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Sample records for borneo

  1. On Reptiles from North Borneo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lidth de Jeude, van Th.W.

    1893-01-01

    The following list is the catalogue of a collection of reptiles captured by Mr. J. Chr. Prakke in the neighbourhood of the Sandakan-bay (N. Borneo). As Dr. F. Mocquard in his latest papers ¹) on reptiles of Borneo gives a full account of the literature of Bornean herpetology, I think I may content

  2. Quantifying deformation in North Borneo with GPS

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    Mustafar, Mohamad Asrul; Simons, Wim J. F.; Tongkul, Felix; Satirapod, Chalermchon; Omar, Kamaludin Mohd; Visser, Pieter N. A. M.

    2017-10-01

    The existence of intra-plate deformation of the Sundaland platelet along its eastern edge in North Borneo, South-East Asia, makes it an interesting area that still is relatively understudied. In addition, the motion of the coastal area of North-West Borneo is directed toward a frontal fold-and-thrust belt and has been fueling a long debate on the possible geophysical sources behind it. At present this fold-and-thrust belt is not generating significant seismic activity and may also not be entirely active due to a decreasing shelfal extension from south to north. Two sets of Global Positioning System (GPS) data have been used in this study; the first covering a time period from 1999 until 2004 (ending just before the Giant Sumatra-Andaman earthquake) to determine the continuous Sundaland tectonic plate motion, and the second from 2009 until 2011 to investigate the current deformations of North Borneo. Both absolute and relative positioning methods were carried out to investigate horizontal and vertical displacements. Analysis of the GPS results indicates a clear trend of extension along coastal regions of Sarawak and Brunei in North Borneo. On the contrary strain rate tensors in Sabah reveal that only insignificant and inconsistent extension and compression occurs throughout North-West Borneo. Moreover, station velocities and rotation rate tensors on the northern part of North Borneo suggest a clockwise (micro-block) rotation. The first analysis of vertical displacements recorded by GPS in North-West Borneo points to low subsidence rates along the western coastal regions of Sabah and inconsistent trends between the Crocker and Trusmadi mountain ranges. These results have not been able to either confirm or reject the hypothesis that gravity sliding is the main driving force behind the local motions in North Borneo. The ongoing Sundaland-Philippine Sea plate convergence may also still play an active role in the present-day deformation (crustal shortening) in North

  3. The trypanorhynch cestode fauna of Borneo.

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    Schaeffner, Bjoern C; Beveridge, Ian

    2014-12-19

    Borneo is considered a centre for biodiversity in both the terrestrial and aquatic environments. However, information on the diversity of parasites and trypanorhynch cestodes infecting sharks and rays in particular is rather limited at present. During a large-scale study focusing on the parasite diversity of elasmobranchs from Malaysian and Indonesian Borneo a total of 520 spiral intestines of elasmobranchs were collected during seven years of extensive sampling. Trypanorhynch cestodes were discovered in 163 specimens belonging to 43 different elasmobranch species (i.e. 17 species of sharks and 26 species of rays). Overall, 50 species of trypanorhynchs were recovered from the hosts' spiral intestines, some of which represented new species and genera that have been subsequently described. Numerous new host records are added for previously described species. Of the 50 trypanorhynch species present in waters off Borneo 30 (= 60%) were recovered from rays, while 20 species (= 40%) were found in sharks. The geographical distribution of these cestode species was dominated by taxa that occur in the Indo-west Pacific (= 30%) followed by species endemic to Borneo (= 28%). Nine species (= 18%) are found both in Borneo and Australia or have a cosmopolitan distribution. The present study also assessed the host specificity for 16 species belonging to three prominent trypanorhynch genera recovered from elasmobranchs from Borneo (i.e. Dollfusiella Campbell & Beveridge, 1994, Prochristianella Dollfus, 1946 and Parachristianella Dollfus, 1946). Most species (= 63%) were euryxenous utilizing hosts from different orders or even classes, with only a single species (i.e. Dollfusiella imparispinis Schaeffner & Beveridge, 2013) being oioxenous utilizing a single host species. The remaining species (= 31%) were mesostenoxenous utilizing different host species from a single genus. The least host specific taxa were the three representatives of Parachristianella and Prochristianella clarkeae

  4. Two new Orchidantha species (Lowiaceae) from Borneo

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    Poulsen, A.D.; Leong-Škorničková, J.

    2017-01-01

    Two new Orchidantha species discovered in Sarawak, O. micrantha and O. megalantha, are described and illustrated. They may well represent the species with the smallest and the largest flowers currently known in the genus and certainly from Borneo. With its small flowers, O. micrantha is similar to

  5. Revision of Medinilla (Melastomataceae) of Borneo

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    Regalado Jr., Jacinto C.

    1990-01-01

    Forty-eight species of Medinilla are now known from Borneo, 28 of which are described as new. At least 20 taxa are known only from one to three collections. Eleven species groups have been recognized and defined. A more thorough understanding of the genus awaits further study of Philippine and New

  6. Taxonomic revision of Beilschmiedia (Lauraceae) in Borneo

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    Nishida, S.

    2008-01-01

    A revision of Beilschmiedia Nees (Lauraceae) in Borneo is given. Descriptions, distribution maps, illustrations of leaves, terminal buds, and flowers, and a key to the species are provided. Twenty-six species were recognized, including one newly described species. The new species is distinguished

  7. Two new Orchidantha species (Lowiaceae) from Borneo

    OpenAIRE

    Poulsen, A.D.; Leong-Škorničková, J.

    2017-01-01

    Two new Orchidantha species discovered in Sarawak, O. micrantha and O. megalantha, are described and illustrated. They may well represent the species with the smallest and the largest flowers currently known in the genus and certainly from Borneo. With its small flowers, O. micrantha is similar to O. borneensis to which it is compared. The large-flowered O. megalantha is compared to the morphologically closest species, O. holttumii, from nearby Brunei. The conservation status of both new spec...

  8. Observations on rheophytic palms in Borneo

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    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available OBSERVATIONS SUR LES PALMIERS RHEOPHYTES DE BORNEO. Les palmiers de Bornéo, Pinanga rivularis Becc. et P. tenella (H.A. Wendl. Scheff. ont été depuis longtemps reconnus par Beccari comme ayant un comportement rhéophyte. Depuis lors, une troisième espèce rhéophyte, Areca rheophytica J. Dransf. a été enregistrée à Bornéo. Les deux espèces de Pinanga, bien que très semblables superficiellement, ne sont pas étroitement apparentées. Elles présentent de remarquables différences dans leurs formes biologiques, pouvant être mises en corrélation avec les différences dans les caractéristiques des systèmes de rivières où croissent ces palmiers. Des observations détaillées de la structure des fruits de P. rivularis suggèrent des adaptations inhabituelles de dissémination. OBSERVACIONES SOBRE LAS PALMERAS REÓFITAS DE BORNEO. Hace tiempo que Beccari observó que las palmas de Borneo Pinanga rivularis Becc. y P. tenella (H.A. Wendl. se comportan como reófitas. Desde entonces, una tercera especie reofítica, Areca rheophytica J. Dransf. ha sido registrada en Borneo. Las dos especies de Pinanga, aunque muy similares superficialmente, no son estrechamente emparentadas presentan notables diferencias en sus formas biológicas que pueden ser relacionadas con las diferencias en las características de los sistemas de ríos donde se encuentran. Observaciones detalladas de la estructura de los frutos de P. rivularis sugieren adaptaciones inusuales de diseminación. The Bornean palms Pinanga rivularis Becc. and P. tenella (H.A. Wendl. Scheff. were long ago recognised by Beccari as behaving as rheophytes. Since then a third rheophytic species, Areca rheophytica J. Dransf. has been recorded in Borneo. The two species of Pinanga, although superficially very similar, are not closely related. They display remarkable differences in habit which may be correlated with differences in the character of the river systems where they occur. Detailed

  9. The Mosses of Crocker Range Park, Malaysian Borneo

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    Monica Suleiman

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the mosses from Crocker Range Park (CRP in Sabah, Malaysian Borneo. In total, 293 species, three subspecies and eight varieties belonging to 118 genera and 36 families are reported. This represents about 40% and 47% of the species and infra-specific taxa reported from Borneo and Sabah, respectively. Out of these, six species are new records for Borneo, namely Barbella horridula, Chaetomitrium lancifolium, Distichophyllum leiopogon, Rhaphidostichum luzonense, Rosulabryum capillare and Taxiphyllum taxirameum and 12 species and one variety are new to Sabah. With these additions, the current number of mosses in Sabah and Borneo are 651 and 766, respectively. The largest family of mosses is Calymperaceae with 35 species and one subspecies, followed by Sematophyllaceae with 32 species and two varieties and Pylaisiadelphaceae with 21 species and one variety. In conclusion, CRP has a very high species richness of mosses which is the second highest in Borneo, after Mount Kinabalu.

  10. Two new species of Morinda (Rubiaceae) from Sumatra and Borneo

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    Suratman,

    2011-01-01

    Two new species of Morinda from Sumatra and Borneo, M. lanuginosa and M. wongiana, are described and illustrated. The morphological comparison of the new taxa with similar species in the genus is also discussed.

  11. New species of Podochilus and Trichoglottis (Orchidaceae) from Borneo

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    Schuiteman, A.

    1998-01-01

    The new species Podochilus marsupialis Schuit. and Trichoglottis tinekeae Schuit., both from Borneo, are described and illustrated. The new name Podochilus sect. Sarganella is proposed to replace the illegitimate Podochilus sect. Eu-Podochilus Schltr.

  12. Forest fruit production is higher on Sumatra than on Borneo.

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    Serge A Wich

    Full Text Available Various studies have shown that the population densities of a number of forest vertebrates, such as orangutans, are higher on Sumatra than Borneo, and that several species exhibit smaller body sizes on Borneo than Sumatra and mainland Southeast Asia. It has been suggested that differences in forest fruit productivity between the islands can explain these patterns. Here we present a large-scale comparison of forest fruit production between the islands to test this hypothesis.Data on fruit production were collated from Sumatran and Bornean sites. At six sites we assessed fruit production in three forest types: riverine, peat swamp and dryland forests. We compared fruit production using time-series models during different periods of overall fruit production and in different tree size classes. We examined overall island differences and differences specifically for fruiting period and tree size class. The results of these analyses indicate that overall the Sumatran forests are more productive than those on Borneo. This difference remains when each of the three forest types (dryland, riverine, and peat are examined separately. The difference also holds over most tree sizes and fruiting periods.Our results provide strong support for the hypothesis that forest fruit productivity is higher on Sumatra than Borneo. This difference is most likely the result of the overall younger and more volcanic soils on Sumatra than Borneo. These results contribute to our understanding of the determinants of faunal density and the evolution of body size on both islands.

  13. Large estragole fluxes from oil palms in Borneo

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    During two field campaigns (OP3 and ACES), which ran in Borneo in 2008, we measured large emissions of estragole in ambient air above oil palm canopies flower enclosures. However, we did not detect this compound at a nearby rainforest. Estragole is a known attractant of the Afric...

  14. Four new species of the Melolonthid genus Apogonia from Borneo

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    Ritsema Cz., C.

    1905-01-01

    Closely allied to and strongly resembling A. abdominalis Rits., from Central Borneo (Notes Leyd. Mus. vol. XVIII, p. 26), but somewhat smaller, the punctuation somewhat stronger, the front margin of the clypeus slightly emarginate, the sides of the prothorax more narrowly edged, the pygidium

  15. Montane pollen from the Tertiary of NW. Borneo

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    Muller, J.

    1966-01-01

    In NW. Borneo thick series of Tertiary sediments occur which are rich in fossil pollen and spores. The majority of these plant microfossils were derived from the various types of tropical lowland vegetation such as mangrove (Muller, 1964), mixed peat swamp forest and mixed Dipterocarp forest. Some

  16. Four Decades of Forest Persistence, Clearance and Logging on Borneo

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    Gaveau, David L. A.; Sloan, Sean; Molidena, Elis; Yaen, Husna; Sheil, Doug; Abram, Nicola K.; Ancrenaz, Marc; Nasi, Robert; Quinones, Marcela; Wielaard, Niels; Meijaard, Erik

    2014-01-01

    The native forests of Borneo have been impacted by selective logging, fire, and conversion to plantations at unprecedented scales since industrial-scale extractive industries began in the early 1970s. There is no island-wide documentation of forest clearance or logging since the 1970s. This creates an information gap for conservation planning, especially with regard to selectively logged forests that maintain high conservation potential. Analysing LANDSAT images, we estimate that 75.7% (558,060 km2) of Borneo's area (737,188 km2) was forested around 1973. Based upon a forest cover map for 2010 derived using ALOS-PALSAR and visually reviewing LANDSAT images, we estimate that the 1973 forest area had declined by 168,493 km2 (30.2%) in 2010. The highest losses were recorded in Sabah and Kalimantan with 39.5% and 30.7% of their total forest area in 1973 becoming non-forest in 2010, and the lowest in Brunei and Sarawak (8.4%, and 23.1%). We estimate that the combined area planted in industrial oil palm and timber plantations in 2010 was 75,480 km2, representing 10% of Borneo. We mapped 271,819 km of primary logging roads that were created between 1973 and 2010. The greatest density of logging roads was found in Sarawak, at 0.89 km km−2, and the lowest density in Brunei, at 0.18 km km−2. Analyzing MODIS-based tree cover maps, we estimate that logging operated within 700 m of primary logging roads. Using this distance, we estimate that 266,257 km2 of 1973 forest cover has been logged. With 389,566 km2 (52.8%) of the island remaining forested, of which 209,649 km2 remains intact. There is still hope for biodiversity conservation in Borneo. Protecting logged forests from fire and conversion to plantations is an urgent priority for reducing rates of deforestation in Borneo. PMID:25029192

  17. Four decades of forest persistence, clearance and logging on Borneo.

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    David L A Gaveau

    Full Text Available The native forests of Borneo have been impacted by selective logging, fire, and conversion to plantations at unprecedented scales since industrial-scale extractive industries began in the early 1970s. There is no island-wide documentation of forest clearance or logging since the 1970s. This creates an information gap for conservation planning, especially with regard to selectively logged forests that maintain high conservation potential. Analysing LANDSAT images, we estimate that 75.7% (558,060 km2 of Borneo's area (737,188 km2 was forested around 1973. Based upon a forest cover map for 2010 derived using ALOS-PALSAR and visually reviewing LANDSAT images, we estimate that the 1973 forest area had declined by 168,493 km2 (30.2% in 2010. The highest losses were recorded in Sabah and Kalimantan with 39.5% and 30.7% of their total forest area in 1973 becoming non-forest in 2010, and the lowest in Brunei and Sarawak (8.4%, and 23.1%. We estimate that the combined area planted in industrial oil palm and timber plantations in 2010 was 75,480 km2, representing 10% of Borneo. We mapped 271,819 km of primary logging roads that were created between 1973 and 2010. The greatest density of logging roads was found in Sarawak, at 0.89 km km-2, and the lowest density in Brunei, at 0.18 km km-2. Analyzing MODIS-based tree cover maps, we estimate that logging operated within 700 m of primary logging roads. Using this distance, we estimate that 266,257 km2 of 1973 forest cover has been logged. With 389,566 km2 (52.8% of the island remaining forested, of which 209,649 km2 remains intact. There is still hope for biodiversity conservation in Borneo. Protecting logged forests from fire and conversion to plantations is an urgent priority for reducing rates of deforestation in Borneo.

  18. Papers in Borneo Linguistics No. 1. Pacific Linguistics, Series A--Occasional Papers No. 20.

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    Prentice, D. J.

    The first paper in this volume, "A Wordlist for Use in Borneo," is a listing of 250 items in English, accompanied by notes and glosses in colloquial Malay (as spoken in Sabah). It is intended to be used in eliciting linguistic information in Borneo and to serve as "a guide to relationships between languages of the region, and not as…

  19. People's perceptions about the importance of forests on Borneo.

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    Erik Meijaard

    Full Text Available We ascertained villagers' perceptions about the importance of forests for their livelihoods and health through 1,837 reliably answered interviews of mostly male respondents from 185 villages in Indonesian and Malaysian Borneo. Variation in these perceptions related to several environmental and social variables, as shown in classification and regression analyses. Overall patterns indicated that forest use and cultural values are highest among people on Borneo who live close to remaining forest, and especially among older Christian residents. Support for forest clearing depended strongly on the scale at which deforestation occurs. Deforestation for small-scale agriculture was generally considered to be positive because it directly benefits people's welfare. Large-scale deforestation (e.g., for industrial oil palm or acacia plantations, on the other hand, appeared to be more context-dependent, with most respondents considering it to have overall negative impacts on them, but with people in some areas considering the benefits to outweigh the costs. The interviews indicated high awareness of negative environmental impacts of deforestation, with high levels of concern over higher temperatures, air pollution and loss of clean water sources. Our study is unique in its geographic and trans-national scale. Our findings enable the development of maps of forest use and perceptions that could inform land use planning at a range of scales. Incorporating perspectives such as these could significantly reduce conflict over forest resources and ultimately result in more equitable development processes.

  20. Borneo: The new NS sunflower confectionary type hybrid

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    Hladni Nada

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available At the Institute of Field and Vegetable Crops in Novi Sad, beside the basic direction in sunflower breeding, the creation of standard hybrids with high oil content with high seed and oil yield, hybrids are being created for special confectionery purposes directed towards the final kernel products. In this program, apart from breeding in order to improve main seed yield components, special attention is given to the increase of protein content and the quality with the decrease of seed oil content, to the increase of the weight of 1000 seeds and to the decrease of content of the shell. Two-line SC hybrid was created by crossing the cytoplasmatic male sterile line of the mother with a father line with fertility restoration genes. Borneo is a high protein confectionary type hybrid that has been registered in Slovakia (EU in 2009. It contains successfully combined genes responsible for high genetic potential for yield and valuable technical and technological seed traits. The hybrid is adequate for nutrition, dehuling and kernel production. Borneo is a medium early hybrid with the genetic potential for yield of over 4,5t/ha and its seed oil content is under 43%. .

  1. Growth characteristics of Dayak Borneo yam (Dioscorea hispida and detoxification techniques as alternative food

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    RUDITO

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Rudito, Suwarto, Azkiyah L, Witono Y, Saragih B, Arung ET. 2017. Growth characteristics of Dayak Borneo yam (Dioscorea hispida and detoxification techniques as alternative food. Pros Sem Nas Masy Biodiv Indon 3: 99-103. Finding of local food sources to enhance food security areas. This study focuses on the characteristics of growth Dayak Borneo yam observation, toxic substances and detoxification techniques development of non nutritional. The objective of the research was to find out a more concrete picture, as well as comparing it with Java yam non nutritional components as a basis for further exploration of alternative food. Observations indicate that the plant growth of Dayak Borneo yam had specific characteristics, and can be grown in intercropping with other crops. Yam tubers have negative image due to the toxins contained by this commodity, as well as technology management (detoxification and processing of yam products that have not been controlled by the community. But based on the results of physical and chemical detoxification, indicates that the Dayak Borneo yam can be exploited further as food. Dayak Borneo yam need to be developed modification process in raw materials of Dayak Borneo yam as modified starch through fermentation techniques which also intended to obtain intermediate product from which Dayak Borneo yam has a larger functionality as a food ingredient.

  2. Cladocera (Crustacea: Branchiopoda) of Sabah state in Borneo Island, Malaysia.

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    Sinev, Artem Y; Yusoff, Fatimah M

    2015-08-19

    Fauna of Cladocera (Crustacea: Branchiopoda) of Sabah state of Malaysia, Borneo Island, was evaluated for the first time. Samples from 40 locations were studied, and 31 species of Cladocera were revealed, including three species of Sididae, one species of Daphnidae, one species of Moinidae, four species of Macrothricidae, two species of Ilyocryptidae, and 20 species of Chydoridae. One species of Ilyocryptidae, Ilyocryptus yooni Jeong, Kotov and Lee, 2012, is recorded for Malaysia for the first time, and one more, Anthalona sp., is probably new for science. Of 31 species recorded for Sabah, only three are true planktonic species and 28 are substrate-associated species. Absence of large natural lakes, habitats with most rich cladoceran fauna, can be an important factor limiting diversity of Cladocera in Sabah.

  3. Review: Davidson, Jamie S.: From Rebellion to Riots: Collective Violence on Indonesian Borneo (2008)

    OpenAIRE

    Karolina Chmielewska

    2009-01-01

    Review of the monograph: Davidson, Jamie S.: From rebellion to riots: collective violence on Indonesian Borneo. Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin Press 2008, ISBN 13-978-0-299-22580-3, 312 p. Besprechung der Monographie: Davidson, Jamie S.: From rebellion to riots: collective violence on Indonesian Borneo. Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin Press 2008, ISBN 13-978-0-299-22580-3, 312 S.

  4. Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Agricultural Wetlands in Borneo

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    Abdul, H.; Fatah, L.; Nursyamsi, D.; Kazuyuki, I.

    2011-12-01

    At the forum G20 meeting in 2009, Indonesian President delivered Indonesia's commitment to reduce national greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 26% in 2020 by unilateral action and by 41% with support of other countries. To achieve the target, Indonesian government has put forestry, agriculture (including peatlands), energy, industry and transportation as main responsible sectors. Development of crop with low GHG emissions, increasing C sequestration and the use of organic fertilizers are among the activities to be carried out in 2010-2020 period to minimize GHG emissions from agricultural sectors. Three experiments have been carried out to elucidate the reflectivity of crop selection, soil ameliorants and organic fertilizers on GHG emissions from agricultural wetlands in Borneo. Firstly, gas samples were collected in weekly basis from oil palm, paddy, and vegetables fields and analyzed for methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) concentrations by a gas chromatography. Secondly, coal fly ash, dolomite and ZnSO4 were incorporated into a pot containing peat and/or alluvial soils taken from wetlands in South Kalimantan. The air samples were taken and analyzed for CH4 by a gas chromatography. Finally, microbial consortium are isolated from soil, sediment and cow dung. The microbes were then propagated and used in a rice straw composting processes. The CO2, CH4 and N2O emissions from composting vessel were measured at one, two and four weeks of composting processes. The results showed that shifting the use of peatlands for oil palm to vegetable field reduced the GHG emissions by about 74% and that to paddy field reduce the GHG emissions by about 82%. The CH4 emissions from paddy field can be further reduced by applying dolomite. However, the use of coal fly ash and ZnSO4 increased CH4 emissions from peat soil cultivated to rice. The use of microbe isolated from saline soil could reduce GHG emissions during the composting of rice straw. The social aspect of GHG reduction in

  5. Changing Place: Palm Oil and Sense of Place in Borneo

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    Ellie Lindsay

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The conservation of tropical ecosystems is complex and contested, not least in terms of cultural and political perspectives between developed and developing nations (Bawa & Seidler, 1998; Colchester, 2000; Brosius & Hitchner, 2010. In Sabah, on the island of Borneo, Malaysia much of the forest has recently been converted to oil palm plantations. The plantations cover vast areas and leave relatively little space for native flora and fauna. Whilst efforts are underway to enhance biodiversity within the plantations, there is no clear consensus as to how this might best be achieved and this has led in part to divisions opening up amongst stakeholders (Othman & Ameer, 2009. A range of Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs working within Sabah endeavour to conserve threatened biodiversity; at the Governmental level there are significant drivers for development and economic stability; while the plantation owners are trying to improve their yields and increase their global market. There is also increasing consumer pressure in Europe and North America linked to concerns about the survival of iconic rainforest species such as orang-utans. This paper considers these issues within a context of globalisation and profound economic and social change within Malaysia.

  6. Reinstatement of Nepenthes hemsleyana (Nepenthaceae), an endemic pitcher plant from Borneo, with a discussion of associated Nepenthes taxa

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    Scharmann, M.; Grafe, T.U.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, N. baramensis and N. rafflesiana var. subglandulosa were described from Borneo as new taxa closely related to N. rafflesiana. However, comparison of new collections made in Borneo with N. baramensis and N. rafflesiana var. subglandulosa indicated a synonymy. Furthermore, they were

  7. DNA analysis indicates that Asian elephants are native to Borneo and are therefore a high priority for conservation.

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    Prithiviraj Fernando

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available The origin of Borneo's elephants is controversial. Two competing hypotheses argue that they are either indigenous, tracing back to the Pleistocene, or were introduced, descending from elephants imported in the 16th-18th centuries. Taxonomically, they have either been classified as a unique subspecies or placed under the Indian or Sumatran subspecies. If shown to be a unique indigenous population, this would extend the natural species range of the Asian elephant by 1300 km, and therefore Borneo elephants would have much greater conservation importance than if they were a feral population. We compared DNA of Borneo elephants to that of elephants from across the range of the Asian elephant, using a fragment of mitochondrial DNA, including part of the hypervariable d-loop, and five autosomal microsatellite loci. We find that Borneo's elephants are genetically distinct, with molecular divergence indicative of a Pleistocene colonisation of Borneo and subsequent isolation. We reject the hypothesis that Borneo's elephants were introduced. The genetic divergence of Borneo elephants warrants their recognition as a separate evolutionary significant unit. Thus, interbreeding Borneo elephants with those from other populations would be contraindicated in ex situ conservation, and their genetic distinctiveness makes them one of the highest priority populations for Asian elephant conservation.

  8. Seasonal Forecasting of Fires across Southern Borneo, 1997-2010

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    Spessa, Allan; Field, Robert; Kaiser, Johannes; Langner, Andreas; Moore, Jonathan; Pappenberger, Florian; Siegert, Florian; Weber, Ulrich

    2014-05-01

    several studies using historical data have established negative relationships between fires and antecedent rainfall, and/or positive relationships between fires and deforestation in regions affected by El Nino, comparatively little work has attempted to predict fires and emissions in such regions. Ensemble seasonal climate forecasts issued with several months lead-time have been applied to support risk assessment systems in many fields, notably agricultural production and natural disaster management of flooding, heat waves, drought and fire. The USA, for example, has a long-standing seasonal fire danger prediction system. Fire danger monitoring systems have been operating in Indonesia for over a decade, but, as of yet, no fire danger prediction systems exist. Given the effort required to mobilise suppression and prevention measures in Indonesia, one could argue that high fire danger periods must be anticipated months in advance for mitigation and response measures to be effective. To address this need, the goal of our work was to examine the utility of seasonal rainfall forecasts in predicting severe fires in Indonesia more than one month in advance, using southern Borneo (comprising the bulk of Kalimantan) as a case study. Here we present the results of comparing seasonal forecasts of monthly rainfall from ECMWF's System 4 against i) observed rainfall (GPCP), and ii) burnt area and deforestation (MODIS, AVHRR and Landsat) across southern Borneo for the period 1997-2010. Our results demonstrate the utility of using ECMWF's seasonal climate forecasts for predicting fire activity in the region. Potential applications include improved fire mitigation and responsiveness, and improved risk assessments of biodiversity and carbon losses through fire. These are important considerations for forest protection programmes (e.g. REDD+), forest carbon markets and forest (re)insurance enterprises.

  9. Two new species of Hoya R.Br. (Apocynaceae, Asclepiadoideae from Borneo

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    Michele Rodda

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Two new Hoya R.Br. species from Borneo are described and illustrated. The first, Hoya ruthiae Rodda was collected in Sabah on Bukit Baturong, a limestone outcrop. It is one of the few species in the genus to have clear exudate. It is compared with the morphologically related Hoya uncinata Teijsm. and Binn. The other, Hoya bakoensis Rodda, was collected in the kerangas forests of Bako National Park. It belongs to Hoya section Acanthostemma (Bl. Kloppenb., a section with numerous members in the Philippines but under-represented in Borneo.

  10. Large estragole fluxes from oil palms in Borneo

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    P. K. Misztal

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available During two field campaigns (OP3 and ACES, which ran in Borneo in 2008, we measured large emissions of estragole (methyl chavicol; IUPAC systematic name 1-allyl-4-methoxybenzene; CAS number 140-67-0 in ambient air above oil palm canopies (0.81 mg m−2 h−1 and 3.2 ppbv for mean midday fluxes and mixing ratios respectively and subsequently from flower enclosures. However, we did not detect this compound at a nearby rainforest. Estragole is a known attractant of the African oil palm weevil (Elaeidobius kamerunicus, which pollinates oil palms (Elaeis guineensis. There has been recent interest in the biogenic emissions of estragole but it is normally not included in atmospheric models of biogenic emissions and atmospheric chemistry despite its relatively high potential for secondary organic aerosol formation from photooxidation and high reactivity with OH radical. We report the first direct canopy-scale measurements of estragole fluxes from tropical oil palms by the virtual disjunct eddy covariance technique and compare them with previously reported data for estragole emissions from Ponderosa pine. Flowers, rather than leaves, appear to be the main source of estragole from oil palms; we derive a global estimate of estragole emissions from oil palm plantations of ~0.5 Tg y−1. The observed ecosystem mean fluxes (0.44 mg m−2 h−1 and mean ambient volume mixing ratios (3.0 ppbv of estragole are the highest reported so far. The value for midday mixing ratios is not much different from the total average as, unlike other VOCs (e.g. isoprene, the main peak occurred in the evening rather than in the middle of the day. Despite this, we show that the estragole flux can be parameterised using a modified G06 algorithm for emission. However, the model underestimates the afternoon peak even though a similar approach works well for isoprene. Our measurements suggest that this biogenic

  11. Mammalian communities as indicators of disturbance across Indonesian Borneo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan M. Cheyne

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Using camera traps at eight grids across Indonesian Borneo we show how mammalian species assemblages can provide reliable information about how disturbance affects a forest. This enables us to use the large mammal community structure at each site to assess the impacts of human disturbance and habitat variables. Occupancy ranged from 0.01–0.77 with pig-tailed macaques, muntjac, orang-utans, sun bears, bearded pigs and common porcupines consistently having an occupancy of >0.5. These large mammals were generally making use of the whole forest surveyed and avoided the forest edge in only a few grids. A General Linear Model with general contrasts and survey effort as a covariate was performed to assess the impact of different variables. Logging and hunting were positively associated with low species number (F=6.3, p=0.012 and F=5.4, p=0.003 respectively. Logging and hunting contributed to a low % of carnivorous species (F=1.5, p=0.021 and F=4.8, p=0.041 respectively and a higher % of IUCN Endangered and Vulnerable species (F=5.9, p=0.044 and F=5.0, p=0.044 respectively. The presence of burnt areas within the study grids was positively associated with reduced species numbers (F=5.3, p=0.018 and reducted % of carnivorous species (F=6.8, p=0.023 but not the % of IUCN Endangered and Vulnerable species. This is likely a result of burnt areas reducing the area of suitable habitat for many mammals. The proximity of the grids to roads, villages, rivers and presence of logging camps have been proposed as suitable parameters to indicate disturbance. In our study none of these parameters significantly affected the total species numbers, % of carnivores, and % of IUCN concern (Endangered and Vulnerable, nor did the protected status of the forest. We have identified 4 species as specific indicators whose presence or absence can help determine the type and/or extent of forest disturbance and/or be a proxy indicator for the presence of other species. Leopard cat

  12. Nepenthes baramensis (Nepenthaceae) – a new species from north-western Borneo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clarke, C.; Moran, J.A.; Lee, C.C.

    2011-01-01

    Nepenthes baramensis, a new species from peat swamp and heath forests in north-western Borneo, is described. It is distinguished from related species on the basis of its modified pitchers, which facilitate a facultative mutualistic interaction with Hardwicke’s Woolly Bat, Kerivoula hardwickii, which

  13. Note on the rare terrestrial orchid Apostasia elliptica found in Borneo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poulsen, A.D.

    1993-01-01

    Apostasia elliptica J.J. Smith has only been collected twice before, in Sumatra and on the Malay Peninsula. The species has now been found in Borneo. The collection by Bünnemeijer (107) from Sumatra, Westcoast Reserve, Ophir District, N of Talu represents the type and is deposited in BO. The Malay

  14. Borneo : a quantitative analysis of botanical richness, endemicity and floristic regions based on herbarium records

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raes, Niels

    2009-01-01

    Based on the digitized herbarium records housed at the National Herbarium of the Netherlands I developed high spatial resolution patterns of Borneo's botanical richness, endemicity, and the floristic regions. The patterns are derived from species distribution models which predict a species

  15. On probably young miocene fossils from the coal concession Batoe Panggal, near Tenggarong (Samarinda), Eastern Borneo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beets, C.

    1950-01-01

    In the collections of the Leyden Geological Museum is a set of fossiliferous clay-stones which was long ago collected by the mining engineer Hulshoff-Pol in the coal quarries of Batoe Panggal 1), Eastern Borneo. He presented the collection in 1902 to Dr M. Schmidt, who at that time was making

  16. A new species of Scandarma (Crustacea: Brachyura: Sesarmidae) from Sabah, Borneo, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Peter K L

    2013-01-01

    A new species of terrestrial sesarmid crab, Scandarma raymondi, is described from Sabah, Malaysia. This is the third species in the genus; others are from Taiwan, Japan and Sarawak, Borneo. The new species differs from congeners in the live coloration, proportions of the carapace and ambulatory legs and morphologies of the male abdomen, chela and male first gonopod.

  17. A new species of the genus Dilar Rambur (Neuroptera: Dilaridae) from Borneo

    Science.gov (United States)

    John D. Oswald; Nathan M. Schiff

    2001-01-01

    Dilar macleodi is described as a new species from lowland rainforest habitat in the Malaysian State of Sarawak on the island of Borneo. Diagnoses are provided to distinguish D. macleodi from the four other dilarid species that have been reported from the peninsula of Indochina or the Malay Archipelago.

  18. Highly Divergent Dengue Virus Type 2 in Traveler Returning from Borneo to Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenjun; Pickering, Paul; Duchêne, Sebastián; Holmes, Edward C; Aaskov, John G

    2016-12-01

    Dengue virus type 2 was isolated from a tourist who returned from Borneo to Australia. Phylogenetic analysis identified this virus as highly divergent and occupying a basal phylogenetic position relative to all known human and sylvatic dengue virus type 2 strains and the most divergent lineage not assigned to a new serotype.

  19. Bartonella and Rickettsia in arthropods from the Lao PDR and from Borneo, Malaysia☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kernif, Tahar; Socolovschi, Cristina; Wells, Konstans; Lakim, Maklarin B.; Inthalad, Saythong; Slesak, Günther; Boudebouch, Najma; Beaucournu, Jean-Claude; Newton, Paul N.; Raoult, Didier; Parola, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Rickettsioses and bartonelloses are arthropod-borne diseases of mammals with widespread geographical distributions. Yet their occurrence in specific regions, their association with different vectors and hosts and the infection rate of arthropod-vectors with these agents remain poorly studied in South-east Asia. We conducted entomological field surveys in the Lao PDR (Laos) and Borneo, Malaysia by surveying fleas, ticks, and lice from domestic dogs and collected additional samples from domestic cows and pigs in Laos. Rickettsia felis was detected by real-time PCR with similar overall flea infection rate in Laos (76.6%, 69/90) and Borneo (74.4%, 268/360). Both of the encountered flea vectors Ctenocephalides orientis and Ctenocephalides felis felis were infected with R. felis. The degrees of similarity of partial gltA and ompA genes with recognized species indicate the rickettsia detected in two Boophilus spp. ticks collected from a cow in Laos may be a new species. Isolation and further characterization will be necessary to specify it as a new species. Bartonella clarridgeiae was detected in 3/90 (3.3%) and 2/360 (0.6%) of examined fleas from Laos and Borneo, respectively. Two fleas collected in Laos and one flea collected in Borneo were co-infected with both R. felis and B. clarridgeiae. Further investigations are needed in order to isolate these agents and to determine their epidemiology and aetiological role in unknown fever in patients from these areas. PMID:22153360

  20. Traditional Usages of Taro (Colocasia spp. by Ethnic Communities in Borneo

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    Linda Oktavianingsih

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Borneo has a a wealth of various flora, including the Aroids (Araceae. Taro is one of the Aroids that cultivated and used as food crop since a long time ago by the people in Borneo. This study aimed to determine the utilization of Taros traditionally by several ethnic communities in Borneo. The research used Survey Explorative Method with Direct Interview Technique in the field. Taro samples were taken from various habitats of Banjar, Dayak, Kutai, Malay, Bugis, Toraja and China ethnic. The results showed that Taro species widely used are : Colocasia esculenta var. esculenta and var. antiquorum, Colocasia  affinis and wild of Colocasiaesculenta. C. esculenta var. esculenta and var. antiquorum is used as subsistence food crop and vegetables. Besides, it is used as medicine such as high blood pressure lowering and for consumption of diabetics. Parts of the plants consumed include leaves, petiole, corm and stolon. C. affinis is used as ornamental plants of the home garden, while wild C. esculenta  is used as animal fodder. Taro in Borneo have a considerable variation of traditional cultivars and vernacular names. Fifty eight traditional cultivars from 5 different habitat to be used by some ethnics.

  1. Rapid conversions and avoided deforestation: examining four decades of industrial plantation expansion in Borneo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaveau, David L. A.; Sheil, Douglas; Husnayaen; Salim, Mohammad A.; Arjasakusuma, Sanjiwana; Ancrenaz, Marc; Pacheco, Pablo; Meijaard, Erik

    2016-09-01

    New plantations can either cause deforestation by replacing natural forests or avoid this by using previously cleared areas. The extent of these two situations is contested in tropical biodiversity hotspots where objective data are limited. Here, we explore delays between deforestation and the establishment of industrial tree plantations on Borneo using satellite imagery. Between 1973 and 2015 an estimated 18.7 Mha of Borneo’s old-growth forest were cleared (14.4 Mha and 4.2 Mha in Indonesian and Malaysian Borneo). Industrial plantations expanded by 9.1 Mha (7.8 Mha oil-palm; 1.3 Mha pulpwood). Approximately 7.0 Mha of the total plantation area in 2015 (9.2 Mha) were old-growth forest in 1973, of which 4.5-4.8 Mha (24-26% of Borneo-wide deforestation) were planted within five years of forest clearance (3.7-3.9 Mha oil-palm; 0.8-0.9 Mha pulpwood). This rapid within-five-year conversion has been greater in Malaysia than in Indonesia (57-60% versus 15-16%). In Indonesia, a higher proportion of oil-palm plantations was developed on already cleared degraded lands (a legacy of recurrent forest fires). However, rapid conversion of Indonesian forests to industrial plantations has increased steeply since 2005. We conclude that plantation industries have been the principle driver of deforestation in Malaysian Borneo over the last four decades. In contrast, their role in deforestation in Indonesian Borneo was less marked, but has been growing recently. We note caveats in interpreting these results and highlight the need for greater accountability in plantation development.

  2. Ancyronyx reticulatus and A. pulcherrimus, two new riffle beetle species from Borneo, and discussion about elmid plastron structures (Coleoptera: Elmidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodada, Ján; Jäch, Manfred A; Ciampor, Fedor

    2014-02-03

    Two new species of Ancyronyx Erichson, 1847 (Coleoptera: Elmidae) are described from Borneo: A. pulcherrimus (Brunei) and A. reticulatus (Sabah). Habitus views, illustrations of important characters as well as plastron structures of Ancyronyx reticulatus are presented and discussed.

  3. A global model study of the impact of land-use change in Borneo on atmospheric composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. J. Warwick

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a high resolution version of the Cambridge p-TOMCAT chemical transport model is used, along with measurement data from the 2008 NERC-funded Oxidant and Particle Photochemical Processes (OP3 project, to examine the potential impact of the expansion of oil palm in Borneo on atmospheric composition. Several model emission scenarios are run for the OP3 measurement period, incorporating emissions from both global datasets and local flux measurements. Using the OP3 observed isoprene fluxes and OH recycling chemistry in p-TOMCAT substantially improves the comparison between modelled and observed isoprene and OH concentrations relative to using MEGAN isoprene emissions without OH recycling. However, a similar improvement was also achieved without using HOx recycling, by fixing boundary layer isoprene concentrations over Borneo to follow the OP3 observations. An extreme hypothetical future scenario, in which all of Borneo is converted to oil palm plantation, assessed the sensitivity of the model to changes in isoprene and NOx emissions associated with land-use change. This scenario suggested a 70% upper limit on surface ozone increases resulting from land-use change on Borneo, excluding the impact of future changes in emissions elsewhere. Although the largest changes in this scenario occurred directly over Borneo, the model also calculated notable regional changes of O3, OH and other species downwind of Borneo and in the free troposphere.

  4. A global model study of the impact of land-use change in Borneo on atmospheric composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warwick, N. J.; Archibald, A. T.; Ashworth, K.; Dorsey, J.; Edwards, P. M.; Heard, D. E.; Langford, B.; Lee, J.; Misztal, P. K.; Whalley, L. K.; Pyle, J. A.

    2013-09-01

    In this study, a high resolution version of the Cambridge p-TOMCAT chemical transport model is used, along with measurement data from the 2008 NERC-funded Oxidant and Particle Photochemical Processes (OP3) project, to examine the potential impact of the expansion of oil palm in Borneo on atmospheric composition. Several model emission scenarios are run for the OP3 measurement period, incorporating emissions from both global datasets and local flux measurements. Using the OP3 observed isoprene fluxes and OH recycling chemistry in p-TOMCAT substantially improves the comparison between modelled and observed isoprene and OH concentrations relative to using MEGAN isoprene emissions without OH recycling. However, a similar improvement was also achieved without using HOx recycling, by fixing boundary layer isoprene concentrations over Borneo to follow the OP3 observations. An extreme hypothetical future scenario, in which all of Borneo is converted to oil palm plantation, assessed the sensitivity of the model to changes in isoprene and NOx emissions associated with land-use change. This scenario suggested a 70% upper limit on surface ozone increases resulting from land-use change on Borneo, excluding the impact of future changes in emissions elsewhere. Although the largest changes in this scenario occurred directly over Borneo, the model also calculated notable regional changes of O3, OH and other species downwind of Borneo and in the free troposphere.

  5. Mini Review: Innovation technology cultivaion of Citrus Tangerines Borneo Prima in East Kalimantan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AFRILIA TRI WIDYAWATI

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Widyawati AT, Nurbani. 2017. Mini Review: Innovation technology cultivaion of Citrus Tangerines Borneo Prima in East Kalimantan. Pros Sem Nas Masy Biodiv Indon 3: 127-131. The demand for high-value commodities such as oranges continues to increase every year. One of the qualities of orange that can not be met by domestic manufacturers is the color of a citrus peel. Most consumers like citrus orange, like mandarin oranges and other citrus imports. Efforts to reduce the national citrus imports is to improve the productivity and quality of citrus orange in Indonesia. Citrus Tangerines Borneo Prima is one of the featured horticultural commodities in East Kalimantan, which has the advantage of being low lying tangerine with orange rind. It Is indispensable citrus cultivation technique is good and right, so that the citrus plant can develop optimally so that later can produce citrus fruit both in quality and quantity.

  6. A note on the occurrence of a crayback stalagmite at Niah Caves, Borneo

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    Lundberg Joyce

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Crayback stalagmites have mainly been reported from New South Wales, Australia. Here we document a small crayback in the entrance of Painted Cave (Kain Hitam, part of the Niah Caves complex in Sarawak, Borneo. Measuring some 65 cm in length and 18 cm in height, this deposit is elongate in the direction of the dominant wind and thus oriented towards the natural tunnel entrance. It shows the classic humpbacked long profile, made up of small transverse segments or plates, in this case the tail extending towards the entrance. The dark blue-green colour down the centre suggests that cyanobacterial growth follows the track of the wind-deflected roof drip. The dry silty cave sediment provides material for accretion onto the biological mat. This is the only example known from Borneo and one of the very few known from outside of Australia.

  7. Borneo: a quantitative analysis of botanical richness, endemicity and floristic regions based on herbarium records

    OpenAIRE

    Raes, Niels

    2009-01-01

    Based on the digitized herbarium records housed at the National Herbarium of the Netherlands I developed high spatial resolution patterns of Borneo's botanical richness, endemicity, and the floristic regions. The patterns are derived from species distribution models which predict a species occurrence based on the identified relationships between species recorded presences and the ecological circumstances at those localities. A new statistical method was developed to test the species distribut...

  8. Borneo and Indochina are major evolutionary hotspots for Southeast Asian biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruyn, Mark; Stelbrink, Björn; Morley, Robert J; Hall, Robert; Carvalho, Gary R; Cannon, Charles H; van den Bergh, Gerrit; Meijaard, Erik; Metcalfe, Ian; Boitani, Luigi; Maiorano, Luigi; Shoup, Robert; von Rintelen, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    Tropical Southeast (SE) Asia harbors extraordinary species richness and in its entirety comprises four of the Earth's 34 biodiversity hotspots. Here, we examine the assembly of the SE Asian biota through time and space. We conduct meta-analyses of geological, climatic, and biological (including 61 phylogenetic) data sets to test which areas have been the sources of long-term biological diversity in SE Asia, particularly in the pre-Miocene, Miocene, and Plio-Pleistocene, and whether the respective biota have been dominated by in situ diversification, immigration and/or emigration, or equilibrium dynamics. We identify Borneo and Indochina, in particular, as major "evolutionary hotspots" for a diverse range of fauna and flora. Although most of the region's biodiversity is a result of both the accumulation of immigrants and in situ diversification, within-area diversification and subsequent emigration have been the predominant signals characterizing Indochina and Borneo's biota since at least the early Miocene. In contrast, colonization events are comparatively rare from younger volcanically active emergent islands such as Java, which show increased levels of immigration events. Few dispersal events were observed across the major biogeographic barrier of Wallace's Line. Accelerated efforts to conserve Borneo's flora and fauna in particular, currently housing the highest levels of SE Asian plant and mammal species richness, are critically required. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press, on behalf of the Society of Systematic Biologists. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. New Insight Into The Crustal Structure of The Continental Margin Off NW Sabah/borneo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barckhausen, U.; Franke, D.; Behain, D.; Meyer, H.

    The continental margin offshore NW Sabah/Borneo (Malaysia) has been investigated with reflection and refraction seismics, magnetics, and gravity during the recent cruise BGR01-POPSCOMS. A total of 4000 km of geophysical profiles has been acquired, thereof 2900 km with reflection seismics. Like in major parts of the South China Sea, the area seaward of the Sabah Trough consists of extended continental lithosphere. We found evidence that the continental crust also underlies the continental slope land- ward of the Trough, a fact that raises many questions about the tectonic history and development of this margin. The characteristic pattern of rotated fault blocks and half grabens and the carbon- ates which are observed all over the Dangerous Grounds can be traced a long way landward of the Sabah Trough beneath the sedimentary succession of the upper plate. The magnetic anomalies which are dominated by the magnetic signatures of relatively young volcanic features also continue under the continental slope. The sedimentary rocks of the upper plate, in contrast, seem to generate hardly any magnetic anoma- lies. We suspect that the volcanic activity coincided with the collision of Borneo and the Dangerous Grounds in middle or late Miocene time. The emplacement of an al- lochtonous terrane on top of the extended continental lithosphere could be explained by overthrusting as a result of the collision or it could be related to gravity sliding following a broad uplift of NW Borneo at the same time.

  10. Contribution of the Heart of Borneo (HoB initiative towards botanical exploration in Sabah, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Sabran

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Heart of   Borneo (HoB declaration is a conservation agreement initiated by WWF and signed by three countries, i.e., Brunei       Darussalam, Indonesia and Malaysia in Bali, Indonesia on 12th February 2007 to protect more than 23 million hectares of forested region on Borneo Island. These forested areas could be well protected when conservation management plan is in place. One of the crucial activities to facilitate the planning and formulation of conservation plan is to conduct  scientific expeditions that include botanical exploration. The primary objective of the expedition is to identify the key conservation targets within the forest reserves. For the past five years, several expeditions have been conducted by the Sabah Forestry Department under the auspices of the HoB project to explore various forest reserves with conservation issues within the Heart of Borneo area. This paper will present the findings which include plant richness, endemism and plant conservation status in each forest reserves that has been explored. 

  11. Indo-Pacific Humpback Dolphins in Borneo: A Review of Current Knowledge with Emphasis on Sarawak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minton, Gianna; Zulkifli Poh, Anna Norliza; Peter, Cindy; Porter, Lindsay; Kreb, Danielle

    2016-01-01

    Indo-Pacific humpback dolphins (Sousa chinensis) are documented from various locations along Borneo's coast, including three sites in Sarawak, Malaysia, three sites in Sabah, Malaysia, three locations in Kalimantan, Indonesia and the limited coastal waters of the Sultanate of Brunei. Observations in all these areas indicate a similar external morphology, which seems to fall somewhere between that documented for Chinese populations known as S. chinensis, and that of Sousa sahulensis in Australia and Papua New Guinea. Sightings occur in shallow nearshore waters, often near estuaries and river mouths, and associations with Irrawaddy dolphins (Orcaella brevirostris) are frequently documented. Population estimates exist for only two locations and sightings information throughout Borneo indicates that frequency of occurrence is rare and group size is usually small. Threats from fisheries by-catch and coastal development are present in many locations and there are concerns over the ability of these small and fragmented populations to survive. The conservation and taxonomic status of humpback dolphins in Borneo remain unclear, and there are intriguing questions as to where these populations fit in our evolving understanding of the taxonomy of the genus. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The atmospheric chemistry of trace gases and particulate matter emitted by different land uses in Borneo

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKenzie, A. R.; Langford, B.; Pugh, T. A. M.; Robinson, N.; Misztal, P. K.; Heard, D. E.; Lee, J. D.; Lewis, A. C.; Jones, C. E.; Hopkins, J. R.; Phillips, G.; Monks, P. S.; Karunaharan, A.; Hornsby, K. E.; Nicolas-Perea, V.; Coe, H.; Gabey, A. M.; Gallagher, M. W.; Whalley, L. K.; Edwards, P. M.; Evans, M. J.; Stone, D.; Ingham, T.; Commane, R.; Furneaux, K. L.; McQuaid, J. B.; Nemitz, E.; Seng, Yap Kok; Fowler, D.; Pyle, J. A.; Hewitt, C. N.

    2011-01-01

    We report measurements of atmospheric composition over a tropical rainforest and over a nearby oil palm plantation in Sabah, Borneo. The primary vegetation in each of the two landscapes emits very different amounts and kinds of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), resulting in distinctive VOC fingerprints in the atmospheric boundary layer for both landscapes. VOCs over the Borneo rainforest are dominated by isoprene and its oxidation products, with a significant additional contribution from monoterpenes. Rather than consuming the main atmospheric oxidant, OH, these high concentrations of VOCs appear to maintain OH, as has been observed previously over Amazonia. The boundary-layer characteristics and mixing ratios of VOCs observed over the Borneo rainforest are different to those measured previously over Amazonia. Compared with the Bornean rainforest, air over the oil palm plantation contains much more isoprene, monoterpenes are relatively less important, and the flower scent, estragole, is prominent. Concentrations of nitrogen oxides are greater above the agro-industrial oil palm landscape than over the rainforest, and this leads to changes in some secondary pollutant mixing ratios (but not, currently, differences in ozone). Secondary organic aerosol over both landscapes shows a significant contribution from isoprene. Primary biological aerosol dominates the super-micrometre aerosol over the rainforest and is likely to be sensitive to land-use change, since the fungal source of the bioaerosol is closely linked to above-ground biodiversity. PMID:22006961

  13. Out of Borneo: biogeography, phylogeny and divergence date estimates of Artocarpus (Moraceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Evelyn W; Gardner, Elliot M; Harris, Robert; Chaveerach, Arunrat; Pereira, Joan T; Zerega, Nyree J C

    2017-03-01

    The breadfruit genus ( Artocarpus , Moraceae) includes valuable underutilized fruit tree crops with a centre of diversity in Southeast Asia. It belongs to the monophyletic tribe Artocarpeae, whose only other members include two small neotropical genera. This study aimed to reconstruct the phylogeny, estimate divergence dates and infer ancestral ranges of Artocarpeae, especially Artocarpus , to better understand spatial and temporal evolutionary relationships and dispersal patterns in a geologically complex region. To investigate the phylogeny and biogeography of Artocarpeae, this study used Bayesian and maximum likelihood approaches to analyze DNA sequences from six plastid and two nuclear regions from 75% of Artocarpus species, both neotropical Artocarpeae genera, and members of all other Moraceae tribes. Six fossil-based calibrations within the Moraceae family were used to infer divergence times. Ancestral areas and estimated dispersal events were also inferred. Artocarpeae, Artocarpus and four monophyletic Artocarpus subgenera were well supported. A late Cretaceous origin of the Artocarpeae tribe in the Americas is inferred, followed by Eocene radiation of Artocarpus in Asia, with the greatest diversification occurring during the Miocene. Borneo is reconstructed as the ancestral range of Artocarpus , with dozens of independent in situ diversification events inferred there, as well as dispersal events to other regions of Southeast Asia. Dispersal pathways of Artocarpus and its ancestors are proposed. Borneo was central in the diversification of the genus Artocarpus and probably served as the centre from which species dispersed and diversified in several directions. The greatest amount of diversification is inferred to have occurred during the Miocene, when sea levels fluctuated and land connections frequently existed between Borneo, mainland Asia, Sumatra and Java. Many species found in these areas have extant overlapping ranges, suggesting that sympatric

  14. Active tectonic deformation along rejuvenated faults in tropical Borneo: Inferences obtained from tectono-geomorphic evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Manoj Joseph; Menier, David; Siddiqui, Numair; Kumar, Shashi Gaurav; Authemayou, Christine

    2016-08-01

    The island of Borneo is enveloped by tropical rainforests and hostile terrain characterized by high denudation rates. Owing to such conditions, studies pertaining to neotectonics and consequent geomorphic expressions with regard to surface processes and landscape evolution are inadequately constrained. Here we demonstrate the first systematic tectono-geomorphic evaluation of north Borneo through quantitative and qualitative morphotectonic analysis at sub-catchment scale, for two large drainage basins located in Sarawak: the Rajang and Baram basins. The extraction of morphometric parameters utilizing digital elevation models arranged within a GIS environment focuses on hypsometric curve analysis, distribution of hypsometric integrals through spatial autocorrelation statistics, relative uplift values, the asymmetry factor and the normalized channel steepness index. Hypsometric analysis suggests a young topography adjusting to changes in tectonic boundary conditions. Autocorrelation statistics show clusters of high values of hypsometric integrals as prominent hotspots that are associated with less eroded, young topography situated in the fold and thrust belts of the Interior Highlands of Borneo. High channel steepness and gradients (> 200 m0.9) are observed in zones corresponding to the hotspots. Relative uplift values reveal the presence of tectonically uplifted blocks together with relatively subsided or lesser uplifted zones along known faults. Sub-catchments of both basins display asymmetry indicating tectonic tilting. Stream longitudinal profiles demonstrate the presence of anomalies in the form of knickzones without apparent lithological controls along their channel reaches. Surfaces represented by cold spots of low HI values and low channel gradients observed in the high elevation headwaters of both basins are linked to isolated erosional planation surfaces that could be remnants of piracy processes. The implication of our results is that Borneo experiences

  15. Three new species of Begonia (Begoniaceae from Limestone Hills in southwestern Sarawak, Borneo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Che-Wei Lin

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Most species of Begonia in Borneo, like those of other areas, are narrowly distributed and site-specific. In this study we report three new species of Begonia, namely B. felis C. W. Lin & C.-I Peng, B. kuchingensis C. W. Lin & C.-I Peng (sect. Petermannia and B. serianensis C. W. Lin & C.-I Peng (sect. Reichenheimia from the Padawan-Serian limestone hills in southwestern Sarawak. In addition to the taxonomic account, color plates, line drawings, a distribution map, and comparisons with phenetically similar species are provided to aid in identification.

  16. New locality record of Isomyia paurogonita Fang & Fan, 1986 (Diptera: Calliphoridae) from Peninsular Malaysia and Borneo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, C C; Aisha, S; Kurahashi, H; Omar, B

    2013-03-01

    Isomyia paurogonita Fang & Fan, 1986 (Diptera: Calliphoridae), a rare species of the subfamily Rhiniinae (tribe Cosminini) was recorded for the first time in Malaysia. We collected one male and two females during a field trip conducted at Genting Highland, Pahang, peninsular Malaysia in May 2011. A 3-day old cow liver was offered as attractant and dipterans collected were transferred to the laboratory for specimens processing and identification. The adults of I. paurogonita were attracted to the odour and then captured by using a sweep net. Isomyia paurogonita was also recorded from two other localities in Peninsular and Malaysian Borneo, namely Gombak Utara, Selangor and Sibu, Sarawak.

  17. Do Anthropogenic Dark Earths Occur in the Interior of Borneo? Some Initial Observations from East Kalimantan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meine van Noordwijk

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic soils of the Amazon Basin (Terra Preta, Terra Mulata reveal that pre-Colombian peoples made lasting improvements in the agricultural potential of nutrient-poor soils. Some have argued that applying similar techniques could improve agriculture over much of the humid tropics, enhancing local livelihoods and food security, while also sequestering large quantities of carbon to mitigate climate change. Here, we present preliminary evidence for Anthropogenic Dark Earths (ADEs in tropical Asia. Our surveys in East Kalimantan (Indonesian Borneo identified several sites where soils possess an anthropogenic development and context similar in several respects to the Amazon’s ADEs. Similarities include riverside locations, presence of useful fruit trees, spatial extent as well as soil characteristics such as dark color, high carbon content (in some cases, high phosphorus levels, and improved apparent fertility in comparison to neighboring soils. Local people value these soils for cultivation but are unaware of their origins. We discuss these soils in the context of local history and land-use and identify numerous unknowns. Incomplete biomass burning appears key to these modified soils. More study is required to clarify soil transformations in Borneo and to determine under what circumstances such soil improvements might remain ongoing.

  18. Diversity of Begonia (Begoniaceae in Borneo – how many species are there?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Sang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A total of 126 species are currently named and described from Borneo (Brunei - 16 species, Kalimantan – 5 species, Sabah – 41 species and Sarawak – 72 species. However, based on our survey of the Begonia collection in the Sarawak Herbarium, the un-named taxa (about 110 species significantly outnumber the 72-named species. The situation is probably the same for Sabah, so with many more new species than the 41 named ones at a conservative estimate the Sabah Begonia flora can be expected to exceed 100 species. For Kalimantan (5 named species, the total number of un-named species is likely to be even higher considering that Kalimantan occupies a  larger land area, its begonia-rich mountains and limestone areas are hardly collected, and the Begonia flora has hardly been studied at all. We can therefore expect the Begonia flora of Borneo to exceed 600 species. In view of the high level of narrow endemism (80% of species are known from a single locality, expeditions to unexplored areas are  necessary to document, in particular, areas that are experiencing irreversible land-use change. Alpha-taxonomy on a large scale is needed to tackle the backlog of literally hundreds of new undescribed species. 

  19. Extreme differences in forest degradation in Borneo: comparing practices in Sarawak, Sabah, and Brunei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane E Bryan

    Full Text Available The Malaysian states of Sabah and Sarawak are global hotspots of forest loss and degradation due to timber and oil palm industries; however, the rates and patterns of change have remained poorly measured by conventional field or satellite approaches. Using 30 m resolution optical imagery acquired since 1990, forest cover and logging roads were mapped throughout Malaysian Borneo and Brunei using the Carnegie Landsat Analysis System. We uncovered ∼364,000 km of roads constructed through the forests of this region. We estimated that in 2009 there were at most 45,400 km(2 of intact forest ecosystems in Malaysian Borneo and Brunei. Critically, we found that nearly 80% of the land surface of Sabah and Sarawak was impacted by previously undocumented, high-impact logging or clearing operations from 1990 to 2009. This contrasted strongly with neighbouring Brunei, where 54% of the land area remained covered by unlogged forest. Overall, only 8% and 3% of land area in Sabah and Sarawak, respectively, was covered by intact forests under designated protected areas. Our assessment shows that very few forest ecosystems remain intact in Sabah or Sarawak, but that Brunei, by largely excluding industrial logging from its borders, has been comparatively successful in protecting its forests.

  20. The persistence and conservation of Borneo's mammals in lowland rain forests managed for timber: observations, overviews and opportunities.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijaard, E.; Sheil, D.

    2008-01-01

    Lowland rainforests on Borneo are being degraded and lost at an alarming rate. Studies on mammals report species responding in various ways to habitat changes that occur in commercial forestry concessions. Here we draw together information on the relationship between the ecological, evolutionary,

  1. A study of the impact of land-use change in Borneo on atmospheric composition using a global model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warwick, N. J.; Archibald, A. T.; Ashworth, K.; Dorsey, J.; Edwards, P. M.; Heard, D. E.; Langford, B.; Lee, J.; Misztal, P. K.; Whalley, J. L. K.; Pyle, J. A.

    2013-03-01

    In this study, we use a high resolution version of the Cambridge p-TOMCAT model, along with data collected during the 2008 NERC-funded Oxidant and Particle Photochemical Processes (OP3) project, to examine the potential impact of the expansion of oil palm in Borneo on air quality and atmospheric composition. Several model emission scenarios are run for the OP3 measurement period, incorporating emissions from both global datasets and local flux measurements. Isoprene fluxes observed at a forest site during OP3 were considerably less than fluxes calculated using the MEGAN model. Incorporating the observed isoprene fluxes into p-TOMCAT substantially improved the comparison between modelled and observed isoprene surface mixing ratios and OH concentrations relative to using the MEGAN emissions. If both observed isoprene fluxes and HOx recycling chemistry were included, the ability of the model to capture diurnal variations in isoprene and OH was further improved. However, a similar improvement was also achieved using a~standard chemical mechanism without HOx recycling, by fixing boundary layer isoprene concentrations over Borneo to follow the OP3 observations. Further model simulations, considering an extreme scenario with all of Borneo converted to oil palm plantation, were run to determine the maximum atmospheric impact of land use change in Borneo. In these simulations, the level of nitrogen oxides was found to be critical. If only isoprene emissions from oil palm are considered, then large scale conversion to oil palm produced a decrease in monthly mean surface ozone of up to ~20%. However, if related changes in NOx emissions from fertilisation, industrial processing and transport are also included then ozone increases of up to ~70% were calculated. Although the largest changes occurred locally, the model also calculated significant regional changes of O3, OH and other species downwind of Borneo and in the free troposphere.

  2. New Insight Into the Crustal Structure of the Continental Margin offshore NW Sabah/Borneo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barckhausen, U.; Franke, D.; Behain, D.; Meyer, H.

    2002-12-01

    The continental margin offshore NW Sabah/Borneo (Malaysia) has been investigated with reflection and refraction seismics, magnetics, and gravity during the recent cruise BGR01-POPSCOMS. A total of 4000 km of geophysical profiles has been acquired, thereof 2900 km with reflection seismics. The focus of investigations was on the deep water areas. The margin looks like a typical accretionary margin and was presumably formed during the subduction of a proto South China Sea. Presently, no horizontal movements between the two plates are being observed. Like in major parts of the South China Sea, the area seaward of the Sabah Trough consists of extended continental lithosphere which is characterised by a pattern of rotated fault blocks and half grabens and a carbonate platform of Early Oligocene to Early Miocene age. We found evidence that the continental crust also underlies the Sabah Trough and the adjacent continental slope, a fact that raises many questions about the tectonic history and development of this margin. The tectonic pattern of the Dangerous Grounds' extended continental crust can be traced a long way landward of the Sabah Trough beneath the sedimentary succession of the upper plate. The magnetic anomalies which are dominated by the magnetic signatures of relatively young volcanic features also continue under the continental slope. The sedimentary rocks of the upper plate, in contrast, seem to generate hardly any magnetic anomalies. Based on the new data we propose the following scenario for the development of the NW Sabah continental margin: Seafloor spreading in the present South China Sea started at about 30 Ma in the Late Oligocene. The spreading process separated the Dangerous Grounds area from the SE Asian continent and ceased in late Early Miocene when the oceanic crust of the proto South China Sea was fully subducted in eastward direction along the Borneo-Palawan Trough. During Lower and/or Middle Miocene, Borneo rotated counterclockwise and was

  3. READING HABITS IN DIGITAL ERA: A RESEARCH ON THE STUDENTS IN BORNEO UNIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firima Zona Tanjung

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to explore the current reading habits of university students. Moreover, it aims to determine the effects of widespread use of the internet and other digital resources in reading habits and to give some possible recommendation to improve students’ reading habits in the digital era. The research design was descriptive survey research. The instrument of the research was questionnaire, which is based on Akarsu and Dariyemez (2014 and Chauhan and Lal (2012. The participants of the research were 320 students studying in six majors in Faculty of Teachers Training and Education at Borneo University. They were selected through the cluster random sampling. The questionnaire involved six categories, namely demographic information, frequency of items read, contents of online reading, online activities, content first clicked when online, and techniques to develop reading habits. All research data was analyzed using SPSS Statistics 22 program.

  4. Case report: two human Streptococcus suis infections in Borneo, Sabah, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajahram, Giri Shan; Hameed, Ahneez Abdul; Menon, Jayaram; William, Timothy; Tambyah, Paul Anantharajah; Yeo, Tsin Wen

    2017-03-04

    Streptococcus Suis (S.suis) is increasingly being recognised as a potentially preventable emerging zoonotic infection in humans with a global distribution. It is a major cause of meningitis especially among those in contact with pigs and has also been associated with a toxic shock syndrome. We report the first two human cases from Sabah, Borneo, Malaysia which expands the global reach of this important pathogen. Here, we illustrate their epidemiological risk factors, clinical presentation and resulting sequelae of both patients. The continued public health threat of zoonotic infections such as S.suis, highlights the need for accurate epidemiological surveillance, regulation of pig farming, slaughtering and continued advocacy of best practices for pork preparation and consumption.

  5. Preliminary Cluster Analysis For Several Representatives Of Genus Kerivoula (Chiroptera: Vespertilionidae) in Borneo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Noor Haliza; Abdullah, M. T.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study is to use cluster analysis on morphometric parameters within the genus Kerivoula to produce a dendrogram and to determine the suitability of this method to describe the relationship among species within this genus. A total of 15 adult male individuals from genus Kerivoula taken from sampling trips around Borneo and specimens kept at the zoological museum of Universiti Malaysia Sarawak were examined. A total of 27 characters using dental, skull and external body measurements were recorded. Clustering analysis illustrated the grouping and morphometric relationships between the species of this genus. It has clearly separated each species from each other despite the overlapping of measurements of some species within the genus. Cluster analysis provides an alternative approach to make a preliminary identification of a species.

  6. Assessment of atmospheric impacts of biomass open burning in Kalimantan, Borneo during 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmud, Mastura

    2013-10-01

    Biomass burning from the combustion of agricultural wastes and forest materials is one of the major sources of air pollution. The objective of the study is to investigate the major contribution of the biomass open burning events in the island of Borneo, Indonesia to the degradation of air quality in equatorial Southeast Asia. A total of 10173 active fire counts were detected by the MODIS Aqua satellite during August 2004, and consequently, elevated the PM10 concentration levels at six air quality stations in the state of Sarawak, in east Malaysia, which is located in northwestern Borneo. The PM10 concentrations measured on a daily basis were above the 50 μg m-3 criteria as stipulated by the World Health Organization Air Quality Guidelines for most of the month, and exceeded the 24-h Recommended Malaysian Air Quality Guidelines of 150 μg m-3 on three separate periods from the 13th to the 30th August 2004. The average correlation between the ground level PM10 concentrations and the satellite derived aerosol optical depth (AOD) of 0.3 at several ground level air quality stations, implied the moderate relationship between the aerosols over the depth of the entire column of atmosphere and the ground level suspended particulate matter. Multiple regression for meteorological parameters such as rainfall, windspeed, visibility, mean temperature, relative humidity at two stations in Sarawak and active fire counts that were located near the centre of fire activities were only able to explain for 61% of the total variation in the AOD. The trajectory analysis of the low level mesoscale meteorological conditions simulated by the TAPM model illustrated the influence of the sea and land breezes within the lowest part of the planetary boundary layer, embedded within the prevailing monsoonal southwesterlies, in circulating the aged and new air particles within Sarawak.

  7. Borneo stalagmites reveal climatic excursions associated with Toba ash layers prior to Greenland Stadial 20

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, K. M.; Orland, I. J.; Carolin, S.; Adkins, J. F.; Valley, J. W.; Jersild, A.; LeGrande, A. N.; Colose, C.

    2017-12-01

    The Toba super-eruption occurred in close association with an abrupt climate transition from Greenland Interstadial (GI-) 20 to Greenland Stadial (GS-) 20, roughly 74 thousand years ago. However, recent attempts to characterize either the regional or global climate response to Toba have been limited by a lack of age control, geographic proximity, and/or convincing marker of the major eruption in most high-resolution paleoclimate archives. Here, we use a suite of micro-scale analytical techniques to evaluate the oxygen isotopic and geochemical composition of multiple stalagmites that grew across the Toba interval in Gunung Mulu National Park, northern Borneo. New timeseries of stalagmite d18O at 50-micron scales across the Toba horizon revleal a large (>1‰), rapid (segments across the Toba horizon in two well-dated stalagmites previously published in Carolin et al., 2013 and Caroline et al., 2014. The SIMS d18O data reveal high-frequency d18O excursions of +2 and -2 per mil during the transition from GI-20 (warm conditions) to Greenland Stadial GS-20 (cool conditions), suggesting that this period was characterized by large fluctuations in regional hydroclimate in the western tropical Pacific, with potentially profound impacts on global atmospheric circulation. We also present results from synchrotron analyses of ash-related elements (S, P, Si, and Al) to resolve the number and relative magnitude of Toba-related eruptions as recorded in several different stalagmites from Borneo, where ash layers likely exceeded 2cm on the overlying terrain. Together, these results indicate that large, rapid ( 10yr-long) environmental changes with marked effects on both the vegetation and hydroclimate above the cave may have been triggered by discrete eruptions of the Toba caldera. We investigate the regional hydroclimate responses to the Toba super-eruption in the isotope-equipped NASA-GISS coupled climate model across a range of eruption sizes, number, and duration.

  8. Helicobacter pylori Infection Rates in Patients Undergoing Endoscopy in the Interior of Borneo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Feng Yih; Chong, Hock Chin; Tan, Yew Eng; Heng, Sophia Si Ling; Asilah, Siti Mohd Desa; Ridwan, Hashim

    2016-04-01

    Very limited data are available on the Helicobacter pylori infection among the population of interior Borneo. We aimed to investigate the H. pylori infection rate among an endoscoped interior Borneo population and to report the differences between the infected and noninfected patients. We retrospectively analyzed the data of the rapid urease test (RUT) records in Endoscopy Unit Hospital Keningau from January 2009 to May 2014. Student's t-test, chi-square test or Fisher's exact test were used accordingly. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to identify independent risk factors for H. pylori infection. Birth cohort was analyzed against H. pylori infection rate with chi-square test. Overall, there were 215 of 774 (27.8%) positive RUTs. Patients with H. pylori infection were younger (47.66 ± 14.93 vs 50.50 ± 15.02 years, p = .019), more likely to be female (OR = 1.54, 95% CI 1.12-2.13, p = .008) and originated from the Pensiangan district (OR = 1.63, 95% CI 1.01-2.64, p = .047). Chinese patients were less likely infected with H. pylori (OR = 0.36, 95% CI 0.16-0.80, p = .013). Birth cohort was significantly associated with H. pylori infection rate (χ(2) (7) = 14.71, p = .040) with an increasing trend of H. pylori infection rate in patients born later (χ(2) (1) = 5.26, p = .022). The overall H. pylori infection rate in this population was unexpectedly low. Accordingly, it may be a recent arrival in this community. Gender, age, dietary practice, socioeconomic status, and ethnicity were among the factors associated with H. pylori infection. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Orangutans, enamel defects, and developmental health: A comparison of Borneo and Sumatra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Mark F; Skinner, Matthew M

    2017-08-01

    Orangutans (Pongo sp.) show among the highest occurrence of three types of developmental enamel defect. Two are attributed to nutritional factors that reduce bone growth in the infant's face early in development. Their timing and prevalence indicate that Sumatra provides a better habitat than does Borneo. The third type, repetitive linear enamel hypoplasia (rLEH) is very common but its etiology is not understood. Our objective is to draw attention to this enigmatic, episodic stressor in the lives of orangutans. We are concerned that neglect of this possible marker of ill health may be contributing, through inaction, to their alarming decline in numbers. Width and depth of an LEH are considered proxies for duration and intensity of stress. The hypothesis that Bornean orangutans would exhibit relatively wider and deeper LEH was tested on 163 independent episodes of LEH from 9 Sumatran and 26 Bornean orangutans measured with a NanoFocus AG "µsurf Mobile Plus" scanner. Non-normally distributed data (depths) were converted to natural logs. No difference was found in width of LEH among the two island taxa; nor are their differences in width or depth between the sexes. After controlling for significant differences in LEH depths between incisors and canines, defects are, contrary to prediction, significantly deeper in Sumatran than Bornean animals (median = 28, 18 µm, respectively). It is concluded that repetitive LEH records an unknown but significant stressor present in both Sumatra and Borneo, with an average periodicity of 6 months (or multiples thereof) that lasts about 6-8 weeks. It is worse in Sumatra. Given this patterning, shared with apes from a wide range of ecological and temporal sources, rLEH is more likely attributable to disease than to malnutrition. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. First record of the tree-frog genus Chiromantis from Borneo with the description of a new species (Amphibia: Rhacophoridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Masafumi; Shimada, Tomohiko; Sudin, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    We record a tree frog of the genus Chiromantis for the first time from outside the Southeast Asian continent and describe it as a new species, Chiromantis inexpectatus. The new species from the Malaysian state of Sabah, Borneo, is a small-sized Chiromantis (male snout-vent length ca. 22 mm), and is distinguished from all other members of the genus by the combination of the following morphological characteristics: dark stripes absent, but dark spots present on dorsum; a dark-brown lateral band present from snout tip to half of body, bordered ventrally by white stripe; third and fourth fingers less than half webbed; third finger disk wider than tympanum diameter; and inner metatarsal tubercle present. Significance of findings of this species from Borneo Island, as well as phylogeny and breeding habit of the genus Chiromantis, are briefly discussed.

  11. A new species of Tropidophorus Duméril & Bibron, 1839 (Squamata: Sauria: Scincidae) from Sarawak, East Malaysia (Borneo).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pui, Yong Min; Karin, Benjamin R; Bauer, Aaron M; Das, Indraneil

    2017-05-03

    A new species of the genus Tropidophorus is described from Putai, upper Baleh, Kapit districts, Sarawak, East Malaysia (Borneo). Tropidophorus sebi sp. nov. is diagnosable from congeners from Borneo by the combination of the following characters: head shields present, dorsal and lateral scales smooth; parietal scales in two pairs; supraciliaries eight; supraoculars four; supralabials seven; infralabials four; postmental undivided; longitudinal scale rows 58; ventrals 53; transverse scale rows at midbody 34; subcaudals 98; preanals enlarged, single; and subdigital lamellae of Toe IV 19. In addition, we determine the phylogenetic position of this species within the Tropidophorus group based on mitochondrial markers, and present a key to identification of the known Bornean species in the genus.

  12. The persistence and conservation of Borneo's mammals in lowland rain forests managed for timber: observations, overviews and opportunities.

    OpenAIRE

    Meijaard, E.; Sheil, D.

    2008-01-01

    Lowland rainforests on Borneo are being degraded and lost at an alarming rate. Studies on mammals report species responding in various ways to habitat changes that occur in commercial forestry concessions. Here we draw together information on the relationship between the ecological, evolutionary, and biogeographic characteristics of selected Bornean non-volant mammals, and their response to timber harvesting and related impacts. Only a minority of species show markedly reduced densities after...

  13. Biodiversity conservation values of fragmented communally reserved forests, managed by indigenous people, in a human-modified landscape in Borneo

    OpenAIRE

    Takeuchi, Yayoi; Soda, Ryoji; Diway, Bibian; Kuda, Tinjan ak.; Nakagawa, Michiko; Nagamasu, Hidetoshi; Nakashizuka, Tohru

    2017-01-01

    This study explored the conservation values of communally reserved forests (CRFs), which local indigenous communities deliberately preserve within their area of shifting cultivation. In the current landscape of rural Borneo, CRFs are the only option for conservation because other forested areas have already been logged or transformed into plantations. By analyzing their alpha and beta diversity, we investigated how these forests can contribute to restore regional biodiversity. Although CRFs w...

  14. Stream ecosystem integrity is impaired by logging and shifting agriculture in a global megadiversity center (Sarawak, Borneo)

    OpenAIRE

    Jinggut, T.; Yule, C.M.; Boyero, Luz

    2012-01-01

    In common with most of Borneo, the Bakun region of Sarawak is currently subject to heavy deforestation mainly due to logging and, to a lesser extent, traditional slash-and-burn farming practices. This has the potential to affect stream ecosystems, which are integrators of environmental change in the surrounding terrestrial landscape. This study evaluated the effects of both types of deforestation by using functional and structural indicators (leaf litter decomposition rates and associated det...

  15. A preliminary checklist of the freshwater snails of Sabah (Malaysian Borneo) deposited in the BORNEENSIS collection, Universiti Malaysia Sabah

    OpenAIRE

    Ng, Ting Hui; Dulipat, Jasrul; Foon, Junn Kitt; Lopes-Lima, Manuel; Alexandra Zieritz,; Liew, Thor-Seng

    2017-01-01

    Sabah, a Malaysian state at the north-eastern tip of Borneo, is situated in one of the Earth’s biodiversity hotspots yet its freshwater gastropod diversity remains poorly known. An annotated checklist of the freshwater gastropods is presented, based on specimens deposited in the BORNEENSIS collection of the Institute for Tropical Biology and Conservation at Universiti Malaysia Sabah, Malaysia. A KMZ file is also provided, which acts as a repository of digital images and complete collection da...

  16. Terrathelphusa secula, a new species of semiterrestrial freshwater crab (Crustacea: Brachyura: Gecarcinucidae) from Sabah, East Malaysia, Borneo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Peter K L; Tan, Leo W H

    2015-08-28

    A new species of semiterrestrial gecarcinucid freshwater crab, Terrathelphusa secula, is described from Danum Valley in Sabah, East Malaysia, eastern Borneo. In the form of its carapace, third maxilliped, and male second gonopod, it most closely resembles T. ovis Ng, 1997, and T. telur Ng, 1997, from eastern Sarawak and Brunei, respectively. It differs markedly from these and other congeners in its proportionately much wider carapace, and a male first gonopod that is strongly curved and sickle-shaped.

  17. Genomic structure of the native inhabitants of Peninsular Malaysia and North Borneo suggests complex human population history in Southeast Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yew, Chee-Wei; Lu, Dongsheng; Deng, Lian; Wong, Lai-Ping; Ong, Rick Twee-Hee; Lu, Yan; Wang, Xiaoji; Yunus, Yushimah; Aghakhanian, Farhang; Mokhtar, Siti Shuhada; Hoque, Mohammad Zahirul; Voo, Christopher Lok-Yung; Abdul Rahman, Thuhairah; Bhak, Jong; Phipps, Maude E; Xu, Shuhua; Teo, Yik-Ying; Kumar, Subbiah Vijay; Hoh, Boon-Peng

    2018-02-01

    Southeast Asia (SEA) is enriched with a complex history of peopling. Malaysia, which is located at the crossroads of SEA, has been recognized as one of the hubs for early human migration. To unravel the genomic complexity of the native inhabitants of Malaysia, we sequenced 12 samples from 3 indigenous populations from Peninsular Malaysia and 4 native populations from North Borneo to a high coverage of 28-37×. We showed that the Negritos from Peninsular Malaysia shared a common ancestor with the East Asians, but exhibited some level of gene flow from South Asia, while the North Borneo populations exhibited closer genetic affinity towards East Asians than the Malays. The analysis of time of divergence suggested that ancestors of Negrito were the earliest settlers in the Malay Peninsula, whom first separated from the Papuans ~ 50-33 thousand years ago (kya), followed by East Asian (~ 40-15 kya), while the divergence time frame between North Borneo and East Asia populations predates the Austronesian expansion period implies a possible pre-Neolithic colonization. Substantial Neanderthal ancestry was confirmed in our genomes, as was observed in other East Asians. However, no significant difference was observed, in terms of the proportion of Denisovan gene flow into these native inhabitants from Malaysia. Judging from the similar amount of introgression in the Southeast Asians and East Asians, our findings suggest that the Denisovan gene flow may have occurred before the divergence of these populations and that the shared similarities are likely an ancestral component.

  18. The Rajang Unconformity: Major provenance change between the Eocene and Miocene sequences in NW Borneo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitfeld, H. T.; Hennig, J.; BouDagher-Fadel, M.; Hall, R.

    2017-12-01

    The offshore Sarawak Basin NW of North Sarawak is a major hydrocarbon province in SE Asia. A very thick sedimentary sequence of Oligocene to ?Early Miocene age, named Cycle 1, is an important hydrocarbon source and reservoir. Despite numerous wells the stratigraphy and tectonic history is not very well understood. The Nyalau Formation of onshore North Sarawak is the supposed equivalent of the offshore Cycle 1 sequence. The Nyalau Formation is a thick sedimentary sequence of mainly tidal to deltaic deposits. The formation is dominated by well-bedded sandstone-mudstone alternations and thicker sandstones with abundant bioturbation. The sandstones are predominantly arenaceous. Various lithic fragments and feldspar indicate multiple sources and fresh input from igneous and metamorphic rocks. Interbedded thin limestone beds and marls yielded Early Miocene foraminifera for the upper part of the succession. Zircons separated from the sandstones yielded mainly Cretaceous and Triassic ages. The Triassic is the dominant age population. The Nyalau Formation conformably overlies the Buan Shale and the Tatau Formation, and in places unconformably overlies the Belaga Formation. The Belaga Formation is part of the Rajang Group that represents remnants of a large submarine fan deposited in the Late Cretaceous to Eocene in Central Sarawak. In contrast to the Nyalau Formation, the majority of zircons from the Rajang Group have Cretaceous ages. This marks an important change in provenance at the major unconformity separating the Belaga and Nyalau Formations. This unconformity was previously interpreted as the result of an orogeny in the Late Eocene. However, there is no evidence for a subduction or collision event at this time in Sarawak. We interpret it to mark plate reorganisation in the Middle Eocene and name it the Rajang Unconformity. Borneo is the principal source of Cretaceous zircons which were derived from the Schwaner Mountains and West Sarawak. The dominant Triassic zircon

  19. Spatial congruence between carbon and biodiversity across forest landscapes of northern Borneo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Labrière

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how carbon and biodiversity vary across tropical forest landscapes is essential to achieving effective conservation of their respective hotspots in a global context of high deforestation. Whether conservation strategies aimed at protecting carbon hotspots can provide co-benefits for biodiversity protection, and vice versa, highly depends on the extent to which carbon and biodiversity co-occur at the landscape level. We used field measurements and easily accessible explanatory variables to model aboveground carbon density, soil carbon density and tree alpha diversity (response variables over a mostly forested area of northern Borneo. We assessed the spatial relationships between response variables and the spatial congruence of their hotspots. We found a significant positive relationship between aboveground carbon density and tree alpha diversity, and an above-than-expected-by-chance spatial congruence of their hotspots. Consequently, the protection of areas of high aboveground carbon density through financial mechanisms such as REDD+ is expected to benefit tree diversity conservation in the study area. On the other hand, relationships between soil carbon density and both aboveground carbon density and tree alpha diversity were negative and spatial congruences null. Hotspots of soil carbon density, mostly located in peatlands, therefore need specific conservation regulations, which the current moratorium on peat conversion in Indonesia is a first step toward.

  20. BIOLOGY AND POPULATION DYNAMICS OF BANANA SHRIMP (Penaeus merguiensis IN THE TARAKAN WATERS, EAST BORNEO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duranta D. Kembaren

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Study of biology and population dynamic of banana shrimp (Penaeus merguiensis in Tarakan waters, East Borneo was carried out from January to November 2012. The aim of this research was to identify the biological aspects and population dynamics of banana shrimp. For estimating dynamic population, data were analysed using FiSAT II. The result showed that length at first capture (Lc of banana shrimp by mini trawl (pukat hela was 35 mm and the size at first maturity (Lm was 33,86 mm in carapace length. Spawning occured all year around and reached it’s peak in March. The growth coefficient (K of banana shrimp was 1,45/year with carapace asymptotic length (CL” of 80 mm. Total mortality rate (Z and natural mortality rate (M were 4,85/year and 1,76/year. While fishing mortality rate (F and exploitation rate (E were 3,09/year and 0,64, respectively. The exploitation rate of banana shrimp in Tarakan waters tended to be overexploited so that it needed to be managed wisely and carefully by reducing the fishing effort and fishing season especially on spawning season. The recruitment peak of banana shrimp occured in May.

  1. Additions to the knowledge of the land snails of Sabah (Malaysia, Borneo), including 48 new species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, Jaap J.; Liew, Thor-Seng; Schilthuizen, Menno

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We present reviews of the Sabah (Malaysia, on the island of Borneo) species of the following problematical genera of land snails (Mollusca, Gastropoda): Acmella and Anaglyphula (Caenogastropoda: Assimineidae); Ditropopsis (Caenogastropoda: Cyclophoridae); Microcystina (Pulmonata: Ariophantidae); Philalanka and Thysanota (Pulmonata: Endodontidae); Kaliella, Rahula, (Pulmonata: Euconulidae); Trochomorpha and Geotrochus (Pulmonata: Trochomorphidae). Next to this, we describe new species in previously revised genera, such as Diplommatina (Diplommatinidae); Georissa (Hydrocenidae); as well as some new species of genera not revised previously, such as Japonia (Cyclophoridae); Durgella and Dyakia (Ariophantidae); Amphidromus, and Trachia (Camaenidae); Paralaoma (Punctidae); Curvella (Subulinidae). All descriptions are based on the morphology of the shells. We distinguish the following 48 new species: Acmella cyrtoglyphe, Acmella umbilicata, Acmella ovoidea, Acmella nana, Acmella subcancellata, Acmella striata, and Anaglyphula sauroderma (Assimineidae); Ditropopsis davisoni, Ditropopsis trachychilus, Ditropopsis constricta, Ditropopsis tyloacron, Ditropopsis cincta, and Japonia anceps (Cyclophoridae); Diplommatina bidentata and Diplommatina tylocheilos (Diplommatinidae); Georissa leucococca and Georissa nephrostoma (Hydrocenidae); Durgella densestriata, Dyakia chlorosoma, Microcystina microrhynchus, Microcystina callifera, Microcystina striatula, Microcystina planiuscula, and Microcystina physotrochus (Ariophantidae); Amphidromus psephos and Trachia serpentinitica (Camaenidae); Philalanka tambunanensis, Philalanka obscura, Philalanka anomphala, Philalanka rugulosa, and Philalanka malimgunung (Endodontidae); Kaliella eurytrochus, Kaliella sublaxa, Kaliella phacomorpha, Kaliella punctata, Kaliella microsoma, Rahula delopleura, (Euconulidae); Paralaoma angusta (Punctidae); Curvella hadrotes (Subulinidae); Trochomorpha trachus, Trochomorpha haptoderma, Trochomorpha

  2. Phytochemicals and Antioxidative Properties of Borneo Indigenous Liposu (Baccaurea lanceolata) and Tampoi (Baccaurea macrocarpa) Fruits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Bakar, Mohd Fadzelly; Ahmad, Nor Ezani; Abdul Karim, Fifilyana; Saib, Syazlina

    2014-01-01

    Two underutilized indigenous fruits of Borneo, Liposu (Baccaurea lanceolata) and Tampoi (Baccaurea macrocarpa) were investigated for their total phenolic (TPC), flavonoid (TFC), anthocyanin (TAC) and carotenoid (TCC) contents as well as antioxidant properties in vitro. The fruits were separated into three different parts (i.e., pericarp, flesh and seed) and extracted using 80% methanol. Antioxidant activity was determined using DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) free radical scavenging, ABTS decolorization and FRAP (Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Power) assays. The results showed that B. macrocarpa pericarp contained the highest amount of total phenolics, total flavonoid, total anthocyanin and total carotenoid with the values of 60.04 ± 0.53 mg GAE/g, 44.68 ± 0.67 mg CE/g, 1.23 ± 0.20 mg c-3-gE/100 g and 0.81 ± 0.14 mg BCE/g. Results from DPPH, ABTS and FRAP assays also showed that the pericarp of B. macrocarpa displayed the highest antioxidant capacity. The antioxidant activity of the extract was significantly correlated with the total phenolic and flavonoid contents, but not with the carotenoid contents. In conclusion, B. macrocarpa displayed high potential as natural source of phytochemicals with antioxidant properties. PMID:26785068

  3. Additions to the knowledge of the land snails of Sabah (Malaysia, Borneo), including 48 new species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, Jaap J; Liew, Thor-Seng; Schilthuizen, Menno

    2015-01-01

    We present reviews of the Sabah (Malaysia, on the island of Borneo) species of the following problematical genera of land snails (Mollusca, Gastropoda): Acmella and Anaglyphula (Caenogastropoda: Assimineidae); Ditropopsis (Caenogastropoda: Cyclophoridae); Microcystina (Pulmonata: Ariophantidae); Philalanka and Thysanota (Pulmonata: Endodontidae); Kaliella, Rahula, (Pulmonata: Euconulidae); Trochomorpha and Geotrochus (Pulmonata: Trochomorphidae). Next to this, we describe new species in previously revised genera, such as Diplommatina (Diplommatinidae); Georissa (Hydrocenidae); as well as some new species of genera not revised previously, such as Japonia (Cyclophoridae); Durgella and Dyakia (Ariophantidae); Amphidromus, and Trachia (Camaenidae); Paralaoma (Punctidae); Curvella (Subulinidae). All descriptions are based on the morphology of the shells. We distinguish the following 48 new species: Acmella cyrtoglyphe, Acmella umbilicata, Acmella ovoidea, Acmella nana, Acmella subcancellata, Acmella striata, and Anaglyphula sauroderma (Assimineidae); Ditropopsis davisoni, Ditropopsis trachychilus, Ditropopsis constricta, Ditropopsis tyloacron, Ditropopsis cincta, and Japonia anceps (Cyclophoridae); Diplommatina bidentata and Diplommatina tylocheilos (Diplommatinidae); Georissa leucococca and Georissa nephrostoma (Hydrocenidae); Durgella densestriata, Dyakia chlorosoma, Microcystina microrhynchus, Microcystina callifera, Microcystina striatula, Microcystina planiuscula, and Microcystina physotrochus (Ariophantidae); Amphidromus psephos and Trachia serpentinitica (Camaenidae); Philalanka tambunanensis, Philalanka obscura, Philalanka anomphala, Philalanka rugulosa, and Philalanka malimgunung (Endodontidae); Kaliella eurytrochus, Kaliella sublaxa, Kaliella phacomorpha, Kaliella punctata, Kaliella microsoma, Rahula delopleura, (Euconulidae); Paralaoma angusta (Punctidae); Curvella hadrotes (Subulinidae); Trochomorpha trachus, Trochomorpha haptoderma, Trochomorpha

  4. Fire Distribution in Peninsular Malaysia, Sumatra and Borneo in 2015 with Special Emphasis on Peatland Fires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miettinen, Jukka; Shi, Chenghua; Liew, Soo Chin

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we analyze the spatio-temporal distribution of vegetation fires in Peninsular Malaysia, Sumatra, and Borneo in the severe El Niño year of 2015, concentrating on the distribution of fires between mineral soils and peatland areas, and between land cover types in peatland areas. The results reveal that 53% of all Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) fire detections were recorded in peatlands that cover only 12% of the study area. However, fire occurrence in the peatland areas was highly dependent on land cover type. Pristine peat swamp forests (PSF) experienced only marginal fire activity (30 fire detections per 1000 km 2 ) compared to deforested undeveloped peatlands (831-915 fire detections per 1000 km 2 ). Our results also highlight the extreme fire vulnerability of the southern Sumatran and Bornean peatlands under strong El Niño conditions: 71% of all peatland hotspots were detected in the provinces of South Sumatra and Central Kalimantan, which contain 29% of peatlands in the study area. Degraded PSF and all deforested peatland land cover types, including managed areas, in the two provinces were severely affected, demonstrating how difficult it is to protect even managed drained agricultural areas from unwanted fires during dry periods. Our results thereby advocate rewetting and rehabilitation as the primary management option for highly fire prone degraded undeveloped peatland areas, whenever feasible, as a means to reduce fire risk during future dry episodes.

  5. Diversification in a biodiversity hotspot--the evolution of Southeast Asian rhacophorid tree frogs on Borneo (Amphibia: Anura: Rhacophoridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertwig, Stefan T; Schweizer, Manuel; Das, Indraneil; Haas, Alexander

    2013-09-01

    The tree-frog family Rhacophoridae is a major group contributing to the high pecies richness and reproductive diversity among vertebrates of Sundaland. Nonetheless, rhacophorid evolution, specially on Borneo, has not been studied within a phylogenetic context. In this study, we examine the phylogenetic relationships of 38 (out of 41) Bornean species of Rhacophoridae, in combination with data from previous phylogenetic studies. In the final super matrix of 91 species, we analyse sequence data from two mitochondrial and three nuclear genes. The resulting trees show the genus Rhacophorus as a paraphyletic assemblage. As a consequence, we transfer Rhacophorus appendiculatus and R. kajau to two other genera and propose the new phylogeny-based combinations--Kurixalus appendiculatus and Feihyla kajau, respectively. Furthermore, we use our phylogenetic hypotheses to reconstruct the evolution of reproductive modes in rhacophorid tree frogs. Direct development to the exclusion of a free larval stage evolved twice independently, once in an ancestor of the Pseudophilautus+Raorchestes clade in India and Sri Lanka, and once within Philautus in Southeast Asia. The deposition of egg clutches covered by a layer of jelly in Feihyla is also present in F. kajau and thus confirms our generic reassignment. The remarkably high diversity of rhacophorid tree frogs on Borneo is the outcome of a complex pattern of repeated vicariance and dispersal events caused by past changes in the climatic and geological history of the Sunda shelf. We identified geographic clades of closely related endemic species within Rhacophorus and Philautus, which result from local island radiations on Borneo. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Milankovitch cycles in an equatorial delta from the Miocene of Borneo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Nathan; Zeeden, Christian; Hilgen, Frederik; Krijgsman, Wout

    2017-08-01

    The factors controlling sedimentary cyclicity in deltaic systems are a subject of intense debate, and more research, in different deltaic environments and time periods, is needed to better understand the possible mechanisms. Offshore and Pleistocene case studies are more common than proximal and more ancient, greenhouse-climate examples. Furthermore, many studies lack a (statistical) cyclostratigraphic element. The paleo-Mahakam delta of Eastern Kalimantan, Borneo developed during the globally warm middle Miocene, in an equatorial setting, making it of interest to comprehend cyclic sedimentation in a period of warmer yet rapidly changing climate. In this study, statistical analysis of lithological changes shows that regular sandstone/shale alternations occur in a distinct pattern of cycles with thicknesses of ∼90, ∼30, and ∼17 m. Using independent dating, these thicknesses translate into periods of about 100, 40, and 20 kyr, matching the known periods of Earth's orbital eccentricity, obliquity and precession. The obliquity dominance in the middle interval is markedly similar to that observed in the global marine isotope (benthic δ18O) and other cyclic proxy records for this time interval. Despite a mismatch in the number of 40 kyr cycles compared to the global record that can be plausibly linked to the major sea-level drop at ∼13.8 Ma and facies shifts, it appears that the proximal setting of the paleo-Mahakam's sedimentation was dominantly controlled by allogenic orbital forcing, probably as a consequence of glacioeustasy. In particular, the observed obliquity dominance at paleo-equatorial latitudes, as seen in other records, highlights the dominance of orbital forcing, and potentially glacioeustatic sea level change, during this crucial period of warmer climate.

  7. The Rungus Longhouse of Sabah, Malaysian Borneo – A Dying Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahauddin Azizi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Rungus tribal group can be found in the northeast corner of Sabah, Malaysian Borneo, farming the land mostly on agricultural products in small scale plantations. Their longhouses, facing extinction, are dual-purpose dwellings, constructed entirely of traditional materials utilising small split timbers lashed with rattan for the frame, palm fronds for the thatched roof, split bamboo for the floor and tree bark of hewn wood for the compartment walls. Each family has its own separate quarters off a common hall for socialising and community work. Village life is usually communal and the village is the major political unit based on the cultural traditions. Strongly related to the spirit of the place, the ‘rice spirit’, in particular, figures prominently in the Rungus people’s beliefs and practices in controlling the spirits and the people’s daily life. Unfortunately, all of these unique beliefs seem to have disappeared through time, thus requiring proper documentation of the longhouses. The objectives gear towards analysing the architectural values and investigating cultural understanding associated with the longhouses. Most importantly, the issue of how the Rungus people relate to the environment is studied through the tangible and intangible cultural aspects of the people. The research utilises the observation technique, interviews with the residents, visual data collection and measured drawings of five longhouses as the processes to document data. The paper instigates an investigation into the conformity of the Rungus people of their place in the environment to perpetuate their lifestyle in a land that is surrounded by nature.

  8. Rising floodwaters: mapping impacts and perceptions of flooding in Indonesian Borneo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Jessie A.; Wilson, Kerrie A.; Abram, Nicola K.; Nunn, Malcolm; Gaveau, David L. A.; Runting, Rebecca K.; Tarniati, Nina; Mengersen, Kerrie L.; Meijaard, Erik

    2016-06-01

    The roles of forest and wetland ecosystems in regulating flooding have drawn increasing attention in the contexts of climate change adaptation and disaster risk reduction. However, data on floods are scarce in many of the countries where people are most exposed and vulnerable to their impacts. Here, our separate analyses of village interview surveys (364 villages) and news archives (16 sources) show that floods have major impacts on lives and livelihoods in Indonesian Borneo, and flooding risks are associated with features of the local climate and landscape, particularly land uses that have seen rapid expansions over the past 30 years. In contrast with government assessments, we find that flooding is far more widespread, and that frequent, local, events can have large cumulative impacts. Over three years, local news agencies reported floods that affected 868 settlements, 966 times (including 89 in urban areas), inundated at least 197 000 houses, and displaced more than 776 000 people, possibly as many as 1.5 million (i.e. 5%-10% of the total population). Spatial analyses based on surveys in 364 villages show that flood frequency is associated with land use in catchment areas, including forest cover and condition, and the area of wetlands, mines (open-cut coal or gold mines), and oil palm. The probability that floods have become more frequent over the past 30 years was higher for villages closer to mines, and in watersheds with more extensive oil palm, but lower in watersheds with greater cover of selectively-logged or intact forests. We demonstrate that in data-poor regions, multiple sources of information can be integrated to gain insights into the hydrological services provided by forest and wetland ecosystems, and motivate more comprehensive assessment of flooding risks and options for ecosystem-based adaptation.

  9. Impact of logging and forest conversion to oil palm plantations on soil bacterial communities in Borneo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee-Cruz, Larisa; Edwards, David P; Tripathi, Binu M; Adams, Jonathan M

    2013-12-01

    Tropical forests are being rapidly altered by logging and cleared for agriculture. Understanding the effects of these land use changes on soil bacteria, which constitute a large proportion of total biodiversity and perform important ecosystem functions, is a major conservation frontier. Here we studied the effects of logging history and forest conversion to oil palm plantations in Sabah, Borneo, on the soil bacterial community. We used paired-end Illumina sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, V3 region, to compare the bacterial communities in primary, once-logged, and twice-logged forest and land converted to oil palm plantations. Bacteria were grouped into operational taxonomic units (OTUs) at the 97% similarity level, and OTU richness and local-scale α-diversity showed no difference between the various forest types and oil palm plantations. Focusing on the turnover of bacteria across space, true β-diversity was higher in oil palm plantation soil than in forest soil, whereas community dissimilarity-based metrics of β-diversity were only marginally different between habitats, suggesting that at large scales, oil palm plantation soil could have higher overall γ-diversity than forest soil, driven by a slightly more heterogeneous community across space. Clearance of primary and logged forest for oil palm plantations did, however, significantly impact the composition of soil bacterial communities, reflecting in part the loss of some forest bacteria, whereas primary and logged forests did not differ in composition. Overall, our results suggest that the soil bacteria of tropical forest are to some extent resilient or resistant to logging but that the impacts of forest conversion to oil palm plantations are more severe.

  10. Reduced-impact logging and biodiversity conservation: a case study from Borneo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, David P; Woodcock, Paul; Edwards, Felicity A; Larsen, Trond H; Hsu, Wayne W; Benedick, Suzan; Wilcove, David S

    2012-03-01

    A key driver of rain forest degradation is rampant commercial logging. Reduced-impact logging (RIL) techniques dramatically reduce residual damage to vegetation and soils, and they enhance the long-term economic viability of timber operations when compared to conventionally managed logging enterprises. Consequently, the application of RIL is increasing across the tropics, yet our knowledge of the potential for RIL also to reduce the negative impacts of logging on biodiversity is minimal. We compare the impacts of RIL on birds, leaf-litter ants, and dung beetles during a second logging rotation in Sabah, Borneo, with the impacts of conventional logging (CL) as well as with primary (unlogged) forest. Our study took place 1-8 years after the cessation of logging. The species richness and composition of RIL vs. CL forests were very similar for each taxonomic group. Both RIL and CL differed significantly from unlogged forests in terms of bird and ant species composition (although both retained a large number of the species found in unlogged forests), whereas the composition of dung beetle communities did not differ significantly among forest types. Our results show little difference in biodiversity between RIL and CL over the short-term. However, biodiversity benefits from RIL may accrue over longer time periods after the cessation of logging. We highlight a severe lack of studies investigating this possibility. Moreover, if RIL increases the economic value of selectively logged forests (e.g., via REDD+, a United Nations program: Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation in Developing Countries), it could help prevent them from being converted to agricultural plantations, which results in a tremendous loss of biodiversity.

  11. A preliminary checklist of the freshwater snails of Sabah (Malaysian Borneo) deposited in the BORNEENSIS collection, Universiti Malaysia Sabah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Ting Hui; Dulipat, Jasrul; Foon, Junn Kitt; Lopes-Lima, Manuel; Alexandra Zieritz; Liew, Thor-Seng

    2017-01-01

    Sabah, a Malaysian state at the north-eastern tip of Borneo, is situated in one of the Earth's biodiversity hotspots yet its freshwater gastropod diversity remains poorly known. An annotated checklist of the freshwater gastropods is presented, based on specimens deposited in the BORNEENSIS collection of the Institute for Tropical Biology and Conservation at Universiti Malaysia Sabah, Malaysia. A KMZ file is also provided, which acts as a repository of digital images and complete collection data of all examined material, so that it can be shared and adapted to facilitate future research.

  12. Carbon stocks and fluxes in tropical lowland dipterocarp rainforests in Sabah, Malaysian Borneo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Saner

    Full Text Available Deforestation in the tropics is an important source of carbon C release to the atmosphere. To provide a sound scientific base for efforts taken to reduce emissions from deforestation and degradation (REDD+ good estimates of C stocks and fluxes are important. We present components of the C balance for selectively logged lowland tropical dipterocarp rainforest in the Malua Forest Reserve of Sabah, Malaysian Borneo. Total organic C in this area was 167.9 Mg C ha⁻¹±3.8 (SD, including: Total aboveground (TAGC: 55%; 91.9 Mg C ha⁻¹±2.9 SEM and belowground carbon in trees (TBGC: 10%; 16.5 Mg C ha⁻¹±0.5 SEM, deadwood (8%; 13.2 Mg C ha⁻¹±3.5 SEM and soil organic matter (SOM: 24%; 39.6 Mg C ha⁻¹±0.9 SEM, understory vegetation (3%; 5.1 Mg C ha⁻¹±1.7 SEM, standing litter (<1%; 0.7 Mg C ha⁻¹±0.1 SEM and fine root biomass (<1%; 0.9 Mg C ha⁻¹±0.1 SEM. Fluxes included litterfall, a proxy for leaf net primary productivity (4.9 Mg C ha⁻¹ yr⁻¹±0.1 SEM, and soil respiration, a measure for heterotrophic ecosystem respiration (28.6 Mg C ha⁻¹ yr⁻¹±1.2 SEM. The missing estimates necessary to close the C balance are wood net primary productivity and autotrophic respiration.Twenty-two years after logging TAGC stocks were 28% lower compared to unlogged forest (128 Mg C ha⁻¹±13.4 SEM; a combined weighted average mean reduction due to selective logging of -57.8 Mg C ha⁻¹ (with 95% CI -75.5 to -40.2. Based on the findings we conclude that selective logging decreased the dipterocarp stock by 55-66%. Silvicultural treatments may have the potential to accelerate the recovery of dipterocarp C stocks to pre-logging levels.

  13. Long-term halocarbon observations from a coastal and an inland site in Sabah, Malaysian Borneo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, A. D.; Harris, N. R. P.; Ashfold, M. J.; Gostlow, B.; Warwick, N. J.; O'Brien, L. M.; Beardmore, E. J.; Nadzir, M. S. M.; Phang, S. M.; Samah, A. A.; Ong, S.; Ung, H. E.; Peng, L. K.; Yong, S. E.; Mohamad, M.; Pyle, J. A.

    2014-08-01

    Short-lived halocarbons are believed to have important sources in the tropics, where rapid vertical transport could provide a significant source to the stratosphere. In this study, quasi-continuous measurements of short-lived halocarbons are reported for two tropical sites in Sabah (Malaysian Borneo), one coastal and one inland (rainforest). We present the observations for C2Cl4, CHBr3, CH2Br2* (actually ~80% CH2Br2 and ~20% CHBrCl2) and CH3I from November 2008 to January 2010 made using our μDirac gas chromatographs with electron capture detection (GC-ECD). We focus on the first 15 months of observations, showing over one annual cycle for each compound and therefore adding significantly to the few limited-duration observational studies that have been conducted thus far in southeast Asia. The main feature in the C2Cl4 behaviour at both sites is its annual cycle, with the winter months being influenced by northerly flow with higher concentrations, typical of the Northern Hemisphere, and with the summer months influenced by southerly flow and lower concentrations representative of the Southern Hemisphere. No such clear annual cycle is seen for CHBr3, CH2Br2* or CH3I. The baseline values for CHBr3 and CH2Br2* are similar at the coastal (overall median: CHBr3 1.7 ppt, CH2Br2* 1.4 ppt) and inland sites (CHBr3 1.6 ppt, CH2Br2* 1.1 ppt), but periods with elevated values are seen at the coast (overall 95th percentile: CHBr3 4.4 ppt, CH2Br2ast 1.9 ppt), presumably resulting from the stronger influence of coastal emissions. Overall median bromine values from [CHBr3 × 3] + [CH2Br2* × 2] are 8.0 ppt at the coast and 6.8 ppt inland. The median values reported here are largely consistent with other limited tropical data and imply that southeast Asia generally is not, as has been suggested, a hot spot for emissions of these compounds. These baseline values are consistent with the most recent emissions found for southeast Asia using the p-TOMCAT (Toulouse Off-line Model of

  14. Carbon Stocks and Fluxes in Tropical Lowland Dipterocarp Rainforests in Sabah, Malaysian Borneo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saner, Philippe; Loh, Yen Yee; Ong, Robert C.; Hector, Andy

    2012-01-01

    Deforestation in the tropics is an important source of carbon C release to the atmosphere. To provide a sound scientific base for efforts taken to reduce emissions from deforestation and degradation (REDD+) good estimates of C stocks and fluxes are important. We present components of the C balance for selectively logged lowland tropical dipterocarp rainforest in the Malua Forest Reserve of Sabah, Malaysian Borneo. Total organic C in this area was 167.9 Mg C ha−1±3.8 (SD), including: Total aboveground (TAGC: 55%; 91.9 Mg C ha−1±2.9 SEM) and belowground carbon in trees (TBGC: 10%; 16.5 Mg C ha−1±0.5 SEM), deadwood (8%; 13.2 Mg C ha−1±3.5 SEM) and soil organic matter (SOM: 24%; 39.6 Mg C ha−1±0.9 SEM), understory vegetation (3%; 5.1 Mg C ha−1±1.7 SEM), standing litter (<1%; 0.7 Mg C ha−1±0.1 SEM) and fine root biomass (<1%; 0.9 Mg C ha−1±0.1 SEM). Fluxes included litterfall, a proxy for leaf net primary productivity (4.9 Mg C ha−1 yr−1±0.1 SEM), and soil respiration, a measure for heterotrophic ecosystem respiration (28.6 Mg C ha−1 yr−1±1.2 SEM). The missing estimates necessary to close the C balance are wood net primary productivity and autotrophic respiration. Twenty-two years after logging TAGC stocks were 28% lower compared to unlogged forest (128 Mg C ha−1±13.4 SEM); a combined weighted average mean reduction due to selective logging of −57.8 Mg C ha−1 (with 95% CI −75.5 to −40.2). Based on the findings we conclude that selective logging decreased the dipterocarp stock by 55–66%. Silvicultural treatments may have the potential to accelerate the recovery of dipterocarp C stocks to pre-logging levels. PMID:22235319

  15. Locally Appropriate Energy Strategies for the Developing World: A focus on Clean Energy Opportunities in Borneo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirley, Rebekah Grace

    This dissertation focuses on an integration of energy modeling tools to explore energy transition pathways for emerging economies. The spate of growth in the global South has led to a global energy transition, evidenced in part by a surge in the development of large scale energy infrastructure projects for the provision of reliable electricity service. The rational of energy security and exigency often usher these large scale projects through to implementation with minimal analysis of costs: social and environmental impact, ecological risk, or opportunity costs of alternative energy transition pathways foregone. Furthermore, development of energy infrastructure is inherently characterized by the involvement of a number of state and non-state actors, with varying interests, objectives and access to authority. Being woven through and into social institutions necessarily impacts the design, control and functionality of infrastructure. In this dissertation I therefore conceptualize energy infrastructure as lying at the intersection, or nexus, of people, the environment and energy security. I argue that energy infrastructure plans and policy should, and can, be informed by each of these fields of influence in order to appropriately satisfy local development needs. This case study explores the socio-techno-environmental context of contemporary mega-dam development in northern Borneo. I describe the key actors of an ongoing mega-dam debate and the constellation of their interaction. This highlights the role that information may play in public discourse and lends insight into how inertia in the established system may stymie technological evolution. I then use a combination of power system simulation, ecological modeling and spatial analysis to analyze the potential for, and costs and tradeoffs of, future energy scenarios. In this way I demonstrate reproducible methods that can support energy infrastructure decision making by directly addressing data limitation barriers. I

  16. Description of the lynx spiders of a canopy fogging project in northern Borneo (Araneae: Oxyopidae), with description of a new genus and six new species of Hamataliwa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deeleman - Reinhold, C.L.

    2009-01-01

    All oxyopid spider species collected in a long-term ecological canopy project in northern Borneo are described. A total of nine species in three genera could be established, one of which belongs to a new genus. Four species could be assigned to known species, five are described as new species in the

  17. Genetics and morphology of the genus Tritetrabdella (Hirudinea, Haemadipsidae) from the mountainous rain forests of Sabah, Borneo, reveal a new species with two new subspecies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kappes, H.

    2013-01-01

    Blood-feeding terrestrial leeches of the family Haemadipsidae are a notorious part of the invertebrate diversity in Asian and Australian rain forests. All hitherto published records of terrestrial leeches of Borneo belong to the genus Haemadipsa. Here, a second, poorly known haemadipsid genus is

  18. Review of Dolichostyrax Aurivillius (Cerambycidae, Lamiinae) in Borneo, with descriptions of three new genera and the first case of (ovo)viviparity in the long-horned beetles

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriš,Radim; Kundrata,Robin; Trnka,Filip

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We reviewed the species of genus Dolichostyrax Aurivillius ( Cerambycidae : Morimopsini ) from Borneo, which included the redescriptions of two species ? Dolichostyrax moultoni Aurivillius, 1911 and Dolichostyrax longipes Aurivillius, 1913, with the first female description for the latter. After the examination of the additional material previously identified as Dolichostyrax , we described three new genera ? Borneostyrax gen. n., Microdolichostyrax gen. n., and Eurystyrax gen. n. Bo...

  19. Mesoscale model simulation of low level equatorial winds over Borneo during the haze episode of September 1997

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmud, Mastura

    2009-08-01

    The large-scale vegetation fires instigated by the local farmers during the dry period of the major El Niño event in 1997 can be considered as one of the worst environmental disasters that have occurred in southeast Asia in recent history. This study investigated the local meteorology characteristics of an equatorial environment within a domain that includes the northwestern part of Borneo from the 17 to 27 September 1997 during the height of the haze episode by utilizing a limited area three-dimensional meteorological and dispersion model, The Air Pollution Model (TAPM). Daily land and sea breeze conditions near the northwestern coast of Borneo in the state of Sarawak, Malaysia were predicted with moderate success by the index of agreement of less than one between the observed and simulated values for wind speed and a slight overprediction of 2.3 of the skill indicator that evaluates the standard deviation to the observed values. The innermost domain of study comprises an area of 24,193 km2, from approximately 109°E to 111°E, and from 1°N to 2.3°N, which includes a part of the South China Sea. Tracer analysis of air particles that were sourced in the state of Sarawak on the island of Borneo verified the existence of the landward and shoreward movements of the air during the simulation of the low level wind field. Polluted air particles were transported seawards during night-time, and landwards during daytime, highlighting the recirculation features of aged and newer air particles during the length of eleven days throughout the model simulation. Near calm conditions at low levels were simulated by the trajectory analysis from midnight to mid-day on the 22 of September 1997. Low-level turbulence within the planetary boundary layer in terms of the total kinetic energy was weak, congruent with the weak strength of low level winds that reduced the ability of the air to transport the pollutants. Statistical evaluation showed that parameters such as the systematic

  20. Pemanfaatan Model WRF-ARW Untuk Analisis Fenomena Atmosfer Borneo Vortex (Studi Kasus Tanggal 28 Desember 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randy Ardianto

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini memanfaatkan model WRF-ARW (Weather Research and Forcasting – Advanced Research WRF untuk memberikan gambaran mengenai kondisi atmosfer saat kejadian Borneo Vortex. Hasil visualisasi model WRF-ARW pada tanggal 28 Desember 2014 menunjukkan adanya vortex, dimana hal ini menimbulkan belokan angin dan arus konvergen di Laut Cina Selatan, Selat Karimata, dan Kalimantan bagian selatan. Selain itu kondisi atmosfer yang labil dan kelembaban udara yang tinggi saat itu, memicu terbentuknya awan-awan konvektif pada ketiga wilayah tersebut. Uji kehandalan sederhana pada model menunjukkan bahwa secara spasial model mampu memetakan wilayah-wilayah yang terdapat hujan dengan baik namun dari segi intensitas hujan, angka yang dihasilkan oleh model tergolong underestimate jika dibandingkan dengan data TRMM 3B42.

  1. Tropical biomass burning smoke plume size, shape, reflectance, and age based on 2001–2009 MISR imagery of Borneo

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    C. S. Zender

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Land clearing for crops, plantations and grazing results in anthropogenic burning of tropical forests and peatlands in Indonesia, where images of fire-generated aerosol plumes have been captured by the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR since 2001. Here we analyze the size, shape, optical properties, and age of distinct fire-generated plumes in Borneo from 2001–2009. The local MISR overpass at 10:30 a.m. misses the afternoon peak of Borneo fire emissions, and may preferentially sample longer plumes from persistent fires burning overnight. Typically the smoke flows with the prevailing southeasterly surface winds at 3–4 m s−1, and forms ovoid plumes whose mean length, height, and cross-plume width are 41 km, 708 m, and 27% of the plume length, respectively. 50% of these plumes have length between 24 and 50 km, height between 523 and 993 m and width between 18% and 30% of plume length. Length and cross-plume width are lognormally distributed, while height follows a normal distribution. Borneo smoke plume heights are similar to previously reported plume heights, yet Borneo plumes are on average nearly three times longer than previously studied plumes. This could be due to sampling or to more persistent fires and greater fuel loads in peatlands than in other tropical forests. Plume area (median 169 km2, with 25th and 75th percentiles at 99 km2 and 304 km2, respectively varies exponentially with length, though for most plumes a linear relation provides a good approximation. The MISR-estimated plume optical properties involve greater uncertainties than the geometric properties, and show patterns consistent with smoke aging. Optical depth increases by 15–25% in the down-plume direction, consistent with hygroscopic growth and nucleation overwhelming the effects of particle dispersion. Both particle single-scattering albedo and top-of-atmosphere reflectance peak about halfway down-plume, at

  2. Update: outbreak of acute febrile illness among athletes participating in Eco-Challenge-Sabah 2000--Borneo, Malaysia, 2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-19

    During September 7-11, 2000, CDC was notified by the Idaho Department of Health, the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services, and the GeoSentinel Global Surveillance Network of at least 20 cases of acute febrile illness in three countries; all ill patients had participated in the Eco-Challenge-Sabah 2000 multisport expedition race in Borneo, Malaysia, during August 21-September 3, 2000. Participants included athletes from 29 U.S. states and 26 countries. This report updates the ongoing investigation of this outbreak through December 2, which suggests that Leptospira were the cause of illness and that water from the Segama River was the primary source of infection. Participants in adventure sports and exotic tourism should be aware of potential exposure to unusual and emerging infectious agents.

  3. Integration of carbon conservation into sustainable forest management using high resolution satellite imagery: A case study in Sabah, Malaysian Borneo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langner, Andreas; Samejima, Hiromitsu; Ong, Robert C.; Titin, Jupiri; Kitayama, Kanehiro

    2012-08-01

    Conservation of tropical forests is of outstanding importance for mitigation of climate change effects and preserving biodiversity. In Borneo most of the forests are classified as permanent forest estates and are selectively logged using conventional logging techniques causing high damage to the forest ecosystems. Incorporation of sustainable forest management into climate change mitigation measures such as Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+) can help to avert further forest degradation by synergizing sustainable timber production with the conservation of biodiversity. In order to evaluate the efficiency of such initiatives, monitoring methods for forest degradation and above-ground biomass in tropical forests are urgently needed. In this study we developed an index using Landsat satellite data to describe the crown cover condition of lowland mixed dipterocarp forests. We showed that this index combined with field data can be used to estimate above-ground biomass using a regression model in two permanent forest estates in Sabah, Malaysian Borneo. Tangkulap represented a conventionally logged forest estate while Deramakot has been managed in accordance with sustainable forestry principles. The results revealed that conventional logging techniques used in Tangkulap during 1991 and 2000 decreased the above-ground biomass by an annual amount of average -6.0 t C/ha (-5.2 to -7.0 t C/ha, 95% confidential interval) whereas the biomass in Deramakot increased by 6.1 t C/ha per year (5.3-7.2 t C/ha, 95% confidential interval) between 2000 and 2007 while under sustainable forest management. This indicates that sustainable forest management with reduced-impact logging helps to protect above-ground biomass. In absolute terms, a conservative amount of 10.5 t C/ha per year, as documented using the methodology developed in this study, can be attributed to the different management systems, which will be of interest when implementing REDD+ that

  4. Clustering and genetic differentiation of the normocyte binding protein (nbpxa) of Plasmodium knowlesi clinical isolates from Peninsular Malaysia and Malaysia Borneo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Md Atique; Fong, Mun Yik; Lau, Yee Ling; Yusof, Ruhani

    2016-04-26

    The zoonotic malaria parasite Plasmodium knowlesi has become an emerging threat to South East Asian countries particular in Malaysia. A recent study from Sarawak (Malaysian Borneo) discovered two distinct normocyte binding protein xa (Pknbpxa) types of P. knowlesi. In the present study, the Pknbpxa of clinical isolates from Peninsular Malaysia and Sabah (Malaysian Borneo) were investigated for the presence of Pknbpxa types and natural selection force acting on the gene. Blood samples were collected from 47 clinical samples from Peninsular Malaysia (n = 35) and Sabah (Malaysian Borneo, n = 12) were used in the study. The Pknbpxa gene was successfully amplified and directly sequenced from 38 of the samples (n = 31, Peninsular Malaysia and n = 7, Sabah, Malaysian Borneo). The Pknbpxa sequences of P. knowlesi isolates from Sarawak (Malaysian Borneo) were retrieved from GenBank and included in the analysis. Polymorphism, genetic diversity and natural selection of Pknbpxa sequences were analysed using DNAsp v 5.10, MEGA5. Phylogentics of Pknbpxa sequences was analysed using MrBayes v3.2 and Splits Tree v4.13.1. The pairwise F ST indices were used to determine the genetic differentiation between the Pknbpxa types and was calculated using Arlequin 3.5.1.3. Analyses of the sequences revealed Pknbpxa dimorphism throughout Malaysia indicating co-existence of the two types (Type-1 and Type-2) of Pknbpxa. More importantly, a third type (Type 3) closely related to Type 2 Pknbpxa was also detected. This third type was found only in the isolates originating from Peninsular Malaysia. Negative natural selection was observed, suggesting functional constrains within the Pknbpxa types. This study revealed the existence of three Pknbpxa types in Malaysia. Types 1 and 2 were found not only in Malaysian Borneo (Sarawak and Sabah) but also in Peninsular Malaysia. A third type which was specific only to samples originating from Peninsular Malaysia was discovered. Further genetic

  5. An integrated study of geochemistry and mineralogy of the Upper Tukau Formation, Borneo Island (East Malaysia): Sediment provenance, depositional setting and tectonic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, Ramasamy; Roy, Priyadarsi D.; Kessler, Franz L.; Jong, John; Dayong, Vivian; Jonathan, M. P.

    2017-08-01

    An integrated study using bulk chemical composition, mineralogy and mineral chemistry of sedimentary rocks from the Tukau Formation of Borneo Island (Sarawak, Malaysia) is presented in order to understand the depositional and tectonic settings during the Neogene. Sedimentary rocks are chemically classified as shale, wacke, arkose, litharenite and quartz arenite and consist of quartz, illite, feldspar, rutile and anatase, zircon, tourmaline, chromite and monazite. All of them are highly matured and were derived from a moderate to intensively weathered source. Bulk and mineral chemistries suggest that these rocks were recycled from sedimentary to metasedimentary source regions with some input from granitoids and mafic-ultramafic rocks. The chondrite normalized REE signature indicates the presence of felsic rocks in the source region. Zircon geochronology shows that the samples were of Cretaceous and Triassic age. Comparable ages of zircon from the Tukau Formation sedimentary rocks, granitoids of the Schwaner Mountains (southern Borneo) and Tin Belt of the Malaysia Peninsular suggest that the principal provenance for the Rajang Group were further uplifted and eroded during the Neogene. Additionally, presence of chromian spinels and their chemistry indicate a minor influence of mafic and ultramafic rocks present in the Rajang Group. From a tectonic standpoint, the Tukau Formation sedimentary rocks were deposited in a passive margin with passive collisional and rift settings. Our key geochemical observation on tectonic setting is comparable to the regional geological setting of northwestern Borneo as described in the literature.

  6. Recent Shift of Deforestation to High Elevation Areas from 2001 to 2013 in Borneo Detected by MODIS Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, S.; Suzuki, R.

    2015-12-01

    The biomass of tropical forests sequestrates tons of carbon and plays an important role in the global carbon cycle regulating the climate. Also its high biodiversity ecosystems bring us many valuable resources and cultural and educational ecosystem services. However, large areas of the tropical forest are deforested and converted to oil palm or acacia plantation for the economic benefit of the local society mainly in Southeast Asia. Monitoring of the tropical forest from satellites provides us the information about the deforestation for decadal time period over extensive areas and enables us to discuss it from a scientific point of view. The purpose of this study is to reveal the interannual change and recent trend of deforestation in relation to the land elevation for decadal time period over Borneo by using data from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). We acquired the atmospherically corrected and cloud free Terra-MODIS and Aqua-MODIS daily data products (MOD09GA and MYD09GA; collection 5) from 2001 to 2013 for Borneo. We extracted the pixel values in the 500m surface reflectance bands 1 (red) and 4 (green) products and calculated the green-red vegetation index (GRVI), (band 4 - band 1) / (band 4 + band 1), at a daily time step. GRVI shows a positive value for the land prevailed by green vegetation, while it shows a negative value for the land prevailed by no-green components such as bare land. As for the elevation data, ASTER Global Digital Elevation Model (GDEM) which has 33.3m spatial resolution was employed. The original resolution was resampled to the grid system of MODIS data (i.e. 500m resolution). Pixels which had a negative GRVI ratio more than 80 % (termed as "no green pixel") in each year were regarded as the land characterized by no vegetation, and mapped the distribution for each year. Throughout the 13 years, no green pixels mainly found over the coastal low land below 20m of the elevation and the area was almost constant (around

  7. The Increase of Arthropods Biodiversity in Paddy Field Ecosystem Managed by Using Integrated Pest Management at South Borneo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samharinto

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the arthropods biodiversity in two paddy field ecosystems, namely, paddy field ecosystem using Integrated Pest Management (IPM system and non-IPM paddy field ecosystem. This study was conducted from April 2011 – November 2011 in three locations, that is, Pasar Kamis village and Sungai Rangas village in Banjar regency, and Guntung Payung village in Banjarbaru city, South Borneo Province. In this study, we used insect nets, yellow sticky traps, light trap and pitfall trap to get the sample or catch the arthropods in one period of planting season. The arthropods caught were then classified into some classes: pest (herbivore, natural enemy (parasitoid and predator, and other arthropods. After that, the Species Diversity Index was determined using its Shannon-Wiener Index (H’, Evenness (e, Species Richness (R, and Species Similarity Index (IS. The sum of arthropods which have the characteristic of pest and parasitoid were higher in the IPM paddy fields than in the non-IPM paddy fields, and the sum of other arthropods were the same. The highest H’ and e values were in the IPM paddy field in Pasar Kamis village. The IS value for each three locations were 77.5% in Pasar Kamis village, 93.42% in Guntung Payung village, and 78.76% in Sungai Rangas village.

  8. Behind an ambitious megaproject in Asia: The history and implications of the Bakun hydroelectric dam in Borneo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sovacool, Benjamin K., E-mail: bsovacool@nus.edu.sg [Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy, National University of Singapore, Oei Tiong Ham Building, 469C Bukit Timah Road, Singapore 259772 (Singapore); Bulan, L.C. [Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy, National University of Singapore, Oei Tiong Ham Building, 469C Bukit Timah Road, Singapore 259772 (Singapore)

    2011-09-15

    Using a case-study, inductive, narrative approach, this article explores the history, drivers, benefits, and barriers to the Bakun Hydroelectric Project in East Malaysia. Situated on the island of Borneo, Bakun Dam is a 204 m high concrete face, rock filled dam on the Balui River in the Upper Rajang Basin in the rainforests of Sarawak. Bakun Dam and its affiliated infrastructure could be the single largest and most expensive energy project ever undertaken in Southeast Asia. Based on data collected through site visits, original field research in Sarawak, and more than 80 research interviews, the article begins by teasing out the complex history and drivers behind the Bakun project before identifying a set of potential social, political, and economic benefits the project could deliver. It then delves into six sets of barriers in the technical, economic, political, legal and regulatory, social, and environmental realms. We find that Bakun illustrates how centralized energy megaprojects, while ostensibly championed for reasons of economies of scale and the ability to bring about transformational change in the shortest period of time, often fail to address broader development goals such as fighting energy poverty and improving the livelihoods of the local communities they are supposed to serve. - Highlights: > Bakun Dam is concrete face, rock filled dam on the Balui River in the Upper Rajang Basin in the rainforests of Sarawak. > The project faces technical, economic, political, legal and regulatory, social, and environmental barriers. > We conclude the project will fail to fight energy poverty or improve the livelihoods of local populations.

  9. Biodiversity conservation values of fragmented communally reserved forests, managed by indigenous people, in a human-modified landscape in Borneo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yayoi Takeuchi

    Full Text Available This study explored the conservation values of communally reserved forests (CRFs, which local indigenous communities deliberately preserve within their area of shifting cultivation. In the current landscape of rural Borneo, CRFs are the only option for conservation because other forested areas have already been logged or transformed into plantations. By analyzing their alpha and beta diversity, we investigated how these forests can contribute to restore regional biodiversity. Although CRFs were fragmented and some had been disturbed in the past, their tree species diversity was high and equivalent to that of primary forests. The species composition of intact forests and forests disturbed in the past did not differ clearly, which indicates that past logging was not intensive. All CRFs contained unique and endangered species, which are on the IUCN Red List, Sarawak protected plants, or both. On the other hand, the forest size structure differed between disturbed and intact CRFs, with the disturbed CRFs consisting of relatively smaller trees. Although the beta diversity among CRFs was also high, we found a high contribution of species replacement (turnover, but not of richness difference, in the total beta diversity. This suggests that all CRFs have a conservation value for restoring the overall regional biodiversity. Therefore, for maintaining the regional species diversity and endangered species, it would be suitable to design a conservation target into all CRFs.

  10. Rural Tourism at its Peak: Socio-Cultural Impacts towards Host Communities of Kinabalu Park, Sabah (Malaysian-Borneo

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    Tangit Tania Maria

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Kinabalu Park in Sabah (Malaysian-Borneo represents multiple tourism opportunities for its stakeholders, host communities and tourists. Being the first World Heritage Site in Malaysia endorsed by UNESCO since 2000, this nature-based tourism destination is a popular tourism destination in Malaysia, as well as in the Asia region. The designated study area includes villages nearby Kinabalu Park. Through the popularity of the park and various other attractions within the area, tourism activities contributes to socio-cultural impacts towards its host communities. The perceptions and attitudes of the locals towards tourism are identified and evaluated. By having the input of host communities as part of conserving tourism whilst meeting certain principles of sustainable tourism, the paper aims to attain interesting findings about the perceptions of the host communities towards socio-cultural impacts of tourism on their community. The paper further aims to recommend for the continuous improvement of sustainable tourism development at Kinabalu Park and its surroundings.

  11. Stream ecosystem integrity is impaired by logging and shifting agriculture in a global megadiversity center (Sarawak, Borneo).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinggut, Tajang; Yule, Catherine M; Boyero, Luz

    2012-10-15

    In common with most of Borneo, the Bakun region of Sarawak is currently subject to heavy deforestation mainly due to logging and, to a lesser extent, traditional slash-and-burn farming practices. This has the potential to affect stream ecosystems, which are integrators of environmental change in the surrounding terrestrial landscape. This study evaluated the effects of both types of deforestation by using functional and structural indicators (leaf litter decomposition rates and associated detritivores or 'shredders', respectively) to compare a fundamental ecosystem process, leaf litter decomposition, within logged, farmed and pristine streams. Slash-and-burn agricultural practices increased the overall rate of decomposition despite a decrease in shredder species richness (but not shredder abundance) due to increased microbial decomposition. In contrast, decomposition by microbes and invertebrates was slowed down in the logged streams, where shredders were less abundant and less species rich. This study suggests that shredder communities are less affected by traditional agricultural farming practices, while modern mechanized deforestation has an adverse effect on both shredder communities and leaf breakdown. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Biodiversity conservation values of fragmented communally reserved forests, managed by indigenous people, in a human-modified landscape in Borneo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Yayoi; Soda, Ryoji; Diway, Bibian; Kuda, Tinjan Ak; Nakagawa, Michiko; Nagamasu, Hidetoshi; Nakashizuka, Tohru

    2017-01-01

    This study explored the conservation values of communally reserved forests (CRFs), which local indigenous communities deliberately preserve within their area of shifting cultivation. In the current landscape of rural Borneo, CRFs are the only option for conservation because other forested areas have already been logged or transformed into plantations. By analyzing their alpha and beta diversity, we investigated how these forests can contribute to restore regional biodiversity. Although CRFs were fragmented and some had been disturbed in the past, their tree species diversity was high and equivalent to that of primary forests. The species composition of intact forests and forests disturbed in the past did not differ clearly, which indicates that past logging was not intensive. All CRFs contained unique and endangered species, which are on the IUCN Red List, Sarawak protected plants, or both. On the other hand, the forest size structure differed between disturbed and intact CRFs, with the disturbed CRFs consisting of relatively smaller trees. Although the beta diversity among CRFs was also high, we found a high contribution of species replacement (turnover), but not of richness difference, in the total beta diversity. This suggests that all CRFs have a conservation value for restoring the overall regional biodiversity. Therefore, for maintaining the regional species diversity and endangered species, it would be suitable to design a conservation target into all CRFs.

  13. The Duffy binding protein (PkDBPαII) of Plasmodium knowlesi from Peninsular Malaysia and Malaysian Borneo show different binding activity level to human erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Khai Lone; Amir, Amirah; Lau, Yee Ling; Fong, Mun Yik

    2017-08-11

    The zoonotic Plasmodium knowlesi is a major cause of human malaria in Malaysia. This parasite uses the Duffy binding protein (PkDBPαII) to interact with the Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC) receptor on human and macaque erythrocytes to initiate invasion. Previous studies on P. knowlesi have reported distinct Peninsular Malaysia and Malaysian Borneo PkDBPαII haplotypes. In the present study, the differential binding activity of these haplotypes with human and macaque (Macaca fascicularis) erythrocytes was investigated. The PkDBPαII of Peninsular Malaysia and Malaysian Borneo were expressed on the surface of COS-7 cells and tested with human and monkey erythrocytes, with and without anti-Fy6 (anti-Duffy) monoclonal antibody treatment. Binding activity level was determined by counting the number of rosettes formed between the transfected COS-7 cells and the erythrocytes. Anti-Fy6 treatment was shown to completely block the binding of human erythrocytes with the transfected COS-7 cells, thus verifying the specific binding of human DARC with PkDBPαII. Interestingly, the PkDBPαII of Peninsular Malaysia displayed a higher binding activity with human erythrocytes when compared with the Malaysian Borneo PkDBPαII haplotype (mean number of rosettes formed = 156.89 ± 6.62 and 46.00 ± 3.57, respectively; P < 0.0001). However, no difference in binding activity level was seen in the binding assay using M. fascicularis erythrocytes. This study is the first report of phenotypic difference between PkDBPαII haplotypes. The biological implication of this finding is yet to be determined. Therefore, further studies need to be carried out to determine whether this differential binding level can be associated with severity of knowlesi malaria in human.

  14. Construction costs and physico-chemical properties of the assimilatory organs of Nepenthes species in Northern Borneo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osunkoya, Olusegun O; Daud, Siti Dayanawati; Di-Giusto, Bruno; Wimmer, Franz L; Holige, Thippeswamy M

    2007-05-01

    Species of the Nepenthaceae family are under-represented in studies of leaf traits and the consequent view of mineral nutrition and limitation in carnivorous plants. This study is aimed to complement existing data on leaf traits of carnivorous plants. Physico-chemical properties, including construction costs (CC), of the assimilatory organs (leaf and pitcher) of a guild of lowland Nepenthes species inhabiting heath and/or peat swamp forests of Brunei, Northern Borneo were determined. Stoichiometry analyses indicate that Nepenthes species are nitrogen limited. Most traits vary appreciably across species, but greater variations exist between the assimilatory organs. Organ mass per unit area, dry matter tissue concentration (density), nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), carbon, heat of combustion (H(c)) and CC values were higher in the leaf relative to the pitcher, while organ thickness, potassium (K) and ash showed the opposite trend. Cross-species correlations indicate that joint rather than individual consideration of the leaf and the pitcher give better predictive relationships between variables, signalling tight coupling and functional interdependence of the two assimilatory organs. Across species, mass-based CC did not vary with N or P, but increases significantly with tissue density, carbon and H(c), and decreases with K and ash contents. Area-based CC gave the same trends (though weaker in strength) in addition to a significant positive correlation with tissue mass per unit area. The lower CC value for the pitcher is in agreement with the concept of low marginal cost for carnivory relative to conventional autotrophy. The poor explanatory power of N, P or N : P ratio with CC suggests that factors other than production of expensive photosynthetic machinery (which calls for a high N input), including concentrations of lignin, wax/lipids or osmoregulatory ions like K(+), may give a better explanation of the CC variation across Nepenthes species.

  15. Contribution of pitcher fragrance and fluid viscosity to high prey diversity in a Nepenthes carnivorous plant from Borneo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giusto, Bruno Di; Grosbois, Vladimir; Fargeas, Elodie; Marshall, David J; Gaume, Laurence

    2008-03-01

    Mechanisms that improve prey richness in carnivorous plants may involve three crucial phases of trapping:attraction, capture and retention. Nepenthes rafflesiana var. typica is an insectivorous pitcher plant that is widespread in northern Borneo. It exhibits ontogenetic pitcher dimorphism with the upper pitchers trapping more flying prey than the lower pitchers. While this difference in prey composition has been ascribed to differences in attraction,the contribution of capture and retention has been overlooked. This study focused on distinguishing between the prey trapping mechanisms, and assessing their relative contribution to prey diversity. Arthropod richness and diversity of both visitors and prey in the two types of pitchers were analysed to quantify the relative contribution of attraction to prey trapping. Rate of insect visits to the different pitcher parts and the presence or absence of a sweet fragrance was recorded to clarify the origin and mechanism of attraction. The mechanism of retention was studied by insect bioassays and measurements of fluid viscosity. Nepenthes rafflesiana was found to trap a broader prey spectrum than that previously described for any Nepenthes species,with the upper pitchers attracting and trapping a greater quantity and diversity of prey items than the lower pitchers. Capture efficiency was low compared with attraction or retention efficiency. Fragrance of the peristome,or nectar rim,accounted mainly for the observed non-specific, better prey attraction by the upper pitchers, while the retentive properties of the viscous fluid in these upper pitchers arguably explains the species richness of their flying prey. The pitchers of N. rafflesiana are therefore more than simple pitfall traps and the digestive fluid plays an important yet unsuspected role in the ecological success of the species.

  16. Plant DNA barcodes and assessment of phylogenetic community structure of a tropical mixed dipterocarp forest in Brunei Darussalam (Borneo)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Salim, Kamariah; Chase, Mark W.; Dexter, Kyle G.; Pennington, R. Toby; Tan, Sylvester; Kaye, Maria Ellen; Samuel, Rosabelle

    2017-01-01

    DNA barcoding is a fast and reliable tool to assess and monitor biodiversity and, via community phylogenetics, to investigate ecological and evolutionary processes that may be responsible for the community structure of forests. In this study, DNA barcodes for the two widely used plastid coding regions rbcL and matK are used to contribute to identification of morphologically undetermined individuals, as well as to investigate phylogenetic structure of tree communities in 70 subplots (10 × 10m) of a 25-ha forest-dynamics plot in Brunei (Borneo, Southeast Asia). The combined matrix (rbcL + matK) comprised 555 haplotypes (from ≥154 genera, 68 families and 25 orders sensu APG, Angiosperm Phylogeny Group, 2016), making a substantial contribution to tree barcode sequences from Southeast Asia. Barcode sequences were used to reconstruct phylogenetic relationships using maximum likelihood, both with and without constraining the topology of taxonomic orders to match that proposed by the Angiosperm Phylogeny Group. A third phylogenetic tree was reconstructed using the program Phylomatic to investigate the influence of phylogenetic resolution on results. Detection of non-random patterns of community assembly was determined by net relatedness index (NRI) and nearest taxon index (NTI). In most cases, community assembly was either random or phylogenetically clustered, which likely indicates the importance to community structure of habitat filtering based on phylogenetically correlated traits in determining community structure. Different phylogenetic trees gave similar overall results, but the Phylomatic tree produced greater variation across plots for NRI and NTI values, presumably due to noise introduced by using an unresolved phylogenetic tree. Our results suggest that using a DNA barcode tree has benefits over the traditionally used Phylomatic approach by increasing precision and accuracy and allowing the incorporation of taxonomically unidentified individuals into analyses

  17. Rapid replacement of riparian rainforest habitat and the impacts on the meandering dynamics of the Kinabatangan River, Borneo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Alexander J.; Constantine, José A.

    2014-05-01

    Meandering rivers are defined by their nature to migrate, remobilising floodplain sediment and constructing new surfaces for riparian vegetation to colonise. The presence of riparian vegetation has long been known to limit the ability of rivers to erode riverbanks, but it has remained unclear the principal means by which vegetation provides this function. As a result, most models that predict meandering behaviour do not fully incorporate vegetation, thereby limiting their utility where forest is rapidly replaced. The problem is particularly acute along the Kinabatangan River of Sabah in Malaysian Borneo, where oil palm plantations are replacing one of the oldest riparian rainforests on the planet. The area of Sabah has seen rapid and extensive land use change in the last 40 years, as virgin rainforest has been systematically cleared for logging, and to make way for oil palm plantations. In the 18 years from 1990 to 2008, Sabah lost half of its intact rainforest, which equates to more than 1.85 million hectares. Using Landsat imagery dating back to 1973, we report here the impacts of this rapid land-use change on rates of meander migration on a 280-km reach of the Kinabatangan River. The river planform has been remarkably stable throughout the time period of study, but individual meanders show a rapid response to large discharge events, migrating over an order of magnitude faster than nearby reaches. Rapidly migrating meanders generally occur along portions of floodplain that have been artificially cleared of riparian vegetation, potentially resulting in significant increases in sediment load and within-channel bar development. A field campaign is planned to investigate the mechanisms by which riparian vegetation effect meander migration in these tropical regions.

  18. Behind an ambitious megaproject in Asia: The history and implications of the Bakun hydroelectric dam in Borneo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sovacool, Benjamin K.; Bulan, L.C.

    2011-01-01

    Using a case-study, inductive, narrative approach, this article explores the history, drivers, benefits, and barriers to the Bakun Hydroelectric Project in East Malaysia. Situated on the island of Borneo, Bakun Dam is a 204 m high concrete face, rock filled dam on the Balui River in the Upper Rajang Basin in the rainforests of Sarawak. Bakun Dam and its affiliated infrastructure could be the single largest and most expensive energy project ever undertaken in Southeast Asia. Based on data collected through site visits, original field research in Sarawak, and more than 80 research interviews, the article begins by teasing out the complex history and drivers behind the Bakun project before identifying a set of potential social, political, and economic benefits the project could deliver. It then delves into six sets of barriers in the technical, economic, political, legal and regulatory, social, and environmental realms. We find that Bakun illustrates how centralized energy megaprojects, while ostensibly championed for reasons of economies of scale and the ability to bring about transformational change in the shortest period of time, often fail to address broader development goals such as fighting energy poverty and improving the livelihoods of the local communities they are supposed to serve. - Highlights: → Bakun Dam is concrete face, rock filled dam on the Balui River in the Upper Rajang Basin in the rainforests of Sarawak. → The project faces technical, economic, political, legal and regulatory, social, and environmental barriers. → We conclude the project will fail to fight energy poverty or improve the livelihoods of local populations.

  19. Coral Reefs at the Northernmost Tip of Borneo: An Assessment of Scleractinian Species Richness Patterns and Benthic Reef Assemblages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waheed, Zarinah; van Mil, Harald G J; Syed Hussein, Muhammad Ali; Jumin, Robecca; Golam Ahad, Bobita; Hoeksema, Bert W

    2015-01-01

    The coral reefs at the northernmost tip of Sabah, Borneo will be established under a marine protected area: the Tun Mustapha Park (TMP) by the end of 2015. This area is a passage where the Sulu Sea meets the South China Sea and it is situated at the border of the area of maximum marine biodiversity, the Coral Triangle. The TMP includes fringing and patch reefs established on a relatively shallow sea floor. Surveys were carried out to examine features of the coral reefs in terms of scleractinian species richness, and benthic reef assemblages following the Reef Check substrate categories, with emphasis on hard coral cover. Variation in scleractinian diversity was based on the species composition of coral families Fungiidae (n = 39), Agariciidae (n = 30) and Euphylliidae (n = 15). The number of coral species was highest at reefs with a larger depth gradient i.e. at the periphery of the study area and in the deep South Banggi Channel. Average live hard coral cover across the sites was 49%. Only 7% of the examined reefs had > 75% hard coral cover, while the majority of the reef sites were rated fair (51%) and good (38%). Sites with low coral cover and high rubble fragments are evidence of blast fishing, although the observed damage appeared old. Depth was a dominant factor in influencing the coral species composition and benthic reef communities in the TMP. Besides filling in the information gaps regarding species richness and benthic cover for reef areas that were previously without any data, the results of this study together with information that is already available on the coral reefs of TMP will be used to make informed decisions on zoning plans for conservation priorities in the proposed park.

  20. Distinct genetic difference between the Duffy binding protein (PkDBPαII) of Plasmodium knowlesi clinical isolates from North Borneo and Peninsular Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Mun-Yik; Rashdi, Sarah A A; Yusof, Ruhani; Lau, Yee-Ling

    2015-02-21

    Plasmodium knowlesi is one of the monkey malaria parasites that can cause human malaria. The Duffy binding protein of P. knowlesi (PkDBPαII) is essential for the parasite's invasion into human and monkey erythrocytes. A previous study on P. knowlesi clinical isolates from Peninsular Malaysia reported high level of genetic diversity in the PkDBPαII. Furthermore, 36 amino acid haplotypes were identified and these haplotypes could be separated into allele group I and allele group II. In the present study, the PkDBPαII of clinical isolates from the Malaysian states of Sarawak and Sabah in North Borneo was investigated, and compared with the PkDBPαII of Peninsular Malaysia isolates. Blood samples from 28 knowlesi malaria patients were used. These samples were collected between 2011 and 2013 from hospitals in North Borneo. The PkDBPαII region of the isolates was amplified by PCR, cloned into Escherichia coli, and sequenced. The genetic diversity, natural selection and phylogenetics of PkDBPαII haplotypes were analysed using MEGA5 and DnaSP ver. 5.10.00 programmes. Forty-nine PkDBPαII sequences were obtained. Comparison at the nucleotide level against P. knowlesi strain H as reference sequence revealed 58 synonymous and 102 non-synonymous mutations. Analysis on these mutations showed that PkDBPαII was under purifying (negative) selection. At the amino acid level, 38 different PkDBPαII haplotypes were identified. Twelve of the 28 blood samples had mixed haplotype infections. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that all the haplotypes were in allele group I, but they formed a sub-group that was distinct from those of Peninsular Malaysia. Wright's FST fixation index indicated high genetic differentiation between the North Borneo and Peninsular Malaysia haplotypes. This study is the first to report the genetic diversity and natural selection of PkDBPαII of P. knowlesi from Borneo Island. The PkDBPαII haplotypes found in this study were distinct from those from

  1. La superstición incauta de una catástrofe natural: las posibilidades del final en Los invertebrables y Borneo de O. Coelho

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Catalin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Entre el 2003 y el 2006, Oliverio Coelho publica su trilogía (Los invertebrables, Borneo y Promesas naturales. Dentro de un estudio más amplio sobre los imaginarios para después del final en la narrativa argentina actual, el presente trabajo analiza el modo como los dos primeros avatares de la serie configuran dicho imaginario. Se abordará el lugar que se le otorga al Estado, la manera en que se opera sobre la “lectura en clave” y la puesta en tensión de la (indefinición de lo humano como forma de conquista del afuera. Between 2003 and 2006, Oliverio Coelho published his trilogy composed by Los invertebrables, Borneo and Promesas naturales. In the framework of a larger study about the imaginaries for “after the end” in contemporary Argentinian narrative, the present work analyzes how the first two avatars of the series configure this imaginary. I study the place that the State occupies in these fictions, the ways in which a “ciphered” type of reading is used, and the tensions that arise around the (indefinition of the human as a way of conquering the outside.

  2. MAIN CAREGIVER’S EXPERIENCE IN MEETING SELF-CARE NEEDS AMONG ADOLESCENTS WITH ASD IN PONTIANAK MUNICIPALITY, WEST BORNEO, INDONESIA: A QUALITATIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilis Lestari

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Autism spectrum disorder (ASD is a complex developmental disorder, increasing in number, faster than that of other developmental disorders in the world. This complex disorder affects a child’s self-autonomy, which is important for individual self-care. Objective : This study is to explore main caregivers’ experience to meet self-care needs among adolescents with ASD in Pontianak, West Borneo, Indonesia. Methods: Qualitative semi-structured in-depth interviews were done with 7 main caregivers that have lived together and taken care of the adolescents with ASD in Pontianak Municipality, West Borneo Province. Sampling was taken with purposive sampling (maximum variation. Source (interviews and method (observations of self-care activities and documents like photos, learning reports and field notes triangulations were taken on 1 participant and 7 autistic adolescents. Participants’ statements were recorded by using a voice recorder, and then transcribed, coded, interpreted, and categorized in order that sub-topics and main topics could be formed. Results: The study identified five main topics: i.e., 1 Autonomy in self-care; 2 Care effort; 3 Feelings, support, and expectations. Three findings of the study emphasize the potentials of children with autism to be autonomous in daily self-care. Conclusions: Adolescents with ASD can potentially meet the needs of their daily care independently.

  3. Hydrogeomorphological and water quality impacts of oil palm conversion and logging in Sabah, Malaysian Borneo: a multi-catchment approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Rory; Nainar, Anand; Bidin, Kawi; Higton, Sam; Annammala, Kogilavani; Blake, William; Luke, Sarah; Murphy, Laura; Perryman, Emily; Wall, Katy; Hanapi, Jamil

    2016-04-01

    The last three decades have seen a combination of logging and land-use change across most of the rainforest tropics. This has involved conversion to oil palm across large parts of SE Asia. Although much is now known about the hydrological and sediment transport impacts of logging, relatively little is known about how impacts of oil palm conversion compare with those of logging. Furthermore little is known about the impacts of both on river morphology and water quality. This paper reports some findings of the first phase of a ten-year large-scale manipulative multi-catchment experiment (part of the SAFE - Stability of Altered Forest Ecosystems - Project), based in the upper part of the Brantian Catchment in Sabah, Malaysian Borneo; the project is designed to assess the degree to which adverse impacts of oil palm conversion (on erosion, downstream channel change, water quality and river ecology) might be reduced by retaining buffer zones of riparian forest of varying width from zero to 120 metres. Ten 2 km2 catchments of contrasting land use history have been instrumented since 2011 to record discharge, turbidity, conductivity and water temperature at 5-minute intervals. These comprise 6 repeat-logged catchments being subjected in 2015-16 to conversion to oil palm with varying riparian forest widths; a repeat-logged 'control' catchment; an old regrowth catchment; an oil palm catchment; and a primary forest catchment. In addition, (1) monthly water samples from the catchments have been analysed for nitrates and phosphates, (2) channel cross-sectional change along each stream has been monitored at six-monthly intervals and (3) supplementary surveys have been made of downstream bankfull channel cross-sectional size and water chemistry at a wider range of catchment sites, and (4) sediment cores have been taken and contemporary deposition monitored at a hierarchical network of sites in the large Brantian catchment for geochemical analysis and dating to establish the

  4. A Tragedy of Borneo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NN,

    1960-01-01

    It was a nice and cool evening in October 1958, when we were sitting in all safety and comfort in the Resthouse at Ranau. The sky had cleared up and Mt Kinabalu dominated the scenery in all its rugged majesty. Mr D.I. Nicholson, the Ecologist of Sandakan, and I were to start next day to climb the

  5. Cenozoic bryozoans from Borneo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Martino, E.

    2014-01-01

    Bryozoans are colonial marine invertebrates with an abundant fossil record ranging from Ordovician to Holocene. They are found particularly in shelf sediments deposited at all palaeolatitudes. The Cenozoic bryozoan fauna of Indonesia has been severely neglected in the past. The paucity of previous

  6. New on-line method for water isotope analysis of fluid inclusions in speleothems using laser absorption spectroscopy: Application to stalagmites from Borneo and Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affolter, Stéphane; Fleitmann, Dominik; Nele Meckler, Anna; Leuenberger, Markus

    2014-05-01

    Speleothems are recognised as key continental archives for paleoclimate reconstructions. They contain fluid inclusions representing past drip water trapped in the calcite structure. Speleothem can be precisely dated and therefore the oxygen (δ18O) and hydrogen (δD) isotopes of fluid inclusions constitute powerful proxies for paleotemperature or to investigate changes in the moisture source over several interglacial-glacial cycles. To liberate fluid inclusion water and to analyse its isotopic composition, a new online extraction method developed at Bern is used. The principle can be summarised as follows: Prior to crushing, the sample is placed into a copper tube, fixed to the line previously heated to 140° C and flushed with a nitrogen and standard water mixture. Thereafter, the speleothem sample is crushed using a simple hydraulic crushing device and the released water from fluid inclusions is transferred by the nitrogen-standard water mixture flow to a Picarro L1102-i isotopic liquid water and water vapor analyser. The measuring principle is based on wavelength-scanned cavity ring-down spectroscopy (WS-CRDS) technology that allows us to simultaneously monitor hydrogen and oxygen isotopes. Reproducibility of standard water measurements is typically better than 1.5 o for δD and 0.4 o for δ18O. With this method, we successfully analysed δD and δ18O isotopic composition of a stalagmite from Northern Borneo (tropical West Pacific) covering almost two glacial-interglacial cycles from MIS 12 to early MIS 9 (460-330 ka) as well as recent samples from Switzerland and Borneo. These results are used in combination with calcite δ18O to reconstruct paleotemperature. Currently, we are measuring a stalagmite from Milandre cave (Jura, Switzerland) covering the Bølling-Allerød, Younger Dryas cold phase and the Holocene.

  7. Impact of the 2015/2016 El Niño event on rainwater and cave dripwater isotopes in Northern Borneo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, S. A.; Cobb, K. M.; Moerman, J. W.; Bennett, A. L.; Gerstner, H.; Malang, J.; Wong, C. I.

    2017-12-01

    Paleoclimate reconstructions of past hydrological variability are primarily comprised of water isotope timeseries, and vastly extend sparse instrumental precipitation data from many key areas of the world. At Gunung Mulu National Park in Northern Borneo (4N 115E), stalagmite oxygen isotope (δ18O) records provide a view of western tropical Pacific hydroclimate across much of the last 500,000 years [Partin et al. 2007, Carolin et al. 2013, 2016] including a recent study of past ENSO extremes across the Holocene [Chen et al. 2016]. The climatic interpretation of the N. Borneo stalagmite δ18O records is based on analysis of a 6.5-yr-long timeseries of daily rainfall δ18O, and companion timeseries of cave dripwater δ18O from Gunung Mulu [Moerman et al. 2013, 2014]. Taken together, these studies demonstrate rainfall δ18O acts as a robust proxy for regional convective activity (via the amount effect), which is transmitted into the caves over a period of 2-10 months. However, these findings are highly dependent on the magnitude of the observed changes during the study period, which did not include a strong El Nino event. Here we present an extension of the world's longest running daily rainfall δ18O time series and biweekly cave dripwater δ18O timeseries to span the period from 2012 to 2017, creating an 11-yr-long timeseries for analysis of climatic and karst influences on observed rainwater and dripwater δ18O. Most notably, our new time series captures the very strong 2015/2016 El Niño event. Dramatic reductions in rainfall at Mulu ( 25% across DJF) were accompanied by a 6‰ increase in rainfall δ18O. Cave dripwaters also record the influence of 2015/2016 El Niño event through significantly reduced drip rates as well as 2-4‰, increases in dripwater δ18O. We present compelling evidence that dripwater residence times vary across the expanded time-series - most notably during the 2015/2016 El Niño event. Our results carry important implications for the

  8. View of Nature of Science (VNOS Form B: An Instrument for Assessing Preservice Teachers View of Nature of Science at Borneo University Tarakan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Listiani Listiani

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available NOS form B is an instrument that has been developed and revised to assess the view of nature of science of preservice science teachers through nature of science aspects.Indeed, students and teachers have to have the view of nature of science to avoid misconceptions of science concepts. Unfortunately, research on the view of Nature of Science is less conducted in Indonesia. This is a qualitative research that was conducted in Borneo University Tarakan. Respondents are preservice biology teachers in the sixth semester. The first step of this research is translating and adapting the VNOS form B into Bahasa Indonesia to make sure that the instrument is culturally fit to Indonesian and the transadapted instrument then given to the respondents. The result shows that the VNOS form B can be applied to assess the view of nature of science of preservice biology teachers. However, the result also shows that most of preservice biology teachers have few understanding on aspects of nature of scince.

  9. Characteristics and knowledge about HIV/AIDS and drug abuse associated with inmates education level within prison populations in Singkawang, West Borneo in 2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigarlaki, Herke G

    2008-07-01

    to identify the characteristics and knowledge of inmates within prison population in Singkawang city about HIV/AIDS and drugs associated with their education level. a cross-sectional study with 240 respondents was conducted in Singkawang City, West Borneo. The subjects were inmates of prison population. They were interviewed by co-assistant doctors who completed the questionnaire forms about various aspects of knowledge about HIV/AIDS and drugs, including the application of standardized scales on subject characteristics. Data was prepared by using Microsoft Excel 2000 and all data were evaluated by univariate and bivariate analyses. The presentation will be shown in table. at the end of 2006, 91.25% respondents were male and mostly were Malay ethnic group. Moreover, 32.08% of them had formal educational background of Senior High School. Approximately 83.33% of respondents had discovered their status of HIV/AIDS by voluntary counseling and testing (VCT). Their level of knowledge about HIV/AIDS issue particularly that AIDS is caused by HIV was 90.42%. Approximately 48.33% respondents agreed that the risk factor for drug abuse was living with a family member who had taken up smoking and alcoholic consumption. our data indicate that higher education level has better contribution to the better knowledge about HIV/AIDS and drugs.

  10. Magnetic signature of river sediments drained into the southern and eastern part of the South China Sea (Malay Peninsula, Sumatra, Borneo, Luzon and Taiwan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissel, Catherine; Liu, Zhifei; Li, Jinhua; Wandres, Camille

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic properties of 22 river samples collected in the Malay Peninsula, Sumatra, Borneo, Luzon and Taiwan have been investigated in order to magnetically characterize the sediments drained and deposited into the South China Sea. The geological formations as well as the present climatic conditions are different from one region to another. Laboratory analyses include low-field magnetic susceptibility, anhysteretic (ARM) and isothermal (IRM) remanent magnetizations acquisition and decay, back-field acquisition, thermal demagnetization of three-axes IRM, hysteresis cycles and low-temperature magnetic measurements. The magnetic properties indicate that the sediments are a mixture of hematite, magnetite and pyrrhotite in different proportions depending on the region. Combined with results previously reported for the three main Asian rivers (Pearl, Red and Mekong rivers), the new data indicate that, in general, hematite-rich sediments are delivered to the southern basin of the South China Sea while the northern basin is fed with magnetite and pyrrhotite-rich sediments. In addition to this general picture, some variability is observed at smaller geographic scales. Indeed, the magnetic assemblages are closely related to the geology of the various catchments while clay minerals, previously reported for the same samples, are more representative of the climatic conditions under which the parent rocks have evolved within each catchment. The magnetic fraction, now well characterized in the main river sediments drained into the South China Sea, can be used as a tracer for changes in precipitation on land and in oceanic water mass transport and exchange.

  11. The impact of local surface changes in Borneo on atmospheric composition at wider spatial scales: coastal processes, land-use change and air quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyle, J. A.; Warwick, N. J.; Harris, N. R. P.; Abas, Mohd Radzi; Archibald, A. T.; Ashfold, M. J.; Ashworth, K.; Barkley, Michael P.; Carver, G. D.; Chance, K.; Dorsey, J. R.; Fowler, D.; Gonzi, S.; Gostlow, B.; Hewitt, C. N.; Kurosu, T. P.; Lee, J. D.; Langford, S. B.; Mills, G.; Moller, S.; MacKenzie, A. R.; Manning, A. J.; Misztal, P.; Nadzir, Mohd Shahrul Mohd; Nemitz, E.; Newton, H. M.; O'Brien, L. M.; Ong, Simon; Oram, D.; Palmer, P. I.; Peng, Leong Kok; Phang, Siew Moi; Pike, R.; Pugh, T. A. M.; Rahman, Noorsaadah Abdul; Robinson, A. D.; Sentian, J.; Samah, Azizan Abu; Skiba, U.; Ung, Huan Eng; Yong, Sei Eng; Young, P. J.

    2011-01-01

    We present results from the OP3 campaign in Sabah during 2008 that allow us to study the impact of local emission changes over Borneo on atmospheric composition at the regional and wider scale. OP3 constituent data provide an important constraint on model performance. Treatment of boundary layer processes is highlighted as an important area of model uncertainty. Model studies of land-use change confirm earlier work, indicating that further changes to intensive oil palm agriculture in South East Asia, and the tropics in general, could have important impacts on air quality, with the biggest factor being the concomitant changes in NOx emissions. With the model scenarios used here, local increases in ozone of around 50 per cent could occur. We also report measurements of short-lived brominated compounds around Sabah suggesting that oceanic (and, especially, coastal) emission sources dominate locally. The concentration of bromine in short-lived halocarbons measured at the surface during OP3 amounted to about 7 ppt, setting an upper limit on the amount of these species that can reach the lower stratosphere. PMID:22006963

  12. Heart of borneo as a ′Jalan Tikus′: Exploring the links Between indigenous rights, extractive and exploitative industries, and conservation at the World Conservation Congress 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitchner Sarah

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available At the Fourth World Conservation Congress in Barcelona in October 2008, a number of motions were passed that emphasised human and indigenous rights and the role of the private sector, particularly extractive and exploitative industries, in conservation. These issues are highly relevant to the ongoing World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF-led Heart of Borneo (HoB conservation initiative, which is situated in an area with overlapping political jurisdictions and an array of possible futures, which could include new or expanded protected areas, community-managed conservation programmes, or oil palm plantations potentially covering millions of hectares. The HoB initiative is ambiguous in the sense that its borders are not fixed, its land and resource management strategies are not clearly defined, its projects are not predetermined, and its policies regarding who benefits from it are not obvious. HoB is also ambitious, and its actors must negotiate a number of different types of scales: geographic, political, economic, institutional, and ecological. These factors offer both opportunities and weaknesses both for conservation and for local and indigenous communities living within the HoB area. Using HoB as an example, I show how small NGOs, national branches of multinational NGOs like WWF, and local and indigenous communities must walk a ′jalan tikus′ to accomplish conservation and indigenous rights goals. I also offer suggestions on how the motions passed by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN membership can be incorporated into HoB planning on the ground.

  13. The effects of catchment and riparian forest quality on stream environmental conditions across a tropical rainforest and oil palm landscape in Malaysian Borneo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, Sarah H; Barclay, Holly; Bidin, Kawi; Chey, Vun Khen; Ewers, Robert M; Foster, William A; Nainar, Anand; Pfeifer, Marion; Reynolds, Glen; Turner, Edgar C; Walsh, Rory P D; Aldridge, David C

    2017-06-01

    Freshwaters provide valuable habitat and important ecosystem services but are threatened worldwide by habitat loss and degradation. In Southeast Asia, rainforest streams are particularly threatened by logging and conversion to oil palm, but we lack information on the impacts of this on freshwater environmental conditions, and the relative importance of catchment versus riparian-scale disturbance. We studied 16 streams in Sabah, Borneo, including old-growth forest, logged forest, and oil palm sites. We assessed forest quality in riparian zones and across the whole catchment and compared it with stream environmental conditions including water quality, structural complexity, and organic inputs. We found that streams with the highest riparian forest quality were nearly 4 °C cooler, over 20 cm deeper, had over 40% less sand, greater canopy cover, more stored leaf litter, and wider channels than oil palm streams with the lowest riparian forest quality. Other variables were significantly related to catchment-scale forest quality, with streams in the highest quality forest catchments having 40% more bedrock and 20 times more dead wood, along with higher phosphorus, and lower nitrate-N levels compared to streams with the lowest catchment-scale forest quality. Although riparian buffer strips went some way to protecting waterways, they did not maintain fully forest-like stream conditions. In addition, logged forest streams still showed signs of disturbance 10-15 years after selective logging. Our results suggest that maintenance and restoration of buffer strips can help to protect healthy freshwater ecosystems but logging practices and catchment-scale forest management also need to be considered.

  14. Effects of land use on surface–atmosphere exchanges of trace gases and energy in Borneo: comparing fluxes over oil palm plantations and a rainforest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, David; Nemitz, Eiko; Misztal, Pawel; Di Marco, Chiara; Skiba, Ute; Ryder, James; Helfter, Carole; Cape, J. Neil; Owen, Sue; Dorsey, James; Gallagher, Martin W.; Coyle, Mhairi; Phillips, Gavin; Davison, Brian; Langford, Ben; MacKenzie, Rob; Muller, Jennifer; Siong, Jambery; Dari-Salisburgo, Cesare; Di Carlo, Piero; Aruffo, Eleonora; Giammaria, Franco; Pyle, John A.; Hewitt, C. Nicholas

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports measurements of land–atmosphere fluxes of sensible and latent heat, momentum, CO2, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), NO, NO2, N2O and O3 over a 30 m high rainforest canopy and a 12 m high oil palm plantation in the same region of Sabah in Borneo between April and July 2008. The daytime maximum CO2 flux to the two canopies differs by approximately a factor of 2, 1200 mg C m−2 h−1 for the oil palm and 700 mg C m−2 h−1 for the rainforest, with the oil palm plantation showing a substantially greater quantum efficiency. Total VOC emissions are also larger over the oil palm than over the rainforest by a factor of 3. Emissions of isoprene from the oil palm canopy represented 80 per cent of the VOC emissions and exceeded those over the rainforest in similar light and temperature conditions by on average a factor of 5. Substantial emissions of estragole (1-allyl-4-methoxybenzene) from the oil palm plantation were detected and no trace of this VOC was detected in or above the rainforest. Deposition velocities for O3 to the rainforest were a factor of 2 larger than over oil palm. Emissions of nitrous oxide were larger from the soils of the oil palm plantation than from the soils of the rainforest by approximately 25 per cent. It is clear from the measurements that the large change in the species composition generated by replacing rainforest with oil palm leads to profound changes in the net exchange of most of the trace gases measured, and thus on the chemical composition of the boundary layer over these surfaces. PMID:22006962

  15. Genetic diversity in the C-terminus of merozoite surface protein 1 among Plasmodium knowlesi isolates from Selangor and Sabah Borneo, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Nan Jiun; Goh, Xiang Ting; Koehler, Anson V; William, Timothy; Yeo, Tsin Wen; Vythilingam, Indra; Gasser, Robin B; Lim, Yvonne A L

    2017-10-01

    Plasmodium knowlesi, a malaria parasite of macaques, has emerged as an important parasite of humans. Despite the significance of P. knowlesi malaria in parts of Southeast Asia, very little is known about the genetic variation in this parasite. Our aim here was to explore sequence variation in a molecule called the 42kDa merozoite surface protein-1 (MSP-1), which is found on the surface of blood stages of Plasmodium spp. and plays a key role in erythrocyte invasion. Several studies of P. falciparum have reported that the C-terminus (a 42kDa fragment) of merozoite surface protein-1 (MSP-1 42 ; consisting of MSP-1 19 and MSP-1 33 ) is a potential candidate for a malaria vaccine. However, to date, no study has yet investigated the sequence diversity of the gene encoding P. knowlesi MSP-1 42 (comprising Pk-msp-1 19 and Pk-msp-1 33 ) among isolates in Malaysia. The present study explored this aspect. Twelve P. knowlesi isolates were collected from patients from hospitals in Selangor and Sabah Borneo, Malaysia, between 2012 and 2014. The Pk-msp-1 42 gene was amplified by PCR and directly sequenced. Haplotype diversity (Hd) and nucleotide diversity (л) were studied among the isolates. There was relatively high genetic variation among P. knowlesi isolates; overall Hd and л were 1±0.034 and 0.01132±0.00124, respectively. A total of nine different haplotypes related to amino acid alterations at 13 positions, and the Pk-MSP-1 19 sequence was found to be more conserved than Pk-msp-1 33 . We have found evidence for negative selection in Pk-msp- 42 as well as the 33kDa and 19kDa fragments by comparing the rate of non-synonymous versus synonymous substitutions. Future investigations should study large numbers of samples from disparate geographical locations to critically assess whether this molecule might be a potential vaccine target for P. knowlesi. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Investigating how fundamental parameters of XRF sample preparation and analysis affect the observed elemental concentration: an experiment using fluvial sediment from Sabah, Borneo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higton, Sam; Walsh, Rory

    2015-04-01

    X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) is an important technique for measuring the concentrations of geochemical elements and inorganic contaminants adsorbed to sediments as an input to sediment tracing methods used to evaluate sediment transport dynamics in river catchments. In addition to traditional laboratory-based XRF instruments, the advent of increasingly advanced portable handheld XRF devices now mean that samples of fluvial sediment can be analysed in the field or in the laboratory following appropriate sample preparation procedures. There are limitations and sources of error associated with XRF sample preparation and analysis, however. It is therefore important to understand how fundamental parameters involved in sample preparation and analysis, such as sample compression and measurement exposure duration, affect observed variability in measurement results. Such considerations become important if the resulting measurement variability is high relative to the natural variability in element concentrations at a sample site. This paper deployed a simple experimental design to assess the impacts of varying a number of sample preparation and XRF analysis parameters on recorded measurements of elemental concentrations of the fine fraction (Sabah, Borneo; the core site is being used for research into multi-proxy sediment fingerprinting as part of the Stability of Altered Forest Ecosystems (SAFE) project. Some fundamental sample preparation procedures consistent with US EPA Method 6200 were applied to all sediment samples in order to explore key variables of interest. All sediment samples were air-dried to constant weight and sample quantity was sufficient to satisfy the assumption of 'infinite thickness' of sample. Standard plastic sample cups were used for both the Rigaku laboratory machine and the Niton portable XRF machine. A computer-controlled desktop laboratory stand was used in conjunction with the Niton handheld XRF analyser to ensure consistent repeated measurements

  17. Land snails of Leptopoma Pfeiffer, 1847 in Sabah, Northern Borneo (Caenogastropoda: Cyclophoridae): an analysis of molecular phylogeny and geographical variations in shell form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phung, Chee-Chean; Heng, Pooi-San; Liew, Thor-Seng

    2017-01-01

    Leptopoma is a species rich genus with approximately 100 species documented. Species-level identification in this group has been based on shell morphology and colouration, as well as some anatomical features based on small sample sizes. However, the implications of the inter- and intra-species variations in shell form to the taxonomy of Leptopoma species and the congruency of its current shell based taxonomy with its molecular phylogeny are still unclear. There are four Leptopoma species found in Sabah, Borneo, and their taxonomy status remains uncertain due to substantial variation in shell forms. This study focuses on the phylogenetic relationships and geographical variation in shell form of three Leptopoma species from Sabah. The phylogenetic relationship of these species was first estimated by performing Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian analysis based on mitochondrial genes (16S rDNA and COI) and nuclear gene (ITS-1). Then, a total of six quantitative shell characters (i.e., shell height, shell width, aperture height, aperture width, shell spire height, and ratio of shell height to width) and three qualitative shell characters (i.e., shell colour patterns, spiral ridges, and dark apertural band) of the specimens were mapped across the phylogenetic tree and tested for phylogenetic signals. Data on shell characters of Leptopoma sericatum and Leptopoma pellucidum from two different locations (i.e., Balambangan Island and Kinabatangan) where both species occurred sympatrically were then obtained to examine the geographical variations in shell form. The molecular phylogenetic analyses suggested that each of the three Leptopoma species was monophyletic and indicated congruence with only one of the shell characters (i.e., shell spiral ridges) in the current morphological-based classification. Although the geographical variation analyses suggested some of the shell characters indicating inter-species differences between the two Leptopoma species, these also pointed to

  18. Erosion on tropical rain-forest terrain: a re-evaluation in the light of long-term monitoring, aerial photographic evidence and sediment fingerprinting in Borneo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Rory; Bidin, Kawi; Blake, William; Clarke, Michelle; Sayer, Aimee; Ghazali, Rosmadi; Annammala, Kogila; Chappell, Nick; Douglas, Ian

    2010-05-01

    Rain-forest vegetation is generally considered to be highly protective against erosion, but with disturbance via logging leading to major, but relatively short-lived increases in erosion for a 2-year period until rapid revegetation of slopes has occurred. This paper questions and re-assesses these views using a combination of long-term monitoring, GIS-assisted aerial photograph analysis and multi-proxy sediment fingerprinting in primary rainforest and adjacent terrain that was selectively logged either in 1988-89 or in 1992-93 within the Segama catchment in eastern Sabah, Malaysian Borneo. In primary forest areas, repeat measurements using the erosion bridge technique over the 20-year period 1990-2010 demonstrate how slopewash rates are significant, but concentrated in extreme events and increasing sharply with slope angle. Continuous monitoring of suspended sediment, coupled with repeat erosion bridge measurement, however, demonstrate that pipe erosion is at least as important even on moderate terrain and landsliding is an important process on steep terrain. In the selectively logged Baru catchment, a combination of long-term monitoring of suspended sediment and repeat measurements at an erosion bridge network has demonstrated that the erosional impact of logging is longer-term than formerly thought, with a major secondary peak in erosion 5-10 years after logging due to road-linked landslides and the decay of logs in debris dams; analysis of current bed-sediment and floodplain cores using a multi-proxy sediment fingerprinting approach demonstrates that sources of sediment are still different to those in primary forest over 20 years after logging ceased. Sediment fingerprinting at the large catchment scale (focussing on the analysis of lateral bench and floodplain sediment cores compared with upstream tributary sediment inputs), together with GIS-assisted analysis of aerial photographic evidence of spatial differences in landslide occurrence, demonstrates the key

  19. Eine neue Gnetum-Art aus Borneo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Markgraf, F.

    1966-01-01

    Frutex alte scandens. Rami sulcati et crebre lenticellosi. Ramuli teretes laeves. Folia (adumbrata?) opposita, petiolus 12 mm longus, lamina glabra, elliptica, acuminata, 11—17 cm longa, 6—7½cm lata, firme chartacea; nervi secundarii 9 paria, arcuata, ante marginem coniuncta, subtus conspicua.

  20. The use of downstream sediment mini-cores to indicate changes through time in the spatial pattern and process contribution of erosion within a small, selectively logged rainforest catchment in Sabah, Malaysian Borneo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R. E.; Walsh, R. P. D.; Coombs, T. J.; Bidin, K.; Blake, W. H.

    2012-04-01

    Multi-proxy sediment fingerprinting (using changes in geochemical variables within downstream floodplain or lateral bench cores and relating them to differences in geochemical character of upstream tributary sediment inputs and/or down soil profiles, preferably in combination with dating using Pb-210 and Cs-137) provides the potential for assessing changes in sediment sources through time. This has rarely been done in tropical rainforest catchments, but needs to be tested at a variety of spatial scales. This poster paper presents the results of an attempt to use mini-cores of bankside sediment to explore changes through post-logging time in the relative contributions made by different sub-catchments to the sediment budget of a small (0.44 sq.km.) Baru catchment (selectively logged in the first half of 1989) in the Danum Valley area of Sabah, Malaysian Borneo. The catchment provides a good testing ground for the technique, as it has been monitored for slope erosion and stream suspended sediment transport continuously from before logging to the present day. The research design comprised (1) sampling (at 2 cm vertical intervals) fluvially deposited sediment down replicated pit profiles at three bankside locations at the downstream end of the catchment between the long-term gauging station and the confluence with a higher-order stream: (2) sampling of the finer bed-sediment the three principal tributaries (2West, 2Middle and 2East) and of surface, sub-surface and deep surface soil material from soil pits and road-cuttings across the catchment; (3) geochemical analysis of the <63μ, 63-125μ and 125μ-2mm fractions of all samples (following drying and sieving), using a portable Niton elemental analyser; (4) graphical and statistical analysis of the data. Pit 1 (34 cm deep) was considered to provide the longest and most dependable sediment record and marked changes in the levels of some elements were detected, with Mn, Fe, Ti and Zr proving to be the most useful. Local

  1. A new Nepenthes from Mount Ilas Mapulu in Borneo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adam, Jumaat H.; Wilcock, C.C.

    1990-01-01

    Caulis angularis. Folia coriacea, sessilia vel subpetiolata; lamina anguste elliptica vel oblanceolata, apex acutus vel obtusus subpeltatus, basis attenuata, semi-amplexicaulis, non decurrens; nervi longitudinales paralleli 8-10. Ascidia ellipsoidea, cum alis duabus prominentibus; os obliquum.

  2. Fuel distribution process risk analysis in East Borneo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laksmita Raizsa

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Fuel distribution is an important aspect of fulfilling the customer’s need. It is risky because it can cause tardiness that can cause fuel scarcity. In the process of distribution, many risks are occurring. House of Risk is a method used for mitigating the risk. It identifies seven risk events and nine risk agents. Matrix occurrence and severity are used for eliminating the minor impact risk. House of Risk 1 is used for determining the Aggregate Risk Potential (ARP. Pareto diagram is applied to prioritize risk that must be mitigated by preventive actions based on ARP. It identifies 4 priority risks, namely A8 (Car trouble, A4 (Human Error, A3 (Error deposit via bank and underpayment, and A6 (traffic accident which should be mitigated. House of Risk 2 makes for mapping between the preventive action and risk agent. It gets the Effectiveness to Difficulty Ratio (ETD for mitigating action. Conducting safety talk routine once every three days with ETD 2088 is the primary preventive actions.

  3. A new montane Scaevola from Borneo: S. Verticillata (Goodeniaceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenhouts, P.W.

    1964-01-01

    Frutex. Rami subteretes, lanato-tomentosi. Folia 4-verticillata, apice ramulorum congesta, ad axillas pilis sericeis isabellinis c. 1½ cm longis fasciculatis instructa; periolus c. ¾ cm longus, supra canaliculatus, lanatus; lamina obovato-oblonga, 5½-7 cm longa, 2½—3 cm lata, chartacea, in vivo

  4. How Unilever palm oil suppliers are burning up Borneo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-04-15

    New evidence shows expansion by Unilever palm oil suppliers is driving species extinction in Central Kalimantan, and fuelling climate change. In November 2007, Greenpeace released 'Cooking the Climate', an 82-page report summarizing the findings of a two-year investigation that revealed how the world's largest food, cosmetic and biofuel companies were driving the wholesale destruction of Indonesia's rainforests and peatlands through growing palm oil consumption. This follow-up report provides further evidence of the expansion of the palm oil sector in Indonesia into remaining rainforests, orang-utan habitat and peatlands in Kalimantan. It links the majority of the largest producers in Indonesia to Unilever, probably the largest palm oil corporate consumer in the world.

  5. Carbon stocks and fluxes in managed peatlands in northern Borneo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arn Teh, Yit; Manning, Frances; Cook, Sarah; Zin Zawawi, Norliyana; Sii, Longwin; Hill, Timothy; Page, Susan; Whelan, Mick; Evans, Chris; Gauci, Vincent; Chocholek, Melanie; Khoon Kho, Lip

    2017-04-01

    Oil palm is the largest agricultural crop in the tropics and accounts for 13 % of current tropical land area. Patterns of land-atmosphere exchange from oil palm ecosystems therefore have potentially important implications for regional and global C budgets due to the large scale of land conversion. This is particularly true for oil palm plantations on peat because of the large C stocks held by tropical peat soils that are potential sensitivity to human disturbance. Here we report preliminary findings on C stocks and fluxes from a long-term, multi-scale project in Sarawak, Malaysia that aims to quantify the impacts of oil palm conversion on C and greenhouse gas fluxes from oil palm recently established on peat. Land-atmosphere fluxes were determined using a combination of top-down and bottom-up methods (eddy covariance, canopy/stem and soil flux measurements, net primary productivity). Fluvial fluxes were determined by quantifying rates of dissolved and particulate organic C export. Ecosystem C dynamics were determined using the intensive C plot method, which quantified all major C stocks and fluxes, including plant and soil stocks, leaf litterfall, aboveground biomass production, root production, stem/canopy respiration, root-rhizosphere respiration, and heterotrophic soil respiration. Preliminary analysis indicates that vegetative aboveground biomass in these 7 year old plantations was 8.9-11.9 Mg C ha-1, or approximately one-quarter of adjacent secondary forest. Belowground biomass was 5.6-6.5 Mg C ha-1; on par with secondary forests. Soil C stocks in the 0-30 cm depth was 233.1-240.8 Mg C ha-1, or 32-36% greater than soil C stocks in secondary forests at the same depth (176.8 Mg C ha-1). Estimates of vegetative aboveground and belowground net primary productivity were 1.3-1.7 Mg C ha-1 yr-1 and 0.8-0.9 Mg C ha-1 yr-1, respectively. Fruit brunch production was approximately 67 Mg C ha-1over 7 yearsor 9.6 Mg C ha-1 yr-1. Total soil respiration rates were 18 Mg C ha-1 yr-1, with 26 % accounted for by root-rhizosphere respiration and 74 % from heterotrophic soil respiration. This translates to a peat mineralization rate of 10 to 17 Mg C ha-1 yr-1 in the upper 35 cm soil depth above the water table. Fluvial C fluxes were 1.9 Mg C ha-1yr-1, or roughly three times the flux from secondary forest. Findings from the partitioned soil respiration and fluvial flux measurements indicate that peat mineralization may be occurring. However, it is unclear if this represents a net loss of C from the ecosystem, due to the apparent increase in soil C stocks following land conversion, rather than an expected net reduction in soil C. This unexpected finding implies that other processes may be offsetting C losses from heterotrophic decay and fluvial exchange.

  6. Not more, but strategic collaboration needed to conserve Borneo's orangutan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courtney L. Morgans

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In conservation, Collaboration is thought to improve returns from investment and is frequently encouraged, however not all collaborations are equal and may therefore lack characteristics important for addressing collective action problems. Furthermore, partnerships that are advantageous for a collective may not necessarily be advantageous for an individual. This study investigated collaboration within the Bornean orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus conservation sector – a system with reported inefficiencies and for which there has been a renewed call for collaborative partnerships. Collaborative partnerships were conceptualised as a social network and analysed using exponential random graph modelling. The prevalence of structural attributes associated with social processes considered to be important for solving collective action problems such as trust and innovation were investigated. Qualitative surveying techniques were used to measure the perceptions of collaboration held by individual actors within the network and the impact of organizational attributes on network formation and perceptions was assessed. Collaboration was found to be occurring within the conservation network and was positively perceived at the individual organisational level. At the collective level, the current collaborative network contains some structural characteristics important for addressing the collective-action problem of orangutan conservation, particularly through innovation and knowledge sharing. However efforts to develop trust between organisations may be needed. To improve returns on investment, future collaborative partnerships must be strategically implemented with individual roles and desired overall outcomes explicitly articulated. Increased operational transparency and improved performance evaluation will be critical for achieving improved collaborative efficiency.

  7. Not more, but strategic collaboration needed to conserve Borneo's orangutan

    OpenAIRE

    Courtney L. Morgans; Angela M. Guerrero; Marc Ancrenaz; Erik Meijaard; Kerrie A. Wilson

    2017-01-01

    In conservation, Collaboration is thought to improve returns from investment and is frequently encouraged, however not all collaborations are equal and may therefore lack characteristics important for addressing collective action problems. Furthermore, partnerships that are advantageous for a collective may not necessarily be advantageous for an individual. This study investigated collaboration within the Bornean orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) conservation sector – a system with reported ineffici...

  8. Reconciling forest conservation and logging in Indonesian Borneo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaveau, David L A; Kshatriya, Mrigesh; Sheil, Douglas; Sloan, Sean; Molidena, Elis; Wijaya, Arief; Wich, Serge; Ancrenaz, Marc; Hansen, Matthew; Broich, Mark; Guariguata, Manuel R; Pacheco, Pablo; Potapov, Peter; Turubanova, Svetlana; Meijaard, Erik

    2013-01-01

    Combining protected areas with natural forest timber concessions may sustain larger forest landscapes than is possible via protected areas alone. However, the role of timber concessions in maintaining natural forest remains poorly characterized. An estimated 57% (303,525 km²) of Kalimantan's land area (532,100 km²) was covered by natural forest in 2000. About 14,212 km² (4.7%) had been cleared by 2010. Forests in oil palm concessions had been reduced by 5,600 km² (14.1%), while the figures for timber concessions are 1,336 km² (1.5%), and for protected forests are 1,122 km² (1.2%). These deforestation rates explain little about the relative performance of the different land use categories under equivalent conversion risks due to the confounding effects of location. An estimated 25% of lands allocated for timber harvesting in 2000 had their status changed to industrial plantation concessions in 2010. Based on a sample of 3,391 forest plots (1×1 km; 100 ha), and matching statistical analyses, 2000-2010 deforestation was on average 17.6 ha lower (95% C.I.: -22.3 ha- -12.9 ha) in timber concession plots than in oil palm concession plots. When location effects were accounted for, deforestation rates in timber concessions and protected areas were not significantly different (Mean difference: 0.35 ha; 95% C.I.: -0.002 ha-0.7 ha). Natural forest timber concessions in Kalimantan had similar ability as protected areas to maintain forest cover during 2000-2010, provided the former were not reclassified to industrial plantation concessions. Our study indicates the desirability of the Government of Indonesia designating its natural forest timber concessions as protected areas under the IUCN Protected Area Category VI to protect them from reclassification.

  9. Reconciling Forest Conservation and Logging in Indonesian Borneo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaveau, David L. A.; Kshatriya, Mrigesh; Sheil, Douglas; Sloan, Sean; Molidena, Elis; Wijaya, Arief; Wich, Serge; Ancrenaz, Marc; Hansen, Matthew; Broich, Mark; Guariguata, Manuel R.; Pacheco, Pablo; Potapov, Peter; Turubanova, Svetlana; Meijaard, Erik

    2013-01-01

    Combining protected areas with natural forest timber concessions may sustain larger forest landscapes than is possible via protected areas alone. However, the role of timber concessions in maintaining natural forest remains poorly characterized. An estimated 57% (303,525 km2) of Kalimantan's land area (532,100 km2) was covered by natural forest in 2000. About 14,212 km2 (4.7%) had been cleared by 2010. Forests in oil palm concessions had been reduced by 5,600 km2 (14.1%), while the figures for timber concessions are 1,336 km2 (1.5%), and for protected forests are 1,122 km2 (1.2%). These deforestation rates explain little about the relative performance of the different land use categories under equivalent conversion risks due to the confounding effects of location. An estimated 25% of lands allocated for timber harvesting in 2000 had their status changed to industrial plantation concessions in 2010. Based on a sample of 3,391 forest plots (1×1 km; 100 ha), and matching statistical analyses, 2000–2010 deforestation was on average 17.6 ha lower (95% C.I.: −22.3 ha–−12.9 ha) in timber concession plots than in oil palm concession plots. When location effects were accounted for, deforestation rates in timber concessions and protected areas were not significantly different (Mean difference: 0.35 ha; 95% C.I.: −0.002 ha–0.7 ha). Natural forest timber concessions in Kalimantan had similar ability as protected areas to maintain forest cover during 2000–2010, provided the former were not reclassified to industrial plantation concessions. Our study indicates the desirability of the Government of Indonesia designating its natural forest timber concessions as protected areas under the IUCN Protected Area Category VI to protect them from reclassification. PMID:23967062

  10. A new species of Combretum from East Borneo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Exell, A.W.

    1954-01-01

    Combretum kostermansii Exell, sp. nov. Frutex scandens, ramulis primo fulvo-pilosis et tomentellis demum sparse pilosis, atro-rubris. Folia opposita breviter petiolata, petiolo 1—3 mm longo, piloso, lamina chartacea, ovata vel oblongo-ovata, basi cordata, apice acuminata, 2—7 X 1.8—3.6 cm, supra

  11. Improving the age control of eastern Borneo's Miocene sedimentary record

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marshall, N.T.

    2016-01-01

    The Indonesia Archipelago is a complex region that both harbors the today’s most biodiverse marine environments and plays an important role in climate and ocean regulation. Additionally, the area contains a large human population and noteworthy fossil fuel industries. However, there is a dearth of

  12. A new species of Secamone (Apocynaceae, Secamonoideae) from Borneo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NN,

    2004-01-01

    A new species of Secamone (Apocynaceae, Secamonoideae), S. badia Klack. from Sarawak, Malaysia, is described and illustrated. The distinctness of the genera Toxocarpus and Genianthus in relation to Secamone is also discussed.

  13. Reconciling forest conservation and logging in Indonesian Borneo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L A Gaveau

    Full Text Available Combining protected areas with natural forest timber concessions may sustain larger forest landscapes than is possible via protected areas alone. However, the role of timber concessions in maintaining natural forest remains poorly characterized. An estimated 57% (303,525 km² of Kalimantan's land area (532,100 km² was covered by natural forest in 2000. About 14,212 km² (4.7% had been cleared by 2010. Forests in oil palm concessions had been reduced by 5,600 km² (14.1%, while the figures for timber concessions are 1,336 km² (1.5%, and for protected forests are 1,122 km² (1.2%. These deforestation rates explain little about the relative performance of the different land use categories under equivalent conversion risks due to the confounding effects of location. An estimated 25% of lands allocated for timber harvesting in 2000 had their status changed to industrial plantation concessions in 2010. Based on a sample of 3,391 forest plots (1×1 km; 100 ha, and matching statistical analyses, 2000-2010 deforestation was on average 17.6 ha lower (95% C.I.: -22.3 ha- -12.9 ha in timber concession plots than in oil palm concession plots. When location effects were accounted for, deforestation rates in timber concessions and protected areas were not significantly different (Mean difference: 0.35 ha; 95% C.I.: -0.002 ha-0.7 ha. Natural forest timber concessions in Kalimantan had similar ability as protected areas to maintain forest cover during 2000-2010, provided the former were not reclassified to industrial plantation concessions. Our study indicates the desirability of the Government of Indonesia designating its natural forest timber concessions as protected areas under the IUCN Protected Area Category VI to protect them from reclassification.

  14. Analysis of Demersal Fish Schooling Distribution in Tarakan Waters North Borneo by Using Hidroacoustic Method

    OpenAIRE

    ', Susilawati; Mulyadi, Aras; ', Mubarak

    2015-01-01

    This research is aimed to determine the distribution of demersal fish schooling and the relation between demersal fish schooling and temperature, salinity and depth of water by using hydroacoustic method. The research was held in August 2014 at the Research Institute of Marine Fisheries Laboratory of Muara Baru, North Jakarta. This research used hydroacoustic method with acoustic descriptor techniques. The amount of fish schooling was obtained by digitization and integration, the values of in...

  15. Milankovitch cycles in an equatorial delta from the Miocene of Borneo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marshall, Nathan; Zeeden, Christiaan; Hilgen, Frederik; Krijgsman, Wout

    2017-01-01

    The factors controlling sedimentary cyclicity in deltaic systems are a subject of intense debate, and more research, in different deltaic environments and time periods, is needed to better understand the possible mechanisms. Offshore and Pleistocene case studies are more common than proximal and

  16. Recent trends in the intrinsic water-use efficiency of ringless rainforest trees in Borneo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loader, N J; Walsh, R P D; Robertson, I; Bidin, K; Ong, R C; Reynolds, G; McCarroll, D; Gagen, M; Young, G H F

    2011-11-27

    Stable carbon isotope (δ(13)C) series were developed from analysis of sequential radial wood increments from AD 1850 to AD 2009 for four mature primary rainforest trees from the Danum and Imbak areas of Sabah, Malaysia. The aseasonal equatorial climate meant that conventional dendrochronology was not possible as the tree species investigated do not exhibit clear annual rings or dateable growth bands. Chronology was established using radiocarbon dating to model age-growth relationships and date the carbon isotopic series from which the intrinsic water-use efficiency (IWUE) was calculated. The two Eusideroxylon zwageri trees from Imbak yielded ages of their pith/central wood (±1 sigma) of 670 ± 40 and 759 ± 40 years old; the less dense Shorea johorensis and Shorea superba trees at Danum yielded ages of 240 ± 40 and 330 ± 40 years, respectively. All trees studied exhibit an increase in the IWUE since AD 1960. This reflects, in part, a response of the forest to increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration. Unlike studies of some northern European trees, no clear plateau in this response was observed. A change in the IWUE implies an associated modification of the local carbon and/or hydrological cycles. To resolve these uncertainties, a shift in emphasis away from high-resolution studies towards long, well-replicated time series is proposed to develop the environmental data essential for model evaluation. Identification of old (greater than 700 years) ringless trees demonstrates their potential in assessing the impacts of climatic and atmospheric change. It also shows the scientific and applied value of a conservation policy that ensures the survival of primary forest containing particularly old trees (as in Imbak Canyon and Danum).

  17. Strategic Planning of small and medium industries. Case study: Hulu Sungai Selatan Regency, South Borneo Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elya, N.; Shoimah, F.; Kartika, A. P.; Sukanto, A. B.

    2017-06-01

    Hulu Sungai Selatan Regency has a potential of SMI (Small and Medium Industries) sectors can be developed as economic development. Based on RTRW of Hulu Sungai Selatan Regency, the region has 14 SMI are a propeller, pottery, blacksmith, dried fish, purun webbing, pastries, dodol, crackers, imitation jewelry, woven water hyacinth, bamboo, syrup, brown sugar, and saber. There are several issues related to SMI development such as low quality and quantity of human resources, local raw material, limited capital, low competitiveness, conventional production equipment, and lack of media for marketing the product. The purpose of this study is to develop the leading sectors of SMI and improve the economy and quality of the resident. The research method is descriptive qualitative, leading sectors analysis and force field analysis. Data were obtained from primary and secondary survey of relevant institutions and interview to the community. Based on leading sectors analysis, there is six leading sector is a propeller, blacksmith, dodol, dried fish, pottery, and crackers. Based on force field analysis, determined the strategy for using operational excellence’s concept, so that we can develop the industrial sector by minimizing productions cost so SMI’s product can compete by the price and efficient production process.

  18. Biomass burning drives atmospheric nutrient redistribution within forested peatlands in Borneo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponette-González, Alexandra G.; Curran, Lisa M.; Pittman, Alice M.; Carlson, Kimberly M.; Steele, Bethel G.; Ratnasari, Dessy; Mujiman; Weathers, Kathleen C.

    2016-08-01

    Biomass burning plays a critical role not only in atmospheric emissions, but also in the deposition and redistribution of biologically important nutrients within tropical landscapes. We quantified the influence of fire on biogeochemical fluxes of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and sulfur (S) in a 12 ha forested peatland in West Kalimantan, Indonesia. Total (inorganic + organic) N, {{{{NO}}}3}- -N, {{{{NH}}}4}+ -N, total P, {{{{PO}}}4}3- -P, and {{{{SO}}}4}2- -S fluxes were measured in throughfall and bulk rainfall weekly from July 2013 to September 2014. To identify fire events, we used concentrations of particulate matter (PM10) and MODIS Active Fire Product counts within 20 and 100 km radius buffers surrounding the site. Dominant sources of throughfall nutrient deposition were explored using cluster and back-trajectory analysis. Our findings show that this Bornean peatland receives some of the highest P (7.9 kg {{{{PO}}}4}3- -P ha-1yr-1) and S (42 kg {{{{SO}}}4}2- -S ha-1yr-1) deposition reported globally, and that N deposition (8.7 kg inorganic N ha-1yr-1) exceeds critical load limits suggested for tropical forests. Six major dry periods and associated fire events occurred during the study. Seventy-eight percent of fires within 20 km and 40% within 100 km of the site were detected within oil palm plantation leases (industrial agriculture) on peatlands. These fires had a disproportionate impact on below-canopy nutrient fluxes. Post-fire throughfall events contributed >30% of the total inorganic N ({{{{NO}}}3}- -N + {{{{NH}}}4}+ -N) and {{{{PO}}}4}3- -P flux to peatland soils during the study period. Our results indicate that biomass burning associated with agricultural peat fires is a major source of N, P, and S in throughfall and could rival industrial pollution as an input to these systems during major fire years. Given the sheer magnitude of fluxes reported here, fire-related redistribution of nutrients may have significant fertilizing or acidifying effects on a diversity of nutrient-limited ecosystems.

  19. Ecosystem Services and Biodiversity in a Rapidly Transforming Landscape in Northern Borneo

    OpenAIRE

    Labri?re, Nicolas; Laumonier, Yves; Locatelli, Bruno; Vieilledent, Ghislain; Comptour, Marion

    2015-01-01

    Because industrial agriculture keeps expanding in Southeast Asia at the expense of natural forests and traditional swidden systems, comparing biodiversity and ecosystem services in the traditional forest–swidden agriculture system vs. monocultures is needed to guide decision making on land-use planning. Focusing on tree diversity, soil erosion control, and climate change mitigation through carbon storage, we surveyed vegetation and monitored soil loss in various land-use areas in a northern B...

  20. Ecosystem Services and Biodiversity in a Rapidly Transforming Landscape in Northern Borneo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Labrière

    Full Text Available Because industrial agriculture keeps expanding in Southeast Asia at the expense of natural forests and traditional swidden systems, comparing biodiversity and ecosystem services in the traditional forest-swidden agriculture system vs. monocultures is needed to guide decision making on land-use planning. Focusing on tree diversity, soil erosion control, and climate change mitigation through carbon storage, we surveyed vegetation and monitored soil loss in various land-use areas in a northern Bornean agricultural landscape shaped by swidden agriculture, rubber tapping, and logging, where various levels and types of disturbance have created a fine mosaic of vegetation from food crop fields to natural forest. Tree species diversity and ecosystem service production were highest in natural forests. Logged-over forests produced services similar to those of natural forests. Land uses related to the swidden agriculture system largely outperformed oil palm or rubber monocultures in terms of tree species diversity and service production. Natural and logged-over forests should be maintained or managed as integral parts of the swidden system, and landscape multifunctionality should be sustained. Because natural forests host a unique diversity of trees and produce high levels of ecosystem services, targeting carbon stock protection, e.g. through financial mechanisms such as Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+, will synergistically provide benefits for biodiversity and a wide range of other services. However, the way such mechanisms could benefit communities must be carefully evaluated to counter the high opportunity cost of conversion to monocultures that might generate greater income, but would be detrimental to the production of multiple ecosystem services.

  1. Ecosystem Services and Biodiversity in a Rapidly Transforming Landscape in Northern Borneo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrière, Nicolas; Laumonier, Yves; Locatelli, Bruno; Vieilledent, Ghislain; Comptour, Marion

    2015-01-01

    Because industrial agriculture keeps expanding in Southeast Asia at the expense of natural forests and traditional swidden systems, comparing biodiversity and ecosystem services in the traditional forest-swidden agriculture system vs. monocultures is needed to guide decision making on land-use planning. Focusing on tree diversity, soil erosion control, and climate change mitigation through carbon storage, we surveyed vegetation and monitored soil loss in various land-use areas in a northern Bornean agricultural landscape shaped by swidden agriculture, rubber tapping, and logging, where various levels and types of disturbance have created a fine mosaic of vegetation from food crop fields to natural forest. Tree species diversity and ecosystem service production were highest in natural forests. Logged-over forests produced services similar to those of natural forests. Land uses related to the swidden agriculture system largely outperformed oil palm or rubber monocultures in terms of tree species diversity and service production. Natural and logged-over forests should be maintained or managed as integral parts of the swidden system, and landscape multifunctionality should be sustained. Because natural forests host a unique diversity of trees and produce high levels of ecosystem services, targeting carbon stock protection, e.g. through financial mechanisms such as Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+), will synergistically provide benefits for biodiversity and a wide range of other services. However, the way such mechanisms could benefit communities must be carefully evaluated to counter the high opportunity cost of conversion to monocultures that might generate greater income, but would be detrimental to the production of multiple ecosystem services.

  2. Do Anthropogenic Dark Earths Occur in the Interior of Borneo? Some Initial Observations from East Kalimantan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sheil, D.; Basuki, I.; German, L.; Kuyper, T.W.; Limberg, G.; Puri, R.K.; Sellato, B.; Noordwijk, van M.

    2012-01-01

    Anthropogenic soils of the Amazon Basin (Terra Preta, Terra Mulata) reveal that pre-Colombian peoples made lasting improvements in the agricultural potential of nutrient-poor soils. Some have argued that applying similar techniques could improve agriculture over much of the humid tropics, enhancing

  3. CMS: LiDAR Data for Forested Sites on Borneo Island, Kalimantan, Indonesia, 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset provides airborne LiDAR data collected over 90 sites totaling approximately 100,000 hectares of forested land in Kalimantan, Indonesia on the island of...

  4. Paleoecology and Paleoclimate of Tanjung Formation Deposition, Based on Palynological Data From Siung Malopot, Central Borneo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristyarin, D. A.; Rahardjo, A. T.; Bambang, P.

    2016-01-01

    The northern part of Barito basin is exposed around Siung Malopot area (Central Kalimantan), showing the late cretaceous basement of andesite lavas and granite intrusion. The basement is unconformably overlied by the rocks of Tanjung formation at middle to late Eocene age. Compressive phase during Miocene and Plio-Pleistocene folded and uplifted all existing rocks, made the rocks become relatively north-south structurally oriented. The exposed Tanjung formation consists of sandstone, mudstone, siltstone with intercalation of coals and thin layers of limestone. These lithologies may represent the upper parts of Tanjung formation. Palynology quantitative study is an approach to identify the palaeoclimate and palaeoecology of a certain sedimentation system. Analyses from 18 samples taken from lithologies of Tanjung formation show the presence of palinomorph fossils associated in Proxapertites operculatus zonation indicating the P18-P20 age intervals, or late eocene age. The ratio of spore and non-spore percentage, as well as the comparison between arboreal pollen (AP) and non-arboreal pollen (NAP) show the significant change of environment from time to time during the deposition of the Tanjung formation, also indicating the climate humidity that became more stabile to the younger ages. From 52 observed taxa in the samples, the ratio of marine versus non-marine taxon indicates the influence of sea-water influx in the sedimentation system, explaining the possible presence of thin limestone intercalations at the upper parts of Tanjung formation. Palynology quantitative study on Tanjung Formation indicates the sedimentation of this formation was in backmangrove environment that tends to become more influenced by marine conditions.

  5. A new species of Rafflesia and notes on other species from Trus Madi Range, Sabah (Borneo)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mat Salleh, Kamarudin; Latiff, A.

    1989-01-01

    A new species of Rafflesia, R. tengku-adlinii Mat Salleh & Latiff, is described herein, with illustration and remarks on its distribution. In addition, R. keithii Meijer is reported from another locality in the Trus Madi Range, Sabah, and its distribution is also discussed.

  6. A checklist of land snails from the west coast islands of Sabah, Borneo (Mollusca, Gastropoda)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phung, Chee-Chean; Yu, Fred Tuh Yit; Liew, Thor-Seng

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Sabah, situated in one of the world’s biodiversity hotspots, has the largest number of islands in Malaysia with more than 500 of various sizes and degrees of isolation. However, information on the islands’ biodiversity is limited. This study provides an up-to-date checklist of land snail species found on 24 west coast islands in Sabah. A total of 67 species (nearly 20% of the total number of land snail species in the state) representing 37 genera and 19 families is enumerated based on systematic field surveys of 133 sampling plots, BORNEENSIS database records and species checklists published between 2000 and 2016. The number of species on the islands ranges from four to 29. Labuan Island has the highest number of species (29), followed by Tiga Island (25), Mantanani Besar Island (24) and Gaya Island (23). However, the populations of some land snail species may have declined as several previously recorded species on the islands were not found in a recent systematic field sampling. This checklist is provided as a baseline inventory for future island land snail studies and to better inform biodiversity conservation plans of marine parks and other islands on the Sabah west coast. PMID:28769672

  7. Problem in the generic delimitation between Alseodaphne, Dehaasia and Nothaphoebe (Lauraceae) in Borneo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Julia, S.; Soepadmo, E.; Yahud, W.

    2009-01-01

    Alseodaphne, Dehaasia and Nothaphoebe are, morphologically, three closely related genera belonging to the Persea subgroup of the Lauraceae. A total of 214 binomials of the three genera have been published by various authors (International Plant Names Index, March 2007), of which 44 have been

  8. Leaf litter breakdown in streams of East Malaysia, Borneo: a study of biodiversity and ecosystem functioning

    OpenAIRE

    Jinggut, Tajang

    2017-01-01

    Litter decomposition in streams represents an important terrestrial-aquatic link in tropical forests and studies have shown that detritivore shredders are more abundant in temperate than tropical streams because the feeding guild is believed to be more adapted to cool waters where there is greater availability of high quality resources. I hypothesized that this global variation in shredder distribution may be observed at local scales in tropical regions along an altitudinal gradient and inves...

  9. Aspergillus species isolated from mangrove forests in Borneo Island, Sarawak, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.S.S. Seelan

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A study on the occurrence of Aspergillus spp. on selected mangrove forests in Sarawak was conducted to find out their diversity and distribution. Samples were obtained from mangrove soils and leaf litters at different locations, i.e. Sematan, Lundu, Kampung Bako, Bako in Sarawak. Soil and leaf litter samples were taken randomly at different locations with five replicates from each area. A total of 138 isolates of Aspergillus species were obtained from the soil and leaf litter samples by using direct plating and Warcup method. Based on both macroscopic and microscopic observations, using an identification key, individual isolates were classified within the genus Aspergillus, belonging to three subgenera, four sections and five species. The fungi isolates were identified as A. terreus, A. flavipes, A. carneus, A. fumigatus and A. clavatus. The most frequent isolated species was A. flavipes (63.04%, followed by A. fumigatus (16.7%, A. terreus (13.04%, A. carneus (5.8% and A. clavatus (1.44%. All of the isolated Aspergillus species grew well on MEA and CYA at 25°C. A. carneus produced reddish sclerotia on MEA after seven days and this could be used as an important characteristic in this species identification. A. clavatus from mangrove soil in Kampung Bako has shown long conidiophores (ranging from 3-5 cm with swollen hyphal structures, while A. clavatus from Sematan area has shorter conidiophores (ranging from 2.5-3.5 cm on MEA.

  10. Two new species of Paraorygmatobothrium (Cestoda: Tetraphyllidea) from weasel sharks (Carcharhiniformes: Hemigaleidae) of Australia and Borneo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhnke, Timothy R; Healy, Claire J; Shapero, Scot

    2006-02-01

    Two new species of Paraorygmatobothrium Ruhnke, 1994, P. janineae n. sp. and P. kirstenae n. sp., are described from the spiral intestine of 2 shark species of the Family Hemigaleidae: Hemigaleus microstoma and Hemipristis elongata. The 2 new cestode species differ from other members of Paraorygmatobothrium in vitelline follicle distribution and possession of a cephalic peduncle. The 2 new species differ from 1 another in total length, maximum width, scolex size, number of proglottids per strobila, and number of testes per proglottid. The generic diagnosis of Paraorygmatobothrium is emended to include the new species. The results of this study extend the distribution of Paraorygmatobothrium to include the carcharhinid shark family Hemigaleidae.

  11. Molluscan fauna of the lower Gelingseh Beds s. str., Sangkulirang area, Kalimantan Timur (East Borneo)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beets, C.

    1986-01-01

    A compilation is given of the results of an investigation of all the molluscs collected by L.M.R. Rutten some seventy years ago, at five localities in the type area of the Gelingseh Beds s. str., Late Miocene. Thirteen new species are described, viz, Smaragdia gelingsehensis, Rissoina maduparensis,

  12. First report of Colletotrichum spp. causing diseases on Capsicum spp. in Sabah, Borneo, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.K. Yun

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Blackish or orange liquid-like spots were found on (n=100 fruits of chillies (Capsicum sold in five local markets in Kota Kinabalu, Sabah, Malaysia. Colletotrichum gloeosporioides and C. capsici were identified as the causal agents of an anthracnose disease. This is the first report of Colletotrichum spp. as the causal agent of anthracnose infected chillies in Sabah.

  13. Description of Pristina armata n. sp. (Clitellata: Naididae: Pristininae) from a carnivorous plant (Nepenthes sp.) in Borneo, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenková, Jana; Čermák, Václav

    2013-01-01

    A new clitellate species of Pristininae (Naididae), Pristina armata n. sp., found in the pitcher of the carnivorous plant Nepenthes sp., is reported from East Kalimantan, Indonesia. P. armata n. sp. is a very small clitellate, less than 1 mm long in fixed state, and without proboscis on the prostomium. Signs of reproduction by paratomy were observed, but the generic placement remains preliminary because sexually mature individuals were not found. P. armata n. sp. is characterized by giant hook-like dorsal chaetae at IV. The description of P. armata n. sp. was based on six fixed specimens of different size and stage of development. Noteworthy is the habitat of P. armata n. sp. in Nepenthes pitchers, this being the first clitellate species described from such a habitat. P. armata n. sp. may be a member of the nepenthebionts' community, realizing its life cycle inside the digestive fluid of the Nepenthes pitcher, or it belongs to nepenthephiles, species that commonly occur in this habitat but do not specialize on it.

  14. Biology of Incidental Catch Sea Star Stellaster childreni Gray, 1840 (Echinodermata: Asteroidea), from Malaysian Borneo Exclusive Economic Zone

    OpenAIRE

    Hassan, Ruhana; Lee, Suet Yee; Morni, Wan Zabidii Wan

    2017-01-01

    Sea star (class Asteroidea, phylum Echinodermata) is one of the most successful marine organisms inhabiting a wide range of habitats. As one of the key stone species, sea stars are responsible for maintaining much of the local diversity of species within certain communities. Malaysian Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) Resource Survey had been carried out from 16th Aug to 6th Nov 2015 and one of the invertebrate by-catch organisms is sea star Stellaster childreni Gray, 1840. This study documents m...

  15. Positive body image: inter-ethnic and rural-urban differences among an indigenous sample from Malaysian Borneo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swami, Viren; Kannan, Kumaraswami; Furnham, Adrian

    2012-11-01

    Previous studies examining body image from a cross-cultural perspective have tended to neglect samples from different ethnic groups or along a rural-urban continuum. To overcome this limitation, the present study examined positive body image among rural and urban women from three major indigenous ethnic groups in Sabah, Malaysia. A total of 202 women completed the Body Appreciation Scale, as well as measures of media exposure and financial security, and provided their demographic details. s showed that there were significant rural-urban differences in body appreciation, with rural participants having significantly higher body appreciation than urban participants. A comparison with a previous data set of West Malaysian women (Swami & Chamorro-Premuzic, 2008) showed that the current urban sample had significantly lower body appreciation and that the rural group had significantly higher body appreciation. Further results showed that research site (urban vs rural) explained 11.0% of the variance in body appreciation. Participant body mass index and exposure to western forms of media explained an additional 2.0% of the variance. These results suggest that there are differences in body image between rural and urban women. Results are discussed in relation to the promotion of positive body image, particularly in developing societies where health care resources may be limited.

  16. Extenuation of Saline Solutes in Shallow Aquifer of a Small Tropical Island: A Case Study of Manukan Island, North Borneo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Zaharin Aris

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Intensive exploitation of groundwater from Manukan Island’s aquifer has disturbed the natural equilibrium between fresh and saline water and has resulted in the increase of groundwater salinity and the hydrochemical complexities of freshwater-seawater contact. It was observed that the mixing between freshwater-seawater has created diversity in the geochemical processes of Manukan Island’s aquifer and altered the freshwater and seawater mixture away from the theoretical composition line. The results from reactive transport modelling confirmed that the migration of seawater into the fresher parts of the aquifer apparently leads to a calcification of the aquifer despite the seawater being supersaturated for carbonate minerals and shows that the composition of the near coast zone and further landward area may vary and have a significant effect on the processes during the intrusion. It was observed that the effect of freshening aquifer in the landward area near the recharge zone of the study area has incriminated the calcite saturation states of the area. The accumulation of Ca as the interface travels landward up to 100 m from the coast leads to an increasing calcite supersaturation with travelled distance and possibly to the precipitation of calcite.

  17. Evading Colonial Authority. Rebels and Outlaws in the Borderlands of Dutch West Borneo 1850s–1920s

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eilenberg, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Borderlands in Southeast Asia are often portrayed as being outside state influence, as zones of anarchy where identities are flexible, loyalties ephemeral and state authority largely avoided. Depicted by shifting state administrators as rebels and outlaws roaming the border hills the populations...

  18. Functional structure of ant and termite assemblages in old growth forest, logged forest and oil palm plantation in Malaysian Borneo

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Luke, S. H.; Fayle, Tom Maurice; Eggleton, P.; Turner, E. C.; Davies, R. G.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 11 (2014), s. 2817-2832 ISSN 0960-3115 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-32302S Grant - others:European Social Fund(CZ) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0064; Australïan Research Council Discovery Grant(AU) DP140101541 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : feeding groups * formicidae * functional groups Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 2.365, year: 2014 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10531-014-0750-2

  19. Assessment of Near-Bottom Water Quality of Southwestern Coast of Sarawak, Borneo, Malaysia: A Multivariate Statistical Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Lin Soo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The study on Sarawak coastal water quality is scarce, not to mention the application of the multivariate statistical approach to investigate the spatial variation of water quality and to identify the pollution source in Sarawak coastal water. Hence, the present study aimed to evaluate the spatial variation of water quality along the coastline of the southwestern region of Sarawak using multivariate statistical techniques. Seventeen physicochemical parameters were measured at 11 stations along the coastline with approximately 225 km length. The coastal water quality showed spatial heterogeneity where the cluster analysis grouped the 11 stations into four different clusters. Deterioration in coastal water quality has been observed in different regions of Sarawak corresponding to land use patterns in the region. Nevertheless, nitrate-nitrogen exceeded the guideline value at all sampling stations along the coastline. The principal component analysis (PCA has determined a reduced number of five principal components that explained 89.0% of the data set variance. The first PC indicated that the nutrients were the dominant polluting factors, which is attributed to the domestic, agricultural, and aquaculture activities, followed by the suspended solids in the second PC which are related to the logging activities.

  20. Biology of Incidental Catch Sea Star Stellaster childreni Gray, 1840 (Echinodermata: Asteroidea, from Malaysian Borneo Exclusive Economic Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruhana Hassan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sea star (class Asteroidea, phylum Echinodermata is one of the most successful marine organisms inhabiting a wide range of habitats. As one of the key stone species, sea stars are responsible for maintaining much of the local diversity of species within certain communities. Malaysian Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ Resource Survey had been carried out from 16th Aug to 6th Nov 2015 and one of the invertebrate by-catch organisms is sea star Stellaster childreni Gray, 1840. This study documents morphological characters and diet of the sea star, besides providing brief descriptions of the habitats based on particle size analysis and vessel log data sheet. A total of 217 individuals had been examined throughout this study. Fragments of flora and fauna were found in the gut including Mollusca (gastropod, bivalves, and scaphopods, sponge seagrass, and seaweed as well as benthic Foraminifera. Stellaster childreni were found at depth of 45 m to 185 m in the South China Sea off Sarawak Malaysia, with various sea bottom substrata. Approximately 41% of S. childreni were found at a mixture of sandy and muddy substratum, followed by mixture of sandy and coral (19.3%, muddy substratum (17.5%, coral substratum (11.5%, and sandy areas (10.6%. The widely distributed sea star on different types of sea beds suggested healthy deep sea ecosystem; thus Malaysia should explore further potential fisheries resources in the EEZ off Sarawak coast.

  1. Bird community changes in response to single and repeated fires in a lowland tropical rainforest of eastern Borneo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slik, J.W.F.; Balen, van S.

    2006-01-01

    Our current understanding of bird community responses to tropical forest fires is limited and strongly geographically biased towards South America. Here we used the circular plot method to carry out complete bird inventories in undisturbed, once burned (1998) and twice burned forests (1983 and 1998)

  2. The impact of selective-logging and forest clearance for oil palm on fungal communities in Borneo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerfahi, Dorsaf; Tripathi, Binu M; Lee, Junghoon; Edwards, David P; Adams, Jonathan M

    2014-01-01

    Tropical forests are being rapidly altered by logging, and cleared for agriculture. Understanding the effects of these land use changes on soil fungi, which play vital roles in the soil ecosystem functioning and services, is a major conservation frontier. Using 454-pyrosequencing of the ITS1 region of extracted soil DNA, we compared communities of soil fungi between unlogged, once-logged, and twice-logged rainforest, and areas cleared for oil palm, in Sabah, Malaysia. Overall fungal community composition differed significantly between forest and oil palm plantation. The OTU richness and Chao 1 were higher in forest, compared to oil palm plantation. As a proportion of total reads, Basidiomycota were more abundant in forest soil, compared to oil palm plantation soil. The turnover of fungal OTUs across space, true β-diversity, was also higher in forest than oil palm plantation. Ectomycorrhizal (EcM) fungal abundance was significantly different between land uses, with highest relative abundance (out of total fungal reads) observed in unlogged forest soil, lower abundance in logged forest, and lowest in oil palm. In their entirety, these results indicate a pervasive effect of conversion to oil palm on fungal community structure. Such wholesale changes in fungal communities might impact the long-term sustainability of oil palm agriculture. Logging also has more subtle long term effects, on relative abundance of EcM fungi, which might affect tree recruitment and nutrient cycling. However, in general the logged forest retains most of the diversity and community composition of unlogged forest.

  3. The impact of selective-logging and forest clearance for oil palm on fungal communities in Borneo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorsaf Kerfahi

    Full Text Available Tropical forests are being rapidly altered by logging, and cleared for agriculture. Understanding the effects of these land use changes on soil fungi, which play vital roles in the soil ecosystem functioning and services, is a major conservation frontier. Using 454-pyrosequencing of the ITS1 region of extracted soil DNA, we compared communities of soil fungi between unlogged, once-logged, and twice-logged rainforest, and areas cleared for oil palm, in Sabah, Malaysia. Overall fungal community composition differed significantly between forest and oil palm plantation. The OTU richness and Chao 1 were higher in forest, compared to oil palm plantation. As a proportion of total reads, Basidiomycota were more abundant in forest soil, compared to oil palm plantation soil. The turnover of fungal OTUs across space, true β-diversity, was also higher in forest than oil palm plantation. Ectomycorrhizal (EcM fungal abundance was significantly different between land uses, with highest relative abundance (out of total fungal reads observed in unlogged forest soil, lower abundance in logged forest, and lowest in oil palm. In their entirety, these results indicate a pervasive effect of conversion to oil palm on fungal community structure. Such wholesale changes in fungal communities might impact the long-term sustainability of oil palm agriculture. Logging also has more subtle long term effects, on relative abundance of EcM fungi, which might affect tree recruitment and nutrient cycling. However, in general the logged forest retains most of the diversity and community composition of unlogged forest.

  4. Work Engagement, Intrinsic Motivation and Job Satisfaction among Employees of A Coal Mining Company in South Borneo

    OpenAIRE

    Hasan Sartono; Mauliah Ardhani

    2016-01-01

    This paper seeks to establish the relationships between three job characteristics constructs, namely work engagement, intrinsic motivation and job satisfaction in a workplace notorious for discord and conflict between workers and employers. A quantitative methodology was adopted using a cross-sectional survey. Respondents were selected from the workers at a mining company, with a final sample of 156 employees participating in the study. The Utrecht Work Engagement Scale, Intrinsic Motivation ...

  5. Work Engagement, Intrinsic Motivation and Job Satisfaction among Employees of A Coal Mining Company in South Borneo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Sartono

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper seeks to establish the relationships between three job characteristics constructs, namely work engagement, intrinsic motivation and job satisfaction in a workplace notorious for discord and conflict between workers and employers. A quantitative methodology was adopted using a cross-sectional survey. Respondents were selected from the workers at a mining company, with a final sample of 156 employees participating in the study. The Utrecht Work Engagement Scale, Intrinsic Motivation Inventory and the Minnesota JobSatisfaction Questionnaire were used to collect data. The results of the study indicate positive relationships between job satisfaction, work engagement and intrinsic motivation among the workers. Age and marital status were found to be significant contributors to workers’ job satisfaction, intrinsic motivation and work engagement. Implications of these results are that human resource interventions are required in order to deal with enhancing work engagement, intrinsic motivation and job satisfaction. Furthermore, the results indicate that intrinsic motivation and work engagement can enhance job satisfaction. The current study adds to the research pointing at job satisfaction as a promising underlying mechanism for employees’ to be internally motivated and engaged at work. Keywords: Work engagement, Intrinsic motivation, Job satisfaction

  6. Work Engagement, Intrinsic Motivation and Job Satisfaction among Employees of A Coal Mining Company in South Borneo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Sartono

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper seeks to establish the relationships between three job characteristics constructs, namely work engagement, intrinsic motivation and job satisfaction in a workplace notorious for discord and conflict between workers and employers. A quantitative methodology was adopted using a cross-sectional survey. Respondents were selected from the workers at a mining company, with a final sample of 156 employees participating in the study. The Utrecht Work Engagement Scale, Intrinsic Motivation Inventory and the Minnesota Job Satisfaction Questionnaire were used to collect data. The results of the study indicate positive relationships between job satisfaction, work engagement and intrinsic motivation among the workers. Age and marital status were found to be significant contributors to workers’ job satisfaction, intrinsic motivation and work engagement. Implications of these results are that human resource interventions are required in order to deal with enhancing work engagement, intrinsic motivation and job satisfaction. Furthermore, the results indicate that intrinsic motivation and work engagement can enhance job satisfaction. The current study adds to the research pointing at job satisfaction as a promising underlying mechanism for employees’ to be internally motivated and engaged at work.

  7. Neues über das Tertiär von Java und die mesozoischen Schichten von West-Borneo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin, K.

    1888-01-01

    Die Monographie, welche unter dem Titel Die Fossilien von Java herausgegeben wird ¹), ist so weit fortgeschritten, dass sich aus den in ihr beschriebenen Gastropoden bereits eine Anzahl von Schlussfolgerungen ableiten lässt, welche für die in Bearbeitung begriffene, geologische Karte von Java von

  8. THE USE OF Pomacea canaliculata SNAILS IN FEED TO IMPROVE QUALITY OF ALABIO DUCK (Anas plathyrinchos Borneo MEAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Subhan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This research was aimed to improve the physical and chemical quality of Alabio ducks which was fed with Pomacea canaliculata snails. Those ducks were raised intensively. There were nine treatments  included R0 (control feed, R1 (control feed + 2.5% Pomacea canaliculata snails from swampy area, R2 (control feed + 5% Pomacea canaliculata snails from swampy area, R3 (control feed + 7.5% Pomacea canaliculata snails from swampy area R4 (control feed + 10% Pomacea canaliculata snails from swampy area R5 (control feed + 2.5% Pomacea canaliculata snails from tidal swampy area, R6 (control feed + 5% Pomacea canaliculata snails from tidal swampy area, R7 (control feed + 7.5% Pomacea canaliculata snails from tidal swampy area, and R8 (control feed + 10% Pomacea canaliculata snails from tidal swampy area. The variables observed included meat chemical and physical quality. A Completely Randomized Design was used in this study. Analysis of variance and Duncan’s multiple range test were used to analyze data. The research results revealed that using Pomacea canaliculata snails in duck feed had a significant effect (P<0.05 towards the physical characteristics (water holding capacity, cooking loss, and tenderness, and chemical characteristics of Alabio duck meat (water, protein, collagen, fat, and cholesterol content. However, there was no significant effect towards meat pH. It can be concluded that using 5% Pomacea canaliculata snails in a mixture of Alabio duck feed decreased cooking loss and meat cholesterol content.

  9. Biology of Incidental Catch Sea StarStellaster childreniGray, 1840 (Echinodermata: Asteroidea), from Malaysian Borneo Exclusive Economic Zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Ruhana; Lee, Suet Yee; Morni, Wan Zabidii Wan

    2017-01-01

    Sea star (class Asteroidea, phylum Echinodermata) is one of the most successful marine organisms inhabiting a wide range of habitats. As one of the key stone species, sea stars are responsible for maintaining much of the local diversity of species within certain communities. Malaysian Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) Resource Survey had been carried out from 16th Aug to 6th Nov 2015 and one of the invertebrate by-catch organisms is sea star Stellaster childreni Gray, 1840. This study documents morphological characters and diet of the sea star, besides providing brief descriptions of the habitats based on particle size analysis and vessel log data sheet. A total of 217 individuals had been examined throughout this study. Fragments of flora and fauna were found in the gut including Mollusca (gastropod, bivalves, and scaphopods), sponge seagrass, and seaweed as well as benthic Foraminifera. Stellaster childreni were found at depth of 45 m to 185 m in the South China Sea off Sarawak Malaysia, with various sea bottom substrata. Approximately 41% of S. childreni were found at a mixture of sandy and muddy substratum, followed by mixture of sandy and coral (19.3%), muddy substratum (17.5%), coral substratum (11.5%), and sandy areas (10.6%). The widely distributed sea star on different types of sea beds suggested healthy deep sea ecosystem; thus Malaysia should explore further potential fisheries resources in the EEZ off Sarawak coast.

  10. [Can western medicine resolve psychological problems in ethnic regions outside Europe? 2 cases from the region of Borneo-Sarawak].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilz, A; Wiesnagrotzki, S; Leixnering, W

    1983-07-31

    The case histories of two patients healed by animist treatment in the Iban tradition are reviewed by two psychiatrists. Both psychiatrists point to the difficulties in the evaluation of the background of the disease and of the mechanisms of its treatment by people not aware of the cultural and sociological aspects of eastern civilisation. The diagnostic classification of both patients by means of western medicine and the possible treatment of their disease are discussed. The failure of western medicine to understand the psychiatrical aspects of animist religions in the pathogenesis of diseases raises the question whether western medicine will be able to cope with the health problems of Iban (and other animists) sufficiently when their animist tradition will be replaced by western civilisation.

  11. Functional structure of ant and termite assemblages in old growth forest, logged forest and oil palm plantation in Malaysian Borneo

    OpenAIRE

    Luke, Sarah H.; Fayle, Tom M.; Eggleton, Paul; Turner, Edgar C.; Davies, Richard G.

    2014-01-01

    Forested tropical landscapes around the world are being extensively logged and converted to agriculture, with serious consequences for biodiversity and potentially ecosystem functioning. Here we investigate associations between habitat disturbance and functional diversity of ants and termites – two numerically dominant and functionally important taxa in tropical rain forests that perform key roles in predation, decomposition, nutrient cycling and seed dispersal. We compared ant and termite oc...

  12. Evaluating land use and aboveground biomass dynamics in an oil palm–dominated landscape in Borneo using optical remote sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Minerva; Malhi, Yadvinder; Bhagwat, Shonil

    2014-01-01

    The focus of this study is to assess the efficacy of using optical remote sensing (RS) in evaluating disparities in forest composition and aboveground biomass (AGB). The research was carried out in the East Sabah region, Malaysia, which constitutes a disturbance gradient ranging from pristine old growth forests to forests that have experienced varying levels of disturbances. Additionally, a significant proportion of the area consists of oil palm plantations. In accordance with local laws, rip...

  13. Review of the odd chrysidid genus Loboscelidia Westwood, 1874 (Hymenoptera, Chrysididae, Loboscelidiinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynn Kimsey

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The chrysidid genus Loboscelidia is reviewed and 11 new species are described, including L. cinnamonea (Borneo, L. fulgens (Viet Nam, L. fulva (Thailand, L. incompleta (India, L. kafae (Borneo, L. laminata (Viet Nam, L. meifungae (Borneo, L. nasiformis (Thailand, L. nitidula (Thailand, L. pecki (Viet Nam, and L. sisik (Borneo. A key to males of the species of Loboscelidia is given.

  14. Heavy Metals (Cd, Cu, Cr, Pb and Zn) in Meretrix meretrix Roding, Water and Sediments from Estuaries in Sabah, North Borneo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Mohd. Harun; Sidi, Jovita; Aris, Ahmad Zaharin

    2007-01-01

    Concentrations of heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Cr, Pb and Zn) in tissues of Meretrix meretrix Roding (M. meretrix R.), water and sediments from two estuaries were determined. One estuary is located in an urban area of Kota Kinabalu (Likas estuary) and the other in a rural district of Kota Belud (Kota Belud estuary), where both are in Sabah, North of…

  15. Indications and outcome of anti-phospholipid syndrome testing in an obstetric population at Sabah Women & Children Hospital, Kota Kinabalu, Sabah, Borneo Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valayatham, Vijayan

    2012-08-01

    We audited indications and outcomes of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) screening in the pregnant population at our centre. Prospective and observational. All APS test results returned were audited for validity of indication and subsequent outcome. 24 of a total of 146 (16%) of requests for the antiphospholipid antibodies and lupus anticoagulant were not indicated. Two positive results returned for a total of 116 "indicated" requests (1.7%). There needs to be increased awareness among obstetricians on the indications for screening for antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). The prevalence of antiphospholipid syndrome with obstetric manefestations in the study population is lower than rates published in the literature.

  16. Changes in forest land use and management in Sabah, Malaysian Borneo, 1990–2010, with a focus on the Danum Valley region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Glen; Payne, Junaidi; Sinun, Waidi; Mosigil, Gregory; Walsh, Rory P. D.

    2011-01-01

    In an earlier special issue of this journal, Marsh & Greer summarized forest land use in Sabah at that time and gave an introduction to the Danum Valley Conservation Area. Since that assessment, during the period 1990–2010, the forests of Sabah and particularly those of the ca 10 000 km2 concession managed on behalf of the State by Yayasan Sabah (the Sabah Foundation) have been subject to continual, industrial harvesting, including the premature re-logging of extensive tracts of previously only once-logged forest and large-scale conversion of natural forests to agricultural plantations. Over the same period, however, significant areas of previously unprotected pristine forest have been formally gazetted as conservation areas, while much of the forest to the north, the south and the east of the Danum Valley Conservation Area (the Ulu Segama and Malua Forest Reserves) has been given added protection and new forest restoration initiatives have been launched. This paper analyses these forest-management and land-use changes in Sabah during the period 1990–2010, with a focus on the Yayasan Sabah Forest Management Area. Important new conservation and forest restoration and rehabilitation initiatives within its borders are given particular emphasis. PMID:22006960

  17. Changes in forest land use and management in Sabah, Malaysian Borneo, 1990-2010, with a focus on the Danum Valley region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Glen; Payne, Junaidi; Sinun, Waidi; Mosigil, Gregory; Walsh, Rory P D

    2011-11-27

    In an earlier special issue of this journal, Marsh & Greer summarized forest land use in Sabah at that time and gave an introduction to the Danum Valley Conservation Area. Since that assessment, during the period 1990-2010, the forests of Sabah and particularly those of the ca 10 000 km(2) concession managed on behalf of the State by Yayasan Sabah (the Sabah Foundation) have been subject to continual, industrial harvesting, including the premature re-logging of extensive tracts of previously only once-logged forest and large-scale conversion of natural forests to agricultural plantations. Over the same period, however, significant areas of previously unprotected pristine forest have been formally gazetted as conservation areas, while much of the forest to the north, the south and the east of the Danum Valley Conservation Area (the Ulu Segama and Malua Forest Reserves) has been given added protection and new forest restoration initiatives have been launched. This paper analyses these forest-management and land-use changes in Sabah during the period 1990-2010, with a focus on the Yayasan Sabah Forest Management Area. Important new conservation and forest restoration and rehabilitation initiatives within its borders are given particular emphasis.

  18. The impact of land-use change from forest to oil palm on soil greenhouse gas and volatile organic compound fluxes in Malaysian Borneo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewer, Julia; Leduning, Melissa; Kerdraon-Byrne, Deirdre; Sayer, Emma; Sentien, Justin; Skiba, Ute

    2017-04-01

    Monocultures of oil palm have expanded in SE Asia, and more recently also in Africa and South America, frequently replacing tropical forests. The limited data available clearly show that this conversion is associated with a potentially large greenhouse gas (GHG) burden. The physical process of land-use change, such is felling, drainage and ploughing can significantly increase emissions of N2O and soil CO2 respiration and decrease CH4 oxidation rates in the short term; and in the long-term regular nitrogen applications will impact in particular soil N2O fluxes. Little is known about volatile organic compound (VOC) fluxes from soil and litter in tropical forests and their speciation or about the links between GHG and VOC fluxes. VOC emissions are important as they directly and indirectly influence the concentrations and lifetimes of air pollutants and GHGs. For example, oxidation of VOCs generate tropospheric ozone which is also a potent GHG. Within ecosystems, monoterpenes can mediate plant-microbe and plant- interactions and protect photosynthesis during abiotic stress. However, little is known about monoterpene composition in the tropics - a widely recognized major global source of terpenoids to the atmosphere. These knowledge gaps make it difficult for developing countries in the tropics, especially SE Asia, to develop effective mitigation strategies. Current understanding of soil GHG fluxes associated with land-use change from forest to oil palm is not sufficient to provide reliable estimates of their carbon footprints and sustainability or advice on GHG mitigation strategies. To provide the necessary data we have installed a total of 56 flux chambers in logged forests, forest fragments and mature and young oil palm plantations as well as riparian zones within the SAFE landscape in SE Sabah (Stability of Altered Forest Ecosystems; http://www.safeproject.net). Soil respiration rates, N2O, CH4 and VOC fluxes together with soil moisture, pH, mineral and total C and N were measured over a two year period. Additionally the effects of changes in forest litter diversity on soil properties were investigated using mesocosms. For this experiment leaf litter was transplanted into different forest types and oil palm plantations of different stand ages to simulate the change in litter-fall caused by changes in above ground plant composition. Laboratory incubations using soil and litter from the field sites provide additional detailed data on soil properties, carbon storage capacity and microbial activity to identify potential mechanisms for the field observations.

  19. Habitat-use and conservation of two elusive ground birds (Carpococcyx radiatus and Polyplectron schleiermacheri) in Sungai Wain protection forest, East Kalimantan, Indonesian Borneo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fredriksson, G.M.; Nijman, V.

    2004-01-01

    We studied the distribution and habitat-use of two endemic ground birds, the Borneon groundcuckoo Carpococcyx radiatus and the Bornean peacockpheasant Polyplectron schleiermacheri in the Sungai Wain protection Forest, East Kalimantan. Both species are highly elusive and neither has been subject to

  20. Investment in seed physical defence is associated with species' light requirement for regeneration and seed persistence: evidence from Macaranga species in Borneo

    Science.gov (United States)

    The life stage from seed dispersal to seedling emergence is often critical in determining the regeneration success of plants. During this period seeds must survive an array of seed predators and pathogens and germinate under conditions favorable for seedling establishment. To maximise recruitment s...

  1. Dr. A. W. Nieuwenhuis’: Forschungsreisen in Niederländisch Borneo. Ornithologische Ergebnisse, hauptsächlich vom oberen Mahakan und Kajan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Finsch, O.

    1905-01-01

    Wenn für die zoologische Kenntniss der grossen Sunda-Inseln die Forschungsarbeiten von Thomas Horsfield und Sir Stamford Raffles die erste wissenschaftliche Grundlage bilden, so gilt dies ganz besonders für die Ornithologie. Eine Reihe neuer Arten wurden durch die Genannten zuerst beschrieben und

  2. Methane and CO2 fluxes from peat soil, palm stems and field drains in two oil palm plantations in Sarawak, Borneo, on different tropical peat soil types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Frances; Lip Khoon, Kho; Hill, Tim; Arn Teh, Yit

    2017-04-01

    Oil palm plantations have been expanding rapidly on tropical peat soils in the last 20 years, with 50 % of SE Asian peatlands now managed as industrial or small-holder plantations, up from 11% in 1990. Tropical peat soils are an important carbon (C) store, containing an estimated 17 % of total peatland C. There are large uncertainties as to the soil C dynamics in oil palm plantations on peat due to a shortage of available data. It is therefore essential to understand the soil C cycle in order to promote effective management strategies that optimise yields, whilst maintaining the high C storage capacity of the soil. Here we present CO2 and CH4 fluxes from two oil palm plantations in Sarawak, Malaysia on peat soils. Data were collected from different surface microforms within each plantation that experienced different surface management practices. These included the area next to the palm, in bare soil harvest paths, beneath frond piles, underneath cover crops, from the surface of drains, and from palm stems. Data were collected continuously over one year and analysed with different environmental variables, including soil temperature, WTD, O2, soil moisture and weather data in order to best determine the constraints on the dataset. Total soil respiration (Rtot) varied between 0.09 and 1.59 g C m-2 hr-1. The largest fluxes (0.59 - 1.59 g C m-2 hr-1) were measured next to the palms. Larger CO2 fluxes were observed beneath the cover crops than in the bare soil. This trend was attributed to priming effects from the input of fresh plant litter and exudates. Peat soil type was shown to have significantly different fluxes. The different plantations also had different environmental drivers best explaining the variation in Rtot - with soil moisture being the most significant variable on Sabaju series soil and soil temperature being the most significant environmental variable in the plantation with the Teraja series soil. Rtot was shown to reduce significantly with increasing distance from the palm. The relationship between Rtot and root biomass, which also decreased significantly with increasing distance from the palm, allowed for the partitioning of Rtot into peat oxidation and Ra. Here rates of peat oxidation were estimated to be 0.11 g C m-2 hr-1 following partitioning, and 0.16 g C m-2 hr-1 without partitioning. Methane fluxes varied between 0 and 1.95 g C m-2 hr-1. The largest methane fluxes were emitted from collection drains. Methane oxidation was occasionally observed in field drains, when the water table dropped below the depth of the drain. Soil methane fluxes were lower than those from collection drains. The highest methane fluxes were observed next to palms (0.02 mg C m-2 hr-1) and the lowest under frond piles (0.08 mg C m-2 hr-1). Methane emissions were measured from the palm stems. Preliminary data gives a range between 0.005 and 0.27 µg C m-2 hr-1. These results show wide ranges in both CO2 and CH4 emissions from different sources within the plantations, with the collection drains being the largest source of C fluxes.

  3. Morphological indicators of growth stages in carbonates platform evolution: comparison between present-day and Miocene platforms of Northern Borneo, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, B.; Menier, D.; Ting, K. K.; Chalabi, A.

    2012-04-01

    Satellite images of present-day reefs and carbonate platforms of the Celebes Sea, east of Sabah, Malaysia, exhibit large-scale features indicative of the recent evolution of the platforms. These include: (1) multiple, sub-parallel reef rims at the windward margin, suggestive of back-stepping of the platform margin; (2) contraction of the platform, possibly as a result of recent sea level fluctuations; (3) colonization of the internal lagoons by polygonal reef structures and (4) fragmentation of the platforms and creation of deep channels separating platforms that used to be part of a single entity. These features are analogue to what has been observed on seismic attribute maps of Miocene carbonate platforms of Sarawak. An analysis of several growth stages of a large Miocene platform, referred to as the Megaplatform, shows that the platform evolves in function of syn-depositional tectonic movements and sea level fluctuations that result in back-stepping of the margin, illustrated by multiple reef rims, contraction of the platform, the development of polygonal structures currently interpreted as karstic in origin and fragmentation of the megaplatform in 3 sub-entities separated by deep channels that precedes the final demise of the whole platform. Comparing similar features on present-day to platforms and Miocene platforms leads to a better understanding of the growth history of Miocene platforms and to a refined predictability of reservoir and non-reservoir facies distribution.

  4. Investigation on the antimicrobial activities of gingers (Etlingera coccinea (Blume) S.Sakai & Nagam and Etlingera sessilanthera R.M.Sm.) endemic to Borneo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel-Jambun, D; Dwiyanto, J; Lim, Y Y; Tan, J B L; Muhamad, A; Yap, S W; Lee, S M

    2017-10-01

    To investigate the antimicrobial properties of Etlingera coccinea and Etlingera sessilanthera and to isolate and identify the antimicrobial compounds. Extracts were obtained via sequential solvent extraction method using hexane, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate, methanol and water. Antimicrobial activity testing was done using broth microdilution assay against 17 strains of bacteria. The leaf hexane extract of E. coccinea and rhizome hexane extract of E. sessilanthera showed best antimicrobial activities, with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values ranging from 0·016 to 1 mg ml -1 against Gram-positive bacteria. From these active extracts, two antimicrobials were isolated and identified as trans-2-dodecenal and 8(17),12-labdadiene-15,16-dial with MIC values ranging from 4 to 8 μg ml -1 against Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus. Etlingera coccinea and E. sessilanthera demonstrated good antimicrobial activities against clinically relevant bacteria strains. The antimicrobial compounds isolated showed low MIC values, hence suggesting their potential use as antimicrobial agents. This study is the first to identify the potent antimicrobials from these gingers. The antimicrobials isolated could potentially be developed further for use in treatment of bacterial infections. Also, this study warrants further research into other Etlingera species in search for more antimicrobial compounds. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  5. The genus Baijiania (Cucurbitaceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilde, de W.J.J.O.; Duyfjes, B.E.E.

    2003-01-01

    The genus Baijiania, originally thought to be indigenous in China and Borneo, appears to be restricted to Borneo. The only species is Baijiania borneensis, with two varieties, the type variety and var. paludicola Duyfjes, var. nov.

  6. New genera and species of the tribe Taphurini (Hemiptera, Cicadidae) from Sundaland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duffels, J.P.

    2011-01-01

    Three new genera and five species of Taphurini from Sundaland (Malayan Peninsula, Sumatra, Borneo and Java) are described: Sundabroma including S. bimaculata sp. n. from Borneo and S. suffusca sp. n. from the Malayan Peninsula, Allobroma including A. kedenburgi (Breddin, 1905) comb. n. from Borneo

  7. Prevalence of Cryptosporidium spp., Enterocytozoon bieneusi, Encephalitozoon spp. and Giardia intestinalis in Wild, Semi-Wild and Captive Orangutans (Pongo abelii and Pongo pygmaeus) on Sumatra and Borneo, Indonesia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mynářová, Anna; Foitová, I.; Kváč, Martin; Květoňová, Dana; Rost, M.; Morrogh-Bernard, H.; Nurcahyo, W.; Nguyen, C.; Supriyadi, S.; Sak, Bohumil

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 3 (2016), č. článku e0152771. E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP505/11/1163 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Gorilla gorilla beringei * free ranging gorillas * molecular characterization Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 2.806, year: 2016

  8. Some Ectoparasites of the Birds of Asia,

    Science.gov (United States)

    BIRDS, PARASITES, CLASSIFICATION, ARTHROPODA , DISTRIBUTION, FLIGHT, MITES, ECOLOGY, LICE, INDIA, JAPAN, TAIWAN, CHINA, PHILIPPINES, THAILAND, BORNEO, INDONESIA, SINGAPORE, ASIA, TABLES(DATA), HANDBOOKS, ARMY RESEARCH, DIPTERA.

  9. Philippine and North Bornean Languages: Issues in Description, Subgrouping, and Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobel, Jason William

    2013-01-01

    The Philippines, northern Sulawesi, and northern Borneo are home to two or three hundred languages that can be described as Philippine-type. In spite of nearly five hundred years of language documentation in the Philippines, and at least a century of work in Borneo and Sulawesi, the majority of these languages remain grossly underdocumented, and…

  10. Telosticta fugispinosa sp. nov. from Sabah (Odonata: Zygoptera: Platystictidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dow, Rory A; Afendy, Aqilah; Rahman, Homathevi

    2016-04-14

    Telosticta fugispinosa sp. nov. (holotype male, from Borneo, Sabah, West Coast division, Crocker Range National Park, Inobong, Kimamabang waterfall stream system, 21 ix 2012, deposited in RMNH) is described from Kinabalu National Park and Crocker Range National Park in Sabah, Malaysian Borneo. It is distinguished from all other species of Telosticta by the form of the male anal appendages.

  11. A taxonomic study on the genus Ettchellsia Cameron, with descriptions of three new species (Hymenoptera, Megalyridae, Dinapsini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiharu Mita

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Three new species of Ettchellsia Cameron, namely, E. ignita sp. n. from Peninsular Malaysia and Borneo, E. nigripes sp. n. from Sulawesi and E. reidi sp. n. from Borneo are described and illustrated. A key to the species of Ettchellsia is provided based on females.

  12. A taxonomic study on the genus Ettchellsia Cameron, with descriptions of three new species (Hymenoptera, Megalyridae, Dinapsini)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mita, Toshiharu; Shaw, Scott R.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Three new species of Ettchellsia Cameron, namely, Ettchellsia ignita sp. n. from Peninsular Malaysia and Borneo, Ettchellsia nigripes sp. n. from Sulawesi and Ettchellsia reidi sp. n. from Borneo are described and illustrated. A key to the species of Ettchellsia is provided based on females. PMID:23378818

  13. On a collection of Mammals from Billiton

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jentink, F.A.

    1890-01-01

    Up to this day I knew only a single Mammal, Sciurus prevostii, from Billiton, a small island, situated between Borneo and Banka. As the islands between Sumatra and Borneo bear a peculiar scientific interest with regard to the distribution of the animals and to the hypothesis concerning the relation

  14. Summary of Synoptic Meteorological Observations. Indonesian Coastal Marine Areas. Volume 2. Area 8 - West Borneo, Area 9 - Karimata Strait, Area 10 - Southwest Java Sea, Area 11 - South Central Java, Area 12 - Southeast Java, Area 13 - Southeast Java Sea, Area 14 - Northeast Java Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-04-01

    PAST THOR FOG FOG WO SMOKF SPRAY h60 iHwR PCPN FRAZN G6 TIME HOUR LTNG 8O PCPN HAZF 6L9G OUST SIG PCPN PCPN PAST HE 9LW6 SNOW WEA N .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0...SNOW OTHER HAIL PCOPN AT PCPN PAST THOR FOG FOG WD SMOKE SPRAY NO IHWR PCN FARZN as TIME HOUR LTNG AD PCRN HAZE SLAG OUST 5:0 PCPN PCPN PAST HR BLAG...WO SMOKE SPRAY NO (G0T) IHwR PCPN FRZN 08 TIME HOUR LTNG WO PCPN HALE sLWG OUST S1G PCRN PCPN PAST HR PLwG SNOW WEA 0C03 .0 10.0 .0 .1 .0 .0 .0 10.0

  15. Short-term impact of disturbance on genetic diversity and structure of indonesian populations of the butterfly Drupadia theda in East Kalimantan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fauvelot, C.Y.; Cleary, D.F.R.; Menken, S.B.J.

    2006-01-01

    Abstract We investigated the short-term impact of disturbance on genetic diversity and structure of the tropical butterfly Drupadia theda Felder (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae). Populations were sampled from five landscapes in East Kalimantan (Borneo, Indonesia) which were differentially disturbed by

  16. Ecohydrology: When will the jungle burn?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, David

    2017-06-01

    Fire weather indices are unsuited to forecast fire in tropical rainforests. Now research shows the area burnt across Borneo is related to drought-depleted water tables, presenting the opportunity to predict fire danger in these environments.

  17. CMS: LiDAR-derived Canopy Height, Elevation for Sites in Kalimantan, Indonesia, 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset provides canopy height and elevation data products derived from airborne LiDAR data collected over 90 sites on the island of Borneo in late 2014. The...

  18. The Caddisfly Triaenodes pellectus Ulmer (Trichoptera, Leptoceridae: Triaenodini) taken in Sabah, East Malaysia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, J.; Andersen, T.

    2001-01-01

    Triaenodes pellectus Ulmer is recorded from Sabah on the Island of Borneo, constituting the southernmost record of this widespread species. A checklist of the Triaenodes species from the southeast Asian islands and New Guinea is given.

  19. Four new species of Adicella MacLachlan (Trichoptera: Leptoceridae: Triaenodini) from Sabah, East Malaysia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, J.; Andersen, T.

    1997-01-01

    Four new species of Adicella MacLachlan, 1877, A. anakpanah spec, nov., A. bavanga spec, nov., A. danumensis spec, nov., and A. gada spec, nov., from Sabah (Borneo), East Malaysia, are described and figured.

  20. Amplification of wildfire area burnt by hydrological drought in the humid tropics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muh, Taufik; Torfs, Paul J.J.F.; Uijlenhoet, Remko; Jones, Philip D.; Murdiyarso, Daniel; Lanen, van Henny A.J.

    2017-01-01

    Borneo's diverse ecosystems, which are typical humid tropical conditions, are deteriorating rapidly, as the area is experiencing recurrent large-scale wildfires, affecting atmospheric composition and influencing regional climate processes. Studies suggest that climate-driven drought regulates

  1. Hispinen aus dem Holländischen Kolonialgebiet. 27. Beitrag zur Kenntnis der Hispinen (Col. Chrys.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uhmann, E.

    1930-01-01

    NEUE ART: Botryonopa Kleinei, Borneo, NEUE VERBREITUNGSGEBIETE: Metaxycera purpurata Guér, Surinam, bisher Brasilien, ferner Paraguay, Uruguay, Cayenne, Columbien. Sceloenopla maculata 01., Surinam, bisher Cayenne. Sceloenopla quinquemaculata Guér., Surinam, bisher Columbien. Amplipalpa collaris

  2. Note sur un Lepidocyclina nouveau de Bornéo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlumberger, C.

    1899-01-01

    Les travaux des géologues hollandais et de quelques savants anglais nous ont déjà fait connaître un bon nombre de foraminifères fossiles de Java et de Borneo, mais il reste encore à glaner après eux. Je viens de trouver dans une roche calcaire de Borneo que Mons. MARTIN, professeur à Leiden, a bien

  3. A MONOGRAPH OF CARYODAPHNOPSIS A. SHAW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    a. j. g. h. kostermans

    1974-12-01

    Full Text Available Of the genus Caryodapknopaia 7 species are known, of which twoare described here for the first time. The genus occurs from Yunnanto Indochina, with the exception of C. tonkinensis, which goes as far asthe Philippines and Borneo. Apparently most species are distributed bywater and C.tonkinensis is assumed to have spread from the mainlandto Borneo during the glacial period, when a land connection existed.The genus is related to Nothaphoebe and Alseodaphne and hencebelongs to Perseae.

  4. Description of a new species of Enispa Walker, 1866 (Lepidoptera: Erebidae, Boletobiinae) from Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellinen, Markku J

    2017-05-31

    The genus Enispa Walker, 1866, type species: Enispa eosarialis Walker, 1866 [Borneo, Sarawak] (= Micraeschus Butler, 1878, type species: Hyria elataria Walker, 1861 [Sri Lanka]), contains several species, about 20 of which described and many still undescribed, some also probably misplaced. The genus occurs in Indo-Australian tropics and subtropics. Presently there are 5 species known from Borneo, with mention of several undescribed Enispa-like species (Holloway, 2009). From Thailand there are 8 species illustrated in Kononenko & Pinratana's (2013) book, 5 of which unidentified and some others, based on specimens originated from present author, which most probably are not Enispa. Nielsen & al. (1996) mentioned 7 species in Australia.

  5. Some introductory notes on the development and characteristics of Sabah Malay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom G. Hoogervorst

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This is a preliminary description of the Malay variety used as a lingua franca in the Malaysian state of Sabah at the northernmost top of Borneo. The paper discusses a number of common linguistic features that distinguish Sabah Malay from other Malay varieties and analyses these features from a historical linguistic perspective. While it is argued that Sabah Malay has a close historical relation with other Malay dialects spoken in Borneo, especially Brunei Malay, the vernacular is also influenced phonologically and lexically by Sabah’s indigenous and immigrant speech communities. Words and sentences recorded or elicited during fieldwork in various parts of Sabah illustrate these points.

  6. A new section in Nepenthes (Nepenthaceae) and a new species from Sulawesi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheek, M.; Jebb, M.

    2016-01-01

    Nepenthes section Tentaculatae of Borneo and Sulawesi is described and delimited, with a key to the nine species, including N. maryae of Central Sulawesi, Indonesia, which is here assessed as Vulnerable under criterion D2 using the 2001 IUCN standard. It is hypothesised that this species might trap

  7. Nepenthes minima (Nepenthaceae), a new pyrophytic grassland species from Sulawesi, Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheek, M.; Jebb, M.H.P.

    2016-01-01

    Nepenthes minima is the first known pyrophytic grassland Nepenthes species from outside Indochina and the Philippines. A member of the sect. Regiae (Borneo, Wallacea, New Guinea) it is restricted to the highland grasslands of Central Sulawesi (Celebes) and has close affinities with Nepenthes maxima.

  8. Forest loss and Borneo’s climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlpine, Clive A.; Johnson, Alex; Salazar, Alvaro; Syktus, Jozef; Wilson, Kerrie; Meijaard, Erik; Seabrook, Leonie; Dargusch, Paul; Nordin, Haziq; Sheil, Douglas

    2018-04-01

    The equatorial island of Borneo is a deforestation hotspot. However, the influence of forest loss on the island’s climate remains largely unexplored. Here, we examine how forest loss is related to changes in ground-based records of temperature (1961–2007) and precipitation (1951–2007), and MODIS data for temperature (2002–2016). Analyses were performed for the entire island, lowland areas (deforestation and changes in local climate was most pronounced for watersheds in southeast Borneo, which have lost 40%–75% of their forests since 1973. These watersheds also had a significantly higher frequency of temperatures above 31 °C. Watersheds in north and northwest Borneo, which have lost 5%–25% of their forest cover, maintained a more stable climate with a similar distribution of mean and extreme warm temperatures between forest and modified forest areas. Watersheds with >15% forest loss had a >15% reduction in rainfall. We conclude that loss of forest in Borneo has increased local daily temperatures and temperature extremes, and reduced daily precipitation.

  9. A grammar of Mualang : an Ibanic language of Western Kalimantan, Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjia, Johnny

    2007-01-01

    This dissertation deals with Mualang, an Ibanic (Malayic-Dayak) language spoken in the interior of western Kalimantan (Borneo), Indonesia. Given the relatively large number of speakers (approximately 40,000 people), and due to its fairly isolated geography and some well-maintained socio-cultural

  10. Influence of boundary layer dynamics and isoprene chemistry on the organic aerosol budget in a tropical forest.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, R.H.H.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Jimenez, J.L.; Ganzeveld, L.N.; Robinson, N.H.; Allan, J.D.; Coe, H.; Pugh, T.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    We study the organic aerosol (OA) budget in a tropical forest by analyzing a case that is representative for the OP3 campaign at Borneo. A model is designed that combines the essential dynamical and chemical processes that drive the diurnal evolution of reactants in the atmospheric boundary layer

  11. In vivo carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatoprotective and in vitro ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Garcinia hombroniana, known as “manggis hutan” (jungle mangosteen) in Malaysia, is distributed in tropical Asia, Borneo, Thailand, Andaman, Nicobar Islands, Vietnam and India. In Malaysia, its ripened crimson sour fruit rind is used as a seasoning agent in curries and culinary dishes. Its roots and leaves ...

  12. English Language Teaching in Brunei: A View through a Critical Lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Clayton

    2011-01-01

    The small sultanate of Brunei, located on the island of Borneo in the South China Sea, introduced bilingual education shortly after independence. As a consequence, Brunei's Ministry of Education outsourced much of its English language teaching requirements to qualified expatriate teachers. Despite over 25 years of systemic English language…

  13. The Influence of AQ on the Academic Achievement among Malaysian Polytechnic Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matore, Mohd Effendi Ewan Mohd; Khairani, Ahmad Zamri; Razak, Nordin Abd

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the influence of Adversity Quotient (AQ) on the academic achievement among Malaysian polytechnic students. A total of 1,845 students from five polytechnics in Malaysia participated in this study and these polytechnic was selected from five different zones, namely Nouthern, Southern, Eastern, Western and Borneo. The…

  14. Progress in Malesian botany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NN,

    1986-01-01

    Check Lists of Indonesian Trees under editorship of Dr. T.C. WHITMORE (OXF) and Dr. I.G.M. TANTRA (Forest Dept., Bali). In April 1986 the list for Sumatra was ready to be printed. The lists for Celebes and Nusa Tenggara were in the typing stage. Manuscripts for the Moluccas, Borneo and New Guinea

  15. British Defense Policy: A New Approach?

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-12-14

    by the 15th century. It was soon to be followed by the discovery of the New World, Newfoundland fishing areas, and sea routes to the Far East during... Zanzibar , Borneo, Tanganyika, 65 Uganda, Mauritus, Malaya and Korea. 13 Defense spending actually reflected the ambitious nature of the British pursuit of

  16. Leidlikud lahendused : uus elamuehitus Amsterdamis = Enforcing Ingenuity New Housing in Amsterdam / Hans Ibelings ; hollandi keelest tõlk. eesti keelde Katrin Laiapea ja inglise keelde Robyn de Jong-Dalziel

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ibelings, Hans

    2001-01-01

    Amsterdami kahe elamurajooni planeeringust. Borneo-Sporenburgi (1994-2001) planeeringu tegi Adriaan Geuze ja tema büroo West 8. Kolm hiigelelamut projekteerisid Koen van Velsen, Frits van Dongen ja Kees Christiaanse. Valmimisjärgus IJburgi planeeringu autorid Felix Claus, Frits van Dongen ja Ton Schaap. 13 ill

  17. The genus Alangium in the Netherlands Indies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloembergen, S.

    1935-01-01

    The present revision comprises, besides the Alangia of the Netherlands Indies proper, also those of the Malay Peninsula, North Borneo, and Eastern New Guinea. The materials examined were kindly put at the author’s disposal by the Directions of the following herbaria: B = the Herbarium of the Botanic

  18. Contribution of pitcher fragrance and fluid viscosity to high prey ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR G

    important yet unsuspected role in the ecological success of the species. [Di Giusto B, Grosbois V, Fargeas E, Marshall D J and Gaume L 2008 Contribution of pitcher fragrance and fluid viscosity to high prey diversity in a Nepenthes carnivorous plant from Borneo; J. Biosci. 33 121–136] http://www.ias.ac.in/jbiosci. J. Biosci.

  19. Unexpected diversity of slow lorises (Nycticebus spp.) within the Javan pet trade: implications for slow loris taxonomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nekaris, K.A.I.; Jaffe, S.

    2007-01-01

    Since the 1950s, Sundaland (Borneo, Java, Sumatra and their surrounding islands) was thought to be inhabited by a single slow loris species, the greater slow loris Nycticebus coucang. Early taxonomies as well as recent morphological and genetic studies, however, point to at least three species

  20. Performing "Chinese-ness" in Singkawang

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ong, C.E.; Ormond, M.E.; Sulianti, Dian

    2017-01-01

    Through an examination of two festivals – Qing Ming and Cap Go Meh – in the town of Singkawang in Indonesian Borneo (Kalimantan), we show how Singkawang-bound Chinese Indonesian tourists and their Singkawang-based relatives produce a diasporic heritage network through ‘moorings’ generated by both

  1. Jellyfish-associated bacterial communities and bacterioplankton in Indonesian Marine lakes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cleary, D.F.R.; Becking, L.E.; Polonia, A.; Freitas, B.M.; Gomes, N.

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we compared communities of bacteria in two jellyfish species (the ‘golden’ jellyfish Mastigias cf. papua and the box jellyfish Tripedalia cf. cystophora) and water in three marine lakes located in the Berau region of northeastern Borneo, Indonesia. Jellyfish-associated

  2. Antiproliferative Effect of the Methanol Extract of Piper crocatum Ruiz ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    Samarinda, East Borneo 75123, 3Dharmasis Cancer Hospital, Jalan Letjend S. Parman Kav 84-86, Jakarta 11420,. Indonesia. Abstract ... Keywords: Piper crocatum leaf; methanol extract; antiproliferative; breast cancer; T47D cells. Received: 6 February 2009 .... blocking with 5% skim milk in Phospate- bufferred saline (PBS ...

  3. Assessment Profile of Malaysia: High-Stakes External Examinations Dominate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Saw Lan

    2010-01-01

    Malaysia is a federation of 13 states located in South-east Asia. The country consists of two geographical regions; Peninsular Malaysia (also known as West Malaysia) and Malaysian Borneo (also known as East Malaysia) separated by the South China Sea. The educational administration in Malaysia is highly centralised with four hierarchical levels;…

  4. Physico-chemical evaluation of the “Casturi” Mango

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangifera casturi “Casturi” mango is a tropical fruit tree about 10–30 m tall which is endemic to very small area around Banjarmasin in Southern Borneo (Indonesia). The casturi mango is believed to be first introduced to Florida by Richard Campbell in early 2000 as part of the germplasm conservat...

  5. Reviews

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NN,

    1995-01-01

    CHAN, C.L., A. LAMB, P.S. SHIM & J.J. WOOD. 1994. Orchids of Borneo, Volume 1. xvii + 402 pp., illus. The Sabah Society, Kota Kinabalu, in association with the Bentham-Moxon Trust, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. ISBN 967-99947-3-2. £ 30.00. Three years after publication of volume 2, which was entirely

  6. What a botanist can contribute to conservation in Malesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, M.

    1977-01-01

    Reviewing the conservation situation in Indonesia, we see that concern for animals outweighs that for plants. Sumatra with its richer fauna of large mammals, is better cared for than Borneo with its richer flora*. Too often in the reports, a forest is called a forest, to the neglect of the amazing

  7. Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuiteman, A.

    1995-01-01

    Three years after publication of volume 2, which was entirely devoted to Bulbophyllum (by J.J. Vermeulen), volume 1 of what should become a complete iconography of the Orchids of Borneo has appeared. Each volume is projected to contain a hundred species, which means that eventually fifteen volumes

  8. A new genus of Blacinae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester P. Gibson

    1977-01-01

    A new genus, Canalicephalus, of the subfamily Blacinae is described along with 4 new species, C. orientalis from Borneo, C. novus from New Guinea, and C. bakeri and C. mindanao, both from the Philippines. Keys are included to separate these 2 genera and the 4...

  9. Design of a Small, Low Cost, P-Band Airborne Polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Figueras i Ventura, J.; Hoogeboom, P.

    2004-01-01

    A preliminary study of the design of a small, low cost, P-band airborne, polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar desired by the Wageningen University and the Borneo Orangutan Survival Foundation (BOS) to carry out forest biomass monitoring in Indonesia is presented. The requirements of the application

  10. Siphonoecetini Just, 1983 (Crustacea, Amphipoda, Ischyroceridae) 11: Cephaloecetes schioettei sp. nov. from The Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Just, Jean

    2017-05-29

    The new species described below, Cephaloecetes schioettei, is the second siphonoecetine to be recorded from the archipelago region of Indonesia, The Philippines and Papua New Guinea. The previous reports were of Borneoecetes wongi Barnard & Thomas, 1984 from Borneo and from Papua New Guinea by Myers (1995).

  11. Tree Flora of Sabah and Sarawak project – progress and future activities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, H.S.; Nadiah, I.; Eryani, S.S.

    2009-01-01

    Tropical forests in Borneo (Brunei Darussalam, Kalimantan, Sabah and Sarawak) are considered as one of the twelve mega biodiversity centres in the world. However, until now, there is no up-to-date or complete documentation on the flora of the island. The Tree Flora of Sabah and Sarawak Project,

  12. Zorotypus weiweii (Zoraptera: Zorotypidae), a new species of angel insects, from Sabah, East Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianyun; Li, Hu; Cai, Wanzhi

    2016-09-12

    A new species of the insect order Zoraptera, Zorotypus weiweii, is described and figured from Sabah, East Malaysia. The new species represents the second angel insect from Borneo. Z. caudelli Karny was also collected near the type locality of Z. weiweii. Methods of specimen collection and a brief note of angel insects in Malaysia were provided based on new materials and biological observations.

  13. Two replacement names of the genus group of Micronoctuini and a new species of the genus Tentaxus Han & Kononenko from Sabah, East Malaysia (Lepidoptera, Erebidae, Hypenodinae). Taxonomic study of Micronoctuini. Contribution I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, H L; Kononenko, V S

    2017-12-05

    Two replacement names of the genus group in Micronoctuini (Lepidoptera, Erebidae, Hypenodinae), Tentaxus nom. nov. pro Tentax Fibiger 2011 (unavailable name) and Flaxus nom. nov. pro Flax Fibiger 2011 (unavailable name) are proposed; 43 new conbinations (comb. nov.) are stated. A new species T. zhangweiweii Han & Kononenko, sp. nov. is described from Borneo (Sabah, East Malaysia).

  14. Dispatch from the field: ecology of ground-web-building spiders with description of a new species (Araneae, Symphytognathidae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Miller, J. A.; Schilthuizen, M.; Burmester, J. L.; van der Graaf, L.; Merckx, V.; Jocqué, M.; Kessler, P. J. A.; Fayle, Tom Maurice; Breeschoten, T.; Broeren, R.; Bouman, R.; Chua, W.-J.; Feijen, F.; Fermont, T.; Groen, K.; Groen, M.; Kil, N. J. C.; de Laat, H. A.; Moerland, M. S.; Moncoquet, C.; Panjang, E.; Philip, A. J.; Roca-Eriksen, R.; Rooduijn, B.; van Santen, M.; Swakman, V.; Evans, M. N.; Evans, L. J.; Love, K.; Joscelyne, S. H.; Tober, A. V.; Wilson, H. F.; Ambu, L. N.; Goossens, B.

    -, č. 2 (2014), e1076 ISSN 1314-2828 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-32302S Grant - others:Australian Research Council Discovery Grant(AU) DP140101541 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Borneo * Crassignatha * disturbance Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour http://biodiversitydatajournal.com/articles.php?id=1076#articles.php?id=1076&_suid=140136443701508137781001837112

  15. World Epidemiology Review, Number 109.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-10-11

    Schistosomiasis Discussed (JORNAL DO BRASIL, 5 Aug 78) 7 Briefs Rio Combats Tuberculosis 9 Rondonia Yellow-Fever Alert 9 BRUNEI Campaign...Launched To Eliminate Tuberculosis (BORNEO BULLETIN, 5 Aug 78) 10 - a - [III - INT - 134] CONTENTS (Continued) Page Measles Epidemic Believed To Be... infantilism , "lung color," monale, followed by cardiac deficiency, cyanosis, intestinal stenosis; glomerulonephritis and neurological symptoms. Many

  16. Case report of a new pathogenic variant of Aspergillus fumigates isolated from Hipposideros cervinus (Chiroptera: Hipposideridae in Sarawak, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.S.J. Seelan

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available First record of new Aspergillus fumigatus variant (UNIMAS F009 was reported from the ears of bats at Kubah National Park, Borneo, Malaysia. Morphological characterization of this isolate showed some differences in terms of their growth rate, colony color, size of conidia and pigmentation on different media.

  17. Peer Evaluation Can Reliably Measure Local Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-García, Victoria; Díaz-Reviriego, Isabel; Duda, Romain; Fernández-Llamazares, Álvaro; Gallois, Sandrine; Guèze, Maximilien; Napitupulu, Lucentezza; Pyhälä, Aili

    2016-01-01

    We assess the consistency of measures of individual local ecological knowledge obtained through peer evaluation against three standard measures: identification tasks, structured questionnaires, and self-reported skills questionnaires. We collected ethnographic information among the Baka (Congo), the Punan (Borneo), and the Tsimane' (Amazon) to…

  18. Taxonomic revision of Geesinkorchis (Coelogyninae; Epidendroideae; Orchidaceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hsu, Shih-Chung; Gravendeel, B.; Vogel, de E.F.

    2005-01-01

    An updated taxonomic description of the orchid genus Geesinkorchis and a new identification key are given in addition to a distribution map, photographs and analytical drawings. Two new species (G. quadricarinata and G. breviunguiculata) are described from Borneo and Sumatra, respectively.

  19. Contributions to a review of the Dendrelaphis pictus complex (Serpentes: Colubridae) - 1. Description of a sympatric species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rooijen, J.; Vogel, G.

    2008-01-01

    A new species of the colubrid genus Dendrelaphis Boulenger, 1890 is described. Dendrelaphis haasi sp. nov. ranges from the Malaysian Peninsula to Sumatra, Java and Borneo. Within this range it also inhabits the islands of Pulau Tioman, Nias, Billiton and the Mentawei Archipelago. D. haasi is similar

  20. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Sulu Sea, located between Borneo and the Philippines, is separated from the surrounding ocean by two chains of islands. ... An 8-month time series of chlorophyll near the centre of the Sulu Sea has been used to show that the chlorophyll level is significantly higher than the level in the adjacent South China Sea.

  1. Selliguea sri-ratu, a new species in Polypodiaceae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hovenkamp, P.H.

    1996-01-01

    In a revision of the Malesian representatives of the genus Selliguea (Polypodiaceae) several recently collected specimens form Borneo were found to represent a very distinct, but hitherto undescribed species. From the few collections seen so far, it appears that the new species is not a very narrow

  2. Population structure and demographic history of a tropical lowland rainforest tree species Shorea parvifolia (Dipterocarpaceae) from Southeastern Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanaga, Hiroko; Teshima, Kosuke M; Khatab, Ismael A; Inomata, Nobuyuki; Finkeldey, Reiner; Siregar, Iskandar Z; Siregar, Ulfah J; Szmidt, Alfred E

    2012-01-01

    Distribution of tropical rainforests in Southeastern Asia has changed over geo-logical time scale, due to movement of tectonic plates and/or global climatic changes. Shorea parvifolia is one of the most common tropical lowland rainforest tree species in Southeastern Asia. To infer population structure and demographic history of S. parvifolia, as indicators of temporal changes in the distribution and extent of tropical rainforest in this region, we studied levels and patterns of nucleotide polymorphism in the following five nuclear gene regions: GapC, GBSSI, PgiC, SBE2, and SODH. Seven populations from peninsular Malaysia, Sumatra, and eastern Borneo were included in the analyses. STRUCTURE analysis revealed that the investigated populations are divided into two groups: Sumatra-Malay and Borneo. Furthermore, each group contained one admixed population. Under isolation with migration model, divergence of the two groups was estimated to occur between late Pliocene (2.6 MYA) and middle Pleistocene (0.7 MYA). The log-likelihood ratio tests of several demographic models strongly supported model with population expansion and low level of migration after divergence of the Sumatra-Malay and Borneo groups. The inferred demographic history of S. parvifolia suggested the presence of a scarcely forested land bridge on the Sunda Shelf during glacial periods in the Pleistocene and predominance of tropical lowland rainforest at least in Sumatra and eastern Borneo. PMID:22957170

  3. Geographical variation in Bubo sumatranus (Raffles) (Aves, Strigidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mees, G.F.

    1964-01-01

    In recent literature (Chasen, 1935; Peters, 1940; Delacour, 1947; Smythies, 1957) two races of Bubo sumatranus are recognized : B. s. sumatranus (Raffles) from Sumatra, Bangka, and the Malay Peninsula, and B. s. strepitans (Temminck) from Java and Borneo. From the zoogeographical point of view a

  4. Contribution of pitcher fragrance and fluid viscosity to high prey ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR G

    Nepenthes rafflesiana var. typica is an insectivorous pitcher plant that is widespread in northern. Borneo. It exhibits ontogenetic pitcher dimorphism with the upper pitchers trapping more flying prey than the lower pitchers. While this difference in prey composition has been ascribed to differences in attraction, the contribution ...

  5. Child Care Services in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pheng, Liew Sau

    2007-01-01

    Malaysia is a multi-ethnic, multi-racial, and multi-religious country with a population of more than 25 million people who live in the Peninsular and the States of Sabah and Sarawak on Borneo Island. It is a harmonious and peaceful nation comprised of Malays, who are the ethnic majority, followed by Chinese, Indians, Ibans, Kadazandusuns, and…

  6. Remarks on Chalcites malayanus (Raffles)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Junge, G.C.A.

    1938-01-01

    Till now it was assumed that the Malay Peninsula, Sumatra, Java, Borneo, and Celebes are inhabited by the typical race of Chalcites malayanus. At Prof. Stresemann's request I compared the beautiful series collected by Heinrich in Celebes with the material in the Leiden Museum and it proved that the

  7. The Cornaceae, Sensu Stricto, of the Netherlands Indies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Danser, B.H.

    1934-01-01

    After Mr. S. BLOEMBERGEN had planned a revision of the Cornaceae, sensu amplissimo, of the Netherlands Indies (inclusive those of the Malay Peninsula and the non-Dutch parts of Borneo and New Guinea) and had received, for that purpose, herbarium materials from different institutes, it appeared

  8. The genus Podocarpus in the Netherlands Indies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wasscher, J.

    1941-01-01

    When delimiting the area to be dealt with in this paper, it appeared, on the one hand, desirable to include some adjacent regions, such as the Malay Peninsula, North Borneo, Eastern New Guinea, the Bismarck Archipelago, and the Solomon Islands; on the other hand the war made it impossible to obtain

  9. The Umbelliferae of the Netherlands Indies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buwalda, P.

    1936-01-01

    Besides the Umbelliferae of the Netherlands Indies proper, also those of the Malay Peninsula and the non-Dutch parts of Borneo and New Guinea have been taken up in this revision. The materials examined belong to the following Herbaria: (B) = the Herbarium of the Botanic Garden, Buitenzorg. (BD) =

  10. All rights reserved and www.bioline.org.br/ja Assessment of Tree ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF HORSFALL

    inevitable loss of genetic resources at all levels. Ideally, conservation ... exploitation of some targeted species for economic, social and spiritual .... Blighia sapida. Ackee, Bread fruit. 57. 13. 14. Bombax buonopozense. Eso. 62. 23. 15. Bridelia micrantha. Coast goldleaf. 41. 15. 16. Calophyllum inophyllum. Borneo Mahogany ...

  11. Survey on birds of prey and owls Falconiformes and Strigiformes) on Java sea islands: correction and additions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijman, V.

    2005-01-01

    ): In Southeast Asia the short-eared owl Asio flammeus is a northern migrant and is normally not recorded south of Singapore and, rarely, northern Borneo. The occurrence of short-eared owl in the Kangean archipelago, Java Sea, has been noted in several publications, including a recent one in this

  12. Comparative and demographic analysis of orang-utan genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Locke, Devin P.; Hillier, LaDeana W.; Warren, Wesley C.

    2011-01-01

    ‘Orang-utan’ is derived from a Malay term meaning ‘man of the forest’ and aptly describes the southeast Asian great apes native to Sumatra and Borneo. The orang-utan species, Pongo abelii (Sumatran) and Pongo pygmaeus (Bornean), are the most phylogenetically distant great apes from humans, thereb...

  13. Balantidiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    exposure to pigs is help- ful but often impractical.29-32 References 1. Kean BH, Mott KE, Russell AJ, eds. Tropical Medicine and Parasitology ...endangered orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus) in Central and East Kalimantan, Borneo, Indonesia. Parasitology . 2010;137:123-135. 10. Toft JD 2d. The

  14. ANTHROPOGENIC ACTIVITIES THREATENING THE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Osondu

    2012-02-17

    Feb 17, 2012 ... America, Malaysia, Indonesia and Borneo. (Boo, 1990). In Africa, the loss of Savanna ... rare species, visiting indigenous people and bird watching. The increasing rate of ... since inception of the park. Fig: 1 Map of Oyo State showing location of Old Oyo National Park and adjoining community. #. #. #. #. #. #.

  15. A Multicultural Social Studies Series. Book 2. Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Irene; Sung, Robert

    This text is designed for students continuing in the Chinese Bilingual Pilot Program, ESEA Title VII, at the seventh grade level. The text introduces different cultural aspects and general knowledge of Asia, and is divided into twenty-five lessons, having the following headings: Glimpses of Asia; Monsoon; Malaysia; Borneo; Asian Countries; Caste…

  16. Taxonomy of Hodgsonia (Cucurbitaceae), with a note on the ovules and seeds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilde, de W.J.J.O.; Duyfjes, B.E.E.

    2001-01-01

    Hodgsonia, ranging from NE India through S China to Java and Borneo, was for a long time considered as monotypic, but there are two (and possibly three) species, demarcated at the Isthmus of Kra in S Thailand. The few, woody ‘seeds’ should be regarded as pyrenes, a condition not known elsewhere in

  17. A taxonomic revision of the Malesian genus Trigonopleura Hook.f. (Euphorbiaceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welzen, van Peter C.; Bulalacao, Lolita J.; Ôn, van Tran

    1995-01-01

    Trigonopleura, a genus from W Malesia, has three species, the widespread T. malayana (Malay Peninsula, Sumatra, Borneo, Sulawesi) and the two endemic species T. dubia (Philippines) and T. macrocarpa (Sarawak, Kuching). The species differ slightly from each other in leaf size, colour, and margin,

  18. A genome-wide assessment of stages of elevational parapatry in Bornean passerine birds reveals no introgression: implications for processes and patterns of speciation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert G. Moyle

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Topographically complex regions often contain the close juxtaposition of closely related species along elevational gradients. The evolutionary causes of these elevational replacements, and thus the origin and maintenance of a large portion of species diversity along elevational gradients, are usually unclear because ecological differentiation along a gradient or secondary contact following allopatric diversification can produce the same pattern. We used reduced representation genomic sequencing to assess genetic relationships and gene flow between three parapatric pairs of closely related songbird taxa (Arachnothera spiderhunters, Chloropsis leafbirds, and Enicurus forktails along an elevational gradient in Borneo. Each taxon pair presents a different elevational range distribution across the island, yet results were uniform: little or no gene flow was detected in any pairwise comparisons. These results are congruent with an allopatric “species-pump” model for generation of species diversity and elevational parapatry of congeners on Borneo, rather than in situ generation of species by “ecological speciation” along an elevational gradient.

  19. Serendipity at the Smithsonian: The 107-year journey of Rhipidocyrtus muiri Falin & Engel, new genus and species (Ripidiinae, Ripidiini), from jungle beast to valid taxon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falin, Zachary H; Engel, Michael S

    2014-01-01

    THE LONG AND TORTUOUS HISTORY OF AN ENIGMATIC AND RARE NEW GENUS AND SPECIES OF RIPIDIINE WEDGE BEETLE (RIPIPHORIDAE: Ripidiinae: Ripidiini) from Borneo is discussed and the taxon described and figured as Rhipidocyrtus muiri Falin & Engel, gen. n. and sp. n. The holotype male, and only known specimen, was collected 107 years ago in Borneo but subsequent to this it was transferred among early researchers in the early 1900s. The specimen was dissected and many portions slide mounted, but these were disassociated from the pinned body for more than a generation. A happenstance encounter led to the rediscovery and reassociation of the body and slide-mounted abdomen and other sclerites in 2011, and to its eventual description herein. Ripidiine diversity is briefly discussed and comparisons made between Rhipidocyrtus and other members of the subfamily.

  20. Phylogeographic Evidence for 2 Genetically Distinct Zoonotic Plasmodium knowlesi Parasites, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusof, Ruhani; Ahmed, Md Atique; Jelip, Jenarun; Ngian, Hie Ung; Mustakim, Sahlawati; Hussin, Hani Mat; Fong, Mun Yik; Mahmud, Rohela; Sitam, Frankie Anak Thomas; Japning, J Rovie-Ryan; Snounou, Georges; Escalante, Ananias A; Lau, Yee Ling

    2016-08-01

    Infections of humans with the zoonotic simian malaria parasite Plasmodium knowlesi occur throughout Southeast Asia, although most cases have occurred in Malaysia, where P. knowlesi is now the dominant malaria species. This apparently skewed distribution prompted an investigation of the phylogeography of this parasite in 2 geographically separated regions of Malaysia, Peninsular Malaysia and Malaysian Borneo. We investigated samples collected from humans and macaques in these regions. Haplotype network analyses of sequences from 2 P. knowlesi genes, type A small subunit ribosomal 18S RNA and cytochrome c oxidase subunit I, showed 2 genetically distinct divergent clusters, 1 from each of the 2 regions of Malaysia. We propose that these parasites represent 2 distinct P. knowlesi types that independently became zoonotic. These types would have evolved after the sea-level rise at the end of the last ice age, which separated Malaysian Borneo from Peninsular Malaysia.

  1. Clutch size declines with elevation in tropical birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, A.J.; Freeman, Benjamin G.; Mitchell, Adam E.; Martin, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    Clutch size commonly decreases with increasing elevation among temperate-zone and subtropical songbird species. Tropical songbirds typically lay small clutches, thus the ability to evolve even smaller clutch sizes at higher elevations is unclear and untested. We conducted a comparative phylogenetic analysis using data gathered from the literature to test whether clutch size varied with elevation among forest passerines from three tropical biogeographic regions—the Venezuelan Andes and adjacent lowlands, Malaysian Borneo, and New Guinea. We found a significant negative effect of elevation on variation in clutch size among species. We found the same pattern using field data sampled across elevational gradients in Venezuela and Malaysian Borneo. Field data were not available for New Guinea. Both sets of results demonstrate that tropical montane species across disparate biogeographic realms lay smaller clutches than closely related low-elevation species. The environmental sources of selection underlying this pattern remain uncertain and merit further investigation.

  2. A review of Bornean Micronectidae (Hemiptera, Heteroptera, Nepomorpha) with descriptions of two new species from Sabah, Malaysia1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ping-ping; Nieser, Nico; Lapidin, Johnny

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Previous research of Bornean Micronectidae Jaczewski, 1924 (pygmy water boatmen) is summarized based on the data from the literature and recent work. All the Bornean micronectids belong to the genus Micronecta Kirkaldy, 1897. Descriptions or redescriptions and a key to the eight species, which have so far been found in Borneo are presented, namely Micronecta decorata Lundblad, 1933, Micronecta ludibunda Breddin, 1905, Micronecta liewi sp. n., Micronecta lakimi sp. n., Micronecta lumutensis Chen, Nieser & Lansbury, 2008, Micronecta skutalis Nieser & Chen, 1999, Micronecta kymatista Nieser & Chen, 1999) and Micronecta quadristrigata Breddin, 1905. The synonyms are indicated under each species. To facilitate identification, illustrations and habitus photos are provided. The faunistic components of Micronectidae in Borneo are discussed from a zoogeographic point of view. PMID:25987878

  3. A review of Bornean Micronectidae (Hemiptera, Heteroptera, Nepomorpha) with descriptions of two new species from Sabah, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ping-Ping; Nieser, Nico; Lapidin, Johnny

    2015-01-01

    Previous research of Bornean Micronectidae Jaczewski, 1924 (pygmy water boatmen) is summarized based on the data from the literature and recent work. All the Bornean micronectids belong to the genus Micronecta Kirkaldy, 1897. Descriptions or redescriptions and a key to the eight species, which have so far been found in Borneo are presented, namely Micronectadecorata Lundblad, 1933, Micronectaludibunda Breddin, 1905, Micronectaliewi sp. n., Micronectalakimi sp. n., Micronectalumutensis Chen, Nieser & Lansbury, 2008, Micronectaskutalis Nieser & Chen, 1999, Micronectakymatista Nieser & Chen, 1999) and Micronectaquadristrigata Breddin, 1905. The synonyms are indicated under each species. To facilitate identification, illustrations and habitus photos are provided. The faunistic components of Micronectidae in Borneo are discussed from a zoogeographic point of view.

  4. A review of Bornean Micronectidae (Hemiptera, Heteroptera, Nepomorpha with descriptions of two new species from Sabah, Malaysia1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pingping Chen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Previous research of Bornean Micronectidae Jaczewski, 1924 (pygmy water boatmen is summarized based on the data from the literature and recent work. All the Bornean micronectids belong to the genus Micronecta Kirkaldy, 1897. Descriptions or redescriptions and a key to the eight species, which have so far been found in Borneo are presented, namely M. decorata Lundblad, 1933, M. ludibunda Breddin, 1905, M. liewi sp. n., M. lakimi sp. n., M. lumutensis Chen, Nieser & Lansbury, 2008, M. skutalis Nieser & Chen, 1999, M. kymatista Nieser & Chen, 1999 and M. quadristrigata Breddin, 1905. The synonyms are indicated under each species. To facilitate identification, illustrations and habitus photos are provided. The faunistic components of Micronectidae in Borneo are discussed from a zoogeographic point of view.

  5. Speciation and zoogeography of amphibian in Sundaland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nia Kurniawan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Sundaland is an interesting area to be explored based on its geological history, topography, and climate. Sundaland consists of Penisular Malaysia, Sumatra, Borneo, and Java which experienced some emergence and submergence process in the past. During 1981-2015, most of research in Sundaland found that amphibian family in Sundaland was dominated by Bufonidae, Ranidae, Microhylidae, Megophrydae, Rachophoridae, and Dicroglossidae which experienced lot of speciation in its history. Among of 4 major islands in Sundaland, Borneo has the highest number of species diversity, then Peninsular Malaysia, Sumatra, and Java. During those years, Sumatra and Java got least concern by researcher. Therefore, it is suggested for further study to explore more in Sumatra and Java. Keywords: Sundaland, amphibian, speciation, zoogeography.

  6. Pythons in Burma: Short-tailed python (Reptilia: Squamata)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zug, George R.; Gotte, Steve W.; Jacobs, Jeremy F.

    2011-01-01

    Short-tailed pythons, Python curtus species group, occur predominantly in the Malayan Peninsula, Sumatra, and Borneo. The discovery of an adult female in Mon State, Myanmar, led to a review of the distribution of all group members (spot-mapping of all localities of confirmed occurrence) and an examination of morphological variation in P. brongersmai. The resulting maps demonstrate a limited occurrence of these pythons within peninsular Malaya, Sumatra, and Borneo with broad absences in these regions. Our small samples limit the recognition of regional differentiation in the morphology of P. brongersmai populations; however, the presence of unique traits in the Myanmar python and its strong allopatry indicate that it is a unique genetic lineage, and it is described as Python kyaiktiyo new species.

  7. Nepenthes diversity in Sulasih Talang Nature Reserve - West Sumatra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DWI MURTI PUSPITANINGTYAS

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Nepenthes is one of carnivorous plants which very popular as ornamental plant. Most of them grow in mountain forest habitat above 1.000 m a.s.l. Sumatra has the richest Nepenthes flora after Borneo, with 29 species. The observation was done in Sulasih Talang Nature Reserve - West Sumatra. According to this inventory in Sulasih Talang Nature Reserve, there are 6 species can be found in this area, which 5 species are endemic to Sumatra, that are N. pectinata, N. inermis, N. bongso, N. spathulata and N. talangensis. N. gracilis is widespread in Sumatra, Borneo and Celebes, whereas the other species N. talangensis is only found in Mount Talang. Threat to those species are, habitat destruction, over exploitation and volcano eruption.

  8. Rare Animal Education Usingaugmented Reality

    OpenAIRE

    Hening Artdias; Ridwan Sanjaya; Alb. Dwi Yoga Widiantoro

    2018-01-01

    Indonesia has a lot of the diversity on flora and fauna that can be assets and icon on this area. Unfortunately flora flora and fauna that exist in Indonesia is less reasing. The animals endangered in Indonesia are Javan Rhino , Sumatran Rhino, Sumatran Tiger, Sumatran Orangutan, Sumatran Elephant, Borneo Elephant, Bornean Orangutan and Turtle. They are extinction because destruction of forest habitats, a conflict between humans and animals, trade, hunting, the arrests beyond capacity. [1]...

  9. Development of Solar Energy in Sabah Malaysia: The Case of Trudgill’s Perception

    OpenAIRE

    Jamalludin Sulaiman; Azlinda Azman; Behnaz Saboori

    2014-01-01

    Solar energy in Malaysia was first introduced as one of the five fuels in electricity generation through the Fifth Fuel Policy in 2001. However, the current real harnessing of available solar sources is still below its actual potential. This study examined the non-technical barriers towards solar energy implementation in Sabah located on the Borneo Island on eastern part of Malaysia. Following the theoretical framework, the proposed non-technical barriers are agreement, knowledge, technologic...

  10. Behavioral Studies Peptic Ulcer Patients Self-Medication by Visiting Pharmacy in Pontianak

    OpenAIRE

    Eka K. Untari; Siti N. Nurbaeti; Esy Nansy

    2013-01-01

    Self-medication practices is now considered as a component of self-care. Gastric ulcer is one of minor symptom that can be treated by self-medication. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence, behavior, and appropriateness of self-medication practice for gastric ulcer or its related symptom amongst population. The population of this study attended community pharmacies in Pontianak of West Borneo province. This study was a cross sectional survey involving 98 adults who did se...

  11. Three new species of Echinobothrium (Cestoda: Diphyllidea) from Indo-Pacific stingrays of the genus Pastinachus (Rajiformes: Dasyatidae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kuchta, Roman; Caira, J. N.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 3 (2010), s. 185-196 ISSN 0015-5683 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB600960902; GA ČR GAP506/10/1994; GA MŠk LC522 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Borneo * Echinobothrium nataliae * Echinobothrium reginae * Echinobothrium vojtai * hook formula * Madagascar * Macrobothridium Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 1.533, year: 2010

  12. Population and economic development in Sarawak, Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Furuoka, Fumitaka

    2014-01-01

    This paper chooses a Malaysian state in Borneo Island, Sarawak, as the case study to examine the relationship between population growth and economic development. The findings imply that there is no statistically significant long-run relationship, but a causal relationship between population growth and economic development in Sarawak. In other words, the empirical findings indicate that population can have neither positive nor negative impact on economic development. The findings also indicate...

  13. PENGARUH KERJA TIM DAN ORGANIZATIONAL LEARNING TERHADAP KINERJA PEGAWAI BADAN DIKLAT PROVINSI KALIMANTAN BARAT

    OpenAIRE

    Sartono, Lidya Natalia

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the research is to obtain information about the effect of teamwork an organizational learning on job performance of employee at Education and Training Board at  Province of West Borneo. The research was conducted by using quantitative survey method with path analysis applied in testing hypothesis. The number 71 employee as sample was selected by using Slovin formula. The research conclude: (1) there is direct effect of teamwork on job performance. (2) there is direct eff...

  14. A Historical Perspective on Light Infantry

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    battle- scarred terrain. Logistics Had the CCF possessed a modern, well-organized, efficient logistic system comprising motor transport and stocks on...Jungle Frontier: 92 Special Air Service Regiment in the Borneo Campaign, 1963-1966 (London: Arms and Armour Press, 1985), 65, 57. Lieutenant Colonel P. E...1963-1966. London: Arms and Armour Press, 1985. Foxley-Norris, C. N., Air Vice Marshal, "Air Aspects of Operations Against ’Confrontation.’ " In

  15. Využití kyselých proteáz z láčkovek pro účely vodík/deuteriové výměny.

    OpenAIRE

    Darebná, Petra

    2013-01-01

    Application of acid proteases from Nepenthes in hydrogen/deuterium exchange Petra Darebná (Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, Charles University in Prague, Czech Republic) Nepenthes are mostly found in Borneo and Sumatra. They are one of a few carnivorous plants which produce its own proteolytic enzymes (nepenthesin I and nepenthesin II), which provide an alternative source of nitrogen and other nutrients in case that these plants grow in a soil which lacks such nutrients. These ...

  16. Physical Chemical Properties of Fermented and Roasted Rambutan Seed Fat (RSF) as A Potential Source of Cocoa Butter Replacer

    OpenAIRE

    Luma Khairy.H; Fered Saadoon; Boshra Varastegani; Tajul A. Yang; Wahidu Zzaman

    2017-01-01

    Rambutan (Nephelium opossum L) is one of the most important tropical fruits that is originally found in Malaysia, Thailand, the Philippines, Vietnam, Borneo and other countries in this region. The industrial processing of this fruit produces seeds and peels as waste materials. The aim of this work was to determine the physical-chemical properties of fermented-roasted Rambutan seed fat (RSF) and its mixtures with Cocoa butter (CB) in term of viscosity, texture (hardness), thermal stability, an...

  17. Jumping in the night: an investigation of leaping activity of western tarsier (cephalopachus bancanus borneanus) using accelerometers

    OpenAIRE

    Costantini, David; Sebastiano, Manrico; Goossens, Benoit; Stark, Danica

    2017-01-01

    Accelerometers enable scientists to quantify the activity of free-living animals whose direct observation is difficult or demanding due to their elusive nature or nocturnal habits. However, the deployment of accelerometers on small-bodied animals and, in particular, on primates has been little explored. Here we show the first application of accelerometers on the western tarsier (Cephalopachus bancanus borneanus), a nocturnal, small-bodied primate endemic to the forests of Borneo. The fieldwor...

  18. A MONOGRAPH OF THE GENUS DIPLODISCUS* Turcz. (TILIACEAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. G. H. KOSTERMANS

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available 1. Seven species of the genus Diplodiscus are described, of which three(D. microlepis, D. parviflorus and D. decumbens are new to science, and one (D. hookerianus was formerly described as Pentace (for the description of D. decumbens cf. p. 264.2. The area of distribution of the genus covers the Malay Peninsula,Borneo and the Philippines.3. The affinities of the genus are discussed.4. A key to the species is presented.

  19. Soils on exposed Sunda Shelf shaped biogeographic patterns in the equatorial forests of Southeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slik, J. W. Ferry; Aiba, Shin-Ichiro; Bastian, Meredith; Brearley, Francis Q.; Cannon, Charles H.; Eichhorn, Karl A. O.; Fredriksson, Gabriella; Kartawinata, Kuswata; Laumonier, Yves; Mansor, Asyraf; Marjokorpi, Antti; Meijaard, Erik; Morley, Robert J.; Nagamasu, Hidetoshi; Nilus, Reuben; Nurtjahya, Eddy; Payne, John; Permana, Andrea; Poulsen, Axel D.; Raes, Niels; Riswan, Soedarsono; van Schaik, Carel P.; Sheil, Douglas; Sidiyasa, Kade; Suzuki, Eizi; van Valkenburg, Johan L. C. H.; Webb, Campbell O.; Wich, Serge; Yoneda, Tsuyoshi; Zakaria, Rahmad; Zweifel, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    The marked biogeographic difference between western (Malay Peninsula and Sumatra) and eastern (Borneo) Sundaland is surprising given the long time that these areas have formed a single landmass. A dispersal barrier in the form of a dry savanna corridor during glacial maxima has been proposed to explain this disparity. However, the short duration of these dry savanna conditions make it an unlikely sole cause for the biogeographic pattern. An additional explanation might be related to the coarse sandy soils of central Sundaland. To test these two nonexclusive hypotheses, we performed a floristic cluster analysis based on 111 tree inventories from Peninsular Malaysia, Sumatra, and Borneo. We then identified the indicator genera for clusters that crossed the central Sundaland biogeographic boundary and those that did not cross and tested whether drought and coarse-soil tolerance of the indicator genera differed between them. We found 11 terminal floristic clusters, 10 occurring in Borneo, 5 in Sumatra, and 3 in Peninsular Malaysia. Indicator taxa of clusters that occurred across Sundaland had significantly higher coarse-soil tolerance than did those from clusters that occurred east or west of central Sundaland. For drought tolerance, no such pattern was detected. These results strongly suggest that exposed sandy sea-bed soils acted as a dispersal barrier in central Sundaland. However, we could not confirm the presence of a savanna corridor. This finding makes it clear that proposed biogeographic explanations for plant and animal distributions within Sundaland, including possible migration routes for early humans, need to be reevaluated. PMID:21746913

  20. Impact of Biomass Burning Aerosols on the Diurnal Cycle of Convective Clouds and Precipitation Over a Tropical Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodzic, Alma; Duvel, Jean Philippe

    2018-01-01

    A coupled weather-aerosol model is used to study the effect of biomass burning aerosols on deep convection over the Borneo Island and surrounding oceans. Simulations are performed at the convection-permitting scale (4 km) for 40 days during the boreal summer and include interactive fire emissions and the aerosol effect on radiative and microphysical processes. Intense burning occurs daily in the southern part of the island, and smoke propagates northward to regions of deep convection. The model captures well the observed diurnal cycle of precipitation and high cloud cover. Cloud microphysics and radiative aerosol impacts are considered separately. Modifications of the cloud microphysics by smoke aerosols reinforce deep convection near the central Borneo mountainous region. This reinforced convection is due to reduced shallow precipitation in the afternoon that leads to a warm planetary boundary layer anomaly at sunset enhancing deep convection at night. Aerosol absorptive properties strongly affect local and synoptic atmospheric responses. The radiative processes of moderately absorbing aerosols tend to reduce deep convection over most regions due to local surface cooling and atmosphere warming that increase the static stability. For more absorbing aerosols, however, the impact is reversed with increased nighttime convection over most regions. This is partly related to changes in the vertical water vapor divergence profiles that decrease the convergence toward Borneo for moderately absorbing aerosols and increase it for more absorbing ones. These changes in the synoptic circulation due to large-scale aerosol perturbations are as important as local processes to explain the observed rainfall perturbation patterns.

  1. Amplification of wildfire area burnt by hydrological drought in the humid tropics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taufik, Muh; Torfs, Paul J. J. F.; Uijlenhoet, Remko; Jones, Philip D.; Murdiyarso, Daniel; van Lanen, Henny A. J.

    2017-06-01

    Borneo's diverse ecosystems, which are typical humid tropical conditions, are deteriorating rapidly, as the area is experiencing recurrent large-scale wildfires, affecting atmospheric composition and influencing regional climate processes. Studies suggest that climate-driven drought regulates wildfires, but these overlook subsurface processes leading to hydrological drought, an important driver. Here, we show that models which include hydrological processes better predict area burnt than those solely based on climate data. We report that the Borneo landscape has experienced a substantial hydrological drying trend since the early twentieth century, leading to progressive tree mortality, more severe than in other tropical regions. This has caused massive wildfires in lowland Borneo during the past two decades, which we show are clustered in years with large areas of hydrological drought coinciding with strong El Niño events. Statistical modelling evidence shows amplifying wildfires and greater area burnt in response to El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) strength, when hydrology is considered. These results highlight the importance of considering hydrological drought for wildfire prediction, and we recommend that hydrology should be considered in future studies of the impact of projected ENSO strength, including effects on tropical ecosystems, and biodiversity conservation.

  2. Giant taro and its relatives: a phylogeny of the large genus Alocasia (Araceae) sheds light on Miocene floristic exchange in the Malesian region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nauheimer, Lars; Boyce, Peter C; Renner, Susanne S

    2012-04-01

    Alocasia comprises over 113 species of rainforest understorey plants in Southeast Asia, the Malesian region, and Australia. Several species, including giant taro, Alocasia macrorrhizos, and Chinese taro, Alocasia cucullata, are important food plants or ornamentals. We investigated the biogeography of this genus using plastid and nuclear DNA sequences (5200 nucleotides) from 78 accessions representing 71 species, plus 25 species representing 16 genera of the Pistia clade to which Alocasia belongs. Divergence times were inferred under strict and relaxed clock models, and ancestral areas with Bayesian and maximum likelihood approaches. Alocasia is monophyletic and sister to Colocasiagigantea from the SE Asian mainland, whereas the type species of Colocasia groups with Steudnera and Remusatia, requiring taxonomic realignments. Nuclear and plastid trees show topological conflict, with the nuclear tree reflecting morphological similarities, the plastid tree species' geographic proximity, suggesting chloroplast capture. The ancestor of Alocasia diverged from its mainland sister group c. 24 million years ago, and Borneo then played a central role in the expansion of Alocasia: 11-13 of 18-19 inferred dispersal events originated on Borneo. The Philippines were reached from Borneo 4-5 times in the Late Miocene and Early Pliocene, and the Asian mainland 6-7 times in the Pliocene. Domesticated giant taro originated on the Philippines, Chinese taro on the Asian mainland. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Age and provenance of Triassic to Cenozoic sediments of West and Central Sarawak, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitfeld, H. Tim; Galin, Thomson; Hall, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Sarawak is located on the northern edge of Sundaland in NW Borneo. West and Central Sarawak include parts of the Kuching and Sibu Zones. These contain remnants of several sedimentary basins with ages from Triassic to Cenozoic. New light mineral, heavy mineral and U-Pb detrital zircon ages show differences in provenance reflecting the tectonic evolution of the region. The oldest clastic sediments are Triassic (Sadong Formation and its deep marine equivalent Kuching Formation). They were sourced by a Triassic (Carnian to Norian) volcanic arc and reworked Paleoproterozoic detritus derived from Cathaysialand. The Upper Jurassic to Cretaceous Pedawan Formation is interpreted as forearc basin fill with distinctive zircon populations indicating subduction beneath present-day West Sarawak which initiated in the Late Jurassic. Subsequent subduction until the early Late Cretaceous formed the Schwaner Mountains magmatic arc. After collision of SW Borneo and other microcontinental fragments with Sundaland in the early Late Cretaceous, deep marine sedimentation (Pedawan Formation) ceased, and there was uplift forming the regional Pedawan-Kayan unconformity. Two episodes of extension followed and were responsible for basin development on land in West Sarawak from the latest Cretaceous onwards, probably in a pull-apart setting. The first episode is associated with sediments of the Kayan Group, deposited in the Latest Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) to Eocene, and the second episode with Upper Eocene sediments of the Ketungau Basin. Zircon ages indicate volcanic activity throughout the Early Cenozoic in NW Borneo, and inherited zircon ages indicate reworking of Triassic and Cretaceous rocks. A large deep marine basin, the Rajang Basin, was north of the Lupar Line Fault in Central Sarawak (Sibu Zone) from the Late Cretaceous to the Late Eocene. Zircons from sediments of the Rajang Basin indicate they have similar ages and provenance to contemporaneous terrestrial sediments of the Kayan

  4. The Cretaceous and Cenozoic tectonic evolution of Southeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahirovic, S.; Seton, M.; Müller, R. D.

    2014-04-01

    Tectonic reconstructions of Southeast Asia have given rise to numerous controversies that include the accretionary history of Sundaland and the enigmatic tectonic origin of the proto-South China Sea. We assimilate a diversity of geological and geophysical observations into a new regional plate model, coupled to a global model, to address these debates. Our approach takes into account terrane suturing and accretion histories, the location of subducted slabs imaged in mantle tomography in order to constrain the evolution of regional subduction zones, as well as plausible absolute and relative plate velocities and tectonic driving mechanisms. We propose a scenario of rifting from northern Gondwana in the latest Jurassic, driven by northward slab pull from north-dipping subduction of Tethyan crust beneath Eurasia, to detach East Java, Mangkalihat, southeast Borneo and West Sulawesi blocks that collided with a Tethyan intra-oceanic subduction zone in the mid-Cretaceous and subsequently accreted to the Sunda margin (i.e., southwest Borneo core) in the Late Cretaceous. In accounting for the evolution of plate boundaries, we propose that the Philippine Sea plate originated on the periphery of Tethyan crust forming this northward conveyor. We implement a revised model for the Tethyan intra-oceanic subduction zones to reconcile convergence rates, changes in volcanism and the obduction of ophiolites. In our model the northward margin of Greater India collides with the Kohistan-Ladakh intra-oceanic arc at ∼53 Ma, followed by continent-continent collision closing the Shyok and Indus-Tsangpo suture zones between ∼42 and 34 Ma. We also account for the back-arc opening of the proto-South China Sea from ∼65 Ma, consistent with extension along east Asia and the formation of supra-subduction zone ophiolites presently found on the island of Mindoro. The related rifting likely detached the Semitau continental fragment from South China, which accreted to northern Borneo in the mid

  5. Carbon sequestration in Southeast Asian tropical peatlands over the Holocene period: large-scale hydrological controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dommain, R.; Couwenberg, J.; Cobb, A.; Gandois, L.; Kai, F.; Su'ut, N.; Abu Salim, K.; Harvey, C. F.; Glaser, P. H.; Joosten, H.

    2012-12-01

    Tropical peatlands are recognized as a significant sink of carbon dioxide and an important source of methane. Low latitude peatlands contain an estimated pool of 90 Pg C, of which ca. 70 Pg C is stored in Southeast Asian peatlands. However, the Holocene development of this carbon reservoir is poorly established. Here we provide a synthesis of carbon uptake rates by tropical peatlands in Southeast Asia across millennial timescales for the past 11,000 years. Our reconstruction of the carbon accumulation history for Borneo, Sumatra and Peninsular Malaysia is based on a synthesis of radiocarbon dated peat profiles, modeling of peatland extent, and a new carbon accumulation record from Brunei (NW-Borneo). During the early Holocene the first peatlands formed in southern Borneo under the influence of a strong monsoon and rapid rise in sea-level. The carbon accumulation rate (CAR) in these peatlands was on average 60 g C m-2 yr-1 at this time. Peatlands started to spread across the coastal lowlands of Borneo, Sumatra and Peninsular Malaysia after 8000 cal BP only when the rate of rising sea-level decreased. The major phase of coastal peatland initiation lasted from 7000 to 4000 cal BP. This period was marked by a Holocene precipitation maximum, suppressed El Niño activity, and the Holocene maximum in sea-level on the Sunda Shelf. The mean CAR of coastal peatlands at this time was 80 g C m-2 yr-1, with a Holocene peak of ~100 g C m-2 yr-1 from 4900 to 4500 cal BP. Significantly, atmospheric CO2 concentrations measured in the Taylor Dome Antarctic ice core indicate a plateau during this period of otherwise rising CO2 concentrations. During the Late Holocene CAR declined both in coastal peatlands (ca. 70 g C m-2 yr-1) and in southern Borneo (ca. 20 g C m-2 yr-1) in response to falling sea-levels and increased El Niño frequency and intensity. In fact, several peatlands in southern Borneo have stopped accumulating peat-carbon under higher El Niño activity. These results

  6. Evolutionary and ecological forces influencing population diversification in Bornean montane passerines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Vivien L; Smith, Brian Tilston; Burner, Ryan C; Rahman, Mustafa Abdul; Lakim, Maklarin; Prawiradilaga, Dewi M; Moyle, Robert G; Sheldon, Frederick H

    2017-08-01

    The mountains of Borneo are well known for their high endemicity and historical role in preserving Southeast Asian rainforest biodiversity, but the diversification of populations inhabiting these mountains is poorly studied. Here we examine the genetic structure of 12 Bornean montane passerines by comparing complete mtDNA ND2 gene sequences of populations spanning the island. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian phylogenetic trees and haplotype networks are examined for common patterns that might signal important historical events or boundaries to dispersal. Morphological and ecological characteristics of each species are also examined using phylogenetic generalized least-squares (PGLS) for correlation with population structure. Populations in only four of the 12 species are subdivided into distinct clades or haplotype groups. Although this subdivision occurred at about the same time in each species (ca. 0.6-0.7Ma), the spatial positioning of the genetic break differs among the species. In two species, northeastern populations are genetically divergent from populations elsewhere on the island. In the other two species, populations in the main Bornean mountain chain, including the northeast, are distinct from those on two isolated peaks in northwestern Borneo. We suggest different historical forces played a role in shaping these two distributions, despite commonality in timing. PGLS analysis showed that only a single characteristic-hand-wing index-is correlated with population structure. Birds with longer wings, and hence potentially more dispersal power, have less population structure. To understand historical forces influencing montane population structure on Borneo, future studies must compare populations across the entirety of Sundaland. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Review of the Oriental lantern-fly genus Egregia Chew Kea Foo, Porion & Audibert, 2011, with a new species from Sumatra (Hemiptera: Fulgoromorpha: Fulgoridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérôme Constant

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Datua brevirostris Lallemand, 1959 is transferred to the genus Egregia Chew Kea Foo, Porion & Audibert, 2011 in the Aphaeninae and the new combination Egregia brevirostris (Lallemand, 1959 comb. nov. is proposed. Egregia marpessa Chew Kea Foo, Porion & Audibert, 2011, the type-species of the genus Egregia, is synonymized with Egregia brevirostris (Lallemand, 1959. A second species, Egregia laprincesse sp. nov. is described from Sumatra, extending the distribution of the genus hitherto recorded only from Borneo. Distribution maps and an identification key are provided. The male genitalia of E. brevirostris are illustrated and described. The genus Datua Schmidt, 1911 now contains a single species, D. bisinuata Schmidt, 1911.

  8. Kapasitas dan Energi Adsorpsi Humin Terhadap Eosin

    OpenAIRE

    Anshar A.M.; Santosa S. J.; Sudiono S.

    2015-01-01

    Humin is a natural ingredient that is widely available in Indonesia, especially Borneo.  Humin is interact and absorb eosin compound that can cause environmental pollution. The interaction between eosin and humin was set on optimum time dan pH so that the humin adsorption would be optimum. This research measured the adsorption capacity and energy required to adsorp eosin on humin by performing various concentration of eosin. The amount of humin adsorption energy against eosin was 34.136 kJ/mo...

  9. An ant-plant by-product mutualism is robust to selective logging of rain forest and conservasion to oil palm plantation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fayle, Tom Maurice; Edwards, D. P.; Foster, W. A.; Yusah, K. M.; Turner, E. C.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 178, č. 2 (2015), s. 441-450 ISSN 0029-8549 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-32302S; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-04258S Grant - others:European Social Fund(CZ) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/30.0006; Australian Research Council Discovery Grant(AU) DP140101541 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : bird’s nest fern * Formicidae * Malaysian Borneo Subject RIV: EH - Ecology , Behaviour Impact factor: 2.902, year: 2015 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00442-014-3208-z

  10. Name Me – ein Porträt als Dialog anhand des Namensystems der Kelabit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelika Böck

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Dieser Beitrag betrifft die künstlerische Arbeit Name Me, die im Rahmen von Porträt als Dialog, der Erforschung von Formen der individuellen Repräsentation, entstand. Porträt als Dialog provoziert in unterschiedlichen Konstellationen einen Darstellungsdialog, um zur Erweiterung der Kunstform Porträt beizutragen. Name Me richtet den Blick auf die Benennung und Namensänderung der Kelabit, einer indigenen Bevölkerungsgruppe im Hochland Zentral-Borneos. Vorgestellt wird deren Namensystem und das (ehemals praktizierte ihrer Nachbarn, der Penan.

  11. Bibliographie

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    I. Sources A. Accords et traités 1. Agreement between Indonesia and Singapore in the Strait of Singapore, Jakarta, 25 May 1973. 2. Agreement between the Federation of Malaya, United Kingdom and Northern Ireland, North Borneo, Sarawak and Singapore, Kuala Lumpur, Government Print, 9 July 1963. 3. Agreement between the Government of Malaysia and the Government of the Republic of Singapore for avoidance of double taxation and the prevention of fiscal evasion with respect to tax income, Kuala Lum...

  12. Relationships between Tropical, Temperate and Boreal Forest Variables and PALSAR Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansey, Kevin; Balzter, Heiko; Hoscilo, Agata; Luckman, Adrian; Page, Susan E.

    2008-11-01

    The overall aim of our ALOS project is to evaluate the information content of polarimetric radar data sets, being acquired by the PALSAR instrument, to estimate forest variables (specifically those related to biomass and biomass change) of forested regions in the UK (temperate forest), central Siberia (boreal forest) and Indonesia (tropical forest in Sumatra and Borneo). By utilising the FBD and PLR operating modes of PALSAR, as well as interferometric products derived from 46-day repeat-pass data, we explore the relationships between measured bio-physical forest variables (from field data) with values of backscatter coefficient, coherence and other data derived values. The paper will show our initial observations and interpretations.

  13. Dopady pěstování palmy olejné na ostrově Kalimantan v Indonésii

    OpenAIRE

    Hruška, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    The main aim of this bachelor thesis is the evaluation of the impacts of the development of oil palm planting in Indonesia on the environment and social community of the local population in the selected region Kalimantan on the island Borneo. In next step the thesis focuses on the possibilities of using palm oil, the economic causes of the oil-palm planting and political background of the issue. The work also deals the possibilities of solving the assessment of the sustainability of planting ...

  14. Chemistry and Pharmacognosy of the Genus Durio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudiyansyaha; Panthong, Kanda; Garson, Mary J

    2015-11-01

    Durio is well known as one of the sources of seasonal fruit production in Southeast Asia with its center of diversity in Borneo. Thailand, Indonesia, and Malaysia are the main Durio producers in the world. Besides having much information about the utilization and benefit from its timber and fruits as a food substance, traditionally some parts of this plant, such as leaves, bark and root, can also be used for medical purposes. This review deals with chemical constituents and the biological activities of Durio plants.

  15. The palaeogeography of Sundaland and Wallacea since the Late Jurassic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Hall

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The continental core of Southeast (SE Asia, Sundaland, was assembled from Gondwana fragments by the Early Mesozoic. Continental blocks rifted from Australia in the Jurassic [South West (SW Borneo, East Java-West Sulawesi-Sumba], and the Woyla intraoceanic arc of Sumatra, were added to Sundaland in the Cretaceous. These fragments probably included emergent areas and could have carried a terrestrial flora and fauna. Sarawak, the offshore Luconia-Dangerous Grounds areas, and Palawan include Asian continental material. These probably represent a wide accretionary zone at the Asia-Pacific boundary, which was an active continental margin until the mid Cretaceous. Subduction ceased around Sundaland in the Late Cretaceous, and from about 80 Ma most of Sundaland was emergent, physically connected to Asia, but separated by deep oceans from India and Australia. India moved rapidly north during the Late Cretaceous and Early Cenozoic but there is no evidence that it made contact with SE Asia prior to collision with Asia. One or more arc-India collisions during the Eocene may have preceded India-Asia collision. The arcs could have provided dispersal pathways from India into SE Asia before final suturing of the two continents. During the Late Cretaceous and Early Cenozoic there was no significant subduction beneath Sumatra, Java and Borneo. At about 45 Ma Australia began to move north, subduction resumed and there was widespread rifting within Sundaland. During the Paleogene east and north Borneo were largely submerged, the Makassar Straits became a wide marine barrier within Sundaland, and West Sulawesi was separated from Sundaland but included land. By the Early Miocene the proto-South China Sea had been eliminated by subduction leading to emergence of land in central Borneo, Sabah and Palawan. Australia-SE Asia collision began, eliminating the former deep ocean separating the two continents, and forming the region now known as Wallacea. The microplate or

  16. REVIEW: The Diversity of Indigenous Honey Bee Species of Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SOESILAWATI HADISOESILO

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been known that Indonesia has the most diverse honey bee species in the world. At least five out of nine species of honey bees are native to Indonesia namely Apis andreniformis, A. dorsata, A. cerana, A. koschevnikovi, and A. nigrocincta. One species, A. florea, although it was claimed to be a species native to Indonesia, it is still debatable whether it is really found in Indonesia or not. The new species, A. nuluensis, which is found in Sabah, Borneo is likely to be found in Kalimantan but it has not confirmed yet. This paper discusses briefly the differences among those native honey bees.

  17. Discovering Phonemes of Bidayuh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jecky Misieng

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available There are generally three views of the notion of a phoneme. The structuralist view of the phoneme focuses on this language phenomenon as a phonetic reality. In discovering phonemes of a language, phonologists who hold this view will look for minimal contrasting pairs as a way to determine contrasting sounds of that language. They will also look for allophones or two sounds of the same phoneme which may appear in complementary distribution. This paper will discuss the possible application of the structuralist approach to analyzing the phonemes of a dialect of Bidayuh, one of the Malayo-Polynesian languages spoken in the northern region of Borneo.

  18. Survey on birds of prey and owls Falconiformes and Strigiformes) on Java sea islands: correction and additions.

    OpenAIRE

    Nijman, V.

    2005-01-01

    ): In Southeast Asia the short-eared owl Asio flammeus is a northern migrant and is normally not recorded south of Singapore and, rarely, northern Borneo. The occurrence of short-eared owl in the Kangean archipelago, Java Sea, has been noted in several publications, including a recent one in this journal (Nijman, Raffles Bull. Zool. 2004, 52(2): 647-651). Kangean would represent the southernmost locality for the species and the first for Indonesia. The contention that short-eared owl does occ...

  19. The forest for the trees: tuberculosis control efforts in west Kalimantan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoeb, Marwa; Lopez de Castilla, Diego; Pottinger, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Alam Sehat Lestari (ASRI), an Indonesian-American, non-profit organization located on the border of Gunung Palung National Park in west Kalimantan on the island of Borneo, is linking the delivery of health care to the conservation of natural resources. The clinic's experience shows that an unconventional 'forests-for-health care' incentive programme can provide a powerful way to break the cycle that links poverty, poor health and environmental destruction around the park. However, the challenges of preventing, diagnosing and treating tuberculosis in this setting remain considerable and success will still depend upon a multilateral collaborative approach.

  20. サバ州キナバタンガン川流域におけるエコツーリズムの背景と実態 : 持続可能な自然保護・地域社会・観光の融合への模索 (研究ノート)

    OpenAIRE

    海津, ゆりえ

    2012-01-01

    This research note aims to review of the background of Borneo study-eco tour by World Wildlife Foundation (WWF) since late 1990s at Kinabatangan river basin, Saba, Malaysia. Kinabatangan basin area is the place where is developed since 18th century by Asian countries, such as China and Japan. Most of wild forest are cut down and transferred into plantation under the development and it causes reduce of number of wild mammals such as Oran-Utang, Pigmy Elephant and other monkeys. WWF focused on ...

  1. Four new species of Arenga (Palmae from Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanis Palar Mogea

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available MOGEA, JOHANIS P. 2004. Four new species of Arenga (Palmae from Indonesia. Reinwardtia 12 (2: 181 – 189. ― Arenga distincta from Borneo and A. longipes, A. plicata, and A. talamauensis from Sumatra are described and illustrated for the first time. The descriptions are followed by  information regarding the habitat and  geographical distribution, and notes on morphological similarities with other, presumably related species.  Leaves of A. longipes and A.  talamauensis are paripinnate while the other two species are imparipinnate.  

  2. Sound Database of Marine Animal Vocalizations Structure and Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-08-01

    Lacdp~de) 1804 BD8B Peponocephala electra (Gray) 1846 BD10A Sotalia borneensis Lydekker 1901 BD12A Sotalia brasiliensis Van Beneden 1875 BD12C Sotalia ...fluviatilis (Gervais) 1855 BD12B Sotalia quianensis Van Beneden 1864 BD12D Sousa chinensis (Osbeck) 1765 BD13A Sousa plumbea (Cuvier) 1829 BD13 B Sousa...Lissodelphis borealis BD8A South. rt. whale dolphin -- Lissodelphis peronii BD8B -- Peponocephala electra BD1OA Borneo dolphin -- Sotalia borneensis BD12A

  3. Going the whole orang

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Wyhe, John; Kjærgaard, Peter C.

    2015-01-01

    This article surveys the European discovery and early ideas about orangutans followed by the contrasting experiences with these animals of the co-founders of evolution by natural selection, Charles Darwin and Alfred Russel Wallace. The first non-human great ape that both of them interacted...... with was the orangutan. They were both profoundly influenced by what they saw, but the contexts of their observations could hardly be more different. Darwin met orangutans in the Zoological Gardens in London while Wallace saw them in the wild in Borneo. In different ways these observations helped shape their views...

  4. Phylogeographic structure of the commercially important tropical tree species Dryobalanops aromatica Gaertn. F. (Dipterocarpaceae revealed by microsatellite markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fifi Gus Dwiyanti

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Dryobalanops aromatica Gaertn. F. (Kapur is an economically important timber     species in Southeast Asia that can serve as a good model for studying the impact of the Pleistocene glaciations on the genetic diversity and distribution of species in tropical regions. Seven polymorphic microsatellite markers were        analyzed in five natural populations of D. aromatica (N = 120 individuals: Gunung Panti in Malay Peninsula, Lingga Island in Lingga Archipelago, Lambir Hills National Park, Limbang and Similajau National Park in Borneo. The level of gene diversity (HE for the five populations was relatively high with a range from 0.571 (Similajau to 0.729 (Gunung Panti. The high genetic diversity in the present study could be attributed to the larger refugia population sizes of D. aromatica than that of other species. The population genetic structure revealed two distinct groups: the Malay Peninsula-Lingga Archipelago and Borneo. This pattern suggests that populations in each geographical area might be the consequence of post-glacial expansion from one or two refugia, but that gene flow between different glacial refugia was fairly restricted. 

  5. Diagnosing the Growth of Equatorial Typhoon Vamei (2001 from an Energy Standpoint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gin-Rong Liu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Surprisingly, on 27 December 2001, a storm named Typhoon Vamei formed near in Singaporean waters. An examination on the SSM/I-derived rainfall rates and air-sea parameters showed that significant higher latent heat release and air-sea energy flux during convective rainfall activities played a key role in the typhoon¡¦s growth. A quantitative analysis revealed that the energy flux from the ocean to the atmosphere and the latent heat release during the rainfall activities both increased significantly during the initial growth stage. However, the values rapidly decreased just before the storm reached typhoon strength. Separately, in contrast to a case that occurred in 1999, the total thermal energy calculated from Typhoon Vamei¡¦s formation was two times higher. Thus, despite a very weak Coriolis force in the equatorial belt, the special terrain of Borneo Island and narrow channel in the equatorial South China Sea caused a Borneo vortex via northeasterly cold surges, together with the accumulated energy was sufficiently strong enough to induce the formation of Typhoon Vamei.

  6. Isolasi dan Identifikasi Bakteri dari Tinja Orangutan Penderita Gangguan Gastrointestinal (BACTERIAL ISOLATION AND IDENTIFICATION IN FAECES OF ORANGUTAN WITH GASTROINTESTINAL DISTURBANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Haryadi Wibowo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Orangutans are among protected animals by the law. One of orangutans’ main health problems isgastrointestinal disease due to bacterial infection. Microbiological data of causative agent of illness inorangutan still not much reported scientifically. This research aim was to identify causative agent ofbacterial infection on gastrointestinal disorder in orangutan isolated from stool samples. The sampleswere collected from Yayasan Konservasi Alam Yogyakarta and Borneo Orangutan Survival, Semboja,Kalimantan Timur. Fresh fecal samples were collected using sterile swab and put them into a steriletransport media. To achieve pure cultures, bacterial isolation was performed by using plate streaking onselective media. Gram stain was done to confirm the cell uniformity and morphology. Bacterialidentification was performed according to Bergey’s Manual Determinative Bacteriology on some biochemicalcharacters to determine the isolated bacteria. The result showed that three bacteria were identified fromstool samples orangutan from Yayasan Konservasi Alam Yogyakarta, i.e.: Citrobacter amalonaticus,Providensia rustigianii, and Proteus mirabilis. Meanwhile, three bacteria, which were Klebsiella planticola,Enterobanter agglomerans and Escherichia coli, were also identified in samples taken from Borneo orangutan.

  7. Revision, phylogeny, and microhabitat shifts in the Southeast Asian spider genus Aetana (Araneae, Pholcidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard A. Huber

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The previously poorly known Southeast Asian spider genus Aetana Huber, 2005 is revised. Fifteen species are newly described, and the first SEM data and a first phylogenetic analysis of the genus are presented. Four species groups are well supported, one restricted to Borneo, two restricted to the Philippines, and one ranging from the Philippines to Fiji. The cladistic analysis and field observations suggest that the ancestor of Aetana built its web close to the ground, in confined spaces among and under rocks and logs. In at least two cases, evolutionary shifts of microhabitat resulted in species being adapted to life in higher forest strata, with correlated morphological and behavioral changes (lighter coloration; longer abdomen; additional sheet in web or more strongly domed web. The following species are newly described: A. abadae Huber, sp. nov., A. baganihan Huber, sp. nov., A. banahaw Huber, sp. nov., A. kiukoki Huber, sp. nov., A. libjo Huber, sp. nov., A. loboc Huber, sp. nov., A. lozadae Huber, sp. nov., A. manansalai Huber, sp. nov., A. ocampoi Huber, sp. nov., A. paragua Huber, sp. nov. and A. pasambai Huber, sp. nov. from the Philippines; A. gaya Huber, sp. nov., A. indah Huber, sp. nov., A. lambir Huber, sp. nov. and A. poring Huber, sp. nov. from northern Borneo. The female of A. kinabalu Huber, 2005 is newly described. A potential case of female genital dimorphism is documented in A. ocampoi Huber, sp. nov.

  8. Maintaining Identity Political Culture In Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauzi, AM; Sudrajat, A.; Affandi, A.; Raditya, A.

    2018-01-01

    This study investigates the portrayal of traditional political cultures in West Kalimantan Province, a growing of election process. Results showed that Political life in Indonesia leads to modern political culture after experiencing a change of paradigm of political life. Political life in Indonesia leads to modern political culture after experiencing a change of paradigm of political life. Beginning Indonesia’s independence in the Old Order Phase, the politics used using the ideological paradigm, subsequent to the New Order Period used the political paradigm of unification and simplification of political parties but in practice it became the strategy of the State’s rulers to facilitate subjugating its citizens. After entering the reform era, several phenomena of political culture are displayed, some are using modern paradigm by giving women the widest possible role in political parties, and so on. Besides that there is the opposite of displaying and practicing traditional political culture, this is as it runs in West Borneo Province. The change of political culture in the modern direction is different from the political culture of the citizens in terms of who will be chosen, most West Borneo Province residents determine their political choice by using traditional patterns.

  9. Impact of the 2015 wildfires on Malaysian air quality and exposure: a comparative study of observed and modeled data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mead, M. I.; Castruccio, S.; Latif, M. T.; Nadzir, M. S. M.; Dominick, D.; Thota, A.; Crippa, P.

    2018-04-01

    In September and October 2015, Equatorial Asia experienced the most intense biomass burning episodes over the past two decades. These events, mostly enhanced by the extremely dry weather associated with the occurrence of strong El Niño conditions, resulted in the transnational transport of hazardous pollutants from the originating sources in Indonesian Borneo and Sumatra to the highly populated Malaysian Peninsula. Quantifying the population exposure form this event is a major challenge, and only two model-based studies have been performed to date, with limited evaluation against measurements. This manuscript presents a new data set of 49 monitoring stations across Peninsular Malaysia and Malaysian Borneo active during the 2015 haze event, and performs the first comparative study of PM10 (particulate matter with diameter population exposure. This study showed that more than 60% of the population living in the highly populated region of the Greater Klang Valley was systematically exposed to unhealthy/hazardous air quality conditions associated with the increased pollutant concentrations from wildfires and that almost 40% of the Malaysian population was on average exposed to PM10 concentrations higher than 100 µg m‑3 during September and October 2015.

  10. Phylogenetic relationships of Malaysia's pig-tailed macaque Macaca nemestrina based on D-loop region sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Latiff M. A., B.; Ampeng, A.; Yaakop, S.; Md-Zain B., M.

    2014-09-01

    Phylogenetic relationships among Malaysian pig-tailed macaques have never been established even though the data are crucial in aiding conservation plan for the species. The aims of this study is to establish the phylogenetic relationships of Macaca nemestrina in Malaysia. A total of 21 genetic samples of M. nemestrina yielding 458 bp of D-loop sequences were used in phylogenetic analyses, in addition to one sample of M. fascicularis which was used as an outgroup. Sequence character analysis revealed that D-loop locus contains 23% parsimony informative character detected among the ingroups. Further analysis indicated a clear separation between populations originating from different regions; the Malay Peninsula populations are separated from Borneo Insular population; and Perak population formed a distinctive clade within Peninsular Malaysia populations. Phylogenetic trees (NJ, MP and Bayesian) portray a consistent clustering paradigm as Borneo population was distinguished from Peninsula population (100% bootstrap value in the NJ, MP, 1.00 posterior probability in Bayesian trees). Perak's population was separated from other Peninsula populations (100% in NJ, 99% in MP and 1.00 in Bayesian). D-loop region of mtDNA is proven to be a suitable locus in studying the separation of M. nemestrina at population level. These findings are crucial in aiding the conservation management and translocation process of M. fascicularis populations in Malaysia.

  11. Biogeographic distribution and metric dental variation of fossil and living orangutans (Pongo spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tshen, Lim Tze

    2016-01-01

    The genus Pongo has a relatively richer Quaternary fossil record than those of the African great apes. Fossil materials are patchy in terms of anatomical parts represented, limited almost exclusively to isolated teeth, jaw and bone fragments. Fossil evidence indicates that the genus Pongo had a broadly continuous distribution across the southern part of the Indomalayan biogeographic region, ranging in time from Early Pleistocene to Holocene: southern China (77 fossil sites), Vietnam (15), Laos (6), Cambodia (2), Thailand (4), Peninsular Malaysia (6), Sumatra (4), Borneo (6) and Java (4). Within this distribution range, there are major geographical gaps with no known orangutan fossils, notably central and southern Indochina, central and southern Thailand, eastern Peninsular Malaysia, northern and southern Sumatra, and Kalimantan. The geological time and place of origin of the genus remain unresolved. Fossil orangutan assemblages usually show greater extent of dental metrical variation than those of modern-day populations. Such variability shown in prehistoric populations has partially contributed to confusion regarding past taxonomic diversity and systematic relationships among extinct and living forms. To date, no fewer than 14 distinct taxa have been identified and named for Pleistocene orangutans. Clear cases suggestive of predation by prehistoric human are few in number, and limited to terminal Pleistocene-Early Holocene sites in Borneo and a Late Pleistocene site in Vietnam.

  12. New record of a phoretic flea associated with earwigs (Dermaptera, Arixeniidae) and a redescription of the bat fleaLagaropsylla signata(Siphonaptera, Ischnopsyllidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastriter, Michael W; Miller, Kelly B; Svenson, Gavin J; Martin, Gavin J; Whiting, Michael F

    2017-01-01

    Lagaropsylla signata (Wahlgren, 1903), previously known only from the Island of Java, Indonesia is redescribed and reported for the first time in Deer Cave, Gunung Mulu National Park, Sarawak, Malaysia (west coast of Borneo). Many were found clinging to the earwig Arixenia esau Jordan, 1909. A similar account of a phoretic flea ( Lagaropsylla turba Smit, 1958) on the same species of cave-dwelling earwig has been reported in peninsular Malaysia in a well-documented association with the hairless naked bulldog bat, Cheiromeles torquatus Horsfield, 1824. The association of Lagaropsylla signata with Arixenia esau is parallel to the evolution and co-existence with bats in Deer Cave just as in the case of Lagaropsylla turba , Arixenia esau , and Cheiromeles torquatus . The evidence suggests that Lagaropsylla turba and Lagaropsylla signata are obligate phoretic parasites whose survival depends on Arixenia esau to access a bat host. Arixenia esau is reported for the first time in Deer Cave and the occurrence of Lagaropsylla signata on the island of Borneo represented a new record, previously being found only on the island of Java. Images of Lagaropsylla signata attached to Arixenia esau are provided. Xeniaria jacobsoni (Burr, 1912), often associated with Arixenia esau in other geographical areas, was not present in the material examined from Deer Cave. The natural history of the earwig genera Arixenia Jordan, 1909 and Xeniaria Maa, 1974 are discussed and summarized relative to their associations with phoretic fleas and their bat hosts.

  13. New record of a phoretic flea associated with earwigs (Dermaptera, Arixeniidae and a redescription of the bat flea Lagaropsylla signata (Siphonaptera, Ischnopsyllidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael W. Hastriter

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Lagaropsylla signata (Wahlgren, 1903, previously known only from the Island of Java, Indonesia is redescribed and reported for the first time in Deer Cave, Gunung Mulu National Park, Sarawak, Malaysia (west coast of Borneo. Many were found clinging to the earwig Arixenia esau Jordan, 1909. A similar account of a phoretic flea (Lagaropsylla turba Smit, 1958 on the same species of cave-dwelling earwig has been reported in peninsular Malaysia in a well-documented association with the hairless naked bulldog bat, Cheiromeles torquatus Horsfield, 1824. The association of L. signata with A. esau is parallel to the evolution and co-existence with bats in Deer Cave just as in the case of L. turba, A. esau, and C. torquatus. The evidence suggests that L. turba and L. signata are obligate phoretic parasites whose survival depends on A. esau to access a bat host. Arixenia esau is reported for the first time in Deer Cave and the occurrence of L. signata on the island of Borneo represented a new record, previously being found only on the island of Java. Images of L. signata attached to A. esau are provided. Xeniaria jacobsoni (Burr, 1912, often associated with A. esau in other geographical areas, was not present in the material examined from Deer Cave. The natural history of the earwig genera Arixenia Jordan, 1909 and Xeniaria Maa, 1974 are discussed and summarized relative to their associations with phoretic fleas and their bat hosts.

  14. PENGELOLAAN PASCA PELEPASLIARAN DAN AKTIVITAS ORANGUTAN (Pongo pygmaeus wurmbii Groves, 2001 EX-CAPTIVE DI SUAKA MARGASATWA LAMANDAU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ventie Angelia Nawangsari

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Orangutan is an endemic wild animal of Sumatra and Kalimantan (Borneo Island. The population of Borneo orangutan decrease and become endangered caused by high damage of its habitat and illegal hunting. The conservation efforts needs to be done to maintain the population. One of this effort is release of ex-captive orangutan. One of the factors of the success of release is orangutan activity and post release management. The objective of this research was to analyze post-release management and daily activity of orangutan. Data collection of management was obtained through direct observation and interview to manager of release and veterinary. While data collection of orangutan activity through observation using focal-animal sampling method. The orangutan post-release management conducted by orangutan monitoring, supply additional feed in feeding site area, monitoring of reintoduction habitat, and medical examination of orangutan. The daily activity of ex-captive orangutan showed that rest activity had significantly different in adult and adolescent’s age class. The adults has duration of rest activity longer than the adolescents.Keywords: activity, orangutan, post-release

  15. Distribution of Atmospheric Aerosol over the South China Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Jen Huang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The satellite-derived aerosol optical depth (AOD data is used to investigate the distribution of aerosol over the South China Sea (SCS. High correlation coefficients are found between in situ AERONET data and satellite AOD measurements around the SCS with the highest coefficient of 0.9 on the Dongsha Island (i.e., Pratas Island. The empirical orthogonal function (EOF analysis of AOD over the SCS shows that high AOD is always found around offshore areas of China, Indochina, Sumatra, and Borneo. Besides, spring is the major season of occurring coarse aerosol particles (AOT_C but fine aerosol particles (AOT_F occur yearly. The biomass burning is found in Indochina during March and April, and so it is in Sumatra and Borneo from August to October. The results also show that the AOT_F are higher during El Niño events, but higher AOT_C are found in La Niña years.

  16. Cluster Analysis of Monthly Precipitation over the Western Maritime Continent under Climate Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh K Singh

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Changes in climate because of global warming during the 20th and 21st centuries have a direct impact on the hydrological cycle as driven by precipitation. However, studying precipitation over the Western Maritime Continent (WMC is a great challenge, as the WMC has a complex topography and weather system. Understanding changes in precipitation patterns and their groupings is an important aspect of planning mitigation measures to minimize flood and drought risk as well as of understanding the redistribution of precipitation arising from climate change. This paper employs Ward’s hierarchical clustering on regional climate model (RCM-simulated monthly precipitation gridded data over 42 approximately evenly distributed grid stations from the years 2030 to 2060. The aim was to investigate spatial and temporal groupings over the four major landmasses in the WMC and to compare these with historical precipitation groupings. The results showed that the four large-scale islands of Java, Sumatra, Peninsular Malaysia and Borneo would experience a significant spatial redistribution of precipitation over the years 2030 to 2060, as compared to historical patterns from 1980 to 2005. The spatial groups were also compared for two future forcing scenarios, representative concentration pathways (RCPs 4.5 and 8.5, and different groupings over the Borneo region were observed.

  17. The assesment of flex blue implementation in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahala Maruli Lumbanraja

    2014-01-01

    Flex blue is a small power modular and light water cooled reactor. The reactor site is located at the bottom of the sea surface (off shore) and main control room on the ground. Hull that contains of the main reactor components is placed at a depth of 60-100 m in the bottom of the sea surface so that the safety and security system is quite high. NPP was developed by the DCNS-France to meet the electrical energy needs of the world. The purpose of this study was to study the pre-feasibility of Flex blue implementation in Indonesia based on technological factors, sea geographical conditions and regulatory. The methodology used is to study a variety of literature study on NPP Flex blue technology, geographic conditions, and regulatory systems in Indonesia. In this study, location of potential sites are on the east coast of the island of Sumatra, Java's northern coast, the coast of the Borneo island and surrounding coastal islands between the east of the Sumatra island, northern Java and Borneo, however in terms of regulation, this technology could not be implemented. (author)

  18. Sea-level and provenance controlled clay mineral assemblage since the last 19 ka in the southern South China Sea: records of Core MD05-2894 off the Sunda Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H.; Liu, Z.; Colin, C.; Sathiamurthy, E.; Hantoro, W. S.; Zhao, Y.

    2010-12-01

    High-resolution clay mineral assemblage at Core MD05-2894 (7°2.25'N, 111°33.11'E, water depth 1982 m) in the southern South China Sea is used to investigate the provenance and transport process of fine-grained sediments since the last 19 ka. In order to perform the source analysis, clay minerals in surface sediments of various potential source areas are also analyzed, including the Mekong River, Malay Peninsula, Sumatra, Borneo, and the Sunda Shelf. Clay mineralogical results at Core MD05-2894 indicate the sea level rise as the principal factor to drive provenance changes. During the late glacial stage, the Sunda Shelf was exposed. High values of smectite (average 32%) and kaolinite (27%) at the core suggest a large contribution of fine-grained sediments transported by the potential Sunda paleo-drainage system from Malaysia Peninsula and Sumatra, where kaolinite and smectite are rich. During the deglaciation when the sea level rises, illite and chlorite contents increased with a similar pattern, whereas kaolinite and smectite contents decreased, suggesting more sediment contribution from the Mekong River and Northwest Borneo. During the Holocene, variations in four clay mineral contents keep relatively stable with more illite and chlorite contents than those of the deglaciation and last glacial stage, indicating a mixture of various provenances.

  19. Targeted conservation to safeguard a biodiversity hotspot from climate and land-cover change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struebig, Matthew J; Wilting, Andreas; Gaveau, David L A; Meijaard, Erik; Smith, Robert J; Fischer, Manuela; Metcalfe, Kristian; Kramer-Schadt, Stephanie

    2015-02-02

    Responses of biodiversity to changes in both land cover and climate are recognized [1] but still poorly understood [2]. This poses significant challenges for spatial planning as species could shift, contract, expand, or maintain their range inside or outside protected areas [2-4]. We examine this problem in Borneo, a global biodiversity hotspot [5], using spatial prioritization analyses that maximize species conservation under multiple environmental-change forecasts. Climate projections indicate that 11%-36% of Bornean mammal species will lose ≥ 30% of their habitat by 2080, and suitable ecological conditions will shift upslope for 23%-46%. Deforestation exacerbates this process, increasing the proportion of species facing comparable habitat loss to 30%-49%, a 2-fold increase on historical trends. Accommodating these distributional changes will require conserving land outside existing protected areas, but this may be less than anticipated from models incorporating deforestation alone because some species will colonize high-elevation reserves. Our results demonstrate the increasing importance of upland reserves and that relatively small additions (16,000-28,000 km(2)) to the current conservation estate could provide substantial benefits to biodiversity facing changes to land cover and climate. On Borneo, much of this land is under forestry jurisdiction, warranting targeted conservation partnerships to safeguard biodiversity in an era of global change. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Total solar eclipse of 17-18 March 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiala, A.D.; Bangert, J.A.; Harris, W.T.

    1987-03-17

    It is a continuing policy of the Nautical Almanac Office to prepare issues of the series of Naval Observatory Circulars containing detailed information for observing most total solar eclipses and some annular solar eclipses. This is a service to the international scientific community, based on agreements with Commissions and Working Groups of the International Astronomical Union. A total eclipse of the Sun will occur on Thursday, 17 March and Friday, 18 March 1988. It will be preceded by an associated short partial eclipse of the Moon on 3 March. The duration of totality of the solar eclipse will approach 4 minutes at maximum, the longest since 11 June 1983. Not much of the path is over land. First landfall will occur just after sunrise at the west coast of Sumatra, at Oh 28m U.T. The track will cross Sumatra in three minutes, with the umbral shadow growing so as to increase both the width of the path and the duration of totality. Palembang lies near the central line, and is probably one of the most accessible such places. Bangka Island, just off the east coast of Sumatra, is relatively flat and a mining area. The path will reach Borneo at Oh 36m U.T. with the umbral shadow continuing to expand. It will take approximately 13 minutes to cross the island, and the track will lie completely within Indonesian territory on Borneo. The other major land mass in the path of totality is the southern tip of Mindanao.

  1. Total solar eclipse of 17-18 March 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiala, Alan D.; Bangert, John A.; Harris, William T.

    1987-03-01

    It is a continuing policy of the Nautical Almanac Office to prepare issues of the series of Naval Observatory Circulars containing detailed information for observing most total solar eclipses and some annular solar eclipses. This is a service to the international scientific community, based on agreements with Commissions and Working Groups of the International Astronomical Union. A total eclipse of the Sun will occur on Thursday, 17 March and Friday, 18 March 1988. It will be preceded by an associated short partial eclipse of the Moon on 3 March. The duration of totality of the solar eclipse will approach 4 minutes at maximum, the longest since 11 June 1983. Not much of the path is over land. First landfall will occur just after sunrise at the west coast of Sumatra, at Oh 28m U.T. The track will cross Sumatra in three minutes, with the umbral shadow growing so as to increase both the width of the path and the duration of totality. Palembang lies near the central line, and is probably one of the most accessible such places. Bangka Island, just off the east coast of Sumatra, is relatively flat and a mining area. The path will reach Borneo at Oh 36m U.T. with the umbral shadow continuing to expand. It will take approximately 13 minutes to cross the island, and the track will lie completely within Indonesian territory on Borneo. The other major land mass in the path of totality is the southern tip of Mindanao.

  2. Mitochondrial DNA and the Y chromosome suggest the settlement of Madagascar by Indonesian sea nomad populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusuma, Pradiptajati; Cox, Murray P; Pierron, Denis; Razafindrazaka, Harilanto; Brucato, Nicolas; Tonasso, Laure; Suryadi, Helena Loa; Letellier, Thierry; Sudoyo, Herawati; Ricaut, François-Xavier

    2015-03-17

    Linguistic, cultural and genetic characteristics of the Malagasy suggest that both Africans and Island Southeast Asians were involved in the colonization of Madagascar. Populations from the Indonesian archipelago played an especially important role because linguistic evidence suggests that the Malagasy language branches from the Southeast Barito language family of southern Borneo, Indonesia, with the closest language spoken today by the Ma'anyan. To test for a genetic link between Malagasy and these linguistically related Indonesian populations, we studied the Ma'anyan and other Indonesian ethnic groups (including the sea nomad Bajo) that, from their historical and linguistic contexts, may be modern descendants of the populations that helped enact the settlement of Madagascar. A combination of phylogeographic analysis of genetic distances, haplotype comparisons and inference of parental populations by linear optimization, using both maternal and paternal DNA lineages, suggests that Malagasy derive from multiple regional sources in Indonesia, with a focus on eastern Borneo, southern Sulawesi and the Lesser Sunda islands. Settlement may have been mediated by ancient sea nomad movements because the linguistically closest population, Ma'anyan, has only subtle genetic connections to Malagasy, whereas genetic links with other sea nomads are more strongly supported. Our data hint at a more complex scenario for the Indonesian settlement of Madagascar than has previously been recognized.

  3. Dayak and Their Daily Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Darmadi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This article titled "Dayak and Daily Life" This paper aims to reveal the Dayak and in their daily life. Dayak is a native of Borneo has its own characteristics. Dayak, divided into 405 sub-sub clans [1]. Each sub Dayak both Indonesia and Malaysia are identical. Dayak customs and culture comes from the word "Power" which means upstream, to refer to people who live in inland areas or in the interior of Borneo. In the arsenal of art and culture, Dayak has many similarities such as; saber, chopsticks, beliong, betang, cupai, renjung, empajang and others. Dayak indigenous religion is Kaharingan which is the original religion born of the cultural ancestors of the Dayaks. Most of the Dayak people still adhere to the belief of the existence of unseen objects in certain places such as rocks, large trees, planting gardens in the forest, lakes, pools, and others are believed to have "magical powers". Daily life of the Dayaks in general farming, farming. When will open farming land, farming they held ritual.

  4. Moving in a hierarchized landscape Changing border regimes in Central Kalimantan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dave Lumenta

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Transnational mobility is a common feature among borderland communities. Central Borneo has been a relatively fluid and open riverine-based socio-cultural and economic space since the arrival of colonial states, without much interference from the establishment of international boundaries on local cross-border mobility practices. This applies to the Kenyah, a cluster of related ethnic groups occupying the Apokayan plateau in East Kalimantan (Indonesia, who are historically an integral part of the socio-cultural and economic fabric throughout the major riverine systems of Sarawak (Malaysia. Despite the relative absence of states, Central Borneo has not escaped the onslaught of social differentiation embedded in nation-state identities. The penetration of Sarawak’s logging industry has brought the terrestrial re-ordering of the Bornean landscape away from the relative egalitarian social order of river basins into hierarchical social relations embedded in capitalistic modes of production. This has brought about the construction of the Kenyah’s visibility as an “Indonesian underclass“ inside Sarawak.

  5. Potensi Sektor Perekonomian di Kabupaten Malinau Provinsi Kalimantan Utara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dio Caisar Darma

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study uses LQ Analysis Tool, DLQ, Shift Share, and Overlay during 5 yeares (2009 – 2013. As for the operating variable in this study is the GDP at Constant Prices, Economic Growth, Growth Sector, in the economy of Malinau Regency and the North of Borneo Province. Based on the results of the analysis are sector LQ base (seed in Malinau Regency is agriculture, electricity, gas and water, building and construction sector, the hotel and restaurant trade, and services sectors. DLQ analysis results show that, of the nine in the field of business, only the mining and quarrying sector that has a great chance to be developed in the future. Then, with a Shift Share Analysis results it is known that there is a change in the sectoral aggregate workmanship compared to the changes in the same sector in the economy with the Malinau Regency Regional Share (Rj of -557,195.12 million rupiah. Shift Differential category (Dj are seven sector experienced more rapid economic growth in Malinau Regency than North of Borneo Province or Pj 0. The other side, from the results of the Analysis of Overlay, there are six sector, which has a value notation is quite positive and dominant namely: agriculture, electricity, gas and water, building and construction sector, trade, hotels and restaurants, as well as services sector dominates with results notation (+ - +.

  6. Jumping in the Night: An Investigation of the Leaping Activity of the Western Tarsier (Cephalopachus bancanus borneanus) Using Accelerometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantini, David; Sebastiano, Manrico; Goossens, Benoit; Stark, Danica J

    2017-01-01

    Accelerometers enable scientists to quantify the activity of free-living animals whose direct observation is difficult or demanding due to their elusive nature or nocturnal habits. However, the deployment of accelerometers on small-bodied animals and, in particular, on primates has been little explored. Here we show the first application of accelerometers on the western tarsier (Cephalopachus bancanus borneanus), a nocturnal, small-bodied primate endemic to the forests of Borneo. The fieldwork was carried out in the Lower Kinabatangan Wildlife Sanctuary, Sabah, Malaysian Borneo. We provide guidelines for the deployment of accelerometers on tarsiers that might also be applied to other primate species. Our collected data on 2 females show levels of leaping activity comparable to those previously described using direct observation of wild or captive individuals. The 2 females showed different patterns of leaping activity, which calls for work to explore individual differences further. Our work demonstrates that accelerometers can be deployed on small primates to acquire body motion data that would otherwise be demanding to collect using classic field observations. Future work will be focused on using accelerometer data to discriminate in more detail the different behaviours tarsiers can display and to address the causes and consequences of individual variations in activity. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Inferring Pongo conservation units: a perspective based on microsatellite and mitochondrial DNA analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanthaswamy, Sreetharan; Kurushima, Jennifer D; Smith, David Glenn

    2006-10-01

    In order to define evolutionarily significant and management units (ESUs and MUs) among subpopulations of Sumatran (Pongo pygmaeus abelii) and Bornean (P. p. pygmaeus) orangutans we determined their genetic relationships. We analyzed partial sequences of four mitochondrial genes and nine autosomal microsatellite loci of 70 orangutans to test two hypotheses regarding the population structure within Borneo and the genetic distinction between Bornean and Sumatran orangutans. Our data show Bornean orangutans consist of two genetic clusters-the western and eastern clades. Each taxon exhibits relatively distinct mtDNA and nuclear genetic distributions that are likely attributable to genetic drift. These groups, however, do not warrant designations as separate conservation MUs because they demonstrate no demographic independence and only moderate genetic differentiation. Our findings also indicate relatively high levels of overall genetic diversity within Borneo, suggesting that observed habitat fragmentation and erosion during the last three decades had limited influence on genetic variability. Because the mtDNA of Bornean and Sumatran orangutans are not strictly reciprocally monophyletic, we recommend treating these populations as separate MUs and discontinuing inter-island translocation of animals unless absolutely necessary.

  8. Genetic signature of anthropogenic population collapse in orang-utans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoît Goossens

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Great ape populations are undergoing a dramatic decline, which is predicted to result in their extinction in the wild from entire regions in the near future. Recent findings have particularly focused on African apes, and have implicated multiple factors contributing to this decline, such as deforestation, hunting, and disease. Less well-publicised, but equally dramatic, has been the decline in orang-utans, whose distribution is limited to parts of Sumatra and Borneo. Using the largest-ever genetic sample from wild orang-utan populations, we show strong evidence for a recent demographic collapse in North Eastern Borneo and demonstrate that this signature is independent of the mutation and demographic models used. This is the first demonstration that genetic data can detect and quantify the effect of recent, human-induced deforestation and habitat fragmentation on an endangered species. Because current demographic collapses are usually confounded by ancient events, this suggests a much more dramatic decline than demographic data alone and emphasises the need for major conservation efforts.

  9. Genetic Signature of Anthropogenic Population Collapse in Orang-utans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Great ape populations are undergoing a dramatic decline, which is predicted to result in their extinction in the wild from entire regions in the near future. Recent findings have particularly focused on African apes, and have implicated multiple factors contributing to this decline, such as deforestation, hunting, and disease. Less well-publicised, but equally dramatic, has been the decline in orang-utans, whose distribution is limited to parts of Sumatra and Borneo. Using the largest-ever genetic sample from wild orang-utan populations, we show strong evidence for a recent demographic collapse in North Eastern Borneo and demonstrate that this signature is independent of the mutation and demographic models used. This is the first demonstration that genetic data can detect and quantify the effect of recent, human-induced deforestation and habitat fragmentation on an endangered species. Because current demographic collapses are usually confounded by ancient events, this suggests a much more dramatic decline than demographic data alone and emphasises the need for major conservation efforts.

  10. The fluorescence properties of aerosol larger than 0.8 μm in urban and tropical rainforest locations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Gabey

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available UV-LIF measurements were performed on ambient aerosol in Manchester, UK (urban city centre, winter and Borneo, Malaysia (remote, tropical using a Wide Issue Bioaerosol Spectrometer, version 3 (WIBS3. These sites are taken to represent environments with minor and significant primary biological aerosol (PBA influences respectively, and the urban dataset describes the fluorescent background aerosol against which PBA must be identified by researchers using LIF. The ensemble aerosol at both sites was characterised over 2–3 weeks by measuring the fluorescence intensity and optical equivalent diameter (DP of single particles sized 0.8 ≤ DP ≤ 20 μm. Filter samples were also collected for a subset of the Manchester campaign and analysed using energy dispersive X-Ray (EDX spectroscopy and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM, which revealed mostly non-PBA at D ≤ 1 μm.

    The WIBS3 features three fluorescence channels: the emission following a 280 nm excitation is recorded at 310–400 nm (channel F1 and 400–600 nm (F2, and fluorescence excited at 350 nm is detected at 400–600 nm (F3. In Manchester the primary size mode of fluorescent and non-fluorescent material was present at 0.8–1.2 μm, with a secondary fluorescent mode at 2–4 μm. In Borneo non-fluorescent material peaked at 0.8–1.2 μm and fluorescent at 3–4 μm. Agreement between fluorescent number concentrations in each channel differed at the two sites, with F1 and F3 reporting similar concentrations in Borneo but F3 outnumbering F1 by a factor of 2–3 across the size spectrum in Manchester.

    The fluorescence intensity in each channel generally rose with DP at both sites with the exception of F1 intensity in Manchester, which peaked at DP = 4 μm, causing a divergence between F1 and F3 intensity at larger DP. This divergence and the differing

  11. Kebijakan Peraturan Daerah Berbasis Politik Rekognisi dan Resolusi Konflik Etnik

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suharno suharno

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia, as a multicultural country, has a high potential of conflicts among forming elements of its multiculturalism. To minimize potential of conflicts, it is necessary to construct space of co-existence for several identities. State, as an all-encompassing and all-embracing institution should be able to present policies that provide the space. Policy interventions can be taken in preventive, curative, and preservative domains. The problem is that in Indonesia centralistic era many state policies were being monocultural, containing misrecognition, even authoritarian. The situation adds conflict potential. The combination between monocultural policy and State failure in guarding policy becomes key variable in several multiethnic conflict in various regions of Indonesia. In context of centralized politics, East Kotawaringin (Kotim proved a victorious success in ethnic conflict resolution. Sampit conflict between Dayak and Madurese in 2001 which is known as the most cruel and bloody conflict and claimed a huge amount of victims cleanses Madurese Ethnic from Sampit due to be killed, fled into the forests, or refuge outside Sampit even Central Borneo. Yet the conflict was resolved without leaving some significant problems. Unlike conflict resolutions in other regions e.g. West Borneo dan Ambon where conflict resolutions were intervened by Jakarta, Kotim succeeded in enactment of Local Regulation No 5 Year 2004 on Handling of impacted inhabitants of Ethnic Conflict. In the mentioned Local Regulation the rights of each conflicting party are recognized. Political recognition must be realized or included in a public policy (government or state, so that each party obtain legal certainty.  In preparing a public policy concerning inter-group relations in a multicultural society required the participation of each group, so the product of public policy can be understood and accepted by all groups. Implementation of the Regulation involved maximum

  12. Mesoscale modeling of smoke transport over the Southeast Asian Maritime Continent: Interplay of sea breeze, trade wind, typhoon, and topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Ge, Cui; Yang, Zhifeng; Hyer, Edward J.; Reid, Jeffrey S.; Chew, Boon-Ning; Mahmud, Mastura; Zhang, Yongxin; Zhang, Meigen

    2013-03-01

    The online-coupled Weather Research and Forecasting model with Chemistry (WRFchem) is used to simulate the transport of smoke particles over the Southeast Asian Maritime Continent during September-October 2006. In this period, dry conditions associated with the moderate El Niño event caused the largest regional biomass burning outbreak since 1997. Smoke emission in WRFchem is specified according to the Fire Locating and Modeling of Burning Emissions (FLAMBE) database derived from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) fire products. The modeled smoke transport pathway is found to be consistent with the MODIS true color images and measured mass concentration of surface PM10 (particulate matter with diameter less than 10 μm). The interplay of sea/land breezes, typhoons and storms over the subtropical western Pacific Ocean, trade winds, and topographic effects, can be clearly seen in the model simulation. The most severe smoke events in 1-5 October 2006 are found to be associated with the meteorological responses to the typhoon Xangsane (#18) over the western subtropical Pacific Ocean, which moved smoke from Sumatra eastward in the lower troposphere (below 700 hPa), forming smoke layers mixed with and above the boundary layer clouds over Borneo. In contrast, the second largest week-long smoke transport event of 15-18 October 2006 was associated with the seasonal monsoonal transition period, during which smoke plumes were wide spread over the 5°S-5°N zone as a result of (a) the near surface divergence coupled with the 700 hPa bifurcation of wind (flowing both to the west and to the east), and (b) the near-surface southeasterly and easterly winds along the equator transporting smoke from Borneo to Sumatra and Peninsular Malaysia. Analysis of data from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarisation (CALIOP) shows that smoke particles in October 2006 were primarily located within 3.5 km above the surface. Smoke particles contributed roughly half

  13. Genetic Diversity, Natural Selection and Haplotype Grouping of Plasmodium knowlesi Gamma Protein Region II (PkγRII): Comparison with the Duffy Binding Protein (PkDBPαRII).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Mun Yik; Rashdi, Sarah A A; Yusof, Ruhani; Lau, Yee Ling

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium knowlesi is a simian malaria parasite that has been reported to cause malaria in humans in Southeast Asia. This parasite invades the erythrocytes of humans and of its natural host, the macaque Macaca fascicularis, via interaction between the Duffy binding protein region II (PkDBPαRII) and the Duffy antigen receptor on the host erythrocytes. In contrast, the P. knowlesi gamma protein region II (PkγRII) is not involved in the invasion of P. knowlesi into humans. PkγRII, however, mediates the invasion of P. knowlesi into the erythrocytes of M. mulata, a non-natural host of P. knowlesi via a hitherto unknown receptor. The haplotypes of PkDBPαRII in P. knowlesi isolates from Peninsular Malaysia and North Borneo have been shown to be genetically distinct and geographically clustered. Also, the PkDBPαRII was observed to be undergoing purifying (negative) selection. The present study aimed to determine whether similar phenomena occur in PkγRII. Blood samples from 78 knowlesi malaria patients were used. Forty-eight of the samples were from Peninsular Malaysia, and 30 were from Malaysia Borneo. The genomic DNA of the samples was extracted and used as template for the PCR amplification of the PkγRII. The PCR product was cloned and sequenced. The sequences obtained were analysed for genetic diversity and natural selection using MEGA6 and DnaSP (version 5.10.00) programmes. Genetic differentiation between the PkγRII of Peninsular Malaysia and North Borneo isolates was estimated using the Wright's FST fixation index in DnaSP (version 5.10.00). Haplotype analysis was carried out using the Median-Joining approach in NETWORK (version 4.6.1.3). A total of 78 PkγRII sequences was obtained. Comparative analysis showed that the PkγRII have similar range of haplotype (Hd) and nucleotide diversity (π) with that of PkDBPαRII. Other similarities between PkγRII and PkDBPαRII include undergoing purifying (negative) selection, geographical clustering of haplotypes

  14. Characterisation of Asian Snakehead Murrel Channa striata (Channidae in Malaysia: An Insight into Molecular Data and Morphological Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Min Song

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Conservation is imperative for the Asian snakeheads Channa striata, as the species has been overfished due to its high market demand. Using maternal markers (mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 gene (COI, we discovered that evolutionary forces that drove population divergence did not show any match between the genetic and morphological divergence pattern. However, there is evidence of incomplete divergence patterns between the Borneo population and the populations from Peninsular Malaysia. This supports the claim of historical coalescence of C. striata during Pleistocene glaciations. Ecological heterogeneity caused high phenotypic variance and was not correlated with genetic variance among the populations. Spatial conservation assessments are required to manage different stock units. Results on DNA barcoding show no evidence of cryptic species in C. striata in Malaysia. The newly obtained sequences add to the database of freshwater fish DNA barcodes and in future will provide information relevant to identification of species.

  15. Potential effects of climate change on members of the Palaeotropical pitcher plant family Nepenthaceae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura K Gray

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic climate change is predicted to have profound effects on species distributions over the coming decades. In this paper, we used maximum entropy modelling (Maxent to estimate the effects of projected changes in climate on extent of climatically-suitable habitat for two Nepenthes pitcher plant species in Borneo. The model results predicted an increase in area of climatically-suitable habitat for the lowland species Nepenthes rafflesiana by 2100; in contrast, the highland species Nepenthes tentaculata was predicted to undergo significant loss of climatically-suitable habitat over the same period. Based on the results of the models, we recommend that research be undertaken into practical mitigation strategies, as approximately two-thirds of Nepenthes are restricted to montane habitats. Highland species with narrow elevational ranges will be at particularly high risk, and investigation into possible mitigation strategies should be focused on them.

  16. Four New Species of Nepenthes L. (Nepenthaceae) from the Central Mountains of Mindanao, Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronemeyer, Thomas; Coritico, Fulgent; Wistuba, Andreas; Marwinski, David; Gieray, Tobias; Micheler, Marius; Mey, François Sockhom; Amoroso, Victor

    2014-06-06

    Together with the islands of Sumatra (Indonesia) and Borneo (Indonesia, Malaysia), the Philippines are the main center of diversity for carnivorous pitcher plants of the genus, Nepenthes L. Nepenthes are the largest of all carnivorous plants, and the species with the biggest pitchers are capable of trapping and digesting small amphibians and even mammals. The central cordillera of Mindanao Island in the south of the Philippines is mostly covered with old, primary forest and is the largest remaining cohesive, untouched area of wilderness in the Philippines. In a recent field exploration of two areas of the central cordillera, namely Mount Sumagaya and a section of the Pantaron range, four new taxa of Nepenthes were discovered. These four remarkable new species, N. pantaronensis, N. cornuta, N. talaandig and N. amabilis, are described, illustrated and assessed.

  17. Potential effects of climate change on members of the Palaeotropical pitcher plant family Nepenthaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Laura K; Clarke, Charles; Wint, G R William; Moran, Jonathan A

    2017-01-01

    Anthropogenic climate change is predicted to have profound effects on species distributions over the coming decades. In this paper, we used maximum entropy modelling (Maxent) to estimate the effects of projected changes in climate on extent of climatically-suitable habitat for two Nepenthes pitcher plant species in Borneo. The model results predicted an increase in area of climatically-suitable habitat for the lowland species Nepenthes rafflesiana by 2100; in contrast, the highland species Nepenthes tentaculata was predicted to undergo significant loss of climatically-suitable habitat over the same period. Based on the results of the models, we recommend that research be undertaken into practical mitigation strategies, as approximately two-thirds of Nepenthes are restricted to montane habitats. Highland species with narrow elevational ranges will be at particularly high risk, and investigation into possible mitigation strategies should be focused on them.

  18. Two New Nepenthes Species from the Philippines and an Emended Description of Nepenthes ramos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronemeyer, Thomas; Suarez, Wally; Nuytemans, Herman; Calaramo, Michael; Wistuba, Andreas; Mey, François S; Amoroso, Victor B

    2016-05-06

    With 50 species of the genus Nepenthes L. currently described from the Philippines, it is without doubt that the country, along with the islands of Sumatra (Indonesia) and Borneo (Indonesia, Malaysia, Brunei), should be considered the center of diversity of the genus. In this work, we describe two new species. One species, N. aenigma sp. nov., is from Ilocos Norte province on Luzon Island and has the-for Nepenthes-unusual ecological preference to grow in dense vegetation in deep shade. The other new species is from Mount Hamiguitan in Davao Oriental province on Mindanao Island. With this new entry, Mount Hamiguitan is now home to four endemic species (N. peltata, N. micramphora, N. hamiguitanensis, N. justinae sp. nov.). Furthermore, we provide an emended description of N. ramos based on field data. Nepenthes kurata is synonymized here with N. ramos.

  19. Kapasitas dan Energi Adsorpsi Humin Terhadap Eosin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anshar A.M.

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Humin is a natural ingredient that is widely available in Indonesia, especially Borneo.  Humin is interact and absorb eosin compound that can cause environmental pollution. The interaction between eosin and humin was set on optimum time dan pH so that the humin adsorption would be optimum. This research measured the adsorption capacity and energy required to adsorp eosin on humin by performing various concentration of eosin. The amount of humin adsorption energy against eosin was 34.136 kJ/mol while the adsorption capacity was1, 611 x 10-6mol/g. This indicated that the type of interaction between humin and eosin was chemical interaction.

  20. Nuclear Malaysia in the news 2013: Making headlines in nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear was a term that always misunderstands by public as a terrifying term. The nuclear activities around Malaysia was disseminated in newspaper and Malaysian Nuclear Agency as a responsible agency for nuclear for peace were collecting that news and compiled them to make the public aware the benefits of nuclear energy to develop our country. All the news about nuclear were collected using various type of newspaper published in Malaysia such as Utusan Malaysia, Berita Harian, Daily Express, News Straits Time, The Star, Borneo Post and others. This news was compiled according to their main topics such as energy, nuclear in agriculture, education and others. Each year one edition of this report will publish and disseminate it to the other libraries, government agencies, school and others to make the public aware the existence of nuclear activities around their countries.

  1. Trajectories of Disturbance in Island SE Asia: A Hypothesis of Anthropogenic Forest Management and Food Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, C. O.

    2014-12-01

    This paper synthesises evidence from Late Quaternary pollen diagrams from across Island SE Asia to show that what appears to be anthopogenic forest modification started more than 50,000 years ago. Initially disturbance of forests was by fire, during interstadials when successional processes would otherwise have led to closed canopy forest. It is hypothesised that the resultant habitats would have provided accessible broad-spectrum resources to mobile foraging populations. During the Holocene, there is some evidence for the early interchange and propagation of economically-important plants, notably between New Guinea and Borneo. I use GIS to chart patterns of floral disturbance through the Holocene, most probably linked to diverse land management and food production strategies. We need a new wave of pollen and charcoal-based studies plus plant macrofossil work on many archaeological sites across the region to test and substantiate this hypothesis.

  2. Nuclear Malaysia in the news 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear was a term that always misunderstood by public as a terrifying term. Nuclear activities around Malaysia were disseminated in newspaper and Malaysian Nuclear Agency as a responsible agency were collecting that news and compiled them. The purpose for this compilation were to make the public aware the benefits of nuclear energy and all the activities regarding nuclear surround them. All the news about nuclear technology were collected using various type of newspaper published in Malaysia such as Utusan Malaysia, Berita Harian, Daily Express, News Straits Time, The Star, Borneo Post and others. This news was compiled according to their main topics such as energy, nuclear in agriculture, education and others. Each year one edition of this report will publish and disseminate it to the other libraries, government agencies, school and others to make the public aware the existence of nuclear activities around their countries.

  3. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-12-01

    Malaysia is a country of 330,000 square kilometers and a population of 11.9 million. The country is divided into two parts 640 kilometers apart. West Malaysia consists of the Malay Peninsula, and East Malaysia of the provinces of Sarawak and Sabah, formerly North Borneo. The country is the world's leading producer of tin and rubber. Geologic descriptions in detail are difficult to find although maps are available. Uranium exploration, chiefly by the Malaysian Geological Survey, has been carried out without discovery of commercial quantities. Based on possible recovery of uranium from deeply weathered granites on the Malay Peninsula, and possible discoveries in East Malaysia, a uranium potential of 1,000 to 10,000 tonnes U (category 2) is assigned. (author)

  4. UJI DAYA HAMBAT PERASAN BUAH JERUK SIAM BANJAR (Citrus reticulata TERHADAP PERTUMBUHAN Shigella dysenteriae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eka Kumalasari

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Siam orange (Citrus reticulata is kind of orange which a lot in Sout Borneo and a national top variety called banjar siam orange. Orange contains secondary metabolites flavonoids, saponins, alkaloids which cause damage bacteria cell wall permeability. Objective of this study is to find out inhibition siam orange fruit squeeze to Shigella dysenteriae growth. This study is an experimental research laboratory. Inhibition test of siam banjar orange (Citrus reticulata fruit squeeze to Shigella dysenteriae growthwas conducted with diffusion methodwhich performed at Bacteriology Laboratory of Banjarbaru Center Veterinary. Result of phytochemicals screening showedthat banjar siam orange fruit squeeze contain alkaloids, saponins, and flavonoids. Result of the study showed banjar siam orange fruit squeeze has the ability to inhibite Shigella dysenteriae growth with 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% concentrations. The higher concentration of banjar siam orange squeeze, the greater diameter of inhibition zone result.

  5. New lucinid bivalves from shallow and deeper water of the Indian and West Pacific Oceans (Mollusca, Bivalvia, Lucinidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Taylor

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Four new species and a new genus of lucinid bivalves are described from shallow and deeper waters in the Indian and West Pacific Oceans. The new genus Scabrilucina (subfamily Lucininae includes the little-known S. victorialis (Melvill, 1899 from the Arabian Sea and S. vitrea (Deshayes, 1844 from the Andaman Sea as well as a new species S. melvilli from the Torres Strait off northeastern Australia. Ferrocina brunei new species (Lucininae was recovered from 60 m near oil drilling activities off Borneo; its anatomy confirmed the presence of symbiotic bacteria. Two unusual deeper water species of Leucosphaerinae are described, both species included in on-going molecular analyses; Gonimyrtea ferruginea from 400–650 m in the southwest Pacific and Myrtina reflexa from 200–825 m off Zanzibar and Madagascar.

  6. Characterisation of Asian Snakehead Murrel Channa striata (Channidae) in Malaysia: An Insight into Molecular Data and Morphological Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Li Min; Munian, Kaviarasu; Abd Rashid, Zulkafli; Bhassu, Subha

    2013-01-01

    Conservation is imperative for the Asian snakeheads Channa striata, as the species has been overfished due to its high market demand. Using maternal markers (mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 gene (COI)), we discovered that evolutionary forces that drove population divergence did not show any match between the genetic and morphological divergence pattern. However, there is evidence of incomplete divergence patterns between the Borneo population and the populations from Peninsular Malaysia. This supports the claim of historical coalescence of C. striata during Pleistocene glaciations. Ecological heterogeneity caused high phenotypic variance and was not correlated with genetic variance among the populations. Spatial conservation assessments are required to manage different stock units. Results on DNA barcoding show no evidence of cryptic species in C. striata in Malaysia. The newly obtained sequences add to the database of freshwater fish DNA barcodes and in future will provide information relevant to identification of species. PMID:24396312

  7. Chemistry and mineralogy of garnet pyroxenites from Sabah, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, B.A.

    1974-01-01

    Garnet pyroxenites and corundum-garnet amphibolites from the Dent peninsula of eastern Sabah (North Borneo) occur as blocks in a slump breccia deposit of late Miocene age. The earliest formed minerals include pyrope-almandine garnet, tschermakitic augite, pargasite, and rutile. Cumulate textures are present in two of the six specimens studied. The earlier fabric has been extensively brecciated and partly replaced by plagioclase, ilmenite, and a fibrous amphibole. The bulk composition and mineralogy of these rocks are similar to those of garnet pyroxenite lenses within ultramafic rocks. Estimated temperature and pressure for the origin of the Sabah garnet pyroxenites is 850??150?? C and 19??4 kbar. ?? 1974 Springer-Verlag.

  8. Combining Natural Ingredients and Beliefs: The Dayak Tribe's Experience Caring for Sick Children with Traditional Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anggerainy, Shinta Widiastuty; Wanda, Dessie; Hayati, Happy

    Instead of seeking conventional health care, the Dayak tribe in Borneo, Indonesia, treats sick children at home with traditional medicine. The objective of this descriptive, qualitative study was to explore the Dayak tribe's use of traditional medicine to care for sick children. Comprehensive interviews were conducted with 10 caregivers, with collected data analyzed using content analysis. Key recurring themes identified were: 1) traditional medicine as first aid; 2) ease of access and cost-effectiveness; 3) traditional medicine was not always effective; 4) a combination of natural ingredients and beliefs; 5) the importance of "communicating" with plants; and 6) engagement with metaphysical forces. Health professionals should respect familial cultures' beliefs regarding the provision of health care at home. Furthermore, they need to develop competency in performing cultural assessments and providing information to these parents on the risks of not seeking professional emergency care for children with conditions that can't be handled at home with traditional medicine.

  9. Chemical Constituents from the Lianas of Gnetum cuspidatum Blume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nik Fatini Nik Azmin; Norizan Ahmat; Nik Khairunissa Nik Abdullah Zawawi; Norizan Ahmat; Nik Khairunissa Nik Abdullah Zawawi

    2016-01-01

    Gnetum is a genus of gymnosperms, the sole genus in the family Gnetaceae with approximately 40 species. Various species has been used for the treatment of rheumatitis, arthritis, bronchitis and asthma in folk medicines. Gnetum cuspidatum Blume is known throughout tropical Southeast Asia from Thailand, Vietnam, Cambodia, Malaysia, Sumatra, Java, and Borneo to the Maluku, Sulawesi and New Guinea. In this research work, a methanol extract of the lianas of Gnetum cuspidatum was subjected to vacuum liquid chromatography for fractionation. Later, several selective fractions had undergone the repetitive radial chromatography technique for further purification. Four known constituents categorized as stilbene type of compound have been successfully isolated and identified which include resveratrol (1), gnetucleistol C (2), gnetucleistol D (3) and gnemonol M (4). The structures and configuration of the reported compounds were elucidated on the basis of 2D-NMR correlations and comparison with the literature. (author)

  10. Clinical features and management of Plasmodium knowlesi infections in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshvar, Cyrus; William, Timothy; Davis, Timothy M E

    2018-01-01

    Plasmodium knowlesi is a simian malaria of primarily the macaque species of South East Asia. While it was known that human infections could be induced during the years of malariotherapy, naturally occurring P. knowlesi human infections were thought to be rare. However, in 2004, knowlesi infections became recognized as an important infection amongst human populations in Sarawak, Malaysian Borneo. Since then, it has become recognized as a disease affecting people living and visiting endemic areas across South East Asia. Over the last 12 years, clinical studies have improved our understanding of this potentially fatal disease. In this review article the current literature is reviewed to give a comprehensive description of the disease and treatment.

  11. Nuclear Malaysia in the news 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear was a term that always misunderstood by public as a terrifying term. Nuclear activities around Malaysia were disseminated in newspaper and Malaysian Nuclear Agency as a responsible agency were collecting that news and compiled them. The purpose for this compilation were to make the public aware the benefits of nuclear energy and all the activities regarding nuclear surround them. All the news about nuclear technology were collected using various type of newspaper published in Malaysia such as Utusan Malaysia, Berita Harian, Daily Express, News Straits Time, The Star, Borneo Post and others. This news was compiled according to their main topics such as energy, nuclear in agriculture, education and others. Each year one edition of this report will publish and disseminate it to the other libraries, government agencies, school and others to make the public aware the existence of nuclear activities around their countries.

  12. A new species of Rock Gecko genus Cnemaspis (Squamata: Gekkonidae) from Western Sarawak, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurita, Takaki; Nishikawa, Kanto; Matsui, Masafumi; Hikida, Tsutomu

    2017-05-03

    A new species of Asian rock gecko, genus Cnemaspis, is described from Padawan, western Sarawak, Malaysian Borneo. The new species forms a clade with C. paripari and C. nigridia of the C. nigridia group in a mitochondrial DNA phylogeny and is similar to them morphologically in some characters such as caudal scalation. It differs from the other Asian Cnemaspis species in its unique combination of snout-vent length (up to 62.7 mm), 4-9 precloacal pores in males, keeled subcaudals with an enlarged, smooth, median row, presence of ventrolateral caudal tubercles, and coloration (head and upper flanks dark-yellow; anterior portion of tail black; posterior portion of tail white with black, paravertebral blob). Phylogenetic relationships within the C. nigridia group and the distributional ranges of species within the group suggest allopatric speciation by geographic isolation.

  13. Plasmodium knowlesi malaria in a traveller returning from the Philippines to Italy, 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Canale, Ettore; Sgarabotto, Dino; Marini, Giulia; Menegotto, Nicola; Masiero, Serena; Akkouche, Wassim; Biasolo, Maria Angela; Barzon, Luisa; Palù, Giorgio

    2017-10-01

    Plasmodium knowlesi is a simian parasite responsible for most human cases of malaria in Malaysian Borneo. A timely recognition of infection is crucial because of the risk of severe disease due to the rapid increase in parasitemia. We report a case of P. knowlesi infection in a traveller who developed fever and thrombocytopenia after returning from the Philippines in 2016. Rapid antigen test was negative, microscopy examination showed parasites similar to Plasmodium malariae, with a parasite count of 10,000 parasites per μL blood, while molecular testing identified P. knowlesi infection. Treatment with atovaquone-proguanil led to resolution of fever and restoration of platelet count in two days. P. knowlesi infection should be suspected in febrile travellers returning from South East Asia. Due to the low sensitivity of rapid antigen tests and the low specificity of microscopy, confirmation by molecular tests is recommended.

  14. Association between Landscape Factors and Spatial Patterns of Plasmodium knowlesi Infections in Sabah, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornace, Kimberly M; Abidin, Tommy Rowel; Alexander, Neal; Brock, Paddy; Grigg, Matthew J; Murphy, Amanda; William, Timothy; Menon, Jayaram; Drakeley, Chris J; Cox, Jonathan

    2016-02-01

    The zoonotic malaria species Plasmodium knowlesi has become the main cause of human malaria in Malaysian Borneo. Deforestation and associated environmental and population changes have been hypothesized as main drivers of this apparent emergence. We gathered village-level data for P. knowlesi incidence for the districts of Kudat and Kota Marudu in Sabah state, Malaysia, for 2008-2012. We adjusted malaria records from routine reporting systems to reflect the diagnostic uncertainty of microscopy for P. knowlesi. We also developed negative binomial spatial autoregressive models to assess potential associations between P. knowlesi incidence and environmental variables derived from satellite-based remote-sensing data. Marked spatial heterogeneity in P. knowlesi incidence was observed, and village-level numbers of P. knowlesi cases were positively associated with forest cover and historical forest loss in surrounding areas. These results suggest the likelihood that deforestation and associated environmental changes are key drivers in P. knowlesi transmission in these areas.

  15. ROLE OF COASTAL SEDIMENT ON SOIL NUTRIENT AVAILABILITY AND OIL PALM YIELD AT PEATLANDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denah Suswati

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Peatlands which is limited in chemical, physical and ecology require appropriate management for oil palm plantation. Coastal sediment as an ameliorant in peatlands increased productivity some crops. This study aims determining the effect of the doses of coastal sediment as ameliorant on peatlands to the availability of N, P, K, Ca, Mg and Na oil palm plantations. This research was performed in the area of oil palm plantation in Kubu Raya district, Borneo, Indonesia. Experimental design employed randomized block design with 4 levels of coastal sediment doses (L, i.e. L0 = 0 t ha-1; L1 = 20 t ha-1; L2 = 40 t ha-1; L3 = 60 t ha-1 with three replication. The results showed that the application of coastal sediment at 40 t ha-1 in oil palm plantations significantly increased soil pH, availability of N, K, Ca and Mg, while P was not significantly different.

  16. Designing Digital Solutions for Preserving Penan Sign Language: A Reflective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tariq Zaman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oroo’ is a language of nomadic Penans in the rainforests of Borneo and the only way of asynchronous communication between nomadic groups in the forest journey. Like many other indigenous languages, the Oroo’ language is also facing imminent extinction. In this paper, we present the research process and reflections of a multidisciplinary community-based research project on digitalizing and preserving the Oroo’ sign language. As a methodology for project activities, we are employing Participatory Action Research in Software Development Methodology Augmentation (PRISMA. Preliminary results show a general interest in digital contents and a positive impact of the project activities. In this paper, we present scenario of a research project that is retooled to fit the need of communities, informing language revitalization efforts and assisting with the evolution of community-based research design.

  17. Stingless bees use terpenes as olfactory cues to find resin sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhardt, S D; Zeilhofer, S; Blüthgen, N; Schmitt, Thomas

    2010-09-01

    Insects largely rely on olfactory cues when seeking and judging information on nests, partners, or resources. Bees are known to use volatile compounds-besides visual cues-to find flowers suitable for pollen and nectar collection. Tropical stingless bees additionally collect large amounts of plant resins for nest construction, nest maintenance, nest defense, and to derive chemical constituents for their cuticular profiles. We here demonstrate that stingless bees of Borneo also use olfactory cues to find tree resins. They rely on volatile mono- and sesquiterpenes to locate or recognize known resin sources. Moreover, by modifying resin extracts, we found that stingless bees do not use the entire resin bouquet but relative proportions of several terpenes. In doing so, the bees are able to learn specific tree resin profiles and distinguish between tree species and partly even tree individuals.

  18. Thumb-pads up-a new species of thick-thumbed bat from Sumatra (Chiroptera: Vespertilionidae: Glischropus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csorba, Gábor; Görföl, Tamás; Wiantoro, Sigit; Kingston, Tigga; Bates, Paul J J; Huang, Joe Chun-Chia

    2015-06-29

    To date, three species of the genus Glischropus are recognized from the Indomalayan zoogeographic region-G. bucephalus from the Indochinese subregion, G. tylopus from the Sundaic subregion (Peninsular Thailand and Malaysia, Borneo, Sumatra, Moluccas) and G. javanus, restricted to Java. The investigation of the holotype and three topotype specimens of G. batjanus supported the view that the name was previously correctly regarded as the junior subjective synonym of G. tylopus. During review of material recently collected in southwestern Sumatra, Indonesia, one specimen of a yet undescribed species of Thick-thumbed bat was identified. G. aquilus n. sp. markedly differs from its congeners by its dark brown pelage, nearly black ear and tragus, and in skull proportions. The phylogenetic analysis based on cytb sequences also supports the specific distinctness of G. aquilus n. sp. Its discovery brings the count to 88 species of bats known from Sumatra.

  19. Epitypification with an emended description of Tropidia connata (Orchidaceae, Epidendroideae, Tropidieae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izai Alberto Bruno Sabino Kikuchi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We found several specimens of Tropidia connata, a mycoheterotrophic orchid from Borneo, with features which have never been described in any of the existing literature, namely subterranean tubers. We mainly focus on the importance of the subterranean structures in comparison with the mycoheterotrophic genus Kalimantanorchis from the tribe Tropidieae. This finding of the tuberous structure gives a new insight into the classification of mycoheterotrohic species of Tropidieae and might affect the generic placement of Kalimantanorchis. We made a detailed study on the newly discovered specimens as well as the type, and found more diagnostic characters of T. connata than the previous description. Considering that the type specimen lacks the whole tuberous character, we consequently designate an epitype with a drawing and emend the description.

  20. Going the whole orang: Darwin, Wallace and the natural history of orangutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wyhe, John; Kjærgaard, Peter C

    2015-06-01

    This article surveys the European discovery and early ideas about orangutans followed by the contrasting experiences with these animals of the co-founders of evolution by natural selection, Charles Darwin and Alfred Russel Wallace. The first non-human great ape that both of them interacted with was the orangutan. They were both profoundly influenced by what they saw, but the contexts of their observations could hardly be more different. Darwin met orangutans in the Zoological Gardens in London while Wallace saw them in the wild in Borneo. In different ways these observations helped shape their views of human evolution and humanity's place in nature. Their findings played a major role in shaping some of the key questions that were pursued in human evolutionary studies during the rest of the nineteenth century. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Transport of short-lived species into the Tropical Tropopause Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashfold, M. J.; Harris, N. R. P.; Atlas, E. L.; Manning, A. J.; Pyle, J. A.

    2012-07-01

    We use NAME, a trajectory model, to investigate the routes and timescales over which air parcels reach the tropical tropopause layer (TTL). Our aim is to assist the planning of aircraft campaigns focussed on improving knowledge of such transport. We focus on Southeast Asia and the Western Pacific which appears to be a particularly important source of air that enters the TTL. We first study the TTL above Borneo in November 2008, under neutral El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) conditions. Air parcels (trajectories) arriving in the lower TTL (below ~15 km) are most likely to have travelled from the boundary layer (BL; planning flights for the long-duration aircraft now capable of making such measurements.

  2. Molecular phylogeny and biogeography of caecilians from Southeast Asia (Amphibia, Gymnophiona, Ichthyophiidae), with special reference to high cryptic species diversity in Sundaland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Kanto; Matsui, Masafumi; Yong, Hoi-Sen; Ahmad, Norhayati; Yambun, Paul; Belabut, Daicus M; Sudin, Ahmad; Hamidy, Amir; Orlov, Nikolai L; Ota, Hidetoshi; Yoshikawa, Natsuhiko; Tominaga, Atsushi; Shimada, Tomohiko

    2012-06-01

    We investigated the phylogenetic relationships and estimated the history of species diversification and character evolution in two ichthyophiid genera: Caudacaecilia and Ichthyophis. We estimated the phylogenetic relationships of 67 samples from 33 localities in Southeast Asia from 3840-bp sequences of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA, 16S rRNA, and cyt b genes using Bayesian inference, maximum likelihood, and maximum parsimony methods. The Southeast Asian samples formed a well-supported clade differentiated from a South Asian sample. The Southeast Asian clade was divided into two subclades, one containing samples from South China, Indochina, Malay Peninsula, and Java. The other consisted of samples from Borneo and the Philippines. Neither Caudacaecilia nor Ichthyophis was monophyletic, nor did samples with or without light stripes lateral to the body form clades. We found several distinct sympatric lineages and undescribed species, especially from Sundaland. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. First measurements of aerosol optical depth and Angstrom exponent number from AERONET's Kuching site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Santo V.; Chew, Boon N.; Mohamad, M.; Mahmud, M.; Liew, Soo C.

    2013-10-01

    We report our first measurements, over the 2011 dry season period, of aerosol optical depth, Angstrom exponent number and its fine mode counterpart obtained from photometric measurements at AERONET's newest site located at the city of Kuching, Sarawak, East Malaysia. This site was set up as part of the collaborative efforts of the Seven South East Asian Studies (7SEAS) regional aerosol measurements initiative. Located at the converging zone between peninsular Malaysia and the land masses of Sumatra, Borneo, Java and Sulawesi, this site is expected to provide first hand evidence about the physical and optical characteristics of the regional aerosol environment, specially during the biomass burning months. Moreover, given its relative proximity to our Singapore radiation measurement super-site, Kuching is expected to provide further insight on aerosol transport pathways caused by seasonal winds transporting smoke to other parts of the maritime continent and the South Asia region.

  4. Distribution and origin of sediments on the northern Sunda Shelf, South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shi-Guo; Wong, H. K.; Luo, You-Lang; Liang, Zhi-Rong

    1999-03-01

    Seventy-seven surface sediment samples and core samples from the outer Sunda Shelf were analyzed and a number of seismic profiles of the shelf were interpreted. The bottom sediments could be divided into six types: terrigenous sand, biogenic sand, silt-sand, clay-silt-sand, clayey silt and coral reef detritus. Our seismic data showed a thick, prograding Pleistocene deltaic sequence near the shelf-break and a thin Holocene sedimentary layer on the outer shelf. Eleven thermoluminescence (TL) ages were determined. The oldest relict sediments were derived from Late Pleistocene deposits. Based on sediment types, ages, and origins, five sedimentary areas were identified: area of modern Mekong sediments; insular shelf area receiving modern sediments from small Borneo rivers; shelf area near the Natuna-Anambas islands in the southeastern Gulf of Thailand Basin off the Malay Peninsula; area of relict sediments on the outer shelf north of the Natuna Islands, and typical coral reefs and detritus sediments.

  5. United States Air Force Statistical Digest, Fiscal Year 1968. Twenty Third Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    1968-09-30

    46,637 162 288 52,918 152 348C/ tlC -12:JB. . . . ... . . . . 57,953 69 17,321 91 190 13,798 67 3)6 0-12’)1•• . . . . . . . . . . . 41,315 47 7,881 42... China , Indo- China , Thailand, Malay Peninsula, Sumatra, Java, Borneo, Celebes, Timor, Taiwan, the Philippinss,and South East Asia, GENll:!W. CARGO SP1...1fo:t’th:Fao1f1q lnclŕJ~t CoastotCenada North 5Q°Horth Latitude, and Alaska. 61 ~ P8c1t1.c 1nclucies ChiDa, Indo- China , Tbailantl.,Malay PeninsUla

  6. AVHRR for monitoring global tropical deforestation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malingreau, J. P.; Laporte, N.; Tucker, C. J.

    1989-01-01

    Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data have been used to assess the dynamics of forest trnsformations in three parts of the tropical belt. A large portion of the Amazon Basin has been systematically covered by Local Area Coverage (LAC) data in the 1985-1987 period. The analysis of the vegetation index and thermal data led to the identification and measurement of large areas of active deforestation. The Kalimantan/Borneo forest fires were monitored and their impact was evaluated using the Global Area Coverage (GAC) 4 km resolution data. Finally, High Resolution Picture Transmission (HRPT) data have provided preliminary information on current activities taking place at the boundary between the savanna and the forest in the Southern part of West Africa. The AVHRR approach is found to be a highly valuable means for carrying out deforestation assessments in regional and global perspectives.

  7. The Influence of Indian Ocean Atmospheric Circulation on Warm Pool Hydroclimate During the Holocene Epoch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, J.E.; Oppo, D. W.; LeGrande, A. N.; Huang, Y.; Rosenthal, Y.; Linsley, B. K.

    2012-01-01

    Existing paleoclimate data suggest a complex evolution of hydroclimate within the Indo-Pacific Warm Pool (IPWP) during the Holocene epoch. Here we introduce a new leaf wax isotope record from Sulawesi, Indonesia and compare proxy water isotope data with ocean-atmosphere general circulation model (OAGCM) simulations to identify mechanisms influencing Holocene IPWP hydroclimate. Modeling simulations suggest that orbital forcing causes heterogenous changes in precipitation across the IPWP on a seasonal basis that may account for the differences in time-evolution of the proxy data at respective sites. Both the proxies and simulations suggest that precipitation variability during the September-November (SON) season is important for hydroclimate in Borneo. The preeminence of the SON season suggests that a seasonally lagged relationship between the Indian monsoon and Indian Ocean Walker circulation influences IPWP hydroclimatic variability during the Holocene.

  8. Interactive Land-Use Planning in Indonesian Rain-Forest Landscapes: Reconnecting Plans to Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Wollenberg

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia's 1999-2004 decentralization reforms created opportunities for land-use planning that reflected local conditions and local people's needs. We report on seven years of work in the District of Malinau in Indonesian Borneo that attempted to reconnect government land-use plans to local people's values, priorities, and practices. Four principles are proposed to support more interactive planning between government and local land users: Support local groups to make their local knowledge, experience, and aspirations more visible in formal land-use planning and decision making; create channels of communication, feedback, and transparency to support the adaptive capacities and accountability of district leadership and institutions; use system frameworks to understand the drivers of change and resulting scenarios and trade-offs; and link analysis and intervention across multiple levels, from the local land user to the district and national levels. We describe the application of these principles in Malinau and the resulting challenges.

  9. A New Moss Checklist of Negara Brunei Darussalam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Benito C.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A new moss checklist with updated nomenclature is given for the small country of Brunei Darussalam located in the northern part of Borneo. A total of 103 species in 50 genera are now collected and reported. The country’s moss flora is still very much undercollected, judging from our present results: (i the absence of cosmopolitan and common paleotropical species such as Bryum apiculatum Schwägr., Callicostella papillata (Mont. Mitt., Funaria hygrometrica Hedw., Isopterygium minutirameum (Müll. Hal. A. Jaegr., Octoblepharum albidum Hedw. and Philonotis hastata (Duby Wijk & Margad.; (ii the absence of widespread families such as Pottiaceae and Ditrichaceae; and (iii the under-representation of speciose genera such as Ectropothecium, Macromitrium, Thuidium and Trichosteleum, with only one species collected. The incompleteness of our knowledge of the moss flora makes it impossible to assess the country’s endangered moss species.

  10. Will current conservation responses save the Critically Endangered Sumatran rhinoceros Dicerorhinus sumatrensis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havmøller, Rasmus Gren; Payne, Junaidi; Ramono, Widodo

    2016-01-01

    The Critically Endangered Sumatran rhinoceros Dicerorhinus sumatrensis formerly ranged across South-east Asia. Hunting and habitat loss have made it one of the rarest large mammals and the species faces extinction despite decades of conservation efforts. The number of individuals remaining...... is unknown as a consequence of inadequate methods and lack of funds for the intensive field work required to estimate the population size of this rare and solitary species. However, all information indicates that numbers are low and declining. A few individuals persist in Borneo, and three tiny populations...... increased but the species has continued to go locally extinct across its range. Conventional captive breeding has also proven difficult; from a total of 45 Sumatran rhinoceros taken from the wild since 1984 there were no captive births until 2001. Since then only two pairs have been actively bred...

  11. Nuclear Malaysia in The News 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear was a term that always misunderstands by public as a terrifying term. The nuclear activities around Malaysia was disseminated in newspaper and Malaysian Nuclear Agency as a responsible agency for nuclear for peace were collecting that news and compiled them to make the public aware the benefits of nuclear energy to develop our country. All the news about nuclear were collected using various type of newspaper published in Malaysia such as Utusan Malaysia, Berita Harian, Daily Express, News Straits Time, The Star, Borneo Post and others. This news was compiled according to their main topics such as energy, nuclear in agriculture, education and others. Each year one edition of this report will publish and disseminate it to the other libraries, government agencies, school and others to make the public aware the existence of nuclear activities around their countries.

  12. Possible conservation units of the sun bear (Helarctos malayanus) in Sarawak based on variation of mtDNA control region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onuma, Manabu; Suzuki, Masatsugu; Ohtaishi, Noriyuki

    2006-11-01

    The mitochondrial DNA control region of the sun bear (Helarctos malayanus) was sequenced using 21 DNA samples collected from confiscated sun bears to identify conservation units, such as evolutionarily significant units and management units, in Sarawak, Borneo Island. A total of 10 haplotypes were observed, indicating the presence of at least two lineages in the sun bear population in Sarawak. Presumably, these two lineages could represent evolutionarily significant units. However, the geographical distributions of the two lineages remained unknown due to the lack of information regarding the exact capture locations of the confiscated sun bears. It is essential to elucidate the geographical distributions of these lineages in order to create a proper conservation plan for the sun bears in Sarawak. Therefore, further studies examining the haplotype distributions using DNA samples from known localities are essential.

  13. Hot water immersion as a treatment for stonefish sting: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darlene F. Ongkili

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The North Borneo state of Sabah is known worldwide for its beautiful islands and dive sites. Local hospitals deal with a number of marine-related injuries, including marine fauna envenomation by Scorpaenidae and Synanceiidae families of fish. We report a case of a tourist who presented with excruciating pain on her right foot after stepping on a stonefish. Despite being given parenteral analgesia and regional anaesthesia, the pain persisted. Her pain improved after she soaked her foot in hot water for about 30 minutes. No further treatment was required. We reviewed the literature comparing this inexpensive mode of treatment with other conventional treatments. We also explored the possibility of using hot water immersion for treatment of envenomation by other types of marine animals.

  14. Continental crustal history in SE Asia: Insights from zircon geochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevastjanova, I.; Hall, R.; Gunawan, I.; Ferdian, F.; Decker, J.

    2012-12-01

    It is well known that SE Asia is underlain mostly by continental crust derived from Gondwana. However, there are still many uncertainties about the ages of protoliths, origin, arrival ages and history of different blocks, because much of the basement is unexposed. We have compiled previously published and new zircon U-Pb age and Hf isotope data from SE Asia. Our data set currently contains over 8400 U-Pb ages and over 600 Hf isotope analyses from sedimentary, metamorphic and igneous rocks and work is continuing to increase its size and the area covered. Zircons range in age from 3.4 Ga to near-zero. Archean zircons (>2.5 Ga) are rare in SE Asia and significant Archean populations (particularly zircons >2.8 Ga) are found only in East Java and the Sibumasu block of the Malay Peninsula. The presence of Archean zircons strongly suggests that the East Java and Sibumasu blocks were once situated near present-day Western Australia. Detrital Paleoproterozoic (ca. 1.9-1.8 Ga) zircons are abundant in many parts of SE Asia. In Sundaland (Malay Peninsula, Sumatra, West Java, Borneo) the most likely source for these zircons is the tin belt basement, but a north Australian source is more likely for eastern Indonesian samples. An early Mesoproterozoic (ca. 1.6-1.5 Ga) zircon population, particularly common in eastern Indonesia, is interpreted to be derived from central or northern Australia. Mesoproterozoic zircons, ca. 1.4 Ga, are common only on fragments that are now attached to or were previously part of the north Australian margin, such as the Bird's Head of New Guinea, Timor, Seram, Sulawesi and SW Borneo. Hf isotope characteristics of zircons from Seram are similar to those of zircons from eastern Australia. This supports the suggestion that Seram was part of the Australian margin. Late Meso- and early Neoproterozoic zircons (ca. 1.2-1.1 Ga, 900 Ma, and 600 Ma) are present, but not abundant, in SE Asia. Dominant Phanerozoic populations are Permian-Triassic, Cretaceous, and

  15. Nuclear Malaysia in the news 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear was a term that always misunderstood by public as a terrifying term. Nuclear activities around Malaysia were disseminated in newspaper and Malaysian Nuclear Agency as a responsible agency were collecting that news and compiled them. The purpose for this compilation were to make the public aware the benefits of nuclear energy and all the activities regarding nuclear surround them. All the news about nuclear technology were collected using various type of newspaper published in Malaysia such as Utusan Malaysia, Berita Harian, Daily Express, News Straits Time, The Star, Borneo Post and others. This news was compiled according to their main topics such as energy, nuclear in agriculture, education and others. Each year one edition of this report will publish and disseminate it to the other libraries, government agencies, school and others to make the public aware the existence of nuclear activities around their countries.

  16. Nuclear Malaysia in the news 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear was a term that always misunderstood by public as a terrifying term. Nuclear activities around Malaysia were disseminated in newspaper and Malaysian Nuclear Agency as a responsible agency were collecting that news and compiled them. The purpose for this compilation were to make the public aware the benefits of nuclear energy and all the activities regarding nuclear surround them. All the news about nuclear technology were collected using various type of newspaper published in Malaysia such as Utusan Malaysia, Berita Harian, Daily Express, News Straits Time, The Star, Borneo Post and others. This news was compiled according to their main topics such as energy, nuclear in agriculture, education and others. Each year one edition of this report will publish and disseminate it to the other libraries, government agencies, school and others to make the public aware the existence of nuclear activities around their countries.

  17. A MONOGRAPH OF THE GENUS SCHOUTENIA* Korth. (Tiliaceae

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    ROEKMOWATI ROEKMOWATI

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The genus consists of 8 species in Siam, Indochina, the Malay Peninsula, Sumatra,Borneo, Java, and the Lesser Sunda Islands. It is here divided into 2 subgenera,the monotypic Schoutevia with S. cvata Korth. and Chartacalyx with S. accres-cens (Mast. Curtis as type species. Chartacalyx is divided into 2 sections, Char-tacalyx and A disci flora with S. kuiistleri King as type spscies.Three species, S. curtisii, corneri, and kostermansii are considered new.S. hypoleuca Pierre is reduced to synonymy of S. ovata Korth. S. peregrines Craib is reduced to a subspecies of S. glomerata King. The varieties of S. accrescens (Mast. Curtis are deleted. The species is dividedinto 3 subspecies: accrescens, stellata, and borneensis. A forma lepidota is reeog-nized for subspecies accrescens.. S. buurmanii K. et V. and S. kunstleri King- are considered to be differentspecies.

  18. Nuclear Malaysia in the news 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear was a term that always misunderstands by public as a terrifying term. The nuclear activities around Malaysia was disseminated in newspaper and Malaysian Nuclear Agency as a responsible agency for nuclear for peace were collecting that news and compiled them to make the public aware the benefits of nuclear energy to develop our country. All the news about nuclear were collected using various type of newspaper published in Malaysia such as Utusan Malaysia, Berita Harian, Daily Express, News Straits Time, The Star, Borneo Post and others. This news was compiled according to their main topics such as energy, nuclear in agriculture, education and others. Each year one edition of this report will publish and disseminate it to the other libraries, government agencies, school and others to make the public aware the existence of nuclear activities around their countries.

  19. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Brunei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-02-01

    Brunei is a very small country consisting of only 5,800 sq km, and with only 150,000 people. Its main mineral products are crude oil and natural gas. It is hot and humid throughout the year being located only 4 degrees north of the equator on the island of Borneo. The sultanate of Brunei contains very thick sediments, some of which probably have the characteristics of a good uranium host rock for sandstone type deposits, but tacking a classic source, the uranium potential is minimal. Potential for other types of uranium deposits is likewise considered minimal. Therefore Brunei is assigned a potential in category 1 (less than 1000 tonnes U). (author)

  20. Two New Nepenthes Species from the Philippines and an Emended Description of Nepenthes ramos

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    Thomas Gronemeyer

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available With 50 species of the genus Nepenthes L. currently described from the Philippines, it is without doubt that the country, along with the islands of Sumatra (Indonesia and Borneo (Indonesia, Malaysia, Brunei, should be considered the center of diversity of the genus. In this work, we describe two new species. One species, N. aenigma sp. nov., is from Ilocos Norte province on Luzon Island and has the—for Nepenthes—unusual ecological preference to grow in dense vegetation in deep shade. The other new species is from Mount Hamiguitan in Davao Oriental province on Mindanao Island. With this new entry, Mount Hamiguitan is now home to four endemic species (N. peltata, N. micramphora, N. hamiguitanensis, N. justinae sp. nov.. Furthermore, we provide an emended description of N. ramos based on field data. Nepenthes kurata is synonymized here with N. ramos.

  1. Four New Species of Nepenthes L. (Nepenthaceae from the Central Mountains of Mindanao, Philippines

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    Thomas Gronemeyer

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Together with the islands of Sumatra (Indonesia and Borneo (Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines are the main center of diversity for carnivorous pitcher plants of the genus, Nepenthes L. Nepenthes are the largest of all carnivorous plants, and the species with the biggest pitchers are capable of trapping and digesting small amphibians and even mammals. The central cordillera of Mindanao Island in the south of the Philippines is mostly covered with old, primary forest and is the largest remaining cohesive, untouched area of wilderness in the Philippines. In a recent field exploration of two areas of the central cordillera, namely Mount Sumagaya and a section of the Pantaron range, four new taxa of Nepenthes were discovered. These four remarkable new species, N. pantaronensis, N. cornuta, N. talaandig and N. amabilis, are described, illustrated and assessed.

  2. Identification of traditional medicinal plant extracts with novel anti-influenza activity.

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    Dhivya Rajasekaran

    Full Text Available The emergence of drug resistant variants of the influenza virus has led to a need to identify novel and effective antiviral agents. As an alternative to synthetic drugs, the consolidation of empirical knowledge with ethnopharmacological evidence of medicinal plants offers a novel platform for the development of antiviral drugs. The aim of this study was to identify plant extracts with proven activity against the influenza virus. Extracts of fifty medicinal plants, originating from the tropical rainforests of Borneo used as herbal medicines by traditional healers to treat flu-like symptoms, were tested against the H1N1 and H3N1 subtypes of the virus. In the initial phase, in vitro micro-inhibition assays along with cytotoxicity screening were performed on MDCK cells. Most plant extracts were found to be minimally cytotoxic, indicating that the compounds linked to an ethnomedical framework were relatively innocuous, and eleven crude extracts exhibited viral inhibition against both the strains. All extracts inhibited the enzymatic activity of viral neuraminidase and four extracts were also shown to act through the hemagglutination inhibition (HI pathway. Moreover, the samples that acted through both HI and neuraminidase inhibition (NI evidenced more than 90% reduction in virus adsorption and penetration, thereby indicating potent action in the early stages of viral replication. Concurrent studies involving Receptor Destroying Enzyme treatments of HI extracts indicated the presence of sialic acid-like component(s that could be responsible for hemagglutination inhibition. The manifestation of both modes of viral inhibition in a single extract suggests that there may be a synergistic effect implicating more than one active component. Overall, our results provide substantive support for the use of Borneo traditional plants as promising sources of novel anti-influenza drug candidates. Furthermore, the pathways involving inhibition of hemagglutination

  3. Oxygenated volatile organic carbon in the western Pacific convective center: ocean cycling, air–sea gas exchange and atmospheric transport

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    C. Schlundt

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A suite of oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs – acetaldehyde, acetone, propanal, butanal and butanone were measured concurrently in the surface water and atmosphere of the South China Sea and Sulu Sea in November 2011. A strong correlation was observed between all OVOC concentrations in the surface seawater along the entire cruise track, except for acetaldehyde, suggesting similar sources and sinks in the surface ocean. Additionally, several phytoplankton groups, such as haptophytes or pelagophytes, were also correlated to all OVOCs, indicating that phytoplankton may be an important source of marine OVOCs in the South China and Sulu seas. Humic- and protein-like fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM components seemed to be additional precursors for butanone and acetaldehyde. The measurement-inferred OVOC fluxes generally showed an uptake of atmospheric OVOCs by the ocean for all gases, except for butanal. A few important exceptions were found along the Borneo coast, where OVOC fluxes from the ocean to the atmosphere were inferred. The atmospheric OVOC mixing ratios over the northern coast of Borneo were relatively high compared with literature values, suggesting that this coastal region is a local hotspot for atmospheric OVOCs. The calculated amount of OVOCs entrained into the ocean seemed to be an important source of OVOCs to the surface ocean. When the fluxes were out of the ocean, marine OVOCs were found to be enough to control the locally measured OVOC distribution in the atmosphere. Based on our model calculations, at least 0.4 ppb of marine-derived acetone and butanone can reach the upper troposphere, where they may have an important influence on hydrogen oxide radical formation over the western Pacific Ocean.

  4. Lemang (Rice bamboo as a representative of typical Malay food in Indonesia

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    Bertha Araminta Wahyudi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Traditional food as foods typical of the region is one of the cultural elements in various regions of Indonesia. The food is very closely related to customs, indicating that it is very characteristic of each region and ethnicity. Indonesia consists of various ethnic groups. Ethnic Malay is one of the dominant tribe in Indonesia. Malay is spread throughout Indonesia, especially in Sumatra and Borneo. Malay has influenced Indonesia's culture in terms of food. Lemang is a traditional Malay delicacy, which has become a part of Indonesia's culture. Several regions in Indonesia use lemang for traditional ceremonies, such as Bengkulu, Jambi, West Sumatra, North Sumatra, and South Borneo. Each region has a different variation, function, and manner of presentation of lemang but same method of cooking. Local residents use the traditional method to cook lemang using open fire. This method has been passed down from ancestors and has a social value. Cooking lemang by the traditional method involves family members and neighbors so that it can improve kinship. By using the traditional method, local residents can reduce the operational cost. However, the traditional method needs longer cooking time and the quality of products is not uniform due to difficulty in controlling heat. Therefore, researchers have developed new methods of cooking lemang to get uniform quality and to reduce the cooking time. The new methods involve the use of lemang oven and stainless steel mold. Cooking lemang in an oven and replacing bamboo stalk with stainless steel mold can reportedly reduce the cooking time with the same quality as that obtained using the traditional method.

  5. Population density of red langurs in Sabangau tropical peat-swamp forest, Central Kalimantan, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers Smith, David A; Ehlers Smith, Yvette C

    2013-08-01

    Because of the large-scale destruction of Borneo's rainforests on mineral soils, tropical peat-swamp forests (TPSFs) are increasingly essential for conserving remnant biodiversity, particularly in the lowlands where the majority of habitat conversion has occurred. Consequently, effective strategies for biodiversity conservation are required, which rely on accurate population density and distribution estimates as a baseline. We sought to establish the first population density estimates of the endemic red langur (Presbytis rubicunda) in Sabangau TPSF, the largest remaining contiguous lowland forest-block on Borneo. Using Distance sampling principles, we conducted line transect surveys in two of Sabangau's three principle habitat sub-classes and calculated group density at 2.52 groups km⁻² (95% CI 1.56-4.08) in the mixed-swamp forest sub-class. Based on an average recorded group size of 6.95 individuals, population density was 17.51 ind km⁻², the second highest density recorded in this species. The accessible area of the tall-interior forest, however, was too disturbed to yield density estimates representative of the entire sub-class, and P. rubicunda was absent from the low-pole forest, likely as a result of the low availability of the species' preferred foods. This absence in 30% of Sabangau's total area indicates the importance of in situ population surveys at the habitat-specific level for accurately informing conservation strategies. We highlight the conservation value of TPSFs for P. rubicunda given the high population density and large areas remaining, and recommend 1) quantifying the response of P. rubicunda to the logging and burning of its habitats; 2) surveying degraded TPSFs for viable populations, and 3) effectively delineating TPSF sub-class boundaries from remote imagery to facilitate population estimates across the wider peat landscape, given the stark contrast in densities found across the habitat sub-classes of Sabangau. © 2013 Wiley

  6. Dated phylogenies of the sister genera Macaranga and Mallotus (Euphorbiaceae: congruence in historical biogeographic patterns?

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    Peter C van Welzen

    Full Text Available Molecular phylogenies and estimates of divergence times within the sister genera Macaranga and Mallotus were estimated using Bayesian relaxed clock analyses of two generic data sets, one per genus. Both data sets were based on different molecular markers and largely different samples. Per genus three calibration points were utilised. The basal calibration point (crown node of all taxa used was taken from literature and used for both taxa. The other three calibrations were based on fossils of which two were used per genus. We compared patterns of dispersal and diversification in Macaranga and Mallotus using ancestral area reconstruction in RASP (S-DIVA option and contrasted our results with biogeographical and geological records to assess accuracy of inferred age estimates. A check of the fossil calibration point showed that the Japanese fossil, used for dating the divergence of Mallotus, probably had to be attached to a lower node, the stem node of all pioneer species, but even then the divergence time was still younger than the estimated age of the fossil. The African (only used in the Macaranga data set and New Zealand fossils (used for both genera seemed reliably placed. Our results are in line with existing geological data and the presence of stepping stones that provided dispersal pathways from Borneo to New Guinea-Australia, from Borneo to mainland Asia and additionally at least once to Africa and Madagascar via land and back to India via Indian Ocean island chains. The two genera show congruence in dispersal patterns, which corroborate divergence time estimates, although the overall mode and tempo of dispersal and diversification differ significantly as shown by distribution patterns of extant species.

  7. Increased detection of Plasmodium knowlesi in Sandakan division, Sabah as revealed by PlasmoNex™

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Plasmodium knowlesi is a simian malaria parasite that is widespread in humans in Malaysian Borneo. However, little is known about the incidence and distribution of this parasite in the Sandakan division, Malaysian Borneo. Therefore, the aim of the present epidemiological study was to investigate the incidence and distribution of P. knowlesi as well as other Plasmodium species in this division based on a most recent developed hexaplex PCR system (PlasmoNex™). Methods A total of 189 whole blood samples were collected from Telupid Health Clinic, Sabah, Malaysia, from 2008 to 2011. All patients who participated in the study were microscopically malaria positive before recruitment. Complete demographic details and haematological profiles were obtained from 85 patients (13 females and 72 males). Identification of Plasmodium species was conducted using PlasmoNex™ targeting the 18S ssu rRNA gene. Results A total of 178 samples were positive for Plasmodium species by using PlasmoNex™. Plasmodium falciparum was identified in 68 samples (38.2%) followed by 64 cases (36.0%) of Plasmodium vivax, 42 (23.6%) cases of P. knowlesi, two (1.1%) cases of Plasmodium malariae and two (1.1%) mixed-species infections (i e, P. vivax/P. falciparum). Thirty-five PlasmoNex™ positive P. knowlesi samples were misdiagnosed as P. malariae by microscopy. Plasmodium knowlesi was detected in all four districts of Sandakan division with the highest incidence in the Kinabatangan district. Thrombocytopaenia and anaemia showed to be the most frequent malaria-associated haematological complications in this study. Conclusions The discovery of P. knowlesi in Sandakan division showed that prospective studies on the epidemiological risk factors and transmission dynamics of P. knowlesi in these areas are crucial in order to develop strategies for effective malaria control. The availability of advanced diagnostic tool PlasmoNex™ enhanced the accuracy and accelerated the speed in the

  8. Two new species of Begonia, B. moneta and B. peridoticola (Begoniaceae) from Sabah, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ching-I; Lin, Che-Wei; Repin, Rimi; Kono, Yoshiko; Leong, Wai-Chao; Chung, Kuo-Fang

    2015-12-01

    Mount Kinabalu, reknowned for its high biodiversity and endemism, is a National Park in the State of Sabah on the northern end of the island of Borneo. Every year many visit the higher part of the Kinabalu National Park, while most lowland forests in the Park are under-explored. Two unknown species of Begonia were collected from a peridotic (ultramafic) cliff in the Kinabalu National Park at ca. 400 m elevation. The two species are named B. moneta C.-I Peng, Rimi & C. W. Lin and B. peridoticola Rimi, C.-I Peng & C. W. Lin. Begonia moneta (sect. Baryandra) is similar to B. gueritziana Gibbs, a widespread species of the same section in Borneo, differing in the peltate (vs. basifixed) leaves and the smaller flower parts. Also, their chromosome numbers are different (B. moneta, 2n = 30; B. gueritziana, 2n = 28). The peltate and succulent foliage of B. moneta is also reminiscent of B. burttii Kiew & S. Julia and B. payung S. Julia & Kiew, both of sect. Reichenheimia, from Sarawak. Begonia moneta is distinct from the two species in having branched (vs. entire) placental lamellae. Additionally, B. moneta differs from B. burttii in having 4 (vs. 5) tepals in pistillate flowers and markedly unequal (vs. equal) fruit wings. Begonia moneta differs from B. payung in the smaller leaves and conspicuously winged (vs. wingless) capsules. Begonia peridoticola (sect. Petermannia) resembles B. punchak Kiew & S. Julia from limestone areas in Kuching Division, Sarawak, differing in the entire leaf margin (vs. distantly dentate), much larger capsular wings (8-11 mm vs. 2-3 mm wide) and yellow, spiral (vs. crimson, U-shaped) styles. A careful study of the herbarium materials and literature supports the recognition of the two new species. Detailed descriptions, line drawings, color plates, chromsome data, foliar SEM observations and comparisons with phenetically similar species are provided to aid in identification.

  9. Quantity and configuration of available elephant habitat and related conservation concerns in the Lower Kinabatangan floodplain of Sabah, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, Jason G; Othman, Nurzhafarina; Ismail, Sulaiman; Ancrenaz, Marc; Goossens, Benoit; Ambu, Laurentius N; Estes, Anna B; Palmiotto, Peter A

    2012-01-01

    The approximately 300 (298, 95% CI: 152-581) elephants in the Lower Kinabatangan Managed Elephant Range in Sabah, Malaysian Borneo are a priority sub-population for Borneo's total elephant population (2,040, 95% CI: 1,184-3,652). Habitat loss and human-elephant conflict are recognized as the major threats to Bornean elephant survival. In the Kinabatangan region, human settlements and agricultural development for oil palm drive an intense fragmentation process. Electric fences guard against elephant crop raiding but also remove access to suitable habitat patches. We conducted expert opinion-based least-cost analyses, to model the quantity and configuration of available suitable elephant habitat in the Lower Kinabatangan, and called this the Elephant Habitat Linkage. At 184 km(2), our estimate of available habitat is 54% smaller than the estimate used in the State's Elephant Action Plan for the Lower Kinabatangan Managed Elephant Range (400 km(2)). During high flood levels, available habitat is reduced to only 61 km(2). As a consequence, short-term elephant densities are likely to surge during floods to 4.83 km(-2) (95% CI: 2.46-9.41), among the highest estimated for forest-dwelling elephants in Asia or Africa. During severe floods, the configuration of remaining elephant habitat and the surge in elephant density may put two villages at elevated risk of human-elephant conflict. Lower Kinabatangan elephants are vulnerable to the natural disturbance regime of the river due to their limited dispersal options. Twenty bottlenecks less than one km wide throughout the Elephant Habitat Linkage, have the potential to further reduce access to suitable habitat. Rebuilding landscape connectivity to isolated habitat patches and to the North Kinabatangan Managed Elephant Range (less than 35 km inland) are conservation priorities that would increase the quantity of available habitat, and may work as a mechanism to allow population release, lower elephant density, reduce human

  10. Quantity and configuration of available elephant habitat and related conservation concerns in the Lower Kinabatangan floodplain of Sabah, Malaysia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason G Estes

    Full Text Available The approximately 300 (298, 95% CI: 152-581 elephants in the Lower Kinabatangan Managed Elephant Range in Sabah, Malaysian Borneo are a priority sub-population for Borneo's total elephant population (2,040, 95% CI: 1,184-3,652. Habitat loss and human-elephant conflict are recognized as the major threats to Bornean elephant survival. In the Kinabatangan region, human settlements and agricultural development for oil palm drive an intense fragmentation process. Electric fences guard against elephant crop raiding but also remove access to suitable habitat patches. We conducted expert opinion-based least-cost analyses, to model the quantity and configuration of available suitable elephant habitat in the Lower Kinabatangan, and called this the Elephant Habitat Linkage. At 184 km(2, our estimate of available habitat is 54% smaller than the estimate used in the State's Elephant Action Plan for the Lower Kinabatangan Managed Elephant Range (400 km(2. During high flood levels, available habitat is reduced to only 61 km(2. As a consequence, short-term elephant densities are likely to surge during floods to 4.83 km(-2 (95% CI: 2.46-9.41, among the highest estimated for forest-dwelling elephants in Asia or Africa. During severe floods, the configuration of remaining elephant habitat and the surge in elephant density may put two villages at elevated risk of human-elephant conflict. Lower Kinabatangan elephants are vulnerable to the natural disturbance regime of the river due to their limited dispersal options. Twenty bottlenecks less than one km wide throughout the Elephant Habitat Linkage, have the potential to further reduce access to suitable habitat. Rebuilding landscape connectivity to isolated habitat patches and to the North Kinabatangan Managed Elephant Range (less than 35 km inland are conservation priorities that would increase the quantity of available habitat, and may work as a mechanism to allow population release, lower elephant density, reduce

  11. Djenkolism: case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bunawan NC

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Nur C Bunawan,1 Asghar Rastegar,2 Kathleen P White,3 Nancy E Wang41Alam Sehat Lestari Clinic, West Kalimantan, Borneo, Indonesia; 2Section of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA; 3General Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA; 4Department of Surgery and Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USAAbstract: Djenkolism is an uncommon but important cause of acute kidney injury. It sporadically occurs after an ingestion of the djenkol bean (Archidendron pauciflorum, which is native to Southeast Asia. The clinical features defining djenkolism include: spasmodic suprapubic and/or flank pain; urinary obstruction; and acute kidney injury. The precise pathogenesis of acute kidney injury following djenkol ingestion remains unknown. However, it is proposed that an interaction between the characteristics of the ingested beans and the host factors causes hypersaturation of djenkolic acid crystals within the urinary system, resulting in subsequent obstructive nephropathy with sludge, stones, or possible spasms. We report a case of djenkolism from our rural clinic in Borneo, Indonesia. Our systematic literature review identified 96 reported cases of djenkolism. The majority of patients recovered with hydration, bicarbonate therapy, and pain medication. Three patients required surgical intervention; one patient required ureteral stenting for the obstructing djenkolic acid stones. Four of the 96 reported patients died from acute kidney failure. We stress the importance of awareness of djenkolism to guide medical practitioners in the treatment of this rare disease in resource-poor areas in Southeast Asia.Keywords: djenkolism, acute renal failure, acute kidney injury, tropical medicine

  12. Tides and Their Dynamics over the Sunda Shelf of the Southern South China Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daryabor, Farshid; Ooi, See Hai; Abu Samah, Azizan; Akbari, Abolghasem

    2016-01-01

    A three-dimensional Regional Ocean Modelling System is used to study the tidal characteristics and their dynamics in the Sunda Shelf of the southern South China Sea. In this model, the outer domain is set with a 25 km resolution and the inner one, with a 9 km resolution. Calculations are performed on the inner domain. The model is forced at the sea surface by climatological monthly mean wind stress, freshwater (evaporation minus precipitation), and heat fluxes. Momentum and tracers (such as temperature and salinity) are prescribed in addition to the tidal heights and currents extracted from the Oregon State University TOPEX/Poseidon Global Inverse Solution (TPXO7.2) at the open boundaries. The results are validated against observed tidal amplitudes and phases at 19 locations. Results show that the mean average power energy spectrum (in unit m2/s/cph) for diurnal tides at the southern end of the East Coast of Peninsular Malaysia is approximately 43% greater than that in the East Malaysia region located in northern Borneo. In contrast, for the region of northern Borneo the semidiurnal power energy spectrum is approximately 25% greater than that in the East Coast of Peninsular Malaysia. This implies that diurnal tides are dominant along the East Coast of Peninsular Malaysia while both diurnal and semidiurnal tides dominate almost equally in coastal East Malaysia. Furthermore, the diurnal tidal energy flux is found to be 60% greater than that of the semidiurnal tides in the southern South China Sea. Based on these model analyses, the significant tidal mixing frontal areas are located primarily off Sarawak coast as indicated by high chlorophyll-a concentrations in the area.

  13. Laboratory markers of disease severity in Plasmodium knowlesi infection: a case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willmann Matthias

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmodium knowlesi malaria causes severe disease in up to 10% of cases in Malaysian Borneo and has a mortality rate of 1 - 2%. However, laboratory markers with the ability to identify patients at risk of developing complications have not yet been assessed as they have for other species of Plasmodium. Methods A case control study was undertaken in two hospitals in Sarikei and Sibu, Malaysian Borneo. One hundred and ten patients with uncomplicated (n = 93 and severe (n = 17 P. knowlesi malaria were studied. Standardized pigment-containing neutrophil (PCN count, parasite density and platelet counts were determined and analysed by logistic regression and receiver operating characteristic (ROC analysis. Results The PCN count was strongly associated with risk of disease severity. Patients with high parasite density (≥ 35,000/μl or with thrombocytopaenia (≤ 45,000/μl were also more likely to develop complications (odds ratio (OR = 9.93 and OR = 5.27, respectively. The PCN count yielded the highest area under the ROC curve (AUC estimate among all markers of severity (AUC = 0.8561, 95% confidence interval: 0.7328, 0.9794. However, the difference between all parameter AUC estimates was not statistically significant (Wald test, p = 0.73. Conclusion Counting PCN is labour-intensive and not superior in predicting severity over parasitaemia and platelet counts. Parasite and platelet counts are simpler tests with an acceptable degree of precision. Any adult patient diagnosed with P. knowlesi malaria and having a parasite count ≥35,000/μl or ≥1% or a platelet count ≤45,000/μl can be regarded at risk of developing complications and should be managed according to current WHO guidelines for the treatment of severe malaria.

  14. The Structure Difference in the Southern Margin of the Dangerous Grounds: Implications for the Final Evolution of the South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, P.; Shen, C.; Zhao, Z.; Xie, X.; Mei, L.; Gong, J.; Huang, X.

    2015-12-01

    We interpret two multi-channel seismic reflection profiles, more than 900 km across the entire Dangerous Grounds, locating in east and west of the southern margin of the South China Sea respectively. Eight Cenozoic sequence boundaries are determined as well as three tectono-stratigraphic units. Detailed analysis of extensional features and unconformities revealed the tectonic in the east and west. Early extension (syn-rifting sequence) occurred in the two profiles during continental rifting, which lasted from Palaeocene to Early Oligocene, and resulted in formation of half-grabens and rotated fault-blocks. Late extension (drift-rifting sequence) has the significant difference in the both profiles. The eastern Dangerous Grounds entered rifting-depression stage and some compressional deformation occurred in the Reed Bank basin at about the beginning of Early Miocene, probably resulting from the collision of the Dangerous Grounds and the Sabah-Cagayan Arc. The western Dangerous Grounds was still in rifting until the end of Early Miocene, forming the MMU or DRU which is strongly erosional and represents a major break in sedimentation and/or erosion in partial area. Denudation fold and inverted fault can be distinguished blow the MMU, indicating the cessation of the South China Sea accompanied the NW compression, while the boundary corresponding the MMU is nearly a plano-conformity in the east. The thermal sag (post-rifting sequence) is characterized by non-faulted draping strata in the whole area. The different structure in east and west may be related to the final evolution of the SCS. When the proto-SCS closed in a scissor fashion plus the clockwise rotation of Borneo, the initial collision (c.20Ma) appeared in east part building the NW foreland basin system from Palawan Trough to Reed Bank in a short-live process, while the west part was drifting southwards until c.15Ma to form the even more remarkable foreland system from Borneo Trough to deep-water Sarawak.

  15. The Affecting Factors of Fasciolopsia sis in the Elementary Student in E ndemic Area

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    Khairudin

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Fasciolopsis buski is a one of trematodes parasites which can infect human infestation of Fasciolopsis buski into human body due drink un-boiled water and consume uncooked water plants such as supan-supan, lotus and genjer. Incidence of Fasciolopsiasis in Indonesia is endemic in Babirik Subdistrict, Hulu Sungai Utara District South Borneo Province and prevalence is 1.2-7.8%. Until now the prevalence rate Fasciolopsiasis events showed no tendency to fall, it shows the spread of disease to other areas. In Fasciolopsis buski guess is spread through environmental sanitation and poor personal hygiene. Theresearch objective was to analyze the relationship between house basic sanitation and Fasciolopsiasis Elementary Student in Hulu Sungai Utara District, South Borneo. During January to July of 2010. This Type of observational analytic study was performed in a cross sectional of elementary student aged 7-13 years as many as 110 students. Data collected through, interviews and observation. The data collection with laboratory examination, observation, and interview. Data analysis used multiple logistic regression. The result show that the prevalence ratio of Fasciolopsiasis incidence was 4.0% and there was relationship between incidence Fasciolopsiasis with house basic sanitation OR=97.745, drink un-boiled water, OR=2.0, consume uncooked water plants OR=39.869, Play on swamp OR=0.015, Lack of knowledge OR=0.03. It was concluded that the five variables studied house basic sanitation is not related to the incident. Fasciolopsiasis. It needs to supervise and increase school health program done by Education Office and Primary Heathcare at subdistrict level.

  16. PENGARUH JARINGAN PERDAGANGAN GLOBAL PADA STRUKTUR WILAYAH DAN KONFIGURASI SPASIAL PUSAT PEMERINTAHAN KESULTANAN-KESULTANAN MELAYU DI KALIMANTAN BARAT

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    Uray Fery Andi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Lokasi pusat-pusat pemerintahan kesultanan Melayu di Kalimantan Barat berada di sepanjang tepian sungai. Sungai menjadi faktor yang sangat penting dalam kehidupan kesultanan, yaitu terkait dengan fungsinya sebagai sumber kehidupan dengan beragan jenis flora dan fauna, sebagai aksesibilitas dan jalur transportasi serta komunikasi. Keterbatasan wilayah tepian sungai menyebabkan perkembangan pusat kesultanan melebar sepanjang tepian sungai karena wilayah daratan masih berupa hutan dan kurang aman. Perkembangan aktivitas perdagangan global pada masa pemerintahan kesultanan yang semakin pesat menyebabkan jalur sungai semakin ramai dilalui oleh pedagang lokal, regional dan internasional. Keberadaan kongsi dagang Belanda (VOC hingga menjadi pemerintahan Hindia Belanda turut mempengaruhi perkembangan pusat-pusat pemerintahan kesultanan Melayu di Kalimantan Barat.Tujuan dari penelitian ini adalah untuk mengetahui pengaruh jaringan perdagangan global terhadap struktur wilayah Borneo Barat dan konfigurasi spasialpusat pemerintahankesultanan-kesultanan Melayu di Kalimantan Barat. Penelitian dilakukan dengan menggunakan metode sejarah yaitu dengan mengetahui perkembangan sistem jaringan perdagangan global dan korelasinya dengan sejarah pembentukan wilayah kesultanan. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa sistem dan jaringan perdagangan mempengaruhi struktur wilayah Borneo Barat dengan sistem hulu-hilir dan konfigurasi spasial wilayah pusat pemerintahan kesultanan Melayu yang terbatas dan melebar sepanjang tepian sungai. Kata-kata kunci: jaringan perdagangan, struktur wilayah, konfigurasi spasial, kesultanan Melayu, Kalimantan Barat   THE INFLUENCE OF GLOBAL TRADING NETWORK ON THE MALAY SULTANATES CENTRAL OF GOVERNMENT STRUCTURE AND SPATIAL CONFIGURATION IN WEST KALIMANTAN Malay sultanates central government in West Kalimantan were located along the banks of the river. The river became very important factor in the life of sultanates, which was related to its

  17. Book Reviews

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    Lynn Pan

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available - Matthew Amster, Jérôme Rousseau, Kayan religion; Ritual life and religious reform in Central Borneo. Leiden: KITLV Press, 1998, 352 pp. [VKI 180.] - Atsushi Ota, Johan Talens, Een feodale samenleving in koloniaal vaarwater; Staatsvorming, koloniale expansie en economische onderontwikkeling in Banten, West-Java, 1600-1750. Hilversum: Verloren, 1999, 253 pp. - Wanda Avé, Johannes Salilah, Traditional medicine among the Ngaju Dayak in Central Kalimantan; The 1935 writings of a former Ngaju Dayak Priest, edited and translated by A.H. Klokke. Phillips, Maine: Borneo Research Council, 1998, xxi + 314 pp. [Borneo Research Council Monograph 3.] - Peter Boomgaard, Sandra Pannell, Old world places, new world problems; Exploring issues of resource management in eastern Indonesia. Canberra: Centre for Resource and Environmental Studies, Australian National University, 1998, xiv + 387 pp., Franz von Benda-Beckmann (eds. - H.J.M. Claessen, Geoffrey M. White, Chiefs today; Traditional Pacific leadership and the postcolonial state. Stanford, California: Stanford University Press, 1997, xiv + 343 pp., Lamont Lindstrom (eds. - H.J.M. Claessen, Judith Huntsman, Tokelau; A historical ethnography. Auckland: Auckland University Press, 1996, xii + 355 pp., Antony Hooper (eds. - Hans Gooszen, Gavin W. Jones, Indonesia assessment; Population and human resources. Canberra: Research School of Pacific and Asian Studies, Australian National University, 1997, 73 pp., Terence Hull (eds. - Rens Heringa, John Guy, Woven cargoes; Indian textiles in the East. London: Thames and Hudson, 1998, 192 pp., with 241 illustrations (145 in colour. - Rens Heringa, Ruth Barnes, Indian block-printed textiles in Egypt; The Newberry collection in the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1997. Volume 1 (text: xiv + 138 pp., with 32 b/w illustrations and 43 colour plates; Volume 2 (catalogue: 379 pp., with 1226 b/w illustrations. - H.M.J. Maier, David T. Hill, Beyond the

  18. Tracing the depositional history of Kalimantan diamonds by zircon provenance and diamond morphology studies

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    Kueter, Nico; Soesilo, Joko; Fedortchouk, Yana; Nestola, Fabrizio; Belluco, Lorenzo; Troch, Juliana; Wälle, Markus; Guillong, Marcel; Von Quadt, Albrecht; Driesner, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    Diamonds in alluvial deposits in Southeast Asia are not accompanied by indicator minerals suggesting primary kimberlite or lamproite sources. The Meratus Mountains in Southeast Borneo (Province Kalimantan Selatan, Indonesia) provide the largest known deposit of these so-called "headless" diamond deposits. Proposals for the origin of Kalimantan diamonds include the adjacent Meratus ophiolite complex, ultra-high pressure (UHP) metamorphic terranes, obducted subcontinental lithospheric mantle and undiscovered kimberlite-type sources. Here we report results from detailed sediment provenance analysis of diamond-bearing Quaternary river channel material and from representative outcrops of the oldest known formations within the Alino Group, including the diamond-bearing Campanian-Maastrichtian Manunggul Formation. Optical examination of surfaces of diamonds collected from artisanal miners in the Meratus area (247 stones) and in West Borneo (Sanggau Area, Province Kalimantan Barat; 85 stones) points toward a classical kimberlite-type source for the majority of these diamonds. Some of the diamonds host mineral inclusions suitable for deep single-crystal X-ray diffraction investigation. We determined the depth of formation of two olivines, one coesite and one peridotitic garnet inclusion. Pressure of formation estimates for the peridotitic garnet at independently derived temperatures of 930-1250 °C are between 4.8 and 6.0 GPa. Sediment provenance analysis includes petrography coupled to analyses of detrital garnet and glaucophane. The compositions of these key minerals do not indicate kimberlite-derived material. By analyzing almost 1400 zircons for trace element concentrations with laser ablation ICP-MS (LA-ICP-MS) we tested the mineral's potential as an alternative kimberlite indicator. The screening ultimately resulted in a small subset of ten zircons with a kimberlitic affinity. Subsequent U-Pb dating resulting in Cretaceous ages plus a detailed chemical reflection make

  19. Hydroclimatic variations in the Makassar Strait over the past 5000 years

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    Kwiatkowski, C.; Mohtadi, M.; Holbourn, A. E.; Kuhnt, W.; Hebbeln, D.; Mulitza, S.

    2015-12-01

    The Indonesian Throughflow (ITF) is the only low-latitude connection between two oceans and an important part of the global conveyor belt influencing global climate. About 80% of the ITF flows through the Makassar Strait between the islands of Borneo and Sulawesi and can be modified by the complex climate system over the Maritime continent characterized by interacting climate phenomena like e.g. El Niño Southern Oscillation and the Australasian monsoon system. To assess changes in the hydroclimate of the Makassar Strait in relation to dominant climatic forcing over the past 5,000 years, sediment core SO 217-18517 (1°32.198' S 117°33.756' E, 698 m water depth) collected off the Mahakam Delta, eastern Borneo, was studied. We use shell Mg/Ca ratio in planktic foraminifera to reconstruct sea surface temperature (SST), sedimentation rates and Ti/Ca ratios to reconstruct changes in terrigenous runoff, and seawater δ18O (δ18Osw) as a measure of past changes in sea surface salinity. Zr/Rb ratios are interpreted to indicate changes in grain size distribution. SST shows small-scale variations around 28.5°C during the mid Holocene, a decreasing trend between 3,000 and 1,700 years BP, and thereafter minor variations around 27.5°C. Sedimentation rates were higher between 3,400 and 1,000 years BP. Runoff increased during the past 5,000 years while our data indicate no change in sea surface salinity from mid to late Holocene. Grain size decreased until 1,700 years BP, and remained stable thereafter towards the present. The partly inconsistent timing and pattern of our data indicate the different degree to which our proxies are influenced by different forcings. We will explore the complex connection between local insolation and climate phenomena such as ENSO, dynamic and thermodynamic changes in ITCZ and monsoonal rainfall, their possible relation to high-latitude forcing including an (inter)hemispheric insolation gradient.

  20. Evaluating mid-Holocene precipitation over Australasia and the Maritime Continent in climate models

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    Ackerley, Duncan; Reeves, Jessica

    2015-04-01

    The Australasian INTIMATE (INTegration of Ice-core, Marine and Terrestrial records) initiative (INQUA project #0809) was undertaken to develop a consistent chronological assessment of the climate of the past 30000 years over Australia, New Zealand and the Maritime Continent. Work has continued as part of SHAPE initiative (INQUA project #1302), but there has currently been little use of this comprehensive resource for evaluating the available climate model data. Therefore, this work presents the initial assessment of model simulations of the mid-Holocene over the Australasian and Maritime Continents (taken from the Paleoclimate Modelling Intercomparison Project, PMIP) in relation to those available data. The mid-Holocene (6 ka) encompasses a period after sea level stabilisation (around 8-7.5 ka) and before the onset of strong ENSO-related variability (post 4 ka). There is some evidence of possibly drier conditions over northern Australia with increased coastal dune activity, along with slightly wetter conditions over Borneo and Papua New Guinea. Weakening of the Southern Hemisphere mid-latitude westerlies (relative to the early Holocene) is also likely to have occurred, as evidenced by drier conditions in Western Tasmania and Victoria. The modelled results from the mid-Holocene simulations indicate that conditions were approximately 1-6% drier over much of continental Australia than at present. There is also evidence of slightly wetter conditions (1-3%) over the northern tip of Australia and parts of Papua New Guinea and Borneo. The Southern Hemisphere westerlies in the mid-latitudes (around 50S) are also weaker by 1-2 m s-1 in the model simulations. There are also differences in the seasonal cycle of precipitation and circulation in these models in response to the changes in the orbital parameters in the mid-Holocene relative to present day. The precipitation in the early half of the monsoon season (October, November and December-OND) is typically 10% higher in the

  1. Wihdah al-Wujud Puisi Ahmad Aran

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    Khairul Fuad

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available AbstractIslamic mysticism had influence in West Borneo through the thought of Muhammad KhatibalSambasiy, an inisiator ofQadiriahNaqsabandiahSufi Path (tarikat. One field that has strong tasawuf influence is literature as exemplified by the works of AhmadAran, a literature writer of West Borneo, , especially his poetry. His works are compiled inan antology entitled Jepin Kapuas RinduPuisi Kumpulan Puisi Kalimantan Barat. Except Aran’s poetry, poetries from other writers were also found on the anthology published by KomiteSastraDewanKesenian Kalimantan Barat (DKKB at 2000. WahdatulWujud a discourse of Islamic mysticism was  used by Ahmad Aran in his poetry. Through hermeneutic approach, especially exoteric exegete (tafsir, this study concludes that wahdatulwujud was actualized by Ahmad Aran indeed in his poetry Keywords: wihdatulwujud, poetry, and Ahmad Aran.AbstrakTasawuf memiliki pengaruh di Kalimantan Barat melalui pemikiran Ahmad Khatib alSambasiy, penggagas Tarikat QadiriahNaqsabandiah (TQN;  dan aspek yang paling mudah dipengaruhi adalah sastra. Selain Odhy’s, puisi-puisi Ahmad Aran juga dipengaruhi oleh tasawuf yang berkembang di wilayah tersebut. Karya puisinya Aran terdapat di dalam antologi Jepin Kapuas Rindu Puisi Kumpulan Puisi Kalimantan Barat. Selain karya Ahmad Aran, puisi-puisi sastrawan Kalimantan Barat lainnya juga dimuat di dalam antologi yang dipublikasikan oleh Komite Sastra Dewan Kesenian Kalimantan Barat (DKKB pada tahun 2000., puisi-puisi lain juga terdapat di dalam antologi itu yang dipublikasikan oleh Komite Sastra Dewan Kesenian Kalimantan Barat (DKKB pada 2000 ini. Wihdah al-Wujud merupakan wacana tasawuf yang digunakan oleh Ahmad Aran dalam puisinya. Oleh karena itu, konsep ini menjadi rumusan masalah dan teknik untuk menganalisis puisinya. Dengan menggunakan pendekatan hermeneutik, khususnya tafsir (exoteric exegete akhirnya ditemukan bahwa wihdah al-Wujud sebagai pengaruh tasawuf, memang

  2. Eusideroxylon zwageri (Ulin as Key Species in Two Zones of Sangkima Rain Forest, Kutai National Park, East Kalimantan

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    Intan N. Azizah

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim of this research was to study trees’ diversity quality in primary and intensively used forest of Sangkima area in Kutai National Park (TNK, East Kalimantan (Borneo. Field observation was carried out by vegetation analysis using 17 sampling plots of 25x25 m2. Community structure of each forest was determined by calculating trees' density, basal area, frequency, important value and stratification of species. While trees diversity was estimated by taxa richness, Shannon-Wiener diversity index, and rate of endemism. Both forests were compared by Morisita community similarity index. Data were tabulated by Microsoft Excel 2007 and statistically analyzed by PCA method and supported by hierarchical cluster analysis in SPSS 15.00 for windows. The result showed that diversity quality in primary and intensively used forest of Sangkima TNK was high, indicated by similar stratification. The forests were composed by A stratum trees of > 30 m high to ground co ver plants, but they were domi nated by B stratum trees of 20-30m high. Primary forest’s formation was Eusideroxylon zwageri-Mixed Dipterocarpaceae, while intensively used forest’s formation was E. zwageri. Taxa richness of both forests was not different significantly. In the primary forest was found 34 species, 25 families and 16 orders, while intensively used forest was found 36 species, 20 families and 13 orders. Diversity Index of primary forest (H=4.57 was slightly higher than secondary forest (H=4.28. Rate of endemism of both forests reached 100%. Eusideroxylon zwageri and Cananga odorata were co-dominant in the Borneo rain forest. Tree of E. zwageri showed a bigges t trunk and largest canopy. Cananga odorata showed a high density in both zones. Luxurious jungle performed A to E strata, but B stratum was dominant. Based on those five characters, trees’ diversity quality in Sangkima was still high. Bi plot analysis showed that trees’ community structure of both forests composed by

  3. Ant mosaics in Bornean primary rain forest high canopy depend on spatial scale, time of day, and sampling method

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    Kalsum M. Yusah

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Competitive interactions in biological communities can be thought of as giving rise to “assembly rules” that dictate the species that are able to co-exist. Ant communities in tropical canopies often display a particular pattern, an “ant mosaic”, in which competition between dominant ant species results in a patchwork of mutually exclusive territories. Although ant mosaics have been well-documented in plantation landscapes, their presence in pristine tropical forests remained contentious until recently. Here we assess presence of ant mosaics in a hitherto under-investigated forest stratum, the emergent trees of the high canopy in primary tropical rain forest, and explore how the strength of any ant mosaics is affected by spatial scale, time of day, and sampling method. Methods To test whether these factors might impact the detection of ant mosaics in pristine habitats, we sampled ant communities from emergent trees, which rise above the highest canopy layers in lowland dipterocarp rain forests in North Borneo (38.8–60.2 m, using both baiting and insecticide fogging. Critically, we restricted sampling to only the canopy of each focal tree. For baiting, we carried out sampling during both the day and the night. We used null models of species co-occurrence to assess patterns of segregation at within-tree and between-tree scales. Results The numerically dominant ant species on the emergent trees sampled formed a diverse community, with differences in the identity of dominant species between times of day and sampling methods. Between trees, we found patterns of ant species segregation consistent with the existence of ant mosaics using both methods. Within trees, fogged ants were segregated, while baited ants were segregated only at night. Discussion We conclude that ant mosaics are present within the emergent trees of the high canopy of tropical rain forest in Malaysian Borneo, and that sampling technique, spatial scale, and time

  4. From Raja to Prime Minister Entre rajah et premier ministre. Les étrangers et l’exploitation économique à Bornéo et dans le Pacifique au xixe siècle

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    Kees van Dijk

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Some twenty years after the Sultan of Brunei had bestowed upon the Englishman James Brooke the title of Rajah of Sarawak, giving him extensive authorities over a large tract of land, an American, Joseph William Torrey, United States consul in Brunei, gained the right to call himself Rajah of Marudu and Ambong. Though Torrey’s efforts failed to establish a profitable business in Sabah, they formed the root of the British North Borneo Company. Torrey probably was one of the last of his kind. Elsewhere in the Pacific, European and American residents and adventurers did not bother much about native titles, expanding their hold over land and its inhabitants by economic and political manipulation. In Hawaii and Samoa political reform and becoming cabinet minister or prime minister of a still independent island state served their purposes better.Quelque vingt ans après que le sultan de Brunei eut accordé à l’Anglais James Brooke le titre de rajah de Sarawak, qui lui donnait d’importants pouvoirs sur une vaste région, un Américain, Joseph William Torrey, consul des Etats-Unis à Brunei, obtint le titre de rajah de Marudu et Ambong. Les efforts de Torrey, échouant à établir une affaire profitable à Sabah, constituèrent néanmoins les bases de la British North Borneo Company. Torrey fut sans doute l’un des derniers de ce type d’aventuriers. Ailleurs dans le Pacifique, des résidents et des aventuriers européens et américains, par des manœuvres économiques et politiques, consolidèrent leur contrôle sur les territoires et leurs populations, sans trop se soucier d’obtenir des titres locaux. A Hawaii et à Samoa, il leur fut plus utile d’entreprendre des réformes politiques et de se pourvoir d’un poste de ministre ou de premier ministre d’un Etat insulaire encore indépendant.

  5. Mitogenomic phylogeny of the common long-tailed macaque (Macaca fascicularis fascicularis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liedigk, Rasmus; Kolleck, Jakob; Böker, Kai O; Meijaard, Erik; Md-Zain, Badrul Munir; Abdul-Latiff, Muhammad Abu Bakar; Ampeng, Ahmad; Lakim, Maklarin; Abdul-Patah, Pazil; Tosi, Anthony J; Brameier, Markus; Zinner, Dietmar; Roos, Christian

    2015-03-21

    Long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis) are an important model species in biomedical research and reliable knowledge about their evolutionary history is essential for biomedical inferences. Ten subspecies have been recognized, of which most are restricted to small islands of Southeast Asia. In contrast, the common long-tailed macaque (M. f. fascicularis) is distributed over large parts of the Southeast Asian mainland and the Sundaland region. To shed more light on the phylogeny of M. f. fascicularis, we sequenced complete mitochondrial (mtDNA) genomes of 40 individuals from all over the taxon's range, either by classical PCR-amplification and Sanger sequencing or by DNA-capture and high-throughput sequencing. Both laboratory approaches yielded complete mtDNA genomes from M. f. fascicularis with high accuracy and/or coverage. According to our phylogenetic reconstructions, M. f. fascicularis initially diverged into two clades 1.70 million years ago (Ma), with one including haplotypes from mainland Southeast Asia, the Malay Peninsula and North Sumatra (Clade A) and the other, haplotypes from the islands of Bangka, Java, Borneo, Timor, and the Philippines (Clade B). The three geographical populations of Clade A appear as paraphyletic groups, while local populations of Clade B form monophyletic clades with the exception of a Philippine individual which is nested within the Borneo clade. Further, in Clade B the branching pattern among main clades/lineages remains largely unresolved, most likely due to their relatively rapid diversification 0.93-0.84 Ma. Both laboratory methods have proven to be powerful to generate complete mtDNA genome data with similarly high accuracy, with the DNA-capture and high-throughput sequencing approach as the most promising and only practical option to obtain such data from highly degraded DNA, in time and with relatively low costs. The application of complete mtDNA genomes yields new insights into the evolutionary history of M. f

  6. Genetic diversity and natural selection of Plasmodium knowlesi merozoite surface protein 1 paralog gene in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Md Atique; Fauzi, Muh; Han, Eun-Taek

    2018-03-14

    Human infections due to the monkey malaria parasite Plasmodium knowlesi is on the rise in most Southeast Asian countries specifically Malaysia. The C-terminal 19 kDa domain of PvMSP1P is a potential vaccine candidate, however, no study has been conducted in the orthologous gene of P. knowlesi. This study investigates level of polymorphisms, haplotypes and natural selection of full-length pkmsp1p in clinical samples from Malaysia. A total of 36 full-length pkmsp1p sequences along with the reference H-strain and 40 C-terminal pkmsp1p sequences from clinical isolates of Malaysia were downloaded from published genomes. Genetic diversity, polymorphism, haplotype and natural selection were determined using DnaSP 5.10 and MEGA 5.0 software. Genealogical relationships were determined using haplotype network tree in NETWORK software v5.0. Population genetic differentiation index (F ST ) and population structure of parasite was determined using Arlequin v3.5 and STRUCTURE v2.3.4 software. Comparison of 36 full-length pkmsp1p sequences along with the H-strain identified 339 SNPs (175 non-synonymous and 164 synonymous substitutions). The nucleotide diversity across the full-length gene was low compared to its ortholog pvmsp1p. The nucleotide diversity was higher toward the N-terminal domains (pkmsp1p-83 and 30) compared to the C-terminal domains (pkmsp1p-38, 33 and 19). Phylogenetic analysis of full-length genes identified 2 distinct clusters of P. knowlesi from Malaysian Borneo. The 40 pkmsp1p-19 sequences showed low polymorphisms with 16 polymorphisms leading to 18 haplotypes. In total there were 10 synonymous and 6 non-synonymous substitutions and 12 cysteine residues were intact within the two EGF domains. Evidence of strong purifying selection was observed within the full-length sequences as well in all the domains. Shared haplotypes of 40 pkmsp1p-19 were identified within Malaysian Borneo haplotypes. This study is the first to report on the genetic diversity and natural

  7. Do biomass burning aerosols intensify drought in equatorial Asia during El Niño?

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    M. G. Tosca

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available During El Niño years, fires in tropical forests and peatlands in equatorial Asia create large regional smoke clouds. We characterized the sensitivity of these clouds to regional drought, and we investigated their effects on climate by using an atmospheric general circulation model. Satellite observations during 2000–2006 indicated that El Niño-induced regional drought led to increases in fire emissions and, consequently, increases in aerosol optical depths over Sumatra, Borneo and the surrounding ocean. Next, we used the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM to investigate how climate responded to this forcing. We conducted two 30 year simulations in which monthly fire emissions were prescribed for either a high (El Niño, 1997 or low (La Niña, 2000 fire year using a satellite-derived time series of fire emissions. Our simulations included the direct and semi-direct effects of aerosols on the radiation budget within the model. We assessed the radiative and climate effects of anthropogenic fire by analyzing the differences between the high and low fire simulations. Fire aerosols reduced net shortwave radiation at the surface during August–October by 19.1±12.9 W m−2 (10% in a region that encompassed most of Sumatra and Borneo (90° E–120° E, 5° S–5° N. The reductions in net shortwave radiation cooled sea surface temperatures (SSTs and land surface temperatures by 0.5±0.3 and 0.4±0.2 °C during these months. Tropospheric heating from black carbon (BC absorption averaged 20.5±9.3 W m−2 and was balanced by a reduction in latent heating. The combination of decreased SSTs and increased atmospheric heating reduced regional precipitation by 0.9±0.6 mm d−1 (10%. The vulnerability of ecosystems to fire was enhanced because the decreases in precipitation exceeded those for evapotranspiration. Together, the satellite and modeling results imply a possible positive feedback loop in which anthropogenic burning

  8. Do biomass burning aerosols intensify drought in equatorial Asia during El Niño?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tosca, M G; Randerson, J; Zender, C S; Flanner, M G; Rasch, Philip J

    2010-04-16

    During El Niño years, fires in tropical forests and peatlands in equatorial Asia create large regional smoke clouds. We characterized the sensitivity of these clouds to regional drought, and we investigated their effects on climate by using an atmospheric general circulation model. Satellite observations during 2000–2006 indicated that El Niño-induced regional drought led to increases in fire emissions and, consequently, increases in aerosol optical depths over Sumatra, Borneo and the surrounding ocean. Next, we used the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) to investigate how climate responded to this forcing. We conducted two 30 year simulations in which monthly fire emissions were prescribed for either a high (El Niño, 1997) or low (La Niña, 2000) fire year using a satellite-derived time series of fire emissions. Our simulations included the direct and semi-direct effects of aerosols on the radiation budget within the model. We assessed the radiative and climate effects of anthropogenic fire by analyzing the differences between the high and low fire simulations. Fire aerosols reduced net shortwave radiation at the surface during August–October by 19.1±12.9 W m-2 (10%) in a region that encompassed most of Sumatra and Borneo (90° E–120° E, 5° S–5° N). The reductions in net shortwave radiation cooled sea surface temperatures (SSTs) and land surface temperatures by 0.5±0.3 and 0.4±0.2 °C during these months. Tropospheric heating from black carbon (BC) absorption averaged 20.5±9.3 W m-2 and was balanced by a reduction in latent heating. The combination of decreased SSTs and increased atmospheric heating reduced regional precipitation by 0.9±0.6 mm d-1 (10%). The vulnerability of ecosystems to fire was enhanced because the decreases in precipitation exceeded those for evapotranspiration. Together, the satellite and modeling results imply a possible positive feedback loop in which anthropogenic burning in the region

  9. Modelling the species distribution of flat-headed cats (Prionailurus planiceps, an endangered South-East Asian small felid.

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    Andreas Wilting

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The flat-headed cat (Prionailurus planiceps is one of the world's least known, highly threatened felids with a distribution restricted to tropical lowland rainforests in Peninsular Thailand/Malaysia, Borneo and Sumatra. Throughout its geographic range large-scale anthropogenic transformation processes, including the pollution of fresh-water river systems and landscape fragmentation, raise concerns regarding its conservation status. Despite an increasing number of camera-trapping field surveys for carnivores in South-East Asia during the past two decades, few of these studies recorded the flat-headed cat. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we designed a predictive species distribution model using the Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt algorithm to reassess the potential current distribution and conservation status of the flat-headed cat. Eighty-eight independent species occurrence records were gathered from field surveys, literature records, and museum collections. These current and historical records were analysed in relation to bioclimatic variables (WorldClim, altitude (SRTM and minimum distance to larger water resources (Digital Chart of the World. Distance to water was identified as the key predictor for the occurrence of flat-headed cats (>50% explanation. In addition, we used different land cover maps (GLC2000, GlobCover and SarVision LLC for Borneo, information on protected areas and regional human population density data to extract suitable habitats from the potential distribution predicted by the MaxEnt model. Between 54% and 68% of suitable habitat has already been converted to unsuitable land cover types (e.g. croplands, plantations, and only between 10% and 20% of suitable land cover is categorised as fully protected according to the IUCN criteria. The remaining habitats are highly fragmented and only a few larger forest patches remain. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Based on our findings, we recommend that future conservation

  10. The structure and stratigraphy of deepwater Sarawak, Malaysia: Implications for tectonic evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madon, Mazlan; Kim, Cheng Ly; Wong, Robert

    2013-10-01

    The structural-stratigraphic history of the North Luconia Province, Sarawak deepwater area, is related to the tectonic history of the South China Sea. The Sarawak Basin initiated as a foreland basin as a result of the collision of the Luconia continental block with Sarawak (Sarawak Orogeny). The foreland basin was later overridden by and buried under the prograding Oligocene-Recent shelf-slope system. The basin had evolved through a deep foreland basin ('flysch') phase during late Eocene-Oligocene times, followed by post-Oligocene ('molasse') phase of shallow marine shelf progradation to present day. Seismic interpretation reveals a regional Early Miocene Unconformity (EMU) separating pre-Oligocene to Miocene rifted basement from overlying undeformed Upper Miocene-Pliocene bathyal sediments. Seismic, well data and subsidence analysis indicate that the EMU was caused by relative uplift and predominantly submarine erosion between ˜19 and 17 Ma ago. The subsidence history suggests a rift-like subsidence pattern, probably with a foreland basin overprint during the last 10 Ma. Modelling results indicate that the EMU represents a major hiatus in the sedimentation history, with an estimated 500-2600 m of missing section, equivalent to a time gap of 8-10 Ma. The EMU is known to extend over the entire NW Borneo margin and is probably related to the Sabah Orogeny which marks the cessation of sea-floor spreading in the South China Sea and collision of Dangerous Grounds block with Sabah. Gravity modelling indicates a thinned continental crust underneath the Sarawak shelf and slope and supports the seismic and well data interpretation. There is a probable presence of an overthrust wedge beneath the Sarawak shelf, which could be interpreted as a sliver of the Rajang Group accretionary prism. Alternatively, magmatic underplating beneath the Sarawak shelf could equally explain the free-air gravity anomaly. The Sarawak basin was part of a remnant ocean basin that was closed by

  11. Upper Mantle Responses to India-Eurasia Collision in Indochina, Malaysia, and the South China Sea

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    Hongsresawat, S.; Russo, R. M.

    2016-12-01

    We present new shear wave splitting and splitting intensity measurements from SK(K)S phases recorded at seismic stations of the Malaysian National Seismic Network. These results, in conjunction with results from Tibet and Yunnan provide a basis for testing the degree to which Indochina and South China Sea upper mantle fabrics are responses to India-Eurasia collision. Upper mantle fabrics derived from shear wave splitting measurements in Yunnan and eastern Tibet parallel geodetic surface motions north of 26°N, requiring transmission of tractions from upper mantle depths to surface, or consistent deformation boundary conditions throughout the upper 200 km of crust and mantle. Shear wave splitting fast trends and surface velocities diverge in eastern Yunnan and south of 26°N, indicating development of an asthenospheric layer that decouples crust and upper mantle, or corner flow above the subducted Indo-Burma slab. E-W fast shear wave splitting trends southwest of 26°N/104°E indicate strong gradients in any asthenospheric infiltration. Possible upper mantle flow regimes beneath Indochina include development of olivine b-axis anisotropic symmetry due to high strain and hydrous conditions in the syntaxis/Indo-Burma mantle wedge (i.e., southward flow), development of strong upper mantle corner flow in the Indo-Burma wedge with olivine a-axis anisotropic symmetry (i.e., westward flow), and simple asthenospheric flow due to eastward motion of Sundaland shearing underlying asthenosphere. Further south, shear-wave splitting delay times at Malaysian stations vary from 0.5 seconds on the Malay Peninsula to over 2 seconds at stations on Borneo. Splitting fast trends at Borneo stations and Singapore trend NE-SW, but in northern Peninsular Malaysia, the splitting fast polarization direction is NW-SE, parallel to the trend of the Peninsula. Thus, there is a sharp transition from low delay time and NW-SE fast polarization to high delay times and fast polarization directions that

  12. The Occurrence of Hybrid in Nepenthes hookeriana Lindl. from Central Kalimantan can be Detected by RAPD and ISSR Markers

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    KUSUMADEWI SRI YULITA

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Nepenthes spp. (Nepenthaceae is one of the most popular ornamental plants in Southeast Asia. There are 97 species of Nepenthes to which 64 are found in Indonesia with the center of its diversity located in Borneo. N. x hookeriana was hypothesised to be a natural hybrid between N. ampullaria and N. rafflesiana on the basis of morphological characters. Several variants of each species were also known. This present study aimed to detect the occurrence of hybrid within N. x hookeriana ‘spotted’ and ‘green’ variant using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD and inter-simple sequence repeats (ISSR. Five RAPD primers and three ISSR primers were used to amplify total DNA genome and produced 83 polymorphic bands ranging in size from 300-1700 bp. Clustering analysis was performed based on RAPD and ISSR profiles using the UPGMA method. The genetic similarity of the combined markers range between 0.30-0.75 indicating a narrow range of genetic similarity among the accessions. Results from cluster analyses suggested that N. x hookeriana was indeed a hybrid between N. ampullaria and N. Rafflesiana, however it was genetically more similar to N. raflessiana.

  13. Longevity, lignin content and construction cost of the assimilatory organs of Nepenthes species.

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    Osunkoya, Olusegun O; Daud, Siti Dayanawati; Wimmer, Franz L

    2008-11-01

    This study examined level of causal relationships amongst functional traits in leaves and conjoint pitcher cups of the carnivorous Nepenthes species. Physico-chemical properties, especially lignin content, construction costs, and longevity of the assimilatory organs (leaf and pitcher) of a guild of lowland Nepenthes species inhabiting heath and/or peat swamp forests of Brunei, northern Borneo were determined. Longevity of these assimilatory organs was linked significantly to construction cost, lignin content and structural trait of tissue density, but these effects are non-additive. Nitrogen and phosphorus contents (indicators of Rubisco and other photosynthetic proteins), were poor predictors of organ longevity and construction cost, suggesting that a substantial allocation of biomass of the assimilatory organs in Nepenthes is to structural material optimized for prey capture, rigidity and escape from biotic and abiotic stresses rather than to light interception. Leaf payback time - a measure of net carbon revenue - was estimated to be 48-60 d. This is in line with the onset of substantial mortality by 2-3 months of tagged leaves in many of the Nepenthes species examined. However, this is a high ratio (i.e. a longer minimum payback time) compared with what is known for terrestrial, non-carnivorous plants in general (5-30 d). It is concluded that the leaf trait bivariate relationships within the Nepenthes genus, as in other carnivorous species (e.g. Sarraceniaceae), is substantially different from the global relationship documented in the Global Plant Trait Network.

  14. Total flavonoid content and antioxidant activity in leaves and stems extract of cultivated and wild tabat barito (Ficus deltoidea Jack)

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    Manurung, Hetty; Kustiawan, Wawan; Kusuma, Irawan W.; Marjenah

    2017-02-01

    Tabat barito (Ficus deltoidea Jack) is a name given by Dayak Tribe who lived in Borneo-Kalimantan and it is belongs to the moraceae. Almost all of the parts of F. deltoidea plant is widely used as a medicinal property. The total flavonoid content (TFC) and antioxidant activity from cultivated and wild F. deltoidea leaves and stems extract were assessed. Total flavonoid content was estimated by using Aluminium chloride colorimetric method and expressed as catechin equivalents (mg CE g-1 extract) and the antioxidant activity by the DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl hydrazyl) method. The content of total flavonoid of leaves and stems (430.77 and 371.80 µg CE mg-1 extract) of cultivated F. deltoidea were higher than in the wild leaves and stems (114.82 and 66.67 µg CE mg-1 extract). The IC50 of leaves extract of cultivated and wild F. deltoidea, based on the DPPH assay, has a strong antioxidant activity (34.19 and 39.31 µg mL-1 extract) as compared to stems extract. These results showed that the cultivated F. deltoidea are suitable source for medicinal properties and the leaves could be exploited as source of natural antioxidants.

  15. The Brazil of Marianne North: Memories of an English Traveler

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    Ana Lúcia Almeida Gazzola

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Starting from reflections about woman and femininity in the Victorian era, the explosion of literary market in the 19th century, and the access of women to education, literature, and journalism, this text introduces the work of Marianne North, English painter who used to travel aiming to paint the flora of other countries, particularly the exotic tropical flora. Marianne became one of the most famous globetrotter travelers of her time, visiting several countries such as Canada, USA, Jamaica, Brazil, Tenerife, Japan, Borneo, Java, Ceylon, Singapore, India, Wales, Australia, New Zealand, Tasmania, South Africa, Seychelles Islands, and Chile. In total, she left registers of about 272 genres (almost 1000 species of plants, some of them little known by the experts. Hence, the text deals with the dual condition of Marianne North as a painter and author of reports about the visited countries. In Brazil, for instance, she lived between 1972 and 1873. Her professionalism and objectivity distinguish her from the other travelers of 19th century.

  16. Poverty and corruption compromise tropical forest reserves.

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    Wright, S Joseph; Sanchez-Azofeifa, G Arturo; Portillo-Quintero, Carlos; Davies, Diane

    2007-07-01

    We used the global fire detection record provided by the satellite-based Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) to determine the number of fires detected inside 823 tropical and subtropical moist forest reserves and for contiguous buffer areas 5, 10, and 15 km wide. The ratio of fire detection densities (detections per square kilometer) inside reserves to their contiguous buffer areas provided an index of reserve effectiveness. Fire detection density was significantly lower inside reserves than in paired, contiguous buffer areas but varied by five orders of magnitude among reserves. The buffer: reserve detection ratio varied by up to four orders of magnitude among reserves within a single country, and median values varied by three orders of magnitude among countries. Reserves tended to be least effective at reducing fire frequency in many poorer countries and in countries beset by corruption. Countries with the most successful reserves include Costa Rica, Jamaica, Malaysia, and Taiwan and the Indonesian island of Java. Countries with the most problematic reserves include Cambodia, Guatemala, Paraguay, and Sierra Leone and the Indonesian portion of Borneo. We provide fire detection density for 3964 tropical and subtropical reserves and their buffer areas in the hope that these data will expedite further analyses that might lead to improved management of tropical reserves.

  17. Geographical Variation in Community Divergence: Insights from Tropical Forest Monodominance by Ectomycorrhizal Trees.

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    Fukami, Tadashi; Nakajima, Mifuyu; Fortunel, Claire; Fine, Paul V A; Baraloto, Christopher; Russo, Sabrina E; Peay, Kabir G

    2017-08-01

    Convergence occurs in both species traits and community structure, but how convergence at the two scales influences each other remains unclear. To address this question, we focus on tropical forest monodominance, in which a single, often ectomycorrhizal (EM) tree species occasionally dominates forest stands within a landscape otherwise characterized by diverse communities of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) trees. Such monodominance is a striking potential example of community divergence resulting in alternative stable states. However, it is observed only in some tropical regions. A diverse suite of AM and EM trees locally codominate forest stands elsewhere. We develop a hypothesis to explain this geographical difference using a simulation model of plant community assembly. Simulation results suggest that in a region with a few EM species (e.g., South America), EM trees experience strong selection for convergent traits that match the abiotic conditions of the environment. Consequently, EM species successfully compete against other species to form monodominant stands via positive plant-soil feedbacks. By contrast, in a region with many EM species (e.g., Southeast Asia), species maintain divergent traits because of complex plant-soil feedbacks, with no species having traits that enable monodominance. An analysis of plant trait data from Borneo and Peruvian Amazon was inconclusive. Overall, this work highlights the utility of geographical comparison in understanding the relationship between trait convergence and community convergence.

  18. TANGGUNG JAWAB SEKUTU MAATSCHAP TERHADAP PIHAK KE 3 DALAM SUATU PERJANJIAN KONSORSIUM TERKAIT BUBARNYA MAATSCHAP ATAS KEHENDAK PARA SEKUTU (Kasus Perjanjian Konsorsium antara PT Agro Bintang Dharma Nusantara dengan Pemerintah Daerah Balikpapan, Bontang, K

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    Julius Caesar Transon Simorangkir

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The development of society in the field of economy requires laws to regulate economic problems. Scientific developments in the field of economy should be accompanied by regulations that govern them. Dynamic human life resulted in a pattern of life that compound so that the interests of each individual is different, if not set or laid out by the law, there will be cheating in any transaction or trade activity. In the case of procurement of ferry quickly conducted a consortium of several regions in Borneo as Balikpapan, Bontang, Paser, and east Kutai PT Argo Stars Darma Nusantara in terms of cooperation agreements number 021/ABDN-Dir/SPK/X/01 dated October 4th, 2001, for the provision of services fast boats "water jet ferry" Trans East Kalimantan. Based on the above cases occur inequality allies in terms of responsibility to third parties, due to the dissolution of the consortium agreement by the will of some allies. Section 1646, Book IV of the Civil Code to determine the various ways the end of an alliance, one of which is the fellowship ended due to the will of one or several parties. The termination agreement also automatically terminates the agreement made by the parties. However, responsibility for third party does not necessarily come to an end. Responsibility towards third parties stipulated in Article 1642-1645.Keywords: Responsibility Allies, to third parties, the Consortium Agreement

  19. Origin of marginal basins of the NW Pacific and their plate tectonic reconstructions

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    Xu, Junyuan; Ben-Avraham, Zvi; Kelty, Tom; Yu, Ho-Shing

    2014-03-01

    Geometry of basins can indicate their tectonic origin whether they are small or large. The basins of Bohai Gulf, South China Sea, East China Sea, Japan Sea, Andaman Sea, Okhotsk Sea and Bering Sea have typical geometry of dextral pull-apart. The Java, Makassar, Celebes and Sulu Seas basins together with grabens in Borneo also comprise a local dextral, transform-margin type basin system similar to the central and southern parts of the Shanxi Basin in geometry. The overall configuration of the Philippine Sea resembles a typical sinistral transpressional "pop-up" structure. These marginal basins except the Philippine Sea basin generally have similar (or compatible) rift history in the Cenozoic, but there do be some differences in the rifting history between major basins or their sub-basins due to local differences in tectonic settings. Rifting kinematics of each of these marginal basins can be explained by dextral pull-apart or transtension. These marginal basins except the Philippine Sea basin constitute a gigantic linked, dextral pull-apart basin system.

  20. Diversity of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor genes in Indonesian populations of Java, Kalimantan, Timor and Irian Jaya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velickovic, M; Velickovic, Z; Panigoro, R; Dunckley, H

    2009-01-01

    Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) regulate the activity of natural killer and T cells through interactions with specific human leucocyte antigen class I molecules on target cells. Population studies performed over the last several years have established that KIR gene frequencies (GFs) and genotype content vary considerably among different ethnic groups, indicating the extent of KIR diversity, some of which have also shown the effect of the presence or absence of specific KIR genes in human disease. We have determined the frequencies of 16 KIR genes and pseudogenes and genotypes in 193 Indonesian individuals from Java, East Timor, Irian Jaya (western half of the island of New Guinea) and Kalimantan provinces of Indonesian Borneo. All 16 KIR genes were observed in all four populations. Variation in GFs between populations was observed, except for KIR2DL4, KIR3DL2, KIR3DL3, KIR2DP1 and KIR3DP1 genes, which were present in every individual tested. When comparing KIR GFs between populations, both principal component analysis and a phylogenetic tree showed close clustering of the Kalimantan and Javanese populations, while Irianese populations were clearly separated from the other three populations. Our results indicate a high level of KIR polymorphism in Indonesian populations that probably reflects the large geographical spread of the Indonesian archipelago and the complex evolutionary history and population migration in this region.

  1. Behavioral Studies Peptic Ulcer Patients Self-Medication by Visiting Pharmacy in Pontianak

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    Eka K. Untari

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Self-medication practices is now considered as a component of self-care. Gastric ulcer is one of minor symptom that can be treated by self-medication. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence, behavior, and appropriateness of self-medication practice for gastric ulcer or its related symptom amongst population. The population of this study attended community pharmacies in Pontianak of West Borneo province. This study was a cross sectional survey involving 98 adults who did self-medication on peptic ulcer or its related symptom. This study was conducted in 2010. The result of showed that 67.3% of gastric ulcer self-medication practice was appropriate; 66.3% subject used antacida class to treat the symptom; 6.1% participant however, still used antibiotic; and only 27% subject satisfied with the information given during self-medication process. Although self-medication practice for gastric ulcer was often done, some practice might be harmful. Thus, there is a need to educate the community to ensure its safe practices.

  2. It's not just conflict that motivates killing of orangutans.

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    Jacqueline T Davis

    Full Text Available We investigated why orangutans are being killed in Kalimantan, Indonesia, and the role of conflict in these killings. Based on an analysis of interview data from over 5,000 respondents in over 450 villages, we also assessed the socio-ecological factors associated with conflict and non-conflict killings. Most respondents never kill orangutans. Those who reported having personally killed an orangutan primarily did so for non-conflict reasons; for example, 56% of these respondents said that the reason they had killed an orangutan was to eat it. Of the conflict-related reasons for killing, the most common reasons orangutans were killed was fear of orangutans or in self-defence. A similar pattern was evident among reports of orangutan killing by other people in the villages. Regression analyses indicated that religion and the percentage of intact forest around villages were the strongest socio-ecological predictors of whether orangutans were killed for conflict or non-conflict related reasons. Our data indicate that between 44,170 and 66,570 orangutans were killed in Kalimantan within the respondents' active hunting lifetimes: between 12,690 and 29,024 for conflict reasons (95%CI and between 26,361 and 41,688 for non-conflict reasons (95% CI. These findings confirm that habitat protection alone will not ensure the survival of orangutans in Indonesian Borneo, and that effective reduction of orangutan killings is urgently needed.

  3. Quantifying killing of orangutans and human-orangutan conflict in Kalimantan, Indonesia.

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    Erik Meijaard

    Full Text Available Human-orangutan conflict and hunting are thought to pose a serious threat to orangutan existence in Kalimantan, the Indonesian part of Borneo. No data existed prior to the present study to substantiate these threats. We investigated the rates, spatial distribution and causes of conflict and hunting through an interview-based survey in the orangutan's range in Kalimantan, Indonesia. Between April 2008 and September 2009, we interviewed 6983 respondents in 687 villages to obtain socio-economic information, assess knowledge of local wildlife in general and orangutan encounters specifically, and to query respondents about their knowledge on orangutan conflicts and killing, and relevant laws. This survey revealed estimated killing rates of between 750 and 1800 animals killed in the last year, and between 1950 and 3100 animals killed per year on average within the lifetime of the survey respondents. These killing rates are higher than previously thought and are high enough to pose a serious threat to the continued existence of orangutans in Kalimantan. Importantly, the study contributes to our understanding of the spatial variation in threats, and the underlying causes of those threats, which can be used to facilitate the development of targeted conservation management.

  4. Quantifying killing of orangutans and human-orangutan conflict in Kalimantan, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijaard, Erik; Buchori, Damayanti; Hadiprakarsa, Yokyok; Utami-Atmoko, Sri Suci; Nurcahyo, Anton; Tjiu, Albertus; Prasetyo, Didik; Nardiyono; Christie, Lenny; Ancrenaz, Marc; Abadi, Firman; Antoni, I Nyoman Gede; Armayadi, Dedy; Dinato, Adi; Ella; Gumelar, Pajar; Indrawan, Tito P; Kussaritano; Munajat, Cecep; Priyono, C Wawan Puji; Purwanto, Yadi; Puspitasari, Dewi; Putra, M Syukur Wahyu; Rahmat, Abdi; Ramadani, Harri; Sammy, Jim; Siswanto, Dedi; Syamsuri, Muhammad; Andayani, Noviar; Wu, Huanhuan; Wells, Jessie Anne; Mengersen, Kerrie

    2011-01-01

    Human-orangutan conflict and hunting are thought to pose a serious threat to orangutan existence in Kalimantan, the Indonesian part of Borneo. No data existed prior to the present study to substantiate these threats. We investigated the rates, spatial distribution and causes of conflict and hunting through an interview-based survey in the orangutan's range in Kalimantan, Indonesia. Between April 2008 and September 2009, we interviewed 6983 respondents in 687 villages to obtain socio-economic information, assess knowledge of local wildlife in general and orangutan encounters specifically, and to query respondents about their knowledge on orangutan conflicts and killing, and relevant laws. This survey revealed estimated killing rates of between 750 and 1800 animals killed in the last year, and between 1950 and 3100 animals killed per year on average within the lifetime of the survey respondents. These killing rates are higher than previously thought and are high enough to pose a serious threat to the continued existence of orangutans in Kalimantan. Importantly, the study contributes to our understanding of the spatial variation in threats, and the underlying causes of those threats, which can be used to facilitate the development of targeted conservation management.

  5. Quantifying Killing of Orangutans and Human-Orangutan Conflict in Kalimantan, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijaard, Erik; Buchori, Damayanti; Hadiprakarsa, Yokyok; Utami-Atmoko, Sri Suci; Nurcahyo, Anton; Tjiu, Albertus; Prasetyo, Didik; Nardiyono; Christie, Lenny; Ancrenaz, Marc; Abadi, Firman; Antoni, I Nyoman Gede; Armayadi, Dedy; Dinato, Adi; Ella; Gumelar, Pajar; Indrawan, Tito P.; Kussaritano; Munajat, Cecep; Priyono, C. Wawan Puji; Purwanto, Yadi; Puspitasari, Dewi; Putra, M. Syukur Wahyu; Rahmat, Abdi; Ramadani, Harri; Sammy, Jim; Siswanto, Dedi; Syamsuri, Muhammad; Andayani, Noviar; Wu, Huanhuan; Wells, Jessie Anne; Mengersen, Kerrie

    2011-01-01

    Human-orangutan conflict and hunting are thought to pose a serious threat to orangutan existence in Kalimantan, the Indonesian part of Borneo. No data existed prior to the present study to substantiate these threats. We investigated the rates, spatial distribution and causes of conflict and hunting through an interview-based survey in the orangutan's range in Kalimantan, Indonesia. Between April 2008 and September 2009, we interviewed 6983 respondents in 687 villages to obtain socio-economic information, assess knowledge of local wildlife in general and orangutan encounters specifically, and to query respondents about their knowledge on orangutan conflicts and killing, and relevant laws. This survey revealed estimated killing rates of between 750 and 1800 animals killed in the last year, and between 1950 and 3100 animals killed per year on average within the lifetime of the survey respondents. These killing rates are higher than previously thought and are high enough to pose a serious threat to the continued existence of orangutans in Kalimantan. Importantly, the study contributes to our understanding of the spatial variation in threats, and the underlying causes of those threats, which can be used to facilitate the development of targeted conservation management. PMID:22096582

  6. Utility of COX1 phylogenetics to differentiate between locally acquired and imported Plasmodium knowlesi infections in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Jin Phang; Gao, Qiu Han Christine; Lee, Vernon J; Tetteh, Kevin; Drakeley, Chris

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Although there have been several phylogenetic studies on Plasmodium knowlesi (P. knowlesi), only cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (COX1) gene analysis has shown some geographical differentiation between the isolates of different countries. METHODS Phylogenetic analysis of locally acquired P. knowlesi infections, based on circumsporozoite, small subunit ribosomal ribonucleic acid (SSU rRNA), merozoite surface protein 1 and COX1 gene targets, was performed. The results were compared with the published sequences of regional isolates from Malaysia and Thailand. RESULTS Phylogenetic analysis of the circumsporozoite, SSU rRNA and merozoite surface protein 1 gene sequences for regional P. knowlesi isolates showed no obvious differentiation that could be attributed to their geographical origin. However, COX1 gene analysis showed that it was possible to differentiate between Singapore-acquired P. knowlesi infections and P. knowlesi infections from Peninsular Malaysia and Sarawak, Borneo, Malaysia. CONCLUSION The ability to differentiate between locally acquired P. knowlesi infections and imported P. knowlesi infections has important utility for the monitoring of P. knowlesi malaria control programmes in Singapore. PMID:26805667

  7. The impact of tropical forest logging and oil palm agriculture on the soil microbiome.

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    Tripathi, Binu M; Edwards, David P; Mendes, Lucas William; Kim, Mincheol; Dong, Ke; Kim, Hyoki; Adams, Jonathan M

    2016-05-01

    Selective logging and forest conversion to oil palm agriculture are rapidly altering tropical forests. However, functional responses of the soil microbiome to these land-use changes are poorly understood. Using 16S rRNA gene and shotgun metagenomic sequencing, we compared composition and functional attributes of soil biota between unlogged, once-logged and twice-logged rainforest, and areas converted to oil palm plantations in Sabah, Borneo. Although there was no significant effect of logging history, we found a significant difference between the taxonomic and functional composition of both primary and logged forests and oil palm. Oil palm had greater abundances of genes associated with DNA, RNA, protein metabolism and other core metabolic functions, but conversely, lower abundance of genes associated with secondary metabolism and cell-cell interactions, indicating less importance of antagonism or mutualism in the more oligotrophic oil palm environment. Overall, these results show a striking difference in taxonomic composition and functional gene diversity of soil microorganisms between oil palm and forest, but no significant difference between primary forest and forest areas with differing logging history. This reinforces the view that logged forest retains most features and functions of the original soil community. However, networks based on strong correlations between taxonomy and functions showed that network complexity is unexpectedly increased due to both logging and oil palm agriculture, which suggests a pervasive effect of both land-use changes on the interaction of soil microbes. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Increasing land-use intensity reverses the relative occupancy of two quadrupedal scavengers.

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    Joshua P Twining

    Full Text Available Human land use is continuously altering the natural environment, yet the greater ecological implications of this change for many groups that are key to healthy ecosystem functioning remains uncharacterised in the tropics. Terrestrial scavenging vertebrates are one such group, providing integral ecosystem services through the removal of carrion which is a crucial component of both nutrient cycling and disease dynamics. To explore how anthropogenic processes may affect forest scavengers, we investigated the changes in the relative occupancy of two important terrestrial scavengers along a gradient of land use intensity, ranging from protected forest to oil palm plantation in Borneo. We found the Malay civet (Viverra tangalunga had highest, albeit variable, occupancy in areas of low land use intensity and the Southeast Asian water monitor (Varanus salvator macromaculatus had highest occupancy in areas of high land use intensity. Land use had no effect on the combined occupancy of the two species. In high land use intensity sites, individual water monitors were larger and had better body condition, but at population level had a highly biased sex ratio with more males than females and increased signs of intraspecific conflict. We did not assess scavenging rate or efficiency as a process, but the high occupancy rates and apparent health of the scavengers in high land use intensity landscapes suggests this ecological process is robust to land use change.

  9. Future malaria spatial pattern based on the potential global warming impact in South and Southeast Asia

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    Hassan M. Khormi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We used the Model for Interdisciplinary Research on Climate-H climate model with the A2 Special Report on Emissions Scenarios for the years 2050 and 2100 and CLIMEX software for projections to illustrate the potential impact of climate change on the spatial distributions of malaria in China, India, Indochina, Indonesia, and The Philippines based on climate variables such as temperature, moisture, heat, cold and dryness. The model was calibrated using data from several knowledge domains, including geographical distribution records. The areas in which malaria has currently been detected are consistent with those showing high values of the ecoclimatic index in the CLIMEX model. The match between prediction and reality was found to be high. More than 90% of the observed malaria distribution points were associated with the currently known suitable climate conditions. Climate suitability for malaria is projected to decrease in India, southern Myanmar, southern Thailand, eastern Borneo, and the region bordering Cambodia, Malaysia and the Indonesian islands, while it is expected to increase in southern and south-eastern China and Taiwan. The climatic models for Anopheles mosquitoes presented here should be useful for malaria control, monitoring, and management, particularly considering these future climate scenarios.

  10. Selective logging in tropical forests decreases the robustness of liana-tree interaction networks to the loss of host tree species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magrach, Ainhoa; Senior, Rebecca A; Rogers, Andrew; Nurdin, Deddy; Benedick, Suzan; Laurance, William F; Santamaria, Luis; Edwards, David P

    2016-03-16

    Selective logging is one of the major drivers of tropical forest degradation, causing important shifts in species composition. Whether such changes modify interactions between species and the networks in which they are embedded remain fundamental questions to assess the 'health' and ecosystem functionality of logged forests. We focus on interactions between lianas and their tree hosts within primary and selectively logged forests in the biodiversity hotspot of Malaysian Borneo. We found that lianas were more abundant, had higher species richness, and different species compositions in logged than in primary forests. Logged forests showed heavier liana loads disparately affecting slow-growing tree species, which could exacerbate the loss of timber value and carbon storage already associated with logging. Moreover, simulation scenarios of host tree local species loss indicated that logging might decrease the robustness of liana-tree interaction networks if heavily infested trees (i.e. the most connected ones) were more likely to disappear. This effect is partially mitigated in the short term by the colonization of host trees by a greater diversity of liana species within logged forests, yet this might not compensate for the loss of preferred tree hosts in the long term. As a consequence, species interaction networks may show a lagged response to disturbance, which may trigger sudden collapses in species richness and ecosystem function in response to additional disturbances, representing a new type of 'extinction debt'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  11. IMPAK - 1/2003 issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    IMPAK is quarterly bulletin of the Department of Environment, Malaysia. In this issue, IMPAK's provide the details on Sub Regional Fire Fighting Arrangements (SRFAs) Fire and Haze Disaster Table Top Exercise, which was held on 29-30 July 2003 in Jakarta Indonesia. Four feature articles were reported in this issue - (I) Haze: What You Should Know What You Should Do, (II) Indoor Air Quality and the Environment explained the relation between indoor airs qualities is affected by outdoors environment, (III) Peatland: Use and Conservation - is an extensive research on maintaining peatland due to its importance in our ecosystem. To increase readers' knowledge on peatland, the fourth article is Peat Fire Outbreaks, more information to combating fire in peatland. In the ASEAN News section, three activities joined by DOE; ASEAN agreement on Transboundary Haze Pollution (ASEAN Haze Agreement), the 13th Joint Meeting of the ASEAN Working Groups on Sub Regional Fire Fighting Arrangements (SRFAs) for Sumatera and Borneo, Jambi, Indonesia and Summary of the Asean Environment Ministers' Forum on Land and Forest Fire Hazards

  12. Phylogeny and host-plant relationships of the Australian Myrtaceae leafmining moth genus Pectinivalva (Lepidoptera, Nepticulidae), with new subgenera and species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoare, Robert J.B.; van Nieukerken, Erik J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The phylogeny of the mainly Australian nepticulid genus Pectinivalva Scoble, 1983 is investigated on the basis of morphology, and a division into three monophyletic subgenera is proposed on the basis of these results. These subgenera (Pectinivalva, Casanovula Hoare, subgen. n. and Menurella Hoare, subgen. n. ) are described and diagnosed, the described species of Pectinivalva are assigned to them, and representative new species are described in each: Pectinivalva (Pectinivalva) mystaconota Hoare, sp. n., Pectinivalva (Casanovula) brevipalpa Hoare, sp. n., Pectinivalva (Casanovula) minotaurus Hoare, sp. n., Pectinivalva (Menurella) scotodes Hoare, sp. n., Pectinivalva (Menurella) acmenae Hoare, sp. n., Pectinivalva (Menurella) xenadelpha Van Nieukerken & Hoare, sp. n., Pectinivalva (Menurella) quintiniae Hoare & Van Nieukerken, sp. n., and Pectinivalva (Menurella) tribulatrix Van Nieukerken & Hoare, sp. n. Pectinivalva (Menurella) quintiniae (from Quintinia verdonii, Paracryphiaceae) is the first known member of the genus with a host-plant not belonging to Myrtaceae. Pectinivalva (Menurella) xenadelpha from Mt Gunung Lumut, Kalimantan, Borneo, is the first pectinivalvine reported from outside Australia. Keys to the subgenera of Nepticulidae known from Australia, based on adults, male and female genitalia, and larvae, are presented. Host-plant relationships of Pectinivalva are discussed with relation to the phylogeny, and a list of known host-plants of Pectinivalva, including hosts of undescribed species, is presented. DNA barcodes are provided for most of the new and several unnamed species. PMID:23794827

  13. Sea level rise along Malaysian coasts due to the climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luu, Quang-Hung; Tkalich, Pavel; Tay, Tzewei

    2015-04-01

    Malaysia consists of two major parts, a mainland on the Peninsular Malaysia and the East Malaysia on the Borneo Island. Their surrounding waters connect the Andaman Sea located northeast of the Indian Ocean to the Celebes Sea in the western tropical Pacific Ocean through the southern East Sea of Vietnam/South China Sea. As a result, inter-annual sea level in the Malaysian waters is governed by various regional phenomena associated with the adjacent parts of the Indian and Pacific Oceans. We estimated sea level rise (SLR) rate in the domain using tide gauge records often being gappy. To reconstruct the missing data, two methods are used: (i) correlating sea level with climate indices El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD), and (ii) filling the gap using records of neighboring tide gauges. Latest vertical land movements have been acquired to derive geocentric SLR rates. Around the Peninsular Malaysia, geocentric SLR rates in waters of Malacca Strait and eastern Peninsular Malaysia during 1986-2011 are found to be 3.9±3.3 mm/year and 4.2 ± 2.5 mm/year, respectively; while in the East Malaysia waters the rate during 1988-2011 is 6.3 ± 4.0 mm/year. These rates are arguably higher than global tendency for the same periods. For the overlapping period 1993-2011, the rates are consistent with those obtained using satellite altimetry.

  14. Revision of the enigmatic Southeast Asian spider genus Savarna (Araneae, Pholcidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard A. Huber

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The genus Savarna Huber, 2005 was previously one of the most poorly known Pholcinae genera. Less than 20 specimens (representing four nominal species were available worldwide; nothing was known about ultrastructure, natural history, or relationships. We present the first SEM data, supporting the position of the genus in Pholcinae outside the Pholcus group of genera and weakly suggesting a closer relationship with the genera Khorata Huber, 2005, Spermophorides Wunderlich, 1992, and two undescribed species of unknown affinity from Borneo. We provide the first data about microhabitat, web structure, and reaction to disturbance. We clarify the type locality of Savarna tessellata (Simon, 1901 (“Jalor, Biserat” and describe topotypical material. We describe the previously unknown male of Spermophora miser Bristowe, 1952 and transfer the species (that was previously considered incertae sedis to Savarna as Savarna miser (Bristowe, 1952 comb. nov. Savarna baso (Roewer, 1963 is newly synonymized with S. miser. We newly describe the most northern species in the genus, Savarna kaeo sp. nov., and provide amendments to the descriptions of all previously described species.

  15. In situ measurements of isoprene and monoterpenes within a south-east Asian tropical rainforest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. E. Jones

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs emitted from tropical rainforests comprise a substantial fraction of global atmospheric VOC emissions, however there are only relatively limited measurements of these species in tropical rainforest regions. We present observations of isoprene, α-pinene, camphene, Δ-3-carene, γ-terpinene and limonene, as well as oxygenated VOCs (OVOCs of biogenic origin such as methacrolein, in ambient air above a tropical rainforest in Malaysian Borneo during the Oxidant and Particle Photochemical Processes above a south-east Asian tropical rainforest (OP3 project in 2008. Daytime composition was dominated by isoprene, with an average mixing ratio of the order of ~1 ppb. γ-terpinene, limonene and camphene were the most abundant monoterpenes, with average daytime mixing ratios of 102, 71 and 66 ppt respectively, and with an average monoterpene toisoprene ratio of 0.3 during sunlit hours, compared to 2.0 at night. Limonene and camphene abundances were seen to be related to both temperature and light conditions. In contrast, γ-terpinene emission continued into the late afternoon/evening, under relatively low temperature and light conditions. The contributions of isoprene, monoterpenes and other classes of VOC to the volatile carbon budget and OH reactivity have been summarised for this rainforest location. We observe good agreement between surface and aircraft measurements of boundary layer isoprene and methacrolein above the natural rainforest, suggesting that the ground-level observations are broadly representative of isoprene emissions from this region.

  16. Student's Need Analysis for the Development of Chemistry Modules Based Guided Inquiry to Improve Science Process Skill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Arantika

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Science process skills (SPS are an important aspect of learning science. SPS help students to develop creativity in learning. Process skills such as observing, formulating questions, interpreting, experimenting, hypothesizing, applying concepts, and communicating. This study aims to analyze the need for development resources needs of science filled with science process skills. Requirement analysis of the development of teaching materials with the skill of the process of science needs to be done because the textbook is the reference a teacher in the class. The subjects matter of chemistry the study was three senior high schools in Sambas, West Borneo. Needs analysis conducted using a qualitative approach, in terms of needs in classroom learning and content of process skills on teaching materials. Data were collected by interviews and questionnaires were analyzed descriptively. The results showed that as many as 27 percents of students perceive the book used in learning has not yet trained the science process skills. As many as 73 percents of students perceive that they need instructional materials in the form of inquiry-based chemistry modules to improve science process skills. Modules are developed based guided inquiry for having guided inquiry learning stages that can practice students' science process skills.

  17. AHP 35: Review Essay: COMPARATIVE BORDERLANDS ACROSS DISCIPLINES AND ACROSS SOUTHEAST ASIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William B. Noseworthy

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Early in the colonial period, many studies examining upland Southeast Asia focused on ethnography and ecology as a means for the colonial state to better understand the region's geography. This process resulted in the construction of physical, social, and intellectual boundaries that sought to maintain control of the colonial enterprise. The natural borderlands of the region defied such easy definition – the highlands, the plains at the edges of deltas, and heavily forested regions – became a fascination of colonial study. In the climate of pending Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN integration, which promises to begin the process of loosening restrictions for border crossing between Southeast Asian states by area residents, the study of borderlands has risen again. Because many of these border areas have pockets of highlands culture, continued study of the uplands is particularly relevant to deepening an understanding of the region. This review of several books on the Southeast Asian uplands explores historical and cultural strategies of individuals, particularly in Laos, Thailand, Vietnam, the Dayak community on the island of Borneo, and the Cham community in Vietnam and Cambodia, as well as some of the challenges that they face regarding 'the borderlands'. Putting these studies in conversation can help develop an interdisciplinary dialogue between scholars in Anthropology, Political Science, Linguistics, Ethnomusicology, and History, allowing for a more integrated international perspective.

  18. Analisis Energi dan Sebaran Suhu pada Gasifier Unggun Tetap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogi Sirodz Gaos

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Performance test of Imbert Downdraft Gesifier by using cyclone as an auxiliary for tar filtering has been conducted with three kinds of feeding chips, i. e; borneo wood, tamarind wood and leucena wood. The research has been developed to support as an energy source for combined heat power generation. Gesifier will be coupled to diesel generating set and waste heat from the exhaust gas will be used as energy source for an adsorption type refrigeration system. The test had produced the best combustible gas with the chemical composition CO = 55,59 %, CH4 = 0,14 %, C2H6 = 0,3 % and C3H8= 0, 08 %. The maximum temperature 1142 oC has been found in oxidation zone based on the leucena wood test, meanwhile the calculation result of energy availability for the combustible gas was 60,39 kW and specific energy availability was 0,082 kg/kWh. The test result of temperature distribution along the reactor compare to numerical solution of mathemathicai modelling has got the similar curve.

  19. Designing multifunctional landscapes for forest conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santika, Truly; Meijaard, Erik; Wilson, Kerrie A.

    2015-11-01

    A multifunctional landscape approach to forest protection has been advocated for tropical countries. Designing such landscapes necessitates that the role of different land uses in protecting forest be evaluated, along with the spatial interactions between land uses. However, such evaluations have been hindered by a lack of suitable analysis methodologies and data with fine spatial resolution over long time periods. We demonstrate the utility of a matching method with multiple categories to evaluate the role of alternative land uses in protecting forest. We also assessed the impact of land use change trajectories on the rate of deforestation. We employed data from Kalimantan (Indonesian Borneo) at three different time periods during 2000-2012 to illustrate our approach. Four single land uses (protected areas (PA), natural forest logging concessions (LC), timber plantation concessions (TC) and oil-palm plantation concessions (OC)) and two mixed land uses (mixed concessions and the overlap between concessions and PA) were assessed. The rate of deforestation was found to be lowest for PA, followed by LC. Deforestation rates for all land uses tended to be highest for locations that share the characteristics of areas in which TC or OC are located (e.g. degraded areas), suggesting that these areas are inherently more susceptible to deforestation due to foregone opportunities. Our approach provides important insights into how multifunctional landscapes can be designed to enhance the protection of biodiversity.

  20. The avian fossil record in Insular Southeast Asia and its implications for avian biogeography and palaeoecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanneke J.M. Meijer

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Excavations and studies of existing collections during the last decades have significantly increased the abundance as well as the diversity of the avian fossil record for Insular Southeast Asia. The avian fossil record covers the Eocene through the Holocene, with the majority of bird fossils Pleistocene in age. Fossil bird skeletal remains represent at least 63 species in 54 genera and 27 families, and two ichnospecies are represented by fossil footprints. Birds of prey, owls and swiftlets are common elements. Extinctions seem to have been few, suggesting continuity of avian lineages since at least the Late Pleistocene, although some shifts in species ranges have occurred in response to climatic change. Similarities between the Late Pleistocene avifaunas of Flores and Java suggest a dispersal route across southern Sundaland. Late Pleistocene assemblages of Niah Cave (Borneo and Liang Bua (Flores support the rainforest refugium hypothesis in Southeast Asia as they indicate the persistence of forest cover, at least locally, throughout the Late Pleistocene and Holocene.

  1. Trophic flexibility and the persistence of understory birds in intensively logged rainforest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, David P; Woodcock, Paul; Newton, Rob J; Edwards, Felicity A; Andrews, David J R; Docherty, Teegan D S; Mitchell, Simon L; Ota, Takahiro; Benedick, Suzan; Bottrell, Simon H; Hamer, Keith C

    2013-10-01

    Effects of logging on species composition in tropical rainforests are well known but may fail to reveal key changes in species interactions. We used nitrogen stable-isotope analysis of 73 species of understory birds to quantify trophic responses to repeated intensive logging of rainforest in northern Borneo and to test 4 hypotheses: logging has significant effects on trophic positions and trophic-niche widths of species, and the persistence of species in degraded forest is related to their trophic positions and trophic-niche widths in primary forest. Species fed from higher up the food chain and had narrower trophic-niche widths in degraded forest. Species with narrow trophic-niche widths in primary forest were less likely to persist after logging, a result that indicates a higher vulnerability of dietary specialists to local extinction following habitat disturbance. Persistence of species in degraded forest was not related to a species' trophic position. These results indicate changes in trophic organization that were not apparent from changes in species composition and highlight the importance of focusing on trophic flexibility over the prevailing emphasis on membership of static feeding guilds. Our results thus support the notion that alterations to trophic organization and interactions within tropical forests may be a pervasive and functionally important hidden effect of forest degradation. © 2013 Society for Conservation Biology.

  2. Revealing transboundary and local air pollutant sources affecting Metro Manila through receptor modeling studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pabroa, Preciosa Corazon B.; Bautista VII, Angel T.; Santos, Flora L.; Racho, Joseph Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    Ambient fine particulate matter (PM 2 .5) levels at the Metro Manila air sampling stations of the Philippine Nuclear Research Research Institute were found to be above the WHO guideline value of 10 μg m 3 indicating, in general, very poor air quality in the area. The elemental components of the fine particulate matter were obtained using the energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometry. Positive matrix factorization, a receptor modelling tool, was used to identify and apportion air pollution sources. Location of probable transboundary air pollutants were evaluated using HYSPLIT (Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory Model) while location of probable local air pollutant sources were determined using the conditional probability function (CPF). Air pollutant sources can either be natural or anthropogenic. This study has shown natural air pollutant sources such as volcanic eruptions from Bulusan volcano in 2006 and from Anatahan volcano in 2005 to have impacted on the region. Fine soils was shown to have originated from China's Mu US Desert some time in 2004. Smoke in the fine fraction in 2006 show indications of coming from forest fires in Sumatra and Borneo. Fine particulate Pb in Valenzuela was shown to be coming from the surrounding area. Many more significant air pollution impacts can be evaluated with the identification of probable air pollutant sources with the use of elemental fingerprints and locating these sources with the use of HYSPLIT and CPF. (author)

  3. Implementing the problem-based learning in order to improve the students’ HOTS and characters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jailani Jailani

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The study was to describe the implementation of Problem-Based Learning (PBL toward the improvement of students’ Higher Order Thinking Skill (HOTS and characters and to describe the obstacles that had been encountered within the implementation. The study was a mixed research that made use of concurrent mixed method design. The population in the study was the students from eight junior high schools that had been selected from six provinces in Indonesia namely the Yogyakarta Special Region, Bengkulu, South Borneo, West Nusa Tenggara, Southeast Sulawesi and Papua. There were 648 students who had been selected randomly from these schools. The researchers conducted the PBL process within the experimental classes and the expository learning process within the eight control classes. The data gathering process was conducted through the test, the self-assessment and the open questionnaire. The quantitative data analysis was conducted inferentially using multivariate and univariate analysis, while the qualitative data analysis was conducted descriptively. The results of the study showed that: (1 the implementation of PBL had been more effective in comparison to the expository one in terms improving the students’ HOTS; (2 the implementation of PBL had not been more effective in comparison to the expository one in terms of improving the students’ characters; and (3 in overall the obstacles that had been encountered within the implementation of PBL process were related to the teachers’ unpreparedness, the time allocation, the unequal students’ input, the students’ learning habits and the difficult assessment.

  4. Ants use odour cues to exploit fig-fig wasp interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatz, Bertrand; Hossaert-McKey, Martine

    2010-01-01

    Fig wasps may constitute a relatively abundant food source for ants associated with the fig-fig wasp nursery pollination mutualism. We found previously that a Mediterranean ant species detects fig wasps by chemical signals. In this paper we want to test the generality of this finding by studying two tropical ants, Oecophylla smaragdina and Crematogaster sp., preying on fig wasps on the dioecious Ficus fistulosa in Brunei (Borneo). Behavioural tests in a Y-tube olfactometer showed that these two ants were attracted both to odours emitted by receptive figs and to those emitted by fig wasps (male and female of the pollinator, and a non-pollinating fig wasp) used here as a kairomone. Naïve workers were not attracted to fig wasps, suggesting that olfactory learning may play a role in prey detection. We also found that O. smaragdina was much more likely to be present on figs of male trees (where fig wasps are more abundant), and that the abundance of this ant species varied strongly with developmental phase of figs on individual trees. Moreover, its aggressiveness was also strongly influenced by the nature of the object presented in our behavioural tests, the site of the test and the developmental phase of the fig tested. Investigation on the chemical and behavioural ecology of the different interacting species provides important insights into the intricate relationships supported by the fig-fig wasp mutualism.

  5. BANJARESE GREETINGS SYSTEM IN DISTRICT KAPUAS OF CENTRAL KALIMANTAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indra Perdana

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Research on the study of the use of greeting in Banjarese which stay in Kapuas District of Central Borneo.This Research focused to describe the greeting word used by the people, particularly the greeting word in Banjarese used by the first generetion in Kapuas. The research method used is descriptive qualitative. Data collection by observation with a look at, involved notes. Sources of research data used is the preference of all speech that is displayed by 1 Aged over 30 years, 2 Native language studied. 3 Knowing its own culture, 4 The Banjarese are the first generation derived from Banjarmasin, 5 The Banjarese who had lived in Kapuas. Based on this research shows 1 Greetings kinship to greet our parents (father + mother → (+ Uma Abah; Greetings kinship parents to greet our father and mother (grandfather + grandmother → (kai + nini; Greetings kinship to greet parents our grandparents are corrected; Greetings kinship to greet both parents protested was waring; Greetings kinship to say hello (brother + sister → (kaka + ading. Greetings kinship to say hello if our children have children (grandchildren → (grandchildren; Greetings kinship to say hello if we have children and grandchildren is a great-grandfather. And 2 The system of daily greeting, to call people who may be called ikam lifetime, lives. I use the word, unda to appoint themselves. As for honor or call older used the word pian, and said ulun to appoint its own self.

  6. Global forest loss disproportionately erodes biodiversity in intact landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betts, Matthew G; Wolf, Christopher; Ripple, William J; Phalan, Ben; Millers, Kimberley A; Duarte, Adam; Butchart, Stuart H M; Levi, Taal

    2017-07-27

    Global biodiversity loss is a critical environmental crisis, yet the lack of spatial data on biodiversity threats has hindered conservation strategies. Theory predicts that abrupt biodiversity declines are most likely to occur when habitat availability is reduced to very low levels in the landscape (10-30%). Alternatively, recent evidence indicates that biodiversity is best conserved by minimizing human intrusion into intact and relatively unfragmented landscapes. Here we use recently available forest loss data to test deforestation effects on International Union for Conservation of Nature Red List categories of extinction risk for 19,432 vertebrate species worldwide. As expected, deforestation substantially increased the odds of a species being listed as threatened, undergoing recent upgrading to a higher threat category and exhibiting declining populations. More importantly, we show that these risks were disproportionately high in relatively intact landscapes; even minimal deforestation has had severe consequences for vertebrate biodiversity. We found little support for the alternative hypothesis that forest loss is most detrimental in already fragmented landscapes. Spatial analysis revealed high-risk hot spots in Borneo, the central Amazon and the Congo Basin. In these regions, our model predicts that 121-219 species will become threatened under current rates of forest loss over the next 30 years. Given that only 17.9% of these high-risk areas are formally protected and only 8.9% have strict protection, new large-scale conservation efforts to protect intact forests are necessary to slow deforestation rates and to avert a new wave of global extinctions.

  7. A Greenhouse Gas Balance of Electricity Production from Co-firing Palm Oil Products from Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wicke, B.; Dornburg, V.; Faaij, A.; Junginger, M.

    2007-05-01

    The Netherlands imports significant quantities of biomass for energy production, among which palm oil has been used increasingly for co-firing in existing gas-fired power plants for renewable electricity production. Imported biomass, however, can not simply be considered a sustainable energy source. The production and removal of biomass in other places in the world result in ecological, land-use and socio-economic impacts and in GHG emissions (e.g. for transportation). As a result of the sustainability discussions, the Cramer Commission in the Netherlands has formulated (draft) criteria and indicators for sustainable biomass production. This study develops a detailed methodology for determining the GHG balance of co-firing palm oil products in the Netherlands based on the Cramer Commission methodology. The methodology is applied to a specific bio-electricity chain: the production of palm oil and a palm oil derivative, palm fatty acid distillate (PFAD), in Northeast Borneo in Malaysia, their transport to the Netherlands and co-firing with natural gas for electricity production at the Essent Claus power plant

  8. Co-benefits of sustainable forest management in biodiversity conservation and carbon sequestration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuo Imai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sustainable forest management (SFM, which has been recently introduced to tropical natural production forests, is beneficial in maintaining timber resources, but information about the co-benefits for biodiversity conservation and carbon sequestration is currently lacking. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We estimated the diversity of medium to large-bodied forest-dwelling vertebrates using a heat-sensor camera trapping system and the amount of above-ground, fine-roots, and soil organic carbon by a combination of ground surveys and aerial-imagery interpretations. This research was undertaken both in SFM applied as well as conventionally logged production forests in Sabah, Malaysian Borneo. Our carbon estimation revealed that the application of SFM resulted in a net gain of 54 Mg C ha(-1 on a landscape scale. Overall vertebrate diversity was greater in the SFM applied forest than in the conventionally logged forest. Specifically, several vertebrate species (6 out of recorded 36 species showed higher frequency in the SFM applied forest than in the conventionally logged forest. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The application of SFM to degraded natural production forests could result in greater diversity and abundance of vertebrate species as well as increasing carbon storage in the tropical rain forest ecosystems.

  9. BEBERAPA TUMBUHAN OBAT ASAL KALIMANTAN TIMUR SEBAGAI SUMBER SAPONIN POTENSIAL

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    Laode Rijai

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Saponin is a class of natural compounds that have activity that is strongly associated with utilization in pharmacy. Exploration has been carried out against a number of secondary metabolite content of medicinal plants in East Kalimantan and some of them found to contain saponins. Plants were found to contain saponins and are considered potential Kokang leaf (Lepisanthes amoena, Kesumbakeling leaf (Bixa orellana, L, Belimbing Wuluh leaf (Averrhoa bilimbi L., Sugi Gadjah leaf (Hyptis capitata, Karamunting leaf (Melastoma malabathricum L, Cempedak bark (Artocarpus champeden, Wijaya Kusuma leaf (Epiphyllum oxipetalum, Langsat seeds (Lansium domesticum, ekor kucing leaf (Acalypha hispida, Kelor bark (Moringa oleifera, Jarong leaf (Stachytarpheta mutabilis, Miana leaf (Coleus atropureus, Jengger Ayam leaf (Celosia cristata, and fruit of Libo (Ficus vargelata. Key words : East borneo medicinal plants, saponins   Abstrak Saponin adalah golongan senyawa alami yang memiliki aktivitas yang sangat terkait dengan pemanfaatan dalam bidang farmasi. Telah dilakukan eksplorasi kandungan metabolit sekunder  terhadap sejumlah tumbuhan obat yang ada di Kalimantan Timur dan beberapa diantaranya terbukti mengandung saponin. Tumbuhan-tumbuhan yang terbukti mengandung sponin dan dianggap potensial adalah daun Kokang (Lepisanthes amoena, daun Kesumbakeling (Bixa orellana, L, daun Belimbing Wuluh (Averrhoa bilimbi L., daun Sugi Gadjah (Hyptis capitata, daun Karamunting (Melastoma malabathricum L, kulit batang Cempedak (Artocarpus champeden, daun Wijaya Kusuma (Epiphyllum oxipetalum, biji Langsat (Lansium domesticum, daun ekor kucing (Acalypha hispida, Kulit Batang Kelor (Moringa oleifera, daun Jarong (Stachytarpheta mutabilis, daun Miana (Coleus atropureus, daun Jengger Ayam (Celosia cristata, buah Libo (Ficus vargelata. Kata Kunci: Tumbuhan Obat Kaltim; Saponin

  10. Producer farmer’s sovereignty in dry land and swamps areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhaeti, RN; Wahyuni, S.

    2018-01-01

    Farmers could perform their farming if they have sovereignty on their farming production inputs and marketing. Suboptimal land, such as dry land and swamps areas have good prospect if applying appropriate technologies. A research in 2015, on status of farmers’ sovereignty, had been conducted in Piani and North Candi Laras Subdistricts, Tapin District, South Borneo Province, representing swamp land and dry land respectively. Data and information were obtained through interviewing related agencies at provincial and district levels and 30 units of farmer’s households. The primary and secondary data were analyzed descriptively. The research results showed that farmers in swamps and dry land were categorized as large farmers and had sovereignty over the land and production. Water shortage and excessive in both land types could be overcome by giving access on appropriate technology such as programs making farmers improve their farming techniques and providing levees. In addition, land certification program, farming expansion and constructing new irrigated lowland were also some efforts to improve farmers’ sovereignty. It was crucial to identify and improve farmer’s sovereignty indicators through research in larger sites and samples.

  11. Mutualism between tree shrews and pitcher plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Jonathan A; Chin, Lijin

    2010-01-01

    Three species of Nepenthes pitcher plants from Borneo engage in a mutualistic interaction with mountain tree shrews, the basis of which is the exchange of nutritional resources. The plants produce modified “toilet pitchers” that produce copious amounts of exudates, the latter serving as a food source for tree shrews. The exudates are only accessible to the tree shrews when they position their hindquarters over the pitcher orifice. Tree shrews mark valuable resources with feces and regularly defecate into the pitchers when they visit them to feed. Feces represent a valuable source of nitrogen for these Nepenthes species, but there are many facets of the mutualism that are yet to be investigated. These include, but are not limited to, seasonal variation in exudate production rates by the plants, behavioral ecology of visiting tree shrews and the mechanism by which the plants signal to tree shrews that their pitchers represent a food source. Further research into this extraordinary animal-plant interaction is required to gain a better understanding of the benefits to the participating species. PMID:20861680

  12. Tree shrew lavatories: a novel nitrogen sequestration strategy in a tropical pitcher plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Charles M.; Bauer, Ulrike; Lee, Ch'ien C.; Tuen, Andrew A.; Rembold, Katja; Moran, Jonathan A.

    2009-01-01

    Nepenthes pitcher plants are typically carnivorous, producing pitchers with varying combinations of epicuticular wax crystals, viscoelastic fluids and slippery peristomes to trap arthropod prey, especially ants. However, ant densities are low in tropical montane habitats, thereby limiting the potential benefits of the carnivorous syndrome. Nepenthes lowii, a montane species from Borneo, produces two types of pitchers that differ greatly in form and function. Pitchers produced by immature plants conform to the ‘typical’ Nepenthes pattern, catching arthropod prey. However, pitchers produced by mature N. lowii plants lack the features associated with carnivory and are instead visited by tree shrews, which defaecate into them after feeding on exudates that accumulate on the pitcher lid. We tested the hypothesis that tree shrew faeces represent a significant nitrogen (N) source for N. lowii, finding that it accounts for between 57 and 100 per cent of foliar N in mature N. lowii plants. Thus, N. lowii employs a diversified N sequestration strategy, gaining access to a N source that is not available to sympatric congeners. The interaction between N. lowii and tree shrews appears to be a mutualism based on the exchange of food sources that are scarce in their montane habitat. PMID:19515656

  13. Predicting the Occurrence of Haze Events in Southeast Asia using Machine Learning Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H. H.; Chulakadabba, A.; Tonks, A.; Yang, Z.; Wang, C.

    2017-12-01

    Severe local- and regional-scale air pollution episodes typically originate from 1) high emissions of air pollutants, 2) poor dispersion conditions, and 3) trans-boundary pollutant transport. Biomass burning activities have become more frequent in Southeast Asia, especially in Sumatra, Borneo, and the mainland Southeast. Trans-boundary transport of biomass burning aerosols often lead to air quality problems in the region. Furthermore, particulate pollutants from human activities besides biomass burning also play an important role in the air quality of Southeast Asia. Singapore, for example, has a dynamic industrial sector including chemical, electric and metallurgic industries, and is the region's major petroleum-refining center. In addition, natural gas and oil power plants, waste incinerators, active port traffic, and a major regional airport further complicate Singapore's air quality issues. In this study, we compare five Machine Learning algorithms: k-Nearest Neighbors, Linear Support Vector Machine, Decision Tree, Random Forest and Artificial Neural Network, to identify haze patterns and determine variable importance. The algorithms were trained using local atmospheric data (i.e. months, atmospheric conditions, wind direction and relative humidity) from three observation stations in Singapore (Changi, Seletar and Paya Labar). We find that the algorithms reveal the associations in data within and between the stations, and provide in-depth interpretation of the haze sources. The algorithms also allow us to predict the probability of haze episodes in Singapore and to determine the correlation between this probability and atmospheric conditions.

  14. Different palm oil production systems for energy purposes and their greenhouse gas implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wicke, Birka; Dornburg, Veronika; Junginger, Martin; Faaij, Andre

    2008-01-01

    This study analyses the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of crude palm oil (CPO) and palm fatty acid distillate (PFAD) production in northern Borneo (Malaysia), their transport to the Netherlands and their co-firing with natural gas for electricity production. In the case of CPO, conversion to biodiesel and the associated GHG emissions are also studied. This study follows the methodology suggested by the Dutch Commission on Sustainable Biomass (Cramer Commission). The results demonstrate that land use change is the most decisive factor in overall GHG emissions and that palm oil energy chains based on land that was previously natural rainforest or peatland have such large emissions that they cannot meet the 50-70% GHG emission reduction target set by the Cramer Commission. However, if CPO production takes place on degraded land, management of CPO production is improved, or if the by-product PFAD is used for electricity production, the emission reduction criteria can be met, and palm-oil-based electricity can be considered sustainable from a GHG emission point of view. Even though the biodiesel base case on logged-over forest meets the Cramer Commission's emission reduction target for biofuels of 30%, other cases, such as oil palm plantations on degraded land and improved management, can achieve emissions reductions of more than 150%, turning oil palm plantations into carbon sinks. In order for bioenergy to be sustainably produced from palm oil and its derivatives, degraded land should be used for palm oil production and management should be improved

  15. The Lived Experiences of Mentoring Nurses in Malaysia

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    Noraini Binti Enrico

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Being a nursing mentor is not an entirely new concept in nursing. However, it is a new phenomenon in the nursing profession in Malaysia. The nursing administration and the senior nurses in Malaysia have claimed that they have started a mentorship program by having senior nurses shadow new graduate nurses for the past two to three years ago. With no study found in Malaysia investigating the lived experiences of mentors mentoring new registered nurses, it led the researcher to develop this research that explores the real life experiences of these senior Malaysian nurses who mentor neophyte nurses.Objectives: This research explores and describes the lived experiences of nurses mentoring neophyte or new registered nurses at one of the major hospital in the Malaysia Borneo and how such experiences influence their daily routine as a nurse and also as a mentor. The research will also attaches meaning to these experiences and identifies both positive and negative experiences as a mentor to neophyte.Methods: The experiences of nurses mentoring the neophyte in the clinical area were captured using a qualitative approach to research and further viewed through methods informed by phenomenology, which used interpretive and descriptive semi-structured interviews. Hermeneutic interpretive phenomenology was used in the focus to analyze interview transcript into textual expression of the mentors. Three main themes emerge from this study are being unprepared and challenged, perceptions of mentees, mentor hope and desire.Key words: nursing mentor, phenomenon, neophyte, Malaysia.

  16. KAPASITAS ANTIOKSIDAN DAN INHIBITOR ALFA GLUKOSIDASE EKSTRAK UMBI BAWANG DAYAK [Antioxidant and Alpha-Glucosidase Inhibitory Properties of Bawang Dayak Bulb Extracts

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    Andi Early Febrinda*

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Bawang dayak (Eleutherine palmifolia is an indigenous plant in Borneo traditionally used by Dayak tribes to treat any kind of degenerative deseases including diabetes mellitus. The purpose of this research was to measure antioxidant and antidiabetic capacities of water and ethanolic extracts of bawang dayak bulb. Parameters evaluated in this research were phytochemical screening, total phenolics, flavonoid content, DPPH free-radical scavenging activity, and alpha glucosidase inhibiting (AGI activity. The result showed that the total phenolics and flavonoid content in bawang dayak ethanolic extract (217.71 mg GAE/g and 65.35 mg QE/g were higher than that of the water extract (139.93 mg GAE/g and 16.95 mg QE/g. The ethanolic extract also had higher antioxidant and AGI activities (IC50 112 and 241 ppm than that of the water extract (IC50 526 and 505 ppm. In addition, the IC50 values for AGI in bawang dayak ethanolic extract was lower than acarbose which is known as a commercial antidiabetic agent.

  17. Solar Water Heating System for Biodiesel Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syaifurrahman; Usman, A. Gani; Rinjani, Rakasiwi

    2018-02-01

    Nowadays, electricity become very expensive thing in some remote areas. Energy from solar panels give the solution as renewable energy that is environment friendly. West Borneo is located on the equator where the sun shines for almost 10-15 hours/day. Solar water heating system which is includes storage tank and solar collections becomes a cost-effective way to generate the energy. Solar panel heat water is delivered to water in storage tank. Hot water is used as hot fluid in biodiesel jacked reactor. The purposes of this research are to design Solar Water Heating System for Biodiesel Production and measure the rate of heat-transfer water in storage tank. This test has done for 6 days, every day from 8.30 am until 2.30 pm. Storage tank and collection are made from stainless steel and polystyrene a well-insulated. The results show that the heater can be reach at 50ºC for ±2.5 hours and the maximum temperature is 62ºC where the average of light intensity is 1280 lux.

  18. Intensified water storage loss by biomass burning in Kalimantan: Detection by GRACE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jiancheng; Tangdamrongsub, Natthachet; Hwang, Cheinway; Abidin, Hasanuddin Z.

    2017-03-01

    Biomass burning is the principal tool for land clearing and a primary driver of land use change in Kalimantan (the Indonesian part of Borneo island). Biomass burning here has consumed millions of hectares of peatland and swamp forests. It also degrades air quality in Southeast Asia, perturbs the global carbon cycle, threatens ecosystem health and biodiversity, and potentially affects the global water cycle. Here we present the optimal estimate of water storage changes over Kalimantan from NASA's Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE). Over August 2002 to December 2014, our result shows a north-south dipole pattern in the long-term changes in terrestrial water storage (TWS) and groundwater storage (GWS). Both TWS and GWS increase in the northern part of Kalimantan, while they decrease in the southern part where fire events are the most severe. The loss rates in TWS and GWS in the southern part are 0.56 ± 0.11 cm yr-1 and 0.55 ± 0.10 cm yr-1, respectively. We use GRACE estimates, burned area, carbon emissions, and hydroclimatic data to study the relationship between biomass burning and water storage losses. The analysis shows that extensive biomass burning results in excessive evapotranspiration, which then increases long-term water storage losses in the fire-prone region of Kalimantan. Our results show the potentials of GRACE and its follow-on missions in assisting water storage and fire managements in a region with extensive biomass burning such as Kalimantan.

  19. On the type species of the genus Aetius O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1896: The first description of male with notes on cymbial notch and mating plug (Araneae: Corinnidae: Castianeirinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhin, Puthoor Pattammal; Nafin, Karunnappilli Shamsudheen; Simmons, Zoë; Sudhikumar, Ambalaparambil Vasu

    2016-08-23

    The rare ant mimicking sac spider genus Aetius was erected by O. Pickard-Cambridge in 1896 based on an unspecified number of female specimen(s) collected from Sri Lanka. The type species of the genus, A. decollatus O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1896, has been redescribed twice based on the holotype (Majumder & Tikader 1991; Deeleman-Reinhold 2001). Reimoser (1934) recorded the genus for the first time from India, who collected a male specimen from Mudumalai Tiger Reserve in Tamil Nadu State of southern India. This specimen was identified as A. decollatus, but it was never formally described and was later recognised to be a penultimate male (Dankittipakul & Singtripop 2013). Deeleman-Reinhold (2001) described the second representative of the genus, A. nocturnus, based on a single female specimen from Borneo, 105 years after the establishment of the genus. Dankittipakul & Singtripop (2013) described the male of A. nocturnus, thereby revealing the male genitalia of the genus, but the type species was still known only from the female sex.

  20. Uji Aktivitas Antioksidan dan Penghambatan Tirosinase serta Uji Manfaat Gel Ekstrak Kulit Batang Taya (Nauclea subdita terhadap Kulit

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    Meiliana Charissa

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Dayak women in Borneo treat their skin with natural ingredients, one of which is taya cortex (Nauclea subdita. Flavonoids that can be found in natural ingredients have antioxidant effect and can inhibit the activity of tyrosinase in melanogenesis process. The research objectives were to measure the antioxidant activity and the inhibition of tyrosinase of taya cortex extract, to obtain a stable  formulation of taya cortex extract gel, and  to determine the safety and efficacy on human skin. The method used for antioxidant activity test was DPPH method. The inhibition of tyrosinase was conducted with kojic acid as control. The safety and efficacy test were conducted to healthy women ages 35-50 with healthy and normal skin. The results show IC50 value of 568.58 µg/mL in L-tyrosine and 1374.69 µg/mL in L-DOPA for inhibiton of tyrosinase. Antioxidant activity assay of the extract  shows IC50 value of 48.78 µg/mL and can be categorized as a powerful antioxidant (<50 µg/mL. The formulation of gel containing taya cortex extract was physically stable for 12 weeks. Safety test and efficacy test of the gel show the gel is safe to use topically and show an increase in skin elasticity.

  1. Systematics of Eutropis rugifera (Stoliczka, 1870) (Squamata: Scincidae) including the redescription of the holotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarasinghe, A A Thasun; Poyarkov, Nikolay A; Campbell, Patrick D; Leo, Sandy; Supriatna, Jatna; Hallermann, Jakob

    2017-05-26

    Eutropis rugifera has long been identified as a widespread species complex distributed in Nicobar, Peninsular Malaysia, Greater Sundaic Islands, Bali, Sulawesi and the Philippines. This skink was described by Stoliczka in 1870 from Nicobar Island based on a single specimen (holotype by monotypy). Later, Peters (1871), Bartlett (1895) and Werner (1896) described three more species which were morphologically similar to Euprepes percarinatus (from Java), Mabuia rubricollis (Borneo) and M. quinquecarinata (Sumatra) respectively, which are currently considered junior objective synonyms of Eutropis rugifera. We examined all the available synonym types and voucher specimens of Eutropis rugifera deposited at several museums. A morphological examination of the types of this species and mtDNA analysis (584 bp of 16S rRNA) of the samples from different biogeographic regions revealed that Eutropis rugifera from Nicobar Island, Bali Island, and Bawean Island are composed of a monophyletic species. However, the taxonomic status of the above population requires further clarification, and the population in Bawean Island may represent a cryptic species. Finally, we provide a complete redescription of E. rugifera based on its holotype.

  2. Kennis is macht: de veelzijdige expedities van botanicus Pieter Willem Korthals (1807–1892

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    Maarten Manse

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge is power: the versatile expeditions of botanist Pieter Willem Korthals (1807–1892The National Herbarium in Leiden houses a fascinating archive about one of the few botanists of the Committee for Natural History of the Netherlands Indies, Pieter Willem Korthals (1807–1892. The notebooks and reports of his travels in Java, Sumatra and Borneo reveal the hybrid position of Korthals in the colonial world of the Dutch East Indies. Korthals was an experienced botanist who employed methods such as measuring, taking notes and sensual observation at various locales in the Malay Archipelago. His multi-faceted fieldwork tied into the colonial administration’s desire to acquire valuable information about the islands’ human and natural resources. In particular, after the introduction in 1830 of the Cultivation System in Java, the colonial authorities in Batavia were eager to learn more about the system’s efficiency in more remote areas. By drawing upon rich archival sources, this brief essay uses Korthals’ case to shed fresh light on the production of botanical and other knowledge in the for- mer Dutch colony in the East Indies.

  3. Transformation-cost time-series method for analyzing irregularly sampled data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozken, Ibrahim; Eroglu, Deniz; Stemler, Thomas; Marwan, Norbert; Bagci, G. Baris; Kurths, Jürgen

    2015-06-01

    Irregular sampling of data sets is one of the challenges often encountered in time-series analysis, since traditional methods cannot be applied and the frequently used interpolation approach can corrupt the data and bias the subsequence analysis. Here we present the TrAnsformation-Cost Time-Series (TACTS) method, which allows us to analyze irregularly sampled data sets without degenerating the quality of the data set. Instead of using interpolation we consider time-series segments and determine how close they are to each other by determining the cost needed to transform one segment into the following one. Using a limited set of operations—with associated costs—to transform the time series segments, we determine a new time series, that is our transformation-cost time series. This cost time series is regularly sampled and can be analyzed using standard methods. While our main interest is the analysis of paleoclimate data, we develop our method using numerical examples like the logistic map and the Rössler oscillator. The numerical data allows us to test the stability of our method against noise and for different irregular samplings. In addition we provide guidance on how to choose the associated costs based on the time series at hand. The usefulness of the TACTS method is demonstrated using speleothem data from the Secret Cave in Borneo that is a good proxy for paleoclimatic variability in the monsoon activity around the maritime continent.

  4. Human Infections and Detection of Plasmodium knowlesi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshvar, Cyrus

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Plasmodium knowlesi is a malaria parasite that is found in nature in long-tailed and pig-tailed macaques. Naturally acquired human infections were thought to be extremely rare until a large focus of human infections was reported in 2004 in Sarawak, Malaysian Borneo. Human infections have since been described throughout Southeast Asia, and P. knowlesi is now recognized as the fifth species of Plasmodium causing malaria in humans. The molecular, entomological, and epidemiological data indicate that human infections with P. knowlesi are not newly emergent and that knowlesi malaria is primarily a zoonosis. Human infections were undiagnosed until molecular detection methods that could distinguish P. knowlesi from the morphologically similar human malaria parasite P. malariae became available. P. knowlesi infections cause a spectrum of disease and are potentially fatal, but if detected early enough, infections in humans are readily treatable. In this review on knowlesi malaria, we describe the early studies on P. knowlesi and focus on the epidemiology, diagnosis, clinical aspects, and treatment of knowlesi malaria. We also discuss the gaps in our knowledge and the challenges that lie ahead in studying the epidemiology and pathogenesis of knowlesi malaria and in the prevention and control of this zoonotic infection. PMID:23554413

  5. First molecular data and the phylogenetic position of the millipede-like centipede Edentistoma octosulcatum Tömösváry, 1882 (Chilopoda: Scolopendromorpha: Scolopendridae.

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    Varpu Vahtera

    Full Text Available Edentistoma octosulcatum Tömösváry, 1882, is a rare, superficially millipede-like centipede known only from Borneo and the Philippines. It is unique within the order Scolopendromorpha for its slow gait, robust tergites, and highly modified gizzard and mandible morphology. Not much is known about the biology of the species but it has been speculated to be arboreal with a possibly vegetarian diet. Until now its phylogenetic position within the subfamily Otostigminae has been based only on morphological characters, being variably ranked as a monotypic tribe (Arrhabdotini or classified with the Southeast Asian genus Sterropristes Attems, 1934. The first molecular data for E. octosulcatum sourced from a newly collected specimen from Sarawak were analysed with and without morphology. Parsimony analysis of 122 morphological characters together with two nuclear and two mitochondrial loci resolves Edentistoma as sister group to three Indo-Australian species of Rhysida, this clade in turn grouping with Ethmostigmus, whereas maximum likelihood and parsimony analyses of the molecular data on their own ally Edentistoma with species of Otostigmus. A position of Edentistoma within Otostigmini (rather than being its sister group as predicted by the Arrhabdotini hypothesis is consistently retrieved under different analytical conditions, but support values within the subfamily remain low for most nodes. The species exhibits strong pushing behaviour, suggestive of burrowing habits. Evidence against a suggested vegetarian diet is provided by observation of E. octosulcatum feeding on millipedes in the genus Trachelomegalus.

  6. Epidemiology of Plasmodium knowlesi malaria in north-east Sabah, Malaysia: family clusters and wide age distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Bridget E; William, Timothy; Dhararaj, Prabakaran; Anderios, Fread; Grigg, Matthew J; Yeo, Tsin W; Anstey, Nicholas M

    2012-12-05

    The simian parasite Plasmodium knowlesi is a common cause of human malaria in Malaysian Borneo, with a particularly high incidence in Kudat, Sabah. Little is known however about the epidemiology in this substantially deforested region. Malaria microscopy records at Kudat District Hospital were retrospectively reviewed from January 2009-November 2011. Demographics, and PCR results if available, were recorded for each positive result. Medical records were reviewed for patients suspected of representing family clusters, and families contacted for further information. Rainfall data were obtained from the Malaysian Meteorological Department. "Plasmodium malariae" mixed or mono-infection was diagnosed by microscopy in 517/653 (79%) patients. Of these, PCR was performed in 445 (86%) and was positive for P. knowlesi mono-infection in 339 (76%). Patients with knowlesi malaria demonstrated a wide age distribution (median 33, IQR 20-50, range 0.7-89 years) with P. knowlesi predominating in all age groups except those Sabah, including potential for human-to-human transmission, are needed.

  7. Pittosporum peridoticola (Pittosporaceae), a new ultramafic obligate species restricted to Kinabalu Park (Sabah, Malaysia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugau, John B; van der Ent, Antony

    2015-12-01

    Kinabalu Park, in Sabah (Malaysia) on Borneo Island, is renowned for the exceptionally high plant diversity it protects, with at least 5000 plant species enumerated to date. Discoveries of plant novelties continue to be made in Sabah, especially on isolated ultramafic outcrops, including in the genus Pittosporum (Pittosporaceae) with P. linearifolium from Bukit Hampuan on the southern border of the Park, and P. silamense from Bukit Silam in Eastern Sabah, both narrow endemics restricted to ultramafic soils. A distinctive new species of Pittosporum (P. peridoticola J.B.Sugau and Ent, sp. nov.) was discovered on Mount Tambuyukon in the north of Kinabalu Park during ecological fieldwork. The diagnostic morphological characters of this taxon are discussed and information about the habitat in which it grows is provided. The soil chemistry in the rooting zone of P. peridoticola has high magnesium to calcium quotients, high extractable nickel and manganese concentrations, but low potassium and phosphorus concentrations, as is typical for ultramafic soils. Analysis of foliar samples of various Pittosporum-species originating from ultramafic and non-ultramafic soils showed a comparable foliar elemental stoichiometry that is suggestive of 'Excluder-type' ecophysiology. Pittosporum peridoticola is an ultramafic obligate species restricted to Kinabalu Park with only two known populations within the boundaries of the protected area. It is vulnerable to any future stochastic landscape disturbance events, such as forest fires or severe droughts, and therefore its conservation status is 'Near Threatened'.

  8. Seasonal and Spatial Dynamics of the Primary Vector of Plasmodium knowlesi within a Major Transmission Focus in Sabah, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Meng L; Chua, Tock H; Leong, Cherng S; Khaw, Loke T; Fornace, Kimberly; Wan-Sulaiman, Wan-Yusoff; William, Timothy; Drakeley, Chris; Ferguson, Heather M; Vythilingam, Indra

    2015-01-01

    The simian malaria parasite Plasmodium knowlesi is emerging as a public health problem in Southeast Asia, particularly in Malaysian Borneo where it now accounts for the greatest burden of malaria cases and deaths. Control is hindered by limited understanding of the ecology of potential vector species. We conducted a one year longitudinal study of P. knowlesi vectors in three sites within an endemic area of Sabah, Malaysia. All mosquitoes were captured using human landing catch. Anopheles mosquitoes were dissected to determine, oocyst, sporozoites and parous rate. Anopheles balabacensis is confirmed as the primary vector of. P. knowlesi (using nested PCR) in Sabah for the first time. Vector densities were significantly higher and more seasonally variable in the village than forest or small scale farming site. However An. balabacensis survival and P. knowlesi infection rates were highest in forest and small scale farm sites. Anopheles balabacensis mostly bites humans outdoors in the early evening between 1800 to 2000 hrs. This study indicates transmission is unlikely to be prevented by bednets. This combined with its high vectorial capacity poses a threat to malaria elimination programmes within the region.

  9. Trends of breast cancer treatment in Sabah, Malaysia: a problem with lack of awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, B D K; Chuah, J A; Kumar, V M; Rohamini, S; Siti, Z S; Yip, C H

    2009-08-01

    Sabah, formerly known as North Borneo, is part of East Malaysia. 52.2 percent of patients with breast cancer in Sabah presented at advanced stages and up to 20.4 percent of patients defaulted proper treatment, opting for traditional therapy. We performed a two-year prospective study looking at the treatment trends of breast cancer in Sabah. Our subjects were all newly-diagnosed breast cancer cases seen at the hospital in 2005 and 2006. Type of surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, hormonal therapy and surgical complication for each patient were studied. Out of 186 newly-diagnosed cases, 152 (81.7 percent) had surgery, 126 (67.7 percent) had chemotherapy, 118 (63.4 percent) had radiotherapy and 92 (49.5 percent) had hormonal therapy. 18.3 percent did not have surgery either due to refusal of treatment or advanced disease. They were more likely to be non-Chinese (91.1 percent, p-value is 0.02). Only 15.8 percent had breast-conserving surgery. The most frequent surgical complication was seroma formation (15.0 percent) . The commonest chemotherapy regime and hormonal therapy were anthracycline-based regime (88.1 percent) and tamoxifen (95.8 percent), respectively. The proportion of breast-conserving surgery and usage of modern adjuvant therapies are low in Sabah. This can be attributed to lack of breast cancer awareness leading to late presentation and refusal of treatment, coupled with insufficient health service funding.

  10. Mutational analysis of Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase and dihydropteroate synthase genes in the interior division of Sabah, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Tiek Ying; Sylvi, Mersumpin; William, Timothy

    2013-12-10

    The sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine (SDX/PYR) combination had been chosen to treat uncomplicated falciparum malaria in Malaysia for more than 30 years. Non-silent mutations in dihydrofolate reductase (dhfr) and dihydropteroate synthase (dhps) genes are responsible for the resistance to pyrimethamine and sulphadoxine, respectively. This study reports the mutational analysis of pfdhfr and pfdhps in single Plasmodium falciparum infection isolates from the interior division of Sabah, Malaysian Borneo. A total of 22 P. falciparum single infection isolates collected from two districts of the interior division of Sabah from February to November 2010 were recruited for the mutational study of pfdhfr and pfdhps. Both genes were amplified by nested PCR prior to DNA sequencing and mutational analysis. A total of three pfdhfr and four pfdhps alleles were identified. The most prevalent pfdhfr allele is ANRNL (86%) involving triple mutation at position 108(S to N), 59(C to R) and 164(I to L). In pfdhps, two novel alleles, SGTGA (73%) and AAKAA (5%) were identified. Alleles involving triple mutation in both pfdhfr (ANRNL) and pfdhps (SGTGA), which were absent in Sabah in a study conducted about 15 years ago, are now prevalent. High prevalence of mutations in SDX/PYR associated drug resistance genes are reported in this study. This mutational study of pfdhps and pfdhfr indicating that SDX/PYR should be discontinued in this region.

  11. Nickel biopathways in tropical nickel hyperaccumulating trees from Sabah (Malaysia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Ent, Antony; Callahan, Damien L; Noller, Barry N; Mesjasz-Przybylowicz, Jolanta; Przybylowicz, Wojciech J; Barnabas, Alban; Harris, Hugh H

    2017-02-16

    The extraordinary level of accumulation of nickel (Ni) in hyperaccumulator plants is a consequence of specific metal sequestering and transport mechanisms, and knowledge of these processes is critical for advancing an understanding of transition element metabolic regulation in these plants. The Ni biopathways were elucidated in three plant species, Phyllanthus balgooyi, Phyllanthus securinegioides (Phyllanthaceae) and Rinorea bengalensis (Violaceae), that occur in Sabah (Malaysia) on the Island of Borneo. This study showed that Ni is mainly concentrated in the phloem in roots and stems (up to 16.9% Ni in phloem sap in Phyllanthus balgooyi) in all three species. However, the species differ in their leaves - in P. balgooyi the highest Ni concentration is in the phloem, but in P. securinegioides and R. bengalensis in the epidermis and in the spongy mesophyll (R. bengalensis). The chemical speciation of Ni 2+ does not substantially differ between the species nor between the plant tissues and transport fluids, and is unambiguously associated with citrate. This study combines ion microbeam (PIXE and RBS) and metabolomics techniques (GC-MS, LC-MS) with synchrotron methods (XAS) to overcome the drawbacks of the individual techniques to quantitatively determine Ni distribution and Ni 2+ chemical speciation in hyperaccumulator plants.

  12. Actephila alanbakeri (Phyllanthaceae): a new nickel hyperaccumulating plant species from localised ultramafic outcrops in Sabah (Malaysia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Ent, Antony; van Balgooy, Max; van Welzen, Peter

    2015-12-01

    The Malaysian state of Sabah on the Island of Borneo is emerging as a hotspot for nickel hyperaccumulator species with at least 25 such species discovered to date. New discoveries of the hyperaccumulation trait in described taxa, as well as taxonomical novelties that are nickel hyperaccumulators, continue to be made. Here we describe a new nickel hyperaccumulating species of Actephila (Phyllanthaceae) originating from two known populations on ultramafic soils in Sabah. The most characteristic feature of Actephila alanbakeri are its knobbly fruits, but other diagnostic morphological characters are discussed and information about its ecology and rhizosphere and plant tissue chemistry is provided. This new species is one of the strongest known nickel hyperaccumulator plants in Southeast Asia with up to 14,700 μg g -1 (1.47 %) nickel in its leaves. The occurrences of Actephila alanbakeri on just two sites, both of which lie outside protected areas and are disturbed by recurring forest fires, combined with the small total numbers of individuals, render this species Endangered (EN) on the basis of IUCN Red List Criteria.

  13. Nickel biopathways in tropical nickel hyperaccumulating trees from Sabah (Malaysia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Ent, Antony; Callahan, Damien L.; Noller, Barry N.; Mesjasz-Przybylowicz, Jolanta; Przybylowicz, Wojciech J.; Barnabas, Alban; Harris, Hugh H.

    2017-02-01

    The extraordinary level of accumulation of nickel (Ni) in hyperaccumulator plants is a consequence of specific metal sequestering and transport mechanisms, and knowledge of these processes is critical for advancing an understanding of transition element metabolic regulation in these plants. The Ni biopathways were elucidated in three plant species, Phyllanthus balgooyi, Phyllanthus securinegioides (Phyllanthaceae) and Rinorea bengalensis (Violaceae), that occur in Sabah (Malaysia) on the Island of Borneo. This study showed that Ni is mainly concentrated in the phloem in roots and stems (up to 16.9% Ni in phloem sap in Phyllanthus balgooyi) in all three species. However, the species differ in their leaves - in P. balgooyi the highest Ni concentration is in the phloem, but in P. securinegioides and R. bengalensis in the epidermis and in the spongy mesophyll (R. bengalensis). The chemical speciation of Ni2+ does not substantially differ between the species nor between the plant tissues and transport fluids, and is unambiguously associated with citrate. This study combines ion microbeam (PIXE and RBS) and metabolomics techniques (GC-MS, LC-MS) with synchrotron methods (XAS) to overcome the drawbacks of the individual techniques to quantitatively determine Ni distribution and Ni2+ chemical speciation in hyperaccumulator plants.

  14. Thinned crustal structure and tectonic boundary of the Nansha Block, southern South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Miao; Wu, Shi-Guo; Zhang, Jian

    2016-12-01

    The southern South China Sea margin consists of the thinned crustal Nansha Block and a compressional collision zone. The Nansha Block's deep structure and tectonic evolution contains critical information about the South China Sea's rifting. Multiple geophysical data sets, including regional magnetic, gravity and reflection seismic data, reveal the deep structure and rifting processes. Curie point depth (CPD), estimated from magnetic anomalies using a windowed wavenumber-domain algorithm, enables us to image thermal structures. To derive a 3D Moho topography and crustal thickness model, we apply Oldenburg algorithm to the gravity anomaly, which was extracted from the observed free air gravity anomaly data after removing the gravity effect of density variations of sediments, and temperature and pressure variations of the lithospheric mantle. We found that the Moho depth (20 km) is shallower than the CPD (24 km) in the Northwest Borneo Trough, possibly caused by thinned crust, low heat flow and a low vertical geothermal gradient. The Nansha Block's northern boundary is a narrow continent-ocean transition zone constrained by magnetic anomalies, reflection seismic data, gravity anomalies and an interpretation of Moho depth (about 13 km). The block extends southward beneath a gravity-driven deformed sediment wedge caused by uplift on land after a collision, with a contribution from deep crustal flow. Its southwestern boundary is close to the Lupar Line defined by a significant negative reduction to the pole (RTP) of magnetic anomaly and short-length-scale variation in crustal thickness, increasing from 18 to 26 km.

  15. Future malaria spatial pattern based on the potential global warming impact in South and Southeast Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khormi, Hassan M; Kumar, Lalit

    2016-11-21

    We used the Model for Interdisciplinary Research on Climate-H climate model with the A2 Special Report on Emissions Scenarios for the years 2050 and 2100 and CLIMEX software for projections to illustrate the potential impact of climate change on the spatial distributions of malaria in China, India, Indochina, Indonesia, and The Philippines based on climate variables such as temperature, moisture, heat, cold and dryness. The model was calibrated using data from several knowledge domains, including geographical distribution records. The areas in which malaria has currently been detected are consistent with those showing high values of the ecoclimatic index in the CLIMEX model. The match between prediction and reality was found to be high. More than 90% of the observed malaria distribution points were associated with the currently known suitable climate conditions. Climate suitability for malaria is projected to decrease in India, southern Myanmar, southern Thailand, eastern Borneo, and the region bordering Cambodia, Malaysia and the Indonesian islands, while it is expected to increase in southern and south-eastern China and Taiwan. The climatic models for Anopheles mosquitoes presented here should be useful for malaria control, monitoring, and management, particularly considering these future climate scenarios.

  16. The dispersal of Homo sapiens across southern Asia: how early, how often, how complex?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennell, Robin; Petraglia, Michael D.

    2012-07-01

    The timing and the paths of colonization of southern Asia by Homo sapiens are poorly known, though many population geneticists, paleoanthropologists, and archaeologists have contended that this process began with dispersal from East Africa, and occurred between 60,000 and 40,000 years ago. However, the evidence for this scenario is very weak, particularly the lack of human skeletal evidence between the Levant and Borneo before 40 ka, and other explanations are possible. Here we argue that environmental and archaeological information is increasingly indicating the likelihood that H. sapiens exited Africa much earlier than commonly thought, and may have colonized much of southern Asia well before 60,000 years ago. Additionally, we cannot exclude the possibility that several dispersal events occurred, from both North and East Africa, nor the likelihood that early populations of H. sapiens in southern Asia interbred with indigenous populations of Neanderthals, Denisovans and Homo erectus. The population history of southern Asia during the Upper Pleistocene is likely far more complex than currently envisaged.

  17. [Is the fight against dengue complicated with the emergence of a new viral serotype?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero, Nereida; Quiroz, Yasmir

    2014-09-01

    Dengue is a viral acute febrile illness, currently considered one of the most important arbovirosis worldwide in terms of morbidity, mortality and economic impact. Various theories have been proposed to explain the pathogenesis of severe forms of dengue, involving among other factors, features related to the virus, such as the presence of more virulent strains and/or strains with increased replicative capacity. A crucial point at this time is the discovery of a new viral type, dengue 5, from nonhuman primates in Malaysia-Borneo, which could result in greater difficulties for control and vaccine production (currently in efficacy tests). Once the circulation of this viral type has been demonstrated in the human population, the high risk of infection will have extreme or controversial public health implications. Therefore, a worldwide program to combat dengue should include an urgent need to implement continuous vector elimination, community education and prevention and control of the disease. Only then, we will be aiming to reduce the morbidity and transmission risk of dengue, while new technological and effective alternatives come about.

  18. Analysis of nuclear and organellar genomes of Plasmodium knowlesi in humans reveals ancient population structure and recent recombination among host-specific subpopulations

    KAUST Repository

    Diez Benavente, Ernest

    2017-09-18

    The macaque parasite Plasmodium knowlesi is a significant concern in Malaysia where cases of human infection are increasing. Parasites infecting humans originate from genetically distinct subpopulations associated with the long-tailed (Macaca fascicularis (Mf)) or pig-tailed macaques (Macaca nemestrina (Mn)). We used a new high-quality reference genome to re-evaluate previously described subpopulations among human and macaque isolates from Malaysian-Borneo and Peninsular-Malaysia. Nuclear genomes were dimorphic, as expected, but new evidence of chromosomal-segment exchanges between subpopulations was found. A large segment on chromosome 8 originating from the Mn subpopulation and containing genes encoding proteins expressed in mosquito-borne parasite stages, was found in Mf genotypes. By contrast, non-recombining organelle genomes partitioned into 3 deeply branched lineages, unlinked with nuclear genomic dimorphism. Subpopulations which diverged in isolation have re-connected, possibly due to deforestation and disruption of wild macaque habitats. The resulting genomic mosaics reveal traits selected by host-vector-parasite interactions in a setting of ecological transition.

  19. It's not just conflict that motivates killing of orangutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jacqueline T; Mengersen, Kerrie; Abram, Nicola K; Ancrenaz, Marc; Wells, Jessie A; Meijaard, Erik

    2013-01-01

    We investigated why orangutans are being killed in Kalimantan, Indonesia, and the role of conflict in these killings. Based on an analysis of interview data from over 5,000 respondents in over 450 villages, we also assessed the socio-ecological factors associated with conflict and non-conflict killings. Most respondents never kill orangutans. Those who reported having personally killed an orangutan primarily did so for non-conflict reasons; for example, 56% of these respondents said that the reason they had killed an orangutan was to eat it. Of the conflict-related reasons for killing, the most common reasons orangutans were killed was fear of orangutans or in self-defence. A similar pattern was evident among reports of orangutan killing by other people in the villages. Regression analyses indicated that religion and the percentage of intact forest around villages were the strongest socio-ecological predictors of whether orangutans were killed for conflict or non-conflict related reasons. Our data indicate that between 44,170 and 66,570 orangutans were killed in Kalimantan within the respondents' active hunting lifetimes: between 12,690 and 29,024 for conflict reasons (95%CI) and between 26,361 and 41,688 for non-conflict reasons (95% CI). These findings confirm that habitat protection alone will not ensure the survival of orangutans in Indonesian Borneo, and that effective reduction of orangutan killings is urgently needed.

  20. EXPLORING L1 INTERFERENCE IN THE WRITINGS OF KADAZANDUSUN ESL STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelster Sherralyn Jeoffrey Pudin

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available For many ethnic KadazanDusuns from Sabah, North Borneo, English is a third language after their mother tongue and Malay. The burden of having to contend with an additional language frequently leads to errors, particularly those caused by interference from the first language (L1. This study set out to identify the types and frequency of English language errors and their correlations in the writing of KadazanDusun ESL students at Universiti Malaysia Sabah. A further aim of the study was to establish which of these errors could be attributed to L1 interference. A total of 54 students with lower Malaysian University Entrance Test (MUET band scores were asked to complete a questionnaire and write a short essay on a designated topic. The language errors were categorized and analysed via statistical analysis. Errors considered to be related to L1 interference were then identified after consultation with an experienced KadazanDusun language lecturer. The most common errors were those involving singular /plural nouns and unusual sentence structures. The results show that approximately 25% of the errors were attributable to L1 interference, i.e. mode (normal/involuntary, voice (actor (-ing form /undergoer (-ed form, overuse of article, linker (when linker is used, no article is needed, auxiliary verb and direct translation. The findings of this study give ESL practitioners a better insight into student errors and should lead to improved writing performance in the classroom.