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Sample records for borehole sealing technical

  1. Sealing of investigation boreholes, Phase 4 - Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pusch, Roland [Drawrite AB, Luleaa Technical University, Luleaa (Sweden); Ramqvist, Gunnar [El-Tekno AB, Figeholm (Sweden); Bockgaard, Niclas [Golder Associates, Goeteborg (Sweden); Ekman, Lennart [LE Geokonsult AB, Baelinge (Sweden)

    2011-09-15

    The report describes the outcome of Phase 4 of the project 'Sealing of investigation boreholes', which deals with 1) characterization and planning of borehole sealing, 2) performance and quality assessment, 3) sealing of large diameter holes, and 4) interaction of clay and concrete plugs. A specific goal was to find ways to characterize, plan and seal of boreholes so that their impact on the overall hydraulic performance of the repository rock can predicted and controlled. The work comprised selection of representative 'reference holes' at the Laxemar and Forsmark sites for development of a general programme for planning and simulating implementation of borehole plugging campaigns, considering also cost issues. A second aim was to define and quantify the role of seals in the reference holes for finding out how important sealing really is. A third was to test a practical way to seal large diameter boreholes and a fourth to find out how concrete matures and performs in contact with smectite clay. The study demonstrated, in conclusion, the need for developing techniques for preparing deep boreholes before lasting seals are installed in them, since poor sealing can short-circuit hydraulically important fracture zones intersected by the holes. The practically oriented sealing activities showed that the technique developed for tight sealing of large-diameter boreholes is practical and feasible. The issue of chemical stability was investigated by testing the performance and constitution of a plug consisting of CBI concrete in contact with smectite-rich seals for almost three years. This study showed that none of them underwent substantial degradation in this period of time, but chemical reactions and thereby generated changes in physical behaviour of the plug components had taken place, particularly in the clay. The rate of degradation is, however, not yet known. It was concluded from this study that it is suitable to carry out a corresponding

  2. Ceramic Borehole Seals for Nuclear Waste Disposal Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, B.; Coates, K.; Wohletz, K.; Dunn, S.; Patera, E.; Duguid, A.; Arnold, B.; Zyvoloski, G.; Groven, L.; Kuramyssova, K.

    2015-12-01

    Sealing plugs are critical features of the deep borehole system design. They serve as structural platforms to bear the weight of the backfill column, and as seals through their low fluid permeability and bond to the borehole or casing wall. High hydrostatic and lithostatic pressures, high mineral content water, and elevated temperature due to the waste packages and geothermal gradient challenge the long term performance of seal materials. Deep borehole nuclear waste disposal faces the added requirement of assuring performance for thousands of years in large boreholes, requiring very long term chemical and physical stability. A high performance plug system is being developed which capitalizes on the energy of solid phase reactions to form a ceramic plug in-situ. Thermites are a family of self-oxidized metal/oxide reactions with very high energy content and the ability to react under water. When combined with engineered additives the product exhibits attractive structural, sealing, and corrosion properties. In the initial phase of this research, exploratory and scaled tests demonstrated formulations that achieved controlled, fine grained, homogeneous, net shape plugs composed predominantly of ceramic material. Laboratory experiments produced plug cores with confined fluid permeability as low as 100 mDarcy, compressive strength as high as 70 MPa (three times the strength of conventional well cement), with the inherent corrosion resistance and service temperature of ceramic matrices. Numerical thermal and thermal/structural analyses predicted the in-situ thermal performance of the reacted plugs, showing that they cooled to ambient temperature (and design strength) within 24 to 48 hours. The current development effort is refining the reactant formulations to achieve desired performance characteristics, developing the system design and emplacement processes to be compatible with conventional well service practices, and understanding the thermal, fluid, and structural

  3. Permeameter studies of water flow through cement and clay borehole seals in granite, basalt and tuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    South, D.L.; Daemen, J.J.K.

    1986-10-01

    Boreholes near a repository must be sealed to prevent rapid migration of radionuclide-contaminated water to the accessible environment. The objective of this research is to assess the performance of borehole seals under laboratory conditions, particularly with regard to varying stress fields. Flow through a sealed borehole is compared with flow through intact rock. Cement or bentonite seals have been tested in granite, basalt, and welded tuff. The main conclusion is that under laboratory conditions, existing commercial materials can form high quality seals. Triaxial stress changes about a borehole do not significantly affect seal performance if the rock is stiffer than the seal. Temperature but especially moisture variations (drying) significantly degrade the quality of cement seals. Performance partially recovers upon resaturation. A skillfully sealed borehole may be as impermeable as the host rock. Analysis of the influence of relative seal-rock permeabilities shows that a plug with permeability one order of magnitude greater than that of the rock results in a flow increase through the hole and surrounding rock of only 1-1/2 times compared to the undisturbed rock. Since a borehole is only a small part of the total rock mass, the total effect is even less pronounced. The simplest and most effective way to decrease flow through a rock-seal system is to increase the seal length, assuming it can be guaranteed that no dominant by-pass flowpath through the rock exists.

  4. A strategy to seal exploratory boreholes in unsaturated tuff; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, J.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Case, J.B.; Givens, C.A.; Carney, B.C. [IT Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-04-01

    This report presents a strategy for sealing exploratory boreholes associated with the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. Over 500 existing and proposed boreholes have been considered in the development of this strategy, ranging from shallow (penetrating into alluvium only) to deep (penetrating into the groundwater table). Among the comprehensive list of recommendations are the following: Those boreholes within the potential repository boundary and penetrating through the potential repository horizon are the most significant boreholes from a performance standpoint and should be sealed. Shallow boreholes are comparatively insignificant and require only nominal sealing. The primary areas in which to place seals are away from high-temperature zones at a distance from the potential repository horizon in the Paintbrush nonwelded tuff and the upper portion of the Topopah Spring Member and in the tuffaceous beds of the Calico Hills Unit. Seals should be placed prior to waste emplacement. Performance goals for borehole seals both above and below the potential repository are proposed. Detailed construction information on the boreholes that could be used for future design specifications is provided along with a description of the environmental setting, i.e., the geology, hydrology, and the in situ and thermal stress states. A borehole classification scheme based on the condition of the borehole wall in different tuffaceous units is also proposed. In addition, calculations are presented to assess the significance of the boreholes acting as preferential pathways for the release of radionuclides. Design calculations are presented to answer the concerns of when, where, and how to seal. As part of the strategy development, available technologies to seal exploratory boreholes (including casing removal, borehole wall reconditioning, and seal emplacement) are reviewed.

  5. Experimental research on sealing of boreholes, shafts and ramps in welded tuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuenkajorn, K. [Rock Engineering International, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Laboratory and in-situ experiments have been conducted to determine the mechanical and hydraulic performance of cement borehole seals in densely welded Apache Leap tuff. Test results indicate that under saturated conditions, commercial expansive cement can provide good bond strength and adequate hydraulic performance for borehole seal under changing stress conditions. The cement seal should be installed at the intact portion of the opening, and should have a length-to-diameter ratio greater than four. Drying increases borehole plug permeability and decreases mechanical and hydraulic bonds at the plug-rock interface. In-situ testing indicates that installation procedure may significantly affect the cement plug performance.

  6. New-Generation Sealing Slurries For Borehole Injection Purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stryczek, Stanisław; Gonet, Andrzej; Wiśniowski, Rafał; Złotkowski, Albert

    2015-12-01

    The development of techniques and technologies thanks to which parameters of the ground medium can be modified makes specialists look for new recipes of geopolymers - binders for the reinforcing and sealing of unstable and permeable grounds. The sealing slurries are expected to meet a number of strict requirements, therefore it is important to find new admixtures and additives which could modify the fresh and hardened slurry. Special attention has been recently paid to the fluid ash - a by-product of the combustion of hard coals. However, the use of this additive is associated with the application of appropriate superplastifier. Laboratory analyses of rheological parameters of fresh sealing slurries and the ways of improving their liquidity by a properly selected third-generation superplastifier are presented in the paper. The slurries were based on Portland cement CEM I, milled granulated large-furnace slag and fly ash from fluidized-bed combustion of hard coal.

  7. Deep Boreholes Seals Subjected to High P, T conditions – Preliminary Experimental Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caporuscio, Florie Andre [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Norskog, Katherine Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Maner, James Lavada [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-01-18

    The objective of this planned experimental work is to evaluate physio-chemical processes for ‘seal’ components and materials relevant to deep borehole disposal. These evaluations will encompass multi-laboratory efforts for the development of seals concepts and application of Thermal-Mechanical-Chemical (TMC) modeling work to assess barrier material interactions with subsurface fluids, their stability at high temperatures, and the implications of these processes to the evaluation of thermal limits. Deep borehole experimental work will constrain the Pressure, Temperature (P, T) conditions which “seal” material will experience in deep borehole crystalline rock repositories. The rocks of interest to this study include the silicic (granitic gneiss) end members. The experiments will systematically add components to capture discrete changes in both water and EBS component chemistries.

  8. Deep Boreholes Seals Subjected to High P,T conditions - Proposed Experimental Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caporuscio, F.

    2015-12-01

    Deep borehole experimental work will constrain the P,T conditions which "seal" material will experience in deep borehole crystalline rock repositories. The rocks of interest to this study include mafic (amphibolites) and silicic (granitic gneiss) end members. The experiments will systematically add components to capture discrete changes in both water and EBS component chemistries. Experiments in the system wall rock-clay-concrete-groundwater will evaluate interactions among components, including: mineral phase stability, metal corrosion rates and thermal limits. Based on engineered barrier studies, experimental investigations will move forward with three focusses. First, evaluation of interaction between "seal" materials and repository wall rock (crystalline) under fluid-saturated conditions over long-term (i.e., six-month) experiments; which reproduces the thermal pulse event of a repository. Second, perform experiments to determine the stability of zeolite minerals (analcime-wairakitess) under repository conditions. Both sets of experiments are critically important for understanding mineral paragenesis (zeolites and/or clay transformations) associated with "seals" in contact with wall rock at elevated temperatures. Third, mineral growth at the metal interface is a principal control on the survivability (i.e. corrosion) of waste canisters in a repository. The objective of this planned experimental work is to evaluate physio-chemical processes for 'seal' components and materials relevant to deep borehole disposal. These evaluations will encompass multi-laboratory efforts for the development of seals concepts and application of Thermal-Mechanical-Chemical (TMC) modeling work to assess barrier material interactions with subsurface fluids and other barrier materials, their stability at high temperatures, and the implications of these processes to the evaluation of thermal limits.

  9. Sealing of 300 mm boreholes KXTT3 and KXTT4 at Aespoe HRL. Report of Subproject 3 of Borehole sealing Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pusch, Roland [Drawrite AB, Lund (Sweden); Luleaa Technical Univ., Luleaa (Sweden); Ramqvist, Gunnar [Eltekno AB, Figeholm (Sweden)

    2011-11-15

    Sealing of two moderately dipping 300 mm diameter holes that had been bored from a niche adjacent to the ramp in the Aespoe URL in conjunction with earlier geohydrological investigations (TRUE Project, Winberg et al. 2000) was successfully completed in early 2010. The work was preceded by a pilot test on the ground surface for investigating if a simple version of sealing by pressing down clay pellets into clay mud is feasible. The borehole was simulated by a steel tube that was filled with smectite mud in which a cage filled with clay pellets was moved down. The experience from this experiment was that the mud used was somewhat too stiff and that strong vibration significantly reduced its viscosity but not sufficiently much. The predicted average density at water saturation was 1,780 kg/m{sup 3} (dry density 1,240 kg/m{sup 3}). The finally selected sealing method comprised casting of concrete plugs where the inflow of water was significant (up to 30 l/min), and to install precompacted blocks of smectite-rich clay where the rock was 'dry'. The finally matured clay plugs will have a density of around 2,000 kg/m{sup 3} (dry density 1,580 kg/m{sup 3}) and a hydraulic conductivity of less than E-12 m/s, which is estimated to be at least one order of magnitude lower than the bulk conductivity of the surrounding rock mass (Pusch 2008). This provides excellent sealing of all parts of the holes deeper than about 1-2 m below the tunnel floor. Groundwater flow in the rock around the clay plugs can cause some minor erosion but this effect is deemed negligible considering the coagulating effect on released clay particles by the brackish Aespoe water. Inspection of the closed upper borehole ends showed accumulation of some very dilute mineral suspension after a few days. A careful analysis of the mineral content showed that it did not contain smectite particles, hence certifying that erosion of the clay plugs in the holes had not taken place. The particles were

  10. Justification Of The Use Of Boreholes For Disposal Of Sealed Radiological Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarling, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Peter [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Soon there will be only 14 states in two compacts that are able to dispose of Low Level Waste (LLW): the Northwest and Rocky Mountain compact with disposal options in Richland, Washington, and the Atlantic compact with disposal options in Barnwell, South Carolina. How do states not in one of the two compacts dispose of their LLW? The Off-Site Source Recovery Project can take possession and dispose of some of the unwanted transuranic sources at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). However, there will be no path forward for states outside of the two compacts for disposal of their non-transuranic LLW. A solution that has been much discussed, debated and researched, but has not been put into wide scale practice, is the borehole disposal concept. It is the author's position that companies that drill and explore for oil have been disposing of sources in borehole-like structures for years. It should be noted that these companies are not purposely disposing of these sources, but the sources are irretrievable and must be abandoned. Additionally, there are Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations that must be followed to seal the well that contains the lost and abandoned source. According to the NRC Event Notification Reports database, there were a minimum of 29 reports of lost and abandoned sources in oil wells between December 1999 and October 2006. The sources were lost at depths between 2,018-18,887 feet, or 600-5,750 meters. The companies that are performing explorations with the aid of sealed radiological sources must follow regulation 10 CFR Part 39. Subsection 15 outlines the procedures that must be followed if sources are determined to be irretrievable and abandoned in place. If the NRC allows and has regulations in place for oil companies, why can't states and/or companies be allowed to dispose of LLW in a similar fashion?

  11. Closure of the Spent Fuel Repository in Forsmark - Studies of alternative concepts for sealing of ramp, shafts and investigation boreholes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gylling, Bjoern [SKB AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Luterkort, David [SGI, Stockholm (Sweden); Johansson, Roland [Miljoe- och Energikonsult AB, Ekeroe (Sweden)

    2012-12-15

    In March 2011, SKB submitted applications under the Nuclear Activities Act and the Environmental Code for the construction and operation of a final repository for spent nuclear fuel in Forsmark. An important supporting document for the application under the Nuclear Activities Act was the SR-Site safety assessment. As a part of the work with the application and as background material for SR-Site, SKB prepared production reports, including the closure production report. The closure production report presented definitions, requirements and design premises, a reference design and the initial state for repository closure. SR-Site evaluated the reference design and related design premises that were presented in the closure production report. SR-Site thereby concluded that the design premises on which the reference design were based are adequate. Relaxing the requirements would require additional sensitivity analyses focusing on the hydraulic properties of the access, main and transport tunnels. SR-Site further concluded that the reference design could likely be simplified without violating the current design premises. Furthermore, additional simplifications could probably be made if the design premises could be revised. This has been studied in the project 'Closure - concept studies', whose results are presented in this report. SR-Site also evaluated the reference design for investigation boreholes that is presented in the production report. The evaluation showed that the impact of improper borehole seals is very moderate. Further, SR-Site concludes that the current design premises are appropriate but possibly too strict, since even open boreholes seem to have a limited impact on the groundwater flow in the repository. Since it might be difficult to inspect the outcome of the current design of borehole sealing, it could be of interest to assess whether a solution that may result in higher effective permeability of the borehole seals would provide sufficiently

  12. Seal design alternatives study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Sambeek, L.L. [RE/SPEC Inc., Rapid City, SD (US); Luo, D.D.; Lin, M.S.; Ostrowski, W.; Oyenuga, D. [Parsons Brinckerhoff Quade & Douglas, Inc., San Francisco, CA (US)

    1993-06-01

    This report presents the results from a study of various sealing alternatives for the WIPP sealing system. Overall, the sealing system has the purpose of reducing to the extent possible the potential for fluids (either gas or liquid) from entering or leaving the repository. The sealing system is divided into three subsystems: drift and panel seals within the repository horizon, shaft seals in each of the four shafts, and borehole seals. Alternatives to the baseline configuration for the WIPP seal system design included evaluating different geometries and schedules for seal component installations and the use of different materials for seal components. Order-of-magnitude costs for the various alternatives were prepared as part of the study. Firm recommendations are not presented, but the advantages and disadvantages of the alternatives are discussed. Technical information deficiencies are identified and studies are outlined which can provide required information.

  13. Safety considerations in the disposal of disused sealed radioactive sources in borehole facilities

    CERN Document Server

    International Atomic Energ Agency. Vienna

    2003-01-01

    Sealed radioactive sources are used in medicine, industry and research for a wide range of purposes. They can contain different radionuclides in greatly varying amounts. At the end of their useful lives, they are termed 'disused sources' but their activity levels can still be quite high. They are, for all practical purposes, another type of radioactive waste that needs to be disposed of safely. Disused sealed radioactive sources can represent a significant hazard to people if not managed properly. Many countries have no special facilities for the management or disposal of radioactive waste, as they have no nuclear power programmes requiring such facilities. Even in countries with developed nuclear programmes, disused sealed sources present problems as they often fall outside the common categories of radioactive waste for which disposal options have been identified. As a result, many disused sealed sources are kept in storage. Depending on the nature of the storage arrangements, this situation may represent a ...

  14. Sealing performance of bentonite and bentonite/crushed rock borehole plugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouyang, S.; Daemen, J.J.K. [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Mining and Geological Engineering

    1992-07-01

    This study includes a systematic investigation of the sealing performance of bentonite and bentonite/crushed rock plugs. American Colloid C/S granular bentonite and crushed Apache Leap tuff have been mixed to prepare samples for laboratory flow testing. Bentonite weight percent and crushed tuff gradation are the major variables studied. The sealing performance assessments include high injection pressure flow tests, polyaxial flow tests, high temperature flow tests, and piping tests. The results indicate that a composition to yield a permeability lower than 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} cm/s would have at least 25% bentonite by weight mixed with well-graded crushed rock. Hydraulic properties of the mixture plugs may be highly anisotropic if significant particle segregation occurs during sample installation and compaction. Temperature has no significant effect on the sealing performance within the test range from room temperature to 600{degree}C. Piping damage to the sealing performance is small if the maximum hydraulic gradient does not exceed 120 and 280 for samples with a bentonite content of 25 and 35%, respectively. The hydraulic gradients above which flow of bentonite may take place are deemed critical. Analytical work includes the introduction of bentonite occupancy percentage and water content at saturation as two major parameters for plug design. A permeability model is developed for the prediction of permeability in clays, especially in view of the difficulties in obtaining this property experimentally. A piping model is derived based on plastic flow theory. This piping model permits the estimation of critical hydraulic gradients at which flow of bentonite takes place. The model can also be used to define the maximum allowable pore diameter of a protective filter layer.

  15. Task Order 22 – Engineering and Technical Support, Deep Borehole Field Test. AREVA Summary Review Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denton, Mark A. [AREVA Federal Services, Charlotte, NC (United States)

    2016-01-19

    Under Task Order 22 of the industry Advisory and Assistance Services (A&AS) Contract to the Department of Energy (DOE) DE-NE0000291, AREVA has been tasked with providing assistance with engineering, analysis, cost estimating, and design support of a system for disposal of radioactive wastes in deep boreholes (without the use of radioactive waste). As part of this task order, AREVA was requested, through a letter of technical direction, to evaluate Sandia National Laboratory’s (SNL’s) waste package borehole emplacement system concept recommendation using input from DOE and SNL. This summary review report (SRR) documents this evaluation, with its focus on the primary input document titled: “Deep Borehole Field Test Specifications/M2FT-15SN0817091” Rev. 1 [1], hereafter referred to as the “M2 report.” The M2 report focuses on the conceptual design development for the Deep Borehole Field Test (DBFT), mainly the test waste packages (WPs) and the system for demonstrating emplacement and retrieval of those packages in the Field Test Borehole (FTB). This SRR follows the same outline as the M2 report, which allows for easy correlation between AREVA’s review comments, discussion, potential proposed alternatives, and path forward with information established in the M2 report. AREVA’s assessment focused on three primary elements of the M2 report: the conceptual design of the WPs proposed for deep borehole disposal (DBD), the mode of emplacement of the WP into DBD, and the conceptual design of the DBFT. AREVA concurs with the M2 report’s selection of the wireline emplacement mode specifically over the drill-string emplacement mode and generically over alternative emplacement modes. Table 5-1 of this SRR compares the pros and cons of each emplacement mode considered viable for DBD. The primary positive characteristics of the wireline emplacement mode include: (1) considered a mature technology; (2) operations are relatively simple; (3) probability of a

  16. Task Order 22 – Engineering and Technical Support, Deep Borehole Field Test. AREVA Summary Review Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denton, Mark A. [AREVA Federal Services, Charlotte, NC (United States)

    2016-01-19

    Under Task Order 22 of the industry Advisory and Assistance Services (A&AS) Contract to the Department of Energy (DOE) DE-NE0000291, AREVA has been tasked with providing assistance with engineering, analysis, cost estimating, and design support of a system for disposal of radioactive wastes in deep boreholes (without the use of radioactive waste). As part of this task order, AREVA was requested, through a letter of technical direction, to evaluate Sandia National Laboratory’s (SNL’s) waste package borehole emplacement system concept recommendation using input from DOE and SNL. This summary review report (SRR) documents this evaluation, with its focus on the primary input document titled: “Deep Borehole Field Test Specifications/M2FT-15SN0817091” Rev. 1 [1], hereafter referred to as the “M2 report.” The M2 report focuses on the conceptual design development for the Deep Borehole Field Test (DBFT), mainly the test waste packages (WPs) and the system for demonstrating emplacement and retrieval of those packages in the Field Test Borehole (FTB). This SRR follows the same outline as the M2 report, which allows for easy correlation between AREVA’s review comments, discussion, potential proposed alternatives, and path forward with information established in the M2 report. AREVA’s assessment focused on three primary elements of the M2 report: the conceptual design of the WPs proposed for deep borehole disposal (DBD), the mode of emplacement of the WP into DBD, and the conceptual design of the DBFT. AREVA concurs with the M2 report’s selection of the wireline emplacement mode specifically over the drill-string emplacement mode and generically over alternative emplacement modes. Table 5-1 of this SRR compares the pros and cons of each emplacement mode considered viable for DBD. The primary positive characteristics of the wireline emplacement mode include: (1) considered a mature technology; (2) operations are relatively simple; (3) probability of a

  17. Reference design and operations for deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrick, Courtney Grant; Brady, Patrick Vane; Pye, Steven; Arnold, Bill Walter; Finger, John Travis; Bauer, Stephen J.

    2011-10-01

    A reference design and operational procedures for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste in deep boreholes have been developed and documented. The design and operations are feasible with currently available technology and meet existing safety and anticipated regulatory requirements. Objectives of the reference design include providing a baseline for more detailed technical analyses of system performance and serving as a basis for comparing design alternatives. Numerous factors suggest that deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste is inherently safe. Several lines of evidence indicate that groundwater at depths of several kilometers in continental crystalline basement rocks has long residence times and low velocity. High salinity fluids have limited potential for vertical flow because of density stratification and prevent colloidal transport of radionuclides. Geochemically reducing conditions in the deep subsurface limit the solubility and enhance the retardation of key radionuclides. A non-technical advantage that the deep borehole concept may offer over a repository concept is that of facilitating incremental construction and loading at multiple perhaps regional locations. The disposal borehole would be drilled to a depth of 5,000 m using a telescoping design and would be logged and tested prior to waste emplacement. Waste canisters would be constructed of carbon steel, sealed by welds, and connected into canister strings with high-strength connections. Waste canister strings of about 200 m length would be emplaced in the lower 2,000 m of the fully cased borehole and be separated by bridge and cement plugs. Sealing of the upper part of the borehole would be done with a series of compacted bentonite seals, cement plugs, cement seals, cement plus crushed rock backfill, and bridge plugs. Elements of the reference design meet technical requirements defined in the study. Testing and operational safety assurance requirements are also defined. Overall

  18. Technical know-how relevant to planning of borehole investigation for fault characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, T.; Takeuchi, R.; Tsuruta, T.; Matsuoka, T.; Kunimaru, T.; Saegusa, H.

    2011-12-01

    As part of the national R&D program for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste (HLW), the broad scientific study of the deep geological environment, JAEA has established the Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory (MIU) in Central Japan as a generic underground research laboratory (URL) facility. The MIU Project focuses on the crystalline rocks. In the case of fractured rock, a fault is one of the major discontinuity structures which control the groundwater flow conditions. It is important to estimate geological, hydrogeological, hydrochemical and rock mechanical characteristics of faults, and then to evaluate its role in the engineering design of repository and the assessment of long-term safety of HLW disposal. Therefore, investigations for fault characterization have been performed to estimate its characteristics and to evaluate existing conceptual and/or numerical models of the geological environment in the MIU project. Investigations related to faults have been conducted based on the conventional concept that a fault consists of a "fault core (FC)" characterized by distribution of the faulted rocks and a "fractured zone (FZ)" along FC. With the progress of investigations, furthermore, it is clear that there is also a case in which an "altered zone (AZ)" characterized by alteration of host rocks to clay minerals can be developed around the FC. Intensity of alteration in AZ generally decreases with distance from the FC, and AZ transits to FZ. Therefore, the investigation program focusing on properties of AZ is required for revising the existing conceptual and/or numerical models of geological environment. In this study, procedures for planning of fault characterizations have been summarized based on the technical know-how learnt through the MIU Project for the development of Knowledge Management System performed by JAEA under a contract with the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry as part of its R&D supporting program for developing geological

  19. Use of polyurethane resins for sealing test boreholes at Cogema Vendee. [France]. Utilisation de resines polyurethane pour l'etanchement des sondages a Cogema-Vendee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tourscher, M.

    1989-11-01

    The mining division is briefly described. The main problem for mining development is an important flow rate of water at a pressure of 0 to 10 bars through exploratory boreholes. Use of polyurethane resin reacting with water was retained but taking account of flow rate and pressure a new method was developed using a polyamide sleeve, allowing reaction and expansion before dilution by flowing water. Cost is estimated at 4683 FF/borehole.

  20. Radioactive sealed sources: Reasonable accountability, exemption, and licensing activity thresholds -- A technical basis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Shingleton, K.L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1996-07-01

    Perhaps owing to their small size and portability, some radiation accidents/incidents have involved radioactive sealed sources (RSSs). As a result, programs for the control and accountability of RSSs have come to be recommended and emplaced that essentially require RSSs to be controlled in a manner different from bulk, unsealed radioactive material. Crucially determining the total number of RSSs for which manpower-intensive radiation protection surveillance is provided is the individual RSS activity above which such surveillance is required and below which such effort is not considered cost effective. Individual RSS activity thresholds are typically determined through scenarios which impart a chosen internal or external limiting dose to Reference Man under specified exposure conditions. The resultant RSS threshold activity levels have meaning commensurate with the assumed scenario exposure parameters, i.e., if they are realistic and technically based. A review of how the Department of Energy (DOE), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) have determined their respective accountability, exemption, and licensing threshold activity values is provided. Finally, a fully explained method using references readily available to practicing health physicists is developed using realistic, technically-based calculation parameters by which RSS threshold activities may be locally generated.

  1. Drip Sealing Grouting of Tunnels in Crystalline Rock: Conceptualisation and Technical Strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butron, Christian

    2012-07-01

    A conceptual model of the groundwater hydraulic conditions around the tunnel contour in ancient brittle crystalline rocks has been developed and verified. The general aim has been to reach an understanding of the groundwater conditions in and close to the tunnel roof where dripping takes place and to propose technical and practical strategies for waterproofing. Dripping is accompanied by ice growth and icicle formation in cold regions, creating additional problems such as shotcrete fall-outs, icicle fall-outs, damage to vehicles, damage to trains, etc. The methodology for the development of the conceptual model is based mainly on transmissivity determinations from short-duration hydraulic tests and analyses of the connectivity of the fracture structure by means of semi-variogram analysis. The determination of the dimensionality of the flow in the fractures has also been found to be essential in order to describe the conductive system. This conceptual model describes the fracture systems as a combination of transmissive patches (2D-flow fractures) connected by less pervious channels (1D-flow fractures). It provides an understanding of the heterogeneity and connectivity of the fracture network and thus the groundwater conditions, not only in the roof but also around the tunnel contour. The pre-excavation grouting design process used in the tunnelling projects followed a structured approach and the evaluation showed that the grouting design reduced the inflow and fulfilled the environmental demands. However, dripping remained, making its characterisation very important when proposing a possible solution for its control. It is proposed that the remaining dripping comes from a channelised system that has been left unsealed and which would be extremely difficult to intersect with future boreholes, as well as from some ungrouted fractures with inconvenient orientations. Geomembrane lining and post-excavation grouting are possible solutions, although particular attention

  2. Borehole Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Records of past temperature derived from boreholes drilled into the Earth crust. Parameter keywords describe what was measured in this data set. Additional summary...

  3. Repository seals requirements study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-03

    The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project, managed by the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) Management and Operating Contractor (M and O) is conducting investigations to support the Viability Assessment and the License Application for a high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The sealing subsystem is part of the Yucca Mountain Waste Isolation System. The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project is currently evaluating the role of the sealing subsystem (shaft, ramp and exploratory borehole seals) in achieving the overall performance objectives for the Waste Isolation System. This report documents the results of those evaluations. This report presents the results of a repository sealing requirements study. Sealing is defined as the permanent closure of the shafts, ramps, and exploratory boreholes. Sealing includes those components that would reduce potential inflows above the repository, or that would divert flow near the repository horizon to allow vertical infiltration to below the repository. Sealing of such features as emplacement drifts was not done in this study because the current capability to calculate fracture flow into the drifts is not sufficiently mature. The objective of the study is to provide water or air flow performance based requirements for shafts, ramps, and exploratory boreholes located near the repository. Recommendations, as appropriate, are provided for developing plans, seals component testing, and other studies relating to sealing.

  4. Deep Borehole Field Test Research Activities at LBNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobson, Patrick [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Tsang, Chin-Fu [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Kneafsey, Timothy [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Borglin, Sharon [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Piceno, Yvette [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Andersen, Gary [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Nakagawa, Seiji [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Nihei, Kurt [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Rutqvist, Jonny [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Doughty, Christine [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Reagan, Matthew [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-08-19

    The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy Used Fuel Disposition’s (UFD) Deep Borehole Field Test is to drill two 5 km large-diameter boreholes: a characterization borehole with a bottom-hole diameter of 8.5 inches and a field test borehole with a bottom-hole diameter of 17 inches. These boreholes will be used to demonstrate the ability to drill such holes in crystalline rocks, effectively characterize the bedrock repository system using geophysical, geochemical, and hydrological techniques, and emplace and retrieve test waste packages. These studies will be used to test the deep borehole disposal concept, which requires a hydrologically isolated environment characterized by low permeability, stable fluid density, reducing fluid chemistry conditions, and an effective borehole seal. During FY16, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory scientists conducted a number of research studies to support the UFD Deep Borehole Field Test effort. This work included providing supporting data for the Los Alamos National Laboratory geologic framework model for the proposed deep borehole site, conducting an analog study using an extensive suite of geoscience data and samples from a deep (2.5 km) research borehole in Sweden, conducting laboratory experiments and coupled process modeling related to borehole seals, and developing a suite of potential techniques that could be applied to the characterization and monitoring of the deep borehole environment. The results of these studies are presented in this report.

  5. Alternative technical summary report for immobilized disposition in deep boreholes: Immobilized disposal of plutonium in coated ceramic pellets in grout without canisters, Version 4.0. Fissile materials disposition program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wijesinghe, A.M.

    1996-08-23

    This paper summarizes and compares the immobilized and direct borehole disposition alternatives previously presented in the alternative technical summary. The important design concepts, facility features and operational procedures are first briefly described. This is followed by a discussion of the issues that affect the evaluation of each alternative against the programmatic assessment criteria that have been established for selecting the preferred alternatives for plutonium disposition.

  6. Seals and sealing handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Flitney, Robert K

    2014-01-01

    Seals and Sealing Handbook, 6th Edition provides comprehensive coverage of sealing technology, bringing together information on all aspects of this area to enable you to make the right sealing choice. This includes detailed coverage on the seals applicable to static, rotary and reciprocating applications, the best materials to use in your sealing systems, and the legislature and regulations that may impact your sealing choices. Updated in line with current trends this updated reference provides the theory necessary for you to select the most appropriate seals for the job and with its 'Failur

  7. Closure and Sealing Design Calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. Lahnalampi; J. Case

    2005-08-26

    The purpose of the ''Closure and Sealing Design Calculation'' is to illustrate closure and sealing methods for sealing shafts, ramps, and identify boreholes that require sealing in order to limit the potential of water infiltration. In addition, this calculation will provide a description of the magma that can reduce the consequences of an igneous event intersecting the repository. This calculation will also include a listing of the project requirements related to closure and sealing. The scope of this calculation is to: summarize applicable project requirements and codes relating to backfilling nonemplacement openings, removal of uncommitted materials from the subsurface, installation of drip shields, and erecting monuments; compile an inventory of boreholes that are found in the area of the subsurface repository; describe the magma bulkhead feature and location; and include figures for the proposed shaft and ramp seals. The objective of this calculation is to: categorize the boreholes for sealing by depth and proximity to the subsurface repository; develop drawing figures which show the location and geometry for the magma bulkhead; include the shaft seal figures and a proposed construction sequence; and include the ramp seal figure and a proposed construction sequence. The intent of this closure and sealing calculation is to support the License Application by providing a description of the closure and sealing methods for the Safety Analysis Report. The closure and sealing calculation will also provide input for Post Closure Activities by describing the location of the magma bulkhead. This calculation is limited to describing the final configuration of the sealing and backfill systems for the underground area. The methods and procedures used to place the backfill and remove uncommitted materials (such as concrete) from the repository and detailed design of the magma bulkhead will be the subject of separate analyses or calculations. Post

  8. Low Cost, Durable Seal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, George; Parsons, Jason; Friedman, Jake

    2010-12-17

    Seal durability is critical to achieving the 2010 DOE operational life goals for both stationary and transportation PEM fuel cell stacks. The seal material must be chemically and mechanically stable in an environment consisting of aggressive operating temperatures, humidified gases, and acidic membranes. The seal must also be producible at low cost. Currentlyused seal materials do not meet all these requirements. This project developed and demonstrated a high consistency hydrocarbon rubber seal material that was able to meet the DOE technical and cost targets. Significant emphasis was placed on characterization of the material and full scale molding demonstrations.

  9. Rapid Response Research and Development (R&D) for the Aerospace Systems Directorate. Delivery Order 0021: Engineering Research and Technical Analyses of Advanced Airbreathing Propulsion Fuels, Subtask: Fit-for-Purpose (FFP) and Dynamic Seal Testing of Alternative Aviation Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    equal part by weight mixture of the following individual FAME components: • Palm Oil Methyl Ester (POME) • Rapeseed Methyl Ester (RME) • Soy(bean...Research and Technical Analyses of Advanced Airbreathing Propulsion Fuels Subtask: Fit-For-Purpose (FFP) and Dynamic Seal Testing of Alternative ...Technical Analyses of Advanced Airbreathing Propulsion Fuels Subtask: Fit-For-Purpose (FFP) and Dynamic Seal Testing of Alternative Aviation

  10. Effect of Stresses and Strains of Roadway Surrounding Rocks on Borehole Airtightness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WU Wei

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available At present, many high gas and outburst mines have poor gas drainage effects. An important reason influencing the gas drainage effect is a poor hole-sealing effect. Most studies on gas drainage borehole sealing focus on local and foreign borehole sealing methods, borehole sealing equipment, and borehole sealing materials. Numerical simulations of initial drilling sealing depth are insufficient because studies on this subject are few. However, when the initial sealing depth of the borehole is not chosen reasonably, air can enter the gas drainage drill hole through the circumferential crack of roadway surrounding rocks under the influence of suction pressure of the drainage system. This phenomenon ultimately affects the hole-sealing effect. To improve the drilling hole sealing of gas drainage boring, we deduced the expression formulas of the crushing zone, plastic zone, and elastic zone around the coal-seam floor stone drift and conducted a stress–strain analysis of the coal-seam floor stone drift of the 2145 working surfaces of the Sixth Coal Mine of Hebi Coal Mine Group Company by using theoretical analysis, numerical simulation, and on-scene verification. Finally, we obtain the initial drilling sealing depth, which is a main contribution of this study. The results prove the following. The performed hole-sealing process with an initial drilling sealing depth of 8 m has a gas drainage efficiency of 55%. Compared with the previous 6.8 m initial drilling sealing depth with a gas drainage efficiency of less than 30%, which was adopted by the mine, the initial sealing depth of 8 m chosen in the numerical simulation is reasonable and conforms to the actual situation on the spot. Therefore, the initial drilling sealing depth chosen in the numerical simulation will produce practical and effective guidance to study the field hole-sealing depth.

  11. Seals and sealing handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Flitney, Robert K

    2007-01-01

    Wherever machinery operates there will be seals of some kind ensuring that the machine remains lubricated, the fluid being pumped does not leak, or the gas does not enter the atmosphere. Seals are ubiquitous, in industry, the home, transport and many other places. This 5th edition of a long-established title covers all types of seal by application: static, rotary, reciprocating etc. The book bears little resemblance to its predecessors, and Robert Flitney has re-planned and re-written every aspect of the subject. No engineer, designer or manufacturer of seals can afford to be without this uniq

  12. Analysis of the stability of the gas extraction boreholes based on the Hoke-Brown criterion and their sealing-up methods%基于Hoke-Brown准则的瓦斯抽采钻孔稳定性分析及封孔技术

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李松涛; 孙玉宁; 王永龙; 刘春

    2016-01-01

    light of the established theoretical equation.Furthermore,we have adopted the capsule bag grouting method at the tailing gate of No.310207 panel,Shanxi,in accordance with the theoretical accounting and the geological conditions of the formation rock.The results of our study show that,with the increase of the GSI index,the low supporting force of the borehole wall can also display favorable sealing effects,for the elastic radius around the borehole tends simply to reach 0.102 3 m,that is,about 1.7 times bigger than the radius of the borehole itself with its GSI being 55.In spite of this,the change of the disturbed factor (D)can only have a limited effect on the berehole stability,for the evolution of the radius of the plastic zone can likely be dramatically greater on the premise that the imbalance coefficient (λ) is over 1.2.In addition,the gas pressure tends to produce remarkable impact gradually on the plastic zone,in case the distance from the original pore pressure point to the center of borehole should be no longer than 1 m.The field test we have done also indicates that,if the gas concentration that has been drained falls to the point of 30%,the effective time of the gas extraction can be extended to about two months by using the capsule bag grouting technology in comparison with the known polyurethane sealing method.Therefore,the innovated borehole sealing method we have propoeed can be expected to heighten the average gas concentration to be extracted by 58.2% based on the fidd data collected during a period of three months and the corresponding period of time.

  13. Glass sealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brow, R.K.; Kovacic, L.; Chambers, R.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Hernetic glass sealing technologies developed for weapons component applications can be utilized for the design and manufacture of fuel cells. Design and processing of of a seal are optimized through an integrated approach based on glass composition research, finite element analysis, and sealing process definition. Glass sealing procedures are selected to accommodate the limits imposed by glass composition and predicted calculations.

  14. Mechanical seals

    CERN Document Server

    Mayer, E

    1977-01-01

    Mechanical Seals, Third Edition is a source of practical information on the design and use of mechanical seals. Topics range from design fundamentals and test rigs to leakage, wear, friction and power, reliability, and special designs. This text is comprised of nine chapters; the first of which gives a general overview of seals, including various types of seals and their applications. Attention then turns to the fundamentals of seal design, with emphasis on six requirements that must be considered: sealing effectiveness, length of life, reliability, power consumption, space requirements, and c

  15. Deep boreholes; Tiefe Bohrloecher

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bracke, Guido [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit gGmbH Koeln (Germany); Charlier, Frank [NSE international nuclear safety engineering gmbh, Aachen (Germany); Geckeis, Horst [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (Germany). Inst. fuer Nukleare Entsorgung; and others

    2016-02-15

    The report on deep boreholes covers the following subject areas: methods for safe enclosure of radioactive wastes, requirements concerning the geological conditions of possible boreholes, reversibility of decisions and retrievability, status of drilling technology. The introduction covers national and international activities. Further chapters deal with the following issues: basic concept of the storage in deep bore holes, status of the drilling technology, safe enclosure, geomechanics and stability, reversibility of decisions, risk scenarios, compliancy with safe4ty requirements and site selection criteria, research and development demand.

  16. Brush Seals for Improved Steam Turbine Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnquist, Norman; Chupp, Ray; Baily, Fred; Burnett, Mark; Rivas, Flor; Bowsher, Aaron; Crudgington, Peter

    2006-01-01

    GE Energy has retrofitted brush seals into more than 19 operating steam turbines. Brush seals offer superior leakage control compared to labyrinth seals, owing to their compliant nature and ability to maintain very tight clearances to the rotating shaft. Seal designs have been established for steam turbines ranging in size from 12 MW to over 1200 MW, including fossil, nuclear, combined-cycle and industrial applications. Steam turbines present unique design challenges that must be addressed to ensure that the potential performance benefits of brush seals are realized. Brush seals can have important effects on the overall turbine system that must be taken into account to assure reliable operation. Subscale rig tests are instrumental to understanding seal behavior under simulated steam-turbine operating conditions, prior to installing brush seals in the field. This presentation discusses the technical challenges of designing brush seals for steam turbines; subscale testing; performance benefits of brush seals; overall system effects; and field applications.

  17. Bond strength of cementitious borehole plugs in welded tuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akgun, H.; Daemen, J.J.K. [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (USA). Dept. of Mining and Geological Engineering

    1991-02-01

    Axial loads on plugs or seals in an underground repository due to gas, water pressures and temperature changes induced subsequent to waste and plug emplacement lead to shear stresses at the plug/rock contact. Therefore, the bond between the plug and rock is a critical element for the design and effectiveness of plugs in boreholes, shafts or tunnels. This study includes a systematic investigation of the bond strength of cementitious borehole plugs in welded tuff. Analytical and numerical analysis of borehole plug-rock stress transfer mechanics is performed. The interface strength and deformation are studied as a function of Young`s modulus ratio of plug and rock, plug length and rock cylinder outside-to-inside radius ratio. The tensile stresses in and near an axially loaded plug are analyzed. The frictional interface strength of an axially loaded borehole plug, the effect of axial stress and lateral external stress, and thermal effects are also analyzed. Implications for plug design are discussed. The main conclusion is a strong recommendation to design friction plugs in shafts, drifts, tunnels or boreholes with a minimum length to diameter ratio of four. Such a geometrical design will reduce tensile stresses in the plug and in the host rock to a level which should minimize the risk of long-term deterioration caused by excessive tensile stresses. Push-out tests have been used to determine the bond strength by applying an axial load to cement plugs emplaced in boreholes in welded tuff cylinders. A total of 130 push-out tests have been performed as a function of borehole size, plug length, temperature, and degree of saturation of the host tuff. The use of four different borehole radii enables evaluation of size effects. 119 refs., 42 figs., 20 tabs.

  18. Geochemical analysis of the sealing system. Technical Report to work package 9.1.2. Preliminary safety case of the Gorleben site (VSG)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Mingliang; Herbert, Horst-Juergen

    2012-02-15

    The geochemical reaction simulation of ground water and brines with sealing materials for a proposed repository at the Gorleben site is a task under the framework of the VSG project. The calculations presented in this report are aimed to provide a preliminary evaluation of the geochemical stability of three potential engineering barrier materials foreseen in the shaft sealing system in case of groundwater and brine intrusion. The long-term stability of these materials is a key issue for the sealing function of the shaft seals. This is governed by many factors such as geotechnical, hydraulic and geochemical processes. In order to better understand the potential effect of geochemical processes on the long-term properties of these sealing materials, geochemical simulations of the potential interactions between groundwater and brine and shaft sealing materials were performed.

  19. Deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stein, Joshua S.; Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Brady, Patrick Vane; Swift, Peter N.; Rechard, Robert Paul; Arnold, Bill Walter; Kanney, Joseph F.; Bauer, Stephen J.

    2009-07-01

    Preliminary evaluation of deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel indicates the potential for excellent long-term safety performance at costs competitive with mined repositories. Significant fluid flow through basement rock is prevented, in part, by low permeabilities, poorly connected transport pathways, and overburden self-sealing. Deep fluids also resist vertical movement because they are density stratified. Thermal hydrologic calculations estimate the thermal pulse from emplaced waste to be small (less than 20 C at 10 meters from the borehole, for less than a few hundred years), and to result in maximum total vertical fluid movement of {approx}100 m. Reducing conditions will sharply limit solubilities of most dose-critical radionuclides at depth, and high ionic strengths of deep fluids will prevent colloidal transport. For the bounding analysis of this report, waste is envisioned to be emplaced as fuel assemblies stacked inside drill casing that are lowered, and emplaced using off-the-shelf oilfield and geothermal drilling techniques, into the lower 1-2 km portion of a vertical borehole {approx}45 cm in diameter and 3-5 km deep, followed by borehole sealing. Deep borehole disposal of radioactive waste in the United States would require modifications to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act and to applicable regulatory standards for long-term performance set by the US Environmental Protection Agency (40 CFR part 191) and US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (10 CFR part 60). The performance analysis described here is based on the assumption that long-term standards for deep borehole disposal would be identical in the key regards to those prescribed for existing repositories (40 CFR part 197 and 10 CFR part 63).

  20. Ceramic Seal.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smartt, Heidi A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Romero, Juan A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Custer, Joyce Olsen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hymel, Ross W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Krementz, Dan [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Gobin, Derek [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Harpring, Larry [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Martinez-Rodriguez, Michael [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Varble, Don [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); DiMaio, Jeff [Tetramer Technologies, Pendleton, SC (United States); Hudson, Stephen [Tetramer Technologies, Pendleton, SC (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Containment/Surveillance (C/S) measures are critical to any verification regime in order to maintain Continuity of Knowledge (CoK). The Ceramic Seal project is research into the next generation technologies to advance C/S, in particular improving security and efficiency. The Ceramic Seal is a small form factor loop seal with improved tamper-indication including a frangible seal body, tamper planes, external coatings, and electronic monitoring of the seal body integrity. It improves efficiency through a self-securing wire and in-situ verification with a handheld reader. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), under sponsorship from the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D), have previously designed and have now fabricated and tested Ceramic Seals. Tests have occurred at both SNL and SRNL, with different types of tests occurring at each facility. This interim report will describe the Ceramic Seal prototype, the design and development of a handheld standalone reader and an interface to a data acquisition system, fabrication of the seals, and results of initial testing.

  1. Ferrules seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J.L.

    1984-07-10

    A device is provided for sealing an inner tube and an outer tube without excessively deforming the tubes. The device includes two ferrules which cooperate to form a vacuum-tight seal between the inner tube and outer tube and having mating surfaces such that overtightening is not possible. 3 figs.

  2. Deep Borehole Field Test Requirements and Controlled Assumptions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardin, Ernest [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-07-01

    This document presents design requirements and controlled assumptions intended for use in the engineering development and testing of: 1) prototype packages for radioactive waste disposal in deep boreholes; 2) a waste package surface handling system; and 3) a subsurface system for emplacing and retrieving packages in deep boreholes. Engineering development and testing is being performed as part of the Deep Borehole Field Test (DBFT; SNL 2014a). This document presents parallel sets of requirements for a waste disposal system and for the DBFT, showing the close relationship. In addition to design, it will also inform planning for drilling, construction, and scientific characterization activities for the DBFT. The information presented here follows typical preparations for engineering design. It includes functional and operating requirements for handling and emplacement/retrieval equipment, waste package design and emplacement requirements, borehole construction requirements, sealing requirements, and performance criteria. Assumptions are included where they could impact engineering design. Design solutions are avoided in the requirements discussion. Deep Borehole Field Test Requirements and Controlled Assumptions July 21, 2015 iv ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This set of requirements and assumptions has benefited greatly from reviews by Gordon Appel, Geoff Freeze, Kris Kuhlman, Bob MacKinnon, Steve Pye, David Sassani, Dave Sevougian, and Jiann Su.

  3. Seal Counts

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Database of seal counts from aerial photography. Counts by image, site, species, and date are stored in the database along with information on entanglements and...

  4. Deep Borehole Field Test Laboratory and Borehole Testing Strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhlman, Kristopher L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brady, Patrick V. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); MacKinnon, Robert J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Heath, Jason E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Herrick, Courtney G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jensen, Richard P. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gardner, W. Payton [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sevougian, S. David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bryan, Charles R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jang, Je-Hun [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Stein, Emily R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bauer, Stephen J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Daley, Tom [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Freifeld, Barry M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Birkholzer, Jens [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Spane, Frank A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-09-19

    Deep Borehole Disposal (DBD) of high-level radioactive wastes has been considered an option for geological isolation for many years (Hess et al. 1957). Recent advances in drilling technology have decreased costs and increased reliability for large-diameter (i.e., ≥50 cm [19.7”]) boreholes to depths of several kilometers (Beswick 2008; Beswick et al. 2014). These advances have therefore also increased the feasibility of the DBD concept (Brady et al. 2009; Cornwall 2015), and the current field test design will demonstrate the DBD concept and these advances. The US Department of Energy (DOE) Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste (DOE 2013) specifically recommended developing a research and development plan for DBD. DOE sought input or expression of interest from States, local communities, individuals, private groups, academia, or any other stakeholders willing to host a Deep Borehole Field Test (DBFT). The DBFT includes drilling two boreholes nominally 200m [656’] apart to approximately 5 km [16,400’] total depth, in a region where crystalline basement is expected to begin at less than 2 km depth [6,560’]. The characterization borehole (CB) is the smaller-diameter borehole (i.e., 21.6 cm [8.5”] diameter at total depth), and will be drilled first. The geologic, hydrogeologic, geochemical, geomechanical and thermal testing will take place in the CB. The field test borehole (FTB) is the larger-diameter borehole (i.e., 43.2 cm [17”] diameter at total depth). Surface handling and borehole emplacement of test package will be demonstrated using the FTB to evaluate engineering feasibility and safety of disposal operations (SNL 2016).

  5. Research borehole drilling activity for boreholes DH-18, DH-19, DC-12, DC-13, DC-14, DC-15, and deepening of existing borehole DC-7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-09-01

    This report is an environmental evaluation of the impacts of proposed borehole drilling activities at the Hanford Site, northwest of Richland, Washington. The proposed action is to drill six research boreholes ranging in depth from 137 to 1372 meters (m) (250 to 4500 +- feet (ft)). In addition, an existing borehole (DC-7) will be extended from 1249 to 1524 m (4099 to 5000 +- ft). The purpose of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) borehole drilling activities is to collect data on in situ rock formations that are considered potentialy suitable for nuclear waste repositories. The technical program efforts necessary to identify and qualify specific underground waste facility sites in candidate rock formations include geologic and hydrologic studies (seismicity and tectonics, rock structure and stratigraphy, lithology, etc.). Borehole drilling is an integral part of the geological studies and is essential to a thorough understanding of potentially suitable geologic formations. The purpose of the proposed drilling activities is to obtain data for evaluating Columbia River basalts that are being evaluated by the National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) Program to determine their suitability potential for nuclear waste repositories. Unavoidable impact to the environment is limited primarily to the clearing of land needed for access and drilling operations. Considerations exercised during site preparation, drilling, and subsequent site restoration will limit modification of the natural environment to the minimum required for accomplishment of test objectives.

  6. Final disposal of high-level nuclear waste in very deep boreholes. An evaluation based on recent research of bedrock conditions at great depths; Slutfoervaring av hoegaktivt kaernavfall i djupa borrhaal. En utvaerdering baserad paa senare aars forskning om berggrunden paa stora djup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aahaell, Karl-Inge [Karlstad Univ. (Sweden)

    2007-01-15

    This report evaluates the feasibility of very deep borehole disposal of high-level nuclear waste, e.g., spent nuclear fuel, in the light of recent technological developments and research on the characteristics of bedrock at extreme depths. The evaluation finds that new knowledge in the field of hydrogeology and technical advances in drilling technology have advanced the possibility of using very deep boreholes (3-5 km) for disposal of the Swedish nuclear waste. Decisive factors are (1) that the repository can be located in stable bedrock at a level where the groundwater is isolated from the biosphere, and (2) that the waste can be deposited and the boreholes permanently sealed without causing long-term disturbances in the density-stratification of the groundwater that surrounds the repository. Very deep borehole disposal might offer important advantage compared to the relatively more shallow KBS approach that is presently planned to be used by the Swedish nuclear industry in Sweden, in that it has the potential of being more robust. The reason for this is that very deep borehole disposal appears to permit emplacement of the waste at depths where the entire repository zone would be surrounded by stable, density-stratified groundwater having no contact with the surface, whereas a KBS-3 repository would be surrounded by upwardly mobile groundwater. This hydro-geological difference is a major safety factor, which is particularly apparent in all scenarios that envisage leakage of radioactive substances. Another advantage of a repository at a depth of 3 to 5 km is that it is less vulnerable to impacts from expected events (e.g., changes in groundwater conditions during future ice ages) as well as undesired events (e.g. such as terrorist actions, technical malfunction and major local earthquakes). Decisive for the feasibility of a repository based on the very deep borehole concept is, however, the ability to emplace the waste without failures. In order to achieve this

  7. The Technical Study of Electromagnetic Forming Sealing for the Plastic Bottle%塑料瓶的电磁成形封口研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱春城; 李洪涛

    2000-01-01

    对塑料瓶的电磁成形封接工艺进行研究,通过对放电电压、电容、线圈位置等参数进行调节,得出了优化的封口工艺。试验结果表明:线圈位置,电压对封口效果影响较大。%This paper introduces the research of electromagnetic forming sealing for the plastic bottle. The sealing technology is opimized by adjusting discharge voltage,capacitance、 coil position. The experiments show that coil position and voltage have larger influence to the sealing effect.

  8. Technical Analysis and Performance Evaluation of Sliding Sleeve Seal%滑套密封技术分析与性能评估∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余海燕; 雷中清; 冯强; 党伟; 周俊然; 王益山

    2015-01-01

    As an important tool of the slicing mining technology of petroleum and natural gas,sliding sleeves’ sealing performance directly affects on the slicing mining effect.Different sealing solutions used for the sliding sleeves were classi⁃fied and summarized,including the O⁃ring seal,lip seal,special seal and their different combination sealing forms.The seal⁃ing performances were evaluated for different forms of seals from five aspects,such as sealing effect,shearing resistance, wear resistance,service life and cost.By considering the five indicators synthetically,sleeve seals can choose simple star⁃rings,star⁃rings with apron,U⁃rings,double triangle rings of Tecom,and other forms of seals.Taking economy and practica⁃bility into consideration,simple O⁃rings and O⁃rings with flat apron are more applicable at slow speed and low pressure, and combination of O⁃rings and trapezoidal rings,fabric reinforced rubber combination V⁃ring seals,K⁃type seals of Tecom Manchester,T⁃rings of TeKanggelai are usually used at high pressure and large speed change.%滑套作为石油天然气分层开采技术的重要工具,其密封性能直接影响着施工的效果。对用于滑套的不同密封方案进行总结分类,包括O形圈密封、唇形密封、特殊型密封及其不同的组合密封形式;从密封效果、抗剪切性、耐磨性、使用寿命、成本5项指标对各类密封进行性能评估。综合考虑5项指标,滑套密封可选用简单星形密封圈、星形密封圈加挡圈、 U型密封圈、特康双三角密封圈等密封形式;而从经济实用方面来考虑,低压且速度不高时,可使用简单O形圈、 O形密封圈加平挡圈;压力较高且速度变化较大时,可使用O形圈和梯形环的组合、 V形夹织物橡胶组合密封圈、 K型特康斯特密封圈、 T型特康格来圈。

  9. High-density support matrices: Key to the deep borehole disposal of spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibb, F.G.F. [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Engineering Materials, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)], E-mail: f.gibb@sheffield.ac.uk; McTaggart, N.A.; Travis, K.P.; Burley, D. [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Engineering Materials, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Hesketh, K.W. [Nexia Solutions Ltd., B709 Springfields, Preston PR4 0XJ (United Kingdom)

    2008-03-15

    Deep (4-5 km) boreholes are emerging as a safe, secure, environmentally sound and potentially cost-effective option for disposal of high-level radioactive wastes, including plutonium. One reason this option has not been widely accepted for spent fuel is because stacking the containers in a borehole could create load stresses threatening their integrity with potential for releasing highly mobile radionuclides like {sup 129}I before the borehole is filled and sealed. This problem can be overcome by using novel high-density support matrices deployed as fine metal shot along with the containers. Temperature distributions in and around the disposal are modelled to show how decay heat from the fuel can melt the shot within weeks of disposal to give a dense liquid in which the containers are almost weightless. Finally, within a few decades, this liquid will cool and solidify, entombing the waste containers in a base metal sarcophagus sealed into the host rock.

  10. Safety valve for offshore borehole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGill, H.L.; Randermann, E. Jr.; Musik, O.J.

    1977-10-06

    The invention concerns a new and improved submarine safety valve with a valve element which rotate, which can be used, in emergencies, to separate the wound-up piping which extends into the borehole and to close the production line.

  11. 2005 CNPC S&E International Seminar on Borehole Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ From 23rd to 24th in September, the 2005 CNPC S&E International Seminar on Borehole Technology was held in Beijing. Invited by CNPC S&E, 68 honorable guests from 14 countries in Central Asia, Africa, North and South Americas and Southeast Asia and more than 100 representatives for the embassies in the People's Republic of China from 13 countries discussed the trend,progress and utilization of borehole technology and the service strength of CNPC's borehole technology together.The honorable attendees can further know the technical strength of CNPC S&E through this communication,and therefore find out the best cooperation way to create a higher value for the oil company in one hand, and improve the force and popularity of CNPC S&E in the international market on the other hand.

  12. Handling and Emplacement Options for Deep Borehole Disposal Conceptual Design.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cochran, John R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hardin, Ernest [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-07-01

    This report presents conceptual design information for a system to handle and emplace packages containing radioactive waste, in boreholes 16,400 ft deep or possibly deeper. Its intended use is for a design selection study that compares the costs and risks associated with two emplacement methods: drill-string and wireline emplacement. The deep borehole disposal (DBD) concept calls for siting a borehole (or array of boreholes) that penetrate crystalline basement rock to a depth below surface of about 16,400 ft (5 km). Waste packages would be emplaced in the lower 6,560 ft (2 km) of the borehole, with sealing of appropriate portions of the upper 9,840 ft (3 km). A deep borehole field test (DBFT) is planned to test and refine the DBD concept. The DBFT is a scientific and engineering experiment, conducted at full-scale, in-situ, without radioactive waste. Waste handling operations are conceptualized to begin with the onsite receipt of a purpose-built Type B shipping cask, that contains a waste package. Emplacement operations begin when the cask is upended over the borehole, locked to a receiving flange or collar. The scope of emplacement includes activities to lower waste packages to total depth, and to retrieve them back to the surface when necessary for any reason. This report describes three concepts for the handling and emplacement of the waste packages: 1) a concept proposed by Woodward-Clyde Consultants in 1983; 2) an updated version of the 1983 concept developed for the DBFT; and 3) a new concept in which individual waste packages would be lowered to depth using a wireline. The systems described here could be adapted to different waste forms, but for design of waste packaging, handling, and emplacement systems the reference waste forms are DOE-owned high- level waste including Cs/Sr capsules and bulk granular HLW from fuel processing. Handling and Emplacement Options for Deep Borehole Disposal Conceptual Design July 23, 2015 iv ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This report has

  13. TAML level 5 sealed junctions offer solutions for thermal production of heavy oil with multilateral wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fipke, S.R. [Halliburton, Houston, TX (United States)

    2009-07-01

    Multilateral wells are used in heterogenous heavy oil reservoirs to provide increased reservoir exposure. New level 5 junction designs have recently been developed by the Technical Advancement for Multilaterals (TAML) Association to provide the minimum temperature and pressure ratings required to effectively seal junctures and control the steam injection process during enhanced oil recovery (EOR) processes. This study described 2 new conceptual multilateral technology (MLT) design alternatives for use in steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) operations, notably stacked multilateral injectors above a multilateral producer, and a multilateral horizontally-applied steam drainage (ML-HASD). The designs addressed the thermal expansion, heat loss, and steam placement challenges caused by the steam flow's close proximity to the cooler oil being produced in the same borehole. It was concluded that both designs avoid the production problems associated with multilateral SAGD operations. 6 refs., 6 figs.

  14. Python fiber optic seal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ystesund, K.; Bartberger, J.; Brusseau, C.; Fleming, P.; Insch, K.; Tolk, K.

    1993-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a high security fiber optic seal that incorporates tamper resistance features that are not available in commercial fiber optic seals. The Python Seal is a passive fiber optic loop seal designed to give indication of unauthorized entry. The seal includes a fingerprint feature that provides seal identity information in addition to the unique fiber optic pattern created when the seal is installed. The fiber optic cable used for the seal loop is produced with tamper resistant features that increase the difficulty of attacking that component of a seal. A Seal Reader has been developed that will record the seal signature and the fingerprint feature of the seal. A Correlator software program then compares seal images to establish a match or mismatch. SNL is also developing a Polaroid reader to permit hard copies of the seal patterns to be obtained directly from the seal.

  15. Radiological Characterization Technical Report on Californium-252 Sealed Source Transuranic Debris Waste for the Off-Site Source Recovery Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldman, Alexander [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-04-24

    This document describes the development and approach for the radiological characterization of Cf-252 sealed sources for shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The report combines information on the nuclear material content of each individual source (mass or activity and date of manufacture) with information and data on the radionuclide distributions within the originating nuclear material. This approach allows for complete and accurate characterization of the waste container without the need to take additional measurements. The radionuclide uncertainties, developed from acceptable knowledge (AK) information regarding the source material, are applied to the summed activities in the drum. The AK information used in the characterization of Cf-252 sealed sources has been qualified by the peer review process, which has been reviewed and accepted by the Environmental Protection Agency.

  16. Preliminary analyses of the deep geoenvironmental characteristics for the deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Youl; Lee, Min Soo; Choi, Heui Joo; Kim, Geon Young; Kim, Kyung Su [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Spent fuels from nuclear power plants, as well as high-level radioactive waste from the recycling of spent fuels, should be safely isolated from human environment for an extremely long time. Recently, meaningful studies on the development of deep borehole radioactive waste disposal system in 3-5 km depth have been carried out in USA and some countries in Europe, due to great advance in deep borehole drilling technology. In this paper, domestic deep geoenvironmental characteristics are preliminarily investigated to analyze the applicability of deep borehole disposal technology in Korea. To do this, state-of-the art technologies in USA and some countries in Europe are reviewed, and geological and geothermal data from the deep boreholes for geothermal usage are analyzed. Based on the results on the crystalline rock depth, the geothermal gradient and the spent fuel types generated in Korea, a preliminary deep borehole concept including disposal canister and sealing system, is suggested.

  17. Numerical Borehole Breakdown Investigations using XFEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckhuis, Sven; Leonhart, Dirk; Meschke, Günther

    2016-04-01

    During pressurization of a wellbore a typical downhole pressure record shows the following regimes: first the applied wellbore pressure balances the reservoir pressure, then after the compressive circumferential hole stresses are overcome, tensile stresses are induced on the inside surface of the hole. When the magnitude of these stresses reach the tensile failure stress of the surrounding rock medium, a fracture is initiated and propagates into the reservoir. [1] In standard theories this pressure, the so called breakdown pressure, is the peak pressure in the down-hole pressure record. However experimental investigations [2] show that the breakdown did not occur even if a fracture was initiated at the borehole wall. Drilling muds had the tendency to seal and stabilize fractures and prevent fracture propagation. Also fracture mechanics analysis of breakdown process in mini-frac or leak off tests [3] show that the breakdown pressure could be either equal or larger than the fracture initiation pressure. In order to gain a deeper understanding of the breakdown process in reservoir rock, numerical investigations using the extended finite element method (XFEM) for hydraulic fracturing of porous materials [4] are discussed. The reservoir rock is assumed to be pre-fractured. During pressurization of the borehole, the injection pressure, the pressure distribution and the position of the highest flux along the fracture for different fracturing fluid viscosities are recorded and the influence of the aforementioned values on the stability of fracture propagation is discussed. [1] YEW, C. H. (1997), "Mechanics of Hydraulic Fracturing", Gulf Publishing Company [2] MORITA, N.; BLACK, A. D.; FUH, G.-F. (1996), "Borehole Breakdown Pressure with Drilling Fluids". International Journal of Rock Mechanics and Mining Sciences 33, pp. 39-51 [3] DETOURNAY, E.; CARBONELL, R. (1996), "Fracture Mechanics Analysis of the Breakdown Process in Minifrac or Leakoff Test", Society of Petroleum

  18. Turbine with radial acting seal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eng, Darryl S; Ebert, Todd A

    2016-11-22

    A floating brush seal in a rim cavity of a turbine in a gas turbine engine, where the floating brush seal includes a seal holder in which the floating brush seal floats, and a expandable seal that fits within two radial extending seal slots that maintains a seal with radial displacement of the floating brush seal and the seal holder.

  19. Initial field testing definition of subsurface sealing and backfilling tests in unsaturated tuff; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, J.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Case, J.B.; Tyburski, J.R. [I. T. Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-05-01

    This report contains an initial definition of the field tests proposed for the Yucca Mountain Project repository sealing program. The tests are intended to resolve various performance and emplacement concerns. Examples of concerns to be addressed include achieving selected hydrologic and structural requirements for seals, removing portions of the shaft liner, excavating keyways, emplacing cementitious and earthen seals, reducing the impact of fines on the hydraulic conductivity of fractures, efficient grouting of fracture zones, sealing of exploratory boreholes, and controlling the flow of water by using engineered designs. Ten discrete tests are proposed to address these and other concerns. These tests are divided into two groups: Seal component tests and performance confirmation tests. The seal component tests are thorough small-scale in situ tests, the intermediate-scale borehole seal tests, the fracture grouting tests, the surface backfill tests, and the grouted rock mass tests. The seal system tests are the seepage control tests, the backfill tests, the bulkhead test in the Calico Hills unit, the large-scale shaft seal and shaft fill tests, and the remote borehole sealing tests. The tests are proposed to be performed in six discrete areas, including welded and non-welded environments, primarily located outside the potential repository area. The final selection of sealing tests will depend on the nature of the geologic and hydrologic conditions encountered during the development of the Exploratory Studies Facility and detailed numerical analyses. Tests are likely to be performed both before and after License Application.

  20. Regenerator seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Leonard C.; Pacala, Theodore; Sippel, George R.

    1981-01-01

    A method for manufacturing a hot side regenerator cross arm seal assembly having a thermally stablilized wear coating with a substantially flat wear surface thereon to seal between low pressure and high pressure passages to and from the hot inboard side of a rotary regenerator matrix includes the steps of forming a flat cross arm substrate member of high nickel alloy steel; fixedly securing the side edges of the substrate member to a holding fixture with a concave surface thereacross to maintain the substrate member to a slightly bent configuration on the fixture surface between the opposite ends of the substrate member to produce prestress therein; applying coating layers on the substrate member including a wear coating of plasma sprayed nickel oxide/calcium flouride material to define a wear surface of slightly concave form across the restrained substrate member between the free ends thereon; and thereafter subjecting the substrate member and the coating thereon to a heat treatment of 1600.degree. F. for sixteen hours to produce heat stabilizing growth in the coating layers on the substrate member and to produce a thermally induced growth stress in the wear surface that substantially equalizes the prestress in the substrate whereby when the cross arm is removed from the fixture surface following the heat treatment step a wear face is formed on the cross arm assembly that will be substantially flat between the ends.

  1. MWD tool for deep, small diameter boreholes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buytaert, J.P.R.; Duckworth, A.

    1992-03-17

    This patent describes an apparatus for measuring a drilling parameters while drilling a borehole in an earth formation, wherein the borehole includes a small diameter deep borehole portion and a large diameter upper borehole portion. It includes small diameter drillstring means for drilling the deep borehole portion; sensor means, disposed within the small diameter drillstring means, for measuring a drilling parameter characteristic of the deep portion of the borehole while drilling the deep portion of the borehole and for providing sensor output signals indicative of the measured parameter; an upper drillstring portion extending between the surface of the formation and the small diameter drillstring means, the upper drillstring portion including a large diameter drillstring portion; data transmission means disposed within the large diameter drillstring portion and responsive to the sensor output.

  2. The Antartic Ice Borehole Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar, A.; Carsey, F.; Lane, A.; Engelhardt, H.

    2000-01-01

    The Antartic Ice Borehole Probe mission is a glaciological investigation, scheduled for November 2000-2001, that will place a probe in a hot-water drilled hole in the West Antartic ice sheet. The objectives of the probe are to observe ice-bed interactions with a downward looking camera, and ice inclusions and structure, including hypothesized ice accretion, with a side-looking camera.

  3. Slant Borehole Demonstration Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GARDNER, M.G.

    2000-07-19

    This report provides a summary of the demonstration project for development of a slant borehole to retrieve soil samples from beneath the SX-108 single-shell tank. It provides a summary of the findings from the demonstration activities and recommendations for tool selection and methods to deploy into the SX Tank Farm. Daily work activities were recorded on Drilling and Sampling Daily Work Record Reports. The work described in this document was performed during March and April 2000.

  4. Conceptual waste packaging options for deep borehole disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Jiann -Cherng [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hardin, Ernest L. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-07-01

    This report presents four concepts for packaging of radioactive waste for disposal in deep boreholes. Two of these are reference-size packages (11 inch outer diameter) and two are smaller (5 inch) for disposal of Cs/Sr capsules. All four have an assumed length of approximately 18.5 feet, which allows the internal length of the waste volume to be 16.4 feet. However, package length and volume can be scaled by changing the length of the middle, tubular section. The materials proposed for use are low-alloy steels, commonly used in the oil-and-gas industry. Threaded connections between packages, and internal threads used to seal the waste cavity, are common oilfield types. Two types of fill ports are proposed: flask-type and internal-flush. All four package design concepts would withstand hydrostatic pressure of 9,600 psi, with factor safety 2.0. The combined loading condition includes axial tension and compression from the weight of a string or stack of packages in the disposal borehole, either during lower and emplacement of a string, or after stacking of multiple packages emplaced singly. Combined loading also includes bending that may occur during emplacement, particularly for a string of packages threaded together. Flask-type packages would be fabricated and heat-treated, if necessary, before loading waste. The fill port would be narrower than the waste cavity inner diameter, so the flask type is suitable for directly loading bulk granular waste, or loading slim waste canisters (e.g., containing Cs/Sr capsules) that fit through the port. The fill port would be sealed with a tapered, threaded plug, with a welded cover plate (welded after loading). Threaded connections between packages and between packages and a drill string, would be standard drill pipe threads. The internal flush packaging concepts would use semi-flush oilfield tubing, which is internally flush but has a slight external upset at the joints. This type of tubing can be obtained with premium, low

  5. Site investigation SFR. Boremap mapping of core drilled borehole KFR106

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winell, Sofia (Geosigma AB (Sweden))

    2010-06-15

    This report presents the result from the Boremap mapping of the core drilled borehole KFR106, drilled from an islet ca 220 m southeast of the pier above SFR. The borehole has a length of 300.13 m, and a bearing and inclination of 195.1 deg and -69.9 deg, respectively. The purpose of the location and orientation of the borehole is to investigate the possible occurrence of gently dipping, water-bearing structures in the area. The geological mapping is based on simultaneous study of drill core and borehole image (BIPS). The two lowermost meters of the drill core was mapped in Boremap without access to complementary BIPS-image. The dominating rock type, which occupies 72% of KFR106, is fine- to medium-grained, metagranite granodiorite (rock code 101057), which is foliated with a medium to strong intensity. Pegmatite to pegmatitic granite (rock code 101061) is the second most common rock type and it occupies 16% of the mapped interval. It is also frequent as smaller rock occurrences (< 1 m) in other rock types throughout the borehole. Subordinate rock types are fine- to medium-grained granite (rock code 111058), felsic to intermediate meta volcanic rock (rock code 103076), fine- to medium-grained metagranitoid (rock code 101051) and amphibolite (rock code 102017). Totally 49% of the rock in KFR106 has been mapped as altered, where muscovitization and oxidation is the two most common. Additional shorter intervals of alterations are in decreasing order of abundance quartz dissolution, epidotization, argillization, albitization, chloritization, laumontization and carbonatization. A total number of 2801 fractures are registered in KFR106. Of these are 1059 open, 1742 sealed and 84 partly open. This result in the following fracture frequencies: 6.0 sealed fractures/m, 3.7 open fractures/m and 0.3 partly open fractures/m. In addition there are 5 narrow brecciated zones, and 20 sealed networks with a total length of 18 m. The most frequent fracture fillings in KFR106 are

  6. Borehole Summary Report for Core Hole C4998 – Waste Treatment Plant Seismic Boreholes Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnett, D. BRENT; Garcia, Benjamin J.

    2006-12-15

    Seismic borehole C4998 was cored through the upper portion of the Columbia River Basalt Group and Ellensburg Formation to provide detailed lithologic information and intact rock samples that represent the geology at the Waste Treatment Plant. This report describes the drilling of borehole C4998 and documents the geologic data collected during the drilling of the cored portion of the borehole.

  7. Magnetically Actuated Seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinera, Alex

    2013-01-01

    This invention is a magnetically actuated seal in which either a single electromagnet, or multiple electromagnets, are used to control the seal's position. This system can either be an open/ close type of system or an actively controlled system.

  8. Magnetically Actuated Seal Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — FTT proposes development of a magnetically actuated dynamic seal. Dynamic seals are used throughout the turbopump in high-performance, pump-fed, liquid rocket...

  9. Turbomachine Interface Sealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Robert C.; Chupp, Raymond E.; Lattime, Scott B.; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2005-01-01

    Sealing interfaces and coatings, like lubricants, are sacrificial, giving up their integrity for the benefit of the component. Clearance control is a major issue in power systems turbomachine design and operational life. Sealing becomes the most cost-effective way to enhance system performance. Coatings, films, and combined use of both metals and ceramics play a major role in maintaining interface clearances in turbomachine sealing and component life. This paper focuses on conventional and innovative materials and design practices for sealing interfaces.

  10. Backtracking urbanization from borehole temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Peter; Rivera, Jaime A.; Blum, Philipp; Rybach, Ladislaus

    2016-04-01

    The thermal regime in shallow ground is influenced by various factors such as short and long term climatic variations, atmospheric urban warming, land use change and geothermal energy use. Temperature profiles measured in boreholes represent precious archives of the past thermal conditions at the ground surface. Changes at the ground surface induce time-dependent variations in heat transfer. Consequently, instantaneous and persistent changes such as recent atmospheric climate change or paving of streets cause perturbations in temperature profiles, which now can be found in depths of hundred meters and even more. In our work, we focus on the influence of urbanization on temperature profiles. We inspect profiles measured in borehole heat exchanger (BHE) tubes before start of energy extraction. These were obtained at four locations in the city and suburbs of Zurich, Switzerland, by lowering a specifically developed temperature logging sensor in the 200-400 m long tubes. Increased temperatures indicate the existence of a subsurface urban heat island (SUHI). At the studied locations groundwater flow can be considered negligible, and thus conduction is the governing heat transport process. These locations are also favorable, as long-term land use changes and atmospheric temperature variations are well documented for more than the last century. For simulating transient land use changes and their effects on borehole temperature profiles, a novel analytical framework based on the superposition of Green's functions is presented. This allows flexible and fast computation of the long term three-dimensional evolution of the thermal regime in shallow ground. It also facilitates calibration of unknown spatially distributed parameter values and their correlation. With the given spatial and temporal discretization of land use and background atmospheric temperature variations, we are able to quantify the heat contribution by asphalt and buildings. By Bayesian inversion it is

  11. Final disposal in deep boreholes using multiple geological barriers. Digging deeper for safety. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bracke, Guido; Hurst, Stephanie; Merkel, Broder; Mueller, Birgit; Schilling, Frank

    2016-03-15

    The proceedings of the workshop on final disposal in deep boreholes using multiple geological barriers - digging deeper for safety include contributions on the following topics: international status and safety requirements; geological and physical barriers; deep drilling - shaft building; technical barriers and emplacement technology for high P/T conditions; recovery (waste retrieval); geochemistry and monitoring.

  12. Seals For Cryogenic Turbomachines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Robert C.; Tam, L. T.; Braun, M. J.; Vlcek, B. L.

    1988-01-01

    Analysis considers effects of seals on stability. Report presents method of calculation of flows of cryogenic fluids through shaft seals. Key to stability is local average velocity in seal. Local average velocity strongly influenced by effects of inlet and outlet and injection of fluid.

  13. Deep Borehole Disposal Safety Analysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeze, Geoffrey A. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Stein, Emily [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Price, Laura L. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); MacKinnon, Robert J. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Tillman, Jack Bruce [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-10-01

    This report presents a preliminary safety analysis for the deep borehole disposal (DBD) concept, using a safety case framework. A safety case is an integrated collection of qualitative and quantitative arguments, evidence, and analyses that substantiate the safety, and the level of confidence in the safety, of a geologic repository. This safety case framework for DBD follows the outline of the elements of a safety case, and identifies the types of information that will be required to satisfy these elements. At this very preliminary phase of development, the DBD safety case focuses on the generic feasibility of the DBD concept. It is based on potential system designs, waste forms, engineering, and geologic conditions; however, no specific site or regulatory framework exists. It will progress to a site-specific safety case as the DBD concept advances into a site-specific phase, progressing through consent-based site selection and site investigation and characterization.

  14. Thermal Performance Analysis of a Geologic Borehole Repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reagin, Lauren [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-08-16

    The Brazilian Nuclear Research Institute (IPEN) proposed a design for the disposal of Disused Sealed Radioactive Sources (DSRS) based on the IAEA Borehole Disposal of Sealed Radioactive Sources (BOSS) design that would allow the entirety of Brazil’s inventory of DSRS to be disposed in a single borehole. The proposed IPEN design allows for 170 waste packages (WPs) containing DSRS (such as Co-60 and Cs-137) to be stacked on top of each other inside the borehole. The primary objective of this work was to evaluate the thermal performance of a conservative approach to the IPEN proposal with the equivalent of two WPs and two different inside configurations using Co-60 as the radioactive heat source. The current WP configuration (heterogeneous) for the IPEN proposal has 60% of the WP volume being occupied by a nuclear radioactive heat source and the remaining 40% as vacant space. The second configuration (homogeneous) considered for this project was a homogeneous case where 100% of the WP volume was occupied by a nuclear radioactive heat source. The computational models for the thermal analyses of the WP configurations with the Co-60 heat source considered three different cooling mechanisms (conduction, radiation, and convection) and the effect of mesh size on the results from the thermal analysis. The results of the analyses yielded maximum temperatures inside the WPs for both of the WP configurations and various mesh sizes. The heterogeneous WP considered the cooling mechanisms of conduction, convection, and radiation. The temperature results from the heterogeneous WP analysis suggest that the model is cooled predominantly by conduction with effect of radiation and natural convection on cooling being negligible. From the thermal analysis comparing the two WP configurations, the results suggest that either WP configuration could be used for the design. The mesh sensitivity results verify the meshes used, and results obtained from the thermal analyses were close to

  15. Thermal Performance Analysis of a Geologic Borehole Repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reagin, Lauren [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-08-16

    The Brazilian Nuclear Research Institute (IPEN) proposed a design for the disposal of Disused Sealed Radioactive Sources (DSRS) based on the IAEA Borehole Disposal of Sealed Radioactive Sources (BOSS) design that would allow the entirety of Brazil’s inventory of DSRS to be disposed in a single borehole. The proposed IPEN design allows for 170 waste packages (WPs) containing DSRS (such as Co-60 and Cs-137) to be stacked on top of each other inside the borehole. The primary objective of this work was to evaluate the thermal performance of a conservative approach to the IPEN proposal with the equivalent of two WPs and two different inside configurations using Co-60 as the radioactive heat source. The current WP configuration (heterogeneous) for the IPEN proposal has 60% of the WP volume being occupied by a nuclear radioactive heat source and the remaining 40% as vacant space. The second configuration (homogeneous) considered for this project was a homogeneous case where 100% of the WP volume was occupied by a nuclear radioactive heat source. The computational models for the thermal analyses of the WP configurations with the Co-60 heat source considered three different cooling mechanisms (conduction, radiation, and convection) and the effect of mesh size on the results from the thermal analysis. The results of the analyses yielded maximum temperatures inside the WPs for both of the WP configurations and various mesh sizes. The heterogeneous WP considered the cooling mechanisms of conduction, convection, and radiation. The temperature results from the heterogeneous WP analysis suggest that the model is cooled predominantly by conduction with effect of radiation and natural convection on cooling being negligible. From the thermal analysis comparing the two WP configurations, the results suggest that either WP configuration could be used for the design. The mesh sensitivity results verify the meshes used and results obtained from the thermal analyses were close to being

  16. Zero leakage sealings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotesovec, Bernhard; Steinrück, Herbert

    2010-11-01

    The piston rod of a reciprocating compressor is sealed with elastic cylindrical sealing elements. Across the sealings the pressure drops from the operating pressure to the ambient pressure. The lubrication gap between the elastic sealing and reciprocating piston rod is studied with the aim to find conditions of a leakage free sealing. The flow in the lubrication gap and the elastic deformation of the sealing are determined simultaneously. The net-flow during one cycle of the reciprocating piston rod is calculated. It turns out that maintaining zero leakage is very sensible. Indeed the outbound flow during out-stroke has to be equal the inbound flow during the in-stroke. By prescribing a special shape of the undeformed sealing zero leakage can be attained - at least theoretically for certain operating conditions. It turns out that temperature dependent material data and a model for cavitation is necessary. The model, its numerical implementation and results will be discussed.

  17. Radiological consequences of accidents during disposal of spent nuclear fuel in a deep borehole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grundfelt, Bertil [Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-07-15

    In this report, an analysis of the radiological consequences of potential accidents during disposal of spent nuclear fuel in deep boreholes is presented. The results presented should be seen as coarse estimates of possible radiological consequences of a canister being stuck in a borehole during disposal rather than being the results of a full safety analysis. In the concept for deep borehole disposal of spent nuclear fuel developed by Sandia National Laboratories, the fuel is assumed to be encapsulated in mild steel canisters and stacked between 3 and 5 km depth in boreholes that are cased with perforated mild steel casing tubes. The canisters are joined together by couplings to form strings of 40 canisters and lowered into the borehole. When a canister string has been emplaced in the borehole, a bridge plug is installed above the string and a 10 metres long concrete plug is cast on top of the bridge plug creating a floor for the disposal of the next sting. In total 10 canister strings, in all 400 canisters, are assumed to be disposed of at between 3 and 5 kilometres depth in one borehole. An analysis of potential accidents during the disposal operations shows that the potentially worst accident would be that a canister string is stuck above the disposal zone of a borehole and cannot be retrieved. In such a case, the borehole may have to be sealed in the best possible way and abandoned. The consequences of this could be that one or more leaking canisters are stuck in a borehole section with mobile groundwater. In the case of a leaking canister being stuck in a borehole section with mobile groundwater, the potential radiological consequences are likely to be dominated by the release of the so-called Instant Release Fraction (IRF) of the radionuclide inventory, i.e. the fraction of the radionuclides that as a consequence of the in-core conditions are present in the annulus between the fuel pellets and the cladding or on the grain boundaries of the UO{sub 2} matrix

  18. Model on surface borehole squeezing deformation fracture*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Hai-tao; HU Qian-ting; HUANG Sheng-shu

    2009-01-01

    As a good method to solve the problem of high methane on the workface and in the goaf, drawing coal strata methane through a surface borehole is used. However, the excavation affected the overlying rock strata greatly. When the excavation face passed through the surface borehole position, the surface borehole fractures fast. This problem was seriously related to the unformed squeeze effect. Therefore, a squeezing deformation fracture model based on the rock strata squeezing effect was set up. At the same time, a 3DEC simulation model is presented to confirm the theory. The result shows that the mod-el is reliable and has a good engineering application value.

  19. Borehole Summary Report for Waste Treatment Plant Seismic Borehole C4996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams , S. C.; Ahlquist, Stephen T.; Fetters, Jeffree R.; Garcia, Ben; Rust, Colleen F.

    2007-01-28

    This report presents the field-generated borehole log, lithologic summary, and the record of samples collected during the recent drilling and sampling of the basalt interval of borehole C4996 at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) on the Hanford Site. Borehole C4996 was one of four exploratory borings, one core hole and three boreholes, drilled to investigate and acquire detailed stratigraphic and down-hole seismic data. This data will be used to define potential seismic impacts and refine design specifications for the Hanford Site WTP.

  20. SNG-log in borehole Ermelund-208

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsbech, Uffe C C

    1996-01-01

    A Spectral Natural Gamma-ray log has been run in a borehole in Ermelunden. The vertical distribution of Th, U, and K is similar to that observed in neighbouring boreholes. A new measuring and data processing technique was used and the probes own background signal was determined. Surprisingly a si......-rays are emitted and detected by the probe. The intensity of cosmic radiation varies with depth, and, therefore, slightly influences the accuracy of the thorium concentration determination....

  1. Slim hole logging in shallow boreholes

    OpenAIRE

    Monnet, R.; L. Baron; Chapellier, D. M.

    2000-01-01

    While well logging, a continuous recording of the physical parameters down a borehole, is employed systematically in petroleum exploration, its application in environmental prospections, such as hydrogeology or civil engeering, has been very limited. This deficiency is partly due to the fact that logging probes used in this kind of boreholes are generally not calibrated and the results are more or less qualitative. The purpose of this lecture is to show that it is possible to calibrate these ...

  2. Using boreholes as windows into groundwater ecosystems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P R Sorensen

    Full Text Available Groundwater ecosystems remain poorly understood yet may provide ecosystem services, make a unique contribution to biodiversity and contain useful bio-indicators of water quality. Little is known about ecosystem variability, the distribution of invertebrates within aquifers, or how representative boreholes are of aquifers. We addressed these issues using borehole imaging and single borehole dilution tests to identify three potential aquifer habitats (fractures, fissures or conduits intercepted by two Chalk boreholes at different depths beneath the surface (34 to 98 m. These habitats were characterised by sampling the invertebrates, microbiology and hydrochemistry using a packer system to isolate them. Samples were taken with progressively increasing pumped volume to assess differences between borehole and aquifer communities. The study provides a new conceptual framework to infer the origin of water, invertebrates and microbes sampled from boreholes. It demonstrates that pumping 5 m(3 at 0.4-1.8 l/sec was sufficient to entrain invertebrates from five to tens of metres into the aquifer during these packer tests. Invertebrates and bacteria were more abundant in the boreholes than in the aquifer, with associated water chemistry variations indicating that boreholes act as sites of enhanced biogeochemical cycling. There was some variability in invertebrate abundance and bacterial community structure between habitats, indicating ecological heterogeneity within the aquifer. However, invertebrates were captured in all aquifer samples, and bacterial abundance, major ion chemistry and dissolved oxygen remained similar. Therefore the study demonstrates that in the Chalk, ecosystems comprising bacteria and invertebrates extend from around the water table to 70 m below it. Hydrogeological techniques provide excellent scope for tackling outstanding questions in groundwater ecology, provided an appropriate conceptual hydrogeological understanding is applied.

  3. Working programme for MIU-4 borehole investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ota, Kunio; Nakano, Katsushi; Metcalfe, R.; Ikeda, Koki; Goto, Jun-ichi; Amano, Kenji; Takeuchi, Shinji; Hama, Katsuhiro; Matsui, Hiroya [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Toki, Gifu (Japan). Tono Geoscience Center

    1999-08-01

    Surface-based investigations have now been carried out since 1997 according to the Master Plan of the Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory (MIU) (PNC, 1996). The specific goals of the surface-based investigations are: To acquire information necessary for understanding the undisturbed deep geological environment as a background of the MIU and for predicting the effects of the construction of underground facilities. To establish methodologies for evaluating predictions. To formulate detailed design concepts for underground facilities and to plan scientific investigations during the construction of the MIU. In addition, appropriate, systematic methodologies for investigating the deep subsurface should be developed through the surface-based investigations. It is expected that the surface-based investigations with further borehole investigations will last until March 2002. However, the construction of the MIU was provisionally planned to commence in the 2000 financial year. JNC has drilled four 1,000m-deep boreholes and one 400m-deep borehole at the MIU site (JNC's land of about 140,000m{sup 2}) in Akeyo-cho, Mizunami City, Gifu Prefecture. In the surface-based investigations, specifically three 1,000m-deep boreholes, MIU-1, MIU-2 and MIU-3, have been drilled. Investigations in these boreholes have characterised mainly the geological structure and hydrogeological features of the deep geological environment. In addition, JNC has been developing investigation techniques and improving equipment for these investigations. At the time of writing, a series of borehole investigations are being carried out in the MIU-3 borehole. The MIU-3 borehole investigations aim mainly at characterising the Tsukiyoshi fault that intersects the crystalline basement in the site. (J.P.N.)

  4. Dynamic sealing principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuk, J.

    1976-01-01

    The fundamental principles governing dynamic sealing operation are discussed. Different seals are described in terms of these principles. Despite the large variety of detailed construction, there appear to be some basic principles, or combinations of basic principles, by which all seals function, these are presented and discussed. Theoretical and practical considerations in the application of these principles are discussed. Advantages, disadvantages, limitations, and application examples of various conventional and special seals are presented. Fundamental equations governing liquid and gas flows in thin film seals, which enable leakage calculations to be made, are also presented. Concept of flow functions, application of Reynolds lubrication equation, and nonlubrication equation flow, friction and wear; and seal lubrication regimes are explained.

  5. Space Shuttle Orbiter AFT heat shield seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walkover, L. J.

    1979-01-01

    The evolution of the orbiter aft heat shield seal (AHSS) design, which involved advancing mechanical seal technology in severe thermal environment is discussed. The baseline design, various improvements for engine access, and technical problem solution are presented. It is a structure and mechanism at the three main propulsion system (MPS) engine interfaces to the aft compartment structure. Access to each MPS engine requires disassembly and removal of the AHSS. Each AHSS accommodates the engine movement, is exposed to an extremely high temperature environment, and is part of the venting control of the aft compartment.

  6. "Plug" ósseo autógeno para orifícios de trepanação: nota técnica Autogenic bone plug to seal burr holes: technical note

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOSUÉ GUIMARÃES GRANHA VIALOGO

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Vários materiais são utilizados para ocluir os orifícios de trepanação em neurocirurgia, por motivos variados: para evitar fístula liquórica após trepanações, para auxiliar a fixação do "flap" ósseo e por motivos estéticos, na região frontal. Dentre estes materiais citamos os heterólogos (botões de silicone, miniplacas de metal, cera de osso, metilmetacrilato, gelfoam, cimento de polímero vegetal, cerâmica de hidroxiapatita, e os autólogos (pó de osso originado da trepanação, gordura, músculo, aponeurose. Os materiais heterólogos ou sintéticos podem provocar reação de corpo estranho com erosão da pele e exposição do material, tornando necessária sua retirada, em tempo variável no pós-operatório. Há cerca de três anos, o autor vem utilizando um botão ou "plug" ósseo autólogo, feito com surgicel e o pó de osso proveniente da trepanação, com bom resultado estético eliminando as desconfortáveis depressões cranianas pós-trepanação. Apresentamos a técnica de confecção deste prático `plug ósseo autólogo'. Nas neuroendoscopias, praticamente sanou-se o problema da fístula liquórica e reação de corpo estranho. Encorajamos a utilização deste botão ósseo autólogo em nosso meio, como método eficiente, econômico e biologicamente aceitável para ocluir orifícios cranianos de trepanação.Many neurosurgical procedures can be performed by a single burr hole: neuroendoscopy, microvascular decompression, stereotactic procedures, chronic subdural haematomas. It is technically difficult to suture and close the dura, located at the bottom of such holes, which can lately lead to CSF leakage. On the other hand, the surgical material used to seal the burr holes can be divided in heterogenic (metal screws, silicon plugs, gelfoam, bone wax, metilmetacrilate, hidroxiapatite, and autogenic (fat, aponeurosis, muscle, and bone dust from trephination. The heterogenic group always brings the possibility of

  7. Applications of quantum message sealing

    CERN Document Server

    Worley, G G

    2005-01-01

    In 2003, Bechmann-Pasquinucci introduced the concept of quantum seals, a quantum analogue to wax seals used to close letters and envelopes. Since then, some improvements on the method have been found. We first review the current quantum sealing techniques, then introduce and discuss potential applications of quantum message sealing, and conclude with some discussion of the limitations of quantum seals.

  8. High Test Peroxide High Sealing Conical Seal Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — High Test Peroxide (HTP) Highly Compatible High Sealing Conical Seals are necessary for ground test operations and space based applications. Current conical seals...

  9. Saving Seal Cutting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    On April 20, the graduation ceremony of China’s seal-cutting art postgraduates and visiting experts from the Institute of Seal Cutting Art under the China Art Academy was held in Beijing. On the same day, the exhibition of the works of the teachers and graduates of the institute was also held.

  10. BASIMO - Borehole Heat Exchanger Array Simulation and Optimization Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Daniel; Rühaak, Wolfram; Welsch, Bastian; Bär, Kristian; Sass, Ingo

    2016-04-01

    Borehole heat exchangers represent a well-established technology, which pushes for new fields of applications and novel modifications. Current simulation tools cannot - or only to some extent - describe features like inclined or partly insulated boreholes unless they run fully discretized models of the borehole heat exchangers. However, fully discretized models often come at a high computational cost, especially for large arrays of borehole heat exchangers. We present a tool, which uses one dimensional thermal resistance and capacity models for the borehole heat exchangers coupled with a numerical finite element model for the subsurface heat transport. An unstructured tetrahedral mesh bypasses the limitations of structured grids for borehole path geometries, while the thermal resistance and capacity model is improved to account for borehole heat exchanger properties changing with depth. The presented tool benefits from the fast analytical solution of the thermal interactions within the boreholes while still allowing for a detailed consideration of the borehole heat exchanger properties.

  11. Optimization of Borehole Heat Exchanger Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Daniel; Rühaak, Wolfram; Welsch, Bastian; Oladyshkin, Sergey; Sass, Ingo

    2016-04-01

    Arrays of borehole heat exchangers are an increasingly popular source for renewable energy. Furthermore, they can serve as borehole thermal energy storages for seasonally fluctuating heat sources like solar thermal energy or district heating grids. However, the uncertainty of geological parameters and the nonlinear behavior of the complex system make it difficult to simulate and predict the required design of borehole heat exchanger arrays. As a result, the arrays easily turn out to be over or undersized, which compromises the economic feasibility of these systems. Here, we present a novel optimization strategy for the design of borehole thermal energy storages. The arbitrary polynomial chaos expansion method is used to build a proxy model from a set of numerical training simulations, which allows for the consideration of parameter uncertainties. Thus, the resulting proxy model bypasses the problem of excessive computation time for the numerous function calls required for a mathematical optimization. Additionally, we iteratively refine the proxy model during the optimization procedure using additional numerical simulation runs. With the presented solution, many aspects of borehole heat exchanger arrays can be optimized under geological uncertainty.

  12. Seismic considerations in sealing a potential high-level radioactive waste repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, J.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Richardson, A.M.; Lin, Ming [Agapito (J.F.T.) and Associates, Inc., Grand Junction, CO (United States)

    1992-07-01

    The potential repository system is intended to isolate high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain. One subsystem that may contribute to achieving this objective is the sealing subsystem. This subsystem is comprised of sealing components in the shafts, ramps, underground network of drifts, and the exploratory boreholes. Sealing components can be rigid, as in the case of a shaft seal, or can be more compressible, as in the case of drift fill comprised of mined rockfill. This paper presents the preliminary seismic response of discrete sealing components in welded and nonwelded tuff. Special consideration is given to evaluating the stress in the seal, and the behavior of the interface between the seal and the rock. The seismic responses are computed using both static and dynamic analyses. Also presented is an evaluation of the maximum seismic response encountered by a drift seal with respect to the angle of incidence of the seismic wave. Mitigation strategies and seismic design considerations are proposed which can potentially enhance the overall response of the sealing component and subsequently, the performance of the overall repository system.

  13. Heat Calculation of Borehole Heat Exchangers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Filatov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers a heat calculation method of borehole heat exchangers (BHE which can be used for designing and optimization of their design values and included in a comprehensive mathematical model of heat supply system with a heat pump based on utilization of low-grade heat from the ground.The developed method of calculation is based on the reduction of the problem general solution pertaining to heat transfer in BHE with due account of heat transfer between top-down and bottom-up flows of heat carrier to the solution for a boundary condition of one kind on the borehole wall. Used the a method of electrothermal analogy has been used for a calculation of the thermal resistance and  the required shape factors for calculation of  a borehole filler thermal resistance have been obtained numerically. The paper presents results of heat calculation of various BHE designs in accordance with the proposed method.

  14. Developments of borehole strain observation outside China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱泽华; 石耀霖

    2004-01-01

    Borehole strain observation is playing an increasingly important role in the study on the crustal movements. It hasbeen used by many countries such as China, USA, Japan, Peru, Australia, South Africa, Iceland and Italy, in research fields of plate tectonics, earthquake, volcanic eruption, dam safety, oil field subsidence, mining collapse andso on. Borehole strainmeter has been improved rapidly and tends to get more and more components included inone probe. Based on observations by this kind of instruments, studies on seismic strain step, slow earthquake,earthquake precursor and volcanic eruption forecasting have made remarkable achievements. In the coming years,borehole strain observation is going to become one major geodetic means, together with GPS and InSAR.

  15. Borehole radar and BIPS investigations in boreholes at the Boda area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlsten, S.; Straahle, A. [GEOSIGMA AB, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2000-12-01

    As part of the studies conducted in the Boda area, measurements with borehole radar, borehole TV (BIPS) and deviation measurements were performed during May 2000. The investigations were carried out in four percussion-drilled boreholes with a total length of 514 m. Two boreholes are vertical and two are directed into and below the cave area. The BIPS measurement showed the presence of 14 open fractures. Largest apparent aperture width of open fractures was 133 mm. In the lowest part in boreholes 2, 3, and 4, particles in suspension deteriorated the visibility. BIPS has revealed a dominating subhorizontal fracture set and another striking NW to N-S with a dip close to vertical. Possible but very uncertain is a third fracture set striking NE and dipping steeply towards S. The open and partly open fractures forms an average block size 11 m wide and 6 m high, while the length of the block is uncertain. Of 98 borehole radar reflectors interpreted to intersect within BIPS-mapped sections, 90 were possible to combine with BIPS-mapped structures, i.e. 92% of the radar reflectors. The fractured rock around Boda is a shallow feature, since borehole radar and BIPS measurements shows no evidence of increased fracturing or the presence of caves at larger depth in the Boda area. The result indicates that the formation of the superficial fracture system (with caves included) at Boda in all probability is connected to glacial action, such as banking.

  16. Slim hole logging in shallow boreholes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Monnet

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available While well logging, a continuous recording of the physical parameters down a borehole, is employed systematically in petroleum exploration, its application in environmental prospections, such as hydrogeology or civil engeering, has been very limited. This deficiency is partly due to the fact that logging probes used in this kind of boreholes are generally not calibrated and the results are more or less qualitative. The purpose of this lecture is to show that it is possible to calibrate these tools in order to obtain quantitative results, to make available to geologists, engineers and technicians engaged in shallow exploration, the information required for effectively applying the well-logging method.

  17. Sealing device for providing a seal in a turbomachine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacy, Benjamin Paul; Kottilingam, Srikanth Chandrudu; Porter, Christopher Donald; Schick, David Edward; Weber, David Wayne

    2016-08-16

    Sealing device for providing seals between adjacent components, and turbomachines utilizing such sealing devices, are provided. A sealing device includes a seal plate insertable between the adjacent components, the seal plate comprising a first face and an opposing second face. The sealing device further includes a plurality of pins extending from one of the first face or the second face, the plurality of pins configured to space the one of the first face or the second face from contact surfaces of the adjacent components.

  18. Critical condition study of borehole stability during air drilling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deng Jingen; Zou Linzhan; Tan Qiang; Yan Wei; Gao Deli; Zhang Hanlin; Yan Xiuliang

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to establish the existence of the critical condition of borehole stability during air drilling.Rock Failure Process Analysis Code2D was used to set up a damage model of the borehole excavated in strain-softening rock.Damage evolution around the borehole was studied by tracking acoustic emission.The study indicates that excavation damaged zone (EDZ) is formed around borehole because of stress concentration after the borehole is excavated.There is a critical condition for borehole stability; the borehole will collapse when the critical damage condition is reached.The critical condition of underground excavation exists not only in elastic and ideal plastic material but in strain-softening material as well.The research is helpful to developing an evaluation method of borehole stability during air drilling.

  19. Fur seal investigations, 1966

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Annually a report is made on the fur seal investigations carried on by the Bureau of Commercial Fisheries on the Pribilof Islands and at sea. Investigations on the...

  20. Ribbon Seal Distribution Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains GIS layers that depict the known spatial distributions (i.e., ranges) and reported breeding areas of ribbon seals (Histriophoca fasciata). It...

  1. Ringed Seal Distribution Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains GIS layers that depict the known spatial distributions (i.e., ranges) of the five subspecies of ringed seals (Phoca hispida). It was produced...

  2. Bearded Seal Distribution Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains GIS layers that depict the known spatial distributions (i.e., ranges) of the two subspecies of bearded seals (Erignathus barbatus). It was...

  3. Spotted Seal Distribution Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains GIS layers that depict the known spatial distributions (i.e., ranges) and reported breeding areas of spotted seals (Phoca largha). It was...

  4. Borehole camera technology for measuring the relaxation zone of surrounding rock: mechanism and application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jing Hong-wen; Li Yuan-hai; Liang Jun-qi; Yu De-cheng [China University of Mining & Technology, Xuzhou (China). State Key Laboratory for Geomechanics & Deep Underground Engineering

    2009-05-15

    A panoramic borehole camera technology (BCT) and digital image processing method was developed by constructing a system composed of hardware and software. The technology was used for measuring the relaxation zone of surrounding rock with the borehole camera. The hardware consists of a mini CCD camera and a high-pressure sealed magnetic compass that is used for camera positioning. The software includes real-time image monitoring and a processing program that includes the procedure for analysis of the relaxation zone. The roundness of cracks in the boreholes is taken as the index for identifying the relaxation zone. The system was used to measure the relaxation zone of a deep roadway in the Qiwu coal mine of Shandong province. The distribution of the relaxation zone around the roadway was obtained. The results show that the thickness of the broken rock zone varies with the measuring position within a cross section of the roadway. The reliability of the measuring method was tested and verified by comparing the data from BCT with those measured by an ultrasonic method; the difference is less than 3.5%. The system provides a new method for the measurement of the relaxation zone when engineering deep underground. 6 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Non-linear degradation model of cement barriers in a borehole repository for disused radioactive sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gharbieh, Heidar K., E-mail: heidar.gharbieh@tu-clausthal.de [Institute of Disposal Research, Clausthal University of Technology, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Cota, Stela, E-mail: sdsc@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nucelar (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Narrow diameter borehole facilities (a few tens of centimeters), like the BOSS concept developed by the IAEA, provide a safe and cost effective disposal option for radioactive waste and particularly disused sources. The BOSS concept (borehole disposal of sealed radioactive sources) comprises a multi-barrier system of cement grout and stainless steel components. In order to predict the long-time performance of the cement barriers as an input of a future safety assessment under the specific hydrochemical and hydrological conditions, a non-linear degradation model was developed in this work. With the assistance of the program 'PHREEQC' it describes the change of the porosity and the hydraulic conductivity with time, which also let to conclusions concerning the change of the sorption capacity of the cement grout. This work includes the theoretical approach and illustrates the non-liner degradation by means of an exemplary water composition found in the saturated zone and the dimensions of the backfill made of cement grout representing a barrier of the BOSS borehole facility. (author)

  6. Borehole radar modeling for reservoir monitoring applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miorali, M.; Slob, E.C.; Arts, R.J.

    2010-01-01

    The use of down-hole sensors and remotely controlled valves in wells provide enormous benefits to reservoir management and oil production. We suggest borehole radar measurements as a promising technique capable of monitoring the arrival of undesired fluids in the proximity of production wells. The h

  7. Sliding seal for mining machine power transmission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levenstein, V.M.

    1993-07-06

    A generally tubular sealing mechanism is described for use in the power train of a mining machine to seal between an annular seal face on one of two spaced apart units in the power train and a sealing ring surface on the other of said units for sealed protection of a drive shaft connected between said two units, said sealing mechanism including a tubular seal carrier with a first end portion having a cylindrical sealing surface for being telescoped with said sealing ring surface, an annular seal element mountable on said cylindrical sealing surface for sealing engagement between said sealing ring surface and said cylindrical sealing surface, said carrier further having a second end portion with a radially extending face, a clamp connectable between said one unit and said carrier for urging said radially extending face toward said annular seal face, and a sealing member mountable in sealing engagement between said annular seal face and said radially extending face.

  8. Development of a Universal Canister for Disposal of High-Level Waste in Deep Boreholes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Laura L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gomberg, Steve [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

    2015-11-01

    The mission of the United States Department of Energy’s Office of Environmental Management is to complete the safe cleanup of the environmental legacy brought about from five decades of nuclear weapons development and government-sponsored nuclear energy research. Some of the wastes that must be managed have been identified as good candidates for disposal in a deep borehole in crystalline rock. In particular, wastes that can be disposed of in a small package are good candidates for this disposal concept. A canister-based system that can be used for handling these wastes during the disposition process (i.e., storage, transfer, transportation, and disposal) could facilitate the eventual disposal of these wastes. Development of specifications for the universal canister system will consider the regulatory requirements that apply to storage, transportation, and disposal of the capsules, as well as operational requirements and limits that could affect the design of the canister (e.g., deep borehole diameter). In addition, there are risks and technical challenges that need to be recognized and addressed as Universal Canister system specifications are developed. This paper provides an approach to developing specifications for such a canister system that is integrated with the overall efforts of the DOE’s Used Fuel Disposition Campaign's Deep Borehole Field Test and compatible with planned storage of potential borehole-candidate wastes.

  9. THE ORIGINS OF SEALS AND SEALING IN CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1994-01-01

    The origin of Chinese seals remains obscure in modern research. Most publications, influenced by the traditional point of view, have dealt with the seals handed down from the Eastern Zhou (771-256 B.C.). Only a few studies have discussed seals from their earliest-and still neglected-history. There have even been some suggestions, based on the idea of using a seal and using it on clay first developed in Mesopotamia, that the seal was introduced to China from the Near East. This proposed foreign origin makes the history of Chinese seals more complicated.

  10. Low Noise Borehole Triaxial Seismometer Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerr, James D; McClung, David W

    2006-11-06

    This report describes the preliminary design and the effort to date of Phase II of a Low Noise Borehole Triaxial Seismometer for use in networks of seismic stations for monitoring underground nuclear explosions. The design uses the latest technology of broadband seismic instrumentation. Each parameter of the seismometer is defined in terms of the known physical limits of the parameter. These limits are defined by the commercially available components, and the physical size constraints. A theoretical design is proposed, and a preliminary prototype model of the proposed instrument has been built. This prototype used the sensor module of the KS2000. The installation equipment (hole locks, etc.) has been designed and one unit has been installed in a borehole. The final design of the sensors and electronics and leveling mechanism is in process. Noise testing is scheduled for the last quarter of 2006.

  11. Near Field Investigation of Borehole Heat Exchangers

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    As an alternative and renewable energy source, the shallow geothermal energy evolving as one of the most popular energy source due to its easy accessibility and availability worldwide, and the ground source heat pump (GSHP) systems are the most frequent applications for extracting the energy from the shallow subsurface. As the heat extraction capacity of the GSHP system applications arises, the design of the borehole heat exchangers (BHE), which is the connected part of the system in the grou...

  12. Sealing coupling. [LMFBR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardini, J.A.; Brubaker, R.C.; Rusnak, J.J.

    1982-09-20

    Disclosed is a remotely operable releasable sealing coupling which provides fluid-tight joinder of upper and a lower conduit sections. Each conduit section has a concave conical sealing surface adjacent its end portion. A tubular sleeve having convex spherical ends is inserted between the conduit ends to form line contact with the concave conical end portions. An inwardly projecting lip located at one end of the sleeve cooperates with a retaining collar formed on the upper pipe end to provide swivel capture for the sleeve. The upper conduit section also includes a tapered lower end portion which engages the inside surface of the sleeve to limit misalignment of the connected conduit sections.

  13. Deep Borehole Field Test Conceptual Design Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardin, Ernest L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-09-30

    This report documents conceptual design development for the Deep Borehole Field Test (DBFT), including test packages (simulated waste packages, not containing waste) and a system for demonstrating emplacement and retrieval of those packages in the planned Field Test Borehole (FTB). For the DBFT to have demonstration value, it must be based on conceptualization of a deep borehole disposal (DBD) system. This document therefore identifies key options for a DBD system, describes an updated reference DBD concept, and derives a recommended concept for the DBFT demonstration. The objective of the DBFT is to confirm the safety and feasibility of the DBD concept for long-term isolation of radioactive waste. The conceptual design described in this report will demonstrate equipment and operations for safe waste handling and downhole emplacement of test packages, while contributing to an evaluation of the overall safety and practicality of the DBD concept. The DBFT also includes drilling and downhole characterization investigations that are described elsewhere (see Section 1). Importantly, no radioactive waste will be used in the DBFT, nor will the DBFT site be used for disposal of any type of waste. The foremost performance objective for conduct of the DBFT is to demonstrate safe operations in all aspects of the test.

  14. Full 3-D numerical modeling of borehole electric image logging and the evaluation model of fracture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A full 3-D finite element method numerical modeling program is written based on the principle and technical specification of borehole electric image well logging tool. The response of well logging is computed in the formation media model with a single fracture. The effect of changing fracture aperture and resistivity ratio to the logging response is discussed. The identification ability for two parallel fractures is also present. A quantitative evaluation formula of fracture aperture from borehole electric image logging data is set up. A case study of the model well is done to verify the accuracy of the for-mula. The result indicates that the formula is more accurate than the foreign one.

  15. GOLD PRESSURE VESSEL SEAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A.E.

    1963-11-26

    An improved seal between the piston and die member of a piston-cylinder type pressure vessel is presented. A layer of gold, of sufficient thickness to provide an interference fit between the piston and die member, is plated on the contacting surface of at least one of the members. (AEC)

  16. Mechanical Face Seal Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-12-01

    These liquids range from lubricants to highly toxic chemicals and acids. The applications range from helicopter transmissions to nuclear reactor... Analit ~is., N ,iontat ting lame St-ak"ts fnn. ASXIE namin Behaioir ni Nonmmuiam ing (knied-Fate Mechanikal Seals:* SL /I ub In h. 104. 1. 111 *)6ii-414

  17. Ceramic to metal seal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snow, Gary S. (Albuquerque, NM); Wilcox, Paul D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1976-01-01

    Providing a high strength, hermetic ceramic to metal seal by essentially heating a wire-like metal gasket and a ceramic member, which have been chemically cleaned, while simultaneously deforming from about 50 to 95 percent the metal gasket against the ceramic member at a temperature of about 30 to 75 percent of the melting temperature of the metal gasket.

  18. Detection of grey seal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bleijswijk, J.; Begeman, L.; Witte, H.J.; IJsseldijk, L.L.; Brasseur, S.M.J.M.; Gröne, A.; Leopold, M.F.

    2014-01-01

    DNA was analysed from external wounds on 3 dead harbour porpoises Phocoena phocoena that were stranded in the Netherlands. Puncture wounds as well as the edges of large open wounds were sampled with sterile cotton swabs. With specific primers that target the mtDNA control region of grey seal Halicho

  19. ITER lip seal welding and cutting developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levesy, B.; Cordier, J.J.; Jokinen, T. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Kujanpää, V.; Karhu, M. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland (Finland); Le Barbier, R. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Määttä, T. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland (Finland); Martins, J.P.; Utin, Y. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Different TIG and Laser welding techniques are tested. • Twin spot laser welding techniques is the best. • Limited heat input gives a stable weld pool in all positions. • Penetrations is achieved. • Lip seal welding and cutting with a robotic arm is successfully performed on a representative mock-up. - Abstract: The welded lip seals form part of the torus primary vacuum boundary in between the port plugs and the vacuum vessel, and are classified as Protection Important Component. In order to refurbish the port plugs or the in-vessel components, port plugs have to be removed from the machine. The lip seal design must enable up to ten opening of the vacuum vessel during the life time operation of the ITER machine. Therefore proven, remote reliable cutting and re-welding are essential, as these operations need to be performed in the port cells in a nuclear environment, where human presence will be restricted. Moreover, the combination of size of the components to be welded (∼10 m long vacuum compatible thin welds) and the congested environment close to the core of the machine constraint the type and size of tools to be used. This paper describes the lip seal cutting and welding development programme performed at the VTT Technical Research Centre, Finland. Potential cutting and welding techniques are analyzed and compared. The development of the cutting, TIG and laser welding techniques on samples are presented. Effects of lip seal misalignments and optimization of the 2 welding processes are discussed. Finally, the manufacturing and test of the two 1.2 m × 1 m representative mock-ups are presented. The set-up and use of a robotic arm for the mock-up cutting and welding operations are also described.

  20. Effects of the deviation characteristics of nuclear waste emplacement boreholes on borehole liner stresses; Yucca Mountain Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glowka, D.A.

    1990-09-01

    This report investigates the effects of borehole deviation on the useability of lined boreholes for the disposal of high-level nuclear waste at the proposed Yucca Mountain Repository in Nevada. Items that lead to constraints on borehole deviation include excessive stresses that could cause liner failure and possible binding of a waste container inside the liner during waste emplacement and retrieval operations. Liner stress models are developed for two general borehole configurations, one for boreholes drilled with a steerable bit and one for boreholes drilled with a non-steerable bit. Procedures are developed for calculating liner stresses that arise both during insertion of the liner into a borehole and during the thermal expansion process that follows waste emplacement. The effects of borehole curvature on the ability of the waste container to pass freely inside the liner without binding are also examined. Based on the results, specifications on borehole deviation allowances are developed for specific vertical and horizontal borehole configurations of current interest. 11 refs., 22 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Preliminary experience in the monitoring of geothermal probes by borehole logging; Erste Erfahrungen bei der bohrlochgeophysikalischen Ueberpruefung von Erdwaermesonden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann, Karsten [Bohrlochmessung-Storkow GmbH, Storkow (Germany)

    2010-05-15

    Authorities as well as waterworks experts have long been calling for a control strategy to ensure that groundwater protection is considered in geothermal projects. So far, control options for geothermal probes were lacking, which raised doubts about the efficiency of sealing. Waterworks experts also were unable to understand why new groundwater wells or groundwater measuring fonts are subject to careful control via geophysical borehole logs while geothermal probes with a depth of 100 m and more can be installed nearby without adequate monitoring. The contribution presents a preliminary approach for monitoring and testing of shallow geothermal probes. (orig.)

  2. Utilization of test boreholes in prospecting and mining operations. [NONE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sierak, J.P.

    1987-02-01

    Test boreholes are of fundamental importance for mining and prospecting operations. The drilling techniques are suited to the geological conditions and to the nature of the information desired. At Cogema, non-coring test boreholes, mainly drilled by a rotary percussive method, represent over 90% of the footage drilled; they achieve impressive performances at a cost which is by far less than that of coring test boreholes. The geological exploitation of these test boreholes is effected by a combined investigation of well logging and of cuttings. These investigations lead to an assessment for certain substances like uranium or coal or they mark the limits for favourable zones which alone will form the object of coring boreholes. In mining operations, boreholes indicate the definition for workable panels; they ensure at less cost the distribution of fluids, the forwarding of stowing material and the mine ventilation.

  3. Seals Having Textured Portions for Protection in Space Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Christopher (Inventor); Garafolo, Nicholas (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A sealing construct for a space environment includes a seal-bearing object, a seal on the seal-bearing object, and a seal-engaging object. The seal includes a seal body having a sealing surface, and a textured pattern at the sealing surface, the textured pattern defining at least one shaded channel surface. The seal-engaging object is selectively engaged with the seal-bearing object through the seal. The seal-engaging object has a sealing surface, wherein, when the seal-engaging object is selectively engaged with the seal-bearing object, the sealing surface of the seal-engaging object engages the sealing surface of the seal, and the seal is compressed between the seal-bearing object and the seal-engaging object such that at least one shaded channel surface engages the sealing surface of the seal-engaging object.

  4. Regenerator cross arm seal assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Anthony V.

    1988-01-01

    A seal assembly for disposition between a cross arm on a gas turbine engine block and a regenerator disc, the seal assembly including a platform coextensive with the cross arm, a seal and wear layer sealingly and slidingly engaging the regenerator disc, a porous and compliant support layer between the platform and the seal and wear layer porous enough to permit flow of cooling air therethrough and compliant to accommodate relative thermal growth and distortion, a dike between the seal and wear layer and the platform for preventing cross flow through the support layer between engine exhaust and pressurized air passages, and air diversion passages for directing unregenerated pressurized air through the support layer to cool the seal and wear layer and then back into the flow of regenerated pressurized air.

  5. Boring and Sealing Rock with Directed Energy Millimeter-Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woskov, P.; Einstein, H. H.; Oglesby, K.

    2015-12-01

    Millimeter-wave directed energy is being investigated to penetrate into deep crystalline basement rock formations to lower well costs and to melt rocks, metals, and other additives to seal wells for applications that include nuclear waste storage and geothermal energy. Laboratory tests have established that intense millimeter-wave (MMW) beams > 1 kW/cm2 can melt and/ or vaporize hard crystalline rocks. In principle this will make it possible to create open boreholes and a method to seal them with a glass/ceramic liner and plug formed from the original rock or with other materials. A 10 kW, 28 GHz commercial (CPI) gyrotron system with a launched beam diameter of about 32 mm was used to heat basalt, granite, limestone, and sandstone specimens to temperatures over 2500 °C to create melts and holes. A calibrated 137 GHz radiometer view, collinear with the heating beam, monitored real time peak rock temperature. A water load surrounding the rock test specimen primarily monitored unabsorbed power at 28 GHz. Power balance analysis of the laboratory observations shows that the temperature rise is limited by radiative heat loss, which would be expected to be trapped in a borehole. The analysis also indicates that the emissivity (absorption efficiency) in the radiated infrared range is lower than the emissivity at 28 GHz, giving the MMW frequency range an important advantage for rock melting. Strength tests on one granite type indicated that heating the rock initially weakens it, but with exposure to higher temperatures the resolidified black glassy product regains strength. Basalt was the easiest to melt and penetrate, if a melt leak path was provided, because of its low viscosity. Full beam holes up to about 50 mm diameter (diffraction increased beam size) were achieved through 30 mm thick basalt and granite specimens. Laboratory experiments to form a seal in an existing hole have also been carried out by melting rock and a simulated steel casing.

  6. The experimental study of acoustic field in an asymmetric borehole

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LINWeijun; ZHANGChengyu; ZHANGHailan; WANGXiuming

    2003-01-01

    The acoustic field in an asymmetric borehole was investigated by recording and comparing the waveforms with different offset in both axial symmetric borehole and axial asymmetric borehole. The two-dimensional spectrum in wave-number and frequency domain was also calculated and compared with the result of numeric simulation with 2.5-D finite difference method, and a consistent result was obtained. This work provides an accurate verification of our investigation of asymmetric borehole with 2.5-D finite difference method.

  7. 46 CFR 160.066-13 - Technical tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Technical tests. 160.066-13 Section 160.066-13 Shipping....066-13 Technical tests. (a) The following conditions apply to technical tests as described in this... signals are protected by sealed packaging, then the conditioning for the technical tests must be...

  8. Sealing the Mitochondrial Respirasome

    OpenAIRE

    Winge, Dennis R.

    2012-01-01

    The mitochondrial respiratory chain is organized within an array of supercomplexes that function to minimize the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during electron transfer reactions. Structural models of supercomplexes are now known. Another recent advance is the discovery of non-OXPHOS complex proteins that appear to adhere to and seal the individual respiratory complexes to form stable assemblages that prevent electron leakage. This review highlights recent advances in our underst...

  9. A sealing element

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obi, F.; Takada, K.

    1983-09-22

    A sealing lining made of a mixture of polyethylene or polypropylene with an additive which prevents destruction of the lining is used in the element. The content of the additive in the mixture is 10 to 30 percent by mass. The additive basically consists of polyethylene. Carboxyl groups are introduced into the polymer as an anion and sodium, potassium and molybdenum are introduced as the cation.

  10. Second ILAW Site Borehole Characterization Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SP Reidel

    2000-08-10

    The US Department of Energy's Hanford Site has the most diverse and largest amounts of radioactive tank waste in the US. High-level radioactive waste has been stored at Hanford since 1944. Approximately 209,000 m{sup 3} (54 Mgal) of waste are currently stored in 177 tanks. Vitrification and onsite disposal of low-activity tank waste (LAW) are embodied in the strategy described in the Tri-Party Agreement. The tank waste is to be retrieved, separated into low- and high-level fractions, and then immobilized. The low-activity vitrified waste will be disposed of in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. This report is a plan to drill and characterize the second borehole for the Performance Assessment. The first characterization borehole was drilled in 1998. The plan describes data collection activities for determining physical and chemical properties of the vadose zone and saturated zone on the northeast side of the proposed disposal site. These data will then be used in the 2005 Performance Assessment.

  11. Navy GTE seal development activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grala, Carl P.

    1993-10-01

    Under the auspices of the Integrated High Performance Turbine Engine Technology Initiative, the Naval Air Warfare Center conducts advanced development programs for demonstration in the next generation of air-breathing propulsion systems. Among the target technologies are gas path and lube oil seals. Two development efforts currently being managed by NAWCAD are the High Performance Compressor Discharge Film-Riding Face Seal and the Subsonic Core High Speed Air/Oil Seal. The High Performance Compressor Discharge Film-Riding Face Seal Program aims at reducing parasitic leakage through application of a film-riding face sea concept to the compressor discharge location of a Phase 2 IHPTET engine. An order-of-magnitude leakage reduction relative to current labyrinth seal configurations is expected. Performance goals for these seals are (1) 1200 F air temperature, (2) 800 feet-per-second surface velocity, and (3) 600 SPI differential pressure. The two designs chosen for fabrication and rig test are a spiral groove and a Rayleigh step seal. Rig testing is currently underway. The Subsonic Core High Speed Air/Oil Seal Program is developing shaft-to-ground seals for next-generation propulsion systems that will minimize leakage and provide full life. Significantly higher rotor speeds and temperatures will be experienced. Technologies being exploited include, hydrodynamic lift assist features, ultra light weight designs, and improved cooling schemes. Parametric testing has been completed; a final seal design is entering the endurance test phase.

  12. TECHNOLOGY ROADMAPPING FOR IAEA SEALS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HOFFHEINS,B.; ANNESE,C.; GOODMAN,M.; OCONNOR,W.; GUSHUE,S.; PEPPER,S.

    2003-07-13

    In the fall of 2002, the U.S. Support Program (USSP) initiated an effort to define a strategy or ''roadmap'' for future seals technologies and to develop a generalized process for planning safeguards equipment development, which includes seals and other safeguards equipment. The underlying objectives of the USSP include becoming more proactive than reactive in addressing safeguards equipment needs, helping the IAEA to maintain an inventory of cost-effective, reliable, and effective safeguards equipment, establishing a long-term planning horizon, and securing IAEA ownership in the process of effective requirements definition and timely transitioning of new or improved systems for IAEA use. At an initial workshop, seals, their functions, performance issues, and future embodiments were discussed in the following order: adhesive seals, metal seals, passive and active loop seals, ultrasonic seals, tamper indicating enclosures (including sample containers, equipment enclosures, and conduits). Suggested improvements to these technologies focused largely on a few themes: (1) The seals must be applied quickly, easily, and correctly; (2) Seals and their associated equipment should not unduly add bulk or weight to the inspectors load; (3) Rapid, in-situ verifiability of seals is desirable; and (4) Seal systems for high risk or high value applications should have two-way, remote communications. Based upon these observations and other insights, the participants constructed a skeletal approach for seals technology planning. The process begins with a top-level review of the fundamental safeguards requirements and extraction of required system features, which is followed by analysis of suitable technologies and identification of technology gaps, and finally by development of a planning schedule for system improvements and new technology integration. Development of a comprehensive procedure will require the partnership and participation of the IAEA. The

  13. Borehole plugging of man-made accesses to a basalt repository: a preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, C.L.; Anttonen, G.J.; O' Rourke, J.E.; Niccum, M.R.

    1979-09-01

    This report describes the status of work currently in progress for the Basalt Borehole Plugging Program (BBPP). The primary objectives of the BBPP outlined in this report have been met during this first phase of work. These objectives included: (1) the preparation of a preliminary list of candidate plug materials; (2) a description of available machinery capable of placing candidate plug materials; and (3) the development of physical and geochemical testing programs to help evaluate the chemical stability and physical properties of candidate plug materials. The most significant finding from work to date is that given reasonable regulatory criteria, nothing has been identified which would prevent design of a plug system to seal manmade openings leading to a nuclear waste repository in Columbia River basalt for significantly long periods of time (on the order of thousands of years). Work accomplished to date indicates that this plug system can be designed using both natural and manufactured materials and can be emplaced with existing placement machinery and modifications of that machinery. The objectives of Task II are to conduct laboratory tests to evaluate the suitability of preferred candidate materials for plugging boreholes in the proposed repository, select plug system(s), initiate preconceptual machinery design for the placement of materials in plug system(s), and prepare a preliminary Task II report. As with Task I project organization, Task II is divided into subtasks that are identified by written subtask work summaries.

  14. Establishment and application of drilling sealing model in the spherical grouting mode based on the loosing-circle theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao; Zhiyong; Lin; Baiquan; Gao; Yabin; Cheng; Yanying

    2012-01-01

    There are quite a few studies that have been done on borehole sealing theory both domestically and internationally.The existing researches usually consider drilling of the surroundings as a dense homogeneous elastic body which does not meet the characteristics of real drilling of the fractured body.Based on the loosing-circle theory and analyses of the surrounding rock stress field,cracks and seepage fields,combined with Newtonian fluid spherical grouting model,we deduced the dynamic relationship between the seepage coefficient and rock or grouting parameters of the drilling sealing fluid mode of spherical fissure grouting.In this experiment,mucus was injected in the simulated coal seam and the permeability coefficient of the sealing body was calculated by using the model.To verify the validity of the model,the calculated sealing body number was compared with the extreme negative pressure that the sealing body could withstand.The theoretical model revealed the drilling sealing fluid mechanism,provided a method for the quantitative calculation of the drilling sealing fluid effect by grouting mode and a reference for the subsequent research of sealing mechanism.

  15. COMPLETION OF THE TRANSURANIC GREATER CONFINEMENT DISPOSAL BOREHOLE PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT FOR THE NEVADA TEST SITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colarusso, Angela; Crowe, Bruce; Cochran, John R.

    2003-02-27

    Classified transuranic material that cannot be shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico is stored in Greater Confinement Disposal boreholes in the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site on the Nevada Test Site. A performance assessment was completed for the transuranic inventory in the boreholes and submitted to the Transuranic Waste Disposal Federal Review Group. The performance assessment was prepared by Sandia National Laboratories on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office using an iterative methodology that assessed radiological releases from the intermediate depth disposal configuration against the regulatory requirements of the 1985 version of 40 CFR 191 of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The transuranic materials are stored at 21 to 37 m depth (70 to 120 ft) in large diameter boreholes constructed in the unsaturated alluvial deposits of Frenchman Flat. Hydrologic processes that affect long- term isolation of the radionuclides are dominated by extremely slow upward rates of liquid/vapor advection and diffusion; there is no downward pathway under current climatic conditions and there is no recharge to groundwater under future ''glacial'' climatic conditions. A Federal Review Team appointed by the Transuranic Waste Disposal Federal Review Group reviewed the Greater Confinement Disposal performance assessment and found that the site met the majority of the regulatory criteria of the 1985 and portions of the 1993 versions of 40 CFR 191. A number of technical and procedural issues required development of supplemental information that was incorporated into a final revision of the performance assessment. These issues include inclusion of radiological releases into the complementary cumulative distribution function for the containment requirements associated with drill cuttings from inadvertent human intrusion, verification of mathematical models used in the

  16. Site selection for drinking-water pumping boreholes using a fuzzy spatial decision support system in the Korinthia prefecture, SE Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonakos, Andreas K.; Voudouris, Konstantinos S.; Lambrakis, Nikolaos I.

    2014-12-01

    The implementation of a geographic information system (GIS)/fuzzy spatial decision support system in the selection of sites for drinking-water pumping boreholes is described. Groundwater is the main source of domestic supply and irrigation in Korinthia prefecture, south-eastern Greece. Water demand has increased considerably over the last 30 years and is mainly met by groundwater abstracted via numerous wells and boreholes. The definition of the most "suitable" site for the drilling of new boreholes is a major issue in this area. A method of allocating suitable locations has been developed based on multicriteria analysis and fuzzy logic. Twelve parameters were finally involved in the model, prearranged into three categories: borehole yield, groundwater quality, and economic and technical constraints. GIS was used to create a classification map of the research area, based on the suitability of each point for the placement of new borehole fields. The coastal part of the study area is completely unsuitable, whereas high values of suitability are recorded in the south-western part. The study demonstrated that the method of multicriteria analysis in combination with fuzzy logic is a useful tool for selecting the best sites for new borehole drilling on a regional scale. The results could be used by local authorities and decision-makers for integrated groundwater resources management.

  17. Borehole Logging for Uranium by Gamma-Ray Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løvborg, Leif; Nyegaard, P.; Christiansen, E. M.

    1980-01-01

    The resources in a large syngenetic deposit of low-grade uranium (U) ore with thorium at Kvanefjeld, South Greenland, were evaluated by spectrometric gamma-ray logging of 23 boreholes, 46 mm in diameter and 200 m deep. The borehole probe's detector contained 22 cm3 of sodium-iodide, and the photo......The resources in a large syngenetic deposit of low-grade uranium (U) ore with thorium at Kvanefjeld, South Greenland, were evaluated by spectrometric gamma-ray logging of 23 boreholes, 46 mm in diameter and 200 m deep. The borehole probe's detector contained 22 cm3 of sodium...... of the spectrometer system were determined by calculating the average number of U and thorium (Th) counts per meter of borehole and comparing these with the U-Th concentrations in 1-m sections of analyzed drill core. The sensitivity and the background count rate in the uranium window varied appreciably from one hole...

  18. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. BIPS logging in borehole KAS09

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustafsson, Jaana; Gustafsson, Christer (Malaa Geoscience AB (Sweden))

    2010-01-15

    This report includes the data gained in BIPS logging performed at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. The logging operation presented here includes BIPS logging in the core drilled borehole KAS09. The objective for the BIPS logging was to observe the condition of KAS09 in order to restore the borehole in the hydrogeological monitoring programme.All measurements were conducted by Malaa Geoscience AB on October 9th 2009. The objective of the BIPS logging is to achieve information of the borehole including occurrence of rock types as well as determination of fracture distribution and orientation. This report describes the equipment used as well as the measurement procedures and data gained. For the BIPS survey, the result is presented as images. The basic conditions of the BIPS logging for geological mapping and orientation of structures are satisfying for borehole KAS09, although induced affects from the drilling on the borehole walls limit the visibility

  19. Surface borehole synthesis tension deformation fracture time-space rule

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Jianzhong; Sun Haitao; Hu Qianting

    2012-01-01

    In order to release the tension and shear effect of the superjacent rock strata movement during excavation in coal mine,protect the surface borehole case from fracturing fast and make a good use of the surface borehole during goaf methane drawing,a common synthesis tension deformation fracture model was set up based on the synthesis tension effect of the rock strata,and the deformation rule of the surface borehole case with time and space was researched.The results suggest that,to reduce the deformation the surface borehole should be built between the boundary of the stope and the knee of subsidence curve.At the same time,a 3DEC simulation model and an engineering example were carried out to examine the rules of theoretical model.The result suggests that the model and the rules accord to the test and have good building and protection engineering application values to the surface borehole.

  20. Sealing the mitochondrial respirasome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winge, Dennis R

    2012-07-01

    The mitochondrial respiratory chain is organized within an array of supercomplexes that function to minimize the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during electron transfer reactions. Structural models of supercomplexes are now known. Another recent advance is the discovery of non-OXPHOS complex proteins that appear to adhere to and seal the individual respiratory complexes to form stable assemblages that prevent electron leakage. This review highlights recent advances in our understanding of the structures of supercomplexes and the factors that mediate their stability.

  1. Borehole plugging by compaction process. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, R.; MacGowan, C.; Nolan, E.; Morey, R.; Palty, A.

    1976-08-01

    The requirements of an overall program to preserve the integrity of a repository formation are documented. The repository is intended to be in stable earth stratum used as a safe and permanent storage area for nuclear waste material. These wastes represent an environmental hazard for a period of up to 200,000 years. An engineering analysis, a reliability and quality-assurance program, and a development program for borehole plugging by compaction process, using natural earthen materials, are presented. Part 1 provides the engineering analysis of downhole compaction methods and related instrumentation along with a recommended development plan from concept through a pilot in-situ experiment. Part 2 provides a reliability and quality-assurance program from laboratory testing of materials through an in-situ experiment.

  2. Development of a hydraulic borehole seismic source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cutler, R.P.

    1998-04-01

    This report describes a 5 year, $10 million Sandia/Industry project to develop an advanced borehole seismic source for use in oil and gas exploration and production. The development Team included Sandia, Chevron, Amoco, Conoco, Exxon, Raytheon, Pelton, and GRI. The seismic source that was developed is a vertically oriented, axial point force, swept frequency, clamped, reaction-mass vibrator design. It was based on an early Chevron prototype, but the new tool incorporates a number of improvements which make it far superior to the original prototype. The system consists of surface control electronics, a special heavy duty fiber optic wireline and draw works, a cablehead, hydraulic motor/pump module, electronics module, clamp, and axial vibrator module. The tool has a peak output of 7,000 lbs force and a useful frequency range of 5 to 800 Hz. It can operate in fluid filled wells with 5.5-inch or larger casing to depths of 20,000 ft and operating temperatures of 170 C. The tool includes fiber optic telemetry, force and phase control, provisions to add seismic receiver arrays below the source for single well imaging, and provisions for adding other vibrator modules to the tool in the future. The project yielded four important deliverables: a complete advanced borehole seismic source system with all associated field equipment; field demonstration surveys funded by industry showing the utility of the system; industrial sources for all of the hardware; and a new service company set up by their industrial partner to provide commercial surveys.

  3. Modelling of thermally driven groundwater flow in a facility for disposal of spent nuclear fuel in deep boreholes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsic, Nico; Grundfelt, Bertil [Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-09-15

    In this report calculations are presented of buoyancy driven groundwater flow caused by the emission of residual heat from spent nuclear fuel deposited in deep boreholes from the ground surface in combination with the natural geothermal gradient. This work has been conducted within SKB's programme for evaluation of alternative methods for final disposal of spent nuclear fuel. The basic safety feature of disposal of spent nuclear fuel in deep boreholes is that the groundwater at great depth has a higher salinity, and hence a higher density, than more superficial groundwater. The result of this is that the deep groundwater becomes virtually stagnant. The study comprises analyses of the effects of different inter-borehole distances as well as the effect of different permeabilities in the backfill and sealing materials in the borehole and of different shapes of the interface between fresh and saline groundwater. The study is an update of a previous study published in 2006. In the present study, the facility design proposed by Sandia National Laboratories has been studied. In this design, steel canisters containing two BWR elements or one PWR element are stacked on top of each other between 3 and 5 kilometres depth. In order to host all spent fuel from the current Swedish nuclear programme, about 80 such holes are needed. The model used in this study comprises nine boreholes spaced 100 metres alternatively 50 metres apart in a 3{Chi}3 matrix. In one set of calculations the salinity in the groundwater was assumed to increase from zero above 700 metres depth to 10% by weight at 1500 metres depth and below. In another set, a sharper salinity gradient was applied in which the salinity increased from 0 to 10% between 1400 and 1500 metres depth. A geothermal gradient of 16 deg C/km was applied. The heat output from the spent fuel was assumed to decrease by time in manner consistent with the radioactive decay in the fuel. When the inter-borehole distance decreased from

  4. 48 CFR 52.214-23 - Late submissions, modifications, revisions, and withdrawals of technical proposals under two-step...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., modifications, revisions, and withdrawals of technical proposals under two-step sealed bidding. 52.214-23... Late submissions, modifications, revisions, and withdrawals of technical proposals under two-step..., Modifications, Revisions, and Withdrawals of Technical Proposals Under Two-Step Sealed Bidding (NOV 1999)...

  5. Face-Sealing Butterfly Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tervo, John N.

    1992-01-01

    Valve plate made to translate as well as rotate. Valve opened and closed by turning shaft and lever. Interactions among lever, spring, valve plate, and face seal cause plate to undergo combination of translation and rotation so valve plate clears seal during parts of opening and closing motions.

  6. Seals. Grades 3-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New England Aquarium, Boston, MA.

    Explanations of a marine mammal rescue program and information on seals and sea lions are presented in this curriculum package for intermediate grade teachers. Activities are highlighted which focus on the natural history of harbor seals. This unit contains: (1) pre-trip activities (including fact sheets and worksheets on the different types of…

  7. Gulf and Dilmun Type seals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Steffen

    2011-01-01

    these Gulf Type‘ seals drew heavily on Indus Valley iconography and Indus script was occasionally employed in a pidgin-like manner. While the earliest circular seals incorporate features from Mesopotamian glyptic only to a lesser extent, this becomes a more important source of inspiration for later Dilmun...

  8. Geomechanical Engineering Concepts Applied to Deep Borehole Disposal Wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrick, C. G.; Haimson, B. C.; Lee, M.

    2015-12-01

    Deep borehole disposal (DBD) of certain defense-generated radioactive waste forms is being considered by the US Department of Energy (DOE) as an alternative to mined repositories. The 17 inch diameter vertical boreholes are planned to be drilled in crystalline basement rock. As part of an initial field test program, the DOE will drill a demonstration borehole, to be used to test equipment for handling and emplacing prototype nonradioactive waste containers, and a second smaller diameter borehole, to be used for site characterization. Both boreholes will be drilled to a depth of 5 km. Construction of such boreholes is expected to be complex because of their overall length, large diameter, and anticipated downhole conditions of high temperatures, pore pressures, and stress regimes. It is believed that successful development of DBD boreholes can only be accomplished if geologic and tectonic conditions are characterized and drill activities are designed based on that understanding. Our study focuses primarily on using the in situ state of stress to mitigate borehole wall failure, whether tensile or compressive. The measured stresses, or their constrained estimates, will include pore pressure, the vertical stress, the horizontal stresses and orientations, and thermally induced stresses. Pore pressure will be measured directly or indirectly. Horizontal stresses will be estimated from hydraulic fracturing tests, leak off tests, and breakout characteristics. Understanding the site stress condition along with the rock's strength characteristics will aid in the optimization of mud weight and casing design required to control borehole wall failure and other drilling problems.Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. SAND2015-6552A

  9. Gas-path seal technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuk, J.

    1976-01-01

    Improved gas-path seals are needed for better fuel economy, longer performance retention, and lower maintenance, particularly in advanced, high-performance gas turbine engines. Problems encountered in gas-path sealing are described, as well as new blade-tip sealing approaches for high-pressure compressors and turbines. These include a lubricant coating for conventional, porous-metal, rub-strip materials used in compressors. An improved hot-press metal alloy shows promise to increase the operating surface temperatures of high-pressure-turbine, blade-tip seals to 1450 K (2150 F). Three ceramic seal materials are also described that have the potential to allow much higher gas-path surface operating temperatures than are possible with metal systems.

  10. Aerodynamic seals for rotary machine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bidkar, Rahul Anil; Cirri, Massimiliano; Thatte, Azam Mihir; Williams, John Robert

    2016-02-09

    An aerodynamic seal assembly for a rotary machine includes multiple sealing device segments disposed circumferentially intermediate to a stationary housing and a rotor. Each of the segments includes a shoe plate with a forward-shoe section and an aft-shoe section having multiple labyrinth teeth therebetween facing the rotor. The sealing device segment also includes multiple flexures connected to the shoe plate and to a top interface element, wherein the multiple flexures are configured to allow the high pressure fluid to occupy a forward cavity and the low pressure fluid to occupy an aft cavity. Further, the sealing device segments include a secondary seal attached to the top interface element at one first end and positioned about the flexures and the shoe plate at one second end.

  11. Turbine and Structural Seals Team Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Seals Team Facilities conceive, develop, and test advanced turbine seal concepts to increase efficiency and durability of turbine engines. Current projects include...

  12. Sampling and Analysis Plan - Waste Treatment Plant Seismic Boreholes Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reidel, Steve P.

    2006-05-26

    This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) describes planned data collection activities for four entry boreholes through the sediment overlying the basalt, up to three new deep rotary boreholes through the basalt and sedimentary interbeds, and one corehole through the basalt and sedimentary interbeds at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) site. The SAP will be used in concert with the quality assurance plan for the project to guide the procedure development and data collection activities needed to support borehole drilling, geophysical measurements, and sampling. This SAP identifies the American Society of Testing Materials standards, Hanford Site procedures, and other guidance to be followed for data collection activities.

  13. Site investigation SFR. Fracture mineralogy including identification of uranium phases and hydrochemical characterisation of groundwater in borehole KFR106

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandstroem, Bjoern [WSP Sverige AB, Goeteborg (Sweden); Nilsson, Kersti [Geosigma AB, Uppsala (Sweden); Tullborg, Eva-Lena [Terralogica AB, Graabo (Sweden)

    2011-12-15

    This report presents the fracture mineralogy and hydrochemistry of borehole KFR106. The most abundant fracture minerals in the examined drill core samples are clay minerals, calcite, quartz and adularia; chlorite is also common but is mostly altered and found interlayered with corrensite. The most common clay mineral is a mixed layer clay consisting of illite-smectite. Pyrite, galena, chalcopyrite, barite (-celestine) and hematite are also commonly found in the fractures, but usually in trace amounts. Other minerals identified in the examined fractures are U-phosphate, pitchblende, U(Ca)-silicate, asphaltite, biotite, monazite, fluorite, titanite, sericite, xenotime, rutile and (Ca, REEs)-carbonate. Uranium has been introduced, mobilised and reprecipitated during at least four different episodes: 1) Originally, during emplacement of U-rich pegmatites, probably as uraninite. 2) At a second event, uranium was mobilised under brittle conditions during formation of breccia/cataclasite. Uraninite was altered to pitchblende and partly coffinitised. Mobilised uranium precipitated as pitchblende closely associated with hematite and chlorite in cataclasite and fracture sealings prior to 1,000 Ma. 3) During the Palaeozoic U was remobilised and precipitated as U-phosphate on open fracture surfaces. 4) An amorphous U-silicate has also been found in open fractures; the age of this precipitation is not known but it is inferred to be Palaeozoic or younger. Groundwater was sampled in two sections in borehole KFR106 with pumping sequences of about 6 days for each section. The samples from sections KFR106:1 and KFR106:2 (260-300 m and 143-259 m borehole length, i.e. -261 and -187 m.a.s.l. mid elevation of the section, respectively) were taken in November 2009 and yielded groundwater chemistry data in accordance with SKB chemistry class 3 and 5. In section KFR106:1 and KFR106:2, the chloride contents were 850 and 1,150 mg/L and the drilling water content 6 and 4%, respectively

  14. Direction of improvement of the radial-face seals of rotor supports of the aircraft engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Bondarchuk

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Today the radial-face contacts seals are the most wide-spread type of sealers of the aircraft engine rotor supports. In the paper the main shortcomings of the radial-face contact seals are specified the removal of which will result in increase in the operating range in terms of the pressure and temperature of the sealing air, reduction of leakages and extension of life-time. On the basis of the literature, patents and catalogues of the manufacturing companies the modern trends of improvement of the sealing structure are considered. The innovative technical solution for the radial-face contact seal with oil lubrication has been developed allowing increasing its efficiency. In order to increase the sealing reliability the hydrodynamic grooves of unique form made with the use of a laser are used. High sealing efficiency is ensured due to the simultaneous application of principles of hydrostatic and hydrodynamic lubrication. The method of calculation of seal properties has been suggested. The results of testing the new type of sealing for the engine rotor support as part of a moving-base simulator and aircraft gas-turbine engine have been presented.

  15. Methane drainage with horizontal boreholes in advance of longwall mining: an analysis. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabello, D.P.; Felts, L.L.; Hayoz, F.P.

    1981-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Morgantown Energy Technology Center has implemented a comprehensive program to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of coalbed methane as an energy resource. The program is directed toward solution of technical and institutional problems impeding the recovery and use of large quantities of methane contained in the nation's minable and unminable coalbeds. Conducted in direct support of the DOE Methane Recovery from Coalbeds Project, this study analyzes the economic aspects of a horizontal borehole methane recovery system integrated as part of a longwall mine operation. It establishes relationships between methane selling price and annual mine production, methane production rate, and the methane drainage system capital investment. Results are encouraging, indicating that an annual coal production increase of approximately eight percent would offset all associated drainage costs over the range of methane production rates and capital investments considered.

  16. BoreholeAR: A mobile tablet application for effective borehole database visualization using an augmented reality technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangho; Suh, Jangwon; Park, Hyeong-Dong

    2015-03-01

    Boring logs are widely used in geological field studies since the data describes various attributes of underground and surface environments. However, it is difficult to manage multiple boring logs in the field as the conventional management and visualization methods are not suitable for integrating and combining large data sets. We developed an iPad application to enable its user to search the boring log rapidly and visualize them using the augmented reality (AR) technique. For the development of the application, a standard borehole database appropriate for a mobile-based borehole database management system was designed. The application consists of three modules: an AR module, a map module, and a database module. The AR module superimposes borehole data on camera imagery as viewed by the user and provides intuitive visualization of borehole locations. The map module shows the locations of corresponding borehole data on a 2D map with additional map layers. The database module provides data management functions for large borehole databases for other modules. Field survey was also carried out using more than 100,000 borehole data.

  17. Completion summary for boreholes USGS 140 and USGS 141 near the Advanced Test Reactor Complex, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twining, Brian V.; Bartholomay, Roy C.; Hodges, Mary K.V.

    2014-01-01

    with gravel was described. Basalt flows generally ranged in thickness from 3 to 76 ft (average of 14 ft) and varied from highly fractured to dense with high to low vesiculation. Geophysical and borehole video logs were collected during certain stages of the drilling and construction process at boreholes USGS 140 and USGS 141. Geophysical logs were examined synergistically with the core material for borehole USGS 140; additionally, geophysical data were examined to confirm geologic and hydrologic similarities between boreholes USGS 140 and USGS 141 because core was not collected for borehole USGS 141. Geophysical data suggest the occurrence of fractured and (or) vesiculated basalt, dense basalt, and sediment layering in both the saturated and unsaturated zones in borehole USGS 141. Omni-directional density measurements were used to assess the completeness of the grout annular seal behind 6-in. diameter well casing. Furthermore, gyroscopic deviation measurements were used to measure horizontal and vertical displacement at all depths in boreholes USGS 140 and USGS 141. Single-well aquifer tests were done following construction at wells USGS 140 and USGS 141 and data examined after the tests were used to provide estimates of specific-capacity, transmissivity, and hydraulic conductivity. The specific capacity, transmissivity, and hydraulic conductivity for well USGS 140 were estimated at 2,370 gallons per minute per foot [(gal/min)/ft)], 4.06 × 105 feet squared per day (ft2/d), and 740 feet per day (ft/d), respectively. The specific capacity, transmissivity, and hydraulic conductivity for well USGS 141 were estimated at 470 (gal/min)/ft, 5.95 × 104 ft2/d, and 110 ft/d, respectively. Measured flow rates remained relatively constant in well USGS 140 with averages of 23.9 and 23.7 gal/min during the first and second aquifer tests, respectively, and in well USGS 141 with an average of 23.4 gal/min. Water samples were analyzed for cations, anions, metals, nutrients, volatile

  18. Friction Characteristics of Mechanical Seals with Laser-textured Seal Faces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Heat generated by friction between faces of mechanica l seals is a major factor that causes deterioration of the seals and shortens th eir service life. Excessive temperature rise can greatly alter the seal geometry and vaporize the sealing fluid, resulting in friction of boundary lubrication. These effects on face seals usually lead to excessive leakage and ultimately ren der the seal inoperable. In order to maintain the reliability of seals, high fri ction and unwanted wear must be avoided. Using the l...

  19. Shock-induced wave propagation over porous and fractured borehole zones: Theory and experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fan, H.; Smeulders, D.M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Borehole waves are strongly affected by adjacent porous zones or by fractures intersecting the borehole. A theoretical description for both porous and fracture zones is possible based on the introduction of an effective borehole fluid bulk modulus, characterizing the wave attenuation via borehole wa

  20. Piceance Basin Oil Shale Data: Assays, Boreholes and Formation Tops

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This database contains Oil Shale Assays, Borehole Locations and Formation Tops that were used in support of the 2009 Oil Shale Assessment (Survey Fact Sheet...

  1. An acoustic imaging system of migration technique used in borehole

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Weijun; WU Nan; SUN Jian; ZHANG Hailan

    2008-01-01

    In order to detect the damage of casing boreholes, an acoustic imaging method with a two-dimensional ultrasonic array was presented. Each element of the array independently emits down ultrasonic waves, the echoes received by all elements are sampled and transmitted to a computer on ground surface, where the dynamic migration method is used to form a 2 or 3-dimensional image of the situation in the borehole. The numerical simulation and experiment are conducted that demonstrate a high imaging accuracy with a small number of elements used in array. Since the delay circuits used in the traditional phased array imaging system is not needed in this system, and all data process could be completed in a ground system,the complexity and the volume of system in borehole may be significantly simplified, which is critical to the borehole instrument.

  2. Experimental and Numerical Comparison of Two Borehole Heat Exchangers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alberdi Pagola, Maria; Poulsen, Søren Erbs

    2014-01-01

    This report outlines key results from a comparative study of two different pipe borehole heat exchanger (BHE) configurations. The work was carried out by VIA University College and in collaboration with GM Plast A/S.......This report outlines key results from a comparative study of two different pipe borehole heat exchanger (BHE) configurations. The work was carried out by VIA University College and in collaboration with GM Plast A/S....

  3. Development of a Single-Borehole Radar for Well Logging

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng-ou Zhou; Qing Zhao; Haining Yang; Tingjun Li

    2012-01-01

    An impulse-based single-borehole radar prototype has been developed for well logging. The borehole radar is comprised of subsurface sonde and surface equipment. An armored 7-conductor well logging cable is used to connect subsurface sonde and surface equipment which is well compatible with the other well logging instruments. The performance experiments of the prototype have been conducted in a test field. The results show that the prototype system is capable of detecting the target which is 8...

  4. Correcting Borehole Temperture Profiles for the Effects of Postglacial Warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath, V.; Gonzalez-Rouco, J. F.

    2010-09-01

    Though the investigation of observed borehole temperatures has proved to be a valuable tool for the reconstruction of ground surface temperature histories, there are many open questions concerning the signifcance and accuracy of the reconstructions from these data. In particular, the temperature signal of the warming after the Last glacial Maximum (LGM) is still present in borehole temperature proiles. It also influences the relatively shallow boreholes used in current paleoclimate inversions to estimate temperature changes in the last centuries. This is shown using Monte Carlo experiments on past surface temperature change, using plausible distributions for the most important parameters, i.e.,amplitude and timing of the glacial-interglacial transition, the prior average temperature, and petrophysical properties. It has been argued that the signature of the last glacial-interglacial transition could be responsible for the high amplitudes of millennial temperature reconstructions. However, in shallow boreholes the additional effect of past climate can reasonably approximated by a linear variation of temperature with depth, and thus be accommodated by a "biased" background heat flow. This is good news for borehole climatology. A simple correction based on subtracting an appropriate prior surface temperature history shows promising results reducing these errors considerably, in particular with deeper boreholes, where the warming signal in heat flow can no longer be approximated linearly. We will show examples from North America and Eurasia, comparing temperatures reduced the proposed algoritm with AOGCM modeling results.

  5. Geophysical borehole logging and optical imaging of the boreholes KR34, KR35 and KR36, at Olkiluoto 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majapuro, J. [Suomen Malmi Oy, Espoo (Finland)

    2005-09-15

    Suomen Malmi Oy conducted geophysical borehole logging and optical imaging surveys of the boreholes KR34, KR35 and KR36 at the Olkiluoto site in Eurajoki during May - June 2005. The survey is a part of Posiva Oy's detailed investigation program for the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel. The methods applied are magnetic susceptibility, natural gamma radiation, gamma-gamma density, single point resistance, Wenner-resistivity, borehole radar, full waveform sonic and optical imaging. The assignment included the field work of all surveys, interpretation and processing of the acoustic and borehole radar data. The report describes the field operation, equipment as well as processing procedures and shows the obtained results and their quality in the appendices. The raw and processed data are delivered digitally in WellCAD and Excel format. (orig.)

  6. 7 CFR 29.35 - Lot seal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Lot seal. 29.35 Section 29.35 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... INSPECTION Regulations Definitions § 29.35 Lot seal. A seal approved by the Director for sealing lots...

  7. 7 CFR 29.34 - Sample seal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sample seal. 29.34 Section 29.34 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... INSPECTION Regulations Definitions § 29.34 Sample seal. A seal approved by the Director for sealing...

  8. Seal device for ferromagnetic containers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Ross E.; Jason, Andrew J.

    1994-01-01

    A temporary seal or patch assembly prevents the escape of contents, e.g., fluids and the like, from within a container having a breach therethrough until the contents can be removed and/or a repair effected. A frame that supports a sealing bladder can be positioned over the breach and the frame is then attached to the container surface, which must be of a ferromagnet material, by using switchable permanent magnets. The permanent magnets are designed to have a first condition that is not attracted to the ferromagnetic surface and a second conditions whereby the magnets are attracted to the surface with sufficient force to support the seal assembly on the surface. Latching devices may be attached to the frame and engage the container surface with hardened pins to prevent the lateral movement of the seal assembly along the container surface from external forces such as fluid drag or gravity.

  9. Quantum String Seal Is Insecure

    CERN Document Server

    Chau, H F

    2006-01-01

    A quantum string seal encodes the value of a (bit) string as a quantum state in such a way that everyone can extract a non-negligible amount of information on the string by a suitable measurement. Moreover, such measurement must disturb the quantum state and is likely to be detected by an authorized verifier. In this way, the intactness of the encoded quantum state plays the role of a wax seal in the digital world. Here I analyze the security of quantum string seal by studying the information disturbance tradeoff of a measurement. This information disturbance tradeoff analysis extends the earlier results of Bechmann-Pasquinucci et al. and Chau by concluding that all quantum string seals are insecure. Specifically, I find a way to obtain non-trivial information on the string that escapes the verifier's detection with probability at least one half.

  10. Alaska Harbor Seal Glacial Surveys

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Floating glacial ice serves as a haul-out substrate for a significant number (10-15%) of Alaskan harbor seals, and thus surveying tidewater glacial fjords is an...

  11. Northern Fur Seal Food Habits

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains food habits samples, usually scats, collected opportunistically on northern fur seal rookeries and haulouts in Alaska from 1987 to present....

  12. The disposal alternative deep boreholes. Content and scope of R and D programme necessary for comparison with the KBS-3 method; Foervarsalternativet djupa borrhaal. Innehaall och omfattning av FUD-program som kraevs foer jaemfoerelse med KBS-3-metoden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wikberg, P. [and others

    2000-08-01

    Deposition of spent fuel elements in {>=} 2000 m deep boreholes is an alternative to the KBS-3 method that has been developed in Sweden for more than 20 years. This report gives an account of the research and development needed in order to bring the deep borehole method to the same level of development as the KBS-3 method. Five majors areas are discussed: Geoscience, Technical issues, Technical barriers, Safety assessment and Time-plans and costs. It is estimated that a full R,D and D programme would need about 30 years to be completed, and the costs would amount to around 4 billion SEK (over 400 million USD)

  13. Status of Understanding for Seal Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, P. F.

    1984-01-01

    Material selection for mainshaft face and ring seals, labyrinth seals, accessory gearbox face seals, and lip seals are discussed in light of tribology requirements and a given seal application. Carbon graphite has been found to be one of the best sealing materials and it is widely used in current gas turbine mainshaft and accessory gearbox seals. Its popularity is due to its unique combination of properties which consists of dimensional stability, corrosion resistance, low friction, good self lubricating characteristics, high thermal conductivity and low thermal expansion, the latter two properties combining to provide good thermal shock resistance. A brief description of the seals and the requirements they must meet are discussed to provide insight into the limitations and advantages of the seals in containing the lubricant. A forecast is made of the operational requirements of main shaft and gearbox seals for advanced engines and candidate materials and coatings that may satisfy these advanced engine requirements.

  14. Thermal modelling of borehole heat exchangers and borehole thermal energy stores; Zur thermischen Modellierung von Erdwaermesonden und Erdsonden-Waermespeichern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Dan

    2011-07-15

    The thermal use of the underground for heating and cooling applications can be done with borehole heat exchangers. This work deals with the further development of the modelling of thermal transport processes inside and outside the borehole as well as with the application of the further developed models. The combination of high accuracy and short computation time is achieved by the development of three-dimensional thermal resistance and capacity models for borehole heat exchangers. Short transient transport processes can be calculated by the developed model with a considerable higher dynamic and accuracy than with known models from literature. The model is used to evaluate measurement data of a thermal response test by parameter estimation technique with a transient three-dimensional model for the first time. Clear advantages like shortening of the test duration are shown. The developed borehole heat exchanger model is combined with a three-dimensional description of the underground in the Finite-Element-Program FEFLOW. The influence of moving groundwater on borehole heat exchangers and borehole thermal energy stores is then quantified.

  15. Grease lubrication mechanisms in bearing seals

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Rolling bearings contain seals to keep lubricant inside and contaminants outside the bearing system. These systems are often lubricated with grease; the grease acts as a lubricant for the bearing and seal and improves the sealing efficiency. In this thesis, the influence of lubricating grease on bearing seal performance is studied. Rheological properties of the grease, i.e. shear stress and normal stress difference, are evaluated and related to the lubricating and sealing performance of the s...

  16. Geology of the Waste Treatment Plant Seismic Boreholes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnett, D. BRENT; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Fecht, Karl R.; Lanigan, David C.; Reidel, Steve; Rust, Colleen F.

    2007-02-28

    In 2006, DOE-ORP initiated the Seismic Boreholes Project (SBP) to emplace boreholes at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) site in order to obtain direct Vs measurements and other physical property measurements in Columbia River basalt and interbedded sediments of the Ellensburg Formation. The goal was to reduce the uncertainty in the response spectra and seismic design basis, and potentially recover design margin for the WTP. The characterization effort within the deep boreholes included 1) downhole measurements of the velocity properties of the suprabasalt, basalt, and sedimentary interbed sequences, 2) downhole measurements of the density of the subsurface basalt and sediments, and 3) confirmation of the geometry of the contact between the various basalt and interbedded sediments through examination of retrieved core from the corehole and data collected through geophysical logging of each borehole. This report describes the results of the geologic studies from three mud-rotary boreholes and one cored borehole at the WTP. All four boreholes penetrated the entire Saddle Mountains Basalt and the upper part of the Wanapum Basalt where thick sedimentary interbeds occur between the lava flows. The basalt flows penetrated in Saddle Mountains Basalt included the Umatilla Member, Esquatzel Member, Pomona Member and the Elephant Mountain Member. The underlying Priest Rapids Member of the Wanapum Basalt was also penetrated. The Ellensburg Formation sediments consist of the Mabton Interbed, the Cold Creek Interbed, the Selah Interbed and the Rattlesnake Ridge Interbed; the Byron Interbed occurs between two flows of the Priest Rapids Member. The Mabton Interbed marks the contact between the Wanapum and Saddle Mountains Basalts. The thicknesses of the basalts and interbedded sediments were within expected limits. However, a small reverse fault was found in the Pomona Member flow top. This fault has three periods of movement and less than 15 feet of repeated section. Most of the

  17. GPK-2 re-entry and deepening -- a technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumgartner, J.; Gerard, A.; Barla, R.; Socomine, S.A.

    1999-01-01

    Between mid February to end of May 1999 (in 104 days) the well GPK2 at the Soultz HDR site was successfully re-entered and deepened from 3876 m to a final depth of 5084 m and fully completed. Re-entry included the pulling of the existing 321 1 m long internal 9 5/8-inch by 7-inch casing string, fishing of a submersible pump and some 150 m of 2 3/8-inch tubing, sealing of a major loss zone and opening of a 6 1/4-inch well section in granite (3211-3876 m) to 8 1/2-inch hole size. The well was extended to 5048 m in 8 1/2'' hole size and again completed with a floating 9 5/8-inch by 7-inch casing string. The casing shoe is at 4431 m. A bottom hole core was taken in the depth range 5048-5051 m. The core recovery was app. 40%. A pilot hole in 6 1/4-inch was drilled from 5051-5084 m for in situ stress measurements using the hydraulic fracturing technique. The re-entry and deepening of the well GPK2 was accompanied by several technical developments. New casing packer elements based on inflatable metal shells were developed in a close cooperation between SOCOMINE and MeSy GmbH (patent pending). These packer elements were successfully integrated into the completion of the well. The full weight of the casing string is supported by these elements which are filled with and imbedded in cement. High temperature cementing strategies (up to 170-190 C) for the complex saline fluids encountered in Soultz (High Magnesium Resistant Cements) were developed in a cooperation between Schlumberger Dowell (Vechta), SOCOMINE, SII of Houston, Ruhr-University Bochum, BGR Hannover and IFP Paris. The development of several high temperature logging tools (200 C range, 6-arm caliper, PTF probe) was initiated with CSMA (Cornwall) during the preparation of the deepening of GPK2. Initial scientific investigations included borehole logging (NGS, CLIPER, ARI, UBI, TEMPERATURE), geological investigations (cuttings, core) and seismic monitoring while drilling. During the first temperature log

  18. Harbour seals (Phoca vitulina and rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nynke Osinga

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Throughout the past few decades, rehabilitation of seals has become an activity that is anchored in the present day society of many countries. Seals are primarily rehabilitated to help individual animals in distress. At the same time, the release of seals which would have otherwise died can be considered as a contribution to the population. Most rehabilitated seals are animals under one year of age. They are mainly orphans, weaned seals with complications and seals with a parasiticbronchopneumonia. For the optimal handling of seals and their diseases, centralised operations with quality standards are essential. Rehabilitation provides an instrument to monitor the health of the seal population and its ecosystem. Changes in stranding trends or the appearance of new diseases can be monitored. Moreover, rehabilitation is important to show the general public thestate of the marine environment. In the Netherlands there is significant social support for the rehabilitation of seals. Experience obtained with seal care is of importance in countries where urgent help of threatened seal species is required. Here individual seals are also ambassadors to raise support for the protection of this species in general. Given that the anthropogenic impact on the seals and their environment is extensive in the Wadden Sea, rehabilitation centres can compensate the consequences of this impact on individual seals as well as the population as a whole.

  19. Sealing Performance of Labyrinth Seals against Small Oil Particles in HDDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyatake, Masaaki; Yoshimoto, Shigeka; Dambara, Shinsuke; Nakamura, Taichi; Tanaka, Katsuhiko

    Small oil particles generated from lubricant for ball bearings in HDDs sometimes cause fatal problems such as head crashes. A labyrinth seal is often used to prevent oil particles from scattering onto the disk surfaces. In this paper, the sealing performance of labyrinth seals for small oil particles is investigated numerically and experimentally. Two types of labyrinth seal are considered, one a straight-type and the other a bent-type seal. It was found that the sealing capability of the labyrinth seal is generated by the centrifugal force exerted on oil particles due to disk rotation when they pass through the seal gap.

  20. Project of the borehole neutron generator for the direct determination of oxygen and carbon by activation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanovich, B. Yu; Vovchenko, E. D.; Iliinskiy, A. V.; Isaev, A. A.; Kozlovskiy, K. I.; Nesterovich, A. V.; Senyukov, V. A.; Shikanov, A. E.

    2016-09-01

    The paper deals with application features of borehole neutron generator (BNG) based on the vacuum accelerating tube (AT) with laser-plasma ion source for determination of oxygen isotope 16O and carbon isotope 12C by direct activation. The project of pulsed BNG for realization of an activation method in the conditions of natural presence of productive hydrocarbons is offered. The diode system with radial acceleration, magnetic electron insulation and laser-plasma source of deuterons at the anode in a sealed-off vacuum accelerating tube is applied. The permanent NdFeB magnet with induction about 0.5 T for produce the insulating magnetic field in the diode gap is proposed. In the experiments on the model of BNG with the accelerating voltage source (≈350 kV), performed by the scheme of Arkadiev-Marx generator, the output of (d, d) neutrons was ∼107 pulse-1.

  1. Analysis of borehole-radar reflection logs from selected HC boreholes at the Project Shoal area, Churchill County, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, J.W.; Joesten, P.K.; Pohll, G.M.; Mihevic, Todd

    2001-01-01

    Single-hole borehole-radar reflection logs were collected and interpreted in support of a study to characterize ground-water flow and transport at the Project Shoal Area (PSA) in Churchill County, Nevada. Radar logging was conducted in six boreholes using 60-MHz omni-directional electric-dipole antennas and a 60-MHz magnetic-dipole directional receiving antenna.Radar data from five boreholes were interpreted to identify the location, orientation, estimated length, and spatial continuity of planar reflectors present in the logs. The overall quality of the radar data is marginal and ranges from very poor to good. Twenty-seven reflectors were interpreted from the directional radar reflection logs. Although the range of orientation interpreted for the reflectors is large, a significant number of reflectors strike northeast-southwest and east-west to slightly northwest-southeast. Reflectors are moderate to steeply dipping and reflector length ranged from less than 7 m to more than 133 m.Qualitative scores were assigned to each reflector to provide a sense of the spatial continuity of the reflector and the characteristics of the field data relative to an ideal planar reflector (orientation score). The overall orientation scores are low, which reflects the general data quality, but also indicates that the properties of most reflectors depart from the ideal planar case. The low scores are consistent with reflections from fracture zones that contain numerous, closely spaced, sub-parallel fractures.Interpretation of borehole-radar direct-wave velocity and amplitude logs identified several characteristics of the logged boreholes: (1) low-velocity zones correlate with decreased direct-wave amplitude, indicating the presence of fracture zones; (2) direct-wave amplitude increases with depth in three of the boreholes, suggesting an increase in electrical resistivity with depth resulting from changes in mineral assemblage or from a decrease in the specific conductance of ground

  2. Gas Path Sealing in Turbine Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, L. P.

    1978-01-01

    A survey of gas path seals is presented with particular attention given to sealing clearance effects on engine component efficiency. The effects on compressor pressure ratio and stall margin are pointed out. Various case-rotor relative displacements, which affect gas path seal clearances, are identified. Forces produced by nonuniform sealing clearances and their effect on rotor stability are discussed qualitatively, and recent work on turbine-blade-tip sealing for high temperature is described. The need for active clearance control and for engine structural analysis is discussed. The functions of the internal-flow system and its seals are reviewed.

  3. Comparing plume characteristics inferred from cross-borehole geophysical data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haarder, Eline Bojsen; Binley, Andrew; Zibar, Majken Caroline Looms

    2012-01-01

    Three cross-borehole geophysical methods are used to image water migration in the unsaturated zone after a point injection of water. Mass balance calculations and moment analysis highlight the differences in resolution between the methods. The choice of moisture content threshold value significan......Three cross-borehole geophysical methods are used to image water migration in the unsaturated zone after a point injection of water. Mass balance calculations and moment analysis highlight the differences in resolution between the methods. The choice of moisture content threshold value...... significantly influences results of the moment analysis. We compare results of three cross-borehole geophysical approaches for imaging tracer migration arising from a point injection of water in the unsaturated zone: three-dimensional electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), two-dimensional ground...

  4. Geology and Geophysics of new boreholes at the FEBEX site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carbonell, R.; Perez-Estaun, A. [Inst. Jaume Almera, CSIC (Spain); Missana, T.; Buil, B.; Garralon, A.; Gomez, J. [CIEMAT (Spain); Suso, J.; Carretero, G.; Bueno, J.; Martinez, L. [AITEMIN (Spain); Hernan, P. [ENRESA (Spain)

    2007-06-15

    Geophysical data has been acquired to characterized the fracture network of the surrounding volume within the FEBEX gallery. The geophysic data include new borehole logging such as Natural Gamma and Borehole Ground Penetrating radar and cross hole ultrasonic tomography. The preliminary processing and integration of these different data sets indicates that the GPR record can provide images of the fractures, specially if they are fluid filled. The GPR is specially sensitive to the water content as it directly affects the electrical conductivity and the dielectric permittivity Therefore it is adequate for mapping water conductive fractures of the crystalline rock. The correlation of the anomalies measured by the natural gamma can be correlated with the 'diffractions' in the GPR and the fractures imaged by the borehole televiewer. The cross hole ultrasonic tomography data is under processing and no interpretations have been attempted yet.

  5. Development of a Single-Borehole Radar for Well Logging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng-ou Zhou

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available An impulse-based single-borehole radar prototype has been developed for well logging. The borehole radar is comprised of subsurface sonde and surface equipment. An armored 7-conductor well logging cable is used to connect subsurface sonde and surface equipment which is well compatible with the other well logging instruments. The performance experiments of the prototype have been conducted in a test field. The results show that the prototype system is capable of detecting the target which is 8 meters away from the borehole. This radar prototype has been employed in a real oil field well with a depth of about 1600 meters. Compared with conventional resistivity well logging tools, the prototype system provides comprehensive well-bore formation analysis information.  

  6. Method of monitoring core sampling during borehole drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duckworth, A.; Barnes, D.; Gennings, T.L.

    1991-04-30

    This paper describes a method of monitoring the acquisition of a core sample obtained from a coring tool on a drillstring in a borehole. It comprises: measuring the weight of a portion of the drillstring at a pre-selected borehole depth when the drillstring is off bottom to define a first measurement; drilling to acquire a core sample; measuring the weight of a portion of the drillstring at a pre-selected borehole depth when the drillstring is off-bottom to define a second measurement; determining the difference between the first and second measurements, the difference corresponding to the weight of the core sample; and comparing the measured core sample weight to a calculated weight of a full core sample to determine if the core sample has been acquired.

  7. SEG/Houston `95 - technical program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    This document contains the Expanded Abstracts with Authors` Biographies for the Technical Program of the Society of Exploration Geophysicists International Exposition and 65th Annual Meeting which was held in Houston, Texas, USA October 8-13, 1995. The major topics covered by the presentations include: borehole geophysics, computing techniques, electromagnetics, development and production, gravity and magnetics, near surface, and rock physics. Seismic acquisition, seismic inversion, seismic lithology, seismic migration, seismic modeling and processing are discussed in detail.

  8. Mechanical seal with textured sidewall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khonsari, Michael M.; Xiao, Nian

    2017-02-14

    The present invention discloses a mating ring, a primary ring, and associated mechanical seal having superior heat transfer and wear characteristics. According to an exemplary embodiment of the present invention, one or more dimples are formed onto the cylindrical outer surface of a mating ring sidewall and/or a primary ring sidewall. A stationary mating ring for a mechanical seal assembly is disclosed. Such a mating ring comprises an annular body having a central axis and a sealing face, wherein a plurality of dimples are formed into the outer circumferential surface of the annular body such that the exposed circumferential surface area of the annular body is increased. The texture added to the sidewall of the mating ring yields superior heat transfer and wear characteristics.

  9. Cryogenic Flange and Seal Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    The assembly of flanges, seals, and pipes are used to carry cryogenic fluid from a storage tank to the vehicle at launch sites. However, after a certain amount of cycles these raised face flanges with glass-filled Teflon gaskets have been found to have torque relaxation and are as a result susceptible to cryogenic fluid leakage if not re-torqued. The intent of this project is to identify alternate combinations of flanges and seals which may improve thermal cycle performance and decrease re-torque requirements. The general approach is to design a test fixture to evaluate leak characteristics between spiral and concentric serrations and to test alternate flange and seal combinations. Due to insufficient time, it was not possible to evaluate these different types of combinations for the combination that improved thermal cycle performance the most. However, the necessary drawings for the test fixture were designed and assembled along with the collection of the necessary parts.

  10. Data Communication PC/NaI-borehole probe (Hardware & Software)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Peter Buch

    Development of new hard- & software to a NaI borehole probe on a PC. Save data from the probe each 10'th sec, handle the data from the probe and make calculations every 10'th sec and show the results on the monitor.......Development of new hard- & software to a NaI borehole probe on a PC. Save data from the probe each 10'th sec, handle the data from the probe and make calculations every 10'th sec and show the results on the monitor....

  11. Reclamation report, Basalt Waste Isolation Project, boreholes 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, C.A.; Rickard, W.H. Jr.; Cadoret, N.A.

    1991-01-01

    The restoration of areas disturbed activities of the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) has been undertaken by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in fulfillment of obligations and commitments made under the National Environmental Policy Act and the Nuclear Waste Policy Act. This restoration program comprises three separate projects: borehole reclamation, Near Surface Test Facility reclamation, and Exploratory Shaft Facility reclamation. Detailed descriptions of these reclamation projects may be found in a number of previous reports. This report describes the second phase of the reclamation program for the BWIP boreholes and analyzes its success relative to the reclamation objective. 6 refs., 14 figs., 13 tabs.

  12. Stabilizing geometry for hydrodynamic rotary seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietle, Lannie L.; Schroeder, John E.

    2010-08-10

    A hydrodynamic sealing assembly including a first component having first and second walls and a peripheral wall defining a seal groove, a second component having a rotatable surface relative to said first component, and a hydrodynamic seal comprising a seal body of generally ring-shaped configuration having a circumference. The seal body includes hydrodynamic and static sealing lips each having a cross-sectional area that substantially vary in time with each other about the circumference. In an uninstalled condition, the seal body has a length defined between first and second seal body ends which varies in time with the hydrodynamic sealing lip cross-sectional area. The first and second ends generally face the first and second walls, respectively. In the uninstalled condition, the first end is angulated relative to the first wall and the second end is angulated relative to the second wall. The seal body has a twist-limiting surface adjacent the static sealing lip. In the uninstalled condition, the twist-limiting surface is angulated relative to the peripheral wall and varies along the circumference. A seal body discontinuity and a first component discontinuity mate to prevent rotation of the seal body relative to the first component.

  13. Development and Test of a 1,000 Level 3C Fiber Optic Borehole Seismic Receiver Array Applied to Carbon Sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulsson, Bjorn N.P. [Paulsson, Inc., Van Nuys, CA (United States)

    2015-02-28

    To address the critical site characterization and monitoring needs for CCS programs, US Department of Energy (DOE) awarded Paulsson, Inc. in 2010 a contract to design, build and test a fiber optic based ultra-large bandwidth clamped borehole seismic vector array capable of deploying up to one thousand 3C sensor pods suitable for deployment into high temperature and high pressure boreholes. Paulsson, Inc. has completed a design or a unique borehole seismic system consisting of a novel drill pipe based deployment system that includes a hydraulic clamping mechanism for the sensor pods, a new sensor pod design and most important – a unique fiber optic seismic vector sensor with technical specifications and capabilities that far exceed the state of the art seismic sensor technologies. These novel technologies were all applied to the new borehole seismic system. In combination these technologies will allow for the deployment of up to 1,000 3C sensor pods in vertical, deviated or horizontal wells. Laboratory tests of the fiber optic seismic vector sensors developed during this project have shown that the new borehole seismic sensor technology is capable of generating outstanding high vector fidelity data with extremely large bandwidth: 0.01 – 6,000 Hz. Field tests have shown that the system can record events at magnitudes much smaller than M-2.3 at frequencies up to 2,000 Hz. The sensors have also proved to be about 100 times more sensitive than the regular coil geophones that are used in borehole seismic systems today. The fiber optic seismic sensors have furthermore been qualified to operate at temperatures over 300°C (572°F). The fibers used for the seismic sensors in the system are used to record Distributed Temperature Sensor (DTS) data allowing additional value added data to be recorded simultaneously with the seismic vector sensor data.

  14. Legacy HMSRP Hawaiian Monk Seals Observers

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set documents observers that have collected monk seal data as part of the ongoing monk seal population assessment efforts by PSD personnel and cooperating...

  15. HMSRP Hawaiian Monk Seal Handling Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains records for all handling and measurement of Hawaiian monk seals since 1981. Live seals are handled and measured during a variety of events...

  16. HMSRP Hawaiian Monk Seal Entanglement data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data set contains records of all entanglements of Hawaiian monk seals in marine debris. The data set comprises records of seals entangled by derelict fishing...

  17. Film riding seals for rotary machines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bidkar, Rahul Anil; Sarawate, Neelesh Nandkumar; Wolfe, Christopher Edward; Ruggiero, Eric John; Raj Mohan, Vivek Raja

    2017-03-07

    A seal assembly for a rotary machine is provided. The seal assembly includes multiple sealing device segments disposed circumferentially intermediate to a stationary housing and a rotor. Each of the segments includes a shoe plate with a forward-shoe section and an aft-shoe section having one or more labyrinth teeth therebetween facing the rotor. The sealing device includes a stator interface element having a groove or slot for allowing disposal of a spline seal for preventing segment leakages. The sealing device segment also includes multiple bellow springs or flexures connected to the shoe plate and to the stator interface element. Further, the sealing device segments include a secondary seal integrated with the stator interface element at one end and positioned about the multiple bellow springs or flexures and the shoe plate at the other end.

  18. Legacy HMSRP Hawaiian Monk Seal Ultrasound Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Ultrasounds measuring the condition of juvenile seals at Laysan Island during 2009-2010, collected when seals were handled as part of the De-Worming Project

  19. The stress peak at the borehole of point-fitted IGU with undercut anchors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike Tibolt

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The highest transparency in glass facades is obtained with point fitted glass units. Point fitted insulating glass units minimize thermal bridging and lead to glass facades with better energy efficiency. Though, insufficient knowledge is present to offer a design method for point fittings in insulating glass. Therefore research has been carried out to extend the existing SLG-design-method (Linear superposition of local and global stress components of Beyer for point fitted single and laminated glass to insulation glass units. This paper presents the first results of this research campaign. Load bearing tests on point fittings in single glazing have been conducted. A finite element model of the point fitting is calibrated by strain comparison. A test campaign for the deviation of a material law for silicone, used as secondary sealant in the edge seal system, is presented. The verified FE-model is implemented in a selected insulation glass unit, and the influence of the edge distance of the point fitting, as well as the edge bond stiffness and geometry on the stress peak at the borehole is investigated. In addition, the size of the so called ‘local area’ is adjusted for insulation glass units.

  20. Geophysical borehole logging of the boreholes KR23 extension, KR29 and KR29b at Olkiluoto 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahti, M. [Suomen Malmi Oy, Espoo (Finland); Heikkinen, E. [JP-Fintact Oy, Vantaa (Finland)

    2005-04-15

    Suomen Malmi Oy conducted geophysical borehole logging of the boreholes KR23 extension, KR25b, KR29 and KR29b at the Olkiluoto site in Eurajoki during October 2004. The survey is a part of Posiva Oy's detailed investigation program for the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel. The assignment included the field work and processing of the acoustic data. The report describes the field operation, equipment as well as processing procedures and shows the obtained results and their quality in the appendices. The raw and processed data are delivered digitally in WellCAD and Excel format. (orig.)

  1. Multi-layer seal for electrochemical devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Yeong-Shyung [Richland, WA; Meinhardt, Kerry D [Kennewick, WA; Stevenson, Jeffry W [Richland, WA

    2010-09-14

    Multi-layer seals are provided that find advantageous use for reducing leakage of gases between adjacent components of electrochemical devices. Multi-layer seals of the invention include a gasket body defining first and second opposing surfaces and a compliant interlayer positioned adjacent each of the first and second surfaces. Also provided are methods for making and using the multi-layer seals, and electrochemical devices including said seals.

  2. Multi-layer seal for electrochemical devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Yeong-Shyung [Richland, WA; Meinhardt, Kerry D [Kennewick, WA; Stevenson, Jeffry W [Richland, WA

    2010-11-16

    Multi-layer seals are provided that find advantageous use for reducing leakage of gases between adjacent components of electrochemical devices. Multi-layer seals of the invention include a gasket body defining first and second opposing surfaces and a compliant interlayer positioned adjacent each of the first and second surfaces. Also provided are methods for making and using the multi-layer seals, and electrochemical devices including said seals.

  3. Predicting Leakage in Labyrinth Seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, G. L.; Rhode, D. L.; Cogan, K. C.; Chi, D.; Demko, J.

    1985-01-01

    Analytical and empirical methods evaluated. 264-page report presents comprehensive information on leakage in labyrinth seals. Summarizes previous analyses of leakage, reviews leakage tests conducted by authors and evaluates various analytical and experimental methods of determining leakage and discusses leakage prediction techniques.

  4. Pre-sealing risk analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ensminger, D.A.; Hough, M.E.; Oston, S.G.

    1980-01-07

    This report describes studies of accidents involving high-level radioactive waste before sealing the waste into a repository. The report summarizes work done in this area during Fiscal Year 1978 and supplements previous work. Models of accident probability, severity, and consequences are refined and extended.

  5. Borehole Heat Exchanger Systems: Hydraulic Conductivity and Frost-Resistance of Backfill Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anbergen, Hauke; Sass, Ingo

    2016-04-01

    Ground source heat pump (GSHP) systems are economic solutions for both, domestic heating energy supply, as well as underground thermal energy storage (UTES). Over the past decades the technology developed to complex, advanced and highly efficient systems. For an efficient operation of the most common type of UTES, borehole heat exchanger (BHE) systems, it is necessary to design the system for a wide range of carrier fluid temperatures. During heat extraction, a cooled carrier fluid is heated up by geothermal energy. This collected thermal energy is energetically used by the heat pump. Thereby the carrier fluid temperature must have a lower temperature than the surrounding underground in order to collect heat energy. The steeper the thermal gradient, the more energy is transferred to the carrier fluid. The heat injection case works vice versa. For fast and sufficient heat extraction, even over long periods of heating (winter), it might become necessary to run the BHE with fluid temperatures below 0°C. As the heat pump runs periodically, a cyclic freezing of the pore water and corresponding ice-lens growth in the nearfield of the BHE pipes becomes possible. These so called freeze-thaw-cycles (FTC) are a critical state for the backfill material, as the sealing effect eventually decreases. From a hydrogeological point of view the vertical sealing of the BHE needs to be secured at any time (e.g. VDI 4640-2, Draft 2015). The vertical hydraulic conductivity of the BHE is influenced not only by the permeability of the grouting material itself, but by the contact area between BHE pipes and grout. In order to assess the sealing capacity of grouting materials a laboratory testing procedure was developed that measures the vertical hydraulic conductivity of the system BHE pipe and grout. The key features of the procedure are: • assessment of the systeḿs hydraulic conductivity • assessment of the systeḿs hydraulic conductivity after simulation of freeze-thaw-cycle

  6. Aerodynamic seal assemblies for turbo-machinery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bidkar, Rahul Anil; Wolfe, Christopher; Fang, Biao

    2015-09-29

    The present application provides an aerodynamic seal assembly for use with a turbo-machine. The aerodynamic seal assembly may include a number of springs, a shoe connected to the springs, and a secondary seal positioned about the springs and the shoe.

  7. Piston rod seal for a Stirling engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Wilbur

    1984-01-01

    In a piston rod seal for a Stirling engine, a hydrostatic bearing and differential pressure regulating valve are utilized to provide for a low pressure differential across a rubbing seal between the hydrogen and oil so as to reduce wear on the seal.

  8. Ergonomics and safety of manual bag sealing.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, M.D. de; Bosch, T.; Eikhout, S.M.; Vink, P.

    2005-01-01

    A variety of seals is used to close bags. Each seal has advantages and disadvantages. For shop assistants sealing bags could be a repetitive physically demanding action. Opening and closing the bags again can cause some discomfort or annoyance for consumers. Besides, it is an activity which can enda

  9. Annular Pressure Seals and Hydrostatic Bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-01

    affecting the rotordynamics of liquid turbopumps, in particular those handling large density fluids. Highlights on the bulk-flow analysis of annular seals... rotordynamic stability. Hydrostatic bearings rely on external fluid pressurization to generate load support and large centering stiffnesses, even in...SEALS IN PUMP APPLICATIONS Seal rotordynamic characteristic have a primary influence on the stability response of high-performance turbomachinery [1

  10. Application of linear inverse theory to borehole gravity data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkhard, N.R.

    1991-09-01

    Traditional borehole gravity interpretations are based upon an earth model which assumes horizontal, laterally infinite, uniformly thick, and constant density layers. I apply discrete stabilized linear inverse theory to determine the density distribution directly from borehole gravity observations that have been corrected for drift, tide, and terrain. The stabilization is the result of including a priori data about the free-air gradient and the density structure in the inversion process. The discrete generalized linear inverse approach enables one to solve for a density distribution using all of the borehole gravity data. Moreover, the data need not be free-air corrected. An important feature of the approach is that density estimates are not required to be density averages between adjacent borehole gravity observations as in the traditional method. This approach further permits the explicit incorporation of independent density information from gamma-gamma logging tools or laboratory core measurements. Finally, explicit linear constraints upon the density and/or free-air gradient can also be handled. The non-uniqueness of the density structure determined by the inversion process is represented in a resolution matrix. 12 refs., 11 figs.

  11. Seismic signatures of partial saturation on acoustic borehole modes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chao, G.E.; Smeulders, D.M.J.; Van Dongen, M.E.H.

    2007-01-01

    We present an exact theory of attenuation and dispersion of borehole Stoneley waves propagating along porous rocks containing spherical gas bubbles by using the Biot theory. An effective frequency-dependent fluid bulk modulus is introduced to describe the dynamic (oscillatory) behavior of the gas bu

  12. Deep Borehole Disposal Remediation Costs for Off-Normal Outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finger, John T. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Cochran, John R. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hardin, Ernest [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-08-17

    This memo describes rough-order-of-magnitude (ROM) cost estimates for a set of off-normal (accident) scenarios, as defined for two waste package emplacement method options for deep borehole disposal: drill-string and wireline. It summarizes the different scenarios and the assumptions made for each, with respect to fishing, decontamination, remediation, etc.

  13. Shock-Induced Borehole Waves and Fracture Effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fan, H.; Smeulders, D.M.

    2011-01-01

    We perform wave experiments using a vertical shock tube setup. Shock waves are generated by the rupture of a thin membrane. In the test section, the incident pressure waves generate borehole-guided waves along water-saturated samples. The tube is equipped with side wall gages and a mobile pressure p

  14. Development of a mobile borehole investigation software using augmented reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, J.; Lee, S.; Oh, M.; Yun, D. E.; Kim, S.; Park, H. D.

    2015-12-01

    Augmented reality (AR) is one of the most developing technologies in smartphone and IT areas. While various applications have been developed using the AR, there are a few geological applications which adopt its advantages. In this study, a smartphone application to manage boreholes using AR has been developed. The application is consisted of three major modules, an AR module, a map module and a data management module. The AR module calculates the orientation of the device and displays nearby boreholes distributed in three dimensions using the orientation. This module shows the boreholes in a transparent layer on a live camera screen so the user can find and understand the overall characteristics of the underground geology. The map module displays the boreholes on a 2D map to show their distribution and the location of the user. The database module uses SQLite library which has proper characteristics for mobile platforms, and Binary XML is adopted to enable containing additional customized data. The application is able to provide underground information in an intuitive and refined forms and to decrease time and general equipment required for geological field investigations.

  15. Imaging for Borehole Wall by a Cylindrical Linear Phased Array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Bi-Xing; SHI Fang-Fang; WU Xian-Mei; GONG Jun-Jie; ZHANG Cheng-Guang

    2010-01-01

    @@ A new ultrasonic cylindrical linear phased array (CLPA) transducer is designed and fabricated for the borehole wall imaging in petroleum logging based on the previous theoretical researches.First,the CLPA transducer,which is made up of numbers of the piezoelectric elements distributed on the surface of a cylinder uniformly,is designed and fabricated.

  16. Thermal modeling of bore fields with arbitrarily oriented boreholes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzarotto, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    The accurate prediction of the thermal behavior of bore fields for shallow geothermal applications is necessary to carry out a proper design of such systems. A classical methodology to perform this analysis is the so-called g-function method. Most commercial tools implementing this methodology are designed to handle only bore fields configurations with vertical boreholes. This is a limitation since this condition might not apply in a real installation. In a recent development by the author, a semi-analytical method to determine g-function for bore fields with arbitrarily oriented boreholes was introduced. The strategy utilized is based on the idea introduced by Cimmino of representing boreholes as stacked finite line sources. The temperature along these finite lines is calculated by applying the superposition of the effects of each linear heat source in the field. This modeling technique allows to approximate uneven heat distribution along the boreholes which is a key feature for the calculation of g-functions according to Eskilson's boundary conditions. The method has been tested for a few simple configurations and showed results that are similar compare to previous results computed numerically by Eskilson. The method has been then successfully applied to the g-function calculation of an existing large scale highly asymmetrical bore field.

  17. X-ray inspection for boreholes in intact trees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, R.M.C.; Hemming, J.

    2010-01-01

    X-ray systems are commonly used for luggage inspection. The size of these systems is sufficient for inspection of intact trees. The first objective of this study is to determine whether such an X-ray system is able to visualise boreholes in intact trees. The present study is partly based on human in

  18. Characteristics of a magnetic fluid seal and its motion in an axial variable seal gap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAN Ji-guo; YANG Zhi-yi

    2008-01-01

    With suitable assumptions a hydrodynamic model for the magnetic fluid motion in an axial variable gap seal was constructed, and the solution to the equations of the model was deduced. The characteristics of a magnetic fluid seal and its motion,including the speed and pressure distribution, and the seal capacity of a magnetic fluid rotating seal were systematically described.The factors affecting seal capacity and ways to improve seal capacity based on the hydrodynamic model are discussed. The basic condition for dynamic seal availability is presented. The rotating speed and radius of the shafts should be decreased. The work can provide proof of a seal design or suggest ways to improve the seal capacity of magnetic fluid seals.

  19. Geology of the Waste Treatment Plant Seismic Boreholes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnett, D. Brent; Fecht, Karl R.; Reidel, Stephen P.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Lanigan, David C.; Rust, Colleen F.

    2007-05-11

    In 2006, the U.S. Department of Energy initiated the Seismic Boreholes Project (SBP) to emplace boreholes at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) site in order to obtain direct shear wave velocity (Vs) measurements and other physical property measurements in Columbia River basalt and interbedded sediments of the Ellensburg Formation. The goal was to reduce the uncertainty in the response spectra and seismic design basis, and potentially recover design margin for the WTP. The characterization effort within the deep boreholes included 1) downhole measurements of the velocity properties of the suprabasalt, basalt, and sedimentary interbed sequences, 2) downhole measurements of the density of the subsurface basalt and sediments, and 3) geologic studies to confirm the geometry of the contact between the various basalt and interbedded sediments through examination of retrieved core from the core hole and data collected through geophysical logging of each borehole. This report describes the results of the geologic studies from three mud-rotary boreholes and one cored borehole at the WTP. All four boreholes penetrated the entire Saddle Mountains Basalt and the upper part of the Wanapum Basalt where thick sedimentary interbeds occur between the lava flows. The basalt flows penetrated in Saddle Mountains Basalt included the Umatilla Member, Esquatzel Member, Pomona Member, and the Elephant Mountain Member. The underlying Priest Rapids Member of the Wanapum Basalt also was penetrated. The Ellensburg Formation sediments consist of the Mabton Interbed, the Cold Creek Interbed, the Selah Interbed, and the Rattlesnake Ridge Interbed; the Byron Interbed occurs between two flows of the Priest Rapids Member. The Mabton Interbed marks the contact between the Wanapum and Saddle Mountains Basalts. The thicknesses of the basalts and interbedded sediments were within expected limits. However, a small reverse fault was found in the Pomona Member flow top. This fault has three periods of

  20. Determination of correction factors for borehole natural gamma-ray measurements by Monte Carlo simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maucec, M.; Hendriks, Peter; Limburg, J.; de Meijer, R. J.

    2009-01-01

    The analysis of natural gamma-ray spectra measured in boreholes has to take into account borehole parameters such as the presence of casings and borehole diameter. For large, high-efficiency gamma-ray detectors, such as BGO-based systems, which employ full-spectrum data analysis, corresponding corre

  1. Methods and apparatus for removal and control of material in laser drilling of a borehole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinzler, Charles C.; Zediker, Mark S.; Faircloth, Brian O.; Moxley, Joel F.

    2016-12-06

    The removal of material from the path of a high power laser beam during down hole laser operations including drilling of a borehole and removal of displaced laser effected borehole material from the borehole during laser operations. In particular, paths, dynamics and parameters of fluid flows for use in conjunction with a laser bottom hole assembly.

  2. Optimization of Deep Borehole Systems for HLW Disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Driscoll, Michael [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Baglietto, Emilio [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Buongiorno, Jacopo [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Lester, Richard [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Brady, Patrick [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Arnold, B. W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-09

    This is the final report on a project to update and improve the conceptual design of deep boreholes for high level nuclear waste disposal. The effort was concentrated on application to intact US legacy LWR fuel assemblies, but conducted in a way in which straightforward extension to other waste forms, host rock types and countries was preserved. The reference fuel design version consists of a vertical borehole drilled into granitic bedrock, with the uppermost kilometer serving as a caprock zone containing a diverse and redundant series of plugs. There follows a one to two kilometer waste canister emplacement zone having a hole diameter of approximately 40-50 cm. Individual holes are spaced 200-300 m apart to form a repository field. The choice of verticality and the use of a graphite based mud as filler between the waste canisters and the borehole wall liner was strongly influenced by the expectation that retrievability would continue to be emphasized in US and worldwide repository regulatory criteria. An advanced version was scoped out using zinc alloy cast in place to fill void space inside a disposal canister and its encapsulated fuel assembly. This excludes water and greatly improves both crush resistance and thermal conductivity. However the simpler option of using a sand fill was found adequate and is recommended for near-term use. Thermal-hydraulic modeling of the low permeability and porosity host rock and its small (≤ 1%) saline water content showed that vertical convection induced by the waste’s decay heat should not transport nuclides from the emplacement zone up to the biosphere atop the caprock. First order economic analysis indicated that borehole repositories should be cost-competitive with shallower mined repositories. It is concluded that proceeding with plans to drill a demonstration borehole to confirm expectations, and to carry out priority experiments, such as retention and replenishment of in-hole water is in order.

  3. Study of borehole probing methods to improve the ground characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeimipour, Ali

    Collecting geological information allows for optimizing ground control measures in underground structures. This includes understanding of the joints and discontinuities and rock strength to develop rock mass classifications. An ideal approach to collect such information is through correlating the drilling data from the roofbolters to assess rock strength and void location and properties. The current instrumented roofbolters are capable of providing some information on these properties but not fully developed for accurate ground characterization. To enhance existing systems additional instrumentation and testing was conducted in laboratory and field conditions. However, to define the geology along the boreholes, the use of probing was deemed to be most efficient approach for locating joints and structures in the ground and evaluation of rock strength. Therefore, this research focuses on selection and evaluation of proper borehole probes that can offer a reliable assessment of rock mass structure and rock strength. In particular, attention was paid to borehole televiewer to characterize rock mass structures and joints and development of mechanical rock scratcher for determination of rock strength. Rock bolt boreholes are commonly drilled in the ribs and the roof of underground environments. They are often small (about 1.5 inches) and short (mostly 2-3 meter). Most of them are oriented upward and thus, mostly dry or perhaps wet but not filled with water. No suitable system is available for probing in such conditions to identify the voids/joints and specifically to measure rock strength for evaluation of rock mass and related optimization of ground support design. A preliminary scan of available borehole probes proved that the best options for evaluation of rock structure is through analysis of borehole images, captured by optical televiewers. Laboratory and field trials with showed that these systems can be used to facilitate measurement of the location, frequency and

  4. Detection of buried pipes by polarimetric borehole radar; Polarimetric borehole radar ni yoru maisetsukan no kenshutsu jikken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, M.; Niitsuma, H. [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Nakauchi, T. [Osaka Gas Co. Ltd., Osaka (Japan)

    1997-05-27

    If the borehole radar is utilized for detection of buried pipes, the underground radar measurement becomes possible even in the situation where the mesurement on the earth surface is difficult, for example, such a place as under the road where there is much traffic. However, since buried pipes are horizontally installed and the existing borehole radar can send/receive only vertical polarization, the measurement conducted comes to be poor in efficiency from a viewpoint of the polarization utilization. Therefore, by introducing the polarimetric borehole radar to the detection of buried pipes, a basic experiment was conducted for the effective detection of horizontal buried pipes. Proposing the use of a slot antenna which can send/receive horizontal polarization in borehole in addition to a dipole antenna which sends/receives vertical polarization, developed was a step frequency type continuous wave radar of a network analyzer basis. As a result of the experiment, it was confirmed that reflection from buried pipes is largely dependent on polarization. Especially, it was found that in the slot dipole cross polarization mesurement, reflection from buried pipes can be emphasized. 4 refs., 5 figs.

  5. Symmetries in Images on Ancient Seals

    CERN Document Server

    Sparavigna, Amelia

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the presence of symmetries in images engraved on ancient seals, in particular on stamp seals. Mainly used to secure the containers from tampering and for owner's identification, these objects appeared during the 5th millennium BC in Mesopotamia. Usually the seals were engraved with simple images, suitable to communicate an immediate information. Rotational symmetries are already displayed by the most ancient stamp seals, whose images reach a quasi-perfect symmetry in their small circular or ovoid spaces. Bilateral symmetries are quite common in Egyptian scarab seals.

  6. Non-contacting fluid ring seal systems for railcar axle bearing systems: Quarterly progress report No. 4, March 16-June 15, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-06-01

    The main objectives of this DOE contract is the technical development of a practical, cost effective Fluid Ring seal system capable of: Drastically reducing locomotive drawbar traction power requirements by lowering seal friction losses prevalent in present railcar axle bearing systems; increasing reliability and safety of railroad cars by minimizing bearing lubricant leakage and minimizing bearing ''hot boxes''; and improving the productivity of the railway transportation systems by reducing rolling stock ''outages'' due to long seal life. Listed in this report are the seal test data.

  7. Data Qualification Report: Flow Meter Survey Data From Borehole UE-25c#3 For Use On The Yucca Mountain Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Wilson

    2001-02-28

    This Data Qualification Report uses corroborating data methods according to Attachment 2 of AP-SIII.2Q, Rev. 00, ICN 3, ''Qualification of Unqualified Data and the Documentation of Rationale for Accepted Data'', to qualify flowing interval data from a borehole spinner log. This report was prepared in accordance with Data Qualification Plan DQP-NBS-GS-000005, Rev. 00. These data were collected under the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) Quality Assurance Requirements and Description (QARD) document but are unqualified because unqualified software was used in data reduction. The unqualified flow log was run in Borehole UE-25c No.3 in 1995. Corroborative evidence is available from independent flow logs run in the same borehole in 1984 by an earlier investigator. This corroborative support is unusually strong because it represents a second measurement of the same data. The corroborating data agree well with the data being qualified and support the adequacy of the data. The unqualified software, the TERRASTATION code by Terrasciences Inc., is widely used and accepted by the technical community for non-project applications. The widespread acceptance of the software further supports the adequacy of the data. In view of the evidence provided by the corroborating data and general acceptance of the software, the Data Qualification Team has concluded that the flowing interval data considered in this report are adequate for generalized use. These data are qualified for use by the YMP and can be appropriately used in a wide variety of applications, so long as consideration is given to accuracy, precision, and representativeness of the data for an intended use in a technical product.

  8. Rotary seal with improved film distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietle, Lannie Laroy; Schroeder, John Erick

    2015-09-01

    The present invention is a generally circular rotary seal that establishes sealing between relatively rotatable machine components for lubricant retention and environmental exclusion, and incorporates seal geometry that interacts with the lubricant during relative rotation to distribute a lubricant film within the dynamic sealing interface. The features of a variable inlet size, a variable dynamic lip flank slope, and a reduction in the magnitude and circumferentially oriented portion of the lubricant side interfacial contact pressure zone at the narrowest part of the lip, individually or in combination thereof, serve to maximize interfacial lubrication in severe operating conditions, and also serve to minimize lubricant shear area, seal torque, seal volume, and wear, while ensuring retrofitability into the seal grooves of existing equipment.

  9. Rotary seal with improved film distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietle, Lannie Laroy; Schroeder, John Erick

    2013-10-08

    The present invention is a generally circular rotary seal that establishes sealing between relatively rotatable machine components for lubricant retention and environmental exclusion, and incorporates seal geometry that interacts with the lubricant during relative rotation to distribute a lubricant film within the dynamic sealing interface. The features of a variable inlet size, a variable dynamic lip flank slope, and a reduction in the magnitude and circumferentially oriented portion of the lubricant side interfacial contact pressure zone at the narrowest part of the lip, individually or in combination thereof, serve to maximize interfacial lubrication in severe operating conditions, and also serve to minimize lubricant shear area, seal torque, seal volume, and wear, while ensuring retrofitability into the seal grooves of existing equipment.

  10. The origin of fluids and gases in the DFDP-2B borehole, New Zealand; insight from on-line mud gas monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathewson, Loren; Wiersberg, Thomas; Niedermann, Samuel; Erzinger, Joerg; Menzies, Catriona; Toy, Virginia; Zimmer, Martin

    2016-04-01

    The Deep Fault Drilling Project (DFDP) aims to improve our understanding of the Alpine Fault Zone, a tectonically active fault system in New Zealand known to rupture in large events, by deep scientific drilling. The borehole DFDP-2B approached the Alpine Fault at depth, reaching a final depth of 892 m. During drilling, gas was extracted from returning drilling mud and changes in the gas composition were tracked by mass spectrometry (N2, O2, Ar, CO2, CH4, He, and H2), gas chromatography (CH4, C2H6, C3H8, i/n-C4H10), and alpha-spectrometry for 222Rn. The rapid formation of mud wall cake seals the borehole from fluid inflow along the borehole; hence formation-derived gases enter mostly at the drill bit during drilling. Gas was sampled for offline analyses on noble gas and stable isotopes to complement the dataset. Apart from an atmospheric input, the gases in drilling mud derive from the pore space of rock, crushed at the drill bit, and from permeable layers intersected by the borehole. OLGA thus may provide information on fluid origins, flow rates and paths, fluid-rock interactions along these paths, and the permeability structure of the faulted rock mass. The principle formation-derived gases found in drilling mud during drilling of DFDP-2 were CO2 (≤1.7 vol.-%), H2 (50 at 236 m). For a more comprehensive overview, compilation of the OLGA dataset with cuttings data and data from geophysical downhole logging is ongoing.

  11. Seal dynamics on the Swedish west coast: Scenarios of competition as Baltic grey seal intrude on harbour seal territory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Carl Johan

    2012-07-01

    The Kattegat-Skagerrak region on the Swedish west coast is home to an abundant harbour seal population (Phoca vitulina) and a small scattered grey seal population (Halichoerus grypus). In addition, grey seal from the growing population in the Baltic Sea frequently migrate into the Kattegat-Skagerrak. Harbour seals on the west coast of Sweden show relatively high population growth (approximately 9%) compared to the Baltic grey seal in ice-free habitats (approximately 6%), which, in theory, makes harbour seal the stronger competitor of the two in this region. However, incidents of disease in harbour seals that lower population growth are becoming more frequent. These epidemics are primarily caused by the Phocine Distemper Virus (PDV), and may reduce population size with up to 70%. This study models the average development under potential scenarios of competing harbour- and Baltic grey seal populations using Leslie matrices and the Lotka-Volterra model of inter-specific competition. The model is parameterised with previously published data, and resource overlap is incorporated through density dependent pup survival. Using numerical methods short- and long-term abundances are simulated under weak, moderate and strong competition and for different frequencies of PDV epidemics. Results show that the harbour seals are resilient to competition while exerting a negative effect on grey seal abundance under moderate to strong competition. Hence Baltic grey seal benefit from weaker levels of competition. Under moderate and strong competition grey seal abundance is a direct function of the PDV frequency as this reduces the competitive strength of harbour seals. Theoretically this means that higher frequencies of PDV or other pathogens epidemics could facilitate an expansion of Baltic grey seal into Kattegat-Skagerrak. Independent of interaction strength and frequency of epidemics the projected changes to abundances are slow (50-100 years), and even in exceedingly stable

  12. Mechanical Deformation of Ship Stern-Shaft Mechanical Face Seals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱汉华; 刘正林; 温诗铸; 严新平

    2004-01-01

    In ship propeller shaft systems, the shaft seal is a mechanical face seal, which includes a stationary metal seal ring and a rotating ring.The seal faces are deformed with different loads.The deformation of the seal faces affects the performance of mechanical face seals, which leads to water leakage, so the seal face deformation must be analyzed.A mechanics model with deformation equations was developed to describe ship stern-shaft seals.An example was given to verify the deformation equations.The solution of the deformation equations gives a theoretical basis for the analysis of seal leakage and improvements of seal structures.

  13. Measuring and interpretation of three-component borehole magnetic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virgil, C.; Ehmann, S.; Hördt, A.; Leven, M.; Steveling, E.

    2012-04-01

    Three-component borehole magnetics provides important additional information compared with total field or horizontal and vertical measurements. The "Göttinger Bohrloch Magnetometer" (GBM) is capable of recording the vector of the magnetic field along with the orientation of the tool using three fluxgate magnetometers and fibre-optic gyros. The GBM was successfully applied in the Outokumpu Deep Drill Hole (OKU R2500), Finland in September 2008 and in the Louisville Seamount Trail (IODP Expedition 330) from December 2010 until February 2011, and in several shallower boreholes. With the declination of the magnetic field, the GBM provides additional information compared to conventional tools, which reduces the ambiguity for structural interpretation. The position of ferromagnetic objects in the vicinity of the borehole can be computed with higher accuracy. In the case of drilled-through structures, three-component borehole magnetics allow the computation of the vector of magnetization. Using supplementary susceptibility data, the natural remanent magnetization (NRM) vector can be derived, which yields information about the apparent polar wander curve and/or about the structural evolution of the rock units. The NRM vector can further be used to reorient core samples in regions of strong magnetization. The most important aspect in three-component borehole magnetics is the knowledge of the orientation of the probe along the drillhole. With the GBM we use three fibre-optic gyros (FOG), which are aligned orthogonal to each other. These instruments record the turning rate about the three main axes of the probe. The FOGs benefit from a high resolution (FOG triplet, temperature dependent drift of the FOGs, misalignment of the fluxgate and FOG triplet in respect with each other, as well as start and end position of the probe with respect to Earth's reference frame. Using the high precision gyro data, we can compute the vector of the magnetic anomaly with respect to the Earth

  14. Hermetic seal for a shaft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, F. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    An hermetic seal for a linear rod having a portion thereof projected axially through a port defined in a wall for a pressure chamber and supported thereby for omni-directional motion is described. The seal is characterized by a resilient, impervious, cylindrical body having a first section concentrically related to the shaft and integrally affixed thereto comprising a linear ordered array of annular flutes. A second section integrally is affixed to the wall of the chamber and concentrically related to the port comprising a second linear ordered array of annular flutes. A third section is interposed between the first and second sections and integrally affixed in coaxial alignment therewith comprising an annular ordered array of linear flutes concentrically related to the shaft, whereby axial, angular, and pivotal motion of the rod is accommodated.

  15. Borehole cylindrical noise during hole-surface and hole-hole resistivity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osiensky, James L.; Nimmer, Robin; Binley, Andrew M.

    2004-04-01

    Drilled boreholes generally are the only feasible means to access the subsurface for the emplacement of downhole electrodes for most hole-hole and hole-surface resistivity experiments. However, the very existence of the borehole itself creates the potential for significant noise due to the inevitable conductivity contrast that develops between the borehole walls and the formation. Borehole cylindrical noise develops whenever a current source is placed in a drilled borehole. Borehole geometries may range from nearly perfect cylinders to highly, irregular, rugose holes in consolidated rock, to relatively minor, collapsed, disturbed zones in caving sediments. Boreholes in non-caving formations generally are filled with artificial, conductive materials to afford crucial, electrical continuity between downhole electrodes and the borehole walls. Filled boreholes form cylindrically shaped heterogeneities that create significant noise due to preferential current flow up and down the conductive columns. Selected conditions are simulated with a finite difference model to illustrate the significance of borehole cylindrical noise on hole-hole and hole-surface mise-à-la-masse electrical potentials near a current electrode. Mise-à-la-masse electrical potentials measured during a field tracer experiment also are presented. These measurements are used to illustrate significant errors may develop in the interpretation of apparent resistivity estimates out to a distance of several meters from the current source if borehole cylindrical noise is not recognized and accounted for in the analysis of electrical potential data.

  16. Temporal and spatial changes of radon concentration in borehole water (Little Carpathians Mts., Slovakia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Smetanová

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The 222Rn activity concentration in ground water from four boreholes was investigated from January 2006 to June 2008. The boreholes are situated in the region of the Astronomical and Geophysical Observatory in Modra-Piesok (Little Carpathians Mts., 40 km NW from Bratislava, Slovakia. Three boreholes have been drilled in Lower Triassic quartzite. Another borehole has been drilled in granodiorite of the Modra massif in which the quartzite is folded. Temporal and spatial differences in radon concentration were observed. Significant short-term variations were noticed in all boreholes. Precipitation caused the changes of water level and strongly affected the values of 222Rn activity concentration in less deep boreholes. The measured activities in boreholes ranged approximately over 1–240 kBq/m3.

  17. PARTICLE DISPLACEMENTS ON THE WALL OF A BOREHOLE FROM INCIDENT PLANE WAVES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M.W.

    1987-01-01

    Particle displacements from incident plane waves at the wall of a fluid-filled borehole are formulated by applying the seismic reciprocity theorem to far-field displacement fields. Such displacement fields are due to point forces acting on a fluid-filled borehole under the assumption of long wavelengths. The displacement fields are analyzed to examine the effect of the borehole on seismic wave propagation, particularly for vertical seismic profiling (VSP) measurements. When the shortest wavelength of interest is approximately 25 times longer than the borehole's diameter, the scattered displacements are proportional to the first power of incident frequency and borehole diameter. When the shortest wavelength of interest is about 40 times longer than the borehole's diameter, borehole effects on VSP measurements using a wall-locking geophone are negligible.

  18. Design optimization of seal structure for sealing liquid by magnetic fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tonggang; Cheng, Yusheng; Yang, Zhiyi

    2005-03-01

    The durability of the magnetic fluid seal clearly decreases when sealing another liquid because of the interface instability caused by the applied magnetic field and the velocity difference of the two liquids. With an intention to establish a stable interface during sealing liquid, a new magnetic fluid seal was developed in this paper. The parameters of the structure were optimized by a simulation apparatus. And the magnetic fluid seal designed based on the optimum parameters shows good performance and long life for sealing lubricating oil.

  19. Numerical Analysis of Magnetic Fluid Sealing Performance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The sealing performance of magnetic fluid is related to the magnetic fluid itself. Many factors can influence the magnetic field and the seal pressure differences of magnetic fluid seals, such as the sealing gap, the shaft eccentricity, the shaft diameter, the volume of the magnetic fluid and the centrifugal force. These factors are analyzed by numerical computation . When the seal material and structure are the same, the seal pressure difference is directly proportional to the magnetic field intensity and the saturation magnetization of the magnetic fluid. The sealing performance of the magnetic fluid will reduce with the increase of the sealing gap and shaft eccentricity. The sealing performance will increase with the volume of the magnetic fluid and decrease with the increase of the shaft diameter taking gravity into account. The increase of the shaft diameter is the same as the reduction of the volume of the magnetic fluid. The magnetic fluid cross-section can change because of the centrifugal force. Some improvements can reduce the influence of the centrifugal force. The centrifugal force can be utilized to improve the sealing performance.

  20. Deep Borehole Emplacement Mode Hazard Analysis Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sevougian, S. David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-08-07

    This letter report outlines a methodology and provides resource information for the Deep Borehole Emplacement Mode Hazard Analysis (DBEMHA). The main purpose is identify the accident hazards and accident event sequences associated with the two emplacement mode options (wireline or drillstring), to outline a methodology for computing accident probabilities and frequencies, and to point to available databases on the nature and frequency of accidents typically associated with standard borehole drilling and nuclear handling operations. Risk mitigation and prevention measures, which have been incorporated into the two emplacement designs (see Cochran and Hardin 2015), are also discussed. A key intent of this report is to provide background information to brief subject matter experts involved in the Emplacement Mode Design Study. [Note: Revision 0 of this report is concentrated more on the wireline emplacement mode. It is expected that Revision 1 will contain further development of the preliminary fault and event trees for the drill string emplacement mode.

  1. Metamorphic rocks in the deep boreholes near Maribor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirka Trajanova

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Six research-captive boreholes for thermal water passed through a pile of metamorphic rocks near Maribor (Eastern Slovenia that is on average about 1000 m thick. The succession of metamorphic rocks is characteristic for the Pohorje Mt. and eastern Kobansko region. In the area of the boreholes two tectonic zones are more pronounced: the upper one, at a depth of about 510 to 550 m at the contact of the Štelenska Gora and Phyllite formations and the deeper one at a depth of about 460 to 590 m, indicating the reverse fault junction of the Phyllite and Kobansko formations. They belong to the second andthe third thrust unit of the accretionary wedge formed at the collision of the European and African plates. Four Alpine nappe units are proven in the Slovenian part of the Eastern Alps.

  2. Method and apparatus for borehole fluid influx detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosso, D.S.

    1988-03-22

    This patent describes an apparatus for detection of fluid influx in a borehole in which a drill string is positioned, the drill string cooperating with the wall of the borehole to define an annulus, and in which drilling fluid is circulated from the surface through the interior of the drill string and into the annulus back to the surface, including: means for generating a coherent energy signal at a downhole location and propagation the signal as a primary signal in the drilling fluid in the drill string and as a secondary signal in the drilling fluid in the annulus; means for detecting the primary signal; means for detecting the secondary signal; means for measuring the difference between at least one selected parameter of the primary signal with the same selected parameter of the secondary signal, and means for determining changes in the measured difference between the selected parameter of the primary and secondary signals wherein fluid influx into the annulus is determined.

  3. Development of an acoustic sensor for a geothermal borehole televiewer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wonn, J.W.

    1979-03-01

    The objective of this project is to upgrade acoustic sensor technology such that appropriate well logging instruments can be made to operate under the hostile environment conditions anticipated in geothermal resource exploration and evaluation. The Borehole Televiewer (BHTV) was selected as the vehicle for this sensor improvement work, primarily because of its demonstrated ability to detect and characterize fractures under sub-geothermal conditions. The work done toward providing an improved sensor for the televiewer is described. An experimental sensor concept was devised, incorporating a thin metal acoustic window, an improved, high-temperature internal coupling fluid, and thermally resistant sensor internals. During an autoclave test, it was successfully demonstrated that the resulting experimental sensor design concept provides the basic target detection and characterization functions required of a fracture mapping, Borehole Televiewer under simulated geothermal conditions. In particular, the experimental sensor remained operational at 275/sup 0/C and 7000 psi.

  4. Development of an acoustic sensor for a geothermal Borehole Televiewer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wonn, J.W.

    1979-03-01

    The objective of this project is to upgrade acoustic sensor technology such that appropriate well logging instruments can be made to operate under the hostile environment conditions anticipated in geothermal resource exploration and evaluation. The Borehole Televiewer (BHTV) was selected as the vehicle for this sensor improvement work, primarily because of its demonstrated ability to detect and characterize fractures under sub-geothermal conditions. The work done toward providing an improved sensor for the televiewer is described. An experimental sensor concept was devised, incorporating a thin metal acoustic window, an improved, high-temperature internal coupling fluid, and thermally resistant sensor internals. During an autoclave test, it was successfully demonstrated that the resulting experimental sensor design concept provides the basic target detection and characterization functions required of a fracture mapping, Borehole Televiewer under simulated geothermal conditions. In particular, the experimental sensor remained operational at 275/sup 0/C and 7000 psi.

  5. Resistivity probes for borehole measuring. Resistivitetssonder til borehulsmaalinger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hovgaard, J.

    1990-09-01

    Various aspects of resistivity measurements in boreholes are dealt with. The models used were point electrode models and infinite uniform media. This simplification of the geometry meant that relations between the resistivity, the currents and the voltage could be expressed analytically, thus giving a better understanding of the measuring principle. The possibilities for the interpretion of the resistivity logs are handled with special regard to oil and gas detection. It is claimed that resistivity logs are very informative in this respect. (AB).

  6. Sensitivity Analysis on LOCCW of Westinghouse typed Reactors Considering WOG2000 RCP Seal Leakage Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Jang-Hwan; Jeon, Ho-Jun; Hwang, Seok-Won [KHNP Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In this paper, we focus on risk insights of Westinghouse typed reactors. We identified that Reactor Coolant Pump (RCP) seal integrity is the most important contributor to Core Damage Frequency (CDF). As we reflected the latest technical report; WCAP-15603(Rev. 1-A), 'WOG2000 RCP Seal Leakage Model for Westinghouse PWRs' instead of the old version, RCP seal integrity became more important to Westinghouse typed reactors. After Fukushima accidents, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power (KHNP) decided to develop Low Power and Shutdown (LPSD) Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) models and upgrade full power PSA models of all operating Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). As for upgrading full power PSA models, we have tried to standardize the methodology of CCF (Common Cause Failure) and HRA (Human Reliability Analysis), which are the most influential factors to risk measures of NPPs. Also, we have reviewed and reflected the latest operating experiences, reliability data sources and technical methods to improve the quality of PSA models. KHNP has operating various types of reactors; Optimized Pressurized Reactor (OPR) 1000, CANDU, Framatome and Westinghouse. So, one of the most challengeable missions is to keep the balance of risk contributors of all types of reactors. This paper presents the method of new RCP seal leakage model and the sensitivity analysis results from applying the detailed method to PSA models of Westinghouse typed reference reactors. To perform the sensitivity analysis on LOCCW of the reference Westinghouse typed reactors, we reviewed WOG2000 RCP seal leakage model and developed the detailed event tree of LOCCW considering all scenarios of RCP seal failures. Also, we performed HRA based on the T/H analysis by using the leakage rates for each scenario. We could recognize that HRA was the sensitive contributor to CDF, and the RCP seal failure scenario of 182gpm leakage rate was estimated as the most important scenario.

  7. Equipment and Experimental Technique For Temperature Measurements In Deep Boreholes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khristoforov, A.

    The technique of temperature measurements is highly informative since any dynami- cal processes in the boreholes and in the vicinities are accompanied by thermal effects. Electronics and equipment for remote measurements in the boreholes are briefly dis- cussed in the report. It includes a deep instrument, cable winch and surface recording unit placed onboard a car. The temperature dependent frequency modulated signal is used in deep instrument. A cable of original construction was developed for chute-lift operations. It has a signal and power channel at the same time and play the depth me- ter. The surface recording unit includes power supply for deep instruments, receiver, frequency meter and indicator. A personal computer is used for the measurement nu- merical control. Energy for the electronics is supplied by a car battery. Self sufficiency and high accuracy are specialities of the equipment. Using the technique and equip- ment we made the experimental study of temperature in the boreholes of the East European platform, Middle Asia, West Siberia, Kamchatka and other regions. Most of our temperatures and temperature gradients have been used for mapping.

  8. Chemical energy system for a borehole seismic source. [Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelke, R.; Hedges, R.O.

    1996-03-01

    We describe a detonation system that will be useful in the seismological examination of geological structures. The explosive component of this system is produced by the mixing of two liquids; these liquids are classified as non-explosive materials by the Department of Transportation. This detonation system could be employed in a borehole tool in which many explosions are made to occur at various points in the borehole. The explosive for each explosion would be mixed within the tool immediately prior to its being fired. Such an arrangement ensures that no humans are ever in proximity to explosives. Initiation of the explosive mixture is achieved with an electrical slapper detonator whose specific parameters are described; this electrical initiation system does not contain any explosive. The complete electrical/mechanical/explosive system is shown to be able to perform correctly at temperatures {le}120{degrees}C and at depths in a water-filled borehole of {le} 4600 ft (i.e., at pressures of {le}2000 psig).

  9. Development of a 400 Level 3C Clamped Downhole Seismic Receiver Array for 3D Borehole Seismic Imaging of Gas Reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjorn N. P. Paulsson

    2006-09-30

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to perform high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology has been hampered by the lack of acquisition technology necessary to record large volumes of high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data. This project took aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array has removed the technical acquisition barrier for recording the data volumes necessary to do high resolution 3D VSP and 3D cross-well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that promise to take the gas industry to the next level in their quest for higher resolution images of deep and complex oil and gas reservoirs. Today only a fraction of the oil or gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of detailed compartmentalization of oil and gas reservoirs. In this project, we developed a 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array that allows for economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring. This new array has significantly increased the efficiency of recording large data volumes at sufficiently dense spatial sampling to resolve reservoir complexities. The receiver pods have been fabricated and tested to withstand high temperature (200 C/400 F) and high pressure (25,000 psi), so that they can operate in wells up to 7,620 meters (25,000 feet) deep. The receiver array is deployed on standard production or drill tubing. In combination with 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources, the 400

  10. Coalbed methane reservoir boundaries and sealing mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU Xianbo; LIN Xiaoying; LIU Shaobo; SONG Yan

    2005-01-01

    It is important to investigate the coalbed methane reservoir boundaries for the classification, exploration, and development of the coalbed methane reservoir.Based on the investigation of the typical coalbed methane reservoirs in the world, the boundaries can be divided into four types: hydrodynamic boundary, air altered boundary,permeability boundary, and fault boundary. Hydrodynamic and air altered boundaries are ubiquitous boundaries for every coalbed methane reservoir. The four types of the fault sealing mechanism in the petroleum geological investigation (diagen- esis, clay smear, juxtaposition and cataclasis) are applied to the fault boundary of the coalbed methane reservoir. The sealing mechanism of the open fault boundary is the same with that of the hydrodynamic sealing boundary.The sealing mechanism of the permeability boundary is firstly classified into capillary pressure sealing and hydrocarbon concentration sealing. There are different controlling boundaries in coalbed methane reservoirs that are in different geological backgrounds. Therefore, the coalbed methane reservoir is diversiform.

  11. Air riding seal for a turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, Jacob A; Brown, Wesley D; Sexton, Thomas D; Jones, Russell B

    2016-07-19

    An air riding seal between a rotor and a stator in a turbine of a gas turbine engine, where an annular piston is movable in an axial direction within a housing that extends from the stator, and a bellows is secured to the annular piston to form a flexible air passageway from a compressed air inlet through the annular piston and into a cushion cavity that forms an air riding seal between the annular piston and the rotor sealing surface. In another embodiment, a flexible seal secured to and extending from the annular piston forms a sealing surface between the annular piston chamber and the annular piston to provide a seal and allow for axial movement.

  12. Characterization of magnetized ore bodies based on three-component borehole magnetic and directional borehole seismic measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virgil, Christopher; Neuhaus, Martin; Hördt, Andreas; Giese, Rüdiger; Krüger, Kay; Jurczyk, Andreas; Juhlin, Christopher; Juhojuntti, Niklas

    2016-04-01

    In the last decades magnetic prospecting using total field data was used with great success for localization and characterization of ferromagnetic ore bodies. Especially borehole magnetic measurements reveal important constraints on the extent and depth of potential mining targets. However, due to the inherent ambiguity of the interpretation of magnetic data, the resulting models of the distribution of magnetized material, such as iron ore bodies, are not entirely reliable. Variations in derived parameters like volume and estimated ore content of the expected body have significant impact on the economic efficiency of a planned mine. An important improvement is the introduction of three-component borehole magnetic sondes. Modern tools comprise orientation modules which allow the continuous determination of the tool's heading regardless of the well inclination and independent of the magnetic field. Using the heading information the recorded three-component magnetic data can be transferred from the internal tool's frame to the geographic reference frame. The vector information yields a more detailed and reliable description of the ore bodies compared to total field or horizontal and vertical field data. Nevertheless complementary information to constrain the model is still advisable. The most important supplementary information for the interpretation of magnetic data is the knowledge of the structural environment of the target regions. By discriminating dissimilar rock units, a geometrical starting model can be derived, constraining the magnetic interpretation and leading to a more robust estimation of the rock magnetizations distribution. The most common approach to reveal the lithological setting rests upon seismic measurements. However, for deep drilling targets surface seismic and VSP lack the required spatial resolution of 10s of meters. A better resolution is achieved by using directed sources and receivers inside the borehole. Here we present the application of

  13. NEW POLIMER SEALING FLUID STOPS MUD LOSS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislaw Stryczek

    1989-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with a composition of sealing fluid, prepared from acrylic acid salt water solution Solakryl M. Laboratory test results of technological properties of its modifications with mineral agents are shown. A new method of sealing mud loss operations with given sealing liquid is discussed along with comments on effects of its use for stopping mud loss in case of freeze-well drilling is described (the paper is published in Croatian.

  14. Influence of Rocket Engine Characteristics on Shaft Sealing Technology Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keba, John E.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs of The Influence of Rocket Engine Characteristics on Shaft Sealing Technology Needs. The topics include: 1) Rocket Turbomachinery Shaft Seals (Inter-Propellant-Seal (IPS) Systems, Lift-off Seal Systems, and Technology Development Needs); 2) Rocket Engine Characteristics (Engine cycles, propellants, missions, etc., Influence on shaft sealing requirements); and 3) Conclusions.

  15. A reliable sealing method for microbatteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yuxing; Cartmell, Samuel; Li, Qiuyan; Xiao, Jie; Li, Huidong; Deng, Zhiqun Daniel; Zhang, Ji-Guang

    2017-02-01

    With continuous downsizing of electronic devices, lithium batteries of traditional shapes cannot meet the demand where small-size high energy density batteries are needed. Conventional sealing methods become increasingly difficult to apply and impose high processing cost as the size of batteries decreases. In this report, a facile sealing method is proposed and demonstrated in CFx/Li mini-batteries. The method employs a temporary barrier to liquid electrolytes while relies on the epoxies/cell casings bond for the hermetic sealing. Cells sealed by this method show no degradation for an extended period of storage time.

  16. Self-acting geometry for noncontact seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, G. P.

    1981-01-01

    Performance ot two self acting seal designs for a liquid oxygen (LOX) turbopump was predicted over ranges of pressure differential and speed. Predictions were compared with test results. Performance of a radial face seal for LOX was predicted up to 448 N/cu cm and 147 m/sec. Performance of a segmented circumferential seal for helium was predicted up to 69 N/cu cm and 189 m/sec. Results confirmed predictions of noncontact operation. Qualitative agreement between test and analysis was found. The LOX face seal evidently operated with mostly liquid in the self acting geometry and mostly gas across the dam.

  17. Byzantine seals from the Ras fortress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanišević Vujadin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, seals found at the location of the Ras fortress (Tvrđava Ras have been published. Inscriptions on these seals show that they used to belong to persons which could be identified with certain military commanders who served under Alexios I Komnenos. The seals in question are: the seals of protonobelissimos Eustathios Kamytzes, Constantine Dalassenos Doukas, protoproedros and doux Constantine Kekaumenos and a certain person called Alexios. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 177021 i br. 177032

  18. Well sealing via thermite reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowry, William Edward; Dunn, Sandra Dalvit

    2016-11-15

    A platform is formed in a well below a target plug zone by lowering a thermite reaction charge into the well and igniting it, whereby the products of the reaction are allowed to cool and expand to form a platform or support in the well. A main thermite reaction charge is placed above the platform and ignited to form a main sealing plug for the well. In some embodiments an upper plug is formed by igniting an upper thermite reaction charge above the main thermite reaction charge. The upper plug confines the products of ignition of the main thermite reaction charge.

  19. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) channel corner seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurrier, Francis R.

    1980-01-01

    A corner seal for an MHD duct includes a compressible portion which contacts the duct walls and an insulating portion which contacts the electrodes, sidewall bars and insulators. The compressible portion may be a pneumatic or hydraulic gasket or an open-cell foam rubber. The insulating portion is segmented into a plurality of pieces of the same thickness as the electrodes, insulators and sidewall bars and aligned therewith, the pieces aligned with the insulator being of a different size from the pieces aligned with the electrodes and sidewall bars to create a stepped configuration along the corners of the MHD channel.

  20. Sealed nickel-cadmium battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-08-15

    Overcharge protection, and especially the chargeability of a sealed Ni/Cd battery with high currents is improved by rolling a carbon-containing powdered material into the surface of the negative electrode, which material catalyzes the reduction of oxygen. Wetting of the electrode with a Tylose dispersion prior to application of the powder (by powdering, vibration or in an agitator) improves the adhesion of the powder. The cadmium electrode thus prepared combines in itself the functions of a negative principal electrode and of an auxiliary oxygen electrode.

  1. Albinistic common seals (Phoca vitulina) and melanistic grey seals (Halichoerus grypus) rehabilitated in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osinga, Nynke; 't Hart, Pieter; Vader, Pieter C. van Voorst

    2010-01-01

    The Seal Rehabilitation and Research Centre (SRRC) in Pieterburen, The Netherlands, rehabilitates seals from the waters of the Wadden Sea, North Sea and Southwest Delta area. Incidental observations of albinism and melanism in common and grey seals are known from countries surrounding the North Sea.

  2. Seals at sea: modelling seal distribution in the German bight based on aerial survey data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herr, H.; Scheidat, M.; Lehnert, K.; Siebert, U.

    2009-01-01

    The Wadden Sea is an important habitat for harbour seals and grey seals. They regularly haul-out on sandbanks and islands along the coast. Comparably little is known about the time seals spend at sea and how they use the remainder of the North Sea. Yet, human activity in offshore waters is increasin

  3. Corkscrew Seals: Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) Infanticide and Cannibalism May Indicate the Cause of Spiral Lacerations in Seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Large numbers of dead seals with characteristic spiral lesions have been washing ashore around the North Atlantic over the past two decades. Interactions with ship propellers and shark predation have been suggested as the likely causal mechanisms. However, new evidence points towards a more likely candidate: grey seal predation. An adult male grey seal was observed and recorded catching, killing and eating five weaned grey seal pups over a period of one week on the Isle of May, Scotland. A further 9 carcasses found in the same area exhibited similar injuries. Post mortem analysis of lesions indicated the wound characteristics were similar to each other and in 12 of the 14 carcasses analysed, were indistinguishable from carcasses previously attributed to propeller interaction. We therefore propose that most of the seal carcasses displaying spiral lacerations in the UK are caused by grey seal predation. Cases in other locations should be re-evaluated using the scoring system presented here to identify whether grey seal predation is a major cause of mortality in phocid seals. PMID:27254025

  4. Corkscrew Seals: Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus Infanticide and Cannibalism May Indicate the Cause of Spiral Lacerations in Seals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Brownlow

    Full Text Available Large numbers of dead seals with characteristic spiral lesions have been washing ashore around the North Atlantic over the past two decades. Interactions with ship propellers and shark predation have been suggested as the likely causal mechanisms. However, new evidence points towards a more likely candidate: grey seal predation. An adult male grey seal was observed and recorded catching, killing and eating five weaned grey seal pups over a period of one week on the Isle of May, Scotland. A further 9 carcasses found in the same area exhibited similar injuries. Post mortem analysis of lesions indicated the wound characteristics were similar to each other and in 12 of the 14 carcasses analysed, were indistinguishable from carcasses previously attributed to propeller interaction. We therefore propose that most of the seal carcasses displaying spiral lacerations in the UK are caused by grey seal predation. Cases in other locations should be re-evaluated using the scoring system presented here to identify whether grey seal predation is a major cause of mortality in phocid seals.

  5. Numerical simulation on heat transfer performance of vertical U-tube with different borehole fill materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Heat exchange performance of vertical U-tube heat exchanger was studiedwith two different borehole fill materials and CFD software. Borehole surface temperature and water temperature distribution were simulated on the condition of continuous operation for 8 h in winter with inlet water temperature being 10 ℃. The results show that there is no obvious difference on heat exchanger performance between the two different borehole fill materials.

  6. Challenges and opportunities for fractured rock imaging using 3D cross-borehole electrical resistivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, Judith; Johnson, Timothy C.; Slater, Lee D.

    2015-02-02

    There is an increasing need to characterize discrete fractures away from boreholes to better define fracture distributions and monitor solute transport. We performed a 3D evaluation of static and time-lapse cross-borehole electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) data sets from a limestone quarry in which flow and transport are controlled by a bedding-plane feature. Ten boreholes were discretized using an unstructured tetrahedral mesh, and 2D panel measurements were inverted for a 3D distribution of conductivity. We evaluated the benefits of 3D versus 2.5D inversion of ERT data in fractured rock while including the use of borehole regularization disconnects (BRDs) and borehole conductivity constraints. High-conductivity halos (inversion artifacts) surrounding boreholes were removed in static images when BRDs and borehole conductivity constraints were implemented. Furthermore, applying these constraints focused transient changes in conductivity resulting from solute transport on the bedding plane, providing a more physically reasonable model for conductivity changes associated with solute transport at this fractured rock site. Assuming bedding-plane continuity between fractures identified in borehole televiewer data, we discretized a planar region between six boreholes and applied a fracture regularization disconnect (FRD). Although the FRD appropriately focused conductivity changes on the bedding plane, the conductivity distribution within the discretized fracture was nonunique and dependent on the starting homogeneous model conductivity. Synthetic studies performed to better explain field observations showed that inaccurate electrode locations in boreholes resulted in low-conductivity halos surrounding borehole locations. These synthetic studies also showed that the recovery of the true conductivity within an FRD depended on the conductivity contrast between the host rock and fractures. Our findings revealed that the potential exists to improve imaging of fractured

  7. Borehole Geophysical Logging Program: Incorporating New and Existing Techniques in Hydrologic Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacker, Michael A.; Cunningham, Kevin J.

    2008-01-01

    The borehole geophysical logging program at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)-Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC) provides subsurface information needed to resolve geologic, hydrologic, and environmental issues in Florida. The program includes the acquisition, processing, display, interpretation, and archiving of borehole geophysical logs. The borehole geophysical logging program is a critical component of many FISC investigations, including hydrogeologic framework studies, aquifer flow-zone characterization, and freshwater-saltwater interface delineation.

  8. Geologic and geochemical results from boreholes drilled in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, 2007 and 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworowski, Cheryl; Susong, David; Heasler, Henry; Mencin, David; Johnson, Wade; Conrey, Rick; Von Stauffenberg, Jennipher

    2016-06-01

    Between 2007 and 2008, seven Earthscope Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) boreholes ranging in depth from about 200 to 800 feet deep were drilled in and adjacent to the Yellowstone caldera in Yellowstone National Park, for the purpose of installing volcano monitoring instrumentation. Five of the seven boreholes were equipped with strainmeters, downhole seismometers, and tiltmeters. Data collected during drilling included field observations of drill cuttings, stratigraphy within the boreholes, water temperature, and water and drill cuttings samples from selected depths.

  9. Space Environment Effects on Silicone Seal Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    deGroh, Henry C., III; Daniels, Christopher C.; Dever, Joyce A.; Miller, Sharon K.; Waters, Deborah L.; Finkbeiner, Joshua R.; Dunlap, Patrick H.; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2010-01-01

    A docking system is being developed by the NASA to support future space missions. It is expected to use redundant elastomer seals to help contain cabin air during dockings between two spacecraft. The sealing surfaces are exposed to the space environment when vehicles are not docked. In space, the seals will be exposed to temperatures between 125 to -75 C, vacuum, atomic oxygen, particle and ultraviolet radiation, and micrometeoroid and orbital debris (MMOD). Silicone rubber is the only class of space flight-qualified elastomeric seal material that functions across the expected temperature range. NASA Glenn has tested three silicone elastomers for such seal applications: two provided by Parker (S0899-50 and S0383-70) and one from Esterline (ELA-SA-401). The effects of atomic oxygen (AO), UV and electron particle radiation, and vacuum on the properties of these three elastomers were examined. Critical seal properties such as leakage, adhesion, and compression set were measured before and after simulated space exposures. The S0899-50 silicone was determined to be inadequate for extended space seal applications due to high adhesion and intolerance to UV, but both S0383-70 and ELA-SA-401 seals were adequate.

  10. Space Environment's Effects on Seal Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    deGroh, Henry C., III; Daniels, Christopher C.; Dunlap, Patrick; Miller, Sharon; Dever, Joyce; Waters, Deborah; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2007-01-01

    A Low Impact Docking System (LIDS) is being developed by the NASA Johnson Space Center to support future missions of the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV). The LIDS is androgynous, such that each system half is identical, thus any two vehicles or modules with LIDS can be coupled. Since each system half is a replica, the main interface seals must seal against each other instead of a conventional flat metal surface. These sealing surfaces are also expected to be exposed to the space environment when vehicles are not docked. The NASA Glenn Research Center (NASA GRC) is supporting this project by developing the main interface seals for the LIDS and determining the durability of candidate seal materials in the space environment. In space, the seals will be exposed to temperatures of between 50 to 50 C, vacuum, atomic oxygen, particle and ultraviolet radiation, and micrometeoroid and orbital debris (MMOD). NASA GRC is presently engaged in determining the effects of these environments on our candidate elastomers. Since silicone rubber is the only class of seal elastomer that functions across the expected temperature range, NASA GRC is focusing on three silicone elastomers: two provided by Parker Hannifin (S0-899-50 and S0-383-70) and one from Esterline Kirkhill (ELA-SA-401). Our results from compression set, elastomer to elastomer adhesion, and seal leakage tests before and after various simulated space exposures will be presented.

  11. 19 CFR 101.7 - Customs seal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Customs seal. 101.7 Section 101.7 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY GENERAL PROVISIONS § 101.7 Customs seal. (a) Design. According to the design furnished by the...

  12. Earlier pupping in harbour seals, Phoca vitulina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijnders, P.J.H.; Brasseur, S.M.J.M.; Meesters, H.W.G.

    2010-01-01

    The annual reproductive cycle of most seal species is characterized by a tight synchrony of births. Typically, timing of birth shows little inter-annual variation. Here, however we show that harbour seals Phoca vitulina from the Wadden Sea (southeast North Sea) have shortened their yearly cycle, mov

  13. Polarimetric borehole radar measurement near Nojima fault and its application to subsurface crack characterization; Polarimetric borehole radar ni yoru Nojima danso shuhen no chika kiretsu keisoku jikken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, M.; Taniguchi, Y.; Miwa, T.; Niitsuma, H. [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Ikeda, R. [National Research Institute for Disaster Prevention, Tsukuba (Japan); Makino, K. [Geophysical Surveying and Consulting Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-05-27

    Practical application of subsurface crack characterization by the borehole radar measurement to which the radar polarimetric method was introduced was attempted to measuring objects for which the borehole radar has not been much used, for example, the inside of low loss rock mass or fracture zone where cracks tightly exist. A system was trially manufactured which makes the radar polarimetric measurement possible in the borehole at a 1000m depth and with a about 10cm diameter, and a field experiment was conducted for realizing the subsurface crack characterization near the Nojima fault. For the measuring experiment by the polarimetric borehole radar, used were Iwaya borehole and Hirabayashi borehole drilled in the north of Awaji-shima, Hyogo-ken. In a comparison of both polarization systems of Hirabayashi borehole, reflected waves at depths of 1038m and 1047m are relatively stronger in both polarization systems than those with the same polarization form and at different depths, whereas reflected waves around a 1017m depth are strong only as to the parallel polarization system. Characteristics of the polarization in this experiment indirectly reflect crack structures. 6 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Safety analysis of stability of surface gas drainage boreholes above goaf areas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yu-zhou; LI Xiao-hong

    2007-01-01

    As longwall caving mining method prevails rapidly in China coal mines, amount of gas emission from longwall faces and goaf area increased significantly. Using traditional gas drainage methods, such as drilling upward holes to roof strata in tailgate or drilling inseam and cross-measure boreholes, could not meet methane drainage requirements in a gassy mine. The alternative is to drill boreholes from surface down to the longwall goaf area to drain the gas out. As soon as a coal seam is extracted out, the upper rock strata above the goaf start to collapse or become fractured depending upon the rock characteristics and the height above the coal seam. During overlying rock strata being fractured,boreholes in the area may be damaged due to ground movement after the passage of the longwall face. The sudden damage of a borehole may cause a longwall production halt or even a serious mine accident. A theoretical calculation of the stability of surface boreholes in mining affected area is introduced along with an example of determination of borehole and casing diameters is given for demonstration. By using this method for the drilling design, the damage of surface boreholes caused by excessive mining induced displacement can be effectively reduced if not totally avoided. Borehole and casing diameters as well as characteristics of filling materials can be determined using the proposed method by calculating the horizontal movement and vertical stain at different borehole depths.

  15. Active Infrared Thermography for Seal Contamination Detection in Heat-Sealed Food Packaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karlien D’huys

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Packaging protects food products from environmental influences, assuring quality and safety throughout shelf life if properly performed. Packaging quality depends on the quality of the packaging material and of the closure or seal. A common problem possibly jeopardizing seal quality is the presence of seal contamination, which can cause a decreased seal strength, an increased packaging failure risk and leak formation. Therefore, early detection and removal of seal contaminated packages from the production chain is crucial. In this work, a pulsed-type active thermography method using the heated seal bars as an excitation source was studied for detecting seal contamination. Thermal image sequences of contaminated seals were recorded shortly after sealing. The detection performances of six thermal image processing methods, based on a single frame, a fit of the cooling profiles, thermal signal reconstruction, pulsed phase thermography, principal component thermography and a matched filter, were compared. High resolution digital images served as a reference to quantify seal contamination, and processed thermal images were mapped to these references. The lowest detection limit (equivalent diameter 0.60 mm was obtained for the method based on a fit of the cooling profiles. Moreover, the detection performance of this method did not depend strongly on the time after sealing at which recording of the thermal images was started, making it a robust and generally applicable method.

  16. Joint inversion of surface and borehole magnetic amplitude data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zelin; Yao, Changli; Zheng, Yuanman; Yuan, Xiaoyu

    2016-04-01

    3D magnetic inversion for susceptibility distribution is a powerful tool in quantitative interpretation of magnetic data in mineral exploration. However, the inversion and interpretation of such data are faced with two problems. One problem is the poor imaging results of deep sources when only surface data are inverted. The other is the unknown total magnetization directions of sources when strong remanence exists. To deal with these problems simultaneously, we propose a method through the joint inversion of surface and borehole magnetic amplitude data. In this method, we first transform both surface and borehole magnetic data to magnetic amplitude data that are less sensitive to the directions of total magnetization, and then preform a joint inversion of the whole amplitude data to generate a 3D susceptibility distribution. The amplitude inversion algorithm uses Tikhonov regularization and imposes a positivity constraint on the effective susceptibility defined as the ratio of magnetization magnitude over the geomagnetic field strength. In addition, a distance-based weighting function is used to make the algorithm applicable to joint data sets. To solve this positivity-constraint inversion problem efficiently, an appropriate optimization method must be chosen. We first use an interior-point method to incorporate the positivity constraint into the total objective function, and then minimize the objective function via a Gauss-Newton method due to the nonlinearity introduced by the positivity constraint and the amplitude data. To further improve the efficiency of the inversion algorithm, we use a conjugate gradient method to carry out the fast matrix-vector multiplication during the minimization. To verify the utility of the proposed method, we invert the synthetic and field data using three inversion methods, including the joint inversion of surface and borehole three-component magnetic data, the inversion of surface magnetic amplitude data, and the proposed joint

  17. Water inflow into boreholes during the Stripa heater experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, P.H.; Rachiele, R.; Remer, J.S.; Carlsson, H.

    1981-04-01

    During the operation of three in-situ heater experiments at Stripa, Sweden, groundwater flowed into many of the instrumentation and heater boreholes. These flows were recovered and measured routinely. The records of water inflow indicate two origins: inflow attributed to local hydrological pressure gradients, and water migration from cracks closing under the rapidly increasing, thermal-induced stress changes. The latter component appeared as a main pulse that occurred when the heaters were turned on, and lasted about 30 to 40 days, steadily declining over the next several months, and decreasing sharply when heater power was decreased or stopped. The magnitude of the total inflow per hole ranged over more than five decades, from 0.1 to over 10,000 liters over the 500 to 600 day time periods. When plotted against the logarithm of total volume, the frequency distribution displays a normal curve dependence with a mean of approximately 10 liters. Of this amount, 1 to 2 liters of flow into 38-mm-diam boreholes accompanied an increase in applied heat load. These amounts are compatible with rock porosities of a fraction of one percent. Inflow into the 3.6 and 5.0 kW heater holes peaked within 3 to 6 days after heater turn on, then declined to zero inflow, with no further inflow measured for the remainder of the experiments. In the heater holes of the time-scaled experiment, which operated at 1.125 kW or less, the initial pulse of inflow took much longer to decay, and 7 of 8 heater holes continued to flow throughout the experiment. The packing off and isolation of a borehole some 40 m distant in the ventilation drift dramatically increased the inflow into the heater holes in one of the three heater experiments. This demonstrated the existence of permeable flow paths among a number of boreholes. The records of water inflow demonstrate the need for a thorough understanding of the nature of fluid flow and storage in fractured crystalline rock.

  18. Instrument for orientation of a deflection in a borehole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vechkhaizer, Ya.I.; Buslaev, V.F.; Khafizof, Z.Kh.; Shafikov, F.Kh.

    1981-05-17

    The instrument contains a diamagnetic pipe, a dipmeter with a cylindrical ring, and a framework installed in it, an azimuthal rheochord with magnetic arrow, and an extender with a locknut. To shorten the lowering and raising operations and increase the reliability of orientation of the deflector in vertical and inclined borehole shafts it is equipped with an additional deflector with a cylindrical ring. Installed in it is an additional famework. The extender with locknut is placed between the main and auxillary dipmeters. The frameworks of both dipmeters are arrested with rings with the aid of fixers; the azimuthal rheochords are installed according to one generatrix.

  19. Grey seal (Halichoerus grypus) predation on harbour seals (Phoca vitulina) on the island of Helgoland, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Neer, Abbo; Jensen, Lasse Fast; Siebert, Ursula

    2015-03-01

    The prey spectrum of grey seals has to date been described as largely consisting of different fish, cephalopod and shrimp species. On the German island of Helgoland Düne, where harbour seals (Phoca vitulina) and grey seals (Halichoerus grypus) co-occur, a young male grey seal was observed in 2013 and again in 2014 preying upon young harbour seals. A harbour seal carcass with severe traumatic lesions was retrieved and post-mortem examinations were performed. In the following weeks several carcasses showing similar lesions were found. Sightings of grey seals assumed to be preying on harbour porpoises have increased around the North Sea. Increased competition as well as individualised behaviour could explain the increased number of observations, but former cases of abnormal lesions of marine mammals attributed to for example predation by sharks or mechanical processes should be revisited with regard to the emerging knowledge.

  20. [Methods for sealing of corneal perforations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samoilă, O; Totu, Lăcrămioara; Călugăru, M

    2012-01-01

    A variety of corneal pathology can lead to corneal ulcers and perforations. A deep corneal ulcer may need surgical treatment to allow good volume restoration and reepithelisation. Corneal perforation must be sealed and when the perforation is large, the task of repairing the defect can be underwhelming. The elegant solution is the corneal transplant, but this is not always readily available, especially in undeveloped countries. We present here two cases with different solutions to seal the perforated cornea: the first one has a large peripheral defect and it is successfully sealed with scleral patch and the second one is central with small perforation and is successfully sealed with multilayered amniotic membrane. Both cases are followed for over 12 months and demonstrate good corneal restoration (both on clinical examination and corneal topography). Sclera and amniotic membrane can be used to seal corneal defects when corneal transplant is not readily available.

  1. Film riding seal assembly for turbomachinery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bidkar, Rahul Anil; Giametta, Andrew Paul; Gibson, Nathan Evan McCurdy; Cleveland, Nicolas Joseph

    2016-06-07

    An aerodynamic seal assembly for a rotary machine includes multiple sealing segments disposed circumferentially intermediate to a stationary housing and a rotor. Each of the segments includes a shoe plate with a forward load-bearing section and an aft load-bearing section configured to generate an aerodynamic force between the shoe plate and the rotor. The shoe plate includes at least one labyrinth teeth facing the rotor and positioned between the forward load-bearing section and the aft load-bearing section. The sealing segment also includes at least one spring connected to a pedestal located about midway of an axial length of the shoe plate and to a stator interface element. Further, the sealing segment includes a rigid segmented secondary seal attached to the stator interface element at one first end and in contact with the pedestal of the shoe plate at one second end.

  2. A reliable sealing method for microbatteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuxing; Cartmell, Samuel; Li, Qiuyan; Xiao, Jie; Li, Huidong; Deng, Zhiqun Daniel; Zhang, Ji-Guang

    2017-02-01

    As electronic devices continue to become smaller, their energy sources (i.e., batteries) also need to be smaller. Typically, energy densities of batteries decrease as the battery size decreases due to the relative increase of parasitic weight such as packaging materials. In addition, the sealing methods in conventional batteries are difficult to apply to microbatteries. In this work, we developed a facile sealing method for microbatteries. The method employs a dual-sealing concept: a first rubber barrier temporally confines the organic electrolytes and a second adhesive barrier forms a hermetic seal with the battery case. With this innovative sealing approach, excellent shelf life and operation life of the batteries have been demonstrated. A minimal amount of packing materials is employed resulting in high energy densities.

  3. Does the seal licensing system in Scotland have a negative impact on seal welfare?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laetitia Nunny

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the licensing system that permits seal shooting in Scotland, which was established under Part 6 Conservation of Seals of the Marine (Scotland Act 2010. Four approaches were used: data were collated and analyzed from both the Scottish Government and Scottish Marine Animal Stranding Scheme; a survey was sent to current license holders and informal interviews were conducted with key stakeholder types. Between February 2011 and the end of October 2015, 1229 gray seals and 275 common seals were reported shot under license to the Scottish Government. The numbers of seals reported as shot has reduced year-on-year since the licensing system was put in place. While some license holders, notably fish farms, were using some non-lethal forms of deterrent to reduce seal-related damage, these were often used alongside seal shooting. Of the seals reported as shot to the Scottish Government, only a small percentage were also reported to the Scottish Marine Animal Stranding Scheme, despite this being a licensing requirement. Only 2.3% of the shot gray seals and 4.5% of the shot common seals were necropsied. There is evidence from these necropsies that some seals had not died instantly or had not been shot in the manner recommended by the Scottish Seal Management Code of Practice. These preliminary results show that more carcasses need to be recovered and necropsied if the welfare implications of current seal shooting practice are to be properly assessed. The current legislation does not specify closed seasons to protect breeding seals and thirty-five per cent of necropsied seals were pregnant gray seals. Seals have also been shot during their lactation periods when pups are dependent on their mothers. This raises significant welfare concerns. The re-introduction of closed seasons specific to each species of seal is recommended along with greater effort to deploy non-lethal methods. Independent assessment of the number of seals being killed

  4. Transients in Pacific/North American Plate Boundary Deformation: Synthesis and Modeling of GPS and Borehole Strain Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Sean C.; Frey, H. V. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This is the Final Technical Report on research conducted between 1 June 1997 and 14 September 2001 entitled "Transients in Pacific/North American plate boundary deformation: Synthesis and modeling of GPS and borehole strain observations." As the project title implies, our effort involved a geodetic study of strain transients, i.e., temporal variations in deformation rates, that occur within plate boundary zones and their relationship to earthquakes and plate motions. Important transients occur during and following large earthquakes, and there are also strain transients not apparently associated with earthquakes. A particularly intriguing class of transients, for which there is a modest but growing list of examples, are preseismic anomalies. Such earthquake precursors, if further documented and understood, would have obvious importance for earthquake hazard mitigation. Because the timescales for these diverse transients range over at least 6 orders of magnitude (minutes to years), no single geodetic technique is optimum. We therefore undertook a systematic synthesis of Global Positioning Satellite (GPS) and borehole strainmeter data in three areas in California where there are adequate numbers of both types of instruments (or their equivalent): the San Francisco Bay region (within the Bay Area Regional Deformation network), southern California (within the Southern California Integrated GPS Network), and Parkfield (where a two-color laser system provides a proxy for continuous GPS measurements). An integral component of our study was the elucidation of the physical mechanisms by which such transients occur and propagate. We therefore initiated the development of multiple forward models, using two independent approaches. In the first, we explored the response to specified earthquake slip in viscoelastic models that incorporated failure criteria and the geometry of major faults in California. In the second approach, we examined the dynamical response of a complex

  5. Ocean climate and seal condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crocker Daniel E

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The condition of many marine mammals varies with fluctuations in productivity and food supply in the ocean basin where they forage. Prey is impacted by physical environmental variables such as cyclic warming trends. The weaning weight of northern elephant seal pups, Mirounga angustirostris, being closely linked to maternal condition, indirectly reflects prey availability and foraging success of pregnant females in deep waters of the northeastern Pacific. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of ocean climate on foraging success in this deep-diving marine mammal over the course of three decades, using cohort weaning weight as the principal metric of successful resource accrual. Results The mean annual weaning weight of pups declined from 1975 to the late 1990s, a period characterized by a large-scale, basin-wide warm decadal regime that included multiple strong or long-duration El Niños; and increased with a return to a cool decadal regime from about 1999 to 2004. Increased foraging effort and decreased mass gain of adult females, indicative of reduced foraging success and nutritional stress, were associated with high ocean temperatures. Conclusion Despite ranging widely and foraging deeply in cold waters beyond coastal thermoclines in the northeastern Pacific, elephant seals are impacted significantly by ocean thermal dynamics. Ocean warming redistributes prey decreasing foraging success of females, which in turn leads to lower weaning mass of pups. Annual fluctuations in weaning mass, in turn, reflect the foraging success of females during the year prior to giving birth and signals changes in ocean temperature cycles.

  6. Induced temperature gradients to examine groundwater flowpaths in open boreholes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Eddie W; Shanafield, Margaret A; Cook, Peter G

    2014-01-01

    Techniques for characterizing the hydraulic properties and groundwater flow processes of aquifers are essential to design hydrogeologic conceptual models. In this study, rapid time series temperature profiles within open-groundwater wells in fractured rock were measured using fiber optic distributed temperature sensing (FO-DTS). To identify zones of active groundwater flow, two continuous electrical heating cables were installed alongside a FO-DTS cable to heat the column of water within the well and to create a temperature difference between the ambient temperature of the groundwater in the aquifer and that within the well. Additional tests were performed to examine the effects of pumping on hydraulic fracture interconnectivity around the well and to identify zones of increased groundwater flow. High- and low-resolution FO-DTS cable configurations were examined to test the sensitivities of the technique and compared with downhole video footage and geophysical logging to confirm the zones of active groundwater flow. Two examples are presented to demonstrate the usefulness of this new technique for rapid characterization of fracture zones in open boreholes. The combination of the FO-DTS and heating cable has excellent scope as a rapid appraisal tool for borehole construction design and improving hydrogeologic conceptual models.

  7. Interim reclamation report, Basalt Waste Isolation project: Boreholes, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, C.A.; Rickard, W.H. Jr.; Hefty, M.G.

    1990-03-01

    In 1968, a program was started to assess the feasibility of storing Hanford Site defense waste in deep caverns constructed in basalt. This program was expanded in 1976 to include investigations of the Hanford Site as a potential location for a mined commercial nuclear waste repository. An extensive site characterization program was begun to determine the feasibility of using the basalts beneath the Hanford Site for the repository. Site research focused primarily on determining the direction and speed of groundwater movement, the uniformity of basalt layers, and tectonic stability. Some 98 boreholes were sited, drilled, deepened, or modified by BWIP between 1977 and 1988 to test the geologic properties of the Site. On December 22, 1987, President Reagan signed into law the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987, which effectively stopped all repository-related activities except reclamation of disturbed lands at the Hanford Site. This report describes the development of the reclamation program for the BWIP boreholes, its implementation, and preliminary estimates of its success. The goal of the reclamation program is to return sites disturbed by the repository program as nearly as practicable to their original conditions using native plant species. 48 refs., 28 figs., 14 tabs.

  8. An Effective Method for Borehole Imaging of Buried Tunnels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loreto Di Donato

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Detection and imaging of buried tunnels is a challenging problem which is relevant to both geophysical surveys and security monitoring. To comply with the need of exploring large portions of the underground, electromagnetic measurements carried out under a borehole configuration are usually exploited. Since this requires to drill holes in the soil wherein the transmitting and receiving antennas have to be positioned, low complexity of the involved apparatus is important. On the other hand, to effectively image the surveyed area, there is the need for adopting efficient and reliable imaging methods. To address these issues, in this paper we investigate the feasibility of the linear sampling method (LSM, as this inverse scattering method is capable to provide almost real-time results even when 3D images of very large domains are built, while not requiring approximations of the underlying physics. In particular, the results of the reported numerical analysis show that the LSM is capable of performing the required imaging task while using a quite simple measurement configuration consisting of two boreholes and a few number of multiview-multistatic acquisitions.

  9. NTRCI Legacy Engine Research and Development Project Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith-Holbert, Connie [National Transportation Research Center, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States); Petrolino, Joseph [National Transportation Research Center, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States); Watkins, Bart [Power Source Technologies Inc., Corvallis, OR (United States); Irick, David [Power Source Technologies Inc., Corvallis, OR (United States)

    2011-12-31

    The Legacy engine is a completely new design, transitional diesel engine, replacing the reciprocating engine with a rotary engine. The Legacy engine offers significant advances over conventional internal combustion engines in 1) power to weight ratio; 2) multiple fuel acceptance; 3) fuel economy; and 4) environmental compliance. These advances are achieved through a combination of innovative design geometry, rotary motion, aspiration simplicity, and manufacturing/part simplicity. The key technical challenge to the Legacy engine's commercialization, and the focus of this project, was the development of a viable roton tip seal. The PST concept for the roton tip seal was developed into a manufacturable design. The design was evaluated using a custom designed and fabricated seal test fixture and further refined. This design was incorporated into the GEN2.5A prototype and tested for achievable compression pressure. The Decision Point at the end of Phase 1 of the project (described below) was to further optimize the existing tip seal design. Enhancements to the tip seal design were incorporated into the GEN2.5B prototype and tested and evaluated using the iterative research strategy described below. Compression pressures adequate for compression ignition of diesel fuel were achieved, although not consistently in all combustion volumes. The variation in compression pressures was characterized versus design features. As the roton tip seal performance was improved, results pointed toward inadequate performance of the housing side seals. Enhancement of the housing side seal system was accomplished using a custom designed side seal test fixture. The design enhancements developed with the test fixture were also incorporated into the GEN2.5B prototype and tested and evaluated using the iterative research strategy described below. Finally, to simplify the requirements for the roton tip seals and to enhance the introduction and combustion of fuel, a flush-mount fuel injector

  10. Broadband hydroseismograms observed by closed borehole wells in the Kamioka mine, central Japan: Response of pore pressure to seismic waves from 0.05 to 2 Hz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kano, Yasuyuki; Yanagidani, Takashi

    2006-03-01

    We obtained broadband hydroseismograms by monitoring the pore pressure changes of a rock mass in the Kamioka mine, using borehole wells. The wellhead was sealed to maintain an undrained condition, under which there is no flow of water through the interface between the well and the rock mass. This reduces the wellbore storage effect, which can cause a high-frequency cutoff response for systems of conventional open wells and rock mass. Using these closed borehole wells, 16 hydroseismograms were recorded for earthquakes in a range of magnitudes of 4.5-7.9 and epicentral distances of 1.0°-71.6°. Direct P waves, SV waves converted to P, and Rayleigh phases are clearly observed on the hydroseismograms. The similarity between hydroseismograms and seismograms reveals a clear relationship between radial ground velocity and pore pressure. The relationship is expressed as a zero-order system, which is characterized by no distortion or time lag between the input and output, and the pore pressure has no coupling with shear deformation. These results are consistent with an undrained constitutive relation of linear poroelastic theory and confirm that the relation is valid for the seismic frequency range. We determined in situ values of pore pressure sensitivity to volumetric change of the rock mass, which were then used to estimate in situ Skempton coefficients with values of 0.70-0.85.

  11. Tamper-indicating quantum optical seals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humble, Travis S [ORNL; Williams, Brian P [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Confidence in the means for identifying when tampering occurs is critical for containment and surveillance technologies. Fiber-optic seals have proven especially useful for actively surveying large areas or inventories due to the extended transmission range and flexible layout of fiber. However, it is reasonable to suspect that an intruder could tamper with a fiber-optic sensor by accurately replicating the light transmitted through the fiber. In this contribution, we demonstrate a novel approach to using fiber-optic seals for safeguarding large-scale inventories with increased confidence in the state of the seal. Our approach is based on the use of quantum mechanical phenomena to offer unprecedented surety in the authentication of the seal state. In particular, we show how quantum entangled photons can be used to monitor the integrity of a fiber-optic cable - the entangled photons serve as active sensing elements whose non-local correlations indicate normal seal operation. Moreover, we prove using the quantum no-cloning theorem that attacks against the quantum seal necessarily disturb its state and that these disturbances are immediately detected. Our quantum approach to seal authentication is based on physical principles alone and does not require the use of secret or proprietary information to ensure proper operation. We demonstrate an implementation of the quantum seal using a pair of entangled photons and we summarize our experimental results including the probability of detecting intrusions and the overall stability of the system design. We conclude by discussing the use of both free-space and fiber-based quantum seals for surveying large areas and inventories.

  12. Borehole locations and top surface altitudes of each of the 16 hydrostratigraphic layers of the Atlantic Coastal Plain of North and South Carolina (pp1773_unit_alt_boreholes)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Point data pp1773_unit_alt_boreholes represent the 309 locations of various types of boreholes that were used to determine the altitudes of each of the 16...

  13. Vacuum-sealed casting process under pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Chen-xi; GUO Tai-ming; WU Chun-jing; WANG Hong

    2006-01-01

    A new casting method, the vacuum-sealed mold casting under pressure, has been developed, and thin wall iron castings with high precision and smooth surface have been produced successfully with this casting method. The experimental results show that the liquid iron has a very excellent filling ability because a high negative pressure is formed in the mold cavity during filling process. The vacuum-sealed mold under pressure has very high compressive strength greater than 650 kPa, which is 3-4 times as high as that of the molds produced by high-pressure molding process or vacuum-sealed molding process.

  14. Compliant Glass Seals for SOFC Stacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Y. S.; Choi, Jung-Pyung; Xu, Wei; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Koeppel, Brian J.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Lara-Curzio, Edgar

    2014-04-01

    This report summarizes results from experimental and modeling studies performed by participants in the Solid-State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Core Technology Program, which indicate that compliant glass-based seals offer a number of potential advantages over conventional seals based on de-vitrifying glasses, including reduced stresses during stack operation and thermal cycling, and the ability to heal micro-damage induced during thermal cycling. The properties and composition of glasses developed and/or investigated in these studies are reported, along with results from long-term (up to 5,800h) evaluations of seals based on a compliant glass containing ceramic particles or ceramic fibers.

  15. Infiltrating/sealing proximal caries lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martignon, S; Ekstrand, K R; Gomez, J

    2012-01-01

    This randomized split-mouth controlled clinical trial aimed at assessing the therapeutic effects of infiltration vs. sealing for controlling caries progression on proximal surfaces. Out of 90 adult students/patients assessed at university clinics and agreeing to participate, 39, each with 3...... differences in lesion progression between infiltration and placebo (P = 0.0012) and between sealing and placebo (P = 0.0269). The study showed that infiltration and sealing are significantly better than placebo treatment for controlling caries progression on proximal lesions. No significant difference...

  16. Compliant Glass Seals for SOFC Stacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Yeong -Shyung [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Choi, Jung-Pyung [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xu, Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stephens, Elizabeth V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Koeppel, Brian J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stevenson, Jeffry W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lara-Curzio, Edgar [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-04-30

    This report summarizes results from experimental and modeling studies performed by participants in the Solid-State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Core Technology Program, which indicate that compliant glass-based seals offer a number of potential advantages over conventional seals based on de-vitrifying glasses, including reduced stresses during stack operation and thermal cycling, and the ability to heal micro-damage induced during thermal cycling. The properties and composition of glasses developed and/or investigated in these studies are reported, along with results from long-term (up to 5,800h) evaluations of seals based on a compliant glass containing ceramic particles or ceramic fibers.

  17. Floating air riding seal for a turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebert, Todd A

    2016-08-16

    A floating air riding seal for a gas turbine engine with a rotor and a stator, an annular piston chamber with an axial moveable annular piston assembly within the annular piston chamber formed in the stator, an annular cavity formed on the annular piston assembly that faces a seal surface on the rotor, where the axial moveable annular piston includes an inlet scoop on a side opposite to the annular cavity that scoops up the swirling cooling air and directs the cooling air to the annular cavity to form an air cushion with the seal surface of the rotor.

  18. Temperature logging as an aid to understanding groundwater flow in boreholes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conaway, J.G.

    1987-01-01

    Borehole temperatures are affected by a range of physical phenomena, including drilling and engineering procedures, thermal resistivity of the rock, surface climatic changes, local heat sources and sinks, free convection of the borehole fluid, and water flows inside the borehole. As a result, temperature logs provide unique information not available from other logs. On the other hand, because the temperature log is sensitive to a variety of phenomena, one or more of these may obscure the effect being studied. In the case where groundwater is entering the borehole at one depth and exiting at another depth (or at the surface) the temperature disturbance resulting from this flow is likely to be a prominent feature of the temperature profile of the borehole. Because of this, water flows in boreholes are often a source of noise in temperature logs, obscuring the features of interest. Recently, however, unusual groundwater behavior was noted in several boreholes at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), and temperature logs were run as part of a program to study this phenomenon. In this case the groundwater flow has been the feature of interest in the logs, and the logs have been useful as an aid in understanding the water flow in those boreholes.

  19. An analysis of the lithology to resistivity relationships using airborne EM and boreholes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfod, Adrian A.S.; Christiansen, Anders Vest; Møller, Ingelise

    2014-01-01

    We present a study of the relationship between dense airborne skyTEM resistivity data and sparse lithological borehole data. Understanding the resistivity structure of the subsurface is of great importance to hydrogeological surveys and to ensure a high standard for groundwater quality. Borehole ...

  20. Borehole Miner - Extendible Nozzle Development for Radioactive Waste Dislodging and Retrieval from Underground Storage Tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CW Enderlin; DG Alberts; JA Bamberger; M White

    1998-09-25

    This report summarizes development of borehole-miner extendible-nozzle water-jetting technology for dislodging and retrieving salt cake, sludge} and supernate to remediate underground storage tanks full of radioactive waste. The extendible-nozzle development was based on commercial borehole-miner technology.

  1. Flushing solutions for sinking boreholes in the complex conditions of Western Siberia and the Far East

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolaeva, L.V.; Demina, T.N.; Konovalov, V.S.; Ulybusheva, E.I.

    1979-01-01

    The presence of stable clay beds in the stratum is one feature of drilling boreholes in the fields of the Far East. Experience has been accumulated which makes it possible to establish the causes of complications in the boreholes of this region and their connection to the quality of the flushing solution. Formulae for solutions based on the local raw materials are proposed.

  2. Technical Network

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    In order to optimize the management of the Technical Network (TN), to ease the understanding and purpose of devices connected to the TN, and to improve security incident handling, the Technical Network Administrators and the CNIC WG have asked IT/CS to verify the "description" and "tag" fields of devices connected to the TN. Therefore, persons responsible for systems connected to the TN will receive email notifications from IT/CS asking them to add the corresponding information in the network database. Thank you very much for your cooperation. The Technical Network Administrators & the CNIC WG

  3. Technical Network

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    In order to optimise the management of the Technical Network (TN), to facilitate understanding of the purpose of devices connected to the TN and to improve security incident handling, the Technical Network Administrators and the CNIC WG have asked IT/CS to verify the "description" and "tag" fields of devices connected to the TN. Therefore, persons responsible for systems connected to the TN will receive e-mails from IT/CS asking them to add the corresponding information in the network database at "network-cern-ch". Thank you very much for your cooperation. The Technical Network Administrators & the CNIC WG

  4. Borehole Geologic Data for the 216-Z Crib Facilities, A Status of Data Assembled through the Hanford Borehole Geologic Information System (HBGIS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Last, George V.; Mackley, Rob D.; Lanigan, David C.

    2006-09-25

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is assembling existing borehole geologic information to aid in determining the distribution and potential movement of contaminants released to the environment and to aid selection of remedial alternatives. This information is being assembled via the Hanford Borehole Geologic Information System (HBGIS), which is being developed as part of the Characterization of Systems Project, managed by PNNL, and the Remediation Decision Support Task of the Groundwater Remediation Project, managed by Fluor Hanford, Inc. The purpose of this particular study was to assemble the existing borehole geologic data pertaining to sediments underlying the 216-Z Crib Facilities and the Plutonium Finishing Plant Closure Zone. The primary objective for Fiscal Year 2006 was to assemble the data, complete log plots, and interpret the location of major geologic contacts for each major borehole in and around the primary disposal facilities that received carbon tetrachloride. To date, 154 boreholes located within or immediately adjacent to 19 of the 216-Z crib facilities have been incorporated into HBGIS. Borehole geologic information for the remaining three Z-crib facilities is either lacking (e.g. 216-Z-13, -14, and -15), or has been identified as a lesser priority to be incorporated at a later date.

  5. On the use of borehole radar measurements for 3D assessment of structures in rock volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiren, S.A. [GEOSIGMA AB, Uppsala (Sweden)

    1998-09-01

    Construction of a three-dimensional model of an area, for example a site for radioactive waste disposal, requires subsurface extrapolation of surface data and interpolation of subsurface and surface data. Such structural interpretation is based on local information in the perspective of the regional structural setting of the site. The SKB borehole radar, which can detect structures within a radius of 15 to 25 m around the borehole, is one of the most important sources of geometrical information from boreholes. Directional borehole radar measurements produce information on the angle ({alpha}) at which a feature intersects the borehole and the location (azimuth) relative to the borehole. Although the azimuthal information is important for the subsequent interpretation, the critical parameter that determines whether the feature is detected by the radar appears to be the {alpha}-angle. In this paper, the performance of the radar tool concerning {alpha}-angles is studied. The reason for undertaking the study was that predicted low angle intersections between boreholes and structures were not identified. This suggests that the relationship between the sampled population and the target population needs to be investigated. The analysed data sets comprise 307 reflectors from the Romuvaara site in Finland and 307 reflectors from the cored boreholes in the Hard Rock Laboratory at Aespoe. In the Aespoe bedrock, the shape of the frequency histogram displaying the {alpha}-angles is very consistent throughout the area. A brief comparison of amplitudes and reflectivity shows that the shape of the frequency histogram is tool-dependent rather than depending on the physical properties of the zones. The potential of the borehole radar to detect structures intersecting the borehole at very high angles is low due to the transmitter-receiver configuration of the tool. In the Aespoe radar data, the range of the borehole radar appears to be narrower than expected, with very few radar

  6. Investigating the sealing capacity of a seal system in rock salt (DOPAS project)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantschik, Kyra; Moog, Helge C.; Czaikowski, Oliver; Wieczorek, Klaus [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) gGmbH, Braunschweig (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    This paper describes research and development work on plugging and sealing repositories, an issue of fundamental importance for the rock salt option which represents one of the three European repository options, besides the clay rock and the crystalline rock options. The programme aims at providing experimental data needed for the theoretical analysis of the long-term sealing capacity of concrete- based sealing materials. In order to demonstrate hydro-mechanical material stability under representative load scenarios, a comprehensive laboratory testing programme is carried out. This comprises investigation of the sealing capacity of the combined seal system and impact of the so-called excavation-damaged zones (EDZ) as well as investigation of the hydro-chemical long-term stability of the seal in contact with different brines under diffusive and advective conditions. This paper presents experimental approaches and preliminary results from laboratory investigations on salt concrete and combined systems as obtained to date.

  7. Effect of bar sealing parameters on OPP/MCPP heat seal strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The effect of bar sealing parameters on the heat seal strength of oriented polypropylene (OPP/metallic cast polypropylene (MCPP laminate film was investigated. Based on the results obtained from the parametric study, a bar sealing process window was developed. All points drop within the process window are combinations of platen temperature and dwell time that produce acceptable heat seal. Optimum combinations are indicated by the lower border of the window. The plateau initiation temperature, Tpi of OPP/MCPP laminate film used in the present study occurred before the final melting temperature, Tmf of the sealant material. The highest achievable heat seal strength was at the plateau region, and the corresponding failure modes were delaminating, tearing or combine failure modes (delaminating and tearing. Minimum pressure level of 1.25 bars is necessary to bring the laminate interface into intimate contact in order to effect sealing.

  8. Site characterization data from the Area 5 science boreholes, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blout, D.O.; Hammermeister, P.; Zukosky, K.A.

    1995-02-01

    The Science Borehole Project consists of eight boreholes that were drilled (from 45.7 m [150 ft] to 83.8 m [275 ft] depth) in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, on behalf of the US Department of Energy. These boreholes are part of the Area 5 Site Characterization Program developed to meet data needs associated with regulatory requirements applicable to the disposal of low-level and mixed waste at this site. This series of boreholes was specifically designed to characterize parameters controlling near-surface gas transport and to monitor changes in these and liquid flow-related parameters over time. These boreholes are located along the four sides of the approximately 2.6-km{sup 2} (1-mi{sup 2}) Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site to provide reasonable spatial coverage for sampling and characterization. Laboratory testing results of samples taken from core and drill cuttings are reported.

  9. Finite Element Analysis of Elastomeric Seals for LIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald, Jay J.; Daniels, Christopher C.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Create a means of evaluating seals w/o prototypes. Motivation: Cost Prototype 54" seal approx.$100k per seal pair FEA license + high end workstation approx. $30k per year. Development time: 6 months lead time for a new seal design Many designs per day (solution time <1 minute) Understanding: Difficult to experimentally measure strains, contact pressure profile, stresses, displacements

  10. Non-contacting fluid ring seal systems for railcar axle bearing systems: Quarterly progress report No. 1, June 15 to September 15, 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    The main objectives of this DOE contract is the technical development of a practical, cost effective Fluid Ring seal system capable of: Drastically reducing locomotive drawbar traction power requirements by lowering seal friction losses prevalent in present railcar axle bearing systems; increasing reliability and safety of railroad cars by minimizing bearing lubricant leakage and minimizing bearing ''hot boxes''; and improving the productivity of the railway transportation systems by reducing rolling stock ''outages'' due to long seal life. 14 refs.

  11. Self-Sealing Wet Chemistry Cell for Field Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beegle, Luther W.; Soto, Juancarlos; Lasnik, James; Roark, Shane

    2012-01-01

    In most analytical investigations, there is a need to process complex field samples for the unique detection of analytes, especially when detecting low concentration organic molecules that may identify extraterrestrial life. Wet chemistry based instruments are the techniques of choice for most laboratory- based analysis of organic molecules due to several factors including less fragmentation of fragile biomarkers, and ability to concentrate target species resulting in much lower limits of detection. Development of an automated wet chemistry preparation system that can operate autonomously on Earth and is also designed to operate under Martian ambient conditions will demonstrate the technical feasibility of including wet chemistry on future missions. An Automated Sample Processing System (ASPS) has recently been developed that receives fines, extracts organics through solvent extraction, processes the extract by removing non-organic soluble species, and delivers sample to multiple instruments for analysis (including for non-organic soluble species). The key to this system is a sample cell that can autonomously function under field conditions. As a result, a self-sealing sample cell was developed that can autonomously hermetically seal fines and powder into a container, regardless of orientation of the apparatus. The cap is designed with a beveled edge, which allows the cap to be self-righted as the capping motor engages. Each cap consists of a C-clip lock ring below a crucible O-ring that is placed into a groove cut into the sample cap.

  12. Sealing concepts for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, C.L.; Gulick, C.W.; Lambert, S.J.

    1982-09-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) facility is proposed for development in the southeast portion of the State of New Mexico. The proposed horizon is in bedded salt located approximately 2150 ft below the surface. The purpose of the WIPP is to provide an R&D facility to demonstrate the safe disposal of radioactive wastes resulting from defense activities of the United States. As such, it will include a disposal demonstration for transuranic (TRU) wastes and an experimental area to address issues associated with disposal of defense high level wastes (DHLW) in bedded salt. All DHLW used in the experiments are planned for retrieval at the termination of testing; the TRU waste can be permanently disposed of at the site after the pilot phase is complete. This report addresses only the Plugging and Sealing program, which will result in an adequate and acceptable technology for final sealing and decommissioning of the facility at the WIPP site. The actual plugging operations are intended to be conducted on a commercial industrial basis through contracts issued by the DOE. This report is one in a series that is based on a technical program of modeling, laboratory materials testing and field demonstration which will provide a defensible basis for the actual plugging operations to be conducted by the DOE for final closure of the facility.

  13. Deep boreholes - Status and analysis of consequences of application in Sweden; Djupa borrhaal - Status och analys av konsekvenserna vid anvaendning i Sverige

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grundfelt, Bertil; Wiborgh, Marie [Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2006-09-15

    wide and deep holes. The investigation also concludes that traditional drilling fluids probably cannot be used. It is recommended that stiff foam that binds the cuttings should be used instead. The bottom line of the study is that it is probable that existing technology can be used to produce the deposition holes but that this will be the greatest challenge the drilling industry has been exposed to. Based on the design solution proposed in the Pass study, 45 holes are required for the disposal of the spent fuel from 40 years operation of the Swedish nuclear reactors. Each borehole will require a surface facility of about 1 ha. This area would host a 60-80 metres tall drilling rig together with the buildings and facilities needed for drilling, handling and dewatering of dill cuttings, casing of the hole, disposal of the spent fuel and sealing the hole after the disposal. The distance between the holes has been set to 500 metres, in order to avoid that holes deviating from the vertical direction come too close to each other. If the conditions on the ground and geological conditions allow, the repository can be hosted within a surface area of about 10 km{sup 2}. Within the present study, it has been estimated that 5-10 drilling sites need to be in operation for disposal or under construction simultaneously, in order to achieve a disposal time that is adapted to the Swedish nuclear programme. The available information about the geoscientific conditions at great depths in crystalline rock is based on only few boreholes, none of which are located in an area that would be a candidate repository site. The water turnover at these great depths is generally assumed to be low whereas the groundwater salinity, temperatures and rock stresses are expected to increase with an increasing depth. Today there is no established or even well thought-out technology for disposal of canisters with spent nuclear fuel in deep boreholes. In the proposed possible solutions the disposal is carried

  14. Improved Gas Seal for Electrolytic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, R.

    1984-01-01

    Breakage by differential thermal expansion reduced. Cells for hot electrolysis of gases improved by design that reduces vulnerability of gas seals to breakage at operating temperature of about 1000 degrees C.

  15. HMSRP Hawaiian Monk Seal Survival Factors

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains records of survival factors recorded by PSD personnel and cooperating scientists as part of the ongoing monk seal population assessment...

  16. HMSRP Hawaiian Monk Seal Survey Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains records of Hawaiian monk seal and green turtle sightings in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (NWHI) since 1982 at Lisianski Island, and since...

  17. HMSRP Hawaiian Monk Seal Tag Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains records for all tags applied to Hawaiian monk seals since 1981. These tags were applied by PSD personnel and cooperating scientists as part of...

  18. HMSRP Hawaiian Monk Seals on Social Media

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — As social media platforms develop, they potentially provide valuable information for wildlife researchers and managers. NOAA’s Hawaiian Monk Seal Research Program...

  19. HMSRP Hawaiian Monk Seal Necropsy Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains information on Hawaiian monk seal gross necropsy (in some cases only field notes or minimal information) and histopathology results beginning...

  20. HMSRP Hawaiian Monk Seal Photo Identification Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This photo collection contains identification and other images and video of Hawaiian monk seals taken by PSD personnel and cooperating scientists as part of the...

  1. Temporary fire sealing of penetrations on TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hondorp, H.L.

    1981-02-01

    The radiation shielding provided for TFTR for D-D and D-T operation will be penetrated by numerous electrical and mechanical services. Eventually, these penetrations will have to be sealed to provide the required fire resistance, tritium sealability, pressure integrity and radiation attenuation. For the initial hydrogen operation, however, fire sealing of the penetrations in the walls and floor is the primary concern. This report provides a discussion of the required and desirable properties of a temporary seal which can be used to seal these penetrations for the hydrogen operation and then subsequently be removed and replaced as required for the D-D and D-T operations. Several candidate designs are discussed and evaluated and recommendations are made for specific applications.

  2. Properties of Sealing Materials in Groundwater Wells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Köser, Claus

    on the maximum swelling pressure; i) the bulk density of the sample, and ii) whether the sample is sorted or unsorted. CT scans (Computed Tomography) have been used to evaluate certain properties of bentonite seals in a limited volume. In this context, a set of algorithms to convert CT numbers (HU unit......) into densities for clay/water systems has been developed. This method has successfully been used to evaluate e.g., macroporosity, homogenization of the bentonite seal during the hydration of water, hydraulic conductivity and the creation of channels in the bentonite seals. Based on the results obtained...... in this Ph.D. thesis, a number of recommendations has been offered; i) a change regarding the production of pellets and ii) how sealing material must be treated in the actual construction of groundwater wells....

  3. HMSRP Hawaiian Monk Seal Microsatellite Genotypes

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Currently ~2,400 Hawaiian monk seal specimens have been analyzed genetically, providing genotypes at 18 microsatellite loci. These data are organized by individual,...

  4. Epoxy resins used to seal brachytherapy seed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Natalia Carolina Camargos; Ferraz, Wilmar Barbosa; Reis, Sergio Carneiro dos; Santos, Ana Maria Matildes dos, E-mail: nccf@cdtn.br, E-mail: ferrazw@cdtn.br, E-mail: reissc@cdtn.br, E-mail: amms@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, BH (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Prostate cancer treatment with brachytherapy is recommended for patients with cancer at an early stage. In this treatment, small radioactive seeds are implanted directly in the prostate gland. These seeds are composed at least of one radionuclide carrier and an X-ray marker enclosed within a metallic tube usually sealed by laser process. This process is expensive and, furthermore, it can provoke a partial volatilization of the radionuclide and change the isotropy in dose distribution around the seed. In this paper, we present a new sealing process using epoxy resin. Three kinds of resins were utilized and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X ray (EDS) and by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) after immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) and in sodium iodine solution (NaI). The sealing process showed excellent potential to replace the sealing laser usually employed. (author)

  5. HMSRP Hawaiian Monk Seal Fisheries Interactions data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data set contains records of all documented hookings and/or entanglements of Hawaiian monk seals with actively fished gear, both commercial and recreational. The...

  6. Contamination and potential impacts to monk seals

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — There are six main Hawaiian monk seal breeding colonies (French Frigate Shoals, Kure Atoll, Laysan Island, Lisianski Island, Pearl and Hermes Reef and Midway Atoll)...

  7. Reactor coolant pump shaft seal stability during station blackout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhodes, D B; Hill, R C; Wensel, R G

    1987-05-01

    Results are presented from an investigation into the behavior of Reactor Coolant Pump shaft seals during a potential station blackout (loss of all ac power) at a nuclear power plant. The investigation assumes loss of cooling to the seals and focuses on the effect of high temperature on polymer seals located in the shaft seal assemblies, and the identification of parameters having the most influence on overall hydraulic seal performance. Predicted seal failure thresholds are presented for a range of station blackout conditions and shaft seal geometries.

  8. A novel muon detector for borehole density tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonneville, Alain; Kouzes, Richard T.; Yamaoka, Jared; Rowe, Charlotte; Guardincerri, Elena; Durham, J. Matthew; Morris, Christopher L.; Poulson, Daniel C.; Plaud-Ramos, Kenie; Morley, Deborah J.; Bacon, Jeffrey D.; Bynes, James; Cercillieux, Julien; Ketter, Chris; Le, Khanh; Mostafanezhad, Isar; Varner, Gary; Flygare, Joshua; Lintereur, Azaree T.

    2017-04-01

    Muons can be used to image the density of materials through which they pass, including geological structures. Subsurface applications of the technology include tracking fluid migration during injection or production, with increasing concern regarding such timely issues as induced seismicity or chemical leakage into aquifers. Current density monitoring options include gravimetric data collection and active or passive seismic surveys. One alternative, or complement, to these methods is the development of a muon detector that is sufficiently compact and robust for deployment in a borehole. Such a muon detector can enable imaging of density structure to monitor small changes in density - a proxy for fluid migration - at depths up to 1500 m. Such a detector has been developed, and Monte Carlo modeling methods applied to simulate the anticipated detector response. Testing and measurements using a prototype detector in the laboratory and shallow underground laboratory demonstrated robust response. A satisfactory comparison with a large drift tube-based muon detector is also presented.

  9. Elastic wave scattering to characterize heterogeneities in the borehole environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiao-Ming; Li, Zhen; Hei, Chuang; Su, Yuan-Da

    2016-04-01

    Scattering due to small-scale heterogeneities in the rock formation surrounding a wellbore can significantly change the acoustic waveform from a logging measurement which in turn can be used to characterize the formation heterogeneities. This study simulates the elastic heterogeneity scattering in monopole and dipole acoustic logging and analyse the resulting effects on the waveforms. The results show that significant coda waves are generated in both monopole and dipole waveforms and the dipole coda is dominated by S-to-S scattering, which can be effectively utilized to diagnose the heterogeneity in the rock formation. The coda wave modelling and analysis were used to characterize dipole acoustic data logged before and after fracturing a reservoir interval, with significant coda wave in the after-fracturing data indicating fracturing-induced heterogeneous property change in the rock volume surrounding the borehole.

  10. Non-integral dimensions ultrasonic phased arrays in a borehole

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Bixing; ZHANG Chengguang; Deng Fangqing

    2009-01-01

    The non-integral dimensions ultrasonic phased arrays and their scanning and test-ing methods in a borehole are studied. First, the focusing acoustic fields excited by the 1.25D, 1.5D, and 1.75D phased arrays are analyzed, and then the imaging resolution in the elevation direction and the influence of the dynamic elements are investigated. Second, the focusing and deflexion characteristics of the acoustic fields excited by the annular and segmented annular phased arrays are studied, and they are compared with those excited by the 2D surface array. The application method of the 1.25D, 1.5D, and 1.75D, annular and segmented annular phased arrays in acoustic logging are analyzed and discussed. It provides a theoretical foundation for the application of the ultrasonic phased arrays in acoustic logging.

  11. OSL-thermochronometry of feldspar from the KTB borehole, Germany

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guralnik, Benny; Jain, Mayank; Herman, Frédéric;

    2015-01-01

    The reconstruction of thermal histories of rocks (thermochronometry) is a fundamental tool both in Earth science and in geological exploration. However, few methods are currently capable of resolving the low-temperature thermal evolution of the upper ∼2 km of the Earth's crust. Here we introduce...... the current geothermal gradient, or (ii) inverted into a geothermal palaeogradient of 29±2 °C km−1, integrating natural thermal conditions over the last ∼65 ka. The demonstrated ability to invert a depth–luminescence dataset into a meaningful geothermal palaeogradient opens new venues for reconstructing...... recent ambient temperatures of the shallow crust (200 °C Ma−1 range). Although Na-feldspar IRSL is prone to field saturation in colder or slower environments, the method's primary relevance appears to be for borehole and tunnel studies, where it may offer remarkably recent (...

  12. Probe for temperature logging of deep cold boreholes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zangirolami, M.; Cavagnero, G.; Rossi, A.

    2003-04-01

    A new probe has been developed for measuring some physical parameters in deep cold boreholes such as those of the European Project for Ice Coring in Antarctica (EPICA), which is targeted to drill two holes through the ice sheet down to the bedrock at DOME C and at Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica. The probe is operative in the temperature range 0 to -60^oC and for pressures up to 35 MPa, down to 3500 m depth and in the presence of aggressive fluid filling. The probe is equipped with : 1) a set of four thermometers. Three are fitted in the expandable arms of the probe, to log the temperature of the ice-wall. The fourth thermometer is fitted into a static arm in a central position, between the previous three, and logs the temperature of the borehole fluid, for comparison. Thermistor-type sensors have been selected, with a resolution of 2 mK in the interval near 0^oC. During laboratory tests a time constant of 2.7 s was obtained for the thermal sensors fitted in their protective case. After final assemblage of the probe the sensors were calibrated in the laboratory against a standard precision thermometer, over the range 0 to -60^oC; 2) a sensor for differential measurement of the pressure of the liquid column of the drill fluid, with a resolution of a few 10-6 MPa, sufficient to detect any convective cells, induced by the dishomogeneous composition of the mixing fluids; 3) a manometer (strain gauge) for measuring the hydrostatic pressure of the fluid column in the full range 0 to 35 MPa, from the surface to bottom hole, with a resolution better than 0.001 of the full range; 4) a vertical depth meter for direct measurement of depth on the wall of the borehole, to eliminate any uncertainties caused by variations in the length of the electro-mechanical drilling wire due to the fatigue and strain of drilling operations. The progressive depths are measured by a wheel counter and encoder on the upper arms of the probe, with an expected resolution better than 10-3; 5) a

  13. Emergency sacrificial sealing method in filters, equipment, or systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Erik P

    2014-09-30

    A system seals a filter or equipment component to a base and will continue to seal the filter or equipment component to the base in the event of hot air or fire. The system includes a first sealing material between the filter or equipment component and the base; and a second sealing material between the filter or equipment component and the base and proximate the first sealing material. The first sealing material and the second seal material are positioned relative to each other and relative to the filter or equipment component and the base to seal the filter or equipment component to the base and upon the event of fire the second sealing material will be activated and expand to continue to seal the filter or equipment component to the base in the event of hot air or fire.

  14. Application study of magnetic fluid seal in hydraulic turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Z. Y.; Zhang, W.

    2012-11-01

    The waterpower resources of our country are abundant, and the hydroelectric power is developed, but at present the main shaft sealing device of hydraulic turbine is easy to wear and tear and the leakage is great. The magnetic fluid seal has the advantages of no contact, no wear, self-healing, long life and so on. In this paper, the magnetic fluid seal would be used in the main shaft of hydraulic turbine, the sealing structure was built the model, meshed the geometry, applied loads and solved by using MULTIPHYSICS in ANSYS software, the influence of the various sealing structural parameters such as tooth width, height, slot width, sealing gap on the sealing property were analyzed, the magnetic fluid sealing device suitable for large-diameter shaft and sealing water was designed, the sealing problem of the hydraulic turbine main shaft was solved effectively which will bring huge economic benefits.

  15. Emergency sacrificial sealing method in filters, equipment, or systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Erik P.

    2017-02-28

    A system seals a filter or equipment component to abase and will continue to seal the filter or equipment component to the base in the event of hot air or fire. The system includes a first sealing material between the filter or equipment component and the base; and a second sealing material between the filter or equipment component and the base and proximate the first sealing material. The first sealing material and the second seal material are positioned relative to each other and relative to the filter or equipment component and the base to seal the filter or equipment component to the base and upon the event of fire the second sealing material will be activated and expand to continue to seal the filter or equipment component to the base in the event of hot air or fire.

  16. Borehole geophysical logging and aquifer-isolation tests conducted in well MG-1693 at North Penn Area 5 Superfund Site near Colmar, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Philip H.

    2006-01-01

    hydraulic connection outside the borehole with intervals above and below the isolated interval. The specific capacities of intervals 9, 11, 12, and 13 were similar: 2.12, 2.17, 3.09, and 3.08 (gal/min)/ft, respectively. The aquifer-isolation tests indicate that wells MG-1693 (NP-87) and MG-924 (NP-21) are connected primarily through the high-angle fracture from 416 to 435 ft bls. Pumping in either of these wells directly impacts the other well, allowing the pumped well to draw from water-bearing zones in the non-pumped well that are not present in or are not connected directly to the pumped well. The two boreholes act as a single, U-shaped well. The aquifer-isolation tests also show that the lower zones in well MG-1693 (NP-87) are a major source of hydraulic head in well MG-1661 (W-13) through the broken casing joint at 82 ft bls. Water moving upward from the lower intervals in well MG-1693 (NP-87) exits the borehole through the broken casing joint, moves upward outside the borehole, possibly around and (or) through a poor or damaged casing seal, and through the weathered zone above bedrock to well MG-1661 (W-13). Samples for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were collected in nine isolated intervals. Six compounds were detected (1,1-dichloroethane, 1,1-dichloroethene, cis-1,2-dichloroethene, toluene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and trichloroethene (TCE)), and TCE was found in all nine isolated intervals. Intervals 4 (124-149 ft bls) and 6 (277-302 ft bls) had the highest total concentration of VOCs (6.66 and 6.2 micrograms per liter, respectively). Intervals 1 (68-93 ft bls) and 4 each had five compounds detected, which was the highest number of compounds detected. Interval 5 (252-277 ft bls) had the lowest total concentration of VOCs (0.08 microgram per liter) and the least number of VOCs detected (one). Detected compounds were not evenly distributed throughout the intervals. Contaminants were found in shallow, intermediate, and deep intervals and were associated with

  17. The Advantage of Sensor Sealing Laser Welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Yezhi; XU yu

    2007-01-01

    @@ Laser Welding Inevitably Applied in Sen sor Production Certain kinds of sensors such as pressure sensor,temperature sensor, optic-electronic sensor etc. utilize welding seal according to different application environment. With precision components and IC which is isolated by inert gas inside, these sensors should be sealed and able to resist the pressure. So the welding process must avoid distortion and harm to the components and IC.

  18. Some Aspects of Sealed Nickel Cadmium Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. K. Saha

    1967-11-01

    Full Text Available Sealed Nickel Cadmium Cell system is termed till today as the most reliable power pack for electronic apparatus specially in low temperature use. This paper brings out the development and production of sealed nickel cadmium cells of pocket plate construction. The author who has gained experience in production of Ni-Cd cells in East Germany discusses also the major problems faced by the battery manufactures of to-day.

  19. Anodizing And Sealing Aluminum In Nonchromated Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmons, John R.; Kallenborn, Kelli J.

    1995-01-01

    Improved process for anodizing and sealing aluminum involves use of 5 volume percent sulfuric acid in water as anodizing solution, and 1.5 to 2.0 volume percent nickel acetate in water as sealing solution. Replaces process in which sulfuric acid used at concentrations of 10 to 20 percent. Improved process yields thinner coats offering resistance to corrosion, fatigue life, and alloy-to-alloy consistency equal to or superior to those of anodized coats produced with chromated solutions.

  20. Troubleshooting ProSeal LMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bimla Sharma

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Supraglottic devices have changed the face of the airway management. These devices have contributed in a big way in airway management especially, in the difficult airway scenario significantly decreasing the pharyngolaryngeal morbidity. There is a plethora of these devices, which has been well matched by their wider acceptance in clinical practice. ProSeal laryngeal mask airway (PLMA is one such frequently used device employed for spontaneous as well as controlled ventilation. However, the use of PLMAat tunes maybe associated with certain problems. Some of the problems related with its use are unique while others are akin to the classic laryngeal mask airway (eLMA. However, expertise is needed for its safe and judicious use, correct placement, recognition and management of its various malpositions and complications. The present article describes the tests employed for proper confirmation of placementto assess the ventilatooy and the drain tube functions of the mask, diagnosis of various malpositions and the management of these aspects. All these areas have been highlighted under the heading of troubleshooting PLMA. Many problems can be solved by proper patient and procedure selection, maintaining adequate depth of anaesthesia, diagnosis and management of malpositions. Proper fixation of the device and monitoring cuff pressure intraopera-tively may bring down the incidence of airway morbidity.

  1. Aerodynamical sealing by air curtains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Daria; Linden, Paul

    2015-11-01

    Air curtains are artificial high-velocity plane turbulent jets which are installed in a doorway in order to reduce the heat and the mass exchange between two environments. The performance of an air curtain is assessed in terms of the sealing effectiveness E, the fraction of the exchange flow prevented by the air curtain compared to the open-door situation. The main controlling parameter for air curtain dynamics is the deflection modulus Dm representing the ratio of the momentum flux of the air curtain and the transverse forces acting on it due to the stack effect. In this talk, we examine the influence of two factors on the performance of an air curtain: the presence of an additional ventilation pathway in the room, such as a small top opening, and the effects of an opposing buoyancy force which for example arises if a downwards blowing air curtain is heated. Small-scale experiments were conducted to investigate the E (Dm) -curve of an air curtain in both situations. We present both experimental results and theoretical explanations for our observations. We also briefly illustrate how simplified models developed for air curtains can be used for more complex phenomena such as the effects of wind blowing around a model building on the ventilation rates through the openings.

  2. Rock stress orientation measurements using induced thermal spalling in slim boreholes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakami, Eva [Geosigma AB, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2011-05-15

    In the planning and design of a future underground storage for nuclear waste based on the KBS-3 method, one of the aims is to optimize the layout of deposition tunnels such that the rock stresses on the boundaries of deposition holes are minimized. Previous experiences from heating of larger scale boreholes at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (AHRL) gave rise to the idea that induced borehole breakouts using thermal loading in smaller diameter boreholes, could be a possible way of determining the stress orientation. Two pilot experiments were performed, one at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory and one at ONKALO research site in Finland. An acoustic televiewer logger was used to measure the detailed geometrical condition of the borehole before and after heating periods. The acoustic televiewer gives a value for each 0.7 mm large pixel size around the borehole periphery. The results from the loggers are presented as images of the borehole wall, and as curves for the maximum, mean and minimum values at each depth. Any changes in the borehole wall geometry may thus be easily detected by comparisons of the logging result images. In addition, using an optical borehole televiewer a good and detailed realistic colour picture of the borehole wall is obtained. From these images the character of the spalls identified may be evaluated further. The heating was performed in a 4 m long section, using a heating cable centred in an 8 m deep vertical borehole, drilled from the floor of the tunnels. For the borehole in the Q-tunnel of AHRL the results from the loggings of the borehole before the heating revealed that breakouts existed even before this pilot test due to previous heating experiments at the site (CAPS). Quite consistent orientation and the typical shape of small breakouts were observed. After the heating the spalling increased slightly at the same locations and a new spalling location also developed at a deeper location in the borehole. At ONKALO three very small changes

  3. Adhesive sealing of the pulp chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belli, S; Zhang, Y; Pereira, P N; Pashley, D H

    2001-08-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate quantitatively the ability of four different filling materials to seal the orifices of root canals as a secondary seal after root canal therapy. Forty extracted human molar teeth were used. The top of pulp chambers and distal halves of the roots were removed using an Isomet saw. The canal orifices were temporarily sealed with a gutta-percha master cone without sealer. The pulp chambers were then treated with a self-etching primer adhesive system (Clearfil SE Bond), a wet bonding system (One-Step), a 4-methacryloyloxyethyl trimellitate anhydride adhesive system (C&B Metabond), or a reinforced zinc oxide-eugenol (IRM). The specimens were randomly divided into four groups of 10 each. A fluid filtration method was used for quantitative evaluation of leakage. Measurements of fluid movement were made at 2-min intervals for 8 min. The quality of the seal of each specimen was measured by fluid filtration immediately and after 1 day, 1 wk, and 1 month. Even after 1 month the resins showed an excellent seal. Zinc oxide-eugenol had significantly more leakage when compared with the resin systems (p < 0.05). Adhesive resins should be considered as a secondary seal to prevent intraorifice microleakage.

  4. Predicting edge seal performance from accelerated testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardikar, Kedar; Vitkavage, Dan; Saproo, Ajay; Krajewski, Todd

    2014-10-01

    Degradation in performance of a PV module attributable to moisture ingress has received significant attention in PV reliability research. Assessment of field performance of PV modules against moisture ingress through product-level testing in temperature-humidity control chambers poses challenges. Development of a meaningful acceleration factor model is challenging due to different rates of degradation of components embedded in a PV module, when exposed to moisture. Test results are typically a convolution of moisture barrier performance of the edge seal and degradation of laminated components when exposed to moisture. It is desirable to have an alternate method by which moisture barrier performance of the edge seal in its end product form can be assessed in any given field conditions, independent of particular cell design. In this work, a relatively inexpensive test technique was developed to test the edge seal in its end product form in a manner that is decoupled from other components of the PV module. A theoretical framework was developed to assess moisture barrier performance of edge seal with desiccants subjected to different conditions. This framework enables the analysis of test results from accelerated tests and prediction of the field performance of the edge seal. Results from this study lead to the conclusion that the edge seal on certain Miasole glass-glass modules studied is effective for the most aggressive weather conditions examined, beyond the intended service.

  5. Completion summary for borehole USGS 136 near the Advanced Test Reactor Complex, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twining, Brian V.; Bartholomay, Roy C.; Hodges, Mary K.V.

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, cored and completed borehole USGS 136 for stratigraphic framework analyses and long-term groundwater monitoring of the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer at the Idaho National Laboratory. The borehole was initially cored to a depth of 1,048 feet (ft) below land surface (BLS) to collect core, open-borehole water samples, and geophysical data. After these data were collected, borehole USGS 136 was cemented and backfilled between 560 and 1,048 ft BLS. The final construction of borehole USGS 136 required that the borehole be reamed to allow for installation of 6-inch (in.) diameter carbon-steel casing and 5-in. diameter stainless-steel screen; the screened monitoring interval was completed between 500 and 551 ft BLS. A dedicated pump and water-level access line were placed to allow for aquifer testing, for collecting periodic water samples, and for measuring water levels. Geophysical and borehole video logs were collected after coring and after the completion of the monitor well. Geophysical logs were examined in conjunction with the borehole core to describe borehole lithology and to identify primary flow paths for groundwater, which occur in intervals of fractured and vesicular basalt. A single-well aquifer test was used to define hydraulic characteristics for borehole USGS 136 in the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer. Specific-capacity, transmissivity, and hydraulic conductivity from the aquifer test were at least 975 gallons per minute per foot, 1.4 × 105 feet squared per day (ft2/d), and 254 feet per day, respectively. The amount of measureable drawdown during the aquifer test was about 0.02 ft. The transmissivity for borehole USGS 136 was in the range of values determined from previous aquifer tests conducted in other wells near the Advanced Test Reactor Complex: 9.5 × 103 to 1.9 × 105 ft2/d. Water samples were analyzed for cations, anions, metals, nutrients, total organic

  6. Sealing device and method for sealing fractures or leaks in wall or formation surrounding tube-shaped channel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    (11) arranged between the second annular flow barrier (8) and a third annular flow barrier (12) and including a sealing fluid activation device (13) adapted to at least initiate or accelerate curing of the sealing fluid (17). In operation, the elongated body may be displaced along the tube......-shaped channel until the sealing fluid activation section is placed at a position where sealing fluid has been ejected by the sealing fluid placement section, and the sealing fluid activation device may be activated. Thereby, sealing fluid may be cured at selected locations along the tube-shaped channel after...

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF A CERAMIC TAMPER INDICATING SEAL: SRNL CONTRIBUTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krementz, D.; Brinkman, K.; Martinez-Rodriguez, M.; Mendez-Torres, A.; Weeks, G.

    2013-06-03

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) are collaborating on development of a Ceramic Seal, also sometimes designated the Intrinsically Tamper Indicating Ceramic Seal (ITICS), which is a tamper indicating seal for international safeguards applications. The Ceramic Seal is designed to be a replacement for metal loop seals that are currently used by the IAEA and other safeguards organizations. The Ceramic Seal has numerous features that enhance the security of the seal, including a frangible ceramic body, protective and tamper indicating coatings, an intrinsic unique identifier using Laser Surface Authentication, electronics incorporated into the seal that provide cryptographic seal authentication, and user-friendly seal wire capture. A second generation prototype of the seal is currently under development whose seal body is of Low Temperature Co-fired Ceramic (LTCC) construction. SRNL has developed the mechanical design of the seal in an iterative process incorporating comments from the SNL vulnerability review team. SRNL is developing fluorescent tamper indicating coatings, with recent development focusing on optimizing the durability of the coatings and working with a vendor to develop a method to apply coatings on a 3-D surface. SRNL performed a study on the effects of radiation on the electronics of the seal and possible radiation shielding techniques to minimize the effects. SRNL is also investigating implementation of Laser Surface Authentication (LSA) as a means of unique identification of each seal and the effects of the surface coatings on the LSA signature.

  8. Mini-CORK observatories using the MeBo seafloor drill rig - a new development for long-term data acquisition and sampling in shallow boreholes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopf, A.; Freudenthal, T.; Ratmeyer, V.; Bergenthal, M.; Renken, J.; Zabel, M.; Wefer, G.

    2011-12-01

    State of the art technology for long-term monitoring of fluid migration within the sea floor is the sealing of a borehole with a Circulation Obviation Retrofit Kit (CORK) after sensor installation and/or fluid sampling devices within the drill string. However, the combined used of a drilling vessels and a remotely operated drilling (ROV) required for a CORK installation in the deep sea is a costly exercise that limits the number of monitoring stations installed. Robotic sea floor drill rigs are a cost effective alternative for shallow drillings down to 50-100 m below sea floor. Here we present a Mini-CORK system that is developed for installation with the sea floor drill rig MeBo. This rig was developed at MARUM Research Centre, University of Bremen in 2005 and can sample the sea floor in water depths up to 2000 m. The MeBo is deployed on the seabed and remotely controlled from the vessel. All required drill tools for wire-line core drilling down to 70 m below sea floor are stored on two rotating magazines and can be loaded below the top drive drill head for assembling the drill string. For one of the upcoming cruises with RV Sonne offshore Japan (Nankai Trough accretionary prism), MeBo will be used for the first time to place observatories. Two different designs have been developed. The first, relatively simple long-term device resembles a MeBo drill rod in its geometry, and contains a pressure and temperature transducer in the borehole plus an identical pair of transducers for seafloor reference. The device also contains a data logger, battery unit, and an acoustic modem so that data can be downloaded at any time from a ship of opportunity. The key element at the base of the observatory rod is a seal at the conical thread to separate the borehole hydraulically from the overlying water body. It is realized by an adapter, which also contains a hotstab hydraulic connection and an electrical connection. The second observatory device is a seafloor unit, which replaces

  9. Very deep borehole. Deutag's opinion on boring, canister emplacement and retrievability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, Tim [Well Engineering Partners BV, The Hague (Netherlands)

    2000-05-01

    An engineering feasibility study has been carried out to determine whether or not it is possible to drill the proposed Very Deep Borehole concept wells required by SKB for nuclear waste disposal. A conceptual well design has been proposed. All aspects of well design have been considered, including drilling tools, rig design, drilling fluids, casing design and annulus isolation. The proposed well design is for 1168.4 mm hole to be drilled to 500 m. A 1066.8 mm outer diameter (OD) casing will be run and cemented. A 1016 mm hole will be drilled to approximately 2000 m, where 914.4 mm OD casing will be run. This annulus will be sealed with bentonite slurry apart from the bottom 100 m which will be cemented. 838.2 mm hole will be drilled to a final depth of 4000 m, where 762 mm OD slotted casing will be run. All the hole sections will be drilled using a downhole hammer with foam as the drilling fluid medium. Prior to running each casing string, the hole will be displaced to mud to assist with casing running and cementing. The waste canisters will be run on a simple J-slot tool, with integral backup system in case the J-slot fails. The canisters will all be centralised. Canisters can be retrieved using the same tool as used to run them. Procedures are given for both running and retrieving. Logging and testing is recommended only in the exploratory wells, in a maximum hole size of 311.1 mm. This will require the drilling of pilot holes to enable logging and testing to take place. It is estimated that each well will take approximately 137 days to drill and case, at an estimated cost of 4.65 Meuro per well. This time and cost estimate does not include any logging, testing, pilot hole drilling or time taken to run the canisters. New technology developments to enhance the drilling process are required in recyclable foam systems, in hammer bit technology, and in the development of robust under-reamers. It is the authors conclusion that it is possible to drill the well with

  10. Heartworm (Acanthocheilonema spirocauda) and seal louse (Echinophthirius horridus) infections in harbour seals (Phoca vitulina) from the North and Baltic Seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnert, Kristina; Schwanke, Eva; Hahn, Kerstin; Wohlsein, Peter; Siebert, Ursula

    2016-07-01

    The seal louse (Echinophthirius [E.] horridus) and the heartworm (Acanthocheilonema [A.] spirocauda) are parasites of harbour seal (Phoca vitulina). Little is known about the role of the seal louse as a potential vector and its role for the development and transmission of heartworm larvae to their final host, the harbour seal. The life-cycle of the heartworm is still not fully understood. For the presented study, findings of 1191 stranded harbour seals collected along the North- and Baltic Sea coast between 1996 and 2013 were examined. 4.4% (n = 53) of these harbour seals were infected with adult heartworms and 3.4% (n = 40) harbour seals carried seal lice. The highest prevalence and level of infection with adult heartworms (A. spirocauda) (9.3%) and seal lice (E. horridus) (8.9%) were found on yearling harbour seals (7-18 months) compared to neonate and adult seals. Investigating seal lice (n = 35) for larval heartworm stages one larvae was encountered in an ethanol-fixated seal louse. During a health monitoring survey of live harbour seals, 109 animals were captured and examined during spring and autumn between 2008 and 2014. Blood samples were taken and microfilariae were discovered in blood smears in 41% (n = 45) of the examined harbour seals. Yearling seals (n = 21) showed higher prevalence (86%) and level of infection with microfilariae than adults. Microfilariae were identified as A. spirocauda by sequencing the species-specific COI gene in 24 blood samples. The high prevalence of microfilariae of A. spirocauda in blood samples (41%) is in contrast to the low prevalence of mature infections/adult specimens in stranded seals (4.4%) investigated. Although rare parasites of seals, the recent increase in prevalence of heartworm and seal lice in stranded seals and the relatively high occurrence of microfilaria in the free-ranging population underscore the importance of further studies investigating the immunology of infections and their transmission pathways, as

  11. Single-borehole measuring method for broken rock zone in gently inclined thin layer weakness structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Qing-fa; ZHOU Ke-ping; LONG Teng-teng; GAO Feng

    2008-01-01

    According to the structural characteristics of gently inclined thin layer rock mass in which lots of weak interlayer existed, the concept of gently inclined thin layer weakness structure was proposed. If single-borehole measuring method of the acoustic along the conventional arrangement mode was used in measuring the broken rock zone in this structure, the change of the relationship curves (Vp-L) between acoustic p-wave velocity (Vp) and borehole depth (L) would present the irregular feature due to the mechanical characteristics of layered rock mass and harmful effects of weak interlayers, and the scope of broken rock zone couldn't be defined quickly. Based on the analysis of the mechanical characteristics of layered rock mass, the propagation rule of acoustic and distributions characteristics of plastic zone and slip zone in layered rock mass, new arrangement mode of acoustic measuring boreholes for broken rock zone in gently inclined thin layer weakness structure was proposed. Namely, the measuring boreholes in two sides were parallel to the strata, the measuring boreholes in the roof and floor perpendicular to the strata. Besides the controlling depth of the measuring boreholes in the scope of the large plastic zones or the large slip zones should be increased. Engineering exampleshowed that new acoustic measuring boreholes arrangement mode had the better applicability and could determine the scope of the broken rock zone in the gently inclined thin layer weakness structure quickly.

  12. Room Q data report: Test borehole data from April 1989 through November 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, A.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Howard, C.L. [RE/SPEC, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jones, R.L.; Peterson, T.P. [Tech. Reps., Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-03-01

    Pore-pressure and fluid-flow tests were performed in 15 boreholes drilled into the bedded evaporites of the Salado Formation from within the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The tests measured fluid flow and pore pressure within the Salado. The boreholes were drilled into the previously undisturbed host rock around a proposed cylindrical test room, Room Q, located on the west side of the facility about 655 m below ground surface. The boreholes were about 23 m deep and ranged over 27.5 m of stratigraphy. They were completed and instrumented before excavation of Room Q. Tests were conducted in isolated zones at the end of each borehole. Three groups of 5 isolated zones extend above, below, and to the north of Room Q at increasing distances from the room axis. Measurements recorded before, during, and after the mining of the circular test room provided data about borehole closure, pressure, temperature, and brine seepage into the isolated zones. The effects of the circular excavation were recorded. This data report presents the data collected from the borehole test zones between April 25, 1989 and November 25, 1991. The report also describes test development, test equipment, and borehole drilling operations.

  13. Causes of Borehole Failure in Complex Basement Terrains: ABUAD Case Study, Southwestern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    1 Ogundana, A.K , 2 Aladesanmi A. O., 3 Okunade A., 4Olutomilola O.O

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A preliminary assessment of primary causes of borehole failure has being conducted using Afe Babalola University as a case study. A total of fourteen boreholes (namely borehole 1-14 were studied, vertical electrical soundings, depth sounding, flushing and pump testing were conducted on each of the boreholes to establish their status at the time of the study and possible evaluation of the groundwater potential of the wells. Four out of the fourteen boreholes (borehole 1-4 are productive and in-use, while the remaining ten (borehole 5-14 are out-of-use and abandoned for various. The productive holes were able to support continuous flow of water for over 3 hours without drop in volume of water flow. Seven of the holes (boreholes 5, 6, 8, 9, 11, 12 & 14 failed and were abandoned because of low yield (could not flow beyond 5 minutes, while the remaining three (boreholes 7, 10 & 13 failed and were abandoned due to wrong location and improper completion, caving/formation problems, and wrong installation/completion respectively. Proper well completion is essential in areas prone to caving and other formation related problems. Air drilling should be avoided in areas with thick and loose overburden. Right mixture of drilling mud should be applied to secure the hole wall while flushing should be continuous throughout drilling in such formation. Casing should be done immediately and such holes should be lined and grouted. Timers should be installed on low yield wells and regulated/programmed for 5 or 10 minutes flow depending on the recharge rate. Pump rating for installation should be strictly based on well recharge rate. Productive wells should be properly maintained and monitored for optimal performance.

  14. Effects of rejuvenator seal and fog seal on performance of open-graded friction course pavement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadeem A. Qureshi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available An open-graded friction course (OGFC is a special-purpose surface layer of hot-mix asphalt (HMA pavement that is increasingly being used around the world. Owing to its numerous benefits, OGFC is being regularly used as a final riding surface on interstate and high-traffic expressways by different highway agencies in the United States. However, some OGFC sections have experienced premature failure due to ravelling only after 6-8 years of service life. To maintain an effective, longer service life and enhanced performance of OGFC, preventive maintenance has been considered essential. There are several approaches to maintaining OGFC, one of which is the application of a fog seal and rejuvenator seal. A fog seal can reduce ravelling and extend the service life of OGFC while a rejuvenator seal can revitalise the existing aged asphalt binder in the top OGFC layer. This research focuses on optimising the fog and rejuvenator seal application rates by evaluating their effectiveness in terms of surface friction and durability. Three types of seal material were evaluated: Pavegaard (PG and Pavepreserve (PP asphalt rejuvenators and a cationic slow-setting asphalt emulsion (CSS-1H as a fog seal. Improvement in abrasion resistance of OGFC pavement was observed on application of fog and rejuvenator seals but surface friction was reduced to some extent. Hamburg test clearly shows a trend that the medium application rate of 0.10 gallon/square yard is better in enhancing resistance to rutting/moisture susceptibility of OGFC.

  15. Development of sprayed ceramic seal systems for turbine gas path sealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bill, R. C.; Shiembob, L. T.; Stewart, O. L.

    1978-01-01

    A ceramic seal system is reported that employs plasma-sprayed graded metal/ceramic yttria stabilized zirconium oxide (YSZ). The performance characteristics of several YSZ configurations were determined through rig testing for thermal shock resistance, abradability, and erosion resistance. Results indicate that this type of sealing system offers the potential to meet operating requirements of future gas turbine engines.

  16. Imagining Technicities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liboriussen, Bjarke; Plesner, Ursula

    2011-01-01

    , this article focuses on innovative uses of virtual worlds in architecture. We interviewed architects, industrial designers and other practitioners. Conceptually supported by an understanding of technicity found in Cultural Studies, the interviews were then coded with a focus on interviewees’ references......The actors of the building industry have access to a range of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs), and are constantly presented with new software and new communications platforms. Through case studies, and inspired by sociotechnical approaches to the study of emerging technologies...... to the elements of taste and skill. In the final analysis those references were synthesized as five imagined technicities: the architect, the engineer, the client, the Chinese, and the Virtual World native. Because technicities are often assumed and rarely discussed as actants who influence practice, their role...

  17. Development of a Whole Container Seal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhn, Michael J [ORNL; Pickett, Chris A [ORNL; Stinson, Brad J [ORNL; Rowe, Nathan C [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    This paper outlines a technique for utilizing electrically conductive textiles as a whole container seal. This method has the potential to provide more robustness for ensuring that the container has not been breached versus conventional sealing methods that only provide tamper indication at the area used for normal access. The conductive textile is used as a distributed sensor for detecting and localizing container tamper or breach. For sealing purposes, the conductive fabric represents a bounded, near-infinite grid of resistors. The well-known infinite resistance grid problem was used to model and confirm the expected accuracy and validity of this approach. An experimental setup was built that uses a multiplexed Wheatstone bridge measurement to determine the resistances of a coarse electrode grid across the conductive fabric. Non-uniform resistance values of the grid infer the presence of damage or tears in the fabric. Results suggest accuracy proportional to the electrode spacing in determining the presence and location of disturbances in conductive fabric samples. Current work is focused on constructing experimental prototypes for field and environmental testing to gauge the performance of these whole container seals in real world conditions. We are also developing software and hardware to interface with the whole container seals. The latest prototypes are expected to provide more accuracy in detecting and localizing events, although detection of a penetration should be adequate for most sealing applications. We are also developing smart sensing nodes that integrate digital hardware and additional sensors (e.g., motion, humidity) into the electrode nodes within the whole container seal.

  18. Summary Report of Geophysical Logging For The Seismic Boreholes Project at the Hanford Site Waste Treatment Plant.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, Martin G.; Price, Randall K.

    2007-02-01

    During the period of June through October 2006, three deep boreholes and one corehole were drilled beneath the site of the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The boreholes were drilled to provide information on ground-motion attenuation in the basalt and interbedded sediments underlying the WTP site. This report describes the geophysical logging of the deep boreholes that was conducted in support of the Seismic Boreholes Project, defined below. The detailed drilling and geological descriptions of the boreholes and seismic data collected and analysis of that data are reported elsewhere.

  19. Catalog of borehole lithologic logs from the 600 Area, Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fecht, K R; Lillie, J T

    1982-03-01

    Rockwell Hanford Operations (Rockwell) geoscientists are studying the Hanford Site subsurface environment to assure safe management operations, disposal, and storage of radioactive waste. As part of this effort, geoscientists have collected geotechnical data from about 3000 boreholes drilled on the Hanford Site since the early 1900s. These boreholes have been used for subsurface geologic, hydrologic, and engineering investigation, water supply, ground-water monitoring, and natural gas production. This report is a catalog of all obtainable (about 800) lithologic logs from boreholes in a portion of the Hanford Site known as the 600 Area.

  20. Solid oxide fuel cell having a glass composite seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rose, Anthony J.; Mukerjee, Subhasish; Haltiner, Jr., Karl Jacob

    2013-04-16

    A solid oxide fuel cell stack having a plurality of cassettes and a glass composite seal disposed between the sealing surfaces of adjacent cassettes, thereby joining the cassettes and providing a hermetic seal therebetween. The glass composite seal includes an alkaline earth aluminosilicate (AEAS) glass disposed about a viscous glass such that the AEAS glass retains the viscous glass in a predetermined position between the first and second sealing surfaces. The AEAS glass provides geometric stability to the glass composite seal to maintain the proper distance between the adjacent cassettes while the viscous glass provides for a compliant and self-healing seal. The glass composite seal may include fibers, powders, and/or beads of zirconium oxide, aluminum oxide, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), or mixtures thereof, to enhance the desirable properties of the glass composite seal.

  1. Mechanical seal having a single-piece, perforated mating ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khonsari, Michael M.; Somanchi, Anoop K.

    2007-08-07

    A mechanical seal (e.g., single mechanical seals, double mechanical seals, tandem mechanical seals, bellows, pusher mechanical seals, and all types of rotating and reciprocating machines) with reduced contact surface temperature, reduced contact surface wear, or increased life span. The mechanical seal comprises a rotating ring and a single-piece, perforated mating ring, which improves heat transfer by controllably channeling coolant flow through the single-piece mating ring such that the coolant is in substantially uniform thermal contact with a substantial portion of the interior surface area of the seal face, while maintaining the structural integrity of the mechanical seal and minimizing the potential for coolant flow interruptions to the seal face caused by debris or contaminants (e.g., small solids and trash) in the coolant.

  2. Advanced helium purge seals for Liquid Oxygen (LOX) turbopumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Wilbur; Lee, Chester C.

    1989-01-01

    Program objectives were to determine three advanced configurations of helium buffer seals capable of providing improved performance in a space shuttle main engine (SSME), high-pressure liquid oxygen (LOX) turbopump environment, and to provide NASA with the analytical tools to determine performance of a variety of seal configurations. The three seal designs included solid-ring fluid-film seals often referred to as floating ring seals, back-to-back fluid-film face seals, and a circumferential sectored seal that incorporated inherent clearance adjustment capabilities. Of the three seals designed, the sectored seal is favored because the self-adjusting clearance features accommodate the variations in clearance that will occur because of thermal and centrifugal distortions without compromising performance. Moreover, leakage can be contained well below the maximum target values; minimizing leakage is important on the SSME since helium is provided by an external tank. A reduction in tank size translates to an increase in payload that can be carried on board the shuttle. The computer codes supplied under this program included a code for analyzing a variety of gas-lubricated, floating ring, and sector seals; a code for analyzing gas-lubricated face seals; a code for optimizing and analyzing gas-lubricated spiral-groove face seals; and a code for determining fluid-film face seal response to runner excitations in as many as five degrees of freedom. These codes proved invaluable for optimizing designs and estimating final performance of the seals described.

  3. Molecular characterization of mycobacteria isolated from seals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumárraga, M J; Bernardelli, A; Bastida, R; Quse, V; Loureiro, J; Cataldi, A; Bigi, F; Alito, A; Castro Ramos, M; Samper, S; Otal, I; Martin, C; Romano, M I

    1999-09-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) was diagnosed in 10 seals from three species (Arctocephalus australis, Arctocephalus tropicalis and Otaria flavescens) found in South America. The mycobacteria isolated from these cases belonged to the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, as determined by RFLP using an IS6110 probe, spoligotyping, analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence and by PCR-restriction analysis of hsp65. Polymorphisms in gyrA, katG, oxyR and pncA were investigated in some of the isolates, as well as the presence of the MPB70 antigen. The insertion sequence IS6110 was present in three to seven copies in the genome of the mycobacteria isolated from seals. Using the IS6110 probe, six patterns (designated A, B, C, D, E and F) were identified from 10 different isolates. Patterns A and B were found for the mycobacteria isolated from two and four seals, respectively, indicating an epidemiological relationship between isolates grouped according to their IS6110 RFLP. The mycobacteria isolated from seals shared the majority of their IS6110 DNA-containing restriction fragments, and nine isolates had an identical spoligotype; only one isolate showed a minor difference in its spoligotype. In addition, none of these spoligotypes were found in other M. tuberculosis complex strains. These results suggest that the isolates from seals constitute a unique group of closely related strains. The mycobacteria isolated from seals showed polymorphisms at gyrA codon 95 and katG codon 463, as do group 1 M. tuberculosis, and M. bovis. Group 1 mycobacteria are associated with cluster cases. The spoligotypes found in the mycobacteria isolated from seals lack spacers 39-43, as does M. bovis, but the MPB70 antigen, which is highly expressed in M. bovis and minimally expressed in M. tuberculosis, was not detected in these mycobacteria. The mycobacteria isolated from seals also showed oxyR and pncA polymorphisms specific to M. tuberculosis. In conclusion, the mycobacteria that cause TB in seals in the South

  4. Drilling, logging, and testing information from borehole UE-25 UZ{number_sign}16, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thamir, F.; Thordarson, W.; Kume, J.; Rousseau, J. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States). Yucca Mountain Project Branch; Long, R. [Dept. of Energy, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Cunningham, D.M. Jr. [Science Applications International Corp., Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    1998-09-01

    Borehole UE-25 UZ{number_sign}16 is the first of two boreholes that may be used to determine the subsurface structure at Yucca Mountain by using vertical seismic profiling. This report contains information collected while this borehole was being drilled, logged, and tested from May 27, 1992, to April 22, 1994. It does not contain the vertical seismic profiling data. This report is intended to be used as: (1) a reference for drilling similar boreholes in the same area, (2) a data source on this borehole, and (3) a reference for other information that is available from this borehole. The reference information includes drilling chronology, equipment, parameters, coring methods, penetration rates, completion information, drilling problems, and corrective actions. The data sources include lithology, fracture logs, a list of available borehole logs, and depths at which water was recorded. Other information is listed in an appendix that includes studies done after April 22, 1994.

  5. Numerical Modeling of a Shallow Borehole Thermal Energy Storage System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catolico, N.; Ge, S.; Lu, N.; McCartney, J. S.

    2014-12-01

    Borehole thermal energy storage (BTES) combined with solar thermal energy harvesting is an economic technological system to garner and store energy as well as an environmentally-sustainable alternative for the heating of buildings. The first community-scale BTES system in North America was installed in 2007 in the Drake Landing Solar Community (DLSC), about 35 miles south of Calgary, Canada. The BTES system involves direct circulation of water heated from solar thermal panels in the summer into a storage tank, after which it is circulate within an array of 144 closed-loop geothermal heat exchangers having a depth of 35 m and a spacing of 2.5 m. In the winter the circulation direction is reversed to supply heat to houses. Data collection over a six year period indicates that this system can supply more than 90% of the winter heating energy needs for 52 houses in the community. One major challenge facing the BTES system technology is the relatively low annual efficiency, i.e., the ratio of energy input and output is in the range of 15% to 40% for the system in Drake Landing. To better understand the working principles of BTES and to improve BTES performance for future applications at larger scales, a three-dimensional transient coupled fluid and heat transfer model is established using TOUGH2. The time-dependent injection temperatures and circulation rate measured over the six years of monitoring are used as model input. The simulations are calibrated using soil temperature data measured at different locations over time. The time-dependent temperature distributions within the borehole region agree well with the measured temperatures for soil with an intrinsic permeability of 10e-19 m2, an apparent thermal conductivity of 2.03 W/m°C, and a volumetric heat capacity of 2.31 MJ/m-3°C. The calibrated model serves as the basis for a sensitivity analysis of soil and operational parameters on BTES system efficiency preformed with TOUGH2. Preliminary results suggest 1) BTES

  6. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Ball

    2010-01-01

    Operational Experience At the end of the first full-year running period of LHC, CMS is established as a reliable, robust and mature experiment. In particular common systems and infrastructure faults accounted for <0.6 % CMS downtime during LHC pp physics. Technical operation throughout the entire year was rather smooth, the main faults requiring UXC access being sub-detector power systems and rack-cooling turbines. All such problems were corrected during scheduled technical stops, in the shadow of tunnel access needed by the LHC, or in negotiated accesses or access extensions. Nevertheless, the number of necessary accesses to the UXC averaged more than one per week and the technical stops were inevitably packed with work packages, typically 30 being executed within a few days, placing a high load on the coordination and area management teams. It is an appropriate moment for CMS Technical Coordination to thank all those in many CERN departments and in the Collaboration, who were involved in CMS techni...

  7. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Ball

    2010-01-01

    Operational Experience Since the closure of the detector in February, the technical operation of CMS has been quite smooth and reliable. Some minor interventions in UXC were required to cure failures of power supplies, fans, readout boards and rack cooling connections, but all these failures were repaired in scheduled technical stops or parasitically during access dedicated to fixing LHC technical problems. The only occasion when CMS had to request an access between fills was to search for the source of an alarm from the leak-detection cables mounted in the DT racks. After a few minutes of diagnostic search, a leaking air-purge was found. Replacement was complete within 2 hours. This incident demonstrated once more the value of these leak detection cables; the system will be further extended (during the end of year technical stop) to cover more racks in UXC and the floor beneath the detector. The magnet has also been operating reliably and reacted correctly to the 14s power cut on 29 May (see below). In or...

  8. Technical Training: Technical Training Seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch Monday 9 February 2004 From 10:00 to 12:00 - IT Auditorium - bldg. 31, 3rd floor ANSOFT High-Frequency Seminar David Prestaux, Application Engineer, ANSOFT F-78535 BUC, France This Technical Training seminar will present two Ansoft application products: Ansoft HFSS and Ansoft Designer. Ansoft HFSS makes use of the Finite Element Method (FEM) to calculate field solutions from first principles. It can accurately predict all high-frequency behaviours such as dispersion, mode conversion, and losses due to materials and radiation. Ansoft Designer is a suite of design tools to fully integrate high-frequency, physics-based electromagnetic simulations into a seamless system-level simulation environment. Ansoft Designer uses a simple interface to give complete control over every design task, by a method allowing multiple solvers, Solver on Demand. • Introduction • Overview of the Ansoft Total solution • Ansoft HFSS 9...

  9. A single institution experience using the LigaSure vessel sealing system in laparoscopic nephrectomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PING Hao; XING Nian-zeng; ZHANG Jun-hui; NIU Yi-nong; ZHANG Jian-zhong; WANG Jian-wen

    2011-01-01

    Background Vascular control and tissue dissection are crucial steps in successful laparoscopic surgery. Recently, a new commercially available vessel sealing technology, the LigaSure vessel sealing system (Valleylab, Boulder, USA),has been introduced. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the benefits of the LigaSure in laparoscopic nephrectomy.Methods From January 2005 to March 2010, 170 laparoscopic nephrectomies were performed with the LigaSure vessel sealing system, including simple and radical nephrectomy and nephroureterectomy. In a retrospective study, the laparoscopic operating time, estimated intraoperative blood loss, duration of postoperative drainage, total amount of postoperative drainage, as well as postoperative hospital stay, were recorded and studied.Results All 170 laparoscopic nephrectomies using LigaSure were accomplished successfully without conversion to open surgery. There was no severe vascular complication or other serious complications. The mean laparoscopic operating time was 124.2 minutes (range, 14-230 minutes); mean blood loss was 148.6 ml (range, 20-540 ml); mean time for postoperative drainage was 3.1 days (range, 1-7 days); mean amount of postoperative drainage was 206.5 ml (range, 27-435 ml) and mean postoperative hospital stay was 6.9 days (range, 3-18 days).Conclusions Laparoscopic nephrectomy using LigaSure appears technically feasible and easy, and produces satisfactory results. The LigaSure provides a safe and fast way to seal vessels and tissue bundles during nephrectomy.

  10. Seal assembly with anti-rotation pin for high pressure supercritical fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Steven A.; Fuller, Robert L.

    2014-08-05

    A seal assembly for sealing a machine with a first chamber and a second chamber is provided. A rotating shaft extends through the first and second chambers, and rotates therein. The seal assembly has a seal housing, a seal ring and a seal pin. The seal housing is positionable in the machine housing. The seal housing has a seal pocket extending into a fluid side thereof, and a housing receptacle extending into an inner diameter thereof at the seal pocket. The seal ring is positionable in the seal pocket of the seal housing for forming a seal therewith. The seal ring has a ring receptacle extending into an outer diameter thereof. The ring receptacle is positionable adjacent to the housing receptacle for defining a pin hole therebetween. The seal pin is loosely positionable in the pin hole whereby movement about the seal ring is accommodated while preventing rotation thereof.

  11. Current challenges for high-resolution monitoring of deep geological repository boreholes using terrestrial laser scanner and photogrammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrea, Dario; Savunen, Johanna; Abellan, Antonio; Derron, Marc-Henri; Mattila, Jussi; Jaboyedoff, Michel

    2015-04-01

    The Onkalo site has been selected as final deep geological repository for the disposal of nuclear waste in Finland. Several exploratory boreholes, similar to those that will host the nuclear waste, are currently under construction in order to analyse various technical aspects of the disposal. Among them, an accurate monitoring of the deformation of each borehole is required. The present study aims at finding the most suitable technique for measuring and monitoring small scale (below mm) deformations of these boreholes with high confidence and accuracy. Two different close-range monitoring techniques are compared here: a phase-shift terrestrial laser scanning (Z+F 5006i) and photogrammetry (Canon EOS 6D&EF20mm + Adamtech 3DM Mine Mapping Suite 2.5). Both techniques are applied using multi temporal acquisitions. As for the data acquired by the terrestrial laser scanner, our study has revealed that parts of the 3D datasets are affected by an artificial distortion, with a maximum shift up to 6 mm, which is clearly below the required accuracy. The origin of this artifact is related with the data acquisition strategy: since the accuracy of the laser measurement is affected by the incidence angle, we observed that when the incidence angle is higher than 45°, the range is unsatisfactorily underestimated. Furthermore, we found another issue in the influence of the surface condition on range measurement, such as wet versus dry, or dark versus light colored rock surface. As for the photogrammetric data, we observed that, when compared to a theoretical cylinder, the 3D point cloud was affected by a sub-millimetric distortion. This distortion is due to the construction and georeferencing of the final 3D model. The error can reach up to +/- 0.8 mm in the border areas of the picture, which is significant value as a millimetric deformation should be detected. Up to now, the photogrammetric acquisitions have provided more accurate results than the laser scanning, but there is a

  12. Borehole data package for the 100-K area ground water wells, CY 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, B.A.

    1994-12-27

    Borehole, hydrogeologic and geophysical logs, drilling, as-built diagrams, sampling, and well construction information and data for RCRA compliant groundwater monitoring wells installed in CY 1994 at the 100-K Basins.

  13. New developments in high resolution borehole seismology and their applications to reservoir development and management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulsson, B.N.P. [Chevron Petroleum Technology Company, La Habra, CA (United States)

    1997-08-01

    Single-well seismology, Reverse Vertical Seismic Profiles (VSP`s) and Crosswell seismology are three new seismic techniques that we jointly refer to as borehole seismology. Borehole seismic techniques are of great interest because they can obtain much higher resolution images of oil and gas reservoirs than what is obtainable with currently used seismic techniques. The quality of oil and gas reservoir management decisions depend on the knowledge of both the large and the fine scale features in the reservoirs. Borehole seismology is capable of mapping reservoirs with an order of magnitude improvement in resolution compared with currently used technology. In borehole seismology we use a high frequency seismic source in an oil or gas well and record the signal in the same well, in other wells, or on the surface of the earth.

  14. Hydrogeological characterisation using cross-borehole ground penetration radar and electrical resistivity tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zibar, Majken Caroline Looms

    2007-01-01

    . The methods provided estimates of soil moisture content and electrical resistivity variations among 12 m deep boreholes located 5 – 7 m apart. The moisture content change following natural precipitation was observed to be practically negligible, providing minimal information to constrain the dynamic...... was characterized by ~30 m thick unsaturated zone consisting mainly of sands of varying coarseness. Following an instrumentation of 16 boreholes two geophysical methods (cross-borehole ground penetrating radar and electrical resistivity tomography) were applied during natural precipitation and forced infiltration...... properties of the subsurface. On the other hand, volumetric moisture content variations of up to 5% were observed during a 20-day long forced infiltration experiment. The cross-borehole electrical resistance tomography and ground penetrating radar data collected during this experiment were subsequently...

  15. Acoustic and optical borehole-wall imaging for fractured-rock aquifer studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J.H.; Johnson, C.D.

    2004-01-01

    Imaging with acoustic and optical televiewers results in continuous and oriented 360?? views of the borehole wall from which the character, relation, and orientation of lithologic and structural planar features can be defined for studies of fractured-rock aquifers. Fractures are more clearly defined under a wider range of conditions on acoustic images than on optical images including dark-colored rocks, cloudy borehole water, and coated borehole walls. However, optical images allow for the direct viewing of the character of and relation between lithology, fractures, foliation, and bedding. The most powerful approach is the combined application of acoustic and optical imaging with integrated interpretation. Imaging of the borehole wall provides information useful for the collection and interpretation of flowmeter and other geophysical logs, core samples, and hydraulic and water-quality data from packer testing and monitoring. ?? 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Cylindrical electrochemical cells with a diaphragm seal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georgopoulos, P.

    1993-07-13

    A cylindrical electrochemical cell is described comprising an anode, a cathode and electrolyte contained in a cylindrical container, the container having an open end and a closed end; wherein the open end of the container is sealed with a seal assembly comprising: (a) a disc-shaped seal member, made from an electrically insulative material, having an outer edge wall connected via a base to a centrally located cylindrical hub that defines an orifice; which base has a ventable diaphragm portion and a nonventable diaphragm portion that is thicker than the ventable diaphragm portion; and wherein the ventable diaphragm portion joins the hub at an interface and becomes gradually thicker in the direction away from the interface toward the outer edge wall so that the ventable diaphragm portion is thinnest at the interface; and (b) a current collector extending through the orifice defined by the hub into the cell's interior to contact one of the cell's electrodes.

  17. Analysis of induced temperature anomalies along borehole heat exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Michael; Schelenz, Sophie; Stollberg, Reiner; Gossel, Wolfgang; Dietrich, Peter; Vienken, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Over the last years, the thermal use of the shallow subsurface for heat generation, cooling, and thermal energy storage has increased. However, the injection or extraction of heat potentially drives changes in the subsurface temperature regime; especially in urban areas. The presented case study investigates the intensive use of borehole heat exchangers (BHE) and their potential thermal impacts on subsurface temperatures, as well as thermal interactions between individual BHE's for a residential neighborhood in Cologne, Germany. Based on on-site subsurface parameterization, a 3D subsurface model was designed, using the finite element software FEFLOW (DHI WASY). The model contains five BHE, extracting 8.2 kW, with a maximum BHE depth of 38 m, whereby the thickness of the unsaturated zone is 22 m. The simulated time span is 10 years. This study focusses on two questions: How will different BHE arrangements vary in terms of temperature plume formation and potential system interaction and what is the influence of seasonal subsurface heat storage on soil and ground water temperatures.

  18. Method for measurement of azimuth of a borehole while drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiPersio, R.D.; Cobern, M.E.

    1989-03-21

    A method is described for determining the azimuth angle of a borehole being drilled by instruments contained downhole in the drillstring, including the steps of: sensing with accelerometer means, during a period of nonrotation of the drillstring, the components of Gx, Gy and Gz of the total gravity field Go at the location of the instrument; sensing with magnetometer means, during a period of nonrotation of the drillstring, the components of Hx, Hy and Hz of the total magnetic field Ho at the location of the instrument; the components Gz and Hz being along the axis of the drillstring, the components Gx and the components and Gy being orthogonal to Gz and the components Hx and Hy being orthogonal to Hz; rotating the magnetometer means with the drillstring and obtaining the parameter Hzr which is the Hz component of the magnetic field at the location of the instrument during rotation of the drillstring; determining Ho from values Hx, Hy and Hz sensed during nonrotation of the drillstring; determining the inclination angle of the drillstring; determining the dip angle of the magnetic field; determining the angle between the direction of the magnetic field and the axis of the drillstring at the location of the instrument from Ho and Hzr; and determining the azimuth angle.

  19. Borehole Radar Evaluation Program: Antenna designs for optimal directionality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, J. G.; Morris, H. E.

    1991-05-01

    The thrust of this progress report deals with the significant advances we have made in the past few months toward optimal radiating efficiency and optimal directionality from antenna arrays that fit inside a 5.5 in.-OD tool. The reasons spawning this development effort on antennas are the many uses for underground radar systems that can be built around such high-performance antennas. Targets of interest include large man-made voids, natural voids in strata, fractures zones in hard rock, edges and internal faults in salts domes and glaciers, etc. Recent progress includes observation of the radiation patterns of several dipole arrays which we designed to fit within a 5.5-inch OD borehole tool and to radiate efficiently at wavelengths in the band from 0.4 meter to 2 meters with optimal directionality. Front-to-back ratios of 15 dB are consistently observed in the horizontal plane of these arrays. These antennas are observed to radiate with high efficiencies, less than 1 dB loss, into air at 1.3 meter wavelength.

  20. Borehole Radar Evaluation Program: Antenna designs for optimal directionality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castle, J.G.; Morris, H.E.

    1991-05-01

    The thrust of this progress report deals with the significant advances we have made in the past few months toward optimal radiating efficiency and optimal directionality from antenna arrays that fit inside a 5.5 in.-OD tool. The reasons spawning this development effort on antennas are the many uses for underground radar systems that can be built around such high-performance antennas. Targets of interest include large man-made voids, natural voids in strata, fractures zones in hard rock, edges and internal faults in salts domes and glaciers, etc. Recent progress includes observation of the radiation patterns of several dipole arrays which we designed to fit within a 5.5-inch OD borehole tool and to radiate efficiently at wavelengths in the band from 0.4 meter to 2 meters with optimal directionality. Front-to-back ratios of 15 dB are consistently observed in the horizontal plane of these arrays. These antennas are observed to radiate with high efficiencies, less than 1 dB loss, into air at 1.3 meter wavelength. 18 figs.

  1. Advances in directional borehole radar data analysis and visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D.V.G.; Brown, P.J.

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey is developing a directional borehole radar (DBOR) tool for mapping fractures, lithologic changes, and underground utility and void detection. An important part of the development of the DBOR tool is data analysis and visualization, with the aim of making the software graphical user interface (GUI) intuitive and easy to use. The DBOR software system consists of a suite of signal and image processing routines written in Research Systems' Interactive Data Language (IDL). The software also serves as a front-end to many widely accepted Colorado School of Mines Center for Wave Phenomena (CWP) Seismic UNIX (SU) algorithms (Cohen and Stockwell, 2001). Although the SU collection runs natively in a UNIX environment, our system seamlessly emulates a UNIX session within a widely used PC operating system (MicroSoft Windows) using GNU tools (Noer, 1998). Examples are presented of laboratory data acquired with the prototype tool from two different experimental settings. The first experiment imaged plastic pipes in a macro-scale sand tank. The second experiment monitored the progress of an invasion front resulting from oil injection. Finally, challenges to further development and planned future work are discussed.

  2. Intracoronal sealing ability of two dental cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, John D; Pashley, David H; Loushine, Robert J; Weller, R Norman; Kimbrough, W Frank; Pereira, Patricia N

    2002-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of sealing the coronal 2-mm of the root canals versus covering the entire pulpal floor with one of two dental-resin cements (Principle or C&B Metabond). Sixty-two molars with the occlusal half of the crowns and the apical half of the roots removed were used. Each canal was enlarged by using a #3 Gates Glidden bur and obturated with unsealed gutta-percha cones. The teeth were randomly assigned to four groups, each containing 15 teeth, plus a negative and a positive control. In group 1, 2 mm of Principle were placed over the entire pulpal floor. In group 2, Principle was placed 2 mm into each canal orifice. Groups 3 and 4 were the same as groups 1 and 2, except C&B Metabond cement was used. After the cement set, the gutta-percha was removed and the integrity of the seal was tested by fluid filtration at a pressure of 20 cm H2O at 1 h and at 1, 2, and 4 weeks. The data were analyzed by a three-way ANOVA and the Student-Newman-Keuls tests at alpha = 0.05. The controls behaved as expected. Results showed that there were no statistically significant differences among the materials used or the location (p > 0.05), but there was a significant difference with respect to time. Principle leaked significantly more than C&B Metabond at 1 h (p < 0.05), but the seal became tighter over time. C&B Metabond leaked less early (p < 0.05) but increased in leakage at 4 weeks. Both materials sealed well over the 4-week study. Principle was easier to use, and sealing the entire pulpal floor was easier than sealing only the canal orifice.

  3. Dynamic analysis of C/C composite finger seal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Guoding; Wang Li’na; Yu Qiangpeng; Su Hua

    2014-01-01

    A seal device as an important component of aeroengines has decisive influence on per-formance, reliability, and working life of aeroengines. With the development of aeroengines, demands on the performance characteristics of seal devices are made strictly. Finger seal as a novel kind of sealing device, recently attracts more and more attentions in academic circles and engineer-ing fields at home and abroad. Research on finger seals has been extensively developed, especially on leakage and wear performances under dynamic conditions. However, it is a pity that the work on finger seals has been limited with a single approach that is improving the performance by structural optimization;in addition, the technology of dynamic analysis on finger seals is weak. Aiming at the problems mentioned above, a distributed mass equivalent dynamic model of finger seals considering the coupling effect of overlaid laminates is established in the present paper, the dynamic perfor-mance of 2.5 dimension C/C composite finger seal is analyzed with the model, and then the effects of fiber bundle density and fiber bundle preparation direction on finger seal’s dynamic performance are discussed, as well as compared with those of Co-based alloy finger seal. The current work is about dynamic analysis of finger seals and application of C/C composite in this paper may have much academic significance and many engineering values for improving research level of finger seal dynamics and exploring feasibility of C/C composite being used for finger seals.

  4. Dynamic analysis of C/C composite finger seal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Guoding

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A seal device as an important component of aeroengines has decisive influence on performance, reliability, and working life of aeroengines. With the development of aeroengines, demands on the performance characteristics of seal devices are made strictly. Finger seal as a novel kind of sealing device, recently attracts more and more attentions in academic circles and engineering fields at home and abroad. Research on finger seals has been extensively developed, especially on leakage and wear performances under dynamic conditions. However, it is a pity that the work on finger seals has been limited with a single approach that is improving the performance by structural optimization; in addition, the technology of dynamic analysis on finger seals is weak. Aiming at the problems mentioned above, a distributed mass equivalent dynamic model of finger seals considering the coupling effect of overlaid laminates is established in the present paper, the dynamic performance of 2.5 dimension C/C composite finger seal is analyzed with the model, and then the effects of fiber bundle density and fiber bundle preparation direction on finger seal’s dynamic performance are discussed, as well as compared with those of Co-based alloy finger seal. The current work is about dynamic analysis of finger seals and application of C/C composite in this paper may have much academic significance and many engineering values for improving research level of finger seal dynamics and exploring feasibility of C/C composite being used for finger seals.

  5. Acoustoelastic effects of Stoneley waves in a borehole surrounded by a transversely isotropic elastic solid

    OpenAIRE

    Jinxia Liu; Zhiwen Cui; Zhengliang Cao; Kexie Wang

    2014-01-01

    Stoneley wave in a fluid-filled pressurized borehole surrounded by a transversely isotropic elastic solid with nine independent third-order elastic constants in presence of biaxial stresses are studied. A simplified acoustoelastic formulation of Stoneley wave is presented for the parallelism of the borehole axis and the formation axis of symmetry. Sensitivity coefficients and velocity dispersions for Stoneley wave due to the presence of stresses are numerically investigated, respectively. The...

  6. Borehole Gravity Meter Surveys at the Waste Treatment Plant, Hanford, Washington.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacQueen, Jeffrey D.; Mann, Ethan

    2007-04-06

    Microg-LaCoste (MGL) was contracted by Pacfic Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) to record borehole gravity density data in 3 wells at the HanfordWaste Treatment Plant (WTP) site. The survey was designed to provide highly accurate density information for use in seismic modeling. The borehole gravity meter (BHGM) tool has a very large depth of investigation (hundreds of feet) compared to other density tools so it is not influenced by casing or near welbore effects, such as washouts.

  7. Influence of heavy metals pollution in borehole water collected within abandoned battery industry, Essien Udim, Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Uffia, I. Dan; Etim D. E

    2013-01-01

    Physico-chemical and heavy metals analyses of water samples from three boreholes located within abandoned battery company in Essien Udim LGA, Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria was carried out to ascertain the impact of pollution from battery industry on groundwater quality. Borehole locations were at different distances of 0km, 2km, and 5km (X1, X11 and X111) respectively away from the abandoned battery vicinity. The parameters determined included; turbidity, temperature, pH, Dissolved oxygen (DO), ...

  8. The Device for Communication in the Tool for Measurement in Boreholes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miloš Slankamenac

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper an implementation and test of the device for communication between Telemetry system and Surface unit with the tool for measurement of pipe diameter, fluid velocity and direction of flow in the borehole (Calliper-Fullbore Flowmeter - CFF are presented. This communication is done according to SIPLOS (Simultaneous Production Logging String protocol and it is used by Hotwell company [1] as a part of a larger system for borehole investigations.

  9. Study on a new type of sealing - regeneration-labyrinth sealing for displacer in cryocoolers: Part I - Theoretical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L. Q.; Zhang, L.

    2000-02-01

    A new concept of sealing structure - regeneration-labyrinth sealing has been put forward to substitute for sealing rings that influence seriously the performance of cryocoolers. A program, which can simulate the thermophysical process occurring in the sealing structure, is developed consequently. Using numerical simulation, the reasonable structure of the regeneration-labyrinth sealing has been determined. The influences of some parameters, such as the heat transfer coefficient of forced convection, the cylinder-displacer gap, the diameter and length of cylinder on the losses of cooling capacity have been studied numerically. As a result, the designing principle of the new type of sealing is obtained.

  10. Fluid seals technology at BHR Group Ltd.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leefe, Simon

    1991-01-01

    A mathematical model was developed for ESA, which couples the rigid body dynamics in four degrees of freedom of a flexibly mounted stator (with Coulomb damping) of a turbopump face seal with the fluid film behavior. The interfacial film is assumed gaseous, and the model incorporates laminar/turbulent flow, inertia and sonic choking. Seal faces may be wavy and coned, while the rotating ring can be eccentrically mounted, misaligned with the shaft and oscillate axially at arbitrary frequency. The model is currently being coded into software. An experimental program using a high speed cryogenic/hot gas test rig is being conducted to verify the output of the computer program.

  11. Development of the Borehole 2-D Seismic Tomography Software Using MATLAB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugraha, A. D.; Syahputra, A.; Fatkhan, F.; Sule, R.; Hendriyana, A.

    2011-12-01

    We developed 2-D borehole seismic tomography software that we called "EARTHMAX-2D TOMOGRAPHY" to image subsurface physical properties including P-wave and S-wave velocities between two boreholes. We used Graphic User Interface (GUI) facilities of MATLAB programming language to create the software. In this software, we used travel time of seismic waves from source to receiver by using pseudo bending ray tracing method as input for tomography inversion. We can also set up a model parameterization, initial velocity model, ray tracing processes, conduct borehole seismic tomography inversion, and finally visualize the inversion results. The LSQR method was applied to solve of tomography inversion solution. We provided the Checkerboard Test Resolution (CTR) to evaluate the model resolution of the tomography inversion. As validation of this developed software, we tested it for geotechnical purposes. We then conducted data acquisition in the "ITB X-field" that is located on ITB campus. We used two boreholes that have a depth of 39 meters. Seismic wave sources were generated by impulse generator and sparker and then they were recorded by borehole hydrophone string type 3. Later on, we analyzed and picked seismic arrival time as input for tomography inversion. As results, we can image the estimated weathering layer, sediment layer, and basement rock in the field depicted by seismic wave structures. More detailed information about the developed software will be presented. Keywords: borehole, tomography, earthmax-2D, inversion

  12. Fissure seal or fluoride varnish?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deery, Christopher

    2016-09-01

    Data sourcesCochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Medline, Embase, the US National Institutes of Health Trials Register and the World Health Organization (WHO) Clinical Trials Registry PlatformStudy selectionRandomised controlled trials (RCTs) with at least 12 months follow-up, in which fissure sealants, or fissure sealants together with fluoride varnishes, were compared with fluoride varnishes alone for preventing caries in occlusal surfaces of permanent teeth of children and adolescents.Data extraction and synthesisTwo reviewers independently screened search results, extracted data and assessed risk of bias of included studies. Studies were grouped and analysed on the basis of sealant material type (resin-based sealant and glass ionomer-based sealant, glass ionomer and resin-modified glass ionomer) and different follow-up periods. Odds ratio were calculated for caries or no caries on occlusal surfaces of permanent molar teeth. Mean differences were calculated for continuous outcomes and data. Evidence quality was assessed using GRADE (Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation) methods.ResultsEight RCTs involving a total of 1747 children aged five to ten years of age were included. Three trials compared resin-based fissure sealant versus fluoride varnish. Results from two studies (358 children) after two years were combined. Sealants prevented more caries, pooled odds ratio (OR) = 0.69 (95%CI; 0.50 to 0.94). One trial with follow-up at four and nine years found that the caries-preventive benefit for sealants was maintained, with 26% of sealed teeth and 55.8% of varnished teeth having developed caries at nine years. Evidence for glass-ionomer sealants was of low quality. One split-mouth trial analysing 92 children at two-year follow-up found a significant difference in favour of resin-based fissure sealant together with fluoride varnish compared with fluoride varnish only (OR

  13. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Ball

    Overview From a technical perspective, CMS has been in “beam operation” state since 6th November. The detector is fully closed with all components operational and the magnetic field is normally at the nominal 3.8T. The UXC cavern is normally closed with the radiation veto set. Access to UXC is now only possible during downtimes of LHC. Such accesses must be carefully planned, documented and carried out in agreement with CMS Technical Coordination, Experimental Area Management, LHC programme coordination and the CCC. Material flow in and out of UXC is now strictly controlled. Access to USC remains possible at any time, although, for safety reasons, it is necessary to register with the shift crew in the control room before going down.It is obligatory for all material leaving UXC to pass through the underground buffer zone for RP scanning, database entry and appropriate labeling for traceability. Technical coordination (notably Stephane Bally and Christoph Schaefer), the shift crew and run ...

  14. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Ball and W. Zeuner

    2011-01-01

    In this report we will review the main achievements of the Technical Stop and the progress of several centrally-managed projects to support CMS operation and maintenance and prepare the way for upgrades. Overview of the extended Technical Stop  The principal objectives of the extended Technical Stop affecting the detector itself were the installation of the TOTEM T1 telescopes on both ends, the readjustment of the alignment link-disk in YE-2, the replacement of the light-guide sleeves for all PMs of both HFs, and some repairs on TOTEM T2 and CASTOR. The most significant tasks were, however, concentrated on the supporting infrastructure. A detailed line-by-line leak search was performed in the C6F14 cooling system of the Tracker, followed by the installation of variable-frequency drives on the pump motors of the SS1 and SS2 tracker cooling plants to reduce pressure transients during start-up. In the electrical system, larger harmonic filters were installed in ...

  15. HMSRP Hawaiian Monk Seal Cell Phone Tag Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This project investigates foraging behavior of Hawaiian monk seals by conducting telemetry studies. During these studies, live seals are instrumented with dive...

  16. HMSRP Hawaiian Monk Seal Master Identification Records (annual)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains records of all individually identified Hawaiian monk seals since 1981. These seals were identified by PSD personnel and cooperating...

  17. Bentonite as a waste isolation pilot plant shaft sealing material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daemen, J.; Ran, Chongwei [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)

    1996-12-01

    Current designs of the shaft sealing system for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) propose using bentonite as a primary sealing component. The shaft sealing designs anticipate that compacted bentonite sealing components can perform through the 10,000-year regulatory period and beyond. To evaluate the acceptability of bentonite as a sealing material for the WIPP, this report identifies references that deal with the properties and characteristics of bentonite that may affect its behavior in the WIPP environment. This report reviews published studies that discuss using bentonite as sealing material for nuclear waste disposal, environmental restoration, toxic and chemical waste disposal, landfill liners, and applications in the petroleum industry. This report identifies the physical and chemical properties, stability and seal construction technologies of bentonite seals in shafts, especially in a saline brine environment. This report focuses on permeability, swelling pressure, strength, stiffness, longevity, and densification properties of bentonites.

  18. Reactor coolant pump shaft seal behavior during station blackout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kittmer, C.A.; Wensel, R.G.; Rhodes, D.B.; Metcalfe, R.; Cotnam, B.M.; Gentili, H.; Mings, W.J.

    1985-04-01

    A testing program designed to provide fundamental information pertaining to the behavior of reactor coolant pump (RCP) shaft seals during a postulated nuclear power plant station blackout has been completed. One seal assembly, utilizing both hydrodynamic and hydrostatic types of seals, was modeled and tested. Extrusion tests were conducted to determine if seal materials could withstand predicted temperatures and pressures. A taper-face seal model was tested for seal stability under conditions when leaking water flashes to steam across the seal face. Test information was then used as the basis for a station blackout analysis. Test results indicate a potential problem with an elastomer material used for O-rings by a pump vendor; that vendor is considering a change in material specification. Test results also indicate a need for further research on the generic issue of RCP seal integrity and its possible consideration for designation as an unresolved safety issue.

  19. Evaluation of Subterranean Subsidence at Seal Beach National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this study was to determine the amount of subsurface subsidence at Naval Weapons Station Seal Beach (NWSSB) areas which include Seal Beach National...

  20. Comparative Analysis of TBM Main Drive Lubrication Seal System%TBM主驱动润滑密封系统的对比分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭付军; 赵云辉; 张晶晶

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the TBM main bearing seal structure of the form, the three representative of the main drive lubrication seal system, the advantages and disadvantages of the comparative analysis, and the EP2 lubrication sealing system design ideas, with a view to provide technical reference and new ideas for the design of the sealing system.%本文从TBM主轴承密封结构形式出发,总结了三种有代表性的主驱动润滑密封系统,对其优缺点进行对比分析,并阐述了EP2润滑密封系统的设计思路,以期为密封系统的设计提供技术借鉴和新思路.

  1. Design Method and Application on Gas Pre-drainage Borehole to Expose Coal in Cross-cut%石门揭煤预抽瓦斯钻孔设计方法与应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚海亮; 陈亮

    2013-01-01

    石门掘进为快速安全地揭煤通过煤层,依据“四原则”前探钻孔布置及“三点法”探孔资料分析并融合“后视点”、“截流抽采”等技术,提出了“五步法”预抽钻孔设计方法.实践结果表明:“四原则”前探钻孔布置方式可准确探明煤层赋存情况,按“五步法”预抽钻孔设计方法可保证钻孔施工的准确性,孔深误差±3 m,可消除由于钻孔施工不准而导致抽采瓦斯空白带的出现,有效抽采揭煤区域瓦斯及石门安全掘进顺利通过煤层.%In order to expose coal and through the coal seam quickly and safely when drainage in cross-cut,according to four principles for arrangement of advance detect borehole,and three-point method for analysis on the boreholes data,as well as the technical points of back sight point and closure drainage,the five-step pre-drainage borehole design method contains was put forward.Practical results showed that the arrangement of advance detect borehole based on the four principles can be accurately ascertain the coal ocurrence in the case of proven regional.The five-step pre-drainage borehole design method could ensure the accuracy of the borehole construction,hole depth error could be controlled within ±3 m,it could eliminate the gas blank zone caused by inaccurate borehole construction,and it was good for predrainage in uncovering coal area and roadway driving.

  2. Automatic Inspection Of Heat Seals Between Plastic Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Kula R.; Lew, Thomas M.; Sinclair, Robert B.

    1995-01-01

    Automatic inspection apparatus detects flaws in heat seals between films of polyethylene or other thermoplastic material. Heat-sealed strip in multilayer plastic sheet continuously moved lengthwise over illuminators. Variations in light transmitted through sheet interpreted to find flaws in heat seal. Site of flaw marked to facilitate subsequent manual inspection. Heat sealing used to join plastic films in manufacturing of variety of products, including inflatable toys and balloons carrying scientific instruments to high altitudes.

  3. Non-contacting shaft seals for gas and steam turbines

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Improvements upon current gas turbine sealing technology performance are essential for decreasing specific fuel consumption to meet stringent future efficiency targets. The clearances between rotating and static components of a gas turbine, which need to be sealed, vary over a flight cycle. Hence, a seal which can passively maintain an optimum clearance, whilst preventing contact between itself and the rotor, is extremely desirable. Various configurations of a Rolls Royce (RR) seal concep...

  4. Cyclic high temperature heat storage using borehole heat exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boockmeyer, Anke; Delfs, Jens-Olaf; Bauer, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    The transition of the German energy supply towards mainly renewable energy sources like wind or solar power, termed "Energiewende", makes energy storage a requirement in order to compensate their fluctuating production and to ensure a reliable energy and power supply. One option is to store heat in the subsurface using borehole heat exchangers (BHEs). Efficiency of thermal storage is increasing with increasing temperatures, as heat at high temperatures is more easily injected and extracted than at temperatures at ambient levels. This work aims at quantifying achievable storage capacities, storage cycle times, injection and extraction rates as well as thermal and hydraulic effects induced in the subsurface for a BHE storage site in the shallow subsurface. To achieve these aims, simulation of these highly dynamic storage sites is performed. A detailed, high-resolution numerical simulation model was developed, that accounts for all BHE components in geometrical detail and incorporates the governing processes. This model was verified using high quality experimental data and is shown to achieve accurate simulation results with excellent fit to the available experimental data, but also leads to large computational times due to the large numerical meshes required for discretizing the highly transient effects. An approximate numerical model for each type of BHE (single U, double U and coaxial) that reduces the number of elements and the simulation time significantly was therefore developed for use in larger scale simulations. The approximate numerical model still includes all BHE components and represents the temporal and spatial temperature distribution with a deviation of less than 2% from the fully discretized model. Simulation times are reduced by a factor of ~10 for single U-tube BHEs, ~20 for double U-tube BHEs and ~150 for coaxial BHEs. This model is then used to investigate achievable storage capacity, injection and extraction rates as well as induced effects for

  5. Use of the North Sea by harbour seal with special emphasis on the Horns Reef area. Test of prototype GPS/GSM-transmitter on harbour seals in the Sealarium Esbjerg[Denmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tougaard, S.; Tougaard, J.

    2004-04-15

    A combined GPS-receiver and GSM mobile phone transmitter designed for deployment on wild seals was tested on a captive harbour seal. The unit has been under development in recent years and consists of a GPS-unit for positioning and a GSM mobile phone unit for transmission of logged positions to land. The test took place in the Sealarium at the Fisheries and Maritime Museum, Esbjerg. The unit was glued onto the fur on the head of the seal, where it stayed on for 13 days. Only one position was acquired by the unit and it failed to connect to the GSM-net during the test. Technical information from the constructor of the unit is not available and it is thus not possible to conclude on the reasons why the unit did not function as intended. The behaviour of the seal can however, be ruled out, as close observation and registration of the seals dive behaviour during the first days of deployment showed that the unit was free of the water for sufficiently long periods for positions to be acquired. (au)

  6. Sealing materials for solid oxide fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, P.H.

    1999-02-01

    A major obstacle in the achievement of high electrical efficiency for planar solid oxide fuel cell stacks (SOFC) is the need for long term stable seals at the operational temperature between 850 and 1000 deg. C. In the present work the formation and properties of sealing materials for SOFC stacks that fulfil the necessary requirements were investigated. The work comprises analysis of sealing material properties independently, in simple systems as well as tests in real SOFC stacks. The analysed sealing materials were based on pure glasses or glass-ceramic composites having B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, P{sub 2}O{sub 5} or siO{sub 2} as glass formers, and the following four glass systems were investigated: MgO/caO/Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}B{sub 2}O{sub 3}-P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, MgO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, MgO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-P{sub 2}O{sub 5}-SiO{sub 2} and BaO/Na{sub 2}O-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}. (au) 32 tabs., 106 ills., 107 refs.

  7. On the lubrication of mechanical face seals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubbinge, Hans

    1999-01-01

    Hence, in this thesis, a model is presented which is able to calculate a complete Stribeck curve for a mechanical face seal and, as a consequence, the transition from full film to mixed lubrication as a function of the operational conditions. This model is based on a combination of a contact model a

  8. Measure Guideline: Guide to Attic Air Sealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lstiburek, J.

    2014-09-01

    The Guide to Attic Air Sealing was completed in 2010 and although not in the standard Measure Guideline format, is intended to be a Measure Guideline on Attic Air Sealing. The guide was reviewed during two industry stakeholders meetings held on December 18th, 2009 and January 15th, 2010, and modified based on the comments received. Please do not make comments on the Building America format of this document. The purpose of the Guide to Attic Air Sealing is to provide information and recommendations for the preparation work necessary prior to adding attic insulation. Even though the purpose of this guide is to save energy - health, safety and durability should not be compromised by energy efficiency. Accordingly, combustion safety and ventilation for indoor air quality are addressed first. Durability and attic ventilation then follow. Finally, to maximize energy savings, air sealing is completed prior to insulating. The guide is intended for home remodelers, builders, insulation contractors, mechanical contractors, general contractors who have previously done remodeling and homeowners as a guide to the work that needs to be done.

  9. A morbillivirus causing mass mortality in seals.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    1989-01-01

    textabstractDuring an outbreak of a serious apparently infectious disease among harbour seals (Phoca vitulina), which started in the Kattegat area in April 1988 and rapidly spread to the North sea, the Wadden sea and the Baltic sea, greater than 17,000 animals died within a period of eight months. I

  10. Bearings and Seals. FOS: Fundamentals of Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Deere Co., Moline, IL.

    This manual on bearings and seals is one of a series of power mechanics texts and visual aids for use in training for the servicing of automotive and off-the-road farm and industrial machines. Materials provide basic information and illustrations for use by vocational students and teachers as well as shop servicemen and laymen. Focusing on…

  11. Optimization of CPMG sequences for NMR borehole measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ronczka

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Nuklear Magnetic Resonance (NMR can provide key information such as porosity and permeability for hydrological characterization of geological material. Especially the NMR transverse relaxation time T2 is used to estimate permeability since it reflects a pore-size dependent relaxation process. The measurement sequence (CPMG usually used consists of several thousands of electromagnetic pulses to densely record the relaxation process. These pulses are equidistantly spaced by a time constant τ. In NMR borehole applications the use of CPMG sequences for measuring the transverse relaxation time T2 is limited due to requirements on energy consumption. It is state of the art to conduct at least two sequences with different echo spacings (τ for recording fast and slow relaxing processes that correspond to different pore-sizes. For the purpose to reduce the amount of energy used for conducting CPMG sequences and to obtain both, slow and fast, decaying components within one sequence we tested the usage of CPMG sequences with an increasing τ and a decreasing number of pulses. A synthetic study as well as laboratory measurements on samples of glass beads and granulate of different grain size spectra were conducted to evaluate the effects of of an increasing τ spacing, e.g. an enhanced relaxation due to diffusion processes. The results are showing broadened T2 distributions if the number of pulses is decreasing and the mean grain size is increasing, which is mostly an effect of a significantly shortened acquisition time. The shift of T2 distributions to small decay times in dependence of the τ spacing and the mean grain size distribution is observable. We found that it is possible to conduct CPMG sequences with an increased τ spacing. According to the acquisition time and enhanced diffusion the sequence parameters (number of pulses and τmax has to be chosen carefully. Otherwise the underestimated relaxation time (T2 will lead to misinterpretations.

  12. Borehole dilatometer installation, operation, and maintenance at sites in Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myren, G.D.; Johnston, M.J.S.; Mueller, R.J.

    2006-01-01

    In response to concerns about the potential hazard of Mauna Loa volcano in Hawaii, the USGS began efforts in 1998 to add four high-resolution borehole sites. Located at these sites are; strainmeters, tiltmeters, seismometers, accelerometers and other instrumentation. These instruments are capable of providing continuous monitoring of the magma movement under Mauna Loa. Each site was planned to provide multi-parameter monitoring of volcanic activity. In June of 2000, a contract was let for the core drilling of three of these four sites. They are located at Hokukano (west side of Mauna Loa) above Captain Cook, Hawaii; at Mauna Loa Observatory (11,737 feet near the summit), and at Mauna Loa Strip Road (east side of Mauna Loa). Another site was chosen near Halema'uma u' and Kilauea's summit, in the Keller deep well. (See maps). The locations of these instruments are shown in Figure 1 with their latitude and longitude in Table 1. The purpose of this network is to monitor crustal deformation associated with volcanic intrusions and earthquakes on Mauna Loa and Kilauea volcanoes. This report describes the methods used to locate sites, install dilatometers, other instrumentation, and telemetry. We also provide a detailed description of the electronics used for signal amplification and telemetry, plus techniques used for instrument maintenance. Instrument sites were selected in regions of hard volcanic rock where the expected signals from magmatic activity were calculated to be a maximum and the probability of earthquakes with magnitude 4 or greater is large. At each location, an attempt was made to separate tectonic and volcanic signals from known noise sources for each instrument type.

  13. Test of Seal System for Flexible Pipe End Fitting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banke, Lars; Jensen, Thomas Gregers

    1999-01-01

    by compression of the gaskets, thus using the geometry to establish a seal towards the inner liner of the pipe and the steel sleeve of the end fitting. This paper describes how the seal system of an end fitting can be tested using an autoclave. By regulating temperature and pressure, the seal system can...

  14. 14 CFR 1221.102 - Establishment of the NASA Seal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Establishment of the NASA Seal. 1221.102 Section 1221.102 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION THE NASA SEAL AND OTHER DEVICES, AND THE CONGRESSIONAL SPACE MEDAL OF HONOR NASA Seal, NASA Insignia, NASA Logotype,...

  15. 14 CFR 1221.109 - Use of the NASA Seal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Use of the NASA Seal. 1221.109 Section 1221.109 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION THE NASA SEAL AND OTHER DEVICES, AND THE CONGRESSIONAL SPACE MEDAL OF HONOR NASA Seal, NASA Insignia, NASA Logotype, NASA...

  16. Analyses toward factors influencing sealing clearance of a metal rubber seal and derivation of a calculation formula

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Hui; Zhao Yalei; Liu Jianguo; Jiang Hongyuan

    2016-01-01

    Sealing clearance is a key factor for a metal rubber seal’s sealability. The expansion coef-ficient and expansion deformation in the radial direction of metal rubber have been obtained through a thermal expansion experiment of metal rubber. The influence of the elastic modulus to the sealing clearance has been analyzed theoretically. By combining the temperature and elasticity factors of metal rubber with the elastic mechanics theory, the calculation formula of the sealing clearance has been derived, and the values of the sealing clearance and the leakage rate in certain working conditions have been calculated. Experimental results are consistent with calculation results in a high degree. The calculation formula of the sealing clearance can explain the influences of the temperature and elastic modulus factors of metal rubber on the sealing clearance. It can pro-vide guidance for the study of sealing mechanism of metal rubber seals.

  17. Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediments Below the T Tank Farm: Boreholes C4104, C4105, 299-W10-196, and RCRA Borehole 299-W11-39

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Horton, Duane G.; Lanigan, David C.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Clayton, Ray E.; Legore, Virginia L.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Baum, Steven R.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Vickerman, Tanya S.; Orr, Robert D.; Brown, Christopher F.

    2008-09-11

    This report was revised in September 2008 to remove acid-extractable sodium data from Tables 4.8, 4.28, and 4.52. The sodium data was removed due to potential contamination introduced during the acid extraction process. The rest of the text remains unchanged from the original report issued in September 2004. The overall goal of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., is to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities at Hanford. To meet this goal, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. tasked scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to perform detailed analyses on vadose zone sediments from within Waste Management Area (WMA) T-TX-TY. This report is the second of two reports written to present the results of these analyses. Specifically, this report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from boreholes C4104 and C4105 in the T Tank Farm, and from borehole 299-W-11-39 installed northeast of the T Tank Farm. Finally, the measurements on sediments from borehole C4104 are compared with a nearby borehole drilled in 1993, 299- W10-196, through the tank T-106 leak plume.

  18. Technical Training: Technical Training Seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Tuesday 30 March TECHNICAL TRAINING SEMINAR From 9:00 to 12:00 and from 13:00 to 16:00 hrs - Council Chamber, Salle B, Salle des Pas Perdus National Instruments (NI) on Tour 2004 Claudia Jüngel, Evrem Yarkin, Joel Clerc, Hervé Baour / NATIONAL INSTRUMENTS The special event NI on Tour 2004, run in Germany, Austria and Switzerland, will be at CERN on March 30. Technical seminars and free introductory courses will be offered all day long in the Council Chamber, Salle B, and Salle des Pas Perdus (buildings 61 and 503). Technical conferences: 09:00 - 12:00 Data acquisition systems on PCs. Industrial measurement and control techniques. 13:00 - 16:00 Advanced LabVIEW software and PXI instrumentation. Measuring instruments and system components for teststand automation. Introductory courses: 09:00 - 12:00 DIAdem: Data analysis and presentation 13:00 - 16:00 Data acquisition with LabVIEW Language: English and French Free special seminar. Registration is recommended with National Instruments Switzerland (please sp...

  19. Technical Training: Technical Training Seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Tuesday 30 March TECHNICAL TRAINING SEMINAR From 9:00 to 12:00 and from 13:00 to 16:00 hrs - Council Chamber, Salle B, Salle des Pas Perdus National Instruments (NI) on Tour 2004 Claudia Jüngel, Evrem Yarkin, Joel Clerc, Hervé Baour / NATIONAL INSTRUMENTS The special event NI on Tour 2004, run in Germany, Austria and Switzerland, will be at CERN on March 30. Technical seminars and free introductory courses will be offered all day long in the Council Chamber, Salle B, and Salle des Pas Perdus (buildings 61 and 503). Technical conferences: 09:00 - 12:00 Data acquisition systems on PCs. Industrial measurement and control techniques. 13:00 - 16:00 Advanced LabVIEW software and PXI instrumentation. Measuring instruments and system components for teststand automation. Introductory courses: 09:00 - 12:00 DIAdem: Data analysis and presentation 13:00 - 16:00 Data acquisition with LabVIEW Language: English and French Free special seminar. Registration is recommended with National Instruments Swi...

  20. Description of borehole geophysical and geologist logs, Berks Sand Pit Superfund Site, Longswamp Township, Berks County, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Dennis J.; Conger, Randall W.

    2003-01-01

    Between October 2002 and January 2003, geophysical logging was conducted in six boreholes at the Berks Sand Pit Superfund Site, Longswamp Township, Berks County, Pa., to determine (1) the waterproducing zones, water-receiving zones, zones of vertical borehole flow, orientation of fractures, and borehole and casing depth; and (2) the hydraulic interconnection between the six boreholes and the site extraction well. The boreholes range in depth from 61 to 270 feet. Geophysical logging included collection of caliper, natural-gamma, single-point-resistance, fluid-temperature, fluid-flow, and acoustic-televiewer logs. Caliper and acoustic-televiewer logs were used to locate fractures, joints, and weathered zones. Inflections on fluid-temperature and single-point-resistance logs indicated possible water-bearing fractures, and flowmeter measurements verified these locations. Single-point-resistance, natural-gamma, and geologist logs provided information on stratigraphy. Flowmeter measurements were conducted while the site extraction well was pumping and when it was inactive to determine the hydraulic connections between the extraction well and the boreholes. Borehole geophysical logging and heatpulse flowmetering indicate active flow in the boreholes. Two of the boreholes are in ground-water discharge areas, two boreholes are in ground-water recharge areas, and one borehole is in an intermediate regime. Flow was not determined in one borehole. Heatpulse flowmetering, in conjunction with the geologist logs, indicates highly weathered zones in the granitic gneiss can be permeable and effective transmitters of water, confirming the presence of a two-tiered ground-water-flow system. The effort to determine a hydraulic connection between the site extraction well and six logged boreholes was not conclusive. Three boreholes showed decreases in depth to water after pumping of the site extraction well; in two boreholes, the depth to water increased. One borehole was cased its

  1. Sealed source dismantling hot cell - startup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dellamano, Jose Claudio; Ferreira, Robson de Jesus, E-mail: jcdellam@ipen.br, E-mail: rojefer@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Gerencia de Rejeitos radioativos

    2013-07-01

    Sealed radioactive sources are widely used in many applications of nuclear technology and at the end of the useful life, most sources become radioactive waste. In Brazil, this waste is received by the Institutes of the National Nuclear Energy Commission and kept under centralized storage. The Waste Management Department at the Nuclear and Energy Research Institute is the main storage center, having received around 20,000 disused sources. A hot cell was designed and constructed to manage Co-60 spent sealed sources with activity up to 3.7 10{sup 1}0 Bq and other sources with equivalent activities. In the hot cell the sources are withdraw from their original shielding and transferred to a standard shielding for further disposal off. The original shielding disassembling is made outside the hot cell and after opening, it is transferred inside the hot cell and the sealed source is removed remotely. The source is checked in relation to external contamination and its activity is checked. After this, the source is positioned in the standard shielding located inside an overpack at the bottom of the hot cell. This paper describes some pre-operational tests carried out in it, that include: opening and closing doors and locks, checking of all electrical and pneumatic controls, the original shielding movement inside the hot-cell, dose rate measurements outside the hot-cell, insertion of the sealed sources inside the activity meter chamber, transferring the sealed source to the standard shielding, movement of the overpack with the standard shielding to outside of the hot-cell and plugging of the standard shielding. (author)

  2. Angel wing seals for blades of a gas turbine and methods for determining angel wing seal profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, John Zhiqiang

    2003-01-01

    A gas turbine has buckets rotatable about an axis, the buckets having angel wing seals. The seals have outer and inner surfaces, at least one of which, and preferably both, extend non-linearly between root radii and the tip of the seal body. The profiles are determined in a manner to minimize the weight of the seal bodies, while maintaining the stresses below predetermined maximum or allowable stresses.

  3. The Use of ExoSeal Vascular Closure Device for Direct Antegrade Superficial Femoral Artery Puncture Site Hemostasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rimon, Uri, E-mail: rimonu@sheba.health.gov.il; Khaitovich, Boris, E-mail: borislena@012.net.il [Tel-Aviv University, Diagnostic and Interventional Imaging Department, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Hashomer, Affiliated to the Sackler School of Medicine (Israel); Yakubovich, Dmitry, E-mail: Dmitry.Yakubovitch@sheba.health.gov.il [Tel-Aviv University, Vascular Surgery Department, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Hashomer, Affiliated to the Sackler School of Medicine (Israel); Bensaid, Paul, E-mail: paulbensaid@hotmail.com; Golan, Gil, E-mail: gilgolan201@gmail.com [Tel-Aviv University, Diagnostic and Interventional Imaging Department, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Hashomer, Affiliated to the Sackler School of Medicine (Israel); Silverberg, Daniel, E-mail: Daniel.Silverberg@sheba.health.gov.il [Tel-Aviv University, Vascular Surgery Department, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Hashomer, Affiliated to the Sackler School of Medicine (Israel)

    2015-06-15

    PurposeThis study was designed to assess the efficacy and safety of the ExoSeal vascular closure device (VCD) to achieve hemostasis in antegrade access of the superficial femoral artery (SFA).MethodsWe retrospectively reviewed the outcome of ExoSeal VCD used for hemostasis in 110 accesses to the SFA in 93 patients between July 2011 and July 2013. All patients had patent proximal SFA based on computer tomography angiography or ultrasound duplex. Arterial calcifications at puncture site were graded using fluoroscopy. The SFA was accessed in an antegrade fashion with ultrasound or fluoroscopic guidance. In all patients, 5–7F vascular sheaths were used. The ExoSeal VCD was applied to achieve hemostasis at the end of the procedure. All patients were clinically examined and had ultrasound duplex exam for any puncture site complications during the 24 h postprocedure.ResultsIn all procedures, the ExoSeal was applied successfully. We did not encounter any device-related technical failure. There were four major complications in four patients (3.6 %): three pseudoaneurysms, which were treated with direct thrombin injection, and one hematoma, which necessitated transfusion of two blood units. All patients with complications were treated with anticoagulation preprocedure or received thrombolytic therapy.ConclusionsThe ExoSeal VCD can be safely used for antegrade puncture of the SFA, with a high procedural success rate (100 %) and a low rate of access site complications (3.6 %)

  4. Endovascular therapy for abdominal aortic aneurysm and iliac artery aneurysm using SEAL aortic stent-graft: A single center experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Su Young; Kim, Jeong Ho; Byun, Sung Su; Kang, Jin Mo; Choi, Sang Tae; Park, Jae Hyung [Gachon University Gil Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of SEAL aortic stent-graft for abdominal aortoiliac aneurysms. Between October 2007 and January 2014, 33 patients with abdominal aortoiliac aneurysms were treated with SEAL aortic stent-graft. We evaluated the technical success rate, clinical and CT follow-up periods, major complications, need for additional interventional treatment, aneurysm-related mortality and clinical success rate. SEAL bifurcated aortic stent-graft was successfully placed in 32 patients (97%). Clinical and CT follow-up periods were 24 and 14 months, respectively. Endoleak developed in 13 patients (41%): spontaneous regression or decrease in 6, need for additional treatment in 4 and follow-up loss in 3. Significant stenosis of stent-graft occurred in 4 patients (12%) and was treated with stenting in 3. Migration of stent-graft was noted in 3 patients (9%) and treated with additional stent-grafting. Aneurysm-related mortality was 9% (3 of 33). The placement of SEAL stent-graft was effective in 26 patients (79%). The placement of SEAL aortic stent-graft was safe and effective in patients with aneurysms of abdominal aorta and iliac arteries. However, complicating endoleaks, stenosis and migration of the stent-graft developed during the follow-up. Therefore, regular CT follow-up seems to be mandatory.

  5. Injection sealing of the TASS tunnel. Progress report; Injekteringen av TASS-tunneln. Delresultat t o m september 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funehag, Johan (Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden))

    2008-12-15

    SKB's disposal facility is planned to be located approx. 400-500 m deep and the demands of its water tightness will be very high. The plant will be located in relatively fault-free rock with limited discharge and sealing will be carried out by injection. Given the very fine cracks that need to be sealed and the strong desire to use an injection material which generate a leachate with a pH lower than 11, SKB performs studies of silica sol and cement-based mortar with low pH in order to be able to use these in the sealing works. In the sealing project a 100 m long tunnel is constructed, the TASS tunnel at a depth of 450 min at SKB's rock laboratory on Aespoe. This report includes the results obtained until September 2008. At this date the injection stages 1, 2, and half of stage 3 have been done and preparation for Stage 3 is ongoing. The tunnel has reached a length of 55.5 m and the results from leaching measurements exist for stage 2 (Section 10-34 m). Both cement-based mortar with low pH and silica sol has been used, but cement-based mortar has been used only in relatively small scale. The cement-based mortar is developed especially for the repository. Silica sol used a particle size of about 25 nm and accelerator in the form of sodium chloride. The limit for inward leakage in the tunnel is 1 l/min and 60 m tunnel. Groundwater pressure was found to be 3.0-3.5 MPa. Past results obtained from Stage 2 indicate that injection shields fulfil the rate requirement over a 23 meter distance. The control holes drilled in the screens have been used to gradually steer the injection and to demonstrate a direct sealing effect of the screens. A controllable gelation time is necessary for efficient and controllable injection. Used mixing procedure has been proven to work and intended gelation times have been achieved. The two cement-based mortar mixtures for crack injection used in the project are robust and have desirable properties. Design methodology linking borehole

  6. The derivation of an anisotropic velocity model from combined surface and borehole seismic experiments at the COSC-1 borehole, central Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Helge; Krauß, Felix; Hedin, Peter; Buske, Stefan; Giese, Rüdiger; Juhlin, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    The Scandinavian Caledonides provide a well preserved example of a Paleozoic continent-continent collision, where the surface geology in combination with geophysical data provide control of the geometry of parts of the Caledonian structure. The project COSC (Collisional Orogeny in the Scandinavian Caledonides) investigates the structure and physical conditions of the orogen units and the underlying basement with two approximately 2.5 km deep fully cored boreholes in western Jämtland, central Sweden. In 2014 the COSC-1 borehole was successfully drilled through the Seve Nappe Complex. This unit, mainly consisting of gneisses, belongs to the so-called Middle Allochthons and has been ductilely deformed and transported during collisional orogeny. A major seismic survey was conducted in and around the COSC-1 borehole which comprised both seismic reflection and transmission experiments. Combined with core analysis and downhole logging, the survey will allow extrapolation of the structures away from the borehole. The survey consisted of three parts: 1) a high-resolution zero-offset Vertical Seismic Profile (VSP), 2) a multi-azimuthal walkaway VSP in combination with three long offset surface receiver lines, and 3) a limited 3D seismic survey. Data from the multi-azimuthal walkaway VSP experiment and the long offset surface lines were used to derive a detailed velocity model around the borehole from the inversion of first arrival traveltimes. The comparison of velocities from these tomography results with a velocity function calculated from the zero-offset VSP revealed clear differences in velocities for mainly horizontally and vertically traveling waves. Therefore, an anisotropic VTI model was constructed, using the P-wave velocity function from zero-offset VSP and the Thomson parameters ɛ and δ. The latter were partly derived from ultrasonic lab measurements on COSC-1 core samples. Traveltimes were calculated with an anisotropic eikonal solver and serve as the basis

  7. Installation of borehole seismometer for earthquake characteristics in deep geological environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Dong Hee; Choi, Weon Hack; Cho, Sung Il; Chang, Chun Joong [KHNP CRI, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Deep geological disposal is currently accepted as the most appropriate method for permanently removing spent nuclear fuel from the living sphere of humans. For implementation of deep geological disposal, we need to understand the geological changes that have taken place over the past 100,000 years, encompassing active faults, volcanic activity, elevation, ubsidence, which as yet have not been considered in assessing the site characteristics for general facilities, as well as to investigate and analyze the geological structures, fracture systems and seismic responses regarding deep geological environment about 500 meters or more underground. In regions with high seismic activity, such as Japan, the Western United States and Taiwan, borehole seismometers installed deep underground are used to monitor seismic activity during the course of seismic wave propagation at various depths and to study the stress changes due to earthquakes and analyze the connection to fault movements. Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd. (KHNP) have installed the deep borehole earthquake observatory at depths of about 300 to 600 meters in order to study the seismic response characteristics in deep geological environment on June, 2014 in Andong area. This paper will show the status of deep borehole earthquake observatory and the results of background noise response characteristics of these deep borehole seismic data as a basic data analysis. We present here the status of deep borehole seismometer installation by KHNP. In order to basic data analysis for the borehole seismic observation data, this study shows the results of the orientation of seismometer and background noise characteristics by using a probability density function. Together with the ground motion data recorded by the borehole seismometers can be utilized as basic data for seismic response characteristics studies with regard to spent nuclear fuel disposal depth and as the input data for seismic hazard assessment that

  8. Vadose Zone Characterization and Monitoring Beneath Waste Disposal Pits Using Horizontal Boreholes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLin, S. G.; Newman, B. D.; Broxton, D. E.

    2004-12-01

    Vadose zone characterization and monitoring immediately below landfills using horizontal boreholes is an emerging technology. However, this topic has received little attention in the peer-reviewed literature. The value of this approach is that activities are conducted below the waste, providing clear and rapid verification of containment. Here we report on two studies that examined the utility of horizontal boreholes for environmental characterization and monitoring under radioactive waste disposal pits. Both studies used core sample analyses to determine the presence of various radionuclides, organics, or metals. At one borehole site, water content and pore-water chloride concentrations were also used to interpret vadose zone behavior. At another site, we examined the feasibility of using flexible membrane liners in uncased boreholes for periodic monitoring. For this demonstration, these retrievable liners were air-injected into boreholes on multiple occasions carrying different combinations of environmental surveillance equipment. Instrument packages included a neutron logging device to measure volumetric water at regular intervals, high-absorbency collectors that wicked available water from borehole walls, or vent tubes that were used to measure air permeability and collect air samples. The flexible and retrievable liner system was an effective way to monitor water content and collect air permeability data. The high-absorbency collectors were efficient at extracting liquid water for contaminant analyses even at volumetric water contents below 10 percent, and revealed vapor-phase tritium migration at one disposal pit. Both demonstration studies proved that effective characterization and periodic monitoring in horizontal boreholes is both feasible and adaptable to many waste disposal problems and locations.

  9. Evolution of stress-induced borehole breakout in inherently anisotropic rock: Insights from discrete element modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, K.; Kwok, C. Y.

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study is to better understand the mechanisms controlling the initiation, propagation, and ultimate pattern of borehole breakouts in shale formation when drilled parallel with and perpendicular to beddings. A two-dimensional discrete element model is constructed to explicitly represent the microstructure of inherently anisotropic rocks by inserting a series of individual smooth joints into an assembly of bonded rigid discs. Both isotropic and anisotropic hollow square-shaped samples are generated to represent the wellbores drilled perpendicular to and parallel with beddings at reduced scale. The isotropic model is validated by comparing the stress distribution around borehole wall and along X axis direction with analytical solutions. Effects of different factors including the particle size distribution, borehole diameter, far-field stress anisotropy, and rock anisotropy are systematically evaluated on the stress distribution and borehole breakout propagation. Simulation results reveal that wider particle size distribution results in the local stress perturbations which cause localization of cracks. Reduction of borehole diameter significantly alters the crack failure from tensile to shear and raises the critical pressure. Rock anisotropy plays an important role on the stress state around wellbore which lead to the formation of preferred cracks under hydrostatic stress. Far-field stress anisotropy plays a dominant role in the shape of borehole breakout when drilled perpendicular to beddings while a secondary role when drilled parallel with beddings. Results from this study can provide fundamental insights on the underlying particle-scale mechanisms for previous findings in laboratory and field on borehole stability in anisotropic rock.

  10. Simpevarp site investigation. Geophysical, radar and BIPS logging in borehole KSH01A, HSH01, HSH02 and HSH03

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, Per; Gustafsson, Christer [RAYCON, Malaa (Sweden)

    2003-04-01

    The objective of the surveys is to both receive information of the borehole itself, and from the rock mass around the borehole. Bore hole radar was used to investigate the nature and the structure of the rock mass located around the boreholes, and BIPS for geological surveying and fracture mapping and orientation. Geophysical logging was used to measure changes in physical properties in the borehole fluid and the bedrock surrounding the boreholes. This field report describes the equipment used as well the measurement procedures. For the BIPS survey, the result is presented as images. Radar data is presented in radargrams and identified reflectors in each borehole are listed in tables. Geophysical logging data is presented in graphs as a function of depth.

  11. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Ball and W. Zeuner

    2011-01-01

      Operational experience 2011 CMS is approaching the end of a very successful year of operation. Proton- proton running ended in the late afternoon of 30th October with a stunning 5.73 fb–1 delivered by LHC, of which CMS recorded 5.22 fb–1. During heavy-ion operation, which continues until 7th December, both the accelerator and the CMS detector have also performed very well. Despite the encouraging overall reliability of technical operation, several infrastructure failures which occurred since the last Bulletin are worthy of mention, with one leading for the first time to significant data-loss. On 10th July, a CERN-wide power failure brought down essentially all services including the magnet, due to an MCS setting being left in “manual” after the recent technical stop, but there was no significant damage and the detector was operational before the LHC, despite a slow and tortuous recovery (one of several indications this year that there is room for improve...

  12. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Ball and W. Zeuner

    2013-01-01

    For the reporting period, the CMS common systems and infrastructure worked well, without failures that caused significant data losses. One more disconnection of the magnet cold box occurred in the shadow of interruptions in data taking, caused by a series of technical faults. The recognition during 2012 that re-connection can only safely be done at around 2 T implies a minimum magnet recovery time of 12 hours and raises serious concerns about the number of ramping cycles of the magnet these incidents cause. This has triggered studies of how to make the cryo-system of the magnet more robust against failures. The proton-proton run ended just before the end-of-year CERN closure, during which CASTOR was installed on the negative end of CMS and both ZDC calorimeters were installed in TAN absorbers the LHC tunnel, in preparation for the heavy-ion run. The installation of CASTOR was an excellent “engineering test” of procedures for working in an activated environment. Despite some technical pr...

  13. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    Austin Ball

    Summary of progress since last CMS week. Ten years of construction work have been completed. CMS is closed, in very close to the ideal low luminosity configuration, and performed well in the first tests with LHC beam. Behind this encouraging news is the story of a summer of intense commitment by many teams (from the collaboration and 3 CERN departments) working together, against the clock and despite many minor setbacks, to ensure that the experiment was ready to play a leading role in the excitement of September 10. Following beampipe bakeout and refill with pure neon, a magnificent effort by the ECAL group and the pt 5 technical crew made it possible to install and commission all 4 ECAL endcap Dees before the end of August. In the shadow of this activity, the barrel and forward pixel trackers and part of the beam monitoring were installed within the vac tank. The pt 5 technical teams then succeeded in safely removing the 20t installation tables and their support blocks from beneath the already installed ...

  14. Experimental toxoplasma gondii infection in grey seals (Halichoerus grypus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gajadhar, A. A.; Measures, L.; Forbes, L. B.;

    2004-01-01

    changes were observed in all inoculated seals but not in control animals. A modified agglutination test revealed the presence of antibodies to T. gondii in sera collected from inoculated seals and mice inoculated as controls. No evidence of the parasite was found on an extensive histological examination......Laboratory-reared animals were used to assess the susceptibility of seals (Halichoerus grypus) to Toxoplasma gondii infection. Four seals were each orally inoculated with 100 or 10,000 oocysts of T. gondii (VEG strain), and another 4 seals served as negative controls. Occasionally, mild behavioral...

  15. Investigation of seal technology for Francis turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Wei

    2012-06-01

    Leakage loss and disk friction loss caused by the clearance gap flow at the back of a runner have a major impact on the efficiency of hydraulic turbines. Accordingly, it is extremely important to develop and improve the seal technology by investigating the gap flow. Generally, there are two types of the gap flow: axial gap flow between a rotating disk and a stator (e.g. the flow at the back of a runner) and the annular gap flow (e.g. the flow at an annular seal). Firstly, the overview of previous researches on labyrinth seal, rotating disk flow and Taylor-Couette flow are summarized. Labyrinth seals are the primary type of seals for turbo machinery. However, most researchers studied it for compressible flow only. It is also found that the enclosed rotating disk flow with through-flow can be studied instead of the gap flow in a hydraulic machine. Furthermore, the above mentioned annular gap flow is similar to the Taylor-Couette flow. The Taylor-vortices are formed in the annular gap due to the rotation of disk, which could be used as a resistance of flow. Therefore, in the present work, three parts are investigated. The first part is the investigation of the labyrinth seal for Francis turbines. The second part is the investigation of the gap flow between two stationary walls. The third part is investigation of the annular gap flow between one stationary and one rotating wall, based on the theory of Taylor-Couette flow. Afterwards, the theoretical formulas for leakage flow of a traditional labyrinth seal used in high head Francis turbine is derived and is verified to give acceptable results. The theoretical model is useful to predict the leakage flow by the measurements of Francis turbine at the Aabjoera Power plant. For straight-through labyrinth seal, the effects of cavity dimensions, numbers and locations on the leakage flow are investigated numerically. Smaller cavity depth, longer cavity length and fewer cavity numbers are required in order to reduce leakage

  16. Twenty-three Years of Evolving "State-of-the-Art" CORK Borehole Geophysical Monitoring: A Review of Technologies and Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, E. E.; Becker, K.; Meldrum, R.; Heesemann, M.; Villinger, H. W.; Kinoshita, M.; Paros, J. M.; Inderbitzen, K. E.

    2014-12-01

    The first successful attempt to instrument an Ocean Drilling Program borehole for formation pressure and temperature monitoring and fluid sampling was accomplished in 1991 in Hole 857D, and the system there has been in nearly continuous operation since that time. This hole and others that followed have provided many new insights into ocean crustal and subduction zone hydrogeology and geodynamics, while at the same time being the "proving ground" for a number of technological advances in ocean borehole monitoring, including 1) the CORK scheme itself for sealing holes for hydrologic recovery to natural-state conditions after drilling; 2) the use of absolute pressure sensors for monitoring both relative formation pressures and changes in seafloor depth; 3) multi-level completions for pressure monitoring that leave cased borehole interiors open for other instrumentation; 4) the development of ultra-high-precision, low-power digital recording systems for examining the effects on the formation of seismic and microseismic loading; and 5) the proof-of-concept of an optical communications system that eliminates dependence on submersibles or ROVs for data download operations (see Tivey et al., this session). Relatively low-sample-rate data spanning the first part of the more than two decades of operations have shown how large anomalous pressures generated thermally and by deformation can be; how seafloor tidal loading influences formation pressure and can drive an "a.c." component of flow; and how seismogenic and slow strain can be observed by way of formation-fluid pressure transients. More recent instrumentation has allowed much higher fidelity observations (1 Hz sampling at a resolution of 10-8 of full-scale), and thus is permitting complementary studies of hydrologic, oceanographic, seismic, and microseismic phenomena. Plans for the future include connections to shore via observatory cable systems, such as those of NEPTUNE Canada and DONET, for unlimited power supply and

  17. Forsmark site investigation. Geophysical, radar and BIPS logging in boreholes HFM01, HFM02, HFM03 and the percussion drilled part of KFM01A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustafsson, Christer; Nilsson, Per [Malaa Geoscience AB/RAYCON, Jaerfaella (Sweden)

    2003-03-01

    This document reports the data gained during logging operations, which is one of the activities performed within the site investigation at Forsmark. The logging operations presented here include geophysical logging with Wellmac, RAMAC and BIPS. In total, 430 metres of logging was carried out in four percussion drilled boreholes. The boreholes in question are; KFM01A (c. 100 m deep of which 50 m were logged/diameter 165 mm), HFM01 (200 m/140 mm), HFM02 (100 m/140 mm) and HFM03 (30 m/140 mm). The borehole referred to as KFM01A is the uppermost, percussion drilled part of a c 1000 m deep telescopic drilled borehole of which the section 1001000 metres is core drilled. All measurements were conducted in June 2002. Instruments used: Borehole radar (RAMAC) system with dipole radar antennas. Borehole TV system (Borehole Image Processing System BIPS), a high resolution, side viewing, colour borehole TV system. Borehole geophysical logging system (WELLMAC)

  18. Cross-borehole flow analysis to characterize fracture connections in the Melechov Granite, Bohemian-Moravian Highland, Czech Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paillet, Frederick L.; Williams, John H.; Urik, Joseph; Lukes, Joseph; Kobr, Miroslav; Mares, Stanislav

    2012-01-01

    Application of the cross-borehole flow method, in which short pumping cycles in one borehole are used to induce time-transient flow in another borehole, demonstrated that a simple hydraulic model can characterize the fracture connections in the bedrock mass between the two boreholes. The analysis determines the properties of fracture connections rather than those of individual fractures intersecting a single borehole; the model contains a limited number of adjustable parameters so that any correlation between measured and simulated flow test data is significant. The test was conducted in two 200-m deep boreholes spaced 21 m apart in the Melechov Granite in the Bohemian-Moravian Highland, Czech Republic. Transient flow was measured at depth stations between the identified transmissive fractures in one of the boreholes during short-term pumping and recovery periods in the other borehole. Simulated flows, based on simple model geometries, closely matched the measured flows. The relative transmissivity and storage of the inferred fracture connections were corroborated by tracer testing. The results demonstrate that it is possible to assess the properties of a fracture flow network despite being restricted to making measurements in boreholes in which a local population of discrete fractures regulates the hydraulic communication with the larger-scale aquifer system.

  19. Estimation of the sustainable yields of boreholes in fractured rock formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tonder, G. J.; Botha, J. F.; Chiang, W.-H.; Kunstmann, H.; Xu, Y.

    2001-01-01

    The simplest way to derive an estimate for the sustainable yield of a borehole is to study the behaviour of drawdowns observed during a hydraulic (also known as a pumping test) of the borehole, through an appropriate conceptual model. The choice of this model is probably the most difficult choice that the analyst of such a hydraulic test has to make, since a wrong model can only lead to the wrong conclusions and failure of the borehole. This paper discusses a semi-analytical and two numerical methods that can be used to simplify the analyses of hydraulic tests in fractured rock formations. The first method, called the Method of Derivative Fitting (MDF), uses a new approach to identify the conceptual model needed in such analyses. This is achieved by characterizing the various flow periods in fractured rock aquifers with numerical approximations of the first logarithmic derivative of the observed drawdown (the derivative of the drawdown with respect to the logarithm of the time). Semi-analytical expressions are used to estimate the influence that boundaries may have on the observed drawdown and the sustainable yield of a borehole — the rate at which a borehole can be pumped without lowering the water level below a prescribed limit. An effort has also been made to quantify errors in the estimates introduced by uncertainties in the parameters, such as the transmissivity and storativity, through a Gaussian error propagation analysis. These approximations and the MDF, called the Flow Characteristics Method (FCM) have been implemented in a user-friendly EXCEL notebook, and used to estimate the sustainable yield of a borehole on the Campus Test Site at the University of the Orange Free State. The first numerical method, a two-dimensional radial flow model, is included here because it allows the user more freedom than the FCM, although it requires more information. One particular advantage of the method is that it allows one to obtain realistic estimates of the

  20. A Fiber-Optic Borehole Seismic Vector Sensor System for Geothermal Site Characterization and Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulsson, Bjorn N.P. [Paulsson, Inc.; Thornburg, Jon A [Paulsson, Inc.; He, Ruiqing [Paulsson, Inc.

    2015-04-21

    Seismic techniques are the dominant geophysical techniques for the characterization of subsurface structures and stratigraphy. The seismic techniques also dominate the monitoring and mapping of reservoir injection and production processes. Borehole seismology, of all the seismic techniques, despite its current shortcomings, has been shown to provide the highest resolution characterization and most precise monitoring results because it generates higher signal to noise ratio and higher frequency data than surface seismic techniques. The operational environments for borehole seismic instruments are however much more demanding than for surface seismic instruments making both the instruments and the installation much more expensive. The current state-of-the-art borehole seismic instruments have not been robust enough for long term monitoring compounding the problems with expensive instruments and installations. Furthermore, they have also not been able to record the large bandwidth data available in boreholes or having the sensitivity allowing them to record small high frequency micro seismic events with high vector fidelity. To reliably achieve high resolution characterization and long term monitoring of Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) sites a new generation of borehole seismic instruments must therefore be developed and deployed. To address the critical site characterization and monitoring needs for EGS programs, US Department of Energy (DOE) funded Paulsson, Inc. in 2010 to develop a fiber optic based ultra-large bandwidth clamped borehole seismic vector array capable of deploying up to one thousand 3C sensor pods suitable for deployment into ultra-high temperature and high pressure boreholes. Tests of the fiber optic seismic vector sensors developed on the DOE funding have shown that the new borehole seismic sensor technology is capable of generating outstanding high vector fidelity data with extremely large bandwidth: 0.01 – 6,000 Hz. Field tests have shown

  1. Determination of thermal dispersivity using a borehole heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, V.; Bayer, P.; Bisch, G.; Braun, J.; Klaas, N.; Blum, P.

    2012-04-01

    Shallow geothermal energy is a popular option for the heating and air-conditioning of buildings, because it is a regenerative energy and modern heat-pump-based low-enthalpy geothermal systems are often economically advantageous to alternative technologies. Geothermal systems extract heat from the ground, or inject waste heat. This may cause temperature anomalies in the subsurface, and when shallow aquifers exist, these anomalies can be observed in the groundwater. To ensure an efficiently operating, and in the long-run, sustainable, geothermal system, a precise knowledge of the evolving temperature anomaly is desirable. When planning a system, among the subsurface heat transport processes, advection due to flowing groundwater is not often considered. Accordingly, the role of thermal dispersion is rarely inspected. To determine the thermal dispersion influencing the temperature plume around a borehole heat extractor (BHE), a geothermal lab experiment is performed in an artificial aquifer. The size of the aquifer is 9 m × 6 m × 4.5 m, it is heterogeneous and composed of five different sand layers. In the lab, a specific hydraulic gradient is imposed. A BHE is installed in this aquifer, and the exact size and temporal evolution of the induced temperature anomaly is measured by a monitoring network of over 100 temperature sensors. Based on the known hydraulic and thermal properties of the different sand layers, a high-resolution finite element model is built, which simulates the transient conditions during the experiment. This model contains a fully discretized BHE, with an integrated heat carrier fluid flow inside the U-pipes, located inside the BHE. Therefore, the model is able to consider the coupled processes between the temperature development of the heat carrier fluid and the heat propagation in the subsurface. Except the longitudinal and transversal dispersivity, all material properties and boundary conditions are known, thus the dispersivities can be

  2. Low torque hydrodynamic lip geometry for rotary seals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietle, Lannie L.; Schroeder, John E.

    2015-07-21

    A hydrodynamically lubricating geometry for the generally circular dynamic sealing lip of rotary seals that are employed to partition a lubricant from an environment. The dynamic sealing lip is provided for establishing compressed sealing engagement with a relatively rotatable surface, and for wedging a film of lubricating fluid into the interface between the dynamic sealing lip and the relatively rotatable surface in response to relative rotation that may occur in the clockwise or the counter-clockwise direction. A wave form incorporating an elongated dimple provides the gradual convergence, efficient impingement angle, and gradual interfacial contact pressure rise that are conducive to efficient hydrodynamic wedging. Skewed elevated contact pressure zones produced by compression edge effects provide for controlled lubricant movement within the dynamic sealing interface between the seal and the relatively rotatable surface, producing enhanced lubrication and low running torque.

  3. Method of making hermetic seals for hermetic terminal assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, John S.; Marlino, Laura D.; Ayers, Curtis W.

    2010-04-13

    This invention teaches methods of making a hermetic terminal assembly comprising the steps of: inserting temporary stops, shims and jigs on the bottom face of a terminal assembly thereby blocking assembly core open passageways; mounting the terminal assembly inside a vacuum chamber using a temporary assembly perimeter seal and flange or threaded assembly interfaces; mixing a seal admixture and hardener in a mixer conveyor to form a polymer seal material; conveying the polymer seal material into a polymer reservoir; feeding the polymer seal material from the reservoir through a polymer outlet valve and at least one polymer outlet tube into the terminal assembly core thereby filling interstitial spaces in the core adjacent to service conduits, temporary stop, and the terminal assembly casing; drying the polymer seal material at room temperature thereby hermetically sealing the core of the terminal assembly; removing the terminal assembly from the vacuum chamber, and; removing the temporary stops, shims.

  4. Dimensional Analysis on Resistance Characteristics of Labyrinth Seals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Dongxu; JIA Li; YANG Lixin

    2014-01-01

    Experimental investigation of stepped and straight-through labyrinth seals was designed to study the sealing performance of two different typical labyrinth seals.In order to facilitate dimensional analysis on the flow resistance characteristics of labyrinth seals,the variable cross-section of the flow channels are considered as constant cross-section flow.The mechanical energy loss of flow caused by throttle turbulence intensity is considered as caused by friction along the way.The friction coefficient of stepped labyrinth seals is bigger than that of straight-through labyrinth seals by more than 40% for the same Reynolds number and the ratio of equivalent diameter and the seal length.The expression of friction coefficient f and fRe are obtained from experimental data.The verifications indicate that the expressions are highly accurate.The contribution to the total pressure drop of each tooth cavity gradually becomes less along the flow direction.

  5. Apparatus and method for inspecting a sealed container

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, J Frank [Pocatello, ID; Jones, James L [Idaho Falls, ID; Hunt, Alan W [Pocatello, ID; Spaulding, Randy J [Pocatello, ID; Smith, Michael [Phoenix, AZ

    2009-03-24

    An apparatus for inspecting a sealed container is disclosed and which includes a pulsed electron accelerator which is positioned in spaced relation relative to a first side of the sealed container, and which produces a pulsed beam of photons which passes through the sealed container and any contents enclosed within the sealed container; a detector positioned in spaced relation relative to a second, opposite side of the sealed container, and which receives the pulsed beam of photons which passes through the contents of the sealed container, and which produces an output signal; and a computer for developing a visible image from the output signal of the detector which depicts the contents of the sealed container.

  6. Seals/Secondary Fluid Flows Workshop 1997; Volume I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Robert C. (Editor)

    2006-01-01

    The 1997 Conference provided discussions and data on (a) program overviews, (b) developments in seals and secondary air management systems, (c) interactive seals flows with secondary air or fluid flows and powerstream flows, (d) views of engine externals and limitations, (e) high speed engine research sealing needs and demands, and (f) a short course on engine design development margins. Sealing concepts discussed include, mechanical rim and cavity seals, leaf, finger, air/oil, rope, floating-brush, floating-T-buffer, and brush seals. Engine externals include all components of engine fluid systems, sensors and their support structures that lie within or project through the nacelle. The clean features of the nacelle belie the minefield of challenges and opportunities that lie within. Seals; Secondary air flows; Rotordynamics; Gas turbine; Aircraft; CFD; Testing; Turbomachinery

  7. Single-valued definition of the multivalued function for borehole acoustic waves in transversely isotropic formations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    It is useful to extract all components, including compressional, shear, and guided waves, from the full waveforms when we investigate the acoustic log data. The component waves can be simulated by calculating the contributions from poles and branch points of the borehole acoustic function according to Cauchy’s theorem. For such an algorithm to be implemented, the multivalued function for the borehole wave field in the frequency-axial-wavenumber domain has to be rendered single-valued first. Assuming that the borehole axis is parallel to the symmetry axis of transverse isotropy, this paper derives the branch points of the borehole acoustic function. We discover that the number and the locations of those branch points are determined by the relation among the formation parameters c33, c44, ε, and δ. Thus the single-valued definitions in the acoustic-wave computation are sorted into two different cases. After building the Riemann surface related to each radial wavenumber, we give the single-valued definition of the borehole acoustic function inside and on the integration contour based on the radiation condition. In a formation with δ > ε + c44/2c33, if we choose the integration contour and the single-valued definition of the acoustic function in the way used in isotropic cases, the simulation results of component waves will be wrong.

  8. Geostatistical borehole image-based mapping of karst-carbonate aquifer pores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael Sukop,; Cunningham, Kevin J.

    2016-01-01

    Quantification of the character and spatial distribution of porosity in carbonate aquifers is important as input into computer models used in the calculation of intrinsic permeability and for next-generation, high-resolution groundwater flow simulations. Digital, optical, borehole-wall image data from three closely spaced boreholes in the karst-carbonate Biscayne aquifer in southeastern Florida are used in geostatistical experiments to assess the capabilities of various methods to create realistic two-dimensional models of vuggy megaporosity and matrix-porosity distribution in the limestone that composes the aquifer. When the borehole image data alone were used as the model training image, multiple-point geostatistics failed to detect the known spatial autocorrelation of vuggy megaporosity and matrix porosity among the three boreholes, which were only 10 m apart. Variogram analysis and subsequent Gaussian simulation produced results that showed a realistic conceptualization of horizontal continuity of strata dominated by vuggy megaporosity and matrix porosity among the three boreholes.

  9. Numerical study on scanning radiation acoustic field in formations generated from a borehole

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHE Xiaohua; ZHANG Hailan; QIAO Wenxiao; JU Xiaodong

    2005-01-01

    Numerical study on scanning radiation acoustic field in formations generated by linear phased array transmitters in a fluid-filled borehole is carried out using a real axis integration (RAI) method. The main lobe width of the acoustic beams and the incident angle on the borehole wall can be controlled by means of adjusting parameters, such as the element number and the delay time between the neighboring array elements of linear phased array transmitter. The steered angle of longitudinal waves generated in the formation satisfies the Snell's law for plane waves when the incident angle on the borehole wall is less than the first critical angle. When the lobe width of the acoustic beams is narrow and the steered angle is less than the first critical angle, the acoustic field in the formation can be approximately calculated given that the linear phased array is put in the formation without borehole. The technique of scanning radiation acoustic field can be applied to enhancing investigation resolution and signal-to-noise ratio in crosswell seismic survey and borehole acoustic reflection imaging.

  10. Using the Hypergeometric Model to analyze the buckling of drillstrings in curved boreholes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sampaio, J.H.B. Jr. [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Eustes, A.W. III [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Petroleum Engineering Dept.

    1998-12-31

    Current methodologies for analytically determining the onset of buckling of drillstrings within curved boreholes are limited. In this paper, the Hypergeometric Model is shown to be an effective model to determine drillstring buckling within curved boreholes. With the Hypergeometric Model, the analysis of drillstring buckling results in curves expressing the local buckling force versus the angle of inclination. The local buckling force alone, however, does not contain all the information required for a practical analysis. From the local buckling force curve, the positional buckling force is derived. The positional buckling force considers the distributed weight of the drillstring and the friction between the drillstring and the borehole wall. From this curve, the point of minimum resistance to buckling of the drillstring is determined. Using the local and positional buckling force curves, experimental results and simulations are presented. When multiple configurations exist (for example tapered drillstrings, tapered boreholes, multi-curved boreholes, or any combination of these), the analysis procedure uses superposition of two or more single configuration curves and a graphical algorithm. The Hypergeometric Model permits the optimization of the position of the crossing points (cross-over positioning, casing-shoe positioning, and change of curvature) to achieve extended reach with less risk and cost. The procedure for this model and examples are presented in this paper.

  11. Measurements and Design Calculations for a Deep Coaxial Borehole Heat Exchanger in Aachen, Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Dijkshoorn

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at evaluating the feasibility of an installation for space heating and cooling the building of the university in the center of the city Aachen, Germany, with a 2500 m deep coaxial borehole heat exchanger (BHE. Direct heating the building in winter requires temperatures of 40°C. In summer, cooling the university building uses a climatic control adsorption unit, which requires a temperature of minimum 55°C. The drilled rocks of the 2500 m deep borehole have extremely low permeabilities and porosities less than 1%. Their thermal conductivity varies between 2.2 W/(m·K and 8.9 W/(m·K. The high values are related to the quartzite sandstones. The maximum temperature in the borehole is 85°C at 2500 m depth, which corresponds to a mean specific heat flow of 85 mW/m2–90 mW/m2. Results indicate that for a short period, the borehole may deliver the required temperature. But after a 20-year period of operation, temperatures are too low to drive the adsorption unit for cooling. In winter, however, the borehole heat exchanger may still supply the building with sufficient heat, with temperatures varying between 25 and 55°C and a circulation flow rate of 10 m3/h at maximum.

  12. An automatic recognition and parameter extraction method for structural planes in borehole image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chuanying; Zou, Xianjian; Han, Zengqiang; Wang, Yiteng; Wang, Jinchao

    2016-12-01

    As a breakthrough in borehole imaging technology, digital panoramic borehole camera technology has been widely employed. The high-resolution panoramic borehole images can accurately reproduce the geometric features of structural planes. However, the detection of these features is usually done manually, which is both time-consuming and introduces human errors. To solve this problem, this paper presents a method for the automatic recognition and parameter extraction of borehole geometric features of camera images. In this method, the image's gray and gradient level, and also their projection on the depth axis are used to identify the locations of structural planes. Afterwards, iterative matching is employed by using a template of sinusoidal function to search for structural planes in the identified image blocks. Finally, optimal sine curves are selected as the feature curves of structural planes, and their related parameters are converted into structural plane parameters required for engineering, such as their positions, dip directions, dip angles and fracture widths. The method can automatically identify all of structural planes throughout the whole borehole camera image in a continuous and rapid manner, and obtain the corresponding structural parameters. It has proven highly reliable, accurate and efficient.

  13. Technical presentation

    CERN Multimedia

    FP Department

    2009-01-01

    07 April 2009 Technical presentation by Leuze Electronics: 14.00 – 15.00, Main Building, Room 61-1-017 (Room A) Photoelectric sensors, data identification and transmission systems, image processing systems. We at Leuze Electronics are "the sensor people": we have been specialising in optoelectronic sensors and safety technology for accident prevention for over 40 years. Our dedicated staff are all highly customer oriented. Customers of Leuze Electronics can always rely on one thing – on us! •\tFounded in 1963 •\t740 employees •\t115 MEUR turnover •\t20 subsidiaries •\t3 production facilities in southern Germany Product groups: •\tPhotoelectric sensors •\tIdentification and measurements •\tSafety devices

  14. Technical presentation

    CERN Multimedia

    FI Department

    2008-01-01

    RADIOSPARES, the leading catalogue distributor of components (electronic, electrical, automation, etc.) and industrial supplies will be at CERN on Friday 3 October 2008 (Main Building, Room B, from 9.00 a.m. to 3.00 p.m.) to introduce its new 2008/2009 catalogue. This will be the opportunity for us to present our complete range of products in more detail: 400 000 part numbers available on our web site (Radiospares France, RS International, extended range of components from other manufacturers); our new services: quotations, search for products not included in the catalogue, SBP products (Small Batch Production: packaging in quantities adapted to customers’ requirements); partnership with our focus manufacturers; demonstration of the on-line purchasing tool implemented on our web site in conjunction with CERN. RADIOSPARES will be accompanied by representatives of FLUKE and TYCO ELECTRONICS, who will make presentations, demonstrate materials and answer any technical questio...

  15. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Ball and W. Zeuner

    2010-01-01

    Overview Once again, the bulk of this article reviews the intense activity of a recently completed shutdown, which, although quite unforeseeable until a few weeks before it started, proved by its success that our often advertised capability to conduct major maintenance within a two month period is real. Although safely completed, on-time to remarkable precision, the activity was not without incident, and highlighted our dependence on many experienced, specialist teams and their precise choreography. Even after the yoke was safely closed, magnet re-commissioning and beampipe pumpdown showed new and thought-provoking behaviour. The struggle to maintain adequate technical resources will be a pre-occupation over the coming months, in parallel with the start of truly sustained operation, for which various procedures are still being put in place. Planning for future shutdowns must now become a high priority, with many working groups and task forces already in existence to prepare infrastructure improvements and to...

  16. Technical presentation

    CERN Multimedia

    GS Department

    2010-01-01

    10 March 2010 DYNEOS 10:00 – 12:00 - Main Building, Room B, 61-1-009 Dyneos AG is active in the fields of photonics, laser and high-precision positioning. Our highly qualified engineer team has more than 30 years of experience in electro-optical solutions sales. The engineers are supported by a technical and administrative team. We are focused on the Swiss market and represent six suppliers (Coherent, PI Physik Instrumente, SIOS, Nanonics Imaging, APE, Ekspla) in order to give a qualified sales and service support to our customers. Our products are dedicated to the research field as well as to industry. In addition to standard catalog products, we offer custom designs to fulfill the specific needs of OEM customers or specific applications.

  17. Technical Training: Technical Training Seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch Tuesday 3 February 2004 From 09:00 to 13:30 - Training Centre Auditorium - bldg. 593, room 11 USB (Universal Serial Bus) CYPRESS Seminar Claudia Colombini, Field Application Engineer CYPRESS ActiveComp Electronic GmbH D-85077 MANCHING, Germany As a pioneer in USB, CYPRESS sets the standard for cost-effective solutions without sacrificing functionality, performance or reliability. Having shipped over 200 million USB devices, Cypress is the undisputed market leader and demonstrates unmatched USB expertise. With the industry's broadest selection of USB solutions, Cypress has the right silicon, software and support for every USB application, from Low-speed to High-Speed and USB On-The-Go (OTG). 9:00 - 10:30 Overview of USB systems. USB CYPRESS product overview. Peripherals: Low Speed, Full Speed, High Speed (1.1 and 2.0). Hub Solutions, Embedded Host Solutions, On-The-Go (OTG) and wireless USB. USB Development Tools (first part) 10:30 -...

  18. Advanced Bristle Seals for Gas Turbine Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-28

    test sequence I retained the .003 inch shim and added a positive seal between the shim stock and the housing using Room Temperature Vulcanizing (RTV...113.4 200 6 1.131 1.040 175.142 0.219 * STANDARD CUBIC FOOT PER MINUTE u FLOW(cfm) OF AIR 2 70F/14.7psil TABLE C-8. TESI SEQUENCE H DATA "H. STATIC

  19. Shrink-Fit Solderable Inserts Seal Hermetically

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croucher, William C.

    1992-01-01

    Shrink-fit stainless-steel insert in aluminum equipment housing allows electrical connectors to be replaced by soldering, without degrading hermeticity of housing or connector. Welding could destroy electrostatic-sensitive components and harm housing and internal cables. Steel insert avoids problems because connector soldered directly to it rather than welded to housing. Seals between flange and housing, and between connector and flange resistant to leaks, even after mechanical overloading and thermal shocking.

  20. Deep boreholes. An alternative for final disposal of spent nuclear fuel? Report from KASAM's question-and-answer session on 14-15 March 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2009-03-15

    On 14-15 March 2007, KASAM held a hearing for the purpose of thoroughly examining deep boreholes as a method for the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel. Some of the questions that were raised were: What are the technical, geological and hydrological premises and possibilities? What are the risks from different viewpoints and what values underlie different views of the potential and suitability of deep boreholes? This report is a summary of the seminar. KASAM has made a selection of contributions and questions from the debate that took place on the basis of their relevance to the purpose of the seminar. The report generally follows the chronological lecture-and debate format of the seminar, but has been edited according to different issues rather than according to when different persons spoke. Chapter 2 describes a number of premises and criteria in the Environmental Code's and the Nuclear Activities Act's requirements on alternatives reporting. The chapter also contains a description of what the deep borehole concept entails and a discussion of the geoscientific premises. In addition, the chapter describes how different values can influence the choice of final disposal method. Chapters 3-6 describe and discuss technology and long-term safety, the viewpoints of the supervisory authorities on deep boreholes and safety philosophy via lectures followed by questions by KASAM's questioners and the audience. On the evening of 14 March, representatives of the seven parliamentary parties discussed their preparations and standpoints for an upcoming national debate on the final disposal of nuclear waste. This discussion is also reproduced in the report as Chapter 7. The main points from a concluding panel debate and discussion are presented in Chapter 8. In conclusion, Chapter 9 contains some reflections on various arguments proffered during the question-and-answer session, questions on which agreement seems to exist, and where there are differences of

  1. Study of Performance on Recharging the Borehole by Means of Exhaust-air Energy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Ya-su; FAHL(E)N Per

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the performance analysis of recharging the borehole by means of exhaust-air energy is carried out. The results show that a vertical borehole used as heat source for a Ground Source Heat Pump (GSHP) can be recharged in high efficiency. With equal heat transfer capabilities of exhaust-air coil and borehole collector, the system provides a maximum overall efficiency. However, due to ground infinite capacity, the optimum brine flow rate is different from conventional twoexchanger system. The recharging system provides two peak overall efficiencies when the capacity ratio Cr = 5 for laminar flow and Cr = 15 for turbulent flow respectively.The overall efficiency is independent of exhaust-air temperature and undisturbed ground temperature,although the fluid properties depend on temperature. In practical system lower ethyl percentage brine should be chosen if the freezing point meets the system request,which can provide a higher overall efficiency.

  2. Numerical Simulation of Shear-Horizontal-Wave-Induced Electromagnetic Field in Borehole Surrounded by Porous Formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Zhi-Wen; WANG Ke-Xie; SUN Jian-Cuo; ZHU Zheng-Ya; YAO Gui-Jin; HU Heng-Shan

    2007-01-01

    Seismoelectric field excited by purely torsional loading applied directJy to the borehole wall is considered.A brief formulation and some computed waveforms show the advantage of using shear-horizontal (SH) transverseelectric(TE) seismoelectric waves logging to measure shear velocity in a fluid-saturated porous lormation.By assuming that the acoustic field is not influenced by its induced electromagnetic field due to seismoelectric effect,the coupling governing equations for electromagnetic field are reduced to Maxwell equations with a propagation current source.It is shown that this simplification is valid and the borehole seismoelectric conversion effcient is mainly dependent on the electrokinetic coupling coeffcient.The receivers to detect the conversion electromagnetic field and to obtain shear veloeity can be set in the borehole fluid in the SH-TE seismoelectric wave log.

  3. Failure development around a borehole in an orthorhombic thermo-elastoplastic rock medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piłacik, Alicja; Dąbrowski, Marcin

    2016-04-01

    The elastic anisotropy of a rock medium is one of the main factors affecting stress distribution around the borehole. It governs the initiation and propagation of the technologically induced compressive and tensile failure zones, and reopening of natural mechanical discontinuities. We conducted a two-dimensional analysis of failure around a pressurized horizontal borehole in an orthorhombic elastic rock medium subject to variable far-field loads. The analytical solution to the thermoelastic problem was derived. An elastoplastic finite element method code was developed using MILAMIN platform (milamin.org) and implemented in MATLAB. Various yield functions were used, including von Mises, Mohr-Coulomb, Drucker-Prager and Hoek-Brown failure criteria. The analysis was augmented by introducing rock heterogeneities and discrete mechanical discontinuities in the vicinity of the borehole.

  4. Geophysical borehole logging and optical imaging of the pilot hole ONK-PH2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahti, M. [Suomen Malmi Oy, Espoo (Finland); Heikkinen, E. [JP-Fintact Oy, Vantaa (Finland)

    2005-01-15

    Suomen Malmi Oy conducted geophysical borehole logging and optical imaging surveys of pilot hole ONK-PH2 in ONKALO tunnel at the Olkiluoto site in December 2004. The survey is a part of Posiva Oy's detailed investigation program for the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel. The methods applied are magnetic susceptibility, natural gamma radiation, gamma-gamma density, single point resistance, Wenner-resistivity, borehole radar, full waveform sonic and optical imaging. The assignment included the field work of all the surveys, integration of the data as well as interpretation of the acoustic and borehole radar data. The report describes the field operation, equipment, processing procedures, interpretation results and shows the obtained geophysical and image data. The data as well as the interpretation results are delivered digitally in WellCAD and Excel format. (orig.)

  5. How do seal whiskers suppress vortex shedding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinehart, Aidan; Flaherty, Justin; Bunjavick, Joseph; Shyam, Vikram; Zhang, Wei

    2016-11-01

    Certain seal whiskers possess a unique geometry that significantly reduces the vortex-induced vibration; which has attracted great attention to understand how the unique shape re-organizes the wake structure and its potential for passive flow control. The shape of the whiskers can be described as an elliptical cross-section that is lofted along the length of the whisker. Along the entire length of the whisker the ellipse varies in major and minor axis as well as angle of incidence with respect to the axis of the whisker. Of particular interest in this study is to identify what effect the angle of incidence has on the flow structure around the whisker, which has been overlooked in the past. The study will analyze the wake structure behind various scaled-up whisker models using particle image velocimitry (PIV). These whisker models share common geometry dimensions except for the angle of incidence. Flow conditions are created in a water channel and a wind tunnel, covering a wide range of Reynolds number (a few hundreds to thousands), similar to the ambient flow environment of seals and to the targeted aero-propulsion applications. This study will help address knowledge gaps in understanding of how certain geometry features of seal whiskers influence the wake and establish best practices for its application as effective passive flow control strategy.

  6. CENTRIFUGAL PUMP AND SHAFT SEALING MEANS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushing, F.C.

    1960-09-01

    A description is given of sealing means between a hollow rotatable shaft and a stationary member surrounding the shaft which defines therewith a sealing space of annular cross-section, comprising a plurality of axially spaced rings held against seats by ring springs which serve to subdivide the sealing space- into a plurality of zones. Process gas introduced into the hollow shaft through a port communicating with a centrally located zone which iu turn communicates with a bore in the sleeve, is removed from the shaft through a second port communicating with an adjacent central zone and discharged through a second bore. A sealant gas is supplied to an end zone under a pressure sufficient to cause it to flow axially into adjacent zones and then maintained at a lower pressure than either the sealant gas source or the process gas inlet zone, preventing the sealant gas from entering the shaft and allowing gases leaking into the sealant gas to be withdrawn and led to a separator.

  7. Impact of Groundwater Flow and Energy Load on Multiple Borehole Heat Exchangers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehkordi, S Emad; Schincariol, Robert A; Olofsson, Bo

    2015-01-01

    The effect of array configuration, that is, number, layout, and spacing, on the performance of multiple borehole heat exchangers (BHEs) is generally known under the assumption of fully conductive transport. The effect of groundwater flow on BHE performance is also well established, but most commonly for single BHEs. In multiple-BHE systems the effect of groundwater advection can be more complicated due to the induced thermal interference between the boreholes. To ascertain the influence of groundwater flow and borehole arrangement, this study investigates single- and multi-BHE systems of various configurations. Moreover, the influence of energy load balance is also examined. The results from corresponding cases with and without groundwater flow as well as balanced and unbalanced energy loads are cross-compared. The groundwater flux value, 10(-7) m/s, is chosen based on the findings of previous studies on groundwater flow interaction with BHEs and thermal response tests. It is observed that multi-BHE systems with balanced loads are less sensitive to array configuration attributes and groundwater flow, in the long-term. Conversely, multi-BHE systems with unbalanced loads are influenced by borehole array configuration as well as groundwater flow; these effects become more pronounced with time, unlike when the load is balanced. Groundwater flow has more influence on stabilizing loop temperatures, compared to array characteristics. Although borehole thermal energy storage (BTES) systems have a balanced energy load function, preliminary investigation on their efficiency shows a negative impact by groundwater which is due to their dependency on high temperature gradients between the boreholes and surroundings.

  8. High energy gas fracture experiments in liquid-filled boreholes: potential geothermal application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuderman, J.F.; Chu, T.Y.; Jung, J.; Jacobson, R.D.

    1986-07-01

    High Energy Gas Fracturing is a tailored pulse fracturing technique which uses propellants to obtain controlled fracture initiation and extension. Borehole pressurization rates can be tailored, by suitable choice of propellants, to produce four or eight fractures radiating from the wellbore. High Energy Gas Fracture (HEGF) research is conducted at DOE's Nevada Test Site (NTS) in a tunnel complex where experiments can be done under realistic in situ stress conditions (1400 psi (9.7 MPa) overburden stress). Pressure measurements are made in the test borehole during all fracturing experiments. Experiments are mined back to provide direct observation of fracturing obtained. The initial objective of HEGF research was to develop multiple fracturing technology for application in gas well stimulation. HEGF research at NTS and in Devonian shale demonstration tests has resulted in a completed technology for multiple fracturing in uncased, liquid-free wellbores. Current resarch is directed toward extending the technique to liquid-filled boreholes for application in geothermal in addition to gas and oil wells. For liquid-free boreholes, multiple fracturing is specified in terms of pressure risetime required for a given borehole diameter. Propellants are mixed to achieve the desired risetime using a semiempirical mixing equation. The same techniques were successfully applied to fracturing in liquid-filled wellbores. However, the addition of liquid in the borehole results in a significantly more complicated fracturing behavior. Hydrodynamic effects are significant. Multiple fractures are initiated but only some propagated. Multiple- and hydraulic-type fracturing and wellbore crushing have been observed in the same experiment. The potential of using HEGB for geothermal well stimulation has been demonstrated through the present experiments. 18 refs., 40 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. The ICDP Snake River Geothermal Drilling Project: preliminary overview of borehole geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Douglas R.; Liberty, Lee M.; Kessler, James E.; Kuck, Jochem; Kofman, Randolph; Bishop, Ross; Shervais, John W.; Evans, James P.; Champion, Duane E.

    2012-01-01

    Hotspot: The Snake River Geothermal Drilling Project was undertaken to better understand the geothermal systems in three locations across the Snake River Plain with varying geological and hydrological structure. An extensive series of standard and specialized geophysical logs were obtained in each of the wells. Hydrogen-index neutron and γ-γ density logs employing active sources were deployed through the drill string, and although not fully calibrated for such a situation do provide semi-quantitative information related to the ‘stratigraphy’ of the basalt flows and on the existence of alteration minerals. Electrical resistivity logs highlight the existence of some fracture and mineralized zones. Magnetic susceptibility together with the vector magnetic field measurements display substantial variations that, in combination with laboratory measurements, may provide a tool for tracking magnetic field reversals along the borehole. Full waveform sonic logs highlight the variations in compressional and shear velocity along the borehole. These, together with the high resolution borehole seismic measurements display changes with depth that are not yet understood. The borehole seismic measurements indicate that seismic arrivals are obtained at depth in the formations and that strong seismic reflections are produced at lithological contacts seen in the corresponding core logging. Finally, oriented ultrasonic borehole televiewer images were obtained over most of the wells and these correlate well with the nearly 6 km of core obtained. This good image log to core correlations, particularly with regards to drilling induced breakouts and tensile borehole and core fractures will allow for confident estimates of stress directions and or placing constraints on stress magnitudes. Such correlations will be used to orient in core orientation giving information useful in hydrological assessments, paleomagnetic dating, and structural volcanology.

  10. Bipolar electrosurgical vessel-sealing device with compressive force monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Roland K; Chastagner, Matthew W; Geiger, James D; Shih, Albert J

    2014-06-01

    Bipolar electrosurgical vessel sealing is commonly used in surgery to perform hemostasis. The electrode compressive force is demonstrably an important factor affecting the vessel seal burst pressure, an index of the seal quality. Using a piezoresistive force sensor attached to the handle of a laparoscopic surgical device, applied handle force was measured and used to predict the electrosurgical vessel compressive force and the pressure at the electrode. The sensor enables the monitoring of vessel compressive force during surgery. Four levels of compressive force were applied to seal three types of porcine vessels (carotid artery, femoral artery, and jugular vein). The burst pressure of the vessel seal was tested to evaluate the seal quality. Compressive pressure was found to be a statistically significant factor affecting burst pressure for femoral arteries and jugular veins. Vessels sealed with low compressive pressure (<300 kPa) have a higher failure rate (burst pressure<100 mm Hg) than vessels sealed with high compressive pressure. An adequate compressive force is required to generate the compressive pressure needed to form a seal with high burst pressure. A laparoscopic surgical device with compressive force monitoring capability can help ensure adequate compressive pressure, vessel burst pressure, and quality of seal.

  11. P TFE油封技术发展趋势%Development Trend of PTFE Oil Seal Technologies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡泽华; 张红烨

    2015-01-01

    介绍聚四氟乙烯油封的研究发展过程以及目前国内外材料和结构的研究现状,展望聚四氟乙烯油封的发展趋势,指出PTFE油封总体技术方案应从流体动力学分析、油封结构深层次研发、油封唇口材料的深层次应用及油封台架试验验证方面入手,针对改善高转速下油封的跟随性、高温下唇口过盈力的保持及降低高线速度下唇口磨损方面进行重点技术研究,通过对油封腰部韧性、唇口回复性及油封润滑状态等方面的控制,来保证产品达到使用要求的性能与寿命。%The research and development process of Polytetrafluoroethylene ( PTFE) oil seal,and research status of its materials and structures at home and abroad were presented. Development trend of PTFE oil seal was prospected. It was pointed out that the overall technical scheme of PTFE oil seal should be started from the aspects of fluid dynamics analy⁃sis,the structure development of oil seal, the application of lip materials and the test verification of oil seal by bench test, study the key technologies including improving the following of oil lips in high rotational speed,maintaining the lip interfer⁃ence force of oil seal at high temperature and reducing the wear of seal lip under high linear speed,and ensure that prod⁃ucts met the requirements of the performance and use life through controlling the lubrication status of oil seal,the lip recov⁃ery and the toughness on the waist of seal lip.

  12. Geophysical borehole logging of the boreholes KR30, KR31, KR31b, KR32, KR33, KR33b and KR24 Upper Part, at Olkiluoto 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majapuro, J. [Suomen Malmi Oy, Espoo (Finland)

    2005-12-15

    Suomen Malmi Oy conducted geophysical borehole logging of the boreholes KR30, KR31, KR31B, KR32, KR33, KR33B and KR24 upper part at the Olkiluoto site in Eurajoki during December 2004, January, February and September 2005. The survey is a part of Posiva Oy's detailed investigation program for the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel. The assignment included the field work and processing of the acoustic data. The report describes the field operation, equipment as well as processing procedures and shows the obtained results and their quality in the appendices. The raw and processed data are delivered digitally in WellCAD and Excel format. (orig.)

  13. Station blackout with reactor coolant pump seal leakage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evinay, A. (Southern California Edison, Irvine, CA (United States))

    1993-01-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) amended its regulations in 10CFR50 with the addition of a new section, 50.63, [open quotes]Loss of All Alternating Current Power.[close quotes] The objective of these requirements is to ensure that all nuclear plants have the capability to withstand a station blackout (SBO) and maintain adequate reactor core cooling and containment integrity for a specified period of time. The NRC also issued Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.155, [open quotes]Station Blackout,[close quotes] to provide guidance for meeting the requirements of 10CFR50.63. Concurrent with RG-1.155, the Nuclear Utility Management and Resources Council (NUMARC) has developed NUMARC 87-00 to address SBO-coping duration and capabilities at light water reactors. Licensees are required to submit a topical report based on NUMARC 87-00 guidelines, to demonstrate compliance with the SBO rule. One of the key compliance criteria is the ability of the plant to maintain adequate reactor coolant system (RCS) inventory to ensure core cooling for the required coping duration, assuming a leak rate of 25 gal/min per reactor coolant pump (RCP) seal in addition to technical specification (TS) leak rate.

  14. Overview of high-temperature batteries for geothermal and oil/gas borehole power sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidotti, Ronald A.; Reinhardt, Frederick W.; Odinek, Judy

    Batteries currently used as power supplies for measurement while drilling (MWD) equipment in boreholes for oil and gas exploration use a modified lithium/thionyl chloride technology. These batteries are limited to operating temperatures below 200 °C. At higher temperatures, the batteries and the associated electronics must be protected by a dewar. Sandia National Laboratories has been actively engaged in developing suitable alternative technologies for geothermal and oil/gas borehole power sources that are based on both ionic liquid and solid-state electrolytes. In this paper, we present the results of our studies to date and the directions of future efforts.

  15. Accuracy and borehole influences in pulsed neutron gamma density logging while drilling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Huawei; Sun, Jianmeng; Wang, Jiaxin; Gardner, Robin P

    2011-09-01

    A new pulsed neutron gamma density (NGD) logging has been developed to replace radioactive chemical sources in oil logging tools. The present paper describes studies of near and far density measurement accuracy of NGD logging at two spacings and the borehole influences using Monte-Carlo simulation. The results show that the accuracy of near density is not as good as far density. It is difficult to correct this for borehole effects by using conventional methods because both near and far density measurement is significantly sensitive to standoffs and mud properties.

  16. Disposition of excess weapon plutonium in deep boreholes - site selection handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiken, G.; Woldegabriel, G.; Morley, R.; Plannerer, H.; Rowley, J.

    1996-09-01

    One of the options for disposing of excess weapons plutonium is to place it near the base of deep boreholes in stable crystalline rocks. The technology needed to begin designing this means of disposition already exists, and there are many attractive sites available within the conterminous United States. There are even more potential sites for this option within Russia. The successful design of a borehole system must address two criteria: (1) how to dispose of 50 metric tons of weapons plutonium while making it inaccessible for unauthorized retrieval, and (2) how to prevent contamination of the accessible biosphere, defined here as the Earth`s surface and usable groundwaters.

  17. Analysis of the Data from the Geophysical Borehole Logging on the KURT Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyung Su; Koh, Yong Kwon; Bae, Dae Seok; Kim, Geon Young; Park, Kyung Woo; Ji, Sung Hoon; Ryu, Ji Hun

    2009-08-15

    The properties of rock mass in the deep borehole, which is named DB-1 and installed in KURT site, were analyzed using the resultant data from several geophysical borehole logging methods including BIPS, SPS, full-wave sonic logging, gamma-gamma logging, electrical resistivity survey. From the results, the fracture zones at 154 m and 200-224 m depth in DB-1 was identified. We expected that the results can establish the basic information about the structural geology in and around KURT site.

  18. Deep Drilling Into the Chicxulub Impact Crater: Pemex Oil Exploration Boreholes Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fucugauchi, J. U.; Perez-Cruz, L.

    2007-05-01

    The Chicxulub structure was recognized in the 1940´s from gravity anomalies in oil exploration surveys by Pemex. Geophysical anomalies occur over the carbonate platform in NW Yucatan, where density and magnetic susceptibility contrasts with the carbonates suggested a buried igneous complex or basement uplift. The exploration program developed afterwards included several boreholes, starting with the Chicxulub-1 in 1952 and eventually comprising eight deep boreholes completed through the 1970s. The investigations showing Chicxulub as a large impact crater formed at the K/T boundary have relayed on the Pemex decades-long exploration program. Despite frequent reference to Pemex information, original data have not been openly available for detailed evaluation and incorporation with results from recent efforts. Logging data and core samples remain to be analyzed, reevaluated and integrated in the context of recent marine, aerial and terrestrial geophysical surveys and the drilling/coring projects of UNAM and ICDP. In this presentation we discuss the paleontological data, stratigraphic columns and geophysical logs for the Chicxulub-1 (1582m), Sacapuc-1 (1530m), Yucatan-6 (1631m) and Ticul-1 (3575m) boreholes. These boreholes remain the deepest ones drilled in Chicxulub and the only ones providing samples of the melt-rich breccias and melt sheet. Other boreholes include the Y1 (3221m), Y2 (3474m), Y4 (2398m) and Y5A (3003m), which give information on pre-impact stratigraphy and crystalline basement. We concentrate on log and microfossil data, stratigraphic columns, lateral correlation, integration with UNAM and ICDP borehole data, and analyses of sections of melt, impact breccias and basal Paleocene carbonates. Current plans for deep drilling in Chicxulub crater focus in the peak ring zone and central sector, with proposed marine and on-land boreholes to the IODP and ICDP programs. Future ICDP borehole will be located close to Chicxulub-1 and Sacapuc-1, which intersected

  19. Core drilling of deep borehole OL-KR36 at Olkiluoto in Eurajoki 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niinimaeki, R.; Rautio, T. [Suomen Malmi Oy, Espoo (Finland)

    2005-07-15

    Posiva Oy submitted an application for the Decision in Principle to the Finnish Government in May 1999. A positive decision was made at the end of 2000 by the Government. The Finnish Parliament ratified the Decision in Principle on the final disposal facility for spent nuclear fuel at Olkiluoto, Eurajoki in May 2001. The decision makes it possible for Posiva to focus the confirming bedrock investigations at Olkiluoto, where in the next few years an underground rock characterisation facility, ONKALO, will be constructed. As a part of the investigations Suomen Malmi Oy (Smoy) core drilled 205.17 m deep borehole with a diameter of 75.7 mm at Olkiluoto in May 2005. This borehole was aimed to get additional information of the quality of bedrock and the anomalous part of the bedrock and quality and the location of the fractured zones R19A and R19B. The identification number of the borehole is OL-KR36. A set of monitoring measurements and samplings from the drilling and returning water was carried out during the drilling. Both the volume and the electric conductivity of the drilling water and the returning water were recorded. The drill rig was computer controlled and during drilling the computer recorded information about drilling measurements. The objective of all these measurements was to obtain more information about bedrock and groundwater properties. Sodium fluorescein was used as a label agent in the drilling water. The volume of the used drilling water was about 117 m{sup 3} and the measured volume of the returning water was about 51m{sup 3} in borehole OL-KR36. The deviation of the borehole was measured with the deviation measuring instruments EMS and Maxibor. The results of the Maxibor measurements indicate that borehole OL-KR36 deviates 10.34 m left and 7.11 m up at the borehole depth of 204 m. Uniaxial compressive strength, Young's Modulus and Poisson' s ratio were measured from the core samples. The average uniaxial compressive strength is about 126

  20. Finite line-source model for borehole heat exchangers. Effect of vertical temperature variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandos, Tatyana V.; Fernandez, Esther; Santander, Juan Luis G.; Isidro, Jose Maria; Perez, Jezabel; Cordoba, Pedro J. Fernandez de [Instituto Universitario de Matematica Pura y Aplicada, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Montero, Alvaro; Urchueguia, Javier F. [Instituto de Ingenieria Energetica, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain)

    2009-06-15

    A solution to the three-dimensional finite line-source (FLS) model for borehole heat exchangers (BHEs) that takes into account the prevailing geothermal gradient and allows arbitrary ground surface temperature changes is presented. Analytical expressions for the average ground temperature are derived by integrating the exact solution over the line-source depth. A self-consistent procedure to evaluate the in situ thermal response test (TRT) data is outlined. The effective thermal conductivity and the effective borehole thermal resistance can be determined by fitting the TRT data to the time-series expansion obtained for the average temperature. (author)

  1. Sharks shape the geometry of a selfish seal herd: experimental evidence from seal decoys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vos, Alta; O'Riain, M Justin

    2010-02-23

    Many animals respond to predation risk by forming groups. Evolutionary explanations for group formation in previously ungrouped, but loosely associated prey have typically evoked the selfish herd hypothesis. However, despite over 600 studies across a diverse array of taxa, the critical assumptions of this hypothesis have remained collectively untested, owing to several confounding problems in real predator-prey systems. To solve this, we manipulated the domains of danger of Cape fur seal (Arctocephalus pusillus pusillus) decoys to provide evidence that a selfish reduction in a seals' domain of danger results in a proportional reduction in its predation risk from ambush shark attacks. This behaviour confers a survival advantage to individual seals within a group and explains the evolution of selfish herds in a prey species. These findings empirically elevate Hamilton's selfish herd hypothesis to more than a 'theoretical curiosity'.

  2. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    Austin Ball

    2013-01-01

      Since the last report, much visible progress has been made, as the LS1 programme approaches the halfway point. From early October, technical and safety shift-crew have been present around the clock, allowing detectors to stay switched on overnight, ensuring that safety systems are operational and instructions for non-expert shift-crew are clear. LS1 progress Throughout the summer, whilst the solenoid vacuum tank and YB0 surfaces were accessible, an extensive installation programme took place to prepare for Tracker colder operation and the PLT installation, in 2014, the Phase 1 Pixel Tracker installation, in 2016–’17, and the HCAL Phase 1 upgrade completion, ending in LS2. This included pipework for N2 or dry air to flush the Tracker bulkhead region, many sensors to monitor temperature and dew point in the Tracker and its service channels, heating wires outside the Tracker cooling bundles, supports for the new vacuum-jacketed, concentric, CO2 Pixel cooling lines, the PLT cool...

  3. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Ball and W. Zeuner

    2012-01-01

      UXC + detectors As explained in detail in the November 2011 bulletin, the bellows unit at −18.5 m from the CMS interaction point was identified as a prime candidate for the regularly occurring pressure spikes which occasionally led to sustained severe background conditions in 2011, affecting dead time and data quality. Similar regions in LHC with vacuum instabilities were observed to be close to bellows, which radiography showed to have distorted RF-fingers — on removal, they proved to have been severely overheated. The plans for the Year-End Technical Stop were adapted to prioritise radiography of the bellows at 16 m to 18 m either end of CMS. Excellent work by the beam pipe, survey and heavy mechanical teams allowed the X-rays to be taken as planned on 20th December, showing that the bellow at −18.5m had an obvious non-conformity. The RF-fingers were found inside the end of the opposing flared pipe instead of outside. In addition, the overlap between fingers and...

  4. Performance analysis on borehole energy storage system including utilization of solar thermal and photovoltaic energies; Taiyonetsu hikari riyo wo fukumu borehole energy chozo system no kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, T. [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Yamaguchi, A. [Matsushita Electric Co. Ltd., Osaka (Japan)

    1996-10-27

    A permanent borehole energy storage system utilizing solar energy and waste heat from coolers is simulated, to be used as an air conditioning system for super-tall buildings. A 100m-long pipe is buried vertically into the ground, and a heat medium is caused to circulate in the pipe for the exchange of heat with the soil. Thirty borehole units are used, each measuring 9m{times}9m (with the pipe pitch being 3m). Solar cells occupying half of the wall surface facing south and solar collectors installed on the roof supply electric power and heat for cooling and warming. Heat in the ground is transferred mainly by conduction but also is carried by water and gas in movement. So, an analysis is carried out using an equation in which heat and water move at the same time. Because waste heat from cooling and warming systems is accumulated in the ground and none is discharged into the air, big cities will be protected from warming (from developing heat islands). As compared with the conventional boiler-aided air conditioning system, a hybrid borehole system incorporating solar collectors and solar cells will bring about an 80% reduction in CO2 emission and annual energy consumption. 7 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Phocid seals, seal lice and heartworms: a terrestrial host-parasite system conveyed to the marine environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leidenberger, Sonja; Harding, Karin; Härkönen, Tero

    2007-10-15

    Adaptation of pinnipeds to the marine habitat imposed parallel evolutions in their parasites. Ancestral pinnipeds must have harboured sucking lice, which were ancestors of the seal louse Echinophthirius horridus. The seal louse is one of the few insects that successfully adjusted to the marine environment. Adaptations such as keeping an air reservoir and the ability to hold on to and move on the host were necessary, as well as an adjustment of their life cycle to fit the diving habits of their host. E. horridus are confined to the Northern Hemisphere and have been reported from 9 species of northern phocids belonging to 4 genera, including land-locked seal species. The transmission from seal to seal is only possible when animals are hauled-out on land or ice. Lice are rarely found on healthy adult seals, but frequently on weak and young animals. The seal louse is suggested to play an important role as an intermediate host transmitting the heartworm Acanthocheilonema spirocauda among seals. However, the evidence is restricted to a single study where the first 3 larval stages of the heartworm were shown to develop in the louse. The fourth-stage larvae develop in the blood system of seals and eventually transform into the adult stage that matures in the heart. Since all other studies failed to confirm the presence of heartworm larvae in seal lice, other unknown intermediate hosts could be involved in the transmission of the heartworm. Transplacental transmission of microfilariae in seals has been suggested as an additional possibility, but is not likely to be important since the occurrence of heartworms in adult seals is very rare compared with juveniles. Furthermore, there are no findings of the first 3 larval stages in seals. This review shows that the heartworm infects nearly the same species of seals as the seal louse, except for the grey seal Halichoerus grypus, where the heartworm is absent. Prevalence and intensity of infection differ among regions in the

  6. Air temperature regulation in mine workings on the basis of local and block ventilation systems with boreholes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bobrov, A.I.; Batmanov, Y.K.; Lunev, S.G.; Martynov, A.A. [Makeyevka Safety in Mines Research Institute, Makeyevka (Ukraine)

    1997-12-31

    The thermal factor is one of the main factors complicating coal mining in the Donetsk Basin (Ukraine). Local ventilation systems (small diameter boreholes to improve ventilation in individual headings at deep levels) and block ventilation systems (large diameter boreholes for ventilation and air temperature control in independently mined blocks and panels) are discussed. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  7. 30 CFR 75.1321 - Permits for firing more than 20 boreholes and for use of nonpermissible blasting units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... for use of nonpermissible blasting units. 75.1321 Section 75.1321 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND...-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1321 Permits for firing more than 20 boreholes and for use of nonpermissible blasting units. (a) Applications for permits for firing more than 20 boreholes in...

  8. Obesity: An Independent Risk Factor for Insufficient Hemostasis Using the AngioSeal Vascular Closure Device After Antegrade Puncture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minko, Peter, E-mail: peterminko@yahoo.com; Katoh, Marcus [University Hospital Saarland, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Graeber, Stefan [University Hospital Saarland, Institute of Medical Biometry, Epidemiology and Medical Informatics (Germany); Buecker, Arno [University Hospital Saarland, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany)

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to investigate the efficacy of the AngioSeal vascular closure device after antegrade puncture of the femoral artery. Methods: In a prospective study, 120 consecutive patients underwent lower limb vascular intervention by an antegrade access to the common femoral artery (CFA). After intervention, a 6F (n = 88) or an 8F (n = 32) AngioSeal vascular closure device was used to achieve hemostasis. The technical success or the cause of failure was documented. In addition, the coagulation status (platelets, INR, prothrombin time, atrial thromboplastin time (PTT)), hypertonus, locoregional habitus of the groin, body mass index (BMI), presence of calcifications, and history of previous surgical interventions of the CFA were evaluated. Results: Hemostasis was achieved in 97 patients (81%). In 12 patients (10%), persistent bleeding of the puncture site required manual compression. In another nine patients (8%) a kink of the sheath obviated the passage of the collagen plug toward the vessel, and in two patients the anchor dislodged out of the vessel, requiring manual compression. There were no significant differences between the groups of successful and unsuccessful sealing regarding the mean platelets (241 vs. 254 * 10{sup 9}/l; P = 0.86), INR (1.06 vs. 1.02; P = 0.52), prothrombin time (90% vs. 90%; P = 0.86), and PTT (30 vs. 31 s; P = 0.82). However, unsuccessful sealing was more likely in obese patients with an increased BMI (26.6 vs. 28.8 kg/m{sup 2}; P = 0.04). Conclusions: Obesity seems to be an independent risk factor for insufficient sealing using the AngioSeal vascular closure device after antegrade puncture of the CFA. In 8% of our patients, hemostasis could not be achieved due to kink of the flexible sheath.

  9. Apartment Compartmentalization With an Aerosol-Based Sealing Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, S. [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings, Norwalk, CT (United States); Berger, D. [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings, Norwalk, CT (United States); Harrington, C. [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings, Norwalk, CT (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Air sealing of building enclosures is a difficult and time-consuming process. Current methods in new construction require laborers to physically locate small and sometimes large holes in multiple assemblies and then manually seal each of them. The innovation demonstrated under this research study was the automated air sealing and compartmentalization of buildings through the use of an aerosolized sealant, developed by the Western Cooling Efficiency Center at University of California Davis. CARB sought to demonstrate this new technology application in a multifamily building in Queens, NY. The effectiveness of the sealing process was evaluated by three methods: air leakage testing of overall apartment before and after sealing, point-source testing of individual leaks, and pressure measurements in the walls of the target apartment during sealing.

  10. Field Trial of an Aerosol-Based Enclosure Sealing Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrington, Curtis [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Springer, David [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), Davis, CA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This report presents the results from several demonstrations of a new method for sealing building envelope air leaks using an aerosol sealing process developed by the Western Cooling Efficiency Center at UC Davis. The process involves pressurizing a building while applying an aerosol sealant to the interior. As air escapes through leaks in the building envelope, the aerosol particles are transported to the leaks where they collect and form a seal that blocks the leak. Standard blower door technology is used to facilitate the building pressurization, which allows the installer to track the sealing progress during the installation and automatically verify the final building tightness. Each aerosol envelope sealing installation was performed after drywall was installed and taped, and the process did not appear to interrupt the construction schedule or interfere with other trades working in the homes. The labor needed to physically seal bulk air leaks in typical construction will not be replaced by this technology.

  11. A New Design of Magnetic Fluid Seal for Liquids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Tong-gang; YANG Zhi-yi

    2005-01-01

    Direct contract between the sealed liquid and the magnetic fluid in a dynamic system under magnetic field may lead to an unstable interface, consequently, break down the seal. Aiming at this problem, a new magnetic fluid seal (MFS) was developed. In this new MFS, a soft iron bushing with high permeability was introduced on the shaft and nonferrous shields were installed beside the bushing and the pole pieces. The parameters of the bushing and the shields were optimized in a seal simulation facility. The results show that the bushing with a thickness of 7 mm and shields with a width of 8 mm are best for sealing a shaft 20 mm in diameter. The MFS designed based on the optimum parameters shows good performance and long life span for sealing lubricating oil.

  12. Condition monitoring of reciprocating seal based on FBG sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiuxu; Zhang, Shuanshuan; Wen, Pengfei; Zhen, Wenhan; Ke, Wei

    2016-07-01

    The failure of hydraulic reciprocating seals will seriously affect the normal operation of hydraulic reciprocating machinery, so the potential fault condition monitoring of reciprocating seals is very important. However, it is extremely difficult because of the limitation of reciprocating motion and the structure constraints of seal groove. In this study, an approach using fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors is presented. Experimental results show that the contact strain changes of a reciprocating seal can be detected by FBG sensors in the operation process of the hydraulic cylinders. The failure condition of the reciprocating seal can be identified by wavelet packet energy entropy, and the center frequency of power spectrum analysis. It can provide an effective solution for the fault prevention and health management of reciprocating hydraulic rod seals.

  13. Method of forming shrink-fit compression seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podgorski, T. J. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A method for making a glass-to-metal seal is described. A domed metal enclosure having a machined seal ring is fitted to a glass post machined to a slight taper and to a desired surface finish. The metal part is then heated by induction in a vacuum. As the metal part heats and expands relative to the glass post, the metal seal ring, possessing a higher coefficient of expansion than the glass post, slides down the tapered post. Upon cooling, the seal ring crushes against the glass post forming the seal. The method results in a glass-to-metal seal possessing extremely good leak resistance, while the parts are kept clean and free of the contaminants.

  14. Pressure actuated film riding seals for turbo machinery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bidkar, Rahul Anil; Thatte, Azam Mihir; Gibson, Nathan Evan McCurdy; Giametta, Andrew Paul

    2015-08-25

    A seal assembly for a rotary machine is provided. The seal assembly includes multiple sealing device segments disposed circumferentially intermediate to a stationary housing and a rotor. Each of the sealing device segments includes a stator interface element, a shoe plate having an extended portion having one or more labyrinth teeth facing the rotor and a load bearing portion, wherein the shoe plate is configured to generate an aerodynamic force between the shoe plate and the rotor. The sealing device segment further includes a secondary seal configured to be in contact with the stator interface element at a radially outer end and configured to be in contact with an elevated nose section of the extended portion of the shoe plate on a radially inner end; and multiple flexible elements attached to the shoe plate and to the stator interface element.

  15. Characterizing fluidic seals for on-board reagent delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inamdar, Tejas; Anthony, Brian W.

    2013-03-01

    The reagent delivery mechanism in a point-of-care, HIV diagnostic, microfluidic device is studied. Reagents held in an aluminum blister pack are released on the opening of a fluidic seal. The fluidic seals, controlling the flow of reagents, are characterized to reduce anomalies in the desired flow pattern. The findings of this research can be divided into three categories - 1) bonding phenomenon 2) influence of seal pattern on flow and rupture mechanics and 3) process parameters which minimize flow anomalies. Four seal patterns - line hemisphere, line flat, chevron hemisphere and chevron flat were created and tested for reagent delivery using a flow sensor and a force gauge. Experiments suggest that one of the patterns - line-flat - inducted the fewest flow anomalies. A parameter scoping exercise of the seal manufacturing process parameters (temperature, time, pressure) was performed for the line flat seal. Temperature, time, pressure / gap and distance settings which minimize flow anomalies were found.

  16. Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediments Below the C Tank Farm: Borehole C4297 and RCRA Borehole 299-E27-22

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Christopher F.; Serne, R. JEFFREY; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Horton, Duane G.; Lanigan, David C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Vickerman, Tanya S.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Baum, Steven R.; Parker, Kent E.; Lindberg, Michael J.

    2006-10-18

    The overall goal of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., is to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities at Hanford. To meet this goal, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. tasked scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to perform detailed analyses on vadose zone sediments from within Waste Management Area (WMA) C. This report is the first of two reports written to present the results of these analyses. Specifically, this report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from borehole C4297, installed adjacent to Tank C-105, and from borehole 299-E27-22, installed directly north of the C Tank Farm. Sediments from borehole 299-E27-22 were considered to be background uncontaminated sediments against which to compare contaminated sediments for the C Tank Farm characterization effort. This report also presents our interpretation of the data in the context of sediment types, the vertical extent of contamination, the migration potential of the contaminants, and the likely source of the contamination in the vadose zone and groundwater below the C Tank Farm. The information presented in this report supports the A-AX, C and U Waste Management Area field investigation report(a) in preparation by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. A core log was generated for both boreholes and a geologic evaluation of all core samples was performed at the time of opening. Aliquots of sediment from the borehole core samples were analyzed and characterized in the laboratory for the following parameters: moisture content, gamma-emitting radionuclides, one-to-one water extracts (which provide soil pH, electrical conductivity, cation, trace metal, and anion data), total carbon and inorganic carbon content, and 8 M nitric acid extracts (which provide a measure of the total leachable sediment content of contaminants). Two key radiocontaminants

  17. Apartment Compartmentalization With an Aerosol-Based Sealing Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, Sean [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), Norwalk, CT (United States); Berger, David [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), Norwalk, CT (United States); Harrington, Curtis [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2015-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Building America Team, Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings, sought to demonstrate this new technology application in a new construction multifamily building in Queens, New York. The effectiveness of the sealing process was evaluated by three methods: air leakage testing of overall apartment before-and-after sealing, point-source testing of individual leaks, and pressure measurements in the walls of an apartment during sealing.

  18. Develop Efficient Leak Proof M1 Abrams Plenum Seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-07

    UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED ER-GLSV11389-001.docx Develop Efficient Leak Proof M1 Abrams Plenum Seal SBIR Phase I: Topic A13-061...Leak Proof M1 Abrams Plenum Seal Christian Muehfeld Steve Pennala Great Lakes Sound & Vibration, Inc. 47140 North Main Street Houghton, MI 49931 ER...061. The purpose of this report is to show the feasibility of developing an efficient, leak proof plenum seal for the M1 Abrams . It also shows the

  19. Hardness testing of some fissure-sealing materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulvestad, H

    1977-11-01

    The mechanical properties of fissure-sealing materials are of significant importance for their durability, i.e. their wear resistance. One of the methods of evaluating a material's resistance to attrition is to apply a hardness test. In the present investigation, the surface hardness of some fissure-sealing materials was tested. Sealants made from diluted composite materials and with inclusion of inorganic filler particles appeared to have a considerable higher surface hardness than the other sealing materials tested.

  20. Hydraulic forces caused by annular pressure seals in centrifugal pumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iino, T.; Kaneko, H.

    1980-01-01

    The hydraulic forces caused by annular pressure seals were investigated. The measured inlet and exit loss coefficients of the flow through the seals were much smaller than the conventional values. The results indicate that the damping coefficient and the inertia coefficient of the fluid film in the seal are not affected much by the rotational speed or the eccentricity of the rotor, though the stiffness coefficient seemed to be influenced by the eccentricity.