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Sample records for boron carbide nanoparticles

  1. Functionalization and cellular uptake of boron carbide nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, M. W.; Björkdahl, O.; Sørensen, P. G.; Hansen, T.; Jensen, M. R.; Gundersen, Hans Jørgen Gottlieb; Bjørnholm, T.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we present surface modification strategies of boron carbide nanoparticles, which allow for bioconjugation of the transacting transcriptional activator (TAT) peptide and fluorescent dyes. Coated nanoparticles can be translocated into murine EL4 thymoma cells and B16 F10 malignant...... melanoma cells in amounts as high as 0.3 wt. % and 1 wt. %, respectively. Neutron irradiation of a test system consisting of untreated B16 cells mixed with B16 cells loaded with boron carbide nanoparticles were found to inhibit the proliferative capacity of untreated cells, showing that cells loaded with...... boron-containing nanoparticles can hinder the growth of neighboring cells upon neutron irradiation. This could provide the first step toward a T cell-guided boron neutron capture therapy....

  2. A thermo dynamical model for the shape and size effect on melting of boron carbide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniammal, Paneerselvam; Arivuoli, Dakshanamoorthy

    2012-02-01

    The size and shape dependence of the melting temperature of Boron Carbide (B4C) nanoparticles has been investigated with a numerical thermo dynamical approach. The problem considered in this paper is the inward melting of nanoparticles with spherical and cylindrical geometry. The cylindrical Boron Carbide (B4C) nanoparticles, whose melting point has been reported to decrease with decreasing particle radius, become larger than spherical shaped nanoparticle. Comparative investigation of the size dependence of the melting temperature with respect to the two shapes is also been done. The melting temperature obtained in the present study is approximately a dealing function of radius, in a good agreement with prediction of thermo dynamical model. PMID:22629885

  3. Electroextraction of boron from boron carbide scrap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Ashish [Chemistry Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam – 603102 (India); Anthonysamy, S., E-mail: sas@igcar.gov.in [Chemistry Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam – 603102 (India); Ghosh, C. [Physical Metallurgy Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam – 603102 (India); Ravindran, T.R. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam – 603102 (India); Divakar, R.; Mohandas, E. [Physical Metallurgy Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam – 603102 (India)

    2013-10-15

    Studies were carried out to extract elemental boron from boron carbide scrap. The physicochemical nature of boron obtained through this process was examined by characterizing its chemical purity, specific surface area, size distribution of particles and X-ray crystallite size. The microstructural characteristics of the extracted boron powder were analyzed by using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Raman spectroscopic examination of boron powder was also carried out to determine its crystalline form. Oxygen and carbon were found to be the major impurities in boron. Boron powder of purity ∼ 92 wt. % could be produced by the electroextraction process developed in this study. Optimized method could be used for the recovery of enriched boron ({sup 10}B > 20 at. %) from boron carbide scrap generated during the production of boron carbide. - Highlights: • Recovery of {sup 10}B from nuclear grade boron carbide scrap • Development of process flow sheet • Physicochemical characterization of electroextracted boron • Microscopic examination of electroextracted boron.

  4. Electroextraction of boron from boron carbide scrap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies were carried out to extract elemental boron from boron carbide scrap. The physicochemical nature of boron obtained through this process was examined by characterizing its chemical purity, specific surface area, size distribution of particles and X-ray crystallite size. The microstructural characteristics of the extracted boron powder were analyzed by using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Raman spectroscopic examination of boron powder was also carried out to determine its crystalline form. Oxygen and carbon were found to be the major impurities in boron. Boron powder of purity ∼ 92 wt. % could be produced by the electroextraction process developed in this study. Optimized method could be used for the recovery of enriched boron (10B > 20 at. %) from boron carbide scrap generated during the production of boron carbide. - Highlights: • Recovery of 10B from nuclear grade boron carbide scrap • Development of process flow sheet • Physicochemical characterization of electroextracted boron • Microscopic examination of electroextracted boron

  5. Process for microwave sintering boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method of microwave sintering boron carbide comprises leaching boron carbide powder with an aqueous solution of nitric acid to form a leached boron carbide powder. The leached boron carbide powder is coated with a glassy carbon precursor to form a coated boron carbide powder. The coated boron carbide powder is consolidated in an enclosure of boron nitride particles coated with a layer of glassy carbon within a container for microwave heating to form an enclosed coated boron carbide powder. The enclosed coated boron carbide powder is sintered within the container for microwave heating with microwave energy

  6. Methods of producing continuous boron carbide fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garnier, John E.; Griffith, George W.

    2015-12-01

    Methods of producing continuous boron carbide fibers. The method comprises reacting a continuous carbon fiber material and a boron oxide gas within a temperature range of from approximately 1400.degree. C. to approximately 2200.degree. C. Continuous boron carbide fibers, continuous fibers comprising boron carbide, and articles including at least a boron carbide coating are also disclosed.

  7. Fivefold twinned boron carbide nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xin; Jiang, Jun; Liu, Chao; Yuan, Jun

    2009-09-01

    Chemical composition and crystal structure of fivefold twinned boron carbide nanowires have been determined by electron energy-loss spectroscopy and electron diffraction. The fivefold cyclic twinning relationship is confirmed by systematic axial rotation electron diffraction. Detailed chemical analysis reveals a carbon-rich boron carbide phase. Such boron carbide nanowires are potentially interesting because of their intrinsic hardness and high temperature thermoelectric property. Together with other boron-rich compounds, they may form a set of multiply twinned nanowire systems where the misfit strain could be continuously tuned to influence their mechanical properties. PMID:19687534

  8. Sputtering behavior of boron and boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sputtering yields of boron were measured with D+ and B+ ions for normal and oblique angles of incidence. Self-sputtering data of boron carbide were simulated in the experiment by using Ne+ ions. The energies of the impinging ions were between 20 eV and 10 keV. The measured data are compared with computer simulated values calculated with the TRIMSP program. The boron data for normal ion impact are higher than the calculated values, whereas those for oblique ion incidence are smaller than the calculation predicts. This discrepancy is explained by the surface roughness and supported by SEM micrographs. The comparison of the boron carbide data with TRIMSP calculations shows much better agreement than the boron data. In this case the target surface was much smoother. (orig.)

  9. Mass spectrometric determination of boron isotope in boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron isotopes in boron carbide are measured by thermionic ionization mass spectrometry with no prior chemical separation. Boron is converted to sodium borate by fusion of the boron carbide with sodium hydroxide (or sodium carbonate) directly on the rhenium filament. The boron isotopic ratios are measured by using the Na2BO2+ ion

  10. Wettability of boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The wettability of boron carbide has been examined by means of the sessile drop method, using the following candidate alloys: (96wt%AG-4wt%Ti), (Ag-26.5wt%Cu-3wt%Ti), (Sn-10wt%Ag-4wt%Ti), Sn(99.95wt%) and Al(99.99wt%). The results show that B4C is completely wetted by the Ag-based alloys. Sn-10wt%Ag-4wt%Ti alloy and pure Al partly wet the B4C surface, while pure Sn does not wet B4C at all. For all the alloys used, except pure Sn, a reaction layer was observed at the interface between the ceramic part and the metal drop. Although the spreading kinetics of the Al-drop was much slower compared with the Ti-containing alloys, the reaction rate was considerably higher in the former case. This suggests that aluminium is an attractive candidate material for brazing of B4C. Formation of the low melting B2O3 at the B4C surface may cause oxidation of the filler metal during joining, which, in turn, leads to a low bond strength

  11. Thermal conductivity of boron carbides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, C.; Emin, D.; Gray, P. E.

    1985-01-01

    Knowledge of the thermal conductivity of boron carbide is necessary to evaluate its potential for high-temperature thermoelectric energy conversion applications. Measurements have been conducted of the thermal diffusivity of hot-pressed boron carbide BxC samples as a function of composition (x in the range from 4 to 9), temperature (300-1700 K), and temperature cycling. These data, in concert with density and specific-heat data, yield the thermal conductivities of these materials. The results are discussed in terms of a structural model that has been previously advanced to explain the electronic transport data. Some novel mechanisms for thermal conduction are briefly discussed.

  12. Determination of boron and silicon in boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sodium carbonate fusion technique for the dissolution of boron carbide followed by the determination of boron by alkalimetric titration and silicon impurity by spectrophotometry is described. The elemental boron content in the commercially available boron carbide ranged from 77.2 to 77.60 % and the silicon in the range 1170 to 2500 ppm. (author)

  13. Boron carbide nanolumps on carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, J. Y.; Li, W. Z.; Wen, J. G.; Ren, Z. F.

    2002-01-01

    Boron carbide nanolumps are formed on the surface of multiwall carbon nanotubes by a solid-state reaction between boron and carbon nanotubes. The reaction is localized so that the integrity of the structure of carbon nanotubes is maintained. Inner layers of multiwall carbon nanotubes are also bonded to boron carbide nanolumps. These multiwall carbon nanotubes with boron carbide nanolumps are expected to be the ideal reinforcing fillers for high-performance composites because of the favorable morphology.

  14. Advanced microstructure of boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werheit, Helmut; Shalamberidze, Sulkhan

    2012-09-26

    The rhombohedral elementary cell of the complex boron carbide structure is composed of B(12) or B(11)C icosahedra and CBC, CBB or B□B (□, vacancy) linear arrangements, whose shares vary depending on the actual chemical compound. The evaluation of the IR phonon spectra of isotopically pure boron carbide yields the quantitative concentrations of these components within the homogeneity range. The structure formula of B(4.3)C at the carbon-rich limit of the homogeneity range is (B(11)C) (CBC)(0.91) (B□B)(0.09) (□, vacancy); and the actual structure formula of B(13)C(2) is (B(12))(0.5)(B(11)C)(0.5)(CBC)(0.65)(CBB)(0.16) (B□B)(0.19), and deviates fundamentally from (B(12))CBC, predicted by theory to be the energetically most favourable structure of boron carbide. In reality, it is the most distorted structure in the homogeneity range. The spectra of (nat)B(x)C make it evident that boron isotopes are not randomly distributed in the structure. However, doping with 2% silicon brings about a random distribution. PMID:22945740

  15. Determination of boron content in boron carbide, boron nitride and amorphous boron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present article an analyzing method of determination of boron content in boron carbide, boron nitride and amorphous boron described. Examined samples were digested with potassium hydroxide and potassium nitrate in nickel crucible and the boron contents determined subsequently by an alcalimetric titration of boric acid in presence of mannite resp. sorbite. (author)

  16. Microwave sintering of boron carbide composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron carbide is an important ceramic material because of its high hardness and low specific gravity. it is used for applications involving impact and wear resistance. The disadvantages of boron carbide materials are difficulty in fabrication and sensitivity to brittle fracture. These problems are significantly reduced by production of cermets based on boron carbide and aluminum or aluminum alloys. Microwave heating of boron carbide materials results in ultrarapid heating and high temperatures. Therefore, a finer microstructure is obtained. The objective of this work was to define a technology that would allow the manufacture of boron carbide ceramics having mechanical properties similar to those exhibited by hot-pressed specimens. microwave heating would be used for the densification step. Mixtures of boron carbide and aluminum were considered for this research because aluminum simultaneously acts as a sintering aid and introduces phases that contribute to toughness enhancement

  17. Conduction mechanism in boron carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, C.; Emin, D.

    1984-01-01

    Electrical conductivity, Seebeck-coefficient, and Hall-effect measurements have been made on single-phase boron carbides, B(1-x)C(x), in the compositional range from 0.1 to 0.2 X, and between room temperature and 1273 K. The results indicate that the predominant conduction mechanism is small-polaron hopping between carbon atoms at geometrically inequivalent sites.

  18. Sintering behavior of boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pressureless sintering behavior of boron carbide (B4C) in argon was studied, with change in time and temperature, using carbon as sintering aid. Carbon was added via fenolic resin, acting also as a binder. After isostatic pressing the specimens were sintered in a graphite furnace at 19600C/1h, 21600C/15 minutes and 1h and 22000C/1h. The achieved density was 97% of the theoretical. Some mechanical properties and microstructural aspects have been evaluated. (author)

  19. Boron carbide whiskers produced by vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    1965-01-01

    Boron carbide whiskers have an excellent combination of properties for use as a reinforcement material. They are produced by vaporizing boron carbide powder and condensing the vapors on a substrate. Certain catalysts promote the growth rate and size of the whiskers.

  20. Magnetron sputter deposition of boron and boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fabrication of X-ray optical coatings with greater reflectivity required the development of sputter deposition processes for boron and boron carbide. The use of high density boron and boron carbide (B4C) and a vacuum-brazed target design was required to achieve the required sputter process stability and resistance to the thermal stress created by high rate sputtering. Our results include a description of the target fabrication procedures and sputter process parameters necessary to fabricate B4C and boron modulated thin film structures. (orig.)

  1. Stabilization of boron carbide via silicon doping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, J E; Bhakhri, V; Hao, R; Prior, T J; Scheler, T; Gregoryanz, E; Chhowalla, M; Giulani, F

    2015-01-14

    Boron carbide is one of the lightest and hardest ceramics, but its applications are limited by its poor stability against a partial phase separation into separate boron and carbon. Phase separation is observed under high non-hydrostatic stress (both static and dynamic), resulting in amorphization. The phase separation is thought to occur in just one of the many naturally occurring polytypes in the material, and this raises the possibility of doping the boron carbide to eliminate this polytype. In this work, we have synthesized boron carbide doped with silicon. We have conducted a series of characterizations (transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction) on pure and silicon-doped boron carbide following static compression to 50 GPa non-hydrostatic pressure. We find that the level of amorphization under static non-hydrostatic pressure is drastically reduced by the silicon doping. PMID:25427850

  2. Stabilization of boron carbide via silicon doping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, J. E.; Bhakhri, V.; Hao, R.; Prior, T. J.; Scheler, T.; Gregoryanz, E.; Chhowalla, M.; Giulani, F.

    2015-01-01

    Boron carbide is one of the lightest and hardest ceramics, but its applications are limited by its poor stability against a partial phase separation into separate boron and carbon. Phase separation is observed under high non-hydrostatic stress (both static and dynamic), resulting in amorphization. The phase separation is thought to occur in just one of the many naturally occurring polytypes in the material, and this raises the possibility of doping the boron carbide to eliminate this polytype. In this work, we have synthesized boron carbide doped with silicon. We have conducted a series of characterizations (transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction) on pure and silicon-doped boron carbide following static compression to 50 GPa non-hydrostatic pressure. We find that the level of amorphization under static non-hydrostatic pressure is drastically reduced by the silicon doping.

  3. Non-catalytic facile synthesis of superhard phase of boron carbide (B13C2) nanoflakes and nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Sky Shumao; Su, Liap Tat; Guo, Jun; Vasylkiv, Oleg; Borodianska, Hanna; Xi, Zhu; Krishnan, Gireesh M; Su, Haibin; Tokl, Alfred I Y

    2012-01-01

    Boron Carbide is one the hardest and lightest material that is also relatively easier to synthesis as compared to other superhard ceramics like cubic boron nitride and diamond. However, the brittle nature of monolithic advanced ceramics material hinders its use in various engineering applications. Thus, strategies that can toughen the material are of fundamental and technological importance. One approach is to use nanostructure materials as building blocks, and organize them into a complex hierarchical structure, which could potentially enhance its mechanical properties to exceed that of the monolithic form. In this paper, we demonstrated a simple approach to synthesize one- and two-dimension nanostructure boron carbide by simply changing the mixing ratio of the initial compound to influence the saturation condition of the process at a relatively low temperature of 1500 degrees C with no catalyst involved in the growing process. Characterization of the resulting nano-structures shows B13C2, which is a superhard phase of boron carbide as its hardness is almost twice as hard as the commonly known B4C. Using ab-initio density functional theory study on the elastic properties of both B12C3 and B13C2, the high hardness of B13C2 is consistent to our calculation results, where bulk modulus of B13C2 is higher than that of B4C. High resolution transmission electron microscopy of the nanoflakes also reveals high density of twinning defects which could potentially inhibit the crack propagation, leading to toughening of the materials. PMID:22524026

  4. Ni doping of semiconducting boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The wide band gap, temperature stability, high resistivity, and robustness of semiconducting boron carbide make it an attractive material for device applications. Undoped boron carbide is p type; Ni acts as a n-type dopant. Here we present the results of controlled doping of boron carbide with Ni on thin film samples grown using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The change in the dopant concentration within the thin film as a function of the dopant flow rate in the precursor gas mixture was confirmed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements; with increasing dopant concentration, current-voltage (I-V) curves clearly establish the trend from p-type to n-type boron carbide.

  5. High temperature thermoelectric properties of boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron carbides are refractory solids with potential for application as very high temperature p-type thermoelectrics in power conversion applications. The thermoelectric properties of boron carbides are unconventional. In particular, the electrical conductivity is consistent with the thermally activated hopping of a high density (∼1021/cm3) of bipolarons; the Seebeck coefficient is anomalously large and increases with increasing temperature; and the thermal conductivity is surprisingly low. In this paper, these unusual properties and their relationship to the unusual structure and bonding present in boron carbides are reviewed. Finally, the potential for utilization of boron carbides at very high temperatures (up to 2200 degrees C) and for preparing n-type materials is discussed

  6. Boron Carbides As Thermo-electric Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Charles

    1988-01-01

    Report reviews recent theoretical and experimental research on thermoelectric materials. Recent work with narrow-band semiconductors demonstrated possibility of relatively high thermoelectric energy-conversion efficiencies in materials withstanding high temperatures needed to attain such efficiencies. Among promising semiconductors are boron-rich borides, especially boron carbides.

  7. Sintering of boron carbide (B4C)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron carbide (B4C) is used as a control element in different types of reactors due to the high fast and thermal neutron absorption cross-section of B-10. Requirements of the Advanced Reactor Division of the Bariloche Atomic Center triggered the study of the possibilities of fabricating B4C pellets by cold-pressing and sintering. The results of essays of sinterability of two different commercial boron carbide powders, sintered at temperatures between 1200 and 2200 deg C, are given. Characterizations of the samples were made to determine the evolution of density, porosity, microstructure and boron content as a function of sintering temperature. (Author)

  8. Nuclear fuel management and boron carbide coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years one way of introducing burnable absorber is to coat the fuel pellets by a thin layer of burnable absorber so called integral fuel burnable absorber (IFBA). In this method the fuel is coated with boron nitride or boron carbide. Boron has low absorption cross-section and when it exists on the surface of the fuel, it interacts with thermalized neutron. B4C is a boron compound, which can be used for coating the nuclear fuel. It has high thermal stability and withstands high pressure and temperatures. High technology product of boron carbide has different ratio of B: C. But in nuclear reactor when boron carbide is used, it must be rich with boron. In this research chemical vapor decomposition (CVD) has been using boron trichloride and carbon tetra chloride for reactant materials. The experiments were carried out at high temperatures (1050 degree Celsius, 1225 degree Celsius and 1325 degree Celsius). The coated samples were analyzed using X-Ray diffractometer (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and will be presented in this paper. It was seen that decreasing the reaction temperature caused an increase on the quality and thickness of the coating

  9. Synthesis and properties of low-carbon boron carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on the production of boron carbides of low carbon content (3 and CCl4 at 1273-1673 K in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactor. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that phase separation had occurred, and tetragonal boron carbide was formed along with β-boron or α-boron carbide under carbon-depleted gas-phase conditions. At temperatures greater than 1390 degrees C, graphite substrates served as a carbon source, affecting the phases present. A microstructure typical of CVD-produced α-boron carbide was observed. Plan view TEM of tetragonal boron carbide revealed a blocklike structure

  10. Anomalous electronic transport in boron carbides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emin, D.; Samara, G. A.; Wood, C.

    The boron carbides are composed of icosahedral units, B12 and B11C1, linked together by strong intericosahedral bonds. With such distributions of icosahedral and intericosahedral compositions, boron carbides, B/sub 1-x/C/sub x/, are single phase over 0.1 less than or equal to x less than or equal to 0.2. The electronic transport properties of the boron carbides were examined within this single-phase region. Results are inconsistent with conventional analyses of both itinerant and hopping transport. Most striking are Seebeck coefficients which are both large and rapidly increasing functions of temperature despite thermally activated dc conductivities. These results manifest the hopping of small bipolaronic holes between carbon-containing icosahedral that are inequivalent in energy and electron-lattice coupling strength. Under hydrostatic pressures up to approx. 25 kbar, the dc conductivities increase with pressure. This anomalous behavior for hopping conduction reflects the distinctive structure and bonding of these materials.

  11. Joining of boron carbide using nickel interlayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbide ceramics such as boron carbide due to their unique properties such as low density, high refractoriness, and high strength to weight ratio have many applications in different industries. This study focuses on direct bonding of boron carbide for high temperature applications using nickel interlayer. The process variables such as bonding time, temperature, and pressure have been investigated. The microstructure of the joint area was studied using electron scanning microscope technique. At all the bonding temperatures ranging from 1150 to 1300degC a reaction layer formed across the ceramic/metal interface. The thickness of the reaction layer increased by increasing temperature. The strength of the bonded samples was measured using shear testing method. The highest strength value obtained was about 100 MPa and belonged to the samples bonded at 1250 for 75 min bonding time. The strength of the joints decreased by increasing the bonding temperature above 1250degC. The results of this study showed that direct bonding technique along with nickel interlayer can be successfully utilized for bonding boron carbide ceramic to itself. This method may be used for bonding boron carbide to metals as well.

  12. Thermal conductivity behavior of boron carbides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, C.; Zoltan, A.; Emin, D.; Gray, P. E.

    1983-01-01

    Knowledge of the thermal conductivity of boron carbides is necessary to evaluate its potential for high temperature thermoelectric energy conversion applications. The thermal diffusivity of hot pressed boron carbide B/sub 1-x/C/sub x/ samples as a function of composition, temperature and temperature cycling was measured. These data in concert with density and specific heat data yield the thermal conductivities of these materials. The results in terms of a structural model to explain the electrical transport data and novel mechanisms for thermal conduction are discussed.

  13. Lattice dynamics of α boron and of boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The atomic structure and the lattice dynamics of α boron and of B4C boron carbide have been studied by Density Functional Theory (D.F.T.) and Density Functional Perturbation Theory (D.F.P.T.). The bulk moduli of the unit-cell and of the icosahedron have been investigated, and the equation of state at zero temperature has been determined. In α boron, Raman diffusion and infrared absorption have been studied under pressure, and the theoretical and experimental Grueneisen coefficients have been compared. In boron carbide, inspection of the theoretical and experimental vibrational spectra has led to the determination of the atomic structure of B4C. Finally, the effects of isotopic disorder have been modeled by an exact method beyond the mean-field approximation, and the effects onto the Raman lines has been investigated. The method has been applied to isotopic alloys of diamond and germanium. (author)

  14. Boron carbide-based ceramics via polymer route synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron carbide is a ceramic material with excellent high temperature physical properties. As compared to conventional techniques, the preparation of boron carbide from polymeric precursors is attractive as this technique offers a number of unique advantages. In this paper, the screening of polymeric precursors to boron carbide will be discussed. Two promising boron carbide, carborane containing polymeric precursors have resulted in 60-70 wt.% ceramic yields. The chemistry of polymer synthesis and the transformations from the polymer to amorphous and crystalline boron carbide were investigated with infrared spectroscopy, NMR spectroscopy, thermal analysis, and x-ray diffraction

  15. Determination of carbon and sulphur in boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron carbide is used in control rods of nuclear power reactors. The chemical specification for carbon in boron carbide ranges between 15 - 24 wt.% depending upon the grade of boron carbide. Hence carbon in boron carbide is to be determined accurately to find out the stoichiometry. Sulphur, which is present in trace quantities, is also to be determined to find out the purity of boron carbide. Carbon is determined by combustion followed by (i) thermal conductivity detection and (ii) infrared detection. Sulphur is determined by (i) combustion followed by infrared detection and (ii) vacuum combustion extraction - quadrupole mass spectrometry. The results are compared. (author)

  16. Boron carbide whisker and platelet reinforced ceramic matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron carbide whisker and platelet-reinforced alumina and boron-carbide-whisker-reinforced silicon carbide composites were prepared by hot-pressing. The mechanical properties of hot-pressed boron carbide platelet and whisker-reinforced composites are better than the inherent ceramic matrix. A maximum fracture toughness, K(lc), of 9.5 MPa sq rt m is achieved for alumina/boron carbide whisker composites, 8.6 MPa sq rt m is achieved for alumina/boron carbide platelet composites, and 3.8 MPa sq rt m is achieved for silicon carbide/boron carbide whisker composites. The fracture toughness is dependent on the volume fraction of the platelets and whiskers. 12 refs

  17. Boron carbide morphology changing under purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmatullin, I. A.; Sivkov, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    Boron carbide synthesized by using coaxial magnetoplasma accelerator with graphite electrodes was purified by two different ways. XRD-investigations showed content changing and respectively powder purification. Moreover TEM-investigations demonstrated morphology changing of product under purification that was discussed in the work.

  18. Boron carbide synthesis at plasma spray process

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ctibor, Pavel; Brožek, Vlastimil; Hofman, R.

    Bari : Department of Chemistry, University of Bari, 2003 - (d'Agostino, R.; Favia, P.; Fracassi, F.; Palumbo, F.). s. 631 [International Symposium on Plasma Chemistry/16th./. 22.06.2003-27.06.2003, Taormina] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Keywords : boron carbide , plasma spray process Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  19. The manufacturing method of boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The new method for manufacturing of boron carbide as powder with controlled purity and surface development has been described. The suspension of boric acid aqueous solution and carbon black in alcohol has been homogenized mechanically. Water and alcohol are then evaporated during mixing. After drying homogenous mixture is heated in temperature range of 1270-1870 C during one hour

  20. Boron carbide nanowires: Synthesis and characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Zhe

    Bulk boron carbide has been widely used in ballistic armored vest and the property characterization has been heavily focused on mechanical properties. Even though boron carbides have also been projected as a promising class of high temperature thermoelectric materials for energy harvesting, the research has been limited in this field. Since the thermal conductivity of bulk boron carbide is still relatively high, there is a great opportunity to take advantage of the nano effect to further reduce it for better thermoelectric performance. This dissertation work aims to explore whether improved thermoelectric performance can be found in boron carbide nanowires compared with their bulk counterparts. This dissertation work consists of four main parts. (1) Synthesis of boron carbide nanowires. Boron carbide nanowires were synthesized by co-pyrolysis of diborane and methane at low temperatures (with 879 °C as the lowest) in a home-built low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) system. The CVD-based method is energy efficient and cost effective. The as-synthesized nanowires were characterized by electron microscopy extensively. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results show the nanowires are single crystalline with planar defects. Depending on the geometrical relationship between the preferred growth direction of the nanowire and the orientation of the defects, the as-synthesized nanowires could be further divided into two categories: transverse fault (TF) nanowires grow normal to the defect plane, while axial fault (AF) ones grow within the defect plane. (2) Understanding the growth mechanism of as-synthesized boron carbide nanowires. The growth mechanism can be generally considered as the famous vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism. TF and AF nanowires were found to be guided by Ni-B catalysts of two phases. A TF nanowire is lead by a hexagonal phase catalyst, which was proved to be in a liquid state during reaction. While an AF nanowires is catalyzed by a

  1. Characterization of boron carbide with an electron microprobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteudi, G.; Ruste, J.

    1983-01-01

    Within the framework of a study of heterogeneous materials (Matteudi et al., 1971: Matteudi and Verchery, 1972) thin deposits of boron carbide were characterized. Experiments using an electronic probe microanalyzer to analyze solid boron carbide or boron carbide in the form of thick deposits are described. Quantitative results on boron and carbon are very close to those obtained when applying the Monte Carlo-type correction calculations.

  2. Behavior of Disordered Boron Carbide under Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanchini, Giovanni; McCauley, James W.; Chhowalla, Manish

    2006-07-01

    Gibbs free-energy calculations based on density functional theory have been used to determine the possible source of failure of boron carbide just above the Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL). A range of B4C polytypes is found to be stable at room pressure. The energetic barrier for shock amorphization of boron carbide is by far the lowest for the B12(CCC) polytype, requiring only 6GPa≈P(HEL) for collapse under hydrostatic conditions. The results clearly demonstrate that the collapse of the B12(CCC) phase leads to segregation of B12 and amorphous carbon in the form of 2 3 nm bands along the (113) lattice direction, in excellent agreement with recent transmission electron microscopy results.

  3. Boron carbide synthesis by plasma spray process

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ctibor, Pavel; Brožek, Vlastimil; Hofman, R.

    Bari : Department of Chemistry, University of Bari, 2003 - (d'Agostino, R.; Favia, P.; Fracassi, F.; Palumbo, F.), s. - [International Symposium on Plasma Chemistry/16th./. Taormina (IT), 22.06.2003-27.06.2003] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/01/0149 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Keywords : boron carbide , plasma spray, synthesis Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  4. Plasma Spray Deposition of Boron Carbide

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brožek, Vlastimil; Hofman, R.; Ctibor, Pavel; Hrabovský, Milan

    Praha : MAXDORF, s.r.o., 2002 - (Nitsch, K.; Rodová, M.). s. 11-12 [Development of Materials Science in Research and Education.. 10.09.2002-12.09.2002, Ostravice] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/01/0149; GA ČR GA202/01/1563 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Keywords : plasma spray, boron carbide Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  5. Electron-Spin Resonance in Boron Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Charles; Venturini, Eugene L.; Azevedo, Larry J.; Emin, David

    1987-01-01

    Samples exhibit Curie-law behavior in temperature range of 2 to 100 K. Technical paper presents studies of electron-spin resonance of samples of hot pressed B9 C, B15 C2, B13 C2, and B4 C. Boron carbide ceramics are refractory solids with high melting temperatures, low thermal conductives, and extreme hardnesses. They show promise as semiconductors at high temperatures and have unusually large figures of merit for use in thermoelectric generators.

  6. Thermal conductivity of boron carbide-boron nitride composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that because of their preferred orientation, the addition of boron nitride dispersions to hot-pressed boron carbide was found to result in a considerable degree of anisotropy in thermal conductivity of the resulting composite, indicated by an increase in the thermal conductivity perpendicular to the hot-pressing direction by as much as a factor of 3 at the highest boron nitride volume fractions of this study, and a decrease in the thermal conductivity parallel to the hot-pressing direction by as much as a factor of 2. The composite data were found to be below the values expected from composite theory, which may represent indirect evidence for the existence of an interfacial thermal barrier

  7. Combustion synthesis of boron carbide - a spectroscopic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron Carbide is one of the hardest materials known, ranking third behind diamond and cubic boron nitride. It is the hardest material produced in tonnage quantities. Boron carbide (BxCx) enriched in the 10B isotope is used as a control rod material in the nuclear industry due to its high neutron absorption cross section and other favorable physico-chemical properties. Conventional methods of preparation of boron carbide are energy intensive processes accompanied by huge loss of boron. Attempts were made at IGCAR Kalpakkam to develop energy efficient and cost effective methods to prepare boron carbide. Nuclear applications of boron carbide include shielding, control rod and shut down pellets. Within control rods, boron carbide is often powdered, to increase its surface area. The products of the gel combustion and microwave synthesis experiments were characterized for phase purity by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The carbide formation was ascertained using finger-print spectroscopy of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR). Samples of pyrolized/microwave heated powder were characterized for surface morphology using electron microscope (SEM). The present work shows the recent advances in understanding of structural and chemical variation in boron carbide and their influence on morphology, optical and vibrational property result discussed in details. (author)

  8. Production process for boron carbide coated carbon material and boron carbide coated carbon material obtained by the production process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A boron carbide coated carbon material is used for a plasma facing material of a thermonuclear reactor. The surface of a carbon material is chemically reacted with boron oxide to convert it into boron carbide. Then, it is subjected to heat treatment at a temperature of not lower than 1600degC in highly evacuated or inactive atmosphere to attain a boron carbide coated carbon material. The carbon material used is an artificial graphite or a carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite material. In the heat treatment, when the atmosphere is in vacuum, it is highly evacuated to less than 10Pa. Alternatively, in a case of inactive atmosphere, argon or helium gas each having oxygen and nitrogen content of not more than 20ppm is used. With such procedures, there can be obtained a boron carbide-coated carbon material with low content of oxygen and nitrogen impurities contained in the boron carbide coating membrane thereby hardly releasing gases. (I.N.)

  9. Brazed boron-silicon carbide/aluminum structural panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, W. E., Jr.; Bales, T. T.; Brooks, T. G.; Lawson, A. G.; Mitchell, P. D.; Royster, D. M.; Wiant, R.

    1978-01-01

    Fluxless brazing process minimizes degradation of mechanical properties composite material of silicon carbide coated boron fibers in an aluminum matrix. Process is being used to fabricate full-scale Boron-Silicon Carbide/Aluminum-Titanium honeycomb core panels for flight testing and ground testing.

  10. Structure and single-phase regime of boron carbides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emin, David

    1988-09-01

    The boron carbides are composed of twelve-atom icosahedral clusters which are linked by direct covalent bonds and through three-atom intericosahedral chains. The boron carbides are known to exist as a single phase with carbon concentrations from about 8 to about 20 at. %. This range of carbon concentrations is made possible by the substitution of boron and carbon atoms for one another within both the icosahedra and intericosahedral chains. The most widely accepted structural model for B4C (the boron carbide with nominally 20% carbon) has B11C icosahedra with C-B-C intericosahedral chains. Here, the free energy of the boron carbides is studied as a function of carbon concentration by considering the effects of replacing carbon atoms within B4C with boron atoms. It is concluded that entropic and energetic considerations both favor the replacement of carbon atoms with boron atoms within the intericosahedral chains, C-B-C-->C-B-B. Once the carbon concentration is so low that the vast majority of the chains are C-B-B chains, near B13C2, subsequent substitutions of carbon atoms with boron atoms occur within the icosahedra, B11C-->B12. Maxima of the free energy occur at the most ordered compositions: B4C,B13C2,B14C. This structural model, determined by studying the free energy, agrees with that previously suggested by analysis of electronic and thermal transport data. These considerations also provide an explanation for the wide single-phase regime found for boron carbides. The significant entropies associated with compositional disorder within the boron carbides, the high temperatures at which boron carbides are formed (>2000 K), and the relatively modest energies associated with replacing carbon atoms with boron atoms enable the material's entropy to be usually important in determining its composition. As a result, boron carbides are able to exist in a wide range of compositions.

  11. Synthesis and photoluminescence property of boron carbide nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large scale, high density boron carbide nanowires have been synthesized by using an improved carbothermal reduction method with B/B2O3/C powder precursors under an argon flow at 1100°C. The boron carbide nanowires are 5–10 μm in length and 80–100 nm in diameter. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED) characterizations show that the boron carbide nanowire has a B4C rhombohedral structure with good crystallization. The Raman spectrum of the as-grown boron carbide nanowires is consistent with that of a B4C structure consisting of B11C icosahedra and C-B-C chains. The room temperature photoluminescence spectrum of the boron carbide nanowires exhibits a visible range of emission centred at 638 nm. (condensed matter: structure, thermal and mechanical properties)

  12. Boron carbide synthesis by carbothermic reduction of boron oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron carbide (B4C) is a ceramic material of technological applications due to its extreme hardness and high chemical as well as thermal stability. Some parameters of the process for obtaining B4C by carbothermic reduction of B2O3 have been determined. The starting powders and the final products have been analysed by chemical, spectrographic and X-ray diffraction methods. The results show that the B4C obtained by the carbothermic reduction process is suitable for applications with a definite determination of the free carbon content. (author)

  13. Boron carbide/carbon composite material and production process therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The boron carbide/carbon composite material of the present invention comprises from 15 to 40% by volume of graphite and the balance of two kinds of powdery boron carbides X and Y having different average grain sizes. The average grain size of the powdery boron carbide X is less than 1/2 of the average grain size of the boron carbide Y, and the composite material comprises more than 10% by volume of the powdery boron carbide X and more than 30% by volume of the powdery boron carbide Y. They are press-molded under heating at a temperature range of 480 to 600degC, followed by sintering. A binder pitch of less evaporation ingredient melting upon heating is used as a binder. Since the pitch of satisfactory melting property is used, there is no worry that binding property lacks to reduce the lowering of the strength even if a great amount of powdery boron carbide is added. Further, since a carbonization yield is improved due to less evaporation content, density and strength of the composite material can be increased. (T.M.)

  14. Computational Studies of Physical Properties of Boron Carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lizhi Ouyang

    2011-09-30

    The overall goal is to provide valuable insight in to the mechanisms and processes that could lead to better engineering the widely used boron carbide which could play an important role in current plight towards greener energy. Carbon distribution in boron carbide, which has been difficult to retrieve from experimental methods, is critical to our understanding of its structure-properties relation. For modeling disorders in boron carbide, we implemented a first principles method based on supercell approach within our G(P,T) package. The supercell approach was applied to boron carbide to determine its carbon distribution. Our results reveal that carbon prefers to occupy the end sites of the 3-atom chain in boron carbide and further carbon atoms will distribute mainly on the equatorial sites with a small percentage on the 3-atom chains and the apex sites. Supercell approach was also applied to study mechanical properties of boron carbide under uniaxial load. We found that uniaxial load can lead to amorphization. Other physical properties of boron carbide were calculated using the G(P,T) package.

  15. Design, Fabrication and Performance of Boron-Carbide Control Elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A control blade design, incorporating boron-carbide (B4C) in stainless-steel tubes, was introduced into service in boiling water reactors in April 1961. Since that time this blade has become the standard reference control element in General Electric boiling-water reactors, replacing the 2% boron-stainless-steel blades previously used. The blades consist of a sheathed, cruciform array of small vertical stainless-steel tubes filled with compácted boron-carbide powder. The boron-carbide powder is confined longitudinally into several independent compartments by swaging over ball bearings located inside the tubes. The development and use of boron-carbide control rods is discussed in five phases: 1. Summary of experience with boron-steel blades and reasons for transition to boron-carbide control; 2. Design of the boron-carbide blade, beginning with developmental experiments, including early measurements performed in the AEC ''Control Rod Material and Development Program'' at the Vallecitos Atomic Laboratory, through a description of the final control blade configuration; 3. Fabrication of the blades and quality control procedures; 4. Results of confirmatory pre-operational mechanical and reactivity testing; and 5. Post-operational experience with the blades, including information on the results of mechanical inspection and reactivity testing after two years of reactor service. (author)

  16. Highly thermal conductive carbon fiber/boron carbide composite material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a composite member for use in walls of a thermonuclear reactor, if carbon fibers and boron carbide are mixed, since they are brought into contact with each other directly, boron is reacted with the carbon fibers to form boron carbide to lower thermal conductivity of the carbon fibers. Then, in the present invention, graphite or amorphous carbon is filled between the carbon fibers to provide a fiber bundle of not less than 500 carbon fibers. Further, the surface of the fiber bundle is coated with graphite or amorphous carbon to suppress diffusion or solid solubilization of boron to carbon fibers or reaction of them. Then, lowering of thermal conductivity of the carbon fibers is prevented, as well as the mixing amount of the carbon fiber bundles with boron carbide, a sintering temperature and orientation of carbon fiber bundles are optimized to provide a highly thermal conductive carbon fiber/boron carbide composite material. In addition, carbide or boride type short fibers, spherical graphite, and amorphous carbon are mixed in the boron carbide to prevent development of cracks. Diffusion or solid solubilization of boron to carbon fibers is reduced or reaction of them if the carbon fibers are bundled. (N.H.)

  17. Dispersion of boron carbide in a tungsten carbide/cobalt matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Particles of boron carbide (105-125 microns) were coated with a layer (10-12 microns) of titanium carbide in a fluidized bed. These coated particles have been successfully incorporated in a tungsten carbide--cobalt matrix by hot pressing at 1 tonf/in2, (15.44 MN/m2) at 13500C. Attempts to produce a similar material by a cold pressing and sintering technique were unsuccessful because of penetration of the titanium carbide layer by liquid cobalt. Hot-pressed material containing boron carbide had a static strength in bend of approximately 175,000 lbf/in2, (1206MN/m2) which compares favorably with the strength of conventionally produced tungsten carbide/cobalt. The impact strength of the material containing boron carbide was however considerably lower than tungsten carbide/cobalt. In rock drilling tests on Darley Dale sandstone at low speeds and low loads, the material containing boron carbide drilled almost ten times as far without seizure as tungsten carbide/cobalt. In higher speed and higher load rotary drilling tests conducted by the National Coal Board, the material containing boron carbide chipped badly compared with normal NCB hardgrade material

  18. Some physical properties of compacted specimens of highly dispersed boron carbide and boron suboxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Structure, shear modulus and internal friction (IF) of compacted specimens of boron carbide and boron suboxide have been investigated. Microtwins and stacking faults were observed along the {100} plane systems of polycrystalline specimens of boron carbide. Electrical conductivity of the specimens was that of p-type. Concentration of holes varied from 1017 to 1019 cm-3. The IF was measured in the temperature range 80-300 K. It was shown that the IF of boron carbide and that of boron suboxide were characterized with a set of similar relaxation processes. Mechanisms of the relaxation processes in boron carbide and boron suboxide are discussed in terms of the Hasiguti model of interaction between dislocations and point defects

  19. Hugoniot equation of state and dynamic strength of boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron carbide ceramics have been particularly problematic in attempts to develop adequate constitutive model descriptions for purposes of analysis of dynamic response in the shock and impact environment. Dynamic strength properties of boron carbide ceramic differ uniquely from comparable ceramics. Furthermore, boron carbide is suspected, but not definitely shown, to undergoing polymorphic phase transformation under shock compression. In the present paper, shock-wave compression measurements conducted over the past 40 years are assessed for the purpose of achieving improved understanding of the dynamic equation of state and strength of boron carbide. In particular, attention is focused on the often ignored Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Hugoniot measurements performed on porous sintered boron carbide ceramic. The LANL data are shown to exhibit two compression anomalies on the shock Hugoniot within the range of 20–60 GPa that may relate to crystallographic structure transitions. More recent molecular dynamics simulations on the compressibility of the boron carbide crystal lattice reveal compression transitions that bear similarities to the LANL Hugoniot results. The same Hugoniot data are complemented with dynamic isentropic compression data for boron carbide extracted from Hugoniot measurements on boron carbide and copper granular mixtures. Other Hugoniot measurements, however, performed on near-full-density boron carbide ceramic differ markedly from the LANL Hugoniot data. These later data exhibit markedly less compressibility and tend not to show comparable anomalies in compressibility. Alternative Hugoniot anomalies, however, are exhibited by the near-full-density data. Experimental uncertainty, Hugoniot strength, and phase transformation physics are all possible explanations for the observed discrepancies. It is reasoned that experimental uncertainty and Hugoniot strength are not likely explanations for the observed differences. The notable

  20. Hugoniot equation of state and dynamic strength of boron carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grady, Dennis E. [Applied Research Associates, Southwest Division, 4300 San Mateo Blvd NE, A-220, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87110-129 (United States)

    2015-04-28

    Boron carbide ceramics have been particularly problematic in attempts to develop adequate constitutive model descriptions for purposes of analysis of dynamic response in the shock and impact environment. Dynamic strength properties of boron carbide ceramic differ uniquely from comparable ceramics. Furthermore, boron carbide is suspected, but not definitely shown, to undergoing polymorphic phase transformation under shock compression. In the present paper, shock-wave compression measurements conducted over the past 40 years are assessed for the purpose of achieving improved understanding of the dynamic equation of state and strength of boron carbide. In particular, attention is focused on the often ignored Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Hugoniot measurements performed on porous sintered boron carbide ceramic. The LANL data are shown to exhibit two compression anomalies on the shock Hugoniot within the range of 20–60 GPa that may relate to crystallographic structure transitions. More recent molecular dynamics simulations on the compressibility of the boron carbide crystal lattice reveal compression transitions that bear similarities to the LANL Hugoniot results. The same Hugoniot data are complemented with dynamic isentropic compression data for boron carbide extracted from Hugoniot measurements on boron carbide and copper granular mixtures. Other Hugoniot measurements, however, performed on near-full-density boron carbide ceramic differ markedly from the LANL Hugoniot data. These later data exhibit markedly less compressibility and tend not to show comparable anomalies in compressibility. Alternative Hugoniot anomalies, however, are exhibited by the near-full-density data. Experimental uncertainty, Hugoniot strength, and phase transformation physics are all possible explanations for the observed discrepancies. It is reasoned that experimental uncertainty and Hugoniot strength are not likely explanations for the observed differences. The notable

  1. Shock-wave strength properties of boron carbide and silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Time-resolved velocity interferometry measurements have been made on boron carbide and silicon carbide ceramics to assess dynamic equation-of-state and strength properties of these materials. Hugoniot precursor characteristics, and post-yield shock and release wave properties, indicated markedly different dynamic strength and flow behavior for the two carbides. (orig.)

  2. An investigation on gamma attenuation behaviour of titanium diboride reinforced boron carbide-silicon carbide composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyuk, Bulent; Beril Tugrul, A.

    2014-04-01

    In this study, titanium diboride (TiB2) reinforced boron carbide-silicon carbide composites were investigated against Cs-137 and Co-60 gamma radioisotope sources. The composite materials include 70% boron carbide (B4C) and 30% silicon carbide (SiC) by volume. Titanium diboride was reinforced to boron carbide-silicon carbide composites as additive 2% and 4% by volume. Average particle sizes were 3.851 µm and 170 nm for titanium diboride which were reinforced to the boron carbide silicon carbide composites. In the experiments the gamma transmission technique was used to investigate the gamma attenuation properties of the composite materials. Linear and mass attenuation coefficients of the samples were determined. Theoretical mass attenuation coefficients were calculated from XCOM computer code. The experimental results and theoretical results were compared and evaluated with each other. It could be said that increasing the titanium diboride ratio causes higher linear attenuation values against Cs-137 and Co-60 gamma radioisotope sources. In addition decreasing the titanium diboride particle size also increases the linear and mass attenuation properties of the titanium diboride reinforced boron carbide-silicon carbide composites.

  3. Helium behaviour in implanted boron carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motte Vianney

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available When boron carbide is used as a neutron absorber in nuclear power plants, large quantities of helium are produced. To simulate the gas behaviour, helium implantations were carried out in boron carbide. The samples were then annealed up to 1500 °C in order to observe the influence of temperature and duration of annealing. The determination of the helium diffusion coefficient was carried out using the 3He(d,p4He nuclear reaction (NRA method. From the evolution of the width of implanted 3He helium profiles (fluence 1 × 1015/cm2, 3 MeV corresponding to a maximum helium concentration of about 1020/cm3 as a function of annealing temperatures, an Arrhenius diagram was plotted and an apparent diffusion coefficient was deduced (Ea = 0.52 ± 0.11 eV/atom. The dynamic of helium clusters was observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM of samples implanted with 1.5 × 1016/cm2, 2.8 to 3 MeV 4He ions, leading to an implanted slab about 1 μm wide with a maximum helium concentration of about 1021/cm3. After annealing at 900 °C and 1100 °C, small (5–20 nm flat oriented bubbles appeared in the grain, then at the grain boundaries. At 1500 °C, due to long-range diffusion, intra-granular bubbles were no longer observed; helium segregates at the grain boundaries, either as bubbles or inducing grain boundaries opening.

  4. On surface Raman scattering and luminescence radiation in boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werheit, H; Filipov, V; Schwarz, U; Armbrüster, M; Leithe-Jasper, A; Tanaka, T; Shalamberidze, S O

    2010-02-01

    The discrepancy between Raman spectra of boron carbide obtained by Fourier transform Raman and conventional Raman spectrometry is systematically investigated. While at photon energies below the exciton energy (1.560 eV), Raman scattering of bulk phonons of boron carbide occurs, photon energies exceeding the fundamental absorption edge (2.09 eV) evoke additional patterns, which may essentially be attributed to luminescence or to the excitation of Raman-active processes in the surface region. The reason for this is the very high fundamental absorption in boron carbide inducing a very small penetration depth of the exciting laser radiation. Raman excitations essentially restricted to the boron carbide surface region yield spectra which considerably differ from bulk phonon ones, thus indicating structural modifications. PMID:21386312

  5. Radial furnace shows promise for growing straight boron carbide whiskers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feingold, E.

    1967-01-01

    Radial furnace, with a long graphite vaporization tube, maintains a uniform thermal gradient, favoring the growth of straight boron carbide whiskers. This concept seems to offer potential for both the quality and yield of whiskers.

  6. Analytical chemistry methods for boron carbide absorber material. [Standard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DELVIN WL

    1977-07-01

    This standard provides analytical chemistry methods for the analysis of boron carbide powder and pellets for the following: total C and B, B isotopic composition, soluble C and B, fluoride, chloride, metallic impurities, gas content, water, nitrogen, and oxygen. (DLC)

  7. Analysis of boron carbides' electronic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Iris A.; Beckel, Charles L.

    1986-01-01

    The electronic properties of boron-rich icosahedral clusters were studied as a means of understanding the electronic structure of the icosahedral borides such as boron carbide. A lower bound was estimated on bipolaron formation energies in B12 and B11C icosahedra, and the associated distortions. While the magnitude of the distortion associated with bipolaron formation is similar in both cases, the calculated formation energies differ greatly, formation being much more favorable on B11C icosahedra. The stable positions of a divalent atom relative to an icosahedral borane was also investigated, with the result that a stable energy minimum was found when the atom is at the center of the borane, internal to the B12 cage. If incorporation of dopant atoms into B12 cages in icosahedral boride solids is feasible, novel materials might result. In addition, the normal modes of a B12H12 cluster, of the C2B10 cage in para-carborane, and of a B12 icosahedron of reduced (D sub 3d) symmetry, such as is found in the icosahedral borides, were calculated. The nature of these vibrational modes will be important in determining, for instance, the character of the electron-lattice coupling in the borides, and in analyzing the lattice contribution to the thermal conductivity.

  8. Determination of boron isotope ratios in boron carbide by mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper introduces the direct determination of boron isotope ratios in the boron carbide powder by thermal ionization mass spectrometry. The technique for sample loading, the procedure for heating and the eliminating of effects induced by oxygen are studied. The study indicates that the preparing process for the sample will be shorted, and the time for determination and the exposure dose of the laboratory assistant will be reduced for the reason of directly determination of boron carbide. (authors)

  9. Conductivities and Seebeck coefficients of boron carbides: Softening bipolaron hopping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aselage, T. L.; Emin, D.; McCready, S. S.

    2001-08-01

    The electrical conductivities and Seebeck coefficients of boron carbides B12+xC3-x with 0.06function of the composition x. This strong sensitivity to composition indicates that percolation effects, arising from boron carbides having carbon atoms in inequivalent locations, influence the conductivity at low temperature. With x holes per unit cell, boron carbides have very large Seebeck coefficients that depend only weakly on x. The magnitudes and temperature dependences of the Seebeck coefficients are consistent with large contributions from carrier-induced softening of local vibrations. Softening effects can be exceptionally large when singlet bipolarons are stabilized among degenerate electronic energy levels by their softening of symmetry-breaking vibrations: ``softening bipolarons.'' The boron carbide transport properties are generally consistent with those expected of softening bipolarons. Finally, two high-temperature effects are observed in the boron carbide conductivities. The conductivities of samples having high carrier densities, x~1, are suppressed above 700 K. This suppression can arise when the rapid hopping of nearby carriers disrupts the energy coincidence required for a carrier's hop. At even higher temperatures, a sharp increase in the boron carbide conductivities (σ~T4) suggests a radiation-induced excitation of mobile charge carriers.

  10. Method for determination of boron carbide in wurtzite-like boron nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A technique for increase of sensitivity and analysis accuracy while boron carbide determination in wurtzite-like boron nitride is proposed. Boron nitride with an addition of boron carbide is bjected to treatment by the mixture of concentrated sulphuric acid and 0.1-0.5 N of porassium bichromate solution at ratio of (2-1):1 at the temperature of mixture boiling. Boron carboide content is calculated according to the quantity of restored Cr(3+), which is determined by titration of Cr(6+) excess with the Mohr's salt solution

  11. Atomic structure of amorphous shear bands in boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, K Madhav; Liu, P; Hirata, A; Fujita, T; Chen, M W

    2013-01-01

    Amorphous shear bands are the main deformation and failure mode of super-hard boron carbide subjected to shock loading and high pressures at room temperature. Nevertheless, the formation mechanisms of the amorphous shear bands remain a long-standing scientific curiosity mainly because of the lack of experimental structure information of the disordered shear bands, comprising light elements of carbon and boron only. Here we report the atomic structure of the amorphous shear bands in boron carbide characterized by state-of-the-art aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy. Distorted icosahedra, displaced from the crystalline matrix, were observed in nano-sized amorphous bands that produce dislocation-like local shear strains. These experimental results provide direct experimental evidence that the formation of amorphous shear bands in boron carbide results from the disassembly of the icosahedra, driven by shear stresses. PMID:24052052

  12. The determination of boron and carbon in reactor grade boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sealed tube method of dissolution at high temperature and pressure has been successfully applied in the analysis of reactor grade boron carbide for the determination of boron. A 50 mg sample of boron carbide is completely dissolved by heating with concentrated nitric acid in a sealed tube at 3000C. The boron content of the resultant sample solution is determined by the mannitol potentiometric titration method. The precision of the method for the determination of 2.5 mg of boron using the Harwell automatic potentiometric titrator is 0.2% (coefficient of variation). The carbon content of a boron carbide sample is determined by combustion of the sample at 10500C in a stream of oxygen using vanadium pentoxide to ensure the complete oxidation of the sample. The carbon dioxide produced from the sample is measured manometrically and the precision of the method for the determination of 4 mg of carbon is 0.4% (coefficient of variation). (author)

  13. Tribological behaviour of mechanically synthesized titanium-boron carbide nanostructured coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliofkhazraei, M; Rouhaghdam, A Sabour

    2012-08-01

    In this paper, titanium-boron carbide (Ti/B4C) nanocomposite coatings with different B4C nanoparticles contents were fabricated by surface mechanical attrition treatment (SMAT) method by using B4C nanoparticles with average nanoparticle size of 40 nm. The characteristics of the nanopowder and coatings were evaluated by microhardness test, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Friction and wear performances of nanocomposite coatings and pure titanium substrate were comparatively investigated, with the effect of the boron carbide content on the friction and wear behaviours to be emphasized. The results show the microhardness, friction and wear behaviours of nanocomposite coatings are closely related with boron carbide nanoparticle content. Nanocomposite coating with low B4C content shows somewhat (slight) increased microhardness and wear resistance than pure titanium substrate, while nanocomposite coating with high B4C content has much better (sharp increase) wear resistance than pure titanium substrate. The effect of B4C nanoparticles on microhardness and wear resistance was discussed. PMID:22962832

  14. Raman spectroscopy of boron carbides and related boron-containing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raman spectra of crystalline boron, boron carbide, boron arsenide (B12As2), and boron phosphide (B12P2) are reported. The spectra are compared with other boron-containing materials containing the boron icosahedron as a structural unit. The spectra exhibit similar features some of which correlate with the structure of the icosahedral units of the crystals. The highest Raman lines appear to be especially sensitive to the B-B distance in the polar triangle of the icosahedron. Such Raman structural markers are potentially useful in efforts to tailor electronic properties of these high temperature semiconductors and thermoelectrics

  15. Characterization of a boron carbide-based polymer neutron sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chuting; James, Robinson; Dong, Bin; Driver, M. Sky; Kelber, Jeffry A.; Downing, Greg; Cao, Lei R.

    2015-12-01

    Boron is used widely in thin-film solid-state devices for neutron detection. The film thickness and boron concentration are important parameters that relate to a device's detection efficiency and capacitance. Neutron depth profiling was used to determine the film thicknesses and boron-concentration profiles of boron carbide-based polymers grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) of ortho-carborane (1,2-B10C2H12), resulting in a pure boron carbide film, or of meta-carborane (1,7-B10C2H12) and pyridine (C5H5N), resulting in a pyridine composite film, or of pyrimidine (C4H4N2) resulting in a pure pyrimidine film. The pure boron carbide film had a uniform surface appearance and a constant thickness of 250 nm, whereas the thickness of the composite film was 250-350 nm, measured at three different locations. In the meta-carborane and pyridine composite film the boron concentration was found to increase with depth, which correlated with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)-derived atomic ratios. A proton peak from 14N (n,p)14C reaction was observed in the pure pyrimidine film, indicating an additional neutron sensitivity to nonthermal neutrons from the N atoms in the pyrimidine.

  16. Determination of soluble carbon in nuclear grade boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work describes two different techniques (manometric and wet chemical) for the soluble carbon determination in nuclear grade boron carbide. The techniques are based on the reaction of the boron carbide with a sulfocromic mixture, generating CO2. The techniques differ on the mode they do the measurement of CO2 produced. By wet chemical technique the CO2 is absorved in a barium hydroxide solution and is determinated by titration. In the manometric technique the CO2 gas is measured using a McLeod gauge. The gas produced by the latter technique is analysed by mass spectrometry. The details of the analytical technique and the data obtained are discussed. (author)

  17. Hot-press fabrication and joining of boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method has been developed for fabricating long, cylindrical rubber-mill rolls of boron carbide for use with abrasive materials. The technique consisted of initially hot pressing the boron carbide (to 90% of the theoretical density) to short, hollow cylinders having a length-to-diameter ratio of about one. This initial hot-press operation was followed by a second hot press to join or bond, and further densify, the short sections into a final compact having a length-to-diameter ratio of three. Flexural-strength data show that the integrity of the bond is comparable to that of the base material

  18. Pressureless sintering of beta silicon carbide nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study reports the pressureless sintering of cubic phase silicon carbide nanoparticles (β-SiC). Green blended compounds made of SiC nano-sized powder, a fugitive binder and a sintering agent (boron carbide, B4C), have been prepared. The binder is removed at low temperature (e.g. 800 degrees C) and the pressureless sintering studied between 1900 and 2100 degrees C. The nearly theoretical density (98% relative density) was obtained after 30 min at 2100 degrees C. The structural and microstructural evolutions during the heat treatment were characterised. The high temperatures needed for the sintering result in the β-SiC to α-SiC transformation which is revealed by the change of the composite microstructure. From 1900 degrees C, dense samples are composed of β-SiC grains surrounding α-SiC platelets in a well-defined orientation. TEM investigations and calculation of the activation energy of the sintering provided insight to the densification mechanism. (authors)

  19. Disorder and defects are not intrinsic to boron carbide

    OpenAIRE

    Swastik Mondal; Elena Bykova; Somnath Dey; Sk. Imran Ali; Natalia Dubrovinskaia; Leonid Dubrovinsky; Gleb Parakhonskiy; Sander van Smaalen

    2016-01-01

    A unique combination of useful properties in boron-carbide, such as extreme hardness, excellent fracture toughness, a low density, a high melting point, thermoelectricity, semi-conducting behavior, catalytic activity and a remarkably good chemical stability, makes it an ideal material for a wide range of technological applications. Explaining these properties in terms of chemical bonding has remained a major challenge in boron chemistry. Here we report the synthesis of fully ordered, stoichio...

  20. The diffusion bonding of silicon carbide and boron carbide using refractory metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joining is an enabling technology for the application of structural ceramics at high temperatures. Metal foil diffusion bonding is a simple process for joining silicon carbide or boron carbide by solid-state, diffusive conversion of the metal foil into carbide and silicide compounds that produce bonding. Metal diffusion bonding trials were performed using thin foils (5 microm to 100 microm) of refractory metals (niobium, titanium, tungsten, and molybdenum) with plates of silicon carbide (both α-SiC and β-SiC) or boron carbide that were lapped flat prior to bonding. The influence of bonding temperature, bonding pressure, and foil thickness on bond quality was determined from metallographic inspection of the bonds. The microstructure and phases in the joint region of the diffusion bonds were evaluated using SEM, microprobe, and AES analysis. The use of molybdenum foil appeared to result in the highest quality bond of the metal foils evaluated for the diffusion bonding of silicon carbide and boron carbide. Bonding pressure appeared to have little influence on bond quality. The use of a thinner metal foil improved the bond quality. The microstructure of the bond region produced with either the α-SiC and β-SiC polytypes were similar

  1. Isotopic effects on the phonon modes in boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werheit, H; Kuhlmann, U; Rotter, H W; Shalamberidze, S O

    2010-10-01

    The effect of isotopes ((10)B-(11)B; (12)C-(13)C) on the infrared- and Raman-active phonons of boron carbide has been investigated. For B isotopes, the contributions of the virtual crystal approximation, polarization vector and isotopical disorder are separated. Boron and carbon isotope effects are largely opposite to one another and indicate the share of the particular atoms in the atomic assemblies vibrating in specific phonon modes. Some infrared-active phonons behave as expected for monatomic boron crystals. PMID:21403227

  2. Raman spectroscopic characterization of the core-rim structure in reaction bonded boron carbide ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raman spectroscopy was used to characterize the microstructure of reaction bonded boron carbide ceramics. Compositional and structural gradation in the silicon-doped boron carbide phase (rim), which develops around the parent boron carbide region (core) due to the reaction between silicon and boron carbide, was evaluated using changes in Raman peak position and intensity. Peak shifting and intensity variation from the core to the rim region was attributed to changes in the boron carbide crystal structure based on experimental Raman observations and ab initio calculations reported in literature. The results were consistent with compositional analysis determined by energy dispersive spectroscopy. The Raman analysis revealed the substitution of silicon atoms first into the linear 3-atom chain, and then into icosahedral units of the boron carbide structure. Thus, micro-Raman spectroscopy provided a non-destructive means of identifying the preferential positions of Si atoms in the boron carbide lattice

  3. Raman spectroscopic characterization of the core-rim structure in reaction bonded boron carbide ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jannotti, Phillip; Subhash, Ghatu; Zheng, James Q.; Halls, Virginia; Karandikar, Prashant G.; Salamone, S.; Aghajanian, Michael K.

    2015-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy was used to characterize the microstructure of reaction bonded boron carbide ceramics. Compositional and structural gradation in the silicon-doped boron carbide phase (rim), which develops around the parent boron carbide region (core) due to the reaction between silicon and boron carbide, was evaluated using changes in Raman peak position and intensity. Peak shifting and intensity variation from the core to the rim region was attributed to changes in the boron carbide crystal structure based on experimental Raman observations and ab initio calculations reported in literature. The results were consistent with compositional analysis determined by energy dispersive spectroscopy. The Raman analysis revealed the substitution of silicon atoms first into the linear 3-atom chain, and then into icosahedral units of the boron carbide structure. Thus, micro-Raman spectroscopy provided a non-destructive means of identifying the preferential positions of Si atoms in the boron carbide lattice.

  4. Raman spectroscopic characterization of the core-rim structure in reaction bonded boron carbide ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jannotti, Phillip; Subhash, Ghatu, E-mail: subhash@ufl.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Zheng, James Q.; Halls, Virginia [Program Executive Office—Soldier Protection and Individual Equipment, US Army, Fort Belvoir, Virginia 22060 (United States); Karandikar, Prashant G.; Salamone, S.; Aghajanian, Michael K. [M-Cubed Technologies, Inc., Newark, Delaware 19711 (United States)

    2015-01-26

    Raman spectroscopy was used to characterize the microstructure of reaction bonded boron carbide ceramics. Compositional and structural gradation in the silicon-doped boron carbide phase (rim), which develops around the parent boron carbide region (core) due to the reaction between silicon and boron carbide, was evaluated using changes in Raman peak position and intensity. Peak shifting and intensity variation from the core to the rim region was attributed to changes in the boron carbide crystal structure based on experimental Raman observations and ab initio calculations reported in literature. The results were consistent with compositional analysis determined by energy dispersive spectroscopy. The Raman analysis revealed the substitution of silicon atoms first into the linear 3-atom chain, and then into icosahedral units of the boron carbide structure. Thus, micro-Raman spectroscopy provided a non-destructive means of identifying the preferential positions of Si atoms in the boron carbide lattice.

  5. Modification of optical surfaces employing CVD boron carbide coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Non-reflective or high emissivity optical surfaces require materials with given roughness or surface characteristics wherein interaction with incident radiation results in the absorption and dissipation of a specific spectrum of radiation. Coatings have been used to alter optical properties, however, extreme service environments, such as experienced by satellite systems and other spacecraft, necessitate the use of materials with unique combinations of physical, chemical, and mechanical properties. Thus, ceramics such as boron carbide are leading candidates for these applications. Boron carbide was examined as a coating for optical baffle surfaces. Boron carbide coatings were deposited on graphite substrates from BCl3, CH4, and H2 gases employing chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques. Parameters including temperature, reactant gas compositions and flows, and pressure were explored. The structures of the coatings were characterized using electron microscopy and compositions were determined using x-ray diffraction. The optical properties of the boron carbide coatings were measured, and relationships between processing conditions, deposit morphology, and optical properties were determined

  6. Standard specification for nuclear-Grade boron carbide pellets

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This specification applies to boron carbide pellets for use as a control material in nuclear reactors. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only.

  7. Silicon carbide sintered body manufactured from silicon carbide powder containing boron, silicon and carbonaceous additive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hidehiko

    1987-01-01

    A silicon carbide powder of a 5-micron grain size is mixed with 0.15 to 0.60 wt% mixture of a boron compound, i.e., boric acid, boron carbide (B4C), silicon boride (SiB4 or SiB6), aluminum boride, etc., and an aluminum compound, i.e., aluminum, aluminum oxide, aluminum hydroxide, aluminum carbide, etc., or aluminum boride (AlB2) alone, in such a proportion that the boron/aluminum atomic ratio in the sintered body becomes 0.05 to 0.25 wt% and 0.05 to 0.40 wt%, respectively, together with a carbonaceous additive to supply enough carbon to convert oxygen accompanying raw materials and additives into carbon monoxide.

  8. Disorder and defects are not intrinsic to boron carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Swastik; Bykova, Elena; Dey, Somnath; Ali, Sk Imran; Dubrovinskaia, Natalia; Dubrovinsky, Leonid; Parakhonskiy, Gleb; van Smaalen, Sander

    2016-01-01

    A unique combination of useful properties in boron-carbide, such as extreme hardness, excellent fracture toughness, a low density, a high melting point, thermoelectricity, semi-conducting behavior, catalytic activity and a remarkably good chemical stability, makes it an ideal material for a wide range of technological applications. Explaining these properties in terms of chemical bonding has remained a major challenge in boron chemistry. Here we report the synthesis of fully ordered, stoichiometric boron-carbide B13C2 by high-pressure-high-temperature techniques. Our experimental electron-density study using high-resolution single-crystal synchrotron X-ray diffraction data conclusively demonstrates that disorder and defects are not intrinsic to boron carbide, contrary to what was hitherto supposed. A detailed analysis of the electron density distribution reveals charge transfer between structural units in B13C2 and a new type of electron-deficient bond with formally unpaired electrons on the C-B-C group in B13C2. Unprecedented bonding features contribute to the fundamental chemistry and materials science of boron compounds that is of great interest for understanding structure-property relationships and development of novel functional materials.

  9. Disorder and defects are not intrinsic to boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Swastik; Bykova, Elena; Dey, Somnath; Ali, Sk Imran; Dubrovinskaia, Natalia; Dubrovinsky, Leonid; Parakhonskiy, Gleb; van Smaalen, Sander

    2016-01-01

    A unique combination of useful properties in boron-carbide, such as extreme hardness, excellent fracture toughness, a low density, a high melting point, thermoelectricity, semi-conducting behavior, catalytic activity and a remarkably good chemical stability, makes it an ideal material for a wide range of technological applications. Explaining these properties in terms of chemical bonding has remained a major challenge in boron chemistry. Here we report the synthesis of fully ordered, stoichiometric boron-carbide B13C2 by high-pressure-high-temperature techniques. Our experimental electron-density study using high-resolution single-crystal synchrotron X-ray diffraction data conclusively demonstrates that disorder and defects are not intrinsic to boron carbide, contrary to what was hitherto supposed. A detailed analysis of the electron density distribution reveals charge transfer between structural units in B13C2 and a new type of electron-deficient bond with formally unpaired electrons on the C-B-C group in B13C2. Unprecedented bonding features contribute to the fundamental chemistry and materials science of boron compounds that is of great interest for understanding structure-property relationships and development of novel functional materials. PMID:26777140

  10. Atomic-Level Understanding of "Asymmetric Twins" in Boron Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Kelvin Y.; An, Qi; Toksoy, M. Fatih; McCauley, James W.; Haber, Richard A.; Goddard, William A.; Hemker, Kevin J.

    2015-10-01

    Recent observations of planar defects in boron carbide have been shown to deviate from perfect mirror symmetry and are referred to as "asymmetric twins." Here, we demonstrate that these asymmetric twins are really phase boundaries that form in stoichiometric B4C (i.e., B12C3 ) but not in B13C2 . TEM observations and ab initio simulations have been coupled to show that these planar defects result from an interplay of stoichiometry, atomic positioning, icosahedral twinning, and structural hierarchy. The composition of icosahedra in B4C is B11C and translation of the carbon atom from a polar to equatorial site leads to a shift in bonding and a slight distortion of the lattice. No such distortion is observed in boron-rich B13C2 because the icosahedra do not contain carbon. Implications for tailoring boron carbide with stoichiometry and extrapolations to other hierarchical crystalline materials are discussed.

  11. Carbon-rich icosahedral boron carbide designed from first principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jay, Antoine; Vast, Nathalie; Sjakste, Jelena; Duparc, Olivier Hardouin [Ecole Polytechnique, Laboratoire des Solides Irradiés, CEA-DSM-IRAMIS, CNRS UMR 7642, F-91120 Palaiseau (France)

    2014-07-21

    The carbon-rich boron-carbide (B{sub 11}C)C-C has been designed from first principles within the density functional theory. With respect to the most common boron carbide at 20% carbon concentration B{sub 4}C, the structural modification consists in removing boron atoms from the chains linking (B{sub 11}C) icosahedra. With C-C instead of C-B-C chains, the formation of vacancies is shown to be hindered, leading to enhanced mechanical strength with respect to B{sub 4}C. The phonon frequencies and elastic constants turn out to prove the stability of the carbon-rich phase, and important fingerprints for its characterization have been identified.

  12. The local structure of transition metal doped semiconducting boron carbides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Jing; Dowben, P A [Department of Physics and Astronomy and the Nebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience, Behlen Laboratory of Physics, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, PO Box 880111, Lincoln, NE 68588-0111 (United States); Luo Guangfu; Mei Waining [Department of Physics, University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, NE 68182-0266 (United States); Kizilkaya, Orhan [J. Bennett Johnston Sr. Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices, Louisiana State University, 6980 Jefferson Hwy., Baton Rouge LA 70806 (United States); Shepherd, Eric D; Brand, J I [College of Engineering, and the Nebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience, N209 Walter Scott Engineering Center, 17th and Vine Streets, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588-0511 (United States)

    2010-03-03

    Transition metal doped boron carbides produced by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition of orthocarborane (closo-1,2-C{sub 2}B{sub 10}H{sub 12}) and 3d metal metallocenes were investigated by performing K-edge extended x-ray absorption fine structure and x-ray absorption near edge structure measurements. The 3d transition metal atom occupies one of the icosahedral boron or carbon atomic sites within the icosahedral cage. Good agreement was obtained between experiment and models for Mn, Fe and Co doping, based on the model structures of two adjoined vertex sharing carborane cages, each containing a transition metal. The local spin configurations of all the 3d transition metal doped boron carbides, Ti through Cu, are compared using cluster and/or icosahedral chain calculations, where the latter have periodic boundary conditions.

  13. INFLUENCE OF FINE-DISPERSED BORON CARBIDE ON THE STRUCTURE AND CHARACTERISTICS OF IRON-BORON ALLOY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. F. Nevar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The influence of boron carbide as fine-dispersed material input into the melt on structure morphology, founding, technological and exploitation characterisstics of cast iron-boron material is shown.

  14. Rapid mass-spectrometric determination of boron isotopic distribution in boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rein, J E; Abernathey, R M

    1972-07-01

    Boron isotopic ratios are measured in boron carbide by thermionic ionization mass spectrometry with no prior chemical separation. A powder blend of boron carbide and sodium hydroxide is prepared, a small portion is transferred to a tantalum filament, the filament is heated to produce sodium borate, and the filament is transferred to the mass spectrometer where the(11)B/(10)B ratio is measured, using the Na(2)BO(2)(+) ion. Variables investigated for their effect on preferential volatilization of (10)B include the sodium hydroxide-boron carbide ratio and the temperature and duration of filament heating. A series of boron carbide pellets containing natural boron, of the type proposed for the control rods of the Fast Flux Test Facility reactor, were analysed with an apparently unbiased result of 4.0560 for the (11)B/(10)B ratio (standard deviation 0.0087). The pellets contained over 3% metal impurities typically found in this material. Time of analysis is 45 min per sample, with one analyst. PMID:18961131

  15. Process to produce silicon carbide fibers using a controlled concentration of boron oxide vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Thomas Duncan (Inventor); Lipowitz, Jonathan (Inventor); Nguyen, Kimmai Thi (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A process for producing polycrystalline silicon carbide by heating an amorphous ceramic fiber that contains silicon and carbon in an environment containing boron oxide vapor. The boron oxide vapor is produced in situ by the reaction of a boron containing material such as boron carbide and an oxidizing agent such as carbon dioxide, and the amount of boron oxide vapor can be controlled by varying the amount and rate of addition of the oxidizing agent.

  16. Predicted boron-carbide compounds: A first-principles study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, De Yu; Yan, Qian; Wang, Bing; Wang, Yuan Xu, E-mail: wangyx@henu.edu.cn; Yang, Jueming; Yang, Gui [Institute for Computational Materials Science, School of Physics and Electronics, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China)

    2014-06-14

    By using developed particle swarm optimization algorithm on crystal structural prediction, we have explored the possible crystal structures of B-C system. Their structures, stability, elastic properties, electronic structure, and chemical bonding have been investigated by first-principles calculations with density functional theory. The results show that all the predicted structures are mechanically and dynamically stable. An analysis of calculated enthalpy with pressure indicates that increasing of boron content will increase the stability of boron carbides under low pressure. Moreover, the boron carbides with rich carbon content become more stable under high pressure. The negative formation energy of predicted B{sub 5}C indicates its high stability. The density of states of B{sub 5}C show that it is p-type semiconducting. The calculated theoretical Vickers hardnesses of B-C exceed 40 GPa except B{sub 4}C, BC, and BC{sub 4}, indicating they are potential superhard materials. An analysis of Debye temperature and electronic localization function provides further understanding chemical and physical properties of boron carbide.

  17. Predicted boron-carbide compounds: a first-principles study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, De Yu; Yan, Qian; Wang, Bing; Wang, Yuan Xu; Yang, Jueming; Yang, Gui

    2014-06-14

    By using developed particle swarm optimization algorithm on crystal structural prediction, we have explored the possible crystal structures of B-C system. Their structures, stability, elastic properties, electronic structure, and chemical bonding have been investigated by first-principles calculations with density functional theory. The results show that all the predicted structures are mechanically and dynamically stable. An analysis of calculated enthalpy with pressure indicates that increasing of boron content will increase the stability of boron carbides under low pressure. Moreover, the boron carbides with rich carbon content become more stable under high pressure. The negative formation energy of predicted B5C indicates its high stability. The density of states of B5C show that it is p-type semiconducting. The calculated theoretical Vickers hardnesses of B-C exceed 40 GPa except B4C, BC, and BC4, indicating they are potential superhard materials. An analysis of Debye temperature and electronic localization function provides further understanding chemical and physical properties of boron carbide. PMID:24929411

  18. Predicted boron-carbide compounds: A first-principles study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By using developed particle swarm optimization algorithm on crystal structural prediction, we have explored the possible crystal structures of B-C system. Their structures, stability, elastic properties, electronic structure, and chemical bonding have been investigated by first-principles calculations with density functional theory. The results show that all the predicted structures are mechanically and dynamically stable. An analysis of calculated enthalpy with pressure indicates that increasing of boron content will increase the stability of boron carbides under low pressure. Moreover, the boron carbides with rich carbon content become more stable under high pressure. The negative formation energy of predicted B5C indicates its high stability. The density of states of B5C show that it is p-type semiconducting. The calculated theoretical Vickers hardnesses of B-C exceed 40 GPa except B4C, BC, and BC4, indicating they are potential superhard materials. An analysis of Debye temperature and electronic localization function provides further understanding chemical and physical properties of boron carbide

  19. Hydrogen storage in pillared Li-dispersed boron carbide nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Xiaojun; Gao, Yi; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2007-01-01

    Ab initio density-functional theory study suggests that pillared Li-dispersed boron carbide nanotubes is capable of storing hydrogen with a mass density higher than 6.0 weight% and a volumetric density higher than 45 g/L. The boron substitution in carbon nanotube greatly enhances the binding energy of Li atom to the nanotube, and this binding energy (~ 2.7 eV) is greater than the cohesive energy of lithium metal (~1.7 eV), preventing lithium from aggregation (or segregation) at high lithium d...

  20. Boron carbide (B4C) coating. Deposition and testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron carbide was proposed as a material of in-situ protecting coating for tungsten tiles of ITER divertor. To prove this concept the project including investigation of regimes of plasma deposition of B4C coating on tungsten and tests of boron carbide layer in ITER-like is started recently. The paper contends the first results of the project. The results of B4C coating irradiation by the plasma pulses of QSPU-T plasma accelerator are presented. The new device capable of B4C film deposition on tungsten and testing of the films and materials with ITER-like heat loads and ion- and electron irradiation is described. The results of B4C coating deposition and testing of both tungsten substrate and coating are shown and discussed

  1. Boron carbide (B4C) coating. Deposition and testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizov, E.; Barsuk, V.; Begrambekov, L.; Buzhinsky, O.; Evsin, A.; Gordeev, A.; Grunin, A.; Klimov, N.; Kurnaev, V.; Mazul, I.; Otroshchenko, V.; Putric, A.; Sadovskiy, Ya.; Shigin, P.; Vergazov, S.; Zakharov, A.

    2015-08-01

    Boron carbide was proposed as a material of in-situ protecting coating for tungsten tiles of ITER divertor. To prove this concept the project including investigation of regimes of plasma deposition of B4C coating on tungsten and tests of boron carbide layer in ITER-like is started recently. The paper contends the first results of the project. The results of B4C coating irradiation by the plasma pulses of QSPU-T plasma accelerator are presented. The new device capable of B4C film deposition on tungsten and testing of the films and materials with ITER-like heat loads and ion- and electron irradiation is described. The results of B4C coating deposition and testing of both tungsten substrate and coating are shown and discussed.

  2. Final design review of boron carbide safety rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The object of this paper discusses the design review of the boron carbide safety rod for the Westinghouse Savannah River Company. This paper reviewed information presented by personnel of the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) Equipment Engineering Section, SRL Materials Technology Section and Reactor Materials Engineering and Technology. From this report, views, opinions and recommendations were made on the safety rod from materials testing to production

  3. Nanoindentation testing of boron carbide thin film at elevated temperature

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čtvrtlík, Radim; Stranyánek, Martin; Boháč, Petr

    Leoben : Montanuniversität, 2009 - (Eichlseder, W.), s. 29-30 ISBN 978-3-902544-02-5. [Danubia-Adria Symposium on Advances in Experimental Mechanics /26/. Leoben (AT), 23.09.2009-26.09.2009] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN301370701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : boron carbide * nanoindentation testing * elastic modulus Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  4. Micro-homogeneity studies of boron carbide powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have studied the micro-homogeneity of boron carbide powders by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (TXRF) using slurry sampling. To get information on the particle size distributions of the powders, the stabilized slurries of boron carbide powders were nebulized, the aerosols were transported into a Batelle impactor and the droplets were collected on the impactor stages bearing TXRF sample holders. In a first series of measurements, parameters of the impaction like the duration of the impaction and the use of glutinous substance on the sample holders were optimized. The different mass size fractions for industrial boron carbide powders were determined by weight measurements of the fractions collected on the different stages. The established particle size distributions were in the range of 0.5 to >16 μm and found similar to those determined by laser diffraction reported elsewhere. Analyses of the mass fractions by slurry sampling TXRF showed that Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni and Cu within the measurements errors were homogeneously distributed over the mass fractions between 0.5 and 4 μm and that their concentrations agreed with the bulk composition, as determined with ICP-OES subsequent to digestion. However, light underestimates were found at the 5 (Mn) up to 150 μg g-1 (Fe) level. Finally, boron carbide powders were washed out with nitric acid with different concentrations and leaching solutions and the residues were analyzed by ICP-OES and TXRF respectively. It is shown that up to 60% of the residual trace impurities in the powder studied can be removed by leaching with 34% (v/v) of nitric acid. (author)

  5. WSP-Sprayed Boron Carbide Coatings for Fusion Applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matějíček, Jiří; Neufuss, Karel; Ctibor, Pavel; Rohan, Pavel; Dubský, Jiří; Chráska, Pavel; Brožek, Vlastimil

    Düsseldorf: DVS, 2002 - (Lugscheider, E.; Berndt, C.), s. 1-5 ISBN 3-87155-783-8. [International Thermal Spray Conference.. Essen (DE), 04.03.2002-06.03.2002] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/01/0149 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Keywords : thermal spray coatings, boron carbide, fusion reactor materials Subject RIV: JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials

  6. Boron carbide nitride derived from amine-boranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that amine-boranes such as pyridine- or piperazine-borane can be converted into infusible polymers by thermal crosslinking at temperatures up to 420 degrees C. Further rise of the temperature up to 1050 degrees C in argon results in transformation of the polymers into black residues. Microstructural (TEM/EELS, ESCA) and chemical investigations indicate the presence of single phase boron carbide nitrides which exhibit a graphite-like, turbostratic structure with a homogeneous distribution of the elements B, N, and C. Subsequent annealing at 2200 degrees C in argon gives rise to crystallization of the pyrolytic material generating the thermodynamically stable phases BN, C, and B4C. The semiconducting properties of the X-ray amorphous boron carbide nitride synthesized at 1050 degrees C depend on the B/N/C-ratio which can be influenced by the type of amine-borane-precursor and by the applied atmosphere (Ar or NH3) during pyrolysis. The amine-boranes can be converted into boron carbide nitride- and BN-monoliths at 1050 degrees C under argon or reactive gas (NH3), respectively. The monoliths are transformed into composites with 91% rel. density containing BN, C, and B4C when heated up to 2200 degrees C

  7. Properties of boron-carbide based nanotubular structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: One of the most important areas of search for a new generation of superconductors is amongst layered A1B2-type systems. One such structure, LiBC, which is isovalent with, and structurally similar to, the superconductor MgB2, has recently attracted attention due to the nature of its electronic structure. It was found by Rosner et al., that the character of the Fermi surface of hole-doped LiBC is very similar to the features which lead to superconductivity in MgB2 at TC ∼ 40 K. Exploration of the novel properties of tubular analogues of layered and crystalline structures is another promising trend in the search for novel superconductors. Carbon nanotubes, for example, have been found tp have a superconducting transition temperature, TC, of approximately 0.55 K. A number of interesting attempts to model the properties of hypothetical nanotubular modifications of layered A1B2 and A1B2 - type ternary suicides have also been performed recently. We have proposed a new class of charged Boron-Carbide nanotubes (BC(-)) which correspond to a charged backbone structure for the hypothetical LiBC nanotubes. In the present work we discuss the energetics and electronic structure of these charged Boron-Carbide nanotubes, and the effects of hole-doping of these structures. We also present some preliminary results of calculations of the vibrational properties of charged and hole-doped Boron-Carbide nanotubes

  8. Sintering of nano crystalline silicon carbide by doping with boron carbide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M S Datta; A K Bandyopadhyay; B Chaudhuri

    2002-06-01

    Sinterable nano silicon carbide powders of mean particle size (37 nm) were prepared by attrition milling and chemical processing of an acheson type alpha silicon carbide having mean particle size of 0.39 m (390 nm). Pressureless sintering of these powders was achieved by addition of boron carbide of 0.5 wt% together with carbon of 1 wt% at 2050°C at vacuum (3 mbar) for 15 min. Nearly 99% sintered density was obtained. The mechanism of sintering was studied by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. This study shows that the mechanism is a solid-state sintering process. Polytype transformation from 6H to 4H was observed.

  9. Superconductivity in heavily boron-doped silicon carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Kriener, Takahiro Muranaka, Junya Kato, Zhi-An Ren, Jun Akimitsu and Yoshiteru Maeno

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The discoveries of superconductivity in heavily boron-doped diamond in 2004 and silicon in 2006 have renewed the interest in the superconducting state of semiconductors. Charge-carrier doping of wide-gap semiconductors leads to a metallic phase from which upon further doping superconductivity can emerge. Recently, we discovered superconductivity in a closely related system: heavily boron-doped silicon carbide. The sample used for that study consisted of cubic and hexagonal SiC phase fractions and hence this led to the question which of them participated in the superconductivity. Here we studied a hexagonal SiC sample, free from cubic SiC phase by means of x-ray diffraction, resistivity, and ac susceptibility.

  10. Structural phase transitions in boron carbide under stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korotaev, P.; Pokatashkin, P.; Yanilkin, A.

    2016-01-01

    Structural transitions in boron carbide B4C under stress were studied by means of first-principles molecular dynamics in the framework of density functional theory. The behavior depends strongly on degree of non-hydrostatic stress. Under hydrostatic stress continuous bending of the three-atom C-B-C chain was observed up to 70 GPa. The presence of non-hydrostatic stress activates abrupt reversible chain bending, which is displacement of the central boron atom in the chain with the formation of weak bonds between this atom and atoms in the nearby icosahedra. Such structural change can describe a possible reversible phase transition in dynamical loading experiments. High non-hydrostatic stress achieved in uniaxial loading leads to disordering of the initial structure. The formation of carbon chains is observed as one possible transition route.

  11. Depressurization amorphization of single-crystal boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, X Q; Tang, Z; Zhang, L; Guo, J J; Jin, C Q; Zhang, Y; Goto, T; McCauley, J W; Chen, M W

    2009-02-20

    We report depressurization amorphization of single-crystal boron carbide (B4C) investigated by in situ high-pressure Raman spectroscopy. It was found that localized amorphization of B4C takes place during unloading from high pressures, and nonhydrostatic stresses play a critical role in the high-pressure phase transition. First-principles molecular dynamics simulations reveal that the depressurization amorphization results from pressure-induced irreversible bending of C-B-C atomic chains cross-linking 12 atom icosahedra at the rhombohedral vertices. PMID:19257688

  12. 13C NMR spectroscopy of amorphous hydrogenated carbon and amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the 13C NMR spectrum of amorphous hydrogenated carbon and boron carbide. The amorphous hydrogenated carbon spectra consist primarily of an sp3 line at 40 ppm and an sp2 line at 140 ppm and are in reasonable agreement with the recent theoretical calculations of Mauri, Pfrommer, and Louie, but there are some notable discrepancies. The amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide spectra are very different from those of amorphous hydrogenated carbon, being dominated by one line at 15 ppm. We interpret this line as due to carbon bound in boron carbide icosahedra, because polycrystalline boron carbide with boron carbide icosahedra as the unit cell gives very similar NMR spectra. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  13. Fabrication and characterization of carbon and boron carbide nanostructured materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynaud, Sara

    Carbon is present in nature in a variety of allotropes and chemical compounds. Due to reduced dimensionality, nanostructured carbon materials, i.e. single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), are characterized by unique physical and chemical properties. There is a potential for SWNTs use as biological probes and assists for tunable tissue growth in biomedical applications. However, the presumed cytotoxicity of SWNTs requires investigation of the risks of their incorporation into living systems. Boron is not found in nature in elementary form. Boron based materials are chemically complex and exist in various polymorphic forms, i.e. boron carbide (BC). Because BC is a lightweight material with exceptional mechanical and elastic properties, it is the ideal candidate for armor and ballistic applications. However, practical use of BC as armor material is limited because of its anomalous glass-like behaviour at high velocity impacts, which has been linked to stress-induced structural instability in one of BC polymorphs, B12(CCC). Theoretical calculations suggest that formation of B12(CCC) in BC could be suppressed by silicon doping. In the first part of this thesis, biocompatibility of SWNTs is investigated. It is shown that under normal cell implantation conditions, the electrical conductivity of the SWNTs decreases due to an increase in structural disorder. This research suggests that SWNTs can be functionalized by protein and biological cells reducing the risk of cytotoxicity. In the second part of this thesis, boron carbide nanostructured materials are synthesized and investigated. Radio frequency sputtering deposition technique is employed for fabrication of BC (Si free) and BC:Si thin films. Variation of plasma conditions and temperature are found to affect chemical composition, adhesion to the substrate and morphology of the films. It is shown that BC films are predominantly amorphous and a small addition of Si largely improves their mechanical properties. In addition

  14. Boron carbide composite carbon material, method of manufacturing the same and plasma facing material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A boron carbide composite material of the present invention is formed by compositing boron carbide, which is a material suitable as a plasma facing material especially for a thermonuclear reactor. Boron carbide is filled in open cells of a carbon fiber-carbon composite material containing carbon fibers and a carbon matrix. In addition, a boron carbide film is formed on the surface of the composite material. A CVD method and a plasma flaming method are generally known, but they involve problems of occurrence of cracks and peeling of coating film due to thermal stresses. Then, a boron compound is chemically reacted with the surface of a carbon material to convert the carbon on the surface to boron carbide. The composite material contains carbon fibers oriented in one direction, and a boron carbide coating film is formed on the plasma facing surface. With such a constitution, there can be obtained a useful plasma facing material which has excellent strength especially in the direction of the fibers and having heat resistance, chemical stability and ware resistance even after the boron carbide coating film is exhausted and the base material is exposed. (T.M.)

  15. Electron microscopy study of radiation effects in boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron carbide is a disordered non-stoechiometric material with a strongly microtwinned polycristallyne microstructure. This ceramic is among the candidate materials for the first wall coating in fusion reactor and is used as a neutron absorber in the control rods of fast breeder reactors. The present work deals with the nature of radiation damage in this solid. Because of helium internal production, neutron irradiated boron carbide is affected by swelling and by a strong microcracking which can break up a pellet in fine powder. These processes are rather intensitive to the irradiation parameters (temperature, flux and even neutron spectrum). Transmission electron microscopy of samples irradiated by the fast neutrons of a reactor, the electrons of a high voltage electron microscope and of samples implanted with helium ions was used to understand the respective roles of helium and point defects in the processes of swelling and microcracking. The design of an irradiation chamber for helium implantation at controlled temperature from 600 to 17000C was an important technical part of this work

  16. Frequency mixing in boron carbide laser ablation plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oujja, M.; Benítez-Cañete, A.; Sanz, M.; Lopez-Quintas, I.; Martín, M.; Nalda, R. de, E-mail: r.nalda@iqfr.csic.es; Castillejo, M.

    2015-05-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Two-color frequency mixing has been studied in a laser ablation boron carbide plasma. • A space- and time-resolved study mapped the nonlinear optical species in the plasma. • The nonlinear process maximizes when charge recombination is expected to be completed. • Neutral atoms and small molecules are the main nonlinear species in this medium. • Evidence points to six-wave mixing as the most likely process. - Abstract: Nonlinear frequency mixing induced by a bichromatic field (1064 nm + 532 nm obtained from a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser) in a boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) plasma generated through laser ablation under vacuum is explored. A UV beam at the frequency of the fourth harmonic of the fundamental frequency (266 nm) was generated. The dependence of the efficiency of the process as function of the intensities of the driving lasers differs from the expected behavior for four-wave mixing, and point toward a six-wave mixing process. The frequency mixing process was strongly favored for parallel polarizations of the two driving beams. Through spatiotemporal mapping, the conditions for maximum efficiency were found for a significant delay from the ablation event (200 ns), when the medium is expected to be a low-ionized plasma. No late components of the harmonic signal were detected, indicating a largely atomized medium.

  17. Boron carbide neutron screen for GRR-1 neutron spectrum tailoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presence of fast neutron spectra in new reactor concepts (such as Gas Cooled Fast Reactor, new generation Sodium Cooled Fast Reactor, Lead Fast Reactor, Accelerator Driven System and nuclear Fusion Reactors) is expected to induce a strong impact on the contained materials, including structural materials (e.g. steels), nuclear fuels, neutron reflecting materials (e.g. beryllium) and tritium breeding materials (for fusion reactors). Therefore, effective operation of these reactors will require extensive testing of their components, which must be performed under neutronic conditions representative of those expected to prevail inside the reactor cores when in operation. Depending on the material, the requirements of a test irradiation can vary. In this work preliminary studies were performed to observe the behavior of the neutron spectrum within a boron carbide neutron screen inserted in a hypothetical reflector test hole of the Greek Research Reactor. Four different screen configurations were simulated with Monte Carlo code TRIPOLI-4. The obtained data showed that the insertion of boron carbide caused not only elimination of the thermal (E < 1 eV) component of the neutron energy spectrum but also absorption of a considerable proportion of the intermediate energy neutrons (1x10-6 MeV < E < 1 MeV). (author)

  18. Structural and mechanical properties of activated sintered boron carbide-based materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron carbide based materials (B4C-MexIV-VIBy) were obtained by pressureless sintering at 2150--2250 C in the presence of some transition metal (IV-VI group) carbides (MexIV-VICy, where Me is Ti, V, Cr, and W). The structural and mechanical (micro hardness, abrasive wear resistance) properties of these materials were studied. Changes of the boron carbide lattice parameters were observed after sintering. EDS analysis showed the presence of a transition metal phase in the boron carbide structure. A considerable increase in microhardness (76 GPa) and abrasive wear resistance values of the sintered materials (1.8 times as compared to pure hot-pressed B4C) was registered. A new class of superhard boron carbide-based materials was obtained by pressureless sintering. The materials processed by this method are promising for high performance applications

  19. Embedding Ba Monolayers and Bilayers in Boron Carbide Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhiyang; Luo, Jian; Shi, Baiou; Zhao, Jiong; Harmer, Martin P.; Zhu, Jing

    2015-11-01

    Aberration corrected high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM) was employed to study the distribution of barium atoms on the surfaces and in the interiors of boron carbide based nanowires. Barium based dopants, which were used to control the crystal growth, adsorbed to the surfaces of the boron-rich crystals in the form of nanometer-thick surficial films (a type of surface complexion). During the crystal growth, these dopant-based surface complexions became embedded inside the single crystalline segments of fivefold boron-rich nanowires collectively, where they were converted to more ordered monolayer and bilayer modified complexions. Another form of bilayer complexion stabilized at stacking faults has also been identified. Numerous previous works suggested that dopants/impurities tended to segregate at the stacking faults or twinned boundaries. In contrast, our study revealed the previously-unrecognized possibility of incorporating dopants and impurities inside an otherwise perfect crystal without the association to any twin boundary or stacking fault. Moreover, we revealed the amount of barium dopants incorporated was non-equilibrium and far beyond the bulk solubility, which might lead to unique properties.

  20. Boron carbide particles formed from an amorphous boron/graphite powder mixture using a shock-wave technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron carbide (B4C) particles with filamental, distorted ellipsoidal, platelike, and polyhedral shapes were formed from vapor generated from an amorphous boron/graphite powder mixture with 14% starting density using a cylindrical shock-wave technique. The crystal phases of shocked compact and microstructures of the B4C particles were characterized by X-ray diffractometry and electron microscopy, respectively

  1. Characterization of boron carbide particles and its shielding behavior against neutron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • B4C was characterized by XRD, SEM, EDS, FT-IR and Raman Spectroscopy. • B4C was investigated for the neutron shielding behavior analysis. • Neutron permeability experiments were moderated in the Howitzer using Ra–Be source. • The pellet with 12.5 g B4C powder had the lowest neutron permeability rate. • Total macroscopic cross sections found between 1.491 ± 0.0074 and 0.722 ± 0.0071 cm-1. - Abstract: Boron minerals, considered future essential materials, can be used as raw materials in the production of boron carbide. In this study, boron carbide, the hardest material after diamond and cubic boron nitride, is characterized and the neutron shielding behavior is investigated. The characterization and structural evaluation of the boron carbide sample was performed using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) and Raman Spectroscopy. In addition, a neutron Howitzer was used to measure the neutron permeability of boron carbide samples of various thicknesses. The sample composed of 12.5 g of boron carbide powder and 3 g of Wax® had the lowest neutron permeability rate (62.1%). Pellet 3 had the smallest total macroscopic cross section of boron carbide particles, 0.722 ± 0.0071 cm−1

  2. Determination of isotopic composition of boron in boron carbide by TIMS and PIGE: an inter-comparison study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper reports a comparison of results on the determination of isotopic composition of boron in boron carbide (B4C) samples by Thermal Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (TIMS) and Particle Induced Gamma ray Spectrometry (PIGE). B4C samples having varying boron isotopic composition (natural, enriched with respect to 10B) and their synthetic mixtures) have been analysed by both the techniques. The 10B atom% was found to be in the range of 20-67%. (author)

  3. Effect of boron carbide on primary crystallization of chromium cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Studnicki

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available In the paper results of the influence of boron carbide (B4C as inoculant of abrasion-resisting chromium cast iron (about 2,8% carbon and 18% chromium on primary crystallization researches are presented. Boron carbide dispersion was introduced at the bottom of pouring ladle before tap of liquid cast iron. In this investigations were used three different quantities of inoculant in amounts 0,1%; 0,2% and 0,3% with relation to bath weight. It has been demonstrated that such small additions of boron carbide change primary crystallization parameters, particularly temperature characteristic of process, their time and kinetics.

  4. Priority compositions of boron carbide crystals obtained by self-propagating high-temperature synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarev, V. I.; Konovalikhin, S. V.; Kovalev, I. D.; Vershinnikov, V. I.

    2015-09-01

    Splitting of reflections from boron carbide has been found for the first time by an X-ray diffraction study of polycrystalline mixture of boron carbide В15- х С х , (1.5 ≤ x ≤ 3) and its magnesium derivative C4B25Mg1.42. An analysis of reflection profiles shows that this splitting is due to the presence of boron carbide phases of different compositions in the sample, which are formed during crystal growth. The composition changes from В12.9С2.1 to В12.4С2.6.

  5. Compatibility of heat resistant alloys with boron carbide, 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper includes an experimental result of out-of-pile compatibility and capsule design for irradiation test in Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR). The compatibility between sheath material and neutron absorber materials for control rod devices (CRD) was examined for potential use in a very high temperature reactor (VHTR) which is under development at JAERI. The purpose of the compatibility tests are preliminary evaluation of safety prior to irradiation tests. Preliminary compatibility evaluation was concerned with three items as follows : 1) Lithium effects on the penetrating reaction of Incoloy 800H alloy in contact with a mixture of boronated graphite and lithium hydroxide powders, 2) Short term tensile properties of Incoloy 800H and Hastelloy XR alloy reacted with boronated graphite and fracture mode analysis, 3) Reaction behavior of both alloys under transient power conditions of a VHTR. It was clear that the reaction rate constant of the Incoloy 800H alloy was accelerated by doping lithium hydroxide into the boron carbide and graphite powder. The mechanical properties of Incoloy 800H and Hastelloy XR alloy reacted with boronated graphite were decreased. Ultimate tensile strength and tensile ductilities at temperatures over 850 deg C were reduced, but there was no change in the proof (yield) stress. Both alloys exhibited a brittle intergranular fracture mode during transient power conditions of a VHTR and also exhibited severe penetration. Irradiation capsules for compatibility test were designed to simulate three irradiation conditions of VHTR: 1) steady state for VHTR, 2) Transient power condition, 3) Service limited life of CRD. Capsule irradiation experiments have been carried out satisfactorily and thus confirm the validity of the capsule design procedure. (author)

  6. Microalloying Boron Carbide with Silicon to Achieve Dramatically Improved Ductility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Qi; Goddard, William A

    2014-12-01

    Boron carbide (B4C) is a hard material whose value for extended engineering applications such as body armor; is limited by its brittleness under impact. To improve the ductility while retaining hardness, we used density functional theory to examine modifying B4C ductility through microalloying. We found that replacing the CBC chain in B4C with Si-Si, denoted as (B11Cp)-Si2, dramatically improves the ductility, allowing a continuous shear to a large strain of 0.802 (about twice of B4C failure strain) without brittle failure. Moreover, (B11C)-Si2 retains low density and high hardness. This ductility improvement arises because the Si-Si linkages enable the icosahedra accommodate additional shear by rotating instead of breaking bonds. PMID:26278950

  7. Dynamical conductivity of boron carbide: heavily damped plasma vibrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werheit, Helmut; Gerlach, Guido

    2014-10-22

    The FIR reflectivity spectra of boron carbide, measured down to ω~10 cm(-1) between 100 and 800 K, are essentially determined by heavily damped plasma vibrations. The spectra are fitted applying the classical Drude-Lorentz theory of free carriers. The fitting Parameter Π=ωp/ωτ yields the carrier densities, which are immediately correlated with the concentration of structural defects in the homogeneity range. This correlation is proved for band-type and hopping conductivity. The effective mass of free holes in the valence band is estimated at m*/me~2.5. The mean free path of the free holes has the order of the cell parameters. PMID:25273152

  8. Infiltration processing of boron carbide-, boron-, and boride-reactive metal cermets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This patent describes a method of fabricating metal-ceramic composites from previously formed ceramic precursor starting constituents selected from boron-carbide, boron and borides and metals reactive therewith selected from reactive metals, alloys thereof, and compounds thereof which reduce to reactive metals or alloys thereof. It comprises: chemically pretreating the previously formed starting constituents of a ceramic precursor; consolidating the chemically pretreated starting constituents into a porous ceramic precursor; infiltrating molten reactive metal into the chemically pretreated ceramic precursor; wherein the step of chemically pretreating the starting constituents of the ceramic precursor alters the surface chemistry to enhance infiltration of the precursor by the molten reactive metal by slowing the kinetics of reaction relative to the kinetics of densification

  9. Phase and property studies of boron carbide-boron nitride composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on boron carbide-boron nitride particulate composites that were fabricated by vacuum hot-pressing. Near-theoretical densities of B4C were obtained, but percent theoretical densities decreased with increasing amounts of BN. The grain size of B4C and BN was not affected by composition, but the amount of twinning in B4C decreased with increasing BN content. No third phase was found at the B4C-BN interface by analytical STEM analysis. Lattice parameter measurements indicated slight solubility of B4C in BN, but no solubility of BN in B4C for samples hot-pressed at 2250 degrees C. Room-temperature flexural strength measurements revealed a sharply decreasing strength with increasing BN content up to 40% BN, and then relatively constant values with greater amounts of BN

  10. Mechanical analysis of a boron carbide control rod for pressurized water reactor application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A control rod using boron carbide as the neutron poison was analyzed for use in a pressurized water reactor. The motivation for this study stems from the increasing use of boron carbide in control rod elements for large commercial nuclear power stations and the potential safety hazard related to excessive inelastic cladding deformation due to pellet-cladding interaction. As such, the radiation induced dilatation of the boron carbide pellets and the ensuing pellet-cladding interaction phenomena were the dominant concerns of this investigation. Based on the small deformation theory of linear elasticity, the method developed herein can be used to predict that rod burnup which initiates the yielding of the cladding. The details of the physical properties of boron carbide and related design data required for the analysis are included

  11. The effects of stoichiometry on the mechanical properties of icosahedral boron carbide under loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, DeCarlos E; McCauley, James W; Wright, T W

    2012-12-19

    The effects of stoichiometry on the atomic structure and the related mechanical properties of boron carbide (B(4)C) have been studied using density functional theory and quantum molecular dynamics simulations. Computational cells of boron carbide containing up to 960 atoms and spanning compositions ranging from 6.7% to 26.7% carbon were used to determine the effects of stoichiometry on the atomic structure, elastic properties, and stress-strain response as a function of hydrostatic, uniaxial, and shear loading paths. It was found that different stoichiometries, as well as variable atomic arrangements within a fixed stoichiometry, can have a significant impact on the yield stress of boron carbide when compressed uniaxially (by as much as 70% in some cases); the significantly reduced strength of boron carbide under shear loading is also demonstrated. PMID:23165091

  12. Methods of synthesizing boron carbide powder and controlling its sintering piece density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The boron carbide powder is synthesized directly and its composition, lattice constant and mean particle size are measured, the optimum technological parameters of synthetic reaction are determined experimentally. The volume density control method of hot pressing sintering boron carbide are studied, and its microstructure and properties are tested. The maximal deviation of volume density of sintering boron carbide is +-2% of theory density (T.D.), when position limitation piece in the furnace is used to control the piece density precision. The various property indexes of the sintered boron carbide with 92% T.D. of volume density can reach or exceed the various reference values required by the performance of reactor. The bending strength of the sintered piece gets about 10% lower when temperature increases from normal temperature to 600 degree C

  13. The effects of stoichiometry on the mechanical properties of icosahedral boron carbide under loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of stoichiometry on the atomic structure and the related mechanical properties of boron carbide (B4C) have been studied using density functional theory and quantum molecular dynamics simulations. Computational cells of boron carbide containing up to 960 atoms and spanning compositions ranging from 6.7% to 26.7% carbon were used to determine the effects of stoichiometry on the atomic structure, elastic properties, and stress-strain response as a function of hydrostatic, uniaxial, and shear loading paths. It was found that different stoichiometries, as well as variable atomic arrangements within a fixed stoichiometry, can have a significant impact on the yield stress of boron carbide when compressed uniaxially (by as much as 70% in some cases); the significantly reduced strength of boron carbide under shear loading is also demonstrated.

  14. Synthesis of boron carbide nano particles using polyvinyl alcohol and boric acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Fathi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study boron carbide nano particles were synthesized using polyvinyl alcohol and boric acid. First, initial samples with molar ratio of PVA : H3BO3 = 2.7:2.2 were prepared. Next, samples were pyrolyzed at 600, 700 and 800°C followed by heat treatment at 1400, 1500 and 1600°C. FTIR analysis was implemented before and after pyrolysis in order to study the reaction pathway. XRD technique was used to study the composition of produced specimens of boron carbide. Moreover, SEM and PSA analysis were also carried out to study the particle size and morphology of synthesized boron carbide. Finally, according to implemented tests and analyses, carbon-free boron carbide nano particles with an average size of 81 nm and mainly spherical morphology were successfully produced via this method.

  15. Preliminary study of neutron absorption by concrete with boron carbide addition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdullah, Yusof, E-mail: yusofabd@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my; Yusof, Mohd Reusmaazran; Zali, Nurazila Mat; Ahmad, Megat Harun Al Rashid Megat; Yazid, Hafizal [Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Ariffin, Fatin Nabilah Tajul; Ahmad, Sahrim [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Hamid, Roszilah [Department of Civil and Structural Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Mohamed, Abdul Aziz [College of Engineering, Universiti Tenaga National, Jalan Ikram-Uniten, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-02-12

    Concrete has become a conventional material in construction of nuclear reactor due to its properties like safety and low cost. Boron carbide was added as additives in the concrete construction as it has a good neutron absorption property. The sample preparation for concrete was produced with different weight percent of boron carbide powder content. The neutron absorption rate of these samples was determined by using a fast neutron source of Americium-241/Be (Am-Be 241) and detection with a portable backscattering neutron detector. Concrete with 20 wt % of boron carbide shows the lowest count of neutron transmitted and this indicates the most neutrons have been absorbed by the concrete. Higher boron carbide content may affect the concrete strength and other properties.

  16. Standard specification for nuclear-grade boron carbide powder

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This specification defines the chemical and physical requirements for boron carbide powder intended for a variety of nuclear applications. Because each application has a different need for impurity and boron requirements, three different chemical compositions of powder are specified. In using this specification, it is necessary to dictate which type of powder is intended to be used. In general, the intended applications for the various powder types are as follows: 1.1.1 Type 1—For use as particulate material in nuclear reactor core applications. 1.1.2 Type 2—Powder that will be further processed into a fabricated shape for use in a nuclear reactor core or used in non-core applications when the powder directly or indirectly may cause adverse effects on structural components, such as halide stress corrosion of stainless steel. 1.1.3 Type 3—Powder that will be used for non-core applications or special in-core applications. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other ...

  17. Boron carbide, a potentially dangerous material in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Certain kinds of nuclear reactors, e.g. Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) are controlled by rods containing some neutron absorbing material. A common material of that kind is boron carbide (B4C). The control rods are made from stainless steel, and have cavities filled with B4C. At first sight, this appears to be an ideal combination, as there is a high concentration of the neutron absorbing element boron, and both materials are comparatively inert. At high temperatures they may, however, react violently producing a chemically aggressive melt. The reaction is exothermic and once started, it continues spontaneously. Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA) has been used to measure the reaction enthalpy for a mixture of 10% (by weight) of B4C and 90% of stainless steel. A reaction enthalpy of 4.37 ± 0.19 kJ/g B4C has been found. The reaction starts at 1100 deg. C, or even lower temperature. In a reactor accident, this may cause the control rods to melt at a temperature that is more than 400 degrees lower than the melting point of stainless steel. Furthermore, it has been found that the resulting melt is able to dissolve at least its own weight of stainless steel. Thus, in addition to loss of control rods, the reaction may cause a premature failure of the reactor vessel, as the bottom may dissolve in the molten control rods. (authors)

  18. Deposition from gas-phase of boron-carbide on graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deposition of boron-carbide on graphite was investigated, as a step in the development of carbon fibers/boron-carbide composite. Experiment were first conducted in a 'hot-wall' reactor, then in a 'cold-wall' reactor, which enables better process control and higher tempratures. Various susceptor configurations were utilized as to enable adequate characterization, good material yield, process simplicity, and reproducibility of the results

  19. Study on Processing Conditions of Aluminum Matrix Composites Reinforced with Boron Carbide Particles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu Xueying; Zhang Hong; Xi Huizhi; Yi Xiaosu

    2004-01-01

    Different pre-heating of boron carbide particles for reinforcement and different processing conditions were studied in this work. Being one of the most cost-effective industrial methods, conventional melt stir-casting route was utilized.Result showed that the boron carbide particles distributed well for a suitable pre-heating temperature and processed in air.No reaction product was found at the A1-B4C interfaces at the resolution limit of SEM used in that way.

  20. Study and optimization of the carbothermic reduction process for obtaining boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron carbide - B sub(4)C - is a ceramic material of technological importance due to its hardness and high chemical and thermal stabilities. Moreover, its high neutron capture cross section makes it suitable for application as neutron absorber in nuclear technology. The process for obtaining carbothermally derived boron carbide has been studied in two steps: firstly, the parameters of the boric acid → boron oxide dehydration reaction have been defined; secondly, the optimization of the carbothermal reduction reaction using boron oxide has been undertaken looking for boron carbide having low level of free carbon. The starting materials as well as the main products have been studied by chemical and spectrographic analyses, X-ray diffractometry, granulometric classification and scanning electron microscopy. The optimization of the carbothermic reduction process allowed for the development and set up of a fabrication procedure yielding high quality B sub(4) C powders, starting from low cost and easily available (in the Brazilian market) raw materials. (author)

  1. The effect of aluminum on the microstructure and phase composition of boron carbide infiltrated with silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reaction-bonded boron carbide is prepared by pressureless infiltration of boron carbide preforms with molten silicon in a graphite furnace under vacuum. The presence of Al2O3 parts in the heated zone, even though not in contact with the boron carbide preform, causes aluminum to appear in the liquid silicon. The formation of aluminum sub-oxide (Al2O) stands behind the transport of aluminum into the composite. The presence of aluminum in the boron carbide-silicon system accelerates the transformation of the initial boron carbide particles into Bx(C,Si,Al)y and Al1.36B24C4, newly formed carbide phases. It also leads during cooling to the formation of some Si-Al solid solution particles. The effect of Al on the microstructural evolution is well accounted for by the calculated isothermal section of the quaternary Al-B-C-Si phase diagram, according to which the solubility of boron in liquid silicon increases with increasing aluminum content. This feature is a key factor in the evolution of the microstructure of the infiltrated composites.

  2. The effect of aluminum on the microstructure and phase composition of boron carbide infiltrated with silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayun, S., E-mail: hayuns@bgu.ac.il [Department of Materials Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, P.O. Box 653, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel); Dilman, H.; Dariel, M.P.; Frage, N. [Department of Materials Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, P.O. Box 653, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel)

    2009-12-15

    Reaction-bonded boron carbide is prepared by pressureless infiltration of boron carbide preforms with molten silicon in a graphite furnace under vacuum. The presence of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} parts in the heated zone, even though not in contact with the boron carbide preform, causes aluminum to appear in the liquid silicon. The formation of aluminum sub-oxide (Al{sub 2}O) stands behind the transport of aluminum into the composite. The presence of aluminum in the boron carbide-silicon system accelerates the transformation of the initial boron carbide particles into B{sub x}(C,Si,Al){sub y} and Al{sub 1.36}B{sub 24}C{sub 4}, newly formed carbide phases{sub .} It also leads during cooling to the formation of some Si-Al solid solution particles. The effect of Al on the microstructural evolution is well accounted for by the calculated isothermal section of the quaternary Al-B-C-Si phase diagram, according to which the solubility of boron in liquid silicon increases with increasing aluminum content. This feature is a key factor in the evolution of the microstructure of the infiltrated composites.

  3. Enhancement of oxidation resistance via a self-healing boron carbide coating on diamond particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Youhong; Meng, Qingnan; Qian, Ming; Liu, Baochang; Gao, Ke; Ma, Yinlong; Wen, Mao; Zheng, Weitao

    2016-02-01

    A boron carbide coating was applied to diamond particles by heating the particles in a powder mixture consisting of H3BO3, B and Mg. The composition, bond state and coverage fraction of the boron carbide coating on the diamond particles were investigated. The boron carbide coating prefers to grow on the diamond (100) surface than on the diamond (111) surface. A stoichiometric B4C coating completely covered the diamond particle after maintaining the raw mixture at 1200 °C for 2 h. The contribution of the boron carbide coating to the oxidation resistance enhancement of the diamond particles was investigated. During annealing of the coated diamond in air, the priory formed B2O3, which exhibits a self-healing property, as an oxygen barrier layer, which protected the diamond from oxidation. The formation temperature of B2O3 is dependent on the amorphous boron carbide content. The coating on the diamond provided effective protection of the diamond against oxidation by heating in air at 1000 °C for 1 h. Furthermore, the presence of the boron carbide coating also contributed to the maintenance of the static compressive strength during the annealing of diamond in air.

  4. Synthesis of boron carbide nanoflakes via a bamboo-based carbon thermal reduction method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: B4C nanoflakes were synthesized via a facile and cost-effective bamboo-based carbon thermal reduction method. Highlights: •Boron carbide nanoflakes were successfully synthesized via a bamboo-based carbon thermal reduction method. •A fluoride-assisted VLS nucleation and VS growth mechanism were proposed. •We studied the resistivity of boron carbide nanoflakes via in situ TEM techniques for the first time. -- Abstract: Boron carbide nanoflakes have been successfully synthesized by a facile and cost-effective bamboo-based carbon thermal reduction method. The majority of the boron carbide products exhibited a flake-like morphology with lateral dimensions of 0.5–50 μm in width and more than 50 μm in length, while the thickness was less than 150 nm. The structural, morphological, and elemental analyses demonstrated that these nanoflakes grew via the fluoride-assisted vapor–liquid–solid combined with vapor–solid growth mechanism. The corresponding growth model was proposed. In addition, the electrical property of individual boron carbide nanoflake was investigated by an in situ two point method inside a transmission electron microscope. The resistivity of boron carbide nanoflakes was measured to be 0.14 MΩ cm

  5. An investigation on gamma attenuation behaviour of titanium diboride reinforced boron carbide–silicon carbide composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, titanium diboride (TiB2) reinforced boron carbide–silicon carbide composites were investigated against Cs-137 and Co-60 gamma radioisotope sources. The composite materials include 70% boron carbide (B4C) and 30% silicon carbide (SiC) by volume. Titanium diboride was reinforced to boron carbide–silicon carbide composites as additive 2% and 4% by volume. Average particle sizes were 3.851 µm and 170 nm for titanium diboride which were reinforced to the boron carbide silicon carbide composites. In the experiments the gamma transmission technique was used to investigate the gamma attenuation properties of the composite materials. Linear and mass attenuation coefficients of the samples were determined. Theoretical mass attenuation coefficients were calculated from XCOM computer code. The experimental results and theoretical results were compared and evaluated with each other. It could be said that increasing the titanium diboride ratio causes higher linear attenuation values against Cs-137 and Co-60 gamma radioisotope sources. In addition decreasing the titanium diboride particle size also increases the linear and mass attenuation properties of the titanium diboride reinforced boron carbide–silicon carbide composites. - Highlights: • Linear and mass attenuation coefficients of B4C–SiC composites were investigated. • Reinforcing titanium diboride causes higher linear attenuation coefficients. • Decreasing titanium diboride particle size increases linear and mass attenuation coefficients. • Nano particle sized samples much closer to the theoretical results than micro sized ones

  6. Photoluminescence and Raman spectroscopy characterization of boron- and nitrogen-doped 6H silicon carbide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ou, Yiyu; Jokubavicius, Valdas; Liu, Chuan; Berg, Rolf W.; Linnarsson, Margareta; Kamiyama, Satoshi; Lu, Zhaoyue; Yakimova, Rositza; Syväjärvi, Mikael; Ou, Haiyan

    2011-01-01

    Boron - and nitrogen-doped 6H silicon carbide epilayers grown on low off-axis 6H silicon carbide substrates have been characterized by photoluminescence and Raman spectroscopy. Combined with secondary ion mass spectrometry results, preferable doping type and optimized concentration could be...

  7. Micrometric rods grown by nanosecond pulsed laser deposition of boron carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Quintas, Ignacio; Oujja, Mohamed; Sanz, Mikel; Benitez-Cañete, Antonio [Instituto de Química Física Rocasolano, CSIC, Serrano 119, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Chater, Richard J. [Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Cañamares, Maria Vega [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, Serrano 119, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Marco, José F. [Instituto de Química Física Rocasolano, CSIC, Serrano 119, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Castillejo, Marta, E-mail: marta.castllejo@iqfr.csic.es [Instituto de Química Física Rocasolano, CSIC, Serrano 119, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Micrometric rods obtained by ns pulsed laser deposition of boron carbide at 1064 and 266 nm. • At 1064 nm microrods display crystalline polyhedral shape with sharp edges and flat sides. • Microrods consist of a mixture of boron, boron oxide, boron carbide and aliphatic hydrocarbons. - Abstract: Micrometric size rods have been fabricated via pulsed laser deposition in vacuum from boron carbide targets using nanosecond pulses of 1064 and 266 nm and room temperature Si (1 0 0) substrates. Morphological, structural and chemical characterization of the microrods was made by applying scanning electron microscopy, focussed ion beam microscopy coupled to secondary ion mass spectrometry, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy. Ablation at 1064 nm favours the formation of microrods with high aspect ratio, sharp edges and pyramidal tips, typically 10 μm long with a cross section of around 2 μm × 2 μm. Differently, at 266 nm the microrods are of smaller size and present a more globular aspect. The analyses of the microrods provide information about their crystalline nature and composition, based on a mixture which includes boron, boron oxide and boron carbide, and allows discussion of the wavelength dependent growth mechanisms involved.

  8. Micrometric rods grown by nanosecond pulsed laser deposition of boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Micrometric rods obtained by ns pulsed laser deposition of boron carbide at 1064 and 266 nm. • At 1064 nm microrods display crystalline polyhedral shape with sharp edges and flat sides. • Microrods consist of a mixture of boron, boron oxide, boron carbide and aliphatic hydrocarbons. - Abstract: Micrometric size rods have been fabricated via pulsed laser deposition in vacuum from boron carbide targets using nanosecond pulses of 1064 and 266 nm and room temperature Si (1 0 0) substrates. Morphological, structural and chemical characterization of the microrods was made by applying scanning electron microscopy, focussed ion beam microscopy coupled to secondary ion mass spectrometry, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy. Ablation at 1064 nm favours the formation of microrods with high aspect ratio, sharp edges and pyramidal tips, typically 10 μm long with a cross section of around 2 μm × 2 μm. Differently, at 266 nm the microrods are of smaller size and present a more globular aspect. The analyses of the microrods provide information about their crystalline nature and composition, based on a mixture which includes boron, boron oxide and boron carbide, and allows discussion of the wavelength dependent growth mechanisms involved

  9. Lattice dynamics of {alpha} boron and of boron carbide; Proprietes vibrationnelles du bore {alpha} et du carbure de bore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vast, N

    1999-07-01

    The atomic structure and the lattice dynamics of {alpha} boron and of B{sub 4}C boron carbide have been studied by Density Functional Theory (D.F.T.) and Density Functional Perturbation Theory (D.F.P.T.). The bulk moduli of the unit-cell and of the icosahedron have been investigated, and the equation of state at zero temperature has been determined. In {alpha} boron, Raman diffusion and infrared absorption have been studied under pressure, and the theoretical and experimental Grueneisen coefficients have been compared. In boron carbide, inspection of the theoretical and experimental vibrational spectra has led to the determination of the atomic structure of B{sub 4}C. Finally, the effects of isotopic disorder have been modeled by an exact method beyond the mean-field approximation, and the effects onto the Raman lines has been investigated. The method has been applied to isotopic alloys of diamond and germanium. (author)

  10. Dynamic modulus and damping of boron, silicon carbide, and alumina fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicarlo, J. A.; Williams, W.

    1980-01-01

    The dynamic modulus and damping capacity for boron, silicon carbide, and silicon carbide-coated boron fibers were measured from -190 to 800 C. The single fiber vibration test also allowed measurement of transverse thermal conductivity for the silicon carbide fibers. Temperature-dependent damping capacity data for alumina fibers were calculated from axial damping results for alumina-aluminum composites. The dynamic fiber data indicate essentially elastic behavior for both the silicon carbide and alumina fibers. In contrast, the boron-based fibers are strongly anelastic, displaying frequency-dependent moduli and very high microstructural damping. The single fiber damping results were compared with composite damping data in order to investigate the practical and basic effects of employing the four fiber types as reinforcement for aluminum and titanium matrices.

  11. Gamma scintillator system using boron carbide for neutron detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Galim, Y. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva (Israel); Wengrowicz, U. [NRC-Negev, PO Box 9001, Beer-Sheva 84190 (Israel); Raveh, A. [Advanced Coatings Center at Rotem Industries Ltd., Mishor Yamin, D.N. Arava 86800 (Israel); Orion, I. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva (Israel)

    2014-08-21

    A new approach for neutron detection enhancement to scintillator gamma-ray detectors is suggested. By using a scintillator coupled with a boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) disc, the 478 keV gamma-photon emitted from the excited Li in 94% of the {sup 10}B(n,α){sup 7}Li interactions was detected. This suggests that the performance of existing gamma detection systems in Homeland security applications can be improved. In this study, a B{sub 4}C disc (2 in. diameter, 0.125 in. thick) with ∼19.8% {sup 10}B was used and coupled with a scintillator gamma-ray detector. In addition, the neutron thermalization moderator was studied in order to be able to increase the neutron sensitivity. An improvement in the detector which is easy to assemble, affordable and efficient was demonstrated. Furthermore, a tailored Monte-Carlo code written in MATLAB was developed for validation of the proposed application through efficiency estimation for thermal neutrons. Validation of the code was accomplished by showing that the MATLAB code results were well correlated to a Monte-Carlo MCNP code results. The measured efficiency of the assembled experimental model was observed to be in agreement with both models calculations.

  12. Sintering process study of boron carbide with carbon addition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work studies the pressureless sintering process of boron carbide with carbon addition, in order to obtain absorber pellets to the nuclear reactors PWR. Sintering's tests were made with addition of 1 to 10% weight of carbon in several temperature, to determine the influence of these parameters in sintering process. The original material was leached in sulfochromic solution to remove the free carbon present. Sample sintering microstructure were analyzed by scanning electronic microscopic. Different stages of sintering were observed and we tried to identify the process that avoid the densification. The leached material with sulfochromic solution, as coarse material, showed limited densification during the sintering, showing a pores structure, coarsening, with grain/particle domains separated by interconnected pores. The several stages evolution of densification process denotes that the surface to surface transport leads the structure coarsened. The limited densification coincides with the coarsened microstructure and it can be explained in terms of kinetic and thermodynamic barriers. Carbon additions and powder with smaller particles got easier the densification, that allowed to obtain pellets with densities 97% TD at 22000 C. It's believed that carbon inhibited the surface to surface transport and coarsening, because it would eliminate or control the oxygen activity. (author). 97 refs., 60 figs., 7 tabs

  13. Amorphisation of boron carbide under slow heavy ion irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosset, D.; Miro, S.; Doriot, S.; Moncoffre, N.

    2016-08-01

    Boron carbide B4C is widely used as a neutron absorber in nuclear plants. Most of the post-irradiation examinations have shown that the structure of the material remains crystalline, in spite of very high atomic displacement rates. Here, we have irradiated B4C samples with 4 MeV Au ions with different fluences at room temperature. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy have been performed. The Raman analyses show a high structural disorder at low fluence, around 10-2 displacements per atoms (dpa). However, the TEM observations show that the material remains crystalline up to a few dpa. At high fluence, small amorphous areas a few nanometers large appear in the damaged zone but the long range order is preserved. Moreover, the size and density of the amorphous zones do not significantly grow when the damage increases. On the other hand, full amorphisation is observed in the implanted zone at a Au concentration of about 0.0005. It can be inferred from those results that short range and long range damages arise at highly different fluences, that heavy ions implantation has drastic effects on the structure stability and that in this material self-healing mechanisms are active in the damaged zone.

  14. Tribological behavior of hot-pressed boron carbide with oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The oxidation behavior at 973-1 273 K and the effect of oxidation on the room-temperature tribological properties of hot-pressed boron carbide ceramic were investigated. Oxidized samples were studied by X-ray diffractometer and scanning electron microscopy. It is demonstrated that the oxidation results in the formation of a thin transparent B2O3 film, and the oxide film is severely cracked during cooling due to the thermal expansion mismatch between the oxide film and B4C substrate. B2O3 reacts with moisture in air to form boric acid, which is a kind of solid lubricant. The sliding friction factors of oxidized B4C pair are about 0.05-0.08, compared to 0.25-0.35 of the as-received B4C pair. When the oxidation temperature is up to 1 273 K, severe unstability and increase of friction factor are observed. Visual inspection of the wear track reveals that the lubricant film is broken and some debris particles occur on and around the rubbing surfaces, because the friction interface is rough by the severe etching of grain boundaries.

  15. Gamma scintillator system using boron carbide for neutron detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new approach for neutron detection enhancement to scintillator gamma-ray detectors is suggested. By using a scintillator coupled with a boron carbide (B4C) disc, the 478 keV gamma-photon emitted from the excited Li in 94% of the 10B(n,α)7Li interactions was detected. This suggests that the performance of existing gamma detection systems in Homeland security applications can be improved. In this study, a B4C disc (2 in. diameter, 0.125 in. thick) with ∼19.8% 10B was used and coupled with a scintillator gamma-ray detector. In addition, the neutron thermalization moderator was studied in order to be able to increase the neutron sensitivity. An improvement in the detector which is easy to assemble, affordable and efficient was demonstrated. Furthermore, a tailored Monte-Carlo code written in MATLAB was developed for validation of the proposed application through efficiency estimation for thermal neutrons. Validation of the code was accomplished by showing that the MATLAB code results were well correlated to a Monte-Carlo MCNP code results. The measured efficiency of the assembled experimental model was observed to be in agreement with both models calculations

  16. Investigation on the Effects of Titanium Diboride Particle Size on Radiation Shielding Properties of Titanium Diboride Reinforced Boron Carbide-Silicon Carbide Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.O. Addemir

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Composite materials have wide application areas in industry. Boron Carbide is an important material for nuclear technology. Silicon carbide is a candidate material in the first wall and blankets of fusion power plants. Titanium diboride reinforced boron carbide-silicon carbide composites which were produced from different titanium diboride particle sizes and ratios were studied for searching of the behaviour against the gamma ray. Cs-137 gamma radioisotope was used as gamma source in the experiments which has a single gamma-peak at 0.662 MeV. Gamma transmission technique was used for the measurements. The effects of titanium diboride particle size on radiation attenuation of titanium diboride reinforced boron carbide-silicon carbide composites were evaluated in related with gamma transmission and the results of the experiments were interpreted and compared with each other. Composite materials have wide application areas in industry. Boron Carbide is an important material for nuclear technology. Silicon carbide is a candidate material in the first wall and blankets of fusion power plants. Titanium diboride reinforced boron carbide-silicon carbide composites which were produced from different titanium diboride particle sizes and ratios were studied for searching of the behaviour against the gamma ray. Cs-137 gamma radioisotope was used as gamma source in the experiments which has a single gamma-peak at 0.662 MeV. Gamma transmission technique was used for the measurements. The effects of titanium diboride particle size on radiation attenuation of titanium diboride reinforced boron carbide-silicon carbide composites were evaluated in related with gamma transmission and the results of the experiments were interpreted and compared with each other. Composite materials have wide application areas in industry. Boron Carbide is an important material for nuclear technology. Silicon carbide is a candidate material in the first wall and blankets of fusion

  17. Rim region growth and its composition in reaction bonded boron carbide composites with core-rim structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aluminum was detected in reaction-bonded boron carbide that had been prepared by pressureless infiltration of boron carbide preforms with molten silicon in a graphite furnace under vacuum. The presence of Al2O3 in the heated zone, even though not in contact with the boron carbide preform, stands behind the presence of aluminium in the rim region that interconnects the initial boron carbide particles. The composition of the rim corresponds to the Bx(C,Si,Al)y quaternary carbide phase. The reaction of alumina with graphite and the formation of a gaseous aluminum suboxide (Al2O) accounts for the transfer of aluminum in the melt and, subsequently in the rim regions. The presence of Al increases the solubility of boron in liquid silicon, but with increasing aluminum content the activity of boron decreases. These features dominate the structural evolution of the rim-core in the presence of aluminum in the melt.

  18. Rim region growth and its composition in reaction bonded boron carbide composites with core-rim structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayun, S.; Weizmann, A.; Dilman, H.; Dariel, M. P.; Frage, N.

    2009-06-01

    Aluminum was detected in reaction-bonded boron carbide that had been prepared by pressureless infiltration of boron carbide preforms with molten silicon in a graphite furnace under vacuum. The presence of Al2O3 in the heated zone, even though not in contact with the boron carbide preform, stands behind the presence of aluminium in the rim region that interconnects the initial boron carbide particles. The composition of the rim corresponds to the Bx(C,Si,Al)y quaternary carbide phase. The reaction of alumina with graphite and the formation of a gaseous aluminum suboxide (Al2O) accounts for the transfer of aluminum in the melt and, subsequently in the rim regions. The presence of Al increases the solubility of boron in liquid silicon, but with increasing aluminum content the activity of boron decreases. These features dominate the structural evolution of the rim-core in the presence of aluminum in the melt.

  19. Determination of boron in graphite, boron carbide and glass by ICP-MS, ICP-OES and conventional wet chemical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron is an important element of interest in nuclear reactor materials due to its high neutron absorption cross section (σ0 =3837 barns for 10B). In the present paper, R and D work and routinely used methods have been described for the analysis of case samples (1) Graphite where boron is present at trace levels, (2) Boron Carbide having boron concentration of about 80% and (3) Glass containing 4-6 % boron. (author)

  20. Growth fusion of submicron spherical boron carbide particles by repetitive pulsed laser irradiation in liquid media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied the fabrication of B4C submicron particles by laser irradiation of boron nanoparticles dispersed in an organic solvent. The spherical shape of the formed particles suggests that instantaneous melt formation and solidification by quenching are involved in the particle-forming process. B4C particles gradually became larger with irradiation time at relatively low laser fluence (1.5 J cm-2 pulse-1) by repetitive melting and fusion of the particles, and the B4C yield increased with irradiation time to 90% for 600 min of irradiation. At higher laser fluences, the B4C yield decreased due to the explosive ablation of boron or B4C to form H3BO3, and thus only the larger B4C particles were observed. The dielectric constant of the organic solvent also affected the generated B4C particle size, probably due to the degree of particle aggregation. Thus, this technique can provide a new approach for fabricating spherical submicron particles of ceramic materials, such as carbides, with simple and safe processes. (orig.)

  1. Nickel-boron nanolayer evolution on boron carbide particle surfaces during thermal treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study is focused on reduction of Ni2O3 and B2O3 in the Ni-B nanolayer on B4C particle surfaces and understanding of the nanolayer composition and morphology changes. Initially, the nanolayer contains Ni2O3, B2O3, and amorphous boron. After 400 oC thermal treatment in a H2-Ar atmosphere, Ni2O3 is reduced to nickel; the nanolayer morphology is maintained and the coated particles demonstrate magnetism. As the thermal treatment temperature is increased to 550 oC, B2O3 is reduced to boron, which reacts with nickel and forms Ni2B. Simultaneously, the nanolayer evolves into nanoparticles. Thermal treatment temperature increase to 700-900 oC only causes Ni2B particle growth but does not fundamentally change the composition or phase.

  2. STURCTURAL CHARACTERISTICS AND QUANTUM CHEMISTRY CALCULATION OF Al-DOPED BORON CARBIDES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Structural characteristics, chemical bonds and thermoelectric properties of Al-doped boron carbides are studied through calculations of various structural unit models by using a self-consistent-field discrete variation Xα method. The calculations show that Al atom doped in boron carbide is in preference to substituting B or C atoms on the end of boron carbide chain, and then may occupy interstitial sites, but it is difficult for Al to substitute B or C atom in the centers of the chain or in the icosahedra. A representative structural unit containing an Al atom is [C-B-Al]ε+-[B11C]ε-, while the structural unit without Al is [C-B-B(C)]ε--[B11C]ε+, and the coexistence of these two different structural units makes the electrical conductivity increased. As the covalent bond of Al-B or Al-C is weaker than that of B-B or B-C, the thermal conductivity decreases when Al is added into boron carbides. With the electrical conductivity increasing and the thermal conductivity decreases, Al doping has significant effect on thermoelectric properties of boron carbides.

  3. Effect of fast neutron irradiation on the properties of boron carbide pellet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron carbide pellets were irradiated in the experimental fast reactor 'JOYO' to 10B burnup of up to 170x1026 cap/m3, fluences of 2x1026/m2 (E>0.1 MeV), and maximum temperatures of about 1,200degC. Post irradiation examinations were made of microstructural changes, helium release, swelling, and thermal conductivity. Boron carbide pellets irradiated to high burnups developed extensive cracking. Helium release from the pellets was initially low, but enhanced helium release was observed at high burnups and high temperatures. The swelling linearly increased with burnup, and when boron carbide was irradiated at high temperatures, the swelling rate began to decrease corresponding to the beginning of enhanced helium release. The correlation between swelling and the helium release was studied and the swelling was interpreted in terms of accumulation of helium in the boron carbide pellet. The thermal conductivity of the boron carbide pellets decreased rapidly by neutron irradiation accompanied with loss of temperature dependence. (author)

  4. Measurements and simulations of boron carbide as degrader material for proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbershagen, Alexander; Baumgarten, Christian; Kiselev, Daniela; van der Meer, Robert; Risters, Yannic; Schippers, Marco

    2016-07-01

    We report on test measurements using boron carbide (B4C) as degrader material in comparison with the conventional graphite, which is currently used in many proton therapy degraders. Boron carbide is a material of lower average atomic weight and higher density than graphite. Calculations predict that, compared to graphite, the use of boron carbide results in a lower emittance behind the degrader due to the shorter degrader length. Downstream of the acceptance defining collimation system we expect a higher beam transmission, especially at low beam energies. This is of great interest in proton therapy applications as it allows either a reduction of the beam intensity extracted from the cyclotron leading to lower activation or a reduction of the treatment time. This paper summarizes the results of simulations and experiments carried out at the PROSCAN facility at the Paul Scherrer Institute1. The simulations predict an increase in the transmitted beam current after the collimation system of approx. 30.5% for beam degradation from 250 to 84 MeV for a boron carbide degrader compared to graphite. The experiment carried out with a boron carbide block reducing the energy to 84 MeV yielded a transmission improvement of 37% compared with the graphite degrader set to that energy.

  5. Structural characteristics and quantum chemistry calculation of Si-doped boron carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Structural characteristics, chemical bonds and thermoelectric properties of Si-doped boron carbides are studied through calculations of various structural unit models by using a self-consistent-field discrete variation Xα method. The calculations show that Si atom doped in boron carbide is in preference to substituting B or C atoms on the end of boron carbide chain, and then may occupy interstitial sites, but it is difficult for Si to substitute B or C atom in the centers of chain or in the icosahedra. A representative structural unit containing a Si atom is [C-B-Si]ε+-[B11C]ε-, while the structural unit without Si is [C-B-B(C)]δ'-[B11C]δ+, and the coexistence of these two different structural units makes the electrical conductivity increases. As the covalent bond of Si-B or Si-C is weaker than that of B-B or B-C, the thermal conductivity decreases when Si is added into boron carbides. With the electrical conductivity increases and the thermal conductivity decreases, Si doping has significant effect on thermoelectric properties of boron carbides

  6. Determination of boron concentration in borosilicate glass, boron carbide and graphite samples by conventional wet-chemical and nuclear analytical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron is an important element in nuclear technology. A comparative study was carried out for the determination of boron in borosilicate glass, boron carbide and graphite samples by wet-chemical and nuclear analytical methods. Wet chemical methods namely titrimetry, Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry and ICP Optical Emission Spectrometry and nuclear analytical methods namely Particle Induced Gamma-Ray Emission and Nuclear Reaction Analysis were used. Boron concentrations were in trace (mg kg-1) level in graphite and percentage level in borosilicate glass and boron carbide. (author)

  7. Study of boron carbide evolution under neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owing to its high neutron efficiency, boron carbide (B4C) is used as a neutron absorber in control rods of nuclear plants. Its behaviour under irradiation has been extensively studied for many years. It now seems clear that brittleness of the material induced by the 10B(n,α)7Li capture reaction is due to penny shaped helium bubbles associated to a high strain field around them. However, no model explains the behaviour of the material under neutron irradiation. In order to build such a model, this work uses different techniques: nuclear microprobe X-ray diffraction profile analysis and Raman and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy to present an evolution model of B4C under neutron irradiation. The use of nuclear reactions produced by a nuclear microprobe such as the 7Li(p,p'γ)7Li reaction, allows to measure lithium profile in B4C pellets irradiated either in Pressurised Water Reactors or in Fast Breeder Reactors. Examining such profiles enables us to describe the migration of lithium atoms out of B4C materials under neutron irradiation. The analysis of X-ray diffraction profiles of irradiated B4C samples allows us to quantify the concentrations of helium bubbles as well as the strain fields around such bubbles.Furthermore Raman spectroscopy studies of different B4C samples lead us to propose that under neutron irradiation. the CBC linear chain disappears. Such a vanishing of this CBC chain. validated by NMR analysis, may explain the penny shaped of helium bubbles inside irradiated B4C. (author)

  8. Priority compositions of boron carbide crystals obtained by self-propagating high-temperature synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponomarev, V. I., E-mail: ksv17@ism.ac.ru; Konovalikhin, S. V.; Kovalev, I. D.; Vershinnikov, V. I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Structural Macrokinetics and Materials Science (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-15

    Splitting of reflections from boron carbide has been found for the first time by an X-ray diffraction study of polycrystalline mixture of boron carbide B{sub 15–x}C{sub x}, (1.5 ≤ x ≤ 3) and its magnesium derivative C{sub 4}B{sub 25}Mg{sub 1.42}. An analysis of reflection profiles shows that this splitting is due to the presence of boron carbide phases of different compositions in the sample, which are formed during crystal growth. The composition changes from B{sub 12.9}C{sub 2.1} to B{sub 12.4}C{sub 2.6}.

  9. Superconductivity in boron carbide? Clarification by low-temperature MIR/FIR spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werheit, H; Kuhlmann, U

    2011-11-01

    The electronic structure and phonon density of B(13)B(2) boron carbide calculated by Calandra et al (2004 Phys. Rev. B 69 224505) defines this compound as metallic, and the authors predict superconductivity with T(C)s up to 36.7 K. Their results are affected by the same deficiencies as former band structure calculations on boron carbides based on hypothetical crystal structures deviating significantly from the real ones. We present optical mid IR/far IR (MIR/FIR) spectra of boron carbide with compositions between B(4.3)C and B(10.37)C, evidencing semiconducting behaviour at least down to 30 K. There is no indication of superconductivity. The spectra yield new information on numerous localized gap states close to the valence band edge. PMID:21997120

  10. Improving tribological properties of sputtered boron carbide coatings by process modifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckardt, T.; Bewilogua, K. [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Schicht- und Oberflaechentechnik, Braunschweig (Germany); van der Kolk, G.; Hurkmans, T.; Trinh, T.; Fleischer, W. [Hauzer Techno Coating Europe BV, Van Heemskerckweg 22, NL-5920, Venlo (Netherlands)

    2000-04-03

    Boron carbide coatings are well-known for extreme hardness and excellent wear resistance. In this paper a d.c. magnetron sputter process for the deposition of boron carbide coatings is described. It is shown that by adding small amounts of a hydrocarbon reactive gas (in this case acetylene) the coefficient of friction can be reduced from 0.8 down to 0.2. Results from a laboratory scale deposition device are successfully transferred to an industrial batch coater. The coating adhesion is well enhanced by a titanium interlayer. From the analysis of the chemical composition and from hardness values it is concluded that a structural modification is responsible for the improvement of sliding behaviour. It is suggested that the introduction of additional bondings reduces the brittleness of boron carbide. Furthermore, a comparison with metal-containing amorphous carbon coatings (Me-DLC) reveals several similarities. (orig.)

  11. Evaluation of mechanical properties of aluminium alloy–alumina–boron carbide metal matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Fabrication of MMC with aluminium alloy–alumina–boron carbide is done. • Different proportions of reinforcements are added. • The effects of varying proportions are studied. • Investigation on mechanical properties above composites is performed. • Failure morphology analysis is done using SEM. - Abstract: This paper deals with the fabrication and mechanical investigation of aluminium alloy, alumina (Al2O3) and boron carbide metal matrix composites. Aluminium is the matrix metal having properties like light weight, high strength and ease of machinability. Alumina which has better wear resistance, high strength, hardness and boron carbide which has excellent hardness and fracture toughness are added as reinforcements. Here, the fabrication is done by stir casting which involves mixing the required quantities of additives into stirred molten aluminium. After solidification, the samples are prepared and tested to find the various mechanical properties like tensile, flexural, impact and hardness. The internal structure of the composite is observed using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM)

  12. Improvements of Thermal, Mechanical, and Water-Resistance Properties of Polybenzoxazine/Boron Carbide Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramdani, Noureddine; Derradji, Mehdi; Wang, Jun; Mokhnache, El-Oualid; Liu, Wen-Bin

    2016-07-01

    Novel kinds of nanocomposites based on bisphenol A-aniline based polybenzoxazine matrix P(BA-a) and 0 wt.%-20 wt.% boron carbide (B4C) nanoparticles were produced and their properties were evaluated in terms of the nano-B4C content. The thermal conductivity of the P(BA-a) matrix was improved approximately three times from 0.18 W/m K to 0.86 W/m K at 20 wt.% nano-B4C loading, while its coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) was deceased by 47% with the same nanofiller content. The microhardness properties were significantly improved by adding the B4C nanoparticles. At 20 wt.% of nano-B4C content, dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) revealed a marked increase in the storage modulus and the glass transition temperature (T g) of the nanocomposites, reaching 3.9 GPa and 204°C, respectively. Hot water uptake tests showed that the water-resistance of the polybenzoxazine matrix was increased by filling with nano-B4C nano-filler. The morphological analysis reflected that the improvements obtained in the mechanical and thermal properties are related to the uniform dispersion of the nano-B4C particles and their strong adhesion to the P(BA-a) matrix.

  13. Elastic properties of boron carbide films via surface acoustic waves measured by Brillouin light scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salas, E.; Jimenez-Villacorta, F.; Jimenez Rioboo, R.J.; Prieto, C. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Sanchez-Marcos, J. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Quimica-Fisica Aplicada, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Munoz-Martin, A.; Prieto, J.E.; Joco, V. [Centro de Microanalisis de Materiales, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-03-15

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) velocity has been determined by high resolution Brillouin light scattering to study the mechano-elastic properties of boron carbide films prepared by radio frequency (RF) sputtering. The comparison of experimentally observed elastic behaviour with simulations made by considering film composition obtained from elastic recoil detection analysis-time of flight (ERDA-ToF) spectroscopy allows establishing that elastic properties are determined by that of crystalline boron carbide with a lessening of the SAW velocity values due to surface oxidation. (Copyright copyright 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. Elastic properties of B-C-N films grown by N2-reactive sputtering from boron carbide targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron-carbon-nitrogen films were grown by RF reactive sputtering from a B4C target and N2 as reactive gas. The films present phase segregation and are mechanically softer than boron carbide films (a factor of more than 2 in Young's modulus). This fact can turn out as an advantage in order to select buffer layers to better anchor boron carbide films on substrates eliminating thermally induced mechanical tensions

  15. Kinetics of formation of a platelet-reinforced ceramic composite prepared by the directed reaction of zirconium with boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper the kinetics of formation of a new class of ceramic composite material, zirconium diboride platelet-reinforced zirconium carbides, are discussed. These materials are prepared by the directed reaction of molten zirconium with boron carbide to form a ceramic material composed of zirconium diboride platelets approximately uniformly distributed in a zirconium carbide matrix containing a controlled amount of residual zirconium metal. Results from interrupted growth studies, differential thermal analysis, adiabatic reaction temperature calculations, and kinetic measurements have been used to study the kinetics of the process. The reaction is very fast and proceeds parabolically with time with a rate constant between 1.6 x 10-2 and 3.9 x 10-2 cm2/s. The proposed mechanism suggests that when molten zirconium contacts boron carbide, the molten zirconium exothermically reacts with the boron carbide to form a boron-rick liquid. Further reaction is sustained by the continuous dissolution of the boron carbide as the boron-rich liquid is drawn into the boron carbide. The product is a zirconium diboride/zirconium carbide/zirconium composite which homogenizes quickly at the reaction temperature to yield a uniform product microstructure throughout the composite. Two alternative rate-limiting steps are discussed and the implications of each are explored

  16. Friction and wear performance of diamond-like carbon, boron carbide, and titanium carbide coatings against glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protection of glass substrates by direct ion beam deposited diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings was observed using a commercial pin-on-disk instrument at ambient conditions without lubrication. Ion beam sputter-deposited titanium carbide and boron carbide coatings reduced sliding friction, and provided tribological protection of silicon substrates, but the improvement factor was less than that found for DLC. Observations of unlubricated sliding of hemispherical glass pins at ambient conditions on uncoated glass and silicon substrates, and ion beam deposited coatings showed decreased wear in the order: uncoated glass>uncoated silicon>boron carbide>titanium carbide>DLC>uncoated sapphire. Failure mechanisms varied widely and are discussed. Generally, the amount of wear decreased as the sliding friction decreased, with the exception of uncoated sapphire substrates, for which the wear was low despite very high friction. There is clear evidence that DLC coatings continue to protect the underlying substrate long after the damage first penetrates through the coating. The test results correlate with field use data on commercial products which have shown that the DLC coatings provide substantial extension of the useful lifetime of glass and other substrates. copyright 1997 Materials Research Society

  17. Novel semiconducting boron carbide/pyridine polymers for neutron detection at zero bias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thin films containing aromatic pyridine moieties bonded to boron, in the partially dehydrogenated boron-rich icosahedra (B10C2HX), prove to be an effective material for neutron detection applications when deposited on n-doped (100) silicon substrates. The characteristic I-V curves for the heterojunction diodes exhibit strong rectification and largely unperturbed normalized reverse bias leakage currents with increasing pyridine content. The neutron capture generated pulses from these heterojunction diodes were obtained at zero bias voltage although without the signatures of complete electron-hole collection. These results suggest that modifications to boron carbide may result in better neutron voltaic materials. (orig.)

  18. Chemical, mass spectrometric, and spectrochemical analysis of nuclear-grade boron carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-01

    The standard covers analytical procedures to determine compliance of nuclear-grade boron carbide powder and pellets to specifications. The following methods are described in detail: total carbon by combustion and gravimetry; total boron by titrimetry; isotopic composition by mass spectrometry; chloride and fluoride separation by pyrohydrolysis; chloride by constant-current coulometry; fluoride by ion-selective electrode; water by constant-voltage coulometry; impurities by spectrochemical analysis; soluble boron by titrimetry; soluble carbon by a manometric measurement; metallic impurities by a direct reader spectrometric method. (JMT)

  19. Aluminum-titanium hydride-boron carbide composite provides lightweight neutron shield material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poindexter, A. M.

    1967-01-01

    Inexpensive lightweight neutron shield material has high strength and ductility and withstands high internal heat generation rates without excessive thermal stress. This composite material combines structural and thermal properties of aluminum, neutron moderating properties of titanium hydride, and neutron absorbing characteristics of boron carbide.

  20. Time-of-flight neutron detection using PECVD grown boron carbide diode detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of novel neutron detectors requires an understanding of the entire neutron detection process, a process which depends strongly on material properties. Here we present accurate measurements of the neutron detection efficiency of an unenriched 640 nm thick boron carbide solid state neutron detector grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition as a function of the neutron wavelength at a time-of-flight facility. The data were compared to that obtained simultaneously by a calibrated nitrogen detector over the same wavelength range. The measured spectra of both detectors fit a Maxwell–Boltzmann wavelength distribution, thereby indicating that the boron carbide detector can be used as a reliable beam monitor. Measurements of the material properties (density, thickness and elemental composition) of the semiconducting boron carbide enable a precise calculation of the ideal expected neutron detection efficiency. The calculated neutron detection efficiency for the effective moderator temperature (obtained from a fit to the Maxwell–Boltzmann distribution) showed excellent agreement with the experimentally determined neutron detection efficiency of 1.25%. Higher efficiencies may be obtained either by increased film thickness and/or 100% 10B enrichment of the boron carbide source molecule

  1. Standard specification for nuclear-grade aluminum oxide-boron carbide composite pellets

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2005-01-01

    1.1 This specification applies to pellets composed of mixtures of aluminum oxide and boron carbide that may be ultimately used in a reactor core, for example, in neutron absorber rods. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only.

  2. UK studies of the performance of boron carbide control rod pins for the fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The preferred neutron absorbing material in control rods for modern fast reactors is boron carbide. This report presents the current status of the UK programme on the development of boron carbide control rod pins. The objective of the programme is to maximise the life of the pins, initially for the UK Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR) and, more recently, for the European Fast Reactor (EFR). The pin life is currently assessed against three criteria, the onset of pellet-cladding mechanical interaction at power, the boron carbide pellet centre temperature, and cladding embrittlement due to the combined effects of irradiation damage and pellet-cladding chemical interaction. Results are presented from the post-irradiation examination of static pins exposed in demountable sub-assemblies in PFR and pins from PFR control rods. The variables include stainless steel [M316 (CW)] and nimonic [PE16] cladding, sodium and helium pin filling, top and bottom pin gas venting and boron carbide with two levels of 10B enrichment from different sources. The results obtained are compared with the 'BORCON' computer model of fast reactor control rod pin performance. (author)

  3. An experimental investigation of wire electrical discharge machining of hot-pressed boron carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravindranadh Bobbili

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The present work discusses the experimental study on wire-cut electric discharge machining of hot-pressed boron carbide. The effects of machining parameters, such as pulse on time (TON, peak current (IP, flushing pressure (FP and spark voltage on material removal rate (MRR and surface roughness (Ra of the material, have been evaluated. These parameters are found to have an effect on the surface integrity of boron carbide machined samples. Wear rate of brass wire increases with rise in input energy in machining of hot-pressed boron carbide. The surfaces of machined samples were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The influence of machining parameters on mechanism of MRR and Ra was described. It was demonstrated that higher TON and peak current deteriorate the surface finish of boron carbide samples and result in the formation of large craters, debris and micro cracks. The generation of spherical particles was noticed and it was attributed to surface tension of molten material. Macro-ridges were also observed on the surface due to protrusion of molten material at higher discharge energy levels.

  4. Fluid flow phenomena in the generation of boron carbide suspensions in magnesium melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilegbusi, O. J.; Szekely, J.

    1988-01-01

    A mathematical representation is developed for the behavior of moderately concentrated magnesium-boron carbide suspensions when subjected to electromagnetic stirring or mechanical agitation. A power-law relationship is employed for the apparent non-Newtonian viscosity of the suspension.

  5. Evidence of amorphisation of B4C boron carbide under slow, heavy ion irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosset, D.; Miro, S.; Doriot, S.; Victor, G.; Motte, V.

    2015-12-01

    Boron carbide is widely used either as armor-plate or neutron absorber. In both cases, a good structural stability is required. However, a few studies have shown amorphisation may occur in severe conditions. Hard impacts lead to the formation of amorphous bands. Some irradiations in electronic regime with H or He ions have also shown amorphisation of the material. Most authors however consider the structure is not drastically affected by irradiations in the ballistic regime. Here, we have irradiated at room temperature dense boron carbide pellets with Au 4 MeV ions, for which most of the damage is in the ballistic regime. This study is part of a program devoted to the behavior of boron carbide under irradiation. Raman observations have been performed after the irradiations together with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Raman observations show a strong structural damage at moderate fluences (1014/cm2, about 0.1 dpa), in agreement with previous studies. On the other hand, TEM shows the structure remains crystalline up to 1015/cm2 then partially amorphises. The amorphisation is heterogeneous, with the formation of nanometric amorphous zones with increasing density. It then appears short range and long range disorder occurs at quite different damage levels. Further experiments are in progress aiming at studying the structural stability of boron carbide and isostructural materials (α-B, B6Si,…).

  6. POROUS STRUCTURE OF CARBON NANOPARTICLES PREPARED BY CHLORINATION OF NANOPARTICLES OF SILICON CARBID

    OpenAIRE

    Sokolov, V. V.; PETROV N.A.; TOMKOVICH M.V.; GUSAROV V. V.

    2014-01-01

    Specific features of the structure of nanoporous carbon, prepared by chlorinating silicon carbide nanoparticles followed by treatment thereof by hydrogenation have been studied. A considerable number of microscopic pores in carbon nanoparticles have been shown.

  7. Evaluation of Aluminum-Boron Carbide Neutron Absorbing Materials for Interim Storage of Used Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this work was to understand the corrosion behavior of Boral® and Bortec® neutron absorbers over long-term deployment in a used nuclear fuel dry cask storage environment. Corrosion effects were accelerated by flowing humidified argon through an autoclave at temperatures up to 570°C. Test results show little corrosion of the aluminum matrix but that boron is leaching out of the samples. Initial tests performed at 400 and 570°C were hampered by reduced flow caused by the rapid build-up of solid deposits in the outlet lines. Analysis of the deposits by XRD shows that the deposits are comprised of boron trioxide and sassolite (H3BO3). The collection of boron- containing compounds in the outlet lines indicated that boron was being released from the samples. Observation of the exposed samples using SEM and optical microscopy show the growth of new phases in the samples. These phases were most prominent in Bortec® samples exposed at 570°C. Samples of Boral® exposed at 570°C showed minimal new phase formation but showed nearly the complete loss of boron carbide particles. Boron carbide loss was also significant in Boral samples at 400°C. However, at 400°C phases similar to those found in Bortec® were observed. The rapid loss of the boron carbide particles in the Boral® is suspected to inhibit the formation of the new secondary phases. However, Material samples in an actual dry cask environment would be exposed to temperatures closer to 300°C and less water than the lowest test. The results from this study conclude that at the temperature and humidity levels present in a dry cask environment, corrosion and boron leaching will have no effect on the performance of Boral® and Bortec® to maintain criticality control.

  8. Evaluation of Aluminum-Boron Carbide Neutron Absorbing Materials for Interim Storage of Used Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lumin [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Science; Wierschke, Jonathan Brett [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Science

    2015-04-08

    The objective of this work was to understand the corrosion behavior of Boral® and Bortec® neutron absorbers over long-term deployment in a used nuclear fuel dry cask storage environment. Corrosion effects were accelerated by flowing humidified argon through an autoclave at temperatures up to 570°C. Test results show little corrosion of the aluminum matrix but that boron is leaching out of the samples. Initial tests performed at 400 and 570°C were hampered by reduced flow caused by the rapid build-up of solid deposits in the outlet lines. Analysis of the deposits by XRD shows that the deposits are comprised of boron trioxide and sassolite (H3BO3). The collection of boron- containing compounds in the outlet lines indicated that boron was being released from the samples. Observation of the exposed samples using SEM and optical microscopy show the growth of new phases in the samples. These phases were most prominent in Bortec® samples exposed at 570°C. Samples of Boral® exposed at 570°C showed minimal new phase formation but showed nearly the complete loss of boron carbide particles. Boron carbide loss was also significant in Boral samples at 400°C. However, at 400°C phases similar to those found in Bortec® were observed. The rapid loss of the boron carbide particles in the Boral® is suspected to inhibit the formation of the new secondary phases. However, Material samples in an actual dry cask environment would be exposed to temperatures closer to 300°C and less water than the lowest test. The results from this study conclude that at the temperature and humidity levels present in a dry cask environment, corrosion and boron leaching will have no effect on the performance of Boral® and Bortec® to maintain criticality control.

  9. Determination of structural changes and phase transformations in boron carbide by static and dynamic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Varun

    Recent transmission electron microscopy results demonstrate that the failure of B4C is commensurate with the segregation of boron icosahedra embedded in amorphous carbon in 2--3 nm wide amorphous bands along the (113) lattice direction, in good agreement with our recent theoretical results. Boron carbide is generally composed of multiple polytypes of B4C which have the same primitive lattice parameters but differ from each other by the location of the boron and carbon atoms in the unit cells. The unit cells are formed by a 12-atom B12-nCn icosahedron and a 3-atom (C3-nBn) chain. Our theoretical results indicate that one polytype, B12(C3), whose formation is responsible for the failure of the entire material. This anomalous and poorly understood glass-like behavior in boron carbide has been the subject of research since its discovery over 70 years ago. The characterization of disorder in hot pressed and powder boron carbide samples is therefore of primary interest. The research work has focused on characterization techniques which can be used at a micrometric sampling size so that individual powder grains of the material can be utilized. Specifically, micro-Raman and electrical conductivity measurements can be used with micrometric gap cells to understand the disorder in B4C. The results also demonstrate that it is possible to induce transformations in boron carbide using electric fields that are comparable with those obtained under shock and nanoindentation. Our calculations present a hypothesis which can provide a solution to prevent the premature failure of B4C. A route to achieve suppression of the B12(CCC) polytype without significantly affecting the elastic constants is via low concentration Silicon (Si) doping of B4C. Suppression of B12(CCC) by Si doping has implications towards development of boron carbide armor with improved properties for protection against high velocity threats. In order to achieve this, nanostructures (nanowires, nanorods, etc.) of Si

  10. Fabrication of Tungsten Carbide Nanoparticles from Refluxing Derived Precursor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEN Jiqiu; LI Yongdi; MENG Xiaopeng; YIN Guangfu; YAO Yadong

    2015-01-01

    Tungsten carbide (WC) nanoparticles were fabricated from a novel refluxing-derived precursor. The precursor was prepared by acid hydrolysis of Na2WO4 with concentrated HCl in water followed by refluxing with ethanol and n-Dedocane, respectively. Then it was heat-treated to 1 200℃for 2 h in vacuum to obtain WC nanoparticles. X-ray studies reveal the formation of hexagonal tungsten carbide and the grain size of 24.3 nm. SEM image shows WC nanoparticles with particle size of 20-60 nm. Long time refluxing results in alkane dehydrogenation and coke formation. The coke is the carbon source in the carbothermal reduction reaction. The novel route of two-stage refluxing is quite general and can be applied in the synthesis of similar carbides.

  11. Gamma and neutron attenuation behaviours of boron carbide–silicon carbide composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Gamma and neutron attenuation behaviours of B4C–SiC composites were investigated. • Increasing SiC ratio increases gamma attenuation behaviour of the B4C–SiC composites. • Increasing SiC ratio decrease attenuation behaviour of the B4C–SiC composites. • HVT values of the B4C–SiC composites were calculated for Cs-137, Co-60 and Pu–Be sources. • Experimental mass attenuation coefficient are compatible with theoretical (XCOM) values. - Abstract: In this study, the gamma and neutron attenuation behaviors of pure boron carbide and boron carbide–silicon carbide composites which include three different silicon carbide ratios (20%, 30%, and 40%) by volume were investigated against Cs-137, Co-60 gamma radioisotope sources and Pu–Be neutron source. Transmission technique was used in the experiments to investigate the gamma and neutron attenuation properties of the materials. Linear and mass attenuation coefficients of the samples were determined for 0.662 (Cs-137) and 1.25 MeV (Co-60) energetic gamma rays. In addition the total macroscopic cross-sections (∑T) were calculated for the materials against Pu–Be neutron source. Theoretical mass attenuation coefficients were calculated from XCOM computer code. The experimental and theoretical mass attenuation coefficients were compared and evaluated with each other. In addition half value thickness (HVT) calculations were carried out by using linear attenuation coefficients and total macroscopic cross-sections. The results showed that increasing silicon carbide ratio decreases HVTs against Cs-137 and Co-60 gamma radioisotope sources whereas increases HVTs against Pu–Be neutron source. The mass attenuation coefficients were compatible with the theoretical (XCOM) values. Increasing silicon carbide ratio in boron carbide–silicon carbide composites causes higher gamma attenuation and lower neutron attenuation values

  12. Boron carbide coating deposition on tungsten and testing of tungsten layers and coating under intense plasma load

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Airapetov, A. A.; Begrambekov, L. B., E-mail: lbb@plasma.mephi.ru [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute) (Russian Federation); Buzhinskiy, O. I. [State Research Center Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research (TRINITI) (Russian Federation); Grunin, A. V.; Gordeev, A. A.; Zakharov, A. M.; Kalachev, A. M.; Sadovskiy, Ya. A.; Shigin, P. A. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute) (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    A device intended for boron carbide coating deposition and material testing under high heat loads is presented. A boron carbide coating 5 μm thick was deposited on the tungsten substrate. These samples were subjected to thermocycling loads in the temperature range of 400–1500°C. Tungsten layers deposited on tungsten substrates were tested in similar conditions. Results of the surface analysis are presented.

  13. Boron carbide coating deposition on tungsten and testing of tungsten layers and coating under intense plasma load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airapetov, A. A.; Begrambekov, L. B.; Buzhinskiy, O. I.; Grunin, A. V.; Gordeev, A. A.; Zakharov, A. M.; Kalachev, A. M.; Sadovskiy, Ya. A.; Shigin, P. A.

    2015-12-01

    A device intended for boron carbide coating deposition and material testing under high heat loads is presented. A boron carbide coating 5 μm thick was deposited on the tungsten substrate. These samples were subjected to thermocycling loads in the temperature range of 400-1500°C. Tungsten layers deposited on tungsten substrates were tested in similar conditions. Results of the surface analysis are presented.

  14. Growth and Physical Structure of Amorphous Boron Carbide Deposited by Magnetron Sputtering on a Silicon Substrate with a Titanium Interlayer

    OpenAIRE

    Roberto Caniello; Espedito Vassallo; Anna Cremona; Giovanni Grosso; David Dellasega; Maurizio Canetti; Enrico Miorin

    2013-01-01

    Multilayer amorphous boron carbide coatings were produced by radiofrequency magnetron sputtering on silicon substrates. To improve the adhesion, titanium interlayers with different thickness were interposed between the substrate and the coating. Above three hundreds nanometer, the enhanced roughness of the titanium led to the growth of an amorphous boron carbide with a dense and continuing columnar structure, and no delamination effect was observed. Correspondingly, the adhesion of the coatin...

  15. Annealing of deep boron centers in silicon carbide

    CERN Document Server

    Ballandovich, V S

    2002-01-01

    Effect of thermal annealing on the high temperature luminescence efficiency (HTL) in 6H-SiC samples grown in different conditions and doped with boron impurity was investigated. Some of the crystals were irradiated by reactor neutrons or fast electrons. The HTL efficiency was shown to depend on the abundance of deep boron centers discovered by capacitive spectroscopy as D-centers. High temperature treatment of samples results in decomposition of D-centers which is identified as B sub S sub i -V sub C complexes. The deep boron centers are shown to be stable at temperature as low as 1500 deg C. Conservation of these centers in SiC crystals at higher temperatures (up to 2600 deg C) is caused by presence of clusters which are the sources of nonequilibrium carbon vacancies

  16. Experimental determination of boron and carbon thermodynamic activities in the carbide phase of the boron-carbon system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    - The boron-carbon phase diagram presents a single phase area ranging from 9 to 20 atomic percent of carbon. The measurement of carbon activity, in this range of composition, has been measured according to the following methods: - quantitative analysis of the methane-hydrogen mixture in equilibrium with the carbide, - high temperature mass spectrometry measurements. The first method turned out to be a failure; however, the apparatus used enabled the elaboration of a B4C composition pure phase from a two-phase (B4C + graphite) industrial product. The results obtained with the other two methods are consistent and lead to a law expressing the increase of the carbon activity in relation with the amount of this element; the high temperature mass spectrometry method has also made it possible to measure the boron activity which decreases when the carbon activity increases, but with a variation of amplitude much lower, according to the theoretical calculations. These results are a first step towards the knowledge of the boron carbide thermodynamical data for compositions different from B4C

  17. The thermal conductivity of boron carbide after fast-neutron irradiation to a burn-up of 12% total boron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermal diffusivity of hot-pressed boron carbide pellets has been measured between 20 and 2000 oC by the laser flash method. Thermal conductivity has been derived from the measured thermal diffusivity and density, and calculated specific heat capacity values, which allow for fission product retention. Pellets of this material have been irradiated in the Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR) at Dounreay, with pellet centre temperatures up to 1500 oC and a maximum total boron burn-up of 12%. Thermal diffusivity measurements on the irradiated material up to 2000 oC showed a marked decrease in the thermal conductivity. This decrease was caused largely by the formation of helium bubbles in the material. Heating of the material during the thermal diffusivity measurements caused the helium bubbles to coalesce, producing fewer, larger bubbles, with a corresponding increase in the thermal conductivity of the material measured on subsequent runs. The thermal conductivity of the irradiated material is almost temperature independent on an individual measurement run. The thermal conductivity values reported extend the database on irradiated boron carbide in terms of both the measurement temperature and the burn-up, and have been incorporated into the fast-reactor control-rod modelling code, BORCON. (Author)

  18. Fabrication and characterization of silicon based thermal neutron detector with hot wire chemical vapor deposited boron carbide converter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to utilize the well established silicon detector technology for neutron detection application, a silicon based thermal neutron detector was fabricated by integrating a thin boron carbide layer as a neutron converter with a silicon PIN detector. Hot wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD), which is a low cost, low temperature process for deposition of thin films with precise thickness was explored as a technique for direct deposition of a boron carbide layer over the metalized front surface of the detector chip. The presence of B-C bonding and 10B isotope in the boron carbide film were confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry respectively. The deposition of HWCVD boron carbide layer being a low temperature process was observed not to cause degradation of the PIN detector. The response of the detector with 0.2 µm and 0.5 µm thick boron carbide layer was examined in a nuclear reactor. The pulse height spectrum shows evidence of thermal neutron response with signature of (n, α) reaction. The results presented in this article indicate that HWCVD boron carbide deposition technique would be suitable for low cost industrial fabrication of PIN based single element or 1D/2D position sensitive thermal neutron detectors

  19. Fabrication and characterization of silicon based thermal neutron detector with hot wire chemical vapor deposited boron carbide converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Pradip; Singh, Arvind; Topkar, Anita; Dusane, Rajiv

    2015-04-01

    In order to utilize the well established silicon detector technology for neutron detection application, a silicon based thermal neutron detector was fabricated by integrating a thin boron carbide layer as a neutron converter with a silicon PIN detector. Hot wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD), which is a low cost, low temperature process for deposition of thin films with precise thickness was explored as a technique for direct deposition of a boron carbide layer over the metalized front surface of the detector chip. The presence of B-C bonding and 10B isotope in the boron carbide film were confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry respectively. The deposition of HWCVD boron carbide layer being a low temperature process was observed not to cause degradation of the PIN detector. The response of the detector with 0.2 μm and 0.5 μm thick boron carbide layer was examined in a nuclear reactor. The pulse height spectrum shows evidence of thermal neutron response with signature of (n, α) reaction. The results presented in this article indicate that HWCVD boron carbide deposition technique would be suitable for low cost industrial fabrication of PIN based single element or 1D/2D position sensitive thermal neutron detectors.

  20. Fabrication and characterization of silicon based thermal neutron detector with hot wire chemical vapor deposited boron carbide converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaudhari, Pradip, E-mail: pradipcha@gmail.com [Semiconductor Thin Films and Plasma Processing Laboratory, Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai – 400076 (India); Singh, Arvind, E-mail: arvindsingh1884@gmail.com [Electronics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai – 400085 (India); Topkar, Anita, E-mail: anita.topkar@gmail.com [Electronics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai – 400085 (India); Dusane, Rajiv, E-mail: rodusane@iitb.ac.in [Semiconductor Thin Films and Plasma Processing Laboratory, Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai – 400076 (India)

    2015-04-11

    In order to utilize the well established silicon detector technology for neutron detection application, a silicon based thermal neutron detector was fabricated by integrating a thin boron carbide layer as a neutron converter with a silicon PIN detector. Hot wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD), which is a low cost, low temperature process for deposition of thin films with precise thickness was explored as a technique for direct deposition of a boron carbide layer over the metalized front surface of the detector chip. The presence of B-C bonding and {sup 10}B isotope in the boron carbide film were confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry respectively. The deposition of HWCVD boron carbide layer being a low temperature process was observed not to cause degradation of the PIN detector. The response of the detector with 0.2 µm and 0.5 µm thick boron carbide layer was examined in a nuclear reactor. The pulse height spectrum shows evidence of thermal neutron response with signature of (n, α) reaction. The results presented in this article indicate that HWCVD boron carbide deposition technique would be suitable for low cost industrial fabrication of PIN based single element or 1D/2D position sensitive thermal neutron detectors.

  1. Atomistic Explanation of Shear-Induced Amorphous Band Formation in Boron Carbide

    OpenAIRE

    An, Qi; Goddard, William A.; Cheng, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Boron carbide (B_4C) is very hard, but its applications are hindered by stress-induced amorphous band formation. To explain this behavior, we used density function theory (Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof flavor) to examine the response to shear along 11 plausible slip systems. We found that the (011 ¯  1 ¯ )/⟨1 ¯ 101⟩ slip system has the lowest shear strength (consistent with previous experimental studies) and that this slip leads to a unique plastic deformation before failure in which a boron-carbon ...

  2. Thermal-shock Resistance of a Ceramic Comprising 60 Percent Boron Carbide and 40 Percent Titanium Diboride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeomans, C M; Hoffman, C A

    1953-01-01

    Thermal-shock resistance of a ceramic comprising 60 percent boron carbide and 40 percent titanium diboride was investigated. The material has thermal shock resistance comparable to that of NBS body 4811C and that of zirconia, but is inferior to beryllia, alumina, and titanium-carbide ceramals. It is not considered suitable for turbine blades.

  3. de Haas-van Alphen investigations of nonmagnetic boron carbide superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dissertation presents de Haas-van Alphen investigations on the nonmagnetic boron carbide superconductors LuNi2B2C and YNi2B2C. From the quantum oscillations in the normal conductivity phase, in combination with band structure calculations, information was obtained on the distributed Fermi surface architecture and on the electron-phonon coupling of the boron carbides. The coupling is strongly anisotropic and dependent on the Fermi surfaces. This suggests a multiband mechanism of superconductivity in this material class. Further, de Haas-van-Alphen oscillations of several Fermi surfaces were observed below Bc2 in the deep Shubnikov phase, whose behaviour cannot be described by existing theories. It may be assumed, however, that the existence of oscillations far below Bc2 suggests the existence of electronic states in the Shubnikov phase. (orig.)

  4. Boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) coating. Deposition and testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azizov, E.; Barsuk, V. [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research (TRINITI), Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Begrambekov, L., E-mail: lbb@plasma.mephi.ru [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), Moscow (Russian Federation); Buzhinsky, O. [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research (TRINITI), Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Evsin, A.; Gordeev, A.; Grunin, A. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), Moscow (Russian Federation); Klimov, N. [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research (TRINITI), Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Kurnaev, V. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), Moscow (Russian Federation); Mazul, I. [Federal State Unitary Interprise Efremov Scientific Research Institute of Electrophysical Apparatus (NIIEFA Efremov), St-Peterburg (Russian Federation); Otroshchenko, V.; Putric, A. [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research (TRINITI), Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Sadovskiy, Ya.; Shigin, P.; Vergazov, S.; Zakharov, A. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-08-15

    Boron carbide was proposed as a material of in-situ protecting coating for tungsten tiles of ITER divertor. To prove this concept the project including investigation of regimes of plasma deposition of B{sub 4}C coating on tungsten and tests of boron carbide layer in ITER-like is started recently. The paper contends the first results of the project. The results of B{sub 4}C coating irradiation by the plasma pulses of QSPU-T plasma accelerator are presented. The new device capable of B{sub 4}C film deposition on tungsten and testing of the films and materials with ITER-like heat loads and ion- and electron irradiation is described. The results of B{sub 4}C coating deposition and testing of both tungsten substrate and coating are shown and discussed.

  5. Sintering boron carbide ceramics without grain growth by plastic deformation as the dominant densification mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Wei; Rehman, Sahibzada Shakir; Wang, Weimin; Wang, Hao; Wang, Yucheng; Zhang, Jinyong; Zhang, Fan; Fu, Zhengyi

    2015-10-01

    A new ceramic sintering approach employing plastic deformation as the dominant mechanism is proposed, at low temperature close to the onset point of grain growth and under high pressure. Based on this route, fully dense boron carbide without grain growth can be prepared at 1,675-1,700 °C and under pressure of (≥) 80 MPa in 5 minutes. The dense boron carbide shows excellent mechanical properties, including Vickers hardness of 37.8 GPa, flexural strength of 445.3 MPa and fracture toughness of 4.7 MPa•m0.5. Such a process should also facilitate the cost-effective preparation of other advanced ceramics for practical applications.

  6. Development of a process to recover boron carbide from nuclear reactor absorber rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron carbide enriched with 10B is used as a control rod in reactor engineering. At present spent rods are disposed of, although major amounts of 10B are still 'unused'. The objective was to recover 10B from the control rods by an energy and cost saving method in order to use it for making new control rods, thus saving raw materials and minimizing the radioactive waste volume. For this purpose, the well-known pyrohydrolysis process was taken and analysed for possible improvements. By mixing boron carbide with CO2 as an oxidation-supporting agent, a lowering of the reaction temperature by 300deg C, and an increase in the oxidation speed by 350% were achieved. Since C02 is not consumed and can be circulated, the method for reprocessing spent control rods presented in this paper is both an economy-priced an energy-saving one. (orig.) With 98 refs., 9 tabs., 14 figs

  7. Theoretical Calculation on Optimum Si-doping Content in Boron Carbide Thin Film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The theoretical expression of the relationship between optimum doping content and crystal structure is presented as well as the preparation methods. By using this expression, the optimum doping content of silicon-doped boron carbide thin film is calculated. The quantitative calculation value is consistent with the experimental results. This theoretical expression is also appropriate to resolve the optimum doping content for other electric materials.

  8. Synthesis of low carbon boron carbide powder using a minimal time processing route: Thermal plasma

    OpenAIRE

    Avinna Mishra

    2015-01-01

    Boron carbide powder was synthesized by thermal plasma reduction of boric acid in presence of graphite with a very minimal processing time. Subsequently, the as-synthesized products were leached to minimize the impurities content. Based on the results of X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy, the effect of leaching on phase purity and crystallinity was studied. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was performed to identify the chemical composition which highlighted the absence of the BO bondi...

  9. Surface energy and relaxation in boron carbide (101¯1) from first principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudet, Todd D.; Smith, John R.; Adams, Jane W.

    2015-10-01

    The surface energy of the boron carbide polytype B11Cp(CBC) for planar separations along {101¯1} was determined to be 3.21 J/m2 via first-principles density-functional computations. Surface atomic relaxations are relatively large, thereby lowering the surface energy significantly. The icosahedra are not intact on the surface, i.e., severed polyhedra are the lowest energy surface configuration. Good agreement was found with an experimental average fracture surface energy.

  10. Properties of Boron Carbide Coatings and Free-Standing Parts Prepared by WSP(r)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matějíček, Jiří; Nanobashvili, S.; Ctibor, Pavel; Brožek, Vlastimil; Neufuss, Karel; Chráska, Pavel

    Franfurkt : WerkstoffInformationsgesselschaft, 2002, s. článek č.914. ISBN 3-88355-302-6. [Materials Week 2001.. Mnichov (DE), 01.10.2001-04.10.2001] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/01/0149 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Keywords : water-stabilized plasma spraying, boron carbide, material properties Subject RIV: JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials

  11. High-temperature mechanical properties of aluminium alloys reinforced with boron carbide particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanical properties of particulate-reinforced metal-matrix composites based on aluminium alloys (6061 and 7015) at high temperatures were studied. Boron carbide particles were used as reinforcement. All composites were produced by hot extrusion. The tensile properties and fracture analysis of these materials were investigated at room temperature and at high temperature to determine their ultimate strength and strain to failure. The fracture surface was analysed by scanning electron microscopy

  12. Preparation and characterization of sputtered boron nitride and boron carbide films and their modification by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanocrystalline cubic boron nitride and boron carbide films have been synthesized using sputtering. The relationship between the structures and properties as well as the influence of the deposition parameters, such as rf power, bias voltage, substrate temperature, composition and flow rate of the sputtering gas, on the structures and properties have been studied. The influence of the ion bombardment could be described by the specific ion momentum P*=[ion momentum.(ion flux/atom flux)]. The specific ion momentum was found to be proportional to the rf power and to the 1.5th power of the bias voltage. Two phases have been identified in our boron nitride films: hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) and cubic boron nitride (c-BN); the films were either single phase or contained a mixture of these two phases. Nanocrystalline boron films have been grown with a deposition rate of 2 nm/s not only on Si but also on hard metal (WC-6%Co) substrates. Stoichiometric and crystalline films have already been grown at room temperature (about 0.1 Tm, Tm=melting point-3900 K). All the films contained about 8 at% carbon and 6 at% oxygen as impurities, which come mainly from the targt. The concentration of the impurities is independent of the deposition paramters. The growth of c-BN appears after the specific ion momentum larger than a threshold value, which is dependent on the substrate temperature, composition and on the flow rate of the sputtering gas. The volume content of c-BN runs through a maximum value with increasing specific ion momentum. (orig.)

  13. Structural modifications induced by ion irradiation and temperature in boron carbide B4C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victor, G.; Pipon, Y.; Bérerd, N.; Toulhoat, N.; Moncoffre, N.; Djourelov, N.; Miro, S.; Baillet, J.; Pradeilles, N.; Rapaud, O.; Maître, A.; Gosset, D.

    2015-12-01

    Already used as neutron absorber in the current French nuclear reactors, boron carbide (B4C) is also considered in the future Sodium Fast Reactors of the next generation (Gen IV). Due to severe irradiation conditions occurring in these reactors, it is of primary importance that this material presents a high structural resistance under irradiation, both in the ballistic and electronic damage regimes. Previous works have shown an important structural resistance of boron carbide even at high neutron fluences. Nevertheless, the structural modification mechanisms due to irradiation are not well understood. Therefore the aim of this paper is to study structural modifications induced in B4C samples in different damage regimes. The boron carbide pellets were shaped and sintered by using spark plasma sintering method. They were then irradiated in several conditions at room temperature or 800 °C, either by favoring the creation of ballistic damage (between 1 and 3 dpa), or by favoring the electronic excitations using 100 MeV swift iodine ions (Se ≈ 15 keV/nm). Ex situ micro-Raman spectroscopy and Doppler broadening of annihilation radiation technique with variable energy slow positrons were coupled to follow the evolution of the B4C structure under irradiation.

  14. Estimation of the upper limit of carbon concentration in boron carbide crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalikhin, S. V.; Ponomarev, V. I.

    2010-08-01

    The existence of a boron carbide phase with ˜25 at % carbon was proven experimentally. To evaluate the maximum possible concentration of C atoms in boron carbide (B12 - x C x )(BC2) crystals, we performed quantum-chemical calculations of (B12 - x C x )(BH2)6(CH3)6 model compounds ( x = 0-4; the goal of calculations was to determine the upper limiting number of C atoms in the B12 - x C x icosahedron) by the density functional theory method (B3LYP, 6-31G** basis set, full geometry optimization). A comparison of the experimental and calculated data showed that the calculations of the model compounds reproduced the experimental dependences of the structural parameters of the icosahedron (mean bond length and volume) on the number of C atoms in it. The icosahedra were found to be stable at x ≤ 3. According to the results of the quantum-chemical calculations, the maximum carbon concentration in boron carbide was 33 at %, which corresponded to the composition B10C5 and the structural formula (B9C3)(BC2).

  15. Methyldichloroborane evidenced as an intermediate in the chemical vapour deposition synthesis of boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinisch, G; Patel, S; Chollon, G; Leyssale, J-M; Alotta, D; Bertrand, N; Vignoles, G L

    2011-09-01

    The most recent ceramic-matrix composites (CMC) considered for long-life applications as thermostructural parts in aerospace propulsion contain, among others, boron-rich phases like boron carbide. This compound is prepared by thermal Chemical Vapour Infiltration (CVI), starting from precursors like boron halides and hydrocarbons. We present a study aiming at a precise knowledge of the gas-phase composition in a hot-zone LPCVD reactor fed with BCl3, CH4 and H2, which combines experimental and theoretical approaches. This work has brought strong evidences of the presence of Methydichloroborane (MDB, BCl2CH3) in the process. It is demonstrated that this intermediate, the presence of which had never been formally proved before, appears for processing temperatures slightly lower than the deposition temperature of boron carbide. The study features quantum chemical computations, which provide several pieces of information like thermochemical and kinetic data, as well as vibration and rotation frequencies, reaction kinetics computations, and experimental gas-phase characterization of several species by FTIR, for several processing parameter sets. The main results are presented, and the place of MDB in the reaction scheme is discussed. PMID:22097577

  16. Standard test methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, and spectrochemical analysis of nuclear-grade boron carbide

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2004-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the chemical, mass spectrometric, and spectrochemical analysis of nuclear-grade boron carbide powder and pellets to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 The analytical procedures appear in the following order: Sections Total Carbon by Combustion and Gravimetry 7-17 Total Boron by Titrimetry 18-28 Isotopic Composition by Mass Spectrometry 29-38 Chloride and Fluoride Separation by Pyrohydrolysis 39-45 Chloride by Constant-Current Coulometry 46-54 Fluoride by Ion-Selective Electrode 55-63 Water by Constant-Voltage Coulometry 64-72 Impurities by Spectrochemical Analysis 73-81 Soluble Boron by Titrimetry 82-95 Soluble Carbon by a Manometric Measurement 96-105 Metallic Impurities by a Direct Reader Spectrometric Method 106-114

  17. Rim region growth and its composition in reaction bonded boron carbide composites with core-rim structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayun, S; Weizmann, A; Dilman, H; Dariel, M P; Frage, N [Department of Materials Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, P. O. Box 653, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel)], E-mail: hayuns@bgu.ac.il

    2009-06-01

    Aluminum was detected in reaction-bonded boron carbide that had been prepared by pressureless infiltration of boron carbide preforms with molten silicon in a graphite furnace under vacuum. The presence of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the heated zone, even though not in contact with the boron carbide preform, stands behind the presence of aluminium in the rim region that interconnects the initial boron carbide particles. The composition of the rim corresponds to the B{sub x}(C,Si,Al){sub y} quaternary carbide phase. The reaction of alumina with graphite and the formation of a gaseous aluminum suboxide (Al{sub 2}O) accounts for the transfer of aluminum in the melt and, subsequently in the rim regions. The presence of Al increases the solubility of boron in liquid silicon, but with increasing aluminum content the activity of boron decreases. These features dominate the structural evolution of the rim-core in the presence of aluminum in the melt.

  18. Synergistic methods for the production of high-strength and low-cost boron carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Charles Schenck

    2011-12-01

    Boron carbide (B4C) is a non-oxide ceramic in the same class of nonmetallic hard materials as silicon carbide and diamond. The high hardness, high elastic modulus and low density of B4C make it a nearly ideal material for personnel and vehicular armor. B4C plates formed via hot-pressing are currently issued to U.S. soldiers and have exhibited excellent performance; however, hot-pressed articles contain inherent processing defects and are limited to simple geometries such as low-curvature plates. Recent advances in the pressureless sintering of B4C have produced theoretically-dense and complex-shape articles that also exhibit superior ballistic performance. However, the cost of this material is currently high due to the powder shape, size, and size distribution that are required, which limits the economic feasibility of producing such a product. Additionally, the low fracture toughness of pure boron carbide may have resulted in historically lower transition velocities (the projectile velocity range at which armor begins to fail) than competing silicon carbide ceramics in high-velocity long-rod tungsten penetrator tests. Lower fracture toughness also limits multi-hit protection capability. Consequently, these requirements motivated research into methods for improving the densification and fracture toughness of inexpensive boron carbide composites that could result in the development of a superior armor material that would also be cost-competitive with other high-performance ceramics. The primary objective of this research was to study the effect of titanium and carbon additives on the sintering and mechanical properties of inexpensive B4C powders. The boron carbide powder examined in this study was a sub-micron (0.6 mum median particle size) boron carbide powder produced by H.C. Starck GmbH via a jet milling process. A carbon source in the form of phenolic resin, and titanium additives in the form of 32 nm and 0.9 mum TiO2 powders were selected. Parametric studies of

  19. Mechanisms of the boron carbide and boron nitride preferred sputtering by low energy ions bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ion irradiation of BN and B4C leads to enriching of the materials with the lighter component - borons as the experiment shows . With a view to explain this effect sputtering of BN and B4C under the irradiation by the He+ and Ar+ ions with the energy E0=0,5-5 keV has been calculated with computer modelling and the real structure of BN has been considered. In the case of B4C the calculations have been carried with Monte-Carlo code. It was shown that enriching of BN by boron may be accounted for building up the molecules N2 on the irradiated surface and their desorbing. The enriching of B4C with boron results from the difference of the binding energy of the B and C atoms. (author). 10 refs., 5 tabs

  20. The high-strain-rate dynamic response of boron carbide-based composites: The effect of microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dynamic high-strain-rate behavior of boron carbide-based composites with similar phase composition yet different microstructural features, namely, amount of residual silicon, average grain size and morphology of the SiC particles, was investigated as a function of the planar impact strength. The composites consisted of boron carbide preforms (compacted or partly sintered powder) with or without free carbon addition, infiltrated with molten silicon. The dynamic response of the composites depends strongly on the amount of residual silicon, on the average size of the boron carbide grains, and on the morphology of the SiC particles. The preliminary sintering of the preforms exerts no effect on the dynamic properties of the composites. The deformation and failure mechanisms under dynamic loading are discussed.

  1. Observation of 'hidden' planar defects in boron carbide nanowires and identification of their orientations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Zhe; Cao, Baobao; Yang, Yang; Jiang, Youfei; Li, Deyu; Xu, Terry T

    2014-01-01

    The physical properties of nanostructures strongly depend on their structures, and planar defects in particular could significantly affect the behavior of the nanowires. In this work, planar defects (twins or stacking faults) in boron carbide nanowires are extensively studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results show that these defects can easily be invisible, i.e., no presence of characteristic defect features like modulated contrast in high-resolution TEM images and streaks in diffraction patterns. The simplified reason of this invisibility is that the viewing direction during TEM examination is not parallel to the (001)-type planar defects. Due to the unique rhombohedral structure of boron carbide, planar defects are only distinctive when the viewing direction is along the axial or short diagonal directions ([100], [010], or 1¯10) within the (001) plane (in-zone condition). However, in most cases, these three characteristic directions are not parallel to the viewing direction when boron carbide nanowires are randomly dispersed on TEM grids. To identify fault orientations (transverse faults or axial faults) of those nanowires whose planar defects are not revealed by TEM, a new approach is developed based on the geometrical analysis between the projected preferred growth direction of a nanowire and specific diffraction spots from diffraction patterns recorded along the axial or short diagonal directions out of the (001) plane (off-zone condition). The approach greatly alleviates tedious TEM examination of the nanowire and helps to establish the reliable structure-property relations. Our study calls attention to researchers to be extremely careful when studying nanowires with potential planar defects by TEM. Understanding the true nature of planar defects is essential in tuning the properties of these nanostructures through manipulating their structures. PMID:24423258

  2. Mechanism for amorphization of boron carbide B4C under uniaxial compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryal, Sitaram; Rulis, Paul; Ching, W. Y.

    2011-11-01

    Boron carbide undergoes an amorphization transition under high-velocity impacts, causing it to suffer a catastrophic loss in strength. The failure mechanism is not clear and this limits the ways to improve its resistance to impact. To help uncover the failure mechanism, we used ab initio methods to carry out large-scale uniaxial compression simulations on two polytypes of stoichiometric boron carbide (B4C), B11C-CBC, and B12-CCC, where B11C or B12 is the 12-atom icosahedron and CBC or CCC is the three-atom chain. The simulations were performed on large supercells of 180 atoms. Our results indicate that the B11C-CBC (B12-CCC) polytype becomes amorphous at a uniaxial strain s = 0.23 (0.22) and with a maximum stress of 168 (151) GPa. In both cases, the amorphous state is the consequence of structural collapse associated with the bending of the three-atom chain. Careful analysis of the structures after amorphization shows that the B11C and B12 icosahedra are highly distorted but still identifiable. Calculations of the elastic coefficients (Cij) at different uniaxial strains indicate that both polytypes may collapse under a much smaller shear strain (stress) than the uniaxial strain (stress). On the other hand, separate simulations of both models under hydrostatic compression up to a pressure of 180 GPa show no signs of amorphization, in agreement with experimental observation. The amorphized nature of both models is confirmed by detailed analysis of the evolution of the radial pair distribution function, total density of states, and distribution of effective charges on atoms. The electronic structure and bonding of the boron carbide structures before and after amorphization are calculated to further elucidate the mechanism of amorphization and to help form the proper rationalization of experimental observations.

  3. Fabrication and Radiocharacterization of Boron Carbide and Tungsten Incorporated Rubber Shields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzieh Salimi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Radioactive ray safeguard is a physical impediment which is placed between radioactive source and the protected object in order to decrease the amount of rays' radiation in the protected area. Different materials such as lead, iron, graphite, water, poly ethylene, concrete, or rubber can be used for protection against nuclear radiations. In safeguard's common designing, two types of Gama and Neutron radiations are usually considered. The weakening amount of Gama radiations is proportional to the mass and atomic number of the safeguard's material. Covering Neutron source varies with regard to the source power and its application. However, what is always true is having the least dose with the least dimensions outside the safeguard. The dose of the safeguard's outside partition is resulted from quick, slow and thermal neutrons, and also from the source's Gammas and secondary Gammas. Neutrons use retarding and neutron-absorbing materials in order to reduce the dose. Due to the weak mechanical characteristics of the pure elastic composites, fillers are used to strengthen and improve their characteristics. Strengthening the elastic material is often defined through increasing the characteristics such as hardness, module, refraction energy, solidity, tear resistance, tensile solidity, lassitude resistance, abrasion resistance. In this paper, rubber shielding materials with boron carbide and tungsten as impurities have been fabricated. The optimum boron carbide contents (5% weight percent have been evaluated using the Monte Carlo code, MCNP. The gamma attenuation coefficients for different boron carbide and tungsten contents have been measured for a number of rubber shields with dimensions of 1×9×16cm3.

  4. Production of boron carbide powder by carbothermal synthesis of gel material

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A K Khanra

    2007-04-01

    Boron carbide (B4C) powder has been produced by carbothermal reduction of boric acid–citric acid gel. Initially a gel of boric acid–citric acid is prepared in an oven at 100°C. This gel is pyrolyzed in a high temperature furnace over a temperature range of 1000–1800°C. The reaction initiation temperature range for B4C formation is determined by thermal analysis. The optimal pyrolysis temperature of B4C synthesis is investigated. During pyrolysis, the evaporation of boron-rich phases results in presence of free carbon in B4C powder. The electron micrographs and particle size analyser reveal the generation of fine B4C particles.

  5. Preparation of titanium diboride powders from titanium alkoxide and boron carbide powder

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hamed Sinaei Pour Fard; Hamidreza Baharvandi

    2011-07-01

    Titanium diboride powders were prepared through a sol–gel and boron carbide reduction route by using TTIP and B4C as titanium and boron sources. The influence of TTIP concentration, reaction temperature and molar ratio of precursors on the synthesis of titanium diboride was investigated. Three different concentrations of TTIP solution, 0.033/0.05/0.1, were prepared and the molar ratio of B4C to TTIP varied from 1.3 to 2.5. The results indicated that as the TTIP concentration had an important role in gel formation, the reaction temperature and B4C to TTIP molar ratio showed obvious effects on the formation of TiB2. Pure TiB2 was prepared using molar composition of Ti : B4C = 1 : 2.3 and the optimum synthesis temperature was 1200°C.

  6. Absorption spectrum of the excitons bound on neutral boron atoms in cubic silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Absorption spectrum of the excitons strongly bound on neutral deep acceptors (boron) is observed for the first time in silicon carbide 3C-SiC:B cubic crystals. The exciton binding energy with EBex acceptor equals 227 meV. The spectrum consists of three absorption lines at photon energies 2.1508; 2.1585 and 2.189 eV and a series of high energy maxima. The spectrum structure is explained by splitting of coupled exciton states by hole-hole exchange interaction in the local acceptor field. It is shown that because of extremely high probability of Auger-processes the decay of excitons bound on neutral boron in 3C-SiC is a radiationless one

  7. The influence of residual gas on boron carbide thin films prepared by magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron carbide (B4C) thin films were prepared by magnetron sputtering and residual gas impurities in the films were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The impurities, mainly oxygen, decrease with improving vacuum. By using argon ion beam etching of the films, the atomic concentration was measured as a function of etching depth. The binding energy spectra were analyzed using wavelet transform and curve fitting, showing that most of the oxygen impurity is in the form of boron oxides, and that the impurities are physically trapped among columnar structures in the film. In order to improve the base vacuum before coating the film, a range of methods were used, including argon gas filling on the target surface and titanium pre-sputtering. The experimental results show that the latter is an efficient and feasible method. Based on the titanium pre-sputtering technology, the optical performance of W/B4C multilayer was improved so much.

  8. Durability of the AD1 alloy reinforced by boron and silicon carbide filaments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of ageing at high temperature on the structure of Al-B and Al-SiC composites has been studied. The composites consist of the AD1 aluminium alloy matrix reinforced by boron or silicon carbide fibres precipitated on tungsten threads. Long-term strength tests at 400 deg C were carried out, and the mechanism of crack generation and propagation in boron fibres was investigated. The long-term strength of the AD1-SiC composite was found to be 9.5 kg/mm2, and that of the AD1-B composite 15 kg/mm2. These strengths are respectively 16.5 and 26.3 times higher than those of the non-reinforced AD1 alloy

  9. Atomistic explanation of shear-induced amorphous band formation in boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Qi; Goddard, William A; Cheng, Tao

    2014-08-29

    Boron carbide (B4C) is very hard, but its applications are hindered by stress-induced amorphous band formation. To explain this behavior, we used density function theory (Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof flavor) to examine the response to shear along 11 plausible slip systems. We found that the (0111)/ slip system has the lowest shear strength (consistent with previous experimental studies) and that this slip leads to a unique plastic deformation before failure in which a boron-carbon bond between neighboring icosahedral clusters breaks to form a carbon lone pair (Lewis base) on the C within the icosahedron. Further shear then leads this Lewis base C to form a new bond with the Lewis acidic B in the middle of a CBC chain. This then initiates destruction of this icosahedron. The result is the amorphous structure observed experimentally. We suggest how this insight could be used to strengthen B4C. PMID:25215991

  10. Atomistic Explanation of Shear-Induced Amorphous Band Formation in Boron Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Qi; Goddard, William A.; Cheng, Tao

    2014-08-01

    Boron carbide (B4C) is very hard, but its applications are hindered by stress-induced amorphous band formation. To explain this behavior, we used density function theory (Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof flavor) to examine the response to shear along 11 plausible slip systems. We found that the (011¯ 1¯)/⟨1¯101⟩ slip system has the lowest shear strength (consistent with previous experimental studies) and that this slip leads to a unique plastic deformation before failure in which a boron-carbon bond between neighboring icosahedral clusters breaks to form a carbon lone pair (Lewis base) on the C within the icosahedron. Further shear then leads this Lewis base C to form a new bond with the Lewis acidic B in the middle of a CBC chain. This then initiates destruction of this icosahedron. The result is the amorphous structure observed experimentally. We suggest how this insight could be used to strengthen B4C.

  11. Modeling and simulation of boron-doped nanocrystalline silicon carbide thin film by a field theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Liming; Chen, Youping; Lee, James D

    2009-02-01

    This paper presents the application of a multiscale field theory in modeling and simulation of boron-doped nanocrystalline silicon carbide (B-SiC). The multiscale field theory was briefly introduced. Based on the field theory, numerical simulations show that intergranular glassy amorphous films (IGFs) and nano-sized pores exist in triple junctions of the grains for nanocrystalline B-SiC. Residual tensile stress in the SiC grains and compressive stress on the grain boundaries (GBs) were observed. Under tensile loading, it has been found that mechanical response of 5 wt% boron-SiC exhibits five characteristic regimes. Deformation mechanism at atomic scale has been revealed. Tensile strength and Young's modulus of nanocrystalline SiC were accurately reproduced. PMID:19441448

  12. Precipitation of AlN in a commercial hot-pressed boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TEM observations have provided insight into the processing and microstructural evolution of a commercial hot-pressed boron carbide. Fine dispersions of nano-scale AlN precipitates and individual submicron AlN precipitates were observed in a modest fraction of the grains. The nano-precipitates were found to be coherent with a well-defined crystallographic relationship to the matrix. The chemistry, size and distribution of both types of precipitates and the coherency of the nano-precipitates indicate that both intragranular homogeneous and heterogeneous precipitation occurred during cooling

  13. Removal of europium from boric acid for recycling of boron carbide in fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes results of work aimed at the removal of europium from boric acid solution. This study was undertaken as part of our efforts towards development of a flow-sheet for recycling of partially depleted boron carbide discharged from fast reactors. Commercially available sorbents such as Duolite, IR-77 and phosphinic acid resin (MPBPA) were evaluated for removal of europium from boric acid solution. The ion exchange of H+/Eu3+ increased with decrease in the concentration of nitric acid, sodium ion and boric acid. The selectivity of the sorbents toward europium was found to be in the order Duolite ≥ IR-77 ≥ MPBPA. (author)

  14. Synthesis of low carbon boron carbide powder using a minimal time processing route: Thermal plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinna Mishra

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Boron carbide powder was synthesized by thermal plasma reduction of boric acid in presence of graphite with a very minimal processing time. Subsequently, the as-synthesized products were leached to minimize the impurities content. Based on the results of X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy, the effect of leaching on phase purity and crystallinity was studied. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was performed to identify the chemical composition which highlighted the absence of the BO bonding in the deconvoluted B 1s core-level spectrum. Finally, the temperature dependent thermal conductivity behavior of the leached materials was analyzed and presented.

  15. Analysis of a boron-carbide-drum-controlled critical reactor experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, W. T.

    1972-01-01

    In order to validate methods and cross sections used in the neutronic design of compact fast-spectrum reactors for generating electric power in space, an analysis of a boron-carbide-drum-controlled critical reactor was made. For this reactor the transport analysis gave generally satisfactory results. The calculated multiplication factor for the most detailed calculation was only 0.7-percent Delta k too high. Calculated reactivity worth of the control drums was $11.61 compared to measurements of $11.58 by the inverse kinetics methods and $11.98 by the inverse counting method. Calculated radial and axial power distributions were in good agreement with experiment.

  16. Lightweight graphene nanoplatelet/boron carbide composite with high EMI shielding effectiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Yongqiang Tan; Heng Luo; Haibin Zhang; Xiaosong Zhou; Shuming Peng

    2016-01-01

    Lightweight graphene nanoplatelet (GNP)/boron carbide (B4C) composites were prepared and the effect of GNPs loading on the electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding effectiveness (SE) has been evaluated in the X-band frequency range. Results have shown that the EMI SE of GNP/B4C composite increases with increasing the GNPs loading. An EMI SE as high as 37 ∼ 39 dB has been achieved in composite with 5 vol% GNPs. The high EMI SE is mainly attributed to the high electrical conductivity, high ...

  17. High frequency organ-pipe modes in amorphous boron carbide observed using surface Brillouin scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorphous boron carbide films of 2 micron thickness were deposited at room temperature by a thermal deposition process on single-crystal silicon substrates. The elastic constants of an amorphous B4C film have been successfully measured by surface Brillouin scattering as a function of temperature, in the process, revealing a phase transition at about 350 deg.C. Quantized wave-vector components perpendicular to the film surface associated with organ-pipe modes occurring within the film were used in conjunction with elastodynamic Green's function calculations as well as independent measurement of longitudinal frequency from bulk excitations to extract the elastic constants

  18. Coaxial nanocable: silicon carbide and silicon oxide sheathed with boron nitride and carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang; Suenaga; Colliex; Iijima

    1998-08-14

    Multielement nanotubes comprising multiple phases, with diameters of a few tens of nanometers and lengths up to 50 micrometers, were successfully synthesized by means of reactive laser ablation. The experimentally determined structure consists of a beta-phase silicon carbide core, an amorphous silicon oxide intermediate layer, and graphitic outer shells made of boron nitride and carbon layers separated in the radial direction. The structure resembles a coaxial nanocable with a semiconductor-insulator-metal (or semiconductor-insulator-semiconductor) geometry and suggests applications in nanoscale electronic devices that take advantage of this self-organization mechanism for multielement nanotube formation. PMID:9703508

  19. Reprocessing of the irradiated boron carbide enriched by boron-10 isotope and its reuse in the control rods of the fast breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper discusses the development of technology for reprocessing of irradiated boron carbide, which provides complete removal of radionuclides from irradiated materials. This technology allows the repeated use of B10 enriched with B4C in fast reactors. (author). 4 figs, 1 tab

  20. The optical properties of boron carbide near boron K-edge inside periodical multilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multilayer mirrors made for the use in the wavelength range near K-edge of boron (188 eV) are of great interest for X-ray fluorescence analysis of boron content in doped semiconductors, plasma diagnostics, astronomy and lithography. Moreover, multilayer mirrors composed by a metal and a low Z element like boron are used as optical elements in both the soft x-ray spectral range as well as at higher photon energies on 3rd generation synchrotron beamlines. Using an energy-resolved photon-in-photon-out method we reconstructed the optical data from energy dependence of both integrated peak intensity and FWHM of the 1st order ML Bragg peak measured at the UHV triple axis soft-x-ray reflectometer at BESSY II. The experiments clearly demonstrate that the peak shape of the ML Bragg peak is most sensitive to any kind of electronic excitation and recombination in solid. The soft-ray reflectivity can give detailed information for MLs with thickness up to several tens of nanometers. In addition, measurements close to a resonance edge probe the chemical state of the respective constituent accompanied with a high sensitivity of changes close to the sample surface.

  1. MICROSTRUCTURE AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF ULTRAFINE WC/Co CEMENTED CARBIDES WITH CUBIC BORON NITRIDE AND Cr₃C₂ ADDITIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Genrong Zhang; Haiyan Chen; Dong Lihua; Yin,; Li Kun

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the microstructure and mechanical properties of ultrafine tungsten carbide and cobalt (WC/Co) cemented carbides with cubic boron nitride (CBN) and chromium carbide (Cr₃C₂) fabricated by a hot pressing sintering process. This study uses samples with 8 wt% Co content and 7.5 vol% CBN content, and with different Cr₃C₂ content ranging from 0 to 0.30 wt%. Based on the experimental results, Cr₃C₂ content has a significant influence on inhibiting abnormal grain growth and dec...

  2. Spectrographic determination of Si, Fe and Mn in nuclear grade boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A spectrographic method is developed to determine Si, Fe and Mn in nuclear grade boron carbide. Boron carbide sample is ground to fine mesh in the presence of liquid N2 and mixed with pure conducting graphite powder in the ratio of 1:1 by weight. Ten milligrammes of the ground charge are loaded in the cavity of a U.C.C. 1991 shallow cup electrode (anode) and arced against a 1/8 inch dia. pointed graphite electrode (cathode) at 15 amp d.c. operated in oxygen atmosphere. Synthetic standards are also arced under the same conditions. The spectra are recorded on a 3.4 m JACO Ebert plane grating spectrograph with 30,000 l.p.i. grating in the wavelength region 2300-2900 A, first order. Si 2506.9 A, Fe 2598.4 A and Mn 2605.7 A lines are used as the analytical lines with BO band head at 2437.1 A as the internal standard line. Si and Fe are estimated in the concentration range, 200-5000 ppm and Mn is estimated in the range, 10-500 ppm. 3 figures, 2 tables, 3 refs. (author)

  3. Sc3B0.75C3, a novel scandium boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Sc-based boron carbide, Sc3B0.75C3, containing linear C-B-C chains and isolated C atoms has been synthesized by a solid-state chemical reaction route. The crystal structure was determined using the X-ray powder diffraction technique and can be assigned to represent a new structure type of rare-earth boron carbides. The tetragonal crystal structure (a=3.3315(3) A, c=7.6737(1) A, P4/mmm (No.123)) is built up from chains of [Sc10] polyhedra parallel to the c-axis and contains linear C-B-C chains. The linear C-B-C chains exhibit a short B-C bond length of 1.417(1) A. Both the X-ray powder diffraction data and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis suggest the possible presence of a B vacancy and site disorder in the C-B-C chain-end sites. (orig.)

  4. Thermo-physical properties of boron carbide reinforced copper composites fabricated by electroless deposition process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► B4C/Cu composites were prepared by spark plasma sintering (SPS). ► Electroless deposition of copper on the B4C particles surface was introduced. ► The salt-based colloid palladium was used in the electroless deposition. ► The uniform surface copper coating over B4C particles surface was formed. - Abstract: B4C/Cu composites with enhanced thermal–physical properties were prepared by spark plasma sintering (SPS) after the pretreatment of electroless deposition of copper on the boron carbide particles surface. The boron carbide particles underwent acid treatment, salt-based colloid palladium activation process, and electroless copper deposition on their surface respectively. Samples were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectrometer in terms of microstructure and chemical composition. The microstructure investigated by SEM shows that high quality copper deposits are obtained on the B4C particles surface accompanied by the good interfacial contact between the copper and the pretreated B4C powder in the sintered sample. It was found that the thermal conductivity decreased as B4C volume fraction increased in copper matrix, while the coefficient of thermal expansion increased

  5. Elastic properties, sp3 fraction, and Raman scattering in low and high pressure synthesized diamond-like boron rich carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dense BCx phases with high boron concentration are predicted to be metastable, superhard, and conductors or superconductors depending on boron concentration. However, up to this point, diamond-like boron rich carbides BCx (dl-BCx) phases have been thought obtainable only through high pressure and high temperature treatment, necessitating small specimen volume. Here, we use electron energy loss spectroscopy combined with transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, surface Brillouin scattering, laser ultrasonics (LU) technique, and analysis of elastic properties to demonstrate that low pressure synthesis (chemical vapor deposition) of BCx phases may also lead to the creation of diamond-like boron rich carbides. The elastic properties of the dl-BCx phases depend on the carbon sp2 versus sp3 content, which decreases with increasing boron concentration, while the boron bonds determine the shape of the Raman spectra of the dl-BCx after high pressure-high temperature treatment. Using the estimation of the density value based on the sp3 fraction, the shear modulus μ of dl-BC4, containing 10% carbon atoms with sp3 bonds, and dl-B3C2, containing 38% carbon atoms with sp3 bonds, were found to be μ = 19.3 GPa and μ = 170 GPa, respectively. The presented experimental data also imply that boron atoms lead to a creation of sp3 bonds during the deposition processes.

  6. Studies on the influence of surface pre-treatments on electroless copper coating of boron carbide particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron carbide is one of the hard ceramic particles which find application as structural materials and neutron shielding material due to its high neutron capture cross section. Copper coating on boron carbide particle is essential for the synthesis of metal-ceramic composites with enhanced sinterability and dispersibility. Surface characteristics of the substrate and the coating parameters play a foremost role in the formation of effective electroless coating. The effect of surface pre-treatment conditions and pH on electroless copper coating of boron carbide particles has been studied. Surface pre-treatement of B4C when compared to acid treated and alkali treated particles were carried out. Uniform copper coating was observed at pH 12 in alkali treated particles when compared to others due to the effective removal of inevitable impurities during the production and processing of commercially available B4C. A threshold pH 11 was required for initiation of copper coating on boron carbide particles. The growth pattern of the copper coating also varies depending on the surface conditions from acicular to spherical morphology.

  7. Improved green-light-emitting pyrotechnic formulations based on tris(2,2,2-trinitroethyl)borate and boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klapötke, Thomas M; Krumm, Burkhard; Rusan, Magdalena; Sabatini, Jesse J

    2014-08-28

    Green-light-emitting pyrotechnic compositions based on tris(2,2,2-trinitroethyl)borate (TNEB) and boron carbide have been investigated. The best performing formulations were found to be insensitive to various ignition stimuli, and exhibited very high spectral purities and luminosities compared to previously reported green-light-emitting formulations. PMID:25012058

  8. Improved green-light-emitting pyrotechnic formulations based on tris(2,2,2-trinitroethyl)borate and boron carbide

    OpenAIRE

    Klapötke, Thomas M.; Krumm, Burkhard; Rusan, Magdalena; Sabatini, Jesse J.

    2014-01-01

    Green-light-emitting pyrotechnic compositions based on tris(2,2,2-trinitroethyl)borate (TNEB) and boron carbide have been investigated. The best performing formulations were found to be insensitive to various ignition stimuli, and exhibited very high spectral purities and luminosities compared to previously reported green-light-emitting formulations.

  9. High-pressure phase transition makes B4.3C boron carbide a wide-gap semiconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hushur, Anwar; Manghnani, Murli H.; Werheit, Helmut; Dera, Przemyslaw; Williams, Quentin

    2016-02-01

    Single-crystal B4.3C boron carbide is investigated through the pressure-dependence and inter-relation of atomic distances, optical properties and Raman-active phonons up to ~70 GPa. The anomalous pressure evolution of the gap width to higher energies is striking. This is obtained from observations of transparency, which most rapidly increases around 55 GPa. Full visible optical transparency is approached at pressures of  >60 GPa indicating that the band gap reaches ~3.5 eV at high pressure, boron carbide is a wide-gap semiconductor. The reason is that the high concentration of structural defects controlling the electronic properties of boron carbide at ambient conditions initially decreases and finally vanishes at high pressures. The structural parameters and Raman-active phonons indicate a pressure-dependent phase transition in single-crystal natB4.3C boron carbide near 40 GPa, likely related to structural changes in the C-B-C chains, while the basic icosahedral structure appears to be less affected.

  10. μ+SR studies of magnetic properties of boron carbide superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positive-muon spin relaxation (μ+SR) has been carried out in the recently-discovered rare-earth boron carbide superconductors RNi2B2C, R = Ho, Er and Tm. For R = Ho and Er zero-field μ+SR measurements showed a well-defined internal field below the Neel temperatures of 5.5 K coexisting with the superconducting state down to 0.1 K. The observed temperature dependence of the order parameter for Ho is consistent with a 2-dimensional Ising model. For R = Tm a spontaneous internal field appears above 30 K, whose magnitude saturates below about 3 K at a value corresponding to a rare earth moment much smaller than for Ho and Er. Transverse-field micro-SR measurements in R = Tm showed a superconducting penetration depth λ, = 1,200 angstrom. The temperature dependence of λ is consistent with conventional s-wave pairing

  11. Enhanced mechanical properties of nanocrystalline boron carbide by nanoporosity and interface phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhav Reddy, K; Guo, J J; Shinoda, Y; Fujita, T; Hirata, A; Singh, J P; McCauley, J W; Chen, M W

    2012-01-01

    Ceramics typically have very high hardness, but low toughness and plasticity. Besides intrinsic brittleness associated with rigid covalent or ionic bonds, porosity and interface phases are the foremost characteristics that lead to their failure at low stress levels in a brittle manner. Here we show that, in contrast to the conventional wisdom that these features are adverse factors in mechanical properties of ceramics, the compression strength, plasticity and toughness of nanocrystalline boron carbide can be noticeably improved by introducing nanoporosity and weak amorphous carbon at grain boundaries. Transmission electron microscopy reveals that the unusual nanosize effect arises from the deformation-induced elimination of nanoporosity mediated by grain boundary sliding with the assistance of the soft grain boundary phases. This study has important implications in developing high-performance ceramics with ultrahigh strength and enhanced plasticity and toughness. PMID:22968698

  12. Lightweight graphene nanoplatelet/boron carbide composite with high EMI shielding effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yongqiang; Luo, Heng; Zhang, Haibin; Zhou, Xiaosong; Peng, Shuming

    2016-03-01

    Lightweight graphene nanoplatelet (GNP)/boron carbide (B4C) composites were prepared and the effect of GNPs loading on the electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding effectiveness (SE) has been evaluated in the X-band frequency range. Results have shown that the EMI SE of GNP/B4C composite increases with increasing the GNPs loading. An EMI SE as high as 37 ˜ 39 dB has been achieved in composite with 5 vol% GNPs. The high EMI SE is mainly attributed to the high electrical conductivity, high dielectric loss as well as multiple reflections by aligned GNPs inside the composite. The GNP/B4C composite is demonstrated to be promising candidate of high-temperature microwave EMI shielding material.

  13. Lightweight graphene nanoplatelet/boron carbide composite with high EMI shielding effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongqiang Tan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Lightweight graphene nanoplatelet (GNP/boron carbide (B4C composites were prepared and the effect of GNPs loading on the electromagnetic interference (EMI shielding effectiveness (SE has been evaluated in the X-band frequency range. Results have shown that the EMI SE of GNP/B4C composite increases with increasing the GNPs loading. An EMI SE as high as 37 ∼ 39 dB has been achieved in composite with 5 vol% GNPs. The high EMI SE is mainly attributed to the high electrical conductivity, high dielectric loss as well as multiple reflections by aligned GNPs inside the composite. The GNP/B4C composite is demonstrated to be promising candidate of high-temperature microwave EMI shielding material.

  14. Detection of a leaking boron-carbide control rod in a TRIGA Mark I reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During a routine quarterly inspection of the boron-carbide control rods of the Omaha Veterans Administration Hospital 18 kW Triga Mark I reactor, a pin hole leak was detected approximately 3 mm from the chamfered edge. The leak was found by observing bubbles when the rod was withdrawn from the reactor tank for visual observation, and could not be seen with the naked eye. This suggests that pin hole leaks could occur and not be visually detected in control rods and fuel elements examined underwater. A review of the rod calibrations showed that the leak had not caused a loss in rod worth. Slides will be presented showing the bubbles observed during the inspection, together with an unmagnified and magnified view of the pin hole. (author)

  15. Structure characterization and strain relief analysis in CVD growth of boron phosphide on silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Guoliang [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Abbott, Julia K.C.; Brasfield, John D. [Department of Chemistry, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Liu, Peizhi [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Dale, Alexis [Department of Chemistry, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Duscher, Gerd [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Rack, Philip D. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Feigerle, Charles S., E-mail: cfeigerl@tennessee.edu [Department of Chemistry, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Highlights: • Crystalline boron phosphide was grown on vicinal 4H (0 0 0 1)-SiC surfaces. • The microstructure evolution of defects generated at the interface was characterized by transmission electron microscopy. • The evolution of lattice distortion and strain are determined. - Abstract: Boron phosphide (BP) is a material of interest for development of a high-efficiency solid-state thermal neutron detector. For a thick film-based device, microstructure evolution is key to the engineering of material synthesis. Here, we report epitaxial BP films grown on silicon carbide with vicinal steps and provide a detailed analysis of the microstructure evolution and strain relief. The BP film is epitaxial in the near-interface region but deviates from epitaxial growth as the film develops. Defects such as coherent and incoherent twin boundaries, dislocation loops, stacking faults concentrate in the near-interface region and segment this region into small domains. The formation of defects in this region do not fully release the strain originated from the lattice mismatch. Large grains emerge above the near-interface region and grain boundaries become the main defects in the upper part of the BP film.

  16. Bare and boron-doped cubic silicon carbide nanowires for electrochemical detection of nitrite sensitively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tao; Zhang, Liqin; Hou, Xinmei; Chen, Junhong; Chou, Kuo-Chih

    2016-01-01

    Fabrication of eletrochemical sensors based on wide bandgap compound semiconductors has attracted increasing interest in recent years. Here we report for the first time electrochemical nitrite sensors based on cubic silicon carbide (SiC) nanowires (NWs) with smooth surface and boron-doped cubic SiC NWs with fin-like structure. Multiple techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) were used to characterize SiC and boron-doped SiC NWs. As for the electrochemical behavior of both SiC NWs electrode, the cyclic voltammetric results show that both SiC electrodes exhibit wide potential window and excellent electrocatalytic activity toward nitrite oxidation. Differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) determination reveals that there exists a good linear relationship between the oxidation peak current and the concentration in the range of 50-15000 μmoL L(-1) (cubic SiC NWs) and 5-8000 μmoL L(-1) (B-doped cubic SiC NWs) with the detection limitation of 5 and 0.5 μmoL L(-1) respectively. Compared with previously reported results, both as-prepared nitrite sensors exhibit wider linear response range with comparable high sensitivity, high stability and reproducibility. PMID:27109361

  17. Structure characterization and strain relief analysis in CVD growth of boron phosphide on silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Crystalline boron phosphide was grown on vicinal 4H (0 0 0 1)-SiC surfaces. • The microstructure evolution of defects generated at the interface was characterized by transmission electron microscopy. • The evolution of lattice distortion and strain are determined. - Abstract: Boron phosphide (BP) is a material of interest for development of a high-efficiency solid-state thermal neutron detector. For a thick film-based device, microstructure evolution is key to the engineering of material synthesis. Here, we report epitaxial BP films grown on silicon carbide with vicinal steps and provide a detailed analysis of the microstructure evolution and strain relief. The BP film is epitaxial in the near-interface region but deviates from epitaxial growth as the film develops. Defects such as coherent and incoherent twin boundaries, dislocation loops, stacking faults concentrate in the near-interface region and segment this region into small domains. The formation of defects in this region do not fully release the strain originated from the lattice mismatch. Large grains emerge above the near-interface region and grain boundaries become the main defects in the upper part of the BP film

  18. Bare and boron-doped cubic silicon carbide nanowires for electrochemical detection of nitrite sensitively

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tao; Zhang, Liqin; Hou, Xinmei; Chen, Junhong; Chou, Kuo-Chih

    2016-04-01

    Fabrication of eletrochemical sensors based on wide bandgap compound semiconductors has attracted increasing interest in recent years. Here we report for the first time electrochemical nitrite sensors based on cubic silicon carbide (SiC) nanowires (NWs) with smooth surface and boron-doped cubic SiC NWs with fin-like structure. Multiple techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) were used to characterize SiC and boron-doped SiC NWs. As for the electrochemical behavior of both SiC NWs electrode, the cyclic voltammetric results show that both SiC electrodes exhibit wide potential window and excellent electrocatalytic activity toward nitrite oxidation. Differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) determination reveals that there exists a good linear relationship between the oxidation peak current and the concentration in the range of 50–15000 μmoL L‑1 (cubic SiC NWs) and 5–8000 μmoL L‑1 (B-doped cubic SiC NWs) with the detection limitation of 5 and 0.5 μmoL L‑1 respectively. Compared with previously reported results, both as-prepared nitrite sensors exhibit wider linear response range with comparable high sensitivity, high stability and reproducibility.

  19. Design of boron carbide-shielded irradiation channel of the outer irradiation channel of the Ghana Research Reactor-1 using MCNP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The MCNP model for the Ghana Research Reactor-1 was redesigned to incorporate a boron carbide-shielded irradiation channel in one of the outer irradiation channels. Extensive investigations were made before arriving at the final design of only one boron carbide covered outer irradiation channel; as all the other designs that were considered did not give desirable results of neutronic performance. The concept of redesigning a new MCNP model, which has a boron carbide-shielded channel is to equip the Ghana Research Reactor-1 with the means of performing efficient epithermal neutron activation analysis. After the simulation, a comparison of the results from the original MCNP model for the Ghana Research Reactor-1 and the new redesigned model of the boron carbide shielded channel was made. The final effective criticality of the original MCNP model for the GHARR-1 was recorded as 1.00402 while that of the new boron carbide designed model was recorded as 1.00282. Also, a final prompt neutron lifetime of 1.5245x10-4 s was recorded for the new boron carbide designed model while a value of 1.5571x10-7 s was recorded for the original MCNP design of the GHARR-1.

  20. Design of boron carbide-shielded irradiation channel of the outer irradiation channel of the Ghana Research Reactor-1 using MCNP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrefah, R G; Sogbadji, R B M; Ampomah-Amoako, E; Birikorang, S A; Odoi, H C; Nyarko, B J B

    2011-01-01

    The MCNP model for the Ghana Research Reactor-1 was redesigned to incorporate a boron carbide-shielded irradiation channel in one of the outer irradiation channels. Extensive investigations were made before arriving at the final design of only one boron carbide covered outer irradiation channel; as all the other designs that were considered did not give desirable results of neutronic performance. The concept of redesigning a new MCNP model, which has a boron carbide-shielded channel is to equip the Ghana Research Reactor-1 with the means of performing efficient epithermal neutron activation analysis. After the simulation, a comparison of the results from the original MCNP model for the Ghana Research Reactor-1 and the new redesigned model of the boron carbide shielded channel was made. The final effective criticality of the original MCNP model for the GHARR-1 was recorded as 1.00402 while that of the new boron carbide designed model was recorded as 1.00282. Also, a final prompt neutron lifetime of 1.5245 × 10(-4)s was recorded for the new boron carbide designed model while a value of 1.5571 × 10(-7)s was recorded for the original MCNP design of the GHARR-1. PMID:20637646

  1. Uniform design and regression analysis of LPCVD boron carbide from BCl3-CH4-H2 system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron carbide was prepared by low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) from BCl3-CH4-H2 system. The deposition process conditions were optimized through using a uniform design method and regression analysis. The regression model of the deposition rate was established. The influences of deposition temperature (T), deposition time (t), inlet BCl3/CH4 gas ratio (δ), and inlet H2/CH4 gas ratio (θ) on deposition rate and microstructure of the coatings were investigated. The optimized deposition parameters were obtained theoretically. The morphologies, phases, microstructure and composition of deposits were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman micro-spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive spectra (EDS), and Auger electron spectra (AES), the results showed that different boron carbides were produced by three kinds of deposition mechanisms

  2. Growth and Physical Structure of Amorphous Boron Carbide Deposited by Magnetron Sputtering on a Silicon Substrate with a Titanium Interlayer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Caniello

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Multilayer amorphous boron carbide coatings were produced by radiofrequency magnetron sputtering on silicon substrates. To improve the adhesion, titanium interlayers with different thickness were interposed between the substrate and the coating. Above three hundreds nanometer, the enhanced roughness of the titanium led to the growth of an amorphous boron carbide with a dense and continuing columnar structure, and no delamination effect was observed. Correspondingly, the adhesion of the coating became three time stronger than in the case of a bare silicon substrate. Physical structure and microstructural proprieties of the coatings were investigated by means of a scan electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The adhesion of the films was measured by a scratch tester.

  3. Structure of an amorphous boron carbide film: an experimental and computational approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An amorphous boron carbide ceramic is prepared via hot wall chemical vapor deposition at 1000 C using a BCl3/CH4/H2 mixture. Its elemental composition is assessed by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and its structure studied by Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), both X-ray diffraction (XRD) and neutron diffraction, 11B magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), and ab initio modeling. The atomic structure factor and pair distribution function derived from neutron diffraction data are compared to those deduced from an atomistic model obtained by a liquid quench ab initio molecular dynamics simulation. The good agreement between experimental data and simulation shows that the as prepared material is essentially made of a random arrangement of icosahedra (B12, B11C, and B10C2) embedded in an amorphous matrix rich in trigonal (BC3 or BC2B) and tetrahedral (CB4) sites. The existence of trigonal boron environments is clearly confirmed by a peak at 50 ppm in both the experimental and simulated 11B MAS NMR spectra, as well as a 190.0 eV component in the XANES-B(1s) spectrum. The inter icosahedral linear C-B-C chains observed in crystalline B4C are absent in the as-processed material. Free hexagonal carbon and B4C crystallites appear in the ceramic when heat-treated at 1300 C/2 h/Ar, as evidenced by high-resolution TEM and Raman spectroscopy. Comparing the pair distribution functions of the heat-treated material with the crystalline B4C model allows confirming the apparition of C-B-C chains in the material. Indeed, two new peaks located at 1.42 and 2.35 Angstroms can only be attributed to a first-neighbor distance between the B and C atoms in the chain and a second-neighbor distance between a chain-boron atom and an icosahedron-boron atom, respectively. (authors)

  4. Fission product analysis of HEU irradiated within a boron carbide capsule: comparison of detection methodology at PNNL and AWE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fission products from HEU formed under a fast-pooled neutron spectrum generated using a boron carbide shield were analyzed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the Atomic Weapons Establishment. The results from each laboratory using chemical separation, high-purity germanium gamma spectroscopy and/or Compton suppression gamma spectroscopy are compared with the potential benefits and limitations of the different gamma spectroscopy methods discussed. (author)

  5. The structure and properties of boron carbide ceramics modified by high-current pulsed electron-beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Yuri; Tolkachev, Oleg; Petyukevich, Maria; Teresov, Anton; Ivanova, Olga; Ikonnikova, Irina; Polisadova, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    The present work is devoted to numerical simulation of temperature fields and the analysis of structural and strength properties of the samples surface layer of boron carbide ceramics treated by the high-current pulsed electron-beam of the submillisecond duration. The samples made of sintered boron carbide ceramics are used in these investigations. The problem of calculating the temperature field is reduced to solving the thermal conductivity equation. The electron beam density ranges between 8…30 J/cm2, while the pulse durations are 100…200 μs in numerical modelling. The results of modelling the temperature field allowed ascertaining the threshold parameters of the electron beam, such as energy density and pulse duration. The electron beam irradiation is accompanied by the structural modification of the surface layer of boron carbide ceramics either in the single-phase (liquid or solid) or two-phase (solid-liquid) states. The sample surface of boron carbide ceramics is treated under the two-phase state (solid-liquid) conditions of the structural modification. The surface layer is modified by the high-current pulsed electron-beam produced by SOLO installation at the Institute of High Current Electronics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk, Russia. The elemental composition and the defect structure of the modified surface layer are analyzed by the optical instrument, scanning electron and transmission electron microscopes. Mechanical properties of the modified layer are determined measuring its hardness and crack resistance. Research results show that the melting and subsequent rapid solidification of the surface layer lead to such phenomena as fragmentation due to a crack network, grain size reduction, formation of the sub-grained structure due to mechanical twinning, and increase of hardness and crack resistance.

  6. The structure and properties of boron carbide ceramics modified by high-current pulsed electron-beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work is devoted to numerical simulation of temperature fields and the analysis of structural and strength properties of the samples surface layer of boron carbide ceramics treated by the high-current pulsed electron-beam of the submillisecond duration. The samples made of sintered boron carbide ceramics are used in these investigations. The problem of calculating the temperature field is reduced to solving the thermal conductivity equation. The electron beam density ranges between 8…30 J/cm2, while the pulse durations are 100…200 μs in numerical modelling. The results of modelling the temperature field allowed ascertaining the threshold parameters of the electron beam, such as energy density and pulse duration. The electron beam irradiation is accompanied by the structural modification of the surface layer of boron carbide ceramics either in the single-phase (liquid or solid) or two-phase (solid-liquid) states. The sample surface of boron carbide ceramics is treated under the two-phase state (solid-liquid) conditions of the structural modification. The surface layer is modified by the high-current pulsed electron-beam produced by SOLO installation at the Institute of High Current Electronics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk, Russia. The elemental composition and the defect structure of the modified surface layer are analyzed by the optical instrument, scanning electron and transmission electron microscopes. Mechanical properties of the modified layer are determined measuring its hardness and crack resistance. Research results show that the melting and subsequent rapid solidification of the surface layer lead to such phenomena as fragmentation due to a crack network, grain size reduction, formation of the sub-grained structure due to mechanical twinning, and increase of hardness and crack resistance

  7. Surface impurity removal from DIII-D graphite tiles by boron carbide grit blasting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the latter half of 1992, the DIII-D tokamak at General Atomics (GA) underwent several modifications of its interior. One of the major tasks involved the removal of accumulated metallic impurities from the surface of the graphite tiles used to line the plasma facing surfaces inside of the tokamak. Approximately 1500 graphite tiles and 100 boron nitride tiles from the tokamak were cleaned to remove the metallic impurities. The cleaning process consisted of several steps: the removed graphite tiles were permanently marked, surface blasted using boron carbide (B4C) grit media (approximately 37 μm. diam.), ultrasonically cleaned in ethanol to remove loose dust, and outgassed at 1000 degrees C. Tests were done using, graphite samples and different grit blaster settings to determine the optimum propellant and abrasive media pressures to remove a graphite layer approximately 40-50 μm deep and yet produce a reasonably smooth finish. EDX measurements revealed that the blasting technique reduced the surface Ni, Cr, and Fe impurity levels to those of virgin graphite. In addition to the surface impurity removal, tritium monitoring was performed throughout the cleaning process. A bubbler system was set up to monitor the tritium level in the exhaust gas from the grit blaster unit. Surface wipes were also performed on over 10% of the tiles. Typical surface tritium concentrations of the tiles were reduced from about 500 dpm/100 cm2 to less than 80 dpm/100 cm2 following the cleaning. This tile conditioning, and the installation of additional graphite tiles to cover a high fraction of the metallic plasma facing surfaces, has substantially reduced metallic impurities in the plasma discharges which has allowed rapid recovery from a seven-month machine opening and regimes of enhanced plasma energy confinement to be more readily obtained. Safety issues concerning blaster operator exposure to carcinogenic metals and radioactive tritium will also be addressed

  8. Study of boron carbide evolution under neutron irradiation by Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron carbide, B12C3, is an absorbing material used to control the reactivity of nuclear reactors by taking advantage of nuclear reactions (e.g. 10B(n,α)7Li), where neutrons are absorbed. During such reactions, radiation damages originating both from these nuclear reactions and from elastic collisions between neutrons and atoms lead to a partial destruction of this material, which gives the main limitation of its lifetime in nuclear reactors. In order to understand the evolution of B12C3 in nuclear plants, the effect of neutron irradiation in B12C3 has been investigated by Raman and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies. Comparisons of B12C3 samples irradiated by 1 MeV electrons, 180 keV helium ions and neutrons are used to study the microstructure evolution of this material by Raman scattering. The analysis of Raman spectra of different B12C3 samples irradiated by neutrons clearly shows that during the cascade displacements, the 485 and 527 cm-1 modes disappear. These characteristic features of Raman spectra of the neutron irradiated samples are interpreted by a microscopic model. This model assumes that the CBC linear chain is destroyed whereas icosahedra are self-healed. 10B atoms destroyed during the neutron irradiation are replaced in icosahedra by other boron and carbon atoms coming from the linear CBC chain. The 11B NMR analysis performed on unirradiated and irradiated B4C samples shows the vanishing of a strong quadrupolar interaction associated to the CBC chain during the high neutron irradiation. The 11B NMR spectroscopy confirms the previous Raman spectroscopy and the proposed microscopic model of B12C3 evolution under neutron irradiation

  9. Boron carbide, B(13-x)C(2-y) (x = 0.12, y = 0.01).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sologub, Oksana; Michiue, Yuichi; Mori, Takao

    2012-08-01

    Boron carbide phases exist over a widely varying compos-itional range B(12+x)C(3-x) (0.06 Boron icosa-hedra are inter-connected by C atoms via their B(Eq) atoms, forming layers parallel to (001), while the B(12) units of the adjacent layers are linked through inter-icosa-hedral B(P)-B(P) bonds. The unique B atom (B(C)) connects the two C atoms of adjacent layers, forming a C-B-C chain along [001]. Depending on the carbon concentration, the carbon and B(P) sites exhibit mixed B/C occupancies to varying degrees; besides, the B(C) site shows partial occupancy. The decrease in carbon content was reported to be realized via an increasing number of chainless unit cells. On the basis of X-ray single-crystal refinement, we have concluded that the unit cell of the given boron-rich crystal contains following structural units: [B(12)] and [B(11)C] icosa-hedra (about 96 and 4%, respectively) and C-B-C chains (87%). Besides, there is a fraction of unit cells (13%) with the B atom located against the triangular face of a neighboring icosa-hedron formed by B(Eq) (B2) thus rendering the formula B(0.87)(B(0.98)C(0.02))(12)(B(0.13)C(0.87))(2) for the current boron carbide crystal. PMID:22904703

  10. Optical constants of magnetron-sputtered boron carbide thin films from photoabsorption data in the range 30 to 770 eV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soufli, Regina; Aquila, Andrew L; Salmassi, Farhad; Fernández-Perea, Mónica; Gullikson, Eric M

    2008-09-01

    This work discusses the experimental determination of the optical constants (refractive index) of DC-magnetron-sputtered boron carbide films in the 30-770 eV photon energy range. Transmittance measurements of three boron carbide films with thicknesses of 54.2, 79.0, and 112.5 nm were performed for this purpose. These are believed to be the first published experimental data for the refractive index of boron carbide films in the photon energy range above 160 eV and for the near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure regions around the boron K (188 eV), carbon K (284.2 eV), and oxygen K (543.1 eV) absorption edges. The density, composition, surface chemistry, and morphology of the films were also investigated using Rutherford backscattering, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and extreme ultraviolet reflectance measurements. PMID:18758535

  11. Phase transitions of boron carbide: Pair interaction model of high carbon limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Sanxi; Huhn, W. P.; Widom, M.

    2015-09-01

    Boron Carbide exhibits a broad composition range, implying a degree of intrinsic substitutional disorder. While the observed phase has rhombohedral symmetry (space group R 3 bar m), the enthalpy minimizing structure has lower, monoclinic, symmetry (space group Cm). The crystallographic primitive cell consists of a 12-atom icosahedron placed at the vertex of a rhombohedral lattice, together with a 3-atom chain along the 3-fold axis. In the limit of high carbon content, approaching 20% carbon, the icosahedra are usually of type B11 Cp, where the p indicates the carbon resides on a polar site, while the chains are of type C-B-C. We establish an atomic interaction model for this composition limit, fit to density functional theory total energies, that allows us to investigate the substitutional disorder using Monte Carlo simulations augmented by multiple histogram analysis. We find that the low temperature monoclinic Cm structure disorders through a pair of phase transitions, first via a 3-state Potts-like transition to space group R3m, then via an Ising-like transition to the experimentally observed R 3 bar m symmetry. The R3m and Cm phases are electrically polarized, while the high temperature R 3 bar m phase is nonpolar.

  12. Porosity determination of alumina and boron carbide ceramic samples by gamma ray transmission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work is to apply the Gamma Ray Transmission (GRT), a non destructive technique, for structural characterization of ceramic samples. With this technique, the porosity of Alumina (Al2O3) and Boron Carbide (B4C) ceramic samples, in tablet format, was determined. The equipment employed is constituted by a 241Am gamma ray source (59.6 keV and 100mCi), a 2''x2'' diameter NaI (Tl) scintillation detector coupled to a standard gamma ray transmission electronic and a micrometric and automated table for sample movement. The porosity profile of the samples shows a homogeneous porosity distribution, within the spatial resolution of the employed transmission system. The mean porosity determined for Al2O3 and B4C were 17.8±1.3% and 3.87±0.43%, respectively. A statistical treatment of these results was performed and showed that the mean porosity values determinate by the GRT are the same as those supplied by the manufacturer. (author)

  13. Enhanced deposition of cubic boron nitride films on roughened silicon and tungsten carbide-cobalt surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teii, K., E-mail: teii@asem.kyushu-u.ac.j [Department of Applied Science for Electronics and Materials, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Sciences, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Hori, T. [Department of Applied Science for Electronics and Materials, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Sciences, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Matsumoto, S. [Exploratory Materials Research Laboratory for Energy and Environment, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Ceramic Forum Co. Ltd., 1-6-6 Taitoh, Taitoh-ku, Tokyo 110-0016 (Japan)

    2011-01-03

    We report the influence of substrate surface roughness on cubic boron nitride (cBN) film deposition under low-energy ion bombardment in an inductively coupled plasma. Silicon and cemented tungsten carbide-cobalt (WC-Co) surfaces are roughened by low-energy ion-assisted etching in a hydrogen plasma, followed by deposition in a fluorine-containing plasma. Infrared absorption coefficients are measured to be 22,000 cm{sup -1} and 17,000 cm{sup -1} for sp{sup 2}-bonded BN and cBN phases, respectively, for our films. For the silicon substrates, the film growth rate and the cBN content in the film increase with increasing the surface roughness, while the amount of sp{sup 2}BN phase in the film shows only a small increase. A larger surface roughness of the substrate results in a smaller contact angle of water, indicating that a higher surface free energy of the substrate contributes to enhancing growth of the cBN film. For the WC-Co substrates, the film growth rate and the cBN content in the film increase similarly by roughening the surface.

  14. Direct deposition of cubic boron nitride films on tungsten carbide-cobalt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teii, Kungen; Matsumoto, Seiichiro

    2012-10-24

    Thick cubic boron nitride (cBN) films in micrometer-scale are deposited on tungsten carbide-cobalt (WC-Co) substrates without adhesion interlayers by inductively coupled plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (ICP-CVD) using the chemistry of fluorine. The residual film stress is reduced because of very low ion-impact energies (a few eV to ∼25 eV) controlled by the plasma sheath potential. Two types of substrate pretreatment are used successively; the removal of surface Co binder using an acid solution suppresses the catalytic effect of Co and triggers cBN formation, and the surface roughening using mechanical scratching and hydrogen plasma etching increases both the in-depth cBN fraction and deposition rate. The substrate surface condition is evaluated by the wettability of the probe liquids with different polarities and quantified by the apparent surface free energy calculated from the contact angle. The surface roughening enhances the compatibility in energy between the cBN and substrate, which are bridged by the interfacial sp(2)-bonded hexagonal BN buffer layer, and then, the cBN overlayer is nucleated and evolved easier. PMID:22950830

  15. Enhanced deposition of cubic boron nitride films on roughened silicon and tungsten carbide-cobalt surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the influence of substrate surface roughness on cubic boron nitride (cBN) film deposition under low-energy ion bombardment in an inductively coupled plasma. Silicon and cemented tungsten carbide-cobalt (WC-Co) surfaces are roughened by low-energy ion-assisted etching in a hydrogen plasma, followed by deposition in a fluorine-containing plasma. Infrared absorption coefficients are measured to be 22,000 cm-1 and 17,000 cm-1 for sp2-bonded BN and cBN phases, respectively, for our films. For the silicon substrates, the film growth rate and the cBN content in the film increase with increasing the surface roughness, while the amount of sp2BN phase in the film shows only a small increase. A larger surface roughness of the substrate results in a smaller contact angle of water, indicating that a higher surface free energy of the substrate contributes to enhancing growth of the cBN film. For the WC-Co substrates, the film growth rate and the cBN content in the film increase similarly by roughening the surface.

  16. New insights into the enigma of boron carbide inverse molecular behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Equation of state and compression mechanism of nearly stoichiometric boron carbide B4C were investigated using diamond anvil cell single crystal synchrotron X-ray diffraction technique up to a maximum quasi-hydrostatic pressure of 74.0(1) GPa in neon pressure transmitting medium at ambient temperature. No signatures of structural phase transitions were observed on compression. Crystal structure refinements indicate that the icosahedral units are less compressible (13% volume reduction at 60 GPa) than the unit cell volume (18% volume reduction at 60 GPa), contrary to expectations based on the inverse molecular behavior hypothesis, but consistent with spectroscopic evidence and first principles calculations. The high-pressure crystallographic refinements reveal that the nature of the chemical bonds (two, versus three centered character) has marginal effect on the bond compressibility and the compression of the crystal is mainly governed by the force transfer between the rigid icosahedral structural units. - Graphical abstract: Single crystal measurements of equation of state and compression mechanism of B4C show that the icosahedral units are less compressibe than the unit cell volume, despite the threei-ceneterd nature of some icosahedral bonds. - Highlights: • Equation of state and compression mechanism of B4C were measured to 75 GPa. • No signatures of structural phase transitions were observed on compression. • Icosahedral units are less compressibe than the unit cell volume. • The nature of the chemical bonds has mariginal effect on the bond compressibility. • The compression is governed by force transfer between the rigid icosahedra

  17. Thermal stability of Mo/Si multilayers with boron carbide interlayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mo/Si multilayer systems with boron carbide (B4C) diffusion barrier layers were deposited on sapphire and silicon substrates by DC magnetron sputtering. Samples were subsequently annealed in vacuum at temperatures between 100 and 800 deg. C for duration of between 20 min and 30 h. Thermally stimulated solid state reactions have been characterized by X-ray analysis methods. Mo/Si multilayers without barrier layers are stable up to 100 deg. C. Interdiffusion was observed to start by 150 deg. C. It was found that B4C diffusion barrier layers with thicknesses between 0.3 and 1.0 nm, depending on the stack sequence, give rise to an increase of the thermal stability up to 400 deg. C. The impact of thermal treatments, at various temperatures and annealing times, on thickness and composition of the interdiffusion layers was investigated by X-ray reflectometry, wide angle X-ray scattering, cross-sectional high resolution transmission electron microscopy and fluorescence extended X-ray absorption fine structure measurements in combination with excitation of X-ray standing waves. The last method was used to investigate the short-range order of Mo/Si multilayers depth-resolved

  18. Micro-structural evolution of phenol-formaldehyde resin modified by boron carbide at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The phenol-formaldehyde (PF) resin was modified by boron carbide (B4C). In order to investigate the modification effect of B4C, the residue values of pure PF resin and B4C modified PF resin were measured using thermal gravity. It was shown that the residue values of B4C modified PF resin are 71.9% and 68.4% after being pyrolyzed at 700 and 1000 deg. C, respectively, which are obviously higher than those of the pure PF resin (62.9% and 60.5% at 700 and 1000 deg. C, respectively). The microstructure evolution of the modified resin at high temperatures was also investigated by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive analysis of X-rays. By means of the microstructure characterization, the modification reactions between the B4C additives and the oxygen-containing volatiles, such as CO and H2O, are demonstrated. The carbon and oxygen elements remained in the resin matrix in the forms of amorphous carbon and B2O3, respectively, resulting in the improvement of residue values and stability of the PF resin at high temperatures. The distribution of modification particles became well-proportioned gradually at the elevated temperatures, and the shape of ceramic additives changed into white spherules due to the surface tension.

  19. Deposition of hexagonal boron nitride thin films on silver nanoparticle substrates and surface enhanced infrared absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver nanoparticle thin films with different average particle diameters are grown on silicon substrates. Boron nitride thin films are then deposited on the silver nanoparticle interlayers by radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering. The boron nitride thin films are characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectra. The average particle diameters of silver nanoparticle thin films are 126.6, 78.4, and 178.8 nm. The results show that the sizes of the silver nanoparticles have effects on the intensities of infrared spectra of boron nitride thin films. An enhanced infrared absorption is detected for boron nitride thin film grown on silver nanoparticle thin film. This result is helpful to study the growth mechanism of boron nitride thin film. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  20. New insights into the enigma of boron carbide inverse molecular behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dera, Przemyslaw, E-mail: pdera@hawaii.edu [Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology, University of Hawaii at Manoa, 1680 East West Road, POST Building, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Manghnani, Murli H.; Hushur, Anwar; Hu, Yi [Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology, University of Hawaii at Manoa, 1680 East West Road, POST Building, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Tkachev, Sergey [Center for Advanced Radiation Sources, The University of Chicago, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Building 434, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Equation of state and compression mechanism of nearly stoichiometric boron carbide B{sub 4}C were investigated using diamond anvil cell single crystal synchrotron X-ray diffraction technique up to a maximum quasi-hydrostatic pressure of 74.0(1) GPa in neon pressure transmitting medium at ambient temperature. No signatures of structural phase transitions were observed on compression. Crystal structure refinements indicate that the icosahedral units are less compressible (13% volume reduction at 60 GPa) than the unit cell volume (18% volume reduction at 60 GPa), contrary to expectations based on the inverse molecular behavior hypothesis, but consistent with spectroscopic evidence and first principles calculations. The high-pressure crystallographic refinements reveal that the nature of the chemical bonds (two, versus three centered character) has marginal effect on the bond compressibility and the compression of the crystal is mainly governed by the force transfer between the rigid icosahedral structural units. - Graphical abstract: Single crystal measurements of equation of state and compression mechanism of B{sub 4}C show that the icosahedral units are less compressibe than the unit cell volume, despite the threei-ceneterd nature of some icosahedral bonds. - Highlights: • Equation of state and compression mechanism of B{sub 4}C were measured to 75 GPa. • No signatures of structural phase transitions were observed on compression. • Icosahedral units are less compressibe than the unit cell volume. • The nature of the chemical bonds has mariginal effect on the bond compressibility. • The compression is governed by force transfer between the rigid icosahedra.

  1. MICROSTRUCTURE AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF ULTRAFINE WC/Co CEMENTED CARBIDES WITH CUBIC BORON NITRIDE AND Cr₃C₂ ADDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genrong Zhang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the microstructure and mechanical properties of ultrafine tungsten carbide and cobalt (WC/Co cemented carbides with cubic boron nitride (CBN and chromium carbide (Cr₃C₂ fabricated by a hot pressing sintering process. This study uses samples with 8 wt% Co content and 7.5 vol% CBN content, and with different Cr₃C₂ content ranging from 0 to 0.30 wt%. Based on the experimental results, Cr₃C₂ content has a significant influence on inhibiting abnormal grain growth and decreasing grain size in cemented carbides. Near-full densification is possible when CBN-WC/Co with 0.25 wt% Cr₃C₂ is sintered at 1350°C and 20 MPa; the resulting material possesses optimal mechanical properties and density, with an acceptable Vickers hardness of 19.20 GPa, fracture toughness of 8.47 MPa.m1/2 and flexural strength of 564 MPa.u̇ Å k⃗

  2. Hot wire chemical vapour deposition (HWCVD) of boron carbide thin films from ortho-carborane for neutron detection application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detection of neutrons is possible if suitable converters such as Li, LiF or 10B in the form of thin films are used along with the semiconductor device. The use of boron (10B) in some host matrix as a neutron detector is attractive due to its large neutron capture cross-section. Boron carbide (BC) films are deposited on silicon substrates by HWCVD technique using solid ortho-carborane (o-C2B10H12) precursor with argon as carrier gas. The films contain 10B required for neutron detection as confirmed by the Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy. Variations in its structure as well as the chemical bonding configurations using Fourier Transform Infra-Red, Raman and X-ray diffraction spectroscopy have been studied.

  3. Modification of the titanium alloy surface in electroexplosive alloying with boron carbide and subsequent electron-beam treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The modification of the VT6 titanium alloy surface in electroexplosion alloying with plasma being formed in titanium foil with a weighed powder of boron carbide with subsequent irradiation by a pulsed electron beam has been carried out. An electroexplosive alloying zone of a thickness up to 50 μm with a gradient structure is found to form. The subsequent electron-beam treatment of the alloying zone results in smoothing of the alloying surface and is accompanied by the formation of the multilayer structure with alternating layers of various alloying degree at a depth of 30 μm

  4. Modification of the titanium alloy surface in electroexplosive alloying with boron carbide and subsequent electron-beam treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gromov, Victor E., E-mail: gromov@physics.sibsiu.ru; Budovskikh, Evgeniy A., E-mail: budovskikh-ea@physics.sibsiu.ru; Bashchenko, Lyudmila P., E-mail: gromov@physics.sibsiu.ru; Kobzareva, Tatyana Yu., E-mail: gromov@physics.sibsiu.ru; Semin, Alexander P., E-mail: gromov@physics.sibsiu.ru [Siberian State Industrial University, Novokuznetsk, 654007 (Russian Federation); Ivanov, Yurii F., E-mail: yufi55@mail.ru [Institute of High Current Electronics SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Wang, Xinli, E-mail: wangxl520@hotmail.com [Northeastern University, Liaoning, Shenyang 110819 China (China)

    2015-10-27

    The modification of the VT6 titanium alloy surface in electroexplosion alloying with plasma being formed in titanium foil with a weighed powder of boron carbide with subsequent irradiation by a pulsed electron beam has been carried out. An electroexplosive alloying zone of a thickness up to 50 μm with a gradient structure is found to form. The subsequent electron-beam treatment of the alloying zone results in smoothing of the alloying surface and is accompanied by the formation of the multilayer structure with alternating layers of various alloying degree at a depth of 30 μm.

  5. Modification of the titanium alloy surface in electroexplosive alloying with boron carbide and subsequent electron-beam treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromov, Victor E.; Budovskikh, Evgeniy A.; Ivanov, Yurii F.; Bashchenko, Lyudmila P.; Wang, Xinli; Kobzareva, Tatyana Yu.; Semin, Alexander P.

    2015-10-01

    The modification of the VT6 titanium alloy surface in electroexplosion alloying with plasma being formed in titanium foil with a weighed powder of boron carbide with subsequent irradiation by a pulsed electron beam has been carried out. An electroexplosive alloying zone of a thickness up to 50 μm with a gradient structure is found to form. The subsequent electron-beam treatment of the alloying zone results in smoothing of the alloying surface and is accompanied by the formation of the multilayer structure with alternating layers of various alloying degree at a depth of 30 μm.

  6. Investigation of wear and tool life of coated carbide and cubic boron nitride cutting tools in high speed milling

    OpenAIRE

    Twardowski, P.; Legutko, S.; G. Krolczyk; S. Hloch

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the investigation was analysis of the wear of milling cutters made of sintered carbide and of boron nitride. The article presents the life period of the cutting edges and describes industrial conditions of the applicability of tools made of the materials under investigation. Tests have been performed on modern toroidal and ball-end mill cutters. The study has been performed within a production facility in the technology of high speed machining of 55NiCrMoV6 and X153CrMoV1...

  7. Boron carbide based solid state neutron detectors: the effects of bias and time constant on detection efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron detection in thick boron carbide(BC)/n-type Si heterojunction diodes shows a threefold increase in efficiency with applied bias and longer time constants. The improved efficiencies resulting from long time constants have been conclusively linked to the much longer charge collection times in the BC layer. Neutron detection signals from both the p-type BC layer and the n-type Si side of the heterojunction diode are observed, with comparable efficiencies. Collectively, these provide strong evidence that the semiconducting BC layer plays an active role in neutron detection, both in neutron capture and in charge generation and collection.

  8. Boron carbide, B13-xC2-y (x = 0.12, y = 0.01

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oksana Sologub

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Boron carbide phases exist over a widely varying compositional range B12+xC3-x (0.06 < x < 1.7. One idealized structure corresponds to the B13C2 composition (space group R-3m and contains one icosahedral B12 unit and one linear C—B—C chain. The B12 units are composed of crystallographically distinct B atoms BP (polar, B1 and BEq (equatorial, B2. Boron icosahedra are interconnected by C atoms via their BEq atoms, forming layers parallel to (001, while the B12 units of the adjacent layers are linked through intericosahedral BP—BP bonds. The unique B atom (BC connects the two C atoms of adjacent layers, forming a C—B—C chain along [001]. Depending on the carbon concentration, the carbon and BP sites exhibit mixed B/C occupancies to varying degrees; besides, the BC site shows partial occupancy. The decrease in carbon content was reported to be realized via an increasing number of chainless unit cells. On the basis of X-ray single-crystal refinement, we have concluded that the unit cell of the given boron-rich crystal contains following structural units: [B12] and [B11C] icosahedra (about 96 and 4%, respectively and C—B—C chains (87%. Besides, there is a fraction of unit cells (13% with the B atom located against the triangular face of a neighboring icosahedron formed by BEq (B2 thus rendering the formula B0.87(B0.98C0.0212(B0.13C0.872 for the current boron carbide crystal.

  9. Effect of sintering temperature and boron carbide content on the wear behavior of hot pressed diamond cutting segments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Islak S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of sintering temperature and boron carbide content on wear behavior of diamond cutting segments. For this purpose, the segments contained 2, 5 and 10 wt.% B4C were prepared by hot pressing process carried out under a pressure of 35 MPa, at 600, 650 and 700 °C for 3 minutes. The transverse rupture strength (TRS of the segments was assessed using a three-point bending test. Ankara andesite stone was cut to examine the wear behavior of segments with boron carbide. Microstructure, surfaces of wear and fracture of segments were determined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM-EDS, and X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis. As a result, the wear rate decreased significantly in the 0-5 wt.% B4C contents, while it increased in the 5-10 wt.% B4C contents. With increase in sintering temperature, the wear rate decreased due to the hard matrix.

  10. Loading Ag nanoparticles on Cd(II) boron imidazolate framework for photocatalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Min; Zhang, De-Xiang; Chen, Shumei; Wen, Tian

    2016-05-01

    An amine-functionalized Cd(II) boron imidazolate framework (BIF-77) with three-dimensional open structure has been successfully synthesized, which can load Ag nanoparticles (NPs) for photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue (MB).

  11. Friction stir surfacing of cast A356 aluminium–silicon alloy with boron carbide and molybdenum disulphide powders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Srinivasu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Good castability and high strength properties of Al–Si alloys are useful in defence applications like torpedoes, manufacture of Missile bodies, and parts of automobile such as engine cylinders and pistons. Poor wear resistance of the alloys is major limitation for their use. Friction stir processing (FSP is a recognized surfacing technique as it overcomes the problems of fusion route surface modification methods. Keeping in view of the requirement of improving wear resistance of cast aluminium–silicon alloy, friction stir processing was attempted for surface modification with boron carbide (B4C and molybdenum disulfide (MoS2 powders. Metallography, micro compositional analysis, hardness and pin-on-disc wear testing were used for characterizing the surface composite coating. Microscopic study revealed breaking of coarse silicon needles and uniformly distributed carbides in the A356 alloy matrix after FSP. Improvement and uniformity in hardness was obtained in surface composite layer. Higher wear resistance was achieved in friction stir processed coating with carbide powders. Addition of solid lubricant MoS2 powder was found to improve wear resistance of the base metal significantly.

  12. Quantification of mass-specific laser energy input converted into particle properties during picosecond pulsed laser fragmentation of zinc oxide and boron carbide in liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lau, Marcus; Barcikowski, Stephan, E-mail: stephan.barcikowski@uni-due.de

    2015-09-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Highly defect-rich zinc oxide is obtained by pulsed laser fragmentation in liquids (PLFL). • Bandgap of semiconductor particles can be linearly controlled, simply by the laser energy dose. • Upscaling parameters are derived, that are mass-specific energy input and fragmentation fluence threshold. • Transferability is shown for one of the hardest material known, fabricating crystalline boron carbide nanoparticles. • Conclusions about laser fragmentation mechanisms occurring in liquids are drawn. - Abstract: Pulsed laser fragmentation in liquids is an effective method to fabricate organic, metal or semiconductor nanoparticles by ablation of suspended particles. However, modelling and up-scaling of this process lacks quantification of the laser energy required for a specific product property like particle diameter of the colloid or bandgap energy of the fabricated nanoparticles. A novel set-up for defined laser energy dose in a free liquid jet enables mass-specific energy balancing and exact threshold determination for pulsed laser fragmentation. By this technique laser energy and material responses can be precisely correlated. Linear decrease of the particle diameter and linear increase of the bandgap energy with mass-specific laser energy input has been observed for the examples of ZnO and B{sub 4}C particles. Trends are analysed by density gradient centrifugation, electron microscopy, UV–vis and X-ray diffraction analysis of the crystal structure. The study contributes to quantitative model parameters for up-scaling and provides insight into the mechanisms occurring when suspended particles are irradiated with pulsed laser sources.

  13. Deterioration of yttria-stabilized zirconia by boron carbide alone or mixed with metallic or oxidized Fe, Cr, Zr mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Bremaecker, A., E-mail: adbremae@sckcen.be [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), NMS, Mol (Belgium); Ayrault, L., E-mail: laurent.ayrault@cea.fr [Institut de Radio-Protection et Sûreté Nucléaire/DPAM/SEMIC, Bât 702, CEN de Cadarache BP3, F-13115 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Clément, B. [Institut de Radio-Protection et Sûreté Nucléaire/DPAM/SEMIC, Bât 702, CEN de Cadarache BP3, F-13115 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2014-08-01

    In the frame of severe accident conditions (PHEBUS FPT3 test), different experiments were carried out on the interactions of 20% yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and 20% ceria-stab zirconia with boron carbide or its oxidation products (B{sub 2}O{sub 3}): either tests under steam between 1230° and 1700 °C with B{sub 4}C alone or B{sub 4}C mixed with metals, either tests under Ar with boron oxide present in a mixture of iron and chromium oxides. In all cases an interaction was observed with formation of intergranular yttrium borate. At 1700 °C boron oxide is able to “pump out” the Y stabiliser from the YSZ grains but also some trace elements (Ca and Al) and to form a eutectic containing YBO{sub 3} and yttrium calcium oxy-borate (YCOB). At the same time a substantial swelling (“bloating”) of the zirconia happens, qualitatively similar to the foaming of irradiated fuel in contact with a Zr-melt. In all samples the lowering of the Y (or Ce)-content in the YSZ grains is so sharp that in the interaction layers zirconia is no longer stabilized. This is important when YSZ is envisaged as simulant of UO{sub 2} or as inert matrix for Am-transmutation.

  14. A comparative study on carbon, boron-nitride, boron-phosphide and silicon-carbide nanotubes based on surface electrostatic potentials and average local ionization energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esrafili, Mehdi D; Behzadi, Hadi

    2013-06-01

    A density functional theory study was carried out to predict the electrostatic potentials as well as average local ionization energies on both the outer and the inner surfaces of carbon, boron-nitride (BN), boron-phosphide (BP) and silicon-carbide (SiC) single-walled nanotubes. For each nanotube, the effect of tube radius on the surface potentials and calculated average local ionization energies was investigated. It is found that SiC and BN nanotubes have much stronger and more variable surface potentials than do carbon and BP nanotubes. For the SiC, BN and BP nanotubes, there are characteristic patterns of positive and negative sites on the outer lateral surfaces. On the other hand, a general feature of all of the systems studied is that stronger potentials are associated with regions of higher curvature. According to the evaluated surface electrostatic potentials, it is concluded that, for the narrowest tubes, the water solubility of BN tubes is slightly greater than that of SiC followed by carbon and BP nanotubes. PMID:23408252

  15. Silver Nanoparticle-Deposited Boron Nitride Nanosheets as Fillers for Polymeric Composites with High Thermal Conductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fangfang; Zeng, Xiaoliang; Yao, Yimin; Sun, Rong; Xu, Jianbin; Wong, Ching-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Polymer composites with high thermal conductivity have recently attracted much attention, along with the rapid development of the electronic devices toward higher speed and performance. However, a common method to enhance polymer thermal conductivity through an addition of high thermally conductive fillers usually cannot provide an expected value, especially for composites requiring electrical insulation. Here, we show that polymeric composites with silver nanoparticle-deposited boron nitride nanosheets as fillers could effectively enhance the thermal conductivity of polymer, thanks to the bridging connections of silver nanoparticles among boron nitride nanosheets. The thermal conductivity of the composite is significantly increased from 1.63 W/m-K for the composite filled with the silver nanoparticle-deposited boron nitride nanosheets to 3.06 W/m-K at the boron nitride nanosheets loading of 25.1 vol %. In addition, the electrically insulating properties of the composite are well preserved. Fitting the measured thermal conductivity of epoxy composite with one physical model indicates that the composite with silver nanoparticle-deposited boron nitride nanosheets outperforms the one with boron nitride nanosheets, owning to the lower thermal contact resistance among boron nitride nanosheets' interfaces. The finding sheds new light on enhancement of thermal conductivity of the polymeric composites which concurrently require the electrical insulation. PMID:26783258

  16. Silver Nanoparticle-Deposited Boron Nitride Nanosheets as Fillers for Polymeric Composites with High Thermal Conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fangfang; Zeng, Xiaoliang; Yao, Yimin; Sun, Rong; Xu, Jianbin; Wong, Ching-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Polymer composites with high thermal conductivity have recently attracted much attention, along with the rapid development of the electronic devices toward higher speed and performance. However, a common method to enhance polymer thermal conductivity through an addition of high thermally conductive fillers usually cannot provide an expected value, especially for composites requiring electrical insulation. Here, we show that polymeric composites with silver nanoparticle-deposited boron nitride nanosheets as fillers could effectively enhance the thermal conductivity of polymer, thanks to the bridging connections of silver nanoparticles among boron nitride nanosheets. The thermal conductivity of the composite is significantly increased from 1.63 W/m-K for the composite filled with the silver nanoparticle-deposited boron nitride nanosheets to 3.06 W/m-K at the boron nitride nanosheets loading of 25.1 vol %. In addition, the electrically insulating properties of the composite are well preserved. Fitting the measured thermal conductivity of epoxy composite with one physical model indicates that the composite with silver nanoparticle-deposited boron nitride nanosheets outperforms the one with boron nitride nanosheets, owning to the lower thermal contact resistance among boron nitride nanosheets’ interfaces. The finding sheds new light on enhancement of thermal conductivity of the polymeric composites which concurrently require the electrical insulation.

  17. Silver Nanoparticle-Deposited Boron Nitride Nanosheets as Fillers for Polymeric Composites with High Thermal Conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fangfang; Zeng, Xiaoliang; Yao, Yimin; Sun, Rong; Xu, Jianbin; Wong, Ching-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Polymer composites with high thermal conductivity have recently attracted much attention, along with the rapid development of the electronic devices toward higher speed and performance. However, a common method to enhance polymer thermal conductivity through an addition of high thermally conductive fillers usually cannot provide an expected value, especially for composites requiring electrical insulation. Here, we show that polymeric composites with silver nanoparticle-deposited boron nitride nanosheets as fillers could effectively enhance the thermal conductivity of polymer, thanks to the bridging connections of silver nanoparticles among boron nitride nanosheets. The thermal conductivity of the composite is significantly increased from 1.63 W/m-K for the composite filled with the silver nanoparticle-deposited boron nitride nanosheets to 3.06 W/m-K at the boron nitride nanosheets loading of 25.1 vol %. In addition, the electrically insulating properties of the composite are well preserved. Fitting the measured thermal conductivity of epoxy composite with one physical model indicates that the composite with silver nanoparticle-deposited boron nitride nanosheets outperforms the one with boron nitride nanosheets, owning to the lower thermal contact resistance among boron nitride nanosheets’ interfaces. The finding sheds new light on enhancement of thermal conductivity of the polymeric composites which concurrently require the electrical insulation. PMID:26783258

  18. Coating on steel ST-37 type with nano powder pack of boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steel ST-37 is a material widely used in industry. The quality of steel ST-37 can be improved by means of surface coating. At present the development of the technology shows the tendency toward nanoscience and nanotechnology that can be applied to various fields, among others energy, industry, medicine, information technology and communication as well as food necessitated by people at competitive selling prices. The steps in powder pack boronizing include: Pre-treatment, powder preparation, boronizing agent preparation, container preparation, boronizing process, metallography, hardness testing and corrosion testing. From the study, it is concluded as follows. The mechanism of boronizing process is divided into three stages, which are the boride compound formation stage, the diffusion stage, and the grain growth and orientation stage. Carbon in B4C on boronizing process does not diffuse into the substrate. The formation of boride compound begins to occur at a temperature of 600 °C, the diffusion process at 700 °C, and the grain growth and orientation at 800 °C. The hardness of boron coating reaches a value of 1115 VHN. Coating by boronizing process shows corrosion resistance in 10% HCl. (author)

  19. Photons transport through ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene based composite containing tungsten and boron carbide fillers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, S.M. [National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation); Kuznetsov, S.A. [Russian State Technological University “MATI”, Moscow 121552 (Russian Federation); Volkov, A.E.; Terekhin, P.N.; Dmitriev, S.V. [National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation); Tcherdyntsev, V.V.; Gorshenkov, M.V. [National University of Science and Technology “MISIS”, Moscow 119049 (Russian Federation); Boykov, A.A., E-mail: kink03@gmail.com [National University of Science and Technology “MISIS”, Moscow 119049 (Russian Federation)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • The developed method for predicting X-ray properties of the polymer. • Higher content of the fillers results in an increase of mechanical properties. • X-ray defensive properties of the samples were investigated experimentally. -- Abstract: Polymers are a base for creating of composite materials with high mechanical and chemical properties. Using the heavy metals as filler in these composites can give them X-ray protective properties. These materials have high deactivation rates and can be used to create Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) used in aggressive environments. It was proposed a model for calculation of X-ray protection properties of the polymer-based nanocomposite materials with ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) matrix, filled with tungsten and boron carbide particles. X-ray protective properties were calculated in a wide range of filler content using the developed model. Results of calculations allow selecting most effective compounds of X-ray protective UHMWPE based composites.

  20. Phase Field Theory and Analysis of Pressure-Shear Induced Amorphization and Failure in Boron Carbide Ceramic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D. Clayton

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A nonlinear continuum phase field theory is developed to describe amorphization of crystalline elastic solids under shear and/or pressure loading. An order parameter describes the local degree of crystallinity. Elastic coefficients can depend on the order parameter, inelastic volume change may accompany the transition from crystal to amorphous phase, and transitional regions parallel to bands of amorphous material are penalized by interfacial surface energy. Analytical and simple numerical solutions are obtained for an idealized isotropic version of the general theory, for an element of material subjected to compressive and/or shear loading. Solutions compare favorably with experimental evidence and atomic simulations of amorphization in boron carbide, demonstrating the tendency for structural collapse and strength loss with increasing shear deformation and superposed pressure.

  1. Comment on: "Is linear group X-Y-Z in boron carbide the weakest link in the structure?" by S. V. Konovalikhin and V. I. Ponomarev (Russ. J. Phys. Chem. A 89 (10), 1850 (2015))

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werheit, H.

    2016-07-01

    The characterization of the boron carbide investigated in the above-mentioned paper and some of the conclusions made on it by the authors are critically appraised with regard to reliable results obtained earlier by other scientists.

  2. The local physical structure of amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide: insights from magic angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquette, Michelle M; Li, Wenjing; Sky Driver, M; Karki, Sudarshan; Caruso, A N; Oyler, Nathan A

    2011-11-01

    Magic angle spinning solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy techniques are applied to the elucidation of the local physical structure of an intermediate product in the plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition of thin-film amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide (B(x)C:H(y)) from an orthocarborane precursor. Experimental chemical shifts are compared with theoretical shift predictions from ab initio calculations of model molecular compounds to assign atomic chemical environments, while Lee-Goldburg cross-polarization and heteronuclear recoupling experiments are used to confirm atomic connectivities. A model for the B(x)C:H(y) intermediate is proposed wherein the solid is dominated by predominantly hydrogenated carborane icosahedra that are lightly cross-linked via nonhydrogenated intraicosahedral B atoms, either directly through B-B bonds or through extraicosahedral hydrocarbon chains. While there is no clear evidence for extraicosahedral B aside from boron oxides, ∼40% of the C is found to exist as extraicosahedral hydrocarbon species that are intimately bound within the icosahedral network rather than in segregated phases. PMID:21959982

  3. Atomistic Origin of Brittle Failure of Boron Carbide from Large-Scale Reactive Dynamics Simulations: Suggestions toward Improved Ductility

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Qi; Goddard, William A.

    2015-09-01

    Ceramics are strong, but their low fracture toughness prevents extended engineering applications. In particular, boron carbide (B4C ), the third hardest material in nature, has not been incorporated into many commercial applications because it exhibits anomalous failure when subjected to hypervelocity impact. To determine the atomistic origin of this brittle failure, we performed large-scale (˜200 000 atoms /cell ) reactive-molecular-dynamics simulations of shear deformations of B4C , using the quantum-mechanics-derived reactive force field simulation. We examined the (0001 )/⟨10 1 ¯ 0 ⟩ slip system related to deformation twinning and the (01 1 ¯ 1 ¯ )/⟨1 ¯ 101 ⟩ slip system related to amorphous band formation. We find that brittle failure in B4C arises from formation of higher density amorphous bands due to fracture of the icosahedra, a unique feature of these boron based materials. This leads to negative pressure and cavitation resulting in crack opening. Thus, to design ductile materials based on B4C we propose alloying aimed at promoting shear relaxation through intericosahedral slip that avoids icosahedral fracture.

  4. The local physical structure of amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide: insights from magic angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magic angle spinning solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy techniques are applied to the elucidation of the local physical structure of an intermediate product in the plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition of thin-film amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide (BxC:Hy) from an orthocarborane precursor. Experimental chemical shifts are compared with theoretical shift predictions from ab initio calculations of model molecular compounds to assign atomic chemical environments, while Lee-Goldburg cross-polarization and heteronuclear recoupling experiments are used to confirm atomic connectivities. A model for the BxC:Hy intermediate is proposed wherein the solid is dominated by predominantly hydrogenated carborane icosahedra that are lightly cross-linked via nonhydrogenated intraicosahedral B atoms, either directly through B-B bonds or through extraicosahedral hydrocarbon chains. While there is no clear evidence for extraicosahedral B aside from boron oxides, ∼40% of the C is found to exist as extraicosahedral hydrocarbon species that are intimately bound within the icosahedral network rather than in segregated phases. (paper)

  5. Ablation of boron carbide for high-order harmonic generation of ultrafast pulses in laser-produced plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganeev, R. A.; Suzuki, M.; Kuroda, H.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate the generation of harmonics up to the 27th order (λ=29.9 nm) of 806 nm radiation in the boron carbide plasma. We analyze the advantages and disadvantages of this target compared with the ingredients comprising B4C (solid boron and graphite) by studying the plasma emission and harmonic spectra from three species. We compare different schemes of the two-color pump of B4C plasma, particularly using the second harmonics of 806 nm laser and optical parametric amplifier (1310 nm) as the assistant fields, as well as demonstrate the sum and difference frequency generation using the mixture of the wavelengths of two laser sources. These studies showed the advantages of the two-color pump of B4C plasma leading to the stable harmonic generation and the growth of harmonic conversion efficiency. We also show that the coincidence of harmonic and plasma emission wavelengths in most cases does not cause the enhancement or decrease of the conversion efficiency of this harmonic. Our spatial characterization of harmonics shows their on-axis modification depending on the conditions of frequency conversion.

  6. Site-specific electron-induced cross-linking of ortho-carborane to form semiconducting boron carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasquale, Frank L. [Department of Chemistry, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203 (United States); Kelber, Jeffry A., E-mail: kelber@unt.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203 (United States)

    2012-01-15

    Semiconducting boron carbide (B{sub 10}C{sub 2}H{sub x}) films have been formed by bombardment of condensed ortho-carborane (closo-1,2-dicarbadodecaborane) multilayers on polycrystalline copper substrates by 200 eV electrons under ultra-high vacuum conditions. The film formation process was characterized by X-ray and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopies. Electron bombardment results in the cross-linking of the icosahedral units. The cross-linking is accompanied by a shift in the B(1s) binding energy indicating site-specific cross-linking between two boron sites on adjacent carborane icosahedra. An additional shift in valence band binding energies attributed to the surface photovoltage effect is indicative of the formation of a p-type semiconductor. This is the first report of B{sub 10}C{sub 2}H{sub x} formation by electron bombardment of condensed films, and the data indicate that this method is a viable route towards formation of ultra-thin films of tailored composition and cross-linkages for emerging nanoelectronics and sensor applications.

  7. The local physical structure of amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide: insights from magic angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paquette, Michelle M; Sky Driver, M; Karki, Sudarshan; Caruso, A N [Department of Physics, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Li Wenjing; Oyler, Nathan A, E-mail: oylern@umkc.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States)

    2011-11-02

    Magic angle spinning solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy techniques are applied to the elucidation of the local physical structure of an intermediate product in the plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition of thin-film amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide (B{sub x}C:H{sub y}) from an orthocarborane precursor. Experimental chemical shifts are compared with theoretical shift predictions from ab initio calculations of model molecular compounds to assign atomic chemical environments, while Lee-Goldburg cross-polarization and heteronuclear recoupling experiments are used to confirm atomic connectivities. A model for the B{sub x}C:H{sub y} intermediate is proposed wherein the solid is dominated by predominantly hydrogenated carborane icosahedra that are lightly cross-linked via nonhydrogenated intraicosahedral B atoms, either directly through B-B bonds or through extraicosahedral hydrocarbon chains. While there is no clear evidence for extraicosahedral B aside from boron oxides, {approx}40% of the C is found to exist as extraicosahedral hydrocarbon species that are intimately bound within the icosahedral network rather than in segregated phases. (paper)

  8. Valence band offset and Schottky barrier at amorphous boron and boron carbide interfaces with silicon and copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to understand the fundamental charge transport in a-B:H and a-BX:H (X = C, N, P) compound heterostructure devices, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy has been utilized to determine the valence band offset and Schottky barrier present at amorphous boron compound interfaces formed with (1 0 0) Si and polished poly-crystalline Cu substrates. For interfaces formed by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of a-B4–5C:H on (1 0 0) Si, relatively small valence band offsets of 0.2 ± 0.2 eV were determined. For a-B:H/Cu interfaces, a more significant Schottky barrier of 0.8 ± 0.16 eV was measured. These results are in contrast to those observed for a-BN:H and BP where more significant band discontinuities (>1–2 eV) were observed for interfaces with Si and Cu.

  9. Valence band offset and Schottky barrier at amorphous boron and boron carbide interfaces with silicon and copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Sean W., E-mail: sean.king@intel.com [Logic Technology Development, Intel Corporation, 5200 NE Elam Young Parkway, Hillsboro, OR 97124 (United States); French, Marc; Xu, Guanghai [Logic Technology Development, Intel Corporation, 5200 NE Elam Young Parkway, Hillsboro, OR 97124 (United States); French, Benjamin [Ocotillo Materials Laboratory, Intel Corporation, 4500 S. Dobson Road, Chandler, AZ 85248 (United States); Jaehnig, Milt; Bielefeld, Jeff; Brockman, Justin; Kuhn, Markus [Logic Technology Development, Intel Corporation, 5200 NE Elam Young Parkway, Hillsboro, OR 97124 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    In order to understand the fundamental charge transport in a-B:H and a-BX:H (X = C, N, P) compound heterostructure devices, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy has been utilized to determine the valence band offset and Schottky barrier present at amorphous boron compound interfaces formed with (1 0 0) Si and polished poly-crystalline Cu substrates. For interfaces formed by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of a-B{sub 4–5}C:H on (1 0 0) Si, relatively small valence band offsets of 0.2 ± 0.2 eV were determined. For a-B:H/Cu interfaces, a more significant Schottky barrier of 0.8 ± 0.16 eV was measured. These results are in contrast to those observed for a-BN:H and BP where more significant band discontinuities (>1–2 eV) were observed for interfaces with Si and Cu.

  10. Growth of boric acid crystallites on the surface of boron-doped silicon carbide samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White crystallites were visually observed on fractured or polished surfaces of SiC samples (grain sizes below ∼500 nm) during exposure to air at room temperature for several days. Characterization of the crystallites by scanning electron microscopy, secondary ion mass spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction identified B(OH)3 crystals with a strong (002) texture. The rate of boric acid formation was determined by a gravimetric experiment. The rate of weight gain increased significantly after an incubation period of 1 week. Nucleation is initially the rate-limiting process. Subsequently small B(OH)3 crystals form on the surface, whose growth rate is determined by grain boundary diffusion of boron to the SiC surface. An estimated grain boundary boron to the SiC surface. An estimated grain boundary diffusion coefficient of boron in SiC was many orders of magnitude higher than extrapolated literature values

  11. Photoluminescence and Raman Spectroscopy Characterization of Boron- and Nitrogen-Doped 6H Silicon Carbide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ou, Yiyu; Jokubavicius, Valdas; Liu, Chuan; Berg, Rolf W.; Linnarsson, Margareta; Kamiyama, Satoshi; Lu, Zhaoyue; Yakimova, Rositza; Syväjärvi, Mikael; Ou, Haiyan

    Nitrogen-boron doped 6H-SiC epilayers grown on low off-axis 6H-SiC substrates have been characterized by photoluminescence and Raman spectroscopy. The photoluminescence results show that a doping larger than 1018 cm-3 is favorable to observe the luminescence and addition of nitrogen is resulting in...

  12. The impact of instilled carbide nanoparticles on rat lungs: an in vivo perspective on acute intratracheal instillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, O.; Lison, D.; Escamilla-Rivera, V.; Mejía, J.; Toussaint, O.; Dogné, J. M.; Lucas, S.

    2015-05-01

    In order to study a scenario of acute high concentration exposure via the pulmonary pathway of silicon carbide and titanium carbide nanoparticles, female Wistar rats were administered by intratracheal instillation doses of 0.5 and 5 mg/rat of each nanomaterial. Inflammatory parameters were studied: protein concentration, lactate dehydrogenase activity, total cell count and differentiated cell count (macrophages, neutrophils, oesonophils, lymphocytes). The genotoxicity potential was assessed by the formation of micronuclei from pneumocytes type II. It was found that silicon carbide nanoparticles induce an inflammatory response and a dose dependent genotoxicity, although the genotoxicity levels are comparably lower to the inflammatory response.

  13. Hollow Spheres of Iron Carbide Nanoparticles Encased in Graphitic Layers as Oxygen Reduction Catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Yang; Jensen, Jens Oluf; Zhang, Wei;

    2014-01-01

    Nonprecious metal catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction are the ultimate materials and the foremost subject for low‐temperature fuel cells. A novel type of catalysts prepared by high‐pressure pyrolysis is reported. The catalyst is featured by hollow spherical morphologies consisting of...... uniform iron carbide (Fe3C) nanoparticles encased by graphitic layers, with little surface nitrogen or metallic functionalities. In acidic media the outer graphitic layers stabilize the carbide nanoparticles without depriving them of their catalytic activity towards the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). As...... a result the catalyst is highly active and stable in both acid and alkaline electrolytes. The synthetic approach, the carbide‐based catalyst, the structure of the catalysts, and the proposed mechanism open new avenues for the development of ORR catalysts....

  14. 核用碳化硼制备工艺研究进展%Progress in preparation of boron carbides used as nuclear shielding material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑伟; 徐姣; 张卫江

    2011-01-01

    Boron carbides are very important materials in refractory liners, dies, bearings, sandblasting nozzles and nuclear industry. In this paper, the production processes for boron carbides are introduced, which include the carbothermal reduction, self-propagation high-temperature synthesis, chemical vapor deposition and sol-gel carbothermal reduction method. The advantages and disadvantages of all the methods are compared. The difficulties, problems and development direction of how to produce boron carbides are discussed.%碳化硼是一种被广泛应用在耐火材料、模具、轴承、喷嘴和核工业中的新型材料,主要介绍了有关制备碳化硼的工艺,其主要包括碳热还原法、自蔓延热还原法、化学气相沉积法和溶胶-凝胶碳热还原法.通过对比指出各种方法的优缺点,探讨了碳化硼制备的研究现状、存在的问题及发展方向.

  15. Alkynyl substituted carboranes as precursors to boron carbide thin films, fibers and composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper the use of alkynyl substituted derivatives of o-carborane as precursors to boron containing ceramics is described. These compounds undergo a thermally or photochemically induced polymerization to afford cross linked polyakynyl-o-carborane derivatives. The increase in molecular weight should allow for increased Tg's and the retention of modelled polymer preforms. In this report, these modification reactions are described. In addition, the retention of molded polymer preforms were analyzed after UV exposure and inert atmosphere pyrolysis

  16. Effect of addition of tartaric acid on synthesis of boron carbide powder from condensed boric acid–glycerin product

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahara, Naoki; Kakiage, Masaki, E-mail: kakiage@apc.saitama-u.ac.jp; Yanase, Ikuo; Kobayashi, Hidehiko

    2013-10-05

    Highlights: •B{sub 4}C powder was synthesized from a condensed H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}-glycerin product with tartaric acid added. •A precursor consisting of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and carbon was prepared by the thermal decomposition in air. •The precursors had a three-dimensional bicontinuous B{sub 2}O{sub 3}/carbon network structure. •The dispersion state became more homogeneous and finer with the addition of tartaric acid. •The complete formation of B{sub 4}C powder was achieved at 1250 °C within a shorter heat treatment time. -- Abstract: The effect of the addition of tartaric acid on the synthesis of boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) powder from a condensed boric acid (H{sub 3}BO{sub 3})–glycerin product was investigated in this study. The condensed product was prepared by dehydration condensation after directly mixing equimolar amounts of H{sub 3}BO{sub 3} and glycerin with the addition of 0–50 mol% tartaric acid (based on glycerin), which was followed by thermal decomposition in air to obtain a precursor powder from which excess carbon had been eliminated. The dispersion state of the boron oxide (B{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and carbon components in the precursor prepared from the condensed product with 25 mol% tartaric acid added was finer than that without tartaric acid added, in which both precursors had a three-dimensional bicontinuous B{sub 2}O{sub 3}/carbon network structure. The complete formation of crystalline B{sub 4}C powder was achieved at 1250 °C within a shorter heat treatment time for the precursor with a fine dispersion state. The synthesized B{sub 4}C powders became fine owing to the increased number of nucleation sites.

  17. Tungsten carbide nanoparticles as efficient cocatalysts for photocatalytic overall water splitting

    KAUST Repository

    Garcia-Esparza, Angel T.

    2012-12-17

    Tungsten carbide exhibits platinum-like behavior, which makes it an interesting potential substitute for noble metals in catalytic applications. Tungsten carbide nanocrystals (≈5 nm) are directly synthesized through the reaction of tungsten precursors with mesoporous graphitic C3N 4 (mpg-C3N4) as the reactive template in a flow of inert gas at high temperatures. Systematic experiments that vary the precursor compositions and temperatures used in the synthesis selectively generate different compositions and structures for the final nanocarbide (W 2C or WC) products. Electrochemical measurements demonstrate that the WC phase with a high surface area exhibits both high activity and stability in hydrogen evolution over a wide pH range. The WC sample also shows excellent hydrogen oxidation activity, whereas its activity in oxygen reduction is poor. These tungsten carbides are successful cocatalysts for overall water splitting and give H2 and O2 in a stoichiometric ratio from H 2O decomposition when supported on a Na-doped SrTiO3 photocatalyst. Herein, we present tungsten carbide (on a small scale) as a promising and durable catalyst substitute for platinum and other scarce noble-metal catalysts in catalytic reaction systems used for renewable energy generation. Platinum replacement: The phase-controlled synthesis of tungsten carbide nanoparticles from the nanoconfinement of a mesoporous graphite C 3N4 (mpg-C3N4) reactive template is shown. The nanomaterials catalyze hydrogen evolution/oxidation reactions, but are inactive in the oxygen reduction reaction. Tungsten carbide is an effective cocatalyst for photocatalytic overall water splitting (see picture). Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Large-area homogeneous periodic surface structures generated on the surface of sputtered boron carbide thin films by femtosecond laser processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Large-area LIPSS were formed by femtosecond laser processing B-C films surface. • The LIPSS spatial period increases with laser fluence (140–200 nm). • Stress-related sinusoidal-like undulations were formed on the B-C films surface. • The undulations amplitude (down to a few nanometres) increases with laser fluence. • Laser radiation absorption increases with surface roughness. - Abstract: Amorphous and crystalline sputtered boron carbide thin films have a very high hardness even surpassing that of bulk crystalline boron carbide (≈41 GPa). However, magnetron sputtered B-C films have high friction coefficients (C.o.F) which limit their industrial application. Nanopatterning of materials surfaces has been proposed as a solution to decrease the C.o.F. The contact area of the nanopatterned surfaces is decreased due to the nanometre size of the asperities which results in a significant reduction of adhesion and friction. In the present work, the surface of amorphous and polycrystalline B-C thin films deposited by magnetron sputtering was nanopatterned using infrared femtosecond laser radiation. Successive parallel laser tracks 10 μm apart were overlapped in order to obtain a processed area of about 3 mm2. Sinusoidal-like undulations with the same spatial period as the laser tracks were formed on the surface of the amorphous boron carbide films after laser processing. The undulations amplitude increases with increasing laser fluence. The formation of undulations with a 10 μm period was also observed on the surface of the crystalline boron carbide film processed with a pulse energy of 72 μJ. The amplitude of the undulations is about 10 times higher than in the amorphous films processed at the same pulse energy due to the higher roughness of the films and consequent increase in laser radiation absorption. LIPSS formation on the surface of the films was achieved for the three B-C films under study. However, LIPSS are formed under different

  19. Large-area homogeneous periodic surface structures generated on the surface of sputtered boron carbide thin films by femtosecond laser processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serra, R., E-mail: ricardo.serra@dem.uc.pt [SEG-CEMUC, Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Coimbra, Rua Luís Reis Santos, 3030-788 Coimbra (Portugal); Oliveira, V. [ICEMS-Instituto de Ciência e Engenharia de Materiais e Superfícies, Avenida Rovisco Pais no 1, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Instituto Superior de Engenharia de Lisboa, Avenida Conselheiro Emídio Navarro no 1, 1959-007 Lisbon (Portugal); Oliveira, J.C. [SEG-CEMUC, Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Coimbra, Rua Luís Reis Santos, 3030-788 Coimbra (Portugal); Kubart, T. [The Ångström Laboratory, Solid State Electronics, P.O. Box 534, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden); Vilar, R. [Instituto Superior de Engenharia de Lisboa, Avenida Conselheiro Emídio Navarro no 1, 1959-007 Lisbon (Portugal); Instituto Superior Técnico, Avenida Rovisco Pais no 1, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Cavaleiro, A. [SEG-CEMUC, Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Coimbra, Rua Luís Reis Santos, 3030-788 Coimbra (Portugal)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Large-area LIPSS were formed by femtosecond laser processing B-C films surface. • The LIPSS spatial period increases with laser fluence (140–200 nm). • Stress-related sinusoidal-like undulations were formed on the B-C films surface. • The undulations amplitude (down to a few nanometres) increases with laser fluence. • Laser radiation absorption increases with surface roughness. - Abstract: Amorphous and crystalline sputtered boron carbide thin films have a very high hardness even surpassing that of bulk crystalline boron carbide (≈41 GPa). However, magnetron sputtered B-C films have high friction coefficients (C.o.F) which limit their industrial application. Nanopatterning of materials surfaces has been proposed as a solution to decrease the C.o.F. The contact area of the nanopatterned surfaces is decreased due to the nanometre size of the asperities which results in a significant reduction of adhesion and friction. In the present work, the surface of amorphous and polycrystalline B-C thin films deposited by magnetron sputtering was nanopatterned using infrared femtosecond laser radiation. Successive parallel laser tracks 10 μm apart were overlapped in order to obtain a processed area of about 3 mm{sup 2}. Sinusoidal-like undulations with the same spatial period as the laser tracks were formed on the surface of the amorphous boron carbide films after laser processing. The undulations amplitude increases with increasing laser fluence. The formation of undulations with a 10 μm period was also observed on the surface of the crystalline boron carbide film processed with a pulse energy of 72 μJ. The amplitude of the undulations is about 10 times higher than in the amorphous films processed at the same pulse energy due to the higher roughness of the films and consequent increase in laser radiation absorption. LIPSS formation on the surface of the films was achieved for the three B-C films under study. However, LIPSS are formed under

  20. Surface modification of the hard metal tungsten carbide-cobalt by boron ion implantation; Oberflaechenmodifikation des Hartmetalls Wolframkarbid-Kobalt durch Bor-Ionenimplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mrotchek, I.

    2007-09-07

    In the present thesis ion beam implantation of boron is studied as method for the increasement of the hardness and for the improvement of the operational characteristics of cutting tools on the tungsten carbide-cobalt base. For the boron implantation with 40 keV energy and {approx}5.10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2} fluence following topics were shown: The incoerporation of boron leads to a deformation and remaining strain of the WC lattice, which possesses different stregth in the different directions of the elementary cell. The maximum of the deformation is reached at an implantation temperature of 450 C. The segregation of the new phases CoWB and Co{sub 3}W was detected at 900 C implantation temperature. At lower temperatures now new phases were found. The tribological characteristics of WC-Co are improved. Hereby the maxiaml effect was measured for implantation temperatures from 450 C to 700 C: Improvement of the microhardness by the factor 2..2.5, improvement of the wear resistance by the factor 4. The tribological effects extend to larger depths than the penetration depth of the boron implantation profile. The detected property improvements of the hard metal H3 show the possibility of a practical application of boron ion implantation in industry. The effects essential for a wer decreasement are a hardening of the carbide phase by deformation of the lattice, a hardening of the cobalt binding material and the phase boundaries because of the formation of a solid solution of the implanted boron atoms in Co and by this a blocking of the dislocation movement and the rupture spreading under load.

  1. Boronic acid functionalized superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle as a novel tool for adsorption of sugar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synthesis of boronic acid functionalized superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles has been reported. Magnetite nanoparticles were prepared by simple co-precipitation from Fe2+ and Fe3+ solution. m-Aminophenyl boronic acid was attached to iron oxide particles through 3,4-dihydroxy benzaldehyde through C=N bond. X-ray diffraction and selected area electron diffraction have shown the formation of inverse spinel phase magnetite of both as prepared and functionalized magnetite particles. FTIR shows attachment of boronic acid-imine onto iron oxide surface through enediol group. Transmission electron microscopy shows well dispersion of boronic acid functionalized particles of size 8 ± 2 nm. Vibration sample magnetometry shows both the particles are superparamagnetic at room temperature having saturation magnetization (Ms) 52 emu/g. In this work the affinity of these boronic acid functionalized particles towards sugar binding was studied taking dextrose sugar as a model. The influence of pH and sugar concentration has been extensively investigated. The results show that such boronic acid modified superparamagnetic particles are efficient support for sugar separation having maximum sugar loading capacity (60 μg/50 μl) at pH 8.

  2. Boronic acid functionalized superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle as a novel tool for adsorption of sugar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohapatra, S., E-mail: sasmita05@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, National Institute of Technology, Rourkela-769008 (India); Panda, N. [Department of Chemistry, National Institute of Technology, Rourkela-769008 (India); Pramanik, P. [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur-721302 (India)

    2009-08-31

    Synthesis of boronic acid functionalized superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles has been reported. Magnetite nanoparticles were prepared by simple co-precipitation from Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} solution. m-Aminophenyl boronic acid was attached to iron oxide particles through 3,4-dihydroxy benzaldehyde through C=N bond. X-ray diffraction and selected area electron diffraction have shown the formation of inverse spinel phase magnetite of both as prepared and functionalized magnetite particles. FTIR shows attachment of boronic acid-imine onto iron oxide surface through enediol group. Transmission electron microscopy shows well dispersion of boronic acid functionalized particles of size 8 {+-} 2 nm. Vibration sample magnetometry shows both the particles are superparamagnetic at room temperature having saturation magnetization (Ms) 52 emu/g. In this work the affinity of these boronic acid functionalized particles towards sugar binding was studied taking dextrose sugar as a model. The influence of pH and sugar concentration has been extensively investigated. The results show that such boronic acid modified superparamagnetic particles are efficient support for sugar separation having maximum sugar loading capacity (60 {mu}g/50 {mu}l) at pH 8.

  3. Sintering of commercial tungsten boride produced by boron-carbide method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinetics of densifying of tungsten boride of technical purity has been studied by sintering under argon and in vacuum. In carbon-containing medium tungsten boride displays virtually no sintering. At 1700 deg C W2B5 decays into β-WB and B; the elementary boron gets oxydized and the samples become loose and lose much weight. Dense tungsten boride (with porosity less than 8%) is possible only provided the powder is purified from oxygen and carbon and the following sintering is carried out in vacuum

  4. Role of friction stir processing parameters on microstructure and microhardness of boron carbide particulate reinforced copper surface composites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Sathiskumar; N Murugan; I Dinaharan; S J Vijay

    2013-12-01

    Friction stir processing (FSP) was applied to fabricate boron carbide (B4C) particulate reinforced copper surface composites. The effect of FSP parameters such as tool rotational speed, processing speed and groove width on microstructure and microhardness was investigated. A groove was contrived on the 6mm thick copper plates and packed with B4C particles. FSP was carried out using five various tool rotational speeds, processing speeds and groove widths. Optical and scanning electron microscopies were employed to study the microstructure of the fabricated surface composites. The results indicated that the selected FSP parameters significantly influenced the area of surface composite, distribution of B4C particles and microhardness of the surface composites. Higher tool rotational speed and lower processing speed produced an excellent distribution of B4C particles and higher area of surface composite due to higher frictional heat, increased stirring and material tranportation. The B4C particles were bonded well to the copper matrix and refined the grains of copper due to the pinning effect of B4C particles. B4C particles retained the original size and morphology because of its small size and minimum sharp corners in the morphology.

  5. Joining of SiC-ceramics by means of boron carbide, silicon and carbon for high temperature applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work is a contribution to joining of SiC-Ceramics for high temperature applications. The aim was to develop a joining technique for Silicon Carbide ceramics by means of boron, carbon and silicon. The joint is created by the formation of a welding zone, which consists of SiC as it is the material to be joined. For this purpose are used the follow means: (a) sputtering layers of B4C, Si and C, (b) vacuum coatings of Si or Si foils and C, (c) powder mixtures of B4C, Si and C. The joints were examined at ceramographic cross sections of the bonding zone, by means of XRD, REM/EDAX, TEM and EPMA. The bond strength was determined in the 4-point bend test at room temperature and at 1370 C. It was found that a useable result can be obtained, if the temperature of the joining process exceeds the melting point of Si (1410 C). A high bending strength with a high Weibull modulus was achieved by using sputter layers. The powder mixtures provided a satisfactory bending strength with a low Weibull modulus. (orig.)

  6. Intermediate-temperature environmental effects on boron nitride-coated silicon carbide-fiber-reinforced glass-ceramic composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The environmental effects on the mechanical properties of fiber-reinforced composites at intermediate temperatures were investigated by conducting flexural static-fatigue experiments in air at 600 and 950 C. The material that was studied was a silicon carbide/boron nitride (SiC/BN) dual-coated Nicalon-fiber-reinforced barium magnesium aluminosilicate glass-ceramic. Comparable time-dependent failure responses were found at 600 and 950 C when the maximum tensile stress applied in the bend bar was >60% of the room-temperature ultimate flexural strength of as-received materials. At both temperatures, the materials survived 500 h fatigue tests at lower stress levels. Among the samples that survived the 500 h fatigue tests, a 20% degradation in the room temperature flexural strength was measured in samples that were fatigued at 600 C. The growth rate of the Si-C-O fiber oxidation product at 600 C was not sufficient to seal the stress-induced cracks, so that the interior of the material was oxidized and resulted in a strength degradation and less fibrous fracture. In contrast, the interior of the material remained intact at 950 C because of crack sealing by rapid silicate formation, and strength/toughness of the composite was maintained. Also, at 600 C, BN oxidized via volatilization, because no borosilicate was formed

  7. Laser-driven synthesis and densification of ultrafine boron carbide powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultrafine (34 nm) B4C powders have been produced by the CO2 laser-driven pyrolysis of BCI3/H2/CH4 (C2H4) mixtures. Powders of B4C stoichiometry, free of excess boron or carbon, are produced through optimization of gas flow rates and laser intensity. These powders are loosely agglomerated and of high purity, consisting of particles which are equiaxed and exhibit a narrow size distribution. The laser-synthesized powders have been hot-pressed in argon to yield parts of theoretical density at 20500C. Examination of the microstructure reveals examples of uniform as well as exaggerated grain growth. Porosity is uniformly distributed throughout the B4C matrix. Microhardness, Young's modulus, transverse rupture strength, and fracture values of 32 GPa, 492 GPa, 455 MPa, and 3.7 MN/m32/, respectively, have been measured

  8. Thermal conductivity and Seebeck coefficients of icosahedral boron arsenide films on silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermal conductivity of icosahedral boron arsenide (B12As2) films grown on (0001) 6H-SiC substrates by chemical vapor deposition was studied by the 3ω technique. The room temperature thermal conductivity decreased from 27.0 to 15.3 W/m K as the growth temperature was decreased from 1450 to 1275 deg. C. This is mainly attributed to the differences in the impurity concentration and microstructure, determined from secondary ion mass spectrometry and high resolution transmission electron microscopy, respectively. Callaway's theory was applied to calculate the temperature-dependent thermal conductivity, and the results are in good agreement with the experimental data. Seebeck coefficients were determined as 107 μV/K and 136 μV/K for samples grown at 1350 deg. C with AsH3/B2H6 flow ratio equals to 1:1 and 3:5, respectively.

  9. Synthesis, characterization and thermoelectric properties of metal borides, boron carbides and carbaborides; Synthese, Charakterisierung und thermoelektrische Eigenschaften ausgewaehlter Metallboride, Borcarbide und Carbaboride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guersoy, Murat

    2015-07-06

    This work reports on the solid state synthesis and structural and thermoelectrical characterization of hexaborides (CaB{sub 6}, SrB{sub 6}, BaB{sub 6}, EuB{sub 6}), diboride dicarbides (CeB{sub 2}C{sub 2}, LaB{sub 2}C{sub 2}), a carbaboride (NaB{sub 5}C) and composites of boron carbide. The characterization was performed by X-ray diffraction methods and Rietveld refinements based on structure models from literature. Most of the compounds were densified by spark plasma sintering at 100 MPa. As high-temperature thermoelectric properties the Seebeck coefficients, electrical conductivities, thermal diffusivities and heat capacities were measured between room temperature and 1073 K. ZT values as high as 0.5 at 1273 K were obtained for n-type conducting EuB{sub 6}. High-temperature X-ray diffraction also confirmed its thermal stability. The solid solutions Ca{sub x}Sr{sub 1-x}B{sub 6}, Ca{sub x}Ba{sub 1-x}B{sub 6} and Sr{sub x}Ba{sub 1-x}B{sub 6} (x = 0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1) are also n-type but did not show better ZT values for the ternary compounds compared to the binaries, but for CaB{sub 6} the values of the figure of merit (ca. 0.3 at 1073 K) were significantly increased (ca. 50 %) compared to earlier investigations which is attributed to the densification process. Sodium carbaboride, NaB{sub 5}C, was found to be the first p-type thermoelectric material that crystallizes with the hexaboride-structure type. Seebeck coefficients of ca. 80 μV . K{sup -1} were obtained. Cerium diboride dicarbide, CeB{sub 2}C{sub 2}, and lanthanum diboride dicarbide, LaB{sub 2}C{sub 2}, are metallic. Both compounds were used as model compounds to develop compacting strategies for such layered borides. Densities obtained at 50 MPa were determined to be higher than 90 %. A new synthesis route using single source precursors that contain boron and carbon was developed to open the access to new metal-doped boron carbides. It was possible to obtain boron carbide, but metal-doping could not be

  10. Process optimization and properties of magnetically hard cobalt carbide nanoparticles via modified polyol method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • High-coercivity cobalt carbides were synthesized by polyol method. • No rare earth elements were used during synthesis process. • Process parameters (reaction temperature, precursors’ concentrations, surfactants and reaction duration) were studied/optimized. • Process was scaled-up to synthesis more than 5 g powders per batch. - Abstract: Cobalt carbide magnetic nanoparticles were successfully synthesized via a modified polyol process without using a rare-earth catalyst during the synthesis process. The present results show admixtures of Co2C and Co3C phases possessing magnetization values exceeding 47 emu/g and coercivity values exceeding 2.3 kOe at room temperature. Moreover, these experiments have illuminated the important role of the reaction temperature, hydroxyl ion concentrations and the reaction duration on the crystallographic structure and magnetic properties of the nanoparticles. The crystallographic structure and particle size of the CoxC nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffractometry and scanning electron microscopy. Vibrating sample magnetometry was used to determine magnetic properties. Scale-up of synthesis to more than 5 g per batch was demonstrated with no significant degradation of magnetic properties

  11. Process optimization and properties of magnetically hard cobalt carbide nanoparticles via modified polyol method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamanpour, Mehdi; Bennett, Steven P. [Center for Microwave Magnetic Materials and Integrated Circuits (CM3IC), Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Majidi, Leily [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Chen, Yajie [Center for Microwave Magnetic Materials and Integrated Circuits (CM3IC), Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Harris, Vincent G. [Center for Microwave Magnetic Materials and Integrated Circuits (CM3IC), Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • High-coercivity cobalt carbides were synthesized by polyol method. • No rare earth elements were used during synthesis process. • Process parameters (reaction temperature, precursors’ concentrations, surfactants and reaction duration) were studied/optimized. • Process was scaled-up to synthesis more than 5 g powders per batch. - Abstract: Cobalt carbide magnetic nanoparticles were successfully synthesized via a modified polyol process without using a rare-earth catalyst during the synthesis process. The present results show admixtures of Co{sub 2}C and Co{sub 3}C phases possessing magnetization values exceeding 47 emu/g and coercivity values exceeding 2.3 kOe at room temperature. Moreover, these experiments have illuminated the important role of the reaction temperature, hydroxyl ion concentrations and the reaction duration on the crystallographic structure and magnetic properties of the nanoparticles. The crystallographic structure and particle size of the Co{sub x}C nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffractometry and scanning electron microscopy. Vibrating sample magnetometry was used to determine magnetic properties. Scale-up of synthesis to more than 5 g per batch was demonstrated with no significant degradation of magnetic properties.

  12. High coercivity cobalt carbide nanoparticles processed via polyol reaction: A new permanent magnet material

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, V. G.; Chen, Y; Yang, A.; Yoon, S.; Chen, Z.; Geiler, Anton; Chinnasamy, C. N.; Lewis, L. H.; Vittoria, C.; Carpenter, E. E.; Carroll, K. J.; Goswami, R.; Willard, M. A.; Kurihara, L.; Gjoka, M.

    2009-01-01

    Cobalt carbide nanoparticles were processed using polyol reduction chemistry that offers high product yields in a cost effective single-step process. Particles are shown to be acicular in morphology and typically assembled as clusters with room temperature coercivities greater than 4 kOe and maximum energy products greater than 20 KJ/m3. Consisting of Co3C and Co2C phases, the ratio of phase volume, particle size, and particle morphology all play important roles in determining permanent magne...

  13. The reaction of H 2O, O 2 and energetic O 2+ on boron carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogiwara, N.; Jimbou, R.; Saidoh, M.; Michizono, S.; Saito, Y.; Mori, K.; Morita, K.

    1994-09-01

    Reaction of polycrystalline B 4C with energetic O 2+ was investigated mainly using Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS). For 5 keV O 2+ irradiation, all of the irradiated oxygen was retained up to the fluence of 2 × 10 17 O/cm 2 in a temperature range from RT to 600°C. The areal density of saturated retention was ˜ 3 × 10 17 O/cm 2. The release of the implanted oxygen begins above 600°C and almost all the oxygen desorbs at ˜ 1000°C. The depth profile of oxygen retained at RT had a big maximum around 8 nm, while the depth profile at 600°C had a broad peak near 8 nm. In contrast to the above results by RBS, retained oxygen was hardly measured by Auger electron spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy with Ar + sputtering. This implies that there are at least two types of trapped states: one is the physically trapped state of a gaseous form (CO or O 2) and the other is a chemically bound state (BO bond). It was also found that boron oxide is formed even at RT using simultaneous electron/He + irradiation during H 2O exposure, while the oxygen molecule scarcely reacts with the B 4C surface under the simultaneous irradiation of electron/He +.

  14. The reaction of H2O, O2 and energetic O2+ on boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reaction of polycrystalline B4C with energetic O2+ was investigated mainly using Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS). For 5 keV O2+ irradiation, all of the irradiated oxygen was retained up to the fluence of 2x1017 O/cm2 in a temperature range from RT to 600 C. The areal density of saturated retention was similar 3x1017 O/cm2. The release of the implanted oxygen begins above 600 C and almost all the oxygen desorbs at similar 1000 C. The depth profile of oxygen retained at RT had a big maximum around 8 nm, while the depth profile at 600 C had a broad peak near 8 nm. In contrast to the above results by RBS, retained oxygen was hardly measured by Auger electron spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy with Ar+ sputtering. This implies that there are at least two types of trapped states: one is the physically trapped state of a gaseous form (CO or O2) and the other is a chemically bound state (B-O bond). It was also found that boron oxide is formed even at RT using simultaneous electron/He+ irradiation during H2O exposure, while the oxygen molecule scarcely reacts with the B4C surface under the simultaneous irradiation of electron/He+. ((orig.))

  15. Gamma Scintillator System Enhancement for Neutron Detection using Boron Carbide for Homeland Security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An efficient and low cost 10B based thermal neutron detector as a replacement for 3He based neutron detectors is suggested. The detection is based on an enhancement to a scintillator gamma-rays detector. 3He supply for neutron detectors is gradually become harder to obtain(1) since the commercial production of this isotope has been practically ended. The 10B(n, )7Li interaction is characterized with two energetic ion and a 478 keV gamma photon which is emitted from the excited 7Li in 94% of the interactions(2). A tailored Monte-Carlo code for the detector model was written in MATLAB in order to assess the detector's efficiency. The simulation model is based on ENDF/B-VII.0(3) libraries for neutrons cross sections, and XCOM(4) database for gamma absorption coefficients. By varying the B4C thickness, optimal efficiency was obtained both for natural occurring 10B compound with atomic abundance of 19.8% as well as for boron-10 enriched to 96%

  16. Ab initio calculations of mechanical, thermodynamic and electronic structure properties of mullite, iota-alumina and boron carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryal, Sita Ram

    The alumino-silicate solid solution series (Al 4+2xSi2-2 xO10-x) is an important class of ceramics. Except for the end member (x=0), Al2 SiO5 the crystal structures of the other phases, called mullite, have partially occupied sites. Stoichiometric supercell models for the four mullite phases 3Al2O 3 · 2SiO2 · 2Al 2O3 · SiO2, 4 Al2O3· SiO 2, 9Al2O3 · SiO2, and iota-Al2 O3 (iota-alumina) are constructed starting from experimentally reported crystal structures. A large number of models were built for each phase and relaxed using the Vienna ab initio simulation package (VASP) program. The model with the lowest total energy for a given x was chosen as the representative structure for that phase. Electronic structure and mechanical properties of mullite phases were studied via first-principles calculations. Of the various phases of transition alumina, iota-Al 2O3 is the least well known. In addition structural details have not, until now, been available. It is the end member of the aluminosilicate solid solution series with x=1. Based on a high alumina content mullite phase, a structural model for iota- Al2O3 is constructed. The simulated x-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern of this model agrees well with a measured XRD pattern. The iota-Al2 O3 is a highly disordered ultra-low-density phase of alumina with a theoretical density of 2854kg/m3. Using this theoretically constructed model, elastic, thermodynamic, electronic, and spectroscopic properties of iota-Al2 O3 have been calculated and compared it with those of alpha- Al2O3 and gamma- Al2O3. Boron carbide (B4C) undergoes an amorphization under high velocity impacts. The mechanism of amorphization is not clear. Ab initio methods are used to carry out large-scale uniaxial compression simulations on two polytypes of stoichiometric boron carbide (B4C), B 11C-CBC, and B12- CCC where B11C or B12 is the 12-atom icosahedron and CBC or CCC is the three-atom chain. The simulations were performed on large supercells of 180 atoms

  17. Cumulative fission yields of short-lived isotopes under natural-abundance-boron-carbide-moderated neutron spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finn, Erin C.; Metz, Lori A.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Pierson, Bruce; Wittman, Richard S.; Friese, Judah I.; Kephart, Rosara F.

    2015-04-09

    The availability of gamma spectroscopy data on samples containing mixed fission products at short times after irradiation is limited. Due to this limitation, data interpretation methods for gamma spectra of mixed fission product samples, where the individual fission products have not been chemically isolated from interferences, are not well-developed. The limitation is particularly pronounced for fast pooled neutron spectra because of the lack of available fast reactors in the United States. Samples containing the actinide isotopes 233, 235, 238U, 237Np, and 239Pu individually were subjected to a 2$ pulse in the Washington State University 1 MW TRIGA reactor. To achieve a fission-energy neutron spectrum, the spectrum was tailored using a natural abundance boron carbide capsule to absorb neutrons in the thermal and epithermal region of the spectrum. Our tailored neutron spectrum is unique to the WSU reactor facility, consisting of a soft fission spectrum that contains some measurable flux in the resonance region. This results in a neutron spectrum at greater than 0.1 keV with an average energy of 70 keV, similar to fast reactor spectra and approaching that of 235U fission. Unique fission product gamma spectra were collected from 4 minutes to 1 week after fission using single-crystal high purity germanium detectors. Cumulative fission product yields measured in the current work generally agree with published fast pooled fission product yield values from ENDF/B-VII, though a bias was noted for 239Pu. The present work contributes to the compilation of energy-resolved fission product yield nuclear data for nuclear forensic purposes.

  18. EPR investigations of silicon carbide nanoparticles functionalized by acid doped polyaniline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karray, Fekri [Laboratoire des materiaux Ceramiques Composites et Polymeres, Faculte des Sciences de Sfax, BP 802, 3018 Sfax (Tunisia); Kassiba, Abdelhadi, E-mail: kassiba@univ-lemans.fr [Institute of Molecules and Materials of Le Mans (I3M), UMR-CNRS 6283, Universite du Maine, 72085 Le Mans (France)

    2012-06-15

    Nanocomposites (SiC-PANI) based on silicon carbide nanoparticles (SiC) encapsulated in conducting polyaniline (PANI) are synthesized by direct polymerization of PANI on the nanoparticle surfaces. The conductivity of PANI and the nanocomposites was modulated by several doping levels of camphor sulfonic acid (CSA). Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) investigations were carried out on representative SiC-PANI samples over the temperature range [100-300 K]. The features of the EPR spectra were analyzed taking into account the paramagnetic species such as polarons with spin S=1/2 involved in two main environments realized in the composites as well as their thermal activation. A critical temperature range 200-225 K was revealed through crossover changes in the thermal behavior of the EPR spectral parameters. Insights on the electronic transport properties and their thermal evolutions were inferred from polarons species probed by EPR and the electrical conductivity in doped nanocomposites.

  19. Molybdenum carbide nanoparticles as catalysts for oil sands upgrading: Dynamics and free-energy profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is no doubt that a huge gap exists in understanding heterogeneous catalysis between a cluster model of a few atoms and a bulk model of periodic slabs. Nanoparticles, which are crucial in heterogeneous catalysis in industry, lie in the middle of the gap. We present here our work on the computational modelling of molybdenum carbide nanoparticles (MCNPs) as the catalysts for the upgrading of oil sands in the in-situ environment, using benzene hydrogenation as a model reaction. With a cluster model, efforts were first made to understand the mechanism of the reaction with a density functional theory (DFT) study on the adsorption of benzene and its hydrogenation product – cyclohexane, as well as the cyclic hydrogenation reaction intermediates on the Mo2C(0001) surface. From the thermodynamic data, along with literature information, it was found that the benzene hydrogenation reaction on molybdenum carbide happens most likely through a Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism with the gradual lifting up of the benzene molecule. The electron localization function (ELF) was then used to help understand the nature of the interactions between the MCNPs, identifying strong multi-center interactions between the adsorbates and the MCNPs. To enable the treatment of larger nanoparticles, a fast semi-empirical density functional tight-binding (DFTB) method was parameterized. With this method, the potential energy profiles of benzene hydrogenation reactions on different sizes of MCNPs are calculated. The study was then extended to consider a MCNP embedded in solvent (benzene), using a quantum mechanical (DFTB) / molecular mechanical approach. Calculations on the free energies profiles with the umbrella sampling method show that the entropy of the MCNPs and the solvent are essential in understanding the catalytic activity of the transition metal related nanoparticles for solid/liquid heterogeneous catalysis

  20. Molybdenum carbide nanoparticles as catalysts for oil sands upgrading: Dynamics and free-energy profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xingchen; Salahub, Dennis R.

    2015-12-01

    There is no doubt that a huge gap exists in understanding heterogeneous catalysis between a cluster model of a few atoms and a bulk model of periodic slabs. Nanoparticles, which are crucial in heterogeneous catalysis in industry, lie in the middle of the gap. We present here our work on the computational modelling of molybdenum carbide nanoparticles (MCNPs) as the catalysts for the upgrading of oil sands in the in-situ environment, using benzene hydrogenation as a model reaction. With a cluster model, efforts were first made to understand the mechanism of the reaction with a density functional theory (DFT) study on the adsorption of benzene and its hydrogenation product - cyclohexane, as well as the cyclic hydrogenation reaction intermediates on the Mo2C(0001) surface. From the thermodynamic data, along with literature information, it was found that the benzene hydrogenation reaction on molybdenum carbide happens most likely through a Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism with the gradual lifting up of the benzene molecule. The electron localization function (ELF) was then used to help understand the nature of the interactions between the MCNPs, identifying strong multi-center interactions between the adsorbates and the MCNPs. To enable the treatment of larger nanoparticles, a fast semi-empirical density functional tight-binding (DFTB) method was parameterized. With this method, the potential energy profiles of benzene hydrogenation reactions on different sizes of MCNPs are calculated. The study was then extended to consider a MCNP embedded in solvent (benzene), using a quantum mechanical (DFTB) / molecular mechanical approach. Calculations on the free energies profiles with the umbrella sampling method show that the entropy of the MCNPs and the solvent are essential in understanding the catalytic activity of the transition metal related nanoparticles for solid/liquid heterogeneous catalysis.

  1. Molybdenum carbide nanoparticles as catalysts for oil sands upgrading: Dynamics and free-energy profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xingchen; Salahub, Dennis R. [Department of Chemistry, Institute for Quantum Science and Technology, and Centre for Molecular Simulation, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2N 1N4 (Canada)

    2015-12-31

    There is no doubt that a huge gap exists in understanding heterogeneous catalysis between a cluster model of a few atoms and a bulk model of periodic slabs. Nanoparticles, which are crucial in heterogeneous catalysis in industry, lie in the middle of the gap. We present here our work on the computational modelling of molybdenum carbide nanoparticles (MCNPs) as the catalysts for the upgrading of oil sands in the in-situ environment, using benzene hydrogenation as a model reaction. With a cluster model, efforts were first made to understand the mechanism of the reaction with a density functional theory (DFT) study on the adsorption of benzene and its hydrogenation product – cyclohexane, as well as the cyclic hydrogenation reaction intermediates on the Mo{sub 2}C(0001) surface. From the thermodynamic data, along with literature information, it was found that the benzene hydrogenation reaction on molybdenum carbide happens most likely through a Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism with the gradual lifting up of the benzene molecule. The electron localization function (ELF) was then used to help understand the nature of the interactions between the MCNPs, identifying strong multi-center interactions between the adsorbates and the MCNPs. To enable the treatment of larger nanoparticles, a fast semi-empirical density functional tight-binding (DFTB) method was parameterized. With this method, the potential energy profiles of benzene hydrogenation reactions on different sizes of MCNPs are calculated. The study was then extended to consider a MCNP embedded in solvent (benzene), using a quantum mechanical (DFTB) / molecular mechanical approach. Calculations on the free energies profiles with the umbrella sampling method show that the entropy of the MCNPs and the solvent are essential in understanding the catalytic activity of the transition metal related nanoparticles for solid/liquid heterogeneous catalysis.

  2. Design, development and characterization of multi-functionalized gold nanoparticles for biodetection and targeted boron delivery in BNCT applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandal, Subhra [Department of Tumor Immunology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre (Netherlands); Bakeine, Gerald J., E-mail: Jamesbakeine1@yahoo.com [Department of Internal Medicine and Therapeutics-Section of Clinical Toxicology, University of Pavia, Piazza Botta 10, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Krol, Silke [Institute of Neurology, Fondazione IRCCS Carlo Besta, Milan (Italy); Ferrari, Cinzia; Clerici, Anna M.; Zonta, Cecilia; Cansolino, Laura [Department of Surgery, Laboratory of Experimental Surgery, University of Pavia (Italy); Ballarini, Francesca [Department of Nuclear and Theoretical Physics, University of Pavia (Italy); Bortolussi, Silva [Department of Nuclear and Theoretical Physics, University of Pavia (Italy)] [National Institute of Nuclear Physics (INFN), Section of Pavia (Italy); Stella, Subrina; Protti, Nicoletta [Department of Nuclear and Theoretical Physics, University of Pavia (Italy); Bruschi, Piero [National Institute of Nuclear Physics (INFN), Section of Pavia (Italy); Altieri, Saverio [Department of Nuclear and Theoretical Physics, University of Pavia (Italy)] [National Institute of Nuclear Physics (INFN), Section of Pavia (Italy)

    2011-12-15

    The aim of this study is to optimize targeted boron delivery to cancer cells and its tracking down to the cellular level. To this end, we describe the design and synthesis of novel nanovectors that double as targeted boron delivery agents and fluorescent imaging probes. Gold nanoparticles were coated with multilayers of polyelectrolytes functionalized with the fluorescent dye (FITC), boronophenylalanine and folic acid. In vitro confocal fluorescence microscopy demonstrated significant uptake of the nanoparticles in cancer cells that are known to overexpress folate receptors. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Synthesis of multi-labeled gold nanoparticles for selective boron delivery to tumor cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tumor selectivity is achieved through folic acid receptor targeting. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Optical fluorescent microscopy allows tracking of cellular uptake of the gold nanoparticle. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In vitro tests demonstrate selective nanoparticle up in folate receptor positive tumor cells.

  3. Design, development and characterization of multi-functionalized gold nanoparticles for biodetection and targeted boron delivery in BNCT applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is to optimize targeted boron delivery to cancer cells and its tracking down to the cellular level. To this end, we describe the design and synthesis of novel nanovectors that double as targeted boron delivery agents and fluorescent imaging probes. Gold nanoparticles were coated with multilayers of polyelectrolytes functionalized with the fluorescent dye (FITC), boronophenylalanine and folic acid. In vitro confocal fluorescence microscopy demonstrated significant uptake of the nanoparticles in cancer cells that are known to overexpress folate receptors. - Highlights: ►Synthesis of multi-labeled gold nanoparticles for selective boron delivery to tumor cells. ► Tumor selectivity is achieved through folic acid receptor targeting. ► Optical fluorescent microscopy allows tracking of cellular uptake of the gold nanoparticle. ► In vitro tests demonstrate selective nanoparticle up in folate receptor positive tumor cells.

  4. Biophysical response of living cells to boron nitride nanoparticles: uptake mechanism and bio-mechanical characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasel, Md. Alim Iftekhar; Li, Tong; Nguyen, Trung Dung; Singh, Sanjleena [Queensland University of Technology (QUT), School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering (Australia); Zhou, Yinghong; Xiao, Yin [Queensland University of Technology (QUT), Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation (Australia); Gu, YuanTong, E-mail: yuantong.gu@qut.edu.au [Queensland University of Technology (QUT), School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering (Australia)

    2015-11-15

    Boron nitride nanomaterials have attracted significant interest due to their superior chemical and physical properties. Despite these novel properties, investigation on the interaction between boron nitride nanoparticle (BN NP) and living systems has been limited. In this study, BN NP (100–250 nm) is assessed as a promising biomaterial for medical applications. The toxicity of BN NP is evaluated by assessing the cells behaviours both biologically (MTT assay, ROS detection etc.) and physically (atomic force microscopy). The uptake mechanism of BN NP is studied by analysing the alternations in cellular morphology based on cell imaging techniques. The results demonstrate in vitro cytocompatibility of BN NP with immense potential for use as an effective nanoparticle for various bio-medical applications.

  5. Biophysical response of living cells to boron nitride nanoparticles: uptake mechanism and bio-mechanical characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron nitride nanomaterials have attracted significant interest due to their superior chemical and physical properties. Despite these novel properties, investigation on the interaction between boron nitride nanoparticle (BN NP) and living systems has been limited. In this study, BN NP (100–250 nm) is assessed as a promising biomaterial for medical applications. The toxicity of BN NP is evaluated by assessing the cells behaviours both biologically (MTT assay, ROS detection etc.) and physically (atomic force microscopy). The uptake mechanism of BN NP is studied by analysing the alternations in cellular morphology based on cell imaging techniques. The results demonstrate in vitro cytocompatibility of BN NP with immense potential for use as an effective nanoparticle for various bio-medical applications

  6. Optical properties of boron carbide near the boron K edge evaluated by soft-x-ray reflectometry from a Ru/B4C multilayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soft-x-ray Bragg reflection from two Ru/B4C multilayers with 10 and 63 periods was used for independent determination of both real and imaginary parts of the refractive index n = 1 -δ + iβ close to the boron K edge (∼188 eV). Prior to soft x-ray measurements, the structural parameters of the multilayers were determined by x-ray reflectometry using hard x rays. For the 63-period sample, the optical properties based on the predictions made for elemental boron major deviations were found close to the K edge of boron for the 10-period sample explained by chemical bonding of boron to B4C and various boron oxides.

  7. Optical properties of boron carbide near the boron K edge evaluated by soft-x-ray reflectometry from a Ru/B(4)C multilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ksenzov, Dmitriy; Panzner, Tobias; Schlemper, Christoph; Morawe, Christian; Pietsch, Ullrich

    2009-12-10

    Soft-x-ray Bragg reflection from two Ru/B(4)C multilayers with 10 and 63 periods was used for independent determination of both real and imaginary parts of the refractive index n = 1 - delta + ibeta close to the boron K edge (approximately 188 eV). Prior to soft x-ray measurements, the structural parameters of the multilayers were determined by x-ray reflectometry using hard x rays. For the 63-period sample, the optical properties based on the predictions made for elemental boron major deviations were found close to the K edge of boron for the 10-period sample explained by chemical bonding of boron to B(4)C and various boron oxides. PMID:20011008

  8. Silver Nanoparticle-Deposited Boron Nitride Nanosheets as Fillers for Polymeric Composites with High Thermal Conductivity

    OpenAIRE

    Fangfang Wang; Xiaoliang Zeng; Yimin Yao; Rong Sun; Jianbin Xu; Ching-Ping Wong

    2016-01-01

    Polymer composites with high thermal conductivity have recently attracted much attention, along with the rapid development of the electronic devices toward higher speed and performance. However, a common method to enhance polymer thermal conductivity through an addition of high thermally conductive fillers usually cannot provide an expected value, especially for composites requiring electrical insulation. Here, we show that polymeric composites with silver nanoparticle-deposited boron nitride...

  9. The influence of hydrogen on the chemical, mechanical, optical/electronic, and electrical transport properties of amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordell, Bradley J.; Karki, Sudarshan; Nguyen, Thuong D.; Rulis, Paul; Caruso, A. N.; Purohit, Sudhaunshu S.; Li, Han; King, Sean W.; Dutta, Dhanadeep; Gidley, David; Lanford, William A.; Paquette, Michelle M.

    2015-07-01

    Because of its high electrical resistivity, low dielectric constant (κ), high thermal neutron capture cross section, and robust chemical, thermal, and mechanical properties, amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide (a-BxC:Hy) has garnered interest as a material for low-κ dielectric and solid-state neutron detection applications. Herein, we investigate the relationships between chemical structure (atomic concentration B, C, H, and O), physical/mechanical properties (density, porosity, hardness, and Young's modulus), electronic structure [band gap, Urbach energy (EU), and Tauc parameter (B1/2)], optical/dielectric properties (frequency-dependent dielectric constant), and electrical transport properties (resistivity and leakage current) through the analysis of a large series of a-BxC:Hy thin films grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition from ortho-carborane. The resulting films exhibit a wide range of properties including H concentration from 10% to 45%, density from 0.9 to 2.3 g/cm3, Young's modulus from 10 to 340 GPa, band gap from 1.7 to 3.8 eV, Urbach energy from 0.1 to 0.7 eV, dielectric constant from 3.1 to 7.6, and electrical resistivity from 1010 to 1015 Ω cm. Hydrogen concentration is found to correlate directly with thin-film density, and both are used to map and explain the other material properties. Hardness and Young's modulus exhibit a direct power law relationship with density above ˜1.3 g/cm3 (or below ˜35% H), below which they plateau, providing evidence for a rigidity percolation threshold. An increase in band gap and decrease in dielectric constant with increasing H concentration are explained by a decrease in network connectivity as well as mass/electron density. An increase in disorder, as measured by the parameters EU and B1/2, with increasing H concentration is explained by the release of strain in the network and associated decrease in structural disorder. All of these correlations in a-BxC:Hy are found to be very similar to those

  10. 等离子喷涂B4C涂层的抗辐射性能研究%Anti-radiation behavior of plasma sprayed boron carbide coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李龙根; 徐志勇; 钱浩

    2009-01-01

    目的 研究用等离子技术喷涂的碳化硼(B4C)涂层的抗辐射能力.方法 将0.1 mm厚度B4C涂在16号锰钢上,研究它对加速器产生的6、10、15 MV高能射线,6、9、12、15 MeV高能电子线,60Co γ线和快中子辐射的防护作用.同时将0.1 mm B4C涂在纸板上,研究它对深部X线机的X线辐射的防护作用.结果 等离子喷涂制备B4C涂层对高能X线和60Co γ线没有防护作用.对电子线有一定防护作用,且随深度的增加有增大趋势,但作用不大.对快中子有较大防护作用.对深部X线机X线有防护作用,防护能力较强.0.1 mm厚的涂层就可带来15%的衰减.结论 用等离子技术喷涂的B4C涂层可在医学领域用来防护千伏级射线.%Objective To study anti-radiation behavior of plasma sprayed boron carbide coatings. Methods The anti-radiation capacity of 16Mn steel which was coated with 0.1 mm plasma sprayed boron carbide were studied. The irradiation beams were 6,10,15 MY X-ray and 6,9,12,15 MeV electron emitted by accelerator, X-ray emitted by 60Co machine,fast neutron, and X-ray emitted by kilovoltage X-ray ma-chine. Results Anti-radiation capacity of plasma sprayed boron carbide coatings was not found for X-ray beams emitted by accelerator and 60Co machine. For electron beams,the anti-radiation capacity were found. The deeper of location, the stronger was anti-radiation. However, the anti-radiation capacity was not good. For fast neutron,the anti-radiation capacity was good. For X-ray emitted by kilovoltage X-ray machine,the anti-radiation was good,and only 0.1 nun plasma sprayed boron carbide had 15% attenuation. Conclusions The plasma sprayed boron carbide coatings have the anti-radiation capacity for X-ray emitted by kilovoltage X-ray machine in medical field.

  11. Facile preparation of boronic acid functionalized Fe-core/Au-shell magnetic nanoparticles for covalent immobilization of adenosine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pham, Tuan Anh; Kumar, Nanjundan Ashok; Jeong, Yeon Tae

    2010-01-01

    The synthesis of biocompatible magnetic nanoparticles is one of the important topics in nanoscience because such materials have potential biomedical applications. Herein, we report a facile approach for surface functionalization of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) with boronic acid and their use for th

  12. Synthesis of amorphous silicon carbide nanoparticles in a low temperature low pressure plasma reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hongfei; Gerbec, Jeffrey A; Sushchikh, Michael; McFarland, Eric W

    2008-08-13

    Commercial scale production of silicon carbide (SiC) nanoparticles smaller than 10 nm remains a significant challenge. In this paper, a microwave plasma reactor and appropriate reaction conditions have been developed for the synthesis of amorphous SiC nanoparticles. This continuous gas phase process is amenable to large scale production use and utilizes the decomposition of tetramethylsilane (TMS) for both the silicon and the carbon source. The influence of synthesis parameters on the product characteristics was investigated. The as-prepared SiC particles with sizes between 4 and 6 nm were obtained from the TMS precursor in a plasma operated at low temperature and low precursor partial pressure (0.001-0.02 Torr) using argon as the carrier gas (3 Torr). The carbon:silicon ratio was tuned by the addition of hydrogen and characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The reaction mechanism of SiC nanoparticle formation in the microwave plasma was investigated by mass spectroscopy of the gaseous products. PMID:21828814

  13. Synthesis of amorphous silicon carbide nanoparticles in a low temperature low pressure plasma reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Commercial scale production of silicon carbide (SiC) nanoparticles smaller than 10 nm remains a significant challenge. In this paper, a microwave plasma reactor and appropriate reaction conditions have been developed for the synthesis of amorphous SiC nanoparticles. This continuous gas phase process is amenable to large scale production use and utilizes the decomposition of tetramethylsilane (TMS) for both the silicon and the carbon source. The influence of synthesis parameters on the product characteristics was investigated. The as-prepared SiC particles with sizes between 4 and 6 nm were obtained from the TMS precursor in a plasma operated at low temperature and low precursor partial pressure (0.001-0.02 Torr) using argon as the carrier gas (3 Torr). The carbon:silicon ratio was tuned by the addition of hydrogen and characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The reaction mechanism of SiC nanoparticle formation in the microwave plasma was investigated by mass spectroscopy of the gaseous products

  14. Generation and Characteristics of IV-VI transition Metal Nitride and Carbide Nanoparticles using a Reactive Mesoporous Carbon Nitride

    KAUST Repository

    Alhajri, Nawal Saad

    2016-02-22

    Interstitial nitrides and carbides of early transition metals in groups IV–VI exhibit platinum-like electronic structures, which make them promising candidates to replace noble metals in various catalytic reactions. Herein, we present the preparation and characterization of nano-sized transition metal nitries and carbides of groups IV–VI (Ti, V, Nb, Ta, Cr, Mo, and W) using mesoporous graphitic carbon nitride (mpg-C3N4), which not only provides confined spaces for restricting primary particle size but also acts as a chemical source of nitrogen and carbon. We studied the reactivity of the metals with the template under N2 flow at 1023 K while keeping the weight ratio of metal to template constant at unity. The produced nanoparticles were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, CHN elemental analysis, nitrogen sorption, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The results show that Ti, V, Nb, Ta, and Cr form nitride phases with face centered cubic structure, whereas Mo and W forme carbides with hexagonal structures. The tendency to form nitride or carbide obeys the free formation energy of the transition metal nitrides and carbides. This method offers the potential to prepare the desired size, shape and phase of transition metal nitrides and carbides that are suitable for a specific reaction, which is the chief objective of materials chemistry.

  15. Electronic transport in boron carbides: temperature (4K-300K), frequency (0-1 GHz) and composition (B13C2-B4C) effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron carbide is a light ceramics of industrial interest. The equilibrium diagram reveals a large compositional range (B9C to B4C). The compositions close to the boundary B4C are obtained by pressing directly in graphite dies while the other compositions were obtained by using boron nitride lined graphite dies and boron additions to the commercial powders. The starting point of the present study was the idea to use the electrical transport properties as possible ways of characterising the industrial materials. We were thus led to measure at low temperatures dc and ac conductivity, dielectric constant and thermopower. The successful study of a measurement method for ac measurements between 10 KHz and 1 GHz and between 4 K and 300 K was one of the main experimental points of the present work. ac measurements have permitted a clear separation between bulk and grain boundary effects on the transport. The bulk results were analysed in terms of the usual conduction models in disordered solids (hopping, polarons...)

  16. Standard test methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, and spectrochemical analysis of nuclear-grade aluminum oxide and aluminum oxide-boron carbide composite pellets

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1994-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the chemical, mass spectrometric, and spectrochemical analysis of nuclear-grade aluminum oxide and aluminum oxide-boron carbide composite pellets to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 The analytical procedures appear in the following order: Sections Boron by Titrimetry 7 to 13 Separation of Boron for Mass Spectrometry 14 to 19 Isotopic Composition by Mass Spectrometry 20 to 23 Separation of Halides by Pyrohydrolysis 24 to 27 Fluoride by Ion-Selective Electrode 28 to 30 Chloride, Bromide, and Iodide by Amperometric Microtitrimetry 31 to 33 Trace Elements by Emission Spectroscopy 34 to 46 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. (F...

  17. Synthesis of carbon-encapsulated iron carbide/iron nanoparticles from phenolic-formaldehyde resin and ferric nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon-encapsulated iron carbide/iron nanoparticles have been synthesized on a large scale by the heat treatment of thermal plastic phenolic-formaldehyde resin with the aid of ferric nitrate. The effects of heating temperature on the morphologies and structures of carbonized products were investigated using transmission electron microscope, high-resolution transmission electron microscope and X-ray diffraction measurements. The products with diameter distribution of 20-100 nm consisted mainly of spheroidal nanoparticles separated by hollow onion-like carbon nanoparticles.

  18. Application of Special Processing Technology of the Dynamic Pressure Bearing Parts of Boron Carbide%碳化硼材料动压轴承零件的特种加工技术应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵荔宁; 孙保和; 周景春; 翁长志; 刘彪

    2015-01-01

    The performance feature of the material of boron carbide and the structure and the precision of bearing parts of boron carbide were introduced. The problems of the boron carbide machining and the features of special processing technology were presented. The application of pressure bearing parts of boron carbide for ion etching process, electric spark machining and ultrasonic machining and the implementation effect of them were expounded.%简要介绍碳化硼材料的性能特点、碳化硼轴承零件的结构和精度,说明碳化硼材料机械加工存在的问题以及特种加工技术的特点,重点论述了离子刻蚀加工、电火花加工和超声加工技术在碳化硼材料轴承零件加工中的应用情况以及取得的实际效果。

  19. Mechanically activated solid-state synthesis of hafnium carbide and hafnium nitride nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanocrystalline hafnium nitrides and hafnium carbides are synthesized, from powder mixtures based on partially hydrated hafnium tetrachloride, ph-HfCl4, and on magnesium, by a three-step process, namely a short mechanical activation step followed by a brief annealing step and a leaching step. Grinding of ph-HfCl4 + Mg leads to the formation of hafnium hydrides which decompose upon annealing in argon to give first metallic hafnium and then HfO2 at higher temperatures. Annealing of such ground ph-HfCl4 + Mg blends in flowing nitrogen yields HfN nanoparticles (average size between 10 and 30 nm). HfC carbides are directly mechanosynthesized from ph-HfCl4 + Mg + C powder mixtures. A subsequent heat treatment in flowing argon allows to better crystallize the grains of HfC (average size around 100 nm) and to decompose the intermediate products. The reaction mechanisms are discussed from results of thermogravimetric analyses and from infrared spectra of ph-HfCl4 + Mg based powder mixtures processed in various ways

  20. Atomic structure of high-coercivity cobalt-carbide nanoparticles ensembles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arena, D. A.; Sterbinsky, G.; Stephens, P. W.; Carroll, K. J.; Yoon, H.; Meng, S.; Huba, Z.; Carpenter, E. E.

    2013-03-01

    Permanent magnets are increasingly important in numerous applications, including the quickly expanding area of green technologies (e . g . high efficiency electric car motors and wind turbine power systems). We present studies of novel permanent magnet materials based on cobalt carbide nanoparticles (NPs), where the energy product (BHmax) exceeds 20 kJ / m3. The NPs are synthesized via a polyol process, which offers a flexible approach to modify the Co-carbide phase (Co2C and Co3C), and NP morphology, size and size dispersion. The Co2C and Co3C phases have unique magnetic properties, and the combination exhibits the high BHmax . We present a detailed assessment of the structure of mixtures of Co2C and Co3 NPs, measured by high-resolution, synchrotron based powder x-ray diffraction (p-XRD). Both the Co2C and Co3 phases exhibit an orthorhombic structure (Pnnm and Pnma space groups, respectively). The high-resolution p-XRD facilitates identification of mixed phase samples, enabling detailed comparisons of the atomic structure with the magnetic properties, measured by both lab-based magnetometry and x-ray spectroscopy (soft x-ray XAS & XMCD).

  1. Boron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The trace element boron (B) is of interest in reclamation situations for several reasons. It plays an essential through largely unidentified role in the growth of higher plants. In argronomic situations B deficiencies are common, and deficiencies in reclamation situations have been suggested but not documented. Among micronutrients, B is unique because the range from deficient concentrations to toxic concentrations either in the soil solution or in plant tissue is narrower than for any other micronutrient. In reclamation situations excessive amounts of B can occur in the soil or in near-surface mining wastes and thus interfere with reclamation objectives, especially in arid and semiarid regions. Also, B is mobile and appears subject to both upward transport (and possible contamination of overlying material) and downward transport (and possible contamination of surface water and groundwater)

  2. Characteristics of Boron Decorated TiO2 Nanoparticles for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell Photoanode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Yuan Ho

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Different boron weight percents on mixed-phase (anatase and rutile TiO2 nanoparticles were synthesized to investigate structure morphology, defect states, luminescence properties, and energy conversion. The measured results indicate that boron doping of TiO2 both increases the crystallite size and rutile-phase percent in an anatase matrix. Decreasing the band gap by boron doping can extend the absorption to the visible region, while undoped TiO2 exhibits high UV absorption. Oxygen vacancy defects generated by boron ions reduce Ti+4 and affect electron transport in dye-sensitized solar cells. Excess electrons originating from the oxygen vacancies of doped TiO2 downward shift in the conduction band edge and prompt the transfer of photoelectrons from the conduction band of the rutile phase to the lower energy anatase trapping sites; they then separate charges to enhance the photocurrent and Jsc. Although the resistance of the electron recombination (Rk between doped TiO2 photoanode and the electrolyte for the doped TiO2 sample is lower, a longer electron lifetime (τ of 19.7 ms with a higher electron density (ns of 2.1 × 1018 cm−3 contributes to high solar conversion efficiency.

  3. Electrolyte influence on the Cu nanoparticles electrodeposition onto boron doped diamond electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the electrolyte influence on deposition and dissolution processes of Cu nanoparticles on boron doped diamond electrodes (DDB). Morphological, structural and electrochemical analysis showed BDD films with good reproducibility, quality and reversible in a specific redox system. Electrodeposition of Cu nanoparticles on DDB electrodes in three different solutions was influenced by pH and ionic strength of the electrolytic medium. Analyzing the process as function of the scan rate, it was verified a better efficiency in 0,5 mol L-1 Na2SO4 solution. Under the influence of the pH and ionic strength, Cu nanoparticles on DDB may be obtained with different morphologies and it was important for defining the desired properties. (author)

  4. Electroanalysis of Hydrogen Peroxide at Boron Doped Diamond Electrode Modified by Silver Nanoparticles and Haemoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electrochemical detection of H2O2 using boron doped diamond electrode modified by silver nanoparticles and haemoglobin is reported. Silver nanoparticle obtained from electrodeposition in the presence of cetyl hexadecylthmoniom bromide (CTAB) surfactant shows the best combination of detection limit, sensitivity and reproducibility. The presence of Ag nanoparticles helps bind haemoglobin to the electrode in an active form, leading to a significantly further increase of electrode response to H2O2. Detection limits below 1 μM are achieved by a synergistic effect of both modifiers, and a good linear signal response is seen up to 8 mM. Interferences from glucose, uric acid, ascorbic acid and dopamine at typical physiological levels are shown to be negligible

  5. Interstitial modification of palladium nanoparticles with boron atoms as a green catalyst for selective hydrogenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Chun Wong Aaron; Mahadi, Abdul Hanif; Li, Molly Meng-Jung; Corbos, Elena Cristina; Tang, Chiu; Jones, Glenn; Kuo, Winson Chun Hsin; Cookson, James; Brown, Christopher Michael; Bishop, Peter Trenton; Tsang, Shik Chi Edman

    2014-12-01

    Lindlar catalysts comprising of palladium/calcium carbonate modified with lead acetate and quinoline are widely employed industrially for the partial hydrogenation of alkynes. However, their use is restricted, particularly for food, cosmetic and drug manufacture, due to the extremely toxic nature of lead, and the risk of its leaching from catalyst surface. In addition, the catalysts also exhibit poor selectivities in a number of cases. Here we report that a non-surface modification of palladium gives rise to the formation of an ultra-selective nanocatalyst. Boron atoms are found to take residence in palladium interstitial lattice sites with good chemical and thermal stability. This is favoured due to a strong host-guest electronic interaction when supported palladium nanoparticles are treated with a borane tetrahydrofuran solution. The adsorptive properties of palladium are modified by the subsurface boron atoms and display ultra-selectivity in a number of challenging alkyne hydrogenation reactions, which outclass the performance of Lindlar catalysts.

  6. The influence of hydrogen on the chemical, mechanical, optical/electronic, and electrical transport properties of amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordell, Bradley J.; Karki, Sudarshan; Nguyen, Thuong D.; Rulis, Paul; Caruso, A. N.; Paquette, Michelle M., E-mail: paquettem@umkc.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, Missouri 64110 (United States); Purohit, Sudhaunshu S. [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, Missouri 64110 (United States); Li, Han; King, Sean W. [Logic Technology Development, Intel Corporation, Hillsboro, Oregon 97124 (United States); Dutta, Dhanadeep; Gidley, David [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Lanford, William A. [Department of Physics, University at Albany, Albany, New York 12222 (United States)

    2015-07-21

    Because of its high electrical resistivity, low dielectric constant (κ), high thermal neutron capture cross section, and robust chemical, thermal, and mechanical properties, amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide (a-B{sub x}C:H{sub y}) has garnered interest as a material for low-κ dielectric and solid-state neutron detection applications. Herein, we investigate the relationships between chemical structure (atomic concentration B, C, H, and O), physical/mechanical properties (density, porosity, hardness, and Young's modulus), electronic structure [band gap, Urbach energy (E{sub U}), and Tauc parameter (B{sup 1/2})], optical/dielectric properties (frequency-dependent dielectric constant), and electrical transport properties (resistivity and leakage current) through the analysis of a large series of a-B{sub x}C:H{sub y} thin films grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition from ortho-carborane. The resulting films exhibit a wide range of properties including H concentration from 10% to 45%, density from 0.9 to 2.3 g/cm{sup 3}, Young's modulus from 10 to 340 GPa, band gap from 1.7 to 3.8 eV, Urbach energy from 0.1 to 0.7 eV, dielectric constant from 3.1 to 7.6, and electrical resistivity from 10{sup 10} to 10{sup 15} Ω cm. Hydrogen concentration is found to correlate directly with thin-film density, and both are used to map and explain the other material properties. Hardness and Young's modulus exhibit a direct power law relationship with density above ∼1.3 g/cm{sup 3} (or below ∼35% H), below which they plateau, providing evidence for a rigidity percolation threshold. An increase in band gap and decrease in dielectric constant with increasing H concentration are explained by a decrease in network connectivity as well as mass/electron density. An increase in disorder, as measured by the parameters E{sub U} and B{sup 1/2}, with increasing H concentration is explained by the release of strain in the network and associated decrease in

  7. Using nano hexagonal boron nitride particles and nano cubic silicon carbide particles to improve the thermal conductivity of electrically conductive adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Hui-wang; Li, Dong-sheng; Fan, Qiong

    2013-01-01

    To satisfy the high electrical and thermal conductivity required for the continuous development of electronic products, nano hexagonal boron nitride (BN) particles and nano cubic silicon carbide (SiC) particles were added into electrically conductive adhesives (ECAs) to improve the thermal conductivity. BN and SiC had little negative effect on the electrical conductivity, but improved the thermal conductivity significantly. When their content was 1.5 wt. %, the thermal conductivity at 100°C, 150°C and 200°C was increased by 71% (100°C), 78% (150°C) and 70% (200°C), and 114% (100°C), 110% (150°C) and 98% (200°C) respectively for BN and SiC comparing with those of the ECAs with no thermal conductive fillers. This method is simple, easy to do, and can be used practically in electronic packaging.

  8. Tensile Mechanical Properties and Strengthening Mechanism of Hybrid Carbon Nanotube and Silicon Carbide Nanoparticle-Reinforced Magnesium Alloy Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Xia Zhou; Depeng Su; Chengwei Wu; Liming Liu

    2012-01-01

    AZ91 magnesium alloy hybrid composites reinforced with different hybrid ratios of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and silicon carbide (SiC) nanoparticulates were fabricated by semisolid stirring assisted ultrasonic cavitation. The results showed that grains of the matrix in the AZ91/(CNT + SiC) composites were obviously refined after adding hybrid CNTs and SiC nanoparticles to the AZ91 alloy, and the room-temperature mechanical properties of AZ91/(CNT + SiC) hybrid composites were improved comparing ...

  9. Effect of heat cycling on microstructure and thermal property of boron carbide sintered bulk as a shielding material for fusion blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Force Free Helical Reactor (FFHR) design activity in NIFS, metallic carbides and hydrides are considered as candidate shielding materials for the fusion blankets. These materials are expected to have some advantages on neutronic and thermo-physical properties. In order to promote the blanket design, it is necessary to clarify thermal properties of the candidate materials. We studied microstructure and thermal property of boron carbide (B4C), which is one of the promising candidates shielding materials, including the effect of heat cycling. By the laser-flash method, thermal diffusivity, which is one of the properties necessary for evaluating thermal conductivity, was measured precisely for B4C samples. The thermal diffusivity of B4C around 200degC decreased to 1/3 (5 × 10-6 m2 S-1) compared with that at room temperature. The sintering density of B4C bulk was decreased slightly by the thermal cycling. It was suggested that the B4C bulk has high thermal stability and soundness of microstructure during the life-time of blanket system. (author)

  10. Cathodic stripping voltammetric determination of chromium in coastal waters on cubic Nano-titanium carbide loaded gold nanoparticles modified electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haitao eHan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The novel cubical nano-titanium carbide loaded gold nanoparticles modified electrode for selective and sensitive detection of trace chromium (Cr in coastal water was established based on a simple approach. Nano-titanium carbide is used as the typical cubical nanomaterial with wonderful catalytic activity towards the reduction of Cr(VI. Gold nanoparticles with excellent physical and chemical properties can facilitate electron transfer and enhance the catalytic activity of the modified electrode. Taking advantage of the synergistic effects of nano-titanium carbide and gold nanoparticles, the excellent cathodic signal responses for the stripping determination of Cr(VI can be obtained. The detection limit of this method is calculated as 2.08 μg L-1 with the linear calibration curve ranged from 5.2 to 1040 μg L-1. This analytical method can be used to detect Cr(VI effectively without using any complexing agent. The fabricated electrode was successfully applied for the detection of chromium in coastal waters collected from the estuary giving Cr concentrations between 12.48 and 22.88 μg L-1 with the recovery between 96% and 105%.

  11. Boron nitride nanosheets decorated with silver nanoparticles through mussel-inspired chemistry of dopamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron nitride nanosheet (BNNS) decorated with silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) was successfully synthesized via mussel-inspired chemistry of dopamine. Poly(dopamine)-functionalized BNNS (PDA-BNNS) was prepared by adding dopamine into the aqueous dispersion of hydroxylated BNNS (OH-BNNS) at alkaline condition. AgNPs were decorated on PDA-BNNS through spontaneous reduction of silver cations by catechol moieties of a PDA layer on BNNS, resulting in AgNP-BNNS with good dispersion stability. Incorporation of PDA on BNNS not only played a role as a surface functionalization method of BNNS, but also provided a molecular platform for creating very sophisticated two-dimensional (2D) BNNS-based hybrid nanomaterials such as metal nanoparticle-decorated BNNS. (paper)

  12. Electrochemical and morphological characterization of gold nanoparticles deposited on boron-doped diamond electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Limat, Meriadec; El Roustom, Bahaa [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Institute of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Jotterand, Henri [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Institute of Physics of the Complex Matter, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Foti, Gyoergy [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Institute of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)], E-mail: gyorgy.foti@epfl.ch; Comninellis, Christos [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Institute of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2009-03-30

    A novel two-step method was employed to synthesize gold nanoparticles dispersed on boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrode. It consisted of sputter deposition at ambient temperature of maximum 15 equivalent monolayers of gold, followed by a heat treatment in air at 600 deg. C. Gold nanoparticles with an average diameter between 7 and 30 nm could be prepared by this method on polycrystalline BDD film electrode. The obtained Au/BDD composite electrode appeared stable under conditions of electrochemical characterization performed using ferri-/ferrocyanide and benzoquinone/hydroquinone redox couples in acidic medium. The electrochemical behavior of Au/BDD was compared to that of bulk Au and BDD electrodes. Finally, the Au/BDD composite electrode was regarded as an array of Au microelectrodes dispersed on BDD substrate.

  13. Chemical, mass spectrometric, and spectrochemical analysis of nuclear-grade aluminum oxide and aluminum oxide-boron carbide composite pellets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-01

    Aluminum oxide pellets are used in a reactor core as filler or spacers within fuel, burnable poison, or control rods. In order to be suitable for this purpose, the material must meet certain criteria for impurity content. The test methods in the standard are designed to show whether or not a given material meets these specifications. The following analytical procedures are described in detail: boron by titrimetry; separation of boron by mass spectrometry; isotopic composition by mass spectrometry; separation of halides by pyrohydrolysis; fluoride by ion-selective electrode; chloride, bromide, and iodide by amperometric microtitrimetry; trace elements by emission spectroscopy. (JMT)

  14. One-pot synthesis of biocompatible boronic acid-functionalized poly(methyl methacrylate) nanoparticles at sub-100 nm scale for glucose sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakalak, Huseyin [Selcuk University, Metallurgy and Materials Engineering (Turkey); Ulasan, Mehmet; Yavuz, Emine [Selcuk University, Advanced Technology Research and Application Center (Turkey); Camli, Sevket Tolga, E-mail: tolgacamli@gmail.com [Biyotez Machinery Chemistry R& D Co. Ltd. (Turkey); Yavuz, Mustafa Selman, E-mail: selmanyavuz@selcuk.edu.tr [Selcuk University, Metallurgy and Materials Engineering (Turkey)

    2014-12-15

    Poly(methyl methacrylate) nanoparticles containing 4-vinylphenyl boronic acid were synthesized in one pot by surfactant-free emulsion polymerization. The nanoparticles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. Boron content in the nanoparticles was confirmed by electron-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. In polymerization process, several co-monomer ratios were studied in order to obtain optimum nanoparticle size. Average hydrodynamic diameter and polydispersity index of nanoparticles versus variation of acetone percentage in the solvent mixture and total monomer concentration were investigated. The effect of boronic acid concentration in the monomer mixture on nanoparticle size and size distribution was also reported. Without further functionalization to the nanoparticles, the catechol dye, alizarin red S, was bound to boronic acid-containing nanoparticles. These nanoparticles behave as a nanosensor by which glucose or fructose can be easily detected. Dye-containing nanoparticles were undertaken displacement reaction by glucose or fructose. The glucose or fructose content was also monitored by UV–Visible spectrophotometer. Furthermore, cytotoxicity studies of boronic acid-carrying poly(methyl methacrylate) nanoparticles were carried out in 3T3 cells, which showed no toxicity effect on the cells.

  15. One-pot synthesis of biocompatible boronic acid-functionalized poly(methyl methacrylate) nanoparticles at sub-100 nm scale for glucose sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poly(methyl methacrylate) nanoparticles containing 4-vinylphenyl boronic acid were synthesized in one pot by surfactant-free emulsion polymerization. The nanoparticles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. Boron content in the nanoparticles was confirmed by electron-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. In polymerization process, several co-monomer ratios were studied in order to obtain optimum nanoparticle size. Average hydrodynamic diameter and polydispersity index of nanoparticles versus variation of acetone percentage in the solvent mixture and total monomer concentration were investigated. The effect of boronic acid concentration in the monomer mixture on nanoparticle size and size distribution was also reported. Without further functionalization to the nanoparticles, the catechol dye, alizarin red S, was bound to boronic acid-containing nanoparticles. These nanoparticles behave as a nanosensor by which glucose or fructose can be easily detected. Dye-containing nanoparticles were undertaken displacement reaction by glucose or fructose. The glucose or fructose content was also monitored by UV–Visible spectrophotometer. Furthermore, cytotoxicity studies of boronic acid-carrying poly(methyl methacrylate) nanoparticles were carried out in 3T3 cells, which showed no toxicity effect on the cells

  16. Innovative boron nitride-doped propellants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thelma Manning

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The U.S. military has a need for more powerful propellants with balanced/stoichiometric amounts of fuel and oxidants. However, balanced and more powerful propellants lead to accelerated gun barrel erosion and markedly shortened useful barrel life. Boron nitride (BN is an interesting potential additive for propellants that could reduce gun wear effects in advanced propellants (US patent pending 2015-026P. Hexagonal boron nitride is a good lubricant that can provide wear resistance and lower flame temperatures for gun barrels. Further, boron can dope steel, which drastically improves its strength and wear resistance, and can block the formation of softer carbides. A scalable synthesis method for producing boron nitride nano-particles that can be readily dispersed into propellants has been developed. Even dispersion of the nano-particles in a double-base propellant has been demonstrated using a solvent-based processing approach. Stability of a composite propellant with the BN additive was verified. In this paper, results from propellant testing of boron nitride nano-composite propellants are presented, including closed bomb and wear and erosion testing. Detailed characterization of the erosion tester substrates before and after firing was obtained by electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. This promising boron nitride additive shows the ability to improve gun wear and erosion resistance without any destabilizing effects to the propellant. Potential applications could include less erosive propellants in propellant ammunition for large, medium and small diameter fire arms.

  17. Innovative boron nitride-doped propellants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thelma MANNING; Henry GRAU; Paul MATTER; Michael BEACHY; Christopher HOLT; Samuel SOPOK; Richard FIELD; Kenneth KLINGAMAN; Michael FAIR; John BOLOGNINI; Robin CROWNOVER; Carlton P. ADAM; Viral PANCHAL; Eugene ROZUMOV

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. military has a need for more powerful propellants with balanced/stoichiometric amounts of fuel and oxidants. However, balanced and more powerful propellants lead to accelerated gun barrel erosion and markedly shortened useful barrel life. Boron nitride (BN) is an interesting potential additive for propellants that could reduce gun wear effects in advanced propellants (US patent pending 2015-026P). Hexagonal boron nitride is a good lubricant that can provide wear resistance and lower flame temperatures for gun barrels. Further, boron can dope steel, which drastically improves its strength and wear resistance, and can block the formation of softer carbides. A scalable synthesis method for producing boron nitride nano-particles that can be readily dispersed into propellants has been developed. Even dispersion of the nano-particles in a double-base propellant has been demonstrated using a solvent-based processing approach. Stability of a composite propellant with the BN additive was verified. In this paper, results from propellant testing of boron nitride nano-composite propellants are presented, including closed bomb and wear and erosion testing. Detailed characterization of the erosion tester substrates before and after firing was obtained by electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. This promising boron nitride additive shows the ability to improve gun wear and erosion resistance without any destabilizing effects to the propellant. Potential applications could include less erosive propellants in propellant ammunition for large, medium and small diameter fire arms.

  18. Synthesis of boron and nitrogen doped graphene supporting PtRu nanoparticles as catalysts for methanol electrooxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Jiming; Zhou, Yingke, E-mail: zhouyk888@hotmail.com; Tian, Xiaohui; Xu, Xiao; Zhu, Hongxi; Zhang, Shaowei; Yuan, Tao

    2014-10-30

    Highlights: • A single-step heat treatment approach is developed to synthesize boron and nitrogen doped graphene supporting PtRu nanocatalysts. • The introduction of boron or nitrogen containing function groups into graphene can modulate the particle size and dispersion of the supporting PtRu nanoparticles. • The optimized catalysts present high electrocatalytic activity and excellent stability for methanol oxidation reaction. - Abstract: In this study, we demonstrate a single-step heat treatment approach to synthesize boron and nitrogen doped graphene supporting PtRu electrocatalysts for methanol electro-oxidation reaction. The reduction of graphene oxide, boron or nitrogen doping of graphene and loading of PtRu nanoparticles happened simultaneously during the reaction process. The morphologies and microstructures of the as-prepared catalysts were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The electrocatalytic methanol oxidation activity and durability of the obtained catalysts were evaluated by the cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometric techniques. The results reveal that the boron and nitrogen doped graphene supporting PtRu electrocatalysts can be successfully prepared by the single step heat treatment technique, and the introduction of boron or nitrogen containing function groups into the reduced graphene sheets could modulate the particle size and dispersion of the supporting PtRu nanoparticles and improve the electrocatalytic performance of methanol oxidation reaction. The optimal annealing temperature is 800 °C, the preferable heat treatment time is 60 min for the nitrogen-doped catalysts and 90 min for the boron-doped catalysts, and the catalysts prepared under such conditions present superior catalytic activities for methanol oxidation than those prepared under other heat treatment conditions.

  19. Synthesis of boron and nitrogen doped graphene supporting PtRu nanoparticles as catalysts for methanol electrooxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A single-step heat treatment approach is developed to synthesize boron and nitrogen doped graphene supporting PtRu nanocatalysts. • The introduction of boron or nitrogen containing function groups into graphene can modulate the particle size and dispersion of the supporting PtRu nanoparticles. • The optimized catalysts present high electrocatalytic activity and excellent stability for methanol oxidation reaction. - Abstract: In this study, we demonstrate a single-step heat treatment approach to synthesize boron and nitrogen doped graphene supporting PtRu electrocatalysts for methanol electro-oxidation reaction. The reduction of graphene oxide, boron or nitrogen doping of graphene and loading of PtRu nanoparticles happened simultaneously during the reaction process. The morphologies and microstructures of the as-prepared catalysts were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The electrocatalytic methanol oxidation activity and durability of the obtained catalysts were evaluated by the cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometric techniques. The results reveal that the boron and nitrogen doped graphene supporting PtRu electrocatalysts can be successfully prepared by the single step heat treatment technique, and the introduction of boron or nitrogen containing function groups into the reduced graphene sheets could modulate the particle size and dispersion of the supporting PtRu nanoparticles and improve the electrocatalytic performance of methanol oxidation reaction. The optimal annealing temperature is 800 °C, the preferable heat treatment time is 60 min for the nitrogen-doped catalysts and 90 min for the boron-doped catalysts, and the catalysts prepared under such conditions present superior catalytic activities for methanol oxidation than those prepared under other heat treatment conditions

  20. Critically designing today’s melt processed bulk magnesium alloys using boron rich nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • B4C nanoparticles increased the tensile ductility of Mg–Al alloy to about 25%. • SiB6 nanoparticles increased the tensile ductility of Mg–Zn alloy to about 23%. • ZrB2 nanoparticles increased the tensile strength of Mg–RE alloy to above 400 MPa. • Hypothetically, 5–10% cold working could significantly increase tensile strength. • Hypothetically, 5–10% cold working could maintain tensile ductility above 10%. - Abstract: In this work, boron rich nanoparticles (B4C, SiB6 and ZrB2) were added to bulk melt processed Mg–Al, Mg–Zn and Mg–RE (Rare Earth) series contemporary magnesium alloys, respectively. The most obvious positive effect when adding B4C nanoparticles to the Mg–Al alloy was the significant increase in tensile ductility (to about 25%). Here, there was no significant change in grain size or crystallographic texture due to nanoparticle addition. However, it was observed that stacking faults formed more easily in the magnesium matrix due to nanoparticle addition. Also, it was observed that coarser nanoparticles broke down high strain zones (HSZs) during tensile deformation. The addition of SiB6 to Mg–Zn alloy also resulted in similar significant increase in tensile ductility (to about 23%). Tensile deformation induced alignment of more rounded and spherical nanoparticles was observed. Stacking faults forming more easily in the alloy matrix was also observed. However, the formation of nanograins (nanoscale recrystallization) during room temperature tensile deformation was observed in this system. This implied that nanograin rotation during deformation was also responsible for the observed enhanced tensile ductility. When ZrB2 was added to Mg–RE alloy, the tensile strength was significantly enhanced (yield strength >400 MPa) after thermal ageing. Here, the ZrB2 nanoparticles induced the formation of thermal ageing resistant long period stacking/ordered (LPSO) nanograins and nanolayers in the Mg–RE alloy matrix

  1. Ballistic behavior of boron carbide reinforced AA7075 aluminium alloy using friction stir processing–An experimental study and analytical approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    I. SUDHAKAR; G. MADHUSUDHAN REDDY; K. SRINIVASA RAO

    2016-01-01

    High strength-to-weight ratio of non-ferrous alloys, such as aluminium, magnesium and titanium alloys, are considered to be possible replacement of widely accepted steels in transportation and automobile sectors. Among these alloys, magnesium is self explosive and titanium is costlier, and aluminium is most likely to replace steels. Application of aluminium or its alloys is also thought of as an appropriate replacement in defence field, especially to enhance the easiness in mobility of combat vehicles while maintaining the same standard as that of conventional armour grade steels. Hence most of the investigations have been confined to aluminium or its alloys as base material and open an era of developing the newer composite materials to address the major limitation, i.e. tribological properties. The surface composites can be fabricated by incorporating the ceramic carbides like silicon carbide, carbides of transition metals and oxides of aluminium using surface modification techniques, such as high energy laser melt treatment, high energy electron beam irradiation and thermal spray process which are based on fusion route. These techniques yield the fusion related problems, such as interfacial reaction, pin holes, shrinkage cavities or voids and other casting related defects, and pave the way to need of an efficient technique which must be based on solid state. Recently developed friction stir processing technique was used in the present investigation for surface modification of AA7075 aluminum alloy, which is an alternative to steels. In the present investigation, 160μm sized boron carbide powder was procured and was reduced to 60μm and 30μm using high energy ball mill. Subsequently these powders were used to fabricate the surface composites using friction stir processing. Ballistic performance testing as per the military standard (JIS.0108.01) was carried out. In the present work, an analytical method of predicting the ballistic behavior of surface composites

  2. Elementary boron and metal-boron compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elementary boron is of interest for its peculiar and difficult bonding behaviour in solids. Due to its high oxygen affinity we find no elementary boron in nature. For the same reason it is difficult to isolate pure, elementary boron, and much confusion about 'boron crystals' has been the result of more than 100 years of research. The polymorphic forms of elementary boron and its closely related higher carbides and higher metal borides as well as the simple metal borides, B3C and BN are reported. The quantum-mechanical background responsible for structure and stoichiometry of these crystals is given. (orig.)

  3. Use of boron cluster-containing redox nanoparticles with ROS scavenging ability in boron neutron capture therapy to achieve high therapeutic efficiency and low adverse effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhenyu; Horiguchi, Yukichi; Nakai, Kei; Matsumura, Akira; Suzuki, Minoru; Ono, Koji; Nagasaki, Yukio

    2016-10-01

    A boron delivery system with high therapeutic efficiency and low adverse effects is crucial for a successful boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). In this study, we developed boron cluster-containing redox nanoparticles (BNPs) via polyion complex (PIC) formation, using a newly synthesized poly(ethylene glycol)-polyanion (PEG-polyanion, possessing a (10)B-enriched boron cluster as a side chain of one of its segments) and PEG-polycation (possessing a reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger as a side chain of one of its segments). The BNPs exhibited high colloidal stability, selective uptake in tumor cells, specific accumulation, and long retention in tumor tissue and ROS scavenging ability. After thermal neutron irradiation, significant suppression of tumor growth was observed in the BNP-treated group, with only 5-ppm (10)B in tumor tissues, whereas at least 20-ppm (10)B is generally required for low molecular weight (LMW) (10)B agents. In addition, increased leukocyte levels were observed in the LMW (10)B agent-treated group after thermal neutron irradiation, and not in BNP-treated group, which might be attributed to its ROS scavenging ability. No visual metastasis of tumor cells to other organs was observed 1 month after irradiation in the BNP-treated group. These results suggest that BNPs are promising for enhancing the BNCT performance. PMID:27467416

  4. Preparation and application of cellular and nanoporous carbides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchardt, Lars; Hoffmann, Claudia; Oschatz, Martin; Mammitzsch, Lars; Petasch, Uwe; Herrmann, Mathias; Kaskel, Stefan

    2012-08-01

    A tutorial review on cellular as well as nanoporous carbides covering their structure, synthesis and potential applications. Especially new carbide materials with a hierarchical pore structure are in focus. As a central theme silicon carbide based materials are picked out, but also titanium, tungsten and boron carbides, as well as carbide-derived carbons, are part of this review. PMID:22344324

  5. Boron nanoparticles with high hydrogen loading: mechanism for B-H binding and potential for improved combustibility and specific impulse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Jesus Paulo L; McMahon, Brandon W; Yu, Jiang; Schneider, Stefan; Boatz, Jerry A; Hawkins, Tom W; McCrary, Parker D; Flores, Luis A; Rogers, Robin D; Anderson, Scott L

    2014-06-11

    Ball milling of boron in an H2 atmosphere was found to result in hydrogen uptake of up to 5% by weight (36 mol %). The nature of the hydrogen binding to boron was probed by a combination of ab initio theory, IR spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and mass spectral measurements of gases evolved during sample heating. The dominant binding mode is found to be H atoms bound to B atoms in the surface layer of the particles, and the high hydrogen loading results from production of very high surface area, indicating that gaseous H2 is an effective agent promoting size reduction in milling. Hydrogen incorporated in the samples was found to be stable for at least a month under ambient conditions. Desorption is observed beginning at ∼60 °C and continuing as the temperature is increased, with broad desorption features peaking at ∼250 and ∼450 °C, and ending at ∼800 °C. Unprotected hydrogenated boron nanoparticles were found to be reactive with O2 producing a hydrated boron oxide surface layer that decomposed readily at 100 °C leading to desorption of H2O. Hydrogenated boron nanoparticles were found to promote a higher flame height in the hypergolic ignition of ionic liquids upon contact with nitric acid. PMID:24806745

  6. Carbon-rich icosahedral boron carbides beyond B4C and their thermodynamic stabilities at high temperature and pressure from first principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ektarawong, A.; Simak, S. I.; Alling, B.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the thermodynamic stability of carbon-rich icosahedral boron carbide at different compositions, ranging from B4C to B2C , using first-principles calculations. Apart from B4C , generally addressed in the literature, B2.5C , represented by B10C2p (C-C), where Cp and (C-C) denote a carbon atom occupying the polar site of the icosahedral cluster and a diatomic carbon chain, respectively, is predicted to be thermodynamically stable under high pressures with respect to B4C as well as pure boron and carbon phases. The thermodynamic stability of B2.5C is determined by the Gibbs free energy G as a function of pressure p and temperature T , in which the contributions from the lattice vibrations and the configurational disorder are obtained within the quasiharmonic and the mean-field approximations, respectively. The stability range of B2.5C is then illustrated through the p -T phase diagrams. Depending on the temperatures, the stability range of B2.5C is predicted to be within the range between 40 and 67 GPa. At T ≳ 500 K, the icosahedral Cp atoms in B2.5C configurationally disorder at the polar sites. By investigating the properties of B2.5C , e.g., elastic constants and phonon and electronic density of states, we demonstrate that B2.5C is both mechanically and dynamically stable at zero pressure, and is an electrical semiconductor. Furthermore, based on the sketched phase diagrams, a possible route for experimental synthesis of B2.5C as well as a fingerprint for its characterization from the simulations of x-ray powder diffraction pattern are suggested.

  7. Homogeneous dispersion of gallium nitride nanoparticles in a boron nitride matrix by nitridation with urea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusunose, Takafumi; Sekino, Tohru; Ando, Yoichi

    2010-07-01

    A Gallium Nitride (GaN) dispersed boron nitride (BN) nanocomposite powder was synthesized by heating a mixture of gallium nitrate, boric acid, and urea in a hydrogen atmosphere. Before heat treatment, crystalline phases of urea, boric acid, and gallium nitrate were recognized, but an amorphous material was produced by heat treatment at 400 degrees C, and then was transformed into GaN and turbostratic BN (t-BN) by further heat treatment at 800 degrees C. TEM obsevations of this composite powder revealed that single nanosized GaN particles were homogeneously dispersed in a BN matrix. Homogeneous dispersion of GaN nanoparticles was thought to be attained by simultaneously nitriding gallium nitrate and boric acid to GaN and BN with urea. PMID:21128417

  8. Synthesis and characterization of boron nitride sponges as a novel support for metal nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG MingTao; LIU YingLiang; GU YunLe; XU ZiLin

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a simple synthetic route for the synthesis of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) powders with high specific surface area, in which BBr3, NH4Cl and Al powders are used as starting materials. The structure and composition of the powders were characterized by electron diffraction, Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in the selected area. X-ray diffraction shows wide peaks of crystalline h-BN with the particle size on the nanometer scale, and transmission electron microscopy reveals that the products have a novel spongy morphol-ogy. Silver nanoparticles loaded h-BN sponges were prepared via a one-step synthesis method. Dif-ferent reaction conditions for the formation of h-BN sponges were also investigated.

  9. Synthesis and characterization of boron nitride sponges as a novel support for metal nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a simple synthetic route for the synthesis of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) powders with high specific surface area, in which BBr3, NH4Cl and Al powders are used as starting materials. The structure and composition of the powders were characterized by electron diffraction, Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in the selected area. X-ray diffraction shows wide peaks of crystalline h-BN with the particle size on the nanometer scale, and transmission electron microscopy reveals that the products have a novel spongy morphology. Silver nanoparticles loaded h-BN sponges were prepared via a one-step synthesis method. Different reaction conditions for the formation of h-BN sponges were also investigated.

  10. Submicron-sized boron carbide particles encapsulated in turbostratic graphite prepared by laser fragmentation in liquid medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Yoshie; Sasaki, Takeshi; Koshizaki, Naoto

    2010-08-01

    Submicron-sized B4C spherical particles were obtained by laser fragmentation of large B4C particles dispersed in ethyl acetate. The irradiated surface of large B4C raw particles was heated and melted by laser energy absorption. B4C droplets were then cooled down, and finally B4C spherical particles were obtained. Moreover, each B4C particle obtained was encapsulated in a graphitic layer that is useful for medical functionalization of particles. Thus, obtained B4C particles encapsulated in graphitic layer may have potential uses in boron neutron capture therapy. PMID:21125920

  11. Electro-explosive alloying of VT6 alloy surface by boron carbide powder with the subsequent electron-beam treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanov, D. A.; Raykov, S. V.; Gromov, V. E.; Ivanov, Yu F.

    2015-11-01

    The formation of electro-explosive alloying zone with the thickness up to 50 μm has been revealed. It has been shown that it has a gradient structure, characterized by the decrease of carbon and boron concentration with the increase of the distance up to the treatment surface. The subsequent electron-beam treatment of alloying zone leads to flattening of alloying surface relief and is accompanied by the formation of a multilevel structure at the depth up to 30 μm, characterized by the interchange of some layers with a different level of alloying, having structure of a submicro- and nanoscale level.

  12. Spark Plasma Sintering of Aluminum-Magnesium-Matrix Composites with Boron Carbide and Tungsten Nano-powder Inclusions: Modeling and Experimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvilis, E. S.; Khasanov, O. L.; Gulbin, V. N.; Petyukevich, M. S.; Khasanov, A. O.; Olevsky, E. A.

    2016-03-01

    Spark-plasma sintering (SPS) is used to fabricate fully-dense metal-matrix (Al/Mg) composites containing hard ceramic (boron carbide) and refractory metal (tungsten) inclusions. The study objectives include the modeling (and its experimental verification) of the process of the consolidation of the composites consisted of aluminum-magnesium alloy AMg6 (65 wt.%), B4C powder (15 wt.%), and W nano-powder (20 wt.%), as well as the optimization of the composite content and of the SPS conditions to achieve higher density. Discrete element modeling of the composite particles packing based on the particle size distribution functions of real powders is utilized for the determination of the powder compositions rendering maximum mixture packing densities. Two models: a power-law creep model of the high temperature deformation of powder materials, and an empirical logarithmic pressure-temperature-relative density relationship are successfully applied for the description of the densification of the aluminum-magnesium metal matrix powder composite subjected to spark-plasma sintering. The elastoplastic properties of the sintered composite samples are assessed by nanoindentation.

  13. Microstructure and pitting corrosion of armor grade AA7075 aluminum alloy friction stir weld nugget zone – Effect of post weld heat treatment and addition of boron carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Vijaya Kumar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir welding (FSW of high strength aluminum alloys has been emerged as an alternative joining technique to avoid the problems during fusion welding. In recent times FSW is being used for armor grade AA7075 aluminum alloy in defense, aerospace and marine applications where it has to serve in non uniform loading and corrosive environments. Even though friction stir welds of AA7075 alloy possess better mechanical properties but suffer from poor corrosion resistance. The present work involves use of retrogression and reaging (RRA post weld heat treatment to improve the corrosion resistance of welded joints of aluminum alloys. An attempt also has been made to change the chemical composition of the weld nugget by adding B4C nano particles with the aid of the FSW on a specially prepared base metal plate in butt position. The effects of peak aged condition (T6, RRA and addition of B4C nano particles on microstructure, hardness and pitting corrosion of nugget zone of the friction stir welds of AA7075 alloy have been studied. Even though RRA improved the pitting corrosion resistance, its hardness was slightly lost. Significant improvement in pitting corrosion resistance was achieved with addition of boron carbide powder and post weld heat treatment of RRA.

  14. A combination method for simulation of secondary knock-on atoms of boron carbide induced by neutron irradiation in SPRR-300

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jian-Chun; Feng, Qi-Jie; Liu, Xian-Kun; Zhan, Chang-Yong; Zou, Yu; Liu, Yao-Guang

    2016-02-01

    A multiscale sequence of simulation should be used to predict properties of materials under irradiation. Binary collision theory and molecular dynamics (MDs) method are commonly used to characterize the displacement cascades induced by neutrons in a material. In order to reduce the clock time spent for the MD simulation of damages induced by high-energy primary knock-on atoms (PKAs), the damage zones were split into sub-cascade according to the sub-cascade formation criteria. Two well-known codes, Geant4 and TRIM, were used to simulate high-energy PKA-induced cascades in B4C and then produce the secondary knock-on atom (SKA) energy spectrum. It has been found that both high-energy primary knock-on B and C atoms move a long range in the boron carbide. These atoms produce sub-cascades at the tip of trajectory. The energy received by most of the SKAs is <10 keV, which can be used as input to reduce the clock time spent for MD simulation.

  15. Preparation and oxidation resistance of 2D C/SiC composites modified by partial boron carbide self-sealing matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The C/SiC composites with partial boron carbide (BCx) self-healing matrix were prepared by isothermal chemical vapor infiltration technique (ICVI). SEM results showed that the multilayer SiC-BCx matrix exist among fiber bundles, nevertheless there were still SiC matrix among monofilaments. The mechanical properties at room temperature were tested and compared with conventional C/SiC composites. The modified composites hold better strain to fracture than the conventional C/SiC composites, although the other mechanical properties of the two kinds of composites were similar. The pull-out of multilayer matrices was the main factor of the increase of strain to fracture. The high residual strengths were demonstrated after oxidized at static air and simulation combustion environments. The improvement for oxidation resistances of the modified composites were contributed to the self-healing of crack and pore during oxidation in static air and simulation combustion environments, compared with conventional C/SiC composites

  16. The influence of Cu-doping on aluminum nitride, silicon carbide and boron nitride nanotubes’ ability to detect carbon dioxide; DFT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdavifar, Zabiollah; Abbasi, Nasibeh

    2014-02-01

    In this research, the potential use of Cu-functionalized [4,4] silicon carbide (SiC), aluminum nitride (AlN) and boron nitride (BN) single-walled nanotubes as nanodevices for CO2 monitoring is investigated. It is found that Cu-doping the different sites of the considered nanotubes and combining these nanotubes with CO2 gas molecules are both exothermic processes, and the relaxed geometries are stable. Our results reveal that the CO2 gas molecules can be strongly physisorbed on the Cu-doped nanotubes, accompanied by large adsorption energy. Compared with the weak adsorption of CO2 molecule onto pristine BNNT and SiCNT, the CO2 molecule tends to be strongly physisorbed onto Cu-decorated BNNT and SiCNT with an appreciable adsorption energy. Furthermore, the results indicate that Cu-functionalized SiCNT is more favorable than Cu-doped BNNT and AlNNT structures for CO2 adsorption. Natural bond orbital analysis indicates that the adsorption of a CO2 molecule onto Cu-doped nanotubes is influenced by the electronic conductance and mechanical properties of the nanotube, which could serve as a signal for a gas sensor. It appears that the considerable charge transfer from the Cu-doped nanotubes to a CO2 molecule reduces the energy gap. These observations suggest that the Cu-doped-SiCNT, -BNNT and -AlNNT can be introduced as promising candidates for gas sensor devices that detect CO2 molecules.

  17. Coated carbide drill performance under soluble coconut oil lubricant and nanoparticle enhanced MQL in drilling AISI P20

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamil, N. A. M.; Azmi, A. I.; Fairuz, M. A.

    2016-02-01

    This research experimentally investigates the performance of a TiAlN coated carbide drill bit in drilling AISI P20 through two different kinds of lubricants, namely; soluble coconut oil (SCO) and nanoparticle-enhanced coconut oil (NECO) under minimum quantity lubrication system. The tool life and tool wear mechanism were studied using various cutting speeds of 50, 100 and 150 m/min with a constant feed of 0.01 mm/rev. Since the flank wear land was not regular along the cutting edge, the average flank wear (VB) was measured at several points using image analysis software. The drills were inspected using a scanning electron microscope to further elucidate the wear mechanism. The result indicates that drilling with the nanoparticle- enhanced lubricant was better in resisting the wear and improving the drill life to some extent

  18. Amperometric oxygen sensor based on a platinum nanoparticle-modified polycrystalline boron doped diamond disk electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutton, Laura; Newton, Mark E; Unwin, Patrick R; Macpherson, Julie V

    2009-02-01

    Pt nanoparticle (NP)-modified polycrystalline boron-doped diamond (pBDD) disk electrodes have been fabricated and employed as amperometric sensors for the determination of dissolved oxygen concentration in aqueous solution. pBDD columns were cut using laser micromachining techniques and sealed in glass, in order to make disk electrodes which were then characterized electrochemically. Electrodeposition of Pt onto the diamond electrodes was optimized so as to give the maximum oxygen reduction peak current with the lowest background signal. Pt NPs, >0-10 nm diameter, were found to deposit randomly across the pBDD electrode, with no preference for grain boundaries. The more conductive grains were found to promote the formation of smaller nanoparticles at higher density. With the use of potential step chronoamperometry, in which the potential was stepped to a diffusion-limited value, a four electron oxygen reduction process was found to occur at the Pt NP-modified pBDD electrode. Furthermore the chronoamperometric response scaled linearly with dissolved oxygen concentration, varied by changing the oxygen/nitrogen ratio of gas flowed into solution. The sensor was used to detect dissolved oxygen concentrations with high precision over the pH range 4-10. PMID:19117391

  19. Synthesis of PBAD-lipiodol nanoparticles for combination treatment with boric acid in boron neutron capture therapy for hepatoma in-vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study attempted to increase BNCT efficiency for hepatoma by a combined treatment of phenylboric acid derivative entrapped lipiodol nanoparticles (PBAD-L nanoparticles) with boric acid. The size of PBAD-L nanoparticles were 400-750 nm at the boron concentrations of 0.3-2.7 mg/ml. After 24 hours the boron concentration in PBAD-L nanoparticles treated human hepatoma HepG2 cells was 112 ppm, while that in rat liver Clone 9 cells was 52 ppm. With the use of 25 μg B/ml boric acid, after 6 hours the boron concentration in HepG2 and Clone 9 cells were 75 ppm and 40 ppm, respectively. In a combined treatment, boron concentration in HepG2 cells which were treated with PBAD-L nanoparticles for 18 hours and then combined with boric acid for 6 hours was 158 ppm. After neutron irradiation, the surviving fraction of HepG2 cells treated with PBAD-L nanoparticles was 12.6%, while that in the ones with a combined treatment was 1.3%. In conclusion, the combined treatment provided a higher boron concentration in HepG2 cells than treatments with either PBAD-L nanoparticles or boric acid, resulting in a higher therapeutic efficacy of BNCT in hepatoma cells. (author)

  20. Influence of trace boron on the morphology of titanium carbide in an Al-Ti-C-B master alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of trace B (boron) element on the morphology of TiC crystals in an Al-Ti-C-B master alloy prepared by a melt reaction method has been investigated in this paper. The morphology and chemical composition of TiC crystals are characterized from X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), energy dispersion spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED) analyses. It is found that both TiC hexagonal platelet and TiC polyhedron have formed in the Al-Ti-C-B master alloy. Furthermore, a trace amount of B element is found in TiC hexagonal platelets evidenced by the EDS spectrum. However, the SAED pattern confirms that the crystal structure of TiC has not changed. The formation and growth mechanism of the TiC hexagonal platelet have been discussed. It is considered that the trace B element in the aluminum melt promotes the transformation of TiC from polyhedron to hexagonal platelet at the initial growth stage.

  1. Preparation, properties, and characterization of boron phosphide films on 4H- and 6H-silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padavala, Balabalaji; Frye, C. D.; Ding, Zihao; Chen, Ruifen; Dudley, Michael; Raghothamachar, Balaji; Khan, Neelam; Edgar, J. H.

    2015-09-01

    Epitaxial growth of boron phosphide (BP) films on 4H- and 6H-SiC(0001) substrates with on- and off-axis orientations was investigated in this study. The films were prepared by chemical vapor deposition using phosphine and diborane as reactants over a temperature range of 1000 oC-1200 °C. The effects of growth parameters such as temperature, reactant flow rates, substrate type, and crystallographic orientation on BP film properties were studied in detail. The epitaxial relationship between BP film and 4H-and 6H-SiC substrate was (111) BPBP||(0001) SiCSiC . Film quality, determined by preferred crystalline orientation and grain size, improved with temperature and PH3/B2H6 flow ratio, as indicated by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. In addition, smoother films were obtained when the diborane flow rate was reduced. Rotational twinning in BP films was absent on 4H-SiC(0001) tilted 4° towards [ 1 1 bar 00 ] , but was confirmed on both 4H-SiC(0001) tilted 4° towards [ 1 2 bar 10 ] , and on-axis 6H-SiC(0001) substrates by synchrotron white beam x-ray topography technique.

  2. Study of boron carbide evolution under neutron irradiation; Contribution a l'etude de l'evolution du carbure de bore sous irradiation neutronique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simeone, D. [CEA/Saclay, Dept. de Mecanique et de Technologie (DMT), 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)]|[Universite Blaise Pascal, Clermont-Ferrand II, (CNRS), 63 - Aubiere (France)

    1999-07-01

    Owing to its high neutron efficiency, boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) is used as a neutron absorber in control rods of nuclear plants. Its behaviour under irradiation has been extensively studied for many years. It now seems clear that brittleness of the material induced by the {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li capture reaction is due to penny shaped helium bubbles associated to a high strain field around them. However, no model explains the behaviour of the material under neutron irradiation. In order to build such a model, this work uses different techniques: nuclear microprobe X-ray diffraction profile analysis and Raman and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy to present an evolution model of B{sub 4}C under neutron irradiation. The use of nuclear reactions produced by a nuclear microprobe such as the {sup 7}Li(p,p'{gamma}){sup 7}Li reaction, allows to measure lithium profile in B{sub 4}C pellets irradiated either in Pressurised Water Reactors or in Fast Breeder Reactors. Examining such profiles enables us to describe the migration of lithium atoms out of B{sub 4}C materials under neutron irradiation. The analysis of X-ray diffraction profiles of irradiated B{sub 4}C samples allows us to quantify the concentrations of helium bubbles as well as the strain fields around such bubbles.Furthermore Raman spectroscopy studies of different B{sub 4}C samples lead us to propose that under neutron irradiation. the CBC linear chain disappears. Such a vanishing of this CBC chain. validated by NMR analysis, may explain the penny shaped of helium bubbles inside irradiated B{sub 4}C. (author)

  3. Heat Flux Calculation and Problem of Flaking of Boron Carbide Coatings on the Faraday Screen of the ICRH Antennas During Tore Supra High Power, Long Pulse Operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corre, Y. [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Cadarache, St. Paul lez Durance; Lipa, M. [CEA IRFM, St. Paul-lez-Durance, France; Agarici, G. [Fusion for Energy (F4E), Barcelona, Spain; Basiuk, V. [CEA IRFM, St. Paul-lez-Durance, France; Colas, L. [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA); Courtois, X. [CEA, St. Paul Les Durance, France; Dumont, R. J. [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Cadarache, St. Paul lez Durance; Ekedahl, A. [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Institute for Magnetic Fusion Research (IRFM); Gardarein, J. L. [University of Aix, Marseille, France; Klepper, C Christopher [ORNL; Martin, V. [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Institute for Magnetic Fusion Research (IRFM); Moncada, V. [CEA, St. Paul Les Durance, France; Portafaix, C. [CEA, St. Paul Les Durance, France; Rigollet, F. [University of Aix, Marseille, France; Tawizgant, R. [CEA, St. Paul Les Durance, France; Travere, J. M. [CEA, St. Paul Les Durance, France; Valliez, K. [CEA, St. Paul Les Durance, France

    2011-01-01

    Reliable and repetitive high power and long pulse tokamak operation is strongly dependant of the ability to secure the Plasma Facing Components (PFCs). In Tore Supra, a network of 7 infrared (IR) video cameras is routinely used to prevent PFCs overheating and damage in selected regions. Real time feedback control and offline analysis are essential for basic protection and understanding of abnormal thermal events. One important limitation detected by the IR real time feed-back loop during high power RF operation (injected power of 9.5 MW over 26 s and 12 MW over 10 s have been achieved respectively in 2006 and 2008) is due to the interaction between fast ions which increase the power flux density and flaking of the boron carbide coatings on the Faraday screen box of the ICRH antennas. An IR-based experimental procedure is proposed in order to detect new flakes during plasma operation. The thermal response of the B4C coating is studied with and without flaking during plasma operation. The experimental heat flux deposited by fast ion losses on the Faraday screen is calculated for high (3.8 T) and low magnetic field (2 T) during high RF power operation (with fundamental hydrogen minority and second harmonic ICRH heating schemes respectively). The paper addresses both thermal science issues applied to machine protection and limitation due to fast ions issues during high RF power, long pulse operation. Safety margin to critical heat flux and number of fatigue cycles under heat load are presented in the paper.

  4. Hexagonal boron nitride nanoparticles decorated halloysite clay nanotubes as a potential hydrogen storage medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthu, R. Naresh; Rajashabala, S.; Kannan, R.

    2016-05-01

    The light weight and compact hydrogen storage materials is still prerequisite for the carbon free hydrogen fuel cell technology. In this work, the hydrogen storage performance of acid treated halloysite clay nanotubes (A-HNTs) and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) nanoparticles decorated acid treated halloysite nanoclay composite (A-HNT-h-BN) are demonstrated, where facile ultrasonic technique is adopted for the synthesis of A-HNT-h-BN nanoclay composite. Hydrogen storage studies were carried out using Sieverts-like hydrogenation setup. The A-HNTs and A-HNT-h-BN nanoclay composite were analyzed by XRD, FTIR, HRTEM, EDX, CHNS-elemental analysis and TGA. The A-HNT-h-BN nanoclay composite shows superior storage capacity of 2.19 wt% at 50 °C compared to the A-HNTs (0.58 wt%). A 100% desorption of stored hydrogen is noted in the temperature range of 138-175 °C. The average binding energy of hydrogen was found to be 0.34 eV for the prepared A-HNT-h-BN nanoclay composite. The excellent storage capability of A-HNT-h-BN nanoclay composite towards hydrogen at ambient temperature may find bright perspective in hydrogen fuel cell technology in near future.

  5. Platinum nanoparticle modified polyaniline-functionalized boron nitride nanotubes for amperometric glucose enzyme biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jianmin; Yin, Longwei

    2011-11-01

    A novel amperometric biosensor based on the BNNTs-Pani-Pt hybrids with Pt nanoparticle homogeneously decorated on polyaniline (Pani)-wrapped boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs), was developed. It is shown that π interactions take place between BNNTs and polyaniline (Pani) located at N atoms from BNNTs and C atoms from Pani, resulting in the water solubility for the Pani wrapped BNNTs hybrids. The developed glucose biosensor displayed high sensitivity and stability, good reproducibility, anti-interference ability, especially excellent acid stability and heat resistance. The resulted BNNTs-Pani-Pt hybrid amperometric glucose biosensor exhibited a fast response time (within 3 s) and a linear calibration range from 0.01 to 5.5 mM with a high sensitivity and low detection limit of 19.02 mA M(-1) cm(-2) and 0.18 μM glucose (S/N = 3). Surprisedly, the relative activity of the GC/BNNTs-Pani-Pt-GOD electrode keeps almost no change in a range from pH 3 to 7. Futhermore, the BNNTs-Pani-Pt hybrid biosensor maintains a high GOD enzymatic activity even at a relatively high temperature of 60 °C. This might be attributed to the effect of electrostatic field and hydrophobia of BNNTs. The unique acid stability and heat resistance of this sensor indicate great promising application in numerous industrial and biotechnological operations involving harsh conditions. PMID:22013877

  6. Boron nitride nanosheets as improved and reusable substrates for gold nanoparticles enabled surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Cai, Qiran

    2015-01-01

    Atomically thin boron nitride (BN) nanosheets have been found to be excellent substrates for noble metal particles enabled surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), thanks to their good adsorption of aromatic molecules, high thermal stability and weak Raman scattering. Faceted gold (Au) nanoparticles have been synthesized on BN nanosheets using a simple but controllable and reproducible sputtering and annealing method. The size and density of the Au particles can be controlled by sputtering time, current and annealing temperature etc. Under the same sputtering and annealing conditions, the Au particles on BN of different thicknesses show various sizes because the surface diffusion coefficients of Au depend on the thickness of BN. Intriguingly, decorated with similar morphology and distribution of Au particles, BN nanosheets exhibit better Raman enhancements than silicon substrates as well as bulk BN crystals. Additionally, BN nanosheets show no noticeable SERS signal and hence cause no interference to the Raman signal of the analyte. The Au/BN substrates can be reused by heating in air to remove the adsorbed analyte without loss of SERS enhancement. This journal is © the Owner Societies 2015.

  7. Nonlocal piezoelastic surface effect on the vibration of visco-Pasternak coupled boron nitride nanotube system under a moving nanoparticle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghorbanpour Arani, A., E-mail: aghorban@kashanu.ac.ir [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University of Kashan, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, University of Kashan, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Roudbari, M.A. [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University of Kashan, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-09-02

    In this article, the nonlocal longitudinal and transverse vibrations of coupled boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) system under a moving nanoparticle using piezoelastic theory and surface stress based on Euler–Bernoulli beam are developed. BNNTs are coupled by visco-Pasternak medium and single-walled zigzag structure BNNT is selected in this study. Hamilton's principle is employed to derive the corresponding higher order equations of motion for both nanotubes. The detailed parametric study is conducted, focusing on the remarkable effects of the small scale parameter, aspect ratio, surface stress and visco-Pasternak coefficients on the vibration behavior of the coupled BNNT system. Also it is demonstrated that the normalized dynamic deflections obtained by using the classical beam theory are smaller than those obtained by the nonlocal beam theory. The influence of the smart controller is proved on the nondimensional fundamental longitudinal frequency. The result of this study can be useful to manufacture of smart microelectromechanical system and nanoelectromechanical system in advanced biomechanics applications with electric field as a parametric controller. - Highlights: • Vibration of coupled boron nitride nanotube system is studied. • Boron nitride nanotubes are coupled by a visco-Pasternak medium. • Single-walled zigzag boron nitride nanotube structure is considered. • The applied electric potential effect on the longitudinal vibration is studied. • The results may be useful to design of micro/nanoelectromechanical systems.

  8. Nonlocal piezoelastic surface effect on the vibration of visco-Pasternak coupled boron nitride nanotube system under a moving nanoparticle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this article, the nonlocal longitudinal and transverse vibrations of coupled boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) system under a moving nanoparticle using piezoelastic theory and surface stress based on Euler–Bernoulli beam are developed. BNNTs are coupled by visco-Pasternak medium and single-walled zigzag structure BNNT is selected in this study. Hamilton's principle is employed to derive the corresponding higher order equations of motion for both nanotubes. The detailed parametric study is conducted, focusing on the remarkable effects of the small scale parameter, aspect ratio, surface stress and visco-Pasternak coefficients on the vibration behavior of the coupled BNNT system. Also it is demonstrated that the normalized dynamic deflections obtained by using the classical beam theory are smaller than those obtained by the nonlocal beam theory. The influence of the smart controller is proved on the nondimensional fundamental longitudinal frequency. The result of this study can be useful to manufacture of smart microelectromechanical system and nanoelectromechanical system in advanced biomechanics applications with electric field as a parametric controller. - Highlights: • Vibration of coupled boron nitride nanotube system is studied. • Boron nitride nanotubes are coupled by a visco-Pasternak medium. • Single-walled zigzag boron nitride nanotube structure is considered. • The applied electric potential effect on the longitudinal vibration is studied. • The results may be useful to design of micro/nanoelectromechanical systems

  9. Effect of Particle Size and Lattice Strain on the Debye-Waller Factors of Silicon Carbide Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purushotham, E

    2016-03-01

    Nano Silicon Carbide (SiC) particles have been produced by ball milling process. The sample was taken 0, 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 hours of milling. The resulting nanoparticle powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction measurements. The high-energy ball milling of SiC after 50 hours resulted in particle size of about 24 nm. The Debye temperature, mean-square amplitudes of vibration, Debye-Waller factor, particle size, and lattice strain and vacancy formation of energies of SiC nanoparticles prepared by ball mill have been obtained from X-ray integrated intensities. The integrated intensities have been measured with a Philips CWU 3710 X-ray powder diffractometer fitted with a scintillation counter using filtered CuKα radiation at room temperature and have been corrected for thermal diffuse scattering. The X-ray Debye temperatures obtained in the present investigation has been used to estimate the vacancy formation energies for SiC nanoparticles. PMID:27455685

  10. Dispersion of silicon carbide nanoparticles in a AA2024 aluminum alloy by a high-energy ball mill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carreño-Gallardo, C.; Estrada-Guel, I. [Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados (CIMAV), Laboratorio Nacional de Nanotecnología-Chihuahua, Miguel de Cervantes No. 120, CP 31109, Chihuahua, México (Mexico); López-Meléndez, C. [Universidad La Salle Chihuahua, Prol. Lomas de Majalca No. 11201, CP 31020, Chihuahua, México (Mexico); Martínez-Sánchez, R., E-mail: roberto.martinez@cimav.edu.mx [Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados (CIMAV), Laboratorio Nacional de Nanotecnología-Chihuahua, Miguel de Cervantes No. 120, CP 31109, Chihuahua, México (Mexico)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • Synthesis of 2024-SiC{sub NP} nanocomposite by mechanical milling process. • SiC nanoparticles improved mechanical properties of aluminum alloy 2024 matrix. • A homogeneous distribution of SiC nanoparticles were observed in the matrix • Compressive and hardness properties of the composite are improved significantly. -- Abstract: Al{sub 2024} alloy was reinforced with silicon carbide nanoparticles (SiC{sub NP}), whose concentration was varied in the range from 0 to 5 wt.%; some composites were synthesized with the mechanical milling (MM) process. Structure and microstructure of the consolidated samples were studied by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy, while mechanical properties were investigated by compressive tests and hardness measurements. The microstructural evidence shows that SiC{sub NP} were homogeneously dispersed into the Al{sub 2024} alloy using high-energy MM after 2 h of processing. On the other hand, an increase of the mechanical properties (yield stress, maximum strength and hardness) was observed in the synthesized composites as a direct function of the SiC{sub NP} content. In this research several strengthening mechanisms were observed, but the main was the obstruction of dislocations movement by the addition of SiC{sub NP}.

  11. Tensile Mechanical Properties and Strengthening Mechanism of Hybrid Carbon Nanotube and Silicon Carbide Nanoparticle-Reinforced Magnesium Alloy Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Zhou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available AZ91 magnesium alloy hybrid composites reinforced with different hybrid ratios of carbon nanotubes (CNTs and silicon carbide (SiC nanoparticulates were fabricated by semisolid stirring assisted ultrasonic cavitation. The results showed that grains of the matrix in the AZ91/(CNT + SiC composites were obviously refined after adding hybrid CNTs and SiC nanoparticles to the AZ91 alloy, and the room-temperature mechanical properties of AZ91/(CNT + SiC hybrid composites were improved comparing with the unreinforced AZ91 matrix. In addition, the tensile mechanical properties of the AZ91 alloy-based hybrid composites were considerably improved at the mass hybrid ratio of 7 : 3 for CNTs and SiC nanoparticles; in particular, the tensile and yield strength were increased, respectively, by about 45 and 55% after gravity permanent mould casting. The reason for an increase in the room-temperature strength of the hybrid composites should be mainly attributable to the larger hybrid ratio of CNTs and SiC nanoparticles, the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE mismatch between matrix and hybrid reinforcements, the dispersive strengthening effects (Orowan strengthening, and the grain refining (Hall-Petch effect.

  12. Dispersion of silicon carbide nanoparticles in a AA2024 aluminum alloy by a high-energy ball mill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Synthesis of 2024-SiCNP nanocomposite by mechanical milling process. • SiC nanoparticles improved mechanical properties of aluminum alloy 2024 matrix. • A homogeneous distribution of SiC nanoparticles were observed in the matrix • Compressive and hardness properties of the composite are improved significantly. -- Abstract: Al2024 alloy was reinforced with silicon carbide nanoparticles (SiCNP), whose concentration was varied in the range from 0 to 5 wt.%; some composites were synthesized with the mechanical milling (MM) process. Structure and microstructure of the consolidated samples were studied by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy, while mechanical properties were investigated by compressive tests and hardness measurements. The microstructural evidence shows that SiCNP were homogeneously dispersed into the Al2024 alloy using high-energy MM after 2 h of processing. On the other hand, an increase of the mechanical properties (yield stress, maximum strength and hardness) was observed in the synthesized composites as a direct function of the SiCNP content. In this research several strengthening mechanisms were observed, but the main was the obstruction of dislocations movement by the addition of SiCNP

  13. Comparative evaluation of particle properties, formation of reactive oxygen species and genotoxic potential of tungsten carbide based nanoparticles in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuehnel, Dana, E-mail: dana.kuehnel@ufz.de [Department of Bioanalytical Ecotoxicology, Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research Leipzig - UFZ, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Scheffler, Katja [Department of Bioanalytical Ecotoxicology, Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research Leipzig - UFZ, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Department of Cell Techniques and Applied Stem Cell Biology, University of Leipzig, Deutscher Platz 5, 04103 Leipzig (Germany); Wellner, Peggy [Department of Bioanalytical Ecotoxicology, Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research Leipzig - UFZ, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Meissner, Tobias; Potthoff, Annegret [Fraunhofer-Institute for Ceramic Technologies and Systems (IKTS), Winterbergstr. 28, 01277 Dresden (Germany); Busch, Wibke [Department of Bioanalytical Ecotoxicology, Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research Leipzig - UFZ, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Springer, Armin [Centre for Translational Bone, Cartilage and Soft Tissue Research, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technical University Dresden, Fetscherstrasse 74, 01307 Dresden (Germany); Schirmer, Kristin [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, 8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); EPF Lausanne, School of Architecture, Civil and Environmental Engineering, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); ETH Zuerich, Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollutant Dynamics, 8092 Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Assessment of toxic potential of tungsten carbide-based nanoparticles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Evaluation of ROS and micronuclei induction of three hard metal nanomaterials. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dependency of observed toxic effects on the materials physical-chemical properties. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differences in several particle properties seem to modulate the biological response. - Abstract: Tungsten carbide (WC) and cobalt (Co) are constituents of hard metals and are used for the production of extremely hard tools. Previous studies have identified greater cytotoxic potential of WC-based nanoparticles if particles contained Co. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and micronuclei would help explain the impact on cultured mammalian cells by three different tungsten-based nanoparticles (WC{sub S}, WC{sub L}, WC{sub L}-Co (S: small; L: large)). The selection of particles allowed us to study the influence of particle properties, e.g. surface area, and the presence of Co on the toxicological results. WC{sub S} and WC{sub L}/WC{sub L}-Co differed in their crystalline structure and surface area, whereas WC{sub S}/WC{sub L} and WC{sub L}-Co differed in their cobalt content. WC{sub L} and WC{sub L}-Co showed neither a genotoxic potential nor ROS induction. Contrary to that, WC{sub S} nanoparticles induced the formation of both ROS and micronuclei. CoCl{sub 2} was tested in relevant concentrations and induced no ROS formation, but increased the rate of micronuclei at concentrations exceeding those present in WC{sub L}-Co. In conclusion, ROS and micronuclei formation could not be associated with the presence of Co in the WC-based particles. The contrasting responses elicited by WC{sub S} vs. WC{sub L} appear to be due to large differences in crystalline structure.

  14. Stability and electronic structure of iron nanoparticle anchored on defective hexagonal boron nitrogen nanosheet: A first-principle study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Fe13 nanoparticle strongly interacts with the monovacancy of h-BN nanosheet. • Significant charges are transferred from Fe13 to the defective h-BN nanosheet. • The upshift of d-band center makes the surface Fe atoms of supported Fe13 with higher reactivity. - Abstract: By first-principle methods, we investigate the stability and electronic structures of Fe13 nanoparticles anchored on hexagonal boron nitrogen nanosheets (h-BNNSs) with monovacancy defect sites. It is found that the defect sites such as boron and nitrogen vacancy significantly increase the adsorption energies of Fe13, suggesting that the supported Fe13 nanoparticles should be very stable against sintering at high temperatures. From the calculated density of states, we testify that the strong interaction is attributed to the coupling between the 3d orbitals of Fe atoms with the sp2 dangling bonds at the defect sites. The Bader charge and differential charge density analyses reveal that there is significant charge redistribution at the interface between Fe13 and the substrates, leading to positive charges located on most of the Fe atoms. Additionally, our results show that the strong binding of the nanoparticle results in the upshift of d-band center of Fe13 toward the Fermi level, thus making the surface Fe atoms with higher reactivity. This work gives a detailed understanding the interaction between Fe13 nanoparticle and defective h-BNNS and will provide helpful instructions in the design and synthesis of supported Fe-based catalysts in heterogeneous catalysis

  15. Optical-optical double resonance, laser induced fluorescence, and revision of the signs of the spin-spin constants of the boron carbide (BC) free radical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunahori, Fumie X.; Nagarajan, Ramya; Clouthier, Dennis J.

    2015-12-01

    The cold boron carbide free radical (BC X 4Σ-) has been produced in a pulsed discharge free jet expansion using a precursor mixture of trimethylborane in high pressure argon. High resolution laser induced fluorescence spectra have been obtained for the B 4Σ--X 4Σ- and E 4Π-X 4Σ- band systems of both 11BC and 10BC. An optical-optical double resonance (OODR) scheme was implemented to study the finer details of both band systems. This involved pumping a single rotational level of the B state with one laser and then recording the various allowed transitions from the intermediate B state to the final E state with a second laser by monitoring the subsequent E-X ultraviolet fluorescence. In this fashion, we were able to prove unambiguously that, contrary to previous studies, the spin-spin constant λ is negative in the ground state and positive in the B 4Σ- excited state. It has been shown that λ″ < 0 is in fact expected based on a semiempirical second order perturbation theory calculation of the magnitude of the spin-spin constant. The OODR spectra have also been used to validate our assignments of the complex and badly overlapped E 4Π-X 4Σ- 0-0 and 1-0 bands of 11BC. The E-X 0-0 band of 10BC was found to be severely perturbed. The ground state main electron configuration is …3σ24σ25σ11π22π0 and the derived bond lengths show that there is a 0.03 Å contraction in the B state, due to the promotion of an electron from the 4σ antibonding orbital to the 5σ bonding orbital. In contrast, the bond length elongates by 0.15 Å in the E state, a result of promoting an electron from the 5σ bonding orbital to the 2π antibonding orbitals.

  16. Heat flux calculation and problem of flaking of boron carbide coatings on the Faraday screen of the ICRH antennas during Tore Supra high power, long pulse operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corre, Y., E-mail: yann.corre@cea.fr [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Lipa, M. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Agarici, G. [Fusion for Energy, C/Josep Pla 2, 08019 Barcelona (Spain); Basiuk, V.; Colas, L.; Courtois, X.; Dunand, G.; Dumont, R.; Ekedahl, A. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Gardarein, J.-L. [IUSTI UMR-CNRS 65-95. Universite de Provence, Marseille (France); Klepper, C.C. [USA ORNL, Fusion Energy Division, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6169 (United States); Martin, V.; Moncada, V.; Portafaix, C. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Rigollet, F. [IUSTI UMR-CNRS 65-95. Universite de Provence, Marseille (France); Tawizgant, R.; Travere, J.-M.; Vulliez, K. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: > We summarize the problem of flaking of the B{sub 4}C coatings in the scope of PFC protection with infrared Real Time Control safety system, during high ICRH power, long discharge operation in the Tore Supra tokamak > We compute the heat flux deposited by fast ions on the Faraday screen of the ICRH antennas > The heat loads attributed to fast ions are evaluated during fundamental hydrogen minority (B = 3.7 T) and second harmonic (B = 2 T) ICRH heating scenarios > We investigate the safety margin to critical heat flux and number of fatigue cycles under heat load for the two heating scenarios. - Abstract: Reliable and repetitive high power and long pulse tokamak operation is strongly dependant of the ability to secure the Plasma Facing Components (PFCs). In Tore Supra, a network of 7 infrared (IR) video cameras is routinely used to prevent PFCs overheating and damage in selected regions. Real time feedback control and offline analysis are essential for basic protection and understanding of abnormal thermal events. One important limitation detected by the IR real time feed-back loop during high power RF operation (injected power of 9.5 MW over 26 s and 12 MW over 10 s have been achieved respectively in 2006 and 2008) is due to the interaction between fast ions which increase the power flux density and flaking of the boron carbide coatings on the Faraday screen box of the ICRH antennas. An IR-based experimental procedure is proposed in order to detect new flakes during plasma operation. The thermal response of the B{sub 4}C coating is studied with and without flaking during plasma operation. The experimental heat flux deposited by fast ion losses on the Faraday screen is calculated for high (3.8 T) and low magnetic field (2 T) during high RF power operation (with fundamental hydrogen minority and second harmonic ICRH heating schemes respectively). The paper addresses both thermal science issues applied to machine protection and limitation due to fast ions

  17. Heat flux calculation and problem of flaking of boron carbide coatings on the Faraday screen of the ICRH antennas during Tore Supra high power, long pulse operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → We summarize the problem of flaking of the B4C coatings in the scope of PFC protection with infrared Real Time Control safety system, during high ICRH power, long discharge operation in the Tore Supra tokamak → We compute the heat flux deposited by fast ions on the Faraday screen of the ICRH antennas → The heat loads attributed to fast ions are evaluated during fundamental hydrogen minority (B = 3.7 T) and second harmonic (B = 2 T) ICRH heating scenarios → We investigate the safety margin to critical heat flux and number of fatigue cycles under heat load for the two heating scenarios. - Abstract: Reliable and repetitive high power and long pulse tokamak operation is strongly dependant of the ability to secure the Plasma Facing Components (PFCs). In Tore Supra, a network of 7 infrared (IR) video cameras is routinely used to prevent PFCs overheating and damage in selected regions. Real time feedback control and offline analysis are essential for basic protection and understanding of abnormal thermal events. One important limitation detected by the IR real time feed-back loop during high power RF operation (injected power of 9.5 MW over 26 s and 12 MW over 10 s have been achieved respectively in 2006 and 2008) is due to the interaction between fast ions which increase the power flux density and flaking of the boron carbide coatings on the Faraday screen box of the ICRH antennas. An IR-based experimental procedure is proposed in order to detect new flakes during plasma operation. The thermal response of the B4C coating is studied with and without flaking during plasma operation. The experimental heat flux deposited by fast ion losses on the Faraday screen is calculated for high (3.8 T) and low magnetic field (2 T) during high RF power operation (with fundamental hydrogen minority and second harmonic ICRH heating schemes respectively). The paper addresses both thermal science issues applied to machine protection and limitation due to fast ions

  18. Optical-optical double resonance, laser induced fluorescence, and revision of the signs of the spin-spin constants of the boron carbide (BC) free radical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cold boron carbide free radical (BC X 4Σ−) has been produced in a pulsed discharge free jet expansion using a precursor mixture of trimethylborane in high pressure argon. High resolution laser induced fluorescence spectra have been obtained for the B 4Σ−–X 4Σ− and E 4Π–X 4Σ− band systems of both 11BC and 10BC. An optical-optical double resonance (OODR) scheme was implemented to study the finer details of both band systems. This involved pumping a single rotational level of the B state with one laser and then recording the various allowed transitions from the intermediate B state to the final E state with a second laser by monitoring the subsequent E–X ultraviolet fluorescence. In this fashion, we were able to prove unambiguously that, contrary to previous studies, the spin-spin constant λ is negative in the ground state and positive in the B 4Σ− excited state. It has been shown that λ″ < 0 is in fact expected based on a semiempirical second order perturbation theory calculation of the magnitude of the spin-spin constant. The OODR spectra have also been used to validate our assignments of the complex and badly overlapped E 4Π–X 4Σ− 0-0 and 1-0 bands of 11BC. The E–X 0-0 band of 10BC was found to be severely perturbed. The ground state main electron configuration is …3σ24σ25σ11π22π0 and the derived bond lengths show that there is a 0.03 Å contraction in the B state, due to the promotion of an electron from the 4σ antibonding orbital to the 5σ bonding orbital. In contrast, the bond length elongates by 0.15 Å in the E state, a result of promoting an electron from the 5σ bonding orbital to the 2π antibonding orbitals

  19. Optical-optical double resonance, laser induced fluorescence, and revision of the signs of the spin-spin constants of the boron carbide (BC) free radical

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunahori, Fumie X. [Department of Chemistry and Physics, Franklin College, Franklin, Indiana 46131 (United States); Nagarajan, Ramya; Clouthier, Dennis J., E-mail: dclaser@uky.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506-0055 (United States)

    2015-12-14

    The cold boron carbide free radical (BC X {sup 4}Σ{sup −}) has been produced in a pulsed discharge free jet expansion using a precursor mixture of trimethylborane in high pressure argon. High resolution laser induced fluorescence spectra have been obtained for the B {sup 4}Σ{sup −}–X {sup 4}Σ{sup −} and E {sup 4}Π–X {sup 4}Σ{sup −} band systems of both {sup 11}BC and {sup 10}BC. An optical-optical double resonance (OODR) scheme was implemented to study the finer details of both band systems. This involved pumping a single rotational level of the B state with one laser and then recording the various allowed transitions from the intermediate B state to the final E state with a second laser by monitoring the subsequent E–X ultraviolet fluorescence. In this fashion, we were able to prove unambiguously that, contrary to previous studies, the spin-spin constant λ is negative in the ground state and positive in the B {sup 4}Σ{sup −} excited state. It has been shown that λ″ < 0 is in fact expected based on a semiempirical second order perturbation theory calculation of the magnitude of the spin-spin constant. The OODR spectra have also been used to validate our assignments of the complex and badly overlapped E {sup 4}Π–X {sup 4}Σ{sup −} 0-0 and 1-0 bands of {sup 11}BC. The E–X 0-0 band of {sup 10}BC was found to be severely perturbed. The ground state main electron configuration is …3σ{sup 2}4σ{sup 2}5σ{sup 1}1π{sup 2}2π{sup 0} and the derived bond lengths show that there is a 0.03 Å contraction in the B state, due to the promotion of an electron from the 4σ antibonding orbital to the 5σ bonding orbital. In contrast, the bond length elongates by 0.15 Å in the E state, a result of promoting an electron from the 5σ bonding orbital to the 2π antibonding orbitals.

  20. Van Hove singularities of some icosahedral boron-rich solids by differential reflectivity spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werheit, Helmut

    2015-09-01

    Differential reflectivity spectra of some icosahedral boron rich solids, β-rhombohedral boron, boron carbide and YB66-type crystals, were measured. The derivatives yield the van Hove singularities, which are compared with results obtained by other experimental methods.

  1. Silicon Carbide Nanoparticles Produced by CO2 Laser Pyrolysis of SiH4/C2H2 Gas Mixtures in a Flow Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulsed CO2-laser-induced decomposition of different mixtures of SiH4 and C2H2 in a flow reactor has been employed to produce silicon carbide clusters and nanoparticles with varying content of carbon. The as-synthesized species were extracted from the reaction zone by a conical nozzle and expanded into the source chamber of a cluster beam apparatus where, after having traversed a differential chamber, they were analyzed with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Thin films of silicon carbide nanoclusters were produced by depositing the clusters at low energy on potassium bromide and sapphire windows mounted into the differential chamber. At the same time, Si and SiC nanoparticles were collected in a filter placed into the exhaust line of the flow reactor. Both beam and powder samples were characterized by FTIR spectroscopy. The close resemblance of the spectra suggests that the composition of the beam and powder particles obtained during the same run is nearly identical. XRD spectroscopy could only be employed for the investigation of the powders. It was found that CO2 laser pyrolysis is ideally suited to produce silicon carbide nanoparticles with a high degree of crystallinity. Nanopowders produced from the pyrolysis of a stoichiometric (2:1) mixture of SiH4/C2H2 were found to contain particles or domains of pure silicon. The characteristic silicon features in the FTIR and XRD spectra, however, disappeared when C2H2 was applied in excess

  2. Pressureless sintered silicon carbide tailored with aluminium nitride sintering agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study reports the influence of aluminium nitride on the pressureless sintering of cubic phase silicon carbide nanoparticles (β-SiC). Pressureless sintering was achieved at 2000 degrees C for 5 min with the additions of boron carbide together with carbon of 1 wt% and 6 wt%, respectively, and a content of aluminium nitride between 0 and 10 wt%. Sintered samples present relative densities higher than 92%. The sintered microstructure was found to be greatly modified by the introduction of aluminium nitride, which reflects the influence of nitrogen on the β-SiC to α-SiC transformation. The toughness of sintered sample was not modified by AlN incorporation and is relatively low (around 2.5 MPa m1/2). Materials exhibited transgranular fracture mode, indicating a strong bonding between SiC grains. (authors)

  3. Synthesis of tantalum carbide and nitride nanoparticles using a reactive mesoporous template for electrochemical hydrogen evolution

    KAUST Repository

    Alhajri, Nawal Saad

    2013-01-01

    Tantalum carbide and nitride nanocrystals were prepared through the reaction of a tantalum precursor with mesoporous graphitic (mpg)-C 3N4. The effects of the reaction temperature, the ratio of the Ta precursor to the reactive template (mpg-C3N4), and the selection of the carrier gas (Ar, N2 and NH3) on the resultant crystal phases and structures were investigated. The produced samples were characterized using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), CHN elemental analyses, thermogravimetric analyses (TGA), nitrogen sorption, a temperature-programmed reaction with mass spectroscopy (MS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results indicate that the different tantalum phases with cubic structure, TaN, Ta2CN, and TaC, can be formed under a flow of nitrogen when formed at different temperatures. The Ta3N5 phase with a Ta5+ oxidation state was solely obtained at 1023 K under a flow of ammonia, which gasified the C 3N4 template and was confirmed by detecting the decomposed gaseous products via MS. Significantly, the formation of TaC, Ta2CN, and TaN can be controlled by altering the weight ratio of the C 3N4 template relative to the Ta precursor at 1573 K under a flow of nitrogen. The high C3N4/Ta precursor ratio generally resulted in high carbide content rather than a nitride one, consistent with the role of mpg-C3N4 as a carbon source. Electrochemical measurements revealed that the synthesized nanomaterials were consistently able to produce hydrogen under acidic conditions (pH 1). The obtained Tafel slope indicates that the rate-determining step is the Volmer discharge step, which is consistent with adsorbed hydrogen being weakly bound to the surface during electrocatalysis. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  4. Molybdenum Carbide Nanoparticles on Carbon Nanotubes and Carbon Xerogel: Low-Cost Cathodes for Hydrogen Production by Alkaline Water Electrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šljukić, Biljana; Santos, Diogo M F; Vujković, Milica; Amaral, Luís; Rocha, Raquel P; Sequeira, César A C; Figueiredo, José L

    2016-05-23

    Low-cost molybdenum carbide (Mo2 C) nanoparticles supported on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and on carbon xerogel (CXG) were prepared and their activity for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) was evaluated in 8 m KOH aqueous electrolyte at 25-85 °C. Measurements of the HER by linear scan voltammetry allowed us to determine Tafel slopes of 71 and 74 mV dec(-1) at 25 °C for Mo2 C/CNT and Mo2 C/CXG, respectively. Stability tests were also performed, which showed the steady performance of the two electrocatalysts. Moreover, the HER kinetics at Mo2 C/CNT was enhanced significantly after the long-term stability tests. The specific activity of both materials was high, and a higher stability was obtained for the activated Mo2 C/CNT (40 A g(-1) at -0.40 V vs. the reversible hydrogen electrode). PMID:27101476

  5. Genotoxicity of tungsten carbide-cobalt (WC-Co) nanoparticles in vitro: mechanisms-of-action studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moche, Hélène; Chevalier, Dany; Vezin, Hervé; Claude, Nancy; Lorge, Elisabeth; Nesslany, Fabrice

    2015-02-01

    We showed previously that tungsten carbide-cobalt (WC-Co) nanoparticles (NP) can be used as a nanoparticulate positive control in some in vitro mammalian genotoxicity assays. Here, we investigate the mechanisms of action involved in WC-Co NP genotoxicity in L5178Y mouse lymphoma cells and primary human lymphocytes, in vitro. Data from the micronucleus assay coupled with centromere staining and from the chromosome-aberration assay show the involvement of both clastogenic and aneugenic events. Experiments with the formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (FPG)-modified comet assay showed a slight (non-significant) increase in FPG-sensitive sites in the L5178Y mouse lymphoma cells but not in the human lymphocytes. Electron paramagnetic resonance spin-trapping results showed the presence of hydroxyl radicals (•OH) in WC-Co NP suspensions, with or without cells, but with time-dependent production in the presence of cells. However, a significant difference in •OH production was observed between human lymphocytes from two different donors. Using H2O2, we showed that WC-Co NP can participate in Fenton-like reactions. Thus, •OH might be produced either via intrinsic generation by WC-Co NP or through a Fenton-like reaction in the presence of cells. PMID:25813722

  6. Plasma synthesis of titanium nitride, carbide and carbonitride nanoparticles by means of reactive anodic arc evaporation from solid titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasma methods using the direct evaporation of a transition metal are well suited for the cost-efficient production of ceramic nanoparticles. In this paper, we report on the development of a simple setup for the production of titanium-ceramics by reactive anodic arc evaporation and the characterization of the aerosol as well as the nanopowder. It is the first report on TiCXN1 − X synthesis in a simple anodic arc plasma. By means of extensive variations of the gas composition, it is shown that the composition of the particles can be tuned from titanium nitride over a titanium carbonitride phase (TiCXN1 − X) to titanium carbide as proven by XRD data. The composition of the plasma gas especially a very low concentration of hydrocarbons around 0.2 % of the total plasma gas is crucial to tune the composition and to avoid the formation of free carbon. Examination of the particles by HR-TEM shows that the material consists mostly of cubic single crystalline particles with mean sizes between 8 and 27 nm

  7. Sintered silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sintered silicon carbide body having a predominantly equiaxed microstructure consists of 91 to 99.85% by weight of silicon carbide at least 95% of which is the alpha phase, up to 5.0% by weight carbonized organic material, 0.15 to 3.0% of boron, and up to 1.0% by weight additional carbon. A mixture of 91 to 99.85 parts by weight silicon carbide having a surface area of 1 to 100 m2/g, 0.67 to 20 parts of a carbonizable organic binder with a carbon content of at least 33% by weight, 0.15 to 5 parts of a boron source containing 0.15 to 3.0 parts by weight boron and up to 15 parts by weight of a temporary binder is mixed with a solvent, the mixture is then dried, shaped to give a body with a density of at least 1.60 g/cc and fired at 1900 to 22500C to obtain an equiaxed microstructure. (author)

  8. Controllable Fabrication of Tungsten Oxide Nanoparticles Confined in Graphene-Analogous Boron Nitride as an Efficient Desulfurization Catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Peiwen; Zhu, Wenshuai; Wei, Aimin; Dai, Bilian; Chao, Yanhong; Li, Changfeng; Li, Huaming; Dai, Sheng

    2015-10-19

    Tungsten oxide nanoparticles (WOx NPs) are gaining increasing attention, but low stabiliity and poor dispersion of WOx NPs hinder their catalytic applications. Herein, WOx NPs were confined in graphene-analogous boron nitride (g-BN) by a one-step, in situ method at high temperature, which can enhance the interactions between WOx NPs and the support and control the sizes of WOx NPs in a range of about 4-5 nm. The as-prepared catalysts were applied in catalytic oxidation of aromatic sulfur compounds in which they showed high catalytic activity. A balance between the W loading and the size distribution of the WOx NPs could govern the catalytic activity. Furthermore, a synergistic effect between g-BN and WOx NPs also contributed to high catalytic activity. The reaction mechanism is discussed in detail and the catalytic scope was enlarged. PMID:26350466

  9. Oxide or carbide nanoparticles synthesized by laser ablation of a bulk Hf target in liquids and their structural, optical, and dielectric properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semaltianos, N. G.; Friedt, J.-M.; Chassagnon, R.; Moutarlier, V.; Blondeau-Patissier, V.; Combe, G.; Assoul, M.; Monteil, G.

    2016-05-01

    Laser ablation of a bulk Hf target in deionized (DI) water, ethanol, or toluene was carried out for the production of nanoparticles' colloidal solutions. Due to the interaction of the ablation plasma plume species with the species which are produced by the liquid decomposition at the plume-liquid interface, hafnia (HfO2) nanoparticles are synthesized in DI water, hafnium carbide (HfC) nanoparticles in toluene, and a mixture of these in ethanol. The hafnia nanoparticles are in the monoclinic low temperature phase and in the tetragonal and fcc high temperature phases. Their size distribution follows log-normal function with a median diameter in the range of 4.3-5.3 nm. Nanoparticles synthesized in DI water have band gaps of 5.6 and 5.4 eV, in ethanol 5.72 and 5.65 eV (using low and high pulse energy), and in toluene 3 eV. The values for the relative permittivity in the range of 7.74-8.90 were measured for hafnia nanoparticles' thin films deposited on substrates by drop-casting (self-assembled layers) in parallel plate capacitor structures.

  10. MICROSTRUCTURE OF BORONIZED PM Cr-V COLD WORK LEDEBURITIC TOOL STEEL

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Jurči; Mária Hudáková

    2010-01-01

    The PM Vanadis 6 cold work tool steel has been boronized at various processing parameters, austenitized, quenched and tempered to a core hardness of 700 HV. Microstructure, phase constitution and microhardness of boronized layers were investigated. It was found that the boronized layers are of two-phase FeB/Fe2B constitution, with an addition of small portion of CrB. Below the boronized layer, intermediate region with elevated carbides ratio was developed. Boronized layers contain also carbid...

  11. Sintered boron, production and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microhardness HV, tensile properties and Young modulus of sintered boron of different porosity were studied. It was shown that with density growth tensile properties improve. HV and brittle-ductile transition temperature Tsub(b) of sintered boron on the one hand and for silicon and titanium carbide on the other were compared and discussed. It was noted that the general level of HV and Tsub(b) for boron is rather high and at similar relative temperatures these characteristics are much higher. Temperature dependences of linear expansion coefficient, thermal capacity, thermal and temperature conductivity of sintered boron of 20% porosity were studied. Gruneisen parameter was evaluated

  12. Method and device to synthesize boron nitride nanotubes and related nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zettl, Alexander K.

    2016-07-19

    Methods and apparatus for producing chemical nanostructures having multiple elements, such as boron and nitride, e.g. boron nitride nanotubes, are disclosed. The method comprises creating a plasma jet, or plume, such as by an arc discharge. The plasma plume is elongated and has a temperature gradient along its length. It extends along its length into a port connector area having ports for introduction of feed materials. The feed materials include the multiple elements, which are introduced separately as fluids or powders at multiple ports along the length of the plasma plume, said ports entering the plasma plume at different temperatures. The method further comprises modifying a temperature at a distal portion of or immediately downstream of said plasma plume; and collecting said chemical nanostructures after said modifying.

  13. Size-Dependent Electrocatalytic Activity of Gold Nanoparticles on HOPG and Highly Boron-Doped Diamond Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tine Brülle

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticles were prepared by electrochemical deposition on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG and boron-doped, epitaxial 100-oriented diamond layers. Using a potentiostatic double pulse technique, the average particle size was varied in the range from 5 nm to 30 nm in the case of HOPG as a support and between < 1 nm and 15 nm on diamond surfaces, while keeping the particle density constant. The distribution of particle sizes was very narrow, with standard deviations of around 20% on HOPG and around 30% on diamond. The electrocatalytic activity towards hydrogen evolution and oxygen reduction of these carbon supported gold nanoparticles in dependence of the particle sizes was investigated using cyclic voltammetry. For oxygen reduction the current density normalized to the gold surface (specific current density increased for decreasing particle size. In contrast, the specific current density of hydrogen evolution showed no dependence on particle size. For both reactions, no effect of the different carbon supports on electrocatalytic activity was observed.

  14. Preparation and characterization of Boron carbide nanoparticles for use as a novel agent in T cell-guided boron neutron capture therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, M. W.; Sørensen, P. G.; Björkdahl, O.;

    2006-01-01

    transmission electron microscopy, photon correlation spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, vibrational spectroscopy, gel electrophoresis and chemical assays and reveal profound changes in surface chemistry and structural characteristics. In vitro thermal neutron irradiation of B16...

  15. Preparation of Polycrystalline Cubic Boron Nitride Compact by Cemented Carbide High-Pressure Infiltration%硬质合金高压熔渗制备聚晶立方氮化硼复合片

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾洪声; 鄂元龙; 李海波; 汪尹强; 贾晓鹏; 马红安; 郑友进

    2014-01-01

    Under high temperature and high pressure conditions (HPHT, 5.2GPa, 1450℃),homogeneous Polycrystalline Cubic Boron Nitride (PcBN)compact ofΦ15 × 5 mm has been synthesized through the cemented carbide high pressure in situ melting infil-tration method.The structure morphology and phase composition of PcBN compact has been investigated through scanning electron microscope (SEM),X-radial Diffractometer (XRD)and Energy Disperse Spectroscopy (EDS).It's mechanism of composite interface has also been discussed.The experiment result shows that the WC and Co in the cemen-ted carbide (WC-Co)substrate spread into Cubic Boron Nitride layer through melting in-filtration.And the binding phase of WC,MoCoB and Co3 W3 C facilitate the interface re-combination of the PcBN compact,hence a compact"concrete"structure has been formed on the PcBN layer.%在高温高压条件下(HPHT,5.2 GPa,1450℃),通过硬质合金基体的高压原位熔渗法,制备了质地均匀的Φ15×5 mm的聚晶立方氮化硼(PcBN)复合片。采用扫描电子显微镜(SEM)、X 射线衍射仪(XRD)、能谱仪(EDS)等考察了PcBN复合片的组织形貌及物相成分,并对其界面复合机理进行了探讨。实验结果表明,硬质合金(WC-Co)基体中 WC 及 Co 通过熔渗扩散到立方氮化硼(cBN)层,通过 WC、MoCoB、Co3 W3 C等粘结相,实现了PcBN复合片的界面复合,PcBN层形成致密的“混凝土”结构。

  16. Synthesis of IV-VI Transition Metal Carbide and Nitride Nanoparticles Using a Reactive Mesoporous Template for Electrochemical Hydrogen Evolution Reaction

    KAUST Repository

    Alhajri, Nawal Saad

    2016-01-01

    Interstitial carbides and nitrides of early transition metals in Groups IV-VI exhibit platinum-like behavior which makes them a promising candidate to replace noble metals in a wide variety of reactions. Most synthetic methods used to prepare these materials lead to bulk or micron size powder which limits their use in reactions in particular in catalytic applications. Attempts toward the production of transition metal carbide and nitride nanoparticles in a sustainable, simple and cheap manner have been rapidly increasing. In this thesis, a new approach was presented to prepare nano-scale transition metal carbides and nitrides of group IV-VI with a size as small as 3 nm through the reaction of transition metal precursor with mesoporous graphitic carbon nitride (mpg-C3N4) that not only provides confined spaces for nanoparticles formation but also acts as a chemical source of nitrogen and carbon. The produced nanoparticles were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), temperature-programmed reaction with mass spectroscopy (MS), CHN elemental analyses, thermogravimetric analyses (TGA), nitrogen sorption, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The effects of the reaction temperature, the ratio of the transition metal precursor to the reactive template (mpg-C3N4), and the selection of the carrier gas (Ar, N2, and NH3) on the resultant crystal phases and structures were investigated. The results indicated that different tantalum phases with cubic structure, TaN, Ta2CN, and TaC, can be formed under a flow of nitrogen by changing the reaction temperatures. Two forms of tantalum nitride, namely TaN and Ta3N5, were selectively formed under N2 and NH3 flow, respectively. Significantly, the formation of TaC, Ta2CN, and TaN can be controlled by altering the weight ratio of the C3N4 template relative to the Ta precursor at 1573 K under a flow of nitrogen where high C3N4/Ta precursor ratio generally resulted in high carbide

  17. Modifications of multi-wall carbon nanotubes with B-containing vapor and their effects on the properties of boron carbide matrix nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herth, S; Miranda, D; Doremus, R H; Siegel, R W

    2008-06-01

    Multi-wall carbon nanotubes were modified by heating them together with elemental boron powder. B4C crystals grew on the surfaces of the nanotubes, and electron diffraction patterns showed an orientation dependence of the surface B4C and the underlying carbon in the nanotubes. There was no reaction of the nanotubes with solid B2O3 alone. Composites of the modified nanotubes in a B4C matrix showed a small increase of density over sintered B4C. PMID:18681054

  18. Synthesis and characterization of carbon or/and boron-doped CdS nanoparticles and investigation of optical and photoluminescence properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Un-doped and carbon or/and boron doped Cadmium sulfide nanoparticles were prepared via chemical co-precipitation procedure by Polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) as a stabilizer. The optical and structural properties were investigated using several techniques. The morphology of CdS nanophotocatalyst was characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy. The optical properties of both un-doped and doped samples were carried out by photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy and UV–vis Diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS). An optimum doping level of the atoms dopant for enhanced PL properties are found through optical study. Degradation of Amoxicillin under UV light elucidation was applied to appraise the photocatalytic efficiency. The results show that the carbon and boron doping CdS nanoparticles has high potential in green chemistry. - Highlights: • Un-doped, C or/and B-doped CdS nanoparticles were successfully synthesized. • The Blue shift was observed in UV–vis absorption spectra for the doped nanoparticles. • Doping of CdS with C and B enhances the fluorescence

  19. Synthesis and characterization of carbon or/and boron-doped CdS nanoparticles and investigation of optical and photoluminescence properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fakhri, Ali, E-mail: ali.fakhri88@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Shahr-e-Qods Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Young Researchers and Elite Club, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khakpour, Reza [Department of Physics, Tehran North Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    Un-doped and carbon or/and boron doped Cadmium sulfide nanoparticles were prepared via chemical co-precipitation procedure by Polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) as a stabilizer. The optical and structural properties were investigated using several techniques. The morphology of CdS nanophotocatalyst was characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy. The optical properties of both un-doped and doped samples were carried out by photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy and UV–vis Diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS). An optimum doping level of the atoms dopant for enhanced PL properties are found through optical study. Degradation of Amoxicillin under UV light elucidation was applied to appraise the photocatalytic efficiency. The results show that the carbon and boron doping CdS nanoparticles has high potential in green chemistry. - Highlights: • Un-doped, C or/and B-doped CdS nanoparticles were successfully synthesized. • The Blue shift was observed in UV–vis absorption spectra for the doped nanoparticles. • Doping of CdS with C and B enhances the fluorescence.

  20. Crystallography, semiconductivity, thermoelectricity, and other properties of boron and its compounds, especially B6O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slack, G. A.; Morgan, K. E.

    2015-09-01

    Electron deficient and non-deficient boron compounds are discussed as potential thermoelectric generator materials. Particular attention is paid to carbon-doped beta-boron, high-carbon boron carbide, and the alpha-boron derivative compound boron suboxide. Stoichiometric B6O shows some promise, and may have a higher ZT than the other two compounds. Carbon saturated beta-boron appears to have a higher ZT than undoped samples. Carbon saturated boron carbide at B12C3 does exist. Its thermoelectric behavior is unknown.

  1. Fabrication of boron-phosphide neutron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron phosphide is a potentially viable candidate for high neutron flux neutron detectors. The authors have explored chemical vapor deposition methods to produce such detectors and have not been able to produce good boron phosphide coatings on silicon carbide substrates. However, semi-conducting quality films have been produced. Further testing is required

  2. Ternary rare earth metal boride carbides containing two-dimensional boron-carbon network: The crystal and electronic structure of R2B4C (R=Tb, Dy, Ho, Er)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ternary rare earth boride carbides R2B4C (R=Tb, Dy, Ho, Er) have been synthesized by reacting the elements at temperatures between 1800 and 2000K. The crystal structure of Dy2B4C has been determined from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data. It crystallizes in a new structure type in the orthorhombic space group Immm (a=3.2772(6) A, b=6.567(2) A, c=7.542(1) A, Z=2, R1=0.035 (wR2=0.10) for 224 reflections with Io>2σ(Io)). Boron atoms form infinite chains of fused B6 rings in [100] joined with carbon atoms into planar, two-dimensional networks which alternate with planar sheets of rare earth metal atoms. The electronic structure of Dy2B4C was also analyzed using the tight-binding extended Hueckel method. - Graphical abstract: Dy2B4C crystallizes a new structure type where planar 63-Dy metal atom layers alternate with planar non-metal layers consisting of ribbons of fused B6 hexagons bridged by carbon atoms. Isostructural analogues with Tb, Ho and Er have also been characterized

  3. Boronate Affinity Fluorescent Nanoparticles for Förster Resonance Energy Transfer Inhibition Assay of cis-Diol Biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuangshou; Ye, Jin; Li, Xinglin; Liu, Zhen

    2016-05-17

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) has been essential for many applications, in which an appropriate donor-acceptor pair is the key. Traditional dye-to-dye combinations remain the working horses but are rather nonspecifically susceptive to environmental factors (such as ionic strength, pH, oxygen, etc.). Besides, to obtain desired selectivity, functionalization of the donor or acceptor is essential but usually tedious. Herein, we present fluorescent poly(m-aminophenylboronic acid) nanoparticles (poly(mAPBA) NPs) synthesized via a simple procedure and demonstrate a FRET scheme with suppressed environmental effects for the selective sensing of cis-diol biomolecules. The NPs exhibited stable fluorescence properties, resistance to environmental factors, and a Förster distance comparable size, making them ideal donor for FRET applications. By using poly(mAPBA) NPs and adenosine 5'-monophosphate modified graphene oxide (AMP-GO) as a donor and an acceptor, respectively, an environmental effects-suppressed boronate affinity-mediated FRET system was established. The fluorescence of poly(mAPBA) NPs was quenched by AMP-GO while it was restored when a competing cis-diol compounds was present. The FRET system exhibited excellent selectivity and improved sensitivity toward cis-diol compounds. Quantitative inhibition assay of glucose in human serum was demonstrated. As many cis-diol compounds such as sugars and glycoproteins are biologically and clinically significant, the FRET scheme presented herein could find more promising applications. PMID:27089186

  4. Agglomeration of tungsten carbide nanoparticles in exposure medium does not prevent uptake and toxicity toward a rainbow trout gill cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühnel, Dana; Busch, Wibke; Meissner, Tobias; Springer, Armin; Potthoff, Annegret; Richter, Volkmar; Gelinsky, Michael; Scholz, Stefan; Schirmer, Kristin

    2009-06-28

    Due to their increased production and use, engineered nanoparticles are expected to be released into the aquatic environment where particles may agglomerate. The aim of this study was to explore the role of agglomeration of nanoparticles in the uptake and expression of toxicity in the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) gill cell line, RTgill-W1. This cell line was chosen as model because it is known to be amenable to culture in complete as well as greatly simplified exposure media. Nano-sized tungsten carbide (WC) with or without cobalt doping (WC-Co), two materials relevant in the heavy metal industry, were applied as model particles. These particles were suspended in culture media with decreasing complexity from L15 with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) to L15 to L15/ex, containing only salts, galactose and pyruvate of the complete medium L15. Whereas the serum supplement in L15 retained primary nanoparticle suspensions, agglomerates were formed quickly in L15 and L15/ex. Nevertheless, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) elemental analysis revealed an uptake of both WC and WC-Co nanoparticles into RTgill-W1 cells irrespective of the state of agglomeration of nanoparticles. The localisation seemed to be restricted to the cytoplasm, as no particles were observed in the nucleus of cells. Moreover, reduction in cell viability between 10 and 50% compared to controls were observed upon particle exposure in all media although the pattern of impact varied depending on the medium and exposure time. Short-term exposure of cells led to significant cytotoxicity at the highest nominal particle concentrations, irrespective of the particle type or exposure medium. In contrast, long-term exposures led to preferential toxicity in the simplest medium, L15/ex, and an enhanced toxicity by the cobalt-containing WC nanoparticles in all exposure media. The composition of the exposure media also influenced the toxicity of the cobalt ions, which may

  5. Agglomeration of tungsten carbide nanoparticles in exposure medium does not prevent uptake and toxicity toward a rainbow trout gill cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to their increased production and use, engineered nanoparticles are expected to be released into the aquatic environment where particles may agglomerate. The aim of this study was to explore the role of agglomeration of nanoparticles in the uptake and expression of toxicity in the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) gill cell line, RTgill-W1. This cell line was chosen as model because it is known to be amenable to culture in complete as well as greatly simplified exposure media. Nano-sized tungsten carbide (WC) with or without cobalt doping (WC-Co), two materials relevant in the heavy metal industry, were applied as model particles. These particles were suspended in culture media with decreasing complexity from L15 with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) to L15 to L15/ex, containing only salts, galactose and pyruvate of the complete medium L15. Whereas the serum supplement in L15 retained primary nanoparticle suspensions, agglomerates were formed quickly in L15 and L15/ex. Nevertheless, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) elemental analysis revealed an uptake of both WC and WC-Co nanoparticles into RTgill-W1 cells irrespective of the state of agglomeration of nanoparticles. The localisation seemed to be restricted to the cytoplasm, as no particles were observed in the nucleus of cells. Moreover, reduction in cell viability between 10 and 50% compared to controls were observed upon particle exposure in all media although the pattern of impact varied depending on the medium and exposure time. Short-term exposure of cells led to significant cytotoxicity at the highest nominal particle concentrations, irrespective of the particle type or exposure medium. In contrast, long-term exposures led to preferential toxicity in the simplest medium, L15/ex, and an enhanced toxicity by the cobalt-containing WC nanoparticles in all exposure media. The composition of the exposure media also influenced the toxicity of the cobalt ions, which may

  6. Electrolyte influence on the Cu nanoparticles electrodeposition onto boron doped diamond electrode; Influencia do eletrolito na eletrodeposicao de nanoparticulas de Cu sobre eletrodo de diamante dopado com boro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsushima, Jorge Tadao; Santos, Laura Camila Diniz; Couto, Andrea Boldarini; Baldan, Mauricio Ribeiro; Ferreira, Neidenei Gomes [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents the electrolyte influence on deposition and dissolution processes of Cu nanoparticles on boron doped diamond electrodes (DDB). Morphological, structural and electrochemical analysis showed BDD films with good reproducibility, quality and reversible in a specific redox system. Electrodeposition of Cu nanoparticles on DDB electrodes in three different solutions was influenced by pH and ionic strength of the electrolytic medium. Analyzing the process as function of the scan rate, it was verified a better efficiency in 0,5 mol L{sup -1} Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution. Under the influence of the pH and ionic strength, Cu nanoparticles on DDB may be obtained with different morphologies and it was important for defining the desired properties. (author)

  7. Undoped and boron doped diamond nanoparticles as platinum and platinum-ruthenium catalyst support for direct methanol fuel cell application

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Torre Riveros, Lyda

    Nanoparticular diamond is a promising material that can be used as a robust and chemically stable catalytic support. It has been studied and characterized physically and electrochemically, in its powder and thin film forms. This thesis work intends to demonstrate that undoped diamond nanoparticles (DNPs) and boron-doped diamond nanoparticles (BDDNPs) can be used as an electrode and a catalytic support material for platinum and ruthenium catalysts. The electrochemical properties of diamond nanoparticle electrodes, fabricated using the ink paste method, were investigated. As an initial step, we carried out chemical purification of commercially available undoped DNPs by refluxing in aqueous HNO3 as well as of BDDNPs which were doped through a collaborative work with the University of Missouri. The purified material was characterized by spectroscopic and surface science techniques. The reversibility of reactions such as ferricyanide/ferrocyanide (Fe(CN) 63-/Fe(CN)64-) and hexaamineruthenium (III) chloride complexes as redox probes were evaluated by cyclic voltammetry at the undoped DNPs and BDDNPs surface. These redox probes showed limited peak currents and presented linear relationships between current (i) and the square root of the potential scan rate (v1/2). However, compared to conventional electrodes, the peak currents were smaller. BDDNPs show an improvement in charge transfer currents when compared to undoped DNPs. Platinum and ruthenium nanoparticles were chemically deposited on undoped DNPs and BDDNPs through the use of the excess of a mild reducing agent such NaBH4. In order to improve the nanoparticle dispersion sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS), a surfactant agent, was used. Percentages of platinum and ruthenium metals were varied as well as the stoichiometric amount of the reducing agent to determine adequate parameters for optimum performance in methanol oxidation. Both before and after the reducing process the samples were characterized by scanning

  8. Pollutant capturing SERS substrate: porous boron nitride microfibers with uniform silver nanoparticle decoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Pengcheng; Xue, Yanming; Wang, Xuebin; Weng, Qunhong; Zhang, Chao; Jiang, Xiangfen; Tang, Daiming; Wang, Xi; Kawamoto, Naoyuki; Ide, Yusuke; Mitome, Masanori; Golberg, Dmitri; Bando, Yoshio

    2015-11-01

    How to concentrate target molecules on the surface of a SERS substrate is a key problem in the practical application of SERS. Herein, we designed for the first time a pollutant capturing surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) substrate, namely porous BN microfibers uniformly decorated with Ag nanoparticles, in which the BN microfibers adsorb pollutants, while the Ag nanoparticles provide SERS activity. This SERS substrate captures pollutants from an aqueous solution completely and accumulates them all on its surface without introducing noise signals. The pores of BN protect the silver particles from aggregation which makes BN/Ag a stable and recyclable SERS substrate. What's more, while the dyes are thoroughly concentrated from a diluted solution, the SERS detection limit is easily enhanced, from 10-6 M to 10-9 M.How to concentrate target molecules on the surface of a SERS substrate is a key problem in the practical application of SERS. Herein, we designed for the first time a pollutant capturing surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) substrate, namely porous BN microfibers uniformly decorated with Ag nanoparticles, in which the BN microfibers adsorb pollutants, while the Ag nanoparticles provide SERS activity. This SERS substrate captures pollutants from an aqueous solution completely and accumulates them all on its surface without introducing noise signals. The pores of BN protect the silver particles from aggregation which makes BN/Ag a stable and recyclable SERS substrate. What's more, while the dyes are thoroughly concentrated from a diluted solution, the SERS detection limit is easily enhanced, from 10-6 M to 10-9 M. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr05625j

  9. Designing nanoscale constructs from atomic thin sheets of graphene, boron nitride and gold nanoparticles for advanced material applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasuja, Kabeer

    2011-12-01

    Nanoscale materials invite immense interest from diverse scientific disciplines as these provide access to precisely understand the physical world at their most fundamental atomic level. In concert with this aim of enhancing our understanding of the fundamental behavior at nanoscale, this dissertation presents research on three nanomaterials: Gold nanoparticles (GNPs), Graphene and ultra-thin Boron Nitride sheets (UTBNSs). The three-fold goals which drive this research are: incorporating mobility in nanoparticle based single-electron junction constructs, developing effective strategies to functionalize graphene with nano-forms of metal, and exfoliating ultrathin sheets of Boron Nitride. Gold nanoparticle based electronic constructs can achieve a new degree of operational freedom if nanoscale mobility is incorporated in their design. We achieved such a nano-electromechanical construct by incorporating elastic polymer molecules between GNPs to form 2-dimensional (2-D) molecular junctions which show a nanoscale reversible motion on applying macro scale forces. This GNP-polymer assembly works like a molecular spring opening avenues to maneuver nano components and store energy at nano-scale. Graphene is the first isolated nanomaterial that displays single-atom thickness. It exhibits quantum confinement that enables it to possess a unique combination of fascinating electronic, optical, and mechanical properties. Modifying the surface of graphene is extremely significant to enable its incorporation into applications of interest. We demonstrated the ability of chemically modified graphene sheets to act as GNP stabilizing templates in solution, and utilized this to process GNP composites of graphene. We discovered that GNPs synthesized by chemical or microwave reduction stabilize on graphene-oxide sheets to form snow-flake morphologies and bare-surfaces respectively. These hybrid nano constructs were extensively studied to understand the effect and nature of GNPs

  10. Comparative study of the photocatalytic performance of boron-iron Co-doped and boron-doped TiO2 nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of nanosized boron-doped and boron-iron co-doped anatase TiO2 represented as Bx,Fey-TiO2 (x = 1, 3, 5, y = 0, 0.5, 1, 3, 5 in wt%) were synthesized by a modified sol-gel method, and characterized by various spectroscopic and analytical techniques. The presence of boron and/or iron causes a red shift in the absorption band of TiO2. The Bx,Fey-TiO2 systems are very effective catalysts for the degradation of toluene under UV or visible light. All reactions follow pseudo-first-order kinetics with the rate being a function of either the dopants or the light source (UV or visible light). The relative quantity and most importantly the position occupied by dopant were found to be the crucial factors in co-doping with respect to the properties and activity of the final product. In general, boron-doping enhances the reactivity while iron-doping works in an opposite manner, thus to show the following order of reactivity regardless of the light source: Bx-TiO2 > TiO2 > Bx,Fey-TiO2. Under the visible light, however, a reversal in this trend is made depending on the relative amount of iron. Thus, for instance, when y ≤ 5, the trend becomes as follows: Bx-TiO2 > Bx,Fey-TiO2 > TiO2

  11. The effect of particle size on the formation and structure of carbide-derived carbon on β-SiC nanoparticles by reaction with chlorine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbide-derived carbon (CDC) coatings were produced by reaction with pure chlorine gas on the surface of β-SiC nanoparticles. Various CDC thicknesses were obtained using moderate temperatures (565-635 degrees C) associated with a short time (30 min) of chlorination under atmospheric pressure. Such conditions enable controlled layer-by-layer silicon extraction from SiC material. Kinetics of CDC formation were assessed using three SiC laser pyrolysis-produced nano-powders of different average size. Under the same conditions, the smallest particle size material is more prone to chlorination and exhibits a thicker carbon coating. Effect of particle size distribution on reactivity with chlorine is also discussed. After achieving carbide to carbon partial conversion, tem observations show good covering and adherent carbon coatings on remaining SiC material, N2 adsorption analysis show that CDC coating is microporous and has a specific surface area exceeding 1000 m2.g-1. Thermogravimetric analysis coupled with mass spectroscopy under He gas flow, is used to determine the thermal stability and the nature of volatile species trapped in the micro-porosity. Under an O2 gas flow, the amount of CDC formed is measured by burning it off at temperatures of 400-750 degrees C, before the onset of oxidation of the remaining SiC. (authors)

  12. Effective performance for undoped and boron-doped double-layered nanoparticles-copper telluride and manganese telluride on tungsten oxide photoelectrodes for solar cell devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srathongluan, Pornpimol; Vailikhit, Veeramol; Teesetsopon, Pichanan; Choopun, Supab; Tubtimtae, Auttasit

    2016-11-01

    This work demonstrates the synthesis of a novel double-layered Cu2-xTe/MnTe structure on a WO3 photoelectrode as a solar absorber for photovoltaic devices. Each material absorber is synthesized using a successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method. The synthesized individual particle sizes are Cu2-xTe(17) ∼5-10nm and MnTe(3) ∼2nm, whereas, the aggregated particle sizes of undoped and boron-doped Cu2-xTe(17)/MnTe(11) are ∼50 and 150nm, respectively. The larger size after doping is due to the interconnecting of nanoparticles as a network-like structure. A new alignment of the energy band is constructed after boron/MnTe(11) is coated on boron/Cu2-xTe nanoparticles (NPs), leading to a narrower Eg equal to 0.58eV. Then, the valence band maximum (VBM) and conduction band minimum (CBM) with a trap state are also up-shifted to near the CBM of WO3, leading to the shift of a Fermi level for ease of electron injection. The best efficiency of 1.41% was yielded for the WO3/boron-doped [Cu2-xTe(17)/MnTe(11)] structure with a photocurrent density (Jsc)=16.43mA/cm(2), an open-circuit voltage (Voc)=0.305V and a fill factor (FF)=28.1%. This work demonstrates the feasibility of this double-layered structure with doping material as a solar absorber material. PMID:27451035

  13. Superconducting RNi2B2C(R=Y,Lu) nanoparticles: size effects and weak links

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential of the arc discharge technique for the growth of complex nanocrystalline systems is demonstrated here with the formation of quaternary superconducting nanoparticles belonging to the recently discovered intermetallic boron carbide family RNi2B2C (R = Y, Lu). The nanoparticles, which were embedded in a glassy carbon matrix and had Tc - 15 K, are reported to exhibit magnetic behavior characterized by finite size effects and weak Josephson links between the particles. The formation and characterization of the nanoparticles are detailed. (orig.)

  14. Analysis of the phonon-polariton response of silicon carbide microparticles and nanoparticles by use of the boundary element method

    OpenAIRE

    Rockstuhl, Carsten; Salt, Martin Guy; Herzig, Hans-Peter

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the small-particle phonon-polariton response of several microstructures that are made of silicon carbide (SiC). Phonon polaritons can be excited in a wavelength region between 10 and 12 µm. Simple structures such as elliptical cylinders support phonon polaritons at two wavelengths, which depend on the axis ratio of the particle. In particles with a more irregular shape such as rectangular or triangular cylinders, up to five phonon polaritons can be excited. Through comparison o...

  15. Stereology of carbide phase in modified hypereutectic chromium cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Suchoń

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In paper are presented results of studies of carbide phase stereology modified hypereutectic wear resistance chromium cast iron which contains carbon about 3,5% and chromium about 25%. Three substances were applied to the modification: boron carbide (B4C, ferroniobium (FeNb and mixture of ferroniobium and rare-earth (RE. The measurements of geometrical features of carbides were conducted on microsection taken from castings wich were cooled with various velocities.

  16. Stereology of carbide phase in modified hypereutectic chromium cast iron

    OpenAIRE

    J. Suchoń; A. Studnicki; M. Przybył

    2010-01-01

    In paper are presented results of studies of carbide phase stereology modified hypereutectic wear resistance chromium cast iron which contains carbon about 3,5% and chromium about 25%. Three substances were applied to the modification: boron carbide (B4C), ferroniobium (FeNb) and mixture of ferroniobium and rare-earth (RE). The measurements of geometrical features of carbides were conducted on microsection taken from castings wich were cooled with various velocities.

  17. In vitro cellular responses to silicon carbide nanoparticles: impact of physico-chemical features on pro-inflammatory and pro-oxidative effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silicon carbide is an extremely hard, wear resistant, and thermally stable material with particular photoluminescence and interesting biocompatibility properties. For this reason, it is largely employed for industrial applications such as ceramics. More recently, nano-sized SiC particles were expected to enlarge their use in several fields such as composite supports, power electronics, biomaterials, etc. However, their large-scaled development is restricted by the potential toxicity of nanoparticles related to their manipulation and inhalation. This study aimed at synthesizing (by laser pyrolysis or sol–gel methods), characterizing physico-chemical properties of six samples of SiC nanopowders, then determining their in vitro biological impact(s). Using a macrophage cell line, toxicity was assessed in terms of cell membrane damage (LDH release), inflammatory effect (TNF-α production), and oxidative stress (reactive oxygen species generation). None of the six samples showed cytotoxicity while remarkable pro-oxidative reactions and inflammatory response were recorded, whose intensity appears related to the physico-chemical features of nano-sized SiC particles. In vitro data clearly showed an impact of the extent of nanoparticle surface area and the nature of crystalline phases (α-SiC vs. β-SiC) on the TNF-α production, a role of surface iron on free radical release, and of the oxidation state of the surface on cellular H2O2 production.

  18. Prediction of boron carbon nitrogen phase diagram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Sanxi; Zhang, Hantao; Widom, Michael

    We studied the phase diagram of boron, carbon and nitrogen, including the boron-carbon and boron-nitrogen binaries and the boron-carbon-nitrogen ternary. Based on the idea of electron counting and using a technique of mixing similar primitive cells, we constructed many ''electron precise'' structures. First principles calculation is performed on these structures, with either zero or high pressures. For the BN binary, our calculation confirms that a rhmobohedral phase can be stablized at high pressure, consistent with some experimental results. For the BCN ternary, a new ground state structure is discovered and an Ising-like phase transition is suggested. Moreover, we modeled BCN ternary phase diagram and show continuous solubility from boron carbide to the boron subnitride phase.

  19. A co-condensation model for in-flight synthesis of metal-carbide nanoparticles in thermal plasma jet

    OpenAIRE

    Vorobev, A.; Zikanov, O.; Mohanty, P.

    2008-01-01

    We present a theoretical analysis of the formation, growth, and transport of two-component nanoparticles in thermal plasma jet. The approach of the aerosol science and the idea of multicomponent co-condensation are employed for the analysis. The processes of homogeneous nucleation, heterogeneous growth, and coagulations due to Brownian collisions are considered in combination with the convective and diffusive transport of particles and the reacting gases within an axisymmetric domain. As a pa...

  20. Aqueously Dispersed Silver Nanoparticle-Decorated Boron Nitride Nanosheets for Reusable, Thermal Oxidation-Resistant Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi; Bunker, Christopher E.; Fernandos, K. A. Shiral; Connell, John W.

    2012-01-01

    The impurity-free aqueous dispersions of boron nitride nanosheets (BNNS) allowed the facile preparation of silver (Ag) nanoparticle-decorated BNNS by chemical reduction of an Ag salt with hydrazine in the presence of BNNS. The resultant Ag-BNNS nanohybrids remained dispersed in water, allowing convenient subsequent solution processing. By using substrate transfer techniques, Ag-BNNS nanohybrid thin film coatings on quartz substrates were prepared and evaluated as reusable surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) sensors that were robust against repeated solvent washing. In addition, because of the unique thermal oxidation-resistant properties of the BNNS, the sensor devices may be readily recycled by short-duration high temperature air oxidation to remove residual analyte molecules in repeated runs. The limiting factor associated with the thermal oxidation recycling process was the Ostwald ripening effect of Ag nanostructures.

  1. Stable iron carbide nanoparticle dispersions in [Emim][SCN] and [Emim][N(CN)2] ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, Varsha; Kraupner, Alexander; Mantion, Alexandre; Jelicić, Aleksandra; Thünemann, Andreas F; Giordano, Cristina; Taubert, Andreas

    2010-07-01

    Dispersions of Fe(3)C nanoparticles in several ionic liquids (ILs) have been investigated. The ILs are based on 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium [Emim] and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium [Bmim] cations. Anions are ethylsulfate [ES], methanesulfonate [MS], trifluoromethylsulfonate (triflate) [TfO], tetrafluoroborate [BF(4)], dicyanamide [N(CN)(2)], and thiocyanate [SCN]. Among the ILs studied, [Emim][SCN] and [Emim][N(CN)(2)] stand out because only in these ILs have stable and transparent nanoparticle dispersions been obtained. All other ILs lead to blackish, slightly turbid dispersions or to completely nontransparent suspensions, which often contain undispersed sediment. UV/vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray scattering suggest that the reason for the stabilization of the Fe(3)C nanoparticles in [Emim][SCN] is the leaching of traces of iron from the particles (without affecting the crystal structure of the Fe(3)C particles). The resulting particle surface is thus carbon-rich, which presumably favors the stabilization of the particles. A similar explanation can be postulated for [Emim][N(CN)(2)], with the dicyanamide anion also being a good ligand for iron. PMID:20426431

  2. Composition and microhardness of CAE boron nitride films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper deals with boron nitride produced by cathodic arc evaporation techniques.The films were applied on titanium and cemented carbide substrates. Their characterization was carried out using X-ray diffraction and Knoop microhardness tests. Demonstrated are the high properties of two-phase films, containing β (cubic) and γ (wurtzitic) modifications of boron nitride. (author). 7 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  3. Boriding with boron carbide base pastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this paper is to develop an advanced technique of boriding using pastes under the conditions of furnace heating. The research is carried out on flat specimens of 20 and U8 steels pre-annealed in vacuum. B4C base pastes were used as saturating media, and the glue prepared by dissolving of nitrocellulose in the mixture of butylacetate and acetone was used as a bond. Measured was the depth of diffusion layers, produced on the 20 and u8 steels after boriding with the pastes under different temperatures and saturation times. The results of metallographic analysis show that borided layers have a specific needle-like structure. The surface of the specimens is clean and free from any paste residues and traces of partial melting

  4. Processability of Nickel-Boron Nanolayer Coated Boron Carbide

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Xiaojing

    2008-01-01

    This dissertation work focuses on the processability improvement of B4C, especially the compaction and sintering improvement of B4C by applying a Ni-B nanolayer coating on individual B4C particles. A modified electroless coating procedure was proposed and employed to coat nanometer Ni-B layer onto micron-sized B4C particles. The thickness was able to be tuned and controlled below 100 nm. Key parameters, including the amount of nickel source, the amount of the surface activation agent (PdCl...

  5. Ag Nanoparticles on Boron Doped Multi-walled Carbon Nanotubes as a Synergistic Catalysts for Oxygen Reduction Reaction in Alkaline Media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The mass activity of Ag/B-MWCNTs reduces with increasing of Ag loading. • The B-MWCNTs can be a promising supporting material for low-cost ORR catalyst. • This work the role of supporting materials in reducing the loading of metal catalyst. - Abstract: Here we report the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity of Ag nanoparticles supported on boron doped multi-walled carbon nanotubes (Ag/B-MWCNTs) with different Ag loadings synthesized by a facile chemical method. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction patterns (XRD) measurements were employed to investigate the morphology and crystal structure of the as-prepared catalysts. The electrochemical results demonstrated that all the Ag/B-MWCNTs samples catalyzed the ORR in alkaline media by an efficient four-electron pathway. Furthermore, Ag/B-MWCNTs with lowest Ag loading (20%) performed the highest mass activity towards ORR mainly due to the synergistic effect of Ag nanoparticles and B-MWCNTs. This work brings insight into the role of supporting materials in reducing the loading of metal catalyst towards low-cost ORR in alkaline media

  6. A Review on the Preparation of Borazine-derived Boron Nitride Nanoparticles and Nanopolyhedrons by Spray-pyrolysis and Annealing Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Salles

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Boron nitride (BN nanostructures (= nanoBN are struc‐ tural analogues of carbon nanostructures but display different materials chemistry and physics, leading to a wide variety of structural, thermal, electronic, and optical applications. Proper synthesis routes and advanced structural design are among the great challenges for preparing nanoBN with such properties. This review provides an insight into the preparation and characteriza‐ tion of zero dimensional (0D nanoBN including nanopar‐ ticles and nanopolyhedrons from borazine, an economically competitive and attractive (from a technical point of view molecule, beginning with a concise intro‐ duction to hexagonal BN, followed by an overview on the past and current state of research on nanoparticles. Thus, a review of the spray-pyrolysis of borazine to form BN nanoparticles is firstly presented. The use of BN nanopar‐ ticles as precursors of BN nanopolyhedrons is then de‐ tailed. Applications and research perspectives for these 0D nanoBN are discussed in the conclusion.

  7. Behaviour of a VVER-1000 fuel element with boron carbide/steel absorber tested under severe fuel damage conditions in the CORA facility (Results of experiment CORA-W2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagen, S.; Hofmann, P.; Noack, V.; Schanz, G.; Schumacher, G.; Sepold, L.

    1994-10-01

    Severe Fuel Damage (SFD) experiments were carried out in the out-of-pile facility CORA as part of the international SFD research. The experimental program was set up to provide information on failure mechanisms of Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel elements in a temperature range from 1200 to 2000 C and in few cases up to 2400 C. Between 1987 and 1992, a total of 17 CORA experiments with two different bundle configurations, i.e. PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) and BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) bundles were performed. These assemblies represented `Western-type` fuel elements with the pertinent materials for fuel, cladding, grid spacer, and absorber rod. At the end of the experimental program two VVER-1000 specific tests were run in the CORA facility with identical objectives but with genuine VVER-type materials. The experiments, designated CORA-W1 and CORA-W2 were conducted on February 18, 1993 and April 21, 1993, respectively. Test bundle CORA-W1 was without absorber material whereas CORA-W2 contained one absorber rod (boron carbide/steel). As in the earlier CORA tests the test bundles were subjected to temperature transients of a slow heatup rate in a steam environment. The transient phases of the tests were initiated with a temperature ramp rate of 1 K/s. With these conditions a so-called small-break LOCA was simulated. The temperature escalation due to the exothermal zircon/niobium-steam reaction started at about 1200 C, leading the bundles to maximum temperatures of approximately 1900 C. The thermal response of bundle CORA-W2 is comparable to that of CORA-W1. In test CORA-W2, however, the temperature front moved faster from the top to the bottom compared to test CORA-W1. The reason for this behavior may be found in an earlier melt formation and relocation of the absorber rod material in CORA-W2. Despite some specific features the material behavior of the VVER-1000 bundle is comparable to that observed in the PWR and BWR tests of Western design. (orig.) [Deutsch

  8. Composite materials and bodies including silicon carbide and titanium diboride and methods of forming same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillo, Thomas M.; Chu, Henry S.; Harrison, William M.; Bailey, Derek

    2013-01-22

    Methods of forming composite materials include coating particles of titanium dioxide with a substance including boron (e.g., boron carbide) and a substance including carbon, and reacting the titanium dioxide with the substance including boron and the substance including carbon to form titanium diboride. The methods may be used to form ceramic composite bodies and materials, such as, for example, a ceramic composite body or material including silicon carbide and titanium diboride. Such bodies and materials may be used as armor bodies and armor materials. Such methods may include forming a green body and sintering the green body to a desirable final density. Green bodies formed in accordance with such methods may include particles comprising titanium dioxide and a coating at least partially covering exterior surfaces thereof, the coating comprising a substance including boron (e.g., boron carbide) and a substance including carbon.

  9. Steam oxidation of boron carbide–stainless steel liquid mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the framework of nuclear reactor core meltdown accidents studies, the oxidation kinetics of boron carbide–stainless steel liquid mixtures exposed to argon/steam atmospheres was investigated at temperatures up to 1527 °C. A B–Cr–Si–O liquid protective layer forms on the surface of the mixtures in contact with steam. This protective layer gradually transforms into a Cr2O3-rich slag. Important quantities of liquid can be projected from the melt during oxidation. These projections are favoured by high B4C contents in the melt, high steam partial pressures and low temperatures. In addition to stainless steel–boron carbide melts, simpler compositions (pure 304L stainless steel, iron–boron, iron–boron carbide and stainless steel–boron) were studied, in order to identify the basic oxidation mechanisms.

  10. The influence of chosen modifiers on stereological parameters of carbides of chromium cast iron

    OpenAIRE

    A. Studnicki; J. Suchoń

    2011-01-01

    The results of investigations of stereological carbides in the modified wear resistance chromium cast iron resistant were introduced in the article. There were following elements: boron, niobium, vanadium, cerium and lanthanum (RE), nitrogen in the composition of modifiers. The influence of used modifiers on such stereological parameters of carbides as: size, perimeter, shape coefficient and volume fraction was showed in tables and on diagrams.

  11. Stereoselective single (copper) or double (platinum) boronation of alkynes catalyzed by magnesia-supported copper oxide or platinum nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grirrane, Abdessamad; Corma, Avelino; Garcia, Hermenegildo

    2011-02-18

    Copper(II) oxide nanoparticles supported on magnesia have been prepared from Cu(II) supported on magnesia by hydrogen reduction at 400 °C followed by storage under ambient conditions. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of the material clearly shows that immediately after the reduction copper(0)-metal nanoparticles are present on the magnesia support, but they undergo fast oxidation to copper oxide upon contact with the ambient for a short time. TEM images show that the catalytically active CuO/MgO material is formed of well-dispersed copper oxide nanoparticles supported on fibrous MgO. CuO/MgO exhibits a remarkable catalytic activity for the monoborylation of aromatic, aliphatic, terminal, and internal alkynes, the products being formed with high regio- (borylation at the less substituted carbon) and stereoselectivity (trans-configured). CuO/MgO exhibits complete chemoselectivity towards the monoborylation of alkynes in the presence of alkenes. Other metal nanoparticles such as gold or palladium are inactive towards borylation, but undergo undesirable oligomerization or partial hydrogenation of the C≡C triple bond. In contrast, platinum, either supported on magnesia or on nanoparticulate ceria, efficiently promotes the stereoselective diborylation of alkynes to yield a cis-configured diboronate alkene. By using platinum as the catalyst we have developed a tandem diborylation/hydrogenation reaction that gives vic-diboronated alkanes from alkynes in one pot. PMID:21319239

  12. The boron trifluoride nitromethane adduct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ownby, P. Darrell

    2004-02-01

    The separation of the boron isotopes using boron trifluoride·organic-donor, Lewis acid·base adducts is an essential first step in preparing 10B enriched and depleted crystalline solids so vital to nuclear studies and reactor applications such as enriched MgB 2, boron carbide, ZrB 2, HfB 2, aluminum boron alloys, and depleted silicon circuits for radiation hardening and neutron diffraction crystal structure studies. The appearance of this new adduct with such superior properties demands attention in the continuing search for more effective and efficient means of separation. An evaluation of the boron trifluoride nitromethane adduct, its thermodynamic and physical properties related to large-scale isotopic separation is presented. Its remarkably high separation factor was confirmed to be higher than the expected theoretical value. However, the reportedly high acid/donor ratio was proven to be an order of magnitude lower. On-going research is determining the crystal structure of deuterated and 11B enriched 11BF 3·CD 3NO 2 by X-ray and neutron diffraction.

  13. Mussel-inspired synthesis of boron nitride nanosheet-supported gold nanoparticles and their application for catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumer Roy, Arup; Park, Sung Young; In, Insik

    2015-03-01

    Gold nanoparticle (AuNP)-decorated boron nitride nanosheet (BNNS) was successfully prepared through the simultaneous reduction of Au3+ ions and the growth of AuNPs on polydopamine (PDA)-grafted BNNS. Both BNNS-AuNP and PDA-BNNS are successfully synthesized in an aqueous buffer solution (pH 8.5) in the absence of any chemical reducing agent and organic reaction, which is therefore environmentally friendly and highly beneficial for the mass production of green catalysts from 2D nanomaterials. BNNS-AuNP showed remarkable dispersion stability in aqueous media and revealed high catalytic efficiency for the reduction of nitrophenol as (4-NP) into 4-aminophenol (4-AP) within 8 min in water. The 2D structural feature of BNNS-AuNP also enables isolation and recycling of catalyst from 4-AP through the ultracentrifugation, which shows the retention of more than 60% of catalytic activity of BNNS-AuNP after five repetitions of the of recycling steps.

  14. WAYS TO INCREASE THE OPERATIONAL CHARACTERISTICS OF CAST PRODUCTS WITH BORON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. F. Nevar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available It is shown that for improvement of physical and chemical properties of cast products, exploited inconditions of intensive contact with the abrasive environment, boron carbide of great interest.

  15. Synthesis of Boron Nanowires, Nanotubes, and Nanosheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajen B. Patel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of boron nanowires, nanotubes, and nanosheets using a thermal vapor deposition process is reported. This work confirms previous research and provides a new method capable of synthesizing boron nanomaterials. The materials were made by using various combinations of MgB2, Mg(BH42, MCM-41, NiB, and Fe wire. Unlike previously reported methods, a nanoparticle catalyst and a silicate substrate are not required for synthesis. Two types of boron nanowires, boron nanotubes, and boron nanosheets were made. Their morphology and chemical composition were determined through the use of scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and electron energy loss spectroscopy. These boron-based materials have potential for electronic and hydrogen storage applications.

  16. Boron-Filled Hybrid Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rajen B; Chou, Tsengming; Kanwal, Alokik; Apigo, David J; Lefebvre, Joseph; Owens, Frank; Iqbal, Zafar

    2016-01-01

    A unique nanoheterostructure, a boron-filled hybrid carbon nanotube (BHCNT), has been synthesized using a one-step chemical vapor deposition process. The BHCNTs can be considered to be a novel form of boron carbide consisting of boron doped, distorted multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) encapsulating boron nanowires. These MWCNTs were found to be insulating in spite of their graphitic layered outer structures. While conventional MWCNTs have great axial strength, they have weak radial compressive strength, and do not bond well to one another or to other materials. In contrast, BHCNTs are shown to be up to 31% stiffer and 233% stronger than conventional MWCNTs in radial compression and have excellent mechanical properties at elevated temperatures. The corrugated surface of BHCNTs enables them to bond easily to themselves and other materials, in contrast to carbon nanotubes (CNTs). BHCNTs can, therefore, be used to make nanocomposites, nanopaper sheets, and bundles that are stronger than those made with CNTs. PMID:27460526

  17. Electrochemical immunoassay for subgroup J of avian leukosis viruses using a glassy carbon electrode modified with a film of poly (3-thiophene boronic acid), gold nanoparticles, graphene and immobilized antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have modified a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) with a film of poly(3-thiophene boronic acid), gold nanoparticles and graphene, and an antibody (Ab) was immobilized on its surface through the covalent bond formed between the boronic acid group and the glycosyl groups of the Ab. Subgroup J of avian leukosis viruses (ALV-J) were electrochemically determined with the help of this electrode. There is a linear relationship between the electron transfer resistance (Ret) and the concentration of ALV-J in the range from 527 to 3,162 TCID50.mL-1 (where TCID50 is the 50 % tissue culture infective dose). The detection limit is 210 TCID50.mL-1 (at an S/N of 3), and the correlation coefficient (R) is 0.9964. The electrochemical immunoassay showed good selectivity, stability and reproducibility. (author)

  18. Fluorescent boronate-based polymer nanoparticles with reactive oxygen species (ROS)-triggered cargo release for drug-delivery applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jäger, Eliezer; Höcherl, Anita; Janoušková, Olga; Jäger, Alessandro; Hrubý, Martin; Konefal, Rafal; Netopilík, Miloš; Pánek, Jiří; Šlouf, Miroslav; Ulbrich, Karel; Štěpánek, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 13 (2016), s. 6958-6963. ISSN 2040-3364 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 7F14009; GA MPO(CZ) FR-TI4/625; GA MŠk(CZ) LH14292; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1507; GA TA ČR(CZ) TE01020118 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : reactive oxygen species (ROS) * responsive nanoparticles * fluorescence life-time imaging (FLIM) Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 7.394, year: 2014

  19. Diffusion Boronizing of H11 Hot Work Tool Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurči, Peter; Hudáková, Mária

    2011-10-01

    The H11 hot work tool steel was boronized at various processing parameters, austenitized, quenched, and tempered to a core hardness of 47-48 HRC. Microstructure, phase constitution, and microhardness of boronized layers were investigated. Effect of boronized region on the bulk properties was determined by the Charpy impact test. Structure of boronized regions is formed by the compound layers and diffusion inter-layer. The compound layers consisted of only (Fe,Cr)2B phase, but in the case of longer processing time, they contained also of the (Fe,Cr)B-phase. The inter-layer contained enhanced portion of carbides, formed due to carbon diffusion from the boride compounds toward the substrate. Microhardness of boronized layers exceeded considerably 2000 HV 0.1. However, boronizing led to a substantial lowering of the Charpy impact toughness of the material.

  20. Boron Poisoning of Plutonium Solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of a theoretical investigation into the possible relaxation of criticality concentration limits in wet chemical reprocessing plants, due to the introduction of boron poisoning, are reported. The following systems were considered: 1. 1 in. stainless steel tubes filled with boron carbide at various pitches in homogeneous mixtures of 239Pu (NO3)4, 5H2O and water. 2. 1 in. and 2 in borosilicate glass Raschig rings in homogeneous mixtures of 239Pu (NO3)4, 5H2O and water. 3. The concentration of natural boron required for k∞ = 1 in homogeneous mixtures of 239Pu-B-H2O. The method of calculation was Monte Carlo using the GEM code with Nuclear Data File cross-sections. The Raschig rings used are those commercially available. The core model consisted of a cubic arrangement of unit cubes of solution within each of which a Raschig ring was centrally placed. The arrangement was such that the rings were regularly stacked with axes parallel, but the side of the unit cube was fixed to preserve the random packing density. Comparison is made with other reported results on boron poisoning. (author)

  1. Predicted phase diagram of boron-carbon-nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hantao; Yao, Sanxi; Widom, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Noting the structural relationships between phases of carbon and boron carbide with phases of boron nitride and boron subnitride, we investigate their mutual solubilities using a combination of first-principles total energies supplemented with statistical mechanics to address finite temperatures. Thus we predict the solid-state phase diagram of boron-carbon-nitrogen (B-C-N). Owing to the large energy costs of substitution, we find that the mutual solubilities of the ultrahard materials diamond and cubic boron nitride are negligible, and the same for the quasi-two-dimensional materials graphite and hexagonal boron nitride. In contrast, we find a continuous range of solubility connecting boron carbide to boron subnitride at elevated temperatures. An electron-precise ternary compound B13CN consisting of B12 icosahedra with NBC chains is found to be stable at all temperatures up to melting. It exhibits an order-disorder transition in the orientation of NBC chains at approximately T =500 K. We also propose that the recently discovered binary B13N2 actually has composition B12.67N2 .

  2. Doping Silicon Wafers with Boron by Use of Silicon Paste

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Gao; Shu Zhou; Yunfan Zhang; Chen Dong; Xiaodong Pi; Deren Yang

    2013-01-01

    In this work we introduce recently developed silicon-paste-enabled p-type doping for silicon.Boron-doped silicon nanoparticles are synthesized by a plasma approach.They are then dispersed in solvents to form silicon paste.Silicon paste is screen-printed at the surface of silicon wafers.By annealing,boron atoms in silicon paste diffuse into silicon wafers.Chemical analysis is employed to obtain the concentrations of boron in silicon nanoparticles.The successful doping of silicon wafers with boron is evidenced by secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) and sheet resistance measurements.

  3. Effect of boron on intergranular hot cracking in Ni-Cr-Fe superalloys containing niobium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, R. G.

    1990-01-01

    Solidification mechanisms had a dominant influence on microfissuring behavior of the test group. Carbon modified the Laves formation significantly and showed that one approach to alloy design would be balancing carbide formers against Laves formers. Boron's strong effect on microfissuring can be traced to its potency as a Laves former. Boron's segregation to grain boundaries plays at best a secondary role in microfissuring.

  4. Growth of diamond layers on diamond and cBN seeds using iron carbide under high pressure and high temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Li Xun; Hao Zhao Yin; LiuPeng; Li Musen; Zou Guang Tian; Cheng Shu Yu; Cheng Kai Jia

    2002-01-01

    Iron carbide without any graphite was studied under high pressure and high temperature (HPHT); diamond layers were obtained both on diamond and on cubic boron nitride seeds at 5.5 GPa and 1700-1750 K. The results showed that transition-metal carbide was the main intermediate in the course of the transformation from graphite to diamond under HPHT.

  5. Carbon fiber/reaction-bonded carbide matrix for composite materials - Manufacture and characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The processing of self-healing ceramic matrix composites by a short time and low cost process was studied. This process is based on the deposition of fiber dual inter-phases by chemical vapor infiltration and on the densification of the matrix by reactive melt infiltration of silicon. To prevent fibers (ex-PAN carbon fibers) from oxidation in service, a self-healing matrix made of reaction bonded silicon carbide and reaction bonded boron carbide was used. Boron carbide is introduced inside the fiber preform from ceramic suspension whereas silicon carbide is formed by the reaction of liquid silicon with a porous carbon xerogel in the preform. The ceramic matrix composites obtained are near net shape, have a bending stress at failure at room temperature around 300 MPa and have shown their ability to self-healing in oxidizing conditions. (authors)

  6. Processing development of 4 tantalum carbide-hafnium carbide and related carbides and borides for extreme environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaballa, Osama Gaballa Bahig

    Carbides, nitrides, and borides ceramics are of interest for many applications because of their high melting temperatures and good mechanical properties. Wear-resistant coatings are among the most important applications for these materials. Materials with high wear resistance and high melting temperatures have the potential to produce coatings that resist degradation when subjected to high temperatures and high contact stresses. Among the carbides, Al4SiC4 is a low density (3.03 g/cm3), high melting temperature (>2000°C) compound, characterized by superior oxidation resistance, and high compressive strength. These desirable properties motivated this investigation to (1) obtain high-density Al4SiC4 at lower sintering temperatures by hot pressing, and (2) to enhance its mechanical properties by adding WC and TiC to the Al4SiC4. Also among the carbides, tantalum carbide and hafnium carbide have outstanding hardness; high melting points (3880°C and 3890°C respectively); good resistance to chemical attack, thermal shock, and oxidation; and excellent electronic conductivity. Tantalum hafnium carbide (Ta4HfC 5) is a 4-to-1 ratio of TaC to HfC with an extremely high melting point of 4215 K (3942°C), which is the highest melting point of all currently known compounds. Due to the properties of these carbides, they are considered candidates for extremely high-temperature applications such as rocket nozzles and scramjet components, where the operating temperatures can exceed 3000°C. Sintering bulk components comprised of these carbides is difficult, since sintering typically occurs above 50% of the melting point. Thus, Ta4 HfC5 is difficult to sinter in conventional furnaces or hot presses; furnaces designed for very high temperatures are expensive to purchase and operate. Our research attempted to sinter Ta4HfC5 in a hot press at relatively low temperature by reducing powder particle size and optimizing the powder-handling atmosphere, milling conditions, sintering

  7. B4C solid target boronization of the MST reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A solid rod of hot-pressed boron carbide is being used as the source of boron during boronization of MST. The most striking result of this procedure is the reduction in oxygen contamination of the plasma (O III radiation, characteristic of oxygen at the edge, falls by about a factor of 3 after boronization.). The radiated power fraction drops to about half its initial value. Particle reflux from the wall is also lowered, making density control simpler. The rod (12.7 mm diameter) is inserted into the edge plasma of normal high-power RFP discharges. B4C is ablated from the surface of the rod and deposited in a thin film (a-B/C:H) on the walls and limiters. The energy flux carried by ''superthermal'' (not ''runaway'') electrons at the edge of MST appears to enhance the efficient, non-destructive ablation of the boron carbide rod

  8. Silicon carbide bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A self-bonded silicon carbide body produced by siliconising a preformed mixture of particles (shaped by means other than slip-casting) of carbon and silicon carbide in the beta form has a mean grain size in the range of 0.1 to 5 microns. Such a body may be produced using silicon carbide particles having a mean surface area in the range 0.5 to 20 square metres per gram. The silicon carbide particles may be produced by heating a mixture of silica and silicon to generate silicon monoxide vapour and passing the vapour through a bed of particulate carbon. (author)

  9. Phase Analysis of Cemented Carbide WC—Co Boronised with Yttrium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘寿荣; 郝建民; 等

    2002-01-01

    Phase analysis for the coated surface with B4Cand Y2O3of cemented carbide WC-20Co in vacuum-heating was carried out by high-temperature X-ray diffraction from ambient temperature to 1300℃,The results show that,the high-concentration active boron atoms are released from the boron-supply agent B4Clocated on the alloy surface and diffused into the γphase,leading to forming the three-element boron-bearing compound W2Co21B6beside forming boron-bearins compounds on the blank surface.By contrast with boronising only,the element yttrium in boronization broadens the boronising temperature range during vacuum-sistering,catalyzes the decarbonisation decomposition of B4C and promotes diffusion of active boron atoms into the bulk of WC-Co.

  10. The influence of chosen modifiers on stereological parameters of carbides of chromium cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Studnicki

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The results of investigations of stereological carbides in the modified wear resistance chromium cast iron resistant were introduced in the article. There were following elements: boron, niobium, vanadium, cerium and lanthanum (RE, nitrogen in the composition of modifiers. The influence of used modifiers on such stereological parameters of carbides as: size, perimeter, shape coefficient and volume fraction was showed in tables and on diagrams.

  11. What is the impact of Silicon Carbide nanoparticles to the mineral composition of rat lungs? A PIXE-μPIXE comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, O.; Colaux, J. L.; Laloy, J.; Dogné, J. M.; Lucas, S.

    2015-05-01

    The exposure to nanomaterials can yield changes in the mineral composition of tissues which may have long term health repercussions. In this study, the changes in mineral composition of rat lungs, exposed to a nanoaerosol of silicon carbide (SiC), has been studied by means of global and local ion beam probes with the Particle-Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) technique, measuring the whole lung contents and selected areas where SiC was found, respectively. It was found that from a global perspective there is a small decrease in the mineral contents (phosphorous, sulphur, chlorine and potassium) of the lung except for Ca, while locally these mineral contents tend fluctuate.

  12. Impurities in silicon carbide ceramics and their role during high temperature creep

    OpenAIRE

    Backhaus-Ricoult, M.; Mozdzierz, N.; Eveno, P.

    1993-01-01

    The high-temperature compressive creep behaviour of hot-pressed silicon carbide ceramics with different additive packages (boron and carbon or no additive) is investigated as a function of several parameters: the microstructure, the nature of the additives and that of the impurities. Additional carbon is present in all the materials investigated, as graphite precipitates of various size and amount. In materials densified with addition of boron, large precipitates of B25C and small amorphous s...

  13. The possibility of the boronizing process on the pressed samples of iron powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Požega Emina D.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of the experimental investigation of the boronizing process on nonsintering iron powder samples (NC100.24, Höganäs, Sweden. Experiments are planned within the limits of applicability of simultaneous sintering at chemical-thermal treatment process (boronizing. The simlex plan of 15 experimental points was used for the experiment, while a polynomial function of fourth degree was employed in the modeling of a mixture composition based on the volume changes, porosity and the depth layer changes. Boronizing was carried out in mixture with born carbide by addition of ammonium bifluoride, ammonium chloride and boron potassium fluoride as activators, by proportion definited plan.

  14. Single step synthesis of nanostructured boron nitride for boron neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanostructured Boron Nitride (BN) has been successfully synthesized by carbo-thermic reduction of Boric Acid (H3BO3). This method is a relatively low temperature synthesis route and it can be used for large scale production of nanostructured BN. The synthesized nanoparticles have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and differential thermal analyzer (DTA). XRD analysis confirmed the formation of single phase nanostructured Boron Nitride. SEM analysis showed that the particles are spherical in shape. DTA analysis showed that the phase is stable upto 900 °C and the material can be used for high temperature applications as well boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT)

  15. Single step synthesis of nanostructured boron nitride for boron neutron capture therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Bikramjeet; Singh, Paviter; Kumar, Manjeet; Thakur, Anup; Kumar, Akshay

    2015-05-01

    Nanostructured Boron Nitride (BN) has been successfully synthesized by carbo-thermic reduction of Boric Acid (H3BO3). This method is a relatively low temperature synthesis route and it can be used for large scale production of nanostructured BN. The synthesized nanoparticles have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and differential thermal analyzer (DTA). XRD analysis confirmed the formation of single phase nanostructured Boron Nitride. SEM analysis showed that the particles are spherical in shape. DTA analysis showed that the phase is stable upto 900 °C and the material can be used for high temperature applications as well boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT).

  16. Synthesis of multiwall boron nitride nanotubes dependent on crystallographic structure of boron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synthesis and growth of multiwall boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) under the B and ZrO2 seed system in the milling–annealing process were investigated. BNNTs were synthesized by annealing a mechanically activated boron powder under nitrogen environment. We explored the aspects of the mechanical activation energy transferred to milled crystalline boron powder producing structural disorder and borothermal reaction of the ZrO2 seed particles on the synthesis of BNNTs during annealing. Under these circumstances, the chemical reaction of amorphous boron coated on the seed nanoparticles with nitrogen synthesizing amorphous BN could be enhanced. It was found that amorphous BN was crystallized to the layer structure and then grown to multiwall BNNTs during annealing. Especially, bamboo-type multiwall BNNTs were mostly produced and grown to the tail-side of the nanotube not to the round head-side. Open gaps with ∼0.3 nm of the bamboo side walls of BNNTs were also observed. Based on these understandings, it might be possible to produce bamboo-type multiwall BNNTs by optimization of the structure and shape of boron coat on the seed nanoparticles. -- Highlights: ► Structure of B is a key factor for BNNT synthesis for milling–annealing method. ► Amorphous boron is coated on the seed during milling of crystalline boron. ► Amorphous BN nanoclusters are crystallized during annealing. ► Growing of bamboo BNNTs is not to the round head-side but to the tail-side.

  17. Silicon nano-carbide in strengthening and ceramic technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudneva, V. V.; Galevsky, G. V.; Kozyrev, N. A.

    2015-09-01

    Technological advantages and conditions of new quality assurance of coatings and products, provided by silicon nano-carbide, have been ascertained in the course of composite electrodeposition of coatings, structural ceramics patterning, and surface hardening of steels via electro-explosive alloying. Silicon nano-carbide has been recommended to be used as a component of wear and corrosion resistant chromium carbide electrodeposited coatings, which can be operated at high temperatures and used for strengthening tools and equipment including those with a complex microrelief of functional surfaces. Silicon nano-carbide as a component of composite “silicon carbide - boron - carbon” can be applied to produce ceramic half products via solid phase sintering in argon under pressure of 0.1 MPa and temperature 2273 K. Application of silicon nano-carbide in technology of tool steel surface hardening via electroexplosive alloying ensures obtaining of a high micro-hard, wear and heat resistant shielding layer which is about 20 μm deep.

  18. Tuning field emission properties of boron nanocones with catalyst concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single crystalline boron nanocones are prepared by using a simple spin spread method in which Fe3O4 nanoparticles are pre-manipulated on Si(111) to form catalyst patterns of different densities. The density of boron nanocones can be tuned by changing the concentration of catalyst nanoparticles. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis shows that the boron nanocone has a β-tetragonal structure with good crystallization. The field emission behaviour is optimal when the spacing distance is close to the nanocone length, which indicates that this simple spin spread method has great potential applications in electron emission nanodevices. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  19. Icosahedral boron-rich solids as refractory semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Icosahedral boron-rich solids are refractory materials composed of twelve-atom boron-rich icosahedral units with strong intericosahedral linkages. These distinctive structures admit unusual electronic and thermal transport properties. Here the distinctive (three-center) bonding which underlies these materials is first described. Then it is shown how insulators, semiconductors and highly degenerate (metal-like) materials emerge from the same basic structure with appropriate substitutions. The electronic transport of the boron carbides is then addressed. The boron carbides are degenerate p-type semiconductors in which the charge carriers are diamagnetically aligned pairs of electrons which hop between icosahedra. Uniquely, this thermally activated hopping conductivity increases with increasing hydrostatic pressure. However, the Seebeck coefficient (thermoelectric power) is uncharacteristic of a degenerate semiconductor. Namely, the Seebeck coefficient is typically both large and an increasing function of temperature. In addition, despite the hardness and refractory character of these materials, their thermal conductivities can be surprisingly low with a glass-like temperature dependence. These features are manifestations of the distinctive structure and bonding of these solids. In fact, this novel mix of properties makes the boron carbides exceptionally good very-high-temperature p-type thermoelectric materials. Icosahedral boron-rich solids have additional potential as high temperature semiconductors. In particular, the wide-gap icosahedral boron-rich pnictides, B/sub 12/P/sub 2/ and B/sub 12/As/sub 2/, may be doped to form wide-gap refractory semiconductors. For example, replacement of the group V element with either a group VI or a group IV element is expected to yield n-type and p-type materials, respectively

  20. Doping of silicon carbide by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It appeared that in some fields, as the hostile environments (high temperature or irradiation), the silicon compounds showed limitations resulting from the electrical and mechanical properties. Doping of 4H and 6H silicon carbide by ion implantation is studied from a physicochemical and electrical point of view. It is necessary to obtain n-type and p-type material to realize high power and/or high frequency devices, such as MESFETs and Schottky diodes. First, physical and electrical properties of silicon carbide are presented and the interest of developing a process technology on this material is emphasised. Then, physical characteristics of ion implantation and particularly classical dopant implantation, such as nitrogen, for n-type doping, and aluminium and boron, for p-type doping are described. Results with these dopants are presented and analysed. Optimal conditions are extracted from these experiences so as to obtain a good crystal quality and a surface state allowing device fabrication. Electrical conduction is then described in the 4H and 6H-SiC polytypes. Freezing of free carriers and scattering processes are described. Electrical measurements are carried out using Hall effect on Van der Panw test patterns, and 4 point probe method are used to draw the type of the material, free carrier concentrations, resistivity and mobility of the implanted doped layers. These results are commented and compared to the theoretical analysis. The influence of the technological process on electrical conduction is studied in view of fabricating implanted silicon carbide devices. (author)