WorldWideScience

Sample records for boreholes

  1. Borehole Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Records of past temperature derived from boreholes drilled into the Earth crust. Parameter keywords describe what was measured in this data set. Additional summary...

  2. On Boreholes and PBO Borehole Strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladwin, M. T.; Mee, M. W.

    2003-12-01

    Borehole tensor strainmeters (GTSM) installed in Australia and California have established a baseline of data spanning more than twenty years. The current baseline of data allows characterisation of a moderate number of instruments in a range of very different environments in a way which defines reasonable performance expectations for the upcoming PBO deployments. A generic understanding of effects which result from the process of installation of the instrument in a stressed rock mass emerges. This indicates that, provided due allowance is made for experimentally determined borehole recovery effects, the contribution of borehole strain meters more than adequately fills the observational gap between high stability/long term geodetic measurements of strain and strain rates and high resolution/high frequency seismic observations of earth deformation processes. The various strain relief processes associated with the installation procedures and borehole recovery effects associated with pre-existing stress fields will be documented. Procedures for calibration of the total borehole inclusion and for progressive removal of effects due to rock anisotropy and visco-elastic creep of the grout and rock close to the borehole from far field tectonic effects will be defined and illustrated with examples. Observed deviations from these processes will be shown to be small and consistent with otherwise observed or implied fault motions. Full details of these borehole induced processes are, however, difficult to determine in the early years following installation, particularly if there is significant tectonic activity at the time. Once quantified for each site, the effects can be robustly removed from data streams.

  3. Borehole seismic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Tao

    In many borehole seismic experiments, the velocity of the tube wave is higher than that of the surrounding rock shear wave. This fast tube wave creates a strong conical shear wave in the surrounding rock, similar to the Mach wave in supersonic aviation and the Cherenkov radiation in electrodynamics. Many geophysicists have tried to utilize the conical signal in VSP (vertical seismic profiling) and cross borehole data interpretation, using quasi static approximations to model the borehole effect. Two popular quasi static approximations are: the effective source array method for source borehole modeling and the squeeze strain method for receiver borehole modeling. These quasi static approximations are sensible as they qualitatively conform to Hueygen's principle and the typical wavelength of a VSP or a cross borehole seismic experiment is much larger than the borehole radius. However, they have not been quantitatively benchmarked against other non approximation method such as the frequency wave number method. The frequency wave number method is a rigorous, non approximation method for modeling straight boreholes without lengthwise variation. The boreholes may consist of many coaxial, homogeneous and axially symmetric shells. In this thesis, the results of the quasi static approximations are compared to the results obtained from the frequency wave number method. The comparison demonstrates that both the effective source array method and squeeze strain method gives the correct arrival time. The effective source array method gives incorrect amplitude and waveform for direct arrivals and tube waves due to its arbitrary assumption of the elementary source radiation pattern. The squeeze strain method gives fairly accurate amplitude and waveform for P and S direct arrivals but it fails to match the tube wave results obtained from the frequency wave number method. The omission of tube wave dispersion and amplitude loss by the quasi static approximation methods also

  4. TV-2 test borehole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new test borehole was drilled for testing logging radiometers for uranium surveying and for dimensioning logging cables. The borehole is 660 m deep and located in it are 4 artificial radioactivity anomalies. The uncased interval is 120 m long, it has significant differences in resistance (200 to 14 000 Ωm) and makes it possible to test all types of electric logging probes. The test borehole makes possible the control of logging instruments after repair in the field, the testing of new probes prior to their being put into operation, the quality and quick dimensioning of logging cables and the performing of developmental and methodological measurements. (A.K.)

  5. Geophysical borehole logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most of the available literature on geophysical borehole logging refers to studies carried out in sedimentary rocks. It is only in recent years that any great interest has been shown in geophysical logging in boreholes in metamorphic and igneous rocks following the development of research programmes associated with geothermal energy and nuclear waste disposal. This report is concerned with the programme of geophysical logging carried out on the three deep boreholes at Altnabreac, Caithness, to examine the effectiveness of these methods in crystalline rock. Of particular importance is the assessment of the performance of the various geophysical sondes run in the boreholes in relation to the rock mass properties. The geophysical data can be used to provide additional in-situ information on the geological, hydrogeological and engineering properties of the rock mass. Fracturing and weathering in the rock mass have a considerable effect on both the design parameters for an engineering structure and the flow of water through the rock mass; hence, the relation between the geophysical properties and the degree of fracturing and weathering is examined in some detail. (author)

  6. Cleaning of boreholes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In terms of long-term safety it is a risk that the boreholes can eventually function as short-circuits between the repository and ground surface. Therefore sealing of investigation boreholes is an important issue for the long- term safety of high-level nuclear waste repositories. In order to seal a borehole properly, the conditions of the borehole have to meet certain predetermined requirements. One of the requirements is that no instruments or materials endangering the plugging operation or the long-term function of the sealing materials, are allowed to be left in the borehole. Sometimes drilling equipment will be left in the hole or it cannot be recovered from the hole with the given constraints of time, cost and resources in spite of attempts. Additionally various measurements may be carried out in the holes after the drilling has been completed and measuring devices may get stuck in holes. Consequently cleaning of the borehole is carried out as an essential activity before sealing can be implemented. There are two common reasons identified for the drill strings to get stuck in holes. First the drill string may get stuck due to acute drilling problems. The second case is where rods are left as casing in a hole either based on the structure of the upper part of the hole or in order to support the hole. To remove the drilling or measuring equipment lost in a borehole, special techniques and professional skill must be applied. Removing measuring equipment from a hole is often demanding and time consuming work. A vital part of the cleaning operation is planning the work in advance. In order to make the plan and to select the suitable methods it is important to know the condition of the stuck material. It is also important to know the exact depth where the equipment are stuck and to have an estimate of the reasons why they have got stuck. It is also very important to know the correct dimensions of the equipment or drill string before commencing the cleaning work

  7. Ice-Borehole Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar, Alberto; Carsey, Frank; Lane, Arthur; Engelhardt, Herman

    2006-01-01

    An instrumentation system has been developed for studying interactions between a glacier or ice sheet and the underlying rock and/or soil. Prior borehole imaging systems have been used in well-drilling and mineral-exploration applications and for studying relatively thin valley glaciers, but have not been used for studying thick ice sheets like those of Antarctica. The system includes a cylindrical imaging probe that is lowered into a hole that has been bored through the ice to the ice/bedrock interface by use of an established hot-water-jet technique. The images acquired by the cameras yield information on the movement of the ice relative to the bedrock and on visible features of the lower structure of the ice sheet, including ice layers formed at different times, bubbles, and mineralogical inclusions. At the time of reporting the information for this article, the system was just deployed in two boreholes on the Amery ice shelf in East Antarctica and after successful 2000 2001 deployments in 4 boreholes at Ice Stream C, West Antarctica, and in 2002 at Black Rapids Glacier, Alaska. The probe is designed to operate at temperatures from 40 to +40 C and to withstand the cold, wet, high-pressure [130-atm (13.20-MPa)] environment at the bottom of a water-filled borehole in ice as deep as 1.6 km. A current version is being outfitted to service 2.4-km-deep boreholes at the Rutford Ice Stream in West Antarctica. The probe (see figure) contains a sidelooking charge-coupled-device (CCD) camera that generates both a real-time analog video signal and a sequence of still-image data, and contains a digital videotape recorder. The probe also contains a downward-looking CCD analog video camera, plus halogen lamps to illuminate the fields of view of both cameras. The analog video outputs of the cameras are converted to optical signals that are transmitted to a surface station via optical fibers in a cable. Electric power is supplied to the probe through wires in the cable at a

  8. Identifying borehole geology projects

    OpenAIRE

    Brearley, S.D.

    2004-01-01

    Over the years, the British Geological Survey (BGS) has amassed a large collection of paper borehole logs from a variety of sources in the UK. This has partly occurred in response to various legal statutes requiring companies to lodge copies of this information with the BGS, as well as resulting from commercial storage contracts and voluntary donations. These hardcopy records, together with other geological and contextual documents, comprise BGS’ National Geological Records Cen...

  9. Directional borehole antenna - Theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A directional antenna has been developed for the borehole radar constructed during phase 2 of the Stripa project. The new antenna can determine the azimuth of a strong reflector with an accuracy of about 3 degrees as confirmed during experiments in Stripa, although the ratio of borehole diameter to wavelength is small, about 0.03. The antenna synthesizes the effect of a loop antenna rotating in the borehole from four signals measured in turn by a stationary antenna. These signals are also used to calculate an electric dipole signal and a check sum which is used to examine the function of the system. The theory of directional antennas is reviewed and used to design an antenna consisting of four parallel wires. The radiation pattern of this antenna is calculated using transmission line theory with due regard to polarization, which is of fundamental importance for the analysis of directional data. In particular the multipole expansion of the field is calculated to describe the antenna radiation pattern. Various sources of error, e.g. the effect of the borehole, are discussed and the methods of calibrating the antenna are reviewed. The ambiguity inherent in a loop antenna can be removed by taking the phase of the signal into account. Typical reflectors in rock, e.g. fracture zones an tunnels, may be modelled as simple geometrical structures. The corresponding analysis is described and exemplified on measurements from Stripa. Radar data is nowadays usually analyzed directly on the computer screen using the program RADINTER developed within the Stripa project. An algorithm for automatic estimation of the parameters of a reflector have been tested with some success. The relation between measured radar data and external coordinates as determined by rotational indicators is finally expressed in terms of Euler angles. (au)

  10. Borehole sealing method and apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method and apparatus is described for sealing boreholes in the earth. The borehole is blocked at the sealing level, and a sealing apparatus capable of melting rock and earth is positioned in the borehole just above seal level. The apparatus is heated to rock-melting temperature and powdered rock or other sealing material is transported down the borehole to the apparatus where it is melted, pooling on the mechanical block and allowed to cool and solidify, sealing the hole. Any length of the borehole can be sealed by slowly raising the apparatus in the borehole while continuously supplying powdered rock to the apparatus to be melted and added to the top of the column of molten and cooling rock, forming a continuous borehole seal. The sealing apparatus consists of a heater capable of melting rock, including means for supplying power to the heater, means for transporting powdered rock down the borehole to the heater, means for cooling the apparatus and means for positioning the apparatus in the borehole. 5 claims, 1 figure

  11. Borehole stability on Yme

    OpenAIRE

    Vikeså, Dan Ole

    2007-01-01

    The main object of this thesis it to perform an in-situ stress and borehole stability evaluation of the wells in the Yme field. The Inversion technique was used find the maximum and minimum horizontal stresses. The stresses were found for the whole well and for the location around each casing shoe. The field was found to be anisotropic. The outcome of the analysis was used together with data form each well to calculate fracture and collapse gradients for the wells. The fracturin...

  12. Control system for borehole tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordon, E.E.

    1987-03-10

    A control assembly is described for use with a tool including one or more subassemblies adapted for controlling and/or monitoring various events within a borehole and actuating instrumentation positioned on the earth's surface for actuating the tool. The assembly comprises: control means connected to the tool for selectively actuating one or more of the subassemblies within the tool, the control means being adapted for operation within the borehole, power supply means connected to the tool for supplying electrical power to the control means for operation thereof independent of the surface actuating instrumentation, communication means connected to the surface actuating instrumentation for communicating therewith, and connection means for selectively connecting the communication means to the control means while the tool and the control means connected thereto are within the borehole to establish communication between the control means and the surface actuating instrumentation. The connection means is adapted for operation within the borehole.

  13. Drilling a borehole for LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    1981-01-01

    Boreholes were drilled along the earlier proposed line of the LEP tunnel under the Jura to find out the conditions likely to be encountered during the construction of the LEP tunnel (Annual Report 1981 p. 106, Fig. 10).

  14. Exploratory borehole Leuggern: geology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Leuggern borehole was drilled in the Plateau Jura of Canton Aargau. The drill-site lies on land administered by the borough of Leuggern, and is located some 13 km to the north of Brugg. Drilling work lasted from July 9, 1984, until February 10, 1985. Isolated short sections were drilling using a centre-bit, but otherwise a roller-bit was used exclusively and the sedimentary cover and crystalline basement were cored virtually continuously down to the maximum depth of 1688.90 m. The 22.26 m thick sedimentary succession is subdivided into Quarternary, Upper, Middle and Lower Muschelkalk and Buntsandstein. The Upper Muschelkalk includes approximately 10 m of Trigonodus Dolomite in fully dolomitised Plattenkalk-facies. The Lower Muschelkalk is developed in its typical uniform mud-marl facies. The basement lies beneath the Bundsandstein, which rests in sharply discordant contact above the basement. The crystalline basement at Leuggern was overprinted by several post-metamorphic, post-granitic, tectonic-hydrothermal events. Later events are recorded by solution cavities and mineral fracture fillings which grew freely into open fractures. Despite problems with orientation of the core sketches, structural analyses yielded interesting results. The following petrophysical parameters were determined for the various basement lithologies: rock and grain density; total and effective porosity; internal and external specific surface and thermal conductivity. The effect of the hydrothermal alteration on these parameters is generally considerable. The location of water inflow was accomplished by means of 'fluid logging' and core inspection. A total of 35 inflow points were registered, of which 29 were clearly identifiable on the core itself. Four different types of flow systems could be characterised. (author) 22 tabs., 109 refs

  15. Development of borehole sealing technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a part of the geoscientific research in JNC Tono Geoscience Center, we are conducting the borehole investigation as a method of surveying techniques to gain an understanding of geological environment characterization (geology/geological structure, rock hydraulic characteristics, ground water geochemical characteristics and rock mechanics) from surface to deep underground. The borehole for the borehole investigation is used for monitoring hole after the borehole investigation. Since the borehole may act as a passage of groundwater flow and disturb the geological environment artificially, it has to be sealed in finally. Moreover, the hydraulic testing and the geochemical analysis of groundwater that be conducted in the zones injected some kind of lost circulation materials might be impacted on the accuracy of test result. The actual technologies regarding to these themes was researched and evaluated. In the second step, clarification of problems and procedure of R and D for solution of these problems was examined. In order to estimate the effect of lost circulation materials on hydraulic testing, a laboratory test of borehole behavior was performed using a scale model that consisted of a borehole and a water-loss zone. In this test, we found out that the lost circulation material was desorbed from the water-loss zone by back-flow action. It was proved by the test that there is little influence from lost circulation materials on hydraulic testing. Investigation regarding borehole sealing technology was conducted in literature search and interview to overseas researchers. In consequent, three kinds of materials - bentonite clay, bentonite pellet, and ethanol bentonite, were selected as effective sealing material. Moreover, five kinds of methods were selected as effective sealing methods. In water permeability test of sealing material, three kinds of sealing materials indicated lower permeability - order of 10-11 m/sec, and it was evaluated that it could be worked as

  16. Stratigraphy of the Harwell boreholes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seven boreholes, five of them partially cored, were drilled at the Atomic Energy Research Establishment at Harwell as part of a general investigation to assess the feasibility of storing low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste in underground cavities. Two of the deeper boreholes were almost wholly cored to provide samples for hydrogeological, hydrochemical, mineralogical, geochemical, geotechnical, sedimentological and stratigraphical studies to enable variations in lithology and rock properties to be assessed, both vertically and laterally, and related to their regional geological setting. This report describes the lithologies, main faunal elements and stratigraphy of the Cretaceous, Jurassic, Triassic and Carboniferous sequences proved in the boreholes. More detailed stratigraphical accounts of the late Jurassic and Cretaceous sequences will be prepared when current studies of the faunal assemblages are complete. (author)

  17. Utility service entrance in boreholes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study evaluates alternatives for utility service entrances to the repository. We determined the requirements for a repository utility supply. These requirements were defined as safety, maintainability, flexibility, reliability, cost efficiency, voltage regulation, and simplicity of operation. The study showed that repository shafts can best satisfy all requirements for location of the utility supply without the use of borehole penetrations into the repository. It is recommended that the shafts be utilized for utility distribution to the repository, and that the current NWTS program position to minimize the number of boreholes penetrating the repository horizon be maintained. 42 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  18. Imaging systems for geotechnical boreholes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott Thomson; S. Adam [CoalBed Concepts Pty Ltd. (Australia)

    2009-05-15

    The objective of this project was to develop a new system for evaluating geotechnical boreholes in underground mining. This approach was predicated on the demonstration of a commercial prototype imaging system (the Slim Borehole Scanner (SBS)) which is designed to be suitable for application in all standard geotechnical boreholes and is certified Intrinsically Safe (IS) in Europe. This project was designed to test this new imaging system in Australian conditions and critically compare the outcomes from the work with currently available technologies. A key aspect of the project was the assessment of the likely impact the imaging system has on current practices and recommendations for improved methods of geotechnical assessment in underground operations. A comprehensive field-testing program of the SBS was undertaken to evaluate its suitability for application in Australian conditions. Test work was completed at BHPB Illawarra Appin Colliery and Xstrata Coal Tahmoor Colliery. The Slim Borehole Scanner (SBS) was found to be a useful tool for enhancing the capability of Australian underground mine operators to assess roof conditions. The SBS is a significant advance on existing qualitative assessment methods such as the Borescope, and is complementary to existing direct measurement methods such as Tel-tales and Gel-extensometers. It is recommended that the SBS system undergo Australian intrinsic safety approval and be adopted as a routine part of the geotechnical engineer's arsenal in assessing roof control issues in Australian mines.

  19. Exploratory borehole Kaisten. Geology - appendix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Kaisten borehole was the fifth (after Boettstein, Weiach, Riniken and Schafisheim) in Nagra's deep drilling programme in Northern Switzerland. It is located within the community of Kaisten, Canton Aargau, approximately 3 km south-west of Laufenburg railway station. The final depth of the borehole was 1306 m. Drilling began on 13th February 1984, continued up to 27th June 1984 and was carried out almost exclusively using the conventional rotary drilling method. With the exception of a 5.5 m-long section in the Muschelkalk and two shallow centering boreholes, the whole drilled section was cored. From a depth of 321.5 m in the Crystalline, removal of cores was done by wire core drilling. The wide range of field and laboratory investigations carried out included stratigraphic-sedimentological and mineralogical-petrographic programmes, as well as different petrophysical, geochemical and isotope geochemistry investigation. This report is a summary of all data acquired up to the end of December 1986. Beneath a sedimentary cover just 300 m thick, with Muschelkalk at the top and Permian at the base, the Kaisten borehole entered the crystalline basement at a depth of 296.5 m; investigations were carried out down to a depth of 1306 m. (author) 55 figs., 42 tabs

  20. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant borehole data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data pertaining to all the surface boreholes used at the WIPP site for site characterization hydrological testing and resource evaluation exist in numerous source documents. This project was initiated to develop a comprehensive data base that would include the data on all WIPP related surface boreholes from the Atomic Energy Commission, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Energy Research and Development Administration, Department of Energy, and Hydrologic Test Borehole Programs. The data compiled from each borehole includes: operator, permit number, location, total depth, type of well, driller, drilling record, casing record, plugging schedule, and stratigraphic summary. There are six groups of boreholes contained in this data base, they are as follows: Commercially Drilled Potash Boreholes, Energy Department Wells, Geologic Exploration Boreholes, Hydrologic Test Boreholes, Potash Boreholes, and Subsurface Exploration Boreholes. There were numerous references which contained borehole data. In some cases the data found in one document was inconsistent with data in another document. In order to ensure consistency and accuracy in the data base, the same references were used for as many of the boreholes as possible. For example, all elevations and locations were taken from Compilation and Comparison of Test-Hole Location Surveys in the Vicinity of the WIPP Site. SAND 88-1065, Table 3-5. There are some sections where a data field is left blank. In this case, the information was either not applicable or was unavailable

  1. Detecting a fluid-filled borehole using elastic waves from a remote borehole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaoming; Cao, Jingji; Li, Zhen; Su, Yuanda

    2016-08-01

    The interaction of a fluid-filled borehole with incident elastic waves is an important topic for downhole acoustic measurements. By analyzing the wave phenomena of this problem, one can simulate the detection of a borehole target using a source-receiver system in a remote borehole. The analysis result shows that the wave signals from the target borehole are of sufficient amplitude even though the borehole size is small compared to wavelength. Consequently, the target borehole can be detected when the two boreholes are far away from each other. The result can be utilized to provide a method for testing downhole acoustic imaging tools. PMID:27586782

  2. Exploratory borehole Weiach. Working programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An extensive geophysical borehole logging programme will serve to verify the results of the core analysis and comlement the core data. Numerous borehole logs are to be registered with different types of tools. These allow one to determine various parameters essential for the full description of the rock sequences penetrated. A first category of logs enables the petrographical identification of the different rock types and indicates porous zones that are either water- or hydrocarbon bearing. A second category provides data e.g. on the degree of pore and fracture fill, rock density and rock temperature, natural gamma radiation and rock-mechanical properties. Other logs measure strike and dip of the sedimentary layers and the position of rock fractures. A fourth category provides information on the diameter and the deviation of the borehole, the quality of casing cementations and the position of casing joints. In addition, well shooting surveys will supply exact values of seismic velocities for the various rock units; data that are needed for the depth correction of the reflection profiles from Nagra's regional seismic network. With numerous hydrological tests ranging from an open-hole production test of the Muschelkalk aquifer to labelled slug tests in low-permeability crystalline sections, the hydraulic conditions of deep groundwater flow will be investigated. The recovered water samples will undergo full physical and geochemical analysis. Furthermore, their isotope content is to be measured in order to estimate the age of the various formation waters. To round off the scientific investigations, a series of rock-mechanical and geotechnical laboratory tests will provide characteristic values to be applied eventually in the design and construction of shafts and caverns for an underground repository

  3. Exploratory borehole Riniken. Working programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An extensive geophysical borehole logging programme will serve to verify the results of the core analysis and comlement the core data. Numerous borehole logs are to be registered with different types of tools. These allow one to determine various parameters essential for the full description of the rock sequences penetrated. A first category of logs enables the petrographical identification of the different rock types and indicates porous zones that are either water- or hydrocarbon-bearing. A second category provides data e.g. on the degree of pore and fracture fill, rock density and rock temperature, natural gamma radiation and rock-mechanical properties. Other logs measure strike and dip of the sedimentary layers and the position of rock fractures. A forth category provides information on the diameter and the deviation of the borehole, the quality of casing cementations and the position of casing joints. In addition, well shooting surveys will supply exact values of seismic velocities for the various rock units; data that are needed for the depth correction of the reflection profiles from Nagra's regional seismic network. With numerous hydrological tests ranging from a production test of the Muschelkalk aquifer to labelled slug tests in low-permeability crystalline sections, the hydraulic conditions of deep groundwater flow will be investigated. The recovered water samples will undergo full physical and geochemical analysis. Furthermore, their isotope content is to be measured in order to estimate the age of the various formation waters and their time of residence in the subsurface. To round off the scientific investigations, a series of rock-mechanical and geotechnical laboratory tests will provide characteristic values to be applied eventually in the design and construction of shafts and caverns for an underground repository

  4. Exploratory borehole Leuggern. Working program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An extensive geophysical borehole logging programme will serve to verify the results of the core analysis and complement the core data. Numerous borehole logs are to be registered with different types of tools. These allow one to determine various parameters essential for the full description of the rock sequences penetrated. A first category of logs enables the petrographical identification of the different rock types and indicates porous zones that are either water- or hydrocarbon-bearing. A second category provides data e.g. on the degree of pore and fracture fill, rock density and rock temperature, natural gamma radiation and rock-mechanical properties. Other logs measure strike and dip of the sedimentary layers and the position of rock fractures. A fourth category provides information on the diameter and the deviation of the borehole, the quality of casing cementations and the position of casing joints. In addition, well shooting surveys will supply exact values of seismic velocities for the various rock units; data that are needed for the depth correction of the reflection profiles from Nagra's regional seismic network. With numerous hydrological tests ranging from a production tests of the Muschelkalk and Buntsandstein aquifers to labelled slug-tests in low-permeability crystalline sections, the hydraulic conditions of deep groundwater flow will be investigated. The recovered water samples will undergo full physical and geochemical analysis. Furthermore, their isotope content is to be measured in order to estimate the age of the various formation waters and their time of residence in the subsurface. To round off the scientific investigations, a series of rock-mechanical and geotechnical laboratory tests will provide characteristic values to be applied eventually in the design and construction of shafts and caverns for an underground repository

  5. Exploratory borehole Kaisten. Working program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The next well on the Nagra drilling programme, Kaisten, lies at the southern border of the Rhine valley. An extensive geophysical borehole logging programme will serve to verify the results of the core analysis and complement the core data. Numerous borehole logs are to be registered with different types of tools. These allow one to determine various parameters essential for the full description of the rock sequences penetrated. A first category of logs enables the petrographical identification of the different rock types and indicates porous zones that are either water- or hydrocarbon-bearing. A second category provides data e.g. on the degree of pore and fracture fill, rock density and rock temperature, natural gamma radiation and rock-mechanical properties. Other logs measure strike and dip of the sedimentary layers and the position of rock fractures. A fourth category provides information on the diameter and the deviation of the borehole, the quality of casing cementations and the position of casing joints. In addition, well shooting surveys will supply exact values of seismic velocities for the various rock units; data that are needed for the depth correction of the reflection profiles from Nagra's regional seismic network. With numerous hydrological tests ranging from production tests of the Buntsandstein aquifer to labelled slug-tests in low-permeability crystalline sections, the hydraulic conditions of deep groundwater flow will be investigated. The recovered water samples will undergo full physical and geochemical analysis. Furthermore, their isotope content is to be measured in order to estimate the age of the various formation waters and their time of residence in the subsurface

  6. Device for geophysical borehole investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electronic circuits for an improved system for the determination of uranium, thorium and potassium in geological structures penetrated by a borehole are described. Previous methods have only considered the main characteristic gamma peaks for these elements and have given poor statistical accuracy. The system described covers the whole energy range from 0.15 to 3 MeV using a sodium iodide scintillator counter, with the energy range divided into five windows. The spectra are analysed by an analogue computer which has previously been calibrated against samples of known concentration. (JIW)

  7. Geophysical borehole logging test procedure: Final draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of geophysical borehole logging from the At-Depth Facility (ADF) is to provide information which will assist in characterizing the site geologic conditions and in classifying the engineering characteristics of the rock mass in the vicinity of the ADF. The direct goals of borehole logging include identification of lithologic units and their correlation from hole to hole, identification of fractured or otherwise porous or permeable zones, quantitative or semi-quantitative estimation of various formation properties, and evaluation of factors such as the borehole diameter and orientation. 11 figs., 4 tabs

  8. A directional antenna for borehole radar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The borehole radar system developed during phase II of the International Stripa Project has been successfully applied to mapping fracture zones up to 100 meters from the borehole in granite. The techniques previously used to determine the orientation of fracture zones (single hole reflection, crosshole reflection, crosshole tomography) have been supplemented with a directional antenna, which makes it possible to determine the orientation from measurements in a single borehole. The antenna works by synthesizing four signals to produce directional information. Tests performed in Stripa show that the resolution of the antenna is about 50

  9. Borehole Summary Report for Waste Treatment Plant Seismic Borehole C4993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rust, Colleen F.; Barnett, D. BRENT; Bowles, Nathan A.; Horner, Jake A.

    2007-02-28

    A core hole (C4998) and three boreholes (C4993, C4996, and C4997) were drilled to acquire stratigraphic and downhole seismic data to model potential seismic impacts and to refine design specifications and seismic criteria for the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) under construction on the Hanford Site. Borehole C4993 was completed through the Saddle Mountains Basalt, the upper portion of the Wanapum Basalt, and associated sedimentary interbeds, to provide a continuous record of the rock penetrated by all four holes and to provide access to the subsurface for geophysical measure¬ment. Presented and compiled in this report are field-generated records for the deep mud rotary borehole C4993 at the WTP site. Material for C4993 includes borehole logs, lithologic summary, and record of rock chip samples collected during drilling through the months of August through early October. The borehole summary report also includes documentation of the mud rotary drilling, borehole logging, and sample collection.

  10. Which boreholes do we need to resolve the Common Era in borehole paleoclimatology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath, V.; Smerdon, J. E.; González-Rouco, J. F.; Beltrami, H.

    2012-04-01

    The global database of borehole temperature profiles used to estimate paleoclimatic ground surface temperature histories (GSTHs) has typically focused on the last 500 years. his is mainly due to the fact that the borehole database is dominated by shallow boreholes (~200-300 m). Nevertheless, it has been shown that these boreholes may be too shallow for proper separation of the downwelling climatic transient and the long-term background steady-state signal associated with heat loss from the earth's interior. The mere inclusion of deeper boreholes, however, does not necessarily mitigate the problem. Borehole temperature profiles of any depth show the signatures of earlier climatic changes, including the strong warming following the last glacial maximum (LGM). In shallow boreholes this effect is very similar to a linear trend, usually cannot be discriminated from a steady-state geotherm, and is unlikely to strongly impact estimates of GSTHs spanning common-era timescales. In deeper boreholes, however, the signature of the LGM cannot be approximated linearly, and biases associated with the LGM may impact GSTH reconstructions during the Common Era. The combined incentive to employ deep boreholes for reliable estimation of the background steady-state signal, while limiting the LGM impacts on reconstructions of Common-Era GSTHs thus leads to an multi-objective optimization problem seeking a trade-off between the impacts of the two effects. Such an optimization of the borehole maximum depth criterion is investigated in this study using numerical models. A Monte Carlo ensemble approach is used to quantify the impact of various reconstruction decisions as temperature histories, error characteristics, thermophysical properties, and maximum borehole depths. The findings have implications for interpretations of current global reconstruction products and future efforts to analyze the global borehole database for Common-Era GSTH reconstructions. (http://palma.fis.ucm.es/~volker/)

  11. Crosshole investigations - results from borehole radar investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new borehole radar system has been designed, built and tested. The system consists of borehole transmitter and receiver probes, a signal control unit for communication with the borehole probes, and a computer unit for storage and display of data. The system can be used both in singlehole and crosshole modes and probing ranges of 115 m and 300 m, respectively, have been obtained at Stripa. The borehole radar is a short pulse system which uses center frequencies in the range 20 to 60 MHz. Single hole reflection measurements have been used to identify fracture zones and to determine their position and orientation. The travel time and amplitude of the first arrival measured in a crosshole experiment can be used as input data in a tomographic analysis. (orig./DG)

  12. Borehole Summary Report for Waste Treatment Plant Seismic Borehole C4996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams , S. C.; Ahlquist, Stephen T.; Fetters, Jeffree R.; Garcia, Ben; Rust, Colleen F.

    2007-01-28

    This report presents the field-generated borehole log, lithologic summary, and the record of samples collected during the recent drilling and sampling of the basalt interval of borehole C4996 at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) on the Hanford Site. Borehole C4996 was one of four exploratory borings, one core hole and three boreholes, drilled to investigate and acquire detailed stratigraphic and down-hole seismic data. This data will be used to define potential seismic impacts and refine design specifications for the Hanford Site WTP.

  13. Using boreholes as windows into groundwater ecosystems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P R Sorensen

    Full Text Available Groundwater ecosystems remain poorly understood yet may provide ecosystem services, make a unique contribution to biodiversity and contain useful bio-indicators of water quality. Little is known about ecosystem variability, the distribution of invertebrates within aquifers, or how representative boreholes are of aquifers. We addressed these issues using borehole imaging and single borehole dilution tests to identify three potential aquifer habitats (fractures, fissures or conduits intercepted by two Chalk boreholes at different depths beneath the surface (34 to 98 m. These habitats were characterised by sampling the invertebrates, microbiology and hydrochemistry using a packer system to isolate them. Samples were taken with progressively increasing pumped volume to assess differences between borehole and aquifer communities. The study provides a new conceptual framework to infer the origin of water, invertebrates and microbes sampled from boreholes. It demonstrates that pumping 5 m(3 at 0.4-1.8 l/sec was sufficient to entrain invertebrates from five to tens of metres into the aquifer during these packer tests. Invertebrates and bacteria were more abundant in the boreholes than in the aquifer, with associated water chemistry variations indicating that boreholes act as sites of enhanced biogeochemical cycling. There was some variability in invertebrate abundance and bacterial community structure between habitats, indicating ecological heterogeneity within the aquifer. However, invertebrates were captured in all aquifer samples, and bacterial abundance, major ion chemistry and dissolved oxygen remained similar. Therefore the study demonstrates that in the Chalk, ecosystems comprising bacteria and invertebrates extend from around the water table to 70 m below it. Hydrogeological techniques provide excellent scope for tackling outstanding questions in groundwater ecology, provided an appropriate conceptual hydrogeological understanding is applied.

  14. Working programme for MIU-4 borehole investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ota, Kunio; Nakano, Katsushi; Metcalfe, R.; Ikeda, Koki; Goto, Jun-ichi; Amano, Kenji; Takeuchi, Shinji; Hama, Katsuhiro; Matsui, Hiroya [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Toki, Gifu (Japan). Tono Geoscience Center

    1999-08-01

    Surface-based investigations have now been carried out since 1997 according to the Master Plan of the Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory (MIU) (PNC, 1996). The specific goals of the surface-based investigations are: To acquire information necessary for understanding the undisturbed deep geological environment as a background of the MIU and for predicting the effects of the construction of underground facilities. To establish methodologies for evaluating predictions. To formulate detailed design concepts for underground facilities and to plan scientific investigations during the construction of the MIU. In addition, appropriate, systematic methodologies for investigating the deep subsurface should be developed through the surface-based investigations. It is expected that the surface-based investigations with further borehole investigations will last until March 2002. However, the construction of the MIU was provisionally planned to commence in the 2000 financial year. JNC has drilled four 1,000m-deep boreholes and one 400m-deep borehole at the MIU site (JNC's land of about 140,000m{sup 2}) in Akeyo-cho, Mizunami City, Gifu Prefecture. In the surface-based investigations, specifically three 1,000m-deep boreholes, MIU-1, MIU-2 and MIU-3, have been drilled. Investigations in these boreholes have characterised mainly the geological structure and hydrogeological features of the deep geological environment. In addition, JNC has been developing investigation techniques and improving equipment for these investigations. At the time of writing, a series of borehole investigations are being carried out in the MIU-3 borehole. The MIU-3 borehole investigations aim mainly at characterising the Tsukiyoshi fault that intersects the crystalline basement in the site. (J.P.N.)

  15. Working programme for MIU-4 borehole investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surface-based investigations have now been carried out since 1997 according to the Master Plan of the Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory (MIU) (PNC, 1996). The specific goals of the surface-based investigations are: To acquire information necessary for understanding the undisturbed deep geological environment as a background of the MIU and for predicting the effects of the construction of underground facilities. To establish methodologies for evaluating predictions. To formulate detailed design concepts for underground facilities and to plan scientific investigations during the construction of the MIU. In addition, appropriate, systematic methodologies for investigating the deep subsurface should be developed through the surface-based investigations. It is expected that the surface-based investigations with further borehole investigations will last until March 2002. However, the construction of the MIU was provisionally planned to commence in the 2000 financial year. JNC has drilled four 1,000m-deep boreholes and one 400m-deep borehole at the MIU site (JNC's land of about 140,000m2) in Akeyo-cho, Mizunami City, Gifu Prefecture. In the surface-based investigations, specifically three 1,000m-deep boreholes, MIU-1, MIU-2 and MIU-3, have been drilled. Investigations in these boreholes have characterised mainly the geological structure and hydrogeological features of the deep geological environment. In addition, JNC has been developing investigation techniques and improving equipment for these investigations. At the time of writing, a series of borehole investigations are being carried out in the MIU-3 borehole. The MIU-3 borehole investigations aim mainly at characterising the Tsukiyoshi fault that intersects the crystalline basement in the site. (J.P.N.)

  16. Geophysical logging of the Harwell boreholes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comprehensive geophysical borehole logging survey was carried out on each of three deep boreholes drilled at the Harwell research site. KOALA and PETRA computer programs were used to analyse and interpret the logs to obtain continuous quantitative estimates of the geological and hydrogeological properties of the sequences penetrated at the Harwell site. Quantitative estimates of the mineral composition and porosity of the cores samples were made. (UK)

  17. Borehole stability in densely welded tuffs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuenkajorn, K.; Daemen, J.J.K. [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Mining and Geological Engineering

    1992-07-01

    The stability of boreholes, or more generally of underground openings (i.e. including shafts, ramps, drifts, tunnels, etc.) at locations where seals or plugs are to be placed is an important consideration in seal design for a repository (Juhlin and Sandstedt, 1989). Borehole instability or borehole breakouts induced by stress redistribution could negate the effectiveness of seals or plugs. Breakout fractures along the wall of repository excavations or exploratory holes could provide a preferential flowpath for groundwater or gaseous radionuclides to bypass the plugs. After plug installation, swelling pressures exerted by a plug could induce radial cracks or could open or widen preexisting cracks in the rock at the bottom of the breakouts where the tangential compressive stresses have been released by the breakout process. The purpose of the work reported here is to determine experimentally the stability of a circular hole in a welded tuff sample subjected to various external boundary loads. Triaxial and biaxial borehole stability tests have been performed on densely welded Apache Leap tuff samples and Topopah Spring tuff samples. The nominal diameter of the test hole is 13.3 or 14.4 mm for triaxial testing, and 25.4 mm for biaxial testing. The borehole axis is parallel to one of the principal stress axes. The boreholes are drilled through the samples prior to applying external boundary loads. The boundary loads are progressively increased until breakouts occur or until the maximum load capacity of the loading system has been reached. 74 refs.

  18. Borehole stability in densely welded tuffs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stability of boreholes, or more generally of underground openings (i.e. including shafts, ramps, drifts, tunnels, etc.) at locations where seals or plugs are to be placed is an important consideration in seal design for a repository (Juhlin and Sandstedt, 1989). Borehole instability or borehole breakouts induced by stress redistribution could negate the effectiveness of seals or plugs. Breakout fractures along the wall of repository excavations or exploratory holes could provide a preferential flowpath for groundwater or gaseous radionuclides to bypass the plugs. After plug installation, swelling pressures exerted by a plug could induce radial cracks or could open or widen preexisting cracks in the rock at the bottom of the breakouts where the tangential compressive stresses have been released by the breakout process. The purpose of the work reported here is to determine experimentally the stability of a circular hole in a welded tuff sample subjected to various external boundary loads. Triaxial and biaxial borehole stability tests have been performed on densely welded Apache Leap tuff samples and Topopah Spring tuff samples. The nominal diameter of the test hole is 13.3 or 14.4 mm for triaxial testing, and 25.4 mm for biaxial testing. The borehole axis is parallel to one of the principal stress axes. The boreholes are drilled through the samples prior to applying external boundary loads. The boundary loads are progressively increased until breakouts occur or until the maximum load capacity of the loading system has been reached. 74 refs

  19. Study on sealing of boreholes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A bibliographical research on the problem of the backfilling and sealing of boreholes, shafts and tunnels for radioactive waste disposal has been carried out. Various materials - both natural and artificial - like clay, industrial cement, polymer concrete, geothermical and magnesium cement have been examined. Their main physico-chemical and durability characteristics have been examined. The problem of the interaction between the sealing and the geological environment has been also dealt. The final subject discussed in the bibliography is the damage caused to the host formation by the excavation of shafts and tunnels. The laboratory tests have been performed on a natural clay and other types of material (cement grout, cement grout with expansive additive, cement mortar and remoulded clay) which have been used as plug materials. The main conclusions obtained from the tests are the following: - The permeability of the cement is lower than the permeability of the clay; - no adhesion was observed between clay and cement mortar, with or without expansive additive, when cured under different ambient conditions, but without any application of load; - When curing took place under load, good adhesion was observed between the clay and the cement mortar; - The flow of water in a specimen consisting of a clay core surrounded by remoulded clay is larger than in the natural clay. These results seem to be caused by the different permeabilities of the remoulded and undisturbed clay and not to depend on flow at the contact between the two materials. A remote instrumentation package for the in situ evaluation of the performance of a plug, has been developed. In order to get rid of the uncertainty associated with the infiltration of the cables through the plug a wireless data transmission system, based on acoustic waves, has been developed

  20. Nuclear borehole logging techniques for coal quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The progress achieved by nuclear logging in the coal industry has been significant. The 'in-situ' information about coal seams provided by borehole logging can significantly reduce exploration and development costs. Nuclear borehole logging is used routinely in the exploration for coal and is getting more acceptance in the mining stage for quality control. Nuclear borehole logging is used to delineate the coal strata and to determine their thickness, depth, ash content, calorific value and Fe and Si content of ash. Two techniques have been developed in the last 7 years for coal logging in boreholes: (i) The spectrometric gamma-gamma for the determination of ash content in coal; and (ii) the prompt neutron-gamma method for the determination of ash, calorific value, Si and Fe in coal. In this paper both gamma-gamma and neutron-gamma techniques were developed for delineating the coal seams and predicting the ash content in coal. The neutron-gamma technique is superior because it can also determine the Si and Fe content of coal and it can sample a larger volume of coal. The neutron-gamma technique is less affected by the rugosity and condition of the borehole. (author). 6 refs, 5 figs, 2 tabs

  1. Developments of borehole strain observation outside China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱泽华; 石耀霖

    2004-01-01

    Borehole strain observation is playing an increasingly important role in the study on the crustal movements. It hasbeen used by many countries such as China, USA, Japan, Peru, Australia, South Africa, Iceland and Italy, in research fields of plate tectonics, earthquake, volcanic eruption, dam safety, oil field subsidence, mining collapse andso on. Borehole strainmeter has been improved rapidly and tends to get more and more components included inone probe. Based on observations by this kind of instruments, studies on seismic strain step, slow earthquake,earthquake precursor and volcanic eruption forecasting have made remarkable achievements. In the coming years,borehole strain observation is going to become one major geodetic means, together with GPS and InSAR.

  2. VTT test borehole for bedrock investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A borehole of depth 150 m and diameter 56 mm has been drilled in the area adjacent to the premises of the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) at Otaniemi, Espoo, for the purposes of calibrating geophysical measurements devices. This report presents the test results obtained so far and illustrates the processing of these, in which the various measurements are plotted as curves and combinations of curves. The interpretations provided so far consists of analyses of lithological variations, bedrock fracturing, the nature and occurrence of fracture zones and groundwater flow patterns. Samples were taken from those parts of the core shown by the borehole measurements to be homogenous and thin sections made from these for mineralogical determinations. The rock mechanical and petrophysical properties of the same points were examined. The core is in the possession of VTT, and the hole itself is available to outsiders for the calibration and testing of borehole measurement equipment. (orig.). (21 refs., 13 figs., 5 tabs.)

  3. Excess plutonium disposition: The deep borehole option

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report reviews the current status of technologies required for the disposition of plutonium in Very Deep Holes (VDH). It is in response to a recent National Academy of Sciences (NAS) report which addressed the management of excess weapons plutonium and recommended three approaches to the ultimate disposition of excess plutonium: (1) fabrication and use as a fuel in existing or modified reactors in a once-through cycle, (2) vitrification with high-level radioactive waste for repository disposition, (3) burial in deep boreholes. As indicated in the NAS report, substantial effort would be required to address the broad range of issues related to deep bore-hole emplacement. Subjects reviewed in this report include geology and hydrology, design and engineering, safety and licensing, policy decisions that can impact the viability of the concept, and applicable international programs. Key technical areas that would require attention should decisions be made to further develop the borehole emplacement option are identified

  4. Excess plutonium disposition: The deep borehole option

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferguson, K.L.

    1994-08-09

    This report reviews the current status of technologies required for the disposition of plutonium in Very Deep Holes (VDH). It is in response to a recent National Academy of Sciences (NAS) report which addressed the management of excess weapons plutonium and recommended three approaches to the ultimate disposition of excess plutonium: (1) fabrication and use as a fuel in existing or modified reactors in a once-through cycle, (2) vitrification with high-level radioactive waste for repository disposition, (3) burial in deep boreholes. As indicated in the NAS report, substantial effort would be required to address the broad range of issues related to deep bore-hole emplacement. Subjects reviewed in this report include geology and hydrology, design and engineering, safety and licensing, policy decisions that can impact the viability of the concept, and applicable international programs. Key technical areas that would require attention should decisions be made to further develop the borehole emplacement option are identified.

  5. VTT test borehole for bedrock investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okko, Olli; Hassinen, Pertti; Front, Kai

    1994-02-01

    A borehole of depth 150 m and diameter 56 mm has been drilled in the area adjacent to the premises of the Technical Research Center of Finland (VTT) at Otaniemi, Espoo, for the purposes of calibrating geophysical measurement devices. The report presents the test results obtained so far and illustrates the processing of these, in which the various measurements are plotted as curves and combinations of curves. The interpretations provided so far consist of analyses of lithological variations, bedrock fracturing, the nature and occurrence of fracture zones and groundwater flow patterns. Samples were taken from those parts of the core shown by the borehole measurements to be homogeneous and thin sections made from these for mineralogical determinations. The rock mechanical and petrophysical properties of the same points were examined. The core is in the possession of VTT, and the hole itself is available to outsiders for the calibration and testing of borehole measurement equipment.

  6. Site response assessment using borehole seismic records

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Donghee; Chang, Chunjoong; Choi, Weonhack [KHNP Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    In regions with high seismic activity, such as Japan, the Western United States and Taiwan, borehole seismometers installed deep underground are used to monitor seismic activity during the course of seismic wave propagation at various depths and to study the stress changes due to earthquakes and analyze the connection to fault movements. The Korea Meteorological Administration (KMA) and the Korea Institute of Geology and Mining (KIGAM) have installed and are operating borehole seismometers at a depth of 70∼100 meters for the precise determination of epicenters. Also, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd. (KHNP) has installed and is operating 2 borehole seismic stations near Weolseong area to observe at a depth of 140 meters seismic activities connected to fault activity. KHNP plans to operate in the second half of 2014 a borehole seismic station for depths less than 300 and 600 meters in order to study the seismic response characteristics in deep strata. As a basic study for analyzing ground motion response characteristics at depths of about 300 to 600 meters in connection with the deep geological disposal of spent nuclear fuel, the present study examined the background noise response characteristics of the borehole seismic station operated by KHNP. In order to analyze the depth-dependent impact of seismic waves at deeper depths than in Korea, seismic data collected by Japan's KIK-net seismic stations were used and the seismic wave characteristics analyzed by size and depth. In order to analyze the borehole seismic observation data from the seismic station operated by KHNP, this study analyzed the background noise characteristics by using a probability density function.

  7. Borehole radar and BIPS investigations in boreholes at the Boda area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlsten, S.; Straahle, A. [GEOSIGMA AB, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2000-12-01

    As part of the studies conducted in the Boda area, measurements with borehole radar, borehole TV (BIPS) and deviation measurements were performed during May 2000. The investigations were carried out in four percussion-drilled boreholes with a total length of 514 m. Two boreholes are vertical and two are directed into and below the cave area. The BIPS measurement showed the presence of 14 open fractures. Largest apparent aperture width of open fractures was 133 mm. In the lowest part in boreholes 2, 3, and 4, particles in suspension deteriorated the visibility. BIPS has revealed a dominating subhorizontal fracture set and another striking NW to N-S with a dip close to vertical. Possible but very uncertain is a third fracture set striking NE and dipping steeply towards S. The open and partly open fractures forms an average block size 11 m wide and 6 m high, while the length of the block is uncertain. Of 98 borehole radar reflectors interpreted to intersect within BIPS-mapped sections, 90 were possible to combine with BIPS-mapped structures, i.e. 92% of the radar reflectors. The fractured rock around Boda is a shallow feature, since borehole radar and BIPS measurements shows no evidence of increased fracturing or the presence of caves at larger depth in the Boda area. The result indicates that the formation of the superficial fracture system (with caves included) at Boda in all probability is connected to glacial action, such as banking.

  8. Characterization of crystalline rocks in deep boreholes. The Kola, Krivoy Rog and Tyrnauz boreholes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SKB studies, as one alternative, the feasibility of disposing of spent nuclear fuel in very deep boreholes. As a part of this work NEDRA has compiled geoscientific data from three superdeep boreholes within the former Soviet Union. The holes considered were: the Kola borehole, 12261 m deep and located on the Kola Peninsula, the Krivoy Rog borehole, 5000 m deep and located in Ukraine, and the Tyrnauz borehole, 4001 m deep and located between the Black Sea and the Caspian Sea. These boreholes all penetrate crystalline formations, but major differences are found when their tectonic environments are compared. Excluding the uppermost horizon affected by surface phenomena, data do not indicate any general correlation between depth and the state of rock fracturing, which is instead governed by site specific, lithological and tectonical factors. This applies also to fracture zones, which are found at similar frequencies at all depths. As opposed to the structural data, the hydrogeological and hydrochemical information reveals a vertical zonation, with clear similarities between the three boreholes. An upper zone with active circulation and fresh or slightly mineralized groundwaters reaches down 1000-2000 m. The interval from 1000-2000 m down to 4000-5000 m can be characterized as a transition zone with lower circulation rates and gradually increasing mineralisation. Below 4000-5000 m, strongly mineralized, stagnant, juvenile or metamorphogenic waters are found. Geothermal data verify the existence of this zonation. 28 figs, 30 tabs

  9. Borehole radar and BIPS investigations in boreholes at the Boda area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of the studies conducted in the Boda area, measurements with borehole radar, borehole TV (BIPS) and deviation measurements were performed during May 2000. The investigations were carried out in four percussion-drilled boreholes with a total length of 514 m. Two boreholes are vertical and two are directed into and below the cave area. The BIPS measurement showed the presence of 14 open fractures. Largest apparent aperture width of open fractures was 133 mm. In the lowest part in boreholes 2, 3, and 4, particles in suspension deteriorated the visibility. BIPS has revealed a dominating subhorizontal fracture set and another striking NW to N-S with a dip close to vertical. Possible but very uncertain is a third fracture set striking NE and dipping steeply towards S. The open and partly open fractures forms an average block size 11 m wide and 6 m high, while the length of the block is uncertain. Of 98 borehole radar reflectors interpreted to intersect within BIPS-mapped sections, 90 were possible to combine with BIPS-mapped structures, i.e. 92% of the radar reflectors. The fractured rock around Boda is a shallow feature, since borehole radar and BIPS measurements shows no evidence of increased fracturing or the presence of caves at larger depth in the Boda area. The result indicates that the formation of the superficial fracture system (with caves included) at Boda in all probability is connected to glacial action, such as banking

  10. Borehole sealing: conceptual design and feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report criteria for sealing boreholes are first considered and the requirements for sealing materials are then specified. For the conceptual design use is made of a multiple-zone borehole plug consisting of key zones and intermediate zones in between. The key zones are located in competent, low-fissured rock and act as efficient barriers to prevent a drain effect by the borehole. Highly compacted bentonite in the form of cylinders with a diameter slightly smaller than that of the borehole and also in the form of spheres or pellets is used as plug material in the key zones, while cement is employed for the intermediate zones. A literature review has revealed that in past experiments mostly cement and bentonite were used as plug materials. The corresponding results showed that both materials are potentially successful candidates. For plug emplacement, it is proposed to employ either a specially designed emplacement tool or a perforated pipe. The latter method is easier to use but the pipe has to remain in the borehole. It is recommended to have a dry density of the bentonite after swelling of not less than 1.3 Mg/m3. This implies limiting values for the space between the bentonite cylinder and the borehole wall. By means of a bentonite slurry filled into the borehole at the key zone, the allowable ring space can be slightly enlarged. For the use of bentonite in the form of spheres or pellets experimental data are scarce and emplacement procedures are not sufficiently developed to guarantee the required minimum final dry density. In order to check the quality of the plug, an indirect procedure is recommended. For sealing boreholes penetrating into the repository zone, direct quality control is then limited to checking whether the procedure is adhered to as specified and to recording the quantities of materials emplaced. It is shown that the proposed plug design represents an efficient flow barrier and that it can satisfy the specified requirements. (author) 13

  11. Borehole radar modeling for reservoir monitoring applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miorali, M.; Slob, E.C.; Arts, R.J.

    2010-01-01

    The use of down-hole sensors and remotely controlled valves in wells provide enormous benefits to reservoir management and oil production. We suggest borehole radar measurements as a promising technique capable of monitoring the arrival of undesired fluids in the proximity of production wells. The h

  12. Groundwater flow dynamic investigation without drilling boreholes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustafa, Mahmoud

    2015-02-01

    The flow net map is a basic tool for groundwater flow dynamics investigation. In areas where there are no boreholes or piezometers are not available, constructing flow net map may be difficult. This work proposes a simple methodology to construct flow net map without drilling boreholes. The flow net map constructed using the proposed approach represents an expected flow net map, which can draw conceptual flow model of the site. The major benefit from constructing the expected flow net map is it gives guidance for locating new boreholes for site investigation, carrying out investigation of the groundwater flow directions and estimating recharge/discharge from the site boundary. An illustrative example for the proposed approach was presented to show how the data required to construct the expected flow net map can be collected. The constructed, expected flow net map using the proposed methodology was compared with actual flow net map constructed from measured water levels. Both maps give consistent hydrological information about the site. The suggested approach represents a simple and cheap way to carry out investigation of groundwater flow dynamics in areas where there are no boreholes are available.

  13. Exploratory borehole Kaisten. Geology - text volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Kaisten borehole was the fifth (after Boettstein, Weiach, Riniken and Schafisheim) in Nagra's deep drilling programme in Northern Switzerland. It is located within the community of Kaisten, Canton Aargau, approximately 3 km south-west of Laufenburg railway station. The final depth of the borehole was 1306 m. Drilling began on 13th February 1984, continued up to 27th June 1984 and was carried out almost exclusively using the conventional rotary drilling method. With the exception of a 5.5 m-long section in the Muschelkalk and two shallow centering boreholes, the whole drilled section was cored. From a depth of 321.5 m in the Crystalline, removal of cores was done by wire core drilling. The wide range of field and laboratory investigations carried out included stratigraphic-sedimentological and mineralogical-petrographic programmes, as well as different petrophysical, geochemical and isotope geochemistry investigation. This report is a summary of all data acquired up to the end of December 1986. Beneath a sedimentary cover just 300 m thick, with Muschelkalk at the top and Permian at the base, the Kaisten borehole entered the crystalline basement at a depth of 296.5 m; investigations were carried out down to a depth of 1306 m. (author) 6 tabs., 122 refs

  14. Method for orienting a borehole core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method is described for longitudinally orienting a borehold core with respect to the longitudinal axis of the drill string which drilled said borehold core in such a manner that the original longitudinal attitude of said borehold core within the earth may be determined. At least a portion of said borehold core is partialy demagnetized in steps to thereby at least partially remove in steps the artificial remanent magnetism imparted to said borehole core by said drill string. The artifical remanent magnetism is oriented substantially parallel to the longitudinal axis of said drill string. The direction and intensity of the total magnetism of said borehold core is measured at desired intervals during the partial demagnetizing procedure. An artificial remanent magnetism vector is established which extends from the final measurement of the direction and intensity of the total magnetism of said borehole core taken during said partial demagnetizing procedure towards the initial measurement of the direction and intensity of the total magnetism of said borehold core taken during said partial demagnetizing procedure. The borehold core is oriented in such a manner that said artificial remanent magnetism vector points at least substantially downwardly towards the bottom of said borehold core for a borehold in the northern hemisphere and points at least substantailly upwardly towards the top of said borehole core for a borehole in the southern hemisphere

  15. Hydrological and hydrogeochemical investigations in boreholes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Underground investigations in boreholes are presumed to be an important investigation technique for the detailed design of a final repository for nuclear waste. The siting of the repository will be based on surface investigations, but for detailed investigations when the access shafts are sunk, investigations in underground boreholes from the initial shafts and tunnels will be of importance. The hydrogeological investigations in boreholes aimed at testing and developing of hydrogeological techniques and instruments for use in an underground environment in order to reflect actual working and testing conditions. This report is the final report from the hydrogeological investigations in boreholes, and it summarizes the different activities carried out during the course of the program. Most of the included activities are reported in separate internal reports, and therefore only the most important results are included, together with the experiences and conclusions gained during the investigations. The hydrogeochemical part of the program is in a separate final report, consequently no hydrogeochemical information is in the current report. (Author)

  16. Borehole data and climate reconstruction in Korea

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Okubo, Y.; Kim, H.CH.; Uchida, Y.; Šafanda, Jan

    Matsuyama, 2003 - (Yamano, M.; Nagao, T.; Sweda, T.), s. 126-135 [ Geothermal /dendrochronological paleoclimate reconstruction across eastern margin of Eurasia. Matsuyama (JP), 28.11.2002-30.11.2002] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3012916 Keywords : borehole data * climate change * Korea Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure

  17. Deep Borehole Field Test Research Activities at LBNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobson, Patrick [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Tsang, Chin-Fu [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Kneafsey, Timothy [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Borglin, Sharon [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Piceno, Yvette [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Andersen, Gary [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Nakagawa, Seiji [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Nihei, Kurt [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Rutqvist, Jonny [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Doughty, Christine [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Reagan, Matthew [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-08-19

    The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy Used Fuel Disposition’s (UFD) Deep Borehole Field Test is to drill two 5 km large-diameter boreholes: a characterization borehole with a bottom-hole diameter of 8.5 inches and a field test borehole with a bottom-hole diameter of 17 inches. These boreholes will be used to demonstrate the ability to drill such holes in crystalline rocks, effectively characterize the bedrock repository system using geophysical, geochemical, and hydrological techniques, and emplace and retrieve test waste packages. These studies will be used to test the deep borehole disposal concept, which requires a hydrologically isolated environment characterized by low permeability, stable fluid density, reducing fluid chemistry conditions, and an effective borehole seal. During FY16, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory scientists conducted a number of research studies to support the UFD Deep Borehole Field Test effort. This work included providing supporting data for the Los Alamos National Laboratory geologic framework model for the proposed deep borehole site, conducting an analog study using an extensive suite of geoscience data and samples from a deep (2.5 km) research borehole in Sweden, conducting laboratory experiments and coupled process modeling related to borehole seals, and developing a suite of potential techniques that could be applied to the characterization and monitoring of the deep borehole environment. The results of these studies are presented in this report.

  18. Borehole Disposal for Spent Radiation Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As generally, many countries in the world, Indonesia still faces some difficulties in the storage and final disposal for spent radiation sources (SRS) which categorized as high risk. Spent radiation sources that have been stored in the Interim Storage 1 and 2 (IS-1 and IS-2), and High Activity Waste Storage (PSLAT) consist of Co-50 or Cs-137 (as irradiator), Pu-238 (as power sources), Am-241 (as neutron source) and Ra-226 (as sources in the medical field). The difficulties faced on storage and disposal are reasoned by long half-life, high gamma radiation, not established disposal system, expensiveness of disposal facility, difficulties on option to reexport of the SRS, lack of skilled labour, and the activity exceed for near surface disposal. For that reason, disposal system for SRS must be developed with the small scale national facility having some advances as well as costly cheaper, fulfill the safety standard, and could avoid the possibility of human intrusion. The answer of this problem is borehole disposal concept. By using this concept can be hoped that the problems of SRS disposal can be handled well, based on site characterization, borehole technology, SRS capsule packaged design, repository facility, and safety assessment. Finally, after obtained the optimum concepts, would be applied in the future to support the national nuclear program accepted by the public. The assessment of borehole disposal technology for SRS has been done. The assessment was done descriptively, involve the waste, site, technology, and safety aspects. Some concepts of borehole have been obtained that have been recommended by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), applicable and suitable with the waste and site condition. The concepts are Borehole Disposal of Sealed Sources (BOSS) with variation as follow: 1) Unsaturated, non-sulphate environments type; 2) Saturated, non-sulphate, non-clay environments with high to medium permeability, and 3) saturated, very low permeability

  19. Development of the Borehole Disposal Concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Energy Corporation of South Africa (Necsa) initiated the Borehole Disposal Concept (BDC) with a view to improving radioactive waste management practices in Africa. An IAEA Technical Cooperation project was launched to investigate the technical feasibility and economic viability of a borehole for the disposal of disused sealed radioactive sources. Phase III of the project was completed by the end of 2004, and the main objective of this phase was to demonstrate the technical feasibility of the concept by means of a practical demonstration. The disposal concept consists of a 260 mm diameter borehole drilled to a depth of up to 100 m in which stainless steel disposal containers are emplaced and backfilled with cement. Each disposal container contains a source within a stainless steel capsule within a containment barrier. Included in the terms of reference of Phase III were the design and the evaluation of the disposal concept. The evaluation included container materials, backfill materials and a generic post-closure safety assessment. The post-closure safety assessment and the associated derivation of activity limits showed that, through the use of multiple physical and chemical barriers, the BDC provides an appropriate degree of long term safety. Furthermore, the safety of the disposal concept is not reliant on an extended period of institutional control, and owing to its small 'footprint', the likelihood of direct human intrusion into the borehole is small. An international peer review team positively assessed the technical feasibility, economic viability and overall safety of the concept, and thus concluded the development phase of the project. The Member States of the African Regional Cooperative Agreement for Research, Development and Training related to Nuclear Science and Technology (AFRA) have decided to proceed to Phase IV of the project with the main aim to implement the borehole disposal technology. (author)

  20. An optimization procedure for borehole emplacement in fractured media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Specifying the position and orientation of the 'next borehole(s)' in a fractured medium, from prior incomplete knowledge of the fracture field and depending on the objectives assigned to this new borehole(s), is a crucial point in the iterative process of site characterization. The work described here explicitly includes site knowledge and specific objectives in a tractable procedure that checks possible borehole characteristics, and rates all trial boreholes according to their compliance with objectives. The procedure is based on the following ideas : Firstly, the optimization problem is strongly constrained, since feasible borehole head locations and borehole dips are generally limited. Secondly, a borehole is an 'access point' to the fracture network. Finally, when performing a flow or tracer test, the information obtained through the monitoring system will be best if this system detects the largest possible share of the flow induced by the test, and if it cuts the most 'interesting' flow paths. The optimization is carried out in four steps. 1) All possible borehole configurations are defined and stored. Typically, several hundred possible boreholes are created. Existing boreholes are also specified. 2) Stochastic fracture networks reproducing known site characteristics are generated. 3) A purely geometrical rating of all boreholes is used to select the 'geometrically best' boreholes or groups of boreholes. 4) Among the boreholes selected by the geometrical rating, the best one(s) is chosen by simulating the experiment for which it will be used and checking flowrates through possible boreholes. This method is applied to study the emplacement of a set of five monitoring boreholes prior to the sinking of a shaft for a planned underground laboratory in a granite massif in France (Vienne site). Twelve geometrical parameters are considered for each possible borehole. A detailed statistical study helps decide on the shape of a minimization function. This is then used

  1. Key Factors to Determine the Borehole Spacing in a Deep Borehole Disposal for HLW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deep fluids also resist vertical movement because they are density stratified and reducing conditions will sharply limit solubility of most dose critical radionuclides at the depth. Finally, high ionic strengths of deep fluids will prevent colloidal transport. Therefore, as an alternative disposal concept, i.e., deep borehole disposal technology is under consideration in number of countries in terms of its outstanding safety and cost effectiveness. In this paper, the general concept for deep borehole disposal of spent fuels or high level radioactive wastes which has been developed by some countries according to the rapid advance in the development of drilling technology, as an alternative method to the deep geological disposal method, was reviewed. After then an analysis on key factors for the distance between boreholes for the disposal of HLW was carried out. In this paper, the general concept for deep borehole disposal of spent fuels or HLW wastes, as an alternative method to the deep geological disposal method, were reviewed. After then an analysis on key factors for the determining the distance between boreholes for the disposal of HLW was carried out. These results can be used for the development of the HLW deep borehole disposal system

  2. Simulation of the thermal borehole resistance in groundwater filled borehole heat exchanger using CFD technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A-M. Gustafsson, L. Westerlund

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The thermal borehole resistance in a groundwater-filled borehole heat exchanger (BHE is affected of both conductive and convective heat transfer through the borehole water. To calculate this heat transport, different models are required compared to calculation of only conductive heat transfer in a back-filled BHE. In this paper some modelling approximations for groundwater-filled, single U-pipe BHEs were investigated using a 3D CFD model. The purpose is to find approximations that enable to construct a fast, simple model including the convective heat transfer that may be used in thermal response test analyses and BHE design programs. Both total heat transfer calculations (including convective and conductive heat transport and only conductive heat transfer calculations were performed for comparison purposes. The approximations that are investigated are the choice of boundary condition at the U-pipe wall and using a single pipe in the middle of the borehole instead of the U-pipe. For the total heat transfer case, it is shown that the choice of boundary condition hardly affects the calculated borehole thermal resistance. For the only conductive heat transfer case, the choice of boundary condition at the pipe wall gives large differences in the result. It is also shown that using an annulus model (single pipe in the middle of the borehole results in similar heat transfer as the U-pipe model provided that the equivalent radius is chosen appropriately. This approximation can radically decrease the number of calculation cells needed.

  3. Simulation of the thermal borehole resistance in groundwater filled borehole heat exchanger using CFD technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustafsson, A-M. [Department of Civil, Mining and Environmental Engineering, Lulea University of Technology, SE-971 87 Lulea (Sweden); Westerlund, L. [Department of Applied Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Lulea University of Technology, SE-971 87 Lulea (Sweden)

    2010-07-01

    The thermal borehole resistance in a groundwater-filled borehole heat exchanger (BHE) is affected of both conductive and convective heat transfer through the borehole water. To calculate this heat transport, different models are required compared to calculation of only conductive heat transfer in a back-filled BHE. In this paper some modelling approximations for groundwater-filled, single U-pipe BHEs were investigated using a 3D CFD model. The purpose is to find approximations that enable to construct a fast, simple model including the convective heat transfer that may be used in thermal response test analyses and BHE design programs. Both total heat transfer calculations (including convective and conductive heat transport) and only conductive heat transfer calculations were performed for comparison purposes. The approximations that are investigated are the choice of boundary condition at the U-pipe wall and using a single pipe in the middle of the borehole instead of the U-pipe. For the total heat transfer case, it is shown that the choice of boundary condition hardly affects the calculated borehole thermal resistance. For the only conductive heat transfer case, the choice of boundary condition at the pipe wall gives large differences in the result. It is also shown that using an annulus model (single pipe in the middle of the borehole) results in similar heat transfer as the U-pipe model provided that the equivalent radius is chosen appropriately. This approximation can radically decrease the number of calculation cells needed.

  4. Design parameters for borehole strain instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladwin, Michael T.; Hart, Rhodes

    1985-01-01

    The response of a borehole strain meter to hydrostatic and shear deformations in an isotropic medium is calculated to facilitate optimum instrument design and produce instrument response factors for parameters typically encountered in installed instruments. Results for an empty borehole are first compared with results for an instrument in intimate contact with the surrounding rock. The effects of the grout used to install the instrument are then examined. Where possible, analytic forms for the response factors are given. Results for typical installations are then presented in graphical form for optimizing instrument design in an environment of known elastic parameters. Alternatively, the results may be applied in the measurement of unknown strain signals, to correct for instrument response or to provide in-situ estimates of the elastic properties of the environment by examination of observed strain response to known strain signals.

  5. Examination of simulated borehole specimens. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quality of the contact between portland cement grout and surrounding rock will be of prime importance if grout is used to seal boreholes for the isolation of nuclear waste. The contact will need to be tight and relatively impermeable. In the study reported herein, simulated borehole (SBH) specimens were prepared and tested in the laboratory. The specimens consisted of grout poured into a hole in sections of anhydrite rock core that had been grouted into a steel pipe to provide restraint. The study was largely devoted to investigating methods of avoiding artifacts during preparation of these SBH specimens for study of the grout-to-rock contact. The work was conducted and is reported in two parts. The first part was a study in which only large round SBH specimens (about 6 by 6 in.) were used, while the second also included some smaller round SBH specimens

  6. High-precision multicomponent borehole deformation monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladwin, Michael T.

    1984-12-01

    An instrument capable of deep borehole measurement of vector plane strain to 0.3 nstrain and tilt to 1.0 nrad has been developed for deployment in crustal deformation and earthquake prediction studies. The instrument has been deployed in California where shear strains dominate the deformation. The 125-mm-diam package is grouted in 175-mm boreholes at depths of approximately 200 m. The wall thickness and the grout thickness are chosen to match instrument strength to expected rock parameters. The instrument is capable of flat response from dc to 10 Hz on any single channel. The electronics package is stable to three parts in 108 over the temperature range 10 to 45° C. Reliable shear strain data is available immediately on installation when simple volume strain meters show only bond curing effects or thermal recovery signals.

  7. Nitrate concentrations in the Morestead borehole, Twyford

    OpenAIRE

    Stuart, M.E.; Chilton, P J; Newell, A. J.; Butcher, A.S.

    2008-01-01

    This report describes work carried out at Morestead, Twyford as part of a BGS research project “Nitrate Mass Balance in the Saturated Zone”. The project aimed to evaluate the role of the diffusive exchange of nitrate between fracture water and porewater in the saturated zone of the aquifer. The approach adopted attempted to obtain a mass balance for the catchment to a public supply borehole by comparing nitrogen released from the soil with nitrogen held in the aquifer and nitro...

  8. Near Field Investigation of Borehole Heat Exchangers

    OpenAIRE

    Erol, Selcuk

    2015-01-01

    As an alternative and renewable energy source, the shallow geothermal energy evolving as one of the most popular energy source due to its easy accessibility and availability worldwide, and the ground source heat pump (GSHP) systems are the most frequent applications for extracting the energy from the shallow subsurface. As the heat extraction capacity of the GSHP system applications arises, the design of the borehole heat exchangers (BHE), which is the connected part of the system in the grou...

  9. Strategic decision analysis applied to borehole seismology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strategic Decision Analysis (SDA) is the evolving body of knowledge on how to achieve high quality in the decision that shapes an organization's future. SDA comprises philosophy, process concepts, methodology, and tools for making good decisions. It specifically incorporates many concepts and tools from economic evaluation and risk analysis. Chevron Petroleum Technology Company (CPTC) has applied SDA to evaluate and prioritize a number of its most important and most uncertain R and D projects, including borehole seismology. Before SDA, there were significant issues and concerns about the value to CPTC of continuing to work on borehole seismology. The SDA process created a cross-functional team of experts to structure and evaluate this project. A credible economic model was developed, discrete risks and continuous uncertainties were assessed, and an extensive sensitivity analysis was performed. The results, even applied to a very restricted drilling program for a few years, were good enough to demonstrate the value of continuing the project. This paper explains the SDA philosophy concepts, and process and demonstrates the methodology and tools using the borehole seismology project example. SDA is useful in the upstream industry not just in the R and D/technology decisions, but also in major exploration and production decisions. Since a major challenge for upstream companies today is to create and realize value, the SDA approach should have a very broad applicability

  10. Multifold borehole radar acquisition and processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The multifold acquisition principle was applied to a borehole radar survey, performed in a granitic site (Grimsel Test Site, Switzerland). Two multifold coverage acquisitions (40-fold and 20-fold) were carried out in a subhorizontal borehole. Instrumental drifts (transmission time and sampling frequency fluctuations) were corrected in order to remove shifts observed on CMP gathers and to optimize velocity analysis and trace stacking. Computation of velocity spectra was adapted in order to take into account the features of the medium investigated (homogeneous velocity, various reflector orientations). The NMO velocities were then interpreted as angles between reflectors and the survey line. The processing, based on the computation of several constant velocity stacked sections performed with different NMO velocities, leads to better results than the standard DMO + NMO processing. The signal-to-noise ratio of the stacked profile is improved in comparison with the single-fold section, which results from a standard acquisition. From a practical pint of view, the implementation of a multifold radar survey within a borehole is difficult but a greater investigation range is obtained, more reflectors are detected and the mapping of geological discontinuities is improved

  11. Initial results of tuff borehole sealing experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laboratory and field experiments are in progress to determine the performance that can be expected of cementitious and of earthen (bentonite) seals when emplaced in welded tuff. Laboratory testing includes materials characterization testing radial permeameter testing of cementitious borehole plugs emplaced in welded tuff cylinders, flow testing of bentonite and of bentonite/crushed tuff plugs, axial strength of cementitious borehole plugs emplaced in welded tuff, and fracture grouting experiments. Experimental work is performed in Apache Leap tuff, a formation exposed in east-central Arizona. Mineralogical, chemical, hydrological and mechanical characterization shows reasonable similarity between the Apache Leap tuff and the Topopah Spring tuff, the proposed Yucca Mountain repository host formation. The main conclusion from the mechanical characterization testing is that the tested tuff, not unexpectedly, is an extremely heterogeneous rock, with highly variable properties. A second notable observation is the extremely low saturated hydraulic conductivity of intact welded tuff, notwithstanding its very high porosity. Mixtures of bentonite and crushed tuff show that samples containing 25 or 35 percent bentonite (by weight) have permeabilities of the same order of magnitude as similarly prepared and emplaced samples consisting of bentonite only. Permeability is noticeably pressure-dependent. Short-term bond strengths of cementitious seals emplaced in tuff cylinders are moderately high, in the range of 3 to 8 MPa, with considerable variability. Results indicate a marked decrease in strength with increasing plug (or borehole) diameter. A pronounced strength loss occurs at 90C, but not at 70C. 12 refs., 6 figs

  12. Geophysical borehole logging in Lavia borehole - results and interpretation of sonic and tube wave measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co, SKB has been contracted by Industrial Power Company LTD, TVO to perform geophysical logging in a borehole at Lavia in Western Finland. The logging has been conducted by Swedish Geological Co, SGAB in accordance with an agreement for cooperation with SKB. The depth of the borehole is 1001 m, diameter 56 mm and inclination 10-20 degrees to the vertical. The aim of the logging was to determine the various geophysical parameters in the borehole in order to interpret and understand the rock mass properties in the vicinity of the borehole. According to the contract the report covers the following main objectives: a technical description of the field work and the equipment used; a review of the theoretical base for the sonic and tube wave methods; an interpretation and presentation of the results obtained by sonic and tube wave mesurements. The evaluation of the sonic and tube wave measurements shows good correlation. On a qualitative basis there seems to be a correlation between tube wave generating points, the relative tube wave amplitudes and the hydraulic conductivity measurements performed as hydraulical tests between packers in the borehole. The low velocity anamalies in the sonic log are mainly caused by tectonic features like fractures and fracture zones but to some extent also by contacts between granite and diorite. The estimation of elastic properties of the rock mass from observation of tube wave velocity are in accordance with laboratory determinations made on core samples. (author)

  13. Effect of borehole design on electrical impedance tomography measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozaffari, Amirpasha; Huisman, Johan Alexander; Treichel, Andrea; Zimmermann, Egon; Kelter, Matthias; Vereecken, Harry

    2015-04-01

    Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) is a sophisticated non-invasive tool to investigate the subsurface in engineering and environmental studies. To increase the depth of investigation, EIT measurements can be made in boreholes. However, the presence of the borehole may affect EIT measurements. Here, we aim to investigate the effect of different borehole components on EIT measurements using 2,5-D and 3D finite element modeling and unstructured meshes. To investigate the effect of different borehole components on EIT measurements, a variety of scenarios were designed. In particular, the effect of the water-filled borehole, the PVC casing, and the gravel filter were investigated relative to complex resistivity simulations for a homogenous medium with chain and electrode modules. It was found that the results of the complex resistivity simulations were best understood using the sensitivity distribution of the electrode configuration under consideration. In all simulations, the sensitivity in the vicinity of the borehole was predominantly negative. Therefore, the introduction of the water-filled borehole caused an increase in the real part of the impedance, and a decrease (more negative) in the imaginary part of the simulated impedance. The PVC casing mostly enhanced the effect of the water-filled borehole described above, although this effect was less clear for some electrode configuration. The effect of the gravel filter mostly reduced the effect of the water-filled borehole with PVC casing. For EIT measurements in a single borehole, the highest simulated phase error was 12% for a Wenner configuration with electrode spacing of 0.33 m. This error decreased with increasing electrode spacing. In the case of cross-well configurations, the error in the phase shit was as high as 6%. Here, it was found that the highest errors occur when both current electrodes are located in the same borehole. These results indicated that cross-well measurements are less affected by the

  14. Borehole Paleoclimatology: In search of a minimum depth criterion for terrestrial borehole temperature profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrami, H.; Smerdon, J. E.; Matharoo, G.; Nickerson, N. R.

    2010-12-01

    One important uncertainty in borehole paleoclimatology that has been overlooked is the degree to which ground surface temperature (GST) reconstructions depend on the maximum depth of the profile. Because the vast majority of measured borehole temperature profiles are acquired from boreholes of opportunity, the maximum measurement depth in data used for paleoclimatic studies varies considerably (beginning at depths as shallow as 100-150 m and extending to depths of more than 1 km). The depth of the borehole is important because the downwelling climatic signal must be separated from the quasi-steady state thermal regime established by the energy in the Earth's interior. This component of the signal is estimated as a linear increase in temperature with depth from the lower section of a borehole temperature profile, which is assumed to be unperturbed by recent changes in climate at the surface. The validity of this assumption is dependent on both the subsurface thermophysical properties and the character of the downwelling climatic signal. Such uncertainties can significantly impact the determination of the quasi-steady state thermal regime, and consequently the magnitude of the temperature anomaly interpreted as a climatic signal. Here we illustrate how the minimum depth of a temperature-depth profile impacts the estimation of the climatic transient and the resultant GST reconstruction. In particular, we attempt to quantitatively illustrate the effects and uncertainties that arise from the analysis of borehole temperature logs of different depths. Our results demonstrate that widely different GST histories can be derived from a single temperature profile truncated at different depths. We show that borehole temperature measurements approaching 500-600 m depths provide the most robust GST reconstructions and are preferable for inferring past climatic variations at the ground surface. Furthermore, we find that the bias introduced by a temperature profile of depths

  15. A strategy to seal exploratory boreholes in unsaturated tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents a strategy for sealing exploratory boreholes associated with the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. Over 500 existing and proposed boreholes have been considered in the development of this strategy, ranging from shallow (penetrating into alluvium only) to deep (penetrating into the groundwater table). Among the comprehensive list of recommendations are the following: Those boreholes within the potential repository boundary and penetrating through the potential repository horizon are the most significant boreholes from a performance standpoint and should be sealed. Shallow boreholes are comparatively insignificant and require only nominal sealing. The primary areas in which to place seals are away from high-temperature zones at a distance from the potential repository horizon in the Paintbrush nonwelded tuff and the upper portion of the Topopah Spring Member and in the tuffaceous beds of the Calico Hills Unit. Seals should be placed prior to waste emplacement. Performance goals for borehole seals both above and below the potential repository are proposed. Detailed construction information on the boreholes that could be used for future design specifications is provided along with a description of the environmental setting, i.e., the geology, hydrology, and the in situ and thermal stress states. A borehole classification scheme based on the condition of the borehole wall in different tuffaceous units is also proposed. In addition, calculations are presented to assess the significance of the boreholes acting as preferential pathways for the release of radionuclides. Design calculations are presented to answer the concerns of when, where, and how to seal. As part of the strategy development, available technologies to seal exploratory boreholes (including casing removal, borehole wall reconditioning, and seal emplacement) are reviewed

  16. Borehole permeability damage and its impacts on gas drainage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luke Connell; Rob Jeffrey; Budi Suharto [CSIRO Petroleum (Australia)

    2008-10-15

    For drilling fines and fluid migration to significantly impact the near borehole permeability overbalanced conditions are required within the borehole during drilling. This is less likely to occur with underground in-seam boreholes since these are drilled with the collar of the borehole open or subject to only low pressure. Mineral precipitation can occur when certain combinations of solutes are supersaturated. Calcium carbonate precipitation could occur as groundwater flows towards a borehole where the pressure drops and CO{sub 2} comes out of solution, resulting in precipitation. Gas and water blocking is a result of the presence of free gas within the cleats acting to impede the flow of water into the borehole, or vice versa, water impeding the flow of gas. Initial drilling of the borehole results in a redistribution of stress around it, generally leading to higher compressive stresses in a zone extending out to about two borehole diameters. During drainage, drawdown of the pressure will act to further increase the effective stress in the vicinity of the borehole. However gas desorption also occurs which counteracts this effect through matrix shrinkage. It was found that the permeability decline will be greatest in deeper coal seams where initial pore pressures are higher, where the beneficial effect of gas desorption is outweighed by the effects of pressure.

  17. Safe management of disused sealed radioactive sources: borehole disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borehole disposal of sealed radioactive sources (BOSS) is one of the most efficient options for disused sealed radioactive sources (DSRS). Currently, borehole disposal is considered one of the most promising options for DSRS including high activity and long-lived sources. It is the right time for Nuclear Malaysia to consider the borehole disposal as the ultimate solution to the increasing number of DSRS stored in the current facility. This paper will discuss the management of DSRS using borehole disposal as well as the needs, concept and the advantages. (Author)

  18. Exploratory borehole Schafisheim. Programme of work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An extensive geophysical borehole logging programme will serve to verify the results of the core analysis and complement the core data. Numerous borehole logs are to be registered with different types of tools. These allow one to determine various parameters essential for the full description of the rock sequences penetrated. A first category of logs enables the petrographical identification of the different rock types and indicates porous zones that are either water- or hydrocarbon-bearing. A second category provides data e.g. on the degree of pore and fracture fill, rock density and rock temperature, natural gamma radiation and rock-mechanical properties. Other logs measure strike and dip of the sedimentary layers and the position of rock fractures. A fourth category provides information on the diameter and the deviation of the borehole, the quality of casing cementations and the position of casing joints. In addition, well shooting surveys will supply exact values of seismic velocities for the various rock units; data that are needed for the depth correction of the reflection profiles from Nagra's regional seismic network. With numerous hydrological tests ranging from a production tests of the triassic Muschelkalk aquifer to labelled slug tests in low-permeability crystalline sections, the hydraulic conditions of deep groundwater flow will be investigated. The recovered water samples will undergo full physical and geochemical analysis. Furthermore, their isotope content is to be measured in order to estimate the age of the various formation waters and their time of residence in the various aquifers. To round off the scientific investigations, a series of rock-mechanical and geotechnical laboratory tests will provide characteristic values to be applied eventually in the design and construction of shafts and caverns for an underground repository

  19. Nuclear borehole probes - theory and experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report gives a summary of the theoretical and expeimental work on borehole probes that has been performed since 1971 at The Department of Electrophysics, The Technical University of Denmark. The first part of the report concerns the use of a spectral natural gamma-ray probe (SNG-probe), which is used for measurements of the spectral distribution of the gamma-rays of the geological strata around a borehole. In general the spectrum is divided into three parts - the gamma-rays from potassium-40, from thorium-232 and daughters, and from uranium-238 and daughters. A set of curves showing the intensities of the gamm-radiation from K, Th, and U versus depth is called a SNG-log. If proper calibrated, the SNG-log gives the concentration of Th, U, and K in the formation surrounding the borehole. Initially the basis for an interpretation of SNG-logs is discussed. Then follows a description og some SNG-problems designed and built by The Department of Electrophysics, and a discussion of the calibration of SNG-probes. Some examples of SNG-logs are presented, and some general comments on the use of SNG-logs are given. The second part of the report concerns mainly the development of theoretical models for neutron-neutron probes, gamma-gamma probes, and pulsed-neutron probes. The purpose of this work has been to examine how well the models correlate with measured results and - where reasonable agreement is found - to use the models in studies of the factors that affect the probe responses in interpretation of experimental results and in probe design. (author)

  20. Borehole plugging telemetry system. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the development of a through-the-earth electromagnetic communication system which was designed to demonstrate that a physical property could be measured deep in the earth and the data received at the surface by wireless telemetry. This system was configured to be placed in a borehole and sealed in place thus preventing the establishment of a pathway between a deep geologic nuclear waste repository and the biosphere. This report contains a detailed description of the downhole and wellhead telemetry electronics, the downhole sensor electronics, integrated system operation, test results, conclusions, and recommendations

  1. The Role of Active Fractures on Borehole Breakout Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahara, D.; Kohl, T.; Schoenball, M.; Müller, B.

    2013-12-01

    The properties of georeservoirs are strongly related to the stress field and their interpretation is a major target in geotechnical management. Borehole breakouts are direct indicators of the stress field as they develop due to the concentration of the highest compressional stress toward the minimum horizontal stress direction. However, the interaction with fractures might create local perturbations. Such weakened zones are often observed by localized anomalies of the borehole breakout orientation. We examined high-quality acoustic borehole televiewer (UBI) logs run in the entire granite sections at the deep well GPK4 at Soultz-sous-Forêts, France. The borehole is moderately inclined (15° - 35°) in its middle section. Detailed analysis of 1221 borehole elongation pairs in the vicinity of 1871 natural fractures observed in GPK4 well is used to infer the role of fractures on the borehole breakouts shape and orientation. Patterns of borehole breakout orientation in the vicinity of active fractures suggest that the wavelength of the borehole breakout orientation anomalies in this granite rock depend on the scale of the fracture while the rotation amplitude and direction is strongly influenced by the fracture orientation. In the upper and middle part of the well even a linear trend between fracture and breakout orientations could be established. In addition to the rotation, breakouts typically are found to be asymmetrically formed in zones of high fracture density. We find that major faults tend to create a systematic rotation of borehole breakout orientation with long spatial wavelength while abrupt changes are often observed around small fractures. The finding suggest that the borehole breakout heterogeneities are not merely governed by the principal stress heterogeneities, but that the effect of mechanical heterogeneities like elastic moduli changes, rock strength anisotropy and fracturing must be taken into account. Thus, one has to be careful to infer the

  2. Borehole locations on seven interior salt domes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is designed as an inventory of all wells known to have been drilled within a five-mile radius of each of seven salt domes within the Interior Salt Basin in east Texas, northern Louisiana and Mississippi. There are 72 boreholes that entered salt above an elevation of -3000 feet mean sea level. For these, details of location, drilling dates, depth of casing and cement, elevation of top of caprock and salt, etc., are given on tables in the appendix. Of the seven domes, Oakwood has the largest number of boreholes, thirty-eight (including two sidetracked wells) that enter the salt stock above -3000 feet mean sea level; another dome in northeast Texas, Keechi, has eight; in northern Louisiana, Rayburn's has four and Vacherie has five; in southern Mississippi, Cypress Creek has seven, Lampton has one, and Richton has nine. In addition, all wells known outside the supra-domal area, but within a five-mile radius of the center of the 7 domes are separately catalogued

  3. Second ILAW Site Borehole Characterization Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SP Reidel

    2000-08-10

    The US Department of Energy's Hanford Site has the most diverse and largest amounts of radioactive tank waste in the US. High-level radioactive waste has been stored at Hanford since 1944. Approximately 209,000 m{sup 3} (54 Mgal) of waste are currently stored in 177 tanks. Vitrification and onsite disposal of low-activity tank waste (LAW) are embodied in the strategy described in the Tri-Party Agreement. The tank waste is to be retrieved, separated into low- and high-level fractions, and then immobilized. The low-activity vitrified waste will be disposed of in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. This report is a plan to drill and characterize the second borehole for the Performance Assessment. The first characterization borehole was drilled in 1998. The plan describes data collection activities for determining physical and chemical properties of the vadose zone and saturated zone on the northeast side of the proposed disposal site. These data will then be used in the 2005 Performance Assessment.

  4. Regulatory issues for deep borehole plutonium disposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a result of recent changes throughout the world, a substantial inventory of excess separated plutonium is expected to result from dismantlement of US nuclear weapons. The safe and secure management and eventual disposition of this plutonium, and of a similar inventory in Russia, is a high priority. A variety of options (both interim and permanent) are under consideration to manage this material. The permanent solutions can be categorized into two broad groups: direct disposal and utilization. The deep borehole disposition concept involves placing excess plutonium deep into old stable rock formations with little free water present. Issues of concern include the regulatory, statutory and policy status of such a facility, the availability of sites with desirable characteristics and the technologies required for drilling deep holes, characterizing them, emplacing excess plutonium and sealing the holes. This white paper discusses the regulatory issues. Regulatory issues concerning construction, operation and decommissioning of the surface facility do not appear to be controversial, with existing regulations providing adequate coverage. It is in the areas of siting, licensing and long term environmental protection that current regulations may be inappropriate. This is because many current regulations are by intent or by default specific to waste forms, facilities or missions significantly different from deep borehole disposition of excess weapons usable fissile material. It is expected that custom regulations can be evolved in the context of this mission

  5. Borehole geophysics in nuclear power plant siting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miniaturized borehole geophysical equipment designed for use in ground-water investigations can be adapted to investigations of nuclear power plant sites. This equipment has proved to be of value in preliminary and comprehensive studies of interior basins where thick sequences of Quaternary clastic sediment, occasionally with associated volcanic rocks, pose problems of stratigraphic correlation. The unconsolidated nature of the deposits generally requires that exploratory holes be cased, which ordinarily restricts the borehole geophysical studies to the radiation functions--natural gamma, gamma-gamma, neutron-gamma, and neutron-epithermal neutron logs. Although a single log response may be dominant in a given area, correlations derive from consideration of all log responses as a composite group. Because major correlations usually are based upon subtle differences in the physical properties of the penetrated sediment, high-resolution logging procedures are employed with some sacrifice of the quantitative parameters important to petroleum technology. All geophysical field data are recorded as hard copy and as digital information on punched paper tape. Digital data are subsequently computer processed and plotted to scales that enhance the stratigraphic data being correlated. Retention of the data in analog format permits rapid review, whereas computer plotting allows playback and detailed examination of log sections and sequences that may be attenuated on hard copy because of the logarithmic nature of the response to the physical property being examined

  6. Natural gamma radiation borehole logging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A borehole logging system employs a gamma-ray detector for measuring the natural gamma radiation of the earth formations surrounding a borehole. Three energy band selectors, each employing a discriminator and count rate meter, separate the output of the gamma-ray detector into potassium, uranium, and thorium energy band signals. A first operational amplifier determines the difference between the potassium energy band signal and those portions of the uranium and thorium energy band signals which represent the influence of uranium and thorium gamma radiation within the potassium energy band, this difference representing the correct potassium gamma radiation. A second operational amplifier determines the difference between the uranium energy band signal and that portion of the thorium energy band signal which represents the influence of the thorium gamma radiation within the uranium energy band, this difference representing the correct uranium gamma radiation. A third operational amplifier determines the difference between the thorium energy band signal and that portion of the uranium energy band signal which represents the influence of the uranium gamma radiation within the thorium energy band, this difference representing the correct thorium gamma radiation

  7. Second ILAW Site Borehole Characterization Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy's Hanford Site has the most diverse and largest amounts of radioactive tank waste in the US. High-level radioactive waste has been stored at Hanford since 1944. Approximately 209,000 m3 (54 Mgal) of waste are currently stored in 177 tanks. Vitrification and onsite disposal of low-activity tank waste (LAW) are embodied in the strategy described in the Tri-Party Agreement. The tank waste is to be retrieved, separated into low- and high-level fractions, and then immobilized. The low-activity vitrified waste will be disposed of in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. This report is a plan to drill and characterize the second borehole for the Performance Assessment. The first characterization borehole was drilled in 1998. The plan describes data collection activities for determining physical and chemical properties of the vadose zone and saturated zone on the northeast side of the proposed disposal site. These data will then be used in the 2005 Performance Assessment

  8. A combined surface and borehole seismic survey at the COSC-1 borehole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Helge; Krauß, Felix; Hedin, Peter; Buske, Stefan; Giese, Rüdiger; Juhlin, Christopher

    2015-04-01

    The ICDP project COSC (Collisional Orogeny in the Scandinavian Caledonides) focuses on the mid Paleozoic Caledonide Orogen in Scandinavia in order to better understand orogenic processes, from the past and in recent active mountain belts. The Scandinavian Caledonides provide a well preserved example of a Paleozoic continent-continent collision. Surface geology in combination with geophysical data provide control of the geometry of the Caledonian structure, including the allochthon and the underlying autochthon, as well as the shallow W-dipping décollement surface that separates the two and consist of a thin skin of Cambrian black shales. During spring/summer 2014 the COSC-1 borehole was drilled to approx. 2.5 km depth near the town of Åre (western Jämtland/Sweden) with nearly 100 % of core recovery and cores in best quality. After the drilling was finished, a major seismic survey was conducted in and around the COSC-1 borehole which comprised both seismic reflection and transmission experiments. Besides a high resolution zero-offset VSP (Vertical Seismic Profiling) experiment also a multi-azimuthal walkaway VSP survey took place. For the latter the source points were distributed along three profile lines centered radially around the borehole. For the central part up to 2.5 km away from the borehole, a hydraulic hammer source was used, which hits the ground for about 20 s with an linear increasing hit rate. For the far offset shots up to 5 km, explosive sources were used. The wavefield of both source types was recorded in the borehole using an array of 15 three-component receivers with a geophone spacing of 10 m. This array was deployed at 7 different depth levels during the survey. At the same time the wavefield was also recorded at the surface by 180 standalone three-component receivers placed along each of the three up to 10 km long lines, as well as with a 3D array of single-component receivers in the central part of the survey area around the borehole. Here

  9. 30 CFR 75.388 - Boreholes in advance of mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Boreholes in advance of mining. 75.388 Section... of mining. (a) Boreholes shall be drilled in each advancing working place when the working place... cannot be examined, and before mining continues, a certified person shall, if possible, determine—...

  10. Borehole survey system using fiber optic gyroscopes strapdown inertial navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shuang; Zhang, Chunxi; Yan, Tingyang; Li, Chen

    2006-11-01

    This paper will present a Fiber Optic Gyroscopes Strap down Inertial Navigation System (SINS) used in borehole survey systems. This system can be used for Wire-Line logging operations because of Fiber Optic Gyroscope's excellent capabilities of long life time, ruggedness, compactness, low cost and high environmental insensitivity. This borehole survey system utilizes the cable length signal aiding Fiber Optic Gyroscopes Strapdown Inertial Navigation System. Furthermore, this system utilizes an optimal estimation procedure based on Kalman filtering method to estimate and compensate the system errors on-line. This paper also presents a cable length model to correct the cable length signal. Simulation results show that the methods can effectively enhance the precision of the borehole survey system. In this system, the borehole survey system can fleetly and continuously survey the borehole during Wire-Line logging operations for determining the precise path of the borehole. Moreover, due to the compact frame of IMU, the borehole surveying system can be used for determining the small diameter boreholes.

  11. Causes of Borehole Failure in Complex Basement Terrains: ABUAD Case Study, Southwestern Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    1 Ogundana, A.K , 2 Aladesanmi A. O., 3 Okunade A., 4Olutomilola O.O

    2015-01-01

    A preliminary assessment of primary causes of borehole failure has being conducted using Afe Babalola University as a case study. A total of fourteen boreholes (namely borehole 1-14) were studied, vertical electrical soundings, depth sounding, flushing and pump testing were conducted on each of the boreholes to establish their status at the time of the study and possible evaluation of the groundwater potential of the wells. Four out of the fourteen boreholes (borehole 1-4) are pro...

  12. Borehole fluid dynamic temperature logging to evaluate fracture hydraulic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A borehole fluid dynamic temperature logging method was developed to evaluate the hydraulic conductivity of fractures intercepted by a borehole. This is different from conventional temperature logs that are measured in a non-flowing borehole, in that in our case the borehole is pumped at a constant flow rate. Thus we call it dynamic temperature logging method. The method involves the flushing of the wellbore with water of a known temperature (different from that of fracture fluids) and then pumping the well at a small flow rate Q. Under this constant flow rate, a sequence of temperature logs is measured at specified time intervals. Distinctive features in the logs develop as fluid from each fracture inflow point enters the borehole. This methodology is being developed to evaluate fracture flow properties at potential nuclear waste repositories

  13. Numerical Borehole Breakdown Investigations using XFEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckhuis, Sven; Leonhart, Dirk; Meschke, Günther

    2016-04-01

    During pressurization of a wellbore a typical downhole pressure record shows the following regimes: first the applied wellbore pressure balances the reservoir pressure, then after the compressive circumferential hole stresses are overcome, tensile stresses are induced on the inside surface of the hole. When the magnitude of these stresses reach the tensile failure stress of the surrounding rock medium, a fracture is initiated and propagates into the reservoir. [1] In standard theories this pressure, the so called breakdown pressure, is the peak pressure in the down-hole pressure record. However experimental investigations [2] show that the breakdown did not occur even if a fracture was initiated at the borehole wall. Drilling muds had the tendency to seal and stabilize fractures and prevent fracture propagation. Also fracture mechanics analysis of breakdown process in mini-frac or leak off tests [3] show that the breakdown pressure could be either equal or larger than the fracture initiation pressure. In order to gain a deeper understanding of the breakdown process in reservoir rock, numerical investigations using the extended finite element method (XFEM) for hydraulic fracturing of porous materials [4] are discussed. The reservoir rock is assumed to be pre-fractured. During pressurization of the borehole, the injection pressure, the pressure distribution and the position of the highest flux along the fracture for different fracturing fluid viscosities are recorded and the influence of the aforementioned values on the stability of fracture propagation is discussed. [1] YEW, C. H. (1997), "Mechanics of Hydraulic Fracturing", Gulf Publishing Company [2] MORITA, N.; BLACK, A. D.; FUH, G.-F. (1996), "Borehole Breakdown Pressure with Drilling Fluids". International Journal of Rock Mechanics and Mining Sciences 33, pp. 39-51 [3] DETOURNAY, E.; CARBONELL, R. (1996), "Fracture Mechanics Analysis of the Breakdown Process in Minifrac or Leakoff Test", Society of Petroleum

  14. The borehole disposal of spent sources (BOSS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Regional Training Course on 'The Management of Low-Level Radioactive Waste from Hospitals and Other Nuclear Applications' hosted by the Atomic Energy Corporation of SA Ltd. (AEC), now NECSA, during July/August 1995, the African delegates reviewed their national radioactive waste programmes. Among the issues raised, which are common to most African countries, were the lack of adequate storage facilities, lack of disposal solutions and a lack of equipment to implement widely used disposal concepts to dispose of their spent sources. As a result of this meeting, a Technical Co-operation (TC) project was launched to look at the technical feasibility and economic viability of such a concept. Phase I and II of the project have been completed and the results can be seen in three reports produced by NECSA. The Safety Assessment methodology used in the evaluation of the concept was that developed during the ISAM programme and detailed in Van Blerk's PhD thesis. This methodology is specifically developed for shallow land repositories, but was used in this case as the borehole need not be more than 100m deep and could fit into the definition of a shallow land disposal system. The studies found that the BOSS concept would be suitable for implementation in African countries as the borehole has a large capacity for sources and it is possible that an entire country's disused sources can be placed in a single borehole. The costs are a lot lower than for a shallow land trench, and the concept was evaluated using radium (226) sources as the most limiting inventory. The conclusion of the initial safety assessment was that the BOSS concept is robust, and provides a viable alternative for the disposal of radium needles. The concept is expected to provide good assurance of safety at real sites. The extension of the safety assessment to other types of spent sources is expected to be relatively straightforward. Disposal of radium needles

  15. Borehole gamma-ray spectrum logging in borehole OL-KR4 at Olkiluoto, in Eurajoki, 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Julkunen, A.; Kallio, L. [Astrock OY, Sodankylae (Finland)

    2005-12-15

    The aim of the detailed borehole surveys is to increase the knowledge of the bedrock on the study area and to supplement the investigations made earlier. As a part of the detailed investigations Astrock Oy carried out borehole spectrometer logging in KR4 at Olkiluoto site in Eurajoki during autumn 2005. This report describes the logging, data processing and the results. (orig.)

  16. Borehole gamma-ray spectrum logging in borehole OL-KR4 at Olkiluoto, in Eurajoki, 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the detailed borehole surveys is to increase the knowledge of the bedrock on the study area and to supplement the investigations made earlier. As a part of the detailed investigations Astrock Oy carried out borehole spectrometer logging in KR4 at Olkiluoto site in Eurajoki during autumn 2005. This report describes the logging, data processing and the results. (orig.)

  17. Borehole-to-borehole geophysical methods applied to investigations of high level waste repository sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This discussion focuses on the use of borehole to borehole geophysical measurements to detect geological discontinuities in High Level Waste (HLW) repository sites. The need for these techniques arises from: (a) the requirement that a HLW repository's characteristics and projected performance be known with a high degree of confidence; and (b) the inadequacy of other geophysical methods in mapping fractures. Probing configurations which can be used to characterize HLW sites are described. Results from experiments in which these techniques were applied to problems similar to those expected at repository sites are briefly discussed. The use of a procedure designed to reduce uncertainty associated with all geophysical exploration techniques is proposed; key components of the procedure are defined

  18. Multiple position borehole extensometer procedure: Final draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the Multiple Position Borehole Extensometer Procedure is to provide detailed information for MPBXs installed at the salt Deaf Smith County ESF. This procedure includes design of equipment, installation, instructions, instrument locations, measurement requirements, support requirements, quality assurance procedures, and data acquisition requirements. Data reduction procedures are also discussed; however, the relevance of the data is discussed elsewhere in the appropriate test plans. Sufficient detail is provided in this procedure to allow for integrating the requirements of this procedure into both the facility construction and overall underground testing programs; identifying necessary equipment for procurement; determining data acquisition requirements as input to Automatic Data Acquisition System (ADAS) design; providing step-by-step procedures for training personnel as well as for directing field operations; establishing quality assurance (QA) checkpoints and implementation methods; and defining data reduction methods and providing the anticipated accuracy of the system. 11 refs., 14 figs

  19. Head assembly for multiposition borehole extensometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A head assembly for a borehole extensometer and an improved extensometer for measuring subsurface subsidence. A plurality of inflatable anchors provide discrete measurement points. A metering rod is fixed to each of the anchors which are displaced when subsidence occurs, thereby translating the attached rod. The head assembly includes a sprocket wheel rotatably mounted on a standpipe and engaged by a chain which is connected at one end to the metering rod and at the other end to a counterweight. A second sprocket wheel connected to the standpipe also engages the chain and drives a connected potentiometer. The head assembly converts the linear displacement of the metering rod to the rotary motion of the second sprocket wheel, which is measured by the potentiometer, producing a continuous electrical output

  20. Multiple position borehole extensometer baseline algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document provides the baseline algorithm for the Multiple Position Borehole Extensometers (MPBX's) used at the Near-Surface Test Facility (NSTF) as a part of the Rock Instrumentation System (RIS) for Full Scale Heater Tests (FS) number-sign 1 and number-sign 2. It represents the baseline information available at the time of publication. The purpose of this document is to state the algorithm to be used for the MPBX's at the NSTF, the basis for the equations, the method used to arrive at the constants in the equations, and to identify further instrument testing necessary to improve the understanding of the instrument's purpose in this high temperature, hard rock environment. 5 refs., 5 figs

  1. Head assembly for multiposition borehole extensometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Donald N.

    1983-01-01

    A head assembly for a borehole extensometer and an improved extensometer for measuring subsurface subsidence. A plurality of inflatable anchors provide discrete measurement points. A metering rod is fixed to each of the anchors which are displaced when subsidence occurs, thereby translating the attached rod. The head assembly includes a sprocket wheel rotatably mounted on a standpipe and engaged by a chain which is connected at one end to the metering rod and at the other end to a counterweight. A second sprocket wheel connected to the standpipe also engages the chain and drives a connected potentiometer. The head assembly converts the linear displacement of the metering rod to the rotary motion of the second sprocket wheel, which is measured by the potentiometer, producing a continuous electrical output.

  2. Temperature profiles in the Harwell boreholes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heat flow at Harwell is estimated at 45 mWm-2 (milli Watt per metre squared is the unit of heat flow). Thermal conductivity values for the formations penetrated range from 1.0 to 4.6 Wm-1 K-1. The temperature profiles recorded in the boreholes enable the vertical groundwater flow patterns within two poorly permeable mudrock units to be evaluated. The two mudrock units act as leaky barriers each separating a pair of aquifer units which induce a vertical hydraulic gradient across the mudrocks. The flow velocity results for the upper mudrock units derived from the temperature profile are compatible with values for groundwater potential derived from hydraulic data (10-9 ms-1 from the temperature profile and 10-12 ms-1 from the hydraulic observations). The results from the lower mudrock sequence are incompatible and this may be due to some other overiding influence upon the temperature profile. (author)

  3. Investigations of the Stenlille-4 borehole logs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report contains analyses of the Stenlille-4 borehole logs. They include an interpretation of nuclear logs by use of the NULIP-5 programme. Furhter a number of possible clay indicators has been investigated. The TDT-logs have been analysed to obtain Σa for pure clay and sand. The relation between the natural gamma count rate and the volume percent of clay has been investigated. Finally a number of cross plots has been made. From these the density of pure sand and clay and the absorption cross section of sand, clay, and salt water has been obtained. The analyses seem to confirm that the interpretation programme NULIP-5 yields consistent results. (author)

  4. Impact of maximum borehole depths on inverted temperature histories in borehole paleoclimatology

    OpenAIRE

    H. Beltrami; J. E. Smerdon; G. S. Matharoo; N. Nickerson

    2011-01-01

    A quantitative assessment is presented for the impact of the maximum depth of a temperature-depth profile on the estimate of the climatic transient and the resultant ground surface temperature (GST) reconstruction used in borehole paleoclimatology. The depth of the profile is important because the downwelling climatic signal must be separated from the quasi-steady state thermal regime established by the energy in the Earth's interior. This component of the signal is estimated as a linear incr...

  5. Impact of maximum borehole depths on inverted temperature histories in borehole paleoclimatology

    OpenAIRE

    H. Beltrami; J. E. Smerdon; G. S. Matharoo; N. Nickerson

    2011-01-01

    A quantitative assessment is presented for the impact of the maximum depth of a temperature-depth profile on the estimate of the climatic transient and the resultant ground surface temperature (GST) reconstruction used in borehole paleoclimatology. The depth of the profile is important because the downwelling climatic signal must be separated from the quasi-steady state thermal regime established by the energy in the Earth's interior. This component of the signal is estimated as a line...

  6. Borehole sealing with highly compactd Na bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the use of highly compacted Na bentonite for borehole plugging. Bentonites have an extremely low permeability and a low diffusivity, and a swelling ability which produces a nonleaching boundary between clay and rock if the initial bulk density of the bentonite is sufficiently high. The suggested technique, which is applicable to long vertical, and inclined, as well as horizontal boreholes, is based on the use of perforated copper pipes to insert elements of compacted bentonite. Such pipe segments are connected at the rock surface and successively inserted in the hole. When the hole is equipped, the clay takes up water spontaneously and swells through the perforation, and ultimately forms an almost completely homogenous clay core. It embeds the pipe which is left in the hole. Several tests were conducted in the laboratory and one field test was run in Stripa. They all showed that a gel soon fills the slot between the pipe and the confinement which had the form of metal pipes in the laboratory investigations. Subsequently, more clay migrates through the perforation and produces a stiff clay filling in the slot. The redistribution of minerals, leading ultimately to a high degree of homogeneity, can be described as a diffusion process. The rate of redistribution depends on the joint geometry and water flow pattern in the rock. In the rock with an average joint frequence of one per meter or higher, very good homogeneity and sealing ability of the clay are expected within a few months after the application of the plug. (author)

  7. Development of a hydraulic borehole seismic source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cutler, R.P.

    1998-04-01

    This report describes a 5 year, $10 million Sandia/Industry project to develop an advanced borehole seismic source for use in oil and gas exploration and production. The development Team included Sandia, Chevron, Amoco, Conoco, Exxon, Raytheon, Pelton, and GRI. The seismic source that was developed is a vertically oriented, axial point force, swept frequency, clamped, reaction-mass vibrator design. It was based on an early Chevron prototype, but the new tool incorporates a number of improvements which make it far superior to the original prototype. The system consists of surface control electronics, a special heavy duty fiber optic wireline and draw works, a cablehead, hydraulic motor/pump module, electronics module, clamp, and axial vibrator module. The tool has a peak output of 7,000 lbs force and a useful frequency range of 5 to 800 Hz. It can operate in fluid filled wells with 5.5-inch or larger casing to depths of 20,000 ft and operating temperatures of 170 C. The tool includes fiber optic telemetry, force and phase control, provisions to add seismic receiver arrays below the source for single well imaging, and provisions for adding other vibrator modules to the tool in the future. The project yielded four important deliverables: a complete advanced borehole seismic source system with all associated field equipment; field demonstration surveys funded by industry showing the utility of the system; industrial sources for all of the hardware; and a new service company set up by their industrial partner to provide commercial surveys.

  8. Impact of maximum borehole depths on inverted temperature histories in borehole paleoclimatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Beltrami

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available A quantitative assessment is presented for the impact of the maximum depth of a temperature-depth profile on the estimate of the climatic transient and the resultant ground surface temperature (GST reconstruction used in borehole paleoclimatology. The depth of the profile is important because the downwelling climatic signal must be separated from the quasi-steady state thermal regime established by the energy in the Earth's interior. This component of the signal is estimated as a linear increase in temperature with depth from the lower section of a borehole temperature profile, which is assumed to be unperturbed by recent changes in climate at the surface. The validity of this assumption is dependent on both the subsurface thermophysical properties and the character of the downwelling climatic signal. Such uncertainties can significantly impact the determination of the quasi-steady state thermal regime, and consequently the magnitude of the temperature anomaly interpreted as a climatic signal. The quantitative effects and uncertainties that arise from the analysis of temperature-depth profiles of different depths are presented. Results demonstrate that widely different GST histories can be derived from a single temperature profile truncated at different depths. Borehole temperature measurements approaching 500–600 m depths are shown to provide the most robust GST reconstructions spanning 500 to 1000 yr BP. It is further shown that the bias introduced by a temperature profile of depths shallower than 500–600 m remains even if the time span of the reconstruction target is shortened.

  9. Impact of maximum borehole depths on inverted temperature histories in borehole paleoclimatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrami, H.; Smerdon, J. E.; Matharoo, G. S.; Nickerson, N.

    2011-07-01

    A quantitative assessment is presented for the impact of the maximum depth of a temperature-depth profile on the estimate of the climatic transient and the resultant ground surface temperature (GST) reconstruction used in borehole paleoclimatology. The depth of the profile is important because the downwelling climatic signal must be separated from the quasi-steady state thermal regime established by the energy in the Earth's interior. This component of the signal is estimated as a linear increase in temperature with depth from the lower section of a borehole temperature profile, which is assumed to be unperturbed by recent changes in climate at the surface. The validity of this assumption is dependent on both the subsurface thermophysical properties and the character of the downwelling climatic signal. Such uncertainties can significantly impact the determination of the quasi-steady state thermal regime, and consequently the magnitude of the temperature anomaly interpreted as a climatic signal. The quantitative effects and uncertainties that arise from the analysis of temperature-depth profiles of different depths are presented. Results demonstrate that widely different GST histories can be derived from a single temperature profile truncated at different depths. Borehole temperature measurements approaching 500-600 m depths are shown to provide the most robust GST reconstructions spanning 500 to 1000 yr BP. It is further shown that the bias introduced by a temperature profile of depths shallower than 500-600 m remains even if the time span of the reconstruction target is shortened.

  10. Impact of maximum borehole depths on inverted temperature histories in borehole paleoclimatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Beltrami

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A quantitative assessment is presented for the impact of the maximum depth of a temperature-depth profile on the estimate of the climatic transient and the resultant ground surface temperature (GST reconstruction used in borehole paleoclimatology. The depth of the profile is important because the downwelling climatic signal must be separated from the quasi-steady state thermal regime established by the energy in the Earth's interior. This component of the signal is estimated as a linear increase in temperature with depth from the lower section of a borehole temperature profile, which is assumed to be unperturbed by recent changes in climate at the surface. The validity of this assumption is dependent on both the subsurface thermophysical properties and the character of the downwelling climatic signal. Such uncertainties can significantly impact the determination of the quasi-steady state thermal regime, and consequently the magnitude of the temperature anomaly interpreted as a climatic signal. The quantitative effects and uncertainties that arise from the analysis of temperature-depth profiles of different depths are presented. Results demonstrate that widely different GST histories can be derived from a single temperature profile truncated at different depths. Borehole temperature measurements approaching 500–600 m depths are shown to provide the most robust GST reconstructions spanning 500 to 1000 ybp. It is further shown that the bias introduced by a temperature profile of depths shallower than 500–600 m remains even if the time span of the reconstruction target is shortened.

  11. Difference flow measurements in borehole KOV01 at Oskarshamn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Posiva Flow Log/Difference Flow method can be used for relatively fast determination of hydraulic conductivity and hydraulic head in fractures or fractured zones in cored boreholes. This report presents the principles of the method as well as the results of the measurements carried out in borehole KOV01 at Oskarshamn in February and March 2001. The aim of the measurements presented in this report was to determine the depth and flow rate of flowing fractures in borehole KOV01 prior to groundwater sampling. The measurements in borehole KOV01 were carried out between 100-1000 m depth using the so called detailed flow logging mode; the flow rate into a 5 m long test section was measured. Detailed flow logging was repeated at the location of the detected flow anomalies using 0.5 m section length and 0.1 m point intervals. The borehole was pumped during these measurements. The occurrence of saline water in the borehole was studied by electric conductivity measurements. The flow guide encloses also an electrode for measuring of single point resistance of the bedrock. It was measured with 0.01 m point intervals during the detailed flow logging. Depth calibration was made on the basis of the known depth marks in the borehole. The depth marks were detected by caliper measurements and by single point resistance measurements

  12. Design of technique for foliation measurements from borehole images, borehole OL-KR12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Posiva carries out investigations and preparations for spent nuclear fuel disposal in Finnish bedrock in Olkiluoto. The orientation and location of the bedrock foliation, its relation to brokenness and other foliation-related bedrock properties are important factors in planning the facilities for final disposal of the spent nuclear fuel, and in assessing the functionality and safety of the facilities. The borehole optical imaging (BIP, OPTV) has become one of the central data sets of site investigations available from several Olkiluoto deep boreholes. The data was assessed to be suitable for detailed foliation mapping. This work aimed at development of foliation observations and classifications, and verified the observations from core. The report will describe the work and give recommendations for similar later approach. OL- KR12 was selected due to its central location, favourable near- perpendicular orientation with respect to known site-scale foliation (160/45), reasonable length (795.34 m, covering the depth level of the planned depository facilities), and abundant fractures (to compare with orientation of the foliation), as well as because a higher resolution OPTV image was available from it. The type, intensity, location and local orientation of foliation and the rock type containing the foliation were acquired. The concordance between the foliation and rock banding was also collected as a separate parameter. The acquisition of parameters was performed with several parallel methods to find out the best possible working procedure. In the main results of comparison, three different principles were found: 1. the initially 10 meter long borehole TV images were appended to form images of longer depth intervals (30-100 meters) before the foliation measurements. 2. The person performing measurements should be concentrating on one parameter at a time, each phase performed in defined sequence, 3. After measurements, the data must be carefully revised from the drill

  13. Borehole Logging for Uranium by Gamma-Ray Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løvborg, Leif; Nyegaard, P.; Christiansen, E. M.;

    1980-01-01

    The resources in a large syngenetic deposit of low-grade uranium (U) ore with thorium at Kvanefjeld, South Greenland, were evaluated by spectrometric gamma-ray logging of 23 boreholes, 46 mm in diameter and 200 m deep. The borehole probe's detector contained 22 cm3 of sodium-iodide, and the...... photomultiplier gain was stabilized electronically using barium-133 (133 Ba) reference gamma rays. The downhole measurements were carried out at depth intervals of 25 cm, and for each stationary position of the borehole probe, counts were accumulated for 100 sec in four energy windows. The calibration constants...

  14. Prediction of multi-borehole undermine coalbed gas drainage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhi-gang

    2009-01-01

    By analyzing the flow character of a single drainage borehole in its effecting time and the correlative theory introduced, the reason for "inflexion" appearance in the flow character curve of the single draining borehole in a multi-borehole was studied. Tak-ing the theory of permeation fluid mechanics and so on as basis, the coalbed gas flow model was set up, and the numerical simulation analyzer was built for undermine gas products. With the results from the analyzer, the gas capacity could be calculated under different conditions and comparisons made with the site measurement data.

  15. BoreholeAR: A mobile tablet application for effective borehole database visualization using an augmented reality technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangho; Suh, Jangwon; Park, Hyeong-Dong

    2015-03-01

    Boring logs are widely used in geological field studies since the data describes various attributes of underground and surface environments. However, it is difficult to manage multiple boring logs in the field as the conventional management and visualization methods are not suitable for integrating and combining large data sets. We developed an iPad application to enable its user to search the boring log rapidly and visualize them using the augmented reality (AR) technique. For the development of the application, a standard borehole database appropriate for a mobile-based borehole database management system was designed. The application consists of three modules: an AR module, a map module, and a database module. The AR module superimposes borehole data on camera imagery as viewed by the user and provides intuitive visualization of borehole locations. The map module shows the locations of corresponding borehole data on a 2D map with additional map layers. The database module provides data management functions for large borehole databases for other modules. Field survey was also carried out using more than 100,000 borehole data.

  16. Detection of contaminants along boreholes with prompt gamma spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geophysical borehole logging techniques are used for estimating subsurface physical, chemical, geologic, and hydrologic parameters. Nuclear borehole logging techniques have advantages and disadvantages that tend to be complementary to those of physical sampling, and these in situ measurements can help address the drawbacks of physical sampling, including high costs, lengthy delays in obtaining results of analyses from laboratories, undersampling, sample-handling problems, and ambiguity in long-term monitoring. As part of an effort to reduce environmental restoration costs, we are evaluating in situ neutron-induced gamma-ray spectroscopy (multispectral) measurements in boreholes to map environmental contaminants. It has been known for some time that this technology is capable of identifying many elements, but earlier borehole equipment was not very sensitive

  17. Detection of contaminants along boreholes with prompt gamma spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geophysical borehole logging techniques are used for estimating subsurface physical, chemical, geological, and hydrological parameters. Nuclear borehole logging techniques have advantages and disadvantages that tend to be complementary to those of physical sampling and these in situ measurements can help address the drawbacks of physical sampling, including high costs, lengthy delays in obtaining results of analyses from laboratories/under sampling, sample handling problems, and ambiguity in long-term monitoring. As part of an effort to reduce environmental restoration costs, we are evaluating in-situ neutron-induced gamma-ray spectroscopy (multispectral) measurements in boreholes to map environmental contaminants. It has been known for some time that this technology is capable of identifying many elements, but earlier borehole equipment was not very sensitive

  18. Methods for use in detecting seismic waves in a borehole

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Phillip B.; Fincke, James R.; Reed, Teddy R.

    2007-02-20

    The invention provides methods and apparatus for detecting seismic waves propagating through a subterranean formation surrounding a borehole. In a first embodiment, a sensor module uses the rotation of bogey wheels to extend and retract a sensor package for selective contact and magnetic coupling to casing lining the borehole. In a second embodiment, a sensor module is magnetically coupled to the casing wall during its travel and dragged therealong while maintaining contact therewith. In a third embodiment, a sensor module is interfaced with the borehole environment to detect seismic waves using coupling through liquid in the borehole. Two or more of the above embodiments may be combined within a single sensor array to provide a resulting seismic survey combining the optimum of the outputs of each embodiment into a single data set.

  19. Core-logs of borehole VI down to 505 m

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the hydrogeological program of the Stripa project the vertical borehole V1 has been drilled 505.5 m. The drillcore has been logged with regard to rock characteristic, fracture frequency, dipping and filling. The results presented as cumulative fracture diagram have formed the base for subdivision of the borehole according to fracture frequency. The variation in the fracture dipping was also taken into account. Chlorite is the most common of the infilling material in the fractures. For the borehole 0-466 m the average fracture frequency is 1.46 fractures/m. Below 466 m the core is highly fractured and crushed indicating that the borehole has entered a crushed zone. Because of this the drilling is temporarily stopped. (Auth.)

  20. SURFACE AND BOREHOLE ELECTROMAGNETIC IMAGING OF CONDUCTING CONTAMINANT PLUMES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Electromagnetic induction tomography is a promising new tool for imaging electrical conductivity variations in the earth. The EM source field is produced by induction coil (magnetic dipole) transmitters deployed at the surface or in boreholes. Vertical and horizontal component ma...

  1. Borehole sealing literature review of performance requirements and materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To ensure the safe disposal of nuclear wastes, all potential pathways for radionuclide release to the biosphere must be effectively sealed. This report presents a summary of the literature up to August 1982 and outlines the placement, mechanical property and durability-stability requirements for borehole sealing. An outline of the materials that have been considered for possible use in borehole sealing is also included. Cement grouts are recommended for further study since it is indicated in the literature that cement grouts offer the best opportunity of effectively sealing boreholes employing present technology. However, new and less well known materials should also be researched to ensure that the best possible borehole plugging system is developed. 78 refs

  2. Piceance Basin Oil Shale Data: Assays, Boreholes and Formation Tops

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This database contains Oil Shale Assays, Borehole Locations and Formation Tops that were used in support of the 2009 Oil Shale Assessment (Survey Fact Sheet...

  3. Borehole radar surveying for orebody delineation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, G.; Mason, I. M.; Hargreaves, J. E.; Wellington, A.

    2000-04-01

    The Arcolabs borehole radar system was developed to assist detailed orebody delineation particularly for mines extracting thin vein ore deposits. The probes are 32 mm and therefore fit in most common exploration and mining drillholes. The system has been successfully used at a number of mine sites to assist with ore delineation at a range of scales. Images from holes drilled alongside the extension of a massive sulphide orebody downdip from current development clearly showed the extent of the orebody and changes in thickness and dip of the orebody. The costs of these surveys were considerably less than the cost of delineation by drilling alone and the resulting image provided more detailed data which could be used to optimize the position of development. Estimates of potential savings from using the system to define the bottom of the orebody were of the order of hundreds of thousands of dollars. Images from short holes drilled at short intervals beneath the footwall of another orebody enabled a detailed wireframe of the orebody contact to be constructed. Better knowledge of the contact location helped to maximize ore extraction and minimize dilution.

  4. Data Qualification Report: Borehole Straigraphic Contacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.W. Clayton; C. Lum

    2000-04-18

    The data set considered here is the borehole stratigraphic contacts data (DTN: M09811MWDGFM03.000) used as input to the Geologic Framework Model. A Technical Assessment method used to evaluate these data with a two-fold approach: (1) comparison to the geophysical logs on which the contacts were, in part, based; and (2) evaluation of the data by mapping individual units using the entire data set. Qualification of the geophysical logs is being performed in a separate activity. A representative subset of the contacts data was chosen based on importance of the contact and representativeness of that contact in the total data set. An acceptance window was established for each contact based on the needs of the data users. Data determined to be within the acceptance window were determined to be adequate for their intended use in three-dimensional spatial modeling and were recommended to be Qualified. These methods were chosen to provide a two-pronged evaluation that examines both the origin and results of the data. The result of this evaluation is a recommendation to qualify all contacts. No data were found to lie outside the pre-determined acceptance window. Where no geophysical logs are available, data were evaluated in relation to surrounding data and by impact assessment. These data are also recommended to be qualified. The stratigraphic contact data contained in this report (Attachment VII; DTN: M00004QGFMPICK.000) are intended to replace the source data, which will remain unqualified.

  5. Optical instruments for a combined seismic and geodetic borehole observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumberge, Mark; Agnew, Duncan; Berger, Jonathan; Hatfield, William; Wyatt, Frank

    2016-04-01

    Optical interferometry offers displacement sensing with the unusual combination of high sensitivity, linearity, and wide dynamic range, and it can be adapted to high temperature environments. We have applied interferometric technology to inertial seismic instruments and to optical fibers for strain measurements. When combining these methods into a single borehole package the result is a system that provides three components of observatory quality seismic recordings, two components of tilt, gravity, and vertical strain. The borehole package is entirely passive with the need for only optical fibers to connect the sensor sonde with surface electronics. One of the sensors in the system is an optical fiber strainmeter, which consists of an optical fiber cable elastically stretched between two borehole anchor points separated by 100 m or more. The fiber's length is recorded optically, enabling sub-nanostrain detection of crustal deformations. A second sensor system uses laser interferometry to record the displacements of inertial mechanical suspensions - spring-mass for the vertical component and pendulums for the horizontal components - housed in a borehole sonde. The combined system is able to measure vertical and horizontal ground velocities, gravity, and tilt with sensitivities that compare favorably with any existing borehole system over time scales from 10 Hz to many days; because the downhole components are entirely passive, the instrument will have a long lifetime and could be made usable at high downhole temperatures. The simplicity and longevity of the metal and glass borehole sonde make it suitable for permanent cementation into a borehole to achieve good coupling and stability. Several versions of the borehole inertial system have been deployed on land with excellent results, and a number of our optical fiber strainmeters have been deployed - both onshore and offshore. The combined system is currently under development.

  6. Experimental and Numerical Comparison of Two Borehole Heat Exchangers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alberdi Pagola, Maria; Poulsen, Søren Erbs

    2014-01-01

    This report outlines key results from a comparative study of two different pipe borehole heat exchanger (BHE) configurations. The work was carried out by VIA University College and in collaboration with GM Plast A/S.......This report outlines key results from a comparative study of two different pipe borehole heat exchanger (BHE) configurations. The work was carried out by VIA University College and in collaboration with GM Plast A/S....

  7. Application of Borehole SIP Technique to Sulfide Mineral Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Changryol; Park, Mi Kyung; Park, Samgyu; Sung, Nak Hoon; Shin, Seung Wook

    2016-04-01

    In the study, SIP (Spectral Induced Polarization) well logging probe system was developed to rapidly locate the metal ore bodies with sulfide minerals in the boreholes. The newly developed SIP logging probe employed the non-polarizable electrodes, consisting of zinc chloride (ZnCl2), sodium chloride (NaCl), gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O), and water (H2O), instead of existing copper electrodes, leading to eliminating the EM coupling effect in the IP surveys as much as possible. In addition, the SIP logging system is designed to make measurements down to maximum 500 meters in depth in the boreholes. The SIP well logging was conducted to examine the applicability of the SIP probe system to the boreholes at the ore mine in Jecheon area, Korea. The boreholes used in the SIP logging are known to have penetrated the metal ore bodies with sulfide minerals from the drilling investigations. The ore mine of the study area is the scarn deposits surrounded by the limestone or lime-silicate rocks in Ordovician period. The results of the SIP well logging have shown that the borehole segments with limestone or lime-silicate rocks yielded the insignificant SIP responses while the borehole segments with sulfide minerals (e.g. pyrite) provided the significant phase shifts of the SIP responses. The borehole segments penetrating the metal ore body, so-called cupola, have shown very high response of the phase shift, due to the high contents of the sulfide mineral pyrite. The phase shifts of the SIP response could be used to estimate the grade of the ore bodies since the higher contents of the sulfide minerals, the higher magnitudes of the phase shifts in the SIP responses. It is, therefore, believed that the borehole SIP technique can be applied to investigate the metal ore bodies with sulfide minerals, and that could be used to estimate the ore grades as a supplementary tool in the future.

  8. Thermal response testing of compromised borehole heat exchangers

    OpenAIRE

    Hemmingway, Phil; Long, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The results of five thermal response tests (TRTs) are presented. Three of the tests were carried out consecutively on the same borehole to illustrate the importance of allowing artificially imposed thermal gradients to dissipate prior to commencement or re-commencement of a test following testing issues. The two remaining tests carried out on separate boreholes confirm the results obtained by the first(uncompromised) of the initial three tests. The testing regime demonstrates the necessity of...

  9. Bond strength of cementitious borehole plugs in welded tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axial loads on plugs or seals in an underground repository due to gas, water pressures and temperature changes induced subsequent to waste and plug emplacement lead to shear stresses at the plug/rock contact. Therefore, the bond between the plug and rock is a critical element for the design and effectiveness of plugs in boreholes, shafts or tunnels. This study includes a systematic investigation of the bond strength of cementitious borehole plugs in welded tuff. Analytical and numerical analysis of borehole plug-rock stress transfer mechanics is performed. The interface strength and deformation are studied as a function of Young's modulus ratio of plug and rock, plug length and rock cylinder outside-to-inside radius ratio. The tensile stresses in and near an axially loaded plug are analyzed. The frictional interface strength of an axially loaded borehole plug, the effect of axial stress and lateral external stress, and thermal effects are also analyzed. Implications for plug design are discussed. The main conclusion is a strong recommendation to design friction plugs in shafts, drifts, tunnels or boreholes with a minimum length to diameter ratio of four. Such a geometrical design will reduce tensile stresses in the plug and in the host rock to a level which should minimize the risk of long-term deterioration caused by excessive tensile stresses. Push-out tests have been used to determine the bond strength by applying an axial load to cement plugs emplaced in boreholes in welded tuff cylinders. A total of 130 push-out tests have been performed as a function of borehole size, plug length, temperature, and degree of saturation of the host tuff. The use of four different borehole radii enables evaluation of size effects. 119 refs., 42 figs., 20 tabs

  10. The experimental results and analysis of a borehole radar prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A prototype of borehole radar has been successfully tested in three sites for different purposes under a field condition. The objective of the prototype is providing an effective down-hole tool for detecting targets in deep boreholes situated in a relatively high conductivity area such as the metal ores. The first testing site is at a geothermal field. The fractures extending more than 20 m from the borehole are delineated by the borehole radar in the single-hole reflection mode. The second testing site is located in a jade mine for basement evaluation. The cross-hole measurement mode was used to detect the cavities made by previous unorganized mining activities. Several high-velocity anomalies were found in the velocity profile and presumably the targets of the mine shafts and tunnels. The third test site is located in a mineralized belt characterized by low resistivity less than 1000 Ohm m, the surface-borehole measurement was carried out and the data were processed with velocity tomography. The low-velocity zone corresponds to a mineralized zone from geological records. The three testing results proved the readiness of this borehole radar prototype for further deployment in more complicated and realistic field situations. (paper)

  11. Exploratory boreholes Boettstein, Weiach, Riniken, Schafisheim, Kaisten, Leuggern: gas measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concentrations of hydrocarbon gas, carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulphide measured during the drilling of the Nagra boreholes are correlated with various drilling and drilling fluid parameters and presented in both graphic and tabular form. The Permocarboniferous in the Weiach borehole and the Muschelkalk in the Schafisheim borehole show clear positive gas anomalies. The hydrocarbon gas concentrations in the Crystalline were many times higher than those in the overlying sediments. Based on gas measurements (gas content and composition) for deep groundwaters and rock samples, it can be concluded for the Crystalline that gases penetrated from the rock formation through the borehole wall and into the drilling fluid and are also released from the crushed rock during the drilling process. Measurements of hydrogen and carbon isotopes on the gases from the Crystalline of the Weiach and Schafisheim boreholes indicate that the gases originated thermocatalytically from organic fossil material; their presence could therefore be explained by, e.g., migration from the Permocarboniferous. On the other hand, the higher deuterium and C-13 values in the Crystalline zone of Boettstein and Leuggern boreholes indicate rather that the hydrocarbon gases have an abiotic origin. (author) 3 figs., 2 tabs., 26 refs

  12. Geophysical borehole logging and optical imaging of the boreholes KR34, KR35 and KR36, at Olkiluoto 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majapuro, J. [Suomen Malmi Oy, Espoo (Finland)

    2005-09-15

    Suomen Malmi Oy conducted geophysical borehole logging and optical imaging surveys of the boreholes KR34, KR35 and KR36 at the Olkiluoto site in Eurajoki during May - June 2005. The survey is a part of Posiva Oy's detailed investigation program for the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel. The methods applied are magnetic susceptibility, natural gamma radiation, gamma-gamma density, single point resistance, Wenner-resistivity, borehole radar, full waveform sonic and optical imaging. The assignment included the field work of all surveys, interpretation and processing of the acoustic and borehole radar data. The report describes the field operation, equipment as well as processing procedures and shows the obtained results and their quality in the appendices. The raw and processed data are delivered digitally in WellCAD and Excel format. (orig.)

  13. Geophysical borehole logging and optical imaging of the boreholes KR34, KR35 and KR36, at Olkiluoto 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suomen Malmi Oy conducted geophysical borehole logging and optical imaging surveys of the boreholes KR34, KR35 and KR36 at the Olkiluoto site in Eurajoki during May - June 2005. The survey is a part of Posiva Oy's detailed investigation program for the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel. The methods applied are magnetic susceptibility, natural gamma radiation, gamma-gamma density, single point resistance, Wenner-resistivity, borehole radar, full waveform sonic and optical imaging. The assignment included the field work of all surveys, interpretation and processing of the acoustic and borehole radar data. The report describes the field operation, equipment as well as processing procedures and shows the obtained results and their quality in the appendices. The raw and processed data are delivered digitally in WellCAD and Excel format. (orig.)

  14. Thermal modelling of borehole heat exchangers and borehole thermal energy stores; Zur thermischen Modellierung von Erdwaermesonden und Erdsonden-Waermespeichern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Dan

    2011-07-15

    The thermal use of the underground for heating and cooling applications can be done with borehole heat exchangers. This work deals with the further development of the modelling of thermal transport processes inside and outside the borehole as well as with the application of the further developed models. The combination of high accuracy and short computation time is achieved by the development of three-dimensional thermal resistance and capacity models for borehole heat exchangers. Short transient transport processes can be calculated by the developed model with a considerable higher dynamic and accuracy than with known models from literature. The model is used to evaluate measurement data of a thermal response test by parameter estimation technique with a transient three-dimensional model for the first time. Clear advantages like shortening of the test duration are shown. The developed borehole heat exchanger model is combined with a three-dimensional description of the underground in the Finite-Element-Program FEFLOW. The influence of moving groundwater on borehole heat exchangers and borehole thermal energy stores is then quantified.

  15. Borehole plugging by hydrothermal transport. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calcium silicate--and aluminosilicate--compositions based on mixtures of fine grained quartz with various cements or calcium silicate compounds have been investigated under hydrothermal conditions in the temperature range 110-2500C and pressure range 1,000-10,000 psi, pressures which are always in excess of that required to maintain liquid H2O, and approximate the confining pressures which might be anticipated in deep boreholes. All silicate cement combinations investigated produce materials having adequate strength after reaction times of 1 day or longer. The calcium aluminate cement was also adequate with respect to strength but would need to be investigated more extensively for overall properties because of its highly reactive chemistry. The mini-rock cylinder-cement plug hydrothermal experiments in both limestone and sandstone resulted in reasonable magnitudes of bonding strength. The typical shear strength of a hydrothermally treated cement-sandstone plug is 1030 psi, and the compressive strength of the extruded cement plug is 9550 psi. Reactions having a potential for producing calcium carbonate plugs in holes drilled in carbonate rocks were studied. It should be noted that most cements are calcium silicate systems and are chemically compatible with the CaCO3 and CaMg(CO3)2 in the rock walls of the hole. A side benefit from this research is some insight into the suitability of massive carbonate rocks as disposal sites. Carbonate rocks by themselves are highly impermeable, have low exchange capacity, and a low water content--all properties that are desirable in the storage medium. A major drawback is the presence of secondary permeability in the form of solutionally modified joints, fractures, and bedding planes

  16. The electrical resistivity method in cased boreholes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schenkel, C.J.

    1991-05-01

    The use of downhole current sources in resistivity mapping can greatly enhance the detection and delineation of subsurface features. The purpose of this work is to examine the resistivity method for current sources in wells cased with steel. The resistivity method in cased boreholes with downhole current sources is investigated using the integral equation (IE) technique. The casing and other bodies are characterized as conductivity inhomogeneities in a half-space. For sources located along the casing axis, an axially symmetric Green's function is used to formulate the surface potential and electric field (E-field) volume integral equations. The situations involving off-axis current sources and three-dimensional (3-D) bodies is formulated using the surface potential IE method. The solution of the 3-D Green's function is presented in cylindrical and Cartesian coordinate systems. The methods of moments is used to solve the Fredholm integral equation of the second kind for the response due to the casing and other bodies. The numerical analysis revealed that the current in the casing can be approximated by its vertical component except near the source and the axial symmetric approximation of the casing is valid even for the 3-D problem. The E-field volume IE method is an effective and efficient technique to simulate the response of the casing in a half-space, whereas the surface potential approach is computationally better when multiple bodies are involved. Analyzing several configurations of the current source indicated that the casing response is influenced by four characteristic factors: conduction length, current source depth,casing depth, and casing length. 85 refs., 133 figs., 11 tabs.

  17. Exploratory borehole Riniken. Geology. Text volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Riniken well was the third borehole of the NAGRA deep drilling programme, drilled after the wells of Boettstein and Weiach. Located in the borough of Riniken (Canton Aargau) at an altitude of 385.07 m above sea level it lies approximately 3 km NNW of Brugg railway station. The well reached a total depth of 1800 m. Drilling at Riniken started on June 23, 1983 and continued until January 12, 1984. The comprehensive drillsite and laboratory studies included stratigraphic, sedimentological, mineralogical, petrographic and structural analyses in addition to a variety of petrophysical and geochemical investigations. This report presents all the data collected up until the end of September 1985. The Riniken well penetrated the ca. 800 m thick Mesozoic Tafeljura sedimentary cover, and then drilled through ca. 1000 m of the clastic fill of the N Swiss Permo-Carboniferous trough. The succession encountered extended from the Effinger Beds (Malm) down to the Upper Rotliegendes. The crystalline basement was not penetrated, but interpretation of the seismic data indicates its presence at depths between 3 and 7 km. The cored sediments display occasional fissures. Most of these fissures are filled with clay minerals, calcite and quartz. Open fissures were encountered only in the Buntsandstein and in the Rotliegendes, at a depth of around 1005 m. Water-saturated zones were recorded in the Schilfsandstein (Keuper), in the Trigonodus-Dolomit, in the Buntsandstein, and in the Rotliegendes between 950 and 1010 m. Water circulation is controlled partly by the presence of high porosity lithologies (e.g. Trigonodus-Dolomit, Buntsandstein) and partly by the occurrence of open fissures (e.g. in the Rotliegendes). However, most of the sedimentary sequence shows low permeabilities (K-10 m/s). 162 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs

  18. Exploratory borehole Riniken. Geology. Supplement volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Riniken well was the third borehole of the NAGRA deep drilling programme, drilled after the wells of Boettstein and Weiach. Located in the borough of Riniken (Canton Aargau) at an altitude of 385.07 m above sea level it lies approximately 3 km NNW of Brugg railway station. The well reached a total depth of 1800 m. Drilling at Riniken started on June 23, 1983 and continued until January 12, 1984. The comprehensive drillsite and laboratory studies included stratigraphic, sedimentological, mineralogical, petrographic and structural analyses in addition to a variety of petrophysical and geochemical investigations. This report presents all the data collected up until the end of September 1985. The Riniken well penetrated the ca. 800 m thick Mesozoic Tafeljura sedimentary cover, and then drilled through ca. 1000 m of the clastic fill of the N Swiss Permo-Carboniferous trough. The succession encountered extended from the Effinger Beds (Malm) down to the Upper Rotliegendes. The crystalline basement was not penetrated, but interpretation of the seismic data indicates its presence at depths between 3 and 7 km. The cored sediments display occasional fissures. Most of these fissures are filled with clay minerals, calcite and quartz. Open fissures were encountered only in the Buntsandstein and in the Rotliegendes, at a depth of around 1005 m. Water-saturated zones were recorded in the Schilfsandstein (Keuper), in the Trigonodus-Dolomit, in the Buntsandstein, and in the Rotliegendes between 950 and 1010 m. Water circulation is controlled partly by the presence of high porosity lithologies (e.g. Trigonodus-Dolomit, Buntsandstein) and partly by the occurrence of open fissures (e.g. in the Rotliegendes). However, most of the sedimentary sequence shows low permeabilities (K-10 m/s). 34 figs

  19. Geology of the Waste Treatment Plant Seismic Boreholes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnett, D. BRENT; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Fecht, Karl R.; Lanigan, David C.; Reidel, Steve; Rust, Colleen F.

    2007-02-28

    In 2006, DOE-ORP initiated the Seismic Boreholes Project (SBP) to emplace boreholes at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) site in order to obtain direct Vs measurements and other physical property measurements in Columbia River basalt and interbedded sediments of the Ellensburg Formation. The goal was to reduce the uncertainty in the response spectra and seismic design basis, and potentially recover design margin for the WTP. The characterization effort within the deep boreholes included 1) downhole measurements of the velocity properties of the suprabasalt, basalt, and sedimentary interbed sequences, 2) downhole measurements of the density of the subsurface basalt and sediments, and 3) confirmation of the geometry of the contact between the various basalt and interbedded sediments through examination of retrieved core from the corehole and data collected through geophysical logging of each borehole. This report describes the results of the geologic studies from three mud-rotary boreholes and one cored borehole at the WTP. All four boreholes penetrated the entire Saddle Mountains Basalt and the upper part of the Wanapum Basalt where thick sedimentary interbeds occur between the lava flows. The basalt flows penetrated in Saddle Mountains Basalt included the Umatilla Member, Esquatzel Member, Pomona Member and the Elephant Mountain Member. The underlying Priest Rapids Member of the Wanapum Basalt was also penetrated. The Ellensburg Formation sediments consist of the Mabton Interbed, the Cold Creek Interbed, the Selah Interbed and the Rattlesnake Ridge Interbed; the Byron Interbed occurs between two flows of the Priest Rapids Member. The Mabton Interbed marks the contact between the Wanapum and Saddle Mountains Basalts. The thicknesses of the basalts and interbedded sediments were within expected limits. However, a small reverse fault was found in the Pomona Member flow top. This fault has three periods of movement and less than 15 feet of repeated section. Most of the

  20. Experimental Investigation of Near-Borehole Crack Plugging with Bentonite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, R. A.; Islam, M. N.; Bunger, A.

    2015-12-01

    The success of the disposal of nuclear waste in a deep borehole (DBH) is determined by the integrity of the components of the borehole plug. Bentonite clay has been proposed as a key plugging material, and its effectiveness depends upon its penetration into near-borehole cracks associated with the drilling process. Here we present research aimed at understanding and maximizing the ability of clay materials to plug near-borehole cracks. A device was constructed such that the borehole is represented by a cylindrical chamber, and a near-borehole crack is represented by a slot adjacent to the center chamber. The experiments consist of placing bentonite clay pellets into the center chamber and filling the entire cavity with distilled water so that the pellets hydrate and swell, intruding into the slot because the cell prohibits swelling in the vertical direction along the borehole. Results indicate that the bentonite clay pellets do not fully plug the slot. We propose a model where the penetration is limited by (1) the free swelling potential intrinsic to the system comprised of the bentonite pellets and the hydrating fluid and (2) resisting shear force along the walls of the slot. Narrow slots have a smaller volume for the clay to fill than wider slots, but wider slots present less resistive force to clay intrusion. These two limiting factors work against each other, leading to a non-monotonic relationship between slot width and intrusion length. Further experimental results indicate that the free swelling potential of bentonite clay pellets depends on pellet diameter, "container" geometry, and solution salinity. Smaller diameter pellets possess more relative volumetric expansion than larger diameter pellets. The relative expansion of the clay also appears to decrease with the container size, which we understand to be due to the increased resistive force provided by the container walls. Increasing the salinity of the solution leads to a dramatic decrease in the clay

  1. The identification of basalt flow features from borehole television logs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigated whether basalt features found in outcrops and cores could be identified in open borehole walls by the use of the borehole television camera. To answer this question detailed outcrop surveys were carried out in several locations in the Snake River Plain, Idaho. A similar type of survey was also done on several locations in the Snake River Plain, Idaho. A similar type of survey was also done on several cores from the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, southeast Idaho. Borehole television logs were viewed to find similar basalt features that were noted in cores and outcrops. From these studies it was found that basalt features can be identified in open borehole walls by the borehole television camera. The basalt flows can be divided into four zones: an upper vesicular zone; a columnar zone; a central zone; and a lower vesicular zone. The upper vesicular zone can be further subdivided into four subzones: an upper vesicular subzone; a transitional subzone; a lower vesicular subzone; and a bubble train subzone. Some specific features found in the borehole TV logs were: bubble-trains, vesicle plumes, borehole extensions, and pipe vesicles. The overall distinctions for the zones were based on the vesicularity. An overall pattern of vesicles was found to be a progression of small numerous vesicles at the top of a flow which increase in size, but decrease in number, towards the center of the flow. The opposite is true starting at the bottom of the basalt flow where small vesicles are numerous, but increase in size while decreasing in number towards the center part of the flow. 14 refs., 3 figs

  2. Deep Borehole Field Test Requirements and Controlled Assumptions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardin, Ernest [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-07-01

    This document presents design requirements and controlled assumptions intended for use in the engineering development and testing of: 1) prototype packages for radioactive waste disposal in deep boreholes; 2) a waste package surface handling system; and 3) a subsurface system for emplacing and retrieving packages in deep boreholes. Engineering development and testing is being performed as part of the Deep Borehole Field Test (DBFT; SNL 2014a). This document presents parallel sets of requirements for a waste disposal system and for the DBFT, showing the close relationship. In addition to design, it will also inform planning for drilling, construction, and scientific characterization activities for the DBFT. The information presented here follows typical preparations for engineering design. It includes functional and operating requirements for handling and emplacement/retrieval equipment, waste package design and emplacement requirements, borehole construction requirements, sealing requirements, and performance criteria. Assumptions are included where they could impact engineering design. Design solutions are avoided in the requirements discussion. Deep Borehole Field Test Requirements and Controlled Assumptions July 21, 2015 iv ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This set of requirements and assumptions has benefited greatly from reviews by Gordon Appel, Geoff Freeze, Kris Kuhlman, Bob MacKinnon, Steve Pye, David Sassani, Dave Sevougian, and Jiann Su.

  3. Final report of the borehole, shaft, and tunnel sealing test - Volume 1: Borehole plugging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Borehole Plugging Experiment comprised field tests of the sealing function and the practicality in handling and application of plugs consisting of segments of perforated metal casings filled with cylindrical blocks of highly compacted sodium bentonite. Preparative tests had shown that the clay swells out through the perforation and embeds the casings. The field tests demonstrated that even very long holes can be effectively sealed by such plugs and that the clay becomes very homogeneous and forms a tight contact with the rock in a relatively short time. By that the plugs become practically impervious and the flow along the clay/rock contact will be insignificant. The longevity of such plugs extends over several thousands years under the conditions that usually prevail in crystalline rock. (author) 8 refs., 37 figs., 8 tabs

  4. VHBORE: A code to compute borehole fluid conductivity profiles with pressure changes in the borehole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the code VHBORE which can be used to model fluid electric conductivity profiles in a borehole intersecting fractured rock under conditions of changing pressure in the well bore. Pressure changes may be due to water level variations caused by pumping or fluid density effects as formation fluid is drawn into the borehole. Previous reports describe the method of estimating the hydrologic behavior of fractured rock using a time series of electric conductivity logs and an earlier code, BORE, to generate electric conductivity logs under constant pressure and flow rate conditions. The earlier model, BORE, assumed a constant flow rate, qi, for each inflow into the well bore. In the present code the user supplies the location, constant pressure, hi, transmissivity, Ti, and storativity, Si, for each fracture, as well as the initial water level in the well, hw(0), In addition, the input data contains changes in the water level at later times, Δhw(t), typically caused by turning a pump on or off. The variable density calculation also requires input of the density of each of the inflow fluids, ρi, and the initial uniform density of the well bore fluid, ρw(0). These parameters are used to compute the flow rate for each inflow point at each time step. The numerical method of Jacob and Lohman (1952) is used to compute the flow rate into or out of the fractures based on the changes in pressure in the wellbore. A dimensionless function relates flow rate as a function of time in response to an imposed pressure change. The principle of superposition is used to determine the net flow rate from a time series of pressure changes. Additional reading on the relationship between drawdown and flow rate can be found in Earlougher (1977), particularly his Section 4.6, open-quotes Constant-Pressure Flow Testingclose quotes

  5. Analysis of borehole-radar reflection logs from selected HC boreholes at the Project Shoal area, Churchill County, Nevada; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single-hole borehole-radar reflection logs were collected and interpreted in support of a study to characterize ground-water flow and transport at the Project Shoal Area (PSA) in Churchill County, Nevada. Radar logging was conducted in six boreholes using 60-MHz omni-directional electric-dipole antennas and a 60-MHz magnetic-dipole directional receiving antenna. Radar data from five boreholes were interpreted to identify the location, orientation, estimated length, and spatial continuity of planar reflectors present in the logs. The overall quality of the radar data is marginal and ranges from very poor to good. Twenty-seven reflectors were interpreted from the directional radar reflection logs. Although the range of orientation interpreted for the reflectors is large, a significant number of reflectors strike northeast-southwest and east-west to slightly northwest-southeast. Reflectors are moderate to steeply dipping and reflector length ranged from less than 7 m to more than 133 m. Qualitative scores were assigned to each reflector to provide a sense of the spatial continuity of the reflector and the characteristics of the field data relative to an ideal planar reflector (orientation score). The overall orientation scores are low, which reflects the general data quality, but also indicates that the properties of most reflectors depart from the ideal planar case. The low scores are consistent with reflections from fracture zones that contain numerous, closely spaced, sub-parallel fractures. Interpretation of borehole-radar direct-wave velocity and amplitude logs identified several characteristics of the logged boreholes: (1) low-velocity zones correlate with decreased direct-wave amplitude, indicating the presence of fracture zones; (2) direct-wave amplitude increases with depth in three of the boreholes, suggesting an increase in electrical resistivity with depth resulting from changes in mineral assemblage or from a decrease in the specific conductance of ground

  6. Geology and Geophysics of new boreholes at the FEBEX site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carbonell, R.; Perez-Estaun, A. [Inst. Jaume Almera, CSIC (Spain); Missana, T.; Buil, B.; Garralon, A.; Gomez, J. [CIEMAT (Spain); Suso, J.; Carretero, G.; Bueno, J.; Martinez, L. [AITEMIN (Spain); Hernan, P. [ENRESA (Spain)

    2007-06-15

    Geophysical data has been acquired to characterized the fracture network of the surrounding volume within the FEBEX gallery. The geophysic data include new borehole logging such as Natural Gamma and Borehole Ground Penetrating radar and cross hole ultrasonic tomography. The preliminary processing and integration of these different data sets indicates that the GPR record can provide images of the fractures, specially if they are fluid filled. The GPR is specially sensitive to the water content as it directly affects the electrical conductivity and the dielectric permittivity Therefore it is adequate for mapping water conductive fractures of the crystalline rock. The correlation of the anomalies measured by the natural gamma can be correlated with the 'diffractions' in the GPR and the fractures imaged by the borehole televiewer. The cross hole ultrasonic tomography data is under processing and no interpretations have been attempted yet.

  7. Drilling surveillance and geomechanical experiments in deep boreholes in salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the framework of the CEC Programme on Radioactive Waste Disposal (1985-1990), in situ experiments in the Asse II salt mine in Germany are conducted. This report describes the work of the 600 m borehole project performed during the contracting period August 1986 - December 1990. During this period measurement devices for measurement of rock mechanical parameters have been developed and were made operational. For the drilling of the boreholes a new technique has been developed. One main subject of investigation was to develop an on-line method to determine the gas content in the flushing air during drilling operation. The method used worked satisfactorily and the test showed that this surveillance method could be used during dry-drilling of deep emplacement boreholes in a future repository. For the second experiment the Variable Pressure Device (VPD) has been constructed to measure the elastic and time-dependent response of the salt on pressure changes. 37 refs., 49 figs., 5 tabs

  8. Consequence assessment of hydrological communications through borehole plugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the effect of borehole plug integrity on consequence assessments performed for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The study is based on scenarios described in the Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix K, for the WIPP, US Department of Energy, October 1980. The flow rates through a borehole, assumed to penetrate the waste storage location and to connect underlying and overlying aquifers, are determined as a function of the hydraulic conductance of the plugs. Similar calculations are performed for multiple boreholes communicating with the aquifers. It is concluded that low permeability plugs (less than 1 md) are not essential to satisfy public health and safety requirements at the WIPP, but rather that such plugs act as a redundant barrier in the multiple barrier isolation concept

  9. 2005 CNPC S&E International Seminar on Borehole Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ From 23rd to 24th in September, the 2005 CNPC S&E International Seminar on Borehole Technology was held in Beijing. Invited by CNPC S&E, 68 honorable guests from 14 countries in Central Asia, Africa, North and South Americas and Southeast Asia and more than 100 representatives for the embassies in the People's Republic of China from 13 countries discussed the trend,progress and utilization of borehole technology and the service strength of CNPC's borehole technology together.The honorable attendees can further know the technical strength of CNPC S&E through this communication,and therefore find out the best cooperation way to create a higher value for the oil company in one hand, and improve the force and popularity of CNPC S&E in the international market on the other hand.

  10. Geophysical borehole logging. Final disposal of spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teollisuuden Voima Oy (Industrial Power Company Ltd.) will take precautions for final disposal of spent fuel in the Finnish bedrock. The first stage of the site selection studies includes drilling of a deep borehole down to approximately 1000 meters in the year 1984. The report deals with geophysical borehole logging methods, which could be used for the studies. The aim of geophysical borehole logging methods is to descripe specially hydrogeological and structural features. Only the most essential methods are dealt with in this report. Attention is paid to the information produced with the methods, derscription of the methods, interpretation and limitations. The feasibility and possibilities for the aims are evaluated. The evaluations are based mainly on the results from Sweden, England, Canada and USA as well as experiencies gained in Finland

  11. Interpretation of hydraulic testing at the Weiach borehole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the results of hydrogeologic interpretations of all analyzable single packer, double packer, and H-log tests conducted in the Weiach borehole. Ten of the 37 technically successful tests were conducted using a single packer configuration. One test of the Upper Muschelkalk was configured using temporary casing with an external casing packer to conduct a drawdown-recovery test in the isolated zone. Twenty-six intervals were tested using a double packer configuration. Nineteen of these intervals were tested using a hydraulic test tool (HTT). Seven of these intervals were tested using a drill-stem test (DST) tool and drill-stem test methods and one test was completed with a DST tool used to isolate the test interval for a pumping sequence. Three H-log tests were completed near the bottom of the borehole with the HTT and double packer configuration. All the tests were completed with one or more of the following test methodologies at each test interval: slug tests, pulse tests, drill-stem tests (DST) and pumping tests. The tests discussed in this report cover the section of the borehole from apparent depth (along the borehole length) of 188.0 m to the bottom of the borehole at 2482.2 m. The testing occurred within the Malm, Dogger, Lias, Keuper, Muschelkalk, Buntsandstein, Perm, Karbon, and Crystalline Groups. A discussion of the testing and interpretation methods is presented. Data analysis was performed using the INTERA Graph Theoretic Field Model (GTFM) which permits borehole pressure history and thermally-induced pressure effects to be incorporated into the simulatons, and Hornergraphical techniques. (author) 32 figs., 10 tabs., 37 refs

  12. Deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stein, Joshua S.; Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Brady, Patrick Vane; Swift, Peter N.; Rechard, Robert Paul; Arnold, Bill Walter; Kanney, Joseph F.; Bauer, Stephen J.

    2009-07-01

    Preliminary evaluation of deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel indicates the potential for excellent long-term safety performance at costs competitive with mined repositories. Significant fluid flow through basement rock is prevented, in part, by low permeabilities, poorly connected transport pathways, and overburden self-sealing. Deep fluids also resist vertical movement because they are density stratified. Thermal hydrologic calculations estimate the thermal pulse from emplaced waste to be small (less than 20 C at 10 meters from the borehole, for less than a few hundred years), and to result in maximum total vertical fluid movement of {approx}100 m. Reducing conditions will sharply limit solubilities of most dose-critical radionuclides at depth, and high ionic strengths of deep fluids will prevent colloidal transport. For the bounding analysis of this report, waste is envisioned to be emplaced as fuel assemblies stacked inside drill casing that are lowered, and emplaced using off-the-shelf oilfield and geothermal drilling techniques, into the lower 1-2 km portion of a vertical borehole {approx}45 cm in diameter and 3-5 km deep, followed by borehole sealing. Deep borehole disposal of radioactive waste in the United States would require modifications to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act and to applicable regulatory standards for long-term performance set by the US Environmental Protection Agency (40 CFR part 191) and US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (10 CFR part 60). The performance analysis described here is based on the assumption that long-term standards for deep borehole disposal would be identical in the key regards to those prescribed for existing repositories (40 CFR part 197 and 10 CFR part 63).

  13. Deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preliminary evaluation of deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel indicates the potential for excellent long-term safety performance at costs competitive with mined repositories. Significant fluid flow through basement rock is prevented, in part, by low permeabilities, poorly connected transport pathways, and overburden self-sealing. Deep fluids also resist vertical movement because they are density stratified. Thermal hydrologic calculations estimate the thermal pulse from emplaced waste to be small (less than 20 C at 10 meters from the borehole, for less than a few hundred years), and to result in maximum total vertical fluid movement of ∼100 m. Reducing conditions will sharply limit solubilities of most dose-critical radionuclides at depth, and high ionic strengths of deep fluids will prevent colloidal transport. For the bounding analysis of this report, waste is envisioned to be emplaced as fuel assemblies stacked inside drill casing that are lowered, and emplaced using off-the-shelf oilfield and geothermal drilling techniques, into the lower 1-2 km portion of a vertical borehole ∼45 cm in diameter and 3-5 km deep, followed by borehole sealing. Deep borehole disposal of radioactive waste in the United States would require modifications to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act and to applicable regulatory standards for long-term performance set by the US Environmental Protection Agency (40 CFR part 191) and US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (10 CFR part 60). The performance analysis described here is based on the assumption that long-term standards for deep borehole disposal would be identical in the key regards to those prescribed for existing repositories (40 CFR part 197 and 10 CFR part 63).

  14. Summary of the Lavia borehole investications in 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Industrial Power Company Ltd (TVO) drilled in the spring 1984 a 1001 m deep borehole, diameter 56 mm, in Lavia. The borehole is used during the years 1984-85 for developing and testing research methods and equipment needed in site investigations of spent fuel final disposal in the future. In 1984 hydraulical and geophysical tests were made and groundwater samples were taken. The drilling site is a wide outcropped area in the northern part of the porphyritic granite formation of Lavia. Geological and fracture mapping as well as geophysical measurements on the surface were made in the area surrounding the drilling site. The bedrock consists of homonous porphyritic granite, in which quartzdiorite occurs in thin incalations. Magnetic or electric anomalies were not observed. Fracture frequency is low and the fractures appear mainly in two sets. The rock types vary in the borehole from porphyritic granite to diorite. Due to slight mineralogical variations, the diorite is either granodiorite, quartzdiorite or tonalite. Granite occurs as veins. Hydraulic conductivity was measured systematically with a packer separation of 30 m between the depths 73-973 m. Hydraulic conductivity is generally 10-10-10-11 m/s. Electric, radiometric, magnetic and acoustic measurements were made in the borehole. In addition, the caliper and the temperature of the borehole were measured. The results of these geophysical measurements indicate the properties of rock types and fracturing in the borehole. On the basis of the results e.g. fracture porosity was interpreted. The results of acoustic tube wave measurement correlate well with hydraulic conductivity. Water samples were taken from four depths. The deepest level was 910 m. The samples were taken with a packer separation of 5 m. In the water analyses it was observed that at several depths remarkable amounts of flushing water from drilling were still remaining in the rock

  15. Elements of a continuous-wave borehole radar. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caffey, T.W.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Geophysical Technology Dept.

    1997-08-01

    The theory is developed for the antenna array for a proposed continuous-wave, ground-penetrating radar for use in a borehole, and field measurements are presented. Accomplishments include the underground measurement of the transmitting beam in the azimuth plane, active azimuth-steering of the transmitting beam, and the development of a range-to-target algorithm. The excellent performance of the antenna array supports the concept of a continuous-wave borehole radar. A field-prototype should be developed for use in both geothermal zones and for the exploration and recovery of oil and gas.

  16. Improvements of U-pipe Borehole Heat Exchangers

    OpenAIRE

    Acuña, José

    2010-01-01

    The sales of Ground Source Heat Pumps in Sweden and many other countries are having a rapid growth in the last decade. Today, there are approximately 360 000 systems installed in Sweden, with a growing rate of about 30 000 installations per year. The most common way to exchange heat with the bedrock in ground source heat pump applications is circulating a secondary fluid through a Borehole Heat Exchanger (BHE), a closed loop in a vertical borehole. The fluid transports the heat from the groun...

  17. Handling and Emplacement Options for Deep Borehole Disposal Conceptual Design.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cochran, John R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hardin, Ernest [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-07-01

    This report presents conceptual design information for a system to handle and emplace packages containing radioactive waste, in boreholes 16,400 ft deep or possibly deeper. Its intended use is for a design selection study that compares the costs and risks associated with two emplacement methods: drill-string and wireline emplacement. The deep borehole disposal (DBD) concept calls for siting a borehole (or array of boreholes) that penetrate crystalline basement rock to a depth below surface of about 16,400 ft (5 km). Waste packages would be emplaced in the lower 6,560 ft (2 km) of the borehole, with sealing of appropriate portions of the upper 9,840 ft (3 km). A deep borehole field test (DBFT) is planned to test and refine the DBD concept. The DBFT is a scientific and engineering experiment, conducted at full-scale, in-situ, without radioactive waste. Waste handling operations are conceptualized to begin with the onsite receipt of a purpose-built Type B shipping cask, that contains a waste package. Emplacement operations begin when the cask is upended over the borehole, locked to a receiving flange or collar. The scope of emplacement includes activities to lower waste packages to total depth, and to retrieve them back to the surface when necessary for any reason. This report describes three concepts for the handling and emplacement of the waste packages: 1) a concept proposed by Woodward-Clyde Consultants in 1983; 2) an updated version of the 1983 concept developed for the DBFT; and 3) a new concept in which individual waste packages would be lowered to depth using a wireline. The systems described here could be adapted to different waste forms, but for design of waste packaging, handling, and emplacement systems the reference waste forms are DOE-owned high- level waste including Cs/Sr capsules and bulk granular HLW from fuel processing. Handling and Emplacement Options for Deep Borehole Disposal Conceptual Design July 23, 2015 iv ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This report has

  18. Pressure-induced brine migration into an open borehole in a salt repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides some solutions to models that predict the brine accumulation in an open borehole. In this model, brine flow rates are controlled by pressure differences between the salt and the borehole

  19. Strengthening Borehole Configuration from the Retaining Roadway for Greenhouse Gas Reduction: A Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    Fei Xue; Nong Zhang; Xiaowei Feng; Xigui Zheng; Jiaguang Kan

    2015-01-01

    A monitoring trial was carried out to investigate the effect of boreholes configuration on the stability and gas production rate. These boreholes were drilled from the retaining roadway at longwall mining panel 1111(1) of the Zhuji Coalmine, in China. A borehole camera exploration device and multiple gas parameter measuring device were adopted to monitor the stability and gas production rate. Research results show that boreholes 1~8 with low intensity and thin casing thickness were broken at ...

  20. Deep Borehole Disposal Remediation Costs for Off-Normal Outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finger, John T. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Cochran, John R. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hardin, Ernest [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-08-17

    This memo describes rough-order-of-magnitude (ROM) cost estimates for a set of off-normal (accident) scenarios, as defined for two waste package emplacement method options for deep borehole disposal: drill-string and wireline. It summarizes the different scenarios and the assumptions made for each, with respect to fishing, decontamination, remediation, etc.

  1. Calibration facilities for borehole and surface environmental radiation measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measuring radiation from contaminated soil and buildings is important in the cleanup of land areas and facilities. It provides the means for quantifying the amount of contamination and assessing the success of efforts to restore areas to acceptable conditions for public use. Instruments that measure in situ radiation from natural or radiochemically-contaminated earth formations must be calibrated in appropriate facilities to provide quantitative assessments of concentrations of radionuclides. For instruments that are inserted into boreholes, these calibration facilities are typically special models having holes for probe insertion and having sufficient size to appear radiometrically ''infinite'' in extent. The US Department of Energy (DOE) has such models at Hanford, Washington, and Grand Junction, Colorado. They are concrete cylinders having a central borehole and containing known, enhanced amounts of K, U, and Th for spectral gamma-ray measurements. Additional models contain U for calibrating neutron probes for fissile materials and total-count gamma-ray probes. Models for calibrating neutron probes for moisture measurements in unsaturated formations exist for steel-cased boreholes at Hanford and for uncased boreholes at the DOE's Nevada Test Site. Large surface pads are available at Grand Junction for portable, vehicle-mounted, or airplane-mounted spectral gamma-ray detectors

  2. Artificial Recharge via Boreholes Using Treated Wastewater: Possibilities and Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostas Voudouris

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Interest in artificial recharge of groundwater using pretreated wastewater continues to increase, especially in semi-arid countries. After the artificial recharge and natural treatment, the water could be extracted through boreholes pumping for direct irrigation. The selection of suitable locations for artificial recharge should be based on hydrogeological conditions, economic evaluation and environmental considerations. Clogging of boreholes that are used for artificial recharge is a serious problem and requires proper planning to reduce it. This paper deals with the investigation of the possibilities and prospects of aquifer recharge via boreholes using treated wastewater. Firstly, the aquifer recharge techniques, the proposed criteria of waste and the clogging effect are presented. Secondly, the possibility of application of artificial recharge in the South-Eastern Mesaoria aquifer of Cyprus is examined. Based on hydrogeological results, artificial recharge using tertiary treated wastewater via boreholes is one of the options available for increasing the groundwater reserves of this aquifer. The recycled water will infiltrate through gravel pack, providing favorable conditions for ventilation and laminar flow due to small water flow velocity. The treatment works include the removal of the fat, oil and grease (FOG and cyanides (CN− content in order to meet the upper acceptable limits.

  3. Borehole Logging for Uranium by Gamma-Ray Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løvborg, Leif; Nyegaard, P.; Christiansen, E. M.; Nielsen, B. L.

    1980-01-01

    photomultiplier gain was stabilized electronically using barium-133 (133 Ba) reference gamma rays. The downhole measurements were carried out at depth intervals of 25 cm, and for each stationary position of the borehole probe, counts were accumulated for 100 sec in four energy windows. The calibration constants...

  4. Preliminary report on geophysical and mechanical borehole measurements at Stripa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A suite of seven logs--neutron, gamma--gamma, resistivity, gamma ray, sonic, caliper, and temperature--operated in a borehole of 380-m depth located eleven zones where the rock permeability is expected to be enhanced due to the presence of open fractures. The sonic waveform record proved especially useful in this regard. Borehole measurements were also acquired in a large number of boreholes from 5- to 14-m length located in experimental drifts some 340-m underground. Here several physical properties, including the porosity, density, sonic velocity, and borehole rugosity, are generally quite uniform, with the exception of a few local chloritic zones and a few minor fractures. However, in situ determinations of the mechanical modulus with the CSM cell indicate substantial variability, with some apparent fracture control. Uranium and thorium concentrations are quite high in the Stripa granite, with local fluctuations associated with mineralogical changes as revealed by the gamma-ray log. A differential resistance probe appears promising as a sensitive detector of fine fracturing. A cross-hole ultrasonic system indicates variations of a few percent in compressional- and shear-wave velocities, reflecting the presence of fractures and changes in fracture characteristics as the rock is heated in a simulated storage test. The geophysical and mechanical data are being compared with the results from core and television logging, with hydrological test data on static pressure and injection permeability, and with displacements induced by thermal loading

  5. Development of a mobile borehole investigation software using augmented reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, J.; Lee, S.; Oh, M.; Yun, D. E.; Kim, S.; Park, H. D.

    2015-12-01

    Augmented reality (AR) is one of the most developing technologies in smartphone and IT areas. While various applications have been developed using the AR, there are a few geological applications which adopt its advantages. In this study, a smartphone application to manage boreholes using AR has been developed. The application is consisted of three major modules, an AR module, a map module and a data management module. The AR module calculates the orientation of the device and displays nearby boreholes distributed in three dimensions using the orientation. This module shows the boreholes in a transparent layer on a live camera screen so the user can find and understand the overall characteristics of the underground geology. The map module displays the boreholes on a 2D map to show their distribution and the location of the user. The database module uses SQLite library which has proper characteristics for mobile platforms, and Binary XML is adopted to enable containing additional customized data. The application is able to provide underground information in an intuitive and refined forms and to decrease time and general equipment required for geological field investigations.

  6. Hydrogeological investigations in two boreholes in the Stripa test station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The investigations included the following: water injection tests in a horizontal core-borehole, Dbh 2; hydrostatic pressure tests in Dbh2; determination of permeability in a vertical core-borehole, Dbh VI. The results of the water injection tests gave very little information due to the fact, that an air cushion was trapped in the borehole. The hydrostatic pressure tests in Dbh 2 were made in that part of the borehole, which is situated beyond the drift (45 - 97 m). Most of the pressure curves were difficult to interpret. The hydrostatic pressure in the section 89 - 97 m (end of the hole) was calculated to 1,67 Mpa. Near the end of the drift (46.00 - 49.71 m) the pressure was 0.22 Mpa. The permeability tests in Dbh VI were performed by measuring the water-flow and hydrostatic pressure in different levels. The calculated average permeability was 6.5x10-10m/s

  7. SNG-logs and core measurements in boreholes at Skagen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spectral Natural Gamma logs (SNG-logs) have been used in boreholes at Skagen (Jutland, Denmark) in order to elucidate some geologic reasons for the town Skagen sinking into the ground. Results of measurements - the SNG-logs and core measurements - are reported and discussed in the present report. (EG)

  8. Size influence on the sealing performance of cementitious borehole plugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flow tests have been conducted on cement plugs with diameters of 158.8 mm and 196.9 mm, and length to diameter ratios of one, in boreholes in basalt blocks and in steel pipes. Expansion strains and curing temperatures have been monitored on cement plugs in boreholes in basalt blocks, in PVC and in steel pipes with diameters from 25.4 mm to 196.9 mm and length to diameter ratios of one and two. During permeability tests, basalt blocks have fractured, presumably due to water injection pressure, cement expansion and packer pressure. Falling head tests have been performed on some block fractures to study the influence of the complicated interaction between a cement borehole plug (e.g. swelling and shrinkage alternations) and the rock, as well as of the normal stress across the fracture, on the hydraulic conductivity of a fracture intersecting a plugged borehole. The hydraulic conductivity of the cement plugs in the steel pipes varies between 3.57 x 10-11 cm/min and 3.65 x 10-9 cm/min. Cement swelling tests remain inconclusive about size effects, primarily because of instrumentation problems. Cement curing temperatures increase from small to large diameter cement plugs

  9. Development of a stress gauge for borehole using photoelasticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the framework of the research and development program on storage and disposal in geologic formation stresses in boreholes are measured by overcoring. The principle is stress release by coring around the rock where determinations are carried out. The aim of the present work is the realisation in laboratory of a gauge model based on this principle and measuring deformations by photoelasticity

  10. Data Communication PC/NaI-borehole probe (Hardware & Software)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Peter Buch

    Development of new hard- & software to a NaI borehole probe on a PC. Save data from the probe each 10'th sec, handle the data from the probe and make calculations every 10'th sec and show the results on the monitor....

  11. Seismic signatures of partial saturation on acoustic borehole modes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chao, G.E.; Smeulders, D.M.J.; Van Dongen, M.E.H.

    2007-01-01

    We present an exact theory of attenuation and dispersion of borehole Stoneley waves propagating along porous rocks containing spherical gas bubbles by using the Biot theory. An effective frequency-dependent fluid bulk modulus is introduced to describe the dynamic (oscillatory) behavior of the gas bu

  12. Zero-Offset VSP in the COSC-1 borehole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauß, Felix; Simon, Helge; Giese, Rüdiger; Buske, Stefan; Hedin, Peter; Juhlin, Christopher; Lorenz, Henning

    2015-04-01

    As support for the COSC drilling project (Collisional Orogeny in the Scandinavian Caledonides), an extensive seismic survey took place during September and October 2014 in and around the newly drilled borehole COSC-1. The main aim of the COSC project is to better understand orogenic processes in past and recently active mountain belts. For this an approx. 2.5 km deep borehole, with nearly 100% core recovery, was drilled in the Scandinavian Caledonides, close to the town of Åre in western Jämtland/Sweden. The seismic survey consisted of a high resolution zero-offset VSP (vertical seismic profiling) and a multi-azimuthal walkaway VSP experiment with receivers at the surface and in the borehole. For the zero-offset VSP (ZVSP) a hydraulic hammer source (VIBSIST 3000) was used and activated over a period of 20 seconds as a sequence of impacts with increasing hit frequency. For each source point, 25 seconds of data were recorded. The wavefield was recorded in the borehole by 15 three-component receivers using a Sercel Slimwave geophone chain with an inter-tool spacing of 10 meters. The ZVSP was designed to result in a geophone spacing of 2 meters over the whole borehole length. The source was about 30 meters away from the borehole and thus, provides a poor geometry to rotate 3C-data in greater depths. For this reason, a check shot position was defined in about 1.9 km distance to the borehole. With this offset shots, it is possible to rotate the components of the 3C receivers and to concentrate the S-wave energy on one component and thus, increase the signal-to-noise ratio of S-wave events. This offset source point was activated periodically for certain depth positions of the geophone chain. The stacked ZVSP-data show a high signal-to-noise ratio and good data quality. Frequencies up to 150 Hz were recorded. On the vertical component, clear direct P-wave arrivals are visible. Several P-wave reflections occur below 1600 meters depth. After rotating the components

  13. Geology of the Waste Treatment Plant Seismic Boreholes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnett, D. Brent; Fecht, Karl R.; Reidel, Stephen P.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Lanigan, David C.; Rust, Colleen F.

    2007-05-11

    In 2006, the U.S. Department of Energy initiated the Seismic Boreholes Project (SBP) to emplace boreholes at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) site in order to obtain direct shear wave velocity (Vs) measurements and other physical property measurements in Columbia River basalt and interbedded sediments of the Ellensburg Formation. The goal was to reduce the uncertainty in the response spectra and seismic design basis, and potentially recover design margin for the WTP. The characterization effort within the deep boreholes included 1) downhole measurements of the velocity properties of the suprabasalt, basalt, and sedimentary interbed sequences, 2) downhole measurements of the density of the subsurface basalt and sediments, and 3) geologic studies to confirm the geometry of the contact between the various basalt and interbedded sediments through examination of retrieved core from the core hole and data collected through geophysical logging of each borehole. This report describes the results of the geologic studies from three mud-rotary boreholes and one cored borehole at the WTP. All four boreholes penetrated the entire Saddle Mountains Basalt and the upper part of the Wanapum Basalt where thick sedimentary interbeds occur between the lava flows. The basalt flows penetrated in Saddle Mountains Basalt included the Umatilla Member, Esquatzel Member, Pomona Member, and the Elephant Mountain Member. The underlying Priest Rapids Member of the Wanapum Basalt also was penetrated. The Ellensburg Formation sediments consist of the Mabton Interbed, the Cold Creek Interbed, the Selah Interbed, and the Rattlesnake Ridge Interbed; the Byron Interbed occurs between two flows of the Priest Rapids Member. The Mabton Interbed marks the contact between the Wanapum and Saddle Mountains Basalts. The thicknesses of the basalts and interbedded sediments were within expected limits. However, a small reverse fault was found in the Pomona Member flow top. This fault has three periods of

  14. Sealing of investigation boreholes, Phase 4 - Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pusch, Roland [Drawrite AB, Luleaa Technical University, Luleaa (Sweden); Ramqvist, Gunnar [El-Tekno AB, Figeholm (Sweden); Bockgaard, Niclas [Golder Associates, Goeteborg (Sweden); Ekman, Lennart [LE Geokonsult AB, Baelinge (Sweden)

    2011-09-15

    The report describes the outcome of Phase 4 of the project 'Sealing of investigation boreholes', which deals with 1) characterization and planning of borehole sealing, 2) performance and quality assessment, 3) sealing of large diameter holes, and 4) interaction of clay and concrete plugs. A specific goal was to find ways to characterize, plan and seal of boreholes so that their impact on the overall hydraulic performance of the repository rock can predicted and controlled. The work comprised selection of representative 'reference holes' at the Laxemar and Forsmark sites for development of a general programme for planning and simulating implementation of borehole plugging campaigns, considering also cost issues. A second aim was to define and quantify the role of seals in the reference holes for finding out how important sealing really is. A third was to test a practical way to seal large diameter boreholes and a fourth to find out how concrete matures and performs in contact with smectite clay. The study demonstrated, in conclusion, the need for developing techniques for preparing deep boreholes before lasting seals are installed in them, since poor sealing can short-circuit hydraulically important fracture zones intersected by the holes. The practically oriented sealing activities showed that the technique developed for tight sealing of large-diameter boreholes is practical and feasible. The issue of chemical stability was investigated by testing the performance and constitution of a plug consisting of CBI concrete in contact with smectite-rich seals for almost three years. This study showed that none of them underwent substantial degradation in this period of time, but chemical reactions and thereby generated changes in physical behaviour of the plug components had taken place, particularly in the clay. The rate of degradation is, however, not yet known. It was concluded from this study that it is suitable to carry out a corresponding

  15. Sealing of investigation boreholes, Phase 4 - Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report describes the outcome of Phase 4 of the project 'Sealing of investigation boreholes', which deals with 1) characterization and planning of borehole sealing, 2) performance and quality assessment, 3) sealing of large diameter holes, and 4) interaction of clay and concrete plugs. A specific goal was to find ways to characterize, plan and seal of boreholes so that their impact on the overall hydraulic performance of the repository rock can predicted and controlled. The work comprised selection of representative 'reference holes' at the Laxemar and Forsmark sites for development of a general programme for planning and simulating implementation of borehole plugging campaigns, considering also cost issues. A second aim was to define and quantify the role of seals in the reference holes for finding out how important sealing really is. A third was to test a practical way to seal large diameter boreholes and a fourth to find out how concrete matures and performs in contact with smectite clay. The study demonstrated, in conclusion, the need for developing techniques for preparing deep boreholes before lasting seals are installed in them, since poor sealing can short-circuit hydraulically important fracture zones intersected by the holes. The practically oriented sealing activities showed that the technique developed for tight sealing of large-diameter boreholes is practical and feasible. The issue of chemical stability was investigated by testing the performance and constitution of a plug consisting of CBI concrete in contact with smectite-rich seals for almost three years. This study showed that none of them underwent substantial degradation in this period of time, but chemical reactions and thereby generated changes in physical behaviour of the plug components had taken place, particularly in the clay. The rate of degradation is, however, not yet known. It was concluded from this study that it is suitable to carry out a corresponding investigation of the plugs

  16. Site Characterization for a Deep Borehole Field Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlman, K. L.; Hardin, E. L.; Freeze, G. A.; Sassani, D.; Brady, P. V.

    2015-12-01

    The US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy is at the beginning of 5-year Deep Borehole Field Test (DBFT) to investigate the feasibility of constructing and characterizing two boreholes in crystalline basement rock to a depth of 5 km (16,400 ft). The concept of deep borehole disposal for radioactive waste has some advantages over mined repositories, including incremental construction and loading, the enhanced natural barriers provided by deep continental crystalline basement, and reduced site characterization. Site characterization efforts need to determine an eligible site that does not have the following disqualifying characteristics: greater than 2 km to crystalline basement, upward vertical fluid potential gradients, presence of economically exploitable natural resources, presence of high permeability connection to the shallow subsurface, and significant probability of future seismic or volcanic activity. Site characterization activities for the DBFT will include geomechanical (i.e., rock in situ stress state, and fluid pressure), geological (i.e., rock and fracture infill lithology), hydrological (i.e., quantity of fluid, fluid convection properties, and solute transport mechanisms), and geochemical (i.e., rock-water interaction and natural tracers) aspects. Both direct (i.e., sampling and in situ testing) and indirect (i.e., borehole geophysical) methods are planned for efficient and effective characterization of these site aspects and physical processes. Borehole-based characterization will be used to determine the variability of system state (i.e., stress, pressure, temperature, and chemistry) with depth, and interpretation of material and system parameters relevant to numerical site simulation. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE

  17. Optimization of Deep Borehole Systems for HLW Disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the final report on a project to update and improve the conceptual design of deep boreholes for high level nuclear waste disposal. The effort was concentrated on application to intact US legacy LWR fuel assemblies, but conducted in a way in which straightforward extension to other waste forms, host rock types and countries was preserved. The reference fuel design version consists of a vertical borehole drilled into granitic bedrock, with the uppermost kilometer serving as a caprock zone containing a diverse and redundant series of plugs. There follows a one to two kilometer waste canister emplacement zone having a hole diameter of approximately 40-50 cm. Individual holes are spaced 200-300 m apart to form a repository field. The choice of verticality and the use of a graphite based mud as filler between the waste canisters and the borehole wall liner was strongly influenced by the expectation that retrievability would continue to be emphasized in US and worldwide repository regulatory criteria. An advanced version was scoped out using zinc alloy cast in place to fill void space inside a disposal canister and its encapsulated fuel assembly. This excludes water and greatly improves both crush resistance and thermal conductivity. However the simpler option of using a sand fill was found adequate and is recommended for near-term use. Thermal-hydraulic modeling of the low permeability and porosity host rock and its small (@@@ 1%) saline water content showed that vertical convection induced by the waste's decay heat should not transport nuclides from the emplacement zone up to the biosphere atop the caprock. First order economic analysis indicated that borehole repositories should be cost-competitive with shallower mined repositories. It is concluded that proceeding with plans to drill a demonstration borehole to confirm expectations, and to carry out priority experiments, such as retention and replenishment of in-hole water is in order.

  18. PRELIMINARY REPORT ON GEOPHYSICAL AND MECHANICAL BOREHOLE MEASUREMENTS AT STRIPA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, P.; Paulsson, B.; Rachiele, R.; Andersson, L.; Schrauf, T.; Hustrulid, W.; Duran, O.; Magnusson, K.A.

    1979-05-01

    Four different systems of borehole instrumentation have been employed thus far at an experimental site at Stripa, Sweden where a series of hydrological and thermo-mechanical experiments are being conducted to examine the suitability of granitic rock for the storage of radioactive waste materials. Asuite of seven logs--neutron, gamma-gamma, resistivity, gamma ray, sonic, caliper, and temperature--operated in a borehole of 380-m depth located eleven zones where the rock permeability is expected to be enhanced due to the presence of open fractures. The sonic waveform record proved especially useful in this regard. Borehole measurements were also acquired in a large number of boreholes from 5- to 14-m length located in experimental drifts some 340-m underground. Here several physical properties, including the porosity, density, sonic velocity, and borehole rugosity, are generally quite uniform, with the exception of a few local chloritic zones and a few minor fractures. However, in situ determinations of the mechanical modulus with the CSM cell indicate substantial variability, with some apparent fracture control. Uranium and thorium concentrations are quite high in the Stripa granite, with local fluctuations associated with mineralogical changes as revealed by the gamma-ray log. Adifferential resistance probe appears promising as a sensitive detector of fine fracturing. Across-hole ultrasonic system indicates variations of a few percent in compressional- and shear-wave velocities, reflecting the presence of fractures and changes in fracture characteristics as the rock is heated in a simulated storage test. The geophysical and mechanical data are being compared with the results from core and television logging, with hydrological test data on static pressure and injection permeability, and with displacements induced by thermal loading.

  19. Optimization of Deep Borehole Systems for HLW Disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Driscoll, Michael [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Baglietto, Emilio [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Buongiorno, Jacopo [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Lester, Richard [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Brady, Patrick [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Arnold, B. W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-09

    This is the final report on a project to update and improve the conceptual design of deep boreholes for high level nuclear waste disposal. The effort was concentrated on application to intact US legacy LWR fuel assemblies, but conducted in a way in which straightforward extension to other waste forms, host rock types and countries was preserved. The reference fuel design version consists of a vertical borehole drilled into granitic bedrock, with the uppermost kilometer serving as a caprock zone containing a diverse and redundant series of plugs. There follows a one to two kilometer waste canister emplacement zone having a hole diameter of approximately 40-50 cm. Individual holes are spaced 200-300 m apart to form a repository field. The choice of verticality and the use of a graphite based mud as filler between the waste canisters and the borehole wall liner was strongly influenced by the expectation that retrievability would continue to be emphasized in US and worldwide repository regulatory criteria. An advanced version was scoped out using zinc alloy cast in place to fill void space inside a disposal canister and its encapsulated fuel assembly. This excludes water and greatly improves both crush resistance and thermal conductivity. However the simpler option of using a sand fill was found adequate and is recommended for near-term use. Thermal-hydraulic modeling of the low permeability and porosity host rock and its small (≤ 1%) saline water content showed that vertical convection induced by the waste’s decay heat should not transport nuclides from the emplacement zone up to the biosphere atop the caprock. First order economic analysis indicated that borehole repositories should be cost-competitive with shallower mined repositories. It is concluded that proceeding with plans to drill a demonstration borehole to confirm expectations, and to carry out priority experiments, such as retention and replenishment of in-hole water is in order.

  20. Development of an acoustic sensor for a geothermal Borehole Televiewer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wonn, J.W.

    1979-03-01

    The objective of this project is to upgrade acoustic sensor technology such that appropriate well logging instruments can be made to operate under the hostile environment conditions anticipated in geothermal resource exploration and evaluation. The Borehole Televiewer (BHTV) was selected as the vehicle for this sensor improvement work, primarily because of its demonstrated ability to detect and characterize fractures under sub-geothermal conditions. The work done toward providing an improved sensor for the televiewer is described. An experimental sensor concept was devised, incorporating a thin metal acoustic window, an improved, high-temperature internal coupling fluid, and thermally resistant sensor internals. During an autoclave test, it was successfully demonstrated that the resulting experimental sensor design concept provides the basic target detection and characterization functions required of a fracture mapping, Borehole Televiewer under simulated geothermal conditions. In particular, the experimental sensor remained operational at 275/sup 0/C and 7000 psi.

  1. Development of an acoustic sensor for a geothermal borehole televiewer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wonn, J.W.

    1979-03-01

    The objective of this project is to upgrade acoustic sensor technology such that appropriate well logging instruments can be made to operate under the hostile environment conditions anticipated in geothermal resource exploration and evaluation. The Borehole Televiewer (BHTV) was selected as the vehicle for this sensor improvement work, primarily because of its demonstrated ability to detect and characterize fractures under sub-geothermal conditions. The work done toward providing an improved sensor for the televiewer is described. An experimental sensor concept was devised, incorporating a thin metal acoustic window, an improved, high-temperature internal coupling fluid, and thermally resistant sensor internals. During an autoclave test, it was successfully demonstrated that the resulting experimental sensor design concept provides the basic target detection and characterization functions required of a fracture mapping, Borehole Televiewer under simulated geothermal conditions. In particular, the experimental sensor remained operational at 275/sup 0/C and 7000 psi.

  2. Computers and advanced technology applied to uranium borehole logging systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A minicomputer has been employed in a uranium borehole logging system to provide digital data acquisition, real time processing for log output, magnetic tape recording, and on-site log analysis procesing for two nuclear logging techniques: spectral gamma ray and prompt fission neutron. A downhole digital data acquisition system (BDATS) is being built. It can acquire and transmit borehole instrument signals without present limitations and degradation experienced in the analog transmisison mode, which is due to the logging system's electrical cable and is present on all logging system cables. The BDATS can replace the data acquisition instrumentation at the surface. A fiber optic logging cable is being developed that can directly replace the electrician conductor logging cable. This should improve the data transmission capabilities of logging systems at least ten-fold when coupled with digital data transmission systems and minicomputer based logging systems. A feasibility study, prototype cable and light transducer system has been completed. 6 refs

  3. Safety indicators in borehole disposal of sealed radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Radioactive Waste Management Laboratory (RWML) at the Energy and Nuclear Research Institute of Sao Paulo, Brazil, is developing the concept of a geological repository adequate for the Brazilian inventory of disused sealed radioactive sources. Sealed sources are numbered to hundreds of thousands, have increasingly been used in industry as well as in medical applications in the last decades, and are believed to have a growing number of applications in the near future. The concept of repository under development is a borehole, drilled to a depth of some four hundred meters bellow ground surface in the crystalline bedrock, preferably in the same site of the national low-level waste disposal facility. In this paper, we present the work being carried out at RWML to identify safety indicators and explore their use as a tool to demonstrate the safety of a borehole disposal facility for disused sealed radioactive sources in Brazil. (author)

  4. Performance of a Borehole XRF Spectrometer for Planetary Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelliher, Warren C.; Carlberg, Ingrid A.; Elam, W. T.; WIllard-Schmoe, Ella

    2007-01-01

    We have designed and constructed a borehole XRF Spectrometer (XRFS) as part of the Mars Subsurface Access program. It will be used to determine the composition of the Mars regolith at various depths by insertion into a pre-drilled borehole. The primary performance metrics for the instrument are the lower limits of detection over a wide range of the periodic table. Power consumption during data collection was also measured. The prototype instrument is complete and preliminary testing has been performed. Terrestrial soil Standard Reference Materials were used as the test samples. Detection limits were about 10 weight parts-per-million for most elements, with light elements being higher, up to 1.4 weight percent for magnesium. Power consumption (excluding ground support components) was 12 watts.

  5. Comparing plume characteristics inferred from cross-borehole geophysical data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haarder, Eline Bojsen; Binley, Andrew; Zibar, Majken Caroline Looms;

    2012-01-01

    Three cross-borehole geophysical methods are used to image water migration in the unsaturated zone after a point injection of water. Mass balance calculations and moment analysis highlight the differences in resolution between the methods. The choice of moisture content threshold value...... significantly influences results of the moment analysis. We compare results of three cross-borehole geophysical approaches for imaging tracer migration arising from a point injection of water in the unsaturated zone: three-dimensional electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), two-dimensional ground...... of resolution. The flow patterns are compared to geological information from a coring obtained at the site and it is concluded that the diversion of water in the lateral direction can be caused by a few thin layers of contrasting geological composition. Mass balance calculations based on moment...

  6. Deep Borehole Emplacement Mode Hazard Analysis Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sevougian, S. David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-08-07

    This letter report outlines a methodology and provides resource information for the Deep Borehole Emplacement Mode Hazard Analysis (DBEMHA). The main purpose is identify the accident hazards and accident event sequences associated with the two emplacement mode options (wireline or drillstring), to outline a methodology for computing accident probabilities and frequencies, and to point to available databases on the nature and frequency of accidents typically associated with standard borehole drilling and nuclear handling operations. Risk mitigation and prevention measures, which have been incorporated into the two emplacement designs (see Cochran and Hardin 2015), are also discussed. A key intent of this report is to provide background information to brief subject matter experts involved in the Emplacement Mode Design Study. [Note: Revision 0 of this report is concentrated more on the wireline emplacement mode. It is expected that Revision 1 will contain further development of the preliminary fault and event trees for the drill string emplacement mode.

  7. Waste isolation pilot plant (WIPP) borehole plugging program description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tests and experiments described attempt to provide a mix of borehole (with limited access) and in-mine (with relatively unlimited access) environments in which assessment of the various issues involved can be undertaken. The Bell Canyon Test provides the opportunity to instrument and analyze a plug in a high pressure region. The Shallow Hole Test permits application of best techniques for plugging and then access to both the top and bottom of the plug for further analysis. The Diagnostic Test Hole permits recovery of bench scale size samples for analysis and establishes an in-borehole laboratory in which to conduct testing and analysis in all strata from the surface into the salt horizon. The additional in mine experiments provide the opportunity to investigate in more detail specific effects on plugs in the salt region and allows evaluation of instrumentation systems

  8. New UK in-situ stress orientation for northern England and controls on borehole wall deformation identified using borehole imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingdon, Andrew; Fellgett, Mark W.; Waters, Colin N.

    2016-04-01

    The nascent development of a UK shale gas industry has highlighted the inadequacies of previous in-situ stress mapping which is fundamental to the efficacy and safety of potential fracturing operations. The limited number of stress inversions from earthquake focal plane mechanisms and overcoring measurements of in-situ stress in prospective areas increases the need for an up-to-date stress map. Borehole breakout results from 36 wells with newly interpreted borehole imaging data are presented. Across northern England these demonstrate a consistent maximum horizontal stress orientation (SHmax) orientation of 150.9° and circular standard deviation of 13.1°. These form a new and quality assured evidence base for both industry and its regulators. Widespread use of high-resolution borehole imaging tools has facilitated investigation of micro-scale relationships between stress and lithology, facilitating identification of breakouts as short as 25 cm. This is significantly shorter than those identified by older dual-caliper logging (typically 1-10+ m). Higher wall coverage (90%+ using the highest resolution tools) and decreasing pixel size (down to 4mm vertically by 2° of circumference) also facilitates identification of otherwise undetectable sub-centimetre width Drilling Induced Tensile Fractures (DIFs). Examination of borehole imaging from wells in North Yorkshire within the Carboniferous Pennine Coal Measures Group has showed that even though the stress field is uniform, complex micro-stress relationships exist. Different stress field indicators (SFI) are significantly affected by geology with differing failure responses from adjacent lithologies, highlighted by borehole imaging on sub-metre scales. Core-log-borehole imaging integration over intervals where both breakouts and DIFs have been identified allows accurate depth matching and thus allows a synthesis of failure for differing lithology and micro-structures under common in-situ conditions. Understanding these

  9. The geomicrobiology of the Harwell and Altnabreac boreholes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waste repositories in deep environments are likely to contain autochthonous and allochthonous microbial populations which may influence near and far-field conditions. Studies of boreholes in argillaceous and crystalline formations at research sites in the U.K. have revealed the presence of several types of contaminant microorganisms which could affect the integrity of materials used in repository construction, alter the geochemistry and may encourage the release of radionuclides from the near-field environment. (author)

  10. Moisture content and recharge estimates at the Yakima Barricade borehole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, E.M.; Szescody, J.E.; Phillips, S.J.

    1991-12-01

    The DOE Deep Microbiology Program recently drilled a borehole near the Yakima Barricade, west of the 200 Areas. The area is vegetated by mature sagebrush. The borehole was drilled by cable tool and approximately every 1.5 m, sediment samples were collected in a bucket by the drill site geologist. Sediment samples for moisture content were sealed quickly Samples of opportunity'' were collected for the HSPA program (Hanford Site Performance Assessment), Isotope Recharge task. It should be noted that, although many QA Level II procedures were incorporated into the dulling and sampling, the Deep Microbiology Program is officially designated QA Level III, and therefore, the recharge values that we report here should only be usedfor planning purposes. A series of graphs illustrate the moisture content and chloride profiles in the Hanford Forrmtion at the Yakima Barricade Borehole. The gravimetric moisture content generally ranges between 0.01 and 0.08 in the first 70 m of sediment (only the first 30 m are shown in the figure), values that are typically found at the Hanford Site. The stratigraphy of this borehole is also attached. The first 1.5 m of the soil profile is Warden silt loam (designated eolian), followed by over 50 m of Hanford Formation. The Hanford Formation is composed of unconsolidated sands, silts, and gravels that were carried into the area by glacial flood waters during the close of the last Ice Age. Below the Hanford Formation is the Ringold Formation composed of semiconsolidated sediments. The water table is located at a depth of approximately 100 m.

  11. Moisture content and recharge estimates at the Yakima Barricade borehole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, E.M.; Szescody, J.E.; Phillips, S.J.

    1991-12-01

    The DOE Deep Microbiology Program recently drilled a borehole near the Yakima Barricade, west of the 200 Areas. The area is vegetated by mature sagebrush. The borehole was drilled by cable tool and approximately every 1.5 m, sediment samples were collected in a bucket by the drill site geologist. Sediment samples for moisture content were sealed quickly ``Samples of opportunity`` were collected for the HSPA program (Hanford Site Performance Assessment), Isotope Recharge task. It should be noted that, although many QA Level II procedures were incorporated into the dulling and sampling, the Deep Microbiology Program is officially designated QA Level III, and therefore, the recharge values that we report here should only be usedfor planning purposes. A series of graphs illustrate the moisture content and chloride profiles in the Hanford Forrmtion at the Yakima Barricade Borehole. The gravimetric moisture content generally ranges between 0.01 and 0.08 in the first 70 m of sediment (only the first 30 m are shown in the figure), values that are typically found at the Hanford Site. The stratigraphy of this borehole is also attached. The first 1.5 m of the soil profile is Warden silt loam (designated eolian), followed by over 50 m of Hanford Formation. The Hanford Formation is composed of unconsolidated sands, silts, and gravels that were carried into the area by glacial flood waters during the close of the last Ice Age. Below the Hanford Formation is the Ringold Formation composed of semiconsolidated sediments. The water table is located at a depth of approximately 100 m.

  12. Research on One Borehole Hydraulic Coal Mining System

    Science.gov (United States)

    XIA, Bairu; ZENG, Xiping; MAO, Zhixin

    The Borehole Hydraulic Coal Mining System (BHCMS) causes fragmentation of coal seams and removes coal slump through a drilled hole using high-pressure water jet. Then the mixture of coal and water as slurry are driven out of the borehole by hydraulic or air-lifting method, and are separated at the surface. This paper presents a case study of hydraulic borehole coal mining. The three key techniques of the BHCMS, namely, hydraulic lift of jet pump, air lift, and water jet disintegration are discussed and analyzed in this paper based on theoretical analysis and field experiments. Some useful findings have been obtained: (1) The design of jet pump, air lift system, and water jet has to be integrated appropriately in order to improve mining efficiency and coal recovery rate, and to decrease energy consumption. The design of hydraulic lift jet pump must meet the requirement of the minimum floating speed of coal particles. The optimization of nondimensional parameters and prevention of cavitation have to be considered in the design; (2) With regard to selecting the nozzle types of jet pump, center nozzle or annular nozzle can be selected according to the size of the removed particles; (3) Through air-lift and back pressure, the water head can be decreased to improve the lift capacity of jet pump and decrease the power loss. The air lift has great limitation if it is used solely to extract coal, but if it is employed in conjunction with jet pump, the lift capacity of jet pump can be increased greatly; (4) With water jets, the air lift can improve the fragmentation radius and capacity. The main factors that affect the effect of water jet are the submergible status of jet, jet pressure, and flowrate. The ideal jet of the monitor in the borehole hydraulic coal-mining system is a nonsubmergible free jet. Through air lift, the nonsubmergible free jet can be set up in the mining hole.

  13. Non-contact infrared temperature measurements in dry permafrost boreholes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junker, Ralf; Grigoriev, Mikhail N.; Kaul, Norbert

    2008-04-01

    While planning the COAST Expedition to the Siberian Laptev Sea in 2005, the question of how to make a short equilibrium temperature measurement in a dry borehole arose. As a result, an infrared borehole tool was developed and used in three dry boreholes (up to 60.2 m deep) in the coastal transition zone from terrestrial to sub-sea permafrost near Mamontovy Klyk in the western Laptev Sea. A depth versus temperature profile was acquired with equilibration times of 50 × 10-3 s at each depth interval. Comparison with a common resistor string revealed an offset due to limitations of accuracy of the infrared technique and the influence of the probe's massive steel housing. Therefore it was necessary to calibrate the infrared sensor with a high precision temperature logger in each borehole. The results of the temperature measurements show a highly dynamic transition zone with temperature gradients up to -0.092°C/m and heat flow of -218 mW/m. A period of submergence of only 600 years the drilled sub-sea permafrost is approaching the overlying seawater temperature at -1.61°C with a temperature gradient of 0.021°C/m and heat flow of 49 mW/m. Further offshore, 11 km from the coastline, a temperature gradient of 0.006°C/m and heat flow of 14 mW/m occur. Thus the sub-sea permafrost in the Mamontovy Klyk region has reached a critical temperature for the presence of interstitial ice. The aim of this article is to give a brief feasibility study of infrared downhole temperature measurements and to present experiences and results of its successful application.

  14. High resolution temperature measurements in the borehole Yaxcopoil-1, Mexico

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wilhelm, H.; Heidinger, P.; Šafanda, Jan; Čermák, Vladimír; Burkhardt, H.; Popov, Y.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 6 (2004), s. 813-819. ISSN 1086-9379 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/03/0997; GA AV ČR KSK3012103 Grant ostatní: Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft(DE) WI687/17-1 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3012916 Keywords : temperature measurements * borehole * Mexico Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 2.673, year: 2004

  15. Bore-hole survey at Camp Century, 1989

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl-Jensen, Dorthe; Gundestrup, NS.; Hansen, BL.; kelty, J.

    1993-01-01

    A combination of the directional surveys of the Camp Century borehole from 1966, 1967, 1969 and 1989 has revealed a deformation pattern similar to that measured at Dye-3, South Greenland and Byrd Station, Antarctica showing high deformation rate for Wisconsin ice. Compared to the Dye-3 profile, t...... deformation shows the same pattern even in details. The surface velocity obtained by integrating the bore hole deformation is in agreement with that obtained from satellite measurements Udgivelsesdato: jan...

  16. Quality control of radioactive waste disposal container for borehole project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper explained quality control of radioactive disposal container for the borehole project. Non-destructive Testing (NDT) is one of the quality tool used for evaluating the product. The disposal container is made of 316L stainless steel. The suitable NDT method for this object is radiography, ultrasonic, penetrant and eddy current testing. This container will be filled with radioactive capsules and cement mortar is grouted to fill the gap. The results of NDT measurements are explained and discussed. (author)

  17. Final interpretation of hydraulic testing at the Siblingen borehole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains the results of the interpretation of hydraulic testing in the sedimentary and crystalline rocks of the Siblingen borehole. Hydraulic tests were performed between September 1988 and April 1989 in single packer, double packer and open hole configurations. A total number of thirty one separate intervals covering about 90% of the Siblingen borehole length were tested. Preliminary field analyses documented in 'Quick-Look' Reports were performed for all intervals tested. Detailed interpretations were conducted for 16 selected intervals and documented in stand-alone reports. The results of both types of analysis are included in this final report. Data analysis was performed using the ITA Transient Interactive Analysis System (TRIAS) and the INTERPRET analysis code of Scientific Software-Intercomp. Representative test interval parameters including hydraulic conductivity, test interval static pressure and equivalent freshwater hydraulic head are interpreted and recommended. Since no reliable in-situ estimation of the specific storage value was possible it was calculated directly from the input parameters. For the crystalline rock 1.5-6 ms-1 to 2.0-4 ms-1 for the sedimentary aquifers and from 5.1-11 ms-1 to 4.0-4 ms-1 for the crystalline rock. Formation pressures and corresponding hydraulic heads were estimated for 26 of the 31 test intervals. The determined equivalent freshwater heads range from 462 m asl. for the Muschelkalk aquifer on top to 436 m asl. for the lowest part of crystalline rock. Relatively high hydraulic conductivities encoutered in the Siblingen borehole are expected to minimize the influence of the pretest borehole pressure history on the test data. There, pressure history was generally not included in the analysis. This report also contains a brief description of the testing equipment and performance as well as testing and analysis methods use for the determination of hydrogeologic parameters. (author) figs., tabs., 40 refs

  18. Canister design for deep borehole disposal of nuclear waste

    OpenAIRE

    Hoag, Christopher Ian.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this thesis was to design a canister for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and other high-level waste in deep borehole repositories using currently available and proven oil, gas, and geothermal drilling technology. The canister is suitable for disposal of various waste forms, such as fuel assemblies and vitrified waste. The design addresses real and perceived hazards of transporting and placing high-level waste, in the form of spent reactor fuel, into a deep igneous rock env...

  19. Cross borehole electromagnetic tomography : scoping study and literature review

    OpenAIRE

    P. B. Wilkinson

    2005-01-01

    Cross-borehole electromagnetic tomography is a non-contact geophysical method that can be used to generate images of the electrical properties of the subsurface. It is rather underutilised for site-scale investigation, due to the broad range of frequencies over which it must respond and the complicated nature of the electromagnetic fields in this range. However, such a system would find applications in a wide variety of environments, from fracture characterisation in highly resistive crystall...

  20. The importance of tracer technology in combined borehole investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In an experimental field for a waste disposal site, investigations have been carried out applying methods from geology, hydrology hydrogeology, hydrochemistry, environmental isotope hydrology and tracer technology. All data obtained result to a dynamic drainage model of groundwater. The combined interpretation of borehole data guarantees a high-grade knowledge of groundwater exfiltrating to the surface drainage, which enables proper control measures of the disposal site and an effective groundwater protection. (author)

  1. Practical evaluation of borehole heat exchanger models in TRNSYS

    OpenAIRE

    Thorén, Åsa

    2016-01-01

    Vertical ground source heat pumps are established and still growing on the global market. The modelling of these systems is important for system design and optimization. This is an active field of research, and many models are often built into system simulation software such as TRNSYS. With the intention of having a better sensibility for existing TRNSYS tools, three different cases are simulated with several TRNSYS tools, so called Types. A Thermal Response Test, a large borehole field of an...

  2. MAW and HTR fuel element test disposal in boreholes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Kernforschungsanlage Juelich, KFA, (Nuclear Research Center Juelich) has been handling a project since 1983 on 'Further Development of the Borehole Technology for the Disposal of Radioactive Wastes in Salt, with the Examples of Dissolver Sludge, Fuel Element Claddings, Fuel Hardware und HTR Fuel Elements'. The project is sponsored by the Bundesminister fuer Forschung und Technologie, BMFT, (Federal Ministry of Research and Technology) under the identification number KWA 5302 3 and bears the short title 'MAW and HTR Fuel Element Test Disposal in Boreholes'. The major objective of the project is to develop a technique for the disposal of the above mentioned wastes in unlined boreholes in salt and to test this technique in the Asse salt mine. The Institut fuer Chemische Technologie der Nuklearen Entsorgung, ICT (Institute of Chemical Technology) at the KFA is responsible for the scientific and organizational management of the project. The Institut fuer Tieflagerung, IfT, (Institute for Underground Disposal) of the Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung mbH, GSF, (Society for Radiological and Environmental Research) is responsible for the geomechanical and mining activities in the project. It supervises the in-situ experiments, and as the owner of the Asse salt mine, it submits applications for the experiments to the licensing authorities. Geomechanical calculations are being carried out by the Bundesanstalt fuer Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe, BGR, (Federal Institute for Geological Sciences and Natural Resources). (orig./RB)

  3. Core-logs of the vertical borehole V2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the hydrogeological programme of the Stripa Project, borehole V2 was prolonged to a final depth of 822 m. The previous core from 0-471.4 m was relogged. The drill core was logged with regard to rock characteristics, fracture frequency, dipping and filling. The results are presented as core-logs and fracture diagrams. Borehole V2 shows similar characteristics as found in other drillings in the Stripa Mine. It penetrates Stripa granite to its full depth. recorded fractures shows a clear predominance of medium-steep fractures, while flat-lying fractures are more sparsly occuring, a fact which is even more pronounced below 400 m depth. Due to the vertical direction of the borehole, steeply dipping fractures are underestimated in the core. The mean fracture frequency, related to the total length of the core, is 2.1 fractures/m. Chlorite, calcite and epidote are the dominating coating minerals in the fractures, each making up about 25-30 percent of all coated fractures. (Authors)

  4. Borehole geophysical investigations of Lavia deep testhole, Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to the Goverment's decision in principle in 1983 Industrial Power Company Ltd (TVO) is making preparations for all the steps of final disposal of the spent fuel produced by its power plants. Before the actual site investigation phase, TVO drilled a deep borehole in Lavia, Western Finland. The borehole is used during 1984-85 for testing investigation techniques and methods used for bedrock characterization. Borehole geophysical loggings performed in Lavia consisted of galvanic electrical, transient electromagnetic, radiometric, temperature, seismic and magnetic msurements. This composite survey provided both lithological and structural information of rock mass. The neutron-neutron, density, natural gamma radiation and susceptibility methods characterized rock type. Fracturing and its type could be interpreted most effectively with resistivity, acoustic P-wave velocity and density logs. Temperature and tube-wave measurements revealed several fractured zones related to possible water flow in rock. Lavia investigations indicated that a high quality of instrumentation and careful calibration are necessary for site investigations. The large amount of log data also requires efficient data collection and processing systems both in the field and laboratory. (author)

  5. Borehole disposal of spent radiation sources: 2. initial safety assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large numbers of spent radiation sources from the medical and other technical professions exist in many countries, even countries that do not possess facilities related to the nuclear fuel cycle, that have to be disposed. This is particularly the case in Africa, South America and some members of the Russian Federation. Since these sources need to be handled separately from the other types of radioactive waste, mainly because of their activity to volume ratio, countries (even those with access to operational repositories) find it difficult to manage and dispose this waste. This has led to the use of boreholes as disposal units for these spent sources by some members of the Russian Federation and in South Africa. However, the relatively shallow boreholes used by these countries are not suitable for the disposal of isotopes with long half-lifes, such as 226Ra and 241Am. With this in mind the Atomic Energy Corporation of South Africa initiated the development of the BOSS disposal concept n-tilde an acronym for Borehole disposal Of Spent Sources n-tilde as part of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) AFRA 1-14 Technical Corporation (TC) project. In this paper, an initial assessment of long-term postclosure safety of the concept is discussed. (author)

  6. A newly developed borehole flowmeter technology for heterogeneous aquifers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extensive borehole flowmeter tests were performed at 37 fully-screened wells on a one-hectare test site to characterize the three-dimensional hydraulic conductivity field of an alluvial aquifer with a σlnK of 4.7. During the site investigations, several major advancements with respect to borehole flowmeter technology were developed. The milestones included: (1) the development of a field-durable electromagnetic borehole flowmeter with a lower detection limit of 0.1 l/min; (2) the realization of the importance of the pumping rate with respect to the calculated value for the depth-averaged hydraulic conductivity; and (3) an evaluation of alternative methods for calculating the depth-averaged hydraulic conductivity. The predicted three-dimensional hydraulic conductivity field was compared to the results of 10 small-scale (3 to 7 m) tracer tests, information about the depositional history of the aquifer, and the results of three large-scale aquifer tests. The hydraulic conductivity data predict the major features of the tracer breakthrough curves, maps the outline of a former river meander in an aerial photograph, and leads to a geometric mean consistent with the average hydraulic conductivity of the aquifer. (Author) (14 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs.)

  7. Hydraulic conductivity explored by factor analysis of borehole geophysical data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, Norbert Péter

    2015-08-01

    A multivariate statistical method is presented for providing hydrogeological information on groundwater formations. Factor analysis is applied to borehole logs in Hungary and the USA to estimate the vertical distribution of hydraulic conductivity of rocks intersected by the borehole. Earlier studies showed a strong correlation between a statistical variable extracted by factor analysis and shale volume in primary porosity rocks. Hydraulic conductivity as a related quantity can be derived directly by factor analysis. In the first step, electric and nuclear logs are transformed into factor logs, which are then correlated to hydraulic properties of aquifers. It is shown that a factor explaining the major part of variance of the measured variables is inversely proportional to hydraulic conductivity. By revealing the regression relation between the above quantities, an estimate for hydraulic conductivity can be given along the entire length of the borehole. Synthetic modeling experiments and field cases demonstrate the feasibility of the method, which can be applied both in primary and secondary porosity aquifers. The results of factor analysis show consistence with those of the Kozeny-Carman method and hydraulic aquifer tests. The application of the statistical analysis of well logs together with independent ground geophysical and hydrogeological methods serves a more efficient exploration of groundwater resources.

  8. Borehole prompt gamma neutron activation and comparison with Monte Carlo simulation using MCNP code Borehole PGNAA experiment comparison with MCNP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohrabpour, M. [Gamma Irradiation Center, Atomic Energy Organization of Iran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shahriari, M. [Physics Department, Amir Kabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zarifian, V.; Moghadam, K.K. [Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Organization of Iran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    1999-04-01

    A borehole experiment using prompt gamma neutron activation analysis has been performed in a large sample box having a volume of 1 m{sup 3}. Brine solutions having a salt concentration in the range of 0-10 wt% of sodium chloride has been used. Chlorine prompt gamma spectral response as a function of the salt concentrations have been obtained. A simulation of the above experiments has also been carried out using the MCNP4A Monte Carlo code. Comparison of the experimental spectral response versus the simulated MCNP4A data has produced excellent agreement. In view of the good benchmark data it is proposed that due to the inherent problems associated with the ordinary calibration procedures for the borehole logging tools, one could employ a combined calibration/simulation scheme to circumvent these difficulties and achieve more effective results.

  9. Characterization of magnetized ore bodies based on three-component borehole magnetic and directional borehole seismic measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virgil, Christopher; Neuhaus, Martin; Hördt, Andreas; Giese, Rüdiger; Krüger, Kay; Jurczyk, Andreas; Juhlin, Christopher; Juhojuntti, Niklas

    2016-04-01

    In the last decades magnetic prospecting using total field data was used with great success for localization and characterization of ferromagnetic ore bodies. Especially borehole magnetic measurements reveal important constraints on the extent and depth of potential mining targets. However, due to the inherent ambiguity of the interpretation of magnetic data, the resulting models of the distribution of magnetized material, such as iron ore bodies, are not entirely reliable. Variations in derived parameters like volume and estimated ore content of the expected body have significant impact on the economic efficiency of a planned mine. An important improvement is the introduction of three-component borehole magnetic sondes. Modern tools comprise orientation modules which allow the continuous determination of the tool's heading regardless of the well inclination and independent of the magnetic field. Using the heading information the recorded three-component magnetic data can be transferred from the internal tool's frame to the geographic reference frame. The vector information yields a more detailed and reliable description of the ore bodies compared to total field or horizontal and vertical field data. Nevertheless complementary information to constrain the model is still advisable. The most important supplementary information for the interpretation of magnetic data is the knowledge of the structural environment of the target regions. By discriminating dissimilar rock units, a geometrical starting model can be derived, constraining the magnetic interpretation and leading to a more robust estimation of the rock magnetizations distribution. The most common approach to reveal the lithological setting rests upon seismic measurements. However, for deep drilling targets surface seismic and VSP lack the required spatial resolution of 10s of meters. A better resolution is achieved by using directed sources and receivers inside the borehole. Here we present the application of

  10. Geophysical borehole logging, dummy-sonding and optical imaging of the borehole OL-KR24 at Olkiluoto 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suomen Malmi Oy conducted geophysical borehole logging, dummy-sonding and optical imaging surveys of the borehole OL-KR24 at the Olkiluoto site in Eurajoki during 1.10.2005 - 4.10.2005. The survey is a part of Posiva Oy's detailed investigation program for the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel. The methods applied are caliper survey and optical imaging. The assignment included the field work of surveys, interpretation and processing of the data. The report describes the field operation, equipment as well as processing procedures and shows the obtained results and their quality in the appendices. The raw and processed data are delivered digitally in WellCAD and Excel format. (orig.)

  11. Long-term pumping test in borehole KR24 flow measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rouhiainen, P.; Poellaenen, J. [PRG-Tec Oy, Espoo (Finland)

    2005-09-15

    The Difference Flow method can be used for the relatively fast determination of transmissivity and hydraulic head in fractures or fractured zones in cored boreholes. In this study, the Difference Flow method was used for hydraulic crosshole interference tests. The tests were performed in boreholes KR24 (pumped borehole) KR4, KR7, KR8, KRlO, KR14, KR22, KR22B, KR26, KR27, KR27B, KR28 and KR28B at Olkiluoto during the first and second quarters of 2004. The distance between the boreholes varies from approximately tens of meters to hundreds of meters. All the measurements were carried out in open boreholes, i.e. no packers were used. For interpretation, a normal single hole test was first performed in each borehole. Flow rates and drawdown were first measured both without pumping and with pumping the borehole under test. For practical reasons, the data set is neither complete nor similar in all tested boreholes. Connected flow to borehole KR24 was detected in all these boreholes. These flow responses were concentrated on a few zones. (orig.)

  12. The State of the Art of the Borehole Disposal Concept for High Level Radioactive Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As an alternative of the high-level radioactive waste disposal in the subsurface repository, a deep borehole disposal is reviewed by several nuclear advanced countries. In this study, the state of the art on the borehole disposal researches was reviewed, and the possibility of borehole disposal in Korean peninsula was discussed. In the deep borehole disposal concept radioactive waste is disposed at the section of 3 - 5 km depth in a deep borehole, and it has known that it has advantages in performance and cost due to the layered structure of deep groundwater and small surface disposal facility. The results show that it is necessary to acquisite data on deep geologic conditions of Korean peninsula, and to research the engineering barrier system, numerical modeling tools and disposal techniques for deep borehole disposal.

  13. Modeling and Prediction of Borehole Collapse Pressure during Underbalanced Drilling in Shale

    OpenAIRE

    Islam, Md. Aminul

    2011-01-01

    Drilling with a bottomhole pressure less than the formation pore pressure (underbalanced) will usually increase the risk of borehole collapse due to yielding or failure of the rock adjacent to the borehole. Understanding borehole collapse mechanisms during underbalanced drilling (UBD) in shale is becoming increasingly important for the petroleum industry, especially due to the implementation of the UBD technique in operational practices. The UBD technique has become a bit of an art in the mod...

  14. The boreholes and geology of the Down Ampney fault research site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An exploratory programme of core drilling confirmed the location of a major fault with a 50-m throw and 700 dip and provided geological reference sections. These data enabled a measurement array of boreholes to be planned and constructed for the geophysical and hydrogeological characterization of the fault. Full details are given of the design, drilling, coring, completion and surveying of the 22 boreholes. The geological sequence is described, together with the structure of the fault zone, which was penetrated by eight boreholes

  15. High-density support matrices: Key to the deep borehole disposal of spent nuclear fuel

    OpenAIRE

    Gibb, F.G.F.; McTaggart, N.A.; Travis, K.P.; Burley, D; Hesketh, K.W.

    2008-01-01

    Deep (4–5 km) boreholes are emerging as a safe, secure, environmentally sound and potentially cost-effective option for disposal of high-level radioactive wastes, including plutonium. One reason this option has not been widely accepted for spent fuel is because stacking the containers in a borehole could create load stresses threatening their integrity with potential for releasing highly mobile radionuclides like 129I before the borehole is filled and sealed. This problem can be overcome by u...

  16. Numerical simulation on heat transfer performance of vertical U-tube with different borehole fill materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Heat exchange performance of vertical U-tube heat exchanger was studiedwith two different borehole fill materials and CFD software. Borehole surface temperature and water temperature distribution were simulated on the condition of continuous operation for 8 h in winter with inlet water temperature being 10 ℃. The results show that there is no obvious difference on heat exchanger performance between the two different borehole fill materials.

  17. A strategy to seal exploratory boreholes in unsaturated tuff; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, J.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Case, J.B.; Givens, C.A.; Carney, B.C. [IT Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-04-01

    This report presents a strategy for sealing exploratory boreholes associated with the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. Over 500 existing and proposed boreholes have been considered in the development of this strategy, ranging from shallow (penetrating into alluvium only) to deep (penetrating into the groundwater table). Among the comprehensive list of recommendations are the following: Those boreholes within the potential repository boundary and penetrating through the potential repository horizon are the most significant boreholes from a performance standpoint and should be sealed. Shallow boreholes are comparatively insignificant and require only nominal sealing. The primary areas in which to place seals are away from high-temperature zones at a distance from the potential repository horizon in the Paintbrush nonwelded tuff and the upper portion of the Topopah Spring Member and in the tuffaceous beds of the Calico Hills Unit. Seals should be placed prior to waste emplacement. Performance goals for borehole seals both above and below the potential repository are proposed. Detailed construction information on the boreholes that could be used for future design specifications is provided along with a description of the environmental setting, i.e., the geology, hydrology, and the in situ and thermal stress states. A borehole classification scheme based on the condition of the borehole wall in different tuffaceous units is also proposed. In addition, calculations are presented to assess the significance of the boreholes acting as preferential pathways for the release of radionuclides. Design calculations are presented to answer the concerns of when, where, and how to seal. As part of the strategy development, available technologies to seal exploratory boreholes (including casing removal, borehole wall reconditioning, and seal emplacement) are reviewed.

  18. Condensed listing of surface boreholes at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Project through 31 December 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains a condensed listing of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) project surface boreholes drilled for the purpose of site selection and characterization through 31 December 1995. The US Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored the drilling activities, which were conducted primarily by Sandia National Laboratories. The listing provides physical attributes such as location (township, range, section, and state-plane coordinates), elevation, and total borehole depth, as well as the purpose for the borehole, drilling dates, and information about extracted cores. The report also presents the hole status (plugged, testing, monitoring, etc.) and includes salient findings and references. Maps with borehole locations and times-of-drilling charts are included

  19. CFD-modelling of natural convection in a groundwater-filled borehole heat exchanger

    OpenAIRE

    Gustafsson, A-M.; Westerlund, L.; Hellström, G.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract In design of ground-source energy systems the thermal erformance of the borehole heat exchangers is important. In Scandinavia, boreholes are usually not grouted but left with groundwater to fill the space between heat exchanger pipes and borehole wall. The common U-pipe arrangement in a groundwater-filled BHE has been studied by a three-dimensional, steady-state CFD model. The model consists of a three meter long borehole containing a single U-pipe with surrounding bedrock...

  20. Borehole camera technology and its application in the Three Gorges Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, C.Y.; Sheng, Q.; Ge, X.R. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Inst. of Rock and Soil Mechanics, Wuhan (China); Law, K.T. [Carleton Univ., Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2002-07-01

    The China's Three Gorges Project is the world's largest hydropower project, consisting of a 1,983-meter long and 185-meter high dam and 26 power generating units. Borehole examination has been conducted at the site to ensure stability of the slope of the ship lock used for navigation. This paper describes 2 systems for borehole inspection and viewing. Both methods of camera borehole technology provide a unique way for geologic engineers to observe the condition inside a borehole. The Axial-View Borehole Television (AVBTV) provides real-time frontal view of the borehole ahead of the probe, making it possible to detect where holes are blocked and to see cracks and other distinctive features in the strata. The Digital Panoramic Borehole Camera System (DPBCS) can collect, measure, save, analyze, manage and displace geological information about a borehole. It can also be used to determine the orientation of discontinuity, generate unrolled image and virtual core graph and conduct statistical analysis. Both camera systems have been demonstrated successfully at the Three Gorges Project for qualitative description of the borehole as well as for quantitative analysis of cracks existing in the rock. It has been determined that most of the cracks dip in the same general direction as the northern slope of the permanent ship lock of the Three Gorges Project. 12 refs., 1 tab., 9 figs.

  1. Study of fissured-rock seepage flow with isotope tracer method in single borehole

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈建生; 董海洲

    2001-01-01

    A systematic summary is presented describing the application of isotope tracer method in detecting seepage flow in a single borehole. In a single borehole, many hydraulic coefficients, such as flow velocity, direction of flow, vertical flow etc., can be obtained by using isotope tracer method. There are three conditions if a fissure intersects a borehole: vertical, parallel and tilt. According to each different condition, the formulation of flow velocity deduced by isotope dilution method is different. At the same time, well theory of blended borehole about fissure groups including single fissure group and multi-fissure groups, has also been discussed.

  2. Comparative study of geological, hydrological, and geophysical borehole investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The understanding of the permeability of the bedrock can be improved by supplementing the results of the water injection tests with information from core mapping, TB-inspection and borehole geophysics. The comparison between different borehole investigations encompasses core mapping, TV-inspection and various geophysical bore hole measurements. The study includes data from two different study areas, namely Kraakemaala and Finnsjoen. In these two areas, extensive geological, hydrological and geophysical investigation have been carried out. The fractures and microfractures in crystalline rock constitute the main transport paths for both groundwater and electric currents. They will therefore govern both the permeability and the resistivity of the rock. In order to get a better understanding of the influence of fractures on permeability and resistivity, a detailed comparison has been made between the hydraulic conductivity, respectively, and the character of fractures in the core and the borehole wall. The fractures show very large variations in hydraulic conductivity. Microfractures and most of the thin fractures have no measurable hydraulic conductivity (in this case -9 m s -1), while test sections which contain a single isloated fracture can have no measurable, to rather high hydraulic conductivities (> 10 -7 m s -1). Wide fracture zones often have hydraulic conductivities which vary from very low (less than 2 x 10 -9 m s -1) to high values (10 -5 m s -1). This indicates that the hydraulic conductivity is governed by a few discrete fractures. The resistivity shows a continous variation in the range 1,000- 100,000 ohm-m and a relatively poor correlation with hydraulic conductivities. The observed difference is considered to the effect of restriction of water flow on a few channels, while electric surface condition, i.e. current transport through thin water films, makes current transport possible through fractures with very small aperatures. (Author)

  3. Borehole Breakouts in Berea Sandstone Reveal a New Fracture Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haimson, B. C.

    - Vertical drilling experiments in high-porosity (22% and 25%) Berea sandstone subjected to critical true triaxial far-field stresses, in which σH (maximum horizontal stress) >σv (vertical stress) >σh (least horizontal stress), revealed a new and non-dilatant failure mechanism that results in thin and very long tabular borehole breakouts that have the appearance of fractures, and which counterintuitively develop orthogonally to σH. These breakouts are fundamentally different from those induced in crystalline rocks, as well as limestones and medium-porosity Berea sandstone. Breakouts in these rocks are typically dog-eared in shape, a result of dilatant multi-cracking tangential to the hole and subparallel to the maximum far-field horizontal stress σH, followed by progressive buckling and shearing of detached rock flakes created by the cracks. In the high-porosity sandstone a narrow layer of grains compacted normal to σH is observed just ahead of the breakout tip. This layer is nearly identical to ``compaction bands'' observed in the field. It is suggested that when a critical tangential stress concentration is reached along the σh spring line at the borehole wall, grain bonding breaks down and a compaction band is formed normal to σH. Debonded loose grains are expelled into the borehole, assisted by the circulating drilling fluid. As the breakout tip advances, the stress concentration ahead of it persists or may even increase, extending the compaction band, which in turn leads to breakout lengthening.

  4. Heat transmission processes in the heat pump borehole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to increasing pollution and related climate changes it is necessary to significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions using the most appropriate energy sources. One of the possible ways is to use the alternative energy sources, a system for underground accumulation of heat energy. In the paper the mathematical model, which describes thermal processes on relation ground- borehole and fluid in a collector, and the reasons for the justifiable use of heat pumps, is presented. Key words: alternative energy sources, heat pumps, U-tube, heat flow processes, thermal resistance

  5. Detection of unexploded ordnance by PGNAA based borehole-logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The performance of a borehole-logging system, based on prompt-gamma-neutron-activation-analysis (PGNAA), for explosive detection was studied by Monte-Carlo simulations. The prompt gamma of nitrogen, which is a constituent of common explosive, was used to identify the unexploded ordnance (UXO). Our results show that the minimum counting time depends on the soil moisture, the cladding thickness and the explosive composition. In conjunction with the standard detection by magnetometry, the PGNAA is a promising analytical technique for definitive identification of deep buried UXOs. (author)

  6. Ceramic Borehole Seals for Nuclear Waste Disposal Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, B.; Coates, K.; Wohletz, K.; Dunn, S.; Patera, E.; Duguid, A.; Arnold, B.; Zyvoloski, G.; Groven, L.; Kuramyssova, K.

    2015-12-01

    Sealing plugs are critical features of the deep borehole system design. They serve as structural platforms to bear the weight of the backfill column, and as seals through their low fluid permeability and bond to the borehole or casing wall. High hydrostatic and lithostatic pressures, high mineral content water, and elevated temperature due to the waste packages and geothermal gradient challenge the long term performance of seal materials. Deep borehole nuclear waste disposal faces the added requirement of assuring performance for thousands of years in large boreholes, requiring very long term chemical and physical stability. A high performance plug system is being developed which capitalizes on the energy of solid phase reactions to form a ceramic plug in-situ. Thermites are a family of self-oxidized metal/oxide reactions with very high energy content and the ability to react under water. When combined with engineered additives the product exhibits attractive structural, sealing, and corrosion properties. In the initial phase of this research, exploratory and scaled tests demonstrated formulations that achieved controlled, fine grained, homogeneous, net shape plugs composed predominantly of ceramic material. Laboratory experiments produced plug cores with confined fluid permeability as low as 100 mDarcy, compressive strength as high as 70 MPa (three times the strength of conventional well cement), with the inherent corrosion resistance and service temperature of ceramic matrices. Numerical thermal and thermal/structural analyses predicted the in-situ thermal performance of the reacted plugs, showing that they cooled to ambient temperature (and design strength) within 24 to 48 hours. The current development effort is refining the reactant formulations to achieve desired performance characteristics, developing the system design and emplacement processes to be compatible with conventional well service practices, and understanding the thermal, fluid, and structural

  7. Interpretation of hydraulic testing at the Schafisheim borehole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the results of hydrogeologic interpretations of the analyzable single packer, double packer, and H-log tests conducted in the Schafisheim borehole. A brief discussion of the testing and interpretation methods is also presented. Data analysis was performed using the INTERA Graph Theoretic Field Model (GTFM) which permits borehole pressure history and thermally-induced pressure effects to be incorporated into the simulations. Formation pressures (and corresponding equivalent freshwater heads) were determined for 11 of the test intervals. The calculated equivalent freshwater heads were at 370 m a.s.l. (Malm) and 444 m a.s.l. (Muschelkalk) for the sedimentary units, and were in a tight range from 366 m a.s.l. to 370 m a.s.l. in the crystalline portion of the borehole. Hydraulic conductivities were estimated for 37 different hydraulic tests in the Schafisheim borehole. A detailed analysis was performed for 16 intervals, and a less in-depth review was conducted of an additional 21 low permeability intervals (Interval 1972.6 was tested twice). Interpreted hydraulic conductivities ranged from 5.0E-06 ms-1 to less than 1.0E-12 ms-1. Zones of high hydraulic conductivity (greater than 1.0E-09 ms-1) were observed at the following approximate true vertical depths: 552.9 m to 563.0 m, 1,227.6 to 1,286.9 m, 1,564.1 m to 1,607.6 m, 1,882.8 m to 1,903.3 m, and 1,953.7 m to 2,005.8 m. A base case specific storage of 1.0E-07 m-1 was generally used for the crystalline rock. A sensitivity analysis was conducted for some tests to determine the uncertainty in the best estimate of K related to the choice of specific storage. In these cases, specific storage was varied by 1 to 2 orders of magnitude from the base case value. (author) figs., tabs., 29 refs

  8. The bed-borehole relationship; La liaison couche-trou

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veillon, D.

    2000-07-01

    This book presents in a theoretical and practical way, a large synthesis of the state of the knowledge about the bed-borehole relationship. Some geological and reservoir engineering considerations are recalled first. Then the different modes of bed-hole connection are examined successively with the completion fluids, the perforation of liners, the control and restoring of cementations, the treatment of matrices, the deep treatment using hydraulic fracturing, the control of sand incomes and other various methods of bed treatment. (J.S.)

  9. Water inflow into boreholes during the Stripa heater experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the operation of three in-situ heater experiments at Stripa, Sweden, groundwater flowed into many of the instrumentation and heater boreholes. These flows were recovered and measured routinely. The records of water inflow indicate two origins: inflow attributed to local hydrological pressure gradients, and water migration from cracks closing under the rapidly increasing, thermal-induced stress changes. The latter component appeared as a main pulse that occurred when the heaters were turned on, and lasted about 30 to 40 days, steadily declining over the next several months, and decreasing sharply when heater power was decreased or stopped. The magnitude of the total inflow per hole ranged over more than five decades, from 0.1 to over 10,000 liters over the 500 to 600 day time periods. When plotted against the logarithm of total volume, the frequency distribution displays a normal curve dependence with a mean of approximately 10 liters. Of this amount, 1 to 2 liters of flow into 38-mm-diam boreholes accompanied an increase in applied heat load. These amounts are compatible with rock porosities of a fraction of one percent. Inflow into the 3.6 and 5.0 kW heater holes peaked within 3 to 6 days after heater turn on, then declined to zero inflow, with no further inflow measured for the remainder of the experiments. In the heater holes of the time-scaled experiment, which operated at 1.125 kW or less, the initial pulse of inflow took much longer to decay, and 7 of 8 heater holes continued to flow throughout the experiment. The packing off and isolation of a borehole some 40 m distant in the ventilation drift dramatically increased the inflow into the heater holes in one of the three heater experiments. This demonstrated the existence of permeable flow paths among a number of boreholes. The records of water inflow demonstrate the need for a thorough understanding of the nature of fluid flow and storage in fractured crystalline rock

  10. Geologic data for borehole ERDA-9, Eddy County, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borehole ERDA-9 is an exploratory well drilled in eastern Eddy County, New Mexico to evaluate and test salt beds for disposal of nuclear wastes. The drilling was done between April 28 and June 4, 1976. Lithologic and stratigraphic details of the geologic section in ERDA-9 are described herein. The selection includes: (1) the Mescalero caliche and the Gatuna Formation of Pleistocene age, (2) the Santa Rosa Sandstone of Triassic age, and (3) the Dewey Lake Red Beds, the Rustler Formation, the Salado Formation, and part of the Castile Formation; all of Permian age

  11. Kinetics of desorption of iodine from borehole waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinetics of mass transfer during iodine desorption by air from water-salt systems and borehole waters of different composition has been studied. With an aid of laboratory installation with film column and sprinkled walls the region of the process procedure in a wide range of phases, concentrations (aqueous iodine solution, sodium chloride solution) and temperatures is determined. Calculation and experimental values of kinetic parameters are obtained. It follows from the data analysis that the process of iodine desorption is complicated by reversible reaction of complexing, its rate being higher than the rate of mass transfer

  12. Current trends in nuclear borehole logging techniques for elemental analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is the result of a consultants' meeting organized by the IAEA and held in Ottawa, Canada, 2-6 November 1987 in order to assess the present technical status of nuclear borehole logging techniques, to find out the well established applications and the development trends. It contains a summary report giving a comprehensive overview of the techniques and applications and a collection of research papers describing work done in industrial institutes. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these 9 papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  13. An Effective Method for Borehole Imaging of Buried Tunnels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loreto Di Donato

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Detection and imaging of buried tunnels is a challenging problem which is relevant to both geophysical surveys and security monitoring. To comply with the need of exploring large portions of the underground, electromagnetic measurements carried out under a borehole configuration are usually exploited. Since this requires to drill holes in the soil wherein the transmitting and receiving antennas have to be positioned, low complexity of the involved apparatus is important. On the other hand, to effectively image the surveyed area, there is the need for adopting efficient and reliable imaging methods. To address these issues, in this paper we investigate the feasibility of the linear sampling method (LSM, as this inverse scattering method is capable to provide almost real-time results even when 3D images of very large domains are built, while not requiring approximations of the underlying physics. In particular, the results of the reported numerical analysis show that the LSM is capable of performing the required imaging task while using a quite simple measurement configuration consisting of two boreholes and a few number of multiview-multistatic acquisitions.

  14. Inventory and Radionuclide Data for Borehole Disposal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The inventory of the Disused Sealed Radioactive Sources or DSRS in Waste Technology Development Centre is currently managed by using Microsoft Excel. All of the important information of the of DSRS including the type of radionuclide, activities with reference dates, the last user that transferred the DSRS to the WasTeC (as a Waste Management Centre of Nuclear Malaysia), manufacturer, type and model of the devices and serial number were recorded in the spread sheet form and safely record in an authorized file. However, due to some of constrain, a better system is considered to manage the inventory in an effective manner. Therefore, an Inventory Management Database System has been developed through a technical collaboration project between WasTeC and Information Technology (IT) Unit, Nuclear Malaysia to manage the inventory data efficiently. Radioactive waste characterization should be performed to ensure that all of the radioactive waste that will be placed in borehole is completely documented. Safety assessment of the waste management strategies and plans for the operators should be verified by the regulatory body. The effort in completing the identification process for the related information such as DSRS source dimension is the key parameter of the inventory management process which will enable the first screening to be done in the point of view for safety assessment aspect critically in the development of borehole disposal facility in Malaysia. (author)

  15. Measuring in-situ stress in deep boreholes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hydrofracturing method of in-situ stress measurement is the only technique which has been proven to be reliable in boreholes below depths of 300 m. The method has been used in a variety of applications at depths of up to 5000m, and in a range of borehole diameters. The equipment used is composed of standard components from proven and long-established oil industry well-logging tools and is simple to operate. This is preferable to the delicate electrical devices used in the overcoring stress measurement method. Electrical components are difficult to waterproof, very small strains are monitored and the tendency of electrical circuits to drift, due to a variety of effects, makes interpretation of the results difficult. However, the interpretation of hydrofracturing test results is often not easy. Many factors can prevent ideal fracturing behaviour from occurring, in which case conventional analyses will yield incorrect answers. The complete state of stress can often not be determined and sweeping assumptions are commonly made about principal stress direction, which cannot always be subsequently verified. (author)

  16. Interim reclamation report, Basalt Waste Isolation project: Boreholes, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1968, a program was started to assess the feasibility of storing Hanford Site defense waste in deep caverns constructed in basalt. This program was expanded in 1976 to include investigations of the Hanford Site as a potential location for a mined commercial nuclear waste repository. An extensive site characterization program was begun to determine the feasibility of using the basalts beneath the Hanford Site for the repository. Site research focused primarily on determining the direction and speed of groundwater movement, the uniformity of basalt layers, and tectonic stability. Some 98 boreholes were sited, drilled, deepened, or modified by BWIP between 1977 and 1988 to test the geologic properties of the Site. On December 22, 1987, President Reagan signed into law the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987, which effectively stopped all repository-related activities except reclamation of disturbed lands at the Hanford Site. This report describes the development of the reclamation program for the BWIP boreholes, its implementation, and preliminary estimates of its success. The goal of the reclamation program is to return sites disturbed by the repository program as nearly as practicable to their original conditions using native plant species. 48 refs., 28 figs., 14 tabs

  17. Reversible rigid coupling apparatus and method for borehole seismic transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Thomas E.; Parra, Jorge O.

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus and method of high resolution reverse vertical seismic profile (VSP) measurements is shown. By encapsulating the seismic detector and heaters in a meltable substance (such as wax), the seismic detector can be removably secured in a borehole in a manner capable of measuring high resolution signals in the 100 to 1000 hertz range and higher. The meltable substance is selected to match the overall density of the detector package with the underground formation, yet still have relatively low melting point and rigid enough to transmit vibrations to accelerometers in the seismic detector. To minimize voids in the meltable substance upon solidification, the meltable substance is selected for minimum shrinkage, yet still having the other desirable characteristics. Heaters are arranged in the meltable substance in such a manner to allow the lowermost portion of the meltable substance to cool and solidify first. Solidification continues upwards from bottom-to-top until the top of the meltable substance is solidified and the seismic detector is ready for use. To remove, the heaters melt the meltable substance and the detector package is pulled from the borehole.

  18. Interim reclamation report, Basalt Waste Isolation project: Boreholes, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, C.A.; Rickard, W.H. Jr.; Hefty, M.G.

    1990-03-01

    In 1968, a program was started to assess the feasibility of storing Hanford Site defense waste in deep caverns constructed in basalt. This program was expanded in 1976 to include investigations of the Hanford Site as a potential location for a mined commercial nuclear waste repository. An extensive site characterization program was begun to determine the feasibility of using the basalts beneath the Hanford Site for the repository. Site research focused primarily on determining the direction and speed of groundwater movement, the uniformity of basalt layers, and tectonic stability. Some 98 boreholes were sited, drilled, deepened, or modified by BWIP between 1977 and 1988 to test the geologic properties of the Site. On December 22, 1987, President Reagan signed into law the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987, which effectively stopped all repository-related activities except reclamation of disturbed lands at the Hanford Site. This report describes the development of the reclamation program for the BWIP boreholes, its implementation, and preliminary estimates of its success. The goal of the reclamation program is to return sites disturbed by the repository program as nearly as practicable to their original conditions using native plant species. 48 refs., 28 figs., 14 tabs.

  19. Resolving the Younger Dryas Event Through Borehole Thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firestone, John Francis

    One of the most striking features of the ice core records from Greenland is a sudden drop in oxygen isotope values (delta O-18) between approximately 11,500 and 10,700 years ago. This Younger Dryas event was an intense return to ice age conditions during a time of general de-glaciation. As recorded in the ice cores, temperatures in Greenland cooled by roughly seven degrees Kelvin. W. Broecker and R. Fairbanks have proposed competing explanations for the cooling and cause of this "aborted ice age." One supposes that the seven degree cooling is real and results from a shutdown in the North Atlantic ocean circulation; the other, that it is largely fictitious and records an intrusion of isotopically light glacial meltwater into the ice core records. Using optimal control methods and heat flow modelling, the author makes a valiant but ultimately futile attempt to distinguish the Younger Dryas event in the ice sheet temperatures measured at Dye 3, South Greenland. The author discusses the prospects for attempting the same in the new Summit boreholes in Central Greenland: how that will require more accurate temperature measurements, a coupled thermo-mechanical model, and a refined uncertainty analysis. He concludes by discussing how borehole temperature analysis may improve the climate histories determined from ice cores.

  20. Characterization plan for the immobilized low-activity waste borehole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford Site has the most diverse and largest amounts of radioactive tank waste in the US. High-level radioactive waste has been stored at Hanford in large underground tanks since 1944. Approximately 209,000 m3 (54 Mgal) of waste are currently stored in 177 tanks. Vitrification and onsite disposal of low activity tank waste (LAW) are embodied in the strategy described in the Tri-Party Agreement. The tank waste is to be retrieved, separated into low- and high-level fractions, and then immobilized by private vendors. The DOE will receive the vitrified waste from private vendors and dispose of the low-activity fraction in the Hanford Site 200 East Area. The Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Disposal Complex (ILAWDC) is part of the disposal complex. This report is a plan to drill the first characterization borehole and collect data at the ILAWDC. This plan updates and revises the deep borehole portion of the characterization plan for the ILAWDC by Reidel and others (1995). It describes data collection activities for determining the physical and chemical properties of the vadose zone and the saturated zone at and in the immediate vicinity of the proposed ILAWDC. These properties then will be used to develop a conceptual geohydrologic model of the ILAWDC site in support of the Hanford ILAW Performance Assessment

  1. Analysis of groundwater from deep boreholes in Svartboberget

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groundwater from two boreholes in granitic rock at an investigation site in Svartboberget has been sampled and analysed. This is part of a larger program of geological, geophysical and hydrogeological investigations aimed at finding a suitable site for a high level radioactive waste repository. Four water-bearing levels in each borehole down to the deepest at about 600m were selected. Prior to sampling, the water-bearing level is isolated between packer sleeves. The water is then pumped to the surface where sensitive parameters such as redox potential, pH, sulphide and oxygen content are measured electrochemically on the flowing water in a system isolated from the air. Water, filter and gas samples are sent to several laboratories for further analysis. The present report is a presentation of the results of the groundwater analyses. The reliability of the results is discussed but there is no evaluation in relation to geology and hydrogeology. This report presents the basic results from the groundeater analyses to be further evaluated by experts in different fields. (author)

  2. Borehole sealing. Final report, March 1, 1973--October 31, 1973

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A program to evaluate existing materials and techniques to permanently plug boreholes penetrating salt strata near prospective radioactive waste depository sites is described. A new subcontract No. 78X-33542C has been issued to seal a borehole near Lyons, Kansas, using the materials and techniques recommended in this report. It is recommended that the well be thoroughly cleaned including removing any casing penetrating the critical salt strata. Following this, any fluid-bearing zones should be grouted using the best grout available. Silica gel was recommended for porous zones backed up by Portland cement to seal fractures and vugs. Recommendations were made to use sulfate resistant Chem Comp or sulfate resistant regular Portland (Type V) as the primary sealing material in the areas where anhydrite strata are present such as the existing wells at Lyons, Kansas, or the prospective wells near Carlsbad, New Mexico. This would be modified to meet existing conditions such as salt saturated slurry through the salt strata or added powdered silica in the zones which might exceed 2300F at any time. A short epoxy plug was recommended at the top and bottom of the salt strata and a short Seal Ring plug at the base of any extensive water zones. Extensive water zones are not expected in the New Mexico area, however

  3. Geochemical factors in borehole-shaft plug longevity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geochemical investigations that address factors controlling the longevity of repository sealing materials in a geochemical environment are discussed. Studies are being made of cement-based materials as major candidates for seals for borehole plugging, and shaft and tunnel sealing in certain potential repository environments. Factors controlling the extent of attainment of equilibrium of the plug components with time and the rate of approach to a state of stable equilibrium of the plug component chemical subsystem within the total system are discussed. The effect of these factors on changes in physical, mechanical and thermal properties of a seal system, and the consequent effectiveness of the seal in preventing transport of radioactive waste species are the dominant features to be determined. Laboratory experiments on the effects of anticipated temperature, pressure, and environmental factors (including chemical composition and specific rock type) are described. Thermodynamic studies are used to determine the potentially stable reaction products under conditions similar to those anticipated for the repository boreholes, shafts, and tunnels during and after the operating stage. Multitemperature reaction series are studied, and reaction kinetics are investigated for the purpose of predicting the course of likely reactions. Detailed studies of permeability, diffusion, and interfacial properties and chemical and microphase characterization of the products of experiments are carried out. Characterization studies of old and ancient cements, mortars, and concretes and prototype man-made seal materials are performed to further assess the factors associated with longevity

  4. Disposition of excess fissile materials in deep boreholes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a result of recent changes throughout the world, a substantial inventory of excess separated plutonium is expected to result from dismantlement of US nuclear weapons. The safe and secure management and eventual disposition of this plutonium, and of a similar inventory in Russia, is a high priority. A variety of options (both interim and permanent) are under consideration to manage this material. The permanent solutions can be categorized into two broad groups: direct disposal and utilization. Plutonium utilization options have in common the generation of high-level radioactive waste which will be disposed of in a mined geologic disposal system to be developed for spent reactor fuel and defense high level waste. Other final disposition forms, such as plutonium metal, plutonium oxide and plutonium immobilized without high-level radiation sources may be better suited to placement in a custom facility. This paper discusses a leading candidate for such a facility; deep (several kilometer) borehole disposition. The deep borehole disposition concept involves placing excess plutonium deep into old stable rock formations with little free water present. The safety argument centers around ancient groundwater indicating lack of migration, and thus no expected communication with the accessible environment until the plutonium has decayed

  5. Borehole plugging test activities in southeastern New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conclusions from these studies indicated that borehole seals with effective permeabilities on the order of tens of darcies would result in doses to maximally exposed individuals of less than 0.01% of natural background. In addition to overall assessments, techniques have been developed to evaluate the effectiveness of a plug/formation system to block fluid flow along the axis of the borehole. These techniques allow the characterization of the flow region within or surrounding a plug. They have been applied to results from tests in which flow was measured around an in situ plug. Current emphasis has been on evaluation of cementitious grouts. Grout mixes with expansive cement have been developed using various additives and both brines and fresh water. These mixes have been tailored to specific rocks for use in field tests. The characteristics (e.g., permeability bond strength) of these mixes and associated rocks have been determined in the laboratory and then compared with in situ performance. Studies of grout feasibility have been coupled with strategies for assessing long-term stability

  6. Borehole locations and top surface altitudes of each of the 16 hydrostratigraphic layers of the Atlantic Coastal Plain of North and South Carolina (pp1773_unit_alt_boreholes)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Point data pp1773_unit_alt_boreholes represent the 309 locations of various types of boreholes that were used to determine the altitudes of each of the 16...

  7. Borehole gamma-ray spectrum logging in borehole OL-KR1 and OL-KR27 at Olkiluoto, in Eurajoki, 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Julkunen, A.; Kallio, L. [Astrock Oy, Sodankylae (Finland)

    2005-12-15

    The aim of the detailed borehole surveys is to increase the knowledge of the bedrock on the study area and to supplement the investigations made earlier. As a part of the detailed investigations Astrock Oy carried out borehole spectrometer logging in KR1 and KR27 at Olkiluoto site in Eurajoki during autumn 2005. This report describes the logging, data processing and the results (orig.)

  8. Borehole gamma-ray spectrum logging in borehole OL-KR1 and OL-KR27 at Olkiluoto, in Eurajoki, 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the detailed borehole surveys is to increase the knowledge of the bedrock on the study area and to supplement the investigations made earlier. As a part of the detailed investigations Astrock Oy carried out borehole spectrometer logging in KR1 and KR27 at Olkiluoto site in Eurajoki during autumn 2005. This report describes the logging, data processing and the results (orig.)

  9. Immobilized low-activity waste site borehole 299-E17-21

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) is the group at the Hanford Site responsible for the safe underground storage of liquid waste from previous Hanford Site operations, the storage and disposal of immobilized tank waste, and closure of underground tanks. The current plan is to dispose of immobilized low-activity tank waste (ILAW) in new facilities in the southcentral part of 200-East Area and in four existing vaults along the east side of 200-East Area. Boreholes 299-E17-21, B8501, and B8502 were drilled at the southwest corner of the ILAW site in support of the Performance Assessment activities for the disposal options. This report summarizes the initial geologic findings, field tests conducted on those boreholes, and ongoing studies. One deep (480 feet) borehole and two shallow (50 feet) boreholes were drilled at the southwest corner of the ILAW site. The primary factor dictating the location of the boreholes was their characterization function with respect to developing the geohydrologic model for the site and satisfying associated Data Quality Objectives. The deep borehole was drilled to characterize subsurface conditions beneath the ILAW site, and two shallow boreholes were drilled to support an ongoing environmental tracer study. The tracer study will supply information to the Performance Assessment. All the boreholes provide data on the vadose zone and saturated zone in a previously uncharacterized area

  10. An analysis of the lithology to resistivity relationships using airborne EM and boreholes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfod, Adrian A.S.; Christiansen, Anders Vest; Møller, Ingelise

    2014-01-01

    We present a study of the relationship between dense airborne skyTEM resistivity data and sparse lithological borehole data. Understanding the resistivity structure of the subsurface is of great importance to hydrogeological surveys and to ensure a high standard for groundwater quality. Borehole ...

  11. Seismoelectric waves in a borehole excited by an external explosive source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conversion of energy between seismic and electromagnetic wave fields has been described by Pride's coupled equations in porous media. In this paper, the seismoelectric field excited by the explosive point source located at the outside of the borehole is studied. The scattering fields inside and outside a borehole are analyzed and deduced under the boundary conditions at the interface between fluid and porous media. The influences of the distance of the point source, multipole components of the eccentric explosive source, and the receiving position along the axis of vertical borehole, on the converted waves inside the borehole are all investigated. When the distance from the acoustic source to the axis of a borehole is far enough, the longitudinal and coseismic longitudinal wave packets dominate the acoustic and electric field, respectively. The three components of both electric field and magnetic field can be detected, and the radial electric field is mainly excited and converted by the dipole component. Owing to the existence of borehole, the electric fields and magnetic fields in the borehole are azimuthal. The distance from the point where the maximum amplitude of the axial components of electric field is recorded, to the origin of coordinate indicates the horizontal distance from the explosive source to the axis of vertical borehole. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  12. Immobilized low-activity waste site borehole 299-E17-21

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reidel, S.P.; Reynolds, K.D.; Horton, D.G.

    1998-08-01

    The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) is the group at the Hanford Site responsible for the safe underground storage of liquid waste from previous Hanford Site operations, the storage and disposal of immobilized tank waste, and closure of underground tanks. The current plan is to dispose of immobilized low-activity tank waste (ILAW) in new facilities in the southcentral part of 200-East Area and in four existing vaults along the east side of 200-East Area. Boreholes 299-E17-21, B8501, and B8502 were drilled at the southwest corner of the ILAW site in support of the Performance Assessment activities for the disposal options. This report summarizes the initial geologic findings, field tests conducted on those boreholes, and ongoing studies. One deep (480 feet) borehole and two shallow (50 feet) boreholes were drilled at the southwest corner of the ILAW site. The primary factor dictating the location of the boreholes was their characterization function with respect to developing the geohydrologic model for the site and satisfying associated Data Quality Objectives. The deep borehole was drilled to characterize subsurface conditions beneath the ILAW site, and two shallow boreholes were drilled to support an ongoing environmental tracer study. The tracer study will supply information to the Performance Assessment. All the boreholes provide data on the vadose zone and saturated zone in a previously uncharacterized area.

  13. CSIRO borehole logging research and development for the solid resource mining industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the various stages preceding exploitation, the solid resource mining industries in Australia require the rapid, yet accurate, analysis of deposits. Borehole logging based on nuclear geophysics generally offers the best avenue for achieving this. The stages of mining where borehole logging can be applied effectively are pre-mine planning, production and, to a lesser extent, exploration. The Borehole Logging Group in the Division of Geomechanics of the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation has carried out a programme of both strategic and applications research which has formed the basis for its development of the modular SIROLOG borehole logging technology. The research carried out for SIROLOG technology development was basically in the fields of spectrometric gamma-gamma, spectrometric neutron-gamma (prompt and delayed) and spectrometric natural gamma borehole logging. Specially developed field equipment and user friendly software were integrated into the SIROLOG system. (author). 20 refs, 5 figs

  14. In-situ mapping of contaminants with nuclear borehole logging techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the DOE Environmental Restoration (ER) Program, techniques which reduce site characterization and long-term monitoring costs and maximize the information obtained from each borehole are needed because drilling boreholes in contaminated areas and analyzing samples are costly procedures. The authors will describe the experience at the Nevada Test Site, where the authors have found that nuclear borehole logging combined with a limited sampling program can yield greatly enhanced data confidence at reduced cost compared with sampling alone. Such a win-win result can be obtained for some contaminants in ER by applying nuclear borehole logging techniques which have the ability to map contaminants in-situ and are nuclide specific. Such measurements give a continuous record along the borehole, typically analyze 103 to 104 times more material than sample analyses, and can be made repeatedly over any period of time to track changes in contaminant concentrations

  15. Site characterization data from the Area 5 science boreholes, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Science Borehole Project consists of eight boreholes that were drilled (from 45.7 m [150 ft] to 83.8 m [275 ft] depth) in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, on behalf of the US Department of Energy. These boreholes are part of the Area 5 Site Characterization Program developed to meet data needs associated with regulatory requirements applicable to the disposal of low-level and mixed waste at this site. This series of boreholes was specifically designed to characterize parameters controlling near-surface gas transport and to monitor changes in these and liquid flow-related parameters over time. These boreholes are located along the four sides of the approximately 2.6-km2 (1-mi2) Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site to provide reasonable spatial coverage for sampling and characterization. Laboratory testing results of samples taken from core and drill cuttings are reported

  16. 200-ZP-1 operable unit borehole summary report for FY 1995 and FY 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document details the well construction, sampling, analyses, and geologic character of the Ringold Formation fluvial unit E gravels as encountered in 16 boreholes in the 200-ZP-1 Operable Unit. These boreholes were drilled by Water Development Hanford Corporation during fiscal years 1995 and 1996. Two of the sixteen boreholes were abandoned; the remaining 14 boreholes were completed as functioning production and compliance wells. The borehole logs and well summary sheets included as Appendices A and B of this document, respectively, depict and describe the vadose zone stratigraphic units encountered during the course of drilling. Appendix C contains the results of sieve analyses conducted on samples obtained via resonant sonic coring and standard split-spoon methods. The sieve analyses were the driver behind the majority of the well designs. Also, for completeness, Appendices D and E contain the well design calculations and the well development process

  17. Assessment of radon variability in the borehole in Garhwal Himalaya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a part of multi-parametric earthquake precursory studies at Ghuttu, Central Himalaya, radon concentration is being measured at two depths in a 68 m borehole. One measurement is taken at a depth of 10 m from surface in the air column above the water table and the second one at 50 m within the water column. Besides radon concentration, air temperature, water temperature, atmospheric pressure, rainfall and water level fluctuations are also recorded with sampling interval of 15 minute. The continuous time series of radon variations at 10 m depth along with other environmental parameters over 3 years (2007-2009) recording shows strong variability including well-defined seasonal, day-to-day and diurnal variations The strong seasonal variations with summer maximum and winter minimum closely follow the similar variations in atmospheric temperature with time lag of few days. The control of temperature gradient in borehole on the emission of radon is evident in the form of different patterns of daily variations. Four types of daily variations are observed (i) positive peaks in late afternoon, (ii) negative peaks in early morning hours (iii) sinusoidal with double peaks and iv) long intervals when daily variations are conspicuously absent, particularly in winter and rainy season. Examination and correlation with environmental factors has revealed that when atmospheric temperature is well below the water temperature in borehole, the later show constant value around 19℃ in all seasons. In this situation, temperature gradients are not conducive to set up the convection currents for the emanation of radon to surface. Thus, explaining the absence of daily variation in radon concentration in winter. During the rainy season, following continuous rainfalls, once the soil/rocks are saturated with water radon concentrations show fair stability. Long pauses in rainfall give jerky variability during rainy season with no clear pattern of daily variation. During rest of the seasons

  18. Thermal Performance Analysis of a Geologic Borehole Repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reagin, Lauren [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-08-16

    The Brazilian Nuclear Research Institute (IPEN) proposed a design for the disposal of Disused Sealed Radioactive Sources (DSRS) based on the IAEA Borehole Disposal of Sealed Radioactive Sources (BOSS) design that would allow the entirety of Brazil’s inventory of DSRS to be disposed in a single borehole. The proposed IPEN design allows for 170 waste packages (WPs) containing DSRS (such as Co-60 and Cs-137) to be stacked on top of each other inside the borehole. The primary objective of this work was to evaluate the thermal performance of a conservative approach to the IPEN proposal with the equivalent of two WPs and two different inside configurations using Co-60 as the radioactive heat source. The current WP configuration (heterogeneous) for the IPEN proposal has 60% of the WP volume being occupied by a nuclear radioactive heat source and the remaining 40% as vacant space. The second configuration (homogeneous) considered for this project was a homogeneous case where 100% of the WP volume was occupied by a nuclear radioactive heat source. The computational models for the thermal analyses of the WP configurations with the Co-60 heat source considered three different cooling mechanisms (conduction, radiation, and convection) and the effect of mesh size on the results from the thermal analysis. The results of the analyses yielded maximum temperatures inside the WPs for both of the WP configurations and various mesh sizes. The heterogeneous WP considered the cooling mechanisms of conduction, convection, and radiation. The temperature results from the heterogeneous WP analysis suggest that the model is cooled predominantly by conduction with effect of radiation and natural convection on cooling being negligible. From the thermal analysis comparing the two WP configurations, the results suggest that either WP configuration could be used for the design. The mesh sensitivity results verify the meshes used and results obtained from the thermal analyses were close to being

  19. Hydraulic effects of unsealed boreholes. Numerical groundwater flow modelling of the Forsmark and Laxemar sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bockgaard, Niclas [Golder Associates AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2011-06-15

    The objective of the work was to investigate hydraulic effects of open and poorly sealed boreholes on groundwater flow conditions through simulations using a numerical groundwater model. Specifically, the boreholes KFM07A, KFM09A, and KFM09B in Forsmark and the boreholes KLX04, KLX06, and KLX10 in Laxemar were studied. The criteria for the selection of these boreholes were that the boreholes should represent typical conditions of the site, the borehole length should exceed 500 m, and that several major fractured zones should be intersected. The boreholes KFM07A and KLX06, respectively, were selected as reference boreholes for more detailed studies of different sealing schemes. The model setup of the Forsmark model followed the Forsmark 2.2 regional-scale conceptual hydrogeological model. The model domain was approximately 15 km (north-south) x 10 km (west- east) x 1.2 km (depth). The 131 deformation zones and three layers of superficial horizontal sheet joint were modelled deterministically. A stochastic discrete fracture network (DFN) representing fractures and minor deformation zones were also generated between the deterministic deformation zones inside central model volume. The side lengths of the square fractures were from 1,000 m down to 10 m. In order to resolve the details of flow in to and out from the borehole, a more detailed DFN was generated in a zone around the borehole KFM07A, where fractures down to a side length of 0.5 m were considered. The model setup of the Laxemar model followed the SDM-Site Laxemar (Laxemar 2.3) regional scale conceptual hydrogeological model. The model domain was approximately 12 km (north-south) x 20 km (west-east) x 2.1 km (depth). A number of 71 deformation zones were modelled deterministically, and one realization of a stochastic DFN, the so-called hydrogeological DFN model base case, was imported to the model. Similar to the Forsmark case, a more detailed DFN was also generated around the reference borehole KLX06. The

  20. Hydraulic effects of unsealed boreholes. Numerical groundwater flow modelling of the Forsmark and Laxemar sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the work was to investigate hydraulic effects of open and poorly sealed boreholes on groundwater flow conditions through simulations using a numerical groundwater model. Specifically, the boreholes KFM07A, KFM09A, and KFM09B in Forsmark and the boreholes KLX04, KLX06, and KLX10 in Laxemar were studied. The criteria for the selection of these boreholes were that the boreholes should represent typical conditions of the site, the borehole length should exceed 500 m, and that several major fractured zones should be intersected. The boreholes KFM07A and KLX06, respectively, were selected as reference boreholes for more detailed studies of different sealing schemes. The model setup of the Forsmark model followed the Forsmark 2.2 regional-scale conceptual hydrogeological model. The model domain was approximately 15 km (north-south) x 10 km (west- east) x 1.2 km (depth). The 131 deformation zones and three layers of superficial horizontal sheet joint were modelled deterministically. A stochastic discrete fracture network (DFN) representing fractures and minor deformation zones were also generated between the deterministic deformation zones inside central model volume. The side lengths of the square fractures were from 1,000 m down to 10 m. In order to resolve the details of flow in to and out from the borehole, a more detailed DFN was generated in a zone around the borehole KFM07A, where fractures down to a side length of 0.5 m were considered. The model setup of the Laxemar model followed the SDM-Site Laxemar (Laxemar 2.3) regional scale conceptual hydrogeological model. The model domain was approximately 12 km (north-south) x 20 km (west-east) x 2.1 km (depth). A number of 71 deformation zones were modelled deterministically, and one realization of a stochastic DFN, the so-called hydrogeological DFN model base case, was imported to the model. Similar to the Forsmark case, a more detailed DFN was also generated around the reference borehole KLX06. The

  1. Adaptive noise reduction for fiber optic gyroscopes in borehole applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Tingyang; Zhang, Chunxi; Gao, Shuang; Ma, Zongfeng

    2006-11-01

    Fiber Optic Gyroscopes (FOGs) have been investigated and proposed as alternative sensors to magnetometers in borehole surveying applications due to their compactness, ruggedness, low cost and high environmental insensitivity. However, FOGs are subject to high measurement noise from various sources, which deteriorates the performance and quality of FOGs, thus the overall system accuracy is limited. To improve the accuracy of the surveying system, adaptive filtering techniques are utilized to reduce the noise level at the output of the FOG. A Forward Linear Prediction (FLP) filter based on Normalized Least-Mean-Square (NLMS) adaptive algorithm was designed and evaluated using kinematic data. Results show that the FLP filter can suppress the FOG noise to a certain degree and a satisfactory signal-to-noise ratio improvement can be achieved using this method.

  2. Borehole, shaft, and tunnel sealing of rock repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Precompacted blocks of Na bentonite powder absorb water and swell to several times their original size when exposed to low- and moderately saline water under unconfined conditions. On application in boreholes, shafts or tunnels, they can only undergo moderate swelling, which yields a homogeneous seal with high density and very low hydraulic conductivity. The swelling pressure exerted on the confining rock creates an intimate clay/rock contact and an effective mechanical rock support. By this, flow through the plugs and along the rock/bentonite interface is negligible and flow through the rock adjacent to the plugs is also diminished by self-sealing through penetration of clay into wider fractures and by the fracture-closing effect of the swelling pressure

  3. Fissures and boreholes plugging in fractured geologic deposits (granites)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report gives the results of bench-scale experiments and field tests, destined to describe the bentonite behavior in fractured scale models and in boreholes, and to allow to study the rock weathering phenomenons under specific conditions. Dry and compact bentonite, used for exploratory drilling plugging, in crystalline rock deposits and in contact with groundwater, show hydration, swelling and mobility properties with penetration in conducting fractures. The purpose of this work is to define the procedure of clay weathering after the swelling phase, under groundwater circulation effect, to estimate plugs longevity. This study is prepared for the European Atomic Energy Community cost-sharing research program on radioactive waste management and disposal. 63 refs., 100 figs., 30 tabs., 17 plates

  4. Calibration and control modules for gamma-ray borehole loggers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A calibration pad for quantitative evaluation of gamma-ray logs, developed and constructed by CNEA is described. The facility is composed of a set of mineralized modules with which it is intended to reproduce the natural variable conditions found in boreholes drilled for uranium mineral exploration, such as the ore concentration, rock's density and porosity, water content, etc. The facility is able to operate under different radiometric models, as follow: 1) gross-count gamma-ray models; 2) gamma-spectrometer models; 3) neutronic-fission models, and 4) models for determination of magnetic susceptibility, density, neutron-neutron, etc. The gathered information allows the adequate quantitative radiometric evaluation of the ore bodies crossed by exploration holes, and also allows the correlation of gamma-ray logs obtained by different logger-equipments. The paper includes the description of the project development and the standards established for the facility's operation. (M.E.L.)

  5. Elastic wave scattering to characterize heterogeneities in the borehole environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiao-Ming; Li, Zhen; Hei, Chuang; Su, Yuan-Da

    2016-04-01

    Scattering due to small-scale heterogeneities in the rock formation surrounding a wellbore can significantly change the acoustic waveform from a logging measurement which in turn can be used to characterize the formation heterogeneities. This study simulates the elastic heterogeneity scattering in monopole and dipole acoustic logging and analyse the resulting effects on the waveforms. The results show that significant coda waves are generated in both monopole and dipole waveforms and the dipole coda is dominated by S-to-S scattering, which can be effectively utilized to diagnose the heterogeneity in the rock formation. The coda wave modelling and analysis were used to characterize dipole acoustic data logged before and after fracturing a reservoir interval, with significant coda wave in the after-fracturing data indicating fracturing-induced heterogeneous property change in the rock volume surrounding the borehole.

  6. Some considerations on a borehole in a clay formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A borehole has been drilled in the clay formation underlying the Trisaia Nuclear Research Center (CNEN) in Southern Italy. The local stratigraphic series includes 850 m of marly clay of Pliocene-Calabrian age. The drilling operation has been interrupted at about -400 m, due to the occurrence of methane gas. The presence of gas, the reducing conditions of the clay and the lack of water in fracture zones testify the extremely low permeability of this clay formation. Reducing conditions may prevent the migration of many radionuclides. The occurrence of some sandy levels and lenses is due to the coastal character of the paleosedimentary environment. Previsions on the homogeneity of clay bodies may be indirectly inferred by examination of feeder paleobasins

  7. Rock stress orientation measurements using induced thermal spalling in slim boreholes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakami, Eva [Geosigma AB, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2011-05-15

    In the planning and design of a future underground storage for nuclear waste based on the KBS-3 method, one of the aims is to optimize the layout of deposition tunnels such that the rock stresses on the boundaries of deposition holes are minimized. Previous experiences from heating of larger scale boreholes at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (AHRL) gave rise to the idea that induced borehole breakouts using thermal loading in smaller diameter boreholes, could be a possible way of determining the stress orientation. Two pilot experiments were performed, one at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory and one at ONKALO research site in Finland. An acoustic televiewer logger was used to measure the detailed geometrical condition of the borehole before and after heating periods. The acoustic televiewer gives a value for each 0.7 mm large pixel size around the borehole periphery. The results from the loggers are presented as images of the borehole wall, and as curves for the maximum, mean and minimum values at each depth. Any changes in the borehole wall geometry may thus be easily detected by comparisons of the logging result images. In addition, using an optical borehole televiewer a good and detailed realistic colour picture of the borehole wall is obtained. From these images the character of the spalls identified may be evaluated further. The heating was performed in a 4 m long section, using a heating cable centred in an 8 m deep vertical borehole, drilled from the floor of the tunnels. For the borehole in the Q-tunnel of AHRL the results from the loggings of the borehole before the heating revealed that breakouts existed even before this pilot test due to previous heating experiments at the site (CAPS). Quite consistent orientation and the typical shape of small breakouts were observed. After the heating the spalling increased slightly at the same locations and a new spalling location also developed at a deeper location in the borehole. At ONKALO three very small changes

  8. Thermal-mechanical modeling of deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disposal of high-level radioactive waste, including spent nuclear fuel, in deep (3 to 5 km) boreholes is a potential option for safely isolating these wastes from the surface and near-surface environment. Existing drilling technology permits reliable and cost-effective construction of such deep boreholes. Conditions favorable for deep borehole disposal in crystalline basement rocks, including low permeability, high salinity, and geochemically reducing conditions, exist at depth in many locations, particularly in geologically stable continental regions. Isolation of waste depends, in part, on the effectiveness of borehole seals and potential alteration of permeability in the disturbed host rock surrounding the borehole. Coupled thermal-mechanical-hydrologic processes induced by heat from the radioactive waste may impact the disturbed zone near the borehole and borehole wall stability. Numerical simulations of the coupled thermal-mechanical response in the host rock surrounding the borehole were conducted with three software codes or combinations of software codes. Software codes used in the simulations were FEHM, JAS3D, Aria, and Adagio. Simulations were conducted for disposal of spent nuclear fuel assemblies and for the higher heat output of vitrified waste from the reprocessing of fuel. Simulations were also conducted for both isotropic and anisotropic ambient horizontal stress in the host rock. Physical, thermal, and mechanical properties representative of granite host rock at a depth of 4 km were used in the models. Simulation results indicate peak temperature increases at the borehole wall of about 30 C and 180 C for disposal of fuel assemblies and vitrified waste, respectively. Peak temperatures near the borehole occur within about 10 years and decline rapidly within a few hundred years and with distance. The host rock near the borehole is placed under additional compression. Peak mechanical stress is increased by about 15 MPa (above the assumed ambient

  9. Room Q data report: Test borehole data from April 1989 through November 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pore-pressure and fluid-flow tests were performed in 15 boreholes drilled into the bedded evaporites of the Salado Formation from within the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The tests measured fluid flow and pore pressure within the Salado. The boreholes were drilled into the previously undisturbed host rock around a proposed cylindrical test room, Room Q, located on the west side of the facility about 655 m below ground surface. The boreholes were about 23 m deep and ranged over 27.5 m of stratigraphy. They were completed and instrumented before excavation of Room Q. Tests were conducted in isolated zones at the end of each borehole. Three groups of 5 isolated zones extend above, below, and to the north of Room Q at increasing distances from the room axis. Measurements recorded before, during, and after the mining of the circular test room provided data about borehole closure, pressure, temperature, and brine seepage into the isolated zones. The effects of the circular excavation were recorded. This data report presents the data collected from the borehole test zones between April 25, 1989 and November 25, 1991. The report also describes test development, test equipment, and borehole drilling operations

  10. Features of gamma-logging using in conditions of contamination of boreholes walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is known that the radioactive contamination of soil around 'Ukryttya' object is concentrated basically on pre-accident surface, which was closed by clean soil layers during liquidation of the accident consequences. During building of foundations for New Safe Confinement a lot of boreholes were drilled for sheet piling. These boreholes were used for gamma-logging to assess soil contamination with radionuclides, forecast of radioactive waste quantities, which will appear after deleting soil from the pit, and doses to the staff at the reaching the active layer of soil. Measurements of a gamma-field have been carried out almost in five hundred boreholes. In processing of gamma-logging data in these boreholes increased values of exposure dose rate below the active layer and on the bottom of some boreholes were discovered. As a result, it was found that the additional radiation below the active layer in most part of boreholes is completely explained by the strain radiation f tom active layer and by pouring out radioactive soil from upper layers to the bottom of boreholes

  11. Inversion of waveforms from Xiangtang borehole seismic array for soil dynamic property

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xue-liang; JIN Xing; TAO Xia-xin; WEI Yong-xiang

    2007-01-01

    In order to understand the site soil response of the Xiangtang borehole seismic array under real strong ground motion, reveal the site response, verify the technique of borehole exploration, and improve the precision of in-situ test and laboratory test, this paper presents a new approach, which is composed of two methods. One is the layered site seismic response method, whose layer transform matrix is always real. The other is a global-local optimization technique, which uses genetic algorithm (GA)-simplex method. An inversion of multi-component waveforms of P, SV and SH wave is carried out simultaneously. By inverting the records of three moderate and small earthquakes obtained from the Xiangtang borehole array (2# ) site, the soil dynamic characteristic parameters, including P velocity, damping ratio and frequency-dependent coefficient b, which has not been given in previous literatures, are calculated. The results show that the soil S wave velocity of the Xiangtang 2# borehole is generally greater than that obtained from the 1994 in-situ test, and is close to the velocity of the 3# borehole, which is more than 200 m away from the 2# borehole. Meanwhile, perceptible soil nonlinear behavior under peak ground motion of about 60×10-2 m/s2 is detected by the inversion analysis. The presented method can be used for studying the soil response of other borehole array sites.

  12. Groundwater flow characterization in a fractured bedrock aquifer using active DTS tests in sealed boreholes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Thomas I.; Parker, Beth L.; Maldaner, Carlos H.; Mondanos, Michael J.

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, wireline temperature profiling methods have evolved to offer new insight into fractured rock hydrogeology. Important advances in wireline temperature logging in boreholes make use of active line source heating alone and then in combination with temporary borehole sealing with flexible impervious fabric liners to eliminate the effects of borehole cross-connection and recreate natural flow conditions. Here, a characterization technique was developed based on combining fiber optic distributed temperature sensing (DTS) with active heating within boreholes sealed with flexible borehole liners. DTS systems provide a temperature profiling method that offers significantly enhanced temporal resolution when compared with conventional wireline trolling-based techniques that obtain a temperature-depth profile every few hours. The ability to rapidly and continuously collect temperature profiles can better our understanding of transient processes, allowing for improved identification of hydraulically active fractures and determination of relative rates of groundwater flow. The advantage of a sealed borehole environment for DTS-based investigations is demonstrated through a comparison of DTS data from open and lined conditions for the same borehole. Evidence for many depth-discrete active groundwater flow features under natural gradient conditions using active DTS heat pulse testing is presented along with high resolution geologic and geophysical logging and hydraulic datasets. Implications for field implementation are discussed.

  13. On Thermally Interacting Multiple Boreholes with Variable Heating Strength: Comparison between Analytical and Numerical Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc A. Rosen

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The temperature response in the soil surrounding multiple boreholes is evaluated analytically and numerically. The assumption of constant heat flux along the borehole wall is examined by coupling the problem to the heat transfer problem inside the borehole and presenting a model with variable heat flux along the borehole length. In the analytical approach, a line source of heat with a finite length is used to model the conduction of heat in the soil surrounding the boreholes. In the numerical method, a finite volume method in a three dimensional meshed domain is used. In order to determine the heat flux boundary condition, the analytical quasi-three-dimensional solution to the heat transfer problem of the U-tube configuration inside the borehole is used. This solution takes into account the variation in heating strength along the borehole length due to the temperature variation of the fluid running in the U-tube. Thus, critical depths at which thermal interaction occurs can be determined. Finally, in order to examine the validity of the numerical method, a comparison is made with the results of line source method.

  14. Causes of Borehole Failure in Complex Basement Terrains: ABUAD Case Study, Southwestern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    1 Ogundana, A.K , 2 Aladesanmi A. O., 3 Okunade A., 4Olutomilola O.O

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A preliminary assessment of primary causes of borehole failure has being conducted using Afe Babalola University as a case study. A total of fourteen boreholes (namely borehole 1-14 were studied, vertical electrical soundings, depth sounding, flushing and pump testing were conducted on each of the boreholes to establish their status at the time of the study and possible evaluation of the groundwater potential of the wells. Four out of the fourteen boreholes (borehole 1-4 are productive and in-use, while the remaining ten (borehole 5-14 are out-of-use and abandoned for various. The productive holes were able to support continuous flow of water for over 3 hours without drop in volume of water flow. Seven of the holes (boreholes 5, 6, 8, 9, 11, 12 & 14 failed and were abandoned because of low yield (could not flow beyond 5 minutes, while the remaining three (boreholes 7, 10 & 13 failed and were abandoned due to wrong location and improper completion, caving/formation problems, and wrong installation/completion respectively. Proper well completion is essential in areas prone to caving and other formation related problems. Air drilling should be avoided in areas with thick and loose overburden. Right mixture of drilling mud should be applied to secure the hole wall while flushing should be continuous throughout drilling in such formation. Casing should be done immediately and such holes should be lined and grouted. Timers should be installed on low yield wells and regulated/programmed for 5 or 10 minutes flow depending on the recharge rate. Pump rating for installation should be strictly based on well recharge rate. Productive wells should be properly maintained and monitored for optimal performance.

  15. Experimental research on sealing of boreholes, shafts and ramps in welded tuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuenkajorn, K. [Rock Engineering International, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Laboratory and in-situ experiments have been conducted to determine the mechanical and hydraulic performance of cement borehole seals in densely welded Apache Leap tuff. Test results indicate that under saturated conditions, commercial expansive cement can provide good bond strength and adequate hydraulic performance for borehole seal under changing stress conditions. The cement seal should be installed at the intact portion of the opening, and should have a length-to-diameter ratio greater than four. Drying increases borehole plug permeability and decreases mechanical and hydraulic bonds at the plug-rock interface. In-situ testing indicates that installation procedure may significantly affect the cement plug performance.

  16. Catalog of borehole lithologic logs from the 600 Area, Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fecht, K R; Lillie, J T

    1982-03-01

    Rockwell Hanford Operations (Rockwell) geoscientists are studying the Hanford Site subsurface environment to assure safe management operations, disposal, and storage of radioactive waste. As part of this effort, geoscientists have collected geotechnical data from about 3000 boreholes drilled on the Hanford Site since the early 1900s. These boreholes have been used for subsurface geologic, hydrologic, and engineering investigation, water supply, ground-water monitoring, and natural gas production. This report is a catalog of all obtainable (about 800) lithologic logs from boreholes in a portion of the Hanford Site known as the 600 Area.

  17. Radionuclide logging of Tank 216-T-106, borehole 299-W10-196

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geophysical surveys were conducted in borehole 299-W10-196 during construction to profile the radionuclide contaminants in the vadose zone that leaked from single-shell Tank 216-T-106. Contaminants from the tank leak were detected to 120 feet below the ground surface. A second complete geophysical survey was conducted about one year after drilling was completed to evaluate contaminant movement that may have been caused by the presence of the cased borehole. Contaminant movement would warrant plugging and abandoning the borehole. Comparison of the two surveys indicate that no contamination movement to greater depths can be identified

  18. The measurement of the vertical component of hydraulic conductivity in single cased and uncased boreholes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The project summarised in the paper aimed to assess the different existing methods of measuring vertical hydraulic conductivity in single boreholes by carrying out some actual field testing. The measurements are relevant to the disposal of radioactive waste into argillaceous rocks, where the primary geological barrier to potential leachate migration is the mudrock. Also the prime parameter of interest in the assessment of mudrocks is the vertical component of hydraulic conductivity. A description of the methods of test analysis and interpretation is given. The experimental programme for open borehole testing and cased borehole testing is described, along with the practical and theoretical considerations. (U.K.)

  19. Catalog of borehole lithologic logs from the 600 Area, Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rockwell Hanford Operations (Rockwell) geoscientists are studying the Hanford Site subsurface environment to assure safe management operations, disposal, and storage of radioactive waste. As part of this effort, geoscientists have collected geotechnical data from about 3000 boreholes drilled on the Hanford Site since the early 1900s. These boreholes have been used for subsurface geologic, hydrologic, and engineering investigation, water supply, ground-water monitoring, and natural gas production. This report is a catalog of all obtainable (about 800) lithologic logs from boreholes in a portion of the Hanford Site known as the 600 Area

  20. Experimental research on sealing of boreholes, shafts and ramps in welded tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laboratory and in-situ experiments have been conducted to determine the mechanical and hydraulic performance of cement borehole seals in densely welded Apache Leap tuff. Test results indicate that under saturated conditions, commercial expansive cement can provide good bond strength and adequate hydraulic performance for borehole seal under changing stress conditions. The cement seal should be installed at the intact portion of the opening, and should have a length-to-diameter ratio greater than four. Drying increases borehole plug permeability and decreases mechanical and hydraulic bonds at the plug-rock interface. In-situ testing indicates that installation procedure may significantly affect the cement plug performance

  1. Large-scale 3-D modeling by integration of resistivity models and borehole data through inversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, N.; Marker, Pernille Aabye; Christiansen, A. V.;

    2014-01-01

    We present an automatic method for parameterization of a 3-D model of the subsurface, integrating lithological information from boreholes with resistivity models through an inverse optimization, with the objective of further detailing of geological models, or as direct input into groundwater models...... and the borehole data set in one variable. Finally, we use k-means clustering to generate a 3-D model of the subsurface structures. We apply the procedure to the Norsminde survey in Denmark, integrating approximately 700 boreholes and more than 100 000 resistivity models from an airborne survey in the...

  2. Controlled drilling technology for HLW management. Directional drilling and mechanics/stress measurements in the borehole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 2000, Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) has been conducting the project on controlled drilling and the logging/measurement technologies in its boreholes. Especially borehole pressure meter and bore hole stress measurement apparatus which can apply to the controlled drilling system was developed. The bore hole was drilled to the 1000 m long in order to intersect the Omagari fault located at Horonobe town in Hokkaido and its core recovery was 99.8% as of FY. 2011. Using borehole logging/measurement/survey, the geological, hydrological, geo-mechanical, geophysical and geochemical data were collected and the Omagari fault was characterized. (author)

  3. Drilling, logging, and testing information from borehole UE-25 UZ{number_sign}16, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thamir, F.; Thordarson, W.; Kume, J.; Rousseau, J. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States). Yucca Mountain Project Branch; Long, R. [Dept. of Energy, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Cunningham, D.M. Jr. [Science Applications International Corp., Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    1998-09-01

    Borehole UE-25 UZ{number_sign}16 is the first of two boreholes that may be used to determine the subsurface structure at Yucca Mountain by using vertical seismic profiling. This report contains information collected while this borehole was being drilled, logged, and tested from May 27, 1992, to April 22, 1994. It does not contain the vertical seismic profiling data. This report is intended to be used as: (1) a reference for drilling similar boreholes in the same area, (2) a data source on this borehole, and (3) a reference for other information that is available from this borehole. The reference information includes drilling chronology, equipment, parameters, coring methods, penetration rates, completion information, drilling problems, and corrective actions. The data sources include lithology, fracture logs, a list of available borehole logs, and depths at which water was recorded. Other information is listed in an appendix that includes studies done after April 22, 1994.

  4. Drilling, logging, and testing information from borehole UE-25 UZ number-sign 16, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borehole UE-25 UZ number-sign 16 is the first of two boreholes that may be used to determine the subsurface structure at Yucca Mountain by using vertical seismic profiling. This report contains information collected while this borehole was being drilled, logged, and tested from May 27, 1992, to April 22, 1994. It does not contain the vertical seismic profiling data. This report is intended to be used as: (1) a reference for drilling similar boreholes in the same area, (2) a data source on this borehole, and (3) a reference for other information that is available from this borehole. The reference information includes drilling chronology, equipment, parameters, coring methods, penetration rates, completion information, drilling problems, and corrective actions. The data sources include lithology, fracture logs, a list of available borehole logs, and depths at which water was recorded. Other information is listed in an appendix that includes studies done after April 22, 1994

  5. Simple, affordable, and sustainable borehole observatories for complex monitoring objectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopf, A.; Freudenthal, T.; Ratmeyer, V.; Bergenthal, M.; Lange, M.; Fleischmann, T.; Hammerschmidt, S.; Seiter, C.; Wefer, G.

    2015-05-01

    Seafloor drill rigs are remotely operated systems that provide a cost-effective means to recover sedimentary records of the upper sub-seafloor deposits. Recent increases in their payload included downhole logging tools or autoclave coring systems. Here we report on another milestone in using seafloor rigs: the development and installation of shallow borehole observatories. Three different systems have been developed for the MARUM-MeBo (Meeresboden-Bohrgerat) seafloor drill, which is operated by MARUM, University of Bremen, Germany. A simple design, the MeBoPLUG, separates the inner borehole from the overlying ocean by using o-ring seals at the conical threads of the drill pipe. The systems are self-contained and include data loggers, batteries, thermistors and a differential pressure sensor. A second design, the so-called MeBoCORK (Circulation Obviation Retrofit Kit), is more sophisticated and also hosts an acoustic modem for data transfer and, if desired, fluid sampling capability using osmotic pumps. In these MeBoCORKs, two systems have to be distinguished: the CORK-A (A stands for autonomous) can be installed by the MeBo alone and monitors pressure and temperature inside and above the borehole (the latter for reference); the CORK-B (B stands for bottom) has a higher payload and can additionally be equipped with geochemical, biological or other physical components. Owing to its larger size, it is installed by a remotely operated underwater vehicle (ROV) and utilises a hot-stab connection in the upper portion of the drill string. Either design relies on a hot-stab connection from beneath in which coiled tubing with a conical drop weight is lowered to couple to the formation. These tubes are fluid-saturated and either serve to transmit pore pressure signals or collect porewater in the osmo-sampler. The third design, the MeBoPUPPI (Pop-Up Pore Pressure Instrument), is similar to the MeBoCORK-A and monitors pore pressure and temperature in a self-contained manner

  6. Simple, affordable and sustainable borehole observatories for complex monitoring objectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopf, A.; Freudenthal, T.; Ratmeyer, V.; Bergenthal, M.; Lange, M.; Fleischmann, T.; Hammerschmidt, S.; Seiter, C.; Wefer, G.

    2014-12-01

    Seafloor drill rigs are remotely operated systems that provide a cost effective means to recover sedimentary records of the upper sub-seafloor deposits. Recent increases in their payload included downhole logging tools or autoclave coring systems. We here report on another milestone in using seafloor rigs: the development and installation of shallow borehole observatories. Three different systems have been developed for the MARUM-MeBo seafloor drill, which is operated by MARUM, University of Bremen, Germany. A simple design, the MeBoPLUG, separates the inner borehole from the overlying ocean by using o-ring seals at the conical threads of the drill pipe. The systems are self-contained and include data loggers, batteries, thermistors and a differential pressure sensor. A second design, the so-called MeBoCORK, is more sophisticated and also hosts an acoustic modem for data transfer and, if desired, fluid sampling capability using osmotic pumps. Of these MeBoCORKs, two systems have to be distinguished: the CORK-A (A = autonomous) can be installed by the MeBo alone and monitors pressure and temperature inside and above the borehole (the latter for reference). The CORK-B (B = bottom) has a higher payload and can additionally be equipped with geochemical, biological or other physical components. Owing to its larger size, it is installed by ROV and utilises a hotstab connection in the upper portion of the drill string. Either design relies on a hotstab connection from beneath which coiled tubing with a conical drop weight is lowered to couple to the formation. These tubes are fluid-saturated and either serve to transmit pore pressure signals or collect pore water in the osmo-sampler. The third design, the MeBoPUPPI (Pop-Up Pore Pressure Instrument), is similar to the MeBoCORK-A and monitors pore pressure and temperature in a self-contained manner. Instead of transferring data upon command using an acoustic modem, the MeBoPUPPI contains a pop-up telemetry with Iridium link

  7. Conceptual waste packaging options for deep borehole disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Jiann -Cherng [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hardin, Ernest L. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-07-01

    This report presents four concepts for packaging of radioactive waste for disposal in deep boreholes. Two of these are reference-size packages (11 inch outer diameter) and two are smaller (5 inch) for disposal of Cs/Sr capsules. All four have an assumed length of approximately 18.5 feet, which allows the internal length of the waste volume to be 16.4 feet. However, package length and volume can be scaled by changing the length of the middle, tubular section. The materials proposed for use are low-alloy steels, commonly used in the oil-and-gas industry. Threaded connections between packages, and internal threads used to seal the waste cavity, are common oilfield types. Two types of fill ports are proposed: flask-type and internal-flush. All four package design concepts would withstand hydrostatic pressure of 9,600 psi, with factor safety 2.0. The combined loading condition includes axial tension and compression from the weight of a string or stack of packages in the disposal borehole, either during lower and emplacement of a string, or after stacking of multiple packages emplaced singly. Combined loading also includes bending that may occur during emplacement, particularly for a string of packages threaded together. Flask-type packages would be fabricated and heat-treated, if necessary, before loading waste. The fill port would be narrower than the waste cavity inner diameter, so the flask type is suitable for directly loading bulk granular waste, or loading slim waste canisters (e.g., containing Cs/Sr capsules) that fit through the port. The fill port would be sealed with a tapered, threaded plug, with a welded cover plate (welded after loading). Threaded connections between packages and between packages and a drill string, would be standard drill pipe threads. The internal flush packaging concepts would use semi-flush oilfield tubing, which is internally flush but has a slight external upset at the joints. This type of tubing can be obtained with premium, low

  8. Numerical Modeling of a Shallow Borehole Thermal Energy Storage System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catolico, N.; Ge, S.; Lu, N.; McCartney, J. S.

    2014-12-01

    Borehole thermal energy storage (BTES) combined with solar thermal energy harvesting is an economic technological system to garner and store energy as well as an environmentally-sustainable alternative for the heating of buildings. The first community-scale BTES system in North America was installed in 2007 in the Drake Landing Solar Community (DLSC), about 35 miles south of Calgary, Canada. The BTES system involves direct circulation of water heated from solar thermal panels in the summer into a storage tank, after which it is circulate within an array of 144 closed-loop geothermal heat exchangers having a depth of 35 m and a spacing of 2.5 m. In the winter the circulation direction is reversed to supply heat to houses. Data collection over a six year period indicates that this system can supply more than 90% of the winter heating energy needs for 52 houses in the community. One major challenge facing the BTES system technology is the relatively low annual efficiency, i.e., the ratio of energy input and output is in the range of 15% to 40% for the system in Drake Landing. To better understand the working principles of BTES and to improve BTES performance for future applications at larger scales, a three-dimensional transient coupled fluid and heat transfer model is established using TOUGH2. The time-dependent injection temperatures and circulation rate measured over the six years of monitoring are used as model input. The simulations are calibrated using soil temperature data measured at different locations over time. The time-dependent temperature distributions within the borehole region agree well with the measured temperatures for soil with an intrinsic permeability of 10e-19 m2, an apparent thermal conductivity of 2.03 W/m°C, and a volumetric heat capacity of 2.31 MJ/m-3°C. The calibrated model serves as the basis for a sensitivity analysis of soil and operational parameters on BTES system efficiency preformed with TOUGH2. Preliminary results suggest 1) BTES

  9. Observation and Scaling of Microearthquakes from TCDP Borehole Seismometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Y.; Ma, K.; Oye, V.; Tanaka, H.

    2009-12-01

    Microearthquakes with magnitude down to 0.5 were detected by the Taiwan Chelungpu-ault Drilling Project Borehole Seismometers (TCDPBHS). A location software (MIMO) was used to determine P- and S-wave onset times, incidence and azimuth angles for the locations of the microevents. Regardless of the large co-seismic slip of 12 m at the drill site during the 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake, our studies show very less seismicity near the drill site from the TCDPBHS recording. The microevents clustered at a depth of 8-10 km, where the 30 degree dipping of the Chelungpu thrust fault becomes flat to a decollement of the Taiwan fold-and-thrust tectonic structure. As a continuous GPS survey did not observe post-slip at the large slip region, and as no seismicity was observed near the drill site, we suggest that the thrust belt above the decollement during the interseismic period is locked. A Fluid Injection Test (FIT) pumping high pressure fluid into hole C with hole A as observation well was carried out at the TCDP boreholes in November 2006, and January, March and April 2007. Compared with background seismicity in November 2007, the observation did not show significant correlation of the FIT related seismicity, despite the distinct observations on the arrival of gas and chemical monitoring through FIT. It is possible that the injected fluid rate of FIT experiments is too deficient to trigger microevents. The low fluid rate indicated the low permeability of the fault zone. We also examined the scaling of the source parameters of the small earthquakes in stress drops and seismic moments. The source parameters of 150 microevents were examined from the source spectra using Brune ω-2 model for a constant Q model. The scaling of the magnitude to the Brune stress drop is a significant positive correlation. However, there has been a debate that this positive relationship might be biased for without Q correction. Fortunately, we had observed 65 clusters showing similar waveforms. The path

  10. Borehole heater test at KAERI Underground Research Tunnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At HLW repository, the temperature change due to the decay heat in near field can affect the hydraulic, mechanical, and chemical behaviors and influence on the repository safety. Therefore, the understanding of the thermal behavior in near field is essential for the site selection, design, as well as operation of the repository. In this study, various studies for the in situ heater test, which is for the investigation of the thermo-mechanical behavior in rock mass, were carried out. At first, similar in situ tests at foreign URLs were reviewed and summarized the major conclusions from the tests. After then an adequate design of heater, observation sensors, and data logging system were developed and installed with a consideration of the site condition and test purposes. In order to minimize the effect of hydraulic phenomenon, a relatively day zone was chosen for the in situ test. Joint distribution and characteristics in the zone were surveyed and the rock mass properties were determined with various laboratory tests. In this study, an adequate location for an in situ borehole heater test was chosen. Also a heater for the test was designed and manufactured and the sensors for measuring the rock behavior were installed. It was possible to observe that stiff joints are developed overwhelmingly in the test area from the joint survey at the tunnel wall. The major rock and rock mass properties at the test site could be determined from the thermo-mechanical laboratory tests using the rock cores retrieved from the site. The measured data were implemented in the three-dimensional computer simulation. From the modeling using FLAC3D code, it was possible to find that the heat convection through the tunnel wall can influence on temperature distribution in rock. Because of that it was necessary to installed a blocking wall to minimize the effect of ventilation system on the heater test, which is carrying out nearby the tunnel wall. The in situ borehole heater test is the first

  11. Methods and apparatus for evaluating formation characteristics while drilling a borehole through earth formations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wraight, P.D.

    1991-05-21

    This patent describes a method for determining at least one characteristic of an earth formation penetrated by a borehole and irradiated by radiation. It comprises: positioning a directional radiation sensor in the borehole adjacent to the irradiated formation and rotating the radiation sensor for obtaining a series of successive measurements that are representative of the radiation returning from circumferentially-spaced locations around the borehole; determining the mean as well as the measured standard deviation of the series of successive measurements; and correlating the mean and the measured standard deviation of the successive measurements for providing indications which are representative of the one formation characteristic as well as the transverse cross-sectional configuration of the borehole.

  12. The extent of temporal smearing in surface-temperature histories derived from borehole temperature measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clow, G.D.

    1992-01-01

    The ability of borehole temperature data to resolve past climatic events is investigated using Backus-Gilbert inversion methods. Two experimental approaches are considered: (1) the data consist of a single borehole temperature profile, and (2) the data consist of climatically-induced temperature transients measured within a borehole during a monitoring experiment. The sensitivity of the data's resolving power to the vertical distribution of the measurements, temperature measurement errors, the inclusion of a local meteorological record, and the duration of a monitoring experiment, are investigated. The results can be used to help interpret existing surface temperature histories derived from borehole temperature data and to optimize future experiments for the detection of climatic signals. ?? 1992.

  13. Borehole data package for the 100-K area ground water wells, CY 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, B.A.

    1994-12-27

    Borehole, hydrogeologic and geophysical logs, drilling, as-built diagrams, sampling, and well construction information and data for RCRA compliant groundwater monitoring wells installed in CY 1994 at the 100-K Basins.

  14. Rock damage induced by drilling: An experimental assessment of potential leakage around borehole seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effective isolation of toxic or radioactive waste below ground requires that migration to the biosphere of unacceptable quantities of contaminants be eliminated. To accomplish this task, all shafts leading to repositories, repository chambers, exploratory boreholes and disposal boreholes used for waste injection must be sealed. It is the purpose of this study at the University of Arizona, which is funded by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, to evaluate the effectiveness of various borehole sealing techniques. As part of this study an evaluation is being made of the amount of cracking (damage) induced in the borehole wall by the drilling operation. The study of the damaged zone is of importance since it must be determined whether or not this zone should be considered as a flow path around the plug

  15. Observation of hydraulic heads in the Nagra boreholes in Northern Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the beginning of the Nagra drilling programme in Northern Switzerland, hydraulic pressures and heads have been observed in the different aquifers encountered in the deep boreholes. The data originate from measurements carried out during the drilling and test phases in the individual boreholes and from long-term monitoring of hydraulic pressures and heads in selected borehole intervals using multipacker systems. The results provide information on regional water flow patterns in Northern Switzerland and surrounding areas and are used to calibrate groundwater models. A regional picture of freshwater heads with relevant equipotential lines is presented for the Muschelkalk aquifer. The article also gives the freshwater heads for the Buntsandstein and the crystalline basement which were observed in the Nagra boreholes. (author) 2 tabs., 12 figs., 8 refs

  16. New developments in high resolution borehole seismology and their applications to reservoir development and management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulsson, B.N.P. [Chevron Petroleum Technology Company, La Habra, CA (United States)

    1997-08-01

    Single-well seismology, Reverse Vertical Seismic Profiles (VSP`s) and Crosswell seismology are three new seismic techniques that we jointly refer to as borehole seismology. Borehole seismic techniques are of great interest because they can obtain much higher resolution images of oil and gas reservoirs than what is obtainable with currently used seismic techniques. The quality of oil and gas reservoir management decisions depend on the knowledge of both the large and the fine scale features in the reservoirs. Borehole seismology is capable of mapping reservoirs with an order of magnitude improvement in resolution compared with currently used technology. In borehole seismology we use a high frequency seismic source in an oil or gas well and record the signal in the same well, in other wells, or on the surface of the earth.

  17. Paleoclimatic reconstructions in western Canada from borehole temperature logs: surface air temperature forcing and groundwater flow

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Majorowicz, J.; Grasby, S. E.; Ferguson, G.; Šafanda, Jan; Skinner, W.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 1 (2006), s. 1-10. ISSN 1814-9324 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Keywords : palaeoclimatic reconstructions * Canada * borehole temperatures Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure

  18. Borehole data package for the 100-K area ground water wells, CY 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borehole, hydrogeologic and geophysical logs, drilling, as-built diagrams, sampling, and well construction information and data for RCRA compliant groundwater monitoring wells installed in CY 1994 at the 100-K Basins

  19. Classification of hydraulic borehole mining technological processes during pay zone development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Relevance of the work is defined by the need of solid mineral deposits development by hydraulic borehole mining. The main advantage of the method is that the extraction of minerals could be carried out in difficult geological conditions, excluding tunneling of mine workings and quarries construction. The article presents a generalized and systematic classification of hydraulic borehole mining technological processes during pay zones development. According to the classification three groups of technological processes were defined: main, auxiliary and hydraulic borehole cutting head monitoring. The main technological processes are: rocks fracturing, suction and lifting of the slurry to the surface, delivery of the slurry to the slurry pump. Auxiliary processes include: cleaning of intake ports of slurry retrieval device, drilling of pilot hole and maintenance of mining chambers roof sustainability. To hydraulic borehole cutting head monitoring processes refer: operation modes control, tripping operation and rotation

  20. Handbook on nuclear data for borehole logging and mineral analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In nuclear geophysics, an extension of the nuclear data available for reactor and shielding calculations, is required. In general, the problems and the methods of attack are the same, but in nuclear geophysics the environment is earth materials, with virtually all the natural elements in the Periodic Table involved, although not at the same time. In addition, the geometrical configurations encountered in nuclear geophysics are very different from those associated with reactor and shielding design, and they can impose a different demand on the required accuracy of the nuclear data and on the dependence on the calculational approach. Borehole logging is a very good example, since an experimental investigation aimed at varying only one parameter (e.g. moisture content) whilst keeping all the others constant in a geologically complex system that effectively exhibits 'infinite geometry' for neutrons and γ rays is virtually impossible. An increasingly important are of nuclear geophysics is the on-line analysis of natural materials such as coal (e.g. C, H, O, Al, Si, Ca, Fe, Cl, S, N,) the raw materials of the cement industry (S, Na, K, Al, Si, Ca, Fe, Mn, Ti, P, Mg, F, O), and mined ores of Fe, Al, Mn, Cu, Ni, Ag and Au, amongst others. Refs, figs and tabs

  1. Electromagnetic Borehole Flowmeter Testing in R-Area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Six constant-rate, multiple-well aquifer tests were recently conducted in R-area to provide site-specific in situ hydraulic parameters for assessing groundwater flow and contaminant transport models of R-Reactor Seepage Basins (RRSB) plume migration and RRSB remedial alternatives. The pumping tests were performed in the Upper Three Runs and Gordon aquifers between December 1999 and February 2000. The tests provide reliable estimates of horizontal conductivity averaged over aquifer thickness, and a relatively large horizontal zone of influence. To complement these results, Electromagnetic Borehole Flowmeter (EBF) testing was subsequently performed to determine the vertical variation of horizontal conductivity for RPC-2PR, RPC-3PW, RPT-2PW, RPT-3PW, RPT-4PW and RPT-30PZ. The EBF data generally indicate significant aquifer heterogeneity over the tested screen intervals (Figures 14, 16-18, 20, 22, 24, 26 and 27-31). The vertical variation of groundwater flow in or out of the well screen under ambient conditions was also measured (Figures 13, 15, 19, 21, 23 and 25). These data have implications for contaminant monitoring

  2. Extending the range of investigation of borehole electrical measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increased cost of drilling for both minerals and fossil fuels provides strong motivation for the development of techniques which can determine the physical properties of rock units a long distance from the borehole. This paper presents theoretical and field results from hole-to-hole measurements (where source and receiver are placed in separate, widely spaced holes) and theoretical results for direct-current measurements from widely spaced electrodes placed ina single hole. Theoretical hole-to-hole studies give an insight into the complex nature of the signal received in an inhomogeneous halfspace. Anomalies can be misinterpreted if the contribution to the signal from the earth-air interface is not considered. Theoretical studies of layered models show that the vertical resolving limits of the normal and bipole--bipole single hole arrays are essentially the same. A recent investigation in Wyoming illustrates the potential usefulness of hole-to-hole measurements in helping to reduce the number of drill holes needed to delineate a uranium orebody. This study also shows the importance of using conventional well logs and theoretical models to interpret data from widely spaced electrodes

  3. Geophysical siting of boreholes in crystalline basement areas of Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olayinka, A. I.

    1992-02-01

    This paper assesses the effectiveness of surface geophysical methods namely electrical resistivity, electromagnetic, seismic refraction, magnetic, gravity and induced polarization for groundwater exploration in crystalline basement complex areas. Most of these geophysical techniques can provide quantitative information on the characteristics of the weathered zone which relate to the occurrence of an economic aquifer. The critical factors in the choice of a particular method include the local geological setting, the initial and maintenance costs of the equipment, the speed of surveying, the manpower required as field crew, the degree of sophistication entailed in data processing to enable a geologically meaningful interpretation, and anomaly resolution. The particular advantages and limitations of each technique are highlighted. Several case histories from Nigeria and the rest of Africa indicate that electrical resistivity (both vertical sounding and horizontal profiling) is the most widely used, followed by electromagnetic traversing. These are often employed in combination to improve upon the percentage of successful boreholes. Due to the high cost of equipment, large scale of the field operations and difficulties in data interpretation, seismic refraction is not widely adopted in commercial-type surveys. Similarly, magnetic, gravity and induced polarization are used only sparingly.

  4. Borehole plugging by hydrothermal transport. A feasibility report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility of forming borehole plugs by hydrothermal transport was examined with respect to five systems, utilizing available literature data. In general, it would appear possible to create plugs with hydrothermal cements, with hydrothermally transported quartz, and with carbonates precipitated in-situ using carbon dioxide or carbon dioxide and water as reacting fluids. Hydrothermal cements appear to be most feasible from an engineering and economic point of view using a slurry with a lime-alumina-silica composition carried into the hole in a single pipe at temperatures in the range of 2000C and requiring only enough pressure to drive the mixture into the hole. Quartz or chalcedony plugs would be the most impervious, have the lowest chemical reactivity with groundwater, the lowest thermal expansion, and be most compatible with the wall rock. Deposition is likely to be slow, and there are severe engineering problems associated with a single pipe system carrying silica-rich solutions at temperatures in excess of 5000C at pressure of 2000 bars (30,000 psi). Calcite plugs could be formed as compatible plug materials in contact with a limestone or dolomite wall rock. It is not known whether non-porous plugs can be readily formed and there is also a problem of chemical reaction with percolating groundwater. The clay-water and sulfur-water systems do not appear to be viable plug systems. In-situ reconstitution of the wall rock does not appear to be an economically feasible possibility

  5. In-situ tritium borehole probe for measurement of tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An apparatus for measuring the in situ levels of tritium in ground water at depth in the earth. A tritium analyzer is made to fit in a sonde or probe which is placed in a borehole. This analyzer can perform a programmed cycle and has a sample intake to allow ambient water to enter; a reaction chamber; a drying chamber; an ion chamber; a cryogenic gas pump, and a spent capsule collection chamber. After the water sample is brought into the unit, it rises into the reaction chamber where it reacts with a preweighed quantity of calcium carbide in a capsule to yield acetylene. Next the acetylene vapor passes through the drying chamber to remove excess water and then flows into the evacuated ion chamber. Following this, the ion chamber is sealed off and a count of tritium beta decay events is started. Following the completion of the count, a valve is opened to remove the acetylene from the ion chamber with the cryogenic gas pump. The spent capsule containing the residue from the reaction is ejected into a collection chamber. Last, the holder for the preweighed calcium carbide capsule is refilled from a stock of such capsules in preparation for a new measurement cycle

  6. Response of borehole extensometers to explosively generated dynamic loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Commercially available, hydraulically anchored, multiple-point borehole extensometers (MPBX) were evaluated with respect to response to dynamic loads produced by explosions. This study is part of the DOE-funded Spent Fuel Test-Climax (SFT-C), currently being conducted in the Climax granitic stock at the Nevada Test Site. The SFT-C is an investigation of the feasibility of short-term storage and retrieval of spent nuclear reactor fuel assemblies at a plausible repository depth in granitic rock. Eleven spent fuel assemblies are stored at a depth of 420 m for three to five years, and will then be retrieved. MPBX units are used in the SFT-C to measure both excavation-induced and thermally induced rock displacements. Long-term reliability of extensometers in this hostile environment is essential in order to obtain valid data during the course of this test. Research to date shows conclusively that extensometers of this type continue to function reliably even though subjected to accelerations of 1.8 g; research also implies that they function well though subjected to accelerations in excess of 100 g. MPBX survivability during the first four months of testing at ambient temperatures was about 90 percent

  7. Stability, failure, and measurements of boreholes and other circular openings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides the reader with an update on the understanding of the stability and instability of circular openings excavated in rock formations. During the past decade, there has been a flurry of activity in this area, mainly spirited by the emergence of new challenges in the oil and gas industry. Detailed tests were conducted in many laboratories throughout the world under controlled conditions. New findings were substantiated by careful field observations, and new analytical methodologies were developed to explain some of the observed mechanisms. This report begins by clarifying that a failure criterion is a relative notion and exists as a function of the individual application. The concept of abnormal stability is then introduced, after which all potential failure are reviewed in chronological order. The report describes the influence of temporary supports during excavation, the stabilizing effect of the end face, delayed instabilities due to time-dependent effects, and long-term stability conditions. The report clearly outlines unusual and/or unexplainable phenomena requiring additional research. The observational evidence given in this report demonstrates the inadequacy of strictly elastic considerations. The report clearly shows the similarities observed in large circular excavations compared to small diameter boreholes. Whenever possible, it attempts to bridge the gap between various disciplines by discussing the findings of typical failures

  8. 24-CHANNEL GEOPHONE ARRAY FOR HORIZONTAL OR VERTICAL BOREHOLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erik C. Westman

    2003-10-24

    Improved ground-imaging capabilities have enormous potential to increase energy, environmental, and economic benefits by improving exploration accuracy and reducing energy consumption during the mining cycle. Seismic tomography has been used successfully to monitor and evaluate geologic conditions ahead of a mining face. A primary limitation to existing seismic tomography, however, is the placement of sensors. The goal of this project is to develop an array of 24 seismic sensors capable of being mounted in either a vertical or horizontal borehole. Development of this technology reduces energy usage in excavation, transportation, ventilation, and processing phases of the mining operation because less waste is mined and the mining cycle suffers fewer interruptions. This new technology benefits all types of mines, including metal/nonmetal, coal, and quarrying. The primary research tasks focused on sensor placement method, sensor housing and clamping design, and cabling and connector selection. An initial design is described in the report. Following assembly, a prototype was tested in the laboratory as well as at a surface stone quarry. Data analysis and tool performance were used for subsequent design modifications. A final design is described, of which several components are available for patent application. Industry partners have shown clear support for this research and demonstrated an interest in commercialization following project completion.

  9. Stakeholder acceptance analysis: Passive soil vapor extraction using borehole flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents evaluations, recommendations, and requirements concerning passive soil vapor extraction (PSVE) derived from a three-year program of stakeholder involvement. PSVE takes advantage of the naturally occurring tendency of soil vapor to leave the subsurface during periods of low barometric pressure. PSVE seeks to expedite the release of volatile contaminants through the use of boreholes and technological enhancements. This report is for technology developers and those responsible for making decisions about the use of technology to remediate contamination by volatile organic compounds. Stakeholders' perspectives help those responsible for technology deployment to make good decisions concerning the acceptability and applicability of PSVE to the remediation problems they face. The report provides: stakeholders' final evaluation of the acceptability of PSVE in light of the technology's field test; stakeholders' principal comments concerning PSVE; requirements that stakeholders have of any remediation technology. Technology decision makers should take these conclusions into account in evaluating the effectiveness and acceptability of any remedial method proposed for their site. In addition, the report presents data requirements for the technology's field demonstration defined by stakeholders associated with the Hanford site in Washington State, as well as detailed comments on PSVE from stakeholders from Sandia National Laboratory, Rocky Flats, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, and Los Alamos National Laboratory

  10. Characterization of cement paste as engineered barrier of borehole repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of axial rupture by compression of cylindrical cement paste samples are presented. This is part of a research on cement paste behavior aiming at investigating the durability of cementitious materials in the environment of repositories for radioactive waste. Portland cement paste is intended to be used as a backfill in a deep borehole for disposal of sealed radiation sources which concept is under development. The service life of the engineered barrier materials plays an important role in the long term safety of such facilities. Accelerated tests in laboratory are being used to evaluate the performance of cement paste under the temperature expected at some hundred meters below grade, under exposure to the radiation emitted by the sources, and under the attack of aggressive chemicals dissolved in the groundwater, during the millennia necessary for the decay of the most active and long-lived radionuclides present in the waste. The large variability in results of mechanical strength as measured by axial compression of cylindrical samples is the subject of this short communication. (author)

  11. The CO2SINK Boreholes for Geological Storage Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Förster

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Europe’s first onshore scientific carbon dioxide storage testing project CO2SINK (CO2 Storage by Injection into a Natural saline aquifer at Ketzin is performed in a saline aquifer in NE Germany. The major objectives of CO2SINK are the advancement of the science and practical processes for underground storage of carbon dioxide, and the provision of operational field results to aid in the development of standards for CO2 geological storage. Three boreholes (one injection well and two observation wells have been drilled in2007, each to a depth of about 800 m. The wells are completed as “smart” wells containing a variety of permanent downhole sensing equipment, which has proven its functionality during its baseline surveys. The injection of CO2 is scheduled for spring 2008 and is intended to last up to two years to allow for monitoring of migration and fate of the injected gas through a combination of downhole monitoring with surface geophysical surveys. This report summarizeswell design, drilling, coring, and completion operations.

  12. Results of pilot borehole investigation in -500m access/research gallery-north (12MI27 and 12MI33 boreholes)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document summarizes the data of pilot boreholes (12MI27, 12MI33) in the -500m Access/Research Gallery-North of Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory (MIU). The boreholes were drilled to verify the geological environment model in phase I (Surface-based Investigation Phase) and the update in phase II (Construction Phase). The geological, hydraulic and geochemical data such as rock mass classification, groundwater inflow points and the volume, water pressure, and hydraulic conductivity at the -500m Access/Research Gallery-North were obtained. In addition, groundwater monitoring system was installed into 12MI33 borehole to observe the groundwater pressure and chemistry in initial condition and change during the excavation of closure test gallery for the flooding test in phase III (Operation Phase) research. The outline of results of pilot boreholes investigation is follows: Biotite granite (Toki granite) with medium to coarse-grained equigranular texture with few fractures are characterized around the -500m Access/Research Gallery-North. Rock mass classification is B to CH class in general. Minor fault with fault gouge (that was not presumed by an original model) are observed around 13 mabh in 12MI33 borehole. Density of fracture in 12MI27 borehole near the Main-shaft fault tends to be compared to 12MI33 borehole. Water inflow in both boreholes is less (Approx. 15mL/min). Permeability ranges from 1.9E-10 to 2.6E-08m/sec at the fracture zone with accompanying host rock alteration, from 4.8E-10 to 6.1E-09m/sec at the zone without alteration and with low inflow, from 1.1E-07 to 2.7E-07m/sec at the zone without alteration and with high inflow, respectively. Groundwater chemistry is rich in Na and Cl ion with the concentration range from 120 to 180 mg/L, from 210 to 410 mg/L, respectively. A CD-ROM's attached as an appendix. (J.P.N.)

  13. The Device for Communication in the Tool for Measurement in Boreholes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miloš Slankamenac

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper an implementation and test of the device for communication between Telemetry system and Surface unit with the tool for measurement of pipe diameter, fluid velocity and direction of flow in the borehole (Calliper-Fullbore Flowmeter - CFF are presented. This communication is done according to SIPLOS (Simultaneous Production Logging String protocol and it is used by Hotwell company [1] as a part of a larger system for borehole investigations.

  14. Natural gamma logging of borehole I on Vernagtferner (Oetztal Alps, Austria)

    OpenAIRE

    Drost, W.; Hofreiter, G.

    1982-01-01

    Natural gamma logging was executed in borehole I on the Vernagtferner (Oetztal Alps, Austria) down to a depth of 60 m below surface. The radioactivity profile reflects the atmospheric injection history. Above a borehole depth of 28 m the log is enriched in bomb produced 137CS along with 4°K and elements of the uranium series. The highest gamma level, which originates from 1963 precipitation with high fallout load, is found in a depth of 18.5 m.

  15. Evaluation of Thermal Anomalies in Multi-Boreholes Field Considering the Effects of Groundwater Flow

    OpenAIRE

    Shibin Geng; Yong Li; Xu Han; Huiliang Lian; Hua Zhang

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the performance of multiple boreholes (multi-BHEs) field is evaluated by considering the groundwater flow. Optimization strategies are presented to mitigate thermal anomalies in the BHEs field. This study shows that groundwater flow greatly improves the heat transfer but causes thermal anomalies downstream. To overcome this problem, a heat transfer model is established for multi-boreholes based on temperature field superposition and moving finite line source model (MFLS). The M...

  16. Quantification of Natural Gradient Flow Using Active Fiber Optic DTS in Sealed Boreholes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, T. I.; Parker, B. L.; Munn, J. D.; Chalari, A.; Mondanos, M.

    2014-12-01

    Temperature has been used for many years to characterize flow in fractured rock systems. Fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing (DTS) was adopted by the oil/gas industry over two decades ago for monitoring processes in deep fractured rock environments. Improvements in DTS system resolutions, methodology advancements, and improved data processing techniques have caused recent popularity for shallow fractured rock hydrogeologic applications. A powerful advance in DTS methodology is the use of response data collected during active cable heating. When applied to borehole applications active heating creates a thermal disequilibrium in the aquifer system that enhances the detection of groundwater flow. Active DTS has been applied to open borehole environments; however, characterization methods based on open borehole measurements are limited in that only the effects of unnatural flow (i.e. vertical cross-connection and redistribution of flow creating local, induced flows) can be observed. To characterize natural gradient flow processes borehole effects need to be minimized.The literature shows borehole sealing using flexible impervious fabric liners creates a static water column in the well that eliminates the negative effects of cross-connection. Measurements in this sealed environment have been shown by others to be representative of natural gradient flow conditions, rather than the conditions created by the borehole short circuiting units or fractures with varying hydraulic head. A new method for flow system characterization using active DTS in sealed boreholes has been developed with excellent prospects for quantitation of natural gradient groundwater fluxes and related hydraulic properties. This project demonstrates the utility of using an analytical solution for calculating apparent thermal conductivities and natural gradient groundwater fluxes at depth-discrete intervals observed continuously along a borehole using active DTS. Groundwater flux data can then be

  17. Basal hydraulic system of a West Antarctic ice stream: constraints from borehole observations

    OpenAIRE

    Engelhardt, Hermann; Kamb, Barclay

    1997-01-01

    Pressure and tracer measurements in boreholes drilled to the bottom of Ice Stream B, West Antarctica, are used to obtain information about the basal water conduit system in which high water pressures are developed. These high pressures presumably make possible the rapid movement of the ice stream. Pressure in the system is indicated by the borehole water level once connection to the conduit system is made. On initial connection, here also called "breakthrough" to the basal water system,...

  18. Evaluation of technology for large- and small-diameter boreholes to characterize crystalline rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Testing methods that have been used in large- and small-diameter boreholes (152 and 76 mm [6 and 3 in.]) were evaluated on their ability to characterize crystalline rocks. The methods evaluated included in-hole geomechanical, geophysical, and geohydrologic techniques and associated laboratory core tests; specific emphasis was on techniques that might be used in a field characterization program involving a small number of deep (up to 1500 m [5000 ft]) boreholes. Each technique was evaluated with regard to its effectiveness and limitations, applicability to the acquisition of data for anticipated rock conditions, and adequacy for assessing the required rock/hydrologic characteristics. Many pertinent case histories that helped to assess applicability were reviewed. A principal objective of the evaluations was to assess whether the techniques would be equally useful in both large- and small-diameter boreholes. Of the techniques evaluated, most are suitable for use in both large- and small-diameter boreholes. Borehole logging, hydrologic testing, and core-testing techniques provide suitable results in both borehole diameters. Geomechanical testing techniques provide suitable data in smaller diameter boreholes and have been designed for application at primarily shallow depths. The results of this study will be of use to the Office of Crystalline Repository Development (OCRD) in determining to what degree it is appropriate to use drilling, sampling, and testing techniques in small-diameter boreholes as opposed to large-diameter methods, while at the same time collecting adequate data for characterizing crystalline rock environments for potential use as a high-level radioactive waste repository. Additionally, further developmental work and specific testing techniques are recommended

  19. Repeated temperature logs from Czech, Slovenian and Portuguese borehole climate observatories

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šafanda, Jan; Rajver, D.; Correia, A.; Dědeček, Petr

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 3 (2007), s. 453-462. ISSN 1814-9324 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA300120603 Grant ostatní: NATO(US) PDD(CP)-(EST.CLG 980 152) Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Source of funding: V - iné verejné zdroje Keywords : borehole temperatures * temperature logs * borehole climate observatories Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 1.450, year: 2007

  20. Influence of heavy metals pollution in borehole water collected within abandoned battery industry, Essien Udim, Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Uffia, I. Dan; Etim D. E

    2013-01-01

    Physico-chemical and heavy metals analyses of water samples from three boreholes located within abandoned battery company in Essien Udim LGA, Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria was carried out to ascertain the impact of pollution from battery industry on groundwater quality. Borehole locations were at different distances of 0km, 2km, and 5km (X1, X11 and X111) respectively away from the abandoned battery vicinity. The parameters determined included; turbidity, temperature, pH, Dissolved oxygen (DO), ...

  1. Research on borehole stability of shale based on seepage-stress-damage coupling model

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaofeng Ran; Yuezhi Wang; Shanpo Jia

    2014-01-01

    In oil drilling, one of the most complicated problems is borehole stability of shale. Based on the theory of continuum damage mechanics, a modified Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion according to plastic damage evolution and the seepage-stress coupling is established. Meanwhile, the damage evolution equation which is based on equivalent plastic strain and the permeability evolution equation of shale are proposed in this paper. The physical model of borehole rock for a well in China western oilfie...

  2. Recent boreholes in the attenuated Carboniferous strata of the Blaenavon-Pontypool area, Gwent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barclay, W.J.; Jones, D.G.

    1978-01-01

    Five IGS boreholes, sunk in 1971 in the Blaenavon-Pontypool area of the east crop of the South Wales coalfield, have greatly increased the amount of information available on the attenuated basal Westphalian and Namurian sequence. Although hitherto though to be absent in parts of this area, a thin but consistent Namurian succession of late Rat2-Gat1 age has been proved every where. Dinantian rocks proved in the boreholes fit the pattern of Namurian overstep towards the east.

  3. Automatic generation of groundwater model hydrostratigraphy from AEM resistivity and boreholes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marker, Pernille Aabye; Foged, N.; Christiansen, A. V.;

    2014-01-01

    Regional hydrological models are important tools in water resources management. Model prediction uncertainty is primarily due to structural (geological) non-uniqueness which makes sampling of the structural model space necessary to estimate prediction uncertainties. Geological structures and...... heterogeneity, which spatially scarce borehole lithology data may overlook, are well resolved in AEM surveys. This study presents a semi-automatic sequential hydrogeophysical inversion method for the integration of AEM and borehole data into regional groundwater models in sedimentary areas, where sand/ clay...

  4. Analysis of Geo-Temperature Restoration Performance under Intermittent Operation of Borehole Heat Exchanger Fields

    OpenAIRE

    Chaofeng Li; Jinfeng Mao; Zheli Xing; Jin Zhou; Yong Li

    2015-01-01

    Intermittent operation can improve the coefficient of performance (COP) of a ground source heat pump (GSHP) system. In this paper, an analytical solution to analyze the geo-temperature restoration performance under intermittent operation of borehole heat exchanger (BHE) fields is established. For this purpose, the moving finite line source model is combined with the g-function and the superposition principle. The model takes into account the heat transfer along the borehole, thermal interfere...

  5. Borehole Gravity Meter Surveys at the Waste Treatment Plant, Hanford, Washington.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacQueen, Jeffrey D.; Mann, Ethan

    2007-04-06

    Microg-LaCoste (MGL) was contracted by Pacfic Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) to record borehole gravity density data in 3 wells at the HanfordWaste Treatment Plant (WTP) site. The survey was designed to provide highly accurate density information for use in seismic modeling. The borehole gravity meter (BHGM) tool has a very large depth of investigation (hundreds of feet) compared to other density tools so it is not influenced by casing or near welbore effects, such as washouts.

  6. Improvement of Borehole Thermal Energy Storage Design Based on Experimental and Modelling Results

    OpenAIRE

    Lanini, Sandra; Delaleux, Fabien; Py, Xavier; Olivès, Régis; Nguyen, Denis

    2014-01-01

    Underground Thermal Energy Storage appears to be an attractive solution for solar thermal energy storage. The SOLARGEOTHERM research project aimed to evaluate the energetic potential of borehole thermal energy storage by means of a full-scale experimental device and heat transfer models. Analysis of the experimental data showed that a single borehole is not efficient for storage. Models showed that the heat transfer fluid in the geothermal probe lost 15 per cent of its energy at a depth of 10...

  7. Core drilling by reverse flushing - a new drilling concept for small diameter boreholes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to minimise the contamination of the groundwater and the preexisting fractures during drilling, SKBs first step in early 1980's was to use specific water wells to provide the water supply for the drilling operation. The next step toward cleaner boreholes was taken as the technique of telescope-type core drilling was introduced. The present report describes the latest improvement toward cleaner boreholes; the development of a core drilling technique using reverse flushing in small diameter boreholes. Reverse flushing is based on the principle of only using formation water, which flows into the borehole, as media to cool off the drill bit and transport the drill cuttings to the surface. The construction of the equipment is described, as well as performance results from a pilot drilling test. Furthermore, factors affecting the reverse flush drilling is discussed. It is concluded that reverse flushing works satisfactory, even under circumstances of only moderate water inflows to the borehole. For good drilling performance, comparable with conventional core drilling, it is required that the borehole penetrates water-bearing zones/fractures every 50-70 m. Due to initial pressure losses in the equipment system for reverse flushing, the technique is not recommended at depths less than 100 m

  8. Water flow in bedrock; estimation of influence of transmissive shaft and borehole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bedrock, a system of large and small fractures that permit water transport through the rock mass. The water content of the bedrock can, under varying hydrostatic pressure conditions, give rise to different flow patterns via boreholes or shafts drilled through the rock. A case is dealt with where a borehole connects a low point in the terrain with a point in the repository where the hydrostatic pressure is higher than at the mouth of the borehole. The situation may be conceived as having arisen when the area was investigated and a hole was drilled at an angle down from the valley to a point below the high point in the area. If the borehole is not sealed, an artesian well may be created. The conductivity used, 2 times 10-9 m/s, presumes that the repository has been emplaced in average quality rock at this depth. In reality, the repository site will be selected where the rock is better than average. In reality, a shaft - even if it is imperfectly backfilled - or a borehole exerts a flow resistance that reduces the available pressure difference at a depth of 500 m. Taken together, these factors indicate that approx. 5 m3/(year, 5 m) is the water flow that can be expected to emerge from the repository through a shaft or a borehole. Only this flow can have been contaminated with escaping substances from the repository area. Water that flows in from other parts of the hole dilutes this flow considerably. (G.B.)

  9. Effects of gas-lift pumping on hydraulic borehole conditions at Finnsjoen, Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recorded volumes of flushing water used during the drilling of cored boreholes, and the amounts recovered at the surface, have been used to estimate the potential quantities of flushing water and drilling debris injected into fractures. The results show that significant amounts of flushing water and drilling debris may be injected into fractures during drilling. For cored boreholes penetrating major fracture zones, only about 7-8% of the total volume of flushing water used was recovered at the surface. A total loss of flushing water occurred in all boreholes during penetration of these fracture zone. The recovered amounts of drilling debris were also low. Higher percentages of drilling debris were recovered from the air-flush percussion boreholes but, on the other hand, larger total amounts of debris were lost to the rock. During gas-lift pumping in borehole KFI10, only very small estimated amounts of the flushing water (3-4%) and drilling debris (approx. 1%) lost to the rock, were recovered. The gas-lift pumping also had a minor influence on the borehole hydraulic parameters calculated from hydraulic tests before and after pumping. (7 figs., 3 tabs., 12 refs.)

  10. Results of prototype borehole instrumentation at the Hydrologic Research Facility, area 25, NTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two 12+ meter (40 feet) deep, dry-augured boreholes, located adjacent to the Hydrologic Research Facility (HRF) calibration laboratory in Area 25, Nevada Test Site (NTS), were instrumented in October, 1991, and a third in February, 1992. Four instrument stations located at depths of 3.0, 6.1, 9.1, and 12.2 meters (m) were established in each borehole in order to evaluate instrumentation that will be used in the deep unsaturated-zone borehole-instrumentation program at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. Yucca Mountain is being evaluated as a potential site for the storage of high-level radioactive waste. The Yucca Mountain borehole-instrumentation program is designed to measure and monitor the unsaturated-zone fluid (liquid and gas) flow potential gradients and flow processes in the unsaturated-zone. To date, results of the HRF prototype borehole instrumentation program indicate that the stability and operational reliability of the sensors selected for use at Yucca Mountain will be adequate to sustain a long-term, in-situ monitoring program; one that is expected to last from three to five years. Data from the HRF borehole instrumentation experiment also indicate that sensor accuracy and precision are sufficient to measure the state variables (pneumatic pressure, temperature, vapor pressure and water potential) needed to quantify water, water vapor, gas, and heat flux in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain

  11. Effects of gas-lift pumping on borehole hydraulic conditions at Finnsjön, Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, J.-E.; Andersson, P.; Gustafsson, E.

    1991-08-01

    The recorded volumes of flushing water used during the drilling of cored boreholes, and the amounts recovered at the surface, have been used to estimate the potential quantities of flushing water and drilling debris injected into fractures. The results show that significant amounts of flushing water and drilling debris may be injected into fractures during drilling. For cored boreholes penetrating major fracture zones, only about 7-8% of the total volume of flushing water used was recovered at the surface. A total loss of flushing water occurred in all boreholes during penetration of these fracture zones. The recovered amounts of drilling debris were also low. Higher percentages of drilling debris were recovered from the air-flush percussion boreholes but, on the other hand, larger total amounts of debris were lost to the rock. During gas-lift pumping in borehole KF110, only very small estimated amounts of the flushing water (3-4%) and drilling debris (approximately 1%) lost to the rock were recovered. The gas-lift pumping was also shown to have a minor influence on the borehole hydraulic parameters calculated from hydraulic tests before and after pumping.

  12. Re-sampling of the KLX02 deep borehole at Laxemar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The project focuses on the origin and changes of deep groundwaters, which are important for understanding the stability of the groundwater surrounding the final repository. The results from the sampling campaign in 1997 down to a depth of 1500m are compared with the results from 1993 sampled in the same borehole. The analytical results and some preliminary calculations are presented. The changes since the last sampling campaign 4 years ago indicate a high degree of mixing and dynamics in the system. The following conclusions are drawn: More changes in the water composition than expected compared with the results from the sampling campaign in 1993; Larger portions of meteoric water in the upper part of the borehole; Less glacial water in the intermediate part of the borehole; More brine water in the lower part of the borehole. The conclusion is that there has been a relatively large change in the groundwater system during the last 4 years in the Laxemar deep borehole. The disturbance removed the effect from the last glaciation and pulled in groundwater, which resulted in a mixture mainly consisting of meteoric and brine waters. The most probable reason is that the annual fluctuation and flow in the open borehole play an important role as a modificator especially for the isotopes. The results show the sensitivity of deep groundwater to changes in the prevailing hydrogeological situation

  13. Permeameter studies of water flow through cement and clay borehole seals in granite, basalt and tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boreholes near a repository must be sealed to prevent rapid migration of radionuclide-contaminated water to the accessible environment. The objective of this research is to assess the performance of borehole seals under laboratory conditions, particularly with regard to varying stress fields. Flow through a sealed borehole is compared with flow through intact rock. Cement or bentonite seals have been tested in granite, basalt, and welded tuff. The main conclusion is that under laboratory conditions, existing commercial materials can form high quality seals. Triaxial stress changes about a borehole do not significantly affect seal performance if the rock is stiffer than the seal. Temperature but especially moisture variations (drying) significantly degrade the quality of cement seals. Performance partially recovers upon resaturation. A skillfully sealed borehole may be as impermeable as the host rock. Analysis of the influence of relative seal-rock permeabilities shows that a plug with permeability one order of magnitude greater than that of the rock results in a flow increase through the hole and surrounding rock of only 1-1/2 times compared to the undisturbed rock. Since a borehole is only a small part of the total rock mass, the total effect is even less pronounced. The simplest and most effective way to decrease flow through a rock-seal system is to increase the seal length, assuming it can be guaranteed that no dominant by-pass flowpath through the rock exists

  14. Development of the Borehole 2-D Seismic Tomography Software Using MATLAB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugraha, A. D.; Syahputra, A.; Fatkhan, F.; Sule, R.; Hendriyana, A.

    2011-12-01

    We developed 2-D borehole seismic tomography software that we called "EARTHMAX-2D TOMOGRAPHY" to image subsurface physical properties including P-wave and S-wave velocities between two boreholes. We used Graphic User Interface (GUI) facilities of MATLAB programming language to create the software. In this software, we used travel time of seismic waves from source to receiver by using pseudo bending ray tracing method as input for tomography inversion. We can also set up a model parameterization, initial velocity model, ray tracing processes, conduct borehole seismic tomography inversion, and finally visualize the inversion results. The LSQR method was applied to solve of tomography inversion solution. We provided the Checkerboard Test Resolution (CTR) to evaluate the model resolution of the tomography inversion. As validation of this developed software, we tested it for geotechnical purposes. We then conducted data acquisition in the "ITB X-field" that is located on ITB campus. We used two boreholes that have a depth of 39 meters. Seismic wave sources were generated by impulse generator and sparker and then they were recorded by borehole hydrophone string type 3. Later on, we analyzed and picked seismic arrival time as input for tomography inversion. As results, we can image the estimated weathering layer, sediment layer, and basement rock in the field depicted by seismic wave structures. More detailed information about the developed software will be presented. Keywords: borehole, tomography, earthmax-2D, inversion

  15. Repeat temperature measurements in boreholes from northwestern Utah link ground and air temperature changes at the decadal time scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Michael G.; Harris, Robert N.; Chapman, David S.

    2010-05-01

    Borehole temperature profiles provide a record of ground surface temperature (GST) change at the decadal to centennial time scale. GST histories reconstructed from boreholes are particularly useful in climate reconstruction if changes in GST and surface air temperature (SAT) are effectively coupled at decadal and longer time periods and it can be shown that borehole temperatures respond faithfully to surface temperature changes. We test these assumptions using three boreholes in northwestern Utah that have been repeatedly logged for temperature over a time span of 29 years. We report 13 temperature-depth logs at the Emigrant Pass Observatory borehole GC-1, eight at borehole SI-1 and five at borehole DM-1, acquired between 1978 and 2007. Systematic subsurface temperature changes of up to 0.6°C are observed over this time span in the upper sections of the boreholes; below approximately 100 m any temperature transients are within observational noise. We difference the temperature logs to highlight subsurface transients and to remove any ambiguity resulting from steady state source of curvature. Synthetic temperature profiles computed from SAT data at nearby meteorological stations reproduce both the amplitude and pattern of the transient temperature observations, fitting the observations to within 0.03°C or better. This observational confirmation of the strong coupling between surface temperature change and borehole temperature transients lends further support to the use of borehole temperatures to complement SAT and multiproxy reconstructions of climate change.

  16. Core drilling of deep borehole OL-KR43 at Olkiluoto in Eurajoki 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niinimaeki, R. [Suomen Malmi Oy, Espoo (Finland)

    2006-12-15

    Posiva Oy submitted an application to the Finnish Government in May 1999 for the Decision in Principle to choose Olkiluoto in the municipality of Eurajoki as the site of the final disposal facility for spent nuclear fuel. A positive decision was made at the end of 2000 by the Government. The Finnish Parliament ratified the decision in May 2001. The decision makes it possible for Posiva to focus the confirming bedrock investigations at Olkiluoto, where in the next few years an underground rock characterisation facility, ONKALO, will be constructed. As a part of the investigations Suomen Malmi Oy (Smoy) core drilled 1000.26 m and 45.01 m deep boreholes with a diameter of 75.7 mm at Olkiluoto in July - October 2006. The identification numbers of the boreholes are OL-KR43 and OL-KR43B, respectively. A set of monitoring measurements and samplings from the drilling and returning water was carried out during the drilling. Both the volume and the electric conductivity of the drilling water and the returning water were recorded. The drill rig was computer controlled and during drilling the computer recorded drilling parameters. The objective of all these measurements was to obtain more information about bedrock and groundwater properties. Sodium fluorescein was used as a label agent in the drilling water. The total volumes of the used drilling and flushing water were 1103 m{sup 3} and 16 m{sup 3} in boreholes OL-KR43 and OL-KR43B, respectively. Measured volumes of the returning water were 916m{sup 3} in borehole OL-KR43 and 13m{sup 3} in borehole OL-KR43B. The deviation of the boreholes was measured with the deviation measuring instruments EMS and Maxibor. Uniaxial compressive strength, Young's Modulus and Poisson's ratio were measured from the core samples. The average uniaxial compressive strength is about 131 MPa, the average Young's Modulus is 37 GPa and the average Poisson's ratio is 0.19. The main rock types are veined gneiss, diatexitic gneiss

  17. TERO thermal property measurements in boreholes KAV01 and KLX06 In Oskarshamn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal properties in situ were measured in two SKB boreholes in the Oskarshamn study site, Sweden. The TERO56 logging device of Posiva Oy designed for determining thermal properties of rocks in 56 mm boreholes was applied. The measurement is based on conduction of heat from a cylindrical source placed in a borehole. When the probe is heated, its temperature as a function of time depends on the applied heating power, heat losses into rock, and the thickness of the water layer between the probe and borehole wall. Temperatures are also dependent on the internal structure of the probe and its material properties. The TERO56 probe is a hollow 1630 mm long aluminium cylinder whose outer diameter is 50 mm. The length of the heating section is 1500 mm. Heating is done from the inner surface of the cylinder with a maximum power of 22 W. The probe temperature is monitored with 28 thermistors placed in lines along the probe. Mild flow of borehole fluid in the measurement section is prevented with soft silicon rubber packers. Measurements of rock thermal properties were carried out in Oskarshamn in boreholes KAV01 (56 mm diameter) and KLX06 (76 mm). Measurements in borehole KAV01 were not possible at the depths originally selected for the measurements (199-366 m). This was due to the active flow in the borehole, which could not be prevented with the silicon rubber packers. However, at deeper layers (508-617 m) where there was no flow, the measurements were successful, and thermal properties typical for granitoids were obtained. Inverted values of thermal conductivity range from 3.14 to 3.49 W m-1 K-1, and diffusivity in the range of 1.21 to 1.98*10-6 m2s-1. In borehole KLX06 (diameter 76 mm) the measurements (at depths 199-286 m) did not yield useful results because of non-conductive conditions, which we attribute to free thermal convection in the thick annulus of water between the probe and the borehole wall. (orig.)

  18. Cyclic high temperature heat storage using borehole heat exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boockmeyer, Anke; Delfs, Jens-Olaf; Bauer, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    The transition of the German energy supply towards mainly renewable energy sources like wind or solar power, termed "Energiewende", makes energy storage a requirement in order to compensate their fluctuating production and to ensure a reliable energy and power supply. One option is to store heat in the subsurface using borehole heat exchangers (BHEs). Efficiency of thermal storage is increasing with increasing temperatures, as heat at high temperatures is more easily injected and extracted than at temperatures at ambient levels. This work aims at quantifying achievable storage capacities, storage cycle times, injection and extraction rates as well as thermal and hydraulic effects induced in the subsurface for a BHE storage site in the shallow subsurface. To achieve these aims, simulation of these highly dynamic storage sites is performed. A detailed, high-resolution numerical simulation model was developed, that accounts for all BHE components in geometrical detail and incorporates the governing processes. This model was verified using high quality experimental data and is shown to achieve accurate simulation results with excellent fit to the available experimental data, but also leads to large computational times due to the large numerical meshes required for discretizing the highly transient effects. An approximate numerical model for each type of BHE (single U, double U and coaxial) that reduces the number of elements and the simulation time significantly was therefore developed for use in larger scale simulations. The approximate numerical model still includes all BHE components and represents the temporal and spatial temperature distribution with a deviation of less than 2% from the fully discretized model. Simulation times are reduced by a factor of ~10 for single U-tube BHEs, ~20 for double U-tube BHEs and ~150 for coaxial BHEs. This model is then used to investigate achievable storage capacity, injection and extraction rates as well as induced effects for

  19. Results of borehole investigation in -500m access/research gallery-north. 13MI38∼13MI44 boreholes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The geological, hydraulic and geochemical data such as rock mass classification, groundwater inflow points and the volume, water pressure, hydraulic conductivity, and results of water analysis were obtained from boreholes (13MI38∼13MI44) in the -500m Access/Research Gallery-North of Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory (MIU). In addition to data acquisition, monitoring systems were installed to observe hydrochemical changes in the groundwater, and rock strain during and after the groundwater recovery experiment. Biotite granite (Toki granite) with medium to coarse-grained equigranular texture is characterized around the -500m Access/Research Gallery-North. Rock mass classification is mostly B class and CH to CM at the fracture zone. Density of fracture in core description is small, and was 2.3 n/m in 13MI38 borehole. Maximum water inflow during drilling borehole was 78 L/min in 13MI38 borehole. Hydraulic conductivity in intact zone ranges from 2.3E-11 to 8.2E-08m/s at low inflow part, and from 1.9E-07 to 9.2E-06m/s at high inflow part, respectively. Groundwater chemistry riches in Na and Cl ion with the concentration ranging from 160 to 220 mg/L, from 280 to 600 mg/L, respectively. The digital data is attached on CD-ROM. (J.P.N.)

  20. Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediments Below the T Tank Farm: Boreholes C4104, C4105, 299-W10-196, and RCRA Borehole 299-W11-39

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Horton, Duane G.; Lanigan, David C.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Clayton, Ray E.; Legore, Virginia L.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Baum, Steven R.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Vickerman, Tanya S.; Orr, Robert D.; Brown, Christopher F.

    2008-09-11

    This report was revised in September 2008 to remove acid-extractable sodium data from Tables 4.8, 4.28, and 4.52. The sodium data was removed due to potential contamination introduced during the acid extraction process. The rest of the text remains unchanged from the original report issued in September 2004. The overall goal of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., is to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities at Hanford. To meet this goal, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. tasked scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to perform detailed analyses on vadose zone sediments from within Waste Management Area (WMA) T-TX-TY. This report is the second of two reports written to present the results of these analyses. Specifically, this report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from boreholes C4104 and C4105 in the T Tank Farm, and from borehole 299-W-11-39 installed northeast of the T Tank Farm. Finally, the measurements on sediments from borehole C4104 are compared with a nearby borehole drilled in 1993, 299- W10-196, through the tank T-106 leak plume.

  1. Calculation of unmitigated release from reverse circulation drilling of a borehole three meters south of borehole 41-15-09 near SST 241-SX-115

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To more fully characterize the vadose zone near Single Shell Tank 241-SX-115, another borehole will be drilled and sampled by using reverse circulation drilling equipment. Compressed air propels the drill and sweeps out cuttings. Dose calculations in this document are performed for an unmitigated airborne release from the drill string. Doses were found not to exceed TWRS risk guideline values

  2. Calculation of unmitigated release from reverse circulation drilling of a borehole three meters south of borehole 41-15-09 near SST 241-SX-115

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SCOTT, D.L.

    1999-05-27

    To more fully characterize the vadose zone near Single Shell Tank 241-SX-115, another borehole will be drilled and sampled by using reverse circulation drilling equipment. Compressed air propels the drill and sweeps out cuttings. Dose calculations in this document are performed for an unmitigated airborne release from the drill string. Doses were found not to exceed TWRS risk guideline values.

  3. Optimization of CPMG sequences for NMR borehole measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ronczka

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Nuklear Magnetic Resonance (NMR can provide key information such as porosity and permeability for hydrological characterization of geological material. Especially the NMR transverse relaxation time T2 is used to estimate permeability since it reflects a pore-size dependent relaxation process. The measurement sequence (CPMG usually used consists of several thousands of electromagnetic pulses to densely record the relaxation process. These pulses are equidistantly spaced by a time constant τ. In NMR borehole applications the use of CPMG sequences for measuring the transverse relaxation time T2 is limited due to requirements on energy consumption. It is state of the art to conduct at least two sequences with different echo spacings (τ for recording fast and slow relaxing processes that correspond to different pore-sizes. For the purpose to reduce the amount of energy used for conducting CPMG sequences and to obtain both, slow and fast, decaying components within one sequence we tested the usage of CPMG sequences with an increasing τ and a decreasing number of pulses. A synthetic study as well as laboratory measurements on samples of glass beads and granulate of different grain size spectra were conducted to evaluate the effects of of an increasing τ spacing, e.g. an enhanced relaxation due to diffusion processes. The results are showing broadened T2 distributions if the number of pulses is decreasing and the mean grain size is increasing, which is mostly an effect of a significantly shortened acquisition time. The shift of T2 distributions to small decay times in dependence of the τ spacing and the mean grain size distribution is observable. We found that it is possible to conduct CPMG sequences with an increased τ spacing. According to the acquisition time and enhanced diffusion the sequence parameters (number of pulses and τmax has to be chosen carefully. Otherwise the underestimated relaxation time (T2 will lead to misinterpretations.

  4. Multiple-aquifer characterization from single borehole extensometer records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Jason P; Burbey, Thomas J

    2004-01-01

    Measurement and analysis of aquifer-system compaction have been used to characterize aquifer and confining unit properties when other techniques such as flow modeling have been ineffective at adequately quantifying storage properties or matching historical water levels in environments experiencing land subsidence. In the southeastern coastal plain of Virginia, high-sensitivity borehole pipe extensometers were used to measure 24.2 mm of total compaction at Franklin from 1979 through 1995 (1.5 mm/year) and 50.2 mm of total compaction at Suffolk from 1982 through 1995 (3.7 mm/year). Analysis of the extensometer data reveals that the small rates of aquifer-system compaction appear to be correlated with withdrawals of water from confined aquifers. One-dimensional vertical compaction modeling indicates measured compaction is the result of nonrecoverable hydrodynamic consolidation of the fine-grained confining units and interbeds, as well as recoverable compaction and expansion of coarse-grained aquifer units. The calibrated modeling results indicate that nonrecoverable specific storage values decrease with depth and range from 1.5 x 10(-5)/m for aquifer units to 1.5 x 10(-4)/m for confining units and interbeds. The aquifer and Potomac system recoverable specific storage values were all estimated to be 4.5 x 10(-6)/m, while the confining units and interbeds had values of 6.0 x 10(-6)/m. The calibrated vertical hydraulic conductivity values of the confining units and interbeds ranged from 6.6 x 10(-4) m/year to 2.0 x 10(-3) m/year. These parameter values will be useful in future management and modeling of ground water in the Virginia Coastal Plain. PMID:14763616

  5. Radiological consequences of accidents during disposal of spent nuclear fuel in a deep borehole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grundfelt, Bertil [Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-07-15

    In this report, an analysis of the radiological consequences of potential accidents during disposal of spent nuclear fuel in deep boreholes is presented. The results presented should be seen as coarse estimates of possible radiological consequences of a canister being stuck in a borehole during disposal rather than being the results of a full safety analysis. In the concept for deep borehole disposal of spent nuclear fuel developed by Sandia National Laboratories, the fuel is assumed to be encapsulated in mild steel canisters and stacked between 3 and 5 km depth in boreholes that are cased with perforated mild steel casing tubes. The canisters are joined together by couplings to form strings of 40 canisters and lowered into the borehole. When a canister string has been emplaced in the borehole, a bridge plug is installed above the string and a 10 metres long concrete plug is cast on top of the bridge plug creating a floor for the disposal of the next sting. In total 10 canister strings, in all 400 canisters, are assumed to be disposed of at between 3 and 5 kilometres depth in one borehole. An analysis of potential accidents during the disposal operations shows that the potentially worst accident would be that a canister string is stuck above the disposal zone of a borehole and cannot be retrieved. In such a case, the borehole may have to be sealed in the best possible way and abandoned. The consequences of this could be that one or more leaking canisters are stuck in a borehole section with mobile groundwater. In the case of a leaking canister being stuck in a borehole section with mobile groundwater, the potential radiological consequences are likely to be dominated by the release of the so-called Instant Release Fraction (IRF) of the radionuclide inventory, i.e. the fraction of the radionuclides that as a consequence of the in-core conditions are present in the annulus between the fuel pellets and the cladding or on the grain boundaries of the UO{sub 2} matrix

  6. Simpevarp site investigation. Geophysical, radar and BIPS logging in borehole KSH01A, HSH01, HSH02 and HSH03

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, Per; Gustafsson, Christer [RAYCON, Malaa (Sweden)

    2003-04-01

    The objective of the surveys is to both receive information of the borehole itself, and from the rock mass around the borehole. Bore hole radar was used to investigate the nature and the structure of the rock mass located around the boreholes, and BIPS for geological surveying and fracture mapping and orientation. Geophysical logging was used to measure changes in physical properties in the borehole fluid and the bedrock surrounding the boreholes. This field report describes the equipment used as well the measurement procedures. For the BIPS survey, the result is presented as images. Radar data is presented in radargrams and identified reflectors in each borehole are listed in tables. Geophysical logging data is presented in graphs as a function of depth.

  7. Simpevarp site investigation. Geophysical, radar and BIPS logging in borehole KSH01A, HSH01, HSH02 and HSH03

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the surveys is to both receive information of the borehole itself, and from the rock mass around the borehole. Bore hole radar was used to investigate the nature and the structure of the rock mass located around the boreholes, and BIPS for geological surveying and fracture mapping and orientation. Geophysical logging was used to measure changes in physical properties in the borehole fluid and the bedrock surrounding the boreholes. This field report describes the equipment used as well the measurement procedures. For the BIPS survey, the result is presented as images. Radar data is presented in radargrams and identified reflectors in each borehole are listed in tables. Geophysical logging data is presented in graphs as a function of depth

  8. Borehole Flow and Contaminant Distribution in Sedimentary-Bedrock Recharge Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J. H.

    2005-12-01

    Borehole flow and contaminant distribution has been investigated at a series of VOC-impacted sites in New York, New Jersey, and California that are recharge areas for sandstone, mudstone, and carbonate-bedrock aquifers. At the investigated sites, downward flow occurs through open boreholes that intersect shallow and deep fracture zones having differing hydraulic heads. Detected flows span the dynamic measurement range of 0.03 to 30 liters per minute for high-resolution flowmeters that employ heat-pulse and electromagnetic technologies. Estimated head differences between shallow and deep zones from model simulation of ambient and stressed flow profiles range from one to more than 10 meters, and are in close agreement with differences measured between zones isolated by straddle packers or by multiple-depth well completions. The presence of boreholes that are open temporarily during installation or completed as open holes impacts contaminant distribution and adversely affects the results of ground-water quality sampling programs. In boreholes open to shallow contaminated zones and deep non-contaminated zones, ambient flow diverts dissolved VOCs from the shallow zones down the borehole and into the deep zones. Samples obtained from such boreholes at purge and sampling rates less than the ambient downward flow represent the water quality of the shallow zones regardless of the depths where samples are collected. This can lead to the erroneous interpretation of a deep contaminant plume. Sampling by use of straddle-packer systems with low purge and sampling rates and short-term zone isolation also may indicate deep contamination because of inadequate flushing. Even in deep zones isolated by multiple-depth completions, elevated VOC concentrations linger for many months because of contaminant diffusion into and out of the bedrock matrix. Conversely, in boreholes open to shallow non-contaminated zones and deep contaminated zones, samples collected at rates less than the

  9. Reference design and operations for deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A reference design and operational procedures for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste in deep boreholes have been developed and documented. The design and operations are feasible with currently available technology and meet existing safety and anticipated regulatory requirements. Objectives of the reference design include providing a baseline for more detailed technical analyses of system performance and serving as a basis for comparing design alternatives. Numerous factors suggest that deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste is inherently safe. Several lines of evidence indicate that groundwater at depths of several kilometers in continental crystalline basement rocks has long residence times and low velocity. High salinity fluids have limited potential for vertical flow because of density stratification and prevent colloidal transport of radionuclides. Geochemically reducing conditions in the deep subsurface limit the solubility and enhance the retardation of key radionuclides. A non-technical advantage that the deep borehole concept may offer over a repository concept is that of facilitating incremental construction and loading at multiple perhaps regional locations. The disposal borehole would be drilled to a depth of 5,000 m using a telescoping design and would be logged and tested prior to waste emplacement. Waste canisters would be constructed of carbon steel, sealed by welds, and connected into canister strings with high-strength connections. Waste canister strings of about 200 m length would be emplaced in the lower 2,000 m of the fully cased borehole and be separated by bridge and cement plugs. Sealing of the upper part of the borehole would be done with a series of compacted bentonite seals, cement plugs, cement seals, cement plus crushed rock backfill, and bridge plugs. Elements of the reference design meet technical requirements defined in the study. Testing and operational safety assurance requirements are also defined. Overall

  10. Installation of borehole seismometer for earthquake characteristics in deep geological environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Dong Hee; Choi, Weon Hack; Cho, Sung Il; Chang, Chun Joong [KHNP CRI, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Deep geological disposal is currently accepted as the most appropriate method for permanently removing spent nuclear fuel from the living sphere of humans. For implementation of deep geological disposal, we need to understand the geological changes that have taken place over the past 100,000 years, encompassing active faults, volcanic activity, elevation, ubsidence, which as yet have not been considered in assessing the site characteristics for general facilities, as well as to investigate and analyze the geological structures, fracture systems and seismic responses regarding deep geological environment about 500 meters or more underground. In regions with high seismic activity, such as Japan, the Western United States and Taiwan, borehole seismometers installed deep underground are used to monitor seismic activity during the course of seismic wave propagation at various depths and to study the stress changes due to earthquakes and analyze the connection to fault movements. Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd. (KHNP) have installed the deep borehole earthquake observatory at depths of about 300 to 600 meters in order to study the seismic response characteristics in deep geological environment on June, 2014 in Andong area. This paper will show the status of deep borehole earthquake observatory and the results of background noise response characteristics of these deep borehole seismic data as a basic data analysis. We present here the status of deep borehole seismometer installation by KHNP. In order to basic data analysis for the borehole seismic observation data, this study shows the results of the orientation of seismometer and background noise characteristics by using a probability density function. Together with the ground motion data recorded by the borehole seismometers can be utilized as basic data for seismic response characteristics studies with regard to spent nuclear fuel disposal depth and as the input data for seismic hazard assessment that

  11. Monitoring borehole flow dynamics using heated fiber optic DTS in a fractured rock aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Thomas; Chalari, Athena; Parker, Beth; Munn, Jonathan; Mondanos, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Temperature profiles in fractured rock have long been used to identify and characterize flow in the rock formation or in the borehole. Fiber optic distributed temperature sensing (DTS) is a tool that allows for continuous borehole temperature profiling in space and time. Recent technology advancements in the spatial, temperature, and temporal resolutions of DTS systems now allow temperature profiling methods to offer improved insight into fractured rock hydrogeologic processes. An innovation in shallow borehole temperature logging utilizes high resolution DTS temperature profiling in sealed and heated boreholes to identify fractures with natural gradient groundwater flow by creating a thermal disequilibrium and monitoring the temperature response. This technique can also be applied to open well conditions to monitor borehole flow distributions caused by hydraulic perturbations such as pumping or injection. A field trial was conducted in Guelph, Ontario, Canada to determine the capabilities of heated DTS for flow monitoring in both open and sealed wells. Intelligent distributed acoustic sensing (iDAS) measurements for vertical seismic profiling were carried out simultaneously with the DTS measurements to assist with characterization of the fractured aquifer system. DTS heat pulse tests were conducted in a single well under sealed conditions for natural gradient flow measurements and open conditions to monitor flow distributions during injection and pumping. The results of these tests indicate that borehole flow distributions can be monitored using DTS and that active heating allows for further information about the hydrogeologic system to be determined than from the passive measurements alone. Depth-continuous transmissivity data from the borehole correlate well with the DTS testing results. DTS based flow monitoring systems may be useful for monitoring transient production and injection processes for a variety of applications including groundwater remediation

  12. Installation of borehole seismometer for earthquake characteristics in deep geological environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deep geological disposal is currently accepted as the most appropriate method for permanently removing spent nuclear fuel from the living sphere of humans. For implementation of deep geological disposal, we need to understand the geological changes that have taken place over the past 100,000 years, encompassing active faults, volcanic activity, elevation, ubsidence, which as yet have not been considered in assessing the site characteristics for general facilities, as well as to investigate and analyze the geological structures, fracture systems and seismic responses regarding deep geological environment about 500 meters or more underground. In regions with high seismic activity, such as Japan, the Western United States and Taiwan, borehole seismometers installed deep underground are used to monitor seismic activity during the course of seismic wave propagation at various depths and to study the stress changes due to earthquakes and analyze the connection to fault movements. Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd. (KHNP) have installed the deep borehole earthquake observatory at depths of about 300 to 600 meters in order to study the seismic response characteristics in deep geological environment on June, 2014 in Andong area. This paper will show the status of deep borehole earthquake observatory and the results of background noise response characteristics of these deep borehole seismic data as a basic data analysis. We present here the status of deep borehole seismometer installation by KHNP. In order to basic data analysis for the borehole seismic observation data, this study shows the results of the orientation of seismometer and background noise characteristics by using a probability density function. Together with the ground motion data recorded by the borehole seismometers can be utilized as basic data for seismic response characteristics studies with regard to spent nuclear fuel disposal depth and as the input data for seismic hazard assessment that

  13. Reference design and operations for deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrick, Courtney Grant; Brady, Patrick Vane; Pye, Steven; Arnold, Bill Walter; Finger, John Travis; Bauer, Stephen J.

    2011-10-01

    A reference design and operational procedures for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste in deep boreholes have been developed and documented. The design and operations are feasible with currently available technology and meet existing safety and anticipated regulatory requirements. Objectives of the reference design include providing a baseline for more detailed technical analyses of system performance and serving as a basis for comparing design alternatives. Numerous factors suggest that deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste is inherently safe. Several lines of evidence indicate that groundwater at depths of several kilometers in continental crystalline basement rocks has long residence times and low velocity. High salinity fluids have limited potential for vertical flow because of density stratification and prevent colloidal transport of radionuclides. Geochemically reducing conditions in the deep subsurface limit the solubility and enhance the retardation of key radionuclides. A non-technical advantage that the deep borehole concept may offer over a repository concept is that of facilitating incremental construction and loading at multiple perhaps regional locations. The disposal borehole would be drilled to a depth of 5,000 m using a telescoping design and would be logged and tested prior to waste emplacement. Waste canisters would be constructed of carbon steel, sealed by welds, and connected into canister strings with high-strength connections. Waste canister strings of about 200 m length would be emplaced in the lower 2,000 m of the fully cased borehole and be separated by bridge and cement plugs. Sealing of the upper part of the borehole would be done with a series of compacted bentonite seals, cement plugs, cement seals, cement plus crushed rock backfill, and bridge plugs. Elements of the reference design meet technical requirements defined in the study. Testing and operational safety assurance requirements are also defined. Overall

  14. Measurement of the thermal performance of a Borehole Heat Exchanger while injecting air bubbles in the groundwater

    OpenAIRE

    Calzada i Oliveras, Eduard

    2012-01-01

    The most common way to exchange heat with the ground in Ground Source Heat Pump (GSHP) applications is with borehole heat exchangers (energy col-lectors in vertical wells). These boreholes contain the pipe with the secondary fluid of the GSHP and they are often filled with natural groundwater. It has been recently discovered that injecting air bubbles in the groundwater side of the boreholes increases the efficiency of the heat transfer. The aim of this thesis is to analyze the thermal change...

  15. Summary of lithologic logging of new and existing boreholes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, March 1994 to June 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes lithologic logging of core from boreholes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, conducted from March 1994 to June 1994. Units encountered during logging include Quaternary-Tertiary alluvium and colluvium, Tertiary Rainier Mesa Tuff, all units in the Tertiary Paintbrush Group, and Tertiary Calico Hills Formation. Logging results are presented in a table of contact depths for core from unsaturated zone neutron (UZN) boreholes and graphic lithologic logs for core from north ramp geology (NRG) boreholes

  16. Forsmark site investigation. Geophysical, radar and BIPS logging in boreholes HFM01, HFM02, HFM03 and the percussion drilled part of KFM01A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document reports the data gained during logging operations, which is one of the activities performed within the site investigation at Forsmark. The logging operations presented here include geophysical logging with Wellmac, RAMAC and BIPS. In total, 430 metres of logging was carried out in four percussion drilled boreholes. The boreholes in question are; KFM01A (c. 100 m deep of which 50 m were logged/diameter 165 mm), HFM01 (200 m/140 mm), HFM02 (100 m/140 mm) and HFM03 (30 m/140 mm). The borehole referred to as KFM01A is the uppermost, percussion drilled part of a c 1000 m deep telescopic drilled borehole of which the section 1001000 metres is core drilled. All measurements were conducted in June 2002. Instruments used: Borehole radar (RAMAC) system with dipole radar antennas. Borehole TV system (Borehole Image Processing System BIPS), a high resolution, side viewing, colour borehole TV system. Borehole geophysical logging system (WELLMAC)

  17. Cross-borehole flow analysis to characterize fracture connections in the Melechov Granite, Bohemian-Moravian Highland, Czech Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paillet, Frederick L.; Williams, John H.; Urik, Joseph; Lukes, Joseph; Kobr, Miroslav; Mares, Stanislav

    2012-01-01

    Application of the cross-borehole flow method, in which short pumping cycles in one borehole are used to induce time-transient flow in another borehole, demonstrated that a simple hydraulic model can characterize the fracture connections in the bedrock mass between the two boreholes. The analysis determines the properties of fracture connections rather than those of individual fractures intersecting a single borehole; the model contains a limited number of adjustable parameters so that any correlation between measured and simulated flow test data is significant. The test was conducted in two 200-m deep boreholes spaced 21 m apart in the Melechov Granite in the Bohemian-Moravian Highland, Czech Republic. Transient flow was measured at depth stations between the identified transmissive fractures in one of the boreholes during short-term pumping and recovery periods in the other borehole. Simulated flows, based on simple model geometries, closely matched the measured flows. The relative transmissivity and storage of the inferred fracture connections were corroborated by tracer testing. The results demonstrate that it is possible to assess the properties of a fracture flow network despite being restricted to making measurements in boreholes in which a local population of discrete fractures regulates the hydraulic communication with the larger-scale aquifer system.

  18. Test plan for in situ stress measurement by the hydraulic fracturing method in boreholes RRL-6 and DC-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrofracturing tests are to be performed to obtain experimental data regarding the magnitudes and orientations of the principal stresses in candidate repository horizons within the reference repository location (RRL). The tests are to be conducted in boreholes RRL-6 and DC-4 located in the reference repository location on the Hanford Site. This series of tests is to be limited to the performance of a maximum of 16 tests in each borehole. Basalt flows to be tested in borehole RRL-6 include the Rocky Coulee, Cohassett, McCoy Canyon, and Umtanum. Testing in borehole DC-4 will be in the Rocky Coulee and Cohassett basalt flows

  19. Insights on desaturation processes based on the chemistry of seepage water from boreholes in the Callovo-Oxfordian argillaceous rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seepage waters from boreholes were collected in the Meuse/Haute-Marne Underground Research Laboratory (NE France) in the Callovo-Oxfordian clay-rich host rock. Over the first months after the drilling of the boreholes, these waters were saltier than the waters collected later on, even in the boreholes that had been drilled without oxygen. These chemical composition variations give insights on the volume of rock affected by the loss of water around the boreholes. This data will help to characterize the desaturation processes in such a rock and the consequences with respect to the composition of the water that will fill the underground works after their closure. (authors)

  20. Measurements of mechanical properties of crushed salt and considerations on the semihydrostatic disposal technique for waste packages in deep boreholes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The semihydrostatic disposal technique for waste packages in unlined vertical boreholes in a salt repository envisages to emplace the packages undefined in the borehole and thereby embedding them totally in crushed salt backfill. For the analysis of the pressure distribution in the filled borehole it is assumed in the theoretical model that the filling consisting of packages and crushed salt can be considered as a homogeneous medium approximately. Typical disposal parameters of crushed salt were measured. Numerical evaluations show that in the semihydrostatic model the maximum pressure in the borehole for a 400-l-waste-package does not exceed 110 kPa. (orig.)

  1. Initial Borehole Accelerometer Array Observations Near the North Portal of the ESF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David von Seggern

    2005-08-17

    This report addresses observed ground motions at the site of the proposed surface facilities associated with the designated repository for high-level nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. In 2003 an accelerometer array was installed at three boreholes on the pad of the north portal of the ESF (Exploratory Studies Facility) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, by the Nevada Seismological Laboratory (NSL). These boreholes, roughly 150 m apart and initially used for extensive geological and geophysical surveys, were ideal locations to measure the subsurface ground motions at the proposed site of surface facilities such as the Waste Handling Building. Such measurements will impact the design of the facilities. Accelerometer emplacement depths of approximately 15 m from the surface and then at the bottom of the boreholes, roughly 100 m, were chosen. Accelerometers were also placed at the surface next to the boreholes, for a total of nine accelerometers, all three-component. Data recording was accomplished with onsite recorders, with the onsite data transmitted to a central computer at a trailer on the pad. All requirements were met to qualify these data as ''Q''. Due to the lack of significant recordings during 2003, several low signal-to-noise (S/N) quality events were chosen for processing. The maximum horizontal peak ground acceleration (PGA) recorded at the pad was approximately 1 cm/s2 in 2003; the corresponding peak ground velocity (PGV) was approximately 0.01 cm/s. PGA and PGV were obtained at all nine accelerometers for most of these events, and spectra were computed. Ground motion amplitudes varied significantly across the boreholes. Higher ground amplifications were observed at the surface for the two boreholes that penetrated a thick amount ({approx} 30 m) of fill and Quaternary alluvium compared to the one that had less than 2 m of such. Additionally, surface-to-deep recordings showed as much as a factor of five amplification at these two

  2. Initial Borehole Accelerometer Array Observations Near the North Portal of the ESF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report addresses observed ground motions at the site of the proposed surface facilities associated with the designated repository for high-level nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. In 2003 an accelerometer array was installed at three boreholes on the pad of the north portal of the ESF (Exploratory Studies Facility) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, by the Nevada Seismological Laboratory (NSL). These boreholes, roughly 150 m apart and initially used for extensive geological and geophysical surveys, were ideal locations to measure the subsurface ground motions at the proposed site of surface facilities such as the Waste Handling Building. Such measurements will impact the design of the facilities. Accelerometer emplacement depths of approximately 15 m from the surface and then at the bottom of the boreholes, roughly 100 m, were chosen. Accelerometers were also placed at the surface next to the boreholes, for a total of nine accelerometers, all three-component. Data recording was accomplished with onsite recorders, with the onsite data transmitted to a central computer at a trailer on the pad. All requirements were met to qualify these data as ''Q''. Due to the lack of significant recordings during 2003, several low signal-to-noise (S/N) quality events were chosen for processing. The maximum horizontal peak ground acceleration (PGA) recorded at the pad was approximately 1 cm/s2 in 2003; the corresponding peak ground velocity (PGV) was approximately 0.01 cm/s. PGA and PGV were obtained at all nine accelerometers for most of these events, and spectra were computed. Ground motion amplitudes varied significantly across the boreholes. Higher ground amplifications were observed at the surface for the two boreholes that penetrated a thick amount (∼ 30 m) of fill and Quaternary alluvium compared to the one that had less than 2 m of such. Additionally, surface-to-deep recordings showed as much as a factor of five amplification at these two boreholes. Signal correlation

  3. Mapping permeable fractures at depth in crystalline metamorphic shield rocks using borehole seismic, logging, and imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, J.; Schmitt, D. R.; Nieuwenhuis, G.; Poureslami Ardakani, E.; Kueck, J.; Abasolo, M. R.

    2012-04-01

    The presence of major fluid pathways in subsurface exploration can be identified by understanding the effects of fractures, cracks, and microcracks in the subsurface. Part of a feasibility study of geothermal development in Northern Alberta consists of the investigation of subsurface fluid pathways in the Precambrian basement rocks. One of the selected sites for this study is in the Fort McMurray area, where the deepest well drilled in the oilsands region in Northeastern Alberta is located. This deep borehole has a depth of 2.3 km which offers substantial depth coverage to study the metamorphic rocks in the Precambrian crystalline basement of this study area. Seismic reflection profiles adjacent to the borehole reveal NW-SE dipping reflectors within the metamorphic shield rocks some of which appear to intersect the wellbore. An extensive logging and borehole seismic program was carried out in the borehole in July, 2011. Gamma ray, magnetic susceptibility, acoustic televiewer, electrical resistivity, and full-waveform sonic logs were acquired to study the finer scale structure of the rock formations, with vertical resolutions in the range of 0.05 cm to 80 cm. These logs supplement earlier electrical microscanner images obtained by the well operator when it was drilled. In addition, we are also interested in identifying other geological features such as zones of fractures that could provide an indication of enhanced fluid flow potential - a necessary component for any geothermal systems to be viable. The interpretation of the borehole logs reveals a highly conductive 13 m thick zone at 1409 m depth that may indicate communication of natural brines in fractures with the wellbore fluid. The photoelectric factor and magnetic susceptibility also appear anomalous in this zone. Formation MicroImager (FMI) log was used to verify the presence of fractures in the borehole in this conductive zone. This fracture zone may coincide with the dipping seismic reflectors in the

  4. Fingerprints of zones in boreholes. An approach to identify the characteristics of structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The classification of geophysical borehole data in order to identify and characterize structures, which intercepts the borehole, is an important part of 3D modelling of the structural pattern of the bedrock. The objective of this study is to test a statistical approach, cluster analysis, on site data in order to see if it is possible to classify complex data set, geological and geophysical borehole data, in order to identify borehole intersects with increased brittle deformation, i.e. brittle deformation zones. The base data used in the study have been provided and delivered by SKB and consist of borehole logging data from the cored borehole KFM03A. The statistical method chosen for this study, cluster analysis using K-means method, groups data into a pre-defined number of clusters with the goal to minimize the variance of data within the group and to maximize the variance between the clusters. The idea is that data can and should be grouped into two categories, two clusters -corresponding to homogeneous bedrock (matrix) in one cluster and open fractures in the other cluster. The analysis also includes a repetition of the cluster analysis, with a stepwise refined data set to see whether strongly accentuated features could be identified. The results show that the use of K-mean Cluster analysis will present clusters that could represent the spatial distribution of bedrock matrix and the location of fractures respectively down the borehole. The results were compared with fracture frequency data (from core mapping) and also with the geological Single Hole Interpretation of KFM03A performed by SKB. The fracture zones identified in the Single Hole Interpretation process are all indicated in the cluster analysis results. The cluster analysis revealed eight additional possible zones. A majority of these are smaller than 5 metres (section width in the borehole) but they are still pronounced in the analysis. Based on the geophysical data, these sections should be taken into

  5. Subsurface fracture surveys using a borehole television camera and an acoustic televiewer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borehole television survey and acoustic televiewer logging provide rapid, cost-effective, and accurate methods of surveying fractures and their characteristics within boreholes varying in diameter from 7.6 to 15.3 cm. In the television survey, a camera probe is used to inspect the borehole walls. Measurements of location, orientation, infilling width, and aperture of fractures are made on the television screen and recorded on computer data record sheets. All observations are recorded on video cassette tapes. With the acoustic televiewer, oriented images of fractures in the borehole walls are recorded on a strip-chart log and also on video cassette tapes. The images are displayed as if the walls were split vertically along magnetic north and spread out horizontally. Measurements of fracture characteristics are made on the strip-chart log, using a digitizing table and a microcomputer, and the data recorded on floppy diskettes. In both surveys, an inclined fracture is displayed as a sinusoidal curve, from which the apparent orientation of the fracture can be measured. Once the borehole orientation is known, the true orientation of the fracture can be computed from its apparent orientation. Computer analysis of the fracture data, provides a rapid assessment of fracture occurrence, fracture aperture, and statisically significant concentrations of fracture orientations

  6. Site characterization and validation - monitoring of saline tracer transport by borehole radar measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this experiment was to map tracer transport in fractured crystalline rock through a combination of radar difference tomography and measurements of tracer concentration in boreholes and the validation drift. The experiment was performed twice, first the D-boreholes were used as a sink and then they were replaced by the validation drift and the experiment repeated. In both experiments saline tracer (200 ml/min, 2% salinity) was injected into fracture zone H about 25 m from the validation drift. The experiment revealed an inhomogeneous transmissivity distribution in Zone H. A significant portion of the tracer is transported upwards along Zone H and towards boreholes T1, T2, and W1. The breakthrough data from both experiments indicate that there are two major transport paths from borehole C2 to the D-boreholes/validation drift. One slow and diluted path to the bottom of the drift which carries the bulk of the mass and one fast path to the crown of the drift with high tracer concentration. The radar difference tomograms show that some tracer is lost through Zone S which intersects Zone H and is nearly perpendicular to it. The intersection between the two zones seems to constitute a preferred flow path. The breakthrough data and the radar difference tomograms have also been used to estimate flow porosity. The estimate obtained area of the same order approximately 10-4. (au) (28 refs.)

  7. System for obtaining high-integrity borehole fluid samples. National Uranium Resource Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high-integrity borehole fluid sampling system has been developed by Bendix Field Engineering Corporation, prime contractor for the US Department of Energy Grand Junction Area Office as a part of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program. Through the use of a high-pressure positive-displacement pump of stainless steel coupled to a Teflon delivery line, the system is designed for delivery of an uncontaminated and unfractionated fluid sample to the surface from depths of up to 300 meters. Inflatable packers may be used to isolate a zone of interest from which the representative sample is subsequently pumped. Specially designed sample receivers are used for storage of the sample under conditions comparable to downhole pressure conditions. In contrast to systems using conventional packer systems developed primarily for the oil industry, this system is capable of sealing uncased boreholes having large borehole caliper variations without the necessity of withdrawing the tool to change the packers. In addition, this new system does not introduce foreign material into the borehole since the system uses only resident borehole fluids to effect packer inflation. Thus, long-term sampling programs may be accomplished without compromising the integrity of subsequent sample acquisition

  8. Measurement of displacements in large boreholes with a strain-gauged proving ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A strain-gauged proving-ring transducer was designed and deployed to measure small diametral displacements in 0.61-m diameter by 4.9-m deep boreholes in rock. The rock surrounding the boreholes was previously heated by storage of spent nuclear fuel assemblies and electrical resistance heaters. Borehole displacement measurements were made subsequent to removal of the spent fuel assemblies to document the rock response and to provide data for comparison with thermal-stress calculations. A transducer was designed to measure displacements in the range of 10 to 100 μm, to function in a time-varying temperature regime of 300 to 600C at a relative humidity of 100%, to be of low stiffness, and to be easily and quickly installed. The strain-gauged proving-ring technology provided a viable means of recording displacements in large (0.61 m) diameter boreholes in rock which are subjected to a time-varying thermal field. Design of a relatively simple transducer to measure borehole displacements was moderately successful. Inadquate environmental protection of the strain gauges resulted in 6 of 14 transducers failing with a mean life of 85 days. The surviving transducers performed adequately, based on comparisons of pretest and post-test calibration results. 5 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  9. An experimental study on the thermal performance measurement of vertical Borehole Heat Exchanger(BHE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowledge of ground thermal properties is most important for the proper design of large BHE(Borehole Heat Exchanger) systems. Thermal response tests with mobile measurement devices were first introduced in Sweden and USA in 1995. Thermal response tests have so far been used primarily for in insitu determination of design data for BHE systems, but also for evaluation of grout material, heat exchanger types and ground water effects. The main purpose has been to determine insitu values of effective ground thermal conductivity, including the effect of ground-water flow and natural convection in the boreholes. Test rig is set up on a small trailer, and contains a circulation pump, a heater, temperature sensors and a data logger for recording the temperature data. A constant heat power is injected into the borehole through the pipe system of test rig and the resulting temperature change in the borehole is recorded. The recorded temperature data are analysed with a line-source model, which gives the effective insitu values of rock thermal conductivity and borehole thermal resistance

  10. A novel TRNSYS type for short-term borehole heat exchanger simulation: B2G model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A novel dynamic borehole heat exchanger model is presented. • Theoretical approach for model parameters calculation is described. • The short-term model is validated against experimental data of a real GSHP. • Strong dynamic conditions due to the ON–OFF regulation are investigated. - Abstract: Models of ground source heat pump (GSHP) systems are used as an aid for the correct design and optimization of the system. For this purpose, it is necessary to develop models which correctly reproduce the dynamic thermal behavior of each component in a short-term basis. Since the borehole heat exchanger (BHE) is one of the main components, special attention should be paid to ensuring a good accuracy on the prediction of the short-term response of the boreholes. The BHE models found in literature which are suitable for short-term simulations usually present high computational costs. In this work, a novel TRNSYS type implementing a borehole-to-ground (B2G) model, developed for modeling the short-term dynamic performance of a BHE with low computational cost, is presented. The model has been validated against experimental data from a GSHP system located at Universitat Politècnica de València, Spain. Validation results show the ability of the model to reproduce the short-term behavior of the borehole, both for a step-test and under normal operating conditions

  11. Combination of surface and borehole seismic data for robust target-oriented imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; van der Neut, Joost; Arntsen, Børge; Wapenaar, Kees

    2016-05-01

    A novel application of seismic interferometry (SI) and Marchenko imaging using both surface and borehole data is presented. A series of redatuming schemes is proposed to combine both data sets for robust deep local imaging in the presence of velocity uncertainties. The redatuming schemes create a virtual acquisition geometry where both sources and receivers lie at the horizontal borehole level, thus only a local velocity model near the borehole is needed for imaging, and erroneous velocities in the shallow area have no effect on imaging around the borehole level. By joining the advantages of SI and Marchenko imaging, a macrovelocity model is no longer required and the proposed schemes use only single-component data. Furthermore, the schemes result in a set of virtual data that have fewer spurious events and internal multiples than previous virtual source redatuming methods. Two numerical examples are shown to illustrate the workflow and to demonstrate the benefits of the method. One is a synthetic model and the other is a realistic model of a field in the North Sea. In both tests, improved local images near the boreholes are obtained using the redatumed data without accurate velocities, because the redatumed data are close to the target.

  12. Geostatistical Borehole Image-Based Mapping of Karst-Carbonate Aquifer Pores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukop, Michael C; Cunningham, Kevin J

    2016-03-01

    Quantification of the character and spatial distribution of porosity in carbonate aquifers is important as input into computer models used in the calculation of intrinsic permeability and for next-generation, high-resolution groundwater flow simulations. Digital, optical, borehole-wall image data from three closely spaced boreholes in the karst-carbonate Biscayne aquifer in southeastern Florida are used in geostatistical experiments to assess the capabilities of various methods to create realistic two-dimensional models of vuggy megaporosity and matrix-porosity distribution in the limestone that composes the aquifer. When the borehole image data alone were used as the model training image, multiple-point geostatistics failed to detect the known spatial autocorrelation of vuggy megaporosity and matrix porosity among the three boreholes, which were only 10 m apart. Variogram analysis and subsequent Gaussian simulation produced results that showed a realistic conceptualization of horizontal continuity of strata dominated by vuggy megaporosity and matrix porosity among the three boreholes. PMID:26174850

  13. Numerical study on scanning radiation acoustic field in formations generated from a borehole

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHE Xiaohua; ZHANG Hailan; QIAO Wenxiao; JU Xiaodong

    2005-01-01

    Numerical study on scanning radiation acoustic field in formations generated by linear phased array transmitters in a fluid-filled borehole is carried out using a real axis integration (RAI) method. The main lobe width of the acoustic beams and the incident angle on the borehole wall can be controlled by means of adjusting parameters, such as the element number and the delay time between the neighboring array elements of linear phased array transmitter. The steered angle of longitudinal waves generated in the formation satisfies the Snell's law for plane waves when the incident angle on the borehole wall is less than the first critical angle. When the lobe width of the acoustic beams is narrow and the steered angle is less than the first critical angle, the acoustic field in the formation can be approximately calculated given that the linear phased array is put in the formation without borehole. The technique of scanning radiation acoustic field can be applied to enhancing investigation resolution and signal-to-noise ratio in crosswell seismic survey and borehole acoustic reflection imaging.

  14. Interpretation of the tracer testing conducted in the Leuggern borehole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tracer testing was conducted in the Leuggern borehole from July to December 1988 to evaluate the hydraulic properties of the crystalline host rock. The tested interval was an approximately 50 m section of fractured crystalline rock at a depth of greater than 1,600 m. The testing consisted of three tracer injection/recovery periods (uranin - 44 days, eosin - 30 days, and naphtionat -14 days), which utilized tracer injection/circulation rates, ranging between 25 and 50 ml/min. During these testing periods, tracer was injected in either of two 1/4 flow lines ported at the top or bottom of the interval and recovered from the other. Following the three tracer injection periods, a natural outflow tracer recovery test was conducted from the central tubing at an average outflow of 12 l/min. The central tubing was ported near the center of the test interval. Data collected during the testing periods included: continuous monitoring of fluid temperature, injection pressure, and electrical conductivity as well as discrete measurement of flow rates, electrical conductivity, fluid temperature, and tracer concentration. Testing results indicate a downward vertical flow of approximately 195-225 ml/min in the isolated interval, from an upper fracture inflow zone to a lower fracture outflow zone. Through analysis of the dilution levels of uranin and eosin during the injection/recovery periods, and review of field data, the top of the upper inflow zone was determined to be approximately 13 m below the top flow line and the bottom of the outflow zone to be approximately 3 to 5 meters above the bottom flow line. The calculated transmissivity value of 6E-05 m2/s from observed outflow rate and pressure recovery data, is consistent with results derived from previous hydraulic packer testing in the interval. The effective porosity was determined to be 0.1. Dispersion coefficient values ranged from 1.0 m to 5.0 m. The lateral hydraulic gradient value calculated from tracer recovery analysis

  15. Rupture Process for Hayward Microearthquakes Inferred from Borehole Seismic Recordings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taira, T.; Dreger, D. S.; Nadeau, R. M.

    2014-12-01

    The Hayward fault (HF) in the San Francisco Bay Area, California is one of the major strands of the San Andreas fault system, extending for about 70 km. Crustal deformation along the HF is characterized by a wide variety of fault slip behaviors from aseismic creep to stick-slip earthquake including a Mw ~6.8 earthquake in 1868. We here document the high-resolution imaging of the rupture models for the recent M 3+ HF earthquakes by making use of waveforms from the Hayward Fault Network (HFN). The HFN is an array of borehole seismic instrumentation and provides an unprecedented high-resolution coverage of the earthquake source study for HF earthquakes. Using the finite-source rupture inversion with an empirical Green's function approach, we find a variety of rupture propagations including subevents, directivity, and high stress drop. Our finite-source modeling reveals a complex slip distribution for the 2013 Mw 3.2 Orinda earthquake that is characterized by a patch of slip with a maximum slip of 4 cm concentrated near the hypocenter at about 6.6 km depth, with a large secondary patch of slip (peak slip of 2 cm) centered up-dip and southeast from the hypocenter at a distance of about 400 m away. The two subevents release 43% and 23% of the total seismic moment (6.7 x 1013 N m) and the inferred peak stress drops are 18 MPa and 10 MPa. The 2011 Mw 4.0 Berkeley and 2012 Mw 4.0 El Cerrito earthquakes are marked by high stress drop. The inferred peak and mean stress drops are about 130-165 MPa and 45 MPa, respectively, which suggests that there are locally high levels of the fault strength on the HF. Our finite-source modeling suggests that the radiation efficiency determined for these two earthquakes is very low (< 0.1) and implies that majority of energy is dissipated during the earthquake rupture process.

  16. Rock stress measurements in the deep boreholes at Kuhmo, Hyrynsalmi, Sievi, Eurajoki and Konginkangas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydraulic fracturing rock stress measurements, conducted in five boreholes are presented. The boreholes are located in different site investigation areas in Finland: Kuhmo-Romuvaara, Hyrynsalmi-Veitsivaara, Sievi-Syyry, Eurajoki-Olkiluoto and Konginkangas-Kivetty. The aim of the measurements was to provide rock stress data, forming input to the site selection process for an underground facility for disposal of high level radioactive waste from the Olkiluoto Nuclear Power Plant. A summary is given of the theoretical background to the hydrofracturing method, whilst the equipment and experimental procedures used in the present case are described in more detail. All results obtained are presented and subjected to critical discussion. The final stress parameters evaluated are magnitudes and directions of the maximum and minimum horizontal stresses. Testing was successfully completed according to the clan at Syyry, Olkiluoto and Kivetty. Testing was partly successful at Romuvaara but unsuccessful in the borehole at Veitsivaara

  17. Apparatus to drill boreholes in coal. Vorrichtung zum Herstellen von Bohrloechern in Kohle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betting, K.; Schmidt, B.H.; Goeretz, H.; Lingnau, H.; Rausch, M.; Becker, H.

    1982-06-03

    The apparatus to drill boreholes in coal, e.g. for the infusion of the coal face, contains a boring head with several nozzles which are connected to a high pressure water aggregate. The boring head contains a water motor driveable with high pressure water to drill boreholes with small diameters without high constructional expenditure. The rotating part of the boring head is connected with a head bearing several nozzles. The boring head contains outlet channels for high pressure water to transmit a torsional moment on the rotating part. A further arrangement at the boring head guides the boring head in the borehole and reaction propulsion jets maintain the desired position of the borehead during drilling.

  18. Methodology study of Posiva difference flow meter in borehole KLX02 at Laxemar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a co-operative work between SKB and Posiva, the Posiva Flow Log/Difference Flow Meter was tested in borehole KLX02 at Laxemar. Two field campaigns were carried out, Campaign 1 in February-March 2000 and Campaign 2 in May-June 2000. In both Campaigns, the borehole interval 200-1,400 m in borehole KLX02 was measured. Conventional borehole flow meters measure the cumulative flow along a borehole. However, the changes of flow with depth are generally more interesting and useful. The name 'Difference Flow Meter' is due to that the flow meter directly measures these changes of flow along the borehole. The main measurement methods of difference flow logging are sequential and over- lapping flow logging, respectively. In Finland, where the method is developed, the terms normal mode and detailed mode, are used for sequential and overlapping flow logging, respectively. In sequential logging, both the thermal pulse-and thermal dilution methods are sed to measure flow, which results in a lower measurement limit of flow. In overlapping flow logging, only the thermal dilution method is used to speed up the measurement but at a higher measurement limit. The faster measurement rate allows for shorter test sections, i. e. a more detailed screening of the flow differences along a borehole. The methodology study has shown that it is possible to determine the transmissivity of interpreted conductive fractures by different combinations (pairs) of data from overlapping flow logging at different draw downs applied in the hole. Good consistency of calculated transmissivities from different drawdown combinations was generally obtained. In addition, in KLX02, the specific flow rate (Q/s) at each logging sequence was found to be a good estimator of transmissivity. However, this may not be the case in boreholes where large head variations occur along the hole. This study has also shown that the undisturbed freshwater head of the interpreted conductive fractures also may be calculated from

  19. Borehole Summary Report for the 216-B-2-2 Ditch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this borehole summary report is to provide the results of the drilling and sampling as a data package. The 216-B-2-2 Ditch borehole data will be evaluated with other existing data during remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) work plan development for the Gable Mountain Pond/B-Pond and Ditches Cooling Water Group (200-CW-1 ). Additional characterization needs for the ditch, as well as for the 200-CW-1 Waste Group in general, will be defined in an RI/FS work plan for the 200-CW-1 Waste Group planned for preparation in fiscal year 1999. After characterization activities have been completed for the waste group, the information (including the 216-B-2-2 borehole data) will be collectively evaluated and documented in a remedial investigation report

  20. Horonobe URL project. Experience on borehole investigations in surface-based investigation phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JAEA (Japan Atomic Energy Agency) has been conducting the project which is combined with construction of URL (Underground Research Laboratory) on Neogene sedimentary rock in Horonobe-cho, Hokkaido, JAPAN. This project conjugates with the MIU project on crystalline rock in Mizunami-shi, Gifu-prefecture, JAPAN, was started FY1999/2000. The total duration of the project is about twenty years. The project consists of the following three phases; 1) Surface-based investigation phase. 2) Construction phase. 3) Operation phase. This report summarizes the experience for deep borehole investigation in surface based investigation phase, which is the most important investigation in the phase. All the deep borehole investigations had been planed and carried out in taking account of not only technical consideration but also practical and social aspects. Specifically, the report describes the important suggestions derived from the work of the deep borehole investigations. (author)

  1. Practical borehole logging procedures for mineral exploration, with emphasis on uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borehole logging is a basic tool in the exploration for and delineation of uranium deposits. This manual describes recommended procedures for carrying out borehole logging, concentrating on practical aspects of the operation of interest to those actually involved in day-to-day field work. The book begins with a discussion of boreholes and then deals with gamma ray logging as the main method of interest. Information is also provided on other techniques including resistance, spontaneous potential, density and neutron logging. Field procedures are described, and examples of logs and interpretations are given. The appendices provide information on calibration procedures and correction factors, a glossary of useful terms and some relevant basic data regarding drill holes and drilling

  2. Test plan for in situ stress measurement by hydraulic fracturing method in borehole RRL-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrofracturing tests are to be performed to obtain information regarding the magnitudes and the orientations of the principal stresses in the candidate repository horizons at the reference repository location. The tests are to be carried out in borehole RRL-2 located in the central portion of the reference repository location, A-H Site. This series of tests is to be limited to the performance of a maximum of 12 tests in borehole RRL-2. Six of the tests will be performed in the Umtanum flow and six in the middle Sentinel Bluffs flow. Borehole intervals to be tested will be chosen after careful examination of core logs and core photographs. 6 refs., 3 figs

  3. Geophysical borehole logging and optical imaging of the pilot hole ONK-PH2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahti, M. [Suomen Malmi Oy, Espoo (Finland); Heikkinen, E. [JP-Fintact Oy, Vantaa (Finland)

    2005-01-15

    Suomen Malmi Oy conducted geophysical borehole logging and optical imaging surveys of pilot hole ONK-PH2 in ONKALO tunnel at the Olkiluoto site in December 2004. The survey is a part of Posiva Oy's detailed investigation program for the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel. The methods applied are magnetic susceptibility, natural gamma radiation, gamma-gamma density, single point resistance, Wenner-resistivity, borehole radar, full waveform sonic and optical imaging. The assignment included the field work of all the surveys, integration of the data as well as interpretation of the acoustic and borehole radar data. The report describes the field operation, equipment, processing procedures, interpretation results and shows the obtained geophysical and image data. The data as well as the interpretation results are delivered digitally in WellCAD and Excel format. (orig.)

  4. How much do terrain effects impact the IHFC borehole paleoclimate data set?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinle, S.; Gosnold, W.

    2005-12-01

    Comparison of measured T-z profiles in the IHFC borehole-climate database with synthetic T-z profiles generated from the NCDC Climate Division annual data reveals some good agreement and some problems in linking the ground surface temperature (GST) with the surface air temperature (SAT). The change from the long-term annual mean temperature occurred several decades prior to the beginning of the instrumental record. The magnitude of change, warming or cooling, recorded in borehole data is greater than predicted by the meteorological data. Although the ensemble approach to analysis of the borehole data set has been generally accepted, this analysis indicates that the data could be greatly improved by consideration of terrain effects on the ground surface temperature. In this case, terrain effect implies all possible noise signals in the near surface thermal regime, e.g., topography, groundwater, deforestation, and urbanization. This research is supported by NSF ATM-038384

  5. Experimental implementation and assessment of two polarimetric calibration approaches applied for a fully polarimetric borehole radar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fully polarimetric borehole radar system with four combinations of dipole and cylindrical slot antennas was developed to acquire fully polarimetric datasets in drilled boreholes. This system in conjunction with several radar polarimetry techniques has proved to be a good alternative to physical subsurface fracture characterization. Furthermore, such polarimetry techniques, namely Pauli decomposition, eigenvector-based decomposition, Durden–Freeman decomposition and polarimetric anisotropy parameter methods, can provide comparable performances in terms of fracture characterization and classification. Polarimetric calibration to determine a scattering matrix (Sinclare matrix) is the foremost procedure in the radar polarimetry processing chain. In this paper, we experimentally implement and evaluate two polarimetric calibration approaches, namely (1) cross-hole polarimetric calibration and (2) single-hole polarimetric calibration, utilizing fully polarimetric datasets acquired at a specific borehole test site. Both polarimetric calibration approaches can guarantee the further implementation of radar polarimetry techniques, and especially, the single-hole polarimetric calibration will be very meaningful to practical applications

  6. Failure development around a borehole in an orthorhombic thermo-elastoplastic rock medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piłacik, Alicja; Dąbrowski, Marcin

    2016-04-01

    The elastic anisotropy of a rock medium is one of the main factors affecting stress distribution around the borehole. It governs the initiation and propagation of the technologically induced compressive and tensile failure zones, and reopening of natural mechanical discontinuities. We conducted a two-dimensional analysis of failure around a pressurized horizontal borehole in an orthorhombic elastic rock medium subject to variable far-field loads. The analytical solution to the thermoelastic problem was derived. An elastoplastic finite element method code was developed using MILAMIN platform (milamin.org) and implemented in MATLAB. Various yield functions were used, including von Mises, Mohr-Coulomb, Drucker-Prager and Hoek-Brown failure criteria. The analysis was augmented by introducing rock heterogeneities and discrete mechanical discontinuities in the vicinity of the borehole.

  7. High-density support matrices: Key to the deep borehole disposal of spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibb, F.G.F. [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Engineering Materials, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)], E-mail: f.gibb@sheffield.ac.uk; McTaggart, N.A.; Travis, K.P.; Burley, D. [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Engineering Materials, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Hesketh, K.W. [Nexia Solutions Ltd., B709 Springfields, Preston PR4 0XJ (United Kingdom)

    2008-03-15

    Deep (4-5 km) boreholes are emerging as a safe, secure, environmentally sound and potentially cost-effective option for disposal of high-level radioactive wastes, including plutonium. One reason this option has not been widely accepted for spent fuel is because stacking the containers in a borehole could create load stresses threatening their integrity with potential for releasing highly mobile radionuclides like {sup 129}I before the borehole is filled and sealed. This problem can be overcome by using novel high-density support matrices deployed as fine metal shot along with the containers. Temperature distributions in and around the disposal are modelled to show how decay heat from the fuel can melt the shot within weeks of disposal to give a dense liquid in which the containers are almost weightless. Finally, within a few decades, this liquid will cool and solidify, entombing the waste containers in a base metal sarcophagus sealed into the host rock.

  8. Rock stress measurements in the deep boreholes at Kuhmo, Hyrynsalmi, Sievi, Eurajoki and Konginkangas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klasson, H. [Renco Ab (Sweden); Leijon, B. [Nuclear Waste Management (Sweden). Section of SKB

    1990-11-01

    Hydraulic fracturing rock stress measurements, conducted in five boreholes are presented. The boreholes are located in different site investigation areas in Finland: Kuhmo-Romuvaara, Hyrynsalmi-Veitsivaara, Sievi-Syyry, Eurajoki-Olkiluoto and Konginkangas-Kivetty. The aim of the measurements was to provide rock stress data, forming input to the site selection process for an underground facility for disposal of high level radioactive waste from the Olkiluoto Nuclear Power Plant. A summary is given of the theoretical background to the hydrofracturing method, whilst the equipment and experimental procedures used in the present case are described in more detail. All results obtained are presented and subjected to critical discussion. The final stress parameters evaluated are magnitudes and directions of the maximum and minimum horizontal stresses. Testing was successfully completed according to the clan at Syyry, Olkiluoto and Kivetty. Testing was partly successful at Romuvaara but unsuccessful in the borehole at Veitsivaara.

  9. Geophysical borehole logging and optical imaging of the pilot hole ONK-PH2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suomen Malmi Oy conducted geophysical borehole logging and optical imaging surveys of pilot hole ONK-PH2 in ONKALO tunnel at the Olkiluoto site in December 2004. The survey is a part of Posiva Oy's detailed investigation program for the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel. The methods applied are magnetic susceptibility, natural gamma radiation, gamma-gamma density, single point resistance, Wenner-resistivity, borehole radar, full waveform sonic and optical imaging. The assignment included the field work of all the surveys, integration of the data as well as interpretation of the acoustic and borehole radar data. The report describes the field operation, equipment, processing procedures, interpretation results and shows the obtained geophysical and image data. The data as well as the interpretation results are delivered digitally in WellCAD and Excel format. (orig.)

  10. Underground nuclear radiation measurements-gamma ray borehole logging- application to uranium exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gamma-ray borehole logging plays a leading role in uranium exploration programs and more so in the estimation of the geological impulse response function in gamma ray intensity which is solely responsible to delineate the radioactive horizons. In the past several attempts have been made to estimate this function numerically, theoretically and heuristically too based on the controlled experiments. However, the present work is an attempt to determine/estimate this geological function by directly using the data of radioactive borehole logging. It is interesting to note in this study that the results obtained by this approach are not only nearer to the results obtained by the earlier attempts but also encourage to study further in detail under different geological formations. The present model is applied to the gamma ray borehole logging in the areas of Yellapur area, Nalgonda dist., A.P, India for the estimation of the geological function and uranium exploration. (author)

  11. Understanding the relationship between audiomagnetotelluric data and models, and borehole data in a hydrological environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhee, D.K.; Pellerin, L.

    2008-01-01

    Audiomagnetotelluric (AMT) data and resulting models are analyzed with respect to geophysical and geological borehole logs in order to clarify the relationship between the two methodologies of investigation of a hydrological environment. Several profiles of AMT data collected in basins in southwestern United States are being used for groundwater exploration and hydrogeological framework studies. In a systematic manner, the AMT data and models are compared to borehole data by computing the equivalent one-dimensional AMT model and comparing with the two-dimensional (2-D) inverse AMT model. The spatial length is used to determine if the well is near enough to the AMT profile to quantify the relationship between the two datasets, and determine the required resolution of the AMT data and models. The significance of the quality of the borehole data when compared to the AMT data is also examined.

  12. Study of Performance on Recharging the Borehole by Means of Exhaust-air Energy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Ya-su; FAHL(E)N Per

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the performance analysis of recharging the borehole by means of exhaust-air energy is carried out. The results show that a vertical borehole used as heat source for a Ground Source Heat Pump (GSHP) can be recharged in high efficiency. With equal heat transfer capabilities of exhaust-air coil and borehole collector, the system provides a maximum overall efficiency. However, due to ground infinite capacity, the optimum brine flow rate is different from conventional twoexchanger system. The recharging system provides two peak overall efficiencies when the capacity ratio Cr = 5 for laminar flow and Cr = 15 for turbulent flow respectively.The overall efficiency is independent of exhaust-air temperature and undisturbed ground temperature,although the fluid properties depend on temperature. In practical system lower ethyl percentage brine should be chosen if the freezing point meets the system request,which can provide a higher overall efficiency.

  13. High-density support matrices: Key to the deep borehole disposal of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deep (4-5 km) boreholes are emerging as a safe, secure, environmentally sound and potentially cost-effective option for disposal of high-level radioactive wastes, including plutonium. One reason this option has not been widely accepted for spent fuel is because stacking the containers in a borehole could create load stresses threatening their integrity with potential for releasing highly mobile radionuclides like 129I before the borehole is filled and sealed. This problem can be overcome by using novel high-density support matrices deployed as fine metal shot along with the containers. Temperature distributions in and around the disposal are modelled to show how decay heat from the fuel can melt the shot within weeks of disposal to give a dense liquid in which the containers are almost weightless. Finally, within a few decades, this liquid will cool and solidify, entombing the waste containers in a base metal sarcophagus sealed into the host rock

  14. Methodology study of Posiva difference flow meter in borehole KLX02 at Laxemar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludvigson, Jan-Erik; Hansson, Kent [Geosigma AB, Uppsala (Sweden); Rouhiainen, Pekka [PRG-Tec Oy, Espoo (Finland)

    2002-02-01

    As a co-operative work between SKB and Posiva, the Posiva Flow Log/Difference Flow Meter was tested in borehole KLX02 at Laxemar. Two field campaigns were carried out, Campaign 1 in February-March 2000 and Campaign 2 in May-June 2000. In both Campaigns, the borehole interval 200-1,400 m in borehole KLX02 was measured. Conventional borehole flow meters measure the cumulative flow along a borehole. However, the changes of flow with depth are generally more interesting and useful. The name 'Difference Flow Meter' is due to that the flow meter directly measures these changes of flow along the borehole. The main measurement methods of difference flow logging are sequential and over- lapping flow logging, respectively. In Finland, where the method is developed, the terms normal mode and detailed mode, are used for sequential and overlapping flow logging, respectively. In sequential logging, both the thermal pulse-and thermal dilution methods are sed to measure flow, which results in a lower measurement limit of flow. In overlapping flow logging, only the thermal dilution method is used to speed up the measurement but at a higher measurement limit. The faster measurement rate allows for shorter test sections, i. e. a more detailed screening of the flow differences along a borehole. The methodology study has shown that it is possible to determine the transmissivity of interpreted conductive fractures by different combinations (pairs) of data from overlapping flow logging at different draw downs applied in the hole. Good consistency of calculated transmissivities from different drawdown combinations was generally obtained. In addition, in KLX02, the specific flow rate (Q/s) at each logging sequence was found to be a good estimator of transmissivity. However, this may not be the case in boreholes where large head variations occur along the hole. This study has also shown that the undisturbed freshwater head of the interpreted conductive fractures also may be

  15. Interpretation of hydraulic testing in crystalline rock at the Leuggern borehole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the results of hydrogeologic interpretations of all analyzable single packer, double packer, and H-log tests conducted in the crystalline rock in the Leuggern borehole. Testing of the Muschelkalk at 74.95 to 117.85 m depth is discussed by Schmassmann (1985). Test 217.9S, which is discussed in this report, contains 14.51 m of Buntsandstein and 4.79 m into the top of the crystalline. A discussion of the testing and interpretation methods is presented. Data analysis was performed using borehole pressure history and thermally-induced pressure effects to be incorporated into the simulations. Formatio pressure (and corresponding equivalent freshwater heads) were determined for 12 test intervals where testing was performed soon after drilling and the formation had an intermediate to high hydraulic conductivity. The calculated equivalent freshwater heads were between 363 m ASL near the top of the crystalline to about 356 m ASL at the bottom of the borehole. Hydraulic conductivities were estimated for 81 intervals, covering the entire crystalline rock portion of the Leuggern borehole. Interpreted hydraulic conductivities ranged from 2.0E-14 to 1.0E-6 ms-1. A base case specific storage of 2.2E-7 m-1 was estimated for the crystalline rock. A sensitivity analysis was conducted for some tests to determine the uncertainty in the best estimate of hydraulic conductivity related to the choice of specific storage. In these cases, specific storage was varied by 1 to 2 orders of magnitude from the base case value. The measured temperature in the borehole ranged from about 19oC at the top of the crystalline rock to about 66oC at the bottom of the borehole. The temperature increases approximately linearly with depth at a gradient of approximately 3.4oC/100 m. (author) 17 figs., 7 tabs., 40 refs

  16. Key Technologies Analyses to Develop a Deep Borehole disposal Concept for HLW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A deep geological disposal system, the disposal depth is about 500 m below ground, is considered as the safest method to isolate the spent fuels(SF) or high-level radioactive waste(HLW) from the human environment with the best available technology at present time. The disposal safety of this system has been demonstrated with underground research laboratory and some advanced countries such as Finland and Sweden are implementing their disposal project on commercial stage. However, if these high-level radioactive wastes can be disposed of in deeper and more stable rock formation than deep geological disposal depth, it has several advantages. Therefore, as an alternative disposal concept, i. e., deep borehole disposal technology is under consideration in number of countries in terms of its outstanding safety and cost effectiveness. In this paper, the general concept for deep borehole disposal of spent fuels or high level radioactive wastes which has been developed by some countries according to the rapid advance in the development of drilling technology, as an alternative method to the deep geological disposal method, was reviewed. And the key technologies and challenges in development of this disposal method with the nuclear environment were analyzed. In this paper, the general concept of deep borehole disposal for spent fuels or high level radioactive wastes which has been developed by some countries according to the rapid advance in the development of borehole drilling technology, as an alternative method to the deep geological disposal method, was reviewed. And the key technologies, such as drilling technology of large diameter borehole, packaging and emplacement technology, sealing technology and performance/safety analyses technologies, and their challenges in development of deep borehole disposal system were analyzed

  17. Thermal considerations in a very deep borehole nuclear waste repository for synroc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of heat propagation in a very deep borehole radioactive waste repository for Synroc is presented. The deep borehole modeled for the high level wastes is hypothetically sited at approximately 4 km below ground level in a granite host rock. The high level waste containers are placed in the lower section of the borehole to within 1.5 km of the surface and backfilled. A geothermal gradient of 0.03 deg C/m is assumed. Transient temperature field calculations are carried out for both 20 wt% and 10 wt% high level radioactive waste (HLW) bearing Synroc, for cooling periods between reactor discharge and geological disposal varying from 5 years to 50 years. The temperatures in the borehole repository were found to be very sensitive to the surface cooling period as well as the waste loading. The initial heat input of the waste may be controlled by cooling in an interim storage until the total heat output is reduced to a suitably low level. Therefore, surface cooling of at least 15 years for 20 wt% HLW containing Synroc is necessary for the given deep bore hole configuration to avoid the centerline temperatures that might affect durability of Synroc if ground water obtained access to the waste form. On the other hand the corresponding minimum surface cooling period for 10 wt% HLW containing Synroc is predicted to be about 5 years to produce similar temperature profiles in the borehole to those of 20 wt% HLW bearing Synroc with a 15-year cooling period before disposal. A variation in the borehole diameter has also been performed to elucidate the sensitivity of the temperature field of the repository. Copyright (2001) Material Research Society

  18. Fracture characterization at the Conoco Borehole Test Facility using shear-wave anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horne, S.A. [Univ. of Edinburgh (United Kingdom); MacBeth, C.D.; Queen, J.; Rizer, W.D.

    1995-12-31

    Two multi-component near-offset VSP experiments are used, in conjunction with borehole data, to characterise the subsurface fracture system at the Conoco Borehole Test Facility, Oklahoma. Time delays between the fast and slow split shear-waves are observed to correlate with the heavily fractured sandstone formations. Inversion of the shear-wave splitting estimates is achieved using a Genetic Algorithm which incorporates an anisotropic ray tracing scheme. The inversion results suggest that the fracture orientation is sub-vertical. A method of determining fracture dip using an opposite azimuth VSP method is suggested.

  19. Fission-track dating of apatite from deep borehole ATK-1 at Atikokan, Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fission-track age and lengths have been determined on apatite separated from core recovered from the ATK-1 deep borehole at Atikokan, Ontario. The apatite ages decrease down the borehole, from 515 ± 72 Ma at the top to 376 ± 46 Ma at a depth of 993 m. The mean confined track length for fossil fission tracks in the apatite is 12.4 μm. Within the limits of the measurement the track lengths are the same for all the samples. The results of this study indicate that the rocks found currently at the surface have never been heated above ∼100C since Upper Cambrian time

  20. Borehole collector for in-situ chemical analysis of ground water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An apparatus has been designed for collection of ground water samples in locations of limited water flow when atmospheric contamination must be avoided. The system consists of a packer outfitted with valves, a flow cell, and probes for measurement of dissolved oxygen, pH and Eh, and is designed for installation in a 3-inch (7.6-cm) diameter borehole. The oxygen probe, which is a commercially available electrochemical device, functions accurately without water flow or oxygen consumption. The borehole collector system has been used to characterize the ground water in the Climax granite stock at the Nevada Test Site of the US Department of Energy

  1. Core drilling of deep borehole OL-KR39 at Olkiluoto in Eurajoki 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niinimaeki, R. [Suomen Malmi Oy, Espoo (Finland)

    2005-11-15

    Posiva Oy submitted an application to the Finnish Government in May 1999 for the Decision in Principle to choose Olkiluoto in the municipality of Eurajoki as the site of the final disposal facility for spent nuclear fuel. A positive decision was made at the end of 2000 by the Government. The Finnish Parliament ratified the decision in May 2001. The decision makes it possible for Posiva to focus the confirming bedrock investigations at Olkiluoto, where in the next few years an underground rock characterisation facility, ONKALO, will be constructed. As a part of the investigations Suomen Malmi Oy (Smoy) core drilled 502.97 m and 45.11 m deep boreholes with a diameter of 75.7 mm at Olkiluoto in August- October 2005. The identification numbers of the boreholes are OL-KR39 and OL-KR39B, respectively. A set of monitoring measurements and samplings from the drilling and returning water was carried out during the drilling. Both the volume and the electric conductivity of the drilling water and the returning water were recorded. The drill rig was computer controlled and during drilling the computer recorded drilling parameters. The objective of all these measurements was to obtain more information about bedrock and groundwater properties. Sodium fluorescein was used as a label agent in the drilling water. The total volumes of the used drilling and flushing water were 415m{sup 3} and 25 m{sup 3} and the measured volumes of the returning water were 175 m{sup 3} and 7 m{sup 3} in boreholes OLKR39 and OL-KR39B, respectively. The deviation of the borehole was measured with the deviation measuring instruments EMS and Maxibor. Uniaxial compressive strength, Young's Modulus and Poisson' s ratio were measured from the core samples. The average uniaxial compressive strength is about 110 MPa, the average Young's Modulus is 49 GP a and the average Poisson' s ratio is 0.25. The main rock types are migmatitic mica gneiss and granite. Filled fracture is the most common

  2. Core drilling of deep borehole OL-KR3B at Olkiluoto in Eurajoki 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rautio, T. [Suomen Malmi Oy, Espoo (Finland)

    2005-10-15

    Posiva Oy submitted an application for the Decision in Principle to the Finnish Government in May 1999. A positive decision was made at the end of 2000 by the Government. The Finnish Parliament ratified the Decision in Principle on the final disposal facility for spent nuclear fuel at Olkiluoto, Eurajoki in May 2001. The decision makes it possible for Posiva to focus the confirming bedrock investigations at Olkiluoto, where in the next few years an underground rock characterisation facility, ONKALO, will be constructed. As a part of the investigations Suomen Malmi Oy (Smoy) core drilled 530.60 m deep borehole with a diameter of 75.7 mm at Olkiluoto in summer 2005. This borehole was aimed to get additional information of the quality of bedrock in the area, where a new shaft with a diameter of 3 m is planned to be located. The identification number of the borehole is OL-KR38. A set of monitoring measurements and samplings from the drilling and returning water was carried out during the drilling. Both the volume and the electric conductivity of the drilling water and the returning water were recorded. The drill rig was computer controlled and during drilling the computer recorded information about drilling parameters. The objective of these measurements was to obtain more information about bedrock and groundwater properties. Sodium fluorescein was used as a label agent in the drilling water. The volume of the used drilling water was about 473m{sup 3} and the measured volume of the returning water was about 38m{sup 3} in borehole OL-KR38. The deviation of the borehole was measured with the deviation measuring instruments EMS and Devitool Peewee. The results of the EMS measurements indicate that borehole OL-KR38 deviates 1.02 m south and 0.58 m west from the target point at the borehole depth of 525 m. Uniaxial compressive strength, Young's Modulus and Poisson's ratio were measured from the core samples. The average uniaxial compressive strength is about 106

  3. Summary of borehole RRL-2 hydraulic fracturing test data and data analysis method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the results of hydraulic fracturing tests carried out in borehole RRL-2 by the Engineering Development Department of the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP). Test results, raw data, and the method of analysis utilized are presented. This report is intended to aid the reader, who is familiar with the hydraulic fracturing technique, in making an independent review of the reported results. Included are the results of hydraulic fracturing tests conducted in borehole DC-12. These results are provided for comparison purposes only. 5 refs., 50 figs., 4 tabs

  4. Statistical properties of background fractures observed at the deep borehole in KAERI Underground Research Tunnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From the analyses of borehole logging and hydraulic test results, the statistical properties of background fractures were characterized, and HRDs were defined. According to the geological model of the KURT site, the hydrogeological units in the site were categorized to the hydraulic soil domains(HSDs), the hydraulic rock domains and the hydraulic conductor domains. In this study, we analyzed the properties of background fractures observed at Db-1, which is a deep borehole located in KURT with the depth of 600m, and characterized the HRDs in the site

  5. Disposition of excess weapon plutonium in deep boreholes - site selection handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiken, G.; Woldegabriel, G.; Morley, R.; Plannerer, H.; Rowley, J.

    1996-09-01

    One of the options for disposing of excess weapons plutonium is to place it near the base of deep boreholes in stable crystalline rocks. The technology needed to begin designing this means of disposition already exists, and there are many attractive sites available within the conterminous United States. There are even more potential sites for this option within Russia. The successful design of a borehole system must address two criteria: (1) how to dispose of 50 metric tons of weapons plutonium while making it inaccessible for unauthorized retrieval, and (2) how to prevent contamination of the accessible biosphere, defined here as the Earth`s surface and usable groundwaters.

  6. Radiological effects of radionuclides released through a borehole in a radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiological effects of the nuclides released through the borehole penetrating a radioactive waste repository are evaluated. The release rates of the long-lived radionuclides are computed using the model considering the diffusion in the water-filled borehole and the rock matrix. Transport of radionuclides in the aquifer is computed using an analytic solution. The result shows that total dose rates for 500,000 years are most originated from Tc-99 and the maximum committed dose rate is 3.29 x 10-15 mrem/yr

  7. Intermediate scale borehole (Room C): In situ data report (January 1989--June 1993)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data are presented from the intermediate scale borehole test, an in situ test fielded in the pillar separating Rooms C1 and C2 at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The test was to provide data on the influence of scale, if any, on the structural behavior of underground openings in salt. These data include selected fielding information, test configuration, instrumentation activities, and comprehensive results from a large number of gages. Construction of the test began in December 1989, with the drilling of the intermediate scale borehole in December 1990. Gage data in this report cover the period from January 1989 through June 1993

  8. Ultimate disposal of HTR spent fuel elements in a borehole-prepared site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept of the Federal Republic of Germany for disposal of radioactive waste that considerably develops heat is to place them in vertical boreholes in salt rock. Among the wastes to be placed there is MAW from the LWR spent fuel reprocessing, and spent fuel from HTR. The technical know-how required for this method is acquired within the project 'MAW and HTR spent fuel test storage in boreholes', under KFA project leadership. Goals and organisation of the project are explained, and the status of work performed with particular regard to HTR spent fuel management is reported. (orig.)

  9. Hydrogeological characterisation using cross-borehole ground penetration radar and electrical resistivity tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zibar, Majken Caroline Looms

    2007-01-01

    . The methods provided estimates of soil moisture content and electrical resistivity variations among 12 m deep boreholes located 5 – 7 m apart. The moisture content change following natural precipitation was observed to be practically negligible, providing minimal information to constrain the dynamic...... properties of the subsurface. On the other hand, volumetric moisture content variations of up to 5% were observed during a 20-day long forced infiltration experiment. The cross-borehole electrical resistance tomography and ground penetrating radar data collected during this experiment were subsequently...

  10. Borehole water and hydrologic model around the Nojima fault, SW Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Fujimoto, Koichiro; Ueda, A; Ohtani, Tomoyuki; Takahashi, M; Ito, Hisao; Tanaka, H.; Boullier, Anne-Marie

    2007-01-01

    The active fault drilling at Nojima Hirabayashi after the 1995 Hyogoken-nanbu (Kobe) earthquake (MJMA = 7.2) provides us with a unique opportunity to investigate subsurface fault structure and the in-situ properties of fault and fluid. The borehole intersected the fault gouge of the Nojima fault at a depth interval of 623m to 625m. The lithology is mostly Cretaceous granodiorite with some porphyry dikes. The fault core is highly permeable due to fracturing. The borehole water was sampled in 1...

  11. The use of progression cavity pumps in the exploitation of geothermal energy from deep boreholes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Željko Vukelić

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In the article, we aim to demonstrate the use of progression cavity pumps in the exploitation of geothermal energy from deep boreholes. The progression cavity pumps presented in the article are the kind generally used to extract oil from deep boreholes. The former provide a very large amount of power while overcoming the pressure elevations of extraction. Their capacity is relatively small, up to 0,005 m3/s. It is expedient to use such pumps during the exploitation of geothermal energy when we do not have sufficiently powerful centrifugal pumps at our disposal and when the exploitation of thermal water is intended for the purposes of health tourism.

  12. Core drilling of deep borehole OL-KR36 at Olkiluoto in Eurajoki 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Posiva Oy submitted an application for the Decision in Principle to the Finnish Government in May 1999. A positive decision was made at the end of 2000 by the Government. The Finnish Parliament ratified the Decision in Principle on the final disposal facility for spent nuclear fuel at Olkiluoto, Eurajoki in May 2001. The decision makes it possible for Posiva to focus the confirming bedrock investigations at Olkiluoto, where in the next few years an underground rock characterisation facility, ONKALO, will be constructed. As a part of the investigations Suomen Malmi Oy (Smoy) core drilled 205.17 m deep borehole with a diameter of 75.7 mm at Olkiluoto in May 2005. This borehole was aimed to get additional information of the quality of bedrock and the anomalous part of the bedrock and quality and the location of the fractured zones R19A and R19B. The identification number of the borehole is OL-KR36. A set of monitoring measurements and samplings from the drilling and returning water was carried out during the drilling. Both the volume and the electric conductivity of the drilling water and the returning water were recorded. The drill rig was computer controlled and during drilling the computer recorded information about drilling measurements. The objective of all these measurements was to obtain more information about bedrock and groundwater properties. Sodium fluorescein was used as a label agent in the drilling water. The volume of the used drilling water was about 117 m3 and the measured volume of the returning water was about 51m3 in borehole OL-KR36. The deviation of the borehole was measured with the deviation measuring instruments EMS and Maxibor. The results of the Maxibor measurements indicate that borehole OL-KR36 deviates 10.34 m left and 7.11 m up at the borehole depth of 204 m. Uniaxial compressive strength, Young's Modulus and Poisson' s ratio were measured from the core samples. The average uniaxial compressive strength is about 126 MPa, the average

  13. Core drilling of deep borehole OL-KR34 at Olkiluoto in Eurajoki 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Posiva Oy submitted an application for the Decision in Principle to the Finnish Government in May 1999. A positive decision was made at the end of 2000 by the Government. The Finnish Parliament ratified the Decision in Principle on the final disposal facility for spent nuclear fuel at Olkiluoto, Eurajoki in May 2001. The decision makes it possible for Posiva to focus the confirming bedrock investigations at Olkiluoto, where in the next few years an underground rock characterisation facility, ONKALO, will be constructed. As a part of the investigations Suomen Malmi Oy (Smoy) core drilled 100.07 m deep borehole with a diameter of 75.7 mm at Olkiluoto in April 2005. This borehole was aimed to get additional information of the quality of bedrock and the anomalous part of the bedrock and quality and the location of the fractured zones R19A and R19B. The identification number of the borehole is OL-KR34. A set of monitoring measurements and samplings from the drilling and returning water was carried out during the drilling. Both the volume and the electric conductivity of the drilling water and the returning water were recorded. The drill rig was computer controlled and during drilling the computer recorded information about drilling parameters. The objective of all measurements was to obtain more information about bedrock and groundwater properties. Sodium fluorescein was used as a label agent in the drilling water. The volume of the used drilling water was about 37m3 and the measured volume of the returning water was about 18m3 in borehole OL-KR34. The deviation of the borehole was measured with the deviation measuring instruments EMS and Maxibor. The results of the Maxibor measurements indicate that borehole OLKR34 deviates 0.84 m right and 0.15 m up at the borehole depth of 99 m. Uniaxial compressive strength, Young's Modulus and Poisson' s ratio were measured from the core samples. The average uniaxial compressive strength is about 142 MPa, the average Young

  14. System and method to estimate compressional to shear velocity (VP/VS) ratio in a region remote from a borehole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vu, Cung; Nihei, Kurt T; Schmitt, Denis P; Skelt, Christopher; Johnson, Paul A; Guyer, Robert; TenCate, James A; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves

    2012-10-16

    In some aspects of the disclosure, a method for creating three-dimensional images of non-linear properties and the compressional to shear velocity ratio in a region remote from a borehole using a conveyed logging tool is disclosed. In some aspects, the method includes arranging a first source in the borehole and generating a steered beam of elastic energy at a first frequency; arranging a second source in the borehole and generating a steerable beam of elastic energy at a second frequency, such that the steerable beam at the first frequency and the steerable beam at the second frequency intercept at a location away from the borehole; receiving at the borehole by a sensor a third elastic wave, created by a three wave mixing process, with a frequency equal to a difference between the first and second frequencies and a direction of propagation towards the borehole; determining a location of a three wave mixing region based on the arrangement of the first and second sources and on properties of the third wave signal; and creating three-dimensional images of the non-linear properties using data recorded by repeating the generating, receiving and determining at a plurality of azimuths, inclinations and longitudinal locations within the borehole. The method is additionally used to generate three dimensional images of the ratio of compressional to shear acoustic velocity of the same volume surrounding the borehole.

  15. 30 CFR 75.1321 - Permits for firing more than 20 boreholes and for use of nonpermissible blasting units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... for use of nonpermissible blasting units. 75.1321 Section 75.1321 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND...-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1321 Permits for firing more than 20 boreholes and for use of nonpermissible blasting units. (a) Applications for permits for firing more than 20 boreholes in...

  16. Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediments Below the C Tank Farm: Borehole C4297 and RCRA Borehole 299-E27-22

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Christopher F.; Serne, R. JEFFREY; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Horton, Duane G.; Lanigan, David C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Vickerman, Tanya S.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Baum, Steven R.; Parker, Kent E.; Lindberg, Michael J.

    2006-10-18

    The overall goal of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., is to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities at Hanford. To meet this goal, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. tasked scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to perform detailed analyses on vadose zone sediments from within Waste Management Area (WMA) C. This report is the first of two reports written to present the results of these analyses. Specifically, this report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from borehole C4297, installed adjacent to Tank C-105, and from borehole 299-E27-22, installed directly north of the C Tank Farm. Sediments from borehole 299-E27-22 were considered to be background uncontaminated sediments against which to compare contaminated sediments for the C Tank Farm characterization effort. This report also presents our interpretation of the data in the context of sediment types, the vertical extent of contamination, the migration potential of the contaminants, and the likely source of the contamination in the vadose zone and groundwater below the C Tank Farm. The information presented in this report supports the A-AX, C and U Waste Management Area field investigation report(a) in preparation by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. A core log was generated for both boreholes and a geologic evaluation of all core samples was performed at the time of opening. Aliquots of sediment from the borehole core samples were analyzed and characterized in the laboratory for the following parameters: moisture content, gamma-emitting radionuclides, one-to-one water extracts (which provide soil pH, electrical conductivity, cation, trace metal, and anion data), total carbon and inorganic carbon content, and 8 M nitric acid extracts (which provide a measure of the total leachable sediment content of contaminants). Two key radiocontaminants

  17. SNG-log in borehole P7 in Faxe Chalk Quarry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsbech, Uffe C C

    1996-01-01

    A spectral natural gamma-ray log in a 190 m borehole in Faxe chalk quarry confirms that Danish bryozoan and corallic limestones contain very low levels of natural radioactivity. Due to the low content of natural radioactivity it has been possible to observe the influence from cosmic radiation. The...

  18. Focused modelling. Fracture identification in Olkiluoto borehole OL-KR04

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An extensive set of measured borehole data has been obtained from geological repository investigations in the bedrock of Olkiluoto. Our hypothesis is that geophysical data may be used more efficiently to identify and classify fracture zones. It is known that several geophysical logging methods yield useful information outside the borehole walls that cannot be reached otherwise. At present, this data is used for additional fracture characterization but not for identification purposes. The study focuses on the application of 14 different geophysical data measured in the borehole OL-KR04. The whole data set is divided into main groups using the Principal Component Analysis (PCA). Each group is composed mainly of sensitive methods detecting specific physical characteristics. The main groups from the geophysical point of view are open fractures, reduced density, increased electrical conductivity, and increased natural radiation. The Varimax optimization method is used to maximize the importance of supporting data as well as to emphasize differences between the discovered principal components. In fracture zone analysis, drilling core samples and the hydrological measurement results form an indispensable data set. For practical reasons, and in order to fulfill the requirements of the PCA analysis, S-wave velocity and electrical resistivity measurements are also performed. A combination of these methods, simultaneously applied using suitable 'trigger limits', identifies penetrated extensive fracture sections in a borehole cost-effectively and unambiguously. (orig.)

  19. Ways for enhancing efficiency of well logging of low-discharge borehole-pump well

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Consideration is given to the problem of using a gamma densitometer in exploration of high-pressure boreholes aimed at finding flooding intervals. The fields of its use are demonstated. The packer densitometer is described, its efficiency under the conditions of low yield and extensive flooding is shown

  20. Compression directions north of the San Fernando Valley determined from borehole breakouts

    OpenAIRE

    Kerkela, Stacy; Stock, Joann M

    1996-01-01

    Borehole breakouts in 4 nearly vertical oil wells, and several other deviated holes, in the San Fernando Valley and Santa Susana Mountains suggest a maximum horizontal compressive stress direction (S_H) of N49°W. These wells provide information about the stress field from 1974 to 1983 in the uppermost crust (

  1. Impact of maximum borehole depths on ground warming patterns: A spatial analysis over the Northern Hemisphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrami, Hugo; Matharoo, Gurpreet S.; Smerdon, Jason E.

    2013-04-01

    Past variations in the Earth's surface energy balance are preserved in the terrestrial subsurface and can be inferred from borehole temperature-depth profiles. These profiles are used to reconstruct past ground surface temperature (GST) histories. Recent work by Beltrami et al. (2011) has shown that estimated GST histories can be significantly impacted by the maximum depth of the borehole temperature measurement. In the present study, we use temperature-depth profiles measured at 558 sites distributed between 30o N and 60o N in the Northern Hemisphere. For each site, the background steady-state temperature profile is estimated using progressively deeper maximum depths of truncation. Additionally, GST histories are reconstructed using multiple maximum depth truncations. In order to control on the influence of the geographical sampling, shallow boreholes are dropped from the analysis once their depth is surpassed. The estimated temperature changes over 50-yr intervals are evaluated in these reconstructions as a function of the maximum truncation depth in the database. Similarly, the total terrestrial heat gain is also estimated using progressive depths of truncations. All calculations show a significant dependence on the maximum depths of the borehole profiles and further indicate the importance of this factor in estimates of past temperature and heat content histories derived from geothermal data. Further, calculations also show that the ground has warmed by 0.5o over last 100 years consistent with the earlier studies by Beltrami and Bourlon (2004).

  2. Computer modeling and laboratory experiments of a specific borehole to surface electrical monitoring technique (BSEMT)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meekes, J.A.C.; Zhang, X.; Abdul Fattah, R.

    2011-01-01

    Geophysical monitoring of the dynamical behavior of subsurface reservoirs (oil, gas, CO2) remains an important issue in geophysical research. A new idea for reservoir monitoring based on electrical resistivity tomography was developed at TNO. The essential element of the so-called BSEMT (Borehole to

  3. Characterization of earthquake fault by borehole experiments; Koseinai sokutei ni yoru jishin danso no kenshutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, H.; Miyazaki, T.; Nishizawa, O.; Kuwahara, Y.; Kiguchi, T. [Geological Survey of Japan, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1996-05-01

    A borehole was excavated to penetrate the Nojima fault at the Hirabayashi area, to investigate the underground structures of the fault by observation of the cores and well logging. The borehole was excavated from 74.6m east of the fault surface. Soil is of granodiorite from the surface, and fault clay at a depth in a range from 624.1 to 625.1m. Observation of the cores, collected almost continuously, indicates that the fault fracture zone expands in a depth range from 557 to 713.05m. The well logging experiments are natural potential, resistivity, density, gamma ray, neutron, borehole diameter, microresistivity and temperature. They are also for DSI- and FMI-observation, after expansion of the borehole. The well logging results indicate that resistivity, density and elastic wave velocity decrease as distance from fault clay increases, which well corresponds to the soil conditions. The BHTV and FMI analyses clearly detect the fault clay demarcations, and show that elastic wave velocity and BHTV results differ at above and below the fault. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Composite surface temperature history from simultaneous inversion of borehole temperatures in western Canadian plains

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Majorowicz, J. A.; Šafanda, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 29, 3/4 (2001), s. 231-239. ISSN 0921-8181 Grant ostatní: UNESCO(XX) IGCP No.428 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3012916 Keywords : global warming * geothermics * borehole temperatures * ground temperatures Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 1.381, year: 2001

  5. [The content of radon 222Rn in deep borehole water of the Pojezierze Mazurskie terrain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachocki, K A; Gorzkowski, B; Majle, T; Rózycki, Z

    1997-01-01

    Radon 222Rn in deep borehole water of Pojezierze Mazurskie region has been quantitative determined. The measurement were performed using the alpha liquid scintillation counting method. The water samples were examined from three voivodships: Elblag, Olsztyn and Suwałki. In some cases the concentrations of 222Rn in investigated water samples exceed 11 Bq/l. PMID:9273666

  6. The contents of radon in deep borehole water of hydro-geological region of Gdansk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon 222Rn in deep borehole water of Gdansk Hydrogeological Region has been quantitatively determined. This region is located in east part of Gdansk Voivodship and in west part of Elblag Voivodship including Zulawy. The measurements were performed using alpha liquid scintillation counting method. Only in some case the concentrations of 222Rn in investigated samples exceed recommended limit 11 Bq/l. (author)

  7. The contents of radon 222Rn in deep borehole water of Pojezierze Mazurskie region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon 222Rn in deep borehole water of Pojezierze Mazurskie region has been quantitatively determined. The measurement were performed using the alpha liquid scintillation counting method. The water samples were examined from 3 provinces: Elblag, Olsztyn and Suwalki. In some cases the concentrations of 222Rn in investigated water samples exceed 11 Bq/l. (author)

  8. Analysis of ground water from boreholes, river water and precipitation in the Underground Research Laboratory project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Horonobe Underground Research Laboratory (URL) Project, ground water from boreholes, river water and precipitation have been periodically analyzed for the environmental monitoring since the fiscal year 2001. This report shows the data set of water chemistry since the fiscal year 2001 to the fiscal year 2006. (author)

  9. Research on Deep Joints and Lode Extension Based on Digital Borehole Camera Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Zengqiang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Structure characteristics of rock and orebody in deep borehole are obtained by borehole camera technology. By investigating on the joints and fissures in Shapinggou molybdenum mine, the dominant orientation of joint fissure in surrounding rock and orebody were statistically analyzed. Applying the theory of metallogeny and geostatistics, the relationship between joint fissure and lode’s extension direction is explored. The results indicate that joints in the orebody of ZK61borehole have only one dominant orientation SE126° ∠68°, however, the dominant orientations of joints in surrounding rock were SE118° ∠73°, SW225° ∠70° and SE122° ∠65°, NE79° ∠63°. Then a preliminary conclusion showed that the lode’s extension direction is specific and it is influenced by joints of surrounding rock. Results of other boreholes are generally agree well with the ZK61, suggesting the analysis reliably reflects the lode’s extension properties and the conclusion presents important references for deep ore prospecting.

  10. Thermal instability of the fluid column in a borehole: application to the Yaxcopoil hole (Mexico)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čermák, Vladimír; Šafanda, Jan; Bodri, L.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 99, č. 6 (2010), s. 1437-1451. ISSN 1437-3254 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA205/06/1181 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Keywords : temperature monitoring * borehole convection * recurrence and recurrence interval analyses * spectral analysis Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 1.980, year: 2010

  11. Analysis of Geo-Temperature Restoration Performance under Intermittent Operation of Borehole Heat Exchanger Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaofeng Li

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Intermittent operation can improve the coefficient of performance (COP of a ground source heat pump (GSHP system. In this paper, an analytical solution to analyze the geo-temperature restoration performance under intermittent operation of borehole heat exchanger (BHE fields is established. For this purpose, the moving finite line source model is combined with the g-function and the superposition principle. The model takes into account the heat transfer along the borehole, thermal interference between BHEs, and the influence of groundwater flow. The accuracy of the model is validated through comparison with an experiment carried out under intermittent operation. The model makes it possible to analyze the geo-temperature restoration performance and its influencing factors, such as BHE spacing, heat flow rate, operation mode, and groundwater flow. The main conclusions of this work are as follows. The heat transfer along the borehole should be considered when analyzing the geo-temperature restoration performance. When the BHE spacing increases, the soil temperature change decreases and the heat recovery improves. Therefore, adequate borehole separation distance is essential in the case of a multiple BHE system with unbalanced load. The presence of groundwater flow is associated with interference between the BHEs, which should not be ignored. In the case of long-term operation, the groundwater flow is beneficial to the geo-temperature recovery process, even for downstream BHEs. Finally, a greater groundwater flux leads to a better geo-temperature recovery.

  12. Non-radiometric borehole geophysical detection of geochemical haloes surrounding sedimentary uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roll-type uranium deposits are formed by the concentration of uranium by ground-water in geochemical cells. Non-uranium minerals having different solubilities may be deposited ahead of or behind the uranium minerals, forming haloes that surround the ore. In addition, oxidizing and reducing environmental conditions may cause zones of mineral alteration to develop beyond the limits of the uranium deposit. Certain physical property anomalies that are commonly associated with haloes can be detected by relatively fast and inexpensive borehole geophysical measurements made either in individual holes, or between two adjacent holes. Borehole measurements that have been found to be useful include electrical resistivity, induced polarization, and magnetic susceptibility. Electrical resistivity is increased by the presence of calcite and other cementing minerals that sometimes create permeability barriers in the neighbourhood of uranium deposits. Induced polarization (IP) response is increased by sulphide and clay minerals that are commonly found in anomalous concentrations near roll-type deposits. Magnetic susceptibility is usually decreased by the oxidation of magnetite to hematite or limonite in the zone of chemical alteration that is left as a trail behind roll fronts. Borehole measurements of electrical resistivity, induced polarization and magnetic susceptibility were made in the vicinity of a uranium roll-type deposit in south Texas. Results indicate that mineral haloes can be detected by borehole measurements made in wide-spaced drill holes, and that the total amount of drilling needed to find a deposit can be reduced substantially by this exploration approach. (author)

  13. Hydrochemical borehole logs characterizing fluoride contamination in a crystalline aquifer (Maheshwaram, India)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauwels, Hélène; Négrel, Philippe; Dewandel, Benoit; Perrin, Jerome; Mascré, Cédric; Roy, Stéphane; Ahmed, Shakeel

    2015-06-01

    Hydrochemical borehole-loggings with a submersible Idronaut Ocean Seven 302 multiparameter probe equipped of F- and NO3-ion-selective electrodes in combination with EC, pH and dissolved oxygen, were applied for characterizing fluoride (F) contamination in a crystalline (hard-rock) aquifer of a small Indian agricultural watershed where groundwater is intensively abstracted for rice irrigation. A high accuracy of F concentrations determined in-situ-shown by comparing with laboratory analyses-was obtained through using conductivity logs for ionic strength consideration. Large variations in chemical composition and particularly of F-concentration were observed inside boreholes, though restricted to the weathered/fractured layer down to 30-35 m depth. This conforms to the hydrogeological model of a crystalline aquifer where most groundwater flow occurs in the shallow part of the fractured zone. The general trend of increasing F content with depth results from F accumulation through water-rock interaction, but the shape of the F profile depends on the connectivity of the fracture network close to the borehole. The concentrations seen within the water-table fluctuation zone locally suggest F input from fertilizers in groundwater, in addition to the earlier-demonstrated role of evaporation from irrigation return flow. It is also likely that, locally, the deepening of boreholes has contributed to increasing the population's vulnerability by tapping F-enriched groundwater at depth.

  14. Comprehensive borehole management for shorter drilling time; Umfassendes Bohrfortschrittsmanagement zur Verkuerzung der Bohrprojektdauer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roehrlich, M. [ExxonMobil Production Deutschland GmbH, Hannover (Germany)

    2007-09-13

    In 2006, the trademarked ExxonMobil Fast Drill Process (FDP) was introduced also in the German ExxonMobil boreholes. The process is to maximize the drilling speed for every meter drilled. The process makes it possible to ensure borehole management on the basis of quantitative data and in consideration of all phases that are relevant for sinking a borehole. The FDP is used world-wide in all ExxonMobil drilling departments. More than 1.35 million meters are drilled annually in many different boreholes with different geological conditions, drilling profiles and international sites. The results were similar in many cases, with a significant increase in ROP and drill bit life, and with less damage caused by vibrations. FDP was developed on the basis of real time monitoring of the specific mechanical energy (MSE) required for drilling. MSE monitoring was found to be an effective tool dor detecting inefficient functioning of the drill bit and the overall system. To make operation more efficient, the causes must be identified and measures must be taken accordingly, taking into account the potential risks involved in such measures. MSE monitoring is a tool while FDPL is a broad management process ensuring that MSE and many other data sources are used effectively for optimisation of the ROP. Consequent implementation of the process resulted in a significant increase of the ROP. The major elements required for achieving this goal are discussed. (orig.)

  15. Letter Report: Borehole Flow and Horizontal Hydraulic Conductivity with Depth at Well ER-12-4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phil L. Oberlander; Charles E. Russell

    2005-12-31

    Borehole flow and fluid temperature during pumping were measured at well ER-12-4 at the Nevada Test Site in Nye County, Nevada. This well was constructed to characterize the carbonate aquifer. The well is cased from land surface to the total depth at 1,132 m (3,713 ft bgs) below ground surface (bgs). The screened section of the well consists of alternating sections of slotted well screen and blank casing from 948 to 1,132 m bgs (3,111 to 3,713 ft bgs). Borehole flow velocity (LT-1) with depth was measured with an impeller flowmeter from the top of the screened section to the maximum accessible depth while the well was pumped and under ambient conditions. A complicating factor to data interpretation is that the well was not filter packed and there is upward and downward vertical flow in the open annulus under ambient and pumping conditions. The open annulus in the well casing likely causes the calculated borehole flow rates being highly nonrepresentative of inflow from the formation. Hydraulic conductivities calculated under these conditions would require unsupportable assumptions and would be subject to very large uncertainties. Borehole hydraulic conductivities are not presented under these conditions.

  16. Letter Report: Borehole Flow and Horizontal Hydraulic Conductivity with Depth at Well ER-12-3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Oberlander; C. Russell

    2005-09-01

    Borehole flow and fluid temperature during pumping were measured at well ER-12-3 at the Nevada Test Site in Nye County, Nevada. This well was constructed to characterize the carbonate aquifer. The well is cased from land surface to the total depth at 1,487 m (4,880 ft) below ground surface (bgs). Slotted screen is placed in an upper screened section from 1,095 to 1,160 m bgs (3,591 to 3,805 ft bgs) and in the lower screened section from 1,278 to 1,474 m bgs (4,191 to 4,834 ft bgs). Borehole flow velocity (LT-1) with depth was measured with an impeller flowmeter from the top of the screened section to the maximum accessible depth while the well was pumped and under ambient conditions. A complicating factor to data interpretation is that the well was not filter packed and there is significant upward and downward vertical flow in the open annulus under ambient and pumping conditions. The open annulus and large vertical flow velocities in the well casing result in the measured borehole flow rates being potentially highly nonrepresentative of conditions in the aquifer. Hydraulic conductivities calculated under these conditions would require unsupportable assumptions and would be subject to very large uncertainties. Borehole hydraulic conductivities are not presented under these conditions.

  17. MODELING OF THE GROUNDWATER TRANSPORT AROUND A DEEP BOREHOLE NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N. Lubchenko; M. Rodríguez-Buño; E.A. Bates; R. Podgorney; E. Baglietto; J. Buongiorno; M.J. Driscoll

    2015-04-01

    The concept of disposal of high-level nuclear waste in deep boreholes drilled into crystalline bedrock is gaining renewed interest and consideration as a viable mined repository alternative. A large amount of work on conceptual borehole design and preliminary performance assessment has been performed by researchers at MIT, Sandia National Laboratories, SKB (Sweden), and others. Much of this work relied on analytical derivations or, in a few cases, on weakly coupled models of heat, water, and radionuclide transport in the rock. Detailed numerical models are necessary to account for the large heterogeneity of properties (e.g., permeability and salinity vs. depth, diffusion coefficients, etc.) that would be observed at potential borehole disposal sites. A derivation of the FALCON code (Fracturing And Liquid CONvection) was used for the thermal-hydrologic modeling. This code solves the transport equations in porous media in a fully coupled way. The application leverages the flexibility and strengths of the MOOSE framework, developed by Idaho National Laboratory. The current version simulates heat, fluid, and chemical species transport in a fully coupled way allowing the rigorous evaluation of candidate repository site performance. This paper mostly focuses on the modeling of a deep borehole repository under realistic conditions, including modeling of a finite array of boreholes surrounded by undisturbed rock. The decay heat generated by the canisters diffuses into the host rock. Water heating can potentially lead to convection on the scale of thousands of years after the emplacement of the fuel. This convection is tightly coupled to the transport of the dissolved salt, which can suppress convection and reduce the release of the radioactive materials to the aquifer. The purpose of this work has been to evaluate the importance of the borehole array spacing and find the conditions under which convective transport can be ruled out as a radionuclide transport mechanism

  18. Core drilling of deep borehole OL-KR37 at Olkiluoto in Eurajoki 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Posiva Oy submitted an application to the Finnish Government in May 1999 for the Decision in Principle to choose Olkiluoto in the municipality of Eurajoki as the site of the final disposal facility for spent nuclear fuel. A positive decision was made at the end of 2000 by the Government. The Finnish Parliament ratified the decision in May 2001. The decision makes it possible for Posiva to focus the confirming bedrock investigations at Olkiluoto, where in the next few years an underground rock characterisation facility, ONKALO, will be constructed. As a part of the investigations Suomen Malmi Oy (Smoy) core drilled 350.00 m and 45.10 m deep boreholes with a diameter of 75.7 mm at Olkiluoto in June- August 2005. The identification numbers of the boreholes are OL-KR37 and OL-KR37B, respectively. A set of monitoring measurements and samplings from the drilling and returning water was carried out during the drilling. Both the volume and the electric conductivity of the drilling water and the returning water were recorded. The drill rig was computer controlled and during drilling the computer recorded information about drilling parameters. The objective of all these measurements was to obtain more information about bedrock and groundwater properties. Sodium fluorescein was used as a label agent in the drilling water. The total volumes of the used drilling and flushing water were 273 m3 and 21m3 and the measured volumes of the returning water were 221m3 and 16m3 in boreholes OL-KR37 and OL-KR37B, respectively. The deviation of the borehole was measured with the deviation measuring instruments EMS and Maxibor. Uniaxial compressive strength, Young's Modulus and Poisson' s ratio were measured from the core samples. The average uniaxial compressive strength is about 106 MPa, the average Young's modulus is 40 GPa and the average Poisson's ratio is 0.20. The main rock types are migmatitic mica gneiss, granite and tonalite. Filled fracture is the most common fracture type. The

  19. Moving to Google Cloud: Renovation of Global Borehole Temperature Database for Climate Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Y.; Huang, S.

    2013-12-01

    Borehole temperature comprises an independent archive of information on climate change which is complementary to the instrumental and other proxy climate records. With support from the international geothermal community, a global database of borehole temperatures has been constructed for the specific purpose of the study on climate change. Although this database has become an important data source in climate research, there are certain limitations partially because the framework of the existing borehole temperature database was hand-coded some twenty years ago. A database renovation work is now underway to take the advantages of the contemporary online database technologies. The major intended improvements include 1) dynamically linking a borehole site to Google Earth to allow for inspection of site specific geographical information; 2) dynamically linking an original key reference of a given borehole site to Google Scholar to allow for a complete list of related publications; and 3) enabling site selection and data download based on country, coordinate range, and contributor. There appears to be a good match between the enhancement requirements for this database and the functionalities of the newly released Google Fusion Tables application. Google Fusion Tables is a cloud-based service for data management, integration, and visualization. This experimental application can consolidate related online resources such as Google Earth, Google Scholar, and Google Drive for sharing and enriching an online database. It is user friendly, allowing users to apply filters and to further explore the internet for additional information regarding the selected data. The users also have ways to map, to chart, and to calculate on the selected data, and to download just the subset needed. The figure below is a snapshot of the database currently under Google Fusion Tables renovation. We invite contribution and feedback from the geothermal and climate research community to make the

  20. Research project MAW and HTR fuel element test storage in boreholes (MHV project). Emplacement and borehole sealing techniques (EBT part-project). Final report on project phase October 1, 1989 - December 31, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper documents the working results of the third project phase from 1.10.89 to 31.12.92. At the beginning, the atmosphere in the repository borehole during the operational and post-operational phase is described. The borehole atmosphere is decisively influenced by gas and humidity releases from the waste forms and the solid rock salt, by the propagation of gases in the unfilled part of the borehole and in the part backfilled with salt grit, and by the permiabilities of the borehole lock and the solid bedrock. Hydrogen gas may be oxidized by an addition agent. The reference concept of borehole storage is the embedding of the waste forms in salt grit. The salt grit backfill required therefore is characterized, and pressure distribution in the backfill during storing of the forms in the borehole is modelled. Finally the flame extinguishing effect of salt grit is described. Safety considerations and a draft concept of a borehole backfill container complete the work of this project phase. (orig./HP)

  1. BACTERIOLOGICAL ANALYSIS AND PUBLIC PERCEPTION ABOUT DRINKING WATER OF BOREHOLES IN ARIB (AIN DEFLA, ALGERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. C. Hamaidi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Water from boreholes in Arib (Ain Defla, south-west of Algeria was investigated to ascertain its quality status and suitability for drinking and domestic uses. Fifty six water samples were collected from four boreholes. The analyses of the Coliform counts obtained from various boreholes samples ranged between 0 and 200 CFU/ 100 ml with regard to total Coliforms and between 0 and 8 CFU/ 100 ml with regard to fecal Coliforms. Three of the boreholes samples showed contamination by Streptococcus sp. Pathogens like Salmonella were not identified but some low levels of sulfite-reducing bacteria was found. The interviews were done to assess perceptions on water taste problems, odour, colour, and turbidity and health problems. The respondents were taken from people in the community using random sampling technique. Sixty people were sampled at each area surrounding the boreholes. It was found out that 43.3% of the respondents rated their drinking water safe for consumption as well as absence of illness after drinking as indicators for judging the quality of the water. The others respondents (56.7% reported having at least some concerns with safety of their water.  More  than 20% of the households reported at least one household member having suffered some water related illness in the past two years. Respondents were asked to judge the quality of the water, based on four sensory characteristics of drinking water. Many respondents rated the smell (33.3%, taste (20%, colour (23.3% and turbidity (23.3%. These results showed that all the samples did not satisfy the WHO requirements for bacteriological characteristics in human consumption.

  2. Site characterization and validation - monitoring of saline tracer transport by borehole radar measurements - phase 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the radar/saline tracer experiment was to provide data for a description on the geometry of the flow paths in the vicinity of the planned validation drift. Saline tracer was injected into zone H through borehole C2 where it intersects the zone. Radar tomography was made in three borehole sections surrounding the injection borehole (W1-C5, C1-C5, and W1-C1). Reference radar tomography measurements were made prior to injection of saline tracer and were repeated 7 times after start of injection. Saline tracer with a concentration of 2% was injected with a flow rate of 200 ml/min. The first arrival was observed in borehole D4 approximately 10 h after start of injection and the mean residence time was approximately 40 h. The distance between the injection point and the sampling point in the D-boreholes is approximately 25 m. The injected tracer only caused minor increases in the radar attenuation. The maximum increase in attenuation due to saline tracer was 25 dB/km or approximately 5% of the normal attenuation of the Stripa granite. In spite of the small changes in amplitude the difference tomograms displayed consistent anomalies both with respect to location and evaluation with time. The difference tomograms showed a nonuniform spread of tracer with time. The tracer appears to follow a few preferred flow paths where some of these paths are linked to the intersection of two minor features (fractures or fracture zones) intersecting zone H. Tracer was also observed to be transported through these zones out of zone H. Radar difference tomography together with saline tracer injection has proven to be a useful tool for characterizing the groundwater flow system through fractured rocks. (au)

  3. Effective Stress and Permeability Redistributions Induced by Successive Roadway and Borehole Excavations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shengyong; Zhou, Fubao; Liu, Yingke; Xia, Tongqiang

    2015-01-01

    Methane extraction from in-seam boreholes is the main approach for recovering methane in China. However, the methane concentration for this method is generally lower than 30 %, which incurs a risk of methane outbursts during pipeline transportation. To increase the methane concentration, we first conducted permeability experiments to investigate the relationships between the permeability and the effective stress at different stages in the complete effective stress-strain process. We then adopted FLAC3D software to calculate the stress distributions around roadways and boreholes after their consecutive excavations and thereby divided the coal mass around the roadway and borehole according to different effective stress stages to understand the gas flow characteristics. The results show that the coal mass along the radial direction of the roadway and borehole can be sequentially divided into four zones, including the full flow zone (FFZ), the transitive flow zone (TFZ), the flow-shielding zone (FSZ), and the in situ rock flow zone (IRFZ), which have been proven correct by field experiments. The methane in the IRFZ was difficult to extract because of the low permeability of coal mass in this zone. The permeability of the FSZ was lower than that of the IRFZ. The permeability along the interface between the FSZ and TFZ was nearly one time as low as that of the IRFZ, while the permeability of the FFZ was two orders of magnitude higher than that of the IRFZ. This four-zone division demonstrates the decaying mechanism of methane extraction concentration and flow in the in-seam borehole and can provide theoretical guidance for improvement of methane extraction.

  4. Effect of Stresses and Strains of Roadway Surrounding Rocks on Borehole Airtightness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WU Wei

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available At present, many high gas and outburst mines have poor gas drainage effects. An important reason influencing the gas drainage effect is a poor hole-sealing effect. Most studies on gas drainage borehole sealing focus on local and foreign borehole sealing methods, borehole sealing equipment, and borehole sealing materials. Numerical simulations of initial drilling sealing depth are insufficient because studies on this subject are few. However, when the initial sealing depth of the borehole is not chosen reasonably, air can enter the gas drainage drill hole through the circumferential crack of roadway surrounding rocks under the influence of suction pressure of the drainage system. This phenomenon ultimately affects the hole-sealing effect. To improve the drilling hole sealing of gas drainage boring, we deduced the expression formulas of the crushing zone, plastic zone, and elastic zone around the coal-seam floor stone drift and conducted a stress–strain analysis of the coal-seam floor stone drift of the 2145 working surfaces of the Sixth Coal Mine of Hebi Coal Mine Group Company by using theoretical analysis, numerical simulation, and on-scene verification. Finally, we obtain the initial drilling sealing depth, which is a main contribution of this study. The results prove the following. The performed hole-sealing process with an initial drilling sealing depth of 8 m has a gas drainage efficiency of 55%. Compared with the previous 6.8 m initial drilling sealing depth with a gas drainage efficiency of less than 30%, which was adopted by the mine, the initial sealing depth of 8 m chosen in the numerical simulation is reasonable and conforms to the actual situation on the spot. Therefore, the initial drilling sealing depth chosen in the numerical simulation will produce practical and effective guidance to study the field hole-sealing depth.

  5. Areal and Shear Strain Coupling of PBO Borehole Strainmeters From Teleseismic Surface Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeloffs, E.; McCausland, W.

    2007-12-01

    In order to compare borehole strainmeter data with tectonic models, we must know the coupling parameters relating elastic deformation of the strainmeter to strain in the surrounding rock. At least two coupling parameters are required: the ratios of instrument areal and shear strain to formation areal and shear strain, respectively. These coupling parameters depend on the relative elastic moduli of the formation, grout, and strainmeter, and typical elastic moduli yield nominal coupling parameters of 1.5 and 3. More accurate coupling parameters must be determined by analyzing each strainmeter's response to a known deformation source after the instrument has been grouted into the borehole. Borehole strainmeters installed by the National Science Foundation-funded Earthscope Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) consist of four gauges, sampled at 20 Hz, that measure extension along distinct azimuths. Teleseismic Love and Rayleigh waves that produce fractional gauge elongations > 10-7 , such as those from the M8.3 Kuril Islands earthquake of November 15, 2006, can be used to constrain the coupling parameters. A planar Love or Rayleigh wave is expected to have a simple strain field that produces the same waveform on all four gauges of a strainmeter. The two-parameter coupling model is consistent with the variation of surface wave amplitudes as functions of azimuth for the borehole strainmeter data analyzed to date, although most of the PBO strainmeters require that differences in the relative gains of the four gauges be estimated as well. Fits to the data can be improved for some strainmeters by allowing for two distinct shear strain coupling parameters, and/or for a small (grout with a relatively low elastic modulus. Surface waves are well recorded by some strainmeters that do not record earth tides, demonstrating that for some borehole strainmeter installations, coupling may decrease at long periods.

  6. Site investigation SFR. Boremap mapping of percussion drilled borehole HFR106

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winell, Sofia (Geosigma AB (Sweden))

    2010-06-15

    This report presents the result from the Boremap mapping of the percussion drilled borehole HFR106, which is drilled from an islet located ca 220 m southeast of the pier above SFR. The purpose of the location and orientation of the borehole is to investigate the possible occurrence of gently dipping, water-bearing structures in the area. HFR106 has a length of 190.4 m and oriented 269.4 deg/-60.9 deg. The mapping is based on the borehole image (BIPS), investigation of drill cuttings and generalized, as well as more detailed geophysical logs. The dominating rock type, which occupies 68% of HFR106, is fine- to medium-grained, pinkish grey metagranite-granodiorite (rock code 101057) mapped as foliated with a medium to strong intensity. Pegmatite to pegmatitic granite (rock code 101061) occupies 29% of the borehole. Subordinate rock types are felsic to intermediate meta volcanic rock (rock code 103076) and fine- to medium-grained granite (rock code 111058). Rock occurrences (rock types < 1 m in length) occupy about 16% of the mapped interval, of which half is veins, dykes and unspecified occurrences of pegmatite and pegmatitic granite. Only 5.5% of HFR106 is inferred to be altered, mainly oxidation in two intervals with an increased fracture frequency. A total number of 845 fractures are registered in HFR106. Of these are 64 interpreted as open with a certain aperture, 230 open with a possible aperture, and 551 sealed. This result in the following fracture frequencies: 1.6 open fractures/m and 3.0 sealed fractures/m. Three fracture sets of open and sealed fractures with the orientations 290 deg/70 deg, 150 deg/85 deg and 200 deg/85 deg can be distinguished in HFR106. The fracture frequency is generally higher in the second half of the borehole, and particularly in the interval 176-187.4 m.

  7. Grimsel test site. Investigation phase IV. Borehole sealing. Technical report 07-01

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the context of the phase IV (1994 - 1996) research and development activities at the Grimsel Test Site (GTS), Nagra developed, in collaboration with the 'Agence nationale pour la gestion des dechets radioactifs' (Andra), an investigation project for the sealing of boreholes drilled from underground. The project had the following goals: (i) sealing of boreholes drilled from underground facilities with a length of up to 500 m; (ii) sealing of boreholes with mainly irregular shape (e.g. breakouts of borehole wall); (iii) ensuring a hydraulic conductivity of 10-11 - 10-12 m/s for the seal; (iv) ensuring reliable quality control in routine production. Nagra's new concept developed in this project was to use highly compacted bentonite pellets or granular bentonite while Andra evaluated the use of a cylindrical block of bentonite. This report deals with Nagra's concepts only. The two techniques tested by Nagra were: 1. Pneumatic injection of granular bentonite into a borehole using a grain size distribution of 4-10 mm. 2. Emplacement using a modified core barrel (MACMET tool) for transport and compaction of bentonite pellets. Following a detailed literature study and the development of appropriate concepts, the necessary tools were developed and successively tested in the laboratory. An appropriate test field was established and characterized at GTS where both techniques were tested in situ to estimate their performance under realistic field conditions. The swelling pressures were monitored for 4 months after seal emplacement until an almost constant value was attained. Finally, the hydraulic and mechanical performances of the seals were tested. It was found that the conductivities measured across the seal were at least equivalent to the matrix properties of the surrounding rock (3-6·10-12 m/s). The hydraulic testing also showed no linear preferential flow along the seals. (author)

  8. Drilling of deep boreholes and associated geological investigations. Final disposal of spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teollisuuden Voima Oy (Industrial Power Company Ltd.) will take precautions for the final disposal of spent fuel in the Finnish bedrock. The first stage of the site selection studies includes drilling of a deep borehole down to approximately 1000 metres in the winter of 1984. The choice of drilling method and equipment depends on the geological circumstances and the target of the investigation. The most common drilling methods used with the investigations of nuclear waste disposal are diamond core drilling and percussion drilling. The Precambrian bedrock outcropping in Finland exists also in Sweden and Canada, where deep boreholes have been done down to more than 1000 metres using diamond core drilling. This method can be also used in Finland and equipment for the drilling are available. One of the main targets of the investigation is to clarify the true strike and dip of fractures and other discontinuities. The methods used abroad are taking of oriented cores, borehole television survey and geophysical measurements. TV-survey and geophysical methods seem to be most favourable in deep boreholes. Also the accurate position (inclination, bearing) of the borehole is essential to know and many techniques are used for measuring of it. Investigations performed on the core samples include core logging and laboratory tests. For the core logging there is no uniform practice concerning the nuclear waste investigations. Different counries use their own classifications. All of these, however, are based on the petrography and fracture properties of the rock samples. Laboratory tests (petrographical and rock mechanical tests) are generally performed according to the recommendations of international standards. The large volumes of data obtained during investigations require computer techniques which allow more comprehensive collection, storage and processing of data. This kind of systems are already used in Sweden and Canada, for instance, and they could be utilize in Finland

  9. The 600 m borehole project of the CEC programme on management and storage of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes work of the 600 m borehole project performed during contracting period August 1986-December 1990. During this period measurement devices for measurement of rock mechanical parameters have been developed and were made operational. For the drilling of boreholes a new technique has been developed. One main subject of investigation was to develop an on-line method to determine gas-content in the flushing air during drilling operation. The possibility to perform measurements was reduced due to drilling problems when drilling the intended 600 m holes. One hole of 100 m depth and two of approximately 300 m have been drilled. In one of the 300 m boreholes convergence measurements have been performed during a 10 months period. The convergence measuring devices have been operating satisfactorily and were successfully in operation since Feb. 1990 (partly even since Nov. 1989). Convergence measurements at greater depths are scheduled for the 2nd part of the programme (1991-1992) when a deeper borehole has been drilled. The experimental results will be used to validate analytical techniques and computer models for prediction of salt behaviour. This report summarizes the analytical techniques. For the second experiment the Variable Pressure Device (VPD) has been constructed to measure the elastic and time-dependent response of the salt on the pressure changes. VPD is placed in a 300 m deep borehole since a 600 m hole could not be drilled. The construction is described in detail and thermo-mechanical analyses are reported of the behaviour of VPD under realistic measurement conditions. (author). 37 refs.; 65 figs.; 7 tabs

  10. Conductive fracture mapping. A study on the correlation between borehole TV- and radar images and difference flow logging results in borehole KLX02

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study presents an attempt to correlate images from borehole-TV (BIPS) and borehole radar with interpreted flow anomalies from Difference Flow Meter logging (DIFF). The measurements were performed in the interval 200-400 m in borehole KLX02 at Laxemar. In total, 59 flow anomalies were interpreted by the DIFF-log in this borehole interval. However, 14 flow anomalies were below the rigorous measurement limit for the actual flow meter and are thus regarded as uncertain. In total, 261 features were primarily interpreted by the BIPS-characterization in the borehole interval 200-400 m but only 12 radar reflectors. The low number of interpreted radar reflectors most likely depends on the low frequency of the antenna used in this case which gave a poor depth resolution. The total number of fractures recorded by the core mapping in this interval was 374 (279 in the rock together with 95 fractures in interpreted crush zones). Prior to the correlation analysis it was necessary to adjust the length scales of the BIPS-measurements relative to the length scale of the Difference Flow logging due to non-linear stretching of logging cables etc to achieve the necessary resolution of the depth scale.This adjustment was done by comparing the distances between clearly identified single features in the BIPS-images with the corresponding distances between clearly identified flow anomalies. The BIPS-measurements consist of 5 independent logging sequences in the studied borehole interval, which resulted in 'jumps' when comparing the non-conform length scales of the different sequences. All of the 59 flow anomalies could be correlated (matched) with BIPS-features with varying degree of certainty. A majority of the correlated BIPS-features was classified as open fractures or fractures with cavities. Most of the flow anomalies below the measurement limit were correlated to veins in the rock. In the correlation between borehole radar reflectors and BIPS-features, the calculated angle and

  11. Hydrogeologic Characterization of Fractured Crystalline Bedrock on the Southern Part of Manhattan, New York, Using Advanced Borehole Geophysical Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumm, F.; Chu, A.; Joesten, P. K.; Lane, J. W.

    2007-12-01

    ABSTRACT. Advanced borehole-geophysical methods were used to assess the hydrogeology of fractured crystalline bedrock in 31 of 64 boreholes on the southern part of Manhattan Island, N.Y. The majority of boreholes penetrated gneiss, schist, and other crystalline bedrock, and had an average depth of 591 ft (180 m) below land surface (BLS). In this study we use a combination of advanced and conventional borehole geophysical logs, and hydraulic measurements to characterize the fractured-rock ground-water flow system in southern Manhattan, N.Y. Borehole-geophysical logs collected in this study included natural gamma, single-point-resistance (SPR), short-normal resistivity (R), mechanical and acoustic caliper, magnetic susceptibility, borehole-fluid temperature and resistivity, specific conductance (SpC), dissolved oxygen (DO), pH, redox, heat-pulse flowmeter (at eight selected boreholes), borehole deviation, acoustic and optical televiewer (ATV and OTV), and directional borehole radar (at 23 selected boreholes). A new geophysical probe that collects multiple fluid parameters, included fluid- temperature, SpC, DO, pH, and redox logs; these were used to help delineate transmissive fractures in the boreholes. All boreholes penetrated moderately fractured bedrock that contained medium and large fractures. A total of 208 large fractures were delineated in the 31 boreholes logged with the OTV. Stereonet analysis of the large fractures indicates most are part of a subhorizontal population cluster with a mean orientation of N43 degrees E, 07 degrees SE and a smaller secondary population cluster dipping toward the northwest. A total of 53 faults were delineated with two major population clusters--one with a mean orientation of N12 degrees W, 66 degrees W and the other with a mean orientation of N11 degrees W, 70 degrees E. Foliation was fairly consistent throughout the study area with dip azimuths ranging from northwest to southwest and dip angles ranging from 30 to 70 degrees

  12. Simulations of a spectral gamma-ray logging tool response to a surface source distribution on the borehole wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed Monte Carlo and discrete ordinates simulation models for the large-detector spectral gamma-ray (SGR) logging tool in use at the Nevada Test Site. Application of the simulation models produced spectra for source layers on the borehole wall, either from potassium-bearing mudcakes or from plate-out of radon daughter products. Simulations show that the shape and magnitude of gamma-ray spectra from sources distributed on the borehole wall depend on radial position with in the air-filled borehole as well as on hole diameter. No such dependence is observed for sources uniformly distributed in the formation. In addition, sources on the borehole wall produce anisotropic angular fluxes at the higher scattered energies and at the source energy. These differences in borehole effects and in angular flux are important to the process of correcting SGR logs for the presence of potassium mudcakes; they also suggest a technique for distinguishing between spectral contributions from formation sources and sources on the borehole wall. These results imply the existence of a standoff effect not present for spectra measured in air-filled boreholes from formation sources. 5 refs., 11 figs

  13. Hanford Borehole Geologic Information System (HBGIS) Updated User’s Guide for Web-based Data Access and Export

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackley, Rob D.; Last, George V.; Allwardt, Craig H.

    2008-09-24

    The Hanford Borehole Geologic Information System (HBGIS) is a prototype web-based graphical user interface (GUI) for viewing and downloading borehole geologic data. The HBGIS is being developed as part of the Remediation Decision Support function of the Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project, managed by Fluor Hanford, Inc., Richland, Washington. Recent efforts have focused on improving the functionality of the HBGIS website in order to allow more efficient access and exportation of available data in HBGIS. Users will benefit from enhancements such as a dynamic browsing, user-driven forms, and multi-select options for selecting borehole geologic data for export. The need for translating borehole geologic data into electronic form within the HBGIS continues to increase, and efforts to populate the database continue at an increasing rate. These new web-based tools should help the end user quickly visualize what data are available in HBGIS, select from among these data, and download the borehole geologic data into a consistent and reproducible tabular form. This revised user’s guide supersedes the previous user’s guide (PNNL-15362) for viewing and downloading data from HBGIS. It contains an updated data dictionary for tables and fields containing borehole geologic data as well as instructions for viewing and downloading borehole geologic data.

  14. Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediments Below the T Tank Farm: Boreholes C4104, C4105, 299-W10-196 and RCRA Borehole 299-W11-39

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serne, R JEFFREY.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Horton, Duane G.; Lanigan, David C.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Clayton, Ray E.; LeGore, Virginia L.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Baum, Steven R.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Vickerman, Tanya S.; Orr, Robert D.; Brown, Christopher F.

    2004-09-01

    This report contains geologic, geochemical, and physical characterization data collected on sediment recovered from boreholes C4104 and C4105 in the T Tank Farm, and 299-W-11-39 installed northeast of the T Tank Farm. The measurements on sediments from borehole C4104 are compared to a nearby borehole 299-W10-196 placed through the plume from the 1973 T-106 tank leak. This report also presents the data in the context of sediment types, the vertical extent of contamination, the migration potential of the contaminants, and the likely source of the contamination in the vadose zone and groundwater below the T Tank Farm. Sediment samples were characterized for: moisture content, gamma-emission radionuclides, one-to-one water extracts (which provide soil pH, electrical conductivity, cation, trace metal, radionuclide and anion data), total carbon and inorganic carbon content, and 8 M nitric acid extracts (which provide a measure of the total leachable sediment content of contaminants). Overall, our analyses showed that common ion exchange is a key mechanism that influences the distribution of contaminants within that portion of the vadose zone affected by tank liquor. We observed slight elevated pH values in samples from borehole C4104. The sediments from the three boreholes, C4104, C4105, and 299-W10-196 do show that sodium-, nitrate-, and sulfate-dominated fluids are present below tank T-106 and have formed a salt plume. The fluids are more dilute than tank fluids observed below tanks at the SX and BX Tank Farms and slightly less than those from the most saline porewater found in contaminated TX tank farm sediments. The boreholes could not penetrate below the gravel-rich strata of the Ringold Formation Wooded Island member (Rwi) (refusal was met at about 130 ft bgs); therefore, we could not identify the maximum vertical penetration of the tank related plumes. The moisture content, pH, electrical conductivity, nitrate, and technetium-99 profiles versus depth in the three

  15. NUMERICAL SIMULATION FOR DYNAMIC INITIAL SHOCK PARAMETERS OF COUPLING CHARGE ON BOREHOLE WALL UNDER THE ACTION OF HIGH EXPLOSIVES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    倪芝芳; 李玉民

    1996-01-01

    According to detonation theory and hydrodynamic principle, a physical model has been set up in this paper. Based on the model a methodology for calculating dynamic initial shock parameters such as shock pressure p,,, shock wave velosity Dm etc. of coupling charge on borehole wall has ben developed. The shock parameters have been calculated when high explosives works on granite, limestone and marble respectively. The magnitude of every parameter on borehole wall has been obtained from ignited dot to the end of borehole along axial direction. Some important conclusions are also gained.

  16. Near surface characterisation of a limestone site using borehole and surface geophysics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sénéchal, G.; Hollender, F.; Rousset, D.

    2003-04-01

    The paper deals with the analysis of the respective performances and the optimization of geophysical methods used for the non-destructive imagery of rocks, from the surface to a depth of approximately 100 m. Different techniques, carried out from the surface or from boreholes, have been tested on the \\char`&{uml;}Médecin Hill\\char`&{uml;} (Centre d'Etude de Cadarache - 13108 St. Paul lez Durance - France). This test site consists in a low fractured limestone, crossed by several faults characterized by a near-vertical dip. The site was previously investigated by numerous other characterization methods (boreholes, surface geology, structural analysis, well logging, etc.): a well known structural 3D model is available. Each tested geophysical method is based on the determination of different physical parameters (elastic parameters, density, electrical resistivity, dielectric permittivity, etc.). In terms of resolution and depth of investigation, every geophysical method has its own drawbacks and advantages. High resolution seismic focuses between 20 and some hundred of meters of depth with a metric to decametric vertical resolution. GPR has a decimetric resolution but electromagnetic waves are strongly attenuated after a few meters of propagation. DC resistivity is a potential method so, resolution dramatically decreases with depth of investigation. The acquisition pattern of this last study leads to a depth of investigation around 15 m and a resolution of one to several meters. Several surface acquisitions have been performed within a 400 m line along which seven boreholes are located. From the high resolution reflection seismic data, we calculated a depth migrated section which displays the main interfaces affected by some near vertical faults. These results are compared to seismic data obtained from a borehole survey interpreted with the help of log data. A radar borehole survey, using tomographic and reflection pattern surveys provided improved information but

  17. Permanent installation of fibre-optic DTS cables in boreholes for temperature monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henninges, J.; Schrötter, J.; Erbas, K.; Böde, S.; Huenges, E.

    2003-04-01

    Temperature measurements have become an important tool for the monitoring of dynamic processes in the subsurface both in academia and industry. An innovative experimental design for the monitoring of spatial and temporal variations of temperature along boreholes was developed and successfully applied under extreme arctic conditions during a field experiment, which was carried out within the framework of the Mallik 2002 Production Research Well Program*. Three 40 m spaced, 1200 m deep wells were equipped with permanent fibre-optic sensor cables and the variation of temperature was measured deploying the Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) technology. The used DTS system enables the simultaneous online registration of temperature profiles along the three boreholes with a maximum spatial resolution of 0.25 m and a minimum sampling interval of 7 sec. After an individual calibration of the fibre-optic sensor cables a resolution of 0.3 °C of the measured temperature data could be achieved. A special feature of the experiment design is the installation of the sensor cables outside the borehole casing. The fibre-optic cables were attached to the outer side of the casing at every connector within intervals of approx. 12 m with cable clamps. The clamps enable a defined positioning of the cable around the perimeter of the casing and are protecting the cable from mechanical damage during installation. After completion the sensor cables are located in the cement annulus between casing and borehole wall. As an example of the performance of the described temperature logging technology data from the reaming of a 300 m thick cement plug inside the borehole is displayed, offering a unique opportunity to explore thermal processes in the near vicinity of a borehole during drilling. The temperature changes image the progress of the drill bit as well as changes in the mud circulation. Furthermore, local effects can be observed that relate to local thermal properties and technical

  18. Drilling and the associated borehole measurements of the pilot hole ONK-PH3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The construction of the ONKALO access tunnel started in September 2004 at Olkiluoto. Most of the investigations related to the construction of the access tunnel aim to ensure successful excavations, reinforcement and sealing. Pilot holes are boreholes, which are core drilled along the tunnel profile. The length of the pilot holes typically varies from several tens of metres to a couple of hundred metres. The pilot holes will mostly aim to confirm the quality of the rock mass for tunnel construction, and in particular at identifying water conductive fractured zones and at providing information that could result in modifications of the existing construction plans. The pilot hole ONK-PH3 was drilled in September 2005. The length of the borehole is 145.04 metres. The aim during the drilling work was to orientate core samples as much as possible. The deviation of the borehole was measured during and after the drilling phase. Electric conductivity was measured from the collected returning water samples. Logging of the core samples included the following parameters: lithology, foliation, fracturing, fracture frequency, RQD, fractured zones, core loss and weathering. The rock mechanical logging was based on Q-classification. The tests to determine rock strength and deformation properties were made with a Rock Tester-equipment. Difference Flow method was used for the determination of hydraulic conductivity in fractures and fractured zones in the borehole. The overlapping i.e. the detailed flow logging mode was used. The flow logging was performed with 0.5 m section length and with 0.1 m depth increments. Water loss tests (Lugeon tests) and a pressure build-up test were used to give background information for the grouting design. Geophysical borehole logging and optical imaging surveys of the pilot hole PH3 included the field work of all the surveys, the integration of the data as well as interpretation of the acoustic and borehole radar data. One of the objectives of the

  19. Protecting coastal abstraction boreholes from seawater intrusion using self-potential data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Malcolm; Butler, Adrian; MacAllister, Donald John; Vinogradov, Jan; Ijioma, Amadi; Jackson, Matthew

    2016-04-01

    We investigate whether the presence and transport of seawater can influence self-potentials (SPs) measured within coastal groundwater boreholes, with a view to using SP monitoring as part of an early warning system for saline intrusion. SP data were collected over a period of 18 months from a coastal groundwater borehole in the fractured Chalk of England. Spectral analysis of the results shows semi-diurnal fluctuations that are several orders of magnitude higher than those observed from monitoring of the Chalk more than 60 km inland, indicating a strong influence from oceanic tides. Hydrodynamic and geoelectric modelling of the coastal aquifer suggests that observed pressure changes (giving rise to the streaming potential) are not sufficient to explain the magnitude of the observed SP fluctuations. Simulation of the exclusion-diffusion potential, produced by changes in concentration across the saline front, is required to match the SP data from the borehole, despite the front being located some distance away. In late summer of 2013 and 2014, seawater intrusion occurred in the coastal monitoring borehole. When referenced to the shallowest borehole electrode, there was a characteristic increase in SP within the array, several days before any measurable increase in salinity. The size of this precursor increased steadily with depth, typically reaching values close to 0.3 mV in the deepest electrode. Numerical modelling suggests that the exclusion-diffusion potential can explain the magnitude of the precursor, but that the polarity of the change in SP cannot be replicated assuming a homogeneous aquifer. Small-scale models of idealised Chalk blocks were used to simulate the effects of discrete fractures on the distribution of SP. Initial results suggest that comparatively large reductions in voltage can develop in the matrix ahead of the front, in conjunction with a reduced or absent precursor in the vicinity of a fracture. Geophysical logging indicates the presence of a

  20. Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediments Below the C Tank Farm: Borehole C4297 and RCRA Borehole 299-E27-22

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Christopher F.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Horton, Duane G.; Lanigan, David C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Vickerman, Tanya S.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Baum, Steven R.; Parker, Kent E.; Lindberg, Michael J.

    2008-09-11

    This report was revised in September 2008 to remove acid-extractable sodium data from Tables 4.7 and 4.25. The sodium data was removed due to potential contamination introduced during the acid extraction process. The rest of the text remains unchanged from the original report issued in September 2006. The overall goal of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., is to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities at the Hanford Site. To meet this goal, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. tasked scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to perform detailed analyses on vadose zone sediments from within Waste Management Area (WMA) C. This report is the first of two reports written to present the results of these analyses. Specifically, this report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physiochemical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from borehole C4297, installed adjacent to tank C-105, and from borehole 299-E27-22, installed directly north of the C Tank Farm. This report also presents the interpretation of data in the context of sediment types, the vertical extent of contamination, the migration potential of the contaminants, and the likely source of the contamination in the vadose zone below the C Tank Farm. The information presented in this report supports the WMA A-AX, C, and U field investigation report in preparation by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc.

  1. Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediments Below the TX Tank Farm: Boreholes C3830, C3831, C3832 and RCRA Borehole 299-W10-27

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Horton, Duane G.; Lanigan, David C.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Clayton, Ray E.; Legore, Virginia L.; Orr, Robert D.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Baum, Steven R.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Vickerman, Tanya S.

    2008-09-11

    This report was revised in September 2008 to remove acid-extractable sodium data from Tables 4.8, 4.28,4.43, and 4.59. The sodium data was removed due to potential contamination introduced during the acid extraction process. The rest of the text remains unchanged from the original report issued in April 2004. The overall goal of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., is to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities at Hanford. To meet this goal, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. tasked scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to perform detailed analyses on vadose zone sediments from within Waste Management Area (WMA) T-TX-TY. This report is the first of two reports written to present the results of these analyses. Specifically, this report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from boreholes C3830, C3831, and C3832 in the TX Tank Farm, and from borehole 299-W-10-27 installed northeast of the TY Tank Farm.

  2. A successful borehole drilled by cryogenic drilling in an arid, unconsolidated soil with boulders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavagnaro, P.; Simon, R.D.; Cooper, G.A. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering

    1997-07-01

    An 80 foot deep borehole was drilled using a novel cryogenic drilling method. The freeze while drilling technique stabilizes the borehole wall while drilling by using conventional air rotary methods but with low temperature nitrogen gas (as cold as {minus}196 C) as the drilling fluid. The location of the field test was a semi-arid alluvial unconsolidated sedimentary formation at the Aerojet, Inc. site in Rancho Cordova, California. The geology was a sandy soil matrix containing cobbles and boulders. The test goal was to drill to 100 feet (30 m), but the test was terminated at 80 feet due to a failure of the swivel shaft and drill bit resulting from the very rough drilling conditions. No safety, technical, or operational problems were encountered that could prevent cryogenic drilling from becoming a standard technique for drilling in unstable near-surface formations.

  3. Finite element modeling of borehole heat exchanger systems. Part 2. Numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diersch, H.-J. G.; Bauer, D.; Heidemann, W.; Rühaak, W.; Schätzl, P.

    2011-08-01

    Single borehole heat exchanger (BHE) and arrays of BHE are modeled by using the finite element method. Applying BHE in regional discretizations optimal conditions of mesh spacing around singular BHE nodes are derived. Optimal meshes have shown superior to such discretizations which are either too fine or too coarse. The numerical methods are benchmarked against analytical and numerical reference solutions. Practical application to a borehole thermal energy store (BTES) consisting of 80 BHE is given for the real-site BTES Crailsheim, Germany. The simulations are controlled by the specifically developed FEFLOW-TRNSYS coupling module. Scenarios indicate the effect of the groundwater flow regime on efficiency and reliability of the subsurface heat storage system.

  4. Simulation of density curve for slim borehole using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borehole logging for formation density has been an important geophysical measurement in oil industry. For calibration of the Gamma Ray nuclear logging tool, numerous rock models of different lithology and densities are necessary. However, the full success of this calibration process is determined by a reliable benchmark, where the complete and precise chemical composition of the standards is necessary. Simulations using the Monte Carlo MCNP have been widely employed in well logging application once it serves as a low-cost substitute for experimental test pits, as well as a means for obtaining data that are difficult to obtain experimentally. Considering this, the purpose of this work is to use the code MCNP to obtain density curves for slim boreholes using Gamma Ray logging tools. For this, a Slim Density Gamma Probe, named TRISONDR, and a 100 mCi Cs-137 gamma source has been modeled with the new version of MCNP code MCNPX. (author)

  5. Simulation of density curve for slim borehole using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Edmilson Monteiro de; Silva, Ademir Xavier da; Lopes, Ricardo Tadeu, E-mail: emonteiro@nuclear.ufrj.b, E-mail: ademir@nuclear.ufrj.b, E-mail: ricardo@lin.ufrj.b [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear; Correa, Samanda Cristine Arruda, E-mail: scorrea@nuclear.ufrj.b [Centro Universitario Estadual da Zona Oeste (CCMAT/UEZO), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Lima, Inaya C.B., E-mail: inaya@lin.ufrj.b [Universidade Estadual do Rio de Janeiro (IPRJ/UERJ) Nova Friburgo, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Instituto Politecnico do Rio de Janeiro; Rocha, Paula L.F., E-mail: ferrucio@acd.ufrj.b [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ) RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Geologia

    2010-07-01

    Borehole logging for formation density has been an important geophysical measurement in oil industry. For calibration of the Gamma Ray nuclear logging tool, numerous rock models of different lithology and densities are necessary. However, the full success of this calibration process is determined by a reliable benchmark, where the complete and precise chemical composition of the standards is necessary. Simulations using the Monte Carlo MCNP have been widely employed in well logging application once it serves as a low-cost substitute for experimental test pits, as well as a means for obtaining data that are difficult to obtain experimentally. Considering this, the purpose of this work is to use the code MCNP to obtain density curves for slim boreholes using Gamma Ray logging tools. For this, a Slim Density Gamma Probe, named TRISOND{sup R}, and a 100 mCi Cs-137 gamma source has been modeled with the new version of MCNP code MCNPX. (author)

  6. Borehole seismic in crystalline environment at the COSC-project in Central Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauß, Felix; Hedin, Peter; Almqvist, Bjarne; Simon, Helge; Giese, Rüdiger; Buske, Stefan; Juhlin, Christopher; Lorenz, Henning

    2016-04-01

    As support for the COSC drilling project (Collisional Orogeny in the Scandinavian Caledonides), an extensive seismic survey took place during September and October 2014 in and around the newly drilled 2.5 km deep COSC-1 borehole. The main aim of the COSC project is to better understand orogenic processes in past and recently active mountain belts. For this, the Scandinavian Caledonides provide a well preserved case of Paleozoic collision of the Laurentia and Baltica continental plates. Surface geology and geophysical data provide knowledge about the geometry of the Caledonian structure. The reflectivity geometry of the upper crust was imaged by regional seismic data and the resistivity structure by magnetotelluric methods. The crustal model was refined by seismic pre-site surveys in 2010 and 2011 to define the exact position of the first borehole, COSC-1. The completely cored COSC-1 borehole was drilled in Central Sweden through the Seve Nappe Complex, a part of the Middle Allochthon of the Scandinavian Caledonides that comprises units originating from the outer margin of Baltica. The upper 2350 m consist of alternating layers of highly strained felsic and calc-silicate gneisses and amphibolites. Below 1710 m the mylonite content increases successively and indicates a high strain zone of at least 800 m thickness. At ca. 2350 m, the borehole leaves the Seve Nappe Complex and enters underlying mylonitised lower grade metasedimentary units of unknown tectonostratigraphic position. The seismic survey consisted of three parts: a limited 3D-survey, a high resolution zero-offset VSP (vertical seismic profile) and a multi-azimuthal walkaway VSP (MSP) experiment with sources and receivers along three surface profiles and receivers at seven different depth levels of the borehole. For the zero-offset VSP (ZVSP) a hydraulic hammer source was used and activated over a period of 20 s as a sequence of impacts with increasing hit frequency. The wave field was recorded with 3

  7. Influence of degree of saturation on the borehole sealing performance of an expansive cement grout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The strength measures of expansive cement grout borehole plugs cast in welded tuff cylinders is investigated as a function of the degree of saturation of the plugged rock cylinder and of borehole size. Details on experimental procedure regarding rock cylinder and cement grout preparation, sample curing conditions, experimental apparatus, sample loading, mechanical characterization of the rock, and cement grout, along with procedures for the determination of the sample saturation assuming uniform saturation, and strength measures are presented. The extrapolated axial strengths to a plug radius of 100 mm show that the more saturated samples show higher strengths as compared to the dry samples. The strength measures decrease with increasing plug radius, obeying a power law

  8. Model experiments to develop a new smooth blasting using a borehole spacer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some model experiments were carried out to develop the new smooth blasting in which cracks were made in a desirable direction by putting a devised spacer into a borehole. After preliminary experiments, the arcshaped spacer piled two lead plates and two rubber plates alternately was made. A cap and explosive were put between the two spacers, and they were inserted into a borehole together. Cracks were made in the two directions, one is the direction lacking spacers, another is the direction normal to it. This result showed that cracking was controlled with the spacers, although more improvement to make cracks only in one direction were needed to apply this blasting method to real cases. (author)

  9. Bulk and mechanical properties of the Paintbrush tuff recovered from borehole USW NRG-6: Data report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental results are presented for bulk and mechanical properties measurements on specimens of the Paintbrush tuff recovered from borehole USW NRG-6 at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Measurements have been performed on four thermal/mechanical units, TCw, PTn, TSw1 and TSw2. On each specimen the following bulk properties have been reported: dry bulk density, saturated bulk density, average grain density, and porosity. Unconfined compression to failure, confined compression to failure, and indirect tensile strength tests were performed on selected specimens recovered from the borehole. In addition, compressional and shear wave velocities were measured on specimens designated for unconfined compression and confined compression experiments. Measurements were conducted at room temperature on nominally water saturated specimens; however, some specimens of PTn were tested in a room dry condition. The nominal strain rate for the fracture experiments was 10-5 s -1

  10. New technologies in the drilling of gas boreholes; Neue Techniken bei der Erstellung von Gasbohrloechern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Achilles, P. [Deutsche Steinkohle AG, Herne (Germany). Abt. TB3-Bergtechnik; Korf, P. [DSK Anthrazit Ibbenbueren GmbH, Ibbenbueren (Germany)

    2001-04-12

    With the requirements on the high-output workings the need for further acceleration of the drilling of gas boreholes has also become a priority. In the past gas boreholes in the floor and roof were drilled exclusively by the rotary drilling method, which conceals many disadvantages. In a research and development project gas drilling technology was to be adapted to the current rates of advance. (orig.) [German] Mit den Anforderungen an die heutigen Hochleistungsabbaubetriebe ist auch die Notwendigkeit einer weiteren Beschleunigung der Gasbohrarbeiten vordringlich geworden. Gasbohrloecher im Liegenden und Hangenden wurden in der Vergangenheit ausschliesslich mit dem drehenden Bohrverfahren hergestellt, welches jedoch aus heutiger Sicht eine Vielzahl von Nachteilen birgt. Im Rahmen eines F+E-Programms sollte die Gasbohrtechnik mit Hilfe der Schlagbohrtechnik den heutigen Abbaugeschwindigkeiten angepasst werden. (orig.)

  11. Full 3-D numerical modeling of borehole electric image logging and the evaluation model of fracture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A full 3-D finite element method numerical modeling program is written based on the principle and technical specification of borehole electric image well logging tool. The response of well logging is computed in the formation media model with a single fracture. The effect of changing fracture aperture and resistivity ratio to the logging response is discussed. The identification ability for two parallel fractures is also present. A quantitative evaluation formula of fracture aperture from borehole electric image logging data is set up. A case study of the model well is done to verify the accuracy of the for-mula. The result indicates that the formula is more accurate than the foreign one.

  12. Elastic waves along a cylindrical borehole in a poroelastic medium saturated by two immiscible fluids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ashish Arora; S K Tomar

    2007-06-01

    The propagation of elastic waves along a cylindrical borehole filled with/without liquid and embedded in an infinite porous medium saturated by two immiscible fluids has been studied. The theory of porous media saturated by two immiscible fluids developed by Tuncay and Corapcioglu (1997) is employed. Frequency equations determining the phase velocity of axial symmetric waves are obtained. It is found that the surface waves along cylindrical borehole are dispersive. The dispersion equation of Rayleigh-type surface waves along the boundary of a poroelastic solid half-space saturated by two immiscible fluids is also obtained. Some special cases have been deduced and the dispersion curves are obtained numerically for a peculiar model. It is found that the density of fluids affects the Rayleigh mode.

  13. Analysis of groundwater from deep boreholes in Kraakemaala, Sternoe and Finnsjoen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groundwater from deep boreholes in granitic rock at three different sites in Sweden - Finnsjoen, Kraakemaala and Sternoe - has been sampled and analysed. A total of ten different boreholes have been sampled; one at Kraakemaala, two at Sternoe and seven at Finnsjoen. In general four levels per hole containing waterbearing fractures have been selected. Prior to sampling, a water-bearing level is isolated between packer sleeves. The deepest levels are down to about 500 m. The sampling was carried out by the Geological Survey of Sweden and a number of laboratories have participated in the water analyses. The present report is a presentation of the results of the groundwater analyses. The reliability of the results is discussesd but there is no evaluation in relation to geology and hydrogeology. This report will present the basic results from the groundwater analyses to be further evaluated by experts in different fields. (author)

  14. Borehole data package for well 699-37-47A, PUREX Plant Cribs, CY 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new groundwater monitoring well (699-37-47A) was installed in 1996 as a downgradient well near the PUREX Plant Cribs Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facility at Hanford. This document provides data from the well drilling and construction operations, as well as data from subsequent characterization of groundwater and sediment samples collected during the drilling process. The data include: well construction documentation, geologist's borehole logs, results of laboratory analysis of groundwater samples collected during drilling and of physical tests conducted on sediment samples collected during drilling, borehole geophysics, and results of aquifer testing including slug tests and flowmeter analysis. This well (699-37-47A) was constructed in support of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) milestone M-24-00H and interim milestone M-24-35 (Ecology et al. 1994), and was funded under Project W-152

  15. Accuracy and borehole influences in pulsed neutron gamma density logging while drilling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new pulsed neutron gamma density (NGD) logging has been developed to replace radioactive chemical sources in oil logging tools. The present paper describes studies of near and far density measurement accuracy of NGD logging at two spacings and the borehole influences using Monte-Carlo simulation. The results show that the accuracy of near density is not as good as far density. It is difficult to correct this for borehole effects by using conventional methods because both near and far density measurement is significantly sensitive to standoffs and mud properties. - Highlights: → Monte Carlo evaluation of pulsed neutron gamma-ray density tools. → Results indicate sensitivity of the tool to standoff and mudcake properties. → Accuracy of far spaced detector is better than near spaced.

  16. Preliminary Borehole Disposal In Medium Flow Hydrogeological Condition Using IAEA Screening Tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A screening tool developed by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has been used to provide means of improving the capacity of Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia) in assessing the potential sites for Borehole Disposal for Disused Sealed Radioactive Sources. It allows the isolation provided by the capsule and disposal container to be evaluated. In addition, it has a conservative model of radionuclide transport with no retardation of radionuclide. Hence, rapid decisions can be made by providing an early indication of the potential suitability of sites based on their hydro-chemical characteristics. The objective of this paper is to identify and determine the types and radionuclide activities of inventory that can be disposed in the borehole. The results of the analysis show the volume of gas doses occur from the disposal and time taken for the cement to be corroded. (author)

  17. Localization and spatial orientation of planar discontinuities in the crystalline - results from the borehole Boettstein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Boettstein-well showed that all groundwater-flow systems in the crystalline basement of Northern Switzerland are - in one way or the other - linked to planar discontinuities (fractures, shear zones or dykes). The location and spatial orientation of such discontinuities is therefore an important prerequisite for the safety analysis of a future repository. Today the acquisition of structural data in a borehole no longer depends on drillcores alone, the autcrops of fractures and other discontinuities can be detected on the borehole wall, if modern wireline imaging systems are used. This article compares the performance of these tools in a crystalline environment and tries to assess the respective merits of core data on the one hand and geophysical records on the other. (author)

  18. Visual texture for automated characterisation of geological features in borehole televiewer imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sit, Waleed; Al-Nuaimy, Waleed; Marelli, Matteo; Al-Ataby, Ali

    2015-08-01

    Detailed characterisation of the structure of subsurface fractures is greatly facilitated by digital borehole logging instruments, the interpretation of which is typically time-consuming and labour-intensive. Despite recent advances towards autonomy and automation, the final interpretation remains heavily dependent on the skill, experience, alertness and consistency of a human operator. Existing computational tools fail to detect layers between rocks that do not exhibit distinct fracture boundaries, and often struggle characterising cross-cutting layers and partial fractures. This paper presents a novel approach to the characterisation of planar rock discontinuities from digital images of borehole logs. Multi-resolution texture segmentation and pattern recognition techniques utilising Gabor filters are combined with an iterative adaptation of the Hough transform to enable non-distinct, partial, distorted and steep fractures and layers to be accurately identified and characterised in a fully automated fashion. This approach has successfully detected fractures and layers with high detection accuracy and at a relatively low computational cost.

  19. Extracting near-borehole P and S reflections from array sonic logging data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There has been widespread interest in acoustic reflection logging recently due to its higher resolution compared to seismic exploration and larger lateral extension compared to logging techniques. Acoustic reflection logging is particularly useful for delineating near-borehole subtle structures and fractured reservoirs. The primary data processing of acoustic reflection logging is to extract the reflection signals from the full waveform records which are overwhelmingly dominated by the borehole direct modes. We present in this paper a method combining a frequency–wavenumber (f–k) filter with a modified parametric prediction to separate the direct and reflection waves. Afterwards, we apply dip stacking to enhance and to further separate P–P and S–S reflection signals, and suppress the residual direct waves and other noises. Processing examples obtained with synthetic and real data show the capabilities of the proposed workflow and algorithms

  20. Canister cryogenic system for cooling germanium semiconductor detectors in borehole and marine probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boynton, G.R.

    1975-01-01

    High resolution intrinsic and lithium-drifted germanium gamma-ray detectors operate at about 77-90 K. A cryostat for borehole and marine applications has been designed that makes use of prefrozen propane canisters. Uses of such canisters simplifies cryostat construction, and the rapid exchange of canisters greatly reduces the time required to restore the detector to full holding-time capability and enhances the safety of a field operation where high-intensity 252Cf or other isotopic sources are used. A holding time of 6 h at 86 K was achieved in the laboratory in a simulated borehole probe in which a canister 3.7 cm diameter by 57 cm long was used. Longer holding times can be achieved by larger volume canisters in marine probes. ?? 1975.

  1. Drilling and completion specifications for Wanapum (Type W) and Grande Ronde (Type GR) multilevel piezometer nest boreholes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wanapum (Type W) and Grande Ronde (Type GR) multilevel piezometer boreholes will provide information on hydraulic heads in seven horizons adjacent to the reference repository location. In addition, the boreholes will be used to determine horizontal and vertical flow rates, and identify possible geologic structures.. This specification includes details for drilling, piezometer design, hydrologic testing, and hydrochemical sampling of the boreholes. It includes drilling requirements, design, and installation procedures for the Type W and Type GR-series piezometer nests, intervals selected for head monitoring and schedules for drilling and piezometer installation. Specific drilling and piezometer installation specifications for the first two boreholes in this series, DC-23W and DC-23GR, are also included. 5 refs., 11 figs., 10 tabs

  2. Storage of nuclear waste in very deep boreholes: Feasibility study and assessment of economic potential. Pt. 1 and 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Part I concentrates on quality assurance-related questions such as geological prerequisities at great depth. Part II concentrates on the engineering aspects of the very deep borehole concept (VDH). (orig.)

  3. Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project: Analysis of horizontal waste emplacement boreholes of a nuclear waste repository in tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In support of the design of a nuclear waste repository in tuff, two dimensional thermal and thermal-mechanical analyses of horizontal emplacement boreholes were performed using finite-element and boundary-element codes. In the finite-element analyses five different equivalent continuum models of a tuff rock mass were used to investigate the state of deformation and stress around the borehole for times up to 300 years following waste emplacement. These models were an isotropic linear elastic model, an ubiquitous joint model with single and orthogonal joints, an a compliant joint model also with single and orthogonal joints. The case of boreholes intersected by discrete fractures was analyzed using boundary-element models. The results of analyses using the various models of the borehole were consistent and indicated stable conditions even when low estimates of the strength of the joints within the tuff rock mass were assumed. 25 refs

  4. Scientific results from the deepened Lopra-1 borehole, Faroe Islands: Thermal structure of the deep Lopra-1/1A borehole in the Faroe Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breiner, Niels

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available nformation on temperature, temperature gradients, thermal conductivity and heat flow from the c. 3.5 km deep Lopra-1/1A borehole in the Faroe Islands is presented and analysed. The upper 2450 m of the drilled sequence consists of thick tholeiitic basalt flows and the deeper parts of hyaloclastites and thin beds of basalt. Temperature data originate from high precision temperature logging a long time after drilling to a depth of 2175 m (the original Lopra-1 borehole and from commercial temperature logs measured a short time after drilling to a depth of 3430 m (Lopra-1/1A. The high-precision temperature log determines accurately levels of inflow of groundwater to the borehole and significantthermal disturbances to a depth of c. 1250 m. Below 1300 m, no significant disturbances are seen and interval temperature gradients for large depth intervals show only small variations between 28 and 33°C/km. The mean least-squares gradient for the depth interval of 1400–3430 m is 31.4°C/ km. In clear contrast to these overall very homogeneous, large-interval, mean temperature gradients, great local variability, between gradients of 20–25°C/km and 45°C/km, was observed between about 1300 and 2175 m (maximum depth of the high-resolution temperature log. These gradient variations are interpreted to be due to thermal conductivity variations and to reflect varying secondary mineralisation and mineral alterations.A preliminary analysis of the Lopra-1/1A temperature–depth function in terms of long-term palaeoclimatic signals indicates subsurface temperatures below about 1300 m to be in equilibrium with mean surface temperatures significantly below zero during the last glacial period. A subsequent temperature increase of 12–16°C occurred at around the termination of the last glaciation. The measured temperatures (some after correction and the thermal regime below 1300 m seem to represent conductive equilibrium conditions without significant disturbances

  5. Heat transfer in borehole heat exchangers and the contribution of groundwater flow

    OpenAIRE

    Liuzzo Scorpo, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    The exploitation of geothermal heat by ground source heat pumps is presently growing throughout Europe and the world. In Italy, at the end of 2010, borehole heat exchangers covered most of the 30% of the total energy used for space conditioning, showing an increase of 50%compared to 2005. The forecasts for 2015 suggest a further increase in the direct uses of the geothermal heat exceeding 50% compared to 2010 and a corresponding increase in the geothermal energy consumption. The possibilit...

  6. Selection of technological parameters in borehole mining production by technical deep drilling and hydroexploitation

    OpenAIRE

    Mitrovic Vladimir; Pinka Ján; Dimitrijevic Bojan

    2004-01-01

    This paper shows the estimate technological parameters for borehole hydro-production of sand by technical deep drilling slim well differently diameters, where are determinate calculation of radius of jet for selects hydro-monitor, the effect of hydro-caving, caving capacity, hydro-transport of pulp and drawings of the most important parts of necessary equipment for exploitation at the mining field exemplified by experimental borerhole hydro-mining of underlying quartz sand at surface open pit...

  7. Ground source energy in crystalline bedrock - increased energy extraction by using hydraulic fracturing in boreholes

    OpenAIRE

    Ramstad, Randi Kalskin

    2004-01-01

    The use of improved equipment and methodology can result in considerable reductions in the drilling costs for medium- to large sized ground source heat pump system in crystalline bedrock. The main point has been to use special techniques within hydraulic fracturing to create a larger heat exchange area in the bedrock, and thus a greater energy extraction per borehole. The energy extraction is based on circulating groundwater. Stimulation with hydraulic fracturing is a well known technique in ...

  8. Gas Membrane Sensor Technique for Long Term Gas Measurements in Deep Boreholes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, M.; Erzinger, J.; Kujawa, Chr.; Co2-Sink Group

    2009-04-01

    The direct determination of the gas composition in subsurface brines in deep boreholes is necessary for the characterization of existing fluids and the monitoring of changes of reservoir gases during industrial use. The conventional methods used for this purpose were mostly expensive and sophisticated techniques and typically involve the collection of discrete samples that are transported to a laboratory for analyses. Alternatively, the presented new gas membrane sensor technique allows for a permanent collection of gas in the subsurface and the continuous conduction of the gathered gas through a special borehole cable with subsequent real time analyses at the surface. The system is easy to handle, avoids complex mechanical components and therefore reduces costs. The main component of the gas sensor is a tube-shaped membrane, together with a piezoresistive pressure and temperature transmitter and two stainless steel capillaries embedded in a borehole cable for the gas transport to the surface. A filler material prevents the membrane from collapsing inwardly under pressures exceeding 200 bars. The practicability of our method was tested by comprehensive laboratory experiments at different pressures, temperatures and salt concentrations and by comparing the results with literature data on gas permeation coefficients and activation energies gained by the conventional "time-lag" method. By taking into account the permeability coefficient for carbon dioxide in the used polydimethylsiloxan membrane, the Henry-law coefficient and the salting out effect the quantification of dissolved carbon dioxide in deep borehole brines is possible. The described method was successful applied at the scientific carbon dioxide storage test site in Ketzin, Germany. Changes in the reservoir gas composition were monitored and the breakthrough of injected carbon dioxide and krypton gas tracer into the observation well were recorded.

  9. Crustal heat flow measurements in western Anatolia from borehole equilibrium temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkan, K.

    2014-01-01

    Results of a crustal heat flow analysis in western Anatolia based on borehole equilibrium temperatures and rock thermal conductivity data are reported. The dataset comprises 113 borehole sites that were collected in Southern Marmara and Aegean regions of Turkey in 1995-1999. The measurements are from abandoned water wells with depths of 100-150 m. Data were first classed in terms of quality, and the low quality data, including data showing effects of hydrologic disturbances on temperatures, were eliminated. For the remaining 34 sites, one meter resolution temperature-depth curves were carefully analyzed for determination of the background geothermal gradients, and any effects of terrain topography and intra-borehole fluid flow were corrected when necessary. Thermal conductivities were determined either by direct measurements on representative surface outcrop or estimated from the borehole lithologic records. The calculated heat flow values are 85-90 mW m-2 in the northern and central parts of the Menderes horst-graben system. Within the system, the highest heat flow values (> 100 mW m-2) are observed in the northeastern part of Gediz Graben, near Kula active volcanic center. The calculated heat flow values are also in agreement with the results of studies on the maximum depth of seismicity in the region. In the Menderes horst-graben system, surface heat flow is expected to show significant variations as a result of active sedimentation and thermal refraction in grabens, and active erosion on horst detachment zones. High heat flow values (90-100 mW m-2) are also observed in the peninsular (western) part of Çanakkale province. The heat flow anomaly here may be an extension of the high heat flow zone previously observed in the northern Aegean Sea. Moderate heat flow values (60-70 mW m-2) are observed in eastern part of Çanakkale and central part of Balıkesir provinces.

  10. Crustal heat flow measurements in western Anatolia from borehole equilibrium temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Erkan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Results of a crustal heat flow analysis in western Anatolia based on borehole equilibrium temperatures and rock thermal conductivity data are reported. The dataset comprises 113 borehole sites that were collected in Southern Marmara and Aegean regions of Turkey in 1995–1999. The measurements are from abandoned water wells with depths of 100–150 m. Data were first classed in terms of quality, and the low quality data, including data showing effects of hydrologic disturbances on temperatures, were eliminated. For the remaining 34 sites, one meter resolution temperature-depth curves were carefully analyzed for determination of the background geothermal gradients, and any effects of terrain topography and intra-borehole fluid flow were corrected when necessary. Thermal conductivities were determined either by direct measurements on representative surface outcrop or estimated from the borehole lithologic records. The calculated heat flow values are 85–90 mW m−2 in the northern and central parts of the Menderes horst-graben system. Within the system, the highest heat flow values (> 100 mW m−2 are observed in the northeastern part of Gediz Graben, near Kula active volcanic center. The calculated heat flow values are also in agreement with the results of studies on the maximum depth of seismicity in the region. In the Menderes horst-graben system, surface heat flow is expected to show significant variations as a result of active sedimentation and thermal refraction in grabens, and active erosion on horst detachment zones. High heat flow values (90–100 mW m−2 are also observed in the peninsular (western part of Çanakkale province. The heat flow anomaly here may be an extension of the high heat flow zone previously observed in the northern Aegean Sea. Moderate heat flow values (60–70 mW m−2 are observed in eastern part of Çanakkale and central part of Balıkesir provinces.

  11. Response functions and thermal influence for various multiple borehole configurations in ground coupled heat pump systems

    OpenAIRE

    Pešl, Metka; Goričanec, Darko

    2012-01-01

    Ground coupled heat pump (GCHP) utilizes the immense renewable storage capacity of the ground as a heat source or sink to provide space heating, cooling, and domestic hot water. GCHP systems are generally comprised of watersource heat pumps and ground heat exchangers (GHEs). Consisting of closedloop of pipes buried in boreholes, ground heat exchangers (GHEs) are devised for extraction or injection of thermal energy from/into the ground. Despite the low energy and lower maintenance benefits of...

  12. Borehole paleoclimatology – the effect of deep lakes and "heat islands" on temperature profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. M. Kutasov

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available It is known that changes in ground surface temperatures could be caused by many non-climatic effects. In this study we propose a method based on utilization of Laplace equation with nonuniform boundary conditions. The proposed method makes possible to estimate the maximum effect of deep lakes and "heat islands" (areas of deforestation, urbanization, farming, mining and wetland drainage on the borehole temperature profiles.

  13. Borehole paleoclimatology ? the effect of deep lakes and "heat islands" on temperature profiles

    OpenAIRE

    Balobaev, V. T.; Kutasov, I. M.; L. V. Eppelbaum

    2008-01-01

    International audience It is known that changes in ground surface temperatures could be caused by many non-climatic effects. In this study we propose a method based on utilization of Laplace equation with nonuniform boundary conditions. The proposed method makes possible to estimate the maximum effect of deep lakes and "heat islands" (areas of deforestation, urbanization, farming, mining and wetland drainage) on the borehole temperature profiles.

  14. Fractured bedrock investigation by using high-resolution borehole images and the Distributed Temperature Sensing technique

    OpenAIRE

    Radioti, Georgia; Delvoie, Simon; Radu, Jean-Pol; Nguyen, Frédéric; Charlier, Robert

    2015-01-01

    In order to investigate the fracturing of the bedrock and its possible heterogeneous distribution in situ, four boreholes equipped with double-U geothermal pipes of 100 m long were installed on the campus of the University of Liege (Liege, Belgium) over a surface area of 32 m². The bedrock, which starts at a depth approximately of 8 m, is quite fractured and consists mainly of siltstone and shale interbedded with sandstone. Different geophysical methods are applied at two different phas...

  15. Ground source energy in crystalline bedrock - increased energy extraction by using hydraulic fracturing in boreholes

    OpenAIRE

    Ramstad, Randi Kalskin

    2004-01-01

    The use of improved equipment and methodology can result in considerable reductions in the drilling costs for medium- to large sized ground source heat pump system in crystalline bedrock. The main point has been to use special techniques within hydraulic fracturing to create a larger heat exchange area in the bedrock, and thus a greater energy extraction per borehole. The energy extraction is based on circulating groundwater.Stimulation with hydraulic fracturing is a well known technique in o...

  16. Determination of in-situ fracture apertures from digital borehole images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaging methods applied to borehole investigations have become common for mapping and characterisation of the rock mass. Today we have access to detailed information about the rock, but we lack some methods for analysis. In this study we develop a methodology for measurements of in-situ fracture geometry, from optical borehole images (BIP-system). We focus on the detailed information about fracture geometry, available thanks to the high image resolution. We have decided to perform the measurements using digital image processing, to avoid bias from the human analyst, and we present on-going work on the image processing methodology. Our method is based on iterative intensity thresholding. We work on grey-scale images, of open fractures that fully intersect the borehole. The fracture trace comes out as a dark sinusoidal in the borehole image. First, the darkest pixels in the image are extracted. Then the pixels, which are immediate neighbours to the first set, are included, under the condition that they are darker than a somewhat lower threshold. The including of neighbours is repeated until the fracture trace is filled. The resulting sinusoidal fracture trace is then used for finding an approximation of the fracture plane. The fracture plane orientation is used for determination of true aperture from the apparent aperture seen in the image. After this, fracture aperture statistics can be determined. The method works well for images of open fractures of simple geometry (sine wave). It needs to be improved to handle more complex geometry, e.g. crossing fracture traces. Today, some minor interaction from the analyst is needed, but slight modifications will minimise this

  17. Core-logs of the subhorizontal boreholes N1 and E1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subhorizontal boreholes N1 and E1 were drilled in the monzogranite of the Stripa pluton for purposes of the hydrogeological investigations. This report presents the results of the megascopic petrographic investigation of the cores and fracture measurements compiled as fracture-logs, RQD-diagrams, cumulative fracture diagram and contour diagrams of oriented fracture measurements. It also describes geologic structures connected with the Stripa pluton. (Author)

  18. Ground surface temperature history at a single site in southern Portugal reconstructed from borehole temperatures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Correia, A.; Šafanda, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 29, 3/4 (2001), s. 155-165. ISSN 0921-8181 Grant ostatní: NATO(XX) CP(CZ)4/D/96/PO; UNESCO(XX) IGCP No.428 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3012916 Keywords : recent climate * global warming * borehole temperatures * Portugal Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 1.381, year: 2001

  19. Evidence of climatic warming in the southern Urals region derived from borehole temperatures and meteorological data

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Golovanova, I. V.; Harris, R. N.; Selezniova, G. V.; Štulc, Petr

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 29, 3/4 (2001), s. 167-188. ISSN 0921-8181 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/96/0969 Grant ostatní: RFFI(RU) 97-05-65123; UNESCO(XX) IGCP No.428 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3012916 Keywords : climatic warming * The Urals * borehole temperatures * surface air temperature Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 1.381, year: 2001

  20. Rock mass sealing: experimental assessment of borehole plug performance. Annual report, June 1983-May 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes experimental field and laboratory borehole plugging performance assessment studies that have been performed, completed, started, or planned during the period June 1, 1983-May 31, 1984. Results are given from field flow tests on three cement plugs installed in vertical boreholes in basalt and on one nearly horizontal cement plug. The horizontal plus seals the borehole very well, as does one of the vertical plugs. The initial hydraulic conductivity of the other two vertical field plugs has been relatively high, and remedial action is described. Laboratory simulations have been performed to study the influence of dynamic loading on cement plug performance, and no detrimental effects have been detected. Conversely, drying of cement plugs, especially over extended periods of time and at elevated temperatures does increase the hydraulic conductivity of the plugs severely, as well as reducing their bond strength along the plug-rock interface. Microscopic inspection, strength and flow tests on boreholes in basalt have been used to identify the characteristics of a drilling-induced damaged zone in basalt. While such a damaged zone exists, and has typical features (e.g., fracture density, size, location, orientation) determined by the drilling method and the rock characteristics, it is thin and not likely to be a preferential flowpath. A comprehensive suite of standard engineering characterization tests has been performed on seven commercial bentonites, complemented by flow tests on bentonite plugs, chemical analysis and swelling tests. Experimental designs are given for the study of size and of thermal effects on plug performance, and a few preliminary results are presented. Results are included from ongoing cement push-out tests and swelling measurements