal difference between oxide and hydride fuels is the high thermal conductivity of the latter. This feature greatly decreases the temperature drop over the fuel during operation, thereby reducing the release of fission gases to the fraction due only to recoil. However, very unusual early swelling due to void formation around the uranium particles has been observed in hydride fuels. Avoidance of this source of swelling limits the maximum fuel temperature to ∼650 deg. C (the design limit recommended by the fuel developer is 750 deg. C). To satisfy this temperature limitation, the fuel-cladding gap needs to be bonded with a liquid metal instead of helium. Because the former has a thermal conductivity ∼100 times larger than the latter, there is no restriction on gap thickness as there is in helium-bonded fuel rods. This opens the possibility of initial gap sizes large enough to significantly delay the onset of pellet-cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI). The large fission-product swelling rate of hydride fuel (3x that of oxide fuel) requires an initial radial fuel-cladding gap of ∼300 m if PCMI is to be avoided. The liquid-metal bond permits operation of the fuel at current LWR linear-heat-generation rates without exceeding any design constraint. The behavior of hydrogen in the fuel is the source of phenomena during operation that are absent in oxide fuels. Because of the large heat of transport (thermal diffusivity) of H in ZrHx, redistribution of hydrogen in the temperature gradient in the fuel pellet changes the initial H/Zr ratio of 1.6 to ∼1.45 at the center and

  8. Stress field computation for hydride blister forming in Zr alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen migration under thermal gradient in zirconium alloys results in formation of hydride blisters. An array of blisters makes Zirconium alloy components of nuclear reactors susceptible to fracture. The whole process of hydride blister formation and fracture of these components is very complex and involves hydrogen migration under thermal gradient, hydride precipitation, straining of the matrix, setting up of hydrostatic stress gradient, enhanced hydrogen migration under the combined influence of thermal and stress gradients, stress reorientation of hydrides, cracking of hydrides, crack growth by delayed hydride cracking mechanism, interlinking of blisters and spontaneous fracture of the component. In this work we estimate the stress components in hydride blisters and the surrounding matrix for certain assumed blister depth as a function of hydride matrix yield strength ratio. The simulation was carried out for a semi ellipsoidal blister using ABAQUS finite element package. The blister formation was simulated by single step and multiple step transformation of the matrix to hydride. It is felt that the same methodology can be used to estimate the stress field around semi constrained inclusion such as hydride blister(s) in hydride forming metals like uranium, zirconium, titanium etc. and of localized corrosion products in metals and alloys. A matrix of dimension in the ratio 5 (along direction 1):1 (along direction 2) was considered for the computations. The Zr matrix having hexagonal crystal structure and faced centered cubic zirconium hydride was modeled as elastically isotropic. Both matrix and hydride was modeled to undergo linear work hardening up to ultimate tensile strength (=1.25Xyield strength), corresponding to a plastic strain of 10 percent. A small strain small displacement theory was adopted. Computations were made for an axisymmetric case with the symmetry axis along the 2 direction. Transformation of zirconium hydrogen solid solution into hydride

  9. Sintered boron, production and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microhardness HV, tensile properties and Young modulus of sintered boron of different porosity were studied. It was shown that with density growth tensile properties improve. HV and brittle-ductile transition temperature Tsub(b) of sintered boron on the one hand and for silicon and titanium carbide on the other were compared and discussed. It was noted that the general level of HV and Tsub(b) for boron is rather high and at similar relative temperatures these characteristics are much higher. Temperature dependences of linear expansion coefficient, thermal capacity, thermal and temperature conductivity of sintered boron of 20% porosity were studied. Gruneisen parameter was evaluated

  10. Fivefold twinned boron carbide nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xin; Jiang, Jun; Liu, Chao; Yuan, Jun

    2009-09-01

    Chemical composition and crystal structure of fivefold twinned boron carbide nanowires have been determined by electron energy-loss spectroscopy and electron diffraction. The fivefold cyclic twinning relationship is confirmed by systematic axial rotation electron diffraction. Detailed chemical analysis reveals a carbon-rich boron carbide phase. Such boron carbide nanowires are potentially interesting because of their intrinsic hardness and high temperature thermoelectric property. Together with other boron-rich compounds, they may form a set of multiply twinned nanowire systems where the misfit strain could be continuously tuned to influence their mechanical properties. PMID:19687534

  11. High ramp rate thermogravimetric analysis of zirconium(II) hydride and titanium(II) hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A unique arc image device has been proposed for high ramp rate thermogravimetry. • Powder oxidation influences decomposition kinetics at temperatures below 933 K. • Particle size has a negligible effect on TiH2 decomposition behavior. • Improvements to the device are required to conduct accurate kinetic analysis. - Abstract: Zirconium and titanium hydride are utilized in liquid phase metal foam processing techniques. This application results in immediate exposure to molten metal and almost immediate decomposition at high temperatures. Most decomposition characterization techniques utilize slow heating rates and are unable to capture the decomposition behavior of hydrides under foam processing conditions. In order to address this issue a specialized high ramp rate thermogravimetric analyzer was created from a xenon arc image refiner. In addition to thermogravimetry, complimentary techniques including X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize hydride decomposition and compare the results to literature. Hydrides were partially oxidized and separated into particles size ranges to evaluate the influence of these factors on decomposition. Oxidizing treatments were found to decrease decomposition rate only at temperatures below 933 K (660 °C) while particle size effects appeared to be negligible. Several improvements to the unique TGA apparatus presented in the current work are suggested to allow reliable kinetic modeling and analysis

  12. Electrochemical and Optical Properties of Magnesium-Alloy Hydrides Reviewed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thirugnasambandam G. Manivasagam

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available As potential hydrogen storage media, magnesium based hydrides have been systematically studied in order to improve reversibility, storage capacity, kinetics and thermodynamics. The present article deals with the electrochemical and optical properties of Mg alloy hydrides. Electrochemical hydrogenation, compared to conventional gas phase hydrogen loading, provides precise control with only moderate reaction conditions. Interestingly, the alloy composition determines the crystallographic nature of the metal-hydride: a structural change is induced from rutile to fluorite at 80 at.% of Mg in Mg-TM alloy, with ensuing improved hydrogen mobility and storage capacity. So far, 6 wt.% (equivalent to 1600 mAh/g of reversibly stored hydrogen in MgyTM(1-yHx (TM: Sc, Ti has been reported. Thin film forms of these metal-hydrides reveal interesting electrochromic properties as a function of hydrogen content. Optical switching occurs during (dehydrogenation between the reflective metal and the transparent metal hydride states. The chronological sequence of the optical improvements in optically active metal hydrides starts with the rare earth systems (YHx, followed by Mg rare earth alloy hydrides (MgyGd(1-yHx and concludes with Mg transition metal hydrides (MgyTM(1-yHx. In-situ optical characterization of gradient thin films during (dehydrogenation, denoted as hydrogenography, enables the monitoring of alloy composition gradients simultaneously.

  13. Kinetics of Final Degassing of Hydrogen Desorption by Metal Hydrides

    CERN Document Server

    Drozdov, I V

    2014-01-01

    The proposed model concerns the 'confluent shrinking core' scenario and reproduces the desorption kinetic after the complete decay of the stoichiometric hydride ($\\beta$-phase). The exact analytical solution is obtained, the numerical values are demonstrated by the example of magnesium hydride.

  14. High energy density battery based on complex hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidan, Ragaiy

    2016-04-26

    A battery and process of operating a battery system is provided using high hydrogen capacity complex hydrides in an organic non-aqueous solvent that allows the transport of hydride ions such as AlH.sub.4.sup.- and metal ions during respective discharging and charging steps.

  15. Growth and decomposition of Lithium and Lithium hydride on Nickel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engbæk, Jakob; Nielsen, Gunver; Nielsen, Jane Hvolbæk;

    2006-01-01

    -hydride films. By only making thin films of LiH it is possible to study the stability of these hydride layers and compare it directly with the stability of pure Li without having any transport phenomena or adsorbed oxygen to obscure the results. The desorption of metallic lithium takes place at a lower...

  16. Hydrogen storage in the form of metal hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwanziger, M. G.; Santana, C. C.; Santos, S. C.

    1984-01-01

    Reversible reactions between hydrogen and such materials as iron/titanium and magnesium/ nickel alloy may provide a means for storing hydrogen fuel. A demonstration model of an iron/titanium hydride storage bed is described. Hydrogen from the hydride storage bed powers a converted gasoline electric generator.

  17. Ultra-sonic observation in niobium hydride precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hidrogen embrittlement of exothermic ocluders, had been considered as due to applied stress induced hydride precipitates leading to brittle fracture. The results of simultaneous measurements of macroscopic deformation and elastic change due to hydride precipitation, using the ultrasonic pulse-echo technique are showed. THen it was tested the possibility of kinectis precipitation parameters evoluation. (Author)

  18. Preferred hydride growth orientations on oxide-coated gadolinium surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► The preferred hydride growth orientations on gadolinium metal coated by a thin oxide layer are presented. ► A preferred growth of the (1 0 0)h plane of the face centered cubic (FCC) GdH2 is observed for the hydride spots forming below the oxidation layer. ► A change to the (1 1 1)h plane of the cubic hydride dominates for the hydride's Growth Centers. ► The texture change is attributed to the surface normal compressive stress component exerted by the oxidation layer on the developing hydride. - Abstract: The initial development of hydrides on polycrystalline gadolinium (Gd), as on some other hydride forming metals, is characterized by two sequential steps. The first step involves the rapid formation of a dense pattern of small hydride spots (referred to as the “small family” of hydrides) below the native oxidation layer. The second stage takes place when some of the “small family” nucleants (referred to as “growth centers”, GCs) break the oxide layer, leading to their rapid growth and finally to the massive hydriding of the sample. In the present study, the texture of the two hydride families was studied, by combining X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis with a microscopic analysis of the hydride, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). It has been observed that for the “small family”, a preferred growth of the (1 0 0)h plane of the cubic GdH2 takes place, whereas for the GCs, a change to the (1 1 1)h plane of the cubic hydride dominates. These preferred growth orientations were analyzed by their structure relation with the (0 0 .1)m basal plane of the Gd metal. It has been concluded that the above texture change is due to the surface normal compressive stress component exerted by the oxidation overlayer on the developing hydride, preventing the (0 0 .1)m||(1 1 1)h growth orientation. This stress is relieved upon the rupture of that overlayer and the development of the GCs, leading to the

  19. Modular hydride beds for mobile applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malinowski, M.E.; Stewart, K.D.

    1997-08-01

    Design, construction, initial testing and simple thermal modeling of modular, metal hydride beds have been completed. Originally designed for supplying hydrogen to a fuel cell on a mobile vehicle, the complete bed design consists of 8 modules and is intended for use on the Palm Desert Vehicle (PDV) under development at the Schatz Energy Center, Humbolt State University. Each module contains approximately 2 kg of a commercially available, low temperature, hydride-forming metal alloy. Waste heat from the fuel cell in the form of heated water is used to desorb hydrogen from the alloy for supplying feed hydrogen to the fuel cell. In order to help determine the performance of such a modular bed system, six modules were constructed and tested. The design and construction of the modules is described in detail. Initial testing of the modules both individually and as a group showed that each module can store {approximately} 30 g of hydrogen (at 165 PSIA fill pressure, 17 C), could be filled with hydrogen in 6 minutes at a nominal, 75 standard liters/min (slm) fueling rate, and could supply hydrogen during desorption at rates of 25 slm, the maximum anticipated hydrogen fuel cell input requirement. Tests made of 5 modules as a group indicated that the behavior of the group run in parallel both in fueling and gas delivery could be directly predicted from the corresponding, single module characteristics by using an appropriate scaling factor. Simple thermal modeling of a module as an array of cylindrical, hydride-filled tubes was performed. The predictions of the model are in good agreement with experimental data.

  20. A Palladium-Catalyzed Three-Component Cross-Coupling of Conjugated Dienes or Terminal Alkenes with Vinyl Triflates and Boronic Acids

    OpenAIRE

    Liao, Longyan; Jana, Ranjan; Urkalan, Kaveri Balan; Sigman, Matthew S.

    2011-01-01

    A three-component coupling of vinyl triflates and boronic acids to alkenes catalyzed by palladium is reported. Using 1,3-dienes, selective 1,2-alkene difunctionalization is observed, whereas the use of terminal alkenes results in 1,1-alkene difunctionalization. The reaction outcome is attributed to the formation of stabilized, cationic Pd-π-allyl intermediates to regulate β-hydride elimination.

  1. Metal hydrides for concentrating solar thermal power energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, D. A.; Paskevicius, M.; Humphries, T. D.; Felderhoff, M.; Capurso, G.; Bellosta von Colbe, J.; Dornheim, M.; Klassen, T.; Ward, P. A.; Teprovich, J. A.; Corgnale, C.; Zidan, R.; Grant, D. M.; Buckley, C. E.

    2016-04-01

    The development of alternative methods for thermal energy storage is important for improving the efficiency and decreasing the cost of concentrating solar thermal power. We focus on the underlying technology that allows metal hydrides to function as thermal energy storage (TES) systems and highlight the current state-of-the-art materials that can operate at temperatures as low as room temperature and as high as 1100 °C. The potential of metal hydrides for thermal storage is explored, while current knowledge gaps about hydride properties, such as hydride thermodynamics, intrinsic kinetics and cyclic stability, are identified. The engineering challenges associated with utilising metal hydrides for high-temperature TES are also addressed.

  2. Helium trapping at erbium oxide precipitates in erbium hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foiles, Stephen M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Battaile, Corbett Chandler [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-02-01

    The formation of He bubbles in erbium tritides is a significant process in the aging of these materials. Due to the long-standing uncertainty about the initial nucleation process of these bubbles, there is interest in mechanisms that can lead to the localization of He in erbium hydrides. Previous work has been unable to identify nucleation sites in homogeneous erbium hydride. This work builds on the experimental observation that erbium hydrides have nano- scale erbium oxide precipitates due to the high thermodynamic stability of erbium oxide and the ubiquitous presence of oxygen during materials processing. Fundamental DFT calculations indicate that the He is energetically favored in the oxide relative to the bulk hydride. Activation energies for the motion of He in the oxide and at the oxide-hydride interface indicate that trapping is kinetically feasible. A simple kinetic Monte Carlo model is developed that demonstrates the degree of trapping of He as a function of temperature and oxide fraction.

  3. Low-frequency excitations in zirconium hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The slow inelastic neutron scattering (INS) on ZrHx systems (x = 0.38, 0.52) revealed new excitations located within the energy range 2-10 MeV. Besides the acoustic vibrations specific to α-HCP Zr and γ-FCO Zr hydride the fine structure of these excitations is clearly observed. The origin of the new observed peaks is not very clear but a proton tunneling or a resonance effect in α-Zr lattice could be taken into account

  4. Tritium immobilization and packaging using metal hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium recovered from CANDU heavy water reactors will have to be packaged and stored in a safe manner. Tritium will be recovered in the elemental form, T2. Metal tritides are effective compounds in which to immobilize the tritium as a stable non-reactive solid with a high tritium capacity. The technology necessary to prepare hydrides of suitable metals, such as titanium and zirconium, have been developed and the properties of the prepared materials evaluated. Conceptual designs of packages for containing metal tritides suitable for transportation and long-term storage have been made and initial testing started. (author)

  5. Nanostructured Magnesium Hydride for Reversible Hydrogen Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rango, P.; Chaise, A.; Fruchart, D.; Miraglia, S.; Marty, Ph.

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this work was to develop suitable materials to store hydrogen in a solid state. A systematic investigation of the co-milling process of magnesium hydride with a transition metal was undertaken in order to produce nanostructured and highly reactive powders. The initiating role of the transition metal was evidenced by in situ neutron diffraction experiments. High performances in terms of thermal and mechanical behavior were achieved introducing expanded graphite and compacting the mixture to form composite materials. Absorption and desorption kinetics have been measured versus temperature and H2 pressure.

  6. Formation of hydrides blisters in zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation of zirconium hydrides blisters in zirconium alloys due to the presence of a thermal gradient is a possible phenomenon which may occur in structural components of a reactor (pressure tubes), thus resulting a very important matter for the nuclear industry. For this reason, a series of experiments were initiated in the Hydrogen Damage Laboratory so as to obtain blisters of zirconium alloys and to study the aspects related to them. Zry-4 and Zr-2.5% Nb blisters were obtained. The propagation of a fissure present in a blister and the fracture surface were observed. The fissure propagated weakly in the blister and stopped in the Zry-4 matrix. (Author)

  7. Hydrogen in novel solid-state metal hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solid-state metal hydrides display hydrogen densities close to that of liquid hydrogen and thus provide a safe and efficient way of storing hydrogen. As a result of recent neutron and synchrotron diffraction work some novel metal hydrides have been characterized that shed new light on the nature of metal-hydrogen interactions. While hydrogen appears as an anion surrounded by a large inventory of cation configurations in ionic hydrides such as Ca4Mg3H14, Ca19Mg8H54, Eu2MgD6, Eu6Mg7D26 and Eu2Mg3D10, it acts as a terminal ligand in covalently bonded hydride complexes based on p-elements such as [BH4]- and d-elements such as [IrH5]4- and [IrH4]5- in the complex hydrides LiBH4 and Mg6Ir2H11, respectively. Surprisingly, hydride complexes and hydride anions can also be discerned in typically metallic (interstitial) hydrides such as NdMgNi4H4 (= Nd3+Mg+2.[Ni4H4]5-) and LaMg2NiD7 (= La3+Mg+22.[NiH4]4-.3H-). Some hydrides also reveal other interesting features such as a hydrogenation induced Ce4+→Ce3+ valence change in CeMn1.8Al0.2H4.4 at room temperature that is accompanied by a Mn/Al metal atom exchange over distances of ∝2.6 A, and a hydrogen induced metal-to-nonmetal transition near ambient conditions that leads from the metallic compound Mg3Ir to the red colored hydride Mg6Ir2H11. In this article recent work and some methodological aspects are highlighted. (orig.)

  8. Results of NDE Technique Evaluation of Clad Hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dennis C. Kunerth

    2014-09-01

    This report fulfills the M4 milestone, M4FT-14IN0805023, Results of NDE Technique Evaluation of Clad Hydrides, under Work Package Number FT-14IN080502. During service, zirconium alloy fuel cladding will degrade via corrosion/oxidation. Hydrogen, a byproduct of the oxidation process, will be absorbed into the cladding and eventually form hydrides due to low hydrogen solubility limits. The hydride phase is detrimental to the mechanical properties of the cladding and therefore it is important to be able to detect and characterize the presence of this constituent within the cladding. Presently, hydrides are evaluated using destructive examination. If nondestructive evaluation techniques can be used to detect and characterize the hydrides, the potential exists to significantly increase test sample coverage while reducing evaluation time and cost. To demonstrate the viability this approach, an initial evaluation of eddy current and ultrasonic techniques were performed to demonstrate the basic ability to these techniques to detect hydrides or their effects on the microstructure. Conventional continuous wave eddy current techniques were applied to zirconium based cladding test samples thermally processed with hydrogen gas to promote the absorption of hydrogen and subsequent formation of hydrides. The results of the evaluation demonstrate that eddy current inspection approaches have the potential to detect both the physical damage induced by hydrides, e.g. blisters and cracking, as well as the combined effects of absorbed hydrogen and hydride precipitates on the electrical properties of the zirconium alloy. Similarly, measurements of ultrasonic wave velocities indicate changes in the elastic properties resulting from the combined effects of absorbed hydrogen and hydride precipitates as well as changes in geometry in regions of severe degradation. However, for both approaches, the signal responses intended to make the desired measurement incorporate a number of contributing

  9. Development of hydride absorber for fast reactor. Application of hafnium hydride to control rod of large fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of hafnium hydride (Hf-hydride) to a control rod for a large fast reactor where the B4C control rod is originally employed is studied. Three types of Hf-hydride control rods are designed. The control rod worth and its change during the burnup are evaluated for different hydrogen-to-hafnium ratios and are compared with those of the original B4C control rod. The result indicates that the worths of the Hf-hydride and the 10B-enriched B4C control rods are approximately the same, and the lifetime of the Hf-hydride control rod is almost four times longer than that of the 10B-enriched B4C control rod. The core performances of the shutdown margin, sodium void reactivity, Doppler reactivity coefficient, and breeding ratio are analyzed. It is indicated that those for the Hf-hydride control rod are almost the same as those for the original B4C control rod. The behavior of neutrons moderated by the Hf-hydride control rod is analyzed. It is confirmed that the Hf-hydride control rod does not cause any thermal spike problems in the fast reactor core. (author)

  10. Nanoindentation measurements of the mechanical properties of zirconium matrix and hydrides in unirradiated pre-hydrided nuclear fuel cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rico, A., E-mail: alvaro.rico@urjc.es [DIMME, Departamento de Tecnología Mecánica, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, c/Tulipán s/n, E-28933 Móstoles, Madrid (Spain); Martin-Rengel, M.A., E-mail: mamartin@mater.upm.es [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales, UPM, E.T.S.I. Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Profesor Aranguren SN, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Ruiz-Hervias, J., E-mail: jesus.ruiz@upm.es [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales, UPM, E.T.S.I. Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Profesor Aranguren SN, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Rodriguez, J. [DIMME, Departamento de Tecnología Mecánica, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, c/Tulipán s/n, E-28933 Móstoles, Madrid (Spain); Gomez-Sanchez, F.J., E-mail: javier.gomez@amsimulation.com [Advanced Material Simulation, S.L, Madrid (Spain)

    2014-09-15

    It is well known that the mechanical properties of the nuclear fuel cladding may be affected by the presence of hydrides. The average mechanical properties of hydrided cladding have been extensively investigated from a macroscopic point of view. In addition, the mechanical and fracture properties of bulk hydride samples fabricated from zirconium plates have also been reported. In this paper, Young’s modulus, hardness and yield stress are measured for each phase, namely zirconium hydrides and matrix, of pre-hydrided nuclear fuel cladding. To this end, nanoindentation tests were performed on ZIRLO samples in as-received state, on a hydride blister and in samples with 150 and 1200 ppm of hydrogen homogeneously distributed along the hoop direction of the cladding. The results show that the measured mechanical properties of the zirconium hydrides and ZIRLO matrix (Young’s modulus, hardness and yield stress) are rather similar. From the experimental data, the hydride volume fraction in the cladding samples with 150 and 1200 ppm was estimated and the average mechanical properties were calculated by means of the rule of mixtures. These values were compared with those obtained from ring compression tests. Good agreement between the results obtained by both methods was found.

  11. Boron thermal regeneration system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An ion exchanger which allows flow in both directions along a selected flow path is described. A separator plate divides the exchanger tank into two chambers each of which has a flow conduit so that flow may enter or leave from either chamber while prohibiting the resin particles from migrating from one side of the tank to the other. This ion exchanger permits a dual-directional flow process to be practised which results in immediate changes in the boron concentration within a nuclear reactor coolant system even if the ion exchanger resins have not been completely equilibrated during a previous operation. (author)

  12. BORONIZING OF STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arzum ULUKÖY

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Boride layer has many advantages in comparison with traditional hardening methods. The boride layer has high hardening value and keeps it's hardeness at high temperatures, and it also shows favorible properties, such as the resistance to wear, oxidation and corrosion. The process can be applied at variety of materials, for instance steel, cast iron, cast steel, nickel and cobalt alloys and cermets. In this rewiew, boronizing process properties, boride layer on steel surfaces and specifications and the factors that effect boride layer are examined

  13. Neutron scattering on hydrides of intermetallic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review surveys the application of neutron scattering for the investigation of the microscopic behaviour of hydrogen in intermetallic compounds. This concerns the structure as well as the dynamics. Neutron diffraction experiments were performed on Ti1.2Mn1.8D3 and LaNi5D7. In the latter case the dominant nickel scattering could be suppressed by isotope substitution with 60Ni, and the anisotropic broadening of the Bragg peaks could be modelled in a correspondingly modified Rietveld-profile refinement. For the investigation of hydrogen diffusion in intermetallic hydrides by means of quasielastic neutron scattering an iterative multiple scattering correction procedure has been developped which allows a reliable determination of hydrogen diffusion coefficients. The mechanism of hydrogen diffusion in intermetallic hydrides comprises three types of jumps: escape jumps out of energetically lower interstitials, transport jumps over the energetically higher sites and locally restricted jump processes. For Ti1.2Mn1.8H3 the main features of the diffusional behaviour could be described quantitatively in the framework of a three state model. By means of neutron vibrational spectroscopy information about the occupied hydrogen sites and thus about the structure can be extracted from the symmetry splitting of the vibrational modes. In this way we showed that in α-LaNi5Hx, La2Ni4-octahedral and La2Ni2-tetrahedral interstitial sites are occupied. (orig./GG)

  14. Millimeter-Wave Spectroscopy of Ethylmercury Hydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goubet, M.; Motiyenko, R. A.; Margulès, L.; Guillemin, J.-C.

    2012-06-01

    The first millimeter-wave rotational spectrum of an organomercury compound, ethylmercury hydride (CH_3CH_2HgH), has been recorded using the Lille fast-scan spectrometer in the frequency range 120 -- 180 GHz. The spectroscopic study is complemented by quantum chemical calculations taking into account relativistic effects on the mercury atom. The very good agreement between theoretical and experimental molecular parameters validates the chosen ab initio method, in particular its capability to predict the accurate values of the quartic centrifugal distortion constants related to this type of compound. Estimations of the nuclear quadrupole coupling constants are not as predictive as the structural parameters but good enough to satisfy the spectroscopic needs. In addition, the orientation of the H--Hg--C bonds axis deduced from the experimental nuclear quadrupole coupling constants compares well with the corresponding ab initio value. From the good agreement between experimental and theoretical results, together with the observation of the six most abundant isotopes of mercury, ethylmercury hydride is unambiguously identified and its calculated equilibrium geometry is confirmed. Alekseev, E.A. et al. Radio Physics and Radio Astronomy 3 (2012) 78.

  15. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Metal Hydrides

    CERN Document Server

    1981-01-01

    In the last five years, the study of metal hydrides has ex­ panded enormously due to the potential technological importance of this class of materials in hydrogen based energy conversion schemes. The scope of this activity has been worldwide among the industrially advanced nations. There has been a consensus among researchers in both fundamental and applied areas that a more basic understanding of the properties of metal/hydrogen syster;,s is required in order to provide a rational basis for the selection of materials for specific applications. The current worldwide need for and interest in research in metal hydrides indicated the timeliness of an Advanced Study Insti­ tute to provide an in-depth view of the field for those active in its various aspects. The inclusion of speakers from non-NATO coun­ tries provided the opportunity for cross-fertilization of ideas for future research. While the emphasis of the Institute was on basic properties, there was a conscious effort to stimulate interest in the applic...

  16. Metal hydrides for lithium-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oumellal, Y; Rougier, A; Nazri, G A; Tarascon, J-M; Aymard, L

    2008-11-01

    Classical electrodes for Li-ion technology operate via an insertion/de-insertion process. Recently, conversion electrodes have shown the capability of greater capacity, but have so far suffered from a marked hysteresis in voltage between charge and discharge, leading to poor energy efficiency and voltages. Here, we present the electrochemical reactivity of MgH(2) with Li that constitutes the first use of a metal-hydride electrode for Li-ion batteries. The MgH(2) electrode shows a large, reversible capacity of 1,480 mAh g(-1) at an average voltage of 0.5 V versus Li(+)/Li(o) which is suitable for the negative electrode. In addition, it shows the lowest polarization for conversion electrodes. The electrochemical reaction results in formation of a composite containing Mg embedded in a LiH matrix, which on charging converts back to MgH(2). Furthermore, the reaction is not specific to MgH(2), as other metal or intermetallic hydrides show similar reactivity towards Li. Equally promising, the reaction produces nanosized Mg and MgH(2), which show enhanced hydrogen sorption/desorption kinetics. We hope that such findings can pave the way for designing nanoscale active metal elements with applications in hydrogen storage and lithium-ion batteries. PMID:18849978

  17. Preparation of zirconium diboride ceramics by reactive spark plasma sintering of zirconium hydride-boron powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monolithic ZrB2 ceramics were prepared by reactive spark plasma sintering of a ZrH2-B mixture at 1650-1800 oC. The microstructure of the resulting ZrB2 ceramics were characterized by X-ray diffractometry and scanning electron microscopy. The ZrH2-B mixture converted completely into ZrB2 without trace quantities of residual ZrH2 and B. Highly dense ZrB2 was obtained at 1750 oC or above. The elastic moduli, flexural strength, thermal and electrical conductivities were comparable with those of ZrB2 ceramics obtained by sintering conventional ZrB2 powders.

  18. Synthesis and hydride transfer reactions of cobalt and nickel hydride complexes to BX3 compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mock, Michael T; Potter, Robert G; O'Hagan, Molly J; Camaioni, Donald M; Dougherty, William G; Kassel, W Scott; DuBois, Daniel L

    2011-12-01

    Hydrides of numerous transition metal complexes can be generated by the heterolytic cleavage of H(2) gas such that they offer alternatives to using main group hydrides in the regeneration of ammonia borane, a compound that has been intensely studied for hydrogen storage applications. Previously, we reported that HRh(dmpe)(2) (dmpe = 1,2-bis(dimethylphosphinoethane)) was capable of reducing a variety of BX(3) compounds having a hydride affinity (HA) greater than or equal to the HA of BEt(3). This study examines the reactivity of less expensive cobalt and nickel hydride complexes, HCo(dmpe)(2) and [HNi(dmpe)(2)](+), to form B-H bonds. The hydride donor abilities (ΔG(H(-))°) of HCo(dmpe)(2) and [HNi(dmpe)(2)](+) were positioned on a previously established scale in acetonitrile that is cross-referenced with calculated HAs of BX(3) compounds. The collective data guided our selection of BX(3) compounds to investigate and aided our analysis of factors that determine favorability of hydride transfer. HCo(dmpe)(2) was observed to transfer H(-) to BX(3) compounds with X = H, OC(6)F(5), and SPh. The reaction with B(SPh)(3) is accompanied by the formation of dmpe-(BH(3))(2) and dmpe-(BH(2)(SPh))(2) products that follow from a reduction of multiple B-SPh bonds and a loss of dmpe ligands from cobalt. Reactions between HCo(dmpe)(2) and B(SPh)(3) in the presence of triethylamine result in the formation of Et(3)N-BH(2)SPh and Et(3)N-BH(3) with no loss of a dmpe ligand. Reactions of the cationic complex [HNi(dmpe)(2)](+) with B(SPh)(3) under analogous conditions give Et(3)N-BH(2)SPh as the final product along with the nickel-thiolate complex [Ni(dmpe)(2)(SPh)](+). The synthesis and characterization of HCo(dedpe)(2) (dedpe = Et(2)PCH(2)CH(2)PPh(2)) from H(2) and a base is also discussed, including the formation of an uncommon trans dihydride species, trans-[(H)(2)Co(dedpe)(2)][BF(4)]. PMID:22040085

  19. Zircaloy-4 hydriding. Hydrogen distribution in PWR's rod cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In pressurised water reactors, Zircaloy 4 is used as fuel cladding in contact with hot water. The precipitation of hydrides at room temperatures causes mechanical deterioration of the cladding. As the cladding is subjected to a radial temperature gradient, the hydrogen distribution is greatly affected. The image analysis method is used to determine the hydride distribution in the irradiated cladding. To calibrate this method, a device was specially built for the preparation of Zircaloy specimens with known hydrogen contents. The hydriding conditions and hydrogen content determination procedures were fixed. We have successfully realized specimens with various hydrogen contents. With these specimens, a relationship between the parameter Sv (surface density of hydrides) and the hydrogen content was established. This parameter Sv is independent from the Zircaloy 4 metallurgical state (i.e. stress relieved or recrystallized) and from the analysis section (longitudinal or transverse). Study of hydrogen content and hydride distribution in irradiated cladding by means of image analysis showed that the method is limited by its ability of separation between neighbouring hydrides at cladding's periphery where the hydrogen content can reach several thousands ppm. Nevertheless, this method gives us some information about hydride distribution inside the cladding. A model for thermal diffusion was developped to stimulate the migration of hydrogen in Zirconium alloys. This model was used to predict hydrogen distribution in the irradiated cladding. Comparison of model predictions with results of image analysis shows good agreement. (Author). refs., figs., tabs

  20. Isotope exchange between gaseous hydrogen and uranium hydride powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Isotope exchange between hydrogen gas and uranium hydride powder can be rapid and reversible. • Gas–solid exchange rate is controlled by transport within ∼0.7 μm hydride particles. • Gas chromatographic separation of hydrogen isotopes using uranium hydride is feasible. - Abstract: Isotope exchange between gaseous hydrogen and solid uranium hydride has been studied by flowing hydrogen (deuterium) gas through packed powder beds of uranium deuteride (hydride). We used a residual gas analyzer system to perform real-time analysis of the effluent gas composition. We also developed an exchange and transport model and, by fitting it to the experimental data, extracted kinetic parameters for the isotope exchange reaction. Our results suggest that, from approximately 70 to 700 kPa and 25 to 400 °C, the gas-to-solid exchange rate is controlled by hydrogen and deuterium transport within the ∼0.7 μm diameter uranium hydride particles. We use our kinetic parameters to show that gas chromatographic separation of hydrogen and deuterium using uranium hydride could be feasible

  1. The development of metal hydrides using as concentrating solar thermal storage materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Xuanhui; Li, Yang; Li, Ping; Wan, Qi; Zhai, Fuqiang

    2015-12-01

    Metal hydrides high temperature thermal heat storage technique has great promising future prospects in solar power generation, industrial waste heat utilization and peak load regulating of power system. This article introduces basic principle of metal hydrides for thermal storage, and summarizes developments in advanced metal hydrides high-temperature thermal storage materials, numerical simulation and thermodynamic calculation in thermal storage systems, and metal hydrides thermal storage prototypes. Finally, the future metal hydrides high temperature thermal heat storage technique is been looked ahead.

  2. Dietary boron, brain function, and cognitive performance.

    OpenAIRE

    Penland, J G

    1994-01-01

    Although the trace element boron has yet to be recognized as an essential nutrient for humans, recent data from animal and human studies suggest that boron may be important for mineral metabolism and membrane function. To investigate further the functional role of boron, brain electrophysiology and cognitive performance were assessed in response to dietary manipulation of boron (approximately 0.25 versus approximately 3.25 mg boron/2000 kcal/day) in three studies with healthy older men and wo...

  3. Banishing brittle bones with boron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A 6-month study indicates that boron, not even considered an essential nutrient for people and animals, may be a key to preventing osteoporosis, say nutritionist Forrest H. Nielsen and anatomist Curtiss D. Hunt at ARS' Grand Forks, North Dakota, Human Nutrition Research Center. They believe the results of the study - the first to look at the nutritional effects of boron in humans - will generate a lot of interest in the element. In the study, 12 postmenopausal women consumed a very low boron diet (0.25 milligrams per day) for 17 weeks then were given a daily 3-mg supplement - representing the boron intake from a well-balanced diet - for 7 more weeks. Within 8 days after the supplement was introduced, the lost 40 percent less calcium, one-third less magnesium, and slightly less phosphorus through the urine. In fact, their calcium and magnesium losses were lower than prestudy levels, when they were on their normal diets. Since boron isn't considered essential for people, there is not recommended intake and no boron supplement on the market. Nielsen says the supplement of sodium borate used in the study was specially prepared based on the amount of boron a person would get from a well-balanced diet containing fruits and vegetables. He says the average boron intake is about 1.5 mg - or half the experimental dose - but average means a lot of people get less and a lot get more. Hunt cautioned that large doses of boron can be toxic, even lethal. The lowest reported lethal dose of boric acid is about 45 grams (1.6 ounces) for an adult and only 2 grams (0.07 ounce) for an infant.

  4. New Pathways and Metrics for Enhanced, Reversible Hydrogen Storage in Boron-Doped Carbon Nanospaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfeifer, Peter [University of Missouri; Wexler, Carlos [University of Missouri; Hawthorne, M. Frederick [University of Missouri; Lee, Mark W. [University of Missouri; Jalistegi, Satish S. [University of Missouri

    2014-08-14

    This project, since its start in 2007—entitled “Networks of boron-doped carbon nanopores for low-pressure reversible hydrogen storage” (2007-10) and “New pathways and metrics for enhanced, reversible hydrogen storage in boron-doped carbon nanospaces” (2010-13)—is in support of the DOE's National Hydrogen Storage Project, as part of the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program’s comprehensive efforts to enable the widespread commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in diverse sectors of the economy. Hydrogen storage is widely recognized as a critical enabling technology for the successful commercialization and market acceptance of hydrogen powered vehicles. Storing sufficient hydrogen on board a wide range of vehicle platforms, at energy densities comparable to gasoline, without compromising passenger or cargo space, remains an outstanding technical challenge. Of the main three thrust areas in 2007—metal hydrides, chemical hydrogen storage, and sorption-based hydrogen storage—sorption-based storage, i.e., storage of molecular hydrogen by adsorption on high-surface-area materials (carbons, metal-organic frameworks, and other porous organic networks), has emerged as the most promising path toward achieving the 2017 DOE storage targets of 0.055 kg H2/kg system (“5.5 wt%”) and 0.040 kg H2/liter system. The objective of the project is to develop high-surface-area carbon materials that are boron-doped by incorporation of boron into the carbon lattice at the outset, i.e., during the synthesis of the material. The rationale for boron-doping is the prediction that boron atoms in carbon will raise the binding energy of hydro- gen from 4-5 kJ/mol on the undoped surface to 10-14 kJ/mol on a doped surface, and accordingly the hydro- gen storage capacity of the material. The mechanism for the increase in binding energy is electron donation from H2 to electron-deficient B atoms, in the form of sp2 boron-carbon bonds. Our team is proud to have

  5. Structural relationships in complex hydrides of the late transition metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Literature data on complex hydrides of the late transition metals (groups 7-10), such as the hydrogen storage material Mg2NiH4, are reviewed with respect to order-disorder phase transitions and structural relationships. They are analysed in terms of crystallographic group-subgroup trees and their use in understanding the different crystal structures from a symmetry point of view is demonstrated. New data are presented on the low temperature behaviour of magnesium iridium hydrides and strontium rhodium hydrides studied by powder X-ray diffraction. (orig.)

  6. Technical and economic aspects of hydrogen storage in metal hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, R.

    1981-01-01

    The recovery of hydrogen from such metal hydrides as LiH, MgH2, TiH2, CaH2 and FeTiH compounds is studied, with the aim of evaluating the viability of the technique for the storage of hydrogen fuel. The pressure-temperature dependence of the reactions, enthalpies of formation, the kinetics of the hydrogen absorption and desorption, and the mechanical and chemical stability of the metal hydrides are taken into account in the evaluation. Economic aspects are considered. Development of portable metal hydride hydrogen storage reservoirs is also mentioned.

  7. PIE techniques for hydride reorientation test at NDC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dry storage of spent fuels in the interim storage facility is being planned in Japan. However, the gradual deterioration of the mechanical property of fuel cladding due to internal pressure and temperature during the storage term is known. Therefore, the integrity of stored fuel rods should be confirmed before the start of dry storage. For the last several years, NDC had a lot of experiences on the hydride reorientation test. The specimen preparation techniques on the hydride reorientation test and the mechanical testing techniques after the hydride reorientation are shown in this paper. (author)

  8. Lattice dynamics of α boron and of boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The atomic structure and the lattice dynamics of α boron and of B4C boron carbide have been studied by Density Functional Theory (D.F.T.) and Density Functional Perturbation Theory (D.F.P.T.). The bulk moduli of the unit-cell and of the icosahedron have been investigated, and the equation of state at zero temperature has been determined. In α boron, Raman diffusion and infrared absorption have been studied under pressure, and the theoretical and experimental Grueneisen coefficients have been compared. In boron carbide, inspection of the theoretical and experimental vibrational spectra has led to the determination of the atomic structure of B4C. Finally, the effects of isotopic disorder have been modeled by an exact method beyond the mean-field approximation, and the effects onto the Raman lines has been investigated. The method has been applied to isotopic alloys of diamond and germanium. (author)

  9. A new and effective approach to boron removal by using novel boron-specific fungi isolated from boron mining wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taştan, Burcu Ertit; Çakir, Dilara Nur; Dönmez, Gönül

    2016-01-01

    Boron-resistant fungi were isolated from the wastewater of a boron mine in Turkey. Boron removal efficiencies of Penicillium crustosum and Rhodotorula mucilaginosa were detected in different media compositions. Minimal Salt Medium (MSM) and two different waste media containing molasses (WM-1) or whey + molasses (WM-2) were tested to make this process cost effective when scaled up. Both isolates achieved high boron removal yields at the highest boron concentrations tested in MSM and WM-1. The maximum boron removal yield by P. crustosum was 45.68% at 33.95 mg l(-1) initial boron concentration in MSM, and was 38.97% at 42.76 mg l(-1) boron for R. mucilaginosa, which seemed to offer an economically feasible method of removing boron from the effluents. PMID:26877036

  10. Delayed hydride in zirconium based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delayed Hydride Cracking (DHC) velocity along the axial direction of Zirconium-2.5% Nb pressure tube materials of different origins i.e. CANDU and RBMK (TMT -I), has been determined in the temperature range of 162 to 250 degree C. DHC crack growth was monitored using Direct Current Potential Drop Technique. It has been observed that the DHC velocity of both materials increases with increase in test temperature. The DHC velocity for the RBMK (TMT -I) material was found about 2 to 5 times lower than that for the CANDU materials at each temperature. In addition, the activation energy of the phenomena was calculated taking into account that DHC is a thermal activated mechanism, following an Arrhenius-type law. (author)

  11. The progress of nanocrystalline hydride electrode materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews research at the Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Poznan University of Technology, on the synthesis of nanocrystalline hydride electrode materials. Nanocrystalline materials have been synthesized by mechanical alloying (MA) followed by annealing. Examples of the materials include TiFe-, ZrV2-, LaNi5 and Mg2Ni-type phases. Details on the process used and the enhancement of properties due to the nanoscale structures are presented. The synthesized alloys were used as negative electrode materials for Ni-MH battery. The properties of hydrogen host materials can be modified substantially by alloying to obtain the desired storage characteristics. For example, it was found that the respective replacement of Fe in TiFe by Ni and/or by Cr, Co, Mo improved not only the discharge capacity but also the cycle life of these electrodes. The hydrogen storage properties of nanocrystalline ZrV2- and LaNi5-type powders prepared by mechanical alloying and annealing show no big difference with those of melt casting (polycrystalline) alloys. On the other hand, a partial substitution of Mg by Mn or Al in Mg2Ni alloy leads to an increase in discharge capacity, at room temperature. Furthermore, the effect of the nickel and graphite coating on the structure of some nanocrystalline alloys and the electrodes characteristics were investigated. In the case of Mg2Ni-type alloy mechanical coating with graphite effectively reduced the degradation rate of the studied electrode materials. The combination of a nanocrystalline TiFe-, ZrV2- and LaNi5-type hydride electrodes and a nickel positive electrode to form a Ni-MH battery, has been successful. (authors)

  12. Hydrogen storage in sodium aluminum hydride.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozolins, Vidvuds; Herberg, J.L. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); McCarty, Kevin F.; Maxwell, Robert S. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Stumpf, Roland Rudolph; Majzoub, Eric H.

    2005-11-01

    Sodium aluminum hydride, NaAlH{sub 4}, has been studied for use as a hydrogen storage material. The effect of Ti, as a few mol. % dopant in the system to increase kinetics of hydrogen sorption, is studied with respect to changes in lattice structure of the crystal. No Ti substitution is found in the crystal lattice. Electronic structure calculations indicate that the NaAlH{sub 4} and Na{sub 3}AlH{sub 6} structures are complex-ionic hydrides with Na{sup +} cations and AlH{sub 4}{sup -} and AlH{sub 6}{sup 3-} anions, respectively. Compound formation studies indicate the primary Ti-compound formed when doping the material at 33 at. % is TiAl{sub 3} , and likely Ti-Al compounds at lower doping rates. A general study of sorption kinetics of NaAlH{sub 4}, when doped with a variety of Ti-halide compounds, indicates a uniform response with the kinetics similar for all dopants. NMR multiple quantum studies of solution-doped samples indicate solvent interaction with the doped alanate. Raman spectroscopy was used to study the lattice dynamics of NaAlH{sub 4}, and illustrated the molecular ionic nature of the lattice as a separation of vibrational modes between the AlH{sub 4}{sup -} anion-modes and lattice-modes. In-situ Raman measurements indicate a stable AlH{sub 4}{sup -} anion that is stable at the melting temperature of NaAlH{sub 4}, indicating that Ti-dopants must affect the Al-H bond strength.

  13. Structural characterization of electrodeposited boron

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ashish Jain; C Ghosh; T R Ravindran; S Anthonysamy; R Divakar; E Mohandas; G S Gupta

    2013-12-01

    Structural characterization of electrodeposited boron was carried out by using transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Electron diffraction and phase contrast imaging were carried out by using transmission electron microscopy. Phase identification was done based on the analysis of electron diffraction patterns and the power spectrum calculated from the lattice images from thin regions of the sample. Raman spectroscopic examination was carried out to study the nature of bonding and the allotropic form of boron obtained after electrodeposition. The results obtained from transmission electron microscopy showed the presence of nanocrystallites embedded in an amorphous mass of boron. Raman microscopic studies showed that amorphous boron could be converted to its crystalline form at high temperatures.

  14. Artificial exomuscle investigations for applications-metal hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In pursuing the development of bionic devices, Victhom identified a need for technologies that could replace current motorized systems and be better integrated into the human body motion. The actuators used to obtain large displacements are noisy, heavy, and do not adequately reproduce human muscle behavior. Subsequently, a project at Victhom was devoted to the development of active materials to obtain an artificial exomuscle actuator. An exhaustive literature review was done at Victhom to identify promising active materials for the development of artificial muscles. According to this review, metal hydrides were identified as a promising technology for artificial muscle development. Victhom's investigations focused on determining metal hydride actuator potential in the context of bionics technology. Based on metal hydride properties and artificial muscle requirements such as force, displacement and rise time, an exomuscle was built. In addition, a finite element model, including heat and mass transfer in the metal hydride, was developed and implemented in FEMLAB software. (review article)

  15. Artificial exomuscle investigations for applications-metal hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crevier, Marie-Charlotte; Richard, Martin; Rittenhouse, D Matheson; Roy, Pierre-Olivier; Bedard, Stephane [Victhom Human Bionics Inc., Saint-Augustin-de-Desmaures, QC (Canada)

    2007-03-01

    In pursuing the development of bionic devices, Victhom identified a need for technologies that could replace current motorized systems and be better integrated into the human body motion. The actuators used to obtain large displacements are noisy, heavy, and do not adequately reproduce human muscle behavior. Subsequently, a project at Victhom was devoted to the development of active materials to obtain an artificial exomuscle actuator. An exhaustive literature review was done at Victhom to identify promising active materials for the development of artificial muscles. According to this review, metal hydrides were identified as a promising technology for artificial muscle development. Victhom's investigations focused on determining metal hydride actuator potential in the context of bionics technology. Based on metal hydride properties and artificial muscle requirements such as force, displacement and rise time, an exomuscle was built. In addition, a finite element model, including heat and mass transfer in the metal hydride, was developed and implemented in FEMLAB software. (review article)

  16. Formation of hydride blisters in zirconium alloy pressure tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fracture of the Zircaloy-2 pressure tube in the Pickering Unit 2 power reactor was associated with the growth of hydride blisters at points of contact between the pressure tube and the cooler calandria tube surrounding it. Similar blisters have been observed in a Zr-2.5 wt% Nb pressure tube in WR-1, an organic-cooled research reactor. These hydride blisters were formed and grew as a result of the thermal diffusion of hydrogen in the zirconium, a mechanism whereby hydrogen diffuses down a temperature gradient. If the terminal solid solubility of hydrogen is exceeded in the cooler regions, hydride will precipitate. In this paper, the time required to grow these hydride blisters will be estimated from the blister size and the hydrogen distribution in its neighborhood, by using simple equations derived from thermal diffusion theory

  17. Out-of-pile accelerated hydriding of Zircaloy fasteners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mechanical joints between Zircaloy and nickel-bearing alloys, mainly the Zircaloy-4/Inconel-600 combination, were exposed to water at 4500F and 5200F to study hydriding of Zircaloy in contact with a dissimilar metal. Accelerated hydriding of the Zircaloy occurred at both temperatures. At 4500F the dissolved hydrogen level of the water was over ten times that at 5200F. At 5200F the initially high hydrogen ingress rate decreased rapidly as exposure time increased and was effectively shut off in about 25 days. Severely hydrided Zircaloy components successfully withstood thermal cycling and mechanical testing. Chromium plating of the nickel-bearing parts was found to be an effective and practical barrier in preventing nickel-alloy smearing and accelerated hydriding of Zircaloy

  18. A nuclear analytical model for uranium zirconium hydride reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear analytical model and codes for the uranium zirconium hydride reactor are outlined. The criticality and control rods effeciency of abroad TRIGA reactor are obtained using this model and codes. The results are satisfactory

  19. A mechanistic approach to develop the secondary hydriding criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reliable criteria of secondary hydriding failures are important to assure safe operation of nuclear fuel in LWR power units. The present paper reviews available data on massive hydriding of Zirconium claddings covering out-of-pile studies and in-pile tests in research reactors. Analyses of these experimental data give evidence that threshold conditions leading to the onset of massive hydriding are drastically changed under irradiation. The changes are caused mainly by irradiation damage of oxygen sublattice in ZrO2 by fission fragments leaving the periphery of fuel pellets. The tests in research reactors provide a basis to develop a parametric dependency which relates the threshold of massive hydriding to composition of steam-hydrogen mixture, irradiation dose rate and temperature

  20. Boron diffusion in silicon devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohatgi, Ajeet; Kim, Dong Seop; Nakayashiki, Kenta; Rounsaville, Brian

    2010-09-07

    Disclosed are various embodiments that include a process, an arrangement, and an apparatus for boron diffusion in a wafer. In one representative embodiment, a process is provided in which a boric oxide solution is applied to a surface of the wafer. Thereafter, the wafer is subjected to a fast heat ramp-up associated with a first heating cycle that results in a release of an amount of boron for diffusion into the wafer.

  1. Transparent yttrium hydride thin films prepared by reactive sputtering

    OpenAIRE

    Mongstad, T.; Platzer-Björkman, C.; Karazhanov, S. Zh.; Holt, A.; Maehlen, J. P.; Hauback, B. C.

    2011-01-01

    Metal hydrides have earlier been suggested for utilization in solar cells. With this as a motivation we have prepared thin films of yttrium hydride by reactive magnetron sputter deposition. The resulting films are metallic for low partial pressure of hydrogen during the deposition, and black or yellow-transparent for higher partial pressure of hydrogen. Both metallic and semiconducting transparent YHx films have been prepared directly in-situ without the need of capping layers and post-deposi...

  2. The Production of Uranium Metal by Metal Hydrides Incorporated

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, P. P.

    1943-01-01

    Metal Hydrides Incorporated was a pioneer in the production of uranium metal on a commercial scale and supplied it to all the laboratories interested in the original research, before other methods for its production were developed. Metal Hydrides Inc. supplied the major part of the metal for the construction of the first experimental pile which, on December 2, 1942, demonstrated the feasibility of the self-sustaining chain reaction and the release of atomic energy.

  3. Electronic structure and optical properties of lightweight metal hydrides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Setten, van M.J.; Popa, V.A.; Wijs, de G.A.; Brocks, G.

    2007-01-01

    We study the dielectric functions of the series of simple hydrides LiH, NaH, MgH2, and AlH3, and of the complex hydrides Li3AlH6, Na3AlH6, LiAlH4, NaAlH4, and Mg(AlH4)2, using first-principles density-functional theory and GW calculations. All compounds are large gap insulators with GW single-partic

  4. Thin-film metal hydrides for solar energy applications

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Thin-film metal hydrides may become important solar energy materials in the future. This thesis demonstrates interesting material properties of metal hydride films, relevant for applications as semiconducting materials for photovoltaic (PV) solar cells and for regulation of light using smart window technology. List of papers. Papers II-VI are removed from the thesis due to copyright restrictions. Paper I C. Platzer-Björkman, T. Mongstad, S. Zh. Karazhanov, J. P. Mæhlen, E. S. Marst...

  5. Suppression of the critical temperature in binary vanadium hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Addition of 10 mol% Cr to V increases the β-hydride TC to >200 °C. • Addition of 10 mol% Ni to V increases the β-hydride TC to >400 °C. • Addition of 10 mol% Al to V decreases the β-hydride TC to 90Al10 membrane can be cycled to 2 without β-hydride formation. -- Abstract: The tendency of vanadium-based alloy membranes to embrittle is the biggest commercialisation barrier for this hydrogen separation technology. Excessive hydrogen absorption and the α → β hydride transition both contribute to brittle failure of these membranes. Alloying is known to reduce absorption, but the influence of alloying on hydride phase formation under conditions relevant to membrane operation has not been studied in great detail previously. Here, the effect of Cr, Ni, and Al alloying additions on V–H phase equilibrium has been studied using hydrogen absorption measurements and in situ X-ray diffraction studies. The addition of 10 mol% Ni increases the critical temperature for α + β hydride formation to greater than 400 °C, compared to 170 °C for V. Cr also increases the critical temperature, to between 200 and 300 °C. The addition of 10 mol% Al, however, suppresses the critical temperature to less than 30 °C, thereby enabling this material to be cycled thermally and hydrostatically while precluding formation of the β-hydride phase. This is despite Al also decreasing hydrogen absorption. The implication of this finding is that one of the mechanisms of brittle failure in vanadium-based hydrogen-selective membranes has been eliminated, thereby increasing the robustness of this material relative to V

  6. Modelling of fuel rod hydriding failures in water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mechanistic models which were developed to describe primary hydriding phenomena in claddings of initially intact rods with residual moisture are described. The models include the following key processes: fuel rod thermal behavior, UO2 fuel oxidation in steam-hydrogen atmosphere under irradiation, hydrogen diffusion in zirconium and in the hydride, growth of the hydride phase. Fuel rod thermomechanical behavior is calculated by using RTOP integral fuel code. An oxidation model represents the effects of temperature dynamics and temperature profile along fuel axis and radius on fuel oxidation as well as on hydrogen accumulation inside the fuel rod. Along with ordinary thermal dissociation of water molecules, the oxidation model also addresses radiolysis of the steam-hydrogen mixture due to fission fragments. The present radiolysis model takes into account the effects of the gas mixture composition, temperature and pressure. A new model of cladding hydriding is proposed in which calculation of the massive hydride growth is performed in 2-D geometry. Hydrogen transport in zirconium cladding is modeled with account for thermodiffusion. The RTOP code comprising the models developed allows us to calculate different scenarios of hydriding rod failures under given operation conditions. Test calculations were carried out and compared to available data. It is shown that there are threshold values of initial steam content inside the intact fuel rod which lead to the possibility of through-cladding hydride growth and formation of the primary defect. The threshold values depend on the oxidation state of the cladding inner surface, linear power profile in the fuel rod, fuel rod geometry, cladding temperature conditions and hydrogen diffusivities in zirconium and zirconium hydride

  7. Hydride distribution around a blister in Zr-2.5Nb pressure tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blisters were grown in Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube sections by a thermal gradient without applying external stress. The surrounding hydride distribution was analyzed. Hydride platelets were observed in the radial direction of the blister. The precipitation of these hydrides was found to be favored by low temperature of blister growth and slow cooling rate after blister formation. The misfit strain produced by hydride blister growth provides the stress necessary to promote radial precipitation. During the subsequent tensile test at 200 C (delayed hydride cracking test) the radial hydride length and thickness are increased. This increase is explained by a stress concentrator effect of the blister. When this effect vanishes, the increase of radial hydrides continues by an autocatalytic effect and stress concentrator effect of the hydride platelet. If a crack originated in the blister reaches the matrix it could propagate along a radial hydride previously precipitated. (orig.)

  8. Optimization of Hydride Rim Formation in Unirradiated Zr 4 Cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimskey, Rick W.; Hanson, Brady D.; MacFarlan, Paul J.

    2013-09-30

    The purpose of this work is to build on the results reported in the M2 milestone M2FT 13PN0805051, document number FCRD-USED-2013-000151 (Hanson, 2013). In that work, it was demonstrated that unirradiated samples of zircaloy-4 cladding could be pre-hydrided at temperatures below 400°C in pure hydrogen gas and that the growth of hydrides on the surface could be controlled by changing the surface condition of the samples and form a desired hydride rim on the outside diameter of the cladding. The work performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory since the issuing of the M2 milestone has focused its efforts to optimize the formation of a hydride rim on available zircaloy-4 cladding samples by controlling temperature variation and gas flow control during pre-hydriding treatments. Surface conditioning of the outside surface was also examined as a variable. The results of test indicate that much of the variability in the hydride thickness is due to temperature variation occurring in the furnaces as well as how hydrogen gas flows across the sample surface. Efforts to examine other alloys, gas concentrations, and different surface conditioning plan to be pursed in the next FY as more cladding samples become available

  9. Metal Hydrides for High-Temperature Power Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa C. E. Rönnebro

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Metal hydrides can be utilized for hydrogen storage and for thermal energy storage (TES applications. By using TES with solar technologies, heat can be stored from sun energy to be used later, which enables continuous power generation. We are developing a TES technology based on a dual-bed metal hydride system, which has a high-temperature (HT metal hydride operating reversibly at 600–800 °C to generate heat, as well as a low-temperature (LT hydride near room temperature that is used for hydrogen storage during sun hours until there is the need to produce electricity, such as during night time, a cloudy day or during peak hours. We proceeded from selecting a high-energy density HT-hydride based on performance characterization on gram-sized samples scaled up to kilogram quantities with retained performance. COMSOL Multiphysics was used to make performance predictions for cylindrical hydride beds with varying diameters and thermal conductivities. Based on experimental and modeling results, a ~200-kWh/m3 bench-scale prototype was designed and fabricated, and we demonstrated the ability to meet or exceed all performance targets.

  10. Metal hydrides based high energy density thermal battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Zhigang Zak, E-mail: zak.fang@utah.edu [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, The University of Utah, 135 South 1460 East, Room 412, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0114 (United States); Zhou, Chengshang; Fan, Peng [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, The University of Utah, 135 South 1460 East, Room 412, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0114 (United States); Udell, Kent S. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, The University of Utah, 50 S. Central Campus Dr., Room 2110, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0114 (United States); Bowman, Robert C. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, The University of Utah, 135 South 1460 East, Room 412, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0114 (United States); Vajo, John J.; Purewal, Justin J. [HRL Laboratories, LLC, 3011 Malibu Canyon Road, Malibu, CA 90265 (United States); Kekelia, Bidzina [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, The University of Utah, 50 S. Central Campus Dr., Room 2110, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0114 (United States)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • The principle of the thermal battery using advanced metal hydrides was demonstrated. • The thermal battery used MgH{sub 2} and TiMnV as a working pair. • High energy density can be achieved by the use of MgH{sub 2} to store thermal energy. - Abstract: A concept of thermal battery based on advanced metal hydrides was studied for heating and cooling of cabins in electric vehicles. The system utilized a pair of thermodynamically matched metal hydrides as energy storage media. The pair of hydrides that was identified and developed was: (1) catalyzed MgH{sub 2} as the high temperature hydride material, due to its high energy density and enhanced kinetics; and (2) TiV{sub 0.62}Mn{sub 1.5} alloy as the matching low temperature hydride. Further, a proof-of-concept prototype was built and tested, demonstrating the potential of the system as HVAC for transportation vehicles.

  11. U-8 wt %Mo and 7 wt %Mo alloys powder obtained by an hydride-de hydride process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium-molybdenum alloys are been tested as a component in high-density LEU dispersion fuels with very good performances. These alloys need to be transformed to powder due to the manufacturing requirements of the fuels. One method to convert ductile alloys into powder is the hydride-de hydride process, which takes advantage of the ability of the U-α phase to transform to UH3: a brittle and relatively low-density compound. U-Mo alloys around 7 and 8 wt % Mo were melted and heat treated at different temperature ranges in order to partially convert γ -phase to α -phase. Subsequent hydriding transforms this α -phase to UH3. The volume change associated to the hydride formation embrittled the material which ends up in a powdered alloy. Results of the optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction during different steps of the process are shown. (author)

  12. Boron Fullerenes: A First-Principles Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalez Szwacki Nevill

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractA family of unusually stable boron cages was identified and examined using first-principles local-density functional method. The structure of the fullerenes is similar to that of the B12icosahedron and consists of six crossing double-rings. The energetically most stable fullerene is made up of 180 boron atoms. A connection between the fullerene family and its precursors, boron sheets, is made. We show that the most stable boron sheets are not necessarily precursors of very stable boron cages. Our finding is a step forward in the understanding of the structure of the recently produced boron nanotubes.

  13. A quantitative phase field model for hydride precipitation in zirconium alloys: Part II. Modeling of temperature dependent hydride precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A quantitative free energy functional developed in Part I (Shi and Xiao, 2014 [1]) was applied to model temperature dependent δ-hydride precipitation in zirconium in real time and real length scale. At first, the effect of external tensile load on reorientation of δ-hydrides was calibrated against experimental observations, which provides a modification factor for the strain energy in free energy formulation. Then, two types of temperature-related problems were investigated. In the first type, the effect of temperature transient was studied by cooling the Zr–H system at different cooling rates from high temperature while an external tensile stress was maintained. At the end of temperature transients, the average hydride size as a function of cooling rate was compared to experimental data. In the second type, the effect of temperature gradients was studied in a one or two dimensional temperature field. Different boundary conditions were applied. The results show that the hydride precipitation concentrated in low temperature regions and that it eventually led to the formation of hydride blisters in zirconium. A brief discussion on how to implement the hysteresis of hydrogen solid solubility on hydride precipitation and dissolution in the developed phase field scheme is also presented

  14. Hydriding and dehydriding characteristics of LiBH4 and transition metals-added magnesium hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Hydriding reaction curves under 12 bar H2, and dehydriding reaction curves under 1.0 bar H2, at 593 K at the 1st cycle for MgH2–10Ni–2LiBH4–2Ti and MgH2. Highlights: ► Addition of Ni, LiBH4, and Ti to MgH2 to increase reaction rates. ► Sample preparation by reactive mechanical grinding. ► At n = 2, the sample absorbed 4.05 wt% H for 60 min at 593 K under 12 bar H2. ► Analysis of rate-controlling step for dehydriding of the sample at n = 3. - Abstract: In this study, MgH2 was used as a starting material instead of Mg. Ni, Ti, and LiBH4 with a high hydrogen-storage capacity of 18.4 wt% were added. A sample with a composition of MgH2–10Ni–2LiBH4–2Ti was prepared by reactive mechanical grinding. The activation of MgH2–10Ni–2LiBH4–2Ti was completed after the first hydriding–dehydrding cycle. The hydriding rate decreases as the temperature increases due to the decrease in the driving force for the hydriding reaction. At the 1st cycle, the sample desorbs 1.45 wt% H for 10 min, 2.54 wt% H for 20 min, 3.13 wt% H for 30 min, and 3.40 wt% H for 60 min at 593 K under 1.0 bar H2. At the 2nd cycle, the sample absorbs 3.84 wt% H for 5 min, 3.96 wt% H for 10 min, and 4.05 wt% H for 60 min at 593 K under 12 bar H2. MgH2–10Ni–2LiBH4–2Ti after reactive mechanical grinding contained MgH2, Mg, Ni, TiH1.924, and MgO phases. The reactive mechanical grinding of Mg with Ni, LiBH4, and Ti is considered to create defects on the surface and in the interior of Mg (to facilitate nucleation), and to reduce the particle size of Mg (to shorten diffusion distances of hydrogen atoms). The formation of Mg2Ni during hydriding–dehydriding cycling increases the hydriding and dehydriding rates of the sample

  15. Chemical Hydride Slurry for Hydrogen Production and Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClaine, Andrew W

    2008-09-30

    The purpose of this project was to investigate and evaluate the attractiveness of using a magnesium chemical hydride slurry as a hydrogen storage, delivery, and production medium for automobiles. To fully evaluate the potential for magnesium hydride slurry to act as a carrier of hydrogen, potential slurry compositions, potential hydrogen release techniques, and the processes (and their costs) that will be used to recycle the byproducts back to a high hydrogen content slurry were evaluated. A 75% MgH2 slurry was demonstrated, which was just short of the 76% goal. This slurry is pumpable and storable for months at a time at room temperature and pressure conditions and it has the consistency of paint. Two techniques were demonstrated for reacting the slurry with water to release hydrogen. The first technique was a continuous mixing process that was tested for several hours at a time and demonstrated operation without external heat addition. Further work will be required to reduce this design to a reliable, robust system. The second technique was a semi-continuous process. It was demonstrated on a 2 kWh scale. This system operated continuously and reliably for hours at a time, including starts and stops. This process could be readily reduced to practice for commercial applications. The processes and costs associated with recycling the byproducts of the water/slurry reaction were also evaluated. This included recovering and recycling the oils of the slurry, reforming the magnesium hydroxide and magnesium oxide byproduct to magnesium metal, hydriding the magnesium metal with hydrogen to form magnesium hydride, and preparing the slurry. We found that the SOM process, under development by Boston University, offers the lowest cost alternative for producing and recycling the slurry. Using the H2A framework, a total cost of production, delivery, and distribution of $4.50/kg of hydrogen delivered or $4.50/gge was determined. Experiments performed at Boston

  16. Wettability of boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The wettability of boron carbide has been examined by means of the sessile drop method, using the following candidate alloys: (96wt%AG-4wt%Ti), (Ag-26.5wt%Cu-3wt%Ti), (Sn-10wt%Ag-4wt%Ti), Sn(99.95wt%) and Al(99.99wt%). The results show that B4C is completely wetted by the Ag-based alloys. Sn-10wt%Ag-4wt%Ti alloy and pure Al partly wet the B4C surface, while pure Sn does not wet B4C at all. For all the alloys used, except pure Sn, a reaction layer was observed at the interface between the ceramic part and the metal drop. Although the spreading kinetics of the Al-drop was much slower compared with the Ti-containing alloys, the reaction rate was considerably higher in the former case. This suggests that aluminium is an attractive candidate material for brazing of B4C. Formation of the low melting B2O3 at the B4C surface may cause oxidation of the filler metal during joining, which, in turn, leads to a low bond strength

  17. Simultaneous Heat and Mass Transfer in DU Hydriding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sources of nuclear fusion reaction are deuterium (D) and tritium (T). Generally, D is fused into T, which generates helium atoms and neutrons. At this time, a tremendous amount of energy is generated. D + T → 4He + n (E = 17.6 MeV) Hydrogen is a gas, and cannot be stored in large amounts. In addition, it can be explosive. Therefore, one of the storing methods for hydrogen is metal hydride. In this research, several kinds of metal hydrides including U, Zr, ZrCo, ZrNi, and LaNi5 have been simulated through modeling work of hydrogen absorption, desorption, and pressure effect in a bed using DU. For the exact modeling of the hydriding process, it is necessary to calculate simultaneous heat and mass transfer because, in the hydriding process, not only is hydrogen gas transported by mass transport and chemisorption but heat transfer also occurs through absorption. Therefore, in this paper, we tried to calculate the simultaneous heat and mass transfer using numerical analysis methods. Simultaneous heat and mass transfer in DU hydriding is well fitted compared to the experimental data, and is more reasonable considering only one variable. The hydriding process changes the temperature and atomic ratio simultaneously, and thus it is necessary to consider in company with two transport phenomena. The numerical analysis method applied Euler's method; however, the Runge-Kutta method is a more widely used numerical solution of a differential equation. Therefore, when analyzing the hydriding process, Runge-Kutta or another method will henceforth be applied

  18. Influence of uranium hydride oxidation on uranium metal behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work addresses concerns that the rapid, exothermic oxidation of active uranium hydride in air could stimulate an exothermic reaction (burning) involving any adjacent uranium metal, so as to increase the potential hazard arising from a hydride reaction. The effect of the thermal reaction of active uranium hydride, especially in contact with uranium metal, does not increase in proportion with hydride mass, particularly when considering large quantities of hydride. Whether uranium metal continues to burn in the long term is a function of the uranium metal and its surroundings. The source of the initial heat input to the uranium, if sufficient to cause ignition, is not important. Sustained burning of uranium requires the rate of heat generation to be sufficient to offset the total rate of heat loss so as to maintain an elevated temperature. For dense uranium, this is very difficult to achieve in naturally occurring circumstances. Areas of the uranium surface can lose heat but not generate heat. Heat can be lost by conduction, through contact with other materials, and by convection and radiation, e.g. from areas where the uranium surface is covered with a layer of oxidised material, such as burned-out hydride or from fuel cladding. These rates of heat loss are highly significant in relation to the rate of heat generation by sustained oxidation of uranium in air. Finite volume modelling has been used to examine the behaviour of a magnesium-clad uranium metal fuel element within a bottle surrounded by other un-bottled fuel elements. In the event that the bottle is breached, suddenly, in air, it can be concluded that the bulk uranium metal oxidation reaction will not reach a self-sustaining level and the mass of uranium oxidised will likely to be small in relation to mass of uranium hydride oxidised. (authors)

  19. Thermal conductivity of boron carbide-boron nitride composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that because of their preferred orientation, the addition of boron nitride dispersions to hot-pressed boron carbide was found to result in a considerable degree of anisotropy in thermal conductivity of the resulting composite, indicated by an increase in the thermal conductivity perpendicular to the hot-pressing direction by as much as a factor of 3 at the highest boron nitride volume fractions of this study, and a decrease in the thermal conductivity parallel to the hot-pressing direction by as much as a factor of 2. The composite data were found to be below the values expected from composite theory, which may represent indirect evidence for the existence of an interfacial thermal barrier

  20. The boron trifluoride nitromethane adduct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ownby, P. Darrell

    2004-02-01

    The separation of the boron isotopes using boron trifluoride·organic-donor, Lewis acid·base adducts is an essential first step in preparing 10B enriched and depleted crystalline solids so vital to nuclear studies and reactor applications such as enriched MgB 2, boron carbide, ZrB 2, HfB 2, aluminum boron alloys, and depleted silicon circuits for radiation hardening and neutron diffraction crystal structure studies. The appearance of this new adduct with such superior properties demands attention in the continuing search for more effective and efficient means of separation. An evaluation of the boron trifluoride nitromethane adduct, its thermodynamic and physical properties related to large-scale isotopic separation is presented. Its remarkably high separation factor was confirmed to be higher than the expected theoretical value. However, the reportedly high acid/donor ratio was proven to be an order of magnitude lower. On-going research is determining the crystal structure of deuterated and 11B enriched 11BF 3·CD 3NO 2 by X-ray and neutron diffraction.

  1. Boron carbide nanolumps on carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, J. Y.; Li, W. Z.; Wen, J. G.; Ren, Z. F.

    2002-01-01

    Boron carbide nanolumps are formed on the surface of multiwall carbon nanotubes by a solid-state reaction between boron and carbon nanotubes. The reaction is localized so that the integrity of the structure of carbon nanotubes is maintained. Inner layers of multiwall carbon nanotubes are also bonded to boron carbide nanolumps. These multiwall carbon nanotubes with boron carbide nanolumps are expected to be the ideal reinforcing fillers for high-performance composites because of the favorable morphology.

  2. Hydriding and neutron irradiation in zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The composition of Zircaloy-4 for nuclear applications is specified by the ASTM B350 Standard, that fixes the amount of alloying elements (Sn, Fe, Cr) and impurities (Ni, Hf, O, N, C, among others) to optimize good corrosion and mechanical behavior.The recycling of zircaloy-4 scrap and chips resulting from cladding tube fabrication is an interesting issue.However, changes in the final composition of the recycled material may occur due to contamination with tool pieces, stainless steel chips, turnings, etc. while scrap is stored and handled. Since the main components of the possible contaminants are Fe, Cr and Ni, it arises the interest in studying up to what limit the Fe, Ni and Cr contents could be exceeded beyond the standard specification without affecting significantly the alloy properties.Zircaloy-4 alloys elaborated with Fe, Cr and Ni additions and others of standard composition in use in nuclear plants are studied by tensile tests, SEM observations and EDS microanalysis.Some samples are tested in the initial condition and others after hydriding treatments and neutron irradiation in the RA6

  3. Reactions of NO with nitrogen hydrides x

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mebel, A. M.; Lin, M. C.

    In this review, we consider the reactions of NO ( x 1,2) with the nitrogen x hydrides NH, NH and NH . The reactions are relevant to the post-combustion, non-catalytic reduction of NO with NH in the thermal de-NO process and with x x HNCO in the rapid reduction of NO as well as to the thermal decomposition of x some high-energy materials, including ammonium dinitramide. The practical importance has motivated considerable theoretical interest in these reactions. We review numerous ab - initio molecular orbital studies of potential energy surfaces for NO NH and theoretical calculations of their kinetic parameters, such as x y thermal rate constants and branching ratios of various products. The most advanced theoretical calculations are carried out using the Gaussian-2 family of methods which provides the chemical accuracy (within 2 kcal mol ) for the energetics and molecular parameters of the reactants, products, intermediates and transition states. We present a detailed comparison of the theoretical results with available experimental data. We show that the reactions of NO with NH and NH x are very fast because they occur without a barrier and lead to the formation of multiple products which include radicals and stable molecules. The reactions of NO with NH , taking place by the H abstraction to form NH and HNO , are slow x x but still relevant to the NH de-NO system, because of their fast reverse processes x which have not yet been measured experimentally.

  4. NEW ADVANCES IN BORON SOIL CHEMISTRY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boron is an essential micronutrient element required for plant growth. Boron deficiency is wide-spread in crop plants throughout the world especially in coarse-textured soils in humid areas. Boron toxicity can also occur, especially in arid regions under irrigation. Plants respond directly to the...

  5. Micro-scale fracture experiments on zirconium hydrides and phase boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, H.; Roberts, S. G.; Gong, J.

    2016-07-01

    Fracture properties of micro-scale zirconium hydrides and phase boundaries were studied using microcantilever testing methods. FIB-machined microcantilevers were milled on cross-sectional surfaces of hydrided samples, with the most highly-stressed regions within the δ-hydride film, within the α-Zr or along the Zr-hydride interface. Cantilevers were notched using the FIB and then tested in bending using a nanoindenter. Load-displacement results show that three types of cantilevers have distinct deformation properties. Zr cantilevers deformed plastically. Hydride cantilevers fractured after a small amount of plastic flow; the fracture toughness of the δ-hydride was found to be 3.3 ± 0.4 MPam1/2 and SEM examination showed transgranular cleavage on the fracture surfaces. Cantilevers notched at the Zr-hydride interface developed interfacial voids during loading, at loads considerably lower than that which initiate brittle fracture of hydrides.

  6. Numerical simulation and performance test of metal hydride hydrogen storage system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Hsiang Yen, Bin-Hao Chen, Bao-Dong Chen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Metal hydride reactors are widely used in many industrial applications, such as hydrogen storage, thermal compression, heat pump, etc. According to the research requirement of metal hydride hydrogen storage, the thermal analyses have been implemented in the paper. The metal hydride reaction beds are considered as coupled cylindrical tube modules which combine the chemical absorption and desorption in metal hydride. The model is then used metal hydride LaNi5 as an example to predict the performance of metal hydride hydrogen storage devices, such as the position of hydration front and the thermal flux. Under the different boundary condition the characteristics of heat transfer and mass transfer in metal hydride have influence on the hydrogen absorption and desorption. The researches revealed that the scroll design can improve the temperature distribution in the reactor and the porous tube for directing hydrogen can increase the penetration depth of hydride reaction to decrease the hydrogen absorption time.

  7. Boron doping a semiconductor particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Gary Don; Reynolds, Jeffrey Scott; Brown, Louanne Kay

    1998-06-09

    A method (10,30) of boron doping a semiconductor particle using boric acid to obtain a p-type doped particle. Either silicon spheres or silicon powder is mixed with a diluted solution of boric acid having a predetermined concentration. The spheres are dried (16), with the boron film then being driven (18) into the sphere. A melt procedure mixes the driven boron uniformly throughout the sphere. In the case of silicon powder, the powder is metered out (38) into piles and melted/fused (40) with an optical furnace. Both processes obtain a p-type doped silicon sphere with desired resistivity. Boric acid is not a restricted chemical, is inexpensive, and does not pose any special shipping, handling, or disposal requirements.

  8. Sodium-based hydrides for thermal energy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, D. A.; Humphries, T. D.; Buckley, C. E.

    2016-04-01

    Concentrating solar-thermal power (CSP) with thermal energy storage (TES) represents an attractive alternative to conventional fossil fuels for base-load power generation. Sodium alanate (NaAlH4) is a well-known sodium-based complex metal hydride but, more recently, high-temperature sodium-based complex metal hydrides have been considered for TES. This review considers the current state of the art for NaH, NaMgH3- x F x , Na-based transition metal hydrides, NaBH4 and Na3AlH6 for TES and heat pumping applications. These metal hydrides have a number of advantages over other classes of heat storage materials such as high thermal energy storage capacity, low volume, relatively low cost and a wide range of operating temperatures (100 °C to more than 650 °C). Potential safety issues associated with the use of high-temperature sodium-based hydrides are also addressed.

  9. Influence of Specific Surface Area of Powder on Hydrogen Desorption Kinetics for Metal Hydrides

    CERN Document Server

    Drozdov, I V

    2014-01-01

    The observable results for desorption kinetics by powder of metal hydride on the example of mangesium hydride are reproduced with the model formulated in terms of specific surface of powder. A volumetric measurement of hydrogen desorption process is evaluated on an example of wet ball milled magnesium hydride, and can be applied generally for any metal hydride. The exact solution of the model reproduces the shape of experimental curves for desorption process providing a satisfying agreement with experimental data.

  10. Boron steel. I Part. Preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the advent of the first nuclear reactors arise the need for control rods and shielding duties for some types of radiations. One of the materials used for this purpose has been the high boron steel. This paper describes the melting and casting procedures employed for the production, at laboratory scale, of steels with Boron content ranging from 1 to 4 per cent, as well as the metallographic and X-Ray techniques used for the identification of the present phases. The electrolytic technique employed for the isolation of the Fe2B phase and its subsequent X-Ray identification has proved to be satisfactory. (Author) 11 refs

  11. Shear amorphization of boron suboxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report for the first time the shear-induced local amorphization of boron suboxide subjected to nanoindentation. The amorphous bands have a width of ∼1–3 nm and a length of 200–300 nm along the (01¯11) crystal plane. We show direct experimental evidence that the amorphous shear bands of boron suboxide are driven from the coalescence of dislocation loops under high shear stresses. These observations provide insights into the microscopic deformation and failure of high-strength and lightweight ceramics

  12. Thermal conductivity of boron carbides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, C.; Emin, D.; Gray, P. E.

    1985-01-01

    Knowledge of the thermal conductivity of boron carbide is necessary to evaluate its potential for high-temperature thermoelectric energy conversion applications. Measurements have been conducted of the thermal diffusivity of hot-pressed boron carbide BxC samples as a function of composition (x in the range from 4 to 9), temperature (300-1700 K), and temperature cycling. These data, in concert with density and specific-heat data, yield the thermal conductivities of these materials. The results are discussed in terms of a structural model that has been previously advanced to explain the electronic transport data. Some novel mechanisms for thermal conduction are briefly discussed.

  13. Mechanical properties of boron coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Internal stress of coatings will cause reliability problems, such as adhesion failure and peeling. We measured the internal stress in boron coatings, which was prepared by the ion plating method, with an apparatus based on the optically levered laser technique. The boron coatings exhibited large compressive stress in the range from -0.5 GPa to -2.6 GPa. It was found that these compressive stresses were decreasing functions of the deposition rate and were increasing functions of the ion bombardment energy. ((orig.))

  14. A study of advanced magnesium-based hydride and development of a metal hydride thermal battery system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chengshang

    Metal hydrides are a group of important materials known as energy carriers for renewable energy and thermal energy storage. A concept of thermal battery based on advanced metal hydrides is studied for heating and cooling of cabins in electric vehicles. The system utilizes a pair of thermodynamically matched metal hydrides as energy storage media. The hot hydride that is identified and developed is catalyzed MgH2 due to its high energy density and enhanced kinetics. TiV0.62Mn1.5, TiMn2, and LaNi5 alloys are selected as the matching cold hydride. A systematic experimental survey is carried out in this study to compare a wide range of additives including transitions metals, transition metal oxides, hydrides, intermetallic compounds, and carbon materials, with respect to their effects on dehydrogenation properties of MgH2. The results show that additives such as Ti and V-based metals, hydride, and certain intermetallic compounds have strong catalytic effects. Solid solution alloys of magnesium are exploited as a way to destabilize magnesium hydride thermodynamically. Various elements are alloyed with magnesium to form solid solutions, including indium and aluminum. Thermodynamic properties of the reactions between the magnesium solid solution alloys and hydrogen are investigated, showing that all the solid solution alloys that are investigated in this work have higher equilibrium hydrogen pressures than that of pure magnesium. Cyclic stability of catalyzed MgH2 is characterized and analyzed using a PCT Sievert-type apparatus. Three systems, including MgH2-TiH 2, MgH2-TiMn2, and MgH2-VTiCr, are examined. The hydrogenating and dehydrogenating kinetics at 300°C are stable after 100 cycles. However, the low temperature (25°C to 150°C) hydrogenation kinetics suffer a severe degradation during hydrogen cycling. Further experiments confirm that the low temperature kinetic degradation can be mainly related the extended hydrogenation-dehydrogenation reactions. Proof

  15. Boron-enhanced diffusion of boron from ultralow-energy boron implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have investigated the diffusion enhancement mechanism of BED (boron enhanced diffusion), wherein the boron diffusivity is enhanced three to four times over the equilibrium diffusivity at 1,050 C in the proximity of a silicon layer containing a high boron concentration. It is shown that BED is associated with the formation of a fine-grain polycrystalline silicon boride phase within an initially amorphous Si layer having a high B concentration. For 0.5 keV B+, the threshold implantation dose which leads to BED lies between 3 x 1014 and of 1 x 1015/cm-2. Formation of the shallowest possible junctions by 0.5 keV B+ requires that the implant dose be kept lower than this threshold

  16. A metal hydride-polymer composite for hydrogen storage applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To address the issue of the breakdown into fine powders that occurs in the practical use of metal hydrides, the possibility of using a polymeric material as a matrix that contains the active metal particles was experimentally assessed. A ball milling approach in the tumbling mode was used to develop a metal hydride-polymer composite with a high metal to polymer weight ratio. The alloy powder was blended with the polymer and a coating of the metal particles was obtained. The composite was consolidated by hot pressing and the pellets were characterized in terms of their hydriding-dehydriding properties. The materials did not show significant losses in either loading capacity or kinetic properties. The polymeric matrix resulted as being stable under hydrogen cycling. Further, from SEM observation it was confirmed that the metal powders remained embedded in the polymeric matrix even after a number of cycles and that the overall dimensional integrity was retained.

  17. Theoretical Estimate of Hydride Affinities of Aromatic Carbonyl Compounds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AI Teng; ZHU Xiao-Qing; CHENG Jin-Pei

    2003-01-01

    @@ Aromatic carbonyl compounds are one type of the most important organic compounds, and the reductions ofthem by hydride agents such as LiAlH4 or NaBH4 are widely used in organic synthesis. The reactivity of carbonyl compounds generally increases in the following order: ketone < aldehyde, and amide < acid < ester < acid halide, which could be related to their hydride affinities (HA). In the previous paper, Robert[1] calculated the absolute HAof a series of small non-aromatic carbonyl compounds. In this paper, we use DFT method at B3LYP/6-311 + + G (2d, 2p)∥B3LYP/6-31 + G* level to estimate hydride affinities of five groups of aromatic carbonyl compounds. The detailed results are listed in Table 1.

  18. Infrared diode laser spectroscopy of lithium hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fundamental and hot bands of the vibration--rotation transitions of 6 LiH, 7 LiH, 6 LiD, and 7 LiD were observed by infrared diode laser spectroscopy at Doppler-limited resolution. Lithium hydride molecules were produced by the reaction of the Li vapor with hydrogen at elevated temperatures. Some 40 transitions were observed and, after combined with submillimeter-wave spectra reported by G. M. Plummer et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 81, 4893 (1984)], were analyzed to yield Dunham-type constants with accuracies more than an order of magnitude higher than those published in the literature. It was clearly demonstrated that the Born--Oppenheimer approximation did not hold, and some parameters representing the breakdown were evaluated. The Born--Oppenheimer internuclear distance r/sup BO//sub e/ was derived to be 1.594 914 26 (59) A, where a new value of Planck's constant recommended by CODATA was employed. The relative intensity of absorption lines was measured to determine the ratio of the permanent dipole moment to its first derivative with respect to the internuclear distance: μ/sub e/ [(partialμpartialr)/sub e/ r/sub e/ ] = 1.743(86). The pressure broadening parameter Δν/sub p/ P was determined to be 6.40 (22) MHzTorr by measuring the linewidth dependence on the pressure of hydrogen, which was about four times larger than the value for the dipole--quadrupole interaction estimated by Kiefer and Bushkovitch's theory

  19. High-Spin Cobalt Hydrides for Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, Patrick L. [Yale University

    2013-08-29

    Organometallic chemists have traditionally used catalysts with strong-field ligands that give low-spin complexes. However, complexes with a weak ligand field have weaker bonds and lower barriers to geometric changes, suggesting that they may lead to more rapid catalytic reactions. Developing our understanding of high-spin complexes requires the use of a broader range of spectroscopic techniques, but has the promise of changing the mechanism and/or selectivity of known catalytic reactions. These changes may enable the more efficient utilization of chemical resources. A special advantage of cobalt and iron catalysts is that the metals are more abundant and cheaper than those currently used for major industrial processes that convert unsaturated organic molecules and biofeedstocks into useful chemicals. This project specifically evaluated the potential of high-spin cobalt complexes for small-molecule reactions for bond rearrangement and cleavage reactions relevant to hydrocarbon transformations. We have learned that many of these reactions proceed through crossing to different spin states: for example, high-spin complexes can flip one electron spin to access a lower-energy reaction pathway for beta-hydride elimination. This reaction enables new, selective olefin isomerization catalysis. The high-spin cobalt complexes also cleave the C-O bond of CO2 and the C-F bonds of fluoroarenes. In each case, the detailed mechanism of the reaction has been determined. Importantly, we have discovered that the cobalt catalysts described here give distinctive selectivities that are better than known catalysts. These selectivities come from a synergy between supporting ligand design and electronic control of the spin-state crossing in the reactions.

  20. Analytical boron diffusivity model in silicon for thermal diffusion from boron silicate glass film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurachi, Ikuo; Yoshioka, Kentaro

    2015-09-01

    An analytical boron diffusivity model in silicon for thermal diffusion from a boron silicate glass (BSG) film has been proposed in terms of enhanced diffusion due to boron-silicon interstitial pair formation. The silicon interstitial generation is considered to be a result of the silicon kick-out mechanism by the diffused boron at the surface. The additional silicon interstitial generation in the bulk silicon is considered to be the dissociation of the diffused pairs. The former one causes the surface boron concentration dependent diffusion. The latter one causes the local boron concentration dependent diffusion. The calculated boron profiles based on the diffusivity model are confirmed to agree with the actual diffusion profiles measured by secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) for a wide range of the BSG boron concentration. This analytical diffusivity model is a helpful tool for p+ boron diffusion process optimization of n-type solar cell manufacturing.

  1. Dissolution and Precipitation Temperatures of δ Hydrides in Zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anelastic effects due to the formation and dissolution of hydrides on crystal bar Zirconium (O-6 and 2x10-5 , in a gaseous atmosphere (He) to allow a better thermal conductivity inside the pendulum.Hydriding was achieved inside the pendulum by the inlet of hydrogen gas.The final hydrogen contents was determined by fusion analysis and resulted in 36 ppm.The first ''in situ'' hydriding is obtained by introducing an hydrogen pressure of 60kPa in the pendulum during 1h at 295K. Then, the hydrogen atmosphere is extracted by mechanical vacuum and an helium atmosphere is reinserted.The IF and G measurements are made in this condition. During the first heating an anomaly at 430K and a little step in the modulus G are obtained, indicating a d dissolution temperature TSSD of 430K for 8.6 wt ppm of H.After a solubilization of 10min at 495K, there are simultaneous effects: a step in G and an IF peak which is not enough developed on its right side.They presume a d precipitation temperature TSSP of 485K for 20 wt ppm of H. After a 1h at 490K, the peaks are again obtained with slight changes.The second ''in situ'' hydration during 8h at 173K, give rise to several peaks and modulus variations in the temperature range (300-400)K which are assessed to be due to transitions occurring to metastable γ and ε hydrides formed upon hydriding at low temperature, and to the δ hydride

  2. Energy management of fuel cell electric vehicle with hydrid tanks

    OpenAIRE

    Ravey, Alexandre; FAIVRE, Sébastien; HIGEL, Charles; HAREL, Fabien; Djerdir, Abdesslem

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel control strategy for fuel cell electric vehicle including hydrid tanks using fuzzy logic controller. The aim of the study is to manage both thermal and electric energy with the same controller in order to use the fuel cell system as a range extender by preventing the batteries state of charge to drop too quickly. The presented controller use both batteries state of charge and thermal status of hydrid tank to control the fuel cell power. This work is a part of the M...

  3. Hydriding and dehydriding properties of CaSi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hydriding and dehydriding properties of CaSi were investigated both theoretically and experimentally. First-principles calculations suggested that CaSiH n is thermodynamically stable. Experimentally, the p -c isotherms clearly demonstrated plateau pressures in a temperature range of 473-573 K and the maximum hydrogen content was 1.9 weight % (wt.%) under a hydrogen pressure of 9 MPa at 473 K. The structure of CaSiH n is different from those of ZrNi hydrides, although CaSi has the CrB-type structure as well as ZrNi

  4. Analysis of boronized wall in LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boronization has been carried out in some experimental fusion devices as one of wall conditioning Methods. The well-known merits of the boronization are as follows: 1) coated-boron on the first wall has strong gettering function for oxygen impurities and oxygen has been kept into boron films as a boron-oxide and 2) boron film covers first wall with apparently low Z materials facing the plasma. However, an operation scenario of boronization for next generation devices such as ITER is not optimized. In this paper, we discuss an optimized method of coated film uniformity in a wide area and a lifetime of boron film as an oxygen getter using experimental data in the large helical device (LHD). In LHD, boronization by glow discharges has been carried out a few times during each experimental campaign. Helium-diborane mixtured gas is used and plasma facing components (PFM) are stainless steel (SS) for the first wall and carbon for the divertor plates kept in the room temperature. Material probes made of SS316 and Si were installed in the vacuum vessel and exposed during the experimental campaign. Depth profiles of their impurities were analyzed using the X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and the Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Two types of gettering process by boron film have been investigated. One is the process during boronization and the other is that after boronization. Concerning a lifetime of boron film, the distribution of oxygen near the top surface region (0 to 20 nm) indicates a process of oxygen gettering, it shows a contribution after boronization. In this paper, these kinds of process using material probes are shown. (authors)

  5. Boron Poisoning of Plutonium Solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of a theoretical investigation into the possible relaxation of criticality concentration limits in wet chemical reprocessing plants, due to the introduction of boron poisoning, are reported. The following systems were considered: 1. 1 in. stainless steel tubes filled with boron carbide at various pitches in homogeneous mixtures of 239Pu (NO3)4, 5H2O and water. 2. 1 in. and 2 in borosilicate glass Raschig rings in homogeneous mixtures of 239Pu (NO3)4, 5H2O and water. 3. The concentration of natural boron required for k∞ = 1 in homogeneous mixtures of 239Pu-B-H2O. The method of calculation was Monte Carlo using the GEM code with Nuclear Data File cross-sections. The Raschig rings used are those commercially available. The core model consisted of a cubic arrangement of unit cubes of solution within each of which a Raschig ring was centrally placed. The arrangement was such that the rings were regularly stacked with axes parallel, but the side of the unit cube was fixed to preserve the random packing density. Comparison is made with other reported results on boron poisoning. (author)

  6. Boron sorption characteristics in resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of boron addition in a nuclear power plant is to control the reactivity. In PHWRs, it is injected into the moderator system in the form of boric anhydride solution, while in PHWRs, it is added to the primary heat transport system in the form of boric acid solution. The required boron levels in PHWRs are controlled by valving in strong base anion exchangers having exchangeable species in OD- form while in PHWRs, the same can be achieved by restoring to the use of Boron Thermal Regeneration System (BTRS). This system operates on the principle of existence of different amounts of various polyborate ions at different temperatures, solution pH's and the boric acid concentrations and on the reversible sorption of these polyions on strong base anion exchange resins. This report describes the salient features of boron sorption characteristics on four types of anion exchange resins, based on experimental data generated in the chemical laboratories of Reactor Engineering Division of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay. The report further makes an attempt to calculate the pH of the resin and solution phases and the percentages of different polyborates and undissociated boric acid, under the experimental conditions investigated. (author). 30 refs., 4 figs., 20 tables

  7. Advanced microstructure of boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werheit, Helmut; Shalamberidze, Sulkhan

    2012-09-26

    The rhombohedral elementary cell of the complex boron carbide structure is composed of B(12) or B(11)C icosahedra and CBC, CBB or B□B (□, vacancy) linear arrangements, whose shares vary depending on the actual chemical compound. The evaluation of the IR phonon spectra of isotopically pure boron carbide yields the quantitative concentrations of these components within the homogeneity range. The structure formula of B(4.3)C at the carbon-rich limit of the homogeneity range is (B(11)C) (CBC)(0.91) (B□B)(0.09) (□, vacancy); and the actual structure formula of B(13)C(2) is (B(12))(0.5)(B(11)C)(0.5)(CBC)(0.65)(CBB)(0.16) (B□B)(0.19), and deviates fundamentally from (B(12))CBC, predicted by theory to be the energetically most favourable structure of boron carbide. In reality, it is the most distorted structure in the homogeneity range. The spectra of (nat)B(x)C make it evident that boron isotopes are not randomly distributed in the structure. However, doping with 2% silicon brings about a random distribution. PMID:22945740

  8. Boron isotopes in geothermal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron is a highly mobile element and during water-rock reactions, boron is leached out of rocks with no apparent fractionation. In geothermal systems where the water recharging the systems are meteoric in origin, the B isotope ratio of the geothermal fluid reflects the B isotope ratio of the rocks. Seawater has a distinctive B isotope ratio and where seawater recharges the geothermal system, the B isotope ratio of the geothermal system reflects the mixing of rock derived B and seawater derived B. Any deviations of the actual B isotope ratio of a mixture reflects subtle differences in the water-rock ratios in the cold downwelling limb of the hydrothermal system. This paper will present data from a variety of different geothermal systems, including New Zealand; Iceland; Yellowston, USA; Ibusuki, Japan to show the range in B isotope ratios in active geothermal systems. Some of these systems show well defined mixing trends between seawater and the host rocks, whilst others show the boron isotope ratios of the host rock only. In geothermal systems containing high amounts of CO2 boron isotope ratios from a volatile B source can also be inferred. (auth)

  9. Exploring "aerogen-hydride" interactions between ZOF2 (Z = Kr, Xe) and metal hydrides: An ab initio study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esrafili, Mehdi D.; Mohammadian-Sabet, Fariba

    2016-06-01

    In this work, a new σ-hole interaction formed between ZOF2 (Z = Kr and Xe) as the Lewis acid and a series of metal-hydrides HMX (M = Be, Mg, Zn and X = H, F, CN, CH3) is reported. The nature of this interaction, called "aerogen-hydride" interaction, is unveiled by molecular electrostatic potential, non-covalent interaction, quantum theory of atoms in molecules and natural bond orbital analyses. Our results indicate that the aerogen-hydride interactions are quite strong and can be comparable in strength to other σ-hole bonds. An important charge-transfer interaction is also associated with the formation of OF2Z⋯HMX complexes.

  10. Observations on Hydride Structures at the Tip of Arrested Cracks Grown under Conditions of Delayed Hydride Cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One sample of Zr2.5%Nb and one sample of cold worked and stress relieved Zircaloy-4 which have been tested for hydrogen induced crack growth have been examined in the crack tip region with the aim of determining the mechanism behind the growth of cracks. The proposed mechanisms are brittle failure of a crack tip hydride and hydrogen enhanced localized shear. The examinations were done by TEM and SEM. However attempts to produce a TEM specimen with a thinned region at the tip of the crack were unsuccessful in both samples. One feature observed in the Zr2.5%Nb material may however be an indication of intense shear deformation at the tip of the crack. On the other hand all observations on the Zircaloy-4 sample indicate precipitation of hydrides ahead of the crack tip and the presence of hydrides on the crack flanks

  11. Raman spectroscopy of boron carbides and related boron-containing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raman spectra of crystalline boron, boron carbide, boron arsenide (B12As2), and boron phosphide (B12P2) are reported. The spectra are compared with other boron-containing materials containing the boron icosahedron as a structural unit. The spectra exhibit similar features some of which correlate with the structure of the icosahedral units of the crystals. The highest Raman lines appear to be especially sensitive to the B-B distance in the polar triangle of the icosahedron. Such Raman structural markers are potentially useful in efforts to tailor electronic properties of these high temperature semiconductors and thermoelectrics

  12. Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, N., E-mail: niranjan@igcar.gov.in [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Radhika, R. [Crystal Growth Centre, Anna University, Chennai (India); Kozakov, A.T. [Research Institute of Physics, Southern Federal University, Rostov-on-Don (Russian Federation); Pandian, R. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Chakravarty, S. [UGC-DAE CSR, Kalpakkam (India); Ravindran, T.R.; Dash, S.; Tyagi, A.K. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite is observed in macroscopic sliding condition. • Low friction coefficient is observed in basal plane and becomes high in prismatic direction. • 3D phase of boronated graphite transformed into 2D structure after friction test. • Chemical activity is high in prismatic plane forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces. - Abstract: Anisotropic friction behavior in macroscopic scale was observed in boronated graphite. Depending upon sliding speed and normal loads, this value was found to be in the range 0.1–0.35 in the direction of basal plane and becomes high 0.2–0.8 in prismatic face. Grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction analysis shows prominent reflection of (0 0 2) plane at basal and prismatic directions of boronated graphite. However, in both the wear tracks (1 1 0) plane become prominent and this transformation is induced by frictional energy. The structural transformation in wear tracks is supported by micro-Raman analysis which revealed that 3D phase of boronated graphite converted into a disordered 2D lattice structure. Thus, the structural aspect of disorder is similar in both the wear tracks and graphite transfer layers. Therefore, the crystallographic aspect is not adequate to explain anisotropic friction behavior. Results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy shows weak signature of oxygen complexes and functional groups in wear track of basal plane while these species dominate in prismatic direction. Abundance of these functional groups in prismatic plane indicates availability of chemically active sites tends to forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces which eventually increases friction coefficient.

  13. Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite is observed in macroscopic sliding condition. • Low friction coefficient is observed in basal plane and becomes high in prismatic direction. • 3D phase of boronated graphite transformed into 2D structure after friction test. • Chemical activity is high in prismatic plane forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces. - Abstract: Anisotropic friction behavior in macroscopic scale was observed in boronated graphite. Depending upon sliding speed and normal loads, this value was found to be in the range 0.1–0.35 in the direction of basal plane and becomes high 0.2–0.8 in prismatic face. Grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction analysis shows prominent reflection of (0 0 2) plane at basal and prismatic directions of boronated graphite. However, in both the wear tracks (1 1 0) plane become prominent and this transformation is induced by frictional energy. The structural transformation in wear tracks is supported by micro-Raman analysis which revealed that 3D phase of boronated graphite converted into a disordered 2D lattice structure. Thus, the structural aspect of disorder is similar in both the wear tracks and graphite transfer layers. Therefore, the crystallographic aspect is not adequate to explain anisotropic friction behavior. Results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy shows weak signature of oxygen complexes and functional groups in wear track of basal plane while these species dominate in prismatic direction. Abundance of these functional groups in prismatic plane indicates availability of chemically active sites tends to forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces which eventually increases friction coefficient

  14. Chemical Hydride Slurry for Hydrogen Production and Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClaine, Andrew W

    2008-09-30

    The purpose of this project was to investigate and evaluate the attractiveness of using a magnesium chemical hydride slurry as a hydrogen storage, delivery, and production medium for automobiles. To fully evaluate the potential for magnesium hydride slurry to act as a carrier of hydrogen, potential slurry compositions, potential hydrogen release techniques, and the processes (and their costs) that will be used to recycle the byproducts back to a high hydrogen content slurry were evaluated. A 75% MgH2 slurry was demonstrated, which was just short of the 76% goal. This slurry is pumpable and storable for months at a time at room temperature and pressure conditions and it has the consistency of paint. Two techniques were demonstrated for reacting the slurry with water to release hydrogen. The first technique was a continuous mixing process that was tested for several hours at a time and demonstrated operation without external heat addition. Further work will be required to reduce this design to a reliable, robust system. The second technique was a semi-continuous process. It was demonstrated on a 2 kWh scale. This system operated continuously and reliably for hours at a time, including starts and stops. This process could be readily reduced to practice for commercial applications. The processes and costs associated with recycling the byproducts of the water/slurry reaction were also evaluated. This included recovering and recycling the oils of the slurry, reforming the magnesium hydroxide and magnesium oxide byproduct to magnesium metal, hydriding the magnesium metal with hydrogen to form magnesium hydride, and preparing the slurry. We found that the SOM process, under development by Boston University, offers the lowest cost alternative for producing and recycling the slurry. Using the H2A framework, a total cost of production, delivery, and distribution of $4.50/kg of hydrogen delivered or $4.50/gge was determined. Experiments performed at Boston

  15. Uranium Hydride Nucleation Kinetics: Effects of Oxide Thickness and Vacuum Outgassing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many factors such as impurities in the oxide and metal, microstructure, gas impurities, and oxide thickness may influence the rate and location of the nucleation of hydride on uranium. This work has concentrated on isolating one of these variables, the oxide thickness, and measuring the effect of the oxide thickness on uranium hydride nucleation. Uranium samples, all from the same lot, were prepared with different oxide thicknesses. The oxide thickness was measured using Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy. Oxidized uranium samples were then exposed to ultra-high purity hydrogen gas under constant volume conditions. Decreases in pressure indicated hydrogen uptake by the sample. The time for hydride nucleation--as well as the maximum hydriding rate--was then calculated from the measured decreases in pressure. The time to nucleate a hydride was found to increase whereas the maximum hydriding rate was found to decrease with increasing oxide thickness. The density of hydride pits also decreased with increasing oxide thickness. The observed results support the argument that the nucleation of hydride is controlled somewhat by diffusion of hydrogen through the oxide layer. Vacuum outgassing of samples, thereby removing the oxide impurities and keeping the oxide thickness constant, dramatically decreased the nucleation time and increased the maximum hydriding rate. Again, this is consistent with hydrogen diffusion through the oxide controlling the nucleation of hydride. Impurities in the oxide layer can decrease the diffusivity of hydrogen and therefore delay the nucleation of uranium hydride

  16. Internal friction study of hydrides in zirconium at low hydrogen contents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Internal friction and shear modulus measurements were carried out on crystal bar zirconium in the as received and hydride conditions using an inverted forced pendulum. Hydriding was achieved in two ways: inside and out of the pendulum. The final hydrogen content determined by fusion analysis in the 'in situ' hydride sample was of 36 ppm. Another sample was hydride by the cathodic charge method with 25 ppm. The thermal solid solubility (TSS) phase boundary presents hysteresis between the precipitation (TSSP) and the dissolution (TSSD) temperatures for the zirconium hydrides. During the first thermal cycling the anelastic effects could be attributed to the δ, ε and metastable γ zirconium hydrides. After 'in situ' annealing at 490 K, these peaks completely disappear in the electrolytically charged sample, while in the 'in situ' hydride, the peaks remain with decreasing intensity. This effect can be understood in terms of the different surface conditions of the samples. (author)

  17. Comparison of irradiation hardening and microstructure evolution in ion-irradiated delta and epsilon hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oono, Naoko, E-mail: n-oono@eng.hokudai.ac.jp [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Kasada, Ryuta [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Higuchi, Toru; Sakamoto, Kan; Nakatsuka, Masafumi [Nippon Nuclear Fuel Development Co., Ltd., 2163 Naritacho Oarai, Higashi-Ibaraki, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Hasegawa, Akiko; Kondo, Sosuke; Iwata, Noriyuki Y.; Matsui, Hideki; Kimura, Akihiko [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2013-11-15

    A δ-Zr-hydride was irradiated with 6.4 MeV Fe{sup 3+} ions to clarify the relationship between hardening and microstructural changes of bulk Zr-hydrides under neutron irradiation. Irradiation hardening was measured by nanoindentation tests. Transmission electron microscope cross-sectional observations showed that the deformation mechanism of the δ-Zr-hydride was both slip and twinning. Dislocation loops were observed in the irradiated hydride matrix. These irradiation-induced defects make slip deformation difficult and consequently promote the twin deformation of δ-Zr-hydride. This work is a continuation of the previous our work (J. Nucl. Mater. 419 (2011) 366–370) focused upon ε-Zr-hydride and we discuss a comparison between the two Zr-hydrides.

  18. Cooling Performance Improvement of the Heat Driven Type Metal Hydride Refrigerator-Heat Transfer Enhancement Influence of Metal Hydride Sheet Loading Into a Metal Hydride Particle Bed

    OpenAIRE

    Bae, Sangchul; Katsuta, Masafumi; Homma, Ikuto; Morita, Eiji

    2012-01-01

    In the refrigeration and air conditioning fields, the demands of energy conservation and renewable energy have been increased recently. In this study, we aim at the development of the heat driven type metal hydride (abbr., MH) that can be driven by the low temperature exhaust or solar heat under 100ᵒC. In order to use this system commercially, heat transfer enhancement of MH particle bed, activation characteric improvement and production cost reduction of MH must be achieved. In this study, w...

  19. Synthesis of boron nitride nanotubes by boron ink annealing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lu Hua; Chen, Ying; Glushenkov, Alexey M

    2010-03-12

    Ball-milling and annealing is one effective method for the mass production of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs). We report that the method has been modified to a boron (B) ink annealing method. In this new process, the nanosize ball-milled B particles are mixed with metal nitrate in ethanol to form an ink-like solution, and then the ink is annealed in nitrogen-containing gas to form nanotubes. The new method greatly enhances the yield of BNNTs, giving a higher density of nanotubes. These improvements are caused by the addition of metal nitrate and ethanol, both of which can strongly boost the nitriding reaction, as revealed by thermogravimetric analysis. The size and structure of BNNTs can be controlled by varying the annealing conditions. This high-yield production of BNNTs in large quantities enables the large-scale application of BNNTs. PMID:20154372

  20. Synthesis of boron nitride nanotubes by boron ink annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball-milling and annealing is one effective method for the mass production of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs). We report that the method has been modified to a boron (B) ink annealing method. In this new process, the nanosize ball-milled B particles are mixed with metal nitrate in ethanol to form an ink-like solution, and then the ink is annealed in nitrogen-containing gas to form nanotubes. The new method greatly enhances the yield of BNNTs, giving a higher density of nanotubes. These improvements are caused by the addition of metal nitrate and ethanol, both of which can strongly boost the nitriding reaction, as revealed by thermogravimetric analysis. The size and structure of BNNTs can be controlled by varying the annealing conditions. This high-yield production of BNNTs in large quantities enables the large-scale application of BNNTs.

  1. Electrochromism of Mg-Ni hydride switchable mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isidorsson, Jan; Giebels, I. A. M. E.; Di Vece, M.; Griessen, Ronald

    2001-11-01

    Switchable mirrors have so far been made of rare-earth and rare-earth-magnesium based metal-hydrides. In this investigation we study Mg-Ni-hydrides, which have been shown by Richardson et al. to exhibit switchable properties similar to those of the rare-earth hydrides. Cyclic voltammetry on MgzNiHx samples with 0.8 less than z less than 3.7 shows that addition of one Mg atom per Mg2Ni gives the best ab/desorption kinetics for hydrogen. X- ray diffraction reveals a structural change as hydrogen is absorbed. The metal-insulator transition is confirmed with simultaneous resistivity measurements. A pressure- composition isotherm of Mg2NiHx is also determined electrochemically. Optical spectrometry during gas loading gives an optical band gap of 1.6 eV for Mg2NiH4. This gap increases with increasing Mg content in a way similar to that of the Mg-doped rare-earth hydrides.

  2. Structural deformation of metallic uranium surrounding hydride growth sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • UH3 formation on uranium surfaces by a controlled uptake of hydrogen at 240 °C. • Large hydride growths (35–125 μm in diameter) form at the surface. • Confined hydride expansion during growth generates stress in the subsurface. • EBSD scans found micro-cracking and twins as forms of stress relief in the metal. - Abstract: Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) was utilised to probe the microstructure of uranium metal in the vicinity of surface corrosion pits, resulting from hydrogen exposure (5 × 104 Pa, at 240 °C). Microstructural analysis of the surface revealed a subtle increase of grain orientation variation for grains at the border of the hydride growths. Cross sectional analysis, at pit sites, revealed significant microstructure deformation in the form of crystal twinning and micro-cracking beneath the surface. These observations provide qualitative evidence that local stress intensities generated as a consequence of hydride growth and confinement, were sufficient to cause deformation within the parent metal

  3. Design and integration of a hydrogen storage on metallic hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work presents a hydrogen storage system using metal hydrides for a Combined Heat and Power (CHP) system. Hydride storage technology has been chosen due to project specifications: high volumetric capacity, low pressures (≤ 3.5 bar) and low temperatures (≤ 75 C: fuel cell temperature). During absorption, heat from hydride generation is dissipated by fluid circulation. An integrated plate-fin type heat exchanger has been designed to obtain good compactness and to reach high absorption/desorption rates. At first, the storage system has been tested in accordance with project specifications (absorption 3.5 bar, desorption 1.5 bar). Then, the hydrogen charge/discharge times have been decreased to reach system limits. System design has been used to simulate thermal and mass comportment of the storage tank. The model is based on the software Fluent. We take in consideration heat and mass transfers in the porous media during absorption/desorption. The hydride thermal and mass behaviour has been integrated in the software. The heat and mass transfers experimentally obtained have been compared to results calculated by the model. The influence of experimental and numerical parameters on the model behaviour has also been explored. (author)

  4. Nanocrystalline Metal Hydrides Obtained by Severe Plastic Deformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Huot

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It has recently been shown that Severe Plastic Deformation (SPD techniques could be used to obtain nanostructured metal hydrides with enhanced hydrogen sorption properties. In this paper we review the different SPD techniques used on metal hydrides and present some specific cases of the effect of cold rolling on the hydrogen storage properties and crystal structure of various types of metal hydrides such as magnesium-based alloys and body centered cubic (BCC alloys. Results show that generally cold rolling is as effective as ball milling to enhance hydrogen sorption kinetics. However, for some alloys such as TiV0.9Mn1.1 alloy ball milling and cold rolling have detrimental effect on hydrogen capacity. The exact mechanism responsible for the change in hydrogenation properties may not be the same for ball milling and cold rolling. Nevertheless, particle size reduction and texture seems to play a leading role in the hydrogen sorption enhancement of cold rolled metal hydrides.

  5. Study on the effect of hydrogen purification with metal hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of hydrogen purification with a AB5-type metal hydride were studied for the development of hydrogen purification system. The system set up two packed-beds, heat exchangers, data acquisition equipment and automatic control unit was used in the work and the compositions of two different gas-mixtures have CO, CH4, CO2, O2 and N2. We investigated about its tolerance against impurities, pressure-composition-isotherm and life cycle test, XRD and particle size analysis with a used metal hydride. Gas chromatograph was used for the analysis of feed and product gas. The used metal hydride is a La, Nd-rich Mm-based AB5 type which has the hydrogen storage capacity of 1.4 wt%. In life cycle test, there were no change of plateau pressure and hysteresis after 600 cycles but hydrogen storage capacity was decreased by about 6.8% and 10.7% after 220, 600 cycles, respectively. The used sample is high strong against CH4 and CO2 but very weak in CO atmosphere. The hydrogen purification performance with gas mixtures was decreased in the order of CH4 ≥ CO ≥ O2 ≥ N2 ≥ CO2. The reason CO investigated high purification effect in gas mixture is due to a strong chemisorption in metal hydride matrix that CO was not released out of the alloy. (authors)

  6. Hydrogen adsorption on palladium and palladium hydride at 1 bar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Martin; Skulason, Egill; Nielsen, Gunver;

    2010-01-01

    The dissociative sticking probability for H-2 on Pd films supported on sputtered Highly Ordered Pyrolytic Graphite (HOPG) has been derived from measurements of the rate of the H-D exchange reaction at 1 bar. The sticking probability for H-2, S. is higher on Pd hydride than on Pd (a factor of 1.4 ...

  7. Process of forming a sol-gel/metal hydride composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congdon, James W.

    2009-03-17

    An external gelation process is described which produces granules of metal hydride particles contained within a sol-gel matrix. The resulting granules are dimensionally stable and are useful for applications such as hydrogen separation and hydrogen purification. An additional coating technique for strengthening the granules is also provided.

  8. Synthesis of vinyl boronates from aldehydes by a practical boron-Wittig reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombs, John R; Zhang, Liang; Morken, James P

    2015-04-01

    A highly stereoselective boron-Wittig reaction between stable and readily accessible 1,1-bis(pinacolboronates) and aldehydes furnishes a variety of synthetically useful di- and trisubstituted vinyl boronate esters. PMID:25799147

  9. Thin-film metal hydrides for solar energy applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mongstad, Trygve Tveiteraas

    2012-11-01

    Thin-film metal hydrides may become important solar energy materials in the future. This thesis demonstrates interesting material properties of metal hydride films, relevant for applications as semiconducting materials for photovoltaic (PV) solar cells and for regulation of light using smart window technology.The work presented here has comprised an experimental study, focusing on three different materials: Magnesium hydride (MgH2), magnesium nickel hydride (Mg2NiH4) and yttrium hydride (YHx). Reactive sputter deposition was used to prepare the metal hydride film samples.This synthesis method is relatively uncommon for metal hydrides. Here,the first demonstration of reactive sputtering synthesis for YHx and Mg2NiH4 is given. Different challenges in forming singlephase, pure metal hydrides were identified: MgH2 could not be deposited without 3-16% metallic Mg present in the films, and YHx was found to react strong-ly to oxygen (O) during the deposition process. On the other hand, Mg2NiH4 films formed easily and apparently without major metallic clusters and with low O content.Mg2NiH4 is a semiconductor with an optical band gap that is suitable for PV solar cells. This study has showed that films with promising electrical and optical properties can be synthesized using reactive cosputtering of Mg and Ni. Using optical methods, the band gap for the as deposited samples was estimated to 1.54-1.76 eV, depending on the Mg-Ni composition. The asdeposited films were amorphous or nano-crystalline, but could be crystallized into the high-temperature fcc structure of Mg2NiH4 using heat treatment at 523 K. The band gap of the crystalline films was 2.1-2.2 eV, depending on the composition.A pronounced photochromic reaction to visible and UV light was observed for transparent yttrium hydride (T-YHx) samples. The optical transmission was reduced when the samples were illuminated, and the original optical transmission was restored when the samples were kept under dark conditions

  10. Synthesis of hydrides by interaction of intermetallic compounds with ammonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarasov, Boris P., E-mail: tarasov@icp.ac.ru [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka 142432 (Russian Federation); Fokin, Valentin N.; Fokina, Evelina E. [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka 142432 (Russian Federation); Yartys, Volodymyr A., E-mail: volodymyr.yartys@ife.no [Institute for Energy Technology, Kjeller NO 2027 (Norway); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim NO 7491 (Norway)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • Interaction of the intermetallics A{sub 2}B, AB, AB{sub 2}, AB{sub 5} and A{sub 2}B{sub 17} with NH{sub 3} was studied. • The mechanism of interaction of the alloys with ammonia is temperature-dependent. • Hydrides, hydridonitrides, disproportionation products or metal–N–H compounds are formed. • NH{sub 4}Cl was used as an activator of the reaction between ammonia and intermetallics. • Interaction with ammonia results in the synthesis of the nanopowders. - Abstract: Interaction of intermetallic compounds with ammonia was studied as a processing route to synthesize hydrides and hydridonitrides of intermetallic compounds having various stoichiometries and types of crystal structures, including A{sub 2}B, AB, AB{sub 2}, AB{sub 5} and A{sub 2}B{sub 17} (A = Mg, Ti, Zr, Sc, Nd, Sm; B = transition metals, including Fe, Co, Ni, Ti and nontransition elements, Al and B). In presence of NH{sub 4}Cl used as an activator of the reaction between ammonia and intermetallic alloys, their interaction proceeds at rather mild P–T conditions, at temperatures 100–200 °C and at pressures of 0.6–0.8 MPa. The mechanism of interaction of the alloys with ammonia appears to be temperature-dependent and, following a rise of the interaction temperature, it leads to the formation of interstitial hydrides; interstitial hydridonitrides; disproportionation products (binary hydride; new intermetallic hydrides and binary nitrides) or new metal–nitrogen–hydrogen compounds like magnesium amide Mg(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}. The interaction results in the synthesis of the nanopowders where hydrogen and nitrogen atoms become incorporated into the crystal lattices of the intermetallic alloys. The nitrogenated materials have the smallest particle size, down to 40 nm, and a specific surface area close to 20 m{sup 2}/g.

  11. Synthesis of Boron Nanowires, Nanotubes, and Nanosheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajen B. Patel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of boron nanowires, nanotubes, and nanosheets using a thermal vapor deposition process is reported. This work confirms previous research and provides a new method capable of synthesizing boron nanomaterials. The materials were made by using various combinations of MgB2, Mg(BH42, MCM-41, NiB, and Fe wire. Unlike previously reported methods, a nanoparticle catalyst and a silicate substrate are not required for synthesis. Two types of boron nanowires, boron nanotubes, and boron nanosheets were made. Their morphology and chemical composition were determined through the use of scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and electron energy loss spectroscopy. These boron-based materials have potential for electronic and hydrogen storage applications.

  12. Analysis of magnetron sputtered boron oxide films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buc, Dalibor [Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava (Slovakia); Bello, Igor [City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Caplovicova, Maria [Comenius University in Bratislava (Slovakia); Mikula, Milan; Kovac, Jaroslav; Hotovy, Ivan [Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava (Slovakia); Chong, Yat Min [City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Siu, Guei Gu [City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)], E-mail: apggsiu@cityu.edu.hk

    2007-10-15

    Boron oxide films were grown on silicon substrates by radio-frequency (rf) unbalanced magnetron sputtering of a boron target in argon-oxygen gas mixtures with different compositions. Microscopic analyses show that overall boron oxide films are amorphous. The film prepared at oxygen/argon flow rate ratio > 0.05 developed large crystallites of boric acid in localize areas of amorphous boron oxide matrices. These crystallites were unstable and at electron microscopic analysis they continuously transformed to a cubic HBO{sub 2} phase and then completely vanished leaving an underlying amorphous boron oxide film behind. The analyses indicate the coexistence of B{sub 6}O, HBO{sub 2} crystallites and amorphous boron oxide matrices. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra revealed spectral bands of BOH, BO, BOB and BH groups. Nanohardness and elastic modulus of a film prepared at low oxygen concentration approach 30 and 300 GPa, respectively. These parameters however vary with deposition conditions.

  13. Microwave sintering of boron carbide composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron carbide is an important ceramic material because of its high hardness and low specific gravity. it is used for applications involving impact and wear resistance. The disadvantages of boron carbide materials are difficulty in fabrication and sensitivity to brittle fracture. These problems are significantly reduced by production of cermets based on boron carbide and aluminum or aluminum alloys. Microwave heating of boron carbide materials results in ultrarapid heating and high temperatures. Therefore, a finer microstructure is obtained. The objective of this work was to define a technology that would allow the manufacture of boron carbide ceramics having mechanical properties similar to those exhibited by hot-pressed specimens. microwave heating would be used for the densification step. Mixtures of boron carbide and aluminum were considered for this research because aluminum simultaneously acts as a sintering aid and introduces phases that contribute to toughness enhancement

  14. Prediction of boron carbon nitrogen phase diagram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Sanxi; Zhang, Hantao; Widom, Michael

    We studied the phase diagram of boron, carbon and nitrogen, including the boron-carbon and boron-nitrogen binaries and the boron-carbon-nitrogen ternary. Based on the idea of electron counting and using a technique of mixing similar primitive cells, we constructed many ''electron precise'' structures. First principles calculation is performed on these structures, with either zero or high pressures. For the BN binary, our calculation confirms that a rhmobohedral phase can be stablized at high pressure, consistent with some experimental results. For the BCN ternary, a new ground state structure is discovered and an Ising-like phase transition is suggested. Moreover, we modeled BCN ternary phase diagram and show continuous solubility from boron carbide to the boron subnitride phase.

  15. CVD-produced boron filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawner, F. E.; Debolt, H. E.; Suplinskas, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    A technique for producing boron filaments with an average tensile strength of 6.89 GPa has been developed which involves longitudinal splitting of the filament and core (substrate) removal by etching. Splitting is accomplished by a pinch wheel device which continuously splits filaments in lengths of 3.0 m by applying a force to the side of the filament to create a crack which is then propagated along the axis by a gentle sliding action. To facilitate the splitting, a single 10 mil tungsten substrate is used instead of the usual 0.5 mil substrate. A solution of hot 30% hydrogen peroxide is used to remove the core without attacking the boron. An alternative technique is to alter the residual stress by heavily etching the filament. Average strengths in the 4.83-5.52 GPa range have been obtained by etching an 8 mil filament to 4 mil.

  16. Boron clusters in luminescent materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sanjoy; Thilagar, Pakkirisamy

    2016-01-21

    In recent times, luminescent materials with tunable emission properties have found applications in almost all aspects of modern material sciences. Any discussion on the recent developments in luminescent materials would be incomplete if one does not account for the versatile photophysical features of boron containing compounds. Apart from triarylboranes and tetra-coordinate borate dyes, luminescent materials consisting of boron clusters have also found immense interest in recent times. Recent studies have unveiled the opportunities hidden within boranes, carboranes and metalloboranes, etc. as active constituents of luminescent materials. From simple illustrations of luminescence, to advanced applications in LASERs, OLEDs and bioimaging, etc., the unique features of such compounds and their promising versatility have already been established. In this review, recent revelations about the excellent photophysical properties of such materials are discussed. PMID:26574714

  17. Effects of B, Fe, Gd, Mg, and C on the structure, hydrogen storage, and electrochemical properties of vanadium-free AB2 metal hydride alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → B, Fe, Gd, Mg, and C were studied as modifiers to the V-free AB2 MH alloys. → Mg and C show improvement in charge retention. → Fe, Gd, and B improve the low temperature performance. - Abstract: The structural, gaseous phase hydrogen storage, and electrochemical properties of a series of vanadium-free AB2 Laves phase based metal hydride alloys with various modifiers (Ti5Zr30Cr9Mn19Co5Ni32-xMx, M = B, Fe, Gd, Mg, and C) were studied. While B and Fe completely dissolve in the main AB2 phases, Gd, Mg, and C form individual secondary phases. The solubilities of Gd, Mg, and C in the AB2 phases are not detectable, 0.3 at.%, and very low, respectively. The C14 crystallite sizes, C15 phase abundances, and Zr7Ni10 phase abundances of modified alloys are larger than those of the base alloy. All modified alloys show decreases in plateau pressure, reversible gaseous phase storage capacity, formation activity, electrochemical capacity, and cycle life. A small amount of boron (0.2 at.%) and carbon in the alloy improve the half-cell high-rate dischargeability and bulk hydrogen diffusion. All modifiers, except for boron, reduce the surface exchange reaction current densities of the alloys. Both Mg and C show improvement in charge retention. Full-cell high-rate performance is improved by adding only a small amount of boron (0.2 at.%). Fe, Gd and 0.2 at.% of boron improve the low-temperature performance of the sealed batteries.

  18. Conduction mechanism in boron carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, C.; Emin, D.

    1984-01-01

    Electrical conductivity, Seebeck-coefficient, and Hall-effect measurements have been made on single-phase boron carbides, B(1-x)C(x), in the compositional range from 0.1 to 0.2 X, and between room temperature and 1273 K. The results indicate that the predominant conduction mechanism is small-polaron hopping between carbon atoms at geometrically inequivalent sites.

  19. Sintering behavior of boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pressureless sintering behavior of boron carbide (B4C) in argon was studied, with change in time and temperature, using carbon as sintering aid. Carbon was added via fenolic resin, acting also as a binder. After isostatic pressing the specimens were sintered in a graphite furnace at 19600C/1h, 21600C/15 minutes and 1h and 22000C/1h. The achieved density was 97% of the theoretical. Some mechanical properties and microstructural aspects have been evaluated. (author)

  20. Boron Enrichment in Martian Clay

    OpenAIRE

    James D Stephenson; Lydia J Hallis; Kazuhide Nagashima; Freeland, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    We have detected a concentration of boron in martian clay far in excess of that in any previously reported extra-terrestrial object. This enrichment indicates that the chemistry necessary for the formation of ribose, a key component of RNA, could have existed on Mars since the formation of early clay deposits, contemporary to the emergence of life on Earth. Given the greater similarity of Earth and Mars early in their geological history, and the extensive disruption of Earth's earliest minera...

  1. Synthesis and enhanced hydrogen desorption kinetics of magnesium hydride using hydriding chemical vapor synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin-Ho [Icheon Branch, Korea Institute of Ceramic Engineering and Technology (KICET), Icheon-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Byung-Goan [Korea Energy Materials Co.Ltd., 409, Daegu Technopark, 1-11, Hosan-Dong, Dalse-Gu 704-230 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Yong-Mook, E-mail: dake@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry, Dongguk University-Seoul, 100715 Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We synthesized pure MgH{sub 2} by a hydriding chemical vapor synthesis process in a hydrogen atmosphere. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The particle size HCVS-MgH{sub 2} was drastically reduced to the sub-micron or micrometer-scale. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HCVS-MgH{sub 2} showed different shapes (needle-like nanofibers and angulated plate) depending on the deposited position. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HCVS-MgH{sub 2} desorbed hydrogen up to about 7.2 wt% and 7.1 wt%. - Abstract: This paper describes the hydriding chemical vapor synthesis (HCVS) of the hydrogen storage alloy MgH{sub 2} in a hydrogen atmosphere and the product's hydrogenation properties. Mg powder was used as a starting material to produce submicron MgH{sub 2} and uniformly heated to a temperature of 600 Degree-Sign C for Mg vaporization. The effects of deposited positions in HCVS reactor on the morphology and the composition of the obtained products were examined by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analyses. It is clearly seen that after the HCVS process, the particle size of synthesized MgH{sub 2} was drastically reduced to the sub-micron or micrometer-scale and these showed different shapes (needle-like nanofibers and angulated plate) depending on the deposited position. The hydrogen desorption temperatures of HCVS-MgH{sub 2} were measured using a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). It was found that after the HCVS process, the desorption temperature of HCVS-MgH{sub 2} decreased from 430 to 385 Degree-Sign C and, simultaneously, the smallest particle size and the highest specific surface area were obtained. These observations indicate that the minimum hydrogen desorption temperature of HCVS-MgH{sub 2} powder with needle-like form can be obtained, and that this temperature is dependent on the particle size and the specific surface area of the products. The thermogravimetric

  2. Boron removal from geothermal waters by electrocoagulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most of the geothermal waters in Turkey contain extremely high concentration of boron when they are used for irrigation. The use of geothermal waters for irrigation can results in excess amount deposition of boron in soil. On the other hand, a minimal boron concentration is required for irrigational waters. In this study, electrocoagulation (EC) was selected as a treatment process for the removal of boron from thermal waters obtained from Ilica-Erzurum in Turkey. Current density (CD), pH of solution and temperature of solution were selected as operational parameters. The results showed that boron removal efficiency increased from pH 4.0 to 8.0 and decreased at pH 10.0. Although boron removal efficiency was highest at pH 8.0, energy consumption was very high at this pH value compared to other pH intervals. Boron removal efficiency reached to 95% with increasing current density from 1.5 to 6.0 mA/cm2, but energy consumption was also increased in this interval. At higher temperatures of solution, such as 313 and 333 K, boron removal efficiency increased. At optimum conditions, boron removal efficiency in geothermal water reached up to 95%

  3. Boron removal from geothermal waters by electrocoagulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilmaz, A. Erdem [Atatuerk University, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Environmental Engineering., 25240 Erzurum (Turkey)], E-mail: aerdemy@atauni.edu.tr; Boncukcuoglu, Recep [Atatuerk University, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Environmental Engineering., 25240 Erzurum (Turkey); Kocakerim, M. Muhtar [Atatuerk University, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, 25240 Erzurum (Turkey); Yilmaz, M. Tolga; Paluluoglu, Cihan [Atatuerk University, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Environmental Engineering., 25240 Erzurum (Turkey)

    2008-05-01

    Most of the geothermal waters in Turkey contain extremely high concentration of boron when they are used for irrigation. The use of geothermal waters for irrigation can results in excess amount deposition of boron in soil. On the other hand, a minimal boron concentration is required for irrigational waters. In this study, electrocoagulation (EC) was selected as a treatment process for the removal of boron from thermal waters obtained from Ilica-Erzurum in Turkey. Current density (CD), pH of solution and temperature of solution were selected as operational parameters. The results showed that boron removal efficiency increased from pH 4.0 to 8.0 and decreased at pH 10.0. Although boron removal efficiency was highest at pH 8.0, energy consumption was very high at this pH value compared to other pH intervals. Boron removal efficiency reached to 95% with increasing current density from 1.5 to 6.0 mA/cm{sup 2}, but energy consumption was also increased in this interval. At higher temperatures of solution, such as 313 and 333 K, boron removal efficiency increased. At optimum conditions, boron removal efficiency in geothermal water reached up to 95%.

  4. Boron deposition from fused salts. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A partial evaluation of the feasibility of a process to electrodeposit pure coherent coatings of elemental boron from molten fluorides has been performed. The deposit produced was powdery and acicular, unless the fluoride melt was purified to have very low oxygen concentration. When the oxygen activity was reduced in the melt by addition of crystalline elemental boron, dense, amorphous boron deposit was produced. The boron deposits produced had cracks but were otherwise pure and dense and ranged up to 0.35 mm thick. Information derived during this project suggests that similar deposits might be obtained crack-free up to 1.00 mm thick by process modifications and improvements

  5. Exploring metal hydrides using autoclave and multi-anvil hydrogenations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puhakainen, Kati

    Metal hydride materials have been intensively studied for hydrogen storage applications. In addition to potential hydrogen economy applications, metal hydrides offer a wide variety of other interesting properties. For example, hydrogen-dominant materials, which are hydrides with the highest hydrogen content for a particular metal/semimetal composition, are predicted to display high-temperature superconductivity. On the other side of the spectrum are hydrides with small amounts of hydrogen (0.1 - 1 at.%) that are investigated as viable magnetic, thermoelectric or semiconducting materials. Research of metal hydride materials is generally important to gain fundamental understanding of metal-hydrogen interactions in materials. Hydrogenation of Zintl phases, which are defined as compounds between an active metal (alkali, alkaline earth, rare earth) and a p-block metal/semimetal, were attempted by a hot sintering method utilizing an autoclave loaded with gaseous hydrogen (Hydride formation competes with oxidative decomposition of a Zintl phase. The oxidative decomposition, which leads to a mixture of binary active metal hydride and p-block element, was observed for investigated aluminum (Al) and gallium (Ga) containing Zintl phases. However, a new phase Li2Al was discovered when Zintl phase precursors were synthesized. Using the single crystal x-ray diffraction (SCXRD), the Li2Al was found to crystallize in an orthorhombic unit cell (Cmcm) with the lattice parameters a = 4.6404(8) Å, b = 9.719(2) Å, and c = 4.4764(8) Å. Increased demand for materials with improved properties necessitates the exploration of alternative synthesis methods. Conventional metal hydride synthesis methods, like ball-milling and autoclave technique, are not responding to the demands of finding new materials. A viable alternative synthesis method is the application of high pressure for the preparation of hydrogen-dominant materials. Extreme pressures in the gigapascal ranges can open access to

  6. Hydride redistribution and crack growth in Zr-2.5 wt.% Nb stressed in torsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of applied shear stresses on zirconium hydride solubility in a zirconium alloy was investigated. Recent studies have shown that zirconium hydride precipiates probably nucleate and grow by means of a shear transformation mechanism. It is postulated that these transformation shear strains can interact with applied shear stress gradients in the same way that the dilatational strains can interact with a dilatational stress gradient, providing a driving force for hydride accumulation, hydride embrittlement and crack propagation. To test this proposition, crack growth experiments were carried out under torsional loading conditions on hydrided, round notched bar specimens of cold-worked Zr-2.5 wt.% Nb cut from Pickering-type pressure tube material. Postmortem metallographic examination of the hydride distribution in these samples showed that, in many cases, the hydrides appeared to have reoriented in response to the applied shear stress and that hydride accumulation at the notch tip had occurred. However, except in a few cases, the rate of accumulation of reoriented hydrides at the notch tip due to applied shear stresses was much less than the rate due to corresponding applied uniaxial stresss. Moreover, the process in shear appears to be more sensitive to the inital hydride size. Attempts to elucidate the fracture mechanism by fractographic examination using scanning and replica transmission electron microscopy proved to be inconclusive because of smearing of the fracture face. (auth)

  7. Metal Hydride Wall Stress Measurements on a Four-Inch Short (FISH) Bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 38 cm (15 inch) long metal hydride bed fabricated using 11.4 cm (4.5 inch) O.D., standard schedule 316/316L stainless steel pipe was fitted with 22 strain gauges to measure tangential and longitudinal stress resulting from hydride absorption and desorption cycling. Tests were conducted using two different LaNi4.25Al0.75 metal hydride fill-levels in the bed.Tests conducted with hydride filled to two-thirds (1.75L) of the 2.63L total bed volume resulted in a maximum stress less than one-third of the pipe's ASME Code allowable, for hydride absorption up to a hydrogen-to-metal ratio (H/M) of 0.86. After 15 absorption/desorption tests and hydride passivation, examination of the bed interior revealed a significant decrease in particle size and increase in hydride height. The second fill level had 0.4L of fresh hydride added to the bed's cycled hydride material, and 56 absorption/desorption tests, up to a gas loading of 0.83 H/M performed. Second fill tests resulted in maximum stresses less than 40% of the ASME Code allowable. Post-test bed radiographs showed a further increase in the apparent hydride fill height, and internal component deformation

  8. In situ study of hydride precipitation kinetics and re-orientation in Zircaloy using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The orientation and distribution of hydrides formed in zirconium alloy nuclear fuel cladding can strongly influence material behavior and in particular resistance to crack growth. The hydride microstructure and hydride platelet orientation (whether in-plane or radial relative to the cladding tubes) are crucial to determining cladding failure limits during mechanical testing. Hydride formation is normally studied by post-facto metallography, performed at room temperature and in the absence of applied stress. This study uses synchrotron radiation to observe in situ the kinetics of hydride dissolution and precipitation in previously hydrided Zircaloy samples. The experiments allow the direct observation of hydride dissolution, re-precipitation, and re-orientation, during heating and cooling under load. The solubility limits and the hydride-matrix orientation relationship determined from in situ experiments were in good agreement with previous post-facto examinations of bulk materials. The present measurements performed under stress and at temperature showed a characteristic diffraction signature of reoriented hydrides. The results suggest a threshold stress for hydride re-orientation between 75 and 80 MPa for the microstructure/texture studied. These results are discussed in light of existing knowledge.

  9. Composite Materials for Hazard Mitigation of Reactive Metal Hydrides.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratt, Joseph William; Cordaro, Joseph Gabriel; Sartor, George B.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Reeder, Craig L.

    2012-02-01

    In an attempt to mitigate the hazards associated with storing large quantities of reactive metal hydrides, polymer composite materials were synthesized and tested under simulated usage and accident conditions. The composites were made by polymerizing vinyl monomers using free-radical polymerization chemistry, in the presence of the metal hydride. Composites with vinyl-containing siloxane oligomers were also polymerized with and without added styrene and divinyl benzene. Hydrogen capacity measurements revealed that addition of the polymer to the metal hydride reduced the inherent hydrogen storage capacity of the material. The composites were found to be initially effective at reducing the amount of heat released during oxidation. However, upon cycling the composites, the mitigating behavior was lost. While the polymer composites we investigated have mitigating potential and are physically robust, they undergo a chemical change upon cycling that makes them subsequently ineffective at mitigating heat release upon oxidation of the metal hydride. Acknowledgements The authors would like to thank the following people who participated in this project: Ned Stetson (U.S. Department of Energy) for sponsorship and support of the project. Ken Stewart (Sandia) for building the flow-through calorimeter and cycling test stations. Isidro Ruvalcaba, Jr. (Sandia) for qualitative experiments on the interaction of sodium alanate with water. Terry Johnson (Sandia) for sharing his expertise and knowledge of metal hydrides, and sodium alanate in particular. Marcina Moreno (Sandia) for programmatic assistance. John Khalil (United Technologies Research Corp) for insight into the hazards of reactive metal hydrides and real-world accident scenario experiments. Summary In an attempt to mitigate and/or manage hazards associated with storing bulk quantities of reactive metal hydrides, polymer composite materials (a mixture of a mitigating polymer and a metal hydride) were synthesized and tested

  10. Effect of alloy elements and hydride morphology on hydrogen embrittlement of zirconium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of Nb and Sn on hydride embrittlement of Zr alloys were investigated. For this, experimental Zr alloys were prepared in a sheet shape and charged with hydrogen. The microstructure and hydride morphology were analyzed and the tensile properties were measured to understand the role of Nb and Sn on the hydride embrittlement of Zr alloy. With addition of Nb and Sn, recrystallization was retarded during the final annealing heat treatment. The retardation was mainly caused from β-Nb precipitates and Sn solute atoms, which was confirmed from texture analyses. Of the two, Sn was found to more effective in retarding recrystallization. When hydrogen was charged, hydride clusters with stacked hydride platelets were observed in unalloyed Zr. However, with addition of Nb and Sn, such hydride clusters were replaced with hydrides platelets which were more or less aligned with the rolling direction and linked up on the rolling plane, and hydride length and the spacing between hydrides were increased. This change in hydride morphology was caused by the retardation of recrystallization. Again, Sn was found to be more effective in in modifying the hydride morphology and aligning hydrides on the rolling plane. Both Nb and Sn contributed to the strengthening of Zr alloys, but Sn is more effective in strengthening than Nb. However, tensile strengths of the experimental alloys were nearly independent of the absorbed hydrogen contents. While ductility was reduced with increasing hydrogen contents, the degree of ductility loss was dependent on Nb and Sn contents which increased hydrogen solubility and retarded recrystallization. For alloys with 1%-Nb and/or 1%-Sn, increase in hydrogen solubility was the main contributor to increase in resistance to hydride embrittlement. On the other hand, for an alloy with 2%-Nb resulted in large amount of β-Nb precipitates, which in turn significantly retarded recrystallization. Therefore, the added contribution of retardation of

  11. Method for determination of boron carbide in wurtzite-like boron nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A technique for increase of sensitivity and analysis accuracy while boron carbide determination in wurtzite-like boron nitride is proposed. Boron nitride with an addition of boron carbide is bjected to treatment by the mixture of concentrated sulphuric acid and 0.1-0.5 N of porassium bichromate solution at ratio of (2-1):1 at the temperature of mixture boiling. Boron carboide content is calculated according to the quantity of restored Cr(3+), which is determined by titration of Cr(6+) excess with the Mohr's salt solution

  12. Boron coating on boron nitride coated nuclear fuels by chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durmazucar, Hasan H.; Guenduez, Guengoer E-mail: ggunduz@metu.edu.tr

    2000-12-01

    Uranium dioxide-only and uranium dioxide-gadolinium oxide (5% and 10%) ceramic nuclear fuel pellets which were already coated with boron nitride were coated with thin boron layer by chemical vapor deposition to increase the burn-up efficiency of the fuel during reactor operation. Coating was accomplished from the reaction of boron trichloride with hydrogen at 1250 K in a tube furnace, and then sintering at 1400 and 1525 K. The deposited boron was identified by infrared spectrum. The morphology of the coating was studied by using scanning electron microscope. The plate, grainy and string (fiber)-like boron structures were observed.

  13. Boron coating on boron nitride coated nuclear fuels by chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium dioxide-only and uranium dioxide-gadolinium oxide (5% and 10%) ceramic nuclear fuel pellets which were already coated with boron nitride were coated with thin boron layer by chemical vapor deposition to increase the burn-up efficiency of the fuel during reactor operation. Coating was accomplished from the reaction of boron trichloride with hydrogen at 1250 K in a tube furnace, and then sintering at 1400 and 1525 K. The deposited boron was identified by infrared spectrum. The morphology of the coating was studied by using scanning electron microscope. The plate, grainy and string (fiber)-like boron structures were observed

  14. Discovery of Novel Complex Metal Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage through Molecular Modeling and Combinatorial Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesch, David A; Adriaan Sachtler, J.W. J.; Low, John J; Jensen, Craig M; Ozolins, Vidvuds; Siegel, Don; Harmon, Laurel

    2011-02-14

    alanate from alkali hydride, Al and hydrogen, was hampering reversibility. The reverse reaction was then studied for the same phase diagram, starting with LiH, NaH, and MgH2, and Al. The study was extended to phase diagrams including KH and CaH2 as well. The observed hydrogen storage capacity in the Al hexahydrides was less than 4 wt. %, well short of DOE targets. The HT assay came on line and after certification with studies on NaAlH4, was first applied to the LiNH2 - LiBH4 - MgH2 phase diagram. The 60-point study elucidated trends within the system locating an optimum material of 0.6 LiNH2 0.3 MgH2 0.1 LiBH4 that stored about 4 wt. % H2 reversibly and operated below 220 °C. Also present was the phase Li4(NH2)3BH4, which had been discovered in the LiNH2 -LiBH4 system. This new ternary formulation performed much better than the well-known 2 LiNH2MgH2 system by 50 °C in the HT assay. The Li4(NH2)3BH4 is a low melting ionic liquid under our test conditions and facilitates the phase transformations required in the hydrogen storage reaction, which no longer relies on a higher energy solid state reaction pathway. Further study showed that the 0.6 LiNH2 0.3 MgH2 0.1 LiBH4 formulation was very stable with respect to ammonia and diborane desorption, the observed desorption was from hydrogen. This result could not have been anticipated and was made possible by the efficiency of HT combinatorial methods. Investigation of the analogous LiNH2 LiBH4 CaH2 phase diagram revealed new reversible hydrogen storage materials 0.625 LiBH4 + 0.375 CaH2 and 0.375 LiNH2 + 0.25 LiBH4 + 0.375 CaH2 operating at 1 wt. % reversible hydrogen below 175 °C. Powder x-ray diffraction revealed a new structure for the spent materials which had not been previously observed. While the storage capacity was not impressive, an important aspect is that it boron appears to participate in a low temperature reversible reaction. The last major area of study also focused on activating boron-based materials in

  15. Some physical properties of compacted specimens of highly dispersed boron carbide and boron suboxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Structure, shear modulus and internal friction (IF) of compacted specimens of boron carbide and boron suboxide have been investigated. Microtwins and stacking faults were observed along the {100} plane systems of polycrystalline specimens of boron carbide. Electrical conductivity of the specimens was that of p-type. Concentration of holes varied from 1017 to 1019 cm-3. The IF was measured in the temperature range 80-300 K. It was shown that the IF of boron carbide and that of boron suboxide were characterized with a set of similar relaxation processes. Mechanisms of the relaxation processes in boron carbide and boron suboxide are discussed in terms of the Hasiguti model of interaction between dislocations and point defects

  16. Boron carbide synthesis by carbothermic reduction of boron oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron carbide (B4C) is a ceramic material of technological applications due to its extreme hardness and high chemical as well as thermal stability. Some parameters of the process for obtaining B4C by carbothermic reduction of B2O3 have been determined. The starting powders and the final products have been analysed by chemical, spectrographic and X-ray diffraction methods. The results show that the B4C obtained by the carbothermic reduction process is suitable for applications with a definite determination of the free carbon content. (author)

  17. FEASIBILITY OF RECYCLING PLUTONIUM AND MINOR ACTINIDES IN LIGHT WATER REACTORS USING HYDRIDE FUEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this DOE NERI program sponsored project was to assess the feasibility of improving the plutonium (Pu) and minor actinide (MA) recycling capabilities of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) by using hydride instead of oxide fuels. There are four general parts to this assessment: (1) Identifying promising hydride fuel assembly designs for recycling Pu and MAs in PWRs; (2) Performing a comprehensive systems analysis that compares the fuel cycle characteristics of Pu and MA recycling in PWRs using the promising hydride fuel assembly designs identified in Part 1 versus using oxide fuel assembly designs; (3) Conducting a safety analysis to assess the likelihood of licensing hydride fuel assembly designs; and (4) Assessing the compatibility of hydride fuel with cladding materials and water under typical PWR operating conditions Hydride fuel was found to offer promising transmutation characteristics and is recommended for further examination as a possible preferred option for recycling plutonium in PWRs

  18. FEASIBILITY OF RECYCLING PLUTONIUM AND MINOR ACTINIDES IN LIGHT WATER REACTORS USING HYDRIDE FUEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenspan, Ehud; Todreas, Neil; Taiwo, Temitope

    2009-03-10

    The objective of this DOE NERI program sponsored project was to assess the feasibility of improving the plutonium (Pu) and minor actinide (MA) recycling capabilities of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) by using hydride instead of oxide fuels. There are four general parts to this assessment: 1) Identifying promising hydride fuel assembly designs for recycling Pu and MAs in PWRs 2) Performing a comprehensive systems analysis that compares the fuel cycle characteristics of Pu and MA recycling in PWRs using the promising hydride fuel assembly designs identified in Part 1 versus using oxide fuel assembly designs 3) Conducting a safety analysis to assess the likelihood of licensing hydride fuel assembly designs 4) Assessing the compatibility of hydride fuel with cladding materials and water under typical PWR operating conditions Hydride fuel was found to offer promising transmutation characteristics and is recommended for further examination as a possible preferred option for recycling plutonium in PWRs.

  19. Formation and growth of hydride blisters in Zr-2.5Nb pressure tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydride blisters were formed on the outer surface of Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube by a nonuniform steady thermal diffusion process. A thermal gradient was applied to the pressure tube with a heat bath kept at a temperature of 415 .deg. C and an aluminum cold finger cooled with flowing water of 15 .deg. C. Optical microscopy and three-dimensional laser profilometry were used to characterize the hydride blisters with different hydrogen concentrations and thermal diffusion time. Hydride blisters were expected to start at a hydrogen concentration of 30 - 70 ppm and a thermal diffusion time of 4 - 6x105 sec. The hydride blister size increases with higher hydrogen concentrations and longer thermal diffusion time. Some of the samples revealed cracks on the hydride blisters. The ratio of hydride blister depth to height was estimated as approximately 8:1

  20. Molecular early main group metal hydrides: synthetic challenge, structures and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harder, Sjoerd

    2012-11-25

    Within the general area of early main group metal chemistry, the controlled synthesis of well-defined metal hydride complexes is a rapidly developing research field. As group 1 and 2 metal complexes are generally highly dynamic and lattice energies for their [MH](∞) and [MH(2)](∞) salts are high, the synthesis of well-defined soluble hydride complexes is an obvious challenge. Access to molecular early main group metal hydrides, however, is rewarding: these hydrocarbon-soluble metal hydrides are highly reactive, have found use in early main group metal catalysis and are potentially also valuable molecular model systems for polar metal hydrides as a hydrogen storage material. The article focusses specifically on alkali and alkaline-earth metal hydride complexes and discusses the synthetic challenge, molecular structures, reactivity and applications. PMID:23012695

  1. On the high-pressure superconducting phase in platinum hydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczȩśniak, D.; Zemła, T. P.

    2015-08-01

    Motivated by the ambiguous experimental data for the superconducting phase in silane (SiH4), which may originate from platinum hydride (PtH), we provide a theoretical study of the superconducting state in the latter alloy. The quantitative estimates of the thermodynamics of PtH at 100 GPa are given for a wide range of Coulomb pseudopotential values ({μ }*) within the Eliashberg formalism. The obtained critical temperature value ({T}{{C}}\\in for {μ }*\\in ) agrees well with the experimental TC for SiH4, which may be ascribed to PtH. Moreover, the calculated characteristic thermodynamic ratios exceed the predictions of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory, implying the occurrence of strong-coupling and retardation effects in PtH. We note that our results may be of high relevance for future theoretical and experimental studies on hydrides.

  2. X-ray photoemission spectroscopy study of zirconium hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) measurements are reported for ZrH/sub 1.65/ and Zr metal. The valence-band measurements are compared with available band-theory density-of-states calculations for the metal and hydride. The hydride spectrum differs significantly from the metal spectrum. Most important, a strong peak associated with hydrogen s electrons appears approximately 7 eV below the Fermi level. XPS measurements of Zr 4p core levels show a binding-energy shift of 1 eV between Zr metal and ZrH/sub 1.65/. It is argued that this shift results from charge readjustment in the vicinity of the Zr site. With the addition of hydrogen, net charge must be transferred from the Zr site to the hydrogen site. A charge-density analysis based on simplified cluster calculations is presented

  3. Effects of metastability on hydrogen sorption in fluorine substituted hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinatel, E.R.; Corno, M.; Ugliengo, P.; Baricco, M., E-mail: marcello.baricco@unito.it

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • Fluorine substitution in simple metal hydrides has been modelled. • The stability of the MH{sub (1−x)}F{sub x} solid solutions has been discussed. • Conditions for reversibility of sorption reactions have been suggested. - Abstract: In this work ab initio calculations and Calphad modelling have been coupled to describe the effect of fluorine substitution on the thermodynamics of hydrogenation–dehydrogenation in simple hydrides (NaH, AlH{sub 3} and CaH{sub 2}). These example systems have been used to discuss the conditions required for the formation of a stable hydride–fluoride solid solution necessary to obtain a reversible hydrogenation reaction.

  4. Hydride precipitation in zirconium studied by pendulum techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of the precipitation peak, the autotwisting strain and the properties of hydride dislocations have been used to map the hydrogen terminal solid solubility boundary in polycrystalline samples and a single-crystal sample of α-zirconium. A low-frequency torsion pendulum was employed for some of the measurements and a low-frequency flexure pendulum for others. These pendulum techniques were successful in extending measurements of the hydrogen terminal solid solubility boundary in α-zirconium to the relatively low hydrogen concentration range 2 to 50 μg/g of technological interest in the nuclear industry. In addition, the results were used to obtain qualitative and quantitative information about the stress dependence of the hydrogen terminal solid solubility boundary and the kinetics of hydride precipitation or dissolution in response to a step change in the applied stress

  5. Detecting low concentrations of plutonium hydride with magnetization measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Wook; Mun, E. D.; Baiardo, J. P.; Zapf, V. S.; Mielke, C. H. [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, MPA-CMMS, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Smith, A. I.; Richmond, S.; Mitchell, J.; Schwartz, D. [Nuclear Material Science Group, MST-16, LANL, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2015-02-07

    We report the formation of plutonium hydride in 2 at. % Ga-stabilized δ-Pu, with 1 at. % H charging. We show that magnetization measurements are a sensitive, quantitative measure of ferromagnetic plutonium hydride against the nonmagnetic background of plutonium. It was previously shown that at low hydrogen concentrations, hydrogen forms super-abundant vacancy complexes with plutonium, resulting in a bulk lattice contraction. Here, we use magnetization, X-ray, and neutron diffraction measurements to show that in addition to forming vacancy complexes, at least 30% of the H atoms bond with Pu to precipitate PuH{sub x} on the surface of the sample with x ∼ 1.9. We observe magnetic hysteresis loops below 40 K with magnetic remanence, consistent with ferromagnetic PuH{sub 1.9}.

  6. Detecting low concentrations of plutonium hydride with magnetization measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the formation of plutonium hydride in 2 at. % Ga-stabilized δ-Pu, with 1 at. % H charging. We show that magnetization measurements are a sensitive, quantitative measure of ferromagnetic plutonium hydride against the nonmagnetic background of plutonium. It was previously shown that at low hydrogen concentrations, hydrogen forms super-abundant vacancy complexes with plutonium, resulting in a bulk lattice contraction. Here, we use magnetization, X-ray, and neutron diffraction measurements to show that in addition to forming vacancy complexes, at least 30% of the H atoms bond with Pu to precipitate PuHx on the surface of the sample with x ∼ 1.9. We observe magnetic hysteresis loops below 40 K with magnetic remanence, consistent with ferromagnetic PuH1.9

  7. Development of a novel metal hydride-air secondary battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamburzev, S.; Zhang, W.; Velev, O.A.; Srinivasan, S.; Appleby, A.J. [Texas A and M University, College Station (United States). Center for Electrochemical Systems and Hydrogen Research; Visintin, A. [Universidad Nacional de La Plata (Argentina). Insituto Nacional de Investigaciones Fisicoquimica Teoricas y Applicadas

    1998-05-01

    A laboratory metal hydride/air cell was evaluated. Charging was via a bifunctional air gas-diffusion electrode. Mixed nickel and cobalt oxides, supported on carbon black and activated carbon, were used as catalysts in this electrode. At 30 mA cm{sup -2} in 6 M KOH, the air electrode potentials were -0.2 V (oxygen reduction) and +0.65 V (oxygen evolution) vs Hg/HgO. The laboratory cell was cycled for 50 cycles at the C/2 rate (10 mA cm{sup -2}). The average discharge/charge voltages of the cell were 0.65 and 1.6 V, respectively. The initial capacity of the metal hydride electrode decreased by about 15% after 50 cycles. (author)

  8. Influence of oxide layer on hydrogen desorption from zirconium hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen desorption from zirconium hydride with hydrogen content of 1.95 H/Zr in He and He-5%O2 atmospheres was studied by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). The morphology, structure and valence states of the oxide layer formed on the surface of zirconium hydride were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). It was found that hydrogen desorption is retarded in the presence of oxygen. Heating in He leads to a large desorption range starting at 500 deg. C while heating in He-5%O2 atmosphere delays decomposition to relatively higher temperature of 525 deg. C. A protective oxide layer composed of monoclinic ZrO2 and small amount of tetragonal ZrO1.88, which acts as a very effective diffusion barrier. The O-H bond was observed in the oxide layer, which is beneficial to fix hydrogen atoms and prevent hydrogen diffusion

  9. Possible toxicity of boron on sugar cane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bravo C., M.

    Analyses of necrotic and green leaf tissues from sugar cane grown in the Tambo Valley (Arequipa, Peru) have shown that the boron concentration in necrotic tissue (average 657.7 ppm) is several times higher than that in the green tissue (average 55.7 ppm). This suggests that the necrosis may be due to boron toxicity.

  10. New techniques for producing thin boron films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review will be presented of methods for producing thin boron films using an electron gun. Previous papers have had the problem of spattering of the boron source during the evaporation. Methods for reducing this problem will also be presented. 12 refs., 4 figs

  11. Fabrication of boron-phosphide neutron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron phosphide is a potentially viable candidate for high neutron flux neutron detectors. The authors have explored chemical vapor deposition methods to produce such detectors and have not been able to produce good boron phosphide coatings on silicon carbide substrates. However, semi-conducting quality films have been produced. Further testing is required

  12. Computational Evidence for the Smallest Boron Nanotube

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xian Jie LIN; Dong Ju ZHANG; Cheng Bu LIU

    2006-01-01

    The structure of boron nanotubes (BNTs) was found not to be limited to hexagonal pyramidal structures. Based on density functional theory calculations we provided evidence for the smallest boron nanotube, a geometrical analog of the corresponding carbon nanotube. As shown by our calculations, the smallest BNT possesses highly structural, dynamical, and thermal stability, which should be interest for attempts at its synthesis.

  13. Boron carbide whiskers produced by vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    1965-01-01

    Boron carbide whiskers have an excellent combination of properties for use as a reinforcement material. They are produced by vaporizing boron carbide powder and condensing the vapors on a substrate. Certain catalysts promote the growth rate and size of the whiskers.

  14. Boron Carbides As Thermo-electric Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Charles

    1988-01-01

    Report reviews recent theoretical and experimental research on thermoelectric materials. Recent work with narrow-band semiconductors demonstrated possibility of relatively high thermoelectric energy-conversion efficiencies in materials withstanding high temperatures needed to attain such efficiencies. Among promising semiconductors are boron-rich borides, especially boron carbides.

  15. Nuclear fuel management and boron carbide coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years one way of introducing burnable absorber is to coat the fuel pellets by a thin layer of burnable absorber so called integral fuel burnable absorber (IFBA). In this method the fuel is coated with boron nitride or boron carbide. Boron has low absorption cross-section and when it exists on the surface of the fuel, it interacts with thermalized neutron. B4C is a boron compound, which can be used for coating the nuclear fuel. It has high thermal stability and withstands high pressure and temperatures. High technology product of boron carbide has different ratio of B: C. But in nuclear reactor when boron carbide is used, it must be rich with boron. In this research chemical vapor decomposition (CVD) has been using boron trichloride and carbon tetra chloride for reactant materials. The experiments were carried out at high temperatures (1050 degree Celsius, 1225 degree Celsius and 1325 degree Celsius). The coated samples were analyzed using X-Ray diffractometer (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and will be presented in this paper. It was seen that decreasing the reaction temperature caused an increase on the quality and thickness of the coating

  16. Effect of thermo-mechanical cycling on zirconium hydride reorientation studied in situ with synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colas, Kimberly B.; Motta, Arthur T.; Daymond, Mark R.; Almer, Jonathan D.

    2013-09-01

    The circumferential hydrides normally present in nuclear reactor fuel cladding after reactor exposure may dissolve during drying for dry storage and re-precipitate when cooled under load into a more radial orientation, which could embrittle the fuel cladding. It is necessary to study the rates and conditions under which hydride reorientation may happen in order to assess fuel integrity in dry storage. The objective of this work is to study the effect of applied stress and thermal cycling on the hydride morphology in cold-worked stress-relieved Zircaloy-4 by combining conventional metallography and in situ X-ray diffraction techniques. Metallography is used to study the evolution of hydride morphology after several thermo-mechanical cycles. In situ X-ray diffraction performed at the Advanced Photon Source synchrotron provides real-time information on the process of hydride dissolution and precipitation under stress during several thermal cycles. The detailed study of diffracted intensity, peak position and full-width at half-maximum provides information on precipitation kinetics, elastic strains and other characteristics of the hydride precipitation process. The results show that thermo-mechanical cycling significantly increases the radial hydride fraction as well as the hydride length and connectivity. The radial hydrides are observed to precipitate at a lower temperature than circumferential hydrides. Variations in the magnitude and range of hydride strains due to reorientation and cycling have also been observed. These results are discussed in light of existing models and experiments on hydride reorientation. The study of hydride elastic strains during precipitation shows marked differences between circumferential and radial hydrides, which can be used to investigate the reorientation process. Cycling under stress above the threshold stress for reorientation drastically increases both the reoriented hydride fraction and the hydride size. The reoriented hydride

  17. Ground-state energy and relativistic corrections for positronium hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Variational calculations of the ground state of positronium hydride (HPs) are reported, including various expectation values, electron-positron annihilation rates, and leading relativistic corrections to the total and dissociation energies. The calculations have been performed using a basis set of 4000 thoroughly optimized explicitly correlated Gaussian basis functions. The relative accuracy of the variational energy upper bound is estimated to be of the order of 2x10-10, which is a significant improvement over previous nonrelativistic results.

  18. Geoneutrinos and Hydridic Earth (or primordially Hydrogen-Rich Planet)

    OpenAIRE

    Bezrukov, L.; Sinev, V.

    2014-01-01

    Geoneutrino is a new channel of information about geochemical composition of the Earth. We alnalysed here the following problem. What statistics do we need to distinguish between predictions of Bulk Silicate Earth model and Hydridic Earth model for Th/U signal ratio? We obtained the simple formula for estimation of error of Th/U signal ratio. Our calculations show that we need more than $22 kt \\cdot year$ exposition for Gran-Sasso underground laboratory and Sudbury Neutrino Observatory. We ne...

  19. Scanning electron microscope techniques for studying Zircaloy corrosion and hydriding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A procedure has been developed for preparing scanning electron microscope (SEM) samples of irradiated or unirradiated Zircaloy, suitable for oxide layer imaging, hydride concentration and morphology determination, and X-ray microanalysis (EPMA). The area fraction of the hydride phase is determined by image analysis of backscattered electron images (BEI). Measurements performed on unirradiated laboratory-hydrided samples, as well as cladding samples from pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel irradiated to a burnup of about 40 MWd/kg U, gave good agreement with hot extraction hydrogen analysis over a wide range of hydrogen concentrations, based on the assumption that all the hydrogen i present as the δ-phase hydride. The local hydrogen concentration can be determined quantitatively with a spatial resolution of less than 100μm. This capability was used to determine the radial hydrogen concentration profiles across the cladding wall for PWR samples with different total hydrogen contents, surface oxide thicknesses, and local heat rating. The results indicated that the hydrogen concentration profile was essentially flat (uniform) across the wall thickness for the samples with a low total hydrogen content (∼200 ppm) or a negligible radial heat flux (plenum), while the samples from fueled sections with >200 ppm or a negligible radial heat flux (plenum), while the samples from fueled sections with >200 ppm H had a steep increase in the hydrogen concentration close to the outer surface. Analysis of a longitudinal section showed peak hydrogen concentrations opposite pellet interfaces a factor of two higher than in the mid-pellet region

  20. Inelastic neutron scattering from amorphous hydride of Zr2Pd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Time-of-flight inelastic neutron scattering data was obtained on hydrided Zr2Pd metallic glass using the Crystal Analyzer Spectrometer at the Los Alamos pulsed spallation neutron source. Energy transfers from about 40 MeV to several hundred MeV were obtained with sufficiently good statistics and signal to noise ratio to show the second harmonic as well as the fundamental hydrogen optic mode

  1. Thermomechanics of hydrogen storage in metallic hydrides: modeling and analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Roubíček, Tomáš; Tomassetti, G.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 7 (2014), s. 2313-2333. ISSN 1531-3492 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/09/0917 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : metal-hydrid phase transformation * hydrogen diffusion * swelling Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.768, year: 2014 http://aimsciences.org/journals/pdfs.jsp?paperID=10195&mode=full

  2. Dendritic surface morphology of palladium hydride produced by electrolytic deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conventional and high-resolution electron microscopic studies of electrolytically-deposited palladium hydride reveal a fascinating variety of surface profile morphologies. The observations provide direct information concerning the surface structure of palladium electrodes and the mechanism of electrolytic deposition of palladium black. Both classical electrochemical mechanisms and recent 'modified diffusion-limited-aggregation' computer simulations are discussed in comparison with the experimental results. 13 refs., 9 figs

  3. The calculated rovibronic spectrum of scandium hydride, ScH

    OpenAIRE

    Lodi, Lorenzo; Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    The electronic structure of six low-lying electronic states of scandium hydride, $X\\,{}^{1}\\Sigma^+$, $a\\,{}^{3}\\Delta$, $b\\,{}^{3}\\Pi$, $A\\,{}^{1}\\Delta$ $c\\,{}^{3}\\Sigma^+$, and $B\\,{}^{1}\\Pi$, is studied using multi-reference configuration interaction as a function of bond length. Diagonal and off-diagonal dipole moment, spin-orbit coupling and electronic angular momentum curves are also computed. The results are benchmarked against experimental measurements and calculations on atomic scan...

  4. Hydrogen storage materials and metal hydride-Ni batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hydrogen storage alloy is the key active material in metal hydride-Ni (MH-Ni) batteries. A brief review of hydrogen storage negative electrode materials including misch-nickel-based alloys, Laves phase alloys, magnesium-based alloys, vanadium-based solid solutions and nanotubes is presented. Current problems that need to be solved are mentioned. In addition, recent developments of MH/Ni-batteries with high power and energy are introduced

  5. Hydride effect on the tensile properties of HANA-4 alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KAERI has developed some Zr-based new alloys, called HANA alloys, for high burn-up fuel cladding material. The sample specimens of HANA cladding tube material showed good performance in corrosion and creep properties at the irradiation test in Halden test reactor up to 10GW/MtU as well as the un-irradiation tests. Zirconium alloys has been used as nuclear fuel cladding material because they have satisfactory mechanical strength and corrosion resistance. It was reported that zirconium alloys responded abnormally in mechanical behavior over a certain temperature and strain rates. For example, the embrittlement of Zircaloy-4 (Zr-1.5Sn-0.2Fe-0.1Cr) alloy can be increased over 227 ∼ 427 .deg. C due to dynamic strain aging(DSA). The change of mechanical properties of HANA-4(Zr-1.5Nb-0.4Sn-0.2Fe-0.1Cr) alloy from DSA was already studied from room temperature to 500 .deg. C when its specimens had been tested with the strain rate of 1.67x10-2/s and 8.33x10-5/s. When a zirconium alloy is used in a nuclear reactor, hydrides form in it from not only external hydrogen sources such as waterside corrosion, dissolved hydrogen in coolant, water radiolysis but also internal sources such as hydrogen content in fuel pellets and moisture absorbed by the uranium dioxide fuel pellet. Hydrogen embrittlement of zirconium alloys has been extensively studied because hydrides may act as a sudden failure at very low strain. For low and medium hydrogen content, the hydrides crack during tensile loading and accelerate the ductile fracture process. To study the effect of hydride on the mechanical properties of HANA-4 cladding tube which had been finally heat-treated at 470 .deg. C, this research was done with tensile tests as an extension of the prior study

  6. Corrosion and hydridation features of RBMK type reactor technological channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Generalization results, obtained in the course of monitoring the corrosion state and hydridation of RBMK-1000 and RBMK-1500 reactor technological channels (TC) are presented. It is shown, that the corrosion behaviour of TC tube metal in reactors differs notably. Comparison of data on hybridization of RBMK-100 and RBMK-1500 reactor technological tubes allows one to suppose a possibly higher tendency to hydrogen absorption in Zr - 2.5% of Nb alloy under TMT-1 and TMT-2 states

  7. Computational modelling of structure and dynamics in lightweight hydrides

    OpenAIRE

    Aeberhard, Philippe C.; David, William I. F.; Edwards, Peter P.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen storage in lightweight hydrides continues to attract significant interest as the lack of a safe and efficient storage of hydrogen remains the major technological barrier to the widespread use of hydrogen as a fuel. The metal borohydrides Ca(BH₄)₂ and LiBH₄ form the subject of this thesis; three aspects of considerable academic interest were investigated by density functional theory (DFT) and molecular dynamics (MD) modelling. (i) High-pressure crystal structures of Ca(BH₄)₂ were pred...

  8. Proximity breakdown of hydrides in superconducting niobium cavities

    OpenAIRE

    Romanenko, A.; Barkov, F.; Cooley, L. D.; Grassellino, A.

    2012-01-01

    Many modern and proposed future particle accelerators rely on superconducting radio frequency cavities made of bulk niobium as primary particle accelerating structures. Such cavities suffer from the anomalous field dependence of their quality factors Q0. High field degradation - so-called high field Q-slope - is yet unexplained even though an empirical cure is known. Here we propose a mechanism based on the presence of proximity-coupled niobium hydrides, which can explain this effect. Further...

  9. Powder production of U-Mo alloy, HMD process (Hydriding- Milling- Dehydriding)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) alloys can be hydrided massively in metastable γ (gamma) phase. The brittle hydride can be milled and dehydrided to acquire the desired size distributions needed for dispersion nuclear fuels. The developments of the different steps of this process called hydriding-milling- dehydriding (HMD Process) are described. Powder production scales for industrial fabrication is easily achieved with conventional equipment, small man-power and low investment. (author)

  10. High Temperature Metal Hydrides as Heat Storage Materials for Solar and Related Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Borislav Bogdanović; Michael Felderhoff

    2009-01-01

    For the continuous production of electricity with solar heat power plants the storage of heat at a temperature level around 400 °C is essential. High temperature metal hydrides offer high heat storage capacities around this temperature. Based on Mg-compounds, these hydrides are in principle low-cost materials with excellent cycling stability. Relevant properties of these hydrides and their possible applications as heat storage materials are described.

  11. High Temperature Metal Hydrides as Heat Storage Materials for Solar and Related Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borislav Bogdanović

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available For the continuous production of electricity with solar heat power plants the storage of heat at a temperature level around 400 °C is essential. High temperature metal hydrides offer high heat storage capacities around this temperature. Based on Mg-compounds, these hydrides are in principle low-cost materials with excellent cycling stability. Relevant properties of these hydrides and their possible applications as heat storage materials are described.

  12. High temperature metal hydrides as heat storage materials for solar and related applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felderhoff, Michael; Bogdanović, Borislav

    2009-01-01

    For the continuous production of electricity with solar heat power plants the storage of heat at a temperature level around 400 degrees C is essential. High temperature metal hydrides offer high heat storage capacities around this temperature. Based on Mg-compounds, these hydrides are in principle low-cost materials with excellent cycling stability. Relevant properties of these hydrides and their possible applications as heat storage materials are described. PMID:19333448

  13. Oxidation of Group 8 transition-Metal Hydrides and Ionic Hydrogenation of Ketones and Aldehydes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Kjell-Tore

    1996-08-01

    Transition-metal hydrides have received considerable attention during the last decades because of their unusual reactivity and their potential as homogeneous catalysts for hydrogenation and other reactions of organic substrates. An important class of catalytic processes where transition-metal hydrides are involved is the homogeneous hydrogenation of alkenes, alkynes, ketones, aldehydes, arenes and nitro compounds. This thesis studies the oxidation of Group 8 transition-metal hydrides and the ionic hydrogenation of ketones and aldehydes.

  14. XPS analysis of boron doped heterofullerenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnyder, B.; Koetz, R. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Muhr, H.J.; Nesper, R. [ETH Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    Boron heterofullerenes were generated through arc-evaporation of doped graphite rods in a helium atmosphere. According to mass spectrometric analysis only mono-substituted fullerenes like C{sub 59}B, C{sub 69}B and higher homologues together with a large fraction of higher undoped fullerenes were extracted and enriched when pyridine was used as the solvent. XPS analysis of the extracts indicated the presence of two boron species with significantly different binding energies. One peak was assigned to borid acid. The second one corresponds to boron in the fullerene cage, which is mainly C{sub 59}B, according to the mass spectrum. This boron is in a somewhat higher oxidation state than that of ordinary boron-carbon compounds. The reported synthesis and extraction procedure opens a viable route for production of macroscopic amounts of these compounds. (author) 2 figs., 1 tab., 7 refs.

  15. Boron isotopic enrichment by displacement chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    10B enriched boron is used in applications requiring high volumetric neutron absorption (absorption cross section- 3837 barn for thermal and 1 barn for 1 MeV fast neutron). It is used in fast breeder reactor (as control rod material), in neutron counter, in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy etc. Owing to very small separation factor, boron isotopic enrichment is a complex process requiring large number of separation stages. Heavy Water Board has ventured in industrial scale production of 10B enriched boron using Exchange Distillation Process as well as Ion Displacement Chromatography Process. Ion Displacement Chromatography process is used in Boron Enrichment Plant at HWP, Manuguru. It is based on isotopic exchange between borate ions (B(OH)4-) on anion exchange resin and boric acid passing through resin. The isotopic exchange takes place due to difference in zero point energy of 10B and 11B

  16. Stabilization of boron carbide via silicon doping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, J E; Bhakhri, V; Hao, R; Prior, T J; Scheler, T; Gregoryanz, E; Chhowalla, M; Giulani, F

    2015-01-14

    Boron carbide is one of the lightest and hardest ceramics, but its applications are limited by its poor stability against a partial phase separation into separate boron and carbon. Phase separation is observed under high non-hydrostatic stress (both static and dynamic), resulting in amorphization. The phase separation is thought to occur in just one of the many naturally occurring polytypes in the material, and this raises the possibility of doping the boron carbide to eliminate this polytype. In this work, we have synthesized boron carbide doped with silicon. We have conducted a series of characterizations (transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction) on pure and silicon-doped boron carbide following static compression to 50 GPa non-hydrostatic pressure. We find that the level of amorphization under static non-hydrostatic pressure is drastically reduced by the silicon doping. PMID:25427850

  17. Stabilization of boron carbide via silicon doping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, J. E.; Bhakhri, V.; Hao, R.; Prior, T. J.; Scheler, T.; Gregoryanz, E.; Chhowalla, M.; Giulani, F.

    2015-01-01

    Boron carbide is one of the lightest and hardest ceramics, but its applications are limited by its poor stability against a partial phase separation into separate boron and carbon. Phase separation is observed under high non-hydrostatic stress (both static and dynamic), resulting in amorphization. The phase separation is thought to occur in just one of the many naturally occurring polytypes in the material, and this raises the possibility of doping the boron carbide to eliminate this polytype. In this work, we have synthesized boron carbide doped with silicon. We have conducted a series of characterizations (transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction) on pure and silicon-doped boron carbide following static compression to 50 GPa non-hydrostatic pressure. We find that the level of amorphization under static non-hydrostatic pressure is drastically reduced by the silicon doping.

  18. Transparent yttrium hydride thin films prepared by reactive sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Thin films of transparent (semiconducting) and black (metallic) yttrium hydride. → Magnetron sputtering with an yttrium target and hydrogen as a reactive gas. → Optical transmission and reflection resemble β-YH2 (black) and γ-YH3 (transparent). → XRD shows that transparent films have an expanded fcc lattice with a = 5.35 A. → Samples are stable at ambient conditions. - Abstract: Metal hydrides have earlier been suggested for utilization in solar cells. With this as a motivation we have prepared thin films of yttrium hydride by reactive magnetron sputter deposition. The resulting films are metallic for low partial pressure of hydrogen during the deposition, and black or yellow-transparent for higher partial pressure of hydrogen. Both metallic and semiconducting transparent YHx films have been prepared directly in situ without the need of capping layers and post-deposition hydrogenation. Optically the films are similar to what is found for YHx films prepared by other techniques, but the crystal structure of the transparent films differ from the well-known YH3-η phase, as they have an fcc lattice instead of hcp.

  19. Superconductivity of novel tin hydrides (SnnHm) under pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdi Davari Esfahani, M.; Wang, Zhenhai; Oganov, Artem R.; Dong, Huafeng; Zhu, Qiang; Wang, Shengnan; Rakitin, Maksim S.; Zhou, Xiang-Feng

    2016-03-01

    With the motivation of discovering high-temperature superconductors, evolutionary algorithm USPEX is employed to search for all stable compounds in the Sn-H system. In addition to the traditional SnH4, new hydrides SnH8, SnH12 and SnH14 are found to be thermodynamically stable at high pressure. Dynamical stability and superconductivity of tin hydrides are systematically investigated. Im2-SnH8, C2/m-SnH12 and C2/m-SnH14 exhibit higher superconducting transition temperatures of 81, 93 and 97 K compared to the traditional compound SnH4 with Tc of 52 K at 200 GPa. An interesting bent H3–group in Im2-SnH8 and novel linear H in C2/m-SnH12 are observed. All the new tin hydrides remain metallic over their predicted range of stability. The intermediate-frequency wagging and bending vibrations have more contribution to electron-phonon coupling parameter than high-frequency stretching vibrations of H2 and H3.

  20. Structural and magnetic properties of DyFe3 hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ternary hydride phases, DyFe3H/sub x/ with x = 1.7, 2.5, and 4.2 all retain the PuNi3 rhombohedral structure of DyFe3 with a maximum volume expansion of 18% for DyFe3H/sub 4.2/. All phases show a preferential expansion parallel to the c0 axis. From bulk magnetization measurements, the Dy-Fe spin compensation temperature is found to decrease linearly from 5450K for DyFe3 to 1500K for DyFe3H/sub 4.2/ with increasing volume of the hydride phases. The 161Dy Moessbauer results for the two Dy sites in the structure indicate a slight reduction occurs in free-ion moment found for DyFe3 in all hydride phases. In addition, the 57Fe Moessbauer data show that the average Fe moment for the five inequivalent Fe sites increases with hydrogen concentration up to x = 2.5

  1. Superconductivity of novel tin hydrides (SnnHm) under pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdi Davari Esfahani, M.; Wang, Zhenhai; Oganov, Artem R.; Dong, Huafeng; Zhu, Qiang; Wang, Shengnan; Rakitin, Maksim S.; Zhou, Xiang-Feng

    2016-01-01

    With the motivation of discovering high-temperature superconductors, evolutionary algorithm USPEX is employed to search for all stable compounds in the Sn-H system. In addition to the traditional SnH4, new hydrides SnH8, SnH12 and SnH14 are found to be thermodynamically stable at high pressure. Dynamical stability and superconductivity of tin hydrides are systematically investigated. Im2-SnH8, C2/m-SnH12 and C2/m-SnH14 exhibit higher superconducting transition temperatures of 81, 93 and 97 K compared to the traditional compound SnH4 with Tc of 52 K at 200 GPa. An interesting bent H3–group in Im2-SnH8 and novel linear H in C2/m-SnH12 are observed. All the new tin hydrides remain metallic over their predicted range of stability. The intermediate-frequency wagging and bending vibrations have more contribution to electron-phonon coupling parameter than high-frequency stretching vibrations of H2 and H3. PMID:26964636

  2. Permeation analysis of tritium through the titanium hydride storage vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A preliminary design of a stainless steel vessel for the long-term storage of hydrogen isotopes has been proposed. The immobilized hydrogen as a titanium hydride could be used in a stainless steel vessel for this application. The vessel as a primary package is designed to form titanium hydride and to contain the hydrogen isotopes and helium-3 produced from the tritium decay. In order to predict against the possibility of a contamination and the deterioration of the mechanical properties, a numerical calculation was carried out for a diffusion analysis of the hydrogen isotopes and helium inside the stainless steel vessel. Numerical results showed that a negligible amount of tritium would be released by a permeation through the vessel wall of a 0.7cm thickness at normal conditions over the entire period of the storage. In the case that the vessel was heated up to a temperature of 600 C for the routine condition of an activation or exothermic hydriding, it would be of little concern regarding a tritium loss or a contamination. However, when the vessel was exposed to a fire condition with a temperature of 800 C, permeation of the hydrogen through the vessel wall resulted in a serious increase in the amount of tritium escaping, in a very short time

  3. The electronic structure of zirconium in hydrided and oxidized states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • XANES and XPS of zirconium in oxidized and hydrided states were studied. • The variations in the XANES spectra are explained with density functional theory. • Hydrogen preferentially bonds to specific oxygen sites in the monoclinic ZrO2. • The monoclinic ZrO2 offers the strongest barrier against hydriding attack. - Abstract: Valence band energy shifts for pure zirconium and a model zirconium alloy (Zircaloy-4) in oxidized and hydrided states have been investigated with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure (XANES) technique. With XANES, we show that O/H interactions in oxidized Zr can be detected in the near-edge region of O K. Using density functional theory (DFT) simulations, we have determined where H atoms bond in the monoclinic ZrO2 lattice. The preferred stoichiometry is ZrO2:H, but the O-H bond is weak; increasing H causes the H atoms to form H2 molecules rather than O-H bonds. These interactions cause energy shifts in the Zr 3d XPS spectra. The results illustrate the complex processes of hydrogen and oxygen interactions at the Zr surface

  4. Safety aspects of tritium storage in metal hydride form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Air or nitrogen ingress accident scenarios into JET tritium storage containers, filled with uranium or intermetallic compound (IMC) hydrides, are discussed based on the experimentally determined kinetics of the reaction of these hydrides with air, O2 and N2. Reaction of uranium with air can occur at room temperature. For the initiation of the reactions of uranium with N2 or of some intermetallic compounds with air, elevated temperatures are required. Temperature rises of the metal hydrides due to air ingress are estimated for various cases. Modern tritium storage containers are protected against air ingress by intermediate and secondary containments which can be either evacuated or filled with inert gas. Therefore, air ingress can only occur due to double failure: failure of secondary containment and process containment at the same time. At JET, the secondary containments are filled with N2. However, even for N2, temperature increases are expected during the ingress into uranium beds (U-beds) for particular scenarios. It is shown that the JET design would not fail in this event. The calculation also shows that the smallest temperature rises during air, O2 or N2 ingress are expected for a getter bed design with free space above the metal getter layer for the gas to flow from inlet to outlet tube. 14 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs

  5. Modellization of Metal Hydride Canister for Hydrogen Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocio Maceiras

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen shows very interesting features for its use on-board applications as fuel cell vehicles. This paper presents the modelling of a tank with a metal hydride alloy for on-board applications, which provides good performance under ambient conditions. The metal hydride contained in the tank is Ti0.98Zr0.02V0.43Fe0.09Cr0.05Mn1.5. A two-dimensional model has been performed for the refuelling process (absorption and the discharge process (desorption. For that, individual models of mass balance, energy balance, reaction kinetics and behaviour of hydrogen gas has been modelled. The model has been developed under Matlab / Simulink© environment. Finally, individual models have been integrated into a global model, and simulated under ambient conditions. With the aim to analyse the temperature influence on the state of charge and filling and emptying time, other simulations were performed at different temperatures. The obtained results allow to conclude that this alloy offers a good behaviour with the discharge process under normal ambient conditions. Keywords: Hydrogen storage; metal hydrides; fuel cell; simulation; board applications

  6. Hydrogen Storage using Metal Hydrides in a Stationary Cogeneration System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the frame of the development of a hydrogen production and storage unit to supply a 40 kW stationary fuel cell, a metal hydride storage tank was chosen according to its reliability and high energetic efficiency. The study of AB5 compounds led to the development of a composition adapted to the project needs. The absorption/desorption pressures of the hydride at 75 C (2 / 1.85 bar) are the most adapted to the specifications. The reversible storage capacity (0.95 %wt) has been optimized to our work conditions and chemical kinetics is fast. The design of the Combined Heat and Power CHP system requires 5 kg hydrogen storage but in a first phase, only a 0.1 kg prototype has been realised and tested. Rectangular design has been chosen to obtain good compactness with an integrated plate fin type heat exchanger designed to reach high absorption/desorption rates. In this paper, heat and mass transfer characteristics of the Metal Hydride tank (MH tank) during absorption/desorption cycles are given. (authors)

  7. Neutron diffraction studies of metal hydrides alloys for hydrogen storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we present results obtained from two different classes of metal hydrides. First, we will discuss the effect of ball milling on the hydrogen storage properties of magnesium hydride. High energy milling of MgD2 produces a nanocrystalline structure made of a mixture of β-MgD2 and the high temperature/high pressure phase γ-MgD2. Neutron powder diffraction showed that the ball-milled β-MgD2 and γ-MgD2 structures are distorted compared to the same phases synthesised at high-pressure and high temperature. The Mg-D bond lengths are modified in β-MgD2. In γ-MgD2 phase, only one bond length is changed. This may be the explanation for the limited amount of γ-MgD2 synthesized by energetic ball milling. The second case is the crystal structure of a new class of metal hydrides, the so called 'Laves phase related BCC solid solution'. From neutron diffraction, we found that two phases are present in the as-cast alloy TiV0.9Mn1.1. One is a BCC solid solution, the other is a C14 Laves phase. We found that in the C14 phase there is a preferential site for titanium atoms while the vanadium and manganese atoms are distributed on the other two sites. (author)

  8. Performance study of a hydrogen powered metal hydride actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainul Hossain Bhuiya, Md; Kim, Kwang J.

    2016-04-01

    A thermally driven hydrogen powered actuator integrating metal hydride hydrogen storage reactor, which is compact, noiseless, and able to generate smooth actuation, is presented in this article. To test the plausibility of a thermally driven actuator, a conventional piston type actuator was integrated with LaNi5 based hydrogen storage system. Copper encapsulation followed by compaction of particles into pellets, were adopted to improve overall thermal conductivity of the reactor. The operation of the actuator was thoroughly investigated for an array of operating temperature ranges. Temperature swing of the hydride reactor triggering smooth and noiseless actuation over several operating temperature ranges were monitored for quantification of actuator efficiency. Overall, the actuator generated smooth and consistent strokes during repeated cycles of operation. The efficiency of the actuator was found to be as high as 13.36% for operating a temperature range of 20 °C-50 °C. Stress-strain characteristics, actuation hysteresis etc were studied experimentally. Comparison of stress-strain characteristics of the proposed actuator with traditional actuators, artificial muscles and so on was made. The study suggests that design modification and use of high pressure hydride may enhance the performance and broaden the application horizon of the proposed actuator in future.

  9. Air passivation of metal hydride beds for waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One waste acceptance criteria for hydride bed waste disposal is that the bed be non-pyrophoric. Batch-wise air ingress tests were performed which determined the amount of air consumed by a metal hydride bed. A desorbed, 4.4 kg titanium prototype hydride storage vessel (HSV) produced a 4.4 deg.C internal temperature rise upon the first air exposure cycle and a 0.1 deg.C temperature rise upon a second air exposure. A total of 346 sec air was consumed by the bed (0.08 sec per gram Ti). A desorbed, 9.66 kg LaNi4.25Al0.75 prototype storage bed experienced larger temperature rises over successive cycles of air ingress and evacuation. The cycles were performed over a period of days with the bed effectively passivated after the 12. cycle. Nine to ten STP-L of air reacted with the bed producing both oxidized metal and water. (authors)

  10. Multidimensional Chemical Modeling. III. Abundance and excitation of diatomic hydrides

    CERN Document Server

    Bruderer, Simon; Stäuber, P; Doty, Steven D

    2010-01-01

    The Herschel Space Observatory opens the sky for observations in the far infrared at high spectral and spatial resolution. A particular class of molecules will be directly observable; light diatomic hydrides and their ions (CH, OH, SH, NH, CH+, OH+, SH+, NH+). These simple constituents are important both for the chemical evolution of the region and as tracers of high-energy radiation. If outflows of a forming star erode cavities in the envelope, protostellar far UV (FUV; 6 100 K) for water ice to evaporate. If the cavity shape allows FUV radiation to penetrate this hot-core region, the abundance of FUV destroyed species (e.g. water) is decreased. In particular, diatomic hydrides and their ions CH$+, OH+ and NH+ are enhanced by many orders of magnitude in the outflow walls due to the combination of high gas temperatures and rapid photodissociation of more saturated species. The enhancement of these diatomic hydrides is sufficient for a detection using the HIFI and PACS instruments onboard Herschel. The effect...

  11. Burnup performances of boron nitride and boron coated nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear fuels of urania (UOV) and 5% and 10% gadolinia (Gd2O3) containing UO2 previously produced by sol-gel technique were coated with first boron nitride (BN) then boron (B) thin layer by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and also by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) techniques to increase the fuel cycle length and to improve the physical properties. From the cross-sectional view of BN and B layers taken from scanning electron microscope (SEM), the excellent adherence of BN onto fuel and B onto BN layer was observed in both cases. The behavior of fuel burnup, depletion of BN and B, the effect of coating thickness and also Gd2O3 content on the burnup performances of the fuels were identified by using the code WIMS-D/4 for Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) and Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) cores. The optimum thickness ratio of B to BN was found as 4 and their thicknesses were chosen as 40 mm and 10 mm respectively in both reactor types to get extended cycle length. The assemblies consisting of fuels with 5% Gd2O3 and also coated with 10 mm BN and 40 mm B layers were determined as candidates for getting higher burnup in both types of reactors

  12. Boron enrichment in martian clay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James D Stephenson

    Full Text Available We have detected a concentration of boron in martian clay far in excess of that in any previously reported extra-terrestrial object. This enrichment indicates that the chemistry necessary for the formation of ribose, a key component of RNA, could have existed on Mars since the formation of early clay deposits, contemporary to the emergence of life on Earth. Given the greater similarity of Earth and Mars early in their geological history, and the extensive disruption of Earth's earliest mineralogy by plate tectonics, we suggest that the conditions for prebiotic ribose synthesis may be better understood by further Mars exploration.

  13. Boron enrichment in martian clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, James D; Hallis, Lydia J; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Freeland, Stephen J

    2013-01-01

    We have detected a concentration of boron in martian clay far in excess of that in any previously reported extra-terrestrial object. This enrichment indicates that the chemistry necessary for the formation of ribose, a key component of RNA, could have existed on Mars since the formation of early clay deposits, contemporary to the emergence of life on Earth. Given the greater similarity of Earth and Mars early in their geological history, and the extensive disruption of Earth's earliest mineralogy by plate tectonics, we suggest that the conditions for prebiotic ribose synthesis may be better understood by further Mars exploration. PMID:23762242

  14. Effect of the hydrogen content and cooling velocity in the hydrides precipitation in α-zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zirconium specimens containing 50-300 ppm hydrogen have been cooled from the hydrogen solution treatment temperature at different rates by furnace cooling, air cooling and oil quenching. Optical and electron microscopical investigations have revealed grain boundary Δ - hydrides in slowly cooled specimens. At higher cooling rates γ and Δ hydrides have been found precipitated both intergranularly and intragranularly. Grain boundary Δ hydrides have been also observed in oil quenched specimens with 300 ppm hydrogen. Quenched specimens have revealed Widmanstatten and parallel plate type hydride morphologies. (Author)

  15. Measurement and modeling of strain fields in zirconium hydrides precipitated at a stress concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Gregory B.; Kerr, Matthew; Daymond, Mark R.

    2012-11-01

    Hydrogen adsorption into zirconium, as a result of corrosion in aqueous environments, leads to the precipitation of a secondary brittle hydride phase. These hydrides tend to first form at stress concentrations such as fretting flaws or cracks in engineering components, potentially degrading the structural integrity of the component. One mechanism for component failure is a slow crack growth mechanism known as Delayed Hydride Cracking (DHC), where hydride fracture occurs followed by crack arrest in the ductile zirconium matrix. The current work employs both an experimental and a modeling approach to better characterize the effects and behavior of hydride precipitation at such stress concentrations. Strains around stress concentrations containing hydrides were mapped using High Energy X-ray Diffraction (HEXRD). These studies highlighted important differences in the behavior of the hydride phase and the surrounding zirconium matrix, as well as the strain associated with the precipitation of the hydride. A finite element model was also developed and compared to the X-ray strain mapping results. This model provided greater insight into details that could not be obtained directly from the experimental approaches, as well as providing a framework for future modeling to predict the effects of hydride precipitation under varied conditions.

  16. Mechanical characteristics of hydrides in titanium and titanium-palladium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the aim of estimating of stress-strain curve and fracture strain of thin layer hydrides of pure titanium (Gr.1) and titanium-palladium alloy (Gr.17), we utilized dual indentation method and advanced indentation machine equipped with acoustic emission (AE) monitoring system. We first estimated stress-strain curves of two base metals and two hydrides utilizing the dual indentation method. Next we estimated the fracture strain of two hydrides by FEM method using the critical indentation force to cause the Mode-I crack in hydrides during indentation tests. The critical force was correctly determined by waveform analysis of AEs detected during indentation test. The fracture strain of hydride of Gr.1 was estimated as 8.1% and larger than that (4.3%) of Gr.17 hydride. Fracture strains of two hydrides appear to be due to the chemical composition of the hydrides. Gr.1 produced a TiH2 hydride, while Gr.1 did a TiH1.971. (author)

  17. Investigation of Liquid Metal Bonded Hydride Fuels for LWRs - A Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydride fuels have been proposed for power production applications in LWRs. The fuel consists of uranium-zirconium hydride pellets clad with Zircaloy tubing. The fuel-cladding gap is filled with a liquid lead-tin- bismuth alloy. Incentives for hydride fuel incorporation into LWRs are briefly reviewed followed by a detailed discussion of material properties, steady-state and transient behaviour, and irradiation effects on hydride fuels. The discussion is based on historical data from the SNAP program and General Atomics' TRIGA reactors and recent research conducted at Universities of Tokyo and California, Berkeley. (author)

  18. Some new techniques in tritium gas handling as applied to metal hydride synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A state-of-the-art tritium Hydride Synthesis System (HSS) was designed and built to replace the existing system within the Tritium Salt Facility (TSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. This new hydriding system utilized unique fast-cycling 5.63 mole uranium beds (50.9 g to T2 at 100% loading) and novel gas circulating hydriding furnaces. Tritium system components discussed include fast-cycling uranium beds, circulating gas hydriding furnaces, valves, storage volumes, manifolds, gas transfer pumps, and graphic display and control consoles. Many of the tritium handling and processing techniques incorporated into this system are directly applicable to today's fusion fuel loops

  19. Some new techniques in tritium gas handling as applied to metal hydride synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A state-of-the-art tritium Hydriding Synthesis System (HSS) was designed and built to replace the existing system within the Tritium Salt Facility (TSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. This new hydriding system utilizes unique fast-cycling 7.9 mole uranium beds (47.5g of T at 100% loading) and novel gas circulating hydriding furnaces. Tritium system components discussed include fast-cycling uranium beds, circulating gas hydriding furnaces, valves, storage volumes, manifolds, gas transfer pumps, and graphic display and control consoles. Many of the tritium handling and processing techniques incorporated into this system are directly applicable to today's fusion fuel loops. 12 refs., 7 figs

  20. Experimental boron neutron capture therapy for melanoma: Systemic delivery of boron to melanotic and amelanotic melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The boron-containing melanin precursor analogue p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) has previously been shown to selectively deliver boron to pigmented murine melanomas when administered in a single intragastric dose. If boron neutron capture therapy is to become a clinically useful method of radiation therapy for human malignant melanoma, the boron carrier must be capable of delivering useful amounts of boron to remote tumor sites (metastases) and to poorly pigmented melanomas. The authors have now determined the ability of BPA to accumulate in several nonpigmented melanoma models including human melanoma xenografts in nude mice. The absolute amount of boron in the nonpigmented melanomas was about 50% of the observed in the pigmented counterparts but was still selectively concentrated in the tumor relative to normal tissues in amounts sufficient for effective neutron capture therapy. Single intragastric doses of BPA resulted in selective localization of boron in the amelanotic Greene melanoma carried in the anterior chamber of the rabbit eye and in a pigmented murine melanoma growing in the lungs. The ratio of the boron concentration in these tumors to the boron concentration in the immediately adjacent normal tissue was in the range of 3:1 to 4:1. These distribution studies support the proposal that boron neutron capture therapy may be useful as a regional therapy for malignant melanoma

  1. Hydride phase equilibria in V-Ti-Ni alloy membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • V70Ti15Ni15 (at.%) comprises a vanadium solid solution plus NiTi and NiTi2. • Dissolution of Ni and Ti into vanadium solid solution increase critical temperature for BCT β-hydride formation. • Three VSS hydride phase fields were observed: BCC, BCC + BCT, BCT + BCT. • NiTi and NiTi2 phases do not stabilise the alloy against brittle failure. - Abstract: Vanadium is highly permeable to hydrogen which makes it one of the leading alternatives to Pd alloys for hydrogen-selective alloy membrane applications, but it is prone to brittle failure through excessive hydrogen absorption and transitions between the BCC α and BCT β phases. V-Ti-Ni alloys are a prospective class of alloy for hydrogen-selective membrane applications, comprising a highly-permeable vanadium solid solution and several interdendritic Ni-Ti compounds. These Ni-Ti compounds are thought to stabilise the alloy against brittle failure. This hypothesis was investigated through a systematic study of V70Ti15Ni15 by hydrogen absorption and X-ray diffraction under conditions relevant to membrane operation. Dissolved hydrogen concentration in the bulk alloy and component phases, phase identification, thermal and hydrogen-induced expansion, phase quantification and hydride phase transitions under a range of pressures and temperatures have been determined. The vanadium phase passes through three different phase fields (BCC, BCC + BCT, BCT + BCT) during cooling under H2 from 400 to 30 °C. Dissolution of Ni and Ti into the vanadium phase increases the critical temperature for β-hydride formation from <200 to >400 °C. Furthermore, the Ni-Ti phases also exhibit several phase transitions meaning their ability to stabilise the alloy is questionable. We conclude that this alloy is significantly inferior to V with respect to its stability when used as a hydrogen-selective membrane, but the hydride phase transitions suggest potential application for high-temperature hydrogen and thermal energy

  2. Reactivity patterns of transition metal hydrides and alkyls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The complex PPN+ CpV(CO)3H- (Cp=eta5-C5H5 and PPN = (Ph3P)2) was prepared in 70% yield and its physical properties and chemical reactions investigated. PPN+ CpV(CO)3H- reacts with a wide range of organic halides. The organometallic products of these reactions are the vanadium halides PPN+[CpV(C)3X]- and in some cases the binuclear bridging hydride PPN+ [CpV(CO)3]2H-. The borohydride salt PPN+[CpV(CO)3BH4]- has also been prepared. The reaction between CpV(CO)3H- and organic halides was investigated and compared with halide reductions carried out using tri-n-butyltin hydride. Results demonstrate that in almost all cases, the reduction reaction proceeds via free radical intermediates which are generated in a chain process, and are trapped by hydrogen transfer from CpV(CO)3H-. Sodium amalgam reduction of CpRh(CO)2 or a mixture of CpRh(CO)2 and CpCo(CO)2 affords two new anions, PPN+ [Cp2Rh3(CO)4]- and PPN+[Cp2RhCo(CO)2]-. CpMo(CO)3H reacts with CpMo(CO)3R (R=CH3,C2H5, CH2C6H5) at 25 to 500C to produce aldehyde RCHO and the dimers [CpMo(CO)3]2 and [CpMo(CO)2]2. In general, CpV(CO)3H- appears to transfer a hydrogen atom to the metal radical anion formed in an electron transfer process, whereas CpMo(CO)3H transfers hydride in a 2-electron process to a vacant coordination site. The chemical consequences are that CpV(CO)3H- generally reacts with metal alkyls to give alkanes via intermediate alkyl hydride species whereas CpMo(CO)3H reacts with metal alkyls to produce aldehyde, via an intermediate acyl hydride species

  3. Colorimetric Sugar Sensing Using Boronic Acid-Substituted Azobenzenes

    OpenAIRE

    Yuya Egawa; Ryotaro Miki; Toshinobu Seki

    2014-01-01

    In association with increasing diabetes prevalence, it is desirable to develop new glucose sensing systems with low cost, ease of use, high stability and good portability. Boronic acid is one of the potential candidates for a future alternative to enzyme-based glucose sensors. Boronic acid derivatives have been widely used for the sugar recognition motif, because boronic acids bind adjacent diols to form cyclic boronate esters. In order to develop colorimetric sugar sensors, boronic acid-conj...

  4. Synthesis and characterization of ammonium phosphate fertilizers with boron

    OpenAIRE

    ANGELA MAGDA; RODICA PODE; CORNELIA MUNTEAN; MIHAI MEDELEANU; ALEXANDRU POPA

    2010-01-01

    The concentration of boron, an essential micronutrient for plants, presents a narrow range between deficiency and toxicity. In order to provide the boron requirement for plants, and to avoid toxicity problems, boron compounds are mixed with basic fertilizers. Sodium borate pentahydrate was used as a boron source. Ammonium orthophosphates fertilizers with boron were prepared by neutralizing phosphoric acid with ammonia and addition of variable amounts of sodium tetraborate pentahydrate to the ...

  5. The determination of boron and carbon in reactor grade boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sealed tube method of dissolution at high temperature and pressure has been successfully applied in the analysis of reactor grade boron carbide for the determination of boron. A 50 mg sample of boron carbide is completely dissolved by heating with concentrated nitric acid in a sealed tube at 3000C. The boron content of the resultant sample solution is determined by the mannitol potentiometric titration method. The precision of the method for the determination of 2.5 mg of boron using the Harwell automatic potentiometric titrator is 0.2% (coefficient of variation). The carbon content of a boron carbide sample is determined by combustion of the sample at 10500C in a stream of oxygen using vanadium pentoxide to ensure the complete oxidation of the sample. The carbon dioxide produced from the sample is measured manometrically and the precision of the method for the determination of 4 mg of carbon is 0.4% (coefficient of variation). (author)

  6. Proceedings of workshop on 'Boron Chemistry and Boron Neutron Capture Therapy'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume contains the proceedings of the 3rd Workshop on 'the Boron Chemistry and Boron Neutron Capture Therapy' held on February 12, in 1991. In this workshop, our attention was focused on the chemical nature of boron compounds and the boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). First, clinical experiences of BNCT in KURRI in 1990 and 1991 were reported (Chap. 3). The feasibility of the gadolinium neutron capture therapy for brain tumors was discussed (Chap. 4). In the chemical field, a rapid spectrophotometric determination of trace amounts of borons in biological samples is described (Chap. 5). The chemical behaviours of p-boronophenylalanine and its analogs in aqueous solutions were investigated by a paper electrophoresis and infrared spectroscopy (Chap. 6). On the molecular design and synthesis of new boron carriers for BNCT, several new synthetic methods for B-10 containing nucleoside derivatives were shown (Chap. 7). (author)

  7. Quantitative boron detection by neutron transmission method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    //Quantitative boron detection is mainly performed by chemical methods like colorimetric titration. High neutron absorption cross section of natural boron makes attractive its detection by absorption measurements. This work is an extension of earlier investigations where neutron radiography technique was used for boron detection. In the present investigation, the neutron absorption rate of boron containing solutions is the way to measure quantitatively the boron content of the solutions. The investigation was carried out in Istanbul TRIGA Mark-II reactor. In the end of the experiments, it was observed that even |ppw| grade boron in aqueous solution can be easily detected. The use of this method is certainly very useful for boron utilizing industries like glass and steel industries.The major disadvantage of the method is the obligation to use always aqueous solutions to be able to detect homogeneously the boron content. Then, steel or glass samples have to be put first in an appropriate solution form. The irradiation of steel samples can give the distribution of boron by the help of a imaging and this suggested method will give its quantitative measurement. The superiority of this method are its quick response time and its accuracy. To test this accuracy, a supposed unknown , solution of boric acid is irradiated and then calculated by the help of the calibration curve. The measured value of boric acid was 0.89 mg and the calculated value was found to be 0.98 mg which gives an accuracy of 10 %. It was also seen that the method is more accurate for low concentration. (authors)

  8. X-ray diffraction study of boron produced by pyrolysis of boron tribromide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, David

    The goal of this research was to determine the composition of boron deposits produced by pyrolysis of boron tribromide, and to use the results to (a) determine the experimental conditions (reaction temperature, etc.) necessary to produce alpha-rhombohedral boron and (b) guide the development/refinement of the pyrolysis experiments such that large, high purity crystals of alpha-rhombohedral boron can be produced with consistency. Developing a method for producing large, high purity alpha-rhombohedral boron crystals is of interest because such crystals could potentially be used to achieve an alpha-rhombohedral boron based neutron detector design (a solid-state detector) that could serve as an alternative to existing neutron detector technologies. The supply of neutron detectors in the United States has been hampered for a number of years due to the current shortage of helium-3 (a gas used in many existing neutron detector technologies); the development of alternative neutron detector technology such as an alpha-rhombohedral boron based detector would help provide a more sustainable supply of neutron detectors in this country. In addition, the prospect/concept of an alpha-rhombohedral boron based neutron detector is attractive because it offers the possibility of achieving a design that is smaller, longer life, less power consuming, and potentially more sensitive than existing neutron detectors. The main difficulty associated with creating an alpha-rhombohedral boron based neutron detector is that producing large, high purity crystals of alpha-rhombohedral boron is extremely challenging. Past researchers have successfully made alpha-rhombohedral boron via a number of methods, but no one has developed a method for consistently producing large, high purity crystals. Alpha-rhombohedral boron is difficult to make because it is only stable at temperatures below around 1100-1200 °C, its formation is very sensitive to impurities, and the conditions necessary for its

  9. Sintering of boron carbide (B4C)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron carbide (B4C) is used as a control element in different types of reactors due to the high fast and thermal neutron absorption cross-section of B-10. Requirements of the Advanced Reactor Division of the Bariloche Atomic Center triggered the study of the possibilities of fabricating B4C pellets by cold-pressing and sintering. The results of essays of sinterability of two different commercial boron carbide powders, sintered at temperatures between 1200 and 2200 deg C, are given. Characterizations of the samples were made to determine the evolution of density, porosity, microstructure and boron content as a function of sintering temperature. (Author)

  10. Developments in boron magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schweizer, M.

    1995-11-01

    This report summarizes progress during the past year on maturing Boron-11 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methodology for noninvasive determination of BNCT agents (BSH) spatially in time. Three major areas are excerpted: (1) Boron-11 MRI of BSH distributions in a canine intracranial tumor model and the first human glioblastoma patient, (2) whole body Boron-11 MRI of BSH pharmacokinetics in a rat flank tumor model, and (3) penetration of gadolinium salts through the BBB as a function of tumor growth in the canine brain.

  11. First boronization in KSTAR: Experiences on carborane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Suk-Ho, E-mail: sukhhong@nfri.re.kr [National Fusion Research Institute, 113 Gwahangno, Yusung-Gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Center for Edge Plasma Science (cEps), Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kun-Su; Kim, Kwang-Pyo; Kim, Kyung-Min; Kim, Hong-Tack [National Fusion Research Institute, 113 Gwahangno, Yusung-Gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Sun, Jong-Ho; Woo, Hyun-Jong [Center for Edge Plasma Science (cEps), Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Electrical Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jae-Min [National Fusion Research Institute, 113 Gwahangno, Yusung-Gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Eun-Kyong [Center for Edge Plasma Science (cEps), Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Electrical Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Woong-Chae; Kim, Hak-Kun; Park, Kap-Rai; Yang, Hyung-Lyeol; Oh, Yeong-Kook; Na, Hoon-Kyun [National Fusion Research Institute, 113 Gwahangno, Yusung-Gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Lho, Taehyeop [National Fusion Research Institute, 113 Gwahangno, Yusung-Gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Center for Edge Plasma Science (cEps), Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Kyu-Sun [Center for Edge Plasma Science (cEps), Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Electrical Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-01

    First boronization was performed in KSTAR tokamak during 2009 campaign in order to reduce oxygen impurities and to lower the power loss due to radiation. We report the results from the experiences on carborane during the first boronization in KSTAR. After the boronization, H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2} level in the vacuum vessel are reduced significantly. The characteristics of the deposited thin films were analyzed by variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry, XPS, and AES. {approx}1.78 x 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} of carbon flux on the wall is estimated by using cavity technique.

  12. Boron site preference in ternary Ta and Nb boron silicides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray single crystal (XSC) and neutron powder diffraction data (NPD) were used to elucidate boron site preference for five ternary phases. Ta3Si1−xBx (x=0.112(4)) crystallizes with the Ti3P-type (space group P42/n) with B-atoms sharing the 8g site with Si atoms. Ta5Si3−x (x=0.03(1); Cr5B3- type) crystallizes with space group I4/mcm, exhibiting a small amount of vacancies on the 4a site. Both, Ta5(Si1−xBx)3, x=0.568(3), and Nb5(Si1−xBx)3, x=0.59(2), are part of solid solutions of M5Si3 with Cr5B3-type into the ternary M–Si–B systems (M=Nb or Ta) with B replacing Si on the 8h site. The D88-phase in the Nb–Si–B system crystallizes with the Ti5Ga4-type revealing the formula Nb5Si3B1−x (x=0.292(3)) with B partially filling the voids in the 2b site of the Mn5Si3 parent type. - Graphical abstract: The crystal structures of a series of compounds have been solved from X-ray single crystal diffractometry revealing details on the boron incorporation. Highlights: ► Structure of a series of compounds have been solved by X-ray single crystal diffractometry. ► Ta3(Si1−xBx) (x=0.112) crystallizes with the Ti3P-type, B and Si atoms randomly share the 8g site. ► Structure of Nb5Si3B1−x (x=0.292; Ti5Ga4-type) was solved from NPD.

  13. Synthesis of Boron Nanorods by Smelting Non-Toxic Boron Oxide in Liquid Lithium

    OpenAIRE

    Amartya Chakrabarti; Tao Xu; Laura K. Paulson; Krise, Kate J.; Maguire, John A; Hosmane, Narayan S.

    2010-01-01

    In contrast to the conventional bottom-up syntheses of boron nanostructures, a unique top-down and greener synthetic strategy is presented for boron nanorods involving nontoxic boron oxide powders ultrasonically smelted in liquid lithium under milder conditions. The product was thoroughly characterized by energy dispersive X-ray analysis, atomic emission spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and, UV-Vis spectroscopy, including structural characterization by transmission electron microscop...

  14. Determination of boron isotope ratios in boron carbide by mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper introduces the direct determination of boron isotope ratios in the boron carbide powder by thermal ionization mass spectrometry. The technique for sample loading, the procedure for heating and the eliminating of effects induced by oxygen are studied. The study indicates that the preparing process for the sample will be shorted, and the time for determination and the exposure dose of the laboratory assistant will be reduced for the reason of directly determination of boron carbide. (authors)

  15. Effect of boron concentration on physicochemical properties of boron-doped carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron-doped carbon nanotubes (B-CNTs) were synthesized using chemical vapour deposition (CVD) floating catalyst method. Toluene was used as the carbon source, triphenylborane as boron as well as the carbon source while ferrocene was used as the catalyst. The amount of triphenylborane used was varied in a solution of toluene and ferrocene. Ferrocene was kept constant at 2.5 wt.%. while a maximum temperature of 900 °C was used for the synthesis of the shaped carbon nanomaterial (SCNMs). SCNMs obtained were characterized by the use of transmission electron microscope (TEM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), high resolution-electron microscope, electron dispersive X-ay spectroscopy (EDX), Raman spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), nitrogen adsorption at 77 K, and inverse gas chromatography. TEM and SEM analysis confirmed SCNMs obtained were a mixture of B-CNTs and carbon nanofibres (B-CNF). EDX and ICP-OES results showed that boron was successively incorporated into the carbon hexagonal network of CNTs and its concentration was dependent on the amount of triphenylborane used. From the VSM results, the boron doping within the CNTs introduced ferromagnetic properties, and as the percentage of boron increased the magnetic coactivity and squareness changed. In addition, boron doping changed the conductivity and the surface energy among other physicochemical properties of B-CNTs. - Highlights: • Boron-doping of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) changes their physiochemical properties. • Amount of boron-doping was dependent on the wt.% of boron precursor used. • Boron-doping changed CNTs surfaces and the distribution of dispersive energy sites. • Boron-doping affected the conductivity and ferromagnetic properties. • Increased boron-doping results in a more favourable interaction with polar probes

  16. Investigation of boron extraction process with aid magnesium hydroxide from mother liquor of boron production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conditions of boron - magnesium concentrate preparation from mother liquor by coprecipitation of borate - ions by magnesium hydroxide are investigated. It is shown that boron - magnesium concentrate and products of its heat treatment at 100 - 500 deg C in water are dissolved partially, and in ammonium citrate - practically completely. Suppositions are made on the composition of the product prepared, on the the structure of its crystal lattice and the processes taking place in it during heat treatment. The conclusion is made on the perspectiveness of processing of mother liquor of boron industry for boron - magnesium concentrate

  17. On the spectroscopic detection of neutral species in a low-pressure plasma containing boron and hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavrov, B P [Faculty of Physics, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg, 198504 (Russian Federation); Osiac, M [Institut fuer Niedertemperatur-Plasmaphysik, 17489 Greifswald, Friedrich-Ludwig-Jahn-Str. 19 (Germany); Pipa, A V [Faculty of Physics, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg, 198504 (Russian Federation); Roepcke, J [Institut fuer Niedertemperatur-Plasmaphysik, 17489 Greifswald, Friedrich-Ludwig-Jahn-Str. 19 (Germany)

    2003-11-01

    Spectroscopic studies of microwave discharges in H{sub 2}-Ar-B{sub 2}H{sub 6} gas mixtures (f = 2.45 GHz, P = 1.2-3.5 kW, p = 1-8 mbar) have been performed to improve the possibilities of diagnostics of non-equilibrium, low-pressure plasmas containing boron and hydrogen. For this purpose, UV-VIS optical emission spectroscopy and infrared absorption spectroscopy with tunable diode lasers (TDLAS) have been applied. It is shown that information about neutral species and the gas temperature may be obtained by means of new and modified spectroscopic methods. A method for the determination of the absolute number density of boron atoms from measured relative intensities of the components of the boron resonance doublet (distorted by reabsorption) is proposed and tested for validity. The maximum of the density was found to be 3.8x10{sup 11} atoms cm{sup -3} at an admixture of diborane of about 2%. The gas temperature was determined from the intensity distributions in the rotational structure of the emission bands of BH and H{sub 2} and from Doppler broadening of the absorption line profiles of the BH molecule. It was observed that values of the gas temperature obtained from the rotational intensity distributions are in good agreement with those obtained from Doppler widths (T{sub g} = 700-1070 K). Based on measurements of the relative line intensities of atomic and molecular hydrogen and the gas temperature, and using a simple excitation-deactivation model, the density of molecular hydrogen was found to be about 40 times higher than the density of atomic hydrogen. It is shown that some absorption lines of boron hydrides (B{sub 2}H{sub 6}, BH{sub 3} and BH) detected by TDLAS may be used for plasma diagnostics.

  18. Hydride precipitation and its influence on mechanical properties of notched and unnotched Zircaloy-4 plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhiyang, E-mail: zw603@uowmail.edu.au [Faculty of Engineering, University of Wollongong, Northfields Avenue, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); The Bragg Institute, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, New Illawarra Road, Lucas Heights, NSW 2234 (Australia); Garbe, Ulf [The Bragg Institute, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, New Illawarra Road, Lucas Heights, NSW 2234 (Australia); Li, Huijun [Faculty of Engineering, University of Wollongong, Northfields Avenue, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Harrison, Robert P.; Toppler, Karl [The Institute of Materials Engineering, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, New Illawarra Road, Lucas Heights, NSW 2234 (Australia); Studer, Andrew J. [The Bragg Institute, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, New Illawarra Road, Lucas Heights, NSW 2234 (Australia); Palmer, Tim [The Institute of Materials Engineering, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, New Illawarra Road, Lucas Heights, NSW 2234 (Australia); Planchenault, Guillaume [Electricite De France, 6 Avenue Montaigne, 93192 Noisy Le Grand Cédex (France)

    2013-05-15

    The hydride formation and its influence on the mechanical performance of hydrided Zircaloy-4 plates containing different hydrogen contents were studied at room temperature. For the unnotched plate samples with the hydrogen contents ranging from 25 to 850 wt. ppm, the hydrides exerted an insignificant effect on the tensile strength, while the ductility was severely degraded with increasing hydrogen content. The fracture mode and degree of embrittlement were strongly related to the hydrogen content. When the hydrogen content reached a level of 850 wt. ppm, the plate exhibited negligible ductility, resulting in almost completely brittle behavior. For the hydrided notched plate, the tensile stress concentration associated with the notch tip facilitated the hydride accumulation at the region near the notch tip and the premature crack propagation through the hydride fracture during hydriding. The final brittle through-thickness failure for this notched sample was mainly attributed to the formation of a continuous hydride network on the thickness section and the obtained very high hydrogen concentration (estimated to be 1965 wt. ppm)

  19. Cracking in hydride blisters in Zr-2.5Nb pressure tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When the pressure tubes contact to the calandria tubes in the CANDU reactor, temperature gradient in the Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube causes the thermal diffusion of hydrogen and formation of hydride blisters. This surface shape change is a result of the volume expansion associated with the transformation from pressure tube matrix to δ-phase hydride. Cracking in the hydride blisters may cause a direct failure of pressure tubes or develope to the delayed hydride cracking. The Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube specimen are hydrided by an electrolytic method and homogenized considering the temperature and time of hydrogen diffusion. The hydride blisters are formed on the outer surface of the specimen by a thermal diffusion between a heat bath maintained at the temperature of 415 deg C and an aluminum cold finger cooled with the flowing water of 15 deg C. An optical microscopy and 3-dimensional profilometry were used to characterize the hydride blisters with different hydrogen concentrations and thermal diffusion times. It reveals higher possibility of cracking for higher hydrogen concentration and longer time for thermal diffusion. The mechanism of cracking in the hydride blister is discussed

  20. Hydride trapping for AAS: Complex analytical problems can be handled with a simple instrumentation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dědina, Jiří; de Moraes, D. P.; Dessuy, M. B.; Kratzer, Jan; Matoušek, Tomáš; de Moraes Flores, E. M.; Vale, M. G. R.

    Ankara Üniversitesi, 2011. [National Spectroscopy Congress /12./. 18.05.2011-22.05.2011, Antalya] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/1783 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : atomic absorption spectrometry * hydride generation * hydride trapping Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  1. Absorption kinetics and hydride formation in magnesium films: Effect of driving force revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrochemical hydrogen permeation measurements and in situ gas-loading X-ray diffraction measurements were performed on polycrystalline Mg films. Hydrogen diffusion constants, the hydride volume content and the in-plane stress were determined for different values of driving forces at 300 K. For α-Mg–H, a hydrogen diffusion constant of DHMg=7(±2)·10-11 m2 s−1 was determined. For higher concentrations, different kinetic regimes with reduced apparent diffusion constants DHtot were found, depending on the driving force, decreasing to about DHtot = 10−18 m2 s−1. This lowest measured diffusion constant is two orders of magnitude larger than that of bulk β-MgH2, and the difference is ascribed to a contribution from a fast diffusion along grain boundaries. The different kinetics regimes are attributed to the spatial distribution of hydrides. A heterogeneous hydride nucleation and growth model is suggested that is based on hemispherical hydrides spatially distributed according to the nuclei densities expressed as a function of the driving force. The model allows us to qualitatively explain the complex stress development, the different diffusion regimes and the blocking-layer thickness. As the blocking-layer thickness inversely scales with the driving force, small driving forces allow the hydriding of large film volume fractions. Maximum stress situations occur for hydride distances reaching four times the hydride radius and for hydride distances equaling the film thickness

  2. Hydride precipitation crack propagation in zircaloy cladding during a decreasing temperature history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An assessment of safety, design, and cost tradeoff issues for short (ten to fifty years) and longer (fifty to hundreds of years) interim dry storage of spent nuclear fuel in Zircaloy rods shall address potential failures of the Zircaloy cladding caused by the precipitation response of zirconium hydride platelets. To perform such assessment analyses rigorously and conservatively will be necessarily complex and difficult. For Zircaloy cladding, a model for zirconium hydride induced crack propagation velocity was developed for a decreasing temperature field and for hydrogen, temperature, and stress dependent diffusive transport of hydrogen to a generic hydride platelet at a crack tip. The development of the quasi-steady model is based on extensions of existing models for hydride precipitation kinetics for an isolated hydride platelet at a crack tip. An instability analysis model of hydride-crack growth was developed using existing concepts in a kinematic equation for crack propagation at a constant thermodynamic crack potential subject to brittle fracture conditions. At the time an instability is initiated, the crack propagation is no longer limited by hydride growth rate kinetics, but is then limited by stress rates. The model for slow hydride-crack growth will be further evaluated using existing available data. (authors)

  3. Experiments on hadronic-atom x-ray intensities of hydrides and deuterides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiegand, C.E.; Lum, G.K.; Godfrey, G.L.

    1977-04-01

    Kaonic-atom x-ray intensities of elements Z = 3, 6, 8, 11, and 20 were significantly reduced when the elements were in hydride form. The ratios I (ZH/sub m/)/I (Z) have a noticeable Z dependence. Deuterides of C and O showed slightly less x-ray emission than their hydride counterparts.

  4. Thermal and mechanical properties of zirconium hydrides with various hafnium contents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zirconium (Zr) hydride is currently expected as a neutron shield material for fast reactors. In order to evaluate safety and economic efficiency of the nuclear reactor, the thermal and mechanical properties of the hydride should be understood. In addition, since chemical properties of Zr and hafnium (Hf) are quite similar, Zr contains a few percent Hf generally. Therefore, it is very important to evaluate the effect of Hf content on the properties of Zr hydride. In the present study, fine bulk samples of δ-phase Zr hydrides with various Hf contents were prepared and their thermal and mechanical properties were investigated. We examined the phase states and the microstructure of the hydrides by means of X-ray diffraction and SEM/EDX analyses. In the temperature range from room temperature to 673 K, the heat capacity and the thermal diffusivity of the hydrides were measured and the thermal conductivity was evaluated. The Vickers hardness and the sound velocity of the hydrides were measured at room temperature, and the elastic modulus was calculated from the measured sound velocity. The effects of temperature and Hf content on the properties of Zr hydrides were studied. (author)

  5. Hydride precipitation and its influence on mechanical properties of notched and unnotched Zircaloy-4 plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hydride formation and its influence on the mechanical performance of hydrided Zircaloy-4 plates containing different hydrogen contents were studied at room temperature. For the unnotched plate samples with the hydrogen contents ranging from 25 to 850 wt. ppm, the hydrides exerted an insignificant effect on the tensile strength, while the ductility was severely degraded with increasing hydrogen content. The fracture mode and degree of embrittlement were strongly related to the hydrogen content. When the hydrogen content reached a level of 850 wt. ppm, the plate exhibited negligible ductility, resulting in almost completely brittle behavior. For the hydrided notched plate, the tensile stress concentration associated with the notch tip facilitated the hydride accumulation at the region near the notch tip and the premature crack propagation through the hydride fracture during hydriding. The final brittle through-thickness failure for this notched sample was mainly attributed to the formation of a continuous hydride network on the thickness section and the obtained very high hydrogen concentration (estimated to be 1965 wt. ppm)

  6. Boron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that borate minerals and refined borates are used extensively for the manufacture of vitreous materials such as insulation and textile fiberglasses, borosilicate glass, and porcelain enamels and frits. In North America, these applications are estimated to account for over 54% of the borate consumption. Other substantial uses are in soaps and detergents, metallurgy, fire retardants, industrial biocides, agriculture, and various miscellaneous applications. Reported domestic borate consumption in 1990 was estimated by the U.S. Bureau of Mines to be 320 000 metric tons B2O3 versus 354 000 metric tons B2O3 in 1989. Consumption is projected to remain essentially static in 1991. Imports were estimated by the Bureau to be 50 000 metric tons B2O3 in 1990. Exports of boric acid and refined borates were approximately 650 000 metric tons of product, a 15 000 metric ton increase from the 1989 level. This increase partially offsets the drop in the 1990 consumption level

  7. Mathematical modeling of the nickel/metal hydride battery system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paxton, B K [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1995-09-01

    A group of compounds referred to as metal hydrides, when used as electrode materials, is a less toxic alternative to the cadmium hydroxide electrode found in nickel/cadmium secondary battery systems. For this and other reasons, the nickel/metal hydride battery system is becoming a popular rechargeable battery for electric vehicle and consumer electronics applications. A model of this battery system is presented. Specifically the metal hydride material, LaNi{sub 5}H{sub 6}, is chosen for investigation due to the wealth of information available in the literature on this compound. The model results are compared to experiments found in the literature. Fundamental analyses as well as engineering optimizations are performed from the results of the battery model. In order to examine diffusion limitations in the nickel oxide electrode, a ``pseudo 2-D model`` is developed. This model allows for the theoretical examination of the effects of a diffusion coefficient that is a function of the state of charge of the active material. It is found using present data from the literature that diffusion in the solid phase is usually not an important limitation in the nickel oxide electrode. This finding is contrary to the conclusions reached by other authors. Although diffusion in the nickel oxide active material is treated rigorously with the pseudo 2-D model, a general methodology is presented for determining the best constant diffusion coefficient to use in a standard one-dimensional battery model. The diffusion coefficients determined by this method are shown to be able to partially capture the behavior that results from a diffusion coefficient that varies with the state of charge of the active material.

  8. Boron-isotope fractionation in plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naturally-occurring variations in the abundance of stable isotopes of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and other elements in plants have been reported and are now used to understand various physiological processes in plants. Boron (B) isotopic variation in several plant species have been documented, but no determination as to whether plants fractionate the stable isotopes of boron, 11B and 10B, has been made. Here, we report that plants with differing B requirements (wheat, corn and broccoli) fractionated boron. The whole plant was enriched in 11B relative to the nutrient solution, and the leaves were enriched in 10B and the stem in 11B relative to the xylem sap. Although at present, a mechanistic role for boron in plants is uncertain, potential fractionating mechanisms are discussed. (author)

  9. Synthesis of Boron-Containing Primary Amines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Hsuan Chung

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, boron-containing primary amines were synthesized for use as building blocks in the study of peptoids. In the first step, Gabriel synthesis conditions were modified to enable the construction of seven different aminomethylphenyl boronate esters in good to excellent yields. These compounds were further utilized to build peptoid analogs via an Ugi four-component reaction (Ugi-4CR under microwave irradiation. The prepared Ugi-4CR boronate esters were then successfully converted to the corresponding boronic acids. Finally, the peptoid structures were successfully modified by cross-coupling to aryl/heteroaryl chlorides via a palladium-mediated Suzuki coupling reaction to yield the corresponding derivatives in moderate to good yields.

  10. Boron toxicity in oil palm (Elaeis guineensis)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajaratnam, J.A.

    1973-01-01

    Potted oil palms were treated with fertilizer of borate-46 at several concentrations and the plants were observed for boron toxicity effects. Toxicity symptoms were apparent at high rates but not at rates equivalent to typical Malaysian soils.

  11. Boron adsorption on hematite and clinoptilolite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis describes experiments performed to determine the suitability of boron as a potential reactive tracer for use in saturated-zone C-well reactive tracer studies for the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP). Experiments were performed to identify the prevalent sorption mechanism of boron and to determine adsorption of boron on hematite and clinoptilolite as a function of pH. These minerals are present in the Yucca Mountain tuff in which the C-well studies will be conducted. Evaluation of this sorption mechanism was done by determining the equilibration time of boron-mineral suspensions, by measuring changes in equilibrium to titrations, and by measuring electrophoretic mobility. Experiments were performed with the minerals suspended in NaCl electrolytes of concentrations ranging from 0.1 N NaCl to 0.001 N NaCl. Experimentalconditions included pH values between 3 and 12 and temperature of about 38 degrees C

  12. Boron-Filled Hybrid Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rajen B; Chou, Tsengming; Kanwal, Alokik; Apigo, David J; Lefebvre, Joseph; Owens, Frank; Iqbal, Zafar

    2016-01-01

    A unique nanoheterostructure, a boron-filled hybrid carbon nanotube (BHCNT), has been synthesized using a one-step chemical vapor deposition process. The BHCNTs can be considered to be a novel form of boron carbide consisting of boron doped, distorted multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) encapsulating boron nanowires. These MWCNTs were found to be insulating in spite of their graphitic layered outer structures. While conventional MWCNTs have great axial strength, they have weak radial compressive strength, and do not bond well to one another or to other materials. In contrast, BHCNTs are shown to be up to 31% stiffer and 233% stronger than conventional MWCNTs in radial compression and have excellent mechanical properties at elevated temperatures. The corrugated surface of BHCNTs enables them to bond easily to themselves and other materials, in contrast to carbon nanotubes (CNTs). BHCNTs can, therefore, be used to make nanocomposites, nanopaper sheets, and bundles that are stronger than those made with CNTs. PMID:27460526

  13. Boron neutron capture therapy. What is next?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) will have difficulties establishing itself without efficient and conclusive clinical trials of glioma, without the expansion to other tumors, and without efficient programs for compound development and testing. (author)

  14. Ni doping of semiconducting boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The wide band gap, temperature stability, high resistivity, and robustness of semiconducting boron carbide make it an attractive material for device applications. Undoped boron carbide is p type; Ni acts as a n-type dopant. Here we present the results of controlled doping of boron carbide with Ni on thin film samples grown using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The change in the dopant concentration within the thin film as a function of the dopant flow rate in the precursor gas mixture was confirmed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements; with increasing dopant concentration, current-voltage (I-V) curves clearly establish the trend from p-type to n-type boron carbide.

  15. Analysis of boron at Koeberg Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soluble reactivity poisons, also called chemical shim, produce spatially uniform neutron absorption when dissolved in reactor coolant water. The boron-10 isotope having a high neutron absorption coefficient is used in commercial pressurised water reactors (PWR) to limit and control reactivity. This is achieved at Koeberg Nuclear Power Station (KNPS) and the majority of commercial PWR's worldwide by the addition of natural boric acid to the reactor coolant. The boric acid dissolved in the coolant decreases the thermal utilisation factor, causing a decrease in reactivity. By varying the concentration of boric acid (and hence also the B-10 concentration) in the coolant, a process referred to as boration and dilution, the reactivity of the core can be easily managed. An increase in boron concentration (boration) creates negative reactivity and if the boron concentration is reduced (dilution), positive reactivity is added. The changing of boron concentration in a PWR is used primarily to compensate for fuel burn-up or poison build-up. The variation in boron concentration allows control rod use to be minimised, which results in a flatter flux profile over the core than can be produced by control rod manipulation. Accurate laboratory and on-line chemical analysis of boron concentration is important because of its operational implications associated with reactivity control and also for nuclear safety. In a normal fuel cycle, as the nuclear fuel is being consumed, the reactor coolant boric acid (B-10) concentration must be reduced by dilution with purified water to maintain the reactor at constant power. Besides in the reactor coolant water, boric acid concentration is also important in the chemical and volume control system and reactor make-up system for operation. For nuclear safety, boric acid concentrations are technical specification parameters, maintained and monitored in the spent fuel system and safety injection systems. Boron concentration determination is

  16. High temperature thermoelectric properties of boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron carbides are refractory solids with potential for application as very high temperature p-type thermoelectrics in power conversion applications. The thermoelectric properties of boron carbides are unconventional. In particular, the electrical conductivity is consistent with the thermally activated hopping of a high density (∼1021/cm3) of bipolarons; the Seebeck coefficient is anomalously large and increases with increasing temperature; and the thermal conductivity is surprisingly low. In this paper, these unusual properties and their relationship to the unusual structure and bonding present in boron carbides are reviewed. Finally, the potential for utilization of boron carbides at very high temperatures (up to 2200 degrees C) and for preparing n-type materials is discussed

  17. Another Look at the Mechanisms of Hydride Transfer Enzymes with Quantum and Classical Transition Path Sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzierlenga, Michael W; Antoniou, Dimitri; Schwartz, Steven D

    2015-04-01

    The mechanisms involved in enzymatic hydride transfer have been studied for years, but questions remain due, in part, to the difficulty of probing the effects of protein motion and hydrogen tunneling. In this study, we use transition path sampling (TPS) with normal mode centroid molecular dynamics (CMD) to calculate the barrier to hydride transfer in yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH) and human heart lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Calculation of the work applied to the hydride allowed for observation of the change in barrier height upon inclusion of quantum dynamics. Similar calculations were performed using deuterium as the transferring particle in order to approximate kinetic isotope effects (KIEs). The change in barrier height in YADH is indicative of a zero-point energy (ZPE) contribution and is evidence that catalysis occurs via a protein compression that mediates a near-barrierless hydride transfer. Calculation of the KIE using the difference in barrier height between the hydride and deuteride agreed well with experimental results. PMID:26262969

  18. Characteristics of hydriding and hydrogen embrittlement of the Ti-Al-Zr alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The characteristics of hydriding and hydrogen embrittlement of the Ti-Al-Zr alloy were evaluated. The amount of hydrogen absorbed into the alloy at 500 deg. C was continuously monitored using a hydrogen pressure measurement. The rate of decrease in hydrogen pressure indicated a high absorption rate of hydrogen into the alloy, following a linear rate law. X-ray diffraction studies showed the formation of δ-phase titanium hydride (TiH1.97) after hydriding. At room temperature, the alloy showed much sensitivity to embrittlement in ductility by hydrogen. The δ-hydrides in the grain boundaries promoted the crack propagation in the presence of stress, leading to the cleavage failure mode. However, the tensile strengths were almost independent of the hydrogen content up to 1174 ppm. It is thus concluded that the δ-hydride acts to decrease the ductility without affecting tensile strengths

  19. Evaluation of hydride blisters in zirconium pressure tube in CANDU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When the garter springs for maintaining the gap between the pressure tube and the calandria tube are displaced in the CANDU reactor, the sagging of pressure tube results in a contact to the calandria tube. This causes a temperature difference between the inner and outer surface of the pressure tube. The hydride can be formed at the cold spot of outer surface and the volume expansion by hydride dormation causes the blistering in the zirconium alloys. An incident of pressure tube rupture due to the hydride blisters had happened in the Canadian CANDU reactor. This report describes the theoretical development and models on the formation and growth of hydride blister and some experimental results. The evaluation methodology and non-destructive testing for hydride blister in operating reactors are also described

  20. Assessing nanoparticle size effects on metal hydride thermodynamics using the Wulff construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki Chul; Dai, Bing; Karl Johnson, J; Sholl, David S

    2009-05-20

    The reaction thermodynamics of metal hydrides are crucial to the use of these materials for reversible hydrogen storage. In addition to altering the kinetics of metal hydride reactions, the use of nanoparticles can also change the overall reaction thermodynamics. We use density functional theory to predict the equilibrium crystal shapes of seven metals and their hydrides via the Wulff construction. These calculations allow the impact of nanoparticle size on the thermodynamics of hydrogen release from these metal hydrides to be predicted. Specifically, we study the temperature required for the hydride to generate a H(2) pressure of 1 bar as a function of the radius of the nanoparticle. In most, but not all, cases the hydrogen release temperature increases slightly as the particle size is reduced. PMID:19420649

  1. Assessing nanoparticle size effects on metal hydride thermodynamics using the Wulff construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reaction thermodynamics of metal hydrides are crucial to the use of these materials for reversible hydrogen storage. In addition to altering the kinetics of metal hydride reactions, the use of nanoparticles can also change the overall reaction thermodynamics. We use density functional theory to predict the equilibrium crystal shapes of seven metals and their hydrides via the Wulff construction. These calculations allow the impact of nanoparticle size on the thermodynamics of hydrogen release from these metal hydrides to be predicted. Specifically, we study the temperature required for the hydride to generate a H2 pressure of 1 bar as a function of the radius of the nanoparticle. In most, but not all, cases the hydrogen release temperature increases slightly as the particle size is reduced.

  2. Strategies for the improvement of the hydrogen storage properties of metal hydride materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hui

    2008-10-24

    Metal hydrides are an important family of materials that can potentially be used for safe, efficient and reversible on-board hydrogen storage. Light-weight metal hydrides in particular have attracted intense interest due to their high hydrogen density. However, most of these hydrides have rather slow absorption kinetics, relatively high thermal stability, and/or problems with the reversibility of hydrogen absorption/desorption cycling. This paper discusses a number of different approaches for the improvement of the hydrogen storage properties of these materials, with emphasis on recent research on tuning the ionic mobility in mixed hydrides. This concept opens a promising pathway to accelerate hydrogenation kinetics, reduce the activation energy for hydrogen release, and minimize deleterious possible by-products often associated with complex hydride systems. PMID:18821548

  3. Mobility and chemical bond of hydrogen in titanium and palladium hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The probabilities for π- meson capture by hydrogen are measured at 25, 155 and 200 deg C in TiHsub(1.65) hydride and at 25, -120 and -196 deg C in PdHsub(0.67) hydride. An analysis of the results obtained shows that within the accuracy of the measurements (approximately 10%) a sharp (up to 1012) change in the mobility of hydrogen in the hydrides induced by temperature changes within the ranges indicated does not noticeably affect the probabilities for π- meson capture by bound hydrogen, i.e. does not lead to appreciable changes in the Me-H bond. A comparison of the capture probabilities for palladium hydride and hydrides of neighboring transition metals shows that there are no pronounced anomalies in the Pd-H bond

  4. Hydride Ions, HCO+ and Ionizing Irradiation in Star Forming Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benz, Arnold O.; Bruderer, Simon; van Dishoeck, Ewine

    2016-06-01

    Hydrides are fundamental precursor molecules in cosmic chemistry and many hydride ions have become observable in high quality for the first time thanks to the Herschel Space Observatory. Ionized hydrides, such as CH+ and OH+ and also HCO+ affect the chemistry of molecules such as water. They also provide complementary information on irradiation by far UV (FUV) or X-rays and gas temperature.We explore hydrides of the most abundant heavier elements in an observational survey covering star forming regions with different mass and evolutionary state. Twelve YSOs were observed with HIFI on Herschel in 6 spectral settings providing fully velocity-resolved line profiles. The YSOs include objects of low (Class 0 and I), intermediate, and high mass, with luminosities ranging from 4 Ls to 2 105 Ls.The targeted lines of CH+, OH+, H2O+, and C+ are detected mostly in blue-shifted absorption. H3O+ and SH+ are detected in emission and only toward some high-mass objects. For the low-mass YSOs the column density ratios of CH+/OH+ can be reproduced by simple chemical models implying an FUV flux of 2 – 400 times the ISRF at the location of the molecules. In two high-mass objects, the UV flux is 20 – 200 times the ISRF derived from absorption lines, and 300 – 600 ISRF using emission lines. Upper limits for the X-ray luminosity can be derived from H3O+ observations for some low-mass objects.If the FUV flux required for low-mass objects originates at the central protostar, a substantial FUV luminosity, up to 1.5 Ls, is required. For high-mass regions, the FUV flux required to produce the observed molecular ratios is smaller than the unattenuated flux expected from the central object(s) at the Herschel beam radius. This is consistent with an FUV flux reduced by circumstellar extinction or by bloating of the protostar.The ion molecules are proposed to form in FUV irradiated cavity walls that are shocked by the disk wind. The shock region is turbulent, broadening the lines to some 1

  5. Data acquisition for delayed hydride cracking studies using DCPD technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Direct current potential drop (DCPD) is a commonly used technique for making measurements on crack propagation in Delayed Hydride Cracking (DHC) studies on materials. It consists of passing a highly stable current ( 5-15A) through a Compact Toughness (CT) specimen of the material subjected to a mechanical load at the requisite elevated temperature, and precisely measuring and tracking the very small voltage developed across two points of specific geometry on it. Though simple in principle, this involves measuring and extracting very small signals from inevitable large spurious signals in a harsh environment, and it requires a high quality data acquisition and analysis system to extract the required information from the experiment

  6. Equilibrium composition for the reaction of plutonium hydride with air

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    There are six independent constituents with 4 chemical elements, i.e. PuH2.7(s), PuN(s), Pu2O3(s), N2, O2 and H2, therefore , the system described involves of 2 independent reactions ,both those of the experimental, which indicates that the chemical equilibrium is nearly completely approached. Therefore, it is believed that the reaction rate of plutonium hydride with air is extremely rapid. The present paper has briefly discussed the simultaneous reactions and its thermodynamic coupling effect.

  7. Simulation of metal hydride reactor with aluminium foam matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'Full text:' A 1-D model has been developed for testing different designs of hydride reactors. The computer program can simulate a complete reactor or a part of it in planar, cylindrical or spherical geometry. It reproduces an experimental loop: absorption followed by desorption and calculates heat transfer during the reaction. Simulation results have been confronted to experimental data with very good correlation. A reactor with a heat transfer matrix inside, such as aluminum foam, can be simulated. We have evaluated the size limits of a reactor and the category of foam that preserves the good reaction kinetic performances of a reactor filled with LaNi5. (author)

  8. Uranium-zirconium hydride TRIGA-LEU fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development and testing of TRIGA-LEU fuel with up to 45 wt-% U is described. Topics that are discussed include properties of hydride fuels, the prompt negative temperature coefficient, pulse heating tests, fission product retention, and the limiting design basis parameter and values. General specifications for Er-U-ZrH TRIGA-LEU fuel with 8.5 to 45 wt-% U and an outline of the inspections during manufacture of the fuel are also included. (author). 8 figs, 1 tab

  9. Comparison between different reactions of group IV hydride with H

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG; Shaolong; ZHANG; Xuqiang; ZHANG; Qinggang; ZHANG; Yici

    2006-01-01

    The four-dimensional time-dependent quantum dynamics calculations for reactions of group IV hydride with H are carried out by employing the semirigid vibrating rotor target model and the time-dependent wave packet method. The reaction possibility, cross section and rate constants for reactions (H+SiH4 and H+GeH4) in different initial vibrational and rotational states are obtained. The common feature for such kind of reaction process is summarized. The theoretical result is consistent with available measurement, which indicates the credibility of this theory and the potential energy surface.

  10. A compact hydrogen recycling system using metal hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A gas recycling system to prevent losses of isotopically enriched hydrogen gas has been developed for the operation of a liquid target (2.7 l) used by the Radiative Muon Capture group at TRIUMF. The experimental requirements for high gas purity (chemical impurities below 10-9), low operating pressure (below 1 bar abs) and high loading pressure (about 10 bar needed for a palladium purifier) together with the usual hydrogen safety requirements were satisfied with a metal hydride storage device in combination with a small pump/compressor system. A description of the complete system together with its characteristic operational data are given in this paper. ((orig.))

  11. The calculated rovibronic spectrum of scandium hydride, ScH

    CERN Document Server

    Lodi, Lorenzo; Tennyson\\, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    The electronic structure of six low-lying electronic states of scandium hydride, $X\\,{}^{1}\\Sigma^+$, $a\\,{}^{3}\\Delta$, $b\\,{}^{3}\\Pi$, $A\\,{}^{1}\\Delta$ $c\\,{}^{3}\\Sigma^+$, and $B\\,{}^{1}\\Pi$, is studied using multi-reference configuration interaction as a function of bond length. Diagonal and off-diagonal dipole moment, spin-orbit coupling and electronic angular momentum curves are also computed. The results are benchmarked against experimental measurements and calculations on atomic scandium. The resulting curves are used to compute a line list of molecular ro-vibronic transitions for $^{45}$ScH.

  12. Lithium-Beryllium-Boron : Origin and Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Vangioni-Flam, Elisabeth; Casse, Michel; Audouze, Jean

    1999-01-01

    The origin and evolution of Lithium-Beryllium-Boron is a crossing point between different astrophysical fields : optical and gamma spectroscopy, non thermal nucleosynthesis, Big Bang and stellar nucleosynthesis and finally galactic evolution. We describe the production and the evolution of Lithium-Beryllium-Boron from Big Bang up to now through the interaction of the Standard Galactic Cosmic Rays with the interstellar medium, supernova neutrino spallation and a low energy component related to...

  13. Innovative boron nitride-doped propellants

    OpenAIRE

    Thelma Manning; Richard Field; Kenneth Klingaman; Michael Fair; John Bolognini; Robin Crownover; Carlton P. Adam; Viral Panchal; Eugene Rozumov; Henry Grau; Paul Matter; Michael Beachy; Christopher Holt; Samuel Sopok

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. military has a need for more powerful propellants with balanced/stoichiometric amounts of fuel and oxidants. However, balanced and more powerful propellants lead to accelerated gun barrel erosion and markedly shortened useful barrel life. Boron nitride (BN) is an interesting potential additive for propellants that could reduce gun wear effects in advanced propellants (US patent pending 2015-026P). Hexagonal boron nitride is a good lubricant that can provide wear resistance and lower ...

  14. A neutron diffraction study of amorphous boron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaplane, R. G.; Lundström, T.; Dahlborg, U.; Howells, W. S.

    1991-07-01

    The structure of amorphous boron has been studied with pulsed neutron diffraction techniques using the ISIS facilities at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. The experimental static structure factor S(Q) and radial distribution function support a structural model based on units of B12 icosahedra resembling those found in crystalline β-rhombohedral boron, but with a certain degree of disorder occurring in the linking between these subunits.

  15. Precipitation of reoriented hydrides and textural change of α-zirconium grains during delayed hydride cracking of Zr-2.5%Nb pressure tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantilever beam (CB) specimens referred to as L90 and L60 with the notch directions tilted normal to, and at an angle of 60 deg. to, the transverse direction of a cold-worked and annealed Zr-2.5%Nb pressure tube, respectively, were subjected to delayed hydride cracking (DHC) testing at 250 deg. C. L60 specimen showed slanted growth of the DHC crack compared to L90 without tilting. An X-ray diffractometric study was carried out on the fractured surfaces of the two CB specimens after DHC testing. The δ-hydride phase was confirmed to sit on the fracture surface, demonstrating the growth of the DHC crack through fracturing of the reoriented hydrides. Furthermore, the texture of the reoriented hydrides was determined for the first time. Comparing the pole figures of the {1 1 1}δ-hydride and the (0 0 0 1)α-zirconium, it is concluded that the reoriented hydrides nucleate first of all at the α-zirconium grains. A change in the orientation of the α-zirconium grains, mainly by twinning on the {1 0 1-bar} planes, was demonstrated to occur during the propagation of the DHC crack. On the basis of the above findings, a mechanism of the DHC was discussed

  16. Formation of alloys in Ti-V system in hydride cycle and synthesis of their hydrides in self-propagating high-temperature synthesis regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleksanyan, A.G., E-mail: a.g.aleks_yan@mail.ru [A.B. Nalbandyan Institute of Chemical Physics of Armenian NAS, 5/2 P.Sevak Str., Yerevan 0014 (Armenia); Dolukhanyan, S.K. [A.B. Nalbandyan Institute of Chemical Physics of Armenian NAS, 5/2 P.Sevak Str., Yerevan 0014 (Armenia); Shekhtman, V.Sh. [Institute of Solid State Physics, RAS, Chernogolovka, Moscow District 142432 (Russian Federation); Huot, J., E-mail: jacques_huot@uqtr.ca [Institut de recherche sur l' hydrogene, Universite du Quebec a Trois-Rivieres (Canada); Ter-Galstyan, O.P.; Mnatsakanyan, N.L. [A.B. Nalbandyan Institute of Chemical Physics of Armenian NAS, 5/2 P.Sevak Str., Yerevan 0014 (Armenia)

    2011-09-15

    Research highlights: > We synthesize Ti-V alloys by new 'hydride cycle' method. Structural characteristics of formed alloys we investigate by X-ray diffraction. > We show that the alloys contain mainly BCC crystal structure. > We investigate the interaction of the synthesized alloys with hydrogen in combustion regime. > We study the properties of hydrides by X-ray, DTA and DSC analyses. - Abstract: In the present work, the possibility of formation of titanium and vanadium based alloys of BCC structure using hydride cycle was investigated. The mechanism of formation of alloys in Ti-V system from the powders of hydrides TiH{sub 2} and VH{sub 0.9} (or of V) by compaction followed by dehydrogenation was studied. Then, the interaction of the synthesized alloys with hydrogen in combustion regime (self-propagating high-temperature synthesis, SHS) resulting in hydrides of these alloys was investigated. DTA and DSC analyses of some alloys and their hydrides were performed and their thermal characteristics were measured.

  17. Discharge cleaning on TFTR after boronization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the beginning of the 1990 TFTR experimental run, after replacement of POCO-AXF-5Q graphite tiles on the midplane of the bumper limiter by carbon fiber composite (CFC) tiles and prior to any Pulse Discharge Cleaning (PDC), boronization was performed. Boronization is the deposition of a layer of boron and carbon on the vacuum vessel inner surface by a glow discharge in a diborane, methane and helium mixture. The amount of discharge cleaning required after boronization was substantially reduced compared to that which was needed after previous openings when boronization was not done. Previously, after a major shutdown, about 105 low current (∼20 kA) Taylor Discharge Cleaning (TDC) pulses were required before high current (∼400 kA) aggressive Pulse Discharge Cleaning (PDC) pulses could be performed successfully. Aggressive PDC is used to heat the limiters from the vessel bakeout temperature of 150 degrees C to 250 degrees C for a period of several hours. Heating the limiters is important to increase the rate at which water is removed from the carbon limiter tiles. After boronization, the number of required TDC pulses was reduced to <5000. The number of aggressive PDC pulses required was approximately unchanged. 14 refs., 1 tab

  18. Amorphous boron nitride at high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durandurdu, Murat

    2016-06-01

    The pressure-induced phase transformation in hexagonal boron nitrite and amorphous boron nitrite is studied using ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The hexagonal-to-wurtzite phase transformation is successfully reproduced in the simulation with a transformation mechanism similar to one suggested in experiment. Amorphous boron nitrite, on the other hand, gradually transforms to a high-density amorphous phase with the application of pressure. This phase transformation is irreversible because a densified amorphous state having both sp3 and sp2 bonds is recovered upon pressure release. The high-density amorphous state mainly consists of sp3 bonds and its local structure is quite similar to recently proposed intermediate boron nitrite phases, in particular tetragonal structure (P42/mnm), rather than the known the wurtzite or cubic boron nitrite due to the existence of four membered rings and edge sharing connectivity. On the basis of this finding we propose that amorphous boron nitrite might be best candidate as a starting structure to synthesize the intermediate phase(s) at high pressure and temperature (probably below 800 °C) conditions.

  19. Inheritance of Boron Efficiency in Oilseed Rape

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Lei; WANG Yun-Hua; NIAN Fu-Zhao; LU Jian-Wei; MENG Jin-Ling; XU Fang-Sen

    2009-01-01

    Field experiments were conducted to study the inheritance of boron efficiency in oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) by evaluating the boron (B) efficiency coefficient (BEC,the ratio of the seed yield at below the critical boron level to that at the boron-sufficient level) with 657 F2:3 fines of a population derived from a cross between a B-efficient cultivar,Qingyou 10,and a B-inefficient cultivar,Bakow.Qingyou i0 had high BEC as well as high seed yield at low available soil B.On the contrary,Bakow produced low seed yield at low B status.Boron deficiency decreased the seed yield of the F2:3 lines to different extents and the distribution of BEC of the population showed a bimodal pattern.When the 657 F2:3 lines were grouped into B-efficient lines and B-inefficient lines according to their BEC,the ratio of B-efficient lines to B-inefficient lines fitted the expected ratio (3:1),indicating that one major gene controlled the B-efficiency trait.127 F2:3 lines selected from the population at random,with distribution of BEC similar to that of the overall population,were used to identify the target region for fine mapping of the boron efficiency gene.

  20. Innovative boron nitride-doped propellants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thelma Manning

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The U.S. military has a need for more powerful propellants with balanced/stoichiometric amounts of fuel and oxidants. However, balanced and more powerful propellants lead to accelerated gun barrel erosion and markedly shortened useful barrel life. Boron nitride (BN is an interesting potential additive for propellants that could reduce gun wear effects in advanced propellants (US patent pending 2015-026P. Hexagonal boron nitride is a good lubricant that can provide wear resistance and lower flame temperatures for gun barrels. Further, boron can dope steel, which drastically improves its strength and wear resistance, and can block the formation of softer carbides. A scalable synthesis method for producing boron nitride nano-particles that can be readily dispersed into propellants has been developed. Even dispersion of the nano-particles in a double-base propellant has been demonstrated using a solvent-based processing approach. Stability of a composite propellant with the BN additive was verified. In this paper, results from propellant testing of boron nitride nano-composite propellants are presented, including closed bomb and wear and erosion testing. Detailed characterization of the erosion tester substrates before and after firing was obtained by electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. This promising boron nitride additive shows the ability to improve gun wear and erosion resistance without any destabilizing effects to the propellant. Potential applications could include less erosive propellants in propellant ammunition for large, medium and small diameter fire arms.

  1. Innovative boron nitride-doped propellants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thelma MANNING; Henry GRAU; Paul MATTER; Michael BEACHY; Christopher HOLT; Samuel SOPOK; Richard FIELD; Kenneth KLINGAMAN; Michael FAIR; John BOLOGNINI; Robin CROWNOVER; Carlton P. ADAM; Viral PANCHAL; Eugene ROZUMOV

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. military has a need for more powerful propellants with balanced/stoichiometric amounts of fuel and oxidants. However, balanced and more powerful propellants lead to accelerated gun barrel erosion and markedly shortened useful barrel life. Boron nitride (BN) is an interesting potential additive for propellants that could reduce gun wear effects in advanced propellants (US patent pending 2015-026P). Hexagonal boron nitride is a good lubricant that can provide wear resistance and lower flame temperatures for gun barrels. Further, boron can dope steel, which drastically improves its strength and wear resistance, and can block the formation of softer carbides. A scalable synthesis method for producing boron nitride nano-particles that can be readily dispersed into propellants has been developed. Even dispersion of the nano-particles in a double-base propellant has been demonstrated using a solvent-based processing approach. Stability of a composite propellant with the BN additive was verified. In this paper, results from propellant testing of boron nitride nano-composite propellants are presented, including closed bomb and wear and erosion testing. Detailed characterization of the erosion tester substrates before and after firing was obtained by electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. This promising boron nitride additive shows the ability to improve gun wear and erosion resistance without any destabilizing effects to the propellant. Potential applications could include less erosive propellants in propellant ammunition for large, medium and small diameter fire arms.

  2. Boronization of Russian tokamaks from carborane precursors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new and cheap boronization technique using the nontoxic and nonexplosive solid substance carborane has been developed and successfully applied to the Russian tokamaks T-11M, T-3M, T-10 and TUMAN-3. The glow discharge in a mixture of He and carborane vapor produced the amorphous B/C coating with the B/C ratio varied from 2.0-3.7. The deposition rate was about 150 nm/h. The primary effect of boronization was a significant reduction of the impurity influx and the plasma impurity contamination, a sharp decrease of the plasma radiated power, and a decrease of the effective charge. Boronization strongly suppressed the impurity influx caused by additional plasma heating. ECR- and ICR-heating as well as ECR current drive were more effective in boronized vessels. Boronization resulted in a significant extension of the Ne- and q-region of stable tokamak operation. The density limit rose strongly. In Ohmic H-mode energy confinement time increased significantly (by a factor of 2) after boronization. It rose linearly with plasma current Ip and was 10 times higher than Neo-Alcator time at maximum current. ((orig.))

  3. Synthesis and properties of low-carbon boron carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on the production of boron carbides of low carbon content (3 and CCl4 at 1273-1673 K in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactor. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that phase separation had occurred, and tetragonal boron carbide was formed along with β-boron or α-boron carbide under carbon-depleted gas-phase conditions. At temperatures greater than 1390 degrees C, graphite substrates served as a carbon source, affecting the phases present. A microstructure typical of CVD-produced α-boron carbide was observed. Plan view TEM of tetragonal boron carbide revealed a blocklike structure

  4. Development of magnetic resonance technology for noninvasive boron quantification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) were developed in support of the noninvasive boron quantification task of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Power Burst Facility/Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (PBF/BNCT) program. The hardware and software described in this report are modifications specific to a GE Signa trademark MRI system, release 3.X and are necessary for boron magnetic resonance operation. The technology developed in this task has been applied to obtaining animal pharmacokinetic data of boron compounds (drug time response) and the in-vivo localization of boron in animal tissue noninvasively. 9 refs., 21 figs

  5. A novel method of boron delivery using sodium iodide symporter for boron neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) effectiveness depends on the preferential sequestration of boron in cancer cells relative to normal tissue cells. We present a novel strategy for sequestering boron using an adenovirus expressing the sodium iodide symporter (NIS). Human glioma grown subcutaneously in athymic mice and orthotopic rat brain tumors were transfected with NIS using a direct tumor injection of adenovirus. Boron bound as sodium tetrafluoroborate (NaBF4) was administered systemically several days after transfection. Tumors were excised hours later and assessed for boron concentration using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. In the human glioma transfected with NIS, boron concentration was more than 10 fold higher with 100 mg/kg of NaBF4, compared to tumor not transfected. In the orthotopic tumor model, the presence of NIS conferred almost 4 times the boron concentration in rat tumors transfected with human virus compared with contralateral normal brain not transfected. We conclude that adenovirus expressing NIS has the potential to be used as a novel boron delivery agent and should be explored for future clinical applications. (author)

  6. Spectromicroscopy of boron for the optimization of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We used synchrotron spectromicroscopy to study the microscopic distribution of boron in rat brain tumour and healthy tissue in the field of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The success of this experimental cancer therapy depends on the preferential uptake of 10B in tumour cells after injection of a boron compound (in our case B12H11SH, or BSH). With the Mephisto (microscope a emission de photoelectrons par illumination synchrotronique de type onduleur) spectromicroscope, high-magnification imaging and chemical analysis was performed on brain tissue sections from a rat carrying an implanted brain tumour and the results were compared with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) detection of boron in bulk tissue. Boron was found to have been taken up more favourably by regions of tumour rather than healthy tissue, but the resulting boron distribution in the tumour was inhomogeneous. The results demonstrate that Mephisto can perform microchemical analysis of tissue sections, detect and localize the presence of boron with submicron spatial resolution. The application of this technique to boron in brain tissue can therefore be used to evaluate the current efforts to optimize BNC therapy. (author)

  7. Proceedings of workshop on 'boron science and boron neutron capture therapy'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitaoka, Y. [ed.

    1998-12-01

    This volume contains the abstracts and programs of the 8th (1996), 9th (1997) and 10th (1998) of the workshop on 'the Boron Science and Boron Neutron Capture Therapy' and the recent progress reports especially subscribed. The 11 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  8. A quantitative phase field model for hydride precipitation in zirconium alloys: Part I. Development of quantitative free energy functional

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A temperature dependent, quantitative free energy functional was developed for the modeling of hydride precipitation in zirconium alloys within a phase field scheme. The model takes into account crystallographic variants of hydrides, interfacial energy between hydride and matrix, interfacial energy between hydrides, elastoplastic hydride precipitation and interaction with externally applied stress. The model is fully quantitative in real time and real length scale, and simulation results were compared with limited experimental data available in the literature with a reasonable agreement. The work calls for experimental and/or theoretical investigations of some of the key material properties that are not yet available in the literature

  9. Development of a component design tool for metal hydride heat pumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Essene L.

    Given current demands for more efficient and environmentally friendly energy sources, hydrogen based energy systems are an increasingly popular field of interest. Within the field, metal hydrides have become a prominent focus of research due to their large hydrogen storage capacity and relative system simplicity and safety. Metal hydride heat pumps constitute one such application, in which heat and hydrogen are transferred to and from metal hydrides. While a significant amount of work has been done to study such systems, the scope of materials selection has been quite limited. Typical studies compare only a few metal hydride materials and provide limited justification for the choice of those few. In this work, a metal hydride component design tool has been developed to enable the targeted down-selection of an extensive database of metal hydrides to identify the most promising materials for use in metal hydride thermal systems. The material database contains over 300 metal hydrides with various physical and thermodynamic properties included for each material. Sub-models for equilibrium pressure, thermophysical data, and default properties are used to predict the behavior of each material within the given system. For a given thermal system, this tool can be used to identify optimal materials out of over 100,000 possible hydride combinations. The selection tool described herein has been applied to a stationary combined heat and power system containing a high-temperature proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell, a hot water tank, and two metal hydride beds used as a heat pump. A variety of factors can be used to select materials including efficiency, maximum and minimum system pressures, pressure difference, coefficient of performance (COP), and COP sensitivity. The targeted down-selection of metal hydrides for this system focuses on the system's COP for each potential pair. The values of COP and COP sensitivity have been used to identify pairs of highest interest for

  10. Kinetic deuterium isotope effects on ligand migrations in metal hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Variable-temperature (VT) 1H and 13C NMR studies of the complexes (μ-X)2Os3(CO)9(μ3-η2-(CH3CH2)2C2) (X = H or D) reveal that alkyne migration over the face of the cluster is directly linked to hydride migrations on the metal core as evidenced by a temperature-independent isotope effect (kHH/kDD = 1.7). In a related study of the VT 13C NMR of (μ-X)2M3(CO)9(μ3-S) (X = H or D; M = Ru, Os) the observation of a kHH/kDD = 1.6 for both the osmium and ruthenium complexes demonstrates that the first stage of carbonyl averaging is brought about by hydride migration and not axial-radial exchange of carbonyl groups, a process that occurs only at higher temperatures. The mechanistic implications of these results are discussed in the context of the reactivity of metal clusters and the dynamic properties of the metal-hydrogen bond

  11. Lab-size rechargeable metal hydride-air cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Wei-Kang; Noreus, Dag [Department of Materials and Enviromental Chemistry, Arrhenius Laboratory, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2010-09-01

    Lab-size rechargeable metal hydride-air (MH-air) cells with a gas management device were designed in order to minimize the loss of electrolyte. An AB{sub 5}-type hydrogen storage alloy was used as anode materials of the MH-air. The thickness of the metal hydride electrodes was in the range of 3.0-3.4 mm. Porous carbon-based air electrodes with Ag{sub 2}O catalysts were used as bi-functional electrodes for oxygen reduction and generation. The electrodes were first examined in half-cells to evaluate their performance and then assembled into one MH-air cell. The results showed the good cycling stability of the rechargeable MH-air cell with a capacity of 1990 mAh. The discharge voltage was 0.69 V at 0.05-0.1 C. The charge efficiency was about 90%. The specific and volumetric energy densities were about 95Wh kg{sup -1} and 140 Wh L{sup -1}, respectively. (author)

  12. Separation of covalent hydrides by gas-solid chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fully automated method was developed for separating the hydrides of elements of the IVth to VIIIth main subgroup of the periodic system and of Kr and Xe on the basis of their volatility using gas chromatography. The automated instrument allowing to carry out reduction, separation of the gaseous phase, the loading of a PORAPAK-packed column, the chromatographic separation and sampling was controlled by a HP 2116B computer. The elution time, peak area and the number of theoretical column plates were computed from chromatograms. The capture probably proceeded by a type of nonpolar nonspecific sorption (ΔH/Tsub(b) = 19.2 cal/mol.deg). The height of the theoretical plate was 0.05 to 0.1 cm. The technique may be used as a routine radiochemical method for group separations and for the separation of radioactive hydrides contained in the solution of targets irradiated with neutrons or charged particles in the preparation of radioactive sources of short-lived radionuclides, or in destructive activation analysis. (M.K.)

  13. Gas phase contributions to topochemical hydride reduction reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Yoji [Department of Energy and Hydrocarbon Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Li, Zhaofei [Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Hirai, Kei [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Tassel, Cédric [Department of Energy and Hydrocarbon Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); The Hakubi Center for Advanced Research, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Ushinomiya-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8302 (Japan); Loyer, François [Department of Energy and Hydrocarbon Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Institut des Sciences Chimiques de Rennes, UMR 6226 Université de Rennes 1-CNRS, équipe CSM, Bât. 10B, Campus de Beaulieu, 263, Avenue du Général Leclerc, 35042 Rennes Cedex (France); Ichikawa, Noriya [CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Abe, Naoyuki [Department of Energy and Hydrocarbon Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Yamamoto, Takafumi [Department of Energy and Hydrocarbon Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Shimakawa, Yuichi [CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); and others

    2013-11-15

    Alkali and alkali earth hydrides have been used as solid state reductants recently to yield many interesting new oxygen-deficient transition metal oxides. These reactions have tacitly been assumed to be a solid phase reaction between the reductant and parent oxide. We have conducted a number of experiments with physical separation between the reductant and oxides, and find that in some cases reduction proceeds even when the reagents are physically separated, implying reactions with in-situ generated H{sub 2} and, to a lesser extent, getter mechanisms. Our findings change our understanding of these topochemical reactions, and should enhance the synthesis of additional new oxides and nanostructures. - Graphical abstract: Topochemical reductions with hydrides: Solid state or gas phase reaction? Display Omitted - Highlights: • SrFeO{sub 2} and LaNiO{sub 2} were prepared by topochemical reduction of oxides. • Separating the reducing agent (CaH{sub 2}, Mg metal) from the oxide still results in reduction. • Such topochemical reactions can occur in the gas phase.

  14. Electronic Principles of Hydrogen Incorporation and Dynamics in Metal Hydrides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljiljana Matović

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available An approach to various metal hydrides based on electronic principles is presented. The effective medium theory (EMT is used to illustrate fundamental aspects of metal-hydrogen interaction and clarify the most important processes taking place during the interaction. The elaboration is extended using the numerous existing results of experiment and calculations, as well as using some new material. In particular, the absorption/desorption of H in the Mg/MgH2 system is analyzed in detail, and all relevant initial structures and processes explained. Reasons for the high stability and slow sorption in this system are noted, and possible solutions proposed. The role of the transition-metal impurities in MgH2 is briefly discussed, and some interesting phenomena, observed in complex intermetallic compounds, are mentioned. The principle mechanism governing the Li-amide/imide transformation is also discussed. Latterly, some perspectives for the metal-hydrides investigation from the electronic point of view are elucidated.

  15. Gas desorption properties of ammonia borane and metal hydride composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'Full text': Ammonia borane (NH3BH3) has been of great interest owing to its ideal combination of low molecular weight and high H2 storage capacity of 19.6 mass %, which exceeds the current capacity of gasoline. DOE's year 2015 targets involve gravimetric as well as volumetric energy densities. In this work, we have investigated thermal decomposition of ammonia borane and calcium hydride composites at different molar ratio. The samples were prepared by planetary ball milling under hydrogen gas atmosphere pressure of 1Mpa at room temperature for 2, and 10 hours. The gas desorption properties were examined by thermal desorption mass spectroscopy (TDMS). The identification of phases was carried out by X-ray diffraction. The results obtain were shown in fig (a),(b),and (c). Hydrogen desorption properties were observed at all molar ratios, but the desorption temperature is significantly lower at around 70 oC at molar ratio 1:1 as shown in fig (c), and unwanted gas (ammonia) emissions were remarkably suppressed by mixing with the calcium hydride. (author)

  16. Electronic structure of the palladium hydride studied by compton scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Mizusaki, S; Yamaguchi, M; Hiraoka, N; Itou, M; Sakurai, Y

    2003-01-01

    The hydrogen-induced changes in the electronic structure of Pd have been investigated by Compton scattering experiments associated with theoretical calculations. Compton profiles (CPs) of single crystal of Pd and beta phase hydride PdH sub x (x=0.62-0.74) have been measured along the [100], [110] and [111] directions with a momentum resolution of 0.14-0.17 atomic units using 115 keV x-rays. The theoretical Compton profiles have been calculated from the wavefunctions obtained utilizing the full potential linearized augmented plane wave method within the local density approximation for Pd and stoichiometric PdH. The experimental and the theoretical results agreed well with respect to the difference in the CPs between PdH sub x and Pd, and the anisotropy in the CPs of Pd or PdH sub x. This study provides lines of evidence that upon hydride formation the lowest valance band of Pd is largely modified due to hybridization with H 1s-orbitals and the Fermi energy is raised into the sp-band. (author)

  17. Gallium Nitride Nanowires Grown by Hydride Vapor Phase Epitaxy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zhan-Hui; XIU Xiang-Qan; YAN Huai-Yue; ZHANG Rong; XIE Zi-Li; HAN Ping; SHI Yi; ZHENG You-Dou

    2011-01-01

    @@ GaN nanowires are grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy using nickel as a catalyst.The properties of the obtained GaN nanowires are characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy,electron diffraction,roomtemperature photoluminescence and energy dispersive spectroscopy.The results show that the nanowires are wurtzite single crystals growing along the[0001]direction and a redshift in the photoluminescence is observed due to a superposition of several effects.The Raman spectra are close to those of the bulk GaN and the significantly broadening of those modes indicates the phonon confinement effects associated with the nanoscale dimensions of the system.%GaN nanowires are grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy using nickel as a catalyst. The properties of the obtained GaN nanowires are characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction, room-temperature photoluminescence and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The results show that the nanowires are wurtzite single crystals growing along the [0001] direction and a redshift in the photoluminescence is observed due to a superposition of several effects. The Raman spectra are close to those of the bulk GaN and the significantly broadening of those modes indicates the phonon confinement effects associated with the nanoscale dimensions of the system.

  18. Interstellar chemistry of nitrogen hydrides in dark clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Gal, Romane Le; Faure, Alexandre; Forêts, Guillaume Pineau des; Rist, Claire; Maret, Sébastien

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to perform a comprehensive analysis of the interstellar chemistry of nitrogen, focussing on the gas-phase formation of the smallest polyatomic species and in particular nitrogen hydrides. We present a new chemical network in which the kinetic rates of critical reactions have been updated based on recent experimental and theoretical studies, including nuclear spin branching ratios. Our network thus treats the different spin symmetries of the nitrogen hydrides self-consistently together with the ortho and para forms of molecular hydrogen. This new network is used to model the time evolution of the chemical abundances in dark cloud conditions. The steady-state results are analysed, with special emphasis on the influence of the overall amounts of carbon, oxygen, and sulphur. Our calculations are also compared with Herschel/HIFI observations of NH, NH$_2$, and NH$_3$ detected towards the external envelope of the protostar IRAS 16293-2422. The observed abundances and abundance ratios ...

  19. A low tritium hydride bed inventory estimation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low tritium hydride beds were developed and deployed into tritium service in Savannah River Site. Process beds to be used for low concentration tritium gas were not fitted with instrumentation to perform the steady-state, flowing gas calorimetric inventory measurement method. Low tritium beds contain less than the detection limit of the IBA (In-Bed Accountability) technique used for tritium inventory. This paper describes two techniques for estimating tritium content and uncertainty for low tritium content beds to be used in the facility's physical inventory (PI). PI are performed periodically to assess the quantity of nuclear material used in a facility. The first approach (Mid-point approximation method - MPA) assumes the bed is half-full and uses a gas composition measurement to estimate the tritium inventory and uncertainty. The second approach utilizes the bed's hydride material pressure-composition-temperature (PCT) properties and a gas composition measurement to reduce the uncertainty in the calculated bed inventory

  20. Superconductive "sodalite"-like clathrate calcium hydride at high pressures

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Hui; Tanaka, Kaori; Iitaka, Toshiaki; Ma, Yanming

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen-rich compounds hold promise as high-temperature superconductors under high pressures. Recent theoretical hydride structures on achieving high-pressure superconductivity are composed mainly of H2 fragments. Through a systematic investigation of Ca hydrides with different hydrogen contents using particle-swam optimization structural search, we show that in the stoichiometry CaH6 a body-centred cubic structure with hydrogen that forms unusual "sodalite" cages containing enclathrated Ca stabilizes above pressure 150 GPa. The stability of this structure is derived from the acceptance by two H2 of electrons donated by Ca forming a "H4" unit as the building block in the construction of the 3-dimensional sodalite cage. This unique structure has a partial occupation of the degenerated orbitals at the zone centre. The resultant dynamic Jahn-Teller effect helps to enhance electron-phonon coupling and leads to superconductivity of CaH6. A superconducting critical temperature (Tc) of 220-235 K at 150 GPa obtained...

  1. Electron and nuclear magnetic resonances in compounds and metallic hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proton pulsed Nuclear Magnetic Resonance measurements were performed on the metallic hydrides ZrCr2Hx (x = 2, 3, 4) and ZrV2Hy (y = 2, 3, 4, 5) as a function of temperature between 180 and 400K. The ultimate aim was the investigation of the relaxation mechanisms in these systems by means of the measurement of both the proton (1H) spin-lattice (T1) and spin-spin (T2) relaxation times and to use these data to obtain information about the diffusive motion of the hydrogen atoms. The diffusional activation energies, the jump frequencies and the Korringa constant, Ck, related with the conduction electron contribution to the 1H relaxation were determined for the above hydrides as a function of hydrogen concentration. Our results were analysed in terms of the relaxation models described by Bloembergen, Purcell and Pound (BPP model) and by Torrey. The Korringa type relaxation due to the conduction electrons in metallic systems was also used to interpret the experimental results. We also present the Electron Paramagnetic Ressonance (EPR) study of Gd3+, Nd3+ and Er3+ ions as impurities in several AB3 intermetallic compounds where A = LA, Ce, Y, Sc, Th, Zr and B = Rh, Ir, Pt. The results were analysed in terms of the multiband model previously suggested to explain the behaviour of the resonance parameter in AB2 Laves Phase compounds. (author)

  2. Aromatic character of planar boron-based clusters revisited by ring current calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Hung Tan; Lim, Kie Zen; Havenith, Remco W A; Nguyen, Minh Tho

    2016-04-28

    The planarity of small boron-based clusters is the result of an interplay between geometry, electron delocalization, covalent bonding and stability. These compounds contain two different bonding patterns involving both σ and π delocalized bonds, and up to now, their aromaticity has been assigned mainly using the classical (4N + 2) electron count for both types of electrons. In the present study, we reexplored the aromatic feature of different types of planar boron-based clusters making use of the ring current approach. B3(+/-), B4(2-), B5(+/-), B6, B7(-), B8(2-), B9(-), B10(2-), B11(-), B12, B13(+), B14(2-) and B16(2-) are characterized by magnetic responses to be doubly σ and π aromatic species in which the π aromaticity can be predicted using the (4N + 2) electron count. The triply aromatic character of B12 and B13(+) is confirmed. The π electrons of B18(2-), B19(-) and B20(2-) obey the disk aromaticity rule with an electronic configuration of [1σ(2)1π(4)1δ(4)2σ(2)] rather than the (4N + 2) count. The double aromaticity feature is observed for boron hydride cycles including B@B5H5(+), Li7B5H5 and M@BnHn(q) clusters from both the (4N + 2) rule and ring current maps. The double π and σ aromaticity in carbon-boron planar cycles B7C(-), B8C, B6C2, B9C(-), B8C2 and B7C3(-) is in conflict with the Hückel electron count. This is also the case for the ions B11C5(+/-) whose ring current indicators suggest that they belong to the class of double aromaticity, in which the π electrons obey the disk aromaticity characteristics. In many clusters, the classical electron count cannot be applied, and the magnetic responses of the electron density expressed in terms of the ring current provide us with a more consistent criterion for determining their aromatic character. PMID:26956732

  3. A quantitative comparison between electrocoagulation and chemical coagulation for boron removal from boron-containing solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilmaz, A. Erdem [Atatuerk University, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Environmental Engineering, 25240 Erzurum (Turkey)], E-mail: aerdemy@atauni.edu.tr; Boncukcuoglu, Recep [Atatuerk University, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Environmental Engineering, 25240 Erzurum (Turkey); Kocakerim, M. Muhtar [Atatuerk University, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, 25240 Erzurum (Turkey)

    2007-10-22

    This paper provides a quantitative comparison of electrocoagulation and chemical coagulation approaches based on boron removal. Electrocoagulation process delivers the coagulant in situ as the sacrificial anode corrodes, due to a fixed current density, while the simultaneous evolution of hydrogen at the cathode allows for pollutant removal by flotation. By comparison, conventional chemical coagulation typically adds a salt of the coagulant, with settling providing the primary pollutant removal path. Chemical coagulation was carried out via jar tests using aluminum chloride. Comparison was done with the same amount of coagulant between electrocoagulation and chemical coagulation processes. Boron removal obtained was higher with electrocoagulation process. In addition, it was seen that chemical coagulation has any effect for boron removal from boron-containing solution. At optimum conditions (e.g. pH 8.0 and aluminum dose of 7.45 g/L), boron removal efficiencies for electrocoagulation and chemical coagulation were 94.0% and 24.0%, respectively.

  4. A quantitative comparison between electrocoagulation and chemical coagulation for boron removal from boron-containing solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper provides a quantitative comparison of electrocoagulation and chemical coagulation approaches based on boron removal. Electrocoagulation process delivers the coagulant in situ as the sacrificial anode corrodes, due to a fixed current density, while the simultaneous evolution of hydrogen at the cathode allows for pollutant removal by flotation. By comparison, conventional chemical coagulation typically adds a salt of the coagulant, with settling providing the primary pollutant removal path. Chemical coagulation was carried out via jar tests using aluminum chloride. Comparison was done with the same amount of coagulant between electrocoagulation and chemical coagulation processes. Boron removal obtained was higher with electrocoagulation process. In addition, it was seen that chemical coagulation has any effect for boron removal from boron-containing solution. At optimum conditions (e.g. pH 8.0 and aluminum dose of 7.45 g/L), boron removal efficiencies for electrocoagulation and chemical coagulation were 94.0% and 24.0%, respectively

  5. Ceramic silicon-boron-carbon fibers from organic silicon-boron-polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccitiello, Salvatore R. (Inventor); Hsu, Ming-Ta S. (Inventor); Chen, Timothy S. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Novel high strength ceramic fibers derived from boron, silicon, and carbon organic precursor polymers are discussed. The ceramic fibers are thermally stable up to and beyond 1200 C in air. The method of preparation of the boron-silicon-carbon fibers from a low oxygen content organosilicon boron precursor polymer of the general formula Si(R2)BR(sup 1) includes melt-spinning, crosslinking, and pyrolysis. Specifically, the crosslinked (or cured) precursor organic polymer fibers do not melt or deform during pyrolysis to form the silicon-boron-carbon ceramic fiber. These novel silicon-boron-carbon ceramic fibers are useful in high temperature applications because they retain tensile and other properties up to 1200 C, from 1200 to 1300 C, and in some cases higher than 1300 C.

  6. Multi-scale characterization of nanostructured sodium aluminum hydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    NaraseGowda, Shathabish

    Complex metal hydrides are the most promising candidate materials for onboard hydrogen storage. The practicality of this class of materials is counter-poised on three critical attributes: reversible hydrogen storage capacity, high hydrogen uptake/release kinetics, and favorable hydrogen uptake/release thermodynamics. While a majority of modern metallic hydrides that are being considered are those that meet the criteria of high theoretical storage capacity, the challenges lie in addressing poor kinetics, thermodynamics, and reversibility. One emerging strategy to resolve these issues is via nanostructuring or nano-confinement of complex hydrides. By down-sizing and scaffolding them to retain their nano-dimensions, these materials are expected to improve in performance and reversibility. This area of research has garnered immense interest lately and there is active research being pursued to address various aspects of nanostructured complex hydrides. The research effort documented here is focused on a detailed investigation of the effects of nano-confinement on aspects such as the long range atomic hydrogen diffusivities, localized hydrogen dynamics, microstructure, and dehydrogenation mechanism of sodium alanate. A wide variety of microporous and mesoporous materials (metal organic frameworks, porous silica and alumina) were investigated as scaffolds and the synthesis routes to achieve maximum pore-loading are discussed. Wet solution infiltration technique was adopted using tetrahydrofuran as the medium and the precursor concentrations were found to have a major role in achieving maximum pore loading. These concentrations were optimized for each scaffold with varying pore sizes and confinement was quantitatively characterized by measuring the loss in specific surface area. This work is also aimed at utilizing neutron and synchrotron x-ray characterization techniques to study and correlate multi-scale material properties and phenomena. Some of the most advanced

  7. Boron-11 NMR spectroscopy of excised mouse tissues after infusion of boron compound used in neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is based on selective boron uptake by the tumor and in situ activation by neutron beam. The authors propose the use of B-11 MR spectroscopy to noninvasively study boron uptake in animal tumor models. Sodium mercaptoundeca-hydrododecaborate was infused into female BALB/cJ mice and liver, brain, spleen, kidney, and tumor tissues were excised for MR (27.4MHz) and total boron content measurements. Boron-11 was easily detectable in tumor, liver, spleen, and skin. The results gave a very good correlation (correlation coefficient of .997) between B-11 MR measurements and total boron content of excised mouse tissues

  8. Simultaneous determination of boron-10 and boron-11 under proton bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The isotopic analysis of boron gained importance with increased use of boron-10 in nuclear technology. Former techniques for determining the stable boron isotope either were limited to the determination of a single isotope or required tedious experimental prodecure. The use of proton induced reactions was therefore investigated as an alternative method for the simultaneous analysis of both stable isotopes of boron through a relatively simple experimental procedure. Aqueous solutions of natural boric acid (19,78 at. % 10B) and enriched boric acid (92,41 at. % 10B) were mixed and evaporated to dryness in order to obtain samples in which the isotopic concentration of boron was known. Thin targets were produced by evaporating boron oxide, converted by heat from the boric acid mixture, onto tantalum backing material. Standard samples with known contents of boron oxide were prepared by dry mixing standard reference boron-containing glass powers in a ball mill. Thick targets containing boron of different isotopic compositions were prepared in matrices of potassium bromide and of ion-exchange resins by mixing the matrix with aqueous solutions of boric acid and of sodium carbonate by fusion with boric oxide. The most intense prompt gamma-rays emitted from boron isotopes under irradiation with protons up to 4,5 MeV were the 428-KeV 10B α(1,0), 718-KeV 10B p(1,0) and the 2124-KeV 11B p(1,0) gamma-rays. Excitation functions for the production of each of these were measured using both thick and thin targets

  9. Main Group Lewis Acid-Mediated Transformations of Transition-Metal Hydride Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Ayan; Teets, Thomas S

    2016-08-10

    This Review highlights stoichiometric reactions and elementary steps of catalytic reactions involving cooperative participation of transition-metal hydrides and main group Lewis acids. Included are reactions where the transition-metal hydride acts as a reactant as well as transformations that form the metal hydride as a product. This Review is divided by reaction type, illustrating the diverse roles that Lewis acids can play in mediating transformations involving transition-metal hydrides as either reactants or products. We begin with a discussion of reactions where metal hydrides form direct adducts with Lewis acids, elaborating the structure and dynamics of the products of these reactions. The bulk of this Review focuses on reactions where the transition metal and Lewis acid act in cooperation, and includes sections on carbonyl reduction, H2 activation, and hydride elimination reactions, all of which can be promoted by Lewis acids. Also included is a section on Lewis acid-base secondary coordination sphere interactions, which can influence the reactivity of hydrides. Work from the past 50 years is included, but the majority of this Review focuses on research from the past decade, with the intent of showcasing the rapid emergence of this field and the potential for further development into the future. PMID:27164024

  10. Preparation and chemical crystallographic study of new hydrides and hydro-fluorides of ionic character

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the context of a growing interest in the study of reversible hydrides with the perspective of their application in hydrogen storage, this research thesis more particularly addressed the case of ternary hydrides and fluorides, and of hydro-fluorides. The author reports the development of a method of preparation of alkaline hydrides, of alkaline earth hydrides and of europium hydride, and then the elaboration of ternary hydrides. He addresses the preparation of caesium fluorides and of calcium or nickel fluorides, of Europium fluorides, and of ternary fluorides. Then, he addresses the preparation of hydro-fluorides (caesium, calcium, europium fluorides, and caesium and nickel fluorides). The author presents the various experimental techniques: chemical analysis, radio-crystallographic analysis, volumetric mass density measurement, magnetic measurements, ionic conductivity measurements, Moessbauer spectroscopy, and nuclear magnetic resonance. He reports the crystallographic study of some ternary alkaline and alkaline-earth hydrides (KH-MgH2, RbH-CaH2, CsH-CaH2, RbH-MgH2 and CsH-MgH2) and of some hydro-fluorides (CsCaF2H, EuF2H, CsNiF2H)

  11. Hydride blister formation in Zr-2.5wt%Nb pressure tube alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydride blisters were grown over a period of 5-91 days under controlled thermal boundary condition using Zr-2.5wt%Nb pressure tube sections. Rectangular plate type specimens were hydrided to hydrogen concentration in the range of 20-250 ppm by weight and homogenized at 400 deg. C. These specimens were held in a specially fabricated jig capable of producing the required thermal gradients. The bulk specimen and the cold spot temperatures were maintained in the range of 270-400 deg. C and 40-100 deg. C respectively. Depending on the thermal gradients employed, two types of blister morphology were identified. The type I blister was single, round and located at the cold spot region whereas the type II blister consisted of several small blisters along a ring around the cold spot. Microstructural examination of the blister cross-section revealed three regions; a single-phase region consisting of hydrides, a region consisting of matrix containing both radial and circumferential hydrides, and another region consisting of matrix and circumferential hydrides. An attempt was made to rationalize the observed radial-circumferential hydride platelet orientation. Hydride blister growth rates were found to vary strongly with hydrogen concentration and bulk specimen temperature. The observed time for blister growth was found to be in agreement with the Sawatzky's model

  12. Characterisation of hydride blister in reactor operated zircaloy-2 pressure tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zircaloy-2 pressure tubes pickup Hydrogen species (H and D) during in-reactor service. The hydrogen pickup leads to hydride precipitation and in the event of a contact between the pressure tube and the calandria tube, hydrogen migrates to the cold spot leading to the formation of hydride blister. One such hydride blister location in an operated Zircaloy-2 pressure tube of RAPS-2 was subjected to metallographic studies and mapping of the microstructure across the tube thickness. Mapping of the hydrogen concentration across the tube thickness was carried out by careful sampling and H estimation by DSC technique. The H profile across the tube thickness, up to the blister boundary, was generated. The hydride blister region was found to be made up of microstructurally different regions starting from dense massive hydride at the outer surface and followed in sequence by a region with dense and thick platelets oriented parallel to the blister boundary and radial platelet region, which subsequently merged with the background platelet distribution appropriate for the average hydrogen content of the pressure tube. The equivalent blister depth corresponding to H content of 16,000 w/ppm has been estimated from the H profile at the blister location. In the case of a hydride blister with measured thickness of 0.4mm the equivalent blister thickness was found to be 0.414mm. Mapping of the hardness of the massive hydride and the adjoining microstructurally different regions was carried out by microhardness measurements at room temperature. (author)

  13. The role of stress-state on the deformation and fracture mechanism of hydrided and non-hydrided Zircaloy-4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockeram, B. V.; Hollenbeck, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    Zircaloy-4 was tested at room-temperature over a range of hydrogen content between 10 and 200 ppm, and stress-states between a triaxiality of -0.23 and 0.9. Triaxiality (η) is defined as the ratio of hydrostatic stress to von Mises stress and was controlled through use of select mechanical test specimen designs. Testing of smooth and notched tensile specimens (η = 0.33 to 0.9) results in an increase in the stress to initiate plastic deformation and a decrease in strain to failure at higher values of η. Increases in triaxiality are shown to have a more significant effect on reducing the strain to failure when the material is hydrided. Increases in strain to failure are observed at lower values of triaxiality for dual keyhole specimens (η = 0.1) and compression specimens (η = -0.17 to -0.23), with hydrided material showing much less decrement in strain to failure at these lower triaxialities. Examinations of microstructure are used to show that a change in mechanism for deformation and fracture with triaxiality can explain these differences in mechanical behavior and a model is developed to describe the observed changes in strain to failure with stress-state.

  14. Effect of thermo-mechanical cycling on zirconium hydride reorientation studied in situ with synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The circumferential hydrides normally present in nuclear reactor fuel cladding after reactor exposure may dissolve during drying for dry storage and re-precipitate when cooled under load into a more radial orientation, which could embrittle the fuel cladding. It is necessary to study the rates and conditions under which hydride reorientation may happen in order to assess fuel integrity in dry storage. The objective of this work is to study the effect of applied stress and thermal cycling on the hydride morphology in cold-worked stress-relieved Zircaloy-4 by combining conventional metallography and in situ X-ray diffraction techniques. Metallography is used to study the evolution of hydride morphology after several thermo-mechanical cycles. In situ X-ray diffraction performed at the Advanced Photon Source synchrotron provides real-time information on the process of hydride dissolution and precipitation under stress during several thermal cycles. The detailed study of diffracted intensity, peak position and full-width at half-maximum provides information on precipitation kinetics, elastic strains and other characteristics of the hydride precipitation process. The results show that thermo-mechanical cycling significantly increases the radial hydride fraction as well as the hydride length and connectivity. The radial hydrides are observed to precipitate at a lower temperature than circumferential hydrides. Variations in the magnitude and range of hydride strains due to reorientation and cycling have also been observed. These results are discussed in light of existing models and experiments on hydride reorientation. The study of hydride elastic strains during precipitation shows marked differences between circumferential and radial hydrides, which can be used to investigate the reorientation process

  15. Hydride re-orientation in Zircaloy and its effect on the tensile properties. Revised edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on literature studies and experimental work, investigations were carried out to determine the stress and thermal conditions required for the reorientation of hydrides from an initial circumferential orientation to a radial one. The section of microscopic reference was transverse, in hydride ring samples of Zircaloy. It was found that, both the degree of reorientation and the relative amount of radial hydrides achieved, were dependent on the hydrogen content of the material, given the same stress and thermal conditions. The need to take most of the hydrides into solution at the uppermost temperature of the thermal cycle, in order for complete reorientation to occur, became also clear. In general, an upper temperature of 500 deg C, in combination with an orientation stress in the interval 150-200 MPa was found to be adequate for the reorientation to radial hydrides. On the basis of these initial results, attempts were then made to produce ring test samples in which the hydrides had assumed the radial orientation. These were subsequently subjected to the tensile test in order to investigate the effect of hydride reorientation on the tensile properties of the material. The tests, which were conducted at room temperature and higher temperatures (100 deg C - 300 deg C), showed that the hydrides were brittle at room temperature but became less so at higher temperatures. With the exception of the samples which were tested at room temperature, all the other samples did show a ductile failure. At the strain rate employed in the present work (0.02cm/mm) therefore, the radial hydrides could not be said to have a reducing effect on the ductile characteristics of Zircaloy at higher temperatures

  16. Boron: out of the sky and onto the ground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Now an accepted, engineered material for aerospace applications, boron is taking its place on the ground. Both current production applications, prototype (development) applications, and speculative applications abound. In the leisure product market, boron epoxy or boron aluminum has been used or tried in golf clubs (in combination with graphite epoxy or to reinforce aluminum or steel), in tennis racquets, in bicycles, racing shells, skis and skipoles, bows and arrows, and others. In the industrial area, boron has been used to reduce fatigue, increase stiffness, or for its abrasive properties. Textile machinery, honing tools, and cut off wheels or saws are among the applications. In the medical field, prosthetics and orthotic braces, wheel chairs, canes, and crutches are all good applications for boron. Applications for boron in transportation, construction, and heavy industry are also possible. The volume of boron used in these applications could have a major impact on prices, making boron composite parts cost competitive with conventional materials. (U.S.)

  17. 15th International Conference on Boron Chemistry (IMEBORON XV)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grüner, Bohumír; Štíbr, Bohumil

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 87, č. 2 (2015), s. 121. ISSN 0033-4545 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : boranes * boron * boron materials * carboranes * IMEBORON XV * medicinal chemistry Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry

  18. Boron Removal in Seawater Reverse Osmosis System

    KAUST Repository

    Rahmawati, Karina

    2011-07-01

    Reverse osmosis successfully proves to remove more than 99% of solute in seawater, providing fresh water supply with satisfied quality. Due to some operational constraints, however, some trace contaminants removal, such as boron, cannot be achieved in one pass system. The stringent criterion for boron from World Health Organization (WHO) and Saudi Arabia local standard (0.5 mg/l) is hardly fulfilled by single pass sea water reverse osmosis (SWRO) plants. Some design processes have been proposed to deal with boron removal, but they are not economically efficient due to high energy and chemical consumption. The objective of this study was to study boron removal by different reverse osmosis membranes in two pH conditions, with and without antiscalant addition. Thus, it was expected to observe the possibility of operating single pass system and necessity to operate two pass system using low energy membrane. Five membrane samples were obtained from two different manufacturers. Three types of feed water pH were used, pH 8, pH 10, and pH 10 with antiscalant addition. Experiment was conducted in parallel to compare membrane performance from two manufacturers. Filtration was run with fully recycle mode for three days. Sample of permeate and feed were taken every 12 hours, and analyzed for their boron and TDS concentration. Membrane samples were also tested for their surface charge. The results showed that boron rejection increases as the feed pH increases. This was caused by dissociation of boric acid to negatively charged borate ion and more negatively charged membrane surface at elevated pH which enhance boron rejection. This study found that single pass reverse osmosis system, with and without elevating the pH, may not be possible to be applied because of two reasons. First, permeate quality in term of boron, does not fulfill WHO and local Saudi Arabia regulations. Second, severe scaling occurs due to operation in alkaline condition, since Ca and Mg concentration are

  19. Small Angle Neutron Scattering Investigation of Hydride Precipitations in Zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The precipitation and annealing behavior of hydrogen in Zircaloy-4 was investigated by means of small angle neutron scattering. The results show that already during cool down in the air lock of the applied furnace zirconium hydride precipitates are formed. The size of the hydrides seems to be greater than the upper detection limit of the SANS experiments performed. These hydrides seem to be stable during various annealing at temperatures between 573 and 773 K for 1 to 16 days in inert atmosphere. (author)

  20. Thermal decomposition kinetics of titanium hydride and Al alloy melt foaming process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG; Donghui; HE; Deping; YANG; Shangrun

    2004-01-01

    A temperature programmed decomposition (TPD) apparatus with metal tube structure, in which Ar is used as the carrier gas, is established and the TPD spectrum of titanium hydride is acquired. Using consulting table method (CTM), spectrum superposition method (SSM) and differential spectrum technique, TPD spectrum of titanium hydride is separated and a set of thermal decomposition kinetics equations are acquired. According to these equations, the relationship between decomposition quantity and time for titanium hydride at the temperature of 940 K is obtained and the result well coincides with the Al alloy melt foaming process.

  1. Rapid Microwave Synthesis, Characterization and Reactivity of Lithium Nitride Hydride, Li4NH

    OpenAIRE

    Nuria Tapia-Ruiz; Natalie Sorbie; Nicolas Vaché; Hoang, Tuan K. A.; Gregory, Duncan H.

    2013-01-01

    Lithium nitride hydride, Li4NH, was synthesised from lithium nitride and lithium hydride over minute timescales, using microwave synthesis methods in the solid state for the first time. The structure of the microwave-synthesised powders was confirmed by powder X-ray diffraction [tetragonal space group I41/a; a = 4.8864(1) Å, c = 9.9183(2) Å] and the nitride hydride reacts with moist air under ambient conditions to produce lithium hydroxide and subsequently lithium carbonate. Li4NH undergoes n...

  2. Proton beam production by a laser ion source with hydride target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamura, M., E-mail: okamura@bnl.gov [Collider-Accelerator Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Saitama (Japan); Stifler, C. [Engineering Physics Systems Department, Providence College, Providence, Rhode Island 02918 (United States); Palm, K. [Department of Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Steski, D.; Kanesue, T. [Collider-Accelerator Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Ikeda, S. [Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Saitama (Japan); Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Kanagawa (Japan); Kumaki, M. [Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Saitama (Japan); Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    We studied proton beam production from a laser ion source using hydrogen rich target materials. In general, gas based species are not suitable for laser ion sources since formation of a dense laser target is difficult. In order to achieve reliable operation, we tested hydride targets using a sub nanosecond Q-switched Nd-YAG laser, which may help suppress target material consumption. We detected enough yields of protons from a titanium hydride target without degradation of beam current during the experiment. The combination of a sub nanosecond laser and compressed hydride target may provide stable proton beam.

  3. Generalized computational model for high-pressure metal hydrides with variable thermal properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazzucco, Andrea; Rokni, Masoud

    2015-01-01

    This study considers a detailed 1D fueling model applied to a metal hydride system, with Ti1.1CrMn as the absorbing alloy, to predict the weight fraction of the absorbed hydrogen and the solid bed temperature. Dependencies of thermal conductivity and specific heat capacity upon pressure and...... hydrogen content, respectively, are accounted for by interpolating experimental data. The effect of variable parameters on the critical metal hydride thickness is investigated and compared to results obtained from a constant-parameter analysis. Finally, the discrepancy in the metal hydride thickness value...

  4. The storage of hydrogen in the form of metal hydrides: An application to thermal engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gales, C.; Perroud, P.

    1981-01-01

    The possibility of using LaNi56, FeTiH2, or MgH2 as metal hydride storage sytems for hydrogen fueled automobile engines is discussed. Magnesium copper and magnesium nickel hydrides studies indicate that they provide more stable storage systems than pure magnesium hydrides. Several test engines employing hydrogen fuel have been developed: a single cylinder motor originally designed for use with air gasoline mixture; a four-cylinder engine modified to run on an air hydrogen mixture; and a gas turbine.

  5. Behaviour of depleted uranium as metal hydride in a storage vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The storage of hydrogen isotopes as metal hydrides is considered a safe and modern technique. The metal hydrides offer a great opportunity for improvement of tritium processing. They allow the design of safe, compact and efficient tritium handling equipment. The paper presents our experience in developing a technology of making experimental hydride storage vessels for tritium handling and processing. The vessel, using depleted uranium as metallic matrix, was tested to determine the experimental conditions for activation, loading and desorption hydrogen. Using depleted uranium, a hydrogen/metal ratio (H/Me) of 2.9 could be achieved. The equipment was tested by successive absorption/desorption cycles. (authors)

  6. Proton beam production by a laser ion source with hydride target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied proton beam production from a laser ion source using hydrogen rich target materials. In general, gas based species are not suitable for laser ion sources since formation of a dense laser target is difficult. In order to achieve reliable operation, we tested hydride targets using a sub nanosecond Q-switched Nd-YAG laser, which may help suppress target material consumption. We detected enough yields of protons from a titanium hydride target without degradation of beam current during the experiment. The combination of a sub nanosecond laser and compressed hydride target may provide stable proton beam

  7. Thermodynamics and statistical mechanics of some hydrides of the lanthanides and actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work deals mainly with the thermodynamic and physical properties of the hydrides of the lanthanides and actinides. In addition, statistical models have been developed and applied to metal-hydrogen systems. A kinetic study of the uranium-hydrogen system was performed. The thermodynamic properties of the hydrides of neptunium, thorium, praseodymium, neodymium, samarium and europium were determined. In addition the samarium-europium-hydrogen ternary system was investigated. Moessbauer effect measurements of cubic neptunium hydrides were interpreted according to a model presented. A comparison. (author)

  8. Analytical control of production of As, P, Si, B hydrides and the mixtures on their basis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highly sensitive and selective detectors which are in the basis of some analytical devices, such as chromatograph Tzvet 500G attachment POU-80, gigrometer Enisej gas analyzer Platon that permit to control the production of As, P, Si, B hydrides, are tested. The techniques of tetermination of constant gases, general carbon, moisture in the mixtures based on As, P, Si, B hydrides with diluting gases (H2, He, Ar) as well as hydrides in them and in the air of working premises, are suggested

  9. First gaseous boronization during pulsed discharge cleaning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, J., E-mail: jinseok@nfri.re.kr [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Den Hartog, D.J.; Goetz, J.A.; Weix, P.J.; Limbach, S.T. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2013-01-15

    The first successful gaseous boronization during a pulsed discharge is reported. Sublimation of o-carborane (C{sub 2}B{sub 10}H{sub 12}) combined with pulsed discharge plasmas with a repetition rate of 1 Hz is used to produce a hard boron-containing coating for reversed field pinch (RFP) plasmas in the Madison Symmetric Torus. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy with Ar ion beam etching for silicon coupons installed at the plasma boundary shows about 60% boron concentration in the deposited layer. Both profilometer and scanning electron microscope analyses of the silicon coupons imply a strong toroidally non-uniform deposition depending on the location of the o-carborane injection. The layer thickness ranges from 50 to 300 nm. Ellipsometry calibrated with the profilometer results yields a refractive index of 2.2-2.3 for the films. The high refractive index implies that the coating is hard and has a well-ordered morphology. A reduction in wall recycling has consistently been observed after all boronization sessions. Comparison of the X-ray spectra in standard RFP plasmas before and after boronization indicates a slight decrease in the effective ionic charge.

  10. Boron isotope fractionation during brucite deposition from artificial seawater

    OpenAIRE

    J. Xiao; Xiao, Y. K.; Liu, C. Q.; Z. D. Jin

    2011-01-01

    Experiments involving boron incorporation into brucite (Mg(OH)2) from magnesium-free artificial seawater with pH values ranging from 9.5 to 13.0 were carried out to better understand the incorporation behavior of boron into brucite. The results show that both concentration of boron in deposited brucite ([B]d) and its boron partition coefficient (Kd) between deposited brucite and final seawater are controll...

  11. Characterization of boron carbide with an electron microprobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteudi, G.; Ruste, J.

    1983-01-01

    Within the framework of a study of heterogeneous materials (Matteudi et al., 1971: Matteudi and Verchery, 1972) thin deposits of boron carbide were characterized. Experiments using an electronic probe microanalyzer to analyze solid boron carbide or boron carbide in the form of thick deposits are described. Quantitative results on boron and carbon are very close to those obtained when applying the Monte Carlo-type correction calculations.

  12. Technology of boron-containing polyphosphate fertilizer 'Phosphobor'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A technology is developed for producing 'Phosphobor' fertilizer based on the rock phosphate weal (17-18% P2O5) with additions of boron-magnesium compound. Boron is part of polyphosphate fertilizer in the form of polymeric compounds of phosphorus and boron. Phosphorus and boron copolymers -boratophosphates - are easily formed in the process of polyphosphate fertilizers production, since borates undergo a mutual polycondensation reaction with phosphates. 8 refs., 1 fig

  13. Glass manufacturing process having boron and fluorine pollution abating features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froberg, M.L.; Schroeder, C.F.

    1981-11-03

    Boron and/or fluorine values are reclaimed from a boron and/or fluorine laden gas stream emanating from a glass melter by means of a preheating bed of glass-forming batch agglomerates. The boron and/or fluorine values in such gases are first reacted with a boron and/or fluorine reactive material and the gases then conveyed into such a preheating bed to separate at least a portion of the reaction products.

  14. Glass manufacturing process having boron and fluorine pollution abating features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron and/or fluorine values are reclaimed from a boron and/or fluorine laden gas stream emanating from a glass melter by means of a preheating bed of glass-forming batch agglomerates. The boron and/or fluorine values in such gases are first reacted with a boron and/or fluorine reactive material and the gases then conveyed into such a preheating bed to separate at least a portion of the reaction products

  15. Proceedings of workshop on 'boron chemistry and boron neutron capture therapy'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume contains the proceedings of the 4th Workshop on 'the Boron Chemistry and Boron Neutron Capture Therapy' held on February 24 in 1992. First, clinical experiences of BNCT in the Kyoto University Research Reactor in 1992 were briefly reported. Then, the killing effects of boron cluster-containing nucleic acid precursors on tumor cells were shown (Chap. 2). The various trials of the optical resolution of B-p-boronophenylalanine for neutron capture therapy were made (Chap. 3). The borate-dextran gel complexes were investigated by the nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The stability constants of borate complexes were listed, and are useful in the solution chemistry of boron compounds (Chap. 4). The interactions between boron compounds and biological materials were studied by the paper electrophoresis which had been developed by us (Chap. 5). Molecular design of boron-10 carriers and their organic synthesis were reported (Chap. 6). Carborane-containing aziridine boron carriers which were directed to the DNA alkylation were synthesized and their cancer cell killing efficacies were tested (Chap. 7). The solution chemistry of deuterium oxide which is a good neutron moderator was reported, relating to the BNCT (Chap. 8). (author)

  16. Synthesis of multiwall boron nitride nanotubes dependent on crystallographic structure of boron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synthesis and growth of multiwall boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) under the B and ZrO2 seed system in the milling–annealing process were investigated. BNNTs were synthesized by annealing a mechanically activated boron powder under nitrogen environment. We explored the aspects of the mechanical activation energy transferred to milled crystalline boron powder producing structural disorder and borothermal reaction of the ZrO2 seed particles on the synthesis of BNNTs during annealing. Under these circumstances, the chemical reaction of amorphous boron coated on the seed nanoparticles with nitrogen synthesizing amorphous BN could be enhanced. It was found that amorphous BN was crystallized to the layer structure and then grown to multiwall BNNTs during annealing. Especially, bamboo-type multiwall BNNTs were mostly produced and grown to the tail-side of the nanotube not to the round head-side. Open gaps with ∼0.3 nm of the bamboo side walls of BNNTs were also observed. Based on these understandings, it might be possible to produce bamboo-type multiwall BNNTs by optimization of the structure and shape of boron coat on the seed nanoparticles. -- Highlights: ► Structure of B is a key factor for BNNT synthesis for milling–annealing method. ► Amorphous boron is coated on the seed during milling of crystalline boron. ► Amorphous BN nanoclusters are crystallized during annealing. ► Growing of bamboo BNNTs is not to the round head-side but to the tail-side.

  17. INFLUENCE OF FINE-DISPERSED BORON CARBIDE ON THE STRUCTURE AND CHARACTERISTICS OF IRON-BORON ALLOY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. F. Nevar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The influence of boron carbide as fine-dispersed material input into the melt on structure morphology, founding, technological and exploitation characterisstics of cast iron-boron material is shown.

  18. Colorimetric Sugar Sensing Using Boronic Acid-Substituted Azobenzenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuya Egawa

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In association with increasing diabetes prevalence, it is desirable to develop new glucose sensing systems with low cost, ease of use, high stability and good portability. Boronic acid is one of the potential candidates for a future alternative to enzyme-based glucose sensors. Boronic acid derivatives have been widely used for the sugar recognition motif, because boronic acids bind adjacent diols to form cyclic boronate esters. In order to develop colorimetric sugar sensors, boronic acid-conjugated azobenzenes have been synthesized. There are several types of boronic acid azobenzenes, and their characteristics tend to rely on the substitute position of the boronic acid moiety. For example, o-substitution of boronic acid to the azo group gives the advantage of a significant color change upon sugar addition. Nitrogen-15 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR studies clearly show a signaling mechanism based on the formation and cleavage of the B–N dative bond between boronic acid and azo moieties in the dye. Some boronic acid-substituted azobenzenes were attached to a polymer or utilized for supramolecular chemistry to produce glucose-selective binding, in which two boronic acid moieties cooperatively bind one glucose molecule. In addition, boronic acid-substituted azobenzenes have been applied not only for glucose monitoring, but also for the sensing of glycated hemoglobin and dopamine.

  19. Boron-containing amino carboxylic acid compounds and uses thereof

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novel compounds which are useful for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) are disclosed. The compounds comprise a stable boron-containing group and an aminocycloalkane carboxylic acid group or a boronated acyclic hydrocarbon-linked amino carboxylic acid. Methods for synthesis of the compounds and for use of the compounds in BNCT are disclosed

  20. Niche applications of metal hydrides and related thermal management issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lototskyy, M., E-mail: mlototskyy@uwc.ac.za [HySA Systems Competence Centre, South African Institute for Advanced Materials Chemistry, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, Bellville 7535 (South Africa); Satya Sekhar, B. [HySA Systems Competence Centre, South African Institute for Advanced Materials Chemistry, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, Bellville 7535 (South Africa); Muthukumar, P. [Mechanical Department, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati 781039 (India); Linkov, V.; Pollet, B.G. [HySA Systems Competence Centre, South African Institute for Advanced Materials Chemistry, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, Bellville 7535 (South Africa)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • MH H{sub 2} storage, compression & heat management: developments/thermal management. • Thermodynamic criteria for proper selection of MH for different gas phase applications. • Factors influencing on H{sub 2} charge/discharge dynamic performance and energy efficiency. • The improvement of MH heat transfer characteristics is crucial. • Ways of improvement of heat transfer in the MH systems. - Abstract: This short review highlights and discusses the recent developments and thermal management issues related to metal hydride (MH) systems for hydrogen storage, hydrogen compression and heat management (refrigeration, pump and upgrade, etc.). Special attention is paid to aligning the system features with the requirements of the specific application. The considered system features include the MH material, the MH bed on the basis of its corresponding MH container, as well as the layout of the integrated system.

  1. The elaborated metal hydride unit for hydrogen storage/compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The laboratory setup for investigations of hydrogen capacity of materials has been created at the Institute for Problems of Materials Science of NAS of Ukraine. It completely meets the modern requirements for the experimental equipment of this class. The setup design makes it possible to investigate hydrogen-sorption characteristics of different materials with low specific density, including nano-carbon structures and composites on their basis, by the volumetric method in the pressure range between 0.01 and 16 MPa H2 and at temperatures from 77 K to 1273 K. The setup provides a sufficient degree of accuracy. It is equipped with a metal-hydride unit for hydrogen storage/compression. The design and service conditions of this device are discussed. (authors)

  2. Noble-gas hydrides: new chemistry at low temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khriachtchev, Leonid; Räsänen, Markku; Gerber, R Benny

    2009-01-20

    Noble-gas chemistry has been undergoing a renaissance in recent years, due in large part to noble-gas hydrides, HNgY, where Ng = noble-gas atom and Y = electronegative fragment. These molecules are exceptional because of their relatively weak bonding and large dipole moments, which lead to strongly enhanced effects of the environment, complexation, and reactions. In this Account, we discuss the matrix-isolation synthesis of noble-gas hydrides, their spectroscopic and structural properties, and their stabilities.This family of species was discovered in 1995 and now has 23 members that are prepared in noble-gas matrices (HXeBr, HKrCl, HXeH, HXeOH, HXeO, etc.). The preparations of the first neutral argon molecule, HArF, and halogen-free organic noble-gas molecules (HXeCCH, HXeCC, HKrCCH, etc.) are important highlights of the field. These molecules are formed by the neutral H + Ng + Y channel. The first addition reaction involving HNgY molecules was HXeCC + Xe + H --> HXeCCXeH, and this led to the first hydride with two noble-gas atoms (recently extended by HXeOXeH). The experimental synthesis of HNgY molecules starts with production of H and Y fragments in solid noble gas via the UV photolysis of suitable precursors. The HNgY molecules mainly form upon thermal mobilization of the fragments.One of the unusual properties of these molecules is the hindered rotation of some HNgY molecules in solid matrices; this has been theoretically modeled. HNgY molecules also have unusual solvation effects, and the H-Xe stretching mode shifts to higher frequencies (up to about 150 cm-1) upon interaction with other species.The noble hydrides have a new bonding motif: HNgY molecules can be represented in the form (H-Ng)+Y-, where (H-Ng)+ is mainly covalent, whereas the interaction between (HNg)+ and Y- is predominantly ionic. The HNgY molecules are highly metastable species representing high-energy materials. The decomposition process HNgY --> Ng + HY is always strongly exoergic

  3. Delayed hydride cracking: theoretical model testing to predict cracking velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pressure tubes from Candu nuclear reactors as any other component manufactured with Zr alloys are prone to delayed hydride cracking. That is why it is important to be able to predict the cracking velocity during the component lifetime from parameters easy to be measured, such as: hydrogen concentration, mechanical and microstructural properties. Two of the theoretical models reported in literature to calculate the DHC velocity were chosen and combined, and using the appropriate variables allowed a comparison with experimental results of samples from Zr-2.5 Nb tubes with different mechanical and structural properties. In addition, velocities measured by other authors in irradiated materials could be reproduced using the model described above. (author)

  4. Metal hydride hydrogen compression: recent advances and future prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yartys, Volodymyr A.; Lototskyy, Mykhaylo; Linkov, Vladimir; Grant, David; Stuart, Alastair; Eriksen, Jon; Denys, Roman; Bowman, Robert C.

    2016-04-01

    Metal hydride (MH) thermal sorption compression is one of the more important applications of the MHs. The present paper reviews recent advances in the field based on the analysis of the fundamental principles of this technology. The performances when boosting hydrogen pressure, along with two- and three-step compression units, are analyzed. The paper includes also a theoretical modelling of a two-stage compressor aimed at describing the performance of the experimentally studied systems, their optimization and design of more advanced MH compressors. Business developments in the field are reviewed for the Norwegian company HYSTORSYS AS and the South African Institute for Advanced Materials Chemistry. Finally, future prospects are outlined presenting the role of the MH compression in the overall development of the hydrogen-driven energy systems. The work is based on the analysis of the development of the technology in Europe, USA and South Africa.

  5. Proton-hydride tautomerism in hydrogen evolution catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana, Luis M Aguirre; Johnson, Samantha I; Corona, Sydney L; Villatoro, Walther; Goddard, William A; Takase, Michael K; VanderVelde, David G; Winkler, Jay R; Gray, Harry B; Blakemore, James D

    2016-06-01

    Efficient generation of hydrogen from renewable resources requires development of catalysts that avoid deep wells and high barriers. Information about the energy landscape for H2 production can be obtained by chemical characterization of catalytic intermediates, but few have been observed to date. We have isolated and characterized a key intermediate in 2e(-) + 2H(+) → H2 catalysis. This intermediate, obtained by treatment of Cp*Rh(bpy) (Cp*, η(5)-pentamethylcyclopentadienyl; bpy, κ(2)-2,2'-bipyridyl) with acid, is not a hydride species but rather, bears [η(4)-Cp*H] as a ligand. Delivery of a second proton to this species leads to evolution of H2 and reformation of η(5)-Cp* bound to rhodium(III). With suitable choices of acids and bases, the Cp*Rh(bpy) complex catalyzes facile and reversible interconversion of H(+) and H2. PMID:27222576

  6. Niche applications of metal hydrides and related thermal management issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • MH H2 storage, compression & heat management: developments/thermal management. • Thermodynamic criteria for proper selection of MH for different gas phase applications. • Factors influencing on H2 charge/discharge dynamic performance and energy efficiency. • The improvement of MH heat transfer characteristics is crucial. • Ways of improvement of heat transfer in the MH systems. - Abstract: This short review highlights and discusses the recent developments and thermal management issues related to metal hydride (MH) systems for hydrogen storage, hydrogen compression and heat management (refrigeration, pump and upgrade, etc.). Special attention is paid to aligning the system features with the requirements of the specific application. The considered system features include the MH material, the MH bed on the basis of its corresponding MH container, as well as the layout of the integrated system

  7. Study on hydrogen permeation barrier of zirconium hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By using gas-solid reaction method, the hydrogen permeation barrier with 5-20 μm thickness was prepared on the surface of zirconium and zirconium hydride. The examinations of the morphology and structure of the barrier were accomplished by optical microscope and SEM. The compositions of the barrier were determined by EDS. The phases in the barrier were also analyzed by XRD. The results indicate that the barrier is well distributed and compact, moreover it combines firmly with the matrix. There are Zr, O, C, P and H etc. elements in the barrier. Otherwise the oxygen diffuses in matrix apparently. The main phases of the barrier are the ZrO2 and ZrP. There exists the ZrC phase or other phases. (authors)

  8. Final report for the DOE Metal Hydride Center of Excellence.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, Jay O.; Klebanoff, Leonard E.

    2012-01-01

    This report summarizes the R&D activities within the U.S. Department of Energy Metal Hydride Center of Excellence (MHCoE) from March 2005 to June 2010. The purpose of the MHCoE has been to conduct highly collaborative and multi-disciplinary applied R&D to develop new reversible hydrogen storage materials that meet or exceed DOE 2010 and 2015 system goals for hydrogen storage materials. The MHCoE combines three broad areas: mechanisms and modeling (which provide a theoretically driven basis for pursuing new materials), materials development (in which new materials are synthesized and characterized) and system design and engineering (which allow these new materials to be realized as practical automotive hydrogen storage systems). This Final Report summarizes the organization and execution of the 5-year research program to develop practical hydrogen storage materials for light duty vehicles. Major results from the MHCoE are summarized, along with suggestions for future research areas.

  9. Modelling zirconium hydrides using the special quasirandom structure approach

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hao

    2013-01-01

    The study of the structure and properties of zirconium hydrides is important for understanding the embrittlement of zirconium alloys used as cladding in light water nuclear reactors. Simulation of the defect processes is complicated due to the random distribution of the hydrogen atoms. We propose the use of the special quasirandom structure approach as a computationally efficient way to describe this random distribution. We have generated six special quasirandom structure cells based on face centered cubic and face centered tetragonal unit cells to describe ZrH2-x (x = 0.25-0.5). Using density functional theory calculations we investigate the mechanical properties, stability, and electronic structure of the alloys. © the Owner Societies 2013.

  10. Enhanced Plasma Performance by ICRF Boronization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    万宝年; 赵燕平; 李建刚; 宋梅; 吴振伟; 罗家融; 李成富; 王小明

    2002-01-01

    Boronization with carborane (C2B10H12) by ICRF has been applied routinely to the walls of HT-7 super-conducting tokamak for the reduction of impurity influx, especially carbon and oxygen. Significant suppression of metallic impurities and radiating power fraction are achieved. The improved confinement for both particle and energy is observed in full range of operation parameters. Energy balance analysis shows that electron heat diffusion coefficient is strongly reduced. Measurements by Langmuir probes at the edge plasma show that the poloidal velocity shear after boronization is changed to a profile favoring to good confinement. The main emphasis of this paper is to describe effects of boronization on aspects of the enhanced plasma performance.

  11. Anomalous electronic transport in boron carbides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emin, D.; Samara, G. A.; Wood, C.

    The boron carbides are composed of icosahedral units, B12 and B11C1, linked together by strong intericosahedral bonds. With such distributions of icosahedral and intericosahedral compositions, boron carbides, B/sub 1-x/C/sub x/, are single phase over 0.1 less than or equal to x less than or equal to 0.2. The electronic transport properties of the boron carbides were examined within this single-phase region. Results are inconsistent with conventional analyses of both itinerant and hopping transport. Most striking are Seebeck coefficients which are both large and rapidly increasing functions of temperature despite thermally activated dc conductivities. These results manifest the hopping of small bipolaronic holes between carbon-containing icosahedral that are inequivalent in energy and electron-lattice coupling strength. Under hydrostatic pressures up to approx. 25 kbar, the dc conductivities increase with pressure. This anomalous behavior for hopping conduction reflects the distinctive structure and bonding of these materials.

  12. Single step synthesis of nanostructured boron nitride for boron neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanostructured Boron Nitride (BN) has been successfully synthesized by carbo-thermic reduction of Boric Acid (H3BO3). This method is a relatively low temperature synthesis route and it can be used for large scale production of nanostructured BN. The synthesized nanoparticles have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and differential thermal analyzer (DTA). XRD analysis confirmed the formation of single phase nanostructured Boron Nitride. SEM analysis showed that the particles are spherical in shape. DTA analysis showed that the phase is stable upto 900 °C and the material can be used for high temperature applications as well boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT)

  13. Single step synthesis of nanostructured boron nitride for boron neutron capture therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Bikramjeet; Singh, Paviter; Kumar, Manjeet; Thakur, Anup; Kumar, Akshay

    2015-05-01

    Nanostructured Boron Nitride (BN) has been successfully synthesized by carbo-thermic reduction of Boric Acid (H3BO3). This method is a relatively low temperature synthesis route and it can be used for large scale production of nanostructured BN. The synthesized nanoparticles have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and differential thermal analyzer (DTA). XRD analysis confirmed the formation of single phase nanostructured Boron Nitride. SEM analysis showed that the particles are spherical in shape. DTA analysis showed that the phase is stable upto 900 °C and the material can be used for high temperature applications as well boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT).

  14. boron and boron nitride coated nuclear fuel production in plasma atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In these study uranium dioxide (UO2) and 5, 10 % gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) containing UO2 nuclear fuel pellets were coated with first boron nitride (BN) then boron (B) layers as the results of the reactions between boron trichloride (BCl3) with ammonia (NH3) and BCl3 with hydrogen (H2) in the medium of argon (Ar) plasma created at 650 W and 500 W and 27.12 MHz to increase the fuel burnup efficiency and reactor core life by the method of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). Grainy BN and B structures were observed on the photographs taken from scanning electron microscope (SEM)

  15. A system to deposit boron films (boronization) in the DIII-D tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A system has been added to the D3-D tokamak to coat its plasma facing surfaces with a film of boron using diborane gas. The system includes special health and safety equipment for handling the diborane gas which is toxic and inflammable. The purpose of the boron film is to reduce the levels of impurity atoms in the D3-D plasmas. Experiments following the application of the boron film in D3-D have led to significant reductions in plasma impurity levels and the observation of a new, very high confinement regime. 9 refs., 1 fig

  16. Hydride Formation in Neutron Irradiated Material Under In Reactor Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present is a brief summary of the three reports completed within the framework of the SPAR III project. The following is a resume of our aims, techniques used to achieve the objectives and conclusions attained under the guiding thread of the hydride formation in neutron irradiated zirconium alloys and other reactor in operating conditions. As is it known, under reactor operating conditions zirconium components go through transformations which affect their original microstructural and thermodynamical properties. Both concerns are starting points of many research lines for the zirconium alloys used in the nuclear power reactors. Regarding microstructural transformations, one of the most important topics is the phase stability of these alloys. To cite a well-known case, second phase particles of zircaloy-4 shown to be unstable under neutron radiation. Since such phases play a role in the corrosion rate control, this instability became a problem for high burnup fuel claddings design. Similar observations can be made about the β−Zr phase in the Zr-2.5Nb CANDU pressure tubes alloy. On the other hand, there are issues directly involved with thermodynamics, e.g., hydrogen behaviour and its role in the degradation processes of fuel assemblies and other zirconium alloys components, which showed to be affected by neutron radiation. Finally, applied stresses and thermal cycling are part of these operating conditions, which can be simulated performing experiments in situ which allows testing hydrogen solubility behaviour and hydride reorientation. In the context described above, the research topics proposed to SPAR III were aimed to improve the knowledge of these degradation processes. In this scheme, zircaloy-4 which remained more than ten years at full power operation and virgin unirradiated zirconium alloys were suited by the more improved micro analytical techniques to characterize microstructural transformations cited above

  17. Physics of hydrogen storage in metal-hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Physical aspects of the hydrogenation-dehydrogenation mechanisms of metal-metal hydride systems were examined. Experimental investigation was conducted for magnesium hydride as a case study. Theoretical analysis and computational study were carried out. The kinetics of hydrogenation-dehydrogenation of traditionally prepared Mg-MgH2 and chemically synthesized Mg-MgH2 were experimentally investigated. A detailed investigation was carried out to determine the reasons for the improved performance of a chemically synthesized Mg-MgH2 previously reported by Bogdanovic and co-workers. A scanning electron microscope was used to examine the surface morphology of the samples. The surface of chemically prepared samples appeared to be covered with micro-spheroidal beads ranging in radius between 0.5 μm and 0.05 μm formed in a fractal-like configuration. Theoretical analysis indicated that the unusual surface structure of the chemically prepared samples could be responsible for the rapid uptake and release of hydrogen. The uptake and release enhancement is believed to be partially due to the substantial increase n the surface area and partially due fast diffusion into the smaller particles. The effect of the addition to nickel to the surface was also investigated. Theoretical analysis was carried, out. Models for the process at the surface as well as in the bulk were developed. Diffusion equation was examined taking into account the diffusion coefficient being function of concentration. A nonlinear differential equation resulted for this case. The differential equation was numerically solved

  18. Boron Nitride Nanotubes for Spintronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal B. Dhungana

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available With the end of Moore’s law in sight, researchers are in search of an alternative approach to manipulate information. Spintronics or spin-based electronics, which uses the spin state of electrons to store, process and communicate information, offers exciting opportunities to sustain the current growth in the information industry. For example, the discovery of the giant magneto resistance (GMR effect, which provides the foundation behind modern high density data storage devices, is an important success story of spintronics; GMR-based sensors have wide applications, ranging from automotive industry to biology. In recent years, with the tremendous progress in nanotechnology, spintronics has crossed the boundary of conventional, all metallic, solid state multi-layered structures to reach a new frontier, where nanostructures provide a pathway for the spin-carriers. Different materials such as organic and inorganic nanostructures are explored for possible applications in spintronics. In this short review, we focus on the boron nitride nanotube (BNNT, which has recently been explored for possible applications in spintronics. Unlike many organic materials, BNNTs offer higher thermal stability and higher resistance to oxidation. It has been reported that the metal-free fluorinated BNNT exhibits long range ferromagnetic spin ordering, which is stable at a temperature much higher than room temperature. Due to their large band gap, BNNTs are also explored as a tunnel magneto resistance device. In addition, the F-BNNT has recently been predicted as an ideal spin-filter. The purpose of this review is to highlight these recent progresses so that a concerted effort by both experimentalists and theorists can be carried out in the future to realize the true potential of BNNT-based spintronics.

  19. Reactive sputter deposition of boron nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The preparation of fully dense, boron targets for use in planar magnetron sources has lead to the synthesis of Boron Nitride (BN) films by reactive rf sputtering. The deposition parameters of gas pressure, flow and composition are varied along with substrate temperature and applied bias. The films are characterized for composition using Auger electron spectroscopy, for chemical bonding using Raman spectroscopy and for crystalline structure using transmission electron microscopy. The deposition conditions are established which lead to the growth of crystalline BN phases. In particular, the growth of an adherent cubic BN coating requires 400--500 C substrate heating and an applied -300 V dc bias

  20. Can Two-Dimensional Boron Superconduct?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penev, Evgeni S; Kutana, Alex; Yakobson, Boris I

    2016-04-13

    Two-dimensional boron is expected to exhibit various structural polymorphs, all being metallic. Additionally, its small atomic mass suggests strong electron-phonon coupling, which in turn can enable superconducting behavior. Here we perform first-principles analysis of electronic structure, phonon spectra, and electron-phonon coupling of selected 2D boron polymorphs and show that the most stable structures predicted to feasibly form on a metal substrate should also exhibit intrinsic phonon-mediated superconductivity, with estimated critical temperature in the range of Tc ≈ 10-20 K. PMID:27003635

  1. Thermal conductivity behavior of boron carbides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, C.; Zoltan, A.; Emin, D.; Gray, P. E.

    1983-01-01

    Knowledge of the thermal conductivity of boron carbides is necessary to evaluate its potential for high temperature thermoelectric energy conversion applications. The thermal diffusivity of hot pressed boron carbide B/sub 1-x/C/sub x/ samples as a function of composition, temperature and temperature cycling was measured. These data in concert with density and specific heat data yield the thermal conductivities of these materials. The results in terms of a structural model to explain the electrical transport data and novel mechanisms for thermal conduction are discussed.

  2. Catalytic Radical Reduction in Aqueous Solution by a Ruthenium Hydride Intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Htet, Yamin; Tennyson, Andrew G

    2016-07-18

    Some manganese complexes can catalyze both antioxidant and pro-oxidant reactions, whereby the disparate reactivity modes are determined by the catalyst environment and afford distinct therapeutic effects. We recently reported the reduction of radicals in buffered aqueous solution catalyzed by a ruthenium complex with biologically relevant non-tertiary alcohols as terminal reductants. Mechanistic evidence is presented, indicating that this catalytic radical reduction is achieved by a Ru-hydride intermediate formed by β-hydride elimination from a Ru-alkoxide species. A similar mechanism and Ru-hydride intermediate was previously reported to kill cancer cells with catalytic pro-oxidant effects. Therefore, our demonstration of catalytic antioxidant effects by the same type of intermediate reveals new potential therapeutic strategies and applications for catalytic systems that form Ru-hydride intermediates. PMID:27254303

  3. Speciation without chromatography using hydride generation for the selective determination of inorganic arsenic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pétursdóttir, Á. H.; Musil, Stanislav; Friedrich, N.; Raab, A.; Gunnlaugsdóttir, H.; Krupp, E.; Feldmann, J.; Nelson, J.

    Baltimore, 2014. [Conference on Mass Spectrometry and Allied Topics /62./. 15.06.2014-19.06.2014, Baltimore] Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : inorganic arsenic * hydride generation * ICP-MS/MS Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  4. Nanometric Antimony Powder Synthesis by Activated Alkaline Hydride Reduction of Antimony Pentachloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel chemical reduction method using an activated alkaline hydride (LiH or NaH-t-BuONa) in tetrahydrofuran solvent has been applied to antimony salt reduction. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy studies have been carried out to characterize the morphology and structure of the materials. Alkali hydride nature influence has been proved. In both cases the process allows to prepare antimony particles in nanometer range from few nanometers to about 20nm which could be used as anodic materials for lithium-ion batteries. With lithium hydride well-crystallized particles inclined to agglomeration were observed whereas finely dispersed amorphous particles were pointing out after activated sodium hydride reduction

  5. Ultrasonic C-Scan Parameters for Detection of Hydride Blisters in Zirconium Pressure Tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EMAT Since Zr-2.5Nb pressure tubes have a high risk for the formation of blisters during their operation in pressurized heavy water reactors, there has been a strong incentive to develop a method for the non-destructive detection of blisters grown on the tube surfaces. However, because there is little mismatch in acoustic impedance between the hydride blisters and zirconium matrix, it is not easy to distinguish the boundary between the blister and zirconium matrix wit h the conventional methods. This study focused on the development of the ultrasonic method to detect the hydride blisters formed on Zr-2.5Nb pressure tubes. Hydride blisters were grown on the outer surface of the zirconium pressure tubes using a cold finger attached to steady state thermal diffusion equipment. An ultrasonic velocity ratio method as well as conventional ultrasonic parameters with immersion technique was developed to detect smaller hydride blisters on the zirconium pressure tube.

  6. The two steps thermal decomposition of titanium hydride and two steps foaming of Al alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHANG; Jintang; HE; Deping

    2005-01-01

    Two steps foaming (TSF) technique was proposed to prepare shaped Al alloy foam. Based on the thermal decomposition kinetics equation of titanium hydride, the relationship between two steps thermal decomposition kinetics of titanium hydride and two steps foaming Al alloy melt was studied. Two steps thermal decomposition curve of titanium hydride under increasing and constant temperature was calculated respectively. The hydrogen mass needed in the second foaming step was also calculated. Results showed that the hydrogen mass of the second thermal decomposition of titanium hydride is enough for the second foaming step in the condition of as-received Al melt foaming. Experimental and theoretical results indicate that two steps foaming technique can be used to prepare Al alloy foam with high porosity, shaped components and sandwich with Al alloy foam core.

  7. The microstructure and hydriding characteristics of high temperature aged U-13 at.%Nb alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Hefei; Shi, Peng; Li, Ruiwen; Jiang, Chunli; Yang, Jiangrong; Hu, Guichao

    2015-09-01

    Niobium as alloying element significantly improves physical and chemical properties of metallic uranium, exhibiting great application potential in uranium alloy materials. The corrosion resistance performance as well as the internal alloy phase structure of uranium-niobium alloy is closely related to aging processes. Microstructure and hydriding characteristics of the 400 °C/9 h + 500 °C/2 h aged uranium-13 at.% niobium alloys (U-13 at.%Nb) were investigated from the point of view of relationship between the microstructure and growth of the hydriding areas. The microstructure, morphology and composition of the alloy phases before and after the hydriding were well characterized by the laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. Experimental results indicated that the hydrogen preferentially reacted with the Nb-depleted phase α-like-U to form monolithic β-UH3Nbx, and the alloy microstructure played an important role in hydride growth.

  8. In situ probing of surface hydrides on hydrogenated amorphous silicon using attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Kessels, W M M; Sanden, M C M; Aydil, E S

    2002-01-01

    An in situ method based on attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) is presented for detecting surface silicon hydrides on plasma deposited hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films and for determining their surface concentrations. Surface silicon hydrides are desorbed by exposing the a-Si:H films to low energy ions from a low density Ar plasma and by comparing the infrared spectrum before and after this low energy ion bombardment, the absorptions by surface hydrides can sensitively be separated from absorptions by bulk hydrides incorporated into the film. An experimental comparison with other methods that utilize isotope exchange of the surface hydrogen with deuterium showed good agreement and the advantages and disadvantages of the different methods are discussed. Furthermore, the determination of the composition of the surface hydrogen bondings on the basis of the literature data on hydrogenated crystalline silicon surfaces is presented, and quantification of the h...

  9. Hydrides of intermetallic compounds R3Ni8Al (R=Sm, Tu, Lu)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interaction of hydrogen with intermetallic compounds (IC) R3Ni8Al (R=Sm, Tu, Lu) with the structure of Ce3Co8Si type was studied. Formation of hydride Sm3Ni8AlH11.7 takes place at a high rate and it is accompanied by increase in the volume of unit cell of IC structure by 23 %. According to the data of X-ray diffraction study the volume of unit cells of hydride structure [Tu, Lu]3Ni8AlHx (1) is 0.7-1.2 % higher than the volume of unit cells of the structures of intermetallic compounds. Thermal decomposition of hydride takes place in two stages at 340-390 K, and that of hydride phase of (1) - in one stage at 340 and 450 K respectively

  10. The uranium zirconium hydride research reactor and its applications in research and education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes briefly the performance, the configuration and the prospects of extensive applications in science, technology and education of the Uranium Zirconium Hydride research reactor in China. (author)

  11. The uranium zirconium hydride research reactor and its applications in research and education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Wei; Wang Daohua; Jiang Xinbiao; A Jinyan; Yang Jun; Chen Da [Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi' an (China)

    2003-03-01

    This paper describes briefly the performance, the configuration and the prospects of extensive applications in science, technology and education of the Uranium Zirconium Hydride research reactor in China. (author)

  12. PWR fuel failure analysis due to hydriding based on PIE data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently failures of nuclear fuel rods in Korean nuclear power plants were reported and their failure causes have been investigated by using PIE techniques. Destructive and physico-chemical examinations reveal that the clad hydriding phenomena had caused the rod failures primarily and secondarily in each case. In this study, the basic mechanisms of the primary and the secondary hydriding failures are reviewed, PIE data such as cladding inner and outer surface oxide thickness and the restructuring of the fuel pellets are analyzed, and they are compared with the predicted behaviors by a fuel performance code. In addition, post-defected fuel behaviors are reviewed and qualitatively analyzed. The results strongly support that the hydriding processes, primary and secondary, played critical roles in the respective fuel rods failures and the secondary hydriding failure can take place even in the fuel rod with low linear heat generation rate. (author)

  13. Electrochemical selenium hydride generation with in situ trapping in graphite tube atomizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A manifold coupling continuous electrolytic hydride generation of volatile hydrides with atomization in graphite tube atomizers after in situ collection was used for Se(IV) determination. Laboratory-made thin-layer flow-through cells with lead wire (cell I) and granular lead (cell II) as the cathode material were used as the electrolytic generators of volatile selenium hydride. The automatic sampling equipment of the graphite atomizer, with an untreated fused silica capillary, was used both for the introduction of volatile hydride into the atomizer and for pretreatment of the graphite furnace surface with a palladium modifier. The influence of the experimental parameters on the analytical signal was studied and optimum conditions for selenium determination were found. The optimum experimental parameters for hydride generation were: catholyte (1 mol l-1 HCl)/anolyte (2 mol l-1 H2SO4) flow rate of 2.0 ml min-1; applied generation current of 1.2 A (cell I) and 0.8 A (cell II); and carrier gas flow rate of 40 (cell I) and 70 ml min-1 (cell II). The hydride generated was collected in the graphite tube (pre-treated with 5 μg of Pd reduced at 800 deg. C) at a temperature of 400 deg. C for 30 s. The overall efficiency of H2Se electrochemical generation, transport and collection was 71±7% for cell I and 80±5% for cell II. The results for electrochemical generation of H2Se (cell II) (absolute limit of detection 50 pg, 3σ criterion) were compared with the original generation of H2Se using NaBH4 as a reduction agent (absolute limit of detection 30 pg) and with conventional liquid sampling. The repeatability at the 1.0 ng ml-1 level was better than 2.4% (relative standard deviation) for electrochemical hydride generation and better than 2.8% for chemical hydride generation

  14. Dehydrogenation in lithium borohydride/conventional metal hydride composite based on a mutual catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, X.B.; Shi, Qing; Vegge, Tejs;

    2009-01-01

    The dehydrogenation of LiBH4 ball-milled with hydrogenated 40Ti–15Mn–15Cr–30V alloy was investigated. It was found that there is a mutual catalysis between the two hydrides, lowering the temperature of hydrogen release from both hydrides. In the case of 1h milled LiBH4/40Ti–15Mn–15Cr–30V with a...

  15. The formation and characteristics of hydride blisters in c.w. Zircaloy-2 pressure tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under the auspices of the IAEA, a consultants' meeting was arranged in Vienna, 1994 July 25-29, at which a Canadian delegation, consisting of AECL and Ontario Hydro Technologies personnel, presented information on their knowledge of the behaviour of hydride blisters in Zircaloy-2 pressure tubes. This document contains the 10 papers presented by the Canadian delegation to the meeting. It is believed that they represent a good reference document on hydride blister phenomena

  16. Boron carbide-based ceramics via polymer route synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron carbide is a ceramic material with excellent high temperature physical properties. As compared to conventional techniques, the preparation of boron carbide from polymeric precursors is attractive as this technique offers a number of unique advantages. In this paper, the screening of polymeric precursors to boron carbide will be discussed. Two promising boron carbide, carborane containing polymeric precursors have resulted in 60-70 wt.% ceramic yields. The chemistry of polymer synthesis and the transformations from the polymer to amorphous and crystalline boron carbide were investigated with infrared spectroscopy, NMR spectroscopy, thermal analysis, and x-ray diffraction

  17. Determination of carbon and sulphur in boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron carbide is used in control rods of nuclear power reactors. The chemical specification for carbon in boron carbide ranges between 15 - 24 wt.% depending upon the grade of boron carbide. Hence carbon in boron carbide is to be determined accurately to find out the stoichiometry. Sulphur, which is present in trace quantities, is also to be determined to find out the purity of boron carbide. Carbon is determined by combustion followed by (i) thermal conductivity detection and (ii) infrared detection. Sulphur is determined by (i) combustion followed by infrared detection and (ii) vacuum combustion extraction - quadrupole mass spectrometry. The results are compared. (author)

  18. Direct evidence of metallic bands in a monolayer boron sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Baojie; Zhang, Jin; Liu, Ro-Ya; Iimori, Takushi; Lian, Chao; Li, Hui; Chen, Lan; Wu, Kehui; Meng, Sheng; Komori, Fumio; Matsuda, Iwao

    2016-07-01

    The search for metallic boron allotropes has attracted great attention in the past decades and recent theoretical works predict the existence of metallicity in monolayer boron. Here, we synthesize the β12-sheet monolayer boron on a Ag(111) surface and confirm the presence of metallic boron-derived bands using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The Fermi surface is composed of one electron pocket at the S ¯ point and a pair of hole pockets near the X ¯ point, which is supported by the first-principles calculations. The metallic boron allotrope in β12 sheet opens the way to novel physics and chemistry in material science.

  19. Medical chemistry of boron neutron capture agents having pharmacological activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a cancer treatment that selectively destroys cancer cells following administering a cancer-selective drug containing stable isotope boron-10 and neutron irradiation. In clinical trial of BNCT, disodium mercaptoundecahydro-closo-dodecaborate (BSH) and p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) have been used, however, development of a new drugs with high cancer selectivity and therapeutic efficiency is expected. Therefore, we review boron-containing drugs as a boron neutron capture agents having pharmacological activity, BNCT research on boron-modified porphyrin derivatives which have photosensitivity and neutron capture activity and our proposed neutron sensitizing agent. (author)

  20. Inefficiency of high boron concentrations for cell killing in boron neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study is to investigate the relationship between the cell-killing effect of the 10B(n, α)7Li capture reaction, intracellular boron concentration, and thermal neutron fluence in boron neutron capture therapy using in vitro cell survival based on a clonogenic assay, and biophysical analysis. Our results showed that the cell-killing yield of the 10B(n, α)7Li capture reaction per unit thermal neutron fluence declined with an increase in the intracellular boron concentration above 45 μg/ml 10B. The cell-killing effect was well described using an empirical power function of the intracellular boron concentration, with exponent 0.443. Knowledge of this effect will help in the optimization of BNCT. (author)

  1. Hydrogen charging, hydrogen content analysis and metallographic examination of hydride in zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaseous and electrolytic hydrogen charging techniques for introducing controlled amount of hydrogen in zirconium alloy is described. Zr-1wt%Nb fuel tube, zircaloy-2 pressure tube and Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube samples were charged with up to 1000 ppm of hydrogen by weight using one of the aforementioned methods. These hydrogen charged Zr-alloy samples were analyzed for estimating the total hydrogen content using inert gas fusion technique. Influence of sample surface preparation on the estimated hydrogen content is also discussed. In zirconium alloys, hydrogen in excess of the terminal solid solubility precipitates out as brittle hydride phase, which acquire platelet shaped morphology due to its accommodation in the matrix and can make the host matrix brittle. The FN number, which represents susceptibility of Zr-alloy tubes to hydride embrittlement was measured from the metallographs. The volume fraction of the hydride phase, platelet size, distribution, interplatelet spacing and orientation were examined metallographically using samples sliced along the radial-axial and radial-circumferential plane of the tubes. It was observed that hydride platelet length increases with increase in hydrogen content. Considering the metallographs generated by Materials Science Division as standard, metallographs prepared by the IAEA round robin participants for different hydrogen concentration was compared. It is felt that hydride micrographs can be used to estimate not only that approximate hydrogen concentration of the sample but also its size, distribution and orientation which significantly affect the susceptibility to hydride embrittlement of these alloys. (author)

  2. Investigation of Lithium Metal Hydride Materials for Mitigation of Deep Space Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojdev, Kristina; Atwell, William

    2016-01-01

    Radiation exposure to crew, electronics, and non-metallic materials is one of many concerns with long-term, deep space travel. Mitigating this exposure is approached via a multi-faceted methodology focusing on multi-functional materials, vehicle configuration, and operational or mission constraints. In this set of research, we are focusing on new multi-functional materials that may have advantages over traditional shielding materials, such as polyethylene. Metal hydride materials are of particular interest for deep space radiation shielding due to their ability to store hydrogen, a low-Z material known to be an excellent radiation mitigator and a potential fuel source. We have previously investigated 41 different metal hydrides for their radiation mitigation potential. Of these metal hydrides, we found a set of lithium hydrides to be of particular interest due to their excellent shielding of galactic cosmic radiation. Given these results, we will continue our investigation of lithium hydrides by expanding our data set to include dose equivalent and to further understand why these materials outperformed polyethylene in a heavy ion environment. For this study, we used HZETRN 2010, a one-dimensional transport code developed by NASA Langley Research Center, to simulate radiation transport through the lithium hydrides. We focused on the 1977 solar minimum Galactic Cosmic Radiation environment and thicknesses of 1, 5, 10, 20, 30, 50, and 100 g/cm2 to stay consistent with our previous studies. The details of this work and the subsequent results will be discussed in this paper.

  3. First-principles calculations of niobium hydride formation in superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, Denise C.; Cooley, Lance D.; Seidman, David N.

    2013-09-01

    Niobium hydride is suspected to be a major contributor to degradation of the quality factor of niobium superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities. In this study, we connect the fundamental properties of hydrogen in niobium to SRF cavity performance and processing. We modeled several of the niobium hydride phases relevant to SRF cavities and present their thermodynamic, electronic, and geometric properties determined from calculations based on density-functional theory. We find that the absorption of hydrogen from the gas phase into niobium is exothermic and hydrogen becomes somewhat anionic. The absorption of hydrogen by niobium lattice vacancies is strongly preferred over absorption into interstitial sites. A single vacancy can accommodate six hydrogen atoms in the symmetrically equivalent lowest-energy sites and additional hydrogen in the nearby interstitial sites affected by the strain field: this indicates that a vacancy can serve as a nucleation center for hydride phase formation. Small hydride precipitates may then occur near lattice vacancies upon cooling. Vacancy clusters and extended defects should also be enriched in hydrogen, potentially resulting in extended hydride phase regions upon cooling. We also assess the phase changes in the niobium-hydrogen system based on charge transfer between niobium and hydrogen, the strain field associated with interstitial hydrogen, and the geometry of the hydride phases. The results of this study stress the importance of not only the hydrogen content in niobium, but also the recovery state of niobium for the performance of SRF cavities.

  4. Metal hydrides reactors with improved dynamic characteristics for a fast cycling hydrogen compressor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents an investigation of coupled heat and mass transfer process in metal hydrides hydrogen storage reactors. Hydrogen storage and compression performance of our designed and developed reactors are studied by varying the operating parameters and analyzing the effects of metal hydride bed parameters. The metal alloy selected to characterize the cycling behaviour of reactors is LaNi5, material synthesized and characterized by us in the range 20-800C. Four types of metal hydride reactors were tested with the aim to provide a fast hydrogen absorption-desorption cycle, able to be thermally cycled at rapid rates. Some new technical solutions have been studied to make a step forward in reducing the duration of the reactors cycle, which combines the effective increase of the thermal conductivity and good permeability to hydrogen gas. Dynamic characteristic of developed fast metal hydride reactors is improved using our novel mixture metal hydride-CA conductive additive due to the increased effective thermal conductivity of the alloy bed. The advanced hydride bed design with high heat transfer capabilities can be thermally cycled at a rapid rate, under 120 seconds, in order to process high hydrogen flow rates.

  5. Influence of lanthanon hydride catalysts on hydrogen storage properties of sodium alanates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Zhe; CHEN Lixin; XIAO Xuezhang; FAN Xiulin; LI Shouquan; WANG Qidong

    2013-01-01

    NaAlH4 complex hydrides doped with lanthanon hydrides were prepared by hydrogenation of the ball-milled NaH/Al+xmol.% RE-H composites (RE=La,Ce; x=2,4,6) using NaHl and A1 powder as raw materials.The influence of lanthanon hydride catalysts on the hydriding and dehydriding behaviors of the as-synthesized composites were investigated.It was found that the composite doped with 2 mol.% La.H3.01 displayed the highest hydrogen absorption capacity of 4.78 wt.% and desorption capacity of 4.66wt.%,respectively.Moreover,the composite doped with 6 mol% CeH2.51 showed the best hydriding/dehydriding reaction kinetics.The proposed catalytic mechanism for reversible hydrogen storage properties of the composite was attributed to the presence of active LaH3.01 and CeH2.51 particles,which were scattering on the surface of NaH and A1 particles,acting as the catalytic active sites for hydrogen diffusion and playing an important catalytic role in the improved hydriding/dehydriding reaction.

  6. Solvent influence on the thermodynamics for hydride transfer from bis(diphosphine) complexes of nickel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connelly Robinson, Samantha J; Zall, Christopher M; Miller, Deanna L; Linehan, John C; Appel, Aaron M

    2016-06-14

    The thermodynamic hydricity of a metal hydride can vary considerably between solvents. This parameter can be used to determine the favourability of a hydride-transfer reaction, such as the reaction between a metal hydride and CO2 to produce formate. Because the hydricities of these species do not vary consistently between solvents, reactions that are thermodynamically unfavourable in one solvent can be favourable in others. The hydricity of a water-soluble, bis-phosphine nickel hydride complex was compared to the hydricity of formate in water and in acetonitrile. Formate is a better hydride donor than [HNi(dmpe)2](+) by 7 kcal mol(-1) in acetonitrile, and no hydride transfer from [HNi(dmpe)2](+) to CO2 occurs in this solvent. The hydricity of [HNi(dmpe)2](+) is greatly improved in water relative to acetonitrile, in that reduction of CO2 to formate by [HNi(dmpe)2](+) was found to be thermodynamically downhill by 8 kcal mol(-1). Catalysis for the hydrogenation of CO2 was pursued, but the regeneration of [HNi(dmpe)2] under catalytic conditions was unfavourable. However, the present results demonstrate that the solvent dependence of thermodynamic parameters such as hydricity and acidity can be exploited in order to produce systems with balanced or favourable overall thermodynamics. This approach should be advantageous for the design of future water-soluble catalysts. PMID:27071366

  7. Fracture mechanism of TiAl intermetallics caused by hydride and atomic hydrogen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高克玮; 王燕斌; 林志; 乔利杰; 褚武扬

    1999-01-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement (HE) of TiAl intermetallics was studied at room temperature. The results showed that there were two forms of HE in TiAl intermetallics, i.e. hydride HE and atomic HE. Most of hydrogen in TiAl intermetallics was transformed into hydrides at room temperature. The hydride exists as (TiAl)Hx for a low hydrogen concentration while it exists in several forms for a higher hydrogen concentration. Stress intensity factor KIC decreased with increase in hydride concentration. KIC decreased further when TiAl intermetallics were charged cathodically with hydrogen in 1 mol/L H2SO4 solution. Stress intensity factor during hydrogen charging KIH was about 50% KIC. 20% of the decrease was caused by hydrides while 30% was caused by atomic hydrogen. Mechanism of HE caused hydrides was the same as any other second phase in nature. Delayed fracture caused by atomic hydrogen resulted from hydrogen induced local plastic deformation.

  8. On the chemistry of hydrides of N atoms and O$^+$ ions

    CERN Document Server

    Awad, Zainab; Williams, David A

    2016-01-01

    Previous work by various authors has suggested that the detection by Herschel/HIFI of nitrogen hydrides along the low density lines of sight towards G10.6-0.4 (W31C) cannot be accounted for by gas-phase chemical models. In this paper we investigate the role of surface reactions on dust grains in diffuse regions, and we find that formation of the hydrides by surface reactions on dust grains with efficiency comparable to that for H$_2$ formation reconciles models with observations of nitrogen hydrides. However, similar surface reactions do not contribute significantly to the hydrides of O$^+$ ions detected by Herschel/HIFI present along many sight lines in the Galaxy. The O$^+$ hydrides can be accounted for by conventional gas-phase chemistry either in diffuse clouds of very low density with normal cosmic ray fluxes or in somewhat denser diffuse clouds with high cosmic ray fluxes. Hydride chemistry in dense dark clouds appears to be dominated by gas-phase ion-molecule reactions.

  9. Removal properties of dissolved boron by glucomannan gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Kyoko; Maehata, Yugo

    2013-04-01

    Boron ions have long been known to form complexes with the cis-diol group of a polysaccharide. Konjac glucomannan (KGM) which is one of polysaccharides was used to remove dissolved boron in this study. KGM forms a complex with boron, but does not remove boron from contaminated waters as well as other polysaccharides because of its high water solubility. Therefore, the removal efficiencies of dissolved boron were examined using both an insoluble KGM gel and KGM semi-gel. The former did not remove dissolved boron, but the latter did. The difference in the ability of boron removal was due to the presence of diol group inside. KGM loses free diol group during the process of gelation. On the other hand, the semi-gel gelated only surface layer in water has diol group inside. The boron removal capacity of the semi-gel was highest at pHs⩾11, when the boron species is present as B(OH)4(-). The capacity was slightly increased by the addition of Al, Ca and Mg under high pH conditions. This was due to co-precipitation of boron with Ca dissolved from the semi-gel. The boron adsorbed to the semi-gel easily was desorbed under low pH conditions and the hysteresis was not found. PMID:23260255

  10. Relationship Between Soil Boron Adsorption Kinetics and Rape Plant Boron Response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUDUANWEI; PIMEIMEI; 等

    1997-01-01

    The boron adsorption kinetic experiment in soil by means a flow displacement technique showed that the kinetic data could be described with some mathematic equations.The average values of the coorealtion coefficeint for zero-order,first-order,parabolic diffusion ,Elovich,power function and eponential equations were 0.957,0.982,0.981,0.984,0.981 and 0.902 ,respectively,The correlation between adsorbed boron or its other expression form and time were the highest for first-order ,parabloic diffusion Elovich,and pwer function equations,the second for the zeroorder equation,and the tlowest for the exponential equation.The parabloic diffusion equation fitted well the expermiental results,with the least standard error among the six kinetic equation,showing that the monvemetn of boron from soil solution to soil colloid surface may be controlled by boron diffusion speed.The boron content of rape seedling obtained from soil cultvation was correlated with the rate constants of the kinetic equations.The constants of first-order ,parabloic diffusion,and exponential equaitions were significanlty correlated with the boron content of the crop of NPK treatment at a 95% probaility level ,with correation coeffecients being 0.686,0.691 and 0.64 and 0.641,respectively.In the case of zero-order equation,it Was significant at 99% probability level(r=0.736),These results showed that the adsorption kinetic constants of soil boron were closely related with the rape plant response to boron.

  11. The structure and local chemical properties of boron-terminated tetravacancies in hexagonal boron-nitride

    OpenAIRE

    Cretu, Ovidiu; Lin, Yung-Chang; Koshino, Masanori; Tizei, Luiz H. G.; Liu, Zheng; Suenaga, Kazutomo

    2014-01-01

    Imaging and spectroscopy performed in a low-voltage scanning transmission electron microscope (LV-STEM) are used to characterize the structure and chemical properties of boron-terminated tetravacancies in hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). We confirm earlier theoretical predictions about the structure of these defects and identify new features in the electron energy-loss spectra (EELS) of B atoms using high resolution chemical maps, highlighting differences between these areas and pristine sampl...

  12. A colorimetric determination of boron in biological sample for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) has shown better prognosis in the treatment of glyemas and gluoblastomas grade III and IV than other therapies. During the treatment the levels of Na210B12H11SH must be known in several compartiments of the organism and with this purpose the method of colorimetric determination of boron using curcumine was established. This method is simple, reprodutible and adequate sensitivity for this control. (author)

  13. Trapping of hydride forming elements within miniature electrothermal devices: part 1. Investigation of collection of arsenic and selenium hydrides on a molybdenum foil strip

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dočekal, Bohumil; Gucer, S.; Selecká, Anna

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 4 (2004), s. 487-495. ISSN 0584-8547. [CSI. Presymposium on Sample Introduction in Atomic Spectrometry /33./. Zaragoza, 03.09.2003-06.09.2003] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/01/0453 Grant ostatní: Scientific and Technical Research Council of Turkey (TUBITAK)(TR) NATO-PC B Advanced Fellowship-Project No. 304 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4031919 Keywords : Arsenic hydride generation * Selenium hydride generation * Molybdenum foil trap Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 3.086, year: 2004

  14. Effects of boron number per unit volume on the shielding properties of composites made with boron ores form China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The total macroscopic removal cross sections, deposited energies and the absorbed doses of three new shielding composites loaded with specific boron-rich slag, boron concentrate ore and boron mud of China for 252Cf neutron source were investigated by experimental and Monte Carlo calculation. The results were evaluated by boron mole numbers per unit volume in composites. The half value layers of the composites were calculated and compared with that of Portland concrete, indicating that ascending boron mole numbers per unit volume in the composites can enhance the shielding properties of the composites for 252Cf neutron source. (authors)

  15. Hydrogen generation using silicon nanoparticles and their mixtures with alkali metal hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patki, Gauri Dilip

    mole of Si. We compare our silicon nanoparticles (˜10nm diameter) with commercial silicon nanopowder (Metal hydrides are also promising hydrogen storage materials. The optimum metal hydride would possess high hydrogen storage density at moderate temperature and pressure, release hydrogen safely and controllably, and be stable in air. Alkali metal hydrides have high hydrogen storage density, but exhibit high uncontrollable reactivity with water. In an attempt to control this explosive nature while maintaining high storage capacity, we mixed our silicon nanoparticles with the hydrides. This has dual benefits: (1) the hydride- water reaction produces the alkali hydroxide needed for base-catalyzed silicon oxidation, and (2) dilution with 10nm coating by, the silicon may temper the reactivity of the hydride, making the process more controllable. Initially, we analyzed hydrolysis of pure alkali metal hydrides and alkaline earth metal hydrides. Lithium hydride has particularly high hydrogen gravimetric density, along with faster reaction kinetics than sodium hydride or magnesium hydride. On analysis of hydrogen production we found higher hydrogen yield from the silicon nanoparticle—metal hydride mixture than from pure hydride hydrolysis. The silicon-hydride mixtures using our 10nm silicon nanoparticles produced high hydrogen yield, exceeding the theoretical yield. Some evidence of slowing of the hydride reaction rate upon addition of silicon nanoparticles was observed.

  16. Synthesis and evaluation of boron folates for Boron-Neutron-Capture-Therapy (BNCT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kettenbach, Kathrin; Schieferstein, Hanno; Grunewald, Catrin; Hampel, Gabriele; Schuetz, Christian L. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Nuclear Chemistry; Iffland, Dorothee; Bings, Nicolas H. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Inorganic Chemistry and Analytical Chemistry; Reffert, Laura M. [Hannover Medical School (Germany). Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry; Ross, Tobias L. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Nuclear Chemistry; Hannover Medical School (Germany). Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry

    2015-07-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) employs {sup 10}B-pharmaceuticals administered for the treatment of malignancies, and subsequently irradiated with thermal neutrons. So far, clinical established pharmaceuticals like boron phenylalanine (BPA) or sodium boron mercaptate (BSH) use imperfect (BPA) or passive (BSH) targeting for accumulation at target sites. Due to the need of a selective transportation of boron drugs into cancer cells and sparing healthy tissues, we combined the BNCT approach with the specific and effective folate receptor (FR) targeting concept. The FR is overexpressed on many human carcinomas and provides a selective and specific target for molecular imaging as well as for tumor therapy. We synthesized and characterized a carborane-folate as well as a BSH-folate to study their in vitro characteristics and their potential as new boron-carriers for BNCT. Uptake studies were carried out using human KB cells showing a significant increase of the boron content in cells and demonstrating the successful combination of active FR-targeting and BNCT.

  17. Rapid mass-spectrometric determination of boron isotopic distribution in boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rein, J E; Abernathey, R M

    1972-07-01

    Boron isotopic ratios are measured in boron carbide by thermionic ionization mass spectrometry with no prior chemical separation. A powder blend of boron carbide and sodium hydroxide is prepared, a small portion is transferred to a tantalum filament, the filament is heated to produce sodium borate, and the filament is transferred to the mass spectrometer where the(11)B/(10)B ratio is measured, using the Na(2)BO(2)(+) ion. Variables investigated for their effect on preferential volatilization of (10)B include the sodium hydroxide-boron carbide ratio and the temperature and duration of filament heating. A series of boron carbide pellets containing natural boron, of the type proposed for the control rods of the Fast Flux Test Facility reactor, were analysed with an apparently unbiased result of 4.0560 for the (11)B/(10)B ratio (standard deviation 0.0087). The pellets contained over 3% metal impurities typically found in this material. Time of analysis is 45 min per sample, with one analyst. PMID:18961131

  18. Coadsorption of lanthanum with boron and gadolinium with boron on Mo(1 1 0)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magkoev, Tamerlan T.; Vladimirov, Georgij G.; Rump, Gennadij A.

    2008-05-01

    Submonolayer to multilayer coadsorption of lanthanum (La) with boron (B) and gadolinium (Gd) with boron on the surface of Mo(1 1 0) has been studied by means of Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and work function ( ϕ) measurements. The equilibrium state of double adsorbate systems achieved either by adsorption of rare-earth metal (REM) on boron precovered Mo(1 1 0) surface held at room temperature or after moderate annealing of the system with opposite order of adsorption (B on REM films) is the layer which is the inhomogeneous mixture of boron and REM atoms with preferential concentration of boron in the surface area of the mixed film. The work function of such films even at REM to boron concentration ratio much higher than 1/6 are very close to the values of corresponding bulk LaB 6 and GdB 6, favoring assumption of surface rearrangement as the dominant reason of high electron emission efficiency of hexaborides. Almost total similarity of the results for La-B and Gd-B systems can be viewed as the consequence of weak participation of Gd f-electrons in determining the thermionic properties of corresponding double layers.

  19. Multi-dimensional boron transport modeling in subchannel approach: Part II. Validation of CTF boron tracking model and adding boron precipitation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Validation of implemented multi-dimensional subchannel boron transport model. • Extension of boron transport model to entrained droplets. • Implementation of boron precipitation model. • Testing of the boron precipitation model under transient condition. - Abstract: The risk of small-break loss of coolant accident (SB-LOCA) and other reactivity initiated transients caused by boron dilution in the light water reactors (LWRs), and the complications of tracking the soluble boron concentration experimentally inside the primary coolant have stimulated the interest in computational studies for accurate boron tracking simulations in nuclear reactors. In Part I of this study, the development and implementation of a multi-dimensional boron transport model with modified Godunov scheme based on a subchannel approach within the COBRA-TF (CTF) thermal-hydraulic code was presented. The modified Godunov scheme approach with a physical diffusion term was determined to provide the most accurate and precise solution. Current paper extends these conclusions and presents the model validation studies against experimental data from the Rossendorf coolant mixing model (ROCOM) test facility. In addition, the importance of the two-phase flow characteristics in modeling boron transient are emphasized, especially during long-term cooling period after the loss of coolant accident (LOCA) condition in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). The CTF capabilities of boron transport modeling are further improved based on the three-field representation of the two-phase flow utilized in the code. The boron transport within entrained droplets is modeled, and a model for predicting the boron precipitation under transient conditions is developed and tested. It is aimed to extend the applicability of CTF to reactor transient simulations, and particularly to a large-break loss of coolant accident (LB-LOCA) analysis

  20. Complex Hydride Compounds with Enhanced Hydrogen Storage Capacity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosher, Daniel A.; Opalka, Susanne M.; Tang, Xia; Laube, Bruce L.; Brown, Ronald J.; Vanderspurt, Thomas H.; Arsenault, Sarah; Wu, Robert; Strickler, Jamie; Anton, Donald L.; Zidan, Ragaiy; Berseth, Polly

    2008-02-18

    The United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), in collaboration with major partners Albemarle Corporation (Albemarle) and the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), conducted research to discover new hydride materials for the storage of hydrogen having on-board reversibility and a target gravimetric capacity of ≥ 7.5 weight percent (wt %). When integrated into a system with a reasonable efficiency of 60% (mass of hydride / total mass), this target material would produce a system gravimetric capacity of ≥ 4.5 wt %, consistent with the DOE 2007 target. The approach established for the project combined first principles modeling (FPM - UTRC) with multiple synthesis methods: Solid State Processing (SSP - UTRC), Solution Based Processing (SBP - Albemarle) and Molten State Processing (MSP - SRNL). In the search for novel compounds, each of these methods has advantages and disadvantages; by combining them, the potential for success was increased. During the project, UTRC refined its FPM framework which includes ground state (0 Kelvin) structural determinations, elevated temperature thermodynamic predictions and thermodynamic / phase diagram calculations. This modeling was used both to precede synthesis in a virtual search for new compounds and after initial synthesis to examine reaction details and options for modifications including co-reactant additions. The SSP synthesis method involved high energy ball milling which was simple, efficient for small batches and has proven effective for other storage material compositions. The SBP method produced very homogeneous chemical reactions, some of which cannot be performed via solid state routes, and would be the preferred approach for large scale production. The MSP technique is similar to the SSP method, but involves higher temperature and hydrogen pressure conditions to achieve greater species mobility. During the initial phases of the project, the focus was on higher order alanate complexes in the phase space