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Sample records for boron carbide powder

  1. Determination of free carbon content in boron carbide ceramic powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, A.R.M. de; Lima, N.B. de; Paschoal, J.O.A.

    1990-01-01

    Boron carbide is a ceramic material of technological importance due to its hardness and high chemical and thermal stabilities. Free carbon is always found as a process dependent impurity in boron carbide. The development of procedures for its detection is required because its presence leads to a degradation of the boron carbide properties. In this work, several procedures for determining free carbon content in boron carbide specimens are reported and discussed for comparison purposes. (author) [pt

  2. Production of boron carbide powder by carbothermal synthesis of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    weight armour plates etc (Alizadeh et al 2004). It can also be used as a reinforcing material for ceramic matrix composites. It is an excellent neutron absorption material in nuclear industry due to its high neutron absorption co- efficient (Sinha et al 2002). Boron carbide can be prepared by reaction of elemental boron and ...

  3. The preparation method of solid boron solution in silicon carbide in the form of micro powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pampuch, R.; Stobierski, L.; Lis, J.; Bialoskorski, J.; Ermer, E.

    1993-01-01

    The preparation method of solid boron solution in silicon carbide in the form of micro power has been worked out. The method consists in introducing mixture of boron, carbon and silicon and heating in the atmosphere of inert gas to the 1573 K

  4. Shock Response of Boron Carbide

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dandekar, D. P. (Dattatraya Purushottam)

    2001-01-01

    .... The present work was undertaken to determine tensile/spall strength of boron carbide under plane shock wave loading and to analyze all available shock compression data on boron carbide materials...

  5. Pulverization of boron element and proportions of boron carbide in boron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, F.M.; Finck, C.

    1956-01-01

    It is possible to reduce boron element into fine powder by means of a mortar and pestle made of sintered boron carbide, the ratio of boron carbide introduced being less than one per cent. Boron element at our disposal is made of sharp edged, dark brown, little grains of average size greater than 5 μ. Grain sizes smaller than 1μ are required for applying thin layers of such boron. (author) [fr

  6. Graphite and boron carbide composites made by hot-pressing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazaki, K.; Hagio, T.; Kobayashi, K.

    1981-01-01

    Composites consisting of graphite and boron carbide were made by hot-pressing mixed powders of coke carbon and boron carbide. The change of relative density, mechanical strength and electrical resistivity of the composites and the X-ray parameters of coke carbon were investigated with increase of boron carbide content and hot-pressing temperature. From these experiments, it was found that boron carbide powder has a remarkable effect on sintering and graphitization of coke carbon powder above the hot-pressing temperature of 2000 0 C. At 2200 0 C, electrical resistivity of the composite and d(002) spacing of coke carbon once showed minimum values at about 5 to 10 wt% boron carbide and then increased. The strength of the composite increased with increase of boron carbide content. It was considered that some boron from boron carbide began to diffuse substitutionally into the graphite structure above 2000 0 C and densification and graphitization were promoted with the diffusion of boron. Improvements could be made to the mechanical strength, density, oxidation resistance and manufacturing methods by comparing with the properties and processes of conventional graphites. (author)

  7. Analytical chemistry methods for boron carbide absorber material. [Standard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DELVIN WL

    1977-07-01

    This standard provides analytical chemistry methods for the analysis of boron carbide powder and pellets for the following: total C and B, B isotopic composition, soluble C and B, fluoride, chloride, metallic impurities, gas content, water, nitrogen, and oxygen. (DLC)

  8. Oxidation of boron carbide at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinbrueck, Martin

    2005-01-01

    The oxidation kinetics of various types of boron carbides (pellets, powder) were investigated in the temperature range between 1073 and 1873 K. Oxidation rates were measured in transient and isothermal tests by means of mass spectrometric gas analysis. Oxidation of boron carbide is controlled by the formation of superficial liquid boron oxide and its loss due to the reaction with surplus steam to volatile boric acids and/or direct evaporation at temperatures above 1770 K. The overall reaction kinetics is paralinear. Linear oxidation kinetics established soon after the initiation of oxidation under the test conditions described in this report. Oxidation is strongly influenced by the thermohydraulic boundary conditions and in particular by the steam partial pressure and flow rate. On the other hand, the microstructure of the B 4 C samples has a limited influence on oxidation. Very low amounts of methane were produced in these tests

  9. High resolution imaging of boron carbide microstructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacKinnon, I.D.R.; Aselage, T.; Van Deusen, S.B.

    1986-01-01

    Two samples of boron carbide have been examined using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). A hot-pressed B 13 C 2 sample shows a high density of variable width twins normal to (10*1). Subtle shifts or offsets of lattice fringes along the twin plane and normal to approx.(10*5) were also observed. A B 4 C powder showed little evidence of stacking disorder in crystalline regions

  10. New Icosahedral Boron Carbide Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverria Mora, Elena Maria

    Novel semiconductor boron carbide films and boron carbide films doped with aromatic compounds have been investigated and characterized. Most of these semiconductors were formed by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The aromatic compound additives used, in this thesis, were pyridine (Py), aniline, and diaminobenzene (DAB). As one of the key parameters for semiconducting device functionality is the metal contact and, therefore, the chemical interactions or band bending that may occur at the metal/semiconductor interface, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy has been used to investigate the interaction of gold (Au) with these novel boron carbide-based semiconductors. Both n- and p-type films have been tested and pure boron carbide devices are compared to those containing aromatic compounds. The results show that boron carbide seems to behave differently from other semiconductors, opening a way for new analysis and approaches in device's functionality. By studying the electrical and optical properties of these films, it has been found that samples containing the aromatic compound exhibit an improvement in the electron-hole separation and charge extraction, as well as a decrease in the band gap. The hole carrier lifetimes for each sample were extracted from the capacitance-voltage, C(V), and current-voltage, I(V), curves. Additionally, devices, with boron carbide with the addition of pyridine, exhibited better collection of neutron capture generated pulses at ZERO applied bias, compared to the pure boron carbide samples. This is consistent with the longer carrier lifetimes estimated for these films. The I-V curves, as a function of external magnetic field, of the pure boron carbide films and films containing DAB demonstrate that significant room temperature negative magneto-resistance (> 100% for pure samples, and > 50% for samples containing DAB) is possible in the resulting dielectric thin films. Inclusion of DAB is not essential for significant negative magneto

  11. Design, Fabrication and Performance of Boron-Carbide Control Elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brammer, H.A.; Jacobson, J.

    1964-01-01

    A control blade design, incorporating boron-carbide (B 4 C) in stainless-steel tubes, was introduced into service in boiling water reactors in April 1961. Since that time this blade has become the standard reference control element in General Electric boiling-water reactors, replacing the 2% boron-stainless-steel blades previously used. The blades consist of a sheathed, cruciform array of small vertical stainless-steel tubes filled with compácted boron-carbide powder. The boron-carbide powder is confined longitudinally into several independent compartments by swaging over ball bearings located inside the tubes. The development and use of boron-carbide control rods is discussed in five phases: 1. Summary of experience with boron-steel blades and reasons for transition to boron-carbide control; 2. Design of the boron-carbide blade, beginning with developmental experiments, including early measurements performed in the AEC ''Control Rod Material and Development Program'' at the Vallecitos Atomic Laboratory, through a description of the final control blade configuration; 3. Fabrication of the blades and quality control procedures; 4. Results of confirmatory pre-operational mechanical and reactivity testing; and 5. Post-operational experience with the blades, including information on the results of mechanical inspection and reactivity testing after two years of reactor service. (author) [fr

  12. Helium diffusion in irradiated boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollenberg, G.W.

    1981-03-01

    Boron carbide has been internationally adopted as the neutron absorber material in the control and safety rods of large fast breeder reactors. Its relatively large neutron capture cross section at high neutron energies provides sufficient reactivity worth with a minimum of core space. In addition, the commercial availability of boron carbide makes it attractive from a fabrication standpoint. Instrumented irradiation experiments in EBR-II have provided continuous helium release data on boron carbide at a variety of operating temperatures. Although some microstructural and compositional variations were examined in these experiments most of the boron carbide was prototypic of that used in the Fast Flux Test Facility. The density of the boron carbide pellets was approximately 92% of theoretical. The boron carbide pellets were approximately 1.0 cm in diameter and possessed average grain sizes that varied from 8 to 30 μm. Pellet centerline temperatures were continually measured during the irradiation experiments

  13. Boron carbide synthesis by carbothermic reduction of boron oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, A.R.M. de; Paschoal, J.O.A.

    1988-01-01

    Boron carbide (B 4 C) is a ceramic material of technological applications due to its extreme hardness and high chemical as well as thermal stability. Some parameters of the process for obtaining B 4 C by carbothermic reduction of B 2 O 3 have been determined. The starting powders and the final products have been analysed by chemical, spectrographic and X-ray diffraction methods. The results show that the B 4 C obtained by the carbothermic reduction process is suitable for applications with a definite determination of the free carbon content. (author) [pt

  14. Sintering of nano crystalline α silicon carbide by doping with boron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sinterable nano silicon carbide powders of mean particle size (37 nm) were prepared by attrition milling and chemical processing of an acheson type alpha silicon carbide having mean particle size of 0.39 m (390 nm). Pressureless sintering of these powders was achieved by addition of boron carbide of 0.5 wt% together ...

  15. Elastic modulus and fracture of boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollenberg, G.W.; Walther, G.

    1978-12-01

    The elastic modulus of hot-pressed boron carbide with 1 to 15% porosity was measured at room temperature. K/sub IC/ values were determined for the same porosity range at 500 0 C by the double torsion technique. The critical stress intensity factor of boron carbide with 8% porosity was evaluated from 25 to 1200 0 C

  16. Method for fabricating boron carbide articles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ardary, Z.; Reynolds, C.

    1980-01-01

    Described is a method for fabricating an essentially uniformly dense boron carbide article of a length-to-diameter or width ratio greater than 2 to 1 comprising the steps of providing a plurality of article segments to be joined together to form the article with each of said article segments having a length-to-diameter or width ratio less than 1.5 to 1. Each segment is fabricated by hot pressing a composition consisting of boron carbide powder at a pressure and temperature effective to provide the article segment with a density greater than about 85% of theoretical density, providing each article segment with parallel planar end surfaces, placing a plurality of said article segments in a hot-pressing die in a line with the planar surfaces of adjacent article segments being disposed in intimate contact, and hot pressing the aligned article segments at a temperature and pressure effective to provide said article with a density over the length thereof in the range of about 94 to 98 percent theoretical density and greater than the density provided in the discrete hot pressing of each of the article segments and to provide a bond between adjacent article segments with said bond being at least equivalent in hardness, strength and density to a remainder of said article

  17. Joining of boron carbide using nickel interlayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vosughi, A.; Hadian, A. M.

    2008-01-01

    Carbide ceramics such as boron carbide due to their unique properties such as low density, high refractoriness, and high strength to weight ratio have many applications in different industries. This study focuses on direct bonding of boron carbide for high temperature applications using nickel interlayer. The process variables such as bonding time, temperature, and pressure have been investigated. The microstructure of the joint area was studied using electron scanning microscope technique. At all the bonding temperatures ranging from 1150 to 1300 d eg C a reaction layer formed across the ceramic/metal interface. The thickness of the reaction layer increased by increasing temperature. The strength of the bonded samples was measured using shear testing method. The highest strength value obtained was about 100 MPa and belonged to the samples bonded at 1250 for 75 min bonding time. The strength of the joints decreased by increasing the bonding temperature above 1250 d eg C . The results of this study showed that direct bonding technique along with nickel interlayer can be successfully utilized for bonding boron carbide ceramic to itself. This method may be used for bonding boron carbide to metals as well.

  18. Lattice dynamics of α boron and of boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vast, N.

    1999-01-01

    The atomic structure and the lattice dynamics of α boron and of B 4 C boron carbide have been studied by Density Functional Theory (D.F.T.) and Density Functional Perturbation Theory (D.F.P.T.). The bulk moduli of the unit-cell and of the icosahedron have been investigated, and the equation of state at zero temperature has been determined. In α boron, Raman diffusion and infrared absorption have been studied under pressure, and the theoretical and experimental Grueneisen coefficients have been compared. In boron carbide, inspection of the theoretical and experimental vibrational spectra has led to the determination of the atomic structure of B 4 C. Finally, the effects of isotopic disorder have been modeled by an exact method beyond the mean-field approximation, and the effects onto the Raman lines has been investigated. The method has been applied to isotopic alloys of diamond and germanium. (author)

  19. Anomalous Seebeck coefficient in boron carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aselage, T.L.; Emin, D.; Wood, C.; Mackinnon, I.D.R.; Howard, I.A.

    1987-01-01

    Boron carbides exhibit an anomalously large Seebeck coefficient with a temperature coefficient that is characteristic of polaronic hopping between inequivalent sites. The inequivalence in the sites is associated with disorder in the solid. The temperature dependence of the Seebeck coefficient for materials prepared by different techniques provides insight into the nature of the disorder

  20. Reaction of boron carbide with molybdenum disilicide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novikov, A.V.; Melekhin, V.F.; Pegov, V.S.

    1989-01-01

    The investigation results of interaction in the B 4 C-MoSi 2 system during sintering in vacuum are presented. Sintering of boron carbide with molybdenum disilicide is shown to lead to the formation of MoB 2 , SiC, Mo 5 Si 3 compounds, the presence of carbon-containing covering plays an important role in sintering

  1. Plasma metallization of refractory carbide powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koroleva, E.B.; Klinskaya, N.A.; Rybalko, O.F.; Ugol'nikova, T.A.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of treatment conditions in plasma on properties of produced metallized powders of titanium, tungsten and chromium carbides with the main particle size of 40-80 μm is considered. It is shown that plasma treatment permits to produce metallized powders of carbide materials with the 40-80 μm particle size. The degree of metallization, spheroidization, chemical and phase composition of metallized carbide powders are controlled by dispersivity of the treated material, concentration of a metal component in the treated mixtures, rate of plasma flow and preliminary spheroidization procedure

  2. Investigations on the conditions for obtaining high density boron carbide by sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kislyj, P.S.; Grabtschuk, B.L.

    1975-01-01

    The results of investigations on kinetics of condensation and mechanisms of mass transfer in the process of sintering of technical, chemically pure and synthesized boron carbide are generalized. Laws on boron carbide densification depending upon temperature, time of isothermic endurance, thermal speed, size of powder particles and variable composition in homogeneity are determined. From the results obtained on condensation kinetics and special experiments on studying the changes in properties after heating under different conditions, the role of dislocation and diffusion processes in mass transfer during boron carbide sintering is exposed. The properties of sintered boron carbide are 15-20% lower than the properties of high-pressed one, that is conditioned by intercrystallite distortion of the first one and transcrystallite of the second one

  3. Study and optimization of the carbothermic reduction process for obtaining boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, A.R.M. de.

    1989-01-01

    Boron carbide - B sub(4)C - is a ceramic material of technological importance due to its hardness and high chemical and thermal stabilities. Moreover, its high neutron capture cross section makes it suitable for application as neutron absorber in nuclear technology. The process for obtaining carbothermally derived boron carbide has been studied in two steps: firstly, the parameters of the boric acid → boron oxide dehydration reaction have been defined; secondly, the optimization of the carbothermal reduction reaction using boron oxide has been undertaken looking for boron carbide having low level of free carbon. The starting materials as well as the main products have been studied by chemical and spectrographic analyses, X-ray diffractometry, granulometric classification and scanning electron microscopy. The optimization of the carbothermic reduction process allowed for the development and set up of a fabrication procedure yielding high quality B sub(4) C powders, starting from low cost and easily available (in the Brazilian market) raw materials. (author)

  4. Structure and properties of hot-pressed boron carbide ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koval' chenko, M S; Tkachenko, IU G; Koval' chuk, V V; Iurchenko, D Z; Satanin, S V [Institut Problem Materialovedeniia, Kiev (Ukrainian SSR)

    1990-07-01

    The microstructure and strength of B4C-TiB2-TiO{sub 2} ceramics samples, hot-compacted from a mixture of two types of B4C-TiO2-C powder, are examined. The two types are obtained by combining boric acid with either sucrose or carbon black. The grain-sizes of the two powders are found to be distinctly different from one another both before and after the grinding procedure and the degree of dispersion is not high. The strength tests show 600 MPa, the Vicker's hardness is 34.5 GPa, and the crack resistance coefficient of ceramics containing 15 percent TiB2 by mass is 5 MPa m exp 1/2. The use of soluble boron carbide powder helps achieve higher levels of strength and crack resistance. 5 refs.

  5. Determination of free and combined carbon in boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shankaran, P.S.; Kulkarni, Amit S.; Pandey, K.L.; Ramanjaneyulu, P.S.; Yadav, C.S.; Sayi, Y.S.; Ramakumar, K.L.

    2009-01-01

    A simple, sensitive and fast method for the determination of free and combined carbon in boron carbide samples, based on combustion in presence of oxygen at different temperatures, has been developed. Method has been standardized by analyzing mixture of two different boron carbide samples. Error associated with the method in the determination of free carbon is less than 5%. (author)

  6. Morphology study of refractory carbide powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vavrda, J.; Blazhikova, Ya.

    1982-01-01

    Refractory carbides were investigated using JSM-U3 electron microscope of Joelco company at 27 KV accelerating voltage. Some photographs of each powder were taken with different enlargements to characterise the sample upon the whole. It was shown that morphological and especially topographic study of powders enables to learn their past history (way of fabrication and treatment). The presence of steps of compact particle fractures and cracks is accompanied by occurence of fine dispersion of carbides subjected to machining after facrication. On the contrary, the character of crystallographic surfaces and features of surface growth testify to the way of crystallization

  7. Pulverization of boron element and proportions of boron carbide in boron; Broyage de bore element et dosage de carbure de bore dans le bore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lang, F M; Finck, C [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1956-07-01

    It is possible to reduce boron element into fine powder by means of a mortar and pestle made of sintered boron carbide, the ratio of boron carbide introduced being less than one per cent. Boron element at our disposal is made of sharp edged, dark brown, little grains of average size greater than 5 {mu}. Grain sizes smaller than 1{mu} are required for applying thin layers of such boron. (author) [French] Il est possible de pulveriser finement du bore element au moyen de mortier et pilon en carbure de bore fritte, le taux de carbure de bore introduit etant inferieur a 1 pour cent. Le bore element dont nous disposons est constitue de petits grains brun fonce, a aretes vives, de dimension moyenne superieure a 5 {mu}. L'application de ce bore en couches minces demande des grains de dimensions inferieures a 1 {mu}. (aute0008.

  8. Highly thermal conductive carbon fiber/boron carbide composite material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiba, Akio; Suzuki, Yasutaka; Goto, Sumitaka; Saito, Yukio; Jinbo, Ryutaro; Ogiwara, Norio; Saido, Masahiro.

    1996-01-01

    In a composite member for use in walls of a thermonuclear reactor, if carbon fibers and boron carbide are mixed, since they are brought into contact with each other directly, boron is reacted with the carbon fibers to form boron carbide to lower thermal conductivity of the carbon fibers. Then, in the present invention, graphite or amorphous carbon is filled between the carbon fibers to provide a fiber bundle of not less than 500 carbon fibers. Further, the surface of the fiber bundle is coated with graphite or amorphous carbon to suppress diffusion or solid solubilization of boron to carbon fibers or reaction of them. Then, lowering of thermal conductivity of the carbon fibers is prevented, as well as the mixing amount of the carbon fiber bundles with boron carbide, a sintering temperature and orientation of carbon fiber bundles are optimized to provide a highly thermal conductive carbon fiber/boron carbide composite material. In addition, carbide or boride type short fibers, spherical graphite, and amorphous carbon are mixed in the boron carbide to prevent development of cracks. Diffusion or solid solubilization of boron to carbon fibers is reduced or reaction of them if the carbon fibers are bundled. (N.H.)

  9. Electron microscopy study of radiation effects in boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoto, T.

    1987-03-01

    Boron carbide is a disordered non-stoechiometric material with a strongly microtwinned polycristallyne microstructure. This ceramic is among the candidate materials for the first wall coating in fusion reactor and is used as a neutron absorber in the control rods of fast breeder reactors. The present work deals with the nature of radiation damage in this solid. Because of helium internal production, neutron irradiated boron carbide is affected by swelling and by a strong microcracking which can break up a pellet in fine powder. These processes are rather intensitive to the irradiation parameters (temperature, flux and even neutron spectrum). Transmission electron microscopy of samples irradiated by the fast neutrons of a reactor, the electrons of a high voltage electron microscope and of samples implanted with helium ions was used to understand the respective roles of helium and point defects in the processes of swelling and microcracking. The design of an irradiation chamber for helium implantation at controlled temperature from 600 to 1700 0 C was an important technical part of this work [fr

  10. Compatibility of heat resistant alloys with boron carbide, 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, Shinichi; Kurasawa, Toshimasa; Endow, Taichi; Someya, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Isao.

    1986-08-01

    This paper includes an experimental result of out-of-pile compatibility and capsule design for irradiation test in Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR). The compatibility between sheath material and neutron absorber materials for control rod devices (CRD) was examined for potential use in a very high temperature reactor (VHTR) which is under development at JAERI. The purpose of the compatibility tests are preliminary evaluation of safety prior to irradiation tests. Preliminary compatibility evaluation was concerned with three items as follows : 1) Lithium effects on the penetrating reaction of Incoloy 800H alloy in contact with a mixture of boronated graphite and lithium hydroxide powders, 2) Short term tensile properties of Incoloy 800H and Hastelloy XR alloy reacted with boronated graphite and fracture mode analysis, 3) Reaction behavior of both alloys under transient power conditions of a VHTR. It was clear that the reaction rate constant of the Incoloy 800H alloy was accelerated by doping lithium hydroxide into the boron carbide and graphite powder. The mechanical properties of Incoloy 800H and Hastelloy XR alloy reacted with boronated graphite were decreased. Ultimate tensile strength and tensile ductilities at temperatures over 850 deg C were reduced, but there was no change in the proof (yield) stress. Both alloys exhibited a brittle intergranular fracture mode during transient power conditions of a VHTR and also exhibited severe penetration. Irradiation capsules for compatibility test were designed to simulate three irradiation conditions of VHTR: 1) steady state for VHTR, 2) Transient power condition, 3) Service limited life of CRD. Capsule irradiation experiments have been carried out satisfactorily and thus confirm the validity of the capsule design procedure. (author)

  11. Boron carbide in pile behaviour Rapsodie experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kryger, B.; Colin, M.

    1983-04-01

    Results concerning boron carbide irradiation experiments performed in RAPSODIE up to 10 22 .cm - 3 capture density in the temperature range 600-1100 0 lead to the following main conclusions: initial density and grain size lowering contribute to swelling decrease but density is the major parameter for swelling limitation; swelling rate can vary in a wide range (ratio 1 to 3) according to combinations of density (1.8 to 2.3) and grain size (10 to 50 μm) values; a swelling balance reveals that the most important contribution to swelling should be a high density of helium small bubbles (<400 A); helium retention increases with density and grain size and decreases with temperature elevation. A diffusion law is proposed to describe the rate of helium release

  12. ENTIRELY AQUEOUS SOLUTION-GEL ROUTE FOR THE PREPARATION OF ZIRCONIUM CARBIDE, HAFNIUM CARBIDE AND THEIR TERNARY CARBIDE POWDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Changrui

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available An entirely aqueous solution-gel route has been developed for the synthesis of zirconium carbide, hafnium carbide and their ternary carbide powders. Zirconium oxychloride (ZrOCl₂.8H₂O, malic acid (MA and ethylene glycol (EG were dissolved in water to form the aqueous zirconium carbide precursor. Afterwards, this aqueous precursor was gelled and transformed into zirconium carbide at a relatively low temperature (1200 °C for achieving an intimate mixing of the intermediate products. Hafnium and the ternary carbide powders were also synthesized via the same aqueous route. All the zirconium, hafnium and ternary carbide powders exhibited a particle size of ∼100 nm.

  13. Boron carbide nanostructures: A prospective material as an additive in concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Paviter; Kaur, Gurpreet; Kumar, Rohit; Kumar, Umesh; Singh, Kulwinder; Kumar, Manjeet; Bala, Rajni; Meena, Ramovatar; Kumar, Akshay

    2018-05-01

    In recent decades, manufacture and ingestion of concrete have increased particularly in developing countries. Due to its low cost, safety and strength, concrete have become an economical choice for protection of radiation shielding material in nuclear reactors. As boron carbide has been known as a neutron absorber material makes it a great candidate as an additive in concrete for shielding radiation. This paper presents the synthesis of boron carbide nanostructures by using ball milling method. The X-ray diffraction pattern, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Scanning Electron Microscope analysis confirms the formation of boron carbide nanostructures. The effect of boron carbide nanostructures on the strength of concrete samples was demonstrated. The compressive strength tests of concrete cube B4C powder additives for 0 % and 5 % of total weight of cement was compared for different curing time period such as 7, 14, 21 and 28 days. The high compressive strength was observed when 5 wt % boron carbide nanostructures were used as an additive in concrete samples after 28 days curing time and showed significant improvement in strength.

  14. Helium behaviour in implanted boron carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motte Vianney

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available When boron carbide is used as a neutron absorber in nuclear power plants, large quantities of helium are produced. To simulate the gas behaviour, helium implantations were carried out in boron carbide. The samples were then annealed up to 1500 °C in order to observe the influence of temperature and duration of annealing. The determination of the helium diffusion coefficient was carried out using the 3He(d,p4He nuclear reaction (NRA method. From the evolution of the width of implanted 3He helium profiles (fluence 1 × 1015/cm2, 3 MeV corresponding to a maximum helium concentration of about 1020/cm3 as a function of annealing temperatures, an Arrhenius diagram was plotted and an apparent diffusion coefficient was deduced (Ea = 0.52 ± 0.11 eV/atom. The dynamic of helium clusters was observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM of samples implanted with 1.5 × 1016/cm2, 2.8 to 3 MeV 4He ions, leading to an implanted slab about 1 μm wide with a maximum helium concentration of about 1021/cm3. After annealing at 900 °C and 1100 °C, small (5–20 nm flat oriented bubbles appeared in the grain, then at the grain boundaries. At 1500 °C, due to long-range diffusion, intra-granular bubbles were no longer observed; helium segregates at the grain boundaries, either as bubbles or inducing grain boundaries opening.

  15. The determination of boron and carbon in reactor grade boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crossley, D.; Wood, A.J.; McInnes, C.A.J.; Jones, I.G.

    1978-09-01

    The sealed tube method of dissolution at high temperature and pressure has been successfully applied in the analysis of reactor grade boron carbide for the determination of boron. A 50 mg sample of boron carbide is completely dissolved by heating with concentrated nitric acid in a sealed tube at 300 0 C. The boron content of the resultant sample solution is determined by the mannitol potentiometric titration method. The precision of the method for the determination of 2.5 mg of boron using the Harwell automatic potentiometric titrator is 0.2% (coefficient of variation). The carbon content of a boron carbide sample is determined by combustion of the sample at 1050 0 C in a stream of oxygen using vanadium pentoxide to ensure the complete oxidation of the sample. The carbon dioxide produced from the sample is measured manometrically and the precision of the method for the determination of 4 mg of carbon is 0.4% (coefficient of variation). (author)

  16. Structure and single-phase regime of boron carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emin, D.

    1988-01-01

    The boron carbides are composed of twelve-atom icosahedral clusters which are linked by direct covalent bonds and through three-atom intericosahedral chains. The boron carbides are known to exist as a single phase with carbon concentrations from about 8 to about 20 at. %. This range of carbon concentrations is made possible by the substitution of boron and carbon atoms for one another within both the icosahedra and intericosahedral chains. The most widely accepted structural model for B 4 C (the boron carbide with nominally 20% carbon) has B/sub 11/C icosahedra with C-B-C intericosahedral chains. Here, the free energy of the boron carbides is studied as a function of carbon concentration by considering the effects of replacing carbon atoms within B 4 C with boron atoms. It is concluded that entropic and energetic considerations both favor the replacement of carbon atoms with boron atoms within the intericosahedral chains, C-B-C→C-B-B. Once the carbon concentration is so low that the vast majority of the chains are C-B-B chains, near B/sub 13/C 2 , subsequent substitutions of carbon atoms with boron atoms occur within the icosahedra, B/sub 11/C→B/sub 12/. Maxima of the free energy occur at the most ordered compositions: B 4 C,B/sub 13/C 2 ,B/sub 14/C. This structural model, determined by studying the free energy, agrees with that previously suggested by analysis of electronic and thermal transport data. These considerations also provide an explanation for the wide single-phase regime found for boron carbides

  17. Colloidal characterization of ultrafine silicon carbide and silicon nitride powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitman, Pamela K.; Feke, Donald L.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of various powder treatment strategies on the colloid chemistry of aqueous dispersions of silicon carbide and silicon nitride are examined using a surface titration methodology. Pretreatments are used to differentiate between the true surface chemistry of the powders and artifacts resulting from exposure history. Silicon nitride powders require more extensive pretreatment to reveal consistent surface chemistry than do silicon carbide powders. As measured by titration, the degree of proton adsorption from the suspending fluid by pretreated silicon nitride and silicon carbide powders can both be made similar to that of silica.

  18. Process for the preparation of fine grain metal carbide powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gortsema, F.P.

    1976-01-01

    Fine grain metal carbide powders are conveniently prepared from the corresponding metal oxide by heating in an atmosphere of methane in hydrogen. Sintered articles having a density approaching the theoretical density of the metal carbide itself can be fabricated from the powders by cold pressing, hot pressing or other techniques. 8 claims, no drawings

  19. Boron-carbide-aluminum and boron-carbide-reactive metal cermets. [B/sub 4/C-Al

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halverson, D.C.; Pyzik, A.J.; Aksay, I.A.

    1985-05-06

    Hard, tough, lighweight boron-carbide-reactive metal composites, particularly boron-carbide-aluminum composites, are produced. These composites have compositions with a plurality of phases. A method is provided, including the steps of wetting and reacting the starting materials, by which the microstructures in the resulting composites can be controllably selected. Starting compositions, reaction temperatures, reaction times, and reaction atmospheres are parameters for controlling the process and resulting compositions. The ceramic phases are homogeneously distributed in the metal phases and adhesive forces at ceramic-metal interfaces are maximized. An initial consolidated step is used to achieve fully dense composites. Microstructures of boron-carbide-aluminum cermets have been produced with modules of rupture exceeding 110 ksi and fracture toughness exceeding 12 ksi..sqrt..in. These composites and methods can be used to form a variety of structural elements.

  20. The diffusion bonding of silicon carbide and boron carbide using refractory metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cockeram, B.V.

    1999-01-01

    Joining is an enabling technology for the application of structural ceramics at high temperatures. Metal foil diffusion bonding is a simple process for joining silicon carbide or boron carbide by solid-state, diffusive conversion of the metal foil into carbide and silicide compounds that produce bonding. Metal diffusion bonding trials were performed using thin foils (5 microm to 100 microm) of refractory metals (niobium, titanium, tungsten, and molybdenum) with plates of silicon carbide (both α-SiC and β-SiC) or boron carbide that were lapped flat prior to bonding. The influence of bonding temperature, bonding pressure, and foil thickness on bond quality was determined from metallographic inspection of the bonds. The microstructure and phases in the joint region of the diffusion bonds were evaluated using SEM, microprobe, and AES analysis. The use of molybdenum foil appeared to result in the highest quality bond of the metal foils evaluated for the diffusion bonding of silicon carbide and boron carbide. Bonding pressure appeared to have little influence on bond quality. The use of a thinner metal foil improved the bond quality. The microstructure of the bond region produced with either the α-SiC and β-SiC polytypes were similar

  1. Synergistic methods for the production of high-strength and low-cost boron carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Charles Schenck

    2011-12-01

    Boron carbide (B4C) is a non-oxide ceramic in the same class of nonmetallic hard materials as silicon carbide and diamond. The high hardness, high elastic modulus and low density of B4C make it a nearly ideal material for personnel and vehicular armor. B4C plates formed via hot-pressing are currently issued to U.S. soldiers and have exhibited excellent performance; however, hot-pressed articles contain inherent processing defects and are limited to simple geometries such as low-curvature plates. Recent advances in the pressureless sintering of B4C have produced theoretically-dense and complex-shape articles that also exhibit superior ballistic performance. However, the cost of this material is currently high due to the powder shape, size, and size distribution that are required, which limits the economic feasibility of producing such a product. Additionally, the low fracture toughness of pure boron carbide may have resulted in historically lower transition velocities (the projectile velocity range at which armor begins to fail) than competing silicon carbide ceramics in high-velocity long-rod tungsten penetrator tests. Lower fracture toughness also limits multi-hit protection capability. Consequently, these requirements motivated research into methods for improving the densification and fracture toughness of inexpensive boron carbide composites that could result in the development of a superior armor material that would also be cost-competitive with other high-performance ceramics. The primary objective of this research was to study the effect of titanium and carbon additives on the sintering and mechanical properties of inexpensive B4C powders. The boron carbide powder examined in this study was a sub-micron (0.6 mum median particle size) boron carbide powder produced by H.C. Starck GmbH via a jet milling process. A carbon source in the form of phenolic resin, and titanium additives in the form of 32 nm and 0.9 mum TiO2 powders were selected. Parametric studies of

  2. Erosion wear of boron carbide ceramic nozzles by abrasive air-jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Jianxin

    2005-01-01

    Boron carbide nozzles were produced by hot pressing. The erosion wear of this nozzle caused by abrasive particle impact was investigated by abrasive air-jets. Silica, silicon carbide and alumina powders with different hardness were used as the erodent abrasive particles. Results showed that the hardness of the erodent particles played an important role with respect to the erosion wear of the boron carbide nozzles. As the hardness of the erodent particles increases, there is a dramatic increase in erosion rate of the nozzles. The nozzle entrance area suffered from severe abrasive impact under large impact angles, and generated maximum tensile stresses. The wear mechanisms of boron carbide nozzle at this area appeared to be entirely brittle in nature with the evidence of large scale-chipping, and exhibited a brittle fracture induced removal process. While at the nozzle center wall section, most of the particles traveled parallel to the nozzle wall, and showed minimum tensile stresses. The wear mode in this area of the nozzle changed from impact to sliding erosion, and the wear mechanisms appeared to be the lateral cracking owing to a surface fatigue fracture mechanism

  3. Electron microscopy of boron carbide before and after electron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoto, T.; Zuppiroli, L.; Beauvy, M.; Athanassiadis, T.

    1984-06-01

    The microstructure of boron carbide has been studied by electron microscopy and related to the composition of the material. After electron irradiations in an usual transmission electron microscope and in a high voltage electron microscope at different temperatures and fluxes no change of these microstructures have been observed but a sputtering of the surface of the samples, which has been studied quantitatively [fr

  4. Functionalization and cellular uptake of boron carbide nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, M. W.; Björkdahl, O.; Sørensen, P. G.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we present surface modification strategies of boron carbide nanoparticles, which allow for bioconjugation of the transacting transcriptional activator (TAT) peptide and fluorescent dyes. Coated nanoparticles can be translocated into murine EL4 thymoma cells and B16 F10 malignant...

  5. Disorder and defects are not intrinsic to boron carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Swastik; Bykova, Elena; Dey, Somnath; Ali, Sk Imran; Dubrovinskaia, Natalia; Dubrovinsky, Leonid; Parakhonskiy, Gleb; van Smaalen, Sander

    2016-01-01

    A unique combination of useful properties in boron-carbide, such as extreme hardness, excellent fracture toughness, a low density, a high melting point, thermoelectricity, semi-conducting behavior, catalytic activity and a remarkably good chemical stability, makes it an ideal material for a wide range of technological applications. Explaining these properties in terms of chemical bonding has remained a major challenge in boron chemistry. Here we report the synthesis of fully ordered, stoichiometric boron-carbide B13C2 by high-pressure-high-temperature techniques. Our experimental electron-density study using high-resolution single-crystal synchrotron X-ray diffraction data conclusively demonstrates that disorder and defects are not intrinsic to boron carbide, contrary to what was hitherto supposed. A detailed analysis of the electron density distribution reveals charge transfer between structural units in B13C2 and a new type of electron-deficient bond with formally unpaired electrons on the C-B-C group in B13C2. Unprecedented bonding features contribute to the fundamental chemistry and materials science of boron compounds that is of great interest for understanding structure-property relationships and development of novel functional materials.

  6. Epithermal neutron activation analysis using a boron carbide irradiation filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehmann, W.D.; Brueckner, J.

    1980-01-01

    The use of boron carbide as a thermal neutron filter in epithermal neutron activation (ENAA) analysis has been investigated. As compared to the use of a cadmium filter, boron provides a greater reduction of activities from elements relatively abundant in terrestrial rocks and fossil fuels, such as Na, La, Sc and Fe. These elements have excitation functions which follow the 1/v law in the 1 to 10 eV lower epithermal region. This enhances the sensitivity of ENAA for elements such as U, Th, Ba and etc. which have strong resonances in the higher epithermal region above 10 eV. In addition, a boron carbide filter has the advantages over cadmium of acquiring a relatively low level of induced activity which poses minimal radiation safety problems, when used for ENAA. (author)

  7. Process for manufacturing boron carbide pellets that can be used for the realization, of the control rods of water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballagny, Alain; Brie, Michel.

    1982-01-01

    The subject of the invention is a process for manufacturing boron carbide pellets with a boron carbide content of not less than 68% by volume and having an open porosity. This process consists in (a) preparing a mix comprising boron carbide powder of which at least 90% of the particles are under 3 μ in size, and an organic binder that can be transformed into carbon by thermal treatment, (b) compressing the hot mix thus obtained to form unbaked pellets, under a pressure of 1000 to 6000 bars, at a temperature of 80 to 250 0 C and (c) submitting the unbaked pellets thus obtained to vacuum thermal treatment to transform this binder into porous carbon. The finished pellets are used in the control rods of water reactors [fr

  8. Standard test methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, and spectrochemical analysis of nuclear-grade boron carbide

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2004-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the chemical, mass spectrometric, and spectrochemical analysis of nuclear-grade boron carbide powder and pellets to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 The analytical procedures appear in the following order: Sections Total Carbon by Combustion and Gravimetry 7-17 Total Boron by Titrimetry 18-28 Isotopic Composition by Mass Spectrometry 29-38 Chloride and Fluoride Separation by Pyrohydrolysis 39-45 Chloride by Constant-Current Coulometry 46-54 Fluoride by Ion-Selective Electrode 55-63 Water by Constant-Voltage Coulometry 64-72 Impurities by Spectrochemical Analysis 73-81 Soluble Boron by Titrimetry 82-95 Soluble Carbon by a Manometric Measurement 96-105 Metallic Impurities by a Direct Reader Spectrometric Method 106-114

  9. Electronic and vibrational hopping transport in boron carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emin, D.

    1991-01-01

    General concepts of hopping-type transport and localization are reviewed. Disorder, electronic correlations and atomic displacements, effects ignored in electronic band structure calculations, foster localization of electronic charge carriers. Examples are given that illustrate the efficacy of these effects in producing localization. This introduction is followed by a brief discussion of the relation between hopping-type transport and localization. The fundamentals of the formation, localization, and hopping transport of small polarons and/or bipolarons is then described. Electronic transport in boron carbides is presented as an example of the adiabatic hopping of small bipolarons. Finally, the notion of vibrational hopping is introduced. The high-temperature thermal diffusion in boron carbides is presented as a potential application of this idea

  10. Determination of soluble carbon in nuclear grade boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega Bustillos, J.O.; Gomes, R.; Camaro, J.; Zorzetto, F.; Domingues, P.; Riella, H.

    1990-05-01

    The present work describes two different techniques (manometric and wet chemical) for the soluble carbon determination in nuclear grade boron carbide. The techniques are based on the reaction of the boron carbide with a sulfocromic mixture, generating CO 2 . The techniques differ on the mode they do the measurement of CO 2 produced. By wet chemical technique the CO 2 is absorved in a barium hydroxide solution and is determinated by titration. In the manometric technique the CO 2 gas is measured using a McLeod gauge. The gas produced by the latter technique is analysed by mass spectrometry. The details of the analytical technique and the data obtained are discussed. (author) [pt

  11. Manufacturing method for boron carbide/carbon composite neutron shielding material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Takenori; Ukai, Shigeharu; Maruyama, Tadashi; Suya, Kiyoshi; Sunami, Yoshihiko.

    1994-01-01

    A less volatile binder pitch which is melted upon heating is used as a binder. Raw materials mainly comprising 60 to 85% by volume of a boron carbide powder and 15 to 40% by volume of a binder pitch are mixed, molded under pressure and heating at 480 to 600degC, then baked under non-pressurization, further impregnated with pitch under a reduced pressure and then baked again. The volume percentage of each of the materials is calculated based on the volume obtained by dividing the blending weight for each of raw materials with the intrinsic density respectively. The binding property relative to the boron carbide powder is improved by using a pitch having satisfactory melting performance and reduction of strength is decreased. Moreover, if the binder pitch is baked at about 2,000degC, it is easily converted into a graphitized tissues to have excellent slidability and fabricability. With such procedures, high bending strength and high heat conductivity can be ensured while keeping high boron content and neutron absorbing performance. (T.M.)

  12. Sodium erosion of boron carbide from breached absorber pins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basmajian, J.A.; Baker, D.E.

    1981-03-01

    The purpose of the irradiation experiment was to provide an engineering demonstration of the irradiation behavior of breached boron carbide absorber pins. By building defects into the cladding of prototypic absorber pins, and performing the irradiation under typical FFTF operating conditions, a qualitative assessment of the consequences of a breach was achieved. Additionally, a direct comparison of pin behavior with that of the ex-reactor test could be made

  13. Correlation for boron carbide helium release in fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basmajian, J.A.; Pitner, A.L.

    1977-04-01

    An empirical helium correlation for the helium release from boron carbide has been developed. The correlation provides a good fit to the experimental data in the temperature range from 800 to 1350 0 K, and burnup levels up to 80 x 10 20 captures/cm 3 . The correlation has the capability of extrapolation to 2200 0 K (3500 0 F) and 200 x 10 20 captures/cm 3 . In this range the helium release rate will not exceed the generation rate

  14. Electrical Characterization of Irradiated Semiconducting Amorphous Hydrogenated Boron Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, George Glenn

    Semiconducting amorphous partially dehydrogenated boron carbide has been explored as a neutron voltaic for operation in radiation harsh environments, such as on deep space satellites/probes. A neutron voltaic device could also be used as a solid state neutron radiation detector to provide immediate alerts for radiation workers/students, as opposed to the passive dosimetry badges utilized today. Understanding how the irradiation environment effects the electrical properties of semiconducting amorphous partially dehydrogenated boron carbide is important to predicting the stability of these devices in operation. p-n heterojunction diodes were formed from the synthesis of semiconducting amorphous partially dehydrogenated boron carbide on silicon substrates through the use of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). Many forms of structural and electrical measurements and analysis have been performed on the p-n heterojunction devices as a function of both He+ ion and neutron irradiation including: transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED), current versus voltage I(V), capacitance versus voltage C(V), conductance versus frequency G(f), and charge carrier lifetime (tau). In stark contrast to nearly all other electronic devices, the electrical performance of these p-n heterojunction diodes improved with irradiation. This is most likely the result of bond defect passivation and resolution of degraded icosahedral based carborane structures (icosahedral molecules missing a B, C, or H atom(s)).

  15. Preparation of aluminum nitride-silicon carbide nanocomposite powder by the nitridation of aluminum silicon carbide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Itatani, K.; Tsukamoto, R.; Delsing, A.C.A.; Hintzen, H.T.J.M.; Okada, I.

    2002-01-01

    Aluminum nitride (AlN)-silicon carbide (SiC) nanocomposite powders were prepared by the nitridation of aluminum-silicon carbide (Al4SiC4) with the specific surface area of 15.5 m2·g-1. The powders nitrided at and above 1400°C for 3 h contained the 2H-phases which consisted of AlN-rich and SiC-rich

  16. Auger electron spectroscopy studies of boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madden, H.H.; Nelson, G.C.; Wallace, W.O.

    1986-01-01

    Auger electron spectroscopy has been used to probe the electronic structure of ion bombardment (IB) cleaned surfaces of B 9 C and B 4 C samples. The shapes of the B-KVV and C-KVV Auger lines were found to be relatively insensitive to the bulk stoichiometry of the samples. This indicates that the local chemical environments surrounding B and C atoms, respectively, on the surfaces of the IB cleaned samples do not change appreciably in going from B 9 C to B 4 C. Fracturing the sample in situ is a way of producing a clean representative internal surface to compare with the IB surfaces. Microbeam techniques have been used to study a fracture surface of the B 9 C material with greater spatial resolution than in our studies of IB surfaces. The B 9 C fracture surface was not homogeneous and contained both C-rich and B-rich regions. The C-KVV line for the C-rich regions was graphitic in shape. Much of the C-rich regions was found by IB to be less than 100 nm in thickness. The C-KVV line from the B-rich regions was carbidic and did not differ appreciably in shape from those recorded for the IB cleaned surfaces

  17. Evidence for multiple polytypes of semiconducting boron carbide (C2B10) from electronic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lunca-Popa, Petru; Brand, J I; Balaz, Snjezana; Rosa, Luis G; Boag, N M; Bai Mengjun; Robertson, B W; Dowben, P A

    2005-01-01

    Boron carbides fabricated via plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition from different isomeric source compounds with the same C 2 B 10 H 12 closo-icosahedral structure result in materials with very different direct (optical) band gaps. This provides compelling evidence for the existence of multiple polytypes of C 2 B 10 boron carbide and is consistent with electron diffraction results

  18. In search of amorphization-resistant boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subhash, Ghatu; Awasthi, Amnaya P.; Kunka, Cody; Jannotti, Phillip; DeVries, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Despite its superior mechanical properties, boron carbide suffers from amorphization, a pressure-induced phenomenon that disturbs crystalline order and likely reduces shear strength. Numerous experimental and computational studies have investigated the structure and origins of amorphization, yet strategies to mitigate this deleterious phenomenon elude. However, recent investigations have revealed three new research avenues for addressing this issue. First, we identify crystallographic cage spaces that may accommodate foreign atoms to potentially prevent structural collapse. Second, we propose polymorph-level tailoring through strict control of processing conditions. Finally, we demonstrate that reducing grain size to nanometer scale increases hardness and may counter amorphization.

  19. Characterization of plastic and boron carbide additive manufactured neutron collimators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, M. B.; Siddel, D. H.; Elliott, A. M.; Anderson, D.; Abernathy, D. L.

    2017-12-01

    Additive manufacturing techniques allow for the production of materials with complicated geometries with reduced costs and production time over traditional methods. We have applied this technique to the production of neutron collimators for use in thermal and cold neutron scattering instrumentation directly out of boron carbide. We discuss the design and generation of these collimators. We also provide measurements at neutron scattering beamlines which serve to characterize the performance of these collimators. Additive manufacturing of parts using neutron absorbing material may also find applications in radiography and neutron moderation.

  20. Kerma factors in interaction of neutrons with boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondarenko, I.M.

    1979-01-01

    Heat generation in neutron interactions with boron carbide B 10 ; B 11 and 12 C is calculated. Kerma-factors (kerma-kinetic energy released in materials) were calculated for neutron energies between 10 -4 eV and 15 MeV. No major simplifying assumptions are introduced, and the accuracy of the calculated kerma-factors depends only on availability and accuracy of the basic nuclear data. The ENDF/B-4 data and recent experimental information are used for the calculation of kerma-factors. Plots of these kerma-factors are presented in units of eVxb/atom and wtxsec/(cmxn) as a function of neutron energy

  1. Superconductivity in heavily boron-doped silicon carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Kriener, Takahiro Muranaka, Junya Kato, Zhi-An Ren, Jun Akimitsu and Yoshiteru Maeno

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The discoveries of superconductivity in heavily boron-doped diamond in 2004 and silicon in 2006 have renewed the interest in the superconducting state of semiconductors. Charge-carrier doping of wide-gap semiconductors leads to a metallic phase from which upon further doping superconductivity can emerge. Recently, we discovered superconductivity in a closely related system: heavily boron-doped silicon carbide. The sample used for that study consisted of cubic and hexagonal SiC phase fractions and hence this led to the question which of them participated in the superconductivity. Here we studied a hexagonal SiC sample, free from cubic SiC phase by means of x-ray diffraction, resistivity, and ac susceptibility.

  2. Structural phase transitions in boron carbide under stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korotaev, P; Pokatashkin, P; Yanilkin, A

    2016-01-01

    Structural transitions in boron carbide B 4 C under stress were studied by means of first-principles molecular dynamics in the framework of density functional theory. The behavior depends strongly on degree of non-hydrostatic stress. Under hydrostatic stress continuous bending of the three-atom C–B–C chain was observed up to 70 GPa. The presence of non-hydrostatic stress activates abrupt reversible chain bending, which is displacement of the central boron atom in the chain with the formation of weak bonds between this atom and atoms in the nearby icosahedra. Such structural change can describe a possible reversible phase transition in dynamical loading experiments. High non-hydrostatic stress achieved in uniaxial loading leads to disordering of the initial structure. The formation of carbon chains is observed as one possible transition route. (paper)

  3. Preparation of fiber reinforced titanium diboride and boron carbide composite bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newkirk, L.R.; Riley, R.E.; Sheinberg, H.; Valencia, F.A.; Wallace, T.C.

    1979-01-01

    A process is described for uniformly infiltrating woven carbon cloth with either titanium diboride or boron carbide at reduced pressure (15 to 25 torr). The effects of deposition temperature on the uniformity of penetration and on coating rate are described for temperatures from 750 to 1000 0 C and deposit loadings from 20 to 43 vol. %. For the boron carbides, boron composition is discussed and evidence is presented suggesting that propene is the dominant rate controlling reactant

  4. Determination of isotopic composition of boron in boron carbide by TIMS and PIGE: an inter-comparison study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasibhushan, K.; Rao, R.M.; Parab, A.R.; Alamelu, D.; Aggarwal, S.K.; Acharya, R.; Chhillar, S.; Pujari, P.K.

    2015-01-01

    The paper reports a comparison of results on the determination of isotopic composition of boron in boron carbide (B 4 C) samples by Thermal Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (TIMS) and Particle Induced Gamma ray Spectrometry (PIGE). B 4 C samples having varying boron isotopic composition (natural, enriched with respect to 10 B) and their synthetic mixtures) have been analysed by both the techniques. The 10 B atom% was found to be in the range of 20-67%. (author)

  5. Size-scaling of tensile failure stress in boron carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wereszczak, Andrew A [ORNL; Kirkland, Timothy Philip [ORNL; Strong, Kevin T [ORNL; Jadaan, Osama M. [University of Wisconsin, Platteville; Thompson, G. A. [U.S. Army Dental and Trauma Research Detachment, Greak Lakes

    2010-01-01

    Weibull strength-size-scaling in a rotary-ground, hot-pressed boron carbide is described when strength test coupons sampled effective areas from the very small (~ 0.001 square millimeters) to the very large (~ 40,000 square millimeters). Equibiaxial flexure and Hertzian testing were used for the strength testing. Characteristic strengths for several different specimen geometries are analyzed as a function of effective area. Characteristic strength was found to substantially increase with decreased effective area, and exhibited a bilinear relationship. Machining damage limited strength as measured with equibiaxial flexure testing for effective areas greater than ~ 1 mm2 and microstructural-scale flaws limited strength for effective areas less than 0.1 mm2 for the Hertzian testing. The selections of a ceramic strength to account for ballistically-induced tile deflection and to account for expanding cavity modeling are considered in context with the measured strength-size-scaling.

  6. Frequency mixing in boron carbide laser ablation plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oujja, M.; Benítez-Cañete, A.; Sanz, M.; Lopez-Quintas, I.; Martín, M.; de Nalda, R.; Castillejo, M.

    2015-05-01

    Nonlinear frequency mixing induced by a bichromatic field (1064 nm + 532 nm obtained from a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser) in a boron carbide (B4C) plasma generated through laser ablation under vacuum is explored. A UV beam at the frequency of the fourth harmonic of the fundamental frequency (266 nm) was generated. The dependence of the efficiency of the process as function of the intensities of the driving lasers differs from the expected behavior for four-wave mixing, and point toward a six-wave mixing process. The frequency mixing process was strongly favored for parallel polarizations of the two driving beams. Through spatiotemporal mapping, the conditions for maximum efficiency were found for a significant delay from the ablation event (200 ns), when the medium is expected to be a low-ionized plasma. No late components of the harmonic signal were detected, indicating a largely atomized medium.

  7. Kerma factors in interaction of neutrons with boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondarenko, I.M.

    1986-03-01

    Heat generation in neutron interactions with boron carbide B 10 ; B 11 and 12 C is calculated. Kerma-factors (kerma-kinetic energy released in materials) were calculated for neutron energies between 10 -4 eV and 15 MeV. No major simplifying assumptions are introduced, and the accuracy of the calculated kerma-factors depends only on availability and accuracy of the basic nuclear data. The ENDF/B-4 data and recent experimental information are used for the calculation of kerma-factors. Plots of these kerma-factors are presented in units of eVxb/atom and wtxsec/(cmxn) as a function of neutron energy [fr

  8. Boron carbide-carbon composites and composites for cryogenic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheinberg, H.

    1979-01-01

    Because of its neutronic properties, high hardness, and high melting temperature, boron carbide (B 4 C) is widely used at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. However because of its hardness and mode of manufacture, it is expensive to machine finish to tight dimensional specifictions. For some neutronic applications, a density considerably below the theoretical 2.52 Mg/m 3 was acceptable, and this relaxation in density specification permitted addition of carbon as a second phase to reduce machining costs. We conducted an experimental program to prepare 50.8-mm-diam by 34.8-mm-thick cylinders of B 4 C and B 4 C-C composites with concentrations of carbon varying from 5.5 to 30 volume percent. Additionally we used three forms of carbon, natural flake graphite, synthetic graphite flour, and a fine furnace black as the source of the second phase. We determined the sound velocity, compressive strength, coefficient of thermal expansion, electrical resistivity, and microstructure as functions of composition. Additionally, an enriched boron ( 10 B)-carbon composite was studied as an alternate material

  9. Structural stability of boron carbide under pressure proven by spectroscopic studies up to 73 GPa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuvashova, Irina [Material Physics and Technology at Extreme Conditions, Laboratory of Crystallography, University of Bayreuth (Germany); Bayerisches Geoinstitut, University of Bayreuth (Germany); Gasharova, Biliana; Mathis, Yves-Laurent [IBPT, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); Dubrovinsky, Leonid [Bayerisches Geoinstitut, University of Bayreuth (Germany); Dubrovinskaia, Natalia [Material Physics and Technology at Extreme Conditions, Laboratory of Crystallography, University of Bayreuth (Germany)

    2017-11-17

    Being a material of choice for lightweight armor applications, boron carbide has been intensively studied. Its behavior under pressure was investigated using both theoretical and experimental methods, such as powder X-ray diffraction and vibrational spectroscopy. As there is a discrepancy in experimental observations, in the presented work we studied vibrational properties of commercially available, ''nearly stoichiometric'' B{sub 4}C using IR and Raman spectroscopy up to 73 GPa. No phase transitions were found in the entire pressure range. Our results are at odds with the recent report of a phase transition in B{sub 4.3}C at about 40 GPa. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  10. High pressure synthesis and investigations of properties of boron allotropes and boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuvashova, Irina

    2017-01-01

    This work aimed at the development of the high-pressure high-temperature (HPHT) synthesis of single crystals of boron allotropes and boron-rich compounds, which could be used further for precise investigations of their structures, properties, and behavior at extreme conditions. To summarize, the present work resulted in the HPHT synthesis of the first previously unknown non-icosahedral boron allotrope ζ-B. This finding confirmed earlier theoretical predictions, which stayed unproven for decades because of experimental challenges which couldn't be overcome until recently. Structural stability of α-B and β-B in the Mbar pressure range and B 13 C 2 up to 68 GPa was experimentally proven. Accurate measurements of the unit cell and B 12 icosahedra volumes of the stoichiometric boron carbide B 13 C 2 as a function of pressure led to conclusion that they undergo a similar reduction upon compression that is typical for covalently bonded solids. Neither 'molecular-like' nor 'inversed molecular-like' solid behavior upon compression was detected that has closed a long-standing scientific dispute. A comparison of the compressional behavior of B 13 C 2 with that of α-B and γ-B allotropes and B 4 C showed that it is determined by the types of bonding involved in the course of compression.

  11. High pressure synthesis and investigations of properties of boron allotropes and boron carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuvashova, Irina

    2017-06-12

    This work aimed at the development of the high-pressure high-temperature (HPHT) synthesis of single crystals of boron allotropes and boron-rich compounds, which could be used further for precise investigations of their structures, properties, and behavior at extreme conditions. To summarize, the present work resulted in the HPHT synthesis of the first previously unknown non-icosahedral boron allotrope ζ-B. This finding confirmed earlier theoretical predictions, which stayed unproven for decades because of experimental challenges which couldn't be overcome until recently. Structural stability of α-B and β-B in the Mbar pressure range and B{sub 13}C{sub 2} up to 68 GPa was experimentally proven. Accurate measurements of the unit cell and B{sub 12} icosahedra volumes of the stoichiometric boron carbide B{sub 13}C{sub 2} as a function of pressure led to conclusion that they undergo a similar reduction upon compression that is typical for covalently bonded solids. Neither 'molecular-like' nor 'inversed molecular-like' solid behavior upon compression was detected that has closed a long-standing scientific dispute. A comparison of the compressional behavior of B{sub 13}C{sub 2} with that of α-B and γ-B allotropes and B{sub 4}C showed that it is determined by the types of bonding involved in the course of compression.

  12. Effect of boron on the microstructure and mechanical properties of carbidic austempered ductile iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Yuncheng; Jin Huijin; Liu Jinhai; Li Guolu

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Boron are applied to carbidic austempered ductile iron (CADI). → Boron microalloying CADI is a new high hardenability of wear-resistant cast iron. → Addition of boron to CADI significantly improves hardenability. → Effect of boron on the CADI grinding ball were investigated. → Optimum property is obtained when boron content at 0.03 wt%. - Abstract: Carbidic austempered ductile iron (CADI) castings provide a unique combination of high hardness and toughness coupled with superior wear resistance properties, but their hardenability restricts their range of applications. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of boron on the microstructure and mechanical properties of CADI. The experimental results indicate that the CADI comprises graphite nodules, which are dispersive boron-carbides that are distributed in the form of strips, and the matrix is a typical ausferritic matrix. Microscopic amounts of boron can improve the hardenability of CADI, but higher boron content reduces the hardenability and toughness of CADI. The results are discussed in the context of the influence of boron content on the microstructure and mechanical properties of grinding balls.

  13. Lattice dynamics of {alpha} boron and of boron carbide; Proprietes vibrationnelles du bore {alpha} et du carbure de bore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vast, N

    1999-07-01

    The atomic structure and the lattice dynamics of {alpha} boron and of B{sub 4}C boron carbide have been studied by Density Functional Theory (D.F.T.) and Density Functional Perturbation Theory (D.F.P.T.). The bulk moduli of the unit-cell and of the icosahedron have been investigated, and the equation of state at zero temperature has been determined. In {alpha} boron, Raman diffusion and infrared absorption have been studied under pressure, and the theoretical and experimental Grueneisen coefficients have been compared. In boron carbide, inspection of the theoretical and experimental vibrational spectra has led to the determination of the atomic structure of B{sub 4}C. Finally, the effects of isotopic disorder have been modeled by an exact method beyond the mean-field approximation, and the effects onto the Raman lines has been investigated. The method has been applied to isotopic alloys of diamond and germanium. (author)

  14. Low-temperature synthesis of silicon carbide powder using shungite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gubernat, A.; Pichor, W.; Lach, R.; Zientara, D.; Sitarz, M.; Springwald, M.

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents the results of investigation the novel and simple method of synthesis of silicon carbide. As raw material for synthesis was used shungite, natural mineral rich in carbon and silica. The synthesis of SiC is possible in relatively low temperature in range 1500–1600°C. It is worth emphasising that compared to the most popular method of SiC synthesis (Acheson method where the temperature of synthesis is about 2500°C) the proposed method is much more effective. The basic properties of products obtained from different form of shungite and in wide range of synthesis temperature were investigated. The process of silicon carbide formation was proposed and discussed. In the case of synthesis SiC from powder of raw materials the product is also in powder form and not requires any additional process (crushing, milling, etc.). Obtained products are pure and after grain classification may be used as abrasive and polishing powders. (Author)

  15. Low-temperature synthesis of silicon carbide powder using shungite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gubernat, A.; Pichor, W.; Lach, R.; Zientara, D.; Sitarz, M.; Springwald, M.

    2017-07-01

    The paper presents the results of investigation the novel and simple method of synthesis of silicon carbide. As raw material for synthesis was used shungite, natural mineral rich in carbon and silica. The synthesis of SiC is possible in relatively low temperature in range 1500–1600°C. It is worth emphasising that compared to the most popular method of SiC synthesis (Acheson method where the temperature of synthesis is about 2500°C) the proposed method is much more effective. The basic properties of products obtained from different form of shungite and in wide range of synthesis temperature were investigated. The process of silicon carbide formation was proposed and discussed. In the case of synthesis SiC from powder of raw materials the product is also in powder form and not requires any additional process (crushing, milling, etc.). Obtained products are pure and after grain classification may be used as abrasive and polishing powders. (Author)

  16. Amorphisation of boron carbide under slow heavy ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gosset, D., E-mail: Dominique.gosset@cea.fr [CEA Saclay, DEN, DANS, DMN, SRMA, LA2M, Université Paris-Saclay, 91191, Gif/Yvette (France); Miro, S. [CEA Saclay, DEN, DANS, DMN, SRMP, Laboratoire JANNUS, Université Paris-Saclay, 91191, Gif/Yvette (France); Doriot, S. [CEA Saclay, DEN, DANS, DMN, SRMA, LA2M, Université Paris-Saclay, 91191, Gif/Yvette (France); Moncoffre, N. [CNRS/IN2P3/IPNL, 69622, Villeurbanne (France)

    2016-08-01

    Boron carbide B{sub 4}C is widely used as a neutron absorber in nuclear plants. Most of the post-irradiation examinations have shown that the structure of the material remains crystalline, in spite of very high atomic displacement rates. Here, we have irradiated B{sub 4}C samples with 4 MeV Au ions with different fluences at room temperature. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy have been performed. The Raman analyses show a high structural disorder at low fluence, around 10{sup −2} displacements per atoms (dpa). However, the TEM observations show that the material remains crystalline up to a few dpa. At high fluence, small amorphous areas a few nanometers large appear in the damaged zone but the long range order is preserved. Moreover, the size and density of the amorphous zones do not significantly grow when the damage increases. On the other hand, full amorphisation is observed in the implanted zone at a Au concentration of about 0.0005. It can be inferred from those results that short range and long range damages arise at highly different fluences, that heavy ions implantation has drastic effects on the structure stability and that in this material self-healing mechanisms are active in the damaged zone.

  17. Impact strength of sintered astaloy CrM powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazior, J.; Ploszczak, J.; Nykiel, M.; Pieczonka, T.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper results of a series of impact tests on sintered Astaloy CrM powders alloys modified by boron are presented and discussed. Boron in different forms, i.e. as elemental boron powder, boron carbide B 4 C powder or mixture of boron and carbon elemental powders, was used in different weight percentage to activate sintering of Astaloy CrM powder and to increase hardenability, with aim of increasing impact strength in view of structural applications. (author)

  18. Determination of boron in graphite, boron carbide and glass by ICP-MS, ICP-OES and conventional wet chemical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatesh, K.; Kamble, Granthali S.; Venkatesh, Manisha; Kumar, Sanjukta A.; Reddy, A.V.R.

    2014-01-01

    Boron is an important element of interest in nuclear reactor materials due to its high neutron absorption cross section (σ 0 =3837 barns for 10 B). In the present paper, R and D work and routinely used methods have been described for the analysis of case samples (1) Graphite where boron is present at trace levels, (2) Boron Carbide having boron concentration of about 80% and (3) Glass containing 4-6 % boron. (author)

  19. Boron Carbide: Stabilization of Highly-Loaded Aqueous Suspensions, Pressureless Sintering, and Room Temperature Injection Molding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Cano, Andres

    Boron carbide (B4C) is the third hardest material after diamond and cubic boron nitride. It's unique combination of properties makes B4C a highly valuable material. With hardness values around 35 MPa, a high melting point, 2450°C, density of 2.52 g/cm3, and high chemical inertness, boron carbide is used in severe wear components, like cutting tools and sandblasting nozzles, nuclear reactors' control rots, and finally and most common application, armor. Production of complex-shaped ceramic component is complex and represents many challenges. Present research presents a new and novel approach to produce complex-shaped B4C components. Proposed approach allows forming to be done at room temperatures and under very low forming pressures. Additives and binder concentrations are kept as low as possible, around 5Vol%, while ceramics loadings are maximized above 50Vol%. Given that proposed approach uses water as the main solvent, pieces drying is simple and environmentally safe. Optimized formulation allows rheological properties to be tailored and adjust to multiple processing approaches, including, injection molding, casting, and additive manufacturing. Boron carbide samples then were pressureless sintered. Due to the high covalent character of boron carbide, multiples sintering aids and techniques have been proposed in order to achieve high levels of densification. However, is not possible to define a clear sintering methodology based on literature. Thus, present research developed a comprehensive study on the effect of multiple sintering aids on the densification of boron carbide when pressureless sintered. Relative densities above 90% were achieved with values above 30MPa in hardness. Current research allows extending the uses and application of boron carbide, and other ceramic systems, by providing a new approach to produce complex-shaped components with competitive properties.

  20. Study of boron carbide evolution under neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simeone, D.

    1999-01-01

    Owing to its high neutron efficiency, boron carbide (B 4 C) is used as a neutron absorber in control rods of nuclear plants. Its behaviour under irradiation has been extensively studied for many years. It now seems clear that brittleness of the material induced by the 10 B(n,α) 7 Li capture reaction is due to penny shaped helium bubbles associated to a high strain field around them. However, no model explains the behaviour of the material under neutron irradiation. In order to build such a model, this work uses different techniques: nuclear microprobe X-ray diffraction profile analysis and Raman and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy to present an evolution model of B 4 C under neutron irradiation. The use of nuclear reactions produced by a nuclear microprobe such as the 7 Li(p,p'γ) 7 Li reaction, allows to measure lithium profile in B 4 C pellets irradiated either in Pressurised Water Reactors or in Fast Breeder Reactors. Examining such profiles enables us to describe the migration of lithium atoms out of B 4 C materials under neutron irradiation. The analysis of X-ray diffraction profiles of irradiated B 4 C samples allows us to quantify the concentrations of helium bubbles as well as the strain fields around such bubbles.Furthermore Raman spectroscopy studies of different B 4 C samples lead us to propose that under neutron irradiation. the CBC linear chain disappears. Such a vanishing of this CBC chain. validated by NMR analysis, may explain the penny shaped of helium bubbles inside irradiated B 4 C. (author)

  1. The All Boron Carbide Diode Neutron Detector: Experiment and Modeling Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabirianov, Ildar F.; Brand, Jennifer I.; Fairchild, Robert W.

    2008-01-01

    Boron carbide diode detectors, fabricated from two different polytypes of semiconducting boron carbide, will detect neutrons in reasonable agreement with theoretical expectations. The performance of the all boron carbide neutron detector differs, as expected, from devices where a boron rich neutron capture layer is distinct from the diode charge collection region (i.e. a conversion layer solid state detector). Diodes were fabricated from natural abundance boron (20% 10 B and 80% 11 B.) directly on the metal substrates and metal contacts applied to the films as grown. The total boron depth was on the order of 2 microns. This is clearly not a conversion-layer configuration. The diodes were exposed to thermal neutrons generated from a paraffin moderated plutonium-beryllium source in moderated and un-moderated, as well as shielded and unshielded experimental configurations, where the expected energy peaks at at 2.31 MeV and 2.8 MeV were clearly observed, albeit with some incomplete charge collection typical of thinner diode structures. The results are compared with other boron based thin film detectors and literature models. (authors)

  2. Evaluation of mechanical properties of aluminium alloy–alumina–boron carbide metal matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijaya Ramnath, B.; Elanchezhian, C.; Jaivignesh, M.; Rajesh, S.; Parswajinan, C.; Siddique Ahmed Ghias, A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Fabrication of MMC with aluminium alloy–alumina–boron carbide is done. • Different proportions of reinforcements are added. • The effects of varying proportions are studied. • Investigation on mechanical properties above composites is performed. • Failure morphology analysis is done using SEM. - Abstract: This paper deals with the fabrication and mechanical investigation of aluminium alloy, alumina (Al 2 O 3 ) and boron carbide metal matrix composites. Aluminium is the matrix metal having properties like light weight, high strength and ease of machinability. Alumina which has better wear resistance, high strength, hardness and boron carbide which has excellent hardness and fracture toughness are added as reinforcements. Here, the fabrication is done by stir casting which involves mixing the required quantities of additives into stirred molten aluminium. After solidification, the samples are prepared and tested to find the various mechanical properties like tensile, flexural, impact and hardness. The internal structure of the composite is observed using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM)

  3. Irradiation damage in boron carbide: point defects, clusters and helium bubbles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoto, T.; Zuppiroli, L.

    1986-06-01

    Boron carbide is a refractory hard and light material of interest in nuclear technology (fission and also fusion). Transmission electron microscopy was used to examine the properties of radiation induced damage. Firstly, the production of point defects and their clustering was studied in samples irradiated by 1 MeV electron in a high voltage electron microscope at selected temperatures from 12 K to 1000 K. Secondly, conventional transmission electron microscopy was used to understand the production of helium bubbles in neutron irradiated boron carbide and their role in the generation of microcracks. Finally, the interaction between point defects and bubbles was also examined

  4. Method of accurate thickness measurement of boron carbide coating on copper foil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacy, Jeffrey L.; Regmi, Murari

    2017-11-07

    A method is disclosed of measuring the thickness of a thin coating on a substrate comprising dissolving the coating and substrate in a reagent and using the post-dissolution concentration of the coating in the reagent to calculate an effective thickness of the coating. The preferred method includes measuring non-conducting films on flexible and rough substrates, but other kinds of thin films can be measure by matching a reliable film-substrate dissolution technique. One preferred method includes determining the thickness of Boron Carbide films deposited on copper foil. The preferred method uses a standard technique known as inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICPOES) to measure boron concentration in a liquid sample prepared by dissolving boron carbide films and the Copper substrates, preferably using a chemical etch known as ceric ammonium nitrate (CAN). Measured boron concentration values can then be calculated.

  5. Compaction of amorphous iron–boron powder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendriksen, Peter Vang; Mørup, Steen; Koch, Christian

    1993-01-01

    Large scale practical use of bulk amorphous alloys requires the capability of molding the material to a desired design, for instance by compaction of an amorphous powder. This is a difficult task because the sintering temperature is limited by the crystallization temperature of the alloy.1 Here we......, should facilitate a compaction. The passivation layer, however, impedes a compaction. Isostatic pressing at 540 K at a pressure of 200 MPa clearly illustrated this; pellets pressed from passivated powder were much more brittle than pellets pressed from unpassivated powder. The density of the pellets...... was very low ([approximately-equal-to]25% of the density of bulk FeB). We have designed a die for uniaxial pressing in which the compaction can be performed without exposing the powder to air and have obtained densities larger than 60% of that of bulk FeB. We have reported studies of the dependence...

  6. Friction and wear performance of diamond-like carbon, boron carbide, and titanium carbide coatings against glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniels, B.K.; Brown, D.W.; Kimock, F.M.

    1997-01-01

    Protection of glass substrates by direct ion beam deposited diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings was observed using a commercial pin-on-disk instrument at ambient conditions without lubrication. Ion beam sputter-deposited titanium carbide and boron carbide coatings reduced sliding friction, and provided tribological protection of silicon substrates, but the improvement factor was less than that found for DLC. Observations of unlubricated sliding of hemispherical glass pins at ambient conditions on uncoated glass and silicon substrates, and ion beam deposited coatings showed decreased wear in the order: uncoated glass>uncoated silicon>boron carbide>titanium carbide>DLC>uncoated sapphire. Failure mechanisms varied widely and are discussed. Generally, the amount of wear decreased as the sliding friction decreased, with the exception of uncoated sapphire substrates, for which the wear was low despite very high friction. There is clear evidence that DLC coatings continue to protect the underlying substrate long after the damage first penetrates through the coating. The test results correlate with field use data on commercial products which have shown that the DLC coatings provide substantial extension of the useful lifetime of glass and other substrates. copyright 1997 Materials Research Society

  7. Spectrophotometric determination of boric acid in boron powder with curcumin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grotheer, E.W.

    1979-01-01

    A rapid and accurate method was needed to determine trace amounts of boric acid for quality control and specification testing of elemental boron. The reaction between boric acid and curcumin occurs at a measurable rate only when the curcumin molecule is protonated. Protonation takes place at the carbonyl groups in the presence of a strong acid and occurs completely and rapidly when sulfuric acid is added to a solution of curcumin in acetic acid. Spectrophotometric measurements were made. The extraction of boric acid from boron powder was found to be complete within 2h when either water or the diol solution was used. Whatman No. 40 cr 42 filter paper was used to obtain diol samples free of boron particles. The extraction efficiency of 2-ethyl-1,3-hexanediol was evaluated by adding 1 ml of 500 ppM aqueous boric acid and 1 drop of 10% NaOH to accurately weighed samples of boron powder. The water then was evaporated at room temperature and the samples were extracted with diol solution. The data obtained are included. The extraction efficiency also was evaluated by determining the boric acid content of boron which had been recovered from a previous extraction and boric acid determination. The determination of boric acid using curcumin is unaffected by the presence of other compounds, except for fluoride and nitrate ions. 2 tables

  8. Successive carbon- and boron saturation of KhVG steel in powder mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alimov, Yu A; Gordienko, S I

    1975-01-01

    Method of successive saturation of KhVG steel with carbon and boron in powder mixtures is described. After carbonization of steel in a charcoal carburator at 930 deg C during 3 hrs a domain of equiaxial large grains is formed there the latter representing carbides of Fe/sub 3/C and (Fe, M)/sub 3/C. The increase of duration of carbonization up to 5 hrs and above results in formation of a cement grid greatly impairing the mechanical properties of the metal. Carbonization is followed by borating in powdered technical boron carbide at 900 deg C for 4 hrs which ensures formation on the sample surface of a borated layer with depth up to 65 mkm covering the carbonized zone. As followed from metallographic and x-ray structural analysis, the borated layer consists of boride needles with complex composition (Fe, Cr, Mn)B. Oil hardening of carbonized KhVG steel from 850 deg C and low-temperature tempering at 180 deg C for 1 hr results in formation in the main metal of martensite-carbide structure and, respectively, in the decrease of the microhardness gradient between the diffusion layers, as compared with borated KhVG steel. Operation tests of strengthened matrices of preforming machines under the conditions of application of dynamic pressing forces up to 1500 kg Fce/cm/sup 2/ demonstrated that the cyclical strength of carboborated coverings is 2.0-3.0 times higher than that of borated ones. The method of carboborating is recommended for strengthening the details of stamp and press tools.

  9. Evidence of amorphisation of B{sub 4}C boron carbide under slow, heavy ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gosset, D., E-mail: dominique.gosset@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DMN-SRMA-LA2M, F-91191 Gif/Yvette (France); Miro, S. [CEA, DEN, DMN-SRMP-JANNUS, F-91191 Gif/Yvette (France); Doriot, S. [CEA, DEN, DMN-SRMA-LA2M, F-91191 Gif/Yvette (France); Victor, G. [CNRS-IN2P3-IPNL, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Motte, V. [CEA, DEN, DMN-SRMA-LA2M, F-91191 Gif/Yvette (France)

    2015-12-15

    Boron carbide is widely used either as armor-plate or neutron absorber. In both cases, a good structural stability is required. However, a few studies have shown amorphisation may occur in severe conditions. Hard impacts lead to the formation of amorphous bands. Some irradiations in electronic regime with H or He ions have also shown amorphisation of the material. Most authors however consider the structure is not drastically affected by irradiations in the ballistic regime. Here, we have irradiated at room temperature dense boron carbide pellets with Au 4 MeV ions, for which most of the damage is in the ballistic regime. This study is part of a program devoted to the behavior of boron carbide under irradiation. Raman observations have been performed after the irradiations together with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Raman observations show a strong structural damage at moderate fluences (10{sup 14}/cm{sup 2}, about 0.1 dpa), in agreement with previous studies. On the other hand, TEM shows the structure remains crystalline up to 10{sup 15}/cm{sup 2} then partially amorphises. The amorphisation is heterogeneous, with the formation of nanometric amorphous zones with increasing density. It then appears short range and long range disorder occurs at quite different damage levels. Further experiments are in progress aiming at studying the structural stability of boron carbide and isostructural materials (α-B, B{sub 6}Si,…).

  10. Evaluation of Aluminum-Boron Carbide Neutron Absorbing Materials for Interim Storage of Used Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lumin [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Science; Wierschke, Jonathan Brett [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Science

    2015-04-08

    The objective of this work was to understand the corrosion behavior of Boral® and Bortec® neutron absorbers over long-term deployment in a used nuclear fuel dry cask storage environment. Corrosion effects were accelerated by flowing humidified argon through an autoclave at temperatures up to 570°C. Test results show little corrosion of the aluminum matrix but that boron is leaching out of the samples. Initial tests performed at 400 and 570°C were hampered by reduced flow caused by the rapid build-up of solid deposits in the outlet lines. Analysis of the deposits by XRD shows that the deposits are comprised of boron trioxide and sassolite (H3BO3). The collection of boron- containing compounds in the outlet lines indicated that boron was being released from the samples. Observation of the exposed samples using SEM and optical microscopy show the growth of new phases in the samples. These phases were most prominent in Bortec® samples exposed at 570°C. Samples of Boral® exposed at 570°C showed minimal new phase formation but showed nearly the complete loss of boron carbide particles. Boron carbide loss was also significant in Boral samples at 400°C. However, at 400°C phases similar to those found in Bortec® were observed. The rapid loss of the boron carbide particles in the Boral® is suspected to inhibit the formation of the new secondary phases. However, Material samples in an actual dry cask environment would be exposed to temperatures closer to 300°C and less water than the lowest test. The results from this study conclude that at the temperature and humidity levels present in a dry cask environment, corrosion and boron leaching will have no effect on the performance of Boral® and Bortec® to maintain criticality control.

  11. Evaluation of Aluminum-Boron Carbide Neutron Absorbing Materials for Interim Storage of Used Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Lumin; Wierschke, Jonathan Brett

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this work was to understand the corrosion behavior of Boral® and Bortec® neutron absorbers over long-term deployment in a used nuclear fuel dry cask storage environment. Corrosion effects were accelerated by flowing humidified argon through an autoclave at temperatures up to 570°C. Test results show little corrosion of the aluminum matrix but that boron is leaching out of the samples. Initial tests performed at 400 and 570°C were hampered by reduced flow caused by the rapid build-up of solid deposits in the outlet lines. Analysis of the deposits by XRD shows that the deposits are comprised of boron trioxide and sassolite (H 3 BO 3 ). The collection of boron- containing compounds in the outlet lines indicated that boron was being released from the samples. Observation of the exposed samples using SEM and optical microscopy show the growth of new phases in the samples. These phases were most prominent in Bortec® samples exposed at 570°C. Samples of Boral® exposed at 570°C showed minimal new phase formation but showed nearly the complete loss of boron carbide particles. Boron carbide loss was also significant in Boral samples at 400°C. However, at 400°C phases similar to those found in Bortec® were observed. The rapid loss of the boron carbide particles in the Boral® is suspected to inhibit the formation of the new secondary phases. However, Material samples in an actual dry cask environment would be exposed to temperatures closer to 300°C and less water than the lowest test. The results from this study conclude that at the temperature and humidity levels present in a dry cask environment, corrosion and boron leaching will have no effect on the performance of Boral® and Bortec® to maintain criticality control.

  12. Equations of state and melting curve of boron carbide in the high-pressure range of shock compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molodets, A. M., E-mail: molodets@icp.ac.ru; Golyshev, A. A.; Shakhrai, D. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Problems in Chemical Physics (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    We have constructed the equations of state for crystalline boron carbide B{sub 11}C (C–B–C) and its melt under high dynamic and static pressures. A kink on the shock adiabat for boron carbide has been revealed in the pressure range near 100 GPa, and the melting curve with negative curvature in the pressure range 0–120 GPa has been calculated. The results have been used for interpreting the kinks on the shock adiabat for boron carbide in the pressure range of 0–400 GPa.

  13. Tritium release from fast neutron irradiated boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollenberg, G.W.

    1977-01-01

    A high-energy neutron reaction with boron produces tritium. In the LMFBR control material, B 4 C, most of the tritium that is generated remains in the pellets. Potential retention mechanisms are discussed. 5 figures

  14. Chemical erosion of sintered boron carbide due to H+ impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, J.W.; Haasz, A.A.

    1990-06-01

    The production of hydrocarbons and boron hydrides due to H + bombardment of sintered B 4 C has been investigated as a function of sample temperature and incident ion energy. While hydrocarbon production was observed, the yields were approximately two orders of magnitude smaller than observed for graphite. There was no evidence to indicate the production of any volatile boron-containing compounds. (3 figs., 11 refs.)

  15. Defects in boron carbide: First-principles calculations and CALPHAD modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saengdeejing, Arkapol; Saal, James E.; Manga, Venkateswara Rao; Liu Zikui

    2012-01-01

    The energetics of defects in B 4+x C boron carbide and β-boron are studied through first-principles calculations, the supercell phonon approach and the Debye–Grüneisen model. It is found that suitable sublattice models for β-boron and B 4+x C are B 101 (B,C) 4 and B 11 (B,C) (B,C,Va) (B,Va) (B,C,Va), respectively. The thermodynamic properties of B 4+x C, β-boron, liquid and graphite are modeled using the CALPHAD approach based on the thermochemical data from first-principles calculations and experimental phase equilibrium data in the literature. The concentrations of various defects are then predicted as a function of carbon composition and temperature.

  16. Effect of material variables on the irradiation performance of boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basmajian, J.A.; Hollenberg, G.W.

    1980-01-01

    Boron carbide pellets were fabricated with variations in material parameters. These pellets were irradiated in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) to determine the effect of these variations on the performance. Helium release from the material and swelling of the pellets are the primary measures of performance. It was determined that material with a smaller grain size released more helium and swelled less. The pellets with boron-to-carbon ratios greater than 4 to 1 did not perform well. Iron additions improved the performance of the material while density variations had little effect

  17. Structural and electronic properties of boron-doped double-walled silicon carbide nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behzad, Somayeh, E-mail: somayeh.behzad@gmail.co [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Moradian, Rostam [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nano Science and Technology Research Center, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Computational Physical Science Research Laboratory, Department of Nano Science, Institute for Studies in Theoretical Physics and Mathematics (IPM), P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Chegel, Raad [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-12-01

    The effects of boron doping on the structural and electronic properties of (6,0)-(14,0) double-walled silicon carbide nanotube (DWSiCNT) are investigated by using spin-polarized density functional theory. It is found that boron atom could be more easily doped in the inner tube. Our calculations indicate that a Si site is favorable for B under C-rich condition and a C site is favorable under Si-rich condition. Additionally, B-substitution at either single carbon or silicon atom site in DWSiCNT could induce spontaneous magnetization.

  18. Structural and electronic properties of boron-doped double-walled silicon carbide nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behzad, Somayeh; Moradian, Rostam; Chegel, Raad

    2010-01-01

    The effects of boron doping on the structural and electronic properties of (6,0)-(14,0) double-walled silicon carbide nanotube (DWSiCNT) are investigated by using spin-polarized density functional theory. It is found that boron atom could be more easily doped in the inner tube. Our calculations indicate that a Si site is favorable for B under C-rich condition and a C site is favorable under Si-rich condition. Additionally, B-substitution at either single carbon or silicon atom site in DWSiCNT could induce spontaneous magnetization.

  19. Structural and electronic properties of boron-doped double-walled silicon carbide nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzad, Somayeh; Moradian, Rostam; Chegel, Raad

    2010-12-01

    The effects of boron doping on the structural and electronic properties of (6,0)@(14,0) double-walled silicon carbide nanotube (DWSiCNT) are investigated by using spin-polarized density functional theory. It is found that boron atom could be more easily doped in the inner tube. Our calculations indicate that a Si site is favorable for B under C-rich condition and a C site is favorable under Si-rich condition. Additionally, B-substitution at either single carbon or silicon atom site in DWSiCNT could induce spontaneous magnetization.

  20. Experimental determination of boron and carbon thermodynamic activities in the carbide phase of the boron-carbon system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froment, A.K.

    1990-01-01

    - The boron-carbon phase diagram presents a single phase area ranging from 9 to 20 atomic percent of carbon. The measurement of carbon activity, in this range of composition, has been measured according to the following methods: - quantitative analysis of the methane-hydrogen mixture in equilibrium with the carbide, - high temperature mass spectrometry measurements. The first method turned out to be a failure; however, the apparatus used enabled the elaboration of a B 4 C composition pure phase from a two-phase (B 4 C + graphite) industrial product. The results obtained with the other two methods are consistent and lead to a law expressing the increase of the carbon activity in relation with the amount of this element; the high temperature mass spectrometry method has also made it possible to measure the boron activity which decreases when the carbon activity increases, but with a variation of amplitude much lower, according to the theoretical calculations. These results are a first step towards the knowledge of the boron carbide thermodynamical data for compositions different from B 4 C [fr

  1. MC Carbide Characterization in High Refractory Content Powder-Processed Ni-Based Superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonov, Stoichko; Chen, Wei; Huo, Jiajie; Feng, Qiang; Isheim, Dieter; Seidman, David N.; Sun, Eugene; Tin, Sammy

    2018-04-01

    Carbide precipitates in Ni-based superalloys are considered to be desirable phases that can contribute to improving high-temperature properties as well as aid in microstructural refinement of the material; however, they can also serve as crack initiation sites during fatigue. To date, most of the knowledge pertaining to carbide formation has originated from assessments of cast and wrought Ni-based superalloys. As powder-processed Ni-based superalloys are becoming increasingly widespread, understanding the different mechanisms by which they form becomes increasingly important. Detailed characterization of MC carbides present in two experimental high Nb-content powder-processed Ni-based superalloys revealed that Hf additions affect the resultant carbide morphologies. This morphology difference was attributed to a higher magnitude of elastic strain energy along the interface associated with Hf being soluble in the MC carbide lattice. The composition of the MC carbides was studied through atom probe tomography and consisted of a complex carbonitride core, which was rich in Nb and with slight Hf segregation, surrounded by an Nb carbide shell. The characterization results of the segregation behavior of Hf in the MC carbides and the subsequent influence on their morphology were compared to density functional theory calculations and found to be in good agreement, suggesting that computational modeling can successfully be used to tailor carbide features.

  2. Development of a process to recover boron carbide from nuclear reactor absorber rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, C.; Lehnert, T.

    1991-01-01

    Boron carbide enriched with 10 B is used as a control rod in reactor engineering. At present spent rods are disposed of, although major amounts of 10 B are still 'unused'. The objective was to recover 10 B from the control rods by an energy and cost saving method in order to use it for making new control rods, thus saving raw materials and minimizing the radioactive waste volume. For this purpose, the well-known pyrohydrolysis process was taken and analysed for possible improvements. By mixing boron carbide with CO 2 as an oxidation-supporting agent, a lowering of the reaction temperature by 300deg C, and an increase in the oxidation speed by 350% were achieved. Since C0 2 is not consumed and can be circulated, the method for reprocessing spent control rods presented in this paper is both an economy-priced an energy-saving one. (orig.) With 98 refs., 9 tabs., 14 figs [de

  3. Role of intericosahedral chains on the hardness of sputtered boron carbide films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobsohn, L.G.; Averitt, R.D.; Wetteland, C.J.; Schulze, R.K.; Nastasi, M.; Daemen, L.L.; Jenei, Z.; Asoka-Kumar, P.

    2004-01-01

    The relationship between the structure and mechanical properties of sputter-deposited boron carbide films was investigated. Changes in the structure induced by annealing were characterized in terms of chemical composition, chemical bonding, and concentrations of defects and trapped impurities. The creation of intericosahedral chains for higher annealing temperatures was revealed by infrared and Raman measurements, and the intensity of the infrared band at 1500 cm-1 was found to be related to the hardness. The presence of residual trapped Ar atoms and of open-volume defects is insensitive to relatively high annealing temperatures and does not influence the recovery of the hardness. Our results suggest postdeposition annealing as a pathway to enhance the mechanical properties of boron carbide films

  4. Optimizing Grain Boundary Complexions to Produce Dense Pressure-Less Sintered Boron Carbide (B4C)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-14

    discontinuous distribution of the yttria. At this stage it is difficult to determine if the discontinuity is genuine or results from dewetting upon cooling...sample. However, the tendency of the film to form beads indicates a dewetting behavior. The weak interface between the yttria and the boron carbide...conform to the dewetting behavior. There is a possibility of a complexion transition as the sample is cooled down in the furnace. At high temperature the

  5. Thermal expansion measurements on boron carbide and europium sesquioxide by laser interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preston, S.D.

    1980-01-01

    A laser interferometer technique for measuring the absolute linear thermal expansion of small annular specimens is described. Results are presented for unirradiated boron carbide (B 4 C) and europia (Eu 2 O 3 ) up to 1000 0 C. Both compounds are neutron-absorbing materials of potential use in fast-reactor control rods and data on their thermophysical properties, in particular linear thermal expansion, are essential to the control rod designers. (author)

  6. Advanced Boron Carbide-Based Visual Obscurants for Military Smoke Grenades

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-13

    components on grenade burning time must be accounted for. Also, how these factors affect smoke cloud thickness and perceived visible obscuration...of Boron Carbide-Based Smoke Compositions. Propellants, Explos., Pyrotech. 2013, 38, 622-628. (30) Commission Internationale de l’Éclairage ( CIE ...volume, gives equation 2. Since αm is only a characteristic of the aerosol, it does not account for

  7. Structural modifications induced by ion irradiation and temperature in boron carbide B{sub 4}C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Victor, G., E-mail: g.victor@ipnl.in2p3.fr [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL), Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Pipon, Y.; Bérerd, N. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL), Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Institut Universitaire de Technologie (IUT) Lyon-1, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Toulhoat, N. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL), Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); CEA-DEN, Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Moncoffre, N. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL), Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Djourelov, N. [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tzarigradsko chaussee blvd, BG-1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); ELI-NP, IFIN-HH, 30 Reactorului Str, MG-6 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Miro, S. [CEA-DEN, Service de Recherches de Métallurgie Physique, Laboratoire JANNUS, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Baillet, J. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL), Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Pradeilles, N.; Rapaud, O.; Maître, A. [SPCTS, UMR CNRS 7315, Centre Européen de la céramique, University of Limoges (France); Gosset, D. [CEA, Saclay, DMN-SRMA-LA2M, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2015-12-15

    Already used as neutron absorber in the current French nuclear reactors, boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) is also considered in the future Sodium Fast Reactors of the next generation (Gen IV). Due to severe irradiation conditions occurring in these reactors, it is of primary importance that this material presents a high structural resistance under irradiation, both in the ballistic and electronic damage regimes. Previous works have shown an important structural resistance of boron carbide even at high neutron fluences. Nevertheless, the structural modification mechanisms due to irradiation are not well understood. Therefore the aim of this paper is to study structural modifications induced in B{sub 4}C samples in different damage regimes. The boron carbide pellets were shaped and sintered by using spark plasma sintering method. They were then irradiated in several conditions at room temperature or 800 °C, either by favoring the creation of ballistic damage (between 1 and 3 dpa), or by favoring the electronic excitations using 100 MeV swift iodine ions (S{sub e} ≈ 15 keV/nm). Ex situ micro-Raman spectroscopy and Doppler broadening of annihilation radiation technique with variable energy slow positrons were coupled to follow the evolution of the B{sub 4}C structure under irradiation.

  8. Structural modifications induced by ion irradiation and temperature in boron carbide B4C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victor, G.; Pipon, Y.; Bérerd, N.; Toulhoat, N.; Moncoffre, N.; Djourelov, N.; Miro, S.; Baillet, J.; Pradeilles, N.; Rapaud, O.; Maître, A.; Gosset, D.

    2015-12-01

    Already used as neutron absorber in the current French nuclear reactors, boron carbide (B4C) is also considered in the future Sodium Fast Reactors of the next generation (Gen IV). Due to severe irradiation conditions occurring in these reactors, it is of primary importance that this material presents a high structural resistance under irradiation, both in the ballistic and electronic damage regimes. Previous works have shown an important structural resistance of boron carbide even at high neutron fluences. Nevertheless, the structural modification mechanisms due to irradiation are not well understood. Therefore the aim of this paper is to study structural modifications induced in B4C samples in different damage regimes. The boron carbide pellets were shaped and sintered by using spark plasma sintering method. They were then irradiated in several conditions at room temperature or 800 °C, either by favoring the creation of ballistic damage (between 1 and 3 dpa), or by favoring the electronic excitations using 100 MeV swift iodine ions (Se ≈ 15 keV/nm). Ex situ micro-Raman spectroscopy and Doppler broadening of annihilation radiation technique with variable energy slow positrons were coupled to follow the evolution of the B4C structure under irradiation.

  9. Boron carbide-coated carbon material, manufacturing method therefor and plasma facing material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Takayuki; Kikuchi, Yoshihiro; Hyakki, Yasuo.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention concerns a plasma facing material suitable to a thermonuclear device. The material comprises a carbon material formed by converting the surface of a carbon fiber-reinforced carbon material comprising a carbon matrix and carbon fibers to a boron carbide, the material has a surface comprising vertically or substantially vertically oriented carbon fibers, and the thickness of the surface converted to boron carbide is reduced in the carbon fiber portion than in the carbon matrix portion. Alternatively, a carbon fiber-reinforced carbon material containing carbon fibers having a higher graphitizing degree than the carbon matrix is converted to boron carbide on the surface where the carbon fibers are oriented vertically or substantially vertically. The carbon fiber-reinforced material is used as a base material, and a resin material impregnated into a shaped carbon fiber product is carbonized or thermally decomposed carbon is filled as a matrix. The material of the present invention has high heat conduction and excellent in heat resistance thereby being suitable to a plasma facing material for a thermonuclear device. Electric specific resistivity of the entire coating layer can be lowered, occurrence of arc discharge is prevented and melting can be prevented. (N.H.)

  10. Thermal evolution behavior of carbides and γ′ precipitates in FGH96 superalloy powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lin; Liu Hengsan; He Xinbo; Rafi-ud-din; Qu Xuanhui; Qin Mingli; Li Zhou; Zhang Guoqing

    2012-01-01

    The characteristics of rapidly solidified FGH96 superalloy powder and the thermal evolution behavior of carbides and γ′ precipitates within powder particles were investigated. It was observed that the reduction of powder size and the increase of cooling rate had transformed the solidification morphologies of atomized powder from dendrite in major to cellular structure. The secondary dendritic spacing was measured to be 1.02–2.55 μm and the corresponding cooling rates were estimated to be in the range of 1.4 × 10 4 –4.7 × 10 5 K·s −1 . An increase in the annealing temperature had rendered the phase transformation of carbides evolving from non-equilibrium MC′ carbides to intermediate transition stage of M 23 C 6 carbides, and finally to thermodynamically stable MC carbides. The superfine γ′ precipitates were formed at the dendritic boundaries of rapidly solidified superalloy powder. The coalescence, growth, and homogenization of γ' precipitates occurred with increasing annealing temperature. With decreasing cooling rate from 650 °C·K −1 to 5 °C·K −1 , the morphological development of γ′ precipitates had been shown to proceed from spheroidal to cuboidal and finally to solid state dendrites. Meanwhile, a shift had been observed from dendritic morphology to recrystallized structure between 900 °C and 1050 °C. Moreover, accelerated evolution of carbides and γ' precipitates had been facilitated by the formation of new grain boundaries which provide fast diffusion path for atomic elements. - Highlights: ► Microstructural characteristic of FGH96 superalloy powder was investigated. ► The relation between microstructure, particle size, and cooling rate was studied. ► Thermal evolution behavior of γ′ and carbides in loose FGH96 powder was studied.

  11. Novel semiconducting boron carbide/pyridine polymers for neutron detection at zero bias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Echeverria, Elena; Enders, A.; Dowben, P.A. [University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Lincoln, NE (United States); James, Robinson; Chiluwal, Umesh; Gapfizi, Richard; Tae, Jae-Do; Driver, M. Sky; Kelber, Jeffry A. [University of North Texas, Department of Chemistry, Denton, TX (United States); Pasquale, Frank L. [University of North Texas, Department of Chemistry, Denton, TX (United States); Lam Research Corporation, PECVD Business Unit, Tualatin, OR (United States); Colon Santana, Juan A. [Center for Energy Sciences Research, Lincoln, NE (United States)

    2014-09-19

    Thin films containing aromatic pyridine moieties bonded to boron, in the partially dehydrogenated boron-rich icosahedra (B{sub 10}C{sub 2}H{sub X}), prove to be an effective material for neutron detection applications when deposited on n-doped (100) silicon substrates. The characteristic I-V curves for the heterojunction diodes exhibit strong rectification and largely unperturbed normalized reverse bias leakage currents with increasing pyridine content. The neutron capture generated pulses from these heterojunction diodes were obtained at zero bias voltage although without the signatures of complete electron-hole collection. These results suggest that modifications to boron carbide may result in better neutron voltaic materials. (orig.)

  12. The irradiation behaviour of boron carbide/graphite between 800 and 1,1000C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattenbach, K.; Hilgendorff, W.; Weiler, K.; Zimmermann, H.U.

    1975-01-01

    64 samples of boron carbide/graphite, a material used as burnable poison in high temperature reactors, were irradiated at temperatures between 800 and 1,100 0 C up to a fluence of 1-2 x 10 20 nvt. The following post-investigations were extended to dimensional measurements to determime a possible swelling or shrinking of the pellet, corrosion tests in completely desalinated water at 300 0 C, preparation of metallographic microsections to check for crack formation, determination of the helium hold back power and the thus involved gas chromatic analysis, as well as burn-up determinations by determining the boron 10/boron 11 ratio and the lithium concentration. (orig./LN) [de

  13. Surface modification of the hard metal tungsten carbide-cobalt by boron ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mrotchek, I.

    2007-01-01

    In the present thesis ion beam implantation of boron is studied as method for the increasement of the hardness and for the improvement of the operational characteristics of cutting tools on the tungsten carbide-cobalt base. For the boron implantation with 40 keV energy and ∼5.10 17 ions/cm 2 fluence following topics were shown: The incoerporation of boron leads to a deformation and remaining strain of the WC lattice, which possesses different stregth in the different directions of the elementary cell. The maximum of the deformation is reached at an implantation temperature of 450 C. The segregation of the new phases CoWB and Co 3 W was detected at 900 C implantation temperature. At lower temperatures now new phases were found. The tribological characteristics of WC-Co are improved. Hereby the maxiaml effect was measured for implantation temperatures from 450 C to 700 C: Improvement of the microhardness by the factor 2..2.5, improvement of the wear resistance by the factor 4. The tribological effects extend to larger depths than the penetration depth of the boron implantation profile. The detected property improvements of the hard metal H3 show the possibility of a practical application of boron ion implantation in industry. The effects essential for a wer decreasement are a hardening of the carbide phase by deformation of the lattice, a hardening of the cobalt binding material and the phase boundaries because of the formation of a solid solution of the implanted boron atoms in Co and by this a blocking of the dislocation movement and the rupture spreading under load

  14. Compatibility of heat resistant alloys with boron carbide, (4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, Sinichi; Saruta, Toru; Ooka, Kiichi; Tanaka, Isao; Aoyama, Isao

    1985-07-01

    This paper relates to the compatibility test of control rod sheath (Hastelloy XR alloy) and neutron absorber (boronated graphite) for the VHTR, which has been researched and developed by JAERI. The irradiation was conducted by using the OGL-1 irradiation facility in the JMTR in order to study reaction behaviour between Hastelloy XR alloy and boronated graphite as well as to determine a reaction barrier performance of refractory metal foils Nb, Mo, W and Re. Irradiation conditions were as follows. Neutron dose : 4.05 x 10 22 m -2 (E 18 m -2 (E > 0.16 pJ, 1 Mev). Helium coolant : Average temperature 855 0 C, Pressure 2.94 MPa, Total impurity concentration 400 kBq/m 3 . Irradiation time : 5.0 Ms (1390 hours). Post-irradiation examinations i.e. visual inspection, dimensional inspection, weight measurement, metallography, hardness test, morphological observations by SEM and analysis of element distributions by EPMA were carried out. In the result, reaction products of Hastelloy XR alloy were observed in the ellipsoidal form locally. These results were same as those of the out-of-pile tests. Obvious irradiation effects were not detectable but a little accelarated increase in reaction depth of Hastelloy XR alloy by heat effect of specimens was observed. The refractory metal foils had a good performance of reaction barrier between Hastelloy XR alloy and boronated graphite. Furthermore, movement of Ni, Fe and Cr in the reaction area of Hastelloy XR alloy, difference in the reaction depth of B and C, irradiation effects on diffusion coefficient, lithium production and heat effect are discussed. (author)

  15. Fabrication and thermal conductivity of boron carbide/copper cermet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Tadashi; Onose, Shoji

    1999-01-01

    Studies on fabrication and thermal conductivity of B 4 C/Cu cermet were made to obtain high performance neutron absorber materials for Liquid Metal-cooled Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR). A mixed powder of B 4 C and Cu was mechanically blended at high speed thereby a coating layer of Cu was formed on the surface of B 4 C powder. Then the B 4 C powder with Cu coating was hot pressed at temperatures from 950 to 1,050degC to form a B 4 C cermet. A high density B 4 C/Cu cermet with 70 vol% of B 4 C and relative density higher than 90% was successfully fabricated. In spite of the low volume fraction of Cu, the B 4 C/Cu cermet exhibited high thermal conductivity which originated from the existence of continuous metallic phase Cu in B 4 C/Cu cermet. (author)

  16. Dependence of some characteristics of granulated wurtzite boron nitride powders on conditions of their production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkogon, V.M.

    1986-01-01

    Compaction of wurtzite boron nitride powders (both pure and with plasticizers) by different methods is studied for its peculiarities. Compaction of powders in all cases is established to obey basic regularities of compaction. Such physical and technological characteristics of wurtzite boron nitride powders granulated after preliminary compaction as specific surface, bulk weight and yield point are studied. It is shown that properties of these powders depend on the method of their compaction prior to granulation. Powders produced after preliminary compaction of initial BN W powders under high static and dynamic pressures possess the best characteristics

  17. Creep behavior and wear resistance of Al 5083 based hybrid composites reinforced with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and boron carbide (B{sub 4}C)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alizadeh, Ali [Faculty of Materials & Manufacturing Processes, Malek-e-Ashtar University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abdollahi, Alireza, E-mail: alirezaabdollahi1366@gmail.com [Faculty of Materials & Manufacturing Processes, Malek-e-Ashtar University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Biukani, Hootan [Faculty of Engineering, South Tehran Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-11-25

    In the current research, aluminum based hybrid composite reinforced with boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was produced by powder metallurgy method. creep behavior, wear resistance, surface roughness, and hardness of the samples were investigated. To prepare the samples, Al 5083 powder was milled with boron carbide particles and carbon nanotubes using planetary ball mill under argon atmosphere with ball-to-powder weight ratio of 10:1 for 5 h. Afterwards, the milled powders were formed by hot press process at 380{sup °}C and then were sintered at 585{sup °}C under argon atmosphere for 2 h. There was shown to be an increase in hardness values of composite with an increase in B{sub 4}C content. The micrograph of worn surfaces indicate a delamination mechanism due to the presence of CNTs and abrasion mechanism in composite containing 10 vol.%B{sub 4}C. Moreover, it was shown that increasing B{sub 4}C content increases the wear resistance by 3 times under a load of 20 N and 10 times under a load of 10 N compared to CNTs-reinforced composite. surface roughness of the composite containing 5 vol.%CNT has shown to be more than other samples. The results of creep test showed that adding carbon nanotubes increases creep rate of Al 5083 alloy; however, adding B{sub 4}C decreases its creep rate. - Highlights: • Al 5083/(CNTs + B{sub 4}C) hybrid composite was produced by powder metallurgy method. • Creep behavior, wear resistance, surface roughness, and Hardness of samples were investigated. • Addition of CNTs to Al 5083 matrix reduces alloy hardness, wear resistance and creep strength. • By addition of B{sub 4}C and composite hybridization, creep strength and wear resistance increased. • Surface roughness of Al-5 vol.%CNT has shown to be more than other samples.

  18. Comparative studies of electrochemical properties of carbon nanotubes and nanostructured boron carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Paviter; Kaur, Gurpreet; Singh, Kulwinder; Singh, Bikramjeet; Kaur, Manjot; Kumar, Manjeet; Bala, Rajni; Kumar, Akshay

    2018-05-01

    Boron carbide (B4C) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have the potential to act as electrocatalyst as these material show bifunctional behavior. B4C and CNTs were synthesized using solvothermal method. B4C display great catalytic activity as compared to CNTs. Raman spectra confirmed the formation of nanostructured carbon nanotubes. The observed onset potential was smaller 1.58 V in case of B4C as compared to CNTs i.e. 1.96 V in cyclic voltammetry. B4C material can emerge as a promising bifunctional electrocatalyst for battery applications.

  19. Determination of nitrogen in boron carbide with the Leco UO-14 Nitrogen Determinator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, R.D.; Ashley, W.H.; Henicksman, A.L.

    1977-11-01

    Use of various metals as fluxes for releasing nitrogen from boron carbide in the Leco Nitrogen Determinator was investigated. Metals such as iron, chromium, and molybdenum that wet the graphite crucible all promoted nitrogen release. Tin, copper, aluminum, and platinum did not wet the graphite and were of no value as fluxes. A procedure for sample handling and the resulting performance of the method are described. The precision at 0.06 to 0.6 percent nitrogen averaged 4 percent relative standard deviation

  20. Thick boron carbide coatings for protection of tokamak first wall and divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buzhinskij, O.I.; Semenets, Yu.M.

    1999-01-01

    A review of characteristics of various types of boron carbide coatings considered as candidate materials for protection of tokamak inner surfaces against high energy heat fluxes is presented. Such coatings are produced by various methods: chemical vapor deposition by means of chloride and fluoride techniques, gas conversion, plasma spray and reaction-sintering. Contrary to pure carbon materials, B 4 C has much lower chemical and high-temperature sputtering, is capable to oxygen gettering and lower hydrogen recycling. In contrast to thin boronization films, the thick coatings can resist high heat fluxes such as in tokamak divertors. Comparative analysis shows that coatings produced by the diffusion methods, such as fluoride CVD and gas conversion, are more resistent to heat loads, and one of the most promising candidates are the fluoride CVD coatings. (orig.)

  1. Microscopic origin of the composition-dependent change of the thermal conductivity in boron carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emin, D.; Howard, I.A.; Green, T.A.; Beckel, C.L.

    1987-01-01

    Large grain polycrystalline boron carbides have a high-temperature thermal conductivity which changes from being characteristic of a crystal to being glass-like as the carbon content is reduced from its maximal value. We relate this phenomenon, to compositional changes within the three-atom intericosahedral chains. With a reduction of the carbon concentration from its maximal concentration (20%), a carbon atom within some of the three-atoms (CBC) intericosahedral chains is replaced by a boron atom, thereby producing CBB chains. We estimate that the CBB chains are significantly softer than the CBC chains. Thus, with this reduction of carbon content the intericosahedral chains are inhomogeneously softened. This suppresses the coherent transport of heat through the chains. The remaining thermal transport occurs incoherently through vibrationally inequivalent structural units, i.e. ''phonon hopping.''

  2. Laser cladding of Ti-6Al-4V with various carbide powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Folkes, J.A.; Shibata, K.

    1994-01-01

    Laser cladding Ti-6Al-4V can be achieved with various weight percentages of different carbide powders. The microstructure and morphology of the clad layer is determined by the cladding powder composition, for a given set of laser parameters, such that 10 and 20 wt% Cr 3 C 2 results in a β + TiC clad microstructure; 10 and 20 wt% WC results in an α + TiC clad microstructure (plus some original WC); and Mo 2 C gives an α + β + TiC or β + TiC structure, depending on the weight percentage of Mo 2 C. The morphology of the TiC in all cases is dendritic or feathery, depending on the carbide content. The microstructure observed in all cases agreed well with that theoretically predicted from the energetics of carbide formation and β-stabilizing properties of each element

  3. Morphological variants of carbides of solidification origin in the rapidly solidified powder particles of hypereutectic iron alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusy, M.; Grgac, P.; Behulova, M.; Vyrostkova, A.; Miglierini, M.

    2004-01-01

    The paper deals with the analysis of the morphological variants of solidification microstructures and vanadium rich M 4 C 3 carbide phases in the rapidly solidified (RS) powder particles from hypereutectic Fe-C-Cr-V alloy prepared by the nitrogen gas atomisation. Five main types of solidification microstructures were identified in RS particles: microstructure with globular carbides, microstructure with globular and star-like carbides, microstructure with primary carbides in the centres of eutectic colonies, microstructure with eutectic colonies without primary carbides and microstructure with eutectic spherulites. Based on the morphological features of carbide phases and the thermal history of RS particles, the microstructures were divided into two groups - microstructures morphologically affected and non-affected during the post-recalescence period of solidification. Thermophysical reasons for the morphologically different M 4 C 3 carbide phases development in the RS powder particles are discussed

  4. The optical properties of boron carbide near boron K-edge inside periodical multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ksenzov, Dmitriy; Schlemper, Christoph; Pietsch, Ullrich [University of Siegen (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Multilayer mirrors made for the use in the wavelength range near K-edge of boron (188 eV) are of great interest for X-ray fluorescence analysis of boron content in doped semiconductors, plasma diagnostics, astronomy and lithography. Moreover, multilayer mirrors composed by a metal and a low Z element like boron are used as optical elements in both the soft x-ray spectral range as well as at higher photon energies on 3rd generation synchrotron beamlines. Using an energy-resolved photon-in-photon-out method we reconstructed the optical data from energy dependence of both integrated peak intensity and FWHM of the 1st order ML Bragg peak measured at the UHV triple axis soft-x-ray reflectometer at BESSY II. The experiments clearly demonstrate that the peak shape of the ML Bragg peak is most sensitive to any kind of electronic excitation and recombination in solid. The soft-ray reflectivity can give detailed information for MLs with thickness up to several tens of nanometers. In addition, measurements close to a resonance edge probe the chemical state of the respective constituent accompanied with a high sensitivity of changes close to the sample surface.

  5. The role of free carbon in the transport and magnetic properties of boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandyopadhyay, A.K.; Beuneu, F.; Zuppiroli, L.; Beauvy, M.

    1984-01-01

    Boron carbide is a ceramic which has a wide field of application because of its mechanical and nuclear properties. This material is difficult to characterise due to the presence of different levels of disorder and inhomogeneities which are found in the usual available samples. The transport and magnetic properties of several samples of boron carbide have been measured from liquid helium to room temperature as a function of temperature and composition. We have attempted to attribute the different features of these properties to the different levels of disorder. The role of free carbon, in form of thin layers of graphite within the disordered semi-conducting matrix, was investigated in particular details, because it was either ignored or neglected by others. Free carbon is found to dominate the D.C. transport when its concentration is larger than 5%; while the principal features of the electron spin resonance (E.S.R.) line show a dominance of free carbon when the concentration is larger than 3.5%. Below these concentrations conductivities as well as spin relaxation rates do not depend very much on free carbon; neither these have been found to be correlated in a simple way to the stoichiometry. (author)

  6. Dynamic Failure and Fragmentation of a Hot-Pressed Boron Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Tomoko; Vargas-Gonzalez, Lionel; LaSalvia, Jerry; Hogan, James David

    2017-12-01

    This study investigates the failure and fragmentation of a hot-pressed boron carbide during high rate impact experiments. Four impact experiments are performed using a composite-backed target configuration at similar velocities, where two of the impact experiments resulted in complete target penetration and two resulted in partial penetration. This paper seeks to evaluate and understand the dynamic behavior of the ceramic that led to either the complete or partial penetration cases, focusing on: (1) surface and internal failure features of fragments using optical, scanning electron, and transmission electron microscopy, and (2) fragment size analysis using state-of-the-art particle-sizing technology that informs about the consequences of failure. Detailed characterization of the mechanical properties and the microstructure is also performed. Results indicate that transgranular fracture was the primary mode of failure in this boron carbide material, and no stress-induced amorphization features were observed. Analysis of the fragment sizes for the partial and completely penetrated experiments revealed a possible correlation between larger fragment sizes and impact performance. The results will add insight into designing improved advanced ceramics for impact protection applications.

  7. Studies on the structure of zirconium carbide powders subjected to vibration grinding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kravchik, A.E.; Neshpor, V.S.

    1976-01-01

    The present work is a study of zirconium carbide powders subjected to vibratory milling in various media. The powders were comminuted in air (dry milling), benzene, trichloroethylene, and distilled water. The milling time was 10-160 h. The chemical compositions, specific surfaces, and crystal lattice parameters of the powder in the initial condition and after milling for 100 h in the various media are given. Vibratory milling of zirconium carbide powder can be successfully performed in benzene. Comminution in benzene enables a large specific surface to be attained, with practically no chemical reaction between the medium and the milling products. In milling in trichloroethylene the latter decomposes, with the formation of hydrochloric acid which reacts with the milling products. In a study of the fine structure parameters of zirconium carbide in the , , and directions the smallest crystal lattice strains and block sizes were observed in the direction. This may be taken as evidence that under such disintegration conditions the (110) planes constitute cleavage planes. An evaluation of internal and surface energies established that the strained crystal lattice energy reaches values which must be allowed for in any subsequent uses of the powder

  8. Synthesis of niobium carbide by a high energy milling technique of powder metallurgy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonello, Rodrigo Tecchio; Gonzalez, Cezar Henrique; Urtiga Filho, Severino Leopoldino; Araujo Filho, Oscar Olimpio de; Ambrozio Filho, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work is to obtain and characterize the Niobium Carbide (NbC) by a suitable high energy milling technique using a SPEX Mill vibratory type and niobium and carbon (graphite) powders. Since this carbide is scarced in the national market and it's necessary to apply this NbC as a reinforcement in two molybdenum high speed steels (AISI M2 and AISI M3:2) object of another work motivated this research. The powders were submitted to a high energy milling procedure for suitable times and conditions and then were characterized by means of Scanning Electronic Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (DRX) techniques. The ball-to-powder weight ratio was 10:1. The analysed samples showed that the high-energy milling is an alternative route of the NbC synthesis. (author)

  9. Synthesis of niobium carbide (NbC) by powder metallurgy high energy milling technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonello, Rodrigo Tecchio; Urtiga Filho, Severino Leopoldino; Araujo Filho, Oscar Olimpio de; Ambrozio Filho, Francisco; Gonzalez, Cezar Henrique

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this work is to obtain and characterize the Niobium Carbide (NbC) by a suitable high energy milling technique using a SPEX Mill vibratory type and niobium and carbon (graphite) powders. Since this carbide is scarce in the national market and it's necessary to apply this NbC as a reinforcement in two molybdenum high speed steels (AISI M2 and AISI M3:2) object of another work motivated this research. The powders were submitted to a high energy milling procedure for suitable times and conditions and then were characterized by means of Scanning Electronic Microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (DRX) techniques. The ball-to-powder weight ratio was 10:1. The analysed samples showed that the high-energy milling is an alternative route of the NbC synthesis. (author)

  10. ELASTO-PLASTIC DEFORMATION OF COMPOSITE POWDERS WITH LAYERED CARBON AND CARBIDE-FORMING ELEMENT COATING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Kovalevsky

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Coating structure formation under magnetron spraying of titanium and carbon cathodes and combined cathodes, namely cobalt (EP 131 – nickel, tungsten – carbon have been investigated under conditions of carbide separate synthesis within the temperature range of 650–1200 °C. Usage of cobalt and nickel particles as matrix material leads to their rapid thermal expansion under heating during sintering process in the dilatometer. Subsequent plastic deformation of sintered samples provides obtaining a composite powder material that is a composite with framing structure of cobalt, titanium and tungsten carbides in the coatings.

  11. Studies on the influence of surface pre-treatments on electroless copper coating of boron carbide particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deepa, J.P.; Resmi, V.G.; Rajan, T.P.D.; Pavithran, C.; Pai, B.C.

    2011-01-01

    Boron carbide is one of the hard ceramic particles which find application as structural materials and neutron shielding material due to its high neutron capture cross section. Copper coating on boron carbide particle is essential for the synthesis of metal-ceramic composites with enhanced sinterability and dispersibility. Surface characteristics of the substrate and the coating parameters play a foremost role in the formation of effective electroless coating. The effect of surface pre-treatment conditions and pH on electroless copper coating of boron carbide particles has been studied. Surface pre-treatement of B 4 C when compared to acid treated and alkali treated particles were carried out. Uniform copper coating was observed at pH 12 in alkali treated particles when compared to others due to the effective removal of inevitable impurities during the production and processing of commercially available B 4 C. A threshold pH 11 was required for initiation of copper coating on boron carbide particles. The growth pattern of the copper coating also varies depending on the surface conditions from acicular to spherical morphology.

  12. Structural models of increasing complexity for icosahedral boron carbide with compositions throughout the single-phase region from first principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ektarawong, A.; Simak, S. I.; Alling, B.

    2018-05-01

    We perform first-principles calculations to investigate the phase stability of boron carbide, concentrating on the recently proposed alternative structural models composed not only of the regularly studied B11Cp (CBC) and B12(CBC), but also of B12(CBCB) and B12( B4 ). We find that a combination of the four structural motifs can result in low-energy electron precise configurations of boron carbide. Among several considered configurations within the composition range of B10.5C and B4C , we identify in addition to the regularly studied B11Cp (CBC) at the composition of B4C two low-energy configurations, resulting in a new view of the B-C convex hull. Those are [B12 (CBC)]0.67[B12(B4)] 0.33 and [B12 (CBC)]0.67[ B12 (CBCB)]0.33, corresponding to compositions of B10.5C and B6.67C , respectively. As a consequence, B12(CBC) at the composition of B6.5C , previously suggested in the literature as a stable configuration of boron carbide, is no longer part of the B -C convex hull. By inspecting the electronic density of states as well as the elastic moduli, we find that the alternative models of boron carbide can provide a reasonably good description for electronic and elastic properties of the material in comparison with the experiments, highlighting the importance of considering B12(CBCB) and B12( B4 ), together with the previously proposed B11Cp (CBC) and B12(CBC), as the crucial ingredients for modeling boron carbide with compositions throughout the single-phase region.

  13. Detection of a leaking boron-carbide control rod in a TRIGA Mark I reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blotcky, A J; Arsenault, L J [General Medical Research, Veterans Administration Hospital, Omaha (United States)

    1974-07-01

    During a routine quarterly inspection of the boron-carbide control rods of the Omaha Veterans Administration Hospital 18 kW Triga Mark I reactor, a pin hole leak was detected approximately 3 mm from the chamfered edge. The leak was found by observing bubbles when the rod was withdrawn from the reactor tank for visual observation, and could not be seen with the naked eye. This suggests that pin hole leaks could occur and not be visually detected in control rods and fuel elements examined underwater. A review of the rod calibrations showed that the leak had not caused a loss in rod worth. Slides will be presented showing the bubbles observed during the inspection, together with an unmagnified and magnified view of the pin hole. (author)

  14. Detection of a leaking boron-carbide control rod in a TRIGA Mark I reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blotcky, A.J.; Arsenault, L.J.

    1974-01-01

    During a routine quarterly inspection of the boron-carbide control rods of the Omaha Veterans Administration Hospital 18 kW Triga Mark I reactor, a pin hole leak was detected approximately 3 mm from the chamfered edge. The leak was found by observing bubbles when the rod was withdrawn from the reactor tank for visual observation, and could not be seen with the naked eye. This suggests that pin hole leaks could occur and not be visually detected in control rods and fuel elements examined underwater. A review of the rod calibrations showed that the leak had not caused a loss in rod worth. Slides will be presented showing the bubbles observed during the inspection, together with an unmagnified and magnified view of the pin hole. (author)

  15. Fine defective structure of silicon carbide powders obtained from different starting materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomila T.V.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The fine defective structure of silicon carbide powders obtained from silicic acid-saccharose, aerosil-saccharose, aerosil-carbon black, and hydrated cellulose-silicic acid gel systems was investigated. The relation between IR absorption characteristics and the microstructure of SiC particles obtained from different starting materials was established. The numerical relationship between the lattice parameter a and the frequency νTO is presented.

  16. High pressure sintering (HP-HT) of diamond powders with titanium and titanium carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaworska, L.

    1999-01-01

    Polycrystalline diamond compacts for cutting tools are mostly manufactured using high pressure sintering (HP-HT). The standard diamond compacts are prepared by diamond powders sintering with metallic binding phase. The first group of metallic binder are metals able to solve carbon - Co, Ni. The second group of metal binders are carbide forming elements - Ti, Cr, W and others. The paper describes high pressure sintering of diamond powder with titanium and nonstoichiometry titanium carbide for cutting tool application. A type of binding phase has the significant influence on microstructure and mechanical properties of diamond compacts. Very homogeneous structure was achieved in case of compacts obtained from metalized diamond where diamond-TiC-diamond connection were predominant. In the case of compacts prepared by mechanical mixing of diamond with titanium powders the obtained structure was nonhomogeneous with titanium carbide clusters. They had more diamond to diamond connections. These compacts compared to the compact made of metallized diamond have greater wear resistance. In the case of the diamond and TiC 0.92 sintering the strong bonding of TiC diamond grains was obtained. The microstructure observations for diamond with 5% wt. Ti and diamond with 5% wt. TiC 0.92 (the initial composition) compacts were performed in transmission microscope. For two type of compacts the strong bonding phase TiC without defects is creating. (author)

  17. Control of core structure in MgB{sub 2} wire through tailoring boron powder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeda, Minoru, E-mail: maeda.minoru70@nihon-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics, College of Science and Technology, Nihon University, 1-8-14 Kanda-Surugadai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-8308 (Japan); Uchiyama, Daisuke [Department of Physics, College of Science and Technology, Nihon University, 1-8-14 Kanda-Surugadai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-8308 (Japan); Hossain, Md Shahriar Al; Ma, Zongqing [Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials, University of Wollongong, North Wollongong, New South Wales 2500 (Australia); Shahabuddin, Mohammed [Department of Physics and Astronomy, College of Science, King Saud University, P.O. Box 2455, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Kim, Jung Ho, E-mail: jhk@uow.edu.au [Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials, University of Wollongong, North Wollongong, New South Wales 2500 (Australia)

    2015-07-05

    Highlights: • The typical void structure in the wire is obtained by using large-sized B powder. • In contrast, void alignment can be achieved by using fine B powder. • The sintering at lower temperatures improves the critical current density in fields. - Abstract: A common fabrication process for MgB{sub 2} wire, namely, the in situ powder-in-tube process, forms numerous voids within the wire core, and void formation cannot be completely avoided. The orientation is, however, known to be aligned more or less along the current-flow direction when ductile coarse magnesium powder is used as a precursor, and further tailoring approaches could open up the way to improving the transport critical current density. Herein, we have used boron powders with different particle sizes, in combination with the coarse magnesium powder, and evaluated their size effects on the phase composition, microstructure, and transport properties. A mixture of the coarse magnesium powder with large-sized boron powder in the wire core, after cold working and sintering, forms a granular morphology. In contrast, an aligned core appears during the reduction process for wire which is prepared by using fine boron powder. The sintering process, especially at a low temperature, where magnesium evaporation hardly occurs, yields an aligned structure, mainly consisting of MgB{sub 2} phase, along the wire direction. These findings demonstrate that the initial size of the starting materials is critical for the tailored structure.

  18. Effects of heat treatment on the microstructure of amorphous boron carbide coating deposited on graphite substrates by chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Siwei; Zeng Bin; Feng Zude; Liu Yongsheng; Yang Wenbin; Cheng Laifei; Zhang Litong

    2010-01-01

    A two-layer boron carbide coating is deposited on a graphite substrate by chemical vapor deposition from a CH 4 /BCl 3 /H 2 precursor mixture at a low temperature of 950 o C and a reduced pressure of 10 KPa. Coated substrates are annealed at 1600 o C, 1700 o C, 1800 o C, 1900 o C and 2000 o C in high purity argon for 2 h, respectively. Structural evolution of the coatings is explored by electron microscopy and spectroscopy. Results demonstrate that the as-deposited coating is composed of pyrolytic carbon and amorphous boron carbide. A composition gradient of B and C is induced in each deposition. After annealing, B 4 C crystallites precipitate out of the amorphous boron carbide and grow to several hundreds nanometers by receiving B and C from boron-doped pyrolytic carbon. Energy-dispersive spectroscopy proves that the crystallization is controlled by element diffusion activated by high temperature annealing, after that a larger concentration gradient of B and C is induced in the coating. Quantified Raman spectrum identifies a graphitization enhancement of pyrolytic carbon. Transmission electron microscopy exhibits an epitaxial growth of B 4 C at layer/layer interface of the annealed coatings. Mechanism concerning the structural evolution on the basis of the experimental results is proposed.

  19. Stereological analysis of structure formation for solid WC-Co alloys in the process of carbide powder consolidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chernyavskij, K S

    1986-03-01

    Evolution of particle size distribution in carbide powders of different technological prehistory is studied in the process of their consolidation as a hard alloy. A successive estimate on identical preparations is used to study a structural powder->alloy transition. Temperature dependences of integral measures of the consolidated structure and characteristics of its heterogeneity are studied. It is shown that all studied structural rearrangements: formation of regular alternation of carbide and binding phases, development of particle-phase interfaces, change in size distribution - more intensely proceed in the high-temperature carbide base alloy.

  20. Design of boron carbide-shielded irradiation channel of the outer irradiation channel of the Ghana Research Reactor-1 using MCNP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrefah, R G; Sogbadji, R B M; Ampomah-Amoako, E; Birikorang, S A; Odoi, H C; Nyarko, B J B

    2011-01-01

    The MCNP model for the Ghana Research Reactor-1 was redesigned to incorporate a boron carbide-shielded irradiation channel in one of the outer irradiation channels. Extensive investigations were made before arriving at the final design of only one boron carbide covered outer irradiation channel; as all the other designs that were considered did not give desirable results of neutronic performance. The concept of redesigning a new MCNP model, which has a boron carbide-shielded channel is to equip the Ghana Research Reactor-1 with the means of performing efficient epithermal neutron activation analysis. After the simulation, a comparison of the results from the original MCNP model for the Ghana Research Reactor-1 and the new redesigned model of the boron carbide shielded channel was made. The final effective criticality of the original MCNP model for the GHARR-1 was recorded as 1.00402 while that of the new boron carbide designed model was recorded as 1.00282. Also, a final prompt neutron lifetime of 1.5245 × 10(-4)s was recorded for the new boron carbide designed model while a value of 1.5571 × 10(-7)s was recorded for the original MCNP design of the GHARR-1. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Study of nano-metric silicon carbide powder sintering. Application to fibers processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malinge, A.

    2011-01-01

    Silicon carbide ceramic matrix composites (SiCf/SiCm) are of interest for high temperature applications in aerospace or nuclear components for their relatively high thermal conductivity and low activation under neutron irradiation. While most of silicon carbide fibers are obtained through the pyrolysis of a poly-carbo-silane precursor, sintering of silicon carbide nano-powders seems to be a promising route to explore. For this reason, pressureless sintering of SiC has been studied. Following the identification of appropriate sintering aids for the densification, optimization of the microstructure has been achieved through (i) the analysis of the influence of operating parameters and (ii) the control of the SiC β a SiC α phase transition. Green fibers have been obtained by two different processes involving the extrusion of SiC powder dispersion in polymer solution or the coagulation of a water-soluble polymer containing ceramic particles. Sintering of these green fibers led to fibers of around fifty microns in diameter. (author) [fr

  2. Effect of the reinforced boron carbide particulate content of AA6061 alloy on formation of the passive film in seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katkar, V.A.; Gunasekaran, G.; Rao, A.G.; Koli, P.M.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Presence of boron carbide increases the corrosion rate of A6061 alloy in seawater. → Increasing the B 4 C content decreases passive layer thickness. → Passive films formed on A6061 and its B 4 C composites are n-type semiconductors. - Abstract: The effect of boron carbide (B 4 C) reinforcement on the corrosion of AA6061 alloy was studied by investigating passive films formed in seawater. The higher passive current and its potential-dependence for these composites indicated formation of porous passive film. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) graph suggests that the alloy surface is partly or totally active. The formed passive film is n-type semiconductor junction in nature. The difference between corrosion potential (E corr ) and potential at zero charge (PZC) suggests that the chloride ions responsible for film breakdown exist within the passive film. A suitable mechanism is proposed for the passive film breakdown.

  3. Development of nano-structured silicon carbide ceramics: from synthesis of the powder to sintered ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reau, A.

    2008-12-01

    The materials used inside future nuclear reactors will be subjected to very high temperature and neutrons flux. Silicon carbide, in the form of SiC f /SiC nano-structured composite is potentially interesting for this type of application. It is again necessary to verify the contribution of nano-structure on the behaviour of this material under irradiation. To verify the feasibility and determine the properties of the matrix, it was envisaged to produce it by powder metallurgy from SiC nanoparticles. The objective is to obtain a fully dense nano-structured SiC ceramic without additives. For that, a parametric study of the phases of synthesis and agglomeration was carried out, the objective of which is to determine the active mechanisms and the influence of the key parameters. Thus, studying the nano-powder synthesis by laser pyrolysis allowed to produce, with high production rates, homogeneous batches of SiC nanoparticles whose size can be adjusted between 15 and 90 nm. These powders have been densified by an innovating method: Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS). The study and the optimization of the key parameters allowed the densification of silicon carbide ceramic without sintering aids while preserving the nano-structure of material. The thermal and mechanical properties of final materials were studied in order to determine the influence of the microstructure on their properties. (author)

  4. Surface impurity removal from DIII-D graphite tiles by boron carbide grit blasting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, R.L.; Hollerbach, M.A.; Holtrop, K.L.; Kellman, A.G.; Taylor, P.L.; West, W.P.

    1993-11-01

    During the latter half of 1992, the DIII-D tokamak at General Atomics (GA) underwent several modifications of its interior. One of the major tasks involved the removal of accumulated metallic impurities from the surface of the graphite tiles used to line the plasma facing surfaces inside of the tokamak. Approximately 1500 graphite tiles and 100 boron nitride tiles from the tokamak were cleaned to remove the metallic impurities. The cleaning process consisted of several steps: the removed graphite tiles were permanently marked, surface blasted using boron carbide (B 4 C) grit media (approximately 37 μm. diam.), ultrasonically cleaned in ethanol to remove loose dust, and outgassed at 1000 degrees C. Tests were done using, graphite samples and different grit blaster settings to determine the optimum propellant and abrasive media pressures to remove a graphite layer approximately 40-50 μm deep and yet produce a reasonably smooth finish. EDX measurements revealed that the blasting technique reduced the surface Ni, Cr, and Fe impurity levels to those of virgin graphite. In addition to the surface impurity removal, tritium monitoring was performed throughout the cleaning process. A bubbler system was set up to monitor the tritium level in the exhaust gas from the grit blaster unit. Surface wipes were also performed on over 10% of the tiles. Typical surface tritium concentrations of the tiles were reduced from about 500 dpm/100 cm 2 to less than 80 dpm/100 cm 2 following the cleaning. This tile conditioning, and the installation of additional graphite tiles to cover a high fraction of the metallic plasma facing surfaces, has substantially reduced metallic impurities in the plasma discharges which has allowed rapid recovery from a seven-month machine opening and regimes of enhanced plasma energy confinement to be more readily obtained. Safety issues concerning blaster operator exposure to carcinogenic metals and radioactive tritium will also be addressed

  5. Porosity determination of alumina and boron carbide ceramic samples by gamma ray transmission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreira, Anderson Camargo; Appoloni, Carlos Roberto

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this work is to apply the Gamma Ray Transmission (GRT), a non destructive technique, for structural characterization of ceramic samples. With this technique, the porosity of Alumina (Al 2 O 3 ) and Boron Carbide (B 4 C) ceramic samples, in tablet format, was determined. The equipment employed is constituted by a 241 Am gamma ray source (59.6 keV and 100mCi), a 2''x2'' diameter NaI (Tl) scintillation detector coupled to a standard gamma ray transmission electronic and a micrometric and automated table for sample movement. The porosity profile of the samples shows a homogeneous porosity distribution, within the spatial resolution of the employed transmission system. The mean porosity determined for Al 2 O 3 and B 4 C were 17.8±1.3% and 3.87±0.43%, respectively. A statistical treatment of these results was performed and showed that the mean porosity values determinate by the GRT are the same as those supplied by the manufacturer. (author)

  6. Boron carbide reinforced aluminium matrix composite: Physical, mechanical characterization and mathematical modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirvanimoghaddam, K.; Khayyam, H.; Abdizadeh, H.; Karbalaei Akbari, M.; Pakseresht, A.H.; Ghasali, E.; Naebe, M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the manufacturing of aluminium–boron carbide composites using the stir casting method. Mechanical and physical properties tests to obtain hardness, ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and density are performed after solidification of specimens. The results show that hardness and tensile strength of aluminium based composite are higher than monolithic metal. Increasing the volume fraction of B_4C, enhances the tensile strength and hardness of the composite; however over-loading of B_4C caused particle agglomeration, rejection from molten metal and migration to slag. This phenomenon decreases the tensile strength and hardness of the aluminium based composite samples cast at 800 °C. For Al-15 vol% B_4C samples, the ultimate tensile strength and Vickers hardness of the samples that were cast at 1000 °C, are the highest among all composites. To predict the mechanical properties of aluminium matrix composites, two key prediction modelling methods including Neural Network learned by Levenberg–Marquardt Algorithm (NN-LMA) and Thin Plate Spline (TPS) models are constructed based on experimental data. Although the results revealed that both mathematical models of mechanical properties of Al–B_4C are reliable with a high level of accuracy, the TPS models predict the hardness and tensile strength values with less error compared to NN-LMA models.

  7. Characterizing the Effect of Laser Power on Laser Metal Deposited Titanium Alloy and Boron Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinlabi, E. T.; Erinosho, M. F.

    2017-11-01

    Titanium alloy has gained acceptance in the aerospace, marine, chemical, and other related industries due to its excellent combination of mechanical and corrosion properties. In order to augment its properties, a hard ceramic, boron carbide has been laser cladded with it at varying laser powers between 0.8 and 2.4 kW. This paper presents the effect of laser power on the laser deposited Ti6Al4V-B4C composites through the evolving microstructures and microhardness. The microstructures of the composites exhibit the formation of α-Ti phase and β-Ti phase and were elongated towards the heat affected zone. These phases were terminated at the fusion zone and globular microstructures were found growing epitaxially just immediately after the fusion zone. Good bondings were formed in all the deposited composites. Sample A1 deposited at a laser power of 0.8 kW and scanning speed of 1 m/min exhibits the highest hardness of HV 432 ± 27, while sample A4 deposited at a laser power of 2.0 kW and scanning speed of 1 m/min displays the lowest hardness of HV 360 ± 18. From the hardness results obtained, ceramic B4C has improved the mechanical properties of the primary alloy.

  8. Properties of p-type amorphous silicon carbide window layers prepared using boron trifluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gandia, J J [Inst. de Energias Renovables, CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Gutierrez, M T [Inst. de Energias Renovables, CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Carabe, J [Inst. de Energias Renovables, CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain)

    1993-03-01

    One set (A) of undoped and three sets (B, C and D) of doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide samples have been made in the framework of a research plan for obtaining high quality p-type window layers by radiofrequency glow discharge of silane-based gas mixtures. The samples of sets A and B were made using different RF-power-density to mass-flow ratios for various methane percentages in the gas mixture. The best carbon incorporation in the amorphous silicon lattice was obtained at the highest RF-power density. The properties of sets C and D, prepared using different RF-power densities and silane and methane proportions have been analysed as functions of the concentration of boron trifluoride with respect to silane. In both cases, the optical gap E[sub G], after a slight initial decrease, remains at a value of approximately 2.1 eV without quenching in the doping ranges covered. The best conductivity obtained is 2x10[sup -7] ([Omega] cm)[sup -1]. IR spectra allow to associate these features with the structural quality of the films. (orig.)

  9. Neutron shielding behavior of thermoplastic natural rubber/boron carbide composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mat Zali, Nurazila; Yazid, Hafizal; Megat Ahmad, Megat Harun Al Rashid

    2018-01-01

    Many shielding materials have been designed against the harm of different types of radiation to the human body. Today, polymer-based lightweight composites have been chosen by the radiation protection industry. In the present study, thermoplastic natural rubber (TPNR) composites with different weight percent of boron carbide (B4C) fillers (0% to 30%) were fabricated as neutron shielding through melt blending method. Neutron attenuation properties of TPNR/B4C composites have been investigated. The macroscopic cross section (Σ), half value layer (HVL) and mean free path length (λ) of the composites have been calculated and the transmission curves have been plotted. The obtained results show that Σ, HVL and λ greatly depend on the B4C content. Addition of B4C fillers into TPNR matrix were found to enhance the macroscopic cross section values thus decrease the mean free path length (λ) and half value layer (HVL) of the composites. The transmission curves exhibited that the neutron transmission of the composites decreased with increasing shielding thickness. These results showed that TPNR/B4C composites have high potential for neutron shielding applications.

  10. Effect of mechanical and thermal loading on boron carbide particles reinforced Al-6061 alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manjunatha, B.; Niranjan, H.B.; Satyanarayana, K.G.

    2015-01-01

    Metal Matrix Composites (MMC) considered as one of the ‘advanced materials’ have evoked growing interest during the last three decades due to their high performance and applications in strategic sectors. These composites exhibit unique and attractive properties over the monolithic alloys, but suffer from low ductility, which makes them not so attractive for some of the applications where high toughness is one of the design criteria. This limitation of MMCs has been overcome by resorting to various treatments such as mechanical and thermal loading. Considering very limited reports available on Al alloy reinforced with boron carbide (B 4 C) particles, this paper presents (i) preparation of Al-6061 alloy reinforced with 1.5–10 wt% B 4 C, (ii) subjecting them to mechanical and thermal treatments and (iii) characterization of all the above samples. Specific ultimate tensile strength and hardness of all the composites were higher than those of matrix. Also, these values increased with increasing amount of particles, with composites containing 8 wt% B 4 C showing the maximum values in all the three conditions. These observations are supported by the uniform distribution of particles in the matrix as observed in their microstructure

  11. X-ray powder diffraction analysis of liquid-phase-sintered silicon carbide ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz, A.L.; Sanchez-Bajo, F. [Universidad de Extremadura, Badajoz (Spain). Dept. de Electronica e Ingenieria Electromecanica; Cumbrera, F.L. [Universidad de Extremadura, Badajoz (Spain). Dept. de Fisica

    2002-07-01

    In an attempt to gain a comprehensive understanding of the microstructural evolution in liquid-phase-sintered silicon carbide ceramics, the effect of the starting {beta}-SiC powder has been studied. Pellets of two different {beta}-SiC starting powders were sintered with simultaneous additions of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} at 1950 C for 1 hour in flowing argon atmosphere. Here we have used X-ray diffraction to obtain the relative abundance of the resulting SiC polytypes after sintering. The significant influence of the defects concentration on the {beta} to {alpha} transformation rate has been determined using the Rietveld method. (orig.)

  12. Hydrothermal development and characterization of the wear-resistant boron carbide from Pandanus: a natural carbon precursor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saritha Devi, H. V.; Swapna, M. S.; Ambadas, G.; Sankararaman, S.

    2018-04-01

    Boron carbide (B4C) is a prominent semiconducting material that finds applications in the field of science and technology. The excellent physical, thermal and electronic properties make it suitable as ceramic armor, wear-resistant, lens polisher and neutron absorber in the nuclear industry. The existing methods of synthesis of boron carbide involve the use of toxic chemicals that adversely affect the environment. In the present work, we report for the first time the use of the hydrothermal method, for converting the cellulose from Pandanus leaves as the carbon precursor for the synthesis of B4C. The carbon precursor is changed into porous functionalized carbon by treating with sodium borohydride (NaBH4), followed by treating with boric acid to obtain B4C. The samples are characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared, Raman, photoluminescent and Ultraviolet-Visible absorption spectroscopy. The formation of B4C from natural carbon source— Pandanus presents an eco-friendly, economic and non-toxic approach for the synthesis of refractory carbides.

  13. Investigation of effects of boron additives and heat treatment on carbides and phase transition of highly alloyed duplex cast iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasgin, Yahya; Kaplan, Mehmet; Yaz, Mehmet

    2009-01-01

    The effect of boron additives and heat treatment on the microstructural morphology of the transition zone in a duplex cast iron, which has an outer shell of white cast iron (with a high Cr-content and containing boron additives) and an inner side composed of normal gray cast iron, has been investigated. For this purpose, two experimental materials possessing different compositions of white-gray duplex cast iron were produced. Subsequently, metallographic investigations were carried out to study the effect of heat treatment applied to the experimental materials by using the scanning electron microscopy technique, along with optical microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Moreover, the formation of various phases and carbide composites in the samples and their effects on the hardness were also investigated using X-ray diffraction techniques. The results of investigations, and hardness showed that addition of the elements Cr and B to high-alloyed white cast iron affected carbide formation significantly, while simultaneously hardening the microstructure, and consequently the carbide present in the transition area of white-gray cast iron was spread out and became thinner. However, B additives and heat treatment did not cause any damage to the transition region of high Cr-content duplex cast iron.

  14. Sintering of nano crystalline α silicon carbide by doping with boron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    tions, they concluded that either reaction sintering or liquid phase .... α-6H silicon carbide single crystal by three different laboratories ... silicon carbide particles by the overall reaction .... layer displacement is likely to occur in such a manner as.

  15. Characterization of boron carbide particulate reinforced in situ copper surface composites synthesized using friction stir processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sathiskumar, R., E-mail: sathiscit2011@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Coimbatore Institute of Technology, Coimbatore, 641 014 Tamil Nadu (India); Murugan, N., E-mail: murugan@cit.edu.in [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Coimbatore Institute of Technology, Coimbatore, 641 014 Tamil Nadu (India); Dinaharan, I., E-mail: dinaweld2009@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, V V College of Engineering, Tisaiyanvilai, 627 657 Tamil Nadu (India); Vijay, S.J., E-mail: vijayjoseph@karunya.edu [Centre for Research in Metallurgy (CRM), School of Mechanical Sciences, Karunya University, Coimbatore, 641 114 Tamil Nadu (India)

    2013-10-15

    Friction stir processing has evolved as a novel solid state technique to fabricate surface composites. The objective of this work is to apply the friction stir processing technique to fabricate boron carbide particulate reinforced copper surface composites and investigate the effect of B{sub 4}C particles and its volume fraction on microstructure and sliding wear behavior of the same. A groove was prepared on 6 mm thick copper plates and packed with B{sub 4}C particles. The dimensions of the groove was varied to result in five different volume fractions of B{sub 4}C particles (0, 6, 12, 18 and 24 vol.%). A single pass friction stir processing was done using a tool rotational speed of 1000 rpm, travel speed of 40 mm/min and an axial force of 10 kN. Metallurgical characterization of the Cu/B{sub 4}C surface composites was carried out using optical microscope and scanning electron microscope. The sliding wear behavior was evaluated using a pin-on-disk apparatus. Results indicated that the B{sub 4}C particles significantly influenced the area, dispersion, grain size, microhardness and sliding wear behavior of the Cu/B{sub 4}C surface composites. When the volume fraction of B{sub 4}C was increased, the wear mode changed from microcutting to abrasive wear and wear debris was found to be finer. Highlights: • Fabrication of Cu/B{sub 4}C surface composite by friction stir processing • Analyzing the effect of B{sub 4}C particles on the properties of Cu/B4C surface composite • Increased volume fraction of B{sub 4}C particles reduced the area of surface composite. • Increased volume fraction of B{sub 4}C particles enhanced the microhardness and wear rate. • B{sub 4}C particles altered the wear mode from microcutting to abrasive.

  16. The Promotion of Liquid Phase Sintering of Boron-Containing Powder Metallurgy Steels by Adding Nickel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Ming-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Boron is a feasible alloying element for liquid phase sintering (LPS of powder metallurgy (PM steels. This study investigated the effect of nickel (Ni, which is widely used in PM steels, on the liquid phase sintering of boron-containing PM steels. The results showed that the addition of 1.8wt% Ni does not apparently modify the LPS mechanism of boron-containing PM steels. However, adding 1.8wt% Ni slightly improves the LPS densification from 0.60 g/cm3 to 0.65 g/cm3, though the green density is reduced. Thermodynamic simulation demonstrated that the presence of Ni lowers the temperature region of liquid formation, resulting in enhanced LPS densification. Moreover, original graphite powders remains in the steels sintered at 1200 ºC. These graphite powders mostly dissolve into the base iron powder when the sintering temperature is increased from 1200 ºC to 1250 ºC.

  17. Method for producing dysprosium-iron-boron alloy powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camp, F.E.; Wooden, S.A.

    1989-01-01

    A method for producing a dysprosium-iron alloy adapted for use in the manufacture of rare-earth element containing, iron-boron permanent magnets, the method including providing a particle mixture comprising dysprosium oxide, iron and calcium, compacting the particle mixture to produce a consolidated article, heating the article for a time at temperature to form a metallic compound comprising dysprosium and iron and to form calcium oxide, producing a particle mass of -35 mesh from the compact, washing the particle mass with water at a temperature no greater than 10 0 C to react to the calcium and to the calcium oxide therewith to form a calcium hydroxide, while preventing oxidation of the particle mass, and removing the calcium hydroxide from the particle mass

  18. Growth of boron doped hydrogenated nanocrystalline cubic silicon carbide (3C-SiC) films by Hot Wire-CVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawbake, Amit [School of Energy Studies, Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune 411 007 (India); Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Colaba, Mumbai 400 005 (India); Mayabadi, Azam; Waykar, Ravindra; Kulkarni, Rupali; Jadhavar, Ashok [School of Energy Studies, Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune 411 007 (India); Waman, Vaishali [Modern College of Arts, Science and Commerce, Shivajinagar, Pune 411 005 (India); Parmar, Jayesh [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Colaba, Mumbai 400 005 (India); Bhattacharyya, Somnath [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, IIT Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Ma, Yuan‐Ron [Department of Physics, National Dong Hwa University, Hualien 97401, Taiwan (China); Devan, Rupesh; Pathan, Habib [Department of Physics, Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune 411007 (India); Jadkar, Sandesh, E-mail: sandesh@physics.unipune.ac.in [Department of Physics, Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune 411007 (India)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Boron doped nc-3C-SiC films prepared by HW-CVD using SiH{sub 4}/CH{sub 4}/B{sub 2}H{sub 6}. • 3C-Si-C films have preferred orientation in (1 1 1) direction. • Introduction of boron into SiC matrix retard the crystallanity in the film structure. • Film large number of SiC nanocrystallites embedded in the a-Si matrix. • Band gap values, E{sub Tauc} and E{sub 04} (E{sub 04} > E{sub Tauc}) decreases with increase in B{sub 2}H{sub 6} flow rate. - Abstract: Boron doped nanocrystalline cubic silicon carbide (3C-SiC) films have been prepared by HW-CVD using silane (SiH{sub 4})/methane (CH{sub 4})/diborane (B{sub 2}H{sub 6}) gas mixture. The influence of boron doping on structural, optical, morphological and electrical properties have been investigated. The formation of 3C-SiC films have been confirmed by low angle XRD, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy and high resolution-transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) analysis whereas effective boron doping in nc-3C-SiC have been confirmed by conductivity, charge carrier activation energy, and Hall measurements. Raman spectroscopy and HR-TEM analysis revealed that introduction of boron into the SiC matrix retards the crystallanity in the film structure. The field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and non contact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) results signify that 3C-SiC film contain well resolved, large number of silicon carbide (SiC) nanocrystallites embedded in the a-Si matrix having rms surface roughness ∼1.64 nm. Hydrogen content in doped films are found smaller than that of un-doped films. Optical band gap values, E{sub Tauc} and E{sub 04} decreases with increase in B{sub 2}H{sub 6} flow rate.

  19. Fabrication and tribological response of aluminium 6061 hybrid composite reinforced with bamboo char and boron carbide micro-fillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chethan, K. N.; Pai, Anand; Keni, Laxmikant G.; Singhal, Ashish; Sinha, Shubham

    2018-02-01

    Metal matrix composites (MMCs) have a wide scope of industrial applications and triumph over conventional materials due to their light weight, higher specific strength, good wear resistance and lower coefficient of thermal expansion. The present study aims at establishing the feasibility of using Bamboo charcoal particulate and boron carbide as reinforcements in Al-6061 alloy matrix and to investigate their effect on the wear of composites taking into consideration the interfacial adhesion of the reinforcements in the alloy. Al-6061 alloy was chosen as a base metallic alloy matrix. Sun-dried bamboo canes were used for charcoal preparation with the aid of a muffle furnace. The carbon content in the charcoal samples was determined by EDS (energy dispersive spectroscopy). In present study, stir casting technique was used to prepare the samples with 1%, 2%, and 3% weight of bamboo charcoal and boron carbide with Al-6061. The fabricated composites were homogenised at 570°C for 6 hours and cooled at room temperature. Wear studies were carried out on the specimens with different speed and loads. It was found that wear rate and coefficient of friction decreased with increase in the reinforcement content.

  20. Effect of sintering temperature and boron carbide content on the wear behavior of hot pressed diamond cutting segments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Islak S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of sintering temperature and boron carbide content on wear behavior of diamond cutting segments. For this purpose, the segments contained 2, 5 and 10 wt.% B4C were prepared by hot pressing process carried out under a pressure of 35 MPa, at 600, 650 and 700 °C for 3 minutes. The transverse rupture strength (TRS of the segments was assessed using a three-point bending test. Ankara andesite stone was cut to examine the wear behavior of segments with boron carbide. Microstructure, surfaces of wear and fracture of segments were determined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM-EDS, and X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis. As a result, the wear rate decreased significantly in the 0-5 wt.% B4C contents, while it increased in the 5-10 wt.% B4C contents. With increase in sintering temperature, the wear rate decreased due to the hard matrix.

  1. Characterization and evaluation of boron carbide for plate-impact conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmquist, T. J.; Johnson, G. R.

    2006-01-01

    This article addresses the response of boron carbide (B 4 C) to high-velocity impact. The authors previously characterized this material in 1999, using the Johnson-Holmquist [AIP Conf. Proc. 309, 981 (1994)] (JH-2) model. Since then, there have been additional experimental data presented in the literature that better describe the hydrostatic pressure (including a phase change). In addition, a series of plate-impact experiments (one-dimensional, uniaxial strain) that used configurations that produced either a shock, a shock release, or a shock reshock was performed. These experiments provide material behavior regarding the damage, failed strength, and hydrostat for which previously there has been little or no data. Constitutive model constants were obtained for the Johnson-Holmquist-Beissel [J. Appl. Phys. 94, 1639 (2003)] model using some of these plate-impact experiments. Computations of all the experiments were performed and analyzed to better understand the material response. The analysis provided the following findings: (1) The material fails and loses strength when the Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL) is exceeded. (2) The material has significant strength after failure and gradually increases as the pressure increases. (3) The shear modulus does not degrade when the material fails (as has been postulated), but rather increases. (4) When the material is reloaded from an initial shocked (failed) state, the loading appears to be elastic, indicating the material is not on the yield surface after failure. To provide more insight into the behavior of B 4 C, the strength versus pressure response was compared to that of silicon carbide (SiC). The strength of SiC increases as the pressure increases beyond the HEL, probably due to pressure hardening or strain hardening. It appears that B 4 C does not experience any hardening effects and fails at the HEL. Although the HEL for B 4 C is higher than that of SiC, the hardening ability of SiC produces a similar maximum strength

  2. Thermo-Mechanical Properties of Unsaturated Polyester Reinforced with SiliconCarbide Powder And with Chopped Glass Fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bushra Hosnie Musa

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The work studied the effectoffine silicon carbide (SiC powder with (0,3,5,7wt % on the thermal conductivity and mechanical properties of unsaturated polyester composite in the presence of a fixed amount of chopped glass fiber. The hand lay-up technique was employed to preparethe required samples. Results showed that tensile, impact strength and thermal conductivity increased with increasing the weight fraction of reinforced materials.

  3. Synthesis of nano-sized amorphous boron powders through active dilution self-propagating high-temperature synthesis method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jilin [The State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); Gu, Yunle [School of Material Science and Engineering, Wuhan Institute of Technology, Wuhan 430073 (China); Li, Zili [The State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); Wang, Weimin, E-mail: wangwm@hotmail.com [The State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); Fu, Zhengyi [The State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2013-06-01

    Graphical abstract: Nano-sized amorphous boron powders were synthesized by active dilution self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) method. The effects of endothermic reaction rate, the possible chemical reaction mechanism and active dilution model for synthesis of the product were also discussed. Highlights: ► Nano-sized amorphous boron powders were synthesized by active dilution self-propagating high-temperature synthesis method. ► The morphology, particle size and purity of the samples could be effectively controlled via changing the endothermic rate. ► The diluter KBH{sub 4} played an important role in active dilution synthesis of amorphous nano-sized boron powders. ► The active dilution method could be further popularized and become a common approach to prepare various inorganic materials. - Abstract: Nano-sized amorphous boron powders were synthesized by active dilution self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) method at temperatures ranging from 700 °C to 850 °C in a SHS furnace using Mg, B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and KBH{sub 4} as raw materials. Samples were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Laser particle size analyzer, Fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR), X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDX), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-resolution transmission TEM (HRTEM). The boron powders demonstrated an average particle size of 50 nm with a purity of 95.64 wt.%. The diluter KBH{sub 4} played an important role in the active dilution synthesis of amorphous nano-sized boron powders. The effects of endothermic reaction rate, the possible chemical reaction mechanism and active dilution model for synthesis of the product were also discussed.

  4. Synthesis of nano-sized amorphous boron powders through active dilution self-propagating high-temperature synthesis method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jilin; Gu, Yunle; Li, Zili; Wang, Weimin; Fu, Zhengyi

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Nano-sized amorphous boron powders were synthesized by active dilution self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) method. The effects of endothermic reaction rate, the possible chemical reaction mechanism and active dilution model for synthesis of the product were also discussed. Highlights: ► Nano-sized amorphous boron powders were synthesized by active dilution self-propagating high-temperature synthesis method. ► The morphology, particle size and purity of the samples could be effectively controlled via changing the endothermic rate. ► The diluter KBH 4 played an important role in active dilution synthesis of amorphous nano-sized boron powders. ► The active dilution method could be further popularized and become a common approach to prepare various inorganic materials. - Abstract: Nano-sized amorphous boron powders were synthesized by active dilution self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) method at temperatures ranging from 700 °C to 850 °C in a SHS furnace using Mg, B 2 O 3 and KBH 4 as raw materials. Samples were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Laser particle size analyzer, Fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR), X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDX), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-resolution transmission TEM (HRTEM). The boron powders demonstrated an average particle size of 50 nm with a purity of 95.64 wt.%. The diluter KBH 4 played an important role in the active dilution synthesis of amorphous nano-sized boron powders. The effects of endothermic reaction rate, the possible chemical reaction mechanism and active dilution model for synthesis of the product were also discussed

  5. High temperature synthesis of ceramic composition by directed reaction of molten titanium or zirconium with boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, W.B.

    1990-01-01

    Alternative methods of producing ceramics and ceramic composites include sintering, hot pressing and more recently hot isostatic pressing (HIP) and self-propagating high temperature synthesis (SHS). Though each of these techniques has its advantages, each suffers from several restrictions as well. Sintering may require long times at high temperatures and for most materials requires sintering aids to get full density. These additives can, and generally do, change (often degrade) the properties of the ceramic. Hot pressing and hot isostatic pressing are convenient methods to quickly prepare samples of some materials to full density, but generally are expensive and may damage some types of reinforcements during densification. This paper focuses on the preparation and processing of composites prepared by the directed reaction of molten titanium or zirconium with boron carbide. Advantages and disadvantages of this approach when compared to traditional methods are discussed, with reference to specific examples. Examples of microstructure are properties of these materials are reported

  6. Phase Field Theory and Analysis of Pressure-Shear Induced Amorphization and Failure in Boron Carbide Ceramic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D. Clayton

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A nonlinear continuum phase field theory is developed to describe amorphization of crystalline elastic solids under shear and/or pressure loading. An order parameter describes the local degree of crystallinity. Elastic coefficients can depend on the order parameter, inelastic volume change may accompany the transition from crystal to amorphous phase, and transitional regions parallel to bands of amorphous material are penalized by interfacial surface energy. Analytical and simple numerical solutions are obtained for an idealized isotropic version of the general theory, for an element of material subjected to compressive and/or shear loading. Solutions compare favorably with experimental evidence and atomic simulations of amorphization in boron carbide, demonstrating the tendency for structural collapse and strength loss with increasing shear deformation and superposed pressure.

  7. The compatibility of stainless steels with particles and powders of uranium carbide and low-sulphur UCS fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venter, S.

    1978-05-01

    Slightly hyperstoichiometric (U,Pu)C is a potential nuclear fuel for fast breeder reactors. The excess carbon above the stoichiometric amount results in a higher carbon activity in the fuel, and carbon is transferred to the stainless steel cladding, resulting in embrittlement of the cladding. It is with this problem of carbon transfer from the fuel to the cladding that this thesis is concerned. For practical reasons, UC and not (U,Pu)C was used as the fuel. The theory of decarburisation of carbide fuel and the carburisation of stainless steel, the facilities constructed for the project at the Atomic Energy Board, and the experimental techniques used, including preparation of the fuels, are discussed. The effect of a number of variables of uranium carbide fuel on its compatibility behaviour with stainless steels was investigated, as well as the effect om microstructure and type of stainless steel (304, 304 L and 316) on the rate of carburisation. These studies can be briefly summarised under the following headings: powder-particle size; surface oxidation of uranium carbide; preparation temperature of uranium carbide; low sulfur UCS fuels; uranium sulfide and the microstructure and type of steel. The author concludes that: the effect of surface oxidation and particle size must be taken into account when evaluating out-of-pile tests; the possible effects of surface oxidation must be taken into account when considering vibro-compacted carbide fuels; there is no advantage in replacing a fraction of the carbon atoms by sulphur atoms in slightly hyperstoichiometric carbide fuels, and the type and thermo-mechanical treatment of the stainless steel used as cladding material in a fuel pin is not important as far as the rate of carburisation by the fuel is concerned

  8. Influence of a powder feed rate on the properties of the plasma sprayed chromium carbide- 25% nickel chromium coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihailo R. Mrdak

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 The plasma spray process is a leading technology of powder depositing in the production of coatings widely used in the aerospace industry for the protection of new parts and for the repair of worn ones. Cermet 75Cr3C2 - 25Ni(Cr coatings based on Cr3C2 carbides are widely used to protect parts as they retain high values of hardness, strength and resistance to wear up to a temperature of 850°C. This paper discusses the influence of the parameters of the plasma spray deposition of 75Cr3C2 - 25Ni(Cr powder on the structure and mechanical properties of the coating. The powder is deposited using plasma spraying at atmospheric pressure (APS. The plasma gas is He, which is an inert gas and does not react with the powder; it produces dense plasma with lower heat content and less incorporated ambient air in the plasma jet thus reducing temperature decomposition and decarburization of Cr3C2 carbide.. In this study, three groups of coatings were deposited with three different powder feed rates of: 30, 45 and 60 g/min. The  coating with the best properties was deposited on the inlet flange parts of the turbo - jet engine TV2-117A to reduce the influence of vibrations and wear. The structures and the mechanical properties of 75Cr3C2 - 25Ni(Cr coatings are analyzed in accordance with the Pratt & Whitney standard. Studies have shown that powder feed rates have an important influence on the mechanical properties and structures of 75Cr3C2 - 25Ni(Cr coatings. 

  9. Versatile Boron Carbide-Based Visual Obscurant Compositions for Smoke Munitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-17

    volatilize and disperse reaction products and inert diluents. Unlike the refractory oxides of common pyrotechnic fuels such as magnesium and aluminum, boron...peaks marked. [1] Akagi, R.; Ohtori, N.; Umesaki, N. Raman spectra of K2O–B2O3 glasses and melts. Journal of Non-Crystalline Solids. 2001

  10. Fabrication of TiC-TiO{sub 2} composite powders by thermal plasma oxidation of titanium carbide powder; Tanka chitan funmatsu no plasma sanka hanno ni yori seiseishita TiC-TiO{sub 2} fukugo funmatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishigaki, T.; Li, Y.; Haneda, H. [National institute for Research Inorganic materials, Tsukuba (Japan); Kataoka, E. [Showa Cabot Supermetals K.K., Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-09-15

    TiC-TiO{sub 2} composite powders were prepared by in-flight oxidation of titanium carbide powder in RF induction thermal plasmas. Original titanium carbide powder of 20 - 38 {mu}m in particle size was axially injected into the center of argon-oxygen plasma. The powders were partially spheroidized and evaporated through the plasma treatment. X-ray diffraction of plasma-treated powders showed the formation of titanium dioxides, both rutile and anatase phases. The phase content of the plasma-prepared powders strongly depended on the plasma conditions, such as the plasma generating pressure and the oxygen flow rate in plasma generating gas. Especially, the increase of oxygen flow rate in plasma gas gave rise to the increase of heat transfer from plasma to powder particles, exothermic heat of oxidation reaction and cooling rate of plasma, giving the increase of spheroidization ratio, formation ratio of titanium dioxides, and content of anatase phases. (author)

  11. Boron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boron is an essential micronutrient element required for plant growth. Boron deficiency is wide-spread in crop plants throughout the world especially in coarse-textured soils in humid areas. Boron toxicity can also occur, especially in arid regions under irrigation. Plants respond directly to the...

  12. Alkynyl substituted carboranes as precursors to boron carbide thin films, fibers and composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, S.E.; Yang, X.; Hawthorne, M.F.; Mackenzie, J.D.; Thorne, K.J.; Zheng, H.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper the use of alkynyl substituted derivatives of o-carborane as precursors to boron containing ceramics is described. These compounds undergo a thermally or photochemically induced polymerization to afford cross linked polyakynyl-o-carborane derivatives. The increase in molecular weight should allow for increased Tg's and the retention of modelled polymer preforms. In this report, these modification reactions are described. In addition, the retention of molded polymer preforms were analyzed after UV exposure and inert atmosphere pyrolysis

  13. Deposition of multicomponent chromium carbide coatings using a non-conventional source of chromium and silicon with micro-additions of boron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez Ruiz, Jesus Eduardo, E-mail: jesus.gonzalez@biomat.uh.cu [Biomaterials Center, University of Havana (Cuba); Rodriguez Cristo, Alejandro [Mechanical Plants Company, Road of the Sub-Plan, Farm La Cana, Santa Clara, Villa Clara (Cuba); Ramos, Adrian Paz [Department of Chemistry, Universite de Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Quintana Puchol, Rafael [Welding Research Center, Central University Marta Abreu of Las Villas, Villa Clara (Cuba)

    2017-01-15

    The chromium carbide coatings are widely used in the mechanical industry due to its corrosion resistance and mechanical properties. In this work, we evaluated a new source of chromium and silicon with micro-additions of boron on the deposition of multi-component coatings of chromium carbides in W108 steel. The coatings were obtained by the pack cementation method, using a simultaneous deposition at 1000 deg for 4 hours. The coatings were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy, optical microscopy, microhardness test method and pin-on-disc wear test. It was found that the coatings formed on W108 steel were mainly constituted by (Cr,Fe){sub 23}C{sub 6} , (Cr,Fe){sub 7} C{sub 3} , Cr{sub 5-x}Si{sub 3-x} C{sub x+z}, Cr{sub 3} B{sub 0,44}C{sub 1,4} and (or) Cr{sub 7} BC{sub 4} . The carbide layers showed thicknesses between 14 and 15 μm and maximum values of microhardness between 15.8 and 18.8 GPa. Also, the micro-additions of boron to the mixtures showed statistically significant influence on the thickness, microhardness and abrasive wear resistance of the carbide coatings. (author)

  14. Synthesis of silicon carbide coating on diamond by microwave heating of diamond and silicon powder: A heteroepitaxial growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leparoux, S. [Empa, Department of Materials Technology, Feuerwerkerstrasse 39, CH-3602 Thun (Switzerland)], E-mail: susanne.leparoux@empa.ch; Diot, C. [Consultant, allee de Mozart 10, F-92300 Chatillon (France); Dubach, A. [Empa, Department of Materials Technology, Feuerwerkerstrasse 39, CH-3602 Thun (Switzerland); Vaucher, S. [Empa, Department of Materials Technology, Feuerwerkerstrasse 39, CH-3602 Thun (Switzerland)

    2007-10-15

    When a powder mixture of diamond and silicon is heated by microwaves, heteroepitaxial growth of SiC is observed on the (1 1 1) as well as on the (1 0 0) faces of the diamond. The SiC over-layer was characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. High-resolution scanning electron microscopy shows the presence of triangular silicon carbide on the (1 1 1) faces of diamond while prismatic crystals are found on the (1 0 0) faces. The crystal growth seems to be favored in the plane parallel to the face (1 1 1)

  15. Synthesis of silicon carbide coating on diamond by microwave heating of diamond and silicon powder: A heteroepitaxial growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leparoux, S.; Diot, C.; Dubach, A.; Vaucher, S.

    2007-01-01

    When a powder mixture of diamond and silicon is heated by microwaves, heteroepitaxial growth of SiC is observed on the (1 1 1) as well as on the (1 0 0) faces of the diamond. The SiC over-layer was characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. High-resolution scanning electron microscopy shows the presence of triangular silicon carbide on the (1 1 1) faces of diamond while prismatic crystals are found on the (1 0 0) faces. The crystal growth seems to be favored in the plane parallel to the face (1 1 1)

  16. Influence of binders on infrared laser ablation of powdered tungsten carbide pressed pellets in comparison with sintered tungsten carbide hardmetals studied by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hola, Marketa; Otruba, Vitezslav; Kanicky, Viktor

    2006-01-01

    Laser ablation (LA) was studied as a sample introduction technique for the analysis of powdered and sintered tungsten carbides (WC/Co) by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The possibility to work with powdered and compact materials with close chemical composition provided the opportunity to compare LA sampling of similar substances in different forms that require different preparation procedures. Powdered WC/Co precursors of sintered hardmetals were prepared for the ablation as pressed pellets with and without powdered silver as a binder, while sintered hardmetal blocks were embedded into a resin to obtain discs, which were then smoothed and polished. A Q-switched Nd:YAG laser operated at its fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm with a pulse frequency of 10 Hz and maximum pulse energy of 220 mJ was used. A single lens was used for the laser beam focusing. An ablation cell (14 cm 3 ) mounted on a PC-controlled XY-translator was connected to an ICP spectrometer Jobin Yvon 170 Ultrace (laterally viewed ICP, mono- and polychromator) using a 1.5-m tubing (4 mm i.d.). Ablation was performed in a circular motion (2 mm diameter). Close attention was paid to the study of the crater parametres depending on hardness, cohesion and Ag binder presence in WC/Co samples. The influence of the Co content on the depth and structure of the ablation craters of the binderless pellets was also studied. Linear calibration plots of Nb, Ta and Ti were obtained for cemented WC/Co samples, binderless and binder-containing pellets. Relative widths of uncertainty intervals about the centroids vary between ± 3% and ± 7%, and exceptionally reach a value above 10%. The lowest determinable quantities (LDQ) of Nb, Ta and Ti calculated from the calibration lines were less than 0.5% (m/m). To evaluate the possibility of quantitative elemental analysis by LA-ICP-OES, two real sintered WC/Co samples and two real samples of powdered WC/Co materials were analysed. The

  17. Influence of binders on infrared laser ablation of powdered tungsten carbide pressed pellets in comparison with sintered tungsten carbide hardmetals studied by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hola, Marketa [Research Centre for Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology and Laboratory of Atomic Spectrochemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University in Brno, Kotlarska 2, CZ 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Otruba, Vitezslav [Research Centre for Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology and Laboratory of Atomic Spectrochemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University in Brno, Kotlarska 2, CZ 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Kanicky, Viktor [Research Centre for Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology and Laboratory of Atomic Spectrochemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University in Brno, Kotlarska 2, CZ 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic)]. E-mail: viktork@chemi.muni.cz

    2006-05-15

    Laser ablation (LA) was studied as a sample introduction technique for the analysis of powdered and sintered tungsten carbides (WC/Co) by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The possibility to work with powdered and compact materials with close chemical composition provided the opportunity to compare LA sampling of similar substances in different forms that require different preparation procedures. Powdered WC/Co precursors of sintered hardmetals were prepared for the ablation as pressed pellets with and without powdered silver as a binder, while sintered hardmetal blocks were embedded into a resin to obtain discs, which were then smoothed and polished. A Q-switched Nd:YAG laser operated at its fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm with a pulse frequency of 10 Hz and maximum pulse energy of 220 mJ was used. A single lens was used for the laser beam focusing. An ablation cell (14 cm{sup 3}) mounted on a PC-controlled XY-translator was connected to an ICP spectrometer Jobin Yvon 170 Ultrace (laterally viewed ICP, mono- and polychromator) using a 1.5-m tubing (4 mm i.d.). Ablation was performed in a circular motion (2 mm diameter). Close attention was paid to the study of the crater parametres depending on hardness, cohesion and Ag binder presence in WC/Co samples. The influence of the Co content on the depth and structure of the ablation craters of the binderless pellets was also studied. Linear calibration plots of Nb, Ta and Ti were obtained for cemented WC/Co samples, binderless and binder-containing pellets. Relative widths of uncertainty intervals about the centroids vary between {+-} 3% and {+-} 7%, and exceptionally reach a value above 10%. The lowest determinable quantities (LDQ) of Nb, Ta and Ti calculated from the calibration lines were less than 0.5% (m/m). To evaluate the possibility of quantitative elemental analysis by LA-ICP-OES, two real sintered WC/Co samples and two real samples of powdered WC/Co materials were analysed

  18. Large-area homogeneous periodic surface structures generated on the surface of sputtered boron carbide thin films by femtosecond laser processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serra, R., E-mail: ricardo.serra@dem.uc.pt [SEG-CEMUC, Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Coimbra, Rua Luís Reis Santos, 3030-788 Coimbra (Portugal); Oliveira, V. [ICEMS-Instituto de Ciência e Engenharia de Materiais e Superfícies, Avenida Rovisco Pais no 1, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Instituto Superior de Engenharia de Lisboa, Avenida Conselheiro Emídio Navarro no 1, 1959-007 Lisbon (Portugal); Oliveira, J.C. [SEG-CEMUC, Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Coimbra, Rua Luís Reis Santos, 3030-788 Coimbra (Portugal); Kubart, T. [The Ångström Laboratory, Solid State Electronics, P.O. Box 534, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden); Vilar, R. [Instituto Superior de Engenharia de Lisboa, Avenida Conselheiro Emídio Navarro no 1, 1959-007 Lisbon (Portugal); Instituto Superior Técnico, Avenida Rovisco Pais no 1, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Cavaleiro, A. [SEG-CEMUC, Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Coimbra, Rua Luís Reis Santos, 3030-788 Coimbra (Portugal)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Large-area LIPSS were formed by femtosecond laser processing B-C films surface. • The LIPSS spatial period increases with laser fluence (140–200 nm). • Stress-related sinusoidal-like undulations were formed on the B-C films surface. • The undulations amplitude (down to a few nanometres) increases with laser fluence. • Laser radiation absorption increases with surface roughness. - Abstract: Amorphous and crystalline sputtered boron carbide thin films have a very high hardness even surpassing that of bulk crystalline boron carbide (≈41 GPa). However, magnetron sputtered B-C films have high friction coefficients (C.o.F) which limit their industrial application. Nanopatterning of materials surfaces has been proposed as a solution to decrease the C.o.F. The contact area of the nanopatterned surfaces is decreased due to the nanometre size of the asperities which results in a significant reduction of adhesion and friction. In the present work, the surface of amorphous and polycrystalline B-C thin films deposited by magnetron sputtering was nanopatterned using infrared femtosecond laser radiation. Successive parallel laser tracks 10 μm apart were overlapped in order to obtain a processed area of about 3 mm{sup 2}. Sinusoidal-like undulations with the same spatial period as the laser tracks were formed on the surface of the amorphous boron carbide films after laser processing. The undulations amplitude increases with increasing laser fluence. The formation of undulations with a 10 μm period was also observed on the surface of the crystalline boron carbide film processed with a pulse energy of 72 μJ. The amplitude of the undulations is about 10 times higher than in the amorphous films processed at the same pulse energy due to the higher roughness of the films and consequent increase in laser radiation absorption. LIPSS formation on the surface of the films was achieved for the three B-C films under study. However, LIPSS are formed under

  19. Large-area homogeneous periodic surface structures generated on the surface of sputtered boron carbide thin films by femtosecond laser processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serra, R.; Oliveira, V.; Oliveira, J.C.; Kubart, T.; Vilar, R.; Cavaleiro, A.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Large-area LIPSS were formed by femtosecond laser processing B-C films surface. • The LIPSS spatial period increases with laser fluence (140–200 nm). • Stress-related sinusoidal-like undulations were formed on the B-C films surface. • The undulations amplitude (down to a few nanometres) increases with laser fluence. • Laser radiation absorption increases with surface roughness. - Abstract: Amorphous and crystalline sputtered boron carbide thin films have a very high hardness even surpassing that of bulk crystalline boron carbide (≈41 GPa). However, magnetron sputtered B-C films have high friction coefficients (C.o.F) which limit their industrial application. Nanopatterning of materials surfaces has been proposed as a solution to decrease the C.o.F. The contact area of the nanopatterned surfaces is decreased due to the nanometre size of the asperities which results in a significant reduction of adhesion and friction. In the present work, the surface of amorphous and polycrystalline B-C thin films deposited by magnetron sputtering was nanopatterned using infrared femtosecond laser radiation. Successive parallel laser tracks 10 μm apart were overlapped in order to obtain a processed area of about 3 mm 2 . Sinusoidal-like undulations with the same spatial period as the laser tracks were formed on the surface of the amorphous boron carbide films after laser processing. The undulations amplitude increases with increasing laser fluence. The formation of undulations with a 10 μm period was also observed on the surface of the crystalline boron carbide film processed with a pulse energy of 72 μJ. The amplitude of the undulations is about 10 times higher than in the amorphous films processed at the same pulse energy due to the higher roughness of the films and consequent increase in laser radiation absorption. LIPSS formation on the surface of the films was achieved for the three B-C films under study. However, LIPSS are formed under different

  20. Surface modification of the hard metal tungsten carbide-cobalt by boron ion implantation; Oberflaechenmodifikation des Hartmetalls Wolframkarbid-Kobalt durch Bor-Ionenimplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mrotchek, I.

    2007-09-07

    In the present thesis ion beam implantation of boron is studied as method for the increasement of the hardness and for the improvement of the operational characteristics of cutting tools on the tungsten carbide-cobalt base. For the boron implantation with 40 keV energy and {approx}5.10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2} fluence following topics were shown: The incoerporation of boron leads to a deformation and remaining strain of the WC lattice, which possesses different stregth in the different directions of the elementary cell. The maximum of the deformation is reached at an implantation temperature of 450 C. The segregation of the new phases CoWB and Co{sub 3}W was detected at 900 C implantation temperature. At lower temperatures now new phases were found. The tribological characteristics of WC-Co are improved. Hereby the maxiaml effect was measured for implantation temperatures from 450 C to 700 C: Improvement of the microhardness by the factor 2..2.5, improvement of the wear resistance by the factor 4. The tribological effects extend to larger depths than the penetration depth of the boron implantation profile. The detected property improvements of the hard metal H3 show the possibility of a practical application of boron ion implantation in industry. The effects essential for a wer decreasement are a hardening of the carbide phase by deformation of the lattice, a hardening of the cobalt binding material and the phase boundaries because of the formation of a solid solution of the implanted boron atoms in Co and by this a blocking of the dislocation movement and the rupture spreading under load.

  1. Basic visualization experiments on eutectic reaction of boron carbide and stainless steel under sodium-cooled fast reactor conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamano, Hidemasa; Suzuki, Tohru; Kamiyama, Kenji; Kudo, Isamu

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes basic visualization experiments on eutectic reaction and relocation of boron carbide (B 4 C) and stainless steel (SS) under a high temperature condition exceeding 1500degC as well as the importance of such behaviors in molten core during a core disruptive accident in a Generation-IV sodium-cooled fast reactor (750 MWe class) designed in Japan. At first, a reactivity history was calculated using an exact perturbation calculation tool taking into account expected behaviors. This calculation indicated the importance of a relocation behavior of the B 4 C-SS eutectic because its behavior has a large uncertainty in the reactivity history. To clarify this behavior, basic experiments were carried out by visualizing the reaction of a B 4 C pellet contacted with molten SS in a high temperature-heating furnace. The experiments have shown the eutectic reaction visualization as well as freezing and relocation of the B 4 C-SS eutectic in upper part of the solidified test piece due to the density separation. (author)

  2. Microstructural and Mechanical Study of Inconel 625 – Tungsten Carbide Composite Coatings Obtained by Powder Laser Cladding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huebner J.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the investigation of fine (~0.54 μm tungsten carbide particles effect on structural and mechanical properties of laser cladded Inconel 625-WC composite. Three powder mixtures with different Inconel 625 – WC weight ratio (10, 20 and 30 weight % of WC were prepared. Coatings were made using following process parameters: laser beam diameter ø ≈ 500 μm, powder feeder rotation speed – 7 m/min, scanning velocity – 10 m/min, laser power – 220 W changed to 320 W, distance between tracks – 1 mm changed to 0.8 mm. Microstructure and hardness were investigated. Coatings produced by laser cladding were crack and pore free, chemically and structurally homogenous. High cooling rate during cladding process resulted in fine microstructure of material. Hardness improved with addition of WC from 396.3 ±10.5 HV for pure Inconel 625, to 469.9 ±24.9 HV for 30 weight % of WC. Tungsten carbide dissolved in Inconel 625 which allowed formation of intergranular eutectic that contains TCP phases.

  3. Swelling of radiation-cured polymer precursor powder for silicon carbide by pyrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinori Takeyama

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic yield, density, volume change and pore size distribution were measured for radiation- and thermally cured PCS powder when they were pyrolyzed in the temperature range of 673–973 K. Higher ceramic yield was obtained for radiation-cured powder due to smaller amount of evolved gas. Temperature dependence of volume change and the total pore volume show that the formation and disappearance of pores in the powders were determined by the volume shrinkage and evolution of decomposed gases. Volume shrinkage narrowed the pore size distribution for radiation-cured powder. For thermally cured powder, the narrowing of size distribution was disturbed by aggregated pores. Smaller amount of evolved gas from radiation-cured powder relative to thermally cured powder prevented the aggregation of pores and provided the narrow size distribution.

  4. Synthesis, characterization and thermoelectric properties of metal borides, boron carbides and carbaborides; Synthese, Charakterisierung und thermoelektrische Eigenschaften ausgewaehlter Metallboride, Borcarbide und Carbaboride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guersoy, Murat

    2015-07-06

    This work reports on the solid state synthesis and structural and thermoelectrical characterization of hexaborides (CaB{sub 6}, SrB{sub 6}, BaB{sub 6}, EuB{sub 6}), diboride dicarbides (CeB{sub 2}C{sub 2}, LaB{sub 2}C{sub 2}), a carbaboride (NaB{sub 5}C) and composites of boron carbide. The characterization was performed by X-ray diffraction methods and Rietveld refinements based on structure models from literature. Most of the compounds were densified by spark plasma sintering at 100 MPa. As high-temperature thermoelectric properties the Seebeck coefficients, electrical conductivities, thermal diffusivities and heat capacities were measured between room temperature and 1073 K. ZT values as high as 0.5 at 1273 K were obtained for n-type conducting EuB{sub 6}. High-temperature X-ray diffraction also confirmed its thermal stability. The solid solutions Ca{sub x}Sr{sub 1-x}B{sub 6}, Ca{sub x}Ba{sub 1-x}B{sub 6} and Sr{sub x}Ba{sub 1-x}B{sub 6} (x = 0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1) are also n-type but did not show better ZT values for the ternary compounds compared to the binaries, but for CaB{sub 6} the values of the figure of merit (ca. 0.3 at 1073 K) were significantly increased (ca. 50 %) compared to earlier investigations which is attributed to the densification process. Sodium carbaboride, NaB{sub 5}C, was found to be the first p-type thermoelectric material that crystallizes with the hexaboride-structure type. Seebeck coefficients of ca. 80 μV . K{sup -1} were obtained. Cerium diboride dicarbide, CeB{sub 2}C{sub 2}, and lanthanum diboride dicarbide, LaB{sub 2}C{sub 2}, are metallic. Both compounds were used as model compounds to develop compacting strategies for such layered borides. Densities obtained at 50 MPa were determined to be higher than 90 %. A new synthesis route using single source precursors that contain boron and carbon was developed to open the access to new metal-doped boron carbides. It was possible to obtain boron carbide, but metal-doping could not be

  5. Direct multielement trace analyses of silicon carbide powders by spark ablation simultaneous inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiera, Arne F.; Schmidt-Lehr, Sebastian; Song, Ming; Bings, Nicolas H.; Broekaert, Jose A.C.

    2008-01-01

    A procedure for the direct analysis of silicon carbide powders (SiC) by simultaneous detection inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry using a Spectro-CIROS TM spectrometer (CCD-ICP-OES) and a novel spark ablation system Spectro-SASSy (SA) as sample introduction technique is described. The sample preparation procedure for SA of non-conducting material is based on mixing the sample powders with a conducting matrix, in this case copper and briquetting pellets. Pressing time, pressure and mixing ratio are shown to be important parameters of the pelleting technique with respect to their mechanical stability for the reliability of the analysis results. A mixing ratio of 0.2 g +0.6 g for SiC and Cu, a pressure of 10 t cm -2 and a pressing time of 8 min have been found optimum. It has also been shown that the spark parameters selected are crucial for uniform volatilization. Electron probe micrographs of the burning spots and the analytical signal magnitude showed that a rather hard spark at 100 Hz was optimum. The determination of trace elements in silicon carbide powders is demonstrated using a calibration based on the addition of standard solutions. For Al, Ti, V, Mn and Fe detection limits in the lower μg g -1 range can be achieved. Internal standardization with Y in combination with the addition of standard solutions allows relative standard deviations in the range of 4 to 24% for concentration levels of the order of 3 to 350 μg g -1

  6. Direct multielement trace analyses of silicon carbide powders by spark ablation simultaneous inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiera, Arne F.; Schmidt-Lehr, Sebastian; Song, Ming [Institute for Inorganic and Applied Chemistry, University of Hamburg, Martin-Luther-King-Platz 6, D-20146 Hamburg (Germany); Bings, Nicolas H. [Institute for Inorganic and Applied Chemistry, University of Hamburg, Martin-Luther-King-Platz 6, D-20146 Hamburg (Germany)], E-mail: bings@chemie.uni-hamburg.de; Broekaert, Jose A.C. [Institute for Inorganic and Applied Chemistry, University of Hamburg, Martin-Luther-King-Platz 6, D-20146 Hamburg (Germany)

    2008-02-15

    A procedure for the direct analysis of silicon carbide powders (SiC) by simultaneous detection inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry using a Spectro-CIROS{sup TM} spectrometer (CCD-ICP-OES) and a novel spark ablation system Spectro-SASSy (SA) as sample introduction technique is described. The sample preparation procedure for SA of non-conducting material is based on mixing the sample powders with a conducting matrix, in this case copper and briquetting pellets. Pressing time, pressure and mixing ratio are shown to be important parameters of the pelleting technique with respect to their mechanical stability for the reliability of the analysis results. A mixing ratio of 0.2 g +0.6 g for SiC and Cu, a pressure of 10 t cm{sup -2} and a pressing time of 8 min have been found optimum. It has also been shown that the spark parameters selected are crucial for uniform volatilization. Electron probe micrographs of the burning spots and the analytical signal magnitude showed that a rather hard spark at 100 Hz was optimum. The determination of trace elements in silicon carbide powders is demonstrated using a calibration based on the addition of standard solutions. For Al, Ti, V, Mn and Fe detection limits in the lower {mu}g g{sup -1} range can be achieved. Internal standardization with Y in combination with the addition of standard solutions allows relative standard deviations in the range of 4 to 24% for concentration levels of the order of 3 to 350 {mu}g g{sup -1}.

  7. Aluminum powder size and microstructure effects on properties of boron nitride reinforced aluminum matrix composites fabricated by semi-solid powder metallurgy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Cunguang; Guo, Leichen; Luo, Ji; Hao, Junjie; Guo, Zhimeng; Volinsky, Alex A.

    2015-01-01

    Al matrix composite reinforced by hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) with nearly full densification was successfully fabricated by the semi-solid powder metallurgy technique. The h-BN/Al composites were synthesized with elemental pure Al powder size of d_5_0=35, 12 and 2 μm. The powder morphology and the structural characteristics of the composites were analyzed using X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The density, Brinell hardness and compressive behavior of the samples were characterized. Density measurement of the Al composites revealed that the composite densification can be effectively promoted by plenty of embedded liquid phase under pressure. Composites prepared using Al powder with varying granularity showed different grain characteristics, and in situ recrystallization occurred inside the original grains with 35 μm Al powder. A sharp interface consisting of Al/Al_2O_3/h-BN was present in the composites. Both the compressive strength and the fracture strain of the investigated composites increased with the decrease of the Al powder size, along with the Brinell hardness. The composite with 2 μm Al powder exhibited the highest relative density (99.3%), Brinell harness (HB 128), compressive strength (763 MPa) and fracture strain (0.299).

  8. New Low Temperature Processing for Boron Carbide/Aluminum Based Composite Armor

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-06-01

    a A’ inLali LA COinitent OF 20 V d Ue to intrusion of the metal ’man during ROC. Subsequent evaluation of the part revealed cracks which had been...Varonic T-205 ethoxylated tallow amine 5.00 33.8 Witcamide 511 diethanol oleylamide 5.00 55.4 Adogen 115-D soya amine 5.25 47.5 Adogen 572 3...metal. A. LI&A JL %AP& La . &&%F" Much research work on ceramic containing systems is devoted to studies Involving the quality of starting po.wders

  9. Exploration on Wire Discharge Machining Added Powder for Metal-Based Diamond Grinding Wheel on Wire EDM Dressing and Truing of Grinding Tungsten Carbide Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, H. M.; Yang, L. D.; Lin, Y. C.; Lin, C. L.

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, the effects of material removal rate and abrasive grain protrusion on the metal-based diamond grinding wheel were studied to find the optimal parameters for adding powder and wire discharge. In addition, this kind of electric discharge method to add powder on the metal-based diamond grinding wheel on line after dressing and truing will be applied on tungsten carbide to study the grinding material removal rate, grinding wheel wear, surface roughness, and surface micro-hardness.

  10. Direct determination of trace elements in boron nitride powders by slurry sampling total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amberger, Martin A.; Hoeltig, Michael; Broekaert, Jose A.C.

    2010-01-01

    The use of slurry sampling total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (SlS-TXRF) for the direct determination of Ca, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn and Ti in four boron nitride powders has been described. Measurements of the zeta potential showed that slurries with good stabilities can be obtained by the addition of polyethylenimine (PEI) at a concentration of 0.1 wt.% and by adjusting the pH at 4. For the optimization of the concentration of boron nitride in the slurries the net line intensities and the signal to background ratios were determined for the trace elements Ca and Ti as well as for the internal standard element Ga in the case of concentrations of boron nitride ranging from 1 to 30 mg mL -1 . As a compromise with respect to high net line intensities and high signal to background ratios, concentrations of 5 mg mL -1 of boron nitride were found suitable and were used for all further measurements. The limits of detection of SlS-TXRF for the boron nitride powders were found to range from 0.062 to 1.6 μg g -1 for Cu and Ca, respectively. Herewith, they are higher than those obtained in solid sampling and slurry sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (SoS-GFAAS, SlS-GFAAS) as well as those of solid sampling electrothermal evaporation inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (SoS-ETV-ICP-OES). For Ca and Fe as well as for Cu and Fe, however, they were found to be lower than for GFAAS and for ICP-OES subsequent to wet chemical digestion, respectively. The universal applicability of SlS-TXRF to the analysis of samples with a wide variety of matrices could be demonstrated by the analysis of certified reference materials such as SiC, Al 2 O 3 , powdered bovine liver and borate ore with a single calibration. The correlation coefficients of the plots for the values found for Ca, Fe and Ti by SlS-TXRF in the boron nitride powders as well as in the before mentioned samples versus the reference values for the respective samples over a

  11. Direct determination of trace elements in boron nitride powders by slurry sampling total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amberger, Martin A.; Hoeltig, Michael [University of Hamburg, Institute for Inorganic and Applied Chemistry, Martin-Luther-King-Platz 6, D-20146 Hamburg (Germany); Broekaert, Jose A.C., E-mail: jose.broekaert@chemie.uni-hamburg.d [University of Hamburg, Institute for Inorganic and Applied Chemistry, Martin-Luther-King-Platz 6, D-20146 Hamburg (Germany)

    2010-02-15

    The use of slurry sampling total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (SlS-TXRF) for the direct determination of Ca, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn and Ti in four boron nitride powders has been described. Measurements of the zeta potential showed that slurries with good stabilities can be obtained by the addition of polyethylenimine (PEI) at a concentration of 0.1 wt.% and by adjusting the pH at 4. For the optimization of the concentration of boron nitride in the slurries the net line intensities and the signal to background ratios were determined for the trace elements Ca and Ti as well as for the internal standard element Ga in the case of concentrations of boron nitride ranging from 1 to 30 mg mL{sup -1}. As a compromise with respect to high net line intensities and high signal to background ratios, concentrations of 5 mg mL{sup -1} of boron nitride were found suitable and were used for all further measurements. The limits of detection of SlS-TXRF for the boron nitride powders were found to range from 0.062 to 1.6 mug g{sup -1} for Cu and Ca, respectively. Herewith, they are higher than those obtained in solid sampling and slurry sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (SoS-GFAAS, SlS-GFAAS) as well as those of solid sampling electrothermal evaporation inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (SoS-ETV-ICP-OES). For Ca and Fe as well as for Cu and Fe, however, they were found to be lower than for GFAAS and for ICP-OES subsequent to wet chemical digestion, respectively. The universal applicability of SlS-TXRF to the analysis of samples with a wide variety of matrices could be demonstrated by the analysis of certified reference materials such as SiC, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, powdered bovine liver and borate ore with a single calibration. The correlation coefficients of the plots for the values found for Ca, Fe and Ti by SlS-TXRF in the boron nitride powders as well as in the before mentioned samples versus the reference values for the respective

  12. Densification of boron carbide at relatively low temperatures by hot pressing and hot isostatic pressing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Telle, R.

    1988-01-01

    The poor sinterability of B 4 C limits its widespread application because both high temperatures and high pressures are required for a complete densification. Moreover, B 4 C suffers from a low strength and fracture toughness, possesses, however, a high potential because of its extreme hardness. Reaction hot pressing of B 4 C-WC-TiC-Si-Co mixtures resulting in B 4 C-TiB 2 -W 2 B 5 composites of high density exhibit remarkable mechanical properties. The influence of hot isostatic pressing (HIP) on the microstructure and the mechanical properties is investigated in cooperation with participants of the COST 503 activities and related to the strengthening and toughening mechanisms. Difficulties during densification by HIP arise from the evaporation of adsorbed volatiles as well as from the strong swelling of the powder compact due to the sintering reaction. Several HIP cycle designs were tested in order to prevent the bloating of the capsule and to control internal stresses due to the misfit of the thermal expansion of the entire phases. In comparison to single phase B 4 C ceramics, bending strength was improved to 1030 MPa, K Ic to 5.2 MPa/m, while hardness was comparable with HV1=38 GPa. Wear test were performed and related to the toughening mechanisms. (orig.) With 56 refs., 9 tabs., 64 figs

  13. Formation of polycrystalline MgB2 synthesized by powder in sealed tube method with different initial boron phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudanto, Sigit Dwi; Imaduddin, Agung; Kurniawan, Budhy; Manaf, Azwar

    2018-04-01

    Magnesium diboride, MgB2 is a new high critical temperature superconductor that discovered in the beginning of the 21st century. The MgB2 has a simple crystal structure and a high critical temperature, which can be manufactured in several forms like thin films, tapes, wires including bulk in the large scale. For that reason, the MgB2 has good prospects for various applications in the field of electronic devices. In the current work, we have explored the synthesis of MgB2 polycrystalline using powder in a sealed tube method. Different initial boron phase for the synthesized of MgB2 polycrystalline were used. These were, in addition to magnesium powders, crystalline boron, amorphous boron and combination both of them were respectively fitted in the synthesis. The raw materials were mixed in a stoichiometric ratio of Mg: B=1:2, ground using agate mortar, packed into stainless steel SS304. The pack was then sintered at temperature of 800°C for 2 hours in air atmosphere. Phase formation of MgB2 polycrystalline in difference of initial boron phase was characterized using XRD and SEM. Referring to the diffraction pattern and microstructure observation, MgB2 polycrystalline was formed, and the formation was effective when using the crystalline Mg and fully amorphous B as the raw materials. The critical temperature of the specimen was evaluated by the cryogenic magnet. The transition temperature of the MgB2 specimen synthesized using crystalline magnesium and full amorphous boron is 42.678 K (ΔTc = 0.877 K).

  14. Spark plasma sintered bismuth telluride-based thermoelectric materials incorporating dispersed boron carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, H.R., E-mail: hugo.williams@leicester.ac.uk [Department of Engineering, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Ambrosi, R.M. [Space Research Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Chen, K. [School of Engineering and Materials Science, Queen Mary, University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Friedman, U. [Department of Engineering, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Ning, H.; Reece, M.J. [School of Engineering and Materials Science, Queen Mary, University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Robbins, M.C.; Simpson, K. [European Thermodynamics Ltd., 8 Priory Business Park, Wistow Road, Kibworth LE8 0R (United Kingdom); Stephenson, K. [European Space Agency, ESTEC TEC-EP, Keplerlaan 1, 2201AZ Noordwijk (Netherlands)

    2015-03-25

    Highlights: • Nano-B{sub 4}C reinforced Bi{sub 0.5}Sb{sub 1.5}Te{sub 3} p-type thermoelectric produced by SPS. • Addition of B{sub 4}C up to 0.2 vol% to SPS’d material has little effect on zT. • Vickers hardness improved by 27% by adding 0.2 vol% B{sub 4}C. • Fracture toughness of SPS material: K{sub IC} = 0.80 MPa m{sup 1/2} by SEVNB. • Mechanical properties much better than commercial directionally solidified material. - Abstract: The mechanical properties of bismuth telluride based thermoelectric materials have received much less attention in the literature than their thermoelectric properties. Polycrystalline p-type Bi{sub 0.5}Sb{sub 1.5}Te{sub 3} materials were produced from powder using spark plasma sintering (SPS). The effects of nano-B{sub 4}C addition on the thermoelectric performance, Vickers hardness and fracture toughness were measured. Addition of 0.2 vol% B{sub 4}C was found to have little effect on zT but increased hardness by approximately 27% when compared to polycrystalline material without B{sub 4}C. The K{sub IC} fracture toughness of these compositions was measured as 0.80 MPa m{sup 1/2} by Single-Edge V-Notched Beam (SEVNB). The machinability of polycrystalline materials produced by SPS was significantly better than commercially available directionally solidified materials because the latter is limited by cleavage along the crystallographic plane parallel to the direction of solidification.

  15. Effect of high energy milling time of the aluminum bronze alloy obtained by powder metallurgy with niobium carbide addition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, Alexandre Nogueira Ottoboni; Silva, Aline da; Rodrigues, Carlos Alberto; Melo, Mirian de Lourdes Noronha Motta; Rodrigues, Geovani; Silva, Gilbert, E-mail: aottoboni@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Itajuba (UNIFEI), Itajuba, MG (Brazil)

    2017-05-15

    The aluminum bronze alloy is part of a class of highly reliable materials due to high mechanical strength and corrosion resistance being used in the aerospace and shipbuilding industry. It's machined to produce parts and after its use cycle, it's discarded, but third process is considered expensive and besides not being correct for environment reasons. Thus, reusing this material through the powder metallurgy (PM) route is considered advantageous. The aluminum bronze chips were submitted to high energy ball milling process with 3% of niobium carbide (NbC) addition. The NbC is a metal-ceramic composite with a ductile-brittle behaviour. It was analyzed the morphology of powders by scanning electron microscopy as well as particle size it was determined. X ray diffraction identified the phases and the influence of milling time in the diffractogram patterns. Results indicates that milling time and NbC addition improves the milling efficiency significantly and being possible to obtain nanoparticles. (author)

  16. In situ formation of titanium carbide using titanium and carbon-nanotube powders by laser cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savalani, M.M.; Ng, C.C.; Li, Q.H.; Man, H.C.

    2012-01-01

    Titanium metal matrix composite coatings are considered to be important candidates for high wear resistance applications. In this study, TiC reinforced Ti matrix composite layers were fabricated by laser cladding with 5, 10, 15 and 20 wt% carbon-nanotube. The effects of the carbon-nanotube content on phase composition, microstructure, micro-hardness and dry sliding wear resistance of the coating were studied. Microstructural observation using scanning electron microscopy showed that the coatings consisted of a matrix of alpha-titanium phases and the reinforcement phase of titanium carbide in the form of fine dendrites, indicating that titanium carbide was synthesized by the in situ reaction during laser irradiation. Additionally, measurements on the micro-hardness and dry sliding wear resistance of the coatings indicated that the mechanical properties were affected by the amount of carbon-nanotube in the starting precursor materials and were enhanced by increasing the carbon-nanotube content. Results indicated that the composite layers exhibit high hardness and excellent wear resistance.

  17. In situ formation of titanium carbide using titanium and carbon-nanotube powders by laser cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savalani, M.M., E-mail: mmfsmm@inet.polyu.edu.hk [Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, Hong Kong Polytechnic University (Hong Kong); Ng, C.C.; Li, Q.H.; Man, H.C. [Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, Hong Kong Polytechnic University (Hong Kong)

    2012-01-15

    Titanium metal matrix composite coatings are considered to be important candidates for high wear resistance applications. In this study, TiC reinforced Ti matrix composite layers were fabricated by laser cladding with 5, 10, 15 and 20 wt% carbon-nanotube. The effects of the carbon-nanotube content on phase composition, microstructure, micro-hardness and dry sliding wear resistance of the coating were studied. Microstructural observation using scanning electron microscopy showed that the coatings consisted of a matrix of alpha-titanium phases and the reinforcement phase of titanium carbide in the form of fine dendrites, indicating that titanium carbide was synthesized by the in situ reaction during laser irradiation. Additionally, measurements on the micro-hardness and dry sliding wear resistance of the coatings indicated that the mechanical properties were affected by the amount of carbon-nanotube in the starting precursor materials and were enhanced by increasing the carbon-nanotube content. Results indicated that the composite layers exhibit high hardness and excellent wear resistance.

  18. Optical properties of boron carbide near the boron K edge evaluated by soft-x-ray reflectometry from a Ru/B4C multilayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ksenzov, Dmitriy; Panzner, Tobias; Schlemper, Christoph; Morawe, Christian; Pietsch, Ullrich

    2009-12-10

    Soft-x-ray Bragg reflection from two Ru/B4C multilayers with 10 and 63 periods was used for independent determination of both real and imaginary parts of the refractive index n = 1 -{delta} + i{beta} close to the boron K edge ({approx}188 eV). Prior to soft x-ray measurements, the structural parameters of the multilayers were determined by x-ray reflectometry using hard x rays. For the 63-period sample, the optical properties based on the predictions made for elemental boron major deviations were found close to the K edge of boron for the 10-period sample explained by chemical bonding of boron to B4C and various boron oxides.

  19. Boron reclamation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.M.

    1980-07-01

    A process to recover high purity 10 B enriched crystalline boron powder from a polymeric matrix was developed on a laboratory basis and ultimately scaled up to production capacity. The process is based on controlled pyrolysis of boron-filled scrap followed by an acid leach and dry sieving operation to return the powder to the required purity and particle size specifications. Typically, the recovery rate of the crystalline powder is in excess of 98.5 percent, and some of the remaining boron is recovered in the form of boric acid. The minimum purity requirement of the recovered product is 98.6 percent total boron

  20. Micromechanical analysis of a hybrid composite—effect of boron carbide particles on the elastic properties of basalt fiber reinforced polymer composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna Golla, Sai; Prasanthi, P.

    2016-11-01

    A fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composite is an important material for structural application. The diversified application of FRP composites has become the center of attention for interdisciplinary research. However, improvements in the mechanical properties of this class of materials are still under research for different applications. The reinforcement of inorganic particles in a composite improves its structural properties due to their high stiffness. The present research work is focused on the prediction of the mechanical properties of the hybrid composites where continuous fibers are reinforced in a micro boron carbide particle mixed polypropylene matrix. The effectiveness of the addition of 30 wt. % of boron carbide (B4C) particle contributions regarding the longitudinal and transverse properties of the basalt fiber reinforced polymer composite at various fiber volume fractions is examined by finite element analysis (FEA). The experimental approach is the best way to determine the properties of the composite but it is expensive and time-consuming. Therefore, the finite element method (FEM) and analytical methods are the viable methods for the determination of the composite properties. The FEM results were obtained by adopting a micromechanics approach with the support of FEM. Assuming a uniform distribution of reinforcement and considering one unit-cell of the whole array, the properties of the composite materials are determined. The predicted elastic properties from FEA are compared with the analytical results. The results suggest that B4C particles are a good reinforcement for the enhancement of the transverse properties of basalt fiber reinforced polypropylene.

  1. Study of the processes of changing the crystal structure of boron carbide after the destruction of a nuclear reactor as a result of earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mammadov, Kh.; Mirzayev, M.; Garibov, R.; Allahverdiyev, G.

    2017-01-01

    The territories of the Trans Caucasian Republics are characterized by high seismic activity. Therefore, the occurrence of cases of anthropogenic catastrophe including in the territories of nuclear reactors is not ruled out in case of natural disasters. Studies to create detectors based on B 4 C for recording ''cold'', ''hot'' and ''fast'' neutrons in order to increase the safety of nuclear reactors have been carried out in recent years. The B 4 C crystal structure is highly stable at relatively large intervals of temperature and pressure. The study of the thermo physical properties of samples of boron carbide irradiated with ionizing beams is interesting from the point of view to study of the stability of the structure and the stability of this compound. The thermal properties of B 4 C irradiated with ionizing γ radiation from a 60''Co source were investigated using the differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) methods. Upon irradiation with ionizing γ rays, a discrete change in the energy of the atoms occurs at the sites of the crystal lattice, the formation of active centers (radicals, ions, electrons), defects in the crystal lattice, the evaporation of crystalline hydrates, which are present in small amounts in bulk and crystalline compounds. The melting point of B 2 O 3 is 723 K, for boron 2348 K, for B 4 C 2623 K. The melting enthalpy for B 2 O 3 is 24.6 kJ/mol. With increasing temperature, the heat capacity and entropy of the non irradiated and irradiated B 4 C samples are increased. The nature of the change in the enthalpy and the Gibbs potential with increasing temperature depends on the presence of oxygen upon irradiation and during thermogravimetric analysis in the temperature range 298-1300 K. Changes in the values of thermodynamic functions occur due to the formation (under the influence of ionizing radiation) of excited atoms, active centers, defects in the crystal structure of

  2. Standard test methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, and spectrochemical analysis of nuclear-grade aluminum oxide and aluminum oxide-boron carbide composite pellets

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1994-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the chemical, mass spectrometric, and spectrochemical analysis of nuclear-grade aluminum oxide and aluminum oxide-boron carbide composite pellets to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 The analytical procedures appear in the following order: Sections Boron by Titrimetry 7 to 13 Separation of Boron for Mass Spectrometry 14 to 19 Isotopic Composition by Mass Spectrometry 20 to 23 Separation of Halides by Pyrohydrolysis 24 to 27 Fluoride by Ion-Selective Electrode 28 to 30 Chloride, Bromide, and Iodide by Amperometric Microtitrimetry 31 to 33 Trace Elements by Emission Spectroscopy 34 to 46 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. (F...

  3. HIP (hot isostatic pressing) sintering of Tantalum (Ta) and tantalum carbide (TaC) powder mixture: relations between microstructure and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valin, F.; Schnedecker, M.

    1994-01-01

    HIP sintering at 1630 C and 195 MPa, during 2 hours, can be used for complete densification of mixtures of commercial tantalum carbide and tantalum powders. HIPed material properties are depending upon initial compositions. For C/Ta ratios inferior to 80%, the monocarbide structure is preserved. A partial ordering of the carbon vacancies will result, for TaC(0.80), in microhardness maximization. The microstructurally homogenous TaC(0.45) shows an excellent toughness. 2 figs., 2 refs

  4. Properties of aerosol particles generated during 213 nm laser ablation: a study of compact and powdered tungsten carbides as materials with a two-component matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hola, M.; Konecna, V.; Kanicky, V.; Mikuska, P.; Kaiser, J.; Hanzlikova, R.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: The laser ablation process of tungsten carbide hardmetals was studied using 213 nm Nd:YAG laser. The samples were presented for ablation as sintered compacts or powders pressed into pellets to compare the generation of particles from samples with similar chemical composition but different physical properties. The influence of laser ablation parameters on the aerosol generation was studied using an optical aerosol spectrometer. In the case of powders, the effect of binder amount was investigated. The structure of generated particles and the properties of ablation-craters were additionally studied by SEM. (author)

  5. Fabrication and characterization of aluminium hybrid composites reinforced with fly ash and silicon carbide through powder metallurgy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilal Naim Shaikh, Mohd; Arif, Sajjad; Arif Siddiqui, M.

    2018-04-01

    This paper reports the fabrication and characterization of aluminium hybrid composites (AMCs) reinforced with commonly available and inexpensive fly ash (FA, 0, 5, 10 and 15 wt.%) particles along silicon carbide (SiC) using powder metallurgy process. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) were employed for microstructural characterization and phase identification respectively. Wear behaviour were investigated using pin-on-disc wear tester for the different combinations of wear parameters like load (10, 20 and 30 N), sliding speed (1.5, 2 and 2.5 m s‑1) and sliding distance (300, 600 and 900 m). SEM confirms the uniform distribution of FA and SiC in aluminium matrix. The hardness of Al/SiC/FA is increased by 20%–25% while wear rate decreased by 15%–40%. From wear analysis, sliding distance was the least significant parameter influencing the wear loss followed by applied load and sliding speed. To identify the mechanism of wear, worn out surface were also analysed by SEM.

  6. The influence of hydrogen on the chemical, mechanical, optical/electronic, and electrical transport properties of amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordell, Bradley J.; Karki, Sudarshan; Nguyen, Thuong D.; Rulis, Paul; Caruso, A. N.; Paquette, Michelle M.; Purohit, Sudhaunshu S.; Li, Han; King, Sean W.; Dutta, Dhanadeep; Gidley, David; Lanford, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Because of its high electrical resistivity, low dielectric constant (κ), high thermal neutron capture cross section, and robust chemical, thermal, and mechanical properties, amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide (a-B x C:H y ) has garnered interest as a material for low-κ dielectric and solid-state neutron detection applications. Herein, we investigate the relationships between chemical structure (atomic concentration B, C, H, and O), physical/mechanical properties (density, porosity, hardness, and Young's modulus), electronic structure [band gap, Urbach energy (E U ), and Tauc parameter (B 1/2 )], optical/dielectric properties (frequency-dependent dielectric constant), and electrical transport properties (resistivity and leakage current) through the analysis of a large series of a-B x C:H y thin films grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition from ortho-carborane. The resulting films exhibit a wide range of properties including H concentration from 10% to 45%, density from 0.9 to 2.3 g/cm 3 , Young's modulus from 10 to 340 GPa, band gap from 1.7 to 3.8 eV, Urbach energy from 0.1 to 0.7 eV, dielectric constant from 3.1 to 7.6, and electrical resistivity from 10 10 to 10 15 Ω cm. Hydrogen concentration is found to correlate directly with thin-film density, and both are used to map and explain the other material properties. Hardness and Young's modulus exhibit a direct power law relationship with density above ∼1.3 g/cm 3 (or below ∼35% H), below which they plateau, providing evidence for a rigidity percolation threshold. An increase in band gap and decrease in dielectric constant with increasing H concentration are explained by a decrease in network connectivity as well as mass/electron density. An increase in disorder, as measured by the parameters E U and B 1/2 , with increasing H concentration is explained by the release of strain in the network and associated decrease in structural disorder. All of these correlations in a

  7. Nanomechanical and in situ TEM characterization of boron carbide thin films on helium implanted substrates: Delamination, real-time cracking and substrate buckling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Framil Carpeño, David, E-mail: david.framil-carpeno@auckland.ac.nz [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, The University of Auckland, 20 Symonds Street, Auckland 1010 (New Zealand); Ohmura, Takahito; Zhang, Ling [Strength Design Group, Structural Materials Unit, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Leveneur, Jérôme [National Isotope Centre, GNS Science, 30 Gracefield Road, Gracefield, Lower Hutt 5010 (New Zealand); Dickinson, Michelle [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, The University of Auckland, 20 Symonds Street, Auckland 1010 (New Zealand); Seal, Christopher [International Centre for Advanced Materials, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Kennedy, John [National Isotope Centre, GNS Science, 30 Gracefield Road, Gracefield, Lower Hutt 5010 (New Zealand); Hyland, Margaret [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, The University of Auckland, 20 Symonds Street, Auckland 1010 (New Zealand)

    2015-07-15

    Boron carbide coatings deposited on helium-implanted and unimplanted Inconel 600 were characterized using a combination of nanoindentation and transmission electron microscopy. Real-time coating, cracking and formation of slip bands were recorded using in situ TEM-nanoindentation, allowing site specific events to be correlated with specific features in their load–displacement curves. Cross-sections through the residual indent impression showed a correlation between pop-outs in the load–displacement curves and coating delamination, which was confirmed with cyclic indentation experiments. Inconel exhibits (-11-1) and (1-1-1) twin variants in its deformed region beneath the indenter, organized in bands with a ladder-like arrangement. The nanomechanical properties of the metal–ceramic coating combinations exhibit a marked substrate effect as a consequence of helium implantation.

  8. Nanomechanical and in situ TEM characterization of boron carbide thin films on helium implanted substrates: Delamination, real-time cracking and substrate buckling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Framil Carpeño, David; Ohmura, Takahito; Zhang, Ling; Leveneur, Jérôme; Dickinson, Michelle; Seal, Christopher; Kennedy, John; Hyland, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    Boron carbide coatings deposited on helium-implanted and unimplanted Inconel 600 were characterized using a combination of nanoindentation and transmission electron microscopy. Real-time coating, cracking and formation of slip bands were recorded using in situ TEM-nanoindentation, allowing site specific events to be correlated with specific features in their load–displacement curves. Cross-sections through the residual indent impression showed a correlation between pop-outs in the load–displacement curves and coating delamination, which was confirmed with cyclic indentation experiments. Inconel exhibits (-11-1) and (1-1-1) twin variants in its deformed region beneath the indenter, organized in bands with a ladder-like arrangement. The nanomechanical properties of the metal–ceramic coating combinations exhibit a marked substrate effect as a consequence of helium implantation

  9. Replacing Chlorine with Hydrogen Chloride as a Possible Reactant for Synthesis of Titanium Carbide Derived Carbon Powders for High-Technology Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tallo, Indrek; Thomberg, Thomas; Jänes, Alar; Lust, Enn

    2013-01-01

    Micro- and mesoporous carbide-derived carbons were synthesized from titanium carbide (TiC) powder via gas phase reaction by using different reactants (Cl 2 and HCl) within the temperature range from 700 to 1100 °C. Analysis of XRD results show that TiC-derived carbons (TiC-CDC) consist mainly of graphitic crystallites. The first-order Raman spectra showed the graphite-like absorption peaks at ∼1577 cm 1 and the disorder-induced peaks at ∼1338 cm- 1 . The energy-related properties of supercapacitors based on 1 M (C 2 H 5 ) 3 CH 3 NBF 4 in acetonitrile and carbide-derived carbons (TiC-CDC (Cl 2 ) and TiC-CDC (HCl)) as electrode materials were also investigated using cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, galvanostatic charge/discharge and constant power methods. The Ragone plots for carbide-derived carbons prepared by using different reactants (Cl 2 , HCl) are quite similar and at high power loads TiC-CDC (Cl 2 ) material synthesized at 900 °C, i.e. materials with optimal porous structure, deliver higher power at constant energy

  10. Review of some past and present powder metallurgy programs at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheinberg, H.

    1977-07-01

    A new process is described for molding and extruding complicated shapes of uranium-loaded graphite to close tolerances for use in nuclear propulsion engines. The process for hot-pressing copper-boron carbide and forming it into sheet for use as neutronic control material for these engines is also described. Fabrication procedure and deformation testing of carbide-graphite composites for fuel element supports are outlined, as is the procedure for fabricating tungsten-thoria heat shields for these reactors. Details are given for production of uranium carbide-zirconium carbide solid-solution powder and fabrication of this powder and molybdenum uranium oxide powder into fuel pins for thermionic reactors. Methods and details are given for spheroidization of lithium deuteride to be used as laser fusion targets and for quality upgrading and characterization of micron-size balloons for that use

  11. Doped Boron Carbide-Based Polymers: Fundamental Studies of a Novel Class of Materials for Enhanced Neutron Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    heterojunction diodes fabricated from these films show no evidence of Schottky barrier formation or of significant leakage current in reverse bias [8...all of summer 2012 for this purpose. Related project work: measuring the electronic structure and the surface oxide of thorium oxide ThO2 with Tony...Detecting and Nanoelectronic Applications, Techon 2012. 4. “The History and Development of Boron Carbon Alloy Devices and Rare Earth Heterojunction

  12. Effect of vanadium carbide on dry sliding wear behavior of powder metallurgy AISI M2 high speed steel processed by concentrated solar energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García, C. [Materials Engineering. E.I.I., Universidad de Valladolid. C/Paseo del cauce 59, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Romero, A. [E.T.S. Ingenieros Industriales. Instituto de Investigaciones Energéticas y Aplicaciones Industriales (INEI). Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Edificio Politécnico, Avda. Camilo José Cela s/n, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Herranz, G., E-mail: gemma.herranz@uclm.es [E.T.S. Ingenieros Industriales. Instituto de Investigaciones Energéticas y Aplicaciones Industriales (INEI). Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Edificio Politécnico, Avda. Camilo José Cela s/n, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Blanco, Y.; Martin, F. [Materials Engineering. E.I.I., Universidad de Valladolid. C/Paseo del cauce 59, 47011 Valladolid (Spain)

    2016-11-15

    Mixtures of AISI M2 high speed steel and vanadium carbide (3, 6 or 10 wt.%) were prepared by powder metallurgy and sintered by concentrated solar energy (CSE). Two different powerful solar furnaces were employed to sinter the parts and the results were compared with those obtained by conventional powder metallurgy using a tubular electric furnace. CSE allowed significant reduction of processing times and high heating rates. The wear resistance of compacts was studied by using rotating pin-on-disk and linearly reciprocating ball-on-flat methods. Wear mechanisms were investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations and chemical inspections of the microstructures of the samples. Better wear properties than those obtained by conventional powder metallurgy were achieved. The refinement of the microstructure and the formation of carbonitrides were the reasons for this. - Highlights: •Powder metallurgy of mixtures of M2 high speed steel and VC are studied. •Some sintering is done by concentrated solar energy. •Rotating pin-on-disk and linearly reciprocating ball-on-flat methods are used. •The tribological properties and wear mechanisms, under dry sliding, are studied.

  13. Influencing factors and kinetics analysis on the leaching of iron from boron carbide waste-scrap with ultrasound-assisted method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Xing, Pengfei; Du, Xinghong; Gao, Shuaibo; Chen, Chen

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, the ultrasound-assisted leaching of iron from boron carbide waste-scrap was investigated and the optimization of different influencing factors had also been performed. The factors investigated were acid concentration, liquid-solid ratio, leaching temperature, ultrasonic power and frequency. The leaching of iron with conventional method at various temperatures was also performed. The results show the maximum iron leaching ratios are 87.4%, 94.5% for 80min-leaching with conventional method and 50min-leaching with ultrasound assistance, respectively. The leaching of waste-scrap with conventional method fits the chemical reaction-controlled model. The leaching with ultrasound assistance fits chemical reaction-controlled model, diffusion-controlled model for the first stage and second stage, respectively. The assistance of ultrasound can greatly improve the iron leaching ratio, accelerate the leaching rate, shorten leaching time and lower the residual iron, comparing with conventional method. The advantages of ultrasound-assisted leaching were also confirmed by the SEM-EDS analysis and elemental analysis of the raw material and leached solid samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A combination method for simulation of secondary knock-on atoms of boron carbide induced by neutron irradiation in SPRR-300

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Jian-Chun; Feng, Qi-Jie; Liu, Xian-Kun; Zhan, Chang-Yong; Zou, Yu; Liu, Yao-Guang

    2016-01-01

    A multiscale sequence of simulation should be used to predict properties of materials under irradiation. Binary collision theory and molecular dynamics (MDs) method are commonly used to characterize the displacement cascades induced by neutrons in a material. In order to reduce the clock time spent for the MD simulation of damages induced by high-energy primary knock-on atoms (PKAs), the damage zones were split into sub-cascade according to the sub-cascade formation criteria. Two well-known codes, Geant4 and TRIM, were used to simulate high-energy PKA-induced cascades in B_4C and then produce the secondary knock-on atom (SKA) energy spectrum. It has been found that both high-energy primary knock-on B and C atoms move a long range in the boron carbide. These atoms produce sub-cascades at the tip of trajectory. The energy received by most of the SKAs is <10 keV, which can be used as input to reduce the clock time spent for MD simulation.

  15. Laser shock processing on microstructure and hardness of polycrystalline cubic boron nitride tools with and without nanodiamond powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melookaran, Roslyn; Melaibari, Ammar; Deng, Cheng; Molian, Pal

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Laser shock waves hardened polycrystalline cubic boron nitride tools by up to 15%. ► Laser shock waves can build layer-by-layer of nanodiamond to form micro-diamond tools. ► Multiple laser shocks induce significant phase transitions in cBN and nanodiamond. -- Abstract: High amplitude, short duration shock waves created by a 1064 nm, 10 ns Q-switched Nd:YAG laser were used to increase the hardness as well as build successive layers of nanodiamond on sintered polycrystalline cubic boron nitride (PcBN) tools. Multiple scans of laser shocking were applied. Scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, Tukon microhardness tester, and optical surface profilometer were used to evaluate the microstructure, phase change, Vicker’s microhardness and surface roughness. Results indicated that laser shock processing of plain PcBN changed the binder concentration, caused phase transition from cubic to hexagonal form, increased the hardness, and almost unaffected surface roughness. Laser shock wave sintering of nanodiamond powders on PcBN resulted in deagglomeration and layer-by-layer build-up of nanoparticles for a thickness of 30 μm inferring that a novel solid freeform technique designated as “shock wave induced freeform technique (SWIFT)” is being discovered for making micro-tools. Depending on the number of multiple laser shocks, the hardness of nanodiamond compact was lower or higher than that of PcBN. It is hypothesized that nanodiamond particles could serve as crack deflectors, increasing the fracture toughness of PcBN.

  16. Nanometric onion-like hollow spheres in laser synthesized boron nitride ultrafine powder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boulanger, L; Willaime, F [CEA Centre d` Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Direction des Technologies Avancees; Cauchetier, M [CEA Centre d` Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. de Recherche sur l` Etat Condense, les Atomes et les Molecules

    1994-12-31

    TEM observations of ultra-fine B Cl{sub 3}-N H{sub 3} powders elaborated by an innovative method, laser pyrolysis, are presented. The resulting microstructures in the as received state and after thermal treatments show small nanometric scale configurations close to the ones met with carbon, such as an hollowed configuration of onions but at a much smaller scale than with carbon. 3 figs., 3 refs.

  17. Natural precursor based hydrothermal synthesis of sodium carbide for reactor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swapna, M. S.; Saritha Devi, H. V.; Sebastian, Riya; Ambadas, G.; Sankararaman, S.

    2017-12-01

    Carbides are a class of materials with high mechanical strength and refractory nature which finds a wide range of applications in industries and nuclear reactors. The existing synthesis methods of all types of carbides have problems in terms of use of toxic chemical precursors, high-cost, etc. Sodium carbide (Na2C2) which is an alkali metal carbide is the least explored one and also that there is no report of low-cost and low-temperature synthesis of sodium carbide using the eco-friendly, easily available natural precursors. In the present work, we report a simple low-cost, non-toxic hydrothermal synthesis of refractory sodium carbide using the natural precursor—Pandanus. The formation of sodium carbide along with boron carbide is evidenced by the structural and morphological characterizations. The sample thus synthesized is subjected to field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), x-ray powder diffraction (XRD), ultraviolet (UV)—visible spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman, and photoluminescent (PL) spectroscopic techniques.

  18. Influence of trace boron on the morphology of titanium carbide in an Al-Ti-C-B master alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nie Jinfeng; Liu Xiangfa; Ma Xiaoguang

    2010-01-01

    The influence of trace B (boron) element on the morphology of TiC crystals in an Al-Ti-C-B master alloy prepared by a melt reaction method has been investigated in this paper. The morphology and chemical composition of TiC crystals are characterized from X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), energy dispersion spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED) analyses. It is found that both TiC hexagonal platelet and TiC polyhedron have formed in the Al-Ti-C-B master alloy. Furthermore, a trace amount of B element is found in TiC hexagonal platelets evidenced by the EDS spectrum. However, the SAED pattern confirms that the crystal structure of TiC has not changed. The formation and growth mechanism of the TiC hexagonal platelet have been discussed. It is considered that the trace B element in the aluminum melt promotes the transformation of TiC from polyhedron to hexagonal platelet at the initial growth stage.

  19. MICROSTRUCTURE, THERMO-PHYSICAL, MECHANICAL AND WEAR PROPERTIES OF IN-SITU FORMED BORON CARBIDE - ZIRCONIUM DIBORIDE COMPOSITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. S. R. Ch. Murthy

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Microstructure, thermos-physical, mechanical and wear properties of in-situ formed B₄C- ZrB₂ composite were investigated. Coefficient of thermal expansion, thermal diffusivity and electrical resistivity of the composite were measured at different temperatures up to 1000 °C in inert atmosphere. Flexural strength was measured up to 900 °C in air. Friction and wear properties have been studied at different loads under reciprocative sliding, using a counter body (ball of cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co at ambient conditions. X-ray diffraction (XRD and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA confirmed the formation of ZrB₂ as the reaction product in the composite. Electrical resistivity was measured as 3.02 x 10-4Ω.m at 1000°C. Thermal conductivity measured at temperatures between 25°C and 1000 °C was in the range of 8 to 10 W/m-K. Flexural strength of the composite decreased with increase in temperature and reached a value of 92 MPa at 900°C. The average value of coefficient of friction (COF was measured as 0.15 at 20 N load and 10 Hz frequency. Increase of load from 5 N to 20 N resulted in decrease in COF from 0.24 to 0.15 at 10 Hz frequency. Specific wear rate data observed was of the order of 10-6 mm³/N-m. Both abrasive and tribo-chemical reaction wear mechanisms were observed on the worn surface of flat and counter body materials. At higher loads (≥10 N a tribo-chemical reaction wear mechanism was dominant.

  20. Optical-optical double resonance, laser induced fluorescence, and revision of the signs of the spin-spin constants of the boron carbide (BC) free radical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunahori, Fumie X.; Nagarajan, Ramya; Clouthier, Dennis J.

    2015-12-01

    The cold boron carbide free radical (BC X 4Σ-) has been produced in a pulsed discharge free jet expansion using a precursor mixture of trimethylborane in high pressure argon. High resolution laser induced fluorescence spectra have been obtained for the B 4Σ--X 4Σ- and E 4Π-X 4Σ- band systems of both 11BC and 10BC. An optical-optical double resonance (OODR) scheme was implemented to study the finer details of both band systems. This involved pumping a single rotational level of the B state with one laser and then recording the various allowed transitions from the intermediate B state to the final E state with a second laser by monitoring the subsequent E-X ultraviolet fluorescence. In this fashion, we were able to prove unambiguously that, contrary to previous studies, the spin-spin constant λ is negative in the ground state and positive in the B 4Σ- excited state. It has been shown that λ″ expected based on a semiempirical second order perturbation theory calculation of the magnitude of the spin-spin constant. The OODR spectra have also been used to validate our assignments of the complex and badly overlapped E 4Π-X 4Σ- 0-0 and 1-0 bands of 11BC. The E-X 0-0 band of 10BC was found to be severely perturbed. The ground state main electron configuration is …3σ24σ25σ11π22π0 and the derived bond lengths show that there is a 0.03 Å contraction in the B state, due to the promotion of an electron from the 4σ antibonding orbital to the 5σ bonding orbital. In contrast, the bond length elongates by 0.15 Å in the E state, a result of promoting an electron from the 5σ bonding orbital to the 2π antibonding orbitals.

  1. Study of boron carbide evolution under neutron irradiation; Contribution a l'etude de l'evolution du carbure de bore sous irradiation neutronique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simeone, D. [CEA/Saclay, Dept. de Mecanique et de Technologie (DMT), 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)]|[Universite Blaise Pascal, Clermont-Ferrand II, (CNRS), 63 - Aubiere (France)

    1999-07-01

    Owing to its high neutron efficiency, boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) is used as a neutron absorber in control rods of nuclear plants. Its behaviour under irradiation has been extensively studied for many years. It now seems clear that brittleness of the material induced by the {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li capture reaction is due to penny shaped helium bubbles associated to a high strain field around them. However, no model explains the behaviour of the material under neutron irradiation. In order to build such a model, this work uses different techniques: nuclear microprobe X-ray diffraction profile analysis and Raman and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy to present an evolution model of B{sub 4}C under neutron irradiation. The use of nuclear reactions produced by a nuclear microprobe such as the {sup 7}Li(p,p'{gamma}){sup 7}Li reaction, allows to measure lithium profile in B{sub 4}C pellets irradiated either in Pressurised Water Reactors or in Fast Breeder Reactors. Examining such profiles enables us to describe the migration of lithium atoms out of B{sub 4}C materials under neutron irradiation. The analysis of X-ray diffraction profiles of irradiated B{sub 4}C samples allows us to quantify the concentrations of helium bubbles as well as the strain fields around such bubbles.Furthermore Raman spectroscopy studies of different B{sub 4}C samples lead us to propose that under neutron irradiation. the CBC linear chain disappears. Such a vanishing of this CBC chain. validated by NMR analysis, may explain the penny shaped of helium bubbles inside irradiated B{sub 4}C. (author)

  2. Optical-optical double resonance, laser induced fluorescence, and revision of the signs of the spin-spin constants of the boron carbide (BC) free radical

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunahori, Fumie X. [Department of Chemistry and Physics, Franklin College, Franklin, Indiana 46131 (United States); Nagarajan, Ramya; Clouthier, Dennis J., E-mail: dclaser@uky.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506-0055 (United States)

    2015-12-14

    The cold boron carbide free radical (BC X {sup 4}Σ{sup −}) has been produced in a pulsed discharge free jet expansion using a precursor mixture of trimethylborane in high pressure argon. High resolution laser induced fluorescence spectra have been obtained for the B {sup 4}Σ{sup −}–X {sup 4}Σ{sup −} and E {sup 4}Π–X {sup 4}Σ{sup −} band systems of both {sup 11}BC and {sup 10}BC. An optical-optical double resonance (OODR) scheme was implemented to study the finer details of both band systems. This involved pumping a single rotational level of the B state with one laser and then recording the various allowed transitions from the intermediate B state to the final E state with a second laser by monitoring the subsequent E–X ultraviolet fluorescence. In this fashion, we were able to prove unambiguously that, contrary to previous studies, the spin-spin constant λ is negative in the ground state and positive in the B {sup 4}Σ{sup −} excited state. It has been shown that λ″ < 0 is in fact expected based on a semiempirical second order perturbation theory calculation of the magnitude of the spin-spin constant. The OODR spectra have also been used to validate our assignments of the complex and badly overlapped E {sup 4}Π–X {sup 4}Σ{sup −} 0-0 and 1-0 bands of {sup 11}BC. The E–X 0-0 band of {sup 10}BC was found to be severely perturbed. The ground state main electron configuration is …3σ{sup 2}4σ{sup 2}5σ{sup 1}1π{sup 2}2π{sup 0} and the derived bond lengths show that there is a 0.03 Å contraction in the B state, due to the promotion of an electron from the 4σ antibonding orbital to the 5σ bonding orbital. In contrast, the bond length elongates by 0.15 Å in the E state, a result of promoting an electron from the 5σ bonding orbital to the 2π antibonding orbitals.

  3. Design, Fabrication and Performance of Boron-Carbide Control Elements; Conception, Fabrication et Comportement de Lames de Commande en Carbure de Bore; Raschety, izgotovlenie i kharakteristiki reguliruyushchikh sterzhnej. Iz karbida Bora; Proyecto, Elaboracion y Rendimiento de Elementos de Control de Carburo de Boro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brammer, H. A.; Jacobson, J. [General Electric Company, San Jose, CA (United States)

    1964-06-15

    A control blade design, incorporating boron-carbide (B{sub 4}C) in stainless-steel tubes, was introduced into service in boiling water reactors in April 1961. Since that time this blade has become the standard reference control element in General Electric boiling-water reactors, replacing the 2% boron-stainless-steel blades previously used. The blades consist of a sheathed, cruciform array of small vertical stainless-steel tubes filled with compacted boron-carbide powder. The boron-carbide powder is confined longitudinally into several independent compartments by swaging over ball bearings located inside the tubes. The development and use of boron-carbide control rods is discussed in five phases: 1. Summary of experience with boron-steel blades and reasons for transition to boron-carbide control; 2. Design of the boron-carbide blade, beginning with developmental experiments, including early measurements performed in the AEC ''Control Rod Material and Development Program'' at the Vallecitos Atomic Laboratory, through a description of the final control blade configuration; 3. Fabrication of the blades and quality control procedures; 4. Results of confirmatory pre-operational mechanical and reactivity testing; and 5. Post-operational experience with the blades, including information on the results of mechanical inspection and reactivity testing after two years of reactor service. (author) [French] Un modele de lame de commande en carbure de bore (B{sub 4}C) a ete mis en place dans des reacteurs a eau bouillante en avril 1961. Depuis lors, cette lame est devenue l 'element de commande temoin classique dans les reacteurs a eau bouillante de la General Electric et a remplace les lames en acier inoxydable a 2% de bore utilisees auparavant. Ces lames consistent en un assemblage gaine cruciforme comprenant de petits tubes d'acier inoxydable verticaux remplis de poudre de carbure de bore agglomeree. Dans le sens de la longueur, cette poudre est enfermee dans plusieurs

  4. Elaboration of silicon carbides nano particles (SiC): from the powder synthesis to the sintered ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reau, A.

    2008-01-01

    Materials for the reactor cores of the fourth generation will need materials supporting high temperatures with fast neutrons flux. SiC f /SiC ceramics are proposed. One of the possible elaboration process is to fill SiC fiber piece with nano particles SiC powder and to strengthen by sintering. The aim of this thesis is to obtain a nano structured SiC ceramic as a reference for the SiC f /SiC composite development and to study the influence of the fabrication parameters. (A.L.B.)

  5. Effect of silicon carbide addition on the corrosion behavior of powder metallurgy Cu−30Zn brass in a 3.5 wt% NaCl solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almomani, Mohammed Ali, E-mail: maalmomani7@just.edu.jo [Department of Industrial Engineering, Jordan University of Science and Technology, P. O. Box 3030, Irbid 22110 (Jordan); Tyfour, Wa' il Radwan, E-mail: wrtyfou@just.edu.jo [Department of Industrial Engineering, Jordan University of Science and Technology, P. O. Box 3030, Irbid 22110 (Jordan); Nemrat, Mohammed Hani, E-mail: mohammednemrat@yahoo.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Institute of Applied Technology, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates)

    2016-09-15

    A study was made to evaluate the corrosion behavior when Cu−30Zn alloy is reinforced with different weight fractions of silicon carbide (SiC) particles in a simulated sea solution (3.5 wt% NaCl aqueous solution). The composites were produced via powder metallurgy (PM) route. For the sake of comparison, the corrosion behaviors of unreinforced and reinforced alloy were examined. Electrochemical measurements (potentiodynamic testing) showed that the corrosion rate of the composites decreased with increase of SiC weight percentages, as a result of weak microgalvanic couple between reinforcement particles and Cu−30Zn matrix, and the low possibility of intermetallic phases formation. ANOVA test indicated that the variations of corrosion rate of the composites upon changing weight percentages of SiC particles are statistically significant. Polarization curves showed that the passive film tends to be less stable, and the potential difference between passivation and free corrosion points increased with increase of SiC weight percentages, as SiC cathodically protect the matrix material by sacrificial anodic dissolution of crevice regions about reinforcement particles. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) images of the sample's surfaces before and after testing are in agreement with the electrochemical results. - Highlights: • Effect of adding SiC on both uniform and localized corrosion of Cu−30Zn alloy is studied. • Reinforcing Cu−30Zn with nonconductive SiC particles decreases its tendency to uniform and localized corrosion. • Reinforcement particles cathodically protect the matrix material, and retard pit propagation to the matrix.

  6. Development of nano-structured silicon carbide ceramics: from synthesis of the powder to sintered ceramics; Elaboration de ceramiques nanostructurees en carbure de silicium: de la synthese de la poudre a la ceramique frittee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reau, A.

    2008-12-15

    The materials used inside future nuclear reactors will be subjected to very high temperature and neutrons flux. Silicon carbide, in the form of SiC{sub f}/SiC nano-structured composite is potentially interesting for this type of application. It is again necessary to verify the contribution of nano-structure on the behaviour of this material under irradiation. To verify the feasibility and determine the properties of the matrix, it was envisaged to produce it by powder metallurgy from SiC nanoparticles. The objective is to obtain a fully dense nano-structured SiC ceramic without additives. For that, a parametric study of the phases of synthesis and agglomeration was carried out, the objective of which is to determine the active mechanisms and the influence of the key parameters. Thus, studying the nano-powder synthesis by laser pyrolysis allowed to produce, with high production rates, homogeneous batches of SiC nanoparticles whose size can be adjusted between 15 and 90 nm. These powders have been densified by an innovating method: Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS). The study and the optimization of the key parameters allowed the densification of silicon carbide ceramic without sintering aids while preserving the nano-structure of material. The thermal and mechanical properties of final materials were studied in order to determine the influence of the microstructure on their properties. (author)

  7. Effect of heat absorbing powder addition on cell morphology of porous titanium composite manufactured by reactive precursor method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobashi, Makoto; Kamiya, Yoshinori; Kanetake, Naoyuki

    2012-01-01

    Open-cell structured porous titanium/ceramics composite was synthesized by a reactive precursor method using titanium and boron carbide (B 4 C) as reactant powders. Pore morphology was controlled by adding heat absorbing powder (titanium diboride: TiB 2 ) in the Ti+B 4 C blended powder. The effects of molar blending ratio of titanium and B 4 C and the amount of heat absorbing powder addition on the cell morphology (either open or closed) were investigated. Fine and homogeneous open-cell structure was achieved by adding appropriate amount of heat absorbing agent powder (>15 vol%), and the relative density of the specimen after the reaction became closer to that of the precursor by increasing TiB 2 volume fraction. When the volume fraction of TiB 2 addition was 20%, the open-cell fraction was maintained as 1.0 regardless of the relative density of the precursor.

  8. Fabrication of boron-phosphide neutron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzsimmons, M.; Pynn, R.

    1997-01-01

    Boron phosphide is a potentially viable candidate for high neutron flux neutron detectors. The authors have explored chemical vapor deposition methods to produce such detectors and have not been able to produce good boron phosphide coatings on silicon carbide substrates. However, semi-conducting quality films have been produced. Further testing is required

  9. Combustion of Na2B4O7 + Mg + C to synthesis B4C powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Guojian; Xu Jiayue; Zhuang Hanrui; Li Wenlan

    2009-01-01

    Boron carbide powder was fabricated by combustion synthesis (CS) method directly from mixed powders of borax (Na 2 B 4 O 7 ), magnesium (Mg) and carbon. The adiabatic temperature of the combustion reaction of Na 2 B 4 O 7 + 6 Mg + C was calculated. The control of the reactions was achieved by selecting reactant composition, relative density of powder compact and gas pressure in CS reactor. The effects of these different influential factors on the composition and morphologies of combustion products were investigated. The results show that, it is advantageous for more Mg/Na 2 B 4 O 7 than stoichiometric ratio in Na 2 B 4 O 7 + Mg + C system and high atmosphere pressure in the CS reactor to increase the conversion degree of reactants to end product. The final product with the minimal impurities' content could be fabricated at appropriate relative density of powder compact. At last, boron carbide without impurities could be obtained after the acid enrichment and distilled water washing.

  10. Behaviour of a VVER-1000 fuel element with boron carbide/steel absorber tested under severe fuel damage conditions in the CORA facility (Results of experiment CORA-W2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, S.; Hofmann, P.; Noack, V.; Schanz, G.; Schumacher, G.; Sepold, L.

    1994-10-01

    The 'Severe Fuel Damage' (SFD) experiments of the Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (KfK), Federal Republic of Germany, were carried out in the out-of-pile facility 'CORA' as part of the international Severe Fuel Damage (SFD) research. The experimental program was set up to provide information on the failure mechanisms of Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel elements in a temperature range from 1200 C to 2000 C and in few cases up to 2400 C. Between 1987 and 1992 a total of 17 CORA experiments with two different bundle configurations, i.e. PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) and BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) bundles were performed. These assemblies represented 'Western-type' fuel elements with the pertinent materials for fuel, cladding, grid spacer, and absorber rod. At the end of the experimental program two VVER-1000 specific tests were run in the CORA facility with identical objectives but with genuine VVER-type materials. The experiments, designated CORA-W1 and CORA-W2 were conducted on February 18, 1993 and April 21, 1993, respectively. Test bundle CORA-W1 was without absorber material whereas CORA-W2 contained one absorber rod (boron carbide/steel). As in the earlier CORA tests the test bundles were subjected to temperature transients of a slow heatup rate in a steam environment. The transient phases of the tests were initiated with a temperature ramp rate of 1 K/s. With these conditions a so-called small-break LOCA was simulated. The temperature escalation due to the exothermal zircon/niobium-steam reaction started at about 1200 C, leading the bundles to maximum temperatures of approximately 1900 C. The thermal response of bundle CORA-W2 is comparable to that of CORA-W1. In test CORA-W2, however, the temperature front moved faster from the top to the bottom compared to test CORA-W1 [de

  11. Sintering of B{sub 4}C powder obtained by a modified carbo-thermal reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha, R.M.; Kazumi, M.H.; Goncalves, D.P.; Melo, F.C.L. [Centro Tecnico Aeroespacial (CTA) - Instituto de Aeronautica e Espaco, Praca Marechal Eduardo Gomes, 50 Campus do CTA - Vila das Acacias, 12228-904 Sao Jose dos Campos-SP (Brazil)

    2005-07-01

    Boron carbide is one of the hardest materials and a highly refractory material that is of great interest for structural, electronic and nuclear applications. B{sub 4}C is commercially manufactured by the carbo-thermal reduction of a mixture of boron oxide (B{sub 2}O{sub 3}) in an batch electric arc furnace process. However the carbo-thermal reaction on the stoichiometric starting composition results an excess carbon residue because of the boron loss in the form of B{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Thus, a modified carbo-thermal reaction is applied with an excess B{sub 2}O{sub 3} to compensate the loss and to obtain stoichiometric powders. The aim of this work is to study the sinterability of this powder with the lower carbon residue acting as sintering additive. Pressureless sintering in the temperatures of 1900 deg. C/30 min and 2100 deg. C/30 min in argon atmosphere were applied. The synthesized powders were analysed by XRD and SEM. Density of 94% of theoretical density was achieved for sample prepared with the powder obtained with 50% B{sub 2}O{sub 3} excess synthesized at 1700 deg. C/15 min. (authors)

  12. Sintering of B4C powder obtained by a modified carbo-thermal reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, R.M.; Kazumi, M.H.; Goncalves, D.P.; Melo, F.C.L.

    2005-01-01

    Boron carbide is one of the hardest materials and a highly refractory material that is of great interest for structural, electronic and nuclear applications. B 4 C is commercially manufactured by the carbo-thermal reduction of a mixture of boron oxide (B 2 O 3 ) in an batch electric arc furnace process. However the carbo-thermal reaction on the stoichiometric starting composition results an excess carbon residue because of the boron loss in the form of B 2 O 2 . Thus, a modified carbo-thermal reaction is applied with an excess B 2 O 3 to compensate the loss and to obtain stoichiometric powders. The aim of this work is to study the sinterability of this powder with the lower carbon residue acting as sintering additive. Pressureless sintering in the temperatures of 1900 deg. C/30 min and 2100 deg. C/30 min in argon atmosphere were applied. The synthesized powders were analysed by XRD and SEM. Density of 94% of theoretical density was achieved for sample prepared with the powder obtained with 50% B 2 O 3 excess synthesized at 1700 deg. C/15 min. (authors)

  13. Boronization and Carburization of Superplastic Stainless Steel and Titanium-Based Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masafumi Matsushita

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Bronization and carburization of fine-grain superplastic stainless steel is reviewed, and new experimental results for fine grain Ti88.5Al4.5V3Fe2Mo2 are reported. In superplastic duplex stainless steel, the diffusion of carbon and boron is faster than in non-superplastic duplex stainless steel. Further, diffusion is activated by uniaxial compressive stress. Moreover, non-superplastic duplex stainless steel shows typical grain boundary diffusion; however, inner grain diffusion is confirmed in superplastic stainless steel. The presence of Fe and Cr carbides or borides is confirmed by X-ray diffraction, which indicates that the diffused carbon and boron react with the Fe and Cr in superplastic stainless steel. The Vickers hardness of the carburized and boronized layers is similar to that achieved with other surface treatments such as electro-deposition. Diffusion of boron into the superplastic Ti88.5Al4.5V3Fe2Mo2 alloy was investigated. The hardness of the surface exposed to boron powder can be increased by annealing above the superplastic temperature. However, the Vickers hardness is lower than that of Ti boride.

  14. Production of silicon carbide bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkinson, K.

    1981-01-01

    A body consisting essentially of a coherent mixture of silicon carbide and carbon for subsequent siliconising is produced by casting a slip comprising silicon carbide and carbon powders in a porous mould. Part of the surface of the body, particularly internal features, is formed by providing within the mould a core of a material which retains its shape while casting is in progress but is compressed by shrinkage of the cast body as it dries and is thereafter removable from the cast body. Materials which are suitable for the core are expanded polystyrene and gelatinous products of selected low elastic modulus. (author)

  15. Superplastic boronizing of duplex stainless steel under dual compression method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jauhari, I.; Yusof, H.A.M.; Saidan, R.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Superplastic boronizing. → Dual compression method has been developed. → Hard boride layer. → Bulk deformation was significantly thicker the boronized layer. → New data on boronizing could be expanded the application of DSS in industries. - Abstract: In this work, SPB of duplex stainless steel (DSS) under compression method is studied with the objective to produce ultra hard and thick boronized layer using minimal amount of boron powder and at a much faster boronizing time as compared to the conventional process. SPB is conducted under dual compression methods. In the first method DSS is boronized using a minimal amount of boron powder under a fix pre-strained compression condition throughout the process. The compression strain is controlled in such a way that plastic deformation is restricted at the surface asperities of the substrate in contact with the boron powder. In the second method, the boronized specimen taken from the first mode is compressed superplastically up to a certain compressive strain under a certain strain rate condition. The process in the second method is conducted without the present of boron powder. As compared with the conventional boronizing process, through this SPB under dual compression methods, a much harder and thicker boronized layer thickness is able to be produced using a minimal amount of boron powder.

  16. Superplastic boronizing of duplex stainless steel under dual compression method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jauhari, I., E-mail: iswadi@um.edu.my [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Yusof, H.A.M.; Saidan, R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2011-10-25

    Highlights: {yields} Superplastic boronizing. {yields} Dual compression method has been developed. {yields} Hard boride layer. {yields} Bulk deformation was significantly thicker the boronized layer. {yields} New data on boronizing could be expanded the application of DSS in industries. - Abstract: In this work, SPB of duplex stainless steel (DSS) under compression method is studied with the objective to produce ultra hard and thick boronized layer using minimal amount of boron powder and at a much faster boronizing time as compared to the conventional process. SPB is conducted under dual compression methods. In the first method DSS is boronized using a minimal amount of boron powder under a fix pre-strained compression condition throughout the process. The compression strain is controlled in such a way that plastic deformation is restricted at the surface asperities of the substrate in contact with the boron powder. In the second method, the boronized specimen taken from the first mode is compressed superplastically up to a certain compressive strain under a certain strain rate condition. The process in the second method is conducted without the present of boron powder. As compared with the conventional boronizing process, through this SPB under dual compression methods, a much harder and thicker boronized layer thickness is able to be produced using a minimal amount of boron powder.

  17. Plastic deformation of particles of zirconium and titanium carbide subjected to vibration grinding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kravchik, A.E.; Neshpor, V.S.; Savel' ev, G.A.; Ordan' yan, S.S.

    1976-12-01

    A study is made of the influence of stoichiometry on the characteristics of microplastic deformation in powders of zirconium and titanium carbide subjected to vibration grinding. The carbide powders were produced by direct synthesis from the pure materials: metallic titanium and zirconium and acetylene black. As to the nature of their elastic deformation, zirconium and titanium carbides can be considered elastic-isotropic materials. During vibration grinding, the primary fracture planes are the (110) planes. Carbides of nonstoichiometric composition are more brittle.

  18. Powder metallurgy of refractory metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eck, R.

    1979-01-01

    This paper reports on the powder metallurgical methods for the production of high-melting materials, such as pure metals and their alloys, compound materials with a tungsten base and hard metals from liquid phase sintered carbides. (author)

  19. Plasma spraying process of disperse carbides for spraying and facing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blinkov, I.V.; Vishnevetskaya, I.A.; Kostyukovich, T.G.; Ostapovich, A.O.

    1989-01-01

    A possibility to metallize carbides in plasma of impulsing capacitor discharge is considered. Powders granulation occurs during plasma spraying process, ceramic core being completely capped. X-ray phase and chemical analyses of coatings did not show considerable changes of carbon content in carbides before and after plasma processing. This distinguishes the process of carbides metallization in impulsing plasma from the similar processing in arc and high-frequency plasma generator. Use of powder composites produced in the impulsing capacitor discharge, for plasma spraying and laser facing permits 2-3 times increasing wear resistance of the surface layer as against the coatings produced from mechanical powders mixtures

  20. Development of Bulk Nanocrystalline Cemented Tungsten Carbide for Industrial Applicaitons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Z. Zak Fang, H. Y. Sohn

    2009-03-10

    This report contains detailed information of the research program entitled "Development of Bulk Nanocrystalline Cemented Tungsten Carbide Materials for Industrial Applications". The report include the processes that were developed for producing nanosized WC/Co composite powders, and an ultrahigh pressure rapid hot consolidation process for sintering of nanosized powders. The mechanical properties of consolidated materials using the nanosized powders are also reported.

  1. Boriding with boron carbide base pastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aliev, A.A.

    1978-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to develop an advanced technique of boriding using pastes under the conditions of furnace heating. The research is carried out on flat specimens of 20 and U8 steels pre-annealed in vacuum. B 4 C base pastes were used as saturating media, and the glue prepared by dissolving of nitrocellulose in the mixture of butylacetate and acetone was used as a bond. Measured was the depth of diffusion layers, produced on the 20 and u8 steels after boriding with the pastes under different temperatures and saturation times. The results of metallographic analysis show that borided layers have a specific needle-like structure. The surface of the specimens is clean and free from any paste residues and traces of partial melting

  2. Pyrotechnic Smoke Compositions Containing Boron Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-10

    smoke. Experimentation and thermodynamic modeling were used in conjunction to develop the compositions which were then evaluated both visually and by...fuel to produce thick clouds of white smoke. Experimentation and thermodynamic modeling were used in conjunction to develop the compositions which...Transmittance-based measurements may be used to quantify the effectiveness of screening smokes. The Beer -Lambert law is used to define the figures of merit

  3. The development of heterogeneous materials based on Ni and B4C powders using a cold spray and stratified selective laser melting technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippov, A. A.; Fomin, V. M.; Buzyurkin, A. E.; Kosarev, V. F.; Malikov, A. G.; Orishich, A. M.; Ryashin, N. S.

    2018-01-01

    The work is dedicated to the creation of new ceramic-composite materials based on boron carbide, nickel and using a laser welding in order to obtain three dimensional objects henceforth. The perspective way of obtaining which has been suggested by the authors combined two methods: cold spray technology and subsequent laser post-treatment. At this stage, the authors focused on the interaction of the laser with the substance, regardless of the multi-layer object development. The investigated material of this work was the metal-ceramic mixture based on boron carbide, which has high physical and mechanical characteristics, such as hardness, elastic modulus, and chemical resistance. The nickel powder as a binder and different types of boron carbide were used. The ceramic content varied from 30 to 70% by mass. Thin ceramic layers were obtained by the combined method and cross-sections of different seams were studied. It was shown that the most perspective layers for additive manufacturing could be obtained from cold spray coatings with ceramic concentrations more than 50% by weight treated when laser beam was defocused (thermal-conductive laser mode).

  4. Spheroidization of transition metal carbides in low temperature plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klinskaya, N.A.; Koroleva, E.B.; Petrunichev, V.A.; Rybalko, O.F.; Solov'ev, P.V.; Ugol'nikova, T.A.

    1986-01-01

    Plasma process of preparation of titanium, tungsten and chromium carbide spherical powders with the main particle size 40-80 μm is considered. Spheroidization degree, granulometric and phase composition of the product are investigated

  5. Effect of Hypoeutectic Boron Additions on the Grain Size and Mechanical Properties of Ti-6Al-4V Manufactured with Powder Bed Electron Beam Additive Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahbooba, Zaynab; West, Harvey; Harrysson, Ola; Wojcieszynski, Andrzej; Dehoff, Ryan; Nandwana, Peeyush; Horn, Timothy

    2017-03-01

    In additive manufacturing, microstructural control is feasible via processing parameter alteration. However, the window for parameter variation for certain materials, such as Ti-6Al-4V, is limited, and alternative methods must be employed to customize microstructures. Grain refinement and homogenization in cast titanium alloys has been demonstrated through the addition of hypoeutectic concentrations of boron. This work explores the influence of 0.00 wt.%, 0.25 wt.%, 0.50 wt.%, and 1.0 wt.% boron additions on the microstructure and bulk mechanical properties of Ti-6Al-4V samples fabricated in an Arcam A2 electron beam melting (EBM) system with commercial processing parameters for Ti-6Al-4V. Analyses of EBM fabricated Ti-6Al-4V + B indicate that the addition of 0.25-1.0 wt.% boron progressively refines the grain structure, and it improves hardness and elastic modulus. Despite a reduction in size, the β grain structure remained columnar as a result of directional heat transfer during EBM fabrication.

  6. Composite materials and bodies including silicon carbide and titanium diboride and methods of forming same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillo, Thomas M.; Chu, Henry S.; Harrison, William M.; Bailey, Derek

    2013-01-22

    Methods of forming composite materials include coating particles of titanium dioxide with a substance including boron (e.g., boron carbide) and a substance including carbon, and reacting the titanium dioxide with the substance including boron and the substance including carbon to form titanium diboride. The methods may be used to form ceramic composite bodies and materials, such as, for example, a ceramic composite body or material including silicon carbide and titanium diboride. Such bodies and materials may be used as armor bodies and armor materials. Such methods may include forming a green body and sintering the green body to a desirable final density. Green bodies formed in accordance with such methods may include particles comprising titanium dioxide and a coating at least partially covering exterior surfaces thereof, the coating comprising a substance including boron (e.g., boron carbide) and a substance including carbon.

  7. High-energy, high-rate consolidation of tungsten and tungsten-based composite powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raghunathan, S.K.; Persad, C.; Bourell, D.L.; Marcus, H.L. (Center for Materials Science and Engineering, Univ. of Texas, Austin (USA))

    1991-01-20

    Tungsten and tungsten-based heavy alloys are well known for their superior mechanical properties at elevated temperatures. However, unalloyed tungsten is difficult to consolidate owing to its very high melting temperature (3683 K). The additions of small amounts of low-melting elements such as iron, nickel, cobalt and copper, facilitate the powder processing of dense heavy alloys at moderate temperatures. Energetic high-current pulses have been used recently for powder consolidation. In this paper, the use of a homopolar generator as a power source to consolidate selected tungsten and tungsten-based alloys is examined. Various materials were consolidated including unalloyed tungsten, W-Nb, W-Ni, and tungsten heavy alloy with boron carbide. The effect of process parameters such as pressure and specific energy input on the consolidation of different alloy systems is described in terms of microstructure and property relationships. (orig.).

  8. Effect of heat treatment on Fe-B-Si-Nb alloy powder prepared by mechanical alloying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Estevam Coelho

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The effect of heat treatment on crystallization behavior of Fe73.5B15Si10Nb1.5 alloy powder prepared by mechanical alloying was studied. The powder samples were prepared by mechanical alloying (MA and for different milling times (1, 5, 25, 70 and 100 hours. Crystalline powders of iron, boron, silicon and niobium were sealed with tungsten carbide balls in a cylindrical vial under nitrogen atmosphere. The ball-to-powder weight ratio was 20 to 1. A Fritsch Pulverizette 5 planetary ball mill was used for MA the powders at room temperature and at 250 rpm. To study the microstructural evolution, a small amount of powder was collected after different milling times and examined by X-ray diffraction, using CuKalpha radiation (lambda = 0.15418 nm. The crystallization behavior was studied by differential thermal analysis, from 25 up to 1000 °C at a heating rate of 25 °C min-1.

  9. Production of titanium carbide from ilmenite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutham Niyomwas

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The production of titanium carbide (TiC powders from ilmenite ore (FeTiO3 powder by means of carbothermal reduction synthesis coupled with hydrochloric acid (HCl leaching process was investigated. A mixture of FeTiO3 and carbon powders was reacted at 1500oC for 1 hr under flowing argon gas. Subsequently, synthesized product of Fe-TiC powders were leached by 10% HCl solutions for 24 hrs to get final product of TiC powders. The powders were characterized using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron and transmission electron microscopy. The product particles were agglomerated in the stage after the leaching process, and the size of this agglomerate was 12.8 μm with a crystallite size of 28.8 nm..

  10. Sintering of nano crystalline o silicon carbide doping with

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sinterable silicon carbide powders were prepared by attrition milling and chemical processing of an acheson type -SiC. Pressureless sintering of these powders was achieved by addition of aluminium nitride together with carbon. Nearly 99% sintered density was obtained. The mechanism of sintering was studied by ...

  11. Carbide-reinforced metal matrix composite by direct metal deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novichenko, D.; Thivillon, L.; Bertrand, Ph.; Smurov, I.

    Direct metal deposition (DMD) is an automated 3D laser cladding technology with co-axial powder injection for industrial applications. The actual objective is to demonstrate the possibility to produce metal matrix composite objects in a single-step process. Powders of Fe-based alloy (16NCD13) and titanium carbide (TiC) are premixed before cladding. Volume content of the carbide-reinforced phase is varied. Relationships between the main laser cladding parameters and the geometry of the built-up objects (single track, 2D coating) are discussed. On the base of parametric study, a laser cladding process map for the deposition of individual tracks was established. Microstructure and composition of the laser-fabricated metal matrix composite objects are examined. Two different types of structures: (a) with the presence of undissolved and (b) precipitated titanium carbides are observed. Mechanism of formation of diverse precipitated titanium carbides is studied.

  12. A novel plastification agent for cemented carbides extrusion molding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji-Cheng Zhou; Bai-Yun Huang

    2001-01-01

    A type of novel plastification agent for plasticizing powder extrusion molding of cemented carbides has been developed. By optimizing their formulation and fabrication method, the novel plastification agent, with excellent properties and uniform distribution characters, were manufactured. The thermal debinding mechanism has been studied, the extruding rheological characteristics and debinding behaviors have been investigated. Using the newly developed plastification agent, the cemented carbides extrusion rods, with diameter up to 25 mm, have been manufactured. (author)

  13. Seebeck effect of some thin film carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beensh-Marchwicka, G.; Prociow, E.

    2002-01-01

    Several materials have been investigated for high-temperature thin film thermocouple applications. These include silicon carbide with boron (Si-C-B), ternary composition based on Si-C-Mn, fourfold composition based on Si-C-Zr-B and tantalum carbide (TaC). All materials were deposited on quartz or glass substrates using the pulse sputter deposition technique. Electrical conduction and thermoelectric power were measured for various compositions at 300-550 K. It has been found, that the efficiency of thermoelectric power of films containing Si-C base composition was varied from 0.0015-0.034 μW/cmK 2 . However for TaC the value about 0.093 μW/cmK 2 was obtained. (author)

  14. Crack propagation and fracture in silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, A.G.; Lange, F.F.

    1975-01-01

    Fracture mechanics and strength studies performed on two silicon carbides - a hot-pressed material (with alumina) and a sintered material (with boron) - have shown that both materials exhibit slow crack growth at room temperature in water, but only the hot-pressed material exhibits significant high temperature slow crack growth (1000 to 1400 0 C). A good correlation of the observed fracture behaviour with the crack growth predicted from the fracture mechanics parameters shows that effective failure predictions for this material can be achieved using macro-fracture mechanics data. (author)

  15. Spark plasma sintering of tantalum carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaleghi, Evan; Lin, Yen-Shan; Meyers, Marc A.; Olevsky, Eugene A.

    2010-01-01

    A tantalum carbide powder was consolidated by spark plasma sintering. The specimens were processed under various temperature and pressure conditions and characterized in terms of relative density, grain size, rupture strength and hardness. The results are compared to hot pressing conducted under similar settings. It is shown that high densification is accompanied by substantial grain growth. Carbon nanotubes were added to mitigate grain growth; however, while increasing specimens' rupture strength and final density, they had little effect on grain growth.

  16. Corrosion resistant cemented carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a corrosion resistant cemented carbide composite. It comprises: a granular tungsten carbide phase, a semi-continuous solid solution carbide phase extending closely adjacent at least a portion of the grains of tungsten carbide for enhancing corrosion resistance, and a substantially continuous metal binder phase. The cemented carbide composite consisting essentially of an effective amount of an anti-corrosion additive, from about 4 to about 16 percent by weight metal binder phase, and with the remaining portion being from about 84 to about 96 percent by weight metal carbide wherein the metal carbide consists essentially of from about 4 to about 30 percent by weight of a transition metal carbide or mixtures thereof selected from Group IVB and of the Periodic Table of Elements and from about 70 to about 96 percent tungsten carbide. The metal binder phase consists essentially of nickel and from about 10 to about 25 percent by weight chromium, the effective amount of an anti-corrosion additive being selected from the group consisting essentially of copper, silver, tine and combinations thereof

  17. Alternative Process for Manufacturing of Thin Layers of Boron for Neutron Measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auge, Gregoire; Partyka, Stanislas [Onet Technologies (France); Guerard, Bruno; Buffet, Jean-Claude [Institut Laue Langevin - ILL, Grenoble (France)

    2015-07-01

    Due to the worldwide shortage of helium 3, Boron-lined proportional counters are developed intensively by several groups. Up to now, thin boron containing layers for neutron detectors are essentially produced by sputtering of boron carbide (B{sub 4}C). This technology provides high quality films but it is slow and expensive. Our paper describes a novel and inexpensive technology for producing boron layers. This technology is based on chemical synthesis of boron 10 nanoparticles, and on electrophoretic deposition of these particles on metallic plates, or on metallic pieces with more complex shapes. The chemical synthesis consists in: - Heating boron 10 with lithium up to 700 deg. C under inert atmosphere: an intermetallic compound, LiB, is produced; - Hydrolysing this intermetallic compound: LiB + H{sub 2}O → B + Li{sup +} + OH{sup -} + 1/2H{sub 2}, where B is under the form of nanoparticles; - Purifying the suspension of boron nanoparticles in water, from lithium hydroxide, by successive membrane filtrations; - Evaporating the purified suspension, in order to get a powder of nanoparticles. The obtained nanoparticles have size around 300 nm, with a high porosity, of about 50%. This particle size is equivalent to about 150 nm massive particles. The nanoparticles are then put into suspension in a specific solvent, in order to perform deposition on metallic surfaces, by electrophoretic method. The solvent is chosen so that it is not electrolysed even under voltages of several tens of volts. An acid is dissolved into the solvent, so that the nanoparticles are positively charged. Deposition is performed on the cathode within about 10 min. The cathode could be an aluminium plate, or a nickel coated aluminium plate. Homogeneous deposition may also be performed on complex shapes, like grids in a Multigrid detector. A large volume of pieces, can be coated with a Boron-10 film in a few hours. The thickness of the layer can be adjusted according to the required neutron

  18. Comparative sinterability of combustion synthesized and commercial titanium carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manley, B.W.

    1984-11-01

    The influence of various parameters on the sinterability of combustion synthesized titanium carbide was investigaged. Titanium carbide powders, prepared by the combustion synthesis process, were sintered in the temperature range 1150 to 1600 0 C. Incomplete combustion and high oxygen contents were found to be the cause of reduced shrinkage during sintering of the combustion syntheized powders when compared to the shrinkage of commercial TiC. Free carbon was shown to inhibit shrinkage. The activation energy for sintering was found to depend on stoichiometry (C/Ti). With decreasing C/Ti, the rate of sintering increased. 29 references, 16 figures, 13 tables

  19. The preparation of titanium-vanadium carbide/nickel cermets. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Precht, W.; Sprissler, B.

    1976-01-01

    Titanium/vanadium alloy carbide rods were prepared by a zone melting procedure. Wetting studies were carried out using sections of the fused rods and candidate matrix material. It was established that nickel exhibits excellent wetting of (Ti, V) C, and accordingly cermet blends were prepared and liquid phase sintered. Processing parameters are discussed as well as their effect on the final microstructure. Alternate methods for cermet preparation are offered which use as received titanium carbide and vanadium carbide powders

  20. Density separation of boron particles. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.M.

    1980-04-01

    A density distribution much broader than expected was observed in lots of natural boron powder supplied by two different sources. The material in both lots was found to have a rhombohedral crystal structure, and the only other parameters which seemed to account for such a distribution were impurities within the crystal structure and varying isotopic ratios. A separation technique was established to isolate boron particles in narrow densty ranges. The isolated fractions were subsequently analyzed for B 10 and total boron content in an effort to determine whether selective isotopic enrichment and nonhomogeneous impurity distribution were the causes for the broad density distribution of the boron powders. It was found that although the B 10 content remained nearly constant around 18%, the total boron content varied from 37.5 to 98.7%. One of the lots also was found to contain an apparently high level of alpha rhombohedral boron which broadened the density distribution considerably. During this work, a capability for removing boron particles containing gross amounts of impurities and, thereby, improving the overall purity of the remaining material was developed. In addition, the separation technique used in this study apparently isolated particles with alpha and beta rhombohedral crystal structures, although the only supporting evidence is density data

  1. Liquid phase sintering of carbides using a nickel-molybdenum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barranco, J.M.; Warenchak, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    Liquid phase vacuum sintering was used to densify four carbide groups. These were titanium carbide, tungsten carbide, vanadium carbide, and zirconium carbide. The liquid phase consisted of nickel with additions of molybdenum of from 6.25 to 50.0 weight percent at doubling increments. The liquid phase or binder comprised 10, 20, and 40 percent by weight of the pressed powders. The specimens were tested using 3 point bending. Tungsten carbide showed the greatest improvement in bend rupture strength, flexural modulus, fracture energy and hardness using 20 percent binder with lesser amounts of molybdenum (6.25 or 12.5 wt %) added to nickel compared to pure nickel. A refinement in the carbide microstructure and/or a reduction in porosity was seen for both the titanium and tungsten carbides when the alloy binder was used compared to using the nickel alone. Curves depicting the above properties are shown for increasing amounts of molybdenum in nickel for each carbide examined. Loss of binder phase due to evaporation was experienced during heating in vacuum at sintering temperatures. In an effort to reduce porosity, identical specimens were HIP processed at 15 ksi and temperatures averaging 110 C below the sintering g temperature. The tungsten carbide and titanium carbide series containing 80 and 90 weight percent carbide phase respectively showed improvement properties after HIP while properties decreased for most other compositions

  2. Innovative boron nitride-doped propellants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thelma Manning

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The U.S. military has a need for more powerful propellants with balanced/stoichiometric amounts of fuel and oxidants. However, balanced and more powerful propellants lead to accelerated gun barrel erosion and markedly shortened useful barrel life. Boron nitride (BN is an interesting potential additive for propellants that could reduce gun wear effects in advanced propellants (US patent pending 2015-026P. Hexagonal boron nitride is a good lubricant that can provide wear resistance and lower flame temperatures for gun barrels. Further, boron can dope steel, which drastically improves its strength and wear resistance, and can block the formation of softer carbides. A scalable synthesis method for producing boron nitride nano-particles that can be readily dispersed into propellants has been developed. Even dispersion of the nano-particles in a double-base propellant has been demonstrated using a solvent-based processing approach. Stability of a composite propellant with the BN additive was verified. In this paper, results from propellant testing of boron nitride nano-composite propellants are presented, including closed bomb and wear and erosion testing. Detailed characterization of the erosion tester substrates before and after firing was obtained by electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. This promising boron nitride additive shows the ability to improve gun wear and erosion resistance without any destabilizing effects to the propellant. Potential applications could include less erosive propellants in propellant ammunition for large, medium and small diameter fire arms.

  3. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance and X-ray Diffraction of Boron- and Phosphorus-Doped Nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binh, Nguyen Thi Thanh; Dolmatov, V. Yu.; Lapchuk, N. M.; Shymanski, V. I.

    2017-11-01

    Powders of boron- and phosphorus-doped detonation nanodiamonds and sintered pellets of non-doped nanodiamond powders were studied using electron paramagnetic resonance and x-ray diffraction. Doping of detonation nanodiamond crystals with boron and phosphorus was demonstrated to be possible. These methods could be used to diagnose diamond nanocrystals doped during shock-wave synthesis.

  4. Colloidal characterization of silicon nitride and silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feke, Donald L.

    1986-01-01

    The colloidal behavior of aqueous ceramic slips strongly affects the forming and sintering behavior and the ultimate mechanical strength of the final ceramic product. The colloidal behavior of these materials, which is dominated by electrical interactions between the particles, is complex due to the strong interaction of the solids with the processing fluids. A surface titration methodology, modified to account for this interaction, was developed and used to provide fundamental insights into the interfacial chemistry of these systems. Various powder pretreatment strategies were explored to differentiate between true surface chemistry and artifacts due to exposure history. The colloidal behavior of both silicon nitride and carbide is dominated by silanol groups on the powder surfaces. However, the colloid chemistry of silicon nitride is apparently influenced by an additional amine group. With the proper powder treatments, silicon nitride and carbide powder can be made to appear colloidally equivalent. The impact of these results on processing control will be discussed.

  5. Doping of silicon carbide by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gimbert, J.

    1999-01-01

    It appeared that in some fields, as the hostile environments (high temperature or irradiation), the silicon compounds showed limitations resulting from the electrical and mechanical properties. Doping of 4H and 6H silicon carbide by ion implantation is studied from a physicochemical and electrical point of view. It is necessary to obtain n-type and p-type material to realize high power and/or high frequency devices, such as MESFETs and Schottky diodes. First, physical and electrical properties of silicon carbide are presented and the interest of developing a process technology on this material is emphasised. Then, physical characteristics of ion implantation and particularly classical dopant implantation, such as nitrogen, for n-type doping, and aluminium and boron, for p-type doping are described. Results with these dopants are presented and analysed. Optimal conditions are extracted from these experiences so as to obtain a good crystal quality and a surface state allowing device fabrication. Electrical conduction is then described in the 4H and 6H-SiC polytypes. Freezing of free carriers and scattering processes are described. Electrical measurements are carried out using Hall effect on Van der Panw test patterns, and 4 point probe method are used to draw the type of the material, free carrier concentrations, resistivity and mobility of the implanted doped layers. These results are commented and compared to the theoretical analysis. The influence of the technological process on electrical conduction is studied in view of fabricating implanted silicon carbide devices. (author)

  6. Laser deposition of carbide-reinforced coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerri, W.; Martinella, R.; Mor, G.P.; Bianchi, P.; D'Angelo, D.

    1991-01-01

    CO 2 laser cladding with blown powder presents many advantages: fusion bonding with the substrate with low dilution, metallurgical continuity in the metallic matrix, high solidification rates, ease of automation, and reduced environmental contamination. In the present paper, laser cladding experimental results using families of carbides (tungsten and titanium) mixed with metallic alloys are reported. As substrates, low alloy construction steel (AISI 4140) (austenitic stainless steel) samples have been utilized, depending on the particular carbide reinforcement application. The coating layers obtained have been characterized by metallurgical examination. They show low dilution, absence of cracks, and high abrasion resistance. The WC samples, obtained with different carbide sizes and percentages, have been characterized with dry and rubber wheel abrasion tests and the specimen behaviour has been compared with the behaviour of materials used for similar applications. The abrasion resistance proved to be better than that of other widely used hardfacing materials and the powder morphology have a non-negligible influence on the tribological properties. (orig.)

  7. Determination of boron in uranium and aluminium by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, Radhika M.; Aggarwal, S.K.

    2003-01-01

    Experiments were conducted for the determination of boron in U 3 O 8 powder and aluminium metal using dynamically modified reversed phase high pressure liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) and using precolumn chromogenic agent viz. curcumin for complexing boron. The complex was separated from the excess of reagent and determined by HPLC. The boron curcumin complex (rosocyanin) was formed after extraction of boron with 2-ethyl-1,3-hexane diol (EHD). Linear calibration curves for boron amounts in the range of 0.02 μg to 0.5 μg were developed and used for the determination of boron in aluminium and uranium samples. (author)

  8. B4C solid target boronization of the MST reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Den Hartog, D.J.; Cekic, M.; Fiksel, G.; Hokin, S.A.; Kendrick, R.D.; Prager, S.C.; Stoneking, M.R.

    1992-10-01

    A solid rod of hot-pressed boron carbide is being used as the source of boron during boronization of MST. The most striking result of this procedure is the reduction in oxygen contamination of the plasma (O III radiation, characteristic of oxygen at the edge, falls by about a factor of 3 after boronization.). The radiated power fraction drops to about half its initial value. Particle reflux from the wall is also lowered, making density control simpler. The rod (12.7 mm diameter) is inserted into the edge plasma of normal high-power RFP discharges. B 4 C is ablated from the surface of the rod and deposited in a thin film (a-B/C:H) on the walls and limiters. The energy flux carried by ''superthermal'' (not ''runaway'') electrons at the edge of MST appears to enhance the efficient, non-destructive ablation of the boron carbide rod

  9. Helium generation and diffusion in graphite and some carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, J.B.; Guinan, M.W.; Hosmer, D.W.; Condit, R.H.; Borg, R.J.

    1976-01-01

    The cross section for the generation of helium in neutron irradiated carbon was found to be 654 mb at 14.4 MeV and 744 mb at 14.9 MeV. Extrapolating to 14.1 MeV (the fusion reactor spectrum) gives 615 mb. The diffusion of helium in dense polycrystalline graphite and in pyrographite was measured and found to be D = 7.2 x 10 -7 m 2 s -1 exp (-80 kJ/RT). It is assumed that diffusion is primarily in the basal plane direction in crystals of the graphite. In polycrystalline graphite the path length is a factor of √2 longer than the measured distance due to the random orientation mismatch between successive grains. Isochronal anneals (measured helium release as the specimen is steadily heated) were run and maximum release rates were found at 200 0 C in polycrystalline graphite, 1000 0 C in pyrographite, 1350 0 C in boron carbide, and 1350 0 and 2400 0 C (two peaks) in silicon carbide. It is concluded that in these candidates for curtain materials in fusion reactors the helium releases can probably occur without bubble formation in graphites, may occur in boron carbide, but will probably cause bubble formation in silicon carbide. 7 figures

  10. Properties of cemented carbides alloyed by metal melt treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisovsky, A.F.

    2001-01-01

    The paper presents the results of investigations into the influence of alloying elements introduced by metal melt treatment (MMT-process) on properties of WC-Co and WC-Ni cemented carbides. Transition metals of the IV - VIll groups (Ti, Zr, Ta, Cr, Re, Ni) and silicon were used as alloying elements. It is shown that the MMT-process allows cemented carbides to be produced whose physico-mechanical properties (bending strength, fracture toughness, total deformation, total work of deformation and fatigue fracture toughness) are superior to those of cemented carbides produced following a traditional powder metallurgy (PM) process. The main mechanism and peculiarities of the influence of alloying elements added by the MMT-process on properties of cemented carbides have been first established. The effect of alloying elements on structure and substructure of phases has been analyzed. (author)

  11. FIST - a suite of X-ray powder crystallography programs for use with a HP-65 calculator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, I.F.; Turek, M.

    1977-12-01

    Programs for X-ray powder crystallography are defined for use with a Hewlett Packard HP-65 (programmable) pocket calculator. These include the prediction of all Bragg reflections for defined P-, F-, I-cubic, tetragonal, hexagonal and orthorhombic cells; the calculation of the position of a specific Bragg reflection from defined unit cells with all symmetries except triclinic; interconversion of theta, 2theta, sin 2 theta and d, as well as the calculation of the Nelson-Riley function; the computation of crystal densities; the interconversion of rhombohedral and hexagonal unit cells, lsub(c) determinations for graphite, the calculation of a and c for boron carbide; and Miller index transformations between various unit cells. (author)

  12. METHOD FOR PRODUCING CEMENTED CARBIDE ARTICLES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onstott, E.I.; Cremer, G.D.

    1959-07-14

    A method is described for making molded materials of intricate shape where the materials consist of mixtures of one or more hard metal carbides or oxides and matrix metals or binder metals thereof. In one embodiment of the invention 90% of finely comminuted tungsten carbide powder together with finely comminuted cobalt bonding agent is incorporated at 60 deg C into a slurry with methyl alcohol containing 1.5% paraffin, 3% camphor, 3.5% naphthalene, and 1.8% toluene. The compact is formed by the steps of placing the slurry in a mold at least one surface of which is porous to the fluid organic system, compacting the slurry, removing a portion of the mold from contact with the formed object and heating the formed object to remove the remaining organic matter and to sinter the compact.

  13. On possibility of fabrication of monolith composite materials on niobium carbide base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ploshkin, V.V.; Ul'yanina, I.Yu.; Filonenko, V.P.

    1984-01-01

    An attempt was made to fabricate the composite material on niobium carbide base possessing the elevated heat resistance, erosion and chemical resistance in special media, as well as capable of withstanding sufficient thermal shocks. Powder of niobium carbide of 10 μm fraction was used as base material, the powder of pure copper of 10...12 μm fraction - as binder. It was shown that samples of composite mateiral on niobium carbide base fabricated by the method of hydrostatic pressing possessed the minimal porosity as compared to samples fabricated by usual methods of powder metallurgy. The basic phases of composite material-copper and niobium carbide - distribute uniformly over sample cross-section and don't interact with each other under any conditions. The fabricated composite material possesses sufficient thermal shock resistance and isn't subjected to brittle fracture

  14. Tantalum and niobium carbides obtention by carbothermic reduction of columbotantalite ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordo, E.; Garcia-Carcedo, F.; Torralba, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    Tantalum and niobium carbides are characterized by its high hardness and chemical corrosion resistance. Both carbides, but mainly TaC, are used in hard metals (sintered carbides), together with their carbides, to manufacture cutting tools and dies in special machining applications involving mechanical shock at high temperature. Its use as reinforcement of wear resistant materials through powder metallurgy techniques are being investigated. However, the use of TaC is usually limited because of its high cost. Therefore tantalum carbide with niobium content, which is cheaper, is used. In this work the obtention of complex tantalum and niobium carbides from a Spanish columbotantalite ore is studied through relatively cheap and simple process as it is carbothermic reduction. Concentration of the ore, its reduction and the characterization of products are described. (Author) 11 refs

  15. ICP-MS determination of boron: method optimization during preparation of graphite reference material for boron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granthali, S.K.; Shailaja, P.P.; Mainsha, V.; Venkatesh, K.; Kallola, K.S.; Sanjukta, A.K.

    2017-01-01

    Graphite finds widespread use in nuclear reactors as moderator, reflector, and fuel fabricating components because of its thermal stability and integrity. The manufacturing process consists of various mixing, moulding and baking operations followed by heat-treatment between 2500 °C and 3000 °C. The high temperature treatment is required to drive the amorphous carbon-to-graphite phase transformation. Since synthetic graphite is processed at high temperature, impurity concentrations in the precursor carbon get significantly reduced due to volatilization. However boron may might partly gets converted into boron carbide at high temperatures in the carbon environment of graphite and remains stable (B_4C: boiling point 3500 °C) in the matrix. Literature survey reveals the use of various methods for determination of boron. Previously we have developed a method for determination of boron in graphite electrodes using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The method involves removal of graphite matrix by ignition of the sample at 800°C in presence of saturated barium hydroxide solution to prevent the loss of boron. Here we are reporting a modification in the method by using calcium carbonate in place of barium hydroxide and using beryllium (Be) as an internal standard, which resulted in a better precession. The method was validated by spike recovery experiments as well as using another technique viz. Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES). The modified method was applied in evaluation of boron concentration in the graphite reference material prepared

  16. The preparation and composition design of boron-rich lanthanum hexaboride target for sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Defang; Min, Guanghui; Wu, Yan; Yu, Huashun; Zhang, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • High-purity LaB 6 powder was prepared due to significant reduction of residual B 4 C and effective purification process. • The effects of raw materials ratio on the size, morphology, phase structure and crystalline size of LaB 6 were studied. • The correlation of component between LaB 6 films and boron-rich targets was established. • The variation of densities of LaB 6 targets with sintering time and sintering temperature was investigated. - Abstract: Lanthanum Hexaboride (LaB 6 ) nano-film has been proved to be promising transparent thermal insulation material, while its properties are limited on purity and composition. High-purity LaB 6 polycrystalline powder was prepared through boron carbide reduction method in this work. A series of techniques such as scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, laser particle analyzer and inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometer were employed to characterize LaB 6 powder. As raising the content of La 2 O 3 in reactants, more uniform, finer (2.686 μm) and purer (99.5139 wt%) LaB 6 powder is prepared, with only 0.4434 wt% residual B 4 C. The density of targets increases with the rise of sintering temperature and the extension of sintering time, while crystallite size increases simultaneously with the extension of sintering time. The introduction of B powder in target is conductive to sintering process, increasing hardness and flexural strength of targets. X-ray photoelectron spectrometer was used to characterize the composition and microstructure of LaB 6 nano-film which is tentatively considered to be composed of LaB 6 nanocrystalline and amorphous microstructure of La and B atoms. The film LaB 6.0627±0.02 was obtained when the ratio of B and La of sputtering target reached 12.5. The thickness and deposition rate decrease with the increase of B content in targets

  17. Abrasive wear behavior of heat-treated ABC-silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiao Feng; Lee, Gun Y.; Chen, Da; Ritchie, Robert O.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2002-06-17

    Hot-pressed silicon carbide, containing aluminum, boron, and carbon additives (ABC-SiC), was subjected to three-body and two-body wear testing using diamond abrasives over a range of sizes. In general, the wear resistance of ABC-SiC, with suitable heat treatment, was superior to that of commercial SiC.

  18. Ultrafine TaC powders prepared in a high frequency plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canteloup, J.; Mocellin, A.

    1976-01-01

    Ultrafine tantalum carbide powders were prepared under conditions allowing higher purities to be achieved than when plasma or chemical vapour deposition techniques are used. The process consists of dissociation-vaporisation of powders in a radio frequency argon plasma followed by quenching of the vapours and collection in an electrostatic precipitator. Physical and chemical properties are given. The presence of excess carbon appears to protect against oxidation and as a dispersing medium for the carbide powders. (U.K.)

  19. Study through potentiodynamic techniques of the corrosion resistance of different aluminium base MMC's with boron additions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abenojar, J.; Bautista, A.; Guzman, S.; Velasco, F.; Martinez, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper compares a wrought aluminium with a PM aluminium and PM aluminium alloys with boron-base additions, containing boron carbide and Fe/B (obtained by mechanical alloying during 36 hours from a Fe-B 50% mixture by weight). The effect of sintering temperature for the Fe/B containing material and the effect of mechanical alloying for the boron carbide containing aluminium alloy on the corrosion resistance of those materials have been studied. Their behaviour is followed through cyclic anodic polarization curves in chloride media. In the Al+20%Fe/B composite, low sintering temperatures (650- 950 deg C) exert a negative effect. However, when the material was sintered at high temperature (1000-1100 deg C) its behaviour was very similar to the PM pure aluminium. The effect of mechanical alloying studied in aluminium with boron carbide was also important in corrosion resistance, finding a lower corrosion rate in the mechanically alloyed material. (author)

  20. High pressure low temperature hot pressing method for producing a zirconium carbide ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockeram, Brian V.

    2017-01-10

    A method for producing monolithic Zirconium Carbide (ZrC) is described. The method includes raising a pressure applied to a ZrC powder until a final pressure of greater than 40 MPa is reached; and raising a temperature of the ZrC powder until a final temperature of less than 2200.degree. C. is reached.

  1. Nondestructive neutron activation analysis of silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandergraaf, T. T.; Wikjord, A. G.

    1973-10-15

    Instrumentel neutron activation analysis was used to determine trace constituents in silicon carbide. Four commercial powders of different origin, an NBS reference material, and a single crystal were characterized. A total of 36 activation species were identified nondestructively by high resolution gamma spectrometry; quantitative results are given for 12 of the more predominant elements. The limitations of the method for certain elements are discussed. Consideration is given to the depression of the neutron flux by impurities with large neutron absorption cross sections. Radiation fields from the various specimens were estimated assuming all radionuclides have reached their saturation activities. (auth)

  2. A study on the development of silicon carbide materials for nuclear application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Won, Dong Yeon; Kim, Chan Jung; Lee, Jae Choon; Kim, Joon Hyung; Lim, Kyung Soo; Kim, Ki Baik

    1987-12-01

    Silicon carbide was synthesized by reaction sintering process from carbon and silicon powders as starting materials. The effects of two processing parameters, i.e., heat treatment time and temperature, were examined (to characterize the reaction sintering process) in terms of the degree of reaction and phase developed during heat treatment. The final products after reaction of silicon and carbon powders were identified as β-SiC having ZnS crystal structure. Sintering of cordierite ceramics which was used as an high temperature inorganic binder to fabricate ceramically bound silicon carbide, and phase identification of the sintered ceramics by X-ray powder diffraction techniques. (Author)

  3. Plasma spheroidization and cladding of powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrunichev, V.A.; Averin, V.V.; Sorokin, L.M.; Koroleva, E.B.

    1987-02-01

    With reference to experimental results for nickel and chromium alloys, it is shown that complex alloy powders can be spheroidized in plasma discharges using an argon plasma with hydrogen. The spheroidizing process is accompanied by the reduction of surface oxides, with uniform element distribution within the particles; the granulometric composition of the particles is preserved. It is also shown that plasma technology can be used for producing metal-clad oxide and carbide powders, which improve the performance of cermets and coatings.

  4. Elaboration of silicon carbides nano particles (SiC): from the powder synthesis to the sintered ceramic; Elaboration de ceramiques nanostructurees en carbure de silicium (SiC): de la synthese de poudre a la ceramique frittee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reau, A. [CEA Saclay, Dept. des Materiaux pour le Nucleaire (DEN/DANS/DMN/SRMA), 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2008-07-01

    Materials for the reactor cores of the fourth generation will need materials supporting high temperatures with fast neutrons flux. SiC{sub f}/SiC ceramics are proposed. One of the possible elaboration process is to fill SiC fiber piece with nano particles SiC powder and to strengthen by sintering. The aim of this thesis is to obtain a nano structured SiC ceramic as a reference for the SiC{sub f}/SiC composite development and to study the influence of the fabrication parameters. (A.L.B.)

  5. Characterization of Nanometric-Sized Carbides Formed During Tempering of Carbide-Steel Cermets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matus K.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article of this paper is to present issues related to characterization of nanometric-sized carbides, nitrides and/or carbonitrides formed during tempering of carbide-steel cermets. Closer examination of those materials is important because of hardness growth of carbide-steel cermet after tempering. The results obtained during research show that the upswing of hardness is significantly higher than for high-speed steels. Another interesting fact is the displacement of secondary hardness effect observed for this material to a higher tempering temperature range. Determined influence of the atmosphere in the sintering process on precipitations formed during tempering of carbide-steel cermets. So far examination of carbidesteel cermet produced by powder injection moulding was carried out mainly in the scanning electron microscope. A proper description of nanosized particles is both important and difficult as achievements of nanoscience and nanotechnology confirm the significant influence of nanocrystalline particles on material properties even if its mass fraction is undetectable by standard methods. The following research studies have been carried out using transmission electron microscopy, mainly selected area electron diffraction and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The obtained results and computer simulations comparison were made.

  6. White light emission from engineered silicon carbide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ou, Haiyan

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is a wide indirect bandgap semiconductor. The light emission efficiency is low in nature. But this material has very unique physical properties like good thermal conductivity, high break down field etc in addition to its abundance. Therefore it is interesting to engineer its...... light emission property so that to take fully potential applications of this material. In this talk, two methods, i.e. doping SiC heavily by donor-acceptor pairs and making SiC porous are introduced to make light emission from SiC. By co-doping SiC with nitrogen and boron heavily, strong yellow emission...... is demonstrated. After optimizing the passivation conditions, strong blue-green emission from porous SiC is demonstrated as well. When combining the yellow emission from co-doped SiC and blue-green from porous SiC, a high color rendering index white light source is achieved....

  7. Advanced technologies of production of cemented carbides and composite materials based on them

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondarenko, V.; Pavlotskaya, E.; Martynova, L.; Epik, I.

    2001-01-01

    The paper presents new technological processes of production of W, WC and (Ti, W)C powders, cemented carbides having a controlled carbon content, high-strength nonmagnetic nickel-bonded cemented carbides, cemented carbide-based composites having a wear-resistant antifriction working layer as well as processes of regeneration of cemented carbide waste. It is shown that these technological processes permit radical changes in the production of carbide powders and products of VK, TK, VN and KKhN cemented carbides. The processes of cemented carbide production become ecologically acceptable and free of carbon black, the use of cumbersome mixers is excluded, the power expenditure is reduced and the efficiency of labor increases. It becomes possible to control precisely the carbon content within a two-phase region -carbide-metal. A high wear resistance of parts of friction couples which are lubricated with water, benzine, kerosene, diesel fuel and other low-viscosity liquids, is ensured with increased strength and shock resistance. (author)

  8. Microstructural evaluation of the NbC-20Ni cemented carbides during sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, D.; Cannizza, E.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Fine carbides in a metallic matrix (binder) form the microstructure of the cemented carbides. Grain size and binder content are the main variables to adjust hardness and toughness. These products are produced by Powder Metallurgy, and traditional route involves mixing carbides with binder by high energy milling, pressing and sintering. During sintering, a liquid phase promotes densification, and a final relative density higher than 99% is expected. Sintering is carried out at high temperatures, and dissolution of the carbides changes the chemical composition of the binder. To control grain growth of the main carbide, which reduces hardness, small quantities of secondary carbides are used. These additives limit dissolution and precipitation of the main carbides reducing the final grain size. This paper focused the structural and chemical evolution during sintering using NbC-20Ni cermets. Mixtures of very fine NbC carbides and carbonyl Ni powders were produce by intense milling. These mixtures were pressed using uniaxial pressures from 50 to 200MPa. Shrinkage was evaluated using dilatometric measurements under an atmosphere of dynamic argon. Samples were also sintered under vacuum in high temperature industrial furnace. The sintered samples were characterized in terms of density hardness, toughness and microstructure. DRX was the main tool used to evaluate the structural evolution of the binder. In situ chemical analysis helped to understand the dissolution mechanisms. (author)

  9. Microstructure evolution of SiC sintered bodies activated by boron and carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gubernat, A.; Stobierski, L.

    2003-01-01

    Investigation on the role of sintering aids on densification of silicon carbide indicate that boron and carbon modify mass transport mechanisms. It leads to changes of microstructure of polycrystalline silicon carbide. In the present work the influence of varying proportions of sintering aids on the material microstructure was studied. The microstructural changes were related to the changes of the selected properties of the resulting materials. (author)

  10. Thermodynamic analysis of thermal plasma process of composite zirconium carbide and silicon carbide production from zircon concentrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostic, Z.G.; Stefanovic, P.Lj.; Pavlovic; Pavlovic, Z.N.; Zivkovic, N.V.

    2000-01-01

    Improved zirconium ceramics and composites have been invented in an effort to obtain better resistance to ablation at high temperature. These ceramics are suitable for use as thermal protection materials on the exterior surfaces of spacecraft, and in laboratory and industrial environments that include flows of hot oxidizing gases. Results of thermodynamic consideration of the process for composite zirconium carbide and silicon carbide ultrafine powder production from ZrSiO 4 in argon thermal plasma and propane-butane gas as reactive quenching reagents are presented in the paper. (author)

  11. Electrophoretic deposits of boron on duralumin plates used for measuring neutron flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, F.M.; Magnier, P.; Finck, C.

    1956-01-01

    Preparation of boron thin film deposits of around 1 mg per cm 2 on duralumin plates with a diameter of 8 cm. The boron coated plates for ionization chambers were originally prepared at the CEA by pulverization of boron carbides on sodium silicates. This method is not controlling precisely enough the quantity of boron deposit. Thus, an electrophoretic method is considered for a better control of the quantity of boron deposit in the scope of using in the future boron 10 which is costly and rare. The method described by O. Flint is not satisfying enough and a similar electrophoretic process has been developed. Full description of the method is given as well as explanation of the use of dried methanol as solvent, tannin as electrolyte and magnesium chloride to avoid alumina formation. (M.P.)

  12. Anode performance of boron-doped graphites prepared from shot and sponge cokes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Tao; Luo, Ruiying [School of Science, Beihang University, Beijing 100083 (China); Yoon, Seong-Ho; Mochida, Isao [Institute for Materials Chemistry and Engineering, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan)

    2010-03-15

    The structures and anode performances of graphitized pristine and boron-doped shot and sponge cokes have been comparatively studied by means of scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and galvanostatic measurement. The results show that high degree of graphitization can be obtained by the substituted boron atom in the carbon lattice, and boron in the resultant boron-doped graphites mainly exist in the form of boron carbide and boron substituted in the carbon lattice. Both of boron-doped graphites from shot and sponge cokes obtain discharge capacity of 350 mAh g{sup -1} and coulombic efficiency above 90%. Apart from commonly observed discharge plateau for graphite, boron-doped samples in this study also show a small plateau at ca. 0.06 V. This phenomenon can be explained that Li ion stores in the site to be void-like spaces that are produced by ''molecular bridging'' between the edge sites of graphene layer stack with a release of boron atoms substituted at the edge of graphene layer. The effect of the amount of boron dopant and graphitization temperature on the anode performance of boron-doped graphite are also investigated in this paper. (author)

  13. Anode performance of boron-doped graphites prepared from shot and sponge cokes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tao; Luo, Ruiying; Yoon, Seong-Ho; Mochida, Isao

    The structures and anode performances of graphitized pristine and boron-doped shot and sponge cokes have been comparatively studied by means of scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and galvanostatic measurement. The results show that high degree of graphitization can be obtained by the substituted boron atom in the carbon lattice, and boron in the resultant boron-doped graphites mainly exist in the form of boron carbide and boron substituted in the carbon lattice. Both of boron-doped graphites from shot and sponge cokes obtain discharge capacity of 350 mAh g -1 and coulombic efficiency above 90%. Apart from commonly observed discharge plateau for graphite, boron-doped samples in this study also show a small plateau at ca. 0.06 V. This phenomenon can be explained that Li ion stores in the site to be void-like spaces that are produced by "molecular bridging" between the edge sites of graphene layer stack with a release of boron atoms substituted at the edge of graphene layer. The effect of the amount of boron dopant and graphitization temperature on the anode performance of boron-doped graphite are also investigated in this paper.

  14. Electrocatalysis on tungsten carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleischmann, R.

    1975-01-01

    General concepts of electrocatalysis, the importance of the equilibrium rest potential and its standardization on polished WC-electrodes, the influence of oxygen in the catalysts upon the oxidation of hydrogen, and the attained results of the hydrogen oxidation on tungsten carbide are treated. (HK) [de

  15. Synthesis and characterization of boron incorporated diamond-like carbon thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, L.L.; Yang, Q.; Tang, Y.; Yang, L.; Zhang, C.; Hu, Y.; Cui, X.

    2015-01-01

    Boron incorporated diamond-like carbon (B-DLC) (up to 8 wt.% boron) thin films were synthesized on silicon wafers using biased target ion beam deposition technique, where diamond-like carbon (DLC) was deposited by ion beam deposition and boron (B) was simultaneously incorporated by biased target sputtering of a boron carbide (B 4 C) target under different conditions. Pure DLC films and B–C films were also synthesized by ion beam deposition and biased target sputtering of B 4 C under similar conditions, respectively, as reference samples. The microstructure and mechanical properties of the synthesized films have been characterized by various technologies. It has been found that B exists in different states in B-DLC, including carbon-rich and B-rich boron carbides, boron suboxide and boron oxide, and the oxidation of B probably occurs during the film deposition. The incorporation of B into DLC leads to the increase of sp 3 bonded carbon in the films, the increase of both film hardness and elastic modulus, and the decrease of both surface roughness and friction coefficient. Furthermore, the content of sp 3 bonded carbon, film hardness and elastic modulus increase, and the film surface roughness and friction coefficient decrease with the increase of B-rich carbide in the B-DLC films. - Highlights: • Biased target ion beam deposition technique is promising to produce high quality DLC based thin films; • Boron exists in different states in B-DLC thin films; • The incorporation of B to DLC with different levels leads to improved film properties; • The fraction of sp 3 bonded C in B-DLC thin films increase with the increase of B-rich carbide content in the films

  16. Powder metallurgy of turbine disc alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingesten, N.G. (Dep. of Engineering Metals)

    1981-03-01

    The first part embraced a study of carbide precipitated in IN 100 and astrology powders. The powder was heat treated at temperatures between 950/sup 0/C and 1150/sup 0/C. After aging at 950-1100/sup 0/C the MC-carbides formed during atomization were replaced by M/sub 23/C/sub 6/-carbides. After 1150/sup 0/C treatments the MC carbides were present again. Precipitation comparable with that obtained in HIP:ed specimens was not observed at free particle surfaces. However, powder particles which had agglomerated during atomization often exhibited considerable precipitation at contiguous surfaces. Obviously, contact between the particles must occur if coarse precipitation at particle surfaces is to develop. Reduced PPB-precipitation was obtained by pre-heat- treatment of powder before compaction. It is suggested that the carbon otherwise available for PPB-precipitation forms carbides in the interior of the powder particles. The aim of the second part was to ..gamma..-strengthen a Co-based super-alloy (Co-15Cr-3Mo-5Ti). Here the Ti-addition gives a coherent and ordered ..gamma..-phase Co/sub 3/Ti. However, upon ageing the alloy is unstable in order to increase the stability modifications of the alloy were prepared by: leaving out the Mo-content, adding 10 % Ni and by decreasing the Ti-content to 4.2 %. In addition, the effect of enhanced grain size and of deformation was investigated. Significant reduction of the transformation rate was only obtained by decresing the Ti-content while deformation of the alloy greatly increased the transformation rate.(author).

  17. Powder processing and spheroidizing with thermal inductively coupled plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nutsch, G.; Linke, P.; Zakharian, S.; Dzur, B.; Weiss, K.-H.

    2001-01-01

    Processing of advanced powder materials for the spraying industry is one of the most promising applications of the thermal RF inductively coupled plasma. By selecting the feedstock carefully and adjusting the RF plasma parameters, unique materials with high quality can be achieved. Powders injected in the hot plasma core emerge with modified shapes, morphology, crystal structure and chemical composition. Ceramic oxide powders such as Al 2 O 3 , ZrO 2 , SiO 2 are spheroidized with a high spheroidization rate. By using the RF induction plasma spheroidizing process tungsten melt carbide powders are obtained with a high spheroidization rate at high feeding rates by densification of agglomerated powders consisting of di-tungsten carbide and monocarbide with a definite composition. This kind of ball-like powders is particularly suited for wear resistant applications. (author)

  18. Synthesis of carbides of refractory metals in salt melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilyushchenko, N.G.; Anfinogenov, A.I.; Chebykin, V.V.; Chernov, Ya.B.; Shurov, N.I.; Ryaposov, Yu.A.; Dobrynin, A.I.; Gorshkov, A.V.; Chub, A.V.

    2003-01-01

    The ion-electron melts, obtained through dissolving the alkali and alkali-earth metals in the molten chlorides above the chloride melting temperature, were used for manufacturing the high-melting metal carbides as the transport melt. The lithium, calcium and magnesium chlorides and the mixture of the lithium chloride with the potassium or calcium chloride were used from the alkali or alkali-earth metals. The metallic lithium, calcium, magnesium or the calcium-magnesium mixtures were used as the alkali or alkali-earth metals. The carbon black or sugar was used as carbon. It is shown, that lithium, magnesium or calcium in the molten salts transfer the carbon on the niobium, tantalum, titanium, forming the carbides of the above metals. The high-melting metal carbides are obtained both from the metal pure powders and from the oxides and chlorides [ru

  19. Influence of spark plasma sintering conditions on the sintering and functional properties of an ultra-fine grained 316L stainless steel obtained from ball-milled powder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, C., E-mail: clement.keller@insa-rouen.fr [Groupe de Physique des Matériaux, CNRS-UMR 6634, Université de Rouen, INSA de Rouen, Avenue de l' Université, 76800 Saint-Etienne du Rouvray (France); Tabalaiev, K.; Marnier, G. [Groupe de Physique des Matériaux, CNRS-UMR 6634, Université de Rouen, INSA de Rouen, Avenue de l' Université, 76800 Saint-Etienne du Rouvray (France); Noudem, J. [Laboratoire de Cristallographie des Matériaux, CNRS-UMR 6508, Université de Caen, ENSICAEN, 7 bd du Maréchal Juin, 14050 Caen (France); Sauvage, X. [Groupe de Physique des Matériaux, CNRS-UMR 6634, Université de Rouen, INSA de Rouen, Avenue de l' Université, 76800 Saint-Etienne du Rouvray (France); Hug, E. [Laboratoire de Cristallographie des Matériaux, CNRS-UMR 6508, Université de Caen, ENSICAEN, 7 bd du Maréchal Juin, 14050 Caen (France)

    2016-05-17

    In this work, 316L samples with submicrometric grain size were sintered by spark plasma sintering. To this aim, 316L powder was first ball-milled with different conditions to obtain nanostructured powder. The process control agent quantity and milling time were varied to check their influence on the crystallite size of milled powder. Samples were then sintered by spark plasma sintering using different sets of sintering parameters (temperature, dwell time and pressure). For each sample, grain size and density were systematically measured in order to investigate the influence of the sintering process on these two key microstructure parameters. Results show that suitable ball-milling and subsequent sintering can be employed to obtain austenitic stainless steel samples with grain sizes in the nanometer range with porosity lower than 3%. However, ball-milling and subsequent sintering enhance chromium carbides formation at the sample surface in addition to intragranular and intergranular oxides in the sample as revealed by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. It has been shown that using Boron nitride together with graphite foils to protect the mold from powder welding prevent such carbide formation. For mechanical properties, results show that the grain size refinement strongly increases the hardness of the samples without deviation from Hall-Petch relationship despite the oxides formation. For corrosion resistance, grain sizes lower than a few micrometers involve a strong decrease in the pitting potential and a strong increase in passivation current. As a consequence, spark plasma sintering can be considered as a promising tool for ultra-fine grained austenitic stainless steel.

  20. High-gravity combustion synthesis and in situ melt infiltration: A new method for preparing cemented carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Guanghua; Li, Jiangtao; Yang, Zengchao; Guo, Shibin; Chen, Yixiang

    2013-01-01

    A new method of high-gravity combustion synthesis and in situ melt infiltration is reported for preparing cemented carbides, where hot nickel melt is in situ synthesized from a highly exothermic combustion reaction and then infiltrated into tungsten carbide powder compacts. The as-prepared sample showed a homogeneous microstructure, and its relative density, hardness and flexural strength were 94.4%, 84 HRA and 1.49 GPa, respectively. Compared with conventional powder metallurgy approaches, high-gravity combustion synthesis offers a fast and furnace-free way to produce cemented carbides

  1. Problems and possibilities of development of boron nitride ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusanova, L.N.; Romashin, A.G.; Kulikova, G.I.; Golubeva, O.P.

    1988-01-01

    The modern state of developments in the field of technology of ceramics produced from boron nitride is analyzed. Substantial difficulties in production of pure ceramics from hexagonal and wurtzite-like boron nitride are stated as related to the structure peculiarities and inhomogeneity of chemical bonds in elementary crystal cells of various modifications. Advantages and disadvantages of familiar technological procedures in production of boron nitride ceramics are compared. A new technology is suggested, which is based on the use of electroorganic compounds for hardening and protection of porous high-purity boron-nitride die from oxidation, and as high-efficient sintered elements for treatment of powders of various structures and further pyrolisis. The method is called thermal molecular lacing (TML). Properties of ceramics produced by the TML method are compared with characteristics of well-known brands of boron nitride ceramics

  2. Development of boronated aluminum alloy for basket of cask for nuclear spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakaguchi, Y.; Saida, T.; Matsuoka, T.; Kuri, S.; Ohsono, K.; Hode, S.

    2001-01-01

    Since 1980's Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. (MHI) has been contributing to develop metal cask technologies for utilities and competent authorities in Japan, and have established transport and storage cask design ''MSF series'' which realizes higher payload and reliability for long term storage. MSF series transport and storage cask uses new-developed boronated aluminum as basket material. This boronated aluminum has been developed to improve characteristics of material. To achieve this object, powder metallurgy method has been adopted for manufacturing boronated material. It is well known that this method provides excellent characteristics for the material and this boronated aluminum alloy has obtained excellent both mechanical and neutron absorbing characteristics. In addition, in order to maintain material properties for long-term use this boronated material is not strengthened by aging treatment. This paper summarizes an outline of the boronated aluminum alloy for basket assemblies by powder metallurgy. (author)

  3. Silicon carbide layer structure recovery after ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Violin, Eh.E.; Demakov, K.D.; Kal'nin, A.A.; Nojbert, F.; Potapov, E.N.; Tairov, Yu.M.

    1984-01-01

    The process of recovery of polytype structure of SiC surface layers in the course of thermal annealing (TA) and laser annealing (LA) upon boron and aluminium implantation is studied. The 6H polytype silicon carbide C face (0001) has been exposed to ion radiation. The ion energies ranged from 80 to 100 keV, doses varied from 5x10 14 to 5x10 16 cm -2 . TA was performed in the 800-2000 K temperature range. It is shown that the recovery of the structure of silicon carbide layers after ion implantation takes place in several stages. Considerable effect on the structure of the annealed layers is exerted by the implantation dose and the type of implanted impurity. The recovery of polytype structure is possible only under the effect of laser pulses with duration not less than the time for the ordering of the polytype in question

  4. High temperature heat capacities and electrical conductivities of boron carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, Tsuneo; Arita, Yuri; Naito, Keiji; Imai, Hisashi

    1991-01-01

    The heat capacities and the electrical conductivities of B x C(x=3, 4, 5) were measured by means of direct heating pulse calorimetry in the temperature range from 300 to 1500 K. The heat capacities of B x C increased with increasing x value. This increase in the heat capacity is probably related to the change of the lattice vibration mode originated from the reduction of the stiffness of the intericosahedral chain accompanied with a change from C-B-C to C-B-B chains. A linear relationship between the logarithm of σT (σ is the electrical conductivity and T is the absolute temperature) of B x C and the reciprocal temperature was observed, indicating the presence of small polaron hopping as the predominant conduction mechanism. The electrical conductivity of B x C also increased with increasing x value (from 4 to 5) due to an increase of the polaron hopping of holes between carbon atoms at geometrically nonequivalent sites, since these nonequivalent sites of carbon atoms were considered to increase in either B 11 C icosahedra or in icosahedral chains with increasing x. The electrical conductivity of B 3 C was higher than that of B 4 C, which is probably due to the precipitation of high-conducting carbon. The thermal conductivity and the thermodynamic quantities of B 4 C were also determined precisely from the heat capacity value. (orig.)

  5. Development and Performance of Boron Carbide-Based Smoke Compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-06

    appears to be caused by multiple coinciding and reinforcing factors in- volving thermodynamics , thermal conductivity, and consoli- dation, as described...determined by using an equation based on the Beer Lambert law [28]: As none of the smokes had any distinct spectral features in the visible spectrum, the

  6. Effect of boron nitride coating on fiber-matrix interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, R.N.; Brun, M.K.

    1987-01-01

    Coatings can modify fiber-matrix reactions and consequently interfacial bond strengths. Commercially available mullite, silicon carbide, and carbon fibers were coated with boron nitride via low pressure chemical vapor deposition and incorporated into a mullite matrix by hot-pressing. The influence of fiber-matrix interactions for uncoated fibers on fracture morphologies was studied. These observations are related to the measured values of interfacial shear strengths

  7. PREPARATION OF TANTALUM CARBIDE FROM AN ORGANOMETALLIC PRECURSOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. P. SOUZA

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work we have synthesized an organometallic oxalic precursor from tantalum oxide. This oxide was solubilized by heating with potassium hydrogen sulfate. In order to precipitate Ta2O5.nH2O, the fused mass obtained was dissolved in a sulfuric acid solution and neutralized with ammonia. The hydrated tantalum oxide precipitated was dissolved in an equimolar solution of oxalic acid/ammonium oxalate. The synthesis and the characterization of the tantalum oxalic precursor are described. Pyrolysis of the complex in a mixture of hydrogen and methane at atmospheric pressure was studied. The gas-solid reaction made it possible to obtain tantalum carbide, TaC, in the powder form at 1000oC. The natural sintering of TaC powder in an inert atmosphere at 1400°C during 10 hours, under inert atmosphere made it possible to densify the carbide to 96% of the theoretical value.

  8. Aspects of the chemistry of boron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moellinger, H.

    1976-01-01

    Crystal phases of elementary boron are reviewed as well as boron-sulphur, boron-selenum, boron-tellurium, and boron-nitrogen compounds, carboranes, and boron-carbohydrate complexes. A boron cadastre of rivers and lakes serves to illustrate the role of boron in environmental protection. Technically relevant boron compounds and their uses are mentioned. (orig.) 891 HK/orig. 892 MB [de

  9. Facile Synthesis of Ternary Boron Carbonitride Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luo Lijie

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this study, a novel and facile approach for the synthesis of ternary boron carbonitride (B–C–N nanotubes was reported. Growth occurred by heating simple starting materials of boron powder, zinc oxide powder, and ethanol absolute at 1150 °C under a mixture gas flow of nitrogen and hydrogen. As substrate, commercial stainless steel foil with a typical thickness of 0.05 mm played an additional role of catalyst during the growth of nanotubes. The nanotubes were characterized by SEM, TEM, EDX, and EELS. The results indicate that the synthesized B–C–N nanotubes exhibit a bamboo-like morphology and B, C, and N elements are homogeneously distributed in the nanotubes. A catalyzed vapor–liquid–solid (VLS mechanism was proposed for the growth of the nanotubes.

  10. Mixed Uranium/Refractory Metal Carbide Fuels for High Performance Nuclear Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knight, Travis; Anghaie, Samim

    2002-01-01

    Single phase, solid-solution mixed uranium/refractory metal carbides have been proposed as an advanced nuclear fuel for advanced, high-performance reactors. Earlier studies of mixed carbides focused on uranium and either thorium or plutonium as a fuel for fast breeder reactors enabling shorter doubling owing to the greater fissile atom density. However, the mixed uranium/refractory carbides such as (U, Zr, Nb)C have a lower uranium densities but hold significant promise because of their ultra-high melting points (typically greater than 3700 K), improved material compatibility, and high thermal conductivity approaching that of the metal. Various compositions of (U, Zr, Nb)C were processed with 5% and 10% metal mole fraction of uranium. Stoichiometric samples were processed from the constituent carbide powders, while hypo-stoichiometric samples with carbon-to-metal (C/M) ratios of 0.92 were processed from uranium hydride, graphite, and constituent refractory carbide powders. Processing techniques of cold uniaxial pressing, dynamic magnetic compaction, sintering, and hot pressing were investigated to optimize the processing parameters necessary to produce high density (low porosity), single phase, solid-solution mixed carbide nuclear fuels for testing. This investigation was undertaken to evaluate and characterize the performance of these mixed uranium/refractory metal carbides for high performance, ultra-safe nuclear reactor applications. (authors)

  11. Joining elements of silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, B.A.

    1979-01-01

    A method of joining together at least two silicon carbide elements (e.g.in forming a heat exchanger) is described, comprising subjecting to sufficiently non-oxidizing atmosphere and sufficiently high temperature, material placed in space between the elements. The material consists of silicon carbide particles, carbon and/or a precursor of carbon, and silicon, such that it forms a joint joining together at least two silicon carbide elements. At least one of the elements may contain silicon. (author)

  12. Sintering of beryllium oxide with 3-4 per cent elemental boron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pointud, R.; Rispal, Ch.; Le Garec, M.

    1958-01-01

    In order to manufacture a baffle absorbing neutrons of various energies, there was developed or mixture of a slower and an absorber. It is made by hot pressing impure beryllium containing boron carbide. The dense briquette has 100 x 100 x 50 mm and is machined on all her faces. She is of 2,85 density and about 3 to 4 per cent porosity, according to 5 per cent of boron. Difference of boron amount is lower than ten per cent between any two points of the briquette. (author) [fr

  13. Turbostratic boron nitride coated on high-surface area metal oxide templates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klitgaard, Søren Kegnæs; Egeblad, Kresten; Brorson, M.

    2007-01-01

    Boron nitride coatings on high-surface area MgAl2O4 and Al2O3 have been synthesized and characterized by transmission electron microscopy and by X-ray powder diffraction. The metal oxide templates were coated with boron nitride using a simple nitridation in a flow of ammonia starting from ammonium...

  14. Powder metallurgical high performance materials. Proceedings. Volume 3: general topics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kneringer, G.; Roedhammer, P.; Wildner, H.

    2001-01-01

    The proceedings of these seminars form an impressive chronicle of the continued progress in the understanding of refractory metals and cemented carbides and in their manufacture and application. The 15 th Plansee Seminar was convened under the general theme 'Powder Metallurgy High Performance Materials'. Under this broadened perspective the seminar will strive to look beyond the refractory metals and cemented carbides, which remain at its focus, to novel classes of materials, such as intermetallic compounds, with potential for high temperature applications. (boteke)

  15. Structure and reactivity of boron-ate complexes derived from primary and secondary boronic esters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeney, Kathryn; Berionni, Guillaume; Mayr, Herbert; Aggarwal, Varinder K

    2015-06-05

    Boron-ate complexes derived from primary and secondary boronic esters and aryllithiums have been isolated, and the kinetics of their reactions with carbenium ions studied. The second-order rate constants have been used to derive nucleophilicity parameters for the boron-ate complexes, revealing that nucleophilicity increased with (i) electron-donating aromatics on boron, (ii) neopentyl glycol over pinacol boronic esters, and (iii) 12-crown-4 ether.

  16. Comparison of fine particle colemanite and boron frit in concrete for time-strength relationship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkman, D.E.; Bussolini, P.L.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that the element boron, when added to concrete, has proved effective in shielding neutron particles by absorbing the neutron and emitting a low-energy gamma ray. The various boron additives used with concrete can severely retard the set time and strength gain. An advantage to using small particle size boron is that the smaller grain size provides better boron disbursement within the concrete matrix to absorb neutrons. However, boron additives of powder consistency are usually not used due to the greater potential of forming chemical solutions that act as a retarder in the concrete. Research has shown that the amount of boron additives in concrete can be reduced significantly if fine grain particles can be successfully incorporated into the concrete matrix. The purpose of this study is to compare strength gain characteristics of concrete mixes containing various quantities of fine grain boron additive. The boron additive colemanite, a natural mineral, is compared with two brands of manufactured aggregate, boron frit. Concrete test cylinders are molded for testing the compressive strength of the mix after 4, 7, 28, and 56 days. Tested are five different quantities of colemanite as well as five comparable amounts of boron frit for each brand of the material. The test values are compared with a control concrete specimen containing no boron additive. Results of this study can be used to optimize the cost and effectiveness of boron additives in radiation shielding concrete

  17. Metal Carbides for Biomass Valorization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carine E. Chan-Thaw

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Transition metal carbides have been utilized as an alternative catalyst to expensive noble metals for the conversion of biomass. Tungsten and molybdenum carbides have been shown to be effective catalysts for hydrogenation, hydrodeoxygenation and isomerization reactions. The satisfactory activities of these metal carbides and their low costs, compared with noble metals, make them appealing alternatives and worthy of further investigation. In this review, we succinctly describe common synthesis techniques, including temperature-programmed reaction and carbothermal hydrogen reduction, utilized to prepare metal carbides used for biomass transformation. Attention will be focused, successively, on the application of transition metal carbide catalysts in the transformation of first-generation (oils and second-generation (lignocellulose biomass to biofuels and fine chemicals.

  18. Nano powders, components and coatings by plasma technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKechnie, Timothy N. (Inventor); Antony, Leo V. M. (Inventor); O'Dell, Scott (Inventor); Power, Chris (Inventor); Tabor, Terry (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Ultra fine and nanometer powders and a method of producing same are provided, preferably refractory metal and ceramic nanopowders. When certain precursors are injected into the plasma flame in a reactor chamber, the materials are heated, melted and vaporized and the chemical reaction is induced in the vapor phase. The vapor phase is quenched rapidly to solid phase to yield the ultra pure, ultra fine and nano product. With this technique, powders have been made 20 nanometers in size in a system capable of a bulk production rate of more than 10 lbs/hr. The process is particularly applicable to tungsten, molybdenum, rhenium, tungsten carbide, molybdenum carbide and other related materials.

  19. Nano powders, components and coatings by plasma technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKechnie, Timothy N [Brownsboro, AL; Antony, Leo V. M. [Huntsville, AL; O'Dell, Scott [Arab, AL; Power, Chris [Guntersville, AL; Tabor, Terry [Huntsville, AL

    2009-11-10

    Ultra fine and nanometer powders and a method of producing same are provided, preferably refractory metal and ceramic nanopowders. When certain precursors are injected into the plasma flame in a reactor chamber, the materials are heated, melted and vaporized and the chemical reaction is induced in the vapor phase. The vapor phase is quenched rapidly to solid phase to yield the ultra pure, ultra fine and nano product. With this technique, powders have been made 20 nanometers in size in a system capable of a bulk production rate of more than 10 lbs/hr. The process is particularly applicable to tungsten, molybdenum, rhenium, tungsten carbide, molybdenum carbide and other related materials.

  20. Standard specification for boron-Based neutron absorbing material systems for use in nuclear spent fuel storage racks

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 This specification defines criteria for boron-based neutron absorbing material systems used in racks in a pool environment for storage of nuclear light water reactor (LWR) spent-fuel assemblies or disassembled components to maintain sub-criticality in the storage rack system. 1.2 Boron-based neutron absorbing material systems normally consist of metallic boron or a chemical compound containing boron (for example, boron carbide, B4C) supported by a matrix of aluminum, steel, or other materials. 1.3 In a boron-based absorber, neutron absorption occurs primarily by the boron-10 isotope that is present in natural boron to the extent of 18.3 ± 0.2 % by weight (depending upon the geological origin of the boron). Boron, enriched in boron-10 could also be used. 1.4 The materials systems described herein shall be functional – that is always be capable to maintain a B10 areal density such that subcriticality Keff <0.95 or Keff <0.98 or Keff < 1.0 depending on the design specification for the service...

  1. Structure and photoluminescence of boron and nitrogen co-doped carbon nanorods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, B.B. [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University of Technology, 69 Hongguang Rd, Lijiatuo, Banan District, Chongqing 400054 (China); Gao, B. [College of Computer Science, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Chongqing Municipal Education Examinations Authority, Chongqing 401147 (China); Zhong, X.X., E-mail: xxzhong@sjtu.edu.cn [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Shao, R.W.; Zheng, K. [Institute of Microstructure and Properties of Advanced Materials, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China)

    2016-07-15

    Graphical abstract: Boron- and nitrogen- doped carbon nanorods. - Highlights: • The co-doping of nitrogen and boron in carbon nanorods. • The doping mechanism of nitrogen and boron in carbon nanorods by plasma. • Photoluminescence properties of nitrogen- and boron-doped carbon nanorods. - Abstract: Boron and nitrogen doped carbon nanorods (BNCNRs) were synthesized by plasma-enhanced hot filament chemical vapor deposition, where methane, nitrogen and hydrogen were used as the reaction gases and boron carbide was the boron source. The results of scanning electron microscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicate that boron and nitrogen can be used as co-dopants in amorphous carbon nanorods. Combined with the characterization results, the doping mechanism was studied. The mechanism is used to explain the formation of different carbon materials by different methods. The photoluminescence (PL) properties of BNCNRs were studied. The PL results show that the BNCNRs generate strong green PL bands and weak blue PL bands, and the PL intensity lowered due to the doping of boron. The outcomes advance our knowledge on the synthesis and optical properties of carbon-based nanomaterials and contribute to the development of optoelectronic nanodevices based on nano-carbon mateirals.

  2. Effect of molybdenum, vanadium, boron on mechanical properties of high chromium white cast iron in as-cast condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurjaman, F.; Sumardi, S.; Shofi, A.; Aryati, M.; Suharno, B.

    2016-02-01

    In this experiment, the effect of the addition carbide forming elements on high chromium white cast iron, such as molybdenum, vanadium and boron on its mechanical properties and microstructure was investigated. The high chromium white cast iron was produced by casting process and formed in 50 mm size of grinding balls with several compositions. Characterization of these grinding balls was conducted by using some testing methods, such as: chemical and microstructure analysis, hardness, and impact test. From the results, the addition of molybdenum, vanadium, and boron on high chromium white cast iron provided a significant improvement on its hardness, but reduced its toughness. Molybdenum induced fully austenitic matrix and Mo2C formation among eutectic M7C3 carbide. Vanadium was dissolved in the matrix and carbide. While boron was played a role to form fine eutectic carbide. Grinding balls with 1.89 C-13.1 Cr-1.32 Mo-1.36 V-0.00051 B in as-cast condition had the highest hardness, which was caused by finer structure of eutectic carbide, needle like structure (upper bainite) matrix, and martensite on its carbide boundary.

  3. The conflicting roles of boron on the radiation response of precipitate-forming austenitic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okita, T.; Sekimura, N.; Garner, F.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Boron is often a deliberately added solute to improve the radiation resistance of austenitic structural alloys, with boron exerting its greatest influence on carbide precipitation. However, boron also a source of helium via transmutation and therefore tends to accelerate the onset of void nucleation. These conflicting contributions of boron with respect to radiation resistance are not easily separated, but are sometimes utilized to mimic fusion-relevant gas generation rates when testing in surrogate fission spectra. In an earlier study the authors demonstrated that in simple model ternary alloys that boron additions tended to homogenize swelling somewhat via increased helium generation but not to exert any significant influence on the total swelling. In these easily swelling alloys void nucleation was not significantly influenced by additional helium or by boron's chemical effect, with boron remaining primarily in solution. In the current study, Fe-15Cr-16Ni-0.25 Ti-0.05C alloys with four levels of natural boron addition (0, 100, 500, 2500 appm) were irradiated side-by-side at ∼400 deg. C in the Fast Flux Test Facility under active temperature control in the Materials Open Test Assembly. Although three sets of irradiation conditions were explored, the boron variation was the only variable operating in each data set. The bulk swelling was measured using an immersion density technique and electron microscopy was employed to determine the details of void, dislocation and precipitate microstructure. It was found that by 100 appm B the strongest and most immediate effect of boron was to reduce swelling at all irradiation conditions explored, but the boron-induced increases in overall helium content were rather small over the 0-100 appm B range. This indicates that boron's primary effect was chemical in nature, expressed via its effect on precipitation. As the boron level was progressively increased, however, there was a reversal in

  4. Surface coatings of mixed hard alloy powder metals sintered-on in vacuo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knotek, O.; Reimann, H.

    1980-01-01

    No technological difficulties are to be encountered in the processing of pseudo hard alloys in the form of powder compounds of conventional nickel base hard alloys with carbides. There is a great alloy influence on the resulting structures of the surface layers. Under some processing conditions the tungsten carbide is completely dissolved from molten matrix alloy. Hard phases on chromium carbide basis resulted upon cooling. Induced chromium carbide Cr 3 C 2 retains its structure while absorbing large amounts of iron into its grid. It can be concluded that not only alloying properties, but also eminently structural criterions are decisive for the stability of the applied supplementary hard phases. (orig.) [de

  5. Ti3SiC2 Synthesis by Powder Metallurgical Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Kero, Ida; Antti, Marta-Lena; Odén, Magnus

    2007-01-01

    Titanium silicon carbide MAX phase was synthesised by a powder metallurgical method from ball milled TiC/Si powders of two different compositions, with TiC/Si ratios of 3:2 and 3:2.2 respectively. The cold pressed samples were analysed by dilatometry under flowing argon or sintered under vacuum for different times. The sintered samples were evaluated using x-ray diffraction (XRD). This study showed that titanium carbide was always present as a secondary phase and silicon carbide accompanied t...

  6. Microstructure and phase evolution in laser clad chromium carbide-NiCrMoNb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatesh, L.; Samajdar, I.; Tak, Manish; Doherty, Roger D.; Gundakaram, Ravi C.; Prasad, K. Satya; Joshi, S.V.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Microstructural development during laser cladding has been studied. • In this multi component system Cr 7 C 3 is found to be the stable carbide phase. • Phases were identified by EBSD since XRD results were not conclusive. • Increase in laser power and/or scanning speed reduced the carbide content. • Hardness seems to depend on phase content as well as microstructure. - Abstract: Microstructural development in laser clad layers of Chromium carbide (Cr x C y )-NiCrMoNb on SA 516 steel has been investigated. Although the starting powder contained both Cr 3 C 2 and Cr 7 C 3 , the clad layers showed only the presence of Cr 7 C 3 . Microtexture measurements by electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD) revealed primary dendritic Cr 7 C 3 with Ni rich FCC metallic phase being present in the interdendritic spaces. Further annealing of the laser clad layers and furnace melting of the starting powder confirmed that Cr 7 C 3 is the primary as well as stable carbide phase in this multi component system. Increase in laser power and scanning speed progressively reduced carbide content in the laser clad layers. Increased scanning speed, which enhances the cooling rate, also led to reduction in the secondary arm spacing (λ 2 ) of the Cr 7 C 3 dendrites. The clad layer hardness increased with carbide content and with decreased dendrite arm spacing.

  7. Architecting boron nanostructure on the diamond particle surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, H.; Dai, D.; Yu, J.H.; Nishimura, K.; Sasaoka, S.; Jiang, N.

    2014-01-01

    The present study provides an efficient approach for nano-functionalization of diamond powders. Boron nanostructure can be grown on diamond particle entire surface by a simple heat-treatment process. After treatment, various boron nanoforms were grown on the diamond particle surface at different processing temperature. High-density boron nanowires (BNWs) grow on the diamond particle entire surface at 1333 K, while nanopillars cover diamond powders when the heat treatment process is performed at 1393 K. The influence of the pretreatment temperature on the microstructure and thermal conductivity of Cu/diamond composites were investigated. Cu/diamond composites with high thermal conductivity of 670 W (m K) −1 was obtained, which was achieved by the formation of large number of nanowires and nanopillars on the diamond particle surface.

  8. (YSZ) powders

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    109–114. © Indian Academy of Sciences. 109 ... Materials Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085, India .... pensions of 900°C calcined YSZ powders. .... The sintered density data of the compacts (sintered at.

  9. Microstructural Study of Titanium Carbide Coating on Cemented Carbide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vuorinen, S.; Horsewell, Andy

    1982-01-01

    Titanium carbide coating layers on cemented carbide substrates have been investigated by transmission electron microscopy. Microstructural variations within the typically 5µm thick chemical vapour deposited TiC coatings were found to vary with deposit thickness such that a layer structure could...... be delineated. Close to the interface further microstructural inhomogeneities were obsered, there being a clear dependence of TiC deposition mechanism on the chemical and crystallographic nature of the upper layers of the multiphase substrate....

  10. Single-Crystal Tungsten Carbide in High-Temperature In-Situ Additive Manufacturing Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolopus, James A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Boatner, Lynn A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-05-18

    Nanoindenters are commonly used for measuring the mechanical properties of a wide variety of materials with both industrial and scientific applications. Typically, these instruments employ an indenter made of a material of suitable hardness bonded to an appropriate shaft or holder to create an indentation on the material being tested. While a variety of materials may be employed for the indenter, diamond and boron carbide are by far the most common materials used due to their hardness and other desirable properties. However, as the increasing complexity of new materials demands a broader range of testing capabilities, conventional indenter materials exhibit significant performance limitations. Among these are the inability of diamond indenters to perform in-situ measurements at temperatures above 600oC in air due to oxidation of the diamond material and subsequent degradation of the indenters mechanical properties. Similarly, boron carbide also fails at high temperature due to fracture. [1] Transition metal carbides possess a combination of hardness and mechanical properties at high temperatures that offer an attractive alternative to conventional indenter materials. Here we describe the technical aspects for the growth of single-crystal tungsten carbide (WC) for use as a high-temperature indenter material, and we examine a possible approach to brazing these crystals to a suitable mount for grinding and attachment to the indenter instrument. The use of a by-product of the recovery process is also suggested as possibly having commercial value.

  11. A study on the formation of uranium carbide in an induction furnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, In Young; Lee, Yoon Sang; Kim, Eung Soo; Lee, Don Bae; Kim, Chang Kyu

    2005-01-01

    Uranium is a typical carbide-forming element. Three carbides, UC, U 2 C 3 and UC 2 , are formed in the uranium-carbon system. The most important of these as fuel is uranium monocarbide UC. It is well known that Uranium carbides can be obtained by three basic methods: 1) by reaction of uranium metal with carbon; 2) by reaction of uranium metal powder with gaseous hydrocarbons; 3) by reaction of uranium oxides with carbon. The use of uranium monocarbide, or materials based on it, has great prospects as fuel for nuclear reactors. It is quite possible that uranium dicarbide UC 2 may also acquire great importance as a fuel, particularly in dispersion fuel elements with graphite matrix. In the present study, uranium carbides are obtained by direct reaction of uranium metal with graphite in a high frequency induction furnace

  12. GRANULATION TRIALS OF WASTE THE DUST SILICON CARBIDE FOR UTILIZATION IN METALLURGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Borowski

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of laboratory granulation tests of dust silicon carbide and the results of research on the selection of the binder and the properties of the granules obtained. The research material was a waste of the silicon carbide powder with a high fragmentation, mixed with a cement or an organic modified starch specimen. Six tests were performed in a disc granulator with 100 cm in diameter. In each series of trial specified: the type and share of the binder, the diameter of the granules, tenderness, type of structure and mechanical properties. Good granules of silicon carbide obtained with the addition of cement binder with 4% of the mass fraction and at least 24 hours of seasoning. The binder should be added twice by powdering, first in a stirred granulator, and again after manufacture. It was found that the resulting granules may be used as a replacement of ferrosilicon in the process of steelmaking.

  13. Synthesis of High Purity Sinterable Silicon Carbide Powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-11-01

    10 G-500 TORCH 50 kW (Max) : kW (Derated) BTU/HR (Derated) RE, E-500 »CTOR/AFTERCOOLEP B70" .0X 72" T/T ISO M BTU/HR Copper B-500 DUST...Fourth and Canal Streets Post Office Box 27003 Richmond, VA 23219 137. Stephen C. Danforth Rutgers University Bowser Road Post Office Box 909

  14. Mechanical alloying and sintering of nanostructured tungsten carbide-reinforced copper composite and its characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusoff, Mahani; Othman, Radzali; Hussain, Zuhailawati

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → W 2 C phase was formed at short milling time while WC only appears after longer milling time. → Cu crystallite size decreased but internal strain increased with increasing milling time. → Increasing milling time induced more WC formation, thus improving the hardness of the composite. → Electrical conductivity is reduced due to powder refinement and the presence of carbide phases. -- Abstract: Elemental powders of copper (Cu), tungsten (W) and graphite (C) were mechanically alloyed in a planetary ball mill with different milling durations (0-60 h), compacted and sintered in order to precipitate hard tungsten carbide particles into a copper matrix. Both powder and sintered composite were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and assessed for hardness and electrical conductivity to investigate the effects of milling time on formation of nanostructured Cu-WC composite and its properties. No carbide peak was detected in the powder mixtures after milling. Carbide WC and W 2 C phases were precipitated only in the sintered composite. The formation of WC began with longer milling times, after W 2 C formation. Prolonged milling time decreased the crystallite size as well as the internal strain of Cu. Hardness of the composite was enhanced but electrical conductivity reduced with increasing milling time.

  15. Processing and Properties of Distaloy Sa Sintered Alloys with Boron and Carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karwan-Baczewska J.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Prealloyed iron-based powders, manufactured in Höganäs Company, are used in the automotive parts industry. The properties and life time of such sintered parts depend, first of all, on their chemical composition, the production method of the prealloyed powder as well as on the technology of their consolidation and sintering. One of simpler and conventional methods aimed at increasing the density in sintered products is the process of activated sintering, performed, for example, by adding boron as elementary boron powder. Under this research project obtained were novel sintered materials, based on prealloyed and diffusion bonded powder, type: Distaloy SA, with the following chemical composition: Fe-1.75% Ni-1.5%Cu- 0.5%Mo with carbon (0.55%; 0.75% and boron (0.2%, 0.4% and 0.6%. Distaloy SA samples alloyed with carbon and boron were manufactured by mixing powders in a Turbula mixer, then compressed using a hydraulic press under a pressure of 600 MPa and sintered in a tube furnace at 1473 K, for a 60 minute time, in the hydrogen atmosphere. After the sintering process, there were performed density and porosity measurements as well as hardness tests and mechanical properties were carried out, too. Eventually, analyzed was the effect of boron upon density, hardness and mechanical properties of novel sintered construction parts made from Distaloy SA powder.

  16. Tungsten--carbide critical assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, G.E.; Paxton, H.C.

    1975-06-01

    The tungsten--carbide critical assembly mainly consists of three close-fitting spherical shells: a highly enriched uranium shell on the inside, a tungsten--carbide shell surrounding it, and a steel shell on the outside. Ideal critical specifications indicate a rather low computed value of k/sub eff/. Observed and calculated fission-rate distributions for 235 U, 238 U, and 237 Np are compared, and calculated leakage neutrons per fission in various energy groups are given. (U.S.)

  17. Metallography of powder metallurgy materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawley, Alan; Murphy, Thomas F.

    2003-01-01

    The primary distinction between the microstructure of an ingot metallurgy/wrought material and one fabricated by the powder metallurgy route of pressing followed by sintering is the presence of porosity in the latter. In its various morphologies, porosity affects the mechanical, physical, chemical, electrical and thermal properties of the material. Thus, it is important to be able to characterize quantitatively the microstructure of powder metallurgy parts and components. Metallographic procedures necessary for the reliable characterization of microstructures in powder metallurgy materials are reviewed, with emphasis on the intrinsic challenges presented by the presence of porosity. To illustrate the utility of these techniques, five case studies are presented involving powder metallurgy materials. These case studies demonstrate problem solving via metallography in diverse situations: failure of a tungsten carbide-coated precipitation hardening stainless steel, failure of a steel pump gear, quantification of the degree of sinter (DOS), simulation of performance of a porous filter using automated image analysis, and analysis of failure in a sinter brazed part assembly

  18. Synthesis and characterization of boron nitrides nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, T.H.; Sousa, E.M.B.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a new synthesis for the production of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNT) from boron powder, ammonium nitrate and hematite tube furnace CVD method. The samples were subjected to some characterization techniques as infrared spectroscopy, thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy and transmission. By analyzing the results can explain the chemical reactions involved in the process and confirm the formation of BNNT with several layers and about 30 nanometers in diameter. Due to excellent mechanical properties and its chemical and thermal stability this material is promising for various applications. However, BNNT has received much less attention than carbon nanotubes, it is because of great difficulty to synthesize appreciable quantities from the techniques currently known, and this is one of the main reasons this work.(author)

  19. Natural cotton as precursor for the refractory boron carbide—a hydrothermal synthesis and characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saritha Devi, H. V.; Swapna, M. S.; Raj, Vimal; Ambadas, G.; Sankararaman, S.

    2018-01-01

    Boron carbide (B4C) is an excellent covalent carbide that finds applications in industries and nuclear power plants. The present synthesis methods of boron carbide are expensive and involve the use of toxic chemicals that adversely affect environment. In the present work, we report for the first time the use of the hydrothermal method for converting the cellulose from cotton as the carbon precursor for B4C. The carbon precursor is converted into functionalized porous carbonaceous material by hydrothermal treatment followed by sodium borohydride. It is further treated with boric acid to make it a B4C precursor. The precursor is characterized by UV-visible diffuse reflectance, Raman, Fourier transform infrared, photoluminescent and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The morphology and structure analysis is carried out using field emission scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction techniques. The results of structural and optical characterization of the sample synthesized are compared with the commercial B4C. The thermal stability of the sample is studied by thermogravimetric analysis. The sample annealed at 700 °C is found to be B4C devoid of amorphous carbon with a yield of 44.7%. The analysis reveals the formation of boron carbide from the sample.

  20. Determination of boron in nuclear materials at subppm levels by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, Radhika M.; Aggarwal, S.K.

    2002-11-01

    Experiments were conducted for the determination of boron in U 3 O 8 powder, aluminium metal and milliQ water using dynamically modified Reversed Phase High Pressure Liquid Chromatography (RP-HPLC) and using two precolumn chromogenic agents viz. chromotropic acid and curcumin for complexing boron. The complex was separated from the excess of reagent and determined by HPLC. When present in subppm levels, chromotropic acid was used successfully only for determination boron in water samples. For determination of boron at subppm levels in uranium and aluminium samples, curcumin was used as the precolumn chromogenic agent. The boron curcumin complex (rosocyanin) was formed after extraction of boron with 2-ethyl-l, 3-hexane diol (EHD). The rosocyanin complex was then separated from excess curcumin by displacement chromatography. Linear calibration curves for boron amounts in the range of 0.02 μg to 0.5 μg were developed with correlation coefficients varying from 0.997 to 0.999 and were used for the determination of boron in aluminium and uranium samples. Precision of about 10% was achieved in samples containing less than 1 ppmw of boron. Detection limit of this method is 0.01 μg boron. (author)

  1. Laser Powder Cladding of Ti-6Al-4V α/β Alloy

    OpenAIRE

    Samar Reda Al-Sayed Ali; Abdel Hamid Ahmed Hussein; Adel Abdel Menam Saleh Nofal; Salah Elden Ibrahim Hasseb Elnaby; Haytham Abdelrafea Elgazzar; Hassan Abdel Sabour

    2017-01-01

    Laser cladding process was performed on a commercial Ti-6Al-4V (α + β) titanium alloy by means of tungsten carbide-nickel based alloy powder blend. Nd:YAG laser with a 2.2-KW continuous wave was used with coaxial jet nozzle coupled with a standard powder feeding system. Four-track deposition of a blended powder consisting of 60 wt % tungsten carbide (WC) and 40 wt % NiCrBSi was successfully made on the alloy. The high content of the hard WC particles is intended to enhance the abrasion resist...

  2. Powder diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, M.

    1995-12-31

    the importance of x-ray powder diffraction as an analytical tool for phase identification of materials was first pointed out by Debye and Scherrer in Germany and, quite independently, by Hull in the US. Three distinct periods of evolution lead to ubiquitous application in many fields of science and technology. In the first period, until the mid-1940`s, applications were and developed covering broad categories of materials including inorganic materials, minerals, ceramics, metals, alloys, organic materials and polymers. During this formative period, the concept of quantitative phase analysis was demonstrated. In the second period there followed the blossoming of technology and commercial instruments became widely used. The history is well summarized by Parrish and by Langford and Loueer. By 1980 there were probably 10,000 powder diffractometers in routine use, making it the most widely used of all x-ray crystallographic instruments. In the third, present, period data bases became firmly established and sophisticated pattern fitting and recognition software made many aspects of powder diffraction analysis routine. High resolution, tunable powder diffractometers were developed at sources of synchrotron radiation. The tunability of the spectrum made it possible to exploit all the subtleties of x-ray spectroscopy in diffraction experiments.

  3. Powder diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, M.

    1995-01-01

    The importance of x-ray powder diffraction as an analytical tool for phase identification of materials was first pointed out by Debye and Scherrer in Germany and, quite independently, by Hull in the US. Three distinct periods of evolution lead to ubiquitous application in many fields of science and technology. In the first period, until the mid-1940's, applications were and developed covering broad categories of materials including inorganic materials, minerals, ceramics, metals, alloys, organic materials and polymers. During this formative period, the concept of quantitative phase analysis was demonstrated. In the second period there followed the blossoming of technology and commercial instruments became widely used. The history is well summarized by Parrish and by Langford and Loueer. By 1980 there were probably 10,000 powder diffractometers in routine use, making it the most widely used of all x-ray crystallographic instruments. In the third, present, period data bases became firmly established and sophisticated pattern fitting and recognition software made many aspects of powder diffraction analysis routine. High resolution, tunable powder diffractometers were developed at sources of synchrotron radiation. The tunability of the spectrum made it possible to exploit all the subtleties of x-ray spectroscopy in diffraction experiments

  4. Powder diffractometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doucet, J.

    1983-01-01

    The new possibilities openned by the synchrotron radiation in the powder diffractometry techniques are presented. This technique is described in a general manner and some aspects which can be developed with the use of the synchrotron radiation are analyzed. (L.C.) [pt

  5. Rf-plasma synthesis of nanosize silicon carbide and nitride. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buss, R.J.

    1997-02-01

    A pulsed rf plasma technique is capable of generating ceramic particles of 10 manometer dimension. Experiments using silane/ammonia and trimethylchlorosilane/hydrogen gas mixtures show that both silicon nitride and silicon carbide powders can be synthesized with control of the average particle diameter from 7 to 200 nm. Large size dispersion and much agglomeration appear characteristic of the method, in contrast to results reported by another research group. The as produced powders have a high hydrogen content and are air and moisture sensitive. Post-plasma treatment in a controlled atmosphere at elevated temperature (800{degrees}C) eliminates the hydrogen and stabilizes the powder with respect to oxidation or hydrolysis.

  6. Analysis of crystallite size and microdeformation crystal lattice the tungsten carbide milling in mill high energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, F.T. da; Nunes, M.A.M.; Souza, C.P. de; Gomes, U.U.

    2010-01-01

    The tungsten carbide (WC) has wide application due to its properties like high melting point, high hardness, wear resistance, oxidation resistance and good electrical conductivity. The microstructural characteristics of the starting powders influences the final properties of the carbide. In this context, the use of nanoparticle powders is an efficient way to improve the final properties of the WC. The high energy milling stands out from other processes to obtain nanometric powders due to constant microstructural changes caused by this process. Therefore, the objective is to undertake an analysis of microstructural characteristics on the crystallite size and microdeformations of the crystal lattice using the technique of X-ray diffraction (XRD) using the Rietveld refinement. The results show an efficiency of the milling process to reduce the crystallite size, leading to a significant deformation in the crystal lattice of WC from 5h milling. (author)

  7. Magnesium doping of boron nitride nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legg, Robert; Jordan, Kevin

    2015-06-16

    A method to fabricate boron nitride nanotubes incorporating magnesium diboride in their structure. In a first embodiment, magnesium wire is introduced into a reaction feed bundle during a BNNT fabrication process. In a second embodiment, magnesium in powder form is mixed into a nitrogen gas flow during the BNNT fabrication process. MgB.sub.2 yarn may be used for superconducting applications and, in that capacity, has considerably less susceptibility to stress and has considerably better thermal conductivity than these conventional materials when compared to both conventional low and high temperature superconducting materials.

  8. POWDER INJECTION MOLDING OF SIC FOR THERMAL MANAGEMENT V

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valmikanathan Onbattuvelli

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Silicon carbide (SiC exhibits many functional properties that are relevant to applications in electronics, aerospace, defense and automotive industries. However, the successful translation of these properties into final applications lies in the net-shaping of ceramics into fully dense microstructures. Increasing the packing density of the starting powders is one effective route to achieve high sintered density and dimensional precision. The present paper presents an in-depth study on the effects of nanoparticle addition on the powder injection molding process (PIM of SiC powder-polymer mixtures. In particular, bimodal mixtures of nanoscale and sub-micrometer particles are found to have significantly increased powder packing characteristics (solids loading in the powder-polymer mixtures. The influence of nanoparticle addition on the multi-step PIM process is examined. The above results provide new perspectives which could impact a wide range of materials, powder processing techniques and applications.

  9. Properties of carbides and hard metals. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazare, S.; Ondracek, G.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements of the electrical resistivity and of the Young modulus are reported for the carbides TiC, HfC, NbC, and TaC. The investigations included the solid solutions TiC-HfC, HfC-NbC, TaC-NbC, and TiC-NbC. For the solid solutions, measurements of the thermal expansion in the range 293-1173 K are also reported. All the samples were prepared by hot pressing of the commercial powders in graphite dies. The chemical composites are also presented. The measurement results are shown in figures. (GSC) [de

  10. Electrophoretic deposits of boron on duralumin plates used for measuring neutron flux; Depots electrophoretiques de bore sur plaques de duralumin destines a des mesures de flux de neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lang, F M; Magnier, P; Finck, C [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1956-07-01

    Preparation of boron thin film deposits of around 1 mg per cm{sup 2} on duralumin plates with a diameter of 8 cm. The boron coated plates for ionization chambers were originally prepared at the CEA by pulverization of boron carbides on sodium silicates. This method is not controlling precisely enough the quantity of boron deposit. Thus, an electrophoretic method is considered for a better control of the quantity of boron deposit in the scope of using in the future boron 10 which is costly and rare. The method described by O. Flint is not satisfying enough and a similar electrophoretic process has been developed. Full description of the method is given as well as explanation of the use of dried methanol as solvent, tannin as electrolyte and magnesium chloride to avoid alumina formation. (M.P.)

  11. Preparation of in-house graphite reference material for boron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Sanjukta A.; Venkatesh, K.; Swain, Kallola K.; Manisha, V.; Kamble, Granthali S.; Pandey, Shailaja P.; Remya Devi, P.S.; Ghosh, M.; Verma, R.

    2016-05-01

    Graphite is extensively used in nuclear technology. Boron concentration in graphite is one of the important parameters that decide its acceptability for nuclear applications. Reliable analytical methods are essential for the determination of boron in graphite at concentration about 5 mg kg -1 . Reference materials are used for validation of existing analytical methods and developing new methodologies. In view of the importance of determination of boron in graphite and unavailability of graphite reference material, an In-house graphite reference material was prepared in Analytical Chemistry Division. Graphite source material was procured, processed to obtain powder of ≤ 75 μm (200 mesh) and bottled. Procedures were developed for the determination of boron in graphite using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICPOES) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) techniques. Homogeneity testing was carried out on the bottled units and boron content along with the combined and expanded uncertainties were established. The assigned boron concentration in the In-house graphite reference material is (7.3±0.46) mg kg -1 . (author)

  12. Porous silicon carbide (SIC) semiconductor device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shor, Joseph S. (Inventor); Kurtz, Anthony D. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    Porous silicon carbide is fabricated according to techniques which result in a significant portion of nanocrystallites within the material in a sub 10 nanometer regime. There is described techniques for passivating porous silicon carbide which result in the fabrication of optoelectronic devices which exhibit brighter blue luminescence and exhibit improved qualities. Based on certain of the techniques described porous silicon carbide is used as a sacrificial layer for the patterning of silicon carbide. Porous silicon carbide is then removed from the bulk substrate by oxidation and other methods. The techniques described employ a two-step process which is used to pattern bulk silicon carbide where selected areas of the wafer are then made porous and then the porous layer is subsequently removed. The process to form porous silicon carbide exhibits dopant selectivity and a two-step etching procedure is implemented for silicon carbide multilayers.

  13. Attenuation of Neutron and Gamma Radiation by a Composite Material Based on Modified Titanium Hydride with a Varied Boron Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yastrebinskii, R. N.

    2018-04-01

    The investigations on estimating the attenuation of capture gamma radiation by a composite neutron-shielding material based on modified titanium hydride and Portland cement with a varied amount of boron carbide are performed. The results of calculations demonstrate that an introduction of boron into this material enables significantly decreasing the thermal neutron flux density and hence the levels of capture gamma radiation. In particular, after introducing 1- 5 wt.% boron carbide into the material, the thermal neutron flux density on a 10 cm-thick layer is reduced by 11 to 176 factors, and the capture gamma dose rate - from 4 to 9 times, respectively. The difference in the degree of reduction in these functionals is attributed to the presence of capture gamma radiation in the epithermal region of the neutron spectrum.

  14. High yield silicon carbide prepolymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baney, R.H.

    1982-01-01

    Prepolymers which exhibit good handling properties, and are useful for preparing ceramics, silicon carbide ceramic materials and articles containing silicon carbide, are polysilanes consisting of 0 to 60 mole% (CH 3 ) 2 Si units and 40 to 100 mole% CH 3 Si units, all Si valences being satisfied by CH 3 groups, other Si atoms, or by H atoms, the latter amounting to 0.3 to 2.1 weight% of the polysilane. They are prepared by reducing the corresponding chloro- or bromo-polysilanes with at least the stoichiometric amount of a reducing agent, e.g. LiAlH 4 . (author)

  15. Transition metal carbide and boride abrasive particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdsaar, H.

    1978-01-01

    Abrasive particles and their preparation are discussed. The particles consist essentially of a matrix of titanium carbide and zirconium carbide, at least partially in solid solution form, and grains of crystalline titanium diboride dispersed throughout the carbide matrix. These abrasive particles are particularly useful as components of grinding wheels for abrading steel. 1 figure, 6 tables

  16. Benefits of Low Boron Core Design Concept for PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daing, Aung Tharn; Kim, Myung Hyun [Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    Nuclear design study was carried out to develop low boron core (LBC) based on one of current PWR concepts, OPR-1000. Most of design parameters were the same with those of Ulchin unit-5 except extensive utilization of burnable poison (BP) pins in order to compensate reactivity increase in LBC. For replacement of reduced soluble boron concentration, four different kinds of integral burnable absorbers (IBAs) such as gadolinia, integral fuel burnable absorber (IFBA), erbia and alumina boron carbide were considered in suppressing more excess reactivity. A parametric study was done to find the optimal core options from many design candidates for fuel assemblies and cores. Among them, the most feasible core design candidate was chosen in accordance with general design requirements. In this paper, the feasibility and design change benefits of the most favorable LBC design were investigated in more detail through the comparison of neutronic and thermal hydraulic design parameters of LBC with the reference plant (REF). As calculation tools, the HELIOS/MASTER code package and the MATRA code were utilized. The main purpose of research herein is to estimate feasibility and capability of LBC which was mainly designed to mitigate boron dilution accident (BDA), and for reduction of corrosion products. The LBC design concept using lower boron concentration with an elevated enrichment in {sup 10}B allows a reduction in the concentration of lithium in the primary coolant required to maintain the optimum coolant pH. All in all, LBC with operation at optimum pH is expected to achieve some benefits from radiation source reduction of reduced corrosion product, the limitation of the Axial Offset Anomaly (AOA) and fuel cladding corrosion. Additionally, several merits of LBC are closely related to fluid systems and system related aspects, reduced boron and lithium costs, equipment size reduction for boric acid systems, elimination of heat tracing, and more aggressive fuel design concepts.

  17. Benefits of Low Boron Core Design Concept for PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daing, Aung Tharn; Kim, Myung Hyun

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear design study was carried out to develop low boron core (LBC) based on one of current PWR concepts, OPR-1000. Most of design parameters were the same with those of Ulchin unit-5 except extensive utilization of burnable poison (BP) pins in order to compensate reactivity increase in LBC. For replacement of reduced soluble boron concentration, four different kinds of integral burnable absorbers (IBAs) such as gadolinia, integral fuel burnable absorber (IFBA), erbia and alumina boron carbide were considered in suppressing more excess reactivity. A parametric study was done to find the optimal core options from many design candidates for fuel assemblies and cores. Among them, the most feasible core design candidate was chosen in accordance with general design requirements. In this paper, the feasibility and design change benefits of the most favorable LBC design were investigated in more detail through the comparison of neutronic and thermal hydraulic design parameters of LBC with the reference plant (REF). As calculation tools, the HELIOS/MASTER code package and the MATRA code were utilized. The main purpose of research herein is to estimate feasibility and capability of LBC which was mainly designed to mitigate boron dilution accident (BDA), and for reduction of corrosion products. The LBC design concept using lower boron concentration with an elevated enrichment in 10 B allows a reduction in the concentration of lithium in the primary coolant required to maintain the optimum coolant pH. All in all, LBC with operation at optimum pH is expected to achieve some benefits from radiation source reduction of reduced corrosion product, the limitation of the Axial Offset Anomaly (AOA) and fuel cladding corrosion. Additionally, several merits of LBC are closely related to fluid systems and system related aspects, reduced boron and lithium costs, equipment size reduction for boric acid systems, elimination of heat tracing, and more aggressive fuel design concepts

  18. Structure and microhardness of alloy VT22 granules additionally doped with carbon and boron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sysoeva, N.V.; Polyakova, I.G.; Karpova, I.G.

    1996-01-01

    Aimed to improve heat resistance and strength of titanium base alloys due to carbon and boron additions (up to 0.3%) a study was made into regularities of phase decomposition in VT22 alloy during its rapid quenching from a liquid state on manufacturing granules 100-400 μm in size. Cooling rates on quenching were found to be sufficiently high to prevent precipitating carbides and borides. Subsequent annealing of granules promotes homogeneous precipitation of strengthening phases in the form of titanium carbides and borides, a reasonable amount of carbon and boron remaining in solid solution. An increase in microhardness of annealed granules reaches 20-25% compared to the standard alloy. 6 refs.; 2 figs.; 2 tabs

  19. Peculiar features of metallurgical processes at plasma-arc spraying of coatings, made of steel wire with powder fillers B4C and B4C+ZrO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Георгій Михайлович Григоренко

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of metallurgical processes occurring in plasma-arc spraying between the steel shell and the carbide fillers of B4C and B4C cored wires with the addition of nanocrystalline ZrO2 powder has been analyzed. Iron-boron compounds alloyed with carbon are formed in ingots as a result of ferritiс coating of wire interacrion with fillers while the ferritic matrix contains boride and carboboride eutectics. Average microhardness of the carboboride compounds and the matrix is high – 17,78; 16,40 and 8,69; 9,95 GPa for the ingots with с B4C and B4C+ZrO2 respectively. The best quality coatings with low porosity (~1%, lamellar structure consisting of ferrite matrix reinforced with dispersed Fe borides, were obtained at a higher heat input (plasmatron current 240-250 A. The average amount of oxides in the coatings makes 15%. 0,5% addition of nanopowder ZrO2 accelerates dispersed iron-boron compounds forming, promotes their uniform distribution in the structure and improves coating microhardness up to 7,0 GPa. Application of the differential thermal analysis method to simulate the interaction processes between the steel shell and the filler during the heating of wire in the shielding gas makes it possible to promote formation of new phases (borides and carboborides of iron and to predict the phase composition of the coatings

  20. Powder technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agueda, Horacio

    1989-01-01

    Powder technology is experiencing nowadays a great development and has broad application in different fields: nuclear energy, medicine, new energy sources, industrial and home artifacts, etc. Ceramic materials are of daily use as tableware and also in the building industry (bricks, tiles, etc.). However, in machine construction its utilization is not so common. The same happens with metals: powder metallurgy is employed less than traditional metal forming techniques. Both cases deal with powder technology and the forming techniques as far as the final consolidation through sintering processes are very similar. There are many different methods and techniques in the forming stage: cold-pressing, slip casting, injection molding, extrusion molding, isostatic pressing, hot-pressing (which involves also the final consolidation step), etc. This variety allows to obtain almost any desired form no matter how complex it could be. Some applications are very specific as in the case of UO 2 pellets (used as nuclear fuels) but with the same technique and other materials, it is possible to manufacture a great number of different products. This work shows the characteristics and behaviour of two magnetic ceramic materials (ferrites) fabricated in the laboratory of the Applied Research Division of the Bariloche Atomic Center for different purposes. Other materials and products made with the same method are also mentioned. Likewise, densities and shrinkage obtained by different methods of forming (cold-pressing, injection molding, slip casting and extrusion molding) using high-purity alumina (99.5% Al 2 O 3 ). Finally, different applications of such methods are given. (Author) [es

  1. Experimental core electron density of cubic boron nitride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlberg, Nanna; Bindzus, Niels; Bjerg, Lasse

    as well as experimental result. The redistribution of electron density will, if not accounted for, result in increased thermal parameters. It is estimated that 1.7-2 electrons is transferred from boron to nitrogen. [1]: N. Bindzus, T. Straasø, N. Wahlberg, J. Becker, L. Bjerg, N. Lock, A.-C. Dippel, and B......Experimental core electron density of cubic boron nitride Nanna Wahlberg*, Niels Bindzus*, Lasse Bjerg*, Jacob Becker*, and Bo B. Iversen* *Aarhus University, Department of Chemistry, CMC, Langelandsgade 140, 8000 Århus, Denmark The resent progress in powder diffraction provides data of quality...... obtained. The displacement parameters reported here are significantly lower than those previously reported, stressing the importance of an adequate description of the core density. The charge transfer from boron to nitrogen clearly affects the inner electron density, which is evident from theoretical...

  2. Niobium carbide synthesis by solid-gas reaction using a rotating cylinder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontes, F.A.O.; Gomes, K.K.P.; Oliveira, S.A.; Souza, C.P.; Sousa, J.F.; Rio Grande do Norte Univ., Natal, RN

    2004-01-01

    A rotating cylinder reactor was designed for the synthesis of niobium carbide powders at 1173 K. Niobium carbide, NbC, was prepared by carbothermal reduction starting from commercial niobium pentoxide powders. The reactor was heated using a custom-made, two-part, hinged, electric furnace with programmable temperature control. The design and operational details of the reactor are presented. The longitudinal temperature gradient inside the reactor was determined. Total reaction time was monitored by a gas chromatograph equipped with an FID detector for determination of methane concentrations. The results show that time of reaction depended on rotation speed. NbC was also prepared in a static-bed alumina reactor using the same conditions as in the previous case. The niobium carbide powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction and compared with commercially available products. Morphological, particle size distribution and surface area analyses were obtained using SEM, LDPS and BET, respectively. Therefore, the present study offers a significant technological contribution to the synthesis of NbC powders in a rotating cylinder reactor. (author)

  3. Boronated liposome development and evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawthorne, M.F.

    1995-01-01

    The boronated liposome development and evaluation effort consists of two separate tasks. The first is the development of new boron compounds and the synthesis of known boron species with BNCT potential. These compounds are then encapsulated within liposomes for the second task, biodistribution testing in tumor-bearing mice, which examines the potential for the liposomes and their contents to concentrate boron in cancerous tissues

  4. Review of some past and present powder metallurgy programs at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheinberg, H.

    1977-01-01

    Powder metallurgy programs at LASL are reviewed. Topics covered include: KIWI reactor fuel elements; Phoebus reactor fuel elements, criticality control and poison plate material, structural composites for fuel element supports, and heat shields for fuel element supports; thermionic emitter reactor uranium carbide--zirconium carbide fuel pins, and molybdenum--uranium oxide fuel pins; laser and electron beam fusion targets; and current work in MHD components

  5. Enhancement of thermal neutron shielding of cement mortar by using borosilicate glass powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Bo-Kil; Lee, Jun-Cheol; Kim, Ji-Hyun; Chung, Chul-Woo

    2017-05-01

    Concrete has been used as a traditional biological shielding material. High hydrogen content in concrete also effectively attenuates high-energy fast neutrons. However, concrete does not have strong protection against thermal neutrons because of the lack of boron compound. In this research, boron was added in the form of borosilicate glass powder to increase the neutron shielding property of cement mortar. Borosilicate glass powder was chosen in order to have beneficial pozzolanic activity and to avoid deleterious expansion caused by an alkali-silica reaction. According to the experimental results, borosilicate glass powder with an average particle size of 13µm showed pozzolanic activity. The replacement of borosilicate glass powder with cement caused a slight increase in the 28-day compressive strength. However, the incorporation of borosilicate glass powder resulted in higher thermal neutron shielding capability. Thus, borosilicate glass powder can be used as a good mineral additive for various radiation shielding purposes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Implantation of boron in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofker, W.K.

    1975-01-01

    The distribution versus depth of boron implanted in silicon and the corresponding electrical activity obtained after annealing are studied. The boron distributions are measured by secondary-ion mass spectrometry. Boron distributions implanted at energies in the range from 30 keV to 800 keV in amorphous and polycrystalline silicon are analysed. Moments of these distributions are determined by a curve-fitting programme and compared with moments calculated by Winterbon. Boron distributions obtained by implantations along a dense crystallographic direction in monocrystalline silicon are found to have penetrating tails. After investigation of some possible mechanisms of tail formation it is concluded that the tails are due to channelling. It was found that the behaviour of boron during annealing is determined by the properties of three boron fractions consisting of precipitated boron, interstitial boron and substitutional boron. The electrical activity of the boron versus depth is found to be consistent with the three boron fractions. A peculiar redistribution of boron is found which is induced by the implantation of a high dose of heavy ions and subsequent annealing. Different mechanisms which may cause the observed effects, such as thermal diffusion which is influenced by lattice strain and damage, are discussed. (Auth.)

  7. Preparation of boron-rich aluminum boride nanoparticles by RF thermal plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Sooseok [Inha University, Department of Chemical Engineering and Regional Innovation Center for Environmental Technology of Thermal Plasma (Korea, Republic of); Matsuo, Jiro; Cheng, Yingying [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Department of Environmental Chemistry and Engineering (Japan); Watanabe, Takayuki, E-mail: watanabe@chemenv.titech.ac.jp [Kyushu University, Department of Chemical Engineering (Japan)

    2013-08-15

    Boron-rich compounds of AlB{sub 12} and AlB{sub 10} nanoparticles were synthesized by a radiofrequency thermal plasma. Aluminum and boron raw powders were evaporated in virtue of high enthalpy of the thermal plasma in upstream region, followed by the formation of aluminum boride nanoparticles in the tail region of plasma flame with rapid quenching. A high production rate of aluminum boride was confirmed by the X-ray diffraction measurement in the case of high input power, high boron content in raw material and helium inner gas. Polyhedral nanoparticles of 20.8 nm in mean size were observed by a transmission electron microscope. In the raw powder mixture of aluminum, titanium, and boron, titanium-boride nanoparticles were synthesized preferentially, because the Gibbs free energy for the boridation of titanium is lower than that of aluminum. Since the nucleation temperature of boron is higher than that of aluminum, the condensation of metal monomers onto boron nuclei results in the formation of boron-rich aluminum boride nanoparticles.

  8. GEN IV: Carbide Fuel Elaboration for the 'Futurix Concepts' experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaudez, Stephane; Riglet-Martial, Chantal; Paret, Laurent; Abonneau, Eric

    2008-01-01

    In order to collect information on the behaviour of the future GFR (Gas Fast Reactor) fuel under fast neutron irradiation, an experimental irradiation program, called 'Futurix-concepts' has been launched at the CEA. The considered concept is a composite material made of a fissile fuel embedded in an inert ceramic matrix. Fissile fuel pellets are made of UPuN or UPuC while ceramics are SiC for the carbide fuel and TiN for the nitride fuel. This paper focuses on the description of the carbide composite fabrication. The UPuC pellets are manufactured using a metallurgical powder process. Fabrication and handling of the fuels are carried out in glove boxes under a nitrogen atmosphere. Carbide fuel is synthesized by carbo-thermic reduction under vacuum of a mixture of actinide oxide and graphitic carbon up to 1550 deg. C. After ball milling, the UPuC powder is pressed to create hexagonal or spherical compacts. They are then sintered up to 1750 deg. C in order to obtain a density of 85 % of the theoretical one. The sintered pellets are inserted into an inert and tight capsule of SiC. In order to control the gap between the fuel and the matrix precisely, the pellets are abraded. The inert matrix is then filled with the pellets and the whole system is sealed by a BRASiC R process at high temperature under a helium atmosphere. Fabrication of the sample to be irradiated was done in 2006 and the irradiation began in May 2007 in the Phenix reactor. This presentation will detail and discuss the results obtained during this fabrication phase. (authors)

  9. Enrichment of boron 10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coutinho, C.M.M.; Rodrigues Filho, J.S.R.; Umeda, K.; Echternacht, M.V.

    1990-01-01

    A isotopic separation pilot plant with five ion exchange columns interconnected in series were designed and built in the IEN. The columns are charged with a strong anionic resin in its alkaline form. The boric acid solution is introduced in the separation columns until it reaches a absorbing zone length which is sufficient to obtain the desired boron-10 isotopic concentration. The boric acid absorbing zone movement is provided by the injection of a diluted hydrochloric acid solution, which replace the boric acid throughout the columns. The absorbing zone equilibrium length is proportional to its total length. The enriched boron-10 and the depleted boron are located in the final boundary and in the initial position of the absorbing zones, respectively. (author)

  10. Metal Immiscibility Route to Synthesis of Ultrathin Carbides, Borides, and Nitrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zixing; Kochat, Vidya; Pandey, Prafull; Kashyap, Sanjay; Chattopadhyay, Soham; Samanta, Atanu; Sarkar, Suman; Manimunda, Praveena; Zhang, Xiang; Asif, Syed; Singh, Abhisek K; Chattopadhyay, Kamanio; Tiwary, Chandra Sekhar; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2017-08-01

    Ultrathin ceramic coatings are of high interest as protective coatings from aviation to biomedical applications. Here, a generic approach of making scalable ultrathin transition metal-carbide/boride/nitride using immiscibility of two metals is demonstrated. Ultrathin tantalum carbide, nitride, and boride are grown using chemical vapor deposition by heating a tantalum-copper bilayer with corresponding precursor (C 2 H 2 , B powder, and NH 3 ). The ultrathin crystals are found on the copper surface (opposite of the metal-metal junction). A detailed microscopy analysis followed by density functional theory based calculation demonstrates the migration mechanism, where Ta atoms prefer to stay in clusters in the Cu matrix. These ultrathin materials have good interface attachment with Cu, improving the scratch resistance and oxidation resistance of Cu. This metal-metal immiscibility system can be extended to other metals to synthesize metal carbide, boride, and nitride coatings. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Development of new metal matrix composite electrodes for electrical discharge machining through powder metallurgy process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Mathalai Sundaram

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Electrical discharge machining (EDM is one of the widely used nontraditional machining methods to produce die cavities by the erosive effect of electrical discharges. This method is popular due to the fact that a relatively soft electrically conductive tool electrode can machine hard work piece. Copper electrode is normally used for machining process. Electrode wear rate is the major drawback for EDM researchers. This research focus on fabrication of metal matrix composite (MMC electrode by mixing copper powder with titanium carbide (TiC and Tungsten carbide (WC powder through powder metallurgy process, Copper powder is the major amount of mixing proportion with TiC and WC. However, this paper focus on the early stage of the project where powder metallurgy route was used to determine suitable mixing time, compaction pressure and sintering and compacting process in producing EDM electrode. The newly prepared composite electrodes in different composition are tested in EDM for OHNS steel.

  12. Treatment of refractory powders by a novel, high enthalpy dc plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pershin, L.; Mitrasinovic, A.; Mostaghimi, J.

    2013-06-01

    Thermophysical properties of CO2-CH4 mixtures at high temperatures are very attractive for materials processing. In comparison with argon, at the same temperature, such a mixture possesses much higher enthalpy and higher thermal conductivity. At high temperatures, CO2-CH4 mixture has a complex composition with strong presence of CO which, in the case of powder treatment, could reduce oxidation. In this work, a dc plasma torch with graphite cathode was used to study the effect of plasma gas composition on spheroidization of tungsten carbide and alumina powders. Two different gas compositions were used to generate the plasma while the torch current was kept at 300 A. Various techniques were employed to assess the average concentration of carbides and oxides and the final shape of the treated powders. Process parameters such as input power and plasma gas composition allow controlling the degree of powder oxidation and spheroidization of high melting point ceramic powders.

  13. Treatment of refractory powders by a novel, high enthalpy dc plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pershin, L; Mitrasinovic, A; Mostaghimi, J

    2013-01-01

    Thermophysical properties of CO 2 –CH 4 mixtures at high temperatures are very attractive for materials processing. In comparison with argon, at the same temperature, such a mixture possesses much higher enthalpy and higher thermal conductivity. At high temperatures, CO 2 –CH 4 mixture has a complex composition with strong presence of CO which, in the case of powder treatment, could reduce oxidation. In this work, a dc plasma torch with graphite cathode was used to study the effect of plasma gas composition on spheroidization of tungsten carbide and alumina powders. Two different gas compositions were used to generate the plasma while the torch current was kept at 300 A. Various techniques were employed to assess the average concentration of carbides and oxides and the final shape of the treated powders. Process parameters such as input power and plasma gas composition allow controlling the degree of powder oxidation and spheroidization of high melting point ceramic powders. (paper)

  14. High density crystalline boron prepared by hot isostatic pressing in refractory metal containers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoenig, C.L.

    1993-08-31

    Boron powder is hot isostatically pressed in a refractory metal container to produce a solid boron monolith with a bulk density at least 2.22 g/cc and up to or greater than 2.34 g/cc. The refractory metal container is formed of tantalum, niobium, tungsten, molybdenum or alloys thereof in the form of a canister or alternatively plasma sprayed or chemical vapor deposited onto a powder compact. Hot isostatic pressing at 1,800 C and 30 PSI (206.8 MPa) argon pressure for four hours produces a bulk density of 2.34 g/cc. Complex shapes can be made.

  15. Thermoelectric properties of boron and boron phosphide CVD wafers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumashiro, Y.; Yokoyama, T.; Sato, A.; Ando, Y. [Yokohama National Univ. (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    Electrical and thermal conductivities and thermoelectric power of p-type boron and n-type boron phosphide wafers with amorphous and polycrystalline structures were measured up to high temperatures. The electrical conductivity of amorphous boron wafers is compatible to that of polycrystals at high temperatures and obeys Mott`s T{sup -{1/4}} rule. The thermoelectric power of polycrystalline boron decreases with increasing temperature, while that of amorphous boron is almost constant in a wide temperature range. The weak temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity of BP polycrystalline wafers reflects phonon scattering by grain boundaries. Thermal conductivity of an amorphous boron wafer is almost constant in a wide temperature range, showing a characteristic of a glass. The figure of merit of polycrystalline BP wafers is 10{sup -7}/K at high temperatures while that of amorphous boron is 10{sup -5}/K.

  16. Microstructure and phase evolution in laser clad chromium carbide-NiCrMoNb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkatesh, L., E-mail: venkatesh@arci.res.in [International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials (ARCI), Balapur, Hyderabad 500005 (India); Department of Metallurgical Engineering & Materials Science, IIT Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400076 (India); Samajdar, I. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering & Materials Science, IIT Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400076 (India); Tak, Manish [International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials (ARCI), Balapur, Hyderabad 500005 (India); Doherty, Roger D. [Department of Materials Engineering, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Gundakaram, Ravi C.; Prasad, K. Satya; Joshi, S.V. [International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials (ARCI), Balapur, Hyderabad 500005 (India)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • Microstructural development during laser cladding has been studied. • In this multi component system Cr{sub 7}C{sub 3} is found to be the stable carbide phase. • Phases were identified by EBSD since XRD results were not conclusive. • Increase in laser power and/or scanning speed reduced the carbide content. • Hardness seems to depend on phase content as well as microstructure. - Abstract: Microstructural development in laser clad layers of Chromium carbide (Cr{sub x}C{sub y})-NiCrMoNb on SA 516 steel has been investigated. Although the starting powder contained both Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2} and Cr{sub 7}C{sub 3}, the clad layers showed only the presence of Cr{sub 7}C{sub 3}. Microtexture measurements by electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD) revealed primary dendritic Cr{sub 7}C{sub 3} with Ni rich FCC metallic phase being present in the interdendritic spaces. Further annealing of the laser clad layers and furnace melting of the starting powder confirmed that Cr{sub 7}C{sub 3} is the primary as well as stable carbide phase in this multi component system. Increase in laser power and scanning speed progressively reduced carbide content in the laser clad layers. Increased scanning speed, which enhances the cooling rate, also led to reduction in the secondary arm spacing (λ{sub 2}) of the Cr{sub 7}C{sub 3} dendrites. The clad layer hardness increased with carbide content and with decreased dendrite arm spacing.

  17. Boron incorporation into rutile: phase equilibria and structural considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grey, I.E.; Li, C.; MacRae, C.M.; Bursill, L.A.

    1997-01-01

    Reduction of rutile in the presence of borate flux stabilised the rutile phase relative to reduced rutiles due to incorporation of boron from the flux. In the presence of borates the rutile phase is stabilised to oxygen fugacities that are lower by almost two orders of magnitude compared with fugacities at the limit of the single-phase rutile phase field in the pure Ti-O system. Boron incorporation is accompanied by reduction of titanium to the trivalent state, according to the charge compensation relation: 3Ti 4+ ≡ 3 Ti 3+ + B 3+ . Results of powder X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy studies on samples prepared in the temperature range 1100 to 1300 deg C have been used to establish a model for boron incorporation. It is proposed that at the temperatures studied, local defects in boron doped rutile result from displacement of titanium atoms to adjacent interstitial sites coupled with occupation by boron of the triangular face of the vacated octahedral sites. This atomic grouping represents a small element of the TiBO 3 (calcite-type) structure. Annealing at a lower temperature results in ordering of the local defects to form (101) r planar intergrowths of rutile and calcite-type structures. 14 refs., 3 tabs., 8 figs

  18. Boron incorporation into rutile: phase equilibria and structural considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grey, I.E.; Li, C.; MacRae, C.M. [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), East Melbourne, VIC (Australia). Div of Minerals; Bursill, L.A. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1997-06-01

    Reduction of rutile in the presence of borate flux stabilised the rutile phase relative to reduced rutiles due to incorporation of boron from the flux. In the presence of borates the rutile phase is stabilised to oxygen fugacities that are lower by almost two orders of magnitude compared with fugacities at the limit of the single-phase rutile phase field in the pure Ti-O system. Boron incorporation is accompanied by reduction of titanium to the trivalent state, according to the charge compensation relation: 3Ti{sup 4+}{identical_to} 3 Ti{sup 3+} + B{sup 3+}. Results of powder X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy studies on samples prepared in the temperature range 1100 to 1300 deg C have been used to establish a model for boron incorporation. It is proposed that at the temperatures studied, local defects in boron doped rutile result from displacement of titanium atoms to adjacent interstitial sites coupled with occupation by boron of the triangular face of the vacated octahedral sites. This atomic grouping represents a small element of the TiBO{sub 3} (calcite-type) structure. Annealing at a lower temperature results in ordering of the local defects to form (101){sub r} planar intergrowths of rutile and calcite-type structures. 14 refs., 3 tabs., 8 figs.

  19. Application of in situ current normalized PIGE method for determination of total boron and its isotopic composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chhillar, Sumit; Acharya, R.; Sodaye, S.; Pujari, P.K.

    2014-01-01

    A particle induced gamma-ray emission (PIGE) method using proton beam has been standardized for determination of isotopic composition of natural boron and enriched boron samples. Target pellets of boron standard and samples were prepared in cellulose matrix. The prompt gamma rays of 429 keV, 718 keV and 2125 keV were measured from 10 B(p,αγ) 7 Be, 10 B(p, p'γ) 10 B and 11 B(p, p'γ) 11 B nuclear reactions, respectively. For normalizing the beam current variations in situ current normalization method was used. Validation of method was carried out using synthetic samples of boron carbide, borax, borazine and lithium metaborate in cellulose matrix. (author)

  20. Superconductivity in borides and carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muranaka, Takahiro

    2007-01-01

    It was thought that intermetallic superconductors do not exhibit superconductivity at temperatures over 30 K because of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) limit; therefore, researchers have been interested in high-T c cuprates. Our group discovered high-T c superconductivity in MgB 2 at 39 K in 2001. This discovery has initiated a substantial interest in the potential of high-T c superconductivity in intermetallic compounds that include 'light' elements (borides, carbides, etc.). (author)

  1. Powder metallurgical high performance materials. Proceedings. Volume 4: late papers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kneringer, G; Roedhammer, P; Wildner, H [eds.

    2001-07-01

    This is the fourth volume (late papers) of the 15th International Plansee seminar 2001 which general theme was 'Powder metallurgical high performance materials'. The seminar looked beyond the refractory metals and cemented carbides, which remain as its focus, to novel classes of materials, such as intermetallic compounds, with potential for high temperature applications. This volume 4 contains papers dealing with high performance P/M metals (ITER and fusion reactors, solid targets, materials microstructure, novel alloys, etc.), P/M hard materials ( production and characterization, tungsten carbides, titanium carbides, microstructural design, coatings composition and performance, etc.) and general topics. From 37 papers 24 correspond to INIS subject scope and they were indexed separately. (nevyjel)

  2. Powder metallurgical high performance materials. Proceedings. Volume 4: late papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kneringer, G.; Roedhammer, P.; Wildner, H.

    2001-01-01

    This is the fourth volume (late papers) of the 15th International Plansee seminar 2001 which general theme was 'Powder metallurgical high performance materials'. The seminar looked beyond the refractory metals and cemented carbides, which remain as its focus, to novel classes of materials, such as intermetallic compounds, with potential for high temperature applications. This volume 4 contains papers dealing with high performance P/M metals (ITER and fusion reactors, solid targets, materials microstructure, novel alloys, etc.), P/M hard materials ( production and characterization, tungsten carbides, titanium carbides, microstructural design, coatings composition and performance, etc.) and general topics. From 37 papers 24 correspond to INIS subject scope and they were indexed separately. (nevyjel)

  3. The effect of the boron source composition ratio on the adsorption performance of hexagonal boron nitride without a template

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ning, E-mail: zhangning5832@163.com; Zhang, Tong; Kan, Hongmin; Wang, Xiaoyang; Long, Haibo; Cui, Xingyu

    2015-08-01

    An inexpensive boric acid (H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}) and borax (Na{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}·10H{sub 2}O) mix was used as a source of boron with different composition ratios, and urea was used as a nitrogen source, in flowing ammonia atmosphere, for the preparation of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) with different micro-morphologies. Under a certain synthesis process, the effects of the molar ratio of borax and boric acid (or simply the boron source composition ratio for short) on the phase composition of the sample were studied; the work also explored the effect of boron source composition ratio on the micro-morphology, adsorption desorption isotherm and specific surface area of the h-BN powder. The main purpose of this work was to determine the optimum composition ratio of preparing spherical mesoporous h-BN and ensure that the micro-mechanism underpinning the formation of spherical mesoporous h-BN was understood. The results showed that at the optimum boron source composition ratio of 1:1, globular mesoporous spheres with a diameter of approximately 600–800 nm could be obtained with the highest pore volume and specific surface area (230.2 m{sup 2}/g). - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Spherical h-BN was synthesized by controlling the boron source composition ratio. • Without extra spherical template, solid Na{sub 2}O was equal to a spherical template. • At boron source composition ratio of 1:1, h-BN had best adsorption performance.

  4. Chemical and phase composition of powders obtained by electroerosion dispersion from alloys WC-Co

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putintseva, M.N.

    2004-01-01

    A consideration is given to the dependence of chemical and phase compositions of dispersed powders on the conditions, the medium of electroerosion dispersing and the content of cobalt in an initial alloy. It is shown that dissociation of carbon from tungsten carbide proceeds even on dispersing in liquid hydrocarbon-containing media (kerosene and machine oil). The phase composition is determined to a large extent by a medium of dispersing and a cobalt content in the initial alloy. In all powders complex tungsten-cobalt carbides and even Co 7 W 6 intermetallic compounds are found [ru

  5. Chemical and Phase Composition of Powders Obtained by Electroerosion Dispersion from WC - Co Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putintseva, M. N.

    2004-03-01

    The dependence of the chemical and phase composition of dispersed powders on the mode and medium of electroerosion dispersion and the content of cobalt in the initial alloy is considered. It is shown that the dissociation of carbon from tungsten carbide occurs even in dispersion in liquid hydrocarbon-bearing media (kerosene and industrial oils). The phase composition is primarily determined by the dispersion medium and the content of cobalt in the initial alloy. Compound tungsten-cobalt carbides and even a Co7W6 intermetallic are determined in all the powders.

  6. Microstructure of reactive synthesis TiC/Cr18Ni8 stainless steel bonded carbides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Junsheng; Liu Junbo; Wang Limei

    2008-01-01

    TiC/Cr18Ni8 steel bonded carbides were synthesized by vacuum sintering with mixed powders of iron, ferrotitanium, ferrochromium, colloidal graphite and nickel as raw materials. The microstructure and microhardness of the steel bonded carbides were analyzed by scanning electron microscope (SEM),X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Rockwell hardometer. Results show that the phases of steel bonded carbides mainly consist of TiC and Fe-Cr-Ni solid solution. The synthesized TiC particles are fine. Most of them are not more than 1 μm With the increase of sintering temperature, the porosity of TiC/Cr18Ni8 steel bonded carbides decreases and the density and hardness increase, but the size of TiC panicles slightly increases. Under the same sintering conditions, the density and hardness of steel bonded carbides with C/Ti atomic ratio 0.9 are higher than those with C/Ti atomic ratio 1.0.The TiC particles with C/Ti atomic ratio 0.9 are much finer and more homogeneous.

  7. Crystallization of nodular cast iron with carbides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pietrowski

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a crystallization process of nodular cast iron with carbides having a different chemical composition have been presented. It have been found, that an increase of molybdenum above 0,30% causes the ledeburutic carbides crystallization after (γ+ graphite eutectic phase crystallization. When Mo content is lower, these carbides crystallize as a pre-eutectic phase. In this article causes of this effect have been given.

  8. Laser cladding of tungsten carbides (Spherotene) hardfacing alloys for the mining and mineral industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amado, J.M.; Tobar, M.J.; Alvarez, J.C.; Lamas, J.; Yanez, A.

    2009-01-01

    The abrasive nature of the mechanical processes involved in mining and mineral industry often causes significant wear to the associated equipment and derives non-negligible economic costs. One of the possible strategies to improve the wear resistance of the various components is the deposition of hardfacing layers on the bulk parts. The use of high power lasers for hardfacing (laser cladding) has attracted a great attention in the last decade as an alternative to other more standard methods (arc welding, oxy-fuel gas welding, thermal spraying). In laser cladding the hardfacing material is used in powder form. For high hardness applications Ni-, Co- or Fe-based alloys containing hard phase carbides at different ratios are commonly used. Tungsten carbides (WC) can provide coating hardness well above 1000 HV (Vickers). In this respect, commercially available WC powders normally contain spherical micro-particles consisting of crushed WC agglomerates. Some years ago, Spherotene powders consisting of spherical-fused monocrystaline WC particles, being extremely hard, between 1800 and 3000 HV, were patented. Very recently, mixtures of Ni-based alloy with Spherotene powders optimized for laser processing were presented (Technolase). These mixtures have been used in our study. Laser cladding tests with these powders were performed on low carbon steel (C25) substrates, and results in terms of microstructure and hardness will be discussed

  9. Laser cladding of tungsten carbides (Spherotene) hardfacing alloys for the mining and mineral industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amado, J.M. [Departamento de Ingenieria Industrial II, Universidade da Coruna, Mendizabal s/n, Ferrol E-15403 (Spain); Tobar, M.J. [Departamento de Ingenieria Industrial II, Universidade da Coruna, Mendizabal s/n, Ferrol E-15403 (Spain)], E-mail: cote@udc.es; Alvarez, J.C.; Lamas, J.; Yanez, A. [Departamento de Ingenieria Industrial II, Universidade da Coruna, Mendizabal s/n, Ferrol E-15403 (Spain)

    2009-03-01

    The abrasive nature of the mechanical processes involved in mining and mineral industry often causes significant wear to the associated equipment and derives non-negligible economic costs. One of the possible strategies to improve the wear resistance of the various components is the deposition of hardfacing layers on the bulk parts. The use of high power lasers for hardfacing (laser cladding) has attracted a great attention in the last decade as an alternative to other more standard methods (arc welding, oxy-fuel gas welding, thermal spraying). In laser cladding the hardfacing material is used in powder form. For high hardness applications Ni-, Co- or Fe-based alloys containing hard phase carbides at different ratios are commonly used. Tungsten carbides (WC) can provide coating hardness well above 1000 HV (Vickers). In this respect, commercially available WC powders normally contain spherical micro-particles consisting of crushed WC agglomerates. Some years ago, Spherotene powders consisting of spherical-fused monocrystaline WC particles, being extremely hard, between 1800 and 3000 HV, were patented. Very recently, mixtures of Ni-based alloy with Spherotene powders optimized for laser processing were presented (Technolase). These mixtures have been used in our study. Laser cladding tests with these powders were performed on low carbon steel (C25) substrates, and results in terms of microstructure and hardness will be discussed.

  10. Powder metallurgy bearings for advanced rocket engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, J. N.; Killman, B. J.; Munson, H.E.

    1985-01-01

    Traditional ingot metallurgy was pushed to the limit for many demanding applications including antifriction bearings. New systems require corrosion resistance, better fatigue resistance, and higher toughness. With conventional processing, increasing the alloying level to achieve corrosion resistance results in a decrease in other properties such as toughness. Advanced powder metallurgy affords a viable solution to this problem. During powder manufacture, the individual particle solidifies very rapidly; as a consequence, the primary carbides are very small and uniformly distributed. When properly consolidated, this uniform structure is preserved while generating a fully dense product. Element tests including rolling contact fatigue, hot hardness, wear, fracture toughness, and corrosion resistance are underway on eleven candidate P/M bearing alloys and results are compared with those for wrought 440C steel, the current SSME bearing material. Several materials which offer the promise of a significant improvement in performance were identified.

  11. Preparation of magnesium metal matrix composites by powder metallurgy process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satish, J.; Satish, K. G., Dr.

    2018-02-01

    Magnesium is the lightest metal used as the source for constructional alloys. Today Magnesium based metal matrix composites are widely used in aerospace, structural, oceanic and automobile applications for its light weight, low density(two thirds that of aluminium), good high temperature mechanical properties and good to excellent corrosion resistance. The reason of designing metal matrix composite is to put in the attractive attributes of metals and ceramics to the base metal. In this study magnesium metal matrix hybrid composite are developed by reinforcing pure magnesium with silicon carbide (SiC) and aluminium oxide by method of powder metallurgy. This method is less expensive and very efficient. The Hardness test was performed on the specimens prepared by powder metallurgy method. The results revealed that the micro hardness of composites was increased with the addition of silicon carbide and alumina particles in magnesium metal matrix composites.

  12. Tribology of carbide derived carbon films synthesized on tungsten carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tlustochowicz, Marcin

    Tribologically advantageous films of carbide derived carbon (CDC) have been successfully synthesized on binderless tungsten carbide manufactured using the plasma pressure compaction (P2CRTM) technology. In order to produce the CDC films, tungsten carbide samples were reacted with chlorine containing gas mixtures at temperatures ranging from 800°C to 1000°C in a sealed tube furnace. Some of the treated samples were later dechlorinated by an 800°C hydrogenation treatment. Detailed mechanical and structural characterizations of the CDC films and sliding contact surfaces were done using a series of analytical techniques and their results were correlated with the friction and wear behavior of the CDC films in various tribosystems, including CDC-steel, CDC-WC, CDC-Si3N4 and CDC-CDC. Optimum synthesis and treatment conditions were determined for use in two specific environments: moderately humid air and dry nitrogen. It was found that CDC films first synthesized at 1000°C and then hydrogen post-treated at 800°C performed best in air with friction coefficient values as low as 0.11. However, for dry nitrogen applications, no dechlorination was necessary and both hydrogenated and as-synthesized CDC films exhibited friction coefficients of approximately 0.03. A model of tribological behavior of CDC has been proposed that takes into consideration the tribo-oxidation of counterface material, the capillary forces from adsorbed water vapor, the carbon-based tribofilm formation, and the lubrication effect of both chlorine and hydrogen.

  13. Bulletin of Materials Science | News

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 25; Issue 3 ... Sintering of nano crystalline silicon carbide by doping with boron carbide ... of these powders was achieved by addition of boron carbide of 0.5 wt% together with carbon of 1 wt% at 2050°C at vacuum (3 mbar) for 15 min. ... pp 213-217 Alloys and Steels.

  14. Polyethylene/boron-containing composites for radiation shielding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Ji Wook [Center for Materials Architecturing, Institute for Multi-Disciplinary Convergence of Materials, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jang-Woo; Yu, Seunggun; Baek, Bum Ki; Hong, Jun Pyo [Center for Materials Architecturing, Institute for Multi-Disciplinary Convergence of Materials, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Yongsok [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Woo Nyon [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Soon Man, E-mail: smhong@kist.re.kr [Center for Materials Architecturing, Institute for Multi-Disciplinary Convergence of Materials, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Nanomaterials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of); Koo, Chong Min, E-mail: koo@kist.re.kr [Center for Materials Architecturing, Institute for Multi-Disciplinary Convergence of Materials, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Nanomaterials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • HDPE/silane-treated boron nitride (mBN) composites were fabricated. • The HDPE/mBN composites revealed a strong adhesion behavior at the interface of matrix/filler. • The HDPE/mBN composites show superior radiation shielding, thermoconductive and mechanical properties to the composites containing pristine BN and B{sub 4}C fillers. - Abstract: High-density polyethylene (HDPE) composites with modified boron nitride (mBN) fillers, functionalized with an organosilane, were fabricated through conventional melt-extrusion processing techniques. The properties and performances of these composites were compared with those of the composites containing pristine BN and boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) fillers. The silane functionalization of the BN fillers strongly improved the interfacial adhesion between the polymer matrix and the filler. As a result, the HDPE/mBN composites showed a better dispersion state of the filler particles, larger tensile modulus, greater effective thermal conductivity, and better neutron shielding property compared with the HDPE/BN and HDPE/B{sub 4}C composites.

  15. Polyethylene/boron-containing composites for radiation shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Ji Wook; Lee, Jang-Woo; Yu, Seunggun; Baek, Bum Ki; Hong, Jun Pyo; Seo, Yongsok; Kim, Woo Nyon; Hong, Soon Man; Koo, Chong Min

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • HDPE/silane-treated boron nitride (mBN) composites were fabricated. • The HDPE/mBN composites revealed a strong adhesion behavior at the interface of matrix/filler. • The HDPE/mBN composites show superior radiation shielding, thermoconductive and mechanical properties to the composites containing pristine BN and B 4 C fillers. - Abstract: High-density polyethylene (HDPE) composites with modified boron nitride (mBN) fillers, functionalized with an organosilane, were fabricated through conventional melt-extrusion processing techniques. The properties and performances of these composites were compared with those of the composites containing pristine BN and boron carbide (B 4 C) fillers. The silane functionalization of the BN fillers strongly improved the interfacial adhesion between the polymer matrix and the filler. As a result, the HDPE/mBN composites showed a better dispersion state of the filler particles, larger tensile modulus, greater effective thermal conductivity, and better neutron shielding property compared with the HDPE/BN and HDPE/B 4 C composites

  16. Ternary ceramic thermal spraying powder and method of manufacturing thermal sprayed coating using said powder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogli, Evelina; Sherman, Andrew J.; Glasgow, Curtis P.

    2018-02-06

    The invention describes a method for producing ternary and binary ceramic powders and their thermal spraying capable of manufacturing thermal sprayed coatings with superior properties. Powder contain at least 30% by weight ternary ceramic, at least 20% by weight binary molybdenum borides, at least one of the binary borides of Cr, Fe, Ni, W and Co and a maximum of 10% by weight of nano and submicro-sized boron nitride. The primary crystal phase of the manufactured thermal sprayed coatings from these powders is a ternary ceramic, while the secondary phases are binary ceramics. The coatings have extremely high resistance against corrosion of molten metal, extremely thermal shock resistance and superior tribological properties at low and at high temperatures.

  17. A New Boron Analysis Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weitman, J; Daaverhoeg, N; Farvolden, S

    1970-07-01

    In connection with fast neutron (n, {alpha}) cross section measurements a novel boron analysis method has been developed. The boron concentration is inferred from the mass spectrometrically determined number of helium atoms produced in the thermal and epithermal B-10 (n, {alpha}) reaction. The relation between helium amount and boron concentration is given, including corrections for self shielding effects and background levels. Direct and diffusion losses of helium are calculated and losses due to gettering, adsorption and HF-ionization in the release stage are discussed. A series of boron determinations is described and the results are compared with those obtained by other methods, showing excellent agreement. The lower limit of boron concentration which can be measured varies with type of sample. In e.g. steel, concentrations below 10-5 % boron in samples of 0.1-1 gram may be determined.

  18. Methods for separating boron from borated paraffin wax and its determination by ion chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeyakumar, S.

    2015-01-01

    Boron compounds are found to be useful in shielding against high-energy neutrons. In radiotherapy treatments, in order to protect occupational workers and patients from the undesirable neutron and gamma doses, paraffin wax containing B 4 C/boric acid is used. Low-level borate wastes generated from the nuclear power plants have been immobilized with paraffin wax using a concentrate waste drying system (CWDS). Borated paraffin waxes are prepared by mixing calculated amounts of either boric acid or boron carbide with the molten wax. This necessitates the determination of boron at different locations in order to check the homogeneous distribution of B over the borated wax. The determination of boron in nuclear materials is inevitable due to its high neutron absorption cross section. For the determination of boron in borated waxes, not many methods have been reported. A method based on the pyrohydrolysis extraction of boron and its quantification with ion chromatography was proposed for paraffin waxes borated with H 3 BO 3 and B 4 C. The B 4 C optimum pyrohydrolysis conditions were identified. Wax samples were mixed with U 3 O 8 , which prevents the sample from flare up, and also accelerates the extraction of boron. Pyrohydrolysis was carried out with moist O 2 at 950℃ for 60 and 90 min for wax with H 3 BO 3 and wax with B 4 C, respectively. Two simple methods of separation based on alkali extraction and melting wax in alkali were also developed exclusively for wax with H 3 BO 3 . In all the separations, the recovery of B was above 98%. During IC separation, B was separated as boron-mannitol anion complex. Linear calibration was obtained between 0.1 and 50 ppm of B, and LOD was calculated as 5 ppb (S/N=3). The reproducibility was better than 5% (RSD)

  19. Influences of hot-isostatic-pressing temperature on microstructure, tensile properties and tensile fracture mode of Inconel 718 powder compact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Litao; Sun, Wenru; Cui, Yuyou; Yang, Rui

    2014-01-01

    Inconel 718 powders have been hot-isostatic-pressed (HIPed) at representative temperatures to investigate the variations in microstructure, tensile properties and tensile fracture mode of the powder compact. Microstructure of the powder compacts were characterized by optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and so on. The results showed that the interdendritic precipitates inherited from the powders were partially retained in the powder compacts when the powders were HIPed at or below 1210 °C but were eliminated when HIPed at and above 1260 °C. The grain size uniformity of the powder compacts first increases and then decreases with increasing HIPing temperature. Prior particle boundaries (PPBs) were observed in the powder compacts HIPed at and below 1260 °C but was eliminated when HIPed at 1275 °C. The PPBs were decorated with carbide particles, the amount of the carbide particles at the PPBs decreases with increasing HIPing temperature. Most of the PPBs were pinned by the carbide particles in the compacts HIPed at 1140 °C. When the HIPing temperature was increased to 1210 °C and 1260 °C, a large number of PPBs de-pinned and moved beyond the pinning carbide particles, leading to grain growth and leaving carbide particles at the site of the original PPBs within the new grains. With increasing HIPing temperature, the 0.2% yield strength of the powder compacts at 650 °C decreases, the tensile elongation increases, and the tensile fracture mode changed from inter-particle dominant fracture to fully dimple ductile fracture

  20. Influences of hot-isostatic-pressing temperature on microstructure, tensile properties and tensile fracture mode of Inconel 718 powder compact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Litao [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Sun, Wenru; Cui, Yuyou [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang (China); Yang, Rui, E-mail: ryang@imr.ac.cn [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang (China)

    2014-04-01

    Inconel 718 powders have been hot-isostatic-pressed (HIPed) at representative temperatures to investigate the variations in microstructure, tensile properties and tensile fracture mode of the powder compact. Microstructure of the powder compacts were characterized by optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and so on. The results showed that the interdendritic precipitates inherited from the powders were partially retained in the powder compacts when the powders were HIPed at or below 1210 °C but were eliminated when HIPed at and above 1260 °C. The grain size uniformity of the powder compacts first increases and then decreases with increasing HIPing temperature. Prior particle boundaries (PPBs) were observed in the powder compacts HIPed at and below 1260 °C but was eliminated when HIPed at 1275 °C. The PPBs were decorated with carbide particles, the amount of the carbide particles at the PPBs decreases with increasing HIPing temperature. Most of the PPBs were pinned by the carbide particles in the compacts HIPed at 1140 °C. When the HIPing temperature was increased to 1210 °C and 1260 °C, a large number of PPBs de-pinned and moved beyond the pinning carbide particles, leading to grain growth and leaving carbide particles at the site of the original PPBs within the new grains. With increasing HIPing temperature, the 0.2% yield strength of the powder compacts at 650 °C decreases, the tensile elongation increases, and the tensile fracture mode changed from inter-particle dominant fracture to fully dimple ductile fracture.

  1. Foundations of powder metallurgy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Libenson, G.A.

    1987-01-01

    Consideration is being given to physicochemical foundations and technology of metal powders, moulding and sintering of bars, made of them or their mixtures with nonmetal powders. Data on he design of basic equipment used in the processes of powder metallurgy and its servicing are presented. General requirements of safety engineering when fabricating metal powders and products of them are mentioned

  2. Muonium states in silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, B.D.; Baumeler, H.; Keller, H.; Kiefl, R.F.; Kuendig, W.; Odermatt, W.; Schneider, J.W.; Estle, T.L.; Spencer, D.P.; Savic, I.M.

    1986-01-01

    Implanted muons in samples of silicon carbide have been observed to form paramagnetic muonium centers (μ + e - ). Muonium precession signals in low applied magnetic fields have been observed at 22 K in a granular sample of cubic β-SiC, however it was not possible to determine the hyperfine frequency. In a signal crystal sample of hexagonal 6H-SiC, three apparently isotropic muonium states were observed at 20 K and two at 300 K, all with hyperfine frequencies intermediate between those of the isotropic muonium centers in diamond and silicon. No evidence was seen of an anisotropic muonium state analogous to the Mu * state in diamond and silicon. (orig.)

  3. Effect of mechanical activation on jell boronizing treatment of the AISI 4140

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yılmaz, S.O.; Karataş, S.

    2013-01-01

    The article presents the effect of mechanical activation on the growth kinetics of boride layer of boronized AISI 4140 steel. The samples were boronized by ferroboron + (SiO 2 –Na 2 O) powders for 873–1173 K temperature and 2, 4, 6 and 8 h times, respectively. The morphology and types of borides formed on the surface of AISI 4140 steel substrate were analyzed. Layer growth kinetics were analyzed by measuring the extent of penetration of FeB and Fe 2 B sublayers as function of treatment time and temperature in the range of 873–1173 K. High diffusivity was obtained by creating a large number of defects through mechanical activation in the form of nanometer sized crystalline particles through the repeated fracturing and cold-welding of the powder particles, and a depth of 100 μm was found in the specimen borided by the 2 h MA powders, for 4 h and 1073 K, where 2000–2350 HV were measured. Consequently, the application conditions of boronizing were improved by usage of mechanical activation. The preferred Fe 2 B boride without FeB could be formed in the boride layer under 973 K boronizing temperature by mechanically activated by ferroboron + sodium silicate powder mixture due to the decrease of the activation energy.

  4. Effect of mechanical activation on jell boronizing treatment of the AISI 4140

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, S. O.; Karataş, S.

    2013-06-01

    The article presents the effect of mechanical activation on the growth kinetics of boride layer of boronized AISI 4140 steel. The samples were boronized by ferroboron + (SiO2-Na2O) powders for 873-1173 K temperature and 2, 4, 6 and 8 h times, respectively. The morphology and types of borides formed on the surface of AISI 4140 steel substrate were analyzed. Layer growth kinetics were analyzed by measuring the extent of penetration of FeB and Fe2B sublayers as function of treatment time and temperature in the range of 873-1173 K. High diffusivity was obtained by creating a large number of defects through mechanical activation in the form of nanometer sized crystalline particles through the repeated fracturing and cold-welding of the powder particles, and a depth of 100 μm was found in the specimen borided by the 2 h MA powders, for 4 h and 1073 K, where 2000-2350 HV were measured. Consequently, the application conditions of boronizing were improved by usage of mechanical activation. The preferred Fe2B boride without FeB could be formed in the boride layer under 973 K boronizing temperature by mechanically activated by ferroboron + sodium silicate powder mixture due to the decrease of the activation energy.

  5. Effect of mechanical activation on jell boronizing treatment of the AISI 4140

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yılmaz, S.O., E-mail: osyilmaz@firat.edu.tr [F.U. Engineering Faculty, Metallurgical and Material Science, 23119 Elazığ (Turkey); Karataş, S. [F.U. Engineering Faculty, Metallurgical and Material Science, 23119 Elazığ (Turkey)

    2013-06-15

    The article presents the effect of mechanical activation on the growth kinetics of boride layer of boronized AISI 4140 steel. The samples were boronized by ferroboron + (SiO{sub 2}–Na{sub 2}O) powders for 873–1173 K temperature and 2, 4, 6 and 8 h times, respectively. The morphology and types of borides formed on the surface of AISI 4140 steel substrate were analyzed. Layer growth kinetics were analyzed by measuring the extent of penetration of FeB and Fe{sub 2}B sublayers as function of treatment time and temperature in the range of 873–1173 K. High diffusivity was obtained by creating a large number of defects through mechanical activation in the form of nanometer sized crystalline particles through the repeated fracturing and cold-welding of the powder particles, and a depth of 100 μm was found in the specimen borided by the 2 h MA powders, for 4 h and 1073 K, where 2000–2350 HV were measured. Consequently, the application conditions of boronizing were improved by usage of mechanical activation. The preferred Fe{sub 2}B boride without FeB could be formed in the boride layer under 973 K boronizing temperature by mechanically activated by ferroboron + sodium silicate powder mixture due to the decrease of the activation energy.

  6. Additive-assisted synthesis of boride, carbide, and nitride micro/nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Bo; Yang, Lishan; Heng, Hua; Chen, Jingzhong; Zhang, Linfei; Xu, Liqiang; Qian, Yitai; Yang, Jian

    2012-01-01

    General and simple methods for the syntheses of borides, carbides and nitrides are highly desirable, since those materials have unique physical properties and promising applications. Here, a series of boride (TiB 2 , ZrB 2 , NbB 2 , CeB 6 , PrB 6 , SmB 6 , EuB 6 , LaB 6 ), carbide (SiC, TiC, NbC, WC) and nitride (TiN, BN, AlN, MgSiN 2 , VN) micro/nanocrystals were prepared from related oxides and amorphous boron/active carbon/NaN 3 with the assistance of metallic Na and elemental S. In-situ temperature monitoring showed that the reaction temperature could increase quickly to ∼850 °C, once the autoclave was heated to 100 °C. Such a rapid temperature increase was attributed to the intense exothermic reaction between Na and S, which assisted the formation of borides, carbides and nitrides. The as-obtained products were characterized by XRD, SEM, TEM, and HRTEM techniques. Results in this report will greatly benefit the future extension of this approach to other compounds. - Graphical abstract: An additive-assisted approach is successfully developed for the syntheses of borides, carbides and nitrides micro/nanocrystals with the assistance of the exothermic reaction between Na and S. Highlights: ► An additive-assisted synthesis strategy is developed for a number of borides, carbides and nitrides. ► The reaction mechanism is demonstrated by the case of SiC nanowires. ► The formation of SiC nanowires is initiated by the exothermic reaction of Na and S.

  7. Low temperature study of nonstoichiometric titanium carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashmetov, M.Yu.

    2005-05-01

    By low temperature neutron diffraction method was studied structure in nonstoichiometric titanium carbide from room temperature up to 12K. It is found of low temperature phase in titanium carbide- TiC 0.71 . It is established region and borders of this phase. It is determined change of unit cell parameter. (author)

  8. Generation and Characteristics of IV-VI transition Metal Nitride and Carbide Nanoparticles using a Reactive Mesoporous Carbon Nitride

    KAUST Repository

    Alhajri, Nawal Saad

    2016-02-22

    Interstitial nitrides and carbides of early transition metals in groups IV–VI exhibit platinum-like electronic structures, which make them promising candidates to replace noble metals in various catalytic reactions. Herein, we present the preparation and characterization of nano-sized transition metal nitries and carbides of groups IV–VI (Ti, V, Nb, Ta, Cr, Mo, and W) using mesoporous graphitic carbon nitride (mpg-C3N4), which not only provides confined spaces for restricting primary particle size but also acts as a chemical source of nitrogen and carbon. We studied the reactivity of the metals with the template under N2 flow at 1023 K while keeping the weight ratio of metal to template constant at unity. The produced nanoparticles were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, CHN elemental analysis, nitrogen sorption, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The results show that Ti, V, Nb, Ta, and Cr form nitride phases with face centered cubic structure, whereas Mo and W forme carbides with hexagonal structures. The tendency to form nitride or carbide obeys the free formation energy of the transition metal nitrides and carbides. This method offers the potential to prepare the desired size, shape and phase of transition metal nitrides and carbides that are suitable for a specific reaction, which is the chief objective of materials chemistry.

  9. Fundamentals of powder metallurgy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, I.H.; Qureshi, K.A.; Minhas, J.I.

    1988-01-01

    This book is being presented to introduce the fundamentals of technology of powder metallurgy. An attempt has been made to present an overall view of powder metallurgy technology in the first chapter, whereas chapter 2 to 8 deal with the production of metal powders. The basic commercial methods of powder production are briefly described with illustrations. Chapter 9 to 12 describes briefly metal powder characteristics and principles of testing, mixing, blending, conditioning, compaction and sintering. (orig./A.B.)

  10. Laser cladding in-situ carbide particle reinforced Fe-based composite coatings with rare earth oxide addition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴朝锋; 马明星; 刘文今; 钟敏霖; 张红军; 张伟明

    2009-01-01

    Particulate reinforced metal matrix composite(PR-MMC) has excellent properties such as good wear resistance,corrosion resistance and high temperature properties.Laser cladding is usually used to form PR-MMC on metal surface with various volume fractions of ceramic particles.Recent literatures showed that laser melting of powder mixture containing carbon and carbide-forming elements,was favorable for the formation of in-situ synthesized carbide particles.In this paper,rare earth oxide(RE2O3) was added into t...

  11. Ligand sphere conversions in terminal carbide complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morsing, Thorbjørn Juul; Reinholdt, Anders; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2016-01-01

    Metathesis is introduced as a preparative route to terminal carbide complexes. The chloride ligands of the terminal carbide complex [RuC(Cl)2(PCy3)2] (RuC) can be exchanged, paving the way for a systematic variation of the ligand sphere. A series of substituted complexes, including the first...... example of a cationic terminal carbide complex, [RuC(Cl)(CH3CN)(PCy3)2]+, is described and characterized by NMR, MS, X-ray crystallography, and computational studies. The experimentally observed irregular variation of the carbide 13C chemical shift is shown to be accurately reproduced by DFT, which also...... demonstrates that details of the coordination geometry affect the carbide chemical shift equally as much as variations in the nature of the auxiliary ligands. Furthermore, the kinetics of formation of the sqaure pyramidal dicyano complex, trans-[RuC(CN)2(PCy3)2], from RuC has been examined and the reaction...

  12. Microsegregation in Nodular Cast Iron with Carbides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pietrowski

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper results of microsegregation in the newly developed nodular cast iron with carbides are presented. To investigate the pearlitic and bainitic cast iron with carbides obtained by Inmold method were chosen. The distribution of linear elements on the eutectic cell radius was examined. To investigate the microsegregation pearlitic and bainitic cast iron with carbides obtained by Inmold method were chosen.The linear distribution of elements on the eutectic cell radius was examined. Testing of the chemical composition of cast iron metal matrix components, including carbides were carried out. The change of graphitizing and anti-graphitizing element concentrations within eutectic cell was determined. It was found, that in cast iron containing Mo carbides crystallizing after austenite + graphite eutectic are Si enriched.

  13. Microsegregation in Nodular Cast Iron with Carbides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietrowski S.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper results of microsegregation in the newly developed nodular cast iron with carbides are presented. To investigate the pearlitic and bainitic cast iron with carbides obtained by Inmold method were chosen. The distribution of linear elements on the eutectic cell radius was examined. To investigate the microsegregation pearlitic and bainitic cast iron with carbides obtained by Inmold method were chosen. The linear distribution of elements on the eutectic cell radius was examined. Testing of the chemical composition of cast iron metal matrix components, including carbides were carried out. The change of graphitizing and anti-graphitizing element concentrations within eutectic cell was determined. It was found, that in cast iron containing Mo carbides crystallizing after austenite + graphite eutectic are Si enriched.

  14. A novel method for boron determination in rock thin sections : first results from Ngawha

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vickridge, I.C.

    1994-01-01

    Previous studies of boron in New Zealand rock have relied on whole rock analyses. In order to gain more detailed knowledge of the sources of boron in rocks, we have developed a nuclear probe technique based on the 1 1B(p,α) nuclear reaction. The technique performs well on powdered USGS standards down to below 10 wt. ppm, and we have applied it with a proton beam focused down to 25 x 25 micrometre on a hydrothermally unaltered greywacke from Puketona, near Ngawha, Northland. There appears to be little variation in the boron concentrations in the sedimentary groundmass, but in the veins the boron appears to be more concentrated in the prehnite than in the quartz. (author). 2 tabs., 5 figs., 14 refs

  15. EFFECT OF THE Si POWDER ADDITIONS ON THE PROPERTIES OF SiC COMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GUOGANG XU

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available By means of transient plastic phase process, the SiC silicon carbide kiln furniture materials were produced through adding Si powder to SiC materials. At the condition of the same additions of SiO2 powder, the effect of the Si powder additions on properties of silicon carbide materials after sintered at 1450°C for 3 h in air atmosphere was studied by means of SEM and other analysis methods. The results showed that silicon powder contributes to both sintering by liquid state and plastic phase combination to improve the strength of samples. When the Si powder additions is lower than 3.5 %, the density and strength of samples increase and porosity decrease with increasing Si powder additions. However when the Si powder additions is higher than 3.5 %, the density and strength of samples decrease and porosity increase with increasing Si powder additions. With increasing of Si additions, the residual strength of sample after thermal shocked increased and linear change rate decreased, and get to boundary value when Si additions is 4.5 %. The results also indicated that at the same sintering temperature, the sample with 3.5 % silicon powder has maximum strength.

  16. From nitrides to carbides: topotactic synthesis of the eta-carbides Fe3Mo3C and Co3Mo3C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alconchel, Silvia; Sapiña, Fernando; Martínez, Eduardo

    2004-08-21

    The molybdenum bimetallic interstitial carbides Fe(3)Mo(3)C and Co(3)Mo(3)C have been synthesized by temperature-programmed reaction (TPR) between the molybdenum bimetallic interstitial nitrides Fe(3)Mo(3)N and Co(3)Mo(3)N and a flowing mixture of CH(4) and H(2) diluted in Ar. These compounds have been characterized by X-ray diffraction, laser Raman spectroscopy, elemental analysis, energy dispersive analysis of X rays, thermal analysis (in air) and scanning electron microscopy (field emission). Their structures have been refined from X-ray powder diffraction data. These carbides crystallize in the cubic system, space group Fd3m[a= 11.11376(6) and 11.0697(3)[Angstrom] for Fe and Co compounds, respectively].

  17. Synthesis and phase transformation mechanism of Nb{sub 2}C carbide phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vishwanadh, B., E-mail: visubathula@gmail.com [Materials Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 094 (India); Murthy, T.S.R.Ch. [Materials Processing Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 094 (India); Arya, A.; Tewari, R.; Dey, G.K. [Materials Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 094 (India)

    2016-06-25

    In the present work, Niobium carbide samples were prepared through powder metallurgy route using spark plasma sintering technique. Some of these samples were heat treated at 900 °C up to 7 days. In order to investigate the phase transformation in Nb{sub 2}C carbide, the as-prepared and heat treated samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD) and transmission electron microscopy techniques. EBSD could index the same area of the sample in terms of any of the three allotropes of Nb{sub 2}C carbide phases (γ-Nb{sub 2}C, β-Nb{sub 2}C and α-Nb{sub 2}C) with good confidence index. From the EBSD patterns orientation relationships (OR) among γ, β and α-Nb{sub 2}C have been determined. Based on this OR when crystals of the three allotropes were superimposed, it has revealed that the basic Nb metal atom lattice (hcp lattice) in all the Nb{sub 2}C phases is same. The only difference exists in the carbides is the ordering of carbon atoms and vacancies in the octahedral positions of the hcp Nb metal atom lattice. Crystallographic analysis showed that for the transformation of γ-Nb{sub 2}C → β-Nb{sub 2}C → α-Nb{sub 2}C, large movement of Nb atoms is not required; but only by ordering of carbon atoms ensues the phase transformation. Literature shows that in the Nb–C system formation of the α-Nb{sub 2}C is not well established. Therefore, first principle calculations were carried out on these carbides. It revealed that the formation energy for α-Nb{sub 2}C is lower than the β and γ-Nb{sub 2}C carbides which indicate that the formation of α-Nb{sub 2}C is thermodynamically feasible. - Highlights: • Nb{sub 2}C carbide was produced by Spark Plasma Sintering in a single process. • Phase transformation mechanism of different Nb{sub 2}C carbide phases is studied. • In all the three Nb{sub 2}C carbides (γ, β, α), the base Nb lattice remains same. • Among γ, β and α-Nb{sub 2}C

  18. Hydrogen chemisorption and oxidation of transition metal carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bethin, J.R.

    1979-01-01

    A study was made of the catalytic activity of WC, focusing on the possible influence of point defects. The chemisorption of H on WC and titanium oxycarbides was studied with differential scanning calorimetry. The catalytic activity of these materials for oxidation of H was determined by potentiostatic steady-state and potentiodynamic measurements in acid electrolyte. Compositions of WC surfaces were determined by x-ray photoemission and related to the catalytic behavior. Titanium oxycarbide surfaces were analyzed by Auger electron spectroscopy. Of the carbides tested only one WC preparation was able to chemisorb H. Both WC powders investigated catalyzed H oxidation with similar specific activities. Spectroscopic studies showed that the active surface of WC was a mixture of WO 3 and a carbon-deficient WC phase. This result indicates that carbon vacancies are the active sites in tungsten carbide. Theoretical models of a carbon vacancy surrounded by metal atoms suggested by calculations by other workers support this assignment and identify the important role of the W6s level. The measured value of the heat of chemisorption is consistent with the proposed model

  19. Plasma Synthesized Doped Boron Nanopowder for MgB2 Superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marzik, James V.

    2012-01-01

    Under this program, a process to synthesize nano-sized doped boron powder by a plasma synthesis process was developed and scaled up from 20 gram batches at program start to over 200 grams by program end. Over 75 batches of boron nanopowder were made by RF plasma synthesis. Particle sizes were typically in the 20-200 nm range. The powder was synthesized by the reductive pyrolysis of BCl 3 in hydrogen in an RF plasma. A wide range of process parameters were investigated including plasma power, torch geometry, gas flow rates, and process pressure. The powder-in-tube technique was used to make monofilament and multifilament superconducting wires. MgB 2 wire made with Specialty Materials plasma synthesized boron nanopowder exhibited superconducting properties that significantly exceeded the program goals. Superconducting critical currents, J c , in excess of 10 5 A cm -2 at magnetic fields of 8 tesla were reproducibly achieved. The upper critical magnetic field in wires fabricated with program boron powder were H c2 (0) = 37 tesla, demonstrating the potential of these materials for high field magnet applications. T c in carbon-doped MgB 2 powder showed a systematic decrease with increasing carbon precursor gas flows, indicating the plasma synthesis process can give precise control over dopant concentrations. Synthesis rates increased by a factor of 400% over the course of the program, demonstrating the scalability of the powder synthesis process. The plasma synthesis equipment at Specialty Materials has successfully and reproducibly made high quality boron nanopowder for MgB 2 superconductors. Research and development from this program enabled Specialty Materials to successfully scale up the powder synthesis process by a factor of ten and to double the size of its powder pilot plant. Thus far the program has been a technical success. It is anticipated that continued systematic development of plasma processing parameters, dopant chemistry and concentration, wire

  20. Boron supplementation in broiler diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EJ Fassani

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Boron supplementation in broiler feed is not a routine practice. However, some reports suggest a positive effect of boron on performance. This study assessed the effects of boron supplementation on broiler performance. Diets were based on maize and soybean meal, using boric acid P.A. as boron source. Six supplementation levels (0, 30, 60, 90, 120 and 150 ppm were evaluated using 1,440 one-day old males housed at a density of 30 chickens in each of 48 experimental plots of 3m². A completely randomized block design was used with 8 replicates. Feed intake, weight gain and feed conversion were assessed in the periods from 1 to 7 days, 1 to 21 days and 1 to 42 days of age, and viability was evaluated for the total 42-day rearing period. No performance variable was affected by boron supplementation (p>0.05 in the period from 1 to 7 days. The regression analysis indicated an ideal level of 37.4 ppm of boron for weight gain from 1 to 21 days (p0.05, although feed intake was reduced linearly with increased boron levels (p0.05. Ash and calcium percentages in the tibias of broilers and viability in the total rearing period were not affected by boron supplementation (p>0.05.

  1. Aqueous slip casting of MgAl2O4 spinel powder

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The reaction proceeds by counter diffusion of the cations through the product layer, .... tain powders, such as Ube E10 silicon nitride Starck, B10 silicon carbide .... 779 kg/mm2 for a nanocrystalline dense MAS consolidated by aqueous slip ...

  2. Nondestructive ultrasonic characterization of armor grade silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portune, Andrew Richard

    Ceramic materials have traditionally been chosen for armor applications for their superior mechanical properties and low densities. At high strain rates seen during ballistic events, the behavior of these materials relies upon the total volumetric flaw concentration more so than any single anomalous flaw. In this context flaws can be defined as any microstructural feature which detriments the performance of the material, potentially including secondary phases, pores, or unreacted sintering additives. Predicting the performance of armor grade ceramic materials depends on knowledge of the absolute and relative concentration and size distribution of bulk heterogeneities. Ultrasound was chosen as a nondestructive technique for characterizing the microstructure of dense silicon carbide ceramics. Acoustic waves interact elastically with grains and inclusions in large sample volumes, and were well suited to determine concentration and size distribution variations for solid inclusions. Methodology was developed for rapid acquisition and analysis of attenuation coefficient spectra. Measurements were conducted at individual points and over large sample areas using a novel technique entitled scanning acoustic spectroscopy. Loss spectra were split into absorption and scattering dominant frequency regimes to simplify analysis. The primary absorption mechanism in polycrystalline silicon carbide was identified as thermoelastic in nature. Correlations between microstructural conditions and parameters within the absorption equation were established through study of commercial and custom engineered SiC materials. Nonlinear least squares regression analysis was used to estimate the size distributions of boron carbide and carbon inclusions within commercial SiC materials. This technique was shown to additionally be capable of approximating grain size distributions in engineered SiC materials which did not contain solid inclusions. Comparisons to results from electron microscopy

  3. Boron atom reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estes, R.; Tabacco, M.B.; Digiuseppe, T.G.; Davidovits, P.

    1982-01-01

    The reaction rates of atomic boron with various epoxides have been measured in a flow tube apparatus. The bimolecular rate constants, in units of cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 , are: 1,2-epoxypropane (8.6 x 10 -11 ), 1,2-epoxybutane (8.8 x 10 -11 ), 1,2,3,4-diepoxybutane (5.5 x 10 -11 ), 1-chloro-2,3-epoxypropane (5.7 x 10 -11 ), and 1,2-epoxy-3,3,3-trichloropropane (1.5 x 10 -11 ). (orig.)

  4. Doping of silicon carbide by ion implantation; Dopage du carbure de silicium par implantation ionique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gimbert, J

    1999-03-04

    It appeared that in some fields, as the hostile environments (high temperature or irradiation), the silicon compounds showed limitations resulting from the electrical and mechanical properties. Doping of 4H and 6H silicon carbide by ion implantation is studied from a physicochemical and electrical point of view. It is necessary to obtain n-type and p-type material to realize high power and/or high frequency devices, such as MESFETs and Schottky diodes. First, physical and electrical properties of silicon carbide are presented and the interest of developing a process technology on this material is emphasised. Then, physical characteristics of ion implantation and particularly classical dopant implantation, such as nitrogen, for n-type doping, and aluminium and boron, for p-type doping are described. Results with these dopants are presented and analysed. Optimal conditions are extracted from these experiences so as to obtain a good crystal quality and a surface state allowing device fabrication. Electrical conduction is then described in the 4H and 6H-SiC polytypes. Freezing of free carriers and scattering processes are described. Electrical measurements are carried out using Hall effect on Van der Panw test patterns, and 4 point probe method are used to draw the type of the material, free carrier concentrations, resistivity and mobility of the implanted doped layers. These results are commented and compared to the theoretical analysis. The influence of the technological process on electrical conduction is studied in view of fabricating implanted silicon carbide devices. (author)

  5. Preparation and study of the nitrides and mixed carbide-nitrides of uranium and of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anselin, F.

    1966-06-01

    A detailed description is given of a simple method for preparing uranium and plutonium nitrides by the direct action of nitrogen under pressure at moderate temperatures (about 400 C) on the partially hydrogenated bulk metal. It is shown that there is complete miscibility between the UN and PuN phases. The variations in the reticular parameters of the samples as a function of temperature and in the presence of oxide have been used to detect and evaluate the solubility of oxygen in the different phases. A study has been made of the sintering of these nitrides as a function of the preparation conditions with or without sintering additives. A favorable but non-reproducible, effect has been found for traces of oxide. The best results were obtained for pure UN at 1600 C (96 per cent theoretical density) on condition that a well defined powder, was used. The criterion used is the integral width of the X-ray diffraction lines. The compounds UN and PuN are completely miscible with the corresponding carbides. This makes it possible to prepare carbide-nitrides of the general formula (U,Pu) (C,N) by solid-phase diffusion, at around 1400 C. The sintering of these carbide-nitrides is similar to that of the carbides if the nitrogen content is low; in particular, nickel is an efficient sintering agent. For high contents, the sintering is similar to that of pure nitrides. (author) [fr

  6. Experimental evaluation of chromium-carbide-based solid lubricant coatings for use to 760 C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellacorte, Christopher

    1987-01-01

    A research program is described which further developed and investigated chromium carbide based self-lubricating coatings for use to 760 C. A bonded chromium carbide was used as the base stock because of the known excellent wear resistance and the chemical stability of chromium carbide. Additives were silver and barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic. The three coating components were blended in powder form, applied to stainless steel substrates by plasma spraying and then diamond ground to the desired coating thickness. A variety of coating compositions was tested to determine the coating composition which gave optimum tribological results. Coatings were tested in air, helium, and hydrogen at temperatures from 25 to 760 C. Several counterface materials were evaluated with the objective of discovering a satisfactory metal/coating sliding combination for potential applications, such as piston ring/cylinder liner couples for Stirling engines. In general, silver and fluoride additions to chromium carbide reduced the friction coefficient and increased the wear resistance relative to the unmodified coating. The lubricant additives acted synergistically in reducing friction and wear.

  7. EFTEM-EELS characterization of VC and Cr3C2 doped cemented carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warbichler, P.; Hofer, F.; Grogger, W.; Lackner, A.

    2001-01-01

    Structure-property correlation plays an important role in the design of advanced materials which are increasingly based on sub-micrometer and sometimes even nanometer grains. In this respect, analytical electron microscopy (AEM) offers a comprehensive range of characterization techniques which are particularly well suited for hard materials: electron diffraction and high resolution electron microscopy for obtaining crystallographic information and especially new emerging techniques such as energy-filtering TEM (EFTEM) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) which enable nearly atomic resolution analysis. In this paper we concentrate on EFTEM and HREM investigations of both WC precursor-powders and sintered WC-Co composites doped with vanadium and chromium carbides in order to control the grain growth during the sintering of the ultra fine WC powders. The aim was to locate the distribution of the doping elements in the powders and in the sintered materials. (author)

  8. Contribution to the study of atmospheric projection and under partial vacuum of tungsten carbide particles with cobalt or nickel binder. Application to fretting coatings on steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinayo, Maria-Elena

    1985-01-01

    This research thesis addresses the plasma spraying (atmospheric, under controlled atmosphere, and under reduced pressure) of tungsten carbides with a metallic binder (WC/Co, WC/Ni; W 2 C/Co). This work comprised an optimisation of the spraying process under reduced pressure, the study of the influence of the powder production process on the physicochemical and micro-structural characteristics as well as on coating fretting properties, and a correlation between spraying parameters in a controlled atmosphere (power and pressure) and coating physico-chemical and micro-structural properties. Results show a high decarburization-oxidation of tungsten carbides during atmospheric spraying, as well as an important evaporation of cobalt. Under reduced pressure, high losses of carbides are noticed. These both phenomena strongly depend on the powder production process. Fretting results highlight remarkable performance of coatings obtained by atmospheric spraying [fr

  9. Aluminum powder metallurgy processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flumerfelt, J.F.

    1999-02-12

    The objective of this dissertation is to explore the hypothesis that there is a strong linkage between gas atomization processing conditions, as-atomized aluminum powder characteristics, and the consolidation methodology required to make components from aluminum powder. The hypothesis was tested with pure aluminum powders produced by commercial air atomization, commercial inert gas atomization, and gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS). A comparison of the GARS aluminum powders with the commercial aluminum powders showed the former to exhibit superior powder characteristics. The powders were compared in terms of size and shape, bulk chemistry, surface oxide chemistry and structure, and oxide film thickness. Minimum explosive concentration measurements assessed the dependence of explosibility hazard on surface area, oxide film thickness, and gas atomization processing conditions. The GARS aluminum powders were exposed to different relative humidity levels, demonstrating the effect of atmospheric conditions on post-atomization processing conditions. The GARS aluminum powders were exposed to different relative humidity levels, demonstrating the effect of atmospheric conditions on post-atomization oxidation of aluminum powder. An Al-Ti-Y GARS alloy exposed in ambient air at different temperatures revealed the effect of reactive alloy elements on post-atomization powder oxidation. The pure aluminum powders were consolidated by two different routes, a conventional consolidation process for fabricating aerospace components with aluminum powder and a proposed alternative. The consolidation procedures were compared by evaluating the consolidated microstructures and the corresponding mechanical properties. A low temperature solid state sintering experiment demonstrated that tap densified GARS aluminum powders can form sintering necks between contacting powder particles, unlike the total resistance to sintering of commercial air atomization aluminum powder.

  10. Syntheses of super-hard boron-rich solids in the B-C-N-O system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubert, Herve Pierre

    Alpha-rhombohedral (alpha-rh.) B-rich materials belonging to the B-C-N-O system were prepared using high-pressure, high-temperature techniques. The samples were synthesized using a multianvil device and characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and parallel electron energy-loss spectroscopy (PEELS). In the B-O system, the formation of BsbxO materials produced from mixtures of B and Bsb2Osb3 between 1 to 10 GPa and 1000 to 1800sp°C was investigated. Graphitic and diamond-like Bsb2O, reported in previous studies, were not detected. The refractory boron suboxide, nominally Bsb6O, which has the alpha-rh. B structure, is the dominant suboxide in the P and T range of our investigation. High-pressure techniques were used successfully to synthesize boron suboxide of improved purity and crystallinity, and less oxygen-deficient (i.e., closer to the nominal Bsb6O composition) in comparison to room-pressure syntheses. Quantitative analyses indicate compositions of Bsb6Osb{0.95} and Bsb6Osb{0.77} for high-pressure and room-pressure samples, respectively. The first preparation, between 4 to 5.5 GPa, of Bsb6O in which the preferred form of the material is as macroscopic near-perfect regular icosahedra (to 30 mum in diameter) is reported. The Bsb6O icosahedra are similar to the multiply-twinned particles observed in some cubic materials. However, a major difference is that Bsb6O has a rhombohedral structure that closely fits the geometrical requirements for obtaining icosahedral twins. The Bsb6O grains are neither 3D-periodic nor quasicrystalline. Their formation can be described as a Mackay packing of icosahedral Bsb{12} units and provides an alternative to crystal formation by propagation of translational symmetry. Icosahedral twins ranging from 20 nm to 30 mum in diameter, as well as micron-sized euhedral crystals (to 40 mum) were prepared. The structural similarity of compounds with the alpha

  11. Vanadium carbide coatings: deposition process and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borisova, A.; Borisov, Y.; Shavlovsky, E.; Mits, I.; Castermans, L.; Jongbloed, R.

    2001-01-01

    Vanadium carbide coatings on carbon and alloyed steels were produced by the method of diffusion saturation from the borax melt. Thickness of the vanadium carbide layer was 5-15 μm, depending upon the steel grade and diffusion saturation parameters. Microhardness was 20000-28000 MPa and wear resistance of the coatings under conditions of end face friction without lubrication against a mating body of WC-2Co was 15-20 times as high as that of boride coatings. Vanadium carbide coatings can operate in air at a temperature of up to 400 o C. They improve fatigue strength of carbon steels and decrease the rate of corrosion in sea and fresh water and in acid solutions. The use of vanadium carbide coatings for hardening of various types of tools, including cutting tools, allows their service life to be extended by a factor of 3 to 30. (author)

  12. Effect of laser pulsed radiation on the properties of implanted layers of silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Violin, Eh.E.; Voron'ko, O.N.; Nojbert, F.; Potapov, E.N.

    1984-01-01

    Results are presented of investigation into pulsed laser radiation effects on the layers of GH polytype silicon carbide converted to amorphous state by implantation of boron and aluminium ions. The implantation doses were selected to be 5x10 16 for boron and 5x10 15 cm -2 for aluminium, with the ion energies being 60 and 80 keV, respectively. The samples annealed under nanosecond regime are stated to posseys neither photoluminescence (PL) nor cathodoluminescence (CL). At the same time the layers annealed in millisecond regime have a weak PL at 100 K and CL at 300 K. The PL and CL are observed in samples, laser-annealed at radiation energy density above 150-160 J/cm 2 in case of boron ion implantation and 100-120 J/cm 2 in case of aluminium ion implantation. Increasing the radiation energy density under the nanosecond regime of laser annealing results in the surface evaporation due to superheating of amorphous layers. Increasing the energy density above 220-240 J/cm 2 results in destruction of the samples

  13. Effect of concentrated light on morphology and vibrational properties of boron and tantalum mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Sartinska

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Heating a mixture of boron (impurities: carbon ∼ B50C2, boric acid – H3BO3 and tantalum (Ta powders in nitrogen flow in a xenon high-flux optical furnace was performed. As-received powder composed of h-BN, H3BO3, TaB2, B9H11 and a number of other phases including β-rhombohedral boron, apparently, heavily doped with Ta. FT–IR examination of any sample of the material reveals the complicated vibration spectrum containing, in particular, an absorption band near 2260 cm−1. The shapes of these bands are different for samples because powders were synthesized at different temperatures. Known, that in β-rhombohedral boron lattice, there are nano-sized voids of different types, which allow an accommodation of single atoms or small groups of atoms. Theoretical calculations performed by the method of quasi-classical type yields the same value, 2260 cm−1, for the vibrations frequency of Ta atoms in D-type crystallographic voids in β-rhombohedral boron lattice. Since, Ta atoms are known to prefer accommodation just in D-voids the experimentally detected bands can be identified with localized vibrations of Ta atoms. Keywords: Condensed matter physics, Materials science, Nanotechnology

  14. Separation process for boron isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rockwood, S D

    1975-06-12

    The method according to the invention is characterized by the steps of preparing a gaseous mixture of BCl/sub 3/ containing the isotopes of boron and oxygen as the extractor, irradiating that mixture in the tube of the separator device by means of P- or R-lines of a CO/sub 2/ laser for exciting the molecules containing a given isotope of boron, simultaneously irradiating the mixture with UV for photodissociating the excited BCl/sub 3/ molecules and separating BCl/sub 3/ from the reaction products of photodissociation and from oxygen. Such method is suitable for preparing boron used in nuclear reactors.

  15. Stable carbides in transition metal alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piotrkowski, R.

    1991-01-01

    In the present work different techniques were employed for the identification of stable carbides in two sets of transition metal alloys of wide technological application: a set of three high alloy M2 type steels in which W and/or Mo were total or partially replaced by Nb, and a Zr-2.5 Nb alloy. The M2 steel is a high speed steel worldwide used and the Zr-2.5 Nb alloy is the base material for the pressure tubes in the CANDU type nuclear reactors. The stability of carbide was studied in the frame of Goldschmidt's theory of interstitial alloys. The identification of stable carbides in steels was performed by determining their metallic composition with an energy analyzer attached to the scanning electron microscope (SEM). By these means typical carbides of the M2 steel, MC and M 6 C, were found. Moreover, the spatial and size distribution of carbide particles were determined after different heat treatments, and both microstructure and microhardness were correlated with the appearance of the secondary hardening phenomenon. In the Zr-Nb alloy a study of the α and β phases present after different heat treatments was performed with optical and SEM metallographic techniques, with the guide of Abriata and Bolcich phase diagram. The α-β interphase boundaries were characterized as short circuits for diffusion with radiotracer techniques and applying Fisher-Bondy-Martin model. The precipitation of carbides was promoted by heat treatments that produced first the C diffusion into the samples at high temperatures (β phase), and then the precipitation of carbide particles at lower temperature (α phase or (α+β)) two phase field. The precipitated carbides were identified as (Zr, Nb)C 1-x with SEM, electron microprobe and X-ray diffraction techniques. (Author) [es

  16. Point defects and transport properties in carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matzke, Hj.

    1984-01-01

    Carbides of transition metals and of actinides are interesting and technologically important. The transition-metal carbides (or carbonitrides) are extensively being used as hard materials and some of them are of great interest because of the high transition temperature for superconductivity, e.g. 17 K for Nb(C,N). Actinide carbides and carbonitrides, (U,Pu)C and (U,Pu)(C,N) are being considered as promising advanced fuels for liquid metal cooled fast breeder nuclear reactors. Basic interest exists in all these materials because of their high melting points (e.g. 4250 K for TaC) and the unusually broad range of homogeneity of nonstoichiometric compositions (e.g. from UCsub(0.9) to UCsub(1.9) at 2500 K). Interaction of point defects to clusters and short-range ordering have recently been studied with elastic neutron diffraction and diffuse scattering techniques, and calculations of energies of formation and interaction of point defects became available for selected carbides. Diffusion measurements also exist for a number of carbides, in particular for the actinide carbides. The existing knowledge is discussed and summarized with emphasis on informative examples of particular technological relevance. (Auth.)

  17. Densification of silicon and zirconium carbides by a new process: spark plasma sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillard, F.

    2006-12-01

    Materials research for suitable utilization in 4. generation nuclear plants needs new ways to densify testing components. Two carbides, silicon and zirconium carbide seems to be the most suitable choice due to their mechanical, thermal and neutron-transparency properties against next nuclear plant specifications. Nevertheless one main difficulty remains, which is densifying them even at high temperature. Spark Plasma Sintering a new metal-, ceramic- and composite-sintering process has been used to densify both SiC and ZrC. Understanding bases of mass transport mechanisms in SPS have been studied. Composites and interfaces have been processed and analyzed. This manuscript reports original results on SiC and ZrC ceramics sintered with commercial powder started, without additives. (author)

  18. Effect of fabrication process on physical and mechanical properties of tungsten carbide - cobalt composite: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaidin, Ahmad Aswad; Jaafar, Talib Ria; Selamat, Mohd Asri; Budin, Salina; Sulaiman, Zaim Syazwan; Hamid, Mohamad Hasnan Abdul

    2017-12-01

    WC-Co, which is also known as cemented carbide, is widely used in metal cutting industry and wear related application due to their excellent mechanical properties. Manufacturing industries are focusing on improving productivity and reducing operational cost with machining operation is considered as one of the factors. Thus, machining conditions are becoming more severe and required better cutting tool bit with improved mechanical properties to withstand high temperature operation. Numerous studies have been made over the generation for further improvement of cemented carbide properties to meet the constant increase in demand. However, the results of these studies vary due to different process parameters and manufacturing technology. This paper summarizes the studies to improve the properties of WC-Co composite using different consolidation (powder size, mixing method, formulation, etc) and sintering parameters (temperature, time, atmosphere, etc).

  19. Nothing Boring About Boron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzorno, Lara

    2015-01-01

    The trace mineral boron is a micronutrient with diverse and vitally important roles in metabolism that render it necessary for plant, animal, and human health, and as recent research suggests, possibly for the evolution of life on Earth. As the current article shows, boron has been proven to be an important trace mineral because it (1) is essential for the growth and maintenance of bone; (2) greatly improves wound healing; (3) beneficially impacts the body’s use of estrogen, testosterone, and vitamin D; (4) boosts magnesium absorption; (5) reduces levels of inflammatory biomarkers, such as high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α); (6) raises levels of antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, and glutathione peroxidase; (7) protects against pesticide-induced oxidative stress and heavy-metal toxicity; (8) improves the brains electrical activity, cognitive performance, and short-term memory for elders; (9) influences the formation and activity of key biomolecules, such as S-adenosyl methionine (SAM-e) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+); (10) has demonstrated preventive and therapeutic effects in a number of cancers, such as prostate, cervical, and lung cancers, and multiple and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma; and (11) may help ameliorate the adverse effects of traditional chemotherapeutic agents. In none of the numerous studies conducted to date, however, do boron’s beneficial effects appear at intakes > 3 mg/d. No estimated average requirements (EARs) or dietary reference intakes (DRIs) have been set for boron—only an upper intake level (UL) of 20 mg/d for individuals aged ≥ 18 y. The absence of studies showing harm in conjunction with the substantial number of articles showing benefits support the consideration of boron supplementation of 3 mg/d for any individual who is consuming a diet lacking in fruits and vegetables or who is at risk for or has osteopenia; osteoporosis

  20. Nonvolatile RRAM cells from polymeric composites embedding recycled SiC powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Girolamo Del Mauro, Anna; Nenna, Giuseppe; Miscioscia, Riccardo; Freda, Cesare; Portofino, Sabrina; Galvagno, Sergio; Minarini, Carla

    2014-10-21

    Silicon carbide powders have been synthesized from tires utilizing a patented recycling process. Dynamic light scattering, Raman spectroscopy, SEM microscopy, and X-ray diffraction have been carried out to gather knowledge about powders and the final composite structure. The obtained powder has been proven to induce resistive switching in a PMMA polymer-based composite device. Memory effect has been detected in two-terminal devices having coplanar contacts and quantified by read-write-erase measurements in terms of level separation and persistence.

  1. Method of forming an abrasive compact of cubic boron nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, F.R.

    1976-01-01

    This patent concerns an abrasive compact comprising diamond or cubic boron nitride or mixtures thereof held in a matrix of a refractory substance and a substance which dissolves the abrasive particle to at least a limited extent. The compact may be made by subjecting a powdered mixture of the ingredients to conditions of temperature and pressure at which the abrasive particle is crystallographically stable and the solvent substance acts to dissolve the abrasive particle. The refractory substance and solvent substance are preferably so chosen that during compact manufacture there is interaction resulting in the formation of a hard material

  2. Structural and mechanical characterization of boron doped biphasic calcium phosphate produced by wet chemical method and subsequent thermal treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albayrak, Onder, E-mail: albayrakonder@mersin.edu.tr

    2016-03-15

    In the current study, boron doped biphasic calcium phosphate bioceramics consisting of a mixture of boron doped hydroxyapatite (BHA) and beta tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) of varying BHA/β-TCP ratios were obtained after sintering stage. The effects of varying boron contents and different sintering temperatures on the BHA/β-TCP ratios and on the sinterability of the final products were investigated. Particle sizes and morphologies of the obtained precipitates were determined using SEM. XRD and FTIR investigation were conducted to detect the boron formation in the structure of HA and quantitative analysis was performed to determine the BHA/β-TCP ratio before and after sintering stage. In order to determine the sinterability of the obtained powders, pellets were prepared and sintered; the rates of densification were calculated and obtained results were correlated by SEM images. Also Vickers microhardness values of the sintered samples were determined. The experimental results verified that boron doped hydroxyapatite powders were obtained after sintering stage and the structure consists of a mixture of BHA and β-TCP. As the boron content used in the precipitation stage increases, β-TCP content of the BHA/β-TCP ratio increases but sinterability, density and microhardness deteriorate. As the sintering temperature increases, β-TCP content, density and microhardness of the samples increase and sinterability improves. - Highlights: • This is the first paper about boron doped biphasic calcium phosphate bioceramics. • Boron doping affects the structural and mechanical properties. • BHA/β-TCP ratio can be adjustable with boron content and sintering temperature.

  3. Spherical rhenium metal powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonhardt, T.; Moore, N.; Hamister, M.

    2001-01-01

    The development of a high-density, spherical rhenium powder (SReP) possessing excellent flow characteristics has enabled the use of advanced processing techniques for the manufacture of rhenium components. The techniques that were investigated were vacuum plasma spraying (VPS), direct-hot isostatic pressing (D-HIP), and various other traditional powder metallurgy processing methods of forming rhenium powder into near-net shaped components. The principal disadvantages of standard rhenium metal powder (RMP) for advanced consolidation applications include: poor flow characteristics; high oxygen content; and low and varying packing densities. SReP will lower costs, reduce processing times, and improve yields when manufacturing powder metallurgy rhenium components. The results of the powder characterization of spherical rhenium powder and the consolidation of the SReP are further discussed. (author)

  4. Boronization in TEXTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winter, J.; Esser, H.G.; Koenen, L.; Reimer, H.; Seggern, J. v.; Schlueter, J.; Waelbroeck, F.; Wienhold, P.; Veprek, S.

    1989-01-01

    The liner and limiters of TEXTOR have been coated in situ with a boron containing carbon film using a RG discharge in a throughflow of 0.8 He + 0.1 B 2 H 6 + 0.1 CH 4 . The average film thickness was 30-50 nm, the ratio of boron and carbon in the layer was about 1:1 according to Auger Electron Spectroscopy. Subsequent tokamak discharges are characterized by a small fraction of radiated power ( eff lower than 1.2 are derived from conductivity measurements. The most prominent change in the impurity concentration compared to good conditions in a carbonized surrounding is measured for oxygen. The value OVI/anti n e of the OVI intensity normalized to the averaged plasma density anti n e decreases by more than a factor of four. The decrease in the oxygen content manifests itself also as a reduction of the CO and CO 2 partial pressures measured during and after the discharge with a sniffer probe. The carbon levels are reduced by a factor of about two as measured by the normalized intensity CII/anti n e of the CII line and via the ratio of the C fluxes and deuterium fluxed measured at the limiter (CI/D α ). The wall shows a pronounced sorption of hydrogen from the plasma, easing the density control and the establishment of low recycling conditions. The beneficial conditions did not show a significant deterioration during more than 200 discharges, including numerous shots at ICRH power levels >2 MW. (orig.)

  5. Electrochemical characterization of doped diamond-coated carbon fibers at different boron concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, E.C. [INPE, CP 515, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP 12201-970 (Brazil)]. E-mail: erica@las.inpe.br; Diniz, A.V. [INPE, CP 515, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP 12201-970 (Brazil); Trava-Airoldi, V.J. [INPE, CP 515, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP 12201-970 (Brazil); Ferreira, N.G. [CTA-Divisao de Materiais, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP 12228-904 (Brazil)

    2005-08-01

    Doped diamond films have been deposited on carbon fibers (felt) obtained from polyacrylonitrile at different levels of boron doping. For a successful coating of the fibers, an ultrasonic pretreatment in a bath of diamond powder dissolved in hexane was required. Films were grown on both sample sides, simultaneously, by hot filament-assisted chemical vapour deposition technique at 750 deg. C from a 0.5% H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} mixture at a total pressure of 6.5 x 10{sup 3} Pa. Boron was obtained from H{sub 2} forced to pass through a bubbler containing B{sub 2}O{sub 3} dissolved in methanol. The doping level studied corresponds to films with acceptor concentrations in the range of 6.5 x 10{sup 18} to 1.5 x 10{sup 21} cm{sup -} {sup 3}, obtained from Mott-Schottky plots. Scanning electron microscopy analyses evidenced fibers totally covered with high quality polycrystalline boron-doped diamond film, also confirmed by Raman spectroscopy spectra. Diamond electrodes grown on carbon fibers demonstrated similar electrochemical behavior obtained from films on Si substrate, for ferri/ferrocyanide redox couple as a function of boron content. The boron content influences electrochemical surface area. A lower boron concentration provides a higher growth rate that results in a higher surface area.

  6. Removal of boron(III) by N-methylglucamine-type cellulose derivatives with higher adsorption rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inukai, Yoshinari; Tanaka, Yoshiharu; Matsuda, Toshio; Mihara, Nobutake; Yamada, Kouji; Nambu, Nobuyoshi; Itoh, Osamu; Doi, Takao; Kaida, Yasuhiko; Yasuda, Seiji

    2004-01-01

    To obtain adsorbents for boron(III) derived from a natural polymer, two forms (powder and fiber) of N-methylglucamine-type cellulose derivatives were newly synthesized. After the graft polymerization of two forms of cellulose with vinyl monomer having epoxy groups, the N-methylglucamine-type cellulose derivatives were obtained by the reaction of the grafted cellulose with N-methylglucamine. The adsorption capacities of the cellulose derivatives for boron(III) were the same levels as that of a commercially available N-methylglucamine-type polystyrene resin. However, the cellulose derivatives adsorbed boron(III) more quickly than the polystyrene resin. The adsorption and desorption of boron(III) with a column method using the cellulose fiber were achieved at a higher flow rate than that using the polystyrene resin. In addition, the boron(III), adsorbed on the cellulose fiber column, was quantitatively recovered with dilute hydrochloric acid in 20- and 200-fold increased concentrations. Consequently, it was found that the cellulose derivatives were superior to the polystyrene resin as adsorbents for boron(III) for treatment of a large quantity of wastewater

  7. Note on boron toxicity in oats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langille, W M; Mahoney, J F

    1959-01-01

    Boron was applied at the rate of 35 pounds per acre of borax to a field of oats. With the first noticeable growth there appeared a definite chlorotic condition of the oat seedlings on plots receiving boron treatments. Analysis of chlorotic tissue at 3 weeks after seeding indicated 110 ppm boron, while apparently healthy tissue contained 6.1 ppm boron at the same stage of growth. There was a rapid decline in the boron content of the oat tissue as the crop grew older. At maturity the oat tissue from the boron-treated plots contained an average of 14.15 ppm boron as compared with 4.10 boron from untreated areas. Boron toxicity had no harmful effect so far as yields were concerned, under the conditions of this experiment. 3 references.

  8. Method for producing polycrystalline boron nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexeevskii, V.P.; Bochko, A.V.; Dzhamarov, S.S.; Karpinos, D.M.; Karyuk, G.G.; Kolomiets, I.P.; Kurdyumov, A.V.; Pivovarov, M.S.; Frantsevich, I.N.; Yarosh, V.V.

    1975-01-01

    A mixture containing less than 50 percent of graphite-like boron nitride treated by a shock wave and highly defective wurtzite-like boron nitride obtained by a shock-wave method is compressed and heated at pressure and temperature values corresponding to the region of the phase diagram for boron nitride defined by the graphite-like compact modifications of boron nitride equilibrium line and the cubic wurtzite-like boron nitride equilibrium line. The resulting crystals of boron nitride exhibit a structure of wurtzite-like boron nitride or of both wurtzite-like and cubic boron nitride. The resulting material exhibits higher plasticity as compared with polycrystalline cubic boron nitride. Tools made of this compact polycrystalline material have a longer service life under impact loads in machining hardened steel and chilled iron. (U.S.)

  9. The Effect of Boron and Zirconium on the Structure and Tensile Properties of the Cast Nickel-Based Superalloy ATI 718Plus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Seyed Ali; Abbasi, Seyed Mehdi; Madar, Karim Zangeneh

    2018-04-01

    The effects of boron and zirconium on cast structure, hardness, and tensile properties of the nickel-based superalloy 718Plus were investigated. For this purpose, five alloys with different contents of boron and zirconium were cast via vacuum induction melting and then purified via vacuum arc remelting. Microstructural analysis by light-optical microscope and scanning electron microscope equipped with energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and phase studies by x-ray diffraction analysis were performed. The results showed that boron and zirconium tend to significantly reduce dendritic arm spacing and increase the amount of Laves, Laves/gamma eutectic, and carbide phases. It was also found that boron led to the formation of B4C and (Cr, Fe, Mo, Ni, Ti)3B2 phases and zirconium led to the formation of intermetallic phases and ZrC carbide. In the presence of boron and zirconium, the hardness and its difference between dendritic branches and inter-dendritic spaces increased by concentrating such phases as Laves in the inter-dendritic spaces. These elements had a negative effect on tensile properties of the alloy, including ductility and strength, mainly because of the increase in the Laves phase. It should be noted that the largest degradation of the tensile properties occurred in the alloys containing the maximum amount of zirconium.

  10. Plasma spraying of zirconium carbide – hafnium carbide – tungsten cermets

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brožek, Vlastimil; Ctibor, Pavel; Cheong, D.-I.; Yang, S.-H.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 1 (2009), s. 49-64 ISSN 1335-8987 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Plasma spraying * cermet coatings * microhardness * zirconium carbide * hafnium carbide * tungsten * water stabilized plasma Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass

  11. Effect of Powder-Suspended Dielectric on the EDM Characteristics of Inconel 625

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talla, Gangadharudu; Gangopadhyay, S.; Biswas, C. K.

    2016-02-01

    The current work attempts to establish the criteria for powder material selection by investigating the influence of various powder-suspended dielectrics and machining parameters on various EDM characteristics of Inconel 625 (a nickel-based super alloy) which is nowadays regularly used in aerospace, chemical, and marine industries. The powders include aluminum (Al), graphite, and silicon (Si) that have significant variation in their thermo-physical characteristics. Results showed that powder properties like electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, density, and hardness play a significant role in changing the machining performance and the quality of the machined surface. Among the three powders, highest material removal rate was observed for graphite powder due to its high electrical and thermal conductivities. Best surface finish and least radial overcut (ROC) were attained using Si powder. Maximum microhardness was found for Si due to its low thermal conductivity and high hardness. It is followed by graphite and aluminum powders. Addition of powder to the dielectric has increased the crater diameter due to expansion of plasma channel. Powder-mixed EDM (PMEDM) was also effective in lowering the density of surface cracks with least number of cracks obtained with graphite powder. X-ray diffraction analysis indicated possible formation of metal carbides along with grain growth phenomenon of Inconel 625 after PMEDM.

  12. The influence of Boron on creep-rupture behaviour of austenitic unstabilized and Nb-stabilized stainless steel X8CrNi 1613 in unirradiated and irradiated condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sen, Susant Kumar.

    1976-10-01

    The present study deals with influence of boron on creep-rupture behaviour in unirradiated condition at 650 0 C along with precipitation behaviour, heat-treatment and recrystallization of unstabilized and stabilized steel. The results of creep-rupture tests on unirradiated specimens show that boron exerts a beneficial effect on the rupture life and ductility. Boron losses its beneficial effect on creep properties in unstabilized steel by prolong creeping. The magnitude of beneficial effect of Boron on creep properties depends upon the initial boron distribution which influences the number, size and distribution of the precipitates. Boron promotes the precipitation of type M 23 C 6 Carbides in the grain as well as at the grain boundary. Boron segregates in atomic form during slow cooling from austenitizing temperature. The recrystallization will be delayed by the presence of boron. The results of creep tests at 650 0 C shows that boron exerts a beneficial effect on creep life of irradiated steels. (orig./GSC) [de

  13. Metal interactions with boron clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimes, R.N.

    1982-01-01

    This book presents information on the following topics: the structural and bonding features of metallaboranes and metallacarboranes; transition-metal derivatives of nido-boranes and some related species; interactions of metal groups with the octahydrotriborate (1-) anion, B 3 H 8 ; metallaboron cage compounds of the main group metals; closo-carborane-metal complexes containing metal-carbon and metal-boron omega-bonds; electrochemistry of metallaboron cage compounds; and boron clusters with transition metal-hydrogen bonds

  14. Reinforcement against crack propagation of PWR absorbers by development of boron-carbon-hafnium composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Provot, B.; Herter, P.

    2000-01-01

    In order to improve the mechanical behaviour of materials used as neutron absorbers in nuclear reactors, we have developed CERCER or CERMET composites with boron and hafnium. Thus a new composite B 4 C/HfB 2 has been especially studied. We have identified three kinds of degradation under irradiation (thermal gradient, swelling due to fission products and accidental corrosion) that induce imposed deformations cracking phenomena. Mechanical behaviour and crack propagation resistance have been studied by ball-on-three-balls and double torsion tests. A special device was developed to enable crack propagation and associated stress intensity factor measurements. Effects of structure and of a second phase are underline. First results show that these materials present crack initiation and propagation resistance much higher than pure boron carbide or hafnium diboride. We observe R-Curves effects, crack bridging or branching, crack arrests, and toughness increases that we can relate respectively to the composite structures. (author)

  15. The influence of metal Mg on micro-morphology and crystallinity of spherical hexagonal boron nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ning, E-mail: zhangning5832@163.com; Liu, Huan; Kan, Hongmin; Wang, Xiaoyang; Long, Haibo; Zhou, Yonghui

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • The action mechanism of Mg to the synthesis of spherical BN was explored. • The influence of Mg content on the crystallinity of h-BN powders was studied. • Even if not added any template, the spherical h-BN could be prepared. - Abstract: This search used the boric acid and borax as a source of boron, urea as a nitrogen source, Mg as metal catalyst, and thus prepared different micro-morphology and crystallinity hexagonal boron nitride powders under a flowing ammonia atmosphere at a nitriding temperature of 750 °C. The effect of Mg content on the crystallinity and micro-morphology of hexagonal boron nitride powders was studied, and the Mg action mechanism was explored. Without the added surfactant, the graphitization index (GI) was 6.87, and the diameter of the spherical h-BN was bigger. When the added Mg were 0.1 g, 0.3 g, 0.5 g and 0.7 g, the (GI) decreased to 6.04, 5.67, 4.62 and 4.84, respectively. When the Mg content was higher (0.9 g), GI value increased rapidly, and the crystallinity became bad. When the Mg content was 0.5 g, the dispersion of h-BN powders was at its optimum and refinement apparently, and the crystallinity at its highest.

  16. Nanodefects in ultrahard crystalline cubic boron nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nistor, S. V.; Stefan, M.; Goovaerts, E.; Schoemaker, D.

    2002-01-01

    Cubic boron nitride (cBN), the second hardest known material after diamond, exhibits high thermal conductivity and an excellent ability to be n or p doped, which makes it a strong candidate for the next generation of high-temperature micro optical and micro electronic devices. According to recent studies, cBN exhibits a better resistance to radiation damage than diamond, which suggests potential applications in extreme radiation environments. Crystalline cBN powders of up to 0.5 mm linear size is obtained in a similar way as diamond, by catalytic conversion of hexagonal BN (hBN) to cBN at even higher pressures (> 5GPa) and temperatures (∼ 1900 K). Considering the essential role played by the nanodefects (point defects and impurities) in determining its physical properties, it is surprising how limited is the amount of published data concerning the properties of nanodefects in this material, especially by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, the most powerful method for identification and characterization of nanodefects in both insulators and semiconductors. This seems to be due mainly to the absence of natural cBN gems and the extreme difficulties in producing even mm 3 sized synthetic crystals. We shall present our recent EPR studies on cBN crystalline powders, performed in a broad temperature range from room temperature (RT) down to 1.2 K on several sorts of large size cBN powder grits of yellow and amber color for industrial applications. Previous multifrequency (9.3 GHz and 95 GHz) EPR studies of brown to black cBN crystallites prepared with excess of boron, resulted in the discovery of two new types of paramagnetic point defects with different spectral properties, called the D1 and D2 centers. Our X(9.3 GHz)-band EPR investigations resulted in the observation in amber cBN crystalline powders of a spectrum with a strong temperature dependence of the lineshape. It was found that for high and low temperatures, respectively, the numerical

  17. Tungsten carbide and tungsten-molybdenum carbides as automobile exhaust catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leclercq, L.; Daubrege, F.; Gengembre, L.; Leclercq, G.; Prigent, M.

    1987-01-01

    Several catalyst samples of tungsten carbide and W, Mo mixed carbides with different Mo/W atom ratios, have been prepared to test their ability to remove carbon monoxide, nitric oxide and propane from a synthetic exhaust gas simulating automobile emissions. Surface characterization of the catalysts has been performed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and selective chemisorption of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. Tungsten carbide exhibits good activity for CO and NO conversion, compared to a standard three-way catalyst based on Pt and Rh. However, this W carbide is ineffective in the oxidation of propane. The Mo,W mixed carbides are markedly different having only a very low activity. 9 refs.; 10 figs.; 5 tabs

  18. High temperature evaporation of titanium, zirconium and hafnium carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gusev, A.I.; Rempel', A.A.

    1991-01-01

    Evaporation of cubic nonstoichiometric carbides of titanium, zirconium and hafnium in a comparatively low-temperature interval (1800-2700) with detailed crystallochemical sample certification is studied. Titanium carbide is characterized by the maximum evaporation rate: at T>2300 K it loses 3% of sample mass during an hour and at T>2400 K titanium carbide evaporation becomes extremely rapid. Zirconium and hafnium carbide evaporation rates are several times lower than titanium carbide evaporation rates at similar temperatures. Partial pressures of metals and carbon over the carbides studied are calculated on the base of evaporation rates

  19. Plasma spheroidizing and cladding of powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrunichev, V.A.; Averin, V.V.; Sorokin, L.M.; Koroleva, E.B.

    1987-01-01

    Arc and high-frequency plasmatrons are used for spheroidizing nickel and chromium-base alloy particles. Different plasma-forming medium compositions are used in the arc variant and the effect of these media on the plasma treatment product is demonstrated. For a high-frequency plasmatron, a long time of plasma contact with the powder leads to the transfer of the part of the material from the treated particles into vaporous state with subsequent condensation at the outlet from the discharge zone. Results of investigations into the formation of metal coatings on oxide and carbide particles during plasma-arc action are also presented. Representative data on the output of particles with coating are obtained and factors, providing for the optimal particle cladding conditions, are indicated

  20. Boron Fullerenes: A First-Principles Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalez Szwacki Nevill

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractA family of unusually stable boron cages was identified and examined using first-principles local-density functional method. The structure of the fullerenes is similar to that of the B12icosahedron and consists of six crossing double-rings. The energetically most stable fullerene is made up of 180 boron atoms. A connection between the fullerene family and its precursors, boron sheets, is made. We show that the most stable boron sheets are not necessarily precursors of very stable boron cages. Our finding is a step forward in the understanding of the structure of the recently produced boron nanotubes.

  1. Alloy Design of Martensitic 9Cr-Boron Steel for A-USC Boiler at 650 °C — Beyond Grades 91, 92 and 122

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Fujio; Tabuchi, M.; Tsukamoto, S.

    Boundary hardening is shown to be the most important strengthening mechanism in creep of tempered martensitic 9% Cr steel base metal and welded joints at 650 °C. The enrichment of soluble boron near prior austenite grain boundaries (PAGBs) by the GB segregation is essential for the reduction of coarsening rate of M23C6 carbides near PAGBs, enhancing the boundary and sub-boundary hardening near PAGBs, and also for the change in α/γ transformation behavior in heat-affected-zone (HAZ) of welded joints during heating of welding, producing the same microstructure in HAZ as in the base metal. Excess addition of nitrogen to the 9Cr-boron steel promotes the formation of boron nitrides during normalizing heat treatment, which consumes most of soluble boron and degrades the creep strength. A NIMS 9Cr steel (MARBN; Martensitic 9Cr steel strengthened by boron and MX nitrides) with 120-150 ppm boron and 60-90 ppm nitrogen, where no boron nitride forms during normalizing heat treatment, exhibits not only much higher creep strength of base metal than Grades 91, 92 and 122 but also substantially no degradation in creep strength due to Type IV fracture in HAZ of welded joints at 650°C. The protective Cr2O3-rich scale forms on the surface of 9Cr steel by pre-oxidation treatment in Ar gas, which significantly improves the oxidation resistance in steam at 650°C.

  2. Some problems connected with boron determination by atomic absorption spectroscopy and the sensitivity improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JELENA J. SAVOVIC

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Two atomizers were compared: an N2O–C2H2 flame and a stabilized U-shaped DC arc with aerosol supply. Both the high plasma temperature and the reducing atmosphere obtained by acetylene addition to the argon stream substantially increase the sensitivity of boron determination by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS when the arc atomizer is used. The results were compared with those for silicon as a control element. The experimental characteristic concentrations for both elements were compared with the computed values. The experimentally obtained characteristic concentration for boron when using the arc atomizer was in better agreement with the calculated value. It was estimated that the influence of stable monoxide formation on the sensitivity for both elements was about the same, but reduction of analyte and formation of non-volatile carbide particles was more important for boron, which is the main reason for the low sensitivity of boron determination using a flame atomizer. The use of an arc atomizer suppresses this interference and significantly improves the sensitivity of the determination.

  3. The suitability of silicon carbide for photocatalytic water oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, M.; Qamar, M. T.; Ahmed, Ikram; Rehman, Ateeq Ur; Ali, Shahid; Ismail, I. M. I.; Hameed, Abdul

    2018-04-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC), owing to its extraordinary chemical stability and refractory properties, is widely used in the manufacturing industry. Despite the semiconducting nature and morphology-tuned band gap, its efficacy as photocatalysts has not been thoroughly investigated. The current study reports the synthesis, characterization and the evaluation of the capability of silicon carbide for hydrogen generation from water splitting. The optical characterization of the as-synthesized powder exposed the formation of multi-wavelength absorbing entities in synthetic process. The structural analysis by XRD and the fine microstructure analysis by HRTEM revealed the cubic 3C-SiC (β-SiC) and hexagonal α-polymorphs (2H-SiC and 6H-SiC) as major and minor phases, respectively. The Mott-Schottky analysis verified the n-type nature of the material with the flat band potential of - 0.7 V. In the electrochemical evaluation, the sharp increase in the peak currents in various potential ranges, under illumination, revealed the plausible potential of the material for the oxidation of water and generation of hydrogen. The generation of hydrogen and oxygen, as a consequence of water splitting in the actual photocatalytic experiments, was observed and measured. A significant increase in the yield of hydrogen was noticed in the presence of methanol as h + scavenger, whereas a retarding effect was offered by the Fe3+ entities that served as e - scavengers. The combined effect of both methanol and Fe3+ ions in the photocatalytic process was also investigated. Besides hydrogen gas, the other evolved gasses such as methane and carbon monoxide were also measured to estimate the mechanism of the process.

  4. SAF line powder operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frederickson, J.R.; Horgos, R.M.

    1983-10-01

    An automated nuclear fuel fabrication line is being designed for installation in the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF) near Richland, Washington. The fabrication line will consist of seven major process systems: Receiving and Powder Preparation; Powder Conditioning; Pressing and Boat Loading; Debinding, Sintering, and Property Adjustment; Boat Transport; Pellet Inspection and Finishing; and Pin Operations. Fuel powder processing through pellet pressing will be discussed in this paper

  5. Two layer powder pressing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiner, H.

    1979-01-01

    First, significance and advantages of sintered materials consisting of two layers are pointed out. By means of the two layer powder pressing technique metal powders are formed resulting in compacts with high accuracy of shape and mass. Attributes of basic powders, different filling methods and pressing techniques are discussed. The described technique is supposed to find further applications in the field of two layer compacts in the near future

  6. Operation whey powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunner, E.

    1987-01-01

    The odyssey of the contaminated whey powder finally has come to an end, and the 5000 tonnes of whey now are designated for decontamination by means of an ion exchange technique. The article throws light upon the political and economic reasons that sent the whey powder off on a chaotic journey. It is worth mentioning in this context that the natural radioactivity of inorganic fertilizers is much higher than that of the whey powder in question. (HP) [de

  7. Optimizing the dual elemental thermal reactive deposition time in carbide layer formation on SUJ2 tool steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochtar, Myrna Ariati; Putra, Wahyuaji Narottama; Mahardika, Bayu

    2018-05-01

    This paper presents developments contributing to the improvement of thermo-reactive deposition (TRD) process in producing hard carbide layers, on automotive components application. The problem in using FeV powder as a coating material that has been applied in the industries is it is high cost. In this study, FeCr powder coating material was mixed into FeV powder with a ratio of 35:65 weight percent. The SUJ2 steel pins components are processed at 980° C, with varying TRD time was 4,6,8 and 10 hours. Scanning Electron microscope (SEM), Electron Probe Micro Analyzer (EPMA) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were applied to analyze the coating layers. The thickness of the carbide layer formed will increase with the longer processing time, which thickness at 4-10 hours is increase from 22.7 to 29.7 micron. The gained thickness tends to be homogeneous. Increasing the TRD process holding time results in a higher hardness of the carbide layerwith hardness at 4, 6, 8 and 10 hours is 2049, 2184, 2175 and 2343 HV. The wear rate at TRD holding time of 4-10 hours with the Ogoshi method was reduced from 5.1 × 10-4 mm3/m to 2.5 × 10-4 mm3/m. Optical microscope observations shows that substrate phases consisting of pearlite and cementite and grains that tend to enlarge with the addition of time. Carbide compounds that are formed are vanadium carbide (V8C7, V6C5, V2C) and chromium carbide (Cr3C2, Cr23C7, Cr3C7). While EDS-Linescan results show complex phase (Fe, V, Cr) xC formed. The research shows that addition of FeCr into FeV powder in TRD process in 980°C with optimum time of 10 hours processing meet the mechanical properties requirement of automotive components.

  8. Silicon carbide production by Self-Propagating High Temperature (SHS) technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, Eduardo de Souza; Schneider, Pedro Luiz; Mattoso, Irani Guedes; Costa, Carlos Roberto Correia da; Louro, Luis Henrique Leme

    1997-01-01

    Samples of silicon carbide (SiC) were synthesized from a mixture of silicon and carbon powders, using the Self-Propagating High Temperature Synthesis (SHS) technique. Three mixtures were tried, using silicon particles of the same average size but carbon particles of different average sizes. The method tried is characterized by an ignition temperature of 1450 deg C and the short duration of the synthesis ( 2-3 min). The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction and scattering electron microscopy. (author)

  9. Hot ductility behavior of a low carbon advanced high strength steel (AHSS) microalloyed with boron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mejia, I.; Bedolla-Jacuinde, A.; Maldonado, C.; Cabrera, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Effect of boron on the hot ductility behavior of a low carbon NiCrVCu AHSS. → Boron addition of 117 ppm improves hot ductility over 100% in terms of RA. → Hot ductility improvement is associated with segregation/precipitation of boron. → Typical hot ductility recovery at lower temperatures does not appear in this steel. → Hot ductility loss is associated with precipitates/inclusions coupled with voids. - Abstract: The current study analyses the influence of boron addition on the hot ductility of a low carbon advanced high strength NiCrVCu steel. For this purpose hot tensile tests were carried out at different temperatures (650, 750, 800, 900 and 1000 deg. C) at a constant true strain rate of 0.001 s -1 . Experimental results showed a substantial improvement in hot ductility for the low carbon advanced high strength steel when microalloyed with boron compared with that without boron addition. Nevertheless, both steels showed poor ductility when tested at the lowest temperatures (650, 750 and 800 deg. C), and such behavior is associated to the precipitation of vanadium carbides/nitrides and inclusions, particularly MnS and CuS particles. The fracture mode of the low carbon advanced high strength steel microalloyed with boron seems to be more ductile than the steel without boron addition. Furthermore, the fracture surfaces of specimens tested at temperatures showing the highest ductility (900 and 1000 deg. C) indicate that the fracture mode is a result of ductile failure, while in the region of poor ductility the fracture mode is of the ductile-brittle type failure. It was shown that precipitates and/or inclusions coupled with voids play a meaningful role on the crack nucleation mechanism which in turn causes a hot ductility loss. Likewise, dynamic recrystallization (DRX) which always results in restoration of ductility only occurs in the range from 900 to 1000 deg. C. Results are discussed in terms of boron segregation towards

  10. Hot ductility behavior of a low carbon advanced high strength steel (AHSS) microalloyed with boron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mejia, I., E-mail: imejia@umich.mx [Instituto de Investigaciones Metalurgicas, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolas de Hidalgo, Edificio ' U' , Ciudad Universitaria, 58066 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico); Bedolla-Jacuinde, A.; Maldonado, C. [Instituto de Investigaciones Metalurgicas, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolas de Hidalgo, Edificio ' U' , Ciudad Universitaria, 58066 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico); Cabrera, J.M. [Departament de Ciencia dels Materials i Enginyeria Metal.lurgica, ETSEIB - Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Fundacio CTM Centre Tecnologic, Av. de las Bases de Manresa 1, 08240 Manresa (Spain)

    2011-05-25

    Research highlights: {yields} Effect of boron on the hot ductility behavior of a low carbon NiCrVCu AHSS. {yields} Boron addition of 117 ppm improves hot ductility over 100% in terms of RA. {yields} Hot ductility improvement is associated with segregation/precipitation of boron. {yields} Typical hot ductility recovery at lower temperatures does not appear in this steel. {yields} Hot ductility loss is associated with precipitates/inclusions coupled with voids. - Abstract: The current study analyses the influence of boron addition on the hot ductility of a low carbon advanced high strength NiCrVCu steel. For this purpose hot tensile tests were carried out at different temperatures (650, 750, 800, 900 and 1000 deg. C) at a constant true strain rate of 0.001 s{sup -1}. Experimental results showed a substantial improvement in hot ductility for the low carbon advanced high strength steel when microalloyed with boron compared with that without boron addition. Nevertheless, both steels showed poor ductility when tested at the lowest temperatures (650, 750 and 800 deg. C), and such behavior is associated to the precipitation of vanadium carbides/nitrides and inclusions, particularly MnS and CuS particles. The fracture mode of the low carbon advanced high strength steel microalloyed with boron seems to be more ductile than the steel without boron addition. Furthermore, the fracture surfaces of specimens tested at temperatures showing the highest ductility (900 and 1000 deg. C) indicate that the fracture mode is a result of ductile failure, while in the region of poor ductility the fracture mode is of the ductile-brittle type failure. It was shown that precipitates and/or inclusions coupled with voids play a meaningful role on the crack nucleation mechanism which in turn causes a hot ductility loss. Likewise, dynamic recrystallization (DRX) which always results in restoration of ductility only occurs in the range from 900 to 1000 deg. C. Results are discussed in terms of

  11. Pharmaceutical powder compaction technology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Çelik, Metin

    2011-01-01

    ... through the compaction formulation process and application. Compaction of powder constituents both active ingredient and excipients is examined to ensure consistent and reproducible disintegration and dispersion profiles...

  12. Synthesis, Characterization, and Evaluation of Boron-Doped Iron Oxides for the Photocatalytic Degradation of Atrazine under Visible Light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan Hu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Photocatalytic degradation of atrazine by boron-doped iron oxides under visible light irradiation was investigated. In this work, boron-doped goethite and hematite were successfully prepared by sol-gel method with trimethylborate as boron precursor. The powders were characterized by XRD, UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectra, and porosimetry analysis. The results showed that boron doping could influence the crystal structure, enlarge the BET surface area, improve light absorption ability, and narrow their band-gap energy. The photocatalytic activity of B-doped iron oxides was evaluated in the degradation of atrazine under the visible light irradiation, and B-doped iron oxides showed higher atrazine degradation rate than that of pristine iron oxides. Particularly, B-doped goethite exhibited better photocatalytic activity than B-doped hematite.

  13. stabilization of ikpayongo laterite with cement and calcium carbide

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF EKWUEME

    Laterite obtained from Ikpayongo was stabilized with 2-10 % cement and 2-10 % Calcium Carbide waste, for use .... or open dumping which have effect on surface and ... Table 1: Chemical Composition of Calcium Carbide Waste and Cement.

  14. Method of fabricating porous silicon carbide (SiC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shor, Joseph S. (Inventor); Kurtz, Anthony D. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Porous silicon carbide is fabricated according to techniques which result in a significant portion of nanocrystallites within the material in a sub 10 nanometer regime. There is described techniques for passivating porous silicon carbide which result in the fabrication of optoelectronic devices which exhibit brighter blue luminescence and exhibit improved qualities. Based on certain of the techniques described porous silicon carbide is used as a sacrificial layer for the patterning of silicon carbide. Porous silicon carbide is then removed from the bulk substrate by oxidation and other methods. The techniques described employ a two-step process which is used to pattern bulk silicon carbide where selected areas of the wafer are then made porous and then the porous layer is subsequently removed. The process to form porous silicon carbide exhibits dopant selectivity and a two-step etching procedure is implemented for silicon carbide multilayers.

  15. ICRF boronization. A new technique towards high efficiency wall coating for superconducting tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jiangang; Zhao Yan Ping; Gu Xue Mao

    1999-01-01

    A new technique for wall conditioning that will be especially useful for future larger superconducting tokamaks, such as ITER, has been successfully developed and encouraging results have been obtained. Solid carborane powder, which is non-toxic and non-explosive, was used. Pulsed RF plasma was produced by a non-Faraday shielding RF antenna with RF power of 10 kW. The ion temperature was about 2 keV with a toroidal magnetic field of 1.8 T and a pressure of 3x10 -1 Pa. Energetic ions broke up the carborane molecules, and the resulting boron ions struck and were deposited on the first wall. In comparison with glow discharge cleaning boronization, the B/C coating film shows higher adhesion, more uniformity and longer lifetime during plasma discharges. The plasma performance was improved after ICRF boronization. (author). Letter-to-the-editor

  16. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2003-08-05

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of ternary mixtures consisting of: Ni powder, Cu powder, and Al powder, Ni powder, Cr powder, and Al powder; Ni powder, W powder and Al powder; Ni powder, V powder, and Al powder; Ni powder, Mo powder, and Al powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100} orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  17. Fission product phases in irradiated carbide fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ewart, F.T.; Sharpe, B.M.; Taylor, R.G.

    1975-09-01

    Oxide fuels have been widely adopted as 'first charge' fuels for demonstration fast reactors. However, because of the improved breeding characteristics, carbides are being investigated in a number of laboratories as possible advanced fuels. Irradiation experiments on uranium and mixed uranium-plutonium carbides have been widely reported but the instances where segregate phases have been found and subjected to electron probe analysis are relatively few. Several observations of such segregate phases have now been made over a period of time and these are collected together in this document. Some seven fuel pins have been examined. Two of the irradiations were in thermal materials testing reactors (MTR); the remainder were experimental assemblies of carbide gas bonded oxycarbide and sodium bonded oxycarbide in the Dounreay Fast Reactor (DFR). All fuel pins completed their irradiation without failure. (author)

  18. Joining of porous silicon carbide bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Carl H.; Couhig, John T.; Pelletier, Paul J.

    1990-05-01

    A method of joining two porous bodies of silicon carbide is disclosed. It entails utilizing an aqueous slip of a similar silicon carbide as was used to form the porous bodies, including the sintering aids, and a binder to initially join the porous bodies together. Then the composite structure is subjected to cold isostatic pressing to form a joint having good handling strength. Then the composite structure is subjected to pressureless sintering to form the final strong bond. Optionally, after the sintering the structure is subjected to hot isostatic pressing to further improve the joint and densify the structure. The result is a composite structure in which the joint is almost indistinguishable from the silicon carbide pieces which it joins.

  19. Metal-boride phase formation on tungsten carbide (WC-Co) during microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, Jamin M.; Catledge, Shane A., E-mail: catledge@uab.edu

    2016-02-28

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A detailed phase analysis after PECVD boriding shows WCoB, CoB and/or W{sub 2}CoB{sub 2}. • EDS of PECVD borides shows boron diffusion into the carbide grain structure. • Nanoindentation hardness and modulus of borides is 23–27 GPa and 600–780 GPa. • Scratch testing shows hard coating with cracking at 40N and spallation at 70N. - Abstract: Strengthening of cemented tungsten carbide by boriding is used to improve the wear resistance and lifetime of carbide tools; however, many conventional boriding techniques render the bulk carbide too brittle for extreme conditions, such as hard rock drilling. This research explored the variation in metal-boride phase formation during the microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition process at surface temperatures from 700 to 1100 °C. We showed several well-adhered metal-boride surface layers consisting of WCoB, CoB and/or W{sub 2}CoB{sub 2} with average hardness from 23 to 27 GPa and average elastic modulus of 600–730 GPa. The metal-boride interlayer was shown to be an effective diffusion barrier against elemental cobalt; migration of elemental cobalt to the surface of the interlayer was significantly reduced. A combination of glancing angle X-ray diffraction, electron dispersive spectroscopy, nanoindentation and scratch testing was used to evaluate the surface composition and material properties. An evaluation of the material properties shows that plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposited borides formed at substrate temperatures of 800 °C, 850 °C, 900 °C and 1000 °C strengthen the material by increasing the hardness and elastic modulus of cemented tungsten carbide. Additionally, these boride surface layers may offer potential for adhesion of ultra-hard carbon coatings.

  20. Metal-boride phase formation on tungsten carbide (WC-Co) during microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, Jamin M.; Catledge, Shane A.

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A detailed phase analysis after PECVD boriding shows WCoB, CoB and/or W_2CoB_2. • EDS of PECVD borides shows boron diffusion into the carbide grain structure. • Nanoindentation hardness and modulus of borides is 23–27 GPa and 600–780 GPa. • Scratch testing shows hard coating with cracking at 40N and spallation at 70N. - Abstract: Strengthening of cemented tungsten carbide by boriding is used to improve the wear resistance and lifetime of carbide tools; however, many conventional boriding techniques render the bulk carbide too brittle for extreme conditions, such as hard rock drilling. This research explored the variation in metal-boride phase formation during the microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition process at surface temperatures from 700 to 1100 °C. We showed several well-adhered metal-boride surface layers consisting of WCoB, CoB and/or W_2CoB_2 with average hardness from 23 to 27 GPa and average elastic modulus of 600–730 GPa. The metal-boride interlayer was shown to be an effective diffusion barrier against elemental cobalt; migration of elemental cobalt to the surface of the interlayer was significantly reduced. A combination of glancing angle X-ray diffraction, electron dispersive spectroscopy, nanoindentation and scratch testing was used to evaluate the surface composition and material properties. An evaluation of the material properties shows that plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposited borides formed at substrate temperatures of 800 °C, 850 °C, 900 °C and 1000 °C strengthen the material by increasing the hardness and elastic modulus of cemented tungsten carbide. Additionally, these boride surface layers may offer potential for adhesion of ultra-hard carbon coatings.

  1. Adsorption of boron from boron-containing wastewaters by ion exchange in a continuous reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yilmaz, A. Erdem; Boncukcuoglu, Recep; Yilmaz, M. Tolga; Kocakerim, M. Muhtar

    2005-01-01

    In this study, boron removal from boron-containing wastewaters prepared synthetically was investigated. The experiments in which Amberlite IRA 743, boron specific resin was used were carried out in a column reactor. The bed volume of resin, boron concentration, flow rate and temperature were selected as experimental parameters. The experimental results showed that percent of boron removal increased with increasing amount of resin and with decreasing boron concentration in the solution. Boron removal decreased with increasing of flow rate and the effect of temperature on the percent of total boron removal increased the boron removal rate. As a result, it was seen that about 99% of boron in the wastewater could be removed at optimum conditions

  2. Lattice vibrations in α-boron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, W.

    1976-01-01

    α-rhombohedral boron is the simplest boron modification, with only 12 atoms per unit cell. The boron atoms are arranged in B 12 icosahedra, which are centered at the lattice points of a primitive rhombohedral lattice. The icosahedra are slightly deformed, as the five-fold symmetry of the ideal icosahedron is incompatible with any crystal structure. The lattice dynamics of α-boron are discussed in terms of the model developed by Weber and Thorpe. (Auth.)

  3. Fabrication of uranium carbide/beryllium carbide/graphite experimental-fuel-element specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muenzer, W.A.

    1978-01-01

    A method has been developed for fabricating uranium carbide/beryllium carbide/graphite fuel-element specimens for reactor-core-meltdown studies. The method involves milling and blending the raw materials and densifying the resulting blend by conventional graphite-die hot-pressing techniques. It can be used to fabricate specimens with good physical integrity and material dispersion, with densities of greater than 90% of the theoretical density, and with a uranium carbide particle size of less than 10 μm

  4. Silicon carbide microsystems for harsh environments

    CERN Document Server

    Wijesundara, Muthu B J

    2011-01-01

    Silicon Carbide Microsystems for Harsh Environments reviews state-of-the-art Silicon Carbide (SiC) technologies that, when combined, create microsystems capable of surviving in harsh environments, technological readiness of the system components, key issues when integrating these components into systems, and other hurdles in harsh environment operation. The authors use the SiC technology platform suite the model platform for developing harsh environment microsystems and then detail the current status of the specific individual technologies (electronics, MEMS, packaging). Additionally, methods

  5. Tool steel for cold worck niobium carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldenstein, H.

    1984-01-01

    A tool steel was designed so as to have a microstructure with the matrix similar a cold work tool steel of D series, containing a dispersion of Niobium carbides, with no intention of putting Niobium in solution on the matrix. The alloy was cast, forged and heat treated. The alloy was easily forged; the primary carbide morfology, after forging, was faceted, tending to equiaxed. The hardness obtained was equivalent to the maximum hardness of a D-3 sttel when quenched from any temperature between 950 0 C, and 1200 0 , showing a very small sensitivy to the quenching temperature. (Author) [pt

  6. Sintered aluminium powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepanova, M.G.; Matveev, B.I.

    1974-01-01

    The mechanical and physical properties of aluminium powder alloys and the various methods employed to produce them are considered. Data are given on the hardening of the alloys SAP and SPAK-4, as well as the powder-alloy system Al-Cr-Zr. (L.M.)

  7. Rare-earth doped boron nitride nanotubes: Synthesis and characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Wellington Marcos; Sousa, Edesia Martins Barros de, E-mail: wellingtonmarcos@yahoo.com.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Full text: Boron nitride is a heat and chemically resistant refractory compound of boron and nitrogen atoms with the chemical formula BN. This structure exists in various crystalline forms that are isoelectronic to a similarly structured carbon lattice. The hexagonal form (h-BN) corresponding to graphite is the most stable and soft among BN polymorph. However, boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) were first time synthesized in 1995 [1] and have a type of one-dimensional (1D) nanostructure. Recently the BNNTs have attracted significant interest for scientific and technological applications due to their Wide bandgap. The Wide-bandgap semiconductors doped with rare-earth are considered as a new type of luminescent material, combining special Wide bandgap semiconducting properties with the rare-earth luminescence feature. BNNTs have a stable wide bandgap of 5.5 eV and super thermal and chemical stabilities, which make BNNTs an ideal nanosized luminescent material [2]. In this study, we report a simple and efficient route for the synthesis of BNNTs doped with samarium and europium. High quality BNNTs doped was produced via CVD technique using NH{sub 3} and N{sub 2} gases as source. Boron amorphous, catalyst and oxides rare-earth powder were used as precursor. Detailed studies involving energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) were performed in order to characterize the BNNTs as grown. [1] Chopra, N. G.; Luyken, R. J. et al. Science, v. 269, p. 966-967, 1995. [2] Chen, H.; Chen, Y. et al. Adv. Matter. v. 19, p. 1845-1848, 2007. (author)

  8. Rare-earth doped boron nitride nanotubes: Synthesis and characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Wellington Marcos; Sousa, Edesia Martins Barros de

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Boron nitride is a heat and chemically resistant refractory compound of boron and nitrogen atoms with the chemical formula BN. This structure exists in various crystalline forms that are isoelectronic to a similarly structured carbon lattice. The hexagonal form (h-BN) corresponding to graphite is the most stable and soft among BN polymorph. However, boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) were first time synthesized in 1995 [1] and have a type of one-dimensional (1D) nanostructure. Recently the BNNTs have attracted significant interest for scientific and technological applications due to their Wide bandgap. The Wide-bandgap semiconductors doped with rare-earth are considered as a new type of luminescent material, combining special Wide bandgap semiconducting properties with the rare-earth luminescence feature. BNNTs have a stable wide bandgap of 5.5 eV and super thermal and chemical stabilities, which make BNNTs an ideal nanosized luminescent material [2]. In this study, we report a simple and efficient route for the synthesis of BNNTs doped with samarium and europium. High quality BNNTs doped was produced via CVD technique using NH 3 and N 2 gases as source. Boron amorphous, catalyst and oxides rare-earth powder were used as precursor. Detailed studies involving energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) were performed in order to characterize the BNNTs as grown. [1] Chopra, N. G.; Luyken, R. J. et al. Science, v. 269, p. 966-967, 1995. [2] Chen, H.; Chen, Y. et al. Adv. Matter. v. 19, p. 1845-1848, 2007. (author)

  9. The effect of carbon mole ratio on the fabrication of silicon carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutham Niyomwas

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Silicon Carbide (SiC particles were synthesized by self-propagating high temperature synthesis (SHS from a powder mixture of SiO2-C-Mg. The reaction was carried out in a SHS reactor under static argon gas at a pressure of 0.5 MPa. The standard Gibbs energy minimization method was used to calculate the equilibrium composition of the reacting species. The effects of carbon mole ratio on the precursor mixture (C/SiO2/Mg: 1/1/2 to 3/1/2 and on the SiC conversion were investigated using X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope technique. The as-synthesized products of SiC-MgO powders were leached with 0.1M HCl acid solution to obtain the SiC particles.

  10. Powder injection molding of Stellite 6 powder: Sintering, microstructural and mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gülsoy, H. Özkan; Özgün, Özgür; Bilketay, Sezer

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to produce Co-based Stellite 6 superalloy components by using the method of Powder Injection Molding (PIM) and to characterize the microstructural and mechanical properties of the produced components. The experimental studies were started through the formation of feedstock by mixing Stellite 6 powder with a multicomponent binder system. Prepared feedstock was formed by utilizing powder injection molding technique. Then the molded samples were subjected to the solvent and thermal debinding processes. Different sintering cycles were applied to the raw components for the purpose of determining the optimum sintering conditions. The densities of the sintered components were determined in accordance with the Archimedes' principle. The microstructural characterization was performed through scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis, energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) analyses, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. Hardness measurement and tensile test were conducted in order to determine the mechanical properties. The results illustrated that the injection molded Stellite 6 components were composed of fine and equiaxed grains, plenty of carbide precipitates exhibiting homogenous distribution throughout the microstructure formed at the grain boundaries and thus the mechanical properties were considerably high.

  11. A new electrothermal-chemical method for metals, carbides, and ceramics hard coating: Experiment and theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zoler, D.; Bruma, C.; Cuperman, S.

    1999-07-01

    A new method and an experimental device for powders of metals, carbides and ceramics coating of various substrates are presented. The powder-particles are accelerated and heated by a mixture of plasma and gases resulted from the burning of an energetic (propellant). The operating prototype already allows one to obtain coatings of metals, carbides and ceramics. Some of the coatings obtained, especially those by carbides powders, indicate even at the present stage of research, properties (as hardness, porosity) which are comparable to those provided by the presently industrial methods in use. The accelerating-heating agent in the device (the plasma-gas mixture) is characterized by very high densities (up to 120 kg/m{sup 3}), temperatures (up to 20,000 K) and velocities (more than 1,500 m/s). Due to these characteristics, the powder particles are accelerated to velocities significantly higher than those reached in other coating devices as, for example, the detonation (D) gun. Some preliminary experimental data show that the accelerated particle can reach velocities higher than 1,000 m/s. In parallel, in order to better understand the phenomena taking place inside the device and to determine the optimal process parameters leading to high quality coatings an appropriate theoretical model was developed. The model is able to describe the complex processes of plasma-gas-propellant interaction, gas flow and powder particles heating and acceleration. The model gives a detailed description of the gas, propellant and accelerated particle parameters, their spatial distribution and temporal evolution; predicts their dependence on the values of some input quantities such as: the plasma energy, propellant characteristics and accelerated particles type and geometry. The computational results the authors obtained show that, indeed, during the acceleration process the particles are heated, melted and eventually vaporized. One of the most interesting theoretical results is that the

  12. Densification rate and interfacial adhesion of bilayer cemented tungsten carbide and steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ojo-kupoluyi, Oluwatosin Job; Tahir, Suraya Mohd; Ariff, Azmah Hanim Mohamed; Baharudin, B.T. Hang Tuah [Univ. Putra Malaysia, Selangor (Malaysia). Dept. of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering; Matori, Khamirul Amin [Univ. Putra Malaysia, Selangor (Malaysia). Dept. of Physics; Univ. Putra Malaysia, Selangor (Malaysia). Inst. of Advanced Technology (ITMA); Shamsul Anuar, Mohd [Univ. Putra Malaysia, Selangor (Malaysia). Dept. of Process and Food Engineering

    2017-12-15

    Manufacturing tailored materials is commonly faced with the challenge of shrinkage mismatch between layers resulting in delamination. The effects of sintering temperature and carbon variation on the densification and interfacial bond strength of bilayer cemented tungsten carbide and steel processed through powder metallurgy are analyzed. It is revealed through field-emission scanning electron microscopy images that inter-layer diffusion induced by liquid-phase sintering plays a major role in the densification and bonding of layers. Through dimensional analysis of sintered bilayer specimens, the strain rate of cemented tungsten carbide is observed to surpass that of steel. An enhanced densification rate of 6.1 % and M{sub 6}C (eta carbide) reduction with increased carbon level results in strong interfacial bonding in specimens sintered at 1 280 C. At 1 295 C, diffusion accelerates and the axial and radial shrinkage increase by 14.05 % and 13.35 %, respectively, in 93.8 wt.% WC - 6 wt.% Fe - 0.2 wt.% C and 93.2 wt.% Fe - 6 wt.% WC - 0.8 wt.% C, thereby increasing the tendency for complete delamination.

  13. Densification rate and interfacial adhesion of bilayer cemented tungsten carbide and steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ojo-kupoluyi, Oluwatosin Job; Tahir, Suraya Mohd; Ariff, Azmah Hanim Mohamed; Baharudin, B.T. Hang Tuah; Shamsul Anuar, Mohd

    2017-01-01

    Manufacturing tailored materials is commonly faced with the challenge of shrinkage mismatch between layers resulting in delamination. The effects of sintering temperature and carbon variation on the densification and interfacial bond strength of bilayer cemented tungsten carbide and steel processed through powder metallurgy are analyzed. It is revealed through field-emission scanning electron microscopy images that inter-layer diffusion induced by liquid-phase sintering plays a major role in the densification and bonding of layers. Through dimensional analysis of sintered bilayer specimens, the strain rate of cemented tungsten carbide is observed to surpass that of steel. An enhanced densification rate of 6.1 % and M 6 C (eta carbide) reduction with increased carbon level results in strong interfacial bonding in specimens sintered at 1 280 C. At 1 295 C, diffusion accelerates and the axial and radial shrinkage increase by 14.05 % and 13.35 %, respectively, in 93.8 wt.% WC - 6 wt.% Fe - 0.2 wt.% C and 93.2 wt.% Fe - 6 wt.% WC - 0.8 wt.% C, thereby increasing the tendency for complete delamination.

  14. Modification of NiAl intermetallic coatings processed by PTA with chromium carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yano, Diogo Henrique Sepel; Brunetti, Cristiano; Pintaude, Giuseppe; Oliveira, Ana Sofia Climaco Monteiro d'

    2010-01-01

    Equipment that operate under high-temperatures can be protected with NiAl intermetallic coatings mainly because of their metallurgical stability. This study as it evaluates the effect of chromium carbide added to Ni-Al intermetallic coatings processed by PTA. Three Ni-Al-Cr23C6 powder mixtures with different carbide fractions (15, 30 and 45 wt%) and another without carbides were deposited by PTA on an AISI 304 stainless steel plate, using two different current intensities (100 and 150A). Coatings were evaluated regarding the presence of welding defects, and resultant microstructures were characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Vickers microhardness and EDS chemical composition were also determined. NiAl and Cr_7C_3 development was confirmed by X-ray diffraction analysis. A combination of NiAl/Cr-Fe-Ni phases was identified. The hardness was strongly related to the formed phases and their amounts. Besides presenting advances toward the development of coatings which can withstand severe operation conditions, the present study shows that PTA hardfacing is able to produce reinforced intermetallic coatings for high-temperature applications. (author)

  15. PIXE characterization of by-products resulting from the zinc recycling of industrial cemented carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freemantle, C.S.; Sacks, N.; Topic, M.; Pineda-Vargas, C.A.

    2015-01-01

    By-product materials of the widely used zinc recycling process of cemented carbides have been studied. Scanning electron microscopy and micro-PIXE techniques have identified elemental concentrations, distributions and purity of by-product materials from an industrial zinc recycling plant. Cobalt surface enrichment, lamellar microstructures of varying composition, including alternating tungsten carbide (WC) grains and globular cobalt, and regions of excess zinc contamination were found in materials with incomplete zinc penetration. Liquid Co–Zn formation occurred above 72 wt.% Zn at the furnace temperature of 930 °C, and was extracted towards the surface of poorly zinc infiltrated material, primarily by the vacuum used for zinc distillation. Surface enrichment was not observed in material that was zinc infiltrated to the sample center, which was more friable and exhibited more homogeneous porosity and elemental concentrations. The result of incomplete zinc infiltration was an enriched surface zone of up to 60 wt.% Co, compared to an original sample composition of ∼10–15 wt.% Co. The impact on resulting powders could be higher or inhomogeneous cobalt content, as well as unacceptably high zinc concentrations. PIXE has proven it can be a powerful technique for solving industrial problems in the cemented carbide cutting tool industry, by identifying trace elements and their locations (such as Zn to 0.1 wt.% accuracy), as well as the distribution of major elements within WC–Co materials.

  16. PIXE characterization of by-products resulting from the zinc recycling of industrial cemented carbides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freemantle, C.S. [School of Chemical & Metallurgical Engineering and DST-NRF Centre of Excellence in Strong Materials, University of the Witwatersrand, P/Bag 3, Wits 2050 (South Africa); Pilot Tools (Pty) (Ltd), P.O. Box 27420, Benrose 2011 (South Africa); Sacks, N. [School of Chemical & Metallurgical Engineering and DST-NRF Centre of Excellence in Strong Materials, University of the Witwatersrand, P/Bag 3, Wits 2050 (South Africa); Topic, M. [iThemba LABS, National Research Foundation, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Pineda-Vargas, C.A. [iThemba LABS, National Research Foundation, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Faculty of Health & Wellness Sciences, CPUT, Bellville (South Africa)

    2015-11-15

    By-product materials of the widely used zinc recycling process of cemented carbides have been studied. Scanning electron microscopy and micro-PIXE techniques have identified elemental concentrations, distributions and purity of by-product materials from an industrial zinc recycling plant. Cobalt surface enrichment, lamellar microstructures of varying composition, including alternating tungsten carbide (WC) grains and globular cobalt, and regions of excess zinc contamination were found in materials with incomplete zinc penetration. Liquid Co–Zn formation occurred above 72 wt.% Zn at the furnace temperature of 930 °C, and was extracted towards the surface of poorly zinc infiltrated material, primarily by the vacuum used for zinc distillation. Surface enrichment was not observed in material that was zinc infiltrated to the sample center, which was more friable and exhibited more homogeneous porosity and elemental concentrations. The result of incomplete zinc infiltration was an enriched surface zone of up to 60 wt.% Co, compared to an original sample composition of ∼10–15 wt.% Co. The impact on resulting powders could be higher or inhomogeneous cobalt content, as well as unacceptably high zinc concentrations. PIXE has proven it can be a powerful technique for solving industrial problems in the cemented carbide cutting tool industry, by identifying trace elements and their locations (such as Zn to 0.1 wt.% accuracy), as well as the distribution of major elements within WC–Co materials.

  17. Diffusion mechanism in molten salt baths during the production of carbide coatings via thermal reactive diffusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aliakbar Ghadi; Hassan Saghafian; Mansour Soltanieh; Zhi-gang Yang

    2017-01-01

    The diffusion mechanism of carbide-forming elements from a molten salt bath to a substrate surface was studied in this research, with particular focus on the processes occurring in the molten bath at the time of coating. Metal, oxide, and metal-oxide baths were investi-gated, and the coating process was performed on H13 steel substrates. Scanning electron microscopy and electron-probe microanalysis were used to study the coated samples and the quenched salt bath. The thickness of the carbide coating layer was 6.5 ± 0.5, 5.2 ± 0.5, or 5.7 ± 0.5μm depending on whether it was deposited in a metal, oxide, or metal-oxide bath, respectively. The phase distribution of vanadium-rich regions was 63%, 57%, and 74% of the total coating deposited in metal, oxide, and metal-oxide baths, respectively. The results obtained using the metal bath indicated that undissolved suspended metal particles deposited onto the substrate surface. Then, carbon subsequently diffused to the sub-strate surface and reacted with the metal particles to form the carbides. In the oxide bath, oxide powders dissolved in the bath with or without binding to the oxidative structure (Na2O) of borax; they were then reduced by aluminum and converted into metal particles. We concluded that, in the metal and oxide baths, the deposition of metal particles onto the sample surface is an important step in the formation of the coating.

  18. Boron steel. I Part. Preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaraiz Franco, E.; Esteban Hernandez, J. A.

    1960-01-01

    With the advent of the first nuclear reactors arise the need for control rods and shielding duties for some types of radiations. One of the materials used for this purpose has been the high boron steel. This paper describes the melting and casting procedures employed for the production, at laboratory scale, of steels with Boron content ranging from 1 to 4 per cent, as well as the metallographic and X-Ray techniques used for the identification of the present phases. The electrolytic technique employed for the isolation of the Fe 2 B phase and its subsequent X-Ray identification has proved to be satisfactory. (Author) 11 refs

  19. Chemical separation of boron isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palko, A.A.

    1978-06-01

    This is the final report of the research performed at ORNL on the chemical fractionation of boron isotopes between BF/sub 3/ gas and the liquid molecular addition compounds of BF/sub 3/. Thirty compounds were studied, ten of them in detail. Graphs and equations are given for variation of isotopic equilibrium constant, vapor pressure, and BF/sub 3/ solubility as a function of temperature. Rate of isotopic exchange and melting points were determined. Several of the compounds are likely candidates for use in a gas-liquid countercurrent exchange system for large-scale separation of boron isotopes. 23 figs, 53 tables, 39 references.

  20. Chemical separation of boron isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palko, A.A.

    1978-06-01

    This is the final report of the research performed at ORNL on the chemical fractionation of boron isotopes between BF 3 gas and the liquid molecular addition compounds of BF 3 . Thirty compounds were studied, ten of them in detail. Graphs and equations are given for variation of isotopic equilibrium constant, vapor pressure, and BF 3 solubility as a function of temperature. Rate of isotopic exchange and melting points were determined. Several of the compounds are likely candidates for use in a gas-liquid countercurrent exchange system for large-scale separation of boron isotopes. 23 figs, 53 tables, 39 references