WorldWideScience

Sample records for boreal mire ecosystems

  1. Fluxes of methane and nitrogen oxides in various boreal mire ecosystems. Effects of land-use activities and environmental changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martikainen, P.J.; Nykaenen, H.; Regina, K. [National Public Health Inst., Kuopio (Finland). Lab. of Environmental Microbiology; Alm, J.; Silvola, J. [Joensuu Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Biology

    1996-12-31

    Atmospheric impact of peatlands is a sum of their gas fluxes. In contrast to carbon dioxide, peatlands are net sources for methane (CH{sub 4}). Methane is an end product in the anaerobic decomposition processes and it has greater capacity to absorb infrared radiation than carbon dioxide. Most of the data on the CH{sub 4} release from northern peatlands is from North America. The total amount of methane released from wetlands is calculated to be 110 Tg yr{sup -1} of which 34 percent (38 Tg yr{sup -1}) is estimated to be emitted from the northern peatlands. Peat with high content of nitrogen is a potential source for gaseous nitrogen oxides, i.e. nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) and nitric oxide (NO). However, the importance of peatlands in producing these trace gases is poorly known. Nitrous oxide and nitric oxide are important components in the atmospheric chemistry and N{sub 2}O also is an effective greenhouse gas. Land-use activities and environmental changes can affect the atmospheric impacts of peatlands by modifying their biogeochemistry. This article presents a short summary of the studies whose objectives were: (1) to measure fluxes of CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O on wide range of natural mires in Finland, (2) to study the short- and long-term changes in fluxes of CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}O and NO on boreal peatlands after lowering their water table. Peatlands used for agriculture, forestry and peat mining were included in the studies. The results from mires drained for forestry may reflect the possible changes in the trace gas fluxes if water table will drop in the northern peatlands as a result of drier climate, (3) to study the effects of nitrogen load on the fluxes of CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}O and NO, (4) to identify the microbiological processes important for the fluxes of N{sub 2}O, NO and CH{sub 4}, and to study the environmental factors regulating these microbial processes

  2. Contemporary mire net ecosystem green-house gas balance: controls and susceptibility to change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Mats; Eriksson, Tobias; Grelle, Achim; Larsson, Anna; Laudon, Hjalmar; Lindroth, Anders; Ottosson-Löfvenius, Mikaell; Peichl, Matthias; Sagerfors, Jörgen; Ågren, Anneli; Öquist, Mats

    2015-04-01

    In this presentation I will address three main issues: 1 - What is the contemporary carbon sequestration function of high latitude mire ecosystems relative to Holocene average? 2 - The relative importance of the component carbon (C) fluxes for the annual mire Net Ecosystem Carbon Balance (NECB); 3 - The importance of gross primary production (GPP) versus ecosystem respiration (Reco) for the annual Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE); The annual boreal mire NECB is made up principally by the biosphere-atmosphere exchange of CO2 (NEE) and CH4 and the runoff C-export. One important research issue is to further understand what controls the relative contribution from the component fluxes to the annual mire NECB. A second important major research issue is to reveal the relative importance of gross photosynthesis (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (Reco) respectively for the annual mire NEE. The relative importance of GPP and Reco respectively for the NECB also encounters the effect of changes in the lengths of the growing season and non-growing season respectively. In this presentation we use ten years of data on annual fluxes of NEE, methane and water discharge C export at a nutrient poor minerogenic boreal mire, Degerö Stormyr, in northern Sweden to address the above questions. Winter time NEE together with methane emission and water discharge C export reduces the growing season NEE with approximately 60%, thus substantially controlling the annual boreal mire NEE.

  3. Accumulation of carbon in northern mire ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tolonen, K.; Turunen, J.; Alm, J. [Joensuu Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Biology; Korhola, A. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Lab. of Physical Geography; Jungner, H. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dating Lab.; Vasander, H. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Forest Ecology

    1996-12-31

    The basic feature in the functional ecology of any mire ecosystem is retardation of the effective decay of organic material resulting in a conspicuous accumulation of plant debris as peat overtime. The carbon accumulation process is slow, and climatic change may have an impact on the carbon cycle of peatlands, therefore, it has been of interest to study the rate of carbon accumulation by geological methods from dated peat strata. The approach is hampered by several facts. First, the mires vary enormously as to their vegetation and hydrology and hence their production and decay properties. It follows that a great number of study sites are needed. Second, the peat in mires expands both vertically and laterally, and this requires a spatial reconstruction of carbon accumulation within a mire basin. Third, simple geological methods cannot account for the actual rate of carbon accumulation in peat, and finally, an additional carbon sink in the mire ecosystems can be the mineral subsoil beneath peat. The proposed warming will perhaps shift northwards the existing climatic mire regimes and, thus, the northern aapa fens will change to Sphagnum bogs that are more effective in sequestering carbon, but distinctly less effective in their CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O emanation. The role of mire fires in more remote northern areas may then become another important factor. The answer to the important question of future total sequestration of carbon to peatlands depends on the precipitation and its seasonal distribution pattern. Most climatic scenarios predict a decrease in the evaporation surplus during the summer at northern regions. Presumably, the consequent lowering of the water table would improve growth of forest on mires and simultaneously decrease the methane fluxes from peat. The combined net effect could be a clear restraining of the radiative forcing

  4. Sensitivity of the boreal forest-mire ecotone CO2, CH4, and N2O global warming potential to rainy and dry weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ťupek, Boris; Minkkinen, Kari; Vesala, Timo; Nikinmaa, Eero

    2015-04-01

    In a mosaic of well drained forests and poorly drained mires of boreal landscape the weather events such as drought and rainy control greenhouse gas dynamics and ecosystem global warming potential (GWP). In forest-mire ecotone especially in ecosystems where CO2 sink is nearly balanced with CO2 source, it's fairly unknown whether the net warming effect of emissions of gases with strong radiative forcing (CH4 and N2O) could offset the net cooling effect of CO2 sequestration. We compared the net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) estimated from the carbon sequestrations of forest stands and forest floor CO2 fluxes against CH4 and N2O fluxes of nine forest/mire site types along the soil moisture gradient in Finland. The ground water of nine sites changed between 10 m in upland forests and 0.1 m in mires, and weather during three years ranged between exceptionally wet and dry for the local climate. The NEE of upland forests was typically a sink of CO2, regardless the weather. Though, xeric pine forest was estimated to be a source of CO2 during wet and intermediate year and became a weak sink only in dry year. The NEE of forest-mire transitions ranged between a sink in dry year, while increased stand carbon sequestration could offset the reduced forest floor CO2 emission, and a source in wet year. The NEE of two sparsely forested mires strongly differed. The lawn type mire was balanced around zero and the hummock type mire was relatively strong NEE sink, regardless the weather. Generally, nearly zero N2O emission could not offset the cooling effect of net CH4 sink and net CO2 sink of upland forest and forest-mire transitions. However in sparsely forested mires, with N2O emission also nearly zero, the CH4 emission during wet and intermediate year played important role in turning the net cooling effect of NEE into a net warming. When evaluating GWP of boreal landscapes, undisturbed forest-mire transitions should be regarded as net cooling ecosystems instead of hotspots of net

  5. Annual CO2 and CH4 fluxes of pristine boreal mires as a background for the lifecycle analyses of peat energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was conducted to improve the estimates of C gas fluxes in boreal ombrotrophic and minerotrophic mires used in the lifecycle analysis of peat energy. We reviewed literature and collected field data from two new sites in southern Finland. In the literature, annual estimates of net CO2 exchange varied from -85 to +67 g C m-2a-1for ombrotrophic mires and from -101 to +98 g C m-2a-1for minerotrophic mires. Correspondingly, net CH4 flux estimates varied from less than -1 up to -16 g C m-2a-1and from less than -1 up to -42 g C m-2a-1for ombrotrophic and minerotrophic mires, respectively. Negative values indicate net efflux from the ecosystem. The modelling of C gas fluxes for the 30 simulated years clearly highlighted the need for long-term records of multiple environmental factors from the same sites, and the need for a number of improvements in the modelling of fluxes, as well as the environmental conditions driving C fluxes. The reduction of uncertainty in the background values of lifecycle analyses requires more detailed knowledge of the mire types used for peat harvesting and long-term field measurements combined with the developed process models and meteorological information. The use of C gas fluxes in pristine mires as a background for anthropogenic emissions is, however, only one option. Another option could be to consider anthropogenic emissions from the use of peat energy as such. (orig.)

  6. Hg0 evasion from boreal mires determined with chamber methods and a novel REA design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterwalder, Stefan; Fritsche, Johannes; Åkerblom, Staffan; Nilsson, Mats B.; Alewell, Christine; Bishop, Kevin

    2015-04-01

    Anthropogenic mercury has accumulated in superficial organic soils of boreal mires, hotspots of methylmercury production. We hypothesize that emission from the peat surface is an important factor in regulating the pool of mercury in mires and ultimately the loading of methylmercury to surface waters. To test this hypothesis, we used both dynamic flux chambers (DFCs) and a dual-intake, single analyzer Relaxed Eddy Accumulation (REA) system to quantify the land-atmosphere exchange of elemental mercury (Hg0) from a mixed acid mire system situated near Vindeln in the county of Västerbotten, Sweden. Teflon and polycarbonate DFCs were used to (i) investigate the effect of sulfur and nitrogen addition as well as warming and changed moisture regimes on Hg0 flux and (ii) to quantify typical all-day summertime fluxes. The novel REA design was developed for long-term, all-year flux monitoring and uses twin inlets at the same level for simultaneous accumulation of up and downdrafts on a pair of gold traps which are then analyzed sequentially on the same detector while another pair of gold traps takes over the accumulation. The exchange of Hg0 from the peatland surface was measured continuously with DFC during cloudless conditions in July 2014 and averaged 0.62 ± 1.3 ng m-2 h-1. The flux revealed a significant diurnal pattern and a strong linear relationship with air temperature inside (R2= 0.65, p levels in the soil are too long because up to now the emission of Hg from the mire surface to the atmosphere has been ignored.

  7. Uptake, turnover and transport of radiocaesium in boreal forest ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study was mainly addressed to aspects on the redistribution of the Chernobyl fallout within and output from a coniferous forest ecosystem. The only detected pathway for Cs to exit the ecosystem was via discharge from mires. About 40% of the deposition on mires discharged via stream water during the snow-melt 1986. The residual fraction discharged at an annual rate of 30% from water saturated fractions and about 2% from drier fractions of the studied mire. No loss of Cs from ridges and moraine slopes to ground water was detected. The main transfer from the canopy to the forest floor occurred during the first year. The estimated transfer from throughfall and litterfall during May 1986 to May 1996 was 50% of the estimated total deposition in the ecosystem. The contribution from herbivory was estimated to 1% of the deposition. In 1987 the fraction of Cs that was retained in the above ground parts of a Scots pine stand was only 4%. The Cs intercepted in mosses and lichens were slowly transferred to the litter and humus layers. Cs in vegetation with green parts above ground during the fallout decreased rapidly during the first vegetation season The ranking in Cs of the studied plants was fireweed 137Cs. Moose meat, berries and mushrooms produced in the boreal region will give rise to a small but significant internally absorbed dose to man during several years. 57 refs, 9 figs, 5 tabs

  8. Contemporary mire net ecosystem carbon balance - controls and susceptibility to change (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, M. B.

    2013-12-01

    In this presentation I will address three main issues: 1 - The relative importance of the component carbon (C) fluxes for the annual mire Net Ecosystem Carbon Balance (NECB); 2 - The importance of gross primary production (GPP) versus ecosystem respiration (Reco) for the annual Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) and finally; 3) the degree of consistency or inconsistency in how controlling factors affects NEE of different mire types. The annual mire NECB is made up principally by the biosphere-atmosphere exchange of CO2 (NEE) and CH4 and the runoff C-export. One important research issue is to further understand what controls the relative contribution from the component fluxes to the annual mire NECB. A second important major research issue is to reveal the relative importance of gross photosynthesis (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (Reco) respectively for the annual mire NEE. The relative importance of GPP and Reco respectively for the NECB also encounters the effect of changes in the lengths of the growing season and non-growing season respectively. The general understanding is that the low rate of decomposition constitutes the major control on peat accumulation. There is though growing evidences from estimates of contemporary annual as well as growing season NEE and peat core based estimates of long-term C accumulation that GPP is at least as important for the annual NEE. Finally, I will address the question to what extent different mire types respond differently to controlling e.g. if bogs and fens respond differently. Recent empirical as well as modeling studies indicate that e.g. changes in water table level causes contrasting response in NEE between bogs and fens.

  9. Sustaining Aquatic Ecosystems in Boreal Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Schindler

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available Few boreal waters are managed in a sustainable manner, because cumulative effects of a variety of human activities are not considered. Fisheries and water quality have declined in most large water bodies of the southern boreal zone. Some of the reasons are direct, including overexploitation of fisheries, alteration of flow patterns, introductions of non-native species, and discharge of eutrophying nutrients and persistent contaminants. However, improper management of watersheds and airsheds also causes degradation of aquatic ecosystems. Clear-cut logging, climatic warming, acid precipitation, and stratospheric ozone depletion are among the more important of these indirect stressors. There are important interactions among these stressors, requiring that they not be treated in isolation. Ecological sustainability of boreal waters would require that exploitation of all parts of the boreal landscape be much lower than it is at present. Unfortunately, management for sustainability is lagging far behind scientific understanding in most countries.

  10. The influence of sulphate deposition on the seasonal variation of peat pore water methyl Hg in a boreal mire.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inger Bergman

    Full Text Available In this paper we investigate the hypothesis that long-term sulphate (SO(4 (2- deposition has made peatlands a larger source of methyl mercury (MeHg to remote boreal lakes. This was done on experimental plots at a boreal, low sedge mire where the effect of long-term addition of SO(4 (2- on peat pore water MeHg concentrations was observed weekly throughout the snow-free portion of 1999. The additions of SO(4 (2- started in 1995. The seasonal mean of the pore water MeHg concentrations on the plots with 17 kg ha(-1 yr(-1 of sulphur (S addition (1.3±0.08 ng L(-1, SE; n = 44 was significantly (p2 ng L(-1 compared to +/-0.5 ng L(-1 in the ambient S deposition plots. The concentrations of pore water MeHg in the S-addition plots were positively correlated (r(2 = 0.21; p = 0.001 to the groundwater level, with the lowest concentrations of MeHg during the period with the lowest groundwater levels. The pore water MeHg concentrations were not correlated to total Hg, DOC concentration or pH. The results from this study indicate that the persistently higher pore water concentrations of MeHg in the S-addition plots are caused by the long-term additions of SO(4 (2- to the mire surface. Since these waters are an important source of runoff, the results support the hypothesis that SO(4 (2- deposition has increased the contribution of peatlands to MeHg in downstream aquatic systems. This would mean that the increased deposition of SO(4 (2- in acid rain has contributed to the modern increase in the MeHg burdens of remote lakes hydrologically connected to peatlands.

  11. CH4 and N2O dynamics in the boreal forest–mire ecotone

    OpenAIRE

    Tupek, B.; K. Minkkinen; J. Pumpanen; Vesala, T; Nikinmaa, E.

    2015-01-01

    In spite of advances in greenhouse gas research, the spatiotemporal CH4 and N2O dynamics of boreal landscapes remain challenging, e.g., we need clarification of whether forest–mire transitions are occasional hotspots of landscape CH4 and N2O emissions during exceptionally high and low ground water level events. In our study, we tested the differences and drivers of CH4 and N2O dynamics of forest/mire types in field conditions along the soil moisture gradient of the fo...

  12. Ecosystem-Vegetation Dynamics in sub-arctic Stordalen Mire, Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugnani, M. P.; Varner, R. K.; Steele, K.; Frey, S. D.; Crill, P. M.

    2012-12-01

    Increased global temperatures have contributed to the thaw of permafrost and a subsequent atmospheric release of stored methane (CH4) from sub-arctic ecosystems. Palsas, small frost uplifted mounds that support specialized dry-tolerant vegetation species, degrade when permafrost thaws, allowing other species such a Sphagnum and Eriophorum to encroach on the microhabitats and outcompete other species, altering the carbon feedback into the thin arctic soil. Other climate change-related events including increased precipitation, seasonal temperature abnormalities and changes in humidity and nutrient availability may alter vegetation dynamics in terms of diversity and abundance in sub-arctic regions. During July 2012, measurements of vegetation composition and species abundance estimates were made in Stordalen Mire (68° 21' N, 19° 03' E), Abisko Sweden, two hundred kilometers north of the Arctic Circle. The mire is an area of discontinuous permafrost populated by micro-ecosystems that vary in vegetation species and abundance depending on growth conditions. All ecosystems provide beneficial services to support a range of life forms including rodents, birds, insects and reindeer. Five representative ecosystems of the mire were chosen to conduct studies on vegetation diversity and percent cover-based abundance: palsa, Eriophorum-dominated fen, Sphagnum-dominated peatland, lakeshore edge and lakeside heath. In each ecosystem vegetation species were recorded in six transects with quadrats along with a corresponding percent cover estimation and scale number based on the Braun-Blanquet percent cover method. To determine nutrient dynamics between ecosystems, soil peat samples were also taken at random from all ecosystem transects. These were analyzed for carbon and inorganic nitrogen as well as ammonium and nitrate. In the vegetation data analysis, the Shannon-Wiener Diversity Index showed that the lakeside heath ecosystem was the most diverse and even in species distribution

  13. Autochamber measurements of Net Ecosystem (CO2) Exchange at a subarctic mire in Northern Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walthall, M.; Parker-Smith, X.; Lawrence, R. D.; Crill, P. M.

    2015-12-01

    Northern latitude wetlands (>~50°N) are characterized by cold and wet conditions that result in low decomposition rates for plant litter. This process promotes the sequestration of carbon (C) in the form of organic matter (i.e. peat) and the formation of widespread peatands. Peatlands, particularly in the Northern Hemisphere, have accumulated C by removing atmospheric CO2 for approximately the past 10,000 years. Historically, peatlands represent a net C sink; however, increases in the global average temperature could alter peatlands ability to store carbon. With a warming climate and permafrost thaw, the pool of once stable soil organic C available for decomposition is increasing. Like all terrestrial ecosystems, a number of environmental factors (e.g. peat temperature and vegetation) play important roles in governing the fate of C in peatlands. Projected climate change is expected to affect these regulating factors. Subarctic peatlands in zones of discontinuous permafrost are experiencing widespread environmental changes due to climate warming. In this study, we present net ecosystem (CO2) exchange and δ13C-CO2 data from Stordalen Mire in northern Sweden (68°22'N, 19°03'E). Measurements were made using a quantum cascade laser spectrometer connected to automatic chambers placed in the three predominant ecosystems (a dry, elevated Palsa; an intermediate thaw regime dominated by Sphagnum spp. and; a completely thawed, inundated site dominated by Eriophorum angustifolium). Team was mentored by Mr. Ryan Lawrence from The University of New Hampshire.

  14. Collected Data of The Boreal Ecosystem and Atmosphere Study (BOREAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcomer, J. (Editor); Landis, D. (Editor); Conrad, S. (Editor); Curd, S. (Editor); Huemmrich, K. (Editor); Knapp, D. (Editor); Morrell, A. (Editor); Nickerson, J. (Editor); Papagno, A. (Editor); Rinker, D. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) was a large-scale international interdisciplinary climate-ecosystem interaction experiment in the northern boreal forests of Canada. Its goal was to improve our understanding of the boreal forests -- how they interact with the atmosphere, how much CO2 they can store, and how climate change will affect them. BOREAS wanted to learn to use satellite data to monitor the forests, and to improve computer simulation and weather models so scientists can anticipate the effects of global change. This BOREAS CD-ROM set is a set of 12 CD-ROMs containing the finalized point data sets and compressed image data from the BOREAS Project. All point data are stored in ASCII text files, and all image and GIS products are stored as binary images, compressed using GZip. Additional descriptions of the various data sets on this CD-ROM are available in other documents in the BOREAS series.

  15. Potential reference mires and lakes ecosystems for biosphere assessment of Olkiluoto site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New lakes and mires will develop in the sea area now surrounding Olkiluoto Island due to the postglacial land uplift. The properties of these objects can be forecast using data from existing lakes and mires. There are, however, no such objects on the present Olkiluoto Island. This Working Report presents a project, initiated in 2007, where lakes and mires at different successional stages, suitable as reference objects for the future ones, were searched. The task included delineation of the study area, based on e.g. geological and climatological factors, and development of the selection criteria. As background, development history and properties of present lakes and mires in the study area are described in this report. For this and forthcoming projects, several GIS data sets were acquired. With help of these data, literature and environmental databases, 33 mires and 27 lakes were selected. These were considered to be the best available analogues for the future objects around Olkiluoto Island. The characteristics of these objects are presented briefly; more detailed information is found in the literature and databases. (orig.)

  16. Controls on winter ecosystem respiration in temperate and boreal ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Wang

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Winter CO2 fluxes represent an important component of the annual carbon budget in northern ecosystems. Understanding winter respiration processes and their responses to climate change is also central to our ability to assess terrestrial carbon cycle and climate feedbacks in the future. However, the factors influencing the spatial and temporal patterns of winter ecosystem respiration (Reco of northern ecosystems are poorly understood. For this reason, we analyzed eddy covariance flux data from 57 ecosystem sites ranging from ~35° N to ~70° N. Deciduous forests were characterized by the highest winter Reco rates (0.90 ± 0.39 g C m−2 d−1, when winter is defined as the period during which daily air temperature remains below 0 °C. By contrast, arctic wetlands had the lowest winter Reco rates (0.02 ± 0.02 g C m−2 d−1. Mixed forests, evergreen needle-leaved forests, grasslands, croplands and boreal wetlands were characterized by intermediate winter Reco rates (g C m−2 d−1 of 0.70(±0.33, 0.60(±0.38, 0.62(±0.43, 0.49(±0.22 and 0.27(±0.08, respectively. Our cross site analysis showed that winter air (Tair and soil (Tsoil temperature played a dominating role in determining the spatial patterns of winter Reco in both forest and managed ecosystems (grasslands and croplands. Besides temperature, the seasonal amplitude of the leaf area index (LAI, inferred from satellite observation, or growing season gross primary productivity, which we use here as a proxy for the amount of recent carbon available for Reco in the subsequent winter, played a marginal role in winter CO2 emissions from forest ecosystems. We found that winter Reco sensitivity to temperature variation across space (

  17. Biodiversity on mire ecosystems and drained peatlands - a basis for environmental peat harvesting; Biologisk maangfald paa myrar och dikad torvmark - underlag foer ett miljoemaessigt torvbruk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stedingk, Henrik von (Swedish Biodiversity Centre, Uppsala (Sweden))

    2009-07-01

    biodiversity than not drained peatlands. The plant succession following drainage leads to denser vegetation and dominance of forest plants. Often drainage is followed by forestry, leading to even lower nature conservation values. Conservation values on drained peatlands are rarely studied. Potential environments for nature conservation in drained peatlands are: 1) Areas with little drainage influence and preserved mire function. 2) Late forest successions after drainage with deciduous trees and dead wood. 3) Open pine forest or swamp forest that act as refugia for old growth lichens and wood fungi. 4) Pools and stream like older ditches with running water. An inventory focused on conservation values on drained peatlands is recommended. Peat harvesting causes ecosystem shift and species living on the mire disappear. An estimation of biodiversity effects from peat harvesting must include the lost mire, time of exploitation, as well as the after-treatment. A longer time perspective is therefore required when evaluating consequences of peat harvesting. The development of a broader spectra of after-treatment involving biodiversity is essential, as well as a system that guarantees a long term perspective in after-treatment for biodiversity. Methods for evaluating effects on the landscape level from increased peat harvesting are required. Increased peat harvesting on drained peatlands could be in convergence with the Swedish environmental goals, if choice of site and after-treatment is based on landscape analysis focusing on biodiversity

  18. Ecosystem Responses to Partial Harvesting in Eastern Boreal Mixedwood Stands

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    Brian D. Harvey

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Partial harvesting has been proposed as a key aspect to implementing ecosystem management in the Canadian boreal forest. We report on a replicated experiment located in boreal mixedwoods of Northwestern Quebec. In the winter of 2000–2001, two partial harvesting treatments, one using a dispersed pattern, and a second, which created a (400 m2 gap pattern, were applied to a 90-year-old aspen-dominated mixed stand. The design also included a clear cut and a control. Over the course of the following eight years, live tree, coarse woody debris, regeneration and ground beetles were inventoried at variable intervals. Our results indicate that all harvesting treatments created conditions favorable to balsam fir (Abies balsamea sapling growth and trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides sapling recruitment. However, balsam fir and trembling aspen regeneration and ground beetles response to gap cuts were closer to patterns observed in clear cuts than in dispersed harvesting. The underlying reasons for these differing patterns can be linked to factors associated with the contrasting light regimes created by the two partial harvesting treatments. The study confirms that partially harvesting is an ecologically sound approach in boreal mixedwoods and could contribute to maintaining the distribution of stand ages at the landscape level.

  19. Controls on winter ecosystem respiration in temperate and boreal ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ciais, P.; Wang, T.; Piao, S.L.; Ottlé, C.; Brender, P.; Moors, E.J.

    2011-01-01

    Winter CO2 fluxes represent an important component of the annual carbon budget in northern ecosystems. Understanding winter respiration processes and their responses to climate change is also central to our ability to assess terrestrial carbon cycle and climate feedbacks in the future. However, the

  20. Distribution and transport of radionuclides in a boreal mire--assessing past, present and future accumulation of uranium, thorium and radium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidman, Fredrik; Ramebäck, Henrik; Bengtsson, Åsa; Laudon, Hjalmar

    2013-07-01

    The spatial distribution of (238)U, (226)Ra, (40)K and the daughters of (232)Th, (228)Ra and (228)Th, were measured in a small mire in northern Sweden. High activity concentrations of (238)U and (232)Th (up to 41 Bq (238)U kg(-1)) were observed in parts of the mire with a historical or current inflow of groundwater from the surrounding till soils, but the activities declined rapidly further out in the mire. Near the outlet and in the central parts of the mire the activity concentrations were low, indicating that uranium and thorium are immobilized rapidly upon their entering the peat. The (226)Ra was found to be more mobile with high activity concentrations further out into the mire (up to 24 Bq kg(-1)), although the central parts and the area near the outlet of the mire still had low activity concentrations. Based on the fluxes to and from the mire, it was estimated that approximately 60-70% of the uranium and thorium entering the mire currently is retained within it. The current accumulation rates were found to be consistent with the historical accumulation, but possibly lower. Since much of the accumulation still is concentrated to the edges of the mire and the activities are low compared to other measurements of these radionuclides in peat, there are no indications that the mire will be saturated with respect to radionuclides like uranium, thorium and radium in the foreseen future. On the contrary, normal peat growth rates for the region suggest that the average activity concentrations of the peat currently may be decreasing, since peat growth may be faster than the accumulation of radionuclides. In order to assess the total potential for accumulation of radionuclides more thoroughly it would, however, be necessary to also investigate the behaviour of other organophilic elements like aluminium, which are likely to compete for binding sites on the organic material. Measurements of the redox potential and other redox indicators demonstrate that uranium possibly

  1. Modeling the effects of organic nitrogen uptake by plants on the carbon cycling of boreal ecosystems

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    Q. Zhu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Boreal forest and tundra are the major ecosystems in the northern high latitudes in which a large amount of carbon is stored. These ecosystems are nitrogen-limited due to slow mineralization rate of the soil organic nitrogen. Recently, abundant field studies have found that organic nitrogen is another important nitrogen supply for boreal ecosystems. In this study, we incorporated a mechanism that allowed boreal plants to uptake small molecular amino acids into a process-based biogeochemical model, the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM, to evaluate the impact of organic nitrogen uptake on ecosystem carbon cycling. The new version of the model was evaluated at both boreal forest and tundra sites. We found that the modeled organic nitrogen uptake accounted for 36–87% of total nitrogen uptake by plants in tundra ecosystems and 26–50% for boreal forests, suggesting that tundra ecosystem might have more relied on the organic form of nitrogen than boreal forests. The simulated monthly gross ecosystem production (GPP and net ecosystem production (NEP tended to be larger with the new version of the model since the plant uptake of organic nitrogen alleviated the soil nitrogen limitation especially during the growing season. The sensitivity study indicated that the most important factors controlling the plant uptake of organic nitrogen were the maximum root uptake rate (Imax and the radius of the root (r0 in our model. The model uncertainty due to uncertain parameters associated with organic nitrogen uptake at tundra ecosystem was larger than at boreal forest ecosystems. This study suggests that considering the organic nitrogen uptake by plants is important to boreal ecosystem carbon modeling.

  2. Structuring Effects of Deer in Boreal Forest Ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steeve D. Côté

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Many deer populations have recently increased worldwide leading to strong direct and indirect ecological and socioeconomical impacts on the composition, dynamic, and functions of forest ecosystems. Deer directly modify the composition and structure of vegetation communities, but they also indirectly affect other species of the ecosystem by modifying the structure of the vegetation. Here we review the results of a research program on overabundant white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus in the boreal forest of Anticosti Island (Québec, Canada aimed at identifying deer densities compatible with forest regeneration. Various silvicultural systems and treatments failed to regenerate deer habitat at high deer densities, but planting size-adapted seedlings could be effective at moderate densities. Using a controlled deer density experiment, we found vegetation recovery at deer densities ≤ 15 deer/km2. The same experiment revealed that other groups of organisms such as insects and birds responded favorably to a reduction of deer density. We also found that alternative successional trajectories may occur after a certain period of heavy browsing during early succession. We conclude that one of the most important remaining research gaps is the need to identify habitat-specific threshold densities at which deer impacts occur and then to design effective wildlife and forest management strategies to limit deer impacts and sustain ecosystem integrity.

  3. Isotopic partitioning of net ecosystem CO2 exchange reveals the importance of methane oxidation in a boreal peatland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasselquist, Niles; Peichl, Matthias; Öquist, Mats; Crill, Patrick; Nilsson, Mats

    2016-04-01

    Partitioning net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) into its different flux components is crucial as it provides a mechanistic framework to better assess how the terrestrial carbon cycle may respond to projected environmental change. This is especially important for northern boreal peatlands, which store approximately one-quarter of the world's soil carbon and yet at the same time are projected to experience some of the greatest environmental changes in the future. Using an experimental setup with automated chambers for measuring NEE (transparent chambers), ecosystem respiration (Reco; opaque chambers) and heterotrophic respiration (Rh; opaque chambers on vegetation-free trenched plots) in combination with continuous measurements of δ13C using near-infrared, diode-laser-based cavity-ring down spectroscopy (Picarro G1101-i analyzer), we partitioned NEE of CO2 into gross primary productivity (GPP), ecosystem respiration (Reco), heterotrophic respiration (Rh) and autotrophic respiration (Ra) using two different approaches (i.e., chamber- and isotope-based methods) in a boreal peatland in northern Sweden (Degerö). Given that δ13C was continuously measured in each chamber, we were also able to further partition Rh into soil organic matter (SOM) mineralization by saprotrophic microbes and the oxidation of methane (CH4) by methanotrophic bacteria. During the ten day measurement period (in late July 2014), the average daily NEE flux at the mire was -0.6 g C m-2 d-1. Overall, the two partitioning approaches yielded similar estimates for the different NEE component fluxes. Average daily fluxes of Rh and Ra were similar in magnitude, yet these two flux components showed contrasting diurnal responses: Ra was greatest during the day whereas there was little diurnal variation in Rh. In general, average 13C signature of CO2 efflux from the Rh chambers (-41.1 ± 0.6 ‰) was between the 13C signature of SOM (-25.8 ± 0.6 ‰) and CH4 in pore water (-69.0 ± 0.8 ‰). Assuming that

  4. Recent changes in vegetation, hydrotopography and peat accumulation in detailed case studies of northern aapa mires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahvanainen, Teemu; Kumpula, Timo; Tolonen, Kimmo

    2016-04-01

    , pools), 155 peat depth measurements and 38 vegetation plots. Despite the pristine wilderness character of the site, we found increased tree encroachment, significant increase of height of Sphagnum hummocks, lateral expansion of ombrotrophic bog zone over fen vegetation and increase of dwarf-shrubs typical to raised bog vegetation. Peat thickness in the bog zone had increased by 2.2 mm per year, greatly exceeding the long-term average of bogs in the region. Our case studies demonstrate a remarkable potential of ecosystem-scale responses in northern aapa mires, ecotone mire type between temperate-south boreal bogs and subarctic palsa mires. Hydrological disturbances can rapidly trigger an allogenic mechanism of fen to bog transition. Traces of ongoing changes in aapa mires can be apparent also in seemingly pristine sites when accurate repeated measurements are performed. Although the observed changes may threaten aapa mire habitat types and biota, they are progressive in terms of peat growth and carbon dioxide sequestration.

  5. Mires and mire types of Peninsula Mitre, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Grootjans

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2007, a field visit by members of the International Mire Conservation Group (IMCG to the Atlantic coast of Peninsula Mitre (the easternmost part of Isla Grande de Tierra del Fuego, Argentina gathered information on mire diversity in this remote wild area with largely pristine mires. Our expedition showed that Peninsula Mitre hosts a wide variety of habitats across two exciting ecological gradients: (i a regional west–east gradient from Sphagnum magellanicum dominated mires in the west to Astelia pumila dominated mires in the east; and (ii a gradient from extremely acid to extremely carbonate rich mire types induced by local bedrock. The large variety of hydromorphological mire types comprises raised bogs, blanket bogs, sloping fens, string fens, flat fens and calcareous spring fens. In the Atlantic coastal area, the abundance of Sphagnum magellanicum in the ombrogenic systems decreases conspicuously from west to east with the species being almost absent in the east. However, the fossil record shows thick layers of Sphagnum peat close beneath mire surfaces everywhere, indicating that substantial hydrological and ecological changes have taken place in the recent past. We observed large scale erosion in the mires along the Atlantic coast. Locally, well-developed fen systems are present, including calcareous spring fens with active travertine (tufa deposition. The regional vegetation can be regarded as a parallel to that of boreal oceanic regions in the northern hemisphere. The mires and peatlands of the peninsula are of global significance. They are impressive, peculiar, extensive and largely pristine mires in a globally very rare climatic and biogeographical context embedded in a landscape with significant natural dynamics. The damaging impact of free-roaming cattle on the mires and upland vegetation is, however, conspicuous and needs urgent attention. Peninsula Mitre deserves the highest possible protection, e.g. as a provincial protected

  6. Sources and sinks of carbon in boreal ecosystems of interior Alaska: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas A. Douglas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Boreal ecosystems store large quantities of carbon but are increasingly vulnerable to carbon loss due to disturbance and climate warming. The boreal region in Alaska and Canada, largely underlain by discontinuous permafrost, presents a challenging landscape for itemizing carbon sources and sinks in soil and vegetation. The roles of fire, forest succession, and the presence (or absence of permafrost on carbon cycle, vegetation, and hydrologic processes have been the focus of multidisciplinary research in boreal ecosystems for the past 20 years. However, projections of a warming future climate, an increase in fire severity and extent, and the potential degradation of permafrost could lead to major landscape and carbon cycle changes over the next 20 to 50 years. To assist land managers in interior Alaska in adapting and managing for potential changes in the carbon cycle we developed this review paper by incorporating an overview of the climate, ecosystem processes, vegetation, and soil regimes. Our objective is to provide a synthesis of the most current carbon storage estimates and measurements to guide policy and land management decisions on how to best manage carbon sources and sinks. We surveyed estimates of aboveground and belowground carbon stocks for interior Alaska boreal ecosystems and summarized methane and carbon dioxide fluxes. These data have been converted into similar units to facilitate comparison across ecosystem compartments. We identify potential changes in the carbon cycle with climate change and human disturbance. A novel research question is how compounding disturbances affect carbon sources and sinks associated with boreal ecosystem processes. Finally, we provide recommendations to address the challenges facing land managers in efforts to manage carbon cycle processes. The results of this study can be used for carbon cycle management in other locations within the boreal biome which encompasses a broad distribution

  7. Nitrogen Additions Affect Root Dynamics in a Boreal Forest Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, K. M.; Treseder, K. K.

    2004-12-01

    As with many ecosystems, North American boreal forests are increasingly subjected to anthropogenic nitrogen deposition. To examine potential effects on plant growth, we created nitrogen fertilization plots in three sites along an Alaskan fire chronosequence composed of forests aged 5, 17, and 80 years. Each site had been exposed to two years of nitrogen fertilization, with four control plots and four nitrogen plots per site. General observations indicate that aboveground net primary productivity appears to be nitrogen limited in each site. We hypothesized that nitrogen fertilization would positively influence root dynamics as well, with nitrogen additions resulting in an increase in standing root biomass and length. To test our hypothesis, we used a minirhizotron camera to collect sequential images of roots in the top 10 cm of soil in both nitrogen fertilized and control plots in each site. Images were collected monthly during the growing season, with a total of five sampling times between May 2003 and May 2004. We then analyzed the images with WinRhizotron root measurement software. Nitrogen fertilization had varying effects on root biomass among the three sites, with a significant site by N interaction (P = 0.039). A decrease in root biomass was observed in the 5 and 80 year old sites, dropping from 207 g/m2 to 79 g/m2 and from 230 g/m2 to 129 g/m2 for the youngest and oldest sites, respectively. In contrast, root biomass increased from 52 g/m2 to 107 g/m2 in the 17 year old site. (Values are for the top 10 cm of soil only, and likely underestimate total root stocks.) Patterns in standing root lengths diverged from those of root biomass, with a 2.5-fold overall increase under nitrogen fertilization across all sites (P = 0.004). There were no significant differences among sites in nitrogen response. Standing root biomass and length differed from one another in their responses to nitrogen fertilization because nitrogen additions decreased specific root weight (as g

  8. n-Alkane distributions as indicators of novel ecosystem development in western boreal forest soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Charlotte; Dungait, Jennifer; Quideau, Sylvie

    2013-04-01

    Novel ecosystem development is occurring within the western boreal forest of Canada due to land reclamation following surface mining in the Athabasca Oil Sands Region. Sphagnum peat is the primary organic matter amendment used to reconstruct soils in the novel ecosystems. We hypothesised that ecosystem recovery would be indicated by an increasing similarity in the biomolecular characteristics of novel reconstructed soil organic matter (SOM) derived from peat to those of natural boreal ecosystems. In this study, we evaluated the use of the homologous series of very long chain (>C20) n-alkanes with odd-over-even predominance as biomarker signatures to monitor the re-establishment of boreal forests on reconstructed soils. The lipids were extracted from dominant vegetation inputs and SOM from a series of natural and novel ecosystem reference plots. We observed unique very long n-alkane signatures of the source vegetation, e.g. Sphagnum sp. was dominated by C31 and aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) leaves by C25. Greater concentrations of very long chain n-alkanes were extracted from natural than novel ecosystem SOM (p<0.01), and their distribution differed between the two systems (p<0.001) and reflected the dominant vegetation input. Our results indicate that further research is required to clarify the influence of vegetation or disturbance on the signature of very long chain n-alkanes in SOM; however, the use of n-alkanes as biomarkers of ecosystem development is a promising method.

  9. Effects of disturbance and climate change on ecosystem performance in the Yukon River Basin boreal forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, Bruce K.; Rigge, Matthew B.; Brisco, Brian; Mrnaghan, Kevin; Rover, Jennifer R.; Long, Jordan

    2014-01-01

    A warming climate influences boreal forest productivity, dynamics, and disturbance regimes. We used ecosystem models and 250 m satellite Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) data averaged over the growing season (GSN) to model current, and estimate future, ecosystem performance. We modeled Expected Ecosystem Performance (EEP), or anticipated productivity, in undisturbed stands over the 2000–2008 period from a variety of abiotic data sources, using a rule-based piecewise regression tree. The EEP model was applied to a future climate ensemble A1B projection to quantify expected changes to mature boreal forest performance. Ecosystem Performance Anomalies (EPA), were identified as the residuals of the EEP and GSN relationship and represent performance departures from expected performance conditions. These performance data were used to monitor successional events following fire. Results suggested that maximum EPA occurs 30–40 years following fire, and deciduous stands generally have higher EPA than coniferous stands. Mean undisturbed EEP is projected to increase 5.6% by 2040 and 8.7% by 2070, suggesting an increased deciduous component in boreal forests. Our results contribute to the understanding of boreal forest successional dynamics and its response to climate change. This information enables informed decisions to prepare for, and adapt to, climate change in the Yukon River Basin forest.

  10. Vulnerability to climate-induced changes in ecosystem services of boreal forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmberg, Maria; Rankinen, Katri; Aalto, Tuula; Akujärvi, Anu; Nadir Arslan, Ali; Liski, Jari; Markkanen, Tiina; Mäkelä, Annikki; Peltoniemi, Mikko

    2016-04-01

    Boreal forests provide an array of ecosystem services. They regulate climate, and carbon, water and nutrient fluxes, and provide renewable raw material, food, and recreational possibilities. Rapid climate warming is projected for the boreal zone, and has already been observed in Finland, which sets these services at risk. MONIMET (LIFE12 ENV/FI/000409, 2.9.2013 - 1.9.2017) is a project funded by EU Life programme about Climate Change Indicators and Vulnerability of Boreal Zone Applying Innovative Observation and Modeling Techniques. The coordinating beneficiary of the project is the Finnish Meteorological Institute. Associated beneficiaries are the Natural Resources Institute Finland, the Finnish Environment Institute and the University of Helsinki. In the MONIMET project, we use state-of-the-art models and new monitoring methods to investigate the impacts of a warming climate on the provision of ecosystem services of boreal forests. This poster presents results on carbon storage in soil and assessment of drought indices, as a preparation for assessing the vulnerability of society to climate-induced changes in ecosystem services. The risk of decreasing provision of ecosystem services depends on the sensitivity of the ecosystem as well as its exposure to climate stress. The vulnerability of society, in turn, depends on the risk of decreasing provision of a certain service in combination with society's demand for that service. In the next phase, we will look for solutions to challenges relating to the quantification of the demand for ecosystem services and differences in spatial extent and resolution of the information on future supply and demand.

  11. Carbonaceous aerosols from prescribed burning of a boreal forest ecosystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The identity and ambient mass concentrations of radiatively important carbonaceous aerosols were measured for a boreal forest prescribed burn conducted in northern Ontario, CAN in August 1989. Nonsize-segregated airborne particles were collected for smoldering-fire and full-fire conditions using a helicopter sampling platform. Total carbon (TC), organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) were measured. Smoke plume mass concentrations of the OC and EC particles were greatest for full-fire conditions and had ranges of 1.560 to 2.160 mg/m-1 (OC) and 0.120 to 0.160 mg/m-3 (EC) with OC:EC ratios of 10 to 18, respectively. Smoldering fire conditions showed smoke plume OC and EC levels of 0.570--1.030 mg/m-3 (OC) and 0.006--0.050 mg/m-3 (EC) and much higher ratios of OC:EC (21 to 95). These aerosol data indicate the formation of EC particles is greatest during full-fire combustion of boreal forest material relative to smoldering combustion. However, EC particles comprise a minor fraction of the particulate carbon smoke aerosols for both full-fire and smoldering conditions; the major component of carbonaceous smoke aerosols emitted during the prescribed burn is OC. Overall, the OC and EC in-plume smoke aerosol data show nonuniform production of these particles during various stages of the prescribed burn, and major differences in the type of carbonaceous aerosol that is generated (OC versus EC)

  12. Understanding the long term ecosystem stability of a fen mire by analyzing subsurface geology, eco-hydrology and nutrient stoichiometry - Case study of the Rospuda valley (NE Poland)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jabłońska, Ewa; Falkowski, Tomasz; Chormański, Jarosław; Jarzombkowski, Filip; Kłosowski, Stanisław; Okruszko, Tomasz; Pawlikowski, Paweł; Theuerkauf, Martin; Wassen, Martin J.; Kotowski, Wiktor

    2014-01-01

    We explored the background of differences in long-term stability between two parts in an undisturbed mire system (Rospuda fen, NE Poland). We re-constructed the Holocene history of the mire and compared it with current vegetation, water level dynamics, water chemistry and nutrient availability in tw

  13. The climate responses of tropical and boreal ecosystems with an improved land surface model (JULES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Anna; Friedlingstein, Pierre; Cox, Peter; Wiltshire, Andy; Jones, Chris

    2016-04-01

    The Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES) is the land surface of the next generation UK Earth System Model (UKESM1). Recently, JULES was updated with new plant functional types and physiology based on a global plant trait database. These developments improved the simulation of terrestrial gross and net primary productivity on local and global scales, and enabled a more realistic representation of the global distribution of vegetation. In this study, we explore the present-day distribution of ecosystems and their vulnerability to climate change in JULES with these improvements, focusing on tropical and boreal ecosystems. Changes to these ecosystems will have implications for biogeophysical and biogeochemical feedbacks to climate change and need to be understood. First, we examine the simulated and observed rainforest-savannah boundary, which is strongly related to annual precipitation and the maximum climatological water deficit. Second, we assess the length of growing season and biomass stored in boreal ecosystems, where 20th century warming has likely extended the growing season. In each case, we first evaluate the ability of JULES to capture observed climate-vegetation relationships and trends. Finally, we run JULES to 2100 using climate data from 3 models and 2 RCP scenarios, and examine potential 21st century changes to these ecosystems. For example, do the tropical forests shrink in response to changes in tropical rainfall seasonality? And, how does the composition of boreal ecosystems change in response to climate warming? Given the potential for climate feedbacks and the inherent value in these ecosystems, it is essential to assess their responses to a range of climate change scenarios.

  14. Arctic and boreal ecosystems of western North America as components of the climate system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapin, F. S., III; McGuire, A.D.; Randerson, J.; Pielke, R., Sr.; Baldocchi, D.; Hobbie, S.E.; Roulet, Nigel; Eugster, W.; Kasischke, E.; Rastetter, E.B.; Zimov, S.A.; Running, S.W.

    2000-01-01

    Synthesis of results from several Arctic and boreal research programmes provides evidence for the strong role of high-latitude ecosystems in the climate system. Average surface air temperature has increased 0.3??C per decade during the twentieth century in the western North American Arctic and boreal forest zones. Precipitation has also increased, but changes in soil moisture are uncertain. Disturbance rates have increased in the boreal forest; for example, there has been a doubling of the area burned in North America in the past 20 years. The disturbance regime in tundra may not have changed. Tundra has a 3-6-fold higher winter albedo than boreal forest, but summer albedo and energy partitioning differ more strongly among ecosystems within either tundra or boreal forest than between these two biomes. This indicates a need to improve our understanding of vegetation dynamics within, as well as between, biomes. If regional surface warming were to continue, changes in albedo and energy absorption would likely act as a positive feedback to regional warming due to earlier melting of snow and, over the long term, the northward movement of treeline. Surface drying and a change in dominance from mosses to vascular plants would also enhance sensible heat flux and regional warming in tundra. In the boreal forest of western North America, deciduous forests have twice the albedo of conifer forests in both winter and summer, 50-80% higher evapotranspiration, and therefore only 30-50% of the sensible heat flux of conifers in summer. Therefore, a warming-induced increase in fire frequency that increased the proportion of deciduous forests in the landscape, would act as a negative feedback to regional warming. Changes in thermokarst and the aerial extent of wetlands, lakes, and ponds would alter high-latitude methane flux. There is currently a wide discrepancy among estimates of the size and direction of CO2 flux between high-latitude ecosystems and the atmosphere. These

  15. Climatic sensitivity of hydrology and carbon exchanges in boreal peatland ecosystems, with implications on sustainable management of reed canary grass (Phalaris arundinacea, L.) on cutaway peatlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong Jinnan

    2013-11-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of climate change on soil hydrology and carbon (C) fluxes in boreal peatland ecosystems, with implications for the feasibility of cultivating reed canary grass (Phalaris arundinacea, L; RCG) as a way to restore the C sink in cutaway peatlands under Finnish conditions. First, hydrological models were developed for pristine peatland ecosystems and the cutaway peatlands under RCG cultivation. Concurrently, the hydrological responses to varying climatic forcing and mire types were investigated for these ecosystems. Thereafter, process-based models for estimating the seasonal and annual C exchanges were developed for the pristine mires and cutaway peatlands. The C models incorporated the hydrological models for corresponding ecosystems. Model simulations based on the climate scenarios (ACCLIM, developed by the Finnish Meteorological Institute, FMI) were further carried out to study the impacts of climate change on the C exchanges in the peatland ecosystems during the 21st century. The simulation showed that the water table (WT) in the pristine Finnish mires would draw down slightly during the 21st century. Such a chance in WT would be related to a decrease in the CO{sub 2} sink but an increase in the CH{sub 4} source at the country scale, as driven mainly by the rising temperature (Ta) and increasing precipitation (P). These changes in CO{sub 2}/ CH{sub 4} fluxes would decrease the total C-greenhouse gas (GHG) sink (CO{sub 2} equilibrium) by 68% at the country scale, and the changes would be more pronounced toward the end of the century. The majority of pristine fens in southern and western Finland and the pristine bogs near the coastal areas would become centurial CO{sub 2} sources under the changing climate. On the other hand, the major distribution of fens in northern Finland would act to increase the CH{sub 4} source at the country scale, whereas the CH{sub 4} emission would tend to decrease with WT in the southern

  16. Carbon-sequestration and ecosystem services in the boreal ecoregion of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, B.; Manies, K.; Labay, K.; Johnson, W. N.; Harden, J. W.

    2011-12-01

    Managing public lands for carbon (C) sequestration is increasingly discussed as a component of national carbon policies. However, management of public land to facilitate carbon sequestration must be considered in the context of other management mandates and the effects on other ecosystem services. Of the United States Fish and Wildlife Service's (USFWS) National Wildlife Refuge lands in Alaska, about 35% are in the boreal ecoregion; primarily in the Intermountain and the Alaska Range Transition ecoregions. These refuges were established to conserve wildlife habitat, fulfill treaty obligations, provide for continued subsistence uses, and ensure necessary water quality and quantity. One of the major factors in determining ecosystem distribution in the boreal ecoregion is disturbance. Fire is the dominant disturbance for Alaska's boreal region. Most USFWS refuge lands are managed with "limited" suppression, where fires burn naturally and are monitored to assure the protection of human life, property, and site specific values (such as historical or religious). However, there is increasing interest in biomass harvest and combustion for local energy production. Harvest and fire can have differing effects on both the spatial and temporal aspects of carbon storage. The current biomass harvest for energy production proposals are considered to be C neutral because they focus on "hazardous" biomass which would burn naturally or in a prescribed burn. The goal of this effort is to explore the relation between C storage and other public land management priorities, as well as, to explore how disturbance type (fire and harvest) affect C storage and boreal ecosystem distribution in the context of wildlife habitat and subsistence use management priorities. We present a conceptual model that defines the linkages among these management priorities, a data gap analysis, and scenarios to be evaluated.

  17. Tree Species Linked to Large Differences in Ecosystem Carbon Distribution in the Boreal Forest of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melvin, A. M.; Mack, M. C.; Johnstone, J. F.; Schuur, E. A. G.; Genet, H.; McGuire, A. D.

    2014-12-01

    In the boreal forest of Alaska, increased fire severity associated with climate change is altering plant-soil-microbial feedbacks and ecosystem carbon (C) dynamics. The boreal landscape has historically been dominated by black spruce (Picea mariana), a tree species associated with slow C turnover and large soil organic matter (SOM) accumulation. Historically, low severity fires have led to black spruce regeneration post-fire, thereby maintaining slow C cycling rates and large SOM pools. In recent decades however, an increase in high severity fires has led to greater consumption of the soil organic layer (SOL) during fire and subsequent establishment of deciduous tree species in areas previously dominated by black spruce. This shift to a more deciduous dominated landscape has many implications for ecosystem structure and function, as well as feedbacks to global C cycling. To improve our understanding of how boreal tree species affect C cycling, we quantified above- and belowground C stocks and fluxes in adjacent, mid-successional stands of black spruce and Alaska paper birch (Betula neoalaskana) that established following a 1958 fire near Fairbanks, Alaska. Although total ecosystem C pools (aboveground live tree biomass + dead wood + SOL + top 10 cm of mineral soil) were similar for the two stand types, the distribution of C among pools was markedly different. In black spruce, 78% of measured C was found in soil pools, primarily in the SOL, where spruce contained twice the C stored in paper birch (4.8 ± 0.3 vs. 2.4 ± 0.1 kg C m-2). In contrast, aboveground biomass dominated ecosystem C pools in birch forest (6.0 ± 0.3 vs. 2.5 ± 0.2 kg C m-2 in birch and spruce, respectively). Our findings suggest that tree species exert a strong influence over plant-soil-microbial feedbacks and may have long-term effects on ecosystem C sequestration and storage that feedback to the climate system.

  18. Effects of shading on photosynthesis, plant organic nitrogen uptake and root fungal colonization in a subarctic mire ecosystem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsrud, Hanna Maria Kerstin; Michelsen, Anders

    2009-01-01

    Arctic dwarf shrub ecosystems are predicted to be exposed to lower light intensity in a changing climate where mountain birch forests are expanding. We investigated how shading at 0%, 65%, and 97% affects photosynthesis, organic N uptake, C and N allocation patterns in plants, and root fungal...... colonization in an ericoid dwarf shrub ecosystem. The ecosystem was labeled by injection of [2-13C,15N]glycine into the soil, and the uptake of 15N and 13C in roots and leaves 24 h later was analysed. Fungal colonization in hair roots was determined visually. Hair root 13C:15N ratios showed that dwarf shrub...... deciduous and evergreen plant species decreased. Species dominance was correlated with uptake of 13C, i.e., the most productive species also took up the highest amount of glycine. The ecosystem exhibited a tendency towards lower colonization by ericoid mycorrhizal fungi and dark septate endophytes in hair...

  19. Functional Diversity of Boreal Bog Plant Species Decreases Seasonal Variation of Ecosystem Carbon Sink Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korrensalo, A.

    2015-12-01

    Species diversity has been found to decrease the temporal variance of productivity of a plant community, and diversity in species responses to environmental factors seems to make a plant community more stable in changing conditions. Boreal bogs are nutrient poor peatland ecosystems where the number of plant species is low but the species differ greatly in their growth form. In here we aim to assess the role of the variation in photosynthesis between species for the temporal variation in ecosystem carbon sink function. To quantify the photosynthetic properties and their seasonal variation for different bog plant species we measured photosynthetic parameters and stress-inducing chlorophyll fluorescence of vascular plant and Sphagnum moss species in a boreal bog over a growing season. We estimated monthly gross photosynthesis (PG) of the whole study site based on species level light response curves and leaf area development. The estimated PG was further compared with a gross primary production (GPP) estimate measured by eddy covariance (EC) technique. The sum of upscaled PG estimates agreed well with the GPP estimate measured by the EC technique. The contributions of the species and species groups to the ecosystem level PG changed over the growing season. The sharp mid-summer peak in sedge PG was balanced by more stable PG of evergreen shrubs and Sphagna. Species abundance rather than differences in photosynthetic properties between species and growth forms determined the most productive plants on the ecosystem scale. Sphagna had lower photosynthesis and clorophyll fluorescence than vascular plants but were more productive on the ecosystem scale throughout the growing season due to their high areal coverage. These results show that the diversity of growth forms stabilizes the seasonal variation of the ecosystem level PG in an ombrotrophic bog ecosystem. This may increase the resilience of the ecosystem to changing environmental conditions.

  20. Declining plant nitrogen supply and carbon accumulation in ageing primary boreal forest ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Högberg, Mona N.; Yarwood, Stephanie A.; Trumbore, Susan; Högberg, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Boreal forest soils are commonly characterized by a low plant nitrogen (N) supply. A high tree below-ground allocation of carbon (C) to roots and soil microorganisms in response to the shortage of N may lead to high microbial immobilisation of N, thus aggravating the N limitation. We studied the N supply at a Swedish boreal forest ecosystem chronosequence created by new land rising out of the sea due to iso-static rebound. The youngest soils develop with meadows by the coast, followed by a zone of dinitrogen fixing alder trees, and primary boreal conifer forest on ground up to 560 years old. With increasing ecosystem age, the proportion of microbial C out of the total soil C pool from the youngest to the oldest coniferous ecosystem was constant (c. 1-1.5%), whereas immobilised N (microbial N out of total soil N) increased and approached the levels commonly observed in similar boreal coniferous forests (c. 6-7 %), whereas gross N mineralization declined. Simultaneously, plant foliar N % decreased and the natural abundance of N-15 in the soil increased. More specifically, the difference in N-15 between plant foliage and soil increased, which is related to greater retention of N-15 relative to N-14 by ectomycorrhizal fungi as N is taken up from the soil and some N is transferred to the plant host. In the conifer forest, where these changes were greatest, we found increased fungal biomass in the F- and H-horizons of the mor-layer, in which ectomycorrhizal fungi are known to dominate (the uppermost horizon with litter and moss is dominated by saprotrophic fungi). Hence, we propose that the decreasing N supply to the plants and the subsequent decline in plant production in ageing boreal forests is linked to high tree belowground C allocation to C limited ectomycorrhizal fungi (and other soil microorganisms), a strong sink for available soil N. Data on organic matter C-14 suggested that the largest input of recently fixed plant C occurred in the younger coniferous forest

  1. Changing sources and sinks of carbon in boreal ecosystems of Interior Alaska: Current and future perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, T. A.; Jones, M.; Hiemstra, C. A.

    2012-12-01

    Future climate scenarios predict a roughly 5°C increase in mean annual air temperatures for the Alaskan Interior over the next 80 years. Increasing temperatures and greater frequency and severity of climate-induced disturbances such as wildfires will be enough to initiate permafrost degradation in many areas of Alaska, leading to major changes in surface hydrology and ecosystem structure and function. This, in turn, is expected to alter the current inventories of carbon sources and sinks in the region and provide a management challenge for carbon itemization efforts. To assist land managers in adapting and planning for potential changes in Interior Alaska carbon cycling we synthesize information on climate, ecosystem processes, vegetation, and soil, permafrost, and hydrologic regimes in Interior Alaska. Our goal is to provide an assessment of the current and likely future regime of Interior Alaska carbon sources and sinks. For our carbon assessment we: 1) synthesize the most recent results from numerous studies on the carbon cycle with a focus on research from the Alaskan boreal biome, 2) assemble a summary of estimates of carbon sources in soil and vegetation in Interior Alaska, 3) categorize carbon sources and sinks for predominant Interior Alaska ecosystems, and 4) identify expected changes in sources and sinks with climate change and human activities. This information is used to provide recommendations on potential actions land managers can take to minimize carbon export from the boreal forest. Though the results from our project are geared primarily toward policy makers and land managers we also provide recommendations for filling research gaps that currently present uncertainty in our understanding of the carbon cycle in boreal forest ecosystems of Interior Alaska.

  2. Photosynthetic properties of boreal bog plant species and their contribution to ecosystem level carbon sink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korrensalo, Aino; Hájek, Tomas; Alekseychik, Pavel; Rinne, Janne; Vesala, Timo; Mehtätalo, Lauri; Mammarella, Ivan; Tuittila, Eeva-Stiina

    2016-04-01

    Boreal bogs have a low number of plant species, but a large diversity of growth forms. This heterogeneity might explain the seasonally less varying photosynthetic productivity of these ecosystems compared to peatlands with vegetation consisting of fewer growth forms. The differences in photosynthetic properties within bog species and phases of growing season has not been comprehensively studied. Also the role of different plant species for the ecosystem level carbon (C) sink function is insufficiently known. We quantified the seasonal variation of photosynthetic properties in bog plant species and assessed how this variation accounts for the temporal variation in the ecosystem C sink. Photosynthetic light response of 11 vascular plant and 8 Sphagnum moss species was measured monthly over the growing season of 2013. Based on the species' light response parameters, leaf area development and areal coverage, we estimated the ecosystem level gross photosynthesis rate (PG) over the growing season. The level of upscaled PG was verified by comparing it to the ecosystem gross primary production (GPP) estimate calculated based on eddy covariance (EC) measurements. Although photosynthetic parameters differed within plant species and months, these differences were of less importance than expected for the variation in ecosystem level C sink. The most productive plant species at the ecosystem scale were not those with the highest maximum potential photosynthesis per unit of leaf area (Pmax), but those having the largest areal coverage. Sphagnum mosses had 35% smaller Pmax than vascular plants, but had higher photosynthesis at the ecosystem scale throughout the growing season. The contribution of the bog plant species to the ecosystem level PG differed over the growing season. The seasonal variation in ecosystem C sink was mainly controlled by phenology. Sedge PG had a sharp mid-summer peak, but the PG of evergreen shrubs and Sphagna remained rather stable over the growing season

  3. Comparing soil biogeochemical processes in novel and natural boreal forest ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Quideau

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Emulating the variability that exists in the natural landscape prior to disturbance should be a goal of soil reconstruction and land reclamation efforts following resource extraction. Long-term ecosystem sustainability within reclaimed landscapes can only be achieved with the re-establishment of biogeochemical processes between reconstructed soils and plants. In this study, we assessed key soil biogeochemical attributes (nutrient availability, organic matter composition, and microbial communities in reconstructed, novel, anthropogenic ecosystems covering different reclamation treatments following open-cast mining for oil extraction. We compared the attributes to those present in a range of natural soils representative of mature boreal forest ecosystems in the same area of northern Alberta. Soil nutrient availability was determined in situ with resin probes, organic matter composition was described with 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and soil microbial community structure was characterized using phospholipid fatty acid analysis. Significant differences among natural ecosystems were apparent in nutrient availability and seemed more related to the dominant tree cover than to soil type. When analyzed together, all natural forests differed significantly from the novel ecosystems, in particular with respect to soil organic matter composition. However, there was some overlap between the reconstructed soils and some of the natural ecosystems in nutrient availability and microbial communities, but not in organic matter characteristics. Hence, our results illustrate the importance of considering the range of natural landscape variability, and including several soil biogeochemical attributes when comparing novel, anthropogenic ecosystems to the mature ecosystems that constitute ecological targets.

  4. Comparing soil biogeochemical processes in novel and natural boreal forest ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quideau, S. A.; Swallow, M. J. B.; Prescott, C. E.; Grayston, S. J.; Oh, S.-W.

    2013-08-01

    Emulating the variability that exists in the natural landscape prior to disturbance should be a goal of soil reconstruction and land reclamation efforts following resource extraction. Long-term ecosystem sustainability within reclaimed landscapes can only be achieved with the re-establishment of biogeochemical processes between reconstructed soils and plants. In this study, we assessed key soil biogeochemical attributes (nutrient availability, organic matter composition, and microbial communities) in reconstructed, novel, anthropogenic ecosystems, covering different reclamation treatments following open-cast mining for oil extraction. We compared the attributes to those present in a range of natural soils representative of mature boreal forest ecosystems in the same area of Northern Alberta. Soil nutrient availability was determined in situ with resin probes, organic matter composition was described with 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and soil microbial community structure was characterized using phospholipid fatty acid analysis. Significant differences among natural ecosystems were apparent in nutrient availability and seemed more related to the dominant tree cover than to soil type. When analyzed together, all natural forests differed significantly from the novel ecosystems, in particular with respect to soil organic matter composition. However, there was some overlap between the reconstructed soils and some of the natural ecosystems in nutrient availability and microbial communities, but not in organic matter characteristics. Hence, our results illustrate the importance of considering the range of natural landscape variability and including several soil biogeochemical attributes when comparing novel, anthropogenic ecosystems to the mature ecosystems that constitute ecological targets.

  5. Nutrient fluxes from insect herbivory increase during ecosystem retrogression in boreal forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, Daniel B; Crutsinger, Gregory M; Kumordzi, Bright B; Wardle, David A

    2016-01-01

    Ecological theory, developed largely from ungulates and grassland systems, predicts that herbivory accelerates nutrient cycling more in productive than unproductive systems. This prediction may be important for understanding patterns of ecosystem change over time and space, but its applicability to other ecosystems and types of herbivore remain uncertain. We estimated fluxes of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) from herbivory of a common tree species (Betula pubescens) by a common species of herbivorous insect along a -5000-yr boreal chronosequence. Contrary to established theory, fluxes of N and P via herbivory increased along the chronosequence despite a decline in plant productivity. The herbivore-mediated N and P fluxes to the soil are comparable to the main alternative pathway for these nutrients via tree leaf litterfall. We conclude that insect herbivores can make large contributions to nutrient cycling even in unproductive systems, and influence the rate and pattern of ecosystem development, particularly in systems with low external nutrient inputs.

  6. Impacts of elevated carbon dioxide and temperature on a boreal forest ecosystem (CLIMEX project)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breemen, N. van; Jenkins, A.; Wright, R.F.;

    1998-01-01

    and the growing season has been prolonged relative to the control area. This has helped to sustain an increase in plant growth relative to the control and has also promoted increased N export in stream water. Photosynthetic capacity and carbon-nitrogen ratio of new leaves of most plant species did not change......To evaluate the effects of climate change on boreal forest ecosystems, both atmospheric CO2 (to 560 ppmv) and air temperature (by 3 degrees-5 degrees C above ambient) were increased at a forested headwater catchment in southern Norway. The entire catchment (860 m(2)) is enclosed within...

  7. Natural disturbance impacts on ecosystem services and biodiversity in temperate and boreal forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thom, Dominik; Seidl, Rupert

    2016-08-01

    In many parts of the world forest disturbance regimes have intensified recently, and future climatic changes are expected to amplify this development further in the coming decades. These changes are increasingly challenging the main objectives of forest ecosystem management, which are to provide ecosystem services sustainably to society and maintain the biological diversity of forests. Yet a comprehensive understanding of how disturbances affect these primary goals of ecosystem management is still lacking. We conducted a global literature review on the impact of three of the most important disturbance agents (fire, wind, and bark beetles) on 13 different ecosystem services and three indicators of biodiversity in forests of the boreal, cool- and warm-temperate biomes. Our objectives were to (i) synthesize the effect of natural disturbances on a wide range of possible objectives of forest management, and (ii) investigate standardized effect sizes of disturbance for selected indicators via a quantitative meta-analysis. We screened a total of 1958 disturbance studies published between 1981 and 2013, and reviewed 478 in detail. We first investigated the overall effect of disturbances on individual ecosystem services and indicators of biodiversity by means of independence tests, and subsequently examined the effect size of disturbances on indicators of carbon storage and biodiversity by means of regression analysis. Additionally, we investigated the effect of commonly used approaches of disturbance management, i.e. salvage logging and prescribed burning. We found that disturbance impacts on ecosystem services are generally negative, an effect that was supported for all categories of ecosystem services, i.e. supporting, provisioning, regulating, and cultural services (P paradox', documenting that disturbances can put ecosystem services at risk while simultaneously facilitating biodiversity. A detailed investigation of disturbance effect sizes on carbon storage and

  8. Soil organic matter cycling in novel and natural boreal forest ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, C. E.; Mercier Quideau, S.

    2013-12-01

    The uplands of the western boreal forest of Canada are characterized by a mosaic of pure and mixed stands of aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) and spruce (Picea glauca (Moench) Voss). In addition to natural ecosystems, the region is now home to novel ecosystems; i.e., ecosystems composed of reclaimed stands formed from trees planted on constructed anthropogenic soils. To understand potential differences in functioning of these novel ecosystems, we must first better understand the functioning of their natural counterparts. Here we present results on both the characterization and cycling of soil organic matter in novel and natural ecosystems found in the Athabasca oil sands region. Soil organic matter from 42 long term monitoring sites was evaluated for long chain (≥ C21) n-alkane composition. The survey showed that n-alkanes were more concentrated and had distinct signatures in natural compared to novel ecosystems. Mineral soils from reclaimed stands showed a distinct microbial community structure from natural aspen and spruce stands, as was demonstrated using phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) as microbial biomarkers following addition of 13C-glucose in a laboratory incubation. Further probing by compound specific analysis of the 13C-enriched PLFAs determined that microbial incorporation of 13C-glucose was different among soils. In a field incubation using 15N labeled aspen litter added to the forest floor of reclaimed, harvested and mature natural aspen stands, the microbial community readily incorporated the tracer and nitrogen was cycled to the above-ground vegetation on all sites. In addition, the amendment of leaf litter to the forest floor also increased soil moisture and soil microbial biomass on both the reclaimed and harvested sites. Utilizing stable isotope tracers in addition to a multi-faceted experimental approach has provided insightful results on the development of soil biogeochemical cycling in novel ecosystems.

  9. The resilience and functional role of moss in boreal and arctic ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turetsky, Merritt; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Euskirchen, Eugenie S.; Talbot, Julie; Frolking, Steve; McGuire, A. David; Tuittila, Eeva-Stiina

    2012-08-24

    Mosses in boreal and arctic ecosystems are ubiquitous components of plant communities, represent an important component of plant diversity, and strongly influence the cycling of water, nutrients, energy and carbon. Here we use a literature review and synthesis as well as model simulations to explore the role of moss in ecological stability and resilience. Our literature review of moss community responses to disturbance showed all possible responses (increases, decreases, no change) within most disturbance categories in boreal and arctic regions. Our modeling simulations suggest that loss of moss within northern plant communities will reduce soil carbon accumulation primarily by influencing decomposition rates and soil nitrogen availability. While two models (HPM and STM-TEM) showed a significant effect of moss removal, results from the Biome-BGC and DVM-TEM models suggest that northern, moss-rich ecosystems would need to experience extreme perturbation before mosses were eliminated. We highlight a number of issues that have not been adequately explored in moss communities, such as functional redundancy and singularity, relationships between response and effect traits, phenotypical plasticity in traits, and whether the effects of moss on ecosystem processes scale with local abundance. We also suggest that as more models explore issues related to ecological resilience, issues related to both parameter and conceptual uncertainty should be addressed: are the models more limited by uncertainty in the parameterization of the processes included or by what is not represented in the model at all? It seems clear from our review that mosses need to be incorporated into models as one or more plant functional types, but more empirical work is needed to determine how to best aggregate species.

  10. Hydrology-driven ecosystem respiration determines the carbon balance of a boreal peatland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gažovič, Michal; Forbrich, Inke; Jager, Daniel F; Kutzbach, Lars; Wille, Christian; Wilmking, Martin

    2013-10-01

    The carbon (C) balance of boreal peatlands is mainly the sum of three different C fluxes: carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Intra- and inter-annual dynamics of these fluxes are differentially controlled by similar factors, such as temperature and water-table. Different climatic conditions within and between years might thus result in varying absolute and relative contributions of each flux to net ecosystem productivity (NEP). In this study CO2 fluxes were measured at a boreal peatland in eastern Finland during a dry year (2006) and a wet year (2007) and combined with DOC and CH4 fluxes from the same site. CO2 uptake in the wet year was 65% higher than in the dry year, caused by higher water table (WT) and subsequently reduced rates of soil respiration. Two to three-fold increases in DOC and CH4 fluxes in the wet year did not completely offset the higher CO2 uptake in that year, resulting in NEP of -83.7±14 g C m(-2) in the dry and -134.5±21 g C m(-2) in the wet year. Thus, in our study, WT was identified as the most important factor responsible for variations in the C balance between the observed years.

  11. Size-based hydroacoustic measures of within-season fish abundance in a boreal freshwater ecosystem.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riley A Pollom

    Full Text Available Eleven sequential size-based hydroacoustic surveys conducted with a 200 kHz split-beam transducer during the summers of 2011 and 2012 were used to quantify seasonal declines in fish abundance in a boreal reservoir in Manitoba, Canada. Fish densities were sufficiently low to enable single target resolution and tracking. Target strengths converted to log2-based size-classes indicated that smaller fish were consistently more abundant than larger fish by a factor of approximately 3 for each halving of length. For all size classes, in both years, abundance (natural log declined linearly over the summer at rates that varied from -0.067 x day(-1 for the smallest fish to -0.016 x day(-1 for the largest (R2 = 0.24-0.97. Inter-annual comparisons of size-based abundance suggested that for larger fish (>16 cm, mean winter decline rates were an order of magnitude lower (-0.001 x day(-1 and overall survival higher (71% than in the main summer fishing season (mean loss rate -0.038 x day(-1; survival 33%. We conclude that size-based acoustic survey methods have the potential to assess within-season fish abundance dynamics, and may prove useful in long-term monitoring of productivity and hence management of boreal aquatic ecosystems.

  12. Sensitivity of Spruce/Moss Boreal Forest Net Ecosystem Productivity to Seasonal Anomalies in Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolking, Steve

    1997-01-01

    Abstract. A process-oriented, daily time step model of a spruce/moss boreal ecosystem simulated 1994 and 1995 productivity for a Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study site near Thompson, Manitoba. Simulated black spruce net primary productivity (NPP) was 139 g C m(exp -2) in 1994 and 112 in 1995; feathermoss NPP was 13.0 g C m(exp -2) in 1994 and 9.7 in 1995; decomposition was 126 g C m(exp -2) in 1994 and 130 in 1995; net ecosystem productivity (NEP) was an uptake of 26.3 g C m(exp -2)in 1994 and 2.5 in 1995. A very dry period for the first half of the 1995 summer was the major cause of that year's lower productivity. Sensitivity simulations explored the impact of 2-month long warmer, cooler, wetter, and drier spells on ecosystem productivity. Warmer summers decreased spruce NPP, moss NPP, and NEP; cooler summers had the opposite effect. Earlier snowmelt (due to either warmer spring temperatures or reduced winter precipitation) increased moss and spruce NPP; later snowmelt had the opposite effect. The largest effect on decomposition was a 5% reduction due to a drier summer. One-month droughts (April through October) were also imposed on 1975 base year weather. Early summer droughts reduced moss annual NPP by -30-40%; summer droughts reduced spruce annual NPP by 10%; late summer droughts increased moss NPP by about 20% due to reduced respiration; May to September monthly droughts reduced heterotrophic respiration by about 10%. Variability in NEP was up to roughly +/- 35%. Finally, 1975 growing season precipitation was redistributed into frequent, small rainstorms and infrequent, large rainstorms. These changes had no effect on spruce NPP. Frequent rainstorms increased decomposition by a few percent, moss NPP by 50%, and NEP by 20%. Infrequent rainstorms decreased decomposition by 5%, moss NPP by 50% and NEP by 15%. The impact of anomalous weather patterns on productivity of this ecosystem depended on their timing during the year. Multiyear data sets are necessary to

  13. Aquatic ecosystem responses to Holocene climate change and biome development in boreal, central Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, Anson W.; Bezrukova, Elena V.; Leng, Melanie J.; Meaney, Miriam; Nunes, Ana; Piotrowska, Natalia; Self, Angela; Shchetnikov, Alexander; Shilland, Ewan; Tarasov, Pavel; Wang, Luo; White, Dustin

    2012-05-01

    Boreal ecosystems are highly vulnerable to climate change, and severe ecological impacts in the near future are virtually certain to occur. We undertook a multiproxy study on an alpine lake (ESM-1) at the modern tree-line in boreal, southern Siberia. Steppe and tundra biomes were extensive in eastern Sayan landscapes during the early Holocene. Boreal forest quickly expanded by 9.1 ka BP, and dominated the landscape until c 0.7 ka BP, when the greatest period of compositional turnover occurred. At this time, alpine meadow landscape expanded and Picea obovata colonised new habitats along river valleys and lake shorelines, because of prevailing cool, moist conditions. During the early Holocene, chironomid assemblages were dominated by cold stenotherms. Diatoms for much of the Holocene were dominated by alkaliphilous, fragilarioid taxa, up until 0.2 ka BP, when epiphytic species expanded, indicative of increased habitat availability. C/N mass ratios ranged between 9.5 and 13.5 (11.1-15.8 C/N atomic ratios), indicative of algal communities dominating organic matter contributions to bottom sediments with small, persistent contributions from vascular plants. However, δ13C values increased steadily from -34.9‰ during the early Holocene (9.3 ka BP) to -24.8‰ by 0.6 ka BP. This large shift in magnitude may be due to a number of factors, including increasing within-lake productivity, increasing disequilibrium between the isotopic balance of the lake with the atmosphere as the lake became isotopically ‘mature’, and declining soil respiration linked to small, but distinct retreat in forest biomes. The influence of climatic variables on landscape vegetation was assessed using redundancy analysis (RDA), a linear, direct ordination technique. Changes in July insolation at 60 °N significantly explained over one-fifth of the variation in species composition, while changes in estimates of northern hemisphere temperature and ice-rafted debris events in the North Atlantic

  14. Response of the boreal forest ecosystem to climatic change and its silvicultural implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kellomaeki, S.; Haenninen, H.; Karjalainen, T. [Joensuu Univ. (Finland). Faculty of Forestry] [and others

    1996-12-31

    During the next 100 years, the mean annual temperature is expected to be 1-6 deg C higher than at present. It is also expected to be accompanied by a lengthening of the thermal growing season and increased precipitation. Consequently, climatic change will increase the uncertainty of the management of forest ecosystems in the future. In this context, this research project aimed to outline the ecological and silvicultural implications of climatic change with regard to (1) how the expected climatic change might modify the functioning and structure of the boreal forest ecosystem, and (2) how the silvicultural management of the forest ecosystem should be modified in order to maintain sustainable forest yield under changing climatic conditions. The experimental component of the project concerned first the effect that elevating temperature and elevating concentration of atmospheric carbon have on the ontogenetic development of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L) and on the subsequent increase in frost damage during winter. The second part of the study looked the effect of elevating temperature and elevating concentration of atmospheric carbon on the growth of Scots pine through photosynthesis, respiration, transpiration, nutrient supply, and changes in crown structure. This experiment was utilised in several subprojects of the overall project

  15. Carbon exchange in Western Siberian watershed mires and implication for the greenhouse effect : A spatial temporal modeling approach

    OpenAIRE

    Borren, W.

    2007-01-01

    The vast watershed mires of Western Siberia formed a significant sink of carbon during the Holocene. Because of their large area these mires might play an important role in the carbon exchange between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. However, estimation of the Holocene and future carbon balance of whole Western Siberian mires is hampered by the lack of spatially resolved models. The main objective was to assess the carbon exchange fluxes of the mires using a 3-D dynamic approach. Th...

  16. Reconciling Harvest Intensity and Plant Diversity in Boreal Ecosystems: Does Intensification Influence Understory Plant Diversity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kershaw, H Maureen; Morris, Dave M; Fleming, Robert L; Luckai, Nancy J

    2015-11-01

    Overall demand for forest products in the boreal forest is increasing to supply growing bio-energy demands in addition to traditional forest products. As a result, there is a need to refine current forest policies to reconcile production and ecosystem function within the context of ecologically sustainable management. This study assessed understory plants' richness, evenness, and diversity in six harvested boreal black spruce-dominated stands situated on loam, sand, and peat site types 15 years after the application of four harvest treatments of increasing biomass removals. Treatments included uncut, stem-only harvest, full-tree harvest, and full-tree harvest + blading of O horizon. Following canopy removal, species richness and diversity (Shannon's and Simpson's indices) increased on all soil types. The more than doubling of slash loading on the stem-only treatment plots compared to the full-tree plots led to significantly lower species diversity on loam sites; however, the reverse was observed on peat sites where the slash provided warmer, drier microsites facilitating the establishment of a broader array of species. Preexisting ericaceous shrub and sphagnum components continued to dominate on the peat sites. Compositional shifts were most evident for the full-tree + bladed treatment on all soil types, with increases in herbaceous cover including ruderal species. The results suggest that the intensification of harvesting on plant diversity varies with soil type, and these differential results should be considered in the refinement of forest biomass-harvesting guidelines to ensure ecological sustainability and biodiversity conservation over a broad suite of soil types. PMID:26092048

  17. Seasonal and inter-annual variation in ecosystem scale methane emission from a boreal fen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinne, Janne; Li, Xuefei; Raivonen, Maarit; Peltola, Olli; Sallantaus, Tapani; Haapanala, Sami; Smolander, Sampo; Alekseychik, Pavel; Aurela, Mika; Korrensalo, Aino; Mammarella, Ivan; Tuittila, Eeva-Stiina; Vesala, Timo

    2016-04-01

    Northern wetlands are one of the major sources of atmospheric methane. We have measured ecosystem scale methane emissions from a boreal fen continuously since 2005. The site is an oligotrophic fen in boreal vegetation zone situated in Siikaneva wetland complex in Southern Finland. The mean annual temperature in the area is 3.3°C and total annual precipitation 710 mm. We have conducted the methane emission measurements by the eddy covariance method. Additionally we have measured fluxes of carbon dioxide, water vapor, and sensible heat together with a suite of other environmental parameters. We have analyzed this data alongside with a model run with University of Helsinki methane model. The measured fluxes show generally highest methane emission in late summers coinciding with the highest temperatures in saturated peat zone. During winters the fluxes show small but detectable emission despite the snow and ice cover on the fen. More than 90% of the annual methane emission occurs in snow-free period. The methane emission and peat temperature are connected in exponential manner in seasonal scales, but methane emission does not show the expected behavior with water table. The lack of water table position dependence also contrasts with the spatial variation across microtopography. There is no systematic variation in sub-diurnal time scale. The general seasonal cycle in methane emission is captured well with the methane model. We will show how well the model reproduces the temperature and water table position dependencies observed. The annual methane emission is typically around 10 gC m-2. This is a significant part of the total carbon exchange between the fen and the atmosphere and about twice the estimated carbon loss by leaching from the fen area. The inter-annual variability in the methane emission is modest. The June-September methane emissions from different years, comprising most of the annual emission, correlates positively with peat temperature, but not with

  18. Spatial variation in vegetation productivity trends, fire disturbance, and soil carbon across arctic-boreal permafrost ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loranty, Michael M.; Liberman-Cribbin, Wil; Berner, Logan T.; Natali, Susan M.; Goetz, Scott J.; Alexander, Heather D.; Kholodov, Alexander L.

    2016-09-01

    In arctic tundra and boreal forest ecosystems vegetation structural and functional influences on the surface energy balance can strongly influence permafrost soil temperatures. As such, vegetation changes will likely play an important role in permafrost soil carbon dynamics and associated climate feedbacks. Processes that lead to changes in vegetation, such as wildfire or ecosystem responses to rising temperatures, are of critical importance to understanding the impacts of arctic and boreal ecosystems on future climate. Yet these processes vary within and between ecosystems and this variability has not been systematically characterized across the arctic-boreal region. Here we quantify the distribution of vegetation productivity trends, wildfire, and near-surface soil carbon, by vegetation type, across the zones of continuous and discontinuous permafrost. Siberian larch forests contain more than one quarter of permafrost soil carbon in areas of continuous permafrost. We observe pervasive positive trends in vegetation productivity in areas of continuous permafrost, whereas areas underlain by discontinuous permafrost have proportionally less positive productivity trends and an increase in areas exhibiting negative productivity trends. Fire affects a much smaller proportion of the total area and thus a smaller amount of permafrost soil carbon, with the vast majority occurring in deciduous needleleaf forests. Our results indicate that vegetation productivity trends may be linked to permafrost distribution, fire affects a relatively small proportion of permafrost soil carbon, and Siberian larch forests will play a crucial role in the strength of the permafrost carbon climate feedback.

  19. A MESO-β SCALE SIMULATION OF THE EFFECTS OF BOREAL FOREST ECOSYSTEM ON THE LOWER ATMOSPHERE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王汉杰; Yi-Fan LI; Aloysius K.LO

    2001-01-01

    Based on the Intensive Field Campaign (IFC-I) data of Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study(BOREAS), a three-dimensional meso-β scale model is used to simulate the effect of boreal forests on the lower atmosphere. A fine horizontal resolution of 2 km × 2 km is used in order to distinguish the vegetative heterogeneity in the boreal region. A total of 20 × 25 grid points cover the entire sub modeling area in BOREAS' South Study Area (SSA). The ecosystem types and their coverage in each grid square are extracted from the North American Land Cover Characteristics Data Base(NALCCD) generated by the U.S. Geographical Survey (USGS) and the University of Nebraska Lincoln (UNL). The topography of the study area is taken from the Digital Elevation Map (DEM)of USGS. The model outputs include the components of the energy balance budget within the canopy and at the ground, the turbulence parameters in the atmospheric boundary layer and the wind,temperature and humidity profiles extending up to a height of 1500 m. In addition to the fine time nd spatial step, the unique feature of the present model is the incorporation of both dynamic and biological effects of the Boreal forest into the model parameterization scheme. The model results compare favorably with BOREAS' IFC-1 data in 1994 when the forest was in the luxuriant growing period.

  20. Natural disturbance impacts on ecosystem services and biodiversity in temperate and boreal forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thom, Dominik; Seidl, Rupert

    2016-08-01

    In many parts of the world forest disturbance regimes have intensified recently, and future climatic changes are expected to amplify this development further in the coming decades. These changes are increasingly challenging the main objectives of forest ecosystem management, which are to provide ecosystem services sustainably to society and maintain the biological diversity of forests. Yet a comprehensive understanding of how disturbances affect these primary goals of ecosystem management is still lacking. We conducted a global literature review on the impact of three of the most important disturbance agents (fire, wind, and bark beetles) on 13 different ecosystem services and three indicators of biodiversity in forests of the boreal, cool- and warm-temperate biomes. Our objectives were to (i) synthesize the effect of natural disturbances on a wide range of possible objectives of forest management, and (ii) investigate standardized effect sizes of disturbance for selected indicators via a quantitative meta-analysis. We screened a total of 1958 disturbance studies published between 1981 and 2013, and reviewed 478 in detail. We first investigated the overall effect of disturbances on individual ecosystem services and indicators of biodiversity by means of independence tests, and subsequently examined the effect size of disturbances on indicators of carbon storage and biodiversity by means of regression analysis. Additionally, we investigated the effect of commonly used approaches of disturbance management, i.e. salvage logging and prescribed burning. We found that disturbance impacts on ecosystem services are generally negative, an effect that was supported for all categories of ecosystem services, i.e. supporting, provisioning, regulating, and cultural services (P < 0.001). Indicators of biodiversity, i.e. species richness, habitat quality and diversity indices, on the other hand were found to be influenced positively by disturbance (P < 0.001). Our analyses thus

  1. The role of forest floor and trees to the ecosystem scale methane budget of boreal forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pihlatie, Mari; Halmeenmäki, Elisa; Peltola, Olli; Haikarainen, Iikka; Heinonsalo, Jussi; Santalahti, Minna; Putkinen, Anuliina; Fritze, Hannu; Urban, Otmar; Machacova, Katerina

    2016-04-01

    Boreal forests are considered as a sink of atmospheric methane (CH4) due to the activity of CH4 oxidizing bacteria (methanotrophs) in the soil. This soil CH4 sink is especially strong for upland forest soils, whereas forests growing on organic soils may act as small sources due to the domination of CH4 production by methanogens in the anaerobic parts of the soil. The role of trees to the ecosystem-scale CH4 fluxes has until recently been neglected due to the perception that trees do not contribute to the CH4 exchange, and also due to difficulties in measuring the CH4 exchange from trees. Findings of aerobic CH4 formation in plants and emissions from tree-stems in temperate and tropical forests during the past decade demonstrate that our understanding of CH4 cycling in forest ecosystems is not complete. Especially the role of forest canopies still remain unresolved, and very little is known of CH4 fluxes from trees in boreal region. We measured the CH4 exchange of tree-stems and tree-canopies from pine (Pinus sylvestris), spruce (Picea abies) and birch (Betula pubescens, Betula pendula) trees growing in Southern Finland (SMEAR II station) on varying soil conditions, from upland mineral soils to paludified soil. We compared the CH4 fluxes from trees to forest-floor CH4 exchange, both measured by static chambers, and to CH4 fluxes measured above the forest canopy by a flux gradient technique. We link the CH4 fluxes from trees and forest floor to physiological activity of the trees, such as transpiration, sap-flow, CO2 net ecosystem exchange (NEE), soil properties such as temperature and moisture, and to the presence of CH4 producing methanogens and CH4 oxidizing methanotrophs in trees or soil. The above canopy CH4 flux measurements show that the whole forest ecosystem was a small source of CH4 over extended periods in the spring and summer 2012, 2014 and 2015. Throughout the 2013-2014 measurements, the forest floor was in total a net sink of CH4, with variation

  2. Effects of climatic changes on carbon dioxide and water vapor fluxes in boreal forest ecosystems of European part of Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effects of possible climatic and vegetation changes on H2O and CO2 fluxes in boreal forest ecosystems of the central part of European Russia were quantified using modeling and experimental data. The future pattern of climatic conditions for the period up to 2100 was derived using the global climatic model ECHAM5 (Roeckner et al 2003 The Atmospheric General Circulation Model ECHAM 5. PART I: Model Description, Report 349 (Hamburg: Max-Planck Institute for Meteorology) p 127) with the A1B emission scenario. The possible trends of future vegetation changes were obtained by reconstructions of vegetation cover and paleoclimatic conditions in the Late Pleistocene and Holocene, as provided from pollen and plant macrofossil analysis of profiles in the Central Forest State Natural Biosphere Reserve (CFSNBR). Applying the method of paleoanalogues demonstrates that increasing the mean annual temperature, even by 1-2 deg. C, could result in reducing the proportion of spruce in boreal forest stands by up to 40%. Modeling experiments, carried out using a process-based Mixfor-SVAT model, show that the expected future climatic and vegetation changes lead to a significant increase of net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and gross primary productivity (GPP) of the boreal forests. Despite the expected warming and moistening of the climate, the modeling experiments indicate a relatively weak increase of annual evapotranspiration (ET) and even a reduction of transpiration (TR) rates of forest ecosystems compared to present conditions.

  3. Changing Arctic ecosystems--the role of ecosystem changes across the Boreal-Arctic transition zone on the distribution and abundance of wildlife populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNew, Lance; Handel, Colleen; Pearce, John; DeGange, Anthony R.; Holland-Bartels, Leslie; Whalen, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Arctic and boreal ecosystems provide important breeding habitat for more than half of North America’s migratory birds as well as many resident species. Northern landscapes are projected to experience more pronounced climate-related changes in habitat than most other regions. These changes include increases in shrub growth, conversion of tundra to forest, alteration of wetlands, shifts in species’ composition, and changes in the frequency and scale of fires and insect outbreaks. Changing habitat conditions, in turn, may have significant effects on the distribution and abundance of wildlife in these critical northern ecosystems. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting studies in the Boreal–Arctic transition zone of Alaska, an environment of accelerated change in this sensitive margin between Arctic tundra and boreal forest.

  4. Biological diversity and boreal forest ecosystem stability : an investigation of the predictions of the diversity-stability hypothesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cobb, T.; James, P. [Regina Univ., Regina, SK (Canada)

    1999-05-01

    The controversy regarding the role of biological diversity in the stabilization of ecosystems was reviewed. The presentation examined the correctness of the current theory that greater diversity leads to greater ecosystem stability. The relationship was tested by quantifying the resistance and resilience of the boreal forest beetle community assemblages found in two different habitat types (jack pine and mixed-wood). Both habitat types were subjected to large scale disturbances, including fire, clear-cutting, and post-fire harvesting. The study showed that the relative abundances of beetle community assemblages found in jack pines were much more resistant to all disturbances tested than those found in mixed-wood.

  5. How have past fire disturbances contributed to the current carbon balance of boreal ecosystems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, C.; Ciais, P.; Zhu, D.; Wang, T.; Peng, S. S.; Piao, S. L.

    2016-02-01

    Boreal fires have immediate effects on regional carbon budgets by emitting CO2 into the atmosphere at the time of burning, but they also have legacy effects by initiating a long-term carbon sink during post-fire vegetation recovery. Quantifying these different effects on the current-day pan-boreal (44-84° N) carbon balance and quantifying relative contributions of legacy sinks by past fires is important for understanding and predicting the carbon dynamics in this region. Here we used the global dynamic vegetation model ORCHIDEE-SPITFIRE (Organising Carbon and Hydrology In Dynamic Ecosystems - SPread and InTensity of FIRE) to attribute the contributions by fires in different decades between 1850 and 2009 to the carbon balance of 2000-2009, taking into account the atmospheric CO2 change and climate change since 1850. The fire module of ORCHIDEE-SPITFIRE was turned off for each decade in turn and was also turned off before and after the decade in question in order to model the legacy carbon trajectory by fires in each past decade. We found that, unsurprisingly, fires that occurred in 2000-2009 are a carbon source (-0.17 Pg C yr-1) for the carbon balance of 2000-2009, whereas fires in all decades before 2000 contribute carbon sinks with a collective contribution of 0.23 Pg C yr-1. This leaves a net fire sink effect of 0.06 Pg C yr-1, or 6.3 % of the simulated regional carbon sink (0.95 Pg C yr-1). Further, fires with an age of 10-40 years (i.e., those that occurred during 1960-1999) contribute more than half of the total sink effect of fires. The small net sink effect of fires indicates that current-day fire emissions are roughly balanced out by legacy sinks. The future role of fires in the regional carbon balance remains uncertain and will depend on whether changes in fires and associated carbon emissions will exceed the enhanced sink effects of previous fires, both being strongly affected by global change.

  6. Importance of the forest canopy to fluxes of methyl mercury and total mercury to boreal ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Louis, V L; Rudd, J W; Kelly, C A; Hall, B D; Rolfhus, K R; Scott, K J; Lindberg, S E; Dong, W

    2001-08-01

    The forest canopy was an important contributor to fluxes of methyl mercury (MeHg) and total mercury (THg) to the forest floor of boreal uplands and wetlands and potentially to downstream lakes, at the Experimental Lakes Area (ELA), northwestern Ontario. The estimated fluxes of MeHg and THg in throughfall plus litterfall below the forest canopy were 2 and 3 times greater than annual fluxes by direct wet deposition of MeHg (0.9 mg of MeHg ha(-1)) and THg (71 mg of THg ha(-1)). Almost all of the increased flux of MeHg and THg under the forest canopy occurred as litterfall (0.14-1.3 mg of MeHg ha(-1) yr(-1) and 110-220 mg of THg ha(-1) yr(-1)). Throughfall added no MeHg and approximately 9 mg of THg ha(-1) yr(-1) to wet deposition at ELA, unlike in other regions of the world where atmospheric deposition was more heavily contaminated. These data suggest that dry deposition of Hg on foliage as an aerosol or reactive gaseous Hg (RGM) species is low at ELA, a finding supported by preliminary measurements of RGM there. Annual total deposition from throughfall and litterfall under a fire-regenerated 19-yr-old jack pine/birch forest was 1.7 mg of MeHg ha(-1) and 200 mg of THg ha(-1). We found that average annual accumulation of MeHg and THg in the surficial litter/fungal layer of soils since the last forest fire varied between 0.6 and 1.6 mg of MeHg ha(-1) and between 130 and 590 mg of THg ha(-1) among sites differing in drainage and soil moisture. When soil Hg accumulation sites were matched with similar sites where litterfall and throughfall were collected, measured fluxes of THg to the forest floor (sources) were similar to our estimates of longterm soil accumulation rates (sinks), suggesting that the Hg in litterfall and throughfall is a new and not a recycled input of Hg to forested ecosystems. However, further research is required to determine the proportion of Hg in litterfall that is being biogeochemically recycled within forest and wetland ecosystems and, thus, does

  7. Influence of different tree-harvesting intensities on forest soil carbon stocks in boreal and northern temperate forest ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clarke, Nicholas; Gundersen, Per; Jönsson-Belyazid, Ulrika;

    2015-01-01

    Effective forest governance measures are crucial to ensure sustainable management of forests, but so far there has been little specific focus in boreal and northern temperate forests on governance measures in relation to management effects, including harvesting effects, on soil organic carbon (SOC......) stocks. This paper reviews the findings in the scientific literature concerning the effects of harvesting of different intensities on SOC stocks and fluxes in boreal and northern temperate forest ecosystems to evaluate the evidence for significant SOC losses following biomass removal. An overview...... of existing governance measures related to SOC is given, followed by a discussion on how scientific findings could be incorporated in guidelines and other governance measures. The currently available information does not support firm conclusions about the long-term impact of intensified forest harvesting...

  8. Decadal and long-term boreal soil carbon and nitrogen sequestration rates across a variety of ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manies, Kristen L.; Harden, Jennifer W.; Fuller, Christopher C.; Turetsky, Merritt R.

    2016-08-01

    Boreal soils play a critical role in the global carbon (C) cycle; therefore, it is important to understand the mechanisms that control soil C accumulation and loss for this region. Examining C & nitrogen (N) accumulation rates over decades to centuries may provide additional understanding of the dominant mechanisms for their storage, which can be masked by seasonal and interannual variability when investigated over the short term. We examined longer-term accumulation rates, using 210Pb and 14C to date soil layers, for a wide variety of boreal ecosystems: a black spruce forest, a shrub ecosystem, a tussock grass ecosystem, a sedge-dominated ecosystem, and a rich fen. All ecosystems had similar decadal C accumulation rates, averaging 84 ± 42 gC m-2 yr-1. Long-term (century) C accumulation rates were slower than decadal rates, averaging 14 ± 5 gC m-2 yr-1 for all ecosystems except the rich fen, for which the long-term C accumulation rates was more similar to decadal rates (44 ± 5 and 76 ± 9 gC m-2 yr-1, respectively). The rich fen also had the highest long-term N accumulation rates (2.7 gN m-2 yr-1). The lowest N accumulation rate, on both a decadal and long-term basis, was found in the black spruce forest (0.2 and 1.4 gN m-2 yr-1, respectively). Our results suggest that the controls on long-term C and N cycling at the rich fen is fundamentally different from the other ecosystems, likely due to differences in the predominant drivers of nutrient cycling (oxygen availability, for C) and reduced amounts of disturbance by fire (for C and N). This result implies that most shifts in ecosystem vegetation across the boreal region, driven by either climate or succession, will not significantly impact regional C or N dynamics over years to decades. However, ecosystem transitions to or from a rich fen will promote significant shifts in soil C and N storage.

  9. Decadal and long-term boreal soil carbon and nitrogen sequestration rates across a variety of ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manies, Kristen L.; Harden, Jennifer W.; Fuller, Christopher C.; Turetsky, Merritt

    2016-01-01

    Boreal soils play a critical role in the global carbon (C) cycle; therefore, it is important to understand the mechanisms that control soil C accumulation and loss for this region. Examining C & nitrogen (N) accumulation rates over decades to centuries may provide additional understanding of the dominant mechanisms for their storage, which can be masked by seasonal and interannual variability when investigated over the short term. We examined longer-term accumulation rates, using 210Pb and 14C to date soil layers, for a wide variety of boreal ecosystems: a black spruce forest, a shrub ecosystem, a tussock grass ecosystem, a sedge-dominated ecosystem, and a rich fen. All ecosystems had similar decadal C accumulation rates, averaging 84 ± 42 gC m−2 yr−1. Long-term (century) C accumulation rates were slower than decadal rates, averaging 14 ± 5 gC m−2 yr−1 for all ecosystems except the rich fen, for which the long-term C accumulation rates was more similar to decadal rates (44 ± 5 and 76 ± 9 gC m−2 yr−1, respectively). The rich fen also had the highest long-term N accumulation rates (2.7 gN m−2 yr−1). The lowest N accumulation rate, on both a decadal and long-term basis, was found in the black spruce forest (0.2 and 1.4 gN m−2 yr−1, respectively). Our results suggest that the controls on long-term C and N cycling at the rich fen is fundamentally different from the other ecosystems, likely due to differences in the predominant drivers of nutrient cycling (oxygen availability, for C) and reduced amounts of disturbance by fire (for C and N). This result implies that most shifts in ecosystem vegetation across the boreal region, driven by either climate or succession, will not significantly impact regional C or N dynamics over years to decades. However, ecosystem transitions to or from a rich fen will promote significant shifts in soil C and N storage.

  10. Modelling soil temperature and moisture and corresponding seasonality of photosynthesis and transpiration in a boreal spruce ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. H. Wu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Recovery of photosynthesis and transpiration is strongly restricted by low temperatures in air and/or soil during the transition period from winter to spring in boreal zones. The extent to which air temperature (Ta and soil temperature (Ts influence the seasonality of photosynthesis and transpiration of a boreal spruce ecosystem was investigated using a process-based ecosystem model (CoupModel together with eddy covariance (EC data from one eddy flux tower and nearby soil measurements at Knottåsen, Sweden. A Monte Carlo-based uncertainty method (GLUE provided prior and posterior distributions of simulations representing a wide range of soil conditions and performance indicators. The simulated results showed sufficient flexibility to predict the measured cold and warm Ts in the moist and dry plots around the eddy flux tower. Moreover, the model presented a general ability to describe both biotic and abiotic processes for the Norway spruce stand. The dynamics of sensible heat fluxes were well described by the corresponding latent heat fluxes and net ecosystem exchange of CO2. The parameter ranges obtained are probably valid to represent regional characteristics of boreal conifer forests, but were not easy to constrain to a smaller range than that produced by the assumed prior distributions. Finally, neglecting the soil temperature response function resulted in fewer behavioural models and probably more compensatory errors in other response functions for regulating the seasonality of ecosystem fluxes.

  11. Modelling soil temperature and moisture and corresponding seasonality of photosynthesis and transpiration in a boreal spruce ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. H. Wu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Recovery of photosynthesis and transpiration is strongly restricted by low temperatures in air and/or soil during the transition period from winter to spring in boreal zones. The extent to which air temperature (Ta and soil temperature (Ts influence the seasonality of photosynthesis and transpiration of a boreal spruce ecosystem was investigated using a process-based ecosystem model (CoupModel together with eddy covariance (EC data from one eddy flux tower and nearby soil measurements at Knottåsen, Sweden. A Monte Carlo based uncertainty method (GLUE provided prior and posterior distributions of simulations representing a wide range of soil conditions and performance indicators. The simulated results showed sufficient flexibility to predict the measured cold and warm Ts in the moist and dry plots around the eddy flux tower. Moreover, the model presented a general ability to describe both biotic and abiotic processes for the Norway spruce stand. The dynamics of sensible heat fluxes were well described the corresponding latent heat fluxes and net ecosystem exchange of CO2. The parameter ranges obtained are probably valid to represent regional characteristics of boreal conifer forests, but were not easy to constrain to a smaller range than that produced by the assumed prior distributions. Finally, neglecting the soil temperature response function resulted in fewer behavioural models and probably more compensatory errors in other response functions for regulating the seasonality of ecosystem fluxes.

  12. Ecosystem services of boreal forests - Carbon budget mapping at high resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akujärvi, Anu; Lehtonen, Aleksi; Liski, Jari

    2016-10-01

    The carbon (C) cycle of forests produces ecosystem services (ES) such as climate regulation and timber production. Mapping these ES using simple land cover -based proxies might add remarkable inaccuracy to the estimates. A framework to map the current status of the C budget of boreal forested landscapes was developed. The C stocks of biomass and soil and the annual change in these stocks were quantified in a 20 × 20 m resolution at the regional level on mineral soils in southern Finland. The fine-scale variation of the estimates was analyzed geo-statistically. The reliability of the estimates was evaluated by comparing them to measurements from the national multi-source forest inventory. The C stocks of forests increased slightly from the south coast to inland whereas the changes in these stocks were more uniform. The spatial patches of C stocks were larger than those of C stock changes. The patch size of the C stocks reflected the spatial variation in the environmental conditions, and that of the C stock changes the typical area of forest management compartments. The simulated estimates agreed well with the measurements indicating a good mapping framework performance. The mapping framework is the basis for evaluating the effects of forest management alternatives on C budget at high resolution across large spatial scales. It will be coupled with the assessment of other ES and biodiversity to study their relationships. The framework integrated a wide suite of simulation models and extensive inventory data. It provided reliable estimates of the human influence on C cycle in forested landscapes. PMID:27420172

  13. Vapor pressure deficit controls on fire ignition and fire spread in boreal forest ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Sedano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Climate-driven changes in the fire regime within boreal forest ecosystems are likely to have important effects on carbon cycling and species composition. In the context of improving fire management options and developing more realistic scenarios of future change, it is important to understand how meteorology regulates different fire processes, including ignition, daily fire spread rates, and cumulative annual burned area. Here we combined MODIS active fires (MCD14ML, MODIS imagery (MOD13A1 and ancillary historic fire perimeter information to produce a dataset of daily fire spread maps of Alaska for the period 2002–2011. This approach provided a spatial and temporally continuous representation of fire progression and a precise identification of ignition and extinction locations and dates for each wildfire. The fire-spread maps were analyzed together with daily vapor pressure deficit (VPD observations from the North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR and lightning strikes from the Alaska Lightning Detection Network (ALDN. We found a significant relationship between daily VPD and probability that a lightning strike would develop into a fire ignition. In the first 5 days after ignition, above average VPD increased the probability that fires would grow to large or very large sizes. Strong relationships also were identified between VPD and burned area at several levels of temporal and spatial aggregation. As a consequence of regional coherence in meteorology, ignition, daily fire spread rates, and fire extinction events were often synchronized across different fires in interior Alaska. At a regional scale, the sum of positive VPD anomalies during the fire season was positively correlated with annual burned area during the NARR era (1979–2011; R2 = 0.45. Some of the largest fires we mapped had slow initial growth, indicating opportunities may exist for suppression efforts to adaptively manage these forests for climate change. The results of our

  14. Inclusion of Additional Plant Species and Trait Information in Dynamic Vegetation Modeling of Arctic Tundra and Boreal Forest Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euskirchen, E. S.; Patil, V.; Roach, J.; Griffith, B.; McGuire, A. D.

    2015-12-01

    Dynamic vegetation models (DVMs) have been developed to model the ecophysiological characteristics of plant functional types in terrestrial ecosystems. They have frequently been used to answer questions pertaining to processes such as disturbance, plant succession, and community composition under historical and future climate scenarios. While DVMs have proved useful in these types of applications, it has often been questioned if additional detail, such as including plant dynamics at the species-level and/or including species-specific traits would make these models more accurate and/or broadly applicable. A sub-question associated with this issue is, 'How many species, or what degree of functional diversity, should we incorporate to sustain ecosystem function in modeled ecosystems?' Here, we focus on how the inclusion of additional plant species and trait information may strengthen dynamic vegetation modeling in applications pertaining to: (1) forage for caribou in northern Alaska, (2) above- and belowground carbon storage in the boreal forest and lake margin wetlands of interior Alaska, and (3) arctic tundra and boreal forest leaf phenology. While the inclusion of additional information generally proved valuable in these three applications, this additional detail depends on field data that may not always be available and may also result in increased computational complexity. Therefore, it is important to assess these possible limitations against the perceived need for additional plant species and trait information in the development and application of dynamic vegetation models.

  15. Mobility of radiocaesium in boreal forest ecosystems: Influence of precipitation chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinnes, E. [Department of Chemistry, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (Norway); Gjelsvik, R.; Skuterud, L.; Thoerring, H. [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (Norway)

    2014-07-01

    Mobility and plant uptake of Cs in soils is generally limited by the presence of clay minerals in the soil. However, cations supplied by precipitation may substantially influence the mobility of radiocaesium in natural surface soil and subsequent transfer to food chains. The chemical composition of precipitation shows substantial variation among different areas in Norway for two main reasons. At sites close to the coast the atmospheric supply of marine cations and anions is many-fold greater than in regions shielded from marine influence by mountains. The southernmost part of the country has been, and still is, substantially affected by soil acidification due to long-range atmospheric transport of acidifying substances from areas elsewhere in Europe. This may explain a much higher greater uptake of {sup 137}Cs from the Chernobyl accident in moose in this region than elsewhere (Steinnes et al., 2009), in spite of the fact that some areas farther north received substantially greater fallout. Similarly a much greater transfer of {sup 137}Cs to natural birch forest vegetation is evident from the more acidified soils in the south than in comparable ecosystems elsewhere in the country (Thoerring et al., 2012). Repeated recordings of activity levels in natural surface soils showed faster leaching of Chernobyl {sup 137}Cs relative to inland areas not only in the south but also in coastal areas farther north (Gjelsvik and Steinnes, 2013), indicating that the amounts of marine cations in precipitation also has an appreciable effect on the Cs leaching. The geographical leaching differences still became less prominent with time. Recent lysimeter experiments with undisturbed soil columns obtained from an area receiving high radiocaesium deposition from the Chernobyl accident, applying precipitation with ionic composition characteristic of the different regions mentioned above, did not change the current depth distribution of {sup 137}Cs. However, acidic precipitation increased

  16. Responses of non-methane biogenic volatile organic compound emissions to climate change in boreal and subarctic ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faubert, P.

    2010-07-01

    Non-methane biogenic volatile organic compound emissions (BVOCs) have important roles in the global atmospheric chemistry but their feedbacks to climate change are still unknown. This thesis reports one of the first estimates of BVOC emissions from boreal and subarctic ecosystems. Most importantly, this thesis assesses the BVOC emission responses to four effects of climate change in these ecosystems: (1) the direct effect of warming, and its indirect effects via (2) water table drawdown, (3) change in the vegetation composition, and (4) enhanced UV-B radiation. BVOC emissions were measured using a conventional chamber method in which the compounds were collected on adsorbent and later analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. On a subarctic heath, warming by only 1.9-2.5 degC doubled the monoterpene and sesquiterpene emissions. Such a high increase of BVOC emissions under a conservative warming cannot be predicted by the current models, which underlines the importance of a focus on BVOC emissions from the Subarctic under climate change. On a subarctic peatland, enhanced UV-B did not affect the BVOC emissions but the water table level exerted the major effect. The water table drawdown experimentally applied on boreal peatland microcosms decreased the emissions of monoterpenes and other VOCs (BVOCs with a lifetime>1 d) for the hollows (wet microsites) and that of all BVOC groups for the lawns (moderately wet microsites). The warming treatment applied on the lawn microcosms decreased the isoprene emission. The removal of vascular plants in the hummock (dry microsites) microcosms decreased the emissions of monoterpenes while the emissions between the microcosms covered with Sphagnum moss and bare peat were not different. In conclusion, the results presented in this thesis indicate that climate change has complex effects on the BVOC emissions. These results make a significant contribution to improving the modeling of BVOC emissions for a better understanding of

  17. Permafrost dynamics structure species compositions of oribatid mite (Acari: Oribatida) communities in sub-Arctic palsa mires

    OpenAIRE

    Markkula, Inkeri

    2014-01-01

    Palsa mires are sub-Arctic peatland complexes, vulnerable ecosystems with patches of permafrost. Permafrost thawing in palsa mires occurs throughout Fennoscandia, probably due to local climatic warming. In palsa mires, permafrost thaw alters hydrological conditions, vegetation structure and microhabitat composition with unknown consequences for invertebrate fauna. This study's objectives were to examine the role of microhabitat heterogeneity and the effects of permafrost dynamics and thaw on ...

  18. Small Boreal Lake Ecosystem Evolution under the Influence of Natural and Anthropogenic Factors: Results of Multidisciplinary Long-Term Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liudmila Shirokova

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Small aquatic ecosystems of the boreal zone are known to be most sensitive indicators of on-going environmental change as well as local anthropogenic pressure, while being highly vulnerable to external impacts. Compared to rather detailed knowledge of the evolution of large and small lakes in Scandinavia and Canada, and large lakes in Eurasia, highly abundant small boreal lakes of northwest Russia have received very little attention, although they may become important centers of attraction of growing rural population in the near future. Here we present the results of a multidisciplinary, multi-annual study of a small boreal humic lake of NW Russia. A shallow (3 m and a deep (16 m site of this lake were regularly sampled for a range of chemical and biological parameters. Average multi-daily, summer-time values of the epilimnion (upper oxygenated layer of the lake provided indications of possible trends in temperature, nutrients, and bacterio-plankton concentration that revealed the local pollution impact in the shallow zone and overall environmental trend in the deep sampling point of the lake. Organic phosphorus, nitrate, and lead were found to be most efficient tracers of local anthropogenic pollution, especially visible in the surface layer of the shallow site of the lake. Cycling of trace elements between the epilimnion and hypolimnion is tightly linked to dissolved organic matter speciation and size fractionation due to the dominance of organic and organo-ferric colloids. The capacity of lake self-purification depends on the ratio of primary productivity to mineralization of organic matter. This ratio remained >1 both during winter and summer periods, which suggests a high potential of lake recovery from the input of allochthonous dissolved organic matter and local anthropogenic pollution.

  19. Recent Tree-growth Responses to Warming Vary by Geographic Region and Ecosystem Type within the Boreal Forest-tundra Transition Zone in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherriff, R.; Miller, A. E.

    2015-12-01

    A critical concern for boreal ecosystems centers on broad-scale responses to warming; i.e., where warming will lead to declining growth and mortality, or enhanced growth and greater productivity. However, few studies have synthesized tree growth along biogeographic gradients in an attempt to address this issue. We sought to develop a broader understanding of how trees have responded to recent warming for a dominant conifer species from the southern boreal to the western forest margin, an area expected to show signs of an early-stage boreal biome shift. A new 30-site network of ring-width chronologies (1216 trees >4cm dbh) were evaluated for growth differences in Picea glauca across low-elevation, closed forests, open woodlands, and altitudinal treeline from southern interior boreal forest to the western forest-tundra margin. Regional temperature records were used to evaluate 1) whether tree growth near western treeline, which experiences cooler summers but warmer winters than in the interior, showed greater sensitivity to temperature than interior sites, 2) if the temperature-growth response varied through time, across ecosystem types, and by tree age, and 3) if there was a temperature-growth threshold. Positive growth trends since the 1980s in many open stands were consistent with the predicted expansion of western and altitudinal treeline. However, years with temperatures >13oC corresponded with a growth plateau or decline at all but the altitudinal treeline sites regardless of geographic location. Closed-canopy stands showed growth declines, high spruce beetle activity, and less resiliency to further warming. Warming leads to markedly different responses according to ecosystem type and biogeographical setting at the boreal forest-tundra margin. Low-elevation forests are less resilient to further warming where temperatures have already reached threshold levels and further spruce beetle outbreaks occur, even at the western margin of boreal forest.

  20. Carbon exchange in Western Siberian watershed mires and implication for the greenhouse effect : A spatial temporal modeling approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borren, W.

    2007-01-01

    The vast watershed mires of Western Siberia formed a significant sink of carbon during the Holocene. Because of their large area these mires might play an important role in the carbon exchange between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. However, estimation of the Holocene and future carbon ba

  1. Implications of floristic and environmental variation for carbon cycle dynamics in boreal forest ecosystems of central Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Zicheng; Apps, M.J.; Bhatti, J.S. [Canadan Forest Service, Edmonton (Canada). Northern Forestry Centre

    2002-06-01

    Species composition, detritus, and soil data from 97 boreal forest stands along a transect in central Canada were analysed using Correspondence Analysis to determine the dominant environmental/site variables that differentiate these forest stands. Picea mariana stands were densely clustered together on the understorey DCA plot, suggesting a consistent understorey species composition (feather mosses and Ericaceae), whereas Populus tremuloides stands had the most diverse understorey species composition (ca. 30 species, mostly shrubs and herbs). Pinus banksiana stands had several characteristic species of reindeer lichens (Cladina spp.), but saplings and Pinus seedlings were rare. Although climatic variables showed large variation along the transect, the CCA results indicated that site conditions are more important in determining species composition and differentiating the stand types. Forest floor characteristics (litter and humus layer, woody debris, and drainage) appear to be among the most important site variables. Stands of Picea had significantly higher average carbon (C) densities in the combined litter and humus layer (43,530 kg-C/ha) than either Populus (25,500 kg-C/ha) or Pinus (19,400 kg-C/ha). The thick surface organic layer in lowland Picea stands plays an important role in regulating soil temperature and moisture, and organic-matter decomposition, which in turn affect the ecosystem C-dynamics. During forest succession after a stand-replacing disturbance (e.g. fires), tree biomass and surface organic layer thickness increase in all stand types as forests recover; however, woody biomass detritus first decreases and then increases after ca. 80 yr. Soil C densities show slight decrease with ages in Populus stands, but increase in other stand types. These results indicate the complex C-transfer processes among different components (tree biomass, detritus, forest floor, and soil) of boreal ecosystems at various stages of succession.

  2. Extent and status of mires, peatlands, and organic soils in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanneberger, Franziska; Barthelmes, Alexandra; Tegetmeyer, Cosima; Busse, Stephan; Joosten, Hans

    2016-04-01

    Key words: peatland distribution, peatland drainage, GIS, Global Peatland Database, European Mires Book The relevance of drained peatlands to climate change due to emission of huge amounts of greenhouse gases has recently been recognised e.g. by IPCC, FAO, and the European Union. Oppositely, natural and restored peatlands provide ecosystem services like enhancing biodiversity, nutrient retention, groundwater storage, flood mitigation, and cooling. To evaluate the drainage status of peatlands and organic soils and to develop specific restoration strategies comprehensive and exact geospatial data are needed. The Global Peatland Database (GPD) is hosted at Greifswald Mire Centre (http://tiny.cc/globalpeat). Currently, it provides estimates on location, extent, and drainage status of peatlands and organic soils for 268 countries and regions of the world. Due to the large diversity of definitions and terms for peatlands and organic soils, this mapping follows the broad definition of organic soils from IPCC that gives a minimum soil organic carbon threshold of 12% and considers any depth of the organic layer larger than 10 cm. GIS datasets are continuously collected, specific terms and definitions analysed and the completeness and accuracy of the datasets evaluated. Currently, the GPD contains geospatial data on peatlands and organic soils for all European countries (except Moldova). Recent information on status, distribution, and conservation of mires and peatlands in Europe is summarised in the European Mires Book. It includes descriptions from 49 countries and other geographic entities in Europe. All country chapters follow a generic structure and include also extensive descriptions of national terminology (also in national languages and script) and typologies as well as up to date area statistics and maps. They are complemented by integrative chapters presenting mire classification, mire regionality, peatland use, and mire conservation in Europe. The European Mires

  3. The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS): An Overview and Early Results from the 1994 Field Year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellers, Piers; Hall, Forrest; Ranson, K. Jon; Margolis, Hank; Kelly, Bob; Baldocchi, Dennis; den Hartog, Gerry; Cihlar, Josef; Ryan, Michael G.; Goodison, Barry; Crill, Patrick; Lettenmaier, Dennis; Wickland, Diane E.

    1995-09-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) is large-scale international field experiment that has the goal of improving our understanding of the exchanges of radiative energy, heat water, CO2, and trace gases between the boreal forest and the lower atmosphere. An important objective of BORES is collect the data needed to improve computer simulation models of the processes controlling these exchanges so that scientists can anticipate the effects of global change.From August 1993 through September 1994, a continuous set of monitoring measurements-meteorology, hydrology, and satellite remote sensing-were gathered over the 1000 × 1000 km BOREAS study region that covers most of Saskatchewan and Manitoba, Canada. This monitoring program was punctuated by six campaigns that saw the deployment of some 300 scientists and aircrew into the field, supported by 11 research aircraft. The participants were drawn primarily from U.S. and Canadian agencies and universities, although there were also important contributions from France, the United Kingdom, and Russia. The field campaigns lasted for a total of 123 days and saw the compilation of a comprehensive surface-atmosphere flux dataset supported by ecological, trace gas, hydrological, and dataset sensing science observations. The surface-atmosphere fluxes of sensible heat, latent heat, CO2, and momentum were measured using eddy correlation equipment mounted on a surface network of 10 towers complemented by four flux-measurement aircraft. All in all, over 350 airborne missions (remote sensing and eddy correlation) were flown during the 1994 field year.Preliminary analyses of the data indicate that the area-averaged photosynthetic capacity of the boreal forest is much less than that of the temperate forests to the south. This is reflected in very low photosynthetic and carbon drawdown rates, which in turn are associated with low transpiration rates (less than 2 mm day1 over the growing season for the coniferous species in the

  4. Ecosystem types of boreal forest in the North Klondike River Valley, Yukon Territory, Canada, and their productivity potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, S

    1996-01-01

    Vegetation, environmental characteristics, and forest productivity were studied in the boreal forest in the North Klondike River Valley, Yukon Territory, Canada. The concept and approach of biogeoclimatic ecosystem classification were followed. For the treed vegetation, five ecosystem types were distinguished based on vegetation structure and physical and chemical properties of soils. They were: 1) spruce-lichen type, 2) spruce-moss type, 3) spruce-Equisetum type, 4) spruce-willow type, and 5) bog forest type. These types were differentiated mainly by moisture regime and base status of soils. The sequence of the ecosystem types reflected their topographical position from slope summit to valley bottom. The spruce-lichen type developed in the driest and nutritionally impoverished habitats, the spruce-Equisetum type occurred in moist and nutritionally enriched sites, and the spruce-moss type was found in between them. The bog forest type occurred where peat had accumulated sufficiently to generate ombrotrophic conditions in habitats of high water table underlain with permafrost. The spruce-willow type developed along small creeks where substrates were very coarse. Tree growth characteristics were measured, except for the bog forest type that did not have trees over 5 m tall. Total volume of standing trees ranged from 29 to 582 m(3)/ha, with an overall mean of 216.9 m(3)/ha. The spruce-Equisetum type exhibited the highest figure, 413.5 m(3)/ha, while spruce-lichen type the lowest one, 87.7 m(3)/ha. Mean annual increment ranged from 0.15 to 2.66 m(3)/ha, with an overall mean of 1.10 m(3)/ha. A similar tendency was noted for all other forestry characteristics, i.e., the spruce-Equisetum type showed the highest productivity while the spruce-lichen type the lowest. This tendency was considered to be attributed to the availability of moisture and basic cations in soils. PMID:24198010

  5. Modelling carbon and water flows in terrestrial ecosystems in the boreal zone - examples from Oskarshamn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlberg, Louise [Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI), Stockholm (Sweden); Gu stafsson, David; Jansson, Per-Erik [Royal Inst. of Technology, Dept. of Land and Water Resources Engineering, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2007-12-15

    Carbon budgets and mean residence times were estimated in four hypothetical ecosystems. The greatest uncertainties in the estimations lie in the calculation of fluxes to and from the field layer. A parametrisation method based on multiple criteria, synthesising a wide range of empirical knowledge on ecosystem behaviour, proved to be useful both in the estimation of unknown parameters, to demonstrate model sensitivity, and to identify processes where our current knowledge is limited. The parameterizations derived from the study of the hypothetical systems were used to estimate site-specific carbon and water budgets for four ecosystems located within the Oskarshamn study-area. Measured soil respiration was used to calibrate the simulations. An analysis of the simulated carbon fluxes indicated that two of the ecosystems, namely the grassland and the spruce forest, were net sources of carbon dioxide, while the alder and the pine forest were net sinks of CO{sub 2}. In the former case, this was interpreted as a result of recent drainage of the organogenic soils and the concurrent increase in decomposition. The results from the study conformed rather well with results from a previous study on carbon budgets from the Oskarshamn study area.

  6. Carbon dioxide emissions and nutrition on a drained pine mire - a case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartman, M.; Karsisto, M.; Kaunisto, S. [Finnish Forest Research Inst., Vantaa (Finland). Vantaa Research Centre

    1996-12-31

    Drainage of boreal peatlands intensify aerobic decomposition and carbon dioxide emission from the peat substrate and increase tree growth. CO{sub 2} emission rates depend on the ground water level and the soil temperature. Predicted rises in mean air temperatures due to anthropogenically induced climate change are expected to further increase carbon dioxide emission from drained boreal peatlands. The role of added nutrients is somewhat vague. The purpose of this presentation is to give some preliminary results on microbial biomass carbon and on carbon dioxide output/input relationship on a pine mire. (6 refs.)

  7. Monitoring of the stability of boreal forest ecosystem in northeast China in relation to natural disturbance in Landsat TM imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qi-Jing; Kondoh, Akihiko; Tateishi, Ryutaro; Takamura, Tamio; Takeuchi, Nobuo

    2001-02-01

    Changbai mountain is a very important natural reserve in China as well as in the world, because it possesses a high bio-diversity, and is a typical ecosystem representing boreal vegetation. Few studies on the dynamic-equilibrium of forest in relation with natural disturbance have been reported. In this study, the change of forest vegetation in the reserve was detected by using Landsat TM images. Image differencing between 1984 and 1997 was adopted to derive new images that indicate cover type change. The natural forest in the reserve was in a status of relative equilibrium. The number of pixels with decrease in radiance was nearly the same as those with increase in radiance. It is demonstrated that the so-called climax is not a pure stand which is generally assumed to be exclusively dominated by climax species, but a complex of mosaic structure that consisted of patches in different stages of succession. This climax structure was maintained by natural disturbance like fall. The pioneer patches are permanent units in the forest community. Gaps are frequently created, and thus the pioneer patches are kept constantly. As a whole, TM imagery is effective for detecting vegetation changes, but tiny gaps with several pixels are difficult to discriminate from noise. The change inside the natural reserve was minor, while the vegetation outside the natural reserve presented an upgrading status, showing the recovery after timber cutting.

  8. Proceedings of a symposium on the reclamation and restoration of boreal peatland and forest ecosystems : towards a sustainable future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatti, J. [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Foote, L.; Moran, S. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada); Nadeau, L. [Northern Alberta Inst. of Technology, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Rochefort, L. [Laval Univ., Quebec City, PQ (Canada); Short, P. [Canadian Sphagnum Peat Moss Association, St. Albert, AB (Canada); Vitt, D.H. [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States); Wieder, K. [Villanova Univ., Villanova, PA (United States)] (comps.)

    2010-07-01

    Disturbances in Canada's boreal forest occur in both upland forests and in peatlands. These disturbances originate from both anthropogenic and natural causes, particularly fire. Techniques for the restoration, as well as the reclamation of peatlands and forests impacted by agriculture, urban development, or oil and gas activities, have made significant advancement over the last decade and these techniques need to be incorporated into the regulation and management of peatland and forest ecosystems. This symposium addressed the issue of how this research is affected by climate change. The sessions were entitled: (1) reclaiming forest and forest soils impacted by oil and gas production, (2) influence of oil sands development on forest communities, (3) understanding the importance of peatland and forest carbon in the twenty-first century, (4) reclaiming wetlands on mined oil sands tailing, (5) disturbance in peatlands and its relevance to minimizing disturbance footprints and informing reclamation efforts, and (6) restoration and management of harvested peatlands. The symposium featured 37 presentations, of which 6 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs.

  9. Stable carbon isotope fractionation during methanogenesis in three boreal peatland ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. E. Galand

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The degradation of organic matter to CH4 and CO2 was investigated in three different boreal peatland systems in Finland, a mesotrophic fen (MES, an oligotrophic fen (OLI, and an ombrotrophic peat (OMB. MES had similar production rates of CO2 and CH4, but the two nutrient-poor peatlands (OLI and OMB produced in general more CO2 than CH4. δ13C analysis of CH4 and CO2 in the presence and absence methyl fluoride (CH3F, an inhibitor of acetoclastic methanogenesis, showed that CH4 was predominantly produced by hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis and that acetoclastic methanogenesis only played an important role in MES. These results, together with our observations concerning the collective inhibition of CH4 and CO2 production rates by CH3F, indicate that organic matter was degraded through different paths in the mesotrophic and the nutrient-poor peatlands. In the mesotrophic fen, the major process is canonical fermentation followed by acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis, while in the nutrient-poor peat, organic matter was apparently degraded to a large extent by a different path which finally involved hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. Our data suggest that degradation of organic substances in the oligotrophic environments was incomplete and involved the use of organic compounds as oxidants.

  10. Vegetation Feedbacks Explain Recent High-latitude Summer Warming in Alaskan Arctic and Boreal Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapin, F. S.; Beringer, J.; Copass, C.; Epstein, H.; Lloyd, A.; Lynch, A.; McGuire, A. D.; Sturm, M.

    2002-12-01

    Although General Circulation Models predict the observed winter and spring warming at high latitudes, there is no obvious physical mechanism in the climate system that can account for the significant increase in summer temperatures that has occurred at high latitudes during the past 30 years. We demonstrate that vegetation-induced feedbacks in snow properties and summer energy exchange with the atmosphere explain this recent summer warming. A combination of stand-age reconstructions, repeat photography, and satellite measures of vegetation greenness demonstrate an expansion of the distribution and an infilling of shrubs in moist tundra and of trees in forest tundra. These vegetation changes increase the depth and thermal resistance of the snow pack, causing a 3oC increase in winter soil temperature and an increase in winter decomposition and nutrient mineralization, which enhance plant growth. These vegetation changes also increase summer heat transport to the atmosphere by increasing radiation absorption (lower albedo) and the proportion of absorbed energy that is transferred to the atmosphere as sensible heat. The resulting increase in atmospheric heating, on a unit-area basis, is similar to effects of a doubling of atmospheric carbon dioxide or a 2% change in solar constant, such as occurred at the last glacial-interglacial boundary. Simulations with the regional climate model ARCSyM indicate that a change from shrubless tundra to shrub-dominated tundra on the North Slope of Alaska would increase July mean temperature by 1.5 to 3.5 degrees C, with the warming effects extending south into the boreal forest of interior Alaska. If these vegetation feedbacks to regional warming are widespread, as suggested by indigenous knowledge and the satellite record, they are of sufficient magnitude to explain the summer warming that has recently been observed in northern Alaska and other regions of the circumpolar Arctic.

  11. Mires and mire types of Peninsula Mitre, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grootjans, A.; Iturraspe, R.; Fritz, C.; Moen, A.; Joosten, H.

    2014-01-01

    In 2007, a field visit by members of the International Mire Conservation Group (IMCG) to the Atlantic coast of Peninsula Mitre (the easternmost part of Isla Grande de Tierra del Fuego, Argentina) gathered information on mire diversity in this remote wild area with largely pristine mires. Our expedit

  12. Community heterogeneity of Early Pennsylvanian peat mires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastaldo, R.A.; Stevanovic-Walls, I. M.; Ware, W.N.; Greb, S.F.

    2004-01-01

    Reconstructions of Pennsylvanian coal swamps are some of the most common images of late Paleozoic terrestrial ecosystems. All reconstructions to date are based on data from either time-averaged permineralized peats or single-site collections. An erect, in situ Early Pennsylvanian forest preserved above the Blue Creek Coal, Black Warrior Basin, Alabama, was sampled in 17 localities over an area of >0.5 km2, resulting in the first temporally and spatially constrained Pennsylvanian mire data set. This three-tiered forest was heterogeneous. Lycopsid and calamitean trees composed the canopy, and lepidodendrids, Lepidophloios, and sigillarians grew together at most sites. More juvenile than mature lycopsid biomass occurs in the forest-floor litter, indicating a mixed-age, multicohort canopy. Pteridophytes (tree fern) and pteridosperms (seed fern) dominated as understory shrubs, whereas sphenophyllaleans, pteridophytes, and pteridosperms composed the ground-cover and liana tier. The proportion of canopy, understory, and ground-cover biomass varied across the forest. Low proportions of ground-cover and liana taxa existed where canopy fossils accounted for >60% of the litter. There is a distinct spatial clustering of sites with more or less understory (or ground cover) where canopy contribution was <60%. Where canopy biomass was low (<50%), understory shrubs contributed more biomass, indicative of light interception and/or competition strategies. Sphenopteris pottsvillea, a ubiquitous ground-cover plant, is abundant in all sites except one, where pteridosperm creepers and lianas dominate the litter, interpreted to indicate total suppression of other ground-cover growth. Ecological wet-dry gradients identified in other Pennsylvanian swamps do not exist in the Blue Creek mire, with the interpreted wettest (Lepidophloios), driest (Sigillaria), and intermediate (Lepidodendron sensu latu) taxa coexisting in most assemblages. ?? 2004 Geological Society of America.

  13. Role of de novo biosynthesis in ecosystem scale monoterpene emissions from a boreal Scots pine forest

    OpenAIRE

    Taipale, R.; Kajos, M. K.; J. Patokoski; Rantala, P.; Ruuskanen, T. M.; J. Rinne

    2010-01-01

    Monoterpene emissions from Scots pine have traditionally been assumed to originate as evaporation from specialized storage pools. More recently, the significance of de novo emissions, originating directly from monoterpene biosynthesis, has been recognized. To study the role of biosynthesis in the ecosystem scale, we measured monoterpene emissions from a Scots pine dominated forest in southern Finland using the disjunct eddy covariance method combined with proton transfer reaction mass ...

  14. Role of de novo biosynthesis in ecosystem scale monoterpene emissions from a boreal Scots pine forest

    OpenAIRE

    Taipale, R.; Kajos, M. K.; J. Patokoski; Rantala, P.; Ruuskanen, T. M.; J. Rinne

    2011-01-01

    Monoterpene emissions from Scots pine have traditionally been assumed to originate as evaporation from specialized storage pools. More recently, the significance of de novo emissions, originating directly from monoterpene biosynthesis, has been recognized. To study the role of biosynthesis at the ecosystem scale, we measured monoterpene emissions from a Scots pine dominated forest in southern Finland using the disjunct eddy covariance method combined with proton transfer reaction mass spectro...

  15. Comparing soil biogeochemical processes in novel and natural boreal forest ecosystems

    OpenAIRE

    S. A. Quideau; M. J. B. Swallow; C. E. Prescott; S. J. Grayston; Oh, S.-W.

    2013-01-01

    Emulating the variability that exists in the natural landscape prior to disturbance should be a goal of soil reconstruction and land reclamation efforts following resource extraction. Long-term ecosystem sustainability within reclaimed landscapes can only be achieved with the re-establishment of biogeochemical processes between reconstructed soils and plants. In this study, we assessed key soil biogeochemical attributes (nutrient availability, organic matter composition, and...

  16. Comparing soil biogeochemical processes in novel and natural boreal forest ecosystems

    OpenAIRE

    S. A. Quideau; M. J. B. Swallow; C. E. Prescott; S. J. Grayston; S.-W. Oh

    2013-01-01

    Emulating the variability that exists in the natural landscape prior to disturbance should be a goal of soil reconstruction and land reclamation efforts following resource extraction. Long-term ecosystem sustainability within reclaimed landscapes can only be achieved with the re-establishment of biogeochemical processes between reconstructed soils and plants. In this study, we assessed key soil biogeochemical attributes (nutrient availability, organic matter composition, and microbial ...

  17. The resilience and functional role of moss in boreal and arctic ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turetsky, M.; Bond-Lamberty, B.; Euskirchen, E.S.; Talbot, J. J.; Frolking, S.; McGuire, A.D.; Tuittila, E.S.

    2012-01-01

    Mosses in northern ecosystems are ubiquitous components of plant communities, and strongly influence nutrient, carbon and water cycling. We use literature review, synthesis and model simulations to explore the role of mosses in ecological stability and resilience. Moss community responses to disturbance showed all possible responses (increases, decreases, no change) within most disturbance categories. Simulations from two process-based models suggest that northern ecosystems would need to experience extreme perturbation before mosses were eliminated. But simulations with two other models suggest that loss of moss will reduce soil carbon accumulation primarily by influencing decomposition rates and soil nitrogen availability. It seems clear that mosses need to be incorporated into models as one or more plant functional types, but more empirical work is needed to determine how to best aggregate species. We highlight several issues that have not been adequately explored in moss communities, such as functional redundancy and singularity, relationships between response and effect traits, and parameter vs conceptual uncertainty in models. Mosses play an important role in several ecosystem processes that play out over centuries – permafrost formation and thaw, peat accumulation, development of microtopography – and there is a need for studies that increase our understanding of slow, long-term dynamical processes.

  18. The resilience and functional role of moss in boreal and arctic ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turetsky, M R; Bond-Lamberty, B; Euskirchen, E; Talbot, J; Frolking, S; McGuire, A D; Tuittila, E-S

    2012-10-01

    Mosses in northern ecosystems are ubiquitous components of plant communities, and strongly influence nutrient, carbon and water cycling. We use literature review, synthesis and model simulations to explore the role of mosses in ecological stability and resilience. Moss community responses to disturbance showed all possible responses (increases, decreases, no change) within most disturbance categories. Simulations from two process-based models suggest that northern ecosystems would need to experience extreme perturbation before mosses were eliminated. But simulations with two other models suggest that loss of moss will reduce soil carbon accumulation primarily by influencing decomposition rates and soil nitrogen availability. It seems clear that mosses need to be incorporated into models as one or more plant functional types, but more empirical work is needed to determine how to best aggregate species. We highlight several issues that have not been adequately explored in moss communities, such as functional redundancy and singularity, relationships between response and effect traits, and parameter vs conceptual uncertainty in models. Mosses play an important role in several ecosystem processes that play out over centuries - permafrost formation and thaw, peat accumulation, development of microtopography - and there is a need for studies that increase our understanding of slow, long-term dynamical processes. PMID:22924403

  19. Role of de novo biosynthesis in ecosystem scale monoterpene emissions from a boreal Scots pine forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Taipale

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Monoterpene emissions from Scots pine have traditionally been assumed to originate as evaporation from specialized storage pools. More recently, the significance of de novo emissions, originating directly from monoterpene biosynthesis, has been recognized. To study the role of biosynthesis in the ecosystem scale, we measured monoterpene emissions from a Scots pine dominated forest in southern Finland using the disjunct eddy covariance method combined with proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry. The interpretation of the measurements was based on a hybrid emission algorithm describing both de novo and pool emissions. During the measurement period May–August 2007, the monthly medians of daytime emissions were 170, 280, 180, and 180 μg m−2 h−1. The emission potential for both de novo and pool emissions exhibited a decreasing summertime trend. The ratio of the de novo emission potential to the total emission potential varied between 30% and 46%. Although the monthly changes were not significant, the ratio always differed statistically from zero, i.e., the role of de novo biosynthesis was evident. The hybrid approach showed promising potential for the improvement of the ecosystem scale emission modelling. Given this feature and the significant role of biosynthesis, we recommend incorporating both de novo and pool emissions into the monoterpene emission algorithms for Scots pine dominated forests.

  20. Effects of Dispersal-Related Factors on Species Distribution Model Accuracy for Boreal Lake Ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Hallstan

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Species distribution modeling is used in applied ecology; for example in predicting the consequences of global change. However, questions still remain about the robustness of model predictions. Here we estimate effects of landscape spatial configuration and organism flight ability—factors related to dispersal—on the accuracy of species distribution models. Distribution models were developed for 129 phytoplankton taxa, 164 littoral invertebrate taxa and 44 profundal invertebrate taxa sampled in 105 Swedish lakes, using six different modeling techniques (generalized linear models (GLM, multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS, classification tree analysis (CTA, mixture discriminant analysis (MDA, generalized boosting models (GBM and random forests (RF. Model accuracy was not affected by dispersal ability (i.e., invertebrate flight ability, but the accuracy of phytoplankton assemblage predictions and, to a lesser extent, littoral invertebrate assemblages were related to ecosystem size and connectivity. Although no general pattern across species or spatial configuration was evident from our study, we recommend that dispersal and spatial configuration of ecosystems should be considered when developing species distribution models.

  1. Role of Boreal Vegetation in Controlling Ecosystem Processes and Feedbacks to Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapin, F. S., III; Hooper, D. U.; Hobbie, S. E.; Verville, J. H.

    1997-01-01

    In the field, dark respiration rates are greatest in cores from more northerly locations. This is due in part to greater amounts of dwarf shrub biomass in the more northerly cores, but also to differences in soil organic matter quality. Laboratory incubations of these soils under common conditions show some evidence for greater pools of available carbon in soils from more northerly tundra sites, although the most northerly site does not fit this pattern for reasons which are unclear at this time. While field measurements of cores transplanted among different vegetation types at the same location (Toolik Lake) show relatively small differences in whole ecosystem carbon flux, laboratory incubation of these same soils shows that there are large differences in soil respiration rates under common conditions. This is presumably due to differences in organic matter quality. Microenvironmental site factors (temperature, soil moisture, degree of anaerobiosis, etc.) may be responsible for evening out these differences in the field. These site factors, which differ with slope, aspect, and drainage within a given location along the latitudinal gradient, appear to exert at least as strong a control over carbon fluxes as do macroclimatic factors among sites across the latitudinal gradient. While our field measurements indicate that, in the short term, warming will tend to increase ecosystem losses Of CO2 via respiration more than they will increase plant gross assimilation, the degree to which different topographically-defined plant communities will respond is likely to vary.

  2. Effects of Conversion from Boreal Forest to Arctic Steppe on Soil Communities and Ecosystem Carbon Pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, P. D.; Natali, S.; Schade, J. D.; Zimov, N.; Zimov, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    The end of the Pleistocene marked the extinction of a great variety of arctic megafauna, which, in part, led to the conversion of arctic grasslands to modern Siberian larch forest. This shift may have increased the vulnerability of permafrost to thawing because of changes driven by the vegetation shift; the higher albedo of grassland and low insulation of snow trampled by animals may have decreased soil temperatures and reduced ground thaw in the grassland ecosystem, resulting in protection of organic carbon in thawed soil and permafrost. To test these hypothesized impacts of arctic megafauna, we examined an experimental reintroduction of large mammals in northeast Siberia, initiated in 1988. Pleistocene Park now contains 23 horses, three musk ox, one bison, and several moose in addition to the native fauna. The park is 16 square km with a smaller enclosure (animals spend most of their time and our study was focused. We measured carbon-pools in forested sites (where scat surveys showed low animal use), and grassy sites (which showed higher use), within the park boundaries. We also measured thaw depth and documented the soil invertebrate communities in each ecosystem. There was a substantial difference in number of invertebrates per kg of organic soil between the forest (600 ± 250) and grassland (300 ± 250), though these differences were not statistically significant they suggest faster nutrient turnover in the forest or a greater proportion of decomposition by invertebrates than other decomposers. While thaw depth was deeper in the grassland (60 ± 4 cm) than in the forest (40 ± 6 cm), we did not detect differences in organic layer depth or percent organic matter between grassland and forest. However, soil in the grassland had higher bulk density, and higher carbon stocks in the organic and mineral soil layers. Although deeper thaw depth in the grassland suggests that more carbon is available to microbial decomposers, ongoing temperature monitoring will help

  3. Permafrost dynamics structure species compositions of oribatid mite (Acari: Oribatida communities in sub-Arctic palsa mires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inkeri Markkula

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Palsa mires are sub-Arctic peatland complexes, vulnerable ecosystems with patches of permafrost. Permafrost thawing in palsa mires occurs throughout Fennoscandia, probably due to local climatic warming. In palsa mires, permafrost thaw alters hydrological conditions, vegetation structure and microhabitat composition with unknown consequences for invertebrate fauna. This study's objectives were to examine the role of microhabitat heterogeneity and the effects of permafrost dynamics and thaw on oribatid mite communities in palsa mires. Oribatid mites were sampled in two palsa mires in Finland and Norway. Three different types of microhabitats were examined: graminoid-dominated wet sites, herb-dominated small hummocks and evergreen shrub-dominated permafrost-underlain palsa hummocks. The results indicate that permafrost dynamics are an important factor structuring oribatid mite communities in palsa mires. The community composition of oribatid mites differed remarkably among microhabitats. Six species were significantly more abundant in permafrost-underlain microhabitats in relation to non-permafrost microhabitats. None of the species identified occurred exclusively in permafrost-underlain microhabitats. Findings suggest that permafrost thaw may not have an impact on species diversity but may alter community composition of oribatid mites in palsa mire ecosystems.

  4. Role of de novo biosynthesis in ecosystem scale monoterpene emissions from a boreal Scots pine forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taipale, R.; Kajos, M. K.; Patokoski, J.; Rantala, P.; Ruuskanen, T. M.; Rinne, J.

    2011-08-01

    Monoterpene emissions from Scots pine have traditionally been assumed to originate as evaporation from specialized storage pools. More recently, the significance of de novo emissions, originating directly from monoterpene biosynthesis, has been recognized. To study the role of biosynthesis at the ecosystem scale, we measured monoterpene emissions from a Scots pine dominated forest in southern Finland using the disjunct eddy covariance method combined with proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry. The interpretation of the measurements was based on a correlation analysis and a hybrid emission algorithm describing both de novo and pool emissions. During the measurement period May-August 2007, the monthly medians of daytime emissions were 200, 290, 180, and 200 μg m-2 h-1. The emissions were partly light dependent, probably due to de novo biosynthesis. The emission potential for both de novo and pool emissions exhibited a decreasing summertime trend. The ratio of the de novo emission potential to the total emission potential varied between 30 % and 46 %. Although the monthly changes were not significant, the ratio always differed statistically from zero, suggesting that the role of de novo biosynthesis was observable. Given the uncertainties in this study, we conclude that more accurate estimates of the contribution of de novo emissions are required for improving monoterpene emission algorithms for Scots pine dominated forests.

  5. Role of de novo biosynthesis in ecosystem scale monoterpene emissions from a boreal Scots pine forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Taipale

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Monoterpene emissions from Scots pine have traditionally been assumed to originate as evaporation from specialized storage pools. More recently, the significance of de novo emissions, originating directly from monoterpene biosynthesis, has been recognized. To study the role of biosynthesis at the ecosystem scale, we measured monoterpene emissions from a Scots pine dominated forest in southern Finland using the disjunct eddy covariance method combined with proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry. The interpretation of the measurements was based on a correlation analysis and a hybrid emission algorithm describing both de novo and pool emissions. During the measurement period May–August 2007, the monthly medians of daytime emissions were 200, 290, 180, and 200 μg m−2 h−1. The emissions were partly light dependent, probably due to de novo biosynthesis. The emission potential for both de novo and pool emissions exhibited a decreasing summertime trend. The ratio of the de novo emission potential to the total emission potential varied between 30 % and 46 %. Although the monthly changes were not significant, the ratio always differed statistically from zero, suggesting that the role of de novo biosynthesis was observable. Given the uncertainties in this study, we conclude that more accurate estimates of the contribution of de novo emissions are required for improving monoterpene emission algorithms for Scots pine dominated forests.

  6. Behaviour of 137Cs in the Boreal forest ecosystem of central Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behaviour of Chernobyl fallout 137Cs in a coniferous forest ecosystem in central Sweden was investigated between 1990 and 1994. Results demonstrated that forest soil belongs to nutrient deficient type, and deposited fallout 137Cs from Chernobyl nuclear accident (CNA) was retained (85%) in the upper 5 cm of humic forest soil layer, with a venial migration deeper into soil profile. No correlation between forest soil exchangeable and total potassium (K+) and 137Cs transfer parameters was observed. However, addition of K+, found to efficiently reduce 137Cs uptake by sheep's fescue and the addition of stable caesium (133Cs+) enhanced it. The addition of ammonium (NH4+) was slightly stimulating the uptake of 137Cs by sheep's fescue in the first cut only. Field plants showed a considerably reduction in their 137Cs activity concentrations. Relative to their 137Cs levels of 1986-89, a little reduction in heather (16%) occurred eight years after CNA. In contrast the reductions in lingonberry and bilberry were 87% and 68%, respectively. Three fractions of forest soil bound 137Cs were observed due to sequential extraction procedure (SEP). The first, is easily extractable 137Cs fraction (F1+F2), it comprises 22% of total forest soil 137Cs inventory in the upper 5 cm layer. The second, is soil organically and biologically bound 137Cs (F3+F4) comprises about 30% of soil bound 137Cs. This fraction might be accounted for long-term soil available 137Cs for plant uptake after bio-degradation processes by soil microorganisms. The third, is the residual fraction (F5), it comprises more than 35% of total forest soil 137Cs inventory, and may be associated with soil components which are probably of organic nature. Sorption of 137Cs by zeolite (Mordenite) revealed that soil bound 137Cs is to some extent more mobile in forest soils with high OM% and low pH than those with low OM%. 99 refs

  7. Functional responses and resilience of boreal forest ecosystem after reduction of deer density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachand, Marianne; Pellerin, Stéphanie; Moretti, Marco; Aubin, Isabelle; Tremblay, Jean-Pierre; Côté, Steeve D; Poulin, Monique

    2014-01-01

    The functional trait-based approach is increasingly used to predict responses of ecological communities to disturbances, but most studies target a single taxonomic group. Here, we assessed the resilience of a forest ecosystem to an overabundant herbivore population by assessing changes in 19 functional traits for plant, 13 traits for ground beetle and 16 traits for songbird communities after six years of controlled browsing on Anticosti Island (Quebec, Canada). Our results indicated that plants were more responsive to 6 years of reduced browsing pressure than ground beetles and songbirds. However, co-inertia analysis revealed that ground beetle communities responded in a similar way than plant communities with stronger relationships between plant and ground beetle traits at reduced deer density, a pattern not detected between plant and songbird. High deer density favored plants species that reproduce vegetatively and with abiotic pollination and seed dispersal, traits implying little interaction with animal. On the other hand, traits found at reduced deer density mostly involved trophic interaction. For example, plants in this treatment had fleshy fruits and large seeds dispersed by birds or other animals whereas ground beetle species were carnivorous. Overall, our results suggest that plant communities recovered some functional components to overabundant herbivore populations, since most traits associated with undisturbed forests were reestablished after six years of deer reduction. The re-establishment of functional plant communities with traits involving trophic interaction induces changes in the ground-beetle trait community, but forest structure remains likely insufficiently heterogeneous to shift the songbird trait community within six years.

  8. Functional responses and resilience of boreal forest ecosystem after reduction of deer density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachand, Marianne; Pellerin, Stéphanie; Moretti, Marco; Aubin, Isabelle; Tremblay, Jean-Pierre; Côté, Steeve D; Poulin, Monique

    2014-01-01

    The functional trait-based approach is increasingly used to predict responses of ecological communities to disturbances, but most studies target a single taxonomic group. Here, we assessed the resilience of a forest ecosystem to an overabundant herbivore population by assessing changes in 19 functional traits for plant, 13 traits for ground beetle and 16 traits for songbird communities after six years of controlled browsing on Anticosti Island (Quebec, Canada). Our results indicated that plants were more responsive to 6 years of reduced browsing pressure than ground beetles and songbirds. However, co-inertia analysis revealed that ground beetle communities responded in a similar way than plant communities with stronger relationships between plant and ground beetle traits at reduced deer density, a pattern not detected between plant and songbird. High deer density favored plants species that reproduce vegetatively and with abiotic pollination and seed dispersal, traits implying little interaction with animal. On the other hand, traits found at reduced deer density mostly involved trophic interaction. For example, plants in this treatment had fleshy fruits and large seeds dispersed by birds or other animals whereas ground beetle species were carnivorous. Overall, our results suggest that plant communities recovered some functional components to overabundant herbivore populations, since most traits associated with undisturbed forests were reestablished after six years of deer reduction. The re-establishment of functional plant communities with traits involving trophic interaction induces changes in the ground-beetle trait community, but forest structure remains likely insufficiently heterogeneous to shift the songbird trait community within six years. PMID:24587362

  9. Functional responses and resilience of boreal forest ecosystem after reduction of deer density.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Bachand

    Full Text Available The functional trait-based approach is increasingly used to predict responses of ecological communities to disturbances, but most studies target a single taxonomic group. Here, we assessed the resilience of a forest ecosystem to an overabundant herbivore population by assessing changes in 19 functional traits for plant, 13 traits for ground beetle and 16 traits for songbird communities after six years of controlled browsing on Anticosti Island (Quebec, Canada. Our results indicated that plants were more responsive to 6 years of reduced browsing pressure than ground beetles and songbirds. However, co-inertia analysis revealed that ground beetle communities responded in a similar way than plant communities with stronger relationships between plant and ground beetle traits at reduced deer density, a pattern not detected between plant and songbird. High deer density favored plants species that reproduce vegetatively and with abiotic pollination and seed dispersal, traits implying little interaction with animal. On the other hand, traits found at reduced deer density mostly involved trophic interaction. For example, plants in this treatment had fleshy fruits and large seeds dispersed by birds or other animals whereas ground beetle species were carnivorous. Overall, our results suggest that plant communities recovered some functional components to overabundant herbivore populations, since most traits associated with undisturbed forests were reestablished after six years of deer reduction. The re-establishment of functional plant communities with traits involving trophic interaction induces changes in the ground-beetle trait community, but forest structure remains likely insufficiently heterogeneous to shift the songbird trait community within six years.

  10. Synchronous wildfire activity rise and mire deforestation at the triassic-jurassic boundary.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik I Petersen

    Full Text Available The end-Triassic mass extinction event (∼201.4 million years ago caused major faunal and floral turnovers in both the marine and terrestrial realms. The biotic changes have been attributed to extreme greenhouse warming across the Triassic-Jurassic (T-J boundary caused by massive release of carbon dioxide and/or methane related to extensive volcanism in the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP, resulting in a more humid climate with increased storminess and lightning activity. Lightning strikes are considered the primary source of wildfires, producing charcoal, microscopically recognized as inertinite macerals. The presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs of pyrolytic origin and allochthonous charcoal in siliciclastic T-J boundary strata has suggested widespread wildfire activity at the time. We have investigated largely autochthonous coal and coaly beds across the T-J boundary in Sweden and Denmark. These beds consist of predominantly organic material from the in situ vegetation in the mires, and as the coaly beds represent a substantial period of time they are excellent environmental archives. We document a remarkable increase in inertinite content in the coal and coaly beds across the T-J boundary. We show estimated burning temperatures derived from inertinite reflectance measurements coupled with palynological data and conclude that pre-boundary late Rhaetian mire wildfires included high-temperature crown fires, whereas latest Rhaetian-Sinemurian mire wildfires were more frequent but dominated by lower temperature surface fires. Our results suggest a major change in the mire ecosystems across the T-J boundary from forested, conifer dominated mires to mires with a predominantly herbaceous and shrubby vegetation. Contrary to the overall regional vegetation for which onset of recovery commenced in the early Hettangian, the sensitive mire ecosystem remained affected during the Hettangian and did not start to recover until around

  11. Carbon exchange in Western Siberian watershed mires and implication for the greenhouse effect. A spatial temporal modeling approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borren, W.

    2007-01-19

    The vast watershed mires of Western Siberia formed a significant sink of carbon during the Holocene. Because of their large area these mires might play an important role in the carbon exchange between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. However, estimation of the Holocene and future carbon balance of whole Western Siberian mires is hampered by the lack of spatially resolved models. The main objective was to assess the carbon exchange fluxes of the mires using a 3-D dynamic approach. These exchange fluxes comprise the sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2) by peat growth, the emission of methane (CH4) by anaerobic peat decay and the emission of CO2 by aerobic peat decay. From the detailed analysis of peat cores from different sites in the southern taiga of Western Siberia, it emerged that Holocene peat growth and carbon accumulation had different trends, caused by variations in vegetation succession. These differences were strongly influenced by the position in the landscape. Therefore, the effect of climatic change on mire development varied spatially. The indirect effects of climate change through local hydrology appeared to be more important than direct influences of changes in precipitation and temperature. Mire development is closely connected to hydrological dynamics. In the thesis a 3-D dynamic modeling approach is described that makes use of groundwater modeling. In successive timesteps peat growth and decay as well as mire type distribution were calculated, depending on hydrological conditions. The model was forced with a paleo-precipitation record to include variable climatic input. The model results show the Holocene development of a watershed mire from a few small spots to a contiguous mire landscape. As hydrology is the major limiting factor, the mire development is most sensitive to precipitation and evapotranspiration. Under unchanged conditions the mire will grow further, eventually reaching its maximum peat thickness around 11400 yr A.D. Under

  12. Effect of industrial pollution on the distribution dynamics of radionuclides in boreal understorey ecosystems (EPORA). Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suomela, M.; Rahola, T. [Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland); Bergman, R. [National Defence Research Establishment (Sweden); Bunzl, K. [National Research Center for Environmental and Health (Germany); Jaakkola, T. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Radiochemical Lab.; Steinnes, E. [Norwegian University of Science and Technology (Norway)

    1999-08-01

    The project EPORA 'Effects of Industrial Pollution on Distribution Dynamics of Radionuclides in Boreal Understorey Ecosystems' is a part of the Nuclear Fission Safety Research programme of the European Union. A suitable environment for the study was found in the surroundings of the Cu-Ni smelter in Monchegorsk, in NW Russia where the huge atmospheric emissions from the smelter have polluted the environment since the 1930's. Samples of soil, litter, plants and runoff water were taken. Total concentrations of the mainpollutants, Ni and Cu, in the organic soil increased from about 10 mg kg{sup -1} at the reference site in Finland to about 5000 mg kg{sup -1} at the most polluted site in Russia. Similar trends were observed for exchangeable fractions and plant concentrations of the same elements. Concentrations of exchangeable K, Ca, and Mg in the organic soil decreased strongly with increased input of chemical pollutants. The radionuclides studied were {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr and {sup 239+240}Pu, mainly originating from the atmospheric nuclear weapons tests. The contribution of the Chernobyl derived {sup 137}Cs deposition was about 10% but insignificant for the other nuclides. The activity distribution of all three radionuclides in the soil, their corresponding residence half-times as well as their aggregated trencher factors for various plants depended on the degree of pollution: Activity distribution: in the litter layer, the activity of all three radionuclides increased continually from the reference site to the most polluted site. This effect was most pronounced for {sup 239+240}Pu and least for {sup 90}Sr and could, at least partly, be explained by the increase of the thickness of this layer. In the root zone, the opposite effect was observed: the largest fraction of all radionuclides was found at the reference site. In the organic layer, the exchangeable fractions of {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr and {sup 239+240}Pu decreased with increasing pollution

  13. Diurnal, seasonal and interannual variability of carbon isotope discrimination at the canopy level in response to environmental factors in a boreal forest ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Baozhang; Chen, Jing M

    2007-10-01

    Accurate estimation of temporal and spatial variations in photosynthetic discrimination of 13C is critical to carbon cycle research. In this study, a combined ecosystem-boundary layer isotope model, which was satisfactorily validated against intensive campaign data, was used to explore the temporal variability of carbon discrimination in response to environmental driving factors in a boreal ecosystem in the vicinity of Fraserdale Tower, Ontario, Canada (49 degrees 52'30''N, 81 degrees 34'12''W). A 14 year (1990-1996 and 1998-2004) hourly CO2 concentration and meteorological record measured on this tower was used for this purpose. The 14 year mean yearly diurnal amplitude of canopy-level discrimination Delta(canopy) was computed to be 2.8 +/- 0.5 per thousand, and the overall diurnal cycle showed that the greatest Delta(canopy) values occurred at dawn and dusk, while the minima generally appeared in mid-afternoon. The average annual Delta(canopy) varied from 18.3 to 19.7 per thousand with the 14 year average of 19 +/- 0.4 per thousand. The overall seasonality of Delta(canopy) showed a gradually increasing trend from leaf emergence in May-September and with a slight decrease at the end of the growing season in October. Delta(canopy) was negatively correlated to vapour pressure deficit and air temperature across hourly to decadal timescales. A strong climatic control on stomatal regulation of ecosystem isotope discrimination was found in this study.

  14. Finnish-Karelian symposium on mire conservation and classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication is a collection of papers based on presentations in a Finnish-karelischen symposium on the classification and conservation of mires, held in 1992. The symposium was arranged according to the contract of cooperation between the ministries of environment of Finland and Karelia, about mire conservation research. The aim of the cooperation is to improve the conservation of mires in the biogeographically uniform area of Eastern Fennoscandia, taking into account the great differences in mire utilization in Finland and Karelia. Another aim is to develop and unify the research methods. Paludification and development of mires is treated in three papers. Lake terrestrialization in Finland has been studied. Mires in fault valleys on the northwestern side of Lake Onega in Karelia have interesting stratigraphical features. The nutrient status of mires at different stages of development has been studied in Karelia, and the usability of the method is studied. The annual growth of hummock and lawn layer Sphagna and its dependence on the weather of the growth period as been studied in Karelia. The relationships of carbon balance, growth and different forms of mire utilization in Finland have been studied. The vegetation of the mires in Vodlozersky national park in Karelia has been studied in Finnish-Karelian cooperation. The main features of the vegetation are presented in one paper. For articles deal with mire conservation. Threatened mire plants and their conservation are treated in one paper. Another deals with the present state of mires in the raised bog zone in Finland, and the success of mire reservation. Gaps in mire conservation and possibilities to improve the protection of mires in Finland have been studied

  15. Conceptual development of a comprehensive measurement system for understanding the boreal and Arctic ecosystem-atmosphere relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hari, Pertti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Bäck, Jaana; Vesala, Timo; Pumpanen, Jukka; Lappalinen, Hanna; Zilitinkevich, Sergej; Asmi, Eija; Laurila, Tuomas; Viisanen, Yrjö; Kulmala, Markku

    2014-05-01

    The climate change is expected to be large at high latitudes and the northern ecosystems in Eurasia will react strongly to this change. We need urgently information about the changes in the state and in the functioning of these ecosystems. The versatility of the ecosystems hampers greatly the combination of the information obtained at single measuring sites. We need a network of stations that are planned and constructed to provide coherent information over the huge area and that utilize the present rapid development of instrumentation. Although the northern ecosystems and the atmosphere are very different they, however, have many common features that enable construction of station network that provides coherent high quality data. We identify three different ecosystems; forest, peat land and aquatic. The layered structure is characteristic for them as well as for the atmosphere. Metabolic processes convert material and energy into other forms, for example, radiation energy is absorbed and emitted in the atmosphere and converted to chemical form in photosynthesis taking place in forests, peat lands, lakes and in the ocean. The processes generate differences in temperature, concentration and pressure that give rise to material and energy flows within the ecosystems and in the atmosphere, between the ecosystems and between the ecosystems and the atmosphere. These material and energy flows convey the interactions between the ecosystems and between the ecosystems and the atmosphere. To obtain coherent and high quality information on the present change in northern ecosystems and in the atmosphere we need network of long-term measuring stations that measure the material and energy fluxes within and between the ecosystems, between the ecosystems and the atmosphere, the processes generating the fluxes and the state of the ecosystems and of the atmosphere. These measuring stations should utilize cutting-edge measuring techniques and instrumentation. The intensive measurements

  16. Substrate Geochemistry and Soil Development in Boreal Forest and Tundra Ecosystems in the Yukon-Tanana Upland and Seward Peninsula, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, L.P.; Crock, J.G.; Wang, B.; Day, W.C.; Eberl, D.D.; Sanzolone, R.F.; Lamothe, P.J.

    2008-01-01

    We report on soil development as a function of bedrock type and the presence of loess in two high latitude ecosystems (boreal forest and tundra) and from two regions in Alaska?the Yukon-Tanana Upland (YTU, east-central Alaska) and the Seward Peninsula (SP, far-west coastal Alaska). This approach to the study of 'cold soils' is fundamental to the quantification of regional geochemical landscape patterns. Of the five state factors in this study, bedrock and biota (ecosystem; vegetation zone) vary whereas climate (within each area) and topography are controlled. The influence of time is assumed to be controlled, as these soils are thousands of years old (late Quaternary to Holocene). The primary minerals in soils from YTU, developed over loess and crystalline bedrock (metamorphic and intrusive), are quartz, plagioclase, and 2:1 clays; whereas in the SP, where loess and metasedimentary bedrock (schist and quartzite) predominate, they are quartz and muscovite. The A horizon of both regions is rich in peat. Examination of the ratio of mobile (K2O, CaO, and Fe2O3) to immobile (TiO2) major oxides, within each region, shows that very little difference exists in the chemical weathering of soils developed between the two ecosystems examined. Differences were observed between tundra soils developed in the two regions. These differences are most probably due to the dissimilarity in the geochemical importance of both loess and bedrock. A minimal loss of cadmium with soil depth is seen for soils developed over YTU crystalline bedrock in the boreal forest environments. This trend is related to the mobility of cadmium in these soils as well as to its biogenic cycling. Major differences were observed in the proportion of cadmium and zinc among the A, B, and C horizon material sequestered in various soil fractions as measured by sequential soil extractions. These trends followed such variables as the decrease with depth in organic matter, the change in clay minerals, and the change

  17. Mercury cycling in boreal ecosystems: The long-term effect of acid rain constituents on peatland pore water methylmercury concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branfireun, Brian A.; Bishop, Kevin; Roulet, Nigel T.; Granberg, Gunnar; Nilsson, Mats

    Sulphate-reducing bacteria have been identified as primary methylators of mercury (Hg) in the laboratory and in field investigations. However, no studies have investigated the effect of long-term deposition of sulphate on methylmercury (MeHg) dynamics in peatlands, which are known to be significant sources of MeHg to downstream waters in the boreal forest zone. As an ancillary experiment to a larger project investigating the effects of acid rain constituents on peatland carbon dynamics, the influence of experimentally elevated Na2SO4 and/or NH4NO3 deposition on peat pore water MeHg concentrations was determined using a simple mesocosm experimental design. After three years, additions of S in amounts equivalent to the 1980s dry and wet deposition in Southern Sweden resulted in peat pore water MeHg concentrations up to six times above background levels. Elevated N loads had no effect on pore water MeHg concentrations.

  18. Technical Report Series on the Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) RSS-19 1994 CASI At-Sensor Radiance and Reflectance Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, John; Freemantle, Jim; Nickeson, Jaime (Editor); Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Remote Sensing Science (RSS)-19 team collected Compact Airborne Spectrographic Imager (CASI) images from the Chieftain Navaho aircraft in order to observe the seasonal change in the radiometric reflectance properties of the boreal forest landscape. CASI was deployed as a site-specific optical sensor during Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) field campaigns. Image data were collected with CASI on 36 days during five field campaigns between February and September 1994, primarily at flux tower sites located at study sites near Thompson, Manitoba, and Prince Albert, Saskatchewan. A variety of CASI data collection strategies were used to meet the following scientific objectives: 1) canopy bidirectional reflectance, 2) canopy biochemistry, 3) spatial variability, and 4) estimates of up and downwelling Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR) and spectral albedo, as well as changes along transects across lakes and transects the Northern Study Area (NSA) and Southern Study Area (SSA). The images are stored as binary image files. A subset of the 1994 CASI acquisitions have been compressed and included on the BOREAS CD-ROM set. This subset includes three images for the NSA-OBS (Old Black Spruce) site on 06 Jun 94, 08 Aug 94, and 06 Sep 94, one image for the SSA-OBS site on 24 Jul 94; and one image for the NSA-Fen site on 08 Aug 94. The CASI imagery on the BOREAS CD-ROMs have been compressed using the Gzip program. The rest of the 1994 BOREAS CASI archive are not contained on the BOREAS CD-ROM set. Inventory listing files are supplied on the CD-ROM to inform users of the data that were collected. The RSS-19 1994 CASI images are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  19. Can We Use Forest Inventory Mapping as a Coarse Filter in Ecosystem Based Management in the Black Spruce Boreal Forest?

    OpenAIRE

    Chafi Chaieb; Nicole J Fenton; Benoit Lafleur; Yves Bergeron

    2015-01-01

    Forest inventory mapping is used worldwide to describe forests at a large spatial scale via the delimitation of portions of the landscape that are structurally homogeneous. Consequently, there is a significant amount of descriptive forest data in forest inventory maps, particularly with the development of ecosystem classification, which represents a significant potential for use in ecosystem based management. With this study we propose to test whether forest inventory maps can be used to desc...

  20. Dynamical vegetation-atmosphere modelling of the boreal zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hui; Stordal, Frode; Berntsen, Terje K.; Bryn, Anders

    2016-04-01

    Vegetation interacts with climate on seasonal to inter-annual time scales through albedo, roughness, evapotranspiration, CO2 sequestration and by influencing snow accumulation and ablation. The Scandinavian mountains and high latitudes is a hot spot for land-atmosphere feedback, as the future's increased winter minimum temperature supports a boreal tree line advance, lowering the surface albedo. The northern ecosystem is dominated by mires, boreal forests and alpine heaths, in addition to agricultural land. Model studies have shown that vegetation-climate feedbacks are strong enough to lead to regime shifts in vegetation and local climate in boreal regions. Biogeophysical factors, such as albedo, the Bowen ratio, and surface roughness, are all involved in these feedbacks, and they are also altered by land use change such as reforestation. For calculations of the dynamical coupling between the atmosphere and the vegetation we have used the Earth System Model NorESM, which includes several advanced features in its land surface model (CLM4.5), such as the inclusion of the radiative forcing due to black carbon and dust deposit onto snow, improved representation of fire, permafrost and its hydrological impact, a new snow cover fraction parameterization reflecting the hysteresis in fractional snow cover for a given snow depth between accumulation and melt phases, as well as dynamic vegetation coupled with carbon-nitrogen cycles. These new features improve the representation of surface albedo feedback in Arctic. We have performed experiments with coupled as well fixed ocean for the current as a quadrupled atmospheric CO2 situation. This model configuration is used to study changes in vegetation in a high end radiative forcing case. It is contrasted with an experiment where vegetation dynamics is neglected. Changes in the features of the vegetation along with surface fluxes, albedo and atmospheric temperatures are analysed, with main emphasis on the boreal zone. In

  1. General characterisation of study area and definition of experimental protocols. WP 1 in the project 'Effect of industrial pollution on the distribution dynamics of radionuclides in boreal understorey ecosystems'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research project EPORA (Effects of Industrial Pollution on the Distribution Dynamics of Radionuclides in Boreal Understorey Ecosystems) is part of the EU Nuclear Fission Safety Programme 1994 - 1998. The main purpose of EPORA is to study the influence of strong chemical pollution on the behaviour of artificial radionuclides (137Cs,90Sr, 239,240Pu) in a northern boreal ecosystem and subsequently to assess the significance of the findings to the radiation exposure of the population in such areas. The present report is a documentation of the selection of study areas based on the assessment of available information on pollution in the Kola Peninsula and Northern Fennoscandia and of sampling and analysing methods. (orig.)

  2. Impact of Temperature Increase and Precipitation Alteration at Climate Change on Forest Productivity and Soil Carbon in Boreal Forest Ecosystems in Canada and Russia: Simulation Approach with the EFIMOD Model

    OpenAIRE

    Chertov, Oleg

    2010-01-01

    The results of EFIMOD model simulations to specify a possible effect of forthcoming climate warming allowed for preliminary quantification of the effects of this environmental change on boreal forests in North America and Europe. In Central Canada, the black spruce and jack pine forests respond to climate warming, fire, harvesting and insects by significant modification of net primary productivity (NPP), soil respiration (Rs), net ecosystem production (NEP) and pools of tree biomass and soil ...

  3. [Global climate change and carbon balance in forest ecosystems of boreal zones: imitating modeling as a forecast tool].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanin, V N; Mikhaĭlov, A V; Bykhovets, S S; Komarov, A S

    2010-01-01

    The individually oriented system of the EFIMOD models simulating carbon and nitrogen flows in forest ecosystems has been used for forecasting the response of forest ecosystems to various forest exploitation regimes with climate change. As input data the forest management materials for the Manturovskii forestry of the Kostroma region were used. It has been shown that increase of mid-annual temperatures and rainfall influence the redistribution of carbon and nitrogen supply in organic form: supply increase of these elements in phytomass simultaneously with depletion of them in soil occurred. The most carbon and nitrogen accumulation in forest ecosystems occurs in the scenario without felling. In addition, in this scenario only the ecosystems of the modeling territory function as a carbon drain; in the other two scenarios (with selective and total felling) they function as a source of carbon. Climate changes greatly influence the decomposition rate of organic matter in soil, which leads to increased emission of carbonic acid. The second consequence of the increase in the destruction rate is nitrogen increase in the soil in a form available for plants that entails production increase of plantations. PMID:21268870

  4. The Recovery of Net Ecosystem Productivity and Water Use Efficiency of a Harvested Aspen Forest in the Western Boreal Plain, Alberta, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrone, R. M.; Giroux, K.; Brown, S. M.; Devito, K. J.; Chasmer, L. E.

    2011-12-01

    The Utikuma Region Study Area (URSA) is located in north-central Alberta, Canada, in a region where aspen (Populus Tremuloides Michx.) dominate the upland vegetation of the Western Boreal Plain (WBP). Due to the heterogeneity of the surficial geology as well as the sub-humid climate where the water balance is dominated by evapotranspiration, the carbon balance across this landscape is highly variable. Moreover, the upland aspen regions represent significant stores of carbon. More recently, aspen stands have become valuable commercial resources for pulp and paper processing. These stands are harvested through clear cutting and are generally left to regenerate on their own, a process which occurs rapidly in clonal species like aspen. At URSA, three eddy covariance towers were setup during the length of the growing seasons of 2005-2009 to investigate the CO2 exchange under natural conditions and the rate of recovery after harvest. In 2007, the south facing slope of URSA was harvested and the north facing slope in 2008. This study examines the inter-annual variability and recovery (after harvest) of net ecosystem productivity (NEP) and water use efficiency (WUE) as controlled by environmental variables such as air temperature, precipitation, soil moisture, growing season length and LAI.

  5. Differential response of bird functional traits to post-fire salvage logging in a boreal forest ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azeria, Ermias T.; Ibarzabal, Jacques; Hébert, Christian; Boucher, Jonathan; Imbeau, Louis; Savard, Jean-Pierre L.

    2011-05-01

    The concept of functional trait-environment relationship posits that species in a local community should possess similar traits that match the selective environment. The present study examines species trait-habitat (using Fourth-corner and RLQ analyses) and habitat occupancy patterns (logistic regression models) of bird assemblages in boreal forest stands following disturbances by forest fire and salvage logging. The stands differed in the amount and composition of residual tree retention, salvage- and aquatic-edges, degree of burn severity (all measured at 100 and 500 m buffers), as well as landscape-level variables such as distance to previously burned forests. Tests of trait-habitat relationships showed that canopy-nesters and bark- and foliage- insectivores required high levels of residual trees of low burn severity, with the feeding guilds showing affinity for different stand composition. In contrast, ground-nesters and omnivores thrived in salvaged areas and associated edges. In addition, cavity-nesting and ground-foragers were associated with severely burned stands. The species' habitat occupancy patterns were commensurate with trait requirements, which also appeared to be scale-dependent. For example, some fire-associated species had high occupancy probability in severely burned stands at small-scale (100 m buffer), which was consistent with their cavity-nesting trait. This pattern, however, was not evident at large-scale, where their feeding requirement (bark-insectivores) for low-severity burns dominated. Our study suggests that trait-habitat relationships can provide critical information to the complex ways species' relate to key habitat factors following natural and anthropogenic disturbances.

  6. Biological processes controlling the development of modern peat-forming ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, P.D. [University of London, London (United Kingdom). Division of Life Sciences

    1995-11-01

    Although no precise modern analogue exists for the peat-forming ecosystems (mires) of Tertiary times, it is argued that the principles underlying peat formation are essentially unchanged in the sense that a peat-forming ecosystem has an incomplete decomposition process (normally because of water-logging), leaving a residue of organic material in its overall energy-flow budget. The study of modern mires is therefore of relevance to Tertiary coal geologists. The classification of modern mires is best achieved by reference to their hydrological characteristics, particularly the source of water entering the system. Flow-fed (rheotrophic) mires are often relatively rich in nutrients and clastic, while rain-fed (ombrotrophic) mires are poor. The transition from one hydrological state to the other can occur during mire development and involves a physical elevation of the mire surface by the growth of peat. 29 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Can We Use Forest Inventory Mapping as a Coarse Filter in Ecosystem Based Management in the Black Spruce Boreal Forest?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chafi Chaieb

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Forest inventory mapping is used worldwide to describe forests at a large spatial scale via the delimitation of portions of the landscape that are structurally homogeneous. Consequently, there is a significant amount of descriptive forest data in forest inventory maps, particularly with the development of ecosystem classification, which represents a significant potential for use in ecosystem based management. With this study we propose to test whether forest inventory maps can be used to describe not only stand characteristics but also dynamic processes. The results indicate that stand types identifiable in forest inventory maps do not in fact represent unique developmental stages, but rather confound stands at multiple developmental stages that may be undergoing different ecological processes. The reasons for this are linked to both the interaction between succession, fire severity and paludification. Finally, some aspects of the process of forest inventory mapping itself contribute to the disjunction between forest types and forest succession. Given the low similarity between spruce mapping types and their actual description following forest inventories, it would be too ambitious to infer the dynamic aspects of spruce forest by map units.

  8. Modeling nonlinear responses of DOC transport in boreal catchments in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasurinen, Ville; Alfredsen, Knut; Ojala, Anne; Pumpanen, Jukka; Weyhenmeyer, Gesa A.; Futter, Martyn N.; Laudon, Hjalmar; Berninger, Frank

    2016-07-01

    Stream water dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations display high spatial and temporal variation in boreal catchments. Understanding and predicting these patterns is a challenge with great implications for water quality projections and carbon balance estimates. Although several biogeochemical models have been used to estimate stream water DOC dynamics, model biases common during both rain and snow melt-driven events. The parsimonious DOC-model, K-DOC, with 10 calibrated parameters, uses a nonlinear discharge and catchment water storage relationship including soil temperature dependencies of DOC release and consumption. K-DOC was used to estimate the stream water DOC concentrations over 5 years for eighteen nested boreal catchments having total area of 68 km2 (varying from 0.04 to 67.9 km2). The model successfully simulated DOC concentrations during base flow conditions, as well as, hydrological events in catchments dominated by organic and mineral soils reaching NSEs from 0.46 to 0.76. Our semimechanistic model was parsimonious enough to have all parameters estimated using statistical methods. We did not find any clear differences between forest and mire-dominated catchments that could be explained by soil type or tree species composition. However, parameters controlling slow release and consumption of DOC from soil water behaved differently for small headwater catchments (less than 2 km2) than for those that integrate larger areas of different ecosystem types (10-68 km2). Our results emphasize that it is important to account for nonlinear dependencies of both, soil temperature, and catchment water storage, when simulating DOC dynamics of boreal catchments.

  9. Effects of acid precipitation on a boreal forest ecosystem. Ion budgets and changes in water chemistry for the Laflamme Lake watershed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papineau, M.

    1987-01-01

    Data on surface waters have been gathered at the Laflamme Lake Watershed in Quebec as part of an ion budget research program. This watershed was set up in 1980 to assess the effects of long range transport of airborne pollutants on a boreal forest ecosystem receiving moderate to high sulphate loading. Precipitation data indicates that between 1981 and 1984, the average pH of water falling onto the watershed was 4.4, that precipitation quality is cyclic and that loading is episodic. The main components of precipitation on an equivalent basis are sulfate, hydrogen, nitrate and ammonium ions. ALthough the sulphate to nitrate ration is 2:1 on a yearly basis, nitrate ions are more important than sulphates in January. Since water and pollutants build up in the snowpack, spring melt is a critical period during which concentrations in surface waters and exports from the watershed are modifed for many parameters especially hydrogen and bicarbonate ions. Lake water quality is characteristic of lakes that are very sensitive to acidification. High sulfate values seem to indicate that the watershed has been affected by atmospheric loading. The average pH of the lake (6.4) indicates that the lake is not yet greatly acidified. Important buffering occurs in the soil and surficial deposits of the watershed. Stream water is slightly less mineralized, slightly more acidic and shows more pronounced changes in water quality than lake water. Over the last five years, sulfate, conductivity and some heavy metal levels have increased in surface waters while no significant trends were seen for pH and alkalinity. In other Quebec monitoring lakes, trends of decreasing pH were seen during this period. When wet loading is compared to stream output, hydrogen and nitrate ions are seen to be retained in the watershed while Ca, Mg, Na, K, sulphate and chloride are lost. 63 refs. 31 figs. 32 tabs.

  10. Modeling forest development after fire disturbance: Climate, soil organic layer, and nitrogen jointly affect forest canopy species and long-term ecosystem carbon accumulation in the North American boreal forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trugman, A. T.; Fenton, N.; Bergeron, Y.; Xu, X.; Welp, L.; Medvigy, D.

    2015-12-01

    Soil organic layer dynamics strongly affect boreal forest development after fire. Field studies show that soil organic layer thickness exerts a species-specific control on propagule establishment in the North American boreal forest. On organic soils thicker than a few centimeters, all propagules are less able to recruit, but broadleaf trees recruit less effectively than needleleaf trees. In turn, forest growth controls organic layer accumulation through modulating litter input and litter quality. These dynamics have not been fully incorporated into models, but may be essential for accurate projections of ecosystem carbon storage. Here, we develop a data-constrained model for understanding boreal forest development after fire. We update the ED2 model to include new aspen and black spruce species-types, species-specific propagule survivorship dependent on soil organic layer depth, species-specific litter decay rates, dynamically accumulating moss and soil organic layers, and nitrogen fixation by cyanobacteria associated with moss. The model is validated against diverse observations ranging from monthly to centennial timescales and spanning a climate gradient in Alaska, central Canada, and Quebec. We then quantify differences in forest development that result from changes in organic layer accumulation, temperature, and nitrogen. We find that (1) the model accurately reproduces a range of observations throughout the North American boreal forest; (2) the presence of a thick organic layer results in decreased decomposition and decreased aboveground productivity, effects that can increase or decrease ecosystem carbon uptake depending on location-specific attributes; (3) with a mean warming of 4°C, some forests switch from undergoing succession to needleleaf forests to recruiting multiple cohorts of broadleaf trees, decreasing ecosystem accumulation by ~30% after 300 years; (4) the availability of nitrogen regulates successional dynamics such than broadleaf species are

  11. Landscape control of uranium and thorium in boreal streams – spatiotemporal variability and the role of wetlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Laudon

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The concentrations of uranium and thorium in ten partly nested streams in the boreal forest region were monitored over a two-year period. Considerable spatiotemporal variations were observed, with little or no correlation between streams. The export of both uranium and thorium varied substantially between the subcatchments, ranging from 1.7 to 30 g km−2 a−1 for uranium and from 3.2 to 24 g km−2 a−1 for thorium. Airborne gamma spectrometry was used to measure the concentrations of uranium and thorium in surface soils throughout the catchment, but could not explain the variability in the export. Instead, the extent of lakes and mires within each subcatchment was found to be a stronger predictor for the transport of uranium and thorium. The results indicate that there is a predictable and systematic accumulation of both uranium and thorium in boreal mires. Approximately 65–80 % of uranium and 55–65 % of thorium entering a mire is estimated to be retained in the peat. Overall, accumulation in mires and other types of wetlands is estimated to decrease the fluxes of uranium and thorium from the boreal forest landscape by 30–40 %. The atmospheric deposition of uranium and thorium was also quantified and its contribution to boreal streams was found to be low compared to weathering.

  12. 北方森林生态系统对全球气候变化的响应研究进展%Response of boreal forest ecosystem to global climate change:a review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩士杰; 王庆贵

    2016-01-01

    北方森林是地球上第2大生物群区,约占陆地森林面积的30%,提供了从局地到全球的生态系统服务功能。1850年以来,全球性持续升温不断显现,2000—2050年全球至少升高2℃,甚至更高。预计到2100年,北方森林区冬季平均温度将升高1.3~6.3℃。与此同时,几乎所有的北方森林生态系统功能都将会受到影响,尤其是近几十年来,该区域发生了很多与温度升高相关的潜在生态响应。本文从碳循环、生物多样性、干旱化和林火发生频率以及冻土变化等方面具体综述了北方森林生态系统对于全球气候变化的响应。响应结果如下:1)气候变化对于北方森林碳循环动态的影响是极其复杂的,迄今为止并没有达成共识;分解对于温度的反应敏感程度至今仍存在很多不确定性。2)动物、植物和微生物(真菌)均对气候变化产生了一定的响应,表现为动物和植物的分布区进一步北移,但真菌的多样性和生产力响应机制尚无法确定。3)北方森林区随气候变化表现为进一步的干旱化和林火发生明显增加。4)北方森林区与冻土伴生,冻土随气候变暖表现出了面积缩小和活动层扩大的趋势。可见,北方森林对气候变化响应明显,尽管到目前为止有些响应机制尚不清楚,但变化趋势十分明显。本文旨在为北方森林的经营和管理提供基础数据和技术支持,实现北方森林的可持续经营。%The boreal forest, one of the largest biomes on the Earth, encompasses ~30% of the global forest area and provides ecosystem services that benefit society at levels ranging from local to global. Warming since the 1850s increases the annual mean temperature from 2000 to 2050 at least 2 ℃ or even more. Annual winter mean temperatures across the boreal zone could be 1. 3-6. 3℃ warmer than today' s by 2100. In the meantime, all aspects of boreal forest ecosystem function are likely to be

  13. Hydrological and chemical budgets of a mire pool formed on alluvial lowland of Hokkaido, northern Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Kizuka, Toshikazu; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Hirano, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Mire pools - permanently water-filled depressions on peatlands - provide important habitats for myriad organisms. Recently, water balance change and eutrophication resulting from agricultural development are increasingly evident in mire pools of alluvial lowlands. Conservation of mire pool hydrochemistry is necessary. We investigated the hydrological and chemical budgets of a pristine mire pool, Akanuma Pool (95,280 m2 area; 1.8 m mean depth), located in Kushiro Mire in Hokkaido, northern Jap...

  14. Carbon Dioxide and Methane Dynamics Trough Fen-Stream-Lake Continuum in North Boreal Zone, Finnish Lapland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juutinen, S.; Kuutti, V.; Valiranta, M.; Seppä, H.; Weckstrom, J.; Tuittila, E.

    2006-12-01

    This study aims to determine spatial and temporal variation in carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) dynamics through a fen-lake continuum. Study was carried out in a catchment dominated by aapa mire over the period from spring 2005 to autumn 2006 in north boreal zone in Finnish Lapland. The study region characteristically has very high lake and mire density. To cover spatial variability we set measurement plots to different plant communities along moisture gradient in the fen and to different positions in the stream and lake. Six different mire communities, stream input to lake marginal mire, a lower stream site, lake in- and output sites, and three littoral and one pelagial site were measured. We measured CO2 and CH4 gas fluxes using closed chamber technique, and dissolved CO2 and CH4 concentrations using headspace equilibration technique weekly to biweekly over the open water season. In association of gas sampling peat and water temperatures, water levels in mire and lake, and stream flow rate were measured. Catchment boundaries and proportions of mire, lake and mineral soil area were determined using topographic maps, aerial photograph and field survey. Precipitation data is achieved from nearby weather station. We will present results of spatial and temporal pattern and seasonal budget of wetland atmosphere exchange of CO2 and CH4. Our preliminary results indicate that there is input of dissolved CO2 and CH4 from mire to the lake. In addition, our observations indicate that there is spatial variation in gas flux dynamics in aquatic environments in relation to the differences in stream flow rate and sediment quality. Seasonally varying hydrology causes changes in gas flux dynamics in all studied wetland surfaces. Information from this study improve the knowledge of carbon transport and balances in northern aapa mire region, where mires are commonly affected by through flow from watershed, and where number of small lakes is great.

  15. CO2 and CH4 fluxes and carbon balance in the atmospheric interaction of boreal peatlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Release of CO2 from peat was studied using IR analyzer in a range of boreal peatlands under varying nutrient status and moisture conditions. Root associated CO2 efflux was separated from the total release by experiments both in the field and in a greenhouse. Emissions of CO2 and CH4 (the latter by gas chromatography) were measured during the snow-covered period and their contribution to the annual fluxes of these gases was inspected. Ecosystem exchange of CO2 under varying irradiation, temperature and moisture conditions was measured at different microsites at two peatland sites with different nutrient ecology. One site represented minerotrophic conditions during a wet growing season and the other site ombrotrophic conditions during an exceptionally dry growing season. Annual carbon balances were compiled for the two sites, and the role of the microsites in the annual carbon balance and CH4 release was studied. The Holocene history of CO2 sequestration and CH4 emission dynamics in a raised mire were simulated using lateral and vertical growth rates derived from radiocarbon ages of peat samples from mire bottom and vertical cores. The model was formulated for a geographic information system (GIS). Artificial or natural lowering of water table increased CO2 release from peat. A drought lasting from late May to July caused a 90 g C m2 net loss in the annual C balance of a natural ombrotrophic bog. In drained forested sites the increase in peat CO2 release could be even 100 %, but the development of the tree layer at least partially compensated for these losses. Wet conditions induced a net accumulation of 67 g C m-2a-1 in the minerotrophic fen site, while the long term average accumulation rate is estimated to be only 15 g C m-2a-1 for Finnish fens. Carbon balance in boreal peatlands is thus extremely sensitive to year-to-year climatic variations. Root activity of vascular plants contributed to the total peat CO2 efflux by 10-40 % as root respiration and root

  16. Seasonality in a boreal forest ecosystem affects the use of soil temperature and moisture as predictors of soil CO2 efflux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kellomäki

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Our objectives were to identify factors related to temporal variation of soil CO2 efflux in a boreal pine forest and to evaluate simple predictive models of temporal variation of soil CO2 efflux. Soil CO2 efflux was measured with a portable chamber in a Finnish Scots pine forest for three years, with a fourth year for model evaluation. Plot averages for soil CO2 efflux ranged from 0.04 to 0.90 g CO2 m−2 h−1 during the snow-free period, i.e. May–October, and from 0.04 to 0.13 g CO2 m−2 h−1 in winter. Soil temperature was a good predictor of soil CO2 efflux. A quadratic model of ln-transformed efflux explained 76–82 % of the variation over the snow-free period. The results revealed an effect of season: at a given temperature of the organic layer, soil CO2 efflux was higher later in the snow-free period (in August and September than in spring and early summer (in May and June. Regression coefficients for temperature (approximations of a Q10 value of month-specific models decreased with increasing average soil temperatures. Efflux in July, the month of peak photosynthesis, showed no clear response to temperature or moisture. Inclusion of a seasonality index, degree days, improved the accuracy of temperature response models to predict efflux for the fourth year of measurements, which was not used in building of regression models. During peak efflux from mid-July to late-August, efflux was underestimated with the models that included degree days as well as with the models that did not. The strong influence of the flux of photosynthates belowground and the importance of root respiration could explain the relative temperature insensitivity observed in July and together with seasonality of growth of root and root-associated mycorrhizal fungi could explain partial failure of models to predict magnitude of efflux in the peak season from mid-July to August. The effect of moisture early in the season was confounded by simultaneous advancement of

  17. Boreal forest health and global change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, S; Bernier, P; Kuuluvainen, T; Shvidenko, A Z; Schepaschenko, D G

    2015-08-21

    The boreal forest, one of the largest biomes on Earth, provides ecosystem services that benefit society at levels ranging from local to global. Currently, about two-thirds of the area covered by this biome is under some form of management, mostly for wood production. Services such as climate regulation are also provided by both the unmanaged and managed boreal forests. Although most of the boreal forests have retained the resilience to cope with current disturbances, projected environmental changes of unprecedented speed and amplitude pose a substantial threat to their health. Management options to reduce these threats are available and could be implemented, but economic incentives and a greater focus on the boreal biome in international fora are needed to support further adaptation and mitigation actions. PMID:26293953

  18. Seasonality in a boreal forest ecosystem affects the use of soil temperature and moisture as predictors of soil CO2 efflux

    OpenAIRE

    S. M. Niinistö; Kellomäki, S.; J. Silvola

    2011-01-01

    Our objectives were to identify factors related to temporal variation of soil CO2 efflux in a boreal pine forest and to evaluate simple predictive models of temporal variation of soil CO2 efflux. Soil CO2 efflux was measured with a portable chamber in a Finnish Scots pine forest for three years, with a fourth year for model evaluation. Plot averages for soil CO2 efflux ranged from 0.04 to 0.90 g CO2 m−2 h−1 during the snow-free period, i.e. May–October, and from 0.04 to 0.13...

  19. Seasonality in a boreal forest ecosystem affects the use of soil temperature and moisture as predictors of soil CO2 efflux

    OpenAIRE

    Kellomäki, S.; J. Silvola; S. M. Niinistö

    2011-01-01

    Our objectives were to identify factors related to temporal variation of soil CO2 efflux in a boreal pine forest and to evaluate simple predictive models of temporal variation of soil CO2 efflux. Soil CO2 efflux was measured with a portable chamber in a Finnish Scots pine forest for three years, with a fourth year for model evaluation. Plot averages for soil CO2 efflux ranged from 0.04 to 0.90 g CO2 m−2 h−1 during the snow-free period, i.e. May–October, and from 0.04 to 0.13 g CO2 m−2 h−1 in ...

  20. VEGETATION AND HYDROLOGY IN A SPRING MIRE COMPLEX IN WESTERN POMERANIA, POLAND

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WOLEJKO, L; AGGENBACH, C; VANDIGGELEN, R; GROOTJANS, AP

    1994-01-01

    The vegetation of one of the largest spring mires in Poland has been studied with special regard to hydrological conditions and stratigraphic development of the mire. Despite its biotic richness the mire is in a slow state of deterioration, initiated by man several hundred years ago. Evidence has be

  1. High Resolution Mapping of Peatland Hydroperiod at a High-Latitude Swedish Mire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan Torbick

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring high latitude wetlands is required to understand feedbacks between terrestrial carbon pools and climate change. Hydrological variability is a key factor driving biogeochemical processes in these ecosystems and effective assessment tools are critical for accurate characterization of surface hydrology, soil moisture, and water table fluctuations. Operational satellite platforms provide opportunities to systematically monitor hydrological variability in high latitude wetlands. The objective of this research application was to integrate high temporal frequency Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR and high spatial resolution Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR observations to assess hydroperiod at a mire in northern Sweden. Geostatistical and polarimetric (PLR techniques were applied to determine spatial structure of the wetland and imagery at respective scales (0.5 m to 25 m. Variogram, spatial regression, and decomposition approaches characterized the sensitivity of the two platforms (SAR and LiDAR to wetland hydrogeomorphology, scattering mechanisms, and data interrelationships. A Classification and Regression Tree (CART, based on random forest, fused multi-mode (fine-beam single, dual, quad pol Phased Array L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR and LiDAR-derived elevation to effectively map hydroperiod attributes at the Swedish mire across an aggregated warm season (May–September, 2006–2010. Image derived estimates of water and peat moisture were sensitive (R2 = 0.86 to field measurements of water table depth (cm. Peat areas that are underlain by permafrost were observed as areas with fluctuating soil moisture and water table changes.

  2. Armillaria ectypa, a rare fungus of mire in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Stasińska

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Armillaria ectypa is a saprotroph that occurs on active raised bogs and alkaline fens, as well as Aapa mires and transitional bogs. It is a very rare and threatened Eurasian species and one of the 33 fungal species proposed for inclusion into the Bern Convention. Its distribution in Poland, ecological notes and morphology of basidiocarp based on Polish specimens are presented.

  3. Restoration of travertine deposition in Polish spring mires

    OpenAIRE

    Bulte, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Calcareous mires are peat forming systems that are fed by groundwater and regularly deposit travertine. Nutrient availability is low and the p|H is high which makes for a very specific habitat for rare plants and animals. Because of changes in land-use an

  4. Carbon storage change in a partially forestry-drained boreal mire determined through peat column inventories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitkanen, A.; Tahvanainen, T.; Simola, H. [Univ. of Eastern Finland, Joensuu (Finland). Dept. pf Biology; Turunen, J. [Geological Survey of Finland, Kuopio (Finland)

    2013-09-01

    To study the impact of forestry drainage on peat carbon storage, we cored paired quantitative peat samples from undrained and drained sides of an eccentric bog. Five pairs of 0 to {<=} 100-cm-deep surface-peat cores, and a pair of profiles representing the full peat deposit provided stratigraphic evidence of marked loss of surface peat due to drainage. For the drained side cores, we found a relative subsidence of 25-37 cm of the surface, and a loss of about 10 kg{sub DW}{sup m-2}, corresponding to 131 {+-} 28 g C m{sup -2} a{sup -1} (mean {+-} SE) for the post-drainage period. Similar peat loss was also found in the full deposit profiles, thus lending credibility to the whole-column inventory approach, even though the decrease (9 kg{sub DW} m{sup -2}) was relatively small in comparison with the total carbon storage (233 and 224 kg{sub DW} m{sup -2} for the undrained and drained sides, respectively). (orig.)

  5. Hydroclimatic shifts recorded in peat archive from Rąbień mire (Central Poland) - better understanding of past climate changes using multidisciplinary approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Słowiński, Michał; Marcisz, Katarzyna; Płóciennik, Mateusz; Obremska, Milena; Pawłowski, Dominik; Okupny, Daniel; Słowińska, Sandra; Borówka, Ryszard; Kittel, Piotr; Forysiak, Jacek; Michczyńska, Danuta J.; Lamentowicz, Mariusz

    2016-04-01

    Hydrological changes are main drivers of the processes occurring in the peatland ecosystem, e.g. organic matter accumulation and decomposition. Hydroclimatic changes in mires are caused by various non-climatic factors, such as hydroseral succession or land use changes. Central Europe, namely Poland, is characterized by a transitional climate with influence o both continental and Atlantic air masses, which makes a this region a very sensitive to climate change. Here we explore a potential of multidisciplinary approach in reconstruction of past climate change and particularly hydroclimatic conditions which control in Sphagnum peatland ecosystem. We reconstructed 3300 years (between 3,500 BC and 200 BC) history of development of Rąbień mire using several biotic proxies (pollen, plant macrofossils, testate amoebae, Cladocera, Chironomidae) and geochemistry. Study site - Rąbień mire (area 42 ha) is located in central Poland and it is protected nature reserve. The origin of the mire depression is connected with the development of the thermokarst basin isolated by dunes. Rąbień mire is limnogenic, i.e. formed by the process of terrestrialisation of a water body and thickness of biogenic deposits is 6.2 m (440 cm of lacustrine sediment and 180 cm of peat). Our results demonstrate the high potential of Rąbień peat record for reconstructing the palaeohydrological dynamics. The studied time interval is characterized by two pronounced dry periods: ~2,500 to ~1,700 cal. BC and ~800 to ~600 cal. BC, and two periods of significant increases in water table: ~1,100 to ~800 cal. BC and ~600 to ~250 cal. BC. The timing of the wet shift at 600 cal. BC corresponds to wet periods in different sites from Central and Eastern Europe. Our investigation reveals a complex pattern of proxies, what might be linked to the past atmospheric circulation patterns. Extreme hydroclimatic conditions most possibly had a direct impact on the functioning of peatland ecosystems. What has been

  6. Seasonality in a boreal forest ecosystem affects the use of soil temperature and moisture as predictors of soil CO2 efflux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kellomäki

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Our objectives were to identify factors related to temporal variation of soil CO2 efflux in a boreal pine forest and to evaluate simple predictive models of temporal variation of soil CO2 efflux. Soil CO2 efflux was measured with a portable chamber in a Finnish Scots pine forest for three years, with a fourth year for model evaluation. Plot averages for soil CO2 efflux ranged from 0.04 to 0.90 g CO2 m−2 h−1 during the snow-free period, i.e. May–October, and from 0.04 to 0.13 g CO2 m−2 h−1 in winter. Soil temperature was a good predictor of soil CO2 efflux. A quadratic model of ln-transformed efflux explained 76–82% of the variation over the snow-free period. The results revealed strong seasonality: at a given soil temperature, soil CO2 efflux was higher later in the snow-free period than in spring and early summer. Regression coefficients for temperature (approximations of a Q10 value of month-specific models decreased with increasing average soil temperatures. Efflux in July, the month of peak photosynthesis, showed no clear response to temperature or moisture. Inclusion of a seasonality index, degree days, improved the accuracy of temperature response models to predict efflux for the fourth year of measurements, which was not used in building of regression models. Underestimation during peak efflux (mid-July to late-August remained uncorrected. The strong influence of the flux of photosynthates belowground and the importance of root respiration could explain the relative temperature insensitivity observed in July and together with seasonality of growth of root and root-associated mycorrhizal fungi could explain partial failure of models to predict magnitude of efflux in the peak season from mid-July to August. The effect of moisture early in the season was confounded by simultaneous advancement of the growing season and increase in temperature. In a dry year, however, the effect of drought was evident as soil CO2 efflux was some 30

  7. Age of vegetation simulated by Boreal ALFRESCO for the state of Alaska. Dataset generated in 2010. NAD83, Alaska Albers projection, http://spatialreference.org/ref/epsg/3338/

    Data.gov (United States)

    Arctic Landscape Conservation Cooperative — These rasters represent output from the Boreal ALFRESCO (Alaska Frame Based Ecosystem Code) model. Boreal ALFRESCO operates on an annual time step, in a landscape...

  8. The occurrence of rare earth elements in some Finnish mires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yliruokanen, I.

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available The content of the more abundant rare earths (RE (Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd and Sm in the ash of 399 peat samples from 26 Finnish mires was determined by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. The content of all rare earths (La-Lu, Y in 29 samples was also determined by spark source mass spectrometry. The median RE contents in peat ashes from areas where the bedrock consists of rapakivi granite, granite or archean gneiss are reported. Detailed data concerning the individual mires are also presented. The highest RE contents were found in samples from rapakivi granite areas where a strong negative Eu anomaly was also observed. The RE contents were in general highest at the basal peat layers.

  9. THE STUDY ON LATENT AND SENSIBLE HEAT FLUX OVER MIRE IN THE SANJIANG PLAIN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Understanding how surface energy fluxes respond to environmental variables and how their components vary on daily and seasonal temporal scales are critical for understanding the ecological process of wetland ecosystem. In view of the fact that studies on surface energy flux over mire in China have been very limited, we have initiated a long-term latent and sensible heat flux (two main components of the surface energy balance) observation over mire in the Sanjiang Plain from June to October in 2004 with the eddy covariance technique. Results showed that the latent and sensible heat flux had large seasonal and diurnal variation during the period of measurement. Generally, latent heat flux between the mire wetland and the atmosphere reached the maximum value in June and then gradually decreased from June to October, whose daily mean fluxes were 9.83,8.00,7.33, 4.82 and 2.04 MJ/(m2·d), respectively. By comparison, sensible heat flux changed unnoticeably with season change from June to October, which were 1.47,0.88,1.75, 1.61,1.33 MJ/(m2·d) respectively. The diurnal variation of both latent and sensible heat flux varied noticeably within a day. After the sunrise, the latent and sensible heat flux increased and reached the maximum at noon (11:00-13:00). Then they decreased gradually and reached the minimum value during the nighttime. The patterns of temporal variation in latent and sensible heat flux were significantly controlled by environmental factors. The latent heat flux was linearly dependent on net radiation and increased with increasing vapour pressure deficit until the vapour pressure deficit surpassed 11 hPa. Wind speed effect on latent heat flux was more complicated and, in general, showed a positive correlation between them in daytime. The sensible heat flux was controlled mainly by air temperature difference between the land surface and the overlying air. However, when the temperature difference was larger than 0.3 ℃, it had no effect on the sensible

  10. Ecohydrological features of some contrasting mires in Tierra del Fuego, Argentina

    OpenAIRE

    Grootjans, A.; Iturraspe, R.; A. Lanting; Fritz, C.; Joosten, H.

    2010-01-01

    In November 2005, Tierra del Fuego (Argentina) hosted the biennial conference and field excursion of the International Mire Conservation Group (IMCG). The group considered the vegetation, hydrology, peat stratigraphy and possible management options for about 20 mires which were visited during a seven-day excursion. We report here some field observations and measurements of electrical conductivity (EC25) in five mires which have been selected to encompass the most important ecohydrological fea...

  11. Dioxins, PCBs, and HCB in soil and peat profiles from a pristine boreal catchment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to explore how atmospherically derived soil pollution is affected by environmental processes at two typical boreal catchment landscape type settings: wetlands and forested areas. Measurements of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) in forest soil and peat from an oligotrophic mire at various depths were performed at a remote boreal catchment in northern Sweden. HOCs in peat were evenly distributed throughout the body of the mire while levels of HOCs in the forest soil increased with increased amount of organic matter. Evaluation of HOC composition by principal component analysis (PCA) showed distinct differences between surface soils and deeper soil and peat samples. This was attributed to vertical transport, degradation and/or shifting sources over time. The calculated net vertical transport differed between surface layers (0.3%) and deeper soils (8.0%), suggesting that vertical transport conditions and processes differ in the deeper layers compared to the surface layers. - Two typical boreal landscape types, wetlands and forested areas, show different vertical distribution and net vertical transport of HOCs.

  12. Large herbivore grazing affects the vegetation structure and greenhouse gas balance in a high arctic mire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbivory is an important part of most ecosystems and affects the ecosystems’ carbon balance both directly and indirectly. Little is known about herbivory and its impact on the carbon balance in high arctic mire ecosystems. We hypothesized that trampling and grazing by large herbivores influences the vegetation density and composition and thereby also the carbon balance. In 2010, we established fenced exclosures in high arctic Greenland to prevent muskoxen (Ovibos moschatus) from grazing. During the growing seasons of 2011 to 2013 we measured CO2 and CH4 fluxes in these ungrazed blocks and compared them to blocks subjected to natural grazing. Additionally, we measured depth of the water table and active layer, soil temperature, and in 2011 and 2013 an inventory of the vegetation density and composition were made. In 2013 a significant decrease in total number of vascular plant (33–44%) and Eriophorum scheuchzeri (51–53%) tillers were found in ungrazed plots, the moss-layer and amount of litter had also increased substantially in these plots. This resulted in a significant decrease in net ecosystem uptake of CO2 (47%) and likewise a decrease in CH4 emission (44%) in ungrazed plots in 2013. While the future of the muskoxen in a changing arctic is unknown, this experiment points to a potentially large effect of large herbivores on the carbon balance in natural Arctic ecosystems. It thus sheds light on the importance of grazing mammals, and hence adds to our understanding of natural ecosystem greenhouse gas balance in the past and in the future. (letter)

  13. Quantifying the water balance of Mfabeni Mire (iSimangaliso Wetland Park, South Africa to understand its importance, functioning and vulnerability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Grundling

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Peatlands occurring in regions with high rates of total evaporation (ET, matching or exceeding precipitation (P during seasonal dry periods or longer-term dry spells, are dependent on sustained groundwater flows to ensure peat accumulation. The objective of this study was to quantify the water balance of Mfabeni Mire in South Africa over one year, and thereby define its contribution to downstream and adjacent ecosystems and identify risks and consequences likely to arise from future shifts in the water balance. P (1,031 mm and ET (1,053 mm dominated the water balance measured from May 2008 to April 2009. These were followed by groundwater inflows (14 mm, stream outflow (9 mm and storage change (-3 mm, a net loss in water stored in the mire with the smallest flux being groundwater outflow (0.3 mm. There were differences in the seasonal patterns of ET from the two dominant plant communities (swamp forest and sedge/reed fen, which probably resulted from their significantly different canopy structures. Limiting factors for ET were low vapour pressure deficit and cloud cover. Although the water balance of Mfabeni Mire was dominated by and equally split between ET and P, it still contributed a small efflux to downstream ecosystems by streamflow. Its value in a landscape where seasonality and long-term dry periods are major ecological drivers lies in its damping effect on climatic variability. This creates a more stable environment for adjacent aquatic ecosystems by contributing to a steady groundwater condition. Mires occurring in areas that experience dry periods, where water stress frequently threatens biodiversity, should be recognised as assets in natural resource management; and their potential to support adjacent ecosystems should be protected through planning and conservation practices. Management of the area should include careful consideration of any proposed changes in land use or encouragement of one plant community at the expense of

  14. Dissolved inorganic carbon and organic carbon in mires in the Forsmark area. A pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) are the large dissolved carbon pools in mires. They are both related to a number of factors such as groundwater flow, minerogenic influence and peat properties, which all are more or less related to peatland development stage. In a scenario of a release of radionuclides from an underground repository containing radioactive material, behaviour of these pools during the mire ontogeny will be of importance for the understanding of how C-14 will constitute a potential risk to humans and non-human biota. In this pilot study, DIC and DOC concentrations were investigated for three mires representing a potential sequence of peatland development in a coastal area at Forsmark in central Sweden characterized by land upheaval, a flat topography and calcareous content in the soil. The mires where chosen based on difference in height above the sea level, covering approximate 1000 years, and characteristics based on their vegetation. Water samples were collected during August from all three mires at two different depths in the anoxic layer of the mires, by extracting water from peat obtained with a peat corer. DIC concentrations where related to the age of the mires, with the lowest concentrations in the highest located mire. There was a positive correlation between pH and DIC, where the higher DIC concentrations were found in the 'richer' fens. DIC concentrations were also positively related to the conductivity within and between the mires, where conductivity would be a proxy for the dominating cation Ca2+ associated to the calcareous-influenced groundwater. DOC concentrations were highest in the oldest mire, but were similar in the younger mires. No patterns were found between DIC and DOC, and the peat bulk density. The report ends with suggestions on how a continued study could be improved

  15. Dissolved inorganic carbon and organic carbon in mires in the Forsmark area. A pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loefgren, Anders [EcoAnalytica, Haegersten (Sweden)

    2011-12-15

    Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) are the large dissolved carbon pools in mires. They are both related to a number of factors such as groundwater flow, minerogenic influence and peat properties, which all are more or less related to peatland development stage. In a scenario of a release of radionuclides from an underground repository containing radioactive material, behaviour of these pools during the mire ontogeny will be of importance for the understanding of how C-14 will constitute a potential risk to humans and non-human biota. In this pilot study, DIC and DOC concentrations were investigated for three mires representing a potential sequence of peatland development in a coastal area at Forsmark in central Sweden characterized by land upheaval, a flat topography and calcareous content in the soil. The mires where chosen based on difference in height above the sea level, covering approximate 1000 years, and characteristics based on their vegetation. Water samples were collected during August from all three mires at two different depths in the anoxic layer of the mires, by extracting water from peat obtained with a peat corer. DIC concentrations where related to the age of the mires, with the lowest concentrations in the highest located mire. There was a positive correlation between pH and DIC, where the higher DIC concentrations were found in the 'richer' fens. DIC concentrations were also positively related to the conductivity within and between the mires, where conductivity would be a proxy for the dominating cation Ca{sup 2+} associated to the calcareous-influenced groundwater. DOC concentrations were highest in the oldest mire, but were similar in the younger mires. No patterns were found between DIC and DOC, and the peat bulk density. The report ends with suggestions on how a continued study could be improved.

  16. Recent burning of boreal forests exceeds fire regime limits of the past 10,000 years

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly, Ryan; Chipman, Melissa L.; Philip E Higuera; Stefanova, Ivanka; Brubaker, Linda B.; Hu, Feng Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Wildfire activity in boreal forests is anticipated to increase dramatically, with far-reaching ecological and socioeconomic consequences. Paleorecords are indispensible for elucidating boreal fire regime dynamics under changing climate, because fire return intervals and successional cycles in these ecosystems occur over decadal to centennial timescales. We present charcoal records from 14 lakes in the Yukon Flats of interior Alaska, one of the most flammable ecoregions of the boreal forest bi...

  17. Hydrological landscape settings of base-rich fen mires and fen meadows : an overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grootjans, A.P.; Adema, E.B.; Bleuten, W.; Joosten, H.; Madaras, M.; Janáková, M.; Middleton, B.

    2006-01-01

    Question: Why do similar fen meadow communities occur in different landscapes? How does the hydrological system sustain base-rich fen mires and fen meadows? Location: Interdunal wetlands and heathland pools in The Netherlands, percolation mires in Germany, Poland, and Siberia, and calcareous spring

  18. Long-term effects of single potassium fertilization on {sup 137}Cs levels in plants and fungi in a boreal forest ecosystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosen, K., E-mail: Klas.Rosen@mark.slu.s [Department of Soil and Environment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SLU, P.O. Box 7014, SE-750 07 Uppsala (Sweden); Vinichuk, M. [Department of Soil and Environment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SLU, P.O. Box 7014, SE-750 07 Uppsala (Sweden); Department of Ecology, Zhytomyr State Technological University, 103 Chernyakhovsky Str., 10005 Zhytomyr (Ukraine); Nikolova, I.; Johanson, K. [Department of Soil and Environment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SLU, P.O. Box 7014, SE-750 07 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2011-02-15

    We examined the long-term effects of a single application of potassium (K) fertilizer (100 kg K ha{sup -1}) in 1992 on {sup 137}Cs uptake in a forest ecosystem in central Sweden. {sup 137}Cs activity concentrations were determined in three low-growing perennial shrubs, heather (Calluna vulgaris), lingonberry (Vaccinium vitis-idaea) and bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus), and in four wild fungal species (Cortinarius semisanguineus, Lactarius rufus, Rozites caperata and Suillus variegatus). Uptake of {sup 137}Cs by plants and fungi growing on K-fertilized plots 17 years after application of the K fertilizer was significantly lower than in corresponding species growing in a non-fertilized control area. The {sup 137}Cs activity concentration was 21-58% lower in fungal sporocarps and 40-61% lower in plants in the K-fertilized area compared with the control. Over the study period, this decrease in {sup 137}Cs activity concentration was more consistent in plants than in fungi, although the effect was statistically significant and strongly pronounced in all species. The effect of K fertilization in reducing {sup 137}Cs activity concentration in fungi and plants decreased over time but was still significant in 2009, 17 years after fertilization. This suggests that application of K fertilizer to forests is an appropriate and effective long-term measure to decrease radiocaesium accumulation in plants and fungi. - Research highlights: {yields} Effects of potassium fertilizer on {sup 137}Cs uptake by plants and fungi are investigated. {yields} {sup 137}Cs activity concentrations in forest plants decreased even within the first year. {yields} The most significant reduction occurred over the first 7-8 years. {yields} The reduction in fungi was less pronounced, but still statistically significant.

  19. Mineralization of cellulose in frozen boreal soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oquist, Mats G.; Segura, Javier; Sparrman, Tobias; Nilsson, Mats; Schleucher, Jurgen

    2015-04-01

    Soils of high-latitude ecosystems store a large fraction of the global soil carbon. In boreal forests, the microbial mineralization of soil organic matter (SOM) during winter can affect the ecosystems net carbon balance. Recent research has shown that microorganisms in the organic surface layer of boreal forest soil can mineralize and grow on simple, soluble monomeric substrates under frozen conditions. However, any substantial impacts of microbial activity in frozen soils on long-term soil carbon balances ultimately depends on whether soil microorganisms can utilize and grow the more complex, polymeric constituents of SOM. In order to evaluate the potential for soil microorganisms to metabolize carbon polymers at low temperatures, we incubated boreal forest soil samples amended with [13C]-cellulose and studied the microbial catabolic and anabolic utilization of the substrate under frozen and unfrozen conditions (-4 and +4°C). Freezing of the soil markedly reduced microbial utilization of the cellulose. The [13C]-CO2 production rate in the samples at +4°C were 0.52 mg CO2 SOM -1 day-1 while rates in the frozen samples (-4°C) were 0.01 mg CO2 SOM -1 day-1. However, newly synthetized [13C]-enriched cell membrane lipids, PLFAs, were detected in soil samples incubated both above and below freezing, confirming that cellulose can sustain also anabolic activity of the microbial populations under frozen conditions. The reduced metabolic rates induced by freezing indicate constraints on exoenzymatic activity, as well as substrate diffusion rates that we can attribute to reduced liquid water content of the frozen soil. We conclude that the microbial population in boreal forest soil has the capacity to metabolize, and grow, on polymeric substrates at temperatures below zero, which involves maintaining exoenzymatic activity in frozen soils. This capacity manifests the importance of SOM mineralization during the winter season and its importance for the net carbon balance of

  20. Studies on reference mires: 1. Lastensuo and Pesaensuo in 2010-2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New lakes and mires will develop in the sea area now surrounding Olkiluoto Island due to the postglacial land uplift. Despite the lack of well-developed mires at present Olkiluoto Island, input data for modelling the future development of the region are needed. Therefore, analogue objects in a larger geographical area have been selected. This Working Report presents first results from studies targeted on two such mires, Lastensuo and Pesaensuo. Not all collected samples have been analysed yet, but will appear in further versions of this report. The characteristics of the study locations appeared to correspond generally well with preliminary information based on literature and GIS analyses. Various site types were covered by the study locations on Lastensuo mire, whereas those on Pesaensuo mire were dwarf-shrub pine bog all over. Pine was the dominant tree species on all of the plots. Because sampling occurred in late summer, some berry (and on Pesaensuo also mushroom) samples were obtained of species typical of mires. On the studied plots, the deepest peat depths reached to 6.5 m (Lastensuo) and 5.5 m (Pesaensuo). Decomposition of sampled peat varied from very weakly decomposed to almost completely decomposed. Element analyses and distribution coefficient values (Kd) of the indigenous key elements Cl, Cs, I, Mo, Nb, Ni, Se and Sr were presented for one plot on Lastensuo mire. Procedures have been improved based on experiences gained on the field and laboratory analyses of the samples. Factors causing uncertainties and further ideas to improve the representativeness of the work are presented in this Working Report. Studies have already been continued on August 2012, when four more plots were established on the Lastensuo mire. In the future, sampling will be extended to another mire. (orig.)

  1. Hydrological and chemical budgets of a mire pool formed on alluvial lowland of Hokkaido, northern Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizuka, Toshikazu; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Hirano, Takashi

    2011-04-01

    SummaryMire pools - permanently water-filled depressions on peatlands - provide important habitats for myriad organisms. Recently, water balance change and eutrophication resulting from agricultural development are increasingly evident in mire pools of alluvial lowlands. Conservation of mire pool hydrochemistry is necessary. We investigated the hydrological and chemical budgets of a pristine mire pool, Akanuma Pool (95,280 m 2 area; 1.8 m mean depth), located in Kushiro Mire in Hokkaido, northern Japan, during its ice-free period (April-November) in 2007-2008. Thereby we elucidated the hydrochemical characteristics of mire pools formed on alluvial lowlands. Surface water inflow and surface water outflow dominated the hydrological budget, respectively representing 18.3 and 20.2 mm day -1. Groundwater seepage through the pool bottom and surface water inflow mainly supplied the lake water with total nitrogen and Ca 2+. Total phosphorus was supplied mostly by groundwater seepage through the bottom. These chemical constituents were run off from the pool mostly by surface water outflow. The input and output fluxes of water were 16-20 times greater than those of North American mire pools because of Hokkaido's higher values of precipitation minus evapotranspiration ( P- ET). Moreover, the Ca 2+ input into the Akanuma Pool was several times greater than those reported from North American studies. Alluvial mineral soil under the peat layer supplied large amounts of nutrients and mineral ions including Ca 2+. These results demonstrate that Hokkaido mire pools' hydrochemical characteristics differ greatly from those of pools in North America. Furthermore, each hydrological budget component maintained a constant fraction throughout the two year study period, although the absolute flow rate varied concomitantly with the precipitation level. Maintaining this budget stability is important for the conservation of mire pool hydrochemistry.

  2. Studies on reference mires: 1. Lastensuo and Pesaensuo in 2010-2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haapanen, R. [Haapanen Forest Consulting, Vanhakylae (Finland); Aro, L. [Finnish Forest Research Institute, Vantaa (Finland); Lahdenperae, A.-M. [Saanio and Riekkola Oy, Helsinki (Finland); Helin, J.; Ikonen, A.T.K.

    2013-07-15

    New lakes and mires will develop in the sea area now surrounding Olkiluoto Island due to the postglacial land uplift. Despite the lack of well-developed mires at present Olkiluoto Island, input data for modelling the future development of the region are needed. Therefore, analogue objects in a larger geographical area have been selected. This Working Report presents first results from studies targeted on two such mires, Lastensuo and Pesaensuo. Not all collected samples have been analysed yet, but will appear in further versions of this report. The characteristics of the study locations appeared to correspond generally well with preliminary information based on literature and GIS analyses. Various site types were covered by the study locations on Lastensuo mire, whereas those on Pesaensuo mire were dwarf-shrub pine bog all over. Pine was the dominant tree species on all of the plots. Because sampling occurred in late summer, some berry (and on Pesaensuo also mushroom) samples were obtained of species typical of mires. On the studied plots, the deepest peat depths reached to 6.5 m (Lastensuo) and 5.5 m (Pesaensuo). Decomposition of sampled peat varied from very weakly decomposed to almost completely decomposed. Element analyses and distribution coefficient values (Kd) of the indigenous key elements Cl, Cs, I, Mo, Nb, Ni, Se and Sr were presented for one plot on Lastensuo mire. Procedures have been improved based on experiences gained on the field and laboratory analyses of the samples. Factors causing uncertainties and further ideas to improve the representativeness of the work are presented in this Working Report. Studies have already been continued on August 2012, when four more plots were established on the Lastensuo mire. In the future, sampling will be extended to another mire. (orig.)

  3. The LiDAR-based topo-hydrological modelling of the Nigula mire, SW Estonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elve Lode

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available There was no big influence of the used cell scales and algorithms on the mean topographical properties of the Nigula mire digital elevation models (DEMs. The DEMs, generated using the Triangulated Irregular Network and Inverse Distance Weighted algorithms, revealed the closest mire surface properties from all used generation algorithms. The subtracted MAX–MIN DEMs layer revealed a well visible net of ditches and possible plant cover pattern differentiated in vertical scale. In the Nigula mire 58% of the mire surface basins have S–SW orientation, followed by the levelled and less fractionated N–NE basin region (23% coverage, and the most fractionated but with steeper sloping W-orientated basin region (8% coverage.

  4. Hydrological and chemical budgets of Akanuma Pool in Kushiro Mire, northern Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizuka, T.; Yamada, H.; Hirano, T.

    2009-12-01

    In Japan, many mire pools have been disappeared because of agricultural and residential development that has taken place since the latter 20th century. Recently, the remaining pools have been recognized as important habitats for numerous organisms, and have been conserved similarly to those in foreign countries. However, the health of their hydrochemical conditions remains unknown because few studies have examined the mire pools’ hydrochemistry. Only two studies of mire pools’ hydrological and chemical budgets have been reported--both for North America. We investigated the hydrological and chemical budgets of a primitive mire pool, Akanuma Pool (area 95,280 m2; mean depth 1.8 m), located in Kushiro Mire, Hokkaido, northern Japan during its ice-free period (April-November) in 2007-2008. The hydrological budget was dominated by surface flow input and surface flow output, respectively representing 17 and 19 mm day-1. Total nitrogen, total phosphorus, and Ca2+ were supplied to the pool water mainly by groundwater seepage through the pool bottom and were run off from the pool mostly by surface flow output. The input and output fluxes of water were about 20 times greater than those of mire pools in North America because of higher values of precipitation minus evapotranspiration in Japan. Moreover, the Ca2+ input of the Akanuma Pool was 7-17 times greater than reported in North America studies. Probably, mineral ions including Ca2+ were supplied by alluvial mineral soils under the peat layer. These results reflect that hydrochemical characteristics of mire pools in Japan differ greatly from those in North America. Furthermore, the characteristics might be general because Japanese mire pools form on alluvial lowlands and have greater precipitation.

  5. Negligible in-stream processing of dissolved organic matter in low order boreal streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothawala, Dolly; Ji, Xing; Laudon, Hjalmar; Ågren, Anneli; Futter, Martyn; Köhler, Stephan; Tranvik, Lars

    2016-04-01

    Low order boreal streams have been considered to be reactive interfaces where dissolved organic matter (DOM) enters inland waters from the surrounding catchment soils. Disentangling the relative influence of key environmental factors suspected to influence stream water DOM composition is highly relevant for predicting the reactivity, and fate of terrestrial DOM. Here, we examined changes to DOM composition using optical approaches from 17 boreal streams, ranging from first to fourth order, over 14 months. We identified two specific fluorescing components, which expressed either a clear mire-wetland or forest signature, providing distinct molecular markers of land cover that is typical of the boreal ecozone. In fact, land cover alone explained 49% of the variability in stream DOM composition. In contrast, seasonal fluctuations in hydrology only contributed to minor shifts (8%) in DOM composition. Perhaps most intriguingly, in-stream transformations to DOM composition were undetectable, suggesting that the extent of in-stream processing was negligible. These findings suggest that low order boreal streams act as passive pipes rather than active reactors. Ultimately, we find that that in-stream processing of DOM was restricted by water residence times (less than 2 days). In summary, these results now leave us better equipped to predict where in the landscape, and when during the year, key DOM transformations may occur within the aquatic conduit.

  6. Ecohydrological features of some contrasting mires in Tierra del Fuego, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Grootjans

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In November 2005, Tierra del Fuego (Argentina hosted the biennial conference and field excursion of the International Mire Conservation Group (IMCG. The group considered the vegetation, hydrology, peat stratigraphy and possible management options for about 20 mires which were visited during a seven-day excursion. We report here some field observations and measurements of electrical conductivity (EC25 in five mires which have been selected to encompass the most important ecohydrological features of the mires of Tierra del Fuego. Existing and new data on landscape topography and vegetation were combined in three-dimensional drawings. These drawings are actually conceptual models which could underpin further ecohydrological research, and proved to be very useful as a basis for discussions amongst conference participants about possible ecohydrological relationships. The mires that were studied developed under a wide range of climatic conditions and included fens and bogs. The bogs typically developed from lakes or fens and most are now dominated by Sphagnum magellanicum. This species forms large hummocks, and can invade weakly-buffered fens. Most of the mires were well preserved, but effects of human impact - such as road building and peat extraction - were also noticeable.

  7. Geological settings of the protected Selisoo mire (northeastern Estonia threatened by oil shale mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Hiiemaa

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The protected Selisoo mire in northeastern Estonia is located above valuable oil shale resources, partly in the permitted mining area. We describe in detail the geomorphology and geological setting of the mire to understand the natural preconditions for its formation, development and preservation. We used the LiDAR-based digital elevation model for relief analysis, mapped the peat thickness with ground-penetrating radar and described the Quaternary cover through corings. Ridges, oriented perpendicular to the generally southward-sloping terrain, and shallow depressions at the surface of mineral soil have influenced mire formation and its spatio-temporal dynamics. The Quaternary cover under the mire is thin and highly variable. Therefore the mire is hydro­geologically insufficiently isolated from the limestone bedrock that is drained by the nearby oil shale mine and consequently the mining activities approaching the mire may have a negative influence on the wetland and proposed Natura 2000 site. Natura 2000 type wetlands, both protected or currently outside the nature reserves, cover a significant portion of the prospective oil shale mining areas. The distribution and resilience of those sites may significantly influence further utilization of oil shale resources.

  8. CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} fluxes and carbon balance in the atmospheric interaction of boreal peatlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alm, J.

    1997-12-31

    Release of CO{sub 2} from peat was studied using IR analyzer in a range of boreal peatlands under varying nutrient status and moisture conditions. Root associated CO{sub 2} efflux was separated from the total release by experiments both in the field and in a greenhouse. Emissions of CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} (the latter by gas chromatography) were measured during the snow-covered period and their contribution to the annual fluxes of these gases was inspected. Ecosystem exchange of CO{sub 2} under varying irradiation, temperature and moisture conditions was measured at different microsites at two peatland sites with different nutrient ecology. One site represented minerotrophic conditions during a wet growing season and the other site ombrotrophic conditions during an exceptionally dry growing season. Annual carbon balances were compiled for the two sites, and the role of the microsites in the annual carbon balance and CH{sub 4} release was studied. The Holocene history of CO{sub 2} sequestration and CH{sub 4} emission dynamics in a raised mire were simulated using lateral and vertical growth rates derived from radiocarbon ages of peat samples from mire bottom and vertical cores. The model was formulated for a geographic information system (GIS). Artificial or natural lowering of water table increased CO{sub 2} release from peat. A drought lasting from late May to July caused a 90 g C m{sup 2} net loss in the annual C balance of a natural ombrotrophic bog. In drained forested sites the increase in peat CO{sub 2} release could be even 100 %, but the development of the tree layer at least partially compensated for these losses. Wet conditions induced a net accumulation of 67 g C m{sup -2}a{sup -1} in the minerotrophic fen site, while the long term average accumulation rate is estimated to be only 15 g C m{sup -2}a{sup -1} for Finnish fens. Carbon balance in boreal peatlands is thus extremely sensitive to year-to-year climatic variations. Root activity of vascular plants

  9. Browning boreal forests of western North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbyla, David

    2011-12-01

    Forest Ecol. Manag. 227 219-32 Berg E E, Hillman K M, Dial R and DeRuwe A 2009 Recent woody invasion of wetlands on the Kenai Peninsula Lowlands, south-central Alaska: a major regime shift after 18 000 years of wet Sphagnum-sedge peat recruitment Canadian J. Forest Res. 39 2033-46 Brabets T P and Walvoord M A 2009 Trends in streamflow in the Yukon River Basin from 1944 to 2004 and the influence of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation J. Hydrol. 371 108-19 Bunn A G, Goetz S J, Kimball J S and Zhang K 2007 Northern high-latitude ecosystems respond to climate change EOS Trans. Am. Geophys. Union 88 333-40 D'Arrigo R, Kaufmann R K, Davi N, Jacoby G C, Laskowski C, Myneni R B and Cherubini P 2004 Thresholds for warming-induced growth decline at elevational tree line in the Yukon Territory, Canada Glob. Biogeochem. Cycles 18 GB3021 Goetz S J, Bunn A G, Fiske G J and Houghton R A 2005 Satellite-observed photosynthetic trends across boreal North America associated with climate and fire disturbance Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 102 13521-5 Lloyd A H and Bunn A G 2007 Responses of the circumpolar boreal forest to the 20th century climate variability Environ. Res. Lett. 2 045013 Lloyd A H and Fastie C L 2002 Spatial and temporal variability in the growth and climate response of treeline trees in Alaska Clim. Change 52 481-509 Malmström C and Raffa K R 2000 Biotic disturbance agents in the boreal forest: considerations for vegetation change models Glob. Change Biol. 6 (Suppl. 1) 35-48 McGuire A D, Ruess R W, Lloyd A, Yarie J, Clein J S and Juday G P 2010 Vulnerability of white spruce tree growth in interior Alaska in response to climate variability: dendrochronological, demographic, and experimental perspectives Canadian J. Forest Res. 40 1197-209 Michealian M, Hogg E H, Hall R J and Arsenault E 2011 Massive mortality of aspen following severe drought along the southern edge of the Canadian boreal forest Glob. Change Biol. 17 2084-94 Parent M B and Verbyla D 2010 The browning of Alaska

  10. MIRE:A GRAPHICAL R PACKAGE FOR MICRORNA RELATED ANALYSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xing-qi Yan; Kang Tu; Lu Xie; Yi-xue Li; Bin Yin; Yan-hua Gong; Jian-gang Yuan; Bo-qin Qiang; Xiao-zhong Peng

    2008-01-01

    Objective To provide a set of useful analysis tools for the researchers to explore the microRNA data.Methods The R language was used for generating the Graphical Users Interface and implementing most functions.Some Practical Extraction and Report Language (Perl) scripts were used for parsing source fries.Results We developed a graphical R package named miRE,which was designated for the analysis of microRNA functions,genomic organization,etc.This package provided effective and convenient tools for molecular biologists to deal with routine analyses in microRNA-related research.With its help,the users would be able to build a desktopcentered microRNA research environment quite easily and effectively,miRE is freely available at http://www.biosino.org/~kanghu/WorkPresentation/miRE/miRE.html.A detailed user manual and tutorials with example code and image are also available.Conclusion miRE is a tool providing an open-source,user-friendly,integrated interface for microRNA-related analysis.With its help,researchers can perform microRNA-related analysis more efficiently.

  11. Impact of drainage on vegetation of transitional mires in Estonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Paal

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The extent of drainage impact was studied in five transitional mires along a hydrosequence. The principal environmental variables driven by drainage are the minimum water level in the peat layer, together with the dry matter and total-N contents of peat. The drawdown effect of a cutoff ditch (intercepting surface and subsurface flow on the minimum water level extends to a distance of 250–320 m. Peat water levels above -50 cm are associated with a sharp increase in Sphagnum cover, and the percentage of bog-specific species increases markedly when the minimum water level is higher than -25 cm. The girths and heights of trees and canopy closure of the tree layer decrease rapidly up to a distance of 200 m from the cutoff ditch. Negative impacts of the cutoff ditch on the canopy cover and average height of trees, estimated using LIDAR data, can be followed for distances up to 400 m and 350 m, respectively. The density and height of shrub stems start to increase at a distance of 16 m and continue to increase up to 400 m from the cutoff ditch. The percentage of bog-specific species increases up to a distance of 100 m, whilst the percentage of fen-specific species begins to decrease remarkably at a distance of about 200 m from the cutoff ditch.

  12. Spatial variability of selected physicochemical parameters within peat deposits in small valley mire: a geostatistical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawłowski Dominik

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Geostatistical methods for 2D and 3D modelling spatial variability of selected physicochemical properties of biogenic sediments were applied to a small valley mire in order to identify the processes that lead to the formation of various types of peat. A sequential Gaussian simulation was performed to reproduce the statistical distribution of the input data (pH and organic matter and their semivariances, as well as to honouring of data values, yielding more ‘realistic’ models that show microscale spatial variability, despite the fact that the input sample cores were sparsely distributed in the X-Y space of the study area. The stratigraphy of peat deposits in the Ldzań mire shows a record of long-term evolution of water conditions, which is associated with the variability in water supply over time. Ldzań is a fen (a rheotrophic mire with a through-flow of groundwater. Additionally, the vicinity of the Grabia River is marked by seasonal inundations of the southwest part of the mire and increased participation of mineral matter in the peat. In turn, the upper peat layers of some of the central part of Ldzań mire are rather spongy, and these peat-forming phytocoenoses probably formed during permanent waterlogging.

  13. Ecohydrology of Interior Alaska boreal forest systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cable, J.; Bolton, W. R.

    2012-12-01

    The ecohydrology of boreal forest ecosystems of Interior Alaska is not well understood largely because of challenges posed by the presence of discontinuous permafrost. Near-surface permafrost results in storage-dominated systems with cold, poorly drained soils, and slow growing, low statured coniferous trees (Picea mariana) or CDE's. The transition to permafrost-free areas can occur over a few meters and is accompanied by a vegetation community dominated by large deciduous trees (Populus sp. and Betula sp.) or DDE's. Typically, areas with permafrost are on north facing slopes and valley bottoms, and areas without permafrost are south facing. In Alaska's boreal forest, the permafrost is very warm and vulnerable to the effects of climate change. Once permafrost begins to thaw, the vegetation community shifts from coniferous to deciduous dominated. Streamflow in watersheds with a larger permafrost distribution tends to be higher and more responsive to precipitation events than in watersheds with low permafrost distribution. In fact, precipitation events in the low permafrost areas do not infiltrate past the rooting zone of the deciduous trees (~5-40 cm). This suggests that the deciduous trees may remove water from the system via uptake and transpiration. We focus on how vegetation water use affects boreal forest hydrology in areas of discontinuous permafrost. Specifically, we ask: what are the patterns of vegetation water use in areas with and without permafrost? This study focuses on the CDE and DDE systems. Our research sites are established on low and high locations on each aspect (south facing DDE, north facing CDE) to capture the variability associated with the different hillside drainage properties. At each of the four sites during the growing season, we measured various aspects of plant water use dynamics, including water flux, water content, water sources, depth of water uptake in the soil, and water stress. We use a Bayesian framework to analyze the data. We

  14. Global estimates of boreal forest carbon stocks and flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Corey J. A.; Warkentin, Ian G.

    2015-05-01

    The boreal ecosystem is an important global reservoir of stored carbon and a haven for diverse biological communities. The natural disturbance dynamics there have historically been driven by fire and insects, with human-mediated disturbances increasing faster than in other biomes globally. Previous research on the total boreal carbon stock and predictions of its future flux reveal high uncertainty in regional patterns. We reviewed and standardised this extensive body of quantitative literature to provide the most up-to-date and comprehensive estimates of the global carbon balance in the boreal forest. We also compiled century-scale predictions of the carbon budget flux. Our review and standardisation confirmed high uncertainty in the available data, but there is evidence that the region's total carbon stock has been underestimated. We found a total carbon store of 367.3 to 1715.8 Pg (1015 g), the mid-point of which (1095 Pg) is between 1.3 and 3.8 times larger than any previous mean estimates. Most boreal carbon resides in its soils and peatlands, although estimates are highly uncertain. We found evidence that the region might become a net carbon source following a reduction in carbon uptake rate from at least the 1980s. Given that the boreal potentially constitutes the largest terrestrial carbon source in the world, in one of the most rapidly warming parts of the globe (Walsh, 2014), how we manage these stocks will be influential on future climate dynamics.

  15. Developing a Student-Scientist Partnership: Boreal Forest Watch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Shannon; Huczek, George; Muir, Bradley

    1998-03-01

    A student-scientist partnership outreach program was funded by the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) to involve students and teachers in scientific investigations pertinent to global change research occurring within the boreal region of Canada. Boreal Forest Watch was planned, designed and piloted by an interdisciplinary group of education and science professionals from the University of New Hampshire, the Prince Albert National Park, and several schools in central Saskatchewan, Canada. A two goal approach was adopted to 1) ensure the educational significance of the program and 2) introduce scientifically valid methods for collection of research data pertinent to global change scientists. Professional educators and school administrators from Saskatchewan were recruited to assist in project planning to ensure that the proposed activities fit within the existing curriculum framework. This process was essential for successful adoption of the program by participating teachers. The process and approach of initiating Boreal Forest Watch are presented in this paper. This program became fully functional in September, 1996 with the training of several participating teachers. Perspectives of the program and its future are provided by members of the design team. Boreal Forest Watch is a unique opportunity for both Canadian students and their teachers to explore their natural environment, learn scientific methods and principles, and contribute data to the global change research community.

  16. Long-term CO2 flux dynamics and soil C stock changes of a drained fen mire under different grassland management practices in Northeast Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustin, Juergen; Giebels, Michael; Albiac Borraz, Elisa; Hoffmann, Mathias; Sommer, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Fen mires, widely distributed in Germany and Northern Europe, contain extreme high amounts of carbon (up to 5000 t C per hectare). For this reason, they play an important role in the global cycle of the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4). Currently more than 95% of all fen mires in central Europe are drained. Therefore, they are assumed to represent extremely strong sources for CO2,accompanied by a fast reduction of the peat carbon stocks. For a number of reasons it is not possible to overcome this problem by restoration measures like flooding at the most drained fen sites. Moreover, there are till now just few and contradictory information about the contribution of alternative land use forms like grassland extensification on the reduction of the CO2 source function of these organic soils. As a contribution to clearing this deficit, we have ongoingly measured the CO2 and CH4 exchange as well as the changes in C stock on a deeply drained fen mire near the village of Paulinenaue from 2007 till 2012. The measurement sites is located within the so-called Rhin-Havelluch, an 80000 ha shallow paludification mire complex in the northwest of Berlin. The investigation included extensively and intensively used meadows (one cut vs. three cuts) on two soil types with different C stocks (Hemic Rheic Histosol vs. Mollic Gleysol). We used transparent chambers for measuring the CO2 flux net ecosystem exchange (difference between gross primary production and ecosystem respiration) and non-transparent chambers for measuring the CO2 flux ecosystem respiration and the CH4 exchange. Determined soil stock changes based on a C budget approach, including cumulated annual net ecosystem exchange, cumulated CH4 exchange, C export by harvest, and C import by fertilization. All current C fluxes were influenced in a complex way by ground-water level, plant development, land use intensity (cut frequency) and current weather conditions. Averaged over the whole investigation

  17. Differentiating moss from higher plants is critical in studying the carbon cycle of the boreal biome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Wenping; Liu, Shuguang; Dong, Wenjie; Liang, Shunlin; Zhao, Shuqing; Chen, Jingming; Xu, Wenfang; Li, Xianglan; Barr, Alan; Andrew Black, T; Yan, Wende; Goulden, Mike L; Kulmala, Liisa; Lindroth, Anders; Margolis, Hank A; Matsuura, Yojiro; Moors, Eddy; van der Molen, Michiel; Ohta, Takeshi; Pilegaard, Kim; Varlagin, Andrej; Vesala, Timo

    2014-01-01

    The satellite-derived normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), which is used for estimating gross primary production (GPP), often includes contributions from both mosses and vascular plants in boreal ecosystems. For the same NDVI, moss can generate only about one-third of the GPP that vascular plants can because of its much lower photosynthetic capacity. Here, based on eddy covariance measurements, we show that the difference in photosynthetic capacity between these two plant functional types has never been explicitly included when estimating regional GPP in the boreal region, resulting in a substantial overestimation. The magnitude of this overestimation could have important implications regarding a change from a current carbon sink to a carbon source in the boreal region. Moss abundance, associated with ecosystem disturbances, needs to be mapped and incorporated into GPP estimates in order to adequately assess the role of the boreal region in the global carbon cycle. PMID:24967601

  18. Preserving species populations in the boreal zone in a changing climate: contrasting trends of bird species groups in a protected area network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raimo Virkkala

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A protected area network should ensure the maintenance of biodiversity. Because of climate change, species ranges are expected to move polewards, causing further demand for the protected area network to be efficient in preserving biota. We compared population changes of different bird species groups according to their habitat preferences in boreal protected areas in Finland on the basis of large-scale censuses carried out in 1981–1999 and in 2000–2009. Population densities of common forest habitat generalists remained the same between the two periods, while densities of species of conservation concern showed contrasting trends: species preferring old-growth forests increased, but those living in mires and wetlands, and species of Arctic mountains decreased. These trends are most probably connected with climate change, but successional changes in protected areas and regional habitat alteration should also be taken into account. Of species preferring old-growth forests, a larger proportion are southern than among species of mires and wetlands, or of Arctic mountains, most or all of which, respectively, had a northerly distribution. In general, northern species have decreased and southern increased with the exception of northern species of old-growth forests which had not declined. On the other hand, bird species of mires and wetlands decreased also in the northernmost protected areas although mires had not been drained in the region in contrast with southern and central Finland thus indicating that regional-scale direct habitat loss did not cause the decline of these species in the north. It is suggested that climate change effects on species in natural boreal and Arctic habitats most probably are habitat-specific with large differences in response times and susceptibility.

  19. Simultaneous high C fixation and high C emissions in Sphagnum mires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. F. Harpenslager

    2015-03-01

    Sphagnum's active lowering of the pH, which triggers the chemical release of CO2 from bicarbonate. Our results clearly illustrate that high Sphagnum biomass production may still coincide with high C emission. These counterintuitive C dynamics in mire succession seem to be the result of both species- and biomass-dependent acidification and buffered water infiltration. Together, these processes can explain part of the large variation in C fluxes (ranging from C sequestration to C release reported for pristine mires in literature.

  20. Ecological Sustainability of Birds in Boreal Forests

    OpenAIRE

    Lisa Venier; Mikko Mönkkönen; Robert Howe; Pekka Helle; JoAnn Hanowski; Gerald Niemi; Daniel Welsh

    1998-01-01

    We review characteristics of birds in boreal forests in the context of their ecological sustainability under both natural and anthropogenic disturbances. We identify the underlying ecological factors associated with boreal bird populations and their variability, review the interactions between boreal bird populations and disturbance, and describe some tools on how boreal bird populations may be conserved in the future. The boreal system has historically been an area with extensive disturbance...

  1. Characterisation of Holocene plant macrofossils from North Spanish ombrotrophic mires: vascular plants

    OpenAIRE

    de Souto, M.; D. Castro; Pontevedra-Pombal, X.; E. Garcia-Rodeja; M.I. Fraga

    2016-01-01

    Methods and criteria that were used to identify plant macrofossils from four ombrotrophic mires in northern Spain are presented. Twelve monocotyledon and ten dicotyledon species were recorded. Some were identified from vegetative or reproductive macroremains (Eriophorum angustifolium, Molinia caerulea, Calluna vulgaris, Erica mackaiana, Erica tetralix, Potentilla erecta), while others were recognised only by their fruits (Rhynchospora alba, Carex durieui, Carex echinata, Carex binervis, Carex...

  2. Power and Socioscientific Issues: The Pedagogy of Mire's Critique of Skin Whitening Cosmeceuticals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blades, David

    2012-01-01

    In her article, "The Scientification of Skin Whitening and the Entrepreneurial University- Linked Corporate Scientific Officer," published in this issue, Amina Mire (2012) deconstructs the tacit investments implicit in such discourses of beauty, in particular those linked to cosmetic products that purport to fight the "war on aging" through the…

  3. Development and validation of the Measure of Indigenous Racism Experiences (MIRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paradies Yin C

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent decades there has been increasing evidence of a relationship between self-reported racism and health. Although a plethora of instruments to measure racism have been developed, very few have been described conceptually or psychometrically Furthermore, this research field has been limited by a dearth of instruments that examine reactions/responses to racism and by a restricted focus on African American populations. Methods In response to these limitations, the 31-item Measure of Indigenous Racism Experiences (MIRE was developed to assess self-reported racism for Indigenous Australians. This paper describes the development of the MIRE together with an opportunistic examination of its content, construct and convergent validity in a population health study involving 312 Indigenous Australians. Results Focus group research supported the content validity of the MIRE, and inter-item/scale correlations suggested good construct validity. A good fit with a priori conceptual dimensions was demonstrated in factor analysis, and convergence with a separate item on discrimination was satisfactory. Conclusion The MIRE has considerable utility as an instrument that can assess multiple facets of racism together with responses/reactions to racism among indigenous populations and, potentially, among other ethnic/racial groups.

  4. Nitrogen balance along a boreal forest fire chronosequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palviainen, Marjo; Pumpanen, Jukka; Berninger, Frank; Heinonsalo, Jussi; Sun, Hui; Köster, Egle; Köster, Kajar

    2016-04-01

    Fire is a major natural disturbance factor in boreal forests, and the frequency of forest fires is predicted to increase due to climate change in boreal regions. Because boreal forests comprise 30% of the global forest area, increases in the annual area burned may have significant implications for global carbon and nitrogen (N) cycles. The productivity of boreal forests is limited by low N availability. Fires cause N loss from ecosystems through oxidation and volatilization of N stored in biomass and soil. N balance may be poorly buffered against forest fires especially in sub-arctic ecosystems where atmospheric N deposition is low. Although forest fires alter N dynamics, there are little quantitative data available on N pools and fluxes through post-fire succession in sub-arctic boreal forests. We studied changes in N pools and fluxes, and the overall N balance across a 155-year forest fire chronosequence in sub-arctic Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) forests in Värriö Strict Nature Reserve situated in Finnish Lapland (67°46' N, 29°35' E). Soil was the largest N pool in all forest age classes and comprised 69-82% of the total ecosystem N pool. The total ecosystem N pool varied from 622 kg ha-1 in the recently burned forest to 960 kg ha-1 in the 155-year-old forest. The forests were N sinks in all age classes the annual N accumulation rate being 2.28 kg ha-1 yr-1 which was distributed almost equally between soil and biomass. The observed changes in ecosystem N pools were consistent with the computed N balance 2.10 kg ha-1 yr-1 over the 155-year post-fire period (Balance= (atmospheric deposition + N fixation) - (leaching + N2O emissions)). The results indicated that N deposition is an important component of the N balance and the N outputs are small (13% of the inputs) in the studied ecosystems. N2O fluxes were negligible (≤ 0.01 kg ha-1 yr-1) compared to the other N fluxes. The biological N fixation increased with succession and constituted 9% of the total N

  5. Simultaneous high C fixation and high C emissions in Sphagnum mires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpenslager, S. F.; van Dijk, G.; Kosten, S.; Roelofs, J. G. M.; Smolders, A. J. P.; Lamers, L. P. M.

    2015-08-01

    Peatlands play an important role in the global carbon (C) cycle due to their large C storage potential. Their C sequestration rates, however, highly vary depending on climatic and geohydrological conditions. Transitional mires are often characterised by floating peat with infiltration of buffered groundwater or surface water. Sphagnum mosses grow on top, producing recalcitrant organic matter and fuelling large C stocks. As Sphagnum species strongly differ in their tolerance to the higher pH in these mires, their species composition can be expected to influence C dynamics in transitional mires. We therefore experimentally determined growth and net C sequestration rates for four different Sphagnum species (Sphagnum squarrosum, S. palustre, S. fallax and S. magellanicum) in aquaria, with floating peat influenced by the infiltration of buffered water. Surprisingly, even though the first three species increased their biomass, the moss-covered peat still showed a net efflux of CO2 that was up to 3 times higher than that of bare peat. This species-dependent C release could be explained by Sphagnum's active lowering of the pH, which triggers the chemical release of CO2 from bicarbonate. Our results clearly illustrate that high Sphagnum biomass production may still coincide with high C emission. These counterintuitive C dynamics in mire succession seem to be the result of both species- and biomass-dependent acidification and buffered water infiltration. Together, these processes can explain part of the large variation in C fluxes (ranging from C sequestration to C release) reported for pristine mires in the literature.

  6. Impact of mire reclamation on export potential and characteristics of dissolved carbons in the Sanjiang Plain, Northeast China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. D. Guo

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available As an important dissolved organic carbon (DOC reservoir, the mires in the Sanjiang Plain, Northeast China, have been suffering from large scale of reclamation, and thus elevated loss and degradation since the 1960s. This study compares the export dynamics of the dissolved carbons, as well as the chemical characteristics of DOC, in the natural mire, degraded mire and drainage ditches during the growing seasons from 2008 to 2010 with the aim to clarify the final effects of the longterm reclamation on the export dynamics of the dissolved carbons. Results show that the average concentrations of total dissolved carbon (TC and DOC are much higher in natural mires than that in degraded mire and drainage ditches. The DOC concentration for natural mires, about 35.53 ± 5.15 mg l−1 on average, is nearly 2.39 times of that in degraded mire (14.84 ± 4.21 mg l−1 and 2.77 times of the average value in ditches (12.84 ± 4.49 mg l−1. Similarly, the hydrophobic fraction and SUVA254 of DOC also represent lower values in the degraded mire and ditches, which suggests that mire reclamation has resulted not only in the reduced DOC concentrations but also in the reduced chemical stability. Whereas the inorganic dissolved carbons (DIC exhibits obvious increased trends in drainage ditches in comparison to natural mires. Analyses of exitation-emission fluorescence spectra reveal that the reclamation has greatly altered the DOC composition with more biological organic substances exporting from the Sanjiang Plain. The presence of protein- and tryptophan-like substances in the ditches indicates there has been extensive agricultural pollution in the surface waters. Changes in the hydrological regime of the mire landscapes by sustained agriculture activities are deemed the prodominant reason, and the trends in the export dynamics of dissolved carbons will keep on if mire reclamation continues in the future.

  7. Effects of boreal forest vegetation on global climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonan, Gordon B.; Pollard, David; Thompson, Starley L.

    1992-10-01

    TERRESTRIAL ecosystems are thought to play an important role in determining regional and global climate1-6 one example of this is in Amazonia, where destruction of the tropical rainforest leads to warmer and drier conditions4-6. Boreal forest ecosystems may also affect climate. As temperatures rise, the amount of continental and oceanic snow and ice is reduced, so the land and ocean surfaces absorb greater amounts of solar radiation, reinforcing the warming in a 'snow/ice/albedo' feedback which results in large climate sensitivity to radiative forcings7-9. This sensitivity is moderated, however, by the presence of trees in northern latitudes, which mask the high reflectance of snow10,11, leading to warmer winter temperatures than if trees were not present12-14. Here we present results from a global climate model which show that the boreal forest warms both winter and summer air temperatures, relative to simulations in which the forest is replaced with bare ground or tundra vegetation. Our results suggest that future redistributions of boreal forest and tundra vegetation (due, for example, to extensive logging, or the influence of global warming) could initiate important climate feedbacks, which could also extend to lower latitudes.

  8. Fire impacts on European Boreal soils: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Paulo; Oliva, Marc; Cerda, Artemi

    2016-04-01

    Fire is an important natural disturbance in boreal ecosystems, fundamental to understand plant distribution (Ryan, 2002; Wallenius et al., 2004; Granstrom, 2001). Nevertheless, nowadays the intense and successful, fire suppression measures are changing their ecological role (Pereira et al., 2013a,b). This is consequence of the lack of understanding of stakeholders and decision makers about the role of the fire in the ecosystems (Mierasukas and Pereira, 2013; Pereira et al., 2016). This fire suppression measures are increasing the amount of fuel accumulation and the risk of severe wildfires, which can increase of frequency and severity in a context of climate change. Fire is a good tool for landscape management and restoration of degraded ecosystems (Toivanen and Kotiaho, 2007). Fire is considered a soil forming factor (Certini, 2014) and in boreal environments it has been observed that low fire severities, do not change importantly soil properties, mean fire severities induce positive impacts on soil, since add an important amounts of nutrients into soil profile and high severity fires had negative impacts due to the high consumption of organic matter (Vanha-Majamaa et al., 2007; Pereira et al., 2014). References Certini, G., 2014. Fire as a soil-forming factor. Ambio, 43, 191-195 Granstrom A. 2001. Fire management for biodiversity in the European Boreal forest. Scandinavian Journal of Forest Research 3: 62-69. Mierauskas, P., Pereira, P. (2013) Stakeholders perception about prescribed fire use in Lithuania. First results, Flamma, 4(3), 157-161. Pereira, P., Cerdà, A., Jordán, A., Bolutiene, V., Úbeda, X., Pranskevicius, M., Mataix-Solera, J. (2013) Spatio-temporal vegetation recuperation after a grassland fire in Lithuania, Procedia Environmental Sciences, 19:856-864 Pereira, P., Mierauskas, P., Ubeda, X., Mataix-Solera, J.,Cerda, A. (2012) Fire in protected areas - the effect of the protection and importance of fire management, Environmental Research

  9. Visible camera cryostat design and performance for the SuMIRe Prime Focus Spectrograph (PFS)

    CERN Document Server

    Smee, Stephen A; Golebiowski, Mirek; Hope, Stephen C; Madec, Fabrice; Gabriel, Jean-Francois; Loomis, Craig; Fur, Arnaud Le; Dohlen, Kjetil; Mignant, David Le; Barkhouser, Robert; Carr, Michael; Hart, Murdock; Tamura, Naoyuki; Shimono, Atsushi; Takato, Naruhisa

    2016-01-01

    We describe the design and performance of the SuMIRe Prime Focus Spectrograph (PFS) visible camera cryostats. SuMIRe PFS is a massively multi-plexed ground-based spectrograph consisting of four identical spectrograph modules, each receiving roughly 600 fibers from a 2394 fiber robotic positioner at the prime focus. Each spectrograph module has three channels covering wavelength ranges 380~nm -- 640~nm, 640~nm -- 955~nm, and 955~nm -- 1.26~um, with the dispersed light being imaged in each channel by a f/1.07 vacuum Schmidt camera. The cameras are very large, having a clear aperture of 300~mm at the entrance window, and a mass of $\\sim$280~kg. In this paper we describe the design of the visible camera cryostats and discuss various aspects of cryostat performance.

  10. The role of fire in the boreal carbon budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, J.W.; Trumbore, S.E.; Stocks, B.J.; Hirsch, A.; Gower, S.T.; O'Neill, K. P.; Kasischke, E.S.

    2000-01-01

    To reconcile observations of decomposition rates, carbon inventories, and net primary production (NPP), we estimated long-term averages for C exchange in boreal forests near Thompson, Manitoba. Soil drainage as defined by water table, moss cover, and permafrost dynamics, is the dominant control on direct fire emissions. In upland forests, an average of about 10-30% of annual NPP was likely consumed by fire over the past 6500 years since these landforms and ecosystems were established. This long-term, average fire emission is much larger than has been accounted for in global C cycle models and may forecast an increase in fire activity for this region. While over decadal to century times these boreal forests may be acting as slight net sinks for C from the atmosphere to land, periods of drought and severe fire activity may result in net sources of C from these systems.

  11. Carbon dioxide and water vapour exchange from understory species in boreal forest.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijmans, M.M.P.D.; Arp, W.J.; Chapin, F.S.

    2004-01-01

    Although recent eddy covariance measurements in boreal forests provide CO2 and energy exchange data for the whole ecosystem, very little is known about the role of the understory vegetation. We conducted chamber flux measurements in an Alaskan black spruce forest in order to compare CO2 and water va

  12. Differentiating moss from higher plants is critical in studying the carbon cycle of the boreal biome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Wenping; Liu, Shuguang; Dong, Wenjie;

    2014-01-01

    The satellite-derived normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), which is used for estimating gross primary production (GPP), often includes contributions from both mosses and vascular plants in boreal ecosystems. For the same NDVI, moss can generate only about one-third of the GPP that vascu...

  13. Upscaling methane emission hotspots in boreal peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cresto Aleina, Fabio; Runkle, Benjamin R. K.; Bruecher, Tim; Kleinen, Thomas; Brovkin, Victor

    2016-04-01

    Small-scale surface heterogeneities can influence land-atmosphere fluxes and therefore carbon, water and energy budgets on a larger scale. This effect is of particular relevance for high-latitude ecosystems, because of the great amount of carbon stored in their soils. Upscaling such small-scale surface heterogeneities and their effects to larger scales is a challenging issue in land surface modeling. We developed a novel approach to upscale local methane emissions in a boreal peatland from the micro-topographic scale to the landscape-scale. We based this parameterization on the analysis of the water table pattern generated by the Hummock-Hollow model (Cresto Aleina et al., 2015), a micro-topography resolving model for peatland hydrology and methane emissions. By computing the water table at the micro-topographic scale, the Hummock-Hollow model is able to describe the effects of micro-topography on hydrology and methane emissions in a typical boreal peatland. We introduce the new parameterization of methane hotspots in a global model-like version of the Hummock-Hollow model. This latter version underestimates methane emissions because of the lack of representation of micro-topographic controls on peatland hydrology. We tested the robustness of the parameterization by simulating methane emissions for the present day and for the next century, forcing the model with three different RCP scenarios. The Hotspot parameterization, despite being calibrated for the 1976-2005 climatology, mimics the output of the micro-topography resolving model for all the simulated scenarios. The new approach bridges the scale gap of methane emissions between this version of the model and the configuration explicitly resolving micro-topography.

  14. Seven centuries of atmospheric Pb deposition recorded in a floating mire from Central Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaccone, Claudio; Lobianco, Daniela; D'Orazio, Valeria; Miano, Teodoro M.; Shotyk, William

    2016-04-01

    Floating mires generally consist of emergent vegetation rooted in highly organic buoyant mats that rise and fall with changes in water level. Generally speaking, the entire floating mass (mat) is divided into a mat root zone and an underlying mat peat zone. Floating mires are distributed world-wide; large areas of floating marsh occur along rivers and lakes in Africa, the Danube Delta in Romania, the Amazon River in South America, and in the Mississippi River delta in USA, whereas smaller areas occur also in The Netherlands, Australia and Canada. While peat cores from ombrotrophic bogs have been often (and successfully) used to reconstruct changes in the atmospheric deposition of several metals (including Pb), no studies are present in literature about the possibility to use peat profiles from floating mires. To test the hypothesis that peat-forming floating mires could provide an exceptional tool for environmental studies, a complete, 4-m deep peat profile was collected in July 2012 from the floating island of Posta Fibreno, a relic mire in the Central Italy. This floating island has a diameter of ca. 30 m, a submerged thickness of about 3 m, and the vegetation is organized in concentric belts, from the Carex paniculata palisade to the Sphagnum palustre centre. The whole core was frozen cut each 1-to-2 cm (n =231), and Pb determined by quadrupole ICP-MS (at the ultraclean SWAMP lab, University of Alberta, Canada) in each sample throughout the first 100 cm, and in each odd-numbered slice for the remaining 300 cm. The 14C age dating of organic sediments (silty peat) isolated from the sample at 385 cm of depth revealed that the island probably formed ca. 700 yrs ago. Lead concentration trend shows at least two main zones of interest, i.e., a clear peak (ranging from 200 to 1600 ppm) between 110-115 cm of depth, probably corresponding to early 1960's - late 1970's, and a broad band (80-160 ppm) between 295-320 cm of depth, corresponding to approximately AD 1480

  15. Long term patterns in dissolved organic carbon, major elements and trace metals in boreal headwater catchments: trends, mechanisms and heterogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Oni

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The boreal landscape is a complex, spatio-temporally varying mosaic of forest and mire landscape elements that control surface water hydrology and chemistry. Here, we assess long-term water quality time-series from three nested headwater streams draining upland forest (C2, peat/mire (C4 and mixed (C7 (forest and mire catchments. Temporal trends in weather and runoff (1981–2008; dissolved organic carbon concentration [DOC] (1993–2010 and other water quality parameters (1987–2011 were assessed. There was no significant annual trend in precipitation or runoff but a significant monotonic increasing trend existed in air temperature and length of growing season. Stream [DOC] was positively correlated with some trace metals (copper, iron and zinc and negatively with several other chemical parameters (e.g. sulfate, conductivity, calcium. Both sulfate and conductivity showed declining trends, while a significant increase was observed in pH during winter and spring. Calcium and magnesium showed monotonic decreasing trends. The declining trajectories of stream base cation and sulfate concentrations during other times of the year were not accompanied by changes in pH and alkalinity. Water temperature increased significantly both annually and in most months while iron and DOC concentrations showed significant increases in autumn months. Though all streams showed significant positive trends in [DOC] in autumn, only C2 had a significant annual increasing trend. There was also a shift in the magnitude of variability in spring [DOC] and increasing trend of summer baseflow [DOC] in C2 and C7.

  16. Sustainable Development of the Boreal Forest: Interaction of Ecological, Social, and Business Feedbacks

    OpenAIRE

    Gail Whiteman; Stuart Chapin, F.

    1998-01-01

    Humans are an integral component of ecosystems, just as the products of ecosystems are critical to social systems. To understand the future state of the boreal forest, we must understand the ecological, social, economic, and business interactions that link ecological and social systems into a common regional system, as well as the feedbacks that govern changes in these interactions. We analyze the negative feedbacks that promoted a sustainable interaction between ecological and social systems...

  17. Vertical and seasonal dynamics of fungal communities in boreal Scots pine forest soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santalahti, Minna; Sun, Hui; Jumpponen, Ari; Pennanen, Taina; Heinonsalo, Jussi

    2016-11-01

    Fungal communities are important for carbon (C) transformations in boreal forests that are one of the largest C pools in terrestrial ecosystems, warranting thus further investigation of fungal community dynamics in time and space. We investigated fungal diversity and community composition seasonally and across defined soil horizons in boreal Scots pine forest in Finland using 454 pyrosequencing. We collected a total of 120 samples from five vertical soil horizons monthly from March to October; in March, under snow. Boreal forest soil generally harbored diverse fungal communities across soil horizons. The communities shifted drastically and rapidly over time. In late winter, saprotrophs dominated the community and were replaced by ectomycorrhizal fungi during the growing season. Our studies are among the first to dissect the spatial and temporal dynamics in boreal forest ecosystems and highlights the ecological importance of vertically distinct communities and their rapid seasonal dynamics. As climate change is predicted to result in warmer and longer snow-free winter seasons, as well as increase the rooting depth of trees in boreal forest, the seasonal and vertical distribution of fungal communities may change. These changes are likely to affect the organic matter decomposition by the soil-inhabiting fungi and thus alter organic C pools. PMID:27515733

  18. Local heterogeneity and scaled dependence of eco-hydrology in mire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, T.

    2011-12-01

    Japanese governments recently started nature conservation project to restore meandering former river channel in order to prevent invasive forest and to recover original ecosystem because various anthropogenic stressors have caused mire degradation in subarctic northern Japan such as drying and invasion of alder-dominant shrub forest. In order to predict effectiveness of this restoration, the author has so far developed the process-based National Integrated Catchment-based Eco-hydrology (NICE) model (Nakayama, 2008a, 2008b, 2010, 2011a, 2011b; Nakayama and Fujita, 2010; Nakayama and Hashimoto, 2011; Nakayama and Watanabe, 2004, 2006, 2008a, 2008b; Nakayama et al., 2006, 2007, 2010, 2011), which includes complex interactions between canopy, surface water, unsaturated water, aquifer, lake, and rivers. Because the model simulates the hydrologic cycle, elevation change, and vegetation succession processes iteratively including competition between native reed-sedge vegetation and invasive alder, it is possible to estimate nonlinear interaction between hydro-geomorphic and vegetation dynamics. In this study, the author further improved the model to evaluate positive feedback between heterogeneous drying and alder invasion in relation to stability and regime shift beyond previous researches about constant slope and its relation to regular pattern. In particular, he evaluated local heterogeneity of groundwater and surface water in both horizontal and vertical directions, and clarified relationship between microtopography about ridge-depression and hydrologic cycle about divergence-convergence in short-term period. This mechanism is also related to interaction between groundwater and inundated flow, scaled dependence of hydrologic cycle, and its effect on sediment deposition and vegetation change. These results will throw some light on two conflicting conceptualizations of peatland hydrology, so-called, shallow-flow and groundwater-flow models (Reeve et al., 2000), and bring

  19. Modeling physical and biogeochemical controls over carbon accumulation in a boreal forest soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, J.J.; Neff, J.C.; Harden, J.W.

    2006-01-01

    Boreal soils are important to the global C cycle owing to large C stocks, repeated disturbance from fire, and the potential for permafrost thaw to expose previously stable, buried C. To evaluate the primary mechanisms responsible for both short- and long-term C accumulation in boreal soils, we developed a multi-isotope (12,14C) Soil C model with dynamic soil layers that develop through time as soil organic matter burns and reaccumulates. We then evaluated the mechanisms that control organic matter turnover in boreal regions including carbon input rates, substrate recalcitrance, soil moisture and temperature, and the presence of historical permafrost to assess the importance of these factors in boreal C accumulation. Results indicate that total C accumulation is controlled by the rate of carbon input, decomposition rates, and the presence of historical permafrost. However, unlike more temperate ecosystems, one of the key mechanisms involved in C preservation in boreal soils examined here is the cooling of subsurface soil layers as soil depth increases rather than increasing recalcitrance in subsurface soils. The propagation of the 14C bomb spike into soils also illustrates the importance of historical permafrost and twentieth century warming in contemporary boreal soil respiration fluxes. Both 14C and total C simulation data also strongly suggest that boreal SOM need not be recalcitrant to accumulate; the strong role of soil temperature controls on boreal C accumulation at our modeling test site in Manitoba, Canada, indicates that carbon in the deep organic soil horizons is probably relatively labile and thus subject to perturbations that result from changing climatic conditions in the future. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  20. Theory and practice of hydrostatic lysimeters for direct measurement of net seepage in a patterned mire in north Scotland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. A. P. Ingram

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel design of lysimeter for use in mires (peatlands with shallow water tables is described. It employs an hydraulic mechanism for the automatic equilibration of soil moisture distribution between the outside and the inside of the lysimeter tank but uses no electronic components or electrical power; and it can be installed with minimal disturbance in surfaces with poor load-bearing capacity. The system was deployed on a mire in northern Scotland to investigate the distribution of shallow seepage associated with catenary arrays of different types of surface (microtopes. During the three-year period 15 November 1988 to 19 November 1991, the fraction of rainfall dispersed as seepage was 52% in a pool system; 62% in ridge-furrow microtopography; and 59-67% in unpatterned sloping mire. The data provide preliminary confirmation of the hypothesis of K. E. Ivanov that different microtopes within the same mire differ in their hydrological norms; and suggest that the range of ecohydrological differences at the study site may be similar to those obtained by Ivanov in western Siberia. Details of lysimeter design, construction, installation and operation are appended together with a discussion of the theory of the lysimeter. Keywords: acrotelm, blanket mire, ecohydrology, evapotranspiration, pool system, valleyside flowe, water balance

  1. Ectomycorrhizal-Dominated Boreal and Tropical Forests Have Distinct Fungal Communities, but Analogous Spatial Patterns across Soil Horizons

    OpenAIRE

    McGuire, Krista L.; Allison, Steven D.; Fierer, Noah; Treseder, Kathleen K.

    2013-01-01

    Fungi regulate key nutrient cycling processes in many forest ecosystems, but their diversity and distribution within and across ecosystems are poorly understood. Here, we examine the spatial distribution of fungi across a boreal and tropical ecosystem, focusing on ectomycorrhizal fungi. We analyzed fungal community composition across litter (organic horizons) and underlying soil horizons (0–20 cm) using 454 pyrosequencing and clone library sequencing. In both forests, we found significant clu...

  2. Main dynamics and drivers of boreal forests fire regimes during the Holocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinari, Chiara; Lehsten, Veiko; Blarquez, Olivier; Clear, Jennifer; Carcaillet, Christopher; Bradshaw, Richard HW

    2015-04-01

    Forest fire is one of the most critical ecosystem processes in the boreal megabiome, and it is likely that its frequency, size and severity have had a primary role in vegetation dynamics since the Last Ice Age (Kasischke & Stocks 2000). Fire not only organizes the physical and biological attributes of boreal forests, but also affects biogeochemical cycling, particularly the carbon balance (Balshi et al. 2007). Due to their location at climatically sensitive northern latitudes, boreal forests are likely to be significantly affected by global warming with a consequent increase in biomass burning (Soja et al. 2007), a variation in vegetation structure and composition (Johnstone et al. 2004) and a rise in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration (Bond-Lamberty et al. 2007). Even if the ecological role of wildfire in boreal forest is widely recognized, a clearer understanding of the environmental factors controlling fire dynamics and how variations in fire regimes impact forest ecosystems is essential in order to place modern fire processes in a meaningful context for projecting ecosystem behaviour in a changing environment (Kelly et al. 2013). Because fire return intervals and successional cycles in boreal forests occur over decadal to centennial timescales (Hu et al. 2006), palaeoecological research seems to be one of the most promising tool for elucidating ecosystem changes over a broad range of environmental conditions and temporal scales. Within this context, our first aim is to reconstruct spatial and temporal patterns of boreal forests fire dynamics during the Holocene based on sedimentary charcoal records. As a second step, trends in biomass burning will be statistically analysed in order to disentangle between regional and local drivers. The use of European and north-American sites will give us the unique possibility to perform a large scale analysis on one of the broadest biome in the world and to underline the different patterns of fire in these two

  3. The calcareous mires in South-East Poland are home to two rare Anthracoidea species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Piątek

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The new collections of Anthracoidea buxbaumii Kukkonen on Carex buxbaumii Wahlenb. and Anthracoidea hostianae B.Lindeb. ex Nannf. on Carex lepidocarpa Tausch recorded in the calcareous mires in South-East Poland are described, illustrated and discussed. The holotype of the latter smut is also re-examined, described and illustrated in detail. Anthracoidea buxbaumii is reported for the second time from Poland on a new host plant. Anthracoidea hostianae is new to Poland. The variability of spore sizes of both species is discussed. The conspecificity of Anthracoidea buxbaumii and A. hostianae suggested in the literature is analyzed.

  4. Climate-Induced Boreal Forest Change: Predictions versus Current Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soja, Amber J.; Tchebakova, Nadezda M.; French, Nancy H. F.; Flannigan, Michael D.; Shugart, Herman H.; Stocks, Brian J.; Sukhinin, Anatoly I.; Parfenova, E. I.; Chapin, F. Stuart, III; Stackhouse, Paul W., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    For about three decades, there have been many predictions of the potential ecological response in boreal regions to the currently warmer conditions. In essence, a widespread, naturally occurring experiment has been conducted over time. In this paper, we describe previously modeled predictions of ecological change in boreal Alaska, Canada and Russia, and then we investigate potential evidence of current climate-induced change. For instance, ecological models have suggested that warming will induce the northern and upslope migration of the treeline and an alteration in the current mosaic structure of boreal forests. We present evidence of the migration of keystone ecosystems in the upland and lowland treeline of mountainous regions across southern Siberia. Ecological models have also predicted a moisture-stress-related dieback in white spruce trees in Alaska, and current investigations show that as temperatures increase, white spruce tree growth is declining. Additionally, it was suggested that increases in infestation and wildfire disturbance would be catalysts that precipitate the alteration of the current mosaic forest composition. In Siberia, five of the last seven years have resulted in extreme fire seasons, and extreme fire years have also been more frequent in both Alaska and Canada. In addition, Alaska has experienced extreme and geographically expansive multi-year outbreaks of the spruce beetle, which had been previously limited by the cold, moist environment. We suggest that there is substantial evidence throughout the circumboreal region to conclude that the biosphere within the boreal terrestrial environment has already responded to the transient effects of climate change. Additionally, temperature increases and warming-induced change are progressing faster than had been predicted in some regions, suggesting a potential non-linear rapid response to changes in climate, as opposed to the predicted slow linear response to climate change.

  5. Reserve selection in boreal forest

    OpenAIRE

    Lundström, Johanna

    2013-01-01

    Most boreal forests in North Europe are intensively managed, and the forest landscape is far from its natural stage leading to hundreds of species being threatened in Sweden alone. Reserves are established to protect biodiversity, but since the resources available for conservation do not cover all species in need of protection, effective prioritization is essential. In this thesis, a reserve selection model based on a goal programming approach was developed, finding the optimal age comp...

  6. How a Sphagnum fuscum-dominated bog changed into a calcareous fen : the unique Holocene history of a Slovak spring-fed mire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hajkova, Petra; Grootjans, A. B.; Lamentowicz, Mariusz; Rybnickova, Eliska; Madaras, Mikulas; Opravilova, Vera; Michaelis, Dierk; Hajek, Michal; Joosten, Hans; Wolejko, Leslaw; Rybníčková, Eliška; Madaras, Mikuláš; Opravilová, Věra; Wołejko, Lesław; Hajkova, T.

    2012-01-01

    In general, mires develop by autogenic succession from more groundwater-fed to more rainwater-fed. This study from a calcareous mire in the West Carpathians (Slovakia) describes a similar development in the Early Holocene, followed by a reverse development in the Middle and Late Holocene. Pollen, ma

  7. Contribution of vegetation and water table on isoprene emission from boreal peatland microcosms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tiiva, Päivi; Faubert, Patrick; Räty, Sanna;

    2009-01-01

    emission in these naturally wet ecosystems, although water table is predicted to decline due to climate warming. We studied the relative contribution of mosses vs. vascular plants to isoprene emission in boreal peatland microcosms in growth chambers by removing either vascular vegetation or both vascular......Boreal peatlands are substantial sources of isoprene, a reactive hydrocarbon. However, it is not known how much mosses, vascular plants and peat each contribute to isoprene emission from peatlands. Furthermore, there is no information on the effects of declining water table depth on isoprene...... vegetation and mosses. The microcosms represented wet hollows and dry hummocks of a boreal ombrotrophic bog. A water table drawdown treatment was applied to the hollows with naturally high water table. The mean (±SE) isoprene emission from hummocks with intact vegetation, 30 ± 6 µg m-2 h-1, was decreased...

  8. Mires and Histosols in French Guiana (South America: new data relating to location and area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Muller

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Large peatland areas have been identified in French Guiana, an equatorial province (département of France, but the exact distribution and ecological condition of mires is not well known. Maps of pedological and agronomic units that were prepared between the early 1950s and 1975 enable us to improve on previously published estimates of Histosol areas in French Guiana. Only the non-forested parts of the province have been studied because there are hardly any pedological maps for the portion that lies within the Amazon rainforest. The extent of Histosols recorded in French Guiana is around 975 km², which is 57–60 % of the estimates of peatland area (1620 km² and 1720 km² reported in the scientific literature. The largest Histosol areas are located near the coast in the north-east of the province, between Cayenne and the border with Brazil. This region receives the highest annual rainfall recorded in French Guiana and provides a particularly favourable hydro-geomorphological setting for peat formation. It will be necessary to explore these large Histosol areas in order to characterise them and to study the associated mire vegetation. Difficult access, combined with the adverse hydro-climatic conditions, will make this a long-term endeavour.

  9. Detectors and cryostat design for the SuMIRe Prime Focus Spectrograph (PFS)

    CERN Document Server

    Gunn, James E; Smee, Stephen A; Orndorff, Joe D; Barkhouser, Robert H; Hart, Murdock; Bennett, Charles L; Greene, Jenny E; Heckman, Timothy; LeFevre, Olivier; Ling, Hung-Hsu; Martin, Laurent; Menard, Brice; Prieto, Eric; Spergel, David; Strauss, Michael A; Ueda, Akitoshi; Wang, Shiang-Yu; Wyse, Rosemary; Zakamska, Nadia

    2012-01-01

    We describe the conceptual design of the camera cryostats, detectors, and detector readout electronics for the SuMIRe Prime Focus Spectrograph (PFS) being developed for the Subaru telescope. The SuMIRe PFS will consist of four identical spectrographs, each receiving 600 fibers from a 2400 fiber robotic positioner at the prime focus. Each spectrograph will have three channels covering wavelength ranges 3800 {\\AA} - 6700 {\\AA}, 6500 {\\AA} - 10000 {\\AA}, and 9700 {\\AA} - 13000 {\\AA}, with the dispersed light being imaged in each channel by a f/1.10 vacuum Schmidt camera. In the blue and red channels a pair of Hamamatsu 2K x 4K edge-buttable CCDs with 15 um pixels are used to form a 4K x 4K array. For the IR channel, the new Teledyne 4K x 4K, 15 um pixel, mercury-cadmium-telluride sensor with substrate removed for short-wavelength response and a 1.7 um cutoff will be used. Identical detector geometry and a nearly identical optical design allow for a common cryostat design with the only notable difference being th...

  10. Boreal forest soil nitrous oxide production and consumption responds positively to temperature and a warmer climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckeridge, K. M.; Edwards, K.; Ziegler, S. E.; Billings, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    The greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O) is both produced and consumed in soils. In strict denitrification, nitrogen (N)-oxides are reduced stepwise by microbial enzymes until dinitrogen (N2) is produced. N2O may be lost and/or consumed during this process, by microbes that may or may not possess the enzyme required for the final step of the reduction chain. In cold, N-limited, boreal forest soils consumption may dominate, resulting in low net N2O flux to the atmosphere, though the ubiquity of this pattern and the temperature response of these processes are unclear. To accurately predict the temperature response of net soil efflux of N2O in the boreal biome, we must understand fundamental, temperature responses of the boreal soil denitrifier community. Using boreal forest organic and mineral soils collected from three climate regions along the Newfoundland and Labrador Boreal Ecosystem Latitudinal Transect, Canada, we measured soil N2O fluxes during ~60 h lab incubations, in which conditions for denitrification were optimized. Organic soils from the warmer climate and incubated at the warmest temperature produced the most N2O. These soils also experienced net consumption of N2O earlier in the incubation than other soils. All mineral soils, regardless of location along the climate gradient, exhibited net N2O consumption earliest in the incubation at the warmest incubation temperature. Ongoing analyses of headspace N2O and N2 d15N and relative abundances of denitrifying communities during the incubation will reveal mechanisms driving changes in [N2O] over time, but these data suggest warmer temperatures in these boreal soils promote enhanced rates of both N2O production and consumption, with 'hot moments' of net N2O efflux during which production far exceeds consumption. If these results are applicable in situ, a warming climate may result in greater net N2O flux from boreal forest soils such as these.

  11. Mirror image hydrocarbons from Tropical and Boreal forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Williams

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Monoterpenes, emitted in large quantities by trees to attract pollinators and repel herbivores, can exist in mirror image forms called enantiomers. In this study such enantiomeric pairs have been measured in ambient air over extensive forest ecosystems in South America and northern Europe. For the dominant monoterpene, α-pinene, the (−-form was measured in large excess over the (+-form over the Tropical rainforest, whereas the reverse was observed over the Boreal forest. Interestingly, over the Tropical forest (−-α-pinene did not correlate with its own enantiomer, but correlated well with isoprene. The results indicate a remarkable ecosystem scale enantiomeric fingerprint and a nexus between the biosphere and atmosphere.

  12. Tree Water Use May Significantly Impact Boreal Hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, J. M.; Bolton, W. R.

    2013-12-01

    The ecohydrology of boreal forest ecosystems of Interior Alaska is not well understood largely because of challenges posed by the presence of discontinuous permafrost. Near-surface permafrost results in storage-dominated systems with cold, poorly drained soils, and slow growing, low statured coniferous trees (Picea mariana) or CDE's. The transition to permafrost-free areas can occur over a few meters and is accompanied by a vegetation community dominated by large deciduous trees (Populus sp. and Betula sp.) or DDE's. Typically, areas with permafrost are on north facing slopes and valley bottoms, and areas without permafrost are south facing. In Alaska's boreal forest, the permafrost is very warm and vulnerable to the effects of climate change. Once permafrost begins to thaw, the vegetation community shifts from coniferous to deciduous dominated. Streamflow in watersheds with a larger permafrost distribution tends to be higher and more responsive to precipitation events than in watersheds with low permafrost distribution. In fact, precipitation events in the low permafrost areas do not infiltrate past the rooting zone of the deciduous trees (~5-40 cm). This suggests that the deciduous trees may remove water from the system via uptake and transpiration. We focus on how vegetation water use affects boreal forest hydrology in areas of discontinuous permafrost. Specifically, we ask: what are the patterns of vegetation water use in areas with and without permafrost? This study focuses on the CDE and DDE systems. Our research sites are established on low and high locations on each aspect (south facing DDE, north facing CDE) to capture the variability associated with the different hillside drainage properties. At each of the four sites during the growing season, we measured various aspects of plant water use dynamics, including water flux, water content, water sources, depth of water uptake in the soil, and water stress. We use a Bayesian framework to analyze the data. We

  13. Methane metabolism in a stratified boreal lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nykänen, Hannu; Peura, Sari; Kankaala, Paula; Jones, Roger

    2013-04-01

    Stratified lakes, typical of the boreal zone, are naturally anoxic from their bottoms. In these lakes methanogenesis can account for up to half of organic matter degradation. However, a major part of the methane (CH4) is oxidized in the water column before reaching the atmosphere. Since methanotrophs use CH4 as their sole carbon and energy source, much CH4-derived carbon is incorporated into their biomass. Microbially produced CH4 has strongly negative δ13C compared to other carbon forms in ecosystems, making it possible to follow its route in food webs. However, only a few studies have estimated the amount of this microbial biomass or its carbon stable isotopic composition due to difficulties in separating it from other biomass or from other carbon forms in the water column. We estimated methanotrophic biomass from measured CH4 oxidation, and δ13C of the biomass from measured δ13C values of CH4, DIC, POM and DOC. An estimate of the fraction of methanotrophs in total microbial biomass is derived from bacterial community composition measurements. The study was made in, Alinen Mustajärvi, a small (area 0.75 ha, maximum depth 6.5 m, mean depth 4.2 m,), oligotrophic, mesohumic headwater lake located in boreal coniferous forest in southern Finland. CH4 and DIC concentrations and their δ13C were measured over the deepest point of the lake at 1 m intervals. 13C of DOM and POM were analyzed from composite samples from epi-, meta-, and hypolimnion. Evasion of CH4 and carbon dioxide from the lake surface to the atmosphere was estimated with boundary layer diffusion equations. CH4oxidation was estimated by comparing differences between observed concentrations and CH4potentially transported by turbulent diffusion between different vertical layers in the lake and also by actual methanotrophy measurements and from vertical differences in δ13C-CH4. The estimate of CH4 production was based on the sum of oxidized and released CH4. Molecular microbiology methods were used to

  14. Latent heat exchange in the boreal and arctic biomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasurinen, Ville; Alfredsen, Knut; Kolari, Pasi; Mammarella, Ivan; Alekseychik, Pavel; Rinne, Janne; Vesala, Timo; Bernier, Pierre; Boike, Julia; Langer, Moritz; Belelli Marchesini, Luca; van Huissteden, Ko; Dolman, Han; Sachs, Torsten; Ohta, Takeshi; Varlagin, Andrej; Rocha, Adrian; Arain, Altaf; Oechel, Walter; Lund, Magnus; Grelle, Achim; Lindroth, Anders; Black, Andy; Aurela, Mika; Laurila, Tuomas; Lohila, Annalea; Berninger, Frank

    2014-11-01

    In this study latent heat flux (λE) measurements made at 65 boreal and arctic eddy-covariance (EC) sites were analyses by using the Penman-Monteith equation. Sites were stratified into nine different ecosystem types: harvested and burnt forest areas, pine forests, spruce or fir forests, Douglas-fir forests, broadleaf deciduous forests, larch forests, wetlands, tundra and natural grasslands. The Penman-Monteith equation was calibrated with variable surface resistances against half-hourly eddy-covariance data and clear differences between ecosystem types were observed. Based on the modeled behavior of surface and aerodynamic resistances, surface resistance tightly control λE in most mature forests, while it had less importance in ecosystems having shorter vegetation like young or recently harvested forests, grasslands, wetlands and tundra. The parameters of the Penman-Monteith equation were clearly different for winter and summer conditions, indicating that phenological effects on surface resistance are important. We also compared the simulated λE of different ecosystem types under meteorological conditions at one site. Values of λE varied between 15% and 38% of the net radiation in the simulations with mean ecosystem parameters. In general, the simulations suggest that λE is higher from forested ecosystems than from grasslands, wetlands or tundra-type ecosystems. Forests showed usually a tighter stomatal control of λE as indicated by a pronounced sensitivity of surface resistance to atmospheric vapor pressure deficit. Nevertheless, the surface resistance of forests was lower than for open vegetation types including wetlands. Tundra and wetlands had higher surface resistances, which were less sensitive to vapor pressure deficits. The results indicate that the variation in surface resistance within and between different vegetation types might play a significant role in energy exchange between terrestrial ecosystems and atmosphere. These results suggest the need

  15. Investigations of boreal forest bidirectional reflectance factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, H. Peter

    view/illumination geometries. Forward mode validation of FLAIR demonstrates its ability to reproduce canopy reflectance values using reasonable canopy properties as input. Inversion of FLAIR to produce a canopy BRF function based on a limited number of observed reflectance values indicate the model's ability to characterize boreal canopy BRF. Difficulties are found with hotspot reflectance values when the modelled BRF function is extrapolated to illumination angles significantly beyond those associated with the observed reflectance. Data for this research was obtained as part of the BOReal Atmosphere-Ecosystem Study (BOREAS), with BRF of various pure canopy stands obtained during five periods of the year (winter, thaw, late spring, mid-summer, and early autumn). Airborne spectral imagery was acquired using the Compact Airborne Spectrographic Imager (CASI). The sensor mount allows multiple view directions ranging from +45° to -45°, and was flown along, perpendicular to, and at 45° to the solar illumination plane. This provides full resolution multi- angular imagery ( ~ 2 x 2 meters) with relevant spectral bands for a significant angular sampling of canopy BRF. Nadir viewing understorey reflectance data was also obtained using field spectrometers.

  16. Improved foot sensitivity and pain reduction in patients with peripheral neuropathy after treatment with monochromatic infrared photo energy--MIRE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkless, Lawrence B; DeLellis, Salvatore; Carnegie, Dale H; Burke, Thomas J

    2006-01-01

    The medical records of 2239 patients (mean age=73 years) with established peripheral neuropathy (PN) were examined to determine whether treatment with MIRE was, in fact, associated with increased foot sensitivity to the Semmes Weinstein monofilament (SWM) 5.07 and a reduction in neuropathic pain. The PN in 1395 of these patients (62%) was due to diabetes. Prior to treatment with MIRE, of the 10 tested sites (5 on each foot), 7.1+/-2.9 were insensitive to the SWM 5.07, and 2078 patients (93%) exhibited loss of protective sensation defined by Medicare as a loss of sensation at two or more sites on either foot. After treatment, the number of insensate sites on both feet decreased to 2.4+/-2.6, an improvement of 66%. Of the 2078 (93%) patients initially presenting with loss of protective sensation, 1106 (53%) no longer had loss of protective sensation after treatment (P<.0001); 1563 patients (70%) also exhibited neuropathic pain in addition to sensory impairment. Prior to treatment with MIRE, pain measured on the 11-point visual analogue scale (VAS) was 7.2+/-2.2 points, despite the use of a variety of pain-relieving therapeutic agents. After treatment with MIRE, pain was reduced by 4.8+/-2.4 points, a 67% reduction. Therefore, MIRE appears to be associated with significant clinical improvement in foot sensation and, simultaneously, a reduction in neuropathic pain in a large cohort of primarily Medicare aged, community-dwelling patients, initially diagnosed with PN. The quality of life associated with these two outcomes cannot be underappreciated. PMID:16504836

  17. Characterisation of Holocene plant macrofossils from North Spanish ombrotrophic mires: vascular plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Souto

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Methods and criteria that were used to identify plant macrofossils from four ombrotrophic mires in northern Spain are presented. Twelve monocotyledon and ten dicotyledon species were recorded. Some were identified from vegetative or reproductive macroremains (Eriophorum angustifolium, Molinia caerulea, Calluna vulgaris, Erica mackaiana, Erica tetralix, Potentilla erecta, while others were recognised only by their fruits (Rhynchospora alba, Carex durieui, Carex echinata, Carex binervis, Carex demissa, Betula alba, seeds (Juncus squarrosus, Juncus bulbosus, Luzula multiflora, Narthecium ossifragum, Drosera rotundifolia, Drosera intermedia, Caltha palustris, Daboecia cantabrica, rhizome fragments with remains of leaves (Agrostis curtisii, or twigs with buds and leaves (Vaccinium myrtillus. Descriptions of the specific distinctive characters for the plant macrofossils that were recorded are accompanied by illustrations that facilitate their interpretation. Dichotomous identification keys are also provided.

  18. Co-existing ericaceous plant species in a subarctic mire community share fungal root endophytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjøller, Rasmus; Olsrud, Maria; Michelsen, Anders

    2010-01-01

    the fungal composition in roots of co-existing ericaceous plants is scarce. In the present paper, the fungal community in roots of four ericaceous plant species, Empetrum hermaphroditum, Andromeda polifolia, Vaccinium uliginosum and Vaccinium vitis-idaea which often dominate subarctic heaths and mires......During the last decade, culture-independent identification tools have widened our knowledge of fungi colonizing ericaceous roots including ericoid mycorrhizal fungi. One focal interest has been to identify fungi, which simultaneously can establish ericoid and ectomycorrhiza, while knowledge about......, was studied. From each of these plants, in each of five plots, clone libraries were established using fungal specific ITS-PCR followed by cloning, PCR–RFLP and sequencing. The clone libraries were dominated by potential ericoid mycorrhizal fungi, particularly Rhizoscyphus ericae, fungi belonging...

  19. Regional-scale surface flux observations across the boreal forest during BOREAS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oncley, S.P.; Lenschow, D.H.; Campos, T.L.;

    1997-01-01

    study area to the subarctic tundra. Typical midsummer, midday, large-scale net ecosystem exchanges of carbon dioxide were about -10 mu mol m(-2) s(-1) for primarily deciduous forests, about -6 mu mol m(-2) s(-1) for the primarily coniferous regions between and including the two BOREAS study areas......A major role of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Electra aircraft during the Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) was to measure fluxes of momentum, sensible and latent heat, carbon dioxide, and ozone on a transect that crossed the entire boreal forest biome....... The observations spanned the growing season (late May to mid-September 1994) and extended the fluxes obtained in two intensive study areas to larger spatial scales to help provide a data set that is useful for comparison with and validation of large-scale models and satellite retrievals. We found the deciduous...

  20. Comparative Modeling Studies of Boreal Water and Carbon Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlan, J.; Peterson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The coordination of the modeling and field efforts for an Intensive Field Campaign (IFC) may resemble the chicken and egg dilemma. This session's theme advocates that early and proactive involvement by modeling teams can produce a scientific and operational benefit for the IFC and Experiment. This talk will provide some examples and suggestions originating from the NASA funded IFC's of the FIFE First ISLSCP (International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project) Field Experiment, Oregon Transect Ecosystem Research (OTTER) and predominately Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Experiments. In February 1994 and prior to the final selection of the BOREAS study sites, a group of funded BOREAS investigators agreed to run their models with data for five community types representing the proposed tower flux sites. All participating models were given identical initial values and boundary conditions and driven with identical climate data. The objectives of the intercomparison exercise were: 1) compare simulation results of participating terrestrial, hydrological, and atmospheric models over selected time frames; 2) learn about model behavior and sensitivity to estimated boreal site and vegetation definitions; 3) prioritize BOREAS field data collection efforts supporting modeling studies; 4) identify individual model deficiencies as early as possible. Out of these objectives evolved some important coordination and science issues for the BOREAS Experiment that can be generalized to IFCs and long term archiving of the data. Some problems are acceptable because they are endemic to maintaining fair and open competition prior to the peer review process. Others are logistical and addressable through application of planning, management, and information sciences. This investigator has identified one source of measurement and model incompatibility that is manifest in the IFC scaling approach. Although intuitively obvious, scaling problems are already more formally defined in

  1. Linking landscape characteristics, streamwater acidity and brown trout (Salmo trutta) distributions in a boreal stream network

    OpenAIRE

    Buffam, Ishi

    2007-01-01

    Perturbations of stream ecosystems are often mediated by the terrestrial watershed, making the understanding of linkages between watersheds and streams essential. In this thesis I explore the connections between landscape characteristics, streamwater acidity and brown trout (Salmo trutta) distributions in Krycklan, a 67 km2 boreal stream network in northern Sweden. The study focuses on hydrochemical changes during the snowmelt-driven spring flood, a period of episodic acidity which is thought...

  2. Relationships among fires, fungi, and soil dynamics in Alaskan Boreal Forests

    OpenAIRE

    Treseder, Kathleen K.; Mack, M. C.; Cross, A

    2004-01-01

    Fires are critical pathways of carbon loss from boreal forest soils, whereas microbial communities form equally critical controls over carbon accumulation between fires. We used a chronosequence in Alaska to test Read's hypothesis that arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi should dominate ecosystems with low accumulation of surface litter, and ectomycorrhizal fungi should proliferate where organic horizons are well-developed. This pattern is expected because ectomycorrhizal fungi display a greater cap...

  3. Response of water use efficiency to summer drought in boreal Scots pine forests in Finland

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Yao; Markkanen, Tiina; Aurela, Mika; Mammarella, Ivan; Thum, Tea; Tsuruta, Aki; YANG, HUIYI; Aalto, Tuula

    2016-01-01

    The influence of drought on plant functioning has received considerable attention in recent years, although our understanding of the response of carbon and water coupling in terrestrial ecosystems remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the response of water use efficiency to summer drought in boreal forests at daily time scales mainly using eddy covariance flux data. In addition, simulation results from the JSBACH land surface model were evaluated against the observed results. ...

  4. Earlier springs decrease peak summer productivity in North American boreal forests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the northern high latitudes, alternative hypotheses with regards to how warming-related shifts in seasonality influence ecosystem productivity exist. Increased plant growth associated with a longer growing season may enhance ecosystem productivity, but shifts to earlier springs may also negatively influence soil moisture status and productivity during the peak of the growing season. Here, we analyzed nearly three decades (1982–2008) of observational records and derived products, including satellite microwave and optical imagery as well as upscaled ecosystem flux observations, to better understand how shifts in seasonality impact hydrology and productivity in the North American boreal forests. We identified a dominant adverse influence of earlier springs on peak summer forest greenness, actual evapotranspiration and productivity at interannual time scales across the drier western and central sections of the North American boreal forests. In the vast regions where this spring onset mechanism operates, ecosystem productivity gains from earlier springs during the early portion of the growing season are effectively cancelled through corresponding losses in the later portion. Our results also indicate that recent decadal shifts towards earlier springs and associated drying in the midst of the growing season over western North American boreal forests may have contributed to the reported declines in summer productivity and increases in tree mortality and fire activity. With projections of accelerated northern high-latitude warming and associated shifts to earlier springs, persistent soil moisture deficits in peak summer may be an effective mechanism for regional-scale boreal forest dieback through their strong influence on productivity, tree mortality and disturbance dynamics. (letter)

  5. Modelling atmospheric OH-reactivity in a boreal forest ecosystem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, D.; Smolander, S.; Sogachev, Andrey;

    2011-01-01

    as well as the vertical OH-reactivity profile. We have used SOSA; a one dimensional vertical chemistry-transport model (Boy et al., 2011a) together with measurements from Hyytiala, SMEAR II station, Southern Finland, conducted in August 2008. Model simulations only account for similar to 30...

  6. Modelling atmospheric OH-reactivity in a boreal forest ecosystem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, D.; Smolander, S.; Sogachev, Andrey;

    2011-01-01

    as well as the vertical OH-reactivity profile. We have used SOSA; a one dimensional vertical chemistry-transport model (Boy et al., 2011) together with measurements from Hyytiälä, SMEAR II station, Southern Finland, conducted in August 2008. Model simulations only account for ~30–50% of the total measured...

  7. Distribution and retention of cesium in Swedish boreal forest ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The retention and distribution of cesium in forest environments are being studied at three locations in Sweden. The main part of the cesium found in the soil was recovered in horizons rich in organic matter. The cesium was retained in the soil organic matter in a more or less extractable form. As different soil types have a different distribution pattern of organic matter the distribution of cesium will depend on the forest soil type. The clay content in Swedish forest soils is in general low which will mitigate the retention of cesium in the soil mineral horizons. The cesium present in the tree was considered to be an effect of assimilation by the tissues in the canopy as well as by the roots. The redistribution of cesium within the trees was extensive which was considered to be an effect of a high mobility of cesium in the close system of a forest environment. The cesium will remain in the forest environment for a considerable time but can be removed by forest practice, by leaching out of the soil profile or by the radioactive decay. (au)

  8. Landscape control of uranium and thorium in boreal streams – spatiotemporal variability and the role of wetlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Lidman

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The concentrations of uranium and thorium in ten partly nested streams in the boreal forest region were monitored over a two-year period. The investigated catchments ranged from small headwaters (0.1 km2 up to a fourth-order stream (67 km2. Considerable spatiotemporal variations were observed, with little or no correlation between streams. The fluxes of both uranium and thorium varied substantially between the subcatchments, ranging from 1.7 to 30 g km−2 a−1 for uranium and from 3.2 to 24 g km−2 a−1 for thorium. Airborne gamma spectrometry was used to measure the concentrations of uranium and thorium in surface soils throughout the catchment, suggesting that the concentrations of uranium and thorium in mineral soils are similar throughout the catchment. The fluxes of uranium and thorium were compared to a wide range of parameters characterising the investigated catchments and the chemistry of the stream water, e.g. soil concentrations of these elements, pH, TOC (total organic carbon, Al, Si and hydrogen carbonate, but it was concluded that the spatial variabilities in the fluxes of both uranium and thorium mainly were controlled by wetlands. The results indicate that there is a predictable and systematic accumulation of both uranium and thorium in boreal wetlands that is large enough to control the transport of these elements. On the landscape scale approximately 65–80% of uranium and 55–65% of thorium entering a wetland were estimated to be retained in the peat. Overall, accumulation in mires and other types of wetlands was estimated to decrease the fluxes of uranium and thorium from the boreal forest landscape by 30–40%, indicating that wetlands play an important role for the biogeochemical cycling of uranium and thorium in the boreal forest landscape. The atmospheric deposition of uranium and thorium was also quantified, and its contribution to boreal streams was

  9. Nitrogen balance of a boreal Scots pine forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. J. Korhonen

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The productivity of boreal forests is considered to be limited by low nitrogen (N availability. Increased atmospheric N deposition has altered the functioning and N cycling of these N-sensitive ecosystems. The most important components of N pools and fluxes were measured in a boreal Scots pine stand in Hyytiälä, Southern Finland. The measurement at the site allowed direct estimations of nutrient pools in the soil and biomass, inputs from the atmosphere and outputs as drainage flow and gaseous losses from two micro-catchments. N was accumulating to the system with a rate of 7 kg N ha−1 yr−1. Nitrogen input as atmospheric deposition was 7.4 kg N ha−1 yr−1. Dry deposition and organic N in wet deposition contributed over half of the input in deposition. Total outputs were 0.4 kg N ha−1 yr−1, the most important outputs being N2O emission to the atmosphere and organic N flux in drainage flow. Nitrogen uptake and retranslocation were as important sources of N for plant growth. Most of the uptaken N originated from decomposition of organic matter, and the fraction of N that could originate directly from deposition was about 30%. In conclusion, atmospheric N deposition fertilizes the site considerably.

  10. High-resolution records detect human-caused changes to the boreal forest wildfire regime in interior Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaglioti, Benjamin V.; Mann, Daniel H.; Jones, Benjamin M.; Wooller, Matthew J.; Finney, Bruce P.

    2016-01-01

    Stand-replacing wildfires are a keystone disturbance in the boreal forest, and they are becoming more common as the climate warms. Paleo-fire archives from the wildland–urban interface can quantify the prehistoric fire regime and assess how both human land-use and climate change impact ecosystem dynamics. Here, we use a combination of a sedimentary charcoal record preserved in varved lake sediments (annually layered) and fire scars in living trees to document changes in local fire return intervals (FRIs) and regional fire activity over the last 500 years. Ace Lake is within the boreal forest, located near the town of Fairbanks in interior Alaska, which was settled by gold miners in AD 1902. In the 400 years before settlement, fires occurred near the lake on average every 58 years. After settlement, fires became much more frequent (average every 18  years), and background charcoal flux rates rose to four times their preindustrial levels, indicating a region-wide increase in burning. Despite this surge in burning, the preindustrial boreal forest ecosystem and permafrost in the watershed have remained intact. Although fire suppression has reduced charcoal influx since the 1950s, an aging fuel load experiencing increasingly warm summers may pose management problems for this and other boreal sites that have similar land-use and fire histories. The large human-caused fire events that we identify can be used to test how increasingly common megafires may alter ecosystem dynamics in the future.

  11. Balancing the Relationship Between Protection and Sustainable Management in Canada′s Boreal Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Carlson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Protection and sustainable forest management are related but unique, with protection focusing on minimising risk to ecosystems and sustainable management emphasising economic development. Given these distinct roles, a defining characteristic of the relationship between the two approaches is their relative abundance and distribution. The relationship is currently imbalanced, with only 12% of Canada allocated to protection, indicating that ecological values have historically been traded off in favour of resource production. The intactness of Canada′s boreal forest provides an opportunity for a more holistic approach that conserves its globally significant environmental attributes while also supporting resource production. The Boreal Forest Conservation Framework proposes a balanced relationship that allocates land approximately equally between protection and sustainable management. It is a framework that has been endorsed by industry, Aboriginal, and conservation organisations, and is supported by conservation science. Recent commitments to comprehensive land-use planning at regional scales are consistent with the collaborative approach promoted by the Boreal Forest Conservation Framework, and suggest that conservation objectives are likely to receive increased attention in Canada′s boreal region relative to recent history. Ensuring that land-use planning is proactive and balanced will be essential to forging a cooperative relationship between sustainable management and protection in the region.

  12. Non-methane biogenic volatile organic compound emissions from boreal peatland microcosms under warming and water table drawdown

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faubert, P; Tiiva, P; Nakam, TA;

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Boreal peatlands have significant emissions of non-methane biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs). Climate warming is expected to affect these ecosystems both directly, with increasing temperature, and indirectly, through water table drawdown following increased evapotranspiration. We...... of anaerobic microbial community. Our results suggest that boreal peatlands could have concomitant negative and positive radiative forcing effects on climate warming following the effect of water table drawdown. The observed decrease in CH4 emission causes a negative radiative forcing while the increase in CO2...... assessed the combined effect of warming and water table drawdown on the BVOC emissions from boreal peatland microcosms. We also assessed the treatment effects on the BVOC emissions from the peat soil after the 7-week long experiment. Emissions of isoprene, monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, other reactive VOCs...

  13. The Elusive Boreal Forest Thaumarchaeota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malin Bomberg

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, Archaea have, with increasing frequency, been found to colonize both agricultural and forest soils in temperate and boreal regions. The as yet uncultured group I.1c of the Thaumarchaeota has been of special interest. These Archaea are widely distributed in mature vegetated acidic soils, but little has been revealed of their physiological and biological characteristics. The I.1c Thaumarchaeota have been recognized as a microbial group influenced by plant roots and mycorrhizal fungi, but appear to have distinct features from their more common soil dwelling counterparts, such as the Nitrosotalea or Nitrososphaera. They appear to be highly dependent on soil pH, thriving in undisturbed vegetated soils with a pH of 5 or below. Research indicate that these Archaea require organic carbon and nitrogen sources for growth and that they may live both aerobically and anaerobically. Nevertheless, pure cultures of these microorganisms have not yet been obtained. This review will focus on what is known to date about the uncultured group I.1c Thaumarchaeota formerly known as the “Finnish Forest Soil” (FFS Archaea.

  14. Seven hundred years of peat formation recorded throughout a deep floating mire profile from Central Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobianco, Daniela; D'Orazio, Valeria; Miano, Teodoro; Zaccone, Claudio

    2016-04-01

    Floating mires are defined by the occurrence of emergent vegetation rooted in highly organic buoyant mats that rise and fall with changes in water level. Islands floating and moving on a lake naturally were already described by Pliny the Elder in his Naturalis historia almost two millennia ago. Actually, he devoted a whole chapter of Naturalis historia to "Of Islands Ever Floating and Swimming", reporting how certain isles were always waving and never stood still. The status of "flotant" has been defined transitory; in fact, these small isles often disappear, in most of the cases because of a transition from floating island to firm land during decades is likely to happen. That is why most of the floating islands described by Pliny the Elder (e.g., Lacus Fundanus, Lacus Cutiliensis, Lacus Mutinensis, Lacus Statoniensis, Lacus Tarquiniensis, Lydia Calaminae, Lacus Vadimonis) do not exist anymore. In the present study, peat formation and organic matter evolution were investigated in order to understand how these peculiar environments form, and how stable actually they are. In fact, it is hoped that peat-forming floating mires could provide an exceptional tool for environmental studies, since much of their evolution, as well as the changes of the surrounding areas, is recorded in their peat deposits. A complete, 4-m deep peat core was collected in July 2012 from the floating island of Posta Fibreno, a relic mire in the Central Italy. This floating island has a diameter of ca. 30 m, a submerged thickness of about 3 m, and the vegetation is organized in concentric belts, from the Carex paniculata palisade to the Sphagnum centre. Here, some of the southernmost Italian populations of Sphagnum palustre occur. The 14C age dating of organic sediments isolated from the sample at 385 cm of depth revealed that the island formed ca. 700 yrs ago (620±30 yr BP). The top 100 cm, consisting almost exclusively of Sphagnum mosses, show a very low bulk density (avg., 0.03±0.01 g cm

  15. Pinus sylvestris as a missing source of nitrous oxide and methane in boreal forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machacova, Katerina; Bäck, Jaana; Vanhatalo, Anni; Halmeenmäki, Elisa; Kolari, Pasi; Mammarella, Ivan; Pumpanen, Jukka; Acosta, Manuel; Urban, Otmar; Pihlatie, Mari

    2016-03-01

    Boreal forests comprise 73% of the world’s coniferous forests. Based on forest floor measurements, they have been considered a significant natural sink of methane (CH4) and a natural source of nitrous oxide (N2O), both of which are important greenhouse gases. However, the role of trees, especially conifers, in ecosystem N2O and CH4 exchange is only poorly understood. We show for the first time that mature Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) trees consistently emit N2O and CH4 from both stems and shoots. The shoot fluxes of N2O and CH4 exceeded the stem flux rates by 16 and 41 times, respectively. Moreover, higher stem N2O and CH4 fluxes were observed from wet than from dry areas of the forest. The N2O release from boreal pine forests may thus be underestimated and the uptake of CH4 may be overestimated when ecosystem flux calculations are based solely on forest floor measurements. The contribution of pine trees to the N2O and CH4 exchange of the boreal pine forest seems to increase considerably under high soil water content, thus highlighting the urgent need to include tree-emissions in greenhouse gas emission inventories.

  16. Pinus sylvestris as a missing source of nitrous oxide and methane in boreal forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machacova, Katerina; Bäck, Jaana; Vanhatalo, Anni; Halmeenmäki, Elisa; Kolari, Pasi; Mammarella, Ivan; Pumpanen, Jukka; Acosta, Manuel; Urban, Otmar; Pihlatie, Mari

    2016-01-01

    Boreal forests comprise 73% of the world's coniferous forests. Based on forest floor measurements, they have been considered a significant natural sink of methane (CH4) and a natural source of nitrous oxide (N2O), both of which are important greenhouse gases. However, the role of trees, especially conifers, in ecosystem N2O and CH4 exchange is only poorly understood. We show for the first time that mature Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) trees consistently emit N2O and CH4 from both stems and shoots. The shoot fluxes of N2O and CH4 exceeded the stem flux rates by 16 and 41 times, respectively. Moreover, higher stem N2O and CH4 fluxes were observed from wet than from dry areas of the forest. The N2O release from boreal pine forests may thus be underestimated and the uptake of CH4 may be overestimated when ecosystem flux calculations are based solely on forest floor measurements. The contribution of pine trees to the N2O and CH4 exchange of the boreal pine forest seems to increase considerably under high soil water content, thus highlighting the urgent need to include tree-emissions in greenhouse gas emission inventories.

  17. Glyphosate in northern ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helander, Marjo; Saloniemi, Irma; Saikkonen, Kari

    2012-10-01

    Glyphosate is the main nonselective, systemic herbicide used against a wide range of weeds. Its worldwide use has expanded because of extensive use of certain agricultural practices such as no-till cropping, and widespread application of glyphosate-resistant genetically modified crops. Glyphosate has a reputation of being nontoxic to animals and rapidly inactivated in soils. However, recent evidence has cast doubts on its safety. Glyphosate may be retained and transported in soils, and there may be cascading effects on nontarget organisms. These processes may be especially detrimental in northern ecosystems because they are characterized by long biologically inactive winters and short growing seasons. In this opinion article, we discuss the potential ecological, environmental and agricultural risks of intensive glyphosate use in boreal regions.

  18. Soil carbon stocks and their rates of accumulation and loss in a boreal forest landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapalee, G.; Trumbore, S.E.; Davidson, E.A.; Harden, J.W.; Veldhuis, H.

    1998-01-01

    Boreal forests and wetlands are thought to be significant carbon sinks, and they could become net C sources as the Earth warms. Most of the C of boreal forest ecosystems is stored in the moss layer and in the soil. The objective of this study was to estimate soil C stocks (including moss layers) and rates of accumulation and loss for a 733 km2 area of the BOReal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study site in northern Manitoba, using data from smaller-scale intensive field studies. A simple process-based model developed from measurements of soil C inventories and radiocarbon was used to relate soil C storage and dynamics to soil drainage and forest stand age. Soil C stocks covary with soil drainage class, with the largest C stocks occurring in poorly drained sites. Estimated rates of soil C accumulation or loss are sensitive to the estimated decomposition constants for the large pool of deep soil C, and improved understanding of deep soil C decomposition is needed. While the upper moss layers regrow and accumulate C after fires, the deep C dynamics vary across the landscape, from a small net sink to a significant source. Estimated net soil C accumulation, averaged for the entire 733 km2 area, was 20 g C m-2 yr-1 (28 g C m-2 yr-1 accumulation in surface mosses offset by 8 g C m-2 yr-1 lost from deep C pools) in a year with no fire. Most of the C accumulated in poorly and very poorly drained soils (peatlands and wetlands). Burning of the moss layer in only 1% of uplands would offset the C stored in the remaining 99% of the area. Significant interannual variability in C storage is expected because of the irregular occurrence of fire in space and time. The effects of climate change and management on fire frequency and on decomposition of immense deep soil C stocks are key to understanding future C budgets in boreal forests.

  19. Influence of spring and autumn phenological transitions on forest ecosystem productivit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richardson, A.D.; Black, T.A.; Ciais, P.; Delbart, N.; Moors, E.J.

    2010-01-01

    We use eddy covariance measurements of net ecosystem productivity (NEP) from 21 FLUXNET sites (153 site-years of data) to investigate relationships between phenology and productivity (in terms of both NEP and gross ecosystem photosynthesis, GEP) in temperate and boreal forests. Results are used to e

  20. Simulations of atmospheric OH, O3 and NO3 reactivities within and above the boreal forest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, D.; Gierens, R.; Crowley, J. N.;

    2015-01-01

    Using the 1-D atmospheric chemistry transport model SOSAA, we have investigated the atmospheric reactivity of a boreal forest ecosystem during the HUMPPA-COPEC-10 campaign (summer 2010, at SMEAR II in southern Finland). For the very first time, we present vertically resolved model simulations of ...

  1. Linear disturbances in boreal peatlands: Hotspots of methane emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strack, Maria

    2016-04-01

    Across Canada's boreal forest, at least 600,000 km of linear disturbances including cutlines and roads crisscross the landscape to facilitate resource exploration and extraction. As the boreal forest consists of up to 50% peatland, many of these linear disturbances also cross peatland ecosystems. Although more permanent access roads may involve the placement of mineral soil fill, most linear disturbances only involve clearing the area of trees to allow the passage of equipment and vehicles. This change in canopy cover and the compression of the peat by heavy equipment alters local thermal, hydrological and ecological conditions, likely changing greenhouse gas flux on the disturbance and possibly in the adjacent peatland. I studied CO2 and CH4 along triplicate transects crossing a winter road through a poor fen near Peace River, Alberta, Canada. Sample plots were located 1, 5 and 10 m from the road on both upstream and downstream sides with an additional three plots in the centre of the road. Productivity of the overstory trees, when present, was also determined. The winter road thawed earlier, had a shallower water table and a significantly higher graminoid cover than the adjacent peatland. Tree productivity and CO2 varied between the plots in the adjacent peatland, but there was no clear pattern in relation to distance from the road. The plots on the winter road acted as a greater or similar sink of CO2 as the adjacent peatland, depending on the specific conditions at the study plot. The most significant change was a substantial increase in CH4 emissions, with plots on the winter road emitting on average (standard deviation) 1100 (550) mg CH4 m-2 d-1 compared to 49 (73) mg CH4 m-2 d-1 in the adjacent peatland. Since the hydrologic impact of cutlines is likely less than winter roads, the increase in CH4 efflux may not be as extreme in all cases. Nonetheless, assuming that peatland accounts for ˜30% of the boreal region and a 150 day emission period for CH4, and a

  2. Characterisation of organic carbon in mire and heath soils at the Elgea-Urkilla Wind Farm, northern Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Azkorra

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a detailed comparative study of carbon storage in mire and heath soils within the Elgea-Urkilla Wind Farm (Basque Country, northern Spain. Different methods for estimating organic C stocks in the uppermost 15 cm of the soil profile were evaluated in an attempt to determine whether there was any spatial variability. The dominant vegetation of the study area was acidophilic and Atlantic heathland, with scattered areas of mire vegetation associated with spring lines. Soils were classified as Haplic Leptic Umbrisols (Oxyaquic, Molliglosic. Two sampling plots (900 m2 and 600 m2 were established adjacent to wind turbines. Mire vegetation was present in the larger plot (PLOT-A and absent from the smaller one (PLOT-B. Fourier-transformed infra-red (FTIR spectra indicated no noteworthy structural dissimilarities in the organic matter characteristics of the soils beneath the two types of vegetation. Soil samples were taken every week at systematically chosen points lying on fixed transects. Estimates of organic C stocks based on single sampling dates were 94–141 t C ha-1 for PLOT-A and 70–105 t C ha-1 for PLOT-B, and tended to increase as the weather became drier. When the estimates were derived from samples taken on several dates but from single transects, the range of the estimate for each plot was reduced to 111–116 t ha-1 for PLOT-A and 81–89 t ha-1 for PLOT-B. The results suggest that organic C stocks vary seasonally, and highlight difficulties that may be encountered in attempting to detect long-term changes in C storage.

  3. Nitrogen balance of a boreal Scots pine forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. J. Korhonen

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The productivity of boreal forests is considered to be limited by low nitrogen (N availability. Increased atmospheric N deposition has altered the functioning and N cycling of these N-sensitive ecosystems by increasing the availability of reactive nitrogen. The most important components of N pools and fluxes were measured in a boreal Scots pine stand in Hyytiälä, Southern Finland. The measurements at the site allowed direct estimations of nutrient pools in the soil and biomass, inputs from the atmosphere and outputs as drainage flow and gaseous losses from two micro-catchments. N was accumulating in the system, mainly in woody biomass, at a rate of 7 kg N ha−1 yr−1. Nitrogen input as atmospheric deposition was 7.4 kg N ha−1 yr−1. Dry deposition and organic N in wet deposition contributed over half of the inputs in deposition. Total outputs were 0.4 kg N ha−1 yr−1, the most important outputs being N2O emission to the atmosphere and organic N flux in drainage flow. Nitrogen uptake and retranslocation were equally important sources of N for plant growth. Most of the assimilated N originated from decomposition of organic matter, and the fraction of N that could originate directly from deposition was about 30%. In conclusion, atmospheric N deposition fertilizes the site considerably, but there are no signs of N saturation. Further research is needed to estimate soil N2 fluxes (emission and fixation, which may amount up to several kg N ha−1 yr−1.

  4. A boreal invasion in response to climate change? Range shifts and community effects in the borderland between forest and tundra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmhagen, Bodil; Kindberg, Jonas; Hellström, Peter; Angerbjörn, Anders

    2015-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that climate warming will allow southern species to advance north and invade northern ecosystems. We review the changes in the Swedish mammal and bird community in boreal forest and alpine tundra since the nineteenth century, as well as suggested drivers of change. Observed changes include (1) range expansion and increased abundance in southern birds, ungulates, and carnivores; (2) range contraction and decline in northern birds and carnivores; and (3) abundance decline or periodically disrupted dynamics in cyclic populations of small and medium-sized mammals and birds. The first warm spell, 1930-1960, stands out as a period of substantial faunal change. However, in addition to climate warming, suggested drivers of change include land use and other anthropogenic factors. We hypothesize all these drivers interacted, primarily favoring southern generalists. Future research should aim to distinguish between effects of climate and land-use change in boreal and tundra ecosystems. PMID:25576279

  5. Does the creation of a boreal hydroelectric reservoir result in a net change in evaporation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strachan, Ian B.; Tremblay, Alain; Pelletier, Luc; Tardif, Simon; Turpin, Christian; Nugent, Kelly A.

    2016-09-01

    Estimates of water consumption from hydroelectricity production are hampered by a lack of common methodological approaches. Studies typically use gross evaporation estimates which do not take into account the evaporative water loss from the pre-flooded ecosystems that would occur without the presence of a reservoir. We evaluate the net change in evaporation following the creation of a hydroelectric reservoir located in the Canadian boreal region. We use a direct measurement technique (eddy covariance) over four different ecosystems to evaluate the pre- and post-flood landscape water flux over a five-year period. The net effect of reservoir creation was to increase evaporation over that of the pre-flooded ecosystem. This change was dependent both on management and differences in the timing of the evaporation with nighttime and autumn contributing strongly to the reservoir evaporation. Managed reduction of water level, and thus the evaporating area, reduced the evaporation.

  6. Spatial and Temporal Variation in Feather Moss Associated Nitrogen Fixation in Coniferous and Deciduous Dominated Alaskan Boreal Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean, M.; Mack, M. C.; Johnstone, J. F.

    2015-12-01

    Dominant canopy tree species have strong effects on the composition and function of understory species. In boreal forests, forest floor bryophytes and their associated microbes are a primary source of ecosystem nitrogen (N) inputs, and thus an important process regulating ecosystem productivity. Bryophyte composition and abundance varies with forest composition, yet how such changes can affect ecosystem processes such as N fixation is still poorly understood. Our goal is to investigate how cyanobacteria-based N fixation occurring in the two most common feather mosses in the Alaskan boreal forest (Pleurozium schreberi and Hylocomium splendens) varies among coniferous and deciduous forest types, over the growing season, and across a nutrient availability gradient. Twelve patches of H. splendens and P. schreberi were identified in three pairs (blocks) of adjacent stands of paper birch (Betula neoalaskana) and black spruce (Picea mariana) near Fairbanks, interior Alaska. Sampling occurred in one block in June, July, August, and September 2014, and in the three blocks once in August 2014. Moss leaf area, moisture and weight, as well as environmental variables such as air temperature and canopy cover were recorded. Fixation rates were consistently higher for P. schreberi than for H. splendens. Overall, N fixation rates were lower in birch than in spruce stands and peaked in August, or July for P. schreberi in birch stands. Moreover, fixation rates varied along the nutrient availability gradient, with fixation rates higher where nutrient availability was lower. This difference was especially clear in spruce stands. Our preliminary results suggest that moss species, canopy type, and environmental factors all influence N fixation rates in Alaskan boreal forests. Our results will enhance the knowledge of the processes that drive N fixation in boreal forests, which is important for predicting ecosystem consequences of changing forest composition.

  7. A boreal invasion in response to climate change? Range shifts and community effects in the borderland between forest and tundra

    OpenAIRE

    Elmhagen, Bodil; Kindberg, Jonas; Hellström, Peter; Angerbjörn, Anders

    2015-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that climate warming will allow southern species to advance north and invade northern ecosystems. We review the changes in the Swedish mammal and bird community in boreal forest and alpine tundra since the nineteenth century, as well as suggested drivers of change. Observed changes include (1) range expansion and increased abundance in southern birds, ungulates, and carnivores; (2) range contraction and decline in northern birds and carnivores; and (3) abundance decli...

  8. Remote Sensing Techniques in Monitoring Post-Fire Effects and Patterns of Forest Recovery in Boreal Forest Regions: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Thuan Chu; Xulin Guo

    2013-01-01

    The frequency and severity of forest fires, coupled with changes in spatial and temporal precipitation and temperature patterns, are likely to severely affect the characteristics of forest and permafrost patterns in boreal eco-regions. Forest fires, however, are also an ecological factor in how forest ecosystems form and function, as they affect the rate and characteristics of tree recruitment. A better understanding of fire regimes and forest recovery patterns in different environmental and ...

  9. Characteristics of Mire Soils and Its Sustainable Utilization in Xianghai Mire Wetland.%向海沼泽湿地土壤特征及可持续利用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白军红; 余国营; 张玉霞

    2001-01-01

    On the basis of the study about the conditions and process of formation of mire soils in Xianghai mire wetland, this paper classifies the soil into four soil subtypes, and describes their main characters such as distribution laws, profile features etc. respectively. In addition, it also puts forward such ways of sustainable exploitation and utilization to solve such problems as salinization, desertification and catagenesis etc..%基于对向海沼津湿地土壤形成条件和主要成土过程的研究,将其沼泽土壤划分为4个亚类型,并分别描述了各自的分布规律和剖面特征。在向海沼泽湿地土壤盐渍化、沙化、退化问题日益严重的大前提下提出了可持续开发利用对策。

  10. Modeling the impacts of organic layer depth on forest stand recovery from disturbance in the North American boreal forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trugman, A. T.; Medvigy, D.; Fenton, N.; Bergeron, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The boreal forest contains over 30 percent of Earth's terrestrial carbon, stored mainly as organic matter in soils. Warming temperatures have decreased the fire return interval at many locations, potentially opening more boreal forest space to early-successional deciduous species. However, previous observational studies have shown that the residual forest organic layer depth after a fire can be directly related to fire severity and that this organic layer depth plays a critical role in determining post-fire secondary succession in the North American boreal forest. In this study, we use a numerical model constrained by field data to evaluate: (1) the extent to which the organic layer inhibits deciduous seedling establishment; (2) whether differences in seedling establishment after mild and severe burns affect mature forest structure and composition on decadal to century time scales. Our modeling experiments were carried out with the Ecosystem Demography model version 2 (ED2) terrestrial biosphere model. ED2 is designed to explicitly track the growth and mortality of individual trees, which compete for light, water, and nutrients using an open nitrogen cycle. Our simulations feature parameterizations for aspen and black spruce species-types as well as a new dynamic soil organic layer module with species-specific litter decay rates. The updated boreal forest model is validated using several datasets across the North American boreal forest that range from daily carbon and energy fluxes to multi-century basal area chronosequences including: (1) sub-daily to monthly eddy covariance measurements taken in Delta Junction, Alaska and Manitoba, Canada; (2) decade-long forest inventory data from the Cooperative Alaska Forest Inventory taken throughout the Alaskan boreal forest; and (3) multi-century basal area chronosequences measured in Manitoba and Quebec. We then use the model to identify the controls that the soil organic layer exerts on secondary succession between aspen

  11. Logging and Fire Effects in Siberian Boreal Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukavskaya, E.; Buryak, L.; Ivanova, G.; Kalenskaya, O.; Bogorodskaya, A.; Zhila, S.; McRae, D.; Conard, S. G.

    2013-12-01

    The Russian boreal zone supports a huge terrestrial carbon pool. Moreover, it is a tremendous reservoir of wood products concentrated mainly in Siberia. The main natural disturbance in these forests is wildfire, which modifies the carbon budget and has potentially important climate feedbacks. In addition, both legal and illegal logging increase landscape complexity and fire hazard. We investigated a number of sites in different regions of Siberia to evaluate the impacts of fire and logging on fuel loads, carbon emissions, tree regeneration, soil respiration, and microbocenosis. We found large variations of fire and logging effects among regions depending on growing conditions and type of logging activity. Partial logging had no negative impact on forest conditions and carbon cycle. Illegal logging resulted in increase of fire hazard, and higher carbon emissions than legal logging. The highest fuel loads and carbon emissions were found on repeatedly burned unlogged sites where first fire resulted in total tree mortality. Repeated fires together with logging activities in drier conditions and on large burned sites resulted in insufficient regeneration, or even total lack of tree seedlings. Soil respiration was less on both burned and logged areas than in undisturbed forest. The highest structural and functional disturbances of the soil microbocenosis were observed on logged burned sites. Understanding current interactions between fire and logging is important for modeling ecosystem processes and for managers to develop strategies of sustainable forest management. Changing patterns in the harvest of wood products increase landscape complexity and can be expected to increase emissions and ecosystem damage from wildfires, inhibit recovery of natural ecosystems, and exacerbate impacts of wildland fire on changing climate and air quality. The research was supported by NASA LCLUC Program, RFBR grant # 12-04-31258, and Russian Academy of Sciences.

  12. Ecology of some mire and bog plant communities in the Western Italian Alps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio BUFFA

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available During a mire vegetation study, conducted mainly in the subalpine-alpine sector of the Western Italian Alps, the ecology of several plant communities and numerous moss species of this kind of vegetation was evaluated. The study area covered the Piedmontese sector of the Graian Alps, the eastern sector of the Aosta Valley as well as certain localities of the Pennine Alps, the Canavese district and the Maritime Alps. They have a rocky substratum representative of the various regional lithologies and include the main sectors characterised by the highest precipitation. Three hundred and twenty two relevées were made using the phytosociological method and the pH and the conductivity of the water table and its depth were measured directly. Cluster Analysis allowed a classification of the samples and the identification of various groups of plant communities. Ordination performed by DCA and CCA allowed us to identify the ecological features of the various plant communities by using the values of the main environmental parameters, measured directly in the field, and certain climatic parameters (altitude and mean annual precipitation available. The use of climatic parameters is an important result for identifying communities which show greater oceanicity, something that is underlined also by the presence of indicator species such as Sphagnum papillosum and S. subnitens. Furthermore the communities are arranged in a "poor-rich" gradient, and are also profoundly influenced by depth to water table which is inversely correlated to the pH. Therefore we find certain kinds of communities all with a very low water table and which are little affected by its chemistry. Other groups share the fact that the water table is outcropping or near the surface and are distinguishable for their pH values and conductivity. We discuss the different response of the bryophytes and vascular plants of these communities to the environmental parameters considered, in light of their

  13. A Changing Number of Alternative States in the Boreal Biome: Reproducibility Risks of Replacing Remote Sensing Products.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi Xu

    Full Text Available Publicly available remote sensing products have boosted science in many ways. The openness of these data sources suggests high reproducibility. However, as we show here, results may be specific to versions of the data products that can become unavailable as new versions are posted. We focus on remotely-sensed tree cover. Recent studies have used this public resource to detect multi-modality in tree cover in the tropical and boreal biomes. Such patterns suggest alternative stable states separated by critical tipping points. This has important implications for the potential response of these ecosystems to global climate change. For the boreal region, four distinct ecosystem states (i.e., treeless, sparse and dense woodland, and boreal forest were previously identified by using the Collection 3 data of MODIS Vegetation Continuous Fields (VCF. Since then, the MODIS VCF product has been updated to Collection 5; and a Landsat VCF product of global tree cover at a fine spatial resolution of 30 meters has been developed. Here we compare these different remote-sensing products of tree cover to show that identification of alternative stable states in the boreal biome partly depends on the data source used. The updated MODIS data and the newer Landsat data consistently demonstrate three distinct modes around similar tree-cover values. Our analysis suggests that the boreal region has three modes: one sparsely vegetated state (treeless, one distinct 'savanna-like' state and one forest state, which could be alternative stable states. Our analysis illustrates that qualitative outcomes of studies may change fundamentally as new versions of remote sensing products are used. Scientific reproducibility thus requires that old versions remain publicly available.

  14. A Changing Number of Alternative States in the Boreal Biome: Reproducibility Risks of Replacing Remote Sensing Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chi; Holmgren, Milena; Van Nes, Egbert H; Hirota, Marina; Chapin, F Stuart; Scheffer, Marten

    2015-01-01

    Publicly available remote sensing products have boosted science in many ways. The openness of these data sources suggests high reproducibility. However, as we show here, results may be specific to versions of the data products that can become unavailable as new versions are posted. We focus on remotely-sensed tree cover. Recent studies have used this public resource to detect multi-modality in tree cover in the tropical and boreal biomes. Such patterns suggest alternative stable states separated by critical tipping points. This has important implications for the potential response of these ecosystems to global climate change. For the boreal region, four distinct ecosystem states (i.e., treeless, sparse and dense woodland, and boreal forest) were previously identified by using the Collection 3 data of MODIS Vegetation Continuous Fields (VCF). Since then, the MODIS VCF product has been updated to Collection 5; and a Landsat VCF product of global tree cover at a fine spatial resolution of 30 meters has been developed. Here we compare these different remote-sensing products of tree cover to show that identification of alternative stable states in the boreal biome partly depends on the data source used. The updated MODIS data and the newer Landsat data consistently demonstrate three distinct modes around similar tree-cover values. Our analysis suggests that the boreal region has three modes: one sparsely vegetated state (treeless), one distinct 'savanna-like' state and one forest state, which could be alternative stable states. Our analysis illustrates that qualitative outcomes of studies may change fundamentally as new versions of remote sensing products are used. Scientific reproducibility thus requires that old versions remain publicly available.

  15. Growth decline linked to warming-induced water limitation in hemi-boreal forests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuchen Wu

    Full Text Available Hemi-boreal forests, which make up the transition from temperate deciduous forests to boreal forests in southern Siberia, have experienced significant warming without any accompanying increase in precipitation during the last 80 years. This climatic change could have a profound impact on tree growth and on the stability of forest ecosystems in this region, but at present evidence for these impacts is lacking. In this study, we report a recent dramatic decline in the growth of hemi-boreal forests, based on ring width measurements from three dominant tree-species (Pinus sylvestris, Larix sibirica and Larix gmelinii, sampled from eight sites in the region. We found that regional tree growth has become increasingly limited by low soil water content in the pre- and early-growing season (from October of the previous year to July of the current year over the past 80 years. A warming-induced reduction in soil water content has also increased the climate sensitivity of these three tree species. Beginning in the mid-1980s, a clear decline in growth is evident for both the pine forests and the larch forests, although there are increasing trends in the proxy of soil water use efficiencies. Our findings are consistent with those from other parts of the world and provide valuable insights into the regional carbon cycle and vegetation dynamics, and should be useful for devising adaptive forest management strategies.

  16. Pinus sylvestris as a missing source of nitrous oxide and methane in boreal forest

    OpenAIRE

    Katerina Machacova; Jaana Bäck; Anni Vanhatalo; Elisa Halmeenmäki; Pasi Kolari; Ivan Mammarella; Jukka Pumpanen; Manuel Acosta; Otmar Urban; Mari Pihlatie

    2016-01-01

    Boreal forests comprise 73% of the world’s coniferous forests. Based on forest floor measurements, they have been considered a significant natural sink of methane (CH4) and a natural source of nitrous oxide (N2O), both of which are important greenhouse gases. However, the role of trees, especially conifers, in ecosystem N2O and CH4 exchange is only poorly understood. We show for the first time that mature Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) trees consistently emit N2O and CH4 from both stems and...

  17. Boreal forests can have a remarkable role in reducing greenhouse gas emissions locally: Land use-related and anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions and sinks at the municipal level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhala, Pekka; Bergström, Irina; Haaspuro, Tiina; Kortelainen, Pirkko; Holmberg, Maria; Forsius, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Ecosystem services have become an important concept in policy-making. Carbon (C) sequestration into ecosystems is a significant ecosystem service, whereas C losses can be considered as an ecosystem disservice. Municipalities are in a position to make decisions that affect local emissions and therefore are important when considering greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation. Integrated estimations of fluxes at a regional level help local authorities to develop land use policies for minimising GHG emissions and maximising C sinks. In this study, the Finnish national GHG accounting system is modified and applied at the municipal level by combining emissions and sinks from agricultural land, forest areas, water bodies and mires (land use-related GHG emissions) with emissions from activities such as energy production and traffic (anthropogenic GHG emissions) into the LUONNIKAS calculation tool. The study area consists of 14 municipalities within the Vanajavesi catchment area located in Southern Finland. In these municipalities, croplands, peat extraction sites, water bodies and undrained mires are emission sources, whereas forests are large carbon sinks that turn the land use-related GHG budget negative, resulting in C sequestration into the ecosystem. The annual land use-related sink in the study area was 78tCO2eqkm(-2) and 2.8tCO2eq per capita. Annual anthropogenic GHG emissions from the area amounted to 250tCO2eqkm(-2) and 9.2tCO2eq per capita. Since forests are a significant carbon sink and the efficiency of this sink is heavily affected by forest management practices, forest management policy is a key contributing factor for mitigating municipal GHG emissions. PMID:26994793

  18. The impact of bryophytes on the carbon stocks of northern boreal forest soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagemann, U.; Moroni, M. T.; Shaw, C. H.; Kurz, W. A.

    2012-04-01

    Dead organic matter (DOM), organic layer, and mineral soil carbon (C) dynamics in cool and humid northern boreal forests are expected to differ from those of drier or warmer boreal forests, because processes such as paludification and woody debris (WD) burial within the organic layer by overgrowing moss are more pronounced in regions with low average temperatures, vigorous moss layers, and long fire-return intervals. However, very few studies have provided field-measured data for these mostly remote regions. Hence, C cycling models such as the Carbon Budget Model of the Canadian Forest Sector (CBM-CFS3) have rarely been validated with field data from northern boreal forest soils, resulting in large uncertainties for estimated C stocks in a large proportion of the boreal forest ecozone. We present (i) measured data on organic layer and mineral soil (0-45 cm) C stocks in 18 old-growth and disturbed high-boreal black spruce stands in Labrador, Canada; (ii) a comparison of field-measured soil C stocks with those predicted using the CBM-CFS3; and (iii) special characteristics of the DOM and soil C dynamics of northern boreal forest soils that require modifications of model parameters and structure. Measured organic layer C stocks (30.4-47.4 Mg C ha-1) were within the range reported for other boreal forests. However, mineral soil C stocks (121.5-208.1 Mg C ha-1) contributed 58-76% to total ecosystem C stocks. Mineral soil C stocks were thus considerably higher than observed in other upland boreal forests in drier or warmer regions, but similar to values reported for black spruce on poorly drained sites and peat soils. In addition, large amounts of deadwood C (4.7-18.2 Mg C ha-1) were found to be buried within the organic layer, contributing up to 31% to total organic layer C stocks. The comparison of field-measured and CBM-CFS3 modeled C stocks showed that organic layer and mineral soil DOM in Labrador black spruce stands likely decays at lower rates than assumed by CBM

  19. Botany: Constraints to growth of boreal forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, Paul; Linder, Sune

    2000-06-01

    Understanding how the growth of trees at high latitudes in boreal forest is controlled is important for projections of global carbon sequestration and timber production in relation to climate change. Is stem growth of boreal forest trees constrained by the length of the growing season when stem cambial cells divide, or by the length of the period when resources can be captured? In both cases, the timing of the thaw in the spring is critical: neither cambial cell division nor uptake of nutrients and carbon dioxide can occur while the soil is frozen. Here we argue, on the basis of long-term observations made in northern Saskatchewan and Sweden, that the time between the spring thaw and the autumn freeze determines the amount of annual tree growth, mainly through temperature effects on carbon-dioxide uptake in spring and on nutrient availability and uptake during summer, rather than on cambial cell division.

  20. Diverse growth trends and climate responses across Eurasia’s boreal forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellmann, Lena; Agafonov, Leonid; Charpentier Ljungqvist, Fredrik; Churakova (Sidorova, Olga; Düthorn, Elisabeth; Esper, Jan; Hülsmann, Lisa; Kirdyanov, Alexander V.; Moiseev, Pavel; Myglan, Vladimir S.; Nikolaev, Anatoly N.; Reinig, Frederick; Schweingruber, Fritz H.; Solomina, Olga; Tegel, Willy; Büntgen, Ulf

    2016-07-01

    The area covered by boreal forests accounts for ˜16% of the global and 22% of the Northern Hemisphere landmass. Changes in the productivity and functioning of this circumpolar biome not only have strong effects on species composition and diversity at regional to larger scales, but also on the Earth’s carbon cycle. Although temporal inconsistency in the response of tree growth to temperature has been reported from some locations at the higher northern latitudes, a systematic dendroecological network assessment is still missing for most of the boreal zone. Here, we analyze the geographical patterns of changes in summer temperature and precipitation across northern Eurasia >60 °N since 1951 AD, as well as the growth trends and climate responses of 445 Pinus, Larix and Picea ring width chronologies in the same area and period. In contrast to widespread summer warming, fluctuations in precipitation and tree growth are spatially more diverse and overall less distinct. Although the influence of summer temperature on ring formation is increasing with latitude and distinct moisture effects are restricted to a few southern locations, growth sensitivity to June-July temperature variability is only significant at 16.6% of all sites (p ≤ 0.01). By revealing complex climate constraints on the productivity of Eurasia’s northern forests, our results question the a priori suitability of boreal tree-ring width chronologies for reconstructing summer temperatures. This study further emphasizes regional climate differences and their role on the dynamics of boreal ecosystems, and also underlines the importance of free data access to facilitate the compilation and evaluation of massively replicated and updated dendroecological networks.

  1. Adaptation of forest ecosystems, forests and forestry to climate change. FINADAPT Working Paper 4

    OpenAIRE

    KellomÀki, Seppo; Strandman, Harri; Nuutinen, Tuula; Peltola, Heli; Korhonen, Kari T; VÀisÀnen, Hannu

    2005-01-01

    In this study, an ecosystem model (Sima), capable of predicting ecosystem level functioning of boreal forests, was used together with a permanent sample plot data of the Finnish national forest inventory (measured in 1995) and different climate scenarios to analyze, how increase in temperature, precipitation and atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration may effect forest growth and dynamics in Finnish conditions. The simulations showed that the forest ecosystems are most impacted in the most n...

  2. Silviculture's Role in Managing Boreal Forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa B. Jain

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available Boreal forests, which are often undeveloped, are a major source of raw materials for many countries. They are circumpolar in extent and occupy a belt to a width of 1000 km in certain regions. Various conifer and hardwood species ranging from true firs to poplars grow in boreal forests. These species exhibit a wide range of shade tolerance and growth characteristics, and occupy different successional positions. The climate is subarctic, with short growing seasons, and the soils are shallow. Both wildfires and timber harvesting play an important role in shaping the structure and composition of boreal forests. Both uneven-aged and even-aged silvicultural systems can be used to produce commercial harvests, but systems can also be designed to meet a variety of other forest management objectives. Wildlife habitat maintenance, water production or conservation, and fire hazard reduction are only some of the objectives for which silvicultural systems can be designed. Coarse wood debris, snags, shrubs, canopy layers, and species composition are examples of forest attributes that can be managed using silvicultural systems. Systems can be designed to sustain predator habitat, yet provide a continual production of wood products. Uneven-aged systems tend to favor the regeneration and development of shade-tolerant species, whereas even-aged systems tend to favor shade-intolerant species. These systems and all of their permutations can create and maintain a suite of different stand compositions and structures that can be used to meet a wide variety of management objectives.

  3. Treefall inputs to boreal soils and implications for C dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manies, K.; Harden, J. W.

    2011-12-01

    Stand replacing fires are the dominant disturbance of black spruce-dominated boreal forests. A previous study (Manies et al. 2005) determined that fire-killed wood is the source of between 10% and 60% of the carbon (C) found in the deeper, more recalcitrant soil layers of these ecosystems, although these inputs vary spatially and temporally. In that study, we assumed that the turnover time for standing dead to be converted to woody debris was approximately nine years. Over the last decade, however, woody debris inventories within two Alaskan study sites, both of which burned in 1999, indicate a longer turnover time than previously estimated. We have used these new constraints on course woody debris inputs to update the original model and calculated the impact slower fall rates could have on C storage within the deep soil C pool. These new values increase the amount of wood-derived C by up to 20%, which in turn increases deep C storage. Understanding the source of soil C is important for modeling efforts, especially those that need to partition different sources of C to determine rates of C cycling. These results also have implications for land managers who are beginning to consider C storage as a part of their management strategies.

  4. Ecosystem Jenga!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umphlett, Natalie; Brosius, Tierney; Laungani, Ramesh; Rousseau, Joe; Leslie-Pelecky, Diandra L.

    2009-01-01

    To give students a tangible model of an ecosystem and have them experience what could happen if a component of that ecosystem were removed; the authors developed a hands-on, inquiry-based activity that visually demonstrates the concept of a delicately balanced ecosystem through a modification of the popular game Jenga. This activity can be…

  5. High Resolution Mapping of Peatland Hydroperiod at a High-Latitude Swedish Mire

    OpenAIRE

    Nathan Torbick; Andreas Persson; David Olefeldt; Steve Frolking; William Salas; Stephen Hagen; Patrick Crill; Changsheng Li

    2012-01-01

    Monitoring high latitude wetlands is required to understand feedbacks between terrestrial carbon pools and climate change. Hydrological variability is a key factor driving biogeochemical processes in these ecosystems and effective assessment tools are critical for accurate characterization of surface hydrology, soil moisture, and water table fluctuations. Operational satellite platforms provide opportunities to systematically monitor hydrological variability in high latitude wetlands. The obj...

  6. Nitrogen and carbon reallocation in fungal mycelia during decomposition of boreal forest litter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna B Boberg

    Full Text Available Boreal forests are characterized by spatially heterogeneous soils with low N availability. The decomposition of coniferous litter in these systems is primarily performed by basidiomycete fungi, which often form large mycelia with a well-developed capacity to reallocate resources spatially- an advantageous trait in heterogeneous environments. In axenic microcosm systems we tested whether fungi increase their biomass production by reallocating N between Pinus sylvestris (Scots pine needles at different stages of decomposition. We estimated fungal biomass production by analysing the accumulation of the fungal cell wall compound chitin. Monospecific systems were compared with systems with interspecific interactions. We found that the fungi reallocated assimilated N and mycelial growth away from well-degraded litter towards fresh litter components. This redistribution was accompanied by reduced decomposition of older litter. Interconnection of substrates increased over-all fungal C use efficiency (i.e. the allocation of assimilated C to biomass rather than respiration, presumably by enabling fungal translocation of growth-limiting N to litter with higher C quality. Fungal connection between different substrates also restricted N-mineralization and production of dissolved organic N, suggesting that litter saprotrophs in boreal forest ecosystems primarily act to redistribute rather than release N. This spatial integration of different resource qualities was hindered by interspecific interactions, in which litters of contrasting quality were colonised by two different basidiomycete species. The experiments provide a detailed picture of how resource reallocation in two decomposer fungi leads to a more efficient utilisation of spatially separated resources under N-limitation. From an ecosystem point of view, such economic fungal behaviour could potentially contribute to organic matter accumulation in the litter layers of boreal forests.

  7. Water budget of a Quebec North-boreal minerotrophic peatland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jutras, S.; Rousseau, A. N.; St-Hilaire, A.; Carrer, G.; Proulx-McInnis, S.; Clerc, C.; Levrel, G.

    2009-05-01

    A significant percentage of the northern Quebec boreal region consists of minerotrophic peatland. Their impact on large-scale watersheds, used for hydroelectric production, is important, especially in relation to climate change. During the last decades, a subtle increase in the surface of ponds at the expense of terrestrial compartments has been observed. To better understand the impacts of this development, a multidisciplinary study to perform a complete integrated analysis of the water balance was launched in summer 2008 on the Abeille peatland (54° 06'52" N, 72° 30'01"W), a minerotrophic peatland with an open-water surface. While all features of the water balance will be considered (precipitation, evapotranspiration, runoff, storage and error), some will be studied in greater depth. Notably, evapotranspiration and storage changes will be considered, since, they are particularly difficult to measure in peatland ecosystems. Indirect methods for estimating actual evapotranspiration are often used. One method is to use a semi-empirical formula to estimate potential evapotranspiration. The main problem with this method is that a relationship between potential and actual evapotranspiration must be established and this is a highly variable process for peat ecosystems. To establish a relationship appropriate to our study site, different methods of direct measurement of the actual evapotranspiration will be used (lysimeters, turbulence flow, daily fluctuations of storage, etc.) and compared. A dense network of wells has been installed to enable monitoring of changes in storage and subsurface runoff. A high accuracy topographic survey will be executed to assess the total water content of the site. A device for measuring the variation of peat surface elevation will also be established. Preliminary results are showing complex dynamic behaviors of water migration through the site, therefore opening the way to new questions and hypotheses to clarify in the coming years.

  8. Altitudinal vs Latitudinal Climactic Drivers: A Comparison of a Relict Picea and Abies Forest in the Southern Appalachians versus the Hemi-Boreal Transition Zone off Southern Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, A.; Lafon, C. W.

    2015-12-01

    Identification of biotic and abiotic determinants of tree species range limits is critical for understanding the effects of climate change on species distributions. Upward shifts of species distributions in montane areas have been widely reported but there have been few reports of latitudinal range retractions. Previous studies have indicated that southern latitudinal limits of a species range are dictated by biotic factors such as competition while others have suggested that abiotic factors, such as temperature, dictate these limits. We investigated the potential climatic gradients at the southern latitudinal limit of the Spruce (Picea) and Fir (Abies) species that dominate the Canadian boreal forest community as well as relict boreal forests containing similar species found in the high elevation areas of the Southern Appalachians. Existing research has suggested that relict ecosystems are more sensitive to climate change and can be indicative of future changes at latitudinal range limits. Expanding on this literature, we hypothesized that we would see similar gradients in climatic variables at the southern latitudinal limit of the Canadian boreal forest and those in the relict boreal forests southern Appalachians acting as controlling factors of these species distributions. We used forty years of climate data from weather stations along the southern edge of the boreal forest in the Canadian Shield provinces, species distribution data from the Canadian National Forest Inventory, (CNFI) geospatial data from the National Park Service (NPS), and historical weather data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to perform our analysis. Our results indicate different climate variables act as controls of warm edge range limits of the Canadian boreal forest than those of the relict boreal forest of the southern Appalachians. However, we believe range retractions of the relict forest may be indicative of a more gradual response of similar species

  9. Detecting Local Drivers of Fire Cycle Heterogeneity in Boreal Forests: A Scale Issue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie Claude Bélisle

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Severe crown fires are determining disturbances for the composition and structure of boreal forests in North America. Fire cycle (FC associations with continental climate gradients are well known, but smaller scale controls remain poorly documented. Using a time since fire map (time scale of 300 years, the study aims to assess the relative contributions of local and regional controls on FC and to describe the relationship between FC heterogeneity and vegetation patterns. The study area, located in boreal eastern North America, was partitioned into watersheds according to five scales going from local (3 km2 to landscape (2800 km2 scales. Using survival analysis, we observed that dry surficial deposits and hydrography density better predict FC when measured at the local scale, while terrain complexity and slope position perform better when measured at the middle and landscape scales. The most parsimonious model was selected according to the Akaike information criterion to predict FC throughout the study area. We detected two FC zones, one short (159 years and one long (303 years, with specific age structures and tree compositions. We argue that the local heterogeneity of the fire regime contributes to ecosystem diversity and must be considered in ecosystem management.

  10. Large-scale variation in boreal and temperate forest carbon turnover rate related to climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurner, Martin; Beer, Christian; Carvalhais, Nuno; Forkel, Matthias; Santoro, Maurizio; Tum, Markus; Schmullius, Christiane

    2016-05-01

    Vegetation carbon turnover processes in forest ecosystems and their dominant drivers are far from being understood at a broader scale. Many of these turnover processes act on long timescales and include a lateral dimension and thus can hardly be investigated by plot-level studies alone. Making use of remote sensing-based products of net primary production (NPP) and biomass, here we show that spatial gradients of carbon turnover rate (k) in Northern Hemisphere boreal and temperate forests are explained by different climate-related processes depending on the ecosystem. k is related to frost damage effects and the trade-off between growth and frost adaptation in boreal forests, while drought stress and climate effects on insects and pathogens can explain an elevated k in temperate forests. By identifying relevant processes underlying broadscale patterns in k, we provide the basis for a detailed exploration of these mechanisms in field studies, and ultimately the improvement of their representations in global vegetation models (GVMs).

  11. Site carbon storage along productivity gradients of a late-seral southern Boreal forest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kranabetter, J.M. [British Columbia Ministry of Forests and Range, Victoria, BC (Canada)

    2009-05-15

    This study examined the total ecosystem carbon (TEC) range of late-seral southern Boreal forests that encompassed a typical gradient of upland plant communities and soils. Stand ages were approximately 180 years old. The study examined major pools of ecosystem carbon (C) effected by timber harvesting for use in forest management C accounting. C content was determined using a combination of direct measures and key parameter estimates of tree biomass, soil bulk density, and specific gravity of decayed wood. The aim of the study was to refine estimates for TEC as a function of plant association and indices of site productivity. The study was also conducted to obtain baseline data on the theoretical upper bounds of C pools among soil and organic horizons, coarse woody debris, and tree biomass in late-seral boreal stands. Soil, coarse woody debris, and forest biomass parameters were compared among plant associations in a randomized incomplete block design. The study showed that TEC was lowest on dry, poor-Cladonia sites and highest on subhydric, very rich-Devil's club sites. It was concluded that while C inventories based on zonal sites may be useful for developing broad estimates of TEC, they are likely to be inaccurate for detailed landscape analyses. 50 refs., 4 tabs., 2 figs.

  12. Priming effects in boreal black spruce forest soils: quantitative evaluation and sensitivity analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaosheng Fan

    Full Text Available Laboratory studies show that introduction of fresh and easily decomposable organic carbon (OC into soil-water systems can stimulate the decomposition of soil OC (SOC via priming effects in temperate forests, shrublands, grasslands, and agro-ecosystems. However, priming effects are still not well understood in the field setting for temperate ecosystems and virtually nothing is known about priming effects (e.g., existence, frequency, and magnitude in boreal ecosystems. In this study, a coupled dissolved OC (DOC transport and microbial biomass dynamics model was developed to simultaneously simulate co-occurring hydrological, physical, and biological processes and their interactions in soil pore-water systems. The developed model was then used to examine the importance of priming effects in two black spruce forest soils, with and without underlying permafrost. Our simulations showed that priming effects were strongly controlled by the frequency and intensity of DOC input, with greater priming effects associated with greater DOC inputs. Sensitivity analyses indicated that priming effects were most sensitive to variations in the quality of SOC, followed by variations in microbial biomass dynamics (i.e., microbial death and maintenance respiration, highlighting the urgent need to better discern these key parameters in future experiments and to consider these dynamics in existing ecosystem models. Water movement carries DOC to deep soil layers that have high SOC stocks in boreal soils. Thus, greater priming effects were predicted for the site with favorable water movement than for the site with limited water flow, suggesting that priming effects might be accelerated for sites where permafrost degradation leads to the formation of dry thermokarst.

  13. Nitrogen export from a boreal stream network following forest harvesting: seasonal nitrate removal and conservative export of organic forms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Schelker

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Boreal streams are under pressure from large scale disturbance by forestry. Recent scenarios predict an increase in forest production in Scandinavia to meet market demands and to mitigate higher anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Increased fertilization and shorter forest rotations are anticipated which will likely enhance the pressure on boreal streams in the near future. Among the major environmental impacts of forest harvesting is the increased mobilization of inorganic nitrogen (N, primarily as nitrate (NO3- into surface waters. But whereas NO3- inputs to first-order streams have been previously described, their downstream fate and impact is not well understood. We evaluated the downstream fate of N inputs in a boreal landscape that has been altered by forest harvests over a 10 year period to estimate the effects of multiple clear-cuts on aquatic N export in a boreal stream network. Small streams showed substantial leaching of NO3- in response to harvests with concentrations increasing by ~ 15 fold. NO3- concentrations at two sampling stations further downstream in the network were strongly seasonal and increased significantly in response to harvesting at the medium size, but not at the larger stream. Nitrate removal efficiency, Er, calculated as the percentage of "forestry derived" NO3- that was retained within the landscape using a mass balance model was highest during the snow melt season followed by the growing season, but declined continuously throughout the dormant season. In contrast, export of organic N from the landscape indicated little removal and was essentially conservative. Overall, net removal of NO3- between 2008 and 2011 accounted for ~ 70 % of the total NO3- mass exported from harvested patches distributed across the landscape. These results highlight the capacity and limitation of N-limited terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems to buffer inorganic N mobilization that arises from multiple clear-cuts within meso-scale boreal

  14. The Jurassic of Denmark and Greenland: Early and Middle Jurassic mires of Bornholm and the Fennoscandian Border Zone: a comparison of depositional environments and vegetation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koppelhus, Eva B.

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Suitable climatic conditions for peat formation existed during Early–Middle Jurassic times in the Fennoscandian Border Zone. Autochthonous peat and allochthonous organic matter were depositedfrom north Jylland, south-east through the Kattegat and Øresund area, to Skåne and Bornholm. The increase in coal seam abundance and thickness from north Jylland to Bornholm indicates that the most favourable peat-forming conditions were present towards the south-east. Peat formation and deposition of organic-rich muds in the Early Jurassic coastal mires were mainly controlled by a continuous rise of relative sea level governed by subsidence and an overall eustatic rise. Watertable rise repeatedly outpaced the rate of accumulation of organic matter and terminated peat formationby lacustrine or lagoonal flooding. Organic matter accumulated in open-water mires and in continuously waterlogged, anoxic and periodically marine-influenced mires. The latter conditionsresulted in huminite-rich coals containing framboidal pyrite. The investigated Lower Jurassic seams correspond to peat and peaty mud deposits that ranged from 0.5–5.7 m in thickness, but were generallyless than 3 m thick. It is estimated that on Bornholm, the mires existed on average for c. 1200 years in the Hettangian–Sinemurian and for c. 2300 years in the Late Pliensbachian; the Early Jurassic(Hettangian–Sinemurian mires in the Øresund area existed for c. 1850 years. Aalenian uplift of the Ringkøbing–Fyn High and major parts of the Danish Basin caused a significant change in the basinconfiguration and much reduced subsidence in the Fennoscandian Border Zone during the Middle Jurassic. This resulted in a more inland position for the Middle Jurassic mires which on occasionenabled peat accumulation to keep pace with, or temporarily outpace, watertable rise. Thus, peat formation was sometimes sustained for relatively long periods, and the mires may have existed for up to 7000 years in the

  15. Effects of Sloped Terrain and Forest Stand Maturity on Evapotranspiration in a Boreal Forested Catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isabelle, P. E.; Nadeau, D.; Parent, A. C.; Rousseau, A. N.; Jutras, S.; Anctil, F.

    2015-12-01

    The boreal forests are the predominant landscape of Canada, occupying 49% of its boreal zone or 27% of the country. Despite the tremendous amount of literature on such ecosystems, some gaps persist in our understanding of boreal forest evapotranspiration (ET), given that direct measurements are costly to obtain and therefore scarce in these remote territories. This is especially the case on sloped terrain, since the eddy covariance method is not traditionally used in such situations. These gaps lead to the implementation of the EVAP experimental project, which intends to produce a major leap in our understanding of the water and energy budgets of a sloped boreal forest. Starting in summer 2015, we heavily instrumented a watershed in the Montmorency Forest (47°17' N; 71°10' W), Quebec, Canada. Located in the Laurentian Mountains, the forest has a mean elevation of 750 m with peaks at 1000 m. The setup includes a 20-m flux tower with two separate sets of eddy correlation and net radiation measurements facing opposite directions, located over an almost mature boreal forest (logged ~20 years ago, 8-10 m trees). Eddy fluxes are also measured under the canopy with a similar setup, while a sub-watershed is instrumented with a 10-m flux tower using homologous instruments, this time on a much younger forest stand (logged ~10 years ago, 4-5 m trees). Both sites are characterized by a significant slope (~20%), facing northeast for the 20-m tower and west for the 10-m tower. With several other instruments, we are measuring every major components of both water and energy budgets, including the outgoing discharge of the watershed and subwatershed. The different slope orientations and local topography of both sites allow us to quantify the relationships between solar exposition, topographic shading and ET rates; these relationships being transposable to other mountainous forested catchments. We also investigate the presence of slope flows and assess their impact on local ET

  16. Responses of aboveground and belowground forest carbon stocks to disturbances in boreal forests of Northeastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chao; He, Hong S.; Hawbaker, Todd J.; Liang, Yu; Gong, Peng; Wu, Wuzhiwei; Zhu, Zhiliang

    2016-04-01

    Boreal forests represents about 1/3 of forest area and 1/3 of forest carbon on earth. Carbon dynamics of boreal forests are sensitive to climate change, natural (e.g., fire) and anthropogenic (e.g., harvest) disturbances. Field-based studies suggest that disturbances alter species composition, stand structure, and litter decomposition, and have significant effects on boreal forest carbon dynamics. Most of these studies, however, covered a relatively short period of time (e.g., few decades), which is limited in revealing such long-term effects of disturbances. Models are therefore developed as important tools in exploring the long-term (e.g., hundreds of years) effects of disturbances on forest carbon dynamics. In this study, we applied a framework of coupling forest ecosystem and landscape model to evaluating the effect of fire, harvest and their interactions on carbon stocks in a boreal forest landscape of Northeastern China. We compared the simulation results under fire, harvest and fire-harvest interaction scenarios with the simulated value of succession scenario at 26 landtypes over 150 years at a 10-year time step. Our results suggest that aboveground and belowground carbon are significantly reduced by fire and harvest over 150years. Fire reduced aboveground carbon by 2.3±0.6 ton/ha, harvest by 6.0±1.4 ton/ha, and fire and harvest interaction by 8.0±1.9 tons/ha. Fire reduced belowground carbon by 4.6±3.4 ton/ha, harvest by 5.0±3.5 ton/ha, and fire-harvest interaction by 5.7±3.7 tons/ha. The divergent response of carbon stocks among landtypes and between disturbance scenarios was due to the spatial interactions between fire, harvest, and species composition. Our results indicated that boreal forests carbon stocks prediction needs to consider the effects of fire and harvest for improving the estimation accuracy.

  17. Understanding COS Fluxes in a Boreal Forest: Towards COS-Based GPP Estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H.; Kooijmans, L.; Franchin, A.; Keskinen, H.; Levula, J.; Mammarella, I.; Maseyk, K. S.; Pihlatie, M.; Praplan, A. P.; Seibt, U.; Sun, W.; Vesala, T.

    2015-12-01

    Carbonyl Sulfide (COS) is a promising new tracer that can be used to partition the Net Ecosystem Exchange into gross primary production (GPP) and respiration. COS and CO2 vegetation fluxes are closely related as these gases share the same diffusion pathway into stomata, which makes COS a potentially powerful tracer for GPP. While vegetative uptake is the largest sink of COS, the environmental drivers are poorly understood, and soil fluxes represent an important but relatively unconstrained component. Therefore, the realization of the COS tracer method requires proper characterization of both soil and ecosystem fluxes. A campaign to provide better constrained soil and ecosystem COS flux data for boreal forests took place in the summer of 2015 at the SMEAR II site in Hyytiälä, Finland. Eddy covariance flux measurements were made above the forest canopy on an Aerodyne continuous-wave quantum cascade laser (QCL) system that is capable of measuring COS, CO2, CO and H2O. Soil COS fluxes were obtained using modified LI-COR LI-8100 chambers together with high accuracy concentration measurements from another Aerodyne QCL instrument. The same instrument alternately measured concentrations in and above the canopy on a cycle through 4 heights, which will be used to calculate ecosystem fluxes using the Radon-tracer method, providing ecosystem fluxes under low-turbulent conditions. We will compare ecosystem fluxes from both eddy covariance and profile measurements and show estimates of the fraction of ecosystem fluxes attributed to the soil component. With the better understanding of ecosystem and soil COS fluxes, as obtained with this dataset, we will be able to derive COS-based GPP estimates for the Hyytiälä site.

  18. Digital Ecosystems

    CERN Document Server

    Briscoe, Gerard

    2009-01-01

    We view Digital Ecosystems to be the digital counterparts of biological ecosystems, which are considered to be robust, self-organising and scalable architectures that can automatically solve complex, dynamic problems. So, this work is concerned with the creation, investigation, and optimisation of Digital Ecosystems, exploiting the self-organising properties of biological ecosystems. First, we created the Digital Ecosystem, a novel optimisation technique inspired by biological ecosystems, where the optimisation works at two levels: a first optimisation, migration of agents which are distributed in a decentralised peer-to-peer network, operating continuously in time; this process feeds a second optimisation based on evolutionary computing that operates locally on single peers and is aimed at finding solutions to satisfy locally relevant constraints. We then investigated its self-organising aspects, starting with an extension to the definition of Physical Complexity to include evolving agent populations. Next, ...

  19. Remote Sensing Techniques in Monitoring Post-Fire Effects and Patterns of Forest Recovery in Boreal Forest Regions: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thuan Chu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The frequency and severity of forest fires, coupled with changes in spatial and temporal precipitation and temperature patterns, are likely to severely affect the characteristics of forest and permafrost patterns in boreal eco-regions. Forest fires, however, are also an ecological factor in how forest ecosystems form and function, as they affect the rate and characteristics of tree recruitment. A better understanding of fire regimes and forest recovery patterns in different environmental and climatic conditions will improve the management of sustainable forests by facilitating the process of forest resilience. Remote sensing has been identified as an effective tool for preventing and monitoring forest fires, as well as being a potential tool for understanding how forest ecosystems respond to them. However, a number of challenges remain before remote sensing practitioners will be able to better understand the effects of forest fires and how vegetation responds afterward. This article attempts to provide a comprehensive review of current research with respect to remotely sensed data and methods used to model post-fire effects and forest recovery patterns in boreal forest regions. The review reveals that remote sensing-based monitoring of post-fire effects and forest recovery patterns in boreal forest regions is not only limited by the gaps in both field data and remotely sensed data, but also the complexity of far-northern fire regimes, climatic conditions and environmental conditions. We expect that the integration of different remotely sensed data coupled with field campaigns can provide an important data source to support the monitoring of post-fire effects and forest recovery patterns. Additionally, the variation and stratification of pre- and post-fire vegetation and environmental conditions should be considered to achieve a reasonable, operational model for monitoring post-fire effects and forest patterns in boreal regions.

  20. The Arctic Boreal Vulnerability Experiment: Observing, Understanding, and Predicting Social-Ecological Change in the Far North

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, M. C.; Goetz, S. J.; Kasischke, E. S.; Kimball, J. S.; Boelman, N.

    2015-12-01

    In the high northern latitudes, climate is warming more rapidly than anywhere else on Earth, transforming vulnerable arctic tundra and boreal forest landscapes. These changes are altering the structure and function of energy, water and carbon cycles, producing significant feedbacks to regional and global climate through changes in energy, water and carbon cycles. These changes are also challenging local and global society. At the local level, communities seek to adapt to new social-ecological regimes. At the global level, changing arctic and boreal systems are increasing becoming the focus of policy discussions at all levels of decision-making. National and international scientific efforts associated with a new NASA field campaign, the Arctic-Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABOVE) will advance our ability to observe, understand and predict the complex, multiscale and non-linear processes that are confronting the natural and social systems in this rapidly changing region. Over the next decade, the newly assembled ABOVE Science Team will pursue this overarching question: "How vulnerable or resilient are ecosystems and society to environmental change in the Arctic and boreal region of western North America?" Through integration of remote sensing and in situ observations with modeling of both ecological and social systems, the ABOVE Science Team will advance an interdisciplinary understanding of the Far North. In this presentation, we will discuss the conceptual basis for the ABOVE Field Campaign, describe Science Team composition and timeline, and update the community on activities. In addition, we will reflect on the visionary role of Dr. Diane Wickland, retired NASA Terrestrial Ecology Program Manager and lead of the Carbon Cycle & Ecosystems Focus Area, in the development and commencement of ABOVE.

  1. Impact of Forest Harvesting on Trophic Structure of Eastern Canadian Boreal Shield Lakes: Insights from Stable Isotope Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaz, Patricia; Sirois, Pascal; Archambault, Philippe; Nozais, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Perturbations on ecosystems can have profound immediate effects and can, accordingly, greatly alter the natural community. Land-use such as forestry activities in the Canadian Boreal region have increased in the last decades, raising concerns about their potential impact on aquatic ecosystems. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of forest harvesting on trophic structure in eastern Canadian Boreal Shield lakes. We measured carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes values for aquatic primary producers, terrestrial detritus, benthic macroinvertebrates, zooplankton and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) over a three-year period in eight eastern Boreal Shield lakes. Four lakes were studied before, one and two years after forest harvesting (perturbed lakes) and compared with four undisturbed reference lakes (unperturbed lakes) sampled at the same time. Stable isotope mixing models showed leaf-litter to be the main food source for benthic primary consumers in both perturbed and unperturbed lakes, suggesting no logging impact on allochthonous subsidies to the littoral food web. Brook trout derived their food mainly from benthic predatory macroinvertebrates in unperturbed lakes. However, in perturbed lakes one year after harvesting, zooplankton appeared to be the main contributor to brook trout diet. This change in brook trout diet was mitigated two years after harvesting. Size-related diet shift were also observed for brook trout, indicating a diet shift related to size. Our study suggests that carbon from terrestrial habitat may be a significant contribution to the food web of oligotrophic Canadian Boreal Shield lakes. Forest harvesting did not have an impact on the diet of benthic primary consumers. On the other hand, brook trout diet composition was affected by logging with greater zooplankton contribution in perturbed lakes, possibly induced by darker-colored environment in these lakes one year after logging. PMID:24763366

  2. Long-term fertilization of a boreal Norway spruce forest increases the temperature sensitivity of soil organic carbon mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coucheney, Elsa; Strömgren, Monika; Lerch, Thomas Z; Herrmann, Anke M

    2013-12-01

    Boreal ecosystems store one-third of global soil organic carbon (SOC) and are particularly sensitive to climate warming and higher nutrient inputs. Thus, a better description of how forest managements such as nutrient fertilization impact soil carbon (C) and its temperature sensitivity is needed to better predict feedbacks between C cycling and climate. The temperature sensitivity of in situ soil C respiration was investigated in a boreal forest, which has received long-term nutrient fertilization (22 years), and compared with the temperature sensitivity of C mineralization measured in the laboratory. We found that the fertilization treatment increased both the response of soil in situ CO2 effluxes to a warming treatment and the temperature sensitivity of C mineralization measured in the laboratory (Q10). These results suggested that soil C may be more sensitive to an increase in temperature in long-term fertilized in comparison with nutrient poor boreal ecosystems. Furthermore, the fertilization treatment modified the SOC content and the microbial community composition, but we found no direct relationship between either SOC or microbial changes and the temperature sensitivity of C mineralization. However, the relation between the soil C:N ratio and the fungal/bacterial ratio was changed in the combined warmed and fertilized treatment compared with the other treatments, which suggest that strong interaction mechanisms may occur between nutrient input and warming in boreal soils. Further research is needed to unravel into more details in how far soil organic matter and microbial community composition changes are responsible for the change in the temperature sensitivity of soil C under increasing mineral N inputs. Such research would help to take into account the effect of fertilization managements on soil C storage in C cycling numerical models.

  3. Quantifying CO2 Fluxes Across a Gradient of Permafrost in Boreal Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euskirchen, E. S.; Edgar, C.; Turetsky, M. R.; Harden, J. W.; McGuire, A. D.

    2011-12-01

    Changes in vegetation and soil properties following permafrost degradation and thermokarst development may cause changes in net carbon uptake, either by stimulating primary productivity due to changes in vegetation composition or by stimulating soil microbial decomposition. In order to better understand these dynamics, we established three sites in interior Alaska across a gradient of permafrost in which permafrost varies in presence and stability. These sites include a black spruce ecosystem with cold soils and stable permafrost, a permafrost collapse scar with thermokarst formation, and a moderately rich fen lacking near surface permafrost. Measurements at the sites include year-round eddy covariance estimates of CO2, water, and energy fluxes as well as the associated micrometeorological variables. During winter, the ecosystems each released approximately 15 - 25 g C m-2 mo-1. However, the black spruce ecosystem began to take up CO2 as soon as air temperatures increased in the spring, with an estimated accumulation of ~23 g C m-2 from late March to early May. During this same period, we observed unusually high rates of ecosystem respiration some days at the thermokarst site, potentially due to the release of trapped CO2 from frozen soil gas pockets. While the black spruce ecosystem continued to act as a net sink of CO2 in the summer, taking up ~2.5± 1 g C m-2 d-1, the thermokarst and fen ecosystems remained CO2 sources, respectively releasing ~2.4 ± 0.8 g C m-2 d-1 and ~1.9 ± 1.1 g C m-2 d-1. While ecosystem respiration was similar across all three ecosystems during the summer (~4.8 ± 1.0 g C m-2 d-1), gross primary productivity was much higher in the spruce ecosystem (~7.3 ± 1.4 g C m-2 d-1) compared to the thermokarst (~ 2.5 ± 0.9 g C m-2 d-1) and fen ecosystems (~ 3.0 ± 1.1 g C m-2 d-1). These results suggest that in these boreal peatland ecosystems, permafrost thaw and thermokarst development will increase CO2 emissions to the atmosphere due to

  4. Boreal Forests of Kamchatka: Structure and Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus P. Eichhorn

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Central Kamchatka abounds in virgin old-growth boreal forest, formed primarily by Larix cajanderi and Betula platyphylla in varying proportions. A series of eight 0.25–0.30 ha plots captured the range of forests present in this region and their structure is described. Overall trends in both uplands and lowlands are for higher sites to be dominated by L. cajanderi with an increasing component of B. platyphylla with decreasing altitude. The tree line on wet sites is commonly formed by mono-dominant B. ermanii forests. Basal area ranged from 7.8–38.1 m2/ha and average tree height from 8.3–24.7 m, both being greater in lowland forests. Size distributions varied considerably among plots, though they were consistently more even for L. cajanderi than B. platyphylla. Upland sites also contained a dense subcanopy of Pinus pumila averaging 38% of ground area. Soil characteristics differed among plots, with upland soils being of lower pH and containing more carbon. Comparisons are drawn with boreal forests elsewhere and the main current threats assessed. These forests provide a potential baseline to contrast with more disturbed regions elsewhere in the world and therefore may be used as a target for restoration efforts or to assess the effects of climate change independent of human impacts.

  5. Variations in the fire regime in the North American boreal forest between 1990 and 2004 and their potential impacts on terrestrial carbon storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasischke, E. S.; Turetsky, M. R.; McGuire, A. D.; French, N. H.

    2004-12-01

    Fires in the North American boreal region play an important role in regulating the the levels of carbon stored in the terrestrial ecosystems of this region, both directly and indirectly. Biomass burning not only consumes carbon present in the aboveground vegetation and litter layers of boreal forests and peatlands (as is common during fires in temperate and tropical ecosystems), but also large amounts of carbon present in the organic layer that lies on top of mineral soil (consisting of moss, lichen, dead woody debris and organic soil). Understanding the factors controlling consumption of ground-layer organic matter during fires in boreal ecosystem is central to quantifying the terrestrial carbon budget in this region. The 1950-2004 period can be divided into 3 distinct epochs in terms of fire activity in the North American boreal region. The early epoch of 1950-1968 experienced the lowest fire activity, 1.2 million ha or Mha per yr, and increased to 2.1 Mha per yr during 1969-1986 epoch and 3.0 Mha per yr during 1987-2004 epoch. The end result of this steep rise in fire activity is an increase in the average amount of carbon released during fires. A key question that needs to be addressed is how much carbon has actually been released through the burning of ground-layer organic matter. The observed increases in average area burned are due to a combination of increases in the frequency of large fire years, as well as increases in average area burned during large fire years. Analyses of fire databases show that as the burned area increases during a given year, the percent of area burned in large fire events increases as well. The amount of fires occurring later in the growing season also increases. Recent and ongoing studies have integrated field observations with satellite observations on fire location and fire severity to provide more detailed assessments of how fires impact carbon budgets of boreal systems. These studies, along with theoretical models, indicate

  6. Timing of plant phenophases since 1752 in the boreal forest environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubin, Eero; Tolvanen, Anne; Karhu, Jouni; Valkama, Jari

    2016-04-01

    almost constant in the southern boreal zone. Effective temperature sum is important for the timing of the bud burst. The timing of phenological phenomena of forest vegetation, berry and seed crops reflects information about the response of the forest environment to the changes in the environmental factors. The global warming will be at its most powerful in the northern latitudes and this phenomenon is predicted to become increasingly more powerful in the future. Study of the regional differences will yield information about the changes in the northern limits of distribution of different plant species, and these changes can significantly affect the quantitative proportions of plant species. These changes, in turn, have an indirect impact on the entire ecosystem and the sources of livelihood relying on it. Phenological monitoring is nowadays more important than ever especially in boreal regions, where spring temperatures are elevated. Compilation and documentation of observations on plant phenophases play a key role in working out the rate of global climate change. To utilize citizen-science data together with the scientific monitoring will be discussed in the conference.

  7. Seasonal courses revealed that boreal trees emit methane even during winter time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machacova, Katerina; Halmeenmäki, Elisa; Pihlatie, Mari; Urban, Otmar

    2016-04-01

    modulated by soil water content also during the winter period. Summarised, boreal tree species and their CH4 emissions play an important role in the ecosystem CH4 exchange, thus reducing the sink strength of boreal forest soils. Therefore, it is necessary to incorporate tree CH4 fluxes and their seasonal variations in the estimation of CH4 balance of boreal forests. Acknowledgement This research was supported by the project ENVIMET (CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0246) and the National Programme for Sustainability I (LO1415), EU FP7 project ExpeER (Grant Agreement 262060), Emil Aaltonen Foundation, The Academy of Finland Centre of Excellence (projects 1118615 and 272041), and Helsinki University Centre for Environment, HENVI. We thank Marian Pavelka, Jiří Dušek, Stanislav Stellner, Jiří Mikula and Marek Jakubík for technical support.

  8. Effects of wind farm construction and operation on mire and wet heath vegetation in the Monte Maior SCI, north-west Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Fagúndez

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available As part of the environmental impact assessment for the construction of a wind farm within the Monte Maior Natura 2000 Site of Community Importance (SCI in Galicia, north-west Spain, a complete analysis of the development site’s important mire and wet heath plant communities was performed. The study included phytosociological characterisation, species-area metrics, calculation of α and β diversity, and analysis of physiognomical characteristics such as life forms, distribution ranges and phenology. Permanent quadrats were monitored for three years after construction of the wind farm in order to identify and describe any changes in floristic composition. Two phytosociological associations were recognised in mire habitat, namely Eleocharitetum multicaulis (Litorelletea uniflorae and Carici durieui-Sphagnetum papillosi subas. ericetosum mackaianae (Oxycocco-Sphagnetea, whilst the wet heath was assigned to Gentiano pneumonanthe-Ericetum mackaianae (Calluno-Ulicetea. The two plant communities shared most physiognomical characteristics and 13–33% of species. Low values were obtained for α and β diversity, with about nine species per square metre for heathland and ten species per square metre for mire habitat. Hemicryptophytes dominated and no therophytes were recorded. The dominant plant families were Poaceae in heathlands and Cyperaceae in mires, and most of the species flowered in early or late summer. Both communities were stable and no change in any of the attributes investigated was observed during the study period. The results indicate that, so long as the traditional land use of low-intensity grazing can be maintained, there are no major hazards for these plant communities. However, some of the data suggest that the improvement of access to the area provided by the wind farm may result in an increase in human activity which could affect environmental conditions and thus the longer-term stability of the plant communities.

  9. Patterns of NPP, GPP, Respiration and NEP During Boreal Forest Succession

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goulden, Michael L.; McMillan, Andrew; Winston, Greg; Rocha, Adrian; Manies, Kristen; Harden, Jennifer W.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin

    2010-12-15

    We deployed a mesonet of year-round eddy covariance towers in boreal forest stands that last burned in ~1850, ~1930, 1964, 1981, 1989, 1998, and 2003 to understand how CO2 exchange changes during secondary succession.The strategy of using multiple methods, including biometry and micrometeorology, worked well. In particular, the three independent measures of NEP during succession gave similar results. A stratified and tiered approach to deploying eddy covariance systems that combines many lightweight and portable towers with a few permanent ones is likely to maximize the science return for a fixed investment. The existing conceptual models did a good job of capturing the dominant patterns of NPP, GPP, Respiration and NEP during succession. The initial loss of carbon following disturbance was neither as protracted nor large as predicted. This muted response reflects both the rapid regrowth of vegetation following fire and the prevalence of standing coarse woody debris following the fire, which is thought to decay slowly. In general, the patterns of forest recovery from disturbance should be expected to vary as a function of climate, ecosystem type and disturbance type. The NPP decline at the older stands appears related to increased Rauto rather than decreased GPP. The increase in Rauto in the older stands does not appear to be caused by accelerated maintenance respiration with increased biomass, and more likely involves increased allocation to fine root turnover, root metabolism, alternative forms of respiration, mycorrhizal relationships, or root exudates, possibly associated with progressive nutrient limitation. Several studies have now described a similar pattern of NEP following boreal fire, with 10-to-15 years of modest carbon loss followed by 50-to-100 years of modest carbon gain. This trend has been sufficiently replicated and evaluated using independent techniques that it can be used to quantify the likely effects of changes in boreal fire frequency and

  10. Absence of snow cover reduces understory plant cover and alters plant community composition in boreal forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreyling, Juergen; Haei, Mahsa; Laudon, Hjalmar

    2012-02-01

    Snow regimes affect biogeochemistry of boreal ecosystems and are altered by climate change. The effects on plant communities, however, are largely unexplored despite their influence on relevant processes. Here, the impact of snow cover on understory community composition and below-ground production in a boreal Picea abies forest was investigated using a long-term (8-year) snow cover manipulation experiment consisting of the treatments: snow removal, increased insulation (styrofoam pellets), and control. The snow removal treatment caused longer (118 vs. 57 days) and deeper soil frost (mean minimum temperature -5.5 vs. -2.2°C) at 10 cm soil depth in comparison to control. Understory species composition was strongly altered by the snow cover manipulations; vegetation cover declined by more than 50% in the snow removal treatment. In particular, the dominant dwarf shrub Vaccinium myrtillus (-82%) and the most abundant mosses Pleurozium schreberi (-74%) and Dicranum scoparium (-60%) declined strongly. The C:N ratio in V. myrtillus leaves and plant available N in the soil indicated no altered nitrogen nutrition. Fine-root biomass in summer, however, was negatively affected by the reduced snow cover (-50%). Observed effects are attributed to direct frost damage of roots and/ or shoots. Besides the obvious relevance of winter processes on plant ecology and distribution, we propose that shifts in the vegetation caused by frost damage may be an important driver of the reported alterations in biogeochemistry in response to altered snow cover. Understory plant performance clearly needs to be considered in the biogeochemistry of boreal systems in the face of climate change.

  11. Modeling the production, decomposition, and transport of dissolved organic carbon in boreal soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhaosheng; Neff, Jason C.; Wickland, Kimberly P.

    2010-01-01

    The movement of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) through boreal ecosystems has drawn increased attention because of its potential impact on the feedback of OC stocks to global environmental change in this region. Few models of boreal DOC exist. Here we present a one-dimensional model with simultaneous production, decomposition, sorption/desorption, and transport of DOC to describe the behavior of DOC in the OC layers above the mineral soils. The field-observed concentration profiles of DOC in two moderately well-drained black spruce forest sites (one with permafrost and one without permafrost), coupled with hourly measured soil temperature and moisture, were used to inversely estimate the unknown parameters associated with the sorption/desorption kinetics using a global optimization strategy. The model, along with the estimated parameters, reasonably reproduces the concentration profiles of DOC and highlights some important potential controls over DOC production and cycling in boreal settings. The values of estimated parameters suggest that humic OC has a larger potential production capacity for DOC than fine OC, and most of the DOC produced from fine OC was associated with instantaneous sorption/desorption whereas most of the DOC produced from humic OC was associated with time-dependent sorption/desorption. The simulated DOC efflux at the bottom of soil OC layers was highly dependent on the component and structure of the OC layers. The DOC efflux was controlled by advection at the site with no humic OC and moist conditions and controlled by diffusion at the site with the presence of humic OC and dry conditions.

  12. Improvement of boreal vegetation modelling and climate interactions through the introduction of new bryophyte and artic-shrub plant functional types in a land surface model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druel, Arsène; Krinner, Gerhard; Peylin, Philippe; Ciais, Philippe; Viovy, Nicolas; Peregon, Anna

    2016-04-01

    Boreal and tundra vegetation, which represents 22% of the global land area, has had a significant impact on climate through changes of albedo, snow cover, soil thermal dynamics, etc. However, it is frequently poorly represented in earth system models used for climate predictions. We improved the description of high-latitude vegetation and its interactions with the environment in the ORCHIDEE land surface model by creating new plant functional types with specific biogeochemical and biophysical properties: boreal shrubs, bryophytes (mosses and lichens) and boreal C3 grasses. The introduction of shrub specificities allows for an intermediate stratum between trees and grasses, with a new carbon allometry within the plant, inducing new interactions between wooden species and their environment, especially the complex snow-shrubs interaction. Similarly, the introduction of non-vascular plants (i.e. bryophytes) involves numerous changes both in physical and biological processes, such as the response of photosynthesis to surface humidity, the decomposition of carbon and the soil thermal conductivity. These changes in turn lead to new processes and interactions between vegetation and moisture (soil and air), carbon cycle, energy balance, etc. For the boreal C3 grasses we did not include new processes compared to the generic C3 grass PFT, but improved the realism of the carbon and water budgets with new boreal adjusted parameters. We assess the performance of the modified ORCHIDEE land surface model and in particular its ability to represent the new plant types (their phenology etc.), and evaluate the effects of these new PFTs on the simulated energy, water and carbon balances of boreal ecosystems. The potential impact of these refinements on future climate simulations will be discussed.

  13. Management effects on carbon fluxes in boreal forests (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindroth, A.; Mölder, M.; Lagergren, F.; Vestin, P.; Hellström, M.; Sundqvist, E.; Norunda Bgs Team

    2010-12-01

    Disturbance by management or natural causes such as wind throw or fire are believed to be one of the main factors that are controlling the carbon balance of vegetation. In Northern Europe a large fraction of the forest area is managed with clear cutting and thinning as the main silvicultural methods. The effect of clear-cutting on carbon dioxide exchanges were studied in different chrono-sequences located in Sweden, Finland, UK and France, respectively. The combined results from these studies showed that a simple model could be developed describing relative net ecosystem exchange as a function of relative rotation length (age). A stand with a rotation length of 100 years, typical for Swedish conditions, looses substantial amounts of carbon during the first 12-15 years and the time it takes to reach cumulative balance after clear-cut, is 25-30 years. The mean net ecosystem exchange over the whole rotation length equals 50% of the maximum uptake. An interesting question is if it is possible to harvest without the substantial carbon losses that take place after clear-cutting. Selective harvest by thinning could potentially be such a method. We therefore studied the effect of thinning on soil and ecosystem carbon fluxes in a mixed pine and spruce forest in Central Sweden, the Norunda forest, located in the semi-boreal zone at 60.08°N, 17.48 °E. The CO2 fluxes from the forest were measured by eddy covariance method and soil effluxes were measured by automatic chambers. Maximum canopy height of the ca. 100 years-old forest was 28 m. The stand was composed of ca 72% pine, 28% before the thinning while the composition after the thinning became 82% pine and 18% spruce. The thinning was made in November/December 2008 in a half- circle from the tower with a radius of 200 m. The LAI decreased from 4.5 to 2.8 after the thinning operation. Immediately after the thinning, we found significantly higher soil effluxes, probably due to increased decomposition of dead roots. The

  14. Effects of warming on the structure and function of a boreal black spruce forest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stith T.Gower

    2010-03-03

    A strong argument can be made that there is a greater need to study the effect of warming on boreal forests more than on any other terrestrial biome. Boreal forests, the second largest forest biome, are predicted to experience the greatest warming of any forest biome in the world, but a process-based understanding of how warming will affect the structure and function of this economically and ecologically important forest biome is lacking. The effects of warming on species composition, canopy structure and biogeochemical cycles are likely to be complex; elucidating the underlying mechanisms will require long-term whole-ecosystem manipulation to capture all the complex feedbacks (Shaver et al. 2000, Rustad et al. 2001, Stromgren 2001). The DOE Program for Ecosystem Research funded a three year project (2002-2005) to use replicated heated chambers on soil warming plots in northern Manitoba to examine the direct effects of whole-ecosystem warming. We are nearing completion of our first growing season of measurements (fall 2004). In spite of the unforeseen difficulty of installing the heating cable, our heating and irrigation systems worked extremely well, maintaining environmental conditions within 5-10% of the specified design 99% of the time. Preliminary data from these systems, all designed and built by our laboratory at the University of Wisconsin, support our overall hypothesis that warming will increase the carbon sink strength of upland boreal black spruce forests. I request an additional three years of funding to continue addressing the original objectives: (1) Examine the effect of warming on phenology of overstory, understory and bryophyte strata. Sap flux systems and dendrometer bands, monitored by data loggers, will be used to quantify changes in phenology and water use. (2) Quantify the effects of warming on nitrogen and water use by overstory, understory and bryophytes. (3) Compare effects of warming on autotrophic respiration and above- and belowground

  15. Salvage logging following fires can minimize boreal caribou habitat loss while maintaining forest quotas: An example of compensatory cumulative effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beguin, Julien; McIntire, Eliot J B; Raulier, Frédéric

    2015-11-01

    Protected area networks are the dominant conservation approach that is used worldwide for protecting biodiversity. Conservation planning in managed forests, however, presents challenges when endangered species use old-growth forests targeted by the forest industry for timber supply. In many ecosystems, this challenge is further complicated by the occurrence of natural disturbance events that disrupt forest attributes at multiple scales. Using spatially explicit landscape simulation experiments, we gather insights into how these large scale, multifaceted processes (fire risk, timber harvesting and the amount of protected area) influenced both the persistence of the threatened boreal caribou and the level of timber supply in the boreal forest of eastern Canada. Our result showed that failure to account explicitly and a priori for fire risk in the calculation of timber supply led to an overestimation of timber harvest volume, which in turn led to rates of cumulative disturbances that threatened both the long-term persistence of boreal caribou and the sustainability of the timber supply itself. Salvage logging, however, allowed some compensatory cumulative effects. It minimised the reductions of timber supply within a range of ∼10% while reducing the negative impact of cumulative disturbances caused by fire and logging on caribou. With the global increase of the human footprint on forest ecosystems, our approach and results provide useful tools and insights for managers to resolve what often appear as lose-lose situation between the persistence of species at risk and timber harvest in other forest ecosystems. These tools contribute to bridge the gap between conservation and forest management, two disciplines that remain too often disconnected in practice. PMID:26321533

  16. Ectomycorrhizal-dominated boreal and tropical forests have distinct fungal communities, but analogous spatial patterns across soil horizons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krista L McGuire

    Full Text Available Fungi regulate key nutrient cycling processes in many forest ecosystems, but their diversity and distribution within and across ecosystems are poorly understood. Here, we examine the spatial distribution of fungi across a boreal and tropical ecosystem, focusing on ectomycorrhizal fungi. We analyzed fungal community composition across litter (organic horizons and underlying soil horizons (0-20 cm using 454 pyrosequencing and clone library sequencing. In both forests, we found significant clustering of fungal communities by site and soil horizons with analogous patterns detected by both sequencing technologies. Free-living saprotrophic fungi dominated the recently-shed leaf litter and ectomycorrhizal fungi dominated the underlying soil horizons. This vertical pattern of fungal segregation has also been found in temperate and European boreal forests, suggesting that these results apply broadly to ectomycorrhizal-dominated systems, including tropical rain forests. Since ectomycorrhizal and free-living saprotrophic fungi have different influences on soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics, information on the spatial distribution of these functional groups will improve our understanding of forest nutrient cycling.

  17. Ecosystem thermodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ecology is no more a descriptive and self-sufficient science. Many viewpoints are needed simultaneously to give a full coverage of such complex systems: ecosystems. These viewpoints come from physics, chemistry, and nuclear physics, without a new far from equilibrium thermodynamics and without new mathematical tools such as catastrophe theory, fractal theory, cybernetics and network theory, the development of ecosystem science would never have reached the point of today. Some ideas are presented about the importance that concept such as energy, entropy, exergy information and none equilibrium have in the analysis of processes taking place in ecosystems

  18. Peat humification and climate change: a multi-site comparison from mires in south-east Alaska

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.J. Payne

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Peatland records of Holocene palaeoclimate have been widely used in Europe. Their potential in western North America remains largely unexploited despite an abundance of candidate sites. Peat humification analysis is a widely used technique for palaeoclimatic inference from peatlands. This study attempts to demonstrate a climatic role in determining peat humification by comparing low-resolution peat humification records from five mires in south-east Alaska. Humification was determined by alkali extraction and colorimetry and records dated by radiocarbon and tephrochronology. Testate amoebae analysis was carried out across a major humification-inferred wet shift in three of the sites. The humification results show variability down the length of the cores but there is only limited agreement between records from different sites. Many general trends in the data appear to be out of phase and periods of proxy 'complacency' are shown. This study does not provide strong evidence for climatic forcing of humification in these sites. Methodological issues including possible problems with the age-depth models and the role of a peat-forming plant species signal in the humification data are discussed. The results support previous studies in suggesting the value of employing a multi-proxy, multi-site, and possibly multi-core approach in peat-based palaeoclimatology.

  19. Two mire species respond differently to enhanced ultraviolet-B radiation: effects on biomass allocation and root exudation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rinnan, Riikka Tiivi Mariisa; Gehrke, Carola; Michelsen, Anders

    2006-01-01

    •  Increased ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation arising from stratospheric ozone depletion may influence soil microbial communities via effects on plant carbon allocation and root exudation. •  Eriophorum angustifolium and Narthecium ossifragum plants, grown in peatland mesocosms consisting of Sphagn...... peat, peat pore water and natural microbial communities, were exposed outdoors to enhanced UV-B radiation simulating 15% ozone depletion in southern Scandinavia for 8 wk. •  Enhanced UV-B increased rhizome biomass and tended to decrease the biomass of the largest root fraction of N....... ossifragum and furthermore decreased dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and monocarboxylic acid concentration, which serves as an estimate of net root exudation, in the pore water of the N. ossifragum mesocosms. Monocarboxylic acid concentration was negatively related to the total carbon concentration of N. ossifragum leaves....... •  Increased UV-B radiation appears to alter below-ground biomass of the mire plants in species-specific patterns, which in turn leads to a change in the net efflux of root exudates....

  20. Fungal Community Shifts in Structure and Function across a Boreal Forest Fire Chronosequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hui; Santalahti, Minna; Pumpanen, Jukka; Köster, Kajar; Berninger, Frank; Raffaello, Tommaso; Jumpponen, Ari; Asiegbu, Fred O; Heinonsalo, Jussi

    2015-11-01

    Forest fires are a common natural disturbance in forested ecosystems and have a large impact on the microbial communities in forest soils. The response of soil fungal communities to forest fire is poorly documented. Here, we investigated fungal community structure and function across a 152-year boreal forest fire chronosequence using high-throughput sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) region and a functional gene array (GeoChip). Our results demonstrate that the boreal forest soil fungal community was most diverse soon after a fire disturbance and declined over time. The differences in the fungal communities were explained by changes in the abundance of basidiomycetes and ascomycetes. Ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi contributed to the increase in basidiomycete abundance over time, with the operational taxonomic units (OTUs) representing the genera Cortinarius and Piloderma dominating in abundance. Hierarchical cluster analysis by using gene signal intensity revealed that the sites with different fire histories formed separate clusters, suggesting differences in the potential to maintain essential biogeochemical soil processes. The site with the greatest biological diversity had also the most diverse genes. The genes involved in organic matter degradation in the mature forest, in which ECM fungi were the most abundant, were as common in the youngest site, in which saprotrophic fungi had a relatively higher abundance. This study provides insight into the impact of fire disturbance on soil fungal community dynamics. PMID:26341215

  1. Interactions between hydrology and water chemistry shape bacterioplankton biogeography across boreal freshwater networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niño-García, Juan Pablo; Ruiz-González, Clara; Del Giorgio, Paul A

    2016-07-01

    Disentangling the mechanisms shaping bacterioplankton communities across freshwater ecosystems requires considering a hydrologic dimension that can influence both dispersal and local sorting, but how the environment and hydrology interact to shape the biogeography of freshwater bacterioplankton over large spatial scales remains unexplored. Using Illumina sequencing of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene, we investigate the large-scale spatial patterns of bacterioplankton across 386 freshwater systems from seven distinct regions in boreal Québec. We show that both hydrology and local water chemistry (mostly pH) interact to shape a sequential structuring of communities from highly diverse assemblages in headwater streams toward larger rivers and lakes dominated by fewer taxa. Increases in water residence time along the hydrologic continuum were accompanied by major losses of bacterial richness and by an increased differentiation of communities driven by local conditions (pH and other related variables). This suggests that hydrology and network position modulate the relative role of environmental sorting and mass effects on community assembly by determining both the time frame for bacterial growth and the composition of the immigrant pool. The apparent low dispersal limitation (that is, the lack of influence of geographic distance on the spatial patterns observed at the taxonomic resolution used) suggests that these boreal bacterioplankton communities derive from a shared bacterial pool that enters the networks through the smallest streams, largely dominated by mass effects, and that is increasingly subjected to local sorting of species during transit along the hydrologic continuum.

  2. Interactions between hydrology and water chemistry shape bacterioplankton biogeography across boreal freshwater networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niño-García, Juan Pablo; Ruiz-González, Clara; Del Giorgio, Paul A

    2016-07-01

    Disentangling the mechanisms shaping bacterioplankton communities across freshwater ecosystems requires considering a hydrologic dimension that can influence both dispersal and local sorting, but how the environment and hydrology interact to shape the biogeography of freshwater bacterioplankton over large spatial scales remains unexplored. Using Illumina sequencing of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene, we investigate the large-scale spatial patterns of bacterioplankton across 386 freshwater systems from seven distinct regions in boreal Québec. We show that both hydrology and local water chemistry (mostly pH) interact to shape a sequential structuring of communities from highly diverse assemblages in headwater streams toward larger rivers and lakes dominated by fewer taxa. Increases in water residence time along the hydrologic continuum were accompanied by major losses of bacterial richness and by an increased differentiation of communities driven by local conditions (pH and other related variables). This suggests that hydrology and network position modulate the relative role of environmental sorting and mass effects on community assembly by determining both the time frame for bacterial growth and the composition of the immigrant pool. The apparent low dispersal limitation (that is, the lack of influence of geographic distance on the spatial patterns observed at the taxonomic resolution used) suggests that these boreal bacterioplankton communities derive from a shared bacterial pool that enters the networks through the smallest streams, largely dominated by mass effects, and that is increasingly subjected to local sorting of species during transit along the hydrologic continuum. PMID:26849312

  3. Nitrous oxide sinks and emissions in boreal aquatic networks in Québec

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soued, C.; Del Giorgio, P. A.; Maranger, R.

    2016-02-01

    Inland waters are important sites of nitrogen processing, and represent a significant component of the global budget of nitrous oxide, a powerful greenhouse gas. Measurements have focused on nitrogen-rich temperate rivers, with low-nitrogen freshwater systems at high latitudes receiving less attention. Here we measured surface water nitrous oxide partial pressures and calculated fluxes across 321 rivers, lakes and ponds in three boreal regions of Québec, Canada. Fluxes to the atmosphere ranged from -23.1 to 115.7 μmol m-2 d-1, with high variability among ecosystem types, regions and seasons. Surprisingly, over 40% of the systems sampled were under-saturated in nitrous oxide during the summer, and one region’s aquatic network was a net atmospheric sink. Fluxes could not be predicted from the relatively narrow range in nitrogen concentrations, but the aquatic systems acting as sinks tended to have lower pH, higher dissolved organic carbon and lower oxygen concentrations. Given the large variability in observed fluxes, we estimate that high-latitude aquatic networks may emit from -0.07 to 0.20 Tg N2O-N yr-1. The potential of boreal aquatic networks to act as net atmospheric nitrous oxide sinks highlights the extensive uncertainty in our understanding of global freshwater nitrous oxide budgets.

  4. Climbing the Slope of Enlightenment during NASA's Arctic Boreal Vulnerability Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, P. C.; Hoy, E.; Duffy, D.; McInerney, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Arctic Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE) is a new field campaign sponsored by NASA's Terrestrial Ecology Program and designed to improve understanding of the vulnerability and resilience of Arctic and boreal social-ecological systems to environmental change (http://above.nasa.gov). ABoVE is integrating field-based studies, modeling, and data from airborne and satellite remote sensing. The NASA Center for Climate Simulation (NCCS) has partnered with the NASA Carbon Cycle and Ecosystems Office (CCEO) to create a high performance science cloud for this field campaign. The ABoVE Science Cloud combines high performance computing with emerging technologies and data management with tools for analyzing and processing geographic information to create an environment specifically designed for large-scale modeling, analysis of remote sensing data, copious disk storage for "big data" with integrated data management, and integration of core variables from in-situ networks. The ABoVE Science Cloud is a collaboration that is accelerating the pace of new Arctic science for researchers participating in the field campaign. Specific examples of the utilization of the ABoVE Science Cloud by several funded projects will be presented.

  5. Ozone effects on Sphagnum mosses, carbon dioxide exchange and methane emission in boreal peatland microcosms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microcosms of a boreal peatland originating from an oligotrophic fen in Eastern Finland were fumigated under four ozone concentrations (0, 50, 100 and 150 ppb O3) in laboratory growth chambers during two separate experiments (autumn and summer) for 4 and 6 weeks, respectively. Ozone effects on Sphagnum mosses and the fluxes of carbon dioxide and methane were evaluated. In both experiments, the three Sphagnum species studied showed only a few significant responses to ozone. In the autumn experiment, membrane permeability of S. angustifolium, measured as conductivity and magnesium leakage, was significantly higher under ozone fumigation (P=0.005 and 2 exchange during the 6-week-long summer experiment, but dark ecosystem respiration was transiently increased by ozone concentration of 100 ppb after 14 days of exposure (P<0.05). Fumigation with 100 ppb of ozone, however, more than doubled (P<0.05) methane emission from the peatland monoliths. Our results suggest that increasing tropospheric ozone concentration may cause substantial changes in the carbon gas cycling of boreal peatlands, even though these changes are not closely associated with the changes in Sphagnum vegetation

  6. Origin of monoterpene emissions from boreal tree species: Determination of de novo and pool emissions by 13CO2 labeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinne, J.; Ghirardo, A.; Koch, K.; Taipale, R.; Zimmer, I.; Schnitzler, J.

    2009-12-01

    Boreal forests emit a large amount of monoterpenes into the atmosphere. Traditionally these emissions are assumed to originate as evaporation from large storage pools. Thus their diurnal cycle would depend mostly on temperature. However, there is indication that a significant part of the monoterpene emission would originate directly from de novo synthesis. By applying 13CO2 fumigation and analyzing the isotope fractions with proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) and classical GC-MS we studied the origin of monoterpene emissions from some major Eurasian boreal and alpine tree species. We determined the fractions originating from de novo biosynthesis and from large internal monoterpene storages for three coniferous tree species with specialized monoterpene storage structures and one dicotyledon species without such structures. The emission from dicotyledon species Betula pendula originated solely from the de novo synthesis. The origin of the emissions from coniferous species was mixed with varying fraction originating from de novo synthesis (Pinus sylvestris 58%, Picea abies 33.5%, Larix decidua 9.8%) and the rest from large internal monoterpene storage pools. Application of the observed fractions of emission originating from de novo synthesis and large storage pools in a hybrid emission algorithm resulted in a better description of ecosystem scale monoterpene emissions from a boreal Scots pine forest stand.

  7. Disentangling the responses of boreal stream assemblages to low stressor levels of diffuse pollution and altered channel morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turunen, Jarno; Muotka, Timo; Vuori, Kari-Matti; Karjalainen, Satu Maaria; Rääpysjärvi, Jaana; Sutela, Tapio; Aroviita, Jukka

    2016-02-15

    Non-point diffuse pollution from land use and alteration of hydromorphology are among the most detrimental stressors to stream ecosystems. We explored the independent and interactive effects of morphological channel alteration (channelization for water transport of timber) and diffuse pollution on species richness and community structure of four organism groups in boreal streams: diatoms, macrophytes, macroinvertebrates, and fish. Furthermore, the effect of these stressors on stream condition was evaluated by Ecological Quality Ratios (EQR) from the national Water Framework Directive (WFD) assessment system. We grouped 91 study sites into four groups that were impacted by either diffuse pollution or hydromorphological alteration, by both stressors, or by neither one. Macroinvertebrate richness was reduced by diffuse pollution, whereas other biological groups were unaltered. Hydromorphological modification had no effect on taxon richness of any of the assemblages. Community structure of all groups was significantly affected by diffuse pollution but not by hydromorphology. Similarly, EQRs indicated negative response by diatoms, macroinvertebrates and fish to diffuse pollution, but not to hydromorphological alteration. Agricultural diffuse pollution thus affected species identities and abundances rather than taxonomic richness. Our results suggest that channelization of boreal streams for timber transport has not altered hydromorphological conditions sufficiently to have a strong impact on stream biota, whereas even moderate nutrient enrichment may be ecologically harmful. Controlling diffuse pollution and associated land use stressors should be prioritized over restoration of in-stream habitat structure to improve the ecological condition of boreal streams. PMID:26706766

  8. Simulating boreal forest carbon dynamics after stand-replacing fire disturbance: insights from a global process-based vegetation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Yue

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Stand-replacing fires are the dominant fire type in North American boreal forest and leave a historical legacy of a mosaic landscape of different aged forest cohorts. To accurately quantify the role of fire in historical and current regional forest carbon balance using models, one needs to explicitly simulate the new forest cohort that is established after fire. The present study adapted the global process-based vegetation model ORCHIDEE to simulate boreal forest fire CO2 emissions and follow-up recovery after a stand-replacing fire, with representation of postfire new cohort establishment, forest stand structure and the following self-thinning process. Simulation results are evaluated against three clusters of postfire forest chronosequence observations in Canada and Alaska. Evaluation variables for simulated postfire carbon dynamics include: fire carbon emissions, CO2 fluxes (gross primary production, total ecosystem respiration and net ecosystem exchange, leaf area index (LAI, and biometric measurements (aboveground biomass carbon, forest floor carbon, woody debris carbon, stand individual density, stand basal area, and mean diameter at breast height. The model simulation results, when forced by local climate and the atmospheric CO2 history on each chronosequence site, generally match the observed CO2 fluxes and carbon stock data well, with model-measurement mean square root of deviation comparable with measurement accuracy (for CO2 flux ~100 g C m−2 yr−1, for biomass carbon ~1000 g C m−2 and for soil carbon ~2000 g C m−2. We find that current postfire forest carbon sink on evaluation sites observed by chronosequence methods is mainly driven by historical atmospheric CO2 increase when forests recover from fire disturbance. Historical climate generally exerts a negative effect, probably due to increasing water stress caused by significant temperature increase without sufficient increase in precipitation. Our simulation results

  9. Simulating boreal forest carbon dynamics after stand-replacing fire disturbance: insights from a global process-based vegetation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, C.; Ciais, P.; Luyssaert, S.; Cadule, P.; Harden, J.; Randerson, J.; Bellassen, V.; Wang, T.; Piao, S. L.; Poulter, B.; Viovy, N.

    2013-12-01

    Stand-replacing fires are the dominant fire type in North American boreal forests. They leave a historical legacy of a mosaic landscape of different aged forest cohorts. This forest age dynamics must be included in vegetation models to accurately quantify the role of fire in the historical and current regional forest carbon balance. The present study adapted the global process-based vegetation model ORCHIDEE to simulate the CO2 emissions from boreal forest fire and the subsequent recovery after a stand-replacing fire; the model represents postfire new cohort establishment, forest stand structure and the self-thinning process. Simulation results are evaluated against observations of three clusters of postfire forest chronosequences in Canada and Alaska. The variables evaluated include: fire carbon emissions, CO2 fluxes (gross primary production, total ecosystem respiration and net ecosystem exchange), leaf area index, and biometric measurements (aboveground biomass carbon, forest floor carbon, woody debris carbon, stand individual density, stand basal area, and mean diameter at breast height). When forced by local climate and the atmospheric CO2 history at each chronosequence site, the model simulations generally match the observed CO2 fluxes and carbon stock data well, with model-measurement mean square root of deviation comparable with the measurement accuracy (for CO2 flux ~100 g C m-2 yr-1, for biomass carbon ~1000 g C m-2 and for soil carbon ~2000 g C m-2). We find that the current postfire forest carbon sink at the evaluation sites, as observed by chronosequence methods, is mainly due to a combination of historical CO2 increase and forest succession. Climate change and variability during this period offsets some of these expected carbon gains. The negative impacts of climate were a likely consequence of increasing water stress caused by significant temperature increases that were not matched by concurrent increases in precipitation. Our simulation results

  10. Simulating boreal forest carbon dynamics after stand-replacing fire disturbance: insights from a global process-based vegetation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, C.; Ciais, P.; Luyssaert, S.; Cadule, P.; Harden, J.; Randerson, J.; Bellassen, V.; Wang, T.; Piao, S.L.; Poulter, B.; Viovy, N.

    2013-01-01

    Stand-replacing fires are the dominant fire type in North American boreal forests. They leave a historical legacy of a mosaic landscape of different aged forest cohorts. This forest age dynamics must be included in vegetation models to accurately quantify the role of fire in the historical and current regional forest carbon balance. The present study adapted the global process-based vegetation model ORCHIDEE to simulate the CO2 emissions from boreal forest fire and the subsequent recovery after a stand-replacing fire; the model represents postfire new cohort establishment, forest stand structure and the self-thinning process. Simulation results are evaluated against observations of three clusters of postfire forest chronosequences in Canada and Alaska. The variables evaluated include: fire carbon emissions, CO2 fluxes (gross primary production, total ecosystem respiration and net ecosystem exchange), leaf area index, and biometric measurements (aboveground biomass carbon, forest floor carbon, woody debris carbon, stand individual density, stand basal area, and mean diameter at breast height). When forced by local climate and the atmospheric CO2 history at each chronosequence site, the model simulations generally match the observed CO2 fluxes and carbon stock data well, with model-measurement mean square root of deviation comparable with the measurement accuracy (for CO2 flux ~100 g C m−2 yr−1, for biomass carbon ~1000 g C m−2 and for soil carbon ~2000 g C m−2). We find that the current postfire forest carbon sink at the evaluation sites, as observed by chronosequence methods, is mainly due to a combination of historical CO2 increase and forest succession. Climate change and variability during this period offsets some of these expected carbon gains. The negative impacts of climate were a likely consequence of increasing water stress caused by significant temperature increases that were not matched by concurrent increases in precipitation. Our simulation

  11. Softwood biochar as a soil amendment material for boreal agriculture

    OpenAIRE

    Tammeorg, Priit

    2014-01-01

    Biochar is a porous carbonaceous solid material produced by pyrolysis. Application of biochar is considered as an efficient way of carbon (C) sequestration since the C in biochar is relatively resistant to microbial degradation. Furthermore, previous research in (sub-) tropical conditions suggests that it may enhance soil fertility and the yields of agricultural crops. To target the lack of knowledge about the effects of biochar in the boreal zone, softwood biochar was added to two boreal soi...

  12. Antioxidant Potential of Bark Extracts from Boreal Forest Conifers

    OpenAIRE

    Jean Legault; Karl Girard-Lalancette; Dominic Dufour; André Pichette

    2013-01-01

    The bark of boreal forest conifers has been traditionally used by Native Americans to treat various ailments and diseases. Some of these diseases involve reactive oxygen species (ROS) that can be prevented by the consumption of antioxidants such as phenolic compounds that can be found in medicinal plants. In this study, ultrasonic assisted extraction has been performed under various solvent conditions (water:ethanol mixtures) on the bark of seven boreal forest conifers used by Native American...

  13. The Role Of Disturbance In Driving Carbon Dynamics Across The North American Boreal Forest In Recent Decades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, D. J.; Chen, G.; Stinson, G.; Kurz, W.; McGuire, A. D.

    2013-12-01

    Studies indicate that, historically, terrestrial ecosystems of the northern high-latitude region may have been responsible for more than half of the global net land-based sink for atmospheric CO2. However, these regions have recently experienced remarkable modification of the major driving forces of the carbon cycle, including surface air temperature warming that is significantly greater than the global average and associated increases in the frequency and severity of disturbances. Whether boreal forest ecosystems will continue to sequester atmospheric CO2 in the face of these dramatic changes is uncertain. Estimates of the current carbon sink in North America's boreal forest region vary widely depending on the measurement or scaling approach used and the budget components considered. Here, we demonstrate results from an updated approach that integrates observational data and inventory-based information on disturbances with process-level representation of ecological dynamics using a terrestrial biogeochemistry model. The integrated approach allows for continental-scale diagnosis of the carbon sink within a simulation framework for attributing the impacts of fire and insect disturbances relative to the major driving forces, including climate, atmospheric chemistry, forest management and land use. The overall results of this approach estimate an approximately 30 Tg C yr-1 sink in the boreal forests of Canada and Alaska over the first decade of the 21st Century, which represents a significant reduction in the strength of the CO2 sink estimated for previous decades. The recent decline in sink strength suggested by our approach is the combined result of (1) weakening sinks due to warming-induced permafrost thaw and associated increase in soil organic matter decomposition and (2) strengthening sources from pyrogenic CO2 emissions as a result of the substantial area of boreal forest burned in wildfires across the region in recent years. Our results suggest that CO2 uptake

  14. Satellite chlorophyll fluorescence measurements reveal large-scale decoupling of photosynthesis and greenness dynamics in boreal evergreen forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, Sophia; Voigt, Maximilian; Thum, Tea; Gonsamo, Alemu; Zhang, Yongguang; Köhler, Philipp; Jung, Martin; Varlagin, Andrej; Guanter, Luis

    2016-09-01

    boreal ecosystems. PMID:26683113

  15. Habitat associations drive species vulnerability to climate change in boreal forests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazziotta, Adriano; Triviño, Maria; Tikkanen, Olli Pekka;

    2016-01-01

    Species climate change vulnerability, their predisposition to be adversely affected, has been assessed for a limited portion of biodiversity. Our knowledge of climate change impacts is often based only on exposure, the magnitude of climatic variation in the area occupied by the species, even...... scenarios. However, climate change will potentially reduce habitat suitability for ~9–43 % of the threatened deadwood-associated species. This loss is likely caused by future increase in timber extraction and decomposition rates causing higher deadwood turnover, which have a strong negative effect on boreal...... forest biodiversity. Our results are species- and scenario-specific. Diversified forest management and restoration ensuring deadwood resources in the landscape would allow the persistence of species whose capacity of delivering important supporting ecosystem services can be undermined by climate change....

  16. Water balance dynamics of a boreal forest watershed: White Gull Creek basin, 1994-1996

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijssen, Bart; Lettenmaier, Dennis P.

    2002-11-01

    Field measurements from the Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) were combined to calculate the water balance of the White Gull Creek basin for the three year period 1994-1996. Evapotranspiration was mapped from the observations made at the BOREAS flux towers to the basin using a simple evaporation model with a bulk canopy resistance based on tower observations. Runoff ratios were low, and evapotranspiration accounted for most of the precipitation over the area. The accumulated storage change, over the 3 year period, was 47 mm or 3.4% of the total precipitation, but precipitation exceeded the sum of discharge and evapotranspiration by 80 mm or 15% of the precipitation in 1994. Five possible explanations for the discrepancy in the water balance are identified, with the most likely cause an underestimation of the evapotranspiration in 1994, especially during periods when the basin is wet.

  17. Ozone photochemistry in boreal biomass burning plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrington, M.; Palmer, P. I.; Lewis, A. C.; Lee, J. D.; Rickard, A. R.; Di Carlo, P.; Taylor, J. W.; Hopkins, J. R.; Punjabi, S.; Oram, D. E.; Forster, G.; Aruffo, E.; Moller, S. J.; Bauguitte, S. J.-B.; Allan, J. D.; Coe, H.; Leigh, R. J.

    2013-08-01

    We present an analysis of ozone (O3) photochemistry observed by aircraft measurements of boreal biomass burning plumes over eastern Canada in the summer of 2011. Measurements of O3 and a number of key chemical species associated with O3 photochemistry, including non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs), nitrogen oxides (NOx) and total nitrogen containing species (NOy), were made from the UK FAAM BAe-146 research aircraft as part of the "quantifying the impact of BOReal forest fires on Tropospheric oxidants over the Atlantic using Aircraft and Satellites" (BORTAS) experiment between 12 July and 3 August 2011. The location and timing of the aircraft measurements put BORTAS into a unique position to sample biomass burning plumes from the same source region in Northwestern Ontario with a range of ages. We found that O3 mixing ratios measured in biomass burning plumes were indistinguishable from non-plume measurements, but evaluating them in relationship to measurements of carbon monoxide (CO), total alkyl nitrates (ΣAN) and the surrogate species NOz (= NOy-NOx) revealed that the potential for O3 production increased with plume age. We used NMHC ratios to estimate photochemical ages of the observed biomass burning plumes between 0 and 10 days. The BORTAS measurements provided a wide dynamic range of O3 production in the sampled biomass burning plumes with ΔO3/ΔCO enhancement ratios increasing from 0.020 ± 0.008 ppbv ppbv-1 in plumes with photochemical ages less than 2 days to 0.55 ± 0.29 ppbv ppbv-1 in plumes with photochemical ages greater than 5 days. We found that the main contributing factor to the variability in the ΔO3/ΔCO enhancement ratio was ΔCO in plumes with photochemical ages less than 4 days, and that was a transition to ΔO3 becoming the main contributing factor in plumes with ages greater than 4 days. In comparing O3 mixing ratios with components of the NOy budget, we observed that plumes with ages between 2 and 4 days were characterised by high aerosol

  18. Towards a Manitoba Hydro boreal woodland caribou strategy: Outcomes from Manitoba Hydro boreal woodland caribou workshop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona E. Scurrah

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Manitoba Hydro is responsible for the continued supply of energy to meet the needs of the province and is committed to protecting the environment when planning the construction and operation of its facilities. Corporate policy dictates ongoing improvement of Environmental Management Systems (EMS in order to meet or surpass regulatory requirements. Environmental objectives are reviewed annually and programs are modified when necessary to address improvements in environmental performance. Manitoba Hydro plans and constructs major transmission projects throughout northern Manitoba which includes areas occupied by boreal woodland caribou. In recognition of the potential issues associated with hydro transmission construction in boreal caribou range, Manitoba Hydro hosted an expert workshop on May 8, 2007 to provide objective advice in the development of a draft corporate strategy that effectively directs targeted monitoring and research for environmental assessment and mitigation. The workshop focused on assessing the potential threats to boreal woodland caribou from a transmission line construction and operation perspective, and identifying appropriate approaches in site selection and environmental assessment (SSEA and long-term monitoring and research. A total of nine threat categories were reviewed to determine the degree and magnitude of potential effects that may result from transmission construction and operation; and of the original nine, five final threat categories were delineated. The main elements of the workshop provided strategic approaches for proactive pre-construction monitoring, research on recruitment and mortality for local populations impacted by ROWs and control areas, and various habitat monitoring, management, and mitigation techniques. Research and monitoring priorities have been identified and continued collaboration with Manitoba Conservation and other land users were also identified.

  19. Riparian woodland encroachment following flow regulation: a comparative study of Mediterranean and Boreal streams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolores Bejarano M.

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Water development accompanying mankind development has turned rivers into endangered ecosystems. Improving the understanding of ecological responses to river management actions is a key issue for assuring sustainable water management. However, few studies have been published where ecological metrics have been quantified in response to various degrees of flow alteration. In this work, changes in natural distribution of trees and shrubs within the riparian corridor (as indicator of the ecological status of the fluvial ecosystem were quantified at multiple sites along a flow alteration gradient (as indicator of impact along two regulated river reaches, one Boreal and the other Mediterranean, each downstream of a dam. Based on the obtained relationships we evaluated differences in response trends related to local physico-climatic factors of the two biomes and regarding to differing life-forms. Woody vegetation establishment patterns represented objective indicators of ecological responses to flow alteration. We found different responses between life-forms. Both trees and shrubs migrated downwards to the channel after dam closure, but shrubs were most impacted under higher degrees of flow alteration in terms of lateral movement. In addition, our results show clear longitudinal recovery trends of natural patterns of tree and shrub distribution corresponding to a decrease in intensity of hydrologic alteration in the Boreal river. However, vegetation encroachment persisted along the entire Mediterranean study reach. This may result from a relatively low gradient of decrease of hydrologic alteration with distance from the dam, coupled with other overlapping pressures and the mediating effect of physico-climatic characteristics on vegetation responses.

  20. Thermokarst rates intensify due to climate change and forest fragmentation in an Alaskan boreal forest lowland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, Mark J; Genet, Hélène; McGuire, Anthony D; Euskirchen, Eugénie S; Zhang, Yujin; Brown, Dana R N; Jorgenson, Mark T; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Breen, Amy; Bolton, William R

    2016-02-01

    Lowland boreal forest ecosystems in Alaska are dominated by wetlands comprised of a complex mosaic of fens, collapse-scar bogs, low shrub/scrub, and forests growing on elevated ice-rich permafrost soils. Thermokarst has affected the lowlands of the Tanana Flats in central Alaska for centuries, as thawing permafrost collapses forests that transition to wetlands. Located within the discontinuous permafrost zone, this region has significantly warmed over the past half-century, and much of these carbon-rich permafrost soils are now within ~0.5 °C of thawing. Increased permafrost thaw in lowland boreal forests in response to warming may have consequences for the climate system. This study evaluates the trajectories and potential drivers of 60 years of forest change in a landscape subjected to permafrost thaw in unburned dominant forest types (paper birch and black spruce) associated with location on elevated permafrost plateau and across multiple time periods (1949, 1978, 1986, 1998, and 2009) using historical and contemporary aerial and satellite images for change detection. We developed (i) a deterministic statistical model to evaluate the potential climatic controls on forest change using gradient boosting and regression tree analysis, and (ii) a 30 × 30 m land cover map of the Tanana Flats to estimate the potential landscape-level losses of forest area due to thermokarst from 1949 to 2009. Over the 60-year period, we observed a nonlinear loss of birch forests and a relatively continuous gain of spruce forest associated with thermokarst and forest succession, while gradient boosting/regression tree models identify precipitation and forest fragmentation as the primary factors controlling birch and spruce forest change, respectively. Between 1950 and 2009, landscape-level analysis estimates a transition of ~15 km² or ~7% of birch forests to wetlands, where the greatest change followed warm periods. This work highlights that the vulnerability and resilience of

  1. Patterns of NPP, GPP, respiration, and NEP during boreal forest succession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulden, M.L.; Mcmillan, A.M.S.; Winston, G.C.; Rocha, A.V.; Manies, K.L.; Harden, J.W.; Bond-Lamberty, B. P.

    2011-01-01

    We combined year-round eddy covariance with biometry and biomass harvests along a chronosequence of boreal forest stands that were 1, 6, 15, 23, 40, 74, and 154 years old to understand how ecosystem production and carbon stocks change during recovery from stand-replacing crown fire. Live biomass (Clive) was low in the 1 and 6 year old stands, and increased following a logistic pattern to high levels in the 74 and 154year old stands. Carbon stocks in the forest floor (Cforest floor) and coarse woody debris (CCWD) were comparatively high in the 1year old stand, reduced in the 6 through 40year old stands, and highest in the 74 and 154year old stands. Total net primary production (TNPP) was reduced in the 1 and 6year old stands, highest in the 23 through 74year old stands and somewhat reduced in the 154year old stand. The NPP decline at the 154year old stand was related to increased autotrophic respiration rather than decreased gross primary production (GPP). Net ecosystem production (NEP), calculated by integrated eddy covariance, indicated the 1 and 6 year old stands were losing carbon, the 15year old stand was gaining a small amount of carbon, the 23 and 74year old stands were gaining considerable carbon, and the 40 and 154year old stands were gaining modest amounts of carbon. The recovery from fire was rapid; a linear fit through the NEP observations at the 6 and 15year old stands indicated the transition from carbon source to sink occurred within 11-12 years. The NEP decline at the 154year old stand appears related to increased losses from Clive by tree mortality and possibly from Cforest floor by decomposition. Our findings support the idea that NPP, carbon production efficiency (NPP/GPP), NEP, and carbon storage efficiency (NEP/TNPP) all decrease in old boreal stands. ?? 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Thermokarst Rates Intensify Due to Climate Change and Forest Fragmentation in an Alaskan Boreal Forest Lowland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, M. J.; Genet, H.; McGuire, A. D.; Euskirchen, E. S.; Zhang, Y.; Brown, D. N.; Jorgenson, T.; Romanovsky, V. E.; Breen, A. L.; Bolton, W. R.

    2015-12-01

    Lowland boreal forest ecosystems in Alaska are dominated by wetlands comprised of a complex mosaic of fens, collapse scar-bogs, low shrub/scrub, and forests growing on elevated ice rich permafrost soils. Thermokarst has affected the lowlands of the Tanana Flats in central Alaska for centuries, as thawing permafrost collapses forests that transition to wetlands. Located within the discontinuous permafrost zone, this region has significantly warmed over the past half-century, and much of these carbon-rich permafrost soils are now within ~0.5o C of thawing. Increases in the collapse of lowland boreal forests in response to warming may have consequences for the climate system. This study evaluates the trajectories and potential drivers of 60 years of forest change in a landscape subjected to permafrost thaw in unburned dominant forest types (paper birch and black spruce) associated with location on elevated permafrost plateau and across multiple time periods (1949, 1978, 1986, 1998 and 2009) using historical and contemporary aerial and satellite images for change detection. We developed (i) a deterministic statistical model to evaluate the potential climatic controls on forest change using gradient boosting and regression tree analysis, and (ii) a 30x30 m land cover map of the Tanana Flats to estimate the potential landscape-level losses of forest area due to thermokarst from 1949 to 2009. Over the 60-year period, we observed a nonlinear loss of birch forests and a relatively continuous gain of spruce forest associated with thermokarst and forest succession, respectively. Gradient boosting and regression tree models identify precipitation and forest fragmentation as the primary factors controlling birch and spruce forest change, respectively. Between 1950-2009 landscape-level analysis estimates a transition of ~15 km² of birch forest area to wetlands on the Tanana Flats, where the greatest change followed warm periods. This work highlights the vulnerability of lowland

  3. Spring Hydrology Determines Summer Net Carbon Uptake in Northern Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Yonghong; Kimball, John; Reichle, Rolf H.

    2014-01-01

    Increased photosynthetic activity and enhanced seasonal CO2 exchange of northern ecosystems have been observed from a variety of sources including satellite vegetation indices (such as the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index; NDVI) and atmospheric CO2 measurements. Most of these changes have been attributed to strong warming trends in the northern high latitudes (greater than or equal to 50N). Here we analyze the interannual variation of summer net carbon uptake derived from atmospheric CO2 measurements and satellite NDVI in relation to surface meteorology from regional observational records. We find that increases in spring precipitation and snow pack promote summer net carbon uptake of northern ecosystems independent of air temperature effects. However, satellite NDVI measurements still show an overall benefit of summer photosynthetic activity from regional warming and limited impact of spring precipitation. This discrepancy is attributed to a similar response of photosynthesis and respiration to warming and thus reduced sensitivity of net ecosystem carbon uptake to temperature. Further analysis of boreal tower eddy covariance CO2 flux measurements indicates that summer net carbon uptake is positively correlated with early growing-season surface soil moisture, which is also strongly affected by spring precipitation and snow pack based on analysis of satellite soil moisture retrievals. This is attributed to strong regulation of spring hydrology on soil respiration in relatively wet boreal and arctic ecosystems. These results document the important role of spring hydrology in determining summer net carbon uptake and contrast with prevailing assumptions of dominant cold temperature limitations to high-latitude ecosystems. Our results indicate potentially stronger coupling of boreal/arctic water and carbon cycles with continued regional warming trends.

  4. Spring hydrology determines summer net carbon uptake in northern ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increased photosynthetic activity and enhanced seasonal CO2 exchange of northern ecosystems have been observed from a variety of sources including satellite vegetation indices (such as the normalized difference vegetation index; NDVI) and atmospheric CO2 measurements. Most of these changes have been attributed to strong warming trends in the northern high latitudes (⩾50° N). Here we analyze the interannual variation of summer net carbon uptake derived from atmospheric CO2 measurements and satellite NDVI in relation to surface meteorology from regional observational records. We find that increases in spring precipitation and snow pack promote summer net carbon uptake of northern ecosystems independent of air temperature effects. However, satellite NDVI measurements still show an overall benefit of summer photosynthetic activity from regional warming and limited impact of spring precipitation. This discrepancy is attributed to a similar response of photosynthesis and respiration to warming and thus reduced sensitivity of net ecosystem carbon uptake to temperature. Further analysis of boreal tower eddy covariance CO2 flux measurements indicates that summer net carbon uptake is positively correlated with early growing-season surface soil moisture, which is also strongly affected by spring precipitation and snow pack based on analysis of satellite soil moisture retrievals. This is attributed to strong regulation of spring hydrology on soil respiration in relatively wet boreal and arctic ecosystems. These results document the important role of spring hydrology in determining summer net carbon uptake and contrast with prevailing assumptions of dominant cold temperature limitations to high-latitude ecosystems. Our results indicate potentially stronger coupling of boreal/arctic water and carbon cycles with continued regional warming trends. (letters)

  5. Soil carbon effluxes in ecosystems of Forsmark and Laxemar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tagesson, Torbern (Dept. of Physical Geography and Ecosystem Analysis, Lund Univ. (Sweden))

    2007-12-15

    Soil carbon effluxes were estimated in a number of ecosystems in Laxemar and Forsmark investigations areas. It was done in a young Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) stand, a wet deciduous stand, a poor fen and an agricultural field in the Laxemar investigation area in south-eastern Sweden (57 deg 5 min N, 16 deg 7 min E) and in a pasture, two Norway spruce (Picea abies) stands, a deciduous forest, a mire, a wet deciduous forest and a clear-cut in the Forsmark investigation area (60 deg 4 min N, 18 deg 2 min E). It was measured with the closed chamber technique in 2005 and 2006. Soil temperature at 10 cm depth, air temperature and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) were also measured. Exponential regressions with soil respiration against air and soil temperature were used to estimate annual soil respiration. A hyperbolic curve with Gross Primary Production (GPP) against PAR was used for modelling GPP for the growing season in the poor fen and the agricultural area of Laxemar. The exponential regressions with soil respiration against air and soil temperature explained on average 33.6% and 44.0% of the variation, respectively. GPP of the ground vegetation were reducing soil carbon effluxes, in all stands but one of the spruce stands, the deciduous forest, the mire and the wet deciduous forest of Forsmark. The significant (all but spruce 2 in Forsmark) curves with GPP against PAR explained on average 22.7% of the variation in GPP. The cubic regressions with GPP against air temperature were only significant for the poor fen and the agricultural field in Laxemar and it explained on average 34.8% of the variation in GPP for these ecosystems. The exponential regressions with air and soil temperature against soil respiration could be used to temporally extrapolate the occasional field measurements. The hyperbolic curve with GPP against PAR could also be used for temporal extrapolation of GPP for the ecosystems without a tree layer, i.e. the poor fen and the agricultural

  6. Soil carbon effluxes in ecosystems of Forsmark and Laxemar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soil carbon effluxes were estimated in a number of ecosystems in Laxemar and Forsmark investigations areas. It was done in a young Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) stand, a wet deciduous stand, a poor fen and an agricultural field in the Laxemar investigation area in south-eastern Sweden (57 deg 5 min N, 16 deg 7 min E) and in a pasture, two Norway spruce (Picea abies) stands, a deciduous forest, a mire, a wet deciduous forest and a clear-cut in the Forsmark investigation area (60 deg 4 min N, 18 deg 2 min E). It was measured with the closed chamber technique in 2005 and 2006. Soil temperature at 10 cm depth, air temperature and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) were also measured. Exponential regressions with soil respiration against air and soil temperature were used to estimate annual soil respiration. A hyperbolic curve with Gross Primary Production (GPP) against PAR was used for modelling GPP for the growing season in the poor fen and the agricultural area of Laxemar. The exponential regressions with soil respiration against air and soil temperature explained on average 33.6% and 44.0% of the variation, respectively. GPP of the ground vegetation were reducing soil carbon effluxes, in all stands but one of the spruce stands, the deciduous forest, the mire and the wet deciduous forest of Forsmark. The significant (all but spruce 2 in Forsmark) curves with GPP against PAR explained on average 22.7% of the variation in GPP. The cubic regressions with GPP against air temperature were only significant for the poor fen and the agricultural field in Laxemar and it explained on average 34.8% of the variation in GPP for these ecosystems. The exponential regressions with air and soil temperature against soil respiration could be used to temporally extrapolate the occasional field measurements. The hyperbolic curve with GPP against PAR could also be used for temporal extrapolation of GPP for the ecosystems without a tree layer, i.e. the poor fen and the agricultural

  7. Form, quantity, and fate of nitrogen inputs along a boreal forest climate transect

    Science.gov (United States)

    VandenBoer, T. C.; Edwards, K.; Ziegler, S. E.

    2013-12-01

    The cycling and fate of soil organic matter, a globally significant carbon (C) reservoir, is intimately linked to the availability and form of nitrogen (N). Nitrogen inputs to remote ecosystems from the atmosphere have been accelerated by increases in agricultural fertilizer use, and fossil fuel use. Such inputs may influence the biogeochemistry of high latitude ecosystems where soil organic matter reservoirs are particularly vulnerable to climate change. The Newfoundland and Labrador Boreal Ecosystem Latitudinal Transect (NL-BELT) network has been actively monitoring C and N pools across three watershed regions spanning 47° to 53° N to understand boreal forest ecosystem responses to a warming climate. Litterfall inputs exhibited decreasing stable nitrogen isotope (d15N) values from south to north along the transect (-2, -3, and -6 ‰) and also among litter sources (deciduous > green needles > brown needles). These regional trends in d15N persist in the bryophytic biomass and throughout the soil organic horizons. Litterfall C:N increased from approximately 55 in the south to 75 in the north. In each region, C:N also exhibited consistent patterns between litterfall input types, with C:N of brown needles > deciduous > green needles. Differences between green and brown needle litterfall C:N increased along this climate gradient indicating that trees increased their N-resorption from south to north, perhaps due to increased N-limitation. Two possible phenomena could explain the trends observed: i) atmospheric N-inputs vary in quantity and composition with latitude along the transect; and/or ii) more rapid recycling of N at the most southern site reduces N-limitation relative to cooler regions. Fractionation during long-range transport of atmospheric reactive-N leads to depletion of 15N and subsequent deposition to the NL-BELT regions could explain these observations. The forms and quantities of atmospheric N-inputs are not constrained for the NL-BELT forests and

  8. Physicochemical properties and stability of thousand-year-old soil organic matter in boreal paleopodzols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Wen-Ting; Klaminder, Jonatan; Boily, Jean-Francois

    2013-04-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) stabilization mechanisms are key to predict carbon (C) cycle responses to climate change, especially in critically sensitive ecosystems, such as the arctic and boreal ecosystems of Scandinavia (IPCC 2007). Interactions between organic matter and soil mineral components can be of particular importance. Their impacts on SOM stability are however not fully resolved. In this study, we present an exhaustive physicochemical characterization of SOM and soil mineral components of boreal paleopodzols formed over several thousands of years in northern Sweden. We also test the hypothesis that old SOM in these environments is strongly associated to mineral surfaces. This work was specifically focused on two relict podzolic profiles capped by more recently developed podzolic profile. Each of the three profiles consisted of a well developed E-horizon and of an underlying B-horizon enriched in secondary weathering products. Soil C age was greater with increasing depth, with the deepest horizon dating from the mid-Holocene. Organic C loadings, expressed in terms of C mass per mineral surface area, decreased from 0.52 to 0.31 mg C m-2 from deep to the deepest B horizons. A monolayer coating model could thus be used to suggest that C was mainly bonded to unsaturated mineral surfaces. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy showed that, unlike in younger B-horizon, the oldest C of the deepest B-horizon did not accumulate in clusters. It was instead distributed more homogenously at the micrometer scale with soil mineral particles. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy moreover showed that the top 1-10 nm of the mineral surfaces contained proportions of aliphatic-C, ether/alcohol-C, and amide-C that varied greatly amongst the three B horizons but not among the three E horizons. Different composition of SOM remained in deep E and B horizons, thereby suggesting a selective SOM preservation process that is controlled by the properties of

  9. Estimating aboveground biomass in the boreal forests of the Yukon River Basin, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, L.; Wylie, B. K.; Nossov, D.; Peterson, B.; Waldrop, M. P.; McFarland, J.; Alexander, H. D.; Mack, M. C.; Rover, J. A.; Chen, X.

    2011-12-01

    Quantification of aboveground biomass (AGB) in Alaska's boreal forests is essential to accurately evaluate terrestrial carbon stocks and dynamics in northern high-latitude ecosystems. However, regional AGB datasets with spatially detailed information (1 m tall), which were converted to plot-level AGB using allometric equations. We acquired Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) images from the Web Enabled Landsat Data (WELD) that provides multi-date composites of top-of-atmosphere reflectance and brightness temperature for Alaska. From the WELD images, we generated a three-year (2008 - 2010) image composite for the Yukon River Basin using a series of compositing criteria including non-saturation, non-cloudiness, maximal normalize difference vegetation index (NDVI), and maximal brightness temperature. Airborne lidar datasets were acquired for two sub-regions in the central basin in 2009, which were converted to vegetation height datasets using the bare-earth digital surface model (DSM) and the first-return DSM. We created a multiple regression model in which the response variable was the field-observed AGB and the predictor variables were Landsat-derived reflectance, brightness temperature, and spectral vegetation indices including NDVI, soil adjusted vegetation index (SAVI), enhanced vegetation index (EVI), normalized difference infrared index (NDII), and normalized difference water index (NDWI). Principal component analysis was incorporated in the regression model to remedy the multicollinearity problems caused by high correlations between predictor variables. The model fitted the observed data well with an R-square of 0.62, mean absolute error of 29.1 Mg/ha, and mean bias error of 3.9 Mg/ha. By applying this model to the Landsat mosaic, we generated a 30-m AGB map for the boreal forests in the Yukon River Basin. Validation of the Landsat-derived AGB using the lidar dataset indicated a significant correlation between the AGB estimates and the lidar

  10. Annual Dynamics of Green House Gases in a Swedish Boreal Forested Catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oquist, M. G.; Klemedtsson, L.; Bishop, K.; Grip, H.; Laudon, H.; Nilsson, M.

    2003-04-01

    We investigated the spatial and temporal variation of CO_2, CH_4 and N_2O in a boreal forested catchment with respect to their atmospheric exchange and their below-ground concentration dynamics. The measurements were carried out at three sites distributed along a gently sloping 22 m transect draining into a small creek. Vegetation was dominated by a 95 year old Norway spruce stand and soil types ranged from organic (a riparian zone histosol) to mineral (podzol on sandy till). Soil gas concentrations (at 5, 10, 20, 40 and 60 cm depth) were measured weekly for 18 months, while gas fluxes were measured weekly during the snow-free season and at 4 campaigns during the winter season. During the growing season average CO_2 efflux from the three sites ranged from 0.7--1.8 g m-2 d-1, while CH_4 displayed a net uptake rate of 0.1--0.3 mg m-2 d-1. Detectable amounts of N_2O emissions appeared sporadically, but never exceeded 0.04 mg m-2 d-1. The variation in CO_2 flux had the same temporal pattern as the variation in soil temperature (5--25 cm depth; r^2 = 0.6--0.85), while ca 40% of the differences in CH_4 consumption could be accounted for by the variations in soil moisture in the top 20 cm. During winter, fluxes of CO_2 and CH_4 were of the same order of magnitude as during summer, but the N_2O emissions were considerably higher, averaging around 0.4 mg m-2 d-1. Furthermore, soil gas concentrations of N_2O during winter showed a strong positive temperature correlation with a ca10-fold increase in concentration per ^oC (r^2 = 0.93). Our results stress the importance of the winter season for the greenhouse gas dynamics of the boreal landscape, and also that both N_2O and CH_4 exchange have the potential to influence how these ecosystems interact with the Earth's radiative balance. Moreover, the strength of atmospheric CH_4 consumption rates in these systems appears to be indifferent to season, which has implications for regional estimates of CH_4 budgets. The temperature

  11. Seasonality and nitrogen supply modify carbon partitioning in understory vegetation of a boreal coniferous forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasselquist, N J; Metcalfe, D B; Marshall, J D; Lucas, R W; Högberg, P

    2016-03-01

    Given the strong coupling between the carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycles, there is substantial interest in understanding how N availability affects C cycling in terrestrial ecosystems, especially in ecosystems limited by N. However, most studies in temperate and boreal forests have focused on the effects of N addition on tree growth. By comparison, less is known about the effects of N availability on the cycling of C in understory vegetation despite some evidence that dwarf shrubs, mosses, and lichens play an important role in the forest C balance. In this study, we used an in situ 13CO2 pulse-labeling technique to examine the short-term dynamics of C partitioning in understory vegetation in three boreal Pinus sylvestris forest stands exposed to different rates of N addition: a low and high N addition that receive annual additions of NH4NO3 of 20 and 100 kg N/ha, respectively, and this is a typo. It should be an unfertilized control. Labeling was conducted at two distinct periods (early vs. late growing season), which provided a seasonal picture of how N addition affects C dynamics in understory vegetation. In contrast to what has been found in trees, there was no obvious trend in belowground C partitioning in ericaceous plants in response to N additions or seasonality. Increasing N addition led to a greater percentage of 13C being incorporated into ericaceous leaves with a high turnover, whereas high rates of N addition strongly reduced the incorporation of 13C into less degradable moss tissues. Addition of N also resulted in a greater percentage of the 13C label being respired back to the atmosphere and an overall reduction in total understory carbon use efficiency. Taken together, our results suggest a faster cycling of C in understory vegetation with increasing N additions; yet the magnitude of this general response was strongly dependent on the amount of N added and varied seasonally. These results provide some of the first in situ C and N partitioning

  12. Assessment of boreal forest historical C dynamics in Yukon River Basin: relative roles of warming and fire regime change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Fengming [ORNL; Yi, Shuhua [Cold and Arid Regions Environmental and Engineering Research Institute, CAS; McGuire, A. David [University of Alaska; Johnson, Kristopher D [University of Alaska, Fairbanks; Liang, Jingjing [University of Alaska, Fairbanks; Harden, Jennifer [USGS, Menlo Park, CA; Kasischke, Eric S. [University of Maryland, College Park; Kurz, Werner [Canadian Forest Service

    2012-01-01

    Carbon (C) dynamics of boreal forest ecosystems have substantial implications for efforts to mitigate the rise of atmospheric CO2 and may be substantially influenced by warming and changing wildfire regimes. In this study we applied a large-scale ecosystem model that included dynamics of organic soil horizons and soil organic matter characteristics of multiple pools to assess forest C stock changes of the Yukon River Basin (YRB) in Alaska, USA, and Canada from 1960 through 2006, a period characterized by substantial climate warming and increases in wildfire. The model was calibrated for major forests with data from long-term research sites and evaluated using a forest inventory database. The regional assessment indicates that forest vegetation C storage increased by 46 Tg C, but that total soil C storage did not change appreciably during this period. However, further analysis suggests that C has been continuously lost from the mineral soil horizon since warming began in the 1970s, but has increased in the amorphous organic soil horizon. Based on a factorial experiment, soil C stocks would have increased by 158 Tg C if the YRB had not undergone warming and changes in fire regime. The analysis also identified that warming and changes in fire regime were approximately equivalent in their effects on soil C storage, and interactions between these two suggests that the loss of organic horizon thickness associated with increases in wildfire made deeper soil C stocks more vulnerable to loss via decomposition. Subbasin analyses indicate that C stock changes were primarily sensitive to the fraction of burned forest area within each subbasin and that boreal forest ecosystems in the YRB are currently transitioning from being sinks to sources at ;0.7% annual area burned. We conclude that it is important for international mitigation efforts focused on controlling atmospheric CO2 to consider how climate warming and changes in fire regime may concurrently affect the CO2 sink

  13. Assessment of boreal forest historical C dynamics in the Yukon River Basin: relative roles of warming and fire regime change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, F.M.; Yi, S.H.; McGuire, A.D.; Johnson, K.D.; Liang, J.; Harden, J.W.; Kasischke, E.S.; Kurz, W.A.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon (C) dynamics of boreal forest ecosystems have substantial implications for efforts to mitigate the rise of atmospheric CO2 and may be substantially influenced by warming and changing wildfire regimes. In this study we applied a large-scale ecosystem model that included dynamics of organic soil horizons and soil organic matter characteristics of multiple pools to assess forest C stock changes of the Yukon River Basin (YRB) in Alaska, USA, and Canada from 1960 through 2006, a period characterized by substantial climate warming and increases in wildfire. The model was calibrated for major forests with data from long-term research sites and evaluated using a forest inventory database. The regional assessment indicates that forest vegetation C storage increased by 46 Tg C, but that total soil C storage did not change appreciably during this period. However, further analysis suggests that C has been continuously lost from the mineral soil horizon since warming began in the 1970s, but has increased in the amorphous organic soil horizon. Based on a factorial experiment, soil C stocks would have increased by 158 Tg C if the YRB had not undergone warming and changes in fire regime. The analysis also identified that warming and changes in fire regime were approximately equivalent in their effects on soil C storage, and interactions between these two suggests that the loss of organic horizon thickness associated with increases in wildfire made deeper soil C stocks more vulnerable to loss via decomposition. Subbasin analyses indicate that C stock changes were primarily sensitive to the fraction of burned forest area within each subbasin and that boreal forest ecosystems in the YRB are currently transitioning from being sinks to sources at ∼0.7% annual area burned. We conclude that it is important for international mitigation efforts focused on controlling atmospheric CO2 to consider how climate warming and changes in fire regime may concurrently affect the CO2 sink

  14. Carbon in boreal coniferous forest soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westman, C.J.; Ilvesniemi, H.; Liski, J.; Mecke, M. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Forest Ecology; Fritze, H.; Helmisaari, H.S.; Pietikaeinen, J.; Smolander, A. [Finnish Forest Research Inst., Vantaa (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    The working hypothesis of the research was that the soil of boreal forests is a large carbon store and the amount of C is still increasing in young soils, like in the forest soils of Finland, which makes these soils important sinks for atmospheric CO{sub 2}. Since the processes defining the soil C balance, primary production of plants and decomposition, are dependent on environmental factors and site properties, it was assumed that the organic carbon pool in the soil is also dependent on the same factors. The soil C store is therefore likely to change in response to climatic warming. The aim of this research was to estimate the C balance of forest soil in Finland and predict changes in the balance in response to changes in climatic conditions. To achieve the aim (1) intensive empirical experimentation on the density of C in different pools in the soil and on fluxes between the pools was done was done, (2) the effect of site fertility and climate on the amount and properties of organic C in forest soil was investigated and (3) dynamic modelling for investigating dynamics of the soil C storage was used

  15. Upscaling methane emission hotspots in boreal peatlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Cresto Aleina

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Upscaling the properties and the effects of small-scale surface heterogeneities to larger scales is a challenging issue in land surface modeling. We developed a novel approach to upscale local methane emissions in a boreal peatland from the micro-topographic scale to the landscape-scale. We based this new parameterization on the analysis of the water table pattern generated by the Hummock–Hollow model, a micro-topography resolving model for peatland hydrology. We introduce this parameterization of methane hotspots in a global model-like version of the Hummock–Hollow model, that underestimates methane emissions. We tested the robustness of the parameterization by simulating methane emissions for the next century forcing the model with three different RCP scenarios. The Hotspot parameterization, despite being calibrated for the 1976–2005 climatology, mimics the output of the micro-topography resolving model for all the simulated scenarios. The new approach bridges the scale gap of methane emissions between this version of the model and the configuration explicitly resolving micro-topography.

  16. The summertime Boreal forest field measurement intensive (HUMPPA-COPEC-2010: an overview of meteorological and chemical influences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Williams

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the background, instrumentation, goals, and the regional influences on the HUMPPA-COPEC intensive field measurement campaign, conducted at the Boreal forest research station SMEAR II (Station for Measuring Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relation in Hyytiälä, Finland from 12 July–12 August 2010. The prevailing meteorological conditions during the campaign are examined and contrasted with those of the past six years. Back trajectory analyses show that meteorological conditions at the site in 2010 were characterized by a higher proportion of southerly flow than in the other years studied. As a result the summer of 2010 was anomalously warm and high in ozone making the campaign relevant for the analysis of possible future climates. A comprehensive land use analysis, provided on both 5 and 50 km scales, shows that the main vegetation types surrounding the site on both the regional and local scales are: coniferous forest (Scots pine and/or Norway spruce; mixed forest (Birch and conifers; and woodland scrub (e.g. Willows, Aspen; indicating that the campaign results can be taken as representative of the Boreal forest ecosystem. In addition to the influence of biogenic emissions, the measurement site was occasionally impacted by sources other than vegetation. Specific tracers have been used here to identify the time periods when such sources have impacted the site namely: biomass burning (acetonitrile and CO, urban anthropogenic pollution (pentane and SO2 and the nearby Korkeakoski sawmill (enantiomeric ratio of chiral monoterpenes. None of these sources dominated the study period, allowing the Boreal forest summertime emissions to be assessed and contrasted with various other source signatures.

  17. The summertime Boreal forest field measurement intensive (HUMPPA-COPEC-2010: an overview of meteorological and chemical influences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Williams

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the background, instrumentation, goals, and the regional influences on the HUMPPA-COPEC intensive field measurement campaign, conducted at the Boreal forest research station SMEAR II (Station for Measuring Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relation in Hyytiälä, Finland from 12 July–12 August 2010. The prevailing meteorological conditions during the campaign are examined and contrasted with those of the past six years. Back trajectory analyses show that meteorological conditions at the site were characterized by a higher proportion of southerly flow. As a result the summer of 2010 was anomalously warm and high in ozone making the campaign relevant for the analysis of possible future climates. A comprehensive land use analysis, provided on both 5 and 50 km scales, shows that the main vegetation types surrounding the site on both the regional and local scales are: coniferous forest (Scots pine and/or Norway spruce; mixed forest (Birch and conifers; and woodland scrub (e.g. Willows, Aspen; indicating that the campaign results can be taken as representative of the Boreal forest ecosystem. In addition to the influence of biogenic emissions, the measurement site was occasionally impacted by sources other than vegetation. Specific tracers have been used here to identify the time periods when such sources have impacted the site namely: biomass burning (acetonitrile and CO, urban anthropogenic pollution (pentane and SO2 and the nearby Korkeakoski sawmill (enantiomeric ratio of chiral monoterpenes. None of these sources dominated the study period, allowing the Boreal forest summertime emissions to be assessed and contrasted with various other source signatures.

  18. 3D simulation of boreal forests: structure and dynamics in complex terrain and in a changing climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazhnik, Ksenia; Shugart, Herman H.

    2015-10-01

    To understand how the Siberian boreal forests may respond to near-future climate change, we employed a modeling approach and examined thresholds for significant and irreversible changes in forest structure and composition that are likely to be reached by mid-21st century. We applied the new spatially-explicit gap-dynamics model SIBBORK toward the understanding of how transition zones, namely treelines, which are notoriously undersampled and difficult to model, may change in the near future. We found that a 2 °C change in annual average air temperature significantly altered the structure, composition, and productivity of boreal forests stands both in the northern and the southern treeline ecotones. Treeline migration occurs at smaller temperature changes. Based on the current (1990-2014) observed warming trends, a 2 °C increase in annual average temperature compared to historical climate (1961-1990) is likely to be experienced at the northern treeline by 2040 and at the southern treeline by 2050. With regards to the forest biome, the most significant warming to date has been predicted and observed in Siberia. A 2 °C increase in annual average temperature compared to the second half of the 19th century is smaller than the predictions of even the most conservative RCP2.6 climate change scenario (IPCC 2013), and has previously been assumed to not likely result in dramatic changes to ecosystems or biome shifts. We show that at a +2 °C change, biome shifts from forest to steppe are likely to occur across a large area in southern Siberia. These changes in land cover will inevitably result in changes in the biodiversity, carbon storage, and the ecosystem services provided by the boreal forests of southern Siberia.

  19. Twelve year interannual and seasonal variability of stream carbon export from a boreal peatland catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, J. A.; Larsson, A.; Wallin, M. B.; Nilsson, M. B.; Laudon, H.

    2016-07-01

    Understanding stream carbon export dynamics is needed to accurately predict how the carbon balance of peatland catchments will respond to climatic and environmental change. We used a 12 year record (2003-2014) of continuous streamflow and manual spot measurements of total organic carbon (TOC), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), methane (CH4), and organic carbon quality (carbon-specific ultraviolet absorbance at 254 nm per dissolved organic carbon) to assess interannual and seasonal variability in stream carbon export for a peatland catchment (70% mire and 30% forest cover) in northern Sweden. Mean annual total carbon export for the 12 year period was 12.2 gCm-2 yr-1, but individual years ranged between 6 and 18 gCm-2 yr-1. TOC, which was primarily composed of dissolved organic carbon (>99%), was the dominant form of carbon being exported, comprising 63% to 79% of total annual exports, and DIC contributed between 19% and 33%. CH4 made up less than 5% of total export. When compared to previously published annual net ecosystem exchange (NEE) for the studied peatland system, stream carbon export typically accounted for 12 to 50% of NEE for most years. However, in 2006 stream carbon export accounted for 63 to 90% (estimated uncertainty range) of NEE due to a dry summer which suppressed NEE, followed by a wet autumn that resulted in considerable stream export. Runoff exerted a primary control on stream carbon export from this catchment; however, our findings suggest that seasonal variations in biologic and hydrologic processes responsible for production and transport of carbon within the peatland were secondary influences on stream carbon export. Consideration of these seasonal dynamics is needed when predicting stream carbon export response to environmental change.

  20. Peat accumulation in coastal-plain mires: a model for coals of the Fruitland Formation (Upper Cretaceous) of southern Colorado, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Roberts L.N.; McCabe, P.J.

    1992-01-01

    In the northwestern part of the San Juan basin, Colorado, thick high-volatile B bituminous coal deposits in the Upper Cretaceous Fruitland Formation are associated with nearshore marine sandstones of the Pictured Cliffs Sandstone. Detailed work along the outcrop and examination of drill cores, revealed two coal-bearing zones in the lower 60 m of the Fruitland Formation. Each zone is up to 13 m thick and consists of interbedded bright and dull coal (average ash values of 17 and 34% on a moisture-free basis, respectively), thin fine-grained clastic partings and abundant altered volcanic ash partings. Isopachs of the interval between the top of the Pictured Cliffs Sandstone and a marker bed (Huerfanito Bentonite Bed) in the underlying Lewis Shale show linear zones where the interval abruptly thickens. These zones, which trend northwest to southeast, represent areas where the shoreline paused during an overall migration to the northeast. Isopach maps of coal in the lower part of the Fruitland Formation and subsurface correlation of shoreface sandstones with coal zones show that the thickest accumulation of coal is 20-25 km landward of these coeval shorelines. The Fruitland coals may be compared to the high-ash peats of the Dismal Swamp in the southeastern U.S.A., which form in pocosin mires about 20 km inland from the Atlantic coast. Clastic deposirion, resulting from coastal processes, precludes the formation of peat in low-lying mires adjacent to the shoreline. The high ash yield, numerous partings and the relationship with the coeval shoreline suggest that the coals in the lower part of the Fruitland Formation accumulated in mires that were transitional from low-lying to raised. ?? 1992.

  1. Designer ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Awasthi, Ashutosh; Singh, Kripal; O'Grady, Audrey; Courtney, Ronan; Kalra, Alok; Singh, Rana Pratap; Cerda Bolinches, Artemio; Steinberger, Yosef; Patra, D.D.

    2016-01-01

    Increase in human population is accelerating the rate of land use change, biodiversity loss and habitat degradation, triggering a serious threat to life supporting ecosystem services. Existing strategies for biological conservation remain insufficient to achieve a sustainable human-nature relatio

  2. Tracking changes of forest carbon density following mega-fires: comparison studies in the Yellowstone National Park and Boreal Forests of Northeast China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Feng; Huang, Chengquan; Huang, Chao; He, Hong; Zhu, Zhiliang

    2016-04-01

    Wildfires and post-fire management directly change C stored in biomass and soil pools, and can have indirect impacts on long-term C balance. Two mega fires occurred in the Yellowstone National Park (YNP) and the boreal forests of Northeast China in 1988 and 1987, respectively, making them ideal sites to examine and compare the effects of management and disturbances on regional carbon dynamics. In this study, we quantified effects of the 1988 Yellowstone fires on YNP carbon storages and fluxes. And then we tracked and modeled post-1988 forest carbon stocks change in YNP, and compared with simulation results of carbon stock changes in post-1987 fire boreal forests of Northeast China. Preliminary results show that in YNP, the mega fires in 1988 were responsible for an immediate loss of 900 g/m2 ecosystem average C density and it would take about a decade before the YNP ecosystem recover to the pre-fire average C condition. In boreal forests of Northeast China, fire reduced aboveground and belowground carbon by 230±60 g/m2 and 460±340 g/m2, respectively.

  3. The Silvics of Some East European and Siberian Boreal Forest Tree Species

    OpenAIRE

    Korzukin, M.D.; Rubinina, A.E.; G. B. Bonan; Solomon, A.M.; Antonovsky, M.Y.

    1989-01-01

    In recent years, the boreal forest has received increased scientific attention in light of projected climatic warming to boreal regions from increased concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide. The ecological consequences of such a warming could be significant. However, before the consequences of climatic change can be properly investigated, the ecology of boreal forest tree species must be adequately understood. Though the life-histories of many North American boreal forest tree species a...

  4. Pre- and Post-Harvest Carbon Dioxide Fluxes from an Upland Boreal Aspen (Populus tremuloides) Forest in Western Boreal Plain, Alberta, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giroux, Kayla

    The Utikuma Region Study Area (URSA) is located in north-central Alberta, Canada, in a region where aspen (Populus tremuloides) dominate the upland vegetation of the Western Boreal Plain Due to the heterogeneity of the surficial geology as well as the sub-humid climate where the water balance is dominated by evapotranspiration, the carbon balance across this landscape is highly variable. Moreover, the upland aspen regions represent significant stores of carbon. More recently, aspen stands have become valuable commercial resources for pulp and paper processing. These stands are harvested through a clear cutting process and are generally left to regenerate on their own, a process which occurs rapidly in clonal species like aspen. Since clonal species establish very quickly following harvest, information on the key ecohydrological controls on stand carbon dioxide (CO2) exchange from the years immediately following harvest are essential to understand the successional trajectory. However, most information currently available on these interactions are obtained several years following a disturbance. Thus, to determine the effects of harvest on aspen regeneration and productivity, ecosystem level fluxes of CO2 three years before and three years after timber harvest were analyzed. Prior to harvest, the ecosystem sequestered 1216 to 1286 g CO2 m-2period-1 over the growing season. Immediately after harvest, the ecosystem became a significant source of CO2 ranging from -874 to -1183 g CO2 m -2period-1, while the second growing season ranged from -233 to -577 g CO2 m-2period-1. The third growing season resulted in a net sink (76 g CO2 m -2period-1) over the same period, but if extrapolated over the whole year, the ecosystem would remain a source of carbon. The magnitude of Gross Ecosystem Productivity (GEP) returned pre-harvest range within two growing seasons. Ecosystem respiration (RE), on the other hand, increased year over year after harvest had taken place. Forest floor

  5. Observation and modelling of HOx radicals in a boreal forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hens, K.; Novelli, A.; Martinez, M.; Auld, J.; Axinte, R.; Bohn, B.; Fischer, H.; Keronen, P.; Kubistin, D.; Nölscher, A. C.; Oswald, R.; Paasonen, P.; Petäjä, T.; Regelin, E.; Sander, R.; Sinha, V.; Sipilä, M.; Taraborrelli, D.; Tatum Ernest, C.; Williams, J.; Lelieveld, J.; Harder, H.

    2014-08-01

    Measurements of OH and HO2 radicals were conducted in a pine-dominated forest in southern Finland during the HUMPPA-COPEC-2010 (Hyytiälä United Measurements of Photochemistry and Particles in Air - Comprehensive Organic Precursor Emission and Concentration study) field campaign in summer 2010. Simultaneous side-by-side measurements of hydroxyl radicals were conducted with two instruments using chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), indicating small systematic disagreement, OHLIF / OHCIMS = (1.31 ± 0.14). Subsequently, the LIF instrument was moved to the top of a 20 m tower, just above the canopy, to investigate the radical chemistry at the ecosystem-atmosphere interface. Comprehensive measurements including observations of many volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and the total OH reactivity were conducted and analysed using steady-state calculations as well as an observationally constrained box model. Production rates of OH calculated from measured OH precursors are consistent with those derived from the steady-state assumption and measured total OH loss under conditions of moderate OH reactivity. The primary photolytic sources of OH contribute up to one-third to the total OH production. OH recycling, which occurs mainly by HO2 reacting with NO and O3, dominates the total hydroxyl radical production in this boreal forest. Box model simulations agree with measurements for hydroxyl radicals (OHmod. / OHobs. = 1.00 ± 0.16), while HO2 mixing ratios are significantly under-predicted (HO2mod. / HO2obs. = 0.3 ± 0.2), and simulated OH reactivity does not match the observed OH reactivity. The simultaneous under-prediction of HO2 and OH reactivity in periods in which OH concentrations were simulated realistically suggests that the missing OH reactivity is an unaccounted-for source of HO2. Detailed analysis of the HOx production, loss, and recycling pathways suggests that in periods of high total OH reactivity there are

  6. Determination of de novo and pool emissions of terpenes from four common boreal/alpine trees by 13CO2 labelling and PTR-MS analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghirardo, Andrea; Koch, Kristine; Taipale, Risto; Zimmer, Ina; Schnitzler, Jörg-Peter; Rinne, Janne

    2010-05-01

    Boreal forests emit a large amount of monoterpenes into the atmosphere. Traditionally these emissions are assumed to originate as evaporation from large storage pools. Thus, their diurnal cycle would depend mostly on temperature. However, there is indication that a significant part of the monoterpene emission would originate directly from de novo synthesis. By applying 13CO2 fumigation and analyzing the isotope fractions with proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) and classical GC-MS, we determined the fractions of monoterpene emissions originating from de novo biosynthesis in Pinus sylvestris (58%), Picea abies (33.5%), Larix decidua (9.8%) and Betula pendula (100%). Application of the observed split between de novo and pool emissions from P. sylvestris in a hybrid emission algorithm resulted in a better description of ecosystem scale monoterpene emissions from a boreal Scots pine forest stand. PMID:20040067

  7. Multitemporal L- and C-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar To Highlight Differences in Water Status Among Boreal Forest and Wetland Systems in the Yukon Flats, Interior Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balser, Andrew W.; Wylie, Bruce K.

    2010-01-01

    Tracking landscape-scale water status in high-latitude boreal systems is indispensible to understanding the fate of stored and sequestered carbon in a climate change scenario. Spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery provides critical information for water and moisture status in Alaskan boreal environments at the landscape scale. When combined with results from optical sensor analyses, a complementary picture of vegetation, biomass, and water status emerges. Whereas L-band SAR showed better inherent capacity to map water status, C-band had much more temporal coverage in this study. Analysis through the use of L- and C-band SARs combined with Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) enables landscape stratification by vegetation and by seasonal and interannual hydrology. Resultant classifications are highly relevant to biogeochemistry at the landscape scale. These results enhance our understanding of ecosystem processes relevant to carbon balance and may be scaled up to inform regional carbon flux estimates and better parameterize general circulation models (GCMs).

  8. Ecosystems Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Ernesto Guhl Nannetti

    2015-01-01

    The article begins by referring to the evolution of engineering with the advancement of natural and physical sciences and the resulting specialization, which has blurred the boundaries of its integrating and holistic nature. This process is illustrated through the expansion of the programs and denominations in Colombia. Further on, it attempts to establish a relationship between engineering and sustainability, and it presents the strong impact of development on the planet's ecosystems, which ...

  9. Vegetation and climate in the Western Sayan Mts according to pollen data from Lugovoe Mire as a background for prehistoric cultural change in southern Middle Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blyakharchuk, Tatiana A.; Chernova, Natalia A.

    2013-09-01

    On the basis of pollen and spore analyses and radiocarbon dating of peat deposits of Lugovoe Mire in southern Middle Siberia, changes of vegetation and climate of the Western Sayan Mts and the Khakasia Republic (Russia) since 6000 yr 14C BP (5000 cal yr BC) are found to correspond with the development of archaeological cultures and with the pollen-based palaeoclimatic reconstruction of Levina and Orlova (1993) constructed for the forest-steppe zone of the south of West Siberia. Three phases in the development of the regional vegetation (Abies, Betula, and Pinus) are distinguished in the pollen diagram of Lugovoe Mire, which form the environmental background for the archaeological cultures developed in this region. The first penetration of ancient hunting-fishing tribes into this area occurred during the ‘Abies stage' of the vegetation. Bronze Age cultures practiced agriculture and animal husbandry mostly during the ‘Betula stage'. Beginning in the Iron Age, archaeological cultures bloomed in the study area on the background of expanding Pinus sylvestris forests. The origin of all these cultures was connected with migrations of people from the southwest or southeast. An important reason for these migrations was dry climatic phases at millennial intervals, which influenced especially strongly the more southerly homelands of the migrating ancient tribes.

  10. Development of biogenic VOC emission inventories for the boreal forest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarvainen, V.

    2008-07-01

    The volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by vegetation, especially forests, can affect local and regional atmospheric photochemistry through their reactions with atmospheric oxidants. Their reaction products may also participate in the formation and growth of new particles which affect the radiation balance of the atmosphere, and thus climate, by scattering and absorbing shortwave and longwave radiation and by modifying the radiative properties, amount and lifetime of clouds. Globally, anthropogenic VOC emissions are far surpassed by the biogenic ones, making biogenic emission inventories an integral element in the development of efficient air quality and climate strategies. The inventories are typically constructed based on landcover information, measured emissions of different plants or vegetation types, and empirical dependencies of the emissions on environmental variables such as temperature and light. This thesis is focused on the VOC emissions from the boreal forest, the largest terrestrial biome with characteristic vegetation patterns and strong seasonality. The isoprene, monoterpene and sesquiterpene emissions of the most prevalent boreal tree species in Finland, Scots pine, have been measured and their seasonal variation and dependence on temperature and light have been studied. The measured emission data and other available observations of the emissions of the principal boreal trees have been used in a biogenic emission model developed for the boreal forests in Finland. The model utilizes satellite landcover information, Finnish forest classification and hourly meteorological data to calculate isoprene, monoterpene, sesquiterpene and other VOC emissions over the growing season. The principal compounds emitted by Scots pine are DELTA3-carene and alpha-pinene in the south boreal zone and alpha- and beta-pinene in the north boreal zone. The monoterpene emissions are dependent on temperature and have a clear seasonal cycle with high emissions in spring

  11. Browning of boreal freshwaters coupled to carbon-iron interactions along the aquatic continuum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gesa A Weyhenmeyer

    Full Text Available The color of freshwaters, often measured as absorbance, influences a number of ecosystem services including biodiversity, fish production, and drinking water quality. Many countries have recently reported on increasing trends of water color in freshwaters, for which drivers are still not fully understood. We show here with more than 58000 water samples from the boreal and hemiboreal region of Sweden and Canada that absorbance of filtered water (a₄₂₀ co-varied with dissolved organic carbon (DOC concentrations (R²  = 0.85, P<0.0001, but that a₄₂₀ relative to DOC is increased by the presence of iron (Fe. We found that concentrations of Fe significantly declined with increasing water retention in the landscape, resulting in significantly lower Fe concentrations in lakes compared to running waters. The Fe loss along the aquatic continuum corresponded to a proportional loss in a₄₂₀, suggesting a tight biogeochemical coupling between colored dissolved organic matter and Fe. Since water is being flushed at increasing rates due to enhanced runoff in the studied regions, diminished loss of Fe along the aquatic continuum may be one reason for observed trends in a₄₂₀, and in particular in a₄₂₀/DOC increases. If trends of increased Fe concentrations in freshwaters continue, water color will further increase with various effects on ecosystem services and biogeochemical cycles.

  12. Methanotrophy Induces Nitrogen Fixation in Boreal Mosses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiirola, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Many methanotrophic bacterial groups fix nitrogen in laboratory conditions. Furthermore, nitrogen (N) is a limiting nutrient in many environments where methane concentrations are highest. Despite these facts, methane-induced N fixation has previously been overlooked, possibly due to methodological problems. To study the possible link between methanotrophy and diazotrophy in terrestrial and aquatic habitats, we measured the co-occurrence of these two processes in boreal forest, peatland and stream mosses using a stable isotope labeling approach (15 N2 and 13 CH4 double labeling) and sequencing of the nifH gene marker. N fixation associated with forest mosses was dependent on the annual N deposition, whereas methane stimulate N fixation neither in high (>3 kg N ha -1 yr -1) nor low deposition areas, which was in accordance with the nifH gene sequencing showing that forest mosses (Pleurozium schreberi and Hylocomium splendens ) carried mainly cyanobacterial N fixers. On the other extreme, in stream mosses (Fontinalis sp.) methane was actively oxidized throughout the year, whereas N fixation showed seasonal fluctuation. The co-occurrence of the two processes in single cell level was proven by co-localizing both N and methane-carbon fixation with the secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) approach. Methanotrophy and diazotrophy was also studied in peatlands of different primary successional stages in the land-uplift coast of Bothnian Bay, in the Siikajoki chronosequence, where N accumulation rates in peat profiles indicate significant N fixation. Based on experimental evidence it was counted that methane-induced N fixation explained over one-third of the new N input in the younger peatland successional stages, where the highest N fixation rates and highest methane oxidation activities co-occurred in the water-submerged Sphagnum moss vegetation. The linkage between methanotrophic carbon cycling and N fixation may therefore constitute an important mechanism in the rapid

  13. Restoring the Nitrogen Cycle in the Boreal Forest - a Case Study from Northern Alberta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masse, Jacynthe; Grayston, Sue; Prescott, Cindy; Quideau, Sylvie

    2014-05-01

    between nitrogen cycling processes in the different vegetation treatments and in the naturally disturbed sites were found. The reasons for these variances will be discussed. The oil sands will be Canada's environmental legacy for the next several hundred years and recreating functional soils is fundamental to our ability to restore boreal ecosystems after disturbance.

  14. Investigation and Quantification of Water Track Networks in Boreal Regions Using Remote Sensing and Geophysical Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendbayar, U.; Misra, D.; Gupta, T.; Ghosh, T.

    2015-12-01

    Water tracks are the most prominent drainage pathways that route water through the soil over permafrost in the polar environment and thus play a major role in hydrology, geomorphology, and geochemistry of the polar ecosystem. Existing literature on water tracks is limited and is largely confined to tundra areas devoid of vegetation. The objective of this study is to initiate the investigation of water tracks in thickly vegetated boreal regions, many of which contain predominant engineered infrastructures. The ancillary objectives include the development of methods for mapping the distribution of water tracks in boreal regions and a preliminary analysis of the geotechnical impacts of water track interception on infrastructures. The study area is Goldstream Road in Fairbanks, Alaska. This road experiences high amounts of damage, possibly due to interception of prominent water tracks. To investigate the road damage, the Alaska Department of Transportation has collected geophysical data in 2012. We plan to create a water track distribution map around the Goldstream Road using high-spatial-and-spectral-resolution remote sensing imagery and correlate it with the geophysical data from 2012. We have collected ground data from two water tracks: one in a residence in Fairbanks and the other besides the Goldstream Road. The two tracks vary greatly in size and features. Both water tracks revealed different yet quite promising characteristics. These findings will be used to extract other water tracks from remotely sensed images of the Goldstream Road area. So far, a 2010 SPOT 5 image (2.5m x 2.5 m), an aerial orthophoto (14 cm x 14 cm) and a DEM (57 cm x 57 cm) from September 2014 have been acquired. Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) processing was performed on the 2010 SPOT 5 image. A detailed water track database was created and water tracks are being manually digitized from the available imagery and Web Mapping Services (WMS). As a test, using FLIR, handheld

  15. Probing the debromination of the flame retardant decabromodiphenyl ether in sediments of a boreal lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orihel, Diane M; Bisbicos, Tommy; Darling, Colin T R; Dupuis, Alain P; Williamson, Mary; Muir, Derek C G

    2016-03-01

    After decades of use of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) as flame retardants, a large reservoir of these toxins has accumulated in ecosystems worldwide. The present study used an innovative approach to examine whether the fully brominated PBDE decabromodiphenyl ether (decaBDE) degrades to more toxic congeners in aquatic environments. The authors incubated intact sediment microcosms with high-purity [(13)C]decaBDE in a remote boreal lake to assess its debromination under ambient conditions. Although the addition of [(13)C]decaBDE increased total PBDE concentrations in sediment more than 10-fold, the relative amount of [(13)C]decaBDE in sediment did not change significantly over a 1-mo incubation. However, observation of small quantities of lower-brominated [(13)C]BDEs lent support to the hypothesis that decaBDE is slowly debrominated. The authors observed a significant increase in octaBDEs and nonaBDEs in profundal, but not littoral, sediment over 30 d. A second experiment in which sediment was incubated under different light and oxygen regimes yielded a surprising result-oxygen significantly stimulated the formation of octaBDEs and nonaBDEs. The authors also conducted a large-scale in situ enclosure experiment in which they followed the fate of experimentally added decaBDE in sediment over 26 mo, but that study yielded little evidence of decaBDE debromination. Overall, the authors suggest that the debromination of decaBDE occurs very slowly, if at all, in natural sediment of boreal lakes, in contrast to the rapid degradation kinetics reported by most laboratory-based studies, which are usually conducted by dissolving decaBDE in organic solvents. The findings reinforce the need for field studies on contaminant fate to inform environmental policy decisions. PMID:26332257

  16. Mechanisms for success after long-term nutrient enrichment in a boreal forest understory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tess Nahanni Grainger

    Full Text Available Global levels of reactive nitrogen are predicted to rise in the coming decades as a result of increased deposition from the burning of fossil fuels and the large-scale conversion of nitrogen into a useable form for agriculture. Many plant communities respond strongly to increases in soil nitrogen, particularly in northern ecosystems where nitrogen levels are naturally very low. An experiment in northern Canada that was initiated in 1990 has been investigating the effects of long-term nutrient enrichment (fertilizer added annually on a boreal forest understory community. We used this experiment to investigate why some species increase in abundance under nutrient enrichment whereas others decline. We focused on four species that differed in their responses to fertilization: Mertensia paniculata and Epilobium angustifolium increased in abundance, Achillea millefolium remained relatively constant and Festuca altaica declined. We hypothesized that the two species that were successful in the new high-nutrient, light-limited environment would be taller, have higher specific leaf area, change phenology by growing earlier in the season and be more morphologically plastic than their less successful counterparts. We compared plant height, specific leaf area, growth spurt date and allocation to leaves in plants grown in control and fertilized plots. We demonstrated that each of the two species that came to dominate fertilized plots has a different combination of traits and responses that likely gave them a competitive advantage; M. paniculata has the highest specific leaf area of the four species whereas E. angustifolium is tallest and exhibits morphological plasticity when fertilized by increasing biomass allocation to leaves. These results indicate that rather than one strategy determining success when nutrients become available, a variety of traits and responses may contribute to a species' ability to persist in a nutrient-enriched boreal forest

  17. Organic matter biogeochemistry in the western boreal forest of Canada (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, C. E.; Mercier Quideau, S.

    2013-12-01

    The western boreal forest of Canada is characterized by mixed and pure stands of aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.), spruce (Picea glauca (Moench) Voss) and pine (Pinus banksiana Lamb.). This study presents results on the characterization and cycling of soil organic matter in these boreal ecosystems derived from examining both climatic and edaphic gradients. The extent of decomposition for pine forest floors was observed to decrease with increasing stand age and decreasing temperature along a latitudinal climatic transect as determined by solid state nuclear magnetic resonance. In a survey of mature aspen, spruce and pine sites, forest floors reflected the dominant vegetative inputs as demonstrated by long chain (≥ C21) n-alkane biomarkers. Utilizing a range of techniques, including compound-specific analysis of phospholipid fatty acids in a laboratory incubation, we determined that while soil microbial communities under aspen and spruce both readily consumed 13C-glucose, their structures remained unique. We also were interested in determining the response of aspen and spruce soil microbial communities to more complex vegetation inputs, and consequently generated double labelled (13C and 15N) aspen litter using multiple pulses of 13CO2(g) and K15NO3(l). Enriched aspen leaves were then applied in the field to the forest floors of aspen and spruce stands. Nitrogen cycling readily occurred on both sites as evidenced by 15N enrichment of above-ground vegetation. While the soil microbial community structures remained distinct between the two stand types across the field incubation, there was overlap in terms of the microorganisms involved in the decomposition of the applied organic matter.

  18. The extent of carbon mineralization in boreal soils controls compositional changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercier Quideau, S.; Oh, S.; Paré, D.

    2013-12-01

    Almost twenty percent of global carbon stocks in vegetation and soil are found in boreal soils, making them the largest terrestrial carbon storehouse in the world. Yet, despite their importance in the global carbon budget, very little is known about the exact nature and decomposition pathways of organic matter in these soils. The overall objective of this study was to examine the effects of vegetation and disturbance (fire and harvest) on: 1) soil organic matter composition, and 2) decomposition-induced changes in composition from a range of representative boreal forest and peatland ecosystems. Forest floor and peat samples (0-10 cm) were obtained from 17 sites along an east-west transect from New Brunswick to British Columbia, Canada. Carbon mineralization rates were measured during a 1-year laboratory incubation at 10 °C. Carbon chemistry in pre- and post-incubation samples was characterized by solid-state ramped-cross-polarization (RAMP-CP) 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The percentage of carbon mineralized during incubation ranged from 1 to 24%, and corresponded to significant increases in aromatic, phenolic, and carbonyl carbons. As expected, significant differences in carbon composition pre-incubation were found among vegetation types regardless of disturbance and sampling location. May be more interestingly, comparable differences among samples persisted post-incubation. In addition, decomposition-induced changes in carbon chemistry significantly differed among vegetation types. Samples from Jack pine and Douglas fir stands, which experienced the highest carbon mineralization, also showed the greatest increase in aromatic, phenolic, and carbonyl carbons. Overall, changes in carbon chemistry were significantly correlated to the percentage of carbon mineralized; i.e., the extent of decomposition that the samples underwent.

  19. No diurnal variation in rate or carbon isotope composition of soil respiration in a boreal forest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study evaluated the diurnal variability in the rate and stable carbon isotope ratio ((delta)13C) of soil respiration in a northern boreal forest, measured with opaque chambers after the removal of understory vegetation. The experiment was conducted in June and August 2004 at the Picea abies L. Karst-dominated Flakaliden Research Forest in northern Sweden, using unfertilized girdled-tree plots and unfertilized non-girdled tree plots. Soil respiration and (delta)13C of soil-respired carbon dioxide (CO2) were measured every 4 hours on 6 plots, with a total of 11 sampling times over each 48 hour period. The purpose was to clarify an earlier study regarding the origin of diurnal patterns of soil CO2 flux. This study explored whether the diurnal patterns were the result of photosynthetic CO2 uptake during the day by the understory or whether there were underlying trends in soil respiration driven by plant root allocation. The sampling campaigns undertaken in this study investigated whether diurnal variations in soil respiration rate and (delta)13C exist in this ecosystem when no understory vegetation is present. Shoot photosynthesis and environmental parameters were measured simultaneously. Despite significant variations in climatic conditions and shoot photosynthetic rates in non-girdled trees, no diurnal patterns in soil respiration rates and (delta)13C were noted in either treatment. The lack of detectable diurnal changes in both treatments indicates that modeling of daily boreal forest carbon balances based on single instantaneous measurements are unlikely to be misconstrued by substantial diurnal trends. However, it was suggested that spatial variable should be accounted for, given the large standard errors. The impact of tree girdling on soil respiration rates also emphasized the significance of canopy photosynthesis in driving soil processes. 37 refs., 2 figs

  20. Seasonal Variability in Boreal Wildfire Activity Associated with Landscape Patterns of Burned Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, K. M.; Kasischke, E. S.

    2012-12-01

    Wildfire is the most prominent disturbance in the boreal forest, effecting changes in stand age and vegetation composition often over thousands of square kilometers. The effect of wildfire on ecosystem structure and function depends heavily on the seasonality of the burn, and periods of seasonally high fire activity are highly sporadic. The majority of area in Alaska that burns in a fire season does so during relatively short periods of high fire activity. These periods, which can be determined from active fire detections or fire management agency data records, are caused by elevated air temperatures and low precipitation which decrease fuel moisture and encourage the spread of fire. While fire fronts dominate during periods of low fire activity, more active periods have a higher proportion of residual burning which remains after a front has passed through. Residual burning is likely responsible for the extensive combustion of surface organic materials in the boreal forest, which can lead to post-fire changes in dominant vegetation type. Seasonal variations in fire activity are therefore an important factor in the mosaic of severity conditions across large burned areas and shifts in land cover over successional time scales. The purpose of this study is to characterize the temporal and spatial variability in periods of seasonal high fire activity that influence patterns of burned area. In large burns, unburned areas within a fire scar may serve as an important seed stock during post-fire recruitment. These areas may also feedback to future fire regimes through the preservation of more fire-resistant vegetation in unburned "islands".

  1. Adaptation and mitigation strategies in Northern Eurasian boreal forests

    OpenAIRE

    A. Shvidenko; F. Kraxner; Obersteiner, M.; D. Schepaschenko

    2011-01-01

    Boreal forests of Northern Eurasia are experiencing ongoing changes in climate, strong impacts by humans including transformation of previously untouched landscapes, and dramatically accelerating disturbance regimes. Current global and regional climatic models predict for this region the most dramatic climatic change over the globe. Unregulated and often destructive anthropogenic impacts on the environment and natural landscapes may substantially accelerate the negative consequences of climat...

  2. Resilience of Alaska's Boreal Forest to Climatic Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapin, F. S., III; McGuire, A. D.; Ruess, R. W.; Hollingsworth, T. N.; Mack, M. C.; Johnstone, J. F.; Kasischke, E. S.; Euskirchen, E. S.; Jones, J. B.; Jorgenson, M. T.; Kielland, K.; Kofinas, G. P.; Turetsky, M. R.; Yarie, J.; Lloyd, A. H.; Taylor, D. L.

    2010-01-01

    This paper assesses the resilience of Alaska s boreal forest system to rapid climatic change. Recent warming is associated with reduced growth of dominant tree species, plant disease and insect outbreaks, warming and thawing of permafrost, drying of lakes, increased wildfire extent, increased postfire recruitment of deciduous trees, and reduced safety of hunters traveling on river ice. These changes have modified key structural features, feedbacks, and interactions in the boreal forest, including reduced effects of upland permafrost on regional hydrology, expansion of boreal forest into tundra, and amplification of climate warming because of reduced albedo (shorter winter season) and carbon release from wildfires. Other temperature-sensitive processes for which no trends have been detected include composition of plant and microbial communities, long-term landscape-scale change in carbon stocks, stream discharge, mammalian population dynamics, and river access and subsistence opportunities for rural indigenous communities. Projections of continued warming suggest that Alaska s boreal forest will undergo significant functional and structural changes within the next few decades that are unprecedented in the last 6000 years. The impact of these social ecological changes will depend in part on the extent of landscape reorganization between uplands and lowlands and on policies regulating subsistence opportunities for rural communities.

  3. Russian boreal peatlands dominate the natural European methane budget

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    About 60% of the European wetlands are located in the European part of Russia. Nevertheless, data on methane emissions from wetlands of that area are absent. Here we present results of methane emission measurements for two climatically different years from a boreal peatland complex in European Russia. Winter fluxes were well within the range of what has been reported for the peatlands of other boreal regions before, but summer fluxes greatly exceeded the average range of 5–80 mg CH4 m−2 d−1 for the circumpolar boreal zone. Half of the measured fluxes ranged between 150 and 450 mg CH4 m−2 d−1. Extrapolation of our data to the whole boreal zone of European Russia shows that theses emissions could amount to up to 2.7 ± 1.1 Tg CH4 a−1, corresponding to 69% of the annual emissions from European wetlands or 33% of the total annual natural European methane emission. In 2008, climatic conditions corresponded to the long term mean, whereas the summer of 2011 was warmer and noticeably drier. Counterintuitively, these conditions led to even higher CH4 emissions, with peaks up to two times higher than the values measured in 2008. As Russian peatlands dominate the areal extend of wetlands in Europe and are characterized by very high methane fluxes to the atmosphere, it is evident, that sound European methane budgeting will only be achieved with more insight into Russian peatlands. (letter)

  4. Resilience of Alaska’s boreal forest to climatic change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapin, F.S.; McGuire, Anthony; Ruess, R.W.; Hollingsworth, Teresa N.; Mack, M.C.; Johnstone, J.F.; Kasischke, E.S.; Euskirchen, E.S.; Jones, J.B.; Jorgenson, M.T.; Kielland, K.; Kofinas, G.; Turetsky, M.R.; Yarie, J.; Lloyd, A.H.; Taylor, D.L.

    2010-01-01

    This paper assesses the resilience of Alaska’s boreal forest system to rapid climatic change. Recent warming is associated with reduced growth of dominant tree species, plant disease and insect outbreaks, warming and thawing of permafrost, drying of lakes, increased wildfire extent, increased postfire recruitment of deciduous trees, and reduced safety of hunters traveling on river ice. These changes have modified key structural features, feedbacks, and interactions in the boreal forest, including reduced effects of upland permafrost on regional hydrology, expansion of boreal forest into tundra, and amplification of climate warming because of reduced albedo (shorter winter season) and carbon release from wildfires. Other temperature-sensitive processes for which no trends have been detected include composition of plant and microbial communities, long-term landscape-scale change in carbon stocks, stream discharge, mammalian population dynamics, and river access and subsistence opportunities for rural indigenous communities. Projections of continued warming suggest that Alaska’s boreal forest will undergo significant functional and structural changes within the next few decades that are unprecedented in the last 6000 years. The impact of these social–ecological changes will depend in part on the extent of landscape reorganization between uplands and lowlands and on policies regulating subsistence opportunities for rural communities.

  5. Russian boreal peatlands dominate the natural European methane budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Julia; Jungkunst, Hermann F.; Wolf, Ulrike; Schreiber, Peter; Gažovič, Michal; Miglovets, Mikhail; Mikhaylov, Oleg; Grunwald, Dennis; Erasmi, Stefan; Wilmking, Martin; Kutzbach, Lars

    2016-01-01

    About 60% of the European wetlands are located in the European part of Russia. Nevertheless, data on methane emissions from wetlands of that area are absent. Here we present results of methane emission measurements for two climatically different years from a boreal peatland complex in European Russia. Winter fluxes were well within the range of what has been reported for the peatlands of other boreal regions before, but summer fluxes greatly exceeded the average range of 5-80 mg CH4 m-2 d-1 for the circumpolar boreal zone. Half of the measured fluxes ranged between 150 and 450 mg CH4 m-2 d-1. Extrapolation of our data to the whole boreal zone of European Russia shows that theses emissions could amount to up to 2.7 ± 1.1 Tg CH4 a-1, corresponding to 69% of the annual emissions from European wetlands or 33% of the total annual natural European methane emission. In 2008, climatic conditions corresponded to the long term mean, whereas the summer of 2011 was warmer and noticeably drier. Counterintuitively, these conditions led to even higher CH4 emissions, with peaks up to two times higher than the values measured in 2008. As Russian peatlands dominate the areal extend of wetlands in Europe and are characterized by very high methane fluxes to the atmosphere, it is evident, that sound European methane budgeting will only be achieved with more insight into Russian peatlands.

  6. Krupneishi v mire muzei

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2006-01-01

    Egiptuses Aleksandrias avatakse vabaõhu antiikmuuseum. Muuseumi ekspositsioonideks on kultuuri- ja arhitektuurimälestised nagu taastatud rooma amfiteater, saunad, sfinkid, obeliskid. 2010. aastaks planeeritakse Giza püramiidide juurde ehitada maailma suurim muuseumikompleks

  7. Observing terrestrial ecosystems and the carbon cycle from space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schimel, David; Pavlick, Ryan; Fisher, Joshua B.; Asner, Gregory P.; Saatchi, Sassan; Townsend, Philip; Miller, Charles E.; Frankenberg, Christian; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Cox, Peter

    2015-02-06

    Modeled terrestrial ecosystem and carbon cycle feedbacks contribute substantial uncertainty to projections of future climate. The limitations of current observing networks contribute to this uncertainty. Here we present a current climatology of global model predictions and observations for photosynthesis, biomass, plant diversity and plant functional diversity. Carbon cycle tipping points occur in terrestrial regions where fluxes or stocks are largest, and where biological variability is highest, the tropics and Arctic/Boreal zones. Global observations are predominately in the mid-latitudes and are sparse in high and low latitude ecosystems. Observing and forecasting ecosystem change requires sustained observations of sufficient density in time and space in critical regions. Using data and theory available now, we can develop a strategy to detect and forecast terrestrial carbon cycle-climate interactions, by combining in situ and remote techniques.

  8. Correlations between the Heterogeneity of Permafrost Thaw Depth and Vegetation in Boreal Forests and Arctic Tundra in Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uy, K. L. Q.; Natali, S.; Kholodov, A. L.; Loranty, M. M.

    2015-12-01

    Global climate change induces rapid large scale changes in the far Northern regions of the globe, which include the thickening of the active layer of arctic and subarctic soils. Active layer depth, in turn, drives many changes to the hydrology and geochemistry of the soil, making an understanding of this layer essential to boreal forest and arctic tundra ecology. Because the structure of plant communities can affect the thermal attributes of the soil, they may drive variations in active layer depth. For instance, trees and tussocks create shade, which reduces temperatures, but also hold snow, which increases temperature through insulation; these aspects of vegetation can increase or decrease summer thaw. The goal of this project is to investigate correlations between the degree of heterogeneity of active layer depths, organic layer thickness, and aboveground vegetation to determine how these facets of Northern ecosystems interact at the ecosystem scale. Permafrost thaw and organic layer depths were measured along 20m transects in twenty-four boreal forest and tundra sites in Alaska. Aboveground vegetation along these transects was characterized by measuring tree diameter at breast height (DBH), tussock dimensions, and understory biomass. Using the coefficient of variation as a measure of heterogeneity, we found a positive correlation between thaw depth variability and tussock volume variability, but little correlation between the former and tree DBH variability. Soil organic layer depth variability was also positively correlated with thaw depth variability, but weakly correlated with tree and tussock heterogeneity. These data suggest that low vegetation and organic layer control the degree of variability in permafrost thaw at the ecosystem scale. Vegetation can thus affect the microtopography of permafrost and future changes in the plant community that affect vegetation heterogeneity will drive corresponding changes in the variability of the soil.

  9. Do Russian boreal peatlands dominate the natural European methane budget?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Julia; Jungkunst, Hermann F.; Kerstin Wolf, Ulrike; Schreiber, Peter; Gažovič, Michal; Miglovets, Mikhail; Mikhaylov, Oleg; Grunwald, Dennis; Erasmi, Stefan; Wilmking, Martin; Kutzbach, Lars

    2015-04-01

    Methane (CH4) emissions of boreal peatlands have previously been reported from Alaska, Canada, Scandinavia, and Western Siberia, but not from the European part of the Russian Federation, which is covered by vast areas of peatlands (8 % of the total surface area). To help to fill this research gap, CH4 emissions were measured during a period of one year from March 2008 to February 2009 in a boreal peatland (61°56'N, 50°13'E) in the Komi Republic, European Russia using the closed chamber technique. Additionally, soil water for analysis of dissolved CH4 and dissolved organic carbon was sampled once per month. Further closed chamber measurements were conducted during the summer 2011. While winter fluxes were well within the range of what has been reported for the peatlands of boreal regions before, the summer fluxes exceeded by far the average of 5-80 mg CH4 m-2d-1 for the boreal zone, as about the half of the measured fluxes ranged between 150 and 450 mg CH4 m-2d-1. There was no evidence that high or low CH4 surface fluxes coincided with high or low values of dissolved CH4 in the soil water. In statistical terms, the environmental conditions during the year 2008 were normal, the air temperature and the precipitation did not show strong deviations from the long term mean. Whereas the summer of 2011 was warmer and noticeable drier than the long term mean. These conditions led to even higher CH4 emissions, with peaks up to seven times higher than the values measured in 2008. These new data sets lead to the assumption that the Russian boreal peatlands play an even more important role in the European CH4 budget than previously thought and should be included into the newest inventories.

  10. Forest harvest contribution to Boreal freshwater methyl mercury load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronberg, Rose-Marie; Drott, Andreas; Jiskra, Martin; Wiederhold, Jan G.; Björn, Erik; Skyllberg, Ulf

    2016-06-01

    Effects of Boreal forest harvest on mercury (Hg) and methyl mercury (MeHg) soil pools and export by stream runoff were quantified by comparing 10 reference watersheds (REFs) covered by >80 year old Norway spruce (Picea abies Karst.) forests with 10 similar watersheds subjected to clear-cutting (CCs). While total Hg soil storage did not change, MeHg pools increased seven times (p = 0.006) in the organic topsoil 2 years after clear-cutting. In undulating terrain, situated above the postglacial marine limit (ML) of the ancient Baltic Sea, the mass ratio between flux-weighted MeHg and dissolved organic carbon (MeHg/DOC) in stream runoff increased 1.8 times (p forest harvest. When recalculated to 100% clear-cutting of the watershed, the annual MeHg stream export increased 3.8 times (p = 0.047). Below the ML, where the terrain was flatter, neither the MeHg/DOC ratio nor the annual export of MeHg differed between REFs and CCs, likely because of the larger contribution of MeHg exported from peaty soils and small wetlands. The most robust measure, MeHg/DOC, was used to calculate MeHg loadings to Boreal headwaters. If the forest harvest effect lasts 10 years, clear-cutting increases MeHg runoff by 12-20% in Sweden and 2% in the Boreal zone as a whole. In Sweden, having intensely managed forests, 37% and 56% of MeHg are exported from peatlands and forest soils, respectively, and forest clear-cutting is adding another 6.6%. In the Boreal zone as a whole peatlands and forests soils contribute with 53% and 46%, respectively, and clear-cutting is estimated to add another 1.0%. An expected rapid increase in Boreal forest harvest and disturbance urge for inclusion of land use effects in mercury biogeochemical cycling models at different scales.

  11. Carbon balance of an old hemi-boreal pine forest in Southern Estonia determined by different methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soosaar, Kaido; Repp, Kalev; Lõhmus, Krista; Uri, Veiko; Rannik, Kaire; Krasnova, Alisa; Ostonen, Ivika; Kukumägi, Mai; Maddison, Martin; Mander, Ülo

    2016-04-01

    The Soontaga Forest Station is located in hemi-boreal 200-years old pine forest (South Estonia; 58o01'N 26o04'E) with a second layer of spruce. The station has the instrumentation to assess the exchange of carbon dioxide (net ecosystem exchange, NEE), soil respiration, tree biomass (above and below ground biomass) and different environmental and meteorological parameters. In this study we quantified carbon balance by analyzing eddy-covariance CO2 flux data (carbon exchange) vs chamber-based measurements (ecosystem respiration) and CO2assimilation (soil and biomass). The annual NEE in this mature coniferous forest was -2.3 t C ha yr‑1, showing a clear diurnal and seasonal trend. During the daytime in summer the forest sequestered CO2, while during the night and late night CO2 emitted from the ecosystem to the atmosphere. Within the growing period, the sequestration of CO2 by plants was greater than soil respiration. Thus, the ecosystem sequestered carbon. Most of the carbon is bound in tree biomass (above and below ground biomass) but as well into soil, while the sequestration in soil increases with stand age. In addition, the biomass of understory, especially belowground litter, is playing essential part in carbon input. A modelling approach of long-term C budget in the Soontaga pine forest is presented.

  12. 松嫩平原西部盐沼的形成与演化%Study on the Formation and Changes of Saline-Alkaline Mire in Songnen Plain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李取生; 邓伟; 钱贞国

    2000-01-01

    摘要:本文运用环境变迁的理论和方法,较系统地分析了松嫩平原西部盐沼的形成与演变机制。本区沼泽形成的主要控制因素是古河道变迁、新构造运动、风力作用、古气候变化。沼泽残余盐碱化与晚更新世松辽大湖的消亡、河道变迁有关,现代盐碱化则主要是水利工程、植被破坏和气候变化引起的,而且呈迅速加剧的趋势。防治沼泽盐碱化的主要措施是实施水稻和芦苇开发、大规模建立蓄洪区和自然保护区。%The saline-sodic mires with areas of 578000 hrn2 in the western Songnen Plain are one kind of the importantland resources and the most prospective landscape. However, they faced to rapid development of salinisation and degrada-tion of ecological function. The study of the formation and changes processes is significant for saline- sodic mires manage-ment. In this paper the mechanism of saline- sodic mire formation and development was analyzed systematically using themethodology and theory of environmental change. The genesis of the mire here are: ①uneven subsidence of the crustmused by Neo- tectonic movement,② widespread distributed paleo- river channels and water- logged lands caused byfrequently river channel changes since Late Pleistocene, ③ wind erosion resulted in the eolian water-logged land mires,④ paleo-climate also caused the mire changes. The processes of mire salinisafion include historical relic salinisation and modem salinisation. The mechanism of his-torical relic salinisafion is the long term accumulation of salts because of the evaporation in the closed lake basins formedafter the disappearance of paleo- Songliao Big Lake, the logged lands formed by river channel changes and eolian erosion.In this area there was a lake as big as 50,000ki2 during early Pleistocene and middle Pleistocene. Since late Pleistocenethis lake disappeared and formed lot of small dosed shallow ponds or water- logged lands because of

  13. Singular and interactive effects of blowdown, salvage logging, and wildfire in sub-boreal pine systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amato, A.W.; Fraver, S.; Palik, B.J.; Bradford, J.B.; Patty, L.

    2011-01-01

    The role of disturbance in structuring vegetation is widely recognized; however, we are only beginning to understand the effects of multiple interacting disturbances on ecosystem recovery and development. Of particular interest is the impact of post-disturbance management interventions, particularly in light of the global controversy surrounding the effects of salvage logging on forest ecosystem recovery. Studies of salvage logging impacts have focused on the effects of post-disturbance salvage logging within the context of a single natural disturbance event. There have been no formal evaluations of how these effects may differ when followed in short sequence by a second, high severity natural disturbance. To evaluate the impact of this management practice within the context of multiple disturbances, we examined the structural and woody plant community responses of sub-boreal Pinus banksiana systems to a rapid sequence of disturbances. Specifically, we compared responses to Blowdown (B), Fire (F), Blowdown-Fire, and Blowdown-Salvage-Fire (BSF) and compared these to undisturbed control (C) stands. Comparisons between BF and BSF indicated that the primary effect of salvage logging was a decrease in the abundance of structural legacies, such as downed woody debris and snags. Both of these compound disturbance sequences (BF and BSF), resulted in similar woody plant communities, largely dominated by Populus tremuloides; however, there was greater homogeneity in community composition in salvage logged areas. Areas experiencing solely fire (F stands) were dominated by P. banksiana regeneration, and blowdown areas (B stands) were largely characterized by regeneration from shade tolerant conifer species. Our results suggest that salvage logging impacts on woody plant communities are diminished when followed by a second high severity disturbance; however, impacts on structural legacies persist. Provisions for the retention of snags, downed logs, and surviving trees as part

  14. Nonlinear response of canopy developmental rate to temperature in temperate and boreal forest in the Northern Hemisphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, H.; Ho, C. H.; Jeong, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the changes in vegetation annual cycle is crucial for improving our knowledge about various interactions between the terrestrial ecosystem and climate. However, our understanding about the vegetation seasonality is mostly confined to some phenological timings such as spring emergence and fall senescence. This study assessed large-scale variations in the vegetation green-up rate (VGrate), which indicates the rate of canopy development from winter dormancy to summer maturity, and its relationship over Northern Hemisphere temperate and boreal forests for 1982-2011. VGrate and local temperature changes show a positive correlation over the region of interest, and it indicates that a temperature increase during green-up period leads to faster canopy development. The responses of VGrate tend to be more sensitive to positive temperature anomalies than negative anomalies despite same magnitude of the temperature changes. These nonlinear responsiveness of VGrate to local temperature change is clearly observed in deciduous broadleaf forests over Eurasia compared to woodlands over North America. These results suggest that anomalous warming in green-up period would make canopy developments faster over wide temperate and boreal forest areas.

  15. Impact of forest harvesting on water quality and fluorescence characteristics of dissolved organic matter in Eastern Canadian Boreal Shield lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Glaz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Forestry activities in the Canadian Boreal region have increased in the last decades, raising concerns about their potential impact on aquatic ecosystems. Water quality and fluorescence characteristics of dissolved organic matter (DOM were measured over a three-year period in eight Eastern Boreal Shield lakes: four lakes were studied before, one and two years after forest harvesting (perturbed lakes and compared with four undisturbed reference lakes (unperturbed lakes sampled at the same time. ANOVAs showed a significant increase in total phosphorus (TP in perturbed lakes when the three sampling dates were considered and in DOC concentrations when considering one year before and one year after the perturbation only. At one year post-clear cutting DOC concentrations were about 15 % greater in the perturbed lakes at ~15 mg C L−1 compared to 12.5 mg C L−1 in the unperturbed lakes. In contrast, absorbance and fluorescence measurements showed that all metrics remained within narrow ranges compared to the range observed in natural waters, indicating that forest harvesting did not affect the nature of DOM characterised with spectroscopic techniques. Multivariate statistical analysis showed lakes to be significantly different one year after the perturbation. These results confirm an impact of forestry activities one year after the perturbation. However, this effect seems to be mitigated two years after, indicating that the system shows high resilience and may be able to return to its original condition.

  16. Spatially explicit fire-climate history of the boreal forest-tundra (Eastern Canada) over the last 2000 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payette, Serge; Filion, Louise; Delwaide, Ann

    2008-07-12

    Across the boreal forest, fire is the main disturbance factor and driver of ecosystem changes. In this study, we reconstructed a long-term, spatially explicit fire history of a forest-tundra region in northeastern Canada. We hypothesized that current occupation of similar topographic and edaphic sites by tundra and forest was the consequence of cumulative regression with time of forest cover due to compounding fire and climate disturbances. All fires were mapped and dated per 100 year intervals over the last 2,000 years using several fire dating techniques. Past fire occurrences and post-fire regeneration at the northern forest limit indicate 70% reduction of forest cover since 1800 yr BP and nearly complete cessation of forest regeneration since 900 yr BP. Regression of forest cover was particularly important between 1500s-1700s and possibly since 900 yr BP. Although fire frequency was very low over the last 100 years, each fire event was followed by drastic removal of spruce cover. Contrary to widespread belief of northward boreal forest expansion due to recent warming, lack of post-fire recovery during the last centuries, in comparison with active tree regeneration more than 1,000 years ago, indicates that the current climate does not favour such expansion.

  17. An 8000 Year History of Fire and Productivity in a Nutrient-Poor Boreal Landscape Reconstructed from Two Lakes in Central Labrador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umbanhowar, C. E., Jr.; Camill, P.; Voldal, E.; Gatlin, J.; Butka, E.

    2015-12-01

    Fire plays an important role in many boreal ecosystems, and fire severity depends on productivity and climate. The boreal forest region of eastern Canada is characterized by both poor soils and a cool, moist climate, suggesting that fire may be less common than in other regions. We collected sediment cores from Canoe (elev. 152 m) and Big Beer (elev. 411 m) lakes and analyzed cores for charcoal, carbon, d15C, biogenic silica, and magnetics. The sediment record for both lakes dated to ~9000 calibrated years BP, and sediment accumulation rates were low for both lakes (40 and 95 yrs cm-1). Biogenic silica and carbon data indicate nearly simultaneous increases in lake and terrestrial productivity from ~8000-7000 BP. As indicated by charcoal, fire was present in the landscape as early as 8500 BP. Fire was more common at the lower elevation Canoe site and largely absent from the higher elevation Big Beer site. Average charcoal accumulation rates at both sites (< 0.01 mm2 cm-2 yr-1) were < 50% of those previously reported for boreal forest sites in more western Canada. Our results support a reduced role for fire in this landscape although it is yet unclear whether poor soils or climate are more directly causal.

  18. Discrimination of rewetted / renaturated habitats from natural moist habitat in a mire by means of DOM quality differences using fluorescence indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzsprung, Peter; Osterloh, Katja; von Tümpling, Wolf; Harir, Mourad; Hertkorn, Norbert; Meissner, Ralf; Friese, Kurt; Bernsdorf, Sabine; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    Discrimination of rewetted / renaturated habitats from natural moist habitat in a mire by means of DOM quality differences using fluorescence indices Mires can be a potential source of dissolved organic matter load (DOC) in fresh water catchment areas. Renaturation and rewetting of formerly drained mire sites is often debated in terms of nature protection aspects as well as in terms of climatic and adjacent water protection. Latter aspect is closely connected with the drinking water supply and thus of major human interest. In this case the Central German uplands play an important role. For estimation of potential leaching of humic substances the principal comparison of natural habitat with artificially rewetted habitats concerning dissolved organic matter quality can be of interest. In this regard a partly rewetted mire in the Harz Mountains, Germany was investigated. Seven locations, one oligotrophic natural, one mesotrophic natural, and together 5 rewetted locations were investigated. The soil water of all sites was sampled monthly and its quality was analysed by bulk parameters like DOC and bulk optical parameters like excitation emission matrix fluorescence (EEM) and UV spectra. Water was pumped from piezometers and immediately filtered. Each site consisted of four parallel piezometers in the peat soil. Samples were stored at 4° C before analysis. All spectroscopic data, both UV spectra and EEM were recorded simultaneously. Fluorescence EEMs were collected using a spectrofluorometer (AQUALOG, HORIBA Jobin Yvon, USA). Fluorescence intensity was measured during emission scans (240 nm - 600 nm every 3.27 nm, 8 pixel) at set excitation wavelength in 3 nm increments from 240 nm to 600 nm. The fluorescence indices freshness (ß/α), Fluorescence Index (FI), and Humification Index (HIX) were calculated [1] from the inner filter effect (IFE) corrected EEM spectra. The natural habitat could be clearly discriminated from the rewetted sites. The DOC, UV absorption at 254

  19. Thermokarst rates intensify due to climate change and forest fragmentation in an Alaskan boreal forest lowland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, M.; Genet, Helene; McGuire, Anthony; Euskirchen, Eugénie S.; Zhang, Yujin; Brown, Dana R. N.; Jorgenson, M.T.; Romanovsky, V.; Breen, Amy L.; Bolton, W.R.

    2016-01-01

    Lowland boreal forest ecosystems in Alaska are dominated by wetlands comprised of a complex mosaic of fens, collapse-scar bogs, low shrub/scrub, and forests growing on elevated ice-rich permafrost soils. Thermokarst has affected the lowlands of the Tanana Flats in central Alaska for centuries, as thawing permafrost collapses forests that transition to wetlands. Located within the discontinuous permafrost zone, this region has significantly warmed over the past half-century, and much of these carbon-rich permafrost soils are now within ~0.5 °C of thawing. Increased permafrost thaw in lowland boreal forests in response to warming may have consequences for the climate system. This study evaluates the trajectories and potential drivers of 60 years of forest change in a landscape subjected to permafrost thaw in unburned dominant forest types (paper birch and black spruce) associated with location on elevated permafrost plateau and across multiple time periods (1949, 1978, 1986, 1998, and 2009) using historical and contemporary aerial and satellite images for change detection. We developed (i) a deterministic statistical model to evaluate the potential climatic controls on forest change using gradient boosting and regression tree analysis, and (ii) a 30 × 30 m land cover map of the Tanana Flats to estimate the potential landscape-level losses of forest area due to thermokarst from 1949 to 2009. Over the 60-year period, we observed a nonlinear loss of birch forests and a relatively continuous gain of spruce forest associated with thermokarst and forest succession, while gradient boosting/regression tree models identify precipitation and forest fragmentation as the primary factors controlling birch and spruce forest change, respectively. Between 1950 and 2009, landscape-level analysis estimates a transition of ~15 km² or ~7% of birch forests to wetlands, where the greatest change followed warm periods. This work highlights that the vulnerability and resilience of

  20. The impact of boreal deciduous and evergreen forests on atmospheric CO2 seasonality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welp, L.; Graven, H. D.; Keeling, R. F.; Bi, J.

    2015-12-01

    The seasonal cycle of atmospheric CO2 is largely controlled by the terrestrial biosphere. It is well known that the seasonal amplitude of net ecosystem productivity (NEP) is the largest in the far north, where forest productivity is compressed into a short growing season. Since 1960, the seasonal amplitude of atmospheric CO2 north of 45N has increased by 35-55%. The increase in the seasonal amplitude is a difficult benchmark for coupled climate-carbon models to replicate. In fact, the models vary widely in their mean seasonal cycle representation. The boreal region has a strong influence on CO2 seasonality at Barrow. Deciduous and evergreen plant functional types (PFTs) have different patterns of NEP. We identified four pairs of nearby deciduous and evergreen forest PFTs with eddy covariance measurements. Evergreen forests show an early peak in NEP in May-June, while deciduous forests have a larger peak in NEP later in June-July. The influence of each PFT on the seasonal cycle at Barrow was computed from atmospheric transport results. We normalized the amplitude influence by the growing season NEP of the tower-based PFT flux and found that deciduous forests have 1.4 to 1.8 times more influence (per unit of growing season NEP) at Barrow than evergreen PFT. This diagnosis depends on the timing of the sharp seasonal draw-down at Barrow, which occurs too late to be explained by evergreen forests. The cycle at Barrow therefore appears to be strongly influenced by deciduous PFT, despite the dominance of evergreen PFTs in boreal forests. This paradoxical conclusion is also reached when examining the seasonality of land surface fluxes calculated using atmospheric inverse methods. We examine how these different PFTs, and possible trends in relative abundance, affect the seasonality of atmosphere CO2 using FluxNet data and atmospheric transport modelling. Our results highlight the importance of parameterizing multiple PFTs or individual species within grid cells in models in

  1. Coupling of soil prokaryotic diversity and plant diversity across latitudinal forest ecosystems

    OpenAIRE

    Jun-Tao Wang; Yuan-Ming Zheng; Hang-Wei Hu; Jing Li; Li-Mei Zhang; Bao-Dong Chen; Wei-Ping Chen; Ji-Zheng He

    2016-01-01

    The belowground soil prokaryotic community plays a cardinal role in sustaining the stability and functions of forest ecosystems. Yet, the nature of how soil prokaryotic diversity co-varies with aboveground plant diversity along a latitudinal gradient remains elusive. By establishing three hundred 400-m2 quadrats from tropical rainforest to boreal forest in a large-scale parallel study on both belowground soil prokaryote and aboveground tree and herb communities, we found that soil prokaryotic...

  2. Land cover mapping, fire regeneration, and scaling studies in the Canadian boreal forest with 1 km AVHRR and Landsat TM data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steyaert, L.T.; Hall, F.G.; Loveland, T.R.

    1997-01-01

    A multitemporal 1 km advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) land cover analysis approach was used as the basis for regional land cover mapping, fire disturbance-regeneration, and multiresolution land cover scaling studies in the boreal forest ecosystem of central Canada. The land cover classification was developed by using regional field observations from ground and low-level aircraft transits to analyze spectral-temporal clusters that were derived from an unsupervised cluster analysis of monthly normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) image composites (April-September 1992). Quantitative areal proportions of the major boreal forest components were determined for a 821 km ?? 619 km region, ranging from the southern grasslands-boreal forest ecotone to the northern boreal transitional forest. The boreal wetlands (mostly lowland black spruce, tamarack, mosses, fens, and bogs) occupied approximately 33% of the region, while lakes accounted for another 13%. Upland mixed coniferous-deciduous forests represented 23% of the ecosystem. A SW-NE productivity gradient across the region is manifested by three levels of tree stand density for both the boreal wetland conifer and the mixed forest classes, which are generally aligned with isopleths of regional growing degree days. Approximately 30% of the region was directly affected by fire disturbance within the preceding 30-35 years, especially in the Canadian Shield Zone where large fire-regeneration patterns contribute to the heterogeneous boreal landscape. Intercomparisons with land cover classifications derived from 30-m Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) data provided important insights into the relative accuracy of the 1 km AVHRR land cover classification. Primarily due to the multitemporal NDVI image compositing process, the 1 km AVHRR land cover classes have an effective spatial resolution in the 3-4 km range; therefore fens, bogs, small water bodies, and small patches of dry jack pine cannot be resolved within

  3. Remote Sensing of Forest Cover in Boreal Zones of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedykh, V. N.

    2011-12-01

    Ecological tension resulting from human activities generates a need for joint efforts of countries in the boreal zone aimed at sustainable forest development, including: conservation of forests binding carbon and ensuring stability of the atmosphere gas composition; preservation of purity and water content of forest areas as conditions ensuring sustainability of the historically formed structure of forest landscapes; and preservation of all flora and fauna species composition diversity as a condition for sustainable existence and functioning of forest ecosystems. We have to address these problems urgently due to climate warming which can interact with the forest cover. In particular, in the forest zone of Siberia, the climate aridization will inevitably result in periodic drying of shallow bogs and upland forests with thick forest litter. This will bring fires of unprecedented intensity which will lead to catastrophic atmospheric pollution. In this connection, the above problems can be solved only by the united efforts of boreal-zone countries, through establishing a uniform system for remote sensing of forests aimed at obtaining and periodic update of comprehensive information for rational decision-making in prevention of adverse human effect on the forest. A need to join efforts in this field of natural resource management is determined by disparate data which were created expressly for economic accounting units used mainly for the solution of economic timber resource problems. However, ecological tasks outlined above can be solved appropriately only by using uniform technologies that are registered within natural territorial complexes (landscapes) established throughout the entire boreal zone. Knowledge of forest state within natural territorial entities having specific physiographic conditions, with account for current and future anthropogenic load, allow one to define evidence-based forest growth potential at these landscapes to ensure development of

  4. Bioaccumulation of microcystins in invasive bivalves: A case study from the boreal lagoon ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aistė Paldavičienė

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the current study we present the first report on the bioaccumulation of microcystins (MC in zebra mussel Dreissena polymorpha from the eutrophic brackish water Curonian Lagoon. The bioaccumulation capacity was related to age structure of mussels and ambient environmental conditions. We also discuss the relevant implications of these findings for biomonitoring of toxic cyanobacteria blooms in the Curonian Lagoon and potential consequences for D. polymorpha cultivation activities considered for the futures as remediation measure. Samples for the analysis were collected twice per year, in June and September, in 2006, 2007 and 2008, from two sites within the littoral zone of the lagoon. The highest microcystin concentrations were measured in mussels larger than 30 mm length and sampled in 2006 (when a severe toxic cyanobacteria bloom occurred. In the following years, a consistent reduction in bioaccumulated MC concentration was noticed. However, certain amount of microcystin was recorded in mussel tissues in 2007 and 2008, when no cyanotoxins were reported in the phytoplankton. Considering high depuration rates and presence of cyanotoxins in the bottom sediments well after the recorded toxic blooms, we assume mechanism of secondary contamination when microcystin residuals could be uptaken by mussels with resuspended sediment particles.

  5. Thorium and uranium in soil fractions and certain macromycete species in boreal forest ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Vinichuk

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The content of thorium (Th and uranium (U in fractions of soil edaphosphere, rhizosphere, rhizoplane, fungal mycelium and fruit bodies were investigated. The concentrations of thorium in edaphosphere and rhizosphere fractions and mycelia of fungi are not different significantly and vary in the range of 0.74–1.45 mg kg–1 dry matter. The concentration of thorium in the rhizoplane fraction is 4 times lower than in the bulk soil – edaphosphere. The concentrations of uranium in edaphosphere, rhizosphere and rhizoplane fractions and fungi mycelium are not significantly different and vary between 3.11 and 9.36 mg kg–1 dry matter. The content of the studied natural isotopes in fruit bodies of fungi is 270 times lower than in the bulk soil: biological absorption coefficients of uranium and thorium in fruit bodies are on average 0.035 and 0.006, respectively. The contents of thorium and uranium in fungal mycelium and fruit bodies increase with increasing their concentrations in the soil. It is shown that in the fungi mycelium of the upper (0–5 cm layer of forest soil can be allocated 2.0–5.0 and 1.4–2.7 % of the total thorium and uranium soil content, respectively.

  6. Distribution and retention of cesium and strontium in Swedish boreal forest ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The retention and distribution of cesium, and to some extent strontium, in forest environments are being studied at three sites in Sweden. The main part of the cesium found in the soil was recovered in horizons rich in organic matter. The cesium was retained in the soil organic matter in a more or less extractable form. As different soil types have a different distribution pattern of organic matter, the distribution of cesium will depend on the forest soil type. The clay content in Swedish forest soils is, in general, low which will mitigate the retention of cesium in the soil mineral horizons. The cesium and strontium present in the trees was considered to be an effect of assimilation by the tissues in the canopy as well as by the roots. The redistribution of cesium within the trees was extensive which was considered to be the effect of a high mobility of cesium in the trees. The recovery of strontium-90 in pines, in relation to the deposition rate was higher compared to the relative recovery of cesium-137, 30 years after deposition. The cesium and strontium will remain in the forest environment for a considerable time but can be reduced by forest practice, by leaching out of the soil profile or by radioactive decay

  7. Thorium and uranium in soil fractions and certain macromycete species in boreal forest ecosystems

    OpenAIRE

    M. M. Vinichuk

    2012-01-01

    The content of thorium (Th) and uranium (U) in fractions of soil edaphosphere, rhizosphere, rhizoplane, fungal mycelium and fruit bodies were investigated. The concentrations of thorium in edaphosphere and rhizosphere fractions and mycelia of fungi are not different significantly and vary in the range of 0.74–1.45 mg kg–1 dry matter. The concentration of thorium in the rhizoplane fraction is 4 times lower than in the bulk soil – edaphosphere. The concentrations of uranium in edaphosphere, rhi...

  8. Ecosystem warming does not affect photosynthesis or aboveground autotrophic respiration for boreal black spruce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronson, Dustin R; Gower, Stith T

    2010-04-01

    We measured light-saturated photosynthesis (A(net)), foliage respiration (R(fol)) and stem respiration (R(stem)) of black spruce (Picea mariana (Mill.) B.S.P.) in heated (+5 degrees C) and control plots during 2005, 2006 and 2007 in Thompson, MB, Canada. Large greenhouses and soil-heating cables were used to maintain air and soil temperature 5 degrees C above ambient air and soil temperature. Each greenhouse contained approximately nine black spruce trees and the majority of their fine root mass. Treatments were soil and air warming, soil-only warming, greenhouses maintained at ambient air temperature and control. Gas exchange rates ranged 0.71-4.66, 0.04-0.74 and 0.1-1.0 micromol m(-)(2) s(-)(1) for A(net), R(fol) and R(stem), respectively. Treatment differences for A(net), R(fol) and R(stem) were not significant in any of the 3 years of measurements. The results of this experiment suggest that in a warmer climate, black spruce may not have significant changes in the rate of photosynthesis or respiration. PMID:20144925

  9. Net Ecosystem Carbon Flux

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Net Ecosystem Carbon Flux is defined as the year-over-year change in Total Ecosystem Carbon Stock, or the net rate of carbon exchange between an ecosystem and the...

  10. Microbial Ecosystems, Protection of

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodelier, P.L.E.; Nelson, K.E.

    2014-01-01

    Synonyms Conservation of microbial diversity and ecosystem functions provided by microbes; Preservation of microbial diversity and ecosystem functions provided by microbes Definition The use, management, and conservation of ecosystems in order to preserve microbial diversity and functioning. Introdu

  11. Astronomical Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuenschwander, D. E.; Finkenbinder, L. R.

    2004-05-01

    Just as quetzals and jaguars require specific ecological habitats to survive, so too must planets occupy a tightly constrained astronomical habitat to support life as we know it. With this theme in mind we relate the transferable features of our elementary astronomy course, "The Astronomical Basis of Life on Earth." Over the last five years, in a team-taught course that features a spring break field trip to Costa Rica, we have introduced astronomy through "astronomical ecosystems," emphasizing astronomical constraints on the prospects for life on Earth. Life requires energy, chemical elements, and long timescales, and we emphasize how cosmological, astrophysical, and geological realities, through stabilities and catastrophes, create and eliminate niches for biological life. The linkage between astronomy and biology gets immediate and personal: for example, studies in solar energy production are followed by hikes in the forest to examine the light-gathering strategies of photosynthetic organisms; a lesson on tides is conducted while standing up to our necks in one on a Pacific beach. Further linkages between astronomy and the human timescale concerns of biological diversity, cultural diversity, and environmental sustainability are natural and direct. Our experience of teaching "astronomy as habitat" strongly influences our "Astronomy 101" course in Oklahoma as well. This "inverted astrobiology" seems to transform our student's outlook, from the universe being something "out there" into something "we're in!" We thank the SNU Science Alumni support group "The Catalysts," and the SNU Quetzal Education and Research Center, San Gerardo de Dota, Costa Rica, for their support.

  12. Diatoms in peat – dominant producers in a changing environment?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kokfelt, Ulla; Struyf, Eric; Randsalu, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Changes in hydrology and temperature can induce rapid changes in boreal wetland ecosystems. Factors such as hydrosere, permafrost, climate and human interference may disturb the prevailing mire vegetation, whereby a new dominant assemblage can develop. At the transition from one vegetation type...... content. Biogenic silica and other nutrients that would otherwise be lost during mineralization in runoff are in this way retained in the ecosystem. Our results imply that silica storage originating from diatoms can be expected to increase in today's rapidly changing boreal wetlands. The impacts...

  13. Frost-ring chronologies as dendroclimatic proxies of boreal environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payette, Serge; Delwaide, Ann; Simard, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Frost rings are formed in tree stems when growing-season frosts affect immature wood cells, producing collapsed cells within annual tree rings. Open boreal forests are most susceptible to record growing-season frost because they lack the greenhouse effect commonly observed in closed forests. Here we present a novel method to construct regional frost-ring chronologies in lichen-black spruce woodlands of the boreal forest zone. Because the ability of trees to form frost rings depends on several factors (including bark thickness and ring width), we used two models to produce a Frost Composite Index based on a frost susceptibility window of cambial age growing-season frost activity may be used as dendroclimatic proxies of climate variability and may give insights into future risks of frost damage in a warming climate.

  14. Forest landscape change in boreal Sweden 1850-2000

    OpenAIRE

    Axelsson, Anna-Lena

    2001-01-01

    In the project described in this thesis, structural changes that have occurred in the boreal Swedish forest during the last 150 years were studied through analysis of historical records. Historical perspectives on forest landscapes provide a better understanding of natural disturbance dynamics as well as anthropogenic changes and a frame of reference for assessing current ecological patterns and processes. The studies were performed at various spatial scales, and were conducted in two differe...

  15. Recreation and tourism induced changes in northern boreal environments

    OpenAIRE

    Kangas, K. (Katja)

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The popularity of nature-based tourism has increased worldwide and peripheral areas with conservational value, like protected areas, are attractive destinations. The recreational use and construction of tourism facilities can cause environmental degradation and decrease the conservational and recreational value of areas if not well planned and managed. The aim of this thesis was to improve our knowledge of recreation and tourism induced changes in northern boreal environments. Dir...

  16. Photosynthesis of ground vegetation in boreal Scots pine forests

    OpenAIRE

    Kulmala, Liisa

    2011-01-01

    Research on carbon uptake in boreal forests has mainly focused on mature trees, even though ground vegetation species are effective assimilators and can substantially contribute to the CO2 uptake of forests. Here, I examine the photosynthesis of the most common species of ground vegetation in a series of differently aged Scots pine stands, and at two clear-cut sites with substantial differences in fertility. In general, the biomass of evergreen species was highest at poor sites and below cano...

  17. Boreal forest albedo and its spatial and temporal variation

    OpenAIRE

    Kuusinen, Nea

    2014-01-01

    Surface albedo refers to the fraction of solar irradiance that is reflected by a surface. Accurate characterisation of the albedo of various land cover types is required for evaluating the energy exchange between the Earth s surface and the atmosphere. The optical and structural properties of a surface determine its albedo. Boreal forest albedo can vary due to factors such as tree species composition, forest structure, understorey vegetation composition, and seasonal changes in vegetation and...

  18. The fate of airborne lead pollution in boreal forest soils

    OpenAIRE

    Klaminder, Jonatan

    2005-01-01

    Lead has a more than three-millennia-long pollution history in Europe. Metal production, burning of coal and use of leaded petrol resulted in a significant pollution of the atmosphere. As a consequence of atmospheric fallout, the Swedish boreal forest is strongly contaminated by airborne lead pollution. High levels of lead in the soil and soil pore water are of concern because the soil fauna, plants and aquatic biota may respond negatively to this toxic element. The fate of the accumulated po...

  19. Using Support Vector Machines to Automatically Extract Open Water Signatures from POLDER Multi-Angle Data Over Boreal Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, J.; Diaz-Barrios, M.; Pinzon, J.; Ustin, S. L.; Shih, P.; Tournois, S.; Zarco-Tejada, P. J.; Vanderbilt, V. C.; Perry, G. L.; Brass, James A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This study used Support Vector Machines to classify multiangle POLDER data. Boreal wetland ecosystems cover an estimated 90 x 10(exp 6) ha, about 36% of global wetlands, and are a major source of trace gases emissions to the atmosphere. Four to 20 percent of the global emission of methane to the atmosphere comes from wetlands north of 4 degrees N latitude. Large uncertainties in emissions exist because of large spatial and temporal variation in the production and consumption of methane. Accurate knowledge of the areal extent of open water and inundated vegetation is critical to estimating magnitudes of trace gas emissions. Improvements in land cover mapping have been sought using physical-modeling approaches, neural networks, and active microwave, examples that demonstrate the difficulties of separating open water, inundated vegetation and dry upland vegetation. Here we examine the feasibility of using a support vector machine to classify POLDER data representing open water, inundated vegetation and dry upland vegetation.

  20. Mountain pine beetle host-range expansion threatens the boreal forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullingham, Catherine I; Cooke, Janice E K; Dang, Sophie; Davis, Corey S; Cooke, Barry J; Coltman, David W

    2011-05-01

    The current epidemic of the mountain pine beetle (MPB), an indigenous pest of western North American pine, has resulted in significant losses of lodgepole pine. The leading edge has reached Alberta where forest composition shifts from lodgepole to jack pine through a hybrid zone. The susceptibility of jack pine to MPB is a major concern, but there has been no evidence of host-range expansion, in part due to the difficulty in distinguishing the parentals and their hybrids. We tested the utility of a panel of microsatellite loci optimized for both species to classify lodgepole pine, jack pine and their hybrids using simulated data. We were able to accurately classify simulated individuals, and hence applied these markers to identify the ancestry of attacked trees. Here we show for the first time successful MPB attack in natural jack pine stands at the leading edge of the epidemic. This once unsuitable habitat is now a novel environment for MPB to exploit, a potential risk which could be exacerbated by further climate change. The consequences of host-range expansion for the vast boreal ecosystem could be significant. PMID:21457381

  1. Modeling atmospheric CO2 concentration profiles and fluxes above sloping terrain at a boreal site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Aalto

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available CO2 fluxes and concentrations were simulated in the planetary boundary layer above subarctic hilly terrain using a three dimensional model. The model solves the transport equations in the local scale and includes a vegetation sub-model. A WMO/GAW background concentration measurement site and an ecosystem flux measurement site are located inside the modeled region at a hilltop and above a mixed boreal forest, respectively. According to model results, the concentration measurement at the hill site was representative for continental background. However, this was not the case for the whole model domain. Concentration at few meters above active vegetation represented mainly local variation. Local variation became inseparable from the regional signal at about 60-100 m above ground. Flow over hills changed profiles of environmental variables and height of inversion layer, however CO2 profiles were more affected by upwind land use than topography. The hill site was above boundary layer during night and inside boundary layer during daytime. The CO2 input from model lateral boundaries dominated in both cases. Daily variation in the CO2 assimilation rate was clearly seen in the CO2 profiles. Concentration difference between the hill site and the forest site was about 5ppm during afternoon according to both model and measurements. The average modeled flux to the whole model region was about 40% of measured and modeled local flux at the forest site.

  2. Nitrous oxide uptake rates in boreal coniferous forests are associated with soil characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siljanen, Henri; Biasi, Christina; Martikainen, Pertti

    2014-05-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a strong greenhouse gas and a significant contributor to the destruction of the ozone layer. The radiative forcing of N2O is considered to be 320 more efficient than carbon dioxide.The major portion of global N2O is emitted from agricultural soils. There are studies suggesting that N2O has also a sink in forest soils. However there is relatively limited knowledge on factors controlling N2O consumption in forest soils. Hence N2O consumption was studied in boreal coniferous forests having different forest cover, soil chemical and physical structure and land-use history. The N2O consumption was measured by static chamber technique in the field across spatio-seasonal sampling design. Typical and atypical denitrifiers were quantified with nosZ functional gene marker. Additionally chemical and physical environmental parameters were analyzed to link N2O flux, microbial community and composition of soils. Nitrous oxide uptake could be associated with specific ecosystem and environmental conditions. Soil physical structure and land-use history were shown to be prior factors determining the strength of the uptake rate.

  3. A large herbivore triggers alternative successional trajectories in the boreal forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidding, Bert; Tremblay, Jean-Pierre; Côté, Steeve D

    2013-12-01

    Alternative successional trajectories (AST) may result in multiple climax states within an ecosystem when disturbances affect colonization history. In the boreal forest, ungulates have been proposed to drive AST because, under herbivore pressure, preferred species may go extinct and apparent competition may benefit browsing-resistant species. Over a 15-year period following logging, we tested whether deer herbivory altered plant species composition and whether the competitive advantage of resistant species was maintained following herbivore removal. We compared exclosures built immediately after logging with delayed exclosures built eight years later on Anticosti Island, Quebec, Canada. Although the palatable tree Betula papyrifera (paper birch) and some palatable herbs recovered in delayed exclosures, we observed legacies in both tree and herb cover. Woody regeneration in delayed exclosures was dominated by Picea glauca (white spruce), and Poaceae (grasses) were abundant in the field layer. Given that only early-successional species recovered, whereas late-successional broadleaf species and Abies balsamea (balsam fir) remained rare, succession may follow an AST after a limited browsing period during early succession. PMID:24597230

  4. Flow regulation effects on the hydrogeochemistry of the hyporheic zone in boreal rivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siergieiev, D; Widerlund, A; Ingri, J; Lundberg, A; Öhlander, B

    2014-11-15

    River-aquifer interfaces are essential for ecosystem functioning in terms of nutrient exchange and biological habitat, but are greatly threatened world-wide. This study examined geochemical aspects of river-aquifer interaction in one regulated and one unregulated boreal river in Northern Sweden to determine whether the geochemical functioning of the hyporheic zone is affected by hydrological alterations, e.g. regulated river discharge and river-aquifer connectivity. In the unregulated Kalix River, the hyporheic pore water was well-oxygenated with orthogonal fluxes (≈0.6-0.7 m d(-1)) and acted as a sink for Fe, Mn, Al, NH4, and Ca, with fractional losses of 95%, 92%, 45%, 31%, and 15%, respectively. A corresponding elevation in the concentrations of these elements in the hyporheic sediment was observed, with higher saturation indices of Fe-, Mn-, and Al-bearing secondary minerals in hyporheic waters. In the regulated Lule River, hydraulic connectivity at the river-aquifer interface was altered by the presence of a clogging layer (0.04 m d(-1)). In addition, the river discharge oscillated daily, severely reducing exchange flows across the riverbed (<0.01 m d(-1)). As a result, the hyporheic pore water was suboxic, with elevated concentrations of filtered Fe and Mn (fractional increases of ≈3700% and ≈2500%, respectively) and other solutes (NH4, Si, S, Ca). A conceptual model revealed functional differences between geochemical features of the hyporheic zone of regulated and unregulated rivers. Overall, the results showed that hyporheic processes are altered along regulated rivers, with resulting impacts on the geochemistry of riverine, riparian and related marine ecosystems. PMID:25022722

  5. Towards ecosystem accounting

    OpenAIRE

    C. Duku; H. Rathjens; Zwart, S.J.; Hein, L

    2015-01-01

    Ecosystem accounting is an emerging field that aims to provide a consistent approach to analysing environment-economy interactions. One of the specific features of ecosystem accounting is the distinction between the capacity and the flow of ecosystem services. Ecohydrological modelling to support ecosystem accounting requires considering among others physical and mathematical representation of ecohydrological processes, spatial heterogeneity of the ecosystem, temporal resolution, and required...

  6. Influence of Time since Fire and Micro-Habitat Availability on Terricolous Lichen Communities in Black Spruce (Picea mariana Boreal Forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saliha Zouaoui

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Terricolous lichens are an important component of boreal forest ecosystems, both in terms of function and diversity. In this study, we examined the relative contribution of microhabitat characteristics and time elapsed since the last fire in shaping terricolous lichen assemblages in boreal forests that are frequently affected by severe stand-replacing fires. We sampled 12 stands distributed across five age classes (from 43 to >200 years. In each stand, species cover (% of all terricolous lichen species and species richness were evaluated within 30 microplots of 1 m2. Our results show that time elapsed since the last fire was the factor that contributed the most to explaining terricolous lichen abundance and species composition, and that lichen cover showed a quadratic relationship with stand age. Habitat variables such as soil characteristics were also important in explaining lichen richness. These results suggest that the presence of suitable substrates is not sufficient for the conservation of late-successional terricolous lichen communities in this ecosystem, and that they also need relatively long periods of times for species dispersal and establishment.

  7. Determination of elemental baseline using peltigeralean lichens from Northeastern Canada (Québec): Initial data collection for long term monitoring of the impact of global climate change on boreal and subarctic area in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darnajoux, Romain; Lutzoni, François; Miadlikowska, Jolanta; Bellenger, Jean-Philippe

    2015-11-15

    Northeastern Canada is mostly free of anthropogenic activities. The extent to which this territory has been impacted by anthropogenic atmospheric depositions remains to be studied. The main goal of our study was to establish background levels for metals in boreal muscicolous/terricolous macrolichens over non-urbanized areas of northeastern Canada (Québec). Concentrations of 18 elements (Na, Mg, Al, P, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Mo, Cd, and Pb) were determined for three species of the genus Peltigera (Peltigera aphthosa (L.) Willd. s.l., Peltigera neopolydactyla (Gyeln.) Gyeln. s.l., Peltigera scabrosa Th. Fr. s.l.), and Nephroma arcticum (L.) Torss., along a 1080 km south-north transect and along a of 730 km west-east transect. We report that elemental contents in the sampled lichen thalli are very low and similar to background levels found in other studies performed in pristine places (high elevation or remote ecosystems) throughout the world. Overall, our results demonstrate that most of the boreal and subarctic zone of Québec (northeastern Canada) is still pristine. The elemental baseline established in these lichen populations will contribute to monitor metal pollution in boreal and sub-polar ecosystems due to global climate change and future industrial expansion.

  8. The influence of storm-induced microsites to tree regeneration patterns in boreal and hemiboreal forest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vodde, F.; Jogiste, K.; Kubota, Y.; Kuuluvainen, T.; Koster, K.; Lukjanova, A.; Metslaid, M.; Yoshida, T.

    2011-01-01

    We reviewed studies dealing with regeneration under variable conditions in boreal and hemiboreal forests as affected by different microsite types by tree species functional groups. Generally, the importance of storm-induced microsites for regeneration dynamics in boreal forests depends on several fa

  9. Climatic factors and reindeer grazing -- the effects on soil carbon dynamics in subarctic boreal pine forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köster, Kajar; Köster, Egle; Berninger, Frank; Pumpanen, Jukka

    2016-04-01

    Reindeer (Rangifer tarandus L.) are the most important large mammalian herbivores in the northern ecosystems, affecting plant diversity, soil nutrient cycling and soil organic matter decomposition. Changes caused by reindeer in vegetation have indirect effects on physical features of the soil e.g. soil microclimate, root biomass and also on soil carbon dynamics. In a field experiment in Finnish Lapland, Värriö Strict Nature Reserve (67° 46' N, 29° 35' E) we investigated how the reindeer grazing in subarctic boreal forest combined with climate (air temperature and precipitation) affects soil temperature, soil water content, and ultimately the CO2 efflux from forest soils. The study was carried out in the growing seasons of the years 2013 and 2014, where 2013 was an extremely dry year (specially the summer), and the year 2014 was a "normal" year in means of precipitations. Our study areas are located in the northern boreal subarctic coniferous forest at the zone of the last intact forest landscapes in Fennoscandia, where large areas of relatively undisturbed subarctic Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) forests can still be found. We established the experiment as a split plot experiment with 2 blocks and 5 sub-plots per treatment that were divided into grazed and non-grazed parts, separated with a fence. The sample plots are located along the borderline between Finland and Russia, where the ungrazed area was excluded from reindeer already in 1918, to prevent the Finnish reindeer from going to the Russian side and there are not many reindeer on Russian side of the area. Our study showed that in subarctic mature pine forests, soil temperatures were higher, and soil water content was fluctuating more on grazed areas compared to non-grazed areas in both years. In both years, the soil water content on the grazed area was highest in June. The situation changed somewhere in the second half of July when the moisture content in the non-grazed area was higher. We found

  10. The oxidation capacity of the boreal forest: first simulated reactivities of O3 and NO3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Mogensen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Using the 1D atmospheric chemistry–transport model SOSAA, we have investigated the atmospheric reactivity of a boreal forest ecosystem during the HUMPPA-COPEC-10 campaign (summer 2010, at SMEAR II in Southern Finland. For the very first time, we present vertically resolved model simulations of the NO3- and O3-reactivity (R together with the modelled and measured reactivity of OH. We find that OH is the most reactive oxidant (R~3 s−1 followed by NO3 (R~0.07 s−1 and O3 (R~2 × 10−5 s−1. The missing OH-reactivity was found to be large in accordance with measurements (~65% as would be expected from the chemical subset described in the model. The accounted OH radical sinks were inorganic compounds (~41%, mainly due to reaction with CO, emitted monoterpenes (~14% and oxidised biogenic volatile organic compounds (~44%. The missing reactivity is expected to be due to unknown biogenic volatile organic compounds and their photoproducts, indicating that the true main sink of OH is not expected to be inorganic compounds. The NO3 radical was found to react mainly with primary emitted monoterpenes (~60% and inorganic compounds (~37%, including NO2. NO2 is, however, only a temporary sink of NO3 under the conditions of the campaign and does not affect the NO3 concentration. We discuss the difference between instantaneous and steady state reactivity and present the first boreal forest steady state lifetime of NO3 (113 s. O3 almost exclusively reacts with inorganic compounds (~91%, mainly NO, but also NO2 during night and less with primary emitted sesquiterpenes (~6% and monoterpenes (~3%. When considering the concentration of the oxidants investigated, we find that O3 is the oxidant that is capable of removing pollutants fastest. As part of this study, we developed a simple empirical parameterisation for conversion of measured spectral irradiance into actinic flux. Further, the meteorological conditions were evaluated using radiosonde observations and

  11. Comprehensive radiative forcing assesment highlights trade-offs in climate mitigation potential of managed boreal forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalliokoski, Tuomo; Berninger, Frank; Bäck, Jaana; Boy, Michael; Kuusinen, Nea; Mäkelä, Annikki; Matthies, Brent; Minkkinen, Kari; Mogensen, Ditte; Peltoniemi, Mikko; Sievänen, Risto; Zhou, Luxi; Vanhatalo, Anni; Valsta, Lauri; Nikinmaa, Eero

    2016-04-01

    Boreal forests have an important role in the mitigation of climate change. In this study we evaluated four key climate impacts of forest management: (1) carbon sequestration (in forest ecosystems and wood products), (2) surface albedo of forest area, (3) forest originating Secondary Organic Aerosols (SOA) and (4) avoided CO2-emissions from wood energy and product substitution. We calculated their net effect at both a single stand and regional level using Finland as a case study. We made analyses both in current climate up to a year 2050 and in the projected climate of year 2050. At the stand level, the carbon sequestration effect and avoided CO2 emissions due to substituted materials dominated in net RF in current climate. The warming effect of surface albedo of forest cover was lower or of same magnitude than cooling effect of SOAs. Together, the rarely considered SOAs and product substitution corresponded over 70% of the total cooling effect of forest cover. The cooling effect of net radiative forcing increased along the increasing site fertility. Although the carbon stocks of broadleaved trees were smaller than that of conifers their total radiative cooling effect was larger due to the integrated albedo and aerosol effects. In the projected climate of 2050, the radiative cooling of aerosols approached the level of forest carbon fixation. These results emphasize the need for holistic evaluation of climate impacts over simple carbon sequestration analysis to understand the role of forest management in climate change mitigation. Landscape level analyses emphasized the broad range of options to reach the cooling effect. The lowest harvest regime, 50% of current annual increment (CAI), yielded the largest cooling effect. Yet, harvests up to CAI produced only slightly less cooling RF if avoided emissions were considered. This result was highly sensitive to used substitution factors. Our result highlights that the combination of intensive harvests and the use of wood

  12. Younger Dryas Cladocera assemblages from two valley mires in central Poland and their potential significance for climate reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawłowski, Dominik

    2012-12-01

    Two sections of sediment from small oxbow-lake infillings located in different river valleys in central Poland were studied by cladoceran analysis in order to examine the response of aquatic ecosystems to the Younger Dryas. Lithological and geochemical records, as well as chydorid (Chydoridae) ephippia analysis were also used to reconstruct Younger Dryas climate trends. A high concentration of cladocerans, as well as the presence of Cladocera taxa preferring warmer water, was found. It is likely that local processes in the oxbow lakes were important, because the presence of warm-preferring taxa was also related to their habitats and their development. Yet local environmental forces, such as the influence of the rivers, habitat modification, macrophyte abundance, and eutrophication, were not only major factors to affect the Cladocera diversity in the Younger Dryas. The observation of changes in the composition and concentration of Cladocera in oxbow-lake infillings indicates that most of the changes occurred in response to climate changes.

  13. Transformation of Digital Ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsson, Stefan; Hedman, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    In digital ecosystems, the fusion relation between business and technology means that the decision of technical compatibility of the offering is also the decision of how to position the firm relative to the coopetive relations that characterize business ecosystems. In this article we develop...... the Digital Ecosystem Technology Transformation (DETT) framework for explaining technology-based transformation of digital ecosystems by integrating theories of business and technology ecosystems. The framework depicts ecosystem transformation as distributed and emergent from micro-, meso-, and macro- level...... coopetition. The DETT framework consists an alternative to the existing explanations of digital ecosystem transformation as the rational management of one central actor balancing ecosystem tensions. We illustrate the use of the framework by a case study of transformation in the digital payment ecosystem...

  14. Methane emission modeling with MCMC calibration for a boreal peatland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raivonen, Maarit; Smolander, Sampo; Susiluoto, Jouni; Backman, Leif; Li, Xuefei; Markkanen, Tiina; Kleinen, Thomas; Makela, Jarmo; Aalto, Tuula; Rinne, Janne; Brovkin, Victor; Vesala, Timo

    2016-04-01

    Natural wetlands, particularly peatlands of the boreal latitudes, are a significant source of methane (CH4). At the moment, the emission estimates are highly uncertain. These natural emissions respond to climatic variability, so it is necessary to understand their dynamics, in order to be able to predict how they affect the greenhouse gas balance in the future. We have developed a model of CH4 production, oxidation and transport in boreal peatlands. It simulates production of CH4 as a proportion of anaerobic peat respiration, transport of CH4 and oxygen between the soil and the atmosphere via diffusion in aerenchymatous plants and in peat pores (water and air filled), ebullition and oxidation of CH4 by methanotrophic microbes. Ultimately, we aim to add the model functionality to global climate models such as the JSBACH (Reick et al., 2013), the land surface scheme of the MPI Earth System Model. We tested the model with measured methane fluxes (using eddy covariance technique) from the Siikaneva site, an oligotrophic boreal fen in southern Finland (61°49' N, 24°11' E), over years 2005-2011. To give the model estimates regional reliability, we calibrated the model using Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) technique. Although the simulations and the research are still ongoing, preliminary results from the MCMC calibration can be described as very promising considering that the model is still at relatively early stage. We will present the model and its dynamics as well as results from the MCMC calibration and the comparison with Siikaneva flux data.

  15. Hydrogen peroxide distribution, production, and decay in boreal lakes

    OpenAIRE

    Häkkinen, P J; Anesio, Alexandre Magno; Granéli, Wilhelm

    2004-01-01

    The distribution, production, and decay of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) were studied in 10 boreal lakes of differing physical-chemical characteristics. Diurnal and vertical fluctuations in H2O2 concentration were followed in the lakes by sampling at six depths three times per day. In addition, incubations of water filtered through 0.2-mu mesh were made under artificial irradiation to study the abiotic production and decay of H2O2. H2O2 concentrations after 8 h of artificial irradiation were signi...

  16. Stomata-controlled nighttime COS fluxes in a boreal forest: implications for the use of COS as a GPP tracer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooijmans, Linda M. J.; Maseyk, Kadmiel; Seibt, Ulli; Vesala, Timo; Mammarella, Ivan; Baker, Ian T.; Franchin, Alessandro; Kolari, Pasi; Sun, Wu; Keskinen, Helmi; Levula, Janne; Chen, Huilin

    2016-04-01

    Carbonyl Sulfide (COS) is a promising new tracer that can be used to partition the Net Ecosystem Exchange into gross primary production (GPP) and respiration. COS and CO2 vegetation fluxes are closely related as these gases share the same diffusion pathway into stomata. This close coupling is the fundamental principle for the use of COS as tracer for GPP. Nonetheless, in contrast to CO2 , the uptake of COS by vegetation is not light-dependent, and therefore the vegetative uptake of COS can continue during the night as long as stomata are open. Nighttime stomatal conductance is observed in a variety of studies, and also nighttime depletion of COS concentrations is reported several times but it is not confirmed with field measurements that the depletion of COS in the night is indeed driven by stomatal opening. In the summer of 2015 a campaign took place at the SMEAR II site in Hyytiälä, Finland to provide better constrained COS flux data for boreal forests using a combination of COS measurements, i.e. atmospheric profile concentrations up to 125 m, eddy-covariance fluxes and soil chamber fluxes, and collocated measurements of stomatal conductance and 222Radon. A high correlation between concentrations of 222Radon and COS implies that the radon-tracer method is a valuable tool to derive nighttime ecosystem COS fluxes. We find that soils contribute to 17% of the total ecosystem COS flux during nighttime in the peak growing season. Nighttime ecosystem COS fluxes show a correlation with stomatal conductance (R2 = 0.3), indicating that nighttime COS fluxes are primarily driven by vegetation. The COS vegetation fluxes will be compared with calculated fluxes from the Simple Biosphere model. Furthermore, the nighttime vegetative COS uptake covers a substantial fraction (25%) of the daily maximum COS uptake by vegetation. Accurate quantification of nighttime COS uptake is required to be able to use COS as a useful tracer for GPP.

  17. A Decade of Plant Species Changes on a Mire in the Italian Alps. Vegetation-Controlled or Climate-Driven Mechanisms?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bragazza, L. [Department of Natural and Cultural Resources, University of Ferrara, Corso Porta Mare 2, I-44100 Ferrara (Italy)

    2006-08-15

    Variation of plant species cover on a Sphagnum-dominated mire in the south-eastern Alps of Italy was assessed over a 10-year period in relation to depth to the water table, peat accumulation rate, and climate. Population dynamics of vascular species appeared to be primarily affected by the autogenic process of peat accumulation, which determined the lowering of water-table position at microhabitat scale. Increase of depth to the water table through peat accumulation resulted in increased cover of ericaceous shrubs at previously moister microhabitats. Conversely, graminoid species such as Eriophorum vaginatum, Trichophorum caespitosum, and Scheuchzeria palustris being negatively affected by autogenic peat growth, were forced to shift their niche towards the wetter end of the water-table gradient. Carex limosa and Carex rostrata decreased their cover along the whole gradient in depth to the water table, likely due to multiple processes related to peat accumulation, competition with bryophytes, and a negative feedback due to increased litter deposition. Bryophytes, in particular Sphagnum mosses, appeared more sensitive to climatic conditions, with higher precipitation favouring faster-growing species. Accordingly, Sphagnum fallax and Sphagnum magellanicum increased their cover much more than Sphagnum capillifolium, whereas Polytrichum strictum showed the strongest decrease at sites where S. magellanicum cover increased most.

  18. Bridging the Mire between E-Research and E-Publishing for Multimedia Digital Scholarship in the Humanities and Social Sciences: An Australian Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Jakubowicz

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Digital media developments confront the humanities and social sciences with major challenges in exploiting multimedia rich data sets. A critical need is demonstrated to bridge the divide between the building of multimedia digital repositories, and the publishing of research outcomes that exploit the interactive potential of digital media. Software that melds the steps in digital research and publishing, now disparate environments, into a single sequence of integrated procedures can provide a critical innovation for the transformation of digital research and publishing from a quasi-craft-like and demanding set of skills, into a transparent and user-directed flow process. Humanities and social science (HSS researchers who use multimedia data could be working more collaboratively, creatively and with far more international impact. The HSS have not yet exploited the interactive and collaborative potential offered by interactive computer technologies, and the expansion of digital repositories. Digital publishing has opened opportunities to incorporate both interactivity and multimedia into scholarly publishing, permitting new modes of visualization and creating ever mutable texts. Open Source software, can offer an internationally significant break-through in research definition, data collection and management, and interactive publishing, leading to a major paradigm shift in eHumanities and eSocialScience. The article proposes a framework for bridging the gap, overcoming the silo problem and building an interactive multimedia research environment (m.i.r.e..

  19. Antioxidant Potential of Bark Extracts from Boreal Forest Conifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legault, Jean; Girard-Lalancette, Karl; Dufour, Dominic; Pichette, André

    2013-01-01

    The bark of boreal forest conifers has been traditionally used by Native Americans to treat various ailments and diseases. Some of these diseases involve reactive oxygen species (ROS) that can be prevented by the consumption of antioxidants such as phenolic compounds that can be found in medicinal plants. In this study, ultrasonic assisted extraction has been performed under various solvent conditions (water:ethanol mixtures) on the bark of seven boreal forest conifers used by Native Americans including: Pinus strobus, Pinus resinosa, Pinus banksiana, Picea mariana, Picea glauca, Larix laricina, and Abies balsamea. The total phenolic content, as well as ORACFL potency and cellular antioxidant activity (IC50), were evaluated for all bark extracts, and compared with the standardized water extract of Pinus maritima bark (Pycnogenol), which showed clinical efficiency to prevent ROS deleterious effects. The best overall phenolic extraction yield and antioxidant potential was obtained with Picea glauca and Picea mariana. Interestingly, total phenolic content of these bark extracts was similar to Pycnogenol but their antioxidant activity were higher. Moreover, most of the extracts did not inhibit the growth of human skin fibroblasts, WS1. A significant correlation was found between the total phenolic content and the antioxidant activity for water extracts suggesting that these compounds are involved in the activity. PMID:26784337

  20. Antioxidant Potential of Bark Extracts from Boreal Forest Conifers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Legault

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The bark of boreal forest conifers has been traditionally used by Native Americans to treat various ailments and diseases. Some of these diseases involve reactive oxygen species (ROS that can be prevented by the consumption of antioxidants such as phenolic compounds that can be found in medicinal plants. In this study, ultrasonic assisted extraction has been performed under various solvent conditions (water:ethanol mixtures on the bark of seven boreal forest conifers used by Native Americans including: Pinus strobus, Pinus resinosa, Pinus banksiana, Picea mariana, Picea glauca, Larix laricina, and Abies balsamea. The total phenolic content, as well as ORACFL potency and cellular antioxidant activity (IC50, were evaluated for all bark extracts, and compared with the standardized water extract of Pinus maritima bark (Pycnogenol, which showed clinical efficiency to prevent ROS deleterious effects. The best overall phenolic extraction yield and antioxidant potential was obtained with Picea glauca and Picea mariana. Interestingly, total phenolic content of these bark extracts was similar to Pycnogenol but their antioxidant activity were higher. Moreover, most of the extracts did not inhibit the growth of human skin fibroblasts, WS1. A significant correlation was found between the total phenolic content and the antioxidant activity for water extracts suggesting that these compounds are involved in the activity.

  1. Controls on CH4 flux from an Alaskan boreal wetland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosavi, Sadredin C.; Crill, Patrick M.; Pullman, Erik R.; Funk, Dale W.; Peterson, Kim M.

    1996-06-01

    Factors controlling the flux of the radiatively important trace gas methane (CH4) from boreal wetlands were examined at three sites along a moisture gradient from a treed low-shrub bog to an open floating graminoid bog in Fairbanks, Alaska. In the summer of 1992 average static chamber flux measurements were -0.02, 71.5, and 289 mg CH4/m2/d in dry, wet, and floating mat communities, respectively. In contrast, the warmer, drier 1993 field season flux measurements were -0.02, 42.9 and 407 mg CH4/m2/d. The data indicate that despite net oxidation of CH4 in the dry regions of the bog, the wetland is a net source of CH4, with fluxes ranging across three orders of magnitude between different plant communities. Comparison with water levels suggests that CH4 flux is turned on and off by changes in site hydrology. In sites where sufficient moisture is present for methanogenesis to occur, CH4 flux appears to be temperature limited, responding exponentially to soil temperature changes. The combined effects of hydrology and temperature create hot spots of CH4 flux within boreal wetlands. The plant communities within Lemeta Bog respond differently to changes in temperature and moisture availability, creating both positive and negative feedbacks to potential global climate change.

  2. What governs the presence of residual vegetation in boreal wildfires?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araya, Yikalo H.; Remmel, Tarmo K.; Perera, Ajith H.

    2016-04-01

    Wildfires are frequent boreal forest disturbances in Canada, and emulating their patterns with forest harvesting has emerged as a common forest management goal. Wildfires contain many patches of residual vegetation of various size, shape, and composition; understanding their characteristics provides insights for improved emulation criteria. We studied the occurrence of residual vegetation within eleven boreal wildfire events in a natural setting; fires ignited by lightning, no suppression efforts, and no prior anthropogenic disturbances. Relative importance of the measurable geo-environmental factors and their marginal effects on residual presence are studied using Random Forests. These factors included distance from natural firebreaks (wetland, bedrock and non-vegetated areas, and water), land cover, and topographic variables (elevation, slope, and ruggedness index). We present results at spatial resolutions ranging from four to 64 m while emphasizing four and 32 m since they mimic IKONOS- and Landsat-type images. Natural firebreak features, especially the proximity to wetlands, are among the most important variables that explain the likelihood residual occurrence. The majority of residual vegetation areas are concentrated within 100 m of wetlands. Topographic variables, typically important in rugged terrain, are less important in explaining the presence of residuals within our study fires.

  3. Using Tree Rings, CO2 Fluxes, and Long-Term Measurements to Understand Carbon Dynamics in an Alaskan Boreal Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond-Lamberty, B. P.; Anderson, C.; Crump, A.; Stegen, J.

    2015-12-01

    Decadal and centennial processes are usually poorly constrained by data, but many opportunities exist to combine disparate data sources such as tree rings, greenhouse gas fluxes from the soil to atmosphere, and long-term tree inventories. At high northern latitudes, permafrost (and its current degradation across large scales) is presumed to exert a strong control on long-term ecosystem carbon uptake and storage. We integrate a variety of data from both Canada and Alaska, focusing on two years of observations across a permafrost gradient in a black spruce Alaskan watershed (the Caribou/Poker Creek Research Watershed ~50 km northeast of Fairbanks, AK, USA). Permafrost depth changes were strongly associated with changes in vegetation and leaf morphology, as well as soil greenhouse fluxes (0.1-2.0 μmol/m2/s, with strong spatial dependencies) and aboveground net primary production (60-550 gC/m2/yr). We use tree-ring data covering the last century to examine how tree response to climate variability changes with elevation and permafrost depth, both along small-scale transects and across the entire 104 km2 watershed. A weakness is that these results are from a single site and point in successional time; we quantify potential variability in this area using 16 years of observations from a Canadian boreal chronosequence. We emphasize that both short and long term observations and experiments, using multiple approaches, are necessary to constrain ecosystem carbon uptake and storage.

  4. Wood phenology: from organ-scale processes to terrestrial ecosystem models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delpierre, Nicolas; Guillemot, Joannès

    2016-04-01

    In temperate and boreal trees, a dormancy period prevents organ development during adverse climatic conditions. Whereas the phenology of leaves and flowers has received considerable attention, to date, little is known regarding the phenology of other tree organs such as wood, fine roots, fruits and reserve compounds. In this presentation, we review both the role of environmental drivers in determining the phenology of wood and the models used to predict its phenology in temperate and boreal forest trees. Temperature is a key driver of the resumption of wood activity in spring. There is no such clear dominant environmental cue involved in the cessation of wood formation in autumn, but temperature and water stress appear as prominent factors. We show that wood phenology is a key driver of the interannual variability of wood growth in temperate tree species. Incorporating representations of wood phenology in a terrestrial ecosystem model substantially improved the simulation of wood growth under current climate.

  5. Global Ecosystem Restoration Index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez, Miguel; Garcia, Monica; Fernandez, Nestor

    2015-01-01

    The Global ecosystem restoration index (GERI) is a composite index that integrates structural and functional aspects of the ecosystem restoration process. These elements are evaluated through a window that looks into a baseline for degraded ecosystems with the objective to assess restoration...

  6. Carbon stock and carbon turnover in boreal and temperate forests - Integration of remote sensing data and global vegetation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurner, Martin; Beer, Christian; Carvalhais, Nuno; Forkel, Matthias; Tito Rademacher, Tim; Santoro, Maurizio; Tum, Markus; Schmullius, Christiane

    2016-04-01

    Long-term vegetation dynamics are one of the key uncertainties of the carbon cycle. There are large differences in simulated vegetation carbon stocks and fluxes including productivity, respiration and carbon turnover between global vegetation models. Especially the implementation of climate-related mortality processes, for instance drought, fire, frost or insect effects, is often lacking or insufficient in current models and their importance at global scale is highly uncertain. These shortcomings have been due to the lack of spatially extensive information on vegetation carbon stocks, which cannot be provided by inventory data alone. Instead, we recently have been able to estimate northern boreal and temperate forest carbon stocks based on radar remote sensing data. Our spatially explicit product (0.01° resolution) shows strong agreement to inventory-based estimates at a regional scale and allows for a spatial evaluation of carbon stocks and dynamics simulated by global vegetation models. By combining this state-of-the-art biomass product and NPP datasets originating from remote sensing, we are able to study the relation between carbon turnover rate and a set of climate indices in northern boreal and temperate forests along spatial gradients. We observe an increasing turnover rate with colder winter temperatures and longer winters in boreal forests, suggesting frost damage and the trade-off between frost adaptation and growth being important mortality processes in this ecosystem. In contrast, turnover rate increases with climatic conditions favouring drought and insect outbreaks in temperate forests. Investigated global vegetation models from the Inter-Sectoral Impact Model Intercomparison Project (ISI-MIP), including HYBRID4, JeDi, JULES, LPJml, ORCHIDEE, SDGVM, and VISIT, are able to reproduce observation-based spatial climate - turnover rate relationships only to a limited extent. While most of the models compare relatively well in terms of NPP, simulated

  7. Retrieval of seasonal dynamics of forest understory reflectance from semi-arid to boreal forests using MODIS BRDF data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisek, Jan; Chen, Jing; Kobayashi, Hideki; Rautiainen, Miina; Schaepman, Michael; Karnieli, Arnon; Sprintsin, Michael; Ryu, Youngryel; Nikopensius, Maris; Raabe, Kairi

    2016-04-01

    Ground vegetation (understory) provides an essential contribution to the whole-stand reflectance signal in many boreal, sub-boreal, and temperate forests. Accurate knowledge about forest understory reflectance is urgently needed in various forest reflectance modelling efforts. However, systematic collections of understory reflectance data covering different sites and ecosystems are almost missing. Measurement of understory reflectance is a real challenge because of an extremely high variability of irradiance at the forest floor, weak signal in some parts of the spectrum, spectral separability issues of over- and understory and its variable nature. Understory can consist of several sub-layers (regenerated tree, shrub, grasses or dwarf shrub, mosses, lichens, litter, bare soil), it has spatially-temporally variable species composition and ground coverage. Additional challenges are introduced by patchiness of ground vegetation, ground surface roughness, and understory-overstory relations. Due to this variability, remote sensing might be the only means to provide consistent data at spatially relevant scales. In this presentation, we report on retrieving seasonal courses of understory Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) from multi-angular MODIS BRDF/Albedo data. We compared satellite-based seasonal courses of understory NDVI against an extended collection of different types of forest sites with available in-situ understory reflectance measurements. These sites are distributed along a wide latitudinal gradient on the Northern hemisphere: a sparse and dense black spruce forests in Alaska and Canada, a northern European boreal forest in Finland, hemiboreal needleleaf and deciduous stands in Estonia, a mixed temperate forest in Switzerland, a cool temperate deciduous broadleaf forest in Korea, and a semi-arid pine plantation in Israel. Our results indicated the retrieval method performs well particularly over open forests of different types. We also demonstrated

  8. Radioactive caesium in Boreal forest landscapes - Dynamics and transport in food webs. Summary of research 1986-1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergman, R.; Nylen, T.; Palo, T

    1998-12-01

    The need for - but also the paucity of - radioecological knowledge concerning the boreal forest became particularly apparent after the nuclear power plant accident in Chernobyl in April 1986. As a consequence several new projects were initiated in the Nordic countries with particular focus on the behaviour of radioactivecaesium in terrestrial and aquatic systems characteristic for the Fenno-Scandinavian landscapes. Among these new projects a multi-disciplinary co-operation in Umeaa between scientists at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, and the Defence Research Establishment emerged. Initially this joint work focused mainly on descriptions of the dynamic changes of the content of radioactive caesium in soil-plant and animal communities in the county of Vaesterbotten. Most of the studies have been performed at the Vindeln experimental forest, 60 km NW of Umeaa. Plants of key interest were: bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus), birch (Betula spp.), and pine (Pinus sylvestris), and among the animals: the moose (Alces alces) and a small rodent, the forest vole (Clethrionomus glareolus). Gradually over the past ten years the research has entered the stage where the specific causes of the caesium behaviour have been addressed - partly by the help of models developed for simulating forest ecosystems, partly by complementary field experiments. This paper reviews our main findings on this theme concerning the behaviour of radioactive caesium in boreal landscapes and significant pathways to man, as has become apparent from the radioecological co-operation dating from about ten years back. A list of the publications arising from these studies since 1986 is also presented in this report.

  9. Life histories and seasonal dynamics of common boreal pelagic copepods (Crustacea, Copepoda inhabiting an oligotrophic Fennoscandian lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svein Birger WÆRVÅGEN

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The annual seasonal abundance and spatial distribution of four widespread pelagic copepods, the Palaeartic calanoid Eudiaptomus gracilis, the cyclopoids Mesocyclops leuckarti and Thermocyclops oithonoides, and the Holartic Cyclops scutifer were investigated in Lake Gjerstadvann, an oligotrophic boreal lake. Important ecological traits such as life cycles, pelagic microhabitats and wintering strategies varied strongly between the investigated copepods, and influenced seasonal succession in the plankton community. Fish predation did not seem to affect copepod abundances, except perhaps the two lage-sized, less abundant species, the Palaeartic calanoid Heterocope saliens and the Holartic cyclopoid Cyclops abyssorum. Life cycles varied from one (C. scutifer to three (M. leuckarti and E. gracilis complete generations per year, primarily related to habitat temperatures. Wintering took place as late instars (C. scutifer, C. abyssorum or cop V and adults (E. gracilis in the plankton, late instars in profundal (T. oithonoides or littoral (M. leuckarti sediment diapause, and embryonic diapause in sediment egg bank (H. saliens. C. scutifer and C. abyssorum exhibited delayed development in the profundal waters during winter, which could be characterised as so-called "active diapause". C. scutifer, T. oithonoides, and C. abyssorum in Lake Gjerstadvann were probably negatively affected by acidified waters. M. leuckarti seemed to be the most acid-tolerant of these species being able to endure pH slightly below 5.0, whereas T. oithonoides was usually absent at such pH levels. The calanoid species H. saliens and E. gracilis were extremely tolerant towards acidic environments. The yearly differences in population abundance as indicated by the fluctuations in the diapausing populations were probably due to environmental variations in water chemistry occurring during the most vulnerable ontogenetic stages, i.e., eggs and nauplii. Even if the pelagic ecosystem in

  10. A Geographic Perspective on Factors Controlling Post-Fire Succession in Boreal Black Spruce Forests in Western North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasischke, E. S.; Kane, E. S.; Genet, H.; Turetsky, M. R.; ODonnell, J. A.; Hoy, E.; Barrett, K.; Baltzer, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    Recent changes to climate and the fire regime have resulted in a number of distinct changes to patterns of post-fire succession in the boreal forest region of western North America. In interior Alaska and Yukon, these responses include a shift from spruce to deciduous dominated forests in black spruce forests that experienced exposure of mineral soils from deep burning of surface organic soils, as well as low seedling recruitment in white spruce forests as a result of moisture stress. In this presentation, we will use a physical geography framework to analyze factors controlling low seedling recruitment in recently burned black spruce forests in Alaska. This approach allows for understanding how changes in the biologic components of black spruce forest ecosystems (e.g., biogeography) are controlled by factors related to geomorphology and climate over multiple spatial and temporal scales. In particular, this framework will be used to examine how the interactions between fire, climate, topography and soil texture influence pre-fire and post-fire permafrost conditions, which interact to have a strong influence on variations in soil moisture. In turn, recent changes to climate combined with variations in soil moisture controlled by differences in permafrost conditions (ground ice content, active layer thickness) can be used to explain variations in post-fire seedling recruitment in black spruce forests, where low recruitment is occurring on the sites with the driest soils. In addition, we will examine the need for further research in other boreal forest regions of western North America where the presence of pine species (jack and lodgepole) that are absent in Alaska, as well as differences in soils and permafrost conditions, are likely resulting in additional patterns of post-fire succession as a result of recent changes to climate and the fire regime.

  11. The size- and time-resolved composition of aerosols from a sub-Arctic boreal forest prescribed burn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Catherine F.; Cahill, Thomas A.; Perry, Kevin D.

    Aerosols from wildfires are the primary aerosols in the Arctic atmosphere during the summer months. These aerosols occur in large, increasing quantities and impact the sensitive radiative balance in the Arctic. FROSTFIRE, a controlled burn in a Long-Term Ecological Research Area 50 km north of Fairbanks, Alaska, was designed to quantify the impacts of wildfire on sub-Arctic boreal forest ecosystems in permafrost regions. However, it provided a unique opportunity to examine smoke aerosols collected in the middle of a sub-Arctic boreal forest fire. A battery-powered eight-stage aerosol impactor (i.e. a Davis Rotating-drum Unit for Monitoring), mounted at the top of a 10 m meteorological tower in the burn zone, collected size- and time-resolved aerosol samples with 19.45 min resolution for 24 h during the burn. The samples underwent Proton Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) and Proton Elastic Scattering Analysis (PESA) to determine the sizes and elemental compositions of the collected aerosols. Throughout the fire, the smoke reaching the sampler was strongly monodisperse with most of the aerosol mass in the optically active 0.56-1.15 μm in aerodynamic diameter size range. Fine organics comprised almost all of the mass in this optically active size range and the concentrations of the organics were high throughout the sampling period. However, unlike the fine organics, the potassium concentrations in the smoke decreased exponentially during the sampling period as the fire progressed from an active flaming to a smoldering behavior. The major findings from this field experiment are the dramatic differences in aerosol composition as a function of fire type (i.e. smoldering or active flaming) and that the largest emission of organics occurs during the smoldering phase, unaccompanied by the potassium emissions often used as a smoke tracer. These results agree with recent laboratory experiments.

  12. National recovery strategy for woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou, boreal population, in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dave Hervieux

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Recovery planning for the boreal population of woodland caribou is a complex task, spanning eight Canadian provinces and territories. To accommodate unique situations across the country, recovery planning for this Species at Risk Act-listed threatened species is occurring at both provincial/ territorial and national levels. The national recovery strategy strives to identify nationally important issues and provide direction for provinces and territories as they plan and implement boreal caribou recovery within their jurisdictions. The national vision is to conserve and recover boreal caribou and their habitat across Canada. Specific goals are to: 1 Prevent extirpation of local boreal caribou populations from all existing caribou ranges; and 2 Maintain or enhance local boreal caribou populations at or to self-sustaining levels within all existing caribou ranges; and 3 Maintain or enhance boreal caribou habitat to support self-sustaining local populations. Nineteen broad national approaches are identified. These approaches include items relating to: habitat planning and management, caribou population monitoring and management, management of human-caused mortality, management of other wildlife species, consideration of government legislation and policy,promotion of stewardship and public outreach, and research. Specific outcomes are provided for each stated recovery approach. For more information on Canada's national recovery strategy for the boreal population of woodland caribou please see www.speciesatrisk.gc.ca/recovery/default_e.cfm

  13. Forest management and biodiversity conservation based on natural ecosystem dynamics in northern Europe: the complexity challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuuluvainen, Timo

    2009-09-01

    Recent research in northern Europe has revised many long-held conceptions of the complexity of forest ecosystems and their natural structure and dynamics. The unveiling of the picture of natural characteristics of forest ecosystem structure and dynamics reveals much more diversity than its traditional complement, highlighting the importance of non-stand-replacing disturbances and the associated heterogeneous and dynamic stand and landscape structures. This increasing detail is a reflection of a fundamental change in the ecological understanding of forests as complex ecosystems. In particular, the generalization that the boreal forest is regulated by fierce stand-replacing disturbances, leading to the dominance of even-aged stand successions, has been disproved. However, this misconception has, until now, been repeated and used to legitimize the dominant practice of clear-cutting as a nature-based way to manage the forest. The practical conclusion of this review paper is that the dominating forest management model in North European boreal forests, which is based on the clear-cut harvesting of timber and growing of even-aged stands, is in contradiction with the variable and complex characteristics of the disturbance-succession cycle observed in naturally dynamic forests with negligible human impact. As a consequence, the structural variation of the boreal forest under management has been grossly truncated compared with its natural range. Because of this, and due to the scarcity of protection areas in many regions of northern Europe, it is not likely that the conservation of native biodiversity and ecological sustainability will be attained, assuming that the model of forest management remains unchanged. Thus, there is a strong incentive for change in the prevailing forest management model toward one that is based on natural ecosystem dynamics and an understanding of forests as complex systems. PMID:19860154

  14. Seventeen-year trends in spring and autumn phenophases of Betula pubescens in a boreal environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poikolainen, Jarmo; Tolvanen, Anne; Karhu, Jouni; Kubin, Eero

    2016-08-01

    Trends in the timing of spring and autumn phenophases of Betula pubescens were investigated in the southern, middle, and northern boreal zones in Finland. The field observations were carried out at 21 sites in the Finnish National Phenological Network in 1997-2013. The effective temperature sum of the thermal growth period, i.e. the sum of the positive differences between diurnal mean temperatures and 5 °C (ETS1), increased annually on average by 6-7 degree day units. Timing of bud burst remained constant in the southern and middle boreal zones but advanced annually by 0.5 day in the northern boreal zone. The effective temperature sum at bud burst (ETS2) showed no trend in the southern and middle boreal zones, whereas ETS2 increased on average from 20-30 to 50 degree day units in the northern boreal zone, almost to the same level as in the other zones. Increase in ETS2 indicates that the trees did not start their growth in very early spring despite warmer spring temperatures. The timing of leaf colouring and leaf fall remained almost constant in the southern boreal zones, whereas these advanced annually by 0.3 and 0.6 day in the middle boreal zone and by 0.6 and 0.4 day in the northern boreal zone, respectively. The duration of the growth period remained constant in all boreal zones. The results indicate high buffering capacity of B. pubescens against temperature changes. The study also shows the importance of the duration of phenological studies: some trends in spring phenophases had levelled out, while new trends in autumn phases had emerged after earlier studies in the same network for a shorter observation period.

  15. Decreases in Soil Moisture and Organic Matter Quality Suppress Microbial Decomposition Following a Boreal Forest Fire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holden, Sandra R.; Berhe, Asmeret A.; Treseder, Kathleen K.

    2015-08-01

    Climate warming is projected to increase the frequency and severity of wildfires in boreal forests, and increased wildfire activity may alter the large soil carbon (C) stocks in boreal forests. Changes in boreal soil C stocks that result from increased wildfire activity will be regulated in part by the response of microbial decomposition to fire, but post-fire changes in microbial decomposition are poorly understood. Here, we investigate the response of microbial decomposition to a boreal forest fire in interior Alaska and test the mechanisms that control post-fire changes in microbial decomposition. We used a reciprocal transplant between a recently burned boreal forest stand and a late successional boreal forest stand to test how post-fire changes in abiotic conditions, soil organic matter (SOM) composition, and soil microbial communities influence microbial decomposition. We found that SOM decomposing at the burned site lost 30.9% less mass over two years than SOM decomposing at the unburned site, indicating that post-fire changes in abiotic conditions suppress microbial decomposition. Our results suggest that moisture availability is one abiotic factor that constrains microbial decomposition in recently burned forests. In addition, we observed that burned SOM decomposed more slowly than unburned SOM, but the exact nature of SOM changes in the recently burned stand are unclear. Finally, we found no evidence that post-fire changes in soil microbial community composition significantly affect decomposition. Taken together, our study has demonstrated that boreal forest fires can suppress microbial decomposition due to post-fire changes in abiotic factors and the composition of SOM. Models that predict the consequences of increased wildfires for C storage in boreal forests may increase their predictive power by incorporating the observed negative response of microbial decomposition to boreal wildfires.

  16. Ecosystem services in ECOCLIM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lise Lotte; Boegh, Eva; Bendtsen, J;

    that actions initiated to reduce anthropogenic GHG emissions are sustainable and not destructive to existing ecosystem services. Therefore it is important to address i.e. land use change in relation to the regulating services of the ecosystems, such as carbon sequestration and climate regulation. At present...... a thorough understanding of the ecosystem processes controlling the uptake or emissions of GHG is fundamental. Here we present ECOCLIM in the context of ecosystem services and the experimental studies within ECOCLIM which will lead to an enhanced understanding of Danish ecosystems....

  17. Fishing for ecosystem services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Kevin L.; Pegg, Mark A.; Cole, Nicholas W.; Siddons, Stephen F.; Fedele, Alexis D.; Harmon, Brian S.; Ruskamp, Ryan L.; Turner, Dylan R.; Uerling, Caleb C.

    2016-01-01

    Ecosystems are commonly exploited and manipulated to maximize certain human benefits. Such changes can degrade systems, leading to cascading negative effects that may be initially undetected, yet ultimately result in a reduction, or complete loss, of certain valuable ecosystem services. Ecosystem-based management is intended to maintain ecosystem quality and minimize the risk of irreversible change to natural assemblages of species and to ecosystem processes while obtaining and maintaining long-term socioeconomic benefits. We discuss policy decisions in fishery management related to commonly manipulated environments with a focus on influences to ecosystem services. By focusing on broader scales, managing for ecosystem services, and taking a more proactive approach, we expect sustainable, quality fisheries that are resilient to future disturbances. To that end, we contend that: (1) management always involves tradeoffs; (2) explicit management of fisheries for ecosystem services could facilitate a transition from reactive to proactive management; and (3) adaptive co-management is a process that could enhance management for ecosystem services. We propose adaptive co-management with an ecosystem service framework where actions are implemented within ecosystem boundaries, rather than political boundaries, through strong interjurisdictional relationships.

  18. Columbia River Estuary Ecosystem Classification Ecosystem Complex

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Estuarine ecosystems are controlled by a variety of processes that operate at multiple spatial and temporal scales. Understanding the hierarchical nature of these...

  19. Microwave snow emission modeling uncertainties in boreal and subarctic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Alexandre; Royer, Alain; St-Jean-Rondeau, Olivier; Montpetit, Benoit; Picard, Ghislain; Mavrovic, Alex; Marchand, Nicolas; Langlois, Alexandre

    2016-03-01

    This study aims to better understand and quantify the uncertainties in microwave snow emission models using the Dense Media Radiative Theory Multi-Layer model (DMRT-ML) with in situ measurements of snow properties. We use surface-based radiometric measurements at 10.67, 19 and 37 GHz in boreal forest and subarctic environments and a new in situ data set of measurements of snow properties (profiles of density, snow grain size and temperature, soil characterization and ice lens detection) acquired in the James Bay and Umiujaq regions of Northern Québec, Canada. A snow excavation experiment - where snow was removed from the ground to measure the microwave emission of bare frozen ground - shows that small-scale spatial variability (less than 1 km) in the emission of frozen soil is small. Hence, in our case of boreal organic soil, variability in the emission of frozen soil has a small effect on snow-covered brightness temperature (TB). Grain size and density measurement errors can explain the errors at 37 GHz, while the sensitivity of TB at 19 GHz to snow increases during the winter because of the snow grain growth that leads to scattering. Furthermore, the inclusion of observed ice lenses in DMRT-ML leads to significant improvements in the simulations at horizontal polarization (H-pol) for the three frequencies (up to 20 K of root mean square error). However, representation of the spatial variability of TB remains poor at 10.67 and 19 GHz at H-pol given the spatial variability of ice lens characteristics and the difficulty in simulating snowpack stratigraphy related to the snow crust. The results also show that, in our study with the given forest characteristics, forest emission reflected by the snow-covered surface can increase the TB up to 40 K. The forest contribution varies with vegetation characteristics and a relationship between the downwelling contribution of vegetation and the proportion of pixels occupied by vegetation (trees) in fisheye pictures was found

  20. Aboveground and belowground legacies of native Sami land use on boreal forest in northern Sweden 100 years after abandonment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freschet, Grégoire T; Ostlund, Lars; Kichenin, Emilie; Wardle, David A

    2014-04-01

    Human activities that involve land-use change often cause major transformations to community and ecosystem properties both aboveground and belowground, and when land use is abandoned, these modifications can persist for extended periods. However, the mechanisms responsible for rapid recovery vs. long-term maintenance of ecosystem changes following abandonment remain poorly understood. Here, we examined the long-term ecological effects of two remote former settlements, regularly visited for -300 years by reindeer-herding Sami and abandoned -100 years ago, within an old-growth boreal forest that is considered one of the most pristine regions in northern Scandinavia. These human legacies were assessed through measurements of abiotic and biotic soil properties and vegetation characteristics at the settlement sites and at varying distances from them. Low-intensity land use by Sami is characterized by the transfer of organic matter towards the settlements by humans and reindeer herds, compaction of soil through trampling, disappearance of understory vegetation, and selective cutting of pine trees for fuel and construction. As a consequence, we found a shift towards early successional plant species and a threefold increase in soil microbial activity and nutrient availability close to the settlements relative to away from them. These changes in soil fertility and vegetation contributed to 83% greater total vegetation productivity, 35% greater plant biomass, and 23% and 16% greater concentrations of foliar N and P nearer the settlements, leading to a greater quantity and quality of litter inputs. Because decomposer activity was also 40% greater towards the settlements, soil organic matter cycling and nutrient availability were further increased, leading to likely positive feedbacks between the aboveground and belowground components resulting from historic land use. Although not all of the activities typical of Sami have left visible residual traces on the ecosystem after

  1. Dissolved organic carbon in Alaskan boreal forest: Sources, chemical characteristics, and biodegradability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickland, K.P.; Neff, J.C.; Aiken, G.R.

    2007-01-01

    The fate of terrestrially-derived dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is important to carbon (C) cycling in both terrestrial and aquatic environments, and recent evidence suggests that climate warming is influencing DOC dynamics in northern ecosystems. To understand what determines the fate of terrestrial DOC, it is essential to quantify the chemical nature and potential biodegradability of this DOC. We examined DOC chemical characteristics and biodegradability collected from soil pore waters and dominant vegetation species in four boreal black spruce forest sites in Alaska spanning a range of hydrologic regimes and permafrost extents (Well Drained, Moderately Well Drained, Poorly Drained, and Thermokarst Wetlands). DOC chemistry was characterized using fractionation, UV-Vis absorbance, and fluorescence measurements. Potential biodegradability was assessed by incubating the samples and measuring CO2 production over 1 month. Soil pore water DOC from all sites was dominated by hydrophobic acids and was highly aromatic, whereas the chemical composition of vegetation leachate DOC varied significantly with species. There was no seasonal variability in soil pore water DOC chemical characteristics or biodegradability; however, DOC collected from the Poorly Drained site was significantly less biodegradable than DOC from the other three sites (6% loss vs. 13-15% loss). The biodegradability of vegetation-derived DOC ranged from 10 to 90% loss, and was strongly correlated with hydrophilic DOC content. Vegetation such as Sphagnum moss and feathermosses yielded DOC that was quickly metabolized and respired. In contrast, the DOC leached from vegetation such as black spruce was moderately recalcitrant. Changes in DOC chemical characteristics that occurred during microbial metabolism of DOC were quantified using fractionation and fluorescence. The chemical characteristics and biodegradability of DOC in soil pore waters were most similar to the moderately recalcitrant vegetation

  2. Modeling micro-topographic controls on boreal peatland hydrology and methane fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Cresto Aleina

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Small-scale surface heterogeneities can influence land–atmosphere fluxes and therefore carbon, water and energy budgets on larger scale. This effect is of particular relevance for high-latitude ecosystems, because of the great amount of carbon stored in their soils. We introduce a novel micro-topographic model, the Hummock–Hollow (HH model, which explicitly represents small-scale surface elevation changes. By computing the water table at the small scale, and by coupling the model with a process-based model for soil methane processes, we are able to model effects of micro-topography on hydrology and methane emissions in a typical boreal peatland. In order to assess the effect of micro-topography on water balance and methane emissions of the peatland we compare two versions of the model, one with a representation of micro-topography and a classical single-bucket model version, and show that the temporal variability in the model version with micro-topography performs better if compared with local data. Accounting for micro-topography almost triples the cumulative methane flux over the simulated time-slice. We found that the single-bucket model underestimates methane emissions because of its poor performance in representing hydrological dynamics. The HH model with micro-topography captures the spatial dynamics of water and methane fluxes, being able to identify the hotspots for methane emissions. The model also identifies a critical scale (0.01 km2 which marks the minimal resolution for the explicit representation of micro-topography in larger-scale models.

  3. Hydrological and thermal controls of ice formation in 25 boreal stream reaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Lovisa; Alfredsen, Knut; Kuglerová, Lenka; Nilsson, Christer

    2016-09-01

    The Northern Hemisphere has a high density of fluvial freshwater ecosystems, many of which become ice-covered during winter. The development and extent of ice have both ecological and socio-economic implications. For example, ice can cause freezing of riparian vegetation and fish eggs as well as influence hydropower production; however, when, where and why ice develops in small streams is not well known. We used observations from 25 stream reaches to study the factors controlling ice development during two consecutive winters, addressing where in the catchment surface or anchor-ice is most likely to develop, how stream morphology influences ice formation, and how climate influences ice processes. Reaches far downstream from lake outlets, or without any upstream lakes, were most prone to develop anchor-ice, but other factors also influenced ice formation. Anchor-ice was most common where water temperature and groundwater inputs were low and stream power high. Given cold air temperature and water supercooling, the in-stream substrate as well as the current velocity were also important for the development of anchor-ice. Climate and substrate seemed to be important factors for the development of surface ice. This study shows that ice processes are substantial during the hydrological year and may therefore have large implications for the ecology and engineering around boreal streams. The study also demonstrates that ice formation in the studied streams was complex, involving many variables and physical processes. We constructed a conceptual model describing the likelihood for various ice types to develop, based on the large dataset. As such, this model will be useful for practitioners and scientists working in small watercourses in the Northern Hemisphere.

  4. Long- and short-term temperature responses of microbially-mediated boreal soil organic matter transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, K.; Buckeridge, K. M.; Edwards, K. A.; Ziegler, S. E.; Billings, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Microorganisms use exoenzymes to decay soil organic matter into assimilable substrates, some of which are transformed into CO2. Microbial CO2 efflux contributes up to 60% of soil respiration, a feature that can change with temperature due to altered exoenzyme activities (short-term) and microbial communities producing different exoenzymes (longer-term). Often, however, microbial temperature responses are masked by factors that also change with temperature in soil, making accurate projections of microbial CO2 efflux with warming challenging. Using soils along a natural climate gradient similar in most respects except for temperature regime (Newfoundland Labrador Boreal Ecosystem Latitudinal Transect), we investigated short-vs. long-term temperature responses of microbially-mediated organic matter transformations. While incubating soils at 5, 15, and 25°C for 84 days, we measured exoenzyme activities, CO2 efflux rates and biomass, and extracted DNA at multiple times. We hypothesized that short-term, temperature-induced increases in exoenzyme activities and CO2 losses would be smaller in soils from warmer regions, because microbes presumably adapted to warmer regions should use assimilable substrates more efficiently and thus produce exoenzymes at a lower rate. While incubation temperature generally induced greater exoenzyme activities (pDNA sequencing will reveal how microbial community abundance and composition change with short-vs. longer-term temperature change. Though short-term microbial responses to temperature suggest higher CO2 efflux and thus lower efficiency of resource use with warming, longer-term adaptations of microbial communities to warmer climates remain unknown; this work helps fill that knowledge gap.

  5. Organic matter mineralization in frozen boreal soils-environmental constraints on catabolic and anabolic microbial activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oquist, Mats G.; Sparrman, Tobias; Schleucher, Jürgen; Nilsson, Mats B.

    2014-05-01

    Heterotrophic microbial mineralization of soil organic matter (SOM) and associated production and emission of atmospheric trace gases proceed during the winter months in the frozen soils of high latitude ecosystems. However, in what ways this microbial activity is constrained by the environmental conditions prevailing in a frozen soil matrix is uncertain. This presentation will address how temperature, water availability and substrate availability combine to regulate rates of microbial activity at below freezing temperatures and the implications of this activity for SOM mineralization in the surface layers of boreal forest soils experiencing seasonal freezing. We show that the amount and availability of liquid water is an integral factor regulating rates of microbial activity in the frozen soil matrix and can also explain frequently observed deviations in the temperature responses of biogenic CO2 production in frozen soils, as compared to unfrozen soils. Using stable isotope labeling (13C) we also show that the partitioning of substrate carbon, in the form of monomeric sugar (glucose), for catabolic and anabolic metabolism remain constant in the temperature range of -4C to 9C. This confirms that microbial growth may proceed even when soils are frozen. In addition we present corresponding data for organisms metabolizing polymeric substrates (cellulose) requiring exoenzymatic activity prior to substrate uptake. We conclude that the metabolic response of soil microorganism to controlling factors may change substantially across the freezing point of soil water, and also the patterns of interaction among controlling factors are affected. Thus, it is evident that metabolic response functions derived from investigations of unfrozen soils cannot be superimposed on frozen soils. Nonetheless, the soil microbial population appear very adapted to seasonal freezing with respect to their metabolic performance.

  6. Fire as an agent in redistributing fallout 137Cs in the Canadian boreal forest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presence of fallout 137Cs in the boreal forest and the effect of fire in redistributing 137Cs were studied in the remote region of Wood Buffalo National Park, N.W.T., Canada. Results of a preliminary study of five burned (the fire occurred in 1981) and five unburned stands conducted in 1986 revealed that 137Cs concentrations were higher in the surface soil of the burned stands than in the unburned ones. In 1989, a comprehensive study was conducted, in which one burned and one unburned white spruce stand were sampled in greater detail. The latter investigation also revealed a difference in the distribution of 137Cs within the burned stand compared to the unburned one. Specifically, in the unburned stand, the highest 137Cs concentration was identified in the epiphytic lichens and in the mosses, whereas in the burned stand, the highest concentration was measured in the surface organic soil. These results indicate that fire caused the mobilization of part of the 137Cs bound to the above-ground matter and concentrated it in the ash layer of the burned surface soil. An additional ecologically important finding in our study was that significantly lower total 137Cs load was observed in the burned stand compared to the unburned one. Hence, our data not only provide evidence that 137Cs is being redistributed within the burned stand to the surface soil, but also that part of the 137Cs is lost due to fire, presumably contaminating other ecosystems. Volatilization and fly-ash during the fire, and runoff (e.g. from snow melt) after the fire are the most likely mechanisms for the 137Cs removal. These findings point to fire as an agent of 137Cs secondary contamination for initially unaffected systems, as well as for those previously contaminated

  7. Moss and soil contributions to the annual net carbon flux of a maturing boreal forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, J.W.; O'Neill, K. P.; Trumbore, S.E.; Veldhuis, H.; Stocks, B.J.

    1997-01-01

    We used input and decomposition data from 14C studies of soils to determine rates of vertical accumulation of moss combined with carbon storage inventories on a sequence of burns to model how carbon accumulates in soils and moss after a stand-killing fire. We used soil drainage - moss associations and soil drainage maps of the old black spruce (OBS) site at the BOREAS northern study area (NSA) to areally weight the contributions of each moderately well drained, feathermoss areas; poorly drained sphagnum - feathermoss areas; and very poorly drained brown moss areas to the carbon storage and flux at the OBS NSA site. On this very old (117 years) complex of black spruce, sphagnum bog veneer, and fen systems we conclude that these systems are likely sequestering 0.01-0.03 kg C m-2 yr-' at OBS-NSA today. Soil drainage in boreal forests near Thompson, Manitoba, controls carbon storage and flux by controlling moss input and decomposition rates and by controlling through fire the amount and quality of carbon left after burning. On poorly drained soils rich in sphagnum moss, net accumulation and long-term storage of carbon is higher than on better drained soils colonized by feathermosses. The carbon flux of these contrasting ecosystems is best characterized by soil drainage class and stand age, where stands recently burned are net sources of CO2, and maturing stands become increasingly stronger sinks of atmospheric CO2. This approach to measuring carbon storage and flux presents a method of scaling to larger areas using soil drainage, moss cover, and stand age information.

  8. Effect of Forest Fire on Regional Carbon Dioxide Exchange Over Boreal Forest in Interior Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, H.; Otsuki, M.; Harazono, Y.; Ueyama, M.; Iwata, T.

    2010-12-01

    Forest fire is a major disturbance in boreal forest ecosystems and significantly influences carbon exchange processes by combustion of vegetation and surface organic soils. In Interior Alaska, area of 7.6x106 ha was burned during 2000-2009 by forest fires. Fire occurrence frequency in the next decade may increase with current warming trend. Hence, it is important to include carbon dioxide (CO2) exchange at fire scars to accurately estimate regional CO2 exchange. To quantify CO2 exchange, CO2 flux and meteorological data were obtained at an undisturbed black spruce forest and a fire scar (five years after fire) in Interior Alaska, and responses of photosynthesis and respiration to meteorological variables were examined in each site. Photosynthesis at the fire scar was reduced to approximately 50 % of photosynthesis at the undisturbed black spruce forest due to loss of vegetation. Respiration at the fire scar was also reduced to 50 % of the undisturbed black spruce forest. This is attributable to decrease of biomass and surface organic matter. Annual net exchanges of CO2 at both sites were uptake of 519 and 256 gCO2/m2/year for the undisturbed black spruce forest and the fire scar, respectively. We used light-use efficiency model to estimate spatial distributions of photosynthesis and respiration using remote sensing imagery, NCEP/NCAR reanalysis meteorology and NASA solar radiation. The model was parameterized using observations at the undisturbed black spruce forest and the fire scar. Estimated regional average of CO2 uptake was reduced by 10 % compared to an estimated value with which fire scars were not included. Further improvement is expected by incorporating severity of forest fires that determine reduction of photosynthesis and respiration after fires.

  9. Modelling Temporal Variability in the Carbon Balance of a Spruce/Moss Boreal Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolking, S.; Goulden, M. L.; Wofsy, S. C.; Fan, S.-M.; Sutton, D. J.; Munger, J. W.; Bazzaz, A. M.; Daube, B. C.; Crill, P. M.; Aber, J. D.; Band, L. E.; Wang, X.; Savages, K.; Moore, T.; Harriss, R. C.

    1996-01-01

    A model of the daily carbon balance of a black spruce/feathermoss boreal forest ecosystem was developed and results compared to preliminary data from the 1994 BOREAS field campaign in northern Manitoba, Canada. The model, driven by daily weather conditions, simulated daily soil climate status (temperature and moisture profiles), spruce photosynthesis and respiration, moss photosynthesis and respiration, and litter decomposition. Model agreement with preliminary field data was good for net ecosystem exchange (NEE), capturing both the asymmetrical seasonality and short-term variability. During the growing season simulated daily NEE ranged from -4 g C m(exp -2) d(exp -1) (carbon uptake by ecosystem) to + 2 g C m(exp -2) d(exp -1) (carbon flux to atmosphere), with fluctuations from day to day. In the early winter simulated NEE values were + 0.5 g C m(exp -2) d(exp -1), dropping to + 0.2 g C m(exp -2) d(exp -1) in mid-winter. Simulated soil respiration during the growing season (+ 1 to + 5 g C m(exp -2) d(exp -1)) was dominated by metabolic respiration of the live moss, with litter decomposition usually contributing less than 30% and live spruce root respiration less than 10% of the total. Both spruce and moss net primary productivity (NPP) rates were higher in early summer than late summer. Simulated annual NEE for 1994 was -51 g C m(exp -2) y(exp -1), with 83% going into tree growth and 17% into the soil carbon accumulation. Moss NPP (58 g C m(exp -2) d(exp -1)) was considered to be litter (i.e. soil carbon input; no net increase in live moss biomass). Ecosystem respiration during the snow-covered season (84 g Cm(exp -2)) was 58% of the growing season net carbon uptake. A simulation of the same site for 1968-1989 showed about 10-20% year-to-year variability in heterotrophic respiration (mean of + 113 g C m-2 y@1). Moss NPP ranged from 19 to 114 g C m(exp -2) y(exp -1); spruce NPP from 81 to 150 g C nt-2 y,@l; spruce growth (NPP minus litterfall) from 34 to 103 g C m

  10. Production of biomass on the fields and mires, and utilisation of it for energy production; Biomassan tuotanto pelloilla ja soilla sekae kaeyttoe energiantuotantoon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mela, T.; Hoemmoe, L.; Partala, A. [Agricultural Research Center, Jokioinen (Finland)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    The research will be carried out as five sub-projects. The first sub-project `Production and breeding of reed canary grass` the biomass production of the reed canary grass will be studied. The breeding material consists of 101 populations collected from various parts of the country in summer 1993, breeder`s lines obtained from Svaloef-Weibull Ab from Sweden (13 populations), and 7 reed canary grass species. A breeding field for reed canary grass was founded in summer 1994. The field was supplemented in the summer 1995. The first selection of the breeding material was made in 1995. The volume of the seed harvest, the germination capacity and development were studied with harvesting time study. Five different plantations were made for the nutrient cycling and nutrient balance of the reed canary grass at Jokioinen in the summer 1995. Two liming and nitrogen-fertilization test areas were made in Northern Ostrobothnia in 1994. The evaporation potential of reed canary grass was studied in connection with drying of a peat production field was studied in the sub-project no. 2, `Cultivation of energy plants at the mire, and the drying of peat production area`, during the summer 1995, and the biomass production using greenhouse-plantations founded in 1994. The plantations evaporated from carex peat bases during the inspection season depending on fertilization 171-450 mm of water, and from the Sphagnum peat base 105-160 mm of water. Average daily evaporations from Carex peat bases were 2.6 - 6.8 mm and from Sphagnum peat bases 1.6 - 2.4 mm

  11. Production of field biomass on the fields and mires and its utilization in energy production; Biomassan tuotanto pelloilla ja soilla sekae kaeyttoe energiantuotantoon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mela, T.; Hoemmoe, L.; Suokangas, A. [Agricultural Research Centre, Helsinki (Finland)

    1997-12-01

    The research will be carried out as five sub-projects. The first sub-project `Breeding of reed canary grass and it`s nutrient balance` is concentrated in the development of new reed canary grass cultivars as well as new fertilization practices for non food production. In sub-project no. 2 `Cultivation of reed canary grass at the mire and the drying of peat production area` the evaporation potential of reed canary grass in connection with the drying of peat production area as well as the use of reed canary grass in purifying the runoff coming from the peat production areas was studied. In sub-project no. 3 `Development of a new efficient harvesting method and technology for straw biomass` various harvesting-transport chains based on different balers and choppers as well as economics of these chains were studied. The economics of the production-utilization chains were studied under the sub-project no. 4 `The economics of-reed canary grass and straw production- harvesting-transport-chains and their availability for bioenergy production`. The availability of reed canary grass and straw for energy production was studied by determining the amount of potential production area near the power plants capable of biomass combustion. In the sub-project no. 5 `Fuel and combustion properties of reed canary grass` the combustion quality of spring harvested reed canary grass turned out to be much better than the quality of autumn harvested grass. The full scale combustion experiments with efficiency and emission determinations were carried out at Kiuruvesi using the mixture of reed canary grass and wood chips (and bark) as a fuel

  12. Effects of Tree Canopy Structure and Understory Vegetation on the Effectiveness of Open-Top-Chamber in Manipulating Boreal Forest Microclimate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teuber, L. M.; Nilsson, M. C.; Wardle, D.; Dorrepaal, E.

    2014-12-01

    Open-top chambers (OTCs) are widely used to passively increase soil and air temperature in various open habitats, such as alpine and arctic tundra, and temperate grasslands. Several studies report warming effects of 1-2 °C in arctic and alpine tundra, and up to 6 °C in temperate grasslands. The variation between studies can be mostly attributed to differences in the abiotic environment, such as snow cover and solar irradiance. Vegetation height and openness affects the amount of irradiance that reaches the ground and may therefore indirectly impact the effectiveness of OTCs. The use of OTCs in forested ecosystems might therefore be limited by reduced canopy openness, while their effect on changes in soil temperature and soil moisture content might additionally be affected by the understory vegetation type and cover. Nevertheless, OTC's are an immensely useful tool in climate-change studies, and could benefit research in forest ecosystems. In this study we therefore investigated whether OTCs can be used to manipulate microclimate in the northern boreal forest and how tree canopy cover and understory vegetation influence OTC effects on air and soil temperature and on soil moisture content.We compared OTC effects at ten sites that were situated along a fire chronosequence in the northern boreal forest in Sweden. Sites were dominated by Pinus sylvestris and Picea abies, and time since the last fire ranged from 47-367 years, resulting in varying degrees of tree canopy openness. We applied full factorial combinations of OTC warming and dwarf shrub removal and moss removal at each site. We measured canopy cover using hemispherical photography; air and soil temperature as well as soil moisture were measured hourly from June until September. Preliminary analyses indicate that OTCs increased monthly mean air temperatures by up to 0.9 °C across all treatments and forest stands. However, the degree of warming showed clear relations with the presence or absence of the

  13. Regional boreal biodiversity peaks at intermediate human disturbance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayor, S J; Cahill, J F; He, F; Sólymos, P; Boutin, S

    2012-01-01

    The worldwide biodiversity crisis has intensified the need to better understand how biodiversity and human disturbance are related. The 'intermediate disturbance hypothesis' suggests that disturbance regimes generate predictable non-linear patterns in species richness. Evidence often contradicts intermediate disturbance hypothesis at small scales, and is generally lacking at large regional scales. Here, we present the largest extent study of human impacts on boreal plant biodiversity to date. Disturbance extent ranged from 0 to 100% disturbed in vascular plant communities, varying from intact forest to agricultural fields, forestry cut blocks and oil sands. We show for the first time that across a broad region species richness peaked in communities with intermediate anthropogenic disturbance, as predicted by intermediate disturbance hypothesis, even when accounting for many environmental covariates. Intermediate disturbance hypothesis was consistently supported across trees, shrubs, forbs and grasses, with temporary and perpetual disturbances. However, only native species fit this pattern; exotic species richness increased linearly with disturbance.

  14. Isotopic composition of carbon dioxide from a boreal forest fire: Inferring carbon loss from measurements and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuur, E.A.G.; Trumbore, S.E.; Mack, M.C.; Harden, J.W.

    2003-01-01

    Fire is an important pathway for carbon (C) loss from boreal forest ecosystems and has a strong effect on ecosystem C balance. Fires can range widely in severity, defined as the amount of vegetation and forest floor consumed by fire, depending on local fuel and climatic conditions. Here we explore a novel method for estimating fire severity and loss of C from fire using the atmosphere to integrate ecosystem heterogeneity at the watershed scale. We measured the ??13C and ??14C isotopic values of CO2 emitted from an experimental forest fire at the Caribou-Poker Creek Research Watershed (CPCRW), near Fairbanks, Alaska. We used inverse modeling combined with dual isotope near measurements of C contained in aboveground black spruce biomass and soil organic horizons to estimate the amount of C released by this fire. The experimental burn was a medium to severe intensity fire that released, on average, about 2.5 kg Cm-2, more than half of the C contained in vegetation and soil organic horizon pools. For vegetation, the model predicted that approximately 70-75% of pools such as needles, fine branches, and bark were consumed by fire, whereas only 20-30% of pools such as coarse branches and cones were consumed. The fire was predicted to have almost completely consumed surface soil organic horizons and burned about half of the deepest humic horizon. The ability to estimate the amount of biomass combusted and C emission from fires at the watershed scale provides an extensive approach that can complement more limited intensive ground-based measurements.

  15. Decadal change in the boreal summer intraseasonal oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaura, Tsuyoshi; Kajikawa, Yoshiyuki

    2016-06-01

    A decadal change in activity of the boreal summer intraseasonal oscillation (BSISO) was identified at a broad scale. The change was more prominent during August-October in the boreal summer. The BSISO activity during 1999-2008 (P2) was significantly greater than that during 1984-1998 (P1). Compared to P1, convection in the BSISO was enhanced and the phase speed of northward-propagating convection was reduced in P2. Under background conditions, warm sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies in P2 were apparent over the tropical Indian Ocean and the western tropical Pacific. The former supplied favorable conditions for the active convection of the BSISO, whereas the latter led to a strengthened Walker circulation through enhanced convection. This induced descending anomalies over the tropical Indian Ocean. Thermal convection tends to be suppressed by descending anomalies, whereas once an active BSISO signal enters the Indian Ocean, convection is enhanced through convective instability by positive SST anomalies. After P2, the BSISO activity was weakened during 2009-2014 (P3). Compared to P2, convective activity in the BSISO tended to be inactive over the southern tropical Indian Ocean in P3. The phase speed of the northward-propagating convection was accelerated. Under background conditions during P3, warmer SST anomalies over the maritime continent enhance convection, which strengthened the local Hadley circulation between the western tropical Pacific and the southern tropical Indian Ocean. Hence, the convection in the BSISO over the southern tropical Indian Ocean was suppressed. The decadal change in BSISO activity correlates with the variability in seasonal mean SST over the tropical Asian monsoon region, which suggests that it is possible to predict the decadal change.

  16. Riparian zone control on base cation concentration in boreal streams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. J. Ledesma

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Riparian zones (RZ are a major factor controlling water chemistry in forest streams. Base cations' (BC concentrations, fluxes, and cycling in the RZ merit attention because a changing climate and increased forest harvesting could have negative consequences, including re-acidification, for boreal surface waters. We present a two-year study of BC and silica (Si flow-weighted concentrations from 13 RZ and 14 streams in different landscape elements of a boreal catchment in northern Sweden. The spatial variation in BC and Si dynamics in both RZ and streams was explained by differences in landscape element type, with highest concentrations in silty sediments and lowest concentrations in peat-dominated wetland areas. Temporal stability in BC and Si concentrations in riparian soil water, remarkably stable Mg/Ca ratios, and homogeneous mineralogy suggest that patterns found in the RZ are a result of a distinct mineralogical upslope signal in groundwater. Stream water Mg/Ca ratios indicate that the signal is subsequently maintained in the streams. Flow-weighted concentrations of Ca, Mg, and Na in headwater streams were represented by the corresponding concentrations in the RZ, which were estimated using the Riparian Flow-Concentration Integration Model (RIM approach. Stream and RZ flow-weighted concentrations differed for K and Si, suggesting a stronger biogeochemical influence on these elements, including K recirculation by vegetation and retention of Si within the RZ. Potential increases in groundwater levels linked to forest harvesting or changes in precipitation regimes would tend to reduce BC concentrations from RZ to streams, potentially leading to episodic acidification.

  17. Soil fluxes of carbonyl sulfide (COS) across four distinct ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, W.; Maseyk, K. S.; Lett, C.; Juarez, S.; Kooijmans, L.; Mammarella, I.; Vesala, T.; Chen, H.; Seibt, U.

    2015-12-01

    Soils are additional but poorly resolved sinks of carbonyl sulfide (COS) in terrestrial ecosystems. COS has been proposed as a tracer for quantifying gross photosynthesis based on the coupled stomatal uptake of COS and CO2. But applying this tracer requires the soil COS flux to be subtracted from the ecosystem flux to obtain the actual plant flux. To simulate soil COS fluxes, we have built a 1-D diffusion-reaction model accounting for vertical transport in the soil, microbial sinks and sources, and a litter layer. Uptake and production of COS in the soil column are linked with soil temperature and moisture through empirical functions adapted from enzyme kinetics and lab incubations. We have measured soil COS fluxes and the related soil variables in four distinct ecosystems: a wheat field (Southern Great Plains, OK, USA), an oak woodland (Santa Monica Mountains, CA, USA), a tropical rainforest (La Selva Biological Station, Costa Rica) and a boreal pine forest (Hyytiälä, Finland). Across all sites, a lower soil temperature and a humid climate are generally favorable to soil COS uptake. Strong COS emissions were observed in the wheat field at high soil temperatures after harvesting but were absent in other ecosystems, indicating that COS exchange may behave differently in agricultural soils. We simulated the soil fluxes in all ecosystems using the diffusion-reaction model, and optimized the source/sink strength parameters with field data. The optimized model provides insights that are not attainable from data analysis alone: For example, the wheat field soil must have continued uptake activity even when it showed net emissions, and leaf litter contributed dominantly to the COS sink after rain in the oak woodland. We expect the new model to be useful for simulating global soil COS fluxes as field data on soil fluxes from a broader range of ecosystems become available.

  18. Impact of forest harvesting on water quality and fluorescence characteristics of dissolved organic matter in eastern Canadian Boreal Shield lakes in summer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaz, P.; Gagné, J.-P.; Archambault, P.; Sirois, P.; Nozais, C.

    2015-12-01

    Forestry activities in the Canadian Boreal region have increased in the last decades, raising concerns about their potential impact on aquatic ecosystems. Water quality and fluorescence characteristics of dissolved organic matter (DOM) were measured over a 3-year period in eight eastern Boreal Shield lakes: four lakes were studied before, 1 and 2 years after forest harvesting (perturbed lakes) and compared with four undisturbed reference lakes (unperturbed lakes) sampled at the same time. ANOVAs showed a significant increase in total phosphorus (TP) in perturbed lakes when the three sampling dates were considered and in DOC concentrations when considering 1 year before and 1 year after the perturbation only. At 1 year post-clear cutting DOC concentrations were about 15 % greater in the perturbed lakes at ~ 15 mgC L-1 compared to 12.5 mgC L-1 in the unperturbed lakes. In contrast, absorbance and fluorescence measurements showed that all metrics remained within narrow ranges compared to the range observed in natural waters, indicating that forest harvesting did not affect the nature of DOM characterized with spectroscopic techniques. These results confirm an impact of forestry activities 1 year after the perturbation. However, this effect seems to be mitigated 2 years after, indicating that the system shows high resilience and may be able to return to its original condition in terms of water quality parameters assessed in this study.

  19. Annual cycle of volatile organic compound exchange between a boreal pine forest and the atmosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Rantala, P.; Aalto, J; Taipale, R.; T. M. Ruuskanen; J. Rinne

    2015-01-01

    Long-term flux measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOC) over boreal forests are rare, although the forests are known to emit considerable amounts of VOCs into the atmosphere. Thus, we measured fluxes of several VOCs and oxygenated VOCs over a Scots-pine-dominated boreal forest semi-continuously between May 2010 and December 2013. The VOC profiles were obtained with a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry, and the fluxes were calculated using vertical concentrati...

  20. Annual cycle of volatile organic compound exchange between a boreal pine forest and the atmosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Rantala, P.; Aalto, J; Taipale, R.; T. M. Ruuskanen; J. Rinne

    2015-01-01

    Long-term flux measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOC) over boreal forests are rare, although the forests are known to emit considerable amounts of VOCs into the atmosphere. Thus, we measured fluxes of several VOCs and oxygenated VOCs over a Scots pine dominated